Submitted by: MGT of America, Inc.

2123 Centre Pointe Boulevard Tallahassee, FL 32308

Florida State College at Jacksonville Organizational Assessment

FINAL REPORT

September 27, 2012

The consultant team gratefully acknowledges the generous access, assistance, and hospitality extended to us by the officers and staff of Florida State College at Jacksonville. It has been a privilege to serve you in this engagement.

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 1-1 1.1 1.2 1.3 Background........................................................................................................... 1-1 Methodology ........................................................................................................ 1-1 Remaining Chapters ............................................................................................. 1-2

2.0

OVERVIEW OF FSCJ AND ITS PEERS ……………..……………………………………………….…..…..……2-1 2.1 2.2 Overview of FSCJ .................................................................................................. 2-1 Overview of Peers ................................................................................................ 2-8

3.0

EVALUATION FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ....................................................... 3-1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Executive Leadership, Strategic Management, and the Office of the Executive Vice President ....................................................................................................... 3-2 College-Wide Leadership...................................................................................... 3-6 Divisional and Campus Leadership ..................................................................... 3-11 Administrative Services Leadership and Delivery .............................................. 3-14 Executive Travel, Entertainment, and Hospitality Expenses .............................. 3-15

4.0

SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS............................................................................... 4-1

Appendices: Appendix A: Revenue and Expenditures for FSCJ and Peers, FY2010-2011 Appendix B: Organizational Charts of Selected Peers Appendix C: Members of the College President’s Cabinet and the District Board of Trustees Appendix D: Summary of State General Auditor’s Findings for FSCJ and Peers Appendix E: FSCJ Vice President of Student Development and Community Education Job Description Appendix F: FSCJ Campus President Job Description Appendix G: FSCJ Vice President and Executive Director of Florida Coast Career Tech Job Description Appendix H: FSCJ Standards of Conduct Policy

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.0

INTRODUCTION

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ or the College) engaged MGT of America, Inc. (MGT), a national higher education research and planning firm, as a consulting partner to assist in the review of the College’s organizational structure and management functions in its transition from a traditional community college to a state college.

1.1

PURPOSE

FSCJ tasked MGT with conducting a review of the following areas: executive leadership; college-wide unit organizational structure; the effectiveness of leadership in identified organizational structures; financial management policies and procedures; the role of the Executive Vice President; and financial policies relating to travel, entertainment, hospitality, and other related matters.

1.2

METHODOLOGY

The approach developed by MGT to conduct the review of the College’s organizational structure and management functions included the following tasks: Task 1.0 – Initiate Project The purpose of this task was to discuss the goals and objectives of the evaluation, establish project timelines, review the basic project methodology to be utilized, and identify data needs. As requested, FSCJ designated a Project Manager with whom MGT worked for project support and guidance. Task 2.0 - Compile and Analyze Background Information The purpose of this task was to work with the College to identify existing materials that relate to the evaluation engagement. MGT requested and received a variety of data including organizational charts, job descriptions, budget and expenditure figures, summary travel records, a list of identified peer institutions, and the College’s policies and procedures. These materials were then assessed to facilitate the development of findings and recommendations. Task 3.0 - Develop Select Benchmark Analyses The purpose of this task was to assess organizational structure and function of peer institutions in areas relevant to the study focus. Five peer colleges that had been previously identified by FSCJ were confirmed for their appropriateness for the organizational review. Data were analyzed to assess organizational structure and function compared to FSCJ.

Page 1-1

Introduction

Task 4.0 - Conduct Onsite Interviews with Key College Stakeholders The MGT project team conducted onsite interviews with stakeholders to collect evaluative information. Phone interviews were used in those instances where face-to-face interviews were not necessary or feasible in the time available. MGT conducted 26 interviews with key stakeholders. Task 5.0 - Evaluate Results of Interviews and Collected Data MGT reviewed all information and data collected for each of the prior tasks and summarized findings. Findings addressed issues regarding the effectiveness of the College’s organizational structure and function; the quality of leadership relative to managerial practices, job knowledge, communications, and collaboration; relevant peer comparisons; and policies, procedures, and practices related to executive travel, entertainment, and hospitality expenses. Task 6.0 - Prepare Report Upon completion of the review, MGT presented its findings and recommendations to the College President and the District Board of Trustees.

1.3

REMAINING CHAPTERS

The following chapters provide the findings and recommendations from the consultant team’s data collection and analysis:
2.0 3.0 4.0 Overview of FSCJ and its Peers Findings and Recommendations Summary of Recommendations

Page 1-2

2.0 OVERVIEW OF FSCJ AND ITS PEERS

2.0

OVERVIEW OF FSCJ AND ITS PEERS

This chapter provides an overview of Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) and its organizational structure, and provides some relevant baseline information about peer institutions. The major sections of this chapter are: 2.1 Overview of FSCJ 2.2 Overview of Peers

2.1

OVERVIEW OF FSCJ

The mission of FSCJ is to “provide optimal access to high quality, affordable and relevant degree, career and community education to enhance the lives of students and the economic development of Northeast Florida.” The College’s location and primary service area in Northeast Florida include Duval and Nassau Counties, as shown in Exhibit 2-1. EXHIBIT 2-1: Primary Service Area of FSCJ, 2012

Source: QuickFacts, U.S. Census Bureau website, 2012.

FSCJ was first established as Florida Junior College at Jacksonville in 1965 and was later named Florida Community College at Jacksonville in 1986. In January, 2007, the College was accredited to offer bachelor degrees, its first being a Bachelor’s in Fire Science Management. On August 1, 2009, the College began operating as a state college, adopting its current name. Today, FSCJ describes
Page 2-1

Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

itself as a “4-year state college offering associate and bachelor degree programs on campus or online,” and strives to meet the following college-wide goals: • Prepare students for distinctive success in their academic, career, and personal goals through collaboration within the College community and individual initiative. Inspire students to a lifetime commitment to continued learning, informed civic engagement, ethical leadership, cultural appreciation, social responsibility, and multicultural awareness in an interconnected world. Optimize access to College programs and services. Provide to students an extraordinarily positive experience in every engagement with the College. Contribute significantly to the ongoing economic development of the Northeast Florida region.

• • •

To achieve these goals, FSCJ has expanded its programs significantly in recent years. According to Community College Week’s June 2011 report, FSCJ “has the largest workforce development program, the largest IT curriculum and the largest [statewide] distance learning program” compared to 1,200 other community colleges nationwide. From its first and only bachelor degree offering in 2007, FSCJ has expanded its bachelor degree program offerings to twelve programs, including: • • • • • • • • • • • • Biomedical Sciences (B.S.) Business Administration (B.S.) Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications (B.A.S.) Digital Media (B.A.S.) Early Childhood Education (B.S.) Information Technology Management (B.A.S.) Nursing (B.S.N.) Public Safety Management (B.A.S.) Supervision and Management (B.A.S.) Converged Communications (B.S.) Fire Science Management (B.A.S.) Human Services (B.S.) (approval pending)

FSCJ currently operates across five campuses and eight education centers. As shown in Exhibit 2-2, the five campuses are located primarily within the city of Jacksonville and include the Downtown Campus, Kent Campus, North Campus, Open Campus, and South Campus.
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Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

EXHIBIT 2-2: FSCJ Campus and Center Locations, 2012

Source: Florida State College at Jacksonville website, 2012.

To achieve its college-wide goals and manage all campuses and centers, FSCJ developed an organizational structure that is divided into four main divisions: the Degree Education Division, Career Education Division, Community Education Division, and the Military, Public Safety, and Security (MPSS) Division (as shown in Exhibit 2-3). There are four main units that fall into one of the four divisions: Florida State College (including Academic Success Centers) in the Degree Education Division, Florida Coast Career Tech in the Career Education Division, Pathways Academy (including community services, employer services, and community continuing education) in the Community Education Division, and Military, Public Safety, and Security in the MPSS Division.

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Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

EXHIBIT 2-3: The Organizational Structure of FSCJ, 2012

Source: Florida State College at Jacksonville, 2012.

The following section provides a brief overview of the four units within FSCJ’s divisional structure. Florida State College, Florida Coast Career Tech, and Pathways Academy operate cooperatively, while MPSS operates, for the most part, independently of the others. • Florida State College. A four-year state college offering associate and bachelor degree programs on campus and online in the following schools:
School of Liberal Arts and Sciences School of Education and Human Services School of Public Safety (under MPSS unit) School of Health Sciences School of Technological Sciences School of Business

The college also offers Academic Success Center services to students to assist with the following:
Admissions and registration Assessment and certification Advising/personal counseling Financial aid and scholarships Career development and counseling Student employment Student life and leadership Student appeals, discipline, and grievances Page 2-4

Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

Florida Coast Career Tech. A two-year technical college offering job skills training and education in the following program areas:
Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Heating Automotive Aviation Building Construction Business and Management Child Care Cosmetology Culinary Arts Dental Firefighter Health Care Law Enforcement Logistics and Distribution Massage Therapy Truck Driving Welding

Pathways Academy. A charter school offering high school dropouts and high-risk students (ages 16-20) an opportunity to earn a high school diploma and college credits. Students are able to transition from Pathways Academy to Florida Coast Career Tech to earn certification or a degree. The Academy offers courses in all of the program areas offered by Florida Coast Career Tech. The Academy is focused on the education and job skill needs of local employers. MPSS. A professional training institute offering certification and degree programs for military and government agencies and private businesses in the areas of public safety, homeland security, fire science management, criminal justice, industrial management, and weapons safety and marksmanship. MPSS also offers program credit that is transferable to other colleges.

The main governance of FSCJ is comprised of a nine-person District Board of Trustees, the College President, and the President’s Cabinet. As shown in Exhibit 2-4, the President’s Cabinet includes 16 direct reports to the College President: an Executive Vice President, ten Vice Presidents, and five Campus Presidents.

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Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

EXHIBIT 2-4: FSCJ President’s Cabinet, 2012

Source: Florida State College at Jacksonville, 2012.

The following section provides a brief summary of the primary duties and responsibilities of the College President and each member of the President’s Cabinet as detailed in position job descriptions provided to MGT by FSCJ: College President. Responsible to the District Board of Trustees for the organization and administration of the College. The general powers, duties, and responsibilities of the office are as set forth in the Florida Statutes State Board of Education rules, and the contract of employment between the District Board of Trustees and the College President are incorporated herein by reference. Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. Provides college-wide educational leadership to achieve a high standard of excellence and innovation in teaching and learning, student development, and faculty and staff professional growth. Serves as acting College President in the absence of the College President and represents the College in community, state, national, and international endeavors. Vice President, Human Resources. Directs the College’s Human Resources program that includes recruitment, selection, professional development, job and performance appraisal, salary and classification studies, records management, benefits, and department level planning. Provides collegewide leadership and direction in planning and budgeting for the support of the College’s employees. Serves as the College’s negotiations manger for all collective bargaining activities. Vice President, Student Development and Community Education. Provides executive level direction, guidance, and policy formation for economic and
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Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

enrollment development activities of the College including research, communication, enrollment services, public relations and public information; and provides college-wide leadership in planning, implementing, and evaluating a comprehensive student success plan emphasizing student retention and student achievement. Vice President, Technology and Chief Information Officer. Provides collegewide leadership in all technology and information systems functions and related areas, including information systems, instructional/academic technology, administrative systems and processes, computer operations, technical support functions, telecommunications, networks, computer applications/systems development, content development and delivery systems, and digital media infrastructure, development, and operations. Vice President of Government Relations. Provides college-wide leadership and administrative responsibility for all state and federal legislative functions, to include planning, coordinating, preparing, and implementing legislative advocacy on behalf of the College. Vice President of Administrative Services. Provides executive level direction, guidance and policy formation for all financial and business management operations of the college system. This includes Financial Aid, purchasing, business services, risk management, financial services, and facilities management and construction. College General Counsel and Vice President of Strategic Initiatives. Acts as the Chief Legal Officer of the College and provides executive level direction, guidance, and policy formation for strategic initiatives. Serves as Assistant Corporate Secretary to the District Board of Trustees. Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Executive Director, Florida State College Foundation. Provides college-wide leadership in planning, coordinating, supervising, implementing, and evaluating a comprehensive private sector resource development program for the College. Vice President and Provost, Florida State College Division. Provides leadership for academic program development leading to an associate’s or bachelor’s degree; monitors compliance with accreditation and agency requirements at the state, regional, and federal levels; champions excellence in teaching and learning by supporting academic administrators, faculty, and students. Overall duties include academic planning support for the core mission of teaching, coordination, and integrative leadership for academic affairs. Establishes college-wide measures of institutional effectiveness, provides for appropriate institutional engagement in related activities, and monitors progress. Oversees preparations for reaffirmation process and review by the Southern Association for Colleges and Schools (SACS).
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Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

Vice President and Executive Director, Florida Coast Career Tech. Leads the division in developing a highly responsive Technical College that provides the most relevant and highest quality technical and career curriculum and programs in the U.S. Responsible for leading all non-credit programs and courses delivered in response to the needs of regional employers. Vice President of Military, Public Safety and Security. Leads the division in developing and providing highly specialized professional training programs to military and government agencies, as well as private businesses. Responsible for creating a learning community that is responsive to the needs and interests of the citizens in the surrounding region. Campus President. Provides the vision and direction to enable student success through planning, development, and operation of a campus, and is a key College leader who creates a learning community responsive to the needs and interests of the citizens of Duval and Nassau counties and the surrounding region. These positions, their relationship to one another, and related service delivery issues are addressed in detail in Chapter 3.0.

2.2

OVERVIEW OF PEERS

For the purposes of this study, FSCJ selected five colleges in Florida to be used for peer comparisons with the College. The five peer institutions are:

• • • • •

Broward College (BC) Daytona State College (DSC) Indian River State College (IRSC) Palm Beach State College (PBSC) St. Petersburg College (SPC)

Exhibit 2-5 shows FTE enrollment estimates for FSCJ and its selected peers for FY2011-2012. As shown, FSCJ had an estimated enrollment higher than four of the five peers, and is lower than only Broward College, which had the largest student enrollment estimate at 31,120 FTE.
Note: Detailed budget data of FSCJ’s and selected peers’ revenue and expenditures for FY2010-2011 are included in Appendix A.

Page 2-8

Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

EXHIBIT 2-5: FTE Enrollment Estimates of FSCJ and Peers, FY2011-2012

Institution Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) Broward College (BC) Daytona State College (DSC) Indian River State College (IRSC) Palm Beach State College (PBSC) St. Petersburg College (SPC) Peer Average:

Total FY2011-2012 FTE Enrollment Estimates 24,798 31,120 13,935 14,238 21,245 22,492 20,606

Source: 2011-12 FTE Estimates Report, FTE Enrollment Reports, Florida Department of Education website.

Similar to FSCJ, all peer institutions offer bachelor degree programs. As shown in Exhibit 2-6, FSCJ, DSC, and IRSC had between 200-275 students who completed bachelor degree programs during 2010-2011. EXHIBIT 2-6: Credit Program Completers for All Bachelor Degree Programs at FSCJ and Peer Institutions, 2010-2011 Number of Bachelor Degree Students 2010-2011 Institution

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) Broward College (BC) Daytona State College (DSC) Indian River State College (IRSC) Palm Beach State College (PBSC) St. Petersburg College (SPC) Peer Average:

205 22 273 242 87 980 321

Source: Florida College System Fact Book 2012, Florida Department of Education website.

The organizational structures of the peer institutions were analyzed and compared to the organizational structure in place at FSCJ on two levels: executive level organizational structure and campus level governance. Exhibit 27 shows how FSCJ compares to its selected peer institutions relative to those positions that report directly to the College President.

Page 2-9

Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

As previously mentioned, FSCJ has 16 direct reports to the College President, the highest among its selected peers. The average number of direct reports to the College President among FSCJ’s peer institutions is ten.
Note: Organizational charts for the peer institutions are included in Appendix B.

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Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

EXHIBIT 2-7: Organizational Structure Comparison of FSCJ and Peers, 2012
Institution Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) Number of Presidential Direct Reports
16 Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services Executive Administrative Assistant to the President Vice President and Provost, Florida State College Division Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Executive Director, Florida State College Foundation Vice President of Administrative Services Vice President, Student Development and Community Education Vice President of Government Relations Vice President, Technology and Chief Information Officer Vice President, Human Resources VP Academic Affairs Executive Director Foundation VP Administration and Business Services VP Student Services and Enrollment Management Senior Vice President, Academic Affairs/VP Executive Director, Foundation

Palm Beach State College (PBSC)
12

Daytona State College (DSC)
11 Executive Vice President, Office of the Executive VP

Indian River State College (IRSC)
9 Vice President Instructional Services Executive Assistant to the President Vice President Academic Affairs Executive Director of Foundation Vice President, Administration & Finance Vice President Student Affairs

Broward College (BC)
8

St. Petersburg College (SPC)
8

Senior Executive Assistant to the President

Chief of Staff

College Provost and Senior VP Academic Senior VP, Academic and Affairs and Student Success Student Affairs Vice President for Institutional Advancement Senior VP Administrative Services VP Institutional Advancement and Executive Director Foundation Senior VP, Administration/Business and Information Technology VP Academic and Student Affairs VP Governmental Policy and Regulatory Government Relations Director Affairs

Temporary - Accounting Senior Vice President, Student Development and Institutional Effectiveness Senior Vice President, Governmental Relations Senior Vice President, Information Technology

Vice President Applied Science & Technology General Counsel and Vice President, Public Policy and Government Affairs

Titles of Direct Reports

College General Counsel and Vice President of Strategic Initiatives Vice President of Military, Public Safety and Security Vice President and Executive Director, Florida Coast Career Tech Campus President, Open Campus Campus President, Kent Campus Campus President, North Campus Campus President, South Campus Campus President, Downtown Campus

General Counsel

Acting General Counsel

Provost - Boca Raton Provost - Lake Worth Provost - Palm Beach Gardens Provost - Belle Glade VP Public Affairs and Marketing Executive Assistant to President for College Advancement and Communications Assistant to President for Equity Programs Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness Director I - Equity and Inclusion Coordinator IV Temporary - Foundation Vice President, Division of Alternative Student Services Assoc. Vice President Institutional Technology Associate VP Institutional Research, Planning and Effectiveness VP Economic Development and Innovation Projects

Source: Florida State College at Jacksonville website, Broward College website, Daytona State College website, Indian River State College website, Palm Beach State College website, and St. Petersburg College website. Page 2-11

Overview of FSCJ and Its Peers

Exhibit 2-8 compares FSCJ’s campuses and campus-level governance and reporting to its selected peers. EXHIBIT 2-8: Overview of FSCJ and Peer Campus-Level Governance, 2012
Institution
Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ)

Number of Campuses

5

Listing of Campuses & FY2010-2011 FTE Enrollments Downtown Campus (8,888) Kent Campus (4,201) North Campus (4,199) Open Campus (2,075) South Campus (5,149)
Hugh Adams Central Campus (12,292) North Campus (8,380) Judson A. Samuels South Campus (6,278) Daytona Beach Campus (11,068) DeLand Campus (1,931) Deltona Campus (951) New Smyrna Beach/Edgewater Campus (605) Flagler/Palm Coast Campus (1,051) Main Campus (St. Lucie) (7,623) St. Lucie West Campus (2,376) Chastain Campus (1,729) Dixon Hendry Campus (563) Mueller Campus (1,709) Belle Glade Campus (899) Boca Raton Campus (4,635) Lake Worth Campus (10,537) Palm Beach Gardens (4,759) Clearwater Campus (4,205) Seminole Campus (6,152) St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus (4,338) Tarpon Springs Campus (3,063)

Governance

Report(s) to

Campus Presidents

College President

Broward College (BC)

3

Campus Presidents

College Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Success Senior Vice President, Student Development and Institutional Effectiveness

Daytona State College (DSC)

5

Campus Deans

Indian River State College (IRSC)

5

Campus Provosts

Vice President of Instructional Services

Palm Beach State College (PBSC)

4

Campus Provosts

College President

St. Petersburg College (SPC)

4

Campus Provosts

Vice President, Academic and Student Affairs

Source: Florida College System Fact Book 2011, Florida Department of Education website; Florida State College at Jacksonville website, Broward College website, Daytona State College website, Indian River State College website, Palm Beach State College website, and St. Petersburg College website, 2012.

As depicted in Exhibit 2-8 above, FSCJ Campus Presidents report to the College President. PBSC is the only other college with this reporting relationship; campuslevel executives at BC, DC, IRSC, and SPC report to the chief college academic officer. Chapter 3.0 offers more detailed findings and recommendations relevant to organizational issues and opportunities to maximize operational efficiency and effectiveness. Also, more detailed peer comparisons concerning areas of college operations are introduced, as appropriate.

Page 2-12

3.0 EVALUATION FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

3.0

EVALUATION FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This chapter provides the findings and recommendations for Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ or the College) that resulted from MGT’s review of the College’s organizational structure and management functions. The major sections of this chapter are: 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Executive Leadership, Strategic Management, and the Office of the Executive Vice President College-Wide Leadership Divisional and Campus Leadership Administrative Services Leadership and Delivery Executive Travel, Entertainment, and Hospitality Expenses

MGT’s specific charge from the FSCJ Board of Trustees was to review the organizational structure and management functions at the College in its transition from a traditional community college to a state college, which began on August 1, 2009. As directed, MGT reviewed the following areas: college-wide unit organizational structure, the effectiveness of leadership in identified organizational structures, executive leadership, the role of the Executive Vice President, financial management policies and procedures, and financial policies relating to travel, entertainment, hospitality, and other related matters. MGT’s findings and recommendations were developed through the following: • A high level review of the current organizational structure and functions of the College and the duties and responsibilities of the President’s Cabinet members. Interviews with all members of the President’s Cabinet and the Board of Trustees. A review of relevant Florida statutes, Board rules and regulations, the Administrative Procedure Manual, college handbooks, selected peer data, auditor general findings, and other available materials that have bearing on this engagement.

• •

Page 3-1

Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

3.1
3.1.1

EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP, STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT, AND THE OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
Executive Leadership

FINDING: The role of the College President, stated broadly, is to be responsible to the District Board of Trustees for the organization and administration of the College. The College President’s formal job description includes a wide variety of leadership roles and responsibilities and vests power in the College President to exercise general oversight of the College. He is to determine College needs and recommended improvements; advise and counsel the District Board of Trustees and recommend Board action; recommend and enforce rules of the District Board of Trustees; recommend and enforce minimum standards for the operation of College programs and for student completion of instructional programs; and exercise responsibilities assigned by law, rules of the State Board of Education, and by the District Board of Trustees. The College President also is authorized to delegate authority as necessary to ensure that laws and rules are executed efficiently. FSCJ’s College President has been serving in this role for the last 15 years. By most accounts, the College President has been a leader in the community college arena, both statewide and nationally. He is often described as a visionary leader who has continued to expand the vision and mission of the College, most recently resulting in the community college attaining state college status by offering limited baccalaureate degree programs. The College now offers twelve baccalaureate degree programs, and has hired a Director to oversee these programs to ensure consistent implementation. Relative to the number of associate degrees awarded nationally during the 2010-2011 academic year by a four-year college, FSCJ ranks: • • • • • Fourth in all disciplines, total population Second in all disciplines, non-minority Seventh in all disciplines, African-American Third in Liberal Arts and Sciences Fourth in Nursing (R.N.)

Source: Community College Week, June, 2012. The data are collected by the National Center for Education Statistics, or NCES, through the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data Set, or IPEDS, completions survey. Note: Community College Week rankings only include associate degrees.

It was noted that the College President has been very good at identifying programs that “put people to work.” Along these lines, the College President listens to business leaders to identify what the College can do that would be helpful for businesses and for creating jobs for students. The College has been

Page 3-2

Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

named one of only 72 of 1,200 community colleges in the country to be awarded a $2 million federal President's Community-Based Job Training Grant out of a total of $125 million awarded. Also, due to significant cutbacks in state funding for higher education, there has been significant focus on private fundraising to boost the College’s financial resources. Data provided by the Vice President for Institutional Advancement, comparing FY ending June 30, 2011 to FY ending June 30 2012, the FSCJ Foundation net assets have increased from $38 million to $39 million. Over this same time period, 30 new scholarships have been established and 700 new donors have contributed to the college. Over the last year, a variety of criticisms have been leveled against the College and the College President. These include the Pell Grant audit, the outside employment of the Executive Vice President, salary increases for the President’s Cabinet, travel and hospitality spending levels, charitable contributions, and other state audit criticisms. To assess the impact on the public perceptions of college leadership as a result of these criticisms, in addition to a document review, MGT interviewed all members of the President’s Cabinet (16) and the District Board of Trustees (9) (see Appendix C for a detailed listing of interviewees). All members of the President’s Cabinet were asked to comment generally on their perceptions of the College President in regards to leadership, managerial practices, collaborative/relational skills, job knowledge, and communication skills. A scale of positive (1), neutral (0), or negative (-1) was used for summary assessment purposes. Results from these interviews are as follows and are shown in Exhibit 3-1. • • • • • Leadership: Positive: 56.3%, Neutral: 31.3%, Negative: 12.5% Managerial Practices: Positive: 18.8%, Neutral: 43.8%, Negative: 37.5% Collaborative/Relational Skills: Positive: 56.3%, Neutral: 25.0%, Negative: 18.8% Job Knowledge: Positive: 87.5%, Neutral: 12.5%, Negative: 0.0% Communication Skills: Positive: 62.5%, Neutral: 31.3%, Negative: 6.3%

The College President received high marks on job knowledge, good marks on communication skills, relationship skills, and overall leadership, but relatively weak marks on internal college managerial practices. Management practices are commonly identified as activities related to organizational planning, organizing, staffing, leading/directing, controlling, and motivating.

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

EXHIBIT 3-1: Perceptions of the FSCJ College President by Area, 2012
90% 80% 70% 60%
56.3% 87.5%

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

56.3%

62.5%

Positive Neutral

43.8%

37.5%

Negative
31.3% 18.8% 12.5% 0.0%

31.3%

12.5%

18.8%

25.0%

Leadership

Managerial Practices

Collaborative/ Relational Skills

Job Knowledge

Communication Skills

Source: MGT interview results, President’s Cabinet, 2012.

There is a sense within the college community that, while the College President’s focus has continued to expand externally, the internal operations of the College have lacked some needed direction. Further, the role of the Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services, which is designated as “acting president in the President’s absence,” has not been effective in filling this internal operational void. The expanding role of the College, including program offerings which significantly impact the role and mission of the College, and the College President’s attention to external affairs has created pressures on roles and responsibilities across campus leadership. Especially in times of change, it is critically important for the College President to focus on the management of internal college operations or to have a position that fills this role. Further, as a number of internal operational issues have received significant attention over the past several months, the need for a key staff resource devoted entirely to operations and administrative accountability is critical. Among other things, a position with a primary focus on internal operations is more likely to ensure that there are appropriate communications of, and compliance with, relevant policies and procedures to avoid missteps that detract from the College’s focus on growth.

6.3%

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

RECOMMENDATION 1: Create a Chief of Staff/Chief Operating Officer position. The general duties of a Chief of Staff/Chief Operating Officer position involve overseeing the proper functioning of all administrative activities of the College. The position would be solely focused on internal operations with the primary purpose being the organization and management of the College President’s Office. This position relieves the College President of a wide and complex variety of administrative responsibilities. The position also may be useful in conducting research or analytical studies to assist the College President in the formulation of new policies, procedures, and strategic planning initiatives. This position also would monitor, expedite, and report on matters related to the activities and responsibilities of the Office of the College President. This position would work closely with the Vice Presidents, campus leadership, and other executive staff to complete assignments from the College President. The College might consider housing the public relations/press relations function here as well (see discussion in Recommendation 7). 3.1.2 Strategic Management

FINDING: As noted earlier, effective August 2007, FSCJ began offering limited baccalaureate degrees in addition to a full complement of associate and certificate programs. This arrangement has created a level of academic program complexity not experienced before. Among other things, issues relative to program accreditation, faculty credentials, and student advising, to name a few examples, now require additional time and attention of college leadership, including the District Board of Trustees. Today, FSCJ has twelve bachelor degree programs (including a Human Services degree program pending) in addition to a vast array of associate degree and non–degree programs and certifications. RECOMMENDATION 2: Conduct a professional development workshop(s) for the District Board of Trustees utilizing an outside facilitator. It should be recognized that the Board’s role continues to expand as the College’s mission expands. A variety of external organizations routinely conduct a variety of workshops and training sessions for college boards. This recommendation is intended to bring attention to professional development opportunities and tools that are available and valuable, especially in times of organizational transition. It should be noted that the Chancellor of the Florida College System is initiating a Board of Trustees Chairs Training program, with an initial workshop planned for October 2012.

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

3.1.3

Office of the Executive Vice President

FINDING: Prior to the creation and filling of the Vice President and Provost position, effective in December 2011, the primary academic-related and student services functions of the College reported to the Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. This Executive Vice President position also was responsible for serving as the “acting College President” in the absence of the College President. Under recent and ongoing restructuring, the majority of the academic functions of Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services are now the responsibility of the Vice President and Provost. These changes have effectively eliminated the Executive Vice President position as previously structured. The student services related functions of this position are recommended to be reassigned to a revised Vice President for Student Services function as noted in Recommendation 5. RECOMMENDATION 3: Eliminate the Executive Vice President position. The majority of duties and responsibilities of this position relating directly to academic programs have been assumed by the newly established Vice President and Provost position. The student services related responsibilities should be reassigned, as provided in Recommendation 5. The remaining duties contained in the current job description do not lend themselves to filling an Executive Vice President role for the College, but focus primarily on external business development opportunities for the College. The position also does not have the focus to continue as the “acting College President” in the absence of the College President.

3.2
3.2.1

COLLEGE-WIDE LEADERSHIP
College-Wide Leadership – Internal Auditor

FINDING: FSCJ does not currently utilize an internal auditor function. This function did exist at the College until it was eliminated in June 2002 and replaced with an internal auditing plan conducted by an outside firm from 2002 to 2007. This is not a unique situation, however, as among FSCJ’s peer comparison group, only DSC has an Internal Auditor function. FSCJ relies on the State of Florida Auditor General’s Office which conducts an annual audit of college operations and issues a report of findings. Once the audit findings are released, the College is obligated to provide a formal response, also known as the Management Response. In the most recent audit report (Report 2012-073, 7/1/2010 to 6/30/2011), FSCJ received 16 negative audit findings, as shown in Exhibit 3-1. A detailed summary of the audit findings found for FSCJ and the peer institutions is provided in Appendix D of this report.
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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

EXHIBIT 3-1: State Audit Findings for FSCJ, FY Ending 06/30/11

Audit Finding Category
Administrative Management Confidential Information Construction Administration Information Technology Personnel and Payroll Student Enrollment Student Tuition and Fees

Number of Findings Found for Reporting Period 7/1/2010 to 6/30/2011
1 1 2 6 3 2 1 16

Total:

Source: State of Florida Auditor General's Report, FYE 06/30/11 for FSCJ.

The purpose of a College Internal Auditor is to plan and conduct operational, financial, and compliance audits to evaluate the effectiveness of internal college controls. The Auditor determines compliance with selected policies, procedures, and regulations, and makes written recommendations to senior administrators to increase efficiency and/or effectiveness of the control systems of functions reviewed. The Auditor also may perform special investigations as requested by the College President and/or President’s Cabinet. The Auditor position works with all levels of management and employees within the College, other internal audit personnel, if present, and external auditors. The Auditor generally consults with administrators, faculty, and staff at all levels to promote good business practices. Interview comments from a number of Board of Trustees members indicated a strong desire to reinstate this function with a reporting relationship to the Board. RECOMMENDATION 4: Establish a College Internal Auditor position reporting to the District Board of Trustees. This position would be responsible on an ongoing basis for ensuring that the College is in compliance with statutes, rules, and regulations of the State and the College. Relying solely on the State’s Auditor to perform this annual function misses opportunities to address issues in a timely and effective manner. Establishing a college internal auditor facilitates the ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of internal college controls. 3.2.2 College-Wide Leadership - Student Services

FINDING: Student support services at FSCJ are distributed across a variety of functions and offices, unlike its peer institutions, which appear to have specific positions designated for the coordination and delivery of student services (see Chapter 2.0, Exhibit 2-7).
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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

The following FSCJ positions all have/had significant student services components: • Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. Until recently, this position was responsible for a wide variety of instructional and student support services programs “in collaboration with campus presidents.” The position was also responsible for providing leadership in the establishment and administration of college-wide academic and student service standards “in collaboration with the chief academic officer, campus presidents, faculty, staff, and student leaders.” Further, the position was responsible for “leadership and professional development for the administrative, faculty, and support staff assigned to instruction and student services.” A majority of these academic functions are being/have been assigned to the Vice President and Provost. Vice President for Student Development and Community Education. This position is a blend of student services related functions. It is also responsible for communications, marketing, branding, and public relations. Vice President for Administrative Services. This position is responsible for Financial Aid, as the Director of Student Financial Aid reports here. However, the implementation of Financial Aid appeals and compliance related issues resides at the campuses under a Dean of Student Success position reporting to the Campus President. Deans of Student Success. These positions are campus-based, report to the Campus President, and are charged with a wide variety of responsibilities, including: 1. Financial Aid 2. Counseling and Academic Advising 3. Orientation 4. Enrollment 5. One-Stop Center Management 6. Student Retention 7. Student Disability Services 8. Appeals 9. Student Life 10. Career Development The Vice President of Student Development and Community Education position, as structured, is limited in its authority to direct many student services collegewide duties and responsibilities, as these responsibilities are spread across a number of positions. Further, the position’s current focus is multi-faceted, including student services, community education, marketing and public
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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

relations, as well as economic development (see Appendix E for a copy of the FSCJ Vice President of Student Development and Community Education job description). RECOMMENDATION 5: Revise/retitle the current Vice President for Student Development and Community Education position and consolidate the duties and responsibilities relating to all key student service functions, including Financial Aid. FINDING: FSCJ Financial Aid administrators report to their respective Campus Presidents. These positions have no centralized reporting to the college-wide Director of Financial Aid. As such, the Director of Financial Aid has little operating authority to influence performance or adherence to state and federal rules and regulations. As shown in Exhibit 3-2, most of FSCJ’s peer institutions have the Financial Aid function reporting to a centralized Student Affairs or Student Services function. EXHIBIT 3-2: Location of Financial Aid Function for FSCJ and Peers, 2012
Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) Broward College (BC) Daytona State College (DSC) Under the Dean of Financial Aid Services, reporting to AVP of Enrollment Development Services who reports to the Senior Vice President for Student Development and Institutional Effectiveness

Under the Campus Presidents, Under the Director of Student reporting to the College Financial Services, reporting President to the AVP for Student Affairs/Financial Services who reports to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management

Indian River State College (IRSC) Under the Director of Financial Aid, reporting to the Associate Dean of Educational Services who reports to the Vice President for Instructional Services

Palm Beach State College (PBSC) Under the Director of Financial Aid, reporting to the Vice President of Student Services and Enrollment Management

St. Petersburg College (SPC) Under the Director of Scholarships and Student Financial Assistance, reporting to the AVP of Financial Assistance, Scholarships, and Veteran Services who reports to the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs

Source: Florida State College at Jacksonville website, Broward College website, Daytona State College website, Indian River State College website, Palm Beach State College website, and St. Petersburg College website, 2012. Page 3-9

Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

RECOMMENDATION 6: Revise reporting structure to allow all Campus Financial Aid administrators to report to the Director of Financial Aid in the Office of the Vice President for Student Services (or other appropriate title to be determined per Recommendation 5), and be responsible and accountable to this centralized function. FINDING: As noted in the discussion of the duties of the Vice President for Student Development and Community Education, the functions of marketing, communications, branding, and public relations are currently the responsibility of this position. RECOMMENDATION 7: Create a separate communications, public relations, and marketing function outside of Vice President’s office and establish a reporting line to the Chief of Staff/Chief Operating Officer position. 3.2.3 College-wide Leadership – Human Resources

FINDING: The Human Resources function reports to the College President and is responsible for a variety of activities, including recruitment, selection, professional development, job and performance appraisal, salary and classification studies, records management, benefits, and departmental planning. Among specific duties listed is the responsibility to “facilitate training and development of all staff through active support measures.” However, the Human Resources department has not been resourced to establish a Professional Development unit, which could, among other things, identify training needs and develop skills-based job specific training. There also appear to be key pieces of professional development and training that reside in other areas of the College. For example, in reviewing the documentation on the Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services position, the position’s duties included the following: Human Resource Management. Provides leadership and professional development for the administrative, faculty and support staff assigned to instruction and student services. The Vice President and Provost is also responsible for “the professional development of teaching faculty as well as other professional personnel necessary for the academic mission of the College.” Findings relating to the Financial Aid audit pointed out insufficient staff training for employees tasked with determining compliance and ensuring that staff receive the appropriate training to successfully perform their jobs.

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

RECOMMENDATION 8: Readdress all FSCJ professional development and training needs in a coordinated and proactive manner. Primary responsibility for administrative professional development and training should be in the Human Resources Office. If they are not already doing so, the Human Resources Office should periodically survey college administration and staff to identify areas where administrative training would not only be beneficial but mission-critical. The Office should then ensure that such basic training programs are offered. Further, when training needs are identified by college or campus units, they should be brought to the attention of the Human Resources Office.

3.3
3.3.1

DIVISIONAL AND CAMPUS LEADERSHIP
Campus Presidents

FINDING: The current role of the Campus Presidents is to provide “vision and direction” to enable student success through planning, development, and operation of an individual campus location. This position is designated as the key campus leader at the individual location to create a learning community responsive to the needs of the region (see Appendix F for a copy of the FSCJ Campus President job description). The responsibilities of the Campus Presidents represent a form of decentralized service delivery. While policy and management is coordinated by college-wide leadership positions, the Campus Presidents are responsible for overseeing direct campus student service delivery. Exhibit 3-3 illustrates this decentralized service delivery model on each of FSCJ’s campuses.

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

EXHIBIT 3-3: Organizational Structure Comparison of FSCJ Campuses, 2012
Downtown Campus
Campus President Dir of Admin Services Dean, Student Success Dean, Career Education Dean Liberal Arts

Kent Campus
Campus President Dir of Admin Services Dean, Student Success Dean, Career Education Dean Liberal Arts Dean Liberal Arts Assoc Dean Lib/Learning CM

North Campus
Campus President Dir of Admin Services Dean, Student Success Dean, Career Education Dean Liberal Arts

South Campus
Campus President Dir of Admin Services Dean, Student Success Dean Liberal Arts Dean Liberal Arts - South Interim Dean, Liberal Arts Assoc Dean Lib/Learning CM Academic Dean

Open Campus
Campus President Assoc Dean, Student Success

Interim Dean of Education Ex Dir Cecil Center Interim Dean, Pre-Collegiate Studies PA School Director Instructional Officer Ex Dir Nassau Center Dean, Fl Coast Career Tech

Academic Dean

Ex Dir Deerwood Center Instr Program Mgr - GED Program Mgr

Dir of Program Dev Dir Wilson Ctr for Arts Counselor Coord Ex Dean, Virtual College Operations Mgr

Source: Data received from Florida State College at Jacksonville, 2012.

Page 3-12

As shown in Exhibit 3-3, campus academic program leaders (deans) report to a Campus President. Further, the Campus Presidents have two primary administrative units under their purview – the Student Success function and the Administrative Services function. Both of these service delivery functions also have college-wide Vice President level positions bearing overall responsibility for ensuring the efficient and effective delivery of these services. RECOMMENDATION 9: Clarify the duties and responsibilities of the Campus Presidents relative to academic and non-academic service delivery. The development of policies and procedures for campus-level administration should primarily reside with the college-wide level functions established to create and oversee these responsibilities. Key campus staff charged with policy and procedure implementation should have a direct reporting line to central administration. 3.3.2 Florida Coast Career Tech

FINDING: The Vice President and Executive Director for the Florida Coast Career Tech (FCCT) program is responsible for the leadership and development of a Technical College Division (i.e. non-credit division). This college-wide position, responsible for all non-credit programs delivering technical and career curriculum, is designed to meet regional employer needs (see Appendix G for a copy of the FSCJ Vice President and Executive Director of FCCT’s job description). The Division must work closely and collaboratively with campuses for day to day operations and resource allocation, in addition to coordinating with the College’s Associate in Science degree technical programs in order to provide seamless educational pathways for students. The recently established Provost function has similar but broader and more encompassing duties. The Provost is responsible for providing leadership for academic program development leading to an associate’s or bachelor’s degree (i.e. Degree Division); monitoring accreditation compliance and agency requirements at the state, regional, and federal levels; and encouraging excellence in teaching and learning by supporting academic administrators, faculty, and students. While many four-year colleges do not offer vocational/technical education, the comprehensive mission of FSCJ and its economic development role in the community make workforce education a critical function of the institution, which should not be structured or viewed as separate from the whole, but rather fully integrated. The current FCCT structure has proved problematic in terms of communication and coordination between functional units of the College, as well as causing ambiguity in terms of FCCT’s identity and relationship to the State College, overall. To maximize efficiency and effectiveness in overlapping administrative functions and to remove barriers to student progression through

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

related career-preparation programs, a different organizational placement is needed. RECOMMENDATION 10: Integrate FCCT into the State College Division, merging it with the Career Degree Education department, operating fully as part of the “one-college” model. The current Division Vice President for FCCT should be reassigned as an AVP under the Provost to work closely with the AVP for Career Degree Education on linking and aligning high-need, high-demand, “go-to-work” programs. With implementation of this recommendation, consideration should be given as to whether the State College Division designation appropriately communicates this expanded mission. 3.3.3 Military, Public Safety, and Security (MPSS)

The Division of Military, Public Safety, and Security (MPSS) is tasked with, among other things, overseeing the Criminal Justice Center and Fire Academy. The Division offers both credit and non-credit programs. The Division appears to function well and to effectively and efficiently coordinate with college-wide leadership as needed. No recommendations for this area are offered.

3.4
3.4.1

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES LEADERSHIP AND DELIVERY
Administrative Systems and Information Technology

FINDING: It has been reported that the current payroll system used by the College is antiquated and in need of replacement. The current system was developed internally in the 1990s in coordination with a system-wide consortium, and is no longer adequate to effectively meet FSCJ’s needs. As a very labor intensive system, more errors are likely to be made, thereby creating Inefficiencies in processing data. Financial Aid technology has also been criticized for being seriously lacking in a number of critical areas, as detailed in the Scheu Report issued in August 2012. RECOMMENDATION 11: Implement an immediate and thorough evaluation of the current payroll and financial aid systems and evaluate options for replacement or outsourcing. Key leaders in the Information Technology department should be called upon to provide needed context for this evaluation.

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

3.5

EXECUTIVE TRAVEL, ENTERTAINMENT, AND HOSPITALITY EXPENSES

FINDING: MGT reviewed relevant Board rules and administrative procedures to determine if current policies and procedures are adequate to regulate responsible stewardship of funds for travel, hospitality, and entertainment expenses. Sections of the rules and procedures that seem especially relevant in this review are referenced below.  Expenses and Travel: Institutional Relationship, Public Service, and Professional Associations, Rules of the Board of Trustees 6Hx7 - 13.2 (3) College employees shall be encouraged to participate in professional associations and/or associations related to their individual fields. Payment of dues for membership shall be a personal responsibility of the individual employee. If a personal membership in an association is deemed in the best interest of the College for institutional promotional reasons, the College President may approve College payment of such dues on behalf of the employee. (3.1) Within the limits of budgeted and available travel funds and approvals, an employee shall be supported for participation in meetings and conventions of the member professional group(s) and association(s).  Expenses and Travel: Travel, Administrative Procedure Manual 6Hx7 – 4.23 To provide guidance relative to travel, the Administrative Procedure Manual (APM) provides specific procedures to implement policy. Relevant to professional travel for conferences and conventions, the APM states that: − Conference and convention expenses are reimbursable if the main purpose of the conference or convention is in connection with the official business of the College, or the event provides a direct educational or other benefit supporting the work purpose of the attendee (BAR 3A42.004). − The benefit to the College must be summarized in a statement prepared by the traveler and/or the applicable supervising administrator. − The traveler’s immediate supervisor, the Budget administrator and the supervising administrator must sign this portion of the form. The College President, or his designee, must approve international travel. − All airline, hotel, rental cars, registration, and incidental fees claimed shall be substantiated by receipts as defined in the preceding sections of this document, and attached to the form. A copy of the program or agenda of any attended convention or conference, itemizing registration fees and
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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

any meals or lodging included in the registration fee, must also be attached.  Public Relations and Hospitality Expenses: Funds Derived from Auxiliary Enterprises, Rules of the Board of Trustees 6Hx7 – 4.8 Board Rule 6Hx7-4.8 (3.1) and (4) directs that funds from auxiliary enterprises “shall be disbursed at the discretion of the College President for the purpose determined to be a direct benefit or in the best interest of the College,” and that the funds “shall be transferred to the current fund and shall be in the approved budget of the College.”  Public Relations and Hospitality Expenses: Promotion, Public Relations, and Hospitality Expenditures, Administrative Procedure Manual (APM) 6Hx7 – 4.8 Per the procedure described in Board Rule 6Hx7-4.8 (3.1) and (4), the APM 6Hx7-4.8 states the following: Per this procedure, the College President may delegate authority to Cabinet officers to authorize expenditures from this budget by the authorization of subordinate hospitality budgets in a Cabinet department as necessary. The College President may direct certain requests for expenditure to the Florida State College Foundation, Inc., for reimbursement under its direct support mission of the College and according to its rules and procedures. Funds derived from auxiliary enterprises largely result from student expenditures for books, food service, vending machines, and commissions from vendors under contract to the College to provide such services. These funds are subject to public scrutiny and, as such, should bear the responsibility standard of reasonableness in their use. Expenditures for meals or refreshments should not exceed what is reasonable and customary for the purpose of the event and location. Expenditures for work conferences involving only College employees should be limited under same standard of reasonability.  Public Trust and Confidence: Public Trust and Confidence, Rules of the Board of Trustees 6Hx7 - 13.5 Pursuant to, and in furtherance of, the philosophy regarding public trust and confidence, the District Board of Trustees does authorize that the College adhere to the following commitments regarding public affairs: (3.1) Conduct all activities of and regarding the College in a responsible and responsive manner intended to earn public confidence;

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

(3.2) Assure that the public within the district has full access to information concerning programs and services, policies, administrative procedures, and activities of the College; (3.3) Maintain an atmosphere that welcomes and nurtures public involvement and participation in College affairs; (3.4) Determine and be sensitive to public reaction to programs, services, policies, and administrative actions anticipated or now carried out in the College; (3.5) Cultivate open, professional, and effective relations with the mass media; (3.6) Encourage participation and involvement of College personnel in civic, cultural, and community affairs; (3.7) Maintain continuous liaison and cooperative relations with other public and private educational institutions and appropriate governmental bodies; and (3.8) Uphold standards of professional conduct and ethics. (4) The employees of Florida State College at Jacksonville shall be encouraged to develop and conduct educational and support programs, services, and functions which are responsive to these identified community needs and which further and advance public trust and confidence. The College President shall be authorized to establish necessary administrative procedures for the implementation of this Rule. (5) The District Board of Trustees, as furtherance of its own philosophy regarding public trust and confidence, shall make periodic appraisals of the College's full adherence to these commitments. For this purpose, the College President shall provide for the preparation and submission of a report to the District Board of Trustees periodically, but at least annually, concerning the efforts of the College to be responsive to this Rule. MGT was informed of a variety of issues and concerns relative to travel, hospitality, and entertainment expenditures that had been previously identified as problematic for the College. These issues have involved a number of questions concerning the propriety of travel by members of the President’s Cabinet, principally the Executive Vice President (See FSCJ State of Florida Operational Audit, 2012-073, Finding #4: “A College’s employee’s employment contract with another organization doing business with the College may have resulted in a conflict of interest in violation of Section 112.313(7)(a), FS.”); the entertainment expenses primarily incurred by the President, including overall level of expenditure as well as source of funds and their appropriate use under
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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

current statutes, rules, policies and procedures; and charitable contributions made on the part of FSCJ and/or the College President. A vast number of documents have been collected and reviewed as a result of alleged improprieties. Determinations have been made relative to whether the activities and expenditures cited involve lack of judgment, lack of internal controls, or both. The District Board of Trustees members conducted internal reviews and commissioned this report to address organizational structure and management policies for future operations. In the interim, Board members have already implemented processes and procedures to, among other things, tighten up on travel and entertainment expenditures by requiring Board pre-approval for the College President’s expenditures. MGT reviewed summary travel records for the President and President’s Cabinet for an 18-month period (January 2011 to June 2012). The results of this review are summarized in Exhibits 3-4 and 3-5.

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

EXHIBIT 3-4: Travel Records by Location and Cost, January 2011 to June 2012
NUMBER OF EVENTS ATTENDED REPORTED BY # College President (Wallace)1 Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services (Green) Vice President, Technology and Chief Information Officer (Rennie)2 Campus President, Downtown Campus (Albrecht) Vice President of Government Relations (Lehr)3 College General Counsel and Vice President of Strategic Initiatives (Miller) Campus President, Open Campus (Kooi) Vice President of Administrative Services (Bowers) Vice President, Student Development and Community Education (Pierce) Vice President of Military, Public Safety and Security (Stevenson) Campus President, North Campus (Darby) Vice President and Provost, Florida State College Division (Bilsky)4 Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Executive Director, Florida State College Foundation (Stamp)5 Campus President, Kent Campus (Cabral-Maly) Campus President, South Campus (Wright)6 Vice President and Executive Director, Florida Coast Career Tech (Mann) Vice President, Human Resources (Arab)7 TOTAL: AVERAGE: 34 5 1 6 18 12 10 11 6 0 9 3 3 1 4 3 0 126 7 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ In-state $ 11,125.64 4,503.05 76.63 3,084.37 8,434.96 7,404.57 4,755.89 5,182.87 2,961.37 3,604.95 1,860.30 1,677.79 1,183.39 1,549.98 581.12 57,986.88 3,410.99 # 13 18 23 8 1 1 3 3 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 84 5 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Out-of-state $ 15,613.58 21,714.90 23,868.72 9,482.74 2,428.36 2,245.00 4,519.46 4,065.69 5,009.82 5,803.21 35.00 1,523.19 1,232.43 1,579.11 172.00 99,293.21 5,840.78 TOTAL NUMBER OF TOTAL NUMBER TRAVEL DAYS OF EVENTS OVER THE 18ATTENDED MONTH PERIOD 47 23 24 14 19 13 13 14 10 4 10 4 4 2 5 4 0 210 12 109 71 78 50 140 35 36 38 29 8 28 9 14 9 15 11 0 680 40 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

TOTAL COST

26,739.22 26,217.95 23,945.35 12,567.11 10,863.32 9,649.57 9,275.35 9,248.56 7,971.19 5,803.21 3,639.95 3,383.49 2,910.22 2,762.50 1,549.98 753.12 157,280.09 9,251.77

Source: Data received from Florida State College at Jacksonville, 2012. Note: All retreats were covered by the President's Office. Retreats were in-state travel. Some of the travel expenses reported by Darby, Bowers, Bilsky, and Mann were split between multiple funding sources. 1 Out of country travel: Shannon, Ireland, 06/21/11 - 06/26/11, (cost: $2,729.21); Bangkok, Thailand, 05/04/12 - 05/10/12, (cost: $0.00). 2 Out of country travel: Darmstadt, Germany, 07/30/11 - 08/04/11 (cost: $2,129.54). 3 Reported absence from most of 2012 Legislative Session due to illness, therefore, travel costs are lower than normal. Days of travel during legislative sessions (2/1/11-2/25/11 and 3/6/11-4/30/11) were adjusted based on the assumption for weekends at home in Jacksonville from the Capitol in Tallahassee. 4 Hired December 19, 2011, therefore travel costs cover only 6 months of the reporting period. 5 One of the travel costs is unknown for in-state travel. 6 Paid for by SACS-COC. 7 No overnight travel for the referenced period.

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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

EXHIBIT 3-5: President’s Cabinet’s Travel Records by Funding Source, January 2011 to June 2012
REPORTED BY TOTAL NUMBER OF EVENTS ATTENDED TRAVEL FUNDING SOURCE(S) REPORTED NUMBER OF TRIPS REPORTED FOR EACH FUNDING SOURCE

College President (Wallace)

1

47

Operating Budget

47

ITLA* Vice President, Technology and Chief Information Officer (Rennie)2 24 CIO Professional Development Conference Sponsor President's Office Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services (Green) Vice President of Government Relations (Lehr)
3

4 17 2 1 23 18 1 12 1 1 14 13 11 2 5 2 3 3 6 2 1 2 4

23 19

OP Budget Operating Budget President's Office Campus President's Operating Budget (162200)

Vice President of Administrative Services (Bowers)

14

Campus President's Operating Budget (148983) President's Office

Campus President, Downtown Campus (Albrecht) College General Counsel and Vice President of Strategic Initiatives (Miller) Campus President, Open Campus (Kooi)

14 13 13

Campus President's Operating Budget (161152) Campus President's Operating Budget - Legal Admin (161300) Campus President's Operating Budget (146310) Reimbursed by AACC Campus President's Operating Budget (161207)

Vice President, Student Development and Community Education (Pierce)

10

Campus President's Operating Budget (167001) President's Office

Campus President, North Campus (Darby)

9

Campus President's Operating Budget (161155) Campus President's Operating Budget (148995) Campus President's Operating Budget (South Campus Travel Budget)

Campus President, South Campus (Wright)6

5

SACS-COC President's Office

Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Executive Director, Florida State College Foundation (Stamp)5 Vice President and Provost, Florida State College Division (Bilsky)4

4

Campus President's Operating Budget (167301)

Campus President's Operating Budget (148981) 4 Campus President's Operating Budget (161130) Campus President's Operating Budget (146010) Campus President's Operating Budget (148943)

1 2.5 0.5 1 1.5 0.5 1 4 2 -

Vice President and Executive Director, Florida Coast Career Tech (Mann)

4

Campus President's Operating Budget (146014) National C-Core President's Office

Vice President of Military, Public Safety and Security (Stevenson) Campus President, Kent Campus (Cabral-Maly) Vice President, Human Resources (Arab)
7

4 2 -

Campus President's Operating Budget (146241) Campus President's Operating Budget (161151) -

Source: Data received from Florida State College at Jacksonville, 2012. Note: All retreats were covered by the President's Office. Retreats were in-state travel. Some of the travel expenses reported by Darby, Bowers, Bilsky, and Mann were split between multiple funding sources. 1 Out of country travel: Shannon, Ireland, 06/21/11 - 06/26/11, (cost: $2,729.21); Bangkok, Thailand, 05/04/12 - 05/10/12, (cost: $0.00). 2 Out of country travel: Darmstadt, Germany, 07/30/11 - 08/04/11 (cost: $2,129.54). 3 Reported absence from most of 2012 Legislative Session due to illness, therefore, travel costs are lower than normal. Days of travel during legislative sessions (2/1/11-2/25/11 and 3/6/11-4/30/11) were adjusted based on the assumption for weekends at home in Jacksonville from the Capitol in Tallahassee. 4 Hired December 19, 2011, therefore travel costs cover only 6 months of the reporting period. 5 One of the travel costs is unknown for in-state travel. 6 Paid for by SACS-COC. 7 No overnight travel for the referenced period. Page 3-20

Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

RECOMMENDATION 12: Continue to require that the College President’s travel and expenditures be preapproved by the Chair of the Board of Trustees, at least in the short-term, for expenditures. The Vice President for Administrative Services should ensure that funds have been properly budgeted and the planned expenditures are in strict compliance with Board rules and Administrative procedures. Over the longer term, consideration should be given to the establishment of a threshold expenditure amount that, if exceeded, would require Board preapproval. Currently Board Rule 4.23 requires that employee expenses that exceed $2,000 per trip will be reported to the Board. FINDING: Under Board rule, the President is authorized to direct requests for expenditures for promotion, public relations, and hospitality to the Florida State College Foundation, Inc., for reimbursement under its direct support mission of the College and according to its rules and procedures. RECOMMENDATION 13: Ensure that, as a routine part of the FSCJ Foundation’s annual budgeting process, the Foundation clearly identifies how much will be budgeted for the President’s discretionary fund. Set-aside funds should have clear indications of what the expenditures are intended to accomplish. Expenditures should then be reviewed routinely by the Foundation Board to ensure appropriate use of funds and adequacy of budget. The Board of Trustees’ liaison to the Foundation should ensure that communications between the Boards is maintained. FINDING: The Board of Trustees has requested that the College President and members of the Cabinet provide information on planned travel over a subsequent threemonth period. Further, Board members have recommended that travel to conferences should be restricted to those having a need to attend based upon position and in those circumstances where it is clearly a direct benefit to the College or to College operations. RECOMMENDATION 14: Continue to provide information on travel budgets and planned expenditures of the President’s Cabinet members to the Board of Trustees for their review. This provides the Board with the opportunity to ensure that planned travel is a value added proposition for the College, as well as for the professional development of the staff. FINDING: MGT understands that the travel and expenditures budgets for the coming year are based upon the prior year expenditure levels. Given the issues and concerns that have been raised regarding these expenditures, a “business as usual” approach is not warranted in moving forward.
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Evaluation Findings and Recommendations

RECOMMENDATION 15: Adopt a zero-based budget approach as part of the annual determination of the level of budgeted and available funds for travel and related expenses to ensure that expenditure levels for this purpose are in line with overall campus budget pressures. FINDING: Board Rule 6Hx7 - 13.5, Public Trust and Confidence, authorizes that the College adhere to a variety of commitments, among them: (3.1) Conduct all activities of and regarding the College in a responsible and responsive manner intended to earn public confidence; (3.4) Determine and be sensitive to public reaction to programs, services, policies and administrative actions anticipated or now carried out in the College; and (3.8) Uphold standards of professional conduct and ethics. The Board Rule further directs that “in furtherance of its own philosophy regarding public trust and confidence, the Board shall make periodic appraisals of the College’s full adherence to these commitments.” RECOMMENDATION 16: Reaffirm the College’s ethics policy to maintain trust and confidence. At all times, the Executive Leadership of the College is responsible for exhibiting good stewardship of the public’s funds. This requires an ongoing sensitivity to economic conditions and the student population served. A copy of FSCJ’s Standards of Conduct policy from the FSCJ 2011 Administrative, Professional, and Career Employee Handbook is included in Appendix H.

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4.0 SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS

4.0 SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS
This chapter provides a summary of the recommendations presented by MGT in this report. Findings related to each recommendation are included in Chapter 3.0.

MGT RECOMMENDATIONS
RECOMMENDATION 1: Create a Chief of Staff/Chief Operating Officer position. RECOMMENDATION 2: Conduct a professional development workshop(s) for the District Board of Trustees utilizing an outside facilitator. RECOMMENDATION 3: Eliminate the Executive Vice President position. RECOMMENDATION 4: Establish a College Internal Auditor position reporting to the District Board of Trustees. RECOMMENDATION 5: Revise/retitle the current Vice President for Student Development and Community Education position and consolidate the duties and responsibilities relating to all key student service functions, including Financial Aid. RECOMMENDATION 6: Revise reporting structure to allow all Campus Financial Aid administrators to report to the Director of Financial Aid in the Office of the Vice President for Student Services (or other appropriate title to be determined per Recommendation 5), and be responsible and accountable to this centralized function. RECOMMENDATION 7: Create a separate communications, public relations, and marketing function outside of Vice President’s office and establish a reporting line to the Chief of Staff/Chief Operating Officer position. RECOMMENDATION 8: Readdress all FSCJ professional development and training needs in a coordinated and proactive manner. Primary responsibility for administrative professional development and training should be in the Human Resources Office.

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Summary of Recommendations

RECOMMENDATION 9: Clarify the duties and responsibilities of the Campus Presidents relative to academic and non-academic service delivery. RECOMMENDATION 10: Integrate FCCT into the State College Division, merging it with the Career Degree Education department, operating fully as part of the “one-college” model. RECOMMENDATION 11: Implement an immediate and thorough evaluation of the current payroll and financial aid systems and evaluate options for replacement or outsourcing. Key leaders in the Information Technology department should be called upon to provide needed context for this evaluation. RECOMMENDATION 12: Continue to require that the College President’s travel and expenditures be preapproved by the Chair of the Board of Trustees, at least in the short-term, for expenditures. RECOMMENDATION 13: Ensure that as a routine part of the FSCJ Foundation’s annual budgeting process, the Foundation clearly identifies how much will be budgeted for the President’s discretionary fund. RECOMMENDATION 14: Continue to provide information on travel budgets and planned expenditures of the President’s Cabinet members to the Board of Trustees for their review. RECOMMENDATION 15: Adopt a zero-based budget approach as part of the annual determination of the level of budgeted and available funds for travel and related expenses to ensure that expenditure levels for this purpose are in line with overall campus budget pressures. RECOMMENDATION 16: Reaffirm the College’s ethics policy to maintain trust and confidence.

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APPENDICES

APPENDIX A: Revenue and Expenditures for FSCJ and Peers, FY2010-2011

Revenue and Expenditures for FY2010-2011, FSCJ and Peers
Revenue and Expenditures FY2010-2011
Total Operating Revenue Net Tuition Grants and Contracts Auxiliary Enterprises Other Operating Revenue Net Nonoperating Revenue State Appropriations Other Nonoperating Interest on Capital Debt Total Revenue Total Operating Expense Personnel Services Scholarships/Waivers Utilities/Communications Supplies/Services Depreciation Total Functional Expense Instruction Public Service Academic Support Student Services Institutional Support Operation & Maintenance Scholarships & Fellowships Auxiliary Enterprises Depreciation Total Operating Revenue $/FTE Net Nonoperating Revenue $/FTE Total Operating Expense $/FTE Income (Loss) $/FTE Instruction % Distribution Public Service % Distribution Academic Support % Distribution Student Services % Distribution Institutional Support % Distribution Operation & Maintenance % Distribution Instruction $/FTE Public Service $/FTE Academic Support $/FTE Student Services $/FTE Institutional Support $/FTE Operation & Maintenance $/FTE Total, Primary Functions $/FTE

Florida State College at Jacksonville Broward (FSCJ) College (BC)
$60,855 $35,568 $20,028 $3,461 $1,798 $147,323 $74,396 $73,331 -$404 $208,178 $219,181 $121,196 $36,779 $7,199 $44,254 $9,753 $219,181 $71,195 $1,749 $25,402 $18,503 $24,246 $29,917 $36,870 $1,546 $9,753 $2,454 $5,941 $8,839 -$444 41.6% 1.0% 14.9% 10.8% 14.2% 17.5% $2,871 $71 $1,024 $746 $978 $1,206 $6,896 $75,349 $40,698 $15,696 $17,703 $1,252 $182,170 $72,608 $110,599 -$1,037 $257,519 $256,845 $134,795 $52,030 $4,474 $57,302 $8,244 $256,845 $76,404 $1,260 $20,210 $22,634 $27,398 $29,183 $51,356 $8,244 $20,156 $2,421 $5,854 $8,253 $22 43.1% 0.7% 11.4% 12.8% 15.5% 16.5% $2,455 $40 $649 $727 $880 $938 $5,691

Institution Daytona State Indian River Palm Beach St. College State College State College Petersburg (DSC) (IRSC) (PBSC) College (SPC)
$29,813 $17,364 $6,302 $4,160 $1,987 $100,222 $48,914 $52,207 -$899 $130,035 $138,898 $78,126 $23,122 $4,150 $26,747 $6,753 $138,898 $57,391 $2,627 $9,927 $12,064 $15,828 $10,363 $23,122 $822 $6,754 $2,139 $7,192 $9,968 -$636 53.0% 2.4% 9.2% 11.1% 14.6% 9.6% $4,118 $189 $712 $866 $1,136 $744 $7,765 $24,080 $15,586 $1,403 $6,192 $899 $91,295 $44,225 $47,227 -$157 $115,375 $118,584 $65,665 $16,847 $4,710 $23,032 $8,330 $118,584 $43,489 $706 $7,843 $9,430 $7,967 $15,342 $16,891 $8,586 $8,330 $1,691 $6,412 $8,329 -$225 51.3% 0.8% 9.3% 11.1% 9.4% 18.1% $3,054 $50 $551 $662 $560 $1,078 $5,954 $50,229 $34,217 $12,379 $1,180 $2,453 $111,679 $51,302 $60,918 -$541 $161,908 $163,878 $92,650 $34,229 $3,761 $23,534 $9,704 $163,878 $58,197 $421 $16,958 $17,923 $10,824 $16,043 $33,073 $9,704 $735 $2,364 $5,257 $7,714 -$93 48.4% 0.3% 14.1% 14.9% 9.0% 13.3% $2,739 $20 $798 $844 $509 $755 $5,666 $53,196 $41,632 $4,384 $2,799 $4,381 $145,523 $63,044 $83,836 -$1,357 $198,719 $203,999 $118,463 $37,843 $6,393 $32,972 $8,328 $203,999 $72,582 $15 $26,566 $19,283 $18,839 $20,457 $37,843 $8,328 $86 $2,365 $6,470 $9,070 -$235 46.0% 0.0% 16.8% 12.2% 11.9% 13.0% $3,227 $1 $1,181 $857 $838 $910 $7,013

Source: Florida College System Fact Book 2011, Florida Department of Education website.

APPENDIX B: Organizational Charts of Selected Peers

District Organizational Chart
Board of Trustees

General Counsel

President

Sr. Executive Asst to the President

College Provost & Senior VP for Academic Affairs & Student Success

Senior VP for Administrative Services

VP Governmental Policy & Regulatory Affairs

VP Institutional Advancement

VP Public Affairs & Marketing

AVP Institutional Research, Planning & Effectiveness

APPENDIX C: Members of the College President’s Cabinet and District Board of Trustees

Appendix C:
Members of the College President’s Cabinet and the District Board of Trustees

College President's Cabinet
Dr. Christal Albrecht, Campus President, Downtown Campus Dr. Christine Arab, Vice President, Human Resources Dr. Judith Bilsky, Vice President and Provost, Florida State College Division Mr. Steve Bowers, Vice President of Administrative Services Dr. Margarita Cabral-Maly, Campus President, Kent Campus Dr. Barbara Darby, Campus President, North Campus Dr. Donald Green, Executive Vice President for Instruction and Student Services Ms. Jana Kooi, Campus President, Open Campus Ms. Susan Lehr, Vice President of Government Relations Dr. Brian Mann, Vice President and Executive Director, Florida Coast Career Tech Ms. Jeanne Miller, College General Counsel and Vice President of Strategic Initiatives Dr. Tracy Pierce, Vice President, Student Development and Community Education Dr. Rob Rennie, Vice President, Technology and Chief Information Officer Mr. Robert Stamp, Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Executive Director, Florida State College Foundation RADM Jim Stevenson, Jr., USN (ret.), Vice President of Military, Public Safety and Security Dr. Steven Wallace, College President Dr. Denis Wright, Campus President, South Campus

District Board of Trustees
Bruce E. Barcelo Karen Bowling Major General Doug Burnett, Florida National Guard (Ret.) Rear Admiral Kevin F. Delaney, USN (Ret.) Candace Holloway James E. McCollum (Chair) Thomas R. McGehee, Jr. Suanne Z. Thamm (Vice Chair, Nassau County) Gwendolyn C. Yates (Vice Chair, Duval County)

APPENDIX D: Summary of State General Auditor’s Findings for FSCJ and Peers

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Summary
Report Number: Report Title: Report Period: Release Date: 2012-073 Florida State College at Jacksonville – Operational Audit 07/01/2010 – 06/30/2011 01/06/2012

Our operational audit disclosed the following: STUDENT ENROLLMENT Finding No. 1: The College had not provided data for its Continuing Workforce Education (CWE) courses requested by the Florida Department of Education to determine adjustments necessary to the College’s full-time equivalent CWE enrollment for the 2006-07 through 2009-10 fiscal years. As a result, the College may receive State funding that it is not entitled to receive. Finding No. 2: The College needed to strengthen its controls to ensure the accurate reporting of instructional contact hours for adult general education classes to the Florida Department of Education. STUDENT TUITION AND FEES Finding No. 3: The College needed to strengthen its procedures for assessing user fees. ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT Finding No. 4: A College employee’s employment with another organization doing business with the College may have resulted in a conflict of interest in violation of Section 112.313(7)(a), Florida Statutes. PERSONNEL AND PAYROLL Finding No. 5: The President’s employment agreement included a severance pay provision that is contrary to Section 215.425(4)(a), Florida Statutes. Finding No. 6: Pursuant to the College President’s employment contract, accrued sick leave was transferred to accrued vacation leave, effectively circumventing the limitation for payment of unused sick leave upon termination provided in Section 1012.865(2)(e)2., Florida Statutes. Finding No. 7: The College had not taken action to recover sick leave overpayments totaling $87,098 noted in our prior report. CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION Finding No. 8: The College’s procedures for the administration of construction management projects needed improvement. Finding No. 9: The College needed to enhance its monitoring procedures for ensuring that design professionals and construction managers obtain required insurance coverage. CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION Finding No. 10: The College did not always provide the required written notification to individuals when their social security numbers were collected, contrary to Section 119.071(5)(a), Florida Statutes.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Finding No. 11: Some inappropriate and unnecessary information technology (IT) access privileges existed. Finding No. 12: The College had not developed a written, comprehensive IT risk assessment. Finding No. 13: The College did not retain some access control records, contrary to the requirements of the State of Florida, General Records Schedule. Finding No. 14: The College did not have written policies and procedures for certain IT functions. Finding No. 15: The College’s procedures for managing access to its telecommunications equipment needed improvement. Finding No. 16: The College’s IT security controls related to user authentication needed improvement. Management's response is included in the audit report as Exhibit B.

Audit Finding Category

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) FYE 6/30/09 FYE 6/30/11 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1

Broward College (BC) FYE 6/30/09 2 FYE 6/30/11 2

Administrative Management Board Policies Confidential Information Construction Administration Facilities Information Technology Motor Vehicles Personnel and Payroll Purchasing Receivables Student Enrollment Student Tuition and Fees Tangible Personal Property Total Findings by Institution

1 2 6 3 2 1 1 2 1 16 4 1 8 3

11

Total Findings by Audit Category Daytona State Indian River State Palm Beach State St. Petersburg FYE College (DSC) College (IRSC) College (PBSC) College (SPC) 6/30/09 & FYE FYE FYE FYE FYE FYE FYE FYE FYE 6/30/09 6/30/11 6/30/08 6/30/11 6/30/08 6/30/11 6/30/08 6/30/11 6/30/08 1 1 1 7 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 2 2 7 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 2 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 3 1 1 2 1 2 1 10 9 1 9 3 4 1 38 Institution

Total Findings by Audit Category FYE 6/30/11 2 4 2 2 0 13 1 3 2 1 2 6 1 39

APPENDIX E: FSCJ Vice President of Student Development and Community Education Job Description

FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE AT JACKSONVILLE JOB DESCRIPTION, 2008 VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY EDUCATION FLSA STATUS: EXEMPT – PAY GRADE: N/A

GENERAL STATEMENT OF JOB
The Vice President for Student Development and Community Education provides executive level direction, guidance and policy formation for economic and enrollment development activities of the College including research, communication, enrollment services, public relations and public information, and provides college-wide leadership in planning, implementing and evaluating a comprehensive student success plan emphasizing student retention and student achievement. This position plans and directs strategic aspects of the College’s policies and initiatives regarding entrepreneurial initiatives development and provides leadership and support for the advancement of the College through the application of key strategic resources. Services as a member of the College President’s Cabinet.

CHARACTERISTIC DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Entrepreneurial and Economic Development Initiatives: Works with the executive leadership team to identify community-wide entrepreneurial and economic development opportunities and challenges and provides leadership for the development of public and private relationships to address the opportunities and challenges. Evaluates existing systems and plans, develops and implements modification and/or new systems based on College needs with respect to economic and enrollment development, including research, communications, enrollment services, public relations and public information, and positions the College to support the economic development initiatives of the regional service area. Demonstrates expertise in a variety of concepts, practices, procedures related to community and economic development. Student Enrollment and Student Success: Provide college-wide leadership to appropriate deans, campus presidents and other administrative staff as necessary in pursuit of continuous improvement in both programs and operations of multiple student success areas including: • • • • • • • • • • • Orientation Assessment Student success technology Counseling and advising Student activities and student development Career Development Centers Service Learning Joint admissions programs Child care centers Learning Communities Student Conduct

APPENDIX F: FSCJ Campus President Job Description

APPENDIX G: FSCJ Vice President and Executive Director of Florida Coast Career Tech Job Description

APPENDIX H: FSCJ Standards of Conduct Policy

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