The Vocab Weekly

Excruciating

Excruciating A question that that has to be asked of you before explaining this word: Can you bear the pain? Can you go through it or are you going to break down? Excruciating is a situation that causes severe pain, that can be both mental as well as physical. The intensity of the pain depends upon the magnitude of the situation that results in pain. Pronunciation: ik-skroo-shee-ey-ting The Dictionary Definitions of Excruciating are as follows: 1. Causing extreme bodily or mental pain 2. Intensely painful; agonizing 3.Very intense or extreme 4. Extremely embarrassing Master Tip to Learn Excruciating Remind a situation in your life when you have undergone extremely mental or physical pain: that one single defining moment in your life when you thought you simply could not take it anymore, that one moment when you thought as if your limbs were broken and did not have strength to carry on. Well, my friend that is the moment of excruciating pain.

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Sept 1-Sept 7| Issue 45

The Vocab Weekly

Fray

Fray Sometimes a fray is fun and sometimes it is bound to get bloody and ugly. However, fray doesn’t only mean a fight, it also means host of other things, which can be found out as you read further. It might mean that you are a little confused so as to its usage but then as long as you keep searching for it in all the text that floats around you in everyday life, you would come to know of its different usages, and thus get familiar with its various forms. It is a Noun and is also a verb. Its first known usage dates back to 14th century. It has originated from a Middle English word Fraien, which means to affray and is a short for affraien. Pronunciation: frey Meanings of Fray 1) A fight or a dispute. (Noun) 2) A noisy squabble. 3) To terrify and to unease/to drive away. (Tr. V.) 4) To strain someone’s nerves. (Verb) 5) To wear away by rubbing. Master’s tip to learn Fray Fray can be easily learnt by associating it with the word gay, as both the words rhyme. However, to relate the words further, we can say it was a gay fray, meaning a happy fight. A fray would hardly be happy for anyone, but could be for you and make you learn the word easily.

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The Vocab Weekly

Harass

Harass These days there are strict punishments for various types of harassments, still people do not let go any opportunity to do so. Bullies harass other children in school, in college this takes place in the form of ragging and in life, your boss is the absolute best at harassing you. It is a verb. Its first usage dates back to 1617. Pronunciation: huh-ras, har-uhs Meanings of Harass 1) To irritate/frustrate constantly 2) To create an unpleased situation for someone with undesirable conduct 3) To worry someone (.e.g. enemy) by repeated raids Master’s tip to learn Harass Harass can be learnt easily, when we remember a situation in which we have been harassed emotionally or physically. Of course, there would be such situations, may be not physical harassment, but emotional harassment situations would be there. Harass can also be associated with the word arras, which means wall hanging of tapestry or simply to remember, just a wall hanging. Sentences examples for Harass 1) Please do not harass me. (Verb) 2) He is a harasser when it comes to junior employees in his office. (Noun)

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Implacable

The Vocab Weekly

Implacable Sometimes it is so difficult to pacify dogs when they see food and sometimes it is difficult to calm down a child when he/she is hungry. And, that is exactly what we call an implacable dog and child. This adjective is used to refer to these situations where peace cannot be found. Its first known usage dates back to 15th century and it is a Middle English word. It seems to have originated form im and pacable. Im is a variant of in, used before b, m, p and placable means someone who can be pacified and someone who is forgiving. Pronunciation: im-plak-uh-buhl, -pley-kuhMeanings of Implacable 1) Someone who cannot be soothed or pacified 2) Someone who is inexorable .i.e. whose mind cannot be changed /relentless 3) Stubborn Master’s tip to learn implacable Implacable can be learnt by associating it with yourself in a situation where you have been totally stubborn about achieving something in your life or completely unsettled after going through something traumatic. Sentence examples for Implacable 1) He is my implacable enemy. (Adjective)

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The Vocab Weekly

Inhibition

Inhibition impulse. In terms of feelings, it is a feeling that makes one self-conscious and unable to act in a relaxed and natural way. It is also referred as a restraint on the direct expression of an instinct. The word is somewhat inclined towards “prohibition”. The difference between both remains the clear indication of voluntary restraint. Prohibition is all about a clear “no” whereas inhibition restrains, but also is solely dependent upon the impulses which control the restraining desires of a mind. Pronunciation: in-i-bish-uhn Meanings of Inhibition 1. The conscious exclusion of unacceptable thoughts or desires. 2. The action of prohibiting or inhibiting or forbidding (or an instance thereof). 3. A nervous feeling that prevents you from expressing your thoughts, emotions, or desires. 4. The blocking or holding back of one psychological process by another. Master’s Tip to learn Inhibition Whenever encountered with this word, think of anyone who loses the self control under influence of alcohol. During this process the self control mechanism against the conscious behavior towards particular situations and the nervousness to hold back, diminishes. This diminishing effect is the opposite of Inhibition .Think of Inhibition as the hurdles which restrict a person from expressing views or actions. People who are restricted by this hurdle are the ones labeled as introverts.

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The Vocab Weekly

Monolithic

Monolithic Monolithic gives an impression of an object being ancient, something huge, massive, no? And, when you will read about it, you will be more sure that monolithic is something huge. It is an adjective. Its first usage dates back to 1815-25. It has originated from two words .i.e. monolith and ic. Monolith means a statue or a column that has been made from a single black stone. Ic means a suffix that forms adjectives. Pronunciation: mon-uh-lith-ik Meanings of Monolithic 1) Something that resembles a monolith .i.e. something big/huge 2) Spread as a single huge piece 3) Something made without the help of other pieces .i.e. made as a single piece 4) Something characterised by uniformity and rigidity. Master’s tip to learn Monolithic Monolithic, sounds like something ancient and huge. So, you can draw a picture of something huge and ancient in front of your eyes when you read the word monolithic. Monolithic can also be learnt with the help of the word Neolithic, as these two words rhyme. Monolithic means something huge and Neolithic means belonging to an earlier age, which now has been outdated. So, monolithic can be something huge that had relevance only in earlier age.

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Petrified

The Vocab Weekly

Petrified Ever seen a parchment that has been turned into stone in order to preserve it or have you ever turned into a stone on seeing a ghost? Well, the stony feeling is not good and just means that you have been petrified of something scary. It is a verb. Its last usage dates back to 1585-95 and has originated from the union of two words petri and fy. Petri is a variant of petro, which is a combining form, meaning rock and is used when forming compound words and fy is a verbal suffix. Pronunciation: pe-truh-fahy The dictionary definitions of petrified are as follows: 1) To transform into stone or stone like substance 2) To be astonished/ astonish someone or to numb someone with fear 3) To harden a person with sadness Master tip to learn petrified: Well, petrified is the easiest to learn when you remember your biggest fear in this world. It could be a spider or a shadow in the dark or even a moment when you were at your lowest. To learn it more easily, the stone like state was represented by HermoineGrenger and others in Harry Potter and Chamber of Secrets were turned into stone like state after various attacked in Hogwarts.

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The Vocab Weekly

Work Out Zone
Work Out 1: Match the following words with their respective meanings or synonyms. Word 1 Excruciating 2 Fray 3 Harass 4 Implacable 5 Inhibition 6 Monolithic 7 Petrified Meaning or Synonym A consistent B painful C uncompromising D tussle E pester F frozen G interference

Work Out 2: Did you really understand the word? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Getting waxed is an excruciating experience. Frays generally erupt over petty issues. Policemen are employed to harass citizens. Some children are just implacable. The good complements from teachers were an inhibition in the child’s progress. The monolithic design was beautiful. The boy was petrified on seeing a lion. yes yes yes no no no yes yes yes yes no no no no

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The Vocab Weekly

Answers: Work Out Zone
Work Out 1 1-B, 2-D, 3-E, 4-C, 5-G, 6-A, 7-F Work Out 2 1-yes, 2-yes, 3-no, 4-yes, 5-no, 6-yes, 7-yes

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