NEWSLETTER

THE HIGH SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC SERVICE YOUTH FARM

Farmer  Column  
As  I  update  this  week’s  newsletter,  I  can’t  believe  it’s     already  Week  14  of  our  2012  season!  I  joined  the     amazing  team  at  the  Youth  Farm  in  early  June  as  the     Americorps  Market  Manager  for  the  summer.  It  has   been  truly  wonderful  to  witness  the  changes  that  have     taken  place  over  the  course  of  the  season,  from  the   somewhat  slow  start  of  early  June  to  the  beginning  of     our  Youth  Program  in  July,  and  finally  now  September     has  arrived,  and  we  no  longer  have  to  worry  about     what  to  do  with  all  of  those  giant  zucchinis.   One  of  my  favorite  parts  of  the  summer  (aside  from     cooking  my  first  callaloo,  that  is)  was  working  with     the  summer  youth  program.  Every  Wednesday  I     worked  with  one  to  three  different  youth,  each  one     arriving  with  varying  enthusiasm  for  this  particular     task.  Yet  even  the  most  hesitant  youths  seemed  to     take  charge  of  the  market  by  the  end  of  the   day,  calculating  change  faster  than  I  could  and     quickly  answering  the  customer’s  questions.     Although  I  have  been  missing  our  youth  since  they     started  school  again,  last  week’s  market  was  especially   significant  for  me.  At  first  I  was  nervous  at  the  thought   of  explaining  to  customers  why  we  could  not  sell  our   own  produce,  yet  after  I  told  the  first  few  customers     that  the  Department  of  Education  had  asked  us  not  to     distribute  our  produce  until  they  set  soil  standards  for     school  gardens,  I  was  overwhelmed  by  the  amount  of  support  we  received.  Everyone  from  our  callaloo-­‐committed  regulars  to   first  time  visitors  expressed  their  support  (along  with  their  regret  at  missing  their  favorite  Youth  Farm  tomatoes,  bitter   melon,  or  okra).  Although  it  was  difficult  to  tell  customers  that  we  didn’t  have  the  produce  they  desired,  it  was  also   encouraging  to  see  how  much  they  valued  the  food  grown  at  the  Youth  Farm.  Not  only  has  the  support  of  our  customers  been   crucial,  but  everyone  at  the  farm  would  also  like  to  thank  61  Local,  a  Brooklyn  restaurant  that  has  generously  opened  their   kitchen  to  us  as  we  preserve  the  late-­‐summer  harvest!  We  really  appreciate  all  of  the  love  and  support  shown  by  the   community.   Thanks,  and  see  you  at  the  Market!  -­‐  Patricia    

Farm News and Notes
The  High  School  for  Public  Service  was  praised  in  the  New  York  Post  as  one  of  the  Best  NYC  High  Schools!  We  are  proud   that  having  a  thriving  farm  is  one  of  the  many  reasons  HSPS  was  chosen.     The  next  volunteer  day/workshop  is  October  6th.  The  workshop  is     Putting  the  Garden  to  Bed  for  the  Year   Growing  tons  of  tasty  veggies  relies  on  sustainable  practices,  and  one  of  the  keys  is  putting  your  garden  to  bed  properly.  Good   for  families  with  gardens  who  want  to  prepare  for  a  fabulous  spring  and  perhaps  some  winter  growing   Want  to  help  us  preserve  some  summer  bounty?  We  are  seeking  volunteers  for  multiple  canning  and  pickling  parties  at  61   Local.  Email  stacey@bkfarmyards.com  to  find  out  more.    

   

Week  1  ·  June  20,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com   Week  14  ·  September  17,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com  

Flower of the week  
        Tithonia     (Tithonia  speciosa)         Many  of     s  on  the  farm  have  been  “carrying  a  torch”  for  Tithonia  ,   u commonly  known  as  Mexican  Sunflower.    (Our  particular  variety  is          

Featured Vegetable: Corn

Home-­‐style  Corn  Relish   Makes  about  6  (8  oz)  half  pints     Fresh  summer  flavors  of  corn,  peppers  and   onions  combine  for  a  delicious  relish  to   serve  on  hamburgers,  hot  dogs  and  your   favorite  sandwiches.   You  will  need:   2  cups  white  vinegar   2/3  cup  sugar     1  Tbsp  salt     4  cups  cooked  corn  kernels  (about  8  ears)     2  cups  diced  mixed  red  and  green  bell   peppers  (about  2  large)   3/4  cup  diced  celery  (about  2  stalks)   1/2  cup  finely  chopped  onion  (about  1   small)   1  Tbsp  dry  mustard     1  tsp  celery  seeds     1  tsp  ground  turmeric     6  (8  oz)  half  pint  glass  preserving  jars   with  lids  and  bands   Directions:   1.)  PREPARE  boiling  water  canner.  Heat  jars   and  lids  in  simmering  water  until  ready  for   use.  Do  not  boil.  Set  bands  aside.     2.)  COMBINE  vinegar,  sugar  and  salt  in  a   large  saucepan.  Bring  to  a  boil,  stirring  to   dissolve  sugar.  Add  corn,  red  and  green   peppers,  celery,  onion,  mustard,  celery  seeds   and  turmeric.  Reduce  heat  and  simmer  15   minutes,  stirring  frequently.     3.)  LADLE  hot  relish  into  hot  jars  leaving  1/2   inch  headspace.  Remove  air  bubbles.  Wipe   rim.  Center  hot  lid  on  jar.  Apply  band  and   adjust  until  fit  is  fingertip  tight.     4.)  PROCESS  filled  jars  in  a  boiling  water   canner  for  15  minutes,  adjusting  for  altitude.   Remove  jars  and  cool.  Check  lids  for  seal   after  24  hours.  Lid  should  not  flex  up  and   down  when  center  is  pressed.     From  Ball’s  Canning  and  Preserving  Recipes      

called  “Torch,”  hence  the  pun.    ;)   This  bright  beauty  is  a  native  of  Mexico  and  of  Central  America.    It’s  a   member  of  the  daisy  family,  but  it’s  more  bodacious,  with  flaming     orange  flowers  and  striking  green  foliage.    It  blooms  brilliantly  on     multi-­‐branched,  tall  stems  –  ours  have  grown  nearly  6’  tall!    Head  on   over  to  o  ur  plot  on  Rutland  Road  and  look  for  these  vibrant,  fiery   flowers  i  n  the  back  row.  
 

Beyond  t  he  dramatic  beauty  it  adds  to  bouquets,  the  greatest  thing     about  Tithonia  is  what  it  brings  to  the  garden…hummingbirds,  bees,   and  butterflies  (especially  monarchs  and  swallowtails!)    These     creatures  are  not  only  lovely  to  see,  they  also  have  the  bonus  of  being     important  beneficial  pollinators.    The  attractive  seedheads  of  the     plant  also  provide  food  for  birds.     Tithonia  “Torch”  is  a  quick  growing  annual  flower  that  is  easy  to   start  from  seed  and  is  heat/drought  tolerant.    The  spectacular  red-­‐ orange  flowers  should  continue  blooming  through  until   frost.    Tithonia  makes  a  great  cut  flower  or  container  specimen  as   well.      
 

It’s  easy  to  see  why  so  many  of  us  love  this  stunner  flower  –  we  hope   you’ll  enjoy  it  too.    

Cucumber  vines  climb  in     Harriet!    

Week  1  ·  June  20,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com  

 

Week  14  ·  September  17,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com