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DoMS NIT Trichy

RECRUITMENT TRENDS
Assignment 2
Dinesh: 215111029 Pulavendran: 215111032 Shiva: 215111039 Santhosh: 215111045 Venkatesh: 215111046 Tilak: 215111048

Table of Contents

Recruitment Trends ................................................................................................................................ 3 Introduction: ....................................................................................................................................... 3 Trends in Recruiting ............................................................................................................................ 4 Traditional agency ........................................................................................................................... 4 Head-hunters .................................................................................................................................. 5 Niche recruiters............................................................................................................................... 6 In-house recruitment ...................................................................................................................... 6 Graduate Recruitment .................................................................................................................... 6 Graduateness .................................................................................................................................. 7 The assessment question ................................................................................................................ 8 What employers need? ................................................................................................................... 8 Qualifications and competence .................................................................................................... 10 Making comparisons ..................................................................................................................... 10 Career fairs .................................................................................................................................... 13 The Internet .................................................................................................................................. 13 Through Social Networking ........................................................................................................... 15 Mobile Recruiting: The Future ...................................................................................................... 19

Recruitment Trends
Introduction:
Recruitment refers to the process of attracting, screening, and selecting a qualified person for a job. All companies in any industry can benefit from contingency or retain professional recruiters or outsourcing the process to recruitment agencies. The recruitment industry has four basic types of firms. 1). Employment agencies deal with clerical, trades, temporary and temporary to hire employment opportunities. 2). Recruitment websites and job search engines used to gather as many candidates as possible by advertising a position over a wide geographic area. Although thought to be a cost effective alternative, a human resource department or department manager will spend time outside their normal duties reading and screening resumes. A professional recruiter has the ability to read and screen resumes, talk to potential candidates and deliver a selective group in a timely manner. 3). "head-hunters" for executive and professional positions. These firms are either contingency or retained. Although advertising is used to keep a flow of candidates these firms rely on networking as their main source of candidates. 4). Niche agencies specialize in a particular industrial area of staffing. Some organizations prefer to utilize employer branding strategy and in-house recruitment instead of recruiting firms. The difference, a recruiting firm is always looking for talent whereas an internal department is focused on filling a single opening. The advantage associated with utilizing a third-party recruiting firm is their ability to know where to find a qualified candidate. Talent Management is a key component to the services a professional recruiting firm can provide. The stages in recruitment include sourcing candidates by networking, advertising or other methods. Utilizing professional interviewing techniques to understand the candidates skills
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but motivations to make a move, screening potential candidates using testing (skills or personality) is also a popular part of the process. The process is meant to not only evaluate the candidate but also evaluate how the candidate will fit into the organization. The recruiter will meet with the hiring manager to obtain specific position and type information before beginning the process. After the recruiter understands the type of person the company needs, they begin the process of informing their network of the opportunity. Recruiters play an important role by preparing the candidate and company for the interview, providing feedback to both parties and handling salary/benefits negotiations.

Trends in Recruiting
Traditional agency
Also known as employment agencies, recruitment agencies have historically had a physical location. A candidate visits a local branch for a short interview and an assessment before being taken onto the agencys books. Recruitment consultants then work to match their pool of candidates to their clients' open positions. Suitable candidates are short-listed and put forward for an interview with potential employers on a contract or direct basis. Compensation to agencies takes several forms, the most popular are: A contingency fee paid by the company when a recommended candidate accepts a job with the client company (typically 20%-30% based and calculated on the candidates first-year base salary (though fees as low as 12.5% can be found online, and which usually has some form of guarantee (3090 days standard), should the candidate fail to perform and is terminated within a set period of time (refundable fully or prorated). An advance payment that serves as a retainer, also paid by the company, non-refundable paid in full depending on outcome and success (e.g. 40% up front, 30% in 90 days and the remainder once a search is completed). This form of compensation is generally reserved for high level executive search/Head-hunters Hourly Compensation for temporary workers and projects. A pre-negotiated hourly fee, in which the agency is paid and pays the applicant as a consultant for services as a third party.
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Many contracts allow a consultant to transition to a full-time status upon completion of a certain number of hours with or without a conversion fee.

Head-hunters
A "head-hunter" is an industry term for a third-party recruiter who seeks out candidates often when normal recruitment efforts have failed. Head-hunters are generally considered more aggressive than in-house recruiters or may have pre-existing industry experience and contacts. They may use advanced sales techniques. They may also purchase expensive lists of names and job titles but more often will generate their own lists. They may arrange a meeting or a formal interview between their client and the candidate and will usually prepare the candidate for the interview, help negotiate the salary and conduct closure to the search. They are frequently members in good standing of industry trade groups and associations. Head-hunters will often attend trade shows and other meetings nationally or even internationally that may be attended by potential candidates and hiring managers. Head-hunters are typically small operations that make high margins on candidate placements (sometimes more than 30% of the candidates annual compensation). Due to their higher costs, Head-hunters are usually employed to fill senior management and executive level roles. Head-hunters are also used to recruit very specialized individuals; for example, in some fields, such as emerging scientific research areas, there may only be a handful of top-level professionals who are active in the field. In this case, since there are so few qualified candidates, it makes more sense to directly recruit them one-by-one, rather than advertise internationally for candidates. While in-house recruiters tend to attract candidates for specific jobs, Head-hunters will attract both candidates and actively seek them out as well. To do so, they may network, cultivate relationships with various companies, and maintain large databases, purchase company directories or candidate lists and cold call prospective recruits. Head-hunters are increasingly using social media to find and research candidates. This approach is often called social recruiting.

Niche recruiters
Specialized recruiters exist to seek staff with a very narrow specialty. Because of their focus, these firms can very often produce superior results due to their ability to channel all of their resources into networking for a very specific skill set. This specialization in staffing allows them to offer more jobs for their specific demographic which in turn attracts more specialized candidates from that specific demographic over time building large proprietary databases. These niche firms tend to be more focused on building ongoing relationships with their candidates as is very common the same candidates are placed many times throughout their careers. Niche firms also develop knowledge on specific employment trends within their industry of focus (e.g. Energy industry) and are able to identify demographic shifts such as aging and its impact on the industry

In-house recruitment
Under pressure to reduce costs, both large- and medium-sized employers tend to undertake their own in-house recruitment, using their human resources department, front-line hiring managers and recruitment personnel who handle targeted functions and populations. In addition to coordinating with the agencies mentioned above, in-house recruiters may advertise job vacancies on their own websites, coordinate internal employee referrals, work with external associations, trade groups and/or focus on campus graduate recruitment. Some large employers choose to outsource all or some of their recruitment process (recruitment process outsourcing) however a much more common approach is for employers to introduce referral schemes where employees are encouraged to source new staff from within their own network.

Graduate Recruitment
Graduates are no longer a homogenous group. They come from all sorts of backgrounds, and are all sorts of ages and colours; they may be disabled. They bring a correspondingly diverse set of expectations, but by and large are in tune with the views of employers. The main exception to this is in their belief that there is still such a thing as a normal graduate career ladder. Their placing flexibility a long way down the list of what they think employers want is a worrying response, particularly since managers need people to cope with and
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initiate change. It seems that university careers services and graduate employers alike have an opportunity here: to clarify to students what life in a company is really like.
Graduateness

Graduateness is a term originally coined by the Higher Education Quality Council (HEQC). In the 1990s, HEQCs Quality Enhancement Group was engaged in an investigation of academic standards in UK higher education. The aim of its graduateness project was to: Clarify approaches to the articulation and assurance of standards in Higher Education Examine levels of comparability across degrees Consider the development of threshold standards across UK degrees in the context of a longer, more diverse HE system. Understanding the process of becoming a graduate, and academics views on this, are important understanding in that it is becoming increasingly necessary for universities and employers to work together. In order to do this effectively, the various frames of reference need to be compared and contrasted. Stakeholders come with different perceptions, expectations and values. In a nutshell, academics will tend to place most emphasis on subject knowledge and analysis, students on personal development, and employers on interpersonal skills and business awareness. The attributes of graduateness arising from the HEQC consultation can be summarised as follows: Mastery of any relevant technical or practical skill necessary to practise in their field. In addition, familiarity with relevant forms of IT. Detailed knowledge of, or a grounding in, their subject, distinctive in its depth (or level). An awareness of the theories associated with the field, its relevant conceptual frameworks, and its boundaries. Critical (or analytical) thinking, making considered evaluations. A general ability to cope with sophisticated and complex problems.
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Autonomy as workers, particularly in terms of conducting research projects and in terms of preparing for lifelong learning. Effective communication skills, both oral and written. Ability to work effectively in partnership with others. Graduates should be self-critical, reflective practitioners with an awareness of ethical dimensions to their field and its interaction with other disciplinary areas and with a wider social context. (Quoted in AGRs newsletter Janus no. 38 September 1996)
The assessment question

If the concern of academics is, quite rightly, to develop those areas of subject knowledge and critical evaluation that will enable their students to perform well on their undergraduate programmes, the question arises as to how the skills identified as being important to employers can accurately be assessed. Of course recruiters gear their selection techniques to precisely this question, but it would be helpful if there were some kind of explicit institutional monitoring, fostering and appraisal of such skills, some of which exist and develop anyway as a part of moving through higher education. In fact, by 2005, government policy will require that all students have the option of developing Progress Files, consisting of a transcript of attainment and some form of personal development planning and recording, along lines recommended by the Quality Assurance Agency. It will be for employers to decide how best to use this extra information in their recruitment processes.
What employers need?

The sorts of skills and attributes that employers need in todays organisation are linked with the changes in companies explored in Chapter 1. If you are working within an organisation that has been restructured or merged you will be convinced that one of the main requirements of all your staff is flexibility and ability to deal with change. You will also be looking for people who can rapidly fit into the culture and work successfully in teams, who can take responsibility and add value. In addition you will want people who are able to
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innovate, communicate and persuade. Ideally you wish for employees who can not only cope with change but anticipate it and lead their team through this, to the benefit of the evolution of the business. A major report by Professor Lee Harvey and colleagues at the University of Central England in Birmingham Graduates Work presents the idea of the enhancement continuum, as shown overleaf.

Organisations unused to hiring graduates (for example, some small and medium enterprises) sometimes hold the stereotype of a graduate as always being transformative: in other words, a bit of a liability as well as an asset. People who always operate on a transformative level will tend, because of their radical approach to things, to create friction. If your organisation is not one in which there is currently much need to deal with change or evolution, and if your culture is such that a transformative employee will not be welcomed or useful, it is important to recognise this, and recruit in this knowledge. Of course the most useful people to have around are those who combine the adaptive, adaptable and transformative elements, as suited to the occasion. At the basis of this is selfknowledge and confidence: something which careers advisers recognises many students lack.
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Qualifications and competence

If as an employer you are looking for multi-skilled, multi-talented people, it is going to be difficult to find succinct evidence of all this through the application form or curriculum vitae. It is understandable that many recruiters, particularly for lower level jobs, rely on lists of qualifications as quantifiable records of a persons achievement. But in seeking to assess what someone may bring to your organisation, a more complex approach is called for.
Making comparisons

The students in the Great Expectations report perceived that the following attributes, in priority order, were most sought after by employers: Communication skills Initiative/capacity to work independently Self-discipline/ability to work hard Team working skills Self-confidence/personality Interest in and commitment to job/organisation Interpersonal skills Intelligence/creativity Ability to learn and apply knowledge Analytical/problem solving skills Time management/organisational skills Leadership potential Ambition
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Relevant work or other experience Flexibility/adaptability Computer literacy Maturity This is fascinating when set against the view from the other side. Employers reported the following skill shortages in 1995:

This is repeated in a similar vein in the February 2001 MPR report: Pay and Progression for Graduates, which found that around a third of employers found graduates lacking in certain skills areas, particularly business awareness and communication skills. The disparity between the students view and that of the employers (e.g.as in technical skills) is bound to be reflected in the way that the students present themselves to the recruiters: in seeking to make the best of themselves according to their own perceptions of what employers want, they may be missing the target! In addition, although employers claim not to be influenced so much by degree discipline as by other developmental attributes, choice of subject does not seem to have an effect on the extent to which a student may develop certain types of competence.

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Career fairs
Going as a visitor to a career fair is a good way in if you have never been to one before. If, however, you work for a large organisation which regularly hires a stand at one or more fairs, there are various points you need to consider. First, are you going with the aim of filling vacancies, or just to give out information about your organisation? Since the end of the boom years in the 1980s, employers have had fewer posts to fill, but have often continued to have a presence at the fairs for PR reasons. Whatever your reasons for attending, you must make sure that you provide good advance publicity not just through the careers service or student body organising the event but also by advertising or providing editorial for some of the student magazines (paper and electronic). You need to have an eye catching stand which both represents what your company is about and which is of the sort to attract the kind of student you want. You need to have lots of literature for people to take away, and application forms that are too attractive to be binned straight after the event! Most importantly of all, the people who are going to be representing your organisation need to be well briefed and good ambassadors for your company. Recent graduates who have joined and become successfully employed by you for a year or two can be easier for students to talk to, as long as they have the breadth of knowledge to be able to represent your companys activities accurately. It is advisable to have someone more senior from the company also at the stand, so that any more complicated enquiries, from students, careers staff or the press, can be dealt with wisely. Finally, remember that attending careers fairs can be very tiring, so make sure that you have enough people present to run the stand.

The Internet
Not all students will visit careers fairs: or will all employers. Paper publications of vacancies may also not reach everyone, so that using electronic means in addition is a wise move. This is particularly so if you are operating in a high-tech environment and/or want to attract people who have those sorts of skills and interests. E-mail is accepted by students and staff as a valid means of communication, and many of the early frustrations experienced by impatient students competing for scarce Internet use have been ironed out. In fact, the High

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Fliers research found that 60% of students surveyed owned a computer although of course that is not the same as saying they all have an Internet connection. The following chart, taken from this research, shows how they made use of the Web when job hunting.

The fact that just-in-time recruitment may be carried out over the Internet will probably make it increasingly attractive to small and medium sized employers. It is also a low-cost way of attracting people who know their way around it. An Internet presence is probably best viewed as a supplement to traditional methods of recruitment, rather than a replacement, though each month that passes brings interest and commitment from more people. Indeed, some major graduate recruiters are only using online recruitment now! Similarly many agencies are using the Internet to attract candidates for their clients, and encouraging students to register their CVs or fill in an online application form.
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Through Social Networking


This is the latest advancement followed in the industry when it comes to recruitment especially of people with experience. Top Social Networking Sites Although social networking sites have seen tremendous growth in the past few years, according to Michigan State Universitys Recruiting Trends 2010-2011, the use of social media for recruiting is still limited to only 28% of the 4,600 employers surveyed, predominantly among larger employers.

LinkedIn has over 85 million members in over 200 countries. A new member joins LinkedIn approximately every second, and about half of its members are outside the U.S. Executives from all Fortune 500 companies are LinkedIn members
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LinkedIn allows recruiters and hiring managers to target passive candidates (those not currently searching for a new position), send direct messages through InMail, post jobs, interact through LinkedIn Groups and LinkedIn Answers, set up automatic search alerts, and set profile reminders. LinkedIn allows employers to leverage their already-existing personal and professional networks through its platform. A Complete LinkedIn Profile Can Be 40 Times More Effective In Finding You Your Next Job Recruiters and hiring managers are turning to LinkedIn to find employees. Its the largest social network devoted to business networking, and 86 percent of employers are using LinkedIn for hiring. Some of the leading resume writers share their advice for job seekers to get the most out of their LinkedIn profile. More than two dozen resume writers responded to a survey looking for information to help job seekers use LinkedIn more effectively in their job search. Here are their top recommendations for job seekers when it comes to LinkedIn. Ask for recommendations, and recommend others, says Kathleen Alexis, CPRW, CCDP. To make the most out of LinkedIn, you must engage with it on a regular basis. Its best not to wait for new connections to locate you; go out and initiate contact with those you feel will benefit your job search. Join on-brand groups to locate other like-minded individuals and post regular updates or feedback that is focused on your personal expertise! notes Adrienne Tom, CPRW, CEIP. Use LinkedIn to identify hiring managers at companies of interest and reach out to them. The goal should be to develop real-life relationships with these people, adds Kelly Donovan, resume writer and LinkedIn profile specialist. Put a word such as seeking on your profile. I have searched on this word when Im looking for temp and temp-to-hire candidates. Also, use other buzz words pertaining to your target job so you will be found by recruiters, says Susan Morbitzer, of Career Choices Unlimited.

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The size of your network on LinkedIn is also important. Join, join, join groups, says Fred Coon, LEA, JCTC, CRW. Join groups that are both directly related to an adjunct to your targeted industry or field. Make sure you join discussion groups and then participate. Your objective is to become a go to person or expert that others name and reference. Alexis agrees. Its all about showing that you are active (on LinkedIn). Join relevant LinkedIn groups and actively participate in discussions. Update your status regularly ideally, at least once per day. Build to at least 400 first-level contacts, says Coon. Remember, it is who (your connections) know that counts in your search. Joining LinkedIn Groups can be a way to meet new people to connect to, says Christine Dennison. Join Groups to extend your network and increase your search results. Take a look at alumni groups, industry groups (your current industry and your targeted industries), and professional associations. Become active in the discussions its a great way to meet people and increase your online visibility. Use LinkedIn to network, but dont neglect face-to-face. Use it as a tool to set up face-toface meetings when possible, adds Morbitzer.

Twitter has 175 million registered users. There are 95 million tweets written per day.vi Significantly more users are disclosing their location, bio and website information on Twitter profiles. The number of Twitter users offering this information has doubled to 63.3%, compared to 31 percent in 2009.

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In 2010, 82% of Twitter users provided a name with their account; in 2009, only about 33% did. From January to August 2010, new users accounted for nearly 44% of the total Twitter population.vii Twitter gives recruiters and hiring managers a platform to interact with a variety of candidates through short, personal messages. It also helps them get to know other recruiters and employers and share resources and information with one another. With Twitters 140-character messaging, recruiters and employers can promote job openings to their followers and target the message accordingly. Twitters hash tags (#), lists, direct messaging (DMs), and search features make it a valuable tool for finding and interacting with candidates.

Facebook has more than 500 million active users. On an average day, 50 percent of active users log on to Facebook. The average Facebook user has 130 friends. People spend over 700 billion minutes per month on Facebook Mobile. There are more than 200 million active users currently accessing Facebook through their mobile devices. People who use Facebook on their mobile devices are twice more active on Facebook than non-mobile users. There are more than 200 mobile operators in 60 countries working to deploy and promote Facebook mobile products. On Facebook, an employer can have a personal presence and a professional fan page. Recruiting can occur through traditional postings on their company fan page, or through
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more innovative methods such as using Facebook Ads to target desired candidates. Although Facebook is thought of primarily as a personal networking site, many recruiters and hiring managers are leveraging its wide reach and large audience for influencing potential candidates.

Mobile Recruiting: The Future


The subject of mobile in recruitment discussions comes second only to social in 2011. And since mobile is, arguably, a social platform for social recruitment; if so, it appears that mobile marketing & recruiting already is the hottest topic of 2011 a trend that will continue in 2012. Just as the internet changed the way we attracted candidates from newsprint to online; the mobile phone is revolutionizing the way employers must market to candidates. Close to 80% of job seekers use mobile applications to look for a job and quite frankly, the stats on speed and retention of mobile recruitment messages by candidates vs. traditional recruiting methods is stunning. But, if your Company hasnt made the move to mobile in your Talent Acquisition strategies, consider the results of a survey conducted by Potential Park of over 30, ooo global job seekers: 57% of job seekers would like to be able to conduct their job search online 51 % wish to receive job alerts about new positions via SMS/mobile email 39% desire to track their progress through the application/recruiting process via mobile 39% want to see & a mobile-friendly, online calendar of recruiting/career events for target companies in their job search If job seekers want these things, then it stands to reason theyre already trying to do these activities as a part of their job search & so companies that developed these components that let them have an edge.

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