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CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
WEATHER
9 die in head-on crash
between bus and tanker
Bongbong:
Careful in
rewriting
history
Aquino blames Arroyo
anew for nation’s woes
Comelec disqualifies 15
party-list organizations
Manila, Beijing to try
to mend bilateral ties
Graft court rejects govt
claims to Tan’s companies
PNoy won’t
reinstate
dismissed
Ombudsman
www.manilastandardtoday.com • mst@mstandardtoday.com
TODAY
Standard
Manila
Vol. XXVI No. 192 16 Pages, 2 Sections
P18.00 Thursday, September 27, 2012
By Joyce Pangco Pa-
ñares and Rey Requejo
PRESIDENT Aquino stood
firm on Wednesday on his de-
cision to fire a deputy Ombuds-
man accused of demanding a
bribe and sitting on the case of
a dismissed police officer, and
Malacañang said it would file a
petition for reconsideration on
the Supreme Court’s order to
reinstate the official.
The Supreme Court, mean-
while, also sustained its order giv-
ing control of 24 percent block of
shares in San Miguel Corp. to the
government in behalf of the coco-
nut farmers.
Mr. Aquino said Deputy
Ombudsman Emilio Gon-
zales sat on the case against
suspended senior inspec-
tor Rolando Mendoza for
By Macon R. Araneta
SENATOR Ferdinand Marcos
Jr. on Wednesday said the peo-
ple who were trying to “rewrite
non-factual events” during the
Martial Law years were more
worrisome than his mother’s ru-
ined shoes, gowns and clothes.
He told reporters he was sur-
prised that some people were
dismissing years of Philippine
history as insignificant.
“To discount everything that
happened--I mean, come on, ev-
erything that happened in the 20
years of my father’s presidency
and to say it’s not historically
significant…well, that’ s already
rewriting history,” the senator
and namesake of the late Presi-
dent Ferdinand Marcos said of
the Martial Law years.
“But that’s something we’ve
been seeing over the years many
many times. Unfortunately, we
have become too accustomed to
The President also appealed
to the industry to support his
administration’s new mining
policies, which the Chamber of
Mines had threatened to chal-
lenge in court.
“We understand the concerns
of mining companies, but as
President, it is my duty to remind
everyone that these minerals are
property of the Filipino people,”
Mr. Aquino said.
“The state must receive fair
compensation from companies
that profit from these resources,
so that we may then channel any
gains made from them to projects
IN the run-up to next year’s elec-
tions, President Benigno Aquino
III rehashed old attacks on his
predecessor Wednesday, com-
plaining about the burdens he
inherited two years ago from
then President Gloria Macapagal-
Arroyo, who is now a congress-
woman representing Pampanga.
In his speech during the oath-
taking of Liberal Party mem-
bers in Bohol, Mr. Aquino again
presented a litany of headaches
that he said his predecessor had
left him, including a project that
would have dredged Laguna de
Bay and dumped the material in
another part of the lake.
“We would have paid P18.7
billion for this plan to play with
mud,” he said.
Mr. Aquino also pointed to P11
billion worth of contracts for pre-
fabricated bridges that was signed
by the past administration two days
before he assumed office.
He also blamed Arroyo for
leaving the National Food Author-
ity with a P177-billion debt, which
had ballooned from P12 billion
when she became President.
Arroyo, who is suffering from
a painful spinal condition, will
By Joel E. Zurbano
THE Elections commission has
rejected more than 15 party list
organizations, including the
namesake of the local football
team Azkal that applied for ac-
creditation to join the May 13,
2013 mid-term elections.
The commission decided ini-
tially to dismiss the petitions for
accreditation of the Asosasyon ng
Mangangalakal or ASKAL and the
Addicts and Alcoholics Carrying
the Message Association. The two
did not file a motion for reconsid-
eration before the commission.
The other rejected organiza-
tions included Aksyon Mahirap,
1-Aangat Ka Pilipino, Isa Akong
Magsasaka Foundation, Aniban
ng Magtutubig ng Pilipinas, Sara-
rong Bicolnon, United Philippine
Transport Tricycle, Trisikidad,
Habal-Habal Operators and Driv-
ers Association, Aurora Integrat-
ed Multi-Purpose Cooperative,
and Nagkaisang Alay sa Bayan
ng Maka-Diyos at Makabayang
Nangangalakal.
Meanwhile, the Federa-
tion of Philippine Industries on
Wednesday asked the Comelec to
By Joyce Pangco Pañares,
Sara Susanne Fabunan,
Macon Ramos-Araneta
and Florante Solmerin
MANILA and Beijing on Wednes-
day agreed to try to mend the
strained relations between the Phil-
ippines and China after last week’s
high-level meeting between Inte-
rior and Local Government Secre-
tary Mar Roxas and Chinese Vice
President Xi Jinping did not pro-
duce concrete results.
President Benigno Aquino III
admitted that his administration
needed to do more in mending
relations with Beijing.
“There are so many things that
have to be tackled,” Mr. Aquino
said.
He, however, welcomed the
establishment of official lines of
By Merck Maguddayao
THE Sandiganbayan on Wednes-
day rejected with finality all the
government’s claims to 60 per-
cent of businessman Lucio Tan’s
holdings in all his companies,
hence putting an end to the 25-
year-old case.
The anti-graft court’s Fifth Di-
vision, in effect, said Tan’s busi-
nesses were purely private.
“Defendants failed to introduce
evidence to prove that the act of
the plaintiff [people of the Philip-
pines] in filing the instant case was
a wrongful act and accompanied
by bad faith, or that plaintiff acted
in a wanton, fraudulent, reckless,
oppressive or malevolent manner,”
the Sandiganbayan said in a resolu-
tion signed on June 11.
Palace insists
on fair share in
mining income
Ivory products. An antique shop store keeper shows a collection of
religious items made from elephant tusks. The National Geographic
said the high demand for ivory products in the Philippines had led to
the slaughter of elephants in Africa. DANNY PATA
Collision. A police photograph shows the damage on a bus after
a head-on collision with a fuel tanker in Muñoz City in Nueva
Ecija. The fuel truck (photo below) was almost cut in half as a
result of the impact.
Mass oathtaking. President Aquino and Liberal Party members in Bohol display the Laban sign during
a mass oathtaking in Tagbilaran City.
By Florante S. Solmerin
NINE people were killed and
nine others were injured in a
multiple collision involving an
Isuzu fuel tanker, a passenger
bus and a Honda motorcycle
before dawn Wednesday along
Maharlika Highway in Baran-
gay Curva, Science City of Mu-
ñoz, Nueva Ecija.
Muñoz police chief Supt. Mi-
chael Angelo Zunega said the inci-
dent, which happened around 2:30
a.m., woke up residents in the area
who had worried that the gas that
spilled from the tanker might catch
fire.
The incident also caused
heavy traffic for several hours
and prompted the police to draw
up alternate routes.
Next page Next page
Next page
Next page
Next page Next page
Next page
Next page
By Joyce Pangco
Pañares
PRESIDENT Beni-
gno Aquino III said
Wednesday that the
government will get
its fair share of min-
ing revenue through
a new law, even as
his administration
agreed to remove a
new requirement for
mining companies to
renegotiate expired
contracts that are now
automatically renewed
for 25 years.
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News
ManilaStandardToday mst.daydesk@gmail.com SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A2
RETIRED broadcast journalist
Jun Bautista—real name Au-
gurio Bautista Camu Jr.—died
Tuesday morning due to compli-
cations arising from emphysema.
He was 73.
Bautista, Jun Bote to his
friends and colleagues, died
around 8:30 a.m. at the Makati
Medical Center, where he had
been taken after he was found
in bed with a weak pulse, his
daughter Maria Lourdes Camu
told the online service of the
GMA Network, where Bautista
had worked from 1974 up to his
retirement in 1999.
Lourdes said Bautista was first
diagnosed with emphysema in
2007 and had since gone in and out
of hospitals. He is survived by his
wife Erminda and children Leo,
Loida, Lourdes, and Liza Jane.
Bautista studied at the Uni-
versity of the Philippines in Los
Baños and was a member of the
Upsilon Sigma Phi fraternity.
His remains have been
brought to Chapel 4 of the Ma-
gallanes Church in Makati City
and will be cremated at 1 p.m.
on Sept. 29 at the Loyola Me-
morial Chapels and Cremato-
rium in Sucat, Parañaque City.
Jun Bautista dies at 73
Complainant Emilio Aguinaldo
Suntay claimed that SMC Global
chairman Ramon Ang and
board member Roberto Ongpin
“colluded” with Landbank
president Gilda Pico and former
chairman Margarito Teves in the
share purchase agreement.
“Landbank officials are
confident that the complaint
filed can be easily explained,
including the fair value price
of P90 per share in December
2008 for the purported
sale of Landbank Meralco
shareholdings to Global 5000
(now SMC Global),” the bank
said in a statement.
The bank said it practiced due
diligence and transparency in the
transaction, and that the shares sold
at P90 each in December 2008
when the prevailing market price
was P57 per share, representing
a premium of 58 percent over the
shares’ market price.
Share sale
explained
LAND Bank of the Philippines on
Wednesday said it will fully explain
the sale of Manila Electric Co. shares
to Global 500, now SMC Global, after
a case was filed against some of its of-
ficials with the Ombudsman claiming
they risked more than P4 billion worth
of government funds in the purchase.
9...
“May iniiwasan na motor ang
bus, galing ito norte papunta
Manila. Nahagip niya ang mo-
tor at nagkaroon ng head-on
collision sa tanker na papuntang
norte,” (The Manila-bound bus
hit first a motorcycle it was try-
ing to evade. After which, it hit
the north-bound tanker head-
on) Zunega said.
The Victory Liner bus (CWR-
195) with body number 1664 was
carrying at least 40 passengers.
Zunega said the injured pas-
sengers were rushed to separate
hospitals in the cities of San
Jose and Cabanatuan, but eight
of the victims succumbed to
multiple injuries.
Among the fatalities were the
drivers of the bus and the fuel
tanker identified as Ryan Ca-
maging of 186 Roosevelt, Que-
zon City and Sylvino Marzo
of Banitbet, Bagabag, Nueva
Ecija, respectively. Also killed
were the driver and his wife
who were riding the motorcycle
that was first hit by the bus.
The couple on the motorcycle
were identified as Leoncio Pa-
jarillo and his wife Evangeline.
The rest of the fatalities were
passengers of the bus.
Zunega identified the other
fatalities as Donatella Aquino
of Maguinting, Piat, Cagayan;
Marife Cale Bondoc of Tanza
Cavite and three other unidenti-
fied female passengers.
They were brought to the
Muñoz Funeral Parlor for au-
topsy.
Injured were Rolando Co-
tanes of Maguinling, Piat, Ca-
gayan; Maria Rowena Dacanay
of Pugoncino, Bagabag, Nueva
Vizcaya; Arthur Antonio Soli-
nas, 45, of Sta. Maria, Nueva
Vizcaya; Juan Lima Taguilan,
70, of Enrile, Cagayan; Araceli
Medina, Jone Audalang, Arthur
Calinas of Sta. Maria, Iabela;
Elvino Bajinang of Juan, Ca-
gayan; and Alama Sansano of
Bayambang, Nueva Vizcaya.
Comelec...
disqualify the LPG Marketers
from participating in next year’s
national and local elections and to
cancel its party list accreditation.
The group said LPGMA had
failed to prove that the sector it
had been claiming to represent
was marginalized and underrep-
resented.
“It is plain that LPGMA Inc.
merely wants to use a seat in
Congress to compete against oth-
er oil companies. Indeed, [rep.
Arnel] Ty has already been using
his seat for his own individual in-
terest,” the federation said in its
petition.
The group said LPGMA’s
members were multimillionaires
and that Ty was an incorporator
of Omni Gas Corp., Republic
Gas Corp., Pinnacle Gas, Multi
Gas Corp., Extraordinaire Gas
Corp., and Suncrest Gas Corp.
that were earning millions and
had assets worth millions more.
“The party-list system is not
meant for big business,” federa-
tion chairman Jesus Arranza said.
“It is not to be wielded by
those who already have much in
life. To allow them to wield the
party-list system as another busi-
ness venture would only make a
mockery of the law.”
In another development, the
Alab ng Mamamahayag or Alam
party list on Monday filed a mo-
tion for reconsideration after the
commission’s rejected its peti-
tion for accreditation for lack of
a track record.
The group also claimed that it
was denied “because it refused to
give P3 million in exchange for
the grant of the application.”
With Alena Mae S. Flores
PNoy...
nine months and was demanding a
bribe, which led to a hostage situ-
ation in which Mendoza and eight
Chinese tourists were killed.
“Mendoza could not appeal to a
higher body because there was no
final adjudication on his motion for
reconsideration. I don’t think it helps
anyone if their own rules are not im-
plemented,” Mr. Aquino said.
Mendoza, a decorated member
of the Manila Police, hijacked in
August 2010 a tourist bus carry-
ing 20 Chinese tourists and four
Filipinos, demanding that the
Ombudsman open his case so he
could defend himself.
A police team assaulted the bus
when negotiations broke down.
Mendoza and eight of the hos-
tages were killed in the shootout.
Mr. Aquino said the Supreme
Court claimed there was no basis
that Gonzales committed betrayal
of public trust but Gonzales was
remiss in his duties for sitting on
the case of Mendoza.
“We do not want that to hap-
pen again, that a person will be
deprived of justice again,” Mr.
Aquino said.
The Supreme Court said Gon-
zales was not relieved of all his
liabilities but the accusation
against him “fell short of the con-
stitutional standard of betrayal of
public trust” and ordered his rein-
statement.
Deputy presidential spokes-
woman Abigail Valte said
Malacañang would seek a rever-
sal of the Supreme Court ruling.
The Supreme Court turned down
the appeal of the Philippine Coco-
nut Producers Federation against
the 2004 decision of the Sandigan-
bayan, which ruled that the 753.8
million shares were public funds.
“Since the block of SMC
shares were acquired using coco-
nut levy funds, which have been
established to be public in char-
acter, it goes without saying that
these acquired croporations and
assets ought to be regarded and
treated as government assets,” the
Court ruling said.
Aquino...
seek re-election, the leader of the
opposition in the House, Rep.
Danilo Suarez, said Wednesday.
Suarez said, however, that Mrs.
Arroyo’s daughter Luli might run
in her place if her health does not
improve.
Mrs. Arroyo continues to lose
weight, he said.
“She is now 88 pounds and her
medical condition is in limbo,” Su-
arez added.
Suarez reiterated a call to the
Aquino administration to allow her
to seek medical treatment abroad.
“The former president may no lon-
ger be willing to go under the knife
for the fourth time after her three sur-
geries had failed,” Suarez added.
Arroyo, in one of her lat-
est Twitter messages, said that
she has to wear again her neck
brace after experiencing constant
numbness in her neck.
Also on Wednesday, Mrs. Ar-
royo’s former political party, now
renamed the National Unity Party,
forged an alliance with President
Aquino’s Liberal Party.
NUP, formerly known as the Kab-
alikat ng Malayang Pilipino, is head-
ed by Nueva Ecija Rep. Rodolfo An-
tonino as president and Cebu Rep.
Pablo Garcia as chairman.
The Liberal Party has also
forged election alliances with the
Nacionalista Party of Senator
Manny Villar and the Nationalist
People’s Coalition of businessman
Eduardo Cojuangco Jr. Joyce
Pangco Panares and Maricel Cruz
Graft...
The resolution said the govern-
ment prosecutors presented insuf-
ficient evidence to indict the Fili-
pino-Chinese tycoon for receiving
benefits and favors from the Mar-
cos administration.
But the Sandiganbayan also
rejected Tan’s claim to P900 mil-
lion in exemplary damages and
attorneys’ fees.
For 25 years the Philippine gov-
ernment had been seeking the for-
feiture of Tan’s 60 per cent shares
in Fortune Tobacco Corp., Himmel
Industries Inc., Foremost Farms
Inc., Asia Brewery Inc., Grand-
span Development Corp., Silangan
Holdings Inc., and Dominium Re-
alty and Construction Corp, claim-
ing they were ill-gotten.
Meanwhile, former National
Economic and Development
Authority and Social Security
System chief Romulo Neri has
declined to testify in the multi-
million-dollar NBN-ZTE deal be-
ing heard at the Sandiganbayan’s
Fifth Division.
In a motion to quash, Neri invoked
his right to remain silent in the case
as he was also facing a separate graft
case in the same deal.
“The right to remain silent by
any person under investigation for
a crime is absolute,” Neri said.
“He need not answer any ques-
tion propounded to him and he
may not be summoned unless he
waives that right.”
In that case, former President
and now Pampanga Rep. Gloria
Macapagal-Arroyo is accused
of benefiting from the allegedly
anomalous National Broadband
Network deal between the Phil-
ippines and Chinese telecommu-
nication firm ZTE Corp. in 2007.
Neri is accused of being the facili-
tator of the foiled deal.
Manila...
communication between the two
countries after Roxas and Xi, who
is being groomed to succeed Hu
Jintao as president of China, had a
cordial meeting last week.
China Ambassador to the Philip-
pines Ma Keqing also urged Manila
to “work on the current difficulties”
and bring the two countries’ bilat-
eral relations back to normal.
Speaking during China’s Na-
tional Day on Tuesday night, Ma
said that the Philippines is an im-
portant neighbor to China and said
that the past 37 years of friendly
cooperation brought “tangible
benefits” to both countries.
“I wish joint efforts will be con-
tinued with the aim of overcoming
current difficulties and bringing the
bilateral relations back to track of
normal development. I believe this
is in the interests of both sides and is
conducive to the peace and stability
of our region,” she said.
Ma added that China would
continue to go for “peaceful de-
velopment” and implement the
“policy of good-neighborliness
with neighbor countries”, despite
the looming change in leadership
with the 18th National Congress
taking place later this year.
Mr. Aquino, however, said he
has to first talk with the replace-
ment of former Ambassador to
China Sonia Brady, on Manila’s
next move on the current situation
on the West Philippine Sea.
The president did not name
Brady’s replacement, although
he earlier said that he was choos-
ing between two senior diplomats
from the short-list of five which
Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert
del Rosario submitted last month.
Mr. Aquino asked del Rosario
to submit the shortlist after Brady
suffered a stroke for the second
time, since she was posted in Bei-
jing. Brady had since recovered
and recently returned to Manila.
Earlier, Roxas admitted that
Manila and Beijing remained
deadlocked over the Panatag
Shoal issue.
“There is no improvement be-
cause both sides are still saying
that is ours. So there is no change
(on the deadlock),” Roxas said.
“Irritants continue to be present.”
Roxas told Xi that “logically,
historically, commonsensically
and even legally” Panatag Shoal
belongs to the Philippines.
Roxas said he and Xi decided to
“leave the (territorial) issue at that”
instead of going into details on how
to resolve the conflicting claims.
“But as I’ve said, talk-talk is
better than no talk,” Roxas said.
Meanwhile, House Minority
Leader and Quezon Rep. Danilo
Suarez said he was puzzled why
China is demanding that the Phil-
ippines pay back the $500 million
of its official development assis-
tance (ODA), for the construction
of the North Rail project.
“That is what I want to know,
i want to find out why we need
to pay them back for the botched
Northrail project,” Suarez said.
“Is that a damage fee for the can-
cellation of the contract? I think we
have the rigt to know about all these
things,” Suarez said.
But House Assistant Majority
Leader and Rep. Sherwin Tugna
of Citizens Battle against Corrup-
tion (Cibac) said that the govern-
ment has no choice but to comply
with the agreement.
Bongbong...
that continuous attempt at rewrit-
ing history.”
Marcos made his statement after
President Benigno Aquino III or-
dered the National Historical Com-
mission to form a committee that
would ensure that the real stories
about Martial Law were disseminat-
ed to the public. He then poured P5
million into a newly created advisory
committee that, he said, would move
against revisionist history, particu-
larly the Martial Law years.
“The Filipino people must re-
member those who have sacrificed
their lives during the Martial Law
years in order for us to have the
freedom we experience today,” Mr.
Aquino had said.
He made the statement as the
country marked the 40th anniver-
sary of the declaration of Martial
Law on Sept. 21, 1972 by Marcos,
saying the horrors of dictatorial
rule had been distorted over time to
make it appear that it had its ben-
efits.
“We want to make sure that the
only truthful information gets to be
printed in textbooks and not the web
of lies spun by propagandists and re-
visionists,” Mr. Aquino had said.
Marcos Jr. on Wednesday mere-
ly shrugged off the reported ruined
collection of shoes and clothes
owned by her mother, former First
Lady and now Rep. Imelda Ro-
mualdez Marcos, that are being
kept at the National Museum.
“These are material things. We
can make more gowns and we can
recreate all of that,” he said.
But he lamented the govern-
ment’s policy of confiscating their
property.
“They confiscated them and left
them fall to ruin. They’re not being
used. They’re saying it belongs to
the government, and then use it, but
nothing happens,” he said.
He described the government’s
actions as a continuation of the con-
fiscatory policy that followed the
People Power Revolution of 1986.
Still, Marcos said he saw nothing
wrong with the coalition between
the Nacionalista Party and the Lib-
eral Party, claiming it indicated
that the Marcoses and the Aquinos
had move on since 1986, when
the Marcos dictatorship ended and
Corazon Aquino took over as Phil-
ippine President.
He said he was “extremely” ex-
cited with the alliance between his
group, the Nacionalista Party, and
the administration party, the Presi-
dent’s Liberal Party.
The two political parties had
forged a partnership for the 2013
midterm elections.
“Very excited, extremely excit-
ed,” Marcos said.
“Finally, I’m not in the opposi-
tion after 15 years. It’s a new expe-
rience for me.”
Marcos expressed hope the al-
liance between his family and the
Aquinos would go beyond the
2013 elections.
He wouldn’t mind meeting the
President or sharing the state with
him to endorse common candidates.
“I have been accustomed to such
situations with the President sev-
eral times,” Marcos said.
“What’s wrong with that? You
see, you can get [past 1986]. We
already passed ’8. been there, done
that.”
Still, Marcos said the partnership
between the two parties was only
a tactical alliance for the elections
and not for something else.
“This is not for policy reasons, not
for ideology or policy,” Marcos said.
“He welcomed the idea of re-
turning to Malacañang in case he
was elected President.
“You work for it. Let’s see how it
will turn out. Who knows,” he said.
With Joyce Pangco Pañares
Palace...
that will directly benefit the Fili-
pino people,” he added.
Mr. Aquino made the statement
as he inaugurated two projects
worth $600 million—the reha-
bilitated smelting facility and a
200-megawatt coal power plant
– belonging to the Philippine As-
sociated Smelting and Refining
Corp. in Isabel, Leyte.
“These measures are not with-
out their sacrifices, but I am cer-
tain you realize our efforts to
make our policy acceptable to all
stakeholders,” the President said.
Mr. Aquino underscored the
need for a “predictable mining
environment” in the country to
attract more investors in the min-
eral extraction industry.
“We are removing much of the
ambiguity that once made it dif-
ficult for those who want to enter
mining,” he said.
“Any industry, mining includ-
ed, can only prosper with a clear,
rules-based system. And that is
precisely what our administration
has been hard at work on: setting
rules that are balanced, fair, and
beneficial to all stakeholders,” the
President added.
On Monday, Mr. Aquino called
for a meeting of the Mining In-
dustry Coordinating Council,
which had agreed to revise three
sections of implementing rules
of Executive Order No. 79 that
spells out the administration’s
new mining policy.
The council removed a provi-
sion that expiring 25-year mining
contracts could be subject to new
terms and conditions in line with
the laws prevailing at the time of
renewal.
The same provision says that
mines covered by expiring con-
tracts may be declared as mineral
reservations.
The Chamber of Mines had
threatened to go to court to chal-
lenge the provision.
“This [provision] effectively
shortens mining contracts to a
mere 25 years in violation of sec-
tion 32 of the Mining Act, which
guarantees the mining companies
of a second 25-year term under
the same terms and conditions.
This provision is patently illegal
and contrary to the assurances of
government that mining contracts
will be respected,” Chamber of
Mines president Philip Romual-
dez said.
The chamber also warned that
the Philippines could lose as
much as $4 billion in foreign min-
ing investments this year and next
because of the extended morato-
rium on new mining projects.
“The $2 billion in mining invest-
ments we are expecting next year
will not happen. The $16 billion in
mining investments we are expect-
ing in this administration will not
happen,” Romualdez said.
Romualdez said the freeze
“caused an outflow” of about
P10 billion in mining investments
since last year, based on Bangko
Sentral data.
In Leyte, the President said
Pasar’s investment reflected the
trust and confidence of foreign in-
vestors in the country’s business
climate.
“You did not misplace your
trust. Value them and treat them
right, and the Filipino worker will
repay your confidence; you will
find just how high Filipino talent
and professionalism can take your
company,” the President said.
“The expansion of this smelt-
ing plant is expected to generate
3,000 jobs for our people. The
construction of a 200-megawatt
clean-coal power plant, which is
worth $300 million, is targeted
to be operational by 2016,” he
added.
Pasar is the only copper smelter
and refinery in the country.
With the expansion, Pasar is
expected to increase its plant
capacity to process 1.2 million
tons of copper concentrates from
700,000 tons at present.
The smelter churns out 215,000
tons of refined copper cathode an-
nually, according to the Depart-
ment of Trade and Industry.
Earlier this week, a Subanon
elder from Zamboanga del Norte
urged the government to lift a
moratorium on mining permits.
Zenaida Dandana, a leader of
the indigenous people in Canat-
uan, said the mining moratorium
threatened to stall development in
her community.
Canatuan’s mining operation
(under TVI Resource Develop-
ment-TVIRD) will run out of
ore at the end of 2013 but there
is another potential ore body next
door that could extend the life of
the mine by up to several years,
but the ban is preventing the com-
pany from pursuing it in time, ac-
cording to Dandana.
She was recently in Manila to
get her message accross on behalf
of the Subanons. TVIRD has been
a great help to us. They provided
us with employment. Schools,
road, livelihood, electricity, water
system and health care, etc. With
the end of the mine’s life, this will
also mean the end of much prog-
ress for us,” she said.
Speaking in a forum on Indig-
enous Peoples and Women in
Mining Areas, Dandana invited
President Aquino to visit Canatu-
an and see for himself what she
was talking about.
SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A3 News
ManilaStandardToday mst.daydesk@gmail.com
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
ARMM spooked by P2b in unpaid loans
IN BRIEF
On fake medical papers
Call Center ng Bayan
Minority seeks hike
in House allocation
STIFFER penalties would be imposed
on the abusive use of medical certifi-
cates in any administrative and judi-
cial proceedings.
This was proposed by the Senate
Committee on Justice and Human
Rights which endorsed a proposal
Senate Bill No. 3211) or an Act In-
creasing Penalty for Falsification of
Medical Certificates, Certificate of
Merits or Services and the Like.
The bill, which was authored by
Senator Lito Lapid, sought to increase
the penalties for falsifying medical
certificates to prision correccional
which carries six months to six years
imprisonment and a fine not exceeding
P200,000.
The current penalty is only six
months imprisonment and a fine of
P1,000. Macon Ramos-Araneta
THE Civil Service Commission will
launch today a hotline for inquiries
and complaints on transactions with
six national government offices.
Dubbed as the Contact Center ng
Bayan, the hotline can be accessed
through 1-6565 using PLDT and
Digitel landlines. is available Monday
to Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
“The Contact Center ng Bayan will
not only provide general information
on the policies and procedures of par-
ticipating agencies. It will also act as
a two-way platform that will allow the
public to express their feedback and
complaints on the quality of frontline
public service delivery,” Civil Service
chairman Francisco Duque said in a
statement.
CCB places in one loop access to
six agencies—Bureau of Internal
Revenue, Civil Service Commission,
Department of Health , Department of
Trade and Industry, National Comput-
er Center, and the Philippine Health
Insurance Corporation.
CCB may also be accessed at www.
contactcenterngbayan.gov.ph.
From hot logs to desks. Smuggled logs and lumber will be donated to the Tesda under a tripartite agreement signed by (from left)
Customs Commissioner Ruffy Biazon,Tesda Director General Joel Villanueva and Environment Secretary Ramon Paje.
Return to sender. A staffer of the Department of
Environment and Natural Resources displays elephant tusks
which have been seized by authorities over a two-year
period. The tusks will be shipped back to their port of origin,
Tanzania. AP
This, Drilon said, had resulted
in additional financial burden to
teachers and retired personnel of
the Education Department in the
region.
Citing a report submitted to
him by current ARMM Gover-
nor Mujiv S. Hataman, Drilon
said that of the P2.15 billion,
P907.06 million refers to the un-
paid shares in premium and loan
amortizations, while the bigger
portion of P1.24 billion refers to
interests that had accrued over
the years due to late and even
non-payments.
He warned that the interests
would continue to balloon if
the problem is not settled at
the soonest time possible. The
interests, he added, had now
surpassed the principal and had
come to a point where the next
year’s budget allocation will
now be used to pay for the in-
terest rates.
“This is a ghost of the past that
continues to haunt us. This is a
manifestation of how the past
administration and the past lead-
ers of ARMM had been remiss in
their obligations to the public,”
said Drilon, who also chairs the
Senate Committee on Finance
that reviews the country’s pro-
posed expenditures.
He vowed to look into the
problem which he described as
a “source of disappointment and
burden for teachers and retired
personnel of the Department of
Education in the ARMM.”
“This sorry scenario contin-
ues to frustrate our teachers in
the ARMM because they could
not avail of their GSIS and Pag-
IBIG benefits like housing and
salary loans due to the discrep-
ancies in the premiums,” noted
Drilon.
He said that based on the docu-
ment submitted by Hataman, the
discrepancies in the contributions
to the GSIS started in 1997. In
2002, the ARMM enered into a
memorandum of agreement with
the national government in a bid
to settle the dispute.
However, it was only in 2006
that the Congress was able to
appropriate P250 million for
the payment of unpaid contri-
butions. Of the amount, only
P127 million was released by
the Department of Budget and
Management and which the
GSIS applied to both the prin-
cipal and the interest, explained
Drilon.
He added that there appeared
to be a misunderstanding be-
tween the DepEd-ARMM and
the DBM and the GSIS insofar as
the payment of interest rates was
concerned.
Of the P2.15 billion, Drilon
said, P877.25 million and
P213.15 million refers to unre-
mitted contribution to the GSIS
for the period 1997 to 2003 and
2004, respectively.
Another P877.24 million cor-
responds to unremitted loan de-
ductions for 17 months within
2001 to 2004, while there was
an additional P243.83 million
unremitted contributions and
loan amortizations to the Pag-
IBIG Fund.
The DepEd-ARMM also owes
the Philippine Public School
Teachers Association P31.93
million which corresponds to the
unremitted loan payments for the
period of April 2003 to Septem-
ber 2005.
Lastly, the GSIS has charged
the ARMM an additional P160.39
million for delayed payments.
“The situation merits an in-
vestigation. It has to be settled
before a similar case blows up in
our face,” said Drilon.
Hataman, meanwhile, has
vowed to go after the officials re-
sponsible for the mess.
By Bernadette Lunas
THE Court of Tax Appeals
has dismissed the petition
of Benjamin Kintanar, the
spouse of the first-ever
convicted tax evader Glo-
ria Kintanar, to undergo
probation.
In a decision penned by
Associate Justice Ame-
lia Cotangco-Manalastas
on September 14, the tax
court’s third division said it
has lost jurisdiction of Kin-
tanar’s case since her con-
viction has already taken
effect.
The CTA found Kinta-
nar, who was also a dis-
tributor of Forever Living
Products Philippines Inc.,
guilty on September 27,
2010 for willful failure to
file his income tax returns
in 1999.
Last month, she appealed
to the CTA third division
for probation after she
withdrew his petition for
review after the CTA en
banc dismissed her plea
for lack of merit.
Probation is the period
during which a person, is
granted to be outside of
confinement but is under
court examination or su-
pervision.
The CTA’s third division,
however, said that Kinta-
nar’s application for proba-
tion was filed only after the
promulgation of the CTA
en banc’s decision dismiss-
ing his appeal.
By Macon Ramos-Araneta
SENATOR Franklin Drilon said on
Wednesday that the former administra-
tion of the Autonomous Region in Muslim
Mindanao owes the government P2.15
billion in unpaid and unremitted contribu-
tions and loan amortizations to the GSIS
and Home Development Mutual Fund.
By Maricel V. Cruz
THE minority bloc in the House of Representatives has proposed
amendments to the Palace-backed P2-trillion national budget for 2013,
which included an increase in appropriations for the lower chamber.
Minority Leader and Quezon Rep. Danilo Suarez said that the
proposed P5.8 billion budget for the House was projected, based
on 250 House members.
But due to the expected increase in the number of incoming
House members after the 2013 elections, Suarez said they proposed
an significant amount of P6.5 billion expenditures for the House.
Apart from the House budget, Suarez also proposed that the
Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency, Dangerous Drug Board,
Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services
Administration (PAGASA), and the National Telecommunications
Commission should get ample funding to enable these agencies
perform effectively.
He said the realignments would be sourced from the Priority So-
cial and Economic Project Fund, a special allocation the opposition
branded as President Aquino’s pork barrel.
For the DDB, Suarez said the agency needs at least P100 million
from its proposed budget of P49 million for 2013, to address the
rampant illegal drug activities in the country.
To improve its weather forecasting and ‘nowcasting’ or real time
weather monitoring, Suarez said that PAGASA needs at least P1
billion budget. Pag-ASA’s P245 million budget was not enough to
upgrade its system, he said.
The NTC should be given P700 million for 2013 because the
approved P178 million was not enough to police the telecommuni-
cation companies.
Last week, the House approved on second reading the President’s
proposed 2013 budget amounting to P2.006-trillion contained in
House Bill 6455.
The third reading and final approval of the budget bill is sched-
uled for next month after Congress has resumed sessions.
Kintanar
loses bid
for tax
probation
THE National Bureau of In-
vestigation is going after an
officer of the Ninoy Parks and
Wildlife Center in Quezon
City for being linked to the
theft of elephant ivory tusks,
which went missing from the
center’s storage room in 2010.
The suspect Medardo Medel
P. Eduarte, alias Medardo P.
Medel, acting NAPWC Park
Superintendent and resident of
150 Paras St., Bonuan Gueset,
Dagupan City, is accused of
qualified theft.
An arrest warrant against Ed-
uarte has been issued by Que-
zon City Regional Trial Court
Judge Catherine Mondon of
Branch 104.
NBI Environmental and
Wildlife Protection Investiga-
tion Division Head Sixto Co-
mia was provided with a copy
of the arrest warrant.
The National Police also
receive the warrant for the ar-
rest of the suspect who was
charged with “qualified theft”.
No bail was recommended for
his temporary liberty.
The charges stemmed from
the complaint filed by Josefina
de Leon, designated officer-
in-charge of the Wildlife Re-
source Division, of the PAWB,
before the NBI.
NBI records showed that
on February 25, 2010, PAWB
sought NBI assistance to inves-
tigate the loss of the elephant
tusks at the bureau premises.
On June 5, 2009, the Bu-
reau of Customs turned over
to the DENR-PAWB boxes
containing seized elephant
tusks. The tusks were received
by De Leon and lawyer Alton
Burban, PAWB Legal Staff,
DENR.
On June 8, 2009, a com-
plete inventory was conducted
by PAWB that yielded a total
of 1,701 pieces of elephant
tusks with a net weight of
4,456 kilograms.
The next day, upon the or-
der of Theresa Mundita Lim,
director of PAWB, the items
were transferred to the custo-
dy of Eduarte at the storage
area located ay the Ninoy
Aquino Parks and Wildlife
Center in Quezon City for
safekeeping. The trans-
fer of the tusks was coordi-
nated by Eduarte and made
possible through the assist-
ance of the NAPWC staff.
Eduarte handled the pro-
curement of the padlock and
held the keys where the tusks
were stored. Inspections were
conducted in August and No-
Parks officer stole elephant tusks—NBI
vember 2009, items were con-
sidered intact, the NBI said in
its report.
Eduarte was also deputy-in-
charge of the entire Security
Force 3 organic security guards
assigned to guard the area eve-
ryday in three shifts daily.
A total of 193 pieces of
elephant tusks with a total
weight of 796.14 kilograms
were missing. It was also
discovered that some of the
missing tusks were replaced
by replicas. Macon Ramos-
Araneta
PUBLIC school teachers who
have no house to call their own
should take heart.
Their plight is being ad-
dressed through a proposal in
the House of Representatives.
Authored by Manila Rep.
Ma. Theresa Bonoan-David,
House Bill 6326, proposes
to address more than 90,000
public schools teachers in the
country who have no capacity
to own houses.
The proponent said that the
average monthly income of
teachers in public schools is
only P10,000 or less.
“More than 20 percent of
spouses of these teachers are
unemployed,” said David,
vice chairman of the House
committee on Globalization.
The lawmaker said there
had been efforts to solve the
housing problem of teach-
ers by providing for a special
homing facility through the
state pension fund.
Under the bill, otherwise
known as the “Teachers Hous-
ing Program”, a teacher will be
provided with a housing loan to
purchase a house and lot with.
The bill provides that loans
obtained under the program shall
be computed based on a net take
home pay of the teacher which
shall not be lower than P3,000.
The interest rate on the loan shall
not be more than 12 percent per
annum and shall be fixed for the
entire term of the loan.
The Government Service
and Insurance System and the
Home Development Mutual
Fund shall contribute a total of
P2 billion for the program.
Maricel V. Cruz
Public school teachers’ housing program eyed
Opinion Adelle Chua, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
mst.lettertotheeditor@gmail.com SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A4
SINCE President Benigno Aquino III
named his Ateneo school mate Maria
Lourdes Sereno as Chief Justice of
the Supreme Court, Filipinos have
become fixated on indications that all
may not be well among the high court’s
magistrates.
After all, the 52-year-old Sereno is
the youngest among her colleagues.
When she finishes her 18-year stint as
top magistrate, she will have outlasted
all the other justices who sit with her
today. Her appointment raised questions
from those who believed there were
more senior, more qualified, and more
psychologically fit contenders to the
top judicial post.
Sereno has vowed to pursue reforms
in the Supreme Court even as her
messianic pronouncements—that it was
God who had installed her at the helm
of the court—has spooked observers.
In her first weeks in office, Sereno has
made efforts to assert the Judiciary’s
budgetary independence, seen by many
as clipped by the Executive branch.
She has also emphasized the need for
a paperless Supreme Court for more
efficient delivery of judicial services to
the public.
Despite these, there appears to
be undue attention to the number of
justices present during the Supreme
Court’s flag raising ceremonies every
Monday. Just this week, it was reported
that Sereno was joined by only one
incumbent justice, and that students
from a Catholic school had to troop to
the court grounds to show their support
for her.
We do not have immediate access
to the justices’ weekly record of flag
raising attendances. We also do not
discount the fact that while their
attendance may be ideal, they may also
be attending to more pressing official
concerns.
But if they are indeed making a
statement with their refusal to show up
during the Monday program, and while
their absence may deliver their message
of protest, we believe they must stop
sulking like children. They must start
showing, not so much their faces as
they raise the flag, but their willingness
to work with their leader for the greater
good.
Whatever we say of Sereno, the fact
is that she is the head of the Supreme
Court. Challenging this, in words and
actions—or inaction—would be akin
to a president’s refusal to recognize the
head of another branch of government
just because he is perceived as an ally
of his much reviled predecessor.
The public discourse about the
Supreme Court need not be as trivial as
counting who is present and who is not.
Our honorable justices must occasion
a conversation based on the quality of
their decisions, their strict work ethic,
and their integrity in office.
Head count
The new Robredo
EDITORIAL
ROLANDO G. ESTABILLO Publisher
RAMONCHITO L. TOMELDAN Managing Editor
CHIN WONG/ RAY S. EÑANO Associate Editors
JOEL P. PALACIOS News Editor
ROGELIO C. SALAZAR President & CEO
MEMBER
Philippine Press Institute
The National Association
of Philippine Newspapers PPI
can be accessed at:
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Manila
Standard
TODAY
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EDGAR M. VALMORIDA Circulation Manager
I JOIN my colleagues in mourning
the death of GMA 7’s Jun Bautista,
the acknowledged dean of the Senate
press corps. “Jun Bote” was a reporter
who was truly respected and loved by
his peers, as opposed to the “household
names” in the current broadcast scene
who make the big bucks but who will
asphyxiate without a teleprompter.
Bote understood the importance
of background and context and
strove to always include them in his
reports, quite a feat in a medium that
encourages practitioners to go for
the attention-grabbing “lead” and the
sensational quote
of the moment.
And Bote had
impeccable English
skills that would
have really made
him out of place
in a broadcast
environment where
tabloid Tagalog
was the language
of choice, had he
not retired when his
illness prevented
him from doing his
job.
But above all,
Jun Bote understood the role of media
as critic of every administration.
As a grateful Arnold Clavio, who
considered Bautista his mentor,
explained:
“I will never forget when he said
media must take an oppositionist
stance because media’s role must
always be the critic of the party in
power. He warned that if media would
not guard against abuses committed
by the government, it would [become
its] propagandist.”
You will be missed, Jun. Not just
by your admiring peers but also by an
entire nation that can always benefit
from the work of independent and
insightful journalists like you.
* * *
Those hoping for the second
coming of Jesse Robredo in the
Aquino administration should look no
further than the current Cabinet. The
new Robredo is already here, in the
person of Foreign Affairs Secretary
Albert del Rosario.
This is not to say that Del Rosario
embodies all of the attributes
of Robredo, whose virtues were
apparently discovered only after his
sudden death. Del Rosario merely
inherited the superhuman forbearance
that the long-suffering Robredo had
elevated to a high art when he served
President Noynoy Aquino.
Del Rosario became the new
Robredo when the foreign secretary
declared, through his spokesman, that
he is not leaving government.
“The Secretary has not mentioned
any plans of resigning,” the DFA
spokesman said. “He has always been
focused on his mandate, and that is to
implement the foreign policy of the
President.”
For a while there, it looked like
there was no other way for Del
Rosario to end his public spat with
“special envoy” Senator Antonio
Trillanes except by quitting, especially
if Aquino would not take the side of
his foreign secretary over his strange
choice for a back-channel negotiator
with China. It was Del Rosario, after
all, who first publicly complained
about the designation of the youngest
senator as unofficial negotiator with
our giant neighbor, which has been
claiming practically all of our territory
just beyond the coastline of Palawan.
Del Rosario, who obviously was
unaware that Trillanes had been
chosen as Aquino’s special negotiator
—contrary to established diplomatic
practice which allows back-channel
talks, as long as they are coordinated
with the foreign secretary—said
the senator was “doing more harm
than good.” For publicly castigating
Trillanes even before Senate President
Juan Ponce Enrile did so in the Senate,
Del Rosario was
accused of working
for the Americans
and for businessman
Manuel Pangilinan
by the senator.
If Del Rosario
had been doing his
job of working to
make peace with the
Chinese, Trillanes
snarkily explained,
there would have
been no need to
appoint him as back-
channel negotiator.
All that remained
was Aquino’s intervention in the fight
between the senator and the foreign
secretary.
* * *
But Malacañang never publicly and
equivocally sided with Del Rosario,
even if the media kept reporting that
Aquino was “distancing” itself from
the senator. All that was really put
on record was Malacañang’s advice
to the two feuding officials to shut
up already—advice that Del Rosario
heeded but which Trillanes, who
quickly found a new enemy in Enrile,
cavalierly ignored.
When Malacañang sent Interior
Secretary Mar Roxas to meet with
the Communist official believed to
be next in line for the presidency of
the People’s Republic, Xi Jinping,
at a China-Asean trade fair, astute
observers noted that the designation
of Roxas had also been recommended
by Trillanes. Indeed, rumors flew at
DFA that Roxas, who had just been
confirmed as interior secretary, was
being groomed to replace the largely
bypassed and ignored Del Rosario.
And now Del Rosario has
decided to break his silence, to
deny reports in this newspaper that
he was about to resign. The richest
member of the Aquino Cabinet
apparently does not believe, after
all that Trillanes has done to
ignore, belittle and insult him—
including in the so-called “Brady
notes” revealed by Enrile—that
Aquino has lost trust in him.
Perhaps the people who give
out the Ramon Magsaysay awards
should consider giving a prize to Del
Rosario, if only because he is willing
to swallow every insult, Robredo-
like, from Aquino and his convicted
coup plotter-turned-back channel
negotiator. Officials with less money
—and a little more pride—than the
foreign secretary would certainly have
quit a long time ago.
In defense of freedoms
MARLON C. MAGTIRA Online Editor/Tech Section Editor
JOJO
A. ROBLES
LOWDOWN
BY NOW it is public knowledge that
I showed the controversial 14-minute
trailer of “Innocence of Muslins” in my
Bill of Rights class last Friday.
By now, too, it should be public
knowledge that because I have seen the
trailer, I was able to form a judgment
that the controversial film is nothing but
garbage. But unless I viewed it, I would
not know what is in it. Hence, I would
not be able to opine, as I do now, that it
is trash.
This is the foundation of freedom
of expression. It is only in the market
place of ideas that we can discern what
the truth is. It is only here that we are
able to form opinions which, taken
collectively, becomes the ever powerful
public opinion.
The ground invoked by the UP
administration in seeking to cancel
the showing of the trailer was the
safety of the students. There were text
messages circulating that a group of
rallyist consisting of no less than a
thousand people were on their way to
the UP campus in Diliman to protest the
showing. The text also said that the UP
police force does not have the required
manpower to maintain peace and order
in case the demonstration should push
through.
Of course anyone can resort to
peaceful rallies to make their beliefs
known. As held by our Court in
Primicias vs. Fugoso, our streets
have since time immemorial been
held in trust for use of the people,
among others, to make public their
grievances. But should this be a basis
to limit two important democratic
freedoms, to wit, the freedom of
expression and academic freedom?
My decision to proceed with film
showing was my personal conviction
on the matter: Certainly not!
I concede that freedom of expression
is not absolute. It is limited primarily
where there is a clear and present
danger that the state has a right to
prevent. The concern was that the same
kind of hysteria that was shown against
the film in Libya and Egypt may erupt
in the Philippines were I to show the
film in class. But as was borne by our
experience after the film was shown,
there was absolutely no untoward
incident that happened.
In the first place, the showing was
in a classroom in a class on the Bill
of Rights. What better way to teach
the nuances of freedom of expression
but allow the students to judge for
themselves whether to accept the
ideas expressed by a controversial
film? Moreover, the fact that the UP
administration sought to stop the
showing of the film was a pedagogical
tool on the true nature of rights: They
are not given in a silver platter.
I concede that a further exception
to protected speech is hate speech. In
Chaplin ski v. New Hampshire, the
US Supreme Court ruled that there are
“certain well-defined and narrowly
limited classes of speech, the prevention
and punishment of which have never
been thought to raise any constitutional
problem. These include x x x insulting
or ‘fighting’ words, those which by
their very utterance inflict injury or tend
to incite an immediate breach of the
peace.” The test according to the Court,
is “what men of common intelligence
would understand would be words
likely to cause an average addressee to
fight . . .”
The problem with hate speech as a
limitation to freedom of speech is that
you need hate speech legislation to
begin with. In the absence of such, them
maxim “nullum crimen, nulla puena,
sine legue” apply. There can be no crime
where there is no law making conduct
criminal. In the absence of Philippine
legislation on hate speech, freedom of
expression cannot be infringed on this
basis.
Unless there be any misunderstanding,
I do not endorse the message of film as
in fact, I consider it to be garbage. It is
however the right to see it so that I can
make my own judgment that is protected
by the Constitution.
And to those who say I did it in
support of election, let me be very
clear: I am not standing for any elective
position. Full stop.
I did it because like Justice Homes,
I believe in freedom of expression:
“When men have realized that time
has upset many fighting faiths, they
may come to believe even more than
they believe the very foundations of
their own conduct that the ultimate
good desired is better reached by free
trade in ideas—that the best test of
truth is the power of the thought to get
itself accepted in the competition of
the market…”
ATTY. HARRY
ROQUE JR.
VIEW FROM MALCOLM
Officials with
less money—and
a little more pride
—than Del Rosario
would have quit a
long time ago.
SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A5 Opinion Adelle Chua, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
mst.lettertotheeditor@gmail.com
INTERIOR and Local Government
Secretary Manuel Roxas II, upon his
arrival from China where he spoke
with the Chinese Vice President, said
that nothing much has changed over
the disputed Scarborough Shoal. The
Chinese still maintain their sovereignty
over it—as we do.
I wonder then what the basis of
Malacañang was in saying that the
back-channel talks participated in by
Senator Antonio Trillanes had minor
successes. If some of the Chinese boats
withdrew from the shoal, that was upon
instructions of Beijing—not because
Trillanes became a negotiator.
To a large
extent, however,
Chinese coast
guard and fishing
vessels remain
there.
What I find
difficult to
comprehend is
why President
Aquino has
r e t a i n e d
Tr i l l a n e s —a
“novato”, totally
experienced as
far as diplomacy and foreign relations
are concerned—as a back-channel
negotiator.
It is clear that Trillanes was a
deep penetration agent of Beijing.
He is working for Chinese interests
because he was recruited by Chinese
intelligence officials.
Clearly, Malacañang committed a
monumental blunder. The President
is making it worse by trying to protect
Trillanes.
Who paid for the numerous times
Trillanes went to China? Who was
responsible for his entry into China
even though his passport was not
stamped by immigration?
Now Trillanes claims that members
of the Federation of Chinese Chambers
of Commerce and Industry were his
contacts. He makes it worse. What
unnamed Chinese business interests
are involved? Are they legitimate
businessmen or smugglers and drug-
traffickers?
The Senate must investigate. But
will it?
***
The Lopez-owned ABS-CBN
claimed that it continues to lead other
networks, namely GMA-7 and TV5, in
the ratings game nationwide.
But this claim doesn’t seem to jibe
with records coming from the GMA
Network, which also claims it is the
leader. GMA uses the more trusted
Nielsen TV Audience Measurement.
ABS-CBN uses Kantar.
According to Nielsen, GMA-7 leads
the ratings contest. Based on full data
(August 1 to 25 official data; August
26 to 31 overnight data), GMA-7
registered an average of 34 percentage
points ahead of ABS-CBN’s 32.7, and
19.2 percentage points ahead of TV5’S
14.8.
In comparison with the previous
month, GMA-7 was the only
broadcast company whose total day
household audience shares across
all areas (inclusive of the Visayas-
Mindanao regions) increased in
August, as driven by improved shares
in the evening block (6 p.m. to 11
p.m.) where viewing levels are at
their highest.
Further, GMA remained
undisputed and led all day parts in
the important areas of Urban Luzon
and Mega Manila, which represent
77 and 59.5 percent, respectively, of
total urban television households in
the country.
In urban Luzon, GMA-7 increased
its total day household audience share
compared to the previous month from
37.1 to 38 percent, while TV5 lagged
farther behind with 14.5 percent. GMA-
7 also maintained its solid performance
in Mega Manila, and even increased its
total day average from 37.9 percent in
July to 39.1 percent in August. On the
other hand, ABS-CBN managed 26.4
percent, while
TV5 got only
14.9 percent.
In the
afternoon block,
GMA-7 further
s t r e n g t h e n e d
its dominance,
scoring double-
digit margins in
audience share
over its closest
c o m p e t i t o r .
GMA-7 led
ABS-CBN in the
afternoon block by 13.9 points in the
National Urban Television Audience
Measurement, 21 points in Urban
Luzon, and 24.8 points in Mega Manila.
Likewise, in the evening block,
GMA-7 doubled its audience share
lead in
Urban Luzon and Mega Manila over
ABS-CBN relative to July.
I have more trust in Nielsen given
that it has a sample size of 1,190
homes in Mega Manila versus Kantar
with only 770 homes. Nielsen also
has a nationwide sample size of
2,000 homes compared to the smaller
sample size of 1,370 utilized by
Kanta Media.
The dominance of GMA Network
over ABS-CBN is best validated by
the fact that GMA Network remains
the most profitable network, with the
network’s bottom line for the first
half of the year at P1.014 billion on
the back of improved advertising
revenues. ABS-CBN posted a lower
net income of P927 million, down
45 percent compared to the same
financial period last year. No wonder
taipan Manny Pangilinan wants to
buy GMA network.
***
The success of the 365 Club at Hotel
Intercon which marked its 40
th
Ruby
last Saturday (Sept. 22) is due to its past
and present membership, especially
those who have gone ahead of us. They
are Toto Olivera, Tato Constantino,
Max Soliven, Louie Beltran, Art
Borjal, Jose Aspiras, Bert Teodoro,
Louie Tabuena, Kokoy Romualdez,
Mike Recto, Raffy Recto, Mesio Yabut,
Ka Doroy Valencia, Pat Dayrit, Juan
T. David, Ben David, Rene Cayetano,
Tony Coronel, Judge Max Asuncio,
Bert Gaite, Biding Sibug, Joe Viterbo,
Ernie Magboo, Albert Villalon, Bernie
Bernabe, Blas Ople, Munding Reyes,
Peping Roño, Sonny Escudero, and
many others, whose names escape me
at the moment.
GMA-7 continues
to dominate
EMIL
P. JURADO
TO THE POINT
Photographer to the stars
By Robert Harland
ONE of the most interesting characters
I’ve had the pleasure of knowing is
a British photographer called Harry
Goodwin.
On New Year’s Day in 1964, the
BBC launched a television program in
Britain called Top of the Pops. It would
change the face of music in the 1960s,
turning its half-hour weekly run down
of the pop chart into required viewing
for everyone between the ages of three
and 30.
Top of the Pops put many previously
unknown bands on the road to fame.
And it went on to become one of the
longest-running TV programs in British
history.
On that first night, a little-known
group called The Rolling Stones was the
opening band. The official photographer
was Harry Goodwin.
Throughout the sixties and seventies,
Goodwin photographed almost every
star who appeared on Top of the Pops
including the Beatles, The Beach Boys,
Roy Orbinson, Stevie Wonder, Bob
Dylan, The Bee Gees, David Bowie,
Tom Jones, Michael Jackson and many
more.
The result is one of the most
extraordinary and comprehensive
collections of photographs of rock and
pop musicians in the world.
Harry, whose passion for photography
dates back to his time in the British
Royal Air Force serving in the Far East
during World War II, recalled the day
when he was offered the job on Top of
the Pops.
The offer was 30 British pounds a
week (P2,000) which he thought a tad
on the low side for a TV program, until
the producer said he would put Harry’s
name on the credits for every show.
That clinched it and the rest, as they say,
is history.
He first photographed The Beatles
in 1963 at The Apollo Theater in
Manchester, England, and went on to
have a close relationship with the band.
In 2007 Yoko Ono opened a permanent
exhibit of Goodwin’s photographs at
the John Lennon Airport in the Beatles’
home town of Liverpool.
He took one of the earliest and
most iconic photographs of the
little-known Jimi Hendrix, later
to be regarded as the greatest
electric guitarist in music history.
They became friends. Harry was
devastated when the star died of a
drug overdose at the age of 28.
When Top of the Pops finished in
1973 he toured the UK with many
leading performers of the day. He
later went on to photograph numerous
boxing and soccer superstars, including
the legendary Muhammad Ali.
I first met Harry in 1969 when I
was working for the record promoter
and manager Tony Hall. I was a record
“plugger” and it was my job was to get
new acts featured on programs like Top
of the Pops. Harry and I met every week
at the Top of the Pops studios and we
became firm friends.
In 2009 at the age of 85 he was
presented with a Lifetime Achievement
Award by the Lord Mayor of Manchester,
Harry’s home town in England.
His pictures have been featured in
many exhibitions including the “Beatles
on the Balcony” show at the National
Portrait Gallery in London in 2006. And
in 2010 the Victoria & Albert Museum
in London ran a major exhibition of
Harry’s photographs, many of which
had not been seen before.
His work is still very much in
demand. His agents in London and
New York are constantly being asked to
supply Harry’s pictures for newspaper
and magazine articles.
Although now nearly 90, he is still
asked to attend concerts and shows by
many of the people he has photographed.
In 2004 he told me one should never
retire. In Harry’s case there is little sign
he’ll be doing that any time soon.
Based in Bacolod City, Robert
Harland is the British Embassy Warden
for Negros Occidental
IT TOOK a foreigner to open the
Filipino public’s eyes to the tragedy
of illegal ivory trading in the
Philippines.
Bryan Christy’s article on the topic
for National Geographic’s October
2012 issue was posted online as early
as last week, and broke on Twitter
when the link to the story was posted
by activist Carlos Celdran, who urged
authorities to investigate the matter.
The story was picked up this week by
local newspapers.
According to Christy, he came to
the country five times to “get a lead
on who was behind 5.4 tons of illegal
ivory seized by customs agents in
Manila in 2009, 7.7 tons seized there
in 2005, and 6.1 tons bound for the
Philippines seized by Taiwan in 2006.
Assuming an average of 22 pounds
of ivory per elephant, these seizures
represent about 1,745 elephants.”
His search led him to interview
Monsignor Cristobal Garcia of Cebu
Archdiocese, member of a wealthy
family and a collector of religious art,
whose extensive collection includes
ivory pieces.
Christy says Garcia gave him tips
on how to purchase ivory and smuggle
it into the United States, among them
this: “Wrap it in old, stinky underwear
and pour ketchup on it,” [Garcia] said.
“So it looks shitty with blood. This is
how it is done.”
Filipino Roman Catholics worship
religious statues in themselves as
objects of spiritual power and magic,
ascribing to them miraculous events
and cures. There’s the Santo Niño de
Cebu, said to be the oldest image in the
country, given by Ferdinand Magellan
to Rajah Humabon in 1521; and the
Jesus Nazareno or Black Nazarene,
carried around in a clamorous and
sweaty procession on its feast day.
While both of these are made of wood,
the material of choice for religious
images is elephant ivory, prized for
its translucent glow and high market
value.
The worldwide treaty that sets and
enforces wildlife trade policy is the
Convention on International/ Trade in
Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and
Flora (CITES), opened for signature
in 1973, in force in 1975. CITES lists
both African and Asian elephants as
threatened species; a global ivory
trade ban was adopted in 1989 to
ensure that elephant populations
worldwide recover from the slaughter
by poachers of their tusks.
The Philippines is party to the treaty,
which ensures that trade in plants and
wild animals does not threaten their
survival and offers protection to over
33,000 species.
The resources of CITES are
limited; it deems the Philippines as
merely a transit point for to China
for ivory, whereas the reality, as
Christy discovered, is that it is also
a destination because of the local
demand for the material, which is sold
mainly in religious image stores in
Tayuman, Manila.
The government recently reacted
to Christy’s story and the subsequent
public interest in the topic, saying
that traders of illegally acquired ivory
would be investigated and prosecuted
if found liable; among the agencies
working on this are the Department of
Environment and Natural Resources,
Bureau of Customs, National Bureau
of Investigation, and the Department
of Justice.
Deputy presidential spokesperson
Abigail Valte said that the NBI was
investigating the ivory trade even
before Christy’s story broke, adding
that Customs intercepted a P48 million
shipment of rhino tusks just last week.
All this is good to hear—now. But
why did we not hear about this sooner?
Why did it have to take a foreigner to
bring this to local public awareness?
Our country hides many secrets,
and this was one of them. Now that
the cover has been thrown back on
this illicit activity, we realize that here
is yet another issue that will bring us
national shame.
“Embarrassing,” NBI Director
Nonnatus Rojas called it, “[and] it
puts us in a bad light.” He vowed that
those “who will be found involved in
the illegal trade will be immediately
charged.”
We have taken for granted too
long many cultural conventions that
turn out to be against the law. And
when a priest himself, a monsignor
no less, gives someone else tips on
how to buy and smuggle new ivory
that was quite likely taken from
illegally killed elephants, we should
wonder about our much-vaunted
morals and those who are supposed
to teach them to us.
Christy revealed another secret
about Garcia. Go online and check out
his article. Find out for yourself what
it is. Maybe it does need an outsider to
tell us these things, because these are
embarrassing things, things that will
put us in a bad light, things that we
would rather not hear for shame.
Email: jennyo@live.com, Blog:
http://jennyo.net, Facebook: Gogirl
Café, Twitter: @jennyortuoste
The secrets that we keep
THE cost of the daily traffic gridlock
in Metro Manila is huge not only to the
economy in terms of loss of production,
but also to public health. There seems
to be no sign of immediate relief.
For the Metro Manila Development
Authority, the battle is constant, difficult
and complicated.
A few months ago, MMDA came
up with a traffic scheme that prohibited
buses from using the overpasses along
Edsa and restricted them to the side roads.
I do not know how much thought was
given to this or what model was used to
calculate the kind of benefits that would
result upon the implementation of the
plan. If the object was to improve traffic
flow, along EDSA, why restrict this
to privately owned vehicles with very
low level of occupancy. How about the
riding public who use the buses to go to
work? Why make them pay the price so
that privately owned vehicles can travel
faster? It seems to me that it should have
been the other way around. Besides, I
doubt very much whether this scheme
really improved travel time along Edsa.
By restricting buses to the side roads,
long queues are often observed in the
entrances. And because of our very
bad driving habits. The entrances to
the overpasses are oftentimes blocked,
causing traffic congestion. This negates
the very intention of the exercise.
This is also true with the U-turns.
U-turns are used in traffic engineering
to allow a very small number of
vehicles to turn around. U-turn slots
are not meant to divert the whole traffic.
Although the vehicle conflict points in
intersections are eliminated thereby
solving one problem, the diversion of
the whole traffic also creates another
problem similar to the restriction of
buses in the first traffic scheme. Another
problem here is that no effort was
made to improve the turning radius of
the U-turn slots to take in big vehicles
like trucks. The benefits of these two
programs are at best minimal. I would
have left things the way they were
to give flexibility to drivers. MMDA
should just study ways to improve
enforcement along EDSA which is the
bigger problem. Putting closed-circuit
television cameras programmed to take
pictures automatically when a violation
is committed is one. This is being done
in other countries already. If this can
be adopted, then maybe MMDA could
even remove the fences that have been
erected in portions of Edsa.
This needs coordination with
LTO so that the names and addresses
of violators can be traced and fines
collected. MMDA might not like this
idea, but I believe it is time for better
coordination with the LTO and other
law enforcement agencies because the
MMDA, in spite of its mandate, cannot
solve the entire traffic problem by itself.
MMDA needs the database of LTO.
It is also time to go back to
orthodox engineering practices.
MMDA must stop projects that are so
weird they cannot be found anywhere
else in the world like the U-turn bridge
along C-5. Why DPWH agreed to the
project, I will never know. It remains
to this day the only one of its kind in
the world.
I also think that MMDA must
refocus its efforts to more strategic
transport and traffic planning. It must
upgrade its research capability. There
is too much attention given to the trees
to the detriment of the forest. In Edsa
for example, trains, buses, jeepneys
and even the ubiquitous tricycles all
compete for passengers. Ordinarily,
when there is rail transportation along
a certain route, bus, jeepney, and
tricycle use is kept to a minimum. It
is hard to understand why up to now
this situation is being allowed by the
authorities. There seems to be no study
made to limit for instance the use of
some buses or outrightly banning
them at certain times along Edsa and
transferring them to C-5. There are
many buses with very few passengers
even empty at times running along
EDSA adding to the congestion. This
could justify the ban or transfer to
other routes.
I do not know if an origin-and-
destination survey was ever done
along Edsa by the Land Transportation
Franchising and Regulatory Board
alone or jointly with MMDA. This kind
of study or survey to the uninitiated
is conducted to determine where
passengers are coming from and where
they are going. Its may include how
many rides a passenger has to take in
order to reach his or her destination.
If there was such a survey, this would
have given both agencies a very good
idea on how many buses to allow along
Edsa, or how many to transfer to C-5 or
other routes. This also would have given
both agencies the necessary data to use
in figuring out which of the jeepneys to
ban along certain routes or portions of
Edsa. But the way I look at it, no study
was ever made or is being contemplated
because the numbers of buses along
EDSA is not decreasing. In fact, the
number is increasing.
The number of jeepneys using
portions of Edsa is also increasing.
Edsa is often referred to as the traffic
battleground. That is why it is closely
monitored—so that traffic will continue
moving at all cost. This is also why
many of the efforts of MMDA is on
Edsa. After all, it is reputedly the busiest
and most polluted stretch of highway in
the country.
The work of the MMDA is well
recognized. All I am saying is that there
are other ways that can be considered to
substantially improve traffic flow.
Improving traffic on Edsa
It wins the
ratings game and
is also the most
profitable.
FLORENCIO
FIANZA
DUTY CALLS
EVERYMAN
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Classifeds
ManilaStandardToday adv.mst@gmail.com SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A6
Page Compositor: Diana Keyser Punzalan
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
Cordillera Administrative Region
OFFICE OF THE REGIONAL DIRECTOR
Engineer’s Hill, Baguio City
The Department of Public Works and Highways, Cordillera
Administrative Region (DPWH-CAR) through its Bids and Awards Committee
(BAC), invites contractors to bid for the aforementioned project/s:
1. Contract ID : 12PO0039
Contract Name : Improvement/ Widening/ Concreting of
Bontoc – Tabuk – Tuguegarao Road,
Mamaga Bridge to Basao Bridge
Contract Location : K0420+900 – K0429+940 (I.S.)
Tinglayan, Kalinga
Scope of Work : PCCP, Roadway Excavation (SR), Concrete
curb and gutter, Grouted Riprap, etc.
Approved Budget Cost : Php 28,356,684.89
Contract Duration : 121 calendar days
Cost of Bidding Documents : Php 20,000.00
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with Revised
IRR of R.A. 9184, Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be automatically
rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent
(LOI),purchase bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior
registration with the DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership,
corporation, cooperative or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to
the type and cost of this contract, (d) completion of a similar contract costing at
least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting
Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment for at least 10% of
ABC. The BAC will use the non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility
check, preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for
registration, to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the
receipt of LOI. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractor’s
applications for registration, with complete requirements, and issue the
Contractor’s Certifcate of Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be
downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph. Letter of Intent submitted
thru mail will not be accepted. Only the Owner and the Authorized Liaison Offcer
as refected in the Contractor’s Registration Certifcate (CRC) will be allowed
to transact with the BAC.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown
below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents From September 27, 2012 - October 17, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference October 5, 2012; 10:00am
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from Prospective
Bidders
Deadline: October 12, 2012; 5:00pm
4. Submission/Receipt of Bids Until 10:00am; October 17, 2012
5. Opening of Bids October 17, 2012; 10:00am
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BD’s) at DPWH-CAR,
BAC-Secretariat, upon payment of non- refundable fee for Bidding Documents
as stated above. Prospective bidders may also download the BDs, if available
from the DPWH web site. Prospective bidders that will download the BDs from
the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of their
Bid Documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall be open only to interested parties
who have purchased the BD’s. Bids must be accompanied by a bid security in
the amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR
of R.A. 9184.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed
in the BD’s in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman.
The frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall
include the eligibility requirements. The second envelope shall contain the
fnancial component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated
Responsive Bid as determined in the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The Department of Public Works and Highways, Cordillera
Administrative Region (DPWH-CAR), reserves the right to accept or reject
any or all bid and to annul the bidding process anytime before Contract
award, without incurring any liability to the affected bidders.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) CONSTANTE R. SARMIENTO
Chief, Maintenance Division
BAC Chairman
DPWH-CAR, Regional Offce
Engineer’s Hill, Baguio City, 2600
Fax/Tel. No. (074)-444-88-38
RE-I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Sarangani District Engineering Offce
Alabel, Sarangani Province
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The DPWH-Sarangani District Engineering Office, Alabel,
Sarangani Province through its Bids and A wards Committee (BAC), invites
contractors to apply to bid for the following contract( s):
1. Contract ID No.: 12ME0080
Contract Name: Rehab./Improvement of Road Slip along
Sarangani-Davao del Sur Coastal Road,
Nacolyael-Small Margus Section, Km.
1729+244-Km.1729+594
Contract Location: Glan, Sarangani Province
Scope of Work: Rehab./Impv’t. of Road Slip
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): 19,890,000.00
Contract Dur91fon: 200 Calendar days
Source of Funds: Government of the Philippines (GOP)
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with
the revised IRR of RA. 9184. Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be
automatically rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI),
purchase bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a)
prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned
partnership, corporation, cooperative, or joint venture (c) with PCAB license
applicable to the type and cost of this contract (d) completion of a similar
contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of ten (10) years, and
(e) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line
commitment for at least 10% of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary
pass/fail criteria in the .eligibility check and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for
registration to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for
the receipt of LOI. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process
contractor’s applications for registration, with complete requirements, and
issue the Contractor’s Certifcate of Registration (CRC). Registration Forms
may be downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are
shown below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 27 - October 16, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference October 4, 2012 @ 2:00 P.M.
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from
Prospective Bidders
Until October 16, 2012 @ 9:00 A.M.
4. Receipt of Bids October 16, 2012 until 10:00 A.M.
5. Opening of Bids October 16, 2012 @ 11:00 A.M.
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BDs) at
DPWH-Sarangani District Engineering Offce, Alabel, Sarangani Province,
upon payment of a non-refundable fee of Php 10,000.00 (Ten Thousand
Pesos Only). Prospective Bidders may also download the BDs, from the
DPWH web site. Prospective Bidders that will download the BDs from
the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of
their documents. The PreBid Conference shall be open only to interested
parties who have purchased BDs. Bids must be accompanied by a bid
security in the amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of
the Revised IRR.
The Prospective Bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms
as specifed in the BDs in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the
BAC Chairman. The frst envelope shall contain the technical component
of the bid, which shall include the copy of CRC. The second envelope
shall contain fnancial component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to
the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in the bid evaluation
and the post-qualifcation.
The DPWH - Sarangani District Engineering Offce reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all bid and to annul the bidding process any time
before Contract award, without incurring any liability to the affected bidders.
(Sgd.) LEO L. LABRADOR
BAC – Chairman
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DPWH DISTRICT ENGINEER
Leyte First Engineering District
Pawing, Palo, Leyte
Contact Person: Lesma B. Tingoy, BAC Chairman
Tel. No. (053) 323-5117; Fax No. (053) 323-8801
e-mail address: dpwh.ro8_leyte1@yahoo.com
September 25, 2012
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Bids and Awards Committee of the DPWH, Leyte First Engineering District,
Pawing, Palo, Leyte, invites contractors to bid for the aforementioned projects:
1 Contract ID No. : 12IC0079
Contract Name : Road Opening, San Miguel-Babatngon-Tacloban City
Road along Babatngon-Sta. Cruz-Caraycaray Section,
Brgy. Bagacay, San Miguel to Brgy. Bacong, Babatngon,
Leyte
Scope of Work : Road Opening
ABC : P37,596,366.80
Contract Duration : 160 CD
Bid Document Fee : P20,000.00
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with the Revised IRR of
R.A. 9184 and the DPWH Manual of Procedures for the Procurement of Locally-Funded
Infrastructure Projects. Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be automatically
rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) signed by the
person authorized in the Contractor’s License issued by PCAB. The LOIs shall be
submitted by the Authorized Liaison Offcer as specifed in the Contractor’s Information
(CI).Submission of LOIs by persons with a Special Power of Attorney shall not be
allowed. The contractor must purchase bid documents and must meet the following
major criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-
owned partnership,corporation, cooperative, or joint venture, (c) with PCAB License
applicable to the type and cost of this contract, (d) completion of asimilar contract
costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, (e) Net Financial Contracting
Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment for at least equal to 10% of
ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility check and
preliminary examination of bids, (f) bidder shall submit together with the bid documents
a notarized statement of availability/serviceability of equipment for the particular project
and statement complying with DPWH Specifcations, and (g) confict of interest. The
BAC shall use non-discretionary “pass/fail” criteria in the examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration to the
DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOI. The DPWH
POCW-Central Offce will only process contractor’s application for registration with
complete requirements and issue the Contractor’s Certifcate of Registration (CRC).
Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
PROCUREMENT ACTIVITY DATE
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 27-October 18, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference October 05, 2012; 9:00 a.m.
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOIs from
Prospective Bidders
October 10, 2012; 10:00a.m.
4. Receipt of Bids October 18, 2012; 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.
5. Opening of Bids October 18, 2012; 2:00 p.m.
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BDs) at DPWH, Leyte First
Engineering District, Pawing, Palo, Leyte, upon payment of a non-refundable fee.
Prospective bidders may also download the BDs from the DPWH website, if available.
Prospective bidders that will download the BDs from the DPWH website shall pay the
said fees on or before the submission of their bid documents. The Pre-Bid Conference
shall be open only to interested parties who have purchased the BDs. Bids must
be accompanied by a bid security, in the amount and acceptable form, as stated in
Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in the
(BDs) in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst envelope
shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include a copy of the
CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of the bid. Contract
will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid ad determined in the bid
evaluation and the post-qualifcation.
The DPWH, Leyte First Engineering District, Pawing, Palo, Leyte reserves the right
to accept or reject any bid, to annul the bidding process at any time prior to contract
award, without thereby incurring any liability to the affected bidder/s.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) LESMA B. TINGOY
Chief, Materials Quality Control Section
BAC Chairman
N O T E D:
(Sgd.) ANGEL A. SIA, JR.
OIC-District Engineer
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Batanes District Engineering Offce
Basco, Batanes
INVITATION TO APPLY FOR ELIGIBILITY AND TO BID
The Department of Public Works & Highways, Batanes District Engineering Offce,
through its Bids and Awards Committee (BAC), invites prospective suppliers/bidders
to apply for eligibility and to bid for the following projects:

1 Contract ID : 12BA0041- Goods
Contract Name : SUPPLY AND DELIVERY OF CONSTRUCTION
MATERIALS TESTING APPARATUS
Contract Location : Basco, Batanes
Approved Budget for the
Contract (ABC) : P 153,700.00
Delivery period : 45 CD upon receipt of approved Purchase
Order
2 Contract ID : 12BA0042- Goods
Contract Name : SUPPLY AND DELIVERY OF CONSTRUCTION
MATERIALS TESTING APPARATUS
Contract Location : Basco, Batanes
Approved Budget for the
Contract (ABC) : P 252,280.00
Delivery period : 45 CD upon receipt of approved Purchase
Order
3 Contract ID : 12BA0043- Goods
Contract Name : IMPROVEMENT OF UYUGAN PORT
Contract Location : Uyugan, Batanes
Approved Budget for the
Contract (ABC) : P 5,065,454.86
Delivery period : 45 CD upon receipt of approved Purchase
Order
Procurement will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures in
accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations.
To bid for this contract, a bidder must meet the following criteria: (a) prior registration
with DPWH, (b) Filipino Citizen/sole proprietorship, corporations/ partnership/
cooperatives/ organizations with at least sixty percent (60%) interest of outstanding
capital stock belongs to the citizens of the Philippines, (c) completed similar contract
whose value must be at least 50% of the ABC within a period of three(3) years, and
(d) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment
at least equal to 10% of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in
the eligibility check and preliminary examinations of bids.
Interested unregistered suppliers/bidders, however, shall submit their applications
for registration to the BAC for Goods, Secretariat, DPWH Central Offce seven(7)
calendar days before the deadline for the submission and opening of bids. The BAC
for Goods, DPWH Central Offce will only process suppliers applications for registration
with complete requirements, and issue the Suppliers’ Registration Certifcate (SRC).
Registration forms may be secured from the secretariat, BAC for Goods Offce, Ground
Floor, DPWH Central Offce.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 25, 2012 –October 18, 2012
2. Pre-Bid conference October 01, 2012; 9:00 A.M.
3. Receipt of Bids October 18, 2012 Deadline: 9:00 AM
4. Opening of Bids October 18, 2012 Time : 10:00 AM
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BDs) at BAC for Goods
Secretariat, DPWH Batanes District Engineering Offce Administrative Building
Motorpol Compound, from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00PM of September 24, 2012 to October
18, 2012 upon payment of non-refundable fee of one thousand pesos (Php 1,000.00).
Prospective Bidders may also download the BDs, if available, from the DPWH website
and shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of their Bid Documents. Bids
must be accompanied by a bid security, in the amount and form, as stated in Section
27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective Bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in the
BDs in two(2) separate sealed envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst envelope
shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include the eligibility
requirements. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of the bid.
Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated responsive Bid as determined in
the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The Department of Public Works & Highways reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all bids and to annul the bidding process any time before Contract award, without
incurring any liability to the affected bidders.


(Sgd.) ROMMEL E. FABI
BAC Vice-Chairman
Noted:
(Sgd.) ALEXANDER D. NOLA, CESE
District Engineer


(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Batanes District Engineering Offce
Basco, Batanes
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) Batanes District
Engineering Offce, Basco, Batanes through its Bids and Awards Committee
(BAC) invites contractors to apply for eligibility and to bid for the following
contract:
a) Contract ID : 12BA0015
b) Contract Name : Improvement of Basco Fishport Phase IV
c) Contract Location : Basco, Batanes
d) Scope of Work : Concrete pile casting 45 x 45, spotting and
driving of piles, pile copping and beam
works,115.2m³ concrete slab works,casting of
sheet pile 60x35, construction of RC Ramp

e) Approved Budget : Php 28,187,024.59
for the Contract
f) Contract Duration : 260 CD
g) Cost of Bid : Php 20,000.00
Documents
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with
the Revised IRR of R.A. 9184. Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be
automatically rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI),
purchase bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior
registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership,
corporation, cooperative, or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to
the type and cost of this contract, (d) completion of a similar contract costing at
least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting
Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment at least equal to 10%
of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility and
preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for
registration to the DPWH POCW-Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt
of LOI. The DPWH POCW-Central Offce will only process contractor’s application
for registration, with complete requirements, and issue the Contractor’s Certifcate
of Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH
website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 25, 2012- October 18, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference October 01, 2012
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI October 08, 2012
4. Receipt of Bids Deadline: 12:00 Noon on Oct. 18, 2012
5. Opening of Bids 2:00 PM on October 18, 2012

The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BD’s) at the Offce of
the Batanes District Engineering Offce, upon payment of non-refundable fee as
stated above. Prospective bidders may also download the BD’s from the DPWH
web site, if available. Prospective bidders that will download the BD’s from the
DPWH website shall pay the said fee on or before the submission of their bid
documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall be open only to interested parties
who have purchased the BD’s. Bids must be accompanied by a bid security, in
the amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed
in the BD’s in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The
frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which includes a
copy of the CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of
the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as
determined in the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The Department of Public Works and Highways, Batanes District Engineering
Offce reserves the right to accept or reject any bid, to annul the bidding process
at any time prior to contract award, without thereby incurring any liability to the
affected bidder/s.
Approved by:

(Sgd.) ROMMEL E. FABI
BAC Vice-Chairman

Noted by:
(Sgd.) ALEXANDER D. NOLA, CESE
District Engineer

Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Camarines Sur 2
nd
District Engineering Offce
Baras, Canaman, Camarines Sur
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
INVITATION TO BID
The DPWH Camarines Sur 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, through its Bids and Awards
Committee (BAC) invites contractors to apply to bid for the following projects;
I. a. Contract I.D. : 13FE0001
b. Contract Name : Preventive. Maintenance
Asphalt overlay along Panganiban Road,
(Intermittent Section)
Sta. 0+975-Sta. 1+602
c. Contract Location : Naga City
d. Scope of Work : Asphalt Overlay
d. Approved Budget for the Contract: P 12,879,641.10
e. Contract Duration : 42 CD
f. Cost of Bidding Documents: P 10,000.00
g. Net length : 628 In.m
II. a. Contract I.D. : 13FE0003
b. Contract Name : Preventive Maintenance
Asphalt overlay along Liboton-Magsaysay Road,
(Intermittent Section)
KO439+(-869)-KO439+(-269)
c. Contract Location : Naga City
d. Scope of Work : Asphalt Overlay
d. Approved Budget for the Contract: P 12,305,292.95
e. Contract Duration : 41 CD
f. Cost of Bidding Documents: P 10,000.00
g. Net length : 600 In.m
III. a. Contract I.D. : 13FE0005
b. Contract Name : Preventive Maintenance
Asphalt overlay along Fraternidad-Biak-na-Bato-E. Angeles-
Bagumbayan Road,
(Intermittent Section)
Sta. 2+000-St. 2+917
c. Contract Location : Naga City
d. Scope of Work : Asphalt Overlay
d. Approved Budget for the Contract: P 18,327,966.31
e. Contract Duration : 53 CD
f. Cost of Bidding Documents: P 10,000.00
g. Net length : 920 In.m
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with the Revised IRR of R.A.
9184. Bids in excess of the ABC for the contract shall be automatically rejected at the opening of bid.
To apply and to bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) signed and
submitted by the person authorized in the Contractor’s License issued by PCAB. Upon submission of
the LOI’s, the interested Contractor must also submit the photo copy and original ( for authentication
purposes and issuance of Bid Documents) for the following documents: 1. Class “A” Documents
(contained in the Contractor’s Registration Certifcate)(CRC), 1.1 Legal Documents: a.)Department
of Trade and Industry Business Name Registration (DTI) or SEC Registration Certifcate or CDA; b.)
valid and Current Mayor’s Permit/Municipal License 1.2 Technical Documents; a.) valid Joint Venture
Agreement, in case of (J.V.) and Eligibility Documents for each member; b.) valid PCAB License
and Registration; c.) Certifcate of Materials Engineer Accreditation duly Certifed by the Authorized
Managing Offcer (AMO); d.) Latest copy of Authorizing Managing Offcer; e.)Certifcate of Safety
Offcer Seminar from DOLE; f.) Phil-Geps Order Form (Document Request list); g.) CPES rating
of the contractor must be at least satisfactory, as provided under Sec. 23.5.2.4 of Revised IRR of
R.A. 9184 1.3) Financial Documents; a.) Prospective Bidders Audited Financial Statement for the
preceding calendar year which should not be earlier than 2 years from the date of bid submission;
b.) Prospective Bidders Computation of its NFCC.
The LOI’s shall be submitted by Authorized Liaison Offcer as specifed in the Contractor’s
Information(C.I.).Submission of LOI’s by persons with a Special Power of Attorney shall not be
allowed. The Contractor must purchase bid documents and must meet the following major criteria:
(a) prior registration with the DPWH & PHILGEPS, b) Filipino citizen or 75%-owned partnership,
corporation, cooperative, or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to the type and cost of
this contract, (d) completion of. a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10
years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment
for at least equal to 10% of ABC. The inclusion of Material Data on the Pledge equipment for the
project in compliance with DO no.58 series of 2012. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail
criteria in the eligibility check, and preliminary examination of bids. .
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration to the DPWH-
POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOI. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce
will only process contractors applications for registration, with complete requirements and issue the
Contractors Certifcate of Registration(CRC). Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH
website www.dpwh.gov.ph
The Signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 24-0ctober 18, 2012
2. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from Prospective bidders October 11,2012 until 10:00 a.m.
3. Pre-Bid Conference October 5, 2012 at 9:00 a.m.
4. Receipts of Bids October 18,2012 until 10:00 a.m.
5. Opening of Bids October 18,2012 at 2:00 p.m.
The BAC will issue hard copies of (BDS) Bidding Documents at the BAC Offce, DPWH
Camarines Sur 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Baras Canaman, Camarines Sur, upon payment of
non-refundable fees as stated above for Bid Documents. Prospective bidders may also download
the BDS if available from DPWH website. Prospective bidders that will download the BDS’s from
the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of their Bid Documents. The
Pre-Bid conference shall be open only to interested parties who have purchased the BDS. Bids
must be accompanied by a Bid Security, in the amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section
27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective Bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in the BDs in two
(2) separate sealed envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst envelope shall contain the technical
component of the bid, eligibility requirements under Section 23.1 of the Revised IRR of R.A. 9184
and a copy of the updated CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of the
bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in the bid
evaluation and the post-qualifcation.
The DPWH Camarines Sur 2
nd
District Engineering Offce reserves the right to accept or reject
any bid, to annul the bidding process at anytime prior Contract Award, without thereby incurring any
liability to the affected bidder/s.
APPROVED:
(Sgd.) EDUARDO A. ALEJO, JR.
BAC-Chairman
News
ManilaStandardToday
mst.daydesk@gmail.com SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A7
More voices vs cybercrime law
Shut down bird
haven, govt told
State auditor testifies
against former mayor

IN BRIEF
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Benguet 1
st
District Engineering Offce
Wangal, La Trinidad, Benguet
Telefax No. (074) 422 6163
September 24, 2012
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) of the Benguet 1
st
District Engineering
Offce, through the DOT Convergence and D.A. Fund, invites contractors to bid for
the aforementioned projects:
1. a. Contract ID: 12PE043
b. Name of Project: Constructi on of Road al ong Ambangeg Juncti on
National Road to Mount Pulag
c. Location St a. 0+000 - St a. 19+000 (v.s.), Bokod/Kabayan,
Benguet
d. Scope of Work: Concreting
e. Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): Php38,397,854.90
f. Duration: 180 C.D.
g. Source of Fund: DOT Convergence
2. a. Contract ID: 12PE044
b. Name of Project: Clustered FMR (D. A.) Projects
c. Location: Various National Roads along Benguet First District
Engineering Offce
d. Scope of Work: Concreting
e. Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): Php13,110,421.11
f. Duration: 180 C.D.
g. Source of Fund: D.A. FUND
NOTE: Expressions of Interest submitted thru mail will not be accepted.
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with the Revised
IRR of R.A. 9184. Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be automatically rejected
at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI), purchase
the bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with
DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative,
or joint venture, (c) with PCAB License applicable to the type and cost of this contract,
(d) completion of a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10
years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line
commitment at least 10% of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria
in the eligibility check and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration to
the DPWH POCW-Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOI. The DPWH
POCW Central Offce will only process contractor’s applications for registration, with
complete requirements, and issue the Contractor’ Certifcate of Registration (CRC).
Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH Website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 26 - October 16, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference October 3, 2012
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from
Prospective Bidders
October 10, 2012 @ 12:00 P.M.
4. Receipt of Bids Until10:00A.M., October 16, 2012
5. Opening of Bids October 16, 2012
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BD’s) at Benguet 1
st
District
Engineering Offce, upon payment of a non-refundable Cost of Bid Documents of Php
20,000.00for 12PE043 and Php10,000.00 for 12PE044. Prospective bidders may also
download the BD’s from the DPWH Website, if available. Prospective bidders that
will download the BD’s from the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on or before
the submission of their Bid Documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall be open only
to interested parties who have purchased the BD’s. Bids must be accompanied by
a bid security, in the amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the
Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in
the BD’s in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst
envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid which shall include a copy
of the CRC. the second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of the bid.
Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in
the bid evaluation and the post-qualifcation.
The Benguet 1
st
District Engineering Offce reserves the right to accept or reject
any bid, to annul the bidding process any time prior to the contract award, without
thereby incurring anyliability to the affected bidder/s.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) CESAR L. BACANI
Engineer III
BAC Chairman
Noted:
(Sgd.) BENEDICTA C. MENDOZA
OIC-Asst. District Engineer
For in the absence of the D.E.
UNA’s bet in Caloocan City. Vice President Jejomar Binay, president of the United Nation-
alist Alliance, raises the hand of Caloocan City Rep. Oscar Malapitan after he was inducted into
the coalition. Malapitan, a former Nacionalista, is eyeing the city’s mayorship. JUN DAVID
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
Region IV-B, MIMAROPA
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Mamburao, Occidental Mindoro
Tel. & Fax No. (043)-711-1012
Email Address: dpwh_mindoro_occidental_bac@yahoo.com
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Department of Public Works and Highways, Mindoro Occidental I
District Engineering Offce, Mamburao, Occidental Mindoro, through its Bids
and Awards Committee (BAC), invites contractors to apply to bid for the following
contracts:
1. a. Contract ID : 12EB0159
b. Contract Name : Assets Preservation of National Roads Generated
from Pavement Management System/Highway
Development and Management -4 (HDM-4),
(Intermittent Sections), Junction MWCR-San Jose
Airport-Junction Bubog Road, K0238+(-110) –
K0238+890
c. Contract Location : San Jose, Occidental Mindoro
d. Scope of Work : Asphalt overlay with reblocking, Reblocking of 102
blocks at 4.50m x 3.35m x 280mm thick, asphalt
overlay of 363.00 l.m. x 6.70m width x 50mm thick.
and Miscellaneous Items
e. Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC) : P 6,636,256.46
f. Source of Fund : FY 2013 Infrastructure Program
g. Contract Duration : 40 C.D.
2. a. Contract ID : 12EB0160
b. Contract Name : Assets Preservation of National Roads Generated
from Pavement Management System/Highway
Development and Management -4 (HDM-
4), (Intermittent Sections), Mindoro Oriental/
Occidental East Coastal Road, (CLUSTER 1):
a) K0210+995 – K0211+117 and b) K0210+117 –
K0212+248
c. Contract Location : Magsaysay, Occidental Mindoro
d. Scope of Work : Asphalt overlay of 160.00 l.m. x 6.10m width x
50mm thick and Asphalt overlay with selective
reblocking of 1,150.00 l.m. x 6.10m width x 50mm
thick and Miscellaneous Items
e. Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC) : P 10,195,358.91
f. Source of Fund : FY 2013 Infrastructure Program
g. Contract Duration : 68 C.D.
Procurement will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures
in accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revised Implementing Rules and
Regulations.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) and must
meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino
citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative, or joint
venture with PCAB license applicable to the type and cost of this contract, (c)
completion of a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10
years, and (d) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit
line commitment for at least 10% of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary
pass/fail criteria in the eligibility check and preliminary examination of bids.

Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration
to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOI.
The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractor’s applications for
registration, with complete requirements, and issue the Contractor’s Certifcate of
Registration (CRC).
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Receipt of LOI from Prospective Bidders Deadline: 5:00 PM on October 09, 2012
2. Issuance of Bidding-Documents From September 27, 2012 to October 16, 2012
3. Pre-Bid Conference 10:00 AM on October 04, 2012
4. Receipt of Bids Deadline: 10:00 AM on October 16, 2012
5. Opening of Bids 10:01 AM on October 16, 2012
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in
the Bidding Documents (BDs) in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the
BAC Chairman. The frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the
bid, including the eligibility requirements. The second envelope shall contain the
fnancial component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated
Responsive Bid as determined in the bid evaluation and the post-qualifcation.
Prospective bidders may download the Registration and LOI Forms from the
DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph. The BAC will issue hard copies of LOI Forms
at DPWH, Mindoro Occidental I District Engineering Offce, Mamburao,
Occidental Mindoro.
Prospective bidders may also download the Bidding Documents (BDs), if available,
from the DPWH web site. The BAC will also issue hard copies of the BDs at the
same address to prospective bidders – upon payment of a non-refundable fee
of P10,000.00each. Bidders that will download the BDs from the DPWH website
shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of their bids. Letter of Intent
submitted thru mail will not be accepted. Only the Manager/Proprietor or the
Liaison Offcer refected in the Contractor’s Registration Certifcate (CRC) will
be allowed to transact with the BAC specifcally in flling of LOI, attend Pre-Bid
Conference, Dropping and Opening of Bids.
The DPWH, Mindoro Occidental I District Engineering Offce, Mamburao,
Occidental Mindoro reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bid and to
annul the bidding process any time before Contract award, without incurring any
liability to the affected bidders.
Approved by:

(SGD.) GERARDO D. CLEMENTE
BAC CHAIRMAN
The senator reiterated his op-
position to RA 10175 which both
houses of Congress passed last
June as a third suit was filed at
the Supreme Court challenging
the law’s constitutionality.
Guingona, who opposed the
bill when it reached the Senate
floor, said the new law fatally
steps backward and leads to the
“vault of archaic policies that
cannot be made to apply to the
modern man operating in a mod-
ern world.”
While Guingona conceded the
need for a Cybercrime Preven-
By Macon Araneta and Rey Requejo
SENATOR Teofisto “TG” Guingona III
warned the public on Monday that the
newly-enacted Republic Act 10175, or
Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012,
clearly suppresses freedom of speech
and expression guaranteed by the Con-
stitution.
tion Act, he said the law that
was signed by President Aquino
on Sept. 12 contains problematic
provisions.
“While libel committed
through traditional print media
is punishable by up to four years
and two months of imprison-
ment, online libel is punishable
by a shocking 12-year imprison-
ment period,” he added.
He further stated that with
the new law, a person can now
be prosecuted for libel under
the Revised Penal Code and li-
bel under the Cybercrime Pre-
vention Act. This is contrary
to the 1987 Constitution which
protects its people against dou-
ble jeopardy.
“The state has no right to gag
its citizens and convict them for
expressing their thoughts. The
Philippines is a democratic coun-
try. The Filipinos should never
be left to cower in the sidelines
-their thoughts and voices should
not be shackled by fear and in-
timidation. The people should
not be afraid of its own govern-
ment,” said Guingona.
The new law also sets no clear
definition of libel and the persons
liable. Thus, virtually any person
can now be charged with a crime,
including people who post criti-
cisms against politicians, actors
and actresses, and other persons
on their Twitter or Facebook ac-
counts.
Meanwhile, the third petition
at the Supreme Court was filed
by cyberspace law specialist Jose
Jesus Disini Jr., a member of the
Philippine Internet Commerce
Society and one of the drafters of
the implementing rules and regu-
lations of RA 8792, or the eCom-
merce Act.
A third petition was filed yes-
terday before the Supreme Court
questioning the constitutionality
of the newly enacted Republic
Act 10175, otherwise known as
“Cybercrime Prevention Act,”
which critics believe would en-
danger citizens’ rights and free-
dom in cyberspace.
Disini asked the high court
to nullify five provisions in the
new law because they violate
the people’s rights to freedom of
expression, due process, equal
protection and privacy of com-
munication.
Joining Disini in questioning
the law were lawyers Rowena
Disini and Lianne Ivy Medina
and online bloggers Ernesto
Sonido Jr. and Janette Toral, who
criticized Sen. Vicente Sotto III
for purportedly plagiarizing an
American blogger in a speech he
delivered in the Senate.
To demonstrate their argu-
ments, the Disini group cited
Sotto’s warning against his crit-
ics that he would seek the crimi-
nal prosecution of the online
bloggers who exposed alleged
plagiarism of online materials in
his speech against the controver-
sial Reproductive Health Bill.
“He (Sotto) warned critics that
once signed into law, the Cyber-
crime Bill will penalize defama-
tory statements made online…
the threat of criminal prosecution
that was issued by Senator Sotto
affected not only bloggers but all
users of the Internet and social
media,” the petition read.
By Merck Maguddayao and Sara Fabunan

AUDIT commissioner Heidi Mendoza continued her testimony
before the Sandiganbayan on Monday against former Makati
mayor Elenita Binay over the allegedly anomalous purchase of
P72 million worth of office furniture for the Makati City Hall in
2000 and 2001.
Mendoza claimed before the anti-graft court’s Fourth Division
that the bidding was rigged as made evident by Mrs. Binay’s failure
to present a floor plan during the bidding.
Despite the absence of the floorplan, however, the three bidders
– Asia Concept, MFE International and Office Gallery – were able
to bid almost the same prices and the contract was awarded to Asia
Concept the next day.
Mendoza claimed that it was later established that the three com-
panies were owned by the same person.
But Binay’s lawyer Sandra Coronel said that Mendoza’s testimo-
ny was weak and based only on an 11-year-old special audit that had
already been dismised as “shoddy” by the Sandiganbayan’s Second
Division in April last year.
“We eagerly await our chance to cross-examine. We are confi-
dent that we’ll be able to reveal that the theories she offered are not
sufficient,” Coronel said. The cross-examination is set for Nov. 7.
It was the third graft case filed by the Ombudsman against Binay
in connection with office furniture purchases during her term.
The lawyer said the same allegations were laid down by Men-
doza in the present case. “The earlier findings in the other case
are the basis,” Coronel said, adding that she is confident the
Fourth Division would see the suit the same way as the Second
Division.
By Vito Barcelo
A GROUP of pilots and aircraft owners on
Wednesday called for the removal of the
man-made bird sanctuary at the Las Piñas-
Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism
Area to prevent bird strikes and lessen the
risk of fatal aircraft accidents
The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Asso-
ciation of the Philippines urged the gov-
ernment to relocate the bird sanctuary that
sits directly along the flight path of aircrafts
landing at the Ninoy Aquino International
Airport’s Runway 06-24.
Manila International Airport Authority
reported recorded 39 bird strike incidents at
the country’s premier airport, an increase of
50 percent incident compared to last year.
The man-made bird sanctuary was pro-
claimed by then President Gloria Maca-
pagal-Arroyo as the Las Piñas-Parañaque
Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area and
its removal will require the repeal of the
Arroyo proclamation by President Aqui-
no, who has not indicated a position on
the matter.
AOPA Secretary General Gomeriano
Amurao, said the removal of the bird sanc-
tuary will permanently resolve the bird
strike problem that may cause deadly air-
craft accidents.
Actor Zac Efron is in town
AMERICAN actor Zachary “Zac” David Efron, star of the
popular movie High School Musical, arrived at 10:17 am
of Wednesday as part of his endorsement contract for local
clothing brand Penshoppe.
Efron’s publicists said Efron is expected to visit Misipis
Bayin Donsol, Sorsogon to interact with whale sharks and
Mount Mayon in Bicol. On Saturday, he is scheduled to ap-
pear at the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay City for the Pen-
shoppe fan conference 2012. Eric B. Apolonio
Carabuena’s big problem
QUEZON City prosecutors have found probable cause to
indict road rage suspect Robert Blair Carabuena for assaulting
a person in authority.
Assistant City Prosecutor Meynardo Bautista, Joel Atanacio
and Victorino Badua Jr. found reason to charge Carabuena in
court of assaulting traffic constable Saturnino Fabros last Aug.
11, but cleared Carabuena’s brother Benjamin of any criminal
liability.
The prosecutors recommended a bail bond of P12,000 for
Carabuena’s provisional liberty and the case will be raffled on
Thursday at 2 p.m.
The Carabuenas have yet to appear before the authorities to
present their side of the issue. Rio N. Araja
Koreans donate fire trucks
A KOREAN firefighting group has donated four fire trucks,
worth around P52 million, to the Bureau of Fire Protection to
help boost the fire bureau’s firefighting capability.
BFP officer-in-charge Ruben Bearis said the refurbished fire
trucks, donated by the Korea Federation of Fire Association, led
by its president Lee Soo Youk, shall be distributed to the towns
of Alang-alang in Leyte, Talacugon in Agusan del Sur, Lake
Sebu in South Cotabato, and Candoni in Negros Oriental.
Candoni and Lake Sebu are fourth class municipalities with no
fire trucks while Alang-alang and Talacugon are also the recipients
of the Association of South East Asian Nations International Fund
for Agricultural Development. Jonathan Fernandez
Another national treasure
THE Sto. Domingo Church, home of Our Lady of La Naval, in
Quezon City will be declared as a National Cultural Treasures
by the National Museum on Oct. 4.
Rev. Clarence Victor Marquez, OP said the occasion will coin-
cide with the traditional enthronement ceremonies of the canonical
image of Nuestra Señora del Rosario, La Naval de Manila.
For almost four centuries, the Sto Domingo church, known
before as the Santo Domingo de Manila, stood within the walls
of Intramuros. It was moved to Quezon City after the destruc-
tion of original structure in World War II.
The church was the sixth Santo Domingo Church. The first
was made of nipa and cogon in 1588 and was replaced with a
concrete church in 1603. Three other churches were destroyed
by earthquakes in 1619, 1862 and 1863. Vito Barcelo
SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A8 Sports Riera U. Mallari, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
sports_mstandard@yahoo.com
That only makes their Ryder
Cup record look all the more
inferior.
They have been the core of the
US team since 1997 at Valder-
rama, where they combined for a
3-6-1 record as the United States
lost the cup. Perhaps it was a sign
of what was to come. For all their
individual achievement, none
has a winning record in the Ry-
der Cup. They have been on six
teams together—Woods missed
in 2008 at Valhalla while recov-
ering from knee surgery—and
the only celebration they shared
was that remarkable comeback at
Brookline.
Fulvio Fantoni explains his defensive error
Ryder woes hound Tiger, Lefty
MEDINAH, Ill.—No other trio of Ameri-
can golfers has qualified for more consecu-
tive Ryder Cup teams than Tiger Woods,
Phil Mickelson and Jim Furyk. Collective-
ly, they have won 146 official tournaments
around the world, including 19 majors.
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
THIS is an interesting account by Fulvio
Fantoni the Worl’s No. 1 ranked Bridge
player. This occurred during the match
Monaco played against Japan in Round 9
of the RR qualifier at the 14
th
World Bridge
Games, Lilie, France. Fantoni placed in
his website his explanation of the defen-
sive error. This admission drew admira-
tion and as Granguru said on vugraph on
Bridge Base Online “a rare error”. Even
the best make mistakes, but they have dis-
cipline to leave the bad boards behind and
learn from their bad errors.
Here is the infamous four hearts made
by the Japanese and the defensive error ex-
plained by Fantoni:
“I mentioned Japan as one of the favou-
rites and indeed they made our life difficult.
These players are very careful, precise and
consistent. Unfortunately I made a mistake
in this match, giving the opponents the
chance to make an unmakeable game.
I will now show you the board, because it
was one of the most interesting of the day and
it is also instructive for the players who wish to
improve their partnership agreements.
Board 3 North
Fantoni
♠94
♥42
♦A109873
♣862
West East
Hanayama Teramoto
♠AKJ6 ♠Q85
♥QJ106 ♥8753
♦KQ6 ♦J4
♣107 ♣AK95
South
Nunes
♠10732
♥AK9
♦52
♣QJ43
West North East South
Pass
1NT Pass 2♣ Pass
2♥ Pass 4♥ Pass
Pass Pass
The contract is 4♥. I lead the ♠4, won
with the Queen in dummy. Declarer now
plays a small heart, Claudio takes with
the King and plays the ♦5. Now I have to
decide whether to win or duck. In other
words, I have to understand if Claudio has
only one diamond or two.
If Claudio had a singleton diamond, the
correct move would be to win my Ace and
play a diamond back (he would ruff);
If Claudio had two diamonds, the correct
move would be to duck so that, when he
wins the ♥A, he can play another diamond to
my Ace. I would then return a diamond that
declarer ruffs and Claudio might over-ruff.
But how to know if Claudio has only one
diamond or two?
You need to trust your partner deeply.
In fact, Claudio knows very well that I
need this information and gives it to me
the only way he can: by deciding to win
the first trump trick with the ♥K and not
with the Ace. Advancing bridge players
won’t find anything particular in this
play of winning with the King when you
hold both the King and the Ace: that’s
one of the basic rules of defensive play.
But if Claudio had a singleton Diamond
he would have won with the Ace, thus
denying that he has the King.
In fact, if Claudio, by taking with the Ace,
gave me the false information of NOT having
the King of Hearts, on his diamond return I’d
be forced to win, hoping to let him ruff before
the declarer has the time to pull trumps.
But Claudio won with the King, revealing
not only that he has the Ace but also that he
wants me to know that he has it. He told me
by this play that we must hold the diamond
Ace and cash it at the right moment.
Unfortunately I was not lucid enough at
the table and so I won the Ace on the first
round, played another diamond back and op-
ponents made their 10 tricks.”
Another fine auction by both pairs Fan-
toni-Nunes of Monaco and Verhees Prooi-
jen of Netherlands from the Monaco match
against Nethrlands in the quarterfinals of the
14
th
World Bridge Games:
Monaco vs. Nethrlands QF 6/6
Board 25 North
Helness
♠KQ75
♥1092
♦7
♣AJ863
West East
Verhees Jr. V. Prooijen
♠843 ♠A
♥AQ8753 ♥KJ6
♦K108 ♦ QJ532
♣K ♣Q1095
South
Helgemo
♠J10862
♥4
♦A964
♣742
West North East South
Pass 1♦ Pass
2♦ Pass 3♥ Pass
4♥ 4♠ Dbl Pass
5♣ Pass 5♥ 5♠
Dbl Pass 6♥ Pass
Pass
Board 25
West North East South
Nunes WIJS Fantoni Muller
2♦ Pass 3♠
Pass Pass Dbl Pass
4♥ 4♠ Pass Pass
Dbl Pass Pass Pass
Comments to: sylvia@globelines.com.ph
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Expect big
feats from
Mama Luz
IN BRIEF
Lady Maroons, Archers favored
UNIVERSITY of the Philippines seeks a fourth
straight women’s crown, while La Salle tries for a
back-to-back men’s championship as the Univer-
sity Athletic Association of the Philippines Sea-
son 75 swimming competition begins today at the
Trace Aquatic Center in Los Baños, Laguna.
The third winningest team in the league with
12 titles, the Lady Maroons amassed 312 points
to defeat 2008 champion Ateneo, which placed
second with 216 points, and the Lady Archers,
who had 159 points in third place last season.
The Green Archers, behind reigning Athlete of
the Year Johansen Aguiler, collected 262 points
to beat University of Santo Tomas, which placed
second with 201 points, and the Blue Eagles, who
had 135 points in third.
Veteran tankers Jackie Junio, Bea Grabador,
Claire Adorna and Tin Hipol will banner the on-
slaught of UP in the four-day meet. But the Lady
Maroons will face stiff opposition from the Lady
Eagles, who will lean on reigning MVP Celina
Gonzalez and last year’s top rookie Kim Uy, and
the Lady Archers, who will bank on former ju-
niors MVP Ingrid Ilustre and rookie Nikki Ba-
colod. Aguilar, a mainstay of Makati Skipjacks,
hopes to steer La Salle to a 12th crown, as the
Season 74 men’s MVP will also draw support
from fifth year tanker Tim Yap.
Philta Cebu leg
netfest tomorrow
ACTION in the Philta-Palawan Pawnshop Re-
gional Age-Group Championships, presented by
Babolat, resumes Friday, with the staging of the
last of two legs hosted by the Cebu International
Tennis Center in Consolacion, Cebu City.
Stefan Suarez of NCR and local ace Jana
Pages are expected to lead the cast in the four-
day event, seeking to duplicate or better their
two title feats in last week’s first leg of the cir-
cuit as part of the province’s commitment to
help promote and develop the sport.
“We expect another week of top-notch action
and new faces to emerge from the tournament,”
said Philta regional vice president Jess Lagman.
Suarez and Pages copped the 16- and 18-under
crowns in their respective divisions but the duo
faces a tougher challenge this time from a slew
of players out to foil their back-to-back title bids.
For details, call tournament in-charge
Bobby Mangunay at 0195-4046464 or email
bobbymangunay@yahoo.com.
BAGUIO bet Alieson Ken Omengan struck
gold in the recent fourth World Junior Wushu
Championships in Macau, China.
Omengan topped the men’s nangun-B dur-
ing the four-day meet held from Sept. 17 to 25.
The Philippines also claimed two silvers
through Omengan, who ruled the men’s nan-
quan B. Faith Liana Andaya finished second
in the women’s jianshu C.
Last August, a seven-man Philippine team
returned home from the eighth Asian Cham-
pionships in Ho Chi Minh Vietnam with four
silvers and three bronzes.
Jessie Aligaga showed the way with a run-
ner-up finish in 48-kg sanda event, while John
Keithley Chan also taking a silver with Engelbert
Addongan and Eleazar Jacob. Peter Atencio
Baguio’s Omengan wins
wushu gold in Macau
SYLVIA LOPEZ
ALEJANDRO
THERE are bigger things to
expect from Filipina body-
builder Luzviminda “Mama
Luz” McClinton, following
her victory in the Phil-Asian
Pacific International body-
building competition held
over the weekend in Cebu
City.
The 33-year-old McClin-
ton will vie in the World
Body Figure and Fitness
Bodybuilding Champion-
ships in Oklahoma on Nov.
10, and then will proceed to
Berlin, Germany for another
world-class competition on
Nov. 24.
McClinton, who has a
13-year-old daughter, was
in fighting form when she
graced Tuesday’s Philippine
Sportswriters Association Fo-
rum at Shakey’s Malate. She
spoke of her passion for the
sport and goal of providing
greater honor for the country.
“I love this sport. It’s my
passion. I’m in love with it.
But it entails a lot of sacrifice,
too,” said McClinton, the first
Pinay bodybuilder to bag the
Pro Fame Figure during the
2010 the World Champion-
ship in Las Vegas.
While she gets help from
some friendly sources, Mc-
Clinton said it would be a
great boost if she could draw
the support of the government
as she competes in the inter-
national stage.
“I’ve given pride and honor
to the country, but this time I
seek the help of the govern-
ment. Perhaps, President Aqui-
no can help me,” she said.
By Jeric Lopez

BARANGAY Ginebra and San Mig
Coffee are perennial contenders ev-
ery conference and with locked and
loaded line-ups, expect both squads
to resume their winning ways in the
38th Philippine Basketball Associa-
tion season.
After winning the Commissioner’s
Cup crown in his first year steering the
team, Mixers coach Tim Cone expects
more from his wards this season, given
that they are intact and their chemistry
is growing further.
“The team knows that we had a
great season last year. We won the
second conference and we went to
the finals again in the third. The aim
coming in is for us to build on that in
terms of chemistry for us to achieve
more. I hope we can do that. We have
the tools,’’ said Cone.
It’s hard to argue with him since
the Mixers will have most of their
core back, plus they added help up-
front as well.
Besides Joe Devance and JC Intal
returning from injuries, San Mig Cof-
fee added rookies Aldrech Ramos and
Jewel Ponferrada in the fray, as well as
Wesley Gonzales.
Meanwhile, the question for the Gin
Kings is that can they finally get over
the hump this season?
It’s been four years since Gine-
bra last won a championship and it
certainly is hopeful that the drought
ends this season, especially with
a much-improved lineup that con-
sists of a right blend of veterans and
young bloods.
Though the Kings made two semifi-
nal appearances last season, they still
failed to make it to the finals.
Reigning league Most Valuable
Player Mark Caguioa hopes so as he
is optimistic about his team’s chances
this coming season.
“The feeling of excitement is with
us this coming season. We have a
good and deep team and we’re look-
ing forward to hopefully win a cham-
pionship. That’s what we all want,’’
said Caguioa.
In the biggest off-season movement,
Ginebra got a gem as it acquired LA
Tenorio, arguably the best point guard
in the league, from Alaska to further
boost its already stacked backcourt.
In addition, the Kings, who don’t
need to wait long before making their
debut as they face newbie Global
Port in the opening on Sunday, also
got two capable Filipino-American
rookies in Chris Ellis and Keith Jen-
sen for more stability upfront as well
as Elmer Espiritu.
PBA preview: Kings, Mixers to resume winning ways
“I would have expected and
definitely wished for a much bet-
ter record than that,’’ Furyk said
Tuesday.
It leads to a question that
brings to mind the chicken and
the egg.
Do they all have losing records
because they are playing on los-
ing teams? Or does the US keep
losing because this triumvirate
has losing records?
“I think it’s both,’’ Woods
said Tuesday. “In order to win
cups, you have to earn points.
And we certainly have not
earned points. And on top of
that, Phil, Jim and myself have
been put out there a lot during
those years. So if we’re not
earning points, it’s hard to win
Ryder Cups that way.’’
So much has been expected.
So little has been delivered. And
they are running out of time to
leave a lasting impression.
Furyk is 42 and has gone four
of the last five PGA Tour seasons
without winning, though the ex-
ception was in 2010 when he
won three times and was voted
player of the year. Even so, he
had to rely on being a captain’s
pick for the first time. Mickelson,
also 42, has qualified for nine
straight teams dating to 1995.
He will set an American record
for most Ryder Cups when the
matches began Friday. Even so,
he narrowly qualified for the
team this year.
They will be leaned on heavily
again at Medinah as the US tries
to win back the cup.
They Americans, dressed in
navy blue shirts, headed out
for the first full day of practice
under warm sunshine in the
Chicago suburbs. They played
fourball matches among the
three groups, which was evi-
dent when Bubba Watson and
his pink-shafted driver drove
through a dogleg on the 440-yard
11th hole and over the gallery’s
head. He still played that shot
(and they won the hole). AP
HANS Christian Melosantos of Ca-
banatuan Auto Club captured the
overall and production front wheel
best time by clocking 35.48 seconds
in the Race Motorsports Club Shell
Helix Slalom Invitational Challenge
at Francisco Ortega Hi-Way, San
Fernando La Union. The event is the
second out of three legs for the Sla-
lom Invitational for the year.
John Lester Pasion, meanwhile,
had the Rear Wheel Production best
time of 48.26 and Ryan Gacayan of
Wholesome Concepts bagged the
novice best clocking of 36.12 and
also posted the second fastest time.
Mark Laguna was third in 36.34,
while Pacoy Ortega placed fourth with
36.54. John Guintu of Wholesome
Concepts timed 36.72 at fifth.
The event was presented by Shell
Helix Motor Oils and co-sponsored by
Outlast Battery, Dubshop Magwheels,
Federal Tyres, with the support of
Mayor Pablo Ortega, Pacoy Ortega,
Ed and Rica Regala and Monet Orte-
ga. Other backers are Corolla Auto
Club Baguio, Special Stage, Baguio
Makaluma, Bagspeed, Auto Impres-
sions, Speed Limits, Wholesome
Concepts and Cabanatuan Auto Club.
Media Partners are Stoplight TV,
C! Magazine, www.autoindustriya.
com, kotse.com and Power Wheels
Magazine.
Overall winners received Outlast
Batteries.
The third Shell Helix Slalom In-
vitational will be held on Oct. 27 in
San Fernando, La Union.
For details, contact Bing Bang
Dulce at nos. 928-6951, 0918-
8119337, 0922-816 5344; email
racemotorsportsclub@yahoo.com
and at the event’s Facebook account
Race Motorsports Club.
Melosantos, Cagayan
rule slalom invitational
Phiten here to stay. Phiten is a Japanese brand that aims to help
maintain the body’s natural state of balance. It started its local distribution in
the Philippines in 2008, with accessories, tapes, and supports initially, but carries
over 100 different products including apparel, supports and bed products.
Phiten remains true to its promise of helping to provide proper blood circulation,
injury prevention and flexibility enhancement to its users, including athletes.
Phiten Philippines also distributes the Phiten E-Water Body and Facial Lotion,
said to be the most advanced lotion today, which relaxes the muscles and nerves
and improve blood circulation and will soon be distributed in the leading retail
stores in the Philippines to make it more accessible to people-on-the-go and
sports enthusiasts. Shown here are Phiten Philippines President and sportsman-
businessman Jean Henri Lhuillier and Phiten International Business Department
Manager Yuzo Fujitani in his visit to the Philippines.
Participants and proponents of the Race Motorsports Club Shell Helix Slalom Invitational Challenge
at Francisco Ortega Hi-Way, San Fernando La Union are shown here prior to the races.
Sports
Manila Standard TODAY
De La Salle showed a lot of
character as it finally completed
the Final Four cast after a stun-
ning 69-66 come-from-behind
classic victory over Far Eastern
University in their gut-wrench-
ing knockout game in the 75th
University Athletic Association
of the Philippines at the Mall of
Asia Arena in Pasay .
Norbert Torres scored 11 of his
21 points in the pivotal payoff
period to tow the Green Archers
from the brink of elimination all
the way to the semifinals.
It seemed like the Tamaraws
were headed to the next round
when they held a 60-50 lead
with under seven minutes left,
but the Archers had other plans
in mind.
Behind Torres’ 5-of-5 clip in
the final 12 minutes, stellar in-
side play and a suffocating de-
fense, La Salle was able to turn
the tables and orchestrate a dra-
matic 17-0 salvo in the next five
minutes to shock everyone.
Tomas Torres’ three-point play
with 38.6 ticks remaining capped
that run to give the Archers a 67-
60 edge and basically the game
and the last Final Four ticket.
“We just refused to lose,’’
said La Salle coach Gee Aba-
nilla. “We just hung tough
and we pulled through. The
boys responded very well and
it all boiled down to defense.
We limited them in the fourth
quarter and that made the dif-
ference.’’
What Abanilla was talking
about was his Archers limiting
the Tamaraws to only six points
in the final six minutes of play
and to only a total of eight points
in the final frame as their offense
suddenly went missing.
The Taft-based dribblers will
face defending champion and
top seed Ateneo De Manila, their
arch-rival, on Saturday in their
semifinal pairing at 4 p.m. The
Blue Eagles will enjoy a twice-
to-beat advantage.
On the other hand, No. 2
University of Santo Tomas and
No. 3 National University will
be the dancing partners, with
the Growling Tigers having the
twice-to-beat incentive. Their
tussle will also be on the same
day at 12 noon.
Terrence Romeo and RR Gar-
cia hit back-to-back triples to
give FEU one last chance in the
dying seconds as it sliced the
deficit to only 67-66, with still
30 seconds left.
After Jeron Teng split his
charities to make it 68-66 with
20.4 left, the Tams had a nice op-
portunity to either tie or win, but
their offense went astray as the
Archers unleashed one solid de-
fensive stance with Mike Tolo-
mia being called for a traveling
violation with 3.5 ticks left.
Almond Vosotros also split his
charities with 2.5 left to settle the
final tally. Romeo’s prayer of a
triple from the other side didn’t
find the mark, leading to such a
heartbreaking finish to FEU’s
season.
SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A9
Riera U. Mallari, Editor sports@manilastandardtoday.com sports_mstandard@yahoo.com
By Jeric Lopez

SOMETIMES, it’s not about how
you start, it’s how you finish.
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
FERN-C Racing karters gave the best they
got and emerged as the team with the big-
gest harvest of trophies, led by Dylan Ar-
ambulo’s twin victory in the season finale
of the 2012 Coca-Cola Karting Super Se-
ries at the Clark International Speedway.
The diminutive 10-year-old Arambulo
staged a surprise comeback in the final
race to capture the Formula Cadet Expert
crown over TRS-Castrol Racing Kids Ar-
thur Tuason and Wils Casequin.
Even more surprising, Arambulo scored
a major upset win when he copped the
Mini-ROK plum on his very first try at
the expense of the top two title contenders
Flynn Jackes and Gabe Cabrera.
Overall, he bagged the Formula Cadet Ex-
pert runner-up crown to account for three of
the nine trophies FERN-C Racing harvest-
ed that day behind the support of BOSCH
Power Tools. Milo Rivera copped the oth-
er champion trophy with his victory in the
ROK Senior class and likewise bagged the
runner-up honors in the ROK Overall.
Estefano Rivera also had two with his run-
ner-up crown in the ROK Junior and his third-
place feat in the ROK Overall, while Raymond
Cudala clinched the runner-up place for the day
to eventually claim the Overall Formula SL
Novice runner-up plum of the series.
Arambulo’s twin victory not only stamped
his mark as a promising future champion, but
also proved the Grade 4 student of Ateneo, has
a lot more to give in his budding racing career.
Like Arambulo, Cudala was also gear-
ing up for a title upset against AUTS Rac-
ing’s Carl Luig in the Formula SL Novice
class after topping the qualifying heat and
the Pre-Final to wrest the lead with a slim
one point edge, 395-394.
FERN C Racing winningest karting team again
By Peter Atencio
THE Philippines and Chinese
Taipei came up with differ-
ent results at the start of the
four-nation Philippine Foot-
ball Peace Cup at the Rizal
Memorial Stadium Tuesday
evening.
Fil-German Patrick
Reichelt struck with a late
goal in the 79th minute with
a header, from a corner kick,
and it went over the head of
an intercepting goalie Doug-
las Herrick, enabling the Az-
kals to escape with a 1-0 win
over Guam.
On the other hand, the Tai-
wanese came from behind
twice to pull off a 2-all draw
with Macau.
Ricardo Joao De Almeida
Torrao scored the first goal for
Macau in the 45th minute, be-
fore Lo Chi En replied for the
Taiwanese three minutes later
and in the second half. Ma-
cau’s Kin Seng Chan scored a
second one in the 57th minute,
but Yang Chao Hsun’s penalty
kick gave Taiwan the draw in
the end.
Reichelt dedicated the goal
to his mother, who came to
Manila for a day to watch his
son play.
Herrick then kept the Azkals
from making a second goal,
getting in the way of succes-
sive attempts by OJ Porteria
and Marvin Angeles in the
88th minute.
The visitors kept the Azkals
from scoring a goal early, po-
sitioning themselves close to
the goalmouth and this led to a
scoreless first half.
The Azkals were able to
come up with 19 attempts at
the goal, with 10 almost mak-
ing it on target, while Guam
had nine decent attempts.
The Philippines will next
face Macau on Thursday at
6:30 p.m.
BOMBERS TRY TO STAY ALIVE
THE Philippine Basketball Association
Legends USA Foundation, headed by
its chairman and president Abe King
will make a historic visit to the King-
dom of Saudi Arabia for a series of
goodwill games.
PBA Legends Foundation secretary
general Rufino Ignacio informed the Ma-
nila Standard that the dream of thousands
of Filipino expatriates in Saudi Arabia to
see the legends in action will come true
from Oct. 24 to Nov. 2, with a series of
games in the cities of Dammam, Jeddah
and Riyadh.
Ignacio noted that the PBA Legends
games are in time for the annual celebra-
tion of the Hajj season in Saudi Arabia.
Hajj is the pilgrimage to Mecca and is
one of the greatest religious observances
in Islam. The Hajj is expected to fall on
Oct. 24 to 29.
He said the program is supported by
His Royal Highness Prince Nawaf bin
Faisal bin Fahad, President General of
Youth Welfare, Ministry of Sports and
Welfare of the Royal Kingdom of Saudi
Arabia.
The Legends goodwill games are also
aimed at strengthening the athletic and
cultural ties between the host country
and the Philippines. Select local teams
from Saudi Arabia will participate in
the program.
Ignacio said that the program is being
managed by Coordinations Est. Compa-
ny, in cooperation with various regional
Filipino basketball organizations in Saudi
Arabia such as the Pilipino Basketball
Association in Dammam; Overseas Fili-
pino Basketball League in Jeddah; and
the Philippine Arabia Basketball Associa-
tion in Riyadh. Ronnie Nathanielsz
Busy sked for Legends
LOTTO RESULTS
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P0.0M+
P0.0M+
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
PH Azkals
turn back
Guam, 1-0
JOSE Rizal University (9-7) will try to
keep its hopes alive for a Final Four seat
when it clashes with San Sebastian
at 6 p.m. today at the Arena in San
Juan in the 88th National Collegiate
Athletic Association men’s basketball
tournament. The Stags have a 11-4 slate
in the solo second and eating the Heavy
Bombers will allow them to stay within
range of a twice-to-beat incentive in the
Final Four. Peter Atencio

Archers complete Final 4 cast
FOLLOWING a banner 37th
season, the Philippine Basket-
ball Association expects yet an-
other marquee season in its com-
ing 38th edition.
Commissioner Chito Salud is
looking forward to yet another
compelling season ahead for
Asia’s first play-for-pay profes-
sional league.
“We’re getting there in terms of
the balance in competition,’’ said
Salud yesterday in the league’s
press conference for the new season
at the Diamond Hotel in Manila.
In an attempt to further boost
the excitement in games, the
board also altered the tournament
format, specifically the Gover-
nors’ Cup, slightly wherein almost
every single game will matter and
rivalries will be renewed as there
will be series again in the playoffs
of the said conference.
“Every game will count and
will matter this season given the
formats of the three conferences.
The PBA right now is very at-
tractive,’’ added Salud. ‘’With
the innovation that we have in
the format for this year, we ex-
pect that our fans will have an-
other fun year.’’
The league’s new season will
open on Sunday with the Philip-
pine Cup. There will be the tradi-
tional opening ceremony at 4 p.m.
as well as recognition to the Smart
Gilas Pilipinas National Team that
won the Jones Cup last month.
“There will be the opening cere-
mony and we will also pay tribute
to our National Team there. The
opening will be short and sweet.
The fans will love it,’’ Salud said.
The opening ceremony will fea-
ture the parade of the teams along
with their muses, as well as a couple
of performances from various art-
ists before the All-Filipino confer-
ence officially opens with Ginebra
and rookie team Global Port play-
ing the first game at 6 p.m. at the
Smart Araneta Coliseum.
Most of the PBA gover-
nors agreed that the three San
Miguel Corporation teams,
Barangay Ginebra, San Mig
Coffee and Petron Blaze, along
with last season’s Governor’s
Cup and Philippine Cup cham-
pions, Rain or Shine and Talk
‘N Text, respectively, are the
teams to beat. Jeric Lopez
Salud sees another banner year for PBA
By Ronnie Nathanielsz
THE defamation lawsuit between Fight-
er of the Decade Manny Pacquiao and
undefeated Floyd Mayweather Jr. has
been settled.
Boxingscene.com reported that it had
received a statement from the office of
retired Judge Daniel Weinstein, who has
served as mediator between the two par-
ties, stating that the they had “settled the
defamation lawsuit between themselves
on confidential terms.”
Judge Weinstein’s statement also in-
cluded a public statement issued by Floyd
Mayweather Jr., Floyd Mayweather Sr.
and Mayweather Promotions.
It said: “They wish to make it clear that
they never intended to claim that Manny
Pacquiao has used or is using any perfor-
mance enhancing drugs, nor are they aware
of any evidence that Manny Pacquiao has
used performance- enhancing drugs. Manny
Pacquiao is a great champion, and no one
should construe any of our prior remarks
as claiming that Manny Pacquiao has used
performance-enhancing drugs.”
Weinstein also earlier served as me-
diator between Pacquiao and Golden Boy
Promotions on the same issue of the Fili-
pino champ being accused of taking per-
formance-enhancing drugs.
The scuttling of the lawsuits appears to
be another positive development in the ef-
forts to stage a megabuck fight between
Mayweather and Pacquiao.
Pacquiao’s defamation suit against Mayweathers settled
FEU’s Russell Escoto (left) loses his balance battling for the looseball against DLSU’s Thomas
Torres in a UAAP game won by the Arhers, 69-66. EY ACASIO
FERN-C Racing again emerged as the winningest team in the 2012 Coca-Cola Karting
Super Series at the Clark International Speedway. Members of the team are (from
left) ROK Senior champion Milo Rivera, ROK Junior runner-up Estefano Rivera, Formula
Cadet Expert and Mini-ROK champion Dylan Arambulo and Formula SL Novice overall
runner-up Raymond Cudala.
PBA officials and team managers (from left) Talk ‘N Text’s Pato Gregorio, Global Port’s Eric Arejola, Air21’s Lito Alvarez, Barako Bull’s Manny Alvarez,
PBA Commissioner Chito Salud, Meralco Bolts’ Ramon Segismundo, PBA Chairman Robert Non of Ginebra, Petron’s Ely Capacio, San Mig Coffee’s
Rene Pardo and Rain or Shine’s Andy Jao link hands in a show of unity during the launching of the league’s 38th season. ROMAN PROSPERO
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
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SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
A10 Manila Standard TODAY
difference at 112
Making a
Through the San Miguel
Community Scholarship
Program, children from
underprivileged families were
able to acquire quality education
to have a brighter future
ahead of them. Students from
Pangasinan, Pampanga, Cebu,
Bacolod, Bukidnon and Davao
were enrolled in vocational
and technological courses. The
scholars also participated in
the annual scholars’ conference
sponsored by various San
Miguel Divisions.
“Malusog na Katawan,
Matalas na Isipan”, is a school-
based supplemental feeding
program targeting malnourished
children from ages 4 to 8 years
old. The goal of the program is to
help the kids reach their optimum
mental and physical development.
The Foundation also was able
to distribute significant number
of books in schools in Cagayan
de Oro, Bukidnon, Agusan del
Norte, Misamis Occidental and
Davao City.
SMFI held trainings on
entrepreneurial skills and gave
out zero interest loans which
have duration of one year to the
communities near the company
plant. This was of great of help
to them to put up their own
choice of business.
For their health initiatives,
SMFI established community
clinics which was operated and
managed by the Foundation.
These community clinics attended
to both common and specialized
illnesses such as tuberculosis,
diabetes and cardiovascular
diseases. The consultation and
medicines were given free until
patients were free from the illness.
SMFI conducted training on
good governance to selected
barangay councils as part of
their livelihood project. The
objective of the training was
for the barangay officials to be
acquainted with their roles and
responsibilities and the rights
of the council. The training also
guided the barangay council
to formulate a medium term
barangay development plan for
their area of jurisdiction.
SMFI has various campaigns
on protecting the environment
as well such as recycling and
recovery. These are keys to cut
waste disposal costs, reducing
gas emissions that contribute
to global climate change, and
pollution prevention that is
practiced in SMC plants to
eliminate the generation of
waste at the source.
Linis Ofis Program is an
internal solid waste management
program which orders employees
to segregate their wastes
properly. It is one approach of the
employees to contribute on their
own simple way.
Another is the Project Blue
Sky pioneered by SMC’s Polo
Brewery. It is an anti-smoke
belching campaign within its
premises by requiring all vehicles
entering the plant to submit a
certificate of compliance that
attests that their vehicle passed an
emission testing.
PET Recycling is a recycling
project to produce environment-
friendly packaging materials
for the local food and beverage
industries using PET or
polyethylene terephthalate. PET
is that soft plastic or polymer
popularly used for containers of
mineral water, and various food
and household items.
Social responsibility
at its best
San Miguel Foundation, Inc. (SMFI), San
Miguel Corporation’s social responsibility
division proactively reaches out to
communities who need help the most and
does effective measures to preserve the
environment. The foundation has various
programs on health, education, livelihood, and
environment protection.
1889: Don Enrique Ma Barretto de Ycaza y Esteban was awarded a
royal grant in Spain to brew beer in the Philippines.
1890: La Fabrica de Cerveza de San Miguel was opened.
1893: After the success of the business, Don Barreto incorporated the
company.
1896: San Miguel Beer was selling more than the imported beer in
the Philippines with a ratio of 5:1
1913: After the death of the key owners, the company changed its
form from a firm of co-participants to a corporation. Don Antonio
Roxas, son of the deceased manager Don Pedro Roxas, was
appointed as president.
1914: San Miguel started exporting to neighbor countries such as
Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Guam.
1922: The company ventured in new businesses which paved way
to the opening of Royal Soft Drinks Plant in Manila which produces
Royal TruOrange.
1925: San Miguel purchased Magnolia Plant, an ice cream business.
1927: The Royal Soft Drinks Plant started bottling Coca-Cola.
1953: Soriano signed the “Manila Agreement” which allowed the
Spanish subsidiary La Segarra which was later renamed as San
Miguel Fábricas de Cerveza y Malta to brew and sell beer under the
San Miguel brand. It is an independent company that has the sole
rights to use san Miguel brands in Europe.
1960: The company was renamed to San Miguel Corporation.
1964: Antonio Roxas was elected chairman of San Miguel and
Andrés Soriano, Jr. became president.
1980’s: Soriano Jr. ventured in the food business by acquiring a
poultry production farm, building an ice cream plant, and added
shrimp processing and freezing into the company operations.
1970’s: San Miguel encountered its first major competitor when Asia
Brewery Inc. entered the market.
1983: San Miguel sold its minority interest to San Miguel Fábricas de
Cerveza y Malta. Enrique Zobel, cousin of the Sorianos, who owned
the Zobel-Ayala real estate and banking group and was vice chairman
of the San Miguel board, sold his groups’s 19.5 percent share to
Eduardo Cojuangco, Jr.
1984: Cojuangco became the Chairman after Soriano Jr. died.
Road map to Success
Soriano embarked in internalization programs with hopes to expand
into other countries and to lessen the impact of the Philippines’ unstable
economy in the company. Soriano III allocated $1 billion to a five-
year program that focused on shaping up domestic operations, then
progressing to licensing and exporting, overseas production, and finally
to distribution of non-beer products. San Miguel reduced its workforce
from a 1989 high of 39,138 to 32,832 by 1993 as a sacrifice for this
program.
In 1996 San Miguel purchased full control of its Hong Kong arm,
San Miguel Brewery Hong Kong Ltd. In April of the following year,
San Miguel’s domestic soft-drink bottling unit, Coca-Cola Bottlers
Philippines Inc., was merged into the Australia-based Coca-Cola Amatil
Ltd. (CCA). In effect, San Miguel exchanged its 70-percent interest in
a Philippine-only operation for a 25-percent stake in CCA, which had
operations in 17 countries. CCA soon demerged the latter operations into
a UK-based firm called Coca-Cola Beverages.
From 1995 through 1997, San Miguel suffered a downturn in its
main domestic businesses because of the Asian Financial crisis. Profits
plummeted that resulted to a major restructuring of the company’s loss-
making food businesses was undertaken. San Miguel’s ice cream and
pasteurized milk business was merged with the operations of Nestlé to
form Nestlé Philippines Inc. In 1998 San Miguel’s stake in this business
was sold off. San Miguel also left the ready-to-eat meal sector and
reduced the operations of its shrimp farming business.
Andres Soriano III resigned in July 1998 and Eduardo M. Cojuangco,
Jr. was elected chairman of San Miguel Corporation. Confronted by
greater competitive pressures as a result of the 1997 financial crisis, the
pace of change quickened for San Miguel upon Cojuangco’s return. The
main goal of Cojuangco was to reduce the expenses, pursue international
investors and partners to strengthen the business, and to position the
company as firm who has high productivity and stable financial standing.
Continuing its
successful path
Cojuangco’s chairmanship was cut short
after Marcos was ousted as the President of the
country in 1986. Being a close colleague and a
presidential adviser, Cojuangco flew to Hawaii
alongside Marcos. Allegedly, Cojuangco used
government money to purchase shares in San
Miguel so the Aquino Administration confiscated
his stakes in the company and allowed Soriano
III to take control. Soriano tried to buy back
Cojuangco’s shares but he was blocked by
Presidential Commission on Good Government
(PCGG) saying that the shares are illegally
obtained. The issue was straightened out during
the early 1990s through a management contract
with A. Soriano Corp.
The new management decided to continue the company’s
investments in China, Vietnam, and Indonesia. San Miguel refurbished
the selling and distribution organization resulting in higher distribution
efficiency, improved coverage of key accounts, greater pricing stability
and reduced overall costs. In China, the company chose to focus on
growth markets while still reaching close to 30 cities.
By the end of 1998, Cojuangco sold San Miguel’s stake in Coca-
Cola Beverages, Coca-Cola Amatil’s bottler in Europe, along with
SMC’s 45 percent stake in Nestlé Philippines. The sale of both Coca-
Cola Beverages and Nestle was part of the new management’s effort
to restructure the San Miguel Group and focus its technological,
managerial and financial strengths to ventures where it believed it
could add the most value.
In May, the San Miguel Brewing International (SMBIL) regional
headquarters was transferred from Hong Kong to Manila to reduce
overhead expenses, the employees of SMBIL were repatriated. The
organizational reformation was meant to configure San Miguel to
enable it to better respond to the competitive climate. The group-wide
logistics and purchasing functions were realigned at the corporate level.
The Food Group, La Tondeña Distillers and the international operations
were recapitalized. Metro Bottled Water Corp., manufacturers of
Wilkins Distilled Water, was acquired.
In February 2001, San Miguel once again regained control of Coca-
Cola Bottlers Philippines, Inc. Shortly after, San Miguel acquired the
Ayala Company’s PureFoods, becoming the undisputed market leader
in the Philippines’ fast growing food industry.
Ramon Ang was appointed president and chief operating officer in
March 2002 after Francisco Eizmendi retired.
Cojuangco acquired various companies such as Australian boutique
brewer J. Boag and Son in 2000, Thai Amarit Brewery Ltd., Japanese
brewer Kirin Brewery Co. Ltd in 2002, Vietnamese food processor
TTC Co. in 2003, and 51 percent of Australia’s top juicemaker Berri
Ltd. in 2004.
In 2005, the company made its biggest overseas acquisition with
the takeover of National Foods Ltd., Australia’s largest publicly
traded dairy followed later in the year with a purchase of Singapore-
based Del Monte Pacific Ltd., the region’s largest pineapple canner.
San Miguel then has merged National Foods’operation with Berri.
In 2006, San Miguel has sold its 65 percent stake at its Coca-Cola
Next page
Locals help clean up their surroundings
Medical services provided for senior citizens
Children enjoy
their meal in
the feeding
program
Students who got
school supplies
from SMI
Community clinic that SMFI put up
Waste management program in the community
The old San Miguel Corp. headequarters in Manila
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SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY A11 Manila Standard TODAY
difference at 112
Making a
Philippine to The Coca-Cola
Company (TCCC) .
In November 2007, SMC
sold Boag’s to Lion. The same
month, SMC also sold National
Foods to Kirin.
While the global financial
meltdown of 2008-2009 sent
many companies into full retreat,
San Miguel Corporation powered
ahead, investing mightily in a
strategy to reaccelerate growth and
improve margins.
In rapid succession beginning
late 2008, SMC bought up shares
in power retailer Meralco, paid up
for the option to own oil refiner
Petron, and acquired a majority
stake in Liberty Holdings, a
Filipino telecommunications
company co-owned by Qatar
Telecom.
San Miguel also participated
in several large-scale projects.
Phase 1 of the P19 billion,
88.5 kilometer two-lane
Tarlac Pangasinan La Unión
Expressway began April
2010. In October 2010, SMC
finalized a deal to acquire 51
percent interest in Universal
LRT Corp. Ltd., the company
in charge of developing the
Metro Rail Transit Line 7
(MRT7).
San Miguel’s energy and
power portfolio is just as
impressive. The company’s
energy subsidiary San Miguel
Energy has become the largest
power producer in Luzon.
Ang was also keen on
entering the mining business.
In early October 2010, SMC
bought a tenth of Australia’s
Indophil Resources, NL, a
company which owns a 37.5
percent stake in the Tampakan
copper-gold project which
covers the provinces of
South Cotabato, Davao del
Sur, and Sultan Kudarat and
has a total resource estimate
of 2.4 billion tons. The
Tampakan mining project is
the Philippines’ largest.
In April 2012, SMC bought
a 49 percent minority stake
in Philippine Airlines (PAL)
Holdings to revitalize PAL and
Air Philippines. SMC has also
expanded its oil and energy
business with the purchase of Esso
Malaysia Berhad, ExxonMobil
Borneo Sdn Bhd and ExxonMobil
Malaysia Sdn Bhd.
As the man behind San
Miguel’s bold direction
toward diversifying a highly
dynamic conglomerate, Ramon
Ang started his long-term
relationship with Eduardo
Cojuangco, Jr. and San Miguel
Corp. (SMC) as “a proprietor
of a small firm that specialized
in reconditioning surplus
engines.”
Ang was born in Manila on
Jan. 14, 1954. He graduated
from Far Eastern University
in 1981 with a degree in
mechanical engineering. In
the early 1970s, he was buying
surplus car engines from Japan
to refurbish and sell them to car
enthusiasts.
After he obliged a request for
assistance on one of his prized
cars, Cojuangco took notice
and ushered him to SMC.
He was appointed president
and chief operating officer of
San Miguel in March 2002,
following the retirement of
Francisco Eizmendi.
Ang took full control of the
conglomerate after Cojuangco
sold his 11-percent stake in the
company. The deal is estimated
at a value of P27.61 billion.
With “full trust and
confidence”, Cojuangco said
that Ang “has continuously
dedicated 100-percent of his
time and effort in ensuring
the growth of the San Miguel
Group to the benefit of its
shareholders” and that he
“rightfully deserves utmost
recognition for transforming
the company into a highly
diversified and profitable
business conglomerate.”
Under his helm, the
conglomerate entered into
diversification that spanned
over vital industries such
as power, fuel and oil,
infrastructure, mining,
telecommunications, airlines
and airports.
With the conglomerate
having no prior experience on
such investments, investors and
market observers were skeptic
at first but Ang was confident
that these investments belong
to the growth areas of the
economy.
In an interview published
earlier in Manila St andar d
Today, Ang said “We have
specific investment criteria,
but if you look at the
businesses we have acquired
and entered so far, you’ll
notice they all have one thing
in common: They belong to
industries that play a key role
in our country’s growth. As
one of the country’s leading
conglomerates, we take very
seriously our ability to have a
positive impact on the lives of
our countrymen.”
Of infrastructure projects,
Ang said, “With the many
toll road and mass transport
projects in the pipeline, we
hope to provide a long-term
solution to the worsening
traffic situation by helping
widen our country’s road
network. On a larger scale,
we see these new roads
and mass transport systems
in the context of a larger
infrastructure network that
will support the growth of the
Philippine tourist industry.”
To boost tourism, the
conglomerate is on top of the
Boracay Airport management,
one of several airport
projects that will beef up the
company’s portfolio. With
Philippine Air Lines (PAL),
SMC hopes to develop the
flag carrier so it could join
the ranks of the best airlines
in the region. “Our immediate
priorities are to modernize its
fleet, expand its network and
improve passenger service,”
added Ang.
In power generation, Ang is
aiming to address the country’s
power requirements by building
the extra capacity needed to
sustain our country’s growth.
Currently, the Bataan refinery
is being upgraded to efficiently
process crude and fuels and
petrochemicals in the long run.
According to Bloomberg,
San Miguel has spent no
less than $4.8 billion for 24
corporate acquisitions since its
diversification shift in 2007.
This figure excludes its recent
$500-million acquisition of a
49-percent stake in in PAL.
Apart from heading San
Miguel Corp., Ang is also
president and chief operating
officer of PAL Holdings,
Philippine Airlines, Trustmark
Holdings Corp. and Zuma
Holdings and Management
Corp.; chair and chief
executive of Petron Corp.,
Petron Marketing Corp., and
SMC Global Power Holdings
Corp.; vice chair of Manila
Electric Co., Ginebra San
Miguel, San Miguel Pure
Foods Co. and San Miguel
Yamamura Haiphong Glass
Co. Ltd. (Vietnam).
He also holds the position of
chair and president in various
other companies, including
San Miguel Properties, San
Miguel Electric Corp., San
Miguel Energy Corp., Lode
Mining Ventures Corp., Bell
Telecommunication Phil., San
Miguel Beverages and San
Miguel Holdings Corp.
Ang also chairs San Miguel
Brewery, San Miguel Foods,
San Miguel Paper Packaging
Corp., and South Luzon
Tollway Corp.
“There is still a lot we can
do in San Miguel, and, as I
have said, for the country. Our
entire diversification strategy
is geared toward helping the
Philippines realize its fullest
potential,” concluded Ang.
Adding value to growing businesses
From A10
Ramon Ang
of San Miguel Corp.
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Manila Standard TODAY
SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
B1
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Ray S. Eñano, Editor extrastory2000@gmail.com
Roderick T. dela Cruz, Assistant Editor
PSE COMPOSITE INDEX
ClosingSeptember 26, 2012
5,292.630
32.54
OIL
PRICES
TODAY
P584-P695.00
LPG/11-kg tank
P47.15-P53.07
Unleaded Gasoline
P38.40-P41.05
Diesel
P40.30-P52.20
Kerosene
P27.20-P31.00
Auto LPG
FOREI GN EXCHANGE RATE
Currency Unit US Dollar Peso
United States Dollar 1.000000 41.7310
Japan Yen 0.012862 0.5367
UK Pound 1.618600 67.5458
Hong Kong Dollar 0.128984 5.3826
Switzerland Franc 1.066325 44.4988
Canada Dollar 1.019784 42.5566
Singapore Dollar 0.813935 33.9663
Australia Dollar 1.044605 43.5924
Bahrain Dinar 2.652661 110.6982
Saudi Arabia Rial 0.266667 11.1283
Brunei Dollar 0.810636 33.8287
Indonesia Rupiah 0.000105 0.0044
Thailand Baht 0.032383 1.3514
UAE Dirham 0.272272 11.3622
Euro Euro 1.290000 53.8330
Korea Won 0.000894 0.0373
China Yuan 0.158564 6.6170
India Rupee 0.018741 0.7821
Malaysia Ringgit 0.325786 13.5954
NewZealand Dollar 0.827267 34.5227
Taiwan Dollar 0.034109 1.4234
Source: PDS Bridge
Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas
Wednesday, September 26, 2012
PESO-DOLLAR RATE
40
42
44
46
48
P42.020
CLOSE
Closing SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
5200
4460
3720
2980
2240
1500
1200
VOLUME 1217.120M
HIGH P41.750 LOW P42.020 AVERAGE P41.886
IN BRIEF
Japanese firms in China wooed
Barclays, DBS see investment grade rating next year
Thailand wants PH
to purchase more rice
Business sector worried by Pangilinan’s threat
By Jenniffer B. Austria
THE business and financial sectors
expressed concerns over the threat
of Philippine Long Distance
Telephone Co. chairman Manuel
Pangilinan to leave the country
and move his group’s operations
to Hong Kong after being dragged
into a political controversy.
Rene Meily, president of the
Philippine-American Chamber of
Commerce of New York, said in
a statement Pangilinan’s threat to
divest of his group’s businesses
in the Philippines would be a
big blow to the government of
President Benigno Aquino III and
could result in a decline in business
confidence in the country.
“Pangilinan’s threat to leave
the country and divest himself
of his businesses, would be a big
blow to the administration. It will
send a strong message of decline
in business confidence in the
country. And whoever takes on
the vacuum left... would not be
able to guarantee the same level
of commitment he has given for
the country’s development over
the past decades,” Meily said.
Meily noted that companies
headed by Pangilinan, including
PLDT and conglomerate Metro
Pacific Investments Corp. had an
estimated market capitalization
of P2 trillion.
Astro del Castillo, managing
director of First Grade Finance
Inc., also expressed concern
that the private sector was being
dragged into the feud between
Senate president Juan Ponce
Enrile and Senator Antonio
Trillanes IV.
“Pangilinan does not deserve
this controversy,” Del Castillo
said. “The public should discern
legitimate business moguls from
the opportunist capitalists. [He]
is among the country’s business
tycoons whose prime objective is
to put the country’s economy back
on track. The country can count
with one hand similar tycoons
who genuinely prioritized the
nation’s interest among the top
corporations, even among the
oldest ones in existence.”
PNB posts P1.77-b profit
PHILIPPINE National Bank reported
Wednesday that net profit in the first six months
of 2012 hit P1.77 billion, up 144 percent year-
on-year.
Total operating income grew 34 percent to
P8.7 billion from the P6.5 billion a year ago,
while interest income on loans rose 6 percent on
improved volume and better spreads from a mix
of corporate, small and medium enterprise and
consumer lending client portfolio.
Net loans and receivables P5.3 billion to
P131.5 billion, while trading and investment
securities gains reached P2.6 billion, 16 times
more than a year ago, due to the gain on sale and
redemption of available for sale securities.
Non-performing loans dropped further to P6.6
billion from P6.9 billion at the end of 2011.
Anna Leah G. Estrada
PH-Saudi air talks
THE Civil Aeronautics Board said Wednesday it
concluded air talks with the Saudi Arabia to get
additional flight frequency to the oil-rich country.
CAB executive director Carmelo Arcilla
said KSA agreed to increase entitlements to 21
flights per week from the current 10 flights.
“The parties signed a new agreement
increasing that would allow flight frequency
for the airline of each country on the route
Philippines to Jeddah/Riyadh,” Arcilla said.
He added the talks also resulted in getting
unlimited flights between Saudi Arabia and Clark,
as well as between the Philippines and Dammam.
The Philippine panel was headed by
Transportation Undersecretary Jose Perpetuo
Lotilla, with Arcilla as vice chairman. The other
members of the panel were representatives
from the Foreign Affairs, Trade and Labor
departments. Lailany P. Gomez
JG Summit raises P3.2b
THE Gokongwei group, through unit Express
Holdings Inc., has raised P3.2 billion from the
sale of JG Summit Holdings’ shares.
JG Summit said in a disclosure to the stock
exchange Express Holdings sold 100 million shares
of the company through an accelerated overnight
equity placement at a price of P32 per share.
“The transaction was done in order to widen
the shareholder base of the company, and as a
response to strong demand for the company’s
stock,” JG Summit said.
The sale price of P32 represents a 7-percent
discount to JG Summit’s closing price of P34.40
Tuesday.
UBS acted as the sole bookrunner for the
overnight transaction.
JG Summit, one of the largest and most diversified
conglomerates in the Philippines, reported a net
income of P7.47 billion in the first six months of the
year, up 25 percent on year. Jenniffer B. Austria
By Julito G. Rada
THE government is in talks
with at least 15 Japanese
companies to relocate to the
Philippines from China, amid
the rising tension over territorial
disputes between Beijing and
Tokyo.
Trade Undersecretary Cristino Panlilio said the
talks with the Japanese firms operating in China
was part of wider government efforts to convince
foreign companies to expand in the Philippines.
Several Japanese companies in China halted
operations last week, after Chinese protesters
surrounded their offices in the wake of the rising
tension in Senkaku Island, which is being claimed
by the two countries as well as Taiwan.
Panlilio, who also heads the Board of
Investments, said the government had a list of 300
Japanese companies based in China, and transfer
priority will be given to those with existing
operations in the Philippines.
“The Philippines continues to market companies
from all countries and convince them of the many
advantages of locating in the Philippines,” Panlilio
said in a text message.
The BoI is also wooing other non-Chinese
investors based in China, such as South Koreans
and Taiwanese, to relocate in the Philippines
which offers a lower cost of doing business.
Panlilio said the government was looking as
well at investors from Turkey and Middle East
countries, such as Kuwait, United Arab Emirates
and Saudi Arabia.
He said the government has not yet received a
positive response from the Japanese companies.
“We are still marketing [to] them. No positive
results yet,” he said.
Panlilio said these Japanese companies were
engaged in electronics, camera and auto parts
manufacturing.
He did not say if the current territorial squabble
between China and Japan could be a major factor for
Japanese firms in China to transfer in the Philippines.
“Perhaps, but it’s part of course for businesses to
undergo different challenges,” he said.
The Board of Investments earlier said it was
sticking to its previous investments target of P400
billion this year. The agency is actively conducting
investment missions overseas to attract foreign
companies to locate here.
Panlilio earlier noted possible investments
by Japanese shipbuilders, following the BoI’s
successful investment mission where members of
the Japanese Shipbuilders Association expressed
their interest to follow in the footsteps of Tsuneishi
Corp. in Cebu. With Bloomberg
By Anna Leah G. Estrada
TWO foreign banks expect the
Philippines to receive its first
investment grade rating next year.
Barclays Capital said in a
report reforms were expected to
pick up after the 2013 elections,
thus, “supporting their view that
the Philippines will receive its
first ever investment grade rating
in H2 2013.”
Separately, Singapore-based
DBS said an investment grade
rating was possible next year,
as the government continued
to show improvement in debt
management and its ability to
repay debt.
“It is not surprising that it won
multiple upgrades from credit
rating agencies over the past two
years,” the DBS Group said in a
research note. “An investment
grade rating is definitely a
possibility in 2013.”
International credit rating
agencies upgraded the country’s
credit ratings in the past, with
Moody’s Investor Service rating
the country Ba2 positive. Standards
& Poor’s rates it BB positive while
Fitch Ratings gave the country a
score of BB+ stable.
Barclays analyst Prakriti Sofat
said Fitch was expected to change
the country’s outlook to positive
in the next three to six months.
“Our base case is for the Senate
to pass the sin taxes before year-
end, which should structurally
boost revenues by an estimated
P33 billion [0.4 percent of
GDP]—a credit positive. Fiscal
incentive rationalization, excise
tax reform bills and mining sector
reforms are in the pipeline,”
Sofat said.
Sofat said the pace and size
of the public-private partnership
projects would also be a key
in determining the sovereign’s
ratings although downside
surprises would pose a risk.
Barclays is maintaining its 2012
GDP forecast for the Philippines at
5.5 percent given the challenging
external environment. It said
growth in 2013 was expected to
average 5.2 percent.
The bank also has a positive
outlook on the peso, which is the
second best-performing emerging
markets in Asian currency.
“The fundamental backdrop for
the Philippine peso is strong, given
the robust balance of payments, an
improving ratings trajectory and
increased political stability,” Sofat
said. With Bernadette Lunas
By Bernadette Lunas
THE government posted a
budget surplus of P2.5 billion
in August, trimming the eight-
month deficit to P71.2 billion,
Finance Secretary Cesar
Purisima said Wednesday.
Data from Treasury showed
the surplus in August snapped
the three straight months of
deficit spending and represented
a significant improvement from
the P39.2-billion deficit recorded
in July. However, it was lower
by 72.6 percent from P9.2-billion
surplus booked in August 2011.
The government said while
the eight-month deficit doubled
to P71.2 billion from P34.5
billion last year, it remained
way below the full-year deficit
cap of P279 billion.
“With this, the Philippines
continues to be in a sweet spot,
generating wide fiscal space
to stimulate the economy and
to spend on key development
projects,” Purisima said in a
statement.
Government expenditures in the
first eight months rose 14.5 percent
to P1.09 trillion from P947.2
billion on sustained increases in
disbursements for infrastructure
and other capital outlays.
Disbursements in August alone
grew 10.4 percent to P126.9
billion from P114.9 billion.
“These figures only prove the
efforts of national government
agencies to roll out key
infrastructure projects to help
boost the country’s viability as
the next investments and tourism
hub in the region,” Budget
Secretary Florencio Abad said.
By Othel V. Campos
THAILAND wants to sell more
rice to the Philippines, despite
Manila’s plan to become self-
sufficient in the staple crop next
year.
National Food Authority legal
counsel Gilbert Lauengco said
Bangkok asked for a guaranteed
rice quota volume of 600,000
metric tons under a government-
to-government agreement, in
exchange of allowing Manila
to extend its rice protectionist
policy.
“They keep on changing their
figures. Maybe because they have
so much disposable production.
Nevertheless, we are still to
assess the merits of the deal. If
we give in to their demand, then
it’s like we already agreed to lift
the QR [quantitative restriction
on rice],” Lauengco said at the
sidelines of the 40
th
anniversary
of the agency at the Food
Terminal Inc. in Taguig City.
The QR on rice is a
protectionist policy that
allowed the Philippines, under
existing rules of the World
Trade Organization, to limit the
volume of rice that enters the
country, preventing a possible
influx of cheap rice imports.
Thailand is the world’s biggest
rice producer with an average
yield of 90 million metric tons
of rice and an excess output
of more than 11 million MT
annually.
Agrilink supporter. San Miguel Foods Inc., through its flagship animal feeds brand B-MEG, is sponsoring Agrilink 2012,
the country’s largest agribusiness trade fair to be held at the World Trade Center in Pasay City on Oct. 4 to 6. B-MEG is set to
introduce its newest products—Premium Hog Pellets, Integra, Alertone and San Miguel Animal Health Care products—at the
event, organized by the Foundation for Resource Linkage and Development Inc. Shown formalizing the partnership are (from left)
Leo Obviar, SMFI-Meats and Poultry general manager; Antonio Roces, FRLD president; and Norman Ramos, SMFI-Feeds Business
general manager.
Govt
reports
P2.5-b
surplus
TRADI NG SUMMARY
SHARES VALUE
FINANCIAL 13,054,646 862,435,303
INDUSTRIAL 74,334,392 718,999,866.63
HOLDING FIRMS 182,855,590 4,440,187,198.93
PROPERTY 141,430,603 617,159,315.93
SERVICES 140,339,579 1,158,149,803.67
MINING & OIL 602,317,068 112,908,891.35
GRAND TOTAL 1,154,331,878 7,909,840,379.513
FINANCIAL 1,352.65 (up) 3.63
INDUSTRIAL 8,066.95 (up) 1.46
HOLDING FIRMS 4,450.81 (down) 57.54
PROPERTY 2,027.94 (down) 24.49
SERVICES 1,791.92 (down) 6.56
MINING & OIL 20,431.20 (down) 97.31
PSEI 5,292.63 (down) 32.54
All Shares Index 3,531.25 (down) 15.41
Gainers: 58; Losers: 95; Unchanged: 43; Total: 196
Stocks fall; BDO,
Bloomberry gain
Business
ManilaStandardToday
extrastory2000@gmail.com
SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
B2
52 Weeks Previous % Net Foreign
High Low STOCKS Close High Low Close Change Volume Trade/Buying
MST BUSINESS DAILY STOCKS REVIEW
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
M
S
T
FINANCIAL
70.50 46.00 Banco de Oro Unibank Inc. 63.00 63.30 63.05 63.30 0.48 4,255,730 221,937,637.00
77.45 50.00 Bank of PI 78.40 78.40 78.00 78.20 (0.26) 1,305,210 (21,336,674.00)
1.82 0.68 Bankard, Inc. 0.72 0.71 0.70 0.70 (2.78) 686,000
595.00 370.00 China Bank 53.75 53.75 53.10 53.15 (1.12) 130,530 (718,011.50)
23.90 13.80 COL Financial 20.20 20.20 20.00 20.00 (0.99) 127,400 (1,134,360.00)
20.70 18.50 Eastwest Bank 23.30 23.50 22.75 23.10 (0.86) 1,537,900 5,448,350.00
22.00 7.95 Filipino Fund Inc. 10.20 11.00 10.54 10.54 3.33 2,000
89.00 50.00 First Metro Inv. 74.00 73.80 68.00 73.80 (0.27) 2,480 3,400.00
3.26 1.91 I-Remit Inc. 2.91 2.91 2.75 2.90 (0.34) 48,000
650.00 420.00 Manulife Fin. Corp. 485.00 485.00 475.00 475.00 (2.06) 140
102.50 60.00 Metrobank 92.50 93.10 91.50 93.00 0.54 2,056,910 71,011,028.50
3.06 1.30 Natl Reinsurance Corp. 1.94 1.94 1.94 1.94 0.00 50,000
77.80 41.00 Phil. National Bank 72.00 72.90 72.10 72.90 1.25 216,690 3,054,389.50
500.00 210.00 PSE Inc. 366.00 370.00 366.00 366.80 0.22 31,250 11,004,000.00
45.50 29.45 RCBC `A’ 44.00 44.00 44.00 44.00 0.00 65,300.00 1,874,400.00
155.20 77.00 Security Bank 159.90 164.00 160.30 162.50 1.63 930,510 65,841,346.00
140.00 58.00 Union Bank 105.00 105.70 104.50 104.90 (0.10) 6,110
2.06 1.43 Vantage Equities 1.87 1.87 1.87 1.87 0.00 402,000 (52,360.00)
INDUSTRIAL
35.50 26.50 Aboitiz Power Corp. 33.20 34.00 33.25 33.55 1.05 1,650,000 22,580,285.00
13.58 8.00 Agrinurture Inc. 8.55 8.46 8.45 8.45 (1.17) 35,100
23.95 11.98 Alaska Milk Corp. 23.50 23.45 23.40 23.40 (0.43) 7,200
1.70 0.97 Alliance Tuna Intl Inc. 1.68 1.69 1.67 1.67 (0.60) 761,000
48.00 25.00 Alphaland Corp. 30.00 30.00 30.00 30.00 0.00 300
1.62 1.08 Alsons Cons. 1.46 1.48 1.44 1.46 0.00 5,389,000 2,308,040.00
Asiabest Group 21.65 21.65 20.65 21.60 (0.23) 53,200
2.96 2.12 Calapan Venture 2.84 2.85 2.80 2.85 0.35 111,000
2.75 2.30 Chemrez Technologies Inc. 2.73 2.73 2.72 2.72 (0.37) 274,000 174,080.00
9.74 7.41 Cirtek Holdings (Chips) 11.90 11.88 11.70 11.88 (0.17) 2,035,700
6.41 4.83 Energy Devt. Corp. (EDC) 6.07 6.10 5.99 6.05 (0.33) 5,270,200 (13,750,968.00)
7.77 2.80 EEI 8.30 8.42 8.24 8.24 (0.72) 293,100 (415,910.00)
3.80 1.00 Euro-Med Lab. 2.16 1.92 1.88 1.88 (12.96) 76,000
19.40 12.50 First Gen Corp. 19.12 19.18 19.04 19.14 0.10 749,300 7,606,864.00
79.30 51.50 First Holdings ‘A’ 78.50 78.50 77.50 77.50 (1.27) 591,070 (20,511,459.50)
0.02 0.0110 Greenergy 0.0160 0.0160 0.0150 0.0160 0.00 2,400,000
13.10 7.80 Holcim Philippines Inc. 12.82 12.86 12.52 12.86 0.31 126,400 (564,626.00)
6.00 3.80 Integ. Micro-Electronics 4.00 4.02 4.00 4.01 0.25 103,000 215,930.00
2.35 0.61 Ionics Inc 0.630 0.620 0.620 0.620 (1.59) 40,000
120.00 80.00 Jollibee Foods Corp. 102.60 102.50 100.00 102.00 (0.58) 168,820 4,354,131.00
Lafarge Rep 9.30 9.30 8.40 9.30 0.00 731,300
8.40 1.04 LMG Chemicals 2.00 2.04 1.98 2.04 2.00 213,000 (237,600.00)
27.45 18.10 Manila Water Co. Inc. 26.75 26.80 26.70 26.75 0.00 1,398,900 (6,327,075.00)
18.10 8.12 Megawide 16.600 16.720 16.720 16.720 0.72 700
280.60 215.00 Mla. Elect. Co `A’ 261.00 261.60 259.00 260.00 (0.38) 595,220 76,829,956.00
12.20 7.50 Pancake House Inc. 7.05 7.06 7.03 7.03 (0.28) 4,300
3.65 1.96 Pepsi-Cola Products Phil. 3.96 3.99 3.92 3.99 0.76 3,841,000 (8,732,250.00)
16.00 9.70 Petron Corporation 10.40 10.40 10.20 10.40 0.00 988,800 66,560.00
14.94 8.05 Phoenix Petroleum Phils. 8.11 8.19 8.10 8.19 0.99 18,000
4.42 1.01 RFM Corporation 3.95 4.18 3.98 4.02 1.77 3,078,000 742,820.00
3.90 2.01 Roxas Holdings 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 0.00 283,000
34.60 26.50 San Miguel Brewery Inc. 34.40 34.40 34.00 34.40 0.00 98,700
129.20 110.20 San Miguel Corp `A’ 110.60 110.70 109.90 110.60 0.00 273,370 3,314,945.00
2.62 1.25 Seacem 2.47 2.51 2.41 2.48 0.40 7,787,000 147,400.00
2.44 1.73 Splash Corporation 1.82 1.80 1.80 1.80 (1.10) 15,000
0.196 0.112 Swift Foods, Inc. 0.135 0.139 0.136 0.139 2.96 850,000
14.66 3.30 Tanduay Holdings 12.48 12.60 12.14 12.28 (1.60) 977,400 (1,353,294.00)
2.88 1.99 TKC Steel Corp. 2.16 2.08 2.05 2.08 (3.70) 12,000
1.41 0.90 Trans-Asia Oil 1.23 1.23 1.21 1.21 (1.63) 452,000
69.20 37.00 Universal Robina 63.85 66.10 65.00 66.10 3.52 2,664,010 94,605,012.00
5.50 1.05 Victorias Milling 1.28 1.29 1.24 1.27 (0.78) 790,000 74,400.00
0.77 0.320 Vitarich Corp. 0.730 0.910 0.730 0.840 15.07 28,957,000 (66,160.00)
18.00 2.55 Vivant Corp. 8.50 8.45 8.45 8.45 (0.59) 1,000
HOLDING FIRMS
1.18 0.65 Abacus Cons. `A’ 0.71 0.72 0.70 0.71 0.00 8,139,000 71,000.00
59.90 35.50 Aboitiz Equity 49.00 48.95 48.20 48.95 (0.10) 476,300 (600,045.00)
0.019 0.014 Alcorn Gold Res. 0.0170 0.0180 0.0170 0.0180 5.88 14,500,000
13.70 8.00 Alliance Global Inc. 13.80 14.04 13.50 13.60 (1.45) 19,677,400 98,573,514.00
2.60 1.80 Anglo Holdings A 1.98 2.00 1.98 1.98 0.00 54,000
5.02 3.00 Anscor `A’ 4.70 4.75 4.70 4.70 0.00 49,000
6.98 0.260 Asia Amalgamated A 5.03 5.02 5.01 5.02 (0.20) 63,100
2.98 1.49 ATN Holdings A 1.50 1.51 1.50 1.50 0.00 102,000
485.20 272.00 Ayala Corp `A’ 435.00 435.00 428.00 430.80 (0.97) 272,520 10,631,936.00
64.80 30.50 DMCI Holdings 58.00 58.15 57.95 58.00 0.00 2,200,000 53,282,127.00
5.20 3.30 Filinvest Dev. Corp. 4.15 4.20 4.15 4.18 0.72 79,000
0.98 0.10 Forum Pacific 0.245 0.248 0.248 0.248 1.22 10,000
556.00 455.40 GT Capital 550.00 560.00 548.50 554.00 0.73 186,800 3,338,195.00
5.22 2.94 House of Inv. 5.70 5.70 5.56 5.57 (2.28) 211,500
36.20 19.00 JG Summit Holdings 34.40 33.00 31.50 31.75 (7.70) 7,033,500 (201,563,665.00)
4.19 2.27 Jolliville Holdings 3.69 3.80 3.50 3.80 2.98 75,000
5.70 2.30 Keppel Holdings `B’ 4.00 4.02 4.01 4.01 0.25 4,000
6.21 4.00 Lopez Holdings Corp. 5.55 5.55 5.45 5.49 (1.08) 701,700 1,342,131.00
1.54 0.61 Lodestar Invt. Holdg.Corp. 1.06 1.10 1.06 1.06 0.00 2,404,000 (107,000.00)
0.91 0.300 Mabuhay Holdings `A’ 0.420 0.410 0.410 0.410 (2.38) 40,000
3.82 1.800 Marcventures Hldgs., Inc. 2.23 2.22 2.18 2.20 (1.35) 4,442,000 (4,038,940.00)
4.65 2.56 Metro Pacific Inv. Corp. 4.15 4.15 4.12 4.13 (0.48) 11,287,000 1,611,970.00
6.24 3.40 Minerales Industrias Corp. 5.10 5.15 5.00 5.10 0.00 22,600
9.66 1.22 MJCI Investments Inc. 6.05 6.20 5.86 6.20 2.48 3,500
0.82 0.44 Prime Orion 0.475 0.490 0.480 0.480 1.05 5,440,000 (2,411,450.00)
4.10 1.56 Republic Glass ‘A’ 2.99 2.91 2.91 2.91 (2.68) 11,000
0.490 0.285 Sinophil Corp. 0.325 0.320 0.320 0.320 (1.54) 750,000
760.00 450.00 SM Investments Inc. 732.00 730.50 727.00 730.50 (0.20) 219,690 (87,482,490.00)
2.71 1.08 Solid Group Inc. 2.09 2.13 2.00 2.00 (4.31) 2,017,000 (208,920.00)
1.57 1.14 South China Res. Inc. 1.16 1.16 1.16 1.16 0.00 10,000
0.420 0.101 Unioil Res. & Hldgs 0.2460 0.2280 0.2280 0.2280 (7.32) 10,000
0.620 0.082 Wellex Industries 0.3300 0.3350 0.3200 0.3200 (3.03) 1,520,000
0.980 0.380 Zeus Holdings 0.405 0.400 0.400 0.400 (1.23) 580,000
P R O P E R T Y
48.00 18.00 Anchor Land Holdings Inc. 18.00 18.90 17.20 17.80 (1.11) 38,900 52,500.00
3.34 1.70 A. Brown Co., Inc. 3.00 3.05 2.94 3.05 1.67 183,000
24.15 13.36 Ayala Land `B’ 23.80 23.95 23.25 23.30 (2.10) 8,894,400 (58,608,910.00)
5.62 3.08 Belle Corp. `A’ 4.73 4.76 4.70 4.70 (0.63) 6,390,000 9,459,910.00
9.00 2.26 Cebu Holdings 5.18 5.20 5.18 5.20 0.39 70,100
5.20 2.20 Cebu Prop. `B’ 5.05 5.00 5.00 5.00 (0.99) 30,000
2.85 1.35 Century Property 1.45 1.46 1.43 1.46 0.69 5,271,000 2,473,700.00
2.91 1.20 City & Land Dev. 2.85 2.72 2.72 2.72 (4.56) 2,000
1.50 1.05 Cityland Dev. `A’ 1.14 1.13 1.10 1.10 (3.51) 128,000
1.11 0.67 Cyber Bay Corp. 0.79 0.79 0.78 0.79 0.00 3,926,000
0.94 0.54 Empire East Land 0.810 0.820 0.810 0.820 1.23 1,901,000 16,400.00
3.80 2.90 Eton Properties 3.65 3.80 3.65 3.68 0.82 350,000
0.310 0.10 Ever Gotesco 0.199 0.201 0.199 0.201 1.01 110,000
2.74 1.63 Global-Estate 1.87 1.89 1.86 1.87 0.00 3,146,000 (2,788,050.00)
1.44 0.98 Filinvest Land,Inc. 1.36 1.36 1.33 1.35 (0.74) 9,475,000 (5,954,180.00)
2.14 0.65 Interport `A’ 1.20 1.23 1.16 1.16 (3.33) 238,000
2.34 1.51 Megaworld Corp. 2.23 2.23 2.18 2.19 (1.79) 75,639,000 (43,322,260.00)
0.36 0.150 MRC Allied Ind. 0.1570 0.1590 0.1570 0.1570 0.00 830,000
0.990 0.089 Phil. Estates Corp. 0.7400 0.7400 0.7200 0.7300 (1.35) 6,206,000 (869,000.00)
0.67 0.41 Phil. Realty `A’ 0.480 0.480 0.480 0.480 0.00 190,000 (48,000.00)
19.94 10.00 Robinson’s Land `B’ 18.18 18.40 18.16 18.30 0.66 818,400 (1,362,874.00)
7.71 2.51 Rockwell 3.29 3.30 3.28 3.28 (0.30) 152,000
2.85 1.81 Shang Properties Inc. 2.79 2.83 2.78 2.81 0.72 410,000
8.95 6.00 SM Development `A’ 6.02 6.04 6.01 6.04 0.33 175,400 (24,080.00)
18.20 10.94 SM Prime Holdings 14.10 14.12 13.96 14.00 (0.71) 8,470,900 (28,280,210.00)
0.91 0.64 Sta. Lucia Land Inc. 0.67 0.69 0.67 0.68 1.49 292,000
4.55 1.80 Starmalls 3.90 3.87 3.75 3.87 (0.77) 22,000
0.64 0.45 Suntrust Home Dev. Inc. 0.500 0.510 0.510 0.510 2.00 10,000
4.66 2.60 Vista Land & Lifescapes 4.800 4.790 4.650 4.760 (0.83) 7,911,000 (12,104,110.00)
S E R V I C E S
4.72 1.20 2GO Group’ 1.70 1.71 1.63 1.70 0.00 23,000
42.00 24.80 ABS-CBN 32.00 32.00 31.60 31.80 (0.62) 27,700
18.98 1.05 Acesite Hotel 1.39 1.45 1.38 1.45 4.32 586,000 (43,500.00)
0.78 0.45 APC Group, Inc. 0.630 0.640 0.640 0.640 1.59 1,000
10.92 7.30 Asian Terminals Inc. 9.01 9.00 9.00 9.00 (0.11) 50,000 450,000.00
102.80 4.45 Bloomberry 10.48 10.94 10.48 10.90 4.01 41,212,400 120,435,156.00
0.5300 0.1010 Boulevard Holdings 0.1590 0.1560 0.1530 0.1550 (2.52) 16,990,000
24.00 5.20 Calata Corp. 5.88 6.39 5.86 6.29 6.97 1,974,500
82.50 60.80 Cebu Air Inc. (5J) 54.35 54.00 52.40 52.45 (3.50) 677,740 (22,764,669.00)
9.70 5.44 DFNN Inc. 5.39 5.38 5.23 5.23 (2.97) 108,100
1172.00 11.70 Globalports 22.50 22.00 20.00 20.00 (11.11) 2,900
1270.00 831.00 Globe Telecom 1142.00 1173.00 1120.00 1121.00 (1.84) 88,870 (45,340,455.00)
11.00 6.18 GMA Network Inc. 9.85 9.88 9.66 9.75 (1.02) 4,100
77.00 43.40 I.C.T.S.I. 70.00 69.90 69.00 69.80 (0.29) 1,441,590 47,512,409.50
0.98 0.36 Information Capital Tech. 0.400 0.435 0.395 0.435 8.75 2,510,000 130,500.00
6.80 4.30 IPeople Inc. `A’ 8.00 7.90 7.90 7.90 (1.25) 300
4.70 1.75 IP Converge 2.20 2.19 2.12 2.16 (1.82) 13,000
34.50 0.036 IP E-Game Ventures Inc. 0.021 0.021 0.020 0.021 0.00 65,600,000
3.87 1.00 IPVG Corp. 1.00 1.01 0.99 0.99 (1.00) 1,413,000 198,000.00
5.1900 2.550 ISM Communications 2.9100 3.0500 2.9100 2.9100 0.00 20,000 (30,500.00)
3.45 2.01 JTH Davies Holdings Inc. 2.15 2.14 2.14 2.14 (0.47) 12,000
10.30 5.90 Leisure & Resorts 7.65 7.90 7.60 7.72 0.92 197,400 (7,640.00)
3.70 2.60 Liberty Telecom 2.54 2.60 2.58 2.60 2.36 30,000
2.65 1.03 Lorenzo Shipping 1.24 1.36 1.35 1.36 9.68 6,000 (6,800.00)
0.84 0.57 Manila Bulletin 0.68 0.70 0.68 0.68 0.00 100,000
4.08 1.21 Manila Jockey 2.90 3.10 2.92 2.99 3.10 3,342,000 76,000.00
22.95 13.80 Pacific Online Sys. Corp. 14.06 14.02 13.88 13.88 (1.28) 21,900
8.58 5.35 PAL Holdings Inc. 7.35 7.58 7.39 7.52 2.31 27,300
3.39 1.05 Paxys Inc. 2.79 2.83 2.76 2.76 (1.08) 523,000
10.00 5.00 Phil. Racing Club 9.45 9.51 9.45 9.51 0.63 10,000
71.00 18.00 Phil. Seven Corp. 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 0.00 12,820 952,500.00
17.88 12.10 Philweb.Com Inc. 16.98 16.98 16.94 16.96 (0.12) 319,500 2,357,580.00
2886.00 2096.00 PLDT Common 2798.00 2796.00 2788.00 2792.00 (0.21) 96,385 (102,162,400.00)
0.39 0.25 PremiereHorizon 0.320 0.315 0.315 0.315 (1.56) 80,000
30.15 10.68 Puregold 30.00 30.00 29.50 29.60 (1.33) 1,182,900 (18,263,930.00)
3.30 2.42 Transpacific Broadcast 2.47 2.58 2.46 2.58 4.45 5,000
MINING & OIL
0.0083 0.0038 Abra Mining 0.0043 0.0044 0.0043 0.0043 0.00 41,000,000
6.20 3.01 Apex `A’ 4.62 4.65 4.60 4.63 0.22 21,000
6.22 3.00 Apex `B’ 4.60 4.60 4.60 4.60 0.00 6,000
20.80 14.50 Atlas Cons. `A’ 17.40 17.40 17.32 17.32 (0.46) 425,900
48.00 20.00 Atok-Big Wedge `A’ 27.30 27.30 24.30 27.20 (0.37) 1,000 (2,730.00)
0.345 0.170 Basic Energy Corp. 0.255 0.260 0.255 0.260 1.96 1,750,000
29.00 19.98 Benguet Corp `A’ 23.95 23.60 23.60 23.60 (1.46) 400
34.00 21.20 Benguet Corp `B’ 24.05 23.85 23.50 23.50 (2.29) 15,000 (356,360.00)
2.23 1.05 Century Peak Metals Hldgs 1.06 1.06 1.05 1.06 0.00 301,000
61.80 6.96 Dizon 23.35 23.75 23.15 23.20 (0.64) 50,800
1.21 0.50 Geograce Res. Phil. Inc. 0.58 0.58 0.56 0.58 0.00 3,066,000 342,000.00
1.81 1.0600 Lepanto `A’ 1.190 1.210 1.170 1.190 0.00 5,362,000
2.070 1.0900 Lepanto `B’ 1.270 1.270 1.250 1.260 (0.79) 4,761,000 1,081,070.00
0.085 0.042 Manila Mining `A’ 0.0590 0.0590 0.0580 0.0590 0.00 70,940,000
0.840 0.570 Manila Mining `B’ 0.0590 0.0590 0.0590 0.0590 0.00 10,200,000
36.50 15.04 Nickelasia 18.00 18.00 17.80 17.82 (1.00) 243,900 (707,724.00)
12.84 2.91 Nihao Mineral Resources 8.02 8.10 7.80 7.90 (1.50) 604,500 (849,252.00)
8.40 2.99 Oriental Peninsula Res. 4.700 4.790 4.530 4.600 (2.13) 1,039,000 (764,310.00)
0.032 0.014 Oriental Pet. `A’ 0.0180 0.0180 0.0180 0.0180 0.00 33,000,000
7.05 5.10 Petroenergy Res. Corp. 5.96 6.00 5.88 5.60 (6.04) 21,100
28.25 18.40 Philex `A’ 14.98 14.98 14.66 14.88 (0.67) 1,513,800 (4,040,790.00)
48.00 3.00 PhilexPetroleum 26.70 26.50 25.65 26.45 (0.94) 133,400
0.062 0.017 Philodrill Corp. `A’ 0.047 0.048 0.047 0.047 0.00 371,100,000 940,000.00
30.00 13.50 PNOC Expls `A’ 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 0.00 40
65.00 39.00 PNOC Expls `B’ 60.00 67.50 67.50 67.50 12.50 2,000
257.80 161.10 Semirara Corp. 220.00 220.00 219.00 220.00 0.00 114,250 1,186,832.00
0.029 0.015 United Paragon 0.0150 0.0150 0.0140 0.0140 (6.67) 55,400,000
PREFERRED
50.00 23.05 ABS-CBN Holdings Corp. 32.00 32.45 31.75 32.10 0.31 1,187,000 (28,254,765.00)
580.00 535.00 Ayala Corp. Pref `A’ 539.00 540.00 540.00 540.00 0.19 20
103.50 100.00 First Gen G 103.10 105.00 103.50 103.50 0.39 52,120
109.80 101.50 First Phil. Hldgs.-Pref. 102.50 104.00 102.50 102.50 0.00 3,100
11.02 6.00 GMA Holdings Inc. 9.60 9.60 9.60 9.60 0.00 400,100 3,840,000.00
80.00 74.50 SMC Preferred 1 75.00 74.40 73.00 73.00 (2.67) 430
1050.00 1000.00 SMPFC Preferred 1012.00 1012.00 1005.00 1005.00 (0.69) 4,550
6.00 0.87 Swift Pref 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 0.00 104,000
WARRANTS & BONDS
1.31 0.62 Megaworld Corp. Warrants 1.27 1.21 1.21 1.21 (4.72) 138,000 45,980.00
0.210 0.00 Omico Corp. Warrant 0.0300 0.0290 0.0280 0.0290 (3.33) 900,000 (2,900.00)
RAY S. EÑANO
Ang’s airport relocation plan
sparks real estate speculations
SAN Miguel Corp. honcho Ramon S. Ang, or
RSA, will be the last person to provide a clue
on the location of an international airport that
his conglomerate plans to build. Mr. Ang has his
reasons—he has not completed the acquisition of
the property that will host the new international
airport and he does not want lot prices in the
undisclosed area to spike up, until he nails pending
transactions.
It may be too late for that. RSA’s announcement
in late August about San Miguel’s plan to construct
a new and modern international airport has sent
real estate agents to a frenzied state. Speculators
easily deduced that the new airport would take
advantage of the road and rail networks that San
Miguel planned to build in and at the oustskirts of
Metro Manila.
The new airport, thus, could be located in the
southern towns of Bulacan province, or in the
proximity of northern Metro Manila. The facility,
based on local aviation rules, should be at least
24 kilometers away from the nearest international
airports to avoid congestion in air traffic. The
Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Parañaque
City is at least 30 kms away from the boundary
of Bulacan and Quezon City while the Diosdado
Macapagal International Airport is at least 60 kms
farther from the southern edge of Bulacan.
Rail and road network
San Miguel’s plan to build a 14.2-km elevated,
six-lane road project that will connect the
North Luzon Expressway and the South Luzon
Expressway and a separate 22-km train line from
San Jose del Monte in Bulacan to the corner of
North Avenue and Edsa in Quezon City will be the
critical link to the new airport.
Airline passengers arriving at the new airport
must be transported quickly to Metro Manila. San
Miguel’s combined elevated road and train line
will provide airline passengers a more flexible
intercity travel.
Real estate speculators have initially pinpointed
San Jose del Monte, Bulacan as the possible site
of the new airport, which Ang wants to build on a
2,000-hectare property. Sources said San Miguel
could be building a landbank in San Jose del Monte
in preparation for the airport.
The city’s location is ideal—San Miguel’s
planned MRT 7 railway project ends there
from Edsa in Quezon City. The San Jose del
Monte station will also serve as the intermodal
transportation terminal of the MRT 7, where
commuters traveling to the north can be linked
by buses. Airline passengers arriving at the new
airport in San Jose del Monte, meanwhile, can
be ferried by a dedicated rail coach to parts of
Metro Manila and San Miguel’s elevated road in
Balintawak, Quezon City.
Coastal towns
Coastal towns or cities, however, offer a more
ideal airport location. San Miguel’s planned
airport in such coastal areas could serve as a
full intermodal transportation hub, where buses,
taxis, train, ships and ferryboats can fetch airline
passengers to their destination.
At least five towns in Bulacan could host San
Miguel’s international airport, although the
conglomerate may need to reclaim parts of their
coastal areas in Manila Bay. The towns of Bulacan,
Obando, Paombong and Hagonoy and Malolos
City hug the shoreline of the province and are
close to the northern edge of Metro Manila.
They are just a few kilometers away from the
Balintawak end of San Miguel’s tollway that starts
from Buendia Avenue in Makati. The toll road, part
of the 30-kilometer Metro Manila Skyway project
package approved by the government in 1995, will
have exits in Quirino in Manila and Plaza Dilao,
Aurora Boulevard, E. Rodriguez Ave., Quezon
Boulevard, Sgt. Rivera and Balintawak in Quezon
City.
E-mail: rayenano@yahoo.com
or extrastory2000@gmail.com
STOCKS fell Wednesday, following
overnight losses on Wall Street amid
concern global stimulus measures won’t be
enough to revive economic growth.
The Philippine Stock
Exchange index, the 30-company
benchmark, shed 32 points, or
0.6 percent, to close at 5,292.63.
Value turnover amounted to P7.9
billion.
The heavier index, representing
all shares, also declined 15 points,
or 0.4 percent, to 3,531.25, as
losers outnumbered gainers, 95
to 58, with 43 issues unchanged.
Bloomberry Resorts Corp.,
the most actively traded stock,
climbed 4 percent to P10.90.
Banks traded higher Wednes-
day, bucking the downtrend in
other sectors. BDO Unibank Inc.
added 0.5 percent to P63.30 while
Metropolitan Bank and Trust Co.
rose 0.5 percent to P93. Security
Bank Corp. increased 1.6 percent
to P162.50.
JG Summit Holdings Inc. fell
7.7 percent to P31.75, after the
Gokongwei group sold P3.2
billion worth of shares in the
conglomerate.
Tanduay Holdings Inc. dropped
1.7 percent to P12.28, after the
Lucio Tan firm announced a share
swap deal with property unit Eton
Properties.
Meanwhile, Asian stock
markets fell Wednesday
after pessimism about global
growth prospects sparked Wall
Street’s worst sell-off in three
months.
Charles Plosser, president
of the US Federal Reserve’s
Philadelphia branch, told an
audience that the Fed’s efforts
to support the world’s biggest
economy would likely fall
short of its goals. That soured
sentiment and sent Wall Street
lower Tuesday.
Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock
average was down 1.7 percent
at 8,932.88 and Hong Kong’s
Hang Seng dropped 0.9 percent
to 20,514.32. South Korea’s
Kospi shed 0.6 percent to
1,979.74 and Australia’s S&P/
ASX 200 fell 0.3 percent to
4,360.70. China’s Shanghai
Composite Index fell 0.6
percent to 2,016.61.
Investors in Hong Kong
and mainland China were also
staying on the sidelines ahead
of major holidays next week,
said Jackson Wong, a vice
president at Tanrich Securities.
Chinese central bank authorities
often announce policy changes
during holidays.
“Investors are still very
cautious and I see further
corrections or consolidations
ahead,” Wong said.
With Bloomberg, AP
By Jenniffer B. Austria
THE Philippine Stock Exchange’s
plan to consolidate its two main
boards will discourage medium-
sized companies from listing
their shares, an investment
banker said Wednesday.
BDO Capital and Investments
Corp. president Eduardo Francisco
said in an interview many
companies would not qualify to
list in the PSE, once the bourse
approved the consolidation of its
first and second boards.
“Medium-sized companies
will no longer apply for listing
because they will not meet the
higher listing requirements,”
Francisco said.
He said if the plan pushed
through, underwriters and
financial advisers would just focus
on encouraging big companies
with strong financial track record
to list in the stock exchange.
Most of the big companies,
particularly the family-owned
firms, were not really interested
in going public because they had
enough cash and saw no need to
raise funds through the equities
market, analysts said.
The present rules require
companies to have an authorized
capital stock of P400 million to
list via the first board and P100
million via the second board.
The first board also requires at
least a three-year track record of
profitable operations while the
second board requires at least a
one-year operating history prior
to the listing application.
PSE earlier approved the
consolidation of the first and
second boards and the retention
of the SME board to align with
the two-listing board structure of
other exchanges. The first and
second boards will be merged
into a new listing board called
Main Board, where companies
need to have an authorized
capital stock of at least P500
million and at least three years
of operating history.
These companies should
also have cumulative earnings
before income tax, depreciation
and amortization of at least P50
million for the last three years
prior to listing.
PSE plan to dissuade small firms
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
PROVINCE OF PANGASINAN
BIDS AND AWARDS COMMITTEE (BAC)
2
nd
Floor Malong Building, Capitol Compound
Lingayen, Pangasinan
Tel. No. (075) 542-6918
Website@biddingandawards.pangasinan gov.ph, E-mail address: ebmendoza57@yahoo.com
INVITATION to BID
The Province of Pangasinan, through its Bids and Awards Committee (BAC), invites
contractors registered and classifed by the Philippine Contractors Accreditation Board
(PCAB) to bid for the project/s described hereunder:
Project No. 1
Name of Project : Construction of Drainage System
Location : Eastern Pangasinan District Hospital, Tayug, Pangasinan
Source of Fund : LBP Loan (PR#2012-09-7293)
Approved Budget
for the Contract : P 5,772,600.00
Contract Duration : Ninety - One (91) Calendar Days
Project No. 1
Name of Project : Delivery of 13,611 bags of Cement (refer to bid documents)
Location : General Services Office, Lingayen, Pangasinan (for use in the
Construction of Farm to Market Road)
Source of Fund : Agri-Infra/Livelihood and agri-Industrial Projects (PR# 2012-06-5135)
Approved Budget
for the Contract : P 3,130,530.00
Bidding is restricted to Filipino citizens/sole proprietorship, organizations/corporations with at
least sixty percent (60%) of the interest belongs to citizens of the Philippines, and to citizen/
organizations of a country the laws or regulations of which grant similar rights or privileges
to Filipino citizens pursuant to RA 5183 and subject to Commonwealth Act 138.
Prospective bidders shall possess a valid PCAB license applicable to the contract, have
completed a similar contract with a value of at least ffty percent (50%) of the ABC to be
bid, and have key personnel and equipment available for the prosecution of the contract.
Certifcate/s of satisfactory performance from the client of the declared completed similar
projects shall be submitted for review.
The bidding will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures using non-
discretionary "pass/fail¨ criterion as specifed in the revised Ìmplementing Rules and
Regulations (IRR) of Republic Act 9184 otherwise known as the “Government Procurement
Reform Act”.
All particulars relative to Eligibility Statement and Screening, Bid Security, Performance
Security, Pre-Bidding Conference(s), Evaluation of Bids, Post-Qualifcation and Award of
Contract shall be governed by the pertinent provisions of R.A. 9184 and its Implementing
Rules and Regulation (as amended).
The complete schedule of activities is listed, as follows:
BAC Activities Schedule
1. Issuance of Bid Documents September 21, 2012 – October 11, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference September 28, 2012; 10:00 am
3. Deadline of Submissions and Opening of Bids October 11, 2012; 10:00am
Bid Documents shall be issued only to contractors/bidders who have submitted formal
Letter of Ìntent (LOÌ) at the BAC Offce, 2/F Malong Building, Capitol Compound, Lingayen,
Pangasinan and upon payment of P1,000.00 Accreditation Fee for new bidders, and a non-
refundable amount of P6,000.00/bidder/project for project No. 1 and P3,500.00/bidder/
project for project No. 2 to the Provincial Treasurer's Offce. Prospective bidders shall
submit their Bid Documents to the BAC Offce at the same address.
The Province of Pangasinan assumes no responsibility whatsoever to compensate or
indemnify bidders for any expenses incurred in the preparation for their bids. Moreover, the
Province of Pangasinan reserves the right to reject any or all bid proposals, or declare a
failure of bidding, or not award the contract, and makes no assurance that contract shall be
entered into as a result of this invitation without thereby incurring any liability in accordance
with RA 9184 and its Implementing Rules and Regulations.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) RAFAEL F. BARAAN
Provincial Administrator
BAC Chairman
Phi l i ppi ne Amusement & Gami ng Corporati on
A Sure Bet for Progress in Gaming, Entertainment and Nation Building
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
The Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR) is inviting all interested bidders in
its forthcoming public bidding for the Supply and Delivery of Two (2) Lots Various IT Equipments
and Software Licenses under ITB No. 09-40-2012.
Description Approved Budget VAT
Exclusive, Zero Rated
Transaction
NOTE: Bidders may bid on
any or all lots
Delivery Schedule
LOT 1 (Computers and peripherals) One Million Six Hundred Fifty-Six
Thousand Five Hundred Forty-
Five Pesos (PhP 1,656,545.00)
Within thirty (30) calendar
days from the effectivity
date specifed in the Notice
to Proceed.
LOT 2 (Software licenses) Seven Hundred Forty-Eight
Thousand Four Hundred Forty
Pesos (PhP 748,440.00)
Source of Fund: Internally Funded
This bidding is open to all suppliers; provided that the winning bidder should be registered with
PAGCOR prior to award of contract. Unregistered suppliers must register at the Suppliers Registration
& Evaluation Section (SRES), Procurement Department (PD), 2nd Floor PAGCOR House, 1330
Roxas Blvd., Ermita, Manila, Tel. No. 526-0573.
Bidders should have completed, within the last three (3) years before the date of submission and
receipt of bids, a contract similar to the Project. The description of an eligible bidder is contained in the
Bidding Documents, particularly, in Section II. Instructions to Bidders. Bidding will be conducted through
open competitive bidding procedures using a non-discretionary "pass/fail¨ criterion as specifed in
the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of Republic Act (RA) 9184, otherwise known as the
“Government Procurement Reform Act”.
Bidding is restricted to Filipino citizens/sole proprietorships, partnerships, or organizations with at least
sixty percent (60%) interest or outstanding capital stock belonging to citizens of the Philippines, and to
citizens or organizations of a country the laws or regulations of which grant similar rights or privileges
to Filipino citizens, pursuant to RA 5183 and subject to Commonwealth Act 138.
All particulars relative to Pre-Bid Conference, Evaluation of Bids, Post-Qualifcation and Award of
Contract shall be governed by the pertinent provisions of R.A. 9184 and its IRR.
The schedule of activities is listed, as follows:
Activities Schedule
1. Issuance of the Bidding Documents September 27, 2012 (Thursday) to October 16, 2012 (Tuesday)
2. Pre-Bid Conference October 3, 2012 (Wednesday) (10:00 A.M.)
3. Deadline for the Submission and Receipt of Bids October 16, 2012 (Tuesday)
4. Opening and Preliminary Examination of Bids October 16, 2012 (Tuesday) (2:00 P.M.) (onwards)
Complete details of the project are indicated in the bid documents which will be available to prospective
bidders at the BAC Secretariat Unit, Procurement Department (BSU-PD), upon payment of a non-
refundable bidding fee which shall be provided by the BAC Secretariat Unit (BSU) upon request.
Prospective bidders may also download the Bidding Documents free of charge from the following
websites: www.pagcor.ph and www.philgeps.net and may be allowed to submit bids provided
that bidders shall pay the non-refundable bidding fee not later than the date of the submission of
bids. The Pre-bid Conference is open to all interested bidders. Prospective bidders should present
to PAGCOR’s Cashier at Sixth (6
th
) Floor, PAGCOR Corporate Offce, M.H. del Pilar cor. Pedro Gil
Sts., Malate, Manila either the Bidding Fee Slip which may be secured from the BSU-PD or a copy
of this ITB in effecting payment for the Bidding Documents. All Bids must be accompanied by a bid
security in any of the acceptable forms and in the amount stated in ITB Clause 18.
PAGCOR assumes no responsibility whatsoever to compensate or indemnify bidders for any expenses
incurred in the preparation of their bids.
PAGCOR reserves the right to accept or reject any Bid, and to annul the bidding process and reject
all Bids at any time prior to contract award, without thereby incurring any liability to the affected
bidder or bidders.
Please address all communications to the Bids and Awards Committee thru the BAC Secretariat
Unit, Room 205, Second Floor, PAGCOR House, 1330 Roxas Boulevard, Ermita, Manila, Tel No.:
524-3911, 521-1542 local 223/571.
(SGD) EDUARDO D. LAGMAN
Chairperson
BIDS AND AWARDS COMMITTEE 1
INVITATION TO BID FOR THE SUPPLY AND DELIVERY OF TWO (2) LOTS
VARIOUS IT EQUIPMENTS AND SOFTWARE LICENSES
Phi l i ppi ne Amusement & Gami ng Corporati on
A Sure Bet for Progress in Gaming, Entertainment and Nation Building
The Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR) is inviting all interested bidders in its forthcoming
public bidding for the Supply and Delivery of Eight (8) Lots Various IT Equipment and Software Licenses for Casino
Filipino–Davao’s Main, Tagum, Iligan & Butuan Satellite Casinos under ITB No.09-36-2012.
Brief Description LOT 1: NETWORK ANDAPPLICATION SERVER EQUIPMENT
x Three (3) units of Branded Network Server
x Three (3) units of Branded Application Server
LOT 2: COMPUTERSAND PERIPHERALS
x Sixteen (16) units Branded Desktop Computer with 15.6” LCD
Monitor with LEDback-lighted technology, with Operating System,
Professional Edition, compatible with those used in PAGCOR
x Three (3) units High-End Branded Desktop Computer with 22”
LCD with LED back-lighted technology, with Operating System,
Professional Edition, Compatible with those used in PAGCOR
x Three (3) units Clone Desktop Computer, with Operating System,
Professional Edition, Compatible with those used in PAGCOR
x Six (6) units Printer, 9-pins dot-matrix, 132-columns
x Eight (8) units Printer, Inkjet 3-in-1
x Three (3) units Printer, Inkjet
x Six (6) units Printer, 9-pin dot-matrix, 80-columns
x Six (6) units Printer, USB Receipt Thermal Printer
x Three (3) units Scanner, Flatbed
x Six (6) units Flash Drive, 8GB
x Three (3) units External USB, 1TB
x Three (3) units 3KVA Electrical UPS
x Fifteen (15) units 650VA Electrical UPS
LOT 3: BRANDED COMPUTERS
x Eight (8) units Branded Compact Ultra Slim Desktop Computer
x Eight (8) units 22” Branded LCD Full HD Wide Screen Monitors
(Mountable)
LOT 4: NETWORK SWITCHES
x Three (3) units 24 Ethernet 10/100/1000 ports and 4 one gigabit
Ethernet SFP ports
LOT 5: CABLE TESTER TOOLS
x Three (3) units Cable Tester, UTP
LOT 6: CRIMPER TOOLS, FLEXIBLE HOSEAND CABLES
x Three (3) pieces Heavy Duty Crimper Tool
x Twelve (12) rolls UTP Cable, CAT 6
x Eighteen (18) sets Flexible Hose, Box
LOT 7: SOFTWARE LICENSE
x Four (4) licenses Relational Database Server License, Standard
Edition (Latest Version), compatible to PAGCOR’s Existing
Database
x Seven (7) licenses Server License Standard Edition for active
directory (Latest Version), compatiblewith thoseused in PAGCOR
x Twenty-three(23) licenses DeviceClient Access Licensefor active
directory, compatible with those used in PAGCOR
x Fourteen (14) licenses Relational DatabaseDeviceClient Access
License, compatible to PAGCOR’s Existing Database
x Eighteen (18) licenses Productivity Application Software, Standard
Edition (Latest Version), compatible to the existing desktop
computers of PAGCOR
LOT 8: VIRTUALIZATION SERVER LICENSE
One (1) license Virtualization Server License, compatible with
those used in PAGCOR
Delivery Schedule Within thirty (30) caIendar days fromthe effectivity date speciñed in the Notice
to Proceed.
Approved Budget: Thetotal ABCis Six Million Six Hundred Seventy-ThreeThousand NineHundred
Fifty-Three Pesos (PhP 6,673,953.00).
The ABC for each of the eight (8) lots are as follows:
Lot 1:
Two Mi l l i on One Hundred Si xt y One Thousand Fi ve Hundred Pesos
(PhP 2,161,500.00), VAT Exclusive, Zero Rated Transaction
Lot 2:
One Million Seven Hundred Eighty-Two Thousand Three Hundred Thirty Pesos
(PhP 1,782,330.00), VAT Exclusive, Zero Rated Transaction
Lot 3:
Two Hundr ed Sevent y-Four Thousand One Hundr ed Twent y Pesos
(PhP 274,120.00), VAT Exclusive, Zero Rated Transaction
Lot 4:
Two Hundred Eighty Thousand Five Hundred Pesos
(PhP 280,500.00), VAT Exclusive, Zero Rated Transaction
Lot 5:
Four Hundred Sixty Two Thousand Pesos (PhP 462,000.00), VAT Exclusive, Zero
Rated Transaction
Lot 6:
One Hundr ed Thi r t y Four Thousand Ni ne Hundr ed Sevent y Pesos
(PhP 134,970.00), VAT Exclusive, Zero Rated Transaction
Lot 7:
One Million Five Hundred One Thousand Five Hundred Thirty Three Pesos
(PhP 1,501,533.00), VAT Exclusive, Zero Rated Transaction
Lot 8:
Seventy Seven Thousand Pesos
(PhP 77,000.00), VAT Exclusive, Zero Rated Transaction
Source of Fund: Internally Funded
Bidders may bid on one or all lots
This bidding is open to all suppliers; provided that the winning bidder should be registered with PAGCOR prior to
award of contract. Unregistered suppliers must register at the Suppliers Registration &Evaluation Section (SRES),
Procurement Department (PD), 2nd Floor PAGCOR House, 1330 Roxas Blvd., Ermita, Manila, Tel. No. 526-0573.
Bidders should have completed, within the last three (3) years before the date of submission and receipt of bids, a
contract similar to the Project. The description of an eligible bidder is contained in the Bidding Documents, particularly,
in Section II. Instructions to Bidders. Bidding will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures using
a non-discretionary "pass/fail¨ criterion as specifed in the Ìmplementing Rules and Regulations (ÌRR) of Republic
Act (RA) 9184, otherwise known as the “Government Procurement Reform Act”.
Bidding is restricted to Filipino citizens/sole proprietorships, partnerships, or organizations with at least sixty percent
(60%) interest or outstanding capital stock belonging to citizens of the Philippines, and to citizens or organizations
of a country the laws or regulations of which grant similar rights or privileges to Filipino citizens, pursuant to RA5183
and subject to Commonwealth Act 138.
All particulars relative to Pre-Bid Conference, Evaluation of Bids, Post-Qualifcation and Award of Contract shall
be governed by the pertinent provisions of R.A. 9184 and its IRR.
The schedule of activities is listed, as follows:
Activities Schedule
1. Issuance of Bid Documents September 27, 2012 to October 15, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference October 2, 2012 3:30 P.M.
3. Deadline for the Submission and Receipt of Bids October 15, 2012 10:00 A.M
4. Opening and Preliminary Examination of Bids October 15, 2012 10:00 A.M. (onwards)
Complete details of the project are indicated in the bid documents which will be available to prospective bidders
at the BAC Secretariat Unit, Procurement Department (BSU-PD), upon payment of a non-refundable bidding fee
of which shall be provided by the BAC Secretariat Unit (BSU) upon request.
Prospective bidders may also download the Bidding Documents free of charge from the following websites:
www.pagcor.ph and www.philgeps.net and may be allowed to submit bids provided that bidders shall pay the
non-refundable bidding fee not later than the date of the submission of bids. The Pre-bid Conference is open to all
interested bidders.. Prospective bidders should present to PAGCOR's Cashier at 6th foor, PAGCOR Corporate
Offce, M.H. del Pilar cor. Pedro Gil Sts., Malate, Manila either the Bidding Fee Slip which may be secured from
the BSU-PD or a copy of this ITB in effecting payment for the Bidding Documents. All Bids must be accompanied
by a bid security in any of the acceptable forms and in the amount stated in ITB Clause 18.
PAGCOR assumes no responsibility whatsoever to compensate or indemnify bidders for any expenses incurred
in the preparation of their bids.
PAGCOR reserves the right to accept or reject any Bid, and to annul the bidding process and reject all Bids at any
time prior to contract award, without thereby incurring any liability to the affected bidder or bidders.
Please address all communications to the Bids and Awards Committee thru the BAC Secretariat Unit, Room 205,
Second Floor, PAGCORHouse, 1330 Roxas Boulevard, Ermita, Manila, Tel No.: 524-3911, 521-1542 local 223/571.
(SGD) EDUARDO D. LAGMAN
Chairperson
BIDS AND AWARDS COMMITTEE 1
INVITATION TO BID FOR THE SUPPLY & DELIVERY OF EIGHT (8) LOTS VARIOUS I.T. EQUIPMENT
AND SOFTWARE LICENSES FOR CASINO FILIPINO – DAVAO’S MAIN, TAGUM, ILIGAN & BUTUAN
SATELLITE CASINOS UNDER ITB NO. 09-36-2012
(MST-Sept. 27, 2012)
Provinces
ManilaStandardToday mst.daydesk@gmail.com• SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 THURSDAY
B3
Quezon Power eyes diversified sources
High poverty, literacy
rate remain a challenge
Revilla, Madalo link up
in free-zone Cavite
ETIHAD Cargo has
unveiled “Safeguard”, a
highly secure valuable
goods service.
The United Arab Emirate
flag carrier’s new offering
supports the requirements
of global security service
companies, freight
forwarders, companies and
individuals who need to
dispatch valuable goods such
as precious metals and stones,
jewellery, legal tender, and
priceless works all over the
world.
Safeguard is being rolled
out in 23 certified cargo
locations across Africa,
Asia, Australia, Europe and
North America in a planned
network of 86 destinations.
Safeguard follows the
company’s successful
Fast-Track priority service
launched in April 2011.
Kevin Knight, Etihad
Airways chief strategy
and planning officer, said
advantages include a speedy
three-hour shipment tender
and retrieval at both origin
and destination airports.
“Right across our
network and especially
here in the UAE, our cargo
customers now have a great
opportunity to forward and
receive valuable shipments
internationally, safe in the
knowledge that they will
be tracked, monitored and
securely stored during
transit,” he said.
Etihad Cargo <www.
etihadcargo.com> operates
a fleet of six freighters,
consisting of one Airbus
A300-600F, two Airbus
A330-200F, one McDonnell
Douglas MD-11F, one Boeing
B777F and one Boeing B747-
400F.
By Dexter A. See
BAGUIO CITY—High poverty
incidence remains to be a challenge
amid a literacy rate of 95.7 percent,
Secretary Herminio Coloma said.
The Presidential Communica-
tions Operations chief took note of
the paradox when he spoke at the
National Literacy Conference and
Awards held at Teachers Camp.
“Despite the almost 96 percent lit-
eracy rate, the income distribution in
the country remains lop-sided with
those in the (lower) economic class D
accounting for more than two-thirds
or 67 percent while the poorest of the
poor (class E) make up another 10
percent of the population,” Coloma
told Manila Standard.
“Out of the more than 92 mil-
lion Filipinos, only a little over nine
million or around 10 percent of the
population belong to the higher
economic classes of society.”
He cited two countries in the
same predicament in which being
able to read and write meant an im-
proved living standard.
Coloma said Cuba in UNDP’s
2011 report of 2011 posted 99.9 per-
cent literacy.
“Same situation can be observed
in North Korea with a 99 percent lit-
eracy rate and ranked 21st based on
the said UNDP report,” he added.
“But intermittent episodes of famine
and widespread hunger are still being
experienced in the said country.”
Coloma said the Department of
Education under Secretary Bro. Armin
Luistro has been promoting “Education
for All” even in remote communities.
“Hand in hand with the high liter-
acy rate, poverty alleviation policies
and programs are continuously being
undertaken and infused,” he said.
Coloma said the government has
heavily invested on education and
health through the modified Con-
ditional Cash Transfer apart from
the priority allocation for the educa-
tional system in the annual national
budget.
By Alena Mae S. Flores
THAILAND’S
Electricity Generating
Public Company
Ltd. is in talks with
the Ayala Group and
Manila Electric Co. for
partnership in the power
sector, an official said.
Quezon Power Philippines managing
director Frank Thiel told reporters during
the recently concluded 2012 Philippine
Energy & Infrastructure Business
Meeting that EGCO was discussing
possible ventures with various firms.
“That’s a known fact that Meralco is
looking for projects... As a developer,
we have to go knocking on doors, trying
to find the right partner,” he said.
Meralco plans to put up 2,500 MW of
power capacity while the Ayala Group
targets around 1,000 MW in the next
five years.
Thiel said EGCO has set the 500
megawatt expansion of its 460-MW
coal-fired power plant in Quezon along
with wind, solar, hydro and natural gas
power projects.
EGCO controls 98 percent of Quezon
Power after acquiring an additional
45.875 percent from Intergen for $375
million in July. The remaining 2 percent
is held by PMR Ltd.
“EGCO’s desire is to expand its presence
in the Philippines. We can do hydro, coal,
even gas,” Thiel said. “We’re not being
constrained by the size, 80MW as well as
500MW, or technology.”
He confirmed an earlier report of
Manila Standard that EGCO and
Meralco were reviewing a possible joint
venture on a 500-MW Quezon Power
expansion.
“We’re hoping (to sign a deal with
Meralco soon).” Thiel said. “We’re
encouraged with what we’re seeing
so far. That is for the partnership in
expansion.”
Quezon Power has secured the
environmental clearance certificate for
the 500 MW expansion.
According to Thiel, talks also forayed
into Meralco being the majority buyer of
electricity.
“The challenge is the offtake
agreement... but we’re very positive we’ll
be able to reach an agreement with them
for QPL2 (Quezon Power expansion).
Banks are looking for offtake agreement
that they would consider financially
bankable,” he said.
“We’re also in the hunt for potential
acquisitions, those who desire to
perhaps exit. It’s a matter of evaluating
opportunities. We’re wide open right
now.”
Thiel said EGCO is confident that
“the power sector in the Philippines is
booming” and as much as 400 MW may
be needed annually.
“We see the demand keeps increasing.
We see potential need for additional
capacity,” he said.
The Quezon Power project started
in May 2000 under the Luzon grid on
a 25-year power sales agreement with
Meralco.
EGCO is the first independent power
producer in Thailand. EGCO is a
holding company with investment in
power generation and supply as well
as comprehensive energy services
providing operation, maintenance,
engineering and construction services
to power plants and other industries in
Thailand and overseas.
EGCO currently has 16 operating
plants with total installed capacity of
4,444 MW in Thailand.
Etihad
launches
‘safeguard’
By Macon R. Araneta
SENATOR Ramon “Bong”
Revilla Jr., Lakas-CMD
president, has formed an alliance
with the Cavite’s Partido
Magdalo.
Keynoting the unification rally
at the Cove Island Resort in Imus,
Cavite, he announced the teamup
of his son Jolo for vice governor
with re-electionist Governor
Juanito Victor Remulla.
“Magdalo succeeded in
transforming Cavite into one
of the most economically
prosperous provinces in the
country,” Revilla said. “(It) gave
birth to CALABARZON, which
is now being looked up to in the
country.”
However, it was Lakas-CMD
that boosted the country in its bid
to become Asia’s Tiger economy,
he said.
Remulla of Partido Magdalo
is nationally affiliated with the
Nacionalista Party which has
partnered with the Liberal Party
for next year’s elections.
Formed during the time of
President Emilio Aguinaldo in the
fight for independence, Magdalo
in cpontemporary times primed
the province’s industrial revolution
under former Gov. Juanito
Remulla.
Revilla discounted any mix-up of
political affiliations because Cavite
had been declared a free zone.
In practice, free zones are
localities where parties that are
coalesced at the national level are
allowed to skip the “equity of the
incumbent” rule on a “free-for-all”
arrangement.
Former Las Pinas Rep. Cynthia
Villar, who is running under the
ruling Liberal Party, said LP and
NP can go their own way in case of
disagreement.
Villar is the wife of NP national
president Manuel Villar whose term
as Senator ends in 2013. Observers
believe that she is eyeing to replace
her husband in the Senate.
Mrs. Villar told reporters that
when President Benigno Aquino
III and Villar talked about the
‘marriage’ of LP and NP, Mr.
Aquino was well informed about
the situation in Cavite.
“There’s no misrepresentation
here,” she said, noting the free zone
privilege for local candidates.
Elections in Cavite, one of the
most populous in the country
(1.6 million voters) is expected
to be a battle royale due to the
keen interest shown by national
officials in the rivalry between
Remulla and LP bet, 3rd district
Rep. Erineo “Ayong” Maliksi,
governor of Cavite from 2001 to
2010.
Adding to the political color is
the fight between Revilla’s actor-
son and the son of Senator Panfilo
Lacson, who serves as his chief of
staff at the Senate.
New members. Senator Manuel Villar, Nacionalist Party president administers the oath of
membership last Aug. 21 to Orani Mayor of Benjamin Serrano Jr. of Bataan (2nd from left) and Vice Mayor
Godofredo Galicia along with councilors at the Laurel House. LINO SANTOS
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Manila
Standard
TODAY
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
THURSDAY
B4
SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 ManilaStandardToday
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