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Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 35
SLIPPING IN POLLS
NATION PAGE 7
NFL, REFS
REACH DEAL
SPORTS PAGE 11
UC TO PAY $1M FOR
PEPPER-SPRAY SUIT
STATE PAGE 5
ROMNEY DECLARES I CARE ABOUT THE PEOPLE OF AMERICA
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By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After working without a contract for more
than a year, about 750 registered nurses have
reached a tentative agreement on a new col-
lective bargaining agreement with Mills-
Peninsula Health Services.
Details of the deal are scarce, however, as
California Nurses Association members will
take a vote Thursday, Oct. 4 on whether to rat-
ify the new contract.
A tentative three-year deal was reached
Tuesday night after months of negotiations
that led to a few one-day strikes and subse-
quent four-day lockouts. The contract, if
approved, will cover this past year and expires
in June 2014.
The CNA represents the registered nurses
who work at Mills-Peninsula, a Sutter Health
Affiliate, which operates hospitals in
Burlingame and San Mateo.
Key to the agreement was the decision by
local hospital ofcials to withdraw more than
three dozen substantial reductions in patient
care protections and nurses economic and
contract standards, as well as improvements
in safe stafng, according to a statement
released by the CNA yesterday.
On pay, the nurses will receive a 2 percent
increase a year over the next two years,
according to the CNA.
Hospital ofcials praised the deal.
This has been a long and challenging
process and we believe the result is a fair
agreement for all concerned, Maynard
Jenkins, the health systems vice president of
Human Resources wrote the Daily Journal in
Nurses reach contract deal
Vote expected next week on agreement with Mills-Peninsula Health Services
Performance will be calculated using test scores,
attendance, graduation rates, other measures
Law will change
ranking system
for state schools
Parents share concerns
about school security
Parkside meeting allows for info,
ideas after attempted abduction
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A mother took a moment while holding the microphone
Wednesday morning and teared up.
Her daughter was the 9-year-old who was groped and
grabbed at a Parkside Elementary School bathroom last week.
Bradley Mrozek, 25, was arrested less than 24 hours later.
Yesterday morning, school ofcials and police had a public
meeting to discuss what happened, what was done and what
can be done to prevent such incidents in the future.
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Gov. Jerry Brown
announced Wednesday that he has signed
legislation that could reduce the use of
standardized tests in calculating the annu-
al rankings of California schools.
Under the bill, the Academic
Performance Index rankings will be calcu-
lated using a combination of test scores,
attendance and graduation rates, as well as
other yet undetermined measures to gauge student learning.
Those measures could include whether students are promot-
ed to the next grade or prepared for college-level courses.
Brown signed SB1458 by Senate President Pro Tem Darrell
Steinberg, D-Sacramento, which requires that standardized
Darrell
Steinberg
See LAW, Page 8
See SECURITY, Page 20
See NURSES, Page 20
NICK ROSE/DAILY JOURNAL
Emergency rescue teams from around the Bay Area participated in a simulated airplane crash in the Bay near San Francisco
International Airport Wednesday morning.Agencies participating in the exercise included the San Francisco Fire Departments
Airport Division, the San Francisco Police Departments Airport Bureau, the South San Francisco Fire Department, the San
Mateo County Sheriffs Ofce, the FBI, the U.S. Coast Guard and American Medical Response.
MARINE EMERGENCY RESPONSE DRILL
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actress Gwyneth
Paltrow is 40.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
Silent Spring, Rachel Carsons
groundbreaking as well as controversial
study on the effects of pesticides on the
environment, was published in book
form by Houghton Mifin.
God loved the birds and invented trees.
Man loved the birds and invented cages.
Jacques Deval, French writer, director (1895-1972)
Rock singer Meat
Loaf is 65.
Singer Avril
Lavigne is 28.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A whale shark is seen in the Galapagos Islands.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning.
Highs in the lower 60s. Southwest winds 5
to 10 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy
fog in the morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Southwest winds 5
to 10 mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s.
West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Patchy fog. Highs in the upper 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Bog Ben,No.4,
in rst place;Money Bags,No.11,in second place;
and Gold Rush,No.1,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:44.14.
(Answers tomorrow)
UNCLE GRAPH AFRAID POCKET
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The special on the wrapping paper, bows, tape
and scissors was this A PACKAGE DEAL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KMISP
NELDB
EORNUN
CLAYUN
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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1 4 6
7 8 23 50 51 26
Mega number
Sept. 25 Mega Millions
15 23 30 38 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 2 7 4
Daily Four
1 7 0
Daily three evening
In 1540, Pope Paul III issued a papal bull establishing the
Society of Jesus, or Jesuits, as a religious order.
In 1779, John Adams was named by Congress to negotiate the
Revolutionary Wars peace terms with Britain.
In 1854, the rst great disaster involving an Atlantic Ocean
passenger vessel occurred when the steamship SS Arctic sank
off Newfoundland; of the more than 400 people on board, only
86 survived.
In 1862, during the Civil War, the Union Armys rst all-black
regiment, the self-described Chasseurs dAfrique (Hunters
of Africa), was formed in New Orleans (which was then under
Northern control).
In 1928, the United States said it was recognizing the
Nationalist Chinese government.
In 1939, Warsaw, Poland, surrendered after weeks of resistance
to invading forces from Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union
during World War II.
In 1941, the United States launched 14 rapidly built Liberty
military cargo vessels.
In 1942, Glenn Miller and his Orchestra performed together
for the last time, at the Central Theater in Passaic, N.J., prior to
Millers entry into the Army.
In 1954, Tonight!, hosted by Steve Allen, made its debut on
NBC-TV.
In 1964, the government publicly released the report of the
Warren Commission, which found that Lee Harvey Oswald
had acted alone in assassinating President John F. Kennedy.
In 1979, Congress gave its nal approval to forming the U.S.
Department of Education.
In 1994, more than 350 Republican congressional candidates
gathered on the steps of the U.S. Capitol to sign the Contract
with America, a 10-point platform they pledged to enact if
voters sent a GOP majority to the House.
Actress Jayne Meadows is 92. Actress Kathleen Nolan is 79.
Actor Wilford Brimley is 78. Actor Claude Jarman Jr. is 78.
Author Barbara Howar is 78. World Golf Hall of Famer Kathy
Whitworth is 73. Singer-musician Randy Bachman (Bachman-
Turner Overdrive) is 69. Actress Liz Torres is 65. Actor A
Martinez is 64. Baseball Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt is 63.
Actor Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa is 62. Singer Shaun Cassidy is 54.
Rock singer Stephan Jenkins (Third Eye Blind) is 48. Actor
Patrick Muldoon is 44. Singer Mark Calderon is 42. Actress
Amanda Detmer is 41. Rock singer Brad Arnold (3 Doors Down)
is 34. Christian rock musician Grant Brandell (Underoath) is 31.
Police: Drunken man on
horse arrested after chase
BUNNELL, Fla. A man was intox-
icated while riding his horse as he led
police on a half-hour chase through a
northeast Florida town, authorities said
Tuesday.
Charles Larkin Cowart, 29, was arrest-
ed Monday afternoon in the city of
Bunnell, about 60 miles south of
Jacksonville.
A police ofcer was responding to a
report of an intoxicated male riding a
horse when he turned on his emergency
lights to stop trafc as Cowart crossed
the street, according to the charging af-
davit. Cowart said he was on his way to
his grandmothers house in nearby
Flagler Beach, but refused ofcers order
to dismount and in an aggressive man-
ner reared the horse back and took off
running.
Ofcers did not immediately chase
after him, the report said, citing the pub-
lic and the horses safety. Cowart contin-
ued to ride through town, causing a
crowd of people to come out of their
homes and a train to slow down as
Cowart crossed over a set of railroad
tracks. Police kept their emergency lights
on, but did not use their sirens to prevent
the horse from being frightened and
potentially making the situation worse.
Cowart ignored several verbal com-
mands to get off the horse, which after
more half an hour, became exhausted.
Cowart eventually jumped off and took
off running. He was captured a short time
later. The horse returned to Cowarts
family and is doing ne, police said.
Cowart was booked into the Flagler
County Jail on charges that included dis-
orderly conduct, resisting arrest without
violence and cruelty to animals. He was
being held Tuesday on $7,000 bond.
A message was left Tuesday at a phone
listing for Cowart in Bunnell, about 60
miles south of Jacksonville. It was not
immediately known if he has an attorney.
Cowart was arrested for petit theft on
Sept. 9 and on a DUI charge in October
2010. The disposition of those charges
wasnt immediately known.
Owner of cussing
cockatoo appealing noise fine
WARWICK, R.I. The owner of a
foul-mouthed cockatoo in Rhode Island
who was slapped with a $15 ne for vio-
lating a noise ordinance is appealing.
The Providence Journal reports that
Warwick resident Lynne Taylor is
appealing to a state court a ne imposed
by a municipal judge. The judge said
Taylor had broken a local law that pro-
hibits residents from letting their pets
habitually howl, bark or make other
noise.
Taylors lawyer says the ordinance is
unconstitutional because it gives no
parameters for what noise constitutes a
violation. He notes the statute says that if
someone is annoyed, its a public nui-
sance.
A neighbor accused Taylors bird of
parroting vulgar phrases, cursing and
loudly speaking expletives. The neighbor
lives with Taylors ex-husband.
Mr. Sexy Back tries
to bring Myspace back
NEW YORK Who am I to say I
want you back? When you were never
mine to give away.
Those are the opening lines of a song
that accompanies a New Myspace pro-
motional video. The once-mighty social
network is trying to stage yet another
comeback with the help of Justin
Timberlake. The new site, for which peo-
ple can request an invitation, looks a bit
like an entertainment-focused version of
Pinterest, with a dash of Twitter and
Facebook thrown in.
But Myspace has tried redesigns
before, to no avail. Will it work this
time?
If you break my heart a second time,
I might never be the same, continues the
song, Heartbeat, by the group JJAMZ.
From the sound if it, Myspace wants to
win the hearts and minds of tech-savvy
hipsters. Founded in 2003 and initially a
fast-rising star, Myspace attracted mostly
teenagers and twentysomethings, offer-
ing them a place to express themselves
online. It peaked in 2008 with some 76
million U.S. visitors in October.
13 18 31 38 44 25
Mega number
Sept. 26 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN MATEO
Theft. Someone stole clothes from a laundry
room on the 100 block of 36th Avenue before
3:56 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24.
Burglary. A backpack was stolen from a
vehicle on the 2200 block of Bridgepointe
Parkway before 1:54 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24.
Threat. A man reported a co-worker put a box
cutter to his throat the previous day on the
2000 block on Chess Drive before 8:59 p.m.
on Friday, Sept. 21.
Suspicious circumstances. Two children ran
to a home stating they were being followed by
a man on the 1800 block of Shoreview Avenue
before 2:16 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 21.
Burglary. A man was seen trying to break
into a home with a for sale sign in front on the
3800 block of Edison Street before 11:28 p.m.
on Thursday, Sept. 20.
SAN CARLOS
Burglary. A vehicle was burglarized on the
2000 block of Birch Avenue before 7:30 a.m.
on Tuesday, Sept. 18.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen from the
100 block of Glenn Way before 6 a.m. on
Tuesday, Sept. 18.
Petty theft. A fundraising sign was stolen
from the 1600 block of Cedar Street before
11:37 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 17.
Police reports
Thats not fare
A taxi driver reported his fare was drunk
and didnt know where to take him on the
200 block of Franklin Parkway in San
Mateo before 2:01 a.m. on Saturday, Sept.
22.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A bill to warn prospective tenants when the
property they are looking to rent is subject to
foreclosure was signed into law by Gov. Jerry
Brown Tuesday.
Senate Bill 1191 requires that a landlord
who receives a notice of default provide writ-
ten notice to any prospective tenant before a
lease is signed. Under existing law, a landlord
is not required to disclose this fact to a
prospective tenant.
The bill was authored by state Sen. Joe
Simitian, D-Palo Alto, and was a winning
entry in the lawmakers There Oughta Be a
Law contest.
The bill proposal was submitted by
Samantha James of San Jose. About a year
ago, James rented a property, paid her securi-
ty deposit and furnished her apartment, only
to nd out two months later that it was in fore-
closure. Sale of the property had been sched-
uled at various times, and then postponed,
according to Simitians ofce.
As James noted in her contest entry, proper-
ties in foreclosure might soon change owners,
possibly forcing a new tenant to move out
within months, or making
it difcult to get a security
deposit returned.
I am extremely pleased
that the governor signed
this bill, Simitian wrote
in a statement. In this
foreclosure crisis, much of
the focus has been on
homeowners, and renters
have gotten lost in the
shufe. This bill, once it
becomes law, is going to ensure that renters
dont get their homes yanked out from under
them, and are fully informed before they sign
a lease on the dotted line.
A foreclosure sale can extinguish leases.
For example, if the new owner intends to
make the property their residence, then exist-
ing leases are invalid.
Additionally, during foreclosure, tenants
can face:
Loss of their security deposit;
Decreased services from the landlord;
Additional moving and refurnishing costs;
and
Having to change schools for children.
The bill is a common sense solution. It
doesnt prohibit a landlord from renting a
home; it simply requires the owner to ensure
that the tenant has full disclosure about the
rental home that is currently facing foreclo-
sure, Debra Carlton, senior vice president of
the California Apartment Association, wrote
in a statement.
SB 1191 allows tenants to void the lease if a
landlord fails to disclose the foreclosure and
sets forth other penalties.
The bill takes effect on Jan. 1, 2013.
The bill was opposed by the Rental Housing
Coalition, a nonprot, the San Diego County
Apartment Association and the Apartment
Association of Greater Los Angeles among
others.
The groups urged Brown to veto the legisla-
tion.
SB 1191 may be well-intentioned but in an
effort to help consumers make better-
informed decisions, the author has overlooked
the potentially destructive impacts the bill
could have on property owners, including the
likelihood of hastening foreclosures, accord-
ing to a RHC statement.
Bill to protect renters signed by governor
Joe Simitian
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A man charged with touching the buttocks of
a 6-year-old girl shopping with her family at a
San Bruno Target store also committed an inap-
propriate act on another child the same day,
according to prosecutors who said he was
caught on video surveillance.
After Glenn Albrecht, 39, was arrested Aug.
26, authorities reviewed store tapes and report-
edly spotted him improperly touching an 11-
year-old girl after the rst incident and before
police took him into custody. The girl did not
report the incident but police were able to iden-
tify her and she described the man grabbing her
buttocks with his hand, according to the District
Attorneys Ofce.
At the time, prosecutors charged Albrecht
with a lewd act and child
pornography possession in
that case, he was already
facing a similar molestation
charge for the earlier
alleged incident. Police say
Albrecht, wearing a shirt
emblazoned with the slogan
Rub me for luck, touched
the girl when she wandered
by herself into an aisle. The
girl told her parents immediately and pointed
out a man later identied as Albrecht when he
reentered the store. The father struck Albrecht
and store security detained him until police
arrived.
A search of Albrechts home turned up a life-
sized doll of a female child, according to the
District Attorneys Ofce.
Prosecutors will seek to consolidate the two
cases and set a preliminary hearing date Oct. 30.
He has no signicant criminal history in San
Mateo County and was out of custody on a
$100,000 property bond. However, Albrecht
was remanded on $200,000 after the new case
was charged.
He will ask for a bail reduction at his upcom-
ing court appearance.
Child groping defendant charged in new case
Glenn Albrecht
4
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
CITY GOVERNMENT
The Belmont City Council voted
to conduct a Proposition 218 hearing
for a proposed 14.22 percent rate
increase for garbage service at its
Tuesday night meeting. Residents
should receive the notications in the
mail soon and will have up until Nov.
13 to turn in them in to protest the proposed hike.
Father of murder
suspect convicted of molestation
SAN JOSE The father of a man accused in the disap-
pearance of a 15-year-old Northern California girl has been
convicted of sexually molesting a younger female relative.
Prosecutors say 51-year-old Genaro Garcia Fernandez
repeatedly raped his relative beginning when she was 7 years
old. A jury in Morgan Hill on Wednesday found guilty of 17
counts. He faces a life sentence.
The molestations took place in the same San Martin home
where his 21-year-old son Antolin Garcia-Torres grew up. His
son has been charged with murder and kidnapping in the dis-
appearance of Sierra LaMar.
The younger Garcia-Torres is being held without bail pend-
ing trial. The Morgan Hill teenager went missing in March
and her body was never found.
Around the Bay
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County supervisors will keep a fire
engine running in the Highlands area
of San Mateo County another three
months while awaiting a final analysis
on whether it should be closed for
good.
The Board of Supervisors, at its
annual budget adoption Tuesday,
agreed to fund Engine 17 on Tower
Road through December when county
staff are expected to come back with its
final report. The extra three months of
full staffing costs $250,000.
Although the report is not complete,
Deputy County Manager Peggy Jensen
said the initial look showed that Station
17, which houses both the county
Engine 17 and Cal Fire Engine 1, has a
relatively low number of incident calls.
Very few calls, too, involve both
engines simultaneously called to dif-
ferent situations. Instead, Engine 17
spends a significant amount of time
covering for other companies.
San Mateo County has been mulling
shared services as a way to cut costs
and increase efficiencies. Talks are
ongoing with the cities of San Carlos
and Redwood City about combining
fire services in the Edgewood/Alameda
de las Pulgas area and, in June, looked
at reducing Engine 17. Station 17
would still house Cal Fire Engine 1.
The board asked then for a report back
in September on the potential impacts
but Jensen said more time is needed for
consultants to wrap up their work and
gather feedback from the Highlands
community.
The consultants also want to look at
how much time all engines in the sur-
rounding area spend on training activi-
ties.
The supervisors shared some worry
about how quickly the engine might be
closed once the final report is returned
in December but County Manager John
Maltbie was hopeful a plan can be
worked out to ease the transition.
Maltbie also told the board the
$250,000 can be accommodated in the
adopted budget.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by
phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
County spares Highlands fire engine
Board of Supervisors will decide future at years end
5
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
advertisment
Attempted residential
burglary in Hillsborough
The Hillsborough Police Department is
investigating an attempted residential burglary
that occurred Wednesday in the 900 block of
Tournament Drive at 12:02 p.m. The unknown
suspect in this case made entry by forcing
open a rear door. The alarm system in the
home was triggered and the suspect ed the
scene, according to Hillsborough police.
The Hillsborough Police Department is
seeking any witnesses in this case. If you
noticed anything suspicious in this area
around the time of the crime, please notify the
Hillsborough Police Department at (650) 375-
7470.
Armed robbery in San Bruno
San Bruno police are on the lookout for
three men who robbed another man at gun-
point just after midnight Monday on the 200
block of San Benito Avenue.
At approximately 12:15 a.m., the man
reported that he parked his car in the area of
South San Anselmo and San Benito avenues.
As he was walking away from the car, he was
approached by the three men, one with a
handgun, according to police. The man with
the gun demanded money and threatened to
shoot him if he ran away. One of the other
men took his wallet and all three hit and
kicked him before eeing north on El Camino
Real, according to police.
The men were described as white, in their
20s, wearing black pants and black hooded
sweatshirts, according to police.
Planned natural gas
venting causes concern
A planned venting of a natural gas line for
repairs caused increase call volume for odor
investigations in some areas of Belmont and
the highlands yesterday, according to Pacic
Gas and Electric.
The company had notied residents of its
plans for the work at the intersection of State
Route 92 and Interstate 280, but it took place
later in the day than the original 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
window. Instead, the work began at 4:45 p.m.,
according to PG&E.
Winds had shifted and caused the natural
gas to have a greater impact than expected,
according to PG&E. The company asks that
anyone with questions or concerns to call
(800) 743-5000.
Local briefs
By Jim Salter and Bob Thomas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRANSON, Mo. For many Americans,
particularly those on the older OK, squarer
side of the generation gap, Andy Williams
was part of the soundtrack of the 1960s and
70s, with easy-listening hits like Moon
River, the Love Story theme and The
Most Wonderful Time of the Year from his
beloved Christmas TV specials.
The singer known for his wholesome, mid-
dle-America appeal was the antithesis of the
counterculture that produced rock and roll.
The old cliche says that if you can remem-
ber the 1960s, you werent there, Williams
once recalled. Well, I was there all right, but
my memory of them is
blurred not by any
drugs I took but by the
relentless pace of the
schedule I set myself.
The entertainer, who
died Tuesday night at his
Branson home following
a yearlong battle with
bladder cancer, had a
plaintive tenor, boyish
features and clean-cut demeanor that helped
him outlast many of the decades rock stars
and fellow crooners such as Frank Sinatra
and Perry Como. He remained on the charts
into the 1970s and continued to perform into
his 80s.
Andy Williams dies at age 84
By Terence Chea
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO The University of
California has agreed to pay $1 million to set-
tle a lawsuit led by demonstrators who were
pepper-sprayed during an Occupy protest at
UC Davis last fall, according to a preliminary
settlement led Wednesday.
The Nov. 18, 2011, incident prompted
national outrage, angry campus protests and
calls for the resignation of Chancellor Linda
Katehi after online videos shot by witnesses
went viral.
Images of a police ofcer casually spraying
orange pepper-spray in the faces of nonviolent
protesters became a rallying symbol for the
Occupy Wall Street movement. The demon-
strators had been protesting steep tuition hikes
and police brutality.
Under the proposed settlement, UC would
pay $30,000 to each of 21 plaintiffs named in
the complaint and an additional $250,000 for
their attorneys to split.
Katehi, who has publicly apologized for the
incident, would be required to issue a formal
written apology to each of the plaintiffs, who
are current students or recent alumni.
If the $1 million settlement is approved,
total costs associated with the incident could
exceed $2 million, according to the
Sacramento Bee newspaper. Those expenses
come as UC faces the prospect of deep budg-
et cuts if Gov. Jerry Browns tax initiative fails
in November.
UC agrees to pay $1M to
settle pepper-spray suit
Andy Williams
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
University ofcials in California have agreed to pay $1 million to settle a lawsuit over a
pepper-spraying incident last year that came to symbolize law enforcement aggression against
anti-Wall Street protesters at UC Davis.
6
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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JoLn Ignacio
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San Bruno Chamber of Commerce
presents the 5th Annual
Ta stes of San Bruno
Tuesday, October 2nd
6:00pm-8:00pm
Veterans Memorial Recreation
Center
251 City Park Way, San Bruno
94066
Live Music Silent Auct ion
Raff le
Buy Tickets at
www.sanbrunochamber.com
Or at the door
(650) 588-018 0
Sharis
West Coast Caf
New York Pizza
Never Too Latte
Pasta Pomodoro
Over 20 vendors in all!

Live Music Silent Auct ion
Raff le
Buy Tickets at
www.sanbrunochamber.co
Or at the door
(650) 588-018 0
Don Picos
Rib Shack
BJs
Outback Steakhouse
Extreme Pizza
Jacks

Vera Salido Maher
Vera Salido Maher, of Millbrae, died in
Hughson Sept. 25, 2012.
Vera was born 91 years
ago in Fowler and was
raised in Winters. She
married her late husband
of 53 years, Richard
Maher of San Francisco,
when she was 18 years
old. She lived in San
Francisco for 22 years
then moved to Millbrae
where they lived for almost 42 years. Vera
lived with her daughter and son-in-law for the
past nine years in Tracy.
Vera is predeceased by her parents, Placido
and Dolores Salido, who came to the United
States from Malaga, Spain and by her broth-
ers, Frank, Placido, Mike and Joe Salido and
her sisters, Dolores Paredes and Rose Corum
and also by her grandson Steve DeBono.
Vera is survived by her daughter Penny and
son-in-law Vince DeBono, her grandchildren
Laurie Pellegrini (Tom), Kelly Saavedra,
Vince DeBono Jr. (Karen);her great-grand-
children Monica, Danielle, Tony, Shauna and
great-great-granddaughter Jessica.
Family and friends are invited to attend the
vigil service at 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30 at
Chapel of the Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive
at El Camino Real in Millbrae. The funeral
will leave the chapel 11:15 a.m. Monday, Oct.
1 and proceed to St. Dunstan Catholic Church,
1133 Broadway in Millbrae where the funeral
mass will be celebrated at 11:30 a.m.
Committal will follow at Holy Cross
Cemetery in Colma. In lieu of owers, the
family suggests memorial contributions be
made to your favorite charity.
Helen Ruggeri
Helen Ruggeri of San Bruno died at her
home Sept. 23, 2012 at the age of 92.
She was the wife of the late Peter Ruggeri
and is survived by her daughters Linda
Ruggeri (her husband Michael Zarrella) and
Katherine Ruggeri (her husband Brian
Walker).
She was a native of Idaho Falls, Idaho.
Private family services have been held with
interment at Skylawn Memorial Park in San
Mateo. The family suggests memorial contri-
butions be made to the Peninsula Humane
Society, Second Harvest Food Bank, St.
Anthony Foundation or KQED.
Obituaries
Charter idea to
go before SMUHSD board
The concept of a 400-student charter
school will be presented to the San Mateo
Union High School District Board of
Trustees tonight.
The six-page presentation from
Capuchino Vice Principal Ken Montgomery
and teacher Nicole Cerra explains a number
of ideas for a school called Ideal High
School, or i.hs.
It outlines a vision for a creative environ-
ment thats different from the traditional
classroom and pulls from Stanford
University research. Also, students and
teachers would use a flexbook online plat-
form to individualize work.
The overview provides no information
about a timeline, possible location or
finances.
At the same meeting, the board will dis-
cuss naming a building at Capuchino in
honor of former superintendent Sam
Johnson Jr. Also, the district will vote to
approve the athletic manual.
The board meets 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27
at the San Mateo Adult School, 789 E.
Poplar Ave., San Mateo.
Ice cream for a cause
Redwood Citys 10-year-old Elston
Dameron-Drew will have a special job
Thursday evening of serv-
ing ice cream at the Cold
Stone Creamery in Palo
Alto.
Dameron-Drew is tak-
ing part in the 11th annual
worlds largest ice cream
social, a nationwide
fundraising event to bene-
fit Make-A-Wish. All day,
Cold Stone will donate $1
from any Love It or
Gotta Have It size ice cream, yogurt or
sorbet creation to Make-A-Wish. Thirty-two
Bay Area locations, including San Mateo,
will be participating.
Since 2002, Cold Stone Creamery has sup-
ported Make-A-Wish in its mission to
change the lives of children with life-threat-
ening medical conditions. Raising more than
$4 million over the last 10 years, Cold Stone
aims to grant more wishes than ever before
in 2012.
Elston
Dameron-Drew
Local briefs
NATION 7
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Are you planning a trip in the next 90 days? Dont leave home unless you have a will and a trust. We can have your trust
prepared before you leave!
If this something you know you have to do but keep putting off, dont delay any longer.
Tuesday, September 25
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,
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Courtyard by Marriott
10:30AM or 1:30PM
550 Shell Boulevard
Foster City, CA 94404
Free Hotel Parking
Thursday, September 27th,
SAN BRUNO
Courtyard by Marriott
10:30AM or 1:30PM
1050 Bayhill Drive
San Bruno, CA 94066
Free Hotel Parking
Friday, September 28
th
,
PALO ALTO
Palo Alto Los Altos Courtyard
10:30AM or 1:30PM
4320 El Camino Real
Los Altos, CA 94022
Free Hotel Parking
Saturday, September 29
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,
SAN FRANCISCO
Holiday Inn Civic Center
11:00AM or 2:00PM
50 8th Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Stop at front desk for parking validation
Sunday, September 30
th
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BURLINGAME
San Francisco Airport
Marriott Waterfront
11:00 or 2:00PM
1800 Bayshore Highway
Burlingame, CA 94010
Validated self parking
By Ben Feller
and Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WESTERVILLE, Ohio
Slipping in states that could sink
his presidential bid, Republican
Mitt Romney declared Wednesday
that I care about the people of
America and can do more than
President Barack Obama to
improve their lives. In an all-day
Ohio duel, Obama scoffed that a
challenger who calls half the
nation victims was unlikely to
be of much help.
Romneys approach reflected
what he is up against: a widening
Obama lead in polls in key states
such as Ohio, the backlash from a
leaked video in which he dispar-
ages Obama supporters as govern-
ment-dependent people who see
themselves as victims, and a cam-
paign imperative to make his pol-
icy plans more
plain.
With under
six weeks to go,
and just one
week before the
first big debate,
Obamas cam-
paign reveled in
the latest public
polling but
tried to crush any sense of over-
confidence. If we need to pass
out horse blinders to all of our
staff, we will do that, said cam-
paign spokeswoman Jen Psaki.
The days setting was Ohio,
where Obamas momentum has
seemed to be growing. Its also a
state no Republican has won the
White House without carrying.
Romney, eager to project confi-
dence and brush aside suggestions
that he was faltering, went after
working-class voters outside
Columbus and Cleveland before
rolling to Toledo. Obama rallied
college crowds at Bowling Green
State University and Kent State
University, reminding Ohioans
their state allows them to start
cast ballots next week. Early vot-
ing has already begun in more
than two dozen other states.
For Romney, in his appearances
and in a new TV ad in which he
appeals straight to the camera, it
was time for plain talk to contrast
himself with Obama, and to
mince no words about his expec-
tations.
There are so many people in
our country who are hurting right
now. I want to help them. I know
what it takes, Romney told the
crowd in Westerville. I care
about the people of America, and
the difference between me and
Barack Obama is I know what to
do.
Polls slipping: Romney assures voters he cares
By Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABOARD AIR FORCE ONE
The White House said
Wednesday that President Barack
Obama considers the deadly
assault on the U.S. consulate in
Libya a terrorist attack.
White House spokesman Jay
Carney said it is certainly the
case that it is our view as an
administration, and the presi-
dents view, that it was a terrorist
attack. Four Americans were
killed in the attack, including
Chris Stevens, the U.S. ambassa-
dor to Libya.
Carneys comments came after
Republican Mitt Romney accused
Obama of failing to acknowledge
what Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton and other offi-
cials have said that the attacks
in Benghazi were acts of terror-
ism against the U.S.
Obama has declined several
chances to call the incident a ter-
rorist attack. He said last week
that extremists used an anti-Islam
video as an excuse to assault U.S.
interests.
White House: Obama views
Libya attack as terrorism
REUTERS
Barack Obama campaigns at Bowling Green State University in Bowling
Green, Ohio.
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
and Jennifer Agiesta
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON It still divides
us, but most Americans think
President Barack Obamas health
care law is here to stay.
More than 7 in 10 say the law will
fully go into effect with some
changes, ranging from minor to
major alterations, a new Associated
Press-GfK poll nds.
Only 12 percent expect the
Affordable Care Act
Obamacare to dismissive oppo-
nents to be repealed completely.
The law covering 30 million
uninsured, requiring virtually every
legal U.S. resident to carry health
insurance and forbidding insurers
from turning away the sick
remains as contentious as the day it
passed more than two years ago.
Theres still more than another year
before its major provisions go into
effect on Jan. 1, 2014.
Although the overhaul survived a
Supreme Court challenge in June,
the November election appears like-
ly to settle its fate. Republican Mitt
Romney vows to begin repealing it
on Day One while Obama pledges
to carry it out faithfully.
But the poll found that Americans
are converging on the idea that the
overhaul will be part of their lives,
although probably not down to its
last comma. They dont totally buy
what either candidate is saying.
People are sort of averaging out
the candidates positions, said
Harvard School of Public Health
professor Robert Blendon, who
tracks polling on health care issues.
Most see health law being implemented
Mitt Romney
STATE/WORLD 8
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Elena Becatoros
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATHENS, Greece Europes
fragile nancial calm was shattered
Wednesday as investors worried that
violent anti-austerity protests in
Greece and Spains debt troubles
showed that the continent still can-
not contain its nancial crisis.
Police red tear gas Wednesday at
rioters hurling gasoline bombs and
chunks of marble during Greeces
largest anti-austerity demonstration
in six months. The protests were
part of a 24-hour general strike, the
latest test for Greeces nearly four-
month-old coalition government
and the new spending cuts it plans to
push through.
The brief but intense clashes by
several hundred rioters among the
60,000 people protesting in Athens
came a day after anti-austerity
protests rocked the Spanish capital.
In Madrid, thousands of angry
protesters again swarmed as close as
they could get Wednesday night to
Parliament, watched by a heavy
contingent of riot police. There was
no fresh violence, but the demon-
strators cut off trafc on one of the
citys major thoroughfares at the
height of the evening commute.
The protesters chanted for the
release of 34 people detained
Tuesday night in clashes that injured
64 others. They also demanded new
elections to oust Prime Minister
Mariano Rajoy and his conservative
government, which has imposed
cutbacks and tax hikes, deepening
the gloom in a country struggling
with recession and unemployment
of nearly 25 percent, the highest
among the 17 nations using the
common euro currency.
Spains central bank warned
Wednesday the countrys economy
continues to shrink signicantly,
sending the Spanish stock index
tumbling and its borrowing costs
rising.
Across Europe, stock markets fell
as well. Germanys DAX dropped 2
percent while the CAC-40 in France
fell 2.4 percent and Britains FTSE
100 slid 1.4 percent. The euro was
also hit, down a further 0.3 percent
at $1.2840.
Greek riots, Spanish marches shatter market
REUTERS
A riot police ofcer prepares to throw a teargas cannister to protestors
during clashes near Syntagma, Greece.
test results make up no more than 60
percent of the index rankings for
high schools starting in 2016. The
law maintains the current formula for
elementary schools and middle
schools, where test scores should
account for at least 60 percent of the
ranking.
The legislation requires the state
superintendent of public instruction
to examine other ways to measure
student achievement, such as subject
mastery, technical skills, and valid,
reliable and stable measures of pupil
preparedness for postsecondary edu-
cation and career.
For high school, the scores also
should factor in how many students
graduated in four, ve and six years,
which the superintendent should ana-
lyze for accuracy.
It also directs the state superintend-
ent to place more emphasis in the
calculation on science and social sci-
ence, which have little weight in the
current school-ranking system, and
measure the accuracy of reported
high school graduation rates.
Im pleased the governor agrees
that test scores alone are hardly a true
indicator of the success or failure of
our students, Steinberg said in a
news release. Life is not a bubble
test, and that system has failed our
kids.
The school ranking system, which
parents use to gauge school perform-
ance, compares schools with similar
student compositions based on
aggregated scores on student
achievement tests, including the high
school exit exam. The lowest-per-
forming schools are required to
improve their scores annually or face
state sanctions and possible takeover.
Brown, a Democrat, vetoed similar
legislation by Steinberg last year,
saying it was loaded with turgid
mandates and that the reforms were
better handled by local panels that
could visit schools, observe teachers,
interview students and examine their
work.
Such a system wouldnt produce
an API number, but it could improve
the quality of our schools, Brown
wrote then.
The new legislation says the super-
intendent may choose to develop a
program exactly like the one
described by Brown if there is
money set aside for it in the state
budget.
The governor did not provide a
statement to accompany
Wednesdays signing.
The previous bill would have
required that test scores account for
no more than 40 percent of the per-
formance index score.
Continued from page 1
LAW
OPINION 9
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Corruption of
moral or social doctrines
Editor,
The column by Dorothy Dimitre,
Media madness, in the Sept. 25 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal, hit a chord
with me. I had just finished reading
Why America failed the roots of
imperial decline by Morris Berman.
Dorothy, from her perspective as an
elder, points out what has been lost in
our society in the way of moral truths
and civility. Morris Berman goes fur-
ther in outlining the cunning business
mindset that he calls the hustler
mentality that has become the primary
driving force which contributes to
corrupting moral or social doctrines
of the past and helped make the coun-
try a model for other nations to emu-
late. Its an uncomfortable book to
read but is worth looking at his per-
spective on current events in our soci-
ety.
Bob Jarmusz
San Mateo
Sidewalk bicyclists
Editor,
Why isnt the Burlingame Police
Department issuing warning citations
to sidewalk bicyclists along California
Drive? Since 1941, Municipal Code
1476 has stated, It is unlawful for
any person to ride or operate a bicycle
on the sidewalk in any of the business
districts of the city and no bicycle
shall be operated on the sidewalk in
any of the residential districts when
and where the sidewalk is being used
by pedestrians.
Why doesnt the Burlingame City
Council, city manager and city attor-
ney hold the police and themselves
accountable to me as a claimant of
sidewalk safety and as a 29-year resi-
dent of this mixed business and resi-
dential corridor?
I would remind them all that the
Organizational Compass of 2003 was
designed to encourage and emulate
19 values and behaviors as a vital part
of the way city employees do business
and provide municipal services.
Georgia Rothrock
Burlingame
Music on the Square
Editor,
I went to see a Journey cover band
at Music on the Square a couple of
weeks ago. Years ago when I was
growing up, music was a very person-
al or even an emotional thing, but now
music is viewed much the same as
flossing ones teeth. Back to the
Journey band. When the band started,
the mix was about as musically pleas-
ing as a tax audit. As time went on, it
didnt get much better.
A few years ago, going to
Courthouse Square was a real joy
similar to listening to music when I
was a kid. I just learned now that
Redwood City paid more than
$60,000 for the right to control the
quality of the music that we listen to
at the square. They now own the
sound and stage.
I have done the number crunch and
the city will not turn a profit on that
$60,000 venture until 2051. All of this
would be justified if it would just
sound better than it did before they
got into the entertainment business,
but it doesnt not by any stretch of
the imagination. Whatever the cause
of the degradation of sound quality
(equipment or personnel), after three
years, it ought to be working right.
But it isnt. I spoke to two of the
Parks and Recreation staff and they
seemed pleasantly satisfied that it
sounded the way it did. Neither of
these two people were over the age of
30 (and I would hazard a guess not
two weeks out of Scooby Doo under-
wear).
Week after week it is like a blind
man with a machine gun, whether or
not these neophytes will get it even
close to sounding right. The city just
keeps loading and the Parks and
Recreation staff just keeps firing.
Michael Roman
Redwood City
Letters to the editor
T
he city of Half Moon Bay cur-
rently pays about 10 percent of
its budget toward the repay-
ment of a bond that was needed to
acquire a piece of property to end a
land dispute that had gone on too long.
The Beachwood property saga ended
with the $18 million purchase that, with
interest, required a $30 million bond
which the city pays about $1 million
toward every year.
That payment puts quite a crimp in
the citys budget and its capital
improvement needs road resurfac-
ing, plans to expand its library and crit-
ical needs like ensuring the Main Street
Bridge is seismically safe. With that in
mind, the city is asking voters to pay
for a half-cent sales tax increase for
three years that aims to raise about
$870,000 annually. Though the money
cannot be earmarked for specic proj-
ects, the city will likely hold hearings
after the November vote to determine
the communitys priorities for the
money if Measure J is successful.
The city has been aggressive in cut-
ting its costs by contracting out services
such as police and parks and recreation
and is currently running a very lean
operation. The additional money would
provide a much-needed buffer until rev-
enue returns to higher levels, propo-
nents contend.
That may be true, but recent reports
indicate city tax revenue is on the rise
and the city recently enjoyed a prelimi-
nary judgment in which it will likely
receive $10 million in an insurance
claim related to the Beachwood devel-
opment. That is in addition to a $5 mil-
lion settlement in early 2008 with the
Association of Bay Area Government
PLAN for a different insurance cover-
age period. Those two amounts will go
a long way toward bridging the gap in
the citys nancial obligation for the
Beachwood property. The city is also
moving toward selling the property for
development, which will bring in addi-
tional revenue from the sale and from
whatever is allowed for the 24-acre site.
While there is an opportunity to pay
down the debt, and that should be the
citys primary focus, there is also an
opportunity to move forward on some
of the more pressing capital improve-
ment needs with this money.
Though the time frame for this tax
measure is modest, three years, this is
not the time to be burdening the popu-
lace with a new tax that has the possi-
bility of providing a disincentive for
visitors and their tourist dollars. The
city has been nancially responsible in
reducing staff and sharing services.
Revenue is climbing, albeit slowly. The
timing is not right for such a proposal
because individual families are still
struggling with the economic downturn
and the recent judgments provide the
city with much-needed wiggle room in
its budget. While the pull for additional
revenue is strong and the intent of the
city is valid, voters should say no to
Measure J.
No on Measure J
Want a voice? Vote
T
he irony wasnt lost. Inside the Board of
Supervisors chambers Tuesday morning, dozens
upon dozens of people railed at the elected offi-
cials over the planned new jail. The onslaught of anger
was peppered with threats, both veiled and not, to each
supervisors legacy and political future. Vote for the jail
and kiss your career goodbye, they said in essence. Some
called for recalls OK, maybe not so scary for District
Four Supervisor Rose Jacobs Gibson who is being termed
out this year while others stuck with warnings about
upcoming elections. Youre not representing us, they said.
We can and will replace
you. Furthermore, we
will defeat the proposed
half-cent sales tax. Take
that, jail advocates!
Outside the chambers
in the rest of the world,
community activists,
legislators and those
who just know the value
of democracy and public
participation put out the
rallying cry for people
to be able to make good
on the types of chal-
lenges laid bare for
county leaders. In case
you missed it, Tuesday
was declared National Voter Registration Day courtesy of
state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San Mateo. Yee
even made the process easier with an earlier bill creating
online registration and, just signed this week, a bill allow-
ing for same-day registration. In other words, no excuses.
On Tuesday, if the press release stack is any indication,
officials and organizations jumped on the bandwagon. The
California secretary of state reminded Californians to
check their registration or sign up if necessary. Groups
with official forms stopped shoppers heading into stores
for milk and socks. Would you like a side of democracy
with your groceries, maam? Even in the aforementioned
room at 400 County Government Center, clipboards
passed around to make sure that those with something to
say on any level of government arent just paying lip serv-
ice.
All in all, the day apparently kicked some into gear. The
Secretary of States Office reported roughly 110,000
Californians registered online in the first week. Not a bad
start at all. The question now is how many of those will
actually vote.
Take the June primary, for example. That election win-
nowed down the candidate pool to two for the District
Four seat replacing Jacobs Gibson, the supervisor who
drew particular ire from the anti-jail contingent because
they argue a strong majority of minority inmates hail from
the jurisdiction. Voter turnout in San Mateo County was
36.5 percent with 123,312 ballots cast out of the 337,702-
person pool a low number by any standard but espe-
cially when one considers that a presidential primary usu-
ally brings in about 56 percent, according to the local
elections office.
And while the presidential race is important, local elec-
tions are just as important if not more so. Cases in point:
The Board of Supervisors, the jail, taxes. Voters chose the
supervisors who in turn approved the new jail. By that
logic, voters do have a say in the future of the county.
Same goes for the half-cent sales tax its fate is in the
hands of voters, not just those who agree or disagree in
theory.
Those who dont bother to actually vote cant effect
change and they sure as heck dont earn the right to vent.
Californians have until Oct. 22 to register for the Nov. 6
election. Hopefully, the momentum of National Voter
Registration Day carries on. Secretary of State Debra
Bowen said in a prepared statement Tuesday that a com-
mon reason people dont register to vote is simply
because they were never asked. Consider this the ques-
tion.
The angry masses before the supervisors wanted them
to know that with every vote its time may be up. Lets
hope they, and all eligible people, remember to register
and actually follow through with a ballot before their
valid time to speak is up, too.
Register to vote online at RegisterToVote.ca.gov. or pick
up a paper application at many post offices, libraries,
Department of Motor Vehicles or other government
offices.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200
ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to
the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com
Editorial
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,413.51 -0.33% 10-Yr Bond 1.618 -3.80%
Nasdaq3,093.70 -0.77% Oil (per barrel) 90.230003
S&P 500 1,433.32 -0.57% Gold 1,756.40
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A mixed report about the housing mar-
ket and unrest in Europe on Wednesday
extended the longest losing streak for the
Standard & Poors 500 index since mid-
July. Other risky assets, like European
stocks and oil, fell more sharply.
The median price of new homes sold
in August rose by a record amount, while
sales of new homes dipped slightly.
Sales in August were up 27.7 percent
from a year earlier, but remain at about
half the pace economists consider
healthy.
Stronger data on the U.S. housing
market have insulated stocks in recent
weeks from a slackening global econo-
my. Stocks other main source of support
has been the Federal Reserves program
to boost the economy by pumping
money in. That idea lost some luster
Tuesday after a key Fed ofcial said he
doubted it will do much good.
There was some optimism coming
into the market, and thats usually when
youre most vulnerable to sell-offs when
there are negative headlines like the
Fed officials comments, unrest in
Europe and weaker data about the U.S.
economy, said Todd Salamone, director
of research at Schaeffers Investment
Research.
Indexes had risen to levels they hadnt
beat for months or years, Salamone said,
creating an almost perfect storm in
terms of the vulnerability to short-term
impacts.
The dip in home sales hurt home-
builder stocks. PulteGroup Inc. fell 76
cents, or 4.7 percent, to $15.30; KB
Home 51 cents, or 3.5 percent, to $13.90
and Beazer Homes USA Inc. 14 cents, or
3.9 percent, to $3.50.
European stocks had their worst day in
months as unrest threatened to boil over
in Greece, where deep budget cuts have
eroded peoples living standards, and
Spain, where citizens are resisting a like-
ly bailout from international lenders.
Earlier, Asian stocks closed lower.
The euro fell sharply against the dol-
lar, and the price of oil closed below $90
per barrel for the rst time since early
August.
Rising demand for lower-risk invest-
ments fed strong bids for U.S. Treasury
debt. The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note fell to 1.62 percent from 1.67 per-
cent late Tuesday. A bonds yield falls as
its price increases.
The Dow Jones industrial average fell
44.04 points, or 0.3 percent, to
13,413.51.
Stocks fall on Europe unrest
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
American Greetings Corp., up $2.48 at $16.82
The greeting card company said that a group
led by its CEO and chief operating ofcer wants
to buy it for about $581 million.
Blyth Inc., down $6.89 at $25.68
Blyths ViSalus unit, which makes weight-loss
products,withdrew its initial public offering due
to uncertain market conditions.
Jabil Circuit Inc., down $2.07 at $18.90
Weaker demand and higher costs drove the
electronic parts makers scal fourth-quarter
net income down 28 percent and resulted in a
a disappointing forecast.
Synnex Corp., down $1.80 at $32.45
The back ofce support services company said
that its scal third-quarter net income fell 10
percent on virtually at revenue.
Capital Senior Living Corp.,up 46 cents at $14.52
Citing future growth,a Raymond James analyst
initiated coverage of the senior housing
providers stock with a Strong Buyrating.
Nasdaq
Sucampo Pharmaceuticals Inc., up 19 cents at
$4.72
The drug maker said the Food and Drug
Administration agreed to conduct a faster
review of Amitiza,a treatment for constipation.
Fortinet Inc., down 83 cents at $25.02
Yahoo Inc. said that it was hiring the security
software companys chief nancial ofcer for
the same job at the Internet company.
Copart Inc., up 43 cents at $27.83
Shares of the automobile auctioneer hit an all-
time high after posting fourth-quarter results
that topped Wall Street expectations.
Big movers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Yahoos new
chief nancial ofcer is getting a big
raise to join the struggling Internet com-
pany.
Ken Goldman, who will become
Yahoos CFO next month, is starting out
with an annual salary of $600,000 and
could earn a bonus of up to $540,000,
according to documents filed
Wednesday. He is also getting restricted
stock and stock options valued at $12
million.
The stock awards will gradually vest
over the next three to four years, and
could end up being worth more or less
than $12 million. That depends on how
Yahoos long-slumping stock fares
under a new management team led by
Marissa Mayer, who became the compa-
nys CEO two months ago.
The pay package represents a signi-
cant bump from Goldmans current job
as CFO of Fortinet Inc., a security soft-
ware maker based in Sunnyvale, Calif.,
less than ve miles from Yahoo Inc.s
headquarters in the same city.
Fortinet paid Goldman an annual
salary of $327,818, according to the
companys most recent compensation
disclosures six months ago. Goldman,
63, also was eligible for a bonus of about
$200,000 at Fortinet.
Yahoo gives new CFO big raise to leave his old job
Kraft Foods Group joining S&P 500
NEW YORK The S&P Dow Jones Indices said
Wednesday that Kraft Foods Group, which is being spun off
from Kraft Foods Inc., will replace Alpha Natural Resources
Inc. on the S&P 500. Kraft Foods Group is a food and bev-
erage business based in Northeld, Ill.
Kraft Foods Inc. is being renamed Mondelez International
Inc. and is changing its ticker symbol to MDLZ. It will
remain in the S&P 100 and the S&P 500.
Alpha, which produces steam and metallurgical coal, will
replace Korn/Ferry International in the S&P MidCap 400.
Alpha is based in Abingdon, Va.
Stafng rm Korn/Ferry, which is based in Los Angeles,
replaces Pulse Electronics Corp. in the S&P SmallCap 600.
S&P Dow Jones Indices says that Alphas and
Korn/Ferrys market capitalizations are more representative
of the mid cap and small cap market spaces, while Pulse is
ranked No. 600 in the S&P SmallCap 600 and is no longer
deemed appropriate for inclusion in that index.
The changes will take effect after the market closes on
Monday.
Abaxis settles Cepheid lawsuit for $17.25 million
UNION CITY Blood analysis systems developer
Abaxis Inc. said Wednesday it will receive $17.25 million
from medical test maker Cepheid Inc. as part of a patent lit-
igation settlement.
Abaxis, based in Union City said the litigation focused on
several of its patents tied to reagent and chemical composi-
tions and processes. All claims against Cepheid will be dis-
missed as part of the settlement.
The agreement allows both companies to move forward
without the distraction of protracted litigation, Abaxis
CEO Clint Severson said in a brief statement.
Cepheid, which is based in Sunnyvale did not immediate-
ly return calls seeking comment.
Abaxis shares climbed 34 cents to $36.67 in Wednesday
morning trading, while Cepheid shares edged up 5 cents to
$39.
Business briefs
BIG PAY BUMP:
Yahoos new chief nancial ofcer, Ken
Goldman, is starting off with a $600,000 salary
and a bonus of up to $540,000. Thats a
signicant raise from the $327,818 salary and
maximum bonus of roughly $200,000 that he
received as CFO at security software specialist
Fortinet Inc.
LONG-TERM INCENTIVES:
Goldman, 63, also is getting restricted stock-
base awards valued at a total of $12 million.
They will vest gradually over the next three to
four years.
CHALLENGE AHEAD:
Yahoo Inc. CEO Marissa Mayer is counting on
Goldman to help turn around the company.
CFO doubles pay
<< No promises this year from Warriors, page 13
49ers prepare for Jets in Ohio, page 12
Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012
COMING HOME AGAIN: BAY AREA NATIVE AND FORMER 49ER ANDRE CARTER SIGNS WITH THE RAIDERS >>> PAGE 12
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK (AP) So long, replacement
refs. The NFLs regular crews will be back on
the eld starting Thursday night.
After two days of marathon negotiations
and mounting frustration among coaches, play-
ers and fans the NFL and the referees union
announced at midnight Thursday that a tentative
agreement had been reached to end a lockout
that began in June.
Commissioner Roger
Goodell, who was at the
bargaining table Tuesday
and Wednesday, said the
regular ofcials would work
the Browns-Ravens game at
Baltimore.
The tentative eight-year
deal must be ratied by 51
percent of the unions 121
members. They plan to vote Friday and
Saturday in Dallas.
Welcome back REFS, Buffalo Bills run-
ning back C.J. Spiller tweeted shortly after the
news broke.
The replacements worked the rst three
weeks of games, triggering a wave of outrage
that threatened to disrupt the rest of the season.
After a missed call cost the Green Bay Packers
a win on a chaotic nal play at Seattle on
Monday night, the two sides really got serious.
We are glad to be getting back on the eld
for this weeks games, referees union presi-
dent Scott Green said.
The agreement hinged on working out pen-
sion and retirement benets for the ofcials,
who are part-time employees of the league. The
tentative pact calls for their salaries to increase
from an average of $149,000 a year in 2011 to
$173,000 in 2013, rising to $205,000 by 2019.
NFL, refs reach tentative agreement
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo School volleyball coach Atlee
Hubbard scheduled a pretty rugged non-league
schedule for the Knights this year, knowing
that her team had a chance to do some damage
this season.
Wednesday night, however, marked the
Knights biggest challenge to date as they host-
ed defending Division II state champion
Presentation. While the Panthers are not the
same team that won the state title last year
they lost a number of key players to graduation
they are still among the best squads in the
Central Coast Section year in and year out.
There were some big matches (I scheduled)
in preseason and Presentation is one of them,
Hubbard said. I scheduled them because I
knew wed have a pretty good team.
Looks like Menlo might be in store for a spe-
cial year after dispatching Presentation in ve
games, 23-25, 25-11, 25-22, 22-25, 15-8.
Nothing came easy for Menlo (12-5 overall)
well, except for the rout in Game 2 but
in the end, the Knights had a little bit more
repower, kept their composure, and passed,
set and received serve just a little bit better
than the Panthers.
Our offense is really clicking, Hubbard
said. Our serving has been on re. Serving is
so important. If you let a team like
[Presentation] pass, theyre going to beat you.
It took a game before the Knights really
turned up the pressure on their service game.
The Panthers jumped out to a 6-1 lead in Game
1 and while Menlo did a good job of staying in
the game, the Knights never could quite get
over the hump. Despite getting eight kills from
Maddie Huber in Game 1, Presentation held on
for a 25-23 win.
We started off a little slow, trying to gure
out what our rhythm would be, Hubbard said.
Game 2, however, was a different story.
Behind strong serving from just about every-
one in the rotation, the Knights crushed the
Knight notch big win
F
ollowing the rst football game of the
NFL season, I said in this space that
the replacement referees would not
have an impact on the game. Boy was I way
off on that one. Over the last three weeks, the
quality of ofciating seems to have deteriorat-
ed to the point of the comical. It came to a
head this past Monday night when the sports
world was atwitter both guratively and
literally following the debacle that ended
the game with a
Seahawks touchdown
for a 14-12 Seattle win
over Green Bay.
Is it any coincidence
that the NFL and the
locked out ofcials are
now feverishly trying
to get a deal done to
get the regular refs
back on the eld?
Darren Rovell, a sports
business analyst for
ESPN, tweeted
Wednesday there were
59,000 tweets per minute skewering the
replacement refs, NFL commissioner Roger
Goodell, NFL owners and the NFL in general
following Monday nights ending. We already
knew social media was having an impact
around the world (Arab Spring, anyone?) and
now it seems to have impacted sports.
The simple fact is Monday nights game
was the straw that broke the camels back, the
seminal moment when fans said enough is
enough. Their cries had to have been heard
by Goodell. Even he had to face-palm him-
self watching that game. He had to say to
himself, This was my biggest fear. Weve
got to x this. Apparently he was ne with
the level of ineptness until it not only cost one
team a win, but cost a team in the most dra-
matic way possible on the last play of the
game.
NFL, refs
both share
some blame
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Menlos Elisa Merten sets the ball during the Knights ve-set victory over defending state
champion Presentation Wednesday night inAtherton.
By Stephen Hawkins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas Yoenis Cespedes
had one of Oaklands two triples in the rst
inning and the Athletics jumped out to a quick
lead in a 9-3 victory at Texas on Wednesday
night to pull within three games of the AL
West-leading Rangers.
The Athletics, who had played ve consec-
utive one-run games, led 5-0 only eight bat-
ters into the game. They chased Martin Perez
(1-3) before the rookie left-hander got all the
way through the batting order.
Oakland has won two of three in the series
that wraps up with a day game Thursday.
After that, the As go home
for a three-game weekend
series against Seattle
before hosting the Rangers
for the nal three games of
the regular season next
week.
Stephen Drew had four
of Oaklands 16 hits,
including a double leading
off the game before scor-
ing on Cespedes triple
into the right-center gap.
The only Oakland starter without a hit was
No. 9 hitter Cliff Pennington. Even Josh
Reddick ended a career-long 0-for-30 slump
with singles in the seventh and ninth innings.
Rookie righty Jarrod Parker (12-8) won his
third consecutive decision over four starts. He
struck out eight in six innings, and his 109
pitches were his most since 111 on June 4,
when he threw eight scoreless innings and
allowed only one hit against the Rangers in
Oakland.
Oakland had a 2 1/2-game lead over the
Angels for the ALs second wild card. Los
Angeles was playing at home later
Wednesday night against Seattle.
The magic number remained at ve for the
two-time defending American League cham-
pion Rangers, who host the Angels for three
games this weekend.
Matt Harrison (17-10), the All-Star left-
hander, starts for Texas in the series nale,
when he will try to become the Rangers rst
18-game winner since Kenny Rogers in 2004.
He faces lefty Travis Blackley (5-3).
The Athletics set an AL record for striking
out the most in a season with their 11 against
six Texas pitchers. They have 1,333, nine
more than Tampa Bay had in 2007, and they
still have seven games left.
After Cespedes one-out triple, the As had
Oakland keeps the pressure on Texas
Roger Goodell
As 9, Rangers 3
Yoenis
Cespedes
See ATHLETICS, Page 16
See LOUNGE, Page 16
See NFL, Page 16
See MENLO, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA The Oakland
Raiders made a move to bolster their
struggling pass rush on Wednesday by
signing proven defensive end Andre
Carter to a free-agent contract.
The Raiders (1-2) had brought
Carter in twice before for workouts in
training camp and earlier this season
before signing him to ll a glaring
need.
I think hell be instrumental, said
defensive tackle Richard Seymour,
who was picked one spot ahead of
Carter in the 2001 draft at sixth over-
all. Hes a proven guy in this league.
Obviously, it will take some times to
get his legs under him, but hes a guy
thats shown he can rush the passer
and I think that
will be essential
for us.
Carter has 76
sacks in 163
career games
over 11 seasons
in the NFL. He
was named to the
Pro Bowl for the
rst time last sea-
son after recording 10 sacks for the
New England Patriots but his season
was cut short by a quadriceps injury
that forced him to miss the nal two
games of the regular season and the
postseason.
Carter was credited with 51 quarter-
back pressures by Pro Football Focus
in 14 games for the Patriots last sea-
son. He tied a New England record
with four sacks in a game against the
New York Jets on Nov. 13.
But because of the injury, Carter
was still looking for a job this season.
Its always tough, he said. It def-
initely gives you a different perspec-
tive. Here I am trying to train hard and
work hard and just get better, and as
the season continued to progressed
and watching Sunday football on the
couch with my son ... I knew God had
a plan and I just kept on continuing to
be patient and in the end it worked out
well.
Carter is trying to get up to speed
with the playbook and his new team-
mates this week but said hed be ready
to play Sunday in Denver against
Peyton Manning and the Broncos if he
gets the call.
If I wasnt ready then I wouldnt be
here, he said.
Carter said on a scale of 1-to-10 that
he was physically at 100, but
acknowledged it would take some
time to get into football shape.
The Raiders are hoping it doesnt
take long because they are in dire need
of a proven pass rusher after having let
Kamerion Wimbley go in the offsea-
son in a cost-cutting move. Oakland
has just three sacks this season one
ahead of last-place Jacksonville as
their lack of a speed rusher on the out-
side has hurt them.
There were a few times where we
had a little something going in the
game last week, and (Ben)
Roethlisberger does a good job of
maneuvering in the pocket, coach
Dennis Allen said before the team
announced the move. But, obviously,
we got to try to do some things that get
a little bit more pressure on the quar-
terback. As we go throughout the sea-
son, were going to need that.
Carter also worked out for Arizona
and St. Louis before signing with the
Raiders. He has returned to his roots,
having starred in high school in San
Jose, playing college ball at California
and spending his rst seasons in the
NFL with the San Francisco 49ers.
Now after stops in Washington for
ve years and one year in New
England, Carter is back home with the
Bay Areas other team.
I had a lot of friends who said you
crossed over to the dark side, he said.
Everything comes full circle. Where
Im at in my career why not be back in
the Bay Area where it all started for
me.
Raiders bolster pass rush, sign DE Andre Carter
Andre Carter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOARDMAN, Ohio Coach
Jim Harbaugh wants the San
Francisco 49ers to get focused,
avoid obstacles and get back to win-
ning.
Harbaugh refused to let a day-
long rain dampen plans to get the
offense untracked Wednesday. A
purposefully placed bus wouldnt
get in his way, either.
Still smarting from a 24-13 loss at
Minnesota on Sunday, Harbaugh
directed a morning walkthrough on
the rain-slickened asphalt of a hotel
parking lot. Then practice took
place in rain at their home-away-
from home, Stambaugh Stadium at
nearby Youngstown State
University.
Patrick Willis, Brandon Jacobs
and Ted Ginn returned from injuries
to work in full pads, though nose
tackle Isaac Sopoaga, nursing a left
knee injury, did not.
Harbaugh couldnt wait to work
on issues that kept the 49ers from a
3-0 start. He ignored a bus parked in
the middle of his walkthrough, then
had players slog through rain to cor-
rect mistakes.
I think when you come off a loss,
you want to get back to work and
make darn sure it doesnt happen
again, he said. Thats the mindset
we have every day, including today,
to work on that mindset in prepara-
tion for the game.
The 49ers moved practice to Ohio
this week in preparation for playing
the Jets at the Meadowlands on
Sunday.
A year ago, they came to the area
between road wins in Cincinnati and
Philadelphia. Harbaugh said then it
was a unique experience for a young
team to bond with its new coach.
Now in his second season and
after a trip to the NFC championship
game, Harbaugh doesnt want dis-
tractions derailing the same atmos-
phere from developing. It was busi-
ness as usual, with an extra helping
of hard work.
The challenge (is), see how
much you can get out of today as it
relates to preparation for the Jets
game, Harbaugh said. Dont know
that theres any rule that it has to be
exactly like it was when were back
in San Francisco or even similar.
Challenge is to see how much we
can get out of today.
Quarterback Alex Smith believes
the 49ers are more advanced at this
point than a year ago. He cautioned
that it wont automatically lead to an
eight-game winning streak and 13-3
nish like last season.
49ers ignore rain, work on offense in Ohio
SPORTS 13
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Mark Jackson isnt making
any playoff promises for the Golden State
Warriors this season.
Maybe its a lesson learned for the point
guard, preacher and boisterous broadcaster
turned NBA head coach. Or maybe hes tem-
pering expectations entering his second sea-
son considering, well, there actually are
expectations with a reshaped roster built
around rehabilitating cen-
ter Andrew Bogut and
point guard Stephen
Curry.
Im not going to say
it, Jackson said
Wednesday. Not because
I dont believe it. But ulti-
mately it comes to a point
where, enough of the talk-
ing, go out and do it.
That time is almost
here.
With training camp beginning next week,
Jackson still made it clear that not making the
postseason would be a major disappointment.
He also recognizes the season outlook and
perhaps his own future hinges largely on
the surgically repaired ankles of Bogut and
Curry, who have had repeated problems stay-
ing on the court throughout their young
careers.
Asked how condent he is both will return
to form and stay healthy this season, Jackson
quipped: I hope so. My family certainly
hopes so.
Same goes for Warriors fans who have long
waited for a winner.
For a franchise that has made the playoffs
once in the last 18 years, talking about the
postseason at any time might seem strange, let
alone before any exhibitions have been
played. Looking at the roster on paper, any-
way its easy to see why the Warriors dont
nd that goal so silly.
The Bogut-Curry combo, if healthy, would
be teamed with power forward David Lee,
second-year shooting guard Klay Thompson
and either Brandon Rush or seventh overall
pick Harrison Barnes of North Carolina at
small forward. Golden State is deeper than in
recent years, too, with Jarrett Jack, Carl
Landry and Richard Jefferson complementing
rookies Draymond Green and Festus Ezeli,
who both impressed enough during summer
league and offseason workouts to be consid-
ered rotation players.
Jackson also has had more time to prepare
this season than last, when the labor lockout
eliminated most of the offseason and training
camp not to mention limiting practice time
during the crammed 66-game schedule.
Injuries also decimated the roster, which has
been quickly reconstructed under new general
manager Bob Myers, and that has Jackson
more optimistic than anything after going 23-
43 last season.
What makes us better is not the timetable,
Jackson said. Its the talent.
Bogut, the 2005 No. 1 overall pick and best
center the franchise has had in at least a
decade, fractured his left ankle Jan. 25 with
Milwaukee and sat out the rest of the season
when he was acquired in a trade for guard
Monta Ellis. He isnt expected to be ready at
the start of training camp Tuesday, but
Jackson is hopeful Bogut will be in the start-
ing lineup for the regular-season opener at
Phoenix on Oct. 31.
Curry, who was medically cleared to resume
all basketball-related activities last week,
repeatedly sprained his surgically repaired
right ankle last season while playing only 26
games. The team said his most recent opera-
tion on April 25 was an exploratory proce-
dure that revealed a stable ankle with no
structural damage and consisted of cleaning
out loose debris and scar tissue.
Injuries aside, Jackson has been pleased
with the progress his team made over the sum-
mer.
He said the reason he made the bold playoff
prediction when he was hired last year was to
change the culture of a losing franchise that,
despite all its failures, is consistently among
the NBAs top-10 in attendance and whose
fans are among the most vocal in the sports
saturated Bay Area.
Warriors coach has high
expectations,not promises
Mark Jackson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Matt Cain pitched
seven innings and had two hits and an RBI to
lead the San Francisco Giants to a 6-0 win over
the Arizona Diamondbacks on Wednesday night.
Brandon Belt added three hits, Pablo Sandoval
singled twice and drove in two runs, and Marco
Scutaro extended his career-best hitting streak to
14 games while helping Cain to his career-best
16th win.
Its San Franciscos rst victory since clinch-
ing the NL West division for the second time in
three years.
The Giants were the fth NL team to pitch a
shutout Wednesday. The last time there were at
least ve shutouts in the same league on the same
day was Sept. 18, 2003, in the NL, according to
STATS LLC.
Miguel Montero and Gerardo Parra had two
hits apiece for Arizona, which only managed to
get one runner past second base while losing for
just the third time in 10 games.
Cain (16-5) looked sharp in his next-to-last
start in the regular season. The right-hander scat-
tered four hits and had six strikeouts, two in the
seventh when he pitched out of two-on, no-outs
situation.
It was exactly the type of outing San Francisco
needed from its ace after two-time NL Cy Young
Award winner Tim Lincecum was knocked
around by the Diamondbacks a day earlier.
Cain, who hasnt lost since Aug. 6, lowered his
ERA at AT&T Park to 2.03. He did it despite
three Giants errors on a sloppy night defensively
for both teams.
Giants beat Arizona
Giants 6, Dbacks 0
SPORTS 14
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Panthers. Presentation struggled with its serve
receive and did everything it could to just keep
the ball off the oor. The Knights took advan-
tage, nishing with 19 kills and just two errors
in the set. Menlo led 3-2 before going on a 5-
1 run to take control. Following a Presentation
kill that made the score 9-4, the Knights put
the game away by winning nine straight
points for an 18-4 advantage. The Panthers
made a small run late, but Menlo nished
Game 2 by winning the nal four points.
The Knights kept that momentum going in
Game 3, but the Panthers also regrouped and
made Menlo work. The Panthers won four
straight points late in the game, cutting a 17-
11 decit to just two points, but a serve into
the net gave the Knights a sideout. Huber,
who nished the match with 25 kills, had
back-to-back put aways to push the Knights
advantage to ve, 20-15 and then outlasted the
Panthers down the stretch.
Menlo had a chance to put the Panthers
away in four games, but Presentation clawed
its way to a win in Game 4, which stayed
close throughout. The Panthers eventually
built a 16-13 lead, but the Knights went on a
5-0 run to take an 18-16 advantage. The
Panthers responded with a run of their own to
tie the game at 20 and it then became a race to
see which team could win ve points rst. A
Presentation hitting error gave Menlo a 21-20
lead, but the Panthers came back with four
unanswered points to take a 24-21 lead before
nishing out the game and forcing a fth and
deciding set.
The Knights, however, treated Game 5 like
Game 2. They jumped out to a big lead early
and were never seriously threatened, building
a 7-1 lead and then cruising to the victory.
It was going to be a good matchup. I know
Pres has a lot of power and it forced us to
think about our defense, Hubbard said. It
was nice to see our team come together, espe-
cially after Emma Thygesen went out (with an
ankle injury), and stay composed. Finishing
matches is something weve been working
on.
The Knights were led Hubers 25 kills and
Maddy Frappier, who finished with 18.
Hubbard said the two have traded off this sea-
son in leading the team and when they are
both involved in the offense, the Knights are a
tough team to beat.
They both are really nice hitters, Hubbard
said. It makes it nice when theyre both on
(top of their game on) the same night.
Continued from page 11
MENLO
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MEDINAH, Ill. Rory McIlroy has gone
from being a rookie in the Ryder Cup to a
marked man at Medinah.
McIlroy is the rst European in nearly 20
years to go into the Ryder Cup as the No. 1
player in the world, although the star power of
this 23-year-old from Northern Ireland is
dened by much more than a computer ranking.
He already has won two majors, with a record
score in the U.S. Open last year at
Congressional and a record margin at the PGA
Championship last month at Kiawah Island.
His four wins this year are the most of anyone
in the world, all against the strongest elds.
So it was no surprise when Jim Furyk referred
to Boy Wonder as the present day Tiger
Woods and a marked man at this Ryder Cup.
Thats the role Woods played for so many years
in these matches when he dominated golf. There
was a feeling among Europeans that beating
Woods was worth more than one point because
of the emotional lift it gave the rest of the team.
McIlroy doesnt see it that way.
This week Im not the No. 1 player in the
world, he said Wednesday. Im one person in
a 12-man team, and thats
it. Its a team effort. Theres
12 guys all striving toward
the same goal. Im just part
of that.
But even in this team
competition, its easy to get
wrapped in a single star, as
it was for Woods.
Theres only one way to
keep score in the Ryder
Cup, though its tempting to make individuals
accountable. Even when Woods was at his best,
he still could only deliver a maximum of ve
points if he played every match. He never came
close, and didnt even produce a winning record
until his fth Ryder Cup.
I dont have a number. I dont have a total,
McIlroy said. I think with the U.S. playing
here at home, I think they are the favorites. Its
a very strong team. So we know we have got to
go out there and play very, very well to have a
chance. So if I play on Friday morning, I just
want to get my point and then take it from
there.
Wednesday brought the Ryder Cup one day
closer to the start of matches that are growing in
anticipation. Both teams look strong on paper,
with all 24 players among the top 35 in the
world. The Americans are loaded with experi-
ence behind Woods, Furyk and Phil Mickelson.
Europe has only one Ryder Cup rookie, Nicolas
Colsaerts, and has the experience when it comes
to winning. It has captured the cup six of the last
eight times.
And while captains Davis Love III and Jose
Maria Olazabal have preached civility and
respect throughout the week, leave it to Ian
Poulter to set the record straight on how the
intensity can change when the rst tee shot is
struck Friday morning.
Its not that we dont like each other, the
Englishman said. We are all good friends, both
sides of the pond. But theres something about
Ryder Cup which kind of intrigues me, how you
can be great mates with somebody, but boy, do
you want to kill them in Ryder Cup.
Poulter is not alone. Among the four
American rookies is Brandt Snedeker, coming
off an $11.44 million payday for winning the
Tour Championship and the FedEx Cup.
Im very, very competitive, Snedeker said.
People dont get that, because Im polite. But I
tee it up on Friday here tee it up against any-
body Im going to try to beat their brains in
as bad as I can.
Love brought the rst dose of tears to
Medinah when talking about the time spent
Tuesday night at a team dinner, when he
showed a video of past captains and spoke of
the camaraderie in the team room. Then, he
dressed his team in bright red pants for a prac-
tice session of foursomes, keeping together the
same partnerships he had the previous day.
Olazabal mixed up his team ever so slightly,
with Luke Donald and Sergio Garcia together.
They are 4-0 in foursomes.
Both teams played only nine holes, trying to
conserve energy for the most dynamic three
days in golf. Even for such a short practice ses-
sions, fans poured into Medinah and set a tone
for the noise level, chanting, USA! USA! just
for players leaving the practice range.
McIlroy, for all his ability, is so unfailingly
polite and respectful that everyone likes him.
Woods calls him such a great kid. The gallery
adores him. Perhaps for the rst time in his
career, he might not get a lot of love from the
other side of the ropes.
I expect it to be loud. I expect them to cheer
for them, McIlroy said. Hopefully, I wont get
heckled, but if I do, then youve just got to stay
calm and be focused on the golf and just get on
with it.
McIlroy the marked man of this Ryder Cup
Rory McIlroy
SPORTS 15
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
at Padres
5:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/29
@Colorado
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/6
Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
@Seattle
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
Dbacks
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/27
vs.FCDallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
@Rangers
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/26
Mariners
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
@Rangers
11:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/27
at Dodgers
7:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
10/1
Rangers
7:05
CSN-CAL
10/1
Mariners
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/28
at Padres
7:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/28
at Dodgers
7:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
10/2
at Padres
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/30
Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/2
Dbacks
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/26
Mariners
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/30
@Jets
10a.m.
FOX
9/30
vs.Seattle
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
10/18
vs.Bills
4:25p.m.
CBS
10/7
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
vs.Giants
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/14
Bye
vs.Rams
1:25a.m.
FOX
11/11
@Broncos
1:05p.m.
CBS
9/30
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/21
BYE
10/7
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
@Falcons
10a.m.
CBS
10/14
vs.Tampa
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/4
@Ravens
10a.m.
CBS
11/11
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 81 75
Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 87 79
New England 1 2 0 .333 82 64
Miami 1 2 0 .333 65 66
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 3 0 0 1.000 88 42
Jacksonville 1 2 0 .333 52 70
Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 67 113
Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 61 83
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 98 67
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 85 102
Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 77 75
Cleveland 0 3 0 .000 57 75
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego 2 1 0 .667 63 51
Denver 1 2 0 .333 77 77
Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 68 99
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 61 88
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 47 54
Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 47 66
N.Y. Giants 2 1 0 .667 94 65
Washington 1 2 0 .333 99 101
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 3 0 0 1.000 94 48
Tampa Bay 1 2 0 .333 60 67
Carolina 1 2 0 .333 52 79
New Orleans 0 3 0 .000 83 102
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Minnesota 2 1 0 .667 70 59
Chicago 2 1 0 .667 74 50
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 57 54
Detroit 1 2 0 .333 87 94
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 3 0 0 1.000 67 40
San Francisco 2 1 0 .667 70 65
Seattle 2 1 0 .667 57 39
St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 60 78
Thursday, Sep. 27
Cleveland at Baltimore, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 30
Tennessee at Houston, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
New England at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 10 a.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
San Francisco at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Miami at Arizona, 1:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 1:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, Pittsburgh
Monday, Oct. 1
Chicago at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
NFL
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 90 65 .581
Baltimore 89 67 .571 1 1/2
Tampa Bay 85 70 .548 5
Boston 69 87 .442 21 1/2
Toronto 68 87 .439 22
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 83 72 .535
Chicago 82 73 .529 1
Kansas City 70 85 .452 13
Cleveland 65 91 .417 18 1/2
Minnesota 65 91 .417 18 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 91 64 .587
Oakland 88 67 .568 3
Los Angeles 86 69 .555 5
Seattle 72 83 .465 19
Monday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 8, Minnesota 2
Detroit 5, Kansas City 4
Baltimore 12,Toronto 2
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 2
Oakland 9,Texas 3
Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 4
L.A. Angels 4, Seattle 3
ThursdaysGames
Kansas City (Mendoza 8-9) at Detroit (Fister 10-9),
10:05 a.m.
Oakland (Blackley 5-3) at Texas (M.Harrison 17-10),
11:05 a.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 7-5) at L.A.Angels (Haren 12-11),
12:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Nova 12-7) at Toronto (Morrow 8-7),
4:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 15-9) at Chicago White Sox
(Peavy 11-12), 5:10 p.m.
FridaysGames
Boston at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
AL STANDINGS
East Division
W L Pct GB
z-Washington 94 61 .606
z-Atlanta 90 65 .581 4
Philadelphia 78 77 .503 16
New York 71 84 .458 23
Miami 66 89 .426 28
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Cincinnati 93 62 .600
St. Louis 84 72 .538 9 1/2
Milwaukee 80 75 .516 13
Pittsburgh 76 79 .490 17
Chicago 59 96 .381 34
Houston 51 105 .327 42 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Francisco 90 65 .581
Los Angeles 80 75 .516 10
Arizona 78 77 .503 12
San Diego 74 81 .477 16
Colorado 61 94 .394 29
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
WednesdaysGames
L.A. Dodgers 8, San Diego 2
Washington 8, Philadelphia 4
Atlanta 3, Miami 0
Milwaukee 8, Cincinnati 1
N.Y. Mets 6, Pittsburgh 0
Houston 2, St. Louis 0
Colorado 6, Chicago Cubs 0
San Francisco 6, Arizona 0
ThursdaysGames
Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-1) at Cincinnati (Latos 13-
4), 9:35 a.m.
Pittsburgh (Correia 11-10) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 19-
6), 10:10 a.m.
Chicago Cubs (Volstad 3-10) at Colorado (Chacin
2-5), 12:10 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 6-7) at San Francisco (Zito 13-8),
12:45 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 20-8) at Philadelphia
(Cloyd 2-1), 4:05 p.m.
Miami (Ja.Turner 1-3) at Atlanta (Hanson 12-9),7:10
p.m.
L.A.Dodgers (Capuano 11-11) at San Diego (C.Kelly
2-2), 7:05 p.m.
FridaysGames
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 4:35 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
NL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Sporting Kansas City167 7 55 37 25
Chicago 16 8 5 53 42 34
D.C. 15 10 5 50 47 39
New York 14 8 8 50 50 43
Houston 12 8 10 46 42 37
Columbus 13 11 6 45 36 37
Montreal 12 15 4 40 44 49
Philadelphia 8 14 6 30 29 33
New England 7 15 8 29 37 41
Toronto FC 5 18 7 22 34 55
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
x-San Jose 18 6 6 60 62 36
x-Los Angeles 15 11 4 49 54 42
x-Real Salt Lake 15 11 4 49 40 34
Seattle 13 7 9 48 45 31
Vancouver 10 12 8 38 31 40
FC Dallas 9 12 9 36 35 38
Colorado 9 18 3 30 38 45
Portland 7 15 8 29 31 51
Chivas USA 7 15 7 28 21 45
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturdays Games
Houston at Seattle, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at New England, 1 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 2 p.m.
FC Dallas at Colorado, 6:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chivas USA, 8 p.m
MLS STANDINGS
NFL
NFL Fined New England coach Bill Belichick
$50,000andWashingtonoffensivecoordinator Kyle
Shanahan$25,000for their actionsduringSundays
games.
ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed RB Alfonso
Smith. Released LB Ricky Elmore from the practice
squad. Signed LB Zack Nash to the practice squad.
ATLANTAFALCONS Released S Mark LeGree
from the practice squad. Signed RB Josh Vaughan
to the practice squad.
KANSASCITYCHIEFSPlacedCRodneyHudson
on injured reserve.Signed G Russ Hochstein and C
Bryan Mattison.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS Released DL Mar-
cus Forston. Signed DL Terrell McClain.
OAKLANDRAIDERS Signed DL Andre Carter.
Signed WR Tori Gurley to the practice squad.
PHILADELPHIAEAGLESReleased WR Jeremy
Ebert from the practice squad. Signed TE Kyle Nel-
son to the practice squad.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERSSigned WR Malcom
Floyd to a three-year contract extension through
2015.
TAMPABAYBUCCANEERS Released WR Jor-
dan Shipley.Signed WR Roscoe Parrish and DE Jeff
Charleston.
TENNESSEETITANSSigned DE Pannel Egboh.
Placed DE Keyunta Dawson on injured reserve.
WASHINGTONREDSKINSPlaced RB Roy Helu
Jr. on injured reserve. Signed RB Ryan Grant.
NBA
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORSSigned G Carlon
Brown, G/F Lance Goulbourne, F Rick Jackson and
G/F Tarence Kinsey.
TRANSACTIONS
GIRLSTENNIS
MenloSchool 7, NotreDame-SJ 0
SINGLES Yao (MS) d.Bartel 6-0,6-0; G.Ong (MS)
d. Gupta 6-0, 6-0; Eliazo (MS) d. M. Nguyen 6-0, 6-0;
Ong (MS) d.V. Nguyen 6-3, 0-6, (10-7). DOUBLES
Hoag-Bronk (MS) d.Knappen-Knappen 6-3,7-6(5);
Kvamme-McConnell (MS) d. Cortez-Kasay 3-6, 6-0;
Schinasi-Golikova (MS) d. Tien-Kakalex 6-2, 6-2.
Records Menlo School 2-0 WBAL, 7-7 overall.
GIRLSWATERPOLO
SacredHeart Prep14, Presentation6
SacredHeart Prep453214
Presentation22116
SHP goal scorers Bocci, McCracken, Stuewe 3;
Bigley, Koshy 2; Willard. SHP goaltender saves
Moran10.Records SacredHeart Prep3-0WCAL,
5-3 overall.
ValleyChristian12, NotreDame-Belmont 2
Notre Dame-Belmont goal scorers Brickley,
Stauber. Records Notre Dame-Belmont 0-3
WCAL, 0-6 overall.
BOYSWATERPOLO
SacredHeart Prep13, Bellarmine9
SacredHeart Prep442213
Bellarmine21429
SHPgoal scorers Hinrichs 5;Enright,Perla-Ward,
Churukian 2; Lazar, A. Swart. Goaltender saves
Runkel 9. Records Sacred Heart Prep 3-0 WCAL,
5-2 overall.
Serra9, ValleyChristian5
Serra4131 9
VC12115
Serragoal scorers Buljan4;Yee3,OLeary2.Serra
goaltender saves Olujic 12.
GIRLS GOLF
MenloSchool 246, SacredHeart Prep250
At PaloAltoHills G&CC, par 36
MS Rong 40; C. Broderick, Schwab 52; E. Brod-
erick 55; Costello, Henderson 57.
SHP Dake, Ellison 47; Wilson 50; Fishback 51;
Cacchione 55; UIam 57.
Records Sacred Heart Prep 2-2 WBAL,3-4 over-
all; Menlo School 2-2.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
16
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Under the proposed deal, the current dened
benet pension plan will remain in place for
current ofcials through the 2016 season or
until the ofcial earns 20 years service. The
dened benet plan will then be frozen.
Retirement benets will be provided for new
hires, and for all ofcials beginning in 2017,
through a dened contribution arrangement.
The annual league contribution made on behalf
of each game ofcial will begin with an aver-
age of more than $18,000 per ofcial and
increase to more than $23,000 per ofcial in
2019.
Beginning with the 2013 season, the NFL
will have the option of hiring a number of of-
cials on a full-time basis to work year round,
including on the eld. The NFL will have the
option to retain additional ofcials for training
and development purposes, and may assign
those additional ofcials to work NFL games.
The number of additional ofcials will be
determined by the NFL.
As you know, this has to be ratied and we
know very little about it, but were excited to be
back. And ready, referee Ed Hochuli told The
Associated Press in a telephone interview.
And I think thats the most important message
that were ready.
Replacement refs arent new to the NFL.
They worked the rst week of games in 2001
before a deal was reached. But those ofcials
came from the highest level of college football;
the current replacements do not. Their ability to
call fast-moving NFL games drew mounting
criticism through Week 3, climaxing last week-
end, when ESPN analyst Jon Gruden called
their work tragic and comical.
Those comments came during Monday
Night Football, with Seattle beating Green
Bay 14-12 on a desperation pass into the end
zone on the nal play. Packers safety M.D.
Jennings had both hands on the ball in the end
zone, and when he fell to the ground in a
scrum, both Jennings and Seahawks receiver
Golden Tate had their arms on the ball.
The closest ofcial to the play, at the back of
the end zone, signaled for the clock to stop,
while another ofcial at the sideline ran in and
then signaled touchdown.
The NFL said in a statement Tuesday that the
touchdown pass should not have been over-
turned but acknowledged Tate should have
been called for offensive pass interference
before the catch. The league also said there was
no indisputable evidence to reverse the call
made on the eld.
That drew even louder howls of disbelief.
Some coaches, including Miamis Joe Philbin
and Cincinnatis Marvin Lewis, tried to restore
some calm by instructing players not to speak
publicly on the issue.
Players were in no mood for apologies from
anyone.
Ill probably get in trouble for this, but you
have to have competent people, Carolina
receiver Steve Smith said. And if youre
incompetent, get them out of there.
Continued from page 11
NFL
I feel kind of bad for the replacement of-
cials. These guys do know the game. They have
been football referees for many years. But none
of them were prepared for the harsh spotlight
brought on by working with arguably the
biggest sporting entity in the world.
They had to know they were in for a world of
scrutiny, but I can understand not wanting to
pass up the kind of money NFL ofcials make.
I asked a local football referee, before the sea-
son started, if he would go if he had gotten the
call. He said he would.
I wonder if he would have the same response
now?
On the other hand, these scabs, as some are
calling them, went into this with eyes wide
open. You reap what you sow. What they were
sowing were constant conferences on the sim-
plest of calls and it went downhill from there.
While a lot of the blame falls on the NFL for
not working hard enough to make a deal with
the regular refs, I also put a lot of onus on the
ofcials. One of the big sticking points was
NFL ofcials wanted a better pension plan.
Pension plan? For what? For the three hours
of work they put in on game day? I know of-
cials spend a lot of hours during the week going
over video of games, dissecting and critiquing
the games they worked, but come on. Most of
these guys are already nancially secure thanks
to their day jobs. Now they want the NFL to
set them up for life after they retire from the
NFL? Please. These guys already earn pretty
good money ofciating in the NFL. They need
more after theyre done with the game? The
NFL barely takes care of retired players and
now ofcials want more? Sorry. No sympathy
here.
But weve seen what the results are when the
regular refs arent working games. At this point,
Im sure most football fans would agree the
NFL should give the regular refs whatever they
want. The NFL is a multi-billion dollar industry.
Would giving ofcials a few more million hurt
the bottom line?
***
Menlo School announced last week the hiring
of three new coaches. Marc Kerrest takes over
the boys varsity soccer team, Jason Orlando
will lead the varsity boys lacrosse squad, while
Glenn Simms is the new softball coach.
All three have extensive coaching resumes
and have experienced success playing and
coaching at several levels.
Kerrest, a native of France, guided the Menlo
girls frosh-soph soccer team to a 14-1-3 record
last season. He has played for several semi-pro
teams in both the Bay Area and New York. He
holds D and C coaching badges.
Orlando played lacrosse at Duke and was a
member of the 2010 national championship
team and made the NCAA seminals three
times during his college career. He began his
coaching career while at Duke and has spent the
last several summers coaching with All-West
Lacrosse, which helped develop lacrosse in
Northern California.
Simms has been a xture in the Menlo and
Peninsula coaching scene for a long time. He
has coached various sports at Menlo for the 15
years, including frosh-soph football, freshman
basketball and volleyball as well as a varsity
baseball assistant for the last several years. He
has also spent several years on the club sports
circuit. He currently coaches club basketball
and softball.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
three consecutive singles. The last was Josh
Donaldsons grounder up the middle that then
rolled under the glove of center elder Josh
Hamilton for a two-base error, making it 4-0.
Derek Norris tripled to left-center on a liner
Hamilton appeared to misplay and let get over his
head.
A night after Yu Darvish was scratched from
his scheduled start because of neck stiffness, and
Scott Feldman and ve other relievers were need-
ed in a 10-inning loss, the Rangers were already
back in their bullpen before the end of the rst
inning.
Wilmer Font, the third Texas pitcher, walked
the only two batters he faced to start the third
before Drews two-run single made it 7-3. Moss
doubled and scored on a single by Norris an
inning later.
Parker walked leadoff hitter Ian Kinsler before
Elvis Andrus doubled off the left-center eld wall.
Michael Young and David Murphy had consecu-
tive singles to start the second, scoring on a eld-
ers choice grounder and a sacrice y by Andrus
that made it 5-3.
Chris Carters strikeout in the second inning
was the third of the game for the As, and pushed
them past the 2007 Rays. Oakland already is well
past its previous franchise mark of 1,226 strike-
outs in 2008.
Carter was the second of three consecutive bat-
ters who struck out against Roy Oswalt. Yoshinori
Tateyama struck out four in 2 1-3 innings, and
was the only Rangers pitcher who didnt allow a
base runner.
Continued from page 11
ATHLETICS
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fall is the best time to prepare lawns for the
next growing season by mowing, raking, aer-
ating and fertilizing. The game plan changes,
though, if drought-stressed grass has been dor-
mant for a long time. In that case, preparation
escalates into repair.
You need to determine if the grass is dead,
said Dave Minner, an extension turf-grass spe-
cialist with Iowa State University at Ames.
Then youll need to renovate with re-seeding
to get it going again.
Ignoring dead or damaged patches in your
turf will only cost more in the end, Minner
said.
Dead areas of the lawn that are not repaired
this fall will likely be invaded by weeds next
summer, he said.
The goal is to get new grass established
before winter sets in. Plant early, Minner
said. Get the leaves up and mow once or
twice. Growth should occur three to four
weeks after planting.
Its difcult to distinguish dead from dor-
mant grass, said Mark Schmidt, principal sci-
entist at John Deere. They both look bad.
When you get plentiful rainfall or cooler
weather, does it bounce back? Look at the
crown the base of the turf plant and you
should see some green color there. If you
dont see any green, its likely dead or dying.
The hot, late-summer sun typically pushes
many lawns into dormancy. The grass turns
brown after shutting down its growth to store
energy. That condition persists only until the
cool autumn rains arrive a month or so later.
The moisture greens things up again, opening
the way for end-of-season revitalization.
But this has not been a typical year. Nearly
79 percent of the contiguous United States had
experienced some degree of drought by Sept.
11, according to a U.S. Drought Monitor
update.
Dormant plants left unaided during an
extended drought will die.
Heres how to deal with stressed lawns to
help them weather another dry season:
Be as gentle as you can, Schmidt said
about drought-damaged grass. Dont douse it
with a lot of water right away or dump a load
of fertilizer on it.
Ease off the mowing with a higher turf cut.
Continue watering to promote grass recovery
if local restrictions allow.
Rake up leaves as they fall. Leaves can
leave a wet mat and block so much light that
they inhibit turf growth, Schmidt said. Pick
them up as early as you can so the grass can
get enough energy and sunlight to build on for
the next season.
There is little to gain from applying fertil-
izer to brittle, dry lawns, said Kurt Bland,
president of Bland Landscaping Co. in Apex,
N.C., and a spokesman for the Professional
Landcare Network. Its just a waste of prod-
uct, he said.
Care for grass now
or replace it later
By Lisa A. Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the lazy days of summer give way to
hectic fall schedules, there is nothing like
dashing in from the cold and being enveloped
by a home lled with delicious smells.
These days, there are endless ways to add a
special scent to your home. Home fragrance
products have exploded into a $5 billion
industry, with candles, diffusers, room sprays
and oils offered everyplace from drug stores to
high-end retailers. There are many use-what-
you-have, do-it-yourself options as well.
The idea is to create an inviting, comforting
and calming environment, whether youre
having 20 people for a sit-down dinner or sim-
ply hanging out on the couch for the evening.
This is a time when people are spending
more time at home, and they want that cozy,
holiday, warm feeling, and maybe you want
that even when youre not entertaining you
want it on a Tuesday night when youre watch-
ing TV, said Jessica Romm, lifestyles editor
at Martha Stewart Living.
Fragrance is a really nice way to do that.
Once comprised mostly of candles and pot-
pourri, the home fragrance market took off in
the mid- to late 1990s, and retail sales in the
United States hit a high of $5.3 billion in
2011, according to Karen Doskow, industry
manager for consumer products at Kline and
Co., a market research company in
Parsippany, N.J. Sales last year were up 4 per-
cent over 2010, she said.
Todays offerings include candles, room
sprays, reed and plug-in diffusers, wax melts,
essential oils, and old standards like drawer
liners and sachets. Many products now offer a
more sophisticated scent and theyre more
decorative as well, Doskow said.
Just as there are scores of scents to choose
from (Yankee Candle has about 200 candle
fragrances), the prices vary greatly. It can
range from a Renuzit adjustable (air freshen-
er) for 99 cents up to a Jo Malone scented can-
dle thats in excess of $100, Doskow said.
In fact, Jo Malones luxury candle offers
230 hours of burn time and sells for $425,
while a large Yankee Candle that offers up to
150 hours of scent costs $27.99. Crabtree &
Evelyn has scented sprays for $19, while
French perfumer Frederic Malles perfume
gun spray sells for $145.
Whatever your budget, try to capture the
natural smells of the season in a simple and
minimal way, Romm says. She mentions mas-
culine scents like wood and leather, and the
smells of seasonal fruits and vegetables, such
as pumpkin, apple, pear and squash.
Youd think about meals that youre cook-
ing or things you would have around fruits
of the season or spices you might use, Romm
said. Our philosophy in terms of home fra-
grance is to not battle or compete with what
you would naturally have in your home during
the fall.
As winter arrives, a fresh Christmas tree is
great, Romm says, but without one, you can
introduce the smell of pine, or eucalyptus, and
spices like clove and cinnamon.
A good way to carry fragrance through your
home is to use multiple products at once, says
Hope Margala Klein, executive vice president
for brand, design and innovation at Yankee
Candle.
We recommend a layered approach, with
the candle being the focus, she said.
About an hour before guests arrive, a host
might light a candle or a no-ame alterna-
tive if kids or pets are an issue in each of
the major entertaining spaces, such as the
kitchen, dining room and great room, and
accent those with diffusers. By the time
guests get here, the house smells amazing,
Klein said.
Dont forget to add a glow to the bathroom,
where you may also want to display a can of
room spray for a concentrated burst of fra-
grance if needed, she recommends.
The amount of scent you should use
depends on the size of your home.
People who have enormous rooms would
probably need more, Klein said. Or if youre
living in a small apartment in New York City,
you could probably do one candle for the
whole place. You dont want it to overpower
folks.
One scent can be used throughout the home
for an intense smell, or you can combine
scents. People will create their own recipes
for what they think is great, Klein said.
Romm is partial to DIY home fragrance,
like setting a pot of apple cider with cinnamon
or cloves to simmer on the stove, displaying a
pretty bowl of cinnamon sticks, or drying
sliced apples on parchment paper in the oven
on low heat.
Fragrances offering new
variety, seasonal scents
18
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Melissa Rayworth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Summer travel leaves many of us with
memories of ocean sunsets or foreign street
scenes or other only-on-vacation sights. Now
that summer is over, how can we hold onto
some of that beauty and bring it into our living
spaces?
The weeks after a trip can be the perfect
time to make small but powerful changes to
your home. I love what traveling does to peo-
ples imaginations and to their creativity, says
Los Angeles-based interior designer Betsy
Burnham.
With minimal effort and expense, she says,
you can live year-round with a bit of the charm
and feeling of your favorite travel destina-
tions. You dont have to redecorate. All you
have to do is kind of pinpoint what it is that
evokes the sensation of still being there.
Look back through your photos and just
think about the sense of place, she says. It
can be as simple as a jar of shells that appears
in your guest bathroom, or as dramatic as
repainting a room.
Here Burnham and interior designers Kyle
Schuneman (author of The First Apartment
Book: Cool Design For Small Spaces, due
out Aug. 28 from Clarkson Potter) and Brian
Patrick Flynn, founder of decordemon.com, to
share advice on bringing your travels into your
home.
COLOR PALETTE
When people get stumped on colors or dec-
orating ideas for a room they spend a lot of
time in, the rst thing Ill do is ask them to
think of a time and place that they went to that
really made them happy, says Flynn.
For one client, he repainted a bathroom the
exact shade of robins egg blue that was used
throughout a hotel where the couple stayed
during a memorable anniversary trip. Every
time she thinks of that color, it brings her back
to that time before they had kids and got busy
with their careers, Flynn explains.
Another client, living in Los Angeles, want-
ed to be reminded of his sun-drenched
Australian home. In his breakfast nook, we
went with pure, bold, almost radiation yel-
low, Flynn says. It always feels sunny and
reminds him of how it feels to be in Australia.
BEGIN A COLLECTION
Schuneman suggests picking up similar
items from different places to create a collec-
tion that will grow with each vacation.
Whether it be something free, like ticket
stubs from everywhere youve been to togeth-
er, or pottery that you can display together, he
says, incorporating these memories are what
good design is all about.
I think creating a collection in your home
from your travels is such an important part of
design, says Schuneman. I actually have a
chapter in my book called The Collector, as I
think those collections are what are so impor-
tant to making a house a home.
Burnham agrees: On her familys rst trip to
Paris, her children bought inexpensive Eiffel
Tower statues sold on street corners. Its so
corny when youre there, she says. But if you
gather similar items during and after a trip and
display them together, it becomes a design
statement and conversation piece. Her fami-
lys Eiffel Tower collection has grown over the
years, and all of a sudden weve got this kind
of funky collection.
LOCALLY GROWN ITEMS
Flynn urges travelers to buy original, local
art. Whether it depicts your destination or just
captures the areas sensibility, the work of
local painters and artisans can commemorate
your trip and add beauty to your home.
Local art is often extremely affordable,
Flynn says, and its a permanent story sitting
on your walls. Youre lling the walls and
telling a story about your vacation.
Along with appreciating artistic beauty, also
keep natural beauty in mind: Burnham sug-
gests taking note of the plants and owers you
saw during your summer travel. If the climate
is at all similar, try to use the same or similar
plants in your own yard. Maybe its a topiary
in a pot, something European, she says, or
beach grass that evokes a sleepy seaside town
you loved visiting.
FRESH USE OF PHOTOS
When you return with photos from your
trip, skip traditional frames in favor of some-
thing more creative.
A great idea for displaying photos is taking
some of your favorites and nding a rustic
slab of wood or maybe a sleek piece of metal,
Schuneman says, and decoupaging the photos
in a random pattern. For little or no money,
you have a cool art piece that will forever be a
memory board and can be customized to just
your taste and the trips feeling.
Choose the material based on the vibe of
your destination perhaps mount camping
photos on unnished wood or photos from an
urban destination on metal.
Another option is choosing a more artistic-
feeling photo maybe a landscape or a
close-up shot and having it blown up on
canvas. Canvas On Demand is one of my
favorite sources for this and their quality is
great, Schuneman says.
Bringing your summer travels home
If you gather similar items during and after a trip and display them together, it becomes a
design statement and conversation piece.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, SEPT. 27
Health screening for seniors. 9 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Menlo Park Senior Center,
100 Terminal Ave., Menlo Park. For ages
60 and older. Those who plan to
participate should only consume
water and medicine 12 hours before
blood tests (if prescribed, diabetes
medicines should be delayed but
blood pressure medicines should be
taken). Exercise should not be
participated in the morning of the
screening. Appointments should be
made with the community center.
Free. For more information call 696-
3660.
BurlingameLions ClubMembership
Drive. Noon. 990 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. Join the Lions Club for
lunch and see what its about. Free. For
more information call 245-2993.
Travel Tour Presentation. 3 p.m
District Board Room, 3401 CSM Drive,
San Mateo. There will be a slideshow
presentation of fascinating tours of
the Canadian Rockies, imperial cities
and Ireland. Free. For more information
visit smccd.edu.
Stroke Lecture. 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Peninsula Stroke Association, 1600
Trousdale Ave., Burlingame. Free. For
more information and to register call
565-8485.
College of San Mateo Political Science
professor Frank Damon speaks at
Burlingame Library. 7 p.m. Lane Room,
Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Damon
will present a lecture and discussion
about the national conventions and
the campaign for election. Free. For
more information call 558-7444, ext.
2.
Marty Brousteins presentation on
his book, Two Among the
Righteous Few: A Story of Courage
in the Holocaust. 7 p.m. Theology
Cafe at St. Pius Parish Church, 1100
Woodside Road, Redwood. For more
information call 361-1411.
Whats Catholicism? 7 p.m. St.
Andrews Catholic Church, 1571
Southgate Ave., Daly City. Everyone is
welcome to this RCIA program. Free.
For more information call 740-5478.
Viennese Waltz, Bachata and Salsa
Classes. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd.,
Suite G, Foster City. International
Standard, Level II Class learning
Viennese Waltz 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. All
Level Bachata Class 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
International Standard, Level I Class
learning Viennese Waltz 8 p.m. to 9
p.m. All Level Salsa Class 8 p.m. to 9
p.m. $16 per class. For more
information call 627-4854.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 28
Rich Redmonds Crash Course for
Success. 10:30 a.m. to noon. Hillsdale
High School Little Theater, 3115 Del
Monte St., San Mateo. For all Hillsdale
High School music students, with
limited seating (40) available to the
open public. All off-campus persons
must sign in and out at the entrance to
the little theater before and after the
event, in addition to having a ticket.
$5 to the public. For more
information email
dgdrummer64@yahoo.com.
Oktoberfest: Lunch and
Entertainment with the Roy
Kaufman Oompa Band. 10:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San
Bruno. Tickets available at front desk.
For more information call 616-7150.
The Peninsula Home and Garden
Show. Noon to 6 p.m. San Mateo
Event Center, 2495 S. Delaware St., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
visit www.smeventcenter.com.
The Burlingame Library Presents
Marissa Moss, Author of the
Amelias Notebook Series. 3:30
p.m. 480 Primrose Road, Burlingame.
For more information call 558-7400.
Wine and Beer Tasting at New Leaf.
4 p.m. to 6 p.m. New Leaf Community
Markets, 150 San Mateo Road Half
Moon Bay. Must be 21 or older to
taste. Free. For more information
email patti@bondmarcom.com
Music on the Square: Salsa by
Edgardo and Candela. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7340.
For Beginners Only Ballroom
Dance Classes. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. $16. For
more information call 627-4854.
Monthly Rhythm Dance Party. 8
p.m. to midnight. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. $10 at 8 p.m. for Hustle
lesson. $5 at 9 p.m. for Rhythm Dance
Party. For more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
The Cheeseballs. 9 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $18.
For more information call 369-7770.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 29
Food Addicts in Recovery
Anonymous. 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Central Peninsula Church, 1005 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. FA is a free 12-step
recovery program for anyone suffering
from food obsession, overeating,
under-eating or bulimia. For more
information call (800) 600-6028.
Fourth Annual Pacic Grand Ball
Ballroom Dance Competition. The
Marriot, 1770 S. Amphlett Blvd., San
Mateo. Professional, Amateur, Pre-Teen,
Junior Ballroom Dance events in
International Latin and Ballroom,
American Rhythm and Smooth styles
will be judged by world class judges
from all over the country. General
admission $10. Seniors or students $7.
Kids under 5 are free. For more
information email
abubnelyte@hotmail.com.
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled eggs,
pancakes, bacon, ham or sausage and
French toast will be served. There will
also be juice, coffee or tea. $8. $5 for
children under 10. For more
information call 583-1740.
Kaplan PSAT Practice Test. 9 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free practice test
recommended for juniors. Optional for
sophomores, not recommended for
those who have not completed
geometry. Register in person or by
phone beginning Sept. 15. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
San Francisco Airline Memorabilia
Show and Sale. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 380
S. Airport Blvd., South San San
Francisco. Buy, sell and trade airline
and aviation memorabilia and
collectibles. $5. For more information
contact SFOAirlineShow@juno.com.
South San Francisco Fire
Departments Annual Open House
and Carnival. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fire
Station 61, 480 N. Canal St., South San
Francisco. October is re prevention
month and this years theme is have
two ways out in order to focus on the
importance of fire escape planning
and practice. There will be a pancake
breakfast, hot dog lunch, station house
tours, safety demonstrations, carnival
rides, games and more. $3 for
breakfast. $3 for lunch. $1 for carnival
rides. $.50 for carnival games. For more
information call 829-6645.
Ninth Annual Burlingame Pet
Parade.10 a.m. Broadway, Burlingame.
Alpacas, police dogs and pet fortune
tellers are part of the fun of this
community event. Free entertainment
and art projects for children. Those
who wish to march in the parade
should report to the parking lot near
Broadway and Chula Vista by 9:30 a.m.
Free. For more information visit
burlingamepetparade.com.
Autumn at Filoli Festival. 10 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. 86 Canada Road, Woodside.
There will be live music, fall art
projects, live entertainment, fruit
tasting and activities. $20 for current
members of Filoli, $25 for
nonmembers. $5 for children between
the ages of 5 and 17. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call 364-8300.
Recording Made Easy Course. 10
a.m. Guitar Center, 53 W. Hillsdale Blvd.,
San Mateo. Introduction to Pro Tools
10. Free. For more information contact
skim@v2comms.com.
San Bruno Community
Preparedness Committee Presents
SanBrunosFirst Annual Emergency
Preparedness Day. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
San Bruno Resource and Recovery
Center, 458 San Mateo Ave., San Bruno.
Learn how to prepare yourself for all
types of emergencies. Free. For more
information call 872-2600.
Annual Car Show and Storewide
Sale. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m 900 El Camino
Real, Millbrae. Proceeds go to The San
Mateo County Commission On
Disabilities. Registration is $25. For
more information call 873-5536.
21st Annual Artistry in Fashion. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Caada College, 4200
Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City.
Professional Designer Sale features 60
designers selling clothing, jewelry and
fashions on the plaza from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Designer Showcase is in
outdoor theater at 11:30 a.m. Visitors
can tour the Fashion Departments
Open House from noon to 3 p.m. to
meet instructors, learn about course
offerings and view student projects.
Food available and parking free. $10
donation. For more information call
306-3370.
Quilting by the Bay: 20th Biennial
Show of Quilts by Peninsula
Quilters Guild Members. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. There will be traditional and
innovative quilts, a youth show,
vendors, a rafe, a vintage fabric sale,
demonstrations and a special exhibit.
$8 for two-day event. $5 for children
under 12. Free parking. For more
information visit
peninsulaquilters.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
The girls parents, who the Daily
Journal will not name to protect the iden-
tity of the girl, were emotional but put
forward ideas for more security on cam-
pus like requiring badges to get into
classrooms or offering better identica-
tion for children.
The mom said the situation could have
been worse.
Superintendent Cynthia Simms agreed
the situation was scary. She added that
everyone involved children, employ-
ees and parents did what they should
have done. Children got away from a
scary situation, informed an adult and the
adult contacted police.
Deputy Police Chief Mike Callagy
explained that a few problems came up
on Friday. First, Mrozek is accused of
harassing two girls and offering alcohol
to 12-year-old boys at Bayside STEM
Academy on Friday and was also report-
edly escorted from the grounds of
Horrall Elementary School by an admin-
istrator who found his presence suspi-
cious. Then, Mrozek is believed to have
gone to Parkside.
Authorities say Mrozek groped the girl
and covered her mouth with his hand
before carting her off campus just before
2:45 p.m. Sept. 21. A short distance
away, the girl escaped by kicking her
attacker and running back to the school
where she reported the incident, accord-
ing to San Mateo police.
While parents were happy that Mrozek
was identied and arrested swiftly, they
had numerous concerns and ideas as a
result of the situation. For example,
many parents questioned why all schools
within the district were not made aware
of the situation to be on high alert from
the rst event.
Simms said the events happened
quickly. Callagy added that police were
on school campuses and parks quickly
looking for the suspect.
Gabriel Gudino, parent of a 9-year-old
boy, requested better notication of par-
ents when something of concern hap-
pens.
I get an alert on my phone if my son
is absent, he said, asking why some-
thing like that couldnt be offered in this
situation.
Parents were notied by either email,
phone or text depending on the informa-
tion provided to the school. Releasing the
correct information in a timely manner
and in both English and Spanish took
time, explained Molly Barton, assistant
superintendent of student services.
Parents quickly responded that they had
not received the updates in the way it had
been described. Barton said the district
would look into that and asked parents to
update contact information to be sure
what the district has is current.
Sonia Cole, who has a rst grader,
wanted to be sure the school was really
safe. She suggested adding a doorbell or
camera for those trying to enter the ofce
to sign in before entering the campus.
Her suggestion was echoed by other par-
ents.
Fences are currently being constructed
around the school where there are gaps a
person could enter, said Simms. In addi-
tion, previously approved bond money
allows for the purchase of security cam-
eras on school campuses. The board
introduced rules for using those cameras
at its meeting Thursday. Simms wrote
down other ideas from parents like offer-
ing self defense courses for students,
teaching parents how to identify poten-
tially dangerous situations, giving chil-
dren whistles to wear in case of an emer-
gency, and rotating lunches to create a
lower student to adult ratio during times
when children are out of the classroom.
Mrozek, who was arrested Saturday,
was in court Tuesday but did not enter a
plea. The San Francisco man asked for a
court-appointed attorney and was
ordered back to court Oct. 2 to identify
his lawyer and enter a plea, said District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe. He faces eight
charges including kidnapping, molesta-
tion and misdemeanor counts of trespass-
ing on school grounds, child annoyance
and offering alcohol to a minor. If found
guilty on all charges, Wagstaffe said
Mrozek could face 15 years to life as
well as a requirement to register as a sex
offender.
He remains in custody without bail.
Anyone with information about Mrozek
or the incidents is asked to notify San
Mateo police at 533-7700.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
SECURITY
an email. We will be able to share more
information about the agreement once it
is nalized by CNA members.
Nurses also praised the deal.
From the beginning, we were pre-
sented with 30 takeaways and patient-
protection removals, said Sharon Tobin,
a registered nurse at the intensive care
unit at the Burlingame campus.
The nurses held their rst work stop-
page for a day last September and then
were locked out by Sutter the next four
days, said Tobin, a 25-year nurse.
The ght was not about money, she
said, but rather for respect for nurses and
the patients they serve.
The nurses came together to stand up
for our community, she told the Daily
Journal.
Another nurse at Mills-Peninsula,
Genel Morgan, called the new contract a
great victory.
We prevailed with our solidarity and
willingness to ght for our practice and
our patients, Morgan wrote in a state-
ment.
Mills-Peninsula nurses were pleased
to see administrators abandon a propos-
al which would have forced nurses who
are sick for more than a week to utilize a
short-term disability program that, when
combined with state-funded disability,
would provide only a fraction of a
nurses salary, according to the CNA.
Sick leave and a slight variation of the
short-term disability proposal have been
key sticking points at other Sutter hospi-
tals, especially Alta Bates Summit
Medical Center in the East Bay, accord-
ing to the CNA.
Among the many other cuts dropped
by Mills-Peninsula management were
demands for a number of reductions that
affect nurse compensation, limits in time
off for medical and pregnancy leaves
and limiting staff nurse participation on
hospital committees, according to the
CNA.
Nurses cited advancements regarding
processing of issues under the contracts
grievance procedure, greater staffing
flexibility and improved language to
enhance stafng based on patient needs.
During lengthy negotiations, Sutter
Health ofcials said full-time nurses are
given up to 40 paid days off for vacation,
sick days and other personal uses. On
average, full-time registered nurses earn
more than $130,000 annually with the
option of choosing either 100 percent
employer-paid benefits or low-cost
health benets with an employer-paid
pension plan, Sutter ofcials said during
negotiations.
The concessions Sutter sought includ-
ed paying thousands of dollars more
annually in out-of-pocket medical
expenses and restrictions on doctor
choices, reduced benets for employees
working less than 30 hours a week,
reduced maternity leave and disciplining
nurses who dont meet arbitrary patient
satisfaction goals based on budget pri-
orities, according to the CNA.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
NURSES
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If youre trying to come
up with the best solution to a present problem, scan
your memory bank to fnd a situation you handled
successfully that is similar to the one youre now
dealing with.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Make it a point to
associate with one of your more successful friends.
This far-seeing pal might have the answer thatll put
you on the road to something positive.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Youre not likely
to make any excuses in order to dodge a diffcult but
necessary decision. Although what you come up with
may call for some diplomacy, you can handle it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Your willingness to
help another could result in a rewarding twist of fate.
Although your motives will be totally unselfsh, you
stand to gain a lot.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- One of your best
natural assets is your ability to manage people
without breeding resentment. Theyll perceive that
your directives are responsible and that you bear
everyones welfare in mind.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- The cycle youre pres-
ently in can result in unusually large rewards if you
complete a job on time. It behooves you to stick to a
schedule.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Salesmanship is one
of your best assets, and youll show it off with pride.
Others will want what youre selling without realizing
that it was you who put the desire in their heads.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Because of the way you
handle your affairs, it could be another red-letter day for
you. Your fnancial picture will make some huge gains.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- This is one of those
days when youre likely to speak your mind whether
you have allies or not. You wont leave any doubt in
the minds of others as to where you stand.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Go after whats owed
you, because it isnt likely youll fnd a better day
to collect on a debt long overdue. Your chances for
being repaid are good.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Your expectations can be
realized if you handle what you want in a practical
fashion. Be a pragmatic visionary and youll actually
draw good things to yourself with little effort.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Due to your own efforts,
as well as those of persons who are working behind
the scenes on your behalf, there is little doubt of
achieving some major accomplishments.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
9-27-12
wEDNSDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Home-heating fuel
4 Rovers pal
8 Huh?
12 Copperhead relative
13 Taking a cruise
14 Roof part
15 Like some ponds
17 Lace or ribbons
18 Fiesta need
19 Suite provider
21 Resins
23 Tableland
24 Cries out
27 Mama -- Elliot
29 So far -- -- know
30 You bet!
32 Round stoppers
36 Cabbage kin
38 Grayish
40 Tos opposite
41 Mr. Canseco
43 Competed at Indy
45 Scholarship basis
47 Do business
49 Break a record
51 Arthurs island
55 Tease
56 Like pumice
58 Edit out
59 Object to
60 Groundhog mo.
61 Huskys tow
62 To boot
63 Go wrong
DOwN
1 Breathe hard
2 -- spumante
3 Reach across
4 Daydream
5 Asimov or Hayes
6 Rec room
7 Word of honor
8 Marshiest
9 Long-eared animals
10 St. Teresas town
11 Speaker pro --
16 Audacity
20 Mantra chants
22 Terror-stricken
24 Chatter
25 NASA counterpart
26 -- Abner of the comics
28 Gleeful shout
31 Newsroom VIPs
33 Col. Sanders place
34 Sourdoughs fnd
35 Pregrown lawn
37 Bailed out
39 False courage
42 Poem by Keats
44 Woe is me!
45 Stair post
46 Napoleons fate
48 Holds down a job
50 Tibetan leader
52 Flora and fauna
53 Above
54 Midwest st.
55 NFL events
57 -- Keane of The Family
Circus
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
English Language & Literature
History & Social Studies
Grades 7-12
Essay Writing
Reading Comprehension
(650)579-2653
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
ASSISTANT MANAGER,
AQUATIC CENTER
STUDENT UNION, INC. - SJSU
FT-EXC. BENEFITS
$3800-$5500
FOR APPLICATION CALL
(408)924-6378, M-F 9AM-5PM
www.union.sjsu.edu
AA/EOE/ADA EMPLOYER
DRIVERS NEEDED!
Palo Alto & Redwood
Make Xtra money!!
Delivering phone books.
Must hv license,
transprtation w/ auto
Insurance. Call now!!
1-888-430-7944
www.deliveryofphonebooks.com
FOSTER CITY RECREATION FACILITY
- part-time staff position open. Evening
and weekend shifts required. Must live
locally. For a full job description, please
email: Rob@themanorassn.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
JEWELRY SALES
FUN! No Nights! Benefits & 401K!
(650)367-6500 FX:(650)367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
IRISH HELP AT HOME
Caregivers wanted.
High Quality Home Care.
Qualified, Experienced
Caregivers for Hourly and Live in
placements in San Mateo.
Inquire at: (650)347-6903
www.irishhelpathome.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING Cooks, Busboys & Serv-
ers - FT & PT, good pay (D.O.E.).
Apply in person: Neals Coffee Shop,
114 DeAnza Blvd., San Mateo, CA
(650)581-1754
129 Cemetery Plots
CEMETERY LOTS - Skylawn Memorial,
6 adjoining lots, retail at $7,600 each.
Asking for $6500 each. Located at
beautiful "Garden of Inspiration"
(415)525-9961
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252094
The following person is doing business
as: Kninebuddies.com, 2306 Hacienda
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Irene
Kostakis, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 08/28/2012
/s/ Irene Kostakis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 233508
The following persons have abandoned
the use of the fictitious business name:
Optometric Center for Family Vision and
Vision Therapy, 1234 Cherry St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070. The fictitious busi-
ness name referred to above was filed in
County on 6/8/09. The business was
conducted by: Kristina Stasko, 72 Pine
ave., San Carlos, CA 94070 and Carole
L. Hong, 351 Booth Bay Ave., Foster
City, CA 94404.
/s/ Kristina Stasko /
/s/ Carole L Hong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 09/19/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/27/12,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12).
23 Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515838
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Annie Pai
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Annie Pai filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Annie Pai
Proposed name: Kaureen Hani Timur
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 18,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/28/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/24/2012
(Published, 09/13/12, 09/20/12,
09/27/12, 10/04/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251727
The following person is doing business
as: Almeida Limousine Service, 151
Eastmoor Avenue, Apt. 108, DALY CITY,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Frederico Inacio Duarte
de Almeida, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Frederico Inacio Duarte de Almeida /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251798
The following person is doing business
as: A and A Group, 40 Dockside Dr., DA-
LY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Antonieta Ascur-
ra, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Antonieta Ascurra /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252034
The following person is doing business
as: BeDutched, 182 Bonita Ave., #A,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Natalie
Smeets, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2012.
/s/ Natalie Smeets /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252226
The following person is doing business
as: New England Lobster Market & Eat-
ery, 824 Cowan Road, Burlingame, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: New England Lobster Co.,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
09/06/2012.
/s/ Marc Worrell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252286
The following person is doing business
as: San Carlos Lock and Key, 922 Termi-
nal Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Shay Bensimon, 3014 Los Prados St.,
#315, San Mateo, CA 94403. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 09/30/2012.
/s/ Shay Bensimon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252261
The following person is doing business
as: BGVB, LLC, 1611 Adrian Road,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: BGVB,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Galen Ma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #2521986
The following person is doing business
as: Nipun Capital, LLC, 1810 Gateway
Dr., Ste 120, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Nipun Capital, LLC. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/21/2012
/s/ Howe Ng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252280
The following person is doing business
as: Seven Seas Travel, 205 De Anza
Blvd, Ste 288, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Kong Lew, 2703 Wakefield Dr.
Belmont, CA 94002. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Kong Lew /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252329
The following person is doing business
as: Evolve Tranning Center, 170 S.
Spruce Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: JJ Proformance, INC. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/12/2012
/s/ Mark P. Tabuso /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252497
The following person is doing business
as: FX Playground, 525 S. Delaware St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jong Won
Pak, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Jong Won Pak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Sept. 17, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
PHO 99 NOODLE HOUSE II INC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
188 SKYLINE PLZ
DALY CITY, CA 94015-3823
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 20, 27, 2012,
October 4, 2012
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Sept. 13, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
ELIANA HUERTA MARTINEZ,
MIGUEL A HUERTA
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
660 LAUREL ST
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070-3112
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 27, 2012,
October 4, 11, 2012
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ FOUND!
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
296 Appliances
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box $80 OBO (650)589-
8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection $50 OBO (650)589-8348
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, (650)787-8600
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, collectible su-
perstars, Gretzki, Messier, more, OK
sold separately, $100 obo, (650)578-
9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POKEMON CARDS - 1000, excellent
condition, $30., (650)365-3987
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RARE BASEBALL CARDS- Five Non-
Mint 1954 Dan Dee Baseball Cards
(Lemon, Wynn, Schoendienst, Mitchell,
Hegan), SOLD!
ROCK MEMORABILIA Rolling Stones
Tour Guide, From 70s. $50 obo
(650)589-8348
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures $60 all, (650)365-3987
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)375-8044
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 SOLD!
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces $50 (650)589-8348
TONKA BULL Dozer from the 50's or
60's $50 obo (650)589-8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NIGHT STANDS - $20., obo, SOLD!
PROSCAM 36" color TV with cabinet
and 2 glass doors like new, SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CALIFORNIA KING Sleep Number Bed
like new, with Frame, $400,
(650)347-7188
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., SOLD!
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh, SOLD!
304 Furniture
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 SOLD!
KITCHEN TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NIGHT STANDS - $35., SOLD!
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)857-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
SOFA/LOVESEAT SET, mint condition,
7-ft sofa, 58 inch loveseat, brown, 6
matching pillows $99.00, (650)578-9208
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
306 Housewares
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
AS NEW Bar-B-Q electric outdoor/in-
door, easy clean, no scrubbing./brushing,
as new, $15., 650-595-3933
AUTO WINE OPENER - mint condition,
one-touch, rechargeable, adapter, foil
cutter, built-in light, easy open, great gift,
$12.00, (650)578-9208
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COCKTAIL GLASSES - beautiful, rich,
smokey hue, oak tree design, wide base,
set of 12, $25.,SOLD!
COFFEE MAKER- Gevalia Connaissuar
ten cup. white, filters included, makes
great coffee, $9., 650-595-3933
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., 650-375-8044
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
WAXER & polisher, Chamberlain Was-
master 900. Never used. In box. $45.
San Mateo (650)341-5347
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
LORUS WATCH- date, sweep second
hand, new battery, stainless steel adjust-
able band, perfect, $19., 650-595-3933
308 Tools
BANDSAW CRAFTMENS - hardly used
$80. obo, 650 345-7352
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1 BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, $35., (650)521-3542
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)857-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRILL PRESS -Craftmens, works great
$85., obo, (650) 345-7352
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
RYOBI TRIM ROUTER - with butt tem-
plate, $40., (650)521-3542
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100., SOLD!
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60., SOLD!
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
24
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Map site
6 Senate figure
10 Brash
14 Winner of the
2005 Best
Picture Oscar
15 Verdi title
princess
16 Rapier cousin
17 Americas most
popular dining-
out occasion
19 Flavorful plant
20 Spot
21 Shows the way
22 Heaven-sent
food
23 Academy
freshman
24 Give way
25 Chess
announcement
28 Place setting
item
30 One way to sing
32 Smack on the
head
33 Last chance in
court
40 Semitic deity
41 Frigid
42 Where some
plates are made
48 Vodka in a blue
bottle
49 Rug often
groomed
50 Honor, in a way
52 ... but I could be
wrong
53 Wear slowly
54 __-mo video
57 Old stage line?
58 Political
propagandist
60 Department store
founder Rowland
Hussey __
61 Asian staple
62 Standard
63 Arise
64 Gross
65 Swing era dance
DOWN
1 Fictional
corporation that
sells earthquake
pills and portable
holes
2 Hectors home
3 Behind schedule
4 Flooring wood
5 Yellow-and-red
gas station
symbol
6 Sushi condiment
7 Diamond gambit,
or a hint to this
puzzles circles
8 Lupino and
others
9 Salary
10 Sake
11 Not against
trying
12 Loewes partner
13 Get off at the pier
18 Clarinetists need
22 Retail price
component
23 Writers
24 __ shui
25 Scots nickname,
maybe
26 Tide rival
27 As well
29 __ any drop to
drink: Coleridge
31 Kind of gravy
34 Tag information
35 Moo goo __ pan
36 Lions share
37 Caribou cousin
38 Disagreeing word
39 Give it a go
42 Leaves in a huff,
with out
43 Attacked eagerly,
as a wrapped gift
44 Kennedy who
married Sargent
Shriver
45 Euclid, vis--vis
geometry
46 __ Tunes
47 Road safety gp.
51 Han River
capital
53 Large in scope
54 Floor
55 Truck filler?
56 Airport south of
Paris
58 __ Lanka
59 TV franchise
since 2000
By Alex Boisvert
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
09/27/12
09/27/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 SOLD!
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
AUTHENTIC ITALIAN book, hard cover,
unopened, recipes, menus picture by re-
gions shown, great gift $10.00, (650)578-
9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLANKET- Double bed size, dusty rose,
satin bindings, warm, like new, washa-
ble. $8., 650-375-8044
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, SOLD!
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
310 Misc. For Sale
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, work great for small of-
fice/room, extra speakers, 4 1/2 in. high,
includes cords. $8.00, (650)578-9208
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEADER shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle
$20., SOLD!
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
310 Misc. For Sale
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color with floral motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40
SOLD!
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
SOLD!
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
mane, tail, ears, eyes, perfect condition
for child/grandchild, $39., 650-595-3933
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $18
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOMTOM GPS- every U.S./Canadian
address, car/home chargers, manual,
in factory carton, $59., 650-595-3933
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, $15., 650-375-8044
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, never used,
$15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
(650)348-6428
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
(650)871-7200
PETMATE DOG CARRIER - XL size,39
1/2 L x 27 W x 30 like new, $95. firm,
SSF, SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
WILL PAY Cash for vintage designer
handbags. Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Gucci,
etc. (650)593-0757
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY SHIRTS - pearl snaps, pock-
ets, XL/XXL, perfect $15 each, cowboy
boots, 9D, black, $45., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
(650)571-5790
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 650 755-9833
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24, $15 SOLD!
PLYWOOD - good plywood, 4x8, various
sizes, 1/4to 3/4, SOLD!
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6x6x1/2 6
Dozen at 50 ea SOLD!
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHING EQUPMENT 3 rods with reels,
2 Tackle boxes full fo supplies, $100 all,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
68 west 38th ave.
San Mateo,
xst. Colgrove
Designer Sale: Great Holiday
Decor and Household Items
Make-up, perfume , jewelry,
Clothes
Great Stuff Don't Miss!
Sat. Only 9/29
9am - 2pm
GARAGE
SALE
SAN MATEO
121 & 131 11th Ave.
Saturday
Sept. 29th
9 am - 4 pm
Collectibles, clocks, house-
hold goods, toys and more!
MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
SAN MATEO
139 Louise Lane
Sat. & Sun.
Sept. 29 & 30
9 am - 4 pm
Furniture, household goods,
holiday decorations, books
and much more!
SAN CARLOS
CITYWIDE
GARAGE SALE
Saturday
September 29
9 am - 4 pm
Over 150 Vendors, List
of Locations at:
sancarlostogether.org
25 Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE
SALE
Sept. 29 & 30
Sat. (9-5)
Sun. (9-3)
3 Gaylord Ct.
San Carlos
Everything
Must Go!
Including:
Queen Bedroom
Set, Dining Room
Set, Living Room
Furniture,
and more!
Cash Only
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20 rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
335 Garden Equipment
WEED WHACKER-STIHL FS45 curved
bar, never used, $85.,obo,
(650)345-7352
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
ADJUSTABLE WALKER (new) $50
(650)345-5446
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
BANK OWNED
HOMES
Free list with
Photos & Maps
of Bank Foreclosures
PeninsulaDistressHomes.com
Get a Fantastic Deal
on a Home
or
Free recorded message
(866) 262-8796
ID# 2042
Receive a Free
Hot List of Homes
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
JEEP 2001 CHEROKEE LTD - 94K
miles, 4 wheel Drive, $7,525, (650)591-
0063
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
INFINITI Q45 94 - Black, lots of extras,
$3500. obo, Annie (650)740-1743
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
FORD 97 Arrowstar Van XLT - 130K
miles, $3500. obo, (650)851-0878
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV 91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
670 Auto Parts
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
Contractors
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)548-5482
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
NORTH HOMES
Additions, Baths, Kitchens,
Driveways, and Decks.
(650)232-1193
www.northhomes.biz
Lic.# 97583
Cleaning
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
Construction
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
26
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
Quality
Gardening

Weekly Lawn Care
Hedges, Fertilizing,
Leaf Blowing
Rose Care
Get ready for
Fall planting

Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance Clean
Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, Roofing.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Landscaping
EXOTIC GARDENS
Sod Lawns, Sprinklers,
Planting, Lighting, Mason
Work, Retaining Walls,
Drainage
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Landscaping
New Lawns
Lawn Renovations
Sprinklers
General CleanUp
Commercial
& Industrial Maint.
Fisher Garden
& Landscape
Since 1972
(650) 347-2636
sher-garden-landscape.com
FREE ESTIMATES QAC. Lic. C24951
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668 (650) 347-6668
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Bookkeeping
TAX PREPARATION
Book Keeping
No Job Too Small
Lorentz Wigby, CPA
(650)579-2692
Larry@wigby-CPA.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
27 Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500 (650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
Marriage & Family Therapist
Behavior, Chronic Pain or
Illness, Trauma & PTSD, Family,
Couples, Teens, and Veterans
Welcome!
(650)380-4459
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Health & Medical
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday Sept. 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Jewelry Silver Watches Diamonds
1Z11 80fll08M0 90 0J400
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 9/30/12
WEBUY