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Fall 2012 1

Expository Writing 1213.014: Sports and the University
Instructor: Michael Rifenburg Email: rifenburg@ou.edu Office: Room 4, Bizzell Library Office Hours: Tuesday 10:30am-12pm and by appointment Required Materials  Murray Sperber’s Beer and Circus  Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein’s They Say/I Say, 2nd edition  3 ring binder

General Information:
Course Description
This expository writing course invites students to explore the mercurial relationship between athletics and academics in American higher education. As we will discuss, college sports began in the mid to late nineteenth century as student-run extracurricular endeavors. Yet quickly, alumni, boosters, and other powerful yet external bodies seized control. Today at many well-known American colleges and universities sports overshadow academics. Key questions will guide the class:  How does a multi-million dollar athletic department fit into the mission of American higher education?  If one believes that college sports have become more important that academics, how can academic regain control of a university?  How are student-athletes treated by the NCAA and how are they typically characterized by the general public?  How can college sports make lasting and positive impact on campus and in the community in the wake of well-known sports related scandals? In an attempt to think through these important and challenging questions, one small essay (1500-1700 words) and 3 longer essays (1800-2400 words) will be assigned. Students will leave this course with a greater awareness of the uniquely American phenomenon of college sports and, more importantly, the ability to read, think, and write critically about a sensitive and important topic.

Assignments and Grading
Final grades will be calculated according to the percentages below. Notice that equal weight is not given to each paper.

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Fall 2012 2 Essay 1: Essay 2: Essay 3: Essay 4: Homework: Participation: 15% of final grade 25% of final grade 25% of final grade 15% of final grade 10% of final grade 10% of final grade

In order for you to read my comments, grades will not be discussed until 24 hours after the grade is given.

Definition of Letter Grades for Final Semester Grade:
A B C D F 89.579.569.559.50100 89.4 79.4 69.4 59.4

Keep in mind some majors require a C or higher in order to have fulfilled the course requirement.

Submission of Work
Unless specified, I ask that all graded work be typed and submitted to the D2L dropbox. The campus maintains many computer labs if access to a computer is an issue. Please follow the MLA format guidelines below:  Times New Roman or Arial 12 point font (not bolded or italicized)  Double-spaced  No extra spaces between paragraphs (if you run Word ’07, this can be touchy)  1” standard margins all around  Your last name and page number on each page after the first—upper right hand corner  No title pages  Titles should be centered. No need to bold, underline, or italicize them  On the first page in the upper left have:  Your name  My name  Course  Date Finally, I will not accept papers via email or on disk, unless permission has been given.

D2L

Unless specified, I ask that you submit essays to the appropriate D2L dropbox. I will grade your papers using the track changes function on Microsoft Word and then reupload your file with the grade.

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Fall 2012 3 When submitting your paper, be sure to save your paper as one of the following: .DOC, .DOCX, or .RTF.

Policies
Workshops
In this course, you will be invited to have your work read by your peers in the class. Developing a sense of audience and appreciation for the reader is critical to becoming a better writer. This is accomplished effectively through sharing your work and getting feedback. We will be holding regular writing workshops that will ask you to prepare comments, offer advice, and listen carefully to the comments and advice of others. Conferences For each of your four essays, I ask that you meet with me in my office. This will be a time where you and I are able to walk through your essay and brainstorm together on ways to strengthen your argument(s). Missed conferences result in an absence.

Homework
For most of the reading assigned for our class, I will ask students to perform a reading response. The reading responses will be turned in at the beginning of class on the day that the reading is due, will be graded, and then returned. Reading responses will receive a grade of 0 (not acceptable), 1 (somewhat acceptable), or 2 (acceptable). Unless specifically assigned, these responses are not a summary, but an informed response. Each response should be one page minimum, typed, double-spaced. While I understand that it may be difficult to write a whole page on some of the articles we will read in class, these reading responses are very helpful for class discussion. We will be using these responses to help springboard class discussions. Keep in mind that I will not accept late responses without a legitimate excuse, nor will I accept responses over e-mail unless prior arrangements have been made.

Attendance
Students are allowed three (3) unexcused absences per semester in a course that meets three times a week, or two (2) in a course that meets twice a week. The penalties for missing more than that are: Penalties for Unexcused Absences 2x/week Course 3x/week Course Penalty 3 4 1 letter grade 5 7 2 letter grades 7 10 Automatic F Three (3) unexcused tardies= 1 unexcused absence

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It is the policy of the University to excuse absences of students that result from religious observances, Provost-approved activities, and legally required absences (such as military service and jury duty) and to provide without penalty for the rescheduling of examinations and additional required coursework.(Faculty Handbook)

Make-up Work
Students are held responsible for all material covered during any absence. I accept late major papers, but they will be penalized. Late papers will lose a full letter grade for each day the paper is late. A paper turned in one day late will be marked down one letter grade. A paper turned in two days late will be marked down two letter grades. After two days a paper will not be accepted and will receive an automatic F. Please note: one day means one day, NOT one class day. I have attached a schedule to this syllabus informing you of the due dates for all major papers; therefore, plan ahead if necessary. I am more lenient on reading responses. If your absence is excused, any work from the missed class will be due the first day you return to class. If the absence is unexcused, work must be turned in the day it’s due

Revision
Papers are never finished; we just run out of time. With this in mind, the option of revising one of the four essays is available. Note that this is optional and not required. Also, to be able to revise a paper, you have to turn on in originally. In other words, please don’t think that if you forget to turn a paper in, you can revise it later. If you decide to revise one of your writing projects for a higher grade, you should read the assessment comments and rethink your approach to the assignment. Think of revising as rewriting. We are going for fundamental changes to paper and not simply moving commas around. Your revision grade will replace the original grade. In order to be eligible for revision, complete these three steps:  Meet with me to talk about my comments and for assistance in improving the original draft  Compose a revision plan where you clearly outline the necessary changes and how you plan to accomplish them  Turn in a hard copy of: the original draft with my comments, your revision plan, and the revised draft. Make sure your name is on everything. Revised drafts are due the day of the final.

Important Dates
Fall Break: October 12th Final Exam: Friday, December 14th, 8-10 am

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Additional Information
Writing Center
Most universities have a writing center, a place for students, faculty, and staff to meet and talk about writing. The Writing Center here at OU is a resource I encourage you to use. As a writer you will want to seek feedback from many different readers. The writing consultants at the writing center are able to talk with you about your writing--at any stage in the process and for any course you are taking. You can make an appointment (online or by phone) and you can drop in whenever they are open. I urge you to visit the web site for more information: www.ou.edu/writingcenter.

Academic Integrity
The Provost’s website (http://www.ou.edu/provost/integrity/) provides the definitions of academic integrity, plagiarism, collusion, and cheating that are used by all instructors, in all courses at the University of Oklahoma. Each student is individually responsible for accessing, reading, and understanding these definitions, and for conducting him- or herself in accordance with the highest standards of academic integrity. Any concepts you do not fully understand need to be cleared up with your instructor before you submit any work for a grade. The most common violation of academic integrity in First-Year Composition courses is plagiarism, which the Provost has defined as: 1. Copying words and presenting them as your own writing. 2. Copying words (even if you give the source) without indicating that they are a direct quotation by enclosing them in quotation marks. 3. Copying words and then changing them slightly or substituting synonyms (even if you give the source). 4. Presenting someone else’s ideas as your own, even if you change the wording. It is also a violation of academic integrity to submit the same work for more than one course, unless you have the express permission of both instructors. Violations of academic integrity carry penalties up to and including expulsion from the university.

Accessibility Statement
Disabilities can be visible and invisible, and I am dedicated to creating an inclusive classroom environment. If you have a disability, or think you may have a disability, I encourage you to contact me so we can work together to develop strategies for your success. The Disability Resource Center (DRC) provides support for students with documented disabilities, and you can contact them at drc@ou.edu or 325-3852. You may contact DRC without notifying me if you would prefer to keep your disability confidential.

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Fall 2012 6 Release Statement The policy statement and syllabus are open to change upon the instructor’s discretion. Finally, continued enrollment in this class signals agreement to the policy statement.

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