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Document Number HG-Rig-012 Issued by, Rigging Department Approved by, Director

HaGun Institute

SAFETY RIGGING RESPONSIBILITY PROCEDURE

1 SAFETY RIGGING RESPONSIBILITY PROCEDURE
1.1 Supervisors:
1.1.1 Shall ensure that personnel safety, preservation of equipment and materials, is considered in the plan of lifting operation 1.1.2 Personnel shall be taught to rig-up loads correctly and carefully. 1.1.3 Personal protective equipment shall be worn; Safety helmets / hard hat Safety Glasses / goggles Respiratory / hearing protections Safety gloves Safety shoes

1.2 Equipment:
1.2.1 Ropes / chain / fibber           Hitching equipment must be checked before and after each use. Worn ropes and broken chains cannot be used safely; frequent inspection should concentrate on finding broken links, strands, or fibbers. Frayed, loose, or cut strands used as signs to detect excessive wear in slings. Watch for fixed kinks. Any sign of corrosion is a signal that the sling is probably defective. Chain links must work freely within one another. Look for cracks, flaws, cold shuts, cut, nicks, stretching, etc. Whenever sling inspection uncovers a defect, the sling must be withdrawn immediately from service and marked or tagged conspicuously to ensure against its use. Using the wrong sling can be dangerous. It is wrong to assume that all chain slings, wire rope slings, or fibber rope slings have the same capacity and are correct for all lifting tasks. Frequently, only the manufacturer is capable of repairing a defective sling. Hooks will show wear by straightened tines, as well as cracks and flaws. Check for these, get replacements for load hooks that are bend open. Once a hook has been overloaded, it can no longer be used safely. Any heavy lifting job calls for the proper size hoist capacity.

1.2.2 Hooks   

Revised: 0 Page 1 of 5 Date: 28 September 2012

Document Number HG-Rig-012 Issued by, Rigging Department Approved by, Director

HaGun Institute

SAFETY RIGGING RESPONSIBILITY PROCEDURE

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Using the wrong sling can be dangerous. It is wrong to assume that all chain slings, wire rope slings, or fibber rope slings have the same capacity and are correct for all lifting tasks. Consider the angle of inclination of chain sling branches. Using a sling that is too short, thus reducing the angle of inclination will cut down your safety margin. Use the Chain Capacity Chart Reference. Always place pads or softeners on sharp corners with which slings and chains might otherwise come into contact, especially in cases where the slings might slide during the lifting operation. Shake out twists and kinks before loading: don’t permit kinky slings to be used. Don’t use a sling where a kink cannot be removed. Be careful to avoid placing a chain or sling so that the weight of the load is carried on the point of the hook. Load slings with the weight on the main portion (bowl) of hooks. Never use a single wire sling when hooked by a spliced eye. When the weight is sufficient, the sling is liable to untwist, allowing the slices to open and slip. Splicing chains or shortening chains with bolts, etc. is prohibited. In using slings of any kind, ensure that slings are properly laid; to make sure that one lay does not lie on top of the other; this will prevent proper equalization, thus putting an undue strain on the outer member. Try to keep pull on sling legs in a straight line. Choker and basket hitches may be used as slings but only after a careful check of safe load limits has been made. Foreign substances such as grit, bits of metal, and glass particles are harmful to cables and ropes. Never drag slings and ropes across the floor or ground.

1.2.3 Rigging signalling  Standard crane signalling shall handle by one designated person only.  During signalling, the crane rigger shall ensure his position is visible by the crane operator, if not visible than communications through handy talky shall be provided.  When multi-lifts (two or more) hoists are being used, the crane rigger must stand in between, to ensure the crane operator can see and understand clearly the signal for each hoist.  Before signalling the crane operator to hoist, the crane rigger shall ensure that the crane block is in-line 90 directly over the load to avoid swinging.  Avoid unbalanced loads. If hooks are beyond reach, ask for assistance, and never force a hook or chain into place by hammering.  Avoid sudden jerking when lifting or lowering, as this can increase the stress put on the chain or hook far beyond the actual weight of the load.

Revised: 0 Page 2 of 5 Date: 28 September 2012

Document Number HG-Rig-012 Issued by, Rigging Department Approved by, Director

HaGun Institute

SAFETY RIGGING RESPONSIBILITY PROCEDURE

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If it is necessary to walk alongside a suspended or elevated load, stand or walk clear of the load – never underneath it. Use a tag line to guide or hold the load. Be certain that your path of travel is free of obstructions before you begin. Material being piled should be properly placed and blocked, ensure that it shall not slip or over balance. Stack material neatly. Cross tie and step back where necessary. Avoid crushing slings when lowering loads. Use cribbing blocks under the load to remove slings. Roll or bend cables in one direction. Never bend first in one direction then another. Hitching equipment not in use shall not remain loose on hoisting devices but should be removed from crane hooks, hoists and loads.

1.2.4 Storing / maintaining equipment: Chains should be hung over the top of the A-Frame storage rack and looped so that no part of them touches the floor when in use.  This method will permit easy examination of the most frequently damaged areas of slings, i.e., the hook, the lower 1/3 of the sling, and the master link where you can check the ID tag.  Also, the crane operator will not need a rigger to unhook and the rigger will not have to lift “much” to hook on.  Good housekeeping throughout the operation will help to control the hazards of mechanical lifting. SPECIAL NOTE: Before lifting dangerous or unusual lifts or fittings, make certain that the immediate supervisor is notified and present.

Revised: 0 Page 3 of 5 Date: 28 September 2012

Document Number HG-Rig-012 Issued by, Rigging Department Approved by, Director

HaGun Institute

SAFETY RIGGING RESPONSIBILITY PROCEDURE

2 OPERATOR - RIGGER RESPONSIBILITIES:
2.1 The crane must not be operated by anyone except an authorized person.
2.1.1 Never use any lifting machine or device unless you have been instructed in its use and fully understand all details of its operation. 2.1.2 The crane should be moved only upon the proper signal from one designated person, particularly where a group is involved. 2.1.3 All signals should be clear and unmistakable.

2.2 The crane rigger and the crane operator are a team handling a valuable piece of equipment.
2.2.1 Improper handling; this machine can be a dangerous machine if not properly handled. 2.2.2 Defective lifting equipment of any kind must be taken out of service for repair or adjustment. 2.2.3 Do not attempt to repair ant defective equipment unless the supervisor specifically authorizes to do so. 2.2.4 Do not walk or stand under a suspended load. 2.2.5 Allow on one else to do so. 2.2.6 Lifting machinery, including hooks, slings, etc., is not designed to carry personnel. 2.2.7 Do not permit anyone to ride on equipment. 2.2.8 Never load any equipment beyond its established capacity. 2.2.9 Careful when handling small pieces! Many accidents occur because of thoughtlessness when handling small pieces. 2.2.10 Remove all loose pieces that may be laying on work that is to be lifted.

2.3 Before starting to hoist, the operator should place the block directly over the load to avoid swinging the load during hoisting.
2.3.1 He shall carefully watch long hitches and the position of the hoisting hook and shall exercise extreme care to avoid running the hook above the limit. 2.3.2 If the chain has been strained in anyway, he shall notify his supervisor at once. 2.3.3 The location of the main circuit breaker for the crane electrical feed lines must be known. Revised: 0 Page 4 of 5 Date: 28 September 2012

Document Number HG-Rig-012 Issued by, Rigging Department Approved by, Director

HaGun Institute

SAFETY RIGGING RESPONSIBILITY PROCEDURE

2.3.4 Safe load factors for each piece of lifting equipment must be known. 2.3.5 Never overload slings, attempt to lift material too heavy for the equipment, or exceed the height limits for which the lifting equipment is designed. 2.3.6 Check the area where material is to be moved. 2.3.7 If the route is not well lighted or has obstructions, a supervisor should be advised so the situation can be corrected. 2.3.8 Break in wire rope gradually; when it is new, wire rope shouldn’t be used at its maximum capacity rating. 2.3.9 Avoid haste, plan thoroughly and proceed cautiously with the work. 2.3.10 Adaptation of equipment to unusual uses should be avoided. 2.3.11 Any change in operating procedures must be approved by a supervisor. 2.3.12 Know the established emergency procedures for personal injury, fire, weather extremes, power failure, etc.

Revised: 0 Page 5 of 5 Date: 28 September 2012