Bicycle Drive Supports

“Pedals for Progress”
If yours is like most households with growing
children and teens, there’s probably at least one
old bicycle sitting unused in your basement or
garage. If so, now is the time to dust it off and
donate it as part of the Rotary Club of Vineland’s
Pedals for Progress bicycle drive scheduled for
Saturday, Sept. 29, from 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m., at
2260 East Sherman Ave. in Vineland.
Those interested in donating bikes or
portable sewing machines need not wait until
September 29—simply call Henry Hansen at
(856) 696-0643 to arrange a drop-off or pick-up
for your donation.
The Rotary Club of Vineland donated over
225 bikes in the past year, affecting hundreds of
families in need. Also a treadle and three
portable sewing machines were collected. The
Club has been collecting bikes (2,500 so far) for
18 years and runs the collection drives twice
per year—in the spring and fall.
Experience the Rossi Advantage
We Service
All Makes &
Models
Express Service $24.95oil change.
Applies to most vehicles. Appointments preferred but not necessary. Coupon not valid with any
other offer. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Limit one coupon per person. Other restric-
tions may apply. Void where prohibited. Up to 5 quarts of oil. Some vehicles slightly higher. Does
not include synthetic oils. Cannot be combined with other offers and discounts. Expires 10/31/12
SEE SERVICE ADVISOR FOR DETAILS
1517 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland
www.RossiHonda.com
856-692-1700
We Treat you Better...Period
FREE
Battery Test • Multi-Point Vehicle Inspection with Every Service
Rossi
Sells Tires
Call Service Advisor for Details
VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 33 | SEPTEMBER 26, 2012
I N S I D E : PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE: PG. 4 • WEDDING WEEKEND • DEERFIELD HARVEST FESTIVAL
C
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A
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IF
IE
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3
1
I
n the case of most college graduates, professional suc-
cess is something that’s achieved over a period of
years, sometimes decades. It’s rare that someone steps
off campus after graduation and into an achievement that
some would consider an apex of his or her profession.
But for Vineland native Vincent Scarpa, a recent
graduate of Emerson College in Boston, that is just
what’s happening. On October 4, Scarpa, 21, will travel to
Manhattan, where he’ll be recognized with the Norman
Mailer Center’s Four-Year College Writing Award for his
short story, “I Hope You’re Wrong About Scottsdale.”
Named after Norman Mailer, a two-time Pulitzer
Prize-winning American novelist, essayist and play-
wright known for his social activism, the Norman
Mailer Center is a highly respected non-profit organi-
zation established to help recognize the talent of stu-
dents and teachers working in the literary field.
Norman Mailer awards are considered to be some
of the most prestigious around. Scarpa’s story was
chosen out of hundreds of submissions. He confessed
that being the recipient of an award of this stature is a
bit surreal.
“For me, it’s a little unreal,” he said during a recent
interview. “To get this award, knowing that it stood out
to the board [that decides these things], it was some-
thing I wasn’t expecting to happen and it’s a hard feel-
ing to describe.”
Part of what helped Scarpa’s piece stand out is likely
Next to Acme & Blockbuster
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CONNECTI NG YOU TO SOUTH JERSEY. WEEKLY.
Vincent Scarpa works at the Vineland Public Library, researching and
writing his next masterpiece.
Vineland Rotary Club members Tim Jacobsen and
Henry Hansen (standing, far right) show members
of the Vineland High School Interact Club how to
prepare a donated bicycle for shipment overseas,
where it will be used for transportation.
E C R W S S
L o c a l
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Award-Winning Storyteller
Recently graduated from Emerson
College, writer Vincent Scarpa has
already picked up a prestigious award
for one of his works.
{ BY RYAN DINGER }
Continued on page 14 Continued on page 15
Grapevine 1-2 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:01 PM Page 1
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{
STAFF
}
{
CONTENTS
}
MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
MICHELE LOW Advertising Executive
TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer
RYAN DINGER Editorial/Sales Assistant
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Ste. 205, Vineland, NJ 08360
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2012. All
rights reserved.
I
Gleanings { BY DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR }
Scaling Back
When times get rough, the survivors look
for ways to trim costs.
W
ith the economy still weak-
ened, many people and fami-
lies are struggling to make
ends meet. It’s a new world
out there. In a recent CNN commentary,
Jack Cafferty declared: “This is not your
father’s country anymore. And we had bet-
ter all start getting used to it.”
Sorry Jack, but it has never been “your
father’s country” for many. My father, for
example, lived through The Great Depression.
And father’s country? What about our
mothers’ country? It has not been their
“country” for quite some time, either. Long
gone are the days of the one-breadwinner
family, and moms being able to focus on the
kids, the most important job ever.
When I was preparing to go on a hiatus
from this job two summers ago, leaving
work and the second paycheck behind, a
friend of mine (a teacher who had lost her
position due to state budget cuts) looked at
me like I had just lost my mind. My hus-
band was similarly astonished.
Maybe it helped that I had been in that
situation before, and not so long before.
With our family living on one income for
six of the last 11 years, I know how to
scale back.
More importantly, I know that the
lifestyle change is always worth it.
The other thing that factors into my
resilience, I think, is the fact that I was
raised on a family farm. In other words, we
were poor. Sorry, Mom and Dad, but it’s not
something you can hide, even from a kid.
Growing up, we had lots of things—love,
good times together, all the fruits and veg-
etables we could ever eat (and more, real-
ly)—but money was not one of them. No
piano or dance lessons for us, no summer
camps, no weeks at the shore.
Yep, we’ve had a long run of prosperity in
this country, and there’s a generation or two
coming up who have never experienced
anything but good economic times.
For them—and anyone willing to listen—
I have some ideas that may help. I’ve done
just about all of these, and happily, they
continue to be part of my lifestyle, even
now that I’m back to contributing to the
family’s income.
Choose as many of these as you can, and
you’ll be surprised at how much money you
save. It’s all about adjusting priorities and
simplifying.
• Someone once told me that as he was
delivering food to a family in need, he spot-
ted a big-screen TV in their living room.
Look around your house and garage to see
what might be worth selling, either on eBay
or by putting an ad in the paper or by having
a yard sale.
• Map out a family budget. It will show
you where the money is being spent and
give you ideas about where to trim.
• Eat out as a treat rather than on a rou-
tine basis. Pack a lunch most days.
• Clip coupons. Write a shopping list
before going to the supermarket and check
the circular for discounted items for which
you also have coupons. Those extreme
couponers have the right idea, but you don’t
have to go overboard to save $50 to $75 a
week.
• Don’t let the water run longer than
needed, in sink, shower, dishwasher or
clothes washer. Whenever possible, hang
clothes out instead of using the dryer.
• Carpool whenever possible. Not just
to and from work, but team up with other
parents for transporting kids to activities
out of town.
• Think about the vehicle you’re driving
and consider trading in for a more fuel-
efficient one.
• Have a yard sale. Getting a few dollars
for something you would only be storing is
very empowering. It’s the ultimate in recy-
cling, a win-win, finding someone who can
use what you no longer have a need for, and
having some extra money in your pocket.
• Buy local products, especially fruits
and vegetables. Living where we do, there’s
no excuse not to, and you’ll be surprised
how far $20 goes at the local farm market. If
you have the time, store some up for winter,
by either canning or freezing.
• Birth control—the more kids, the less
you can afford to give each one of them.
Think beyond diapers—to cell phones and
college tuitions.
• Nix the family vacation for a year, do
day trips, explore closer to home. Try stay-
cations, where you pretend your home is a
hotel and visit your town hall, etc.
• Whenever the market is low, it’s the
perfect time to buy stocks. For people who
have recently “lost” money in the market,
this is a tough thing to do, but the benefits
will be very rewarding when the market
starts to climb again.
Maybe you have additional ideas for
scaling back? I’d like to hear them. I
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RYAN DINGER
1 Pedals for Progress
3,8,10 Faces in the News
4 Prizeweek Puzzle
6,18 News in Brief
12 In Our Schools
20 A Big Day
Fall Planting Day and Wedding
Weekend—both in Downtown
Vineland on Saturday. TODD NOON
20 Robinson’s Farm
The Fairton farm housed German
POWs while they weren’t working
at P.J. Ritter Company.
VINCE FARINACCIO
21 Little Folks, Big Impact
Two youngsters make a difference
by helping good causes.
22-23 HOME AND GARDEN
24 DINING: Future Foods
A glimpse at what Vineland’s
culinary landscape may look like
in 2050. FRANK GABRIEL
27 Community Calendar/
Sports
29 Entertainment
30 REAL ESTATE
31 CLASSIFIEDS
Grapevine 1-2 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:01 PM Page 2
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Faces in the News
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Local Nurses Complete Advanced Coursework
New Jersey’s staggering 10.5 percent vacancy
rate for nurse faculty does not bode well for the
health and health care of Garden State residents.
Not having enough faculty to teach future nursing
students could result in fewer nurses to care for
aging and at-risk populations. This, in turn, could
lead to poor health outcomes and higher health
care costs for New Jersey.
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)
New Jersey Nursing Initiative (NJNI), which is
working hard to change that dire scenario, recently
announced the graduation of 20 RWJF New Jersey
Nursing Scholars with advanced degrees that pre-
pare them to serve as nurse faculty. Two are from
Cumberland County: Marlin Gross, BSN, RN, MSN,
of Bridgeton and Stephanie Henson, BSN, RN,
MSN, of Vineland earned their master of science in
nursing (MSN) degrees at Richard Stockton
College. Additionally, scholar Nancy Mills, BSN,
RN, MSN, of Pittsgrove in neighboring Salem
County earned her MSN degree at the University of
Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.
“I’m very grateful to have had the opportunity to
pursue graduate school as a New Jersey Nursing
Scholar,” said Gross, who now teaches at
Cumberland County College. “The scholarship had
a positive impact on my educational and personal
development. The experience has empowered me
to pursue my doctorate and to continue contribut-
ing to the nursing profession.”
“I definitely plan on pursuing teaching,” said
Henson. “Before I became a New Jersey Nursing
Scholar, I didn’t think I would have taught. But the
scholarship gave me the opportunity to get the
education and confidence to be able to teach.”
“Completing my master’s degree felt like an enor-
mous accomplishment,” said Mills. “Now that I’ve
established my clinical practice as a nurse practi-
tioner, I’m starting to pursue teaching opportunities, because my dream is to bal-
ance my time between teaching and clinical practice. In encounters with patients,
physicians, midwives, and other nurse practitioners, I see an emerging level of
respect for the profession that I find very encouraging as a future nurse educator.”
NJNI, a project of RWJF and the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce Foundation,
provides generous benefits and support to help RWJF New Jersey Nursing Scholars
complete their advanced degree studies. Upon graduation, scholars may receive
financial incentives if they become faculty members at schools of nursing in the state.
From top: Stephanie Henson, Nancy Mills and Marlin Gross.
Grapevine 3-11 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 7:58 PM Page 3
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HOW TO ENTER:
$ PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE $
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2. If he can _ up his
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husband.
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DOWN:
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sel warns purchaser that
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8. Girl gets frustrated
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THIS LIST INCLUDES, AMONG OTHERS,
THE CORRECT WORDS FOR THIS PUZZLE.
AMENDS
AWAKE
AWARE
BET
CAPS
CUPS
DISH
DOCK
FAIR
FAKERS
FISH
FLIER
FLIES
GET
HEIGHT
LET
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PESTS
PLACED
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PRIZEWEEK 092212
Jackpot increases by $25 each week if
no winning entry is received!
$475
1. Solve the puzzle just as you would in
any crossword puzzle. Choose from each
printed clue the word that best fits the
definition. Write the answers in the blank
space provided in each puzzle until all
spaces have been filled in.
2. There is no limit to the number of times
you may enter, however no facsimiles or
reproductions will be accepted. Only original
newspaper entry forms will be accepted.
3. Anyone is eligible to enter except
employees/directors of South Jersey
Federal Credit Union (SJFCU) and the
Grapevine and their immediate families.
4. A basic prize of $50.00 will be awarded
to the winner(s) of each weekly Prizeweek
Puzzle. In the case of multiple winners, the
prize money will be shared. If no correct
puzzle entries are received, $25.00 will
be added the following week. Winners
agree to permit use of their names and
photos by SJFCU and/or the Grapevine.
5. Entries can be mailed to South Jersey
Federal Credit Union, Attn: Prizeweek
Puzzle, PO Box 5429, Deptford, NJ
08096, or dropped off 24 hours a day, 7
days a week in the vestibule of SJFCU,
106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland. Mailed
entries must be received by SJFCU no later
than 10 am on the Monday following the
Wednesday publication of the Prizeweek
Puzzle. Entries dropped off at the SJFCU
Vineland branch must be received no
later than 8:30 am on the Monday fol-
lowing the Wednesday publication of the
Prizeweek Puzzle. SJFCU assumes no
responsibility for late or lost entries.
6. South Jersey Federal Credit Union
reserves the right to issue additional
instructions in connection with the
Prizeweek Puzzle. All such instructions
are to become part of the official rules.
Visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com for list
of additional rules.
This week’s jackpot
Note contest rules at the top of this page.
Readers can deposit their puzzles 24/7
in the drop-slot located in the vestibule of
South Jersey Federal Credit Union,
106 West Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360.
Note: Use a debit card from any financial institution
to gain access to the vestibule drop box after hours.
Entries must be deposited by 8:30 am on Monday.
Or, completed puzzles can mailed to:
South Jersey Federal Credit Union
Prizeweek Puzzle
PO Box 5429
Deptford, NJ 08096-0429
Mailed entries must be received by 10 am on Monday.
SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S
PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE
The answers to last week’s puzzle
are below. For a detailed explanation
of the answers to last week’s puzzle
and additional rules, visit
www.SouthJerseyFCU.com
Grapevine 3-11 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 7:58 PM Page 4
GOING OUT OF BUSINESS
Dear Friend and Customer,
For 110 years, Brody’s Furniture has proudly served the Delaware Valley by providing top
quality, high end home furnishings to our beloved clients. Due to a recent family tragedy,
we have decided it is best to GO OUT OF BUSINESS and close our doors forever.
The heart breaking decision has been made, and now the thankless task has begun.
We are LIQUIDATING our ENTIRE INVENTORY in a matter of weeks! EVERY PIECE of
FINE FURNITURE has been MARKED DOWN for FINAL SALE!
This will be the BIGGEST SALE in our 110-YEAR HISTORY! The BEST SAVINGS and
BIGGEST SELECTION are available NOW, so we urge you to JOIN US and take
advantage of this OPPORTUNITY of a LIFETIME!
Sincerely,
Brody’s Furniture
MASSIVE SAVINGS STOREWIDE!
50% to 70% OFF
EVERYTHING
*OFF ORIG. PRICE
SELLING FAMOUS NAME
BRANDS LIKE DREXEL
HERITAGE, STANLEY,
HIGHLAND HOUSE,
CRAFTMASTER, VAUGHAN
BASSET AND MORE AT
SACRFICIAL PRICES!
585 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland • 856-691-0300 • ACCEPTS CHECKS,
CASH, MC, VISA, AMEX, DISC • SPECIAL SALE HOURS:
Mon., 10-8 • Tues., Wed., Thurs. 10-6 • Fri., 10-8
Sat., 10-6 • Sun., 11-5 • WWW.BRODYSFURNITURE.COM
CLOSING
FOREVER
after
110YEARS
WAYSIDE
FURNITURE
50%
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Topsoil, Hydro-Seeding of Silver
Run Road Set for This Week
Department of Public Works reports
that weather permitting, beginning
Monday September 24, South State Inc.
will begin topsoiling and hydro-seeding
along Silver Run Rd. (CR 627).
The road will remain open and flagging
of traffic will occur from 7 a.m. until 9
a.m. and again from 2 p.m. until the end of
the day along Silver Run Road (CR 627).
However, during the hours of 9 a.m.
through 2 p.m. Silver Run Road (CR 627)
will be closed and traffic will be detoured.
South bound traffic will be detoured
west onto Dividing Creek Rd (CR 555) to
Buckshutem Road (CR 670), and then
turned south bound on Buckshutem Road
(CR 670) to Silver Run (CR 627).
Northbound Silver Run (CR 627) traffic
will be detoured north onto Buckshutem
Road (CR 670) to Dividing Creek Rd (CR
555) and then turned east onto Dividing
Creek Rd (CR 555) to Silver Run (CR 627)
north.
Emergency vehicles and school buses
will have access at all times.
Emergency vehicles and school busses
should use caution as this will be an active
work zone.
This project is expected to be complet-
ed by the end of the week, but may carry
over into next week.
VMEU Public Forum Set for
October 3
There will be a Vineland Municipal
Utilities Public Forum on Wednesday,
October 3, beginning at 7 p.m. the public
forum will take place at Vineland City
Hall, 640 E. Wood Street, in Council
Chambers on the second floor. This public
forum has been scheduled to update utili-
ty customers on the progress and future
goals of Vineland Municipal Utilities.
Present will be Joseph A. Isabella -
Director of Vineland Municipal Utilities,
Robert Napier – Assistant Superintendent
of Distribution, Michael Lawler -
Superintendent of Water Utility, and Lisa
Lucena – Senior Public Information
Assistant.
DYFS Blanket Program
Now that we are into the fall season
some of us start to prepare for our addi-
tional gift giving, FiberArts Café (FAC) is
continuing efforts working on the DYFS
Blanket Program. There has been a great
start already, reports Carol V. Moore,
owner of FiberArts.
“Buzy has delivered many 12x12-inch
squares to Emma in Millville who works
hard putting the squares together for 4x6-
foot finish blankets,” Moore says. “There
are two sisters who also live in Millville
who make complete blankets and have
delivered over 15 beautiful blankets to
date. The Downe Yarners & Sewers not
only make complete blankets, they also
sew large cloth pull-string bags for the
blankets to be given away in. Warren A.
Robinson has given much of the acrylic
yarns needed to make the squares and
blankets in his wife’s name; Jennie
Robinson. And a wonderful woman: The
Crocheting Lady, Gail Ugro from
Mahtomedi MN (a friend from crochet
conference) sends twice a year a box of 50
12x12-inch acrylic squares in great colors.
It is wonderful to be a part of such a giv-
ing community.”
If you would like to join in with this
great work, feel free to stop in any time to
drop off squares, pick up yarn to do
squares or sew squares together. All help
is appreciated and welcomed. FiberArts
Café is located on E. Commerce Street in
Bridgeton. Phone is 856-451-3143.
Aviation Model-Building
Classes Still Available
There is still time to register your child
in the aviation modeling classes that take
place on Saturdays through December at
Millville Airport.
The classes are sponsored by the
Millville Army Air Field Museum and are
held in the Wyble Library Building next to
the Museum on Saturday mornings from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. The cost of the 12-week
program is $125. A maximum of 12 stu-
dents are allowed and there are still sever-
al openings. Parents may sign up their
children by calling the Museum at 856-
327-2347.
The program, entitled Introduction to
Aviation — Aviation through Model
Aeronautics, is offered by the Millville
Army Air Field Museum’s Aerospace
Resource Center.
Students ages 10 years and up learn the
basic concepts of flight by building balsa
gliders, then a rubber-band model series
(an introduction to power flight), and, in
the final stage, building and flying engine-
powered models. At the completion of the
course, each student learns how to fly
control-line models, also called “U-control
models.” At this point, the students are
officially members of the Academy of
Model Aeronautics (AMA). This national
organization provides guidance for all
model aircraft activities.
The AMA is part of the National
Aeronautics Association (NAA), in which
America is recognized worldwide for its
contributions to aviation including tech-
nology and flight records.
The program was developed and is
taught by Howard Bueschel, long-time
aerospace educator for the State of New
Jersey as well as for Mercer County
College and Edison State College in
Trenton, NJ. He is assisted by Roy
Wilson of Mays Landing, NJ, who also
has extensive aeronautical experience
and brings a wealth of information about
airplane modeling. Edward Carlaw com-
pletes the trio of instructors for this
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VOTE FOR STEPHEN PLEVINS
Independent Candidate running
for Vineland City Council.
Stephen Plevins was born and raised in Vineland
and has called it his home for nearly 50 years. A
graduate of Vineland High School, he has made
it his life’s work to improve the community
he grew up in. In 1971, he graduated from
the University of Maryland with his Bachelor’s
degree in Community Public Relations and
Government. He has done graduate coursework
at both the University of Maryland and the
University of Northern Colorado. That’s why he’s
your best choice for City Council.
ON NOVEMBER 6 VOTE FOR PLEVINS
See What Plevins Has Done For Vineland Already:
• Founder of Broaden Your Horizons, an after
school program which has since become the
Vineland Boys and Girls Club
• Member of the Vineland Planning Board
• Past member of the Vineland Sewage Authority
• Co-Founder of Project Thanksgiving, a
program that provides Thanksgiving meals to
over 750 area families in conjunction with the
Salvation Army
Past Honors:
• Recipient of the Jayces State of New Jersey
#1 Volunteer Citizen Award
• Recipient of the Vineland Chamber of Commerce
“Pride in Vineland” award.
• Recipient of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Award
• Recipient of the National Assault Prevention Award
• Presented a Citation from the United States
Congress by House Representative Frank LoBiondo
• 2005 recipient of the Governor’s Award for Best
Volunteer Group in New Jersey
• Honored in the past by five separate New Jersey
Governors
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HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30AM TO 6:00PM
SATURDAY 8:00AM-5:00PM • SUNDAY 9AM-3PM • PHONE: 856-696-1644
482 Tuckahoe Rd. Buena Vista, NJ 08310
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comprehensive course.
In the fall of 2010, a flying-circle model
flying field was created at the Rob
Shannon recreation complex on Cedar
Street, adjacent to Millville Airport. This
new flying circle is a valuable asset to the
entire Introduction to Aviation program
and a home base for the Cumberland
Control Liners model airplane club to fly
their aircraft.
“This is an exciting way for kids to
learn about flight,” continues Bueschel.
“When they complete the course they
have a clear understanding of aviation,
enough so that they can feel confident in
pursuing their interest in an aviation
career. In addition, they have had a great
history lesson, learning about the Millville
Army Air Field, which was America’s First
Defense Airport during WWII, and the P-
47 Thunderbolt fighter plane that pilots
trained in here at the base.”
For more information, call the Millville
Army Air Field Museum at 856-327-2347.
Millville Airport Future Aviators: Graduates
of the fifth class of the Millville Army Air
Field Museum’s 12-week course entitled
“Introduction to Aviation — Aviation
Through Model Aeronautics” display the
“control-line” model airplanes they built and
flew at Millville Airport. Students pictured
from left to right with their “Baby Clown”
control-line models are: Sammy Trimmer,
Michael Mancus, Danny Kuhar, Marley
Mayfield, Luke Henry, Courtland Karpolorich,
Joshua Turgeon, Anuj Patel, Sahil Patel,
and Zachary Turgeon. Absent is Nicholas
Isabella. In the back row are instructors
(left to right): Roy Wilson, Ed Carlaw,
Dr. Basil Ingemi and Howard Bueschel.
Book Bag Campaign a Success
In August, Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Cumberland & Salem Counties launched
their annual Book Bag Campaign in prepa-
ration for the 2012-2013 school year.
Because of the generosity of the local
community, this campaign was highly suc-
cessful with over 700 book bags and sup-
plies collected. A major focus of the cam-
paign was to collect enough supplies to
help schools provide students with the
necessary educational tools throughout
the school year.
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Cumberland
& Salem Counties is especially grateful to
the following donors: Dempsey & Weiss of
Elmer, Farmer’s Mutual Insurance,
Magnolia Hill Studios, Sweet Pea’s
Children’s Shoppe, United Way of Salem
County, Cumberland Green Apartments,
St. John’s Episcopal Church, Community
Health Care, Better Education for Kids,
and numerous individual donors.
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Cumberland
& Salem Counties hosted a summer picnic
where many of the “littles” and their sib-
lings received book bags and school sup-
plies. The organization also partners with
22 different schools within Cumberland
and Salem Counties to provide needed
supplies.
Over 300 local children were mentored
in one-to-one, long-term, life changing
relationships through the Big Brothers Big
Sisters of Cumberland & Salem Counties
program in 2011. But many children are
still waiting to meet their Big Brother or
Big Sister. Not everyone has the desire to
be a mentor but everyone can help make a
difference as a volunteer or donor. For
more information, visit
www.bbbs.org/CumberlandSalemNJ or
call the office at 856-692-0916.
Gewirtz Named New Jersey
Top Doctor
Jonathan Gewirtz, MD, FACOG,
Obstetrics and Gynecology at Vineland
Gynecology Associates was named one of
the top doctors in New Jersey by Castle
Connolly Medical Ltd. and featured in the
Newark Star Ledger’s Best Doctors list.
Dr. Gewirtz is a member of the
American College of Obstetricians and
Gynecologists and the New Jersey
Medical Society and focuses on Bio-
Identical Hormone Replacement therapies
and Integrative Medicine (Alternative
Medicine) and in-office ablation. Dr.
Gewirtz is also the South Jersey coordina-
tor of LUNAFEST, a film festival featuring
works for and about women. Proceeds
from the festival are donated to the state’s
Breast Cancer Fund.
“I am honored to receive the ‘Top
Doctor’ award, which acknowledges my
care and commitment to my patients,” said
Dr. Gewirtz. “I thank my fellow colleagues
for recognizing not just my efforts, but
those of my partners and staff as well.”
Continued on page 18
Grapevine 3-11 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 7:58 PM Page 7
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Faces in the News
I
SEND US YOUR FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The Grapevine... birthdays, engagements, weddings,
anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to the address listed on p. 2.
Tre Bellezze Celebrates Grand Opening
On Wednesday, September 12, Sophia Sutton and Joanne Wendling (holding the scis-
sors) were joined by Vineland Mayor Robert Romano, Greater Vineland Chamber of
Commerce Executive Director Dawn Hunter, and various other chamber members,
friends and customers at a ribbon-cutting ceremony to announce the official opening of
Tre Bellezze, a new restaurant and bar located at 363 Wheat Road in Vineland.
Woman’s Club of Vineland Welcomes DeBartolomeis
The Woman's Club of Vineland, a member of the General Federation of
Women's Clubs, held their September evening business meeting on Monday,
September 10. The speaker was Adriana DeBartolomeis, who was the student
sponsored by the Woman's Club of Vineland to attend Girls Career Institute at
Douglas College this past summer. She spoke very positively on her experience
there. She felt it gave her a feeling of what college would be like and built her
self-confidence. Because of one of the dynamic speakers she heard, Adriana has
decided that she would like to go into counseling for teenage girls.
From left: Shirley Burke, program chair, Adriana DeBartolomeis and Alma Sessa, educa-
tion chairperson.
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RYLA Students at Rotary Luncheon
Students from Vineland High School, Sacred Heart High
School and Millville High School attended a luncheon for
the Vineland Rotary Club on Tuesday, September 18. The
students presented a program about their experiences at
the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards conference (RYLA).
The Vineland Rotary Club sponsored 19 area students
to attend the conference held at Richard Stockton
College of New Jersey this past June 24th through June
28th. RYLA is a training program for leaders and poten-
tial leaders where students come together with other tal-
ented young people from Rotary District 7640, Southern
New Jersey Region. The program is designed for juniors
entering their senior year of high school. This year, 145
students from all over southern New Jersey participated.
The sponsoring Rotary clubs organized the event with
programs emphasizing leadership skills, personal devel-
opment, and citizenship. Students explored career paths
or learn more about their chosen field through discus-
sions with successful community leaders.
Attending from Vineland High School were Sanad
Ashraf, William Butler, Abigail Dooley, Patricia Matias,
Lourdes Monje, Salena Muzzarelli, Rachel Bernhardt,
Brianna Ciancaglini, Tyler Steinbronn, Antoniette
Isekenegbe, Darren Tomasso, Emma Holmes; from Sacred
Heart High School, Ayla Gentiletti, Mia Klekos, Monica
Canglin, Colette Orlandini; from Buena High School,
Casey Sturts; from Millville High School, William Galarza,
and from Edina High School, Edina, Minnesota, J.D. Loyle.
Rotary’s main objective is service—in the community,
in the workplace, and around the globe. The 1.2 million
Rotarians who make up more than 34,000 Rotary clubs
in nearly every country in the world share a dedication to
the ideal of Service Above Self. You'll find members vol-
unteering in communities at home and abroad to sup-
port education and job training, provide clean water,
combat hunger, improve health and sanitation, and eradi-
cate polio.
Rotary clubs are open to people of all cultures and
ethnicities and are not affiliated with any political or reli-
gious organizations. To learn more about Vineland
Rotary Club, please visit our website at www.vinelandro-
tary.com.
Top photo: Vineland High School students, left to right: Abigail Dooley, Antoniette
Isekenegbe, Sanad Ashraf, Salena Muzzarelli, Darren Tomasso, Patricia Matias, Dr.
Thomas McCann, principal of Vineland High School South Campus, Emma Holmes,
Lourdes Monje, Brianna Ciancaglini, Rachel Bernhardt, William Butler, Tyler Steinbronn,
Melanie Druziako, Vineland Rotary Club Adviser.
Bottom photo: Students that attended the luncheon, left to right: Front Row: Ayla
Gentiletti, Monica Canglin, Patricia Matias, Emma Holmes, Lourdes Monje, Colette
Orlandini, Brianna Ciancaglini, Abigail Dooley, William Butler; Back Row: Rachel
Bernhardt, Salena Muzzarelli, Darren Tomasso, Sanad Ashraf, Mia Klekos, Antoniette
Isekenegbe, Tyler Steinbronn, William Galarza.
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Faces in the News
Grapevine 3-11 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 7:58 PM Page 10
Club Members Are Proud to Be American
Members of the Boys & Girls Club of Vineland are proud to be American. In
recognition of Day of Remembrance on September 11, young people wrote and
drew pictures of why they are so proud to live in this country. Some of their rep-
resentations were quite profound and inspirational. Pictured here are Club mem-
bers at the Carl Arthur Recreation Center unit with their projects.
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Not to be combined with any offer. Exp: 10/09/12
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Valid for full yard, or $50 off for non full yard.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
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MOWING
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Not to be combined with any offer. Exp: 10/09/12
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Millville Woman’s Club Preps for First Fundraiser
The Millville Woman’s Club is excited to start their new year with a fundraiser on
Friday, October 5, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., They will be selling their Bertacchi
Meatball sandwiches. The sandwiches are $5 each and can be purchased at the club
house, located at 300 E Street. Pictured here is Kathy Sparacio and Pam McNamee,
chairpersons for the event. The club will also be having their annual rummage sale on
Friday, October 5, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday, October 6, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
They hope to see you there at this opportunity to help support the club and its activities.
Dr. Gruccio Addresses Rotary Club of Vineland
Dr. Mary Gruccio, Superintendent of
Schools, was guest speaker at the week-
ly meeting of the Rotary Club of
Vineland on a recent Tuesday at the
Ramada Inn.
The group of about 60 local commu-
nity and business leaders were briefed
by Dr. Gruccio about her personal and
education background, and first three
months as superintendent.
She spoke of her strong family ties to
Vineland and experience of more than
three decades in the school district as a
teacher, principal, assistant superintend-
ent, and now superintendent.
"I am so proud to be the superintend-
ent of Vineland Public Schools," she said.
"Vineland is my home. And I am also a
proud graduate of Vineland High School, as are both of my children. My daughter,
Lauren, is a teacher in Vineland. Like all of you, we want what is best for our kids."
To accomplish that, said Dr. Gruccio, "we all need to work together, so our stu-
dents can continue to excel in academics, athletics, the arts, and go to some of the
best colleges and universities in the country."
"We need to help our children grow," she said. "And it's also very important that
we teach them about the need to give back to the community."
As a former teacher, Dr. Gruccio said she was strongly committed to providing
the greatest possible support for the people on the front lines—the classroom
teachers. The challenges, she said, were numerous—a focus on test scores that
may not accurately assess student performance, continuing reductions in state aid
despite more state regulations, and unfunded mandates.
"Eventually, these cuts in aid will mean hard work and tough decisions to avoid
cuts in programs and staff that will negatively affect our students," she said.
She also talked about recent changes in the district—a new computer system
(Genesis); new school lunch menus focusing on more fruits and vegetables and
whole grains because of new federal regulations intended to battle childhood obe-
sity; and numerous changes in facilities over the summer.
Dr. Gruccio also talked about the district's strong connection to Cumberland
County College, and how this relationship helps students transition from high
school to college-level learning. "I am a graduate of Cumberland County College
and I'm committed to strengthening our affiliation in a manner that provides quali-
ty educational opportunities for our students, and many others in our county."
She also expressed gratitude to the Rotary for its scholarship program that
provides financial assistance to VHS graduates. "Working together," she said, "we
can help our children grow in a way that will reinforce the fabric of our entire
community."
In response to a question from the audience, Dr. Gruccio explained that although
there are fewer off-site college visits, Vineland High School students are excused
whenever they visit a college and VHS continues to entertain representatives from
many colleges and universities. The school also hosts a "college night."
Another question addressed the possibility of expanded vocational education,
and the new superintendent said she was strongly committed to a full-time voca-
tional experience that opened up a greater number and variety of career tracks.
Grapevine 3-11 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 7:58 PM Page 11
OLMA Adopts New England Prep Online Course
Over summer vacation, Our
Lady of Mercy Academy intro-
duced the New England Prep
online course to a small group of
juniors who are anxious to
improve their math and English
PSAT scores. This online curricu-
lum is designed to be “infused”
into the 9th through 11th grade
high school math and English
curriculum. More than 20 hours
of the New England Prep curricu-
lum is devoted to specific problem types, ensuring that all of the students
enrolled in the program are thoroughly prepared for all problem types likely to
appear on the PSAT, SAT and ACT forms.
Each student participated in an online video lesson lasting more than 20
hours, which was devoted to only the hardest problem types. The students
claim that the course was more exciting, better than being taught in a regular
classroom, and worked well if they had to review the recorded lesson after each
session was completed.
The following students were chosen by principal, Sister Grace Marie, DM, to
focus on these essential curricula: Sedona Hill, Morgan Falasca, Sarah Pustizzi,
Tiara Campbell, BethAnn Cottrell, Katie McLaughlin, Taylor Tighe, Felissa Tan,
Clair Stimson, Karissa Lim, Casey Harmon and Ashly Kiszelenski.
“Hopefully, the end result will improve the scores of these and all students
participating in this new program and we will see up to a 300- to 500-point
increase in their scores this spring,” said Sister Grace Marie.
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A NEW CONCEPT IN AFTER SCHOOL EDUCATION
A Skill Development Program Beyond the Basics
Serving Children Grades 3rd - 6th
Do you know
what skills your child
is missing? Call now for a
FREE Diagnosis
856.780.5989
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FREE DIAGNOSTIC TESTING
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Wed. September 26th • 3:30pm - 8pm
2725 North Delsea Dr. and Forest Grove Rd.
For Directions Call Nelda Sweet, 856.696.4380
Call us anytime to schedule your Free testing
PSAT testing on October 20
Vineland High School students are urged
to sign up now for the Preliminary Scholastic
Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship
Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) that will
be administrated at Vineland High School
on Saturday, October 20, said Henry
Weintraub, district testing coordinator.
Registration for the PSAT began in the
high school guidance offices on September
20. The last day to register is October 17.
“There will be no extensions,” said
Weintraub. Cost is $15 cash or check.
Checks should be made payable to Vineland
Public Schools.
“The number of test booklets is limited
so prompt registration is recommended,”
said Weintraub. The PSAT/NMSQT is a
standardized test that provides the opportu-
nity to practice for the scholastic aptitude
test and to enter the NMSQT scholarship
programs. “Only grade 11 students can qual-
ify for the scholarship programs, but grade
10 and grade 11 students are encouraged to
take the PSAT,” he said.
On the day of the test, students need to
arrive by 7:45 a.m. Testing will conclude at
11:30 a.m. Questions regarding the registra-
tion and test program may be directed to a
high school guidance counselor or
Weintraub (hweintraub@vineland.org or
856-794-6700 ext. 2249.
Delsea Implements
Anti-Bullying Program
The Delsea Regional School District was
awarded an Olweus grant from Gloucester
In Our Schools
I
Who’s Your Hero?
Nominate Your Hometown Hero Today!
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/hometownheroes
Is it someone who gives of their time and energy to make our community a better place to live and
work? Perhaps they’re a policeman, fireman, teacher, coach, volunteer, serviceman or woman, elected
official, or an everyday hero who makes personal sacrifices so that others can live better lives.
They don’t do it for the recognition, but we think they should be recognized anyway.
Grapevine 12-17 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:02 PM Page 12
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County to implement the Olweus Bullying
Prevention Program. Delsea was one of
three school districts in Goucester County
awarded the Olweus grant opportunity,
whose purpose is to change the culture and
norms of the district by stressing preventa-
tive measures to improve peer relations
thereby enhancing the school climate.
The program was created by Dan
Olweus from Norway and has decades of
research and successful implementation.
Both the middle school and high school
have Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
Committees (OBPPC) that will work to
implement the program during the 2012-
2013 school-year. The Olweus model
requires bi-monthly class meetings in
homerooms where students will be dis-
cussing issues that are pertinent to them
and their relationship in the entire school
community. To encourage students to feel
comfortable during these discussion ses-
sions, the district is planning a full day of
unity-building events on Friday,
September 28 in both the middle and high
schools. The intent of this unity day is to
set the foundation for what will be a school
year in which the entire school comes
together to enhance what is already a very
positive and warm environment.
To kick off the September 28 unity day,
school culture motivational speaker Steven
Bollar, aka Stand-Tall Steve, will offer pro-
grams to both the high school and middle
school students as well as elementary stu-
dents from Franklin Township’s Reutter
Elementary School. Stand-Tall Steve will
speak to the high school students at 7:45
a.m. in the high school auditorium followed
by a program for the middle school and ele-
mentary students at 9 a.m.
Stand-Tall Steve is known for his quick
wit, creative thought, humorous stories and
engaging words. His stage presence is com-
manding while he shares important lessons
about education, dedication and life.
Currently the principal of the Hartford
School in Mount Laurel, he was recognized
by South Jersey Magazine as one of the Top
20 Men of the Year. He uses his life experi-
ence to instill students with self-esteem
and team pride that can translate into aca-
demic excellence.
Stand-Tall Steven will be focusing on
efforts that are designed to improve peer
relations and make the school a safer and
more positive place for all students to learn
and develop. His message will promote
improvements in the classroom’s social cli-
mate, and social relationships, while
enhancing attitudes toward schoolwork and
school. The overall program is designed to
be integrated into Delsea’s daily routines
and procedures with outcomes leading to
long term change.
Parents and community members are
welcome to attend. Please contact Mr.
Nicholson, 856-694-0100, ext. 241 in the
middle school and Mrs. Lawyer, ext. 234 in
the high school if interested in attending
the Stand-Tall Steve program or with any
questions regarding the Olweus Bullying
Prevention Program.
Rossi School Band Fundraiser
In May, the Anthony Rossi Intermediate
School Band, under the direction of Ken
Schultz, joined bands from across the
United States and Canada to compete in the
WorldStrides Heritage Music Festival in
New York City. The ensemble earned a
Gold/Superior Rating. With this accom-
plishment, the Rossi Band was invited to
participate in the National Festival of Gold
at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.
Due to the expense of the trip, the band will
be holding many fundraisers throughout
the school year. The first fundraiser of the
year is its 4th Annual Indoor Yard Sale on
Saturday, October 13 from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Spaces or tables can be rented starting at
$8. For more information: 856-238-8398 or
email: rossiyardsale@gmail.com. All pro-
ceeds go toward the band’s trip to the
National Festival of Gold.
Edgarton Hosts Play
Edgarton Christian Academy will host
The Magic of Chad Juros on Friday,
October 12, at the ECA School located at
212 Catawba Avenue in Newfield. Tickets
may be purchased for $10 in advance,
which is recommended, children 2 and
under are admitted free of charge. Tickets
may be purchased at the door at the price
of $12 per person. For information or to
purchase tickets, call 856-521-0660. I
Grapevine 12-17 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:02 PM Page 13
its intriguing subject matter. Set in
Independence, Kansas, “I Hope You’re
Wrong About Scottsdale” tells the story of
a failed actress who takes up a job as a
phone psychic, while simultaneously
struggling to maintain a relationship with
her alcoholic boyfriend.
Scarpa discussed his inspiration to
write this type of story, despite the fact
that he’s never been to Kansas nor worked
as a phone psychic.
“I can’t really pinpoint the genesis of
it,” he said. “I think most writers will
admit that a lot of times that type of thing
is inarticulate. But I was in a writer’s
workshop during my last semester at
Emerson, and in those classes you’re usu-
ally expected to write two or three stories
each. And this was the first one I wrote
for that requirement.”
The story had been one that was linger-
ing in Scarpa’s mind for a while before he
started the workshop, and he noted that
the imposed deadline was the impetus that
got him to sit down and finally write it.
“For a while, I only had the first sen-
tence,” Scarpa said, noting that every story
he writes begins with a singular first sen-
tence that he muses on for a bit before
attempting to hash out a full narrative.
“And I knew that particular sentence was
one I could definitely turn into a story. I
had a lot of ideas about where I wanted to
go with it. But having a due date with the
workshop really put my feet to the fire
and forced me to do the research and
hammer it out.”
Most of Scarpa’s research involved get-
ting some insight into the world of call-in
psychics, a world he was otherwise unfa-
miliar with, but always interested in. To
accomplish this, he spent some time call-
ing into these hotlines.
“I spent an afternoon calling these psy-
chic hotlines,” Scarpa said, “and it was
really interesting. There was a lot of the
same jargon. That industry has always fas-
cinated me—the idea that people spend
money on these things regularly and put
merit into what they’re told. I found a lot
of overlap in the readings. They basically
spoke in very general terms about things
that, in essence, describe the human con-
dition. Becoming familiar with the termi-
nology and the method really pushed the
story along. A lot of the dialogue I had
during these calls shows up in the story.”
Once Scarpa had finished his story, he
didn’t realize just what he had at first.
While he felt it was good, he didn’t know
it was quite this good. That is, until he
received praise from someone he had
already admired.
“The workshop instructor was Jessica
Treadway,” he explained. “And she is the
author of two books of short stories, and
I’m a huge fan of both—that’s actually the
reason I took the class. She pulled me
aside after I submitted my story, and had
great things to say about it, which was
obviously very humbling coming from
someone you admire.
“Usually in these workshops,” Scarpa
added, “you have to submit three or four
drafts before the story is finished. That’s
always been the case for me. But [Jessica]
gave my first draft back to me with just
one edit on it.”
Treadway urged Scarpa to send his
story into the Norman Mailer Center, and
the confidence that her praise instilled in
him was all he needed to do it.
Now, nearly seven months after he sub-
mitted his story for consideration at the
recommendation of Treadway, Scarpa will
reap the fruits of his labor.
There is a star-studded group of
celebrities and literary heavyweights
expected to join Scarpa at the ceremony:
Alec Baldwin will serve as the master of
ceremonies; Joyce Carol Oates will be
honored with a lifetime achievement
award; Muhammad Ali will be speaking;
and Garrison Keillor and Robert Caro will
also be honored.
Having achieved so much in such a
short span of time, one would assume
Scarpa plans to pursue a career as a full-
time writer. He says that’s not the case.
“I don’t see that happening,” he said,
laughing. “It’s something I would love to
do, but I just don’t know how feasible it is.”
So what does the future hold then?
“I’m going to be applying to grad
schools in the winter,” Scarpa said. “I’d
like to get my MFA in creative writing. I
was a little weary about applying to some
of the top programs at first. I thought
maybe I was still a little too green. But
getting this award kind of gave me the
boost I needed. I feel legitimized now.” I {
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www.CompleteCareNJ.org
Stop in any CompleteCare
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WRITER
Continued from cover
Most of Scarpa’s research
involved getting some
insight into the world of
call-in psychics, a world he
was otherwise unfamiliar with,
but always interested in.
To accomplish this,
he spent some time calling
into these hotlines.
Grapevine 12-17 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:02 PM Page 14
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PEDALS
Continued from cover
Rotary has partnered with Pedals for
Progress, a non-profit corporation devoted
to global economic development, to export
bikes to more than 30 third world countries.
Each bike represents food for the table and
helps keep families together. Bicycles repre-
sent mobility and can make the difference
between success and failure for a family.
Children often use the bikes to attend
school on a regular basis. Portable and trea-
dle sewing machines are also collected and
are often used by recipients to make their
own clothes or to start small businesses.
Rotary is a worldwide organization of
more than 1.2 million business, professional,
and community leaders. Members of Rotary
clubs, known as Rotarians, provide humani-
tarian service, encourage high ethical stan-
dards in all vocations, and help build good-
will and peace in the world. Clubs are non-
political, nonreligious, and open to all cul-
tures, races, and creeds. As signified by the
motto Service Above Self, Rotary’s main
objective is service — in the community, in
the workplace, and throughout the world.
The Rotary Club of Vineland has more
than 85 members and meets on Tuesdays, at
12:10 PM at the Vineland Ramada Inn. For
more information, visit www.vinelandro-
tary.com or e-mail the club at
info@vinelandrotary.com. I
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Henry Hansen (pictured) has been involved for
many years in the Vineland Rotary Club’s
Pedals for Progress efforts, in which bicycles
are collected and readied for shipment to third
world countries where they are much needed
for transport. The Vineland club started col-
lecting the bikes 18 years ago. Hansen took
over leadership of the cause in 2003.
The Vineland Rotary Club has collected 2,500
bicycles and hopes to collect another 200 dur-
ing its annual fall bicycle and sewing machine
drive, ending on September 29.
If you have a bicycle or sewing machine to
donate, call Henry Hansen at 856-696-0643 to
arrange for a pickup or drop-off.
Nominate Your Hometown Hero Today!
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/hometownheroes
Is it someone who gives of their time and energy to make our community a
better place to live and work? Perhaps they’re a policeman, fireman, teacher,
coach, volunteer, serviceman or woman, elected official, or an everyday hero
who makes personal sacrifices so that others can live better lives.
They don’t do it for the recognition,
but we think they should be recognized anyway.
Grapevine 12-17 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:02 PM Page 15
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Grapevine 12-17 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:02 PM Page 17
Vineland Gynecology Associates (VGA)
offers women’s care based on years of
medical experience. The board-certified
physicians of VGA are Ronald Portadin,
MD and Jonathan Gewirtz, MD.
Originally of Vineland Obstetrical and
Gynecological Professional Association at
Brewster Road, they have been practicing
together locally for many years. With
Nurse Practitioners Cindy Nevara and
Rita Vastano, they are now located at 1318
S. Main Road, Building 3, in Vineland.
Fall Events for Senior Citizens
and Disabled at Mall
A Senior Citizen Information Expo will
be held on Friday, November 2, from 10
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and will feature informa-
tion and resource materials provided by the
County Office on Aging & Disabled, as well
as various other non-profit agencies in the
community who offer programs and servic-
es to senior citizen and disabled residents.
Non-profit organizations wishing to partic-
ipate or reserve an exhibit table should
contact Melissa Clifton at the Cumberland
County Office on Aging & Disabled at 856-
453-2220 no later than Friday, October 12.
The Annual Fall Senior Craft Fair will
be held on Saturday, November 3, from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m., and will feature various
crafts, holiday decorations, hand-sewn
and crocheted items, flower arrange-
ments, jewelry, etc., all handmade by area
senior and/or disabled residents. Crafters
age 55 and older or disabled may register
for a craft table by calling Melissa Clifton
at the Cumberland County Office on
Aging at 856-453-2220. There is no cost
for table space. Space may be limited; so
early registration is recommended.
The public is welcome and encouraged
to attend these events. For further infor-
mation or more details, contact the Office
on Aging at 856-453-2220.
Additionally, the Cumberland County
Office on Aging & Disabled provides:
Outreach & Information Assistance pro-
grams, Meals on Wheels & Luncheon
Program for Senior Citizens, Office for the
Disabled & Personal, Assistance Program,
Cumberland Area Transit System (CATS),
Retired & Senior Volunteer Program
(R.S.V.P.), Senior Health Insurance Program
(S.H.I.P.), Care Managed Home Care,
Services for Hispanic Elders, and Various
other Non-Profit Agencies offering Services
& Programs for Seniors & Disabled.
Satterfield and Operation
Christmas Child
For 10 years, Livia lived in a Romanian
orphanage. In contrast to the lack of love
and care from the orphanage attendants
and fellow orphans, she vividly remem-
bers her life changing as a child through a
simple shoe box.
Livia remembers feeling shocked that
people across the ocean would care
enough to send her gifts. After going
through the contents of her box, Livia
asked a translator how to say “I love you”
in English so she could share the phrase
with a volunteer, Connie Satterfield, who
had traveled from Georgia to Romania for
a mission trip.
Five years after receiving her shoe box
gift, Livia was adopted by Connie
Satterfield and her husband. Now Livia’s
story has come full-circle as she packs
shoe box gifts for other hurting children
across the world. Livia speaks at events
and churches promoting the project that
changed her life as a young girl.
Vineland area kids, families and volun-
teers host Livia Satterfield as she shares
powerful impact stories with the Southern
New Jersey community. This year the
Southern New Jersey area aims to collect
thousands of shoe box gifts. Attendees will
learn how they can impact hurting chil-
dren across the globe with simple shoe
box gifts this holiday season.
Vineland will be the first stop for thou-
sands of shoe boxes that local families,
churches and groups will fill with toys,
school supplies and necessity items. The
shoe box gifts are hand-delivered to needy
children around the world using whatever
means necessary—sea containers, trucks,
trains, airplanes, helicopters, boats, ele-
phants and dog sleds.
It all takes place on Sunday, September
30, at 6 p.m. at South Vineland United
Methodist Church, 2724 S Main Road,
Vineland, NJ 08360.
New Pathways to Teaching
Cumberland County College offers the
New Pathways to Teaching in New Jersey
program (NPTNJ) that provides a process
for individuals to become licensed teach-
ers without having to complete a tradi-
tional training program. NPTNJ is a state-
approved alternate route curriculum that
addresses a statewide need for teachers at
the elementary, middle and high school
levels.
Cumberland County College’s Stage II
course begins October 10 and continues
through May 2013. It provides coursework
essential for the development of excellent
teachers. Class meets 5-9 p.m. Wednesdays.
This course is for students who have
completed Stage I with a minimum grade
of “B” and have a contract of employment
as a full- or part-time provisional teacher
for the school year. A long-term substitute
assignment may qualify. The position
must be in the same discipline as the
Certificate of Eligibility that is held.
The Stage II course may be taken for
non-credit or graduate credit. The cost of
the non-credit course is $2,400; the 11-
credit program cost is $6,122.
Call CCC’s office of the Workforce
Education Alliance at 856-691-8600 ext.
345 for program details and to register.
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Member
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News in Brief I
Grapevine 18-23 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:03 PM Page 18
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www.romano2012.com
856-839-0466 • 1164 E. Landis Ave (across from the Y)
Paid for by ROMANO2012, Rebecca Bard, Treasurer
VOTE NOV. 6TH 2012 COLUMN L
THOMPSON
LABOY
COCCARO ROMERO
ARROYO
Riverfront Renaissance Center for the Arts
22 N. High St., 6 artists
Clay College, 108 N. High St.
Ceramic artists at work
Glasstown Art Glass, 116 N. High St.
Artist/glassblower Scott Meyer
J.B. and M.E., 129A N. High St.
Artists – Susan Rau & Isabelle Samul
Amethyst Gallery, 212 N. High St.
Artist – Linda Tawes
LaBottega of Art, 508 N. High St.
Artist – Bobbi Berg
Copper Plate, Village on High,
501 N. High St., Artist – Maryann Cannon
Tawes Studio of Art, Village on High,
501 N. High St., Artist – Dennis Tawes
1-800-887-4957
www.GlasstownArtsDistrict.com
Funded by the Urban
Enterprise Program
This programis made possible in part by funds fromthe New Jersey State Council on
the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.
Millville, NJ 08332
Spend the day discovering
South Jersey’s artistic side
and explore studios featuring
area artists and artisans
working in a wide variety
of mediums. A unique
opportunity to meet directly
with artists in an intimate
setting.
Explore. Discover. Enjoy the Arts!
Saturday, Oct. 6 • 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Free Studio Tour
Lead Safety Workshop to Be
Held in Millville
Health Department will host a
“Renovate Right and Be Lead-Safe” work-
shop at the County Health Dept. located
at 309 Buck Street in Millville on
Thursday, October 25, from 1 to 2:15 p.m.
Sponsored by the Southern New Jersey
Perinatal Cooperative, the “Renovate
Right and Be Lead Safe” free workshop
will show do-it-yourself renovators the
safe way to make common repairs and
protect against lead exposure.
If your home was built before 1978 and
you have broken drywall, sticking doors,
or chipping paint, you’ll want to attend
this program. Most homes built before
1978 have lead paint and there are a few
important things you need to know. Come
out and learn how to repair and improve
your home the lead safe way.
Lead dust from old paint is the most
common way children become lead poi-
soned. Children breathe in lead dust when
it gets disturbed by wind, brooms, sanding,
and everyday living. Workshop participants
will learn howto fix broken drywall, a stick-
ing door, and chipping paint the lead-safe
way. Also, a free bucket of supplies (one per
family) will be given to all those who attend.
Pre-registration is required. If you need
more information or would like to regis-
ter, call Deb Asselta at 856-675-5270.
Vineland Environmental
Commission Photo Contest
The Vineland Environmental
Commission will be holding its first photo
contest. Winners will be displayed at the
Vineland Public Library in March 2013.
The theme of the contest is “Vineland
Naturally.” The purpose of the contest is
to call attention to the natural beauty of
Vineland. All photos must be of nature
only (no hand of man, no people photos).
All photos submitted must be printed in
no larger than 8x10 or 8x12 size, matted,
framed and ready to hang with wire.
Photos can be B&W or color. Photos must
be of real places, i.e., no digital recreations
or alterations. Open to all ages. You don’t
have to be a Vineland resident. For more
information, email David Lowenstern at
divadl222@gmail.com.
7th Grade Initiative to Hold
Fall Kickoff at YMCA
All seventh graders from Vineland and
surrounding communities are invited to
attend the free 7th Grade Initiative pro-
gram at the YMCA of Vineland. The fall
kickoff is scheduled from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
on Saturday, October 6. These special
hours for seventh grade students will con-
tinue on Saturday evenings through June.
“7GI,” as the program is known, pro-
vides a safe place for seventh graders to
enjoy their Saturday evenings. It also
encourages healthy eating habits, physical
exercise, and social interaction. All of this
is provided free of charge by the YMCA of
Vineland. This is the program’s third year.
Each Saturday night typically includes
staff-led activities as well as those chosen
by the participants. Examples include
swimming, basketball, rock climbing, the
“dance dance revolution” and other fitness
equipment, dodge ball, and more.
Nutritious snacks are also offered.
Participants must sign up for the “7GI.”
Registration is open now at the YMCA for
this unique and positive experience.
Interested parents are encouraged to call
Cara Messore at the Y for details. She
notes, “The kids who come will have a ton
of fun!” Messore can be reached at 856-
691-0030, ext. 307. The Y is located at
1159 East Landis Avenue, in Vineland.
Historical Society Presents
"Here Comes the Bride"
The Vineland Historical and
Antiquarian Society will host a "wedding
reception" on Saturday, October 6, between
1 and 4 p.m. at its museum at 108 S. Seventh
Street as part of the downtown's wedding
weekend event. The reception will mark
the opening of an exhibit of historic wed-
ding gowns, titled “Here Comes the Bride.”
Visitors will enjoy a slice of wedding
cake and some sparkling grape juice, provid-
ed by the Vineland Chamber of Commerce.
“It’s definitely not a formal affair,” said
Patricia A. Martinelli, administrator/cura-
tor. “We just thought it would be a fun and
interesting way to open the exhibit and
participate in the downtown event.”
The wedding gowns date from the
1860s through the 1980s, and range in
materials from plum velvet to white silk.
The exhibit will include wedding-related
trivia and memorabilia, such as photo-
graphs, cards and nosegays.
The exhibit will be open to the public on
Saturdays between 1 and 4 p.m. in October.
For further information, call 856-691-1111 or
e-mail vinelandhistory@gmail.com.
Pictured: Rose Siciliano of Landisville is
seen here on October 23, 1948, the day
she married Frank Martinelli of Minotola
at Our Lady of Victories Church in
Landisville.
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veryone knows that flowers and
weddings go together, but we at
Main Street Vineland like to take
this to another level. Why not set
the stage for our Wedding Weekend event by
beautifying Landis Avenue with flowers? Like
last year, people will have a chance, on the
same day, to plant flowers downtown for Fall
Planting Day and do their wedding shopping
during our Wedding Weekend retail event. So
mark your calendar for Saturday, October 6.
From 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., we could use your help
at the mini-parks at the Boulevard and Landis
Avenue and other downtown focal points to
add some fall color. We’ll meet at the mini-
parks at 9 a.m., rain or shine. Though we’ll
have some tools and equipment on hand, you
should bring hand tools and comfortable gar-
dener’s gloves, if you want to help and have
them. Ivy Acres of Vineland will be donating
the flowers again this year, as they have done
for the past several years.
To prepare the areas for planting, we’ll be
meeting at the mini-parks this coming
Saturday at 9 a.m., rain or shine, for Fall
Clean-Up Day.
Our Clean-Up and Planting Days have
become true community events—bringing
together volunteers from Main Street
Vineland with those from other organizations
as well as students from local schools. And
everyone is welcome to come back to the
Main Street Vineland office for free pizza.
Meanwhile, nearly 20 downtown business-
es, covering the 500 to 800 blocks of Landis
Avenue, will be participating in the ultimate
wedding shopping experience with a chance
to win some great grand prizes.
Wedding Weekend will take place from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. that same day (October 6). The
businesses will display the merchandise and
services they can offer to the bride- and
groom-to-be. You’ll find everything from
gowns and formal wear, shoes, and jewelry to
flowers, printing services for invitations, lim-
ousine services, banking, bakeries, and restau-
rants as part of this very special event.
Brides and grooms who register at half the
participating vendors set up in Landis
MarketPlace, at 631 E. Landis Avenue, and
half those along Landis Avenue will be eligible
for three grand prizes. Prizes include $250 in
jewelry from DeSoto Jewelers and over $700
in gift certificates.
Maps to help you locate participating busi-
nesses will be available at any of the business-
es. Some businesses will be participating from
their own locations while others will have
booths set up inside Landis MarketPlace, at
631 E. Landis Ave.
What a great way to show people that our
downtown is a beautiful place to do their
shopping!
***
We’ll also show you that Vineland is a great
place to have a good meal at our A Taste of
Vineland event on Wednesday, October 10,
from 6 to 9 p.m., at Mori’s on Landis, 830 E.
Landis Ave. A vast array of signature dishes
will be on hand from Vineland’s finest restau-
rants and eateries—main courses, appetizers
and desserts. Enjoy also live music, a fabulous
silent auction, beer and wine, champagne, and
more. Tickets are $40, with proceeds benefit-
ing downtown revitalization. Call the Main
Street Vineland office now to get your ticket.
***
I also want to thank all the volunteers and
staff who helped out at the BBQ n’ Chili Cook-
Off this past weekend. It’s the hard work and
dedication of people like these—in the plan-
ning, organization, and running the events—
that make these events successful and bring
thousands of people to Landis Avenue. I
For more information on Main Street
Vineland, call 856-794-8653, visit
www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them
out on Facebook.
Downtown Vineland
{ TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND }
I
A Big Day
Indeed
Fall Planting Day and Wedding Weekend coincide
this Saturday to help you plan for your big day.
I
Vintage Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO }
Robinson’s Farm
German POWs spent their days working at
P.J. Ritter Company’s food production plants and
their nights at the Fairton Farm compound.
T
he arrival of 75 German prisoners
at Fairton’s Robinson’s Farmat
the peak of World War II marked
the start of a brief period in
which Cumberland County would be one of
approximately 700 U.S. locations housing
World War II POWs. Supervised by armed
guards, the Germans would spend their
days working at P.J. Ritter Company’s food
production plants and their nights at the
tent-city compound in Fairfield Township
surrounded by floodlights ready to spot an
escape, guard towers with mounted
machine guns and fences topped with
barbed wire. Like their imprisoned com-
rades scattered throughout the country,
their presence here remained hushed.
The group of soldiers at Robinson’s Farm
was originally quartered at Fort Dix follow-
ing their capture by British and American
forces in North Africa and their transport to
the United States. According to former Ritter
Personnel Director Earl L. McCormick’s
insightful account of the POWs housed in
Cumberland County, the “captives [were]
from Hitler’s crack divisions…”
The influx of German prisoners into the
country would continue until spring 1945
and along with it a multitude of issues like
resistance and defiance that began to infest
various camps around the United States.
Escapes were also a concern, especially since
the camps existed on American soil and
could threaten the safety of U.S. civilians.
A total of 2,222 escapes did occur, including
one from Fort Dix, but the numbers were
negligible when you consider there were
371,000 German captives held here.
But a more insidious threat within the
camps occurred when working prisoners
were threatened by fellow soldiers.
According to J. Malcom Garcia’s
Smithsonian.com article “German POWs
on the American Homefront,” pressure
was placed on captives by other prisoners
to “not work so hard” thereby sabotaging
the production of their workplace. As the
article points out, there were those that
upheld the belief that “a good German
would not help the Americans.”
The New York Times elaborated on the
results of such thinking when it reported
in 1945 that outbreaks of violence in
camps throughout the country between
September 1943 and April 1944 had resulted
in six murders and two forced suicides.
The deaths were the product of “Nazi
vengeance courts” and “courts of honor”
implemented by zealous prisoners against
any German soldier who was not deemed
a “pure” Nazi by working efficiently for an
American business.
The situation in Cumberland County
was one of cooperation, but it was not ini-
tially immune to the Nazi intolerance that
had fueled the violence in other camps. As
it turns out, it was the prisoners’ candor
that prevented a similar problem from fes-
tering in Fairton.
Organized into groups of 10 or more, the
POWs were supervised by a civilian
employee but, according to McCormick,
seemed to be directed more by their own
officers who had appointed themselves
foremen and scurried about advising the
soldiers. Various sources report that offi-
cers were not required to work by the rules
of the Geneva Convention, but could do so
if they desired. McCormick points out that
his initial meeting with the POWs did not
include officers. “I learned later that this
was probably planned that way,” he writes.
When an attempt was made to “break
the ice” with the German officers and dis-
arm the “caste system existing between
the officers and soldiers,” McCormick was
alarmed to discover that these individuals
were unlike their charges. Describing
their responses to his inquiries as “arro-
gant,” “haughty” and “contemptuous,” he
recounts the difficulty of maintaining an
air of diplomacy while listening to claims
that “none could withstand the full
German armed might” and that the
Germans’ “secret weapon” would soon
end all Allied resistance.
It wasn’t long before the POWs conveyed
a message to McCormick demanding that
the company remove the officers if the pris-
oners were to work at the plant. Looking
into the matter further, the personnel direc-
tor learned that “the officers were overbear-
ing and warning the men against coopera-
tion with the Americans. They threatened
that a record would be kept on the men to
be reported back to authorities after the
Germans had won the war.” Within days,
the officers were on their way back to Fort
Dix and a calmer work environment greet-
ed the prisoners at the plant where they
continued their labor under the supervision
of a civilian foreman. I
n
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Little Folks,
Big Impact
Two youngsters make a difference to feed the hungry,
prevent bullying—with some help from caring parents.
T
wo youngsters in the Vineland
area have used their good for-
tune to help others less fortu-
nate. One used the opportunity
of his seventh birthday party, where he
could have received many gifts from class-
mates and friends, but decided to run a
food drive instead. Another child is using
her runs and titles in pageants to shine a
light on anti-bullying messages and other
causes. The common denominator:
Parents who have taught their kids to be
compassionate.
“Howard Tate is my son. For short, we
call him Tate,” explains his mom, Terah.
“Tate’s dad [Howard, as well] and I have
always tried to help the homeless and
hungry and wanted to introduce Tate at
an early age to helping those that are less
fortunate than him.”
This food drive idea, she says, came
about from a conversation that she and
Tate’s dad had with him almost a year ago.
They were talking about the hungry kids
in Somalia and explained to him that there
are a lot of hungry children in the world,
even right here in the United States and
New Jersey.
“Tate is very sensitive to the needs of
others and he was very concerned with
helping those that are hungry,” she says.
“He liked that he could send food to the
food bank and it would help someone in
need. We told him that he could put
together his own event to help people.
“When we started planning for his
birthday party, the idea came up that we
could have a really big party at our shop,
Howie’s Dugout Ice Cream Parlor & Cafe,”
she continues. “So we invited half of his
school (he goes to Catholic School, so
invitations went out to about 75 kids and
teachers) and instead of presents for him-
self he asked everyone to bring food for
the food bank instead.”
Tate’s parents went one step further
and told him he could run his food drive
for a week, and to get people to donate, he
could offer a free ice cream or water ice to
anyone who brought food. So, Tate is run-
ning his food drive from Saturday,
September 29, until Saturday October
6. Howie’s Dugout Ice Cream Parlor &
Cafe is located at 3569 E. Landis Avenue
(across from ShopRite at Landis and
Lincoln avenues).
“He wants to be
able to bring a truck-
load of food to feed
as many kids as he
can!” the proud
mom says.
* * *
Another proud
mom, Starlyn
Gonzalez, has this
to say about her
wee one: “My
daughter Charlie
does beauty pag-
eants and she has
been using her titles and these opportuni-
ties to do good for the community. It is a
different side to pageants than you see on
Toddlers and Tiaras.”
Charlie Audrey has collected donations
over $100 worth of school supplies for a
foundation called K.I.D.S (Kids in
Distressed Situations) as well as an $80
cash donation that they “turn into $800
worth of stuff.” She has been set up to
donate the items to the Boys and Girls
Club of Vineland, according to Gonzalez.
“At 18 months old, she is the youngest
benefactor that K.I.D.S has ever had,” says
Gonzalez, who obviously has a lot to do
with making these donations occur.
Just two weekends ago, Charlie was in
White Plains, New York, representing
Vineland in an event for anti-bullying. She
also performed in a sponsor fashion show
for the same cause in front of 10,000 peo-
ple at the Westchester Mall with guest
stars Maddie and Chloe from the hit TV
reality show Dance Moms.
“We have also used our Facebook page
‘Charlies Choice’ to do several other
fundraisers in the past year for local fami-
lies, Gonzalez notes. I
Grapevine 18-23 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:03 PM Page 21
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D E E T N A R
Sign-Up Deadline for
MILC Program
USDA Farm Service Agency State
Executive Director, Paul J. Hlubik,
reminds producers that the deadline to
sign up for the Milk Income Loss Contract
(MILC) program is September 30, 2012.
The MILC Program financially compen-
sates dairy producers when domestic milk
prices fall below a specified level. MILC
payments are made monthly when the
milk price falls below the established
price per hundredweight.
Verifiable production evidence that
confirms the dairy operation’s eligible
production and commercial milk market-
ings must be provided to County Offices
before any payment will be issued to the
dairy operation. To obtain MILC benefits
for all previous months for which a MILC
payment rate was in effect, producers
must provide the dairy operation’s final
production evidence and any supporting
documentation, if not already submitted,
for eligible months by Close Of Business
November 1, 2012.
Any dairy operation that cannot pro-
vide the required documentation to the
satisfaction of COC will be ineligible for
MILC program benefits. For more clarifi-
cation on the MILC Program, please con-
tact your local Farm Service Agency office.
Deerfield Harvest Festival
Farmer of the Year
Deerfield Township Mayor Cosmo
Laurella, on behalf of the Township
Committee and Recreation Committee
congratulates the Smith Family for their
selection as farmer of the year.
In August of 1980, Vernon and Pat
Smith purchased a chicken farm on
Sherman Avenue in Deerfield Township.
For the next three years, while Pat was
teaching school, Vernon spent his time
clearing the property, tearing down chick-
en coops and turning a portion of one
coop into a shop, which he would later
use for teaching decoy carving.
In the spring of 1983, Vernon decided
to try tree farming. He planted his first
1,000 trees, named the farm after his old-
est son, Chris—Chris Smith's Tree Farm—
and began learning everything he could
about growing beautiful Christmas trees.
He spent the next five years fertilizing,
watering, hand-trimming each tree, and
mowing the grass in each field until the
first trees were big enough to sell.
Finally, during the Christmas season of
1987 the trees were big enough to deco-
rate homes all over the area. After each
family chose the perfect tree, Vernon
would cut it down with a bow saw, then
he and son, Chris, would clean the tree
and carry it out to the family's vehicle.
During some of the cold days, Pat even
makes homemade wassail to help warm
the customers after their search for the
perfect tree. At times, they had as many as
a dozen customers all waiting their turn to
get the tree they had picked out. They
have customers that brought picnic lunch-
es and made it a family event. They even
had one customer who said that her tree
was so pretty that she kept it in the yard
Master Gardener Applications
Due November 5
Applications are presently being
accepted for Cumberland County
Master Gardeners Organization
training/accreditation courses for
2013. Classes will begin on
Tuesday, January 8, 2013, and con-
tinue weekly until the end of May.
The cost for these 20 training ses-
sions is $210. The class size is lim-
ited to 20 students and registration
is on a first-come, first-serve basis.
Deadline for applications is Monday,
November 5.
All classes run from 9 a.m. until
12 p.m. and are held at Rutgers
Cooperative Extension Education
Center, 291 Morton Ave.,
Rosenhayn. For further information
or to register for a session, call 451-
2800, ext. 4.
Grapevine 18-23 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:04 PM Page 22
and decorated it for the birds until Easter!
Vernon eventually became a correc-
tions officer but continued to work on the
farm to prepare for each Christmas sea-
son. In the meantime, Chris took over all
of the tree trimming as well as cutting
trees for the customers. He and his wife
Erety are now busy with daughters Sarah
and Katie and yet Chris is on the farm
every weekend between Thanksgiving and
Christmas taking good care of customers
by cutting and cleaning each tree before it
goes out to its new home.
The varieties grown over the nearly 30
years in business include Frasier Fir,
Douglas Fir, White Pine, Scotch Pine, Blue
Spruce, Norway Spruce and White Spruce.
The supply of trees has been limited for
the last several years but they still have
trees including White Pines 10 to 20 foot
or larger. During the off season, however,
the family continues to take care of the
mowing, fertilizing, and replanting when
conditions are right. Over the years, there
have been times when they have gotten
help from son, Jeremy, Pat's brother, Bob,
nephew Ryan, and some other family
members.
The Smith's said that the best part
about having the farm is meeting nice
people and seeing the smile on their faces
once they have found their perfect tree.
South Jersey
Pumpkin Show
The South Jersey Pumpkin Show, now
in its ninth year, will once again feature a
Fall/Winter Home, Garden and
Recreational Expo. The Salem County
Fairgrounds, located in the rolling farm
lands of Woodstown, in Salem County,
will host the Home Show October 12-14,
from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, and 10
a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.
Visitors will find everything for inside and
outside their home, as thousands of prod-
ucts and services will be available.
Consumers will be able to shop for a
new home or sunroom, talk to builders
and contractors, get tips on home
improvement projects and walk through
aisles and aisles of products and services.
Seminars, exhibits, give-aways, product
demonstrations and more will be offered.
The Pumpkin Show festival will feature
a Big Pumpkin Weigh Off, Little Miss
Pumpkin Show, amusement rides, over
100 craftsmen, food court, live bands, con-
tests, and pumpkins by the truckload.
General admission is free and parking
is $5 a car. For more information: 856-
765-0118 or www.sjpumpkinshow.com. I
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Master Gardeners
Shoshana Osofsky, of HeartPath
Acupuncture in Bridgeton, will be guest
speaker at the Cumberland County
Master Gardener's Organization meeting
on Tuesday, October 9, at 12:30 p.m.
Shoshana will focus her talk on herbs
and accupoints for stress reduction.
Learn about the herbs that can help us
find some inner quiet, both because of
their medicinal value and because enjoy-
ing a cup of tea can be a comforting rit-
ual. We will taste the teas that can be
used for stress reduction. The herbs
and teas will be paired with representa-
tive acupuncture points that we can self-
massage to promote relaxation.
A donation of $3 for the class. For
more information about this program or
Master Gardeners, call Viola Carson at
856-451-2800, ext. 4. Meetings are held
on the second Tuesday of each month at
Rutgers Cooperative Education Extension
Center, 291 Morton Ave., Millville.
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470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland
(between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.)
856-691-7881
www.cmgrowers.com
Mon. - Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm
›˜—
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Ž›Ž
FALL PANSIES • ORNAMENTAL CABBAGE & KALE
MULCH &
POTTING SOIL
FALL
DECORATIONS!
MULCH &
POTTING SOIL
ORNAMENTAL
PURPLE
MILLET
FALL MAGIC
PATIO PLANTERS
& CORNUCOPIAS
STRAW,
CORNSTALKS,
GOURDS &
PUMPKINS
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LL PLA A UL FFA F OLOR C ANTING
From left: Erety, Christopher, Pat, and
Vernon. In front, Katie and Sarah Smith.
Pumpkin & Scarecrow
Contest
The annual 4-H Pumpkin and
Scarecrow Contest co-sponsored by
the West Cumberland Ruritan Club
will be held October 25 through 29 at
the Cumberland Mall. 4-H members
may exhibit pumpkins and scarecrows
in one of the following categories:
Funniest Pumpkin; Scariest Pumpkin;
Most Original Pumpkin; Cutest
Pumpkin and Most Original Scarecrow.
4-H clubs may create a display
using pumpkins and other fall vegeta-
bles. Trophies will be awarded to the
first prize winners in each category. 4-
H exhibitors will receive participation
ribbons. Winning club exhibit entries
will also receive awards.
All entries should be brought to the
Cumberland Mall on Thursday,
October 25 from 4 to 7 p.m.
For more information about the
Cumberland 4-H Program call 856-
451-2800 ext. 3 or visit the Cumberland
4-H Program website at www.cumber-
land4h.org to learn more about 4-H.
Grapevine 18-23 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:04 PM Page 23
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691-4848
Fax: 856-691-2294
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The tree leaves are starting to change colors and fall
but here at Marcacci’s, our great service is still the
same and our prices are still best in town. Come in
and check out our great selection of meats.
There is still plenty of time to barbeque!
Gabriel’s Horn { BY FRANK GABRIEL }
I
Future Foods?
D
o you ever stop and think
about the future? Not idle,
mindless daydreaming, mind
you, but serious, cognitive con-
templation?
Having recently celebrated several
notable personal milestones not the least
of which was my—gulp!—50th birthday,
this sort of pondering has taken on a
greater degree of urgency and intensity.
The Vineland region often enters into
those musings, and I wanted to share with
you a few ideas about our mutual home-
town’s potential.
Thusly, you may call this column
“Vineland, 2050.”
Don’t laugh, either, I recall an equidis-
tant 1975 nearly as if yesterday.
By the time we reach the middle of this
century, I see our sleepy little town well
into the process of blooming into a bur-
geoning metropolis.
The connecting jewel—or at least, a
semi-precious stone—linking Atlantic City,
Philadelphia, New York and points to the
south.
Having always been first and foremost
an agricultural hub, food and related
enterprises should continue to play a piv-
otal role in any anticipated development.
I begin by projecting the arrival of
interactive, farm-to-table eateries, not
unlike the dynamic agriturismos of central
Italian regions Tuscany, Lazio and
Umbria.
These would be bastions of country
culture, where visitors could encounter
the entire complexity of our multi-season
growing cycles and receive an authentic,
hands-on feel for farm life.
Urban chefs in desperate need of inspi-
ration, would flock here, intent on improv-
ing both the quality of their lives and the
elevation of their cuisine.
Taking advantage of our natural locale
midway between the Atlantic Ocean and
Delaware Bay, I also prognosticate the
establishment of major seafood processing
businesses regionally.
This would in a way repeat history, as
early in the 1900s Delaware Bay fronting
regions of Salem and Cumberland coun-
ties were home to a large-scale sturgeon
fishery.
Sadly, those distinctive, ancient crea-
tures—specifically the short-nose variety—
were over utilized nearly to the level of
extinction. As a result, you aren’t likely to
find them hereabouts any more.
Seafood ventures could also take the
form of aquaculture, apropos since one of
the country’s first developmental centers
for the incipient industry was at our own
Cumberland County College.
Nearly a full decade ago I had the
pleasure of interviewing a brilliant, whim-
sical scientist named Dr. Tim Jacobsen
there. At that time, he was responsible for
initiating a beta site for farm-raised fish at
the little-college-that-could off Sherman
Avenue.
While working under auspices of a
New Jersey state grant, he allowed yours
truly entry into a sort of personal inner
sanctum; where dual massive tanks of
breeding stock tilapia were being housed
to spawn and grow.
I’ve since lost touch with the talented
Doctor J, but it only makes sense that the
bounty of our nearby waters should
become a prime driving force for local
economies.
Another original regional core busi-
ness, poultry, should once again return to
prominence, albeit similarly in a modified
format.
As an aside, for those of you who might
be new to the area and wondering, our
high school’s mascot—The Fighting Clan,
as in poultry clan, not the hooded kind—
derives from this practice, popularized by
Catch a glimpse of Vineland’s culinary landscape,
circa 2050.
The future of farming? Might Vineland
become an agri-tourism mecca in a few
decades? Could happen, says our columnist.
Grapevine 24-27 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:06 PM Page 24
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SHOP RITE LIQUORS OF VINELAND
PRICES VALID 9/26/12 - 10/02/12
Like “ShopRite Liquors, Wine & Spirits” on to receive extra savings and coupons
3666 E. Landis Ave Vineland, NJ 08361 Located at the ShopRite Shopping Center, Landis & Lincoln • 696-5555
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High Demand for Your
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Excludes tobacco, sale items and items prohibited by
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Coupon code: 100212, Exp: 10/02/12
(62 AND OLDER)
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law. Cannot be combined with any other offers.
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YOUR DONATIONS, HELP AND
KINDNESS GIVE PEACE, JOY
AND LOVE TO MANY OTHERS.
Foodie News
I
eastern European immigrants fleeing The
Holocaust.
We envision a genuine opportunity for
a different type of animal husbandry than
traditional mass-production poultry facili-
ties, where these birds are cruelly crowd-
ed into pens by the tens of thousands.
While humane, artisanally raised beef
and pigs have become all the rage with
gourmets and chefs, the same concept
hasn’t really been applied to
chickens/eggs.
A couple of years back, when we pro-
filed the beekeeping Stewart family of
Dorothy, they introduced this writer to a
delightful array of eggs—light brown, dark
brown and even green—capable of being
laid by various species of chickens. Yolks
were firm, distinctly deep orange with fla-
vor profiles not ever before encountered.
Literally like eating eggs for the very first
time, a true revelation. And that was only
from a tiny pen in their woodsy backyard.
We can only imagine the spectacular
results if applied in a more commercial
setting. Simply put, happy, free ranging
animals produce better food, due to a lack
of stress hormones tainting their products.
Should any of this sound far-fetched,
just ask yourself if a decade or two ago
you ever thought people would be spend-
ing millions of dollars to transmit what
amounts to tiny Post-It notes over phones?
And I’ll see you come 2050. I
Monthly Countdown to St.
Paddy's Day" Celebration”
Bennigan’s Franchising Company can’t
wait for St. Paddy’s Day 2013, so it is gear-
ing up for the Big Day in a big way.
Vineland Bennigan’s, located at 2196 West
Landis Avenue, is kicked it off with a “1/2
Way to St. Paddy's Day” party on
September 17, and will continue the count-
down on the 17th of each month
(October–February) with featured specials
including $2 Guinness Drafts, $4 Irish Car
Bombs, $8 big Irish Burgers, Sheppard’s
Pie, Irish Potatoes and Corned Beef and
Cabbage.
“At Bennigan’s, every day is St. Paddy’s
Day and we invite the local community to
celebrate with us,” said Ed Roth,
Bennigan’s Vineland franchisee. “Our
Irish hospitality isn’t just a once a year
thing, so ‘getting our green’ on with a cele-
bration of our legendary food and drinks
every month is a win-win for our guests
and our restaurant teams.”
The festivities will include featured
green drinks such as the new Irish Flag
shot, Irish Lemonade, Celtic Cooler and
Jack Daniel’s Apple Sour, as well as food
specials and exclusive discounts.
“Bennigan's owns March 17th,” said
Roth. “Throughout September our
Vineland Bennigan’s restaurant will be
giving out ‘countdown coupons’ worth 25
percent off your entire food purchase on
the 17th of each month. We’re going to
keep the excitement building through
February, then gear up for the Big Day
with the biggest party anyone has ever
seen.”
Bennigan’s has returned to its roots
established 36 years ago, “bleeding green”
with a determination to provide a leg-
endary experience to every guest, every
meal, every day. While closing in on nearly
100 restaurants, the company is progres-
sively building upon the resurgence of the
brand with improvements introduced
after Paul Mangiamele took over as chief
executive in May 2011 to bring the iconic
American brand back to its former glory.
The overhaul includes menu optimization,
increased operational standards, server
training and local store marketing pushes,
as well as a new prototype that debuted a
smaller footprint, updated menus and bar
offerings, uniforms, logos and signage.
“Foodie Tuesdays” in
Hammonton
The Richard Stockton College of New
Jersey will host a fun and educational
“Foodie Tuesdays” series of programming
in the heart of the Hammonton Arts
District, on every third Tuesday of the
month through December (October 16,
November 20 and December 18).
The programs include a seminar and
discussion, followed by a light dinner
related to the discussion. The seminar and
discussions take place at the Hammonton
Arts Center, 219 Bellevue Avenue, and the
dining takes place at Annata’s Wine Bar
just across the street.
The seminars and discussions run from
6 to 7:30 p.m., followed by dinner from
7:45 to 9 p.m.
The programs are as follows:
• October 16—“Eating Local: How
Being a Locovore Impacts Local
Economic Development and Your Health
and Pocketbook”
• November 20—“Breaking Bread:
Breads, History and World Culture”
• December 18—Spicing Up
Celebrations: The Chemistry and Culture
of Flavors”
Registration is $35 per person or $30
per person for two or more registered at
the same time. Come with a friend and
save. Two people may register for the
same course for $60.
For more information, call the School
of Graduate and Continuing Studies, 609-
652-4227. I
Grapevine 24-27 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:06 PM Page 25
22:est Landis Avenue
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907 N. Main Rd., Vineland
Larry’s II Plaza
(856) 691-0088
CHINESE RESTAURANT
Cannot be combined with any other coupon, exp: 10/10/12
$
5 OFF
YOUR PURCHASE OF
$
25 or MORE
Cannot be combined with any other offer, exp: 10/10/12
$
3 OFF
YOUR PURCHASE OF
$
15 or MORE
We Accept
HOURS: Mon. - Thurs. 11-10:30
Fri. - Sat. 11-11:30 • Sun. 12-10:30
Andrea Trattoria, 16 N. High St., Millville,
825-8588. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves
up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of
fine dining.
Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served
tapas style, catering, private parties.
Extensive wine list. Live music Thurs. night.
Babe's Village Inn, Martinelli Avenue,
Minotola, NJ 856-697-1727. Famous crabs,
seafood, Italian cuisine. Eat in or Take out.
Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 691-0909. Breakfast and lunch
spot offering sandwiches named for colleges
near and far.
Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S.
Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade
chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets.
Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink
specials. Take-out. Happy Hour Mon-Fri
3pm-7pm, Sun-Thu 10pm-cl. All Sports
packages available. NBA League Pass, NHL
Center Ice, & MLB Extra Innings.
Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland,
697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet
friends at bar. Daily lunch and dinner.
Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring “Gutbuster” a
21-oz. burger, pizza, wings, subs, dinners.
Black Olive Restaurant. 782 S. Brewster Rd,
Vineland. 457-7624. 7 a.m. - 10 p.m daily.
Entrees, desserts. Take out available.
Bombay Bites, 112 W. Chestnut Ave.,
Vineland, 696-0036. Indian cuisine. $8.95
lunch buffet ($5.99 on Mondays).
Bruni's Pizzeria. 2184 N. 2nd St., Millville
(856) 825-2200. Award-winning pizza since
1956. Open Mon-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sun. 11
a.m.-9 p.m.
Bruno's Family Restaurant, Cape May Ave.
and Tuckahoe Rd., Dorothy, 609-476-4739.
Breakfast, lunch, dinner, pizza. Open Mon-
Sat. 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Chow’s Garden 1101 N. 2nd St., Millville,
327-3259. Sushi Bar, All-you-can-eat buffet.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant Lounge, Bakery,
3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 765-5977. Happy
hour everyday 11 a.m.–6 p.m. half-priced
appetizers, and reduced drink specials.
Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main/Magnolia
rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads,
doughnuts, custom wedding cakes.
Dakota Steakhouse & Sushi Bar at Ramada,
W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-
8600. Stylish atmosphere perfect for an
upscale lunch or dinner. Delicious steaks,
seafood and sushi. Closed Monday for dinner.
Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main
Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and
dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes
year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m.
Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-
1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-out, too.
Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24
hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat.
Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave.,
Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored
recipes, fresh ingredients.
Double Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd.,
Vineland, 213-6176. Open for lunch and din-
ner. Traditional tavern fair.
Elmer Diner, 41 Chestnut St., Elmer. 358-
3600. Diverse menu of large portions at rea-
sonable prices.
Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and
pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant.
Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-9800.
Greek and American cuisine, pizza.
Fat Jack's BBQ. Cumberland Mall, next to
DINING OUT
From fine dining to lunch spots to bak-
eries, the area has choices to
satisfy any appetite. Call for hours.
Winners Announced for
BBQ ‘N Chili Cook-Off,
Homemade Wine
The 600 block of Landis Avenue
in Vineland was filled with enthusias-
tic people on Saturday, September
22, for the Sixth Annual BBQ ‘n Chili
Cook-Off, organized by Main Street
Vineland, sponsored by
Susquehanna Bank, and supported
by Comcast. Many contestants
showed off their best barbecued cui-
sine and chili but, in the end, the fol-
lowing were the winners:
People's Choice Awards—BBQ
1st Place: Steve’s BBQ and Fresh
Poultry at the Amish Marketplace
(winner of $500 and a gas grill cour-
tesy of Lowe’s )
2nd Place: Ced and Sons (winner
of $250, barbecue utensils, and a
grill flat iron griddle courtesy of
Swanson Hardware)
3rd Place: Fresh Start Soul Grill
(winner of $100 and a $25 gift cer-
tificate from Swanson Hardware)
People's Choice Awards—Chili
1st Place: Darrol Wilson (winner of
$500 and a charcoal grill)
2nd Place: Sunnyside Kitchenette
at the Amish Marketplace (winner of
$250, a grill light, and a $50 gift
certificate from Rental Country)
3rd Place: Susquehanna Bank
(winner of $100 and a chili pot gift
basket)
“This event packs the Avenue
every year with people having a
great time,” said Main Street
Vineland Executive Director Todd
Noon. “The success of this event
speaks for itself and we enjoy seeing
the event continue and grow.”
A group of at-home winemakers
produced their best at Homemade
Wine Competition. When the tasting
was over, some exuberant winners
emerged.
The entries were judged by a
panel of experts. The winners were
as follows:
Dry Red:
1st place: Benson Binggeli: Chianti
2nd place: Benson Binggeli:
Zinfandel
3rd place: Benson Binggeli:
Cabernet Sauvignon
Sweet Red:
1st place: Benson Binggeli:
Grenache
2nd place: Benson Binggeli: White
Merlot
3rd place: Wayne Panzino: Red
Blend
Dry White:
1st place: Joe Pauline: Piesporter
2nd place: Charles Mish: Angel
Blanc
3rd place: Charles Mish: Meritage
Sweet White:
1st place: Charles Mish:
Liebfraumilch
2nd place: Charles Mish:
Gewurtztraminer
3rd place: Doug Atkinson: Riesling
Other:
1st place: Charles Mish: Peach
Apricot Chardonnay
2nd place: Charles Mish: Kiwi
Pear Sauvignon Blanc
3rd place: Joe Pauline: Zinfandel
Pomegranate
“We were very happy again this
year with the competition and the
response,” said Main Street Vineland
Todd Noon. “Contestants and judges
alike should be proud of their contri-
bution to making this event a contin-
ued success.”
For more information on all Main
Street Vineland events, call the orga-
nization’s office at 856-794-8653,
visit their website at www.main-
streetvineland.org, or visit it on
Facebook.
Grapevine 24-27 092612-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:06 PM Page 26
SPORTS HAPPENINGS
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29
Parish of All Saints Heart Healthy
Walk And Roll. St. John Bosco, 2
Hillcrest Ave., Millville. 9 a.m. registration.
All money collected will benefit religious
education programs. Pledge forms are
available at the Parish of All Saints
Rectory at 621 Dock Street in Millville.
Everyone is invited to participate: Young,
old, in-between and even pets. All children
who bring in $25 and all adults who col-
lect $50 or more will receive a Parish of All
Saints T-Shirt, along with a free lunch. For
more info., call 825-0021.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
11th Annual Friends Village at
Woodstown Golf Outing. Centerton
Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove. Registration begins at 11 a.m.
with a shotgun start at noon. Deadline for
registration is September 12. Event fea-
tures a lunch, dinner and an award cere-
mony, as well a silent auction. Proceeds
benefit Friends Village, a non-profit, retire-
ment community based in Southern New
Jersey for 115 years. For more info., call
856-823-0778 or visit
www.friendsvillage.org.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12
First Annual Vincent P. Martino
Memorial Fund Four-Man Scramble
Golf Tournament. Eastlyn Golf Course,
4049 Italia Ave., Vineland. Registration at
noon, tee-off at 1 p.m. $80 per golfer.
Includes entry into all events, 18-holes of
golf, riding cart, lunch, dinner and a
chance to win various prizes. $40 for din-
ner alone. Sponsored by the Friends of
Vincent P. Martino Memorial Fund, this
tournament will feature a round of golf, a
longest drive contest, a closest to the pin
contest, a hole-in-one contest and door
prizes. Dinner will feature music, dancing
and a chinese auction.To register, call
Felicia at 856-205-9407.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19
Edgar Christian Academy Team
Scramble Golf Tournament. Centerton
Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove. Registration at 10:30 a.m.,
shotgun start at noon. $125 per golfer.
Includes green fees, cart, lunch and
awards dinner. 856-562-0724.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Chris Fitting (top), senior at Cumberland
Christian School, looks to advance the ball
forward against the Pioneer midfield;
Cumberland Christian freshman Chyanne
Smith shields a Pilgrim Academy defender.
MOMMY AND ME MUSIC
AND EXERCISE CLASSES
Attention all parents of infants, tod-
dlers and pre-schoolers. The Café of
Life is offering Mommy and Me
Music / Gym Classes.
Mommy and Me Music is a pleasant
combination of interactive music
play with all sorts of instruments
along with a fun obstacle course to
encourage healthy physical activity
in a safe and clean environment.
Our Exercise Class is designed for
parents to exercise with their chil-
dren. Parents can perform a variety
of exercises including calisthenics,
yoga poses and use resistance
bands. Your child is free to play
and/or join in with the exercises,
either way it is a fun and safe activi-
ty for both of you to enjoy.
Age recommendations:
• Mommy and Me Music: 6 months
to 4 years of age.
• Exercise Class: newborns and up.
Class schedules:
• Mommy and Me Music: Thursdays
day mornings, 10:30 to 11:15am (Fall
session starts September 20th and
ends November 8th, cost is $70 for
8 weeks)
• Exercise Class: Monday and Friday
mornings 10 to 11am (class is on-
going and is free for all pre-paid
music class participants and prac-
tice members of the Good Life
Family Chiropractic Center)
Instructors are Dr. Katie Sarnoff and
Brooke Tharp. Both moms, they have
been teaching the classes for a com-
bined 5 years.
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Starbucks, 825-0014. Open 7 days a week,
11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Eat in or take out. Serving
ribs, wings, sandwiches, salads and sides.
Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Tuckahoe
Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and
dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned.
Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli,
527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says it
all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sun.
Gina’s Ristorante & Outdoor Grill, Landis &
Lincoln aves. in ShopRite Plaza, Vineland.
Serving dinner Tues.–Thurs., 4–9 p.m.; Fri. &
Sat., 4–10 p.m.; Reservations recommended.
205-0049. Grill open 11 a.m.–9 p.m.,
Tues.–Sat. Cheesesteaks. Takeout available.
Golden Palace Diner Restaurant 2623 S
Delsea Dr, Vineland, 692-5424. Serving
breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.
The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course,
4049 Italia Avenue, Vineland, 691-5558. The
golfers’ lounge and bar serves lunch and
snacks daily from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The
Greenview Inn is a fine dining restaurant
open for dinner Wed.-Sun. at 5 p.m.
Guiseppe's Italian Market, 528B N. Harding
Hwy, Buena. 856-213-6391. Hot & Cold Take
outs. Crabs Friday & Saturdays.
Harry’s Pub at Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and
Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-8600. Lunch & dinner
7 days a week. Happy hour daily 4-6pm with
half price appetizers. Live Entertainment
Wednesday thru Saturday.
High Street Chinese Buffet, High St.,
Millville, 825-2288. All-you-can-eat buffet.
Jersey Jerry's. 1362 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
362-5978. Serving subs, sandwiches, and
take-out platters.
Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens,
homemade sides, catering.
Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St.
(Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and
Japanese cuisine. BYOB.
Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily.
Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners.
La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal,
chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun.
Luciano’s New Orleans Seafood Kitchen,
Landis Marketplace, 631 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 609-970-7653. Authentic Cajun
and Creole. Catering 7 days a week by
appointment.
Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cui-
sine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch
and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet.
Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E.
Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick
oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union
Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/ wedding
facility and intimate restaurant. Dungeness
Crabs Night on Tuesdays in the Bistro.
Gourmet Pizza Nite on Wed. Outdoor dining
in adjacent Luna’s Outdoor Bar & Grille.
Millville Queen Diner, 109 E. Broad Street,
Millville. 327-0900. Open 24 hours daily.
Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head
rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and
dinners, casual setting.
Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St.,
Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering.
Mori’s, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 690-0300.
Adjacent to the Landis Theater Performing
Arts Center. Includes a “casual, upscale”
restaurant with a banquet facility and lounge
on site. Lunch and dinner.
MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-
9825. Full bar menu, drink specials.
Old Oar House Irish Pub, 123 N. High Street
Millville, 293-1200. Year round Fresh seafood
daily, slow roasted prime rib specials, deli-
cious summer Salads, everyday lunch & din-
ner specials, homemade corn beef, kitchen
open until 1 a.m., outdoor beer garden.
Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cui-
sine—lamb dishes and salads.
Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-
0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; con-
venient drive-thru, mini-meal specials.
Peking Gourmet, 907 N. Main Rd., (Larry’s II
Plaza), Vineland, 691-0088. Chinese. Takeout
only. All major credit cards accepted.
The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-
1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink
specials and lunch specials.
Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-
8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups,
curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian.
South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner
daily. Seafood and prime rib.
Speedway Cafe at Ramada, W. Landis Ave.
and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-8600. Open Daily,
6 a.m.-11 p.m. Breakfast served all day. Daily
specials Monday thru Friday. Over 30 dinner
selections at 2 for $19.99 and also 7 for $7
available 7 days a week starting at 3 pm.
Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery.
Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee.
A Taste of the Islands, 731 Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 691-9555. Prize-winning BBQ Ribs,
Jamaican jerk chicken, curry chicken,
seafood, rice and beans. Closed Sunday.
Ten22 Bar & Grill at Centerton Country
Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Lunch and dinner. New tavern menu
features soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches,
wraps and entree selections. Sunday Brunch
extravaganza.
Tre Belleze, 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-
8500. Serving lunch and dinner daily with
complimentary buffet Thurs., Fri. and Sat.
from 3-5 p.m. Serving gluten-free pizza,
pasta and beer.
Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat
Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish,
steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out. Live
music Saturday & Sunday night. Dungeness
Crab All You Can Eat.
Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena
Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled
meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily.
Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd.,
Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering.
Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland,
691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings.
Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-
0909. Continental cuisine and spirits served
in a casually upscale setting.
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COMMUNITY CALENDAR

HAPPENINGS
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
Man to Man Prostate Cancer
Awareness Support Group. SJH Fitness
Connection, 1430 W. Sherman Ave.,
Vineland. 7 p.m. Know Your Stats About
Prostate Cancer®, a free men’s prostate
health event supported by the American
Urological Association Foundation and the
NFL. Also, resentation by board certified
urologist, Dr. Christopher Lee. Free. 1-800-
828-7866 or www.KnowYourStats.org.
Monthly Book Club. Vineland Public
Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 2
p.m. Book to be discussed is Plain and
Simple: A Woman’s Journey to the Amish
by Sue Bender. Anyone who has read this
book is invited to the discussion. For help
in obtaining a copy call 794-4244 ext.
4243; be sure to say it’s for the Book Club.
SEPTEMBER 26 AND 27
AARP Driver Safety Program. South
Jersey Healthcare Elmer Hospital, 9
a.m.–12 noon. $12 for AARP members and
$14 for non-members. Members should
bring their AARP membership cards. The
course fee is payable by check to AARP.
Enrollment is limited and classes fill
quickly. To register, call 1-800-770-7547
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
Antique, Arts and Cultural Society of
South Jersey Meeting. Riverfront
Renaissance Center for Art, 22 High St.,
Millville. 7 p.m. The AACSSJ. Has had
many activities, such as speakers, trips,
and Appraisal Day. Join with a $15 dona-
tion. Visitors welcome, just walk in or call
856-825-7787.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
Motor(Less) Night. NJ Motorsports
Park, 1000 Dividing Creek Rd., Millville.
6:30–8:30 p.m.Bicyclists, skateboarders,
rollerbladers, runners and parents with
strollers may feel what it is like to be on
the 2.25-mile Thunderbolt Raceway that
has 14 challenging turns,. $5 adults and
$3 for children under 12. Helmets required.
Vineland Nature Club Meeting. Parvin
State Park Volunteer and Historical Center,
789 Parvin’s Mill Rd, Pittsgrove. 7 p.m.
Wild animals being rehabilitated by Steve
Serwatka will be featured at this first
meeting of the new season. All are encour-
aged to attend.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29
Oldtime Gospel Sing. Fortescue Chapel,
157 New Jersey Ave., Fortescue. 7 p.m.
Hosted by Pastor Melanie, of The Gospel
Way, which airs on Lift FM, 98.5
Bridgeton. 103.3 Vineland, Millville, 97.9
Cape May. Mondays 7:30pm. Sharing
Oldtime and Southern Gospel music will
be: Bill and Linda Green of One Way
Ministries; Steve Byrne; Jill Ransom and
John Panchesine of Jericho Road; Gary
Trull and Marilyn Marich of the
Heavenbound Singers; Pastor Melanie
Jean Garuffi; and Rev. Dr. Fred Goos on
the piano. All are invited to this inter-
denominational event. Coffee, tea, punch
and desert follow the service.
Super Saturday Chicken BBQ & Fun
Day. Our Lady of the Lakes Church, 19
Malaga Road, Collings Lakes. Noon–7 p.m.
Chicken platters, burgers, hot dogs, bever-
ages, face painting, games and activities
for all. Free parking and handicapped
accessible. Call for tickets 609-561-8313.
Beef n Beer Benefit for Nina
Bobryk-Sheppard. Millvile Elks Lodge,
1815 E. Broad St., Millville. 6 p.m. Live
music, food, beer, wine soda, and Chinese
auction. $25 a person. Nina was in a
November 2011 car accident and the mom
of two young children is now a paraplegic.
Visit Friends and Family of Nina on
Facebook to see how you can help.
SHHS Car Wash. 1655 Magnolia Rd.,
Vineland. 9 a.m.–noon in conjunction with
Christ The Good Shepherd Parish yard
sale. Come support SHHS and have your
car washed while shopping.
Vineland High School Interact Club
Car Wash. Memorial School, 414 S. Main
Rd., Vineland. 9 a.m.–2 p.m. $5 for cars
and $7 for trucks and sport utility vehicles.
Details: lolsen@vineland.org
SJH Women’s Health Education Day.
SJH Regional Medical Center, 1505 W.
Sherman Ave., Vineland. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
women can receive free health screenings
for bone density, blood pressure, body
mass index, heart disease risk assessment
and much more. In addition, free yoga, line
dancing and new relaxation room sessions
will be offered. Free event. 888-754-9662
or www.sjhealthcare.net.
3rd Annual Carnival, Car Show and
Craft Fair. WinslowElementary School,
1335 Magnolia Rd., Vineland. 10 a.m.–3
p.m. Carnival games, classic and hot rod
cars, pony rides, bouncies, basket auction,
crafters, face painting, food and more.
SEPTEMBER 29 AND 30
Greenwich Artisans’ Faire &
Marketplace. Gibbon House, 960 Ye
Greate St., Greenwich. Saturday 10 a.m.–5
p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Rain or
shine, free parking. Admission: $5 (children
12 and under free). Hand-woven items,
scarves, red-ware pottery, basketry, home-
made honey, brooms, woodcarving, all-nat-
ural soaps, homemade jams, jellies and
pickles, cloth dolls, leather bags, wreaths,
floral designs, vintage glassware, woodwork-
ing, clay items, holiday ornaments and
more.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
North Vineland Fire Company #3
Chicken BBQ. Moose Hall, 187 W.
Wheat Rd., Vineland. 12 noon–5 p.m.
BBQ chicken as well as steamed and raw
clams. $10. Tickets available: North
Vineland Fire Company #3, Serene
Custard, Manny & Vic’s Pizzeria, Jamar
Grocery, Phoenix Printing, Limpert Bros.,
Inc. Call 696-0363.
Polonia of SJ Polish Heritage
Celebration. Polish Mass – Sacred Heart
Church, Vineland. 1:30–2:30 p.m. Flag
Raise Cultural Celebration – Vineland City
Hall 2:30–3:30 p.m. Polish Dinner –
Sacred Heart Church 4–6 p.m.
207th Church Annivewrsary. Weymouth
United Methodist Church, Weymouth Rd.
(County Rd. 559 south), Weymouth. 2:30
p.m. Officiating Rev. Debra Neill, speaker
Rev. James Rixon.
Puerto Rican Festival Fundraiser
Lunch. North Italy Hall, 414 Virano Ln.,
Vineland. 11:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Adults $7
with soda. 856-842-7943
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2
Greenwich Tea Party Patriots of
South Jersey Meeting. Elmer Grange
Hall, 535 Daretown Rd., Upper Pittsgrove.
7 p.m. Ryan Mauro, an intelligence analyst
with the Asymmetrical Warfare and
Intelligence Center, will discuss interna-
tional threats to U.S. security. www.green-
wichteaparty.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6
Glasstown Chapter of the National
Federation of Blind of NJ Meeting.
Trinity Episcopal Church, 800 E. Wood St.,
Vineland. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Tracy McKinley
from Fox Rehabilitation presents informa-
tion on balance and mobility assistance.
RSVP Lydia Keller 856-696-3518.
SUPPORT GROUPS
All in the Family (support group for
family of addicts) meets every
Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at The Haven
of Vineland, 2725 N. Delsea Dr. (cor-
ner of Delsea and Forest Grove Rd),
Vineland, NJ 08360. 856-696-4380.
Other Groups currently running at
The Haven of Vineland:
• Grief Share- Thurs 6:30
• Autism Support Group- 1st Tues
of each month- 6:30
• Divorce Care- Thurs- 6:30
• Divorce Care for Kids- (sessions
to begin soon)
• Dave Ramsey Financial Peace-
(Sessions to begin soon)
Call Nelda Wheat for more infor-
mation on any group, 856-696-4380,
ext. 106.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
Vineland Mayoral Candidate
Debate. Landis Theater on Landis
Ave., Vineland. 6 p.m., doors open at
5 p.m. Hosted by the Greater
Vineland Chamber of Commerce
and The Daily Journal. Moderated by
The League of Women Voters
Come here what the candidates
have to say. Open to the public.
FREE / No registration required.
Services at Beth Israel
Congregation commemorating the
end of the High Holiday period will
take place Sunday, September 30
through Tuesday, October 9 at the
synagogue, 1015 E. Park Ave.,
Vineland.
Services for Sukkot, the Festival of
the Harvest, will take place on
Sunday, September 30 (eve of
Sukkot) at 6:30 p.m.; Monday,
October 1 (first day), at 9 a.m.;
Tuesday, October 2, at 9 a.m.;
Wednesday and Thursday, October 3
and 4, at 7 a.m.; Friday, October 5, at
7 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. (Shabbat Eve);
and Saturday and Sunday, October 6
(Shabbat) and 7 (Hoshanah Rabah),
at 9 a.m.
Services for Shemini Atzeret (the
eighth day of Sukkot) will be held on
Monday, October 8, at 9 a.m., and
Yizkor will be chanted at 10:45 a.m.
Simchat Torah (Rejoicing in the Law),
which concludes the annual cycle of
the Torah reading, will be celebrated
with services on Tuesday, October 9,
at 9 a.m.
Rabbi Alfredo S. Winter, spiritual
leader of Beth Israel Congregation,
will lead the services.
For more information, call the Beth
Israel Congregation office at 856-691-
0852.
FOOD DRIVE
At Howie’s Dugout Ball Park Cafe
and Ice Cream, 3569 E. Lanids
Ave., Vineland. September 29
through October 6. Seven-year-old
Howard doesn’t want presents for
his birthday, but wants to get food
to bring to the food pantry for those
less fortunate than he. So his moth-
er is running this food drive to give
him his birthday wish.
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SEPTEMBER 25 THROUGH 29
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W.
Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010.
Karaoke Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9
p.m.-close, $3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance
Party Fridays 9 p.m.-Close, $3 Coronas.
All Sports Packages: MLB Extra Innings,
NBA League Pass, NHL Center Ice, and
NFL Sunday Ticket. $3 12-oz. Coors Light
& $5 23-oz. Call for RSVP and
information.
EVERY TUESDAY
Karaoke. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea
Dr., Vineland. Sing your heart out. 765-5977.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr., Vineland. Latin-inspired dance
party. 765-5977.
Country Dancing. The Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, 1022 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove. 7–11 p.m.
EVERY THURSDAY
Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live Jazz
featuring area's best jazz duos. 6:30–9:30
p.m. No cover. RSVP recommended.
Magician Kevin Bethea. Centerton
Country Club & Event Center, Ten22 Bar &
Grill, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. 6–8 p.m. Magician and sleight-of-
hand illusionist.
Jeff Giuliani of Eleven Eleven. Double
Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd.,
Vineland. Live acoustic 7–10 p.m..
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
Adelante. Lou Ferretti's Mori's on Landis,
830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 690-0300.
7–11 p.m. J. Jody Janetta on drums, Jack
Jez on guitar and Stephen Testa on bass.
Steven Calakos. Landis Theater, 830 E.
Landis Ave., Vineland. 7:30 p.m.
Homegrown Calakos began his musical
career at Vineland High School. His
repertoire includes Broadway hits, pop
and contemporary, and the time-tested
standards loved by all. Special guest
artists include Nancy Dixon and her
dancers from Dixon's Dance Academy
and Jaimie Standish, a Philadelphia-
based actor who has performed on stage
regionally and nationally. Tickets $12.50.
Available at www.landistheater.com or
856-691-1121.
SEPTEMBER 27 THROUGH 30
Nightlife at Ten22. Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, The Patio Bar at
Ten22, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Wed.: Country Night with DJ Bob
Morgan, 7-11 p.m. Lessons and non-stop
dancing (song requests all night) on one
of the largest dance floors in region. $5
admission. Thurs: DJ Tommy B 8 p.m., Fri:
TBA 9 p.m., Sat: DJ Tommy B 9 p.m.
Nightlife at Mori’s. Lou Ferretti's Mori's
on Landis, 830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
690-0300. Thurs.: TBA 8 p.m.. Fri.: TBA 8
p.m. Sat.: TBA 8 p.m.
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night,
1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy Hour
Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic drinks.
Wed.–Sat., live entertainment.
Nightlife at Double Eagle. Double Eagle
Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland. Live
music every Friday night. NFL Sunday
Ticket Package Turtlestone Brewing Co. on
draft, along with 16 other imported and
domestic beers. Happy Hour daily 3–6 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 21, 22, AND 23
Nightlife at The Rail. The Rail, 1252
Harding Hwy, Richland. 697-7245. Fri.: TBA.
Sat. TBA.
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Tues.: Bike Nite with
live entertainment. Thurs.: Karaoke. Fri.:
Mike Bryan Band. Sat.: DJ/band. Daily drink
and food specials.
Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar
House Irish Pub. 123 N. High St., Millville,
293-1200. Wed.: Karaoke 9 p.m., Thurs.:
Scott Seabock 8 p.m., Fri.: Steamboat
Annie 9 p.m., Sat.: Glen Eric Duo 9 p.m.
Sun.: Jim Fisher, 5–9 p.m.
EVERY FRIDAY
Gene Cortopassi. Merighi's Savoy Inn, E.
Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-
8051. 6 p.m. Dinner music.
www.savoyinn.com.
EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony Morris.
The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea Dr,,
Vineland. All of the most popular main-
stream dance music. 765-5977.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
ANJ. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210 N. High St.,
Millville. Free. Live music 7–10 p.m.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29
Harlem Gospel Choir. Levoy Theatre,
126-130 N. High St., Millville. 8 p.m. The
Choir was founded in 1986 by Allen Bailey,
who was inspired to form the Choir while
attending a celebration in honor of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. at the Cotton Club
in Harlem. The Choir presents the finest
singers and musicians from Harlem’s black
churches and the New York/tri-state area.
Tickets $30 / $27 / $21.
http://www.levoy.net
Bob Evans. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210 N.
High St., Millville. Free admission. Live
bluegrass 7–9 p.m.
OCTOBER 6 AND 7
Deerfield Township Harvest Festival. The
34th annual festival will feature award-winning
country music songwriter and performer Phil
Vassar, pictured, known as country's leading
piano man with the success of songs like
"Carlene," “Just Another Day in Paradise” and
“Six-Pack Summer," on Saturday, October 6.
On Sunday, October 7, Jo Dee Messina, win-
ner of American Country Music's Top New
Female Vocalist award, will bring the festival to
an exciting close just before a fantastic fire-
works display ends the festival. Messina's back-
to-back chart-toppers "Bye Bye" (ASCAP's Song
of the Year), "I'm Alright" and "Stand Beside
Me" catapulted her to star status.
Vassar and Messina will be joined by Josh
Gracin, Craig Campbell, Connor Christian &
Southern Gothic and more family entertainment
to bring the festival's 2012 theme "Country
Stars and Stripes" to life as the festival contin-
ues its traditional tribute to farmers and to
America. The festival’s outstanding entertain-
ment lineup features local and regional entertainers coupled with established and rising
national performers. It also includes a parade, arts and crafts show, mascot mania, amuse-
ment rides and games, a Sing Fest competition, dessert baking challenge, multi-cultural
food court and fireworks.
The Deerfield Township Harvest Festival committee has decided to offer a limited num-
ber of Reserved Seat Friends of the Festival ticket packs this year to allow guests to sit in a
special section in front of the main festival stage.
Friends of the Festival pack options now include a package for $17 per person for
reserved seats or $12 per person for general admission seats; the packs include seats in
the "friends section" on Saturday and/or Sunday, as well as a soda, hot dog and admission
to the festival. Limited number of seats available.
Friends of the Festival packs may be ordered online through www.dthf.org or purchased
at the Deerfield Township Municipal Hall by September 30. After that date, only general
admission seats will be sold at the festival if seats are available.
Each pack includes a seat in the special section in front of the main festival stage from
6 p.m. until festival closing on Saturday or Sunday. Seats in the Friends of the Festival sec-
tion will be available to everyone without purchase of Friends of the Festival packs from
noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.
Unreserved seat packs will permit guests with those tickets to claim their seats in an
unreserved part of the Friends of the Festival section on a first-come, first-served basis.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

STAR-STUDDED HARVEST FEST, LANDIS AND LEVOY
OFFERINGS, AND NIGHTLIFE AROUND THE REGION.
HAMMONTON
ARTIST OF THE YEAR
The Hammonton Art District Steering
Committee has announced that Nelson
Johnson has been selected as the
Hammonton’s 2012 Artist of the Year.
Nelson is the author of the book
Boardwalk Empire: The Birth, High Times,
and Decline of Atlantic City, which
inspired the HBO series Boardwalk Empire,
as well The Northside: African Americans
and the Creation of Atlantic City.
Johnson is a lifelong Hammonton resi-
dent, having grown up on Bellevue Avenue
working in his family's business. He was
chosen as recipient for this award from a
publicly nominated base of qualified candi-
dates by members of the Hammonton Art
District Steering Committee, which con-
sists of representatives from the Noyes
Museum, the Hammonton Art Center, the
Eagle Theatre, the Richard Stockton
College of New Jersey,
Atlantic Cape
Community College,
and the town of
Hammonton. This honor
is presented annually to
a Hammonton resident
whose work in an arts-
related field, including
the visual arts, creative writing, music, and
the performing arts, has positively con-
tributed to the town, its populace, and the
advancement of the arts in Hammonton.
Johnson will be honored at the Artist
of the Year reception taking place at 7
p.m. on September 29 at the Eagle
Theatre, located at 208 Vine Street in
Hammonton. The event will include live
music as well as refreshments, beverages
and desserts. Tickets to this special event
are $30 and can be purchased at
www.TheEagleTheatre.com or by calling
609-704-5012.
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:AN7ED:
Cíeah, MaLure, Respohsíbíe AduíLs Lo Lake íovíhg care oI
our beauLíIuííy renodeíed ahd ííke "New Agaíh" hones.
)OR RE17 oU RE17-7O-O:1 OpLíoh avaííabíe. NEW ACAIN
HOMES has a cohsLahLíy chahgíhg íhvehLory oI hones beíhg Iuííy
rehovaLed ahd prepared Ior saíe/rehL. We are Lakíhg appíícaLíohs
NOW! Caíí or E-Maíí Loday: NewAgaíhHonesOO@gnaíí.con
CONTACT:
7erry HaIIauer
609-665-0033
PhiI BIack
856-297-2349
NEW
AGAIN
HOMES
NEW AGAIN HOMES is proud to offer
º ConpíeLeíy rehovaLed 8&4 BR hones
º Síhgíe-Ianííy hones íh good íocaLíohs
º SLaíhíess SLeeí appííahces,
Hardwood Iíooríhg ahd nuch nore
CURRENTLY AVAIL$%LE:
RENT - $1,2bO nLh, píus 1 ½ nLh
securíLy deposíL. Sec 8 OK.
RENTTOOWN - $bK+ dowh, $1,1OO/nLh.
*RRG MRE KLVWRU\ &UHGLW FKHFN UHTXLUHG
Oak Valley
Townhouses & Apartments
www.oakvalleyapartments.com
Rental Office #711 • Mon. - Fri. 10am - 5pm
1301 S. Lincoln Ave.Vineland, NJ
CALL TODAY (856) 696-1929
DISCOUNTS FOR:
Police • Firemen • Military
Three Bedroom Townhomes
One & Two Bedroom Apartments
Pet Friendly Community
*For qualied applicants only
Submit an
application by
October 5, 2012 and
receive up to $500
toward moving
expenses
Submit an
application for a
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October 5, 2012 and
your rst month’s
rent is FREE
A beautiful scenic, proud place to call home
LOOKING FOR A NEW HOME?
DON’T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY!
Visit or Call Today!
M
any first-time homeowners
envision spending their first
winter in the warm comfort of
their dream homes, curled up
in the couch, sipping a warm drink and pon-
dering their smart financial decision.
However, with nine out of 10 new home-
owners interested in buying distressed prop-
erties, these bargains often come with tall
grasses, overgrown shrubs, unmanaged pools
and clogged gutters. Property that originally
passed rigorous inspections can soon deterio-
rate and lose value if owners fail to take easy—
but crucial—protection steps. These condi-
tions may have turned the property into a
haven for pests that can threaten the health
and safety of neighbors, children and pets.
And fall is the best time to implement pre-
ventative practices for winter.
That’s why RISE (Responsible Industry for
a Sound Environment)® is helping homeown-
ers keep their homes, lawns and communities
safe during National Inspect and Protect
Week (NIAP). NIAP will be October 1-5 and
each day of the week will coincide with steps
that match RISE’s mantra: INSPECT
(INvestigate, Study, Prepare, Eliminate, Clean
and Treat).
RISE offers these simple tips to discourage
pests from ever calling your home theirs:
Indoors:
• Start off right. Eliminate pests ways in by
sealing spaces around pipes and electrical
wires entering the house.
• Eliminate food sources, water and shelter
that may attract insects.
• Search for cockroach egg casings under
sinks and for insects and their larvae in flour,
pasta and other dry food that is often kept on-
hand for long periods of time.
• Proactive and preventive treatments are
key to keeping pests under control from the
very start of your home ownership.
• Remove stacks of cardboard from your
home as they provide attractive shelter and
food for pests.
Outdoors:
• Remove all standing water in areas such
as pots, buckets, toys, pet bowls, birth baths.
• Clean out ornamental and flower beds to
ensure that mulch is in place. This helps pre-
vent hidden problems from becoming more
significant.
• Pick up fallen leaves and branches and
keep grass and dirt three-inches below the
house foundation.
• Prune back tree branches that are touch-
ing the house or roof. Branches leading to
your home structure provide access points for
insects and rodents.
• For pier and beam foundations, keep the
area under the house free of clutter and sealed
so no wildlife make it home.
• Check roof for buckling/sagging, dam-
aged shingles or signs of cracking or leaking in
the flashing at the chimney and joints.
For more information, check out a home
inspection checklist or visit a virtual online
inspection tool to learn how to keep a happy,
healthy home even throughout winter. I
Real Estate
I
Winter-Ready
Be sure your house is just that as we head into the
uncertainty of wintertime weather and temperatures.
F
AR FANUCCI
REAL ESTATE INC.
P. 856-405-0507
OPEN HOUSE
BROKERS OPEN HOUSE:
Fri., Sept. 28th • 12 - 2
For additional inIormation contact
Brian Collini: 856.305.2346
bcollini¸comcast.net
Bring your buyers to this meticulously maintained
3BR/3 bath two story home! This is the true definition
of turn key. Located on a great corner lot in one of the
most desirable East Vineland neighborhoods; this home
has it all. Open floor plan with a large kitchen, family
room w/gas fireplace, 3 nice sized bedrooms, energy
efficient dual zone central a/c & well manicured lawn
with sprinkler system. This is a must see. Schedule
your appointment today...You wont be disappointed.
Offered at $247,900
2591 Michelon Court, Vineland
OPEN HOUSE:
Sat., Sept. 29th • 12 - 3
Grapevine 28-32 091912-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:00 PM Page 28
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Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.
To order your classified call, 856-457-7815 or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or
visit www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds. See box below for additional ordering information.
Only $10 per ad, per week, up to 20 words; over 20 words,
$0.50 per word. $0.30 for bold—per word/per issue, $3 for a
Border/per issue. Add a photo for $15. Mail Ad & payment or go
online to www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds.
Not responsible for typographical errors. • Once an ad is placed, it cannot be cancelled or changed. The Grapevine does not in any way
imply approval or endorsement. Those interested in goods or services always use good judgment and take appropriate precautions.
Acct. No. ___________________________________Exp. Date________ 3 Digit # on back
of card__________
Signature:__________________________________________
Printed Name:______________________________________
Name ___________________________________
Address__________________________________
City__________________________Zip_________
Phone #: ________________________________
email____________________________________
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Suite 205
Vineland, NJ 08360
www.grapevinenewspaper.com
Mail Ad
Form with
Payment TO:
Classifieds
Call for more information
856-457-7815
1.____________
2.____________ 3.____________ 4.____________ 5.____________
10.____________
15.____________
9.____________
14.____________ 13.____________
7.____________
12.____________
6.____________
11.____________
20.____________ 19.____________ 18.____________ 17.____________
16.____________
25.____________ 24.____________ 23.____________ 22.____________
21.____________
30.____________ 29.____________ 28.____________ 27.____________
26.____________
35.____________ 34.____________ 33.____________ 32.____________
31.____________
40.____________ 39.____________
42.____________
41.____________
44.____________ 43.____________ 45.____________
47.____________
46.____________
49.____________ 48.____________ 50.____________
38.____________ 37.____________
36.____________
8.____________
Check if needed.
Refer to prices above.
JBold
J Border
CLASSIFIEDS
Credit Cards
Accepted:
Having a Yard Sale or Garage Sale?
It’s time to make room in that attic, garage or
basement, and there’s no better way to get the
word out than to advertise your yard sale in
The Grapevine’s Classifieds.
Use the form below, or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Deadline is Friday for the following Wednesday’s paper.
Micro Electric LLC.
Residential repair, addi-
tions, and services.
Bonded and insured.
“no job is too small.”
NJ LIC #14256.
Call 609-501-7777.
Vineland 3-BDRM, 1-BA,
Eat-in-Kitchen, LR, DR,
family-room, sunroom,
mudroom, plus 2 spare-
rooms! Basement w/work-
shop, W/D hookup, 2 stor-
age-rooms. $1050. Call
856-825-7600
2-bedroom, 2nd floor apt.
in Vineland near Newcomb
site, $900/mos. Plus 1 1/2
months Security deposit.
Tenant pays electric. 856-
692-5420.
Leather recliner, excellent
condition, light tan, $150.
(856) 692-2844.
FOR SALE: Wooden swing
set. Asking price is $50. A
large trampoline, also ask-
ing $50. If you’re interest-
ed, call 856-405-0042.
Experienced Stylist want-
ed. Up to 60% commis-
sion. Paid vacation and
bonuses. Call Rose or
Kathy at 856-213-5316.
Protocall Staffing is seek-
ing 100+ people for
Production, Packaging etc.:
• Competitive pay
• Many shifts available
• Must have 2 Valid forms
of ID. Apply in Person M-
TR, 9am-Noon, at 106
Landis Ave, Vineland NJ
or call 856-848-2196
Moving sale, Saturday
September 29 - 9am-2pm
Located inside Fairview
Manor—265 Wall Street,
Vineland. Bunk beds,
furniture, toys, kitchen
items, stereo, etc.
Everything must go!
Cleaning out entire garage
All kinds of tools, shovels,
etc. Call 856-692-0717 for
an appointment.
Girl Scout Troop 97420 is
having a MULTI-family YARD
and BAKE Sale on Saturday,
October 6 at 8 am @
111 Salem St. in Elmer. All
proceeds go to their sum-
mer trip to Europe.
PLEASE come out to sup-
port our efforts to make
the girls’ final event as Girl
Scout a dream come true!
Have a bike taking up
space in your home?
Please consider donating
it. The Vineland Rotary
Club has partnered with
Pedals for Progress to
export bikes to third-world
countries where they are
needed for transportation.
Also collecting treadle and
portable sewing machines.
Contact Henry Hansen at
856-696-0643 for drop-off
or pick-up.
WANTED! Slightly used
childrens books (donated)
to the Coats for Kids event
at the NJMP, Call Brian
856-364-6011 to arrange
pick up.
Wanted Dead or alive.
Junk or running cars.
Quick removal. Cash
paid. 856-649-2732.
TOT LOT providing quality
child care, ages 0-3,
accepting NJCK & TANF.
Mon-Fri 6:30 am.–7pm.
$140 per week w/meals.
856-641-7407.
All American Plumbing
and Drain Cleaning.
Specialing in all plumb-
ing services and repairs,
all at very reasonable
rates. Serving Vineland
and Millville Just give us
a call! 856-696-3052
REAL Painting:
Reasonable Prices–High
Quality Residential &
Commercial Painting
Interior/Exterior/Custon
Staining–South Jersey
Areas. (302) 444-2396
General House Cleaning.
20 years experience.
Reasonable, honest &
reliable. Call 856-697-
1338. Leave message.
Steelman's Drywall.
Drywall installation and
repairing nailpops, cracks,
water damage, unfinished
drywall. Big or small! Call
Joe for a free estimate at
609-381-3814.
Turk's Pressure Clean.
Property maintenance.
Vinyl and aluminum sid-
ing, concrete, brick, roof
cleaning, gutter clean-
out. Over 25 years in
business, fully insured.
(856) 692-7470.
AJB III Construction.
Licensed and fully insured.
Windows, doors, remodel-
ing, and more. Call us
today at 856-332-7865.
FLUTE, PICCOLO, PAN
FLUTE, RECORDER,
FLUTE ENSEMBLE,
Lessons by Renowned
Flutist, BEVERLY PUGH,
(Member, Bay-Atlantic
Symphony). ALL AGES-
ALL LEVELS, REASON-
ABLE RATES & MUSIC
FOR ALL OCCASIONS.
Phone: (Machine) 856-
455-1098. Email:
BevsPanFlutes@aol.com
Electrical
Contractor
Pete Construction
Specializing in decks,
roofs and home
remodeling. State
licensed and insured.
Call for a free esti-
mate. 856-507-1456.
Homecare Provider
available: Prefer to
stay in Cumberland
County. No live in, but
daily and/or overnight
available. No driving.
Call 856-691-1133 or
856-581-5127
Experienced
barber/stylist with a
following wanted for a
busy men’s salon. Call
856-794-2727.
ESTATE SALE
Sat. 10/6 9am-3pm.
5225 Landis Ave, East
Vineland.
Pennsylvania House
Maple Bedroom
Furniture, Steubenville
Dishes, Imperial
China. Lots more.
Help Wanted
Home
Improvement
Estate Sale
Services
Yard Sale
For Rent
For Sale
Do you have a car or boat that is
taking up space in your drive-
way? Are you hoping to sell your
vehicle for some extra cash?
Publicize the sale of your vehicle
by advertising in The Grapevine’s
Classifieds section. Make your
junk someone else’s treasures.
LANDSCAPING & PAVERS
Professional Installations...Over 10 Years
SPECIALIZING IN:
Lawn Maintenance
Landscape Design • Walks,
Driveways • Retaining Walls
Fire Pits • Restoration of Pavers
Call 856-982-7701
or 856-498-7571
lewbowhunter@gmail.com
See our work on

See our w
whunter@gmail.com lewbo
or 85
Call 856-982-7701
e Pits • R Fir
ays • Retaining Drivew
Landscape Design •
Lawn Maintenance
SPECIALIZING IN:
ork on ur w
unter@gmail.com
56-498-7571
856-982-7701
vers ation of Pa Restor
alls W s • Retaining
alks, W pe Design •
Maintenance
ALIZING IN:
We Buy
Used Vehicles!
See Lenny Campbell See Lenny Campbell
808 N. Pearl St., Bridgeton NJ
(856) 451-0095
Items Wanted
Flute Lessons
Need work? Have a business and need more
customers? Why not get the word out through
The Grapevine’s Classifieds?
Advertize your skills and business in the
Classifieds by calling 856-457-7815.
MOWING, EDGING,
TREE & STUMP
REMOVAL, CLEAN-
UPS, BUSH & TREE
TRIMMING, MULCH,
RIVER-ROCK, GUT-
TER CLEANING,
VINELAND/MILLVILLE
AREA, 856-691-2017
Landscaping
Bikes Wanted
UNITED METHODIST WOMEN
INDOOR YARD SALE
Sat., Oct. 6th, 9:00 a.m, 700 Landis Ave.
Use side entrance. Call 856 691-0940
All Proceeds benefit WMW Local and
Global Mission Projects. Everyone Welcome
Grapevine 28-32 091912-de:Layout 1 9/24/12 8:00 PM Page 29
175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234
Our Focus Is You.
All winners have the option of starring in one of our
newspaper ads or on one of our billboards.
Enter to win Capital Bank’s You’re The Star Sweepstakes this summer and
you could also win one of three big prizes fit for a star:
First Place — 42” LCD HDTV
Second Place — A Deluxe Spa Package
Third Place — Dinner for Two
Just stop at your nearest Capital Bank branch to enter. You could be our next
Capital Bank Star!
Vineland Chooses Capital Bank.
Capital Bank is rated 5
Stars by Bauer Financial.
See your bank’s rating at
BauerFinancial.com
You Can Be
Capital Bank’s
Next Star!
No purchase necessary. Sweepstakes drawing November 1, 2012. Three winners will be chosen from entries at each Capital Bank branch for the three prizes. All winners will have the option to be featured in future Capital Bank advertising
programs. You need not be present at the time of the drawing to win. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Capital Bank employees and their immediate family are not eligible to enter or win
prizes. Rates guaranteed, as a minimum, through 1/1/2013; interest rate may vary thereafter. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY).
You’ll Be A Fan Of
Our Starring Rates!
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