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JOURNAL

Clarks Summit, Pa. SEPTEMBER 26 TO OCTOBER 2, 2012 50¢ www.theabingtonjournal.com
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An edition of The Times Leader
THE ABINGTON
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
ArtsEtc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Crosswords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,15
School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,6
Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
INSIDE
Fashion warm accesso-
ries, shown left, for the
cold months ahead with
wool gatherer Emily
Rancier at the Abington
Area Community
Classroom. Page 5.
Want to
meet a
shepherd?
Air Force recruits serve
local community before
serving their country.
Page 3.
Willing RECRUITS
S
afety awareness is the
main theme of the up-
coming children’s event,
“Safety4ALLKIDS Confer-
ence,” organized by the Par-
ents Loving Children through
Autism Foundation (PLCTA)
in conjunction with the Dun-
more Fire Department. But,
According to PLCTA Founder
and President Kathleen Walsh,
safety is not the only goal.
Having fun is another big part.
“We try to bring the training
in a fun, non-threatening way,”
she said.
The free
bi-annual
event, now in its
fifth year, is to be
held at the Dunmore Commu-
nity Center Sept. 29 from
noon to 4 p.m. It will include
various stations for emergency
safety training, which will
accommodate children with
special needs. It is geared
toward children ages 3-13, but
is open to the public, accord-
ing to Walsh. The conference
will feature a variety of chil-
dren’s activities, such as a
bounce house, face painting,
crafts, food and prizes.
The Dunmore Fire Dept.
will prepare the Scranton Fire
Dept. Fire Safety House, a
two-level trailer which func-
tions as a house fire simulator
to give children hands-on
training and experience in
what to do in case of a fire.
Dunmore Fire Dept. Chief
Christopher DeNaples
said the Fire Safety House
is “a good opportunity to
learn about
safety.”
Anoth-
er oppor-
tunity at
the event for families who
have children with special
needs, such as those associ-
ated with Autism, will be a
signup for First Alert. The
program, run through the 911
system, notifies emergency
responders of special needs
before they arrive on scene.
Walsh said First Alert is
proven effective, and just one
way PLCTA is trying to make
the area a safer place to live
for children with Autism. A
lot of safety aspects must be
taken into consideration, she
said, and the Safety4ALL-
KIDS Conference attempts to
address as many as possible.
Walsh said she firmly be-
lieves “knowledge is power,”
Kids event to take to
the fear out of danger
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
What: Safety4ALLKIDS
Conference
When: Sept. 29 from noon – 4
p.m.
Where: Dunmore Community
Center
Who: Open to the public and
geared toward children ages
3-13 and those with special
needs.
Cost: Free
More info: plcta.org
See Danger, Page 7
CLARKS SUMMIT- Turn
your thoughts for a moment
to an old-fashioned holiday
card depicting small- town
America blanketed in freshly
fallen snowwith holiday
lights twinkling beneath a
dusting of snowflakes.
Less than a week after ap-
proaching members of her
committee, Clarks Summit
graphic designer, Ellen
Beechko reported that they
are excited and eager to get
busy with a plan, already in
the works, that will light up
downtown Clarks Summit
during the upcoming holiday
season.
“I think this is going to be a
win-win situation,” Beechko
said, “There was a lot of con-
troversy in the community
about the lights last year.
They weren’t complete. I’d
like it (downtown Clarks
Summit) to have the quaint-
ness of an old Christmas card
with a nostalgic feeling to it.”
One idea under consid-
eration includes installing
tube lights to outline the
buildings in the downtown
area; Plan Bis to go back to
outlining the trees.
“We are going back to the
way the trees originally
looked – doing the whole
COURTESY ELLEN BEECHKO
A rendering of Our Lady of the Snows Church in Clarks Summit
before, left, and after, the planned holiday light building outline.
A holiday glow
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Holiday, Page 7
CLARKS SUMMIT- Jim
Maria, Abington Heights
Education Association Presi-
dent, thinks teacher negotia-
tions are moving in the right
direction.
“I’m really encouraged by
the recent negotiations that
we’ve had and the way that
we’ve been able to open up
communications a little bit,”
Maria said. “Hopefully, we
can continue along that vein
and come to some reasonable
settlement.”
Abington Heights Superin-
tendent of Schools Dr. Mi-
chael Mahon concurred that
talks have intensified.
“Both sides are working
very hard to try to come to a
good solution,” he said.
Maria voiced concern over
problems that may emerge
from public use of the high
school track during school
hours.
“There’s a policy in the
district that allows the public
Abington
negotiations
move
forward
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
See Negotiations, Page 6
“He basically was just a good citizen,” said
Warren Watkins, who currently serves as
secretary for the Clarks Summit Fire Compa-
ny No. 1, but has served in a variety of roles
over the years. “He would see things that he
felt should be addressed and he would do it.”
Sometimes Perry’s addressing of issues
drewflak fromcritics, according to those
who knewhim. They described the mayor as
unwavering in the face of criticismbecause
he did what he thought was in the best in-
terest of residents.
Perry’s son, Scott Perry, 45, provided a
glimpse into his father’s philosophy on public
service.
The elder Perry told his son, “Whatever
A
flagpole dedication served as a testa-
ment to a past mayor’s legacy nearly
10 years after his death.
Clarks Summit Mayor Anthony “Tony”
Perry, who died in 2002, at 65, was remem-
bered by friends and family in a Sept. 17
dedication ceremony at the Clarks Summit
Fire Station on Bedford Street.
Those who knewhimrecalled a public
servant who was devoted to keeping resi-
dents safe and helping anyone in need.
“Tony was a friend to many, and a genuine,
good, honorable man who always lived up to
his word,” said longtime friend Chris Calvey.
“He did many kind deeds for area residents.”
‘Honorable man’ receives his due
BY GERARD E. NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
PHOTO COURTESY
PAMELA ORUE
During the
primary race
for a Clarks
Summit Bor-
ough Council
position in
May of 1969,
Tony Perry
enlisted the
campaign
assistance of
son Scott, left,
and daughter
Pamela.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JASON RIEDMILLER
A flagpole at the Clarks Summit Fire Station,
Bedford Street, was dedicated Sept. 17 in trib-
ute to the former Clarks Summit Mayor Anthony
’Tony’ Perry. Perry, who died Dec. 11, 2002,
served three terms as mayor of the borough.
See ‘Honorable’, Page 7
T
he
Rotary
Club
of the Abing-
tons 8th
Annual Taste
of the Abing-
tons was
held Sept. 23
at Nichols
Village Hotel
and Spa.
According
to Rotary of
the Abing-
tons Presi-
dent John
Hambrose,
each year
there are new
favorites
among the
public.
“Some
want dessert,
some want
unusual and
some want
new,” he
said.
For addi-
tional pho-
tos, see Page
6.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/DANIELLE ANTONELLO-SMOLLEY
Executive Chef Matthew Vinetti of Camelot Restaurant scoops out a spoonful of Seafood Paella.
SCOOP OF DELICIOUSNESS
C M Y K
PAGE 2A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
YOUR COMMUNITY
211 S. State St., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 18411 • 570-587-1148
NEWS@THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM
EDITOR KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI
585-1604 / kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com
STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS
ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
585-1606 / lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
585-1600 / rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
RETAIL ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
JILL ANDES
970-7188 / jill.andes@timesleader.com
AUBREE ARMEZZANI
970-7291/ aarmezzani@timesleader.com
CLASSIFIED ADVISOR
LINDA BYRNES
970-7189 / lbyrnes@timesleader.com
COVERAGE AREA: The Abington Journal, a weekly community newspaper
that is part of Impressions Media in Wilkes-Barre, PA, covers the “Abingtons”
area of Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. This includes but is not limited to
Clarks Summit, Clarks Green, South Abington, Newton, Ransom, Glenburn,
Dalton, La Plume, Factoryville, Waverly, Tunkhannock and the Abington
Heights, Lackawanna Trail and Lakeland school districts.
Our circulation hovers between 2,000 and 3,000 readers. We try to get to as
many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to
cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization,
please send it to us and we’ll do our best to publish it. Photographs (with
captions) are welcome.
CORRECTIONS, clarifications: The Abington Journal will correct errors of
fact or clarify any misunderstandings created by a story. Call 587-1148. Have a
story idea? Please call. We’d like to hear about it. Letters: The Abington Journal
prints all letters, which have local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Abington
Journal, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. All letters must be signed
and include a phone number where we can reach the author. Editor reserves
the right to edit or reject any item submitted. Deadline is noon, Friday prior to
publication. Want a photo that has appeared? We can provide color prints of
photos taken by our staff. Prices: 8x10 - $25; 5x7 - $12. Call, mail in, or stop by
to order.
CIRCULATION
Orders for subscription received by Friday at noon will begin the following
week. See box at right for subscription prices. Local subscriptions should arrive
Wednesdays. Please inform us of damage or delay. Call 587-1148. The Abing-
ton Journal (USPS 542-460), 211 S. State St., PO Box 277, Clarks Summit, PA
18411. Published weekly by Wilkes Barre Publishing Company, 211S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411. $20 per year, in Lackawanna and Wyoming counties
(PA); $24 elsewhere in PA and additional offices. Periodicals postage paid at
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411, and at additional offices.
ISSN. NO. 1931-8871, VOL. 86, ISSUE NO. 39
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Abington Journal, 211 South
State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411.
©COPYRIGHT 2012: Entire contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. No
part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the express
written consent of the publisher.
ADVERTISING
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Mondays at 10 a.m.
DISPLAY ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Thursday at 5 p.m.
CALL 587-1148 (Thursday at noon if proof required.)
We have a variety of rates and programs to suit your advertising needs. The
Abington Journal satisfies most co-op ad programs. Creative services at no
charge. Combination rates with The Dallas Post, Dallas, available. We can pro-
duce your newsletter, flyer or newspaper. Call for quotes on typesetting, pro-
duction and printing.
Complete and mail in this form, or call 587-1148
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Return completed formwith payment to: The Abington Journal, 211S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
THE ABINGTON
JOURNAL
The Abington Senior Community Center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m., serving lunch daily at noon. It provides area seniors with exercise, self-improvement,
recreation and educational programs throughout the year. New classes for the fall include
Latin language, meditation, and Mahjongg instruction.
The Center is funded in part under a contract with the Pennsylvania Department of Aging
and the Lackawanna County Board of Commissioners through the Lackawanna County Area
Agency on Aging. It is managed by Telespond Senior Services, Inc. For additional information,
got to abingtonseniorcommunitycenter.com or call 570.586.8996.
Shown, from left, seated are members of the 2012-2013 Abington Senior Community Cen-
terAdvisory Council. : Elizabeth Schumacher, Ann Dickinson, Ceil Alfano, Joan Berkoski, Wilma
Kreher. Standing: Clara Kozlosky, Shirley Lowrie, Rose Ann Aveline, Mary Leiber, Charlie Gian-
netta, Chet Lowrie, Bob Gilbert, John Romanowski, Tony Bolthouse, Richard Kranick, Jim
Shemanski, Bertha Baranowski, Mary O’Donnell, Center Director, Kathy Stark, Center Manag-
er, Ken Reinheimer, Richard Berezinsky, Executive Director Telespond Senior Services, Inc.
Senior center announces fall activities
DAILY EVENTS
September 26: “Citizen
Scientists: Explore the Uni-
verse” Presentation, at Keys-
tone College, Evans Hall,
Hibbard Campus Center at 7
p.m. The Keystone College
Concerts and Lectures Series
welcomes astronomer Dr.
Michael Castelaz.
The Viewmont Mall Job
Fair, in Viewmont Mall Cen-
ter Court from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. Sponsored by PA Career-
Link Lackawanna County.
Businesses and corporations
from throughout the region
will be on site to become ac-
quainted with qualified candi-
dates. Participants should
come dressed for success,
bring a supply of resumes and
be prepared for on-the-spot
interviewing.
September 27: 11th Annual
Northeastern U.S. disAbility
Conference: “Traumatic Brain
Injury.”on the fourth floor of
the DeNaples Center, Uni-
versity of Scranton beginning
at 8 a.m. Fees vary. Pre-regis-
tration required. Info:
570.941.7819.
ABPA "Business in the Mix"
business card exchange, at
ERA One Source Realty, 230
Northern Boulevard, South
Abington Twp., South Abing-
ton Twp. from 5:30 -7:30 p.m.
Complimentary hors
d’oeuvres, beverages and
cocktails will be provided by
ERA One Source Realty. Cost:
Free. Info/Reservations:
587.9045 or LauraAB-
PA@aol.com.
September 28: Christmas
in September, at Saint Mi-
chaels Center, 403 Delaware
St, Jermyn, from 4 – 8 p.m.,
continuing Sept. 29 from 9
a.m. – 7 p.m. and Sept. 30
from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Cost:
free. Info: 876.1241.
September 29: Hillside
Harvest Moon Festival, at
Abington Area Commuinity
Park from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Featuring: Pumpkin Chunkin’,
Homerun Derby, live music by
Quietmen, art opening for the
Earth Art Trail, the Plein Air
Artists of the Abingtons and
more.
Clarks Summit Abington
High School Class of 1952
60th Class Reunion, at Ni-
chols Village Hotel and Spa at
6 p.m. Info: Call Steuart Bai-
ley at 586.7551.
Ninth Annual Dan Lynott
Memorial Golf Tournament, at
the Scranton Municipal Golf
Course. Info/register: kly-
nott1703@comcast.net.
20th Anniversary of the
Weinberg Memorial Library
celebration and the 2012 Roy-
den B. Davis, S.J. Distin-
guished Author Award book
signing by Jay Parini at 4
p.m., fourth floor of DeNaples
Center, University of Scran-
ton. Cost: free. Info:
570.941.7816.
September 30: Corpus
Christi Harvest Festival turkey
dinner, noon - 5 p.m. at Cor-
pus Christi Church in Mont-
dale. Cost: $10 for adults and
$5 for children. Takeouts
available. Tickets may be pur-
chased at the door and include
a turkey dinner with mashed
potatoes and vegetables, as
well as sauerkraut slaw, stuff-
ing, cranberry sauce, dinner
rolls, pie, and beverages.
Roast Beef Dinner, at SS.
Cyril & Methodius Ukrainian
Catholic Church, River Street,
Olyphant, from noon - 3 p.m.
Take out only. Cost: $10 per
meal. Info/Tickets: 489.6206.
Deadline Sept 24.
Religious Education Class
Moleben Thanksgiving Ser-
vice, at St. John’s Russian
Orthodox Cathedral, Mayfield,
following the divine liturgy,
which begins at 9:30 a.m.
After the service, registration
for classes will be held. Info/
to register students: 876.0730.
Classes begin Oct. 1.
Scout Day, at the Lackawan-
na State Park from 1 – 6 p.m.
Topic rotations will include:
forestry/tree ID, National
Public Lands Day Service
Project, Birds and their Migra-
tion, Wild Edible and Medici-
nal Plants and An All Group:
Live Mammal Presentation.
Geared for Girl and Boy
Scouts ages 7-12. Registration
limited and on a first call
basis. Cost: $2. Register:
945.7110.
October 1: The Abington
Heights Civic League Meet-
ing, at the clubhouse, 115
Colburn Ave, Clarks Summit.
Speaker: Colleen Gilboy. Info:
587.3101.
October 2: The United
Neighborhood Centers of
NEPA and PNC Bank Home-
buyers’ Club, will be offered
free of charge to the public
continuting Oct. 4, 9 and 11
from 6 - 8 p.m. at UNC’s
Community Services Build-
ing, 410 Olive Street, Scran-
ton. The Homebuyers Club is
meant to provide information
and education on becoming a
first-time homebuyer. Seminar
topics include budgeting,
credit and shopping for a
mortgage. A light dinner will
be provided. Registration
(required): 343.8835.
October 3: 5k Zombie
Run, Lackawanna Trail High
School at 5 p.m. Part of the
annual Homecoming festiv-
ities. Race followed by the
homecoming bonfire. Award
for best costume and best
time will be given out.
Cost:$15. Info: Katie Lane,
marching band director, at
lanek@ltsd.org.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
Scott Monsky, a dean’s list
graduate fromCornell Uni-
versity, was omittedfromthe
Sept. 19list of college graduates.
We regret the error.
EDITOR’S NOTE
Editor:
I ama native of Northeastern
Pa. and I knowthat one of the
things that make our part of the
country unique is the mining of
Anthracite Coal and nownat-
ural gas. Also there are many
manufacturers of equipment to
service these industries located
in N.E.PA, which employ thou-
sands of people. I think we
would all agree that these indus-
tries are vital to our region’s
economy.
My question to your readers
is: howcan they support Presi-
dent Obama’s pledge to destroy
the coal industry? Howcan Vice
President Joe Biden, who likes
to cite his being a native son of
this region and Senator Robert
P. Casey Jr., a coal-cracker born
and raised, support this policy?
Howcan unions that represent
the miners, machinist and other
associated trades encourage
their members to vote for an
administration whose policy
will add more workers to the
already too long unemployment
lines? Is the Pennsylvania ener-
gy industry not big enough to
save? Is there no roomfor coal
in the plan to make America
energy independent?
I would appreciate hearing the
opinions of your readers to help
me understand why anyone
would vote for a President, Vice
President and Senator who are
determined for our energy
workers to lose their jobs.
Barry Gangwer
Weatherly
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
The Lackawanna Heritage
Valley National and State
Heritage Area will celebrate
annual National Public Lands
Day with a cleanup event on
the Scranton section of the
Lackawanna River Heritage
Trail Sept. 29. The event will
begin at 9 a.m. and volun-
teers are asked to gather at
the 7th Avenue Trailhead in
Scranton, where free parking
will be available.
The event’s efforts will
focus on cleaning up and
beautifying the trailhead
area, which the public, stu-
dents and service organiza-
tion members are invited to
volunteer for. The organiza-
tion will provide free gloves,
garbage bags, tools and water
for all volunteers.
The 7th Avenue Trailhead
is located four blocks from
the intersection of 7th Ave-
nue and Lackawanna Avenue
in Scranton and is adjacent to
new headquarters at 213
South 7th Avenue.
For more information
about the event, contact
Owen Worozbyt, Volunteer
Coordinator, at 570.963.6730
ext. 8212 or oworoz-
byt@LHVA.org.
Trail cleanup planned for
National Public Lands Day
Afree raffle at the After Hours Card Exchange Sept. 27 will
include a variety of prizes and gift baskets donated by Abington
Business and Professional Association members, such as the one
shown, above, with Gail Rees, Abington Business and Profes-
sional Association Mixer Co-Chairperson and Barry Kaplan,
Abington Business and Professional Association President.
The event will take place at ERAOne Source Realty, 230
Northern Boulevard, South Abington Twp. from5:30 – 7:30
p.m. Sunita Arora, owner of ERAOne Source Realty will bring
international flair to the business card exchange with themed
complimentary hors d’oeuvres and beverages, including wine,
sparkling water and soft drinks. A50/50 raffle will be held dur-
ing the event. Each Abington Business and Professional Associ-
ation member is encouraged to bring one non-member Reserva-
tions areappreciated and can be made to 570 .587.9045 or Lau-
raABPA@aol.comby Sept. 26.
A raffle in the mixer
As the Abington Journal
prepares to award its sixth
annual R. Matthew Burne
Lifetime of Service Award,
we are requesting nomina-
tions from the community for
consideration. Qualifications
of the individual to be nomi-
nated for the award would
include: affecting a positive
change on a small or grand
scale in the community; mak-
ing a unique difference in the
daily lives of others; donating
time and ideas to community
organizations and taking an
active role in shaping the
altruistic nature of the area.
The Award was established
in the Fall of 2007, with the
first honor made posthu-
mously to the family of R.
Matthew Burne. Burne orig-
inated a fundraising event in
the Abingtons known as the
“Haunt on Sean Drive,” was a
lifelong advocate for the St.
Joseph’s Center in Scranton
and dedicated himself to nu-
merous other organizations
and individuals in need.
In 2007, the Burne family
offered a donation in R. Mat-
thew’s memory and has gen-
erously agreed to partner
with The Abington Journal in
continued support of the
Lifetime of Service Award.
This year, a donation by the
Burne family will be made to
the charity selected by the
recipient of the 2012 R. Mat-
thew Burne Lifetime of Ser-
vice Award.
To submit a nomination,
send the following informa-
tion to Editor Kristie Grier
Ceruti at kgrier@theabing-
tonjournal.com or Kristie
Grier Ceruti c/o The Abing-
ton Journal, 211 South State
Street, Clarks Summit, PA
18411:
Nominee’s name, age, town
and contact information,
along with 50-100 words
about her or his contribution
to the community.
Deadline for submission is
October 5, 2012.
Know people who make a
difference? Nominate them.
The Friends of the Abington
Community Library will hold
its Fall Book Sale Oct. 13
from 9 a.m. to 2 pm. at the
Clarks Summit United Metho-
dist Church, corner of Grove
Street and Morgan Highway.
Volunteer members are asked
to help Oct.13 from 3 p.m.
until set up is complete. After
the books are ready for perus-
ing, members may then pre-
view the sale.
Book sale
help sought
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3A
After nearly a year of con-
struction, the newParish Center
at Trinity Lutheran Church in
Clarks Summit is ready to open.
The newcenter is specifically
designed to meet the needs of the
growing congregation. Its Sun-
day School classrooms, meeting
rooms and fellowship hall will
soon be bustling with activity.
The formal dedication of the
newbuilding will be held Sept.
30.
The public is invited to attend
an Open House at the newTrin-
ity Lutheran Church Parish Cen-
ter Oct. 14 between1and 3 p.m.
Members of the Trinity fam-
ily will be on hand to give tours
of the newbuilding and talk
about their mission and activ-
ities. Trinity Lutheran Church
is located at 205 West Grove St,
near the intersection of Grove
and State Street, in Clarks Sum-
mit.
For more information about
the Open House, visit
www.trinitylutherancs.com,
find themon Facebook (Trinity
Lutheran Church, Clarks Sum-
mit), email office@trinityluth-
erancs.comor call the church
office at 570.587.1088.
The public is invited to attend an Open House at the new Trinity Luth-
eran Church Parish Center Oct.14 between 1 and 3 p.m.
Parish Center
set to open
S
eptember is National
HoneyMonthanda
perfect time toreapthe
benefits of this natural sweet
gift producedbyhoneybees
fromthe nectar of plants or
secretions of livingparts of
plants.
Catherine Barry, National
HoneyBoarddirector of
marketing, saidof the versatil-
ityof honey, “One of life’s
simplest pleasures is honey
andit’s sucha versatile in-
gredient that caneasilytransi-
tionfromthe kitchentothe
gymtothe bathroomvanity.
Not onlycanhoneybe used
for its culinaryapplications,
but alsoas a coughsuppres-
sant, ina beautyroutine and
as anenergybooster. Honeyis
alsounique inits color and
flavor profile, as there are
more than300varietals of
honeyinthe UnitedStates
alone, eachwitha distinct
flavor andcolor basedonthe
floral source where the bees
collect the nectar.”
More goodnews fromthe
board: honeycontains nat-
urally-flavored
sugars, as well as
trace enzymes,
minerals, vitamins andamino
acids.
“There’s a tricktoeating
combhoney,” saidEllen
McGlynn, Clarks Summit
beekeeper andco-founder of
Lackawanna BackyardBee-
keepers. “Youcan’t just put it
(honeycomb) onbreadand
enjoyit the inthe same way
youwouldenjoycheese, be-
cause the waxincombhoney
does get stuckonyour teeth.”
She recommendedcuttingthe
honeyinsmall bite- size
squares andspreadingit ona
whole graincracker. Trya
cracker witha hint of salt and
carawayfor a blendof salty-
sweet, she said.
McGlynnis inher third
seasonof beekeepingonher
property. Currently, she has
eight hives .
“Duringthe spring, that
mayinclude adjuga, apples,
blueberries, honeysuckle,
wildmustardandbrambles.
The summer honeymay
include blackberries, su-
mac, clover, wildroses,
coneflower, milkweedand
various asters.” Said
McGlynn, “Goldenrodis
the largest single floral
source inmyyard. Gold-
enrodis the honeyof choice
for meadmakers.”
Sweet September
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Beekeeper, Ellen Kiballa McGlynn,
Clarks Summit.
Honey cakes plated with bay
leaf
Kelly Baker, Everything Natural
manager, mixes an Organic
Honey Exfoliating Scrub.
Make skin
‘bee’have
Use a homemade
moisturizing honey
exfoliating scrub for face
and body, particularly
during winter months when
skin tends to be rough, dry,
flaky and itchy. Kelly Baker,
Everything Natural
manager, whipped up a
batch using natural and
organic ingredients
available at the Clarks
Summit store and a recipe
courtesy of Yahoo
Contributor Elise Marie.
To make the scrub: combine
4 cups of sugar, 1 cup
organic honey, ¾ cups olive
oil and ¼ cup jojoba oil in a
large mixing bowl. Spoon
the thick golden scrub
directly into a glass jar or
plastic container with a lid
and be sure to keep the
scrub nearby a sink, shower
or bath. To apply, splash the
skin with warm water, take
a handful and rub and
massage it over skin in a
circular motion until
exfoliated. Rinse with warm
water and pat dry with a
cotton towel.
A Taste of
Honey
Ancient Roman Libum or
Honey Cakes made by Ellen
McGlynn, using a recipe
courtesy of Squidoo Ancient
Roman Recipes and “PBS:
Nova Series.”
Ingredients:
1 cup of plain flour
1 cup of ricotta cheese
1 egg, beaten
bay leaves
half cup clear honey
Directions:
Sift flour in a mixing bowl.
Beat cheese until soft, stir
into flour. Add beaten egg to
the flour/cheese mixture,
forming a soft dough. Divide
dough into four and shape
each piece into a bun. Place
on a greased baking tray
with a fresh bay leaf
underneath. Heat the oven
to 375 degrees Fahrenheit
(190C). Bake for 35-40
minutes until golden brown.
Warm honey, pour into a flat
plate, remove bay leaves,
and place buns in the
honey. Allow to rest until
honey is absorbed.
Makes 4 servings.
Nutrition information per
serving: Calories: 238;
Protein: 11; Carbs: 37; Fat:
6; Fiber: 2; Weight Watchers
Points: 6
Cook’s Notes: To divide and
shape the dough, a very
wet dough, scoop the
portion into greased palms
(greased with cooking
spray) and toss back and
forth a few times until a
basic disk shape emerges.
Gently place on baking
stone on top of a bay leaf.
Clarks Summit
beekeeper,
Ellen McGlynn, at
left:
“The big surprise in
my beehives this
year was to find
Japanese Knotweed
honey in there.”
Honey scrub
Stories and Photos By Joan Mead-Matsui
Abington Journal Correspondent
According to Beekeeper Ellen McGlynn, some nectar -producing plants in Northeast
Pa. capable of producing distinct monofloral honeys are:
Blacklocust (spring), clear/white and very sweet, similar to corn syrup in taste,
color and texture. Asubstitute for recipes that call for corn syrup.
Whiteclover (summer), large honey producers aimfor when blending honeys from
around the world for generic sale;
Clover honey, classic table honey, amber in color with a delicately rich flavor.
Japaneseknotweed(latesummer), dark amber with a reddish hue. Similar to molas-
ses, only less bitter and lighter in texture. Perfect for fall dishes like sweet potatoes.
Goldenrod(latesummer/earlyfall), McGlynn’s personal favorite, amber in color with
a warm, butterscotch flavor.
U.S. Air Force recruits and recrui-
ters donated time to some furry
friends at the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter in South Abington Twp. They
walked about 30 dogs of all breeds
and sizes.
This is not the first time the Air
Force has donated time to the com-
munity. “Every month recruits who
are preparing to leave for Air Force
Basic Military Training join together
to volunteer in the community. Some-
times we work at the Ronald McDo-
nald House, Red Cross, 5Ks, disabled
veterans homes, etc.,” said Staff Sgt.
Timothy Drolet, a local Air Force
Recruiter for Lackawanna and Sus-
quehanna counties.
There is a reason behind all the
community service, Staff Sgt. Drolet
said.
“While active in the Air Force, we
typically volunteer monthly. I would
like to show them what the Air Force
is going to be like,” he said. He ex-
plained that it is important for
recruits to become active in the
community early on because it
takes six to nine months to join
the Air Force and afterward the
Air Force encourages a lot of
community service.
“The second core value of the
Air Force is service before self
and we intend to live up to that
value,” Drolet said.
In the past three months, the
local recruits have been busy with
the Red Cross, Ronald McDonald
House in Scranton and the Scran-
ton Police 5K for the K9 Unit. The
local Air Force recruits and recrui-
ters spend a great deal of time out
in the community lending helping
hands.
Staff Sgt. Timothy Drolet, Local Enlisted
Recruiter at the Ice Box Complex in
Scranton, volunteers at the Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter with Jada, shelter dog.
‘Service before self’
BY KASEY LYNN
Abington Journal Correspondent
Volunteering at the Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter, clockwise, from
top left: MSgt Juan Villarreal,
Enlisted Ascensions Recruiter
Supervisor for NEPA; SSgt Tim-
othy Drolet, Local Enlisted
Recruiter; Jaideep Kaur ; Antho-
ny Young; Franky Kerekes,
Timothy Vonstorch, 2012 Lake-
land Junior /Senior High School;
Samantha Dumas; Aaron Mcna-
ny, Senior at Baptist Bible Col-
lege, leaving Dec. 4 as an Air-
borne Cryptologic Language
Analyst; and Lee-Anne Sherman
SOUTHABINGTONTWP. -
The South Abington Zoning Board
denied a Pennsylvania American
Water Company request Sept. 19 for
approval to build a newwater pump
station within the township.
The pump station, which would
be built next to one currently on site,
would be constructed as part of the
installation of a public water system
for those affected by contamination
fromthe Ivy Industrial Park.
The board felt the water company
failed to satisfy the requirements
governing the granting of a varia-
nce—or special exception—for this
property on Griffin Pond Road.
The water company representa-
tives said they did not want to post-
pone the issue further after the
board offered to revisit the issue at
later. PAWCAttorney Ed Neyhart
claimed the company had gone to
greater lengths to accommodate the
township than necessary.
“Our project conforms with the
ordinance,” he said. “I will not agree
to make it one building because I
don’t absolutely knowwhat the
feasibility is,” he said.
South Abington Twp. resident
Mark Steckiel spoke out against the
project during public comment. He
said17 property owners had at-
tached their names to a letter ob-
jecting to the water company’s
plans.
“We just do not want this facility
in our neighborhood,” Steckiel said.
Pennsylvania American Water
can appeal the board’s decision in
Lackawanna County Court.
S. Abington
denies pump
station request
BY GERARD E. NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
RANSOMTWP. - At its meeting
Sept. 17, the RansomTownship
Planning Commission discussed
correspondence frommembers of
the Brenneman family, who wish to
purchase land on Newton Ransom
Boulevard for recreational use.
According to Zoning Officer
Bob Lukiewicz, they wish to peri-
odically park a recreational vehicle
for weekend use.
Lukiewicz said if the vehicle is
parked on the property for more
than180 consecutive days, it will
be considered a permanent struc-
ture and subject to different guide-
lines.
Land use
discussed
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
C M Y K
PAGE 4A THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
CROSSWORDS
ANSWERS ON PAGE14
The Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter, 967
Griffin Pond Rd.,
Clarks Summit, is
open for the adop-
tion of pets from
noon to 4:30 p.m.,
daily. Wish list items
are always appre-
ciated, cat litter and
paper towels.
Adopt a cage at the
Griffin Pond Animal Shel-
ter for one month and
your $20 donation will go
toward care and feeding
of the animal in that cage
for the month you choose.
A card will be placed on
the cage identifying the
sponsor for that month.
Send the following
Adopt-a-Cage informa-
tion, including name,
address, city, state and
zip, phone number,
sponsor month, choice of
dog, cat or small animal
cage and how you would
like your sponsor card to
appear, along with $20
for each cage to The
Griffin Pond Animal Shel-
ter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd.,
Clarks Summit, PA 1841 1.
My name is ... Chesney
Name: Chesney
Age: Young adult
Sex: Male
About me: I’m affectionate, like being held,
and am compatible with other cats. If you adopt
Chesney and his cage mate, Bandito, you get a
“buy-one-get-one” adoption discount.
Remember to contact the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter at 586.3700 if your pet is lost or goes
astray.
The American Culinary Fed-
eration of NEPA is holding its
23rd Annual Progressive Din-
ner Oct. 8 at the Westmoreland
Club on Franklin Street in
Wilkes-Barre.
Tickets and further informa-
tion can be obtained by con-
tacting Chef John Hudak at
570.574.9310.
The American Culinary Fed-
eration, Inc. (ACF), a profes-
sional, organization for chefs
and cooks, was founded in
1929 in New York City by
three chefs’ organizations: the
Société Culinaire Philanthro-
pique, the Vatel Club and the
Chefs de Cuisine Association
of America. Since its incep-
tion, little has changed in their
principal goals.
Committee members shown, from left, first row: Sue Richter,CWPC, John Hudak
CEC,AAC, Carmen Allegrucci CEC, AAC. Second row: Bruce Deeble CEC, AAC
and Doug Petruzzi CEC ,AAC. Absent from the photo is Jake Hizny CEC.
ACF dinner set for Oct. 8
Scout Day will be held Sept.
30 from1 to 6 p.m. at Lacka-
wanna State Park, Dalton.
Topic rotations will include
forestry/tree ID, National
Public Lands Day Service
Project, birds and their migra-
tion, wild, edible, and medici-
nal plants, and a live mammal
presentation.
The event is geared toward
Girl and Boy Scouts ages 7 to
12. Registration is open and is
on a first call basis. Call
570.945.7110 to register your
pack or troop. The cost is $2
per scout.
The event will provide op-
portunities for scouts to earn
required environmental badg-
es.
Scout Day Sept.
30 in Dalton
For the sixth consecutive
year, Keystone College in La
Plume has been ranked as
one of the nation’s best col-
leges in U.S. News and
World Report.
Keystone scored partic-
ularly well in the category
which lists small class sizes.
Keystone lauded
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 5A
Hours of Operation:
Tues-Sat 10-4:30
Thurs 10-8
Sun 12-4
willowtreeshop.net
G
r
a
n
d
O
p
e
n
i
n
g
S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r
2
9
!
Now two locations!
14001 Church Hill Road
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570.585.2120
1107 Oram Street
Scranton, Pa 18504
570.969.2120
Grand Opening of our Clarks Summit Store
on September 29
10% off the Entire Store
Gourmet Food Sampling • Basket Raffle
T
he holiday gift
-giving season is
around the cor-
ner, and for those cre-
ative types who prefer to
give handmade gifts the
Abington Area Com-
munity Classroomis
offering “Make &Take”
classes as part of the fall
lineup.
Among the choices that
will help to get you motiva-
ted to create are “Have You
Ever FELTLike This Be-
fore?” with wool
gatherer, Emily Ran-
cier, who will teach
attendees to create a
small felt purse using
a technique known as
“wool roving,” Tues.,
Oct. 9 and16, 6:30
p.m. at Clarks Green
United Methodist
Church, 119 Glen-
burn Road. She will
teach “Silk Scarf
Art” with Gwen Harlemen,
director of the Verve Vertu
Art Studio in Wilkes-Barre,
Oct. 18, 6:30 p.m. at the
First Presbyterian Church of
Clarks Summit, 300 School
Street.
To create felt, Rancier
uses a technique that has
been practiced for thou-
sands of years using water,
soap and agitation, referred
to as “wet felting.”
She explained, “I enjoy
the felting process because
it is always surprising.
Things happen. It’s magical
howa wooly mass can
transformbeneath your
fingers into an authentic
fabric, whether it is stiff and
thick or light as air. And it’s
lots of fun to make a design
with silk fibers, yarns, glitz,
pieces of fabric and prefelts
- the list is endless for what
you can try.”
To make the purse, partic-
ipants will use a resist, or a
thin plastic sheet that will
determine the shape of the
purse as they formthe wool
around it.
“...We will also learn how
to make cords for the purse
straps,” said Rancier, whose
past includes being a shep-
herd for 25 years and a
spinner for 30 years.
The cost of Rancier’s
class is $10 plus $15 supply
cost; registration deadline-
Oct. 2.
According to Dori Wa-
ters, an Abington Area
Community Classroom
organizer, Harleman’s class,
“Silk Scarf Art” will offer
an opportunity to produce a
scarf using a creative and
extremely simple technique
an informal class setting.
“You won’t believe how
easy these are to make. The
possibilities are endless.
You can do spirals, circles
(designs)…anything you
want,” said Waters. The
process involves using a
piece of freezer paper.
“Whatever you do on the
scarf is mirrored on the
freezer paper, so you not
only end up with a beautiful
scarf, but also paper that
you can either frame, or use
as wrapping paper for the
gift,” added Waters. Fee is
$20 plus a $20 supply cost
and registration is open until
Oct. 11.
For details, visit aacclas-
s.org or call 570.954.6650.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Gwen Harlemen’s “Silk Scarf
Art” will produce a scarf
using a simple technique with
freezer paper.
Wearable
creations
BY JOAN
MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal
Correspondent
Create a small felt purse
with wool gatherer, Emily
Rancier, using a technique
known as “wool roving.”
JERMYN– “Un-
believable prices.” “Best
in the area.” “Good track
record.”
Organizers of St. Mi-
chael’s Russian Ortho-
dox Church parish festiv-
al, Christmas in Septem-
ber, can’t rave enough
about their event. It will
be held inside and out-
side of St Michael’s
Center, Jermyn, Sept. 26
to 28.
Festivities include
antiques and collectibles,
a classic car showand a l
performance fromlocal
country star Dani-elle.
“This is our third year of Christmas in Septem-
ber, and it seems every year it’s getting bigger and
more popular for the community,” said archpriest
Rev. John Kowalczyk. “What we want to do is
open this up to the community so it becomes a
major happening. The hall will be stocked with
nearly a million dollars worth of goods.”
Rev. John Perich, who grewup with Kowalc-
zyk in Yonkers, N.Y., will sell collectibles, jew-
elry, and Christmas gifts fromaround the world
fromhis own business called Father John’s World
Treasures. He became internationally known
when he used to work for QVC.
“I’mappealing to people of all different ethnic
backgrounds,” said Perich. “I knowif they come
here for the festival, they will get unbelievable
prices that will not be able to get in local depart-
ment stores.”
St. Michael’s is hiring a caterer to provide fes-
tivalgoers with homemade Russian and Ukrai-
nian foods such as pierogies, Italian sausage,
porketta sandwiches, kielbasa sand-
wiches, sopressata and clamchowd-
er for sale, along with potato pan-
cakes and hot wing pierogies .
“The hallmark of our church is
our homemade pierogies,” said
Kowalczyk. “They’re the best in the
area.”
“The festival will have two tents
with ten-foot tables for people to sit
and enjoy the food.
“The food that’s
brought in and the good
that we prepare are
excellent,” said hall
manager George Pet-
orak. “We have a good
track record of foods
and everything we sell.
We ride on tradition.”
One of the main
festivities is a classic
car showSunday. Cars
displayed will include
muscle cars such as
Chevelles, Camaros,
Pontiacs and Impalas
fromthe1950s and
60s. Motorcycles will
also be featured. Dan
Kitchura, in charge of
the car show, hopes to
have more than100 vehicles displayed. Last year,
there were 50 to 70.
“I think the event has grown every year,” said
Kitchura. “We seemto reach people farther away.
I have people coming fromAvoca, Moosic, so it’s
stretching out pretty quickly.” Anyone with a
vehicle to display in the show, can call Dan at
570.876.4610.
Entertainment will be provided by country
singer and member of St. Michael’s Center Dani-
elle who will performChristmas tunes and origi-
nal songs such as “DreamBig” and “Country
Broke” fromher album. “God blessed me with
he talent that I have and it’s an absolute honor that
I can come out and share it with the community,
especially my church family, " she said.
DJ Greg Bertholf will also provide musical
entertainment.
Church president Joe Krenitsky, president for
more than 35 years, has been supporting this
event through the church committee. “I’mhoping
for a nice day,” he said.
Rev. Kowaczyk calls Christmas
in September a social event for the
area. “We’re expecting thousands
of people for the weekend,” he
said. “Someday, we’ll come close
to the Italian festival in Scranton.
It’s the ultimate holiday festival.
We have something for everyone.”
Ample parking and hand-
icapped-accessible parking is
available.
Want to go?
Christmas in September
Sept. 26, 4- 8p.m.; Sept.
27, 9 a.m. - 7p.m.; Sept.
28, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
St. Michael’s Center
403 Delaware St.,
Jermyn, PA 18433
DID YOU KNOW?
* The word ’pierogi’ is literally translated as ’pie’ in
most Slavic languages.
* Matryoshka dolls, Russian nestling dolls, were
based on similar dolls made in Japan.
* Ded Moroz, whose name means “Grandfather Frost”
is a Slavic fictional character similar to Santa Claus.
Decorations available for sale at last year’s Christ-
mas in September event.
‘Ultimate Holiday Festival’
“The hallmark of our church is our homemade pierogies.
They’re the best in the area.”
St. Michael’s Russian Orthodox Church Archpriest Father John Kowalczyk
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal
Correspondent
C M Y K
PAGE 6A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
7
7
9
2
2
0
Misericordia University recently held a
pinning ceremony in Lemmond Theater at
Walsh Hall to recognize the 21 students
who completed the Part-Time Accelerated
Evening Bachelor of Science Degree Nurs-
ing Program at MU.
During the ceremony, undergraduate
nursing students received the Misericordia
University Nursing Pin, a symbol of
achievement in the nursing profession.
Family and friends attended the event,
which also featured the recital of the in-
ternational pledge for nurses and the in-
ternational prayer for nurses.
The nursing department also recognized
Maria Witkowski of Eynon, Pa., by present-
ing her the Clinical Excellence Award,
which is presented to a student whose grade
point average is greater than 3.0 and who is
judged by faculty to administer superior
nursing skills in clinical practice. Jeffrey
Hartzell of Stroudsburg, Pa., received the
Academic Excellence Award that is confer-
red to a BSN student who has attained the
highest academic standing overall.
Nursing students who received their pins
during the ceremony, included Danielle
Belisle, White Haven, Pa.; Justin Bialy,
Binghamton, N.Y.; Candace Blasko, Taylor,
Pa.; Karen Delay, Mountaintop, Pa.; Koryn
Gallagher, Olyphant, Pa.; Michelle Kelleh-
er, Mountaintop, Pa.; Laura King, Landis-
burg, Pa.; Dixon Kitonyo, Wilkes-Barre,
Pa.; Lori Kolody, Mt. Carmel, Pa.; Louis
LaLonde, Archbald, Pa.; Purity Manundu,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Michelle McDermott,
Scranton, Pa.; Amy Mikula, Tunkhannock,
Pa.; Marthe Nelson, Albrightsville, Pa.;
Bien Xuan Nguyen, Kingston, Pa.; Sarah
Ratcliffe, Lake Ariel, Pa.; Diane R. Sher-
man, Bloomsburg, Pa.; Julie Simrell, Scran-
ton, Pa.; Brian Stecker, Drums, Pa.; El-
izabeth Stuscavage, Wyoming, Pa., and
Christine Tucker, Dallas, Pa.
Misericordia honors nursing students
T
he Rotary Club assem-
bled its 8th annual Taste
Sept. 23 and the com-
munity came out. Two-thirds of
the Rotary members worked
together to run the event.
Rotary member Leah Ducato
Rudolph said, “It really brings
local residents out for a good
time and good food. It’s a win-
win for everyone, participants,
restaurants, Rotary and then
our community, as we give
back100 percent of the pro-
ceeds.”
ABINGTON JOURNAL/DANIELLE ANTONELLO-SMOLLEY
Sushi chef Alex Cao, right, of Atami Sushi makes fresh roll as Qin Chen, owner, prepares ingredients at left.
Taste of the Abingtons was held Sunday at Nichols
Village Hotel and Spa.
Pat Edwards and George Donaldson of Weis Market
T’Shaiya Stephenson, Newton and
Pat Gibbons, Scranton
FOOD FOR ALL TASTES
to come up to the high school
and have access to the track,
and that’s a wonderful thing
except when it overlaps with
the physical education class-
es,” he said. “In the middle of
a class, members of the public
are essentially mingling with
those classes. I have a fear
that opens up the district to
liability and my responsibility
is to the teachers. I wanted to
bring it to your attention that
we have people who have no
clearances in the midst of our
students. I hope the policy
would be revisited to see if
that is a reasonable thing.”
The school board has two
students representatives this
year, Rebecca Fallk, a mem-
ber of student council, march-
ing band, FBLA, mock trail
and Interact and T.J. Murray,
student council vice president,
public relations officer Inter-
act club, member of SADD
club, national honor society,
and football, basketball teams.
Murray announced the high
school has two new clubs,
ping-pong and creative writ-
ing.
Steuart Bailey, representing
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
7069 Clarks Summit, an-
nounced that students may
enter the 2012-13 Voice of
Democracy essay contest.
“It provides the opportunity
for high school students to get
involved in creative writing,”
Bailey said.
This year’s theme, “Is Our
Constitution Still Relevant?”
“Abington Heights has a
history of producing winners
in this national contest,” Bai-
ley added. “Eight years ago,
local students won on the
local and state level and fin-
ished in second place nation-
ally to win over $18,000. The
past two years, Abington
Heights produced a winner at
the district level. This year’s
national winner will receive a
cash benefit of $30,000.”
Gerard Hetman, Lackawan-
na Country Department of
Community relations an-
nounced that Barbara Giovag-
noli, from the county Office
of Environmental Sustainabil-
ity has asked his office to
work on a project called Lack-
awanna County Greensylvania
school paper competition, a
recycling contest to see which
school district in the area can
recycle the most. It’s a state-
wide competition.
The board accepted the
resignation of central office
secretary Mary Ann Naglak.
According to Mahon, the
district does not have plans to
replace her position. They
also accepted the registration
of aide Shari Dikeman.
The board accepted the
leave of absence of middle
school Family and Consumer
Science teacher Beth Kelly.
They appointed Linda Wall as
a longterm substitute Family
and Consumer Science Teach-
er at a cost of $46,059; Randy
Hanyon as Athletic Director
for $35,000, Julia Rusak as a
nurse assistant, and Lauren
Mahler and Karen Senkow as
para professional aides.
Lisa Imbriaco was approved
as a volunteer junior varsity
basketball coach.
Casey Mrykalo, Elizabeth
Coviello, Jeanne Arp, Gianna
Muracco and Gail Pyre were
approved to be added to the
substitute list.
Patricia Bumeder was ap-
proved as a substitute aide.
NEGOTIATIONS
Continued from Page 1
The First Presbyterian
church of Clarks Summit will
hold its 100th Anniversary
Celebration Sunday, Oct. 7
beginning with the10 a.m.
Holy Communion service
followed by a banquet at noon
at the Montdale Country Club
in Scott Township.
The10 a.m. service will
have a brass quartet, scripture
readings and musical numbers
by the Senior choir under the
direction of Susan Kelly and
the Bell Choir under the direc-
tion of Connie Weiss. Rev.
WilliamCarter’s sermon will
be “Choosing the Church.”
Reservations for the church
dinner can be made with Con-
nie Weiss at 586.0434.
First row, from left: Rev. William Carter, church pastor, Connie Weiss, Reservations and Beverly Bright,
Banquet Chairman. Second row: Jack Pittman, Church Historian and liturgist for the 10 a.m. service, Jim
McLaughlin, Banquet Toastmaster and Chris Norton, Church Centennial playwright.
Century celebration
The Keystone College Con-
certs and Lectures Series will
welcome distinguished astrono-
mer Dr. Michael Castelaz for a
presentation on “Citizen Scien-
tists: Explore the Universe”
Sept. 26 at 7 p.m. in Evans Hall,
Hibbard Campus Center. Citi-
zen science, a growing trend in
research, allows people to help
answer serious scientific ques-
tions and provide vital data to
the research
community.
Castelaz
serves as Di-
rector of As-
tronomical
Studies and
Education at
Pisgah Astron-
omical Re-
search Institute (PARI) where he
conducts astronomical research
and teaches high school and
university students. The college
will host John Seager, president
and CEOof the national orga-
nization, Population Connec-
tion, Oct. 1, at
7 p.m. in Evans
Hall, Hibbard
Campus Cen-
ter.
Seager will
speak on,
“Soaring Past 7
Billion: Pop-
ulation Chal-
lenges for a Crowded World.”
Founded in1968 as Zero
Population Growth, Population
Connection focuses on achiev-
ing global population stabiliza-
tion through universal aware-
ness and access to voluntary
family planning, together with
the full empowerment of wom-
en. Keystone College President
Dr. Edward G. BoehmJr. an-
nounced that Regina Peters has
joined the college as Senior
Advisor to the President for
Community Relations and Spe-
cial Projects.
Peters will work closely with
Keystone’s Institutional Ad-
vancement team.
Keystone greets
speakers, advisor
John Seager
Regina Peters
Rev. MitredArchpriest John
D. Sorochka, superintendent and
spiritual director of St. John’s
Academy, alongwithSubdea-
conMichael Pavukannounced
the Moleben(Service of
Thanksgiving) for the opening
of the newacademic year will
take place Sept. 30followingthe
Divine Liturgyat 9:30a.m.
Registrationwill be heldfor
pre-school tohighschool (Ages
3to17) classes inthe classroom
level of the churchfollowingthe
service.
Classes will beginOct. 1at 6
p.m.
Classes to
begin Oct.1
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 7A
NOW OPEN
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ofthe S n ows
(570) 586- 1741
Ca tholic Luthera n
TR INITY LUTHER AN CHUR CH
205 W . Grove S treet
Rev. George M athewsP astor
W ors hip S e rvic e s
S atu rd ay7:00 p .m .
Con tem p oraryS u n d ayS ervice 8:15 a.m .
Trad ition al S ervice 9:30 a.m .
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Call ou rP reschool:
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Chu rch Office
587- 1088
THE CHUR CH
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25 Chu rch Hill,
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Worship Service: Sunday 10:00AM
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decisionyoumake, some people are going
tolike it, some people aren’t....as longas
youdothe right thing, what is best for the
community, younever have toworryabout
it.” In1970s, Perryshowedhis backbone
whenhe, as police commissioner, ordered
the Grove Street Bridge closedafter his
sonnoticeddangerous bridge decay.
“I saidtohimwhenI was walkingover
there [the bridge], ‘Dad, I cansee the rail-
roadtracks throughthe sidewalk,’” Scott
Perrysaid.
His father was skeptical at first, but soon
went tothe bridge toexamine it. Sure
enough, it was dilapidatedas his sonhad
claimed. TonyPerrybecame worried
about those whocrossedthe bridge, and
especiallyabout students whopassedover
onbuses toandfromschool.
“He closedit onhis own, andwhenthey
[state officials] inspectedit, theyagreed
withhim,” saidCarol Perry, Perry’s wife of
38years, whoexplainedthat others were
opposedtoclosingthe bridge.
“Astate trooper showedup. It was a big
fiasco,” saidTonyPerry’s daughter, Pame-
la Orue.
“That made a lot of people unhappy,”
Scott Perrysaid, explainingthat many
didn’t like havingtotake analternate route
while the bridge was closed. “It was falling
apart. It hadtobe done.”
“Nowyousee there’s a brandnewbridge
there,” saidOrue. “He won, right?”
Whenhe wasn’t closingbridges downfor
public safetyor actinginhis official capacities
as mayor or police commissioner or patrolman
over the years, he showedhis softer side, his
daughter said.
Perrylovedtoengage withthe community.
He coachedyouthsports teams. He playedbass
ina band, SouthernComfort, formerlyThe
Funtimers. He drankcoffee andchattedwith
residents indiners “throughout the Abingtons,”
accordingtohis obituary.
“If he wasn’t a friendof yours, bythe
time he was done talkingtoyou, he was,”
Carol Perrysaid. “He woulddoanything
he couldtohelpanybody.”
His daughter saidonholidays her father
wouldtake shifts for police officers who
hadsmall childrensotheycouldbe home
withtheir families.
“He never forgot what it was like tobe
the lowmanonthe totempole,” his son
said.
Scott Perry, nowanassistant chief in
Laceyville, sees himself as retraces his
father’s career path. Workingas a police-
mangives himinsight intohis father.
“I didn’t realize howmuchI learned
fromhimuntil recently, he said. “I have a
muchbetter understandingof myfather.”
His father toldhimtoremember toput
helpingothers above all else inlife.
“That stays withme onthe jobtodayas a
policeman,” he said.
Shortlybefore his death, Perrywonhis
thirdtermas mayor andcelebratedhis 65th
birthday. Inhis last years, he was enamored
of his grandson, ZacharyPerryKarabin.
He especiallyenjoyedtakingZachary
fishingandswimming, accordingtofam-
ily.
In2003, Clarks Summit BoroughCoun-
cil votedunanimouslytoadopt a resolution
renamingthe CarnationDrive Parkafter
Perry.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JASON RIEDMILLER
Family members of the late Clarks Summit
Mayor Anthony ’Tony’ Perry gather after the
flagpole dedication in his memory. Seated:
Carol Perry, wife of the late Clarks Summit
Mayor. Standing: Scott Perry, son of the late
Mayor; Zachary Perry Karabin, grandson and
Pamela Orue, daughter or the late Mayor.
COURTESY CAROL PERRY
Tony Perry served as police com-
missioner from 1977 to 1981.
COURTESY PAMELA ORUE
Mayor Tony Perry, shown, assembles
campaign signs for his last mayoral cam-
paign in 2001.
COURTESY CAROL PERRY
Tony Perry, a musician since his teen
years, played bass in The Funtimers,
which later became Southern Comfort.
‘HONORABLE’
Continued from Page 1
Through the Years
Family Man
COURTESY PAMELA ORUE
Tony and Pamela Perry circa 1979 during
an Abington All Stars Softball Tournament.
COURTESY CAROL PERRY
Scott, Tony and Carol Perry in 1988 at
Scott’s football game at Moravian College.
COURTESY PAMELA ORUE
Tony Perry, right, adored his grandson,
Zachary, left, often taking him fishing and
swimming.
Lifetime of
dedication
* Grew up in West
Scranton and
attended West
Scranton High
School and later
The University of
Scranton and
Lackawanna Junior
College for his Act
120 certification.
* Served in the U.S.
Air Force.
* Moved to Clarks
Summit in 1967 to
take a job as a
patrolman.
* Served as Police
Commissioner from
1977 to 1981.
* Worked for 24
years as a criminal
investigator for the
DA’s office.
* His career in law
enforcement
spanned 34 years.
* Was Vice
President of the
Lackawanna
Mayor’s Association
* When he served
on Clarks Summit
Borough council for
six years, he was in
charge of parks and
recreation
* Served as Grand
Marshal for the
Memorial Day
Parade for the
Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post.
* Was serving his
third term as mayor
when he died. Had
been mayor since
1994.
trees and not just the trunks,” said
Beechko. As part of the proposed
plan, the clock tower would be
decorated in multi-colored lights,
making it a focal point in the hub
of the downtown area.”
Committee members are in the
process of contacting building
landlords for permission to move
ahead. “We all want it to happen,”
she said. “…And we’re trying to
come up with something low
maintenance.” According to
Beechko, to date, the committee
has commitments fromEverything
Natural, Lawrence E. Young Fu-
neral Home, O’Boyle Real Estate,
Beta Bread, The Moore Building,
Petco building, Gerrie Carey build-
ing and Our Lady of the Snows
Church and Rectory.
Beechko and her committee are
seeking help fromthe community
in the formof monetary donations,
additional volunteers and residents
or individuals to adopt a vacant
building. “My goal is to put a com-
mittee together involving the
whole community - as possibly
adopting a building that’s va-
cant…. We can raise to money to
buy the lights, and we are given a
discount on power fromPP&L….
We don’t want this to be a big bur-
den on anyone; we’d like to have
volunteers of all ages and occupa-
tions involved.”
She added, “We have some peo-
ple who have come forward, Archi-
tect, Kuni Matsui and Highland
Associates, who will measure
buildings and want to help with the
design, and we’re looking for any
groups that would like to help line
the buildings with lights. Arepre-
sentative fromWalsh Electrical
Associates will meet with Virginia
Kehoe to determine if power is
sufficient for all of the buildings.
Gerrie Carey, Clarks Summit
Borough President and committee
member said, “What we want is for
people to come forward - anybody
who has any interest in helping
with lighting up of Clarks Summit.
The lights will be left up perma-
nently and will be available for
special occasions such as the Ice
Festival.”
Meetings will be held on Tues-
days, 9:30 a.m. at the Clarks Sum-
mit Borough Building. For more
information, contact Ellen Beech-
ko at 947.2847. The lighting of the
town is scheduled for Nov.15.
HOLIDAY
Continued from Page 1
and a goal of the event is to
“empower the children with
lifesaving safety skills.”
She stressed the importance
of not frightening them by
adding more fear into danger-
ous situations. Walsh said she
would like to erase the nega-
tive connotations children
sometimes have about law
enforcement officers and
emergency responders, and
replace it with the message
that those people are heroes
who are here to help.
“If you want to empower
someone,” she said, “you give
them information and take the
fear away from them.”
DANGER
Continued from Page 1
McGruff the Crime Dog teaches
lifesaving tips at a previous Safe-
ty4ALLKIDS event.
C M Y K
PAGE 8A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
and has worked for the compa-
ny since high school.
Sue and Joe Kashuba, both of
Justus, founded the business in
1985.
According to Mushel, the
number of employees varies by
season. Right now, they have14
people on staff. During the busy
seasons of spring and summer
they have up to 20 staff mem-
bers.
“If business picks up like we
expect, we plan to hire a few
more people,” he said.
Agrand reopening is sched-
uled for October 26, 27 and 28
featuring sales and discounts all
week. There will also be give-
aways including a patio set,
Weber grill and snowthrower.
JUSTUS - According to
Brian Mushel, store manager at
Justus True Value Home and
Garden, the key to the store’s
success is simple.
“Our service is second to
none,” he said. “We take care of
our customers.”
The store, which has been at
its current location since1989,
is in the process of its second
expansion. The business added
more than 3,000 square feet to
its retail location. The project
began in May and will conclude
with a grand re-opening in Oc-
tober. Each current department
will be expanded and sections
devoted to farm, horse and pet
supplies will be added.
“We never had the knowledge
of it and we have horse farms all
around us,” Mushel said. “Peo-
ple started asking us to carry
certain things. We were looking
for things that we can carry that
the big stores like Lowe’s and
Home Depot don’t have.
“It all goes back to service. If
we just filled our shelves and
were a self -serve business, we
wouldn’t be here. We love tak-
ing care of our customers, that’s
why we’re still here.”
Mushel, 34, of Justus, has
served as manager for 12 years
Expansion
in Justus
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
Brian Mushel, has served as man-
ager at Justus True Value Home
and Garden for 12 years and has
worked for the company since
high school.
GLENBURN TWP. - Glen-
burn Twp. residents will soon
have access to an Internet-
based computer program that
will provide reports on ongoing
cleanup efforts at the Precision
National Plating Superfund
cleanup site.
The online database, which
will go live sometime this fall,
will also feature an archive of
information related to the clea-
nup site’s history, according to
the Glenburn Twp. supervisors
at their Sept. 17 meeting. The
board viewed a demonstration
of the website in late August at
a meeting with the EPA.
“It’s kind of a repository for a
lot of data in a computer for-
mat that will help people un-
derstand better what’s going on
around their home, what’s go-
ing on at the site,” Solicitor
Malcolm McGregor said. “This
is viewed as a very positive
step forward.”
The Precision site has been
treated over the years with a
series of calcium polysulfide
injections, which are intended
to reduce the presence of hexa-
valent chromium—a toxicant
and carcinogen—in the soil
and groundwater. The most
recent round of injections be-
gan Sept. 6 and will continue
through November, according
to the EPA on-scene coor-
dinator’s Web page.
Extensive testing for contam-
ination levels will go on this
month and next and will con-
tinue as needed. The results of
these tests will be posted on the
new database.
The EPA is expected to work
with Glenburn officials provide
a demonstration of the program
to the public at a meeting in the
near future.
Supervisors reiterated that
Precision is still footing the bill
for the cleanup in accordance
with a recent settlement with
the EPA. The board also want-
ed to clarify that testing is be-
ing conducted on monitoring
wells, not private wells.
MacGregor noted that the
board will continue to follow
up with the efforts.
In other business, Canadian-
Pacific Railroad handed over
its blueprints for a communi-
cations tower to be built in
Glenburn to the township’s
engineer, who reviewed the
plans for safety and is in con-
tact with the company. Mac-
Gregor said that the tower’s
erection shouldn’t be an issue.
Database to provide
cleanup information
BY GERARD E. NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
Abington Heights Civic
League recently inducted new
board members and officers
for the 2012-2013 year of the
club. The League held its
annual banquet in September
at the Nicolas Village Hotel
and Spa.
Shown, from left, are officers: Treasurer Susan Griffiths; 1st Vice Presi-
dent Cheri Murray; President Sue O’Day; Recording Secretary Donna
Zagrapan and 2nd Vice President Peggy Williams. Absent from photo
are: Corresponding Secretary Ashley Goff and Assistant Treasurer Lynn
Lucash.
Civic League
inducts officers
Building upon the suc-
cess of a strong community
and corporate undertaking,
VaxServe, a wholly- owned
subsidiary of Sanofi Pas-
teur located in downtown
Scranton, and Sanofi Pas-
teur, the vaccines division
of Sanofi, held the fifth
annual Lackawanna Coun-
ty Community Fundraiser.
At the Sept. 20 event, a
record-breaking $88,801
was distributed to benefit
two community organiza-
tions serving children and
families.
Including the Sept. 20
total, the event has raised
almost $320,000, demon-
strating VaxServe and Sa-
nofi Pasteur’s commitment
to community and corpo-
rate social responsibility.
Non-profit recipients for
2012 are the Boys and Girls
Clubs of Northeastern
Pennsylvania and The Em-
ployment Opportunity and
Training Center (EOTC).
The fundraiser, “Our
Kids Come First,” under-
scores the fundraiser’s fo-
cus on helping community
children in need.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/DANIELLE ANTONELLO-SMOLLEY
A video presentation was shown to the attendees at the 5th Annual Lackawanna County Com-
munity Fundraiser held Sept. 20 at the Scranton Cultural Center.
Fromleft: Ellyn Schindler, Albert Thomas, Ellen Casey, Tricia DiBiasi Thomas, Sharon McCrone, PhD,
Frank Epifano at the 5th Annual Lackawanna County Community Fundraiser check presentation.
Shown, from left: attendees Erwin and Larina Kost of Waverly.
5th Annual Lackawanna County Community Fundrais-
er at Scranton Cultural Center was hosted Sept. 20.
Community
Fundraiser
helps insure
‘Our Kids
Come First’
CLARKS SUMMIT- The
parishes of Our Lady of the
Snows in Clarks Summit and
Church of Saint Gregory in
Clarks Green will host an
Adult Faith Formation Series
celebrating the Year of Faith
throughout the Universal
Church.
The Holy Father Pope Bene-
dict issued a year of faith to
celebrate the 50th anniversary
of the opening of the Second
Vatican Council, a landmark in
the history of the church. The
Year of Faith emphasizes self
discovery and a new call to the
evangelical, who and what the
church is and the church’s
identity to the world.
“The Year of Faith is an
opportunity for us to deepen
our faith and to further in-
tegrate the Catholic faith into
our daily lives,” said Rev. Jef-
frey D. Tudgay.
The Year of Faith extends
from October 2012 to Novem-
ber 2013. The parishes of Our
Lady of the Snows and Church
of Saint Gregory will host four
series sessions throughout the
year as their part in the sharing
of the celebration of the Year
of Faith. Each session will
focus on one of the four major
documents of the Second Vat-
ican Council.
Rev. Tudgay said that the
Faith Formation sessions coin-
cide with Bishop Joseph Bam-
bera calling for a calling for
the deep adult faith in cate-
chesis.
Each parish will offer two
days of discussion on each
document. All sessions will be
held on Wednesdays at 10:30
a.m. and 7 p.m.
The first session of the se-
ries will discuss “Dei Verbum:
The Mystery of God’s Word
Revealed,” Our Lady of the
Snows parish will host the
session Oct. 3 and 17, the
Church of Saint Gregory will
host Oct. 10 and 24. The fol-
lowing sessions will discuss
“Sacrosanctum Concilium:
The Church as the Body of
Christ at Prayer,” “Lumen
Gentium: The Body of Christ
as the Light of the World”and
“Gaudium et Specs: The Soli-
darity of Christ’s body with
Humanity.”
Rev. Tudgay reminded the
community of Saint Augus-
tine’s words, “fides quaerens
intellectum.” Translation: faith
seeks understanding.
For more information re-
garding the Year of Faith and
the Adult Faith Formation
series, call Our Lady of the
Snows at 586.1741 or Church
of Saint Gregory at 587.4808.
Or visit the Our Lady of
Snows website: www.olssb-
.com.
Parishes
unite for
Year of Faith
sessions
BY KASEY LYNN
Abington Journal Correspondent
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 9A
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Joseph J.
Sarcevic, 81,
of Schultz-
ville, died
Wednesday,
Sept. 19, at
Abington
Manor. He was the husband
of Helen Teresa Sarcevic,
formerly Gesler, for 56
years.
Born Feb. 4, 1931, in Petri-
jevci, Croatia, he was the
son of the late Antun and the
late Katica Vuksanic Sarcev-
ic. Educated in Croatia, he
was a graduate of Architec-
tural College and was an
architect. In 1957 he was
forced to flee his homeland
with his wife, living in vari-
ous refugee camps in Italy.
He and his wife arrived in
this country in 1959 on the
first airplane transporting
refugees to the United
States. He lived in Ohio with
his family from 1959 to 1976
and then moved to Penn-
sylvania and began working
for GSGS and B as an archi-
tectural renderer, where he
was employed more than 20
years. He worked on many
notable architectural projects
throughout the country.
He was a member of the
Church of St. Gregory,
Clarks Green, and the Croa-
tian Fraternal Union. A lov-
ing and devout husband,
father and grandfather, he
cherished his family values.
Devoted to his family, he
was a faithful and gentle
man. He enjoyed fishing,
playing his harmonica and
was a notable master artist.
He faced the hardship of
leaving his homeland and
leading his family to safety
with dignity. His friendly
smile will be sadly missed.
Surviving are three daugh-
ters, Christina Verdgeline
and husband, Paul, Plains;
Miriam Vukmanic and hus-
band, Richard, Steelton; and
Darlene Milas and husband,
Frederik, Clarks Summit; a
brother, Stjepan Sarcevic,
Croatia; a sister, Terezija
Jambrovic, Croatia; and
grandchildren, Adriana and
Nikola Vukmanic, Steelton;
Antonia and Kristian Milas,
Clarks Summit.
He was preceded in death
by an infant son, Zvonko
Sarcevic.The funeral was
Saturday from the Church of
St. Gregory, 330 N. Abing-
ton Road, Clarks Green,
with services by the Rev.
John M. Lapera. Interment,
Pieta Cemetery, Tunkhan-
nock. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Our
Lady of Peace School, 410
N. Abington Road, Clarks
Green. Arrangements are
being made by the Jennings
Calvey Funeral and Crema-
tion Services Inc., 111 Col-
burn Ave., Clarks Summit.
To send an online condo-
lence, visit www.jenning-
scalvey.com.
Joseph J. Sarcevic
September 19, 2012
John Francis “Frank” Radle
Jr., 93, of Dalton, one of the
greatest of the Greatest Gener-
ation, passed away Thursday,
Sept.20.
Frank was born May 2, 1919
in Dalton to John Radle Sr. and
Molly Jansen Radle. Frank
graduated fromDalton High
School. He met and then mar-
ried Margaret Hosfeld in1942
and was happily married for 41
years. Frank was employed for
many years at the Trane Com-
pany in Dunmore. He and
Margaret were long time mem-
bers of Our Lady of Snows
Church in Clarks Summit.
Frank was preceded in death
by his wife Margaret in1983.
He was also preceded in death
by four brothers, four sisters,
and two infant children.
He is survived by his daugh-
ters Catherine of Suwanee,
Ga., Patricia Benjamin (Ron)
of Leawood, Kan., Mary Fau-
sey (Gene) of Berwick, El-
izabeth Keyser (Larry) of Kan-
sas City, Mo. and his son
Frank Radle (Nancy) of Le-
wiston, Idaho. He is also sur-
vived by his brother Clement
Radle of Dalton, along with14
grandchildren, 8 great -grand-
children and numerous nieces
and nephews.
In accordance with Frank’s
wishes, a private ceremony
was held Sept. 22 at the Law-
rence E. Young funeral home,
Clarks Summit. Interment was
at Greenwood Cemetery,
Schultzville. Memorials may
be sent to the Northeast PA
Alzheimer’s Association, 57
North Franklin St., Wilkes
-Barre, PA18701or Hospice of
the Sacred Heart, 600 Balti-
more Dr., Wilkes- Barre, PA
18702.
To leave an online condo-
lence, visit www. Lawren-
ceeyoungfuneralhome.com.
John Francis ‘Frank’ Radle Jr.
September 20, 2012
Helen Pa-
tricia Gil-
bride Piazza,
92, of Clarks
Summit,
died Tues-
day, Sept.
18, at Abington Manor.
She was the wife of Joseph
T. Piazza, who died June
12, 1973.
Born Aug. 30, 1920, in
Scranton, daughter of the
late James and Helen Mar-
tin Gilbride, she lived in
Clarks Summit for 65
years and most recently in
Easton and Yardley. Helen
was a graduate of Scranton
Central High School. Be-
fore retiring, she was em-
ployed by Clarks Summit
State Hospital for more
than 25 years as a dietary
supervisor. She enjoyed
bowling, pinochle club and
Girl Scout leadership.
Education was very im-
portant to her, and she
enjoyed knowing that her
children and grandchildren
were well-educated; she
attended many high school,
college and graduate
school graduations.
Surviving are three sons,
Joseph T. Piazza and wife,
Nancy, Martins Creek;
Honorable James P. Piazza
and wife, Mary, Clive,
Iowa; and Atty. John J.
Piazza and wife, Tracey,
Yardley; two daughters,
Mary Gail Caputo and
husband, Joseph, Yardley;
and Christine Ofcharsky
and husband, John, South
Abington Twp; a sister,
Mary Hogan, Manchester,
Conn.; 14 grandchildren;
12 great-grandchildren; and
two great-great-grand-
children.
She also was preceded in
death by six brothers and
two sisters; and a daugh-
ter-in-law, Jacqueline To-
masetti Piazza.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the Mus-
cular Dystrophy Associ-
ation, 366 N. Main St.,
Taylor, PA 18517; or a
charity of the donor’s
choice .Arrangements are
being made by the Jen-
nings-Calvey Funeral and
Cremation Services Inc.,
111 Colburn Ave., Clarks
Summit, PA 18411. To send
an online condolence, visit
www.jennings calvey.com.
Helen Patricia
Gilbride Piazza
September 18, 2012
Rudolph J. Perrone, 83,
of Nicholson, died Monday,
Sept. 17, at Gino J. Merli
Veterans Center, Scranton.
His wife of 56 years, the
former Phyllis R. Napol-
itano, died Jan. 8, 2005.
Born Feb. 3, 1929, in
Brooklyn, N.Y., son of the
late Giuseppe and Elena
Caputo Perrone, he was
educated in New York
schools. He honorably
served in the Army Air
Corps during World War II
and was awarded the Ger-
man Occupation Medal and
Combined Air Lift Medal.
Before retiring, he was a
carpenter for 31 years at
Pilgrim State Hospital,
Long Island, N.Y.
Surviving are two daugh-
ters, Phyllis Lanza and
husband, Brian, Nicholson;
and Elena Woll and hus-
band, Herb, Brookhaven,
Long Island, N.Y.; three
sons, Joseph and wife, Lin-
da, Brookside, Fla.; Rudy
Jr., Setauket, Long Island,
N.Y.; and Vincent and
wife, Natalie, North Car-
olina; nine grandchildren;
and five great-grandchil-
dren.
To send an online condo-
lence, visit www.jennings
calvey.com.
Rudolph J. Perrone
September 17, 2012
Ruth E.
Evans, Dal-
ton died
Thursday
evening,
Sept. 20, at
Inpatient
Unit at Community Med-
ical Center. She was the
widow of John H. Evans
who died in 2007.
Born in Scranton she
was the daughter of the
late Stewart and Martha
Whittaker White. She was
a past member of the for-
mer Providence United
Methodist Church, Girl
Scout leader and den
mother for the local Cub
Scouts and loved to square
dance with the former
Saints and Aints in Clarks
Summit. She was a loving
person who will be missed
by all that knew her.
Surviving are a son, Da-
vid S. Evans and his wife
Susan, Dalton; a son in
law Albert Ramage, Falls,
a brother Stewart White,
Scott Twp., four grand-
children, 11 great grand-
children and one great
-great granddaughter;- and
several nieces and neph-
ews.
She was preceded in
death by her daughter,
Linda Ramage and two
brothers, Edward and Nel-
son White.
Ruth E. Evans
September 20, 2012
OBITUARY
CLARKS GREEN-
Representatives from
Courthouse Square Ven-
tures gave presentations
for their plans for the
building on 319 North
Abington Road that cur-
rently holds law offices at
this month’s meeting of
the Clarks Green Bor-
ough Council Sept. 12 at
the Borough building.
Engineer, Robert Naegele
and architect, Jim Rodg-
ers presented the plans
for the two buildings on
the property and the
plans to rent out the
rooms as doctor’s offices
once the building at the
front is rebuilt and the
basement filled in to
remedy water problems,
Rogers explained. “It will
be the same building, just
refreshed,” Naegele said .
The building in the
back will undergo an in-
side renovation. They
plan to replace blacktop
in the back parking lot
with a retention pond that
will serve as a water gar-
den to control storm wa-
ter runoff. Naegele said
that current drivewayswill
not be altered. Cour-
thouse Square Ventures
presented their initial
plan to the Clarks Green
Planning Committee and
will represent the plans to
the committee before coun-
cil takes action.
Jim Kane from the
Abington Area Joint Rec-
reation Board (AAJRB)
addressed council about
the contract with the com-
pany Field Turf and the
work on the soccer field.
Originally, Council had
approved the contract for
Field Turf to install Astro-
turf on the soccer field
while other projects would
be bid out to other compa-
nies. The other projects,
such as a fence with net-
ting and football goal
posts are on the same
field. It was decided that
Field Turf ’s contract would
be extended to include
those projects as well.
Council voted six to one to
approve the change orders
to the Field Turf contract.
Councilman Victor Albe-
rigi mentioned that they
are seeking to begin a bi-
centennial committee to
being plans for Clarks
Green’s upcoming cele-
bration.
C.G. hears renovation plans,
extends Field Turf contract
BY EMILY CULLEY
Abington Journal Correspondent
DALTON- At the Dalton
Borough Council meeting,
Sept. 13, President Bill Salva
mentioned that he received an
agreement fromPennDOTfor
Dalton to plowroads for the
next five years, including Turn-
pike Road, West Main Street
and Bank Street. Salva also
recited the pay fromthe agree-
ment: $4,779 for the first year;
$4,841.15 for the second year;
$4,962.15 for the third;
$5,130.86 for the fourth and
$11,446.97 for the fifth year.
Said Salva, “It worked out in
our favor in the past.”
Salva said Dalton’s current
plowtruck is leaking hydrau-
lics. He said that the cost of
repair is more than $20,000.
He said that the board received
a $22,500 price on a different
truck, a1999 International
S2500 aluminumdump truck,
DT466, fromPenn-Hazle
Equipment, Inc.
“We have to put the old truck
out to bid,” said Salva. “We’re
hoping we can get back in
return fromit at least $8 to
$10,000, which would bring
this truck (the1999 Interna-
tional) more in the $12,000
area.”
Board member Lorraine
Daniels reviewed the capital
reserve account and said that
the board currently has $3,484.
The board approved the
motion to move forward in
obtaining the truck.
Dalton to
plow roads
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal Correspondent
Dr. Louis J.
Giordano, 71,
fromClarks
Summit, died in
his sleep on
Sept. 17 at
Mountain View
Care Center following a brief
illness.
Born in Throop to the late
Louis and Vera (Mancini) Gior-
dano, Louis graduated from
Scranton Preparatory School with
the class of 1959. He graduated
fromThe University of Scranton
and then received his dental train-
ing at Temple University Dental
School. He served as a Captain in
the U.S. Air Force and was sta-
tioned in Plattsburg, NewYork in
the late1960s.
Following his service in the Air
Force, Louis started his dental
practice in Dunmore. He re-
mained a fixture in Dunmore and
the dental community for over 40
years. He loved his work and was
one of a select fewto earn his
post doctorate master’s degree in
dentistry. As much as he loved his
work, he truly enjoyed the great
relationships he developed with
his patients throughout his career.
He was a devoted father to his
three children, serving as an
assistant coach for many of their
sports teams. He served as the
President of the board of the
Humane Society of Lackawanna
County and was a driving force
for the North East chapter of the
Antique Automobile Association.
His hobbies and interests were
many and diverse; he was a wine
maker, golfer, pilot, train collec-
tor, antique car owner, Philadel-
phia sports fan, avid reader, danc-
er and gardener. He will be great-
ly missed by the hundreds of
people who had the pleasure to
knowhim.
He is survived by his children
and former wife Pamela Giorda-
no, son Louis III; two daughters
Mrs. Jill Blomand Mrs. Amanda
Martino; sister Mary Reilly; two
grandchildren Sean and Clara;
many nieces and nephews and
countless close friends, including
his "angel" Patricia Emerick.
Memorials may be made to
The American Heart Association,
POBox163549, Columbus, OH
43216-3549, or Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond
Rd., So. Abington Twp., PA
18411.
To send an online condolence,
visit www.lawrenceeyoungfuner-
alhome.com.
Dr. Louis J. Giordano
September 17, 2012
C M Y K
PAGE 10A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
ArtsEtc...
Last weekat the Dietrich, over
150audience members went on
a journeybackintime witha
radiodrama andmusic about the
Lattimer Massacre of1897,
whichoccurrednear Hazleton. I
feel that bothVanWagner’s song
andBill Bachman’s radiopiece
trulycapturedthis event, which
pittedcoal companyowners, the
sheriff of Luzerne Countyand
strikingminers against each
over withdeadlyconsequences.
Somuchof what we learned
about Lattimer is still relevant to
our worldtodayfrommiscar-
riages of justice toour treatment
of immigrant laborers. It was
great tohear audience members
share their families’ coal mining
histories duringthe discussion
segment of the presentation. We
wouldlike tothankthe Penn-
sylvania Humanities Council for
underwritingthis event.
Inadditiontoour region’s rich
coal mininghistory, this area
alsohas a strongheritage in
quilting. Joinus for Tunkhan-
nock’s11thAnnual Airingof the
Quilts onSaturday, Oct. 6. I am
tellingyoudowntownTunk-
hannockis a sight tobehold
drapedinhundreds of colorful
quilts. OnAiringof the Quilts
day, youcouldjust spendhours
walkingupanddownTioga
Street viewingall of the quilted
creations. At the Dietrich, we
will be exhibitingKent Ward’s
collectionof scrapquilts. They
are absolutelygorgeous! Plus
we will be presentinga quilt
lecture withfiber artist andquilt
designer Joyce Hughes. She will
tell her personal storyof her
journeyintoquilting. She will
alsospeakabout her quilting
inspirations. Joyce is currentlya
finalist inMcCall’s quilt design
contest. Tickets tothe presenta-
tionwill be $5eachandher
handbags andother designs will
be for sale before andafter her
presentation. Tickets canbe
reservedbycalling
570.996.1500or theycanbe
pickedupat the door while they
last.
ComingupinOctober, the
DietrichTheater will be kicking
off its newseasonof the “Gold-
enDays of RadioPlayers.” This
free class taught byEsther Har-
matz andHoyt Keiser will take
youbacktothose thrillingdays
of radio. If youhave ever won-
deredhowsoundeffects were
made, or wonderedhowit feels
tostandinfront of a microphone
andreadthe lines of a heroor a
villain, thenthis class is for you.
Classes will be heldonTues-
days, Oct. 2throughDec. 4from
7to9p.m. The class will culmi-
nate witha live performance for
the public Dec. 4. Sounds like
fun. Right? For more informa-
tionor toregister, please contact
us at 570.996.1500.
Another class that is just
aroundthe corner is Jewelry
Making: BrickStitchEarrings
onWednesday, Oct. 10from6to
9p.m. Inthis class, instructor
MORE THAN
MOVIES
Dietrich Theater
Erica Rogler
See Movies, Page 11
Visual Arts/
Performing Arts
“TerraFirmaandthe Spirit
of Flight,” Recent Sculpture
by Denis A. Yanashot, on dis-
playthroughOct.19at Keystone
College Linder Gallery in the
Miller Library.
Actors Circle Presents:
“Bell, Book and Candle” by
John Van Druten directed by
David Hunisch, at Providence
Playhouse, 1256Providence Rd,
Scranton, Sept. 28, 29and30at 8
p.m. FridaysandSaturdaysand2
p.m. Sundays. Cost: $12 Gener-
al, $8Seniors, $6Students. Info/
reservations: 342.9707 or
www.actorscircle.org.
Riverworks III juried exhi-
bition, through Sept. 29 at Art-
works Gallery and Studio, 503
Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.
Theme: The river and its wa-
tershed. Info: http://www.art-
worksnepa.com.
Hillside Harvest Moon Fest
Sept. 29at AbingtonAreaCom-
munity Park from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. Cost: Free with food for
sale from the Abington Lion’s
ClubandDuffy’s Coffee House.
Livemusicwill alsobefeatured.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
leryMusicShow, Sept. 29at the
gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton.
Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Cost:
$7. Featuring Kite Party, Three
ManCannon, Wicca Phrase and
Halfling. Info: 878.3970.
Craft Shows
The Newton Ransom Fire
Company Ladies Auxiliary
Fall Craft Show, Oct. 13 at The
Newton RansomVolunteer Fire
Company Hall, 1890 Newton
Ransom Blvd., Clarks Summit
fromfrom10a.m. to3p.m. Cost:
free admissionandparking.
Country Christmas Fair,
Oct. 20at ClarksSummit United
Methodist Church on Morgan
Highway from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Cost: $1 (children 12 and under
free).
Annual Craft Fair, at John
Adams Elementary, 927 Ca-
pouse Ave., Scranton Oct. 20
from10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Vendors
needed. Info:348.3655orjohna-
damsbulldogspta@gmail.com
Last week’s winner:
Ann Rossi
of Clarks Summit
Last week’s answer:
1990
I
f the sight of acemetery at night
sends a chill up your spine, if the
poetry of Emily Dickinson
brings tears to your eyes and if the
stories of lives long past give you a
haunting sense of excitement, the
Dunmore Cemetery Tour may be a
perfect highlight to your weekend
Oct. 7 or 14.
The tour, which is a recipient of a
Lackawanna County Arts and Cul-
ture Grant, will be presented by the
Dearly Departed Players beginning
both days at the cemetery gates, 400
Church St, Dunmore at 2 p.m. Cos-
tumed characters will be in place at
several stops throughout the ceme-
tery. Although the event is nowin its
ninth year under the Dearly Depart-
ed Players, this year is an all new
tour with newstops, newstories
fromthe past, newcostumes and
newexhibits, according to Julie
Esty, Artistic Director for the Play-
ers.
The Dearly Departed Players
consists of 14 Lackawanna County
residents, ranging fromages 11-85,
each of whomEsty said brings their
own unique talents to the group.
“When you combine our talents,”
she said, “we are quite a force. It’s
kind of like stars collided or the
planets lined up and brought this
group of people together in the cem-
etery. We’ve become like a family
and a well -oiled machine. We work
together and even though we have a
lot of fun, we get the job done.”
Esty said the tour isn’t something
that happens overnight, but rather
the group works on it year round.
Fromthe research, to the costumes,
to the rehearsals and all the other
aspects , the group works hard to put
it all together.
The event also includes exhibits
and poetry readings (including the
works of various poets such as Emi-
ly Dickinson and Edward Gorey)
starting 30 minutes before the tour
each night, as well as a performance
SUBMITTED ARTWORK
The Dunmore Cemetery Tour will be presented by The Dearly Departed Players Oct. 7 and 14, at 2 p.m. at the Cemetery
gates. 400 Church St, Dunmore.
‘Quite a force’
Dearly Departed Players welcome exhibitors, Scranton
Civic Ballet dancers to annual Dunmore Cemetery Tour
By Elizabeth Baumeister lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
See Force, Page 11
Contestants can only win once in a 60-day period.
A
rtists Ali Woods Wilson and
Benjamin Jackson, whose
paintings will soon be on dis-
play at the Courthouse Art Gallery,
Tunkhannock, enjoy to show their art
jointly.
The two recently exhibited at the
Dietrich Theater together, and when
Woods Wilson got an opportunity to
display her pieces at the Courthouse
Art Gallery in Tunkhannock, she in-
vited Jackson to join her.
“I think we show well together,”
Woods Wilson said of how Jackson’s
work and her own are complementary.
For instance, both like to experiment
with various media.
“I especially like experimenting with
different media and discovering new
techniques that I don’t normally see,”
Jackson, 24, said.
Woods Wilson agreed.
“I love mixing media up,” she said.
“I love experimenting with color, aque-
ous paints and inks, pages from dis-
carded library books and interesting
papers.”
The two even have similar career
aims.
“Secretly, I would love to manage a
gallery someplace beautiful,” Woods
Wilson said.
“Some days I feel like I’d like to
open my own gallery, Jackson said.
“Other days I feel like I’d like to move
to a city and sell my work on the
streets.”
As for artistic philosophies, Jackson
finds a succinct expression of his in
literature.
“One of my favorite quotes was
written by the author Tom Robbins: ‘It
is the function of the artist to call atten-
tion to what life does not.’ I feel like
this is sort of why I started creating
art,” Jackson said.
Woods Wilson finds inspiration
within.
“I make art because there is a
screaming creative beast inside me that
won’t stop until I sit down and make
something,” Woods Wilson said.
Both artists want to continue to grow
as artists and use their skills to earn a
living. Their primary motivation, how-
ever, is to create for its own sake.
“I want to paint no matter where I
end up,” Jackson said.
“I hope to continue to find quiet
moments to create art,” Woods Wilson
said.
The exhibit, called “Two Artists
from Lake Winola,” will open at the
Courthouse Gallery, 1 Courthouse
Square, Tunkhannock, with an opening
reception Sept. 28 from 4 to 6 p.m.
The Gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday. The
show runs through Oct. 19.
For more information on Jackson’s
art, see his profiles on Etsy.com and
Fineartamerica.com.
AT LEFT: Ben-
jamin Jack-
son’s painting
‘Dizzy.’
‘Some days I
feel like I’d like
to open my
own gallery,’
Jackson said.
‘Other days I
feel like I’d like
to move to a
city and sell
my work on
the streets.
Lake Winola artists share
career aims, gallery space
BY GERARD E. NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
How many films are being featured in the Dietrich’s Fall 2012 Film Festival?
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE11A
Aspecial event will be held at
the Abington Community Li-
brary Thursday afternoon, Oct.
11, at 4 p.m. to “kick off ” PNC
Bank’s financial literacy pro-
grams for children, “For Me,
For You, For Later: First Steps to
Spending, Sharing, and Saving”
to be held this Fall and next
Spring at local public libraries.
The library will host “Flow
Circus,” a unique one-man
juggling and mime show, that
travels nationwide to entertain
and educate children of all ages.
Each child who attends will
receive a Sesame Street Work-
shop Kit that includes a DVD
promoting early financial litera-
cy. Pre-registration is nowtak-
ing place at the library. Pre-
school children and older sib-
lings up through the middle
grades are invited to attend this
special performance. During
October, the library will be
launching a series of afternoon
Story Hours for age 3 through 5
years incorporating the themes
of the PNCinitiative. Call for
more information about taking
part in these programs.
NewLarge Print Fictionfor
Adults
“So Far Away,” by Meg
Mitchell Moore. Thirteen-year-
old Natalie Gallagher discovers
a dusty old diary in her family’s
basement and is inspired to
unlock its secrets. Her research
into the life of the Irish im-
migrant servant fromthe1920s
who kept the diary brings her to
Kathleen Lynch, an archivist at
the Massachusetts State Ar-
chives, who sees in Natalie
traces of the daughter she has
lost.
“The Lion is In,” by Delia
Ephron. Marcel is a lion, a re-
tired circus performer stuck in a
cage in an abandoned nightclub,
where three women who are
desperately running fromtheir
mixed-up lives and families,
seek shelter when their car
breaks down. Through Marcel
they find a way to confront their
complicated pasts.
“The Violets of March,” by
Sarah Jio. When Emily Wilson
is invited to spend a month on
Bainbridge Island in Washing-
ton state, she accepts. Once a
best-selling novelist, with the
perfect happily-ever-after mar-
riage, nowthe tide has turned,
but as she sets about researching
her next book, Emily discovers a
red velvet diary, dated1943,
whose contents reveal startling
connections to her own life.
“ASimple Murder: AMys-
tery,” by Eleanor Kuhns. In
1796, traveling weaver Will
Rees learns that his son David
has run away and he immediate-
ly sets out after him. He tracks
himdown at a Shaker settlement
in Maine and unexpectedly
finds himself heading a murder
investigation.
Uncovering the clues that will
solve the mystery will also re-
veal dark secrets that could
threaten the whole Shaker com-
munity.
LIBRARY NEWS
BY MARY ANN MCGRATH
The Abington Community Library is
located at 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks
Summit. Visit our website,
www.lclshome.org/abington to regis-
ter online for events or call the
library at (570) 587-3440.
Don’t have a library card? Register
for one at http://www.lclshome.org/
libraryinfo/library_card_reg.asp.
W
hen he vis-
ited the
Lower East
Side Tene-
ment Museum in New
York in 2002, writer/
producer Jay Kholos
remembered the stories
his grandfather had told
him so long ago.
“They (Jewish people)
really weren’t wanted,”
Kholos said, explaining
why his grandfather fled
Russia as a young man.
“The Cossacks would be
coming through and raid-
ing the villages.”
Kholos’ grandfather
escaped the pogroms of
Eastern Europe and came
to America, entered
through Ellis Island, and
worked hard to earn
enough money to send
for his future wife – Kho-
los’ future “Bubbie” – to
join him in the new land
of opportunity.
“I got the idea in 2002;
in 2003 the play opened
off-Broadway and ran for
16 months,” Kholos said.
The writer/producer
recently arranged another
run for the play, which
will play in Philadelphia
starting Oct. 7. But first,
“A Stoop on Orchard
Street” will play at the
Jewish Community Cen-
ter in Wilkes-Barre.
“You don’t have to be
Jewish to enjoy this play,”
Kholos said with a
chuckle. “But it couldn’t
hurt.”
Seriously, he said, he
believes the setting in
Manhattan’s Lower East
Side and the characters’
dreams of a better life
resonate will resonate
with many Americans
whose ancestors emigrat-
ed from other countries.
The story isn’t auto-
biographical, he said,
except that he sprinkled
some family names into
the script.
If you attend you will
meet an old Vaudevillian
named Ben who will look
back on his life, in partic-
ular the year 1910. That
was a particularly chal-
lenging time for young
Benny, who felt he had to
become the man of the
house when his father,
Hiram, abandoned his
wife, Ruth, and two chil-
dren.
Seeking to fill the void
in Ruth’s life, a neighbor
falls in love with her. “He
feels terribly guilty, ter-
ribly conflicted because
she’s still married,” Kho-
los said, referring to the
lyrics of “Another Man’s
Wife.”
As to how the play
turns out, Kholos advised
you to join the audience
and find out in person.
“It is a very romanti-
cized version of what life
was like,” he said. “We
show a little of the hard-
ship of 12 people living
in a place that has enough
room for four, but we
really delve into the
hopes and dreams of
people in a tenement
house.
“They had no televi-
sion, no radio, just the
socializing with their
group on the stoop, and
the gossip.
“There was always
hope on the stoop.”
SUBMITTED PHOTO
‘A Stoop on Orchard Street’ depicts life in 1910 on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. It will be
presented at the Jewish Community Center in Wilkes-Barre on Oct. 6.
Writer shares grandfather’s
TENEMENT TALES
‘A Stoop on Orchard Street’ depicts life in 1910 on Manhat-
tan’s Lower East Side. It will be presented at the Jewish
Community Center in Wilkes-Barre on Oct. 6.
BY MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
I have nothing against writers
who churn out what is often
contemptuously termed “air-
port pot-boilers,” those paper-
backs we pluck from airport
news stands and supermarket
racks. Just because some au-
thors are inhumanly prolific
does not necessarily mean
they’re bad writers, but it also
doesn’t guarantee they’re good
ones, either. For example, two
writers, John Sandford and J.D.
Robb, have cooked up police
procedural series that have
much in common, except that
Sandford’s “Prey” books leave
me hungry for more, while
Robb’s “In Death” novels make
me reach for the Alka Seltzer.
Sandford’s and Robb’s series
have some eerie similarities:
Both writers publish under
pseudonyms. John Sandford is
the pen name of John Roswell
Camp, a Pulitzer Prize-winning
journalist, while J.D. Robb is
the alias of Nora Roberts (nee
Eleanor Robertson), the pop-
ular romance writer. The pro-
tagonists of their series are
wealthy, marrieddetectives who
specialize in cracking heinous
murder cases. Robb’s Eve Dal-
las lives in a New York City
some 50 years in the future,
while Sandford’s Lucas Daven-
port is firmly rooted in the pre-
sent in Minnesota.
I like to think I have a cast-
iron stomach when it comes to
gulping up pot-boilers, but I
have to admit I’ve only read two
of Robb’s “In Death” books.
Frankly, I just couldn’t choke
down any more. I suppose the
mainreasonis that whileRobb’s
concept for a futuristic police
procedural is filled with prom-
ise, her books in this series are
really thinly disguised romance
novels -- my least favorite
genre. The protagonist, Lieu-
tenant Eve Dallas, appears to be
a tough, no-nonsense cop, but
she’s perfectly willing to have
her hunky, unbelievably perfect,
filthy rich husband run interfe-
rence for her, decide what she’ll
wear, and produce miraculous
meals fromtheir AutoChef ma-
chine. They manage to spend a
great deal of time in the sack,
where a mere look from hubby
can send Eve into paroxysms of
ecstasy. They never fight. Gag.
All this might be palatable if
the writing was any good, but
it’s filled with clichés, stilted
dialogue, suspiciously conve-
nient “discoveries,” and static,
cookie-cutter characters. The
plots are soslowmovingandre-
petitive that I foundmyself mut-
tering, “Please, please, get ON
with it, already!” All this is
topped off by a heroine who is
hard to like. She’s beautiful, of
course, and good at her job, but
except in her relationship with
Roark, she’s a cold fish – closed
off, terse, and without much in
the way of compassion or kind-
ness.
At the opposite end of the
spectrum, we have Sandford’s
Lucas Davenport. He, too, is
wealthier than any cop who’s
not on the take, having made a
killing by developing role-play-
ing games for both popular con-
sumption and police training.
Lucas is a big man, with rough
good looks moderated by sever-
al scars, one of which he ac-
quires when Weather Karkin-
nen, a surgeonhe will later mar-
ry, performs an emergency tra-
cheotomyonhimafter he’s been
shot. He loves breaking the
speedlimit inhis Porsche, wear-
ing designer duds and spending
what little free time he has with
his family, which includes baby
SamandLetty, a younggirl they
adopt after her alcoholic mother
is killed in one of the books. He
also has strong relationships
with his boss and some of the
detectives whojoinhiminhunt-
ing down killer after killer.
However, while Lucas is a de-
voted husband, father, and
friend, he has a darker side. He
sometimes suffers from crip-
pling bouts of depression, and
part of him enjoys violence. He
gets in trouble regularly be-
cause he plays by his own rules,
but he has good instincts and
isn’t afraidtofollowthem. He is
also appealingly aware of his
own inadequacies. In short, he’s
very human.
In addition to creating inter-
esting, multi-faceted, and thor-
oughly believable characters we
can’t help but care about, Sand-
fordis areal craftsmanas awrit-
er. His plots are ingenious, his
dialogue is very realistic, funny,
(and often pretty raunchy), and
his descriptions are vivid and
evoke the settings he clearly
knows very well. Throughout
the series, we become intimate
with the geography of the Twin
Cities, and are treated to won-
derful portraits of the land and
weather of Minnesota. The only
qualm I sometimes have with
the “Prey” novels is that theyare
very violent, and the killers are
often twisted in stomach-turn-
ing ways. Regardless, Sanford
is a master of suspense. Some-
times the suspense is due to the
fact that we knowthe identity of
the killer long before the police
do; at other times, we are guess-
ing right along with the detec-
tives. No matter what plot de-
vice he uses, it’s clear that Sand-
ford really understands the
genre, and as a reader, it’s com-
forting to be in the hands of a
real pro.
I realize that J.D. Robb’s fans
are legion, and that some of
them will want to stone me for
not being able to stomach her
“In Death” series, and that John
Sandford’s “Prey” series won’t
be everyone’s cup of tea. If you
feel the need to lap up gruel that
doesn’t require any digestive ef-
fort on your part, J.D. Robb’s
pot-boilers are perfect fare.
However, if you like an easy
read that has a little more meat
on its bones, put John Sand-
ford’s books on your menu.
With
Jane Julius
Honchell
SEE JANE READ
Snacking on pot-boiler fare can
make you sick or satisfied.
Jane Julius Honchell, who resides in
Glenburn Twp., is a well-known fea-
tures writer and columnist. She is an
associate professor at Keystone
College, La Plume, where she serves
as Director of Theater. "See Jane
Read" appears monthly in The Abing-
ton Journal.
Toni Hockmanwill teachstu-
dents the brickstitchbeading
technique as theycreate beauti-
ful pairs of earrings. The brick
stitchis easytolearn. Once it is
mastered, students cancreate a
varietyof uniquelyshapedjew-
elrywiththis simple stitch. No
experience is requiredandad-
missionis $45includingall
materials.
Be sure tojoinus for our sec-
ondweekof the Dietrich’s Fall
FilmFestival. We are featuring
the finest of foreign, independ-
ent andart films out there. So
youdon’t want tomiss it. As you
cansee the Dietrichis somuch
more thanthe movies!
MOVIES
Continued from Page 10
midway through the tour by the
Scranton Civic Ballet under the
direction of Helen Gaus. Esty
said last year the dancers per-
formed a piece in memory of
the children who worked and
died in mills and mines.
“This year,” she said, “the
students will dance in memory
of the dance teachers who are
buried in Dunmore and else-
where who were here in Scran-
ton—Alexi Ramov, Marie
Shunk, Constance Reynolds,
Jimmy Sutton, J.F. Siegel—just
to name a few.”
She added, “Helen Gaus
does amazing work. Her stu-
dents are fabulous and we are
happy to have them join us
again.”
Exhibitors include: Tom
Costello, who will exhibit the
embossing works of his ances-
tor P.W. Costello; Ed Snyder, a
cemetery photographer from
Philadelphia and Dorothy
Loney, of Scranton, who trav-
els all over photographing
famous graves.
The Genealogical Research
Society of NEPA will be on
hand with information for
those wishing to find out about
their ancestors or preserve their
family history.
An “After Funeral Dinner”
sponsored by the Dunmore
Historical Society will also be
held immediately following the
tour Oct. 7. It will be held at
the Dunmore Civic Center on
Monroe Avenue, and includes
ham, mashed potatoes, a vege-
table, cake, coffee and soda.
The cost of the dinner is $8 and
all proceeds benefit the histor-
ical society.
“We discovered a lot of peo-
ple were hungry after the tour,”
Esty said, “so they can go after-
ward and have a decent meal
and the Dearly Departed Play-
ers will be there chatting it up
and answering questions.”
More information can be
found at the Dearly Departed
Players’ Facebook page or by
calling 570.558.1060.
FORCE
Continued from Page 10
The Linder Gallery at Keys-
tone College will present an
exhibition of sculpture by
Scranton artist Denis Yanash-
ot through Oct. 19 on the
Keystone campus in La
Plume. The exhibit “Terra
Firma and the Spirit of Flight”
will feature his more recent
sculptures made of assembled
bones and other found objects
relating to the experience of
flight.
Yanashot is known through-
out the region for his carved
marble sculptures of flowers
and plant forms. A graduate
of Keystone College, Yanash-
ot teaches art at Riverside
High School in Moosic. This
exhibition is the result of his
participation in the 2012 NE-
PA Regional Art exhibit, for
which he received the Best of
Show award and a One-Person
Exhibit award at Keystone
College.
For further information and
gallery hours, call
570.945.8335.
Sculptor and teacher to
exhibit at Keystone
The Linder Gallery at Keystone
College is hosting ’Terra Firma and
the Spirit of Flight,’ an exhibition
of sculpture by Denis Yanashot
now through Oct.19.
C M Y K
PAGE 12A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
CALL 800-273-7130
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2012-2013
2 FULL SEASON
PENGUINS
TICKETS
SEND OR DROP OFF AT
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
40 Coa| Street º Wi|kes-Barre, PA 18702
570-208-PENS º WWW.WBSPENGUINS.COM
ENTER WIN
2
Forms Due By: October 1st 2012
No Refunds, No Exchanges, No Cash Value
COURTESY OF
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE
E-MAIL
FREE Pre-School Program
Now taking applications for the
2012-2013 School Year
PA Pre-K Counts
Eligibility: Children between the ages of 3 and 4
Income level 300% above poverty level.
Ex: Family of 4 can earn up to $61,950 a year
For more information on this program call 836-2350 or visit our
website at: www.wyomingcountyfamilyresourcecenter.org
Openings Available for the Keystone College
Children’s Center 8:45 - 11:45
Wrap-around services available
The Dalton Fire Company Fall Horse Show was
held Sept. 16 at the Dalton Fire Company Carnival
Grounds.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALICE STUFFLE
Taking a break from the day’s activities.
Equine
adventures
Vanessa Lempicky, of Dalton, rides L’Etoile Brilleante
H
e puts those paws to good use. A
fastidious Wednesday Bear doesn’t
miss a stitch as he takes up the task
of darning, as illustrated by artist “Wall”
copyright 1906 by the Ullman Manufactur-
ing Company. Pick up next week’s print
edition to see what Thursday holds in the
“Busy Bear” seven-postcard series.
THREAD‘BEAR’?
POSTCARD COURTESY JACK HIDDLESTONE
B
ratwurst, sauerkraut,
beer, BlackForest Cake,
it must be Oktoberfest.
OnSunday, Oct. 7from6to8
p.m. at The AbingtonCommu-
nityLibrary, all tastes and
sounds of the traditional Ger-
manholidaycanbe experi-
encedat the library’s first Ok-
toberfest. Aspecial Munich
brewwill be providedbyBanko
NorthInc. withthe librarystaff
anddonors providingthe rest of
the foodincludingsalad, pret-
zels andGermanchocolate
cake. The idea was developed
bylibrarydirector LeahRu-
dolph, volunteer Catherine
HartmanandYoungAdult
LibrarianSandyLongo. They
tookinspirationfromthe fall
seasonandother Oktoberfest
events.
“The event is strictlyfor
adults 21years of age andol-
der,” she said. “While we will
not be handstamping, we have
volunteers inplace toconfirm
age, if needbe, uponadmit-
tance.” There will alsobe au-
thentic Germanmusic, a special
selectionof Germanmemor-
abilia inthe librarydisplaycase.
“We hope that people are
inspiredbythe fall seasonto
spendanhour or twoamong
oldandnewfriends for a great
cause, their library,” Longo
said. Tickets are $20withall
proceeds benefitingthe library.
Onlyadvance tickets will be
acceptedat the event andcanbe
purchasedat the Librarycircu-
lationdeskbefore Oct. 1. More
informationcanbe foundat the
AbingtonCommunityLibrary
locatedon1200W. Grove
Street, Clarks Summit, or on
their website, http://
www.lclshome.org/abington/ .
Hold onto your
Lederhosen.
It’s Oktoberfest at Abington
Community Library
BY EMILY CULLEY
Abington Journal Correspondent
The Division of Urology at Delta Medix, the largest provider of com-
prehensive care for the diagnosis and treatment of urologic problems in
Northeastern Pa., has helped Regional Hospital of Scranton earn top
honors according to U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals 2013.
The annual report, which releases national, state and regional rankings
on hospitals and specialty areas, identified Regional Hospital of Scran-
ton as top performing in urology.
Delta Medix Urologists comprise the Urology Team of Physicians at
Regional Hospital of Scranton, providing state of the art urological care
in a personalized and compassionate environment. The Delta Medix
Urologists are board certified with specialty training in a number of
different aspects of urology.
Delta Medix earns honors
Shown, from left, The Delta Medix Urology Team: Jerald Gilbert, MD,
FACS; James Stefanelli, MD, FACS; J. Robert Ramey, MD, FACS; Beverly
Tomasetti, CRNP; Ronald Barrett, MD, FACS; Ira Kohn, MD, FACS and
Donald Preate Jr, MD, FACS.
C M Y K
SPORTS
Clarks Summit, Pa. SEPTEMBER 26 TO OCTOBER 2, 2012 50¢
FACTORYVILLE –
Lackawanna Trail High
School’s dominating
start to the season
shows no signs of stop-
ping anytime soon.
The Lions tallied 580
yards on offense to blow
by Western Wayne 46-
21 Sept. 21 and keep the
Lions’ season perfect.
Trail went with its
usual run-heavy attack.
Senior Jeremy Greenley
ran for two touchdowns
and led the team with
139 yards. Fellow senior
Pete Murazzi added a
touchdown and 132 of
the Lions’ 375 rushing
yards.
Along with the ground
game, senior quarter-
back Zach Goodrich
was the model of effi-
ciency, completing sev-
en of his 10 passes for
156 yards, including a
59-yard touchdown pass
in the second quarter to
sophomore Liam
Dougherty. Dougherty
also caught a 49-yard
touchdown pass from
junior running back
Jonathon Zedar and
ended the night with
123 receiving yards.
“The play action just
killed them,” Goodrich
said. “My line protected
me really well and it
just opened up the
plays.”
Murazzi said the bal-
anced big-play threat
shown by both the pass-
ing and running game
makes the Lions’ of-
fense tough to stop.
“We’ve trained so
hard, we want to pound
the ball right down on
them,” Murazzi said.
“Then when they get
tired we’re gonna throw
on them. You can’t stop
us. We’re gonna do any-
thing to get the ball in
the endzone.”
Western Wayne
showed some fight
early. After Greenley
broke a 56-yard touch-
down run in the opening
minutes of the game,
Western Wayne senior
Robbie Siclari answered
back with a 61-yard
touchdown of his own.
Because of the Lions’
failed point-after at-
tempt, the Wildcats took
an early 7-6 lead.
The Lions immediate-
ly answered back, fin-
ishing a quick drive
with a short rushing
touchdown by Zedar.
Another long touch-
down, this time from
Murazzi, put the Lions
ahead 21-7 at the end of
the first quarter.
Trail continued to
pound Western Wayne,
scoring 34 unanswered
points before the Wild-
cats managed to score
again off a 44-yard run
from Siclari. Siclari
ended the night with
186 yards from the line
of scrimmage and two
touchdowns.
Senior Cameron
Chism-Brungard scored
another touchdown for
Western Wayne in the
fourth quarter, but it
was not enough to over-
come the massive lead
the Lions built.
Western Wayne had
PHOTO COURTESY ALICE STUFFLE
Lackawanna Trail fullback Pete Murazzi rushed for 132 yards and a touchdown in the Lions’ 46-21 win over Western Wayne.
Lions run past Wildcats
See Lions, Page 14
BY CORY BURRELL
Abington Journal Correspondent
MILFORD- Delaware
Valley senior quarterback
Brian Schor showed why
several Division I college
football programs, including
Miami University in Ohio
where he will enroll next
fall, wanted him to join their
team. He led a 10-play 74-
yard drive in the fourth
quarter Sept. 22, after
Abington Heights had
pulled to within one touch-
down.
After getting sacked for an
11- yard loss, Schor connect-
ed with wide receiver Eric
Pizarro for a 38- yard com-
pletion. Schor also rushed
for 26 yards on the drive,
including a 5-yard touch-
down run with 5:53 left in
the game to give the War-
riors a 27-14 lead.
“It was just at the time of
the game where I had to
make something happen and
I ended up making a good
play,” Schor said. “We said
‘We have to buckle down
and get one in the end zone’
and that’s how we won the
game.’”
Delaware Valley sopho-
more linebacker Matt Wagn-
er set the tone early when he
intercepted a pass from
Abington Heights quarter-
back Dante Pasqualichio and
returned it 32 yards for a
touchdown. After Brendan
Paulison’s extra point, the
Warriors led 7-0 less than in
minute into the game.
The Warriors were threat-
ening again on the next
drive, but Comets’ lineback-
er Drew Kuzma intercepted
a Schor pass at the Abington
Heights 14-yard line.
Delaware Valley running
back Joe Santiago, who
finished the game with 129
yards on 18 carries, scored
his first of two touchdowns
on a 34-yard run with 8:00
left in the second quarter.
On the ensuing drive,
Abington Heights drove the
ball down to the Warriors’
12-yard line, but Pasqual-
ichio was intercepted by
linebacker Connor Decker
ending the threat. Delaware
Valley was unable to convert
the turnover into points as
Paulison’s missed a 40-yard
field goal attempt.
Delaware Valley started
the second half just as they
Warriors
down
Comets
ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI
Abington Heights’ fullback Jerry Langan looks for a hole in the Dela-
ware Valley defense. Langan caught a touchdown pass in the game.
See Comets, Page 14
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
W
hile Robert T. Wnuk,
area fisheries man-
ager for the Penn-
sylvania Fish and Boat Com-
mission, noted there are many
thousands of Bullhead Cat-
fish in Lake Lackawanna at
Lackawanna State Park, only
one Channel Catfish was
found as part of the commis-
sion’s scheduled catfish sur-
vey on the lake Sept. 19.
“We’re out here looking at
the Channel Catfish today. It’s
a species that doesn’t repro-
duce naturally in this lake, so
we stock them. When we
stock fish like that, it does
cost money to raise them and
put them in the lakes, so we
like to make sure it’s work-
ing…that we’re getting a
return for all of the money
we’ve spent,” he said. “Only
one catfish was caught in all
the nets combined.”
The survey event allowed
biologists an opportunity to
determine the success of pre-
viously stocked juvenile cat-
fish and natural reproduction
in that lake, and the public
was invited to the demonstra-
tion of catfish sampling
methods to observe staff in
action and learn more about
catfish and other fish species
in the lake.
The commission wants to
see more of the Channel Cat-
fish due to a demand for
them. “Anglers love to catch
them. They get very big – up
to 35 to 40 pounds. They’re a
very popular sport fish, ” said
Wnuk.
A Pennsylvania style trap
net, which when wet, can
weigh as much as 400
pounds, not including the
weight of the fish. The bait
used in the commission’s nets
consists of cheese trimmings,
soy and molasses. Wnuk said,
“It’s a pretty simple de-
vice…and I’ve caught as
many as 30,000 fish in a sin-
gle net. So when there are a
lot of fish, they catch a lot of
fish. They work very well.”
Channel Catfish are
stocked once per year and
plans are to stock in the next
few weeks. “I request 3,000
fingerlings (2 inches) per
year,” said Wnuk. “The num-
ber we get is variable based
on hatchery conditions. Over
the last 10 years, the lake has
averaged 2,738 fingerlings
per year.”
To learn more about fish
stocking by the Pennsylvania
Fish and Boat Commission,
visit fish.state.pa.us.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
AT LEFT: Walter Dietz,
Regional Outreach &
Education Coordinator,
PA Fish and Boat Com-
mission Bureau of
Boating and Outreach,
NE Region/SE Region,
holding a Channel
Catfish, which can be
up to 30 or 40 pounds
in weight.
Survey says…
Time to stock the Channel Catfish
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
Bill Smoyer, a fish culturist from
Pleasant Mount hatchery, holding
a catfish.
The Oneonta State field hockey team, with
Abington Heights High School graduate
Bridgette Robinson serving as captain, is on
top of the State University of New York Ath-
letic Conference standings after a break-
through victory Sept. 21.
Oneonta allowed just seven shots during a
1-0 victory for its first win over Cortland State
in 23 meetings since 1992. Cortland has won
14 of the 15 SUNYAC championships and has
won three national championships since the
last time it had lost to Oneonta.
Robinson played the entire Cortland game as
a defensive midfielder, helping limit the de-
fending conference champions to two shots
and one penalty corner in the first half.
Oneonta followed up the milestone win by
allowing only two shots, none in the second
half, of a 6-1 romp over Oswego State Sat-
urday. Robinson played all but the final 10:35
when the game was in hand.
The Red Dragons lead the SUNYAC at 3-0.
They are 6-2 overall, including 2-2 in games
against teams that have been ranked in the top
20 this season.
Oneonta has won three straight, outscoring
league competition, 11-1, since a 3-2, double-
overtime loss to sixth-ranked Skidmore, which
shares the nation’s best record at 8-0.Oneonta
gained votes in the coaches’ national Division
III Top 20 poll last week and moved into posi-
tion to potentially join the rankings this week.
Robinson played midfield as a freshman
before moving to defense for her sophomore
and junior seasons. She is now a defensive
midfielder in a new alignment.
During her college career, Robinson has
played in 57 games, including starting in 45 of
her last 47 games.
The 21-year-old Clarks Summit resident is
A.H. grad field hockey
captain at Oneonta State
PHOTO COURTESY SUNY COLLEGE AT ONEONTA
Bridgette Robinson, an Abington Heights graduate, is
a captain for the Oneonta State field hockey team.
See Captain, Page 14
C M Y K
PAGE 14A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
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The Keystone College cheer-
leading squad of La Plume had
an exceptional showing during
the Universal Cheerleading
Association (UCA) national
camp held in August at The
University of Scranton.
The teamwas named camp
champion in the small co-ed
division three category and also
took home first place in the
sideline chant and band dance
categories, and second place in
the cheer category.
The UCACompetition fea-
tured nearly 600 collegiate
cheerleaders fromthroughout
the nation.
Vicki Stanavitch, Keystone
College biology and chemistry
instructor, is cheerleading team
coach and adviser.
First row, from left: Rachel Gonzalez, Lauren Boyle, Alyssa Corey, Alys-
sa Mecca, Gabriella Goldstein, and Rebecca Melendez. Second row:
Shane Venesky, Rachaell Ogden, Jordyn Slager, Kaleen Pastrana, Kacy
Gillette, Arlaina Whitman, Liz Farrell, Cait Beavers and Zack Lakitsky.
Keystone cheerleaders win
awards at UCA camp
Abington Heights varsity
football cheerleaders are
shown. First row, from left:
Ally Lamanna, Alexandra
Albright, Jessica Kurey,
Courtney Norton. Second
row: Julia Pagnani, Hollis
Coldwater, Ann Moschorak,
Camille DeMatteo, Danielle
Barrasse, Casey Wrobel.
Third row: Lauren Rzeszew-
ski, Samantha Bilardi, Brooke
Chapple, Meghan Judge, Va-
nessa Duboski, Mia Caputo,
Alexa Graham, Allie Auriem-
ma
A.H. varsity football cheerleaders
ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI
The rain was annoying, but
did not stop play in the annual
Labor Day Blind Draw tennis
tournament at the Scranton
Tennis Club.
A total of 50 club members
took part in the round robin
style event.
Champions in the Mixed
Doubles event were Howard
Conrad and Cierra Beck, who
defeated Joe and Diane Bailey
in the final. Conrad and Beck,
who each finished as runner
up in his/her respective Club
Championship doubles event,
used Beck’s solid ground
strokes and Conrad’s speed
and volleying to knock off the
husband-wife team, who were
runners up in the STC mixed
doubles event last month.
To reach the final, Beck
and Conrad eliminated the
brother-sister team of Terry
and Jennifer Briggs, while the
Baileys edged Tim Aikman
and Ann Conrad.
In the Men’s Doubles Divi-
sion Bob Cullen and Joe Vin-
son were the champions,
winning the decisive match
against Joe DeOrio and Ken
Strauss. Morey Moritz and
John Azzarelli finished one
point behind the DeOrio-
Strauss team to finish in third
place.
Scranton Tennis Club crowns champs
Men’s Doubles finalists: Ken Strauss and Joe DeOrio, finalists; Joe
Vinson and Bob Cullen, champions; John Weiss, tournament director
Mixed Doubles group winners: kneeling, Joe and Diane Bailey, final-
ists; first row standing, Terry and Jennifer Briggs, semi-finalists;
Cierra Beck and Howard Conrad, champions; Ann Conrad and Tim
Aikman, semi-finalists; Second row: John Weiss, tournament direc-
tor
August 23
Moto 1 - 15 Girls: 1st - Sarah Uhranowsky,
2nd - Katie Delgado, 3rd - Bailee Jones
Moto 2 - 26-30 Cruiser: 1st - Brandon
Stella, 2nd - Chris Roth, 3rd - Brian Skut-
nick
Moto 3 - 31-35 Girls Cruiser: 1st - Becky
DePrato, 2nd - Candy Rosencrance, 3rd -
Kelly Wright
Moto 4 - 6 Novice: 1st - Billy Roberts,
2nd - Delaney Steele, 3rd - Michael Crane,
4th - Emilee Bruno
Moto 5 - 8 Novice: 1st - Ben Hood, 2nd -
Wyatt Steele, 3rd - Kyle Lidy
Moto 6 - 10 Novice: 1st - Mark Strenkoski,
2nd - Marc Pacyna, 3rd - Abigail Weiss
Moto 7 - 12 Novice: 1st - Brandon Stren-
koski, 2nd - Matthew Pacyna, 3rd - Brian
Miller
Moto 8 - 28-35 Novice: 1st - Randy
Willauer, 2nd - Patrick Earley, 3rd - Chuck
Steele
Moto 9 - 7 Inter: 1st - Christian Black,
2nd - Ben Byers, 3rd - Max Roth
Moto 10 - 10 Inter: 1st - David DePrato,
2nd - Nathan Smith, 3rd - Caleb Seamans
Moto 11 - 13 Expert: 1st - Colin Domnick,
2nd - Dan Uhranowsky, 3rd - Brett Butler,
4th - Gavin Bruno, 5th - Aiden Jones
Moto 12 - 17-18 Expert: 1st - RJ Vargo, 2nd
- Tom Delgado, 3rd - Frank Regal
Moto 13 - 28-35 Expert: 1st - Jesse
Trichilo, 2nd - Mike Butry, 3rd - Mason
Byers, 4th - Jake Leader, 5th - Clint
Nichols
August 25
Moto 1 - 12 Girls: 1st - Alisha Waldron, 2nd
- Natalie Smith, 3rd - Brielle Temarantz
Moto 2 - 16 Girls: 1st - Sarah Uhranow-
sky, 2nd – Bailee Jones, 3rd - Jessy Vargo
Moto 3 - 31-35 Cruiser: 1st – Frank Black,
2nd - RJ Vargo, 3rd - Dave Temarantz
Moto 4 - 41-45 Cruiser: 1st - Chris Ed-
wards, 2nd - Joe Amity, 3rd - Bill Hayden
Moto 5 - 26-30 Girls Cruiser: 1st - Amy
Temarantz, 2nd - Jessy Vargo, 3rd - Becky
DePrato, 4th - Candace Opachinski
Moto 6 - 5 & Under Novice: 1st - Carter
Dennis, 2nd - Emilee Bruno, 3rd - Shelby
Hoover
Moto 7 - 6 Novice: 1st - Jacob Wolter,
2nd - JJ Gorrick, 3rd - Lauren Black
Moto 8 - 7 Novice: 1st - Billy Gentile, 2nd
- Jonah Astolfi, 3rd - Caleb White
Moto 9 - 8 Novice: 1st - Ben Hood, 2nd -
Jared White, 3rd - David Walker
Moto 10 - 11 Novice: 1st - Jessica Stan-
gline, 2nd - Joseph Bootz, 3rd - Krystal
Hayden
Moto 11 - 13 Novice: 1st - Matt Sipple, 2nd -
Kevin O’Grady, 3rd - Brian Miller
Moto 12 - 15 Novice: 1st - Jesse O’Grady,
2nd - Matt Stangline, 3rd - Jeffrey Terhune
Moto 13 - 36-40 Novice: 1st - Joe Dennis,
2nd - George Wolter, 3rd - Patrick Earley
Moto 14 - 7 Inter: 1st - Christian Black,
2nd - Ben Byers, 3rd - Kenneth Payne
Moto 15 - 8 Inter: 1st - Nathan Smith, 2nd
- Jake Gentile, 3rd - Jacob Byers
Moto 16 - 16 Inter: 1st - Frank Regal, 2nd -
Luke Anderson, 3rd - Brandon Hoover
Moto 17 - 41 & Over Inter: 1st - Joe Amity,
2nd - Clint Nichols, 3rd - Dave Stangline
Moto 18 - 10 Expert: 1st - Christian
Waldron, 2nd - Gavin Bruno, 3rd - Anthony
LaCroix, 4th - David DePrato
Moto 19 - 13 Expert: 1st - Colin Domnick,
2nd - Dan Uhranowsky, 3rd - Jacob Ger-
lach, 4th - Nathan Proleika, 5th - Brett
Butler
Moto 20 - 17-18 Expert: 1st - RJ Vargo,
2nd - Tom Delgado, 3rd - Adam Stangline
Moto 21 - 28-35 Expert: 1st - Mason
Byers, 2nd - Jesse Trichilo, 3rd - Mike
Butry
August 26(Jill Baldo Memo-
rialrace)
Moto 1 - 12 Girls: 1st - Katie Delgado, 2nd -
Jessica Stangline, 3rd - Natalie Smith
Moto 2 - 26-30 Cruiser: 1st - Frank Black,
2nd - Dave Temarantz, 3rd - Jon Clayton,
4th - Gavin Bruno
Moto 3 - 41-45 Cruiser: 1st - Gary Bleil,
2nd - Chris Roth, 3rd - Candy Rosencrance
Moto 4 - 6 Novice: 1st - Jacob Wolter,
2nd - Emilee Bruno, 3rd - Delaney Steele,
4th - Lauren Black
Moto 5 - 7 Novice: 1st - Eric Nemeth, 2nd
- Wyatt Steele, 3rd - Randy Dougher
Moto 6 - 13 Novice: 1st Matt Sipple, 2nd -
Krista Martin, 3rd - Konor Schmidt
Moto 7 - 15 Novice: 1st - Levi Nice, 2nd -
Tristan Hunter, 3rd - Matt Stangline
Moto 8 - 36-40 Novice: 1st - Randy
Willauer, 2nd - Patrick Earley, 3rd- Steven
Fritz
Moto 9 - 7 Inter: 1st - Christian Black,
2nd - Ben Byers, 3rd - Max Roth
Moto 10 - 8 Inter: 1st - Nathan Smith, 2nd
- Ty Martin, 3rd - Jacob Byers
Moto 11 - 13 Inter: 1st - Rich Drummond,
2nd - Aiden Jones, 3rd - Bailee Jones
Moto 12 - 15 Inter: 1st - Hunter Brink, 2nd
- Sarah Uhranowsky, 3rd - Brandon Hoover
Moto 13 - 17-18 Inter: 1st - Justin Knapper,
2nd - Luke Anderson, 3rd - Adam Stangline
Moto 14 - 28-35 Inter: 1st - RJ Vargo, 2nd
- Thomas Delgado, 3rd - Mike Butry
Moto 15 - 36-40 Inter: 1st - Mason Byers,
2nd - Shawn Martin, 3rd - Frank Black
Moto 16 - 41 & Over Inter: 1st - Joe Amity,
2nd - Glen Knapper, 3rd - Clint Nichols
Moto 17 - 10 Expert: 1st - Gavin Bruno,
2nd - Anthony LaCroix, 3rd - Dominic
LaCroix
Moto 18 - 13 Expert: 1st - Colin Domnick,
2nd - Dan Uhranowsky, 3rd - Garrett Harris
Moto 19 - Our 1-Day Riders: 1st - David
Kuzmick, 2nd - Mark Bruno, 3rd - Robyn
Buccine, 4th - Dave Brzegowski
BMX Results
Kelsey Deveney of Dalton/
Lackawanna Trail, was named
2012 Colonial States Athletic
Conference Field Hockey
Player of the Week and Honor
Roll for the week ending Sept.
16. A senior at Gwynedd-
Mercy College, she totaled
two goals and an assist for the
Griffins during their 1-1 week.
In Thursday’s 4-1 loss to de-
fending national champ The
College of New Jersey, Deve-
ney scored the game’s first
goal to give the Griffins an
early lead. She followed that
up by dialing up a goal and an
assist in the Griffins’ 3-1 win
over visiting Alvernia on Sat-
urday.
Deveney named player of
the week and honor roll
Crossword answers from Page 4
the best showing against
Lackawanna Trail’s de-
fense this season. The
Wildcats’ 21 points are
most any team has scored
against the Lions’ tough
unit. Lackawanna Trail’s
head coach Steve Jervis
said the team allowed
some big plays but was
overall extremely pleased
with the way his team
slowed down the Western
Wayne.
“[Western Wayne head
coach] Keller is a quality
coach,” Jervis said. “You
have to be very disciplined
to stop his offense… I am
very, very proud of how
hard our kids played to-
night.”
The win moves the Li-
ons’ record to 4-0. West-
ern Wayne’s record now
stands at 1-2. All four of
Lackawanna Trails’ wins
have been by at least 22
points. Despite the large
margins of victory, Jervis
said the team must look
past the wins and prepare
for the work that lies
ahead.
“ I always tell our kids a
football season is a mara-
thon, not a sprint,” Jervis
said. “You enjoy the win,
[but] we’ll be right back to
work on Monday.”
Lackawanna Trail’s next
game will take place on
the road 7 p.m. Friday
against Mid Valley. West-
ern Wayne’s next game
will also be at 7 p.m. Fri-
day against Montrose.
LIONS
Continued from Page 13
did in the first with a quick
touchdown. Santiago scored
on a 32- yard run that was
set up by a 34 -yard comple-
tion from Schor to Lucas
Markowitz. Paulison’s extra
point gave the Warriors a
21-0 lead with 10:48 remain-
ing in the third quarter.
Abington Heights put
together a 7-play 75-yard
drive on the next drive that
was capped by a 17-yard
touchdown from Pasqulichio
to fullback Jerry Langan on
a screen pass after the
Comets’ quarterback escap-
ed several defenders.
The Comets continued
their momentum when run-
ning back Quinn Karam
scored on a 2-yard plunge to
end a 16-play 73-yard drive.
After Ryan Patrick’s extra
point, Abington Heights
trailed 21-14 with 9:13 left
in the fourth quarter.
“I’m very proud of the
way my players came out
and fought in the second
half and had an opportunity
to win the football game,”
Repshis said.
“Delaware Valley is a very
good football team. They’re
physical, they run it very
well and have great team
speed.”
Lucas Markowitz, who
caught six passes for 82
yards, added a 30-yard in-
terception return for a
touchdown.
Warriors’ defensive back
Kyle Clark sealed the win
when he intercepted Pas-
qualichio with 1:26 remain-
ing in the game. Clark also
picked up 26 yards on a
fake punt earlier in the
game.
COMETS
Continued from Page 13
on schedule to graduate in
December, completing her
studies in environmental
science in 3 ½ years.
Robinson played for the
Summit Styx, Clarks Sum-
mit and Mr. Delaney’s Stick-
gals club teams locally while
in high school. She played
on Chaos, a Pennsylvania
team that won the 2008 USA
Hockey Regional Rumble
title in Virginia Beach, and
represented the Pocono Re-
gion in the Keystone State
Games.
While at Abington
Heights, Robinson was a
three-year varsity player and
a team captain as a senior.
She led the team’s midfiel-
ders in scoring each of her
last two seasons and had the
game-winning goal to clinch
the Lady Comets’ Wyoming
Valley Conference Division
2 championship in her senior
year.
Robinson also played four
years on the Abington
Heights soccer team.
Oneonta is enjoying re-
surgence in field hockey.
The Red Dragons were 6-13
in 2008 for their 11th losing
record in a 15-year stretch.
While Robinson has been
in the program, Oneonta has
improved to 8-10, 12-8 and
14-7. She was named team
captain during spring work-
outs in her sophomore year.
CAPTAIN
Continued from Page 13
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE15A
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SCRANTON- Scranton
High School used a balanced
offensive attack and opportu-
nistic defense to defeat
Scranton Prep, 43-21, in a
Lackawanna League Division
I football contest at Scranton
Memorial Stadium Sept. 21.
Scranton sophomore run-
ning back Jake McCarthy
finished the game with 173
yards on 20 carries and three
touchdowns. Knights quarter-
back Marlinn Waiters com-
pleted 7 of 14 passes for 186
yards and two touchdowns.
Scranton Prep took an early
7-0 lead when running back
Marshall Kupinski capped off
a four-play 59-yard drive
with a 10-yard touchdown
run with 8:49 left in the first
quarter. Kupinski gained 91
yards on 21 carries.
Scranton came back with a
scoring drive of its own when
Waiters connected with Jim
McNally on a 14-yard touch-
down to end a five-play 64-
yard drive. McCarthy found
Matt Gorton on a halfback
pass for the two-point con-
version and the Knights led
8-7 with 6:17 remaining in
the first quarter.
“The kids responded very
well,” Scranton head coach
Mike Marichak said. “They
never give up, and we have
some big play kids like Jake
(McCarthy) and Karlon
(Quiller).”
The Knights momentum
continued when linebacker
Mike Conrad intercepted
Cavaliers quarterback Griff
DiBileo at midfield. On the
next play, Waiters connected
with Karlon Quiller on a
45-yard completion when
Quiller snatched the ball
away from a Prep defender.
McCarthy capped the short
two-play drive with a 5-yard
touchdown run. Alvaro Fer-
nandez added the extra point
to give Scranton a 15-7ad-
vantage.
DiBileo answered right
back on the next drive with a
54-yard touchdown to Dan
Ryan. Despite a missed extra
point, the Cavaliers cut the
deficit to 15-13.
McCarthy found the end
zone for the second time on a
27-yard run with 11:31 left in
the second quarter. After
Fernandez’s extra point,
Scranton led 22-13.
“Jake’s a very good ath-
lete,” Marichak said. “If you
give him a crease, he has the
speed to break it and his vi-
sion is tremendous.”
On the ensuing possession,
the Knights defense forced
Prep into a three-and-out.
McCarthy scored for the final
time on a 45-yard dash with
7:13 remaining in the second
quarter, giving Scranton a
29-13 lead.
“The defense stepped up
when we needed them,” Mar-
ichak said. “(Prep) made
some big plays, but you’re
gonna expect that out of them
because they are a good foot-
ball team. Our defense has
kinda been bend, but don’t
break and we came up with a
couple good stops.”
Scranton Prep put together
a 12-play 86-yard drive that
was capped by a Kupinski
8-yard touchdown run late in
the second quarter. Jake Sta-
fursky ran in the two-point
conversion to pull the Cava-
liers within 8 points at the
end of the first half.
After stuffing the Cavaliers
on a fourth-and-one play
from midfield on the first
drive of the second half,
Scranton extended its lead
with Waiters scored on a
1-yard quarterback sneak.
Quiller ended the scoring
with a 22-yard diving, finger-
tip catch with less than a
minute remaining in the third
quarter. Quiller finished with
five catches for 167 yards.
Scranton Prep (3-1, 0-1)
will host North PoconoSatur-
day afternoon.
Knights top Cavaliers
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
ABINGTON JOURNAL/NATALIE MENNICUCCI
Scranton Prep senior Marshall Kupinski (33), tackles and makes his
way toward getting the ball from the opposing Scranton High player.
OBITUARY
Ruth L.
Hamm, 97, a
resident of
Clarks Sum-
mit for the
past 67
years, passed
away peacefully in the care
of Abington Manor, Clarks
Summit, Sept. 23.
Ruth was born in Scran-
ton in February 1915. She
was one of seven children
born to William and Mabel
Spitzer. Ruth was preceded
in death by her parents, her
brothers: Walter, Paul and
Roger and sisters Eleanor
and Lois, her husband Les-
ter who passed away in
1953 , daughter Shirlee
Winter and husband Jess,
grandson Kevin Papach and
great -grandson Cody Holl-
inger.
She is survived by her
daughters Judy Papach,
Debbie Pallman and her
husband Bruce, sons Ed-
ward and Walter and his
wife Trudi and her sister
Nancy Singer, along with
nine grandchildren ,16
great- grandchildren, six
great -great grandchildren
and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Ruth was a wonderful
mother, grandmother, sister
and aunt. She was strongly
devoted to family and her
faith. Throughout her life
she touched the lives of
many people in a most
positive and uplifting man-
ner.
The family would like to
sincerely thank the staffs at
Allied Services Terrace and
Abington Manor for the
care they provided "Mother
Hamm’ over the past four
and a half years.
Lawrence E. Young Fu-
neral Home of Clarks Sum-
mit is handling funeral
arrangements.
A private service will be
held at the convenience of
the family.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial contributions may be
made to the Clarks Summit
United Methodist Church,
1310 Morgan Highway,
Clarks Summit, PA 18411.
Online condolences may
be left for the family at
wwwlawrencefuneralhome-
.com.
Ruth L. Hamm
September 23, 2012
Carleton A.
Connell Jr. of
Clarks Sum-
mit, died
Aug. 25 after
a brief ill-
ness. He was
90. His former wife, Mar-
gery (Lombard) Connell
died in December 2001.
“Skinner” as he was
known to all, was the son of
the late Carleton A. and
Lydia T. Connell. He was
born in Scranton and was a
lifetime resident of the
Abingtons. He graduated
from the Fessenden School
in West Newton, Mass., and
The Hill School, Pottstown.
He attended Lafayette Col-
lege until the United States
entered World War II, at
which time he joined the U.
S. Army Air Corps. He
served in North Africa.
Upon returning from the
service, he worked for The
Murray Company in Scran-
ton prior to becoming Gen-
eral Manager of the Lacka-
wanna Mills Paper Compa-
ny. In 1952 he purchased
Kucks Village Art and
Frame Shop, located on
Adams Avenue in Scranton.
In 1955 he moved the busi-
ness to Clarks Green, re-
named it the Abington
Frame Shop, and operated
the business for 50 years
until his retirement in 2005.
Although Connell was an
avid outdoorsman who en-
joyed hunting, fishing and
golf, his greatest excitement
and satisfaction came from
listening and dancing to
great music. Dixieland Jazz
and the big band arrange-
ments of his youth were his
passion. A weekend rarely
went by that Skinner was not
traveling somewhere in the
Pa./N.Y./N.J. area to listen to
music and take over the
dance floor, as only he
could. Through the years he
encouraged and supported a
host of organizations in the
area that were dedicated to
the preservation of Jazz and
big band music.
Surviving are a sister, Ann
Connell Davis, who resides
in North Carolina with her
husband Homer. Three chil-
dren, Alexis Connell Davis
and husband Charles; Jack
Connell; Jill Connell Caden
and husband Rodney, along
with six grandchildren; Tyler
Davis and wife Beth; Todd
Davis and wife Emily; Mat-
thew Caden; Shawn Caden
and partner Kate O’Malley;
Whitney Garner and hus-
band David and Madeline
Connell. Three great-grand-
children, McKenzie Davis,
Jacob Davis and Phaedra
O’Malley Caden, along with
best friend and loving com-
panion Alice Jones.
He was preceded in death
by his brother James L.
Connell and his longtime
companion Nancy Sand-
ercock.
The family will receive
friends on Saturday, Sept.
29, from 10 to 11 a.m. at the
Lawrence E. Young Funeral
Home, 418 South State St.,
Clarks Summit.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the
charity of your choice.
For directions or to send
online condolences, visit
www.lawrenceeyoungfuner-
alhome.com.
Carleton A. Connell Jr.
August 25, 2012
Clouds and the threat of rain did not deter a team of volunteers from
gathering at Abington Area Community Park, South Abington Township
Sept. 8. With screw guns in hand, Tim McCoy, Abington Area Joint
Recreation Board (AAJRB) member and “Boardwalk Build” project man-
ager, along with community volunteers, completed construction of 70
feet of boardwalk. McCoy said the remaining work on the boardwalk,
along the “Walk the Lake” trail, will be completed in time for the sched-
uled Hillside Harvest Moon Fest Sept. 29, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
For more information regarding the Walk the Lake trail and the festiv-
al visit aajrb.com.
Shown above, Dave Hollander, AAJRB Board Member and on behalf
of Abington Area Girls’ Softball League.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Volunteers move forward on ‘Boardwalk’
The Dalton Community
Library holds its Book &Bake
Sales twice a year: the third
Saturdays of April and Octo-
ber, from9 a.m. to 3 p.m. An
upcoming one will be Oct. 20.
They plan to offer a large se-
lection of adult and juvenile
fiction and nonfiction at low
prices, plus an unusual selec-
tion of magazines, paperbacks,
recordings and some surprise
items. They plan to offer
“some of the area’s best baked
goods” for sale. Call 563.2014
for details.
Large selection, ‘area’s best’ baked
goods at Dalton library sale
The first annual 5KZombie
Run, sponsoredbythe Trail
MarchingLions will be held
Oct. 5at 5p.m. at Lackawan-
na Trail HighSchool. The
event will be part of the an-
nual Homecomingfestivities.
Abonfire will followthe race.
Awards will be giventhe male
andfemale withthe best cos-
tume andbest time. There is a
$15registrationfee which
includes a T-shirt. All ages
andwalkers are welcome.
L.T. hosts
Zombie Run
Allied Services Integrated
Health Systemis a sponsor of
the11th Annual Northeastern
U.S. Conference on disABIL-
ITYSept. 27 at The University
of Scranton. Two doctors from
Heinz Rehab Hospital in
Wilkes-Barre have been tapped
to speak at the 2012 Confer-
ence entitled “Traumatic Brain
Injury: AMeeting of the
Minds. The Person. The Par-
ents. The Professionals.”
Michael Raymond, Ph.D.,
American Board of Profes-
sional Neuropsychology; Clin-
ical/Forensic Neuropsychol-
ogy Clinical Director, Brain
Injury &Sports Concussion
Program, Heinz Rehabilitation
Hospital will address “ Mild
Traumatic Brain Injury and
Sport Concussion Manage-
ment.” John Kline, M.D., Med-
ical Director of The Brain
Injury Programat Heinz Re-
hab Hospital, will also address
based on his medical expertise
in Brain Injury Rehab.
Allied sponsors disABILITY conference
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 16
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@theabingtonjournal.com
theabingtonjournal.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
** Must trade in a 99 or newer vehicle.
Chevy Runs Deep
Mon.-Thurs 9am-7:30pm
Fri. 9am-5pm
Sat. 9am-3pm
Sunday Browsing
Family Owned & Operated for Over 40 Years
1609 MAIN AVE. EXIT 190 OFF 1-81
(Right At the Light Go 4 Miles to Our Door)
570-489-7586
Disclaimer: *All prices. Plus tax and tags. All Applicable Rebates Included. Pictures are for illustration purposes only.
GoodThru 9-30-12
Buy For $
31,454
**
V-8, Auto, Air,
Z71 All Star Pkg
MSRP $38,405
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO CREW CAB 4X4
Buy For $
25,637
*
4 cyl., Auto, Air
MSRP $26,330
Buy For $
28,378
**
V-8, Auto, Air, PW, PD
Z71 Package
All Star Edition
MSRP $36,750
2012 SILVERADO EXT CAB 4X4
Buy For $
17,782
*
4 cyl., Auto,
Air, PW, PD, CD
MSRP $18,040
2013 SONIC LT
Buy For $
30,440
2012 TRAVERSE LS AWD
Buy For $
18,362
*
4 cyl, Auto,
Air, CD
MSRP $18,605
2012 CHEVY CRUZE LS
4 Cyl, Auto, Air, PW, PD, 32K, Certified
2010 CHEVY COBALT SDN
$
12,495
$
21,995
6 cyl., Auto, Air, Certified, 28K
2011 CHEVY EQUINOX LS AWD
V-6, Auto, Air, PW, PD, 35K, Certified
2010 TRAVERSE LT AWD
$
21,995 $14,495
2011 CHEVY CRUZE LT
4 cyl., Auto, Air, PW, PD, 35K, Certified
V-6, Auto,
Air, 8 Pass
MSRP $33,450
$
13,995
4 cyl., Auto, Sunroof, 13K
2009 CHEVY MALIBU LT
$
21,495
6 cyl., Auto, Air, PW, PD, 12K, Certified
2010 CHEVY CAMARO LT
www.sylvesterchevrolet.com
2013 CHEVY EQUINOX LS
1.9%
Financing
Available
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICES
The Abington
Journal is a
newspaper of
general circula-
tion and meets
the require-
ments by
Newspaper
Advertising Act
45 Pa.C.S.A.
Section 301.
DEADLINE:
Mondays at 4 pm
for current week
Deadline varies
during holiday
weeks
RATE:
$1.00 line/$12.
per inch
For information or
questions
regarding legal
notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
570-970-7371
or email to:
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
ESTATE NOTICE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Harry E. Lamore-
aux, late of Scott
Township, PA, (Died
September 6,
2012). Letters of
Testamentary in the
above estate hav-
ing been granted,
all creditors shall
make demand and
all debtors shall
make payment
without delay to
Kathryn Lamoreaux,
Executrix, or David
L. Haldeman, Esq.,
1134 Lackawanna
Trail, Clarks Sum-
mit, PA 18411
David L. Haldeman,
Esquire
Attorney for the
Estate
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF ANN
PARDUE
McCORMICK. Late
of Clarks Summit,
Pennsylvania (Died
August 19, 2012)
Letters Testamen-
tary having been
granted to Jane
Pardue. All persons
having claims
against the Estate
or indebted to the
Estate shall make
payment or present
claims to Douglas P.
Thomas, Attorney
for the Estate, 415
Wyoming Avenue,
Scranton, PA 18503
ESTATE NOTICE
RE: ESTATE OF
THEODORE W. NEU-
BERT, late of
Waverly, Pennsylva-
nia. (Died July 26,
2012). Letters Tes-
tamentary in the
above Estate having
been granted, cred-
itors shall make
demand & debtors
shall make payment
to PNC Bank, NA, or
Lucinda W. Neubert,
Co-Executors, or
Charles H. Welles IV,
Attorneys for the
Estate, 11th Floor
Bank Towers, 321
Spruce Street,
Scranton, Pennsyl-
vania 18503
Welles & MCgrath
Attorneys for the
Estate
NOTICE
ESTATE OF CLAIRE
VENTANNI, late of
89 Sturges Road,
Peckville, Pennsyl-
vania (died July 13,
2012), Letters Tes-
tamentary were
issued on August
15, 2012 to Anthony
L. Freda, all persons
having claims
against the Estate
or who are indebted
to the Estate shall
make payment or
make claims to
Anthony L. Freda,
Executor of the
Estate, or to Maria
Marsili, Esq. Attor-
ney for the Estate,
71 River Street,
Suite 2, Carbondale,
PA 18407
150 Special Notices
ADOPTING
YOUR NEWBORN
is our dream.
Endless love, joy,
security awaits.
Maryann and Matt
888-225-7173
Expenses Paid
< < < < < <
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
ADOPTION
Adopting a
newborn is our
greatest wish.
Forever love,
family, and secure
future awaits.
Michelle & Todd
866-936-8363
Expenses Paid.
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
360 Instruction &
Training
EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice.
Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV Certi-
fied. Call 888-220-
3984. www.Centu-
raOnline.com
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner. 91K.
4.8 engine, auto.
Runs great. New
paint, stake body
with metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
$4495.
MAZDA `90 MIATA
Clean unmodified,
maintained. Recent
clutch, brakes.
good top. Inspected
until 3/2013. $2500.
Call or text 570-
407-4541 between
10 a.m. & 2:30 p.m
(570) 407-4541
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
$1500. OBO
570-899-1896
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
TOYOTA `03
HIGHLANDER
White.
Original Owner.
Garage kept.
Excellent condition.
$9,750. Neg.
570-677-3892
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
GREAT DEALS!
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
421 Boats &
Marinas
FISHING BOAT.
Like new. 16 1/2’
Trophy Fiberglass.
25 HP Johnson
motor, 48 lb
thrust, trolling
motor with foot
control. Recharg-
er, pedestal front
seat, carpeted
floor. Live well,
storage compart-
ment. Excellent
condition. $4500.
570-675-5046
after 12 noon
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
439 Motorcycles
‘12 BRAND NEW
SCOOTER
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
HONDA ‘05
750 SHADOW
Windshield, saddle-
bags & new battery.
2,190 Miles Garage
Kept. Asking $4500.
570-430-3041
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
LAND ROVER ‘97
DISCOVERY
inspected runs well
$1800.
RANGE ROVER ‘95
CLASSIC
runs well not
inspected $1500.
570-239-4163 or
570-675-9847
leave message
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
NISSAN `04
PATHFINDER
ARMADA
Excellent condition.
Too many options to
list. Runs & looks
excellent. $10,995
570-655-6132 or
570-466-8824
506 Administrative/
Clerical
LEASING CONSULTANT/
RESIDENT COORDINATOR
Local apartment
community is
looking for a friendly
and energetic
person to join our
team. Applicants
must be detail ori-
ented, dependable,
& capable of work-
ing independently.
Candidates should
be familiar in an
office setting,
be proficient in
Microsoft products,
and possess
exceptional cus-
tomer service/
people skills. This
position offers com-
petitive pay with
benefits. The posi-
tion may have
occasional evening
and weekends.
Opportunity for a
new and exciting
career for the right
individual. (Bilingual
a plus) Please send
resume to:
EagleRidge01
@comcast.net
or mail to
Eagle Ridge, Attn:
Property Manager
9 Beverly Drive,
Edwardsville, PA
18704. EOE
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
KITCHEN &
WAIT STAFF
Day and night. Apply
in person at
JIM’S PLACE PIZZA
206 Grand Avenue
or call
570-587-8686
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AIRLINE CAREERS :
Begin here-Become
an Aviation Mainte-
nance Tech. FAA
approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied-Housing avail-
able. Job placement
assistance.
CALL Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
888-834-9715
Automotive Technician
The qualified candi-
date should be
experienced in
alignments, air-con-
ditioning, and diag-
nostics. State
inspection license
and ASE certifica-
tions preferred.
Valid PA Driver
License a must!
Health Insurance,
Vision & Dental, 401-
K Retirement Plan,
paid holidays, vaca-
tion, closed Sun-
days, Employee
training programs
and discounts! Posi-
tions are available
at our Dallas,
Kingston and
Wilkes-Barre loca-
tions. Apply now by
phone at
1-877-WORK 4 JW
or online at
www.jackwilliams.com
EOE
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
SEXTON
Needed For Church
Maintenance. Full
Time/Part Time.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH,
Clarks Summit
EOE
570-586-8555
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS: HIRING
EXPERIENCED/INEXPERI-
ENCED TANKER DRI-
VERS! Earn up to
$.51/mile! New Fleet
Volvo Tractors! 1
Year OTR Exp. Req.-
Tanker Training
Available. Call
Today:
877-882-6537
www.Oakley
Transport.com
DRIVERS- A. Duie
Pyle Needs Owner
Operators & Com-
pany Drivers.
Regional Truckload
Operations. HOME
EVERY WEEKEND!
O/O Average
$1.84/Miles. Steady,
Year-Round Work.
Requires CDL-A, 2
Years Experience.
Call Dan: 877-910-
7711 www.DriveFor-
Pyle.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS: AVERITT
IS LOOKING FOR
CDL-A DRIVERS!
Weekly hometime
and full benefits
package. 4 months
T/T experience
required- apply
now! 888-362-8608
Visit AVERITTca-
reers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer
DRIVERS: CRST
offers the best
Lease Purchase
Program *SIGN ON
BONUS *No down
payment or credit
check *Great Pay
*Class A CDL
required *Owner
Operators Welcome
Call: 866-403-7044
DRIVERS, $0.01
increase per mile
after 6 months.
Quarterly Bonuses.
Annual Salary $45K
to $60K. CDL-A, 3
months current OTR
experience.
800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
CLASS A DRIVERS:
Regional Up to
42CPM. Weekly
Pay, Benefits, Home
Time. SIGN ON
BONUS. Paid Orien-
tation. 2 Years T/T
experience. 800-
524-5051 www.go
mcilvaine.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
DRIVERS: Experi-
enced Reefer Dri-
vers. GREAT PAY
/Freight lanes from
Presque Isle, ME,
Boston-Lehigh, PA.
800-277-0212 or
primeinc.com
DRIVERS, CDL-A
Experienced Dri-
vers: Up to $5,000
Sign-On Bonus! 6
mos. OTR experi-
ence starts @ $.32/
mile. New student
pay & lease pro-
gram. USA TRUCK
877-521-5775
www.USATruck.jobs
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS: CDL-A
Van & Flatbed *New
Pay Package! *Very
New Trucks *Bene-
fits After 30-Days
*Great Miles, Pay
*Dependable Home-
time *Start Immedi-
ately! CDL Gradu-
ates Needed! 877-
917-2266 drivewith-
western.com
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WATER TANKER
DRIVER
Part time/part time
days & nights with
experience. Must
have clean MVR and
pass DOT require-
ments. Pay is
based on experi-
ence. Call 570-899-
0336 between 8am
& 6pm
554 Production/
Operations
MACHINIST
Local food manufac-
turer seeks experi-
enced machinist.
Nardone Bros.
123 Hazle St.
Wilkes Barre, PA.
18702
Fax Resume:
570-823-2581
Attn: Mario Nardone
600
FINANCIAL
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER,
10,000 BTU, Emer-
son. Good working
condition, automatic
shutoff $30.
570-824-3092
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
“History of Luzerne
County 1892” &
“History of Luzerne
& Lackawanna
County & Wyoming
1786 to 1880”.
$300 for both.
570-283-1233
736 Firewood
FIREWOOD. Mixed
hardwoods. $190 a
cord. $100 for 1/2
cord. $60 for 1/4 of
a cord. Includes
local delivery.
570-499-8963
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each. SOFA,
CHAIR,
OTTOMAN, 3
TABLES, great
for den. Wood
and cloth, all in
excellent condi-
tion. $450.
Call after 12 noon
570-675-5046
PINE LOFT
BEDROOM SUITE:
Includes 3 dresser
drawers, book
shelve, desk with
drawers, and clos-
et. Asking 1000.00
or best offer. ALSO
HESS TRUCKS in
mint condition,
never out of the
boxes. From 1995-
2005 asking 35.
each. Call after 6:00
570-417-1088
Line up a place to live
in classified!
CLARKS SUMMIT
Woodridge Circle
Saturday Sept. 29
9am - 3pm
Furniture, home
decor, appliances
much much more
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 17 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Style, Class, Excellence
MOTORWORLD DRIVE, JUST OFF INTERSTATE 81, WILKES-BARRE
SALES HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY: 9AM-8PM SATURDAY: 9AM-5PM
SUNDAY: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON - 5PM
WWW.MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM
North Eastern Pennsylvania’s y
#1 Luxury Vehicle Destination
*ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER CHANGES. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
0.9% APR FINANCING FOR 36 MONTHS = $28.18/$1,000 FINANCED. 1.9% APR FINANCING FOR 60 MONTHS = $17.50/$1,000 FINANCED.
PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
PAYMENTS INCLUDE ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 9/30/12.
www.motorworldacura.com
T W E N T Y – F I F T H
A N N I V E R S A R Y
fnancing for 24 to 36 months
AND
0.9% APR
fnancing for 37 to 60 months
1.9% APR
ON ALL 2012 ACURA MODELS AND 2013 ACURA ILX*
NEW 2013 ACURA
RRRRRRRRDDDDDDDDXXXXXXXX
NEW 2013 ACURA
IIIIIIIILLLLLLLLXXXXXXXX
IN-STOCK &AVAILABLE!
*LEASE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE WITH 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS
FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT. GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $24,158.75.
NEW 2012 ACURA
MMMMMMMMDDDDDDDDXXXXXXXX
SH-AWD
MODEL # YD2HCJNW
- 6CL I VTECH ENGINE
- 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
WITH GRADE LOGIC
- LEATHER INTERIOR
- POWER MOONROOF - BLUETOOTH
- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST
- ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY
ENGINEERING
0.9
% APR FINANCING
FOR 24 TO 60 MONTHS*
$
419
LEASE
FOR
PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS* GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED IN LEASE
*LEASE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE WITH 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS
FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT. GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $17,615.85.
*LEASE PLUS TAX TAGS TITLE AND $129 PRO
NEW 2012 ACURA
TTTTTTTTSSSSSSSSXXXXXXXX
5-SPEED AUTO
MODEL# CU2F4CJW
- 201HP I VTECH ENGINE
- 5 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
WITH GRADE LOGIC
- LEATHER INTERIOR
- POWER MOONROOF - BLUETOOTH
- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST
- ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY
ENGINEERING
$
299
LEASE
FOR
PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS* GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED
*LEASE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE WITH 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS
FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT. GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $20,496.00.
*LEASE PLUS TAX TAGS TITLE AND $129 PRO
NEW 2012 ACURA
TTTTTTTTLLLLLLLL
6-SPEED AUTO
MODEL# UA8F2CJW
$
334
LEASE
FOR
PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
- 6CL I VTECH ENGINE
- 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
WITH GRADE LOGIC
- LEATHER INTERIOR
- POWER MOONROOF - BLUETOOTH
- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST
- ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY
ENGINEERING
GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED
*LEASE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE WITH 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS
FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT. GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $19,747.75.
*LEASE PLUS TAX TAGS TITLE AND $129 PRO
NEW 2012 ACURA
TTTTTTTTSSSSSSSSXXXXXXXX
5-SPEED AUTO
MODEL# CW2H6BKXW
$
359
LEASE
FOR
PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
- I VTECH ENGINE
- 5 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
WITH GRADE LOGIC
- LEATHER INTERIOR
- POWER MOONROOF - BLUETOOTH
- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST
- ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY
ENGINEERING
GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED
SPORT
WAGON
- NAVIGATION - TECH PACKAGE
*ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS, PLUS TAX, TAG AND TITLE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPO-
GRAPHICAL ERRORS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. MINIMUM FINANCED $15K WITH APPROVED
CREDIT THRU DESIGNATED LENDER. SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES. FINANCING ON SELECT PRE-OWNED MODELS. QUALIFIED
CUSTOMERS ONLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 9/30/12.
www.motorworldgroupmercedes.com
Certified Pre-Owned LowAPRRates
*Eligible customers will receive up to 4 months’ payment credit (if maturing from C, CL, CLK, CLS, E, G, GL, GLK, M, R, S, SL or
SLK-Class) or on their current lease with a lease or finance of any new 2012 or 2013 Mercedes-Benz vehicle through
Mercedes-Benz Financial Services. Certain exclusions apply. See dealer for details.
In this case, the credit is going exactly where it’s due.
Up to 4 months’ Payment Credit on your current Mercedes-Benz Financial Services lease with
the purchase of a new 2012 or 2013 Mercedes-Benz.
New 2013 Mercedes-Benz
$42,355 MSRP
$379*
Plus Tax for 36 Months
LEASE FOR
C300 Sport Sedan 4MATIC AWD
$4,173 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
$2,999.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $26,260.00.
New 2013 Mercedes-Benz
$58,405 MSRP
$619*
Plus Tax for 36 Months
LEASE FOR
E350 Sedan 4MATIC AWD
$4,889 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
$3,475.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $35,627.00.
GLK350 SUV
New 2012 Mercedes-Benz
$42,705 MSRP
$439*
$4,603 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
$3,389.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $27,758.00.
Plus Tax for 30 Months
LEASE FOR
New 2013 Mercedes-Benz
$44,195 MSRP
$439*
$4,284 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
$3,050.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $26,517.00.
Plus Tax for 36 Months
LEASE FOR
GLK350 SUV
There is Mercedes-Benz, and there is everything else.
If you currently own an eligible competitive vehicle, you can get up to:
$2,000 towards the 2013 E-Class Sedan and S-Class $1,000 towards the
2013 Mercedes-Benz of your choice (excluding M, SL and GL-Class)
Driving a Mercedes-Benz has never been more rewarding.
*Qualified customers only. Offer excludes any model year Sprinter, smart, and SLS models. See dealer for details.
2010 MERCEDES-BENZ GLK SUV
STK# J5311A, 23,248 MI ........................................................................................................ SALE PRICE $29,995
2010 MERCEDES-BENZ SEDAN C300 AWD
STK# BP15796, 24,461 MI....................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $31,195
2011 MERCEDES-BENZ GLK SUV AWD
STK# BS0376, 13,459 MI......................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $31,295
2011 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN AWD
STK# BS0378, 12,458 MI......................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $33,995
2012 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN AWD
STK# BS0434, 6,543 MI........................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $34,144
2012 MERCEDES-BENZ GLK SUV AWD
STK# BS04043, 8,338 MI......................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $34,995
2010 MERCEDES-BENZ ML350 SUV
STK# BP15762, 32,569 MI 2 TO CHOOSE FROM......................................................................... SALE PRICE $38,790
2011 MERCEDES-BENZ E350 SEDAN AWD
STK# BP15882, 25,532 MI ...................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $43,300
2009 MERCEDES-BENZ SL550
STK# B9365A, 34,365 MI ........................................................................................................ SALE PRICE $56,995
*PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED.
ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE, $129 PROCESSING FEE AND
ARE SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL. ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALER DESIGNATED LENDER.
1.9% APR FINANCING FOR 60 MONTHS = $17.50/$1,000 FINANCED. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.
OFFERS EXPIRE 9/30/12.
www.motorworldlexus.com
3YEAR/100,000MILELIMITEDWARRANTYAVAILABLEONALL CERTIFIEDPRE-OWNEDLEXUSVEHICLES*
*LEASE WITH 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $3,929 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND
$129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE DUE AT SIGNING. ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT. RESIDUAL IS $22,377.
$
309
LEASE FOR
27MONTHS
PLUS TAX + TAGS*
MSRP: $32,908
NEW2012LEXUSCT200H
NEW2013LEXUSGS350AWD
*LEASE WITH 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $3,586 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND
$129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE DUE AT SIGNING. ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT. RESIDUAL IS $40,267 (AWD).
$
539
LEASE FOR
27MONTHS
PLUS TAX + TAGS*
MSRP: $55,927
*LEASE WITH 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $4,428 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND
$129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE DUE AT SIGNING. ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT. RESIDUAL IS $32,865.
$
429
LEASE FOR
27MONTHS
PLUS TAX + TAGS*
MSRP: $46,950
NEW2013LEXUSRX350AWD
1.9%APR
FOR UP TO60 MONTHS*
*LEASE WITH 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $3,594 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND
$129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE DUE AT SIGNING. ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT. RESIDUAL IS $27,767.
$
319
LEASE FOR
24MONTHS
PLUS TAX + TAGS*
MSRP: $39,667
NEW2012LEXUSIS250
1.9%APR
FOR UP TO60 MONTHS*
INTRODUCING
THE ALL NEW2013 LEXUS ES350
NOWINSTOCK!
2009 LEXUS IS250
STK# K13187A, 12K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD ................................................................. SALE PRICE $27,528
2010 LEXUS ES350
STK# LS0424, 31K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF ........................................................................... SALE PRICE $26,897
2010 LEXUS RX350
STK# L11747A, 35K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD.................................................................. SALE PRICE $29,873
2010 LEXUS IS250
STK# BP15851A, 35K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD................................................................ SALE PRICE $27,891
AT LAST YOUR WAIT IS OVER
NOWGET 1.9%APR FOR UP TO48 MONTHS OR 2.9%APR FOR UP TO60 MONTHS
ONALL LEXUS CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED!
*PRICES & PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY.
DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL PRICES INCLUDE APPLICABLE REBATES AND/OR INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.
PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES. PRICES AVAILABLE ON ADVERTISED VEHICLES ONLY.
MILEAGE CHARGE OF $.25/MILE OVER 30K MILES. LESSEE PAYS FOR EXCESS WEAR. NOT AVAILABLE WITH SOME OTHER OFFERS.
SECURITY DEPOSIT IS NOT REQUIRED AT TIME OF DELIVERY. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS THRU ALLY FINANCIAL, MUST QUALIFY.
TO QUALIFY FOR CONQUEST REBATE YOU MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 9/30/12.
www.motorworldgm.com
LEASE FOR
$
379
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 24 MONTHS*
STK# C3605
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,495 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING PLUS
TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. INCLUDES $2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST.
NEW 2012 CADILLAC ESCALADE PREMIUMCOLLECTION
STK# C3575
LEASE FOR
$
829
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 24 MONTHS*
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,495 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING PLUS
TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. INCLUDES $3,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST.
MOTORWORLD CADILLAC
SUMMER EVENT
NEW 2012 CADILLAC SRX LUXURY COLLECTION
LEASE FOR
$
319
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 24 MONTHS*
STK# C3596
PLU PLUS PPPL
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,495 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING PLUS
TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. INCLUDES $2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST.
NEW 2012 CADILLAC CTS SEDAN AWD LUXURY COLLECTION
COME SEE THE NEW 2013 CADILLAC XTS!
$2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST CASH! MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE
$2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST CASH! MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE
PLUS PLUS U PLUS PLU LUS
*LEASSE BASED ON ONNNNN 24 M 24 M 24 M 24 M 24 M 2 ONTHL ONTH ONTHL ONT ONTHLY PAY PAY Y PAY AY Y PAYMENTS MENTS MENTS M S MENT AT 1 AT 1 AT 1 AT 10K MI 0K MI 0K MI 0K MILES P LES P LES LES PER YE ER YE ER YE R YEAR AR R WI R AR AR TH $2,495 TOO
TAX, TTAGS, TITLE AND $$12 29 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. INCLUDES $2,000 LUXURY LLE
$2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST CASH! MUST BE IN A NON-G
$3,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST CASH! MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE
MotorWorld Acura 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld Cadillac 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld Lexus 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 18
Military,
College Graduate
& Lease Loyalty
Also Available
HOURS:
Mon.-Thur. 8:30 - 8:00 • Fri. 8:30 - 5:00 • Sat. 8:30 - 4:00
THE BIGGEST NAME IN FORD, GIBBONS FORD IS AUTHORIZED TO SERVICE YOUR VEHICLES
CALL 489-4747 OR 1-800-853-4641 TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT
FULL SERVICE…..TIRES………ALIGNMENTS - MASTER CERTIFIED FORD TECHNICIANS
OPEN MON. - FRI. 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM • SAT 7:30 AM - 12:00 PM
NIGHT DROP OFF BOX
Extra Factory
Rebate Available
On Your Trade In
ATTN: ALL LINCOLN/MERCURY OWNERS
950 Main Street, Dickson City, PA. 18519
570-489-4747 • 1-800-853-4641 • Exit 190A Interstate 81 - 1 mile
Darryl Jayne
General Sales Manager
Doug Higgins
Pre-Owned Sales Manager
Stephanie Abraham
Finance Director
Casey Grow
Director of Social Media
Liz Hopkins
Internet Sales
John Orue
Sales Consultant
Don Hull
Sales Consultant
Keith Kime
Sales Consultant
Joe Dickhut
Sales Consultant
Andy Noone
Sales Consultant
Kurtis Medeiros
Sales Consultant
GIBBONS FORD IS TAKING THE FINE
PRINT OUT OF
AUTOMOBILE ADVERTISING.
ALL LEASE PAYMENTS AND LEASE MONIES DUE AT
SIGNING INCLUDE TAX AND TAGS! THE BUY FOR
PRICES REQUIRE TAX AND TAGS TO BE PAID. OTHER
FORD REBATES MAYBE AVAILABLE IF YOU QUALIFY.
0% FINANCING AVAILABLE IN LIEU OF SOME
REBATES ON SELECT MODELS
DON’T BE FOOLED GET A REAL PAYMENT!
10 Way Power Driver Seat
Leather Wrapped Steering
Wheel w/ Audio Controls
PWR Windows
PWR Locks
SYNC System
2012 FORD FUSION
MSRP $29,395
Gibbons Discount -$1,045
Ford Customer Retail Cash -$1,500
Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$1,000
FMCC Retail Customer Cash - $750
$
25,100Plus 41 MPG Buy it for
41
MPG
#012970
PRICE PLUS TAX AND TAGS. EXPIRE 9/30/12
Stk 013027
1.6 L Eco Boost Engine
17” Aluminum Wheels
Blind Spot Mirrors
SYNC System
MSRP $29,130
Gibbons Discount - $576
Retail Customer Cash - $1,000
2013 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD
PRICE PLUS TAX AND TAGS. EXPIRE 9/30/12
Stk #013138
$
27,734 Buy it for
PRICE PLUS TAX AND TAGS. EXPIRE 9/30/12
18” Aluminum Wheels, Rear Spoiler
SYNC System, Sirius Satellite Radio
2013 FORD EDGE SE AWD
MSRP $31,745
Gibbons Discount - $743
Retail Customer Cash - $1,500
Ford Credit Retail - $1,000
Retail Bonus Customer Cash - $500
Stk# 013151
$
28,002 Buy it for
PRICE PLUS TAX AND TAGS. EXPIRE 9/30/12
Fog Lamps, 3rd Row Power Fold Seats
Class IV Trailer Tow, SYNC System
2012 FORD EXPEDITION XLT 4X4
MSRP $48,645
Gibbons Discount - $2,035
Retail Customer Cash - $3,000
Retail Bonus Customer Cash - $1,000
Stk# 012933
$
42,610 Buy it for
Fog Lamps
Leather Wrapped
Steering Wheel w/
Audio Controls
Rear View Camera
SYNC System
2013 FORD EXPLORER XLT
PRICE PLUS TAX AND TAGS. EXPIRE 9/30/12
MSRP $36,015
Gibbons Discount - $1,145
Retail Customer Cash - $1,500
Retail Bonus Customer Cash - $500
$
32,870 Buy it for
Stk# 013131
THE BIGGEST &
BEST NAME IN FORD
PRICE PLUS TAX AND TAGS. EXPIRE 9/30/12
Cruise Control
AM/FM/CD
SYNC w/ My Ford Touch
2013 FORD FOCUS SE
$
16,905
Buy it for
MSRP $18,995
Gibbons Discount - $590
Retail Customer Cash - $1,500
Stk# 013097
JOB FAIR!
EVERY
THURSDAY
12-4
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge...LEARNAND EARN!
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
• High School Diploma/GED
• Computer Skills
• Valid Driver’s License
• Criminal Background Check
• Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benefits Available *
Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career!
AT THE
TUNKHANNOCK
LIBRARY
timesleader.com
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE
SALE AD
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
Package includes a sales kit, garage
sale signs, a FREE unsold merchandise
ad, your sale mapped FREE online
and on our mobile app.
GET RIDOF
HIS STUFF
BEFORE YOU GET RID OF HIM
WE’LL HELP YOU
Plus a FREE BREAKFAST
fromMcDonald’s.
$15
1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
8 LINES
STARTING AT
YOUR CAREER. REINVENTED.
The Prudential Insurance Company of America, Newark, New Jersey and its affiliates are Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employers and are committed to diversity in its workforce.
Prudential is an employer that participates in E-Verify.
Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities.
0204417-00001-00 Ed. 7/2011
Lisa Hummel
Agency Recruiter
32 Scranton Office Park
Scranton, PA 18507
Phone 570-340-7052 Fax 570-340-7063
www.applicationstation.com
Code: PRUDWB_2R
Lisa.Hummel@Prudential.com
Picture a new kind of future – one where you can make an impact, not just a
living. Train for a career in insurance and financial product sales with The
Prudential Insurance Company of America’s Financial Professional Program.
You’ll learn hands-on from seasoned professionals, in the classroom and the
field. And you’ll get the support you need to prepare for required licensing
exams. All while receiving a generous compensation and benefits package.
After your training period, you’ll have a world of opportunities –
including the chance to lead your own practice.
Want to make an exciting career change?
If you have a strong interest in financial sales,
email your resume or call me today.
BUYING
ALL US &
FOREIGN
COINS
CURRENCY
POSTCARDS
STAMPS
GOLD &
SILVER
-TOP DOLLARS
for Silver
Dollars
- TOP DOLLAR
for all United
States,
Canadian &
Foreign Coins &
Paper Money
-Gold Coins
greatly needed
-Proof & Mint
Sets
-Wheat Backs &
Indian Heads
-All Types of Old
Coins
-Gold & Silver
Jewelry &
Bullion
-Sterling Silver
& -Local
Postcards
-Lead Soldiers
& Better
Antiques
GET COIN DEALER
PRICES FOR
YOUR COINS
WE GIVE FREE
APPRAISALS
(No obligations,
No pressure)
HERITAGE
GALLERIES
52 Carr Ave
DALLAS, PA
Across from
Dallas Agway
on Rt. 415
TUES-SAT,
10-6
OR BY APPT.
or b
674-2646
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SAWMILLS: From
only $3,997.00-
MAKE/ SAVE
MONEY with your
own bandmill- Cut
lumber any dimen-
sion. In stock ready
to ship. FREE
Info/DVD: www.Nor-
woodSawmills.com
1-800-578-1363
Ext.300N
758 Miscellaneous
BOOKS hardcover &
paperback, various
Authors, 2 Boxes
$20. a box.
Bread Machine, like
new $20. Sleeping
bags—-4 of them
$10, $15. $20.$25.
like new. 4 shelf cor-
ner unit $20. TV, 19”
Curtis Mathes Color
with remote, $15.
Calculator, Texas
Instrument. New,
$40 570-474-6028
CAR RAMPS, steel,
$40. POST HOLE
DIGGER, $15
570-288-4852
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports.
Sets, singles &
wax. Also buying
comics.
570-212-0398
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
/LAB PUPS
3 yellow females.
$350 each. 1 black
female, 4 black
males. $300 each.
570-836-1090
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HANOVER TWP.
For Sale
by Owner
4 PARK STREET
Ranch, 3 bedroom,
1 bath. Corner lot.
Gas heat, 2 car
garage. $96,000.
570-823-8833
HANOVER TWP.
New Construction.
Lot #2, Fairway
Estates. 2,700
square feet, tile &
hardwood on 1st
floor. Cherry cabi-
nets with center
island. $399,500.
For more details:
patrickdeats.com
570-696-1041
HUNLOCK CREEK
HUNTING/FISHING HUNTING/FISHING
RETREA RETREAT T
Spectacular,
remodeled, two
story house situat-
ed on 110 wooded
acres. It’s an out-
door’s persons
dream come true.
Featuring a 20+
acre fishing lake &
four small ponds,
woods & fields with
deer, turkey, bear &
grouse. Home
boasts breathtaking
views of the lake &
woods. Perfect for
Hunt Club or very
special home.
Most furnishings
included. Serious,
pre-qualified
inquiries only.
Asking $575,000.
Call Jim Stachelek
or email
jims@prudential
keystone.com
Prudential
Keystone
Properties
215-896-8860
SHAVERTOWN
124 School Street
3 bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths
1566 sq ft
$134,900
(570) 313-5571
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained bi-
level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3 sea-
son porch. Profes-
sionally landscaped
yard. 1 car garage,
storage shed, new
appliances, ceiling
fans. Close to
LCCC. $163,900.
Call 570-735-7594
PITTSTON TWP.
23 Ridge Street
4 Bedroom
Colonial Home in
Pocono Ridge
Estates. Large
2 Car Garage,
Paved Driveway,
Electric Heat &
Central Air, 1.5
Baths, Large Eat in
Kitchen & Dining
Room. Double
Deck with Hot Tub.
Low Taxes.
$219,000
Call
570-212-1404
SALE
PENDING
WILKES-BARRE
14 Thompson St.
2 Bedroom, 1.5
Bath. Offstreet
parking with
garage. Deck.
New kitchen and
bath. Good loca-
tion, Must See!
$84,500.
570-417-9970
906 Homes for Sale
TUNKHANNOCK
AREA
3 bedroom home,
2 baths, concrete
porch 3/4 around
the house, garage.
On six acres.
Stonework, stone
fireplace, heat with
wood or oil. Com-
mercial cook stove.
Beautiful view. Well
above flood or high
water. Some farm
equipment, track
loader. With gas &
oil rights. $350,000
570-665-9054
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
& Duplex Home.
Out of flood area
On same lot.
7 apartments, 5 in
excellent condition.
Hardwood floors.
$119,000
570-822-9697
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
915 Manufactured
Homes
HOMES AVAILABLE
Homes available
in Birchwood Vil Birchwood Vil - -
lage lage Estates Estates. 2
and 3 bedrooms.
Rent-to-own
available.
CALL TODAY!
570-613-0719
927 Vacation
Locations
NEW YORK, CABIN
AND LAND BAR-
GAINS: 6 acres-
with stream- was
$29,995 now
$19,995. 3 acres-
long range views-
was $29,995 now
$15,995. 5 acres-
“Alaskan style” river
lodge- was $89,995
now $59,995. Many
more deals now.
Call anytime
800-229-7843
landandcamps.com
NEW YORK, Lake
Property, 6 acres
Salmon River Lake
$29,900. 7 acres
100’ on bass lake
$39,900. 4 lake
properties open
house September
29-30 www.Land-
FirstNY.com
1-888-683-2626
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS
New renovated. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Granite counter-
tops, hardwood
floors, fireplace, all
appliances, wash-
er/dryer hookup.
Off-street parking,
no pets. $1,200/
month + gas. Call
(570)709-4411
DURYEA
Newly remodeled
1 bedroom, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &
washer/dryer
hookup, no pets,
front & side porch-
es, $550/month +
utilities & security.
Call (570)335-8258
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
PAGE 19 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at
delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000
financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
FORD BONUS REBATE.............–– 2,000
FMCC REBATE...........................–– 1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................–– 1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.....–– 1,601
FORD REBATE...........................................................–– 2,000
FORD BONUS REBATE................................................–– 500
FMCC REBATE...........................................................–– 1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................................................–– 1,000
TRADE IN REBATE..................................................–– 1,000
CHROME PKG DISCOUNT OFF MSRP..................................–– 1,500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....................................–– 2,201
XLT, 5.0LV8, Auto., Air, CD, 18” Chrome Wheels, Driver’s Pkg.,
40/20/40 Split Seat, Cruise, Convenience Pkg., SYNC, Keyless
Entry w/Keypad, Fog Lamps, Pwr. Seat, Pwr. Sliding Rear
Window, Pwr. Equipment Group, ABS, Max Trailer Tow Pkg.,
Sirius Satellite Radio,
FORD REBATE.........................................–– 1,500
FORD BONUS REBATE..............................–– 500
OFF LEASE REBATE...............................–– 1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.....................–– 686
3.5L Engine, MyFord
Display, Auto. Climate Control, Pwr. Mirrors,
3rd Row 17” Steel Wheels, CD, Keyless Entry, 3rd Row
Seat, MyKey, Cruise Control, PW, PL, Seat, MyKey, Cruise Control, PW, PL,
24
Mos.
STX, 3.7LV6, Auto., ABS, 17” Aluminum
Wheels, 40/20/40 Split Seat, Decor
Pkg., Cruise, Cloth Seat, Air,
Pwr. Equipment Group
FORD REBATE...........................–– 2,000
FMCC REBATE...........................–– 1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................–– 1,000
TRADE IN REBATE...................–– 1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........–– 761
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/30/12.
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/30/12.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/30/12.
FORD REBATE............................................–– 1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE..................................–– 1,000
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...................–– 45
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........................–– 541
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/30/12.
FORD REBATE...........................–– 1,500
FORD BONUS REBATE................–– 500
FMCC REBATE...........................–– 1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................–– 1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........–– 801
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/30/12.
Pwr. Windows, PDL, Air, Advance Trac with
Roll Stability Control, CD, Remote Keyless
Entry, MyFord, Convenience Group, Auto.
Headlamps, Reverse Sensing Sys
Front Wheel Drive,
Air, AM/FM Radio,
Auto., Anti-Theft
Sys., Anti-Lock Brakes
Sys., Front & Side Airbags,
Wire Mesh Bulkhead,
Cargo Management Pkg.
FORD REBATE............................................–– 1,000
FORD COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT REBATE....................–– 375
OFF LEASE REBATE..................................–– 1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.........................–– 245
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
FORD REBATE...........................–– 1,500
FMCC REBATE...........................–– 1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................–– 1,000
TRADE IN REBATE...................–– 1,000
XLWORK PKG DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.. .–– 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........–– 451
3.7V6, XL Plus Pkg., Cruise Control, CD,
MyKey Sys., Pwr. Equipment Group,
40/20/40 Cloth
Seat, Pwr. Mirrors,
XL Decor Group
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
, SE, 1.6 EcoBoost Engine,
Auto., Keyless Entry with Keypad, PL,
Auto. Headlamps, 17” Alloy Wheels,
Sirius Satellite Radio, Perimeter
Alarm, Tonneau Cover, SYNC, PW
6.2LV8, XL Decor Group, Snow Plow Pkg.,
Electronic Locking Axle, Speed Control,
Sliding Rear Window, Stabilizer Pkg.,
Trailer Brake Controller,
Pwr. Equipment Group,
CD, Tilt Wheel, Air,
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
24
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 20
W
e Make The Difference!
For the past three years, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with the prestigious President’s Award for
excellence in each of a series of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and Customer Service Satisfaction.
*All offers end close of business Sunday, September 30, 2012 or while supplies last. All offers exclude 1st payment, tax, tags, $125 processing fee and $650 acquisition fee on lease offers. Quantities as of 09/21/2012 and include both in-stock and incoming units for all model years and trimlevel for the series described. †Finance and
lease offers require tier 1 plus credit approval through Toyota Financial Services. All leases are based on 12,000 miles per year. No security deposit required for all leases. Available unit counts include both in-stock and incoming units for all model years and trim levels for series described. **Cash Back offers includes funds fromToyota
of Scranton, Toyota Financial Services and Toyota Motor Sales combined. Vehicle must be in stock units --- Prior sales excluded. Customer must present ad at time of purchase. Bonus Cash and Lease Bonus Cash must lease or finance with Toyota Financial Services. Conquest Cash is available on leases or purchases. Must trade any
non-Toyota car, truck, van or SUV. See dealer for details. 2012 Impact Advertising 12TSS-NFC-ABJ092612
OVER595TOYOTASAVAILABLE! OOO LE! LE! LE!
Stop in and ask howyou can save half offMSRP on a newToyota!
***
SAVE HALF OFF ON
NEW CAMRY, COROLLA
AND RAV4s!
One of Pennsylvania’s largest inventories of Toyotas
Over 100 certified employees dedicated to serving you
60,000 square-foot brand-newstate-of-the-art facility
Brand newenvironmentally friendlyToyota Certified collision center
Luxury customer lounge withWi-Fi and flat screenTVs for your comfort
ONLY Dunkin’ Donuts in aToyota Dealership in the United States
WHY GO ANYWHERE ELSE?
Fall
Clearance Sale
2013 COROLLA LE
NEW
Model #1838 Stock# 46397 MSRP: $19,200
2
. 9%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
1
. 9%APR
for up to
48 mos.

OR
1
.9%APR
for up to
36 mos.

OR
$
149
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
219
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
$
500
Lease
Bonus Cash!**
NOWWITH
2012 CAMRY LE
NEW
Model #2532 Stock# 46241 MSRP: $24,025
0
.9%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR $
500
Lease
Bonus Cash!**
NOWWITH
$
500
Conquest
Cash!**
ANDWITH
$
159
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
229
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
2012 RAV4 AWD
NEW
Model #4432 Stock# 46598 MSRP: $25,334
0
%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
$
169
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
500
Lease
Bonus Cash!**
NOWWITH
$
249
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
2012 TUNDRA
DOUBLE CAB 4X4 NEW
Model #8339 Stock# 46355 (4.6L V8, Automatic) MSRP: $33,405
0
%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
$
279
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
1,000
Bonus
Cash!**
NOWWITH
$
359
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
2012 HIGHLANDER 4WD
NEW
Model #6948 Stock# 46263 MSRP: $32,016
0
%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
$
239
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
500
Lease
Bonus Cash!**
NOWWITH
$
309
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
2012 AVALON
NEW
Model #3544 Stock# 46558 MSRP: $34,840
0
%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
$
339
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
399
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
2012 PRIUS
TWO NEW
Model #1223 Stock# 45999 MSRP: $24,960
$
259
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
329
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
3
.9%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
2013 VENZA V6 AWD LE
NEW
Model #2822 Stock# T-inc MSRP: $33,075
$
309
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
379
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
2
.9%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
2012 TACOMA
REG CAB 4X4 NEW
Model #7503 Stock# 46185 (4 cyl. Manual) MSRP: $22,060
3
.9%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
$
229
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
299
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
2012 SIENNA LE
NEW
Model #5338 Stock# 46355 MSRP: $30,835
0
. 9%APR
for up to
60 mos.

OR
0
%APR
for up to
48 mos.

OR
$
279
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $2,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
359
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
3
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
27
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
41
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
101
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
70
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
11
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
74
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
46
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
33
OTHERUNITS
AVAILABLE
4
PAGE 21 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
944 Commercial
Properties
906 Homes for Sale
944 Commercial
Properties
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
Te Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS
®
, Inc.
Open House Directory
Visit timesleader.com & Click “Homes”
to see the most up to date list of Open Houses
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
TH
, 2012
848 Quincy Ave.,
Scranton
Century 21®
Sherlock Homes
Dir: Mulberry St to L on
Quincy, property on corner
of Quincy & Myrtle.
MLS#12-3512
1-3PM
$249,900
DALLAS
COMMERCIAL
BUILDING
FOR LEASE
3593 MEMORIAL HIGHWAY
(RT. 415)
2625 SF BUILDING
GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR
OFFICE OR BUSINESS
SOME UTILITIES INCLUDED
AVAILABLE 11/1/12
CALL JOHN 690-0610
RN Unit Manager
Full time.
RN Supervisor
Full time. 11p.m.-7:30 a.m. shift.
Long term care experience and BSN
preferred. Supervisory and/or man-
agement experience required. Excel-
lent wage and benefit package.
Contact Colleen Knight:
Jewish Home of Eastern PA
1101 Vine Street
Scranton, PA 18510
Phone: 344-6177, ext.140/Fax: 344-6859
Or email: cknight2@frontier.com
EOE
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
JENKINS TWP.
AVAILABLE NOW!
3-4 bedrooms,
2 full baths, dining
room, large living
room, kitchen,
stove, off street
parking. Heat and
water included.
$875/month,
security, credit
check &
references.
917-753-8192
KINGSTON - 2 APTS.
902 MARKET ST.
One very large 2
bedroom apartment
washer/ dryer
hookup, all appli-
ances, recently ren-
ovated, quiet neigh-
borhood, landlord
pays water. $650/
month per unit.
5 ROSS ST.
1 bedroom avail-
able. Private park-
ing. Quiet neighbor-
hood. $600 and
$650. 1 month
rent & security.
Available now! Near
college.
570-656-7125
KINGSTON
183 Zerby Ave
2 bedrooms, 1 tile
bath with shower.
No pets. $575/
month + utilities
& security
570-779-4609
570-407-3991
KINGSTON
1st Ave. 1 bedroom,
single occupancy,
off-street parking,
no pets, references,
$450 + utilities.
Call 570-655-9229
KINGSTON
MUST SEE!!
Elegant 3rd floor
of historic home in
charming neigh-
borhood. 2 bed-
rooms. All stain-
less kitchen,
washer/dryer.
Newly renovated,
hardwood floors,
private deck, 2
car garage, air,
security system,
wifi, intercom &
keyless entry. all
utilities. $1,300 +
security &
references.
570-288-6686.
LUZERNE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets,
yard. $650/month +
1 month security &
utilities. Call
570-817-0410
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LARKSVILLE
Modern 2 bedroom
ranch, central heat
& air, tile bath &
Laminate floors, all
appliances included,
off street parking.
$800 includes heat.
570-760-1045
LARKSVILLE
FREE HEAT
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator &
stove, off-street
parking, small pets
OK. $600/month + 1
month deposit. Call
570-262-1577
LUZERNE
REMODELED REMODELED
PERFECTION PERFECTION
2 bedrooms,
2nd floor, high
quality, maple
kitchens, tiled
baths/vanities,
all appliances
with laundry in
unit, gas
fireplace,
covered
carports, glass
enclosed
porches.
$750 + UTILITIES
2 YEAR SAME.
NO PETS/
NO SMOKING/
EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION.
Managed
America Realty
570-288-1422
NANTICOKE
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, washer/dryer
hookup, off street
parking. No pets.
Heat, water & hot
water included.
$495/month,
570-477-6018,
leave message.
PITTSTON
Large 1st floor
apartment. 1 bed-
room washer/dryer
hookup, water,
sewer & heat
included, off street
parking, $675/
month + security
570-443-0770
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
OLD FORGE
Connell St.
2 bedrooms,
1 bath. Totally
remodeled.
Kitchen appli-
ances. Large
fenced in
yard.
$700/month.
(570)
299-0298
PLYMOUTH TWP.
2nd floor. 2 bed-
room, large rooms.
Plenty of closet
space, off street
parking. $450/mo +
utilities and securi-
ty. No Pets.
570-779-7777
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
TRUCKSVILLE
3 bedrooms,
refrigerator &
stove, washer/
dryer hookup, laun-
dry room, off-street
parking, no pets or
smoking. $700/
month + electric,
gas & hot water, 1
month security,
references & back-
ground check.
570-592-2902
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
1st floor 3 bed-
room apt. Washer
/dryer hookup
$600/month +
utilities & 1 month
security.
139 Sambourne
St. Section 8
okay. No pets.
570-460-6173
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, 1st
floor. All appliances
included, washer/
dryer in basement.
Lots of storage, off
street parking,
hardwood floors &
new windows.
Completely
furnished or unfur-
nished. $650/month
+ utilities & security.
Call Brain at
570-299-0298
WILKES-BARRE
Executive 3 bed-
room apartment.
Gas heat, hard-
wood floors, French
doors, fireplace.
$675 plus
utilities. 655-4915
944 Commercial
Properties
ASHLEY
2100 SQ. FT.
SPACE. 2 overhead
garage doors, close
to Route 81.
$300 per month.
570-592-3575,
DALLAS
Rt. 309
Multi-use Property
1st floor office
space, high traf-
fic area, plenty of
parking. $500/
month + electric.
Security & lease.
570-675-2031
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
947 Garages
PITTSTON
GARAGE SPACE
AVAILABLE
$70/month.
Ideal for cars,
motorcycles,
small boats, RV’s,
trailers, etc.
570-430-9537
950 Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
6 SPACIOUS ROOMS
Freshly painted,
newer carpeting,
full basement, yard,
gas heat, adequate
closets.
$635 month +
security and
utilities. No
smoking.
Some pets
okay.
908-392-2494
EXETER
4 bedrooms, newly
carpeted. Living
room, dining room,
laminated flooring.
Kitchen, w/d
hookup, dishwash-
er, fridge, stove, 1.5
baths. Large attic
and basement.
Deck, off street
parking. First, last
and security
required. No pets
or smoking.
$875 month
570-655-9167
FORTY FORT
2 bedroom, newly
renovated, custom
oak kitchen cabi-
nets, tile floors,
paddle fans, 1.5
baths. Off street
parking, deck and
patio, $800 + utili-
ties; gas, electric
and water, washer
dryier hookup. Ref-
erences required,
no pets or smoking.
570-779-4609
570-407-3991
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
Charming, spacious
6 room, 2 bedroom
duplex, includes 2nd
& 3rd floor. Ample
closets. Washer
/dryer hook-up.
$575/ month + utili-
ties, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
2 bedroom, 1 bath,
1st floor duplex,
New w/w carpeting
& hardwood floors.
Convenient to
Wyoming Ave.
Washer/dryer hook-
up, basement
storage. Reduced!
$520/month
+ utilities, security,
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath
half double, Freshly
cleaned & painted.
Tenant pays all utili-
ties including sewer.
$585 plus security.
Call (570) 357-0712
PLAINS
Spacious 3
bedroom, 1 bath
with Victorian
charm with hard-
wood floors, neutral
decor, stained glass
window, large
kitchen. Washer
/dryer hook-up,
off-street parking.
$700 month +
utilities, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLYMOUTH
3/4 bedroom, 1
bath. Located on
Academy St. $650 +
utilities & security.
Small pets OK with
extra security.
Call 570-262-1577
TAYLOR
216 Union Street.
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
living & dining
rooms, kitchen.
Pergo floors on 1st
floor, carpeting
upstairs. Attic,
basement, porch &
fenced in yard.
Conveniently
located. $750
Call Office
570-901-1020
Trademark
Realty Group
WILKES-BARRE
HALF DOUBLE
3 bedrooms, one full
bath, living & dining
rooms, washer and
dryer hookup. Gas
heat. $550/month
plus utilities, securi-
ty & lease. No pets.
call 570-407-3995
950 Half Doubles
WILKES-BARRE
REGENT STREET
HALF DOUBLE For
Rent. Huge Living
Room. 2 Large
Bedrooms
Call: 570-262-1660
$575.00 a Month
First and Last
Month Rent
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths, small yard,
front porch, off
street parking.
$565/month
security required.
Tenant pays
all utilities.
570-357-0712
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
953Houses for Rent
ASHLEY
CAREY’S PATCH
4 bedrooms,
3 baths, full
modern house,
off street park-
ing. Pet friendly
$1,100/month.
Call Will @
570-417-5186
WILKES-BARRE
52 SLYVANUS St.
Single family home
for rent. 1,450 sq ft.
3 bedrooms with
closets. First floor
tile bath, 1st floor
washer/dryer hook-
up, new gas water
heater, new car-
pets, modern kit-
chen, ceiling fan,
new gas stove,
dead bolt locks,
enclosed front
porch, basement,
residential street,
fenced yard, 1 car
private driveway, 1
car garage. 1 year
lease. 1 month
security. Back-
ground checks.
$790 plus utilities.
call Bill
215-527-8133
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
OCEAN CITY,
MARYLAND, Best
selection of afford-
able rentals.
Full/partial weeks.
Call for FREE
brochure. Open
daily. Holiday Real
Estate.
1-800-638-2102
Online reservations:
www.holidayoc.com
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
HOUSE HOUSE
CLEANING CLEANING
Let Us Help
You Tidy Up!
Call for Informa-
tion
$10 Off Your
First Cleaning
570-378-2605 or
570-378-3049
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
1234 Pressure
Washing
POWER WASHING!
Concrete, Houses,&
Decks. The weather
is changing. Now is
the time to have
your concrete
washed and sealed!
Call now:
(412) 346-2025 or
(570) 591-1933
PA094210
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
GET IT
TOGO.
Search the app store
and install The Times Leader
mobile app now for when
you need your news to go.
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 22
The Journal
Call 1-800-273-7130
For Local Pros
LOCAL PROS
DAPSIS
REGISTERED PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS
Serving Abingtons over 25 years Gas & Oil • 24 Hour Service
313 Leach Hill Road., Clarks Summit • 587-1401
WELL DRILLING
•WELLS
•PUMP REPAIR
•FILTERS
•PUMPS
•WATER SOFTENERS
•SULFUR REMOVAL
COMPLETE WATER SYSTEMS
ROUTES 6-11 • DALTON, PA 18414
563-1123
“TELL YOUR WATER PROBLEMS TO CRESSWELL”
Route 107, Lake Sheridn
(10 Miles from Clarks Summit)
9:00-5:00 Mon-Fri • 8:00-3:30 Sat
945-5379
Sales & Service
MTD Products, Briggs & Stratton,
Husqvarna, Tecumseh, Poulan, Kohler,
White, Mantis, Oregon, Echo, Muray
Small Engine Service
CLARK’ S SHARP-ALL
CONTRACTORS
Pat Regan Gutter Cleaning
All Winter Long
“Te Right Way” Cleaned, Flushed and Minor Repairs
CALL BEFORE YOU REPLACE THEM
Call Pat Regan • 383-1991 • No Answer, Leave Message
MALONE HOME IMPROVEMENTS
New Construction, Remodeling,
Decks, Roofng, Siding, Kitchens,
Baths, Etc.
LICENSED & INSURED
570-499-8226
AIR CONDITIONING
& HEATING
BUILDING &
REMODELING
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
Service - Installation
AJS Mechanical Services, LLC.
Dalton, PA 570-468-0190
We service all brands!
GUTTER REPAIR
& CLEANING
PLUMBING & HEATING
IMPROVEMENT
TOP SOIL/PAVING/EXCAVATION
Shupp’s Excavating, Paving & Topsoil
570-945-3690
TOPSOIL
Screened soil blended with organic matter, compost & lime.
Soil processed at our topsoil pit. We install new lawns!
PARKING SERVICES
Driveways, Parking Lots & Roadways. Commercial & Residential Projects.
**FREE ESTIMATES**
EXCAVATION
Septic Systems, Foundations & Roadways. Tri-axle trucks
hauling top soil, modifed stone & gravel.
WWW.ShuppsExcavating.com Serving the Community Since 1972
EXCAVATING
JACOBY EXCAVATING
570-561-7796 or 570-587-1494
Septic and Basement
Water Problems-SOLVED!
ECO CONSTRUCTION LLC
Fully Licensed & Insured
Specializing in decking, siding, roofing,
kitchens & bathrooms, additions & more.
In house licensed Architect & Engineer.
Summer Special
10%OFF decking, siding and roofing
Senior Discount
www.Ecobsc.com | Find us on Angie’s List
570-945-EC04 (3264)
REPAIRS
ASPHALT SEALING
BOB’S BLACKTOP
Paving: Driveways, Parking Lots,
Patching, Hot Crackfiller Repairs
Residential
Commercial
PA# 041254
836-3587
Saiis
Siivici
Iwsraiiariow
Warii Soiriwiis x Tiiarxiwr
VAN FLEET DRILLING CO., INC.
Puowi:
¡;o-¡o¡-1;;o
:o:o Maiii Roao
Dairow, PA 18¡1¡
PAINTING
PA046618 570-346-1317
Fully Insured • No JobToo Small.
K.D. PAINTING SERVICES
Interior/Exterior, Power Washing,
Deck Refinishing
SMC CONCRETE & GENERAL
CONSTRUCTION
Retaining Walls, Concrete, Pavers, Garage
Floor Coatings and Overlays
ALL PHASES OF CONSTRUCTION
17 Years Experience | Licensed & Insured
570-430-5728
Karpentry by Keiper
Specializing in windows, doors, paneling,
decks, kitchens, bathrooms, roofing, siding, gutters,
ALL PHASES OF CARPENTRY
Licensed General Contractor.
Call 563-2766
(Quality over volume, one job at a time)
CONSTRUCTION
GLASS SERVICES
We do it all!
Auto • Commercial • Residental
WYOMING AVENUE & NEW STREET
346-0777
CELLAR RESURFACING
Chimney construction, hauling, small
demolition, stucco, porches, sidewalks.
Insured. Licensed. I RETURN ALL CALLS!
570-457-5849
RAIN GUTTERS
$EAMLE$$ GUTTER$ FOR LE$$
5”&6” Seamless K Gutters Installed
& Delivery Service for Contractors
Gutter Cleaning & Leaf Covers Available
Call Bill’s Home Improvement
570-343-7708 PA031888
TREE SPECIALIST
KEYSTONE TREE SPECIALIST
Will remain open in the absence of the late
Robert Bleep, Sr.
The company remains family owned & operated.
We will continue to honor and serve past and present clients.
NEW CLIENTS ARE ALSO WELCOME!
Mention this ad for a 5% discount
Please call 570-341-8714 or 570-906-4487
MASONRY
KEATING MASONRY
Åll types of masonry
Fully Insured, Commercial & Residential
Brick, Block, Stone, Stucco, Concrete
SONRYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY
ntial
570-575-2592
570-267-6776
ROOFING
SEAL COATING
TWIN FORCES
Professional Hot Oil Seal Coating
Not Latex!
Asphalt Repair
& Crack Filling
Licensed & Insured
Since 1947
570-477-8963
D & R ROOFING
Commercial & Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
PA 032805 Insured
570-383-8831
PAGE 23 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 24

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