INSIDE: FLORIDA STATE 1, NORTH CAROLINA 0

Women’s soccer team blanked by No.1 Page 3.

Serving UNC students and the University community since 1893

Volume 120, Issue 81

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Friday, September 28, 2012

dth/kaitlyn kelly The football team will wear helmets with an American flag design in the interlocking N.C. logo for Saturday’s game against Idaho. Players will wear new white helmets for the Virginia Tech game.

Heels debut new helmets
University Editor

New football helmet designs will be worn in the next two games.
By Nicole Comparato
When UNC football players open their lockers to find brand new equipment, it’s like Christmas morning. At least that’s what it feels like for quarterback Bryn Renner — especially seeing the new helmets the team will sport during its next two home games.

“This is the first year we have this new equipment, and I know all the guys in the locker room really like it,” he said. “It brings a sort of energy to a team.” Players will wear the classic blue helmets this Saturday against Idaho, with an added detail: The helmets will feature an American flag-inspired decal in honor of Military Appreciation Day. But the big change is the custom-made white helmets that the team will debut for the white-out Virginia Tech game next Saturday. The team hasn’t sported white helmets since the 1960s, said Jason Freeman, assistant football

equipment manager. Freeman said the changes in helmet design are being done to keep up with a national trend. “It’s what the landscape of college football has become,” he said. “You almost have to have more helmets, more jerseys — it’s what a lot of the kids want to see these days.” The white helmets will be complemented by white jerseys and white pants, said Dominic Morelli, UNC football business operations and equipment manager. “They’re going to be looking like Mr. Clean out there,” he said.

“Everything has to be clean and crisp. We don’t want players to worry about anything…”
Dominic Morelli,
UnC football business operations and equipment manager

Freeman, along with the rest of the football equipment team, has been working on the lengthy process of applying the American flag decals to players’ helmets for Saturday’s game. The white helmets for the Virginia Tech game were ordered before the summer started, costing $30,000 to make for all 120 of the players.

“It’s an expensive process to order a whole new set of helmets for everybody because you’re talking 120 guys,” he said. But UNC isn’t the only school putting down large sums to secure festive uniforms. Many other schools are part of this trend, Freeman said, with Oregon leading

See eqUIpMeNt, Page 9

With 21-member group, chancellor search begins
the search committee will have its first organizational meeting Oct. 5.
By Katharine McAnarney
Staff Writer

New Chancellor
In the board’s meeting Thursday, Hargrove said the search committee will have its first organizational meeting on Oct. 5, where it will receive its charge from UNC-system President Thomas Ross. Members include faculty, staff, alumni and community members, such as Kenneth Broun, a former Chapel Hill mayor who also served on the 2007 search committee that eventually chose Thorp. Hargove said the variety of people will enhance the search for Thorp’s successor. University policy requires representation from various constituent groups, such as faculty, alumni and staff, Hargrove added. He said chancellor search committees are large to accommodate for diverse interests, and they usually have about 20 members. “It will allow for a broader input,” he said. “We want the benefit of the full outreach of the University community.” The committee serves with an advisory purpose, he said, and will present a list of finalists to the Board of Trustees. The board will then vote and make

INSIDE: Turn to page 4 to see a breakdown of the chancellor search committee members’ political affiliations.
its recommendation to UNC-system President Thomas Ross. Ross will ultimately recommend a candidate to the UNC-system Board of Governors, which will elect the new chancellor. Hargrove said he wanted committee members to have appropriate credentials, but to also have a personal connection to the University. “We wanted people who are really knowledgeable about the University, and who know the kind of qualities a chancellor at this University would need to succeed.” Barbara Hyde, a member of the Board of Trustees and vice chairwoman of the search committee, said the range of backgrounds on the committee will expand the search. “There are many strong individuals who collectively represent all of the constituents of the University,” she said. She said the committee will look for candidates whose values align with the University’s, and someone with the

UNC spends big money to get home games
UNC will pay Idaho $800,000 to play in Kenan Saturday.
By Melvin Backman
Senior Writer

Out of conference, out of pocket

Non-conference opponents for UNC’s revenue sports get a cut of the money generated by home games.

Let the search begin. The 21 people who will be charged with finding the University’s next leader have been named, and they will spend the rest of the academic year combing through the candidates. The final choice will replace Chancellor Holden Thorp, who announced Sept. 17 that he will resign in June. After attempts to convince Thorp to stay were unsuccessful, Chairman of the Board of Trustees Wade Hargrove scrambled throughout the past week to form the new chancellor’s search committee, which is made up of a diverse set of people, he said. “We wanted to have a representative composite of the University community,” said Hargrove, who will chair the search committee. “We worked hard to try to achieve a representative group.”

Football
School Elon Idaho ECU Amount

Although the UNC men’s basketball team may be more popular and successful than the football squad, the latter still makes more money. In fact, the athletic department can pay the University of Idaho $800,000 to play in Kenan Stadium on Saturday and still profit from the game. The payout, which is the largest ever given to a Tar Heel opponent, and the story behind it provide a glimpse into the complex, big-money world of college football. UNC plays 12 regular season football games each year. Since 2008, seven of those

$350,000 $800,000 $250,000

Basketball
School Gardner-Webb UAB Florida Atlantic E. Tenn State ECU McNeese State Amount

$92,000 $100,000 $75,000 $90,000 $100,000 $90,000

See SearCh, Page 9

See gUaraNteeS, Page 9

SOURCE: UNC DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS DTH/IRINA KIRNOS

Fall Fes tival se pt 26-oct 31
Tailgating Tastes Oktoberfest State Fair Fare Pumpkin Flavors Halloween Treats

Sept. 26 - Oct. 2 Gourmet chips and dips, peanuts, beer and other tailgating tastes.

Oct. 3 - Oct 9 Beer, local brats and Lederhosen to celebrate the ultimate Bavarian bash.

Oct. 10 - Oct 16 State Fair food–vote to determine the blue ribbon winners!

Oct. 17 - Oct 23 Pumpkin treats and good cheer–autumn is officially here.

Oct. 24 - Oct 31 All treats, no tricks for our All Hallow’s Eve festivities.

Mon-Thurs 8-7, Fri & Sat 8-9, Sun 10-7 | 201 S. Estes Drive, Chapel Hill | 919-929-7133 | southernseason.com

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CHiLLiN’ WiTH A CELLO

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LOL JK, my bladder’s fine
From staff and wire reports

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eople are terrible. OK, just some people. This New Jersey woman in particular. Lori Stilley scammed her friends and family out of more than $10,000 — and a free wedding — by telling them that she had bladder cancer when, in fact, her bladder was just peachy. Stilley announced in February 2011 that she had been diagnosed with cancer and continued the ruse through the year. But a few months later — thousands of dollars and a wedding later — she said a miracle was coming. She is free on bail, but there’s no telling what karma will do to her. Hopefully it will leave her innocent bladder out of it.
NOTED. These bagels are schmear-able. The show “National Geographic Taboo” is showcasing the Japanese body modification treatment of saline injections in the forehead. The needle goes in, a saline blob is formed and the doctor places his thumb into the blob to create a bagel shape. Don’t let L.A. find out about this Botox-esque trend. QUOTED. “There’s just a whole lot of nothing going on here.” — Joyce Tabor, a cook at Penny’s Diner in Vaughn, N.M., a town whose only certified police force member is a drug-sniffing dog named Nikka. The police chief recently resigned, leaving only the dog to keep the city safe. Vaughn is now nearly cat free.

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COMMUnIty CaLEndar
Nc Jazz repertory Orchestra: led by unC professor jim Ketch, the n.C. jazz Repertory Orchestra will play a showcase of big-band jazz music to celebrate its 20th anniversary. Tickets are $10 to $15. Time: 8 p.m. location: Memorial Hall ‘44 plays for 44 presidents’: Bring your stars and stripes to the Carrboro artsCenter this weekend for a chronological celebration of the 44 presidents. The company will highlight each one’s successes and failures for a non-partisan presentation. Time: 8 p.m. location: Carrboro artsCenter carrboro Nia dance jam: nothing burns calories and makes you feel ridiculous(ly good?) like

ophomore music major Alex Ullman, left, on cello, and junior music major Leah Taub, right, on guitar, enjoy an afternoon of playing some popular songs on their instruments at Polk Place on Thursday.

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dancing in community. Bring your nia dance moves to the Carrboro Century Center for 90 minutes of self-healing grooves. Time: 7 p.m. location: Carrboro Century Center

duction of the season continues its run. Watch stephen Caffrey embody abstract painter Mark Rothko and bicker with Matt garner, who plays Rothko’s assistant, Ken. Time: 7:30 p.m. location: Paul green Theatre UNc vs. idaho (football): More than just a state of potatoes, Idaho brings their football program to unC for parents’ weekend. Take your dad, he’ll love you for it. Time: 3:30 p.m. location: Kenan stadium To make a calendar submission, email calendar@dailytarheel. com. Please include the date of the event in the subject line, and attach a photo if you wish. Events will be published in the newspaper on either the day or the day before they take place.

POLICE LOG
Someone broke and entered at 375 Umstead Drive at 1:35 p.m. Wednesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. The person kicked in the door and stole $1,226 in property, reports state. Stolen items included a laptop and bookbag, reports state. Someone broke and entered a residence at 132 S. Columbia St. between 3:30 a.m. and 10:10 a.m. Wednesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. The person entered a fraternity house through an unlocked back door and stole $1,500 in property, reports state. Someone reported gunshots at 700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. at 6:52 p.m. Wednesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. Chapel Hill police conducted a narcotic sniff at the intersection of E. Franklin Street and Pickard Lane at 8:17 p.m. Wednesday, according to police reports. Someone communicated threats at 1709 High School Road at 2:47 p.m. Wednesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. Someone communicated threats at 501 Jones Ferry Road between 1:30 p.m. and 4:25 p.m. Wednesday, according to Carrboro police reports. Someone reported assault on a female at 1300 N. Greensboro St. on Wednesday, according to Carrboro police reports. Someone broke and entered property at 122 Fidelity St. between 3 p.m. Sunday and 5 p.m. Tuesday, according to Carrboro police reports.

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Mail and Office: 151 E. Rosemary st. Chapel Hill, nC 27514 andy Thomason, Editor-in-Chief, 962-4086 advertising & Business, 962-1163 news, features, sports, 962-0245 One copy per person; additional copies may be purchased at The Daily Tar Heel for $.25 each. Please report suspicious activity at our distribution racks by emailing dth@dailytarheel.com © 2012 DTH Media Corp. all rights reserved

‘who’s Afraid of virginia woolf?’: It doesn’t sound like a high school-appropriate theater choice, but Chapel Hill High school’s honors theatre Iv class is presenting the mature Edward albee play through the weekend. for $5, see probably the most drastically messed up couple in theater. Time: 6:30 p.m. location: Chapel Hill High school’s Robert C. Hanes Theatre ‘red’: PlayMakers’ Repertory Company’s first mainstage pro-

satUrday

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News

Friday, September 28, 2012

3

Rawlings: ‘All is pretty well here’
hunter rawlings said the University is faring well compared to its peers.
By Caroline Leland
Staff Writer

DTH ONLINE: Visit dai-

lytarheel.com to read about the AAU’s report on the importance of research universities.

Despite a seemingly endless series of scandals and leadership transitions, UNC is lucky. This was the message of Hunter Rawlings, president of the Association of American Universities, when he spoke to the UNC Board of Trustees Thursday. “From everything that I’ve seen, Chapel Hill, despite setbacks, has suffered less … than almost any other flagship in American public education,” he said to a full crowd in Gerrard Hall.

Rawlings was recruited by Chancellor Holden Thorp to conduct a review of UNC’s balance of athletics and academics after former Gov. Jim Martin completes his ongoing independent review of academics. In his speech, Rawlings said all American public universities are facing hard times, and UNC is doing well in comparison to its peers. He said one major problem is the unprecedented turnover rate of public university presidents. In the past 18 months, 13 presidents of the 35 public universities in the Association of American Universities have left their positions — most of them prematurely,

he said. Rawlings identified several reasons for this instability, including mishandling of athletics, state budget cuts and university corporatization. “Some of these businesses that we are running at our universities create clear conflicts of interest with the academic programs,” he said. “We’ve got to stay fixated on quality undergraduate education.” Rawlings proposed several tactics for confronting the University’s problems. “It’s going to take a concerted effort,” he said. “I cannot overemphasize the importance of transparency.” He also stressed the importance of university boards supporting presidents. He said the loyalty of UNC’s Board of Trustees is just one of many reasons for optimism.

“In spite of everything I’ve just said, all is pretty well here,” he said, adding that the University is doing well in respect to its peers. “You’re lucky,” he said. UNC sophomore Luis Segovia said it’s a privilege to attend a public university that is both affordable and high quality. “There are private universities that charge more in tuition that are not up to par with UNC,” he said. Thorp said UNC is successful because it stays focused on the value of a liberal arts education. “These subjects address the essence of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill,” he said. “It has always been part of our heritage to innovate and lead.” Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

dth/silvana goberdhan-vigle Hunter Rawlings speaks about the role of public research universities.

Greenbridge UNC FAlls to No. 1 FsU condos open for business
WOMEN’S SOccEr: flOrida STaTE 1, NOrTh carOliNa 0

The condominiums reopened after a sales freeze since November 2010.
By Holly West
Staff Writer

dth/spencer herlong UNC senior midfielder Ranee Premji, who played 70 minutes for the Tar Heels, lines one up against Florida State on Thursday night.

tar Heels can’t capitalize on o≠ensive disparity
By Robbie Harms
Assistant Sports Editor

DTH ONLINE: Find out how

The No. 1 women’s soccer team in the land came to Chapel Hill on Thursday night, and the No. 1 women’s soccer team in the land left Chapel Hill with its unblemished record still intact. Top-ranked Florida State (10-0-0, 3-0-0) beat No. 13 North Carolina 1-0 Thursday night at Fetzer Field, a loss that both stung and proved valuable for UNC. The Tar Heels (5-3-2, 1-2-1) outshot the Seminoles 14 to five — including seven to two shots on goal — and though they lost, they learned that they could hang with the best team in the country. “We are leaving this game with the feeling that we can play with anyone,” head coach Anson Dorrance said. “Had we beaten them, we would have left this game with the feeling that we can beat anyone. There was no change in our psychological platform following the loss.” UNC forced FSU goalkeeper Kelsey

why the Tar Heels couldn’t find the back of the net against Florida State Thursday night.

Wys to make seven saves, while the Tar Heels’ keepers had only one. UNC had four corner kicks, and the Seminoles had one. Florida State, though, did what UNC couldn’t: Turn one of its goal-scoring chances into a goal. “There’s been games where we’re on the other side of that,” junior forward Kealia Ohai said. “That’s just how soccer is. You got to finish the ball. We did play hard, and we did dominate, I would say. But we didn’t get it done, and they did …That’s the difference.” Ohai looked destined to find the back of the net after a first half of piercing runs through and around FSU’s defense, but her efforts went unrewarded. “One of our biggest game plans was just to put extreme pressure on them,” senior midfielder Maria Lubrano said. “I

think we could count on one hand how many times they got in our half.” The second half was more of the same — UNC created most of the chances and held most of the possession — but after FSU’s Dagny Brynjarsdottir slotted the ball past UNC goalie Bryane Heaberlin, the Tar Heels pressed for a goal. “I think we did get a little too frustrated, pushing a little too much after (the goal) instead of letting things come to us,” Lubrano said. And after UNC’s Crystal Dunn powered into the box and forced Wys to make an acrobatic save with less than six minutes to go, the Tar Heels would have no more close chances to capture the elusive goal. UNC lost, and it didn’t score, but it learned something when the No. 1 team in the land came to Chapel Hill on Thursday night: It’s not too far behind. Contact the desk editor at sports@dailytarheel.com.

Production parodies classic shows
By Tat’yana Berdan
Staff Writer

Greenbridge Condominiums is back in business. After a two-year sales freeze, units in the 10-story Rosemary Street mixed-use development are back up for sale. About one-third of Greenbridge’s 97 condominiums are currently occupied. Betty Harbourt, executive vice president of The Marketing Directors, which handles Greenbridge’s sales and marketing, said about 15 contracts are pending, and she isn’t sure when the building will be at full occupancy. “That’s all up to the market,” she said. “I would say 12 to 18 months.” Sales ceased in November 2010, after Greenbridge’s previous owner failed to make payments on its loans. Foreclosure proceedings began in April 2011. Almost a year ago, Greenbridge was purchased by Square Mile Capital Management LLC, Invesco Ltd. and Canyon Capital Realty Advisors LLC as one of 29 distressed loans in an $889-million national portfolio. Harbourt said the Chapel Hill location was one of the main reasons the buyers, who took over in August, were attracted to the portfolio. “As they evaluated their opportunity, Greenbridge was a star,” she said. “They’re very excited to have such a well-built building in Chapel Hill, which is a market that embraces multi-family living and doesn’t have many options.” When Greenbridge opened in fall 2010, it was touted for its environmentally friendly features. But the development sparked criticism, protests and bomb threats from those who opposed its location — many worrying it would further gentrify the historically black and low-income Northside neighborhood. Harbourt said all the property’s amenities are in place, including an event space for residents called the Sky Lounge. Cindy Spuria is the owner of LIGHT Art+Design — the only business in Greenbridge Spuria said she is excited the sales freeze is over because people assumed the building was closed. Business has picked up since the units started selling again, she said. “Once the property starts to sell, I think the whole area will develop around it. I think it will come to life,” she said. Michael Parker, who has lived at Greenbridge since July 2010, said his favorite part of his two-bedroom condominium is its large deck and proximity to both Chapel Hill and Carrboro. “It is an underappreciated location,” he said. “I can walk to all of the restaurants in Carrboro and all of the restaurants in Chapel Hill.” Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com.

ompany Carolina is giving Broadway a makeover. The company’s “Broadway Abridged” condenses five classic productions into 15-minute parodies — perfect for people with short attention spans. “It’s five zany and absurd summaries of shows that are of a particular interest to theater-going audiences,” said Ben Elling, a junior and the director of “The Glass Menagerie,” one of the five shows. “Broadway Abridged” marks the directorial debuts of the five students leading the shows. Each mini-play exaggerates and satirizes elements of the original version. Sophomore Amanda Ackovitz, who directs “Legally Blonde: The Musical,” said her version pokes fun at the original by using numerous references to “Mean Girls.” Junior Will Hawkins, director of “West Side Story,” said he hopes the performance will teach audience members that Broadway shows don’t have to be on a pedestal — it’s OK to see flaws in the shows and laugh at them. Contact the desk editor at arts@dailytarheel.com.

C

“Which aspect of your show do you like the most, and what drew you to your show?”
Legally Blonde: The Musical
“What really drew me to ‘Legally Blonde’ was that it has been one of the most ridiculous plays to hit Broadway in many years. I was drawn to it because it’s a fun show.”

Wicked
“When I was 14, ‘Wicked’ was my favorite show … I remember my family going to Myrtle Beach, and I listened to the soundtrack the entire weekend and absolutely fell in love with it.”

inBRIEF
Campus briefs
UNC-tested aortic repair devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
The Food and Drug Administration has recently approved two UNC-tested endovascular aortic repair devices. Mark Farber, a doctor and director of UNC Aortic Disease Management, served as the national principal investigator for clinical trials of both devices. Aortic Disease Management is part of the UNC Center for Heart and Vascular Care and conducts clinical trials for the advancement of aortic treatments. The aorta is human body’s main artery and carries oxygen from the heart to the rest of the body. Aortic disease can stretch, weaken or damage the aorta and is potentially fatal.

Blayne Telling, Sophomore; English

The Glass Menagerie
“What my show carries across is how absurd some of the characters are in Tennessee Williams’s plays. It’s so dramatic that the stage seems like it can’t contain them. The absurdness is what I enjoy the most.”

Amanda Ackovitz, Sophomore; philosophy

Ben Elling, Junior; political science and dramatic art

City briefs
The McKee Cornfield Maze in Rougemont will open for the fall season on Saturday at 10 a.m.
The McKee Cornfield Maze will open for its fall season Saturday at 10 a.m. There will be two mazes, pumpkins, corn stalks, farm animals and Maple View ice cream. Tickets are $10 for ages 3 and up. The maze is located at 5011 Kiger Road in Rougemont and will be open until Nov. 4. For more information on the Haunted Maze, visit www.mckeecornfieldmaze.com. — From staff and wire reports

West Side Story
“‘West Side Story’ is such a well-known show, and it definitely has its flaws. I like the opportunity to poke fun at it. It’s so beloved; it’s a staple of musical theater.”

The Phantom of the Opera
“I really love the willingness and energy the cast commit to their performance. I really love ‘Phantom.’ It’s really easy to make fun of something Edgar Harrell, you love.”

brOadWay abridgEd
Time: 7 p.m. Friday to Sunday Location: Hanes Art Center Auditorium Info: http://bit.ly/OD8adk

Will Hawkins, Junior; music and dramatic art

Junior; math and communications

4

Friday, September 28, 2012

Chancellor Search Committee
THE PROCESS
1. Form search committee that best represents University interests. 2. Interview and hire a search firm to help narrow a pool of applicants. 3. Place an official ad for the position in a variety of publications. 4. Conduct airport interviews with the first round of committee-approved candidates. 5. Conduct on-campus interviews with a smaller pool of finalists. 6. Hire the new chancellor at a Board of Governors meeting. By political a liation
Una liated Republican 5 5 Democrat 11

The Daily Tar Heel

Chancellor search committee by the numbers
By gender
Female 5 Male 16

Establishing the search
Five years into his position as the 10th chancellor of UNC, Holden Thorp announced Sept. 17 he will leave his post at the end of the academic year. To find his replacement, Board of Trustees Chairman Wade Hargrove will lead a 21-member search committee through an eight-month process of determining who should lead the University next. With the help of a search firm that has yet to be selected, the committee will interview a pool of around 30 applicants. The committee will hold its first meeting Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. to noon.

members on the committee

21

$800,765
total political campaign contributions made by committee members

years Holden Thorp served as the 10th chancellor of UNC

5

How to read the table
Name Photo Position

TRUSTEES
Wade Hargrove
Chairman of the committee and chairman of the UNC Board of Trustees

ALUmni
Barbara Hyde
Vice chairwoman of the committee and the Board of Trustees

Felicia Washington
Vice chairwoman of the committee

Eric montross

Chairman of the General Alumni Association Board of Directors

Chuck Lovelace

Executive director of the Morehead-Cain Foundation

$25,775
Campaign contributions Political affiliation Compiled by Director of Enterprise Sarah Glen. Graphic by Kevin Uhrmacher.

$39,200
John Townsend iii
Chief operating officer for Tiger Management LLC

$500
donald Curtis Roger Perry
Former chairman of the Board of Trustees Chief executive officer of the Curtis Media Group Inc.

$0
Richard Vinroot
Former Charlotte mayor

$1,925
dwight Stone
Chairman of the Educational Foundation Inc.’s Executive Board of Directors

$55,250

$11,950

$181,725

$475,396

$8,350

STUdEnTS
michael Bertucci
President of the Graduate and Professional Student Federation

FACULTY/STAFF
Jan Boxill
Faculty chairwoman and senior lecturer of philosophy

Valerie Ashby

Professor and chairwoman of the department of chemistry

Kevin m. Guskiewicz

Professor and chairman of the department of exercise and sport science

John mcGowan

Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature

Cam Patterson

Professor of cardiovascular medicine

$0
Will Leimenstoll
Student body president

$0
douglas Shackelford

$0
Jackie Overton

$0
dwayne Pinkney

$0
Kenneth Broun

$0
Key: Republican Democrat Unaffiliated

Professor of taxation at the Kenan-Flagler Business School

Chairwoman of the Employee Forum

Vice provost for finance and academic planning

Former Chapel Hill mayor and dean of the UNC School of Law

$0

$0

$0

$0

$694

UNC Women’s Basketball Team
holding OPEN TRYOUTS!
OCTOBER 8th 6:30-7:30am

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YOU MUST BE A FULL-TIME STUDENT & HAVE MEDICAL CLEARANCE TO PARTICIPATE.
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Feel the pulse of freedom as you take care of America’s heroes. Join the Army National Guard as a medical professional.

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The Daily Tar Heel

Friday, September 28, 2012

5

Time of the essence for UNC’s Presson
Cross country runner Isaac Presson is on the right track.
By Robbie Harms
Assistant Sports Editor

of a Division I cross country runner. Another day of running and routine.

‘Casual progression run’
The van ride is quiet. The runners have been awake for less than an hour. Some stare ahead at the road. Others try to sleep. “It’s never a good sign when you have to start running when it’s still dark out,” Presson said. The vans pull into the trail’s parking lot at 6:34 a.m., and the runners trudge out to begin a five-minute warm-up jog, followed by a series of stretches. Head coach Mark VanAlstyne announces the workout: a 10-mile progression run. Each mile is supposed to be faster than the last. “How far should me and (junior) Patrick (Schellberg) go? Full thing?” Presson, who has been dealing with a tender right ankle, asks his coach. “I would shoot for nine.” “Nice. Nice casual progression run.” Presson joins the circle of runners at the trail head, and they clip off a 5:48 mile before it’s 7 a.m.

“It’s never a good sign when you have to start running when it’s still dark out.”
Isaac Presson,
UNC cross country runner

The Bell Tower tolls three times, but few are awake to hear it, save a select crew of athletes and early-risers. It’s 5:47 a.m. on Sept. 18. The sky is a purplish gray, and a soft wind whips against the flags surrounding North Carolina’s Irwin Belk Track. The only respite from the darkness comes from the field lights towering above the track, and even that only illuminates patches of rubber and grass. Isaac Presson, a 6-foot-3, 155-pound junior on the North Carolina cross country team, walks up to the second floor of Eddie Smith Field House and into the men’s locker room, where freshman Richard Miller asks him if he had caught the score to the Broncos-Falcons game the night before. Presson had not. He had gone to bed at 10:30 p.m. The game was far from over. Presson changes into a gray running shirt, tucks it into a pair of dark blue athletic shorts and exits. He joins his teammates on the bottom floor, and they walk to the parking lot outside the field house. They pile into two 18-passenger vans at 6:11 a.m. and drive to the American Tobacco Trail in Wake County. The routine seems ruthless — waking up before sunrise to run 10 to 12 miles — but for Presson and his teammates, it’s just another Tuesday. Another day in the life

runners have returned from the workout. The watch is black and simple, and it reads 51:17 for the ninemiler. He ran the first five in 29:12, a pace of about 5:50 per mile, and the last four in 22:05, a pace of 5:31. Nice casual progression run. Some runners slam down a Gatorade protein shake, attempting to replace the calories burned by running 10 miles in less than 60 minutes, and then everyone climbs back into the vans.

Fueling the furnace
They arrive back on campus at 8:49 a.m., and Presson, an economics major, attends Business Analytics at 9:30 a.m. and Introduction to Entrepreneurship at 12:30 p.m. He then meets teammates Jack Driggs and Dan Mykityshyn at Sutton’s Drug Store for lunch at 2:15 p.m. Driggs and Mykityshyn already have a table and are sipping on cherry Cokes. Apparently Presson had told them to meet at 2 p.m. Driggs is half-mad and says he’s “on a schedule.” No time to waste. Presson, a laid-back, unassuming 20 year old with unmistakable wit — “I.P.: Ladies love me. Guys want to be me. Jack

Quantified
Numbers. They’re what separate good runners from great ones, and they’re what can drive them insane. They’re what earned Presson, a state champion in the indoor mile at Asheville High, scholarship offers from UNC and N.C. State and interest from Columbia, Virginia and Florida State. And they’re what appear on Presson’s watch a little after 8 a.m. on this Tuesday, when the

See Presson, Page 7

dth/karla towle Isaac Presson, pictured at UNC’s Finley Fields, runs 70 to 75 miles a week. The team runs today at the Notre Dame Invitational in South Bend, Ind.

6

Friday, September 28, 2012

SportsFriday

The Daily Tar Heel

Ebron emerges as a weapon for UNC
By Michael Lananna
Senior Writer

North Carolina tight end Eric Ebron is well aware of the perception that accompanies his position. And, quite frankly, he thinks it’s outdated. “A lot of people think tight ends are usually the man on the ground or the sixth man on the line of scrimmage,” Ebron said. “But we’re a lot more versatile than people think, and we’re a lot stronger and a lot faster than people mistake us for — at least, I am.” As confident as that sounds, for the most part, the sophomore has backed it up with his play. As the Tar Heels (2-2, 0-1 ACC) head into Saturday’s

home matchup with Idaho (0-4), Ebron ranks second on the team in receptions and receiving yards with 14 and 210, respectively. Those numbers already surpass the totals Ebron put together all of last season, and they’re likely to go up even more against an Idaho team that ranks 106th in the nation in passing defense. With UNC’s wide receiving core a bit thin to start the season, Ebron has emerged as a frequent target for quarterback Bryn Renner and the Tar Heel offense. “They really know how to utilize their weapons like me, Erik Highsmith and (Sean) Tapley,” Ebron said. “They really know how to scheme up and put the ball where it needs to be. And

we just execute it. So that’s what really got me where I am now, producing a lot more stats than I did last year.” A lot of that has to do with sheer talent as well. At 6-foot-4 and 235 pounds, Ebron is near the lower end of the tight-end size spectrum. But, perhaps because of that size, he’s near the high end in terms of athleticism. “He’s the most versatile tight end I’ve ever seen,” Renner said. “He could probably start at X receiver if we wanted him to. He’s got that

size and that athletic ability. He can make all the plays … And he can catch the ball any time that he wants.” Ebron said he actually used to play at the X wide receiver slot in high school before moving to tight end his junior year. And while he said he would play at receiver again if the coaching staff asked him to, there’s little chance UNC would move him from a position that appears to fit him perfectly. “He is definitely what you look for if you’re going to draw a blueprint of what we

want a tight end to be,” offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Blake Anderson said. “That’s what you want tight ends to look like, and fortunately he’s a sophomore, and we’ve got him for a while.” But, as an underclassman, Ebron is still prone to making rookie mistakes. In Ebron’s case, that has come in the form of false starts. He’s racked up four false start penalties in the last two games, but Renner just chalked that up to Ebron’s excitable personality. The tight end was unde-

niably enthusiastic as he talked about his role on the team and his position after Tuesday’s practice. Maybe he does have the athletic ability to play at wide receiver, but there’s a little doubt that he has embraced his role as a tight end — stereotypes and all. “You know, I like people who underestimate us,” Ebron said. “Because when we come out and we shock them, then they have no answer.” Contact the desk editor at sports@dailytarheel.com.

DTH PICKS OF THE WEEK
The DTH Sports staff and one celebrity guest compete to pick the winners of the biggest ACC and national college football games each week.
After three weeks of picking, it looks like some of the other pickers are finally figuring out some of Sports Editor Brandon Moree’s secrets to near-perfect picking. No surprise, Moree went 7-1 for the third week, but he might not be alone at the top for long. Assistant Editors Brooke Pryor, Robbie Harms and Henry Gargan all went 7-1 along with Moree last week. If not for Miami’s overtime upset of Georgia Tech, all four would have finished the week with perfect records. Pryor is surging in the standings after entering last week tied for the worst overall record and starting the picking season with a 4-4 record. Gargan could be challenging for a top
Brandon Moree 7-1 21-3 (.875) UNC N.C. State Wake Clemson Ohio State Oregon Georgia Baylor

The Lowdown on saTurday’s Game
north Carolina vs. idaho
(0-4) Kenan Stadium, 3:30 p.m. (2-2, 0-1 aCC)

head-To-head
UNC rush vs. Idaho front seven
Giovani bernard returned last Saturday, joining Romar morris and a.J. blue to form a three-headed rushing attack. idaho allows 145.5 ground yards per game. edge: unC idaho ranks 106th in the nation in passing defense. UnC quarterback bryn Renner threw for 321 yards and two touchdowns in the Tar heels’ win against eCU. edge: unC idaho ranks 118th in the nation rushing, while UnC ranks 20th in rush defense, allowing just 99.5 per game. lead idaho Rb Ryan bass averages 55 yards per game. edge: unC The UnC secondary held eCU to 124 passing yards last Saturday. idaho Qb dominique blackman has a 73 percent completion percentage and 279 aerial yards per game. edge: unC both UnC placekicker Casey barth and idaho kicker Trey Farquhar have done the job this year. They’ve both made six of seven field goal attempts. edge: Push

UNC pass vs. Idaho secondary Idaho rush vs. UNC front seven Idaho pass vs. UNC secondary Special teams

spot, but last week’s 5-3 performance from two weeks ago is pulling his average down. Though Moree still leads all pickers with a 21-3 record overall, Harms is hot on his heels, posting an overall record of 19-5. He’s tied with the guest pickers’ record. Former Sports Editor Kelly Parsons rebounded from her dismal 4-4 showing last week to finish 6-2 with our guest picker, editor of ACCSports.com Jim Young. Senior writer and bloginator supreme Michael Lananna was last in picks this week, finishing 5-3. Last week, Lananna finished 4-4, and he did little to redeem himself this week. He’s sitting at the bottom of the standings for the second straight week. This week’s guest picker is Kyle Rainey,
Brooke Pryor 7-1 16-8 (.667) UNC Miami Wake Clemson Ohio State Oregon Georgia West Virginia Robbie Harms 7-1 19-5 (.792) UNC Miami Wake Clemson MSU Oregon Georgia West Virginia Henry Gargan 7-1 16-8 (.667) UNC N.C. State Wake Clemson MSU Oregon Georgia West Virginia

Kyle Rainey is this week’s guest picker. Rainey is the coordinator of WXYC’s sports talk show and producer of STV’s late night show. a senior communications major from Warrenton. Rainey is the coordinator of the sports talk show on WXYC, UNC’s student radio station. He is also the producer of STV’s late night program, originally titled Late Night STV. You might have seen him Thursday nights around town parading as a stand-up comedian, because he does a little bit of that in his free time.
Kelly Parsons 6-2 16-8 (.667) UNC Miami Wake Clemson MSU Oregon Georgia West Virginia Michael Lananna 5-3 14-10 (.583) UNC N.C. State Wake Clemson Ohio State Oregon Georgia West Virginia Kyle Rainey 6-2 19-5 (.792) UNC Miami Wake Clemson MSU Oregon Georgia West Virginia

Last Week Record to date UNC vs. Idaho N.C. State at Miami Wake Forest vs. Duke Clemson at Boston College Ohio State at Michigan State Washington State vs. Oregon Georgia vs. Tennessee Baylor at West Virginia

The Bottom Line — UNC 45, Idaho 6
Compiled by miChael lananna

With support from The Carolina Asia Center, The Center for Global Initiatives, and UNC and Duke History Departments

A Free Screening of The Revolutionary 7:30 pm September 28, 2012 Varsity Theater Franklin Street

The Daily Tar Heel

SportsFriday

Friday, September 28, 2012

7

HOW THE STATS STACK UP
YPG
2012 339.2

Allowed YPG Quarterback
428.0
Dominique Blackman 87-119-5, 837 yards, 6 TDs Bryn Renner 90-144-3, 1,191 yards, 11 TDs Brian Reader 192-354-12, 1, 974 yards, 10 TDs Bryn Renner 3,086 yards, 26 TDs

Top rusher
Ryan Bass 221 yards, 0 TDs

Defensive Star
Gary Walker 31 tackles, 1 interception for 94 yards
Kevin Reddick 27 tackles, 5.5 tackles for loss, 23 yards, 2 sacks

Play the Craven, nevermore
By Jonathan LaMantia
Staff Writer

2012

453.0

322.8

A.J. Blue 203 yards, 3 TDs

Unc vs. dUke
Time: 7 p.m. today Location: Koskinen Stadium at Duke University Men’s soccer schedule: http://bit.ly/QtelkV

2011

301.5

436.8

Princeton McCarty 705 yards, 3 TDs Giovani Bernard 1,253 yards, 13 TDs

Tre’shawn Robinson 117 tackles, 7.5 tackles for loss Zach Brown 105 tackles, 5.5 sacks, 3 INT

2011

393.2

365.2

from page 5

Presson

(Driggs) can’t beat me,” is his go-to self-describer — laughs it off and sits down. The waitress comes to the table, and Presson orders a cheeseburger with chips on the side. Driggs and Mykityshyn both order a double cheeseburger and fries. The lunch conversation floats from running to recruits to girls to replacing Sutton’s framed basketball jerseys with speed suits. When the food comes, Presson wastes no time. The burger is gone in less than five minutes, and he wipes his mouth.

A runner’s sanctuary

Presson leaves Sutton’s at 2:45 p.m. and arrives at Stallings-Evans Sports Medicine Center at 3:07 p.m. He talks with a trainer and then begins a series of footstrengthening and injuryprevention exercises. 0/12 4:01 PMHe spots Sami Jorgensen, Page 5 a sophomore on the women’s team, doing similar stretches.

“How’re the shins today, Sami?” he asks. “They’re good, it’s just the breathing…” she says, explaining her most recent corporal difficulty. A runner’s body, like any athlete’s, is a temple, a hallowed mix of muscle and bone, and they must treat it accordingly. “I’m pretty fragile,” Presson says. “Definitely the biggest thing holding me back in my running career is injuries.” After an ice bath, he leaves the training room at 4:07 p.m. and walks to the student athlete academic center inside the Loudermilk Center for Excellence. “(A) good thing about this place is that it’s got the best bathrooms,” Presson says of the academic center, where he spends 40 minutes studying International Economics before walking to the weight room at 4:56 p.m. The team knocks out a 45-minute weight-training session, and Gatorade protein shakes are handed out to all. “They would replace a meal for most people,” Presson says on the walk back to his house

“There’s times we’ll go a while without seeing him because he’s always training.”
John ruhl III,
one of Isaac presson’s housemates

for dinner.

Different perspective
There are sodas and salty snacks strewn across the coffee table of Presson’s off-campus house, and a flat-screen T.V. dominates the main room. Presson’s room is messy, large and filled with posters. Junior John Ruhl III, one of Presson’s housemates, says he’s grown accustomed to living with a runner. “I hear him wake up a lot early in the morning,” says Ruhl. “(And) there’s times we’ll go a while without seeing him because he’s always training.” The housemates all find dinner — Presson prepares a burrito filled with generous amounts grilled chicken, rice, cheese, chopped lettuce and salsa — and gather on the couch to watch reruns of “The Office.”

“Isaac is probably the best cook in the house,” Ruhl says. “Nate (Koutlas, another housemate) and the other two are God awful.” Before everyone has settled in, Presson is halfway done with the burrito. In less than 10 minutes he’s back in the kitchen making another one.

Back to sleep
Presson passes the rest of the night studying, and at 10:30 p.m., he’s back where he began the day 17 hours earlier: his bed. He sets his alarm and goes to sleep, ready to do it all again tomorrow. The Bell Tower tolls twice, a subtle, powerful reminder for Presson and all college runners that time is unchanging. Contact the desk editor at sports@dailytarheel.com.

The North Carolina men’s soccer team will look for its first road win of the season against Duke (3-4-1, 1-11) today, but it will do so without its second-leading goal scorer, junior forward Andy Craven. No. 6 UNC (6-1-1, 2-0-1) recorded its third straight shutout in Tuesday’s 1-0 win against Wofford, playing with only 10 men for most of the game after Craven was sent off with a red card in the 16th minute. NCAA rules require that Craven sits out Friday’s game, so the Tar Heels will need to find a replacement at center forward. “Andy is definitely a big loss, but that happens all the time,” senior forward Martin Murphy said. “So we’re just going to have to prepare like we usually would.” Sophomore midfielder Mikey Lopez said it will be tough for UNC’s attack to play without Craven’s skill set. “He definitely brings a good sense of playing the ball behind the defense,” Lopez said. “He makes good runs behind them. It’ll be tough for someone else to replicate that.” UNC, which has struggled to generate offense at times this season, will be challenged by Duke goalkeeper James Belshaw, who has allowed just 0.85 goals per game and has earned back-to-back ACC Player of the Week honors. But Lopez said the Tar Heels are unfazed by Belshaw’s accolades. “I’ve read about him, but I’ve also seen the teams that they’ve played and the scores that they’ve gotten,” Lopez

said. “I don’t think any of our players are too concerned about him being ACC Player of the Week for two times consecutively. It’s just another goalkeeper that we have to beat.” If the offense does struggle, the team can likely count on its defense to pick up the slack as it has done throughout the season. UNC has allowed just 0.25 goals per game, and those numbers rank UNC third in the NCAA and first in the conference. Head coach Carlos Somoano said his entire team deserves the credit for the Tar Heels’ staunch defensive effort, not just the back four defenders. “The six in front of the back four have been outstanding in terms of pressing and closing down players,” he said. “When you have a team that’s doing this well defensively, it’s not a back four. It’s not a goalkeeper. It’s a unit of 11 that’s really coordinating themselves well.” Somoano said Tuesday’s effort without Craven was a positive sign for the Tar Heels as the season progresses. “To be able to do that a man down shows something,” Somoano said. “Those are the kind of things you look for to see if your team really has the juice to do some damage during the season.” Contact the desk editor at sports@dailytarheel.com.

T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F N O R T H C A R O L I NA AT C H A P E L H I L L P R E S E N T S

Humphreys
Josephine
NOVELS: Dreams of Sleep � Rich in Love � The Fireman’s Fair � Nowhere Else on Earth

“A consummate southern storyteller whose subject is the whole, mysterious universe of human affection and heartbreak.”

Thomas Wolfe Lecture
Tuesday, Oct. 2
7:30 p.m. Genome Sciences Bldg.
250 Bell Tower Drive
(across from Sonja Haynes Stone Center) UNC Campus Free / Open to the Public englishcomplit.unc.edu/wolfe

2012

SPONSORS
The Morgan Writer-in-Residence Program The Thomas Wolfe Society Department of English and Comparative Literature

8

Friday, September 28, 2012

News

The Daily Tar Heel

Students encouraged to register their bikes with DPS
By Kristen Skill and Lauren Gil
Staff Writers

The Department of Public Safety is tightening bike policy and encouraging students to abide by a mandatory rule to register their bikes. While permits are required, only 1,000 to 2,000 of the bikes on campus are registered, said Randy Young, DPS spokesman. In an effort to increase registration, students who

register their bikes receive a 50 percent discount on bike locks at UNC Student Stores. And as a result, lock sales have nearly doubled, causing a temporary sellout until Monday, said John Gorsuch, director of Student Stores. “This year in particular I would say it’s been kind of an above average year,” he said. “(DPS) has been better at getting the word out,” Gorsuch said. “Students have been more responsive.”

Students can register for free, either in-person at the department or on its website, Young said. He added that registered bikes are more likely to be returned if stolen because DPS is able to track them. “Bikes that are stolen or involved in crime are usually not registered,” he said. Young said he recalls a recent case where a girl recognized her stolen bike being ridden by another person —

and it was returned by DPS because it was registered. “It’s deterrent to crime,” Young said. “When crime occurs, we can identify what’s lost.” Registered bikes are marked by an official sticker located on the bicycle frame. But Young said that unregistered bikes are not at risk of being impounded, despite DPS’s increased effort to impound bikes not parked at designated racks.

“Bike registration is not connected with bike parking — they are separate issues,” Young said. Students tend to park their bikes illegally because certain bike racks are in higher demand than others, and it can be hard to find a free spot, Young said. “We recommend just a minute or two to find parking.” Young said he encourages students to contact DPS if

they have concerns regarding bike rack congestion. Senior Laura Hamrick said she has never felt a need to register her bike, but she will now likely register it to prevent theft. “I’ve heard about bike registration vaguely, but I’ve never really thought about it — it seems like a good idea, though,” Hamrick said. Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

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BARTENDERS ARE IN DEMAND!
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Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 5 -- Watch out, or you will spend more than expected. Don’t despair; the tunnel could be a simple figment of your imagination. Besides, there’s a light at the end, anyway. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 6 -- The job now is keeping what you’ve learned. Home improvements will drain savings if you’re not careful. Friends can help you replenish your reserves. Schedule carefully. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is a 6 -- You may have to make a mess to get things right, but don’t push your luck, especially around finances. Acknowledge limitations. Friends help you meet the right person. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is a 6 -- Find inspiration in a book, and venture far. But listen to the voice of reason to assure that the giants you fight are not actually windmills. Don’t make expensive promises. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 5 -- Consider all options before taking on new responsibility. A risky proposition could be rewarding, but may also fail. Trust your instincts, & be willing to accept the consequences. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 6 -- It may seem like resistance coming from above, but you may be your biggest obstacle. Get out of your way & face your public. There’s nothing to be afraid of if you really think about it.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 5 -- Focus emotional energy on work, not on drama. The job may get complex, but it’s also rewarding. You may as well enjoy the experience. Watch out for hidden agendas, though. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 -- Breathe deeply and relax. Access your creative side to overcome obstacles with playfulness and joy. Avoid distractions from what’s truly important. Share love. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 7 -- Public duties take from private time at first. Later, relax at home away from noise and raucous crowds. Tell your friends you’ll see them later. Clean house. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 6 -- Give your mate the benefit of the doubt. Check the Internet for ideas, but limit your time. There are plenty of great experiences around the corner, not far from home. Explore. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 5 -- Develop a creative plan of action. Expand wisely, without haste or waste. Emotions center on money, but cash may not be the core issue. Go ahead and be outrageous. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7 -- Pay attention to everything around you. You get flashes of insight at the oddest moments. Don’t take financial risks if you encounter resistance. Avoid distractions.
(c) 2012 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERvICES, INC.

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UNC Community

Julia W. Burns, MD

Adult, Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist
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Closest Chiropractor to Campus! 929-3552
Voted BEST in the Triangle by Readers of the Independent!
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INSIDE THE BANK OF AMERICA BUILDING

136 E. ROSEMARY ST.

919-942-4776

Amanda Dean, Campus Minister
Sunday: 7pm Worship Monday: 11:30am-1:00pm Lunch at Lenoir Thursday: 6pm Dinner & Program Also: Fellowship, Spiritual Growth Groups, Service Opportunities, Alternative Spring Break, Music Groups, Residential Community

Presbyterian Campus Ministry
jrogers@upcch.org • 919-967-2311 110 Henderson St., Chapel Hill
• Thursdays Fellowship dinner & program 5:30-8 PM

Our Faith is over 2,000 years old Our thinking is not

God is still speaking

MASS SCHEDULE

• Weekly small groups • Sunday Worship at our six local Partner Churches. • Trips to the NC mountains & coast as well as annual spring break mission opportunities.

Multi-cultural • Mutli-racial
Uniting - Just Peace Church.
-College Students WelcomeCoffee Hour & Classes at 10:00 a.m. Worship at 8:45am & 11:00am

United Church of Chapel Hill: Welcoming & Affirming Open to EVERYONE Social Justice • EQUALITY

919- 942- 2152 • uncwesley.org 214 Pittsboro St. - Across from the Carolina Inn

Saturday: 5:15pm Sunday: 9am, 11am & Student Mass at 7pm 919-929-3730 • 218 Pittsboro St., CH

www.uncpcm.com

Chapel Hill Mennonite Fellowship
Sunday Evenings at 5:00PM Friends Meeting House 531 Raleigh Road, Chapel Hill

Pastor: Isaac Villegas 919.357.5496 www.mennonit.es/chmf

Meets Sundays at 10am
7326 Sunrise Rd., Chapel Hill

Come worship with a peace church.

varsitychurch.com

Place a Classified: www.dailytarheel.com/classifieds or Call 919-962-0252

Religious Directory

The Daily Tar Heel
from page 1

From Page One
soon. “There has been a lot of precedent about these forums from searches in the past,” he said. The search committee will also have a website to inform the public about their progress. The website, chancellorsearch.unc.edu, is currently under construction. Don Curtis, a member of the Board of Trustees and the search committee, said he is delighted to help find the new chancellor. the University of Georgia dropped a game with the University of Louisville. The Cardinals signed a home-andhome contract and replaced Tennessee. But the last-minute uncertainty Tennessee unleashed meant UNC had less time to fill out its 2012 schedule. The contract with Idaho was drawn up in October. “I want someone who can lead Carolina into all of the challenges that are involved with running a major school.” Curtis said the University has been moving past the recent scandals, and he’s looking forward to the future. “We’ve had some problems, but we are rectifying them, and making sure (they) never happen again.” Thorp’s decision to step down followed years riddled with academic, athletic and his school’s football players like the opportunity to play against teams with big names and bigger stadiums. Wills said Elon calculates its athletic budget in part from money it receives from football games like the one it played against UNC, although he declined to say how much. One-and-done games can be an important income stream for smaller sports programs. In 2010-11, Department of Education data show Elon’s football program brought in 22.7 percent of its $17.2 million in athletic revenue. In the same year, Idaho’s football team was responsible for a whopping 45.7 percent of the $16.8 million its athletic department brought in. “It’s just part of being a lower-level (NCAA) Division 1 school,” Wills said. administrative scandals. In the week following the announcement, students, faculty, staff and the Board of Trustees formally asked Thorp to reconsider. Hyde said searching for Thorp’s successor is the most influential way a trustee serves the University. “It’s the most important responsibility we have, and we take it very seriously.” Will Leimenstoll, student body president and one of the student members of the search committee, said he

Friday, September 28, 2012

9

search

experience to lead faculty and students. Hyde said the committee has not divided responsibilities up yet. Hargrove said the search committee will hold public forums to allow the public to share what characteristics they want in a chancellor. He said the dates for the forums have not been decided, but the committee will make an announcement

“It’s the most important responsibility we have, and we take it very seriously.”
Barbara hyde,
vice chairwoman of the search committee

wants to make the search for Thorp’s successor his top priority this year. Michael Bertucci, president of the graduate and professional student federation, is the other student member. Leimenstoll said he is excited about the opportunity.

“I’m looking for a chancellor who shares our values for UNC and what sets Carolina apart from other universities,” Leimenstoll said. “I don’t take this responsibility lightly.” Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

from page 1

guarantees

from page 1

equipment

games have been at home each year, and senior associate director of athletics Larry Gallo said they net $1.5 million to $1.7 million each. Per Atlantic Coast Conference rules, UNC and other members share media revenue and keep their respective game-day receipts. To attract opponents who don’t eat from the ACC trough, the University pays non-conference visitors. One way to do this is via alternating home-game series, like UNC frequently organizes with East Carolina University. In these cases, both schools get compensated for losing home-game revenue in one year, but they don’t profit. Then there are the “oneand-done” games. These are often against smaller teams who collect larger checks for games they will likely lose. Elon University and Idaho fall into this category. UNC will pay Elon $350,000 for its 62-0 loss on Sept. 1. The University will pay Idaho $800,000 — double its normal high end of $400,000. Profit aside, one-and-done games let UNC schedule an extra home game the next season without worrying about having to play a contractually obligated away game.

Banking on football
Scheduling seven home games is important for the athletic department. Besides giving fans more opportunities to see the Heels at Kenan, it squeezes more money from the athletic department’s biggest money-maker. Data provided to the Department of Education in 2010-11 show that the basketball program brought in $19.7 million. The football team brought in $26.4 million — more than one-third of the athletic department’s $71.4 million take that year. “It’s big time revenue that we bank on,” Gallo said. The football team could operate without the money, but other sports depend on it. The fewer home games the football team plays, the harder things become for others.

From the stands
Fans at the East Carolina game had mixed views of this year’s non-conference schedule. Bill Browning, who’s been a Rams Club member for 25 years, enjoys the friendlier feel of games against smaller opponents. But he wasn’t sure if he’d make the trip from Charlotte for the Idaho game. “That’s a waste of my time and money,” he said. Paola Cardona, a freshman with a giant “L” painted on her torso, was less discerning. “It’s just fun to be home, no matter who we play,” she said. “As long as we’re not losing, money doesn’t matter.” Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

Cost of doing business
The importance of football revenue to bigger athletic departments like UNC’s is reflected in the difference between payments for football and basketball non-conference home games. This year, the largest of the six basketball payouts are $100,000 each for ECU and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. By comparison, the smallest football payment is ECU’s $250,000. Smaller schools also benefit from one-and-done games. “They’re looking for an opportunity to showcase their program and to help their budget,” former UNC Athletic Director Dick Baddour said. Kyle Wills, Elon’s athletic business director, said

‘A domino effect’
The story behind the UNCIdaho game began in 2005. That year, the University of Tennessee and UNC agreed to play each other in 2011 and 2012. Before those games transpired, however, the Volunteers fired their head coach, hired a new one and cancelled the series in 2011. The University got $750,000 per the contract’s buyout clause, and UNC’s schedules for both years were thrown in disarray. “When somebody drops someone, they think it just involves one team,” Gallo said. “It can be a domino effect.” UNC lucked out when

the pack. “That’s kind of a sign of the times now and Oregon kind of started all that,” Morelli said. Fellow Atlantic Coast Conference teams Maryland, Georgia Tech and Virginia Tech have also joined in. The football equipment assistant managers keep track of these sorts of trends, and they are ultimately responsible for the daily organization of UNC football gear. Freeman said they do up to 18 loads of laundry a day between their two 100-pound and 85-pound washers. “When all this stuff comes in, we get close to 1,000 pairs of shoes each year, hundreds and hundreds of Nike boxers, shorts, dry fits, girdles, suits, cold weather gear,” Freeman said. “Anything you see players or coaches wearing, we get.” In addition, equipment staff and student managers are responsible for making sure each of the nine stickers — including the ACC stickers, American flags and player numbers — are placed on all 120 helmets before the games every week. “We’re probably putting in 80 hours a week,” Freeman said. “It’s a lot, but everybody in the (Kenan Center) does — coaches are putting in that

“They do what they have to do, and they do a good job of it.”
Jheranie Boyd,
UnC senior wide receiver

and then some, probably close to 100 hours a week.” Freeman said the team relies on equipment staff to organize the countless parts of each player’s uniform that are required for all home and away games. “Everything has to be clean and crisp,” he said. “We don’t want players to worry about anything except coming into the locker room and putting on the uniform — that’s all they have to worry about.” And players say this effort does not go unappreciated. Jheranie Boyd, a senior wide receiver, said equipment staff help with the players’ needs. “A lot of guys respect them,” he said. “They do what they have to do, and they do a good job of it.” Renner said equipment managers and trainers go above and beyond to help at all times. “It goes without saying they’re the hardest working people in this building,” he said. “I think they go underappreciated.”

dth/kaitlyn kelly Wide receiver Jheranie Boyd poses wearing the American flag football helmet in the UNC locker room on Thursday.

Morelli said most people don’t realize how much work goes on behind the scenes to keep a Division I football program running on the equipment side. “It’s something you really got to enjoy to do. It’s not something you’re going to get rich doing, and it requires a lot of hours and is a lot of work,” he said. “It’s kind of like coaching — but a little different.” Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

Bike registration

games
© 2012 The Mepham Group. All rights reserved.

DPS is pushing for bike owners to complete the mandatory bike registration process. See pg. 8 for story.

Movie Showtimes for Week 9/28-10/4 - All Movies $4.00

Level:

1

2

3

4
Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9.

For sale … again
Units in Greenbridge, a controversial building complex, are back on the market. See pg. 3 for story.

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES J
Fri & Sat: 9:30 Sun: 4:10, 7:10 Tue & Wed: 7:10 Thu: 9:30 Fri & Sat: 9:40 Sun: 7:00 Tue & Wed: 7:20 Thu: 9:40

CLOSED MONDAY

THE BOURNE LEGACY J MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS J
Fri: 7:00 Sat: 7:10 Thu: 7:00 Sun: 4:30

HBCU week
Financial struggles have been affecting HBCUs despite grant funding. See dailytarheel.com for story.

MADAGASCAR 3: Europe’s Most Wanted I
The Varsity Theatre 123 E. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill • 967-8665 www.varsityonfranklin.com

Solution to Thursday’s puzzle

FREE EVENT

STAGED READING & PANEL DISCUSSION

Bits of Broadway
Company Carolina is presenting shortened versions of Broadway’s big hits. See pg. 3 for story.

An Enemy of the People
professor at the Minshar Arts School in Tel Aviv, will share his Israeli adaptation of “ An Enemy of the People,” a reimagining of Henrik Ibsen's classic play of environmental activism. The play which was , originally produced by the Beersheva Theatre, depicts a sudden chemical leak in an Israeli industrial park that endangers the region’s water supply , prompting a family feud that quickly turns into all-out political war. The event will be in English, and will be directed by Carolina’s Communication Studies Artist-in-Residence, Joseph Megel. A panel discussion will follow.

BOGED:
Boaz Gaon,

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACross 1 It can keep a watch on you 6 Phi follower? 10 Took the bus 14 French fry? 15 Transportation option 16 Carafe kin 17 Quarry for Henry VIII’s cat? 19 Word in a boast 20 King of fiction 21 Martin Luther, to Pope Leo X 23 European wine region 25 Bouquet 26 Dutch exporter’s forte? 32 The Olympic Australis and others 33 Slippery 34 Pop-ups, often 37 Hollywood VIP 38 “The Prince of Tides” co-star 40 Bend at a barre 41 LAPD section? 42 Pay stub abbr. 43 Origami staple 44 New Orleans campus sign during spring break? 47 Way up 50 Desperate 51 Horns in 54 Puts in a lower position 59 Melville’s “grand, ungodly, god-like man” 60 Garb for a private pupil? 62 Two after do 63 Go like mad 64 Pitched perfectly 65 It’s pitched 66 Strong arms 67 Racket Down 1 Former fleet 2 Tense 3 Boorish 4 Sitting on 5 Noncommittal response 6 “The Tenant of Wildfell Hall” author Anne 7 Seine flower 8 Addams family nickname 9 Toward shelter 10 Put on a pedestal 11 Have an outstanding loan from 12 Durable fabric 13 Evergreen shrub 18 Muddle 22 Risqué 24 Swift’s birthplace 26 Drudgery 27 Prom night style 28 Myanmar neighbor 29 Bugged? 30 Spot checker? 31 __-de-France 34 Melodramatic moan 35 Wine partner 36 Word with poppy or top 38 Zilch 39 Andean tuber 40 Arnie or Tiger, e.g. 42 Roll up 43 South Carolina university 44 Gossip morsel 45 Down sources 46 First Nations tribe 47 Sting

(C)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All rights reserved.

Saturday, Sept. 29 at 7:30 p.m.
WILLIAM AND IDA FRIDAY CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION Free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required. No reserved seats.
This event is co-sponsored by Theatre J of Washington D.C., which is premiering the English language production of this play in January 2013. Also co-sponsored by Communications Studies and the Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations. This event is made possible by a grant from the Charles H. Revson Foundation in honor of Eli N. Evans, ’58.

48 Chuckle relative 49 Not worth __ 52 Words of reproach, and a hint to how the four longest puzzle answers are formed 53 “The Highway to India” canal 55 “That’s terrible!” 56 __ torch 57 Cockney toast starter 58 Ocular nuisance 61 Clavell’s “__-Pan”

JONATHAN HESS DIRECTOR

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Friday, September 28, 2012

Opinion
Established 1893, 119 years of editorial freedom

The Daily Tar Heel

QUOTE OF THE DAY
“It’s just fun to be home, no matter who we play. As long we’re not losing, money doesn’t matter.”
Paola Cardona, on UNC’s football game Saturday against Idaho

Andy ThomAson EDITOR, 962-4086 OR EDITOR@DAILYTARHEEL.COM ChelseA PhiPPs OpInIOn EDITOR, OpInIOn@DAILYTARHEEL.COM nAThAn d’Ambrosio DEpuTY OpInIOn EDITOR

ediToriAl boArd members
SAnEM KAbACA nAYAb KHAn CODY wELTOn TIM LOngEST TREY MAnguM KAREEM RAMADAn EvAn ROSS

EDiTOriAl cArTOOn

by Daniela Madriz, madriz@email.unc.edu

FEATUrED OnlinE rEADEr cOmmEnT
“If tobacco is so awful, then why is it legal? Oh right, the same government that wants to ban it can’t get by without the tax revenues.”
Mike Morgan, on the proposed public smoking ban

Everett lozzi
Freedom Friday Senior economics and history major from Charlotte. Email: lozzi@live.unc.edu

Smoking lessons from Don Draper

lETTErS TO THE EDiTOr
Column on Jesus’ wife was very inaccurate
TO THE EDITOR: In response to Memet Walker’s rants about the recently discovered “Gospel of Jesus’ Wife.” So yes, a 4th-century Coptic manuscript has recently come to the attention of Biblical scholars. So should we all change our opinions about Jesus and conclude that he had a wife? The answer is a resounding no! At best, the manuscript found is just another fragment of a Gnostic text (By the way, it’s the size of your average smartphone). The fragment sheds no light about the historical Jesus. Why? Because it does not pass historical criteria. No other existing manuscripts independently attest that Jesus had a wife! So, while Walker’s anecdote about Jesus and Mary is amusing, in actuality, he has no basis for the story. Moreover, and probably the most striking thing about the manuscript, is most scholars believe it’s a forgery. Stephen Emmel, a professor at Muenster (the hub of Biblical scholarship), and the founder of the Gospel of Judas, believes that the gospel is a forgery. Even one of our own professors, Zlatko Plese, believes the manuscript is a forgery. As for Walker’s conclusion about the Bible being as unreliable as Wikipedia, again, he has no basis for this assumption. Over 5,500 manuscripts of the New Testament exist; moreover, most of the beloved stories in the New Testament, including the resurrection of Jesus, are independently attested, which means multiple independent 1st-century sources claim the event happened. Nathan Dove ’15 Religious Studies

Kvetching board™
kvetch: v.1 (Yiddish) to complain Guys, let’s give the CUAB a break. They haven’t had experience with something as difficult as handing out tickets because the concert last year was The New Pornographers. To my summer fling: Check your math. You deflowered me, and I kicked you to the curb. Me-2, You-0. To everyone who kvetched last week: Please transfer to UCLA and sit out 1 year before kvetching again. “UNC undergrads have an excellent knowledge of pedestrian laws, and they do not have a death wish,” said no one ever. Since when did Reggie bullock transfer to ECu? To the frat star behind me who asked who Frederick Douglass was: He’s like the Tucker Max of the abolitionist movement, bro. To the girl performing fellatio on the guy in the men’s bathroom on the bottom floor of the UL early Monday morning. There was a water fountain right outside the door. Ya thirstay. So, no more Thorpedo? Who’s gonna do all that chancelling??? To the professor of my 400-level chemistry class who just told us that we weren’t doing “real chemistry”: WHAT AM I DOING wITH MY LIFE? Hey DTH, your meme is bad, and you should feel bad. To the guy dressed up like Britney Spears at 2 a.m. in Wendy’s: You ratchet. That awkward moment when Hunger Lunch runs out of rice and makes lunch hungry. Chacos are to Hipsters as Jack Rogers are to sorostitutes. To my probability professor who told the class that drawing a blue ball from a jar was a success and a red ball was a failure. Blue balls are always a failure. A sad, painful failure. To university Career Services, do the senior class a favor and just send all future job opportunities over the business School listserv. We get it — they’re beyonce, and we’re those other two girls in Destiny’s Child. To last weekends tailgaters with the ECU painted short bus, I legitimately cannot think of a better representation of your school. Way to go UNC, we were rated as the college with the best sex life by Playboy despite having an active Quidditch team. To the guy in the wheelchair wearing the “Life is Crap” T-shirt: You got me on that one. Hang in there, buddy. Send your one-to-two sentence entries to opinion@dailytarheel.com, subject line ‘kvetch.’

S

moking is cool, or at least that’s what “Mad Men” has taught me. Science, though, has taught me that it’s bad. The recent uproar over a proposed expansion of the county’s smoking ban got me thinking — what would Don Draper think? Wouldn’t he be sad? At what point would he justify government intervention? There is, undoubtedly, a cost associated with inhaling secondhand smoke. I hate smoke. It makes breathing difficult, it leaves a bad smell on my clothes and it can irritate my eyes. I’m sensitive, OK? Because of these costs, I am less likely to go to a restaurant or pub that permits smoking inside. In reality, I might be more willing to visit a place that allows smoking if it offers cheaper drinks, better food or a hip clientele (Don Draper). Or I might require higher pay to work in a smoky environment. Others might actually prefer a place where they can smoke among friends. The market would be able to sort this out. And sometimes I even lay in bed imagining a world where smokers whip out their wallets to compensate those around them for secondhand smoke. Though this is just a pipe-dream, it is the ultimate solution. Ultimately, it’s best to let businesses decide for themselves what policy will best suit their patrons. It might be good for some businesses, like a coffee house, to ban smoking, but bad for others, like a bowling alley or a pub. The new push into public spaces does not bother me as much as the preexisting ordinance that bans smoking on some private property. After all, the protection of private property is one of the hallmarks of a free society. How free are you, really, if society can tell you how to behave on your land, in your restaurant, or in your home? I am concerned, like many, with the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. But banning smoking on public property, while at least a little more justified than in private, is unlikely to solve the problem. Long-term damage comes from sustained exposure to secondhand smoke. Pushing smokers into cramped quarters like cars, houses and work spaces is actually more likely to cause damage than a short stroll down the street would. Maybe the solution is to make tobacco illegal altogether — that’s sure to work! A distinction needs to be made between a public road or sidewalk and a private pub or restaurant. Private businesses are enclosed areas where an owner can respond more directly to his or her customers and accommodate their wishes without affecting the public in the same way that behavior on public land does. Requirements for clearly posted smoking policies outside establishments around town would be preferable to sweeping bans. Maybe something like a cigarette with a red circle and a line through it. As we consider smoking policy, we should remember that public and private property should be treated differently.
10/1: POLITICAL AGENTS Zaina Alsous talks about the role of the student in politics.

Honoring the Code
he department of exercise and sport science has become the first department at UNC to require students to complete an informational online assessment about the Honor Code. In light of the recent academic scandals, this should be a Universitywide program to ensure that students do not unwittingly violate the Honor Code. While the assessment is also mandatory for incoming freshmen in all departments, students who enrolled before this year do not have to take

EDiTOriAl

T

The Honor Code assessment should be mandatory.

the assessment. All departments should also make upperclassmen complete the assessment as part of their major requirements. The Honor Code is the academic law of the University. Violating it can have dire consequences, including suspension and expulsion. But many students don’t know what the Honor Code requires them to do to avoid these consequences. There are a lot of gray areas where what is technically cheating might not be clear. Obviously, this assessment won’t stop those who cheat intentionally. But it might keep some students from unintentionally sinking their col-

lege careers. Students in the department of exercise and sport science have expressed that for this process to be fair, the module should be a standard across all departments. If this online module for the Honor Code were to be mandatory across the University, there must be statutes implemented so every student would be required to complete it. Due to problems that the University has faced during the past year, there’s good reason to implement this plan. Besides being good policy, the plan would also improve the University’s reputation demonstrate its commitment to uphold the Honor Code.

Trainings for Greeks
he Greek community has faced scrutiny lately, particularly due to the University’s fraternity system investigating nine reports of hazing among chapters. The University should require Greek leaders — particularly executive council members — to participate in campus trainings like One Act, Safe Zone and HAVEN. These campus programs are available to all students, but the University should reorganize them, tailoring them to students that participate in Greek life.

EDiTOriAl

T

Require Greek leaders to receive campus trainings.

Greek leaders would be responsible for debriefing their chapters about what they learned. This would prove to be beneficial to everyone — even encouraging other members to participate and seek their own certification. While Greek leaders might be skeptical about being required to go through campus programs like these, they should see it as an opportunity rather than a burden. Greek organizations do a lot of great things for the University, the community and their philanthropic causes, but many times these accomplishments are overshadowed by Animal House-type stereotypes of partying. These Greek lead-

ers taking advantage of campus resources to gain valuable knowledge would be a step in the right direction for a community that rarely gets a nod of approval. The proposed $25 annual Greek fee intends to provide enough money to the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life so that all Greek members could go through these trainings. While this would also be good, if the fee is not passed, requiring the officers to receive the training would be a good alternative with lower costs. If Greek leaders were to all receive these certifications, it could serve as a model for other campus leaders to follow.

Student government provides micro-grants
TO THE EDITOR: Did you know that student government wants to give you money? The Jon Curtis Student Enrichment Fund is one of the first programs that sponsors students who want to pursue their passion or learn something new. The fund provides micro-grants, so students can explore their interests, whether it’s attending an academic conference or taking stand-up comedy lessons. Just last month, the fund sponsored a student to be certified as a volunteer online suicide hotline responder for the IMAlive online crisis network. Now it’s your turn. Visit sef.web.unc.edu to learn more and start your application today. The next deadline is Oct. 1st. We hope your application is in the pool. Courtney Brown ’13 Student Enrichment Fund

Promoting the arts
ne of the purposes of a university is to promote arts and culture. Carolina Performing Arts does just that. As ticket sales are showing for the 2012-13 season, CPA is carrying out this role particularly well by lining up performances of well-known works that people actually want to see. CPA should continue this practice in future seasons for the successful promotion of arts at UNC. The more prominent and well-known a performance is, the better the ticket sales are, because people like to

EDiTOriAl

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CPA should continue featuring more well-known works.

hear and see something that’s at least somewhat familiar to them. People don’t want to see or hear performances of works that they have never heard of — doing so is a gamble that could leave them with less money and more disappointment. To attract audiences and submerse them in arts and culture, an organization must have a staple performance that people know or can relate to themselves. CPA has shown its understanding of this concept and should be lauded for it. Last season, CPA held two well-received performances of works by Beethoven. This year, the inclusion of Russian composer Igor Stravinsky’s

“The Rite of Spring” and other well-known pieces in their season line-up has allowed CPA to bring in some of its highest revenues in recent years. Stravinsky, considered to be among the greatest composers of the 20th century, still commands a tremendously large following of fans. CPA did well showcasing one of his most acclaimed works, “The Rite of Spring.” Introductions to great pieces can encourage audiences to further develop their artistic interests. It takes big pictures and big performances to cause people to look deeper into works and allow people to cultivate their own culture. In this sense, CPA is leading the way.

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