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96th

2009

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

This publication is available from the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Publications Fulfillment, Washington, DC 20551. It is also available on the Board’s website, at www.federalreserve.gov.

Letter of Transmittal

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Washington, D.C. May 2010

The Speaker of the House of Representatives: Pursuant to the requirements of section 10 of the Federal Reserve Act, I am pleased to submit the ninety-sixth annual report of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. This report covers operations of the Board during calendar year 2009. Sincerely,

Ben Bernanke Chairman

Overview
The Federal Reserve, the central bank of the United States, is a federal system composed of a central governmental agency—the Board of Governors— and 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks. The Board of Governors, located in Washington, D.C., consists of seven members appointed by the President of the United States and supported by a 2,100-person staff. Besides conducting research, analysis, and policymaking related to domestic and international financial and economic matters, the Board plays a major role in the supervision and regulation of the U.S. banking system and administers most of the nation’s laws regarding consumer credit protection. It also has broad oversight responsibility for the nation’s payments system and the operations and activities of the Federal Reserve Banks. This report covers Board and System operations and activities during calendar-year 2009. The report includes six main sections: v Monetary Policy and Economic Developments. Section 1 provides adapted versions of the February 2010 and July 2009 Monetary Policy Report to the Congress (see pages 3–95). v Federal Reserve Operations. Section 2 provides summaries of the Board and System activities in the areas of banking supervision and regulation, consumer and community affairs, and Reserve Bank operations. It also summarizes Board compliance with the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and its activities regarding legislative developments that affected Board operations in 2009 (see pages 99–207).

For More Background on Board Operations
For more information about the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Reserve System, visit the Board’s website at www.federalreserve.gov/ aboutthefed. An online version of this Annual Report is available at www. federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/rptcongress.

v Records. Section 3 provides an account of actions taken by the Board on questions of policy in 2009, and it also includes the policy actions of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC)1 during the year, provided pursuant to section 10 of the Federal Reserve Act (see pages 211–392). v Federal Reserve System Organization. Section 4 provides listings of key officials at the Board and in the Federal Reserve System, including the Board of Governors, its officers, FOMC members, several System councils, and Federal Reserve Bank and Branch officers and directors (see pages 395–424). v Statistical Tables. Section 5 includes 14 statistical tables that provide updated historical data concerning Board and System operations and activities (see pages 426–466). v Federal Reserve System Audits. Section 6 provides detailed information on the several levels of audit and

1. For more information on the FOMC, see the Board’s website at www.federalreserve.gov/ monetarypolicy/fomc.htm.

review conducted that concern System operations and activities, including those provided by outside auditors and the Board’s Office of Inspector General (see pages 469– 544).

The Federal Reserve System
The Federal Reserve System, which serves as the nation’s central bank, was created by an act of Congress on December 23, 1913. The System consists of a seven-member Board of Governors with headquarters in Washington, D.C., and the 12 Reserve Banks located in major cities throughout the United States.

The Federal Reserve Banks are the operating arms of the central banking system, carrying out a variety of System functions, including operating a nationwide payments system; distributing the nation’s currency and coin; under authority delegated by the Board of Governors, supervising and regulating bank holding companies and statechartered banks that are members of the System; serving as fiscal agents of the U.S. Treasury; and providing a variety of financial services for the Treasury, other government agencies, and other fiscal principals. The maps below and opposite identify Federal Reserve Districts by their official number, city, and letter designation. Á

9
MINNEAPOLIS

1
7 2
CLEVELAND BOSTON CHICAGO NEW YORK 3PHILADELPHIA

12
SAN FRANCISCO

10
KANSAS CITY ST. LOUIS

4
RICHMOND

8 11 DALLAS

5
TLANTA

6A

ALASKA HAWAII

Legend Both pages Federal Reserve Bank city > Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, D.C.

Facing page • Federal Reserve Branch city Branch boundary

Contents
Monetary Policy and Economic Developments
3 3 6 35 45 56 57 57 59 86 MONETARY POLICY REPORT OF FEBRUARY 2010 Part 1—Overview: Monetary Policy and the Economic Outlook Part 2—Recent Financial and Economic Developments Part 3—Monetary Policy: Recent Developments and Outlook Part 4—Summary of Economic Projections Abbreviations MONETARY POLICY REPORT OF JULY 2009 Part 1—Overview: Monetary Policy and the Economic Outlook Part 2—Recent Financial and Economic Developments Part 3—Monetary Policy: Recent Developments and Outlook

Federal Reserve Operations
99 101 101 112 123 124 125 128 129 131 131 131 134 136 138 140 141 141 142 142 144 148 148 150 151 BANKING SUPERVISION AND REGULATION Scope of Responsibilities for Supervision and Regulation Supervision for Safety and Soundness Supervisory Policy Supervisory Information Technology Staff Development Regulation of the U.S. Banking Structure Enforcement of Other Laws and Regulations Federal Reserve Membership CONSUMER AND COMMUNITY AFFAIRS Rulemaking and Regulations Credit Card Reform Overdraft Services and Gift Card Rules Mortgage and Home Equity Lending Reform Private Education Loan Rules Consumer Credit Reporting and Risk-Based Pricing Rules Information Privacy Rules Community Reinvestment Act Rules Oversight and Enforcement Community Reinvestment Act Compliance Fair Lending Enforcement Flood Insurance Coordination with Other Federal Banking Agencies Training for Bank Examiners Agency Reports on Compliance with Consumer Protection Laws

154 155 156 157 157 159 161 162 162 164 165 166 167 168 171 171 176 177 182 184 185 185 187 189 192 193 199

Responding to Consumer Complaints and Inquiries Consumer Complaints Consumer Inquiries Supporting Community Economic Development Foreclosures and Neighborhood Stabilization Other Community Development Initiatives Meeting Data and Analysis Needs Consumer Advisory Council The Credit Card Act Overdraft Services Closed-End Mortgages and Home Equity Lines of Credit Foreclosure Issues Neighborhood Stabilization Other Discussion Topics FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS Developments in Federal Reserve Priced Services Developments in Currency and Coin Developments in Fiscal Agency and Government Depository Services Developments in Use of Federal Reserve Intraday Credit Electronic Access to Reserve Bank Services Information Technology Examinations of the Federal Reserve Banks Income and Expenses SOMA Holdings and Loans Federal Reserve Bank Premises Pro Forma Financial Statements for Federal Reserve Priced Services

THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS AND THE GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE AND RESULTS ACT 199 Strategic Plan, Performance Plan, and Performance Report 199 Mission 199 Goals and Objectives 203 203 205 FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE DEVELOPMENTS The Credit Card Act The Helping Families Save Their Homes Act

Records
211 211 217 218 222 RECORD OF POLICY ACTIONS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS Rules and Regulations Policy Statements and Other Actions Special Liquidity Facilities and Other Initiatives Discount Rates for Depository Institutions in 2009

225 226 257 270 294 322 335 349 375 391

MINUTES OF FEDERAL OPEN MARKET COMMITTEE MEETINGS Meeting Held on January 27–28, 2009 Meeting Held on March 17−18, 2009 Meeting Held on April 28–29, 2009 Meeting Held on June 23–24, 2009 Meeting Held on August 11−12, 2009 Meeting Held on September 22−23, 2009 Meeting Held on November 3−4, 2009 Meeting Held on December 15–16, 2009 LITIGATION

Federal Reserve System Organization
395 398 399 400 401 402 421 BOARD OF GOVERNORS FEDERAL OPEN MARKET COMMITTEE FEDERAL ADVISORY COUNCIL CONSUMER ADVISORY COUNCIL THRIFT INSTITUTIONS ADVISORY COUNCIL FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS AND BRANCHES MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS, 1913–2009

Statistical Tables
426 430 1. Federal Reserve Open Market Transactions, 2009 2. Federal Reserve Bank Holdings of U.S. Treasury and Federal Agency Securities, December 31, 2007–2009 431 3. Federal Reserve Bank Interest Rates on Loans to Depository Institutions, December 31, 2009 A. Rates on Selected Loans B. Rates on Term Auction Facility Loans Outstanding 432 4. Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions, December 31, 2009 433 5. Banking Offices and Banks Affiliated with Bank Holding Companies in the United States, December 31, 2008 and 2009 434 6A. Reserves of Depository Institutions, Federal Reserve Bank Credit, and Related Items, Year-End 1984–2009 and Month-End 2009 438 6B. Loans and Other Credit Extensions, by Type, Year-End 1984–2009 and MonthEnd 2009 442 6C. Reserves of Depository Institutions, Federal Reserve Bank Credit, and Related Items, Year-End 1918–1983

December 31. Initial Margin Requirements under Regulations T. Income and Expenses of the Federal Reserve Banks. Supplemental Information—Collateral Held against Federal Reserve Notes: Federal Reserve Agents’ Accounts 10. by Bank. 1914–2009 12. by Bank. December 31. 2009 Federal Reserve System Audits 469 471 489 541 543 AUDITS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS COMBINED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL ACTIVITIES GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE REVIEWS 547 Index . Principal Assets and Liabilities of Insured Commercial Banks. Operations in Principal Departments of the Federal Reserve Banks. 2009 and 2008. Income and Expenses of the Federal Reserve Banks. 2009 and 2008 8. Acquisition Costs and Net Book Value of the Premises of the Federal Reserve Banks and Branches. Statement of Condition of the Federal Reserve Banks. Statement of Condition of the Federal Reserve Banks. 2006–2009 13. by Class of Bank. 2009 11. U. December 31.446 447 448 453 454 458 464 465 466 7. 2009 and 2008 9B. Number and Annual Salaries of Officers and Employees of the Federal Reserve Banks. June 30. and X 9A. 2009 14. December 31.

Monetary Policy and Economic Developments .

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appear likely to boost spending and sustain the economic expansion. on average. reaching 10 percent by the end of the year—its highest level since the early 1980s— before dropping back in January. and foreign demand. trade flows rebounded in the second half of 2009 after precipitous declines late in 2008 and early in 2009.gov/boarddocs/hh. prices for personal consumption expenditures (PCE) increased . Headline consumer price inflation picked up in 2009 as energy prices rose sharply: Over the 12 months ending in December. supported by an improvement in financial conditions. both exports and imports stayed considerably below their earlier peaks. over the second half of Note: Included in this chapter are the text. and a recovery in foreign economies. The unemployment rate rose further during the second half. inflation is likely to be subdued for some time. though it remained well below its prerecession level. Nevertheless. firms reduced the pace of inventory liquidation markedly in the fourth quarter. 2009.S. investment in nonresidential structures continued to contract. In contrast. With the recovery in U. hiring remains weak. and. real gross domestic product (GDP) rose at about a 4 percent pace.S. U.federalreserve. employment continued to contract in the second half of 2009. and selected figures from the Monetary Policy Report submitted to Congress on February 24. economic activity in the United States turned up in the second half of 2009. Meanwhile. and the median duration of unemployment has lengthened significantly. continued weakness in labor markets. still-tight credit conditions facing some borrowers. along with increased business and household confidence. tables. activity in the housing market. which began to pick up last spring. albeit at a markedly slower pace than in the first half. the pace of the recovery probably will be tempered by households’ desire to rebuild wealth. investment in equipment and software posted a sizable gain in the second half of last year. Other materials in this annual report related to the conduct of monetary policy include the minutes of the 2009 meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee (see the ‘‘Records’’ section) and statistical tables 1– 4 (see the “Statistical Tables” section). pursuant to section 2B of the Federal Reserve Act.3 Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 Part 1 Overview: Monetary Policy and the Economic Outlook After declining for a year and a half. and therefore the figure numbers in this report differ from the figure numbers in the Monetary Policy Report. 2010. stimulus from monetary and fiscal policies. The figures included here have been renumbered. despite some tentative signs of stabilization. However. The complete set of figures is available on the Board’s website at www. In the business sector. Although job losses have slowed. In addition. These factors. U. Consumer spending—which was boosted by supportive monetary and fiscal policies—posted solid increases. likely reflecting improved conditions in capital markets and brighter sales prospects. With substantial resource slack continuing to suppress cost pressures and with longer-term inflation expectations stable. flattened over the second half of 2009.S. Despite the pickup in output.

Nonfinancial firms with access to capital markets took advantage of the improvement in financial conditions to issue corporate bonds and equity shares at a solid pace. In contrast. That development was bolstered by the release of the results of the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program (SCAP). which is an important funding source for consumer loans. Broad equity price indexes increased further. Restrictive bank lending policies to individuals likely were due importantly to banks’ concerns about the ability of households to repay loans in an environment of high unemployment and continued softness in house prices. The functioning of financial markets more generally improved further. senior bank loan officers reported weakening loan demand from households throughout 2009. up from 1⁄2 percent in 2008. After rising at an annual rate of about 13⁄4 percent in 2008 and the first half of 2009. Conditions in short-term funding markets returned to near precrisis levels. core PCE prices increased at an annual rate of just over 1 percent in the second half of the year. on balance. All told. some to augment or improve the quality of their capital and some to repay investments made by the Treasury under the Troubled Asset Relief Program. though to a more limited extent. which were seen as helping clarify the financial conditions of the largest bank holding companies and provided investors with greater assurance about the health of the institutions. Still. In addition. in 2009 nominal household debt experienced its first annual decline since the beginning of the data series in 1951. In contrast. Sentiment rose further over the remainder of the year as investors became more optimistic about the economic outlook. even as interest rates declined for mortgages and many consumer loans. in part because of support from the Federal Reserve’s Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility. price increases for consumer expenditures other than food and energy items—so-called core PCE—slowed noticeably last year. According to survey data. However. a significant portion of issuance likely reflected an effort by businesses to substitute attractively priced longer-term financing for shorter-term debt.4 96th Annual Report. Most of the 19 bank holding companies included in the SCAP issued equity. 2009 in the second half of the year. Investors became more optimistic about the outlook for financial institutions during the first half of last year. and loan losses remained very high. the consumer asset-backed securities market. The recovery in financial markets that began last spring continued through the second half of the year and into 2010. while risk spreads in the commercial paper market were stable at the low end of the range observed since the fall of 2007. during the second half of 2009 amid higher loan losses on their commercial loans and reports of lingering uncertainty about business credit quality. demand for business loans was also weak throughout 2009. many small businesses and other firms that depend largely on banks to meet their funding needs found their access to credit severely restricted. The Federal Reserve continued to support the functioning of financial about 2 percent. delinquency and charge-off rates at commercial banks increased further . banks continued to tighten their lending standards and terms. liquidity and pricing in bank funding markets continued to normalize. Availability of credit for households remained constrained in the second half of 2009. improved. and risk spreads on corporate bonds narrowed considerably.

effective on March 18. effective on January 14. under the statutory authority provided by the Congress in October 2008. In addition. The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) maintained a target range of 0 to 1⁄4 percent for the federal funds rate throughout the second half of 2009 and early 2010 and indicated that economic conditions were likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for an extended period. The planned acquisitions of $300 billion of Treasury securities were completed by October. Overall. To promote a smooth transition in financial markets as the acquisitions are completed. In particular. while the purchases of $1. pays interest on the balances depository institutions hold at Reserve Banks. agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS). The Federal Reserve is taking steps to ensure that it will be able to smoothly withdraw extraordinary policy accommodation when appropriate.25 trillion of MBS and about $175 billion of agency debt are expected to be finished by the end of the first quarter of this year. Because the Federal Reserve. it can put upward pressure on short-term interest rates even with an extraordinarily large volume of reserves in the banking system by raising the interest rate paid on such balances. The rate charged on primary credit loans 5 was increased from 1⁄2 percent to 3⁄4 percent effective February 19. In addition. the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet increased from about $2 trillion in the summer of 2009 to about $2. the Federal Reserve has continued to develop several other tools that it could use to reinforce the effects of increases in the interest rate on balances at Reserve Banks. The Federal Reserve also began to normalize its lending to commercial banks through the discount window by reducing the maximum maturity of loans extended through the primary credit facility from 90 days to 28 days. 2010. The Federal Reserve continued to broaden its efforts to provide even more information to the public regarding its conduct of these programs and of monetary policy (see box in Part 3). the Federal Reserve gradually slowed the pace of these purchases in late 2009 and early 2010. In light of the improved functioning of financial markets. the Federal Reserve continued its purchases of Treasury securities.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 markets and promote recovery in economic activity using a wide array of tools.3 trillion on February 17. and by announcing that the maturity of those loans will be reduced further to overnight. the Federal Reserve has tested its ability to execute reverse repurchase agreements (reverse repos) in the triparty repo market with primary dealers using both Treasury and agency debt as collateral. Further. and it is developing the capability to conduct such transactions with other . the Federal Reserve removed some of the extraordinary support it had provided during the crisis and closed many of its special liquidity facilities and the temporary liquidity swap arrangements with other central banks in the fall of 2009 and early in 2010. The composition of the balance sheet continued to shift as a considerable decline in credit extended through various facilities was more than offset by the increase in securities held outright. and agency debt in order to provide support to mortgage and housing markets and to improve overall conditions in private credit markets. the Federal Reserve announced that the final auction under the Term Auction Facility will occur in March and later noted that the minimum bid rate for that auction had been increased by 1⁄4 percentage point to 1⁄2 percent.

Meanwhile. 2009 of further shocks to the economy. SOURCE: Department of Commerce. In addition. provided projections for economic growth. labor market conditions. real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 4 percent in the second half of 2009.6 96th Annual Report. and most also saw roughly balanced risks surrounding their inflation projections. Participants continued to judge the uncertainty surrounding their projections for economic activity and inflation as unusually high relative to historical norms. except as noted. Nearly all participants judged the risks to their growth outlook as generally balanced.8 percent for real GDP growth. FOMC participants agreed that economic recovery from the recent recession was under way. all of whom participate in FOMC meetings. but that they expected it to proceed at a gradual pace. an increase in energy prices has boosted overall consumer 1. Most participants also anticipated that inflation would remain subdued over this period. 2003–09 Percent.0 to 5. counterparties and against agency MBS. 5. and inflation. 5 percentage points above its level at the start of 2008. unemployment. Nonetheless. before dropping back some in January. Participants expected that real GDP would expand at a rate that was only moderately above its longer-run sustainable growth rate and that the unemployment rate would decline only slowly over the next few years.0 percent for the inflation rate. and slow easing of credit conditions in the banking sector. Conditions in many financial markets have improved significantly. these projections are presented in Part 4 of this report.2 percent for the unemployment rate.7 to 2.5 to 2. restrained in part by household and business uncertainty regarding the economic outlook. Participants also reported their assessments of the rates to which key macroeconomic variables would be expected to converge in the longer run under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence Part 2 Recent Financial and Economic Developments According to the advance estimate from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The Federal Reserve has also announced plans for implementing a term deposit facility. . the members of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks. remain very weak: The unemployment rate rose to 10 percent at the end of last year. which tend to lag changes in economic activity. modest improvement in labor markets. but lending policies at banks remain stringent. retracing part of the sharp decline in activity that began in early 2008 (figure 1). Change in Real Gross Domestic Product. In conjunction with the January 2010 FOMC meeting. annual rate 6 4 H1 2 + 0 _ 2 4 2003 2005 2007 2009 NOTE: Here and in subsequent figures. Bureau of Economic Analysis. The central tendencies of these longer-run projections were 2. it has the option of redeeming or selling assets in order to reduce monetary policy accommodation. and 1. change for a given period is measured to its final quarter from the final quarter of the preceding period.

and corporate bond spreads narrowed substantially.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 price inflation. particularly for loans secured by commercial and residential real estate loans. demand for credit was weak. the AssetBacked Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility.1 Investors also seemed to become more optimistic about the prospects for the banking sector. Private domestic nonfinancial sector debt contracted. The first-time homebuyer tax credit. they fell back sharply in December. suggesting that some of the earlier strength reflected sales that had been pulled forward in anticipation of the expiration of the first-time homebuyer tax credit. many small businesses and other firms that depend primarily on banks for their funding needs faced substantial constraints on their access to credit even as demand for such credit remained weak. issuance of asset-backed securities (ABS). In early November. low-interest1. As the functioning of short-term funding markets improved further. strengthened. After having increased almost 30 percent through mid-2009. the credit quality of bank loan portfolios remained a concern. Treasury yields. However. however. however. Conditions in financial markets improved further in the second half of 2009. price inflation for other items has remained subdued. And. Nevertheless. and inflation expectations have been relatively stable. Domestic Developments The Household Sector Residential Investment and Housing Finance The housing market began to recover in the spring of 2009.2 The index of pending 2. the Treasury. supported in part by the Federal Reserve’s Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF). which was enacted in February 2009 as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. but the pace of improvement slowed during the second half of the year. 2009. on balance. the Term Securities Lending Facility. and other market interest rates remained low while equity prices continued to rise. By contrast. and the temporary swap lines with foreign central banks were closed. 7 rate debt or refinance other debt. the Congress . amid positive earnings news. reflecting a more positive economic outlook as well as the effects of the policy initiatives implemented by the Federal Reserve. sales of new single-family homes retraced about one-half of that gain in the second half of the year. although sales of existing single-family homes moved up noticeably through November. firms with access to capital markets issued corporate bonds at a robust pace. and other government agencies to support financial stability and promote economic recovery. as banks maintained stringent lending standards for both consumer loans and residential real estate loans. with many firms reportedly seeking to lock in long-term. in the second half of 2009. and supply conditions remained tight. In the household sector. was originally scheduled to expire on November 30. the Commercial Paper Funding Facility. Specifically. and many of the largest banking institutions issued equity and repaid investments made by the Treasury under the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). 2010. the Primary Dealer Credit Facility. mortgage rates. the usage of special liquidity facilities declined sharply. and the Federal Reserve closed several of those facilities on February 1. On the positive side. on net. which are an important source of funding for consumer loans.

2009 Performance repeat-sales index—is up.2 .4 The delinquency rate on all subprime loans was about 35 percent in December. even though the last few readings of that index fell back a bit.8 96th Annual Report. That said. annual rate Single-family 1. 2010. on average. Loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) also showed increasing strains. and expanded it to include repeat homebuyers who have owned and occupied a house for at least five of the past eight years. including foreclosed homes. leveled off in December after November’s steep decline. house prices. One house price measure with wide geographic coverage—the Loanextended the credit to sales occurring through April 30. Private Housing Starts. and with a very high unemployment rate. 4. delinquency rates on all types of residential mortgages continued to move higher. The survey. Bureau of the Census. has continued to weigh on the market. from June to December (figure 2).3 The earlier declines in house prices in combination with the low level of mortgage rates have made housing more affordable. After falling sharply for about two and a half years. The recovery in construction activity in the single-family sector also decelerated in the second half of 2009.8 Multifamily .4 1998 2002 2006 2010 NOTE: The data are monthly and extend through January 2010. In the much smaller multifamily sector—where tight credit conditions and high vacancies have depressed building—starts deteriorated a bit further in the second half of the year. home values remained well below the remaining amount of principal on mortgages (socalled underwater loans) for many borrowers in the second half of 2009. from its trough earlier in the year. home sales. 2. With the level of construction remaining quite low. A mortgage is defined as seriously delinquent if the borrower is 90 days or more behind in payments or the property is in foreclosure.6 1. 2010. and the apparent stabilization in prices may bring into the market buyers who were reluctant to purchase a home when prices were perceived to be falling. were more stable in the second half of 2009. as measured by a number of national indexes. the stillsubstantial inventory of unsold homes. the number of respondents who expect house prices to increase over the next 12 months has moved up and now slightly exceeds the number of respondents who expect prices to decrease. was renamed the Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers as of January 1. the inventory of unsold new homes fell sharply and is now less than one-half of the peak reached in 2006. As of December. After stepping up noticeably last spring from an exceptionally low level. serious delinquency rates on prime and near-prime loans had climbed to 16 percent for variable-rate loans and to over 5 percent for fixed rate loans. Against this backdrop. on net. SOURCE: Department of Commerce. a leading indicator of sales of existing homes. formerly the Reuters/University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers. According to the Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers. with de3. Even with house prices showing signs of stabilization. starts of single-family homes were about flat. . 1996–2010 Millions of units.

but the spreads between nonconforming mortgage rates and rates on conforming mortgages remained wide by historical standards. at the same time. and they cannot exceed in size the conforming loan limit. and it cannot exceed $729. Interest rates on nonconforming 5. 1993–2010 Percent Fixed rate 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 Adjustable rate 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 NOTE: The data. about one-half of foreclosure starts have resulted in homeowners losing the home. The conforming loan limit for a first mortgage on a single-family home in the contiguous United States is currently equal to the greater of $417.5 The low mortgage rates reflected the generally low level of Treasury yields and the large purchases of agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS) by the Federal Reserve. Although mortgage rates fell to low levels. and despite a modest upturn around the start of 2010.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 linquency rates moving up to 9 percent at the end of 2009. the Treasury has intensified efforts through its Making Home Affordable program to encourage loan modifications and to allow borrowers to refinance into mortgages with moreaffordable payments. they must be equivalent in risk to a prime mortgage with an 80 percent loan-to-value ratio. similar to the pace earlier in the year. by contrast foreclosure starts for subprime borrowers dropped back somewhat. for whom the number of foreclosure starts moved up a bit in the second half of the year.750. which were reportedly an important factor behind the narrow spread between these conforming mortgage rates and yields on Treasury securities. which are not included in the mortgage pools backing MBS that are eligible for purchase by the Federal Reserve. Respondents to the Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices (SLOOS) indicated throughout 2009 that banks continued to tighten their lending standards for all types of mortgage loans. which remained subdued in the second half of 2009 even though mortgage rates decreased. The FHA announced that it was raising mortgage insurance premiums because its capital reserve ratio had fallen below the required threshold. are contract rates on 30-year mortgages. Historically. Mortgage Interest Rates. Conforming mortgages are those eligible for purchase by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. though smaller net fractions reported doing so in the January 2010 survey than had been the case in earlier surveys. 2010. Interest rates on 30-year fixed-rate conforming mortgages moved down in the second half of 2009. About 1. Foreclosures remained exceptionally elevated in the second half of 2009. they remained near the lowest levels on record (figure 3). the availability of mortgage financing continued to be sharply constrained. which are weekly and extend through February 17.000 or 115 percent of the area’s median house price. Lenders’ reluctance to extend mortgage credit in an environment of declining home values also likely held down refinancing activity. the FHA announced that it was . mortgages.4 million homes entered foreclosure during that period. SOURCE: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation. The heightened level of foreclosures has been particularly notable among prime borrowers. 9 3. To address the foreclosure problem. also generally declined.

Consumer spending appears to have been financed largely out of current income over the past year. total wages. consumer sentiment has rebounded from the very low levels seen earlier in 2009. After dropping during the preceding 21⁄2 years. Accordingly.6 Part of this rebound likely reflected the “cash for clunkers” program. Sales dropped back in January. increasing down-payment requirements for borrowers with very low credit scores. and Ginnie Mae. Real spending on goods excluding motor vehicles also increased at a robust pace in the second half of the year. sales remained close to 11 million units.7 Real labor income—that is. increases in food stamps and Pell grants. a development that helped to rebuild household wealth. Sales of new light motor vehicles jumped from an average annual rate of 91⁄2 million units in the first half of 2009 to a rate of 111⁄4 million units in the second half.10 96th Annual Report. supported in part by improved credit conditions for auto buyers as the ABS market revived. In recent years. and employee benefits. Real disposable personal income— after-tax income adjusted for inflation—increased about 13⁄4 percent last year. household net worth turned up in the second and third quarters of 2009 and likely rose further in the fourth quarter. as the decline in total employee work hours more than offset an increase in real hourly compensation (figure 4). residential mortgage debt outstanding contracted at an even faster pace in the second half than in the first half of the year. . adjusted for inflation—fell sharply in the first half of the 2009. the saving rate moved up a bit further in 2009. 6. but even after the expiration of that program. 2009 The rise in consumer spending in 2009 was buoyed by improvements in some of its underlying determinants: Equity prices moved up from their lows reached last March. subsidies for health insurance coverage for the unemployed. although brisk in the second half of 2009. Overall. The increases in benefit payments under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act included an expansion of unemployment benefits. real personal consumption expenditures (PCE) rose at an annual rate of about 21⁄2 percent in the second half. After increasing sharply in 2008. and a one-time $250 payment to retirees and veterans. the FHA has assumed a greater role in mortgage markets. but the decline occurred largely at Toyota. The securitization market for mortgage loans not guaranteed by a housing-related government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) or the FHA remained closed. and edged down a bit further in the second half. though it remains low by historical standards. with the effects of the tax cuts and higher social benefit payments included in the 2009 fiscal stimulus package accounting for most of the increase. Much of the recovery 7. while real outlays for services rose more modestly. Net issuance of MBS by Fannie Mae. which was confronted by widely publicized problems. Consumer Spending and Household Finance After having been roughly constant in the first half of last year. and households were also able to increase their personal saving and begin deleveraging their balance sheets. Freddie Mac. and household income was lifted by provisions in the fiscal stimulus package. salaries. was down a bit from the levels seen earlier in the year. especially for borrowers with high loan-to-value ratios or lower credit quality.

2003–09 Percent. the ratio of household wealth to disposable income increased in the second half of the year to about its historical average. The contraction was most pronounced in revolving credit.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 4. Changes in interest rates on consumer loans were mixed during the second half of 2009. though smaller net fractions reported doing so than in previous surveys. and that process continued during the second half of 2009. Households began to deleverage around the third quarter of 2008. A net fraction of about one-third of the bank loan officers that responded to the January SLOOS reported weaker demand for all types of consumer loans. on net. Nonrevolving credit also decreased. debt service payments—the required principal and interest on existing mortgages and consumer debt—fell as a share of disposable income. The decline in nonmortgage consumer debt intensified during the latter part of last year. Debt service payments consist of estimated required payments on outstanding mortgage and consumer debt. the ratio of debt service payments to disposable income had declined to its lowest level since 2001 (figure 5). in the January survey. “Household Debt Service and Financial Obligations Ratios. 2003 2005 2007 2009 SOURCE: Department of Commerce. At the end of the third quarter. The same survey also indicated that banks continued to tighten terms on credit card loans over the final three months of 2009 by reducing credit limits and raising interest rates charged. on balance. although the modest gain. Results from the recent SLOOS suggest that the contraction in consumer credit has been the result of both weak demand and tight supply. the Federal Reserve’s flow of funds data indicate that total household debt declined in 2009 for the first time since the data series began in 1951. at the height of the financial crisis. Change in Real Income and in Real Wage and Salary Disbursements. After having been tightened significantly in the summer and fall of 2009. reflected a rebound in equity prices.” statistical release. Including the drop in mortgage debt. Interest rates on . standards and terms on consumer loans other than credit card loans were little changed. annual rate 11 5. in the value of owner-occupied real estate also contributed. SOURCE: Federal Reserve Board. Reflecting these developments. Household Debt Service. 1980–2009 Percent of disposable income 14 13 12 11 1985 1993 2001 2009 Real disposable personal income Real wage and salary disbursements 8 6 4 2 + 0 _ 2 4 6 NOTE: The data are quarterly and extend through 2009:Q3. Bureau of Economic Analysis. which fell at about a 10 percent annual rate during the second half of 2009. With the rise in net worth.

According to the October SLOOS. Issuance picked up slightly after the FDIC provided a temporary extension of safeharbor rules for its handling of . In addition. the pace at which lenders were charging off these loans increased sharply in recent quarters. and others did so in February 2010. Interest rates on credit card loans. 2007–10 Billions of dollars new auto loans generally continued to trend lower. Data for consumer ABS show gross issuance facilitated by the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF) and such issuance outside the TALF. the yields on such securities dropped markedly. TALF consumer ABS Non-TALF consumer ABS 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 Jan. Prior to the crisis. and credit card delinquency rates at commercial banks stayed high at around 61⁄2 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009. ABS issuance backed by credit card receivables gained strength through most of the year.12 96th Annual Report. though it experienced a drop early in the fourth quarter because of uncertainty about how the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) would treat securitized receivables should a sponsoring bank fail. a large portion of consumer credit was funded through the ABS market. SOURCE: Bloomberg and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Similarly.8 Concerns about the ability of households to repay loans may also have contributed to the tightening of lending policies for consumer credit over the second half of 2009. After having essentially ground to a halt at the end of 2008. By the end of the year. On a more positive note. The Credit CARD Act includes some provisions that place restrictions on issuers’ ability to impose certain fees and to engage in risk-based pricing.) Issuance of ABS backed by auto loans in the second half of 2009 was roughly on par with issuance prior to the financial crisis. July 2009 NOTE: Consumer ABS (asset-backed securities) are securities backed by credit card loans. however. 2010 Jan. July 2008 Jan. respondents to the January SLOOS indicated that they expected the credit quality of their consumer loans. 2009 6. the interest rates on TALF loans were chosen so that they would become unattractive as market conditions improved. July 2007 Jan. and issuance of ABS without TALF support increased accordingly. and only a small portion was purchased using loans from the TALF. consumer ABS markets recovered in 2009 with the important support of the TALF (figure 6). (Indeed. Gross Issuance of Selected AssetBacked Securities. to stabilize during 2010. Some provisions took effect in August 2009. nonrevolving consumer loans. and auto loans. Much of the ABS issuance through the summer relied heavily on the TALF for financ8. A renewed ability to securitize auto loans may have contributed to the reduction in the interest rates on these loans. Delinquency rates on auto loans at captive finance companies remained elevated. and spreads on these loans relative to comparable-maturity Treasury securities narrowed further. other than credit card loans. jumped near midyear and increased further toward year-end. some of the increases in credit card interest rates and the tightening of other lending terms reflected adjustments made by banks in anticipation of the imposition of new rules under the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure (Credit CARD) Act. ing.

Business outlays on transportation equipment rose sharply in the second half as firms 7. Bureau of Economic Analysis. issuance of ABS backed by private student loans remained almost entirely dependent on financing from the TALF. orders of nondefense capital goods other than transportation items posted a second strong monthly increase in December. 2003 2005 2007 2009 NOTE: High-tech equipment consists of computers and peripheral equipment and communications equipment. and recent surveys of business conditions have been more upbeat than in several years. continued to fall during the second half of 2009. real spending on nonresidential structures continued to decline steeply throughout 2009. More recently. Investment in equipment other than information processing and transportation. Inventory Investment After running off inventories aggressively during the first three quarters of 2009. firms moved to stem the pace of liquidation in the fourth quarter. Following a steep drop in the first half of the year. as well as difficult financing conditions for new projects. 2003–09 Percent.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 securitized assets in a receivership. corporate profits increased. likely boosted by the desire to replace older. . likely reflecting the drag from rising vacancy rates and plunging property prices for commercial and office buildings. Change in Real Business Fixed Investment. By contrast. but much more slowly than earlier in the year. which accounts for nearly onehalf of E&S outlays. annual rate Structures Equipment and software 40 20 + 0 _ 20 2003 2005 2007 2009 60 40 20 + 0 _ 20 High-tech equipment and software Other equipment excluding transportation rebuilt their fleets of light motor vehicles and accelerated their purchases of large trucks in advance of new environmental regulations on diesel engines. as sales prospects picked up. Real spending on information technology capital—computers. software. and financial conditions for many businesses (especially those with direct access to capital markets) improved (figure 7). Real outlays for construction of structures other than those used for drilling and mining fell at an annual rate of 25 percent in the second half of 2009. and communications equipment—also accelerated toward the end of 2009. 13 The Business Sector Fixed Investment After falling throughout 2008 and the first half of 2009. SOURCE: Department of Commerce. business spending on equipment and software (E&S) began to expand in the second half of last year. In contrast to the upturn in equipment investment. real spending on drilling and mining structures increased sharply in the second half. less-efficient equipment. likely in response to the rebound in oil prices.

Corporate Profits and Business Finance Overall. . enhance the transparency of CRE workout transactions (that is. For commercial and industrial (C&I) loans. earnings for financial firms fluctuated around low levels. the credit quality of their existing C&I loans to small firms was worse than the quality of their loans to larger firms. the corporate bond default rate dropped into the range that had prevailed before the financial crisis began in August 2007. but at a much slower pace than earlier in the year. 2009 Delinquency rates on loans to nonfinancial businesses. a development that could lead to some restocking in the coming months. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Indeed. but the pace of downgrades moderated substantially in the second half of the year.5 percent.” attachment to Automakers added to their dealers’ stocks after cutbacks in production earlier in the year had reduced days’ supply of domestic light vehicles to below their preferred levels. Office of Thrift Supervision. the Federal Reserve joined with other banking regulators to provide guidelines to banks in their efforts to work constructively with troubled CRE borrowers. and ensure that supervisory policies and actions do not inadvertently curtail the availability of credit to sound borrowers. Data from firms that have reported for the fourth quarter suggest that earnings for nonfinancial firms continued to recover. firms continued to draw down inventories in the fourth quarter. National Credit Union Administration. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.9 9. earnings were well below the levels experienced prior to the financial market turmoil and the accompanying recession. Reflecting deterioration in commercial property markets. Still. The credit quality of nonfinancial corporations improved somewhat over the second part of last year. Within the S&P 500. In addition. a large net fraction of banks reported that in the fourth quarter. delinquency rates on commercial real estate (CRE) loans both in securitized pools and on banks’ books moved up sharply in the second half of 2009. operating earnings per share for S&P 500 firms rebounded over the course of 2009. “Policy Statement on Prudent Commercial Real Estate Loan Workouts. Delinquency rates on construction and land development loans climbed to especially high levels. While survey respondents generally expected the credit quality of their C&I loan portfolios to improve during 2010. and Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council State Liaison Committee (2009). rose throughout the year. This statement updated and replaced existing supervisory guidance to assist examiners in evaluating institutions’ efforts to renew or restructure loans to creditworthy CRE borrowers. banks’ outlook for C&I loans to larger firms was more optimistic than it was for such loans to smaller firms. while earnings for nonfinancial firms rebounded sharply as the economic recovery began to take hold. Business leverage. transactions intended to renew and restructure the loans).14 96th Annual Report. although signs of stress persisted. however. The statement was intended to promote supervisory consistency. fell in the third quarter. see Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. In response to a special question on the January 2010 SLOOS. In October 2009. and by the fourth quarter upgrades were outpacing downgrades. purchasing managers in the manufacturing sector report that their customers’ inventories are relatively lean. For more information. as measured by the ratio of debt to assets. Credit rating downgrades outpaced upgrades early in 2009. Outside of motor vehicles. delinquencies in the fourth quarter reached 4.

the last observation is from the January 2010 survey. The definition for firm size suggested for. Many banks experiencing steep declines in C&I loans reported that existing loans were paid down across a wide swath of industries. of banks also continued to report tightening lending standards on CRE loans. 1998–2010 Percent Premiums 90 60 Standards 30 + 0 _ 30 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 NOTE: The data are drawn from a survey generally conducted four times per year. In addition. However. and generally used by. In addition. bank loans to businesses—both C&I and CRE loans—contracted. by increasing the interest rate premiums charged on riskier loans. The decline in bank lending to businesses was due partly to the weakness in loan demand. Net issuance of corporate bonds remained strong as businesses took advantage of favorable market conditions to issue longer-term debt. at the same time. Net percentage is the percentage of banks reporting a tightening of standards or an increase in premiums less the percentage reporting an easing or a decrease. Moreover. Supervision and Regulation Letter SR 09-7 (October 30). inventories. the net fraction of small businesses reporting that credit had become more difficult to obtain over the preceding three months remained at extremely elevated levels during the second half of 2009. Small businesses have been particularly affected by tight bank lending standards because of their lack of direct access to capital markets. SOURCE: Federal Reserve Board. small businesses most frequently cited poor sales. when asked about the most important problem they faced. Respondents to the January 2010 SLOOS indicated that weak demand for C&I loans during the second half of 2009 reflected their customers’ reduced need to use these loans to finance investment in plant and equipment as well as to finance accounts receivable. Responses to the SLOOS indicated that lending standards for C&I loans were tightened significantly in the summer and fall of 2009 and that they remained about unchanged in the final months of the year (figure 8).gov/boarddocs/ srletters/2009/sr0907a1. many banks continued to tighten some terms throughout the year—for example. Considerable net fractions 15 8. survey respondents is that large and medium-sized firms have annual sales of $50 million or more. and mergers and acquisitions. Recognizing that small businesses play a crucial role in the economy and that some . Net Percentage of Domestic Banks Tightening Standards and Increasing Premiums Charged on Riskier Loans to Large and Medium-Sized Borrowers. considerable net fractions of NFIB survey respondents expected lending conditions to tighten further in the near term. which covers 2009:Q4. while only a small fraction cited credit availability. as did commercial paper.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 The debt of domestic nonfinancial businesses contracted slightly during the second half of 2009. and the composition of borrowing continued to shift toward longer-term debt. demand was reportedly low for CRE loans amid weak fundamentals in the sector. Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices.pdf. www.federalreserve. In surveys conducted by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB). The weakness in bank lending to businesses in 2009 was also a consequence of a tightening in lending standards.

by late in the year. the statement emphasized that regulators are working with the industry and supervisory staff to ensure that supervisory policies and actions do not inadvertently curtail the availability of credit to financially sound small business borrowers. although they remain very high by historical standards. with more-conservative 10. which often involves loan extensions by nonbank financial institutions. www. thus eliminating an important source of financing for many lenders—resumed in November 2009 with a securitization supported by the Federal Reserve’s TALF program. and material increases in issuance appeared unlikely in the near term. The Government Sector Federal Government The deficit in the federal unified budget rose markedly in fiscal year 2009 and reached $1. both seasoned and initial offerings by nonfinancial firms were solid in the second half of 2009. In the equity market. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.4 trillion. Further.10 The statement emphasized that financial institutions that engage in prudent small business lending will not be subject to supervisory criticism for small business loans made on that basis. Share repurchases continued to be light. regarding lending to these businesses. and Conference of State Bank Supervisors (2010).occ.” joint press release. about $1 trillion higher than in fiscal 2008. National Credit Union Administration. A handful of subsequent small securitizations. see Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.gov/ftp/release/2010-14. and. issuance of CMBS remains very light. Prior to the crisis. cash-financed mergers picked up toward year-end. new loans had found increased investor interest amid some easing in loan terms. which had been substantial purchasers of such credits.htm. Trading in existing CMBS picked up during the second half of 2009. The market began to show signs of recovery last year with secondary-market prices of loans moving higher. For more information. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. are experiencing difficulty in obtaining or renewing credit. New issuance in the commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) market—which had ceased in the third quarter of 2008. and yield spreads relative to Treasury securities narrowed. 2009 underwriting and simpler structures than had prevailed during the credit boom.” attachment to “Regulators Issue Statement on Lending to Creditworthy Small Businesses. Issuance of leveraged loans. 2010. issuance of leveraged loans fell to low levels when investors moved away from structured finance products such as collateralized loan obligations. “Interagency Statement on Meeting the Credit Needs of Creditworthy Small Business Borrowers. mostly as the result of a few large deals. February 5.treas. However. The effects of the weak economy on . the federal financial regulatory agencies and the Conference of State Bank Supervisors issued a statement on February 5. the Office of Thrift Supervision.16 96th Annual Report. were brought to market and successfully completed without support from the TALF. this segment of the syndicated loan market provided considerable financing to lower-rated nonfinancial firms. Some of the improvement likely reflected support provided by the Federal Reserve through the part of the TALF program that provides loans for the purchase of “legacy” CMBS. After nearly ceasing earlier in the year. Nevertheless. also remained weak throughout 2009 although market conditions reportedly improved.

While the outlays associated with the TARP and the conservatorship of the GSEs contributed importantly to the rapid rise in federal spending in fiscal 2009. Because final payments on 2008 liabilities were not due until April of 2009 and because of the difference between fiscal and calendar years. . and tax receipts over the first four months of the current fiscal year have continued to decline relative to the comparable yearearlier period. This category of spending has continued to rise rapidly thus far in fiscal 2010. In the Monthly Treasury Statements. Federal Borrowing Federal debt expanded rapidly throughout 2009 and rose to more than 50 percent of nominal GDP by the end of 2009. along with the budget costs associated with the fiscal stimulus legislation enacted last February (the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)). the Troubled Asset Relief Program. the spend-out from last year’s fiscal stimulus package is expected to be higher. the highest level recorded since the early 1950s.3 trillion this fiscal year. The Congressional Budget Office projects that the deficit will be about $1. After falling about 2 percent in fiscal 2008. while real defense outlays rose modestly. The deficit is expected to remain sharply elevated in fiscal 2010. outlays excluding these extraordinary costs rose a relatively steep 10 percent. Treasury 12. in part reflecting the boost in spending from the 2009 fiscal stimulus legislation. and tax revenues are anticipated to remain weak.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 revenues and outlays. and the conservatorship of the mortgage-related GSEs. 17 salary income.11 Individual income and payroll taxes also declined substantially. equity purchases and debt-related transactions under the TARP are recorded on a net present value basis. much of the contraction in 2008 corporate profits did not show through to tax revenues until fiscal 2009. up from around 35 percent earlier in the decade. as are the Treasury’s purchases of the GSE’s MBS. To fund the increased borrowing needs. Although the budget costs of the financial stabilization programs are expected to be lower than in the last fiscal year. federal receipts plunged 18 percent in fiscal 2009. and most other categories of spending have increased fairly briskly as well. However. a decline in capital gains realizations.12 Spending for Medicaid and income support programs jumped almost 25 percent in fiscal 2009 as a result of the deterioration in the labor market as well as policy decisions to expand funding for a number of such programs. and the revenuereducing provisions of the 2009 fiscal stimulus legislation. and that federal debt held by the public will reach 60 percent of nominal GDP. all contributed to the widening of the budget gap. reflecting the effects of the weak labor market on nominal wage and 11. The steep drop in economic activity during 2008 and the first half of 2009 resulted in sharply lower tax receipts. Nondefense outlays increased rapidly. real federal expenditures on consumption and gross investment—the part of federal spending that is a direct component of GDP—rose at a 4 percent pace in the second half of 2009. As measured in the national income and product accounts (NIPA). mostly as a result of the sharp contraction in corporate profits in 2008. just a touch below last year’s deficit. The decline in revenues in fiscal 2009 was particularly steep for corporate taxes. taking into account market risk. equity purchases from the GSEs in conservatorship are recorded on a cash flow basis.

These budget pressures showed through to state and local spending. VRDOs also have a contractual liquidity backstop. 15. As measured in the NIPA. typically provided by a commercial or investment bank. which became severely strained during the financial crisis. and many states are currently in the process of addressing shortfalls in their fiscal 2010 budgets. as receipts from property taxes. states were under less pressure to restrain their investment spending. The Build America Bonds program allows state and local governments to issue taxable bonds for capital projects and receive a subsidy payment from the Treasury for 35 percent of interest costs. Moreover. real consumption expenditures of state and local governments declined over the second half of 2009.18 96th Annual Report. At the local level. Variable-rate demand obligations (VRDOs) are taxable or tax-exempt bonds that combine long maturities with floating short-term interest rates that are reset on a weekly. However. primarily to finance new capital projects.13 In particular. demand for Treasury issues kept pace. that ensures that . and those cuts continued 13. The rise in investment spending was supported by infrastructure grants provided by the federal government as part of the ARRA. revenues have held up fairly well. Also. 2009 in January. had largely recovered.14 Shortterm issuance was more moderate and generally consistent with typical seasonal patterns. have continued to rise moderately. and they will need to set aside resources in coming years to rebuild pension assets. Consumption expenditures by state and local governments include all outlays other than those associated with investment projects. and bid-to-cover ratios at these auctions were generally strong. investment spending by state and local governments rose moderately during the second half of 2009. and foreign custody holdings of Treasury securities at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York increased considerably over the year. was strong. because capital budgets are typically not encompassed within balanced budget requirements. State and Local Government Despite the substantial federal aid provided by the ARRA. State and Local Government Borrowing Borrowing by state and local governments picked up a bit in the second half of the year from its already solid pace in the first half. Nevertheless. revenues from income. or other periodic basis. At the state level. reflecting the typically slow response of property assessments to changes in home values. Market participants reported that the market for variable-rate demand obligations. monthly. In contrast. these jurisdictions began to reduce employment in mid-2009. on which these jurisdictions rely heavily. and sales taxes continued to fall in the second half of last year. business. Issuance was supported by the Build America Bonds program. as well as by a recovery of activity in municipal bond markets that increased the availability and lowered the cost of financing. the fiscal situations of state and local governments remain challenging. many state and local governments have experienced significant capital losses in their employee pension funds. which was authorized under the ARRA.15 auctions grew to record sizes. the sharp fall in house prices over the past few years is likely to put some downward pressure on local revenues before long. 14. Gross issuance of long-term bonds. Foreign demand was solid.

9. however. Oil and nonfuel commodity prices increased substantially over the year (figure 10). Despite the bounceback. Prices of Oil and Nonfuel Commodities.” The strength of the recovery in global trade so far. and Mexico. Real imports increased at about the same pace. bondholders are able to redeem their investment at par plus accrued interest even if the securities cannot be successfully remarketed to other investors. 2003 2005 2007 2009 SOURCE: Department of Commerce. SOURCE: For oil. The price of oil rose further over the second half of the year to reach about $80 per barrel in November and has fluctuated between $70 and $80 per barrel through 10. Canada. trading partners but was particularly pronounced for both exports and imports of capital goods. The price of nonfuel commodities is an index of 45 primary-commodity prices and extends through January 2010. trade flows only partially retraced the unusually steep declines registered in late 2008 and early 2009. 2010. Change in Real Imports and Exports of Goods and Services. for nonfuel commodities. supported by the recovery under way in U. The oil price is the spot price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil. differs substantially across countries and regions. real exports rose at an annual rate of nearly 20 percent in the second half of the year. International Monetary Fund. 2003–09 19 Percent. 2005–10 December 2004 = 100 Dollars per barrel 240 220 200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 Oil Nonfuel commodities 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 NOTE: The data are monthly.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 Interest rates on long-term municipal bonds declined during the year. the Commodity Research Bureau. Credit ratings of state and local governments deteriorated over 2009 as a consequence of budgetary problems faced by many of these governments. and the last observation is the average for February 1–17.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. the spot price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose rapidly to reach about $70 per barrel by the middle of 2009. This pattern was also true for global trade flows. reflecting the rise in motor vehicle production in North America. demand. which depends importantly on flows of parts and finished vehicles between the United States. As foreign economic activity began to improve. . The pickup in trade flows was widespread across major types of products and U. as discussed in the box “Developments in Global Trade.S. annual rate Imports Exports H1 20 10 + 0 _ 10 20 The External Sector Both exports and imports rebounded in the second half of 2009 from precipitous falls earlier in the year (figure 9). but the ratio of their yields to those on comparable-maturity Treasury securities remained somewhat elevated by historical standards. Exports and imports of automotive products also picked up sharply in the second half of last year. After plunging from a daily high of about $145 per barrel in mid2008 to a low of less than $40 per barrel early in 2009.

S. which are converted to U. Real and Nominal Global Exports. Switzerland. Israel. particularly in the emerging market economies. Market participants expect some further increases in commodity prices as the economic recovery gains strength. Belgium. 1. Finland. Measured in U. Portugal. the Netherlands. Malaysia. Colombia. Korea. SOURCE: The nominal data are the sum of U. and Turkey. especially China.S. import prices for the first half of 2009. Italy. 1990–2009 Billions of U.S. The ongoing effects of earlier restrictions in OPEC supply were another likely contributing factor.000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 NOTE: The data are monthly and extend through December 2009.20 96th Annual Report. Russia.100 1.1 About one-third of the decline was a result of falling prices. India. and the advanced economies consist of Australia. and the United States.S. dollar prices using each country’s dollar exchange rate and rebased to 2007. the other emerging market economies consist of Hungary. Real global exports are staff estimates expressed in billions of 2007 U. France. in some cases seasonally adjusted by Federal Reserve staff.S. Germany. Brazil. Poland. Indonesia. were about $96 per barrel. As with the rise in oil prices. Japan. Spain. prices of imported goods fell 1 percent while prices for goods excluding oil fell 21⁄2 percent. dollar exports from individual country sources via databases maintained by Haver Analytics.S. The steep decline in commodity prices in late 2008 put considerable downward pressure on U. global exports fell about 35 percent between July 2008 and February 2009. Broad indexes of nonfuel commodity prices also rose from lows near the start of 2009. the Latin American economies consist of Argentina. albeit increases that are less pronounced than those recorded during last year’s rebound. A. those expiring in December 2018) for crude oil also moved up and. Overall for 2009. Luxembourg. The real data are calculated using trade prices from country sources via Haver Analytics (in some cases interpolated from quarterly or annual data). Mexico. dollars. Singapore. The increase in the price of oil over the course of 2009 was driven in large measure by strengthening global activity. notably for oil and other commodities. a key driver of the increase in commodity prices has been resurgent demand from emerging market economies. Denmark. dollars. Ireland. Norway. 2009 Developments in Global Trade The downturn in global activity was accompanied by a dramatic collapse in global trade. The upward-sloping futures curve is consistent with a view by market participants that oil prices will continue to rise as global demand strengthens over the medium term. The emerging Asian economies consist of China. and Vietnam. as of mid-February. Canada. dollars Real Nominal 1991 1997 2003 2009 1.300 1. The total includes 44 countries. Recent upward moves in commodity prices suggest that some of this downward . Hong Kong. and Venezuela. Chile. Greece. and the IMF Direction of Trade Statistics. CEIC. South Africa. the Philippines. the United Kingdom. Sweden. The volume of global exports is estimated to have contracted about 20 percent between mid2008 and early 2009. a larger and more abrupt decline than has been observed in previous cycles (figure A). Thailand.200 1. Austria. The prices of longer-term futures contracts (that is. Taiwan. Forty-four countries are included. mid-February 2010.

and governments.S. The U. as the strength of the Chinese economy has so far been a key factor driving exports of the other emerging Asian economies. Constraints on the supply of trade finance related to the general credit crunch may have played a role at the beginning. although there is no real agreement on why this might be the case. The trade deficit widened moderately over the remainder of the year. In contrast. excluding depreciation charges—remained extremely low by historical standards in 2009. averaging about negative 21⁄2 percent of nominal GDP over the first three quarters of the year. which were generally less directly exposed to the financial crisis than were the advanced economies. or about 3 percent of nominal GDP. pressure on import prices will be reversed in 2010. Greater integration of production across countries and an increase in exports of products for which there are shorter lags between changes in demand and changes in exports—such as electronics—may also have added to the speed and synchronicity of the collapse.S. The primary explanation for the deep and abrupt collapse in global trade seems to be that the contraction in global demand was much more severe than in the past. National Saving Total U. net national saving—that is. financial and economic indicators in the emerging market economies appeared to be relatively resilient. however. which provided considerable fiscal stimulus to its own economy. as both imports and exports picked up in subsequent quarters and oil prices moved higher. After having reached nearly 4 percent of nominal GDP in early 2006. The severity of the decline in trade was a major factor in the spread of the economic downturn to the emerging market economies in Asia and Latin America. but the fall in demand soon became the more important factor. In the fourth quarter of 2009. and most of the emerging market economies experienced deep recessions. Exports appear to have stopped declining in most economies in the first half of 2009. the trade deficit was $440 billion (annual rate). compared with a deficit of 4 percent of nominal GDP a year earlier. In particular. businesses. raising the possibility that those economies had “decoupled” from developments in the advanced economies. but so far the strength of the recovery in trade has differed across countries. Early on. The sensitivity of trade to the decline in gross domestic product also appears to have been stronger in this cycle than in past cycles. A major exception was China. partly reflecting a substantial decline in the value of oil imports. the saving of households. the trade channel proved quite potent. private saving rose consider- . net national saving dropped over the subsequent three years as the federal budget deficit widened substantially and the fiscal positions of state and local governments deteriorated. exports of the emerging Asian economies are much closer to their previous peaks than are exports of the advanced economies. trade deficit narrowed considerably in the first half of 2009.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 21 Developments—continued The fall in global exports was also more widespread across countries and regions than has typically been the case in past recessions. Nominal imports fell more than nominal exports early in the year. However.

although cutbacks in 11. In January. The slowing in net job losses since mid-2009 primarily reflected a reduction in layoffs rather than an improvement in hiring.000 jobs per month from November to January (figure 11). 2003–10 Thousands of jobs. 2009 12.3 million individuals—more than 40 percent of the unemployed— had been out of work for at least six months. The moderation in the pace of job losses was relatively widespread across sectors. though it remained 4. 6. National saving will likely remain relatively low this year in light of the continuing high federal budget deficit. on average. The average duration of an ongoing spell of unemployment continued to lengthen markedly in the second half of 2009. Both the number of new job losses and initial claims for unemployment insurance are down significantly from their highs in the spring of 2009. 3-month moving average NOTE: The data are monthly and extend through January 2010. from January to April of 2009. Civilian Unemployment Rate. employment in the construction industry continued to be sizable through January. 10 8 6 4 1980 1990 2000 2010 The Labor Market Employment and Unemployment After falling sharply in the first half of 2009. the pace of job loss slowed to about 300. while most indicators of hiring conditions. After rising rapidly for more than a year. remain weak.000 per month from May to October.7 percentage points higher than its level two years ago. Furthermore. the jobless rate dropped to 9. on balance. SOURCE: Department of Labor. 200 + 0 _ 200 400 600 800 2004 2006 2008 2010 NOTE: The data are monthly and extend through January 2010. the unemployment rate stabilized at 10 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009 (figure 12). employment continued to contract through the remainder of the year. persistent low levels of national saving will likely be associated with both low rates of capital formation and heavy borrowing from abroad.7 percent.22 96th Annual Report. and to an average of 20. 1976–2010 Percent ably. Nonfarm private payroll employment fell 725. In January. If not raised over the longer run. Bureau of Labor Statistics. over this period.S. limiting the rise in the standard of living of U. such as the Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of job openings. and joblessness became increasingly concentrated among the long-term unemployed.000 jobs per month. residents over time. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Net Change in Private Payroll Employment. the labor force participation rate has declined steeply . SOURCE: Department of Labor. but at a gradually moderating pace.

which measures both wages and the cost to employers of providing benefits. increased only slightly. before ticking up to 33. For example. after rising 31⁄2 percent in the first half. increases in hourly worker compensation have remained subdued. The employment cost index for private industry workers. reflecting. adjusted for the rise in consumer prices— increased only modestly. Prices Headline consumer price inflation picked up in 2009. In addition. driven higher by a resurgence in the cost of crude oil. a development likely related. on net. The retail price of gasoline was up more than 60 percent for the year as a whole. along with the outsized gain in labor productivity noted earlier.3 hours in January. and about 1 percent in 2008. Real hourly compensation—that is. Compensation per hour in the nonfarm business sector—a measure derived from the worker compensation data in the NIPA—showed less deceleration.1 hours per week through the remainder of the year. before in- . employment in the temporary help industry. consumer natural gas prices fell sharply over the first half of 2009. After rising 1⁄2 percent over the 12 months of 2008. However. in recent months. as sharp increases in energy prices offset reductions in food prices and a deceleration in other prices. rose only 11⁄4 percent in nominal terms in 2009 after ris- 23 ing almost 21⁄2 percent in 2008. which frequently is one of the first to see an improvement in hiring. Data for PCE prices in January 2010 are not yet available. only slightly slower than the 2.6 percent rise recorded for 2008. reversing much of the steep decline recorded in 2008. labor market reports have included some encouraging signs that labor demand may be firming.2 hours in November and December and 33. In contrast.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 since last spring. Despite large gains in productivity. after steep declines in 2008 and the first quarter of 2009. in the second half of the year after a sharp rise in the first half and then turned down noticeably in January. compared with a rise of roughly 13⁄4 percent in 2008 (figure 13). has been increasing since October. at least to some extent. to the reactions of potential workers to the scarcity of employment opportunities. the reluctance of firms to increase hiring even as demand expanded. but information from the consumer price index and other sources suggests that inflation remained subdued. overall prices for personal consumption expenditures rose about 2 percent in 2009. rising 2. According to the latest available published data. the fraction of workers on part-time schedules for economic reasons. output per hour in the nonfarm business sector increased at an annual rate of 63⁄4 percent in the second half of 2009. at least in part. the average workweek of production and nonsupervisory employees stabilized at roughly 33. Another indicator of an improvement in work hours. unit labor costs in the nonfarm business sector declined 23⁄4 percent in 2009. Consumer energy prices rose sharply in 2009. Productivity and Labor Compensation Labor productivity surged in 2009. Reflecting the subdued increase in nominal hourly compensation. the core PCE price index—which excludes the prices of energy items as well as those of food and beverages— increased a little less than 11⁄2 percent in 2009. Reflecting the burgeoning supplies from new domestic wells.2 percent in nominal terms in 2009.

The prices of many core consumer goods continued to rise only moderately in 2009. have been relatively stable over the past year. median expectations for year-ahead inflation stood at 2. a notable exception was tobacco. Core PCE prices rose at an annual rate of 13⁄4 percent in the first half of 2009. Change in the Chain-Type Price Index for Personal Consumption Expenditures. creasing again in the last few months of the year as the economic outlook improved.9 percent in January of this year. This slowdown in core inflation was centered in a noticeable deceleration in the prices of nonenergy services.to 10-year inflation expectations was 2. 2009 firms’ widespread cost-cutting efforts over the past year and the continued weakness in the housing market that has put downward pressure on housing costs have likely been important factors. these changes largely reflected the pass-through to retail of huge swings in spot prices of crops and livestock over the past two years. Historically. the Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan survey measure of median 5. this short-term measure has been influenced fairly heavily by contemporaneous movements in energy prices. Policy Actions.8 percent in January. food prices turned up modestly in the fourth quarter of last year. Overall. similar to the readings during most of 2009. PCE price inflation slowed last year. Financial Stability Developments Evolution of the Financial Sector. According to the Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers. Bureau of Economic Analysis. for which tax-induced price hikes were substantial. consumer food prices fell 11⁄2 percent after rising 63⁄4 percent in 2008. and Market Developments The recovery in the financial sector that began in the first half of 2009 continued through the second half of the year and into 2010. and then increased at an annual rate of only a little above 1 percent over the final six months of the year. by contrast. annual rate Total Excluding food and energy 5 4 3 2 1 + 0 _ 2003 2005 2007 2009 NOTE: Change is from December to December. 2003–09 Percent. For those prices. on average. similar to the pace in 2008. as investor concerns about the health of large financial . natural gas prices were down almost 20 percent in 2009. Longer-term inflation expectations. Electricity prices also fell during the early part of 2009 before retracing part of that decline later in the year. moved up.24 96th Annual Report. which were unusually low in the beginning of 2009. and near the lower end of the narrow range that has prevailed over the past few years. while electricity prices were about unchanged. 13. Survey-based measures of near-term inflation expectations. over the remainder of the year. For example. After posting sizable declines throughout much of 2009. up from about 2 percent at the beginning of 2009. For the year as a whole. SOURCE: Department of Commerce. Excluding food and energy.

the Treasury announced that it was amending the cap on its Preferred Stock Purchase Agreements with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to ensure that each firm would maintain positive net worth for the next three years.S. rate. At maturity. Bidasked spreads and haircuts applied to 15. with delinquency and charge-off rates still elevated. such as the effective federal funds rate. functioning in bank funding markets has improved steadily since the spring of last year. Nonetheless. although they remain above pre-crisis levels (figure 14). An overnight index swap (OIS) is an interest rate swap with the floating rate tied to an index of daily overnight rates. July Jan. SOURCE: Markit. or index. 2009 2010 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 NOTE: The data are daily and extend through February 18. 2010. 2010. Credit default swap (CDS) spreads for banking institutions—which primarily reflect investors’ assessments of and willingness to bear the risk that those institutions will default on their debt obligations— fell considerably from their peaks early in 2009. Bank equity prices have increased significantly since spring 2009. 2010 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 NOTE: The data are daily and extend through February 19. for the OIS rate. the difference between interest accrued at the fixed rate and interest accrued by averaging the floating. A measure of stress in these markets—the spread between the London interbank offered rate (Libor) and the rate on comparable-maturity overnight index swaps (OIS)—narrowed at all maturities. Liquidity in term bank funding markets also improved at terms up to six months. Libor is the London interbank offered rate. SOURCE: For Libor. two parties exchange. spreads at shorter maturities reached pre-crisis levels. while those at longer maturities remained somewhat elevated by historical standards (figure 15). on the basis of the agreed notional amount. July 2007 2008 Jan. . Investor concerns about insurance companies— which had come under pressure in early 2009 and a few of which had received capital injections from the Treasury—also diminished. Many of the largest bank holding companies were able to issue equity and repurchase preferred shares that had been issued to the Treasury under the TARP. as indicated by narrowing CDS spreads for those firms and increases in their equity prices. 2007–10 Basis points 25 Large bank holding companies Other banks Jan. Consistent with diminishing concerns about the conditions of banking institutions. Spreads on Credit Default Swaps for Selected U. In December. especially on commercial and residential real estate loans. July Jan.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 14. Conditions improved in other money markets as well. Prebon. conditions in many banking markets remain very challenging. and it also announced that it was providing additional capital to GMAC under the TARP. British Bankers’ Association. July Jan. 2007–10 Basis points Six-month Onemonth Jan. Median spreads for six bank holding companies and nine other banks. July 2007 2008 2009 Jan. Libor Minus Overnight Index Swap Rate. July Jan. institutions subsided further. Banks.

The Federal Reserve also shortened the maximum maturity of loans provided under the primary credit program from 90 days to 28 days.and speculative-grade bonds—the difference between the yields on these securities and those on comparable-maturity Treasury securities—dropped. the Federal Reserve noted that the minimum bid rate for the final auction would be 50 basis points. During the second half of 2009. The Primary Dealer . In the corporate bond market. 2009 Credit Facility. the Commercial Paper Funding Facility. The amounts and maturity of credit auctioned through the Term Auction Facility (TAF) were reduced over time.26 96th Annual Report. 2010. Starting in the second half of 2009. With improved conditions in financial markets. the Term Securities Lending Facility. spreads between rates on lower-quality A2/P2 paper and on asset-backed commercial paper over higher-quality AA nonfinancial paper fell to the low end of the range observed since the fall of 2007. no debt has been issued under the extended program. In light of these developments. and the temporary liquidity swap lines with foreign central banks were all allowed to expire on February 1. continued to normalize. In the commercial paper market. and risk premiums have narrowed noticeably as investors’ appetite for risk appears to be recovering.and medium-term debt issued by banking institutions. In the leveraged loan market. and announced a further reduction of the maximum maturity of those loans to overnight effective March 18. the FDIC announced in late October 2009 that the guarantee program would be extended but with significant restrictions. Later. and bid-asked spreads collateral in repurchase agreement (repo) markets retraced some of the run-ups that had occurred during the financial market turmoil. Amounts outstanding under many of the Federal Reserve’s special liquidity facilities had dwindled to zero (or near zero) over the second half of 2009 as functioning of funding markets. and early in 2010 the Federal Reserve announced that the final TAF auction would be conducted in March 2010. the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility. the FDIC had established in October 2008 a program to provide. the rate charged on primary credit loans was increased from 1⁄2 percent to 3⁄4 percent effective February 19. In addition. 1⁄4 percentage point higher than in recent auctions. to buttress the liquidity of financial institutions. Asset prices in longer-term capital markets have also staged a noticeable recovery since the spring of 2009. but use of the program declined after the summer of 2009 as financial institutions were able to successfully issue nonguaranteed debt. risk spreads on both investment. the Federal Reserve and other agencies removed some of the extraordinary support that had been provided during the crisis. though haircuts on most types of collateral continued to be sizable relative to pre-crisis levels. and by the end of last year those spreads were within ranges observed during the recoveries from previous recessions. in exchange for a fee. the Federal Reserve began to normalize its lending to commercial banks. effective on January 14. both in the United States and abroad. the decline in risk spreads was accompanied by considerable inflows into mutual funds that invest in corporate bonds. Other government agencies also reduced their support to financial institutions. For instance. the average bid price climbed back toward par. Financial institutions issued about $300 billion under this program. a guarantee on short.

While some banks saw earnings boosted earlier last year by gains in trading and investment banking activities. 1998–2010 January 3. the rebound in asset prices likely reflected corporate earnings that were generally above market expectations. SOURCE: Dow Jones Indexes. though it remains elevated by historical standards. however. these steps have added more than $200 billion to common equity since the beginning of 2009. improved measures of corporate credit quality. Stock Price Index. even under a macroeconomic scenario that was more adverse than expected. they would emerge from the subsequent two-year period still capable of meeting the needs of creditworthy borrowers.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 16. combined with conversions of preferred stock. The 19 SCAP firms issued about $110 billion in new common equity. Overall. as measured by the return on equity. as suggested by declines in measures of uncertainty and risk premiums. revenue from these sources is reported to have dropped back in the fourth quarter. Moreover. asset sales. Significant issuance occurred in the wake of the release of the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program (SCAP) results. a measure of the premium that investors require for holding equity shares—the difference between the ratio of 12-month forward expected earnings to equity prices for S&P 500 firms and the long-term real Treasury yield—narrowed in 2009. . investors also became somewhat less concerned about the downside risks to the economic outlook. Equity markets rebounded significantly over the past few quarters. provisioning decreased significantly in the second half of the year. Although delinquency and charge-off rates for residential mortgages and commercial real estate loans continued to climb in the second half of 2009. and other capital actions. Elevated loan loss provisioning continued to be the largest factor restraining earnings. Implied volatility on the S&P 500. as calculated from option prices. During the year. continued to be quite low during the second half of 2009. 2005 = 100 27 Banking Institutions The profitability of the commercial banking sector. 2010. Equity offerings were also undertaken by other financial firms. narrowed noticeably as trading conditions reportedly improved. and brighter economic prospects. held at moderate levels during the second half of 2009 and was well off the peak reached in November 2008. suggesting that banks believe that credit losses may be stabilizing. bank holding companies issued substantial amounts of common equity. and some used the Dow Jones total stock market index 140 120 100 80 60 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 NOTE: The data are daily and extend through February 18. Apparently. which indicated that some firms needed to augment or improve the quality of their capital in order to assure that. leaving broad equity market indexes about 65 percent above the low point reached in March 2009 (figure 16). for most other types of loans these metrics declined or showed signs of leveling out.

see Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The decline in assets combined with an increase in capital to push regulatory capital ratios considerably higher.” press release.28 96th Annual Report. The Financial Accounting Standards Board published Statements of Financial Accounting Standards Nos.16 17. 4636–54. proceeds to repay funds received as part of the Capital Purchase Program. Against a backdrop of weak loan demand and tight credit policies throughout 2009. vol. 75 (January 28). are quarterly and extend through 2009:Q4. . Federal Register. Change in Total Bank Loans and Unused Bank Loan Commitments to Businesses and Households.” final rule. particularly Treasury securities and agency MBS. total industry assets declined. pp. For more information and the text of the final rule. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. and Office of Thrift Supervision (2010). January 21. which are not seasonally adjusted. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. The decline in loans was partially offset by an increase in holdings of securities. The federal banking agencies recently published a related risk-based capital rule that includes an optional one-year phase-in of certain risk-based capital impacts resulting from implementation of FAS 166 and 167. and Other Related Issues. Total loans are adjusted to remove the effects of large thrifts converting to commercial banks or merging with a commercial bank. and Office of Thrift Supervision (2010).federalreserve. 166 and 167. A small number of institutions with large securitization programs will be most affected. albeit at a slower pace than in early 2009. see Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Impact of Modifications to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Capital Maintenance: Regulatory Capital. While the regulatory capital ratios of the affected banking organizations may decrease after implementation of FAS 166 and 167. total loans on banks’ books contracted even more sharply in the last two quarters taken together than in the first half of the year (figure 17). Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. and a further rise in balances at the Federal Reserve. www. The final rule was also published in the Federal Register. “Agencies Issue Final Rule for Regulatory Capital Standards Related to Statements of Financial Accounting Standards Nos.htm. Capital Adequacy Guidelines. annual rate Unused commitments Total loans 30 20 10 + 0 _ 10 20 30 1991 1994 1997 2000 2003 2006 2009 NOTE: The data.gov/ newsevents/press/bcreg/20100121a. The new standards modified the 16. the ratios of organizations most affected by the accounting change are expected to remain substantially in excess of regulatory minimums. Industry analysts estimate that banking organizations will consolidate approximately $600 billion of additional assets as a result of implementing FAS 166 and 167. “Risk-Based Capital Guidelines. 2009 basis for determining whether a firm must consolidate securitized assets (as well as the associated liabilities and equity) onto its balance sheet. 1990–2009 Percent. most banking organizations must implement the standards in the first quarter of 2010. On balance. Consolidation of Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Programs. 166 and 167 (FAS 166 and 167) in June 2009. SOURCE: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council. Outstanding unused loan commitments to both businesses and households also declined. Consolidated Reports of Condition and Income (Call Report).

SOURCE: Department of the Treasury. investors marked down their expectations for the path of the federal funds rate. Interest Rates on Selected Treasury Securities. Quotes on futures contracts imply that. including the reiteration in the statement released after each meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee that economic conditions are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for an extended period. appear to have significantly affected the relative demand for nominal and inflation-indexed securi- .Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 29 Monetary Policy Expectations and Treasury Rates In July 2009. likely in response to generally positive news 18. but they had also anticipated that the removal of policy accommodation would be imminent. such as safe-haven demands and an increased preference of investors for liquid assets. as of mid-February 2010. 2004–10 Percent 10-year 2-year 3-month 5 4 3 2 1 + 0 _ 2004 2006 2008 2010 NOTE: The data are daily and extend through February 18. however. about the economy and declines in the weight investors had placed on extremely adverse economic outcomes. on net. market participants had expected the target federal funds rate to be close to the current target range of 0 to 1⁄4 percent in early 2010. uncertainty about the size of term premiums and potential distortions created by the zero lower bound for the federal funds rate continue to make it difficult to obtain a definitive reading on the policy expectations of market participants from futures prices. The result was an increase in inflation compensation— the difference between comparablematurity nominal yields and TIPS yields. Yields on shorter-maturity Treasury securities have edged lower since last summer. market participants anticipate that policy will be tightened beginning in the third quarter of 2010. Over the second half of 2009. However. 2010. Another contributing factor likely was Federal Reserve communications. Inflation compensation at more distant horizons was somewhat volatile and was little changed on net. and that the tightening will proceed at a pace slower than was expected last summer. Inferences about investors’ inflation expectations have been more difficult to make since the second half of 2008 because special factors. yields on longermaturity nominal Treasury securities have increased slightly. consistent with the downward shift in the expected policy path (figure 18). The increase was concentrated at shorter-maturities and was partly a response to rising prices of oil and other commodities. However. The downward revision in policy expectations since July likely has reflected incoming economic data pointing to a somewhat weaker trajectory for employment and a lower path for inflation than had been anticipated. The gradual tapering and the completion of the Federal Reserve’s largescale asset purchases of Treasury securities in October 2009 appeared to put little upward pressure on Treasury yields. Yields on Treasury inflationprotected securities (TIPS) declined somewhat in the second half of 2009 and into 2010.

000) less individual retirement account (IRA) and Keogh balances at depository institutions. 2010. credit union share draft accounts. By contrast. survey measures of longer-run inflation expectations have remained stable. The monetary base—essentially the sum of currency in circulation and the reserve balances of depository institutions held at the Federal Reserve— expanded rapidly for much of the second half of 2009. Lending to depository institutions as well as credit extended under special liquidity facilities and the temporary liquidity swaps with foreign central banks contracted sharply. Total Federal Reserve assets on February 17.3 trillion. Federal Reserve Banks. stood at about $2. and households and firms maintained some preference for safe and liquid assets.30 96th Annual Report. (6) small-denomination time deposits (time deposits issued in amounts of less than $100. 2009 declines in the interest rates offered on these products. (3) demand deposits at commercial banks (excluding those amounts held by depository institutions. M2 consists of (1) currency outside the U. For other types of securities. and it remained very large throughout 2009 and into 2010 (table 1). Outflows from small time deposits and retail money market mutual funds intensified during the second half of 2009. (4) other checkable deposits (negotiable order of withdrawal. up from about $525 billion in mid-July 2009.S. government. These special factors began to abate in the first half of 2009 and receded further in the second half of the year. Treasury. (2) traveler’s checks of nonbank issuers. with holdings of agency debt expanding from about $100 billion in July 2009 to $165 billion in February and holdings of Trea- ties.S. and (7) balances in retail money market mutual funds less IRA and Keogh balances at money market mutual funds. and the vaults of depository institutions. Holdings of agency MBS surpassed $1 trillion early this year. Monetary Aggregates and the Federal Reserve’s Balance Sheet After a brisk increase in the first half of the year. On net. and the resulting changes in nominal and inflation-adjusted yields may have accounted for part of the recent increase in inflation compensation. accounts and automatic transfer service accounts at depository institutions. (5) savings deposits (including money market deposit accounts). the increases were more modest. as interest rates on savings deposits were reduced more slowly than rates on other types of deposits. likely because of ongoing 17. or NOW. as the increase in reserve balances resulting from the large-scale asset purchases more than offset the decline caused by reduced usage of the Federal Reserve’s credit programs. The compositional shifts that had been under way in the first half of 2009 continued during the remainder of the year. and foreign banks and official institutions) less cash items in the process of collection and Federal Reserve float. The currency component of the money stock expanded modestly in the second half of the year. the monetary base increased more slowly toward the end of 2009 and in early 2010 as these purchases were tapered and as use of Federal Reserve liquidity facilities declined. the U. The nontraditional monetary policy actions taken by the Federal Reserve since the onset of the financial crisis expanded the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet considerably during 2008. the large-scale asset purchases conducted by the Federal Reserve boosted securities held outright.17 The rise in the latter part of the year was driven largely by increases in liquid deposits. the M2 monetary aggregate expanded slowly in the second half of 2009 and in early 2010. . and demand deposits at thrift institutions). However.

.156 15. .721 0 47. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .769 450. . . .000 52. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . Support of critical institutions Net portfolio holdings of Maiden Lane LLC.053 0 30. .418 4.587 1. . . . . . .708 . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . Inc. . .000 106. . . . . . Inc. . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . . .. . .250 2. . .S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .425 892. Inc.571 165. .182 65. . . .535 25.030 101. . . . . . .165 49. . . . . . . Maiden Lane LLC was formed to acquire certain assets of The Bear Stearns Companies. . . . . 17. . . . . . . . . .527 Note: LLC is a limited liability company. . . Inc. Credit extended to other market participants Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility . . . . . . . . . 73. . .701 526. . . . . . . . . . . .. Securities held outright U. . .822 31 Feb. . . . . . . . . .198. . . . . . . . . . . sury securities rising from nearly $700 billion to approximately $775 billion over the same period. . . . . . . . . .S. . . . . . .474 14. . . . .946 July 15.325 42. . The Federal Reserve retains ownership of securities lent through the Term Securities Lending Facility. . . . . . . . . . . .089 25. . . . . . . .123 259. . . . . . . . securities lending reinvestment portfolio of subsidiaries of American International Group. . . . Selected liabilities Federal Reserve notes in circulation . . . . . . . Net portfolio holdings of Commercial Paper Funding Facility LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agency debt securities . . . Reserve balances of depository institutions . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . Maiden Lane III LLC was formed to purchase multisector collateralized debt obligations on which the Financial Products group of AIG has written credit default swap contracts. . . . . . . .S. . Preferred interests in AIA Aurora LLC and ALICO Holdings LLC . . . . as the outstanding balance was reduced in exchange for preferred interests in AIA Aurora LLC and ALICO Holdings LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .600 2. . . . . . . . 2008 2. . .228. . . . Dec. . Total liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .426 0 0 0 7. . Maiden Lane II LLC was formed to purchase residential mortgage-backed securities from the U. . . . . . Loans related to the Maiden Lane facilities—which represent credit extended in conjunction with efforts to avoid disorderly failures of The Bear Stearns Companies. . Selected Components of the Federal Reserve Balance Sheet.152 34. . . . .106 776. . .Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 1. . . . . .921 19. . . On the liability . . . . . . . . . . Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and AIG— stayed roughly steady. 2009 2. . . . . . .121 60. . . 684.871 . .985 1. Agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS)2 . . .824 65. . . . .025. . . . . . . . . . . . .641 0 5. . . . . Selected assets Credit extended to depository institutions and dealers Primary credit . . . 2008–10 Millions of dollars Balance sheet item Total assets . . . . . Term auction credit . . . . . . . . . . . . .404 23. .546 42. . . . U. . . . . . . . .914 . . .743 273. . . . The revolving credit provided to American International Group. .541 0 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .702 5. . . . . . . . .952 93. (AIG). . . .. . . . . . . supplemental financing account . . . . . . Net portfolio holdings of LLCs funded through the Money Market Investor Funding Facility . . . . .. . . .469 111. Inc. . . . . . . . . . .074. 31. U. . . . .205. . . . . . Total capital .219 553. . . . . . . . . . . Treasury.280. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . declined near year-end. .. . . .939 49. . . . . . . . . . . . which are life insurance holding company subsidiaries of AIG. . .168 860. . . . . . Central bank liquidity swaps . . . . . . . .025. . . . . . . . . . . .102 0 . . 475. . . 2010 2.691 111. . Not applicable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (AIG). . . . . . . . . . . . .S. . . . . . . . . Primary Dealer Credit Facility and other broker-dealer credit . .. . . .925 38. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .728 37. . . . . . . Credit extended to American International Group. . . . Includes only MBS purchases that have already settled. . . . Treasury securities . . . . . . . .765 334. . . . . Treasury. . . . . The Federal Reserve has extended credit to several LLCs in conjunction with efforts to support critical institutions. . . . . Source: Federal Reserve Board. . . . . . . . . .327 808.240. . . . . . .234 199.794 853. . Memo Term Securities Lending Facility3 . . . . . . .348 870. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Maiden Lane III LLC1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . general account . . Maiden Lane II LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171.

and foreign import shares. as investors began to focus more on economic news and prospects for the relative strength of the economic recoveries in the United States and elsewhere (figure 19). Concerns about rising budget deficits in many countries and the associated borrowing needs also likely contributed to the increase in 19. As global prospects improved. Sovereign bond yields in the advanced economies rose over most of 2009 as investors moved out of safe investments in government securities and became more willing to purchase riskier securities. reserve balances increased from slightly more than $800 billion in July to about $1. dollar against the currencies of a large group of the most important U.2 trillion as of February 17. Dollar Nominal Exchange Rate. as rising com- 120 115 110 105 100 95 90 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 NOTE: The data. As a result. trading partners. The broad index is a weighted average of the foreign exchange values of the U.S. which had appreciated sharply in late 2008. For 2009 as a whole.32 96th Annual Report. Chinese authorities held the renminbi steady against the dollar throughout the year. 2010. The index weights. The last observation for the series is February 18.S. the dollar stabilized and has since appreciated somewhat. depreciated against most other currencies in the second and third quarters of 2009. securities they had made at the height of the crisis. Broad Index. export shares and from U. SOURCE: Federal Reserve Board. Most Latin American and many emerging Asian stock markets are now close to their levels at the start of the crisis. Stock markets in the emerging market economies rebounded even more impressively over the year. In the fourth quarter. the dollar.S. which change over time. 2009 modity prices supported economic recovery in those countries. International Developments International Financial Markets Global financial markets recovered considerably in 2009 as the effectiveness of central bank and government actions in stabilizing the financial system became more apparent and as signs of economic recovery began to take hold. investors shifted away from the safe-haven investments in U. while the Treasury’s supplementary financing account fell to $5 billion.S. The dollar depreciated particularly sharply against the currencies of major commodity-producing nations. are derived from U. such as Australia and Brazil. 2005–10 December 31. U. Statistical Release H. 2007 = 100 side of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet. 2010.S. although they remain below their levels at the start of the financial crisis in August 2007. are daily.S. the dollar depreciated roughly 41⁄2 percent on a tradeweighted basis against the major foreign currencies and 31⁄2 percent against the currencies of the other important trading partners of the United States.10. Stock markets in the advanced foreign economies registered gains of about 50 percent from their troughs in early March. “Foreign Exchange Rates. on net. which are in foreign currency units per dollar. the decline in the supplementary financing account occurred late in 2009 as part of the Treasury’s efforts to retain flexibility in debt management as federal debt approached the debt ceiling.” .

These spreads remained elevated in early 2010 and also increased in other euroarea countries with sizable budget deficits. Sovereign yields in most of the advanced economies. During the second half of 2009. Dollar funding pressures abroad have also substantially abated. net bank lending abroad resumed. assets.S. Banks located in the United States had sharply curtailed their lending abroad as the financial crisis intensified in the third and fourth quarters of 2008. As a result. private foreign investors had also purchased record amounts of U. and foreign firms are more easily able to obtain dollar funding through private markets such as those for foreign exchange swaps. and funding markets continued to function without disruption as these swap lines expired on February 1. however. Repayment of the drawings in the first half of 2009 generated sizable U. near their levels before the crisis. 33 The Financial Account The pattern of financial flows between the United States and the rest of the world in 2009 reflected the recovery under way in global markets. Countries conducting such intervention bought U. and easing of monetary policy by central banks have all worked to keep long-term nominal interest rates low. as they had during most of the crisis. interbank market conditions continued to normalize. and they renewed their net lending as functioning of interbank markets improved in the first half of 2009. One-month Libor-OIS spreads in euros and sterling are now less than 10 basis points. the announcement of a substantial upward revision to the budget deficit in Greece led to a sharp rise in spreads of Greece’s sovereign debt over comparable yields on Germany’s sovereign debt. The increased availability of funding in private markets also led to reduced demand from foreign central banks for drawings on the liquidity swap lines with the Federal Reserve. likely reflecting safehaven demands. but the recovery in portfolio flows was mixed. and net bank lending proceeded at a moderate pace.S. but net sales in the second and third quarters were modest compared with the amounts acquired in previous . Treasury securities. as contained inflation. Foreign official institutions continued purchasing U. As the financial crisis eased. drawings on the Federal Reserve’s temporary liquidity swap lines by foreign central banks declined in the second half of 2009 to only about $10 billion by the end of the year. official inflows that offset the large private banking outflows. Total private financial flows reversed from the large net inflows that had characterized the second half of 2008 to large net outflows in the first half of 2009. This reversal primarily reflected changes in net bank lending. remained significantly lower than prior to the financial crisis.S. Treasury securities. Foreign exchange intervention by several countries to counteract upward pressure on their currencies gave a boost to these purchases.S. primarily Treasury securities. as improvement in financial conditions became more apparent. Starting in April 2009. Late in the year.S. Treasury securities at a strong pace throughout 2009. 2010. dollars in foreign currency markets and acquired U. expectations of only slow economic recovery. private foreigners began to sell U. especially Portugal and Spain. Conditions in global money markets have continued to improve. with the proceeds.S.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 yields. During the height of the crisis.

performance has been mixed. Although government incentives helped motor vehicle purchases to bounce back from the slump in early 2009.S. and other major foreign economies returned to positive economic growth in the second half.S. with unemployment at high levels and wage gains subdued. but household finances remain stressed. Core consumer price inflation. but it has also taken some initial steps toward scaling back its enhanced credit support measures. The Bank of England continued its purchases of British treasury securities. the Bank of Japan announced a new ¥10 trillion three-month secured lending facility at an unscheduled meeting on December 1. higher energy prices in the second half of 2009 pushed inflation back into positive territory except in Japan. The European Central Bank (ECB) has held its main policy rate at 1 percent since May and has made significant amounts of long-term funding available at this rate. which excludes food and energy. Spurred by external demand and a reduction in the pace of inventory destocking. securities was mixed. Business confidence has shown considerable improvement. Foreign investment in U. investment in foreign securities bounced back quickly and remained strong throughout 2009. increasing its Asset Purchase Facility from £50 billion to £200 billion over the course of the year. However. Meanwhile. Foreign central banks cut policy rates aggressively during the first half of 2009 and left those rates at historically low levels through year-end.S. The recovery in foreign demand for riskier U. quarters. corporate and agency debt. nearly reaching a precrisis pace. other household spending has remained sluggish in most countries. has fluctuated less. In addition to their interest rate moves. 2009 Twelve-month consumer price inflation moved lower through the summer. However.25 percent until at least mid-2010. Emerging Market Economies Recovery from the global financial crisis has been more pronounced in the . Consumer confidence also has improved as financial markets have stabilized.S. Nevertheless. The robust recovery in emerging Asia helped the Japanese economy to turn up in the second quarter. The Bank of Canada has indicated that it expects to keep its target for the overnight rate at a record low 0. Advanced Foreign Economies Economic activity in the advanced foreign economies continued to fall sharply in early 2009 but began to recover later in the year as financial conditions improved and world trade rebounded. Amid concerns about persistent deflation.34 96th Annual Report. equities picked up briskly after the first quarter of 2009. and survey measures of manufacturing activity have risen as well. Housing prices have recovered somewhat in the United Kingdom and more in Canada but have continued to decline in Japan and in some euro-area countries. as it sees reduced need for special programs to provide liquidity. foreign central banks pursued unconventional monetary easing. U. with headline inflation turning negative in all the major advanced foreign countries except the United Kingdom. The ECB has continued its planned purchases of up to €60 billion in covered bonds. industrial production has risen in most countries but remains well below pre-crisis levels. foreign investors continued small net sales of U. allowing overnight interest rates to fall to around 0.35 percent.

Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 emerging market economies than in the advanced foreign economies. asset prices have rebounded sharply after falling steeply in the second half of 2008. which heightened concerns about the survival of the Latvian currency regime. By the end of 2009. Latvia faced difficulties meeting the fiscal conditions of its international assistance package. the rebound in activity has lagged that in Asia. but economic activity in many countries. and the exchange rate between the renminbi and the dollar has been unchanged since then. did not turn up until the third quarter of 2009. authorities acted to slow the increase in bank lending to a more sustainable pace after the level of outstanding loans rose in the first half of the year by nearly one-fourth of nominal GDP. economic and financial conditions in emerging Europe began to recover in the second half of the year.S. the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) maintained a target range for the federal funds rate of 0 to 1⁄4 percent throughout 2009 and into . which is more closely tied to U. In particular. rebounded sharply in the second quarter and remained robust in the second half of the year. With significant spare capacity as a result of the earlier steep contraction in activity in these economies. which helped support economic activity in the rest of Asia and in commodityexporting countries. combined with a surge in bank lending. In Latin America. emerging market economies continued to contract in the first quarter of 2009. supported in part by government stimulus and rising commodity prices. in some cases. inflation remained generally subdued through the first half of last year but moved up in the fourth quarter as adverse weather conditions led to a sharp rise in food prices. the People’s Bank of China (the central bank) increased the required reserve ratio for banks 1⁄2 percentage point in January 2010 and again in February. the level of real GDP in several emerging market economies had recovered to or was approaching pre-crisis peaks. With the economy booming and inflation picking up. Part 3 Monetary Policy: Recent Developments and Outlook Monetary Policy over the Second Half of 2009 and Early 2010 In order to provide monetary stimulus to support a sustainable economic expansion. led to a sharp rise in investment and consumption. production and was adversely affected by the outbreak of the H1N1 virus last spring. In the second half of 2009. the fiscal stimulus package enacted in November 2008. In Brazil. Strong domestic demand contributed to a rebound in imports. the recession was less severe than in Mexico. Chinese authorities halted the modest appreciation of their currency against the dollar in the middle of 2008. However. and economic growth has been fairly strong since the second quarter of last year. In China. but it then grew rapidly. further financial stresses. particularly in emerging Asia. Economic activity in Mexico. Russia and many countries in emerging Europe suffered severe output contractions in the first half of 2009 and. In China and elsewhere in Asia. In aggregate. 35 the country’s first significant monetary policy tightening moves since the financial crisis. which received strong boosts from monetary and fiscal stimulus. The upturn in economic activity was driven largely by domestic demand.

municipal. or agency MBS. 2010. the Federal Reserve began requiring money market mutual funds to have experienced redemptions exceeding a certain threshold before becoming eligible to borrow from the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility.18 Over the summer.36 96th Annual Report. with many banks reporting that they continued to tighten loan standards and terms. Although housing activity apparently was beginning to turn up. mortgage-backed. credit remained tight. meeting participants generally saw the economy as likely to recover only slowly during the second half of 2009 and as still vulnerable to adverse shocks. completing purchases of $300 billion in Treasury securities and making considerable progress toward completing its announced purchases of $1. the weak labor market continued to restrain household income. and subdued inflation. However.25 trillion of agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS) and about $175 billion of agency debt. and earlier declines in net worth were still holding back spending. with financial market conditions improving. However. The Federal Reserve also continued its program of large-scale asset purchases. the Federal Reserve announced that it was extending the authorizations of several of these programs from October 30. and asset-backed securities. In particular. However. The Federal Reserve also suspended auctions conducted under the Term Securities Lending Facility (TSLF) involving only Schedule 1 collateral and reduced the frequency of TSLF auctions involving Schedule 2 collateral. PCE prices moved up moderately in June. and the authorization for the Money Market Investor Funding Facility was not extended. Schedule 2 collateral includes all Schedule 1 collateral as well as investment-grade corporate. Excluding food and energy. in part. substantial resource slack. the Committee also agreed that neither expansion nor contraction of its program of asset purchases was warranted at the time. however. On June 25. 2009. Schedule 1 collateral refers to securities eligible for the open market operations arranged by the Federal Reserve’s Open Market Trading Desk—generally Treasury securities. 2009 during 2008 and early 2009. Given the prospects for an initially modest economic recovery. the terms of some of these facilities were tightened somewhat. and the cumulative improvement in market functioning since the spring was significant. With the downside risks to the economic outlook now considerably reduced but the economic recovery likely to be subdued. FOMC participants expected only a gradual upturn in economic activity and subdued inflation and thought it most likely that the federal funds rate would need to be maintained at an exceptionally low level for an extended period. the Federal Reserve continued to trim the amounts offered through the TAF. to February 1. Nonetheless. the Committee agreed at its August meeting that it should maintain its target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent. The Committee did. agency debt. the amounts to be offered under the Term Auction Facility (TAF) were reduced. the pickup in financial markets was seen as due. decide to gradually slow the pace early 2010. . to support from various government programs. The information reviewed at the August 11–12 FOMC meeting suggested that overall economic activity was stabilizing after having contracted 18. the Federal Reserve took steps to begin winding down many of its special credit and liquidity programs in 2009. Moreover. Developments in financial markets leading up to the meeting were broadly positive. Overall prices for personal consumption expenditures (PCE) rose in June after changing little in each of the previous three months.

boosted by a sharp upturn in energy prices. By the time of the September 22–23 FOMC meeting. while overall consumer price inflation increased in August. and participants expressed considerable uncertainty about the likely strength of the upturn once those supports were withdrawn or their effects waned. these conditions were expected to improve only gradually.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 of the remainder of its purchases of $300 billion of Treasury securities and extend their completion to the end of October to help promote a smooth transition in financial markets. Some of the recent gains in economic activity probably reflected support from government policies. Many regional and small banks were vulnerable to the deteriorating performance of commercial real estate loans. the Committee anticipated that inflation would remain subdued for some time. Core consumer price inflation remained subdued. To promote a smooth transition in markets as these programs concluded. In light of recent experience. meeting participants saw the cumulative improvement in market functioning and pricing since the spring as substantial. rose in July and August. the Committee decided to gradually slow the pace of both its agency MBS and agency debt . Accordingly. With respect to agency debt. Factory output. participants still viewed the economic recovery as likely to be quite restrained. Although the economic outlook had improved further and the risks to the forecast had become more balanced. Developments in financial markets were again regarded as broadly positive. the Committee agreed to maintain its target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and to reiterate its view that economic conditions were likely to warrant an exceptionally low level of the federal funds rate for an extended period. With substantial resource slack likely to persist and longer-term inflation expectations stable. the recovery in economic activity was likely to be protracted. and business contacts indicated 37 that their firms would also be cautious in hiring and investing even as demand for their products picked up. Although employment continued to contract in August. Despite these positive factors. Under these circumstances. with the programs for purchases of agency debt and MBS not due to expire until the end of the year. particularly motor vehicle production. the Committee indicated its intention to purchase the full $1. Policymakers noted that. Sales data for July indicated further increases in the demand for both new and existing single-family homes. they did not need to make decisions at the meeting about any potential modifications to those programs. With respect to the large-scale asset purchase programs.25 trillion of agency MBS that it had previously established as the maximum for this program. incoming data suggested that overall economic activity was beginning to pick up. the Committee agreed to reiterate its intention to purchase up to $200 billion of these securities. Credit from banks remained difficult to obtain and costly for many borrowers. Consumer spending on motor vehicles during that period was boosted by government rebates and greater dealer incentives. Household spending outside of motor vehicles appeared to rise in August after having been roughly flat from May through July. consumers were likely to be cautious in spending. the pace of job losses had slowed noticeably from earlier in the year. the Committee judged that the costs of the economic recovery turning out to be weaker than anticipated could be relatively high.

Further. including the possibility that such a policy stance could lead to excessive risk-taking in financial markets or an unanchoring of inflation expectations. Downside risks to economic activity included continued weakness in the labor market and its implications for the growth of household income and consumer confidence. auguring well for U. participants agreed that the incoming information suggested that economic activity was picking up as anticipated. the outlook for growth abroad had improved since earlier in the year. policymakers expected the recovery to continue in subsequent quarters. subdued inflation trends. The Committee agreed that it was important to remain alert to these risks. expired as scheduled on October 30. Based on this outlook. the Committee decided to maintain the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and noted that economic conditions. and stable inflation expectations. On September 24. were likely to warrant exceptionally low rates for an extended period.25 trillion of agency MBS by the end of the first quarter of 2010. policymakers agreed on the importance of the Federal Reserve continuing to communicate that it has the tools and willingness to begin withdrawing monetary policy accommodation at the appropriate time and pace to prevent any persistent increase in inflation. Business inventories were being brought into better alignment with sales.38 96th Annual Report. the Committee reiterated its intention to purchase $1. participants at the November meeting noted that they were unsure how much of the recent firming in final demand reflected the effects of temporary fiscal programs. consumer price inflation remained subdued. At the November 3–4 FOMC meeting. with output continuing to expand in the fourth quarter. FOMC participants noted the possibility that some negative side effects might result from the maintenance of very low short-term interest rates for an extended period. . Financial market developments over recent months were generally regarded as supportive of continued economic recovery. the Board of Governors announced a gradual reduction in amounts to be auctioned under the TAF through January and indicated that auctions of credit with maturities longer than 28 days would be phased out by the end of 2009. Meanwhile. With respect to the large-scale asset purchase programs. The gradual recovery in construction of single-family homes from its extremely low level earlier in the year appeared to be continuing. the Committee also agreed to specify that its agency debt purchases would cumulate to about $175 billion by the end of the purchases and to extend their completion through the end of the first quarter of 2010. Consumer spending appeared to be rising even apart from the effects of fiscal incentives to purchase autos. The Money Market Investor Funding Facility. Usage of the TAF had been declining in recent months as financial market conditions had continued to improve. 2009 exports. 2009. which had been established in October 2008 to help arrest a run on money market mutual funds. Because of the limited availability of agency debt and concerns that larger purchases could impair market functioning.S. including low levels of resource utilization. Nonetheless. and the pace of inventory runoff was slowing. To keep inflation expectations well anchored. although at a pace that would be rather slow relative to historical experience after severe downturns. especially in Asia. In spite of these largely positive developments. Bank credit remained tight.

Consumer spending was well maintained in the fourth quarter. subdued inflation trends. At the January 26–27 meeting. including low levels of resource utilization. accordingly. but core consumer price inflation remained subdued. The information reviewed at the December 15–16 FOMC meeting suggested that the recovery in economic activity was gaining momentum. and business expenditures on equipment and software appeared to expand substantially. the pace of job losses had slowed noticeably since the summer. On November 17. 2010. the improvement in the housing market slowed. The Committee also decided to reiterate its intention to gradually slow the pace of purchases of agency MBS and agency debt to promote a smooth transition in markets as the announced purchases are completed. However. based on the outlook for a relatively sluggish economic recovery. in January 2010 the maximum maturity of primary credit loans at the discount window for depository institutions would be reduced to 28 days from 90 days. while sales of existing homes continued to increase strongly. in light of continued improvement in financial market conditions. they agreed that the statement to be released following the meeting should note the anticipated expiration of most of the Federal Reserve’s special liquidity facilities on February 1. the Committee agreed that the incoming information. Indeed. The weakness in labor . policymakers generally saw the incoming information as broadly in line with their expectations for a moderate economic recovery and subdued inflation. though mixed. Sales of new homes had risen in October after two months of little change. indicated that overall economic activity had strengthened in recent months. were likely to warrant exceptionally low rates for an extended period. In the labor market.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 first quarter. Although some of the recent data had been better than anticipated. but the unemployment rate remained elevated and hiring stayed quite limited. about as expected. the Board of Governors announced that. Recent data suggested that the pace of inventory liquidation diminished considerably last quarter. FOMC 39 participants broadly anticipated that the pickup in output and employment would be rather slow relative to past recoveries from deep recessions. and stable inflation expectations. and industrial production had sustained the broad-based expansion that began in the third quarter. Financial market conditions were generally regarded as having become more supportive of continued economic recovery during the intermeeting period. layoffs subsided noticeably in the final months of last year. providing a sizable boost to economic activity. Consistent with experience following previous financial crises here and abroad. The Committee made no changes to either its large-scale asset purchase programs or its target range for the federal funds rate of 0 to 1⁄4 percent and. $25 billion less than the previously announced maximum for these purchases. Consumer spending expanded solidly in October. Committee members and Board members agreed that substantial improvements in the functioning of financial markets had occurred. and spending on nonresidential structures continued to fall. decided to reiterate its anticipation that economic conditions. Although the unemployment rate remained very elevated and capacity utilization low. A jump in energy prices pushed up headline inflation somewhat. industrial production advanced at a solid rate in the fourth quarter.

the Summary of Economic Projections.gov/ monetarypolicy/bst. the Federal Reserve further advanced transparency by initiating a quarterly Summary of Economic Projections of Federal Reserve Board members and Reserve Bank presidents.federalreserve.htm.www. “Federal Open Market Committee.” webpage. “Factors Affecting ReserveBalances.1 During the financial crisis.40 96th Annual Report. starting in December 2008 the Federal Reserve has issued 1. The Board’s weekly H. www. the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) releases statements that provide a rationale for the policy decision. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.gov/monetarypolicy/ fomc. www. and generally aims to maximize the amount of information it can provide to the public consistent with its broad policy objectives. Following each of its meetings. FOMC statements and minutes. The Federal Reserve has significantly enhanced its transparency in a number of important dimensions over recent years.” webpage. The Federal Reserve also developed a public website focused on its credit and liquidity programs that provides background information on all the facilities. Statistical Release H. the Federal Reserve implemented a number of credit and liquidity programs to support the functioning of key financial markets and institutions and took complementary steps to ensure appropriate transparency and accountability in operating these programs. along with a record of the Committee’s vote and explanations for any dissents.4.1 statistical release has been greatly expanded to provide detailed information on the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet and the operation of the various credit and liquidity facilities. These projections and the accompanying summary analysis contain detailed information regarding policymakers’ views about the future path of real gross domestic product. 2009 Federal Reserve Initiatives to Increase Transparency Transparency is a key tenet of modern central banking both because it contributes importantly to the accountability of central banks to the government and the public and because it can enhance the effectiveness of central banks in achieving their macroeconomic objectives. In addition.1. the Federal Reserve has long been one of the most transparent central banks in the world.gov/ releases/h41. 2. inflation. . In recognition of the importance of transparency. and unemployment.3 In addition. See Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. On matters related to the conduct of monetary policy. “Credit and Liquidity Programs and the Balance Sheet. 3.htm. Recently.2 The release is closely watched in financial markets and by the public for nearly real-time information on the evolution of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet.”webpage. including the long-run values of these variables assuming appropriate monetary policy. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.4. detailed minutes of each FOMC meeting are made public three weeks following the meeting. and other related information are available on the Federal Reserve Board’s website.federalreserve. the Federal Reserve has provided detailed information on the nontraditional policy actions taken to address the financial crisis.federalreserve. The minutes provide a great deal of information about the range of policymakers’ views on the economic situation and outlook as well as on their deliberations about the appropriate stance of monetary policy.

The Federal Reserve has also been transparent about the management of its programs.6 Moreover.S. 6. “Vendor Information. January 19.” webpage. The CUSIP system—owned by the American Bankers Association and operated by Standard & Poor’s—facilitates the clearing and settlement process of securities. the Federal Reserve recently indicated that it would welcome a full review by the Government Accountability Office of all aspects of the Federal Reserve’s involvement with the extension of credit to AIG.S. “System Open Market Account Holdings.newyorkfed.pdf. www. which is available on the Federal Reserve’s website. To provide further transparency regarding its transactions with AIG.” press release. Ben S. Inc. including the Federal Reserve’s assessment of the expected cost to the Federal Reserve and the U. including stocks of all registered U. Various programs employ private-sector firms as purchasing and settlement agents and to perform other functions. 7.S. Federal Reserve System Monthly Report on Credit and Liquidity Programs and the Balance Sheet (Washington: Board of Governors). and of American International Group. taxpayer of various Federal Reserve programs implemented during the crisis. www.7 On January 11. Inc. Furthermore. government and municipal bonds.org/ aboutthefed/vendor_information. This report includes data on the number and types of borrowers using various facilities and on the types and value of collateral pledged.gov/ monetarypolicy/files/letter_aig_20100119. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York published a revised policy governing the designation of primary dealers. Federal Reserve Bank of New York (2010).org/markets/soma/sysopen_accholdings.. agency. 5.” webpage. Federal Reserve Bank of New York. (AIG)—and in other special lending facilities. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. these data provide the public with precise information about the maturity and asset composition of the Federal Reserve’s securities holdings. and agency mortgage-backed securities.html.8 An important motivation in issuing revised guidance in this area was to make the process for becoming a primary dealer more transparent. html. www. in October 2009. CUSIP is the abbreviation for Committee on Uniform Securities Identification Procedures.federalreserve. “New York Fed Publishes Revised Policy for Administration of Primary Dealer Relationships. . provides more-detailed information on the full range of credit and liquidity programs implemented during the crisis. and Canadian companies and U.org/ newsevents/news/markets/2010/ma100111. Bernanke (2010). and quarterly financial statements for the Federal Reserve System.html. 2010. information on the assets held in the so-called Maiden Lane facilities—created to acquire certain assets of The Bear Stearns Companies. the contracts for all of these vendor arrangements are available on the website of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. A CUSIP number identifies most securities. Dodaro.newyorkfed. January 11. newyorkfed. letter to Gene L. www.4 The monthly report. the Federal Reserve began incorporating these reports into its monthly report on credit and liquidity programs and the balance sheet. Federal Reserve Bank of New York.5 4. the Federal Reserve has recently begun to publish detailed CUSIP-number-level data regarding its holdings of Treasury.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 41 Federal Reserve Initiatives—continued bi-monthly reports to the Congress in fulfillment of section 129 of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. 8. the monthly reports provide detailed information on all of the programs that rely on emergency lending authorities.

On the same day. moreover. the Committee agreed that neither the economic outlook nor financial conditions had changed appreciably since the December meeting and that no changes to the Committee’s large-scale asset purchase programs or to its target range for the federal funds rate of 0 to 1⁄4 percent were warranted at this meeting. On February 18. were likely to warrant exceptionally low rates for an extended period. including low levels of resource utilization. given the overall improvement in funding markets. In addition. including interbank markets. 2010. and stable inflation expectations. Over the course of 2009. the Federal Reserve allowed the Primary Dealer Credit Facility. the Term Securities Lending Facility.25 trillion of agency MBS and about $175 billion of agency debt by the end of the current quarter and to gradually slow the pace of these purchases to promote a smooth transition in markets. the Federal Reserve continued to undertake initiatives to improve communications about its policy actions. 2010. the prospects for job growth remained a significant source of uncertainty in the economic outlook. 1⁄4 percentage point higher than in previous auctions. the Federal Reserve also announced that the minimum bid rate on the final TAF auction on March 8 had been raised to 50 basis points. net debt financing by nonfinancial businesses was near zero in the fourth quarter after declining in the third. effective on February 19. 2010.” markets continued to be an important concern for the Committee. the Commercial Paper Funding Facility. The Committee affirmed its intention to purchase a total of $1. The temporary swap lines with foreign central banks were closed on the same day. effective on March 18. The Federal Reserve noted that the modifications are not expected to lead to tighter financial conditions for households and businesses and do not signal any change in the outlook for the economy or for monetary policy. policymakers reiterated their anticipation that economic conditions. However. In their discussion of monetary policy for the period ahead.42 96th Annual Report. On February 1. Further. 2009 liquidity facilities and that the temporary swap lines with foreign central banks would expire. the Federal Reserve was closing several special . Committee members and Board members agreed that with substantial improvements in most financial markets. 2010. the statement would say that the Federal Reserve was in the process of winding down the TAF and that the final auction would take place in March 2010. and the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility to expire. Increases in energy prices pushed up headline consumer price inflation even as core consumer price inflation remained subdued. consistent with sluggish demand for credit and tight credit standards and terms at banks. particularly in the outlook for consumer spending. subdued inflation trends. These initiatives are described in detail in the box “Federal Reserve Initiatives to Increase Transparency. and the typical maximum maturity for such loans was shortened to overnight. the statement would indicate that on February 1. the Federal Reserve announced a further normalization of the terms of loans made under the primary credit facility: The rate charged on these loans was increased from 1⁄2 percent to 3⁄4 percent. Financial market conditions were supportive of economic growth.

Actual and prospective increases in short-term interest rates will be reflected. in turn. economic conditions are likely to warrant exceptionally low rates for an extended period. thus preventing inflationary pressures from developing. the Federal Reserve sells a security to a counterparty with an agreement to repurchase it at some specified date in the future. The Federal Reserve has a number of tools that will enable it to firm the stance of policy at the appropriate time and to the appropriate degree. as noted in recent statements of the FOMC. the Federal Reserve is also in the process of expanding the set of counterparties with which it can transact and is developing the infrastructure necessary to use its MBS holdings as collateral in these transactions. That tightening will be accomplished partly through changes that will affect the composition and size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet. By increasing the interest rate paid on reserves. Even though. in due course. The capability to carry out these transactions with primary dealers. in October 2008 the Congress gave the Federal Reserve statutory authority to pay interest on banks’ holdings of reserve balances at Federal Reserve Banks. The Federal Reserve has also been developing a number of additional tools that will reduce the quantity of reserves held by the banking system and lead to a tighter relationship between the interest rate that the Federal Reserve pays on banks’ holdings of reserve balances and other shortterm interest rates. as the expansion matures. because banks will not supply short-term funds to the money markets at rates significantly below what they can earn by simply leaving funds on deposit at the Federal Reserve Banks. the Federal Reserve will need to begin to tighten monetary conditions to prevent the development of inflation pressures. the Federal Reserve has enhanced its ability to use reverse repos to absorb very large quantities of reserves. Recently. Most importantly.3 trillion currently. from less than $900 billion before the crisis began in 2007 to about $2. To further increase its capacity to drain reserves through reverse repos. the level of reserves and the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet will be reduced substantially. has already been tested and is currently available if and when needed. . by developing the capacity to conduct such transactions in the triparty repo market. in longerterm interest rates and in financial conditions more generally through standard transmission mechanisms. the Federal Reserve will be able to put significant upward pressure on all shortterm interest rates.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 43 Monetary Policy as the Economy Recovers The actions taken by the Federal Reserve to support financial market functioning and provide extraordinary monetary stimulus to the economy have led to a rapid expansion of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet. The counterparty’s payment to the Federal Reserve has the effect of draining an equal quantity of reserves from the banking system. some of which do not affect the size of the balance sheet or the quantity of reserves. The expansion of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet has been accompanied by a comparable increase in the quantity of reserve balances held by depository institutions. in a reverse repo. Eventually. using the Federal Reserve’s holdings of Treasury and agency debt securities. Reverse repurchase agreements (reverse repos) are one such tool. Bank reserves are currently far above their levels prior to the crisis.

2009 also be used to drain reserves and support the Federal Reserve’s control of short-term interest rates. those operations could be scaled up to drain more-significant volumes of reserve balances to provide tighter control over short-term interest rates. After a revised proposal is approved by the Board. The Federal Reserve currently does not anticipate that it will sell any of its securities holding in the near term. the use of the SFP must be compatible with the Treasury’s debt-management objectives.44 96th Annual Report. If economic and financial developments were to require a more rapid exit from the current highly accommodative policy. which are roughly analogous to certificates of deposit that the institutions offer to their customers. however. It would likely also put at least some direct upward pressure on longer-term yields. The exact sequence of steps and combination of tools that the Federal Reserve chooses to employ as it exits from its current very accommodative policy stance will depend on economic and financial developments. which could be helpful in the Federal Reserve’s conduct of policy. the Federal Reserve could increase the interest rate on reserves at about the same time it commences draining operations. any amount outstanding under the SFP will result in a corresponding decrease in the quantity of reserves in the banking system. The Federal Reserve would likely offer large blocks of such deposits through an auction mechanism. at least until after policy tightening has gotten under way and the economy is As a second means of draining reserves. the Federal Reserve expects to be able to conduct test transactions in the spring and to have the facility available if necessary shortly thereafter. Reverse repos and the deposit facility would together allow the Federal Reserve to drain hundreds of billions of dollars of reserves from the banking system quite quickly should it choose to do so. still. The actual firming of policy would then be implemented through an increase in the interest rate paid on reserves. The Treasury’s temporary Supplementary Financing Program (SFP)— through which the Treasury issues Treasury bills to the public and places the proceeds in a special deposit account at the Federal Reserve—could . One possible trajectory would be for the Federal Reserve to continue to test its tools for draining reserves on a limited basis in order to further ensure preparedness and to give market participants a period of time to become familiar with their operation. A reduction in securities holdings would have the effect of further reducing the quantity of reserves in the banking system as well as reducing the overall size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet. The Federal Reserve also has the option of redeeming or selling securities as a means of applying monetary restraint. The Federal Reserve published in the Federal Register a proposal for such a term deposit facility and is in the process of reviewing the public comments received. As the time for the removal of policy accommodation draws near. The effect of these transactions would be to convert a portion of depository institutions’ holdings of reserve balances into deposits that could not be used to meet depository institutions’ very short-term liquidity needs and could not be counted as reserves. the Federal Reserve is also developing plans to offer to depository institutions term deposits. However. The SFP is not a necessary element in the Federal Reserve’s set of tools to achieve an appropriate monetary policy stance in the future.

In conjunction with the January 26–27. In particular. and inflation for the years 2010 to 2012 and over the longer run. as a guide to its policy stance. No decision has been made on this issue. and any deliberation will be guided in part by the evolution of the federal funds market as policy accommodation is withdrawn. In the long run. to help reduce the size of its balance sheet and the quantity of reserves. submitted projections for output growth. The projections were based on information available through the end of the meeting and on each participant’s assumptions about factors likely to affect economic outcomes. the Federal Reserve is allowing agency debt and MBS to run off as they mature or are prepaid. including his or her assessment of appropriate monetary policy. unemployment. the Federal Reserve is considering the utility. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge . FOMC meeting. Federal Open material appeared as an the minutes of the Jan2010. but in the future it might decide not to do so in all cases. all of whom participate in deliberations of the FOMC. Although passively redeeming agency debt and MBS as they mature or are prepaid will move the Federal Reserve in that direction. 2010. while simulta- 45 neously monitoring a range of market rates. The Federal Reserve anticipates that it will eventually return to an operating framework with much lower reserve balances than at present and with the federal funds rate as the operating target for policy. Any such sales would be gradual. As a result of the very large volume of reserves in the banking system. it is possible that the Federal Reserve could for a time use the interest rate paid on reserves. of communicating the stance of policy in terms of another operating target.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 clearly in a sustainable recovery. during the transition to a more normal policy configuration. the level of activity and liquidity in the federal funds market has declined considerably. raising the possibility that the federal funds rate could for a time become a less reliable indicator than usual of conditions in short-term money markets. would be clearly communicated to market participants. meeting of the Market Committee. the Federal Reserve anticipates that its balance sheet will shrink toward more historically normal levels and that most or all of its securities holdings will be Treasury securities. in combination with targets for reserve quantities. Accordingly. the members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks. such as an alternative short-term interest rate. However. The Federal Reserve is rolling over all maturing Treasury securities. the Federal Reserve may also choose to sell securities in the future when the economic recovery is sufficiently advanced and the FOMC has determined that the associated financial tightening is warranted. and would entail appropriate consideration of economic conditions. Part 4 Summary of Economic Projections The following addendum to uary 26–27. “Appropriate monetary policy” is defined as the future path of policy that the participant deems most likely to foster outcomes for economic activity and inflation that best satisfy his or her interpretation of the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives of maximum employment and stable prices.

6 6. 2. Beyond 2010.4 1.0 to to to to to to to to 4. PCE inflation and core PCE inflation are the percentage rates of change in. .5 8.7 1.1 1.5 to to to to to to to to 4.7 2. the economic recovery from the recent recession was expected to be gradual.5 7.3 to 4. Participants generally expected that it would take some time for the economy to converge fully to its longer-run path—characterized by a sustainable rate of output growth and by rates of employment and inflation consistent with their interpretation of the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives— with a sizable minority of the view that the convergence process could take more than five to six years.2 1. Each participant’s projections are based on his or her assessment of appropriate monetary policy. Most participants also anticipated that inflation would remain subdued over this period.0 5.5 3.5 6.8 0. January 2010 Percent Central tendency1 Variable 2010 Change in real GDP .0 to to to to to to to to 3.0 7.0 2.5 7.9 1.0 2.3 2. . Economic Projections of Federal Reserve Governors and Reserve Bank Presidents.0 2. 2009 and inflation were little changed.8 1. Participants continued to judge the uncertainty surrounding their projections for economic over time under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks. and slow easing of credit conditions in the banking sector.8 7.6 0.4 2.0 3.3 2.6 2. .5 5.1 6. . November projection Unemployment rate .2 1.2 7.9 to 2. the price index for personal consumption expenditures (PCE) and the price index for PCE excluding food and energy.0 2. a few participants made modest upward revisions to their projections for real GDP growth in 2010.0 2.6 2.2 8.4 2. . and most also saw roughly balanced risks surrounding their inflation projections.6 to 10. The November projections were made in conjunction with the meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee on November 3–4.2 0.3 1. which were made in conjunction with the November 2009 FOMC meeting.2 1. however. Longer-run projections for core PCE inflation are not collected.5 2011 3. for that variable in that year. nearly all participants judged the risks to their growth outlook as generally balanced. .7 Longer run 2.0 1.0 6.5 to to to to to to 3.7 9.5 2. As indicated in table 1. 3. .1 1. FOMC participants’ forecasts for economic activity and inflation were broadly similar to their previous projections.8 0. The central tendency excludes the three highest and three lowest projections for each variable in each year. from lowest to highest.0 1. 1. November projection 2. The range for a variable in a given year consists of all participants’ projections.5 9.0 to to to to to to to to 4. .7 1.1 0.6 2012 3. Projections for the unemployment rate are for the average civilian unemployment rate in the fourth quarter of the year indicated.5 9.7 2.9 1.6 1.8 6.0 1.6 8.0 0.8 2. with real gross domestic product (GDP) expanding at a rate that was only moderately above participants’ assessment of its longer-run sustainable growth rate and the unemployment rate declining slowly over the next few years.5 4.1 to 2.2 1.0 to 2.4 3.0 2.0 5.6 7.4 2.2 to to to to to to to to 5.5 9.5 1.0 5.0 1.7 1. As depicted in figure 1.0 5. As in November.46 96th Annual Report.8 8.2 8. . .2 to 2. .3 1.0 Note: Projections of change in real gross domestic product (GDP) and in inflation are from the fourth quarter of the previous year to the fourth quarter of the year indicated. the contours of participants’ projections for economic activity Table 1.0 1.8 1. November projection PCE inflation .9 0.3 Longer run 2. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks to the economy.0 to 4. respectively.0 0.3 6. only gradual improvement in labor market conditions.7 to to to to to to 2010 2011 2.6 to 10.0 2.7 4. November projection Core PCE inflation3 .2 8.3 1.2 2.4 2. with participants continuing to expect that the pace of the economic recovery will be restrained by household and business uncertainty.9 4. 2009.5 4.0 1.4 Range2 2012 3.5 8.5 3.9 1.0 1.5 2.4 4.4 8.8 2.7 1.9 1.8 2. .0 1.

Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 47 .

distress in commercial real estate markets was expected to pose risks to the balance sheets of banking institutions for some time. including accommodative monetary policy. As in November.5 to 2. improved foreign economic conditions were viewed as supporting robust growth in U. The Outlook Participants’ projections for real GDP growth in 2010 had a central tendency of 2. Responding to an improved sales outlook and readier access to bank credit. exports.5 percent. However. the projections for growth in both years had a central tendency of about 31⁄2 to 41⁄2 . Consistent with their outlook for moderate output growth. Several participants also noted that fiscal policy was currently providing substantial support to real activity. only a little below the levels of about 10 percent that prevailed late last year. Their projections for the average unemployment rate in the fourth quarter of 2010 had a central tendency of 9. and a pickup in global economic growth. Recent readings on consumer spending. Participants anticipated that labor market conditions would improve only slowly over the next several years. Moreover.48 96th Annual Report. In addition. Businesses had apparently made progress in bringing their inventory stocks into closer alignment with sales and hence would be likely to raise production as spending gained further momentum. participants generally anticipated that real GDP growth would converge over time to an annual rate of 2. participants also indicated that elevated uncertainty on the part of households and businesses and the very slow recovery of labor markets would likely restrain the pace of expansion.8 percent. a somewhat narrower interval than in November. especially in emerging market economies. and business outlays on equipment and software were seen as broadly consistent with the view that economic recovery was under way.7 percent. participants generally expected that the unemployment rate would decline only about 21⁄2 percentage points by the end activity and inflation as unusually high relative to historical norms. participants’ projections were for real GDP growth to pick up in 2011 and 2012. thereby contributing to only gradual easing of credit conditions for many households and smaller firms. Many participants indicated that the expansion was likely to be restrained not only by firms’ caution in hiring and spending in light of the considerable uncertainty regarding the economic outlook and general business conditions. although conditions in the banking system appeared to have stabilized. ongoing improvements in the conditions of financial markets and institutions. 2009 percent. In the absence of further shocks. businesses were likely to increase production to rebuild their inventory stocks and increase their outlays on equipment and software. but also by limited access to credit by small businesses and consumers dependent on bankintermediated finance.5 to 9. Participants pointed to a number of factors that would support the continued expansion of economic activity. Looking further ahead. but said that they expected less impetus to GDP growth from this factor later in the year.S. participants generally expected that the continued repair of household balance sheets and gradual improvements in credit availability would bolster consumer spending. the longer-run pace that appeared to be sustainable in view of expected demographic trends and improvements in labor productivity. industrial production.8 to 3. albeit at a moderate pace.

1 to 2. Most expected that substantial resource slack would continue to restrain cost pressures.0 to 5. Nearly all participants judged the risks to the inflation outlook as roughly balanced. however. and total consumer price inflation over the period from 1989 to 2008. and 1.0 percent. although a few indicated that the risks to the unemployment outlook remained tilted to the upside. many participants highlighted the difficulties inherent in predicting macroeconomic outcomes in the wake of a financial crisis and a severe recession. but that inflation would rise gradually toward their individual assessments of the measured rate of inflation judged to be most consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate. the unemployment rate.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 of 2012 and would still be well above its longer-run sustainable rate.7 percent for 2010.4 to 1. the central tendency of projections of the longerrun inflation rate was 1. In addition. At the end of this summary. while the remainder expected that inflation would be at or slightly above its longer-run value by that time. Many participants anticipated that global economic growth would spur increases in energy prices. The central tendency of their projections for personal consumption expenditures (PCE) inflation was 1. some pointed to uncertainties regarding the extent to which the recent run-up in labor productivity would prove to be persistent. As in November.19 Participants generally saw the risks to these projections as roughly balanced. the same as in November.7 to 2. Nonetheless. owing partly to substantial ongoing structural adjustments in product and labor markets. Uncertainty and Risks Nearly all participants shared the judgment that their projections of future . and hence that headline PCE inflation would run slightly above core PCE inflation over the next year or two. participants’ longer-run unemployment projections had a central tendency of 5. the box “Forecast Uncertainty” discusses the sources and interpretation of uncertainty in economic forecasts and explains the approach used to assess the uncertainty and risk attending participants’ projections. As in November.0 percent for 2012. However.0 percent for 2011. while others noted the risk that the deteriorating performance of commercial real estate could adversely affect the still-fragile state of the banking system and restrain the growth of output and employment over coming quarters. A majority of participants anticipated that inflation in 2012 would still be below their assessments of the mandate-consistent inflation rate.2 percent. Some participants also noted that considerable uncertainty surrounded their estimates of the productive potential of the economy and the sustainable rate of employment.3 to 2. 1. a few judged that uncertainty in the outlook for inflation was about in line with typical levels. Most participants anticipated that inflation would remain subdued over the next several years. Some participants noted that inflation expectations could drift downward in response to persistently low inflation 19. most participants continued to see the uncertainty surrounding their inflation projections as higher than historical norms. and one viewed the uncertainty surrounding the inflation outlook as lower than average. two saw these risks as tilted to the upside. As in November. Table 2 provides estimates of forecast uncertainty for the change in real GDP. while one regarded the risks as weighted to the downside. 49 economic activity and unemployment continued to be subject to greater-thanaverage uncertainty.

The dispersion in participants’ projections over the next few years was mainly due to differences in their judgments regarding the determinants of inflation. however. Regarding participants’ unemployment rate projections. Measure is the overall consumer price index. Participants also noted that an acceleration in global economic activity could induce a surge in the prices of energy and other commodities that would place upward pressure on overall inflation. As described in the box “Forecast Uncertainty. and continued slack in resource utilization. In contrast. .50 96th Annual Report. unemployment. including their estimates of prevailing resource slack and their assessments of the extent to which such slack affects actual and expected inflation. the price measure that has been most widely used in government and private economic forecasts. fourth quarter of the previous year to the fourth quarter of the year indicated. 1 2010 ±1. Figures 2. For definitions. 2012. For overall and core PCE inflation. The distributions of overall and core inflation for 2011 and 2012. .0 2012 ±1. Unemployment rate1 . Average Historical Projection Error Ranges Percentage points Variable Change in real GDP . Total consumer prices2 . there is about a 70 percent probability that actual outcomes for real GDP. . The distributions of participants’ estimates of the longer-run sustainable rates of output growth and unemployment were essentially the same as in November. .A and 2. November).3 ±0. . and consumer prices will be in ranges implied by the average size of projection errors made in the past.0 ±1.C and 2.” under certain assumptions.6 ±0. refer to general note in table 1. . . but the distributions of . Others pointed to the possibility of an upward shift in expected and actual inflation.6 ±1. the distribution for 2010 narrowed slightly.8 ±1. . the diversity of their assessments regarding the current degree of underlying momentum in economic activity. and the likely pace of easing of bank lending standards and terms. among other factors. .” Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-60 (Washington: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. the distributions of participants’ projections for 2010 were nearly the same as in November. 2011. Projection is percent change. especially if extraordinarily accommodative monetary policy measures were not unwound in a timely fashion. the evolution of consumer and business sentiment. The dispersion in participants’ output growth projections reflected. 2. . .9 2011 ±1.B provide further details on the diversity of participants’ views regarding the likely outcomes for real GDP growth and the unemployment rate in 2010. “Gauging the Uncertainty of the Economic Outlook from Historical Forecasting Errors. Table 2.5 ±0. the relatively tight distribution of participants’ projections for longer-run inflation illustrates their substantial agreement about the measured rate of inflation that is most consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives of maximum employment and stable prices. Diversity of Views Figures 2. . but the distributions of their unemployment rate projections for 2011 and 2012 did not change appreciably. were noticeably more tightly concentrated than in November. . 2009 the projections for real GDP growth in 2011 and in 2012 were little changed. The distribution of participants’ projections for real GDP growth this year was slightly narrower than the distribution of their projections last November.D provide corresponding information about the diversity of participants’ views regarding the inflation outlook. reflecting the absence of forecasts of especially low inflation.0 Note: Error ranges shown are measured as plus or minus the root mean squared error of projections for 1989 through 2008 that were released in the winter by various private and government forecasters. 1. and over the longer run. . . Further information is in David Reifschneider and Peter Tulip (2007).

Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 51 .

2009 .52 96th Annual Report.

Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 53 .

2009 .54 96th Annual Report.

4 to 4. Thus. Participants also provide judgments as to whether the risks to their projections are weighted to the upside.9 percent in the current year and 1. And the future path of the economy can be affected by myriad unforeseen developments and events.5 to 4.7 to 4. in setting the stance of monetary policy. Considerable uncertainty attends these projections.1 to 2. The economic and statistical models and relationships used to help produce economic forecasts are necessarily imperfect descriptions of the real world. on average. or broadly similar to typical levels of forecast uncertainty in the past as shown in table 2. The projection error ranges shown in the table illustrate the considerable uncertainty associated with economic forecasts. smaller than. however. Because current conditions may differ from those that prevailed. The corresponding 70 percent confidence intervals for overall inflation would be 1. are weighted to the downside. or are broadly balanced.5 percent in the second year. These judgments about the uncertainty and the risks attending each participant’s projections are distinct from the diversity of participants’ views about the most likely outcomes. If the uncertainty attending those projections is similar to that experienced in the past and the risks around the projections are broadly balanced. and the potential costs to the economy should they occur. That is. the numbers reported in table 2 would imply a probability of about 70 percent that actual GDP would expand within a range of 1. 3 percent and 2 percent. including those reported in past Monetary Policy Reports and those prepared by Federal Reserve Board staff in advance of meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee. suppose a participant projects that real gross domestic product (GDP) and total consumer prices will rise steadily at annual rates of. For example.Monetary Policy Report of February 2010 55 Forecast Uncertainty The economic projections provided by the members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks inform discussions of monetary policy among policymakers and can aid public understanding of the basis for policy actions. 1. over history.3 percent in the current year. . and 1.0 to 3.0 percent in the second and third years. respectively. the likelihood of their occurring. Forecast uncertainty is concerned with the risks associated with a particular projection rather than with divergences across a number of different projections. but also the range of alternative possibilities. Table 2 summarizes the average historical accuracy of a range of forecasts. participants judge whether each variable is more likely to be above or below their projections of the most likely outcome. participants provide judgments as to whether the uncertainty attached to their projections of each variable is greater than. participants consider not only what appears to be the most likely economic outcome as embodied in their projections.6 percent in the third year.

also. Inc.56 96th Annual Report. 2009 GSE Libor LLC MBS NFIB NIPA OIS PCE repo SCAP SFP government-sponsored enterprise London interbank offered rate limited liability company mortgage-backed securities National Federation of Independent Business national income and product accounts overnight index swap personal consumption expenditures repurchase agreement Supervisory Capital Assessment Program Supplementary Financing Program Abbreviations ABS AIG ARRA CDS C&I CMBS CRE Credit CARD Act CUSIP ECB E&S FAS FDIC FHA FOMC GDP asset-backed securities American International Group. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act credit default swap commercial and industrial commercial mortgage-backed securities commercial real estate Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act Committee on Uniform Securities Identification Procedures European Central Bank equipment and software Financial Accounting Standards Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Federal Housing Administration Federal Open Market Committee. the Committee gross domestic product SLOOS Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices TAF TALF TARP TIPS Term Auction Facility Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility Troubled Asset Relief Program Treasury inflation-protected securities Á .

credit conditions for many households and businesses remain tight. domestic demand triggered an even sharper drop in imports. the downturn in economic activity appears to be abating and financial conditions have eased somewhat. however. in recent months. Private-sector payroll employment fell at an average monthly rate of 670. and strains in financial markets and pressures on financial institutions generally intensified.S.gov/boarddocs/hh). Consumer spending—which has been supported recently by the boost to disposable income from the tax cuts and increases in various benefit payments that were implemented as part of the 2009 fiscal stimulus package—appears to be holding reasonably steady so far this year. have continued to cut capital spending and liquidate inventories in response to soft demand and excessive stocks. U. the ongoing contraction in U. Part 4 of that report is identical to the addendum to the minutes of the June 23−24. Nonetheless. real gross domestic product (GDP) fell sharply again in the first quarter of 2009. The further contraction in domestic economic activity during the first half of 2009 was accompanied by a significant deterioration in labor market conditions. and financial markets are still stressed. developments that partly reflect the broad range of policy actions that have been taken to address the crisis.000 jobs in the first four months of this year before declining by 312. 2009.57 Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 Part 1 Overview: Monetary Policy and the Economic Outlook Amid a severe global economic downturn.000 jobs in June. In the housing market. In the labor market. With the sharp reductions in em- . Meanwhile. the U. employment declines have remained sizable—although the pace of job loss has diminished somewhat from earlier in the year—and the unemployment rate has continued to climb. the unemployment rate moved up steadily from 71⁄4 percent at the turn of the year to 91⁄2 percent in June. economy contracted further and labor market conditions worsened over the first half of 2009. And consumer sentiment is up from the historical lows recorded around the turn of the year. in overall output looks to have moderated somewhat of late. consumer price inflation has remained subdued. exports during the first half of the year. albeit more slowly. economic activity deteriorated sharply. however. Economic activity abroad plummeted in the first quarter and has continued to fall. More recently.federalreserve.000 jobs in May and 415. a leveling out of home sales and construction activity in the first half of 2009 suggests that the demand for new houses may be stabilizing following three years of steep declines. 2009 (the figures from that report are available on the Board’s website. but the contraction Note: The discussion in this chapter consists of the text and tables from parts 1−3 of the Monetary Policy Report submitted to Congress on July 21.S. Businesses. Slumping foreign demand led to a sharp drop in U. at www. In the early part of the year.S. meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee and is presented with those minutes in the “Records” section of this annual report.S. Meanwhile. However.

2009 Reserve also continued to provide funding to financial institutions and markets through a variety of credit and liquidity facilities. the 12-month change in the personal consumption expenditures (PCE) price index was close to zero in May. In May. remained subdued in the first half of this year as the margin of slack in labor and product markets widened considerably further and as prices of oil and other commodities retraced only a part of their earlier steep declines. and market-based measures of the likelihood of default by those institutions rose. In the same month. or stress test) and. the Committee decided to expand its purchases of agency MBS and agency debt and to begin buying longer-term Treasury securities to help improve conditions in private credit markets. During the first few months of 2009.58 96th Annual Report. All told. the Federal Reserve and the Treasury launched the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF). and the Office of Thrift Supervision announced the Financial Stability Plan. strains in short-term funding markets have eased. with some credit spreads in those markets returning close to precrisis levels. In February. flows of credit to businesses and households were impaired. an initiative designed to catalyze the securitization markets by providing financing to investors to support their purchases of certain AAA-rated asset-backed securities. and ones previously taken. The Federal Reserve and other government entities continued to respond forcefully to these adverse financial market developments. In early March. the results of the SCAP were announced and were positively received in financial markets. The Federal Reserve kept its target for the federal funds rate at a range between 0 and 1⁄4 percent and purchased additional agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS) and agency debt. a Capital Assistance Program designed to assess the capital needs of banking institutions under a range of economic scenarios (through the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program (SCAP). the Federal Reserve. which had eased late last year. which slowed sharply late last year. have helped stabilize a number of financial markets and. Throughout the first half of the year. while the 12-month change in PCE prices excluding food and energy was 13⁄4 percent. In recent months. Overall consumer price inflation. At the March meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). the wage and salary incomes of households. the Treasury. bank funding markets were strained. the Federal Reserve announced an expansion of eligible collateral under the TALF program. The plan included. among other elements. if necessary. Broad equity price indexes also fell in the United States and abroad. the Federal . fell during this period. have led to significant improvements. and measures of volatility in such markets stayed at near-record levels. the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. in some cases. pressures on financial firms. adjusted for price changes. and many securitization markets remained shut. The narrowing in spreads ployment. intensified again. These policy actions. Survey measures of longer-term inflation expectations have remained relatively stable this year and currently stand at about their average values in 2008. the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. to assist banking institutions in strengthening the amount and quality of their capital. In addition. Equity prices of banks and insurance companies fell amid reports of large losses in the fourth quarter of 2008.

and the rate of consumer price inflation to be about 2 percent. these projections are presented in Part 4 of this report. Participants generally judged that the degree of uncertainty surrounding the medium-term outlook for both economic activity and inflation exceeded historical norms. with the unemployment rate still elevated at the end of 2011. the 10 banking organizations required by the SCAP to bolster their capital buffers had issued new common equity in amounts that either met or came close to meeting the SCAP requirements. the unemployment rate to be about 5 percent. Although yields on longerterm Treasury securities have risen. bolstered by an accommodative monetary policy. and measures of volatility in equity and other financial markets have retreated somewhat. Part 2 Recent Financial and Economic Developments Economic activity. the members of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks. and the flow of credit to some businesses and households remains constrained. FOMC participants expected total and core inflation to be lower in 2009 than during 2008 as a whole.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 likely reflects. strains remain in most financial markets. despite these notable improvements. government efforts to stabilize financial markets. but corporate bond yields have continued to decline. many financial institutions face the possibility of significant additional losses. and inflation. inflation was forecast to remain subdued in 2010 and 2011. Participants viewed the risks to their projections of economic growth over the medium run as either balanced or tilted to the downside. Mortgage rates have risen about in line with Treasury yields. provided projections for economic growth. some of these increases are likely attributable to improvement in the economic outlook and a reversal in flightto-quality flows. By early June. However. all of whom participate in FOMC meetings. Nonetheless. a decrease in the probability that market participants assign to extremely adverse outcomes for the economy in light of the apparent moderation in the rate of economic contraction. which fell sharply in the fourth quarter of 2008. all participants expected that labor market conditions would continue to deteriorate during the remainder of this year and improve only slowly over the subsequent two years. Participants also reported their assessments of the rates to which key macroeconomic variables would be expected to converge in the longer run under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks to the economy. in part because of the sizable amount of slack in resource utilization. unemployment. In conjunction with the June 2009 FOMC meeting. though they remain at elevated levels. declined at nearly the same rate in the first quar- . in part. Issuance in some securitization markets that were essentially shut down earlier has begun to increase. and most saw the risk to their projections of medium-run inflation as balanced. FOMC participants generally viewed the outlook for the economy as having improved modestly in recent months. Most participants expected real GDP to grow in the longer run at an annual rate of about 21⁄2 percent. Participants expected real GDP to bottom out in the second 59 half of this year and then to move onto a path of gradual recovery. Global equity prices have recouped some of their earlier declines. and fiscal stimulus.

To be sure. particularly in the motor vehicle sector. especially in emerging Asian economies. including the provision of more capital to banking institutions under the Capital Purchase Program. . 2009 tional policy initiatives to support financial stability and promote economic recovery. and the announcement of programs to help banks manage their legacy assets. both equity prices of financial firms and broad equity price indexes rose. the latest indicators suggest that the contraction in foreign activity has lessened. Supported by the Federal Reserve’s Term AssetBacked Securities Loan Facility (TALF). And. the Federal Reserve and other government entities implemented addi- 1. with equity prices falling and spreads of yields on corporate bonds over those on comparable-maturity Treasury securities moving to near-record highs. the bank supervisory agencies undertook a special assessment of the capital strength of the largest U. and housing activity.1 Other government entities also undertook new measures to support the financial sector. in the first half of this year.60 96th Annual Report. Market participants’ concerns about major financial institutions increased. beginning direct purchases of longer-term Treasury securities. businesses have continued to cut back on investment spending. Nevertheless. the pace of contraction appears to have moderated somewhat of late. During the subsequent few months. July). conditions in financial markets began to show signs of improvement starting in March. on balance. Federal Reserve initiatives included expanding direct purchases of agency debt and agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS). Partly as a result of these efforts. Short-term interbank funding markets ter of 2009. Federal Reserve System Monthly Report on Credit and Liquidity Programs and the Balance Sheet (Washington: Board of Governors. and the unemployment rate has risen sharply. nonetheless. equity prices for such institutions fell. on balance. and corporate bond spreads narrowed. issuance of consumer ABS began to approach pre-crisis levels. Meanwhile. see Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (2009). while still quite depressed. Deterioration in the functioning of many financial markets restricted the flow of credit to businesses and households. For more information. In early 2009. These developments spilled over to broader markets. employment declines have remained sizable. has leveled off in recent months. and providing loans against consumer and other assetbacked securities (ABS). In response to these financial market stresses. the pace of job loss has diminished in recent months from the rate earlier this year. Firms responded by substituting longer-term financing through the corporate bond market for shorter-term funding from bank loans and commercial paper (CP).S. strains in some financial markets appeared to intensify from the levels seen in late 2008. banking organizations (the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program. or SCAP). inflation remained subdued in the first half of this year. In addition. or CPP. and firms have reacted to the abrupt rise in inventorysales ratios around the turn of the year by cutting production and running down inventories at a more rapid pace. consumer spending seems to have stabilized. and their credit default swap (CDS) spreads widened substantially. although they remained strained. while the recession abroad led to another sharp drop in export demand in the first quarter. In the labor market. However.

Price declines have been particularly marked in areas of the country that have experienced a large number of foreclosure-related sales. conditions in the labor market deteriorating. House prices continued to fall in the first part of this year. Although consumer surveys continue to suggest that a sizable portion of households expect house prices to fall in the coming year. all else being equal. including reports of a pullback in the availability of credit for new projects and a sharp decline in the price of apartment buildings following a multiyear run-up. expectations of further declines in house prices can make potential buyers reluctant to enter the market. fell more than 9 percent over the 12 months ending in May and is now 20 percent below the peak that it achieved in mid-2006. These declines have coincided with a substantial worsening of many of the economic and financial factors that influence construction in this sector. delinquency rates continued to rise across all categories of mortgage loans. months’ supply of unsold new homes relative to sales has come down somewhat from its peak at the turn of the year. Lower prices improve the affordability of homeownership for potential new buyers and. the LoanPerformance repeat-sales price index. That said. but it still remains quite high compared with earlier in the decade. nearly 40 percent of adjustable-rate subprime loans and 15 percent of fixed-rate subprime loans were . outstanding bank loans to households and nonfinancial businesses continued to decline amid expectations that borrower credit quality would deteriorate further. and household financial conditions remaining weak. and Arizona. risk spreads in many markets that were still quite elevated. the pace of sales for both new and existing homes is still very low by historical standards.000 units. such as Nevada. California. though they remain at a depressed level. and banking institutions involved in the SCAP were able to issue significant amounts of public equity and nonguaranteed debt. The latest readings from national indexes show price declines for existing homes over the past 12 months in the range of 7 to 18 percent. As of April 2009. One such measure with wide geographic coverage. 61 Domestic Developments The Household Sector Residential Investment and Housing Finance Although home prices have continued to fall. Florida. However. and sales of new single-family homes have been little changed since January at a bit below 350. Starts in the multifamily sector—which had held up well through the spring of 2008 even as single-family activity was plummeting—have deteriorated considerably over the past year. With this restrained level of construction. the steep declines in housing demand and construction that began in late 2005 appear to be abating. In the single-family housing sector. starts of new units appear to have firmed of late. and financial conditions that remained somewhat strained.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 also showed substantial improvement. should eventually help bolster housing demand. With house prices still falling. Sales of existing single-family homes have flattened out at a little more than 4 million units at an annual rate since late last year. However. the share of such households appears to have subsided in recent months.

they are typically extended to borrowers with relatively strong credit histories. which encompasses several efforts designed to lower foreclosure rates.3 Although the declines in rates and spreads made borrowing relatively less expensive for those qualified for conforming mortgages. Interest rates on 30-year fixed-rate conforming mortgages declined during early 2009. an extension of the prevailing trend in earlier quarters.000 homes entered the process. and the governmentsponsored enterprises (GSEs) late last year. about 600. although those rates have risen more recently. Early in the year. Over the last three quarters of 2008. Foreclosures also jumped in 2009. about 750. . mortgage rates remain at historically low levels. some private firms. with the effects of the weakness in the housing market and relatively restricted access to credit offsetting the influence of lower mortgage rates.62 96th Annual Report. seriously delinquent. they must be equivalent in risk to a prime mortgage with an 80 percent loan-to-value ratio. The increase may be related to the expiration of temporary foreclosure moratoriums that were put in place by some state and local governments. Mortgage debt outstanding was about flat in the first quarter of 2009. Offer rates on nonconforming jumbo fixedrate loans fell slightly but continued to 2. The secondary market for conventional mortgage loans not guaranteed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac remained essentially shut. The Treasury Department has recently established the Making Home Affordable program. delinquency rates for prime and nearprime loans reached about 12 percent for adjustable-rate loans and 4 percent for fixed-rate loans. Part of the decrease may have reflected expansion of the Federal Reserve’s agency MBS purchase program. such activity 3. 2009 be well above rates on conforming loans.2 In May 2009. The conforming loan limit for a first mortgage on a single-family home in the contiguous United States is currently equal to the greater of $417. it cannot exceed $625. spreads of rates on conforming fixed-rate mortgages over long-term Treasury yields fell to their lowest levels in more than a year. and they cannot exceed in size the conforming loan limit.500. However. Conforming mortgages are those eligible for purchase by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The program includes a provision to allow borrowers to refinance easily into mortgages with lower payments and a provision to encourage mortgage lenders and servicers to modify delinquent mortgages. access to credit remained limited for many other borrowers. probably due to low mortgage interest rates and the waiver of many fees and easing of many underwriting terms by the GSEs.000 homes entered the foreclosure process each quarter. and that only a few of the banks reported having made subprime loans. that about 40 percent of banks had reduced the size of existing home equity lines of credit. representing substantial increases over the past year to historic highs. A mortgage is defined as seriously delinquent if the borrower is 90 days or more behind in payments or the property is in foreclosure. Jumbo mortgages are those that exceed the maximum size of a conforming loan. about in line with increases in Treasury rates. During the first quarter of 2009. In the April 2009 Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices. Refinancing activity was somewhat elevated early in the year. The available indicators suggest that mortgage debt likely remained very soft in the second quarter.000 or 115 percent of the area’s median house price. a majority of respondents indicated that they had tightened standards on residential mortgages over the preceding three months.

equity prices have recorded substantial gains since March. spending lately has been supported by the boost to household incomes from the fiscal stimulus package enacted in February. Continued widespread job losses and the drag from large declines in household wealth have weighed on consumption. sizable reductions in 63 employment and the workweek have cut deeply into total hours worked and hence overall labor compensation. which plunged in 2008. Measures of consumer sentiment. have nonetheless moved up from the historical lows recorded around the turn of the year. In contrast. Outlays on other goods. However. The tightening in standards and terms likely reflected. Consumer Spending and Household Finance Consumer spending appears to have leveled off so far this year after falling sharply in the second half of last year. after-tax income adjusted for inflation—has risen at an annual rate of about 9 percent so far this year. a substantial pickup from the increase of 11⁄4 percent posted in 2008. Household net worth continued to fall in the first quarter of this year as a result of the ongoing declines in house prices and a further drop in equity prices. extending a decline that began in the final quarter of 2008. The recent stimulus-induced jump in real disposable income and the improvement in equity wealth since this spring apparently helped lift consumer sentiment somewhat from its earlier very low levels. Although nominal hourly compensation has risen at a faster pace than overall prices. Real disposable personal income. nominal labor income has been declining steeply.7 million units over the four months ending in June.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 moderated considerably when interest rates rose during the past few months. in part. auto loans. helping to offset continued declines in the value of real estate wealth. Sales of new light motor vehicles continued to contract early this year but have stabilized in recent months—at an average annual rate of 9. Real personal consumption expenditures (PCE). Gains in after-tax income have been bolstered by the tax cuts and increases in social benefit payments that were implemented as part of the 2009 fiscal stimulus package. and other nonrevolving loans—continued to rise during the first half of 2009. while spending on services has only edged up so far this year. although variable from month to month. With real after-tax income up appreciably in the first half of the year and consumer outlays leveling off. Nonmortgage consumer debt outstanding is estimated to have fallen at an annual rate of 2 percent in the first half of 2009. the personal saving rate jumped during the spring. actions that included lowering credit limits on existing credit card accounts. reaching nearly 7 percent in May compared with the 13⁄4 percent average recorded during 2008. The decreases likely reflect both reduced demand for loans as a result of the restrained pace of consumer spending and a restricted supply of credit. have remained at extremely low levels. The increase in credit card loan delinquency . concerns by financial institutions about consumer credit quality. Delinquency rates on most types of consumer lending— credit card loans. have essentially moved sideways since late last year. however. or DPI—that is. while still at depressed levels. The April 2009 Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey showed a further tightening of standards and terms on consumer loans over the preceding three months.

business output contracted steeply. rebounded in early 2009 as some auto finance companies accessed credit through the TALF and others received funding directly from the government. Spreads of these rates over those on comparable-maturity Treasury securities remained at elevated levels. which had declined sharply at the end of 2008. Spreads of yields on AAA-rated credit card and auto ABS over yields on swaps fell sharply in early 2009. and credit availability remained tight for many borrowers. and at 61⁄2 percent as of the end of the first quarter of 2009. More recently. Before the onset of the financial crisis. though at a much less precipitous pace: Although shipments of nondefense capital goods other than transportation items continued to fall in . it appears that the declines in capital spending may be abating. The increased issuance and falling spreads appeared to reflect importantly the TALF program. Issuance of credit card. Real business fixed investment fell markedly in the final quarter of 2008 and the first quarter of this year. and real spending on hightech capital—computers. although they remained at somewhat elevated levels. and student loan ABS began to pick up in March and approached pre-crisis levels in April and May. Real business outlays for equipment and software dropped at an annual rate of 34 percent in the first quarter of 2009 after falling nearly as rapidly in the fourth quarter. The available indicators suggest that real spending on equipment and software fell further in the second quarter. Household bankruptcy rates continued the upward trend that has been evident since the bankruptcy law reform in 2005. with declines broadly based across equipment. the recent increases likely reflect the deterioration in household financial conditions. corporate profits declined. In both quarters. such delinquencies exceeded the level reached during the 2001 recession. which accounts for nearly one-half of outlays for equipment and software. Auto loan rates were about flat. credit card rates ticked upward. The cutbacks in business investment were prompted by a deterioration late last year and early this year in the economic and financial conditions that influence capital expenditures: In particular. which had been announced in late 2008 and began operation in March 2009. Availability of loans to purchase automobiles. software. and communications equipment—fell at an annual rate of more than 20 percent. 2009 rates at banks was particularly sharp. Real investment in equipment other than high tech and transportation. The Business Sector Fixed Investment Businesses have continued to cut back capital spending. The near-complete cessation of issuance in this market in the fourth quarter of 2008 thus likely contributed importantly to the curtailment of consumer credit.64 96th Annual Report. business purchases of motor vehicles plunged at annual rates of roughly 80 percent. dropped at an annual rate of about 35 percent in the first quarter after falling at a 20 percent rate in the previous quarter. software. the market for ABS provided significant support for consumer lending by effectively reducing the cost to lenders of providing such credit. Changes in interest rates on consumer loans were mixed over the first half of the year. auto. and rates on other consumer loans showed a slight decline. and structures. and financing conditions for businesses have improved somewhat.

outlays on other energy-related projects—such as new power plants and the expansion and retooling of existing petroleum refineries—have been growing rapidly for some time now and continued to post robust gains through May. and recent surveys of business conditions have been generally less downbeat than earlier this year. Profitability of both financial and nonfinancial firms showed steep declines. the rate of decline slowed from the first-quarter pace. According to the available data. Borrowing by domestic nonfinancial businesses fell slightly in the first half of 2009 after having slowed markedly in the second half of 2008. although downward revisions to forecasts for earnings over the next two years have slowed recently. as firms entered the year with extremely high inventory-sales ratios despite having drawn down stocks throughout 2008. with net issuance of corporate bonds surging.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 April and May. the recent data on construction expenditures suggest that declines in spending on nonresidential structures may have slowed in the second quarter. However. tight financing conditions. weak business output and profits. In addition. while both commercial and . which had risen briskly for a number of years. this pattern of production declines and inventory liquidation appears to have continued in the second quarter as well. closer to the automakers’ preferred level. days’ supply of domestic light vehicles dropped from its peak of about 65 100 days in February to less than 70 days at the end of June. In contrast. Much of the first-quarter liquidation occurred in the motor vehicle sector. Real spending on nonresidential structures turned down late last year and fell sharply in the first quarter. On balance. has plunged this year in response to the substantial net decline in energy prices since last summer. Corporate Profits and Business Finance Operating earnings per share for S&P 500 firms in the first quarter were about 35 percent below their yearearlier levels. Business financial conditions in the first half of the year were characterized by lower demand for funds. Analysts’ forecasts suggest that the pace of profit declines moderated only slightly in the second quarter. The composition of borrowing shifted. Firms outside of the motor vehicle sector also have been making significant production adjustments to bring down inventories. As a result. Factory output (excluding motor vehicles and parts) plunged in the first quarter. Spending on drilling and mining structures. some recent business surveys suggest that firms have become more comfortable in recent months with the current level of inventories. and rising vacancy rates likely will continue to weigh heavily on this sector. where production was cut sharply and remained low in the second quarter. Outlays for construction of commercial and office buildings declined appreciably late last year and have contracted further so far this year. Inventory Investment Businesses ran off inventories aggressively in the first quarter. Although inventory-sales ratios remain elevated in many industries. business purchases of new trucks and cars appear to have stabilized in the second quarter (albeit at low levels). and inventories of nonfarm goods other than motor vehicles were drawn down noticeably in real terms. even as financial conditions eased somewhat on balance.

assuming that economic activity progressed in line with consensus forecasts. The market for commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS)—an important source of funding before the crisis—remained shut. Both seasoned and initial equity offerings by nonfinancial corporations were modest over the first half of 2009. net equity issuance in the first quarter declined by the smallest amount since 2002. yields on both investment. C&I and commercial real estate (CRE) lending by commercial banks were both quite weak in the first half of 2009.and speculative-grade corporate bonds dropped sharply. Equity retirements are estimated to have slowed in early 2009 from their rapid pace during the second half of 2008. while those on CRE loans rose substantially. as investors’ concerns about the economic outlook eased.to four-family residential properties increased to more than 20 percent. additional spending increases and tax . This reallocation of borrowing may have reflected a desire by businesses to strengthen their balance sheets by substituting longer-term sources of financing for shorter-term sources during a period when the cost of bond financing was generally falling. 2009 loans continued to increase in the first quarter. Banks that responded to the Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey conducted in April 2009 expected delinquency and charge-off rates on such loans to increase over the rest of 2009. The credit quality of nonfinancial firms continued to deteriorate in the first half of 2009. and the fiscal stimulus package enacted in February. Delinquency rates on banks’ C&I The Government Sector Federal Government The deficit in the federal unified budget has increased substantially during the current fiscal year. Financial firms issued bonds at a solid pace. have all contributed to the widening of the budget gap.66 96th Annual Report. the conservatorship of the mortgage-related GSEs. along with the effects of the weak economy on outlays and revenues. Delinquency rates on construction and land development loans for one. Nonetheless. and upgrades were relatively few. The results of the April 2009 Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey indicated that commercial banks had tightened terms and standards on C&I and CRE loans over the preceding three months. The pace of rating downgrades on corporate bonds increased. and their spreads over yields on comparablematurity Treasury securities narrowed appreciably. The budget costs associated with the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP).1 trillion. Over the first nine months of fiscal year 2009—from October through June—the unified budget recorded a deficit of about $1. As a result. bond spreads remained somewhat elevated by historical standards. including both debt issued under the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and debt issued without such guarantees. Equity issuance by such firms picked up substantially from a very low level following the completion of the SCAP reviews in May. likely reflecting reduced demand for loans and a tighter lending stance on the part of banks. The deficit is expected to widen further over the rest of the fiscal year because of the continued slow pace of economic activity. industrial (C&I) loans and CP outstanding fell. In particular.

which have plunged as corporate profits have contracted and as firms have presumably adjusted payments to take advantage of the bonus depreciation provisions contained in the Economic Stimulus Act of 2008 and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The decline in revenue has been particularly pronounced for corporate receipts. which included the effects of the President’s budget proposals. In contrast. and further costs related to financial stabilization programs. the stimulus tax rebates in 2008 lowered individual taxes by about $50 billion during the same period last year. and the Treasury’s purchases of the GSE’s MBS are recorded on a netpresent-value basis. real federal expenditures on consumption and gross investment—the part of federal spending that is a direct component of GDP—fell at an annual rate of 41⁄2 percent in the first quarter following its steep rise of more than 8 percent in 2008. both equity purchases and debt-related transactions under the TARP are recorded on a net-present-value basis. reflecting the weakness in nominal personal income and reduced capital gains realizations. After falling about 2 percent in fiscal 2008. In the Monthly Treasury Statements and the Administration’s budget. Spending was boosted. as nondefense outlays increased slightly. Real defense spending more than accounted for the first-quarter contraction.5 Nominal federal outlays have risen markedly of late. Thus.8 trillion (13 percent of nominal GDP). net interest payments declined compared with the same year-earlier period. federal spending on defense. taking into account market risk. The budget released by the Office of Management and Budget in May. 67 outlays in the first nine months of fiscal 2009 were almost 21 percent higher than during the same period in fiscal 2008. in the second quarter. However. The President’s budget includes a placeholder for additional funds for financial stabilization programs that have not been enacted but have an estimated budget cost of $250 billion.6 Spending for income support—particularly for unemployment insurance benefits—has been pushed up by the deterioration in labor market conditions as well as by policy decisions to expand funding for a number of benefit programs. the tax cuts associated with fiscal stimulus have not contributed to the year-over-year decline in individual tax receipts. by $232 billion in outlays recorded for activities under the TARP and the conservatorship of the GSEs so far this fiscal year. calculated that the deficit for fiscal 2009 would total more than $1. Individual income and payroll tax receipts have also declined noticeably.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 cuts associated with the fiscal stimulus legislation. Meanwhile. federal receipts dropped about 18 percent in the first nine months of fiscal 2009 compared with the same period in fiscal 2008. While the 2009 stimulus plan has reduced individual taxes by around $13 billion so far in fiscal 2009. Medicare. and Social Security also has recorded sizable increases. equity purchases from the GSEs in conservatorship are recorded on a cash-flow basis. . As measured in the national income and product accounts (NIPA). as the reduction in interest rates on Treasury debt more than offset the rise in Treasury debt. 5. defense spending appears to have rebounded. 4.4 The decline in economic activity has cut deeply into tax receipts so far this fiscal year. in part. However. 6. significantly larger than the deficit in fiscal 2008 of $459 billion (31⁄4 percent of nominal GDP). and it is likely to rise further in coming quarters given currently enacted appropriations. After having increased about 9 percent in fiscal 2008.

7 State and Local Government The fiscal positions of state and local governments have deteriorated significantly over the past year. where the share is the greater of 3 percent (at an annual rate) minus the target federal funds rate (or the bottom of the range when the Federal Open Market Committee specifies a range) and zero. generally decreased after the May 1 implementation of the Treasury Market Practices Group’s recommendation of a mandatory charge for delivery failures. . property taxes are based on assessed property values from the previous year. 9. with bid-to-cover ratios within historical ranges. In coming quarters. Third. and sales taxes have declined sharply. and budget strains are particularly acute in some states. The delay between changes in house prices and changes in property tax revenues likely occurs for three reasons. many state and local governments have experienced significant capital losses in their employee pension funds in the past year. receipts from property taxes have continued to rise moderately. reflecting the typically slow response of property taxes to changes in home values.68 96th Annual Report. The fails charge is incurred when a party to a repurchase agreement or cash transaction fails to deliver the contracted Treasury security to the other party by the date agreed upon. Despite the considerable issuance of Treasury securities in the first half of the year. The new practice of a fails charge ensures that the total cost of a fail is at least 3 percent. and they will need to set aside money in coming years to rebuild pension assets. Foreign custody holdings of Treasury securities at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York grew steadily over the first half of the year. the grants-in-aid included in the fiscal stimulus legislation will likely mitigate somewhat the pressures on state budgets. therefore. in many jurisdictions. Outlays by state and local governments have been restrained by the pressures on their budgets. 7. the sharp fall in house prices over the past two years is likely to put downward pressure on local revenues before long. revenues from income. Previously. Fails-to-deliver of Treasury securities. First. demand at Treasury auctions generally kept pace. which was minimal when short-term interest rates were very low. revenues have held up fairly well. aggregate real expenditures on consumption and gross investment Federal Borrowing Federal debt continued to increase in the first half of 2009. the cost of a fail was the lost interest on the funds owed in the transaction. and raising taxes and fees. although at a slightly less rapid pace than had been posted in the second half of 2008. Moreover. 2009 business. as revenues have come in weaker than policymakers expected. Thus. At the local level. 8. Second. but many states are still expecting significant budget gaps for the upcoming fiscal year.9 Nevertheless. At the state level. increases and decreases in market prices for houses tend not to be reflected in property tax bills for quite some time. many localities are subject to state limits on the annual increases in total property tax payments and property value assessments. drawing down rainy day funds. Sales taxes account for nearly one-half of the tax revenues collected by state governments. The charge is a share of the value of the security. As measured in the NIPA. which were elevated earlier in the year. assessments are required to lag contemporaneous changes in market values (or they lag such changes for administrative reasons). the practice was that a failed transaction was allowed to settle on a subsequent day at an unchanged invoice price.8 Plans by states to address widening projected budget gaps have included cutting planned spending.

reversing a portion of the earlier declines. typically provided by a commercial or investment bank. led by sharp declines in real construction spending. bond issuance by state and local governments picked up in the second quarter of 2009 after having been tepid during the first quarter. The composition of new issues continued to be skewed toward higher-rated borrowers. concomitant with the rise in other long-term interest rates over that period. Some municipalities were able to issue new VRDOs. VRDOs also have a contractual liquidity backstop. that ensures that bondholders are able to redeem their investment at par plus accrued interest even if the securities cannot be successfully remarketed to other investors.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 by state and local governments—the part of state and local spending that is a direct component of GDP—fell in both the fourth quarter of last year and the first quarter of this year. recent data on construction expenditures suggest that investment spending in the second quarter picked up. State and local employment has remained about flat over the past year. However. In contrast to long-term municipal bond markets. conditions in short-term municipal bond markets continued to exhibit substantial strains. which included a substantial increase in the amount of federal grants to states and localities. Issuance of short-term debt remained modest. even so. but many lowerrated issuers appeared to be either unwilling or unable to issue this type of debt at the prices that would be demanded of them. Market participants continued to report that the cost of liquidity support and credit enhancement for variable-rate demand obligations (VRDOs)—bonds that combine long maturities with floating short-term interest rates—remained substantially higher than it had been a year earlier. or other periodic basis. Yields on municipal securities rose somewhat in May and June. That bill also aided the finances of state and local governments by establishing Build America Bonds.10 In addition. . auctions of most remaining auction-rate securities failed. However. monthly. VRDOs are taxable or tax-exempt bonds that combine long maturities with floating shortterm interest rates that are reset on a weekly. the ratio of municipal bond yields to those on comparable-maturity Treasury securities dropped to its lowest level in almost a year. the sevenday Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association swap index. taxable state and local government bonds whose interest 69 payments are subsidized by the Treasury at a 35 percent rate. which is generally used to fund capital spending projects or to refund existing long-term debt. although some state and local governments are in the process of reducing outlays for compensation through wage freezes and mandatory furloughs that are not reflected in the employment figures. Interest rates on long-term municipal bonds declined in April as investors’ concerns about the credit quality of municipal bonds appeared to ease somewhat with the passage of the fiscal stimulus plan. State and Local Government Borrowing On net. Issuance of longterm debt. declined to the lowest level on record. 10. increased from the sluggish pace seen in the second half of 2008. although about in line with typical seasonal patterns. suggesting that the market was working well for higher-rated issuers. a measure of yields for high-grade VRDOs.

exceeding even the 24 percent rate of decline in the fourth quarter of 2008. exports. In addition.70 96th Annual Report. with the contraction in real imports described earlier being compounded by a steep fall in the value of nominal oil imports as oil prices declined. with increases following the end of strikerelated production disruptions in the fourth quarter. and Latin America. the spot price of West Texas intermediate (WTI) crude oil rebounded to about $60 per barrel in mid-July of this year. and Mexico exhibiting especially significant declines. The narrowing largely reflected the sharp reduction in the U.S.S. The rebound in oil prices appears to reflect the view that the global demand for oil has begun to pick up once again. Canada. The sharp fall in exports and imports of automotive products partly reflected cutbacks in North American production of motor vehicles. the U. although more moderately. with exports of machinery. However. (Exports of aircraft were the exception. Real imports of goods and services fell at an annual rate of more than 36 percent in the first quarter. Exports in almost all major categories contracted. automotive products. Europe. with exports to Canada. Prices for finished goods declined only slightly in the last quarter of 2008 and the first quarter of this year and have increased slightly in recent months. which turned back up in the second quarter. and industrial supplies displaying particularly pronounced declines. exports dropped sharply in the first quarter. The External Sector The demand for U. which relies heavily on flows of parts and finished vehicles among the United States. reflecting a slowing in the rate of contraction in foreign economic activity. softening the decline in real GDP. The price of crude oil in world markets rose considerably over the first half of this year. . Import prices fell sharply in late 2008 and the first quarter of this year. the ongoing effects of previous reductions in OPEC supply seem to be putting upward pressure on oil prices. All major categories of imports fell. and services recording large decreases. demand for imports fell even more precipitously.S.S. This pattern was influenced importantly by the swing in prices for oil and non-oil commodities. The drop in imports was widespread across U. Real exports of goods and services declined at an annual rate of 31 percent in the first quarter. Europe. After plunging from a record high of more than $145 per barrel in mid-July 2008 to a December average of about $40.) All of our major trading partners reduced their demand for U. Data for April and May suggest that exports in the second quarter continued to fall.S. a bit less than 3 percent of GDP. but they have stabilized over the past few months. with imports of machinery. The prices of longer-term futures contracts for crude oil have moved up to around $85 per barrel. reflecting the view that the market will continue to tighten as global demand strengthens over the medium term. trade deficit. trading partners. U. automotive products. Japan. current account deficit was $406 billion at an annual rate. industrial supplies. 2009 In the first quarter of 2009. considerably narrower than the $706 billion deficit recorded in 2008.S. and Mexico. with large declines observed for imports from Canada.

but the declines slowed to 312. its lowest reading in the post– World War II period. residents over time and hamper the ability of the nation to meet the retirement needs of an aging population. Private nonfarm payroll employment fell by 670. Nonetheless. businesses. The Labor Market Employment and Unemployment The labor market deteriorated significantly further in the first half of this year as employment continued to fall and the unemployment rate rose sharply. however.S. The rise in joblessness has been especially pronounced for those who . Virtually all major industries experienced considerable job losses in the first few months of the year. per month from January to April. job declines in temporary help services slowed noticeably. the civilian unemployment rate has continued to move up rapidly so far this year. in the manufacturing sector.000 in June. and employment in nonbusiness services turned up in May and increased further in June. Since the beginning of the recession in December 2007. if not boosted over the longer run. as a decline in business saving has been more than offset by the recent jump in personal saving. persistent low levels of national saving will likely be associated with both low rates of capital formation and heavy borrowing from abroad. More recently.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 71 National Saving Total net national saving—that is. The May and June declines in construction jobs were the smallest since last fall. private saving has risen considerably.9 million since the start of the recession. the unemployment rate has risen more than 41⁄2 percentage points. In recent months.000 jobs. over this period. employment declines in many industry groups have eased. and governments. net national saving dropped over the subsequent three years as the federal budget deficit widened substantially and the fiscal positions of state and local governments deteriorated. In contrast. In addition. on average. The job losses so far this year have been widespread across industries and have brought the cumulative decline in private employment since December 2007 to more than 61⁄2 mil- lion jobs.000 in May and 415. In addition to shedding jobs. excluding depreciation charges as measured in the NIPA—fell to a level of negative 11⁄2 percent of nominal GDP in the first quarter of this year. which would limit the rise in the standard of living of U. National saving will likely remain very low this year in light of the weak economy and the probable further widening of the federal budget deficit. Average weekly hours of production and nonsupervisory workers on private payrolls dropped sharply through June. job losses in this sector have totaled 1. climbing 21⁄4 percentage points between December 2008 and June to 91⁄2 percent. and some industries have reported small gains. In contrast. on balance. the pace of job loss has moderated somewhat. the saving of households. firms have cut their labor input by shortening hours worked. After having reached 31⁄2 percent of nominal GDP in early 2006. the share of persons who reported that they were working part time for economic reasons—a group that includes individuals whose hours have been cut by their employers as well as those who would like to move to full-time jobs but are unable to find them—is high. employment declines have subsided a bit in recent months but still remain sizable. Meanwhile.

Initial claims for unemployment insurance. which typically weakens during periods of rising unemployment. anecdotes suggest that the impairment of household balance sheets during this recession may have led some workers to delay retirement and other workers to enter the labor force. and the number of individuals receiving regular and emergency unemployment insurance benefits climbed. output per hour in the nonfarm business sector increased at an annual rate of about 11⁄2 percent in the first quarter after rising 21⁄4 percent during all of 2008. on balance. The labor force participation rate. Alternative measures of nominal hourly compensation and wages suggest. in recent months. but narrower. which rose dramatically earlier this year. The employment cost index (ECI) for private industry workers. in part because . Average hourly earnings of production and nonsupervisory workers—a more timely. lost their jobs permanently.72 96th Annual Report. that increases in labor costs have slowed this year in response to the sizable amount of slack in labor markets. especially in recent months. If these productivity estimates prove to be accurate. The emergency unemployment insurance programs that were introduced last July have likely contributed to the higher participation rate and unemployment rate by encouraging unemployed individuals to remain in the labor force to continue to look for work. decreased gradually through March but has moved up somewhat. has decelerated considerably over the past year. have fallen noticeably from their peak but remain elevated. In addition. and their difficulty in finding new jobs has been exacerbated by the ongoing weakness in hiring. In contrast. Other more recent indicators suggest that conditions in the labor market remain very weak. measure of wage developments—have also decelerated significantly. Accordingly. Productivity and Labor Compensation Labor productivity has continued to increase at a surprising rate during the most recent downturn. According to the latest available published data. the median duration of uncompleted spells of unemployment has increased from 81⁄2 weeks in December 2007 to 18 weeks in June 2009. these individuals tend to take longer to find new jobs than those on temporary layoffs or those who left their jobs voluntarily. 2009 firms have responded to the contraction in aggregate demand by aggressively reducing employment and shortening the workweeks of their employees. compensation per hour (CPH) in the nonfarm business sector—an alternative measure of hourly compensation derived from the data in the NIPA—increased about 4 percent over the year ending in the first quarter of 2009. similar to the rate of increase seen during the past several years. reaching nearly 10 million at the end of June. on balance. and the number of workers unemployed more than 15 weeks has moved up appreciably. they would suggest that the fundamental factors that have supported a solid trend in underlying productivity in recent years—such as the rapid pace of technological change and ongoing efforts by firms to use information technology to improve the efficiency of their operations—remain in place. This measure of compensation increased less than 2 percent in nominal terms between March 2008 and March 2009 after rising 31⁄4 percent in each of the preceding two years. which measures both wages and the cost to employers of providing benefits.

a jump in the prices of tobacco products associated with large increases in federal and state excise taxes this spring. Consumer prices for electricity have edged down so far this year— after rising briskly through the end of last year—as fossil fuel input costs have continued to decline. The pickup in core inflation during the first part of this year reflected. in part. have risen at a moderate pace so far this year. and Texas that boosted inventories above historical midyear averages. with the sharp reduction in total hours worked. Core PCE prices rose at an annual rate of 21⁄2 percent over the first five months of the year. crude oil prices have turned up again. 73 Prices Headline consumer prices. with the spot price of WTI rising to around $60 per barrel in mid-July from about $40. compared with 13⁄4 percent over all of 2008. the PCE price index for food and beverages decreased at an annual rate of 1 percent between December 2008 and May 2009. but information from the consumer price index and other sources suggests that total PCE prices posted a relatively large increase that month as gasoline prices jumped. excluding tobacco prices—for which the large increases likely were one-off adjustments—core inflation was unchanged at 13⁄4 percent over this period. prices for other core goods snapped back early this year—following heavy discounting at the end of last year in reaction to weak . as noted previously. While the margin of slack in product and labor markets has widened considerably further this year. Nonetheless. Aside from tobacco. In contrast. many commodity prices have retraced part of their earlier declines. compared with its 3⁄4 percent rise over the 12 months of 2008. The core PCE price index—which excludes the prices of energy items as well as those of food and beverages—also has increased at a moderate pace so far this year following especially low rates of increase late in 2008. North Dakota. Pennsylvania. After climbing nearly 61⁄2 percent in 2008. last December. However. in the first five months of 2009 following their sharp drop late last year. real wage and salary income of households has fallen over this period. on balance. the chain-type price index for personal consumption expenditures increased at an annual rate of about 13⁄4 percent between December 2008 and May 2009. The increase in crude costs has been putting upward pressure on the price of gasoline at the pump in recent months. natural gas prices continued to plunge over the first half of this year in response to burgeoning supplies from new wells in Louisiana. as has the inflation-adjusted increase in average hourly earnings. putting downward pressure on inflation. which fell sharply late last year with the marked deterioration in economic activity and drop-off in the prices of crude oil and other commodities. Indeed.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 The much slower pace of overall consumer price inflation over the past year has supported real wage growth. on average. Food prices decelerated considerably in the first part of this year in response to the dramatic downturn in spot prices of crops and livestock in the second half of last year. Data for PCE prices in June are not yet available. core consumer price increases were moderate. Consumer energy prices flattened out. All told. changes in both broad measures of hourly compensation—the ECI and CPH—have picked up in real terms over the past year.

bid prices remained close to historical lows. and auto loans continued to be minimal in the first few months of the year. prices for a wide range of non-energy services have decelerated noticeably further this year. A measure of stress in the interbank market. CP markets continued to demand and excess inventories—but have been little changed for the most part in recent months. spreads on shorter-maturity A1/P1 nonfinancial and financial CP as well as on assetbacked commercial paper (ABCP) over AA nonfinancial CP declined modestly. and measures of equity price volatility remained very high. Broad equity price indexes continued to fall. Indicators of longer-term inflation expectations have been steadier over this period. and issuance—particularly of loans intended for nonbank lenders—dropped to very low levels. Required margins of collateral (also known as haircuts) and bid-asked spreads generally continued to be wide in the markets for repurchase agreements backed by many types of securities. the spread of the London interbank offered rate (Libor) over the rate on comparable-maturity overnight index swaps (OIS). Survey-based measures of near-term inflation expectations declined late last year and early this year as actual headline inflation came down markedly. some measures have moved back up close to their average levels of recent years. median expectations for year-ahead inflation stood at 3. nonrevolving consumer loans. In the leveraged loan market. remained at elevated levels early in the year. and there was no issuance of CMBS in the first half of 2009. a few financial markets showed signs of improvement early in the year. about the measure’s average value over all of 2008. In the CP market. but. Policy Actions. Issuance of securities backed by credit card loans. Nonetheless. Equity prices for banking and insurance companies fell in the first quarter of the year as a number of large . 2009 financial institutions reported substantial losses for the fourth quarter of 2008.0 percent in the preliminary estimate for July.1 percent in the preliminary July release.74 96th Annual Report. An index based on CDS spreads on AAA-rated CMBS widened and neared the peak levels seen in November. Although part of the improvement likely reflected greater demand from institutional investors as short-term Treasury yields declined to near zero on occasion. Credit default swap spreads for bank holding companies—which primarily reflect investors’ assessments of the likelihood of those institutions defaulting on their debt obligations—rose sharply in early January on renewed concerns that some of those firms could face considerable capital shortfalls and liquidity difficulties. Other financial markets also continued to show signs of stress during the first two months of the year. Strains in short-term funding markets persisted in January and February. Financial Stability Developments Evolution of the Financial Turmoil. In contrast. in recent months. According to the Reuters/University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers. up from about 2 percent around the turn of the year. and the Market Response Stresses in financial markets intensified in the first few months of 2009 but have eased more recently. These expectations in the Reuters/University of Michigan survey stood at 3.

In the initial phase of the program. In an effort to help restore confidence in the strength of U. The SPV would purchase and manage any assets received by the New York Fed in connection with any TALF loans. The plan included the Capital Assistance Program (CAP). although they remained at historically high levels. (CAP and SCAP are described in greater detail in the box titled “Capital Assistance Program and Supervisory Capital Assessment Program. The timing of the announcement of the results and the likely policy responses from this part of the CAP— formally named the SCAP. (AIG).Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 be supported by the Federal Reserve’s Commercial Paper Funding Facility (CPFF). or PPIP. and the Treasury and the Federal Reserve announced a restructuring of the government assistance to AIG to enhance the company’s capital and liquidity in order to facilitate the orderly completion of its global divestiture program. also fell. the effects of Federal Reserve purchases of agency debt and agency MBS. thereby supporting new lending. American International Group. Spreads on 10year Fannie Mae debt and optionadjusted spreads on Fannie Mae mortgage-backed securities over comparable-maturity Treasury securities dropped early in the year. a new Public-Private Investment Program. spreads on shorter-maturity A2/P2 CP. 75 The announcement of the plan did not lead to an immediate improvement in financial market conditions. on February 10. Inc. an expansion of the Federal Reserve’s TALF program.S. the Treasury and the Federal Reserve announced the launch of the TALF. reported losses of more than $60 billion for the fourth quarter of 2008. the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. the Treasury. which would combine public and private capital with government financing to help banks dispose of legacy assets and strengthen their balance sheets. in part. designed to assess the capital needs of depository institutions under a range of economic scenarios and to help increase the amount and strengthen the quality of their capital if necessary. and an extension of the senior debt portion of the FDIC’s Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program to October 31. credit card loans. reflecting. Market participants were reportedly unclear about the methodology that would underlie the assessment of bank capital needs. On March 3. but popularly known as the stress test—were also sources of uncertainty. student loans. The demand for TALF funding was initially .”) On March 2. spreads of yields on BBB-rated and speculative-grade bonds relative to yields on comparable-maturity Treasury securities narrowed in January and February. 2009. In the corporate bond market. the Federal Reserve. and loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. the FDIC. The Treasury’s TARP would purchase $20 billion of subordinated debt in a special purpose vehicle (SPV) created by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Interest rates on 30-year fixed rate conforming mortgages also fell. the Federal Reserve offered to provide up to $200 billion of three-year loans on a nonrecourse basis secured by AAA-rated ABS backed by newly and recently originated auto loans. and the Office of Thrift Supervision announced the Financial Stability Plan. Bank and insurance company equity prices continued to decline. More notably. financial institutions and restart the flow of lending to businesses and households. and CDS spreads of such institutions widened to levels above those observed the previous fall. which is not eligible for purchase under the CPFF.

and Office of Thrift Supervision announced a Capital Assistance Program (CAP) to ensure that the largest banking institutions would be appropriately capitalized with high-quality capital. Supervisors took the unusual step of publicly reporting the findings of the SCAP. the Committee announced that it would expand its purchases of agency MBS by $750 billion. U. and modeling methods of the institutions. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). supervisors were able to apply a consistent and systematic approach across firms to estimate losses. The objective of the exercise was to conduct a comprehensive and consistent assessment simultaneously on the largest BHCs using a common set of alternative macroeconomic scenarios and a common forward-looking conceptual framework. the federal banking supervisors undertook a Supervisory Capital Assessment Program (SCAP) to evaluate the capital needs of the largest U. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. in addition it would also purchase up to $300 billion of longerterm Treasury securities over the next six months. reportedly on concerns that future changes in government policies could adversely affect TALF borrowers. revenues. revenues. Financial markets began to show signs of improvement in early March when a few large banks indicated that they had been profitable in January and February. against a backdrop of weakening economic activity and significant financial market strains. and to determine whether firms would need to raise capital to build a buffer to withstand largerthan-expected losses. 2009. the Treasury. bank holding companies (BHCs) under a more challenging economic environment than generally anticipated. and results were released publicly on May 7. As part of this program. With this information. Yields on a wide range of longer-term debt securities dropped substantially within a day of the release of the Committee’s statement.S. although some of the surprise was attributable to greater-than-anticipated .76 96th Annual Report.S. Extensive information was collected on the characteristics of the major loan. Firstquarter earnings results pre-announced by some large financial institutions were substantially better than expected. 2009. BHCs with risk-weighted assets of more than $100 billion at the end of 2008 were required to participate. 2009. at which. The SCAP was initiated on February 25. Federal Reserve. The decision to depart from the standard practice of maintaining confidentiality of examination information stemmed from the belief that greater modest. and of agency debt by $100 billion. Sentiment continued to improve after the March 17-18 meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). The Treasury and federal banking agencies believe it important for the largest BHCs to have a capital buffer sufficient to withstand losses and allow them to meet the credit needs of their customers if the economy were to weaken more than expected in order to help facilitate a broad and sustainable economic recovery. 2009 Capital Assistance Program and Supervisory Capital Assessment Program On February 10. The SCAP buffer for each BHC was sized to achieve a Tier 1 risk-based ratio of 6 percent and a Tier 1 Common risk-based ratio of 4 percent at the end of 2010 under a more severe macroeconomic scenario than expected. and reserves for 2009 and 2010. and trading portfolios. securities.

many firms had already completed or contracted for asset sales or restructured existing capital instruments.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 77 clarity around the SCAP process and findings would make the exercise more effective at reducing uncertainty and restoring confidence in financial institutions. The 10 firms are required to raise the additional capital by November 9. the combined amount totaled $185 billion. The new fair value guidance reduces the emphasis to be placed on the “last transaction price” in valuing assets when markets are not active and transactions are likely to be forced or distressed. equity in the public markets and raised about $40 billion. To protect taxpayers. and (2) it is unlikely that the institution will be required to sell the debt security before a forecasted recovery of its cost basis. A description of the methodology and a summary of results. Between the end of 2008 and the release of the results in May. they also raised a substantial additional amount of capital by exchanging preferred shares to common shares and selling assets. A number of banks have also been able to issue debt not guaranteed by the FDIC’s Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program. 2009. In early June. although to still-elevated levels. Firms that do not meet their buffer requirement can issue mandatory convertible shares to the Treasury in an amount up to 2 percent of the institution’s risk-weighted assets (or higher on request). . In addition.11 Equity prices of banks and insurance companies rose. almost all of the 10 firms that were asked to raise capital buffers issued new common 1. firms can apply to the Treasury to exchange their existing Capital Purchase Program preferred stock to help meet their buffer requirement. nearly all of which is required to meet the target Tier 1 Common risk-based ratio. Most of these firms and others applied for and received approval from their supervisors to repay their outstanding Capital Purchase Program preferred stock. firms will be expected to have issued private capital before or simultaneously with the exchange. improving institutions’ reported first-quarter earnings. is available at www.htm. the combined amount of additional capital needed to establish the buffer was $75 billion. federalreserve. effects of revisions in accounting rules. The firms not asked to augment their capital also raised about $20 billion in common equity in May and early June. including loss rates on major loan categories for each firm. In early April. Since the release of the results. The new OTTI guidance will require impairment write-downs through earnings only for the credit-related portion of a debt security’s fair value impairment measures of equity price volatility declined.gov/bankinforeg/scap. After adjusting for these transactions and revenues that exceeded what had been assumed in the SCAP. Spreads on lower-rated investment-grade and speculative-grade corporate bonds over comparablematurity Treasury securities also fell. the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued new guidance related to fair value measurements and other-thantemporary impairments (OTTIs). though again to levels that remained high by historical standards. Bid-asked when two criteria are met: (1) The institution does not have the intent to sell the debt security. as a bridge to private capital. Libor-OIS spreads began to edge down. 10 large BHCs repaid about $68 billion to the Treasury. and CDS spreads for such institutions narrowed.1 Results of the SCAP indicated that 10 firms would need to augment their capital or improve the quality of the capital from 2008:Q4 levels. The two changes have resulted in higher fair value estimates and reductions in impairments. Broad stock price indexes also climbed and 11.

Regulatory capital ratios improved in the fourth quarter of 2008 . On June 17. the Federal Reserve outlined the criteria it would use to evaluate applications to redeem Treasury capital from participants in the SCAP. On June 25. Financial markets abroad also improved during the second quarter. Delinquency rates on residential mortgages held by banks soared to 8 percent. at the industry level. 2009 banking sector (see “International Developments” for additional detail). the Federal Reserve announced that while it would extend a number of its liquidity facilities through early 2010. Indeed.78 96th Annual Report. loan quality deteriorated substantially from the already poor levels recorded late last year. continued to lose money amid mounting credit losses. Market participants reportedly viewed the amount of additional capital that banks were required to raise in conjunction with the SCAP as relatively modest. it would trim their size and adjust some of their terms. starting in June. in light of the improvement in financial conditions and reduced usage of some of its facilities. the Federal Reserve announced that. spreads on speculative-grade bonds declined. In early June. issuance of consumer ABS picked up further in May. as measured by return on assets and return on equity. remained very weak. reflecting improved global economic prospects and positive news from the Banking Institutions Profitability of the commercial banking sector. and amid the ongoing improvements in financial markets. aided in part by the emergence of more detail on the SCAP program and the release of its results on May 7. issuance. however. 10 banking institutions redeemed about $68 billion in Treasury capital. Profits were concentrated at the largest banks and were driven by a rebound in trading revenue as well as reduced noninterest expense related to smaller write-downs of intangible assets. bid-asked spreads narrowed in the leveraged loan market. recovered somewhat in the first quarter after having posted near-record lows in the fourth quarter of 2008. with Libor-OIS spreads at one-month tenors declining to near precrisis levels. With uncertainty about the SCAP results resolved. the 10 banking organizations that had been required under the SCAP to bolster their capital buffers all submitted plans that would provide sufficient capital to meet the required buffer under the assessment’s more adverse scenario. and it began to approach precrisis levels. CMBS and securities backed by insurance premium finance loans would be eligible collateral under the TALF. The secondary market for leveraged loans also showed improvement. Similarly. with the average bid price rising considerably. Equity prices for many large banks and insurance companies rose even as substantial equity issuance by banks covered by the SCAP program added to supply. with delinquency rates on credit card loans reaching their highest level on record (back to 1991). At about the same time. Short-term interbank funding markets continued to improve. particularly for securities backed by credit card and auto loans. market participants appeared to mark down the probability of extremely adverse financial market outcomes. in contrast. Smaller banks. Demand for TALF funds increased in May and June. spreads at longer tenors also fell but remained very high. Also in May. Conditions in financial markets continued to improve in the second quarter. particularly of institutional loans. Supported by the TALF.

Some of these paydowns also were likely related to increased issuance of longer-term corporate debt. FOMC communications indicating that the federal funds rate would likely remain low for an extended period reportedly also contributed to the downward revision to policy expectations. suggesting continued deterioration in credit quality and further pressure on earnings. as nonfinancial firms—especially those rated as investment grade—tapped the corporate bond market. weakness in the real economy.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 and the first quarter of 2009 as commercial banks received substantial capital infusions—likely related to funds received by their parent bank holding companies under the Capital Purchase Program—while total assets declined. as banks reportedly sold or securitized large volumes of residential mortgages and consumer credit card loans. as a larger share of loans in the May survey were drawn from commitments arranged after the onset of the financial crisis. reflecting weak loan demand and tight credit conditions. the markdown was attributable to continued concerns about the health of financial institutions. In contrast. investors marked down. unused commitments to fund loans to both households and businesses shrank at an annual rate of more than 30 percent in the first quarter of 2009. 0 to 1⁄4 percent. likely a result of continued weakness in that sector. and a moderation in inflation pressures. with the noticeable exception of demand from prime borrowers for mortgages to purchase homes—a development that coincided with a temporary rise in applications to refinance home mortgages. particularly in the spring. Bank loans to households also fell over the first half of the year. The Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey conducted in April 2009 indicated that large fractions of banks continued to tighten standards and terms on loans to businesses and households over the preceding three months. however. For most loan categories. CRE loans ran off steadily. Data from the February and May Surveys of Terms of Business Lending indicated that the spreads of yields on C&I loans over those on comparablematurity market instruments rose noticeably. on balance. Monetary Policy Expectations and Treasury Rates The current target range for the federal funds rate. However. Despite a decline in loans outstanding. investors marked up their expectations about the pace with which policy accommodation will be removed . Commercial bank lending contracted at an annual rate of nearly 7 percent during the first half of 2009. Loan loss reserves reported by large banks increased considerably in the second quarter. Early in the year. partly as a result of broad and sustained paydowns of outstanding loans amid weak investment spending by businesses. is in line with the level that investors expected at the end of 2008. over the first half of 2009. The increase in the May survey was partly attributable to a steep increase in spreads on loans made under commitment. Demand for most types of loans also reportedly weakened over the survey period. The majority of respondents to 79 the April survey indicated that they expected the credit quality of their loan portfolios to worsen over the remainder of the year. the fractions of banks that reported having done so decreased from the January survey. C&I loans fell at an annual rate of about 14 percent over this period. their expectation for the path of the federal funds rate for the remainder of the year. Later in the period.

accounts and automatic transfer service accounts at depository institutions. and because other special factors have buffeted yields on nominal Treasury issues. In contrast to yields on their nominal counterparts. and (7) balances in retail money . M2 consists of (1) currency outside the U. However. and longer-maturity Treasury securities. Treasury. Yields on longer-maturity Treasury securities increased substantially. (4) other checkable deposits (negotiable order of withdrawal. reflecting robust growth in the first quarter and more moderate growth in the second. after having declined about 200 and 140 basis points. Monetary Aggregates and the Federal Reserve’s Balance Sheet The M2 monetary aggregate expanded at an annual rate of 73⁄4 percent during the first half of 2009.12 This 12. agency MBS. likely in light of increased optimism about the economic outlook. on balance. On net. with the rise concentrated in the second quarter. Federal Reserve Banks. (5) savings deposits (including money market deposit accounts). and foreign banks and official institutions) less cash items in the process of collection and Federal Reserve float. yields on Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS) declined over the first half of 2009.S. The rise in Treasury yields has likely been mitigated somewhat by the implementation of the Federal Reserve’s large-scale asset purchases. yields on 2. and demand deposits at thrift institutions). in 2010. under which the Federal Reserve is conducting substantial purchases of agency debt.S. 2009 which resulted in a noticeable increase in measured inflation compensation— the difference between comparablematurity nominal yields and TIPS yields. Futures quotes currently suggest that investors expect the federal funds rate to remain within the current target range for the remainder of this year and then to rise in 2010. (2) traveler’s checks of nonbank issuers. signs of thawing in the credit markets. during the second half of 2008. over the first half of 2009. credit union share draft accounts. uncertainty about the size of term premiums and potential distortions created by the zero lower bound for the federal funds rate continue to make it difficult to obtain a definitive reading on the policy expectations of market participants from futures prices. or NOW. respectively. during the first half of 2009. Inferences about inflation expectations from inflation compensation have been difficult to make since the second half of 2008 because yields on nominal and TIPS issues appear to have been affected significantly by movements in liquidity premiums. during the first half of 2009.and 10-year Treasury notes rose about 50 and 115 basis points. (3) demand deposits at commercial banks (excluding those amounts held by depository institutions. (6) small-denomination time deposits (time deposits issued in amounts of less than $100. in response to better-than-expected economic data releases. declines in the weight investors attached to highly adverse economic outcomes.80 96th Annual Report. although near-term inflation expectations may have been boosted by rising energy prices. suggesting that the increase in inflation compensation since year-end is partly due to an improvement in market functioning and other special factors. respectively.000) less individual retirement account (IRA) and Keogh balances at depository institutions. Options prices suggest that investor uncertainty about the future path for policy increased. on net. Some of these special factors have begun to subside in recent months. the U. government. technical factors related to the hedging of mortgage holdings. and the vaults of depository institutions. and the large increase in the expected supply of such securities.

S. slightly exceeded currency in circulation. 81 circulation) and about $20 billion in reserve balances held by depository institutions. the majority of Federal Reserve assets consisted of credit extended to depository institutions. Primary dealers are broker-dealers that trade in U. On the liability side. on net. The nontraditional monetary policy actions employed by the Federal Reserve since the onset of the current episode of financial turmoil have resulted in a considerable expansion of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet (table 1). The growth in assets was largely funded by an increase in reserve balances. Over the first half of this year. government securities with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.S. Treasury securities had declined by nearly one-half. as a decline in amounts outstanding under the Federal Reserve’s credit and liquidity programs partially offset the effects on reserve balances of the Federal Reserve’s large-scale asset purchases. the bulk of which was Treasury securities. Holdings of U. and primary dealers. The expansion of the monetary base slowed further in the second quarter of 2009. and holdings of agency debt and MBS rose to more than $625 billion as a result of largescale asset purchases. albeit at a slower pace than in the second half of 2008. The decline importantly reflected a decrease in foreign central banks’ draws on dollar liquidity swap lines and a runoff in credit extended through the CPFF and the Term Auction Facility (TAF). banknotes from both foreign and domestic sources. and other market participants fell as market functioning improved. which.2 trillion. . total Federal Reserve assets decreased slightly. though there were large changes in the composition of those assets. with a notable rise in the first quarter that appeared to reflect strong demand for U. 2008. after the introduction of several new Federal Reserve policy initiatives.1 trillion. primary dealers. Strong growth in liquid deposits was partially offset by rapid declines in small time deposits and retail money market mutual funds. 2007. Holdings of Treasury securities increased to nearly $685 billion. assets had more than doubled to about $2. the Federal Reserve’s assets totaled nearly $920 billion. other central banks.13 The Federal Reserve had extended about $330 billion in funding to the CPFF and was providing more than $100 billion in support of certain critical institutions. By December 31. 13. The currency component of the money stock also increased.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 expansion was due in part to the relatively small difference between market interest rates and the rates offered on M2 assets.S. The amount of credit extended in support of certain critical institutions remained about unchanged. at $860 billion. At that point. The monetary base— essentially the sum of currency in the hands of the public and the reserve balances of depository institutions held at the Federal Reserve—continued to expand rapidly in the first quarter of 2009. Its liabilities included nearly $800 billion in Federal Reserve notes (currency in market mutual funds less IRA and Keogh balances at money market mutual funds. On December 31. Credit extended to depository institutions. prior to much of the financial market turmoil. as well as an increased desire of households and firms to hold safe and liquid assets because of the financial turmoil. as yields on the latter two assets dropped relative to rates on liquid deposits. to about $2.

. . . . . .168 860. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .767 16. .824 65. . . . . . . . .620 40. . . . . . . . . . .152 34. . . . . Maiden Lane II LLC. . . . . .023 791. . . . . . . .. . .794 853. .925 38. Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 881. . . . . .. . . . . . . Stock indexes in Europe and Japan fell about 20 percent. . . . . . . . . . . . . 73. . .418 4. . . . . . . . . . .. . . Net portfolio holdings of LLCs funded through the Money Market Investor Funding Facility . . . .691 111. . . Support of critical institutions Net portfolio holdings of Maiden Lane LLC. Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .S... . . . .327 808. . Memo Term Securities Lending Facility3 . . . . . . . .S. .053 0 30. .743 273. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .914 475. . . Selected Components of the Federal Reserve Balance Sheet. . . . . . . . . . .474 Note: LLC is a limited liability company. . . . . securities lending reinvestment portfolio of subsidiaries of American International Group. .899 93. 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .691 20. . . . . . Net portfolio holdings of Commercial Paper Funding Facility LLC .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . while currency in circulation rose. . . . .641 0 5. . .025. . . . . .. . . . . . Total liabilities . . .. . . . . . . Agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS)2 . .939 49. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .921 19.822 8. and Maiden Lane III LLC1 . . Central bank liquidity swaps . . . . U. . . Source: Federal Reserve Board.922 Dec. . .600 2.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selected assets Credit extended to depository institutions and dealers Primary credit .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . (AIG). . . 2007−09 Millions of dollars Balance sheet item Total assets. . .000 . 2007 917. . . . .546 42. . . .469 111. . . . .102 0 . . . . Treasury securities . . .030 101. . . . . . .000 106. . . . supplemental financing account . Includes only MBS purchases that have already settled. . Maiden Lane LLC was formed to acquire certain assets of The Bear Stearns Companies. .611 0 . Reserve balances of depository institutions . Treasury. . . . Maiden Lane II LLC was formed to purchase residential mortgage-backed securities from the U. . . . . . . . . . . . .074. . . Dec. 3. .. . .728 37. . . . . . 2. . . . . .. . 171. . . . . . . Treasury.708 . . The Federal Reserve retains ownership of securities lent through the Term Securities Lending Facility. . . . . . . . . . . general account . . . . . . . .404 23. . . . . . . . . Not applicable. . . . . . . . . fears that global economic activ- ity would spiral further downward led to a sharp selloff in foreign equity markets and to rising spreads on foreign corporate debt. . . . . .. .348 870. . . 2009 2. . . . . .325 42. . . . . 36. . . . . . . . .S. 31. . . . . . . . .121 60. . . 740. . . .250 2. U. . . . . . . . . . . .946 July 15. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . The Federal Reserve has extended credit to several LLCs in conjunction with efforts to support critical institutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31. . . . .000 24. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .701 526.765 334.82 96th Annual Report. . . . . . Total capital. . . . . . . Securities held outright U. Credit extended to American International Group. . . . 2009 1. . . . . . .219 553.240. . . .198. . . . . . Primary Dealer Credit Facility and other broker-dealer credit . . . . . . Term auction credit . . . . . . . . . . . . Inc.871 684.123 259. . . . . . . . . . . Maiden Lane III LLC was formed to purchase multisector collateralized debt obligations on which the Financial Products group of AIG has written credit default swap contracts. reserve balances fell somewhat. . . . . Selected liabilities Federal Reserve notes in circulation . .. . . . . and European bank shares fell more than 40 percent in response to weak earnings reports and rising fears about the exposure of many Western Euro- . . . Inc. . . . . . . ..769 450. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 . . . . . . . . International Developments International Financial Markets During most of the first quarter of 2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agency debt securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credit extended to other market participants Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility . . . . . . . . . . .234 199. 2008 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

the Federal Reserve’s broad measure of the nominal exchange value of the dollar is about 2 percent lower than it was at the start of the year but remains well above its mid-2008 lows. On net. nominal benchmark bond yields in major foreign countries are higher than at the start of the year. On balance. investors withdrew to some extent from foreign securities. which benefited from the low interest rate environment. Stock markets around the world rebounded in the second quarter along with prospects for global growth. fueled continued dollar appreciation over the first two months of the year. headline European stock indexes are now about where they were at the start of the year. The decisions of several foreign central banks to engage in nontraditional monetary policies appeared to have some effect on longer-term interest rates. and yields on European covered bonds fell nearly 30 basis points over the week following the May 7 announcement by the European Central Bank (ECB) that it would purchase covered bonds. as the economic outlook improved some in the second quarter. However. and amid concerns about mounting fiscal deficits and debts. the dollar depreciated as the global outlook improved a bit and investors accordingly shifted away from Treasury securities to riskier assets abroad. The Federal Reserve’s broadest measure of the nominal tradeweighted foreign exchange value of the dollar rose more than 6 percent during January and February. corporate and agency securities and toward safer U. reversing the pattern observed in the fourth quarter of 2008. Interbank funding markets were supported by government guarantees of bank debt and other policies put in place during 2008 to aid wholesale funding. U. These markets remained more stressed than before the financial crisis.S.S. which were helped both by the improved outlook and by an increased willingness on the part of investors to hold riskier assets. Treasury securities by foreigners . Rapidly easing monetary policies in many foreign economies. yields on nominal benchmark bonds rose. Yields on long-term British gilts fell 60 basis points around the March 5 announcement by the Bank of England that it would begin purchasing government securities. by the easing of strains in financial markets. For 2008 as a whole. more recently. On net. even as yields on inflation-protected bonds have fallen.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 pean banks to emerging Europe. the size of the purchases of U. Treasury securities. During the spring. The Financial Account The pattern of financial flows between the United States and the rest of the world was strongly affected by the intensification of financial turmoil in the fall of 2008 and. foreigners noticeably shifted their purchases away from U. In the second half of 2008. At the same time. beginning in March. However. along with further safe-haven flows into Treasury securities. but their functioning continued to gradually improve from the serious disarray that occurred last fall. and foreigners slowed their purchases of U. Equity prices in the emerging 83 market economies. as the improvement in the global outlook also boosted commodity prices. the dollar fell most sharply against currencies of major commodity-producing economies such as Australia and Canada. assets.S.S.S. Financial stocks led this rise in the advanced foreign economies as some large banks reported strong earnings growth. are now 20 to 75 percent higher than at the start of the year.

Foreign official acquisitions of Treasury securities were concentrated in short-term bills for some months during the winter. reduced the outstanding amounts of U. The pace of private foreign net Treasury purchases slowed in the first quarter. assets in the first several months of 2009. foreign banks were able to repay the loans they had received from their central banks.S. residents bringing home their foreign investments. April. signaling some reversal of the flight to safety. securities. although acquisitions remained centered on U. starting this year. Foreign demand for most other U. they sold larger amounts of other U. however. By the second quarter. as financial turbulence. with prices and building activity declining. although foreign official institutions made large net purchases of Treasury securities.S.S. Finally. remained extremely weak throughout the first part of 2009.S. while industrial production stabilized somewhat. although they did show renewed interest in U. corporate stocks in March. monthly indicators of economic activity in these economies began to show some moderation in the pace of contraction. and in April flows turned to net sales. The pattern of flows has normalized somewhat this year.S. Housing markets also continued to weaken in the first quarter. This development followed net sales in the fourth quarter of 2008 as some countries sold reserves to support their currencies. which were hit hard by a contraction in manufacturing exports. These foreign central banks.S. dollars drawn on swap lines from the Federal Reserve. improvements in the Advanced Foreign Economies The contraction of economic activity in the major advanced foreign economies deepened in the first quarter. Domestic demand plummeted across the advanced foreign economies. in turn. investors returned to net purchases of foreign securities. with double-digit declines in investment spending and sizable negative contributions of inventories to economic growth.S. Purchasing managers indexes and surveys of business confidence rebounded in the second quarter from the exceptionally low levels reached in the first quarter.S. GDP fell particularly sharply in Germany and Japan.S. As private sources of dollar liquidity reemerged. corporate and agency securities through April. Foreigners continued to sell U. Resumption of portfolio investment abroad by U. nearly doubling the previous record.S. was unprecedented.S.84 96th Annual Report. primarily of short-term Treasury securities. but official acquisitions of longterm notes and bonds have been similar to those of bills over the period since February. Following unprecedented net inflows in this category in 2008 resulting from U. Twelve-month consumer price inflation continued to decline during the first half of the year. investors in 2009 also pointed to reduced risk aversion in financial markets. and eroding business and consumer confidence continued to weigh on activity. banks after a sharp contraction of lending in the fourth quarter. however. and particularly May. Foreign official institutions resumed strong net purchases of U. assets. outflows resumed in early 2009 as U. shrinking world trade. Treasury securities. driven down by the fall in oil and other commodity prices since mid-2008 and the . adverse wealth effects. 2009 tone of interbank funding markets led to a resumption of net lending abroad by U.

As policy rates fell to very low levels. However. Excluding food and energy prices. Elsewhere in emerging Asia. The Bank of Japan. and would purchase commercial paper outright. South Korea. Singapore. Economic activity in Mexico contracted sharply late last year and again in the first quarter. partly because of stimulus-driven demand from China. . the economies of Mexico and some other Latin American countries continued to be negatively affected by the sharp fall in commodity prices in the second half of last year. kept rates at that minimal level. Among the larger developing economies. In addition.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 significant increase in economic slack. the slowing in consumer prices in these economies was more limited. economic activity contracted sharply again in the first quarter. the Bank of Japan announced that it would increase its purchase of Japanese government bonds. Taiwan. In Brazil. although they remain weak. India’s economy also was supported by fiscal stimulus and was relatively insulated from the negative global shock because it is less open. The ECB and Bank of England each reduced its key policy rate 150 basis points over the first half of 2009. More recently. However. the economies of Hong Kong. owing largely to Mexico’s strong ties to the United States. and by an enormous jump in credit growth. Foreign central banks responded to worsening economic conditions and reduced inflation by aggressively cutting policy rates and. only China and India have maintained positive growth during the global slowdown. After falling steeply in the fourth quarter. which focused on infrastructure investment. In addition. in some cases. exports. Malaysia. and retail sales suggest that economic activity may be starting to recover. including longer-term bonds. have edged higher in some countries. The Bank of England established an Asset Purchase Facility to purchase up to £125 billion in government and corporate debt. the automobile sector. where the depreciation of the pound late last year contributed to keeping inflation around 2 percent. allocating €442 billion. Chinese growth was supported in the first quarter and boosted significantly further in the second quarter by a large fiscal stimulus package. which had already cut the overnight uncollateralized call rate to 10 basis points. industrial production in several Latin American countries has recently turned higher. production. however. Headline inflation fell to near or below zero in all major economies except the United Kingdom. recent data on business sentiment. 85 Emerging Market Economies The global financial crisis took its toll on the emerging market economies as well. indicators such as industrial production have turned up in some of these countries. appears to have led a rebound in output. while the Bank of Canada lowered its rate 125 basis points. and Thailand all contracted at double-digit annual rates in at least one quarter. as in Asia. central banks implemented nontraditional policies to provide further support to activity. initiating unconventional monetary easing. which has received government support. and the ECB announced plans to purchase as much as €60 billion in covered bonds over the next year and conducted its first one-year financing operations on June 24. The outbreak of the H1N1 virus was a significant drag on Mexican economic activity in the second quarter. in line with their deep trade and financial linkages with the global economy.

Committee members agreed that keeping the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent would be appropriate. some financial markets—particularly those that were receiving support from Federal Reserve liquidity facilities and other government actions—exhibited modest signs of improvement. due in part to pass-through from the peso’s depreciation earlier this year. Hungary. Part 3 Monetary Policy: Recent Developments and Outlook Monetary Policy over the First Half of 2009 Over the second half of 2008.S. especially in China where consumer prices in June were below their year-earlier levels. and Ukraine are among the countries that have received official assistance from the International Monetary Fund. During the first half of 2009. reflecting declines in consumer energy prices. Latvia. and the drop in industrial production had accelerated. Mexican inflation remains near its recent high. although the degree has varied and all stimulus packages have been smaller than that in China. Many emerging market economies have undertaken fiscal stimulus this year. In its January Several countries in emerging Europe continued to experience intense financial stress and sharp economic contractions in the first quarter. Reduced price pressures and weak economic growth prompted significant monetary easing in several Asian emerging market economies. monetary easing has taken place in Latin America. the FOMC maintained its target range for the federal funds rate of 0 to 1⁄4 percent. and continued efforts by the government to stabilize the financial sector and increase the availability of credit. The housing market remained on a steep downward trajectory. 2009 decreasing its target for the federal funds rate from 2 percent to a range between 0 and 1⁄4 percent and took a number of additional actions to increase liquidity and improve the functioning of financial markets. and it extended and modified the nontraditional policy actions taken previously. and foreign demand had weakened. consumer spending continued its significant decline. the slowdown in business equipment investment intensified. relatively low energy prices. but nominal interest rates remain somewhat higher than in Asia. core consumer prices were about flat in those months. The region has faced external financing difficulties as a result of large external imbalances and high dependence on foreign capital flows. Notably. additional fiscal stimulus. Although credit conditions generally had remained tight. Romania. Inflation in Latin America has fallen less sharply. economic activity would begin in the second half of the year in response to monetary easing. In these circumstances. the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) eased the stance of monetary policy by . As the global economy has slowed. Headline consumer prices fell in November and December. Inflation in emerging Asia has decreased significantly. Meeting participants—Federal Reserve Board governors and Federal Reserve Bank presidents—anticipated that a gradual recovery in U. inflation in emerging market economies has diminished. The data reviewed at the January 27–28 FOMC meeting indicated a continued sharp contraction in economic activity. with activity declining at an especially precipitous rate in Latvia. Conditions in the labor market had continued to deteriorate rapidly.86 96th Annual Report.

Notably. looking beyond the very near term. with widespread declines in payroll employment and industrial production. Economic activity continued to fall sharply. reduced house prices. In its March statement. with pressures on financial institutions generally having intensified over the past few months. the FOMC reiterated that the Federal Reserve would use all available tools to promote the resumption of sustainable economic growth and to preserve price stability. nearly all participants indicated that economic conditions had deteriorated relative to their expectations at the time of the 87 January meeting. the Committee met by conference call in a joint session with the Board of Governors to discuss the potential role of the Federal Reserve in the Treasury’s forthcoming Financial Stability Plan. Of particular note was the sharp fall in foreign economic activity. Despite the cutbacks in production. The Federal Reserve’s primary direct role in the plan would be through an expansion of the previously announced Term AssetBacked Securities Loan Facility (TALF). to provide greater support to mortgage lending and housing markets. and a stabilization of house prices. the Committee announced that. 2009. The Committee also stated that. which would be supported by additional funds from the Treasury’s Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). Overall. Nonetheless. At the March FOMC meeting. and financial markets continued to be fragile and unsettled. and the Administration’s new programs to encourage mortgage refinancing and mitigate foreclosures ultimately could bring about a lower cost of homeownership. The Committee indicated that it would continue to monitor carefully the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in light of evolving financial market developments. a sustained increase in home sales. the low level of mortgage interest rates. It would also continue to assess whether expansions of. participants expressed concern about downside risks to an outlook for activity that was already weak. On February 7. it would increase the size of . it was prepared to purchase longer-term Treasury securities if evolving circumstances indicated that such transactions would be particularly effective in improving conditions in private credit markets. in addition to the purchases of agency debt and mortgagebacked securities (MBS) already under way. It was anticipated that such an expansion would provide additional assistance to financial markets and institutions in meeting the credit needs of households and businesses and thus would support overall economic activity.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 statement. exports.S. and nonresidential construction fell. lending facilities would serve to further support credit markets and economic activity and help preserve price stability. the housing market weakened further. Both headline and core consumer prices had edged up in January and February. Credit conditions remained very tight. inventory overhangs appeared to have worsened in a number of areas. Consumer spending had remained flat at a low level. In light of the deterioration in the economic situation and outlook. Business spending on equipment and software had continued to decline across a broad range of categories. participants saw a number of market forces and policies then in place as eventually leading to economic recovery. which was having a negative effect on U. or modifications to. Committee members agreed that substantial additional purchases of longer-term assets would be appropriate.

Housing activity remained depressed but seemed to have leveled off in February and March. participants noted that the pace of decline in some components of final demand appeared to have slowed. and it anticipated that the range of eligible collateral for this facility was likely to be expanded to include other financial assets. and surveys and anecdotal reports pointed to a pickup in household and business confidence. and perhaps some unwinding of flight-to-quality flows. Yields on Treasury and agency securities had fallen after the release of the March FOMC statement. Headline and core consumer prices rose at a moderate pace over the first three months of the year. in part. In contrast. bringing its total purchases of these securities up to $1. with growth of consumption expenditures likely to be restrained and business investment spending probably the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet further by purchasing up to an additional $750 billion of agency MBS.88 96th Annual Report. and that it would increase its purchases of agency debt this year by up to $100 billion to a total of up to $200 billion. 2009 comprehensive resolution regime for systemically important financial institutions. the Committee decided to purchase up to $300 billion of longer-term Treasury securities over the next six months. this initial drop was subsequently reversed amid the improved economic outlook. However. the Federal Reserve and the Treasury agreed to continue to cooperate on measures to improve the stability and functioning of the financial system while minimizing the associated credit risk to the Federal Reserve and preserving the ability of the Federal Reserve to achieve its monetary policy objectives. to help improve conditions in private credit markets. businesses had cut production and employment substantially in recent months—reflecting. Consumer spending firmed in the first quarter after dropping markedly during the second half of 2008. Participants anticipated that the acceleration in final demand and economic activity over the next few quarters would be modest. inventory overhangs that had persisted into the early part of the year— and fixed investment continued to contract. The Committee decided to maintain the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and noted in its March statement that it anticipated that economic conditions were likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for an extended period. In the statement. Participants noted that financial market conditions had generally strengthened. The Committee stated that it would continue to carefully monitor the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in light of evolving financial and economic developments. At the FOMC meeting on April 28 and 29. and the Treasury promised to remove the emergency loans for systemically important institutions from the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet over time to the extent its authorities permit. On March 23. the Federal Reserve and the Treasury issued a joint statement on the role of the Federal Reserve in preserving financial and monetary stability. which noted the increase in planned purchases of longer-term securities.25 trillion in 2009. an easing of concerns about financial institutions. which nonetheless remained at very low levels. The two government entities also agreed to work together with the Congress on a . The Committee also noted that the Federal Reserve had launched the TALF to facilitate the extension of credit to households and small businesses. Moreover.

Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 shrinking further. and their desired saving rates would be relatively high over the extended period that would be required to bring their wealth back up to more normal levels relative to income. Nominal Treasury yields climbed steeply. reflecting investors’ perceptions of an improved economic outlook. The results of the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program (SCAP) were positively received by financial markets. the Federal Reserve would purchase a total of up to $1. and the recent declines in capital spending did not look as severe as those that had occurred around the turn of the year. At the same time. Conditions and sentiment in financial markets had continued to show signs of improvement since the last meeting. although an upturn in energy prices appeared likely to boost headline inflation in June. especially given that the outlook for credit performance would probably remain weak. reflecting the gradual recovery of economic activity in our major trading partners. The Committee indicated that it would continue to carefully monitor the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in light of financial and economic developments. broad stock price indexes increased.25 trillion of agency MBS and up to $200 billion of agency debt by the end of the year. sales and starts of new homes flattened out. participants considered a number of factors that would be likely to restrain the pace of economic recovery over the medium term. Households would likely continue to be cautious. The information reviewed at the June 23–24 FOMC meeting suggested that the economy remained weak. Consumer spending appeared to have stabilized. Demand for U. labor markets and industrial production continued to deteriorate sharply. The Committee would continue to evaluate the timing and overall amounts of its purchases of securities in light of the evolving economic outlook and conditions in finan- 89 cial markets. The Committee reiterated that. though declines in activity seemed to be lessening. The functioning of shortterm funding markets improved. exports would also take time to revive. Looking further ahead. to provide support to mortgage lending and housing markets and to improve overall conditions in private credit markets. consumer price inflation was fairly quiescent in recent months. The Federal Reserve was facilitating the extension of credit to households and businesses and supporting the functioning of financial markets through a range of liquidity programs. and spreads on corporate bonds continued to narrow. a reversal of flight-to-quality . Strains in credit markets were expected to recede only gradually as financial institutions continued to rebuild their capital and remained cautious in their approach to asset-liability management. Apart from a taxinduced jump in tobacco prices. The stimulus from fiscal policy was expected to diminish over time as the government budget moved to a sustainable path.S. the FOMC indicated that it would maintain the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and anticipated that economic conditions would be likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for an extended period. and the institutions involved in the SCAP were subsequently able to issue significant amounts of public equity and nonguaranteed debt. In addition. credit default swap spreads of banking organizations declined considerably. Against this backdrop. the Federal Reserve would buy up to $300 billion of Treasury securities by autumn.

. . . Usage of some of the Federal Reserve’s liquidity programs had also decreased in recent months. . Auctions backed by Schedule 1 collateral suspended effective July 1. . . . . . . Extensions and Modifications of Federal Reserve Liquidity Programs Liquidity program Extension Modification Money market mutual funds have to experience material outflows before being able to sell asset-backed commercial paper that would be eligible collateral for AMLF loans. Extended to February 1. .90 96th Annual Report. . . flows.. . .. . . Source: Federal Reserve Board. The Committee noted that it would continue to evaluate the timing and overall amounts of its purchases of securities in light of the evolving economic outlook and conditions in financial markets. . . .. . . No fixed expiration date Term Securities Lending Facility . Against this backdrop. . Auctions backed by Schedule 2 collateral now conducted every four weeks. . as it had previously announced. the Federal Reserve would purchase a total of up to $1. 2010 Money Market Investor Funding Facility . . . . . . . . .. 2010 Central bank swap lines . .. . . see Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (2009). . . Extended to February 1. the Federal Reserve announced extensions of and modifications to a number of its liquidity programs (see table 2 for a summary of the changes). . Not applicable. . the FOMC reiterated that it would employ all available tools to promote economic recovery and preserve price stability. and technical factors related to the hedging of mortgage holdings. . .. 2009 2. It noted that it would maintain its target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and continued to anticipate that economic conditions would likely warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for an extended period. Extended to February 1. . . . . . . Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF) . . . . . . .. . . . For more details. . . Extended to February 1. . . . The FOMC indicated that. . on June 25. . . . . 2010 . . 2009 Term Auction Facility . . . Total amount offered reduced initially to $75 billion. . . . . . . . Conditions in financial markets had improved notably by the end of June. Expiration date remains at October 30. . . .14 The Federal Reserve noted that the Board and the 14. . . . . .. 2009. The FOMC also stated that the Federal Reserve was monitoring the size and composition of its balance sheet and would make adjustments to its credit and liquidity programs as warranted. . . . . .25 trillion of agency MBS and up to $200 billion of agency debt by the end of the year. . the Federal Reserve would buy up to $300 billion of Treasury securities by autumn. . . “Federal Reserve Announces Extensions of and Modifica- . . . . . although market functioning in many areas remained impaired and seemed likely to remain strained for some time. 2010 Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility . to provide support to mortgage lending and housing markets and to improve overall conditions in private credit markets. In its June statement. . . 2009 Primary Dealer Credit Facility . Auction amounts reduced initially to $125 billion. . . . . In addition.. . . . . . . Extended to February 1. Expiration date remains at December 31.. . . 2010 Commercial Paper Funding Facility .

or modifications of Federal Reserve programs. the sizes of these programs. ery will take hold. if financial stresses did not moderate as expected. Thus. June 25. when such action becomes appropriate. the focus of monetary policy is on stimulating economic activity in order to limit the degree to which the economy falls short of full employment and to prevent a sustained decline in inflation below levels consistent with the Federal Reserve’s legislated objectives. The next section of this report. Indeed. This increase in assets reflects both the expansion of Federal Reserve liquidity facilities and the purchases of longer-term securities. At some point. The FOMC is confident that it has the necessary tools to withdraw policy accommodation. and the downward pressures on inflation will diminish. When this process has advanced sufficiently. In particular. the increase in Federal Reserve assets has been associated with substantial growth in banks’ reserve balances. 2010. labor market conditions will improve. “Monetary Policy as the Economy Recovers. as . Thus. the extension of credit and acquisition of assets by the Federal Reserve has been funded by crediting the reserve accounts of depository institutions (henceforth referred to as banks).” 91 Monetary Policy as the Economy Recovers At present. These initiatives are described more fully in the box titled “Federal Reserve Initiatives to Increase Transparency. Over the first half of the year. Monetary policy actions taken over the past year have led to a considerable increase in the assets held by the Federal Reserve. a contraction in the stock of reserve balances will occur automatically as financial conditions improve. The public would receive timely notice of planned extensions. leaving the level of reserves far above that typically observed when short-term interest rates were significantly greater than zero. the stance of policy will need to be tightened to prevent inflation from rising above levels consistent with price stability and to keep economic activity near its maximum sustainable level. economic recovtions to a Number of Its Liquidity Programs.” has further discussion related to the evolution of these programs. To some extent. as well as the stock of reserve balances they create. Should the recent improvements in market conditions continue. discontinuations. Economic conditions are likely to warrant accommodative monetary policy for an extended period. in a smooth and timely manner. will tend to diminish automatically as financial strains abate.” press release. On the margin. the Board and the FOMC anticipated that a number of the facilities might not need to be extended beyond February 1. most of the liquidity facilities deployed by the Federal Reserve in the current period of financial turmoil are priced at a premium over normal interest rate spreads or have a minimum bid rate that is high enough to make them unattractive under normal market conditions. the Board and the FOMC were prepared to extend the terms of some or all of the facilities as needed to promote financial stability and economic growth.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 FOMC would continue to monitor closely the condition of financial markets and the need for and effectiveness of the Federal Reserve’s special liquidity facilities and arrangements. However. however. the Federal Reserve also undertook a number of initiatives to improve communications about its policy actions.

leading to further reductions in reserve balances. the report summarizes and discusses recent developments across a number of Federal Reserve programs.gov/monetarypolicy/bst. In addition to the new report. redemptions of the Federal Reserve’s holdings of agency debt. as well as the most recent reports to the Congress on 1.newyorkfed. the volume of assets on the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet may remain very large for some time.federalreserve. and asset distribution and other information on the LLCs. the new information provided in the report includes the number of borrowers and the amounts borrowed by type of institution. A guiding principle of the review was that the Federal Reserve would seek to provide to the public as much information and analysis as possible. and longerterm Treasury securities are expected to occur at a rate of $100 billion to $200 billion per year over the next few years. consistent with its objectives of promoting maximum employment and price stability. and data on the concentration of borrowing. 2008.1 Postings in the first half of 2009 included additional explanatory material and details about a number of Federal Reserve credit and liquidity programs. See Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (2009). The report also includes information on liquidity swap usage by country. This section of the Board’s website is available at www.html. and analyses of its lending programs and balance sheet. July). 3. the Federal Reserve issued the first of a series of monthly reports to provide more information on its credit and liquidity programs. Federal Reserve Bank of New York (2009). and the limited liability companies (LLCs) created in 2008 to avert the disorderly failures of The Bear Stearns Companies. agency MBS. In late 2008. collateral by type and credit rating. to less than $600 billion as of July 15. Inc. In addition. as financial conditions improved. 2009 Federal Reserve Initiatives to Increase Transparency The Federal Reserve took a number of nontraditional policy actions during the current episode of financial turmoil. . htm. explanations. the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending programs. the level of bank reserves would continue to remain elevated as well. the annual financial statements of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks.. “Vendor Information.” www. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York recently made available the investment management agreements related to its financial stability and liquidity activities. 2009. and American International Group.. quarterly income earned on different classes of Federal Reserve assets. Inc.org/ aboutthefed/vendor_information. the Board of Governors. But even after lending facilities have wound down and holdings of long-term assets have begun to run off. Without additional actions. noted elsewhere in this report. On June 10. In addition.2 For many of those programs. The Federal Reserve subsequently created a separate section of its website devoted to providing data.3 2.5 trillion as of December 31. Federal Reserve System Monthly Report on Credit and Liquidity Programs and the Balance Sheet (Washington: Board of Governors. Chairman Bernanke asked Vice Chairman Kohn to lead a review of how Federal Reserve disclosure policies should be adapted to make more information about these programs available to the public and to the Congress. total credit extended to banks and other market participants (excluding support of critical institutions) declined from about $1.92 96th Annual Report.

including some large lenders in the federal funds market such as the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs). as such borrowing allows them to earn a spread without any risk. The first method for tightening monetary policy relies on the authority that the Congress granted to the Federal Reserve last fall to pay interest on the balances maintained by banks. the Federal Reserve has various options to deal with the problem. however. Second. Under these transactions. In principle. the payment of interest on reserves was a new policy at the time that the gap was particularly noticeable.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 Despite continued large holdings of assets. Thus. the Federal Reserve sells securities from its portfolio. and agrees to buy back the securities at a later date. raising the interest rate paid on balances that banks hold at the Federal Reserve should provide a powerful upward influence on short-term market interest rates. large-scale lending in the federal funds market by nondepository institutions threatens to hold the federal funds rate below its target. the federal funds rate has been somewhat lower than the rate of interest banks earn on reserve balances. Moreover. the Federal Reserve will be able to tighten monetary policy by inducing increases in the federal funds rate and other short-term market interest rates. Third. including the federal funds rate. Such institutions may have an incentive to lend at rates below the rate that banks receive on reserve balances. The latter two factors are not likely to persist. Despite this logic. the two methods will most likely be used in combination. In general. . thereby removing funds from the market. These transactions are referred to as reverse repurchase agreements to distinguish them from repurchase agreements in which the Federal Reserve is the investor. it could offer these institutions the option of investing in reverse repurchase agreements. as the economy recovers. when payment of interest on reserves first began. the unusually strained conditions in financial markets at that time may have reduced the willingness of banks to arbitrage by borrowing in the federal funds market at rates below the rate paid on reserve balances and earning a higher rate by increasing their deposits at the Federal Reserve. Moreover. For example. without the need to drain reserve balances. they should compete to borrow any funds that are offered in the market at rates below the rate of interest paid by the Federal Reserve. the Federal Reserve will have at its disposal two broad means of tightening monetary policy at the appropriate time. particularly as the economy and financial markets recover. the gap was especially noticeable in October and November 93 2008. A number of foreign central banks have been able to maintain overnight interbank interest rates at or above the level of interest paid on bank reserves even in the presence of unusually high levels of reserve balances (see the box titled “Foreign Experience with Interest on Reserves”). if.15 Eliminating the incentive of nondepository institutions to lend their excess funds into 15. and banks may not have had time to adjust their operations to the new regime. the Federal Reserve is not allowed to pay interest on balances held by nondepository institutions. By raising the rate it pays on banks’ reserve balances. to ensure effectiveness. either of these methods would suffice to raise shortterm interest rates. banks will not supply funds to the money market at an interest rate lower than the rate they can earn risk free at the Federal Reserve. This gap appears to have reflected several factors: First.

including GSEs as well as other institutions. the Federal Reserve could engage in largescale reverse repurchase agreements with financial market participants. returning to their level during much of 2002. A third option is for the Federal Reserve to offer banks the opportunity to hold some of their balances as term deposits.94 96th Annual Report. the resulting deposits are reported on the Federal Reserve balance sheet as the Supplementary Financing Account. The European Central Bank (ECB). Policymakers have several options for reducing the level of reserve balances should such action be desired. even as reserve balances at the BOJ have risen substantially. The second method for tightening monetary policy. the Bank of Japan (BOJ) on a temporary basis has paid interest on excess reserve balances. for example. to maintain a floor under overnight interbank interest rates both in normal circumstances and during the period of financial turmoil. is a standard tool used by major foreign central banks. Many have used interest on reserves. to preserve monetary policy independence. Since November 2008. which is also its current target for the overnight uncollateralized call rate. the overnight rate has traded near 10 basis points in recent months. 2009 Foreign Experience with Interest on Reserves Paying interest on excess reserve balances. not below that rate. at a rate of 10 basis points per year. as a result. One limitation on this option is that the associated Treasury debt is subject to the statutory debt ceiling. has long allowed banks to place excess reserves into a deposit facility that pays interest at a rate below the ECB’s main refinancing rate (its bellwether policy rate). First. Term deposits could not be . when the BOJ was implementing its Quantitative Easing Policy and the call rate was trading at 1 basis point or below. the BOJ noted that its action was intended to keep the call rate close to the targeted level as it supplied additional liquidity to the banking system. is to take steps to reduce the overall level of reserve balances. Reverse repurchase agreements are a traditional tool of Federal Reserve monetary policy implementation. the euro-area overnight interbank rate fell from a level close to the main refinancing rate toward the rate the ECB pays on deposits—but. the Treasury could sell more bills and deposit the proceeds with the Federal Reserve. Also. The Treasury has been conducting such operations since last fall. Sec- ond. the Federal Reserve must ensure that it can achieve its policy objectives without reliance on the Treasury if necessary. Indeed. either directly or by allowing banks to place excess balances into an interest-bearing account. in combination with other tools. The Bank of Canada and the Bank of England also have used their standing deposit facilities to help manage interbank interest rates. importantly. short-term money markets would help ensure that raising the rate of interest paid on reserves would raise the federal funds rate and tighten monetary conditions even if the level of reserve balances were to remain high. The quantity of funds that banks hold in that facility increased sharply as the ECB expanded its liquidityproviding operations last fall and has remained well above pre-crisis levels. despite a high level of assets on the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet. Such deposits would pay interest but would not have the liquidity and transactions features of reserve balances.

the rate of remuneration on term deposits would have to be kept lower than the rates the Federal Reserve charges on its lending facilities. Reserve retains the option to reduce its stock of assets by selling off a portion of its holdings of longer-term securities before they mature. Asset sales by the Federal Reserve would serve to raise short-term interest rates and tighten monetary policy by reducing the level of reserve balances. economic conditions are not likely to warrant a tightening of monetary policy for an extended period. As noted earlier. the Federal 95 16. the Federal Reserve has a wide range of tools that can be used to tighten the stance of monetary policy at the point that the economic outlook calls for such action.16 Each of these three policy options would allow a tightening of monetary policy by draining reserve balances and raising short-term interest rates. However. Raising the rate of interest on reserve balances and draining reserves through the options just described would allow policy to be tightened even if the level of assets on the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet remained very high. In addition.Monetary Policy Report of July 2009 counted toward reserve requirements. nor could they be used to avoid overnight overdraft penalties in reserve accounts. broad-based increases in interest rates could facilitate the achievement of the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate. especially in a period of rising interest rates. To be successful. In short. The timing and pace of any future tightening. measures to drain reserves will likely be used in conjunction with increases in the interest rate paid on reserves to tighten conditions in short-term money markets. such as the discount window. such deposits likely would have to pay rates of interest above the overnight rate on reserve balances. To prevent banks from earning risk-free profits by borrowing from the Federal Reserve and investing the proceeds in term deposits. will be calibrated to best foster the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives of maximum employment and price stability. Á . together with the mix of tools employed. In an environment of strengthening economic activity and rising inflation pressures. such sales could put upward pressure on longer-term interest rates by expanding the supply of longer-term assets available to investors. in addition.

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Federal Reserve Operations .

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57 have repaid all funds received. Department of Treasury’s (Treasury) Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP).6 billion according to FDIC estimates.S. approximately 66 percent of all funds distributed have been repaid.9 percent. lending contracted 2. The risk-based capital ratios for state member banks improved over 2009 in the aggregate.2 percent from 2008.6 percent of loans and foreclosed assets. As a group. Earnings remained lackluster due to elevated provision levels and a sizable increase in securities losses to $4. In the midst of general improvements in financial markets throughout the course of 2009. Treasury and the Federal Reserve.2 billion.4 billion in 2009—in part attributed to a special assessment by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and somewhat less than the $4. In response to the market turmoil of 2008. State member banks repaid approximately $19. As a group. BHCs and state member banks continued to face substantial challenges. consistent with the designation under prompt corrective action standards. and C&I loans. the nonperforming assets ratio escalated to 4. BHCs returned to profitability in 2009. initiated the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program . but weakness encompassed nonfarm nonresidential lending. Of the 596 BHCs that received funds from the U. The nonperforming assets ratio escalated to 4. It plays an important role as the consolidated supervisor of bank holding companies (BHCs). residential mortgages.99 Banking Supervision and Regulation The Federal Reserve has supervisory and regulatory authority over a variety of financial institutions and activities. Mirroring trends at BHCs. State member banks faced challenges similar to those faced by BHCs in 2009. an 18-year high. In 2009. but the percent of state member banks deemed well capitalized by ratios.3 billion or 48 percent of funds received from TARP. 16 state member banks with $13. commercial real estate—especially non-owner nonfarm nonresidential and construction other than single-family—and commercial and industrial (C&I) loans.7 billion loss in 2008. reflecting both contracting loan balances and weakening asset quality. but benefited from higher trading revenue as market conditions improved. including financial holding companies. Weaknesses were broad based. BHC capital ratios improved substantially during 2009. reporting $14.4 billion in assets failed.5 billion in earnings following a $30. dropped to 96 percent from 98 percent at year-end 2008. state member banks sustained losses of $4. with losses of $3.7 percent of loans and foreclosed assets.S. Construction lending accounted for one-third of the growth in problem loans. Improved market conditions boosted trading revenues and triggered appreciation in securities portfolios. working with other federal banking agencies.8 billion loss incurred in 2008. And it is the primary federal supervisor of state banks that are members of the Federal Reserve System.3 percent of assets reported losses in 2009. encompassing residential mortgages (firstlien). U. Although BHC assets grew 15. But 41 percent of all BHCs representing 36.

gov/newsevents/ press/bcreg/20091030a. During 2009. The statement is especially relevant to small 1. In October 2009. supervisors downgraded supervisory ratings and used enforcement tools to bring about corrective action. an international agreement formally titled “International Convergence of Capital Measurement and Capital Standards: A Revised Framework. the Federal Reserve continued to work with banking organizations to correct some of the riskmanagement weaknesses revealed by the financial crisis that began in mid2007. businesses because owner-occupied CRE often serves as collateral for many small business loans. the original version and an updated version issued in November 2005 are available on the website of the Bank for International Settlements (www. or prolonged delays in selling or renting commercial properties. and liquidity risk management. . All of these actions have significantly improved the quality of capital across the largest U. the Federal Reserve issued guidance on BHCs’ capital planning in March 2009.S. The original document was issued in 2004. BHCs had sufficient financial strength to absorb losses under a more adverse than expected macroeconomic scenario. The Basel II Capital Accord. including firmwide risk identification.2 A number of institutions have begun their transition to the new rules after having developed implementation plans and worked to put in place systems that will comply with the final rule’s qualification requirements. To underscore expectations regarding the guidance.1 This policy statement provides guidance for examiners and for financial institutions that are working with CRE borrowers who are experiencing diminished operating cash flows. depreciated collateral values. together with related actions to support repayment of Treasury capital by the 19 banking organizations. the Federal Reserve conducted extensive outreach to examiners and the industry.bis. it was determined that 10 of the BHCs assessed under SCAP needed to augment their capital by a combined total of $185 billion. increased their aggregate tier 1 common capital by nearly $200 billion. the Federal Reserve plans to augment its processes for conducting 2. Popularly known as the bank “stress test. which is made up of representatives of the central banks or other supervisory authorities of 19 countries. These supervisory activities covered a number of areas. The transparency around supervisors’ loss estimates increased investor confidence in the banking system and helped open the public equity markets to these institutions. Where institutions did not make appropriate progress.federalreserve. www.100 96th Annual Report. Interagency Policy Statement on Prudent CRE Loan Restructurings and Workouts (November 2009). Federal Reserve staff continued to work with the other federal banking agencies to implement the advanced approaches of the Basel II Capital Accord in the United States. In light of identified supervisory lessons learned. Actions taken by the 10 BHCs needing to increase their capital buffer. almost all in the form of common equity.org).S.” was developed by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision. senior management oversight. In conjunction with these efforts. 2009 (SCAP). the Federal Reserve issued interagency guidance on commercial real estate (CRE) loan restructurings and workouts. while remaining sufficiently capitalized to meet the needs of their creditworthy borrowers.htm. with the final rule taking effect on April 1.” the SCAP was designed to ensure that 19 of the largest U. banking organizations. 2008. As a result of our analysis.

and state-chartered commercial banks that are members of the Federal Reserve System. (3) an assessment of the key financial factors of capital. and the bank regulatory agencies of other nations. as well as its processes for ensuring that there is appropriate follow-up with institutions about issues identified during examinations and inspections.Banking Supervision and Regulation 101 examinations and inspections as needed. The Federal Reserve also has responsibility for supervising the operations of all Edge Act and agreement corporations. asset quality. and commodities Examinations and Inspections The Federal Reserve conducts examinations of state member banks. and control risks. including financial holding companies formed under the authority of the 1999 Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. including their compliance with laws and regulations. In carrying out these responsibilities. the Federal Reserve seeks primarily to promote their safe and sound operation. state agencies.S. measure. BHCs.S. (2) an assessment of the quality of the risk-management and internal control processes in place to identify. the international operations of state member banks and U. and (4) a review for compliance with applicable laws and regulations. it conducts inspections of BHCs and their nonbank subsidiaries. the Bank Merger Act (with regard to state member banks). BHCs. banking system. In overseeing these organizations. and the structure of the system. monitor. and the U. the Change in Bank Control Act (with regard to BHCs and state member banks). controls. In a process distinct from examinations. branches and agencies of foreign banks. the Federal Reserve coordinates its supervisory activities with the other federal banking agencies. The Federal Reserve exercises important regulatory influence over entry into the U. operations of foreign banking organizations. firms). the review of operations entails (1) an evaluation of the adequacy of governance provided by the board and senior management. through its administration of the Bank Holding Company Act.S. and liquidity. Scope of Responsibilities for Supervision and Regulation The Federal Reserve is the federal supervisor and regulator of all U. The accompanying table (see next page) provides information on examinations and inspections conducted by the Federal Reserve during the past five years. including financial holding companies.S. Supervision for Safety and Soundness To promote the safety and soundness of banking organizations. securities. earnings. Inspections of BHCs.S. It also takes enforcement and other supervisory actions as necessary. and the International Banking Act. and Edge Act and agreement corporations. procedures. the Federal Reserve conducts on-site examinations and inspections and off-site surveillance and monitoring. and operations. functional regulators (that is. are built around a rating system introduced in 2005 that reflects the shift in supervisory practices away from a historical . regulators for insurance. The Federal Reserve is also responsible for imposing margin requirements on securities transactions. the U. Whether an examination or an inspection is being conducted. including an assessment of internal policies.

. . . includes multiple targeted reviews.261 501 496 457 39 5 4.545 1.486 1. . Each of the first two components has four subcomponents: Risk Management—(1) Board and Senior Management Oversight.887 179 597 43 448 12. . . . . . . . . . .940 155 479 46 485 14. . . . . . . . . . . . By Federal Reserve System1 . . . Key aspects of the risk-focused approach to consolidated supervision of large complex banking organizations (LCBOs) include (1) developing an understanding of each LCBO’s legal and operating structure. .102 96th Annual Report. . . . . .405 761 500 261 907 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . Number of inspections . . . . . . . . By state banking agency Small (assets of $1 billion or less) Total number . . . . . . . . .109 169 2. . By Federal Reserve System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and risk-management and internal control functions. . . and (4) Liquidity. . . . . . . . (3) Earnings. . By state banking agency .854 717 486 231 878 1. . business lines. .179 566 557 500 57 9 4. . (3) Risk Monitoring and Management Information Systems. holding companies are assigned a composite rating (C) that is based on assessments of three components: Risk Management (R). . . . Total assets (billions of dollars) . . Number of inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . and controlling those risks. .519 694 479 215 901 1. .233 170 3. . . . . . . . (2) Policies. 2005–2009 Entity/Item State member banks Total number .018 3. . and (4) Internal Controls. . is intended to mirror the primary super3. . . . . . . . . . . Total assets (billions of dollars) . . . . . . . . with activities focused on identifying the areas of greatest risk to banking organizations and assessing the ability of the organizations’ management processes for identifying. . . . . . . . . analysis of financial condition toward a more dynamic. . monitoring. . . . . On site . . . . .264 3. . (2) developing and executing a tailored supervisory plan outlining the work required to maintain a comprehensive understanding and assessment of each LCBO. . . . . . and its primary strategies. . . Financial Condition (F). . . .138 519 500 445 55 19 4. . . . . . The Federal Reserve uses a riskfocused approach to supervision. . . . . . . . . . . . . .063 187 591 38 1. . 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 845 1. . . Financial Condition—(1) Capital. . . . . . Depository Institution (D). . . . (2) Asset Quality. . . . . . incorporating reliance to the . Number of examinations . . . . . Total assets (billions of dollars) . By Federal Reserve System . . . . . Off site . . . . . .186 3. .744 658 640 501 139 18 4.3 The fourth component. . Financial holding companies Domestic . . and the potential Impact (I) of the parent company and its nondepository subsidiaries on the subsidiary depository institution. . . Foreign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192 3. .145 192 599 44 394 10. .281 492 476 438 38 16 4. . visor’s rating of the subsidiary depository institution. . . . . .318 783 563 220 488 15. Off site . . . Procedures. . . . . On site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top-tier bank holding companies Large (assets of more than $1 billion) Total number .690 850 655 195 862 1. forward-looking assessment of risk-management practices and financial factors. . .008 3. . . . . Under the system. . .941 144 557 45 459 13. . . . . . measuring. . For large bank holding companies subject to continuous. . .007 120 2.760 890 3. . .257 112 3. .048 107 2. . . By state banking agency . . . . .449 3. . .420 3. . . . risk-focused supervision.654 947 3. . . . 2009 State Member Banks and Bank Holding Companies. . . . .611 974 3. . . . . . . . . . . . and Limits. . . . . . . known as RFI but more fully termed RFI/C(D). . . . . . . . .

and final rules incorporating the change into existing regulations were issued on September 21. and examination reports tailored to the scope and findings of the examination. preexamination visits. Federal Reserve examiners consult examination reports prepared by the federal and state banking authorities that have primary responsibility for the supervision of those banks. and (5) promoting Systemwide and interagency information-sharing through automated systems and other mechanisms.Banking Supervision and Regulation 103 fullest extent possible on assessments and information developed by other relevant domestic and foreign supervisors and functional regulators. State Member Banks At the end of 2009. on-site examination of these banks is required at least once a year. detailed documentation. risk profile.S. 845 state-chartered banks (excluding nondepository trust companies and private banks) were members of the Federal Reserve System. complexity.710 insured commercial banks and held approximately 99 percent of all insured commercial bank assets in the United States. (3) maintaining continual supervision of these organizations—including through meetings with banking organization management and analysis of internal and external information—so that the Federal Reserve’s understanding and assessment of each organization’s condition remains current. these supervisory programs entail both off-site and on-site work. These banks represented approximately 12 percent of all insured U. Federal Reserve guidelines call for annual inspections of large BHCs and complex smaller companies. although certain well-capitalized. For other banking organizations. The Financial Services Regulatory Relief Act of 2006. a total of 5. As with the LCBOs. as amended by section 111 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 and by the Riegle Community Development and Regulatory Improvement Act of 1994. of which 4. 2007. Bank Holding Companies At year-end 2009.4 The Federal Reserve conducted 655 exams of state member banks in 2009. (4) assigning to each LCBO a supervisory team composed of Reserve Bank staff members who have skills appropriate for the organization’s risk profile (the team leader is the Federal Reserve System’s central point of contact for the organization. thereby 4.974 were top-tier BHCs. has responsibility for only one LCBO. the risk-focused consolidated supervision program provides that examination and inspection procedures are tailored to each banking organization’s size. BHCs were in operation. authorized the federal banking agencies to raise the threshold from $250 million to $500 million.S. In judging the financial condition of the subsidiary banks owned by holding companies. commercial banks and held approximately 14 percent of all insured commercial bank assets in the United States.634 U. . These organizations controlled 5. and condition. and is supported by specialists capable of evaluating the risks of LCBO business activities and functions and assessing the LCBO’s consolidated financial condition). The guidelines for Federal Reserve examinations of state member banks are fully consistent with section 10 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act. including planning. A full-scope. well-managed organizations having total assets of less than $500 million may be examined once every 18 months. which became effective in October 2006.

to evaluate the organization’s efforts to implement corrective measures or to test their adherence to safe and sound banking practices. and BHCs and also the investments by BHCs in export trading companies.104 96th Annual Report. 2009 minimizing duplication of effort and reducing the supervisory burden on banking organizations. the Federal Reserve conducted 640 inspections of large BHCs and 3.109 inspections of small.federalreserve.gov/ boarddocs/srletters/). Noncomplex BHCs with consolidated assets of $1 billion or less are subject to a special supervisory program that permits a more flexible approach. As of year-end 2009. 18 nonmember banks were operating 26 branches in foreign countries and overseas areas of the United States. between $500 million and $1 billion. and insurance underwriting and sales. Edge Act and agreement corporations. including branches. in some instances. including financial holding companies.S. it supervises the activities that foreign banking organizations conduct through entities in the United States. The statute also differentiates between the Federal Reserve’s relations with regulators of depository institutions and its relations with functional regulators. The special supervisory program was implemented in 1997 and modified in 2002. See SR letter 02-01 for a discussion of the factors considered in determining whether a BHC is complex or noncomplex. 74. International Activities The Federal Reserve supervises the foreign branches and overseas investments of member banks. . and BHCs. and 21 state member banks were operating the remaining 54. between $1 billion and $15 billion. 32 national banks were operating 503 of these branches.5 In 2009. Examiners also visit the overseas offices of U. In addition. 53 member banks were operating 557 branches in foreign countries and overseas areas of the United States. Banking Organizations In supervising the international operations of state member banks. and 259. 5. the examinations are coordinated with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC). less than $500 million. the Federal Reserve generally conducts its examinations or inspections at the U. and other requirements may elect to become financial holding companies and thereby engage in a wider range of financial activities. representative offices. where the ultimate responsibility for the foreign offices lies. At the end of 2009. managerial. 479 domestic BHCs and 46 foreign banking organizations had financial holding company status.S. including full-scope securities underwriting. Examinations abroad are conducted with the cooperation of the supervisory authorities of the countries in which they take place. Foreign Operations of U. Edge Act and agreement corporations. In addition. banks to obtain financial and operating information and. The statute streamlines the Federal Reserve’s supervision of all BHCs. agencies. and subsidiaries. merchant banking. Of the domestic financial holding companies. (www. head offices of these organizations. 35 had consolidated assets of $15 billion or more. and sets forth parameters for the supervisory relationship between the Federal Reserve and other regulators. 111. for national banks. noncomplex BHCs. BHCs that meet certain capital. Financial Holding Companies Under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act.S.

and 50 OCC-licensed branches and agencies. Together. provided that the business is strictly related to international transactions. Altogether. in addition.S. may (1) conduct a deposit and loan business in states other than that of the parent. BHCs. operations of foreign banking organizations.S.S. 55 banking organizations.S. Foreign banks continue to be significant participants in the U. commercial banking assets.S. supervisors in a logical. The other part is a review of the financial and operational profile of each organization to assess its general ability to support its U. banking system. were chartered as Edge Act or agreement corporations. these two processes provide critical information to U. These corporations are examined annually. commercial banks. of which 4 were insured by the FDIC. the organization poses through its U. commercial banks.S. but the period may be extended to 18 months if the branch or agency meets certain criteria. U. activities of foreign banks that engage in banking and related activities in the United States through branches.S. These corporations. Edge Act corporations. offices of these foreign banks at the end of 2009 controlled approximately 17 percent of U. Sections 25 and 25A of the Federal Reserve Act grant Edge Act and agreement corporations permission to engage in international banking and foreign financial transactions. In cooperation with the other federal and state banking agencies. operating 10 branches. most of which are subsidiaries of member banks. either by the Federal Reserve or by a state or other federal regulator.S. Agreement corporations are similar organizations. Activities of Foreign Banks The Federal Reserve has broad authority to supervise and regulate the U.Banking Supervision and Regulation 105 Edge Act and Agreement Corporations Edge Act corporations are international banking organizations chartered by the Board to provide all segments of the U. In most cases. especially exports. and certain nonbanking companies. the Federal Reserve conducts a joint program for supervising the U. on-site examinations are conducted at least once every 12 months. agencies. uniform. As of year-end 2009. State-licensed and federally licensed branches and agencies of foreign banks are examined on-site at least once every 18 months. state chartered or federally chartered. economy with a means of financing international business. operations and to determine what risks.S. The Federal Reserve conducted or partici- . At year-end 2009. the U. that enter into agreements with the Board to refrain from exercising any power that is not permissible for an Edge Act corporation. and (2) make foreign investments that are broader than those permissible for member banks. if any. These foreign banks also owned 8 Edge Act and agreement corporations and 3 commercial lending companies. of which 6 were insured by the FDIC. an additional 58 foreign banks operated in the United States through a representative office. supervisory agencies. 176 foreign banks from 53 countries were operating 204 state-licensed branches and agencies.S. and timely manner.S. commercial lending companies.S. operations and is intended to ensure coordination among the various U.S. operations. These 176 foreign banks also operated 78 representative offices. One part involves examination of those foreign banking organizations that have multiple U. The program has two main parts. representative offices. they held a controlling interest in 58 U.

The Federal Reserve also conducts specialized examinations of certain nonbank entities that extend credit subject to the Board’s margin regulations. the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The two divisions coordinate their efforts with each other and also with the Board’s Legal Division to ensure consistent and comprehensive Federal Reserve supervision for compliance with legal requirements.106 96th Annual Report. All safety and soundness examinations include a riskfocused review of information technology risk-management activities. The BSA and separate Board regulations require banking organizations supervised by the Board to file reports on suspicious activity related to possible violations of federal law. the Federal Reserve continued as 6. and other financial crimes. or regulatory proceedings. tax. standards. the National Credit Union Administration. BSA and Board regulations require that banks develop written BSA compliance programs and that the programs be formally approved by bank boards of directors. Anti-Money-Laundering Examinations The Treasury regulations implementing the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) generally require banks and other types of financial institutions to file certain reports and maintain certain records that are useful in criminal. The Council has six voting members: the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. and the chair of the State Liaison Committee. and report forms and to promote uniformity in the supervision of financial institutions. 2009 pated with state and federal banking agencies in 430 examinations in 2009. the Office of Thrift Supervision. fiduciary activities. transfer agent activities. During 2009. but consumer compliance supervision is conducted under the oversight of the Division of Community and Consumer Affairs. and government and municipal securities dealing and brokering. . Information Technology Activities In recognition of the importance of information technology to safe and sound operations in the financial industry. terrorism financing. The Federal Reserve is responsible for examining institutions for compliance with Specialized Examinations The Federal Reserve conducts specialized examinations of banking organizations in the areas of information technology. and other laws pertaining to certain banking and financial activities. In addition. The FFIEC is an interagency body of financial regulatory agencies established to prescribe uniform principles. including anti-money-laundering and consumer protection laws and regulations. Most compliance supervision is conducted under the oversight of the Board’s Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation.6 Compliance with Regulatory Requirements The Federal Reserve examines institutions for compliance with a broad range of legal requirements. the Federal Reserve reviews the information technology activities of supervised banking organizations as well as certain independent data centers that provide information technology services to these organizations. applicable anti-money-laundering laws and regulations and conducts such examinations in accordance with the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) Bank Secrecy Act/ Anti-Money Laundering Examination Manual. including money laundering.

five were examined during the year. and it assumed leadership in one additional examination. as of year-end 2009. Of the 11 entities that dealt in municipal securities during 2009. During 2009. regulations. multiregional data processing servicers. Securities Credit Lenders Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. held in various fiduciary and custodial capacities. management of legal. Government and Municipal Securities Dealers and Brokers The Federal Reserve is responsible for examining state member banks and foreign banks for compliance with the Government Securities Act of 1986 and with the Treasury regulations governing dealing and brokering in government securities. operational.9 trillion of assets. On-site examinations focus on the effectiveness of an organization’s operations and its compliance with relevant securities regulations. These examinations are generally conducted concurrently with the Federal Reserve’s examination of the state member bank or branch. Transfer Agents As directed by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. and audit and control procedures. and exchange or convert securities. the Federal Reserve examines the banks under its jurisdiction for compliance with the Board’s . the Federal Reserve conducted five examinations of broker-dealer activities in government securities at these organizations. Municipal securities dealers are examined pursuant to the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board’s rule G-16 at least once every two calendar years. Federal Reserve examiners conducted 68 on-site fiduciary examinations. Eleven state member banks and four state branches of foreign banks have notified the Board that they are government securities dealers or brokers not exempt from the Treasury’s regulations.3 trillion and $33. and general fiduciary principles. and reputational risk exposures. the Federal Reserve conducted on-site transfer agent examinations at 16 of the 49 state member banks and BHCs that were registered as transfer agents.Banking Supervision and Regulation 107 the lead agency in three interagency examinations of large. including effective management of conflicts of interest. register the transfer of securities. In 2009. Fiduciary Activities The Federal Reserve has supervisory responsibility for state member banks and state member nondepository trust companies that reported $43. transfer agents countersign and monitor the issuance of securities. During 2009. Among other things. respectively. The Federal Reserve is also responsible for ensuring that state member banks and BHCs that act as municipal securities dealers comply with the Securities Act Amendments of 1975. On-site examinations of fiduciary and custody activities are risk-focused and entail the review of an organization’s compliance with laws. of state member banks. excluding transfer agent examinations. As part of its general examination program. the Federal Reserve conducts specialized examinations of those state member banks and BHCs that are registered with the Board as transfer agents. the Board is responsible for regulating credit in certain transactions involving the purchase or carrying of securities.

brokers. including focused supervisory efforts to evaluate the resiliency of the banking institutions under its jurisdiction. together with other federal and state financial regulators. 2009 Regulation U (Credit by Banks and Persons other than Brokers or Dealers for the Purpose of Purchasing or Carrying Margin Stock). and the Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center in conducting the Cyber Financial Industry and Regulators Exercise of 2009. the Federal Reserve joined other financial regulatory agencies.” Business Continuity/Pandemic Preparedness In 2009. or dealers were registered with the Federal Reserve.S. The Federal Reserve exempted 168 lenders from its on-site inspection program on the basis of their regulatory status and annual reports. the Financial Services Sector Coordinating Council. Financial System. In January 2009. Particular emphasis was placed on large institutions’ preparedness for a pandemic-like event and on the resiliency requirements imposed on core and significant market firms under the Interagency Paper on Sound Practices to Strengthen the Resilience of the U.S. share agency key response triggers. and dealers who extend credit subject to Regulation U. and the remaining 380 were subject to limited Federal Reserve supervision. This exercise brought together 76 registered particithat play a critical role in financial markets and are subject to resiliency guidelines issued in April 2003.S. In September 2009. The Federal Reserve may conduct specialized examinations of these lenders if they are not already subject to supervision by the Farm Credit Administration (FCA) or the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). which was formed to improve coordination and communication among financial regulators. and review response context for any needed policymaking. the Federal Reserve and the other FFIEC agencies participated in a pandemic-related tabletop exercise conducted through the FFIEC Task Force on Supervision. The exercise accomplished the following main objectives: validate current interagency pandemic planning and identify existing gaps in communications. is a member of the Financial Banking Information Infrastructure Committee (FBIIC). brokers. the Federal Reserve continued its efforts to strengthen the resilience of the U. financial system in the event of unexpected disruptions. and promote the public/ private partnership.7 7. the Federal Reserve maintains a registry of persons other than banks. Other federal regulators supervised 186 of these lenders. In addition. 566 lenders other than banks.108 96th Annual Report. consider ramifications of national infrastructure limitations. emphasizing response activation and resumption of normal business. financial sector. Fifty-one inspections were conducted during the year. enhance the resilience of the U. The FBIIC protocols were active at various points in 2009 to monitor the status and impact of the H1N1 flu outbreak and each time a significant storm made landfall in the United States. The population under review included core clearing and settlement organizations and firms . At the end of 2009. The Federal Reserve. The FBIIC has established emergency communication protocols to maintain effective communication among members in the event of an emergency. also called the “Sound Practices Paper.

for individual companies. the Federal Reserve prepares quarterly Bank Holding Company Performance Reports (BHCPRs) for use in monitoring and inspecting supervised banking organizations. written agreements. Enforcement orders and prompt corrective action directives. and written agreements. Drawing mainly on the financial data that banks report on their Reports of Condition and Income (Call Reports). which are issued by the Board. the Reserve Banks completed 467 informal enforcement actions in 2009. Enforcement Actions The Federal Reserve has enforcement authority over the banking organizations it supervises and their affiliated parties. Screening systems also assist in the planning of examinations by identifying companies that are engaging in new or complex activities. One of the primary objectives of the exercise was to develop a better understanding of the dependencies of the sector upon the information and communications infrastructure that may impact the sector’s security and resilience. The BHCPRs.gov.federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/ enforcement/). including equity prices. Formal enforcement actions include cease-and-desist orders. which are compiled from data provided by large BHCs in quarterly regulatory reports (FR Y-9C and FR Y-9LP). Informal enforcement actions include memoranda of understanding and board of directors resolutions. Civil money penalties totaling $249. including regulators.570 were assessed. .Banking Supervision and Regulation 109 pants. removal and prohibition orders. Information about these actions is not available to the public. the Federal Reserve completed 191 formal enforcement actions. and civil money penalties. In addition. The primary off-site monitoring tool used by the Federal Reserve is the Supervision and Regulation Statistical Assessment of Bank Risk model (SRSABR). and firms from across the financial services sector to respond to a series of disruptive scenario events. the Federal Reserve also monitors various market data. financial statistics and comparisons with peer companies. and measures of expected default frequency. agency ratings. Surveillance and Off-Site Monitoring The Federal Reserve uses automated screening systems to monitor the financial condition and performance of state member banks and BHCs between onsite examinations. are made public and are posted on the Board’s website (www.ffiec. As directed by statute. Enforcement actions may be taken to address unsafe and unsound practices or violations of any law or regulation. To supplement the SR-SABR screening. all civil money penalties are remitted to either the Treasury or the Federal Emergency Management Agency. which are executed by the Reserve Banks. to gauge market perceptions of the risk in banking organizations. SR-SABR uses econometric techniques to identify banks that report financial characteristics weaker than those of other banks assigned similar supervisory ratings. which can be accessed at www. In 2009. Such monitoring and analysis helps direct examination resources to institutions that have higher risk profiles. In addition to taking these formal enforcement actions. exchanges. contain. BHCPRs are made available to the public on the National Information Center (NIC) website. debt spreads.

and supervisory practices that conform to international best practices. the Federal Reserve continued to provide technical assistance on bank supervisory matters to foreign central banks and supervisory authorities. In the surveillance module. the Asian Development Bank. regulations. the Federal Reserve offered a number of training courses exclu- Initiatives for Minority-Owned and De Novo Depository Institutions Partnership for Progress is a program created by the Federal Reserve to foster the strength and vitality of the nation’s minority-owned and de novo depository institutions. coordinates training programs throughout the region with the help of national banking supervisors and international agencies. the FDIC. The Federal Reserve also contributes to the regional training provision under the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Financial Regulators’ Training Initiative. The Federal Reserve contributes significantly to ASBA’s organizational management and to its training and technical assistance activities. PRISM is a querying tool used by Federal Reserve analysts to access and display financial. surveillance. promotes communication and cooperation among bank supervisors in the region. 2009 During 2009. and the Treasury. along with the OCC. The Federal Reserve works through the FFIEC Task Force on Surveillance Systems to coordinate surveillance activities with the other federal banking agencies. System staff also took part in technical assistance and training missions led by the International Monetary Fund. The group. users can customize the presentation of institutional financial information drawn from Call Reports. and examination data. which is part of the U. sively for foreign supervisory authorities. The Federal Reserve. Launched in 2008. In 2009. The Federal Reserve is also an associate member of the Association of Supervisors of Banks of the Americas (ASBA). the World Bank. and aims to help members develop banking laws. the program seeks to help these institutions compete effectively in today’s marketplace by offering a combination of oneon-one guidance and targeted workshops on topics of particular relevance to starting and growing a bank in a safe and sound manner. headquartered in Mexico. In the analytical module. users can generate reports summarizing the results of surveillance screening for banks and BHCs. an umbrella group of bank supervisors from countries in the Western Hemisphere. International Training and Technical Assistance In 2009. and the Financial Stability Institute. both in the United States and in a number of foreign jurisdictions. and other regulatory reports.110 96th Annual Report. Technical assistance involves visits by Federal Reserve staff members to foreign authorities as well as consultations with foreign supervisors who visit the Board or the Reserve Banks.S. BHCPRs. Designated Partnership for Progress contacts in each of the 12 Reserve . the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (Basel Committee). was an active participant in the Middle East and North Africa Financial Regulators’ Training Initiative. FR Y-9 statements. government’s Middle East Partnership Initiative. Uniform Bank Performance Reports. three major upgrades to the web-based Performance Report Information and Surveillance Monitoring (PRISM) application were completed.

the Federal Reserve led the effort to estimate potential losses—and resources available to absorb those losses—at 19 of the largest U. The SCAP was unusually transparent for a supervisory exercise. the agencies offer training classes and breakout sessions on emerging banking issues. banking organizations. and to offer Treasury-contingent common equity to firms unable to raise the necessary capital through market issuance. with the vast majority in the form of common equity. Termed the “Supervisory Capital Assessment Program. Beginning in February. the Treasury worked with the Federal Reserve and the other . The results were also published.fedpartnership. offers protection to more senior parts of the capital structure. banking organizations needed an additional capital buffer.S. the Federal Reserve coordinates its efforts with those of the other agencies through participation in an annual interagency conference for minority depository institutions. Additionally. as the Federal Reserve published a white paper detailing the methodology. economists.Banking Supervision and Regulation 111 Bank Districts and at the Board answer questions and coordinate assistance for institutions requesting guidance. federal banking agencies to initiate a supervisory exercise to assess whether major U. For the federal banking agencies. the conference provides an opportunity to meet with senior managers from minorityowned institutions and gain a better understanding of the institutions’ unique challenges and opportunities. the staff met with select CEOs from these institutions to learn about their business challenges and opportunities and solicit inputs for improving Partnership for Progress. This effort was designed to ensure that the firms would remain strongly capitalized and able to fulfill their function of providing credit to creditworthy borrowers. the Reserve Banks hosted over 15 such regional training sessions. In the aggregate. and low- Supervisory Capital Assessment Program The weak economic outlook entering 2009 contributed to uncertainty around the health and viability of U. accountants. and key economic assumptions underlying the analysis. to establish the required capital buffer. with supervisors estimating total losses over 2009 and 2010 of $600 billion under the more adverse scenario. Additional information on the Partnership for Progress can be found online at www. and conferences to provide assistance on key aspects of banking supervision. assuming an economic scenario more severe than was anticipated. market specialists. and attorneys from the various agencies played a significant role in designing and executing the SCAP framework.gov/.S. In 2009. With financial markets unwilling to provide capital to financial firms given this uncertainty.S.” or “SCAP.” this unprecedented effort involved over 150 examiners and analysts from across the Federal Reserve System and other federal banking agencies. The SCAP’s emphasis on common equity reflects the fact that it is the first element of the capital structure to absorb losses. the 19 banking organizations were found to need $185 billion of capital. Supervisors. In December 2009. Finally. jeopardizing the critical role banks play in lending to creditworthy households and businesses. process. financial institutions. These contacts also host regional conferences and conduct other outreach activities within their Districts in support of minority and de novo institutions. workshops.

and capital repurchases in the context of their capital planning processes. As with the SCAP. • The Board issued guidance regarding BHCs’ declaration and payment of dividends. 140. Amendment to FASB Interpretation No. generally accepted accounting principles from the Financial Accounting Standard Board’s (FASB’s) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. In the future. and its supervisory directive to these banking organizations to raise much-needed capital. in some instances together with the other federal banking agencies. data-driven analysis to facilitate benchmarking across institutions. The Board also announced two supervisory initiatives designed to spur and monitor progress towards safe and sound incentive compensation arrangements. The Supervisory Policy In December. 166. The final rule eliminates the exclusion of certain consolidated asset-backed commercial paper programs from risk-weighted assets. The Federal Reserve’s identification of these organizations’ capital needs.112 96th Annual Report. provides for a transitional phase-in of the effect on risk-weighted assets and tier 2 capital resulting from the implementation of FAS 166 and FAS 167. and to advance the state of practice more generally in the industry. caused these 19 banking organizations to increase their tier 1 common capital by nearly $200 billion in 2009. and related analysis of capital needed to support repayment of Treasury capital (led by the Federal Reserve). Accounting for Transfers of Financial Assets. The SCAP has served as a model for developing more effective and comprehensive supervision of the financial system. The 10 BHCs projected to have inadequate common stock under the stress test were required to submit a plan for raising such capital by early November. The final rule was issued by the federal banking agencies in January 2010. During the year. The Board’s initiatives are consistent with the Principles for Sound Compensation Practices issued in April 2009 by the Financial Stability Board and with the associated implementation standards. the Board approved a final rule amending the risk-based capital adequacy frameworks for state member banks and BHCs following changes to the U. These efforts have contributed to the recovery of nearly 70 percent of Treasury investments in the banking system. Final guidance is expected to be issued in 2010. and adds a reservation of authority addressing off-balance sheet entities. In fact. 46(R) (FAS 166 and FAS 167). an Amendment of FASB State- . the Federal Reserve will increase its use of horizontal examinations and scenario analysis. ment No.S. the Board. helped restore confidence in the banking system and helped reopen the public equity markets to these institutions. and Statement of Financial Accounting Standards 167. issued several rulemakings and guidance documents: • The Board issued for comment proposed guidance designed to help ensure that incentive compensation policies at banking organizations do not encourage excessive risk taking and are consistent with the safety and soundness of the organization. capital redemptions. the SCAP process. 2009 ers the risk of insolvency. to identify emerging best practices. these activities will involve multi-disciplinary perspectives. and expanded cooperation with primary and functional supervisors.

The guidance also discussed riskmanagement considerations with respect to accepting these warrants. savings associations. • The Board issued supervisory guidance for BHCs and state member banks subject to the market risk capital rule that emphasizes some of the rule’s core requirements and provides additional information and clarification on certain technical aspects of the rule. A final rule is expected to be issued in 2010. credit unions. Board and Reserve Bank staff conducted supervisory analyses of a large number of complex capital issuances. Act).F.E. the effective date of new limits on the inclusion of trust preferred securities and other restricted core capital elements in tier 1 capital. perpetual preferred stock. including national and state banks. private capital investments. issued jointly for comment proposed rules requiring mortgage loan originators who are employees of institutions regulated by these agencies to meet the registration requirements of the Secure and Fair Enforcement for Mortgage Licensing Act of 2008 (the S. and certain of their subsidiaries. Much of the work involved evaluating enhanced forms of trust preferred securities. • Recognizing the challenges faced by banking organizations in raising capital in the uncertain economic environment.F. • The federal banking agencies issued guidance to banking organizations on the appropriate risk weighting of California-registered warrants for risk-based capital purposes. The S. In addition. • The federal banking agencies issued a final rule providing that mortgage loans modified under the Treasury’s Home Affordable Mortgage Program will generally retain the risk weight appropriate to the mortgage loan prior to modification. risk capture in market risk models and model backtesting. and novel transactions to determine their qualification for inclusion in regulatory capital and consistency with safety and soundness. 2011. and banking organizations’ independent reviews of their market riskmanagement and measurement systems.A. • The federal banking agencies. Capital Adequacy Standards In 2009. the Board adopted a final rule that delays until March 31. Act requires these agencies to jointly develop and maintain a system for registering residential mortgage loan originators who are employees of certain regulated institutions. The guidance emphasizes requirements around the application of the market risk capital rule to all positions covered by the rule.E. including increasing dividends or redeeming or repurchasing capital instruments. mandatory convertible securities. together with the FCA and the NCUA. a temporary addendum to the guidance advising certain BHCs to consult with Federal Reserve staff before taking any actions that could result in a diminished capital base. . the Board issued Dividend Increases and Other Capital Distributions for the 19 Supervisory Capital Assessment Firms. and Farm Credit System institutions.A.Banking Supervision and Regulation 113 guidance largely reiterates Board supervisory policies and guidance in light of recent market events and highlights expectations regarding when a BHC should inform and consult with the Federal Reserve in advance of taking capital-related actions that could raise safety-andsoundness concerns.

and the Capital Assistance Program (CAP). Board and Reserve Bank staff also reviewed a significant number of exchange transactions conducted for the purpose of increasing GAAP equity to determine consistency with safety and soundness. 2009 and convertible perpetual preferred stock (mandatory and optionally convertible). as well as other banking organizations’ capital issuances.114 96th Annual Report. Board staff also continued in 2009 to work closely with the Treasury on the terms of the capital instruments issued by banking organizations under the Capital Purchase Program (CPP). The Board also issued an interim final rule allowing the inclusion in BHCs’ tier 1 capital of TARP securities issued by S corporations and mutual banking organizations to the Treasury. initiated in 2008. Staff required banking organizations to make changes needed for instruments to satisfy these criteria. thereby increasing the percentage of banking organizations’ tier 1 capital comprised of common stock. Among these activities during 2009 were the following: • The Board issued with the federal banking agencies and Treasury a joint statement on the CAP that . The Board issued interim final and final rules authorizing the inclusion in BHCs’ tier 1 capital of CPP and CAP securities issued by publicly traded banking organizations. including banking organizations in severely impaired financial condition. The purpose of these programs was to buttress the financial strength of banking organizations and the overall banking and financial systems to enable them to withstand severe financial stresses during 2009. and provided transparent guidelines regarding the capital requirements of banking organizations preparing applications to redeem the Treasury’s capital investment in their firms. initiated in 2009. Other Policy Issues In 2009. These exchange transactions generally involved the exchange of billions of dollars of trust preferred securities at a deep discount in exchange for common stock. the Board evaluated the condition of banking organizations applying to participate in the Treasury’s CPP. as well as consistency with safety and soundness. Board staff reviewed the terms of securities structured by the Treasury for issuance by banking organizations under the CPP and CAP to determine their qualification for inclusion in tier 1 capital and consistency with safety and soundness. Board staff also participated in the review of many applications for private capital investments by private equity firms and other private investors to invest in banking organizations. Much of such staff review during 2009 focused on large amounts of common stockholders’ equity raised under the SCAP process discussed above. Board and Reserve Bank analyses of these capital issuances focused on compliance with the qualifying standards for tier 1 capital under the Board’s capital rules. assessed the ongoing capital requirements of large banking organizations through the SCAP. The focus of the analyses of such capital investments is compliance with the Board’s capital standards for inclusion in tier 1 capital. as well as consistency with safety and soundness to ensure that the terms of such private investments do not (1) impede prudent action by issuing banking organizations to address financial issues or (2) impair the Federal Reserve’s ability to take appropriate supervisory action.

Addressing these challenges was a priority for Federal Reserve staff members. Significant issues arising from stressed market conditions included accounting for financial instruments at fair value. BHCs (SCAP).Banking Supervision and Regulation 115 described the SCAP. accounting firms. Federal Reserve staff members interact with key constituents in the accounting and auditing professions. as well as formal input through public comment letters on proposals. The financial crisis raised accounting and reporting challenges for the financial sector. and disclosure issues affecting global banking organizations. Accordingly. which represents the Basel Committee at international meetings on accounting. accounting for impairment in securities and other financial instruments. Staff members participated in a number of discussions with accounting and auditing standard-setters and provided commentary on a number of proposals relevant to the financial sector. • The Board. auditing. the formulation of policy positions based on the potential impact of changes in standards or guidance (or other events) on the financial sector. Federal Reserve staff Accounting Policy The Federal Reserve strongly endorses sound corporate governance and effective accounting and auditing practices for all regulated financial institutions. accounting and financial sector trade groups. Federal Reserve staff participated in activities arising from global market conditions and in support of efforts related to financial stability. and accounting for asset securitizations and other off-balance-sheet items. the financial services industry. which assessed the amount and quality of capital of the largest banking organizations under challenging economic scenarios. Staff also contributed to the development of numerous comment letters related to accounting and auditing matters that were submitted to the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and the International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board through the Basel Committee. issued a joint statement on the CAP and SCAP and released the results of the assessments of the 19 largest BHCs. standards. FDIC. With respect to the future of financial reporting. Federal Reserve staff routinely provides informal input to standard-setters. and supervisory financial reporting. financial disclosure. These efforts help inform our understanding of current domestic and international practices and proposed standards and . internal controls over financial reporting. staff provided comment letters to the FASB on proposals related to the use of fair value when inactive markets and distressed transactions exist and the recognition and presentation of impairment on investment securities. and other developments affecting the banking industry in the areas of accounting. and OCC. with Treasury. the supervisory policy function is responsible for monitoring major domestic and international proposals. and other financial sector regulators. During 2009. auditing. As a consequence. For example. The Federal Reserve also participates in the Basel Committee’s Accounting Task Force. to ensure appropriate and transparent financial statement reporting. • The Board published a white paper on process and methodologies employed by federal banking agencies in capital assessment of large U.S. including standard-setters.

2009 provided a comment letter to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on a roadmap for potential use of International Financial Reporting Standards in the United States. The Federal Reserve and other federal banking agencies continued during 2009 to regularly share examination findings and enforcement proceedings with the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network under the interagency memorandum of understanding (MOU) that was finalized in 2004. Given the Federal Reserve’s unique perspectives on the challenges facing financial institutions and our role in the financial markets. and the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) in an effort to share and discuss information on BSA/AML examination procedures and general trends. particularly with regard to financial instrument accounting. the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.116 96th Annual Report. The Federal Reserve currently chairs the FFIEC BSA/AML working group. on a quarterly basis. auditing. The Federal Reserve was actively involved in monitoring standard-setting projects that affect convergence. The Federal Reserve issued supervisory guidance to financial institutions and supervisory staff on accounting matters as appropriate. fair-value measurements. Federal Reserve policy staff support the efforts of the Reserve Banks in financial institution supervisory activities related to financial accounting. In addition. The Federal Reserve supported the efforts of the FASB and the IASB to continue toward the achievement of converged standards. Beginning in 2009. the Internal Revenue Service. and participates in the Treasury-led Bank Secrecy Act Advisory Group. which was created to assist the FASB in matters involving valuation for financial reporting purposes. the FFIEC BSA/AML working group meeting participation was expanded. which should help to improve comparability of financial reporting across national jurisdictions and promote more efficient capital allocation. companies to utilize International Financial Reporting Standards. off-balance-sheet accounting. to include the SEC. which is a forum for the discussion of all pending BSA policy and regulatory matters. which includes representatives of regulatory agencies. and provisioning. Federal Reserve staff continued to stress the importance of effective financial reporting and global convergence of accounting standards through regular interactions with the FASB and the IASB. which published in July its review of standardsetting activities following the global financial crisis. law enforcement. Compliance Risk Management Bank Secrecy Act and Anti-Money-Laundering Compliance In 2009. reporting.S. and disclosure. and with the . and the financial services industry and covers all aspects of the BSA. staff participated on the joint FASB and IASB Financial Crisis Advisory Group. the Federal Reserve provided training for staff on risk-focusing and the use of the FFIEC minimum BSA/ Anti-Money-Laundering (AML) examination procedures in conjunction with broader efforts to increase consistency and address industry concerns about regulatory burden. Federal Reserve staff also participated on the FASB’s Valuation Resource Group. This letter supported the long-term goal of a single set of high-quality global standards and also identified a few challenges that would need to be addressed before establishing a date for U.

published in July (consultative paper previously issued in January) • Enhancements to the Basel II framework. together with the other U. Among these final papers. and Counter-Terrorism Financing The Federal Reserve participates in a number of international coordination initiatives related to sanctions. consultative papers. contributing a banking supervisory perspective to formulation of international standards on these matters.Banking Supervision and Regulation 117 Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control under the interagency MOU that was finalized in 2006. International Coordination on Sanctions. and many other policies. During 2009. the Federal Reserve participated in ongoing cooperative work on strategic responses to the financial markets crisis.S. the Federal Reserve participates in efforts to advance sound supervisory policies for internationally active banking organizations and to improve the stability of the international banking system. the Federal Reserve has a long-standing role in the U. Anti-Money Laundering. The Federal Reserve contributed to supervisory policy recommendations. The Federal Reserve participates in a subcommittee of the Basel Committee that focuses on AML/counter-terrorism financing issues. published in July (consultative paper previously issued in January) • Principles for sound stress testing practices and supervision. published in July (consultative paper previously issued in January) • Revisions to the Basel II market risk framework. money laundering. initiatives to enhance and implement Basel II. reports. federal banking supervisors. published in May (consultative paper previously issued in January) . Corporate Compliance Federal Reserve staff conducted training and industry outreach to clarify supervisory expectations with respect to compliance risk management and to implement the Federal Reserve’s 2008 guidance relating to firmwide compliance-risk management programs and oversight at large banking organizations with complex compliance profiles. and papers issued by the Basel Committee. In May 2009. The Federal Reserve also continues to contribute to international efforts to promote transparency and address risks faced by financial institutions involved in international funds transfers. which were generally aimed at improving the supervision of banking organizations’ risk-management practices. delegation to the intergovernmental Financial Action Task Force and its working groups. International Guidance on Supervisory Policies As a member of the Basel Committee. and terrorism financing. the Basel Committee released a paper titled Due Diligence and Transparency regarding Cover Payment Messages Related to Cross-Border Wire Transfers. The Federal Reserve. For example. including expectations for intermediary banks on OFAC sanctions screening and transaction monitoring to comply with BSA/AML requirements.S. and other publications were the following: Final papers: • Guidelines for computing capital for incremental risk in the trading book. issued interagency guidance clarifying the supervisors’ perspective on certain points in the Basel Committee paper.

The guidance promotes prudent CRE loan workouts at regulated financial institutions and instructs examiners to take a balanced and consistent approach in reviewing institutions’ workout activities. and manage credit risk. published in December • Strengthening the resilience of the banking sector.118 96th Annual Report. Further. issued a comprehensive report on the structure and use of special purpose vehicles. The Joint Forum. measure. published on September 28. During the year. the Federal Reserve. This statement was issued to update longstanding guidance regarding the classification and workout of CRE loans. published in December Other publications: • Loss given default floors • Analysis of the trading book quantitative impact study • Stocktaking on the use of credit ratings • Findings on the interaction of market and credit risk • Report on special purpose entities • Report and recommendations of the Cross-border Bank Resolution Group • Range of practices and issues in economic capital frameworks Joint Forum In 2009. Prudent Commercial Real Estate Loan Workouts In October. and to ensure that institutions properly identify. issued a policy statement on Prudent Commercial Real Estate Loan Workouts. and the International Association of Insurance Supervisors. especially in light of recent increases in loan workouts. Stocktaking on the Use of Credit Ratings. National supervisors of these three sectors. The Joint Forum operates under the aegis of the Basel Committee. who are members of the Joint Forum’s founding organizations. the Joint Forum also published a final paper. 2009. the Federal Reserve continued to participate in the Joint Forum—an international group of supervisors of the banking. through its founding organizations. Report on Special Purpose Vehicles. As discussed in the statement. On June 15. the International Organization of Securities Commissions. to coordinate the assessment of regulated institutions’ credit risk. Credit Risk Management The Federal Reserve works with the other federal banking agencies to develop guidance on the management of credit risk. The Federal Reserve expects . standards and monitoring. reports. the Federal Reserve contributed to the development of supervisory policy papers. 2009 Consultative papers: • International framework for liquidity risk measurement. examiners were reminded that renewed or restructured loans to creditworthy borrowers on reasonable terms should not be subject to adverse classification solely because the value of the underlying collateral has declined. prudent workouts are often in the best interest of both the institution and the borrower. and recommendations that may be issued in the near future. jointly meet and work together to carry out the responsibilities of the Joint Forum. and insurance industries established to address varied issues crossing the traditional borders of these sectors. including the regulation of financial conglomerates. along with the other financial regulators of the FFIEC. 2009. securities.

“special mention” (potentially weak) credits declined to $195 billion.4 percent in the 2008 review. and borrower’s inability to obtain new funding. bonds.9 trillion. credit classification. its subsidiaries. workout arrangements. However. notes. accounting for 15. with examiners identifying fewer loans with structurally weak underwriting characteristics compared to credits written in 2006 and 2007.5 percent of the SNC portfolio compared with 5. accounting for 6. However. The reasons for this decline in credit quality include reliance on overly optimistic projections. and affiliates. OCC. The statement sets forth the appropriate standards for evaluating the management practices. the SNC portfolio contained loans with structurally weak underwriting characteristics that were committed before mid-2007 that contributed significantly to the increase in criticized assets. illustrating an examiner’s analytical process for credit classifications and assessment of an institution’s accounting and reporting treatments for restructured loans. considering a project’s current and stabilized cash flows. A SNC is any loan or formal loan commitment—and any asset. and other factors relevant to a borrower’s ability and willingness to repay the debt. Within the “criticized” category.5 percent in the 2008 review. The 2009 SNC review was based on analyses of credit data as of December 31. stocks. Criticized assets were mainly associated with the media and telecom. The agencies established the program in 1977 to promote an efficient and consistent review and classification of shared national credits. utilities. and debentures taken as debts previously contracted— extended to borrowers by a supervised institution. and accounting for CRE loan workouts. debt service capacity. compared with 7. and Office of Thrift Supervision released summary results of the 2009 annual review of the Shared National Credit (SNC) Program. The 2009 review found that the commitment volume of SNCs rose 3. provided by federally supervised institutions. to $2. regulatory reporting. 2008.3 percent of the SNC portfolio. guarantor support. finance and insurance. The rise in classified and criticized credits in part resulted from the deterioration in large. the number of credits remained virtually unchanged.8 percent of the SNC portfolio. leveraged credits used to finance merger and acquisition activity over the past several years. A SNC must have an original loan amount that aggregates to $20 million or more and either (1) is shared by three or more unaffiliated supervised institutions under a formal lending agreement or (2) a portion of which is sold to two or more unaffiliated supervised institutions. and “classified” credits (credits having well-defined weaknesses) rose to $447 billion from $163 billion. Shared National Credit Program In September. The statement includes examples of CRE loan workouts. Underwriting standards in 2008 improved from prior years. with the purchasing institutions assuming their pro rata share of the credit risk. “Criticized” assets represented 22. compared with 13. FDIC. . weak covenant protection. such as other real estate.3 percent over the 2008 review. the Federal Reserve.8 percent in the 2008 review. and oil and gas sectors.Banking Supervision and Regulation 119 examiners to evaluate a regulated institution’s loan workouts.

and condition of the companies’ nonbank subsidiaries. Regulation R implemented certain key exceptions for banks from the definition of the term “broker” under section 3(a) (4) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. to monitor and evaluate risk profiles and capital adequacy. and to analyze a holding company’s overall financial condition. nature. (2) new . It is also used in responding to requests from Congress and the public for information about BHCs and their nonbank subsidiaries. as amended by the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. adopted jointly by the Board and the SEC in September 2007. Nonbank subsidiary reports—FR Y-11. The FR Y-8 report provides information on transactions between an insured depository institution and its affiliates that are subject to section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act. to review performance and conduct pre-inspection analysis.120 96th Annual Report.S. operations. 2009. coordinating. FR Y-9LP. the information is used to monitor structure so as to determine compliance with provisions of the Bank Holding Company Act and Regulation Y and to assess the ability of a foreign banking organization to continue as a source of strength to its U. and FR Y-9SP— provide standardized financial statements for BHCs on both a consolidated and a parent-only basis. including foreign bank supervisors as needed. During 2009. to evaluate proposals for BHC mergers and acquisitions.S. it is used to monitor bank exposures to affiliates and to ensure banks’ compliance with section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act. The information is essential in supervising the companies and in formulating regulations and supervisory policies. a number of revisions to the FR Y-9C report were implemented. the Federal Reserve provided examiner training on Regulation R. The FR Y-6 and FR Y-7 reports gather additional information on organization structure and shareholders from domestic banking organizations and foreign banking organizations. and implementing regulatory reporting requirements for various financial reporting forms filed by domestic and foreign financial institutions subject to Federal Reserve supervision. The reports are used to detect emerging financial problems. Regulatory Reports The Federal Reserve’s supervisory policy function is responsible for developing. respectively. BHCs periodically submit reports providing financial and structure information. Federal Reserve staff members interact with other federal agencies and relevant state supervisors. with a compliance date of January 1. to recommend and implement appropriate and timely revisions to the reporting forms and the attendant instructions. including (1) new data items and revisions to existing data items on trading assets and liabilities. and FR 2886b—help the Federal Reserve determine the condition of BHCs that are engaged in nonbank activities and also aid in monitoring the number. The FR Y-10 report provides data on changes in organization structure at domestic and foreign banking organizations. Reports in the FR Y-9 series—FR Y-9C. FR Y-7N. 2009 Banks’ Securities Activities In 2009. Foreign banking organizations also are required to periodically submit reports to the Federal Reserve. FR 2314. Bank Holding Company Regulatory Reports The Federal Reserve requires that U. for most banks.

FR 2314. (6) clarification of the instructions for reporting unused commitments. but less detailed than. the FR Y-10 report was updated to reference the accounting standard (FAS 167) with respect to the exclusion of reporting of variable interest entities. and the FR Y-8 was revised to require respondents to submit all reports electronically. and FR Y-7N reports were revised to collect new information on assets held in trading accounts. to include the reporting of warrants issued to the Treasury through the TARP CPP program when the warrants represent 5 percent or more of voting stock. the Federal Reserve proposed a number of revisions to the FR Y-9C for implementation in 2010. and (16) new data items and revisions to existing data items for credit derivatives. Trading Assets and Liabilities. and collect additional information on option contracts and other swaps. and to elucidate the legal responsibilities of the person attesting to the validity of the report. Effective December 2009. (12) new data items and revisions to existing data items for fair-value measurements by level for asset and liability categories reported at fair value on a recurring basis. the Consolidated Report of Condition and Income for Edge and Agreement Corporations (FR 2886b) was revised to reduce the reporting frequency to annual for Edge Act and agreement corporations with total assets of $50 million or less. Also effective in March 2009. the FR Y-9SP was revised to also collect new data items associated with the Treasury’s CPP. The proposed revisions include items to identify other-than-temporary impairment losses on debt securities. In 2009. (3) new data items and revisions to existing data items on regulatory capital requirements. (9) new data items and deletion of existing items for holdings of collateralized debt obligations and other structured financial products. (10) new data items and revisions to existing data items for holdings of commercial mortgage-backed securities. (14) new data items for collateral held against over-the-counter derivative exposures (for BHCs with $10 billion or more in total assets).Banking Supervision and Regulation 121 data items associated with the Treasury CPP. (13) new data items for pledged loans and pledged trading assets. comparable to. In addition. additional items for unused credit card lines and other unused commitments and a related additional item for other loans. In addition. Trading Assets and Liabilities. Effective June 2009. (8) instructional guidance on quantifying misstatements. (7) exemptions from reporting certain existing data items for BHCs with less than $1 billion in total assets. on the FR Y-9C report. the instructions for the FR Y-6 were modified to incorporate the extended deadline for completion of the annual audit for nonpublic companies as amended by part 363 of section 112 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act. collect a new Schedule RC-D. (11) new data items and revisions to existing data items for unused commitments with an original maturity of one year or less to asset-backed commercial paper conduits. reformatting of the schedule that . (15) new data items and revisions and deletions of existing data items for investments in real estate ventures. the FR Y-11. effective March 2009. Schedule HC-D. (4) new data items and revisions to several data items applicable to noncontrolling (minority) interests in consolidated subsidiaries. (5) clarification of the definition of loans secured by real estate.

(4) provide guidance in the reporting instructions on quantifying misstatements in the Call Report. and losses. The proposed revisions include items to identify other-than-temporary . (6) collateral and counterparties associated with over-the-counter derivatives exposures. In addition. Effective in March. additional space was provided in the USA Patriot Act Section 314(a) Anti-Money Laundering section to allow for the optional reporting of additional contact information. Call Reports are the primary source of data for the supervision and regulation of banks and the ongoing assessment of the overall soundness of the nation’s banking system. During 2009. Commercial Bank Regulatory Financial Reports As the federal supervisor of state member banks. (5) pledged loans and pledged trading assets. the banking industry. and clarification of the instructions for unused commitments. expenses. (3) clarify the definition of the term “loan secured by real estate”. along with the other banking agencies through the FFIEC. which also serve as benchmarks for the financial information required by many other Federal Reserve regulatory financial reports. In June. the Federal Reserve. are widely used by state and local governments. 2009 collects information on quarterly averages. the FFIEC implemented revisions to the Call Report to enhance the banking agencies’ surveillance and supervision of individual banks and enhance their monitoring of the industry’s condition and performance. securities analysts. (10) investments in real estate ventures. a number of items were eliminated from Schedule O—Other Data for Deposit Insurance Assessment. and (6) expand information collected on trust department activities. (2) real estate construction and development loans on which interest is capitalized. (4) fair value measurements for assets and liabilities reported at fair value on a recurring basis. the FFIEC proposed a number of revisions to the Call Report for implementation in 2010. (5) eliminate the confidential treatment of data collected from trust institutions on fiduciary income. during 2009. revisions were made to (1) modify several data items relating to noncontrolling (minority) interests in consolidated subsidiaries.000 that has been extended through December 31.122 96th Annual Report. The revisions included new items on (1) the date on which the bank’s fiscal year ends. Also during 2009. (2) provide for exemptions from reporting certain existing items by banks having less than $1 billion in total assets. Call Report data. and (11) held-to-maturity and available-for-sale securities in domestic offices. 2013. requires banks to submit quarterly Call Reports. additional items for assets covered by FDIC loss-sharing agreements. revisions were made to Schedule O in response to the temporary increase in the deposit insurance limit from $100. (3) holdings of commercial mortgage-backed securities and structured financial products. (9) unused short-term commitments to asset-backed commercial paper conduits. state banking supervisors. and the academic community.S. (7) credit derivatives. the Report of Assets and Liabilities of U. In addition. Branches and Agencies of Foreign Banks (FFIEC 002) was revised.000 to $250. In September. (8) remaining maturities of unsecured other borrowings and subordinated notes and debentures. such as collateralized debt obligations.

(5) identified and implemented improvements to make technology and data more accessible to staff working in the field. In 2009. revisions were proposed to change the reporting frequency of the number of certain deposit accounts from annually to quarterly. additional items for unused credit card lines and other unused commitments and a related additional item for other loans. as well as through System committees. the supporting systems have been modified over time to extend their useful lives and improve business workflow efficiency. chitecture blueprint and roadmap. (3) developed an IT ar- . (3) the Banking Organization National Desktop (BOND). Within the NIC. SSIT works through assigned staff at the Board and the Reserve Banks. NIC includes (1) data on banking structure throughout the United States as well as foreign banking concerns. to ensure that key staff members throughout the System participate in identifying requirements and setting priorities for information technology initiatives. and uniform Supervisory Information Technology Information technology supporting Federal Reserve supervisory activities is managed within the System Supervisory Information Technology (SSIT) function in the Board’s Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation. continued the phased implementation of the new SNC system. real-time electronic information-sharing and collaboration among federal and state banking agencies for the supervision of banking organizations. National Information Center The NIC is the Federal Reserve’s comprehensive repository for supervisory. which enables supervisory personnel as well as federal and state banking authorities to access NIC data. financial. an additional item on time deposits and revisions to reporting of brokered deposits. During 2009. eliminate an item for internal allocations of income and expense from foreign offices. In addition. In addition. and (4) the Central Document and Text Repository. the following strategic initiatives were initiated or completed: (1) with the other federal regulatory agencies. (2) implemented new tools to improve secure document exchange and work team collaboration. an application that facilitates secure. work continued on upgrading the entire NIC infrastructure to provide easier access to information. clarify the instructions for unused commitments. and banking-structure data. and change the reporting frequency of loans to small businesses and small farms from annually to quarterly. a consistent Federal Reserve enterprise information data repository. and (7) implemented a tool for comprehensively tracking exam findings Systemwide. (6) broadened the use of business intelligence tools to integrate supervisory and management information systems that support both office-based and field staff. It is also the main repository for many supervisory documents. (4) adopted a strategy to simplify application security. new items pertaining to reverse mortgages. a comprehensive metadata repository. and additional items for assets covered by FDIC losssharing agreements. which contains documents supporting the supervisory processes. (2) the National Examination Desktop (NED).Banking Supervision and Regulation 123 impairment losses on debt securities. the SSIT function completed an update to the supervision function’s IT strategic plan.

(4) ability to collect SNC data from some banks on a quarterly basis rather than annually. Finally. in information technology. and consumer affairs. This significantly improves the efficiency of the data collection process and improves the quality of the data. requires that individuals earn the Certified Information Systems Auditor certification offered by the . The SNC Mod is a multi-year. Implementation was extended to begin in April 2010 and is expected to continue throughout 2010 as System applications are transitioned to use the new infrastructure.400 professional supervisory staff and ensuring that these staff have the skills necessary to meet supervisory responsibilities today and in the future. A significant milestone was reached in December 2009 when the project team implemented the second phase of SNC Mod. The Federal Reserve also provides course offerings to staff at state banking agencies. numerous programming changes were made to NIC applications in support of business needs. Comprehensive testing was performed and application developers throughout the System were briefed on upcoming changes. SNC Mod focuses on a complete rewrite of the current legacy systems to take advantage of modern technology to enhance and extend the system’s capabilities. Individuals move through a combination of classroom offerings. NIC support also includes supporting the Shared National Credit Modernization Project (SNC Mod). This phase of the project was primarily focused on improving the data collection and validation processes including (1) collection of additional data elements to further describe the credits. primarily to ensure NIC information remains current with the changing needs based on the continuing changes with the financial and banking markets. the Federal Reserve participated in a number of technologyrelated initiatives supporting the supervision function as part of FFIEC task forces and subgroups. and (5) improvements in data quality and the data validation processes by providing immediate feedback to reporting banks regarding the quality of their reported data. (3) collection of SNC data from banks that are participants in syndicated loans.124 96th Annual Report. Staff Development The Federal Reserve’s staff development program is responsible for the ongoing development of nearly 2. 2009 security across the Federal Reserve System. and on-the-job training over a period of two to five years. (2) collection of Basel II metrics at the credit level. Also during the year. interagency. The SNC Program is an interagency program established in 1977 to provide periodic credit-risk assessments of the largest and most complex credit facilities owned or agented by federally supervised institutions. Training activities in 2009 are summarized in the table opposite. information technology effort led by the Federal Reserve to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the IT systems that support the SNC Program. Examiner Commissioning Program The Examiner Commissioning Program (ECP) involves approximately 22 weeks of instruction. A third specialty. self-paced assignments. Achievement is measured by two professionally validated proficiency examinations: the first proficiency exam is required of all ECP participants. the second proficiency exam is offered in two specialty areas— safety and soundness.

. In 2009. regional. . . the international operations of domestic banking organizations. member banks. an increased number of these proposals involved banking organizations in less than satisfactory financial condition. The Rapid Response™ program.S. banking system at the local. The proposals concern BHC formations and acquisitions. . financial holding companies. . . . 2009 Number of enrollments Course sponsor or type Federal Reserve personnel 2. System programs are also available to state and federal banking agency personnel. The Options Institute2 . .S. As a result of the declining economic conditions. . Act. 164 examiners passed the first proficiency exam and 98 passed the second proficiency exam (75 in safety and soundness and 23 in consumer affairs). . banking operations of foreign banks. . . The Options Institute. System courses were calculated using five days as an average.143 individual applications filed under the five statutes. and the International Banking Act. FFIEC . . . . . . Information Systems Audit Control Association. . introduced in 2008. . the Federal Reserve acts on a variety of proposals that directly or indirectly affect the structure of the U.S. 730 260 3 10 146 65 1 73 1.Banking Supervision and Regulation 125 Training for Banking Supervision and Regulation. . and foreign banking organizations—the Bank Holding Company Under the Bank Holding Company Act. and other transactions involving bank or nonbank firms. offers System and state personnel 60–90 minute teleconference presentations on emerging issues or urgent training needs associated with implementation or issuance of new laws. . with FFIEC courses calculated using four days as an average. the Federal Reserve acted on 633 proposals representing 2. a corporation or similar legal entity must obtain the Federal Reserve’s approval before forming a BHC through the acquisition of one or more banks in the United States. the Bank Merger Act. . Once formed. . Rapid Response™. . and national levels. . or the U. . . or guidance. bank mergers. Training days are approximate. . the Federal Reserve Act. the Change in Bank Control Act. Continuing Professional Development Other formal and informal learning opportunities are available to examiners. a BHC must receive Federal Reserve approval . .322 501 16 9. . provides a three-day seminar on the use of options in risk management. . an educational arm of the Chicago Board Options Exchange. . Banking Structure The Federal Reserve administers five federal statutes that apply to BHCs. including other schools and programs offered within the System and FFIECsponsored schools.393 Instructional time (approximate training days)1 Number of course offerings Federal Reserve System . . Bank Holding Company Act Regulation of the U. . .968 State and federal banking agency personnel 369 266 6 1. . 2. In 2009. regulations. In administering these statutes.

the transaction increases the company’s debt and decreases its equity. A BHC may repurchase its own shares from its shareholders. the Federal Reserve may consider the financial and managerial resources of the applicant. 16 domestic financial holding company declarations and one foreign bank declaration were approved. Depending on the circumstances. The Federal Reserve may object to stock repurchases by holding companies that fail to meet certain standards. In the case of a foreign banking organization seeking to acquire control of a U. the Federal Reserve approved 61 merger applications under the act. the potential public benefits. or to otherwise expand their activities. Also. bank. these activities may or may not require Federal Reserve approval in advance of their commencement. company borrows money to buy the shares. including proposals involving private equity firms. the Federal Reserve acted on one stock repurchase proposal by a BHC. The Federal Reserve has primary jurisdiction if the institution surviving the merger is a state member bank. the act has provided an expedited prior notice procedure for certain permissible nonbank activities and for acquisitions of small banks and nonbank entities. the convenience and needs of the community(ies) to be served. the convenience and needs of the community to be served. and the competitive effects of the proposed merger. Department of Justice regarding the competitive aspects of any proposed bank merger involving unaffiliated insured depository institutions. Since that time the act has also permitted well-run bank holding companies that satisfy certain criteria to commence certain other nonbank activities on a de novo basis without first obtaining Federal Reserve approval. Before acting on a merger proposal. Since 1996. In 2009. The Federal Reserve also must consider the views of the U. including the Board’s capital adequacy guidelines. The Federal Reserve also reviews elections submitted by BHCs seeking financial holding company status under the authority granted by the GrammLeach-Bliley Act. Bank Merger Act The Bank Merger Act requires that all proposals involving the merger of insured depository institutions be acted on by the relevant federal banking agency. BHCs generally may engage in only those nonbanking activities that the Board has previously determined to be closely related to banking under section 4(c)(8) of the Bank Holding Company Act. the future prospects of both the applicant and the firm to be acquired.S. 2009 before acquiring or establishing additional banks.S. the future prospects of the existing and combined organizations.8 When reviewing a BHC application or notice that requires prior approval. the competitive effects of the proposal.126 96th Annual Report. and the applicant’s ability to make available to the Federal Reserve information deemed necessary to ensure compliance with applicable law. . In 2009. the Federal Reserve also considers whether the foreign bank is subject to comprehensive supervision or regulation on a consolidated basis by its home-country supervisor. the Federal Reserve considers the financial and managerial resources of the applicant. Bank holding companies seeking financial holding company status must file a written declaration with the Federal Reserve. When the 8. In 2009. the Federal Reserve acted on 250 applications and notices filed by BHCs to acquire a bank or a nonbank firm. In 2009.

the Federal Reserve approved 47 applications and notices for overseas investments by U. When reviewing proposals to establish domestic branches. including proposals involving private equity firms. In 2009. In 2009. proval to establish foreign branches. During its review of a proposed transaction. the future prospects of the institution to be acquired.Banking Supervision and Regulation 127 Change in Bank Control Act The Change in Bank Control Act requires individuals and certain other parties that seek control of a U. banking organizations. Federal Reserve Act Under the Federal Reserve Act. experience. the Federal Reserve may contact other regulatory or law enforcement agencies for information about relevant individuals. the Federal Reserve considers. the effect of the proposed change on competition in any relevant market. the Federal Reserve considers. State member banks must also obtain Federal Reserve approval to establish financial subsidiaries.S. In 2009.S. When reviewing proposals for foreign branches. the Federal Reserve considers the financial position. the effect of the proposed change on the financial condition of the bank or BHC being acquired. The Federal Reserve is responsible for reviewing changes in the control of state member banks and BHCs. and integrity of the acquiring person. In 2009. In its review. large and other significant investments require prior approval.503 domestic branches and granted prior approval for the establishment of three new foreign branches. the Federal Reserve acted on new and merger-related branch proposals for 1. among other things. the completeness of the information submitted by the acquiring person. Many of the activities are conducted indirectly through Edge Act and agreement corporation subsidiaries. State member banks must obtain Federal Reserve approval to establish domestic branches. among other things. many of which represented investments through an Edge Act or agreement corporation. the Federal Reserve approved 119 change in control notices related to state member banks and BHCs. Banking Organizations U. banking organizations may engage in a broad range of activities overseas.S. These subsidiaries may engage in activities that are financial in nature or incidental to financial activities. one financial subsidiary application was approved. the scope and nature of the banking activities to be conducted. bank or BHC to obtain approval from the relevant federal banking agency before completing the transaction.S. competence. including securitiesrelated and insurance agency-related activities. A proposed transaction should not jeopardize the stability of the institution or the interests of depositors. a member bank may be required to seek Federal Reserve approval before expanding its operations domestically or internationally. Overseas Investments by U. and all member banks (including national banks) must obtain Federal Reserve ap- . the condition of the bank and the bank’s experience in international banking. Although most foreign investments are made under general consent procedures that involve only after-the-fact notification to the Federal Reserve. and whether the proposed change would have an adverse effect on the Deposit Insurance Fund.

commercial lending company subsidiaries. For each pending application and notice.S. whether the foreign bank has adopted and implemented procedures to combat money laundering and whether the home country of the foreign bank is developing a legal regime to address money laundering or is participating in multilateral efforts to combat money laundering. law. the managerial resources of the foreign bank. or the establishment of a new U. the Federal Reserve approved seven applications by foreign banks to establish branches. In 2009. a change in control.federalreserve. banking presence by a foreign bank are made known to the public by an order or an announcement. Financial Disclosures by State Member Banks State member banks that are not members of BHCs and that issue securities registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 must disclose cer- . Orders state the decision.S.S.2 release also contains announcements of applications and notices received by the Federal Reserve upon which action has not yet been taken. if deemed necessary to determine and enforce compliance with applicable law. Enforcement of Other Laws and Regulations The Federal Reserve’s enforcement responsibilities also extend to the disclosure of financial information by state member banks and the use of credit to purchase and carry securities. The H. the related H. they are subsequently reported in the Board’s weekly H. or representative offices in the United States. agencies. office. In reviewing proposals. requires foreign banks to obtain Federal Reserve approval before establishing branches. It also considers whether the home-country supervisor has consented to the establishment of the U. whether the foreign bank has provided adequate assurances that information concerning its operations and activities will be made available to the Federal Reserve. and the record of the foreign bank with respect to compliance with U.2 statistical release. or representative offices in the United States. All orders and announcements are made public immediately. a bank merger. the Federal Reserve generally considers whether the foreign bank is subject to comprehensive supervision or regulation on a consolidated basis by its home-country supervisor. The Board’s website (www. as amended by the Foreign Bank Supervision Enhancement Act of 1991. Public Notice of Federal Reserve Decisions Certain decisions by the Federal Reserve that involve an acquisition by a BHC.S. agencies. the essential facts of the application or notice. whether the home-country supervisor shares information regarding the operations of the foreign bank with other supervisory authorities.gov) provides information on orders and announcements as well as a guide for U.128 96th Annual Report.S. the financial condition and resources of the foreign bank and its existing U. 2009 International Banking Act The International Banking Act. announcements state only the decision. operations. and the basis for the decision. and foreign banking organizations that wish to submit applications or notices to the Federal Reserve.2 gives the deadline for comments.

2. enforcement.Banking Supervision and Regulation 129 tain information of interest to investors. and arbitration functions of the New York Stock Exchange). By statute. and the Federal Reserve examines other Regulation U lenders. These banks accounted for 34 percent of all commercial banks in the United States and for 71 percent of all commercial banking offices. The Board’s Regulation X applies these credit limitations. The SEC. to certain borrowers and to certain credit extensions. the Board is responsible for regulating credit in certain transactions involving the purchasing or carrying of securities. the federal banking agencies examine banks under their respective jurisdictions. the Board’s financial disclosure rules must be substantially similar to those of the SEC. The Board’s Regulation T limits the amount of credit that may be provided by securities brokers and dealers when the credit is used to purchase debt and equity securities. credit obtained from foreign lenders by U.S.663 branches. and the Chicago Board Options Exchange examine brokers and dealers for compliance with Regulation T. 14 state member banks were registered with the Board under the Securities Exchange Act. The Board’s Regulation U limits the amount of credit that may be provided by lenders other than brokers and dealers when the credit is used to purchase or carry publicly held equity securities if the loan is secured by those or other publicly held equity securities. At the end of 2009. or margin requirements. the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (formed through the combination of the National Association of Securities Dealers and the regulation. With respect to compliance with Regulation U. Securities Credit Under the Securities Exchange Act. such as Federal Reserve Membership At the end of 2009. citizens. Á . including annual and quarterly financial reports and proxy statements. the FCA and the NCUA examine lenders under their respective jurisdictions.288 banks were members of the Federal Reserve System and were operating 57. Several regulatory agencies enforce the Board’s securities credit regulations.

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consumer and community groups. Throughout 2009. • supervision and enforcement of state member banks and bank holding companies and their nonbank affiliates to ensure that consumer protection rules are being followed. As discussed below. and industry to gain a broad range of perspectives. the Federal Reserve worked to implement the Credit Card Act. design consumer-tested disclosures to provide consumers consistent and vital information on financial products. and enforce laws and regulations for consumer financial products and services. • consumer complaint and inquiry processes to assist consumers in resolving grievances with their financial institutions and to answer their questions. utilizing a team of attorneys to write regulations that implement legislation. academia. • consumer education to inform consumers about what they need to know when making decisions about their financial services options. and policy with resources from other functions of the Board and the Federal Reserve System to write and interpret regulations. the Board has completed the first two stages of rulemaking. educate and inform consumers. • outreach to national and local government agencies. update regulations to respond to changes in the marketplace. Consistent with the effective dates set by Congress in the legislation. • research to understand the implications of policy on consumer financial markets. The third stage will be completed later in 2010. and • support for national and local agencies and organizations that work to protect and promote community development and economic empowerment to historically underserved communities. the new rules ban harmful practices and require greater transparency in the disclosure of the terms and conditions of credit card accounts. and prohibit unfair and deceptive acts and practices. regulation. and to inform policy decisions and effective practices. Responsibility.131 Consumer and Community Affairs The Board’s Division of Consumer and Community Affairs (DCCA) has primary responsibility for carrying out the Board’s consumer protection program. DCCA augments its dedicated expertise in consumer protection law. the Credit Card Accountability. . Key elements of the division’s program include • rulemaking. Rulemaking and Regulations Credit Card Reform In May 2009. and Disclosure Act of 2009 (the Credit Card Act) codified and expanded existing Federal Reserve regulations prohibiting unfair credit card practices. Among other things. the Federal Reserve’s rulemakings to implement the Credit Card Act were divided into three stages.

See press release (January 12. See press release (July 15. www. . Consumer’s Right to Reject Rate Increase or Change in Terms In addition to the advance notice. 1.htm. Stage Two The second stage of the Board’s implementation of the Credit Card Act includes provisions with an effective date of February 22.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20100112a. Periodic Statements Must Be Mailed 21 Days in Advance The rules require creditors to mail or deliver periodic statements for credit cards at least 21 days before the payment due date and the expiration of any grace period.2 Restricting Rate Increases for Existing Balances An increase in the interest rate that applies to existing balances on a credit card account can come as a costly surprise to consumers who relied on the rate in effect at the time they opened the account or used the account for transactions. www. and balance transfers. rates that vary with an index. consumers must be informed of their right to reject the increase or change before it goes into effect. The exceptions include temporary rates that expire after a specified period.1 45-Day Notice Requirement for Significant Changes The new rules require creditors to provide written notice to consumers 45 days before increasing an annual percentage rate (APR) on. a credit card account. transaction fees. any grace period. cash advances. 2. including when an account is closed.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20090715a. The notice requirement is triggered by increases in rates applicable to purchases. and when the balance is transferred to another account issued by the same creditor. when an account is acquired by another institution. or require immediate repayment of the balance on the account.htm.federalreserve. This requirement must be met before creditors can treat a consumer’s payment as late or impose additional finance charges. including those terms that are most important to consumers and that can have a significant impact on the cost of credit for a consumer: key penalty fees. 2010. If a consumer rejects the increase or change. and accounts that are more than 60 days delinquent. treat the account as in default.132 96th Annual Report. 2010). and the balance computation method. Subject to certain exceptions. 2009 Stage One The first stage of the Board’s implementation of the Credit Card Act includes provisions with an effective date of August 2009. or making another significant change to the terms of. Creditors must also provide notice when changes are made to the terms that are required to be disclosed at account opening.federalreserve. fees imposed for the issuance or availability of credit. 2009). the new rules generally prohibit credit card issuers from increasing the rates and fees that apply to existing balances. the creditor may not impose a fee or charge.

. Reasonable policies and procedures include consideration of at least one of the following in assessing the consumer’s ability to pay: (1) the consumer’s ratio of debt to income. an issuer cannot issue a credit card to a consumer younger than 21 unless their application includes either: (1) information indicating that the underage consumer has independent ability to make the required minimum payments for the account.Consumer and Community Affairs 133 Evaluation of Consumer’s Ability to Pay Under the new rules. Restricting Over-the-Limit Fees The rules generally require creditors to obtain a consumer’s express election (or “opt in”) to the payment of transactions that exceed the account’s credit limit before the creditor may impose any fee for those transactions. In addition. Age Restrictions The rules also impose specific requirements for opening a credit card account or increasing the credit limit on an existing account when the consumer is under the age of 21. The rules also prohibit credit card issuers from • assessing an over-the-limit fee because the issuer did not promptly replenish the consumer’s available credit (such as after the consumer makes a payment). gift cards. Rules for Marketing Credit Cards to Students Additional Consumer Protections The rules also prohibit creditors from offering a college student any tangible items (such as t-shirts. colleges must publicly disclose their agreements with credit card issuers for marketing credit cards. In particular. (2) the consumer’s ratio of debt to assets. Credit card issuers are also prohibited from imposing more than one over-the-limit fee per billing cycle and may not impose an over-the-limit fee for the same transaction in more than three consecutive billing cycles. • conditioning the amount of available credit on the consumer’s consent to payment of over-the-limit transactions. credit card issuers are required to establish and maintain reasonable policies and procedures to consider a consumer’s ability to make required minimum payments each billing cycle (based on the full credit line and including any mandatory fees) before opening a new credit card account or increasing the credit limit for an existing account. or (3) the income the consumer will have after paying existing debt obligations. and • imposing an over-the-limit fee if the consumer’s credit limit is exceeded solely because of accrued interest charges or fees on the account. or magazine subscriptions) to induce the The wide-ranging consumer protection regulations adopted by the Board also include student to apply for a credit card or other open-end credit product if the offer is made on or near a college campus or at an event sponsored by a college. or (2) the signature of a cosigner over age 21 who has the ability to make those payments and who assumes joint liability for any debt on the account. and card issuers must make annual reports to the Board regarding those agreements.

The notice of the opt-in right must be provided. to the institution’s overdraft service for ATM and one-time debit card transactions. Card issuers also are prohibited from imposing interest charges on the portion of the balance that has been repaid when a consumer pays some but not all of a balance prior to expiration of a grace period. Overdraft Services and Gift Card Rules Restrictions on Overdraft Fees In November. 2009 • Credit card issuers are required to establish procedures to ensure that the administrator of an estate can resolve the outstanding credit card balance of a deceased accountholder in a timely manner. without their express consent.htm. • Credit card issuers are required to allocate a consumer’s payment in excess of the required minimum payment first to the balance with the highest rate. and the consumer’s affirmative consent obtained. • Credit card issuers may not charge a fee for making a payment except for payments involving an expedited service by a service representative of the issuer. or affirmatively consents. See press release (November 12. unless a consumer opts in. to overdraft services for these transactions. the Board announced rules that prohibit financial institutions from charging consumers fees for paying overdrafts on automated teller machine (ATM) and one-time debit card transactions. • Credit card issuers may not impose interest charges on balances for days in previous billing cycles as a result of the loss of a grace period (a practice sometimes referred to as “double-cycle billing”). consumer testing by the Board showed that consumers generally want their checks and automated clearing house (ACH) transactions paid even if the payment results in an overdraft fee being assessed. In contrast. . Opt-In Requirement The Board’s rules require institutions to provide consumers with the right to opt in. • Credit card fees charged to a credit card account during the first year after account opening may not exceed 25 percent of the initial credit limit. and (2) the monthly payment amount required to pay off the consumer’s balance in 36 months and the total cost (interest and principal) of repaying the balance in 36 months.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20091112a. Consumers often are enrolled in overdraft services automatically. believing instead that these transactions will be declined. before fees or 3.federalreserve. or affirmatively consent. www. • Credit card issuers must disclose on the periodic statement sent to consumers: (1) the amount of time and total cost (interest and principal) involved in paying the consumer’s balance in full by making only the required minimum payments. Consumer testing by the Board indicated that many consumers are unaware that they can incur overdrafts for ATM or onetime debit transactions.134 96th Annual Report.3 Overdraft fees can be particularly costly in connection with debit card overdrafts because the dollar amount of the fee may considerably exceed the dollar amount of the overdraft. 2009).

The rules include a model form developed through consumer testing that institutions may use to satisfy the opt-in notice requirement. ACH transactions. or Service Fees and Expiration Dates The proposed rules would prohibit dormancy. and network-branded gift cards. Inactivity. be used to buy goods or services at a single merchant or affiliated group of merchants. The opt-in requirement applies to both existing and new accounts. and service fees on gift cards unless: (1) there has been at least one year of inactivity on the gift card. and (3) the consumer is given clear and conspicuous disclosures about the fees on the card and before the card is purchased. These disclosures would have to be provided on or with the card and prior to purchase. See press release (November 16.htm. Restrictions on Gift Card Fees and Expiration Dates In November. This information would have to be clearly and conspicuously disclosed on the card and before the card is purchased.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20091116a. The Board’s overdraft rules are issued under the Electronic Fund Transfer Act and have an effective date of July 1. 2009). which are redeemable at any merchant that accepts the card brand (such as Visa or MasterCard). Protections for Consumers Declining Overdraft Coverage The rules prohibit institutions from conditioning the payment of overdrafts for checks. For consumers who do not consent to the institution’s overdraft service for ATM and onetime debit card transactions.4 The Board’s proposed rules generally cover retail gift cards. .federalreserve. conditions. the rules require institutions to provide those consumers with account terms. 2010. the Board proposed rules that would restrict the fees and expiration dates that may apply to gift cards. Additional Disclosure Requirements The proposed rules also would require the disclosure of all other fees imposed in connection with a gift card. if one is maintained. The proposed rules would also provide that expiration dates for funds underlying a gift card must be at least five years from the date the card was issued or the date when funds were last loaded onto the card. Dormancy. The rules would protect consumers from certain unexpected costs and would require that gift card terms and conditions be clearly stated.Consumer and Community Affairs 135 charges may be assessed on the consumer’s account for paying such overdrafts. The Board’s proposed rules would implement statutory requirements set forth in the Credit Card Act that become effective on August 22. or other types of transactions on the consumer consenting to the institution’s payment of overdrafts for ATM and one-time debit card transactions. which can 4. www. a website that a consumer may use to obtain fee information or replacement cards. The proposed rules also would require the disclosure on the card of a toll-free telephone number and. 2010. inactivity. and features that are otherwise identical to those they provide to consumers who do consent. (2) no more than one such fee is charged per month.

which aims to ensure that required disclosures are presented in clear. justable rates. understandable language and formatting so as to provide consumers with essential information at the appropriate time in the loan process.htm. • Disclosures would show consumers in a simple graph how their loan’s APR compares to the average rate offered to borrowers with excellent credit. • The computation of the APR would be revised to include most fees and settlement costs. lenders would have to provide consumers with a one-page list of key questions to ask about the loan being offered.federalreserve. the proposal would include several requirements: • At application. The results of these sessions informed the Board’s rulemaking. consumers must be able to identify and understand the key terms that determine whether a particular loan is appropriate for them. 2009 Mortgage and Home Equity Lending Reform The Board proposed significant new rules designed to (1) improve the disclosures consumers receive in connection with closed-end mortgages and home-equity lines of credit (HELOCs) and (2) provide new consumer protections for all home-secured credit. 2009).gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20090723a. lenders would have to notify consumers 60 days in advance of a change in their monthly payment. making it a better measure of the total cost of the loan. The new disclosures are designed to answer those questions. • In addition to the early disclosures provided at application. • The information consumers receive within three days after application would highlight risky mortgage features (such as possible payment increases or negative amortization). notice may be given 25 days in advance. . • For adjustable-rate mortgages. (Currently.) • Creditors would have to provide monthly statements to consumers with loans that have payment options that could result in negative amortization. working with a consultant. prepayment penalties. www. See press release (July 23. including by illustrating the highest monthly amount the consumer might pay during the life of the loan. • For adjustable-rate mortgages. To shop for and understand the cost of a home-secured loan. lenders would also be required to provide final disclosures to consumers at least three days before the loan closing. and negative amortization. lenders would be required to show consumers how their payments might change.136 96th Annual Report.5 The Board also adopted new rules to implement provisions of 2009’s Helping Families Save Their Homes Act and the Mortgage Disclosure Improvement Act of 2008 (MDIA). Specifically. conducted focus groups and one-on-one cognitive interviews with more than 180 consumers from nine metropolitan areas across the United States in order to understand consumers’ key concerns when shopping for home-secured credit. Providing Meaningful Disclosures about Mortgages The Board proposed rules in July 2009 to make disclosures about closed-end mortgages more meaningful and useful to consumers by highlighting potentially risky loan features. The Board. such as ad- 5.

• The disclosures must inform the consumer that they are not obligated to complete the transaction simply because disclosures were provided or because the consumer has applied for a loan. yield spread premiums. creditors must provide corrected disclosures to the consumer at least three business days before closing. 2009. The new rules also permit a consumer to waive the waiting periods and expedite closing to address a personal financial emergency. can create incentives for mortgage loan originators to “steer” borrowers to riskier loans with higher rates for which the loan originators will receive greater compensation. • If the APR contained in the early disclosures becomes inaccurate (for example. The May 2009 final rules apply these provisions to loans secured by a dwelling even when it is not the consumer’s principal dwelling. www.Consumer and Community Affairs 137 Early Disclosures for Mortgage Loans In May 2009. These early disclosures must be provided before the consumer pays any fee other than a reasonable fee for obtaining the consumer’s credit history. Consumers generally are not aware of the mortgage broker’s or loan officer’s conflict of interest and cannot reasonably protect themselves against it. such as a second home. 6. To prevent mortgage loan originators from steering consumers to more expensive loans. 2009). the Board proposed rules that would • prohibit payments to a mortgage broker or a loan officer based on the loan’s interest rate or other terms. Anti-Steering Protections Disclosures alone may not always be sufficient to protect consumers from unfair practices. which are payments from a lender to a mortgage broker or loan officer (loan originator) based on the interest rate.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20090508a. which require. such as foreclosure. due to a change in loan terms). The new rules expand on rules published by the Board in July 2008. and • prohibit mortgage brokers or loan officers from steering consumers to a lender offering less favorable terms in order to increase their compensation.htm. among other things. Yield spread premiums may provide some benefit to consumers who choose to pay a higher rate so that the lender will fund origination costs that would otherwise be paid by the consumer. See press release (May 8. . Moreover. that a creditor give a consumer transactionspecific information about costs shortly after the consumer applies for a closedend mortgage loan secured by the consumer’s principal dwelling (“early disclosures”). these rules require that: • Creditors must deliver or mail early disclosures at least seven business days before closing.federalreserve.6 These new rules implement provisions of MDIA and were effective July 30. For example. the Board issued final rules revising the disclosure requirements for mortgage loans in order to ensure that consumers receive information about loan costs earlier in the mortgage process.

creditors would have to provide additional information about the reasons for the action and the consumer’s right to request reinstatement. in November 2009. Although the statutory provision became effective immediately upon enactment. lenders would be required to provide disclosures specifically tailored to the actual credit terms for which the consumer qualifies.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20091116b.htm. the Board proposed rules to enhance consumer protections for HELOCs and improve the timing. 2009). Because mortgages may be sold and transferred several times. The proposed rules would require certain disclosures: • At application. which was enacted in May 2009. These disclosures would provide information about costs and risky mortgage features in a tabular format.138 96th Annual Report. • Within three days after receiving a consumer’s application for a HELOC. the lender would have to notify the consumer 45 days in advance of the change. 2009 Home Equity Lines of Credit (HELOCs) In July 2009. lenders would provide final disclosures in the same format. . borrowers can face difficulties in determining who owns their loan and who to contact about their loan. allowing consumers to more easily compare them with earlier disclosures. • When a consumer’s credit line has been suspended or reduced. content. Notifying Consumers When Mortgage Loans Are Sold or Transferred One of the consumer protection provisions of the Helping Families Save Their Home Act aims to ensure that consumers know who owns their mortgage loan. • Lenders could not terminate an account for delinquency until payment is more than 30 days late. lenders would provide enhanced periodic statements showing the total amount of interest and fees charged for the statement period and the year to date. the Board revised Truth in Lending Act rules for private education 7. The proposed rules also would enhance certain consumer protections applicable to HELOCs: • To the extent a lender can change any terms of a consumer’s HELOC plan. www. • Throughout the life of the HELOC plan. requires a purchaser or assignee that acquires a mortgage loan to provide the required disclosures to consumers in writing within 30 days of acquiring the loan. the lengthy. the Board issued interim final rules which provide guidance for complying with the statute. The proposal would also improve the form and content of these notices. generic disclosure consumers currently receive would be replaced with a new one-page summary of the basic information and risks about HELOCs.federalreserve. and format of information that creditors provide to consumers at application and throughout the life of such accounts. The Helping Families Save Their Home Act.7 Private Education Loan Rules In 2009. • At account opening. See press release (November 16.

Three-Day Right to Cancel A creditor must provide additional disclosures after a consumer accepts a private education loan. Creditors must also provide a set of transaction-specific disclosures when the loan is approved and at consumma- 30-Day Period to Accept or Reject Loan Under the Board’s rules. and terms. with applications and solicitations. Under the Board’s rules.htm. The rules specify disclosures that creditors must provide at three different times in the loan origination process: (1) with the loan application or solicitation. creditors must provide consumers general information about loan rates. The creditor must disclose. fees. 2009).federalreserve. a consumer has the right to accept the rates and terms offered at any time within 30 days after receiving the transactionspecific disclosure provided at approval. and where the consumer can find additional information regarding those loans. logo.Consumer and Community Affairs 139 loans—loans made to a consumer by a private lender in whole or in part for postsecondary educational expenses. tion. The creditor must also disclose the monthly payment at the maximum rate of interest. A consumer has the right to cancel the loan without penalty for up to three business days after receipt of this disclosure and the loan funds may not be disbursed until the three-day period expires. www. the Board worked with a consultant to conduct one-on-one cognitive interviews with consumers in order to develop effective disclosures that consumers can use to understand the costs and features of these loans. their interest rates. including an example of the total cost of a loan based on the maximum interest rate the creditor can charge. and other terms of the loan that are offered to the consumer. estimates of the total repayment amount based on both the current interest rate and the maximum interest rate that may be charged. Prohibition on Co-Branding The rules prohibit creditors from using an educational institution’s name. or mascot in its marketing materials to imply that the educational institution endorses the loans offered by the creditor.8 The Board’s rules implement provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) and apply to loan applications received by creditors on or after February 14. Improved Disclosure To enhance disclosure about private education loans. 2010. See press release (July 30. for example. (2) when the loan is approved. These disclosures must include specific information about the rate. The disclosure must also inform the consumer about the availability of federal student loans. 8. and (3) after the consumer accepts the loan but at least three days before funds are disbursed. fees. .gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20090730a. unless the creditor and educational institution have a preferred lender arrangement under which the educational institution issues a permissible endorsement of the creditor’s loans.

Risk-Based Pricing Rules In December. and on what terms. if a consumer.9 The rules require entities that furnish consumer information to credit bureaus (furnishers) to establish and implement reasonable written policies and procedures to ensure the accuracy and integrity of the information that is reported about consumers. For example. www. such that the consumer’s cost of credit is significantly higher.140 96th Annual Report. if a consumer believes his or her credit report includes inaccurate information. staff training. consumers may obtain credit and other important products and services. Therefore. to impose new responsibilities on credit information furnishers and allow consumers to play a more active role in ensuring the accuracy of their own credit reports. 2010. along with the Federal Trade Commission. Furnishers’ policies and procedures should address matters including recordkeeping. receives a mortgage with an APR higher than that offered to a substantial proportion of other consumers by that creditor. the Board collaborated with other federal financial regulatory agencies and the Federal Trade Commission to publish rules and guidelines promoting the accuracy and integrity of information furnished to credit bureaus and other consumer reporting agencies. 2009 Consumer Credit Reporting and Risk-Based Pricing Rules Credit reports are used to determine whether. If the furnisher’s investigation reveals that the information reported to a credit bureau was inaccurate.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20090702a. and periodic self-evaluations. and rental housing. The Board and other agencies also published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking seeking to identify additional consumer information that furnishers should be required to provide to credit bureaus. which amends the Fair Credit Reporting Act. the Board worked with other federal financial agencies to implement provisions of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act. The rules also require furnishers to include the consumer’s credit limit (if applicable) among the information provided to a credit bureau. the creditor must . The rules become effective July 1. Right to Submit Disputes Directly to Information Furnisher Under the credit reporting rules. Credit Reporting Rules Accuracy of Information Reported to Credit Bureaus In July. and are also widely used to determine a consumer’s eligibility for employment. In 2009. insurance. trols.htm. announced rules requiring creditors to notify consumers when. it is essential that the substantive information included in those reports is accurate. the Board. 2009). internal con9.federalreserve. the consumer may submit a dispute directly to the furnisher of the information and the furnisher must investigate the dispute. based on the consumer’s credit report. See press release (July 2. the furnisher must promptly notify each credit bureau to which the inaccurate information was provided and provide corrected information. oversight of thirdparty service providers. because of information in his or her credit report. the creditor provides credit on less favorable terms than it provides to other consumers.

the Board. 11. typeface. Information from a consumer’s credit report is often used in evaluating the risk posed by the consumer. A financial institution that uses the model form obtains a “safe harbor” for compliance with the regulatory requirements for privacy notices. Under Information Privacy Rules In November. . proposed revisions to regulations under the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) that would require the Board to consider low-cost education loans provided to low-income borrowers when assessing a bank’s record of meeting community credit needs under the CRA. To ensure that privacy information is provided to consumers in a form that is readable and understandable. which was issued under Regulation P.federalreserve. 2011. along with seven other federal regulatory agencies.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20091222b. Community Reinvestment Act Rules In June.000 consumers from five locations across the United States. the Board.htm. 2009. The rules become effective on January 1. The rules give creditors the option of providing consumers with a free credit score and information about their credit score as an alternative to providing risk-based pricing notices. The notice also must contain a statement informing the consumer that he or she may obtain a free copy of his or her credit report from the credit reporting agency identified by the creditor in the notice. collect and share consumer information. along with other federal financial regulators. www. www. and presentation to make it easy for consumers to find specific information on the form and compare information provided by various institutions. Consumer testing confirmed the effectiveness of the model notice as compared with other privacy notices. including a form of notice commonly used by financial institutions. became effective on December 31. See press release (November 17.federalreserve.Consumer and Community Affairs 141 send the consumer a “risk-based pricing” notice. Creditors that use the credit score disclosure alternative generally must provide free credit scores to any consumer who applies for credit before the consumer becomes obligated for the credit. The rules specify the format.11 The Board and other agencies developed the model privacy notice based on extensive consumer testing that involved approximately 1.htm. the model privacy notice uses a standardized tabular format and presents information in a question-and-answer format.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20091117a. 2009). font size. See press release (December 22. The rules require that a notice include a statement that the terms offered to the consumer may be less favorable than the terms offered to consumers with better credit histories. released a model privacy notice designed to make it easier for consumers to understand how financial institutions 10. 2009). The rule.10 Risk-based pricing refers to the practice of setting or adjusting the price and other terms of credit offered or extended to a particular consumer to reflect the risk of nonpayment by that consumer.

and other ventures undertaken in cooperation with minority. education loans are considered consumer loans. loan participations. examination and enforcement techniques. These institutions are not subject to the Community Reinvestment Act and typically engage in relatively few activities covered by consumer protection laws.and womenowned financial institutions and lowincome credit unions when assessing a bank’s CRA record. .14 To carry out this mandate. www. examination work products. 14. depository institutions. • analyzes applications for mergers and acquisitions by state member 12. In addition. consistent with safe and sound operations. During the 2009 reporting period.htm.federalreserve. the Reserve Banks conducted 282 consumer compliance examinations of the System’s 782 state member banks and one foreign banking organization.142 96th Annual Report. and foreign banking organizations that are members of the Federal Reserve System. and Community Reinvestment Act Compliance The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) requires that the Federal Reserve and other federal banking and thrift agencies encourage financial institutions to help meet the credit needs of the local communities in which they do business.12 The proposal would also incorporate into the CRA regulations statutory language allowing the Board to consider capital investments.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20090624a. examiner training. The staff develop and update examination policies. procedures and guidelines. 2009). See press release (June 24. as well as review Reserve Bank supervisory reports. and emerging issues. and Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS). The proposed revision reflects statutory changes made to the CRA by the Higher Education Opportunity Act. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). 13. The foreign banking organizations examined by the Federal Reserve are organizations that operate under section 25 or 25A of the Federal Reserve Act (Edge Act and agreement corporations) and state-chartered commercial lending companies owned or controlled by foreign banks. 2009 current CRA regulations. Division staff provide guidance and expertise to the Reserve Banks on consumer protection regulations. which may not be evaluated as part of a CRA assessment in some cases. Staff members also participate in interagency activities that promote uniformity in examination principles and standards. the division oversees the efforts of the Reserve Banks to ensure that consumer protection laws and regulations are fully and fairly enforced. Examinations are the Federal Reserve’s primary method of enforcing compliance with consumer protection laws and assessing the adequacy of risk management systems for consumer protection. consumer complaint analyses. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. the Federal Reserve • examines state member banks to assess their compliance with the CRA. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC).13 Oversight and Enforcement The Board’s Division of Consumer and Community Affairs supports and oversees supervisory policy and examination procedures for consumer protection and community reinvestment laws in the oversight of state-chartered. bank application analysis and processing.

New York.and moderate-income geographies. 2009. the Reserve Banks conducted CRA examinations of 229 banks: 40 were rated “Outstanding. Taiwan.and nonwomen-owned financial institutions and minority. that 15. M&T Bank Corporation. The second revision would incorporate the CRA statutory language that allows the agencies to consider and take into account capital investments. . NY. Dublin.htm.. to acquire 9.l. NY. to acquire Provident Bancshares Corporation. MD. CO. N. the Federal Reserve and other federal banking and thrift regulatory agencies proposed two revisions to the CRA that would incorporate new statutory requirements into the CRA regulations. and its subsidiary. New York.” and two were rated “Needs to Improve. NY. loan participations. Other comments alleged that certain minority groups received preferential treatment in comparison to other minority groups. (Two other protested applications were withdrawn by the applicants. Some comments referenced pricing information on residential mortgage loans and concerns that minority applicants were more likely than nonminority applicants to receive higher-priced mortgages. See press release (June 24.. Republic of China.9 percent of Chinatrust Financial Holding Company. was approved in May. Ltd. that lenders failed to make credit available to certain minority groups and to low. Buffalo. to acquire 9.A. which requires the agencies to consider low-cost education loans provided to low-income borrowers when assessing a financial institution’s record of meeting community credit needs. Denver.. Mergers and Acquisitions in Relation to the CRA During 2009. to acquire 9. was approved in June. p.9 percent of United Western Bancorp. Taipei.” 187 were rated “Satisfactory. During the 2009 reporting period. The Federal Reserve assesses and rates the CRA performance of state member banks in the course of examinations conducted by staff at the 12 Reserve Banks. New York. New York. was approved in October. their comments raised various issues.16 The first revision would implement Section 1031 of the Higher Education Opportunity Act. www. Baltimore. • An application by Morgan Stanley.federalreserve. Inc.Consumer and Community Affairs 143 banks and bank holding companies in relation to CRA performance. 2008.9 percent of Heritage Bank.c. NY. and June 30.and women-owned institutions and lowincome credit unions.) Members of the public had the opportunity to submit comments on the applications. Ireland..”15 In June 2009. NY. the Board considered and approved four banking merger applications: • An application by Allied Irish Banks. and other ventures between nonminority. • An application by Morgan Stanley. was approved in June.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/ 20090624a. 16. 2009). and • disseminates information on community development techniques to bankers and the public through community affairs offices at the Reserve Banks. The 2009 reporting period for examination data includes examinations with end dates between July 1. • An application by Morgan Stanley.and moderateincome individuals and in low.

on the basis of race. creditors may not discriminate against an applicant because the applicant receives income from a public assistance program or has exercised. However. the applications reviewed contained significantly more complex fair lending concerns than in previous years. The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in residential real estate-related transactions. staff ensure that the institution takes all appropriate corrective action. the matter will be referred to the Department of Justice (DOJ). including the making and purchasing of mortgage loans. and that lenders had not fulfilled their CRA responsibilities. Pursuant to the ECOA. national origin. to the financial crisis in the banking industry. 2009 lenders deliberately omitted reporting race information about certain applicants. In addition. or national origin. and statistical expertise to the examination and ensures that fair lending laws are enforced consistently and rigorously throughout the Federal Reserve System.144 96th Annual Report. During 2009. they work closely with the division’s Fair Lending Enforcement Section. The number of applications with CRA issues. When a matter is returned to the Federal Reserve. When examiners find evidence of potential discrimination. 34 of those applications were approved and 17 were withdrawn. sex or marital status. Fair lending reviews are conducted regularly within the supervisory cycle. or both was somewhat lower in 2009 than in 2008. if the Board has reason to believe that a creditor has engaged in a pattern or practice of discrimination in violation of the ECOA. sex. which brings additional legal . due. as was the total number of all applications received. familial status. The Board also considered 51 applications with outstanding issues involving compliance with consumer protection statutes and regulations. handicap. if warranted by fair lending risk. religion. A DOJ investigation may result in a public civil enforcement action or settlement or the DOJ may decide instead to return the matter to the Federal Reserve for administrative enforcement. any right under the Consumer Credit Protection Act. in any aspect of a credit transaction. or discrimination against potential bor- Fair Lending Enforcement The Federal Reserve is committed to ensuring that the institutions it supervises comply fully with the federal fair lending laws—the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) and the Fair Housing Act. including fair lending laws and the CRA. Additionally. information that is required by the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA). The DOJ reviews the referral and determines whether further investigation is warranted. The Federal Reserve enforces the ECOA and the provisions of the Fair Housing Act that apply to lending institutions. consumer compliance issues. religion. or age. color. the Board referred the following six matters to the DOJ: • One referral involved redlining. in part. some commenters claimed that lenders engaged in high-cost predatory lending and less-thansatisfactory loan servicing activities that contributed to the current foreclosure crisis. The ECOA prohibits creditors from discriminating against any applicant. color. in good faith. In addition. on the basis of race. examiners may conduct fair lending reviews outside of the usual supervisory cycle.

except that a creditor may consider the age of an applicant 62 years or older in the applicant’s favor.Consumer and Community Affairs 145 rowers based upon the racial composition of their neighborhoods. in violation of Regulation B. Evaluating Pricing Discrimination Risk by Analyzing HMDA Data and Other Information The two previously mentioned referrals involving mortgage-pricing discrimination resulted from a process of targeted pricing reviews that the Federal Reserve initiated when Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) pricing data first became available in 2005. In one matter. the Federal Reserve generally uses informal supervisory tools (such as memoranda of understanding between the bank’s board of directors and the Reserve Bank) or board resolutions to ensure that violations are corrected. and its delineated assessment area under the CRA. Thus. in violation of the ECOA and the Fair Housing Act. the location of its branches. • Two referrals involved discrimination on the basis of marital status. Legitimate pricing factors failed to explain the pricing disparities in either matter. in violation of the ECOA. consumer. including a 25 basis point discount on non-mortgage loans. In the other referral. such as information about a borrower’s creditworthiness and loan-to-value ratios. Based on an analysis of the bank’s lending practices. The lender offered customers over 50 years of age membership in a special club with preferential credit features. and commercial loans. Board staff developed—and continues to refine—HMDA screens that identify institutions that may warrant further review on the basis of an analysis of HMDA pricing data. Because HMDA data lack many of the factors lenders routinely use to make credit decisions and set loan prices. HMDA data alone cannot be used to determine whether a lender discriminates. the Board determined that the bank avoided lending in minority neighborhoods. Board staff analyze HMDA data in conjunction with other supervisory information to evaluate a lender’s risk for engaging in discrimination. Thus. In another matter. If a fair lending violation does not constitute a pattern or practice that is referred to the DOJ. the Board can and does bring public enforcement actions. Using 2008 HMDA pricing data— the most recent year for which the data . Most lenders readily agree to correct fair lending violations. however. the Federal Reserve acts on its own to ensure that the violation is remedied by the bank. its marketing. If necessary to protect consumers. • Two referrals involved discrimination in mortgage pricing. the Board found that African-American borrowers paid higher APRs than non-Hispanic white borrowers. • One referral involved discrimination on the basis of age. in violation of Regulation B. The ECOA generally prohibits creditors from considering age when evaluating creditworthiness. an institution improperly required spousal signatures for its agricultural. lenders often take corrective steps as soon as they become aware of a problem. in violation of the ECOA. the Board found that Hispanic and African-American borrowers paid higher annual percentage rates (APRs) and overages than non-Hispanic white borrowers. One referral involved a bank’s policy and practice of requiring spousal guarantees on commercial loans. in violation of the ECOA and the Fair Housing Act. In fact.

Also. Depending on the examination schedule. 947 made 100 or more higher-priced loans. led by a steep reduction in conventional lending. the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) requires most mortgage lenders located in metropolitan areas to collect data about their housing-related lending activity. when appropriate. Robert B. On the basis of these comprehensive assessments.388 home lenders reporting HMDA data. For these institutions.” April 2010 (revises 2009 draft release. borrowers. As in recent years. the targeted pricing review could occur as part of the institution’s next examination or outside the usual supervisory cycle. and the presence of fair lending risk factors. the 2008 HMDA data show that most reporting institutions originated few if any higher-priced loans in 2008: 53 percent of the lenders originated less than 10 higher-priced loans that year and 30 percent originated no higher-priced loans.146 96th Annual Report. perform a pricing . are publicly available—Federal Reserve examiners performed a pricing discrimination risk assessment for each institution that was identified through the HMDA screening process. between 2007 and 2008 (about 31 percent). Federal Reserve staff determined which institutions would receive a targeted pricing review. in fact. examiners might still conclude that the institution is at risk for engaging in pricing discrimination and perform a pricing review. Avery. therefore. the incidence of higher-priced lending fell from a high watermark of 29 percent in 2006 to 18 percent in 2007 and to 12 percent in 2008.pdf. gov/pubs/bulletin/2010/pdf/hmda08final. An article published in September 2009 by Federal Reserve staff in the Federal Reserve Bulletin uses 2008 HMDA data to describe the market for higher-priced loans and patterns of lending across loan products. Kenneth P. owing in large part to the mortgage market turmoil that first showed signs of emerging in late 2006. and neighborhoods of different races and incomes.federalreserve. past supervisory experience with the institution. report very little pricing data.1 The analysis documents the sharp contraction in total home lending 1. Neil Bhutta. These risk assessments incorporated not just the institution’s HMDA data but also the strength of the institution’s fair lending compliance program. The HMDA data also show that the majority of all loan originations were not higher priced. many of the HMDA-reporting institutions supervised by the Federal Reserve originate few higher-priced loans and. Of the 8. The analysis also provides a detailed assessment of the dramatic growth between 2007 and 2008 in home lending backed by the Federal Housing Administration’s (FHA) mortgage insurance program. Gibbs. Glenn B. and Christa N. 2009 Analyzing HMDA Data Enacted by Congress in 1975. Even if an institution is not identified through HMDA screening. www. Brevoort. Canner. consumer complaints against the institution. examiners analyze other available information to assess pricing-discrimination risk and. Data reporting requirements have expanded in recent years to capture reporting lenders’ pricing information for higher-priced consumer mortgage loans. report the data annually to the federal government. The Federal Reserve supervises many institutions that are not required to report data under HMDA. includes revised data). such as discretionary pricing. “The 2008 HMDA Data: The Mortgage Market during a Turbulent Year. and make the data publicly available.

Because HMDA data lack information about credit risk and other legitimate pricing factors. the Federal Reserve continues to carefully . During a targeted pricing review. especially related to credit tightening and loan modification activities. such as those for first-lien mortgages and junior-lien loans. including potential pricing factors that are not available in the HMDA data. show the greatest incidence of higher-priced lending (in 2008 more than two-thirds of these loans are higher priced). to determine whether any pricing disparity by race or ethnicity is fully attributable to legitimate factors. Monitoring Emerging Fair Lending Issues During the past year.Consumer and Community Affairs 147 Analyzing HMDA Data—continued Overall. the data indicate that the incidence of higher-priced lending varies greatly among borrowers of different races and ethnicities. (See “Fair Lending Enforcement” in this chapter. however. compared with 6. or have otherwise limited lending activity in certain geographic areas.1 percent of African-American borrowers and 15.) review. For example. the HMDA data can facilitate fair lending supervision and enforcement. have a much lower incidence of higher-priced lending.4 percent of Hispanic borrowers received higher-priced first-lien conventional home purchase loans. economic conditions have shown signs of improvement. the incidence of higher-priced lending in 2008 was affected by the general “flight to quality” that tended to increase loan prices relative to the yield on Treasury securities and cause some loans to fall above the price reporting threshold even though those same loans would not have crossed the threshold prior to the financial market turmoil. A similar pattern is found among government-backed loans (those insured by the FHA or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs). such as those for manufactured homes. The HMDA data show that the incidence of higher-price lending varies by product type: higher-risk loans. Also. In addition. certain trends in credit markets continue to pose fair lending risk.3 percent of Asian borrowers. but the differences across racial and ethnic groups are much smaller. In response to these trends. Also. Some policies to tighten credit standards may fall disproportionately on minorities and raise fair lending concerns.5 percent of non-Hispanic white and 3. In 2008. 17. however. the incidence of higherpriced lending fell notably because lenders were unwilling or unable to extend credit to borrowers perceived to entail higher risk. the rapid increase of loan modifications and other loss mitigation efforts threatens to outpace compliance management programs. lower-risk loans. or whether any portion of the pricing disparity may be attributable to illegal discrimination. some lenders have implemented tighter credit standards in specific geographic markets. Only seven percent of first-lien conventional home purchase loans and 11 percent of comparable junior-lien loans were reported as higher-priced in 2008. HMDA data alone cannot determine whether the observed pricing disparities and market segmentation reflect discrimination. staff analyze additional information. Lenders remain cautious and continue to reevaluate their lending practices. When analyzed in conjunction with other fair lending risk factors and supervisory information.

federalreserve. The law requires the Board and other federal financial institution regulatory agencies to impose civil money penalties when they find a pattern or practice of violations of the 17. revised the Interagency Fair Lending Examination Procedures to better protect consumers from discriminatory practices. Banking Information and Regulation. redlining. and report formats.htm. including provisions related to interest rate reduction to six percent for active duty servicemembers.17 The updated procedures revise examination guidance for detecting pricing. and (2) identify steering. Additionally. and business obligations.205. regulation. and it supplements other recent guidance and interpretations issued by the agencies and FEMA. www. Consumer Affairs Letters. standards. foreclosure protection. www.gov/ boarddocs/caletters/2009/0902/caltr0902. . which implements the act. Supervision. Under the Federal Reserve’s Regulation H. In 2009. the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). or renewing any such loan unless the building or mobile home and any personal property securing the loan are covered by flood insurance for the term of the loan.19 18. or to be located in. Banking Information and Regulation.federalreserve. which were assessed via consent orders. Supervision. extending.htm. and redlining violations. the Federal Reserve. in conjunction with other Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) agencies. The FFIEC member agencies are the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. During 2009. reverse redlining. and protection of servicemembers’ rights with regard to suspension of life insurance premiums. and the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). The dollar amount of the penalties.gov/ boarddocs/caletters/2009/0903/caltr0903. Federal Reserve Board. the FFIEC issued the following work products: • Interagency Examination Procedures for the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) – The procedures are used to determine institution compliance with SCRA. Flood Insurance The National Flood Insurance Act imposes certain requirements on loans secured by buildings or mobile homes located in. and other fair lending violations. Coordination with Other Federal Banking Agencies The member agencies of the FFIEC develop uniform examination principles. procedures. 2009 monitor lenders’ practices for potential fair lending violations. the Federal Reserve conducts examinations to (1) evaluate whether lenders’ policies may violate fair lending laws by having an illegal disparate impact on minorities.18 • Interagency Questions and Answers Regarding Flood Insurance – The questions and answers supersede the 1997 questions and answers document. totaled $221. taxes. The civil money penalties are payable to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for deposit into the National Flood Mitigation Fund. the Board imposed civil money penalties (CMPs) against seven state member banks. In accordance with these procedures. the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS). state member banks are generally prohibited from making. steering. Consumer Affairs Letters.148 96th Annual Report. reverse redlining. increasing. 19. the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC). Federal Reserve Board. areas determined to have special flood hazards.

Federal Reserve Board.htm. The key technical changes provide streamlined mortgage servicing disclosure language.Consumer and Community Affairs 149 • Interagency Fair Lending Examination Procedures (revised) – The revised examination procedures reflect significant changes in credit markets.R. www. The changes to Regulation C conformed the threshold for rate spread reporting to the definition of “higher-priced mortgage loans” included in 2008 amendments to Regulation Z. The procedures clarify examination procedures related to pricing. 68204).gov/ boarddocs/caletters/2009/0906/caltr0906. to provide a balance that does not include additional funds that may be made available to cover overdrafts. Supervision. eliminate outdated escrow account provisions regarding the phase-in period. broker activity. 21.federalreserve. Supervision.htm.22 20.21 • Interagency Examination Procedures for the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (revised) – The revised examination procedures incorporate the 2008 amendments to Regulation C for reporting pricing information on higher-priced loans. steering.20 • Interagency Examination Procedures for Regulation Z (revised) – The revised examination procedures incorporate the 2008 amendments to Regulation Z. Among other things. redlining. Consumer Affairs Letters. Federal Reserve Board. Supervision. Con- • Interagency Examination Procedures for the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) (revised) – The revised examination procedures incorporate the changes to RESPA that HUD issued in its 2008 final RESPA reform rule (73 F. www.gov/ boarddocs/caletters/2009/0911/caltr0911. www. performing examinations with small sample sizes. the changes apply protections to a newly defined category of “higherpriced mortgages” that includes virtually all closed-end subprime loans secured by a consumer’s principal dwelling. Consumer Affairs Letters. www. 23. for institutions that provide account balance information through an automated system.gov/ boarddocs/caletters/2009/0909/caltr0909.htm. The amendments were designed to protect consumers in the mortgage market from unfair. Banking Information and Regulation. 24. Federal Reserve Board.federalreserve. Consumer Affairs Letters. Supervision. www. Banking Information and Regulation. which included both technical and substantive changes to its Regulation X.24 sumer Affairs Letters.htm.federalreserve. and credit practices since the procedures were last updated. The key substantive changes include implementation of a standardized and binding GFE form and revised HUD1/1A Settlement Statement. Federal Reserve Board.htm. abusive.federalreserve. Banking Information and Regulation. credit products. Federal Reserve Board. Banking Information and Regulation.gov/ boarddocs/caletters/2009/0914/caltr0914. Supervision. and permit an “average charge” to be listed on the Good Faith Estimate (GFE) and HUD-1/1A Settlement Statement. Banking Information and Regulation. . Consumer Affairs Letters. or deceptive lending and servicing practices.gov/ boarddocs/caletters/2009/0910/caltr0910. The changes require institutions to disclose the aggregate dollar amounts charged for overdraft fees and returned item fees on a periodic statement and. 22. and data accuracy.23 • Interagency Examination Procedures for Regulation DD (revised) – The revised examination procedures incorporate changes to Regulation DD that address depository institutions’ disclosure practices related to overdrafts.federalreserve.

These sessions were designed. or other changes. and examination concepts. allows staff to more quickly identify and revise course materials that may be affected by regulatory. self-study programs. For example. 2009 Training for Bank Examiners Ensuring that financial institutions comply with laws that protect consumers and encourage community reinvestment is an important part of the bank examination and supervision process. and (2) classroom instruction focused on case studies. In 2009. . content. staff members conduct in-depth reviews of a course curriculum. In addition to providing core training for non-commissioned assistant examiners. rotational assignments. This mapping tool. FedLearn skill level definitions were identified for each training objective for consumer compliance courses and were included in the content map. a mass-training effort using multi-media to deliver training. Opportunities for continuing development include special projects and assignments. and the Commercial Lending Essentials for Consumer Affairs course. in 2009 the System continued to offer Rapid Response sessions. and presented to System staff within days or weeks of perceived need. Board and Reserve Bank staff routinely review examiner training materials. supervisory enforcement actions. and presentation methods. and an annual senior examiner forum. developed. As the number and complexity of consumer financial transactions grow. In addition. ratings. Board and Reserve Bank staff members are charged with providing updates to the System’s content mapping initiative. The consumer compliance examiner training curriculum consists of six courses focused on various consumer protection laws. the opportunity to instruct at System schools. System staff conducted two real estate workshops for experienced examination staff. This year. training for the examiners who review the organizations under the Federal Reserve’s supervisory responsibility becomes even more important. and one examiner from another regulatory agency. The focus of the workshops was the new and revised mortgage rules and the RESPA reform. including scoping and risk assessment. which provides assistant examiners with the fundamentals of commercial lending. Periodically.150 96th Annual Report. the Board held 11 training sessions for 158 System consumer compliance examiners and professional staff. the examiner curriculum emphasizes the importance of continuing professional development for all examiners. Several courses use a combination of instructional methods: (1) specially developed computer-based instruction that includes interactive self-check exercises. To keep the course materials current. legal. During 2009. focusing on 12 time-sensitive or emerging consumer compliance topics. which provides training on all major aspects of riskfocused supervision. regulations. in response to an ever-changing regulatory environment. and the Board’s referral processes. 25 state examiners. which provides a detailed view of training content in each and every System course. report writing. updating subject matter and adding new elements as appropriate. including the course objectives. mentoring programs. staff reviewed two curricula: the Consumer Affairs Risk-focused Examination Techniques course.

the Department of Transportation (DOT). ethnicity. or adverse action within 30 days after receiving a completed credit application. compared with 85 percent for the 2008 reporting period. the overall sum of actions derived from each regulation will be greater than the actual total number of enforcement actions initiated. the FFIEC member agencies. None of these agencies initiated formal enforcement actions relating to Regulation B during the reporting period. through June 30. The other agencies that enforce the ECOA—the Farm Credit Administration (FCA). and the Grain Inspection. and age. The 2009 reporting period was July 1. This section summarizes data collected from the 12 Federal Reserve Banks. na- 25. counteroffer. which was 30. The most frequently cited violations involved • failure to provide notice of approval. the Small Business Administration. containing the specific reason for the adverse action. for government monitoring purposes. while the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) initiated 13. Packers and Stockyards Administration of the Department of Agriculture—reported substantial compliance among the entities they supervise. along with other required information. the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). . 2008. Public enforcement actions are categorized by regulation throughout the report. Because the agencies use different methods to compile the data. • failure to collect information about applicants seeking credit primarily for the purchase or refinancing of a principal residence. The FCA’s examination activities revealed that most Regulation B violations involved either: (1) creditors’ failure to request or provide information for government monitoring purposes or (2) creditors providing inadequate statements of specific reasons for adverse actions. religion. 26.26 There were no other enforcement actions by FFIEC agencies. Because some enforcement actions include violations of more than one regulation. sex. or sex when not permitted by the regulation. and other federal enforcement agencies. The Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) each initiated one formal Regulation B-related public enforcement action during the reporting period. the information presented here supports only general conclusions. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a complaint against a mortgage company alleging that it violated Regulation B (and the FTC Act). • failure to provide a written notice of denial or other adverse action to a credit applicant.Consumer and Community Affairs 151 Agency Reports on Compliance with Consumer Protection Laws The Board reports annually on compliance with consumer protection laws by entities supervised by federal agencies. including applicants’ race. 2009. marital status. color. and • improperly collecting information on applicants’ race.25 tional origin. Regulation B (Equal Credit Opportunity) The FFIEC agencies reported that approximately 81 percent of the institutions examined during the 2009 reporting period were in compliance with Regulation B.

while the FDIC initiated five. annual. The OCC initiated one formal Regulation P-related enforcement action during the reporting period. The FDIC’s reported information in this area relates to Part 332—Privacy of Consumer Financial Information—of the agency’s regulations and not Regulation P. compared with 97 percent for the 2008 reporting period.152 96th Annual Report. and • disclose the institution’s information sharing practices in initial. The most frequently cited violations involved failure to • provide a clear and conspicuous initial privacy notice to customers. compared with 81 percent for the 2008 re- Regulation M (Consumer Leasing) The FFIEC agencies reported that 100 percent of the institutions examined during the 2009 reporting period were 27. The FTC filed three actions against companies for violating Regulation E and settled two cases brought in 2008. .27 There were no other enforcement actions by FFIEC agencies. and • provide a written explanation to the consumer when an investigation determines that no error or a different error has occurred. compared with 99 percent for the 2008 reporting period. Regulation Z (Truth in Lending) The FFIEC agencies reported that 92 percent of the institutions examined during the 2009 reporting period were in compliance with Regulation Z. while the FDIC initiated five. • provide customers with a clear and conspicuous annual notice reflecting the institution’s privacy policies and practices. The FFIEC agencies did not issue any public enforcement actions specific to Regulation M during the period. The most frequently cited violations involved failure to • investigate and determine whether an error occurred and provide the results to the consumer within 10 business days of receiving a notice of error from a consumer. • provisionally credit the consumer’s account for the amount of an alleged error when an investigation into the alleged error cannot be completed within 10 business days. at the time a consumer contracts for an electronic fund transfer service. which is comparable with the 2008 reporting period. and revised privacy notices. 2009 Regulation E (Electronic Fund Transfers) The FFIEC agencies reported that approximately 94 percent of the institutions examined during the 2009 reporting period were in compliance with Regulation E. There were no other enforcement actions by FFIEC agencies or the SEC. The OCC initiated one formal Regulation E-related enforcement action during the reporting period. • provide initial disclosures that contain required information. in compliance with Regulation M. including limitations on the types of transfers permitted and error-resolution procedures. Regulation P (Privacy of Consumer Financial Information) The FFIEC agencies reported that approximately 98 percent of the institutions examined during the 2009 reporting period were in compliance with Regulation P.

which is comparable with the 2008 reporting period. FDIC. The OTS initiated three formal Regulation AArelated enforcement actions. • provide required information when placing an exception hold on an account. The OTS and the OCC each initiated one formal Regulation Z-related enforcement action during the reporting period. and the FDIC initiated six during the reporting period. In addition. There were no other enforcement actions by FFIEC agencies. The OCC initiated four formal Regulation CC-related enforcement actions during the reporting period. to reimburse a total of approximately $3. 182 banks supervised by the Federal Reserve. • failure to disclose the fact that a creditor has or will acquire an interest in a property purchased as part of a transaction. failure to provide a good faith estimate of the required disclosures before consummation. period were in compliance with Regulation AA. The most frequently cited violations involved • failure to accurately disclose the finance charge in closed-end credit transactions. or not later than three business days after receipt of a written loan application. and • on certain residential mortgage transactions. compared with 89 percent for the 2008 reporting period. under the Interagency Enforcement Policy in Regulation Z. the OCC initiated one. while the FDIC initiated six. while the FDIC had 12. The DOT continued to prosecute one air carrier for its alleged improper handling of credit card refund requests and other Federal Aviation Act violations. • follow procedures when invoking the exception for large-dollar deposits. • failure to accurately disclose the APR in a closed-end credit transaction.Consumer and Community Affairs 153 porting period. Regulation CC (Availability of Funds and Collection of Checks) The FFIEC agencies reported that 90 percent of institutions examined during the 2009 reporting period were in compliance with Regulation CC. There were no other enforcement actions by FFIEC agencies. The FTC filed two settlements and issued three consent orders involving alleged violations of Regulation Z. Regulation AA (Unfair or Deceptive Acts or Practices) The FFIEC agencies reported that more than 99 percent of the institutions examined during the 2009 reporting . There were no other enforcement actions by FFIEC agencies.14 million to consumers for understating APRs or finance charges in their consumer loan disclosures. and • make funds deposited from local and certain other checks available for withdrawal within the times prescribed by the regulation. OCC. and OTS were required. The most frequently cited violations involved failure to • make available on the next business day the lesser of $100 or the aggregate amount of checks deposited that are not subject to next-day availability.

. Regulation M (Consumer Lending). . . the Federal Reserve established Federal Reserve Consumer Help (FRCH) to centralize the processing of consumer complaints and inquiries. . . . Right to Financial Privacy Act . Fair Debt Collection Practices Act . Regulation G (Disclosure / Reporting of CRA-Related Agreements) . fax. . . . .904 cases. . . . . . . . . . . by Regulation/Act. . . . . . 2009 Regulation DD (Truth in Savings) The FFIEC agencies reported that 87 percent of institutions examined during the 2009 reporting period were in compliance with Regulation DD. . The Federal 28. . . . . . In late 2007. . . . . . . .925) were complaints. . . . . . . . . .638 . . Number Responding to Consumer Complaints and Inquiries The Federal Reserve investigates complaints against state member banks and selected nonbank subsidiaries of bank holding companies. Effective September 14. . . • inappropriate use of the phrase “annual percentage yield” in an advertisement without providing required additional terms and conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . Regulation E (Electronic Funds Transfers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . most FRCH consumer contacts occurred by telephone (78 percent). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154 96th Annual Report. . . its second full year of operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2009. . . . Regulation Q (Payment of Interest). . . . . Regulation BB (Community Reinvestment) . . half (26. . . . . . . . mail. . . . . The most frequently cited violations involved • failure to provide account disclosures containing all required information. There were no other enforcement actions by FFIEC agencies. . . while the FDIC initiated nine. . . . . . . . . . 82 49 2 4 265 8 283 142 1 13 2 35 7 6 508 83 52 1 1 3 80 11 1. . . CA Letter 09-08. . . . . . . . . . . . . .gov/boarddocs/caletters/ 2009/0908/caltr0908. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Regulation DD (Truth in Savings). . . and in a form that the consumer may keep. . . . Fair Housing Act. . Regulation P (Privacy of Consumer Financial Information) . . . . . . . The OTS and the OCC each initiated one formal Regulation DD-related enforcement action during the reporting period. . . . . . 2009 Regulation / Act Regulation AA (Unfair or Deceptive Acts or Practices) . • failure to provide account disclosures clearly and conspicuously. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . subsequent disclosures before maturity of time accounts. Reserve also responds to consumer inquiries on a broad range of banking topics. . Complaints against State Member Banks and Selected Nonbank Subsidiaries of Bank Holding Companies about Regulated Practices. While consumers can contact FRCH by telephone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . compared with 86 percent for the 2008 reporting period. . Of these cases. . In 2009. Regulation Z (Truth in Lending) . .htm. . . . . Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . HOPA (Homeowners Protection Act) . e-mail. . . . . . . .979) were inquiries and half (26. . . . . Regulation H (National Flood Insurance Act / Insurance Sales) . . . . . . . . . . or online. Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act . and forwards complaints against other creditors and businesses to the appropriate enforcement agency. . . . . . . . . . . . . and • failure to provide timely. . . . . . Regulation CC (Expedited Funds Availability) . . . . . . . . . . .federalreserve. Regulation D (Reserve Requirements) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Regulation V (Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions) . FRCH processed 53. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Regulation B (Equal Credit Opportunity) . . . www. .28 Each Reserve Bank investigates complaints against state member banks and selected nonbank subsidiaries in its District. . . . . . . . . . Home Ownership Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . Fair Credit Reporting Act. including consumer protection questions. . . . in writing. . . . Approximately three percent of cases were referred from other agencies. . . Regulation C (Home Mortgage Disclosure) . with most cases received directly from consumers. . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . Nondiscrimination complaints Checking accounts . . . . . 18 complaints (one percent of total regulated complaints) alleged discrimination on the basis of prohibited borrower traits or rights.073 in 2009.284) involved unregulated practices and 33 percent (1. . . . . . . The most common real estate complaints by problem code related to: “credit – other rates. . . . . . . . embezzlement. 67 percent (3. “other rates. . . . . . . .Consumer and Community Affairs 155 Complaints against State Member Banks and Selected Nonbank Subsidiaries of Bank Holding Companies about Regulated Practices. . and reverse mortgages. . residential construction loans. .29 The most common credit card complaints related to debt collection practices (12 percent). . Of these. . . . . . . . and fees” (10 percent). religion. . terms.8 Total . and fees” (13 percent). . . and home equity credit lines (19 percent). .643) of complaint submissions were made online. . . . . . . . funds availability not as expected (9 percent). 2009 Subject of Complaint/ Product Type All complaints Number 1638 24 7 561 398 213 Percent 100 1. . . . credit denied other (10 percent). . complaints by product code related to: home-purchase loans (51 percent). openend home equity lines of credit. . . Other loans . . . . . Of the remaining complaints. marital status. . and forgery.000 visits during the year. home refinance/closed-end loans. . . . . .3 1 . . . and credit cards (13 percent). .638) involved regulated practices. . . applicant income derived from public assistance programs or applicant reliance on provisions of the Consumer Credit Protection Act. . Complaints about Regulated Practices The majority of regulated practice complaints concerned checking accounts (34 percent). . national origin. and billing error resolutions (10 percent). . . payment errors and delays (12 percent). and escrow account problems (7 percent). . . Nearly 40 percent (3. . . . . . . . . . home purchase loans. by Product Type. sex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Real estate loans . . home refinance and closed-end loans (23 percent). . . . Thirty-one regulated complaints alleging discrimination were received.30 Fifty percent 29. . . . terms. . . . . .151) of these complaints were closed without investigation pending the receipt of additional information from consumers. disputed withdrawal of funds (7 percent). . . or theft (7 percent). . . home improvement loans. . . . age. . . 30. Discrimination alleged Real estate loans . . . . and the online form page received nearly 395. . . . . Real estate loans include adjustable-rate mortgages. . . . . . Nevertheless. . . . color. . . Prohibited basis includes: race. . . 40 percent (10. . . . Consumer Complaints Complaints against state member banks and selected nonbank subsidiaries of bank holding companies totaled 8. . . Credit cards . . . .2 24.3 13 Complaints involving violations Number 86 3 0 38 16 13 Percent 5 0. .2 0 2.5 0. . . real estate (26 percent). The most common checking account complaints related to insufficient funds or overdraft charges and procedures (52 percent). . .4 34. fraud. . . . .

360 complaints against other banks and creditors to the appropriate regulatory agencies and government offices for investigation. Of the remaining 25 percent. embezzlement or theft (3 percent). 5 percent were deemed violations of law. 2009 of discrimination complaints were related to the age of the applicant or borrower. The top three consumer protection issues documented with specific codes were: adverse action notices received pursuant to the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (11 percent).156 96th Annual Report. referrals were transmitted electronically. Most complaints were related to checking account activity (35 percent). the Board continued to monitor complaints about banking practices not subject to existing regulations. ten percent are open cases that are in process. covering a wide range of topics. embezzlement. terms. The most common violations involved checking accounts. credit card interest rates. national origin. depository forgery. including other federal agencies or written materials. color. In 2009. fraud. fraud. debt collection/ Consumer Inquiries The Federal Reserve received 26. to address their inquiries. evidence revealed that banks or subsidiaries correctly handled the situation. To minimize the time required to re-route complaints to these agencies. 31. and fees.31 The Federal Reserve’s investigation of these complaints revealed no evidence of illegal credit discrimination. Complaint Referrals In 2009. The most common violations where discrimination was alleged involved real estate loans and other loans. . with a focus on instances of potential unfair or deceptive practices. and depository forgery. real estate concerns (25 percent). and opening and closing deposit accounts. and the remainder primarily involved factual disputes or litigated matters. A memorandum of understanding between HUD and the federal bank regulatory agencies requires that complaints alleging a violation of the Fair Housing Act be forwarded to HUD. or ethnicity of the applicant or borrower. one percent was regarding general errors.304 complaints against state member banks and selected nonbank subsidiaries of bank holding companies that involved these unregulated practices. pre-approved credit solicitations (7 percent). More specifically. real estate loans. and credit cards. Consumers were typically directed to other resources.979 consumer inquiries in 2009. consumers most frequently complained about issues involving insufficient funds or overdraft charges and procedures. Complaints About Unregulated Practices As required by Section 18(f) of the Federal Trade Commission Act. and credit cards (9 percent). foreclosures. the Federal Reserve forwarded 18. the Board received 3. Thirty-three percent of discrimination complaints were related to the race. The Federal Reserve forwarded eight complaints to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that alleged violations of the Fair Housing Act. In 75 percent of investigated complaints against state member banks and selected nonbank subsidiaries of bank holding companies. or theft.

state and local governments. the System solicited input from various local stakeholders. knowledge. housing counselors. See Federal Reserve Board. high-priority efforts. a web-based resource center for borrowers. As part of the MORE initiative. and community development practitioners. for example. and federal policymakers. Foreclosures and Neighborhood Stabilization In 2009. in particular. after an unsuccessful sale at a foreclosure auction. with oversight from Board staff. the System’s Foreclosure Toolkit. Community Development. the Board’s CAO promotes and coordinates Systemwide.federalreserve. financial institutions. the System is conducting a study of the uses of funds distributed under the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP).gov/consumerinfo/foreclosure. In 2009. In addition. the Community Affairs Offices (CAOs) at each of the 12 Reserve Banks design activities to respond to the specific needs of the communities they serve. a class of property owned by a lender. which was established by HUD to stabilize communities that have suffered from foreclosures and abandonment.Consumer and Community Affairs 157 Supporting Community Economic Development The Board’s Division of Consumer and Community Affairs (DCCA) works to promote community economic development and fair access to credit for lowand moderate-income communities and populations. Similarly. and organizations that serve low. which will serve as the foundation of a report to be issued in the spring of 2010 to describe the uses of NSP funds and to identify best practices for future funding expenditures. issues related to high rates of foreclosure continued to dominate the System’s community affairs agenda. working to mitigate the impact of foreclosures on individual borrowers and communities. www. community development practitioners. Board community affairs staff focus on issues that have public policy implications.and moderate-income communities and populations. htm. and expertise related to mortgage markets to address the foreclosure problem through the Mortgage Outreach and Research Efforts (MORE) Initiative. In addition.32 32. Mortgage Foreclosure Resources. The Board also partnered with NeighborWorks America® (NWA) again in 2009 to continue to leverage the System’s resources with those of . The MORE initiative aims to enhance the System’s response to the foreclosure crisis by improving understanding of the incidents and underlying causes of foreclosures. government agencies. and enhancing the System’s communication of important research and policy findings to consumers. typically a bank. the Board worked with the Federal Reserve Banks of Boston and Cleveland on a publication addressing issues related to the acquisition and disposition of real estate owned (REO). As a decentralized function. The CAOs provide information and promote awareness of investment opportunities to financial institutions. was updated to provide links to new information on outreach programs and to allow for further customization at the District-level. While each Reserve Bank addressed the impact of foreclosure on lowand moderate-income communities— through programming tailored to the particular needs of communities in their Districts—the entire System coordinated resources.

Analysis of data on non-prime mortgages (subprime and near-prime loans) from First American LoanPerformance (LP) finds that the 90-days-or-more delinquency rate (as of August 2008) for loans originated between January 2006 and April 2008 is very high across geographies regardless of income. populations not targeted by the CRA. Second. however. These three considerations weaken the theoretical link between the CRA and the subprime mortgage boom and bust. The language and enforcement of the CRA do not portend excessively risky lending by banks. institutions not covered by the CRA (independent nonbank institutions) accounted for about half of all higherpriced mortgage originations (a proxy for subprime originations). Moreover. Finally. and perhaps most tellingly. First. that the LP and RealtyTrac data do not identify borrower income. It is important to note.158 96th Annual Report. Similarly. . Finally.and higher-income neighborhoods. data from RealtyTrac on foreclosure filings between January 2006 and August 2008 indicate that about 70 percent of filings have taken place in middle.and moderate-income (LMI) neighborhoods and households within the framework of safe and sound operation. many theories emerged about its underlying causes. The CRA encourages banking institutions to extend credit to low. areas that are not the focus of the CRA. the CRA rules and enforcement process have not changed substantively since 1995. tempering the conclusions one can draw from these data. only six percent of all higher-priced mortgage originations were extended by CRAregulated lenders (and their affiliates) to either lower-income borrowers or neighborhoods in the lenders’ CRA assessment areas (the geographies that are the focus of CRA evaluations). or investments banking institutions must provide.or higher-income neighborhoods.or higher-income areas than in the lower-income areas targeted by the CRA. including some claims that the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) encouraged commercial banks and savings institutions (banking institutions) to undertake high-risk mortgage lending. the CRA does not stipulate minimum targets or even goals for the volume of loans. services. Only a small portion of subprime mortgage originations in 2005 and 2006 can reasonably be linked to the CRA. about 60 percent of higher-priced originations went to middle. 2009 CRA Did Not Cause the Subprime Mortgage Crisis As the recent financial crisis unfolded. and filings have increased more sharply in middle.or higherincome borrowers or neighborhoods. Mortgage defaults and foreclosures have been severe even in middle. while subprime mortgage lending grew most significantly in the early to mid 2000’s. The Board rebuts claims that the CRA lies at the root of the crisis by making the following points. Data collected under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act in 2005 and 2006 also suggest a tenuous link between the CRA and subprime mortgage lending.

a featured program at NWA’s December 2009 Training Institute in Washington. co-hosted a policy discussion that introduced the publication and attracted leaders from the financial services industry. and strategies for reviving the market for Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTCs).htm. www.gov/newsevents/speech/ duke20091209a. which featured discussions and presentations of strategies and best practices in neighborhood stabilization. strategies for managing scattered site properties. Federal Reserve Board Governor Elizabeth Duke delivered opening remarks at the symposium. In 2009.frbsf. 34. Community Development.pdf. community advocates. foundations. Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Resources for Stabilizing Communities. financing of small multifamily properties. The San Francisco Bank’s Center for Community Development Finance published materials that served as the basis for the discussion entitled The Economic Crisis and Community Development Finance: An Industry Assessment. Federal Reserve Board. December 9. think tanks.” www.org/publications/community/ wpapers/2009/wp2009-05. In addition. .C.gov/communitydev/ stablecommunities. Federal Reserve Board. a compendium of policy recommendations regarding the modernization of the Community Reinvestment Act.federalreserve. Topics addressed in the series included the particular problems of tenants that rent properties from owners in foreclosure. the Board cosponsored the Neighborhood Stabilization Symposium.pdf. Community Development.htm. The Boston and San Francisco Banks. D. D. News and Events. together with the Board. 36. and academic institutions. DCCA provided important policy leadership in several areas in 2009.36 The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston also partnered with the Board and the Aspen Institute to follow-up on a System initiative begun in 2004 to address the scale and sustainability of 33. Testimony and Speeches.33 As part of the partnership.34 The symposium attracted an audience of approximately 400 local practitioners and policymakers. Working Papers. 2009. the Board also hosted a series of forums to address the availability of affordable rental housing. The summit brought together leaders in community development finance and featured a robust discussion of strategies to respond to the economic crisis.federalreserve. www. “Keys to Successful Neighborhood Stabilization. policies designed to create rental property from REO inventories.C. www.35 Other Community Development Initiatives Beyond foreclosure and neighborhood stabilization issues. Publications.gov/ communitydev/other20091110a1. 35.Consumer and Community Affairs 159 the NWA network to address community stabilization in the wake of the record number of foreclosures. Federal Reserve Board. The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Community Development. Innovative Ideas for Innovating the LIHTC Market. The Federal Reserve Banks of Boston and San Francisco published Revisiting the CRA: Perspectives on the Future of the Community Reinvestment Act. Louis partnered with the Board for the LIHTC forum and published a collection of policy papers featured at the forum.federalreserve. the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco partnered with the Board and the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund to host a Community Development Finance Summit in Washington.

kc. so it ran additional movie ads over Thanksgiving weekend to encourage wise credit card usage. high foreclosure rates gave rise to concerns about new risks for vulnerable consumers in the mortgage marketplace. directing viewers to 5 Tips for Getting the Most from Your Credit Card. Board staff conducted research to determine the most effective strategy for delivering short information pieces to the greatest number of people. Leading researchers presented original and objective research designed to inform innovative market and product development through a framework that addressed (1) individual consumer preferences and behaviors with respect to consumer finance products. entitled Innovative Financial Services for the Underserved: Opportunities and Outcomes.160 96th Annual Report. and outcomes of inno37. Go to FederalReserve. “Innovative Financial Services for the Underserved: Opportunities and Outcomes. such as financial education and institutional structures.frb.” The Federal Reserve has a wealth of unbiased. Data indicates that consumers go to the movies even in a down economy. www. vation in financial services for lowand moderate-income consumers and underserved populations. 2009 Consumer Education and Outreach: Meeting Consumers Where They Are In today’s complex and ever-changing consumer financial services marketplace. and be able to spot a scam or a deal that is “too good to be true. See Federal Reserve Board. Community Affairs Conferences. Federal Reserve Board. explored the role. The Board also alerted consumers to changes in laws and regulations that have increased consumer credit card protections. with ads running in theaters over Labor Day weekend.” Messages on avoiding foreclosure and scams were later expanded.gov and click on 5 Tips for Avoiding Foreclosure Scams.”1 1. community organizations by hosting a forum on subsidies in community development. throughout the year. and (4) approaches for shaping market participation. In 2009. so the Board began running ads in movie theaters in April that focused on helping consumers avoid foreclosure scams: “Having trouble keeping up with your mortgage payments? Are you facing foreclosure? Don’t be taken advantage of—it shouldn’t hurt to get help.org/ carc2009/. Consumer Information. (3) effects of mortgage products on performance and wealth creation. and.37 The conference. .htm. the System held the sixth biennial System Community Affairs Officer’s Research Conference. In April. Community Development.” www.gov/consumerinfo/ fivetips_creditcard. the Board wanted consumers to have information about their accounts and rights. research-based consumer information. With concern about an increase in foreclosure-related scams. With sweeping new rules being implemented in 2009 and 2010 (see “Credit Card Reform” in this chapter).federalreserve. DCCA engaged in innovative ways to expand its outreach to connect consumers with these resources. the Board was among the first federal banking agencies to reach out to consumers to warn them. it is critical that consumers know where they can go for reliable information to assist them in making financial choices. processes. (2) influences affecting market participation.

gov.federalreserve. See Federal Reserve Board.gov/consumerinfo/ fivetips. For community-development/events/understandinghousing-and-mortgage/data-workshop-finalagenda. new tool complements other interactive calculators on the website.htm. In 2009. state. 5. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia hosted a conference in June entitled Understanding the Housing and Mortgage Markets: What Data Do We Have? What Data Do We Need?38 The conference brought together researchers and government offi38. In fact.and moderate-income neighborhoods. DCCA also expanded its popular 5 Tips series. user-friendly website that focused on new credit card rules released in early 2010. .6 This site includes information about bank products and services and consumers’ rights. See Federal Reserve Board. 3. including calculators that focus on mortgages and mortgage refinancing.federalreserveconsumerhelp.federalreserve. a new interactive Credit Card Repayment Calculator was added to the Federal Reserve’s website. 6. nearly 100 scams were reported through FRCH in 2009 and were sent to the appropriate federal authorities for investigation and prosecution.3 DCCA developed other new.htm. Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.federalreserve. with new information on shopping for a mortgage. Meeting Data and Analysis Needs The Federal Reserve made a concerted effort to address the data needs of community development practitioners in 2009. Community Development. 2009. In addition. and local sources to monitor economic and housing conditions in low. the Board began developing an interactive. Consumer Information. www. 4.” www.Consumer and Community Affairs 161 Consumer Education and Outreach: Meeting Consumers Where They Are—continued The Board also took steps to expand its Internet presence in order to provide consumers with easier access to information. webbased consumer resources and updated existing materials. “Understanding the Housing and Mortgage Markets: What Data Do We Have? What Data Do We Need?. www.and moderate-income communities.pdf. www. This 2.4 The calculator helps consumers estimate how long it will take to pay their credit card bills under different payment scenarios. www.5 The Board is also accessible to consumers through Federal Reserve Consumer Help (FRCH). Community Development Events. Consumer Information. several Reserve Banks developed survey instruments to monitor economic conditions in low. www.frb. Consumer Information. as well as links to other useful websites that provide information about recognizing and reporting scams.phil.federalreserve. See Federal Reserve Board. Consumer Information.gov/creditcard. as well as the limitations of the data and efforts to improve the quality and availability of data to address community development needs.org/ cials responsible for data collection to discuss existing data available from federal. a consumer complaint website. Consumer Information. In the spring of 2009.gov/creditcardcalculator. See Federal Reserve Board.2 The Board developed a similar consumer education webpage on new rules for overdraft protection products. See Federal Reserve Board.gov/consumerinfo/ wyntk_overdraft.

including generic and custom credit scores as well as institutions’ internal information that is statistically derived from their portfolios. The Credit Card Act In the June and October meetings. were held in March.gov/aboutthefed/ cac_20090326.gov/ aboutthefed/cac_20090618. and October. Community Development.and moderate-income communities and two indicators of the condition of organizations serving them. LMI Survey. and • strategies and challenges related to neighborhood stabilization. Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. open to the public. the Council addressed certain provisions of the Credit Card Act amending the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) and proposed amendments to Regulation Z (Truth in Lending) to protect consumers who use credit cards from a number of potentially costly practices (see “Credit Card Reform”). • proposed rules regarding overdraft services. For a list of members of the Council.org/home/subwebnav.gov/aboutthefed/ cac_20091022.kc.pdf. policymakers. the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City developed the LMI Survey.pdf. a quarterly survey that measures the economic conditions of low. see the “Federal Reserve System Organization” section in this report.and moderate-income communities and the organizations that serve them. the financial services industry. www. and state agencies—advises the Board of Governors on matters of Board-administered laws and regulations as well as other consumer-related financial services issues. • proposed changes to Regulation Z regarding disclosures that consumers receive in connection with closedend mortgages and home-equity lines of credit and amendments that would provide new consumer protections for home-secured credit.pdf.cfm?level= 3&theID=11201&SubWeb=3. visit the Board’s website for transcripts of Council meetings. also.162 96th Annual Report. flexible approach regarding issuers’ evaluation of a consumer’s ability to pay.40 39. academic institutions.federalreserve. and others to evaluate and respond to changes in the economic conditions for low.federalreserve. Among the significant topics of discussion for the Council in 2009 were • the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009 (the Credit Card Act).39 The survey results are used to construct five indicators of economic conditions in low. The transcript from the October meeting is available at www. The LMI Survey is available on the Reserve Bank’s website and provides a gauge for service providers. The Credit Card Act prohibits creditors from opening a new credit card account or increasing the credit limit for an existing account unless the creditor considers the consumer’s ability to make the required payments under the terms of the account. Research.and moderate-income individuals. 40. • issues related to foreclosures.federalreserve. stating that issuers should be permitted to use an array of factors in underwriting. Consumer Advisory Council The Board’s Consumer Advisory Council (the Council)—whose members represent consumer and community organizations. June. Industry representatives encouraged the Board to adopt a broad. The transcript from the June meeting is available at www. 2009 example. The transcript from the March meeting is available at www.frb. Consumer representa- . Council meetings.

In response to the Board’s proposed rules to implement the ability-to-pay provision. and that the overall standards for penalty fees should be subject to rigorous validation. Regarding the statutory requirement that issuers reevaluate interest rate increases that are based on the credit risk of the consumer. but noted the challenge in obtaining income information for existing customers. industry members expressed support for the proposed rule requiring consideration of existing obligations as well as income or assets in assessing consumers’ ability to make the required minimum payments.Consumer and Community Affairs 163 tives expressed concern about the ability of regulators to review and validate issuers’ underwriting models and methodologies due to their proprietary nature and about the use of credit scores for underwriting rather than a holistic assessment of consumers’ ability to repay their full potential indebtedness. consumer representatives expressed the view that any fees should be reasonably related to the cost incurred by the creditor as a result of the violation. or other factors. that basing fees on deterrence should also be supported empirically. market conditions. They encouraged the Board to include payment history as an additional factor in the ability-to-pay analysis and to permit use of modeled income. Consumer representatives cautioned that regulators should closely monitor such modeling. A consumer representative encouraged the Board to prohibit the assessment of over-the-limit fees due to credit-line reductions. but urged regulators to monitor the ways in which issuers communicate the change to consumers. 2010. A consumer representative expressed the view that issuers should consider the full utilization of all credit lines in determining ability to pay. A consumer representative expressed the view that the opt-in requirement for over-the-limit transactions and fees will foster consumer choice and competition in the marketplace. Regarding penalty fees associated with credit card accounts. conditions. Industry representatives also supported the proposed rule requiring issuers to estimate minimum payments based on a consumer’s utilization of the full credit line. as a substitute for reported income. not the full utilization of a consumer’s other credit lines. and features provided to consumers who do opt in. but encouraged the Board to clarify that the analysis would take into account only the credit line offered by the particular issuer. industry representatives encouraged the Board to . For over-the-limit fees. based on empirically derived and statistically sound models. as verified by empirical data. Industry representatives supported the adoption of a flexible set of criteria to consider in determining the reasonableness and proportionality of penalty fees and encouraged the inclusion of portfolio-based analysis and issuers’ loss rates as factors in addition to those specifically listed in the statute. Industry representatives encouraged the Board to allow issuers to begin informing consumers in advance of the requirement’s February 22. An industry representative stated that the opt-in requirement for the over-the-limit feature will help to regulate the reasonableness of that fee. consumer representatives urged the Board to ensure that issuers provide appropriate disclosures regarding the opt-in requirement for extensions of credit that exceed the account’s credit limit and to require that consumers who do not opt in nevertheless receive the same account terms. implementation date that creditors obtain a consumer’s express consent before imposing over-the-limit fees.

or opt-in. Several industry representatives ex- . before such overdrafts could be paid by the financial institution and a fee imposed on the consumer’s account for the service. According to one consumer representative. and the consumer does not opt out. Industry representatives generally pointed to the emergence of a new business model in the credit card industry as issuers adjust to the elimination of “back-end” risk-management tools such as repricing and turn to more stringent “front-end” underwriting and overall higher pricing. One member suggested that the Board adopt an opt-out approach for current accounts and an opt-in approach for new accounts as of a certain date. One member also urged the Board to adopt substantive protections regarding overdraft services.164 96th Annual Report. conditions. 2009 adopt a broad set of criteria for issuers to consider in making such decisions. any account fee should be uniform and applied to all accountholders. They also expressed the view that institutions should not be permitted to alter the account terms. the proposal would require a consumer’s affirmative consent. Council members discussed the Board’s proposed amendments to Regulation E (Electronic Fund Transfer Act). A consumer representative stated that surveys show that consumers want a choice about whether overdrafts are paid for debit-card transactions and that consumers generally want the transaction to be declined. As an alternative approach. which they stated would allow consumers to retain control of their financial situation while averting potential operational disruptions at the point of sale and alleviating the burden on institutions to gain affirmative consent from existing account-holders. Overdraft Services At the March meeting. compared to accounts that allow the payment of such overdrafts. The proposed rules would prohibit financial institutions from imposing a fee on a consumer’s asset account for paying an overdraft for an ATM or one-time debit card transaction unless the consumer is given notice of the right to opt out of the institution’s overdraft service. which they stated would provide incentives for institutions to communicate clearly about overdraft services to their customers. such as limiting the number of overdrafts a consumer could be charged for during a year. if banks change their business models to move away from free checking accounts. Consumer representatives expressed the view that issuers’ rate-setting and repricing methodologies should be subject to rigorous scrutiny and validation by regulators. pressed support for the opt-out approach. Members commended the Board for its work on the proposed overdraft rules and incorporation of feedback from the Council in prior meetings. or features for consumers who do not opt in compared to those who do opt in. Industry representatives also supported the idea that financial institutions should be permitted to price differently those accounts that do not allow overdrafts for ATM withdrawals and onetime debit transactions. Consumer representatives generally supported the opt-in approach. which would provide consumers with certain choices relating to the use of overdraft services and the assessment of overdraft fees (see “Overdraft Services and Gift Card Rules”).

Consumer and Community Affairs 165 Closed-End Mortgages and Home Equity Lines of Credit In July 2009. Many of the changes are based on the consumer testing conducted in connection with the review of Regulation Z. in the APR because such a calculation could mean that more loans will exceed the high-cost threshold under federal and state laws. whichever is shorter. Other industry representatives supported a more flexible approach. opposing any exception for brokers. community banks. the Board proposed changes to the disclosures that consumers receive in connection with closedend mortgage loans and home equity lines of credit (HELOCs) with the goal of improving their content and format to make them more useful to consumers (see “Mortgage and Home Equity Lending Reform”). For closed-end mortgages. for the type or amount of changes that would trigger a new disclosure and waiting period. with no waivers permitted. prohibiting certain payments to originators based on the loan’s terms or conditions. or “steering. Consumer representatives and an industry member endorsed a strict three-day rule requiring a new disclosure and waiting period. These disclosures are required by the Board’s Regulation Z. even if nothing has changed since the early TILA disclosure was provided. Several members urged the Board to do further testing regarding consumers’ experiences with mortgage transactions. In response to the proposal’s prohibition on directing. The Board’s proposal would require the creditor to provide a “final” TILA disclosure that the consumer must receive at least three business days be- fore consummation. Several industry representatives expressed the view that the rule should apply only to loan originators. One member urged the Board to consider means to ensure that the rules regarding compensation are applied consistently to banks and non-banks. or mortgage broker businesses. The proposal sets out two alternative approaches to address changes to loan terms and settlement charges during the three-businessday waiting period: receiving a new disclosure (and new waiting period) if any changes occur. they stated that a broader application of the rule would have the effect of diminishing competition.” consumers to transactions that are . The Board’s proposal would also amend Regulation Z to provide limits on compensation to mortgage brokers and to creditors’ employees who originate loans. A consumer representative supported including all fees in the APR to make it a more useful number for consumers and suggested that fees should be amortized over a typical refinancing period or the actual term of the loan. Several industry representatives cautioned against including additional fees. such as third-party charges. not to institutions that function as mortgage brokers. such as allowing consumers to waive the three-day standard so that the closing could take place. and setting a threshold. Council members strongly commended the Board’s work on the disclosures and the use of extensive consumer testing to inform the content and format of the disclosures. such as credit unions. Consumer representatives supported the rule and its classifications according to function. or only when the APR becomes inaccurate or a variable rate feature is added. with a de minimis exception. the Board’s proposal would revise the calculation of the finance charge and annual percentage rate (APR) so that they better capture most fees and costs paid by consumers in connection with the loan.

bright-line rule for what would constitute steering. Consumer representatives expressed the view that there should be a clear appeals process regarding line suspensions or reductions and that the lender should bear the costs associated with reinstating accounts. the Board’s proposal would prohibit creditors from terminating an account for paymentrelated reasons unless the consumer has failed to make a required minimum periodic payment for more than 30 days after the due date for that payment. especially if later analysis shows that the line should not have been changed. They also stated that some foreclosures are being filed while the borrower is in the trial modification period. including the Administration’s Making Home Affordable Program. such as the increasing number of trial modifica- . An industry representative supported the proposed 30-day timeframe for lenders to complete an investigation of a request for reinstatement. but stated that consumers should bear some of the cost. which could be refunded if the appeal is successful. Regarding the federal Making Home Affordable mortgage modification program. and real estate owned (REO) properties. as well as delays in moving borrowers from trial modifications to permanent modifications. Later in 2009. Industry representatives stated that the need to fully document and completely underwrite loan modifications under the federal program leads to longer processing timeframes and compliance challenges. consumer representatives expressed concern about the capacity of servicers to handle the volume of requests and associated documentation. Foreclosure Issues In each of its meetings in 2009. The Board’s proposal also would establish a new safe harbor for suspensions and creditlimit reductions and would impose additional requirements regarding reinstating accounts that have been temporarily suspended or reduced. but encouraged clarification that the time period would be triggered when the lender receives complete information from the borrower. consistent with the new delinquency period in the credit card context. Members generally agreed on the need for more comprehensive and detailed data collection about mortgage delinquencies. Some members noted the impact on small businesses when HELOCs are suspended or the credit limit is reduced. servicers were hampered by a lack of detailed technical guidelines and little advance notice of changes to the program. Regarding HELOCs. An industry member supported the 30-day timeframe. the Council discussed loss-mitigation efforts for mortgages. the performance of modified mortgages. specifically noting the need for definition around the netpresent-value model. foreclosures. but a consumer representative urged the Board to adopt a 60-day delinquency timeframe. in the early stages of the federal modification program. some members pointed to signs of progress in the federal modification program. 2009 not in their best interest in order to increase the originator’s compensation. Industry representatives also supported an appeals process. and other issues related to foreclosures. They also expressed the view that. both industry and consumer representatives urged the Board to set forth a clearer.166 96th Annual Report. A consumer representative noted that there is less risk of steering when a consumer is presented with multiple loan options.

such as being permitted only for subprime loans. Members cited examples of successful collaborations among lenders. A consumer representative also urged the Board to monitor fair-lending issues related to the maintenance and disposition of REO properties by lenders. particularly in areas where foreclosures are concentrated. One member noted that while most borrowers with trial modifications are making their payments. some are not able to do so because of economic hardship. and efforts such as the federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) to address the challenges of stabilizing communities. Members raised concerns about the increasing prevalence of for-profit foreclosure consultants and foreclosure scams and emphasized the need for enforcement against such entities and warnings to consumers about not paying up-front fees for counseling or modification services. the Council discussed the effects of foreclosures on the surrounding community. Members noted the negative effects of REO and vacant properties on neighborhoods. Several consumer and industry representatives endorsed a focus on principal write-downs as a key way to achieve sustainable modifications. particularly in the context of loan modifications. and the impact on the decisionmaking process of other homeowners who are struggling to stay current . Members agreed on the need for uniform loss-mitigation processes and guidelines to increase efficiency and reduce confusion among servicers and borrowers. A consumer representative urged the provision of more resources for legitimate counseling agencies and legal services organizations to help guide distressed borrowers through the modification process. A consumer representative expressed concern about the lack of information provided to borrowers who are denied a loan modification and the absence of an appeals process for the federal program. as well as operational challenges in adjusting to changes to the program. Neighborhood Stabilization Throughout 2009. and nonprofit groups to engage in direct outreach with borrowers. Several consumer representatives expressed support for judicial mortgage modifications in the bankruptcy context and court-mediated resolution programs as additional tools to deal with foreclosures. Members generally agreed that the federal program does not adequately address the situations of jobless borrowers or those who are underwater on their loans. and some members also suggested greater use of short sales in cases where an affordable modification cannot be achieved. servicers. while participating servicers have increased their staffing and resources to implement the modification program. Members commended the Board for its work on fair-lending issues. Industry representatives cautioned that judicial modifications should be a last resort and should have reasonable limitations. they face strict compliance requirements regarding documentation. and that the primary focus should be on achieving affordable modified payments for borrowers. such as job loss.Consumer and Community Affairs 167 tions initiated and borrowers evaluated for trial modifications. Consumer and industry representatives disagreed about the value of second liens and the appropriate treatment of those loans both in the federal modification program and in the safety-andsoundness context. Industry representatives stated that. such as increased vandalism and crime.

One member stated that increased monthly payments and interest rates for credit cards can exacerbate the cyclical problems that consumers and the industry are facing. the Council addressed issues related to the availability and quality of credit. leading to “toxic titles. another member expressed concern that individual issuers’ actions in terms of riskbased pricing for credit cards may . Members discussed measures that aim to restore the flow of critically important credit as well as the current state of lending. members also described the difficulties in working with local governments regarding acquisition of REO properties due to the lack of standard purchase agreements. given the relatively short implementation timeframe for the NSP.” and urged federal regulators to increase oversight of regulated institutions regarding these issues. many local governments have opted for less complicated projects such as land banks or closing-cost assistance. An industry representative commented on the experience of credit card issuers. from holding troubled properties to finding credit-worthy homebuyers and managing scattered-site rental properties. he also noted that Congressional action is likely to impact the overall business model of the credit card industry and access to credit. Finally. Members noted that nonprofit groups face significant challenges in addressing REO issues. They also pointed to some positive developments.and moderate-income communities. including the types and quality of credit products and terms that are available to consumers. which face increased funding costs and a sharp increase in loan losses and are responding by repricing and cutting credit lines. They expressed support for initiatives to capitalize community development financial institutions (CDFIs) and other community development groups that can play important roles in neighborhood revitalization. Other Discussion Topics At the March meeting. particularly for consumers and small businesses. Members noted that the CDFI industry serves as a key funding source for small businesses and other economic development activities. However. such as the NSP’s provision of technical assistance and a move toward collaborative efforts on the local level. rather than more complex acquisition and rehabilitation efforts. One member noted that the National Community Stabilization Trust is working to provide tools to address the issues of neighborhood stabilization and vacant and abandoned properties. such as a clearinghouse for REO properties between servicers and communities. often led by community development organizations. They noted that.168 96th Annual Report. They expressed concern about banks not maintaining their REO properties or not completing foreclosure sales. one member urged that further guidance be provided regarding the implementation of the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2009. particularly in low. One member urged lenders and servicers to be attentive to the valuation process in the sale of REO properties and the effects of their property-disposition activities on housing prices and to focus on selling REO properties to owneroccupants. such as a lack of government infrastructure in some communities for managing the influx of federal funds and the reimbursement feature of the program. Members described challenges in the implementation of the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP). 2009 on their mortgage.

Consumer and Community Affairs 169 work to increase systemic risk. A consumer representative suggested that CRA coverage should be extended to members of federally protected classes. and persons with disabilities. and an industry representative noted the need for quality products that will help bring people who have experienced foreclosures or bankruptcy during the crisis back into the conventional credit market. such as credit unions or insurance companies. One member pointed to the need for both access to credit and quality of credit and the difficulties faced by individuals who have thin or no credit files. Several members noted that non-depository institutions benefited from government interventions during the financial crisis and should be subject to the responsibilities of CRA in exchange for such benefits. Members also expressed support for expanding the CRA to cover financial services and products beyond lending. One member noted that over the years regulators have added products for which institutions can receive CRA credit. Some members also noted that credit cards and home-equity lines of credit are key sources of capital for small businesses. could dilute that purpose and the regulation’s impact. Members praised the Federal Reserve’s steps to bolster the markets for securitized assets and recommended further attention to the markets for Small Business Administration loans and affordable multifamily financing through the Low Income Housing Tax Credit. to ensure fair lending and the availability of quality financial products and services for those individuals. One member urged attention to potentially problematic credit products. An industry representative also expressed concern about the burden of complying with the CRA. A consumer representative stated that some consumers are still being offered credit products that raise concerns. Also at the June meeting. Some members expressed the view that loss-mitigation personnel . but that the process of measuring the impact of such products needs improvement. such as racial and ethnic groups. which face difficulties when those sources of funding are cut off. At the June meeting. not just the quantity of credit. which may become more appealing to cash-strapped borrowers who cannot access other forms of credit. Council members focused on the future of the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA). women. Several industry representatives noted that the CRA’s original purpose focused on serving low. including possible changes in light of developments in the financial services industry. members provided input on the Board’s rulemaking regarding the Secure and Fair Enforcement for Mortgage Licensing Act (SAFE Act). whether to include other products and institutions or to address fair-lending issues. such as tax refund anticipation loans and short-term loans from banks. such as to non-bank affiliates of depository institutions or to other non-bank financial services providers. Both consumer and industry members agreed that any reexamination of the CRA should include attention to the quality and sustainability of credit.and moderateincome communities from which deposits were taken and cautioned that expanding the CRA. Members discussed the idea of extending the CRA beyond depository institutions. the member urged the Federal Reserve to study options for generating alternative sources of credit data to analyze consumers who do not have a traditional credit file. particularly for smaller institutions.

One member encouraged the Board to adopt a “grandfathering” approach for existing originators and to set stricter requirements for education and testing for loan officers at regulated depository institutions. 2009 should be exempt from the SAFE Act’s licensing requirements. Several members supported applying the requirements to personnel who provide refinancings.170 96th Annual Report. Á .

171 Federal Reserve Banks The Federal Reserve Banks provide “payment services” to depository and certain other institutions. For details on how implementing ASC 715 affected the pro forma financial statements. next page). which has resulted in the recognition of a $478.2 Over the past 10 years. taxes. and serve as fiscal agents and depositories for the U. the Reserve Banks implemented the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. including the PSAF (see table. transferring funds and securities. In addition to income taxes and the return on equity. Reserve Banks have recovered 97. Board of Governors assets and costs that are related to priced services are also allocated to priced services. refer to notes 3 and 5 at the end of this chapter. 158. Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Postretirement Plans [Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 715 (ASC 715). costs. and providing a multilateral settlement service. .1 The 1.3 million reduction in equity related to the priced services’ benefit plans through 2009. other income. The Board is currently analyzing further the proposed publicly traded firm model and an alternate model based on a peer group of publicly traded payments processors that was suggested by several commenters. imputed costs and imputed profit are collectively referred to as the privatesector adjustment factor (PSAF).8 percent of their priced services costs. distribute the nation’s currency and coin to depository institutions. Effective December 31. The Reserve Banks charge fees for providing these “priced services. 2009.S government and other entities.3 Developments in Federal Reserve Priced Services Federal Reserve Banks provide a range of payment and related services to depository institutions. which represents a decline in economic value. Including this reduction in equity. Board assets are part of longterm assets. 31.0 percent for the 10-year period. all direct and indirect costs actually incurred as well as the imputed costs that would have been incurred—including financing costs.” The Monetary Control Act of 1980 requires that the Federal Reserve establish fees for priced services provided to depository institutions so as to recover. Financial data reported throughout this chapter—including revenue. 2006. in the pro forma financial statements at the end of this chapter. 2. and Board expenses are included in operating expenses. sales taxes. operating an automated clearinghouse (ACH) service. On March. Compensation-Retirement Benefits]. results in cost recovery of 93. the PSAF includes three other imputed costs: interest on debt. the Board of Governors requested public comment on a proposal to replace the current correspondent bank model underlying the PSAF calculation with a model based on elements derived from publicly traded firms more broadly. income before taxes. The Reserve Banks also contribute to setting national monetary policy and supervision and regulation of banks and other financial entities operating in the United States (discussed in the preceding chapters of this report). including collecting checks. over the long run. and an assessment for deposit insurance by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). and certain other expenses—and the return on equity (profit) that would have been earned if a private business firm had provided the services. and net income—can be linked to the pro forma financial statements at the end of this chapter. 3.

.8 101. . The Reserve Banks are engaged in a number of technology initiatives that will modernize their priced services processing platforms over the next several years. . . . . .3 Cost recovery (percent) 4. . . .6 834.5 9. . cost recovery is 93. 2002.8 97. . and the targeted return on equity. . .8 million. . . They also continued efforts to migrate the FedACH and Fedwire Funds services off a mainframe system and to a distributed environment. . . . . .3 873. .5 104. .8 675. The Banks’ operating expenses and imputed costs totaled $514.6 million. .5 100. . . .2 1.011. . 3. an amount termed net income on clearing balances. .9 859. . . . . . Note: Here and elsewhere in this chapter. . For the 10-year period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total cost is the sum of operating expenses. 1. . 2009 Priced Services Cost Recovery. . . . . .1 955. were not sufficient to offset reduced net income on clearing balances and increased pension costs.9 million and other income and expense (net) of $584. Revenue from services divided by total costs. . 5. . .0 Total costs 916. . . . 2009.7 million.172 96th Annual Report.3 1. 2000–2009 . . . .537. . For 2009. . . . . .600.7 875. . . . . . . imputed costs of $140. imputed costs (interest on debt. . .9 727.5 During the year.4 66. . .7 million. . resulting in a net loss to priced services of $32. 2008.5 92.4 103. . .5 8. . . . . other income was $12.8 percent of the total costs of their commercial check-collection service. . . includes operating expenses of $8. . . 2006. . .4 918. including the PSAF. .0 80. . the PSAF has been adjusted to reflect the actual clearing balance levels maintained throughout 2009.7 947. . . . . . .8 960. In 2009.4 Revenue from priced services amounted to $662. . . . . . . .0 93. . . . . . . . .3 million.1 95. . . 4. . . . .1 million. . . imputed income taxes. . . . . .2 92.0 percent. . . . 5. .3 820.036. .5 million. 4. . . . . Revenue from operations totaled $481. . . interest on float. including the PSAF.7 886. . . . For the 10-year period. reduced operating costs. . .7 112. . .3 85. .0 937. .9 891. . .4 109. . . . . . . .113. For the 10-year period. . . . and accelerated the consolidation of their check-processing infrastructure to improve their overall cost recovery.8 106. 2005. . . . . . . Commercial Check-Collection Service In 2009. . .5 913. including the net reduction in equity related to ASC 715 reported by the priced services in 2009. . . . . . and imputed income taxes of $282. 2003. . .185. . .4 707.7 million and . sales taxes.7 914. . . . . These efforts.2 901.6 1. and the FDIC assessment). 2001.0 72. . . 2004.9 98.031. 2. . .7 931. . . . Reserve Banks recovered 92.5 19.2 Targeted return on equity 3 98. . Other income is revenue from investment of clearing balances net of earnings credits. . . . . . . . in light of uncertainty about the long-term effect that the payment of interest on reserve balances held by depository institutions at the Reserve Banks would have on the level of clearing balances. . . . . .396. . .3 842. . components may not sum to totals or yield percentages shown because of rounding. 2000−2009 Millions of dollars except as noted Year Revenue from services 1 922.4 9. . . .1 984. . . . .5 million. . includes revenue from services of $8. . .1 108.8 percent of total priced services costs of $727. Reserve Banks recovered 92. .7 1. .5 993. . .012.8 million.8 2000. . . 2007. .7 95. .6 994. .5 million. . .3 881. the Banks raised prices. . . . . The Banks are developing and planning to implement a new endto-end electronic check-processing system to improve the efficiency and reliability of their current check-processing operations. . . .2 Operating expenses and imputed costs 2 818. and costs were $707. however. . . .

the number of settlement entries processed. In 2008. . . . . . . Revenue from ACH operations totaled $92.6 Reserve Banks handled 8.717 10. .3 The Reserve Banks continued the consolidation of their check-processing offices in 2009.2 15. . . . the number of transactions originated online and offline.1 –1. . . . . . . Reserve Bank operating expenses and imputed costs totaled $98.388 134.555 505 10. 2003-2006” (December 2007). .8 6. . As a result.8 percent of Reserve Banks’ deposit volume was presented to paying banks using these products.929 9. . .5 million.260 127. to reduce the number of offices at which Banks process checks to meet their long-run cost-recovery requirement under the Monetary Control Act of 1980. . see Federal Reserve System. down from 13 at year-end 2008. .110 −10. . . including the PSAF. resulting in a net loss of $3. . .001. . By year-end 2009. . in 2009.363.584. .Federal Reserve Banks 173 Activity in Federal Reserve Priced Services.3 percent of Reserve Bank check presentments were being made through Check 21 products. . . and in national settlement. . . . including processed and fine-sort items. . . .1 percent from 2008 (see table above).1 –10. . . the Reserve Banks recovered 93.2 –2.6 7. . .357 464 10. .4 7. Check-service fee revenue in 2009 decreased $123. .2 2007 to 2008 –4.220 469 11.2 million. .9 million and other income totaled $1. For details.545. Commercial Automated Clearinghouse Services In 2009. . there were no costs or imputed revenues associated with the transportation of commercial checks between Reserve Bank check-processing offices. National settlement . the Banks were able to reduce their check-processing infrastructure more quickly than originally expected. . .frbservices. .6 percent of Reserve Bank check deposits and 94. . Commercial ACH . . 8. .7 million. other income totaled $9. Fedwire funds transfer . in commercial ACH.8 million.7 By year-end 2009.289 9.1 −0. The Federal Reserve System’s retail payments research suggests that the number of checks written in the United States has been declining since the mid-1990s. 8. 1. www. . Fedwire securities transfer . . 98. .org/files/communications/pdf/research/2007_payments_study.040. 2007–2009 Thousands of items Percent change Service 2009 2008 2007 2008 to 2009 Commercial check . the Banks were processing paper checks at two sites nationwide. This reduction is part of the Reserve Banks’ multiyear initiative. . Because of the rapid adoption of electronic check processing. .5 million from 2008. . . begun in 2003. The Reserve Banks also offer non-Check 21 electronic-presentment products.424 10. .9 Note: Activity in commercial check is the total number of commercial checks collected. .966. .4 percent of the total costs of their commercial ACH services. In 2009.429 137. the total number of commercial items processed. in Fedwire funds transfer and securities transfer. a decrease of 10. the Reserve Banks discontinued the transportation of commercial checks between their check-processing offices.7 –5. . . 7. “The 2007 Federal Reserve Payments Study: Noncash Payment Trends in the United States. .pdf.519 9. . . . . . .6 billion checks in 2009. . . The decline in Reserve Bank check volume has been influenced by nationwide trends away from the use of checks and toward greater use of electronic payment methods. resulting in a net loss of $23.

Check 21 addressed these issues indirectly by creating a new negotiable paper instrument. ACH volumes were down slightly because of lower growth rates in industry ACH volume. in 2003. The law required banks that were either unable or unwilling to accept checks electronically to accept substitute checks in place of the originals. considerable progress has been made toward achieving the act’s purpose of improving the overall efficiency of the nation’s payments system by fostering innovation in the check-collection system. including the PSAF. The banking industry’s extensive reliance on the physical movement of checks became apparent after the terrorist attacks of September 11.4 million. To help depository institutions meet their compliance obligations for international ACH transactions. Reserve Banks recovered 92. and other income amounted to $1. when air traffic came to a standstill resulting in delays in the clearing of many checks. In the five years since. that when properly prepared would be the legal equivalent of an original check.0 billion commercial ACH transactions. The Reserve Banks processed 10. Reserve Bank operating expenses and imputed costs totaled $69. a decrease of 0. This service searches incoming files for a given processing day and. the Reserve Banks began offering an IAT report service. 2009 Check 21 — Five Years Later The Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (Check 21). This statutory change. When Check 21 was enacted.3 million in 2009. The Federal Reserve Banks began offering Check 21 services as soon as the law became effective.174 96th Annual Report. resulting in a net loss of $3.6 million. However. if any IAT items are found. Banks million. Initially.3 million.7 percent from 2008. the nation’s retail payments system was already undergoing a transformation driven by changes in technology. 2001. it generates a report displaying all IAT items for a given business day. the move toward electronic check clearing unfolded gradually as many banks tried to determine how best to apply the provisions of the new law. Federal Reserve research had revealed that.” whereby banks could stop forwarding original checks for collection or return and apply check-imaging technology in a more robust fashion to achieve the efficiencies and cost savings associated with electronic check clearing. facilitated “check truncation. the modernization of the checkcollection system was stymied by laws that let banks demand that original checks be presented for payment. including checks converted at lockbox locations. 2004. The use of the Reserve Banks’ Check 21 services accelerated after banks developed their business strategies and made the investments necessary to support the exchange of check images. in turn. Fedwire Funds and National Settlement Services In 2009.1 percent of the costs of their Fedwire Funds and National Settlement Services. called a substitute check. Revenue from these operations totaled $64. promised a modernization of the nation’s largely paper-based check-clearing system. and consumer and business preferences. was introduced in 2009. rules. the number of electronic payments had surpassed the number of check payments for the first time. . A new industry ACH format related to cross-border transactions. which became effective on October 28. the International ACH Transaction (IAT) format.

91 percent of check returns were deposited electronically and almost 51 percent were delivered electronically. and have begun to offer their customers remote deposit capture services. to approximately 127 million. nonlocal checks. at 13. The transformation of the nation’s check-clearing system has also benefited retail and institutional bank customers. In December 2009.1 percent from 2008. reducing the maximum permissible hold periods for deposited checks under Regulation CC. the Reserve Banks implemented an enhanced Fedwire Funds Service message format to include additional information about cover payments. Federal Reserve Bank substitute check volume peaked in October 2007. . The re-engineering of the process by which banks return checks has lagged that of the forward check collection. Cover payments are bank-to- bank funds transfers used to fund or settle underlying customer payment obligations. The rapid decline in the use of paper checks has allowed the Reserve Banks to reduce their processing infrastructure for paper checks more quickly than originally expected. which represented 34 percent of Reserve Bank presentment volume. by early 2010. Fedwire Funds Service The Fedwire Funds Service allows participants to use their balances at Reserve Banks to transfer funds to other participants. as an increasing number of banks began accepting check presentments electronically. In 2009. improving payment transparency and assisting banks in risk management and transparency. Beginning in 2010. National Settlement Service The National Settlement Service is a multilateral settlement system that allows participants in private-sector clearing arrangements to settle transactions using Federal Reserve balances. no longer exist. the Banks processed checks at 45 offices nationwide. the number of Fedwire funds transfers originated by depository institutions decreased 5. In 2009. which allow checks to be deposited electronically for collection. the use of Reserve Bank electronic check return products has begun to accelerate and.5 trillion.Federal Reserve Banks 175 Check 21—continued initially focused on collecting checks electronically rather than receiving their check presentments electronically. As a result of the disparity in adoption rates on the collection and presentment sides. The Reserve Banks’ consolidation of check-processing sites has resulted in the reclassification of checks from nonlocal to local. however. however. The average daily value of Fedwire funds transfers in 2009 was $2. This infrastructure consolidation has enabled the Banks to significantly reduce check-processing costs. including the costs to physically transport paper checks.9 million per day. In 2003. by December 2009. More recently. only one Reserve Bank office processed paper checks. as a class. This message format provides the space to include identifying information about originators and beneficiaries of transfers. Some banks have also extended deposit cutoff hours at branches and ATMs. almost 99 percent of Reserve Bank check deposits were electronic while 94 percent of check presentments were electronic. The extensive use of costly substitute checks by the Reserve Banks was a transitional phenomenon.

8 billion notes into circulation in 2009. These services are not considered priced services. Board staff worked with Treasury. receipts from circulation decreased to a greater extent. and certain international organizations. resulting in a net loss of $0.5 million.4 million in 2009. to approximately 10.9 million. The Banks’ operating expenses and imputed costs for providing this service totaled $25. compared with credit float of $1.1 percent decrease from 2008.2 percent from 2008.4 percent increase from 2008.7 percent decrease from 2008. and certain international organizations. government-sponsored enterprises.9 In 2009. revenues. government-sponsored enterprises.176 96th Annual Report.9 billion coins into circulation.3 billion coins from circulation in 2009. The Banks received 65.5 million. and the Federal Reserve Banks distribute currency and coin through depository institutions. Although Reserve Bank payments into circulation decreased to pre-financialcrisis levels.1 percent decrease from 2008. Revenue from the service totaled $23. The Fedwire Securities Service allows participants to transfer electronically to other participants in the service certain securities issued by the U. a 5. the service processed settlement files for 41 local and national private-sector arrangements. Secret Service.S.7 million. a 4. The expenses.2 billion Federal Reserve notes from circulation in 2009. Credit float occurs when the Reserve Banks present items for collection to the paying bank prior to providing credit to the depositing bank (debit float occurs when the Reserve Banks credit the depositing bank prior to presenting items for collection to the paying bank). 9. federal government agencies.1 percent in 2009.500 files that contained almost 464. Float The Federal Reserve had daily average credit float of $1.10 Developments in Currency and Coin The Federal Reserve Board issues the nation’s currency (in the form of Federal Reserve notes). The Reserve Banks processed slightly more than 10. volumes.8 percent of the total costs of their Fedwire Securities Service. Reserve Banks provide Treasury securities services in their role as the U.8 billion. the number of non-Treasury securities transfers processed via the service decreased 10. and other income totaled $0. 2009 In 2009. The value of currency in circulation increased 4. . including the PSAF. and the Reserve Banks’ Currency Technology Office to develop a more-secure design for the $100 Federal Reserve note.S. to $887. a 1. likely because consumers typically hold more currency in times of economic uncertainty.976.1 million in 2009. The Fedwire Securities Service In 2009.193. Treasury’s fiscal agent. the Reserve Banks recovered 93.S. and made payments of 35.000 settlement entries for these arrangements in 2009.4 million in 2008. and fees reported here are for transfers of securities issued by federal government agencies. 10. see the “Treasury Securities Service” section later in this chapter. Treasury. the U. following a significant increase in 2008. The Reserve Banks also receive currency and coin from circulation through these institutions. For details. a 4. and they made payments of 68. The Reserve Banks received 35.

and operate the automated systems supporting paper U. maintain. the Banks refined the design for the new system. and invest Treasury balances. and redeem securities. Treasury and other entities fully reimbursed the Reserve Banks for the costs of providing fiscal agency and depository services. savings bonds and book-entry marketable Treasury securities (bills. Reserve Banks are in the early stages of developing a new cash automation platform that will facilitate control of the Banks’ cash operations and improve their efficiency. able expenses amounted to $450.3 million.4 million in 2008. issue. Retail Securities Programs The Reserve Banks continued to support Treasury’s efforts to improve the quality and efficiency of securities services provided to retail customers. In 2009. and support for other entities accounted for 6. The Banks auction. the Banks had upgraded 90 of 131 machines. these services are primarily related to book-entry securities. and enhance the support provided to Reserve Bank customers and business partners.1 million in 2008 (see table. They expect to complete the program in 2010. the Federal Reserve Banks auction Treasury securities. Although the Banks’ staffing levels declined slightly Developments in Fiscal Agency and Government Depository Services As fiscal agents and depositories for the federal government. compared with $72. Treasury securities services consist of retail securities programs (which primarily serve individual investors) and wholesale securities programs (which serve institutional customers). facilitate business continuity and contingency planning. The Reserve Banks actively monitor program expenses.S. Support for Treasury programs accounted for 93.2 percent. provide an expansive and responsive management information reporting system with superior and flexible reporting tools.Federal Reserve Banks 177 new design was unveiled on April 21. savings bonds transactions and book-entry marketable Treasury securities transactions for securities held in Legacy Treasury Direct.S. The Reserve Banks also provide certain fiscal agency and depository services to other entities. By yearend 2009. 2010. Treasury’s first application designed to support retail customers who purchase marketable Treasury securities. next page). The Banks process paper U.7 million in 2009. and they strive to contain these costs while providing the resources necessary to accomplish program objectives. The program will replace the operating systems of the current equipment. compared with $461. which will help improve the Reserve Banks’ processing efficiency. maintain Treasury’s bank account. process electronic and check payments for Treasury. Reserve Bank operating expenses for the retail securities programs were $73. reimburs- .8 percent of the cost. The Reserve Banks continued implementing a program to extend the useful life of the System’s BPS 3000 highspeed currency-processing machines. In 2009. and bonds). notes. collect funds owed to the federal government. provide customer service. Treasury Securities Services The Reserve Banks work closely with Treasury’s Bureau of the Public Debt in support of the borrowing needs of the federal government.

.375. .3 461.7 37. . . Treasury securities safekeeping and transfer . . . . . . consistency. . Computer infrastructure development and support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .738. .0 116. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .967. . During the year.9 450. . . . . . . . .1 105.053. . . . . . .6 30. Treasury auction . . . .6 4. . . . . . . other agencies . . . .463. . . .9 124. . . . .149.719. . . .4 percent decrease from 2008.304. . .5 128. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .031. both the Legacy Treasury Direct and paper savings bonds programs experienced volume declines in 2009. 2007–2009 Thousands of dollars Agency and service Department of the Treasury Bureau of the Public Debt Treasury retail securities . . . . . . .245.5 49.6 27. .814. Other services. Other Fiscal Principals Total. .710. . . . . . . .687. . . . . . The Reserve Banks also printed and mailed more than 20 million savings bonds in 2009. . . .5 7. . . . . . . . an 11. . . . . . . . . .742. . . . . . . . . . providing more opportunities for customer self-service. . . .8 37. . .6 7. .2 429. and higher dollar values of outgoing securities transfers. Treasury’s Retail E-Services initiative aims to lower costs while providing a high-quality customer service experience.558. .757.333. .215. .045. . . . . . . Total . .9 265. . . . . . . . .5 49. . . .354.0 104. . . .2 8.373. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Financial Management Service Payment services . . a 21. . .7 48. . . Total . . . . .8 2. . . . .186. .4 65. . . . . . which supports investments in bookentry Treasury securities and electronic savings bonds. . .7 9. . . . . .3 422.7 279. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .678. . . . . .0 2009 2008 2007 Note: Numbers in bold reflect restatements due to recategorization. . . . . . and eliminating duplicative processes. . . . Other Treasury Total . . . . . . . . Total. . . . . . . . .526. . . Total reimbursable expenses . . . . . and efficiency of support provided to retail securities customers. .178 96th Annual Report. . . . .2 19. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Computer infrastructure development and support . . . . . . . . .017. . .7 41. . . . . . . . . .143. . . . . . .326. . . .154. . .492. . . .1 44. .2 1. . . . . . . . . . . Treasury . . . .8 50. . . . . . This decrease is attributable to fewer reinvestments of maturing securities. . .9 74. . . . . .372. . . . Other services.218. .9 billion (par value) of Treasury securities as of December 31. . .417. .392. . . .7 909. . . . . . . . . the Reserve Banks began working with the Bureau of the Public Debt on an initiative that will improve the quality. . . .1 458. . .6 427. . . . .9 31. . . .123. . . . . . . .2 percent decrease from 2008. . 2009 Expenses of the Federal Reserve Banks for Fiscal Agency and Depository Services. . . . .0 3. .7 66. Wholesale Securities Programs The Reserve Banks also support wholesale securities programs through the . fewer purchases of new securities.609. . .4 278. The Legacy Treasury Direct system held $49.7 724. . . . . .5 72.851. .676. . . . . . Consistent with the trend from previous years. . . . . . . . . . . .9 7. in response to lower activity levels. . . .390. . . Cash-management services. .071. . . .5 31. . . . . . . . . . the associated costs savings were offset by other cost increases. . . . .284.5 8. .6 27. The decline in Legacy Treasury Direct holdings and in the number of paper savings bonds printed and mailed aligns with the Bureau of the Public Debt’s strategic goal to transition retail customers from these legacy products to Treasury’s webbased Treasury Direct application. . . .292. . .179. . . . . . .958.7 70. . . . . .999. . . . .577. .7 108. . . . . . . . 73. . . Collection services . . . . . .058. .3 40. . . . . . . . . . . .

the proportion of Treasury checks presented to the Reserve Banks for processing in image form continued to increase as the number of depository institutions depositing checks in image form with the Banks increased. compared with $37.2 million Treasury checks. which is auctioned monthly. the number of Fedwire Treasury securities transfers decreased 22.1 percent of Treasury checks presented to the Banks were presented in image form. In addition.000 check payments were converted to direct deposit. Reserve Bank operating expenses in 2009 in support of Treasury securities auctions were $30. safekeeping. The Reserve Banks support Treasury’s ongoing effort to convert paper checks to electronic payments through support of the Go Direct initiative (www. Similar to the experience of the commercial check-collection service discussed earlier in this chapter.2 million. The Banks also processed 202. which focuses on converting check benefit payments to direct deposit.3 million in 2008.Federal Reserve Banks 179 sale. issuance. compared with 263 in 2008.org). the Reserve Banks processed 1. The increase in the number of auctions was attributable in part to the reintroduction of the seven-year Treasury note. The decrease in Treasury checks is roughly equivalent to the increase experienced in 2008 due to the economic stimulus payments issued that year. 99. operating expenses associated with securities safekeeping and transfer activities were $8.2 billion ACH payments for Treasury.8 million in 2009. compared with $108. In support of Treasury’s strategic goal to finance government operations effectively at the lowest overall cost. In 2009. an increase of 20. and transfer of marketable Treasury securities. The Banks process electronic and paper-based disbursements such as Social Security and veterans’ benefits.0 percent from the number of conversions in 2008.0 million. The decline in costs is attributable to lower staffing levels resulting from the implementation of the new Treasury auction application in April 2008.godirect. The cost decline is attributable to the lower volume of Treasury security transfers during the year. compared with $9.0 percent from 2008.4 million in 2009. In 2009. .0 percent from 2008. to approximately 10. The increase in the number of ACH payments (relative to check payments) is consistent with Treasury’s longstanding goal to make all payments electronically. The shift in form from paper to images has increased the efficiency of processing Treasury checks.1 million in 2008. The decline in costs is primarily attributable to the staff reductions in the Banks’ Treasury check operations. Reserve Bank operating expenses for payments-related activity totaled $104. a decrease of 25. and resulted in lower staffing levels at the Banks and lower costs to the Treasury. and other types of payments. an increase of 5. more than 692. due in part to consolidation of some Treasury securities dealers. the Banks conducted 283 Treasury securities auctions. In 2009. income tax refunds.4 percent from 2008. The Banks also operate an international electronic payment service that supports government bene- Payments Services The Reserve Banks work closely with Treasury’s Financial Management Service and other government agencies to process payments to individuals and companies. By year-end 2009. the Banks worked to contain costs in the auction and book-entry securities services.2 million in 2008. In 2009.

In 2009. Pay. 2009 fit and other payments to more than 150 countries. The decline in costs is due to the transition of two collection programs from the Reserve Banks to a commercial bank at the end of 2008. systems. compared with 46. the Reserve Banks operate Pay. the Banks processed nearly $24. compared with $22.5 billion in 2008. The Banks actively support various aspects of the CCMM initiative. the Banks improved operational efficiency by reducing the number of service providers used to make international payments.1 billion in 2009. compared with $49.6 million coupons with a dollar value of $42. The Reserve Banks also process paper federal tax deposit coupons submitted by depository institutions. the Banks processed 62.0 million in 2009.2 billion in tax payments through FR-ETA.gov and two other Treasury collection programs.4 million transactions valued at $74.180 96th Annual Report. modernize. the Banks developed software that facilitates the collection of delinquent debts owed to federal agencies and states by matching federal payments Collection Services The Reserve Banks also work closely with Treasury’s Financial Management Service to collect funds owed the federal government—such as federal taxes—and fees for its goods and services.gov program was expanded to include several new agencies. compared with 29.1 billion in 2008.9 million transactions valued at $99. The Banks processed 24. the Pay. The Reserve Banks also support the government’s centralized delinquent debt-collection program. Reserve Bank operating expenses related to collections services totaled $38. depository insti- . In 2009. the Banks are developing a more broadly based settlement framework that will support several additional collection applications.2 million in 2008. and processes supporting Treasury’s collections and cash management programs. In 2009. The Reserve Banks also operate software that supports the settlement of transactions from Pay. a same-day electronic federal tax payment system.9 billion in 2008. There are expected to be further declines in paper tax coupon payments in the coming years as the federal government continues to promote participation in electronic tax payment mechanisms.9 billion in 2008. It is scheduled to replace the current system in 2010. As part of the CCMM initiative. tutions submitted $452. In 2009. Throughout 2009. the Reserve Banks operate several systems to process both electronic and paper tax payments.0 billion in international payments. In support of the collection of funds to pay for goods and services provided by the federal government. the Banks operate the Federal Electronic Tax Application (FR-ETA). a multiyear Treasury effort to simplify. Specifically. During the year.5 million coupons with a dollar value of $54. For example. a Treasury program that allows the public to use the Internet to authorize and initiate payments to federal agencies. To support the collection of federal taxes.gov. and improve the services.9 billion. compared with $44.gov processed transactions worth $64. During the year. including development of new applications to support both collection of funds and monitoring of collateral pledged to government programs. the Reserve Banks and Treasury continued work on the Collections and Cash Management Modernization (CCMM) initiative.5 billion.

7 million in 2008. Treasury Cash-Management Services Treasury maintains an operating cash account at the Reserve Banks to support the various transactions discussed in the preceding sections of this chapter. including past-due child support payments owed to custodial parents. The Banks helped Treasury collect more than $4. The infrastructure supports multiple Treasury applications. Although the Reserve Banks primarily work with the Financial Manage- . Computer Infrastructure and Other Treasury Services The Reserve Banks operate a webapplication infrastructure and provide other technology-related services to Treasury. Reserve Bank operating expenses for the infrastructure and other technologyrelated services—the costs of which are shared by the Financial Management Service and the Bureau of the Public Debt—were $67. and it may instruct the Banks to invest funds from its account in interest-bearing accounts with qualified depository institutions. and the Banks worked closely with Treasury to contain these costs. the Banks began working with the Financial Management Service to develop a new collateral application that will replace the legacy applications and provide support to other new cash-management applications developed as part of the CCMM initiative.0 million in 2009. long-term efficiency improvements in the way the Banks account for government payments and collections. even as the number of applications supported by the infrastructure continued to increase. Treasury investments are fully collateralized.Federal Reserve Banks 181 against delinquent debts. During 2009. The Banks also monitor collateral pledged to other Treasury programs. compared with $48. In addition. with a focus on improving centralized government accounting and reporting functions. The Banks worked with Treasury to identify potential. The slight cost increase is due to additional work associated with application development initiatives supporting Treasury’s CCMM initiative. The web-application infrastructure accounts for the majority of the costs. Reserve Bank operating expenses related to these programs and other cash-management initiatives totaled $49. For example. To support Treasury’s investment programs. The Banks also collaborated with the Financial Management Service on several ongoing software development efforts.1 in 2008. the Banks support Treasury’s Governmentwide Accounting and Reporting Modernization initiative. such as collateral pledged to secure public funds held on deposit at financial institutions. primarily for the Financial Management Service.0 million in 2009. and the Banks monitor the collateral pledged to Treasury. The Reserve Banks provide collateral-management and collateralmonitoring services for Treasury’s investment programs and other Treasury programs that have collateral requirements. which improves the timeliness of accounting data to support better financial analysis and decisionmaking. as part of the CCMM initiative. compared with $65. the Reserve Banks continued to support Treasury’s effort to modernize its financial management processes.8 billion through this program in fiscal year 2009. the Reserve Banks continued to maintain several software applications.

activity that accounts for roughly a quarter of the Banks’ costs for services provided to other non-Treasury entities.federalreserve. 2009 ment Service and Bureau of the Public Debt on fiscal programs. such as Treasury’s debt-management program and its exchange stabilization fund. . the Federal National Mortgage Association.3 million in 2008.4 million in 2009. and the Government National Mortgage Association. 12. but the daily value of funds transferred over just the Federal Reserve’s funds transfer system was about $2. gov/paymentsystems/psr_policy. the institution incurs an overnight overdraft. In 2009.gov/ newsevents/press/other/20081219a. the Board approved revisions to its PSR policy that will become effective in late 2010 or early 2011. the Board implemented an interim policy change for eligible foreign banking organiza11. In December 2008. Reserve Bank operating expenses for services provided to other entities were $27.federalreserve. The Reserve Banks have begun work to modify the systems they use to record collateral pledges and to track daylight overdrafts.htm.0 million in 2008. Postal Service. Book-entry securities issuance and maintenance activities account for a significant amount of the work performed for other entities. The Federal Reserve strongly discourages overnight overdrafts by imposing penalties and taking administrative action against institutions that incur them repeatedly. institutions held on average about $900 billion in their Federal Reserve accounts overnight. The decline in costs is due in part to staff reductions in the Banks’ postal money orders processing operations. The cost increase is primarily due to the development and implementation of a debt-management application. Details about the revisions to the PSR policy are available at www.182 96th Annual Report. Reserve Bank operating expenses for these programs were $40. and the current policy is available at www. the Reserve Banks provide fiscal agency and depository services to other domestic and international entities. When an institution ends a day with a negative balance. Developments in Use of Federal Reserve Intraday Credit The Board’s Payment System Risk (PSR) policy governs the use of Federal Reserve Bank intraday credit.12 The revisions will. in part. allow eligible institutions to collateralize daylight overdrafts and pay no fee for these overdrafts. resulting in operational improvements and lower staffing levels at the Banks and lower costs to the U. Services Provided to Other Entities When permitted by federal statute or when required by the Secretary of the Treasury. the Banks also support other fiscal programs. also known as daylight overdrafts. A daylight overdraft occurs when an institution’s account activity creates a negative balance in the institution’s Federal Reserve account at any time in the operating day. Like Treasury checks.8 million in 2009. In March 2009. Institutions that require overnight credit are encouraged to approach the Federal Reserve’s discount window to borrow funds as necessary. compared with $31. with the majority performed for the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Association.5 trillion. compared with $27. postal money orders are processed primarily in image form now.11 Daylight overdrafts enable institutions to send payments more freely throughout the day than if institutions were limited strictly by their available funds balance.htm.S. The Reserve Banks also process paid postal money orders for the United States Postal Service.

or about 84 percent lower than the average 2008 level. . In 2008.htm#streamproc. Average overdrafts are calculated daily by summing all negative balances incurred by institutions across the Federal Reserve System for each minute of the Fedwire operating day (9 p. Peak overdrafts are calculated daily by summing the negative balances of all institutions on a minute-by-minute basis throughout the Fedwire operating day (9 p.13 The interim policy allows highly rated FBOs to use a streamlined procedure to apply for a max cap and allows these institutions to use 100 percent of their capital measure in calculating the deductible amount for daylight overdraft pricing. and it has likely contributed Recent Trends in Daylight Overdraft Usage During the periods of extreme market stress in 2008. an FBO must have collateral pledged to its Reserve Bank equal to or greater than the amount of its deductible. which decreased the demand for intraday credit. next page). in 2009 the rate paid on reserve balances remained. to an average of about $900 billion in 2009. FBOs introduce greater risks than do U.Federal Reserve Banks 183 tions (FBOs).291 minutes) to arrive at the average overdraft. The average level of average daylight overdrafts in 2009 was about $10 billion. and began purchasing governmentsponsored enterprise mortgage-backed securities. The usage of daylight overdrafts spiked amid the market turmoil near the end of 2008.m. increased its lending under the Term Auction Facility.gov/payment systems/psr_policy. application of different legal regimes). 14. to 6:30 p. Details about the interim changes are available at www. This spread gives institutions incentive to hold higher balances at the Federal Reserve. FBOs were eligible to use up to 35 percent of their capital measure in the calculation of the deductible and net debit cap. reserve balances averaged $180 billion and spiked about 400 percent. ET or 21. light overdrafts decreased to about $55 billion in 2009. on average. about nine basis points more than the effective federal funds rate. To remain eligible for the higher deductible value under the new policy. the Federal Reserve also began paying interest on balances held at the Reserve Banks.5 hours). which is the rate at which depository institutions lend balances to each other overnight. a decrease of about 67 percent from 2008. This sum is then divided by the number of minutes in the day (1. During this period. Furthermore. 15.S.5 hours). In 2008.m. These measures tended to increase balances institutions held at the Banks.15 Daylight overdraft fees paid by institutions also dropped sharply as daylight overdraft levels decreased. Under the previous policy.14 The average level of peak day13.m.chartered institutions in terms of the timeliness and scope of available supervisory information and other supervisory issues that may arise because of the cross-border nature of the FBO’s business (for example. the level of daylight overdrafts spiked and then dropped to historical lows as balances institutions held at the Reserve Banks spiked to historically high levels. to 6:30 p. The most negative of these minuteby-minute balances is the peak overdraft. ET or 21. but dropped sharply as various liquidity programs initiated by the Federal Reserve took effect (see the chart. institutions paid about $52 million in daylight overdraft fees but only $4 million in 2009.m. Both daylight overdrafts and Federal Reserve account balances have remained at these historic levels throughout 2009.federalreserve.

Like FedLine Direct. 20 fewer than a year earlier. batch-file solution to certain services at a cost lower than that for FedLine Direct. 2009 Aggregate Daylight Overdrafts. and FedACH services do so using FedLine Advantage connections. 22 more than a year earlier. 2008−2009 to very low daylight overdraft usage throughout the System. There were 2. 43 more than a year earlier.184 96th Annual Report. which enable unattended computer-tocomputer access to the Banks’ financial services through dedicated connections. Fedwire Securities.979 FedLine Web connections at year-end 2009. It provides an unattended. Also in 2009. of which there were 256 at year-end 2009. Many institutions access Reserve Bank information services and perform limited transaction services through FedLine Web. the Federal Reserve Banks completed the Tier 1 Data De- . There were 5. A large majority of the value transferred through the Banks’ financial services flow through FedLine Direct connections. There were 39 FedLine Command connections at year-end 2009. which provide web-based access. Electronic Access to Reserve Bank Services The Reserve Banks provide several options to enable customers to access the Banks’ financial services information and payment services electronically. The Reserve Banks’ largest customers use FedLine Direct connections. FedLine Command enables computer-to-computer access. Most depository institutions that directly access the Banks’ Fedwire Funds. 10 fewer than at yearend 2008.673 FedLine Advantage connections at year-end 2009.

standards. . Department of Commerce whose mission is to promote U. Federal Reserve Information Technology (FRIT)16 continued to lead Reserve Bank efforts to transition to a more-robust information security model. video. the Reserve Banks approved the following initiatives: • the consolidation of all Reserve Bank helpdesk functions into a national IT helpdesk • a strategy to consolidate and centrally manage Reserve Bank servers and storage • a network strategy that adopts an enterprise approach to the provision. and analyzing and coordinating the System’s IT investments. based on guidance from the National Institute of Science and Technology. FRIT initiated a transition to a new information security assurance program for infrastructure systems.S. 17. In 2009. operation. and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve quality of life. NIST is a non-regulatory federal agency within the U. Examinations of the Federal Reserve Banks Section 21 of the Federal Reserve Act requires the Board of Governors to order an examination of each Reserve Bank at least once a year. and management of hardware and software that provide data. The Board performs its own reviews and engages a public accounting firm. This service replaces the BulkData service previously used to transfer lowrisk files between the Federal Reserve Banks and customers. the Federal Reserve Banks continued to develop and implement their information technology (IT) strategy by strengthening IT governance. and provides thought leadership regarding the System information technology architecture and business use of technology. The public accounting firm annually audits the combined financial statements of the Reserve Banks (see the “Federal Reserve Banks Combined Financial Statements” in the “Audits of the Federal Reserve System” section of this report) as well as the annual financial statements of each of the 12 Banks and the consolidated limited liability company (LLC) entities. managing information security risk.S.Federal Reserve Banks 185 livery Service. including the safeguarding of assets. FRIT supplies national infrastructure and business line technology services to the Federal Reserve System. • enhance the security controls assessment testing program.17 The new assurance program will allow the System to • have a defined and consistent view of information security roles and responsibilities. a cross-business file transfer utility for nonpayment services. Information Technology In 2009. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science. the management of each Reserve Bank annually 16. In 2009. In 2009. the Reserve Banks further enhanced their processes under the guidance of the COSO framework and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The Reserve Banks use the framework established by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) to assess their internal controls over financial reporting. and voice communication for the Reserve Banks. Within this framework. and • introduce an IS risk management function at all levels of the organization.

. . .428 4. . . . . . . . . 3. 1. . . . . . . . . Comprehensive income before distributions to Treasury . . . . . . . Interest on Federal Reserve notes. . . . . 5. . . . . . . 5 2009 54. . . . . . Net income (loss) from consolidated limited liability companies . . . . . .769 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190 2. . . . A public accounting firm issues an attestation report to each Bank’s board of directors and to the Board of Governors. . . . . . . . . . . . Includes a net periodic pension expense of $663 million in 2009 and $160 million in 2008.S. Income. . . . . . . . Current expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175 3. . Dividends paid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232 901 737 36. . . . . . . −) current net income . . . . . Fees for D&T’s services totaled $10 million. . . . . . . . . . Other additions4 . . . . . .007 53. . . . . . . . . . . Treasury securities .820 0 879 172 5. . . . . .693 . . .186 96th Annual Report. . . . .431 2008 41. . Transferred to surplus and change in accumulated other comprehensive income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Profit on foreign exchange transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . each LLC annually provides an assertion letter to the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (the New York Reserve Bank). . . . . . . . . . . . Distributions to U. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 To ensure auditor independence. . Similarly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .463 5. .S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Current net income . . the Board engaged Deloitte & Touche LLP (D&T) to audit the individual and combined financial statements of the Reserve Banks and those of the consolidated LLC entities. . . . .. . . . Provisions for loan restructuring3 . . . . and Bank of America Corporation for the New York Reserve Bank’s and Richmond Reserve Bank’s commitments to provide funding support. . . . . . . .504 1. the Board requires that D&T be independent in all matters relating to the audit. . . Each LLC reimburses the Board of Governors for the fees related to the audit of its financial statements from the entity’s available net assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . In October 2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .694 2. . . . restructuring of the American International Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Net additions to (deductions from. . . For Board expenditures. . . . . . . . . .621 802 888 386 502 1. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . Treasury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2 million were for the audits of the consolidated LLC entities that are associated with Federal Reserve actions to address the financial crisis and are consolidated in the financial statements of the New York Reserve Bank.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .484 4. . . . . . and compensation paid by Citigroup. . Represents the economic effect of the interest rate reduction made pursuant to the April 17. . . . . . making management deci18. . . . . . . Inc. . . . . unrealized gain on Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility loans. .423 1. . Expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Profit on sales of U. . . . . .564 47. . . .979 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .341 3. . . . . . . . . . .266 −1. . . . . . . . . . . . . Of the total fees.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the Reserve Banks began to pay interest to depository institutions on qualifying balances. . . . . .046 4. . . . . 2009 and 2008 Millions of dollars Item Current income . . Interest expense on securities sold under agreements to repurchase . . Operating expenses1 . .588 −2. . . 853 352 500 –3. . . . . .159 35. . . . . . . . . . . . Not applicable. and Distribution of Net Earnings of the Federal Reserve Banks. Inc. . Change in funded status of benefit plans. Specifically. . . . . . . . D&T may not perform services for the Reserve Banks or others that would place it in a position of auditing its own work. . . . . . . . . . . . 4. .689 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .626 31. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2009 provides an assertion letter to its board of directors that confirms adherence to COSO standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In 2009. . Assessments by the Board of Governors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Includes dividends on preferred securities. . . . . . . loan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . For currency costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187 98 48. . . . . . . . . net of related expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Profit on sales of federal agency and government-sponsored enterprise mortgage-backed securities .870 3.. . . . Interest paid to depository institutions and earnings credits granted2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

the division also reviews the accounts and holdings of the System Open Market Account (SOMA) at the New York Reserve Bank and the foreign currency operations conducted by that Reserve Bank. Income in 2009 was $54. Represents the economic effect of the reduction of the interest note on loans made to American International Group. conducted primarily by the Division of Reserve Bank Operations and Payment Systems. the distributions equal net income after the deduction of dividends paid and the amount necessary 19.820 million.621 million provision for loan restructuring. set at 6 percent of paid-in capital by section 7(1) of the Federal Reserve Act.867 million ($3. or in any other way impairing its audit independence. $238 million more than in 2008. and the audit department’s efficiency. Distributions to the U. up from $31.694 million in operating expenses. one Reserve Bank engaged D&T for nonaudit consulting services for which the fees were immaterial. and $172 million in unrealized gains on investments denominated in foreign currencies revalued to reflect current market exchange rates. These net additions were offset by a $2.19 Net additions to and deductions from current net income showed a net profit of $4. The Board’s annual examination of the Reserve Banks includes a wide range of off-site and on-site oversight activities. compared with $41. $2. 2009.046 million in 2008. Treasury in the form of interest on Federal Reserve notes totaled $47. Inc. Expenses totaled $6. In 2009.S. conformance to applicable policies and procedures. and $502 million for currency costs). $5. $386 million in assessments for Board of Governors expenditures. The FOMC receives the external audit reports and a report on the division’s examination.463 million. D&T audits the year-end schedule of participated asset and liability accounts and the related schedule of participated income accounts. $802 million of other additions.689 million in 2008.428 million. . To assess compliance with the policies established by the Federal Reserve’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). totaled $1. 2008.187 million in interest paid to depository institutions on reserve balances and earnings credits granted to depository institutions. Effective October 9.Federal Reserve Banks 187 sions on behalf of the Reserve Banks. Income and Expenses The table on the previous page summarizes the income. 20. expenses. as part of the loan restructuring that occurred on that date.20 Dividends paid to member banks. In addition.431 million in 2009.588 million in net income associated with consolidated LLCs. Division personnel monitor the activities of each Bank and LLC on an ongoing basis and conduct a comprehensive on-site review of each Bank at least once every three years. prior to April 17. which consists of $879 million in realized gains on federal agency and government-sponsored enterprise mortgage-backed securities (GSE MBS). the Reserve Banks began paying explicit interest on reserve balances held by depository institutions at the Reserve Banks as authorized by the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. $98 million in interest expense on securities sold under agreements to repurchase. this reflects an increase in the capital and surplus of member banks and a consequent increase in the paid-in capital stock of the Reserve Banks. and distributions of net earnings of the Reserve Banks for 2009 and 2008. The reviews also include an assessment of the internal audit function’s conformance to International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing.

.99 2008 4.36 0. . . . . . . .370.. 24. to equate the Reserve Banks’ surplus to paid-in capital. . . 6. ..48 10. . . . . . . . . . 7. .31 1. . . . . . . . 623 3. .519 5. . . . . . Not applicable. . . . .57 2.014 512 3.22 0. Term auction credit . . . .. . . 98. . . . . . 3. . . .532r 99r . 8.837 −55. . . . . Credit extended to American International Group. . Total loans to depository institutions . . . .509 53. .179 Average interest rate (percent) 2009 3.90r 1. −737 . . .66r Item U. 20.S.48 0. . .. .. .49r . .401r 18. . . . .80r 12. . .. 4. . . . 68. net of unamortized premiums and discounts. . . . . .072 769. . . (AIG). . . Face value of the securities. . . .95 0. . . . .50 0. . . . . . . . . . .101r 28. . . . . .22 1. . . −67. .30 0. which is reported in “Other assets” on the Statement of Condition of the Federal Reserve Banks in Table 9A in the “Statistical Tables” section of this report. 473. . . . Investments denominated in foreign currencies are revalued daily at market exchange rates. .. . . .616 86.. . . 659.502 39. . . . and excludes undrawn amounts and credit extended to consolidated limited liability companies.483 548. . .779. Includes accrued interest. 3.22 0. . . . .169 Other SOMA liabilities6 . . . . 2.227r 13 Other SOMA assets5 .217 Total SOMA holding and loans . . . . . . . . . . 3.043.487 332. . Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF)8.742r .855 Investments denominated in foreign currencies3 . Dollar value of foreign currency held under these agreements valued at the exchange rate to be used when the foreign currency is returned to the foreign central bank. . . .367 . .19 1. 177.14 . Cash and short-term investments related to the federal agency and government-sponsored enterprise mortgagebacked securities portfolio. .816 r Restatements due to changes in previously reported data and recategorization. . . . .61r 3. . . . . . . . . .891 . . . .407 enterprise mortgage-backed securities . . Total loans to others . . .293r 47.188 96th Annual Report.91r 2. . . . . . . .688 161. . This exchange rate equals the market exchange rate used when the foreign currency was acquired from the foreign central bank. . . . 40. .228 77. 1.23r 2. . . . .446 1. . Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF) . . . . . .482 409. . .34 . .048 Federal agency and government-sponsored 2 . . ..099 23. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . net7 . .254r 22.. . . .348 7. . . . . .35 2. . . . . .09 4. . . . . . .093 3..892 7. . . 2009 and 2008 Millions of dollars except as noted Average daily assets (+)/ liabilities(−) 2009 2008 Current income (+)/ expense (−) 2009 2008 25. . Average daily balance includes outstanding principal and capitalized interest net of unamortized deferred commitment fees and allowance for loan restructuring.66r 2. . . and table 13 gives the number and annual salaries of officers and employees for each Reserve Bank. . . . 4. . 5. . . .85r 2. . . . . .708 Primary. 4. . −182 . . . . . Related to the purchases of federal agency and government-sponsored enterprise mortgage-backed securities that the seller fails to deliver on the settlement date. Treasury securities1 . . . .19r . Total loans . 458 . . .. . . 3. . .63r . . 1.996 414 4. . . . . . . . . . . 1 r −98 Securities sold under agreements to repurchase .. . .983r 2. and seasonal credit ... . . which is the remaining principal balance of the underlying mortgages. . . . Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF) and other broker-dealer credit ... . . . .165 38.24 1. ..83 1. . . .. . . Total SOMA holdings .. . . . . . In the “Statistical Tables” section of this report. . .03r 1. . . . . . . . . . 31. .778r 2. . . .. . . . . . . Does not include unsettled transactions. . Represents the remaining principal balance. . . . .873 Government-sponsored enterprise debt securities1 .59r 1.27 0. . .898 24.817 470 511 2. .220r 296 Central bank liquidity swaps4 . 2009 SOMA Holdings and Loans of the Federal Reserve Banks. . . . and table 11 shows a condensed statement for each Reserve Bank for the years 1914 through 2009. . . . .606 1..025r 206. . . . . . .405 291.523r r 204 786 990 73 36 3. . . .374 32.279r 21. . . Inc. . .168 Securities purchased under agreements to resell. .78 5. Face value. . . ..244r 274. 1. . . . .47 2. .. . . table 9 is a statement of condition for each Reserve Bank. .305 3. .. . . .653 7. . . . . . . . 2. . .. . . . . . . net of unamortized premiums and discounts. . secondary.254r 174. . 1. . . . . table 10 details the income and expenses of each Reserve Bank for 2009. Excludes amount necessary to adjust TALF loans to fair value at December 31. .

611 million from 2008. During 2009. and the American International Group.151 million to $40.48 percent and 0. secondary.779. the average daily holdings under the PDCF and AMLF were $7. to an average daily amount of $98. an increase of $735.405 million. During 2008. Average daily holdings of securities purchased under agreements to resell in 2009 were $3.36 percent and 0. Investments denominated in foreign currencies and central bank liquidity swaps earned interest at average rates of 1.229 million. The average daily balance of central bank liquidity swap drawings was $177.653 million. (AIG) credit extension.220 million in 2008.446 million. in 2009.110 million. compared with $24. in 2009.487 million. Amounts funded by the Reserve Banks under these programs are recorded as loans by the Banks. These facilities included the Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF). The average rate for federal agency and GSE MBS was 4. to an average daily amount of $659. SOMA Securities Holdings The average daily holdings of Treasury securities increased by $111.50 percent in 2009. Average daily holdings of investments denominated in foreign securities in 2009 were $24. a decrease of $82. The average . and seasonal credit extended increased $8.837 million.59 percent in 2008. respectively. respectively. secondary. The average daily holdings of federal agency and GSE MBS totaled $473. decreased to 3. the Federal Reserve established several lending facilities under authority of section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act.630 million from 2008 (see table.502 million and $7.668 million from 2008. respectively.14 percent.855 million.22 percent. and seasonal credit decreased to 0. average daily primary. and term auction credit extended under the Term Auction Facility increased $117. while the average daily balance of securities sold under agreements to repurchase was $67.093 million. SOMA Holdings and Loans The Reserve Banks’ average net daily holdings of securities and loans during 2009 amounted to $1.483 million. Inc. respectively. The average rates of interest earned on the Reserve Banks’ holdings of Treasury and GSE debt securities Lending In 2009. the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF). previous page).09 percent. from 1. from 1. GSE debt securities.19 percent and 1. The increases are due to the purchase of Treasury securities.31 percent in 2009.688 million in 2009 and $161. The average daily holdings of GSE debt securities increased by $94. in 2009.95 percent.898 million. while the average interest rate on term auction credit decreased to 0.47 percent and 2.Federal Reserve Banks 189 A detailed account of the assessments and expenditures of the Board of Governors appears in the “Board of Governors Financial Statements” in the “Audits of the Federal Reserve System” section of this report. an increase of $12. with average rates of interest earned of 0.27 percent in 2009.462 million to $291. and federal agency and GSE MBS through the large-scale asset purchase program. The average interest rates for securities purchased under agreements to resell and securities sold under agreements to repurchase were 0. respectively.616 million. The average rate of interest earned on primary.90 percent in 2008.778 million in 2008.

. . .561 −268 −332 −5. the consolidated LLCs’ net income (loss) recorded by FRBNY is increased by this amount. . . . . . accretion of discounts. . and Maiden Lane III holdings are recorded at fair value. . . . . . JPMorgan Chase for Maiden Lane LLC. . . . . . . and AIG for Maiden Lane II LLC and Maiden Lane III LLC. . .137 27. . . .S. . . .590 4.402 268 −3. . . . .078 . . TALF LLC was formed in 2009 to purchase assets of the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility. . . . . . . . . . .. 8. . . . . .134 1. . 2009 Key Financial Data for Consolidated Limited Liability Companies (LLCs). . . . . . Summary of consolidated LLC net income.188 −4. . . . . Maiden Lane II LLC and Maiden Lane III LLC were formed to acquire certain assets of AIG and its subsidiaries. .5 . . .604 598 4. Maiden Lane. . . . . . . Interest expense—other . as a result.635 −4. .478 −3. 3. . . . . . . . FRBNY earned $1. . . . . . . . . . .098 333.224 −598 0 8 −30 3. . .. . Treasury for TALF LLC. . . . 2. . . and administrative fees of $54 million. . . .. . . . . . . which offsets the net loss attributable to TALF LLC. . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .086 1. . . . . . . . . . . Represents the net assets available for repayment of loans extended by FRBNY and other beneficiaries of the consolidated LLCs.078 620 1. . . . . . . . . . . .681 . Net income (loss) of consolidated LLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . .590 −1. .020 . . . . . . . . . . .060 9. Net income (loss) recorded by FRBNY.604 . . . . . . .020 298 0 298 0 102 102 28. .190 96th Annual Report. .248 −3. . . .140 −1. . . 4. . .230 −1. . . . Less: Net income (loss) allocated to other beneficial interests . . .698 0 0 −2 0 −1 −3 699 −702 0 −7029 1. . . . . . . . . . . . 1.707 −620 0 3 −12 1. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333. . . . . Loans extended to the consolidated LLCs by the FRBNY 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cumulative change in net assets. . Net income (loss) allocated to FRBNY . . . 2009 and 2008 Millions of dollars Commercial Paper Funding Facility LLC (CPFF)1 2009 Net portfolio assets of the consolidated LLCs and the net position of the New York Reserve Bank (FRBNY) and subordinated interest holders Net portfolio assets2 . . . . Earnings on TALF loans include interest income of $414 million. . . . . . 9. . .173 146 1. . The differences between the fair value of the net assets available and the face value of the loans (including accrued interest) are indicative of gains or losses that would be incurred by the beneficiaries if the assets had been fully liquidated at prices equal to the fair value. . . . Fair value reflects an estimate of the price that would be received upon selling an asset if the transaction were to be conducted in an orderly market on the measurement date. .003 29.202 1. .497 −54 −4. . . . . .078 20 176 196 −2. . . . . . . . . . Maiden Lane II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233 −173 14. . and paydown gains and losses. . . . . . . 2009. . . . which includes amortized cost and related fees. .951 25. 9.319 1. . . . .274 4. Interest expense recorded by each consolidated LLC on the loans extended by FRBNY is eliminated when the LLCs are consolidated in FRBNY’s financial statements and. . . . . . . . Cumulative change in net assets since the inception of the program6 Allocated to FRBNY . . . . . . . . CPFF LLC was formed to provide liquidity to the commercial paper market. . . . . Liabilities of consolidated LLCs . . . . Includes accrued interest. . . . eliminated in consolidation . . Net portfolio assets available3 . . . . . . which was formed to improve market conditions for asset-backed securities. . . . . . .248 30. . . . . . . . . 6. . .112 −61 1. . . . . . . . Other beneficial interests4. . . .188 −3. . . . . .. . . . .. .078 . . . . .910 −812 334.. . Interest income is recorded when earned and includes amortization of premiums.. . . Total loans and other beneficial interests. . . .025 million on TALF loans during the year ended December 31.684 29. . . . . . Portfolio holdings gains (losses). .402 −1. . Book value. . . . . . . . . . . . Represents the allocation of the change in net assets and liabilities of the consolidated LLCs that are available for repayment of the loans extended by FRBNY and the other beneficiaries of the consolidated LLCs. . . . . . . . . . . . . .481 30. . Allocated to other beneficial interests . 3. . . . . . . . . . . 4. . Maiden Lane LLC was formed to acquire certain assets of Bear Stearns.233 1. . . . . . 7.379 334. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Add: Interest expense on loans extended by FRBNY. . . . . . . . . Not applicable. . . . . . TALF. .. . . . . . . including a reconciliation of total consolidated LLC net income to the consolidated LLC net income recorded by FRBNY Portfolio interest income7 .379 . . . . . . . .. . .681 1. . . 2008 TALF LLC1 2009 Maiden Lane LLC1 Item 2009 2008 14. . CPFF holdings are recorded at book value. . . . Professional fees . . The other beneficial interest holders are the U. . gains on the valuation of $557 million. . . . Interest expense on loans extended by FRBNY8 . . . 1. .188 30.476 −146 −61 −102 −55 1. . . . . . . . .

To determine whether it is the primary beneficiary of a VIE.797 −3 22.012 7. .380 −1.005 1.208 24.117 7.278 −267 −1. The consolidated LLCs were determined to be variable interest entities.588 4.820 −1.087 −960 −463 −9.099 million.299 0 296 296 517 −45 −28 −2.626 −80 −7. which earned interest at an average rate of 10.500 5. and 21.278 5.213 1.389 −2.Federal Reserve Banks 191 Key Financial Data for Consolidated LLCs. the Reserve Bank evaluates the VIE’s design and capital structure and the relationships among the variable interest holders.198 0 45 45 9.310 1.193 23.195 −2 19.198 −2. or it is most closely associated with the VIE.332 0 −899 −899 0 −2.003 20.910 16.183 406.697 411.193 19.332 −1.184 −530 −2.042 −4.225 −95 −1.032 −296 −171 −1. A VIE is an entity for which the value of the beneficiaries’ financial interests in the entity changes with changes in the fair value of its net assets. involved creating and lending to consolidated LLCs.132 −329 −1.813 406.653 −4.22 Consistent with gener22.065 73.042 1. Investments of the Consolidated LLCs Additional lending facilities established during 2008 and 2009. under authority of section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act.198 2.042 19.256 −48 27.037 17.794 18.389 −7.21 The consolidated LLCs were funded by the New York Reserve Bank.384 5.406 81.912 −2 15.996 −5.499 −5 −1.693 daily balance of credit extended to AIG in 2009 was $39. receive a majority of the VIE’s expected residual gains.239 −27 1.654 −3.315 80.22 percent.522 1.088 −238 −33 −604 −12 201 −34 235 238 473 302 −27 −103 −1.580 80. acquired financial assets and financial liabilities pursuant to the policy objectives.653 960 −1.525 22.022 29. see the “Monetary Policy and Economic Developments” section of this report.003 −329 27 −302 3.003 −1.937 −125 6. For further information on the establishment and policy objectives of these consolidated LLCs.037 −1.299 1. A VIE is consolidated by the financial interest holder that is determined to be the primary beneficiary of the VIE because the primary beneficiary will absorb a majority of the VIE’s expected losses.198 −2.693 27.633 −9 −2. and the New York Reserve Bank is considered to be the primary beneficiary of each.213 413.903 4. 2009 and 2008—continued Millions of dollars Maiden Lane II LLC1 Maiden Lane III LLC1 Total LLCs 2009 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008 15.

the assets and liabilities of these LLCs have been consolidated with the assets and liabilities of the New York Reserve Bank in the preparation of the statements of condition included in this report. while the St. Additionally. The Richmond Reserve Bank completed the construction of a new parking garage adjacent to its headquarters building. see table 14 in the “Statistical Tables” section of this report. which details the acquisition costs and net book value of the Federal Reserve Banks and Branches. the San Francisco Reserve Bank continued its efforts to sell the former Seattle Branch building.23 The proceeds at the maturity or the liquidation of the consolidated LLCs’ assets will be used to repay the loans extended by the New York Reserve Bank. 2009 ally accepted accounting principles. the net assets of the consolidated LLCs appear as assets in table 9 in the “Statistical Tables” section of this report. are included in “Other liabilities” in statistical table 9A. and the design of a remote vehiclescreening facility for the Dallas Reserve Bank. and data center operations. central bank services. including the construction of security improvements to the Richmond Reserve Bank’s headquarters building. long-term facility redevelopment program that now involves renovation of the Bank’s headquarters building. the extensions of credit from the New York Reserve Bank to the consolidated LLCs are eliminated. Á Federal Reserve Bank Premises Several Reserve Banks took action in 2009 to upgrade and refurbish their facilities. Louis Reserve Bank continued a 23.192 96th Annual Report. The New York Reserve Bank also leased space in a nearby office building to accommodate staff growth. The multiyear renovation program at the New York Reserve Bank’s headquarters building continued. As a consequence of the consolidation. The New York Reserve Bank completed a program to enhance the business resiliency of its information technology systems and to upgrade facility support for the Bank’s open market operations. including those with recourse only to the portfolio holdings of the consolidated LLCs. . Security-enhancement programs continued at several facilities. Information regarding the Reserve Banks’ lending to the consolidated LLCs and the asset portfolios of each consolidated LLC is as described in the table on the previous page. and the liabilities of the consolidated LLCs to entities other than the New York Reserve Bank. For more information. the construction of a remote vehicle-screening facility for the Philadelphia Reserve Bank.

211. . . .541. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amounts in bold reflect restatements due to recategorization. .1 31. .950. . . . . Total liabilities and equity (Note 3) . . . . . ..4 449. . . . . respectively) . . . . .173. . . . . .5 19. . . .7 0. .8 0. . . . . . . . . . .728. .9 49. . 2009 and 2008. .4 843. . . . . Long-term assets (Note 2) Premises . . . .0 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 million at December 31. Prepaid expenses .485.0 573.5 501. . . . .8 2009 2008 317. . . . . . . .0 2. . . . . .188. . . . Total short-term liabilities . . . . . Short-term payables . Accrued benefit costs. Total short-term assets .2 231. . . . .6 605. Long-term liabilities Long-term debt . . . . .1 113. . . . .5 3. . Furniture and equipment . . . . .794. .0 436. . .6 8.8 5. . . . . . Total assets .4 4. .648. . . . . . . .5 4. 2009 and 2008 Millions of dollars Item Short-term assets (Note 1) Imputed reserve requirements on clearing balances . . . Short-term liabilities Clearing balances . . . . . 313.8 1.Federal Reserve Banks 193 Pro Forma Financial Statements for Federal Reserve Priced Services Pro Forma Balance Sheet for Federal Reserve Priced Services. . . . . . . Leases.2 944. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794. . . . . Total long-term liabilities . . . . . Short-term debt . .7 441. . . . . . . Prepaid pension costs. . . .704. . . . . . . .8 436. . . .9 5. . . . . Total liabilities .6 1.7 5. .4 346. .3 77. . . . .2 983. . . . . Prepaid FDIC asset. . . . . . . . . . . . leasehold improvements. .8 0.648. . . .0 76. . . . . .3 81. . . . The accompanying notes are an integral part of these pro forma priced services financial statements. . . . . . . . .0 8. . . .1 7. . . .0 146. . . . . . . . . December 31. . . . . . . . . . . . .0 605. . . . .1 29. . . . .7 Note: Components may not sum to totals because of rounding. . . . Imputed investments. . . . . . Equity (including accumulated other comprehensive loss of $478. . . . . . . . Receivables . . . . Items in process of collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..5 2. . . Materials and supplies .779.112. . . . . . .4 60. . . . . .3 0. . . Deferred-availability items . 0. . . . .8 6. . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . Deferred tax asset . .048.3 million and $690. Total long-term assets . . . . . . .3 8. . . . . . . . . . .7 418. . . . . . .147. . . .7 309.4 76. .5 7. .7 4. . . . . . . . . . . and long-term prepayments. . . . . . .

. . . .8 −5. . Net income . . . . . . . . . . . . . Income from operations after imputed costs. .5 −23. Other income and expenses. . . . .4 –22. . . . . . . . .5 −32. . . . . . Interest on debt . .194 96th Annual Report. . . . .1 19. Memo: Targeted return on equity (Note 6).1 −38. . . . . . . .8 92. . .9 92. . . . .5 −22. . . . . . . . . . . .2 −60. . . . . .0 92. . . . . . . . Imputed costs (Note 6) Interest on float .3 –12. . . . . .0 −44. . . . . . . . . . .9 181.2 −60. Pro Forma Income Statement for Federal Reserve Priced Services. . .7 –35. . . .8 16. . . Imputed income taxes (Note 6) . . . . . .4 Fedwire funds 64. Income before income taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 −5. . . . . .8 −3. . . . .4 66.8 −51. . .5 Note: Components may not sum to totals because of rounding. . by Service. . Memo: Targeted return on equity (Note 6).3 −6. . . .3 12. . . .8 −51. . . .9 12. . . . . .7 14. . .4 69. .5 −32. . . . . . . . 2009 and 2008 Millions of dollars Item Revenue from services provided to depository institutions (Note 4) . . FDIC Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . Income before income taxes . . . . . . . . . . .4 0. . . .6 −15. . . . . . . . . .9 93.1 −3.8 −5. . . . . . . . . Operating expenses (Note 5) . . . . . . . .1 9. . . . .4 6. . . . Earnings credits. . . . . . . . . . . . . Other income and expenses (Note 7) Investment income .7 100. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 1. Imputed costs (Note 6) . . . . . . .7 −1. . . . . . . . .2 −35.4 −1. .4 1. . . 2009 Pro Forma Income Statement for Federal Reserve Priced Services. . . . . . .9 0. . . .4 0. .1 19. . . . .6 −15. . . .4 92. . . .0 9. . . . . . . .6 −7. . .9 0. .2 –80. . . . . . . . . 662. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. . . . . . . . .7 −47. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. .1 Fedwire securities 23. .8 Revenue from services (Note 4). . . .5 −1. .5 773. Net income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 25. . . . . . . Imputed income taxes (Note 6) . . . . . .6 2. . . 2009 Millions of dollars Item Total Commercial Commercial check ACH collection 481. . . The accompanying notes are an integral part of these pro forma priced services financial statements.7 −47. . . . . .7 520. . . . . . . .2 −1. . .9 98. . .6 −3. . . Income from operations after imputed costs .0 9. Income from operations . . . . . . .9 1. . . . . .7 713.2 53. . .7 713. . . Sales taxes . . . .5 −0. . . . . .8 2. . . .6 24. .2 0. . . . . . . . . Cost recovery (percent) (Note 8) . . . .4 77.4 808. . . . .4 −1. . . . . . . . .5 1. .4 −0. . . . Operating expenses (Note 5) . . .9 −3. . . .1 3.8 Note: Components may not sum to totals because of rounding. . Income from operations . .7 93. . . . 2009 2008 662.4 0. The accompanying notes are an integral part of these pro forma priced services financial statements. .2 −11. .3 −5. net (Note 7) . . . . . .

Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Postretirement Plans (codified in FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 715 (ASC 715). an estimate of the assets of the Board of Governors used in the development of priced services. to accumulated other comprehensive income (AOCI). Receivables are comprised of fees due the Reserve Banks for providing priced services and the share of suspense-account and difference-account balances related to priced services. . This resulted in an adjustment to the pension and benefit plans related to priced services and the recognition of an associated deferred tax asset with an offsetting adjustment. stated on a basis comparable to that of a commercial bank. As a result. shown as imputed investments.3) million in 2009. equity is imputed at 10 percent of total risk-weighted assets. They reflect adjustments for intra-System items that would otherwise be double-counted on a consolidated Federal Reserve balance sheet. (2) Long-Term Assets Long-term assets consist of long-term assets used solely in priced services. Other long-term liabilities consist of accrued postemployment. The remainder of clearing balances and deposit balances arising from float are assumed to be invested in a portfolio of investments. and adjustments for items associated with providing fixed availability or credit before items are received and processed. which requires an employer to record the funded status of its benefit plans on its balance sheet. Items in process of collection are gross Federal Reserve cash items in process of collection (CIPC). Among the costs to be recovered under the Monetary Control Act is the cost of float. 158. Materials and supplies are the inventory value of short-term assets. In order to reflect the funded status of its benefit plans. Other short-term liabilities include clearing balances maintained at Reserve Banks. on the balance sheet. no short. The increase in the funded status resulted in a corresponding change in AOCI of $(212. and a deferred tax asset related to the priced services pension and postretirement benefits obligation (see Note 3). the Reserve Banks recognized the deferred items related to these plans. a portion of priced services clearing balances held with the Federal Reserve is shown as required reserves on the asset side of the balance sheet. which is included in equity. The reserve requirement imposed on respondent balances must be held as vault cash or as balances maintained at a Reserve Bank. and qualified and nonqualified pension benefits costs and obligations on capital leases. or net CIPC during the period (the difference between gross CIPC and deferred-availability items. an imputed prepaid FDIC asset (see Note 6). which is the portion of gross CIPC that involves a financing cost). (3) Liabilities and Equity Under the matched-book capital structure for assets. To satisfy the FDIC requirements for a well-capitalized institution. which include prior service costs and actuarial gains or losses. Prepaid expenses include salary advances and travel advances for priced-service personnel. short-term assets are financed with short-term payables and clearing balances.Federal Reserve Banks 195 FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS Notes to Pro Forma Financial Statements for Priced Services (1) Short-Term Assets The imputed reserve requirement on clearing balances held at Reserve Banks by depository institutions reflects a treatment comparable to that of compensating balances held at correspondent banks by respondent institutions. the Reserve Banks implemented the Financial Accounting Standard Board’s (FASB) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. valued at the federal funds rate.or long-term debt is imputed. Compensation-Retirement Benefits). the priced-service portion of long-term assets shared with nonpriced services. postretirement. net of tax. 2006. The Reserve Bank priced services recognized a net pension asset in 2009 and a net pension liability in 2008. Another portion of the clearing balances is used to finance short-term and long-term assets. adjustments for items associated with nonpriced items (such as those collected for government agencies). Long-term assets are financed with long-term liabilities and core clearing balances. thus. Effective December 31.

ACH . . . . The cost of debt and the effective tax rate are derived from bank holding company data. Float cost or income is based on the actual float incurred for each priced service. . . return on equity. . . . . . . . . interest on debt. and interest on float. other income and expenses. operating expenses. . . . . . . .2 million in 2008. no debt was imputed in 2009 or 2008. and cost recovery. in contrast to previous years and in light of the uncertainty about the long-term effect that this change would have on the level of clearing balances on the balance sheet. . . . . . .8 million in 2009 and $7. . for each service to the total expenses. .0 3.2 million in 2009 and $28. . . 2008. . . . . . 2009 22. . and are used to impute debt and income taxes in the PSAF model. . . Fedwire Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87. imputed costs. . . . . . . indirect. 2009 (4) Revenue Revenue represents fees charged to depository institutions for priced services and is realized from each institution through one of two methods: direct charges to an institution’s account or charges against its accumulated earnings credits (see Note 7). . . .0 4. . . . . Total . .6 3. . On October 9. Board expenses were $7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . the equity used to determine the imputed profit was adjusted to reflect actual clearing balance levels maintained throughout 2009. . . these expenses do not include amounts related to changes in the funded status of the Reserve Banks’ benefit plans. . sales taxes. the Reserve Banks implemented SFAS No. . In 2009. . Fedwire Funds.9 41. which resulted in a prepaid FDIC asset of $31.5 1. . . . . . . and Fedwire Securities services. . . . (5) Operating Expenses Operating expenses consist of the direct. which are reflected in AOCI (see Note 3). . resulting in zero remaining credit. . . . . . . . . during the period. . . . . either explicitly or through peritem fees. . .3 million in 2009 and $5. Interest is imputed on the debt assumed necessary to finance priced-service assets. . . . Fedwire Securities . .2 million on the priced services balance sheet. . . The imputed FDIC assessment also reflects the increased rates and new assessment calculation methodology approved in 2009. . . . . .2 (6) Imputed Costs Imputed costs consist of income taxes. ACH. . . . however. . . . . . . . 1987. As a result.1 2008 31. . . . . . . . . less the total shipping expenses. . . the Reserve Bank priced services imputed a one-time FDIC assessment credit. which serves as the proxy for the financial data of a representative private-sector firm. . . . . .8 32. . for all services. . . . . . an FDIC assessment. . . . . the Federal Reserve began paying interest on required reserve and excess balances held by depository institutions at Reserve Banks as authorized by the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. .0 5. Certain corporate overhead costs not closely related to any particular priced service are allocated to priced services based on an expense-ratio method. . . . . . .8 million in 2008. . . . . . The after-tax rate of return on equity is based on the returns of the equity market as a whole and is applied to the equity on the balance sheet to impute the profit that would have been earned had the services been provided by a private-sector firm. . . .196 96th Annual Report. . . . . In 2009. . Corporate overhead was allocated among the priced services during 2009 and 2008 as follows (in millions): Check . . . the credit offset $8. . . Many imputed costs are derived from the private-sector adjustment factor (PSAF) model. . . . . . . . . The implementation of SFAS No. . Effective January 1. .0 million of the imputed $11. . .4 million in 2008. . . . Accordingly. Operating expenses also include the nonqualified pension expense of $2. . . Employers’ Accounting for Pensions (codified in ASC 715). . . . . . . . . the Reserve Bank priced services recognized qualified pension-plan operating expenses of $121. . . . . . 158 (ASC 715) does not change the systematic approach required by generally accepted accounting principles to recognize the expenses associated with the Reserve Banks’ benefit plans in the income statement. National Settlement Service. . . . Other imputed costs are allocated among priced services according to the ratio of operating expenses. Float costs include costs for the Check. . . . . Effective in 2007. less shipping expenses. . . . . The income statement by service reflects revenue. . . . . . . . .4 million assessment. . Interest on float is derived from the value of float to be recovered. . .3 1. . . . . . . . . . . and other general administrative expenses of the Reserve Banks for priced services plus the expenses of the Board of Governors related to the development of priced services. . .

. . . . . .974. . . . . imputed income taxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .992. . . . . As-of adjustments and direct charges refer to float that is created by interterritory check transportation and the observance of non-standard holidays by some depository institutions. .9 –1. . . . . . . . . . . Other income also includes imputed interest on the portion of clearing balances set aside as required reserves. . . . . . . Before October 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . imputed costs. . . . . Float subject to recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . Expenses for earnings credits granted to depository institutions on their clearing balances are based on a discounted average couponequivalent yield on three-month Treasury bills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Such float may be recovered from the depository institutions through adjustments to institution reserve or clearing balances or by billing institutions directly. (7) Other Income and Expenses Other income and expenses consist of investment and interest income on clearing balances and the cost of earnings credits. . .3 10. . . . . . . . Float recovered through direct charges and per-item fees is valued at the federal funds rate. . . . . to the sum of operating expenses. . . . . . . .7 –1. . . . . . . . Sources of recovery of float As-of adjustments . . . . . .1 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (8) Cost Recovery Annual cost recovery is the ratio of revenue. . .978. . . . . . . . . . . Direct charges . Investment income on clearing balances for 2009 and 2008 represents the average coupon-equivalent yield on three-month Treasury bills plus a constant spread. . . . . 2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 2. . . . . . . . and targeted return on equity. . . . . . . As a result of the Federal Reserve paying interest on required reserve and excess balances held by depository institutions at Reserve Banks beginning in October 2008 (see Note 6). . . . credit float recovered through per-item fees has been subtracted from the cost base subject to recovery in 2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the return was applied to the total clearing balance maintained. . . adjusted for the effect of reserve requirements on clearing balances. . . . . . . . . . . the investment return is applied only to the required portion of the clearing balance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Federal Reserve Banks 197 The following shows the daily average recovery of actual float by the Reserve Banks for 2009 in millions of dollars: Total float . . . . . . . . . . . Per-item fees . . . . . . including other income. . . –1.0 Unrecovered float includes float generated by services to government agencies and by other central bank services. based on the return on a portfolio of investments. . . . . . . . . Unrecovered float . . . . . . . .

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outlines strategies for achieving those goals. and discusses the environment and other factors that could affect their achievement. sets forth major goals. Performance Plan. The performance report discusses the Board’s performance in relation to its goals. and efficiency of the nation’s monetary. The performance plan includes specific targets for some of the performance measures identified in the strategic plan and describes the operational processes and resources needed to meet those targets. It also discusses validation of data and verification of results. Although the Federal Reserve is not covered by the GPRA. Objectives v Stay abreast of recent developments in and prospects for the U. federalreserve. integrity. Strategic Plan. as set forth in the most recently released strategic and performance plans. and Performance Report The Board’s strategic plan articulates the Board’s mission. The strategic plan. and in those abroad.199 The Board of Governors and the Government Performance and Results Act The Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) of 1993 requires that federal agencies. financial. identifies key quantitative measures of performance.gov/boarddocs/rptcongress. The Board’s mission statement and a Goals and Objectives The Federal Reserve has six primary goals with interrelated and mutually reinforcing elements. and performance report are available on the Board’s website. performance plan. prepare a strategic plan covering a multiyear period and submit an annual performance plan and performance report. v Enhance our knowledge of the structural and behavioral relationships in the macroeconomic and financial markets. Goal Conduct monetary policy that promotes the achievement of the statutory objectives of maximum employment and stable prices. and improve the quality of the data used to gauge economic per- . at www. so that monetary policy decisions will be well informed. the Board of Governors voluntarily complies with the spirit of the act.S. Mission The mission of the Board is to foster the stability. in consultation with Congress and outside stakeholders. and payment systems to promote optimal macroeconomic performance. and discusses the evaluation of performance. It also addresses issues that cross agency jurisdictional lines. economy and financial markets. Updated documents will be posted on the website as they are completed. are listed below. summary of the Federal Reserve’s goals and objectives.

through developmental research activities. v Promote understanding of Federal Reserve policy among other government policy officials and the general public. effective performance.S. and programs designed to inform and protect consumers. and identify emerging financial problems early so that crises can be averted. manage and contain systemic risk. to strengthen market competition. by addressing the supervision function’s procedures. while remaining sensitive to the burden on supervised institutions. resource allocation. v Promote. Objectives v Promote overall financial stability.200 96th Annual Report. Goal Promote a safe. with respect to global financial markets and international institutions. Objective v Produce high-quality assessments and oversight of Federal Reserve System strategies. and sound project management and should assist the Board in the effective discharge of its oversight responsibilities. the Federal Reserve Banks. and help shape the national dialogue on. and strengthen effective communications and collaborations within the Board. projects. and guidelines through a comprehensive and effective supervision program. and accessible banking system and stable financial markets. Goal Develop regulations. 2009 formance. v Implement monetary policy effectively in rapidly changing economic circumstances and in an evolving financial market structure. v Contribute to the development of U. bank and financial holding companies. The oversight process and outputs should help Federal Reserve management foster and strengthen sound internal control systems. develop. to enforce federal consumer protection laws. policies. At the same time. policies. rules. Objectives v Be a leader in. v Enhance efficiency and effectiveness. banks. vised by the Federal Reserve with applicable laws.S. consumer protection in financial services. sound. . and related entities. v Promote compliance by domestic and foreign banking organizations super- Goal Provide high-quality professional oversight of Reserve Banks. and to promote access to banking services in historically underserved markets. and staffing issues. sound. foreign banking organizations. regulations. v Provide a safe. in cooperation with the U. competitive. remain sensitive to the burden on supervised institutions.S. including adoption of technology to meet the business and operational needs of the Federal Reserve. and other agencies and organizations. technology. efficient and reliable operations. and accessible banking system through comprehensive and effective supervision of U. international policies and procedures. competitive. and operations. Department of the Treasury and other agencies.

v Provide strategic planning and financial management support needed for sound business decisions. Reserve Banks. efficiency. national origin. and measurement criteria to ensure that the recruiting. efficiency. effective policies and regulations that foster payment system integrity. and accessibility of U. and central banks. v Efficiently provide safe. and provide analysis on information technology issues to the Board. secure facilities and necessary support for activities conducive to efficient and effective Board operations. v Conduct research and analysis that contributes to policy development and increases the Board’s and others’ understanding of payment system dynamics and risk. Objectives v Develop sound. or sex. oversight mechanisms. Á Goal Foster the integrity. efficiency. Objectives v Develop appropriate policies. Support and assist the Board in overseeing U. encourage. payment and settlement systems. modern. support divisional distributed-processing requirements.S. age. color. training. and accessibility. creed. v Provide cost-effective and secure information resource management services to Board divisions.S. . and effectiveness of Board programs.Government Performance and Results Act 201 Goal Foster the integrity. and enforce a climate of fair and equitable treatment for all employees regardless of race. other financial regulatory institutions. v Establish. dollar payment and securities settlement systems by assessing their risks and riskmanagement approaches against relevant policy objectives and standards. and retention of staff meet Board needs.

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The Board approved interim final rules to implement these provisions on July 15. account-opening disclosures. These Credit Card Act provisions became effective on August 20. notices of . periodic statements. and Disclosure Act of 2009 (Pub. 2009 (90 days after enactment). It does so by prohibiting. Responsibility. L. 2009. such as unexpected increases in interest rates. which are administered by the Board. If a consumer exercises this right. President Obama signed into law two significant pieces of legislation that include provisions affecting the Federal Reserve: the Credit Card Accountability. with respect to consumer credit card accounts. the Board adopted two final rules pertaining to open-end credit (other than credit secured by a home): • The first rule made comprehensive changes to Regulation Z (which implements the Truth in Lending Act). Specifically. which introduces new substantive and disclosure requirements for creditors in an effort to strengthen consumer protections in the credit card market. with certain exceptions. L. changes in terms. In addition. which aims to improve practices in the credit card market. Several provisions of the Credit Card Act build on protections previously adopted by the Board. The first set of provisions requires creditors to provide written notice to consumers 45 days before the creditor increases the annual percentage rate (APR) on a credit card account or makes a significant change to the terms of a credit card account. • The second rule protected consumers by prohibiting certain unfair acts or practices. including amendments that affect credit card applications and solicitations. No. No. The requirements of the Credit Card Act that pertain to credit cards or other open-end credit for which the Board has rulemaking authority become effective in three stages. A second set of Credit Card Act provisions protects consumers from certain types of increases in credit card interest rates and changes in terms. as well as increases to an The Credit Card Act The Federal Reserve played a key role in the development of the Credit Card Act. These notices also must inform consumers of their right to cancel the credit card account before the increase or change goes into effect. the creditor generally is prohibited from applying the increase or change to the account prior to account closure. and advertisements. the Credit Card Act amends the Truth in Lending Act and the Electronic Fund Transfer Act. creditors are required to mail or deliver periodic statements for credit cards at least 21 days before payment is due. which seeks to restore stability to the housing markets. Among other things.203 Federal Legislative Developments In May 2009. in December 2008. increases to an interest rate during the first year after an account has been opened. Following is a summary of the key provisions of these laws as they relate to Federal Reserve System functions. 11124) (the “Credit Card Act”). and the Helping Families Save Their Homes Act of 2009 (Pub. 111-22).

and then to each successive balance with the next highest rate. 2010. under certain circumstances. Generally. the Board must consider the cost sustained by the creditor for the violation or omission. item on or near a college campus to induce college students to apply for or participate in an open-end consumer credit plan. These provisions will become effective on August 22. a consumer who is younger than the age of 21. 2010 (nine months after enactment). for each credit card account. The Board approved final rules to implement these provisions on January 12. or establishing an open-end credit plan on behalf of. creditors must provide the consumer with a payment due date that is the same day each month. and • charging excessive fees on cards with low credit limits. A third group of Credit Card Act provisions addresses the reasonableness and proportionality of penalty fees and periodic review of rate increases by creditors. . the Board is charged with establishing standards for creditors to use in assessing whether or not a penalty fee or charge is reasonable and proportional to the corresponding violation or omission. In addition. and other factors the Board considers necessary or appropriate. a credit card issuer who increases a cardholder’s interest rate is required to review the cardholder’s account at least every six months and assess whether a decrease in the rate is warranted due to a change in such factor(s). Creditors are further prohibited from offering a tangible 1. a card issuer that uses the two-cycle method assesses interest not only on the balance for the current billing cycle but also on balances on days in the preceding billing cycle. creditors consider the consumer’s ability to make the required payments under the card agreement. unless the creditor either determines that the consumer has the independent ability to make the required payments or obtains the signature of a parent or other cosigner with the ability to do so. In addition. In addition. until the payment is exhausted. 2010 (15 months after enactment). if a consumer makes a payment in excess of the minimum payment amount.1 • charging over-the-limit fees unless the cardholder has agreed to allow the issuer to complete over-the-limit transactions. Under these provisions. Furthermore. and with a disclosure setting forth the time and cost of paying off the card balance if only minimum monthly payments are made. In developing these standards.204 96th Annual Report. Creditors also are prohibited from • using the “two-cycle” billing method to impose interest charges. the Board issued a proposed rule to implement the third group of Credit Card Act provisions. On March 3. The “two-cycle” billing method has several permutations. creditors are required to allocate those excess funds first to the card balance with the highest interest rate. The Credit Card Act also requires that before opening a credit card account. The two-cycle method results in greater interest charges for consumers who pay their balance in full one month (and therefore generally qualify for a grace period) but not the next month (and therefore generally lose the grace period). the effect of the fee in deterring omissions or violations by the cardholder. 2010. the cardholder’s conduct. or increasing the account limit. 2009 interest rate that applies to an existing credit card balance. the Credit Card Act prohibits creditors from issuing a credit card to. This second set of provisions became effective on February 22.

and provide these agreements to the Board. including through the HOPE for Homeowners Program previously established by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA) (Pub. inactivity. or general-use prepaid card that is subject to an expiration date of less than five years. the Credit Card Act prohibits the sale or issuance of a gift certificate. among other things. of all the credit facilities authorized by the Board under section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U. 2009. which. L. or service fees with respect to a gift certificate. The Credit Card Act also mandates that creditors post their credit card agreements on their Internet sites. For example. the Helping Families Act included provisions that permit the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to authorize the modification of federally guaranteed rural housing loans and loans guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) either in default or facing imminent default. GAO Audit Authority Title VIII of the Helping Families Act authorizes the Comptroller General of the U. no more than one fee is charged per month. L. and the use of credit cards by small businesses. Finally. President Obama signed into law the Helping Families Save Their Homes Act (the “Helping Families Act”) (Pub. 110289). Under this provision. The Credit Card Act provides an exception to this general prohibition if there has been at least one year of inactivity. and the consumer is provided with clear and conspicuous disclosures about the fees. on college credit card agreements. or generaluse prepaid card. The Board finalized rules to implement these provisions on March 23. The Helping Families Act included a variety of provisions intended to encourage modification of home mortgages either in default or facing imminent default. 2010. Government Accountability Office (GAO) to conduct audits. No. store gift card. The Helping Families Act also provides certain liability protections to loan servicers who make modifications in compliance with the Act. foreclosure. the GAO has full authority to audit the special lend- The Helping Families Save Their Homes Act On May 20. store gift card. In addition.Federal Legislative Developments 205 The Credit Card Act also amends provisions of the Electronic Fund Transfer Act and generally prohibits the imposition of dormancy. Described below are three provisions of the Act that directly relate to the activities and functions of the Federal Reserve or the banking organizations supervised by the Federal Reserve. These provisions will become effective on August 22. The Board is required to establish and maintain a central repository so that the public may easily access and retrieve these agreements.S. the reduction of consumer credit availability. and to make payments to residential mortgage lenders in order to offset certain costs associated with modification. § 343) for a single and specific partnership or corporation in order to protect financial stability and promote the flow of credit during the financial crisis.C. 2010. the Credit Card Act requires the Board to conduct and complete several studies.S. including on-site examinations. and to make several reports to Congress. 111-22). introduced new measures to aid families facing . No.

Title VI of the Helping Families Act also clarifies the GAO’s authority to audit the programs established by the Treasury Department under the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). and risks to. 110343). and operations of the TALF. Inc. to recover any losses that the Deposit Insurance Fund may incur as a result of actions taken by the FDIC under the systemic risk exception to the least-cost resolution requirements in the Federal . expressly authorizes the GAO to audit the programs and activities of the Treasury under the TARP for purposes of conducting ongoing oversight of the activities and performance of the TARP.. until December 31. which is a joint program of the Federal Reserve and Treasury.. Inc. including the Term AssetBacked Securities Loan Facility (TALF). 2009 ing facilities that the Federal Reserve established under section 13(3) for American International Group. For example. The Helping Families Act prohibits an officer or employee of the GAO from disclosing to any person outside the GAO information obtained in audits or examinations conducted under this authority and maintained as confidential by the Board or the Federal Reserve Banks. Specifically. The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (EESA) (Pub. all of the Federal Reserve’s supervisory and regulatory functions are subject to audit by the GAO to the same extent as the supervisory and regulatory functions of the other federal banking agencies. 2010. and Maiden Lane III LLC. which established the TARP. In addition. These provisions augment the GAO’s existing audit authority with respect to the Federal Reserve.. in addition to insured depository institutions. Temporary Increase in FDIC Borrowing Authority The Helping Families Act also includes measures designed to preserve confidence in the deposit insurance fund and assist the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) in recovering any costs of emergency assistance provided to help maintain financial stability during the financial crisis. to allow the FDIC to borrow up to $500 billion from Treasury if the Secretary determines that the increase is necessary after receiving the written recommendations of the Board of Directors of the FDIC and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (each by a vote of not less than two-thirds of the members of the respective board). by JP Morgan Chase & Co. and Bank of America Corporation. Citigroup. L. No.206 96th Annual Report. including Maiden Lane LLC. including those aspects of the TALF that are administered by the Federal Reserve. the TARP. with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Treasury. Maiden Lane II LLC. The Helping Families Act also permits the FDIC. the amount the FDIC may borrow from the Treasury for deposit insurance purposes. Section 601 of the Helping Families Act clarifies and ensures the GAO’s ability to audit the TALF for purposes of assessing the performance of the TARP. from $30 billion to $100 billion. Inc. and to facilitate the acquisition of The Bear Stearns Company. as necessary to understand and assess the performance of. these provisions provide the GAO with the authority to audit the terms. to make special assessments on depository institution holding companies. the Helping Families Act increases. the Helping Families Act allows the Secretary of the Treasury. after consulting with the President. Taken together. conditions.

S. the effects on the industry. As originally enacted. or the respective designee of each. 2013. economic conditions. but only through December 31. the upfront and annual premiums were fixed at 3 percent and 1. 2009. the Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. subject to certain conditions and restrictions. Á The HOPE for Homeowners Program Title II of the Helping Families Act makes several changes to the HOPE for Homeowners Program. such as streamlining certifications and allowing conformity with current FHA practices to the extent possible. a voluntary program designed to allow qualified. FDIC. the increase from $100. Previously. Specifically. until December 31. § 1823(c)(4)(G)). Moreover.000 to $250.Federal Legislative Developments 207 Deposit Insurance Act (12 U. the Helping Families Act extends. The Helping Families Act makes several other technical changes to the program to decrease administrative burdens. at-risk mortgage borrowers to refinance their existing mortgages into new mortgage loans guaranteed by the FHA. The Helping Families Act transferred all responsibilities of the Oversight Board to the Secretary of HUD and converted the Oversight Board into an advisory body with responsibility for advising the Secretary regarding the program. taking into consideration the financial integrity and purpose of the program. The Helping Families Act also gives HUD additional flexibility with respect to the fees assessed for providing government insurance to mortgages refinanced under the program. In establishing any such assessment rate. The Oversight Board is composed of the Secretary of HUD. of the principal balance of the new mortgage. prescribe regulations. HUD is also given greater flexibility in establishing the percentage of any appreciation realized by a borrower on the property refinanced into the program that the borrower must share with HUD. HUD is permitted to share its portion of any appreciation received with either a senior or subordinate mortgage holder whose loans were refinanced pursuant to the program. and issue guidance to implement those requirements and standards.000 in FDIC deposit insurance coverage for insured depository institutions and National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) share insurance coverage for insured credit unions. the Secretary of the Treasury. the Helping Families Act allows HUD to make payments to the servicer for loans refinanced under the program. and the Chairperson of the Board of Directors of the . the Act permits HUD to assess an upfront premium of up to 3 percent. and an annual premium of up to 1.C. respectively. Additionally. the Board of Directors of the program (the “Oversight Board”) was provided authority to establish requirements and standards for the program. and such other factors as the FDIC deems appropriate and relevant to the action taken or the assistance provided. This increase in deposit and share insurance initially was enacted as part of the EESA.5 percent of the principal balance of the new mortgage.5 percent. the FDIC must consider the types of entities that benefit from any action taken or assistance provided. and to originators for new loans made through the program to encourage refinancings for eligible borrowers.

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Records .

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and (4) discount rates for depository institutions. R-1371] On December 4. 2009.) The rule establishes criteria for determining the eligibility of agencies to issue credit ratings for asset-backed securities. and Governors Warsh. One of the final rules revises provisions of the interim final rule issued in October 2008 amending Regulation D. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. (3) special liquidity facilities and other initiatives. and on request from the Board’s Freedom of Information Office. More information on the actions with italicized dates is available via the online version of the Annual Report. Those revisions relate to the payment of interest on respondent Rules and Regulations Regulation A Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks [Docket No. The final rule is effective January 8. Vice Chairman Kohn. and R-1307] On May 18. to be accepted as collateral for the TALF. other than those backed by commercial real estate. Regulation D Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions Regulation I Issue and Cancellation of Federal Reserve Bank Capital Stock [Docket Nos. (2) policy statements and other actions. R-1350. 2009. 2010. All actions were approved by a unanimous vote of the Board members. a special liquidity facility. from the “Reading Rooms” on the Board’s FOIA web page. or similar order payable to third parties. (3) to increase from three to six the permissible number of transfers or withdrawals from savings deposits by check. (See ‘‘Special Liquidity Facilities and Other Initiatives’’ for further discussion of the TALF. debit card. R-1334.211 Record of Policy Actions of the Board of Governors This report provides a summary account of actions taken by the Board on questions of policy in 2009 as implemented through (1) rules and regulations. and Tarullo. and (4) to authorize member banks to enter into pass-through arrangements. Duke. . unless indicated otherwise. the Board approved final rules (1) to direct Federal Reserve Banks to pay interest on certain balances held at Reserve Banks by or on behalf of certain depository institutions. (2) to authorize the establishment of “excess balance accounts” at Reserve Banks for the maintenance of excess balances of eligible institutions. the Board approved a final rule establishing a process by which the Federal Reserve Bank of New York may determine the eligibility of credit rating agencies for the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF).

R-1343] On November 5. approved a joint interim final rule with request for comment to provide that mortgage loans modified under the Department of the Treasury’s Home Affordable Mortgage Program (HAMP. The final rule. 2009. the Board. 2009. Duke. the Board approved a final rule to provide a temporary exemption for state member banks and bank holding companies participating in the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF). The final rules are effective July 2. including any associated fees. 2010. and Tarullo. The final rule is effective January 30. and the consumer’s choices. and institutions must provide consumers who do not opt in with the same terms.) Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. Vice Chairman Kohn. Vice Chairman Kohn. Vice Chairman Kohn. a special liquidity facility. 2009. 2009. and compliance is mandatory July 1. (The Board subsequently announced that the AMLF would expire on February 1. and features (including pricing) that they provide to consumers who do opt in. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. and the final rules implement other conforming amendments to Regulation D and Regulation I. is effective January 19.212 96th Annual Report. 2010. [Docket No. R-1361] On June 23. and Governors Warsh. which includes a model opt-in notice. unless the consumer affirmatively consents. 2010. Under the exemption. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. and Governors Warsh and Duke. The amendments prohibit financial institutions from discriminating against consumers who do not opt in. Regulation H Membership of State Banking Institutions in the Federal Reserve System Regulation Y Bank Holding Companies and Change in Bank Control [Docket R-1332] On January 27. a consumer must be provided with a notice that explains the financial institution’s overdraft services. and Tarullo. Before opting in. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. and Office of Thrift Supervision. which was approved as an interim measure in September 2008. or opts in. acting with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Regulation E Electronic Fund Transfers [Docket No. 2009 balances maintained in the accounts of “ineligible” pass-through correspondents (correspondent institutions ineligible to receive interest on balances maintained on their own behalf at the Federal Reserve). the Board approved a final rule that prohibits financial institutions from paying overdrafts on ATM (automated teller machine) and one-time debit card transactions. conditions. assetbacked commercial paper held by these institutions as a result of their participation in the AMLF is exempt from the Board’s leverage risk-based capital guidelines. and Governors Warsh. 2009. to the overdraft service for those types of transactions. Duke. formerly Making Home Affordable Program) will retain the risk weight assigned to the loan before the .

National Credit Union Administration. is effective December 31. the Board and the other banking agencies approved the interim final rule as a final rule with a clarification that mortgage loans whose HAMP modifications are in the trial period. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. The amendments are effective May 14. Financial institutions may rely on the model form as a safe harbor when providing privacy notices. and Governors Warsh.Record of Policy Actions of the Board of Governors 213 modification. which also removes sample clauses now included in an appendix to the regulation. 2009 (except for the amendment removing the sample clauses. 2009. identity-theft red flags. except for the instructions to appendix C. approved a final rule to implement the privacy-notice and optout provisions of the Gramm-LeachBliley Act. and Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS). 2009. Office of Thrift Supervision. and Governors Warsh. R-1203 and R-1255] On January 26. Votes for these actions: Chairman Bernanke. Federal Trade Commission. approved technical corrections to the rules regarding affiliate marketing. Regulation P Privacy of Consumer Financial Information [Docket No. 2009. and Securities and Exchange Commission. Regulation V Fair Credit Reporting [Docket Nos. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC). The rule includes a model privacy form that will make it easier for consumers to understand how financial institutions collect and share information about them. Under the act. R-1325] On September 2. 2010. 2010. 2009. Duke. The final rule is effective January 1. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. and Tarullo. Duke. . Vice Chairman Kohn. and not yet permanent. and Tarullo. and address discrepancies. Vice Chairman Kohn. which is effective January 1. Duke. which are effective January 1. The rule. 2009. and Tarullo. institutions must notify consumers of their information-sharing practices and inform consumers of their right to opt out of certain sharing practices. Vice Chairman Kohn. the Board approved a revision to Regulation S to change the rates and conditions under which a government agency must reimburse a financial institution for costs incurred in producing customer financial records under the Right to Financial Privacy Act. On November 2. R-1280] On October 26. and Governors Warsh. 2012). acting with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. acting with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Recordkeeping Requirements for Certain Financial Records [Docket No. The modified loans must continue to meet other applicable prudential criteria. qualify for the rule’s riskbased capital treatment. 2009. Regulation S Reimbursement for Providing Financial Records. the Board. Commodity Futures Trading Commission. National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). the Board. The final rule is effective December 21.

2009. The exemption from certain provisions of section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act and the Board’s Regulation W was approved as an interim measure in September 2008 and increases the capacity of participating institutions to purchase asset- . Under the rules. and information about their score. which was approved as an interim measure in September 2008. Regulation W Transactions Between Member Banks and Their Affiliates [Docket No. 2009. the Board. The final rule is effective January 30. and Governors Warsh. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke.214 96th Annual Report. provides credit to the consumer on less favorable terms than it provides to other consumers. 2009. [Docket No. and Governors Warsh and Duke. Vice Chairman Kohn. The rules are effective July 1. and FTC. 2010. such as when a creditor provides consumers who apply for credit with a free credit score [Docket No. 2009. acting with the FTC. and Tarullo. The final rules are effective January 1. [Docket No. approved final rules to implement the risk-based-pricing provisions of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act. Vice Chairman Kohn. on the basis of the consumer’s credit report. a special liquidity facility. 2009. the Board. and Tarullo. the Board approved a final rule to extend to October 30. furnishers must establish reasonable policies and procedures to ensure the accuracy and integrity of the information they provide. Duke. OCC. The Board allowed the rule to expire on October 30. R-1331] On January 27. Duke. the Board approved a final rule to provide a temporary exemption for member banks participating in the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF). OTS. R-1330] On January 27. Under the final rules. NCUA. 2011. 2009 Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. and Governors Warsh. and Governors Warsh and Duke. 2009. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. approved final rules to implement certain provisions of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act regarding entities that furnish information about consumers (furnishers) to consumer reporting agencies. 2009. a creditor must generally provide a consumer with a risk-basedpricing notice when the creditor. a temporary exemption for member banks from certain provisions of section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act and the Board’s Regulation W. R-1300] On May 29. acting with the FDIC. R-1316] On December 17. increases the capacity of member banks to enter into securitiesfinancing transactions with their affiliates. The exemption. The rules provide creditors with several methods for determining which consumers must receive notices and include exceptions to the notice requirement. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. Vice Chairman Kohn. The rules also identify the circumstances under which a furnisher must investigate a consumer’s direct dispute about the accuracy of information in his or her credit report. Vice Chairman Kohn.

2009. Regulation Y Bank Holding Companies and Change in Bank Control [Docket No. quest for comment to allow bank holding companies that are either S-Corps or mutual bank holding companies to include in tier 1 capital all subordinated debt issued to Treasury under TARP. 2009. the Board issued final rules requiring creditors to provide consumers with transaction-specific cost disclosures shortly after receiving an application for a closed-end loan secured by a consumer’s principal dwelling. The MDIA expedites the effective date of these disclosure requirements by about two months. 2009. Vice Chairman Kohn. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. Regulation Z Truth in Lending [Docket No. R-1336 and R-1356] On May 20. the Board approved a final rule to allow bank holding companies to include in tier 1 capital without restriction senior perpetual preferred stock issued to the Department of the Treasury (Treasury) under the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). and Governors Warsh. Duke. the Board approved a final rule to delay until March 31. and the interim final rule is effective June 1. The Board also approved an interim final rule with re- . 2009. and Governors Warsh. the interim final rule will allow small bank holding companies that are S-Corps or mutual bank holding companies to exclude such debt from treatment as “debt” for purposes of the debt-to-equity standard under the Board’s Small Bank Holding Company Policy Statement. R-1340] On May 7. In addition. Vice Chairman Kohn. 2009. Under the Board’s amendments to implement these requirements. In July 2008. as well as broadens and adds to the requirements. and Tarullo. and Tarullo. provided that the subordinated debt will count toward the limit on the amount of other restricted core capital includable in tier 1 capital. the effective date of new limits on the inclusion of trust preferred securities and other restricted core capital elements in tier 1 capital under the Board’s capital adequacy guidelines for bank holding companies. The final rule is effective July 1. Vice Chairman Kohn. 2011. 2009. the Board approved amendments to implement the Mortgage Disclosure Improvement Act (MDIA) that are intended to provide consumers with disclosures earlier in the mortgage process. 2010. This rule makes final the rule approved as an interim measure in October 2008.) Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. but were delayed in view of financial market conditions and in order to promote stability in the financial markets and the banking industry as a whole. The new limits were scheduled to take effect on March 31. Duke. 2009. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. creditors must (1) provide early cost disclosures [Docket Nos. (The Board subsequently announced that the AMLF would expire on February 1. The final rule is effective January 30.Record of Policy Actions of the Board of Governors 215 backed commercial paper from affiliated money market mutual funds. 2009. to July 30. R-1193] On March 16. and Governors Warsh and Duke.

Vice Chairman Kohn. R-1364] On July 15. The amendments. which include model disclosure forms. The amendments also include restrictions on using the name. the Board approved an interim final rule with request for comment to implement a requirement in the Helping Families Save Their Homes Act that consumers receive written notice after their mort- . and Tarullo. and Governors Warsh. such as foreclosure. and (3) provide new disclosures that include a revised annual percentage rate (APR). 2009. Vice Chairman Kohn. 2009. 2009. the Board approved an interim final rule with request for comment to implement certain provisions of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act. and Tarullo. if a change occurs that makes the APR in the early disclosures inaccurate beyond a specified tolerance. or in certain other situations (such as a credit card advance used to fund educational expenses). 2010. The amendments allow a consumer to expedite a loan closing in order to address a personal financial emergency. the creditor is generally prohibited from applying the increase or change to the account. The new disclosure requirements do not apply to education loans made. Duke. R-1353] On July 27. [Docket No. The interim final rule is effective August 20. creditors that extend loans expressly for postsecondary educational expenses must provide disclosures about a loan’s terms and features on or with the loan application and must disclose information about federal student loan programs that may offer less costly alternatives. in the same notice. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. and Tarullo. the Board approved final amendments to revise the disclosure requirements for private education loans. The interim final rule requires creditors to provide written notice to consumers 45 days before increasing an APR on a credit card account or making a significant change to the terms of an account. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. Vice Chairman Kohn. (2) wait seven days after providing the early disclosures before closing the loan. In addition. and compliance is mandatory February 14. Creditors must also inform consumers. of their right to cancel the account before the increase or change goes into effect. consistent with the requirements of the Higher Education Opportunity Act. Duke. or mascot of an educational institution in a way that implies the institution endorses a creditor’s loans. 2009. emblem. Under the amendments. [Docket No. creditors must generally mail or deliver periodic statements for credit cards and other open-end consumer credit accounts at least 21 days before payment is due. or guaranteed by the federal government. If a consumer does so. 2009. The amendments are effective July 30. 2009 for loans secured by dwellings other than a consumer’s principal dwelling (such as a second home). and Governors Warsh. are effective September 14. [Docket R-1378] On November 10. Duke. and wait an additional three days before closing the loan. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. Creditors must also provide additional disclosures when a loan is approved and when it is consummated. 2009. insured.216 96th Annual Report. and Governors Warsh.

to June 1. the Board approved a policy. the Board.) Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. and Tarullo. and to help stabilize the American International Group. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. and Governors Warsh and Duke. are effective September 21. and Farm Credit Administration. 2010. trolled by a Reserve Bank. and supersede the agencies’ questions and answers issued in 1997. developed pursuant to section 110 of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act. which supplement other guidance or interpretations issued by the agencies and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Inc. approved a final rule to extend the compliance date for the joint regulation implementing certain provisions of the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act by six months. The interim final rule is effective November 20. 2010. and compliance is mandatory January 19. Regulation GG Prohibition on Funding of Unlawful Internet Gambling [Docket No. acting jointly with the Department of the Treasury. 2009. acting with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. National Credit Union Administration. and Tarullo. R-1298] On November 25. Vice Chairman Kohn. Duke. and Governors Warsh.Record of Policy Actions of the Board of Governors 217 gage loan has been sold or transferred. approved final revised Interagency Questions and Answers Regarding Flood Insurance. Office of Thrift Supervision. Vice Chairman Kohn. to help prevent avoidable foreclosures on residential mortgage assets that are subject to section 110 and that are owned or con- . 2009. Duke. a purchaser or assignee that acquires a mortgage loan must provide the required disclosures in writing within 30 days. Inc. Interagency Questions and Answers Regarding Flood Insurance [Docket No. 2009. and Governors Warsh. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. 2009. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. R-1311] On July 14. Vice Chairman Kohn. Vice Chairman Kohn. The revised questions and answers. which were formed by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to facilitate the acquisition of The Bear Stearns Companies. and Governors Warsh. the Board. Duke. by JPMorgan Chase & Co. (The Board also approved the issuance of five proposed new questions and answers for public comment. Policy Statements and Other Actions Homeownership Preservation Policy for Residential Mortgage Assets On January 23. Under the act. 2009. The Board also voted to voluntarily apply the policy to the residential mortgage assets held by the Maiden Lane limited liability companies. The questions and answers are intended to help financial institutions meet their responsibilities under federal flood insurance legislation and to increase public understanding of flood insurance regulation. and Tarullo.

) If a Class B or Class C director is affiliated with a company (an officer. Before August 2007. 2009. 2009: Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF). A Class C director who holds stock in a company that becomes a bank holding company or who holds stock that otherwise becomes an impermissible holding must either divest the stock or resign from the Reserve Bank’s board within 60 days of the earlier of the date that (1) the director becomes aware of the impermissible stockholding or (2) the Board informs the Reserve Bank of the change in character of the company. 2009. and Rotation for Directors of Federal Reserve Banks and Their Branches On November 17. qualifications. the maximum available term of primary credit was generally overnight. 2007) and then to 90 days (on March 16. Duke. The revisions address situations in which previously permissible affiliations or stockholdings may become impermissible for Class B and Class C directors. a director. in addition. Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Li- . and Governors Warsh. a director. as a result of a company’s change in character. Class C directors may not own stock in a bank. the Board extended its authorizations for the following facilities until October 30. or an employee of a bank. from the affiliation or resign from the Reserve Bank’s board within 60 days of the earlier of the date that (1) the director becomes aware of the impermissible affiliation or (2) the Board informs the Reserve Bank of the change in character of the company. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. Absent and not voting: Governor Warsh. 2009 Maximum Maturity of Primary Credit Loans On November 12. the Board approved revisions to its eligibility. or an employee of a company) that becomes a bank holding company or that otherwise becomes an impermissible affiliation. The Federal Reserve lengthened the maximum maturity to 30 days (on August 17. (Class B and Class C directors represent the public and may not be an officer. Vice Chairman Kohn. and Governors Duke and Tarullo. the Board approved a reduction in the maximum maturity of primary credit loans at the discount window for depository institutions from 90 days to 28 days. The revisions also clarify the rules regarding a Class C director’s indirect ownership in a financial stock issuer.218 96th Annual Report. Policy Governing Eligibility. and Tarullo. and rotation policy for Federal Reserve Bank and Branch directors. the director must either resign Special Liquidity Facilities and Other Initiatives The Board modified certain aspects of the special liquidity facilities and other initiatives that were previously implemented to promote financial stability and support critical institutions. see the Board’s 2008 Annual Report. Qualifications. 2008) in order to enhance banks’ access to term funds and thus support their ability to lend to households and businesses. 2009. 2010. For more information on the establishment and purposes of the facilities and initiatives discussed in this section. effective January 14. Vice Chairman Kohn. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. Special Liquidity Facilities On January 27.

2009. Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility The Board authorized the Term AssetBacked Securities Loan Facility (TALF) in November 2008 in order to increase credit availability and support economic activity by facilitating the . The Board also trimmed the size and changed the terms of some facilities. 2010: AMLF. interest rate.) The Board and the FOMC suspended TSLF auctions backed by schedule 1 collateral (Treasury. the Board had announced changes to the MMIFF. Commercial Paper Funding Facility (CPFF). 2009. municipal. and stated that TAF funding may be reduced further. The Board and the FOMC also announced that they expected the amounts provided under the TAF would continue to be scaled back in early 2010. and other conditions previously established. 2009. and stated that amounts auctioned under the TSLF may be reduced further. The Board reaffirmed that its authorization for the MMIFF would expire on October 30. 2009. (Further extensions are discussed in this section. CPFF. The Board and the FOMC also reduced the frequency and size of TSLF auctions backed by schedule 2 collateral (schedule 1 collateral and investment-grade corporate. and PDCF. On June 23. and TSLF. (On January 7.Record of Policy Actions of the Board of Governors 219 quidity Facility (AMLF). and other conditions previously established. effective July 13. CPFF. including its economic parameters and the set of eligible investors for the facility. effective July 1. 2009. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. The facilities had been scheduled to expire on April 30. PDCF. and Tarullo. 2009. 2009.) The Board and the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) approved extending their authorizations for the Term Securities Lending Facility (TSLF) until October 30. Specifically. the Board and the FOMC announced that they anticipated the following facilities would expire on February 1. the Board extended its authorizations for the following facilities until February 1. if warranted by market conditions.) Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. and Governors Warsh and Duke. All of the extensions were subject to the same collateral. and asset-backed securities) from every two weeks to every four weeks. the Board announced reductions in the amounts of 84-day TAF auctions. and the TSLF Options Program (TOP). 2010: AMLF. TAF. agencydebt. The Board and the FOMC approved extending their authorizations for the TSLF until February 1. as well as reductions in the maturities of those auctions. (See ‘‘Discount Rates for Depository Institutions in 2009’’ for further discussion of the Note: On September 24. mortgage-backed. effective with the maturity of outstanding June TOP options. Vice Chairman Kohn. interest rate. in light of improving financial conditions and reduced usage of the facilities. and Governors Warsh. Duke. in amounts of $75 billion. Vice Chairman Kohn. 2009. 2010. if warranted by market conditions. the Board reduced the amounts auctioned at biweekly Term Auction Facility (TAF) auctions from $150 billion to $125 billion. and Money Market Investor Funding Facility (MMIFF). and agency-guaranteed mortgagebacked securities). All of the extensions were subject to the same collateral. 2009. The Board and the FOMC also announced reductions in the amounts of schedule 2 TSLF auctions. On December 16.

The inclusion of insurance-premium ABS facilitates the flow of credit to small businesses. a revised definition of eligible borrowers. the Board approved the establishment of two new interest rates for certain fixed-rate loans extended under the TALF that are collateralized by ABS with weighted average lives to maturity of less than two years and that do not benefit from a government guarantee. the Board approved revisions to the TALF’s terms and conditions. some of the interest on collateral financed with a five-year loan may be diverted toward an accelerated repayment of the loan. and additional specifications for ABS collateral. 2009. On February 6 and February 23. the Board expanded the list of eligible autorelated receivables. which in turn helps borrowers finance new purchases of commercial properties or refinance existing commercial mortgages on better terms. and Tarullo. the Board approved an expansion of the eligible collateral for loans extended under the TALF to include ABS backed by mortgage-servicing advances. In addition. ABS backed by mortgage-servicing advances were added to improve servicers’ ability to work with homeowners to prevent avoidable foreclosures. collateral haircuts. Vice Chairman Kohn. the Board approved (1) an alternate lending rate for . the Board and the Department of the Treasury (Treasury) announced the launch of the TALF for eligible holders of ABS backed by newly and recently originated auto. On April 30. On June 22. 2009 (legacy CMBS). 2009. On March 19. On April 21. The Board also announced other technical clarifications to the program. and non-auto floorplan loans. and ABS backed by loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. The other new ABS categories complement the consumer and small business loan categories that were already eligible. credit card. 2009. 2009. ABS backed by student loans. the Board approved an expansion of the eligible collateral for TALF loans to include newly issued commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) and newly issued securities backed by insurance-premiumfinance loans. Duke. 2009. and Governors Warsh.220 96th Annual Report. increases the capacity of current holders of maturing mortgages to make additional loans. loans or leases relating to business equipment. 2009. 2009 issuance of asset-backed securities (ABS) collateralized by consumer and small business loans. On May 18.and two-year London interbank offered (Libor) swap rates and are more closely matched to the duration of the underlying ABS collateral. The Board also authorized TALF loans with maturities of five years to finance purchases of newly issued CMBS. in order to improve legacy CMBS markets and thereby facilitate the issuance of new CMBS. These new rates are based on one. especially in the fourth and fifth years. including interest rates on loans. the Board approved an expansion of the eligible collateral for TALF loans to include certain high-quality CMBS issued before January 1. 2009.) On March 3. In addition. (Unless otherwise indicated. The inclusion of newly issued CMBS as eligible collateral for TALF loans helps prevent defaults on economically viable commercial properties. leases of vehicle fleets. and student loans and by small business loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. and facilitates the sale of distressed properties. Board actions on the TALF in 2009 were approved by the unanimous vote of Chairman Bernanke.

Kroszner. Votes for these actions: Chairman Bernanke. . the Board approved an enhanced credit review process for TALF-eligible ABS to help Other Initiatives Bank of America Corporation On January 15. 2009. On September 29. 2009. as part of a package of coordinated actions with the Department of the Treasury (Treasury) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). for TALF loans against newly issued ABS and eligible legacy CMBS. (The Board also approved the issuance of a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury recommending that the Secretary invoke the systemic-risk exception to the least-cost-resolution requirements in the Federal Deposit Insurance Act to permit the FDIC to participate in the proposed agreement with Bank of America. 2009. Vice Chairman Kohn. the combined Treasury-supplied and TALF-supplied debt would be no greater than the total amount of TALF debt that would be available. On July 6. for loans backed by newly issued CMBS. 2010. authorized the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond to enter into an agreement with Bank of America Corporation under which the Reserve Bank would make certain residual financing available to Bank of America in connection with a designated pool of approximately $118 billion in assets. 2009. Duke. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke and Governors Warsh. and Tarullo. Treasury. leveraging the PPIF equity alone. On August 13. On June 30. the Board approved an increase in the administrative fee charged to TALF borrowers from 5 basis points to (1) 10 basis points for loans collateralized by ABS and (2) 20 basis points for loans collateralized by CMBS (newly issued and legacy). approved an extension of the TALF through March 31. 2009. the Board. Because new CMBS transactions can take more time to arrange. Bank of America paid an exit fee to terminate the term sheet with the Federal Reserve. the Board approved an adjustment to the haircuts applied to any loans extended under TALF to Treasury-sponsored Public-Private Investment Funds (PPIFs). and Governors Warsh.) In September 2009. the Board and the FOMC announced that the anticipated expiration dates for the TALF remained set at June 30. transparency.Record of Policy Actions of the Board of Governors 221 TALF-eligible collateral consisting of ABS that are collateralized by private student loans and have a prime-based coupon and (2) other clarifying and technical changes to the TALF’s terms and conditions. The haircuts were increased so that. if a PPIF borrowed from the TALF. Absent and not voting: Vice Chairman Kohn. TALF loans had been previously authorized through December 31. 2009. for loans backed by all other types of collateral. 2010. and March 31. acting with Treasury. 2010. TALF loans against newly issued CMBS were extended through June 30. the Board. ensure that TALF collateral complies with the Federal Reserve’s high standards for credit quality. The alternate lending rate was established to help make private student loans more affordable and more readily available. and the FDIC related to the residual financing arrangement and related guarantee protections. 2010. and simplicity of structure. 2009. Note: On December 16. and Duke.

222 96th Annual Report. and Tarullo. is extended at a rate above the federal funds rate target set by the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). and facilitate the orderly completion of AIG’s global divestiture program. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. the Board announced a reduction in the maximum maturity of such financing to 28 days effective January 14. 2009. as a backup source of liquidity to depository institutions that. the Federal Reserve’s main lending program for depository institutions. the Board approved the issuance of a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury recommending that the Secretary invoke the systemic-risk exception in the Federal Deposit Insurance Act to allow the FDIC and Treasury to implement the Legacy Loans Program under which . subject to review and determination by the Board of Governors. the FDIC would guarantee debt issued by certain special-purpose entities. Discount Rates for Depository Institutions in 2009 Under the Federal Reserve Act. the maximum amount available under the revolving credit facility would be reduced. Treasury Legacy Loans Program On September 9. the Board announced a temporary change to the Reserve Banks’ discount window lending practices to allow the provision of term financing for as long as 90 days. As part of the restructuring. 2009 American International Group. 2009. established to acquire legacy assets from banking organizations. (2) provide up to approximately $8. would help stabilize the company. (AIG) that. On November 17. together with new capital to be provided by Treasury. On March 16. and Tarullo. and (3) modify the interest rate payable under the revolving credit facility. On March 1. Upon completion of these transactions. Primary Credit Primary credit. and Governors Warsh. 2010.5 billion in new loans to SPVs established by domestic life insurance subsidiaries of AIG to facilitate the securitization of designated blocks of existing life insurance policies held by the parent insurance companies. enhance the company’s capital and liquidity. the Board approved a restructuring of the government’s assistance to American International Group. Vice Chairman Kohn. Inc. in the judgment of the lending Federal Reserve Bank. Votes for this action: Chairman Bernanke. 2008. 2009. Duke. the Board authorized the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to (1) exchange a portion of AIG’s existing outstanding debt under the revolving credit facility for preferred equity interests in special-purpose vehicles (SPVs) that would hold all of the equity interest in two AIG insurance subsidiaries. including Public-Private Investment Funds. It is typically made available. Inc. Vice Chairman Kohn. Duke. the boards of directors of the Federal Reserve Banks must establish rates on discount window loans to depository institutions at least every 14 days. and Governors Warsh. are in generally sound financial condition. with minimal administration and for very short terms.

the Board approved a narrowing of this spread to 50 basis points and in 2008. typically resulting in a rate close to the federal funds rate target. respectively. see federalreserve. see www.Record of Policy Actions of the Board of Governors 223 Throughout 2009. . In 2007. approved a further narrowing to 25 basis points. The spread of the primary credit rate over the FOMC’s target rate was ordinarily 100 basis points. For more information on TAF auctions.1 bidding process as the rate at which all bids can be fulfilled.2 Term Auction Facility Credit In December 2007. up to the maximum auction amount and subject to a minimum bid rate. Throughout 2009. Throughout 2009. The Federal Reserve conducted regular $150 billion auctions of 28. the FOMC maintained a target range for the federal funds rate of 0 to 1⁄4 percent. the spread was set at 50 basis points. At every TAF auction in 2009. On September 24. 2009. respectively.3 On June 25. the Federal Reserve established a temporary Term Auction Facility (TAF). the minimum bid rate was set at a level equal to the rate of interest that banks earn on excess reserve balances. The rate on seasonal credit is calculated every two weeks as an average of selected money-market yields. the secondary and seasonal credit rates were 1 percent and 0. in view of the improvement in financial market conditions and the associated decline in the demand for TAF funds. Secondary and Seasonal Credit Secondary credit is available in appropriate circumstances to depository institutions that do not qualify for primary credit. 2009. Starting on January 12. including minimum bid rates and the auctiondetermined rates on TAF credit. The secondary credit rate is set at a spread above the primary credit rate.gov/monetarypolicy/taf. the Federal Reserve auctions term funds to depository institutions that are in generally sound financial condition and are eligible to borrow under the primary credit program. which remained at 1⁄4 percent throughout the year. The amount of each auction is determined in advance by the Federal Reserve. For current and historical discount rates.htm.15 percent. The amounts offered at 84-day auctions were reduced to $50 billion effective in October and to $25 billion in November and December. the minimum bid rate for TAF auctions was determined based on a measure of the average expected overnight federal funds rate over the term of the credit being auctioned. the resulting interest rate on TAF credit was equal to the minimum bid rate.and 84day TAF credit throughout the first half of 2009. The amounts auctioned in August and September were reduced to $100 billion and $75 billion. the Board announced a reduction in the amount auctioned to $125 billion and noted that TAF funding would be reduced gradually further if market conditions continued to improve. and the interest rate on TAF credit is determined by the 1. the primary credit rate was 1⁄2 percent. At year-end. 2. Under the TAF. and the maturities of those 3.org/. the Board announced that the amounts offered at auctions of 28-day credit would be maintained at $75 billion per auction to ensure that an adequate volume of funding was available in the period leading up to yearend and over year-end. 2009. Seasonal credit is available to smaller depository institutions to meet liquidity needs that arise from regular swings in their loans and deposits.frbdiscountwindow. Previously.

In 2009. 2009.224 96th Annual Report. 2009 operations were aligned with the maturity dates in the cycle for 28-day funds. the auction schedule for 2010 was converted to a single cycle of 28-day funds offered every 28 days. the Federal Reserve indicated that it expected that amounts provided under the Term Auction Facility would continue to be scaled back in early 2010. On December 16. Votes on Changes to Discount Rates for Depository Institutions About every two weeks during 2009. the Board did not approve any changes in the primary credit rate. With the completion of that transition. the Board approved proposals by the 12 Reserve Banks to maintain the formulas for computing the secondary and seasonal credit rates as well as the auction method by which the TAF credit rate is set. Á .

meeting. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York operates under an Authorization for Foreign Currency Operations. 2008. a Foreign Currency Directive. 2008. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York operates under instructions from the Federal Open Market Committee that take the form of an Authorization for Domestic Open Market Operations and a Domestic Policy Directive. contained in the minutes of its meetings. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York was operating under the Domestic Policy Directive approved at the December 15−16. and that it shall include in its annual report to Congress a full account of such actions. and Procedural Instructions with Respect to Foreign Currency Operations) in effect as of January 1.225 Minutes of Federal Open Market Committee Meetings The policy actions of the Federal Open Market Committee. Committee meeting and the Authorization for Foreign Currency Operations approved by notation vote on September 21. starting with the October 2007 Committee meeting. The other policy instruments (the Authorization for Domestic Open Market Operations.) In the foreign currency area.1 1. Policy directives of the Federal Open Market Committee are issued to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York as the Bank selected by the Committee to execute transactions for the System Open Market Account. a Summary of Economic Projections is published as an addendum to the minutes. 2008. 2009. As of January 1. Changes in the instruments during the year are reported in the minutes for the individual meetings. (A new Domestic Policy Directive is adopted at each regularly scheduled meeting. In addition. four times a year. 2009. The minutes of the meetings contain the votes on the policy decisions made at those meetings as well as a summary of the information and discussions that led to the decisions. are presented in the Annual Report of the Board of Governors pursuant to the requirements of section 10 of the Federal Reserve Act. were approved at the January 29−30. The descriptions of economic and financial conditions in the minutes and the Summary of Economic Projections are based solely on the information that was available to the Committee at the time of the meetings. Members of the Committee voting for a particular action may differ among themselves as to the reasons for their votes. in such cases. the range of their views is noted in the minutes. In the area of domestic open market operations. . they are identified in the minutes and a summary of the reasons for their dissent is provided. That section provides that the Board shall keep a complete record of the actions taken by the Board and by the Federal Open Market Committee on all questions of policy relating to open market operations. the Foreign Currency Directive. and Procedural Instructions with Respect to Foreign Currency Operations. When members dissent from a decision. that it shall record therein the votes taken in connection with the determination of open market policies and the reasons underlying each policy action.

Assistant Secretary Mr. Kamin. January 27. Deputy Associate Director.3 Deputy Secretary.m. Present: Mr. Rosengren. Tracy. on Tuesday. Attended portion of the meeting on Tuesday that was a joint session of the Board and the FOMC. Altig. Board of Governors Ms. and Stern. 2009 A meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee was held in the offices of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in Washington. and continued on Wednesday. Bernanke. Ms. Bullard. Sichel. Office of the Secretary. Senior Adviser. Board of Governors Mr. Senior Adviser. Clouse. Division of International Finance. Secretary and Economist Ms. Division of Monetary Affairs. Project Manager. Deputy Director. Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation. Attended Wednesday’s session only. Board of Governors 4. Mosser. 3.m. Levin. Deputy Secretary Mr. English. Vice Chairman Ms. Alternate Members of the Federal Open Market Committee Messrs. Lacker Mr. Division of Monetary Affairs. at 9:00 a. Mr. Madigan. Struckmeyer. Slifman. Division of Research and Statistics. Philadelphia. Division of Monetary Affairs. Fisher. Stockton. Office of the Secretary. Lockhart Mr. Division of Research and Statistics. Board of Governors Mr. Board of Governors Ms. Division of Monetary Affairs. Ms. Small. Board of Governors 2. Board of Governors Ms. Meyer. Connors. Sheets. Assistant Secretary Mr. Cumming. . Board of Governors Mr. Attended portion of the meeting that was a joint session of the Board and the FOMC. Division of Research and Statistics. Deputy Associate Director. Associate Director. Chairman Mr. Blanchard. Board of Governors Messrs. Assistant Secretary Ms. Division of Research and Statistics. Frierson. Mr. 2009 Meeting Held on January 27–28. Board of Governors Mr. Office of Staff Director for Management. D.2 Assistant General Counsel Mr. Kohn Mr. Hoenig. Oliner. 2009. Ashton. Luecke. Office of the Secretary.226 96th Annual Report. Board of Governors Mr. Temporary Manager. 2009.. Yellen Mr. Reeve. Shanks. Economist Mr. Presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks of Dallas. Associate Economists Ms. Assistant to the Board.4 Associate Secretary. January 28. Board of Governors Mr. and Minneapolis. Dynan. Office of Board Members.C. Reifschneider and Wascher. Alvarez. General Counsel Mr. at 1:30 p. Economist Messrs. Deputy Director. Board of Governors Mr. Plosser. Smith. Duke Mr. Danker. Dudley. Evans Mr. Deputy Staff Director. Johnson. respectively Mr. Bailey. Skidmore. and Wilcox. Board of Governors Mr. and Mr. Pianalto. Assistant Director. Board of Governors Mr. Associate Directors. System Open Market Account Ms.3 Secretary of the Board. Warsh Ms.

Senior Economist. Messrs. Clouse. Charles L. Evans. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Mr. Board of Governors Ms. Williams. January 227 Ms. Bernanke William C. Rosenblum. Lockhart. First Vice President. Rudebusch. Federal Reserve Banks of Boston.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Division of Research and Statistics. Alvarez General Counsel Thomas C. Associate Economists In the agenda for this meeting. Philadelphia. as alternate. Fuhrer. Connors. Driscoll and King. Deputy General Counsel Richard M. Wilcox. Dudley. Altig. as alternate. Beattie. First Vice President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Lawrence Slifman. Senior Economist. with Sandra Pianalto. Kusko. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. Sullivan. Bullard. Economists. Thomas A. Division of International Finance. Mses. with Christine M. Office of the Secretary. Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond 3 William C. Jeffrey M. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Board of Governors Mr. Tracy. the following officers of the Federal Open Market Committee were selected to serve until the selection of their successors at the first regularly scheduled meeting of the Committee in 2010: Ben S. Open Market Secretariat Specialist. Dallas. Division of Monetary Affairs. Luecke Assistant Secretary David W. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. Louis. Dennis P. Dudley Brian F. Board of Governors Ms. with James B. Skidmore Assistant Secretary Michelle A. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Hilton and Krane. David W. Ashton Assistant General Counsel D. as alternate. and Sniderman. Board of Governors Messrs. Assistant to the Secretary. with Thomas M. Baxter. Danker Deputy Secretary Matthew M. Senior Research Officer. Stockton Economist David E. Daniel G. San Francisco. Senior Vice Presidents. Jr. Lacker. and Kansas City. The elected members and alternate members were as follows: . Cumming. Louis. and John C. respectively Messrs. as alternate. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Chicago. Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond Messrs. had been received and that these individuals had executed their oaths of office. respectively Mr. Low. Weinberg. Board of Governors Ms. New York. Rasche. St. Hetzel. and Cleveland. and Sellon. with Eric C. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Weber. Mester and Perelmuter. Division of Monetary Affairs. Gust. John A. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Annual Organizational Matters By unanimous vote. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. as alternate. Madigan Chairman Vice Chairman Secretary and Economist Deborah J. Executive Vice Presidents. Federal Reserve Banks of New York. Smith Assistant Secretary Scott G. 2009. Steven B. Senior Economist. Janet L. President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. it was reported that advices of the election of the following members and alternate members of the Federal Open Market Committee for a term beginning January 27. Rosengren. Nathan Sheets Economist David J. Kamin. James A. Green. Joseph S. Yellen. Hoenig.

2. and with the approval of the Committee to renew such arrangements on maturity: Amount of arrangement (millions of dollars equivalent) 2. C.. as the sum of these elements with due regard to sign. the Committee adopted several minor amendments to its Program for Security of FOMC Information. By unanimous vote. specifically authorizes a delay. with the U. The Federal Open Market Committee directs the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to maintain reciprocal currency arrangements (“swap” arrangements) for the System Open Market Account for periods up to a maximum of 12 months with the following foreign banks.000 Foreign bank Bank of Canada Bank of Mexico . The Federal Open Market Committee authorizes and directs the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Exchange Stabilization Fund established by Section 10 of the Gold Reserve Act of 1934.228 96th Annual Report. to the extent necessary to carry out the Committee’s foreign currency directive and express authorizations by the Committee pursuant thereto. D. For this purpose.5 of Regulation N. the overall open position in all foreign currencies is defined as the sum (disregarding signs) of net positions in individual currencies. the foreign currencies listed in paragraph A above. Relations with Foreign Banks and Bankers. Mosser as Manager of the System Open Market Account until the Committee selects a replacement manager. Treasury. unless the Committee. provided that drawings by either party to any such arrangement shall be fully liquidated within 12 months after any amount outstanding at that time was first drawn. including transactions with the U. which are among those designated by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System under Section 214. because of exceptional circumstances. excluding changes in dollar value due to foreign exchange rate movements and interest accruals.0 billion. with the Bank for International Settlements. 2009) 1. plus outstanding contracts for future receipt.e.S. To hold balances of. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York was selected to execute transactions for the System Open Market Account. and with other international financial institutions: B. To maintain an overall open position in all foreign currencies not exceeding $25. By unanimous vote. The net position in a single foreign currency is defined as holdings of balances in that currency.A approved at the January 2008 meeting with the five additional currencies that were approved by the Committee in September and October 2008 in connection with temporary reciprocal currency arrangements: Australian dollars Brazilian reais Canadian dollars Danish kroner Euro Japanese yen Korean won Mexican pesos New Zealand dollars Norwegian kroner Pounds sterling Singapore dollars Swedish kronor Swiss francs Authorization for Foreign Currency Operations (Amended January 27. 2009 By unanimous vote. with foreign monetary authorities.000 3. and to have outstanding forward contracts to receive or to deliver. for System Open Market Account. i. Secretary’s note: The Chairman reported that prior to the meeting he had used his authority under the Committee’s Rules of Organization to appoint Ms. To draw foreign currencies and to permit foreign banks to draw dollars under the reciprocal currency arrangements listed in paragraph 2 below. and in conformity with such procedural instructions as the Committee may issue from time to time: A.S. To purchase and sell the following foreign currencies in the form of cable transfers through spot or forward transactions on the open market at home and abroad. the Committee approved the Authorization for Foreign Currency Operations (shown below) with a clerical amendment that combined the list of currencies in 1. minus outstanding contracts for future delivery of that currency.

to transmit appropriate reports and information to the National Advisory Council on International Monetary and Financial Policies. All Federal Reserve Banks shall participate in the foreign currency operations for System Account in accordance with paragraph 3G(1) of the Board of Governors’ Statement of Procedure with Respect to Foreign Relationships of Federal Reserve Banks dated January 1. U. B. buying such securities under agreements for repurchase of such securities. Foreign currency holdings shall be invested to ensure that adequate liquidity is maintained to meet anticipated needs and so that each currency portfolio shall generally have an average duration of no more than 18 months (calculated as Macaulay duration). questions arising from such reviews and consultations shall be referred for determination to the Federal Open Market Committee. To keep the Secretary of the Treasury fully advised concerning System foreign currency operations.5 of Regulation N shall be referred for review and approval to the Committee. when appropriate in connection with arrangements to provide investment facilities for foreign currency holdings. and the proposed terms of any new arrangements that may be authorized. Government securities may be purchased from foreign central banks under agreements for repurchase of such securities within 30 calendar days. for the purposes of reviewing recent or contemplated operations and of consulting with the Manager on other matters relating to the Manager’s responsibilities. and to consult with the Secretary on policy matters relating to foreign currency operations. be at prevailing market rates. other Board members designated by the Chairman as alternates. All operations undertaken pursuant to the preceding paragraphs shall be reported promptly to the Foreign Currency Subcommittee and the Committee. 6. and holding various time and other deposit accounts at foreign institutions. All transactions in foreign currencies undertaken under paragraph 1. For the purpose of providing an investment return on System holdings of foreign currencies or for the purpose of adjusting interest rates paid or received in connection with swap drawings. 3. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York shall not commit itself to maintain any specific balance. 1944. Meetings of the Subcommittee shall be called at the request of any member. the Vice Chairman of the Board of Governors. Any agreements or understandings concerning the administration of the accounts maintained by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York with the foreign banks designated by the Board of Governors under Section 214. the Vice Chairman’s alternate). or at the request of the Manager. above shall. 9. January 229 Any changes in the terms of existing swap arrangements. 5. C.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. In addition. Such investments may include buying or selling outright obligations of. 8. transactions with foreign central banks may be undertaken at non-market exchange rates. shall be referred for review and approval to the Committee. Staff officers of the Committee are authorized to transmit pertinent information on System foreign currency operations to appropriate officials of the Treasury Department. a foreign government or agency thereof. With the approval of the Committee. At the request of any member of the Subcommittee.S. unless authorized by the Federal Open Market Committee. From time to time. and in the absence of the Vice Chairman of the Committee. selling such securities under agreements for the resale of such securities. to enter into any needed agreement or understanding with the Secretary of the Treasury about the division of responsibility for foreign currency operations between the System and the Treasury. 4. unless otherwise expressly authorized by the Committee. 7.A. The Foreign Currency Subcommittee consists of the Chairman and Vice Chairman of the Committee. It shall be the normal practice to arrange with foreign central banks for the coordination of foreign currency transactions. In making operating arrangements with foreign central banks on System holdings of foreign currencies. The Chairman is authorized: A. and such other member of the Board as the Chairman may designate (or in the absence of members of the Board serving on the Subcommittee. or fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by. System Open Market Account (“Manager”). .

In cooperation. System operations in foreign currencies shall generally be directed at countering disorderly market conditions. By unanimous vote. System foreign currency operations shall be conducted: A.B. C. Any operation that would result in a change on any day in the System’s net position in a single foreign currency exceeding $150 million. if the Subcommittee believes that consultation with the full Committee is not feasible in the time available. Any operation that might generate a substantial volume of trading in a particular currency by the System. B. For such other purposes as may be expressly authorized by the Committee. To achieve this end the System shall: A. D. as appropriate. Undertake spot and forward purchases and sales of foreign exchange. Any swap drawing proposed by a foreign bank not exceeding the larger of (i) $200 million or (ii) 15 percent of the size of the swap arrangement. B. and C. C. or $300 million when the operation is associated with repayment of swap drawings. and to facilitate operations of the Exchange Stabilization Fund. if the Chairman believes that consultation with the Subcommittee is not feasible in the time available): A. unless otherwise directed by the Committee. To provide means for meeting System and Treasury commitments in particular currencies. with foreign monetary authorities. System Open Market Account (“Manager”).230 96th Annual Report. Section 1. In a manner consistent with the obligations of the United States in the International Monetary Fund regarding exchange arrangements under IMF Article IV. Cooperate in other respects with central banks of other countries and with international monetary institutions. The Manager shall clear with the Committee (or with the Subcommittee. the Foreign Currency Subcommittee. with the addition of the clarifying phrase “unless otherwise directed by the Committee” in the first sentence: . dollar reflect actions and behavior consistent with IMF Article IV. 4. 2. 2009 By unanimous vote. Transactions may also be undertaken: A. even though the change in the System’s net position in that currency might be less than the limits specified in 1. 3. Any operation that would result in a change in the System’s overall open position in foreign currencies exceeding $300 million on any day or $600 million since the most recent regular meeting of the Committee. B. if the Chairman believes that consultation with the Subcommittee is not feasible in the time available): Foreign Currency Directive (Reaffirmed January 27. C. 2009) 1. Maintain reciprocal currency (“swap”) arrangements with selected foreign central banks.S. To adjust System balances in light of probable future needs for currencies. shall be guided by the following procedural understandings with respect to consultations and clearances with the Committee. All operations undertaken pursuant to such clearances shall be reported promptly to the Committee. 2. the Committee approved the Procedural Instructions with Respect to Foreign Currency Operations. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 1. The Manager shall clear with the Subcommittee (or with the Chairman. B. provided that market exchange rates for the U. In close and continuous consultation and cooperation with the United States Treasury. 2009) In conducting operations pursuant to the authorization and direction of the Federal Open Market Committee as set forth in the Authorization for Foreign Currency Operations and the Foreign Currency Directive. and the Chairman of the Committee. the Foreign Currency Directive was reaffirmed in the form shown below: Procedural Instructions with respect to Foreign Currency Operations (Amended January 27. through the Manager. or with the Chairman.

S. any agency of the United States in the open market. after applying reasonable limitations on the volume of agreements with individual counterparties. to exchange maturing U. unless otherwise expressly authorized by the Committee. for such Account. add a paragraph authorizing the use of agents to execute transactions in certain mortgage-backed securities (MBS). B. 2. and. Any operation that would result in a change in the System’s overall open position in foreign currencies exceeding $1. In order to ensure the effective conduct of open market operations. Government and Federal agency securities with the Treasury or the individual agencies or to allow them to mature without replacement. or deferred delivery basis. The Federal Open Market Committee authorizes and directs the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. January 231 A. regular. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York may reject bids which could facilitate a dealer’s ability to control a single issue as determined solely by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Government securities held in the System Open Market Account to dealers at rates that shall be determined by competitive bidding. from or to securities dealers and foreign and international accounts maintained at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.S. and add language to the final paragraph that reflects the Committee’s current focus on using the composition and size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet as instruments of monetary policy. or fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York shall set a minimum lending fee consistent with the objectives of the program and apply reasonable limitations on the total amount of a specific issue that may be auctioned and on the amount of securities that each dealer may borrow. 3. Any swap drawing proposed by a foreign bank exceeding the larger of (i) $200 million or (ii) 15 percent of the size of the swap arrangement. In order to ensure the effective conduct of open market operations. to the extent necessary to carry out the most recent domestic policy directive adopted at a meeting of the Committee: . and securities that are direct obligations of. To buy or sell U. shall be determined by competitive bidding. including securities of the Federal Financing Bank. A. Government securities. or fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by. any agency of the United States. By unanimous vote. the Committee approved several amendments to the Authorization for Domestic Open Market Operations (shown below).5 billion since the most recent regular meeting of the Committee. The Manager shall also consult with the Subcommittee or the Chairman about proposed swap drawings by the System and about any operations that are not of a routine character. the Federal Open Market Committee authorizes the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to lend on an overnight basis U. the Federal Open Market Committee authorizes the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to use agents in agency MBS-related transactions. The amendments consolidate language authorizing repurchase agreements and reverse repurchase agreements into one paragraph.S. B. for the System Open Market Account under agreements to resell or repurchase such securities or obligations (including such transactions as are commonly referred to as repo and reverse repo transactions) in 65 business days or less. on a cash. To buy or sell in the open market U. for the System Open Market Account at market prices.S. at rates that. and securities that are direct obligations of. 2009) 1.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. 3. Government securities. The final paragraph now specifies that decisions to make material changes in the composition and size of the portfolio of assets held in the System Open Market Account during the period between meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee will be made in the same manner as decisions to change the intended level of the federal funds rate during the intermeeting period: Authorization for Domestic Open Market Operations (Amended January 27.

By unanimous vote. financial. Lacker dissented. upon the instruction of the Chairman of the Committee. if feasible.B. Any such adjustment shall be made in the context of the Committee’s discussion and decision at its most recent meeting and the Committee’s long-run objectives for price stability and sustainable economic growth. and (b) for New York Bank account. Government and agency securities. international. and fiscal agency accounts maintained at the Bank. the Committee ratified these transactions. and monetary developments during the intermeeting period. 5. the Federal Open Market Committee authorizes and directs the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (a) for System Open Market Account. and to arrange corresponding sale and repurchase agreements between its own account and such foreign. Market Developments and Open Market Operations The Manager of the System Open Market Account reported on recent developments in domestic and foreign financial markets. the Committee voted to suspend temporarily the Guidelines for the Conduct of System Operations in Federal Agency Issues (last amended January 28.232 96th Annual Report. In light of its program to purchase large quantities of agency debt and mortgage-backed securities. Consistent with Committee practice. Participants generally agreed that pur- . There were no open market operations in foreign currencies for the System’s account during the period since the Committee’s December 15–16 meeting. repurchase agreements in U. will consult with the Committee before making any adjustment.S. In the execution of the Committee’s decision regarding policy during any intermeeting period. when appropriate. Mr. 2003). Meeting participants discussed the potential benefits of conducting open market purchases of a substantial quantity of longer-term Treasury securities for the System Open Market Account. In order to ensure the effective conduct of open market operations. to sell U. the Chairman. 2009 4. The remainder of the Committee’s meeting was conducted as a joint meeting with the Board of Governors in order to facilitate policy discussion of developments with regard to the System’s liquidity facilities and balance sheet during the intermeeting period and to consider the need for changes in the System’s approach to using those tools. to adjust somewhat in exceptional circumstances the degree of pressure on reserve positions and hence the intended federal funds rate and to take actions that result in material changes in the composition and size of the assets in the System Open Market Account other than those anticipated by the Committee at its most recent meeting. and shall be based on economic. Transactions undertaken with such accounts under the provisions of this paragraph may provide for a service fee when appropriate. Government securities to such accounts on the bases set forth in paragraph 1.S. the Committee authorizes and directs the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.A under agreements providing for the resale by such accounts of those securities in 65 business days or less on terms comparable to those available on such transactions in the market. The Manager also reported on System open market operations in Treasury securities and in agency debt and mortgage-backed securities during the period since the Committee’s December 15–16 meeting. subject to the conditions imposed on purchases and sales of securities in paragraph l. to undertake with dealers. stating that he views targeted purchases of agency debt and mortgage-backed securities as distorting credit markets and would prefer that the Desk instead purchase Treasury securities. while assisting in the provision of short-term investments for foreign and international accounts maintained at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and accounts maintained at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York as fiscal agent of the United States pursuant to Section 15 of the Federal Reserve Act.

in the view of one participant. Several meeting participants noted that the expansion of the Federal Re- System Liquidity Programs and Balance Sheet Staff reported on developments in System liquidity programs and on changes in the System’s balance sheet since the Committee’s December 15−16 meeting. seemed to reflect some improvement in the func- . Other participants were prepared to purchase longer-term Treasury securities if evolving circumstances were to indicate that such transactions would be particularly effective in improving conditions in private credit markets. and that completing already-announced plans to purchase large quantities of agency debt and mortgage-backed securities and to support certain asset-backed securities markets was. January 233 chasing such securities could be a useful adjunct to other monetary policy tools in some circumstances. tioning of global interbank markets and the commercial paper market after the year-end. likely to be a more effective way to employ the Federal Reserve balance sheet to support credit flows to. credit card receivables. and facilitating the flow of credit to businesses and households. and the System’s lending and asset-purchase programs were resulting in undesirable distortions in the allocation of credit.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. they also noted that it might become necessary to enhance or expand the TALF or other programs. in current circumstances. and currency swaps were providing much-needed support to economic activity by reducing dislocations in financial markets. given the current high level of pessimism and uncertainty about economic prospects and asset values. and spending by. However. The drop. asset purchases. One participant preferred to begin purchasing Treasury securities immediately. as a way to increase the monetary base. Several indicated that they expected the soon-to-beimplemented Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF) to improve liquidity and reduce disruptions in the markets for securities backed by student loans. financial markets—including those for asset-backed securities—were working reasonably well. However. lowering the cost of credit. 2008. Many participants agreed that it would be desirable for the System to develop additional measures of the effects of its programs. they judged that purchases of longer-term Treasury securities would only modestly improve conditions in private credit markets at present. the System’s total assets and liabilities stood at just under $2 trillion. Most participants interpreted the evidence as indicating that credit markets still were not working well. and small business loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. which resulted primarily from a decline in foreign central bank drawings on reciprocal currency arrangements and a reduction in issuers’ sales of commercial paper to the Commercial Paper Funding Facility (CPFF). Others noted that such programs could have undesirable consequences if expanded too far or continued too long. households and businesses. and that the Federal Reserve’s lending programs. and they encouraged additional research on analytical frameworks that could inform Federal Reserve policy actions with respect to the size and composition of its balance sheet. As of January 26. auto loans. about $300 billion less than on December 17. in lieu of expanding programs that aim to support particular segments of the credit markets.

234 96th Annual Report. conditions in credit markets overall remained severely disrupted. the Federal Reserve may need to develop additional tools to manage the size of its balance sheet and the level of the federal funds rate as the economy recovers. Over a longer horizon. In other cases. Participants observed that many of the Federal Reserve’s liquidity programs are priced so that they will become unattractive to borrowers as conditions in financial markets improve. More generally. the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF). and the Money Market Investor Funding Facility (MMIFF) to October 30. consumer spending continued its significant decline. 2009. Staff Review of the Economic and Financial Situation The information reviewed at the meeting indicated a continued sharp contraction in real economic activity. however. the CPFF. these programs will shrink automatically. 2009 serve’s balance sheet along with continued growth of the money supply could help stabilize longer-run inflation expectations in the face of increasing economic slack and very low inflation in coming quarters. however. the deterioration in business equipment investment intensified. Participants also noted that extending the termination date of these liquidity facilities to October 30 would not rule out the possibility of closing particular facilities sooner if improvements in financial conditions were to indicate they were no longer needed to support credit markets and economic activity and to help preserve price stability. the Federal Reserve eventually may have to take a more active role in scaling back programs by adjusting their terms and conditions. Participants also discussed the advisability of extending the termination dates of a number of temporary liquidity facilities and reciprocal currency arrangements from April 30 to October 30. with financial conditions strained and the economic outlook weak. the Committee voted unanimously to extend the termination dates of existing reciprocal currency arrangements and the Term Securities Lending Facility (TSLF) to October 30. Following the discussion. Most expressed support for extending the termination dates in order to reassure market participants that the facilities would remain in place as a backstop to private-sector credit arrangements while financial conditions remained strained. Conditions in the labor market continued to dete- . Participants generally were of the view that. The Board of Governors then voted unanimously to extend the termination dates of the TSLF. the Federal Reserve will need to scale back its liquidity programs and the size of its balance sheet as the economy recovers. to avoid the risk of an unwanted increase in expected inflation and a buildup of inflation pressures. As of late January. despite modest improvements in some sectors. most participants agreed that the Committee should continue to focus on supporting the functioning of financial markets and stimulating the economy through purchases of agency debt and mortgage-backed securities and other measures—including the implementation of the TALF—that will keep the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet at a high level for some time. the Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF). Sales and starts of new homes remained on a steep downward trend. 2009. and foreign demand weakened. they were prepared to extend the facilities beyond year-end if conditions warrant. 2009.

reflecting declines in consumer energy prices. January 235 riorate rapidly in December: Private payroll employment fell sharply. although the stock of unsold new single-family homes continued to move down in November. Indicators of job vacancies and hiring declined further. extraordinary financial stresses remained apparent and credit conditions became still tighter for households and businesses. Outlays on motor vehicles edged down in November and December following a sharper decline in October. and the unemployment rate rose. Although the interest rate on conforming 30-year fixed-rate mortgages declined markedly over the intermeeting period. . Readings on consumer sentiment remained at very low levels by historical standards through the end of 2008 and showed little improvement in early January. more than reversing an increase in November. The production of aircraft and parts recorded an increase in December after being held down in the autumn by a strike and by problems with some outsourced components.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. core consumer prices were about flat in those months. industrial production posted a sharp decline after falling substantially in November. Private nonfarm payrolls fell sharply in December. Early indicators of spending in January pointed to continued soft demand. and tight credit conditions. Available forward-looking indicators pointed to a further contraction in manufacturing output in coming months. Output in hightech sectors contracted in the fourth quarter. the contraction was broad-based. Employment continued to contract. reflecting reduced production of semiconductors. furniture.2 percent in December. Multifamily starts also fell in those months. likely reflecting the combined effects of decreases in house and equity prices. the Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices that was conducted in January indicated that banks had tightened lending standards on prime mortgage loans over the preceding three months. communications equipment. The decrease in production of consumer goods reflected cutbacks in motor vehicle assemblies as well as in the output of consumer durable goods such as appliances. Sales of existing single-family homes dropped less than sales of new homes in November and turned up in December. inventories of unsold homes remained elevated relative to the pace of sales. and carpeting. with substantial losses over a wide range of industries. and computers. While conditions in some financial markets showed limited improvement. The unemployment rate increased to 7. the share of individuals working part time for economic reasons surged. Housing demand remained very weak and. and the labor force participation rate edged down for a second consecutive month. Real consumer spending appeared to decline sharply again in the fourth quarter. and layoffs continued to mount. Single-family housing starts dropped at a much faster rate in those months than they had in the first 10 months of the year. Headline consumer prices fell in November and December. as did permit issuance for both categories. Real spending on goods excluding motor vehicles was estimated to have fallen noticeably in December. In December. Real residential construction contracted in November and December. but the relative strength in sales of existing homes appeared to be at least partly attributable to increases in foreclosure-related and other distressed sales. Industrial production dropped more severely than in earlier months. a weakening labor market.

chemicals. Industrial production. responding to the surge in energy prices in the first half of that year. Orders and shipments for many types of equipment declined in October and November. as a steep decline in imports outweighed a sizable drop in exports. with sales declining even more sharply. In the business sector. and measures of consumer sentiment registered declines across many other countries in both emerging Asia and Latin America. but real investment for many types of buildings stagnated or declined. In December. Excluding food and energy prices. employment fell markedly in November and December after edging up in October. Much of the fall in exports was attributable to a decline in exports of fuels. business purchases of autos and trucks moved down. Increases in consumer food prices began to moderate toward the end of 2008. with decreases registered in all major spending categories. the ratio of book-value inventories to sales increased in October and November. However. More than half of the decline in imports was due to a decrease in imports of oil that mostly reflected a dramatic decrease in prices but also some reduction in volume. and imports of capital goods dropped back in those months. 2009 The market for nonconforming loans remained severely impaired. investment in equipment and software appeared to contract noticeably in the fourth quarter. Several indexes indicated that house prices continued to decline rapidly. Incoming data suggested that economic activity in the emerging market economies slowed significantly in the fourth quarter. Real nonfarm inventories (excluding motor vehicles) appeared to have fallen in the last few months of 2008. as the pace of job losses rose and measures of consumer spending on durable goods and business spending on investment goods showed declines. After rising rapidly during the first nine months of the year. PCE prices appeared to have decelerated over the final three months of the year. retail. trade and industrial production dropped steeply. In Canada. Economic activity in the advanced foreign economies appeared to contract sharply in the fourth quarter. trade. and the results of the January Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey indicated that financing for new projects had become even more difficult to acquire. and measures of consumer and business sentiment declined. The moderation in core PCE prices was widespread across categories of goods and services. All other major categories of exports moved down as well. Spending on high-tech capital goods appeared to decline in the fourth quarter. Forward-looking indicators of investment in equipment and software pointed to likely further declines. and other industrial supplies. All other major categories of imports also recorded sizable decreases. In the United States.S. Construction spending related to petroleum refining and power generation and distribution continued to increase briskly in the second half of 2008. Measures of longer- . which in part reflected lower prices for these goods. international trade deficit narrowed sharply in November. and industrial properties continued to move up in the fourth quarter. with real gross domestic product (GDP) plunging in several Asian economies and appearing little changed in China.236 96th Annual Report. largely reflecting significant reductions in energy prices. The U. producer prices excluding food and energy fell sharply in the last three months of 2008. overall personal consumption expenditure (PCE) prices were estimated to have fallen in December. In Japan and Europe. Vacancy rates for office.

the policy path tilted lower in response to weakerthan-expected economic data releases and increased concerns about the health of some financial institutions. or Libor. Later in the period. Over the intermeeting period. Conditions in short-term funding markets showed some signs of easing. although one auction following the year-end did see a relatively large number of bidders. on net. average hourly earnings moved up moderately. Recent auctions of term funds under the Federal Reserve’s Term Auction Facility were undersubscribed. Conditions in markets for repurchase agreements. In December. the amount of primary credit outstanding declined. Although implied inflation compensation derived from Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) increased over the period. yields on medium. Market participants reportedly were somewhat surprised both by the size of the reduction in the target federal funds rate. investors marked down their expectations for the path of the federal funds rate. The decisions of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) at its December 15–16 meeting reportedly were more aggressive than investors had been expecting. but remained lower than they had been in all but the last few weeks of 2008. including the January 5 recommendation of the Treasury Market Practices Group to implement a . to a range of 0 to 1⁄4 percent.and longerterm nominal Treasury coupon securities increased. the pace of delivery fails continued to run well below the high rates of September and October. In contrast. over comparable-maturity overnight index swap rates declined across most maturities over the period: The one-month spread fell to its lowest level since August 2007. over the period. the three-month spread also declined but remained elevated. With the overnight Treasury general collateral repo rate near zero for much of the period. and by the statements that policy rates would likely remain low for some time and that the FOMC might engage in additional nontraditional policy actions such as the purchase of longer-term Treasury securities. also showed some signs of improvement. despite the worsening economic outlook. reflecting in part reductions in transaction volumes as well as industry efforts to mitigate fails. However. The path first moved down immediately after the December FOMC meeting. The TSLF auctions were also undersubscribed. January 237 term inflation expectations edged up in early January. this increase reportedly was largely attributable to improved trading conditions in the TIPS market rather than upward revisions to inflation expectations. Yields dropped sharply following the release of the FOMC statement. or repos. apparently reflecting a waning of yearend safe-haven demands and an anticipation of substantially increased Treasury debt issuance to finance largerthan-expected deficits associated with the new Administration’s economic stimulus plans. Those price movements were more than reversed after the turn of the year. although significant stresses remained. reportedly in part because investors interpreted it as suggesting that the Federal Reserve might increase its holdings of longer-term Treasury securities. market participants reportedly were reluctant to lend Treasury collateral out of concern that counterparties might fail to return borrowed securities.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Use of the PDCF continued to fall significantly over the period. Though depository institutions continued to make substantial use of the discount window. The spreads of London interbank offered rates. as measured by money market futures rates.

Yields and spreads on corporate bonds decreased noticeably. Yields and spreads on 30-day A1/P1 nonfinancial and financial CP as well as on asset-backed commercial paper (ABCP) declined modestly and remained low. Trading volumes fell to very low levels at the end of 2008. The dollar amounts of outstanding unsecured financial and nonfinancial CP and ABCP rose slightly. but spreads remained high by historical standards. After improving during the early part of the intermeeting period. with increases in trading volume for both investment. 2009 financial charge on settlement fails. By contrast. on net. The MMIFF continued to register no activity despite changes that eased some of the terms of the program. On balance. Market participants nonetheless pointed to the MMIFF as a potentially important backup facility. and the passing of year-end. the Treasury market remained much less liquid than normal. followed by some improvement early in 2009. Treasury. Secondary market prices for leveraged loans stayed near record lows and the average bid-asked spread in that market continued to be very wide. The on-the-run premium for the 10-year nominal Treasury note was little changed at very elevated levels over the intermeeting period. market sentiment toward financial firms appeared to . likely reflecting recent measures taken in support of this market. although they recovered a bit after the end of the year. prime MMMFs had net inflows over the intermeeting period. and many such funds reportedly had waived management fees in an effort to retain investors. Gross issuance of bonds by nonfinancial investment-grade companies remained solid. This small change was more than accounted for by the increase in CP held by the CPFF. In contrast.and speculative-grade bonds and declines in bid-asked spreads for speculative-grade bonds. greater demand from institutional investors. Bid-asked spreads in the on-the-run market declined sharply at the beginning of 2009 after having increased at the end of 2008. which is not eligible for purchase under the CPFF. The market for commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) continued to show signs of strain. Yields and spreads on 30-day A2/P2 CP. The market for Treasury coupon securities showed signs of increased impairment late in 2008. with the CMBX index—an index based on credit default swap (CDS) spreads on AAA-rated CMBS—widening during the intermeeting period from already very elevated levels. Conditions in the leveraged loan market remained very poor and issuance of leveraged syndicated loans was also very weak. over the intermeeting period. dropped sharply after the beginning of the year as some institutional investors reportedly reentered the market. Conditions in the commercial paper (CP) market improved over the intermeeting period.and government-only money market mutual funds (MMMFs) faced pressures stemming from very low short-term interest rates. credit extended under the AMLF declined over the intermeeting period.238 96th Annual Report. Broad equity market indexes fell over the intermeeting period. with average bidasked spreads declining from high levels. but issuance of speculative-grade bonds was limited. particularly for speculative-grade firms. Conditions in the market for repo transactions backed by agency debt and mortgage-backed securities also improved somewhat. Liquidity in the corporate bond market improved over the intermeeting period.

Hedge funds posted negative average returns in December. and additional increases in loan-loss provisions in anticipation of a further deterioration in credit quality. the FDIC. and the deterioration in the macroeconomic environment. Small time deposits also increased strongly. retail MMMF balances increased modestly after a decline in November. M2 expanded at a considerably more rapid pace in December than in previous months. Borrowing by the federal government continued to surge. tighter lending terms. and capital. likely reflecting a combination of tighter credit supply and reduced loan demand as well as some unwinding of the surge during September and October. as banks continued to bid aggressively for these deposits. ending the period below their November lows. January 239 worsen later in the period. asset write-downs. and the Federal Reserve announced on January 16 that they had entered into an agreement with Bank of America to provide a package of guarantees. Conditions in foreign financial markets were relatively calm over the intermeeting period. boosted by programs aimed at reducing financial market strains. banknotes.S. with both mortgage and consumer credit sharply curtailed due to weak household spending and tight credit conditions. In December. given the high cost of borrowing. the Treasury. to support financial market stability. CDS spreads for U. spreads on such debt declined to levels close to those on agency debt. Debt of the domestic nonfinancial sectors expanded at a somewhat faster pace in the fourth quarter of 2008 than in the first three quarters of the year. Flows into both demand deposits and savings deposits surged. although concerns about bank earnings and the stability of the global banking system led to widespread declines in equity prices later in the period. and equity prices for such companies fell on net. while their CDS spreads declined from extremely high levels. In particular. Borrowing by state and local governments picked up as the conditions in municipal bond market improved somewhat.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. The Treasury’s Troubled Asset Relief Program provided additional support to several banking institutions. Commercial bank credit fell for the second consecutive month in December. The Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey conducted in January indicated that banks had continued to tighten credit standards and terms on all major loan categories over the past three months. Those firms substantially underperformed the broader market as a number of large and regional banks reported sizable losses stemming from weak trading results.S. Developments at nonbank financial institutions were mixed. Currency continued to grow briskly. Household debt appeared to have contracted in the fourth quarter. possibly reflecting a reallocation of wealth towards assets that had government insurance or guarantees. Equity prices of insurance companies edged down over the period. apparently boosted by solid foreign demand for U. liquidity access. Governments in major foreign economies initiated several actions . Business debt expanded only modestly. bank holding companies rose sharply in mid-January to near their historical highs. A number of banking organizations issued debt through the FDIC’s Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program. Survey respondents also indicated that they had reduced the size of credit lines for a wide range of existing business and household customers. Commercial and industrial loans declined in November and December.

2009 aimed at strengthening the banking sector and easing credit market strains. the unemployment rate. Participants generally saw credit condi- Staff Economic Outlook In the forecast prepared for the meeting. The dollar increased on balance against the currencies of major U. Foreign demand also was weaker than expected. but moved up subsequently. and household and business spending fell more than anticipated. and for the longer-run. To provide the public with information about their views of likely longer-term economic trends. the staff revised down its outlook for economic activity in the first half of 2009. credit remained unusually tight for both households and businesses. all meeting participants—the four members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the twelve Federal Reserve Banks—provided projections for economic growth. trading partners. Sales and starts of new homes remained on a steep downtrend. reflecting in large part the adverse effects of the intensification of the financial crisis and the interaction between deteriorating economic and financial conditions. perhaps in response to concerns about fiscal deficits. The staff’s projections of real GDP growth in the second half of 2009 and in 2010 were revised upward slightly. indicated a sharp and widespread economic contraction both domestically and abroad. Meeting Participants’ Views and Committee Policy Action In conjunction with this FOMC meeting. participants agreed to collect and publish. with growth in both core and overall PCE prices expected to be unusually low over the next few years in response to slack in resource utilization and relatively flat prices anticipated for many commodities and for imports. Forecasts for core and overall PCE inflation in 2009 and 2010 were little changed. The staff again expected that unemployment would rise substantially through the beginning of 2010 before edging down over the remainder of that year. Participants’ projections through 2011. on a quarterly basis. and equity prices had fallen further. reflecting greater monetary and fiscal stimulus as well as the effects of more moderate oil prices and long-term interest rates.240 96th Annual Report. . Financial markets continued to be strained overall. and consumer price inflation for each year from 2009 through 2011. The incoming data. but they continued to show no more than a gradual economic recovery. Sovereign bond yields in the advanced foreign economies fell early in the period. Industrial production declined steeply. participants agreed that the economy had weakened further going into 2009. likely reflecting declining inflation and expectations of lower policy rates. projections of the longer-run values to which they expect these three variables to converge. Conditions in the labor market deteriorated sharply over the intermeeting period. as well as information received from contacts in the business and banking communities. and as additional context for the Committee’s monetary policy discussions.S. as the implications of weakerthan-anticipated economic data releases more than offset an upward revision to the staff’s assumption of the amount of forthcoming fiscal stimulus. are described in the Summary of Economic Projections that is attached as an addendum to these minutes. In their discussion of the economic and financial situation and the outlook for the economy.

Lower house prices and mortgage rates had increased housing affordability. and permits all continued to decline steeply. the boost to consumer spending might prove shortlived. Several participants noted that firms’ efforts to control inventories as sales declined had contributed to the rapid downturn in production and employment in recent quarters. Some participants mentioned that business contacts had indicated that firms were reducing payrolls aggressively and also freezing wages and salaries. Looking ahead. further restricting growth in personal income and thus probably damping consumer spending. but concerns that house prices may fall further appeared to be holding back potential buyers. but expected that the resulting absence of widespread inventory overhangs might spur a prompt pickup in production in many sectors later this year once sales begin to level out or turn up. they saw a significant risk that the economic recovery would be both delayed and initially quite weak. most participants saw the renewed deterioration in the banking sector’s financial condition as posing a significant downside risk to the economic outlook absent additional initiatives to stabilize the banking system. Participants saw no indication that the housing sector was beginning to stabilize. The pace of commercial construction also had slowed. further declines in wealth. participants anticipated that tax cuts and some other elements of the proposed fiscal stimulus package would add to after-tax incomes and thus boost consumer spending. Though sales of existing homes appeared to have flattened out. They noted that a large number of commercial real estate mortgages will come due at a time when banks likely will still be facing balance-sheet constraints. Participants noted that consumers were continuing to cut back expenditures in response to sharply declining employment. and possible declines in inflation expectations. . unless the cuts were clearly perceived to be permanent. new home sales. a large fraction of those transactions seemed to have resulted from foreclosures or other forced sales. For example. moreover. and tighter credit conditions. and continuing efforts to stabilize the financial sector and increase the availability of credit. All but a few saw the risks to growth as tilted to the downside. However. however. as was the case with the tax rebates distributed in the spring of 2008. with financial markets fragile and some parts of the banking sector under substantial stress. little if any inflation pressure from energy or other import prices.S. But in an environment of considerable economic slack. Participants anticipated that a gradual recovery in U. relatively low energy prices. January 241 tions as extremely tight. though the magnitude of the impetus was far from clear. A number of participants expressed concern that the commercial real estate sector could deteriorate sharply in the months ahead. Participants were. headline and core inflation were expected to be quite low for several years. in light of financial stresses and tight credit conditions. Headline inflation would pick up some as the effects of previous declines in oil and other commodity prices wore off. In particular. quite uncertain about the outlook.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. housing starts. modest signs of improvement were evident in some financial markets—particularly those that were receiving support from Federal Reserve liquidity facilities and other government actions. economic activity would begin during the third or fourth quarter of this year as the economy begins to respond to fiscal stimulus.

and they expected significantly lower headline and core inflation during the next few years than during recent years.S.S. Participants also noted that other categories of business investment were contracting. and vacancy rates in commercial properties could well be climbing.242 96th Annual Report. Participants generally thought that fiscal stimulus was a necessary and important complement to the steps the Federal Reserve and other agencies were taking. they expected the rapid contraction to continue in coming quarters. Several others. would support state and local government spending as well as boost federal spending. business contacts had reported sizable cutbacks in their planned capital expenditures for 2009. exports. State and local government budgets had come under significant pressure as the slowing economy led to declining revenues. most anticipated that inflation will slow for a time to rates somewhat lower than those they judge consistent with the dual goals of price stability and maximum employment.S. suggesting that the downturn in the current cycle could be milder than that seen in the early 1990s. and mineral extraction. especially if inflation expectations were to move down in response to lower actual inflation and increasing economic slack. economic activity in coming quarters. and a few even saw some risk of deflation. anticipated that longer-run inflation expecta- . 2009 the ability to securitize commercial real estate mortgages may remain severely restricted. suggesting that net exports would not provide much support for U. helping to buoy demands for goods and services. Participants indicated they had been surprised by the speed and magnitude of the slowdown in economic growth abroad and the resulting drop in demand for U. including the reduced availability of trade credit. Some participants worried that the outcome could be an increase in defaults on commercial real estate mortgages and forced sales of commercial properties. initially reflecting the recent declines in the prices of energy and other commodities and later responding to several years of substantial economic slack. which could push prices down further and generate additional losses on banks’ commercial real estate loan portfolios. and that it would help foster economic recovery. the commercial real estate sector had expanded more moderately during the recent expansion than during the expansion of the late 1980s. The fiscal stimulus bill. tighter credit. however. but had questions about the details of the proposed legislation and the extent to which it would boost demands for and production of goods and services. reflecting weak sales. had reduced investment in oil. It was noted that the surprisingly sharp decline in both U. exports and imports might also reflect tight credit conditions. Many participants noted some risk of a protracted period of excessively low inflation. participants did not expect foreign economies to rebound quickly. which was being considered by the Congress as the Committee met. Lower energy and commodity prices. Several participants noted that governments in their regions were responding by cutting spending rather than supplementing revenues. Equipment investment had declined particularly sharply. Outside of the agricultural sector. gas. and substantial uncertainty about future economic conditions and government policies. Moreover. Indeed. Participants agreed that inflation pressures had diminished appreciably in recent quarters. However. while supporting consumer spending.

until it was instructed otherwise. One member expressed the view that it would be best to expand holdings of U. Several participants indicated that they thought the FOMC should explore establishing quantitative guidelines or targets for a monetary aggregate.S. others stood ready to expand the program if conditions warrant but noted that the program had only recently been implemented and preferred to wait for more information about economic and financial developments and the program’s effects before considering an expansion. At the conclusion of the discussion. perhaps the growth rate of the monetary base or M2. Committee members agreed that keeping the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent would be appropriate.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. the Committee seeks conditions in reserve markets consistent with federal funds trading in a range from 0 to 1⁄4 percent. to execute transactions in the System Account in accordance with the following domestic policy directive: “The Federal Open Market Committee seeks monetary and financial conditions that will foster price stability and promote sustainable growth in output. and therefore thought it unlikely that inflation would decline below levels they saw as consistent with the dual goals of price stability and maximum employment. Members noted that it may be necessary to expand these programs. January 243 tions would remain well anchored. Members further agreed that these programs were likely to maintain the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet at a high level. supported in part by the Federal Reserve’s aggressive expansion of its balance sheet and the resulting growth of the monetary base. All other members indicated that they thought it appropriate to continue the program of purchasing agency debt and mortgage-backed securities. To further its long-run objectives. They also agreed to continue using liquidity and asset-purchase programs to support the functioning of financial markets and stimulate the economy. Lacker dissenting. Several expressed a willingness to expand the size and duration of those purchases in the near future. Others were skeptical that a single quantitative measure could adequately convey the Federal Reserve’s current approach to monetary policy because the stimulative effect of the Federal Reserve’s liquidity-providing and asset-purchase programs depends not only on the scale but also on the mix of lending programs and securities purchases. In addition. some noted a risk that expected inflation might actually increase to an undesirably high level if the public does not understand that the Federal Reserve’s liquidity facilities will be wound down and its balance sheet will shrink as economic and financial conditions improve. In their discussion of monetary policy for the intermeeting period. Treasury securities rather than to expand targeted liquidity programs. with Mr. a few participants noted that the sizes of some Federal Reserve liquidity programs are determined by banks’ and market participants’ need to use those programs and thus will tend to increase when financial conditions worsen and shrink when financial conditions improve. the Committee voted to authorize and direct the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. in their view such guidelines would provide useful information to the public and help anchor inflation expectations. but had somewhat different views about the best way of doing so. Moreover. The Committee directs the Desk to purchase GSE debt and agency- . the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet needs to be able to adjust in response.

and Warsh. The Committee anticipates that a gradual recovery in economic activity will begin later this year. as consumers and businesses have cut back spending. In light of the declines in the prices of energy and other commodities in recent months and the prospects for considerable economic slack. Lockhart. in part reflecting government efforts to provide liquidity and strengthen financial institutions. Lacker dissented because he preferred to expand the monetary base by purchasing U. Conditions in some financial markets have improved.” nomic growth and price stability in the longer term. Treasury securities rather than through targeted credit programs. the Desk is expected to purchase up to $100 billion in housing-related GSE debt and up to $500 billion in agency-guaranteed MBS. Moreover. but the downside risks to that outlook are significant. the Committee sees some risk that inflation could persist for a time below rates that best foster eco- Mr. Messrs. Kohn. The focus of the Committee’s policy is to support the functioning of financial markets and stimulate the economy through open market operations and other measures that are likely to keep the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet at a high level. 2009 guaranteed MBS during the intermeeting period with the aim of providing support to the mortgage and housing markets. credit conditions for households and firms remain extremely tight.: “The Federal Open Market Committee decided today to keep its target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent. Furthermore. housing starts. and it stands ready to expand the quantity of such purchases and the duration of the purchase program as conditions warrant. Bernanke and Dudley.S. The Committee will continue to monitor carefully the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in light of evolving financial market developments and to assess whether expansions of or modifications to lending facilities would serve to further support credit markets and economic activity and help to preserve price stability. The vote encompassed approval of the following statement to be released at 2:15 p. The Federal Reserve will be implementing the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility to facilitate the extension of credit to households and small businesses. Duke.m. Mr. and employment have continued to decline steeply. global demand appears to be slowing significantly. The System Open Market Account Manager and the Secretary will keep the Committee informed of ongoing developments regarding the System’s balance sheet that could affect the attainment over time of the Committee’s objectives of maximum employment and price stability. Voting against this action: Mr. Industrial production. Evans. By the end of the second quarter of this year. The timing and pace of these purchases should depend on conditions in the markets for such securities and on a broader assessment of conditions in primary mortgage markets and the housing sector. while he recognized that spreads were elevated and volumes low in many . However.” Voting for this action: Messrs. the Committee expects that inflation pressures will remain subdued in coming quarters. Information received since the Committee met in December suggests that the economy has weakened further. The Federal Reserve continues to purchase large quantities of agency debt and mortgage-backed securities to provide support to the mortgage and housing markets. Lacker was fully supportive of the significant expansion of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet and the intention to maintain the size of the balance sheet at a high level. Yellen.244 96th Annual Report. The Committee continues to anticipate that economic conditions are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for some time. The Federal Reserve will employ all available tools to promote the resumption of sustainable economic growth and to preserve price stability. The Committee also is prepared to purchase longer-term Treasury securities if evolving circumstances indicate that such transactions would be particularly effective in improving conditions in private credit markets. Ms. Lacker. nevertheless. and Ms.

several participants expressed concern that an initiative to clarify the Committee’s longer-run inflation objective could be confusing to the public in the current context of economic weakness and financial market strains. the length of time over which policy would aim to achieve any such objective.Minutes of FOMC Meetings.S. 2009. such purchases would limit distortions to private credit flows. The Committee made no decisions on whether to establish such an objective. additional clarity on the longer-run inflation goal would further enhance Federal Reserve communications but would not involve any substantive change in monetary policy strategy. maintaining the size of the balance sheet at a high level through purchases of U. 2009. he saw no evidence of market failures that made targeted credit programs. and maintain a clear distinction between monetary and fiscal policies. It was agreed that the next meeting of the Committee would be held on Tuesday. others judged that the potential benefits of an explicit numerical inflation objective might be largely attained by extending the horizon of their regular projections for economic activity and inflation. Conference Call On January 16. Treasury securities. and the frequency with which the Committee would reevaluate this framework. and might be hard to unwind. The meeting adjourned at 1:05 p. Most meeting participants expressed the view that an explicit numerical objective for longer-run inflation would be fully consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate of promoting maximum employment and price stability and would not impede fostering the stability of the financial system. A number of participants emphasized that . minimize adverse incentive effects. March 17. They expressed a range of views about whether such an objective should be expressed in terms of the consumer price index or the PCE price deflator. necessary. Moreover.m. Participants also discussed several technical issues related to the implementation and communication of an explicit numerical inflation objective. instead. the merits of a point value versus a range. the Committee unanimously approved the minutes of the FOMC meeting held on December 15−16. However. 2009. the Committee met by conference call to discuss issues associated with establishing an explicit numerical objective for inflation. At this meeting. He supported. including the forthcoming TALF. 2008. Many participants agreed that establishing and maintaining a transparent numerical inflation objective would be helpful—at least to some degree—in anchoring inflation expectations and thereby improve the overall effectiveness of monetary policy. In his view. he was concerned that such programs channel credit away from other worthy borrowers. would exacerbate moral hazard. January 245 credit markets. the staff also briefed the Committee on the Notation Vote By notation vote completed on January 5. amount to fiscal policy. 2009. Some indicated that the establishment of a numerical inflation objective could be particularly helpful under present circumstances in forestalling an unwelcome decline in longer-run inflation expectations—and hence in contributing to economic recovery—while also assuring the public that actions taken to counter economic weakness will not lead to high inflation over the longerrun. on January 28.

The October projections were made in conjunction with the FOMC meeting on October 28−29.5 0.0 n.3 to to to to to to to to 3. the members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks.1 1.0 5. and that consumer price inflation would be significantly lower than in recent years. .0 0. October projection . and the Federal Reserve earlier that day. . the price index for personal consumption expenditures (PCE) and the price index for PCE excluding food and energy.a.7 to 2. . . 1.6 7.8 1. all of whom participate in deliberations of the FOMC. .8 0.8 4.a.a.5 0. Projections were based on information available through the conclusion of the meeting. PCE inflation .0 to 1.3 to 2.3 to to to to to to to to 5.1 to to to to to to to to 4. . 2009 FOMC meeting.0 1. −1. 3.7 −2. Economic projections of Federal Reserve Governors and Reserve Bank presidents. .8 1. Addendum: Summary of Economic Projections In conjunction with the January 27–28.8 to to to to to to to to 5. is deemed most likely to foster outcomes for economic activity and inflation that best satisfy the participant’s interpretation of the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives of maximum employment and price stability.5 1. Core PCE inflation3 .1 8.7 1. The central tendency excludes the three highest and three lowest projections for each variable in each year.8 2011 3. −1. Unemployment rate .a.7 5. provided projections for economic growth.0 2010 2. FOMC participants viewed the outlook for economic activity and inflation as having weakened significantly since last October. 6. “Appropriate monetary policy” is defined as the future policy that.5 2. October projection . .0 1. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge over time under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks.3 1. 2010.5 to 2. 2008.1 to 7.9 Range2 2011 2.0 7.9 1.5 7.2 n. .9 0.2 to 1. on each participant’s assumptions regarding a range of factors likely to affect economic outcomes.8 2. Projections for the unemployment rate are for the average civilian unemployment rate in the fourth quarter of the year indicated.2 n. and over the longer run.1 Note: Projections of change in real gross domestic product (GDP) and of inflation are from the fourth quarter of the previous year to the fourth quarter of the year indicated. that the unemployment rate would increase substantially.0 to 9. .6 0.0 6. October projection .5 4.3 2.6 to 8. Longer-run projections for core PCE inflation are not collected. and on his or her assessment of appropriate monetary pol- Table 1.7 1.a. January 2009 Percent Central tendency1 Variable 2009 Change in real GDP .5 n.1 0. .0 8. the FDIC. .8 6. participants projected that real GDP would contract this year.8 to 5. .7 1. when their last projections were made. 4.2 8.0 −0.7 1.5 1. As indicated in Table 1 and depicted in Figure 1. Brian F. .3 2. October projection .2 0. 2.8 1.3 8.0 1.3 7.5 1.5 5.2 0. Madigan Secretary icy.5 to 1.0 5.0 1.5 1. from lowest to highest. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks to the economy. based on current information.5 4.3 to 2.a. and inflation in 2009.9 1.8 7.0 n. .5 to 2.5 to 5.5 to 0. unemployment.7 1.5 to 8.6 to 1.5 −0.5 n.8 1.5 1.4 0.5 9.4 1. PCE inflation and core PCE inflation are the percentage rates of change in.6 1.1 1. 1.3 3.3 to −0. Each participant’s projections are based on his or her assessment of appropriate monetary policy. The range for a variable in a given year includes all participants’ projections.5 1.0 3. 2009 coordinated set of measures for supporting Bank of America that had been taken by the Treasury. 2.0 to 2.5 6. .0 8.8 Longer Run 2.8 1. respectively.5 to 2.9 to 1.7 Longer Run 2009 2010 1. for that variable in that year.0 0. 2011.4 to 3. . 1.246 96th Annual Report.2 8.4 0.3 to 1.

January 247 .Minutes of FOMC Meetings.

Participants’ projections for the average unemployment rate during the fourth quarter of 2009 had a central tendency of 8. participants generally expected that the recovery would be unusually gradual and prolonged: All participants anticipated that unemployment would remain substantially above its longer-run sustainable rate at the end of 2011. and they saw reductions in consumer demand contributing to further weakness in business investment. compared with the central tendency of –0. Participants generally expected that strains in financial markets would ebb only slowly and hence that the pace of recovery in 2010 would be damped. Participants generally judged that their projections for both economic activity and inflation were subject to a degree of uncertainty exceeding historical norms. Most participants expected that.0 percent for 2011. participants expected that the economy would begin to recover— albeit gradually—during the second half of the year. they noted that consumer spending would likely be damped by the deterioration in labor markets.248 96th Annual Report. Looking further ahead. Participants anticipated a broad-based decline in aggregate output during the first half of this year. Participants anticipated that labor market conditions would deteriorate substantially further over the course of this year.1 percent for their projections last October. even absent further economic shocks.5 to 8. a few indicated that more than five to six years would be needed for the economy to converge to a longer-run path characterized by sustainable rates of output growth and unemployment and by an appropriate rate of inflation. markedly higher than last December’s actual unemployment rate of 7. and the weakness of incoming data on spending and employment. The Outlook Participants’ projections for the change in real GDP in 2009 had a central tendency of –1. 2009 Given the strength of the forces currently weighing on the economy.2 to 1.5 to 3. Nonetheless.2 percent the latest available figure at the time of the January FOMC meet- . the tightness of credit conditions.5 to 2.8 to 5. and all participants saw the risks to the inflation outlook as either balanced or tilted to the downside. Nearly all participants viewed the risks to the growth outlook as skewed to the downside.3 to –0. reflecting longer-term trends in the growth of productivity and the labor force. However. absent further shocks. participants generally anticipated that real GDP growth would gain further momentum in 2011. and the recent sharp reduction in stock market wealth. the continuing decline in house prices. and nearly all expected that unemployment would still be well above its longer-run sustainable rate at the end of 2011. economic growth would eventually converge to a rate of 2. the waning of consumer and business confidence.5 percent.7 percent. In explaining these downward revisions.3 percent for 2010 and 3. participants referred to the further intensification of the financial crisis and its effect on credit and wealth.8 percent. reaching a pace that would temporarily exceed their estimates of the longer-run sustainable rate of economic growth and would thereby help reduce the slack in resource utilization. the marked deceleration in global economic activity. mainly reflecting the effects of fiscal stimulus and of Federal Reserve measures providing support to credit markets. participants’ growth projections had a central tendency of 2.

and 1.5 percent for their unemployment rate projections. Participants expected that the unemployment rate would decline further after 2011.0 percent over time. Table 2 provides estimates of forecast uncertainty for the change in real GDP. Modestly positive longer-run inflation would allow the Committee to stimulate economic activity and support employment by setting the federal funds rate temporarily below the inflation rate when the economy is buffeted by a large negative shock to demands for goods and services.8 to 5. others indicated that 11⁄2 or 13⁄4 percent inflation would be appropriate. and most saw it settling in at a rate of 4.0 to 1. Most participants judged that a longer-run PCE inflation rate of 2 percent would be consistent with the dual mandate. Nearly all participants’ projections were more than a percentage point higher than their previous forecasts made last October. Most participants anticipated that output growth in 2010 would not be substantially above its longer-run trend rate and hence that unemployment would decline only modestly next year.9 to 1. reflecting the sharp rise in actual unemployment that occurred during the final months of 2008 as well as participants’ weaker outlook for economic activity this year. Participants’ longer-run projections for total PCE inflation reflected their individual assessments of the measured rates of inflation consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate for promoting price stability and maximum employment.5 The risks to their projections for real GDP growth were judged as being skewed to the downside and the associated risks to their projections for the unemployment rate were tilted to the upside.3 to 1.0 percent. January 249 ing. With economic activity and job creation generally projected to accelerate in 2011. and some anticipated that the unexpected declines in the prices of energy and other commodities that had occurred in the latter part of 2008 would continue to hold down inflation at the consumer level in 2009. Looking beyond this year. participants anticipated that joblessness would decline more appreciably that year.5 percent for 2010.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. and that persistent economic slack would continue to weigh on inflation outcomes for the next few years and hence that total PCE inflation in 2011 would still be below their assessments of the appropriate inflation rate for the longer run. about a percentage point lower than the central tendency of their projections last October.7 percent for 2011. Participants also marked down their projections for core PCE inflation this year in light of their views about the indirect effects of lower energy prices and the influence of increased resource slack.7 to 7. At the end of this summary. Participants generally expected that core and overall inflation would converge over time. Many participants noted that recent readings on inflation had been surprisingly low. the unemployment rate.0 percent over the longer run. . Risks to the Outlook Participants continued to view uncertainty about the outlook for economic activity as higher than normal. and total consumer price inflation over the period from 1987 to 2007. participants’ projections for total PCE inflation had a central tendency of 1.7 to 2. The central tendency of participants’ projections for total PCE inflation this year was 0. the box “Forecast Uncertainty” discusses the sources and interpretation of uncertainty in economic forecasts and explains the approach used to assess the uncertainty and risks attending participants’ projections. as is evident from the central tendency of 6. 0. Par5.

most participants continued to view the uncertainty surrounding their inflation projections as higher than historical norms. composition. . . Total consumer prices2 . . . refer to general note in table 1. 2009 Table 2.0 ±0. Diversity of Views Figures 2.9 Note: Error ranges shown are measured as plus or minus the root mean squared error of projections that were released in the winter from 1987 through 2007 for the current and following two years by various private and government forecasters. For 2009 to 2011.250 96th Annual Report. 1. rising unemployment and weaker growth could exacerbate delinquencies on household and business loans. November). This dispersion . there is about a 70 percent probability that actual outcomes for real GDP.8 ±1. For definitions. Measure is the overall consumer price index.B provide further details on the diversity of participants’ views regarding likely outcomes for real GDP growth and the unemployment rate. and consumer prices will be in ranges implied by the average size of projection errors made in the past.9 2010 ±1. the price measure that has been most widely used in government and private economic forecasts. unemployment. Others referred to uncertainties regard- ing the size.4 ±1. A slight majority of participants judged the risks to the inflation outlook as roughly balanced.A and 2. The slightly narrower estimated width of the confidence interval for inflation in the third year compared with that for the second year is likely the result of using a limited sample period for computing these statistics. In addition. As described in the box “Forecast Uncertainty. the dispersion in participants’ projections for each variable was roughly the same as for their projections last October. Projection is percent change. respectively. Some participants noted the risk that inflation expectations might become unanchored and drift downward in response to persistently low inflation outcomes. “Gauging the Uncertainty of the Economic Outlook from Historical Forecasting Errors. Further information is in David Reifschneider and Peter Tulip (2007).0 2011 ±1.” under certain assumptions. leading to higher losses for financial firms and so to a further tightening of credit conditions that would in turn put further downward pressure on spending to a greater degree than currently foreseen. for example. while others pointed to the possibility of an upward shift if investors became concerned that stimulative policy measures might not be unwound in a timely fashion once the economy begins to recover. fourth quarter of the previous year to the fourth quarter of the year indicated. ticipants highlighted the considerable degree of uncertainty about the future course of the financial crisis and its impact on the real economy. 2009 ±1. some participants noted that a substantial degree of uncertainty was associated with gauging the stimulative effects of nontraditional monetary policy tools that are now being employed given that conventional policy easing was limited by the zero lower bound on nominal interest rates. Unemployment rate1 . and effectiveness of the fiscal stimulus package—which was still under consideration at the time of the FOMC meeting—and of further measures to stabilize the banking system. .5 ±0. . Many participants stated that their assessments regarding the level of uncertainty and balance of risks to the inflation outlook were closely linked to their judgments about the uncertainty and risks to the outlook for economic activity. Participants indicated that elevated uncertainty about global growth was clouding the outlook for prices of energy and other commodities and hence contributing to greater uncertainty in their inflation projections.4 ±0.2 ±0. Average historical projection error ranges Percentage points Variable Change in real GDP1 . 2. while the rest viewed these risks as skewed to the downside. As in October.” Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-60 (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

The dispersion in participants’ projections for total PCE inflation in 2009 was substantially greater than for their projections made last October. due to increased diversity of participants’ views regarding the near-term evolution of prices of energy and raw materials and the extent to which changes in those prices would be likely to pass through into overall inflation. primarily reflecting the anticipated effects of substantial slack over the next three years. A few participants anticipated that inflation in 2011 would be close to their longer-run projections. The dispersion in participants’ projections for core PCE inflation in 2009 was noticeably lower than last October. but the dispersion in their projections for core inflation in 2010 and 2011 was markedly wider. the prevalence of downward nominal wage rigidity. The dispersion in participants’ longer-run projections reflected differences in their estimates regarding the sustainable rates of output growth and unemployment to which the economy would converge under appropriate policy and in the absence of any further shocks.D provide corresponding information regarding the diversity of participants’ views regarding the inflation outlook. January 251 mainly indicated the diversity of participants’ assessments regarding the stimulative effects of fiscal policy.C and 2. the sensitivity of inflation to slack in resource utilization. most participants’ projections for total PCE inflation in 2011 were below their longer-run projections. reflecting varying assessments about the timing and pace of economic recovery.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. and the evolution of households’ desired saving rates. . However. and the likelihood that inflation expectations will remain firmly anchored. this inflation gap was about 1⁄4 to 1⁄2 percentage point for some participants but exceeded a full percentage point for others. Figures 2. the pace of recovery in financial markets.

252 96th Annual Report. 2009 .

Minutes of FOMC Meetings. January 253 .

254 96th Annual Report. 2009 .

January 255 .Minutes of FOMC Meetings.

0 percent in the second year.0 percent to 3. the numbers reported in table 2 would imply a probability of about 70 percent that actual GDP would expand between 1. and the potential costs to the economy should they occur. That is. 2009 Forecast Uncertainty The economic projections provided by the members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks inform discussions of monetary policy among policymakers and can aid public understanding of the basis for policy actions. rather than with divergences across a number of different projections. If the uncertainty attending those projections is similar to that experienced in the past and the risks around the projections are broadly balanced. 1. respectively. Considerable uncertainty attends these projections.2 percent in the current year and 1. And the future path of the economy can be affected by myriad unforeseen developments and events.9 percent in the current year. The economic and statistical models and relationships used to help produce economic forecasts are necessarily imperfect descriptions of the real world. . the likelihood of their occurring. The corresponding 70 percent confidence intervals for overall inflation would be 1. downside. however. 3 percent and 2 percent. and 1. including those reported in past Monetary Policy Reports and those prepared by Federal Reserve Board staff in advance of meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee. suppose a participant projects that real GDP and total consumer prices will rise steadily at annual rates of. Table 2 summarizes the average historical accuracy of a range of forecasts. participants consider not only what appears to be the most likely economic outcome as embodied in their projections. For example. in setting the stance of monetary policy. Participants also provide judgments as to whether the risks to their projections are weighted to the upside. participants provide judgments as to whether the uncertainty attached to their projections of each variable is greater than.256 96th Annual Report. These judgments about the uncertainty and the risks attending each participant’s projections are distinct from the diversity of participants’ views about the most likely outcomes. Forecast uncertainty is concerned with the risks associated with a particular projection.1 percent to 2.4 percent in the second and third years. or broadly similar to typical levels of forecast uncertainty in the past as shown in table 2. smaller than.6 percent to 4. or are broadly balanced.9 percent in the third year. participants judge whether each variable is more likely to be above or below their projections of the most likely outcome.1 percent to 2. The projection error ranges shown in the table illustrate the considerable uncertainty associated with economic forecasts.8 percent to 4. but also the range of alternative possibilities. Because current conditions may differ from those that prevailed on average over history. Thus.

Leahy. Office of the Staff Director for Management. Assistant Secretary Ms. Research and Statistics. Bailey and Mr. Skidmore. First Vice President.. Reifschneider. Assistant Secretary Mr. Mosser. Stockton. Deputy Secretary Mr. Board of Governors Messrs.6 Associate Directors. 2009. D. Rosengren. Board of Governors Ms. Divisions of International Finance. and continued on Wednesday. Smith.m. Fuhrer and Rosenblum. Federal Reserve Bank of St. and Wascher. Williams. Vice Chairman Ms. Bullard. Slifman. Records Management Analyst. and Mr. Associate Economists Ms. Division of Monetary Affairs. respectively. and Minneapolis. Low. Blanchard. Board of Governors Mr. Division of Monetary Affairs. Economist Mr. Monetary Affairs. at 9:00 a. Lewis. Division of Monetary Affairs. Board of Governors Mr. Madigan.6 Assistant to the Secretary. Division of Monetary Affairs. Connors. Clouse. System Open Market Account Ms. Senior Adviser. Luecke. Ms. Temporary Manager. General Counsel Mr. at 2:00 p. Fisher. Cumming. Alvarez. Altig.m. and Research and Statistics. Frierson. Office of Board Members. Struckmeyer. English. Ms. Assistant Secretary Mr. March 17. Philadelphia. respectively. Lockhart Mr. Kamin. Board of Governors Mr. Economist Messrs. Board of Governors Mr. Deputy Secretary. Alternate Members of the Federal Open Market Committee Messrs. Plosser. respectively Mr.C. Johnson. Deputy General Counsel Mr. Dudley. Lacker Mr. Divisions of Banking Supervision and Regulation and Monetary Affairs. Kohn Mr. Federal Reserve Banks of Boston and Dallas. Economist. Executive Vice Presidents. Pianalto. Nelson. and Williams. Mr. Board of Governors Mr. Yellen Mr. Bernanke. Visiting Associate Director. Board of Governors Mr. Gagnon. Office of the Secretary. Chairman Mr. Office of the Secretary. Secretary of the Board. Sullivan. Board of Governors Mr. Board of Governors Ms. Presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks of Dallas. Deputy Directors. Secretary and Economist Ms. Weinberg. March 257 Meeting Held on March 17–18. Hoenig. Warsh Ms. Division of Research and Statistics.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Oliner. Sapenaro. respectively 6. . Danker. Board of Governors Ms. Sheets. Assistant to the Board. and Stern. Attended Tuesday’s session only. Tarullo Mr. March 18. on Tuesday. Office of the Secretary. Wilcox. 2009. Duke Mr. Evans Mr. Baxter. Louis Messrs. Beattie. 2009 A meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee was held in the offices of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in Washington. Present: Mr. Board of Governors Mr. Open Market Secretariat Specialist. Deputy Staff Director.

Senior Vice Presidents. Participants discussed the prospective further increase in the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet. credit card loans. and credit outstanding under the Term Auction Facility increased somewhat over the period as the February auctions experienced higher demand than previous auctions. against AAA-rated assetbacked securities (ABS) backed by newly and recently originated auto loans. with a focus on the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF) and open market purchases of longer-term assets. on a nonrecourse basis. The Manager also reported on System open market operations in Treasury securities and in agency debt and agency mortgagebacked securities (MBS) during the period since the Committee’s January 27–28 meeting. and. New York. loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. Hilton and Schweitzer. asset purchases. Senior Research Officer. respectively Mr. Federal Reserve Banks of New York and Cleveland. lowering the cost of credit.258 96th Annual Report. The Federal Reserve and the Treasury had previously announced their expectation that the program would be expanded to . and that the Federal Reserve’s lending programs. The launch of the TALF was announced on March 3. As of March 12. St. Most meeting participants interpreted the evidence as indicating that credit markets still were not working well. potentially. 2009 Messrs. certain other closely related types of ABS. Credit extended by the Commercial Paper Funding Facility also had declined. Gavin. In contrast. Primary credit extended by the Federal Reserve was about unchanged. and Philadelphia. and currency swaps were providing muchneeded support to economic activity by reducing dislocations in financial markets. while foreign central bank drawings on reciprocal currency arrangements had declined. the System’s total assets and liabilities were about $2 trillion. Klitgaard. and facilitating the flow of credit to businesses and households. Louis. student loans. Weber. Vice Presidents. close to the level of that just before the January 27–28 meeting. Holdings of agency debt and agency MBS had increased. as 90-day paper pur- chased in the early weeks of the program matured and a large portion was not renewed through the facility. respectively Messrs. Staff reported on recent developments in System liquidity programs and on changes in the System’s balance sheet. In the initial phase of the program. By unanimous vote. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Developments in Financial Markets and the Federal Reserve’s Balance Sheet The Manager of the System Open Market Account reported on recent developments in domestic and foreign financial markets. the Committee ratified those transactions. Federal Reserve Banks of Kansas City. the Federal Reserve offered to provide up to $200 billion of three-year loans. and Yi. credit extended under the Primary Dealer Credit Facility declined somewhat over the intermeeting period. Clark. There were no open market operations in foreign currencies for the System’s account during the period since the Committee’s January 27–28 meeting. and credit extended under the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility edged down.

Most participants. It was noted that the Treasury and the Federal Reserve will seek legislation to give the Federal Reserve tools in addition to interest on reserves to manage the federal funds rate while providing the . However. the greater uncertainty over the value of such assets. and the inclusion of additional categories of recently issued. by the end of June. in particular. in part because of the Administration’s new Making Home Affordable program. meeting participants viewed the expansion of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet that might be associated with these and other programs as appropriate in order to foster the dual objectives of maximum employment and price stability. purchases of agency securities could have a more direct effect on mortgage rates. and observed that it could be advantageous to be able to front-load purchases to accommodate the pattern of mortgage refinancing. highly rated ABS as acceptable collateral. Most participants supported the expansion of the lending capacity of the TALF. some participants expressed concern about the risks that might arise from the possible extension of the TALF to include older and lower-quality assets. thereby providing support to economic activity. However. However. thus reducing the Federal Reserve’s credibility regarding long-run price stability. thus providing greater benefits to the housing sector. However. others noted that the pace of MBS issuance was likely to be especially brisk over the next few months. In light of the economic and financial conditions. and some participants saw a risk that private firms might be reluctant to borrow from the TALF out of concern about potential future changes in government policies that could affect TALF borrowers. some participants were concerned that Federal Reserve purchases of longer-term Treasury securities might be seen as an indication that the Federal Reserve was responding to a fiscal objective rather than its statutory mandate. Some participants stated a preference for communicating the Committee’s intention regarding such purchases in terms of the growth rate of Federal Reserve holdings rather than a dollar target for total purchases. respectively. The Federal Reserve’s programs to buy direct debt obligations of the federal housing agencies and agencyguaranteed MBS were on track to reach their initial targets of $100 billion and $500 billion. noting. March 259 accept other types of ABS. other participants anticipated that TALF loans would increase over time as financial market institutions became more familiar with the program.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. and on private borrowing rates more generally. The demand for TALF funding appeared likely to be modest initially. Participants agreed that the asset purchase programs were helping to reduce mortgage interest rates and improve market functioning. Some participants remarked that experience suggested that purchases of Treasury securities would have effects across a variety of long-term debt markets and should ease financial conditions generally while minimizing the Federal Reserve’s influence on the allocation of credit. Also. saw this risk as low so long as the Federal Reserve was clear about the importance of its longterm price stability objective and demonstrated a commitment to take the necessary steps in the future to achieve its objectives. subject to receiving additional capital from the Treasury. however. Participants also discussed the relative merits of increasing the Federal Reserve’s purchases of agency MBS versus initiating purchases of longer-term Treasury securities.

S. Industrial production fell in January and February. The contraction was reflected in widespread declines in payroll employment and industrial production. Both headline and core consumer prices edged up in January and February. The labor force participation rate declined in January and February. These arrangements shall terminate no later than October 30. euros. dollar liquidity abroad. financial institutions shall be initiated by the appropriate Reserve Bank and approved by the Foreign Currency Subcommittee. 2009 funding necessary for the TALF and other key credit-easing programs. 2009. The housing market weakened further. and an aggregate amount of up to SwF 40 billion with the Swiss National Bank. Consumer spending appeared to remain at a low level after changing little. and the Swiss National Bank to support the provision of liquidity in British pounds. an aggregate amount of up to ¥10 trillion with the Bank of Japan.” Staff Review of the Economic and Financial Situation The information reviewed at the March 17–18 meeting indicated that economic activity had fallen sharply in recent months. Business spending on equipment and software continued to fall across a broad range of categories. Private payroll employment dropped considerably over the three months ending in February. The four-week moving average of initial claims for unemployment insurance continued to move up through early March. but these facilities would be available should pressures develop in the future. Requests for drawings on the central bank swap lines and distribution of the foreign currency proceeds to U. The swap arrangements with each foreign central bank shall be subject to the following limits: an aggregate amount of up to £30 billion with the Bank of England.1 percent.S.260 96th Annual Report. and the level of insured unemployed rose further. analogous to the arrangements that currently provide U. and Swiss francs. with cutbacks again . the average workweek of production and nonsupervisory workers on private payrolls continued to be low in February. inventory overhangs appeared to worsen in a number of areas. to 8. the European Central Bank (ECB). The Committee unanimously approved the following resolution: “The Federal Open Market Committee authorizes the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to enter into additional temporary reciprocal currency arrangements (swap lines) with the Bank of England. The Committee also took up a proposal to augment the existing network of central bank liquidity swap lines by adding several temporary swap lines that could provide foreign currency liquidity to U. on balance. with the notable exception of health care. unless extended by mutual agreement of the Committee and the respective foreign central banks. an aggregate amount of up to €80 billion with the ECB. the Bank of Japan. likely in response to weakened labor demand.S. and nonresidential construction fell. Labor market conditions continued to deteriorate. There was no evidence that these institutions were encountering difficulty in meeting foreign currency obligations at this time. on balance. The civilian unemployment rate climbed 1⁄2 percentage point in February. Despite the cutbacks in production. institutions.S. Employment losses remained widespread across industries. financial institutions by means of swap transactions to assist such institutions in meeting short-term liquidity needs in their foreign operations. The Committee also authorizes the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to provide the foreign currencies obtained under the arrangements to U. and the number of aggregate hours worked for this group was markedly below the fourth-quarter average. in recent months. Japanese yen. Meanwhile.

Housing activity continued to be subdued. and demand both for high-tech equipment and software and for equipment other than high-tech and transportation dropped sharply in the fourth quarter. and rising corporate bond yields boosted . which includes questions about employment conditions. Real spending on goods excluding motor vehicles was estimated to have edged up. household net worth for the first time since 1995 had fallen to less than five times disposable income. The output of high-tech products declined as production of computers and semiconductors extended the sharp declines that began in the fourth quarter of 2008. The available data suggested that real consumer spending held steady. The Reuters/ University of Michigan index in early March stood only slightly above its 29year low reached in November. in January and February. Although the stock of unsold new single-family homes fell in January to its lowest level since 2003. In January. The fundamental determinants of equipment and software spending worsened appreciably: Business output dropped. March 261 widespread. rates for conforming 30-year fixed-rate mortgages fluctuated in a relatively narrow range during the intermeeting period. and the Conference Board index. In contrast. Housing demand remained very weak. The financial strain on households intensified over the previous several months. by the end of the fourth quarter. inventories continued to move up relative to the slow pace of sales. and adjusted permit issuance in this sector moved up to a level slightly above starts. on balance. In contrast. The production of other consumer durables and business equipment weakened further. in the first two months of this year after having fallen sharply over the second half of last year. it remained well below the pace of the fourth quarter as manufacturers responded to the significant deterioration in demand over the past few months. nominal shipments of nondefense capital goods excluding aircraft declined.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Consumer sentiment declined further in February as households voiced greater concerns about income and job prospects. reversing the uptick seen in December. and the level of multifamily starts was close to where it had been at the end of the third quarter of 2008. Sales of existing single-family homes fell in January. and broad indicators of near-term manufacturing activity suggested that factory output would continue to contract over the next few months. and substantial declines in equity and house prices continued early this year. House prices continued to decline. fell in February to a new low. on balance. real outlays on motor vehicles contracted further in February after a decline in January. the market for nonconforming loans remained severely impaired. and capacity utilization in manufacturing declined to a very low level. and new orders fell significantly further. Single-family starts ticked up in February. Multifamily starts jumped in February from the very low level in January. Over the previous 12 months. reflecting in part increases in foreclosure-related and other distressed sales. Business spending on transportation equipment continued to fall from already low levels. Although production of light motor vehicles turned up in February. however. After having fallen significantly late last year. the pace of existing home sales declined much less than that of new home sales. The weakness in home sales persisted despite historically low mortgage rates for borrowers eligible for conforming loans.

Exports. outlays on nonresidential structures began to show declines consistent with the weak fundamentals for this sector. especially sales of industrial supplies. All major categories of exports decreased. in part. reportedly because market participants had assigned some probability to the possibility that the Federal Reserve would establish a purchase program for longer-term Treasury secu- . Census data on bookvalue inventory investment for January suggested that firms had further pared their stocks. Output in the advanced foreign economies contracted in the fourth quarter. with large reductions in real gross domestic product (GDP) in all the major economies and a double-digit rate of decline in Japan. apparently exacerbating the overhangs that developed in the second half of 2008. The drop in the value of oil imports reflected a lower price. sales continued to fall more quickly than inventories. and industrial supplies. Economic activity in emerging market economies also weakened significantly in the fourth quarter. however. the path for the federal funds rate implied by futures rates shifted down somewhat. Low readings on overall and core consumer price inflation in recent months. automotive products. mostly on incoming news about the financial sector and the economic outlook. with large declines in imports of oil.262 96th Annual Report. and automotive products. In contrast. such as chemicals and plastics.S. international trade deficit narrowed in December and January. Trade and investment in those countries were particularly weak. reflecting. machinery. 2009 the user cost of capital in the fourth quarter. weaker global demand and steep declines in the prices of a wide variety of energy-intensive goods. Over the intermeeting period. Imports of automotive products declined as automakers made significant production cutbacks throughout North America. After holding up surprisingly well through most of last year. investment declined for most types of buildings over the previous few months. and confidence indicators dropped notably in both Latin America and emerging Asia. The producer price index for core intermediate materials dropped for a fifth month in February. In real terms. Indicators of economic activity. Incoming data for January and February suggested a further significant decline in the first quarter. suggested that the pace of contraction accelerated late in the fourth quarter and into the first quarter. on net. The Federal Open Market Committee’s decision at the January meeting to leave the target range for the federal funds rate unchanged was widely anticipated by investors and had little impact on short-term money markets. as a steep fall in imports more than offset a decline in exports. led by an increase in energy prices. The U. measures of longer-term expectations remained close to their averages over the past couple of years. kept nearterm inflation expectations reported in surveys well below their high levels in mid-2008. Excluding the categories of food and energy. Hourly earnings continued to increase at a moderate rate in February. consumer prices edged higher in January and February after three months of no change. All major categories of imports decreased as well. after posting sizable declines late last year. as well as the weakened economic outlook. overall consumer prices increased in January and February. industrial production. In the United States. especially industrial production. Yields on nominal Treasury coupon securities increased over the period.

leaving longerterm inflation compensation lower over the period. however. but volumes remained low. and spreads between the yields of on. March 263 rities that was not.and speculative-grade CDS indexes widened significantly. over the intermeeting period. speculativegrade issuance. Measures of liquidity in the secondary market for speculative-grade corporate bonds worsened somewhat over the period but remained significantly better than in the fall of 2008. yields were also reported to have responded to concerns over the federal deficit and the growing supply of Treasury securities. inched lower. Daily trading volumes for on-the-run securities. over the intermeeting period. Yields on longer-term inflation-indexed Treasury securities increased more than those on their nominal counterparts. Poor liquidity in the market for Treasury inflation-protected securities continued to make these readings difficult to interpret. however. Average bid-asked spreads for on-the-run nominal Treasury notes were relatively stable near their pre-crisis levels. Spreads of yields on both BBB-rated and speculative-grade bonds relative to those on comparable-maturity Treasury securities were little changed on net. Conditions in the commercial paper (CP) market continued to improve. and forward spreads increased.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. on balance. Gross bond issuance by nonfinancial firms was very strong in January and February. on net. Inc. (AIG). evidently on renewed concerns about the financial condition of some large banks. forthcoming. on balance. especially at longer maturities. reflecting concerns about the adequacy of their capital positions. Conditions in short-term funding markets were mixed over the intermeeting period. Spreads on 30-day A2/P2-rated CP trended down further. over the intermeeting period amid continued concerns about the health of the financial sector. Trading conditions in the leveraged syndicated loan market im- . American International Group. The investment. in fact. Trading conditions in the secondary market for nominal Treasury coupon securities showed some limited signs of improvement. reported losses of more than $60 billion for the fourth quarter of last year. Bank stock prices were particularly hard hit. and inflation compensation at shorter horizons was little changed.and off-the-run 10-year Treasury notes remained very high. and the credit default swap (CDS) spreads of many banks rose above the peaks recorded last fall on anxieties about the financial conditions of the largest banking firms. In unsecured interbank funding markets. and those on AA-rated asset-backed commercial paper remained at the lower end of the range recorded over the past year. spreads of dollar London interbank offered rates (Libor) over comparable-maturity overnight index swap rates trended higher. On March 2. Stock prices of insurance companies dropped sharply over the period. and a further weakening of the economic outlook. Broad equity price indexes dropped significantly. uncertainty regarding the efficacy of government support to the sector. on net. and the Treasury and the Federal Reserve announced a restructuring of the government assistance to AIG to enhance the company’s capital and liquidity to facilitate the orderly completion of its global divestiture program. remained sluggish. as investment-grade issuance more than doubled from its already solid pace in the fourth quarter. Conditions in repurchase agreement markets for most collateral types improved over the period.

Indexes of CDS spreads on AAA-rated CMBS widened to record levels. which was about unchanged in the fourth quarter of last year. total debt of the domestic nonfinancial sector was projected to have continued to expand in the first quarter. Among the advanced foreign economies. The February Survey of Terms of Business Lending indicated that C&I loan rate spreads over comparable-maturity market instruments rose modestly overall from the November survey. with the sharpest drops in the banking sector. In contrast. The expansion in currency remained robust. primarily as a result of declines in both consumer and home mortgage debt. and commercial and industrial (C&I) loans decreased over these months. some banks brought consumer loans that had previously been securitized back onto their books. Household debt appeared to have contracted in the first quarter for the second quarter in a row. Reflecting heavy borrowing by the Treasury. The market for commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) also remained under heavy stress. but issuance continued to be very weak. Savings deposits increased while demand deposits decreased. headline equity price indexes generally fell significantly over the period. In contrast. foremost among the contributors to the rise was a significant appreciation of the dollar against the yen. as Moody’s downgraded a large portion of the 2006 and 2007 vintages after a reevaluation of its rating criteria. After 12 consecutive months of contraction. 2009 proved slightly. Financial conditions in emerging markets also worsened. consumer loans on banks’ books jumped over the first two months of the year because of sizable increases at a few banks that purchased loans from their affiliated finance companies. with their exchange rates and equity prices generally falling and CDS premiums rising a bit on balance. In particular. The debt of the domestic private nonfinancial sector. In addition. The rise in M2 slowed in February from the rapid pace recorded over the previous few months. from very weak household spending. while decelerating. Bank credit continued to decline in January and February. and tighter terms and standards for loans. Several foreign governments and central banks took further steps to sup- . reflecting sizable outflows from Treasury-only funds. Business debt was projected to expand at a moderate pace in the first quarter. Small time deposits also contracted. largely because of a burst of corporate bond issuance. the continued drop in house prices. Commercial real estate loans outstanding also declined over the first part of 2009. which generally provided low yields. but at a pace below that recorded in the fourth quarter of last year. continued to expand briskly. on net. residential mortgage loans on banks’ books increased in February. Retail money funds fell in February. the rise in home equity loans slowed noticeably in January and February. Liquid deposits. as the institutions that had been bidding aggressively for these retail funds stopped doing so.264 96th Annual Report. European bank shares fell steeply as earnings reports for the fourth quarter came in weaker than expected and fears about the exposure of many western European banks to emerging Europe increased. was estimated to have remained about flat in the first quarter. The major currencies index of the dollar rose. Declines in consumer and mortgage debt stemmed. in turn. likely a result of the pickup in refinancing activity. over the intermeeting period.

with real GDP expected to flatten out gradually over the second half of this year and then to expand slowly next year as the stresses in financial markets ease. the British government launched its Asset Protection Scheme. with steep job losses across nearly all sectors. which insured assets placed in the scheme by the Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Bank. Both exports and imports retreated significantly in the fourth quarter of last year and appeared headed for comparable declines this quarter. The Bank of England announced its intention to purchase substantial quantities of government and corporate bonds through its Asset Purchase Facility. inventory adjustments are worked through. the staff revised down its outlook for economic activity. the effects of fiscal stimulus take hold. and long-term interest rates higher. a further drop in house prices. despite some firming in the recent retail . Staff Economic Outlook In the forecast prepared for the meeting. In addition. March 265 port their financial markets and economies. Meeting Participants’ Views and Committee Policy Action In the discussion of the economic situation and outlook. The Swiss National Bank announced that it would purchase both domestic corporate debt and foreign currency to increase liquidity. The deterioration in labor market conditions was rapid in recent months. the dollar stronger. Consumer outlays showed some signs of stabilizing at a low level. with real outlays for goods outside of motor vehicles recording gains in January and February. after which yields on long-term British gilts fell significantly. and easing cost pressures as a result of the sharp net declines in oil and other raw materials prices since last summer. The Bank of Japan stated that it would resume purchases of equities held on banks’ balance sheets. and the correction in housing activity comes to an end.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. announced plans to purchase corporate bonds. The weaker trajectory of real output resulted in the projected path of the unemployment rate rising more steeply into early next year before flattening out at a high level over the rest of the year. Industrial production continued to contract rapidly as firms responded to the falloff in demand and the buildup of some inventory overhangs. The incoming data on business spending suggested that business investment in equipment and structures continued to decline. and mounting job losses threatened to further depress consumer spending. falling import prices. The staff forecast for overall and core personal consumption expenditures (PCE) inflation over the next two years was revised down slightly. Both core and overall PCE price inflation were expected to be damped by low rates of resource utilization. Large declines in equity prices. and demand for new homes remained weak. The staff’s projections for real GDP in the second half of 2009 and in 2010 were revised down. and began its previously announced purchases of commercial paper. nearly all meeting participants said that conditions had deteriorated relative to their expectations at the time of the January meeting. The slowdown was widespread across sectors. with broad equity indexes down significantly amid continued concerns about the health of the financial sector. Singlefamily housing starts had fallen to a post−World War II low in January. Financial conditions overall were even less supportive of economic activity.

participants anticipated further employment cutbacks over coming months. economic activity in the near term. Businesses reported that bank financing was becoming more expensive and more difficult to obtain. Nonetheless. With regard to the outlook for inflation.266 96th Annual Report. and spending on nonresidential structures had recently turned down. it was widely agreed that exports were not likely to be a source of support for U. large inventories of unsold homes relative to sales and the prospect of a continued high level of distressed sales would continue to hold down residential investment in the near term. all participants agreed that inflation pressures were likely to remain subdued. Of particular note was the apparent sharp fall in foreign economic activity. others suggested that strains on household balance sheets from falling equity and house prices. and a stabilization of house prices. but some noted that there was only limited scope for housing activity to fall further. Notably. In light of this development. 2009 sales data and forthcoming tax reductions. and as the weakening economy boosted the prospective losses of financial institutions. leading to a further tightening of credit conditions. Expenditures were being cut substantially for a wide range of capital equipment. Overall. would eventually level out and cease to hold back consumption growth. Several participants noted the tentative signs of stabilization in consumer spending in January and February. participants expressed concern about downside risks to an outlook for activity that was already weak. exports. a sustained increase in home sales. but inventory-sales ratios remained elevated as sales slowed. Some industries that previously were less affected. reduced house prices. Participants did not interpret the uptick in housing starts in February as the beginning of a new trend. Business inventories would come into line with even a .S. reduced credit availability.S. The household saving rate. with pressures on financial institutions generally intensifying this year. mainly owing to potential adverse feedback effects as reduced employment and production weighed on consumer spending and investment. such as agriculture and energy. District business contacts indicated that production and sales were declining steeply. which had already risen considerably. Credit conditions remained very tight. Against this backdrop. had begun to suffer the effects of the slowdown. a number of market forces and policies now in place were seen as eventually leading to economic recovery. and the fear of unemployment could well lead to further increases in the saving rate that would damp consumption growth in the near term. though perhaps at a gradually diminishing rate. which was having a negative effect on U. the low level of mortgage interest rates. Overall. Inventory liquidation was continuing. Looking beyond the very near term. most participants viewed downside risks as predominating in the near term. Business capital spending was weakening in an environment of uncertainty and low business confidence. Several participants said that the degree and pervasiveness of the decline in foreign economic activity was one of the most notable developments since the January meeting. and several expressed the view that inflation was likely to persist below desirable levels. However. and financial markets remained fragile and unsettled. and the Administration’s new programs to encourage mortgage refinancing and mitigate foreclosures ultimately could bring about a lower cost of homeownership.

Minutes of FOMC Meetings. one. participants viewed conditions in financial markets as little changed but remaining extraordinarily stressed. Committee members agreed that substantial additional purchases of longer-term assets eligible for open market operations would be appropriate. Participants saw little chance of a pickup in inflation over the near term. including share prices and CDS spreads of financial institutions. Even without a continuation of outright price declines. Members agreed that the monetary base was likely to grow significantly as a consequence of additional asset purchases. Participants shared comments received from financial industry contacts on their experiences with and concerns about recent government programs to stabilize the financial system. One member preferred to focus additional purchases on longer-term Treasury securities. These contacts feared that uncertainties about future actions the government might take and future regulations it might impose were making it more difficult to plan and were discouraging participation in government efforts to stabilize the financial system. The large volume of issuance of investment-grade corporate bonds in recent weeks was a notable bright spot. Some participants also cautioned that. both could support expanded purchases across a range of assets. Participants agreed that a credible and widely understood program to deal with the troubles of the banking system could help restore business and consumer confidence. March 267 low level of sales. Several expressed concern that inflation was likely to persist below desired levels. and the pressure on production from inventory drawdowns would diminish. In the discussion of monetary policy for the intermeeting period. Some believed that the natural resilience of market forces would become evident later this year. stressed that sustained increases in the monetary base were important to ensure that policy was consistently expansionary. Fiscal and monetary policies were likely to contribute significantly to aggregate demand in coming quarters. However. who saw recovery as delayed and potentially weak. for the most part. in particular. as rising unemployment and falling capacity utilization were holding down wages and prices and inflation expectations appeared subdued. Such purchases would provide further monetary stimulus to help address the very weak economic outlook and reduce the risk that inflation could persist for a time below rates that best foster longer-term economic growth and price stability. however. capital and labor were not being allocated to their most productive uses. were concerned about a possible further rise in the saving rate and a very slow improvement in financial conditions. and several members noted that working across a range of assets and instruments was appropriate when the effects of any one tactic were uncertain. Some indicators. Participants expressed a variety of views about the strength and timing of the recovery. However. Members expressed a range of views as to . Many viewed the strengthening of the banking system as essential for a sustained and robust recovery. because of the poor functioning of the financial system. suggested a worsening of financial market strains since January. and this failure threatened to damp the recovery and reduce the potential growth of the economy over the medium term. Others. whereas another member preferred to focus on agency MBS. falling expectations of inflation would raise the real rate of interest and thus increase the burden of debt and further restrain the economy. with a few pointing to the risk of deflation.

: “Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in January indicates that the economy continues to contract. The timing and pace of these purchases should depend on conditions in the markets for such securities and on a broader assessment of private credit market conditions. though still substantial. Several members felt that the significant deterioration in the economic outlook merited a very substantial increase in purchases of longerterm assets. The Committee directs the Desk to purchase GSE debt. Job losses. At the conclusion of the discussion. exports have slumped as a . Treasury purchases were to be conducted over the next six months. The Committee believed that purchases of these amounts would help to promote a return to economic growth and price stability. until it was instructed otherwise. To further its long-run objectives. and they agreed to include in the Committee’s statement an indication that the range of assets accepted as eligible collateral for the TALF was likely to be expanded. and tight credit conditions have weighed on consumer sentiment and spending. declining equity and housing wealth. The System Open Market Account Manager and the Secretary will keep the Committee informed of ongoing developments regarding the System’s balance sheet that could affect the attainment over time of the Committee’s objectives of maximum employment and price stability. GSEguaranteed MBS. The Committee also directs the Desk to purchase longer-term Treasury securities during the intermeeting period. The Desk is expected to purchase up to $200 billion in housing-related GSE debt by the end of this year.25 trillion of these securities by the end of this year. Weaker sales prospects and difficulties in obtaining credit have led businesses to cut back on inventories and fixed investment.S. Committee members decided to keep the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and to communicate to the public the Committee’s view that the federal funds rate was likely to remain exceptionally low for an extended period. Over the next six months.” The vote encompassed approval of the statement below to be released at 2:15 p. The Desk is expected to purchase at least $500 billion in GSEguaranteed MBS by the end of the second quarter of this year and is expected to purchase up to $1. to execute transactions in the System Account in accordance with the following domestic policy directive: “The Federal Open Market Committee seeks monetary and financial conditions that will foster price stability and promote sustainable growth in output. U. and longer-term Treasury securities during the intermeeting period with the aim of providing support to private credit markets and economic activity. the Committee voted to authorize and direct the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 2009 the preferred size of the increase in purchases. the Desk is expected to purchase up to $300 billion of longer-term Treasury securities. The Committee anticipates that the combination of outright purchases and various liquidity facilities outstanding will cause the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet to expand significantly in coming months. the potential for a large increase over time in the size of the balance sheet from the TALF program was seen as supporting a more modest. members agreed to allow the Desk flexibility within this horizon to respond to market conditions. Members also noted the recent launch of the TALF.m. the Committee seeks conditions in reserve markets consistent with federal funds trading in a range from 0 to 1⁄4 percent. In contrast.268 96th Annual Report. increase in asset purchases. and they also agreed to purchase up to $300 billion of longer-term Treasury securities. Ultimately. members agreed to undertake additional purchases of agency MBS of up to $750 billion and of agency debt of up to $100 billion. The period for conducting the agency debt and MBS purchases was extended from the next three months to the next nine months.

The Committee will maintain the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and anticipates that economic conditions are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for an extended period. the Committee expects that inflation will remain subdued. Messrs. The Federal Reserve’s primary direct role in the plan would be through an expansion of the previously announced TALF. the program’s requirements for highly rated collateral that would exceed the value of the related loans. Duke. Tarullo. In light of increasing economic slack here and abroad. Moreover. and Ms. Bernanke and Dudley. and to increase its purchases of agency debt this year by up to $100 billion to a total of up to $200 billion. Participants agreed it would be impor- . Lacker. will contribute to a gradual resumption of sustainable economic growth. Lockhart. To provide greater support to mortgage lending and housing markets. bringing its total purchases of these securities to up to $1. 2009. the Federal Reserve will employ all available tools to promote economic recovery and to preserve price stability. it was anticipated that such an expansion would provide additional assistance to financial markets and institutions in meeting the credit needs of households and businesses and thus would support overall economic activity. in combination with the added TARP funds as a backstop against losses. were generally seen as providing the Federal Reserve with adequate protection. The Committee will continue to carefully monitor the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in light of evolving financial and economic developments. the Committee anticipates that policy actions to stabilize financial markets and institutions. Yellen. It was agreed that the next meeting of the Committee would be held on Tuesday−Wednesday.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Although the nearterm economic outlook is weak. the Committee met by conference call in a joint session with the Board of Governors to discuss the potential role of the Federal Reserve in the Treasury’s forthcoming financial stabilization plan. April 28–29. meeting participants discussed its principal elements and shared a range of perspectives on its implications for financial markets and institutions. the Committee decided to purchase up to $300 billion of longer-term Treasury securities over the next six months. The meeting adjourned at 1:35 p. 2009. Participants also discussed the implications of the expanded TALF program for the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet over time. on March 18. the Committee sees some risk that inflation could persist for a time below rates that best foster economic growth and price stability in the longer term. to help improve conditions in private credit markets. March 269 number of major trading partners have also fallen into recession. Ms.m. Voting against this action: None. Moreover. Conference Call On February 7. Kohn. In these circumstances. While several participants expressed some concern that the expansion of the TALF program could increase the Federal Reserve’s exposure to credit risk. In the current environment. After hearing an overview of the version of the plan envisioned at the time of the meeting. the Committee decided today to increase the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet further by purchasing up to an additional $750 billion of agency mortgage-backed securities. and Warsh. together with fiscal and monetary stimulus. Evans. which would be supported by additional funds from the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). The Federal Reserve has launched the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility to facilitate the extension of credit to households and small businesses and anticipates that the range of eligible collateral for this facility is likely to be expanded to include other financial assets.25 trillion this year. 2009.” Voting for this action: Messrs.

Alternate Members of the Federal Open Market Committee Messrs. Divisions of Monetary Affairs. Carpenter. and Stern. Board of Governors Messrs. Levin. Clouse. . Economist Mr. Cumming. Board of Governors Mr. Division of Monetary Affairs. Alvarez. Bullard. Divisions of Banking Supervision and Regulation and Monetary Affairs. Vice Chairman Ms.270 96th Annual Report.. Board of Governors Notation Vote By notation vote completed on February 17. Dudley. Assistant Secretary 7. Smith. respectively. Deputy Staff Director. Assistant Secretary Mr. the Committee unanimously approved the minutes of the FOMC meeting held on January 27–28. Danker. Present: Mr. Connors. on Tuesday. and Williams. Johnson. Mosser. Mr. Madigan Secretary Meeting Held on April 28–29. Research and Statistics. Wilcox. Division of Monetary Affairs. Economist Messrs. and Minneapolis. Sullivan. April 28. Bernanke. respectively. and Research and Statistics.C. Rosengren. System Open Market Account Ms. Slifman. Board of Governors Mr. at 9:00 a. Attended Wednesday’s session only. 2009. Yellen Mr. 2009 tant to work with the Treasury to obtain tools to ensure that any reserves added to the banking system through this program could be removed at the appropriate time. and Wascher. D. Assistant to the Board. Associate Directors. Reifschneider. Nelson. Board of Governors Ms. English. Tarullo Mr. General Counsel Mr. Mr. at 2:00 p. Blanchard. Pianalto. Office of the Staff Director for Management. 2009. Monetary Affairs. Meyer. Skidmore. Kamin. Fisher. Sheets. Board of Governors Mr.m. Hoenig. Warsh Ms. Deputy Directors. Chairman Mr.7 Deputy Secretary. Board of Governors Mr. Lockhart Mr. Philadelphia. Office of Board Members. Lacker Mr. Assistant Secretary Ms. and continued on Wednesday. Kohn Mr. Palumbo. Frierson. and Mr. Board of Governors Mr. April 29. Ms. Presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks of Dallas. Barger and Mr. Altig. Plosser. Ms. Office of the Secretary. Evans Mr. Luecke. Board of Governors Mr. 2009. Stockton. Brian F. Associate Economists Ms. Deputy Secretary Mr. Assistant Director. respectively Mr. Senior Adviser. Struckmeyer. Secretary of the Board. Madigan. Division of Research and Statistics. Office of the Secretary.m. Temporary Manager. Duke Mr. 2009. 2009 A joint meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System was held in the offices of the Board of Governors in Washington. Deputy Associate Director. Secretary and Economist Ms.

St. Assistant Vice President. System holdings of agency debt and agency MBS expanded by $215 billion over the same period. respectively. which was authorized by . First Vice President. There were no open market operations in foreign currencies for the System’s account over the intermeeting period. Rich. Board of Governors Ms. owing. respectively Mr. Hornstein. Board of Governors Ms.2 trillion. April 271 Mr. Rasche and Rolnick. followed by a decline for a time—were the same in each case. Burke. Divisions of Monetary Affairs and Research and Statistics. Mester. Division of Monetary Affairs. Federal Reserve Banks of Kansas City. Board of Governors Ms. Low. Division of Monetary Affairs. respectively Messrs. the System’s total assets and liabilities were close to $2. and Olivei. and Minneapolis. Ms. Assistant to the Secretary. Judson and Mr. Project Manager. Louis. Nichols. Credit extended through the Federal Reserve’s liquidity facilities decreased. Barron. Federal Reserve Bank of New York Developments in Financial Markets and the Federal Reserve’s Balance Sheet The Manager of the System Open Market Account reported on recent developments in domestic and foreign financial markets. but the timing and magnitude varied significantly depending upon the underlying assumptions. Federal Reserve Banks of New York. period since the Committee’s March 17–18 meeting. Executive Vice Presidents. Office of the Secretary.8 Economists. Vice Presidents. and Boston. respectively Mr. The general contours of the projections—a rapid near-term increase in Federal Reserve assets and the monetary base. the Committee ratified those transactions. The Manager also reported on System open market operations in Treasury securities and in agency debt and agency mortgagebacked securities (MBS) during the 8. Federal Reserve Banks of Dallas and Cleveland.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Moreover. As of April 22. Open Market Secretariat Specialist. implying considerable uncertainty regarding those assumptions and the resulting projections of the balance sheet and the monetary base. Hakkio. many aspects of the economic and financial outlook were subject to substantial risks. By unanimous vote. Rosenblum and Sniderman. The staff briefed the Committee on recent developments related to the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF). about $130 billion higher than just before the March meeting. The staff reported on recent developments in System liquidity programs and on changes in the System’s balance sheet. Beattie. Philadelphia. The staff also provided the Committee with projections that were intended to illustrate the potential evolution of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet over coming years under a variety of assumptions about the economic and financial outlook and the associated path of monetary policy. Senior Vice Presidents. Board of Governors Mr. to the recent improvement in short-term funding markets. and Messrs. Small. Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Messrs. Richmond. Attended Tuesday’s session only. at least in part.

The four-week moving average of initial claims for unemployment insurance remained elevated in April. Private nonfarm payroll employment registered its fifth consecutive large monthly decrease. Headline and core consumer prices rose at a moderate pace over the first three months of the year. In contrast.5 percent. the Committee discussed the potential benefits of accepting newly issued. in part. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York extended three-year loans secured by AAA-rated asset-backed securities (ABS). these securities were backed by new and recently originated loans made by financial institutions. Industrial production fell substantially in March and for the first quarter as a whole. and the number of individuals receiving unemployment benefits relative to the size of the labor force reached its highest level since 1982. Meeting participants also discussed the possibility that some new TALF loans would have a longer maturity of five years.272 96th Annual Report. Labor market conditions deteriorated further in March. Secretary’s note: The Board of Governors subsequently approved the broadening of the list of TALF-eligible collateral and the addition of five-year loans to the facility. beginning in mid-December 2009. as announced on May 1. The arrangement with the Bank of Canada is in the amount of $2 billion equivalent. The first two monthly subscriptions of the TALF settled during the intermeeting period. 2009. Consumer spending firmed in the first quarter after dropping markedly during the second half of 2008. and that with the Banco de Mexico is in the amount of $3 billion equivalent. with cutbacks widespread across sectors. inventory overhangs that persisted into the early part of the year—and fixed investment continued to contract. and total hours worked for this group stayed below the fourth-quarter average. Under the TALF. and manufacturing ca- . businesses cut production and employment substantially in recent months—likely reflecting. Housing activity remained depressed but seemed to have leveled off in February and March. Staff Review of the Economic Situation The information reviewed at the April 28–29 meeting indicated that the pace of decline in some components of final demand appeared to have slowed recently. Moreover. the Committee decided to extend the reciprocal currency (“swap”) arrangements with the Bank of Canada and the Banco de Mexico for an additional year. At this meeting. these arrangements are associated with the Federal Reserve’s participation in the North American Framework Agreement of 1994. The civilian unemployment rate climbed to 8. By unanimous vote. AAA-rated commercial mortgage-backed securities and insurance premium finance ABS as eligible collateral for TALF loans. The vote to renew the System’s participation in these swap arrangements was taken at this meeting because of the provision in the arrangements that requires each party to provide six months’ prior notice of an intention to terminate its participation. the average workweek of production and nonsupervisory workers on private payrolls ticked down in March from the low level recorded in January and February. with losses widespread across industries. 2009 the Board of Governors last November under section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act. and the labor force participation rate edged down from its February level.

and broad indicators of near-term manufacturing activity suggested that factory output would contract over the next few months. although the spread between the rates on jumbo and conforming loans was still wide and the market for private-label nonprime MBS remained impaired. the fundamentals for this sector remained weak: Wages and salaries dropped. and. house prices were markedly lower than a year ago. but the level of such sales remained low. consumer sentiment strengthened a bit in early April. Recent data also indicated that housing demand might have stabilized. as the drop in starts in the first quarter was well below the pace experienced during the fourth quarter of 2008. Orders and shipments of nondefense capital goods excluding aircraft fell in March. despite recent increases. In contrast. The output of high-technology products decreased in March and in the first quarter overall. equity prices were down substantially from their levels of 12 months earlier. remained high relative to sales. Singlefamily housing starts flattened out in February and March.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Real outlays on new and used motor vehicles expanded in the first quarter following six consecutive quarterly declines. As measured by the Reuters/University of Michigan survey. Existing home sales in March were slightly below the average pace for January and February. leaving the supply of new homes relative to the pace of sales very high by historical standards. Rates on jumbo loans came down as well. The available data suggested that real consumer spending rose moderately in the first quarter after having fallen in the second half of last year. however. on balance. Despite the upturn in consumer spending. the production of communications equipment edged up in the first quarter. Rates for conforming 30-year fixed-rate mortgages extended the significant decline that began late last year. after adjusting for activity outside of permitissuing areas. The output of other consumer durables and business equipment stayed low. and. turning negative again after having been flat in February. the level of permits in March remained above the level of starts. First-quarter domestic production of light motor vehicles reached the lowest level in more than three decades as inventories of such vehicles. with declines about as steep and widespread as in the fourth quarter of 2008. April 273 pacity utilization decreased to a very low level. as households expressed somewhat more optimism about longterm economic conditions. The latest readings from the housing market suggested that the contraction in housing activity might have moderated over the first quarter. Lower mortgage rates and house prices contributed to an increase in housing affordability. Most national indexes of house prices stayed on a downward trajectory. with production of computers and semiconductors extending the downward trend that had begun in the second half of 2008. The fundamental determinants of equipment and software investment stayed weak in the first quarter: Business output . even with this improvement. Sales of new single-family homes held steady in March after edging up in February. for the first quarter as a whole. The contraction in the multifamily sector also showed signs of slowing. while low. the measure was only slightly above the historical low for the series recorded last November. Real spending on goods and services excluding motor vehicles fell in March but was up. Real spending on equipment and software dropped markedly in the first quarter.

employment declined substantially. Staff Review of the Financial Situation The decision by the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) at the March meeting to leave the target range for the federal funds rate unchanged was widely anticipated and had little effect on short-term money markets. suggesting some moderation in the pace of contraction of economic activity going forward. In the April Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices. and within that category. Near-term inflation expectations increased in early April but did not appear to influence longer-term expectations. investors were apparently surprised by the Committee’s announcement that it would increase significantly further the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet by purchasing . and retail sales were weak. and exports of automotive products increased following a marked drop in January. and core prices picked up. However. increased.S. although the overhang appeared to be less severe than in late 2008. The fall in oil imports was driven by lower volumes as prices moved up slightly. the growth of real gross domestic product (GDP) in China appeared to pick up on a quarterly basis following fiscal stimulus measures and steps to foster credit expansion. prices of non-oil imports moved down. 2009 continued to drop sharply. but falling volumes accounted for most of the decline in this category. whose levels in April were still at the low end of the range seen over the past few years. and credit availability was still tight. indicators of developments late in the first quarter. Most major categories of exports increased. Indexes of commodity prices rose in March but stayed far below their year-earlier values. The first-quarter data also offered a few tentative signs that the deceleration of economic activity in emerging markets might have started to abate. the net percentages of respondents that reported they tightened their business lending policies over the previous three months.274 96th Annual Report. though at a noticeably slower pace than in late 2008. overall consumer prices increased over the first three months of 2009 after falling in the fourth quarter of 2008: Energy prices rebounded somewhat after their substantial late-year drop. although continuing to be very elevated. inventories remained sizable early in the year. Despite the significant cuts in production in recent quarters. The U. exports of services declined in February. the producer price index for core intermediate materials fell. in contrast. especially sales of consumer goods. particularly the purchasing managers indexes for all of the major advanced economies. international trade deficit diminished in February to its lowest level since November 1999. In the United States. pharmaceuticals. Industrial production continued to drop through February. edged down for the second consecutive survey. Real spending on nonresidential structures contracted in the first quarter. firms continued their efforts to reduce their stocks. However. Economic conditions again worsened in the advanced foreign economies in the first quarter. as imports fell and exports rose a bit. Hourly earnings of production and nonsupervisory workers edged up in March. In contrast. Exports of capital goods rose despite a modest decrease in exports of aircraft. Given the elevated level of inventories. In particular. All major categories of imports decreased.

and perhaps some reversal of flight-toquality flows. Poor liquidity in the market for Treasury inflation-protected securities continued to make these readings difficult to interpret. In addition. Yields on inflationindexed Treasury securities fell a bit more than those on their nominal counterparts. daily trading volumes for Treasury securities remained low. reportedly buoyed by announcements of policy measures to enhance credit markets and clean up banks’ balance sheets and perhaps by some reduction in concerns about the economic outlook. Premiums paid for on-the-run Treasury securities fell. Option-implied volatility on the S&P 500 index decreased but stayed well above historical norms. In unsecured bank funding markets. an easing of concern about financial institutions. as bid-asked spreads and “haircuts” on most collateral either narrowed or held steady. Broad stock price indexes rose significantly. Trading conditions in the secondary market for nominal Treasury securities also showed some signs of improvement. On net. likely in response to the somewhat better economic outlook. staying at the low end of their respective ranges over the past year. market participants reportedly interpreted the statement that the federal funds rate was likely to remain exceptionally low “for an extended period” as stronger than the phrase “for some time” in the previous statement. Conditions in short-term funding markets improved somewhat over the intermeeting period. including two auctions that garnered no bids. boosted by relatively favorable first-quarter earnings reports from a few major firms. Similarly. over the period. a portion of the substantial declines in yields on nominal Treasury coupon securities that followed the FOMC announcement was subsequently unwound amid the improved economic outlook. all seven auctions under the Term Securities Lending Facility were undersubscribed over the intermeeting period. however.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Rates on Eurodollar futures contracts and yields on Treasury and agency securities fell considerably in response to the statement. The spread between the forward trend earnings-price ratio for S&P 500 firms and an estimate of the real long-run Treasury yield—a rough gauge of the equity risk premium—narrowed during the intermeeting period but was still very high by historical standards. which decreased modestly. As a result. Consistent with modestly better conditions in the term repo market. and average bid asked spreads for Treasury notes were relatively stable near their precrisis levels. Financial stocks outperformed broader markets. resulting in a narrowing of spreads in yields on such . although Libor fixings beyond the one-month maturity stayed elevated. although repo volumes were still low. inflation compensation rose at shorter horizons but changed little at longer horizons. spreads of dollar London interbank offered rates (Libor) over comparable-maturity overnight index swap (OIS) rates edged down. The initial drop in the expected path for the federal funds rate was reversed over subsequent weeks. Still. Spreads on A2/P2-rated commercial paper and AA-rated asset-backed commercial paper narrowed a bit. yields on lower-rated investment-grade and speculative-grade corporate bonds dropped. on net. on net. April 275 up to $300 billion in Treasury securities and expanding purchases of agency MBS and agency debt. Functioning in the repurchase agreement (repo) market showed additional improvement.

276 96th Annual Report, 2009 bonds over those on comparablematurity Treasury securities. Even so, corporate bond spreads remained extremely high by historical standards. Indicators of functioning in the corporate bond market—such as bid-asked spreads estimated by the staff— suggested that conditions in the speculative-grade segment of the market had become less strained since last autumn. Corresponding measures for investment-grade bonds hovered at moderately elevated levels. The leveraged loan market showed some improvement over the past few months, with the average bid-asked spread narrowing and the average bid price moving up from a very depressed level. The basis between an index of credit default swap spreads and measures of investment-grade corporate spreads—a rough proxy for unexploited arbitrage opportunities in the corporate credit market—stayed at high levels, reportedly reflecting an ongoing lack of financing capacity at major financial institutions. No issuance of commercial MBS occurred over the intermeeting period. The debt of the domestic private nonfinancial sector appeared to have contracted in the first quarter at about the same pace as in the fourth quarter of 2008. Activity in the mortgage market reflected mainly refinancing, and staff estimates indicated that residential mortgage debt contracted again in the first quarter, depressed by the very low pace of home sales, falling house prices, and write-downs of nonperforming loans. Consumer credit was essentially flat in January and February. Expansion of nonfinancial business debt was tepid, as robust bond issuance was partly offset by declines in commercial paper and bank loans. Federal debt rose briskly in the first quarter. M2 expanded rapidly in March. A strong increase in liquid deposits, the largest component of M2, likely reflected further reallocations by households toward safer assets. Retail money market mutual funds and small time deposits contracted modestly. Currency growth was apparently bolstered by elevated foreign demand. Commercial bank credit contracted in March and was estimated to have dropped again in April. The decline in bank credit in March was due importantly to a decrease in loans to businesses that reflected, in part, paydowns with the proceeds of bond issuance. Commercial real estate loans also fell. Bank lending to households was weak, although credit extended under revolving home equity lines of credit again expanded robustly. Residential mortgage loans on banks’ books fell, on balance, in March and the first part of April; banks reportedly sold a considerable amount of single-family mortgages to the government-sponsored enterprises. Consumer loans held by banks also shrank, amid heavy securitization. The Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey conducted in April indicated that banks continued to tighten their credit standards and terms on all major loan categories over the previous three months. Stock markets around the world rose substantially over the intermeeting period amid somewhat better sentiment regarding economic prospects, reports of better-than-expected performance from some financial firms in the United States and Europe, and continued support from monetary policies. Pressures in bank funding markets seemed to ease over the period: Spreads between both euro and sterling Libor and their respective OIS rates narrowed significantly, and financial conditions in most emerging market economies improved.

Minutes of FOMC Meetings, April 277 The dollar depreciated against the other major currencies in an environment of seemingly increased investor appetite for risk. During the intermeeting period, foreign authorities took additional steps to address the weaknesses in their economies and financial systems. The European Central Bank and the Bank of Canada, along with several other central banks in both the advanced and emerging market economies, cut policy rates, while the Bank of England and the Bank of Japan continued their asset purchases to provide further monetary stimulus. Several governments, including Japan and Taiwan, announced new fiscal stimulus packages, and a number of European countries took additional measures to support their banking sectors. second half of 2009 and in 2010 were revised up, with real GDP expected to edge higher in the second half and then increase moderately next year. The key factors expected to drive the acceleration in activity were the boost to spending from fiscal stimulus, the bottoming out of the housing market, a turn in the inventory cycle from liquidation to modest accumulation, and ongoing gradual recovery of financial markets. The staff again expected that the unemployment rate would rise through the beginning of 2010 before edging down over the rest of that year. The staff forecast for overall and core personal consumption expenditures (PCE) inflation over the next two years was revised up slightly. The staff raised its near-term estimate of core PCE inflation because recent data on core and overall PCE price inflation came in a bit higher than anticipated. Beyond the near term, however, the staff anticipated that the low level of resource utilization and a gradual decline in inflation expectations would lead to a deceleration in core PCE prices. Looking out to 2011, the staff anticipated that financial markets and institutions would continue to recuperate, monetary policy would remain stimulative, fiscal stimulus would be fading, and inflation expectations would be relatively well anchored. Under such conditions, the staff projected that real GDP would expand at a rate well above that of its potential, that the unemployment rate would decline significantly, and that overall and core PCE inflation would stay in a low range.

Staff Economic Outlook
In the forecast for the meeting, which was prepared prior to the release of the advance estimates of the first-quarter national income and product accounts, the staff revised up its outlook for economic activity in response to recent favorable financial developments as well as better-than-expected readings on final sales. Consumer purchases appeared to have stabilized after falling in the second half of 2008, and the steep decline in the housing sector seemed to be abating. However, the contraction in the labor market persisted into March, industrial production again fell rapidly, and the broad-based decline in equipment and software investment continued. Conditions in financial markets improved more than had been expected: Private borrowing rates moved lower, stock prices rose substantially, and some measures of financial stress eased. The staff’s projections for economic activity in the

Participants’ Views and Committee Policy Action
In conjunction with this FOMC meeting, all meeting participants—the five members of the Board of Governors

278 96th Annual Report, 2009 and the presidents of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks—provided projections for economic growth, the unemployment rate, and consumer price inflation for each year from 2009 through 2011 and over a longer horizon. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge over time under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks. Participants’ forecasts through 2011 and over the longer run are described in the Summary of Economic Projections, which is attached as an addendum to these minutes. In their discussion of the economic situation and outlook, participants agreed that the information received since the March meeting provided some tentative evidence that the pace of contraction in real economic activity was starting to diminish. Participants noted that financial market conditions had generally strengthened, and surveys and anecdotal reports pointed to a pickup in household and business confidence, which nonetheless remained at very low levels. Some signs pointing toward economic stabilization were seen in data on consumer spending, housing, and factory orders. Although economic activity was being damped by the efforts of businesses to pare excess inventories, the substantial drawdown in inventories over recent months was viewed as raising the prospects for a gradual expansion in industrial production later this year. Participants anticipated that the acceleration in final demand and economic activity over the next few quarters would be modest. Growth of consumption expenditures was likely to be restrained by the weakness in labor markets and the lagged effects of past reductions in household wealth. Business investment spending would probably shrink further. Adverse global economic and financial conditions would continue to weigh on the demand for U.S. exports. Financial market developments over the intermeeting period were mainly seen as positive. Equity prices increased, money markets were functioning better, and corporate issuance of bonds and convertible securities was relatively brisk. Measures of volatility and financial stress moved down and risk spreads narrowed in many markets, perhaps partly because of investors’ perceptions of diminished downside tail risks. Even so, risk spreads remained unusually wide and markets continued to be fragile. Despite the improvement in financial markets, credit conditions stayed quite restrictive for many households and businesses. The April Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey showed that a large net fraction of banks had tightened their terms and standards for credit during the previous three months, albeit a modestly smaller fraction than indicated by the January survey. Moreover, meeting participants noted that the volume of credit extended to households and businesses was still contracting as a result of shrinking demand, declining credit quality, capital constraints on financial institutions, and the limited availability of financing through securitization markets. Consumer spending firmed somewhat during the first quarter despite the rising unemployment rate and significant financial strains. Participants generally expected that household demand would gradually strengthen over coming quarters in response to the rise in household wealth from the substantial increase in equity prices that had occurred over the intermeeting period as well as the support for income provided by fiscal policy. Nevertheless,

Minutes of FOMC Meetings, April 279 participants judged that the recovery in consumer demand over the next few quarters would be slow, reflecting adverse labor market conditions and continuing adjustments to earlier reductions in household wealth. Some participants referred to the possibility that activity in the housing market might finally be approaching a trough. Indicators of new home sales appeared to be stabilizing, and inventories of unsold homes diminished somewhat. Participants also reported some signs that the decline in home prices might be slowing. Labor market conditions were still deteriorating. Unemployment claims were exceptionally elevated, and the ratio of permanent job cuts to temporary layoffs was substantially higher than in previous economic downturns. Staff reductions were under way even at traditionally stable employers such as hospitals and nonprofit institutions. An unusually large proportion of employed persons indicated that they were engaged in part-time work because they could not obtain full-time jobs. Participants cited the magnitude of the retrenchment in production and capital spending, but they also noted that manufacturing surveys and informal contacts suggested a noticeable upturn in business sentiment: A number of participants highlighted regional surveys reporting that greater numbers of industrial firms anticipated that their orders and shipments would start expanding over the next six months. Some participants expected that a gradual strengthening of retail sales would lead to an abatement of the decline in capital investment and would tend to induce manufacturers to begin rebuilding depleted stocks of inventories later this year, thereby reinforcing the pickup in industrial production. The outlook in some other sectors seemed less propitious; for example, one participant described survey data indicating that firms in the service sector were expecting sales to decrease further in coming months, and others referred to cutbacks in drilling and mining. The economies of many key trading partners were seen as experiencing quite severe contractions. Participants noted that banking institutions in a number of countries remained exposed to substantial further losses, and the process of repairing the balance sheets of such institutions would likely continue to restrain growth in those economies over coming quarters and hence damp the outlook for U.S. export demand. A few countries did show some signs that weakness was abating, perhaps reflecting, in part, rapid implementation of fiscal stimulus; furthermore, the recent firming of commodity prices gave an indication that global weakness might be starting to subside. Although the near-term economic outlook had improved modestly since March, participants emphasized the tentative nature of the incoming data, which are volatile and subject to revision. The experience of previous recessions underscored the challenges of identifying the onset of economic recovery using real-time indicators. Also, empirical analysis of past episodes in the United States and abroad in which economic downturns had been triggered by financial crises generally concluded that such contractions tended to be more severe and protracted than other recessions. Moreover, participants continued to see significant downside risks to the economic outlook. In particular, while financial strains and risk spreads had lessened somewhat over the intermeeting period, participants agreed that the global financial system remained vulnerable to further shocks.

280 96th Annual Report, 2009 In discussing the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program, which was being conducted jointly by the Federal Reserve and other bank supervisory authorities, a number of participants noted that investors were concerned that the upcoming publication of stress test results might trigger volatility in financial markets. Some participants also referred to mounting losses in commercial real estate, which could have substantial adverse consequences for regional banks and other financial institutions with significant concentrations of such assets. Looking further ahead, participants considered a number of factors that would be likely to restrain the pace of economic recovery over the medium term. Strains in credit markets were expected to recede only gradually as financial institutions continued to rebuild their capital and remained cautious in their approach to asset-liability management, especially given that the outlook for credit performance was likely to improve slowly. Some sectors—such as financial services and residential construction—might well account for a smaller share of the economy in coming years, and the resulting reallocation of labor across sectors could weigh on labor markets for some time. Households would likely remain cautious, and their desired saving rates would be relatively high over the extended period that would be required to bring their stock of wealth back up to more normal levels relative to income. The stimulus from fiscal policy was expected to diminish over time as the government budget moved to a sustainable path. Demand for U.S. exports would also take time to revive, reflecting the gradual recovery of major trading partners. Most participants expected inflation to remain subdued over the next few years, and they saw some risk that elevated unemployment and low capacity utilization could cause inflation to remain persistently below the rates that they judged as most consistent with sustainable economic growth and price stability. Nonetheless, recent monthly readings on consumer price inflation had been above the low rates observed late last year, and survey measures of longer-run inflation expectations had remained reasonably stable, leading many participants to judge that the risk of a protracted period of deflation had diminished. Some participants highlighted the potential pitfalls of making inflation projections based on contemporaneously available measures of resource slack, especially during periods when the economy was facing large supply shocks and significant sectoral reallocation. Several participants referred to contacts who had expressed concerns that the expansion of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet might not be reversed in a sufficiently timely manner and hence that inflation could rise above rates consistent with price stability. In their discussion of monetary policy for the intermeeting period, Committee members agreed that the Federal Reserve’s large-scale securities purchases were providing financial stimulus that would contribute to the gradual resumption of sustainable economic growth in a context of price stability. Members also agreed that it would be appropriate to continue making purchases in accordance with the amounts that had previously been announced— that is, up to $1.25 trillion of agency MBS and up to $200 billion of agency debt by the end of this year, and up to $300 billion of Treasury securities by autumn. Some members noted that a further increase in the total amount of purchases might well be warranted at

Minutes of FOMC Meetings, April 281 some point to spur a more rapid pace of recovery; all members concurred with waiting to see how the economy and financial conditions respond to the policy actions already in train before deciding whether to adjust the size or timing of asset purchases. The Committee reaffirmed the need to monitor carefully the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in light of economic and financial developments. The Committee also discussed its strategy for communicating the anticipated path of its asset purchases and the circumstances under which adjustments to that path would be appropriate. All members agreed that the statement should note that the timing and overall amounts of the Committee’s asset purchases would continue to be evaluated in light of the evolving economic outlook and conditions in financial markets. At the conclusion of the discussion, the Committee voted to authorize and direct the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, until it was instructed otherwise, to execute transactions in the System Account in accordance with the following domestic policy directive:
“The Federal Open Market Committee seeks monetary and financial conditions that will foster price stability and promote sustainable growth in output. To further its long-run objectives, the Committee seeks conditions in reserve markets consistent with federal funds trading in a range from 0 to 1⁄4 percent. The Committee directs the Desk to purchase agency debt, agency MBS, and longer-term Treasury securities during the intermeeting period with the aim of providing support to private credit markets and economic activity. The timing and pace of these purchases should depend on conditions in the markets for such securities and on a broader assessment of private credit market conditions. The Committee anticipates that the combination of outright purchases and various liquidity facilities outstanding will cause the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet to expand significantly in coming months. The Desk is expected to purchase up to $200 billion in housing-related agency debt by the end of this year. The Desk is expected to purchase at least $500 billion in agency MBS by the end of the second quarter of this year and is expected to purchase up to $1.25 trillion of these securities by the end of this year. The Desk is expected to purchase up to $300 billion of longer-term Treasury securities by the end of the third quarter. The System Open Market Account Manager and the Secretary will keep the Committee informed of ongoing developments regarding the System’s balance sheet that could affect the attainment over time of the Committee’s objectives of maximum employment and price stability.”

The vote encompassed approval of the statement below to be released at 2:15 p.m.:
“Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in March indicates that the economy has continued to contract, though the pace of contraction appears to be somewhat slower. Household spending has shown signs of stabilizing but remains constrained by ongoing job losses, lower housing wealth, and tight credit. Weak sales prospects and difficulties in obtaining credit have led businesses to cut back on inventories, fixed investment, and staffing. Although the economic outlook has improved modestly since the March meeting, partly reflecting some easing of financial market conditions, economic activity is likely to remain weak for a time. Nonetheless, the Committee continues to anticipate that policy actions to stabilize financial markets and institutions, fiscal and monetary stimulus, and market forces will contribute to a gradual resumption of sustainable economic growth in a context of price stability. In light of increasing economic slack here and abroad, the Committee expects that inflation will remain subdued. Moreover, the Committee sees some risk that inflation could persist for a time below rates that best foster economic growth and price stability in the longer term. In these circumstances, the Federal Reserve will employ all available tools to promote economic recovery and to preserve

282 96th Annual Report, 2009
price stability. The Committee will maintain the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and anticipates that economic conditions are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for an extended period. As previously announced, to provide support to mortgage lending and housing markets and to improve overall conditions in private credit markets, the Federal Reserve will purchase a total of up to $1.25 trillion of agency mortgage-backed securities and up to $200 billion of agency debt by the end of the year. In addition, the Federal Reserve will buy up to $300 billion of Treasury securities by autumn. The Committee will continue to evaluate the timing and overall amounts of its purchases of securities in light of the evolving economic outlook and conditions in financial markets. The Federal Reserve is facilitating the extension of credit to households and businesses and supporting the functioning of financial markets through a range of liquidity programs. The Committee will continue to carefully monitor the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in light of financial and economic developments.” Voting for this action: Messrs. Bernanke and Dudley, Ms. Duke, Messrs. Evans, Kohn, Lacker, Lockhart, Tarullo, and Warsh, and Ms. Yellen. Voting against this action: None.

cepted; detailed background information on special purpose vehicles; and contracts with private-sector firms that had been engaged to help carry out some of these programs. In the Committee’s discussion of these issues, it was noted that disclosing the identities of individual borrowers would very likely discourage use of the Federal Reserve’s liquidity and credit facilities because prospective borrowers would be concerned that their creditors and counterparties would see borrowing from the Federal Reserve as a sign of financial weakness. The resulting stigma would undermine the effectiveness of those programs in promoting financial stability and economic recovery. It was agreed that the next meeting of the Committee would be held on Tuesday−Wednesday, June 23–24, 2009. The meeting adjourned at 11:50 a.m. on April 29, 2009.

Notation Vote
By notation vote completed on April 7, 2009, the Committee unanimously approved the minutes of the FOMC meeting held on March 17–18, 2009. Brian F. Madigan Secretary

Governor Kohn reported to the Committee on the progress of a Federal Reserve workgroup in its review of the information provided to the public regarding Federal Reserve programs and activities. That review was being conducted to identify opportunities for providing additional information to the public without compromising the Federal Reserve’s mandated policy objectives. The workgroup had been devoting particular attention to approaches to enhancing the transparency of the Federal Reserve’s liquidity and credit facilities, including regular reporting on the number, types, and concentration of borrowers from each program; the amount and nature of collateral ac-

Addendum: Summary of Economic Projections
In conjunction with the April 28–29, 2009, FOMC meeting, the members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks, all of whom participate in deliberations of the FOMC, submitted projections for output growth, unemployment, and inflation in 2009, 2010, 2011, and over the longer run. Projections were based on information available through the end of the meeting and on each partici-

Minutes of FOMC Meetings, April 283 pant’s assumptions about factors likely to affect economic outcomes, including his or her assessment of appropriate monetary policy. “Appropriate monetary policy” is defined as the future path of policy that the participant deems most likely to foster outcomes for economic activity and inflation that best satisfy his or her interpretation of the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives of maximum employment and stable prices. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge over time under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks. As indicated in table 1 and depicted in figure 1, all FOMC participants projected that real GDP would contract this year, that the unemployment rate would increase in coming quarters, and that inflation would be slower this year than in recent years. Almost all participants viewed the near-term outlook for economic activity as having weakened relative to the projections they made at the time of the January FOMC meeting, but they continued to expect a recovery in sales and production to begin during the second half of 2009. With the strong adverse forces that have been acting on the economy likely to abate only slowly, participants generally expected a gradual recovery: All anticipated that unemployment, though declining in coming years, would remain well above its longer-run sustainable rate at the end of 2011; most indicated they expected the economy to take five or six years to converge to a longer-run path characterized by a sustainable rate of output growth and by rates of unemployment and inflation consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives, but several said full convergence would take longer. Participants projected very low inflation this year; most expected inflation to edge up over the next few years toward the rate they consider consistent with the dual objectives. Most par-

Table 1. Economic projections of Federal Reserve Governors and Reserve Bank presidents, April 2009
Percent
Central tendency1 Variable 2009 Change in real GDP . . −2.0 to −1.3 January projection . . −1.3 to −0.5 Unemployment rate . . . 9.2 to 9.6 January projection . . 8.5 to 8.8 PCE inflation . . . . . . . . 0.6 to 0.9 January projection . . 0.3 to 1.0 Core PCE inflation3 . . 1.0 to 1.5 January projection . . 0.9 to 1.1 2010 2.0 2.5 9.0 8.0 1.0 1.0 0.7 0.8 to to to to to to to to 3.0 3.3 9.5 8.3 1.6 1.5 1.3 1.5 2011 3.5 3.8 7.7 6.7 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 to to to to to to to to 4.8 5.0 8.5 7.5 1.9 1.7 1.6 1.5 Longer Run 2.5 2.5 4.8 4.8 1.7 1.7 to to to to to to 2009 Range2 2010 1.5 1.5 8.0 7.0 0.7 0.7 0.5 0.4 to to to to to to to to 4.0 4.5 9.6 9.2 2.0 1.8 2.0 1.7 2011 2.3 2.3 6.5 5.5 0.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 to to to to to to to to 5.0 5.5 9.0 8.0 2.5 2.1 2.5 1.8 Longer Run 2.4 2.4 4.5 4.5 1.5 1.5 to to to to to to 3.0 3.0 5.3 5.5 2.0 2.0

2.7 −2.5 to −0.5 2.7 −2.5 to 0.2 5.0 9.1 to 10.0 5.0 8.0 to 9.2 2.0 −0.5 to 1.2 2.0 −0.5 to 1.5 0.7 to 1.6 0.6 to 1.5

Note: Projections of change in real gross domestic product (GDP) and of inflation are from the fourth quarter of the previous year to the fourth quarter of the year indicated. PCE inflation and core PCE inflation are the percentage rates of change in, respectively, the price index for personal consumption expenditures (PCE) and the price index for PCE excluding food and energy. Projections for the unemployment rate are for the average civilian unemployment rate in the fourth quarter of the year indicated. Each participant’s projections are based on his or her assessment of appropriate monetary policy. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks to the economy. The January projections were made in conjunction with the FOMC meeting on January 27–28, 2009. 1. The central tendency excludes the three highest and three lowest projections for each variable in each year. 2. The range for a variable in a given year includes all participants’ projections, from lowest to highest, for that variable in that year. 3. Longer-run projections for core PCE inflation are not collected.

284 96th Annual Report, 2009

Minutes of FOMC Meetings, April 285 ticipants—though fewer than in January—viewed the risks to the growth outlook as skewed to the downside. Most participants saw the risks to the inflation outlook as balanced; fewer than in January viewed those risks as tilted to the downside. With few exceptions, participants judged that their projections for economic activity and inflation remained subject to a degree of uncertainty exceeding historical norms. The Outlook Participants’ projections for 2009 real GDP growth had a central tendency of negative 2.0 percent to negative 1.3 percent, somewhat below the central tendency of negative 1.3 percent to negative 0.5 percent for their January projections. Participants noted that the data received between the January and April FOMC meetings pointed to a larger decline in output and employment during the first quarter than they had anticipated at the time of the January meeting. However, participants also saw recent indications that the economic downturn was slowing in the second quarter, and they continued to expect that sales and production would begin to recover—albeit gradually— during the second half of the year, reflecting the effects of monetary and fiscal stimulus and of measures to support credit markets and stabilize the financial system along with market forces. In particular, participants noted some improvement in financial conditions in recent months, signs that consumer spending was leveling out, and tentative indications that activity in the housing sector might be nearing its bottom. In addition, they observed that the large reduction in stocks of unsold goods that resulted from firms’ aggressive inventory cutting during the first quarter would make firms more likely to increase production as their sales stabilize and then begin to turn up later this year. Participants expected, however, that recoveries in consumer spending and residential investment initially would be damped by further deterioration in labor markets, still-tight credit conditions, and a continuing, if less pronounced, decline in house prices. Moreover, they anticipated that very low capacity utilization, sluggish growth in sales, and the high cost and limited availability of financing would contribute to further weakness in business fixed investment this year. Looking further ahead, participants’ projections for real GDP growth in 2010 had a central tendency of 2.0 to 3.0 percent, and those for 2011 had a central tendency of 3.5 to 4.8 percent. Participants generally expected that strains in credit markets and in the banking system would ebb slowly, and hence that the pace of recovery would continue to be damped in 2010. But they anticipated that the upturn would strengthen in 2011 to a pace exceeding the growth rate of potential GDP as financial conditions continue to improve, and that it would remain above that rate long enough to eliminate slack in resource utilization over time. Several participants anticipated that rapid growth in the monetary base in 2009—a result of the Federal Reserve’s sizable purchases of longer-term assets—would result in a more pronounced pickup in output and employment growth in 2010 and a somewhat quicker convergence to longer-run equilibrium. Most participants expected that, absent further shocks, real GDP growth eventually would converge to a rate of 2.5 to 2.7 percent per year, reflecting longer-term trends in the growth of productivity and the labor force.

286 96th Annual Report, 2009 In light of their expectation that the recovery will begin gradually, with output initially rising at a below-potential rate, participants anticipated that labor market conditions would continue to deteriorate over the remainder of this year. Their projections for the average unemployment rate during the fourth quarter of 2009 had a central tendency of 9.2 to 9.6 percent, noticeably higher than the actual unemployment rate of 8.5 percent in March—the latest reading available at the time of the April FOMC meeting. All participants revised up their forecasts of the unemployment rate at the end of this year relative to their January projections, reflecting the sharper-than-expected rise in actual unemployment that occurred during the first quarter as well as the downward revisions in their forecasts of output growth in 2009. Most participants anticipated that growth next year would not substantially exceed its longer-run sustainable rate and hence that the unemployment rate would decline only modestly in 2010; some also pointed to the friction of a reallocation of resources away from shrinking economic sectors as likely to restrain progress in reducing unemployment. With output growth and job creation generally projected to pick up appreciably in 2011, participants anticipated that joblessness would decline more noticeably, as evident from the central tendency of 7.7 to 8.5 percent for their projections of the unemployment rate in late 2011. Even so, they expected that the unemployment rate at the end of 2011 would still be declining toward its longer-run sustainable level. Participants projected that unemployment would decline further after 2011; most saw the unemployment rate eventually converging to 4.8 to 5.0 percent. The central tendency of participants’ projections for 2009 PCE inflation was 0.6 to 0.9 percent, an interval that is somewhat narrower but neither higher nor lower than the central tendency of their January projections. Looking beyond this year, participants’ projections for total PCE inflation had central tendencies of 1.0 to 1.6 percent for 2010 and 1.0 to 1.9 percent for 2011. The central tendency of projections for core inflation in 2009 was 1.0 to 1.5 percent; those for 2010 and 2011 were 0.7 to 1.3 percent and 0.8 to 1.6 percent, respectively. Most participants expected that economic slack, though diminishing, would continue to damp inflation pressures for the next few years and hence that total PCE inflation in 2011 would still be below their assessments of its appropriate longer-run level. Some thought that persistent economic slack would be accompanied by declining inflation over the next few years. Most, however, projected that, as the economy recovers, inflation would increase gradually and move toward their individual assessments of the measured rate of inflation consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate for maximum employment and price stability. Several participants, noting that the public’s longer-run inflation expectations have not changed appreciably, anticipated that inflation would return more promptly to levels consistent with their judgments about appropriate longer-run inflation. In April as in January, the central tendency of projections of the longerrun inflation rate was 1.7 to 2.0 percent. Most participants judged that a longer-run PCE inflation rate of 2 percent would be consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate; others indicated that inflation of 11⁄2 or 13⁄4 percent would be appropriate. Modestly

Minutes of FOMC Meetings, April 287 positive longer-run inflation would allow the Committee to stimulate economic activity and support employment by setting the federal funds rate temporarily below the inflation rate when the economy suffers a large negative shock to demands for goods and services. Uncertainty and Risks A majority of participants continued to view the risks to their projections for real GDP growth as skewed to the downside and saw the associated risks to their projections for the unemployment rate as tilted to the upside, but a larger number than in January now saw the risks as broadly balanced. Participants shared the judgment that their projections of future economic activity and unemployment continued to be subject to greater-than-average uncertainty.9 Some participants highlighted the still-considerable uncertainty about the future course of the financial crisis and the risk that a resurgence of financial turmoil could adversely impact the real economy. In addition, some noted the difficulty in gauging the macroeconomic effects of the credit-easing policies that are now being employed by the Federal Reserve and other central banks, given limited experience with such tools. Most participants judged the risks to the inflation outlook as roughly balanced; some continued to view these risks as skewed to the downside, while one saw inflation risks as tilted to the
9. Table 2 provides estimates of forecast uncertainty for the change in real GDP, the unemployment rate, and total consumer price inflation over the period from 1989 to 2008. At the end of this summary, the box “Forecast Uncertainty” discusses the sources and interpretation of uncertainty in economic forecasts and explains the approach used to assess the uncertainty and risks attending participants’ projections.

Table 2. Average historical projection error ranges
Percentage points Variable Change in real GDP1 . . . Unemployment rate1 . . . . Total consumer prices2 . . 2009 ±1.0 ±0.5 ±0.8 2010 ±1.5 ±0.8 ±1.0 2011 ±1.6 ±1.0 ±1.0

Note: Error ranges shown are measured as plus or minus the root mean squared error of projections for 1989 through 2008 that were released in the spring by various private and government forecasters. As described in the box “Forecast Uncertainty,” under certain assumptions, there is about a 70 percent probability that actual outcomes for real GDP, unemployment, and consumer prices will be in ranges implied by the average size of projection errors made in the past. Further information is in David Reifschneider and Peter Tulip (2007), “Gauging the Uncertainty of the Economic Outlook from Historical Forecasting Errors,” Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-60 (Washington: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, November). 1. For definitions, refer to general note in table 1. 2. Measure is the overall consumer price index, the price measure that has been most widely used in government and private economic forecasts. Projection is percent change, fourth quarter of the previous year to the fourth quarter of the year indicated.

upside. Some participants noted the risk that inflation expectations might become unanchored and drift downward in response to persistently low inflation outcomes; several pointed to the possibility of an upward shift in expected and actual inflation if investors become concerned that stimulative monetary policy measures and the attendant expansion of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet might not be unwound in a timely fashion as the economy recovers. Most participants again saw the uncertainty surrounding their inflation projections as exceeding historical norms. Diversity of Views Figures 2.A and 2.B provide further details on the diversity of participants’ views regarding likely outcomes for real GDP growth and the unemploy-

288 96th Annual Report, 2009 ment rate in 2009, 2010, and 2011. The dispersion in participants’ April projections reflects, among other factors, the diversity of their assessments regarding the effects of fiscal stimulus and the likely pace of recovery in the financial sector. Though the dispersion in projections for each variable was roughly the same in April as in January, the downward shift in the distribution of participants’ projections of real GDP growth in 2009, coupled with essentially unchanged distributions of projections for growth in 2010 and 2011, resulted in an upward shift from January to April in the distribution of projections for the unemployment rate in all three years. The dispersion in participants’ longerrun projections reflected differences in their estimates regarding the sustainable rates of output growth and unemployment to which the economy would converge under appropriate policy and in the absence of any further shocks; these distributions did not change appreciably from January to April. Figures 2.C and 2.D provide corresponding information about the diversity of participants’ views regarding the inflation outlook. The dispersion in participants’ projections for total and core PCE inflation during 2009 and the following two years illustrates their varying assessments of the inflation outcomes that will result from persistent economic slack, from expansion and subsequent contraction of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet, and perhaps also from changes in the public’s expectations of future inflation. In contrast, the tight distribution of participants’ projections for longer-run inflation illustrates their substantial agreement about the measured rate of inflation that is most consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives of maximum employment and stable prices.

Minutes of FOMC Meetings. April 289 .

2009 .290 96th Annual Report.

April 291 .Minutes of FOMC Meetings.

292 96th Annual Report. 2009 .

1. For example. Considerable uncertainty attends these projections. smaller than. Participants also provide judgments as to whether the risks to their projections are weighted to the upside. and 1. The corresponding 70 percent confidence intervals for overall inflation would be 1.2 percent to 2. suppose a participant projects that real gross domestic product (GDP) and total consumer prices will rise steadily at annual rates of. the numbers reported in table 2 would imply a probability of about 70 percent that actual GDP would expand between 2 percent to 4 percent in the current year. or broadly similar to typical levels of forecast uncertainty in the past as shown in table 2. rather than with divergences across a number of different projections. or are broadly balanced. Thus. 3 percent and 2 percent. in setting the stance of monetary policy. however. including those reported in past Monetary Policy Reports and those prepared by Federal Reserve Board staff in advance of meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee. the likelihood of their occurring.8 percent in the current year and 1. If the uncertainty attending those projections is similar to that experienced in the past and the risks around the projections are broadly balanced.0 percent to 3. These judgments about the uncertainty and the risks attending each participant’s projections are distinct from the diversity of participants’ views about the most likely outcomes.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. The projection error ranges shown in the table illustrate the considerable uncertainty associated with economic forecasts. downside. but also the range of alternative possibilities. The economic and statistical models and relationships used to help produce economic forecasts are necessarily imperfect descriptions of the real world. participants judge whether each variable is more likely to be above or below their projections of the most likely outcome. participants consider not only what appears to be the most likely economic outcome as embodied in their projections. That is. . Table 2 summarizes the average historical accuracy of a range of forecasts. participants provide judgments as to whether the uncertainty attached to their projections of each variable is greater than. Because current conditions may differ from those that prevailed on average over history. and the potential costs to the economy should they occur.5 percent in the second year.0 percent in the second and third years.5 percent to 4. respectively. And the future path of the economy can be affected by myriad unforeseen developments and events. Forecast uncertainty is concerned with the risks associated with a particular projection.4 percent to 4. April 293 Forecast Uncertainty The economic projections provided by the members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks inform discussions of monetary policy among policymakers and can aid public understanding of the basis for policy actions.6 percent in the third year.

Yellen Messrs. Division of Research and Statistics. Office of Board Members. Nelson. Baxter. Assistant Secretary Mr. and Wascher. Madigan. Duke Mr. D. Dudley. Senior Economist. English. Monetary Affairs. Deputy Staff Director. Alternate Members of the Federal Open Market Committee Messrs. Board of Governors Mr. Present: Mr. Office of the Staff Director for Management. Assistant Secretary Mr. Danker. Altig. Slifman. Lockhart Mr. Kamin. . Philadelphia. Sack. and Stern.C. Presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks of Dallas. Group Manager. Assistant Director.10 General Counsel Mr. Wood. Assistant Secretary Ms. Division of Monetary Affairs. at 9:00 a. Associate Directors. Secretary of the Board. Board of Governors Messrs. Oliner. Kohn Mr.m. Division of Monetary Affairs. Evans Mr. and Research and Statistics. Kiley. Warsh Ms. Lindner. Gagnon. Deputy General Counsel Mr. System Open Market Account Ms. and Mr. Chairman Mr. Division of International Finance. Project Manager.. Division of Monetary Affairs. 2009. Lacker Mr. Office of the Secretary. Associate Economists Mr. on Tuesday. June 23. Economists. Visiting Associate Director. Johnson. Reifschneider. respectively Mr. Plosser. Secretary and Economist Ms. Research and Statistics.10 Deputy Secretary. Deputy Secretary Mr. Carpenter and Perli. Assistant to the Board. Division of Research and Statistics. 2009. Division of Monetary Affairs. Fisher. Division of Research and Statistics. and Minneapolis. Tarullo Mr. Division of Monetary Affairs.m. Office of the Secretary. Blanchard. Ms. Bernanke. respectively. and continued on Wednesday. 2009 A joint meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System was held in the offices of the Board of Governors in Washington. Board of Governors Mr. Board of Governors Mr. Board of Governors Ms. Greenlee. Bullard and Hoenig. Board of Governors Mr. Sheets. Clouse.294 96th Annual Report. Board of Governors Messrs. King. Small. Connors. Skidmore. Stockton. Deputy Associate Directors. Rosengren. Divisions of Banking Supervision and Regulation. Weinberg. Senior Adviser. Board of Governors Messrs. Board of Governors 10. Frierson.10 and McCarthy. Struckmeyer. 2009 Meeting Held on June 23–24. June 24. Board of Governors Mr. Economist Mr. Manager. Smith. Deputy Director. Board of Governors Mr. Attended Tuesday’s session only. Vice Chairman Ms. Board of Governors Mr. Pianalto. Luecke. and Wilcox. Driscoll. Board of Governors Mr. Economist Messrs. at 1:00 p. Alvarez. Board of Governors Mr.

There were no open market operations in foreign currencies for the System’s account over the intermeeting period. Kansas City. securities held in the SOMA portfolio that are direct obligations of federal agencies. Senior Vice Presidents.” Developments in Financial Markets and the Federal Reserve’s Balance Sheet The Manager of the System Open Market Account (SOMA) reported on recent developments in domestic and foreign financial markets. held in the System Open Market Account. Chicago. Federal Reserve Bank of New York regular overnight securities lending operations. McAndrews. Executive Vice Presidents. New York. The analysis indicated that the Federal Reserve was likely to earn substantial net interest . Advisor to the President. respectively Mr. Board of Governors Ms. Schweitzer. Federal Reserve Banks of Boston and Dallas. Philadelphia. Mester and Mosser. Assistant to the Secretary. The Committee reviewed a staff proposal that would authorize the Desk to lend. Cleveland. Logan. Feldman. and St. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York shall set a minimum lending fee consistent with the objectives of the program and apply reasonable limitations on the total amount of a specific issue that may be auctioned and on the amount of securities that each dealer may borrow. and Messrs. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York may reject bids which could facilitate a dealer’s ability to control a single issue as determined solely by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. and Waller. to dealers at rates that shall be determined by competitive bidding. Mses. Beattie. Hilton. Federal Reserve Banks of Minneapolis.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. Krane. respectively Ms. June 295 Ms. Judd. In order to ensure the effective conduct of open market operations.S. The staff also presented information on the possible implications of substantial changes in the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet for the System’s net income. Staff projections suggested that the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet might peak late this year and decline gradually thereafter. The Manager also reported on System open market operations in Treasury securities and in agency debt and agency mortgagebacked securities (MBS) during the period since the Committee’s April 28–29 meeting. New York. Government securities and securities that are direct obligations of any agency of the United States. Open Market Secretariat Specialist. The Committee voted unanimously to amend paragraph 3 of the Authorization for Domestic Open Market Operations with the text underlined below. Office of the Secretary. “3. the Committee ratified those transactions. Vice President. Lending agency securities was viewed as a technical modification to the existing overnight securities lending program that would support functioning of agency debt markets. Division of Monetary Affairs. Low. Fuhrer and Rosenblum. Sellon. Louis. the Federal Open Market Committee authorizes the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to lend on an overnight basis U. By unanimous vote. New York. Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Messrs. Board of Governors Messrs. as part of the Federal Reserve’s The staff reported on projections of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet under various assumptions about economic and financial conditions and the associated path of monetary policy.

given the large amount of current and projected supply of Treasury securities. and agency MBS. and possible approaches to winding down purchases as the programs near completion. the staff briefed the Committee on a number of possible tools that the Federal Reserve might employ to foster effective control of the federal funds rate in the context of a much expanded balance sheet. it was not expected to have to do so. the leverage ratios for most institutions were well above the regulatory minimums at the end of the first quarter. extensions of the duration of securities purchased. The Federal Reserve was already purchasing a very large fraction of new current-coupon agency MBS and agency debt. with few exceptions. in which aggressive increases in shortterm interest rates significantly reduced System net income relative to a baseline scenario. Some of those tools were focused primarily on shaping or strengthening the demand for reserves. Others were concerned that announcements of substantial additional purchases could . while the Federal Reserve would retain the option of selling securities before they mature or are prepaid as a means of tightening policy when appropriate. Some participants thought that increases in purchases of Treasury securities might have little or no effect on long-term interest rates unless the increases were very sizable. steps to increase the flexibility of those purchases both within each program and across programs in response to short-term market developments. In part. agency debt securities. The analysis concluded that. A number of potential modifications to those programs were presented for the Committee’s consideration. even with the substantial growth in reserve balances projected to occur in coming months and even if there were some erosion in bank capital. However. and further increasing the scale of those programs could compromise market functioning. The staff also reviewed the experience to date with the Federal Reserve’s purchases of Treasury securities. The staff presented one scenario. while others were designed to provide greater control over the supply of reserves. that result reflected the fact that many institutions had raised capital lately. Ensuring that policy accommodation can ultimately be withdrawn smoothly and at the appropriate time would remain a top priority of the Federal Reserve. however. including possible expansions in their size. banks’ regulatory leverage ratios (defined as tier 1 capital divided by total average assets) were likely to remain comfortably above regulatory minimums. in addition. 2009 income over the next few years under most interest rate scenarios. meeting participants generally agreed that the Federal Reserve either already had or could develop tools to remove policy accommodation when appropriate. An important issue was whether the further increase in reserve balances that is likely to result from the Federal Reserve’s already-announced program of asset purchases could lead banks to limit their lending and acquisition of securities in order to prevent an excessive decline in their capital ratios. In discussing the staff presentation. Changes in market valuations were thus seen as unlikely to have significant implications for the System’s net income. The analysis also suggested that the market value of the Federal Reserve’s securities holdings could decline appreciably under some scenarios. In a related discussion. The staff also provided the Committee with an analysis of the potential adverse effects of very high reserve balances on bank capital ratios.296 96th Annual Report.

such developments might put renewed pressure on some financial institutions and markets and tighten credit conditions for businesses and households. The staff presented policymakers with proposals for extensions. the Commercial Paper Funding Facility (CPFF). the Term Securities Lending Facility (TSLF). Following the presentation and discussion of the staff proposal. In these circumstances.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. thought that formulating and communicating such a plan would be very difficult. Moreover. The asset purchase programs were intended to support economic activity by improving market functioning and reducing interest rates on mortgage loans and other long-term credit to households and businesses relative to what they otherwise would have been. the Board voted unanimously to extend the AMLF. Use of most of the liquidity facilities had declined in recent months as market conditions had improved. Many participants agreed. in principle. Most. the Committee could formulate a plan for asset purchases that would respond to economic and financial developments in a way that might better promote monetary policy objectives. meeting participants judged that market conditions remained fragile. June 297 add to perceptions that the federal debt was being monetized. that it was appropriate for the Desk to make small adjustments to the size and timing of purchases aimed at fostering market liquidity and improving market functioning. both of which had ebbed notably in recent months. and terminations of various liquidity programs. however. and the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF). The period over year-end was seen as posing heightened risks given the usual pressures in financial markets at that time. A number of the credit and liquidity facilities that the Federal Reserve had established in the course of the financial crisis were scheduled to expire on October 30. Still. participants viewed the availability of the liquidity facilities as a factor that had contributed to the reduction in financial strains. Some participants noted that. and that concerns about counterparty credit risk and access to liquidity. or tightening access to several programs. Participants discussed the merits of including securities backed by adjustable-rate mortgages in MBS purchases and of tapering off purchases of securities as the asset purchase programs were being completed. however. could increase again. potentially leading to an increase in market uncertainty regarding Federal Reserve actions and intentions. participants agreed that most facilities should be extended into early next year. the Primary Dealer . participants also judged that improved market conditions and declining use of the facilities warranted scaling back. public concern about monetization could have adverse implications for inflation expectations. modifications. and participants did not consider it appropriate to allow the Desk discretion to adjust the size and composition of the Federal Reserve’s asset purchases in response to short-run fluctuations in market interest rates. including the Term Auction Facility (TAF). suspending. However. If the Federal Reserve’s backup liquidity facilities were terminated prematurely. but the Committee did not reach a decision on those issues at the meeting. But the Committee had not set specific objectives for longer-term interest rates. While most members did not see large-scale purchases of Treasury securities as likely to be a source of inflation pressures given the weak economic outlook.

” Board members and FOMC participants noted their expectation that a number of these facilities may not need to be extended beyond February 1. 2010. though declines in activity seemed to be lessening. Employment was still falling. The extension of the TSLF required the approval of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). its authorizations for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to provide a Term Securities Lending Facility. although the upturn in energy prices appeared likely to boost headline inflation in June. but the decline was the smallest since September. as that facility was established under the joint authority of the Board and the FOMC. In addition. if possible. subject to the same collateral. the Federal Reserve Bank of New York is directed to suspend Schedule 1 TSLF auctions. In addition. and manufacturers had cut production further in response to excess inventories and soft demand. The Federal Open Market Committee extends until February 1. interest rate. its authorizations for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to engage in temporary reciprocal currency arrangements (“swap arrangements”) with foreign central banks under the conditions previously established by the Committee. In addition. The demand for labor weakened further in May. the Board and the Federal Open Market Committee. the Reserve Bank is directed to reduce over time the amounts provided through the TSLF as market conditions warrant. the Board and the FOMC were prepared to extend the terms of some or all of the facilities as needed to promote financial stability and economic growth. 2010. Staff Review of the Economic Situation The information reviewed at the June 23–24 meeting suggested that the economy remained very weak. But the reductions in employment and industrial production had slowed somewhat. 2009 Credit Facility (PDCF). The Board and the FOMC jointly decided to suspend some TSLF auctions and to reduce the size and frequency of others. and other conditions previously established by the Committee. the FOMC extended the temporary reciprocal currency arrangements (swap lines) between the Federal Reserve and other central banks to February 1.298 96th Annual Report. The Board did not extend the Money Market Investor Funding Facility (MMIFF) beyond October 30. and sales and construction of single-family homes had apparently flattened out. However. and the TSLF through February 1. However. if the recent improvements in market conditions continue. 2010. The FOMC unanimously passed the following resolution to extend the temporary swap arrangements and the TSLF: “The Federal Open Market Committee extends until February 1. the Account Manager is to consult with the Chairman and. albeit less rapidly than in earlier months. effective immediately. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is directed to suspend operations of the Term Securities Lending Facility Options Program (TOP). the recent declines in capital spending were smaller than those recorded earlier in the year. Nonfarm payrolls continued to shrink. 2010. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is directed to conduct Schedule 2 TSLF auctions initially on a monthly basis in amounts of $75 billion. consumer spending appeared to be holding reasonably steady after shrinking in the second half of 2008. Consumer price inflation was fairly quiescent in recent months. average weekly hours of production and nonsupervisory workers on . Should market conditions appear to warrant the resumption of Schedule 1 TSLF or TOP auctions. effective immediately. 2010. if financial stresses do not moderate as expected.

Real outlays on services were reported to have picked up some in April from the average monthly gain seen over the first three months of the year. In contrast. Despite the high level of joblessness. reflecting a sharp deterioration in the fundamentals in that sector. In addition. Sales of light motor vehicles in April and May were slightly higher than the firstquarter average. Industrial production decreased in April and May but at a slower pace than in the first quarter. most industries continued to cut production in both April and May. activity in the much smaller multifamily sector fell significantly further. reversing a small portion of the prior wealth declines. though at a slower pace than over the preceding five months. and adjusted permit issuance for single-family houses was a little above the level of starts. June 299 private payrolls. The fundamental determinants of consumer demand appeared to have improved a bit: Despite the ongoing decline in employment. real disposable personal income rose in the first quarter and posted another sizable gain in April as various provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 boosted transfer payments and reduced personal taxes. improved markedly from the historical lows recorded around the turn of the year. The four-week moving average of initial claims for unemployment insurance fell back a little. as it had been since January. however. Thus aggregate hours worked by this group fell at a slower pace in April and May than on average over the previous seven months. and the factory operating rate dipped further in May. Outside the transportation and hightech sectors. The unemployment rate.4 percent. The production of motor vehicles and parts dropped sharply in May. equity prices recorded substantial gains in April and May. The steep decline in the demand for new single-family houses seemed to have abated. Manufacturing output also fell in those months. and the months’ supply of new homes remained quite elevated relative to sales despite a decrease in the stock of unsold new single-family homes to a level roughly one-half of its mid-2006 peak. and available data suggested that spending was holding reasonably steady in the second quarter. In the high-tech sector. but the number of individuals receiving unemployment insurance benefits continued to increase. principally because of extended plant shutdowns at General Motors and Chrysler. on net. However. which had dropped substantially from September to March. real expenditures on goods other than motor vehicles appeared to have risen slightly in May and to have changed little. the labor force participation rate moved up for a second consecutive month to a level close to where it was at the beginning of the recession. Sales of existing single-family homes had been fairly steady from late 2008 through May. rose further in May. . computer output fell at a pace similar to that in the first quarter.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. while remaining at levels typically seen during recessions. since the turn of the year. were essentially unchanged in April and May. Real personal consumption expenditures rose somewhat in the first quarter after falling in the second half of 2008. to 9. On the basis of the latest retail sales data. but nearterm indicators of production turned somewhat less negative and global semiconductor sales climbed in April for the second consecutive month. the pace of new home sales was still very low in April. Measures of consumer sentiment. The production of commercial aircraft moved up. Single-family housing starts edged up in May.

and monthly surveys of business conditions and sentiment were generally less downbeat than earlier in the year. and the incoming data on shipments and orders of nondefense capital goods pointed to a moderation in the rate of decrease in other major components of E&S. The U. national house prices continued to decline. Real investment in equipment and software (E&S) continued to contract. suggested that the pace of contraction likely moderated in the second quarter. The contraction in spending on computing equipment appeared to be leveling off. however. The principal determinants of investment were still weak: Business output dropped further in the first quarter. Meanwhile. Recent indicators. Rates for conforming 30-year fixed-rate mortgages rose on net between late April and late June but remained below the levels seen over most of 2008. and industrial production stabilized somewhat. Most major categories of exports fell. and consumer goods exhibiting significant declines. Although the months’ supply of nonfarm business inventories remained elevated. although businesses continued to cut their real outlays on software. Domestic demand fell in all major economies. the decline in the second quarter appeared likely to be smaller than in either of the two preceding quarters.S. international trade deficit widened slightly in April. Data suggested a substantial increase in outlays for nonresidential construction in March and April. spreads between rates for jumbo and standard conforming loans narrowed substantially since March. The value of oil imports also rose. The apparent stabilization in housing demand was likely due. as a decrease in imports was more than offset by a drop in exports. led by doubledigit declines in fixed investment and sizable negative contributions of inventories to growth. Outlays on transportation equipment seemed to be firming after shrinking for an extended period. Purchasing managers indexes rebounded from the exceptionally low levels reached in the first quarter. Imports of machinery and industrial supplies displayed significant decreases. demand for nonresidential building remained extremely weak and financing difficult to obtain. industrial supplies. 2009 The relative stability of the resale market over this period coincided with a heightened proportion of transactions involving bank-owned and other distressed properties. Although the market for private-label nonprime mortgages remained closed. to the improvement in housing affordability that resulted from low mortgage rates and declining house prices. concentrated in energy-related sectors. Imports of consumer goods increased.300 96th Annual Report. the user cost of capital was higher than it was a year earlier. The value of imports of goods and services also edged down after remaining about unchanged in March. however. and credit remained tight. as higher prices outweighed lower volumes. Real spending on equipment outside of high-tech and transportation seemed to have dropped less rapidly in the second quarter than in the first quarter. The decline in output in the advanced foreign economies deepened in the first quarter. In emerging market economies. with exports of machinery. and imports of services fell moderately. in part. incoming data showed that first-quarter real gross domestic prod- . However. Outside of the energy-related sectors. large production cutbacks in recent quarters allowed producers to stem the rise in stocks relative to sales. corporate bond yields eased considerably in the weeks leading to the June meeting.

For the second quarter. In addition. The expected path of the federal funds rate implied by futures prices was largely unchanged by the release of the Committee’s statement and minutes. In the United States. The incoming data on labor costs were mixed. Financial conditions continued to improve in most emerging market economies. indicators suggested a broader stabilization of activity in emerging market economies. and selling of long-duration assets as exposure to mortgage prepayment risk dropped with a rise in mortgage rates. Survey measures of long-term inflation expectations showed no signs of moving lower despite the considerable margin of laborand product-market slack present in the economy. Spot commodity prices. which was read as being significantly less negative than anticipated. a reversal of flight-to-quality flows. these prices remained well below their year-earlier levels. as market participants reportedly focused on the suggestion that the total size of the purchase program might need to be increased at some point to spur a more rapid pace of recovery. Malaysia. market participants marked up their expected path for the federal funds rate. Nevertheless. edged up in Korea. rose more rapidly since the end of April. and Singapore. Staff Review of the Financial Situation The decision by the FOMC at its April 28–29 meeting to leave the target range for the federal funds rate unchanged and the accompanying statement indicating that the FOMC would maintain the size of the large-scale asset purchase program were largely anticipated. headline consumer prices were little changed between March and May. However. decreased concerns about the risk of deflation. Yields on nominal Treasury coupon securities increased. and expanded considerably in India and Indonesia. the employment cost index decelerated further. Hong Kong. on net. June 301 uct (GDP) contracted sharply in Mexico. Near-term inflation expectations in the Reuters/ University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers remained steady in May and then rose somewhat in the preliminary June survey. including investors’ perceptions of an improvement in the economic outlook. held down by declines in the prices of food and energy over that period.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. although core prices posted fairly small increases apart from a tax-induced jump in tobacco prices. These moves likely reflected a number of factors. In China. The release of the April FOMC minutes three weeks later prompted a reversal of this move. Some of the rise . which had moved higher over the first four months of 2009. over the intermeeting period. the producer price index for core intermediate materials continued to decline through May. Core inflation was slightly higher from March to May than during the preceding three months. as a few investors apparently had seen some chance that the Committee would expand the purchase program. Increases in average hourly earnings also slowed further in April and May. At earlier stages of processing. but yields on Treasury securities rose slightly. in the days following the release of the May employment report. retail sales and fixed-asset investment rose strongly. albeit at a slower pace than that seen at the end of 2008. inflation compensation rose over the intermeeting period as yields on inflation-indexed Treasury securities increased much less than those on their nominal counterparts. Although the rise in hourly compensation in the nonfarm business sector picked up slightly in the first quarter.

with bid-asked spreads for most types of transactions narrowing a bit and haircuts roughly unchanged. The on-the-run/off-the-run premium narrowed considerably at the short end of the yield curve. remaining at the low end of their ranges over the previous 18 months. These spreads narrowed to levels not seen since early 2008. Yields on speculative-grade and investment-grade corporate bonds dropped. The inclusion of commercial mortgagebacked securities (CMBS) in the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF) program resulted initially in a narrowing of commercial mortgage credit default swap (CDS) spreads.302 96th Annual Report. Such spreads. 2009 in inflation compensation may have reflected an increase in inflation expectations. with the average bid price increasing noticeably and bid-asked spreads narrowing a bit further. while estimates of such spreads for investment-grade corporate bonds remained somewhat elevated. Option-implied volatility on the S&P 500 index declined but remained elevated. Estimates of bid-asked spreads in the secondary market for speculative-grade corporate bonds fell significantly to about their average levels in the few years before the summer of 2007. perhaps associated with these flows. in part. the release of the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program (SCAP) results for the nation’s 19 largest bank holding companies (BHCs) on May 7. spreads later widened as rating agencies issued conflicting opinions regarding the credit quality of senior CMBS tranches. Broad stock price indexes rose. Some strains. but an improvement in liquidity in the market for Treasury inflationprotected securities and mortgagerelated hedging flows may have boosted inflation compensation as well. reflecting. on net. The spread between an estimate of the expected real equity return over the next 10 years for S&P 500 firms and an estimate of the real 10-year Treasury yield—a rough gauge of the equity risk premium—narrowed noticeably but remained high by historical standards. market participants reacted to the large and rapid changes in MBS yields by widening bid-asked spreads on these securities. on net. and spreads over yields on comparable-maturity Treasury securities narrowed considerably. as evidenced by declines in London interbank offered rate (Libor) fixings and in spreads between one. Spreads on A2/P2-rated commercial paper and AA-rated assetbacked commercial paper were little changed.and three-month Libor and comparable-maturity overnight index swap (OIS) rates. The market for repurchase agreements saw slight improvement. Pressures in short-term bank funding markets eased further. remained somewhat wide for longer-dated issues. reflecting generally better-than-expected economic news and further declines in risk premiums. emerged at times in the MBS market. however. Nearly all the BHCs evaluated had enough Tier 1 capital to absorb the higher losses envisioned under the hypotheti- . functioning in the market for Treasury securities generally improved and trading picked up. Market sentiment toward the financial sector improved over the intermeeting period. Over the intermeeting period. but some strains remained. Market sentiment toward the syndicated leveraged loan market also improved. and tentative signs of increased liquidity reportedly emerged. transaction volume rose modestly. apparently reflecting concerns about volatility linked to mortgage-related hedging flows. since late April. over the intermeeting period. however.

Home equity loans edged down—the first monthly decline in this category since October 2006—partly because of banks’ reductions in existing lines of credit. probably in response to declining interest rates on these assets. but issuance of lower-rated speculative-grade bonds remained minimal. Gross bond issuance by nonfinancial corporations was robust in May. Investment-grade issuance rebounded after a lull in April. and asset sales. Commercial bank credit increased slightly in May following six consecutive monthly declines. real estate. the Treasury announced that 10 large financial institutions were eligible to repay the $68 billion in capital that they had received through the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). and consumer loans. The expansion of M2 slowed significantly in April and May. On June 9. the federal government issued large amounts of debt. June 303 cal more adverse scenario. Stock price indexes for the banking sector and the broader financial sectors rose significantly. amid subdued origination activity and broad-based paydowns of outstanding loans. around $70 billion in common equity through public offerings. loans other than commercial and industrial (C&I). Libor-to-OIS spreads in euros and sterling decreased. likely reflecting primarily a waning in foreign demand. as well as nonguaranteed debt. leading investors to shift away from safe-haven assets in the United States to riskier assets elsewhere. Closed-end residential mortgages decreased. Meanwhile. as the reallocation of household wealth toward the safety and liquidity of M2 assets evidently moderated. This decline appeared to be driven by a renewed sense of optimism about global growth prospects. or announced plans to raise. originations were reportedly strong but were more than offset by loan sales to the governmentsponsored enterprises. Speculative-grade issuance was the highest since June 2007. however. The evaluated BHCs have also issued additional debt under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program (TLGP). The dollar depreciated substantially during the intermeeting period against all other major currencies. C&I loans dropped in May. the quantity of consumer loans on banks’ balance sheets decreased even more because of a number of large credit card securitizations. but the turnaround reflected a rise in securities holdings and in the volatile “other” loans category—that is. and state and local government debt was estimated to have expanded moderately. Following the announcement of the SCAP results. and several foreign banks took advantage of improved financial conditions to raise capital and increase issuance of debt outside of . 10 institutions were required to enhance their capital structure to put greater emphasis on common equity. although they remained well above historical norms. CDS spreads for banking organizations declined considerably over the intermeeting period. These offerings accounted for most of the record-high total financial equity issuance in May. Retail money market mutual funds and small time deposits contracted in both months. conversion of preferred stock.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. The rise in currency diminished. The level of private-sector debt was estimated to have remained about unchanged in the second quarter. the 19 evaluated institutions raised. The amount of outstanding consumer loans originated by banks shrank during April and May. as a further modest decline in household debt about offset a slight increase in nonfinancial business debt.

and financial stress appeared to have eased somewhat more than had been anticipated in the staff forecast prepared for the prior FOMC meeting. Most stock markets in emerging market economies rose considerably. the staff projected that real GDP would expand at a rate well above that of its potential. the value of the dollar was lower. Recent declines in payroll employment and industrial production. were smaller than those registered earlier in 2009. and that overall and core personal consumption expenditures inflation would stay low. The improved access to capital markets and better economic outlook buoyed bank stocks. the staff revised upward its outlook for economic activity during the remainder of 2009 and for 2010. Consumer spending appeared to have stabilized since the start of the year. to a pace above the growth rate of potential GDP. equities. corporate bonds. Nonetheless. the staff forecast for inflation was marked up. The Bank of England. The staff projected that real GDP would decline at a substantially slower rate in the second quarter than it had in the first quarter and then increase in the second half of 2009. and the Bank of Japan kept their policy rates constant over the intermeeting period. As a consequence. Meanwhile. and several central banks intervened to purchase dollars. Staff Economic Outlook In the forecast prepared for the June meeting. the rise in energy prices. the staff anticipated that financial markets and institutions would continue to recuperate. the Bank of Canada. but the Bank of England increased the size of its planned asset purchases from £75 billion to £125 billion. fiscal stimulus would be fading. and mutual fund flows into those markets strengthened. 2009 government guarantee programs. less-favorable import prices. The staff also revised up its projection for the increase in real GDP in 2010. and the absence of any downward movement in inflation expectations led the staff to raise its medium-term inflation outlook. Looking ahead to 2011 and 2012. Recent readings on core consumer prices had come in a bit higher than expected. that the unemployment rate would decline significantly. Chinese authorities held the renminbi nearly unchanged against the dollar. the out- . Household wealth was higher. which helped headline equity indexes move higher. and the recent declines in capital spending did not look as severe as those that had occurred around the turn of the year. sales and starts of new homes were flattening out. and inflation expectations would be relatively well anchored. Under such conditions. the low level of resource utilization was projected to result in an appreciable deceleration in core consumer prices through 2010. look for foreign activity was better.304 96th Annual Report. The Bank of Japan continued purchasing commercial paper. The projected boost to aggregate demand from these factors more than offset the negative effects of higher oil prices and mortgage rates. in addition. corporate bond rates had fallen. while still sizable. though less rapidly than potential output. attempting to slow the dollar’s depreciation against their currencies. monetary policy would remain stimulative. The European Central Bank lowered its main policy rate 25 basis points to 1 percent and announced that it would purchase up to €60 billion in covered bonds. the staff projected that the unemployment rate would rise further in 2009 but would edge down in 2010. and government bonds.

was seen as an important reason for reduced lending and tighter terms. Nonetheless. Increases in equity prices had favorable effects on household wealth and overall sentiment. Credit was tight. and survey data and anecdotal reports showed improved expectations for the future.S. Economic activity in foreign economies was unlikely to be sufficiently strong to provide a substantial boost to U. Conditions in the labor market remained poor. and the unemployment rate continued to rise. These factors. at least in part. and banks could face substantial losses in their loan portfolios in coming quarters. Corporate credit markets continued to improve. Consumer spending appeared no longer to be declining but nonetheless remained weak.S. reflecting. housing and consumption demand apparently had leveled off. exports. Worsening credit quality. output would probably begin to grow again in the second half of the year. with some banks quite reluctant to lend. the rate of increase was likely to be relatively slow. In particular. especially for consumer and commercial real estate loans.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. participants generally noted that the improvement in market conditions was in part due to ongoing support from various government programs and that underlying financial conditions remained fragile. most participants saw the economy as still quite weak and vulnerable to further adverse shocks. participants generally agreed that the information received since the April meeting indicated that the economic contraction was slowing and that the decline in activity could cease before long. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge over time under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks. participants generally judged that. which is attached as an addendum to these minutes. In their discussion of the economic situation and outlook. The inventory adjustment process was continuing. the unemployment rate. Business and household confidence had picked up some. Still. credit was still quite tight in many sectors. The continued slug- . while U. but were still significant. along with past declines in wealth. and markets for asset-backed securities also showed an increasing amount of activity. Many participants noted that obtaining financing for commercial real estate projects remained extremely difficult amid worsening fundamentals in the sector. would weigh on consumer spending. June 305 Participants’ Views and Committee Policy Action In conjunction with this FOMC meeting. Developments in financial markets over the intermeeting period were seen as broadly positive. and consumer price inflation for each year from 2009 through 2011 and over a longer horizon. and financial market strains had eased further. all meeting participants—the five members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks—provided projections for economic growth. Most believed that downside risks to economic growth had diminished somewhat since the April meeting. many participants noted that the results of the SCAP helped bolster confidence in banks and led to large infusions of private capital in that sector. Against this backdrop. supported in part by the TALF. Participants’ forecasts through 2011 and over the longer run are described in the Summary of Economic Projections. a reduction in the perceived risk of further severely adverse outcomes. Although financial market conditions had improved.

most participants anticipated that the employment situation was likely to be downbeat for some time. and tight credit conditions. and there was some risk that consumer spending might also decline as a consequence. Others noted that foreclosures were continuing at a very high rate and could push house prices down further and add to inventories of unsold homes. Labor market conditions were of particular concern to meeting participants. Personal income was likely to contract for a time going forward as the effects of these factors waned. some saw the possibility of further increases in the household saving rate. job losses remained substantial over the intermeeting period and the unemployment rate continued to rise rapidly. increases in sales will have to be met by increases in production. Although some improvements were evident in new and continuing unemployment insurance claims and the May payroll report was less weak than expected. Some expressed concern that the increases in mortgage rates seen over the intermeeting period had the potential to further depress the demand for housing and thus impede an economic recovery. Rising labor force participation contributed to the increase in the unemployment rate. Given the significant uncertainties in the economic outlook. a sizable reduction in the saving rate seemed unlikely in the near term. some meeting participants highlighted evidence from regional surveys that pointed to a stabilization or even a slight pickup in manufacturing in some areas. Many businesses had been successful in working down inventories of unsold goods. Participants also observed that. Because these factors were not seen as likely to dissipate quickly. However. Some participants pointed out that households’ financial strains may be encouraging many individuals to enter the labor market despite difficult labor market conditions. holding back housing activity and weighing on household wealth. With the recovery projected to be rather sluggish.306 96th Annual Report. which would. and positive signs were apparent in the energy and agriculture sectors. sharply lower wealth as a result of earlier steep declines in asset prices. elevated uncertainty was said to be inhibiting capital spending in many cases. Some participants noted that. Indicators of single-family starts and sales suggested that housing activity may be leveling out. while personal income had expanded briskly of late. most participants judged that consumer spending would continue to be subdued for some time. Anecdotal reports suggested that the weakness in activity was widespread across many industries and extended to the service sector. The large number of people working part time for economic reasons and the prevalence of permanent job reductions rather than temporary layoffs suggested that labor market conditions were even more difficult than indicated by the unemployment rate. in turn. Reports from district contacts suggested that workweeks were being trimmed and that total hours worked were falling significantly. as this process continues. 2009 gishness in consumer expenditures mainly reflected falling employment. but contacts remained quite uncertain about the timing and extent of the recovery. those increases had been boosted by special one-time factors such as fiscal stimulus and large cost-of-living adjustments for Social Security recipients. but most participants viewed the sector as still vulnerable to further weakness. Participants noted an improvement in business sentiment in many districts. support growth in hours .

In addition. unemployment was also rising sharply and financial strains remained significant. especially in light of the Federal Reserve’s greatly expanded balance sheet and the associated large volume of reserves in the banking system. most participants expected core inflation to remain subdued for some time. A few participants were concerned that inflation expectations could continue to rise. Most participants. substantial resource slack. Still. exports and so contribute to a recovery in the United States. most agreed that. Still. Although the measured increase in productivity might reflect cyclical factors rather than changes in the underlying trend and was subject to data revisions. expected that inflation would remain subdued for some time. Several measures of labor compensation had slowed in recent quarters as unemployment mounted and wages were not likely to exert any significant upward pressures on prices.S. members thought it most likely . growth in unit labor costs was expected to continue to be restrained in coming quarters. Many participants noted that the global nature of this recession meant that growth abroad was not likely to bolster U. but for now. Recent information from China suggested that economic growth may be picking up there. given the expectation that labor market conditions were likely to deteriorate further in coming months and probably would not improve quickly thereafter. In Asia. June 307 worked and eventually in investment outlays. the outlook appeared more promising. in light of the signs that economic activity was stabilizing. However. participants pointed out that some measures of inflation expectations had edged up recently from very low readings. The future path of the federal funds rate would depend on the Committee’s evolving expectations for the economy. and subdued inflation. Substantial resource slack was also likely to keep price inflation low in the future. Participants noted the considerable uncertainty surrounding estimates of the output and unemployment gaps and the extent of their effects on prices. Committee members agreed that the stance of monetary policy should not be changed at this meeting. In their discussion of monetary policy for the period ahead. most participants saw less downside risk to their expectations for inflation. the Committee agreed that it should maintain its target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent. many participants noted that productivity growth had been surprisingly strong in recent quarters. some participants mentioned that growth in that region was likely to remain importantly dependent on exports to major industrial economies that were likely to recover slowly. the economy was almost certainly operating well below its potential and that significant price pressures were unlikely to materialize in the near and medium terms. Moreover. for example. with some evidence that the rate of decline in activity was diminishing. even taking account of such uncertainty. Some participants thought that recovery there was likely to lag behind that of the United States. however. Given the prospects for weak economic activity.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. perhaps reflecting in part reduced concerns about deflation. and that as a result inflation could temporarily rise above levels consistent with the Committee’s dual objectives of maximum employment and stable prices. and were now at levels close to those prevailing prior to the onset of the crisis. Although recent increases in oil and other commodity prices were likely to raise headline inflation over the near term. In Europe.

The Desk is expected to purchase up to $1. the effects of further asset purchases. Moreover. it seemed likely that economic activity was in the process of leveling out. and the Committee expects that inflation will remain subdued for some time. Although economic activity is likely to remain weak for a time. substantial resource slack is likely to dampen cost pressures. Businesses are cutting back on fixed investment and staffing but appear to be making progress in bringing inventory stocks into better alignment with sales.308 96th Annual Report. The prices of energy and other commodities have risen of late. The Committee directs the Desk to purchase agency debt. and longer-term Treasury securities during the intermeeting period with the aim of providing support to private credit markets and economic activity. fiscal and monetary stimulus. Conditions in financial markets have generally improved in recent months. given their forecasts for only a gradual upturn in activity and the lack of inflation pressures. The Committee anticipates that the combination of outright purchases and various liquidity facilities outstanding will cause the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet to expand significantly in coming months. The timing and pace of these purchases should depend on conditions in the markets for such securities and on a broader assessment of private credit market conditions. In these circumstances. Household spending has shown further signs of stabilizing but remains constrained by ongoing job losses. on the economy and on inflation expectations were uncertain. The Committee will maintain the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1⁄4 percent and continues to anticipate that economic conditions are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal . agency MBS. The Desk is expected to purchase up to $300 billion of longer-term Treasury securities by the end of the third quarter.m. until it was instructed otherwise. and the considerable improvements in financial markets over recent months were likely to lend further support to aggregate demand. The Committee also agreed that changes to its program of asset purchases were not warranted at this time. 2009 that the federal funds rate would need to be maintained at an exceptionally low level for an extended period. the Federal Reserve will employ all available tools to promote economic recovery and to preserve price stability. lower housing wealth. At the conclusion of the discussion.25 trillion of agency MBS by the end of the year. Although an expansion of such purchases might provide additional support to the economy. and tight credit. the Committee seeks conditions in reserve markets consistent with federal funds trading in a range from 0 to 1⁄4 percent. The System Open Market Account Manager and the Secretary will keep the Committee informed of ongoing developments regarding the System’s balance sheet that could affect the attainment over time of the Committee’s objectives of maximum employment and price stability. the Committee agreed that the asset purchase programs should proceed for now on the schedule announced at previous meetings. especially purchases of Treasury securities. Accordingly.” The vote encompassed approval of the statement below to be released at 2:15 p. To further its long-run objectives. and market forces will contribute to a gradual resumption of sustainable economic growth in a context of price stability. the Committee continues to anticipate that policy actions to stabilize financial markets and institutions. However. The Desk is expected to purchase up to $200 billion in housing-related agency debt by the end of this year.: “Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in April suggests that the pace of economic contraction is slowing. the Committee voted to authorize and direct the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. to execute transactions in the System Account in accordance with the following domestic policy directive: “The Federal Open Market Committee seeks monetary and financial conditions that will foster price stability and promote sustainable growth in output.

after declining over the first half of this year. all of whom participate in deliberations of the FOMC. output would expand sluggishly over the remainder of the year. In addition. Sack as Manager was satisfactory to the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 2009. by unanimous vote.25 trillion of agency mortgage-backed securities and up to $200 billion of agency debt by the end of the year. The Committee will continue to evaluate the timing and overall amounts of its purchases of securities in light of the evolving economic outlook and conditions in financial markets. the Committee met by conference call in a joint session with the Board of Governors to review recent economic and financial developments. and Warsh. Evans. the Committee unanimously approved the minutes of the FOMC meeting held on April 28−29. 2009. . FOMC participants generally expected that. Voting against this action: None. “Appropriate monetary policy” is defined as the future path of policy that the participant deems most likely to foster outcomes for economic activity and inflation that best satisfy his or her interpretation of the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives of maximum employment and stable prices. FOMC meeting. Messrs. Projections were based on information available through the end of the meeting and on each participant’s assumptions about factors likely to affect economic outcomes.” Voting for this action: Messrs. August 11–12. the Federal Reserve will purchase a total of up to $1. Duke. Notation Vote By notation vote completed on May 19. Madigan Secretary Addendum: Summary of Economic Projections In conjunction with the June 23–24. Lockhart. and Ms. The Federal Reserve is monitoring the size and composition of its balance sheet and will make adjustments to its credit and liquidity programs as warranted. 2011. Tarullo. all FOMC participants projected that real gross domestic product (GDP) would It was agreed that the next meeting of the Committee would be held on Tuesday−Wednesday. 2009. In addition. on the understanding that his selection was subject to being satisfactory to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 2010. and over the longer run. 2009. submitted projections for output growth. Lacker. 2009.m. Conference Call On June 3. Consequently. including his or her assessment of appropriate monetary policy. As previously announced. on June 24. The meeting adjourned at 12:40 p. unemployment. and inflation in 2009. Kohn. June 309 funds rate for an extended period. Brian Sack was selected to serve as Manager. to provide support to mortgage lending and housing markets and to improve overall conditions in private credit markets.Minutes of FOMC Meetings. the members of the Board of Governors and the presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks. Yellen. Ms. Bernanke and Dudley. 2009. Brian F. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge over time under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks. including changes in the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet. System Open Market Account. Secretary’s note: Advice subsequently was received that the selection of Mr. the Federal Reserve will buy up to $300 billion of Treasury securities by autumn. as indicated in table 1 and depicted in figure 1.

7 to 1.2 to to to to to to to to 5.6 5.5 1. recovery in the second half. .7 −2. The April projections were made in conjunction with the meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee on April 28–29.6 4.6 to −0.0 1.9 1. .0 0.0 to 1.2 9. .6 to 0.0 to 9.8 8.4 2. they increased their projections for the path of the unemployment rate from those published in April.5 1.9 to 2. .1 to 10.0 6.8 to 10.7 1.5 April projection .1 1.0 −0. −1. .0 2. .6 0. participants generally expected the recovery to be gradual in 2010.5 1.0 to 3.0 to −1. Participants foresaw only a gradual improvement in labor market conditions in 2010 and 2011.0 0.5 Longer Run 2.0 9. PCE inflation and core PCE inflation are the percentage rates of change in.5 to 10. All participants also expected that overall inflation would be somewhat slower this year than in recent years. the central tendencies of the participants’ inflation forecasts pointed to fairly stable inflation that would be modestly below most participants’ estimates of the rate consistent with the dual objectives. in light of incoming data on labor markets.5 2.1 2.0 to 1. contract over the entirety of this year and that the unemployment rate would increase in coming quarters. .0 to 1.9 0.2 0.5 to 4. 9.7 1.4 1. .5 to 1. reflecting both a slightly less severe contraction in the first half of 2009 and a moderately stronger. For 2010 and 2011.5 0.0 Note: Projections of change in real gross domestic product (GDP) and in inflation are from the fourth quarter of the previous year to the fourth quarter of the year indicated. from lowest to highest. . .0 1.8 1. Most participants indicated that they expected the economy to take five or six years to converge to a longer-run path characterized by a sustainable rate of output growth and by rates of unemployment and inflation consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual objectives.0 to 1.4 4. Participants projected low inflation this year.0 8. .5 2.8 8.0 2. 1.0 9.5 to −0.0 9.3 2.0 to 1. 2. −2.2 0. 2009.8 April projection .9 1.5 2. .5 PCE inflation .5 to 9.0 5.4 7.2 to 1.3 2.6 9.1 to 3.5 to −1. With the strong adverse forces that have been acting on the economy likely to abate only slowly.7 to 10. . the divergence of participants’ views about the inflation outlook remained wide.7 to to to to to to 2009 Range2 2010 2011 2. respectively.0 2.5 4.0 5. 1.2 to 2.5 0. 9.0 2.7 to 1.5 8.6 0.310 96th Annual Report. . but still sluggish.7 to 2. 1. Economic projections of Federal Reserve Governors and Reserve Bank presidents.0 1.3 Longer Run 2. Longer-run projections represent each participant’s assessment of the rate to which each variable would be expected to converge under appropriate monetary policy and in the absence of further shocks to the economy.0 Unemployment rate .0 5. leaving the unemployment rate at the end of 2011 well above the level they viewed as its longer-run sustainable rate.5 8.6 Core PCE inflation3 . .3 April projection .3 to 1.7 1.0 0.6 Change in real GDP. for that variable in that year. The range for a variable in a given year includes all participants’ projections. 2009 Table 1.5 4. Almost all participants viewed the near-term outlook for domestic output as having improved modestly relative to the projections they made at the time of the April FOMC meeting.8 to to to to to to to to 4. and most projected that core inflation would edge down this year. the price index for personal consumption expenditures (PCE) and the price index for PCE excluding food and energy.5 to 2.3 2. but several said full convergence would .8 to 4. The central tendency excludes the three highest and three lowest projections for each variable in each year.8 4. 0. Longer-run projections for core PCE inflation are not collected.8 3.7 −1.5 2. .3 6.6 2.5 0. June 2009 Percent Central tendency1 Variable 2009 2010 2011 3. 1. 3.0 to 9.8 6. Each participant’s projections are based on his or her assessment of appropriate monetary policy.0 2.8 April projection .8 3.5 to 2. however.8 0.1 9.5 0.5 2. Projections for the unemployment rate are for the average civilian unemployment rate in the fourth quarter of the year indicated.2 to 9. Even though all participants had raised their near-term outlook for real GDP.6 1.5 to to to to to to 2.

June 311 .Minutes of FOMC Meetings.

and they continued to expect that sales and production would begin to recover gradually during the second half of the year. participants judged that the projections for economic activity and inflation remained subject to a degree of uncertainty exceeding historical norms. and still-weak housing demand. measures to support credit markets. that recoveries in consumer spending and residential investment initially would be damped by further deterioration in labor markets.0 percent. participants pointed to a further improvement in financial conditions during the intermeeting period. uncertainty about the economic environment. however.1 to 3. Participants generally expected that household financial positions would improve only gradually and that strains in credit markets and in the banking system would ebb slowly. persistently tight credit conditions. and those for 2011 had a central tendency of 3. A number of participants also saw recent increases in some long-term interest rates and in oil prices as factors that could damp a near-term economic recovery. and diminishing financial stresses. In contrast to recent projections. With few exceptions. As reasons for marking up their projections for near-term economic activity. In addition. 2009 take longer. the pace of recovery would continue to be damped in 2010. exports. and fewer participants than in April characterized those risks as skewed to the downside. Most participants saw the risks surrounding their inflation outlook as roughly balanced. and tentative indications of a leveling out of activity in the housing sector. and a continued elevated cost and limited availability of financing would contribute to continued weakness in business fixed investment this year. participants saw additional indications that the economic downturn in the United States and worldwide was moderating in the second quarter. a majority of participants perceived the risks to growth as roughly balanced.0 percent to negative 1. participants’ projections for real GDP growth in 2010 and 2011 were not materially different from those provided in April. The Outlook Participants’ projections for the change in real GDP in 2009 had a central tendency of negative 1. Looking further ahead. signs of stabilization in consumer spending. sluggish growth in sales. the continued repair of household balance sheets.3 percent. although several still viewed those risks as tilted to the downside. The projections for growth in 2010 had a central tendency of 2. somewhat above the central tendency of negative 2. But they anticipated that the upturn would strengthen in late 2010 and in 2011 to a pace exceeding the growth .6 percent.S. hence. Participants expected. Moreover. suggesting that production is likely to increase as sales stabilize and then start to turn up later this year.5 percent to negative 1.3 percent for their April projections.312 96th Annual Report. reflecting the effects of monetary and fiscal stimulus. Some participants noted that weak economic conditions in other countries probably would hold down growth in U.8 to 4. they observed that aggressive inventory reductions during the first half of this year appeared to have left firms’ stocks in better balance with sales. They also anticipated that very low capacity utilization. Participants noted that the data received between the April and June FOMC meetings pointed to a somewhat smaller decline in output during the first half of the year than they had anticipated at the time of the April meeting.

modestly higher than the central tendencies from the April projections. reflecting the higher starting point of the projections. reflecting the sharper-thanexpected rise in unemployment that occurred over the intermeeting period. Most participants anticipated that output growth next year would not substantially exceed its longer-run sustainable rate and hence that the unemployment rate would decline only modestly in 2010. They expected that the unemployment rate would decline considerably further in subsequent years as it moved back toward its longer-run sustainable level. as evident from the central tendency of 8.1 to 2.1 percent. June 313 rate of potential GDP.4 percent. some also pointed to frictions associated with the reallocation of labor from shrinking economic sectors to expanding sectors as likely to restrain progress in reducing unemployment.4 percent in May— the latest reading available at the time of the June FOMC meeting. With output growth and job creation generally projected to pick up appreciably in 2011.8 and 5.5 to 2. participants’ projections for total PCE inflation had central tendencies of 1. Beyond 2011. Participants noted that higher-thanexpected inflation data over the intermeeting period and the anticipated influence of higher oil and commodity prices on consumer prices were factors contributing to the increase in their inflation forecasts. real GDP growth eventually would converge to a rate of 2. which most participants still saw as between 4. Reflecting the large increases in energy prices over the in- .Minutes of FOMC Meetings. about 1⁄2 percentage point above the central tendency of their April projections and noticeably higher than the actual unemployment rate of 9.7 percent per year. All participants raised their forecasts of the unemployment rate at the end of this year.8 percent. including accommodative monetary policy. fiscal stimulus.0 percent for 2011. without further shocks. Even though participants raised their output growth forecasts.8 to 10. participants still expected unemployment to decline in those years. they expected that output growth would remain above that of potential GDP for a time.5 to 9.4 to 8. most participants expected that. they also moved up their unemployment rate projections and continued to anticipate that labor market conditions would deteriorate further over the remainder of the year.8 percent for their projections of the unemployment rate in the fourth quarter of 2011. With little material change in projected output growth in 2010 and 2011.2 to 1. reflecting longer-term trends in the growth of productivity and the labor force. The central tendency of participants’ projections for personal consumption expenditures (PCE) inflation in 2009 was 1. Their projections for the average unemployment rate during the fourth quarter of 2009 had a central tendency of 9. however. leading to a gradual elimination of slack in resource utilization.0 to 1.0 percent. but the projected unemployment rate in each year was about 1⁄2 percentage point above the April forecasts. and continued improvement in financial conditions and household balance sheets. about 1⁄2 percentage point above the central tendency of their April projections. Participants noted several factors contributing to this pickup. Over the longer run. a few participants raised their estimates of the longer-run unemployment rate. Looking beyond this year. The central tendency of the unemployment rate at the end of 2010 was 9.8 percent for 2010 and 1. participants anticipated that joblessness would decline more noticeably.

as the economy recovers. others indicated that inflation of 11⁄2 percent or 13⁄4 percent would be appropriate. As in April. The central tendency of projections for core inflation in 2009 was 1. those for 2010 and 2011 were 1. in June a majority of participants saw the risks to their projections for real GDP growth and the unemployment rate as broadly balanced.3 to 1.6 percent. . Almost all participants shared the judgment that their projections of future economic activity and unemployment continued to be subject to greater-thanaverage uncertainty.7 percent. several participants still saw the risks to their GDP growth forecasts as skewed to the downside and the associated risks to unemployment as skewed to the upside. 2009 termeeting period. Uncertainty and Risks In contrast to the participants’ views over the past several quarters. projected that.314 96th Annual Report.5 percent and 0. the range of participants’ projections of inflation in 2011 remained quite wide.0 to 1.7 to 2. while the forecasts for core and total PCE inflation in 2010 and 2011 increased by similar amounts.11 Many partici11. In contrast. inflation would increase gradually and move closer to their individual assessments of the measured rate of inflation consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate for maximum employment and price stability. At the end of this summary. these participants pointed to the tentative signs of economic stabilization. A few participants also anticipated that projected inflation in 2011 would be modestly above their longer-run inflation projections because of the possible effects of very low short-term interest rates and of the large expansion of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet on the public’s inflation expectations. indications of some effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy actions. and improvements in financial conditions. Most participants judged that a longer-run PCE inflation rate of 2 percent would be consistent with the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate. Table 2 provides estimates of forecast uncertainty for the change in real GDP. the central tendency of projections of the longer-run inflation rate was 1. Modestly positive longer-run inflation would allow the Committee to stimulate economic activity and support employment by setting the federal funds rate temporarily below the inflation rate when the economy suffers a large negative shock to demands for goods and services.9 to 1. the box titled “Forecast Uncertainty” discusses the sources and interpretation of uncertainty in economic forecasts and explains the approach used to assess the uncertainty and risks attending participants’ projections. however. Most participants expected that sizable economic slack would continue to damp inflation pressures for the next few years and hence that total PCE inflation in 2011 would still be below their assessments of its appropriate longer-run level. Some thought that such slack would generate a decline in inflation over the next few years. Several participants.0 percent. respectively. Overall. Most. noting that the public’s longer-run inflation expectations had not changed appreciably. In explaining why they perceived a reduction in downside risks to the outlook. and total consumer price inflation over the period from 1989 to 2008. the unemployment rate. expected that inflation would return more promptly to levels consistent with their judgments about longerrun inflation than these participants had projected in April. the forecasts for core PCE inflation (which excludes the direct effects of movements in food and energy prices) in 2009 were raised by less than the projections for total PCE inflation.

6 ±1. . In addition. Most participants judged the risks to the inflation outlook as roughly balanced. A few participants raised their longer-run pro- pants again highlighted the stillconsiderable uncertainty about the future course of the financial crisis and the risk that a resurgence of financial turmoil could adversely impact the real economy. For definitions.8 ±1. and one saw the inflation risks as tilted to the upside. the surprisingly large increases in unemployment reported during the intermeeting period prompted an upward shift in the distribution. 2011. Measure is the overall consumer price index. Projection is percent change. November). refer to general note in table 1. there were similar upward shifts in the distributions for 2010 and 2011. some noted the difficulty in gauging the macroeconomic effects of the credit-easing policies that have been employed by the Federal Reserve and other central banks. 2010. and consumer prices will be in ranges implied by the average size of projection errors made in the past.4 ±0. Most participants again saw the uncertainty surrounding their inflation projections as exceeding historical norms. “Gauging the Uncertainty of the Economic Outlook from Historical Forecasting Errors. As described in the box “Forecast Uncertainty.” Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-60 (Washington: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.