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City Council
Agenda Item Summary
Meeting Date: October 2, 2012
Prepared by: Mike Branson, City Forester
Name: Consideration of a Resolution designating the Friends ofMission Trail Nature Preserve
(FOMTNP) as an official City support group.
Description: A group of volunteers, known as the Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve, who
has been working in Mission Trail Nature Preserve has requested designation as an
official support group of the City pursuant to City Council Policy 89-47. The members
of this informal volunteer group are interested in the Preserve and its healthy future. They
have been performing trail clearance and invasive plant removal for several years in
coordination with the Forest, Parks and Beach Department.
Overall Cost:
City Funds: None.
Staff Recommendation: Adopt the Resolution.
Important Considerations: City Council Policy 89-47 established a formal procedure for
relationships between the City and its support groups. Official designated support groups
must adhere to the guidelines and standards outlined within Policy 89-47.
Decision Record: Resolution 89-121 (October 3, 1989) established the Support Groups policy;
Resolution 90-49 (May 1, 1990) designated the City's support groups.
Reviewed by:
Jason Stil21*=inistrator Date
CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA

FOREST, PARKS, AND BEACH DEPARTMENT
STAFF REPORT


TO: MAYOR BURNETT AND COUNCIL MEMBERS

THRU: JASON STILWELL, CITY ADMINISTRATOR

FROM: MIKE BRANSON, CITY FORESTER

DATE: 2 OCTOBER 2012

SUBJECT: CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION DESIGNATING THE
FRIENDS OF MISSION TRAIL NATURE PRESERVE (FOMTNP)
AS AN OFFICIAL CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA SUPPORT GROUP


RECOMMENDED ACTION
Adopt the Resolution but require the FOMTNP to fulfill the organizational requirements
under Policy 89-47 before including them as a support group.

BACKGROUND
A group of volunteers, known as the Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve
(FOMTNP), has been working in Mission Trail Nature Preserve (MTNP). The group is
now requesting designation as an official support group of the City pursuant to City
Council Policy 89-47. The members of this informal volunteer group are interested in the
Preserve and its healthy future. They have been performing trail clearance and invasive
plant removal for a couple of years in coordination with the Forest, Parks and Beach
Department.

REVIEW
The FOMTNP group has submitted a letter of application to become recognized as an
official Carmel-by-the-Sea support group. Their application letter addresses how the
group will help to meet the needs of the City in managing Mission Trail Nature Preserve,
what their past efforts have been, and other benefits they may be able to provide for the
City and MTNP.

The FOMTNP has not formalized its organizational structure but will do so in order to
fulfill the standards of the Support Group Policy, if they receive a favorable
recommendation by the City Council.

FISCAL IMPACT
There is no significant fiscal impact from this proposal.
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SUMMARY
The FOMTNP have indicated their willingness to assist the City fulfill the goals and
objectives of the Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan. They have an established
history of hands-on work in the Preserve are interested in promoting the value of the
Preserve to the community.

If the Council approves the FOMTNP to become a support group, the group will
formalize their organization to meet the specifications of the Carmel-by-the-Sea Support
Group Policy 89-47.
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CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
CITY COUNCIL

RESOLUTION 2012-

A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITYOF CARMEL-BY-THE-
SEA DESIGNATING THE FRIENDS OF MISSION TRAIL NATURE PRESERVE
(FOMTNP) AS AN OFFICIAL CITY SUPPORT GROUP
________________________________________________________________________

WHEREAS, on 3 October 1989, the City Council adopted Resolution 89-121, the
Support Groups Policy which establishes the relationship between the City and private
groups; and

WHEREAS, on 1 May 1990, the City Council adopted Resolution No. 90-47
designating the support groups of the City.

WHEREAS, a group of volunteers known as the Friends of Mission Trail Nature
Preserve (FOMTNP) who have been working in Mission Trail Nature Preserve has
requested designation as an official support group of the City pursuant to City Council
Policy 89-47.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE CITY COUNCIL OF
THE CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA DOES:

1. Require the FOMTNP to provide all documentation required per Policy
89-47.
2. Designate the following groups as Support Groups pursuant to City
Council Policy 89-47:
a. Friends of Harrison Memorial Library
b. Carmel Public Library Foundation
c. Friends of Carmel Forest
d. Friends of Sunset Foundation
e. Lester Rowntree Native Plant Garden Committee
f. Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve (after compliance with #1)
3. Authorize the City Administrator to submit the revised list of support
groups to the insurance carrier.

PASSED AND ADOPTED BY THE CITY OF COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
CARMEL-BY-THE SEA this 2nd day of October 2012, by the following roll call vote:

AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS:

NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS:

ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS:


ATTEST: SIGNED,

_________________________ _____________________________
Heidi Burch, City Clerk JASON BURNETT, MAYOR

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113
(Via Hand Delivery)
September 4, 2012
Jason Burnett
Mayor, Carmel-by-the- Sea
City Hall
Dear Jason,
RECEIVED
scp 0 2012
CITY OF
CARMEL BY-THE-SEA
Delivered herewith is the application ofthe Friends of Mission Trail Nature
Preserve for recognition as an official support group of the City Of Carmel.
As you will see from the contents of the application, our group feels that it fits
squarely within the intent of the support group policy for such recognition. Furthermore,
it fits into the "City Administrator 2012 Goals", specifically the "Community Character
Goal", the first bullet point of which reads as follows, as applicable:
. .
"Preserve the community's .. . park, public space and forest assets by
having ... active partnerships with community groups and strategic partners."
We look forward to working through the City's process on our application and to
reaching our goal of achieving recognition as an official support group of the City, so that
. we can assist the City in having Mission Trail Nature Preserve reach and maintain its full
potential.
Thank you, the city administrator and your fellow council members for
consideration of this application.
Sincerely yours,
<Sl
Fraricis
(This is submitted on behalf of the signatories appearing on page 4 of the
application.)
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Appli<;ation
Of
Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve
For
Recognition as a Support Group of .the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea
(Pursuant to City of Carmel-by-the-Sea policy adopted by Resolution 89-121 "Support Groups
Policy" 2007 -19)
Background
By the Carmel-by-the-Sea's council resolution 89-121 (copy attached as Exhibit 1), the
City adopted a formal policy governing "Support Groups" which are formed with a purpose "to
assist the. City or one of its departments." The City declared its encouragement of the formation
and recognition of such groups in the following language of the policy:
"The City Council also recognizes the value of the assistance so provided by support
groups and encourages the formation of such groups where appropriate and/or a need
exists."
In the policy, Support Groups are defined as follows:
"Support groups are associations of individuals who have voluntarily joined
together in a unit whose sole or primary purpose is to provide assistance - either monetary,
social, cultural or but not political- to the City or one of its departments."
Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve ("the Friends") presently is an informally
organized citizens' group which came together in 2009 with the purpose of pursuing policies
which the city has adopted in its Master Plan ("The Master Plan") for Mission Trail Nature
Preserve ("MTNP"), a copy of which is attached to this application for reference (Exhibit 2).
Many members of the group have, over many years, been active in contributing time and effort
. for the city of Carmel itself or to organizations which support the City (See Exhibit 3, an attached
list wl.th samples qf some of these contributions noted.).
This is the guiding principle of the Friends, taken from the MTNP Master Plan: "Active
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management is essential if resource values of the Mission Trail Nature Preserve habitat are
to be protected and preserved".
Since organizing, the Friends has contributed well conceived and focused "hands on"
physical work in MTNP, pnmarily in removing invasive non-native plants in some areas.
(Exhibit 4 is a summary of that work through 2011).
Importantly, the Friends has published a source book of information regarding MTNP
entitled "Mission Trail Nature Preserve, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow" (the "Source Book").
This publication describes the history and environment of MTNP and makes suggestions
regarding its management in the future. (A copy of this publication is submitted together with
and in support of this application.)
How the Friends Would Support the City and its Departments
"Mission Trail Nature Preserve, an isolated remnant of a larger environmentally
sensitive area, is now surrounded by urban development. Active management is essential if
resource values of this habitat are to be protected and preserved."
By this language, the Master Plan recognizes a need which, to a large extent, for various
reasons, the City has not been meeting in recent years. The Friends seeks to become an official
city support group in order to assist the City in addressing this important need.
Policies and objectives designed to implement this through active management appear in
the body of the Master Plan:
"PS-270
"PS-119
"05-27
"PS-122
Continue the annual Monterey pine seedling planting during the
winter of each year (using the seed collecting guidelines of the Genetic
Resources Conservation Program of the University of California at
Davis, in order to maintain appropriate genetic diversity). Enhance
efforts to replant and maintain native tree species similar to nearby
native riparian vegetation."
Remove by hand nonnative shrubs and their roots invading these
areas during late spring when soils are moist and before seed/seed
pods become viable."
Reduce the population of invasive horticultural species in the
Preserve."
Organize volunteer work groups to remove nonnative plants from the
Preserve."
2
116
:
"05-28
"P5-124
"05-38
Prepare annual maintenance plans for habitats within the Preserve.
Encourage native vegetation to reestablish on sites previously mowed,
cut, or invaded by exotic species."
Consider removal of both intentionally introduced plants and
invasives by instituting an annual program through joint efforts of
contract workers and volunteers."
Manage environmentally sensitive habitats in Mission Trail Nature
Preserve to maintain and enhance their natural integrity. Preserve
and protect the Mission Trail Nature Preserv.e native plant, bird
population .... "
Adequate planning, funding and administration of MTNP and the Master Plan by the City
has been deficient, apparently because the City has a constrained budget and lacks adequate staff.
Over the years, this shortfall has resulted in denigration of MTNP. Large invasions of noxious,
invasive, non-native plants and trees continue to spread, relentlessly. Lack of needed planning
for MTNP and for improvements of its infrastructure has led to a progressively larger problem,
year by year. The Friends, at no cost to the City, can provide resources for planning and services
which, over time, would substantially assist in correcting this situation.
Presumably, the Friends' activities would take place under the supervision of the Forest
and Beach Commission and the City Forester.
Some of the ways in which the Friends would support the administration of the MTNP
master plan are set forth in the "Mission Trail Nature Preserve Annual Work Program
(Proposed)" (See Source Book, pp 45- 47).
In addition to physical work, the Friends can contribute expertise, through qualified
consultants, for planning the implementation of the master plan, in conjunction with the City
Forester and the Forest and Beach Commission.
Also, the Friends can raise funds through direct contributions and through obtaining of
grants to the City for planning and projects which will further of the objectives
of the Master Plan for MINP.
Conclusion
The Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve wishes to serve the City as an official
support group, so that it can act, officially, in support of the implementation and ongoing
administration of the MTNP Master Plan, with the goal of assisting the City in enhancing and
maintaining MTNP as an important resource of Carmel-by-the-Sea The Friends is uniquely
able to assist the City and, therefore, by-this application, it requests recognition by the City as an
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official support group as its purposes fit squarely withln the spirit and. word of the policies of the
City regarding support groups.
(Note: Pending favorable action of the City in offering recognition as an official support
group, the Friends has not adopted fornial articles of organization or by-laws, choosing to defer
these steps until favorable action on its application is indicated. At that point, taking into
account the City's thoughts on the subject, the Friends may form itself as a California non-profit
corporation and obtain 501(c)(3) tax exempt status.)
Respectfully
Signatures of Friends of Mission Trail Natme Preserve:
Karen Ferlito

/ Francis P. Lloyd
L J - A _
vvvvyv-:-
Luc.inda.Uoyd

. - - ,.. /) Mary Anne /7- {! .
Joyce Stevens

.. r:. '.: .: ; ..
-
.. .- -- .
. "".'-.:.: .
.. . ,. . : :. _
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MISSION TRAIL
NATURE PRESERVE
MASTER.PLAN
- - - ~ . - - - ,.....,
/ ~ .
119
. . . - ~
Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
MISSION TRAIT. NATURE PRESERVE
MASTERPLAN
TABLE OF CONTENTS
A. Introduction
B. Purpose of Master Plan
C. Vegetation
D. W etlan4s and Riparian Habitats
E. Drainage
F. Public Uses
G. Lester Rowntree Native Plant Garden
H. Flanders Mansion
I. Stewardship Program
J. Parking
K. Use of Mechanized Equipment
L. Maps
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120 Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
MISSION TRAIL NATURE PRESERVE MASTER PLAN
A. INTRODUCTION
IDSTORY OF THE PARK
Mission Trail Nature Preserve, designated. a nature park in 1979,
approved by the Carmel-by-the-Sea Forest and Beach Commission and
adopted by the City Council, has been established as a natural parkland
for passive recreational use. The park boundaries encompass 35 acres of
unspoiled native. vegetation and includes the Flanders Mansion, the Lester
Rowntree Native Plant Garden and the meadow off Martin Road.
The Preserve affords the user the opportunity to enjoy the natural beauty
of seasonal growth and change of flora and fauna, to walk the trails, and
to take in the grandeur of the expansive vistas, particularly those of the
Fish Ranch, Point Lobos, Carmel Mission, and Carmel Bay.
Stately pines, oaks and a pure stand of toyon dominate the northern
reaches of the Preserve, while a dense stand of willow shrouds the low-
lying flood plain to the south.
During any season of the year various birds (more than 50 species) can be
seen, and displays of native grasses, trees, shrubs, and wildflowers can be
. viewed as one hikes along the three miles of trails within the Nature
Preserve boundaries. Each new seasori announces the subtle alterations in
the character of the Preserve vegetation and provides new color displays
for the avid occasional hiker.
B. MASTER PLAN
Most of Mission Trail Nature Preserve is designated as an
Enviromnentally Sensitive Habitat Area (ESHA). ESHA's are defined in
Section 30107.5 of the California Coastal Act of 1976 as "any area in
which plant or animal life or their habitats are either rare or especially
valuable because of their special nature or role in an ecosystem and which
could be easily disturbed or degrp.ded by human activities and
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Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
developments." In a natural setting, ESHA's would be fully self-
sustaining and would not need active management. Mission Trail Nature
Preserve an isolated remnant of a larger environmentally sensitive area, is
now surrounded by urban development. Active management is essential if
resource values of this habitat .are to be protected and preserved.
The purpose of the Master Plan is twofold:
1. To establish and maintain long-range goals for preservation and
use of the Mission Trail Nature Preserve.
2. To guide the City in its decision making process concerning the
management of the Mission Trail Nature Preserve.
The Master plan has evolved over a period of years through data gathered
from a report prepared by Jones and Stokes Associates, staff analysis, and
public input. It consists of both written policies and a physical map of the
park. Throughout the process, citizen input evaluating past City actions
and suggesting further directions has been actively encouraged. The
Mission Trail Park Advisory Committee was assigned the task of
preparing the Master Plan by the City Council. Its members are: Russell
Gifford, Roberta Bialek, Tim Zorach, Steve Brooks, and Wayne Earls
(non-voting members are Gary Olsen, representative from the Rowntree
Native Plant Garden and Maxine Jennings, representative from the
Recreation CoJlliilission).
The Format of the Master Plan is similar to the City's General Plan. It is
divided into sections relating to specific areas of the Nature Preserves,
physical features, frre suppression, vegetation, trails and public use.
Within each of these sections, goals are established, objectives identified,
followed by policies supporting the objectives. It is .intended that all
policies under each objective have equal weight. Naturally, when making
decisions based on the policies in this Master Plan, some policies will
have greater bearing on the matter at hand than do other policies under the
same
The identification number of goals, objectives, and policies in the Mission
Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan is correlated to the numbering order in
the adopted Local Coastal Program of Carmel-by-the-Sea and thus may
not appear in sequential order in this Plan.
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Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
C. VEGETATION
Mission Trail Nature Preserve supports a mosaic of vegetation consisting
of a Monterey pine forest on inland granitic bedrock and old dunes, .
central coast arroyo willow riparian forest, box elder and cottonwood
trees, wetland drainage, wet meadow, coast live oak woodland, coastal
terrace prairie, and horticultural plantings.
GS-8 Preserve the forested tranquil atmosphere of the Mission
Trail Nature Preserve.
05-25 Preserve and enhance the vegetative diversity in
Mission Trail Nature Preserve consisting of Monterey
pine forest, central coast willow riparian forest, wet
meadow, coast live oak woodland, redwood, box
elder, cottonwood, coastal terrace prairie, and
horticultural plantings.
P5-270
P5-118
05-26
PS-119
Continue the annual Monterey pine -seedling planting
during the winter of each year (using the seed
collecting guidelines of the Genetic Resources
Conservation Program of the University of California
at Davis, in order to maintain appropriate genetiC
. diversity). Enhance efforts to replant and maintain
native tree species similar to nearby native riparian
vegetation.
A void removal or pruning of native riparian
vegetation except for drainage channel and road/trail
clear.ance and/or for the purpose of new native
indigenous tree/shrub establishment.
Enhance coastal terrace prairie on the west and south
facing slopes in the Martin Road parcel and between
the Outlet meadow and Ladera Drive.
Remove by hand nonnative shrubs and their roots
invadmg these areas during late spring when soils are
moist and before seed/seed pods become viable.
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Mission Trail Narure Preserve Master Plan
P5-120
05-27
P5-129
P5-122
05-29

P5-127
05-30
P5-128
A void further erosion and loss of native coastal and
terrace vegetation.
the introduction and population of invasive
horticultural species in the Preserve.
Provide residents of adjacent properties with a list of
plants that are compatible with the. native vegetation
of the Preserve. Encourage use of this list as a guide
for planting private landscapes. Additionally, provide
a list of invasive plants to avoid.
Organize volunteer work groups to remove nonnative
plants from the Preserve. The California Department
of Forestry and Fire Protection crews from Gabilan
Camp could be used to assist this effort.
Monitor and protect the Hickman's onion population
found in the Preserve.
Consider retaining a qualified volunteer botanist to
monitor the population of . Hickman's onion to
determine if curnint management practices and public
use of the coastal t,errace prairie are affecting the
viability of the population.
Limit access in the terrace pra1ne during
winter and spring months when the soil disturbance
could affect the species. . .
Maintain and enhance habitat for Monterey Dusky-
Footed Woodrat (a special status wildlife species), in
accordance with recommendations of a qualified
wildlife biologist.
Consider retaining a volunteer biologist to monitor
the rat's population and develop a management plan
to help ensure its survival.
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Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
D. WETLANDS AND RIPARIAN HABITATS
Central coast arroyo willow riparian forest occurs as a dense, multi-
layered forest along the western boundary of the park. Riparian forest
also occurs along a perennial drainage near the western boundary of the
Mission Trail Nature Preserve. The riparian forest is characterized by a
canopy layer of black cottonwood and arroyo willow and a sub-canopy of
shrub-size arroyo willow and dogwood.
Wet meadow dominates the southern end of the Preserve. The wet
meadow_ is characterized by a mix of wet meadow species, grassland
species, and introduced grasses.
GS-9 Protect, maintain and enhance the rare coastal habitats
and associated plants and animals within Mission Trail
Nature Preserve.
05-31 Maintain natural drainage patterns except where
erosion or human safety problems may be created.
Maintain the existing creek bed and preclude it from
becoming debris clogged. Encourage/allow the
channelized ditch to revert to a more natural channel
in order to enhance the park's wetlands (riparian
forest, wet meadow) and natural character.
PS-131 Remove fallen trees and limbs from the stream
channels as needed. Place natural boulders and creek
cobbles to prevent erosion only in . situations where
private property or public safety is at risk.
05-28 Prepare annual maintenance plans for habitats within
the Preserve. Encourage native vegetation to re-
establish on sites previously mowed, cut, or invaded
by exotic species.
PS-123 . Allow willows to grow in the riparian corridor and
the wet meadow.
PS-124 Consider removal of both intentionally introduced
plants and invasives by instituting an annual program
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Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
PS-125
PS-130
E. DRAINAGE
through joint efforts of contract workers and
volunteers.
. .
Research the most appropriate time for mowing
grasses to encourage the growth of native plants and
discourage exotics and schedule accordingly.
-Prohibit cleaning of City maintenance equipment in
the Preserve.
Two main perennial drains and smaller drainages transect Mission Trail
Nature Preserve. The main perennial drainage begins at the northern end
of the Preserve, runs along the western boundary, and forks near the
center. At the northern end, .the drainage bottom is generally UTI-
vegetated. The canyon sides are vegetated with Monterey pine and coast
live oak with a dense underst-ory of French broom, German ivy, English
ivy, and California blackberry. French broom dominates the banks along
the northern portion 'bf the drainage, grading into a dense central coast
arroyo willow riparian forest (near 11th Street entrance to the Preserve at
Willow Trail.) Redwood, bay tree (Umbellularia californica), and
bamboo (Bambusa sp.) also occur in localized portions of the drainage.
GS-10 To preserve the natural drainage of Mission Trail Nature
Preserve and enhance wetlands.
PS-132
PS-133
PS-134
Repair stream bank deterioration as it occurs, and
remove inert debris and new growth to the extent that
they prohibit water flow within the established
channel. Projects of this nature shall be reviewed by
the Forest and Beach Commission, similar to its
review of street projects.
Maintain a box culvert inlet adjacent to Rio Road to
prevent flooding.
Consult with appropriate agencies regarding wetland
management.
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Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
PS-135 Preclude manmade objects from inhibiting .drainage
along the road in-Mission Trail Nature Preserve.
P5-136 Maintain the shoulders and cross flows on . the
Preserve bed to insure surface can easily enter
the creek.
P5-137 Clean and grade road shoulders and maintain culverts
at least twice yearly, to insure continuous drainage.
Trimming by the Forest, Parks, and Beach
Department will be conducted to the extent necessary
to allow access by the City maintenance equipment
and fire apparatus.
F. PUBLIC USES
Mission Trail Nature Preserve is . open to the public for passive
recreational use. Primary uses include hiking, jogging, birding, and
relaxation in a quiet natural setting. There are five Preserve entrances:
Mountain View Avenue, Rio road, 11th Avenue, Martin Road, and Hatton
Road. These entrances lead to a series of trails meandering throughout
the Preserve. This series of trails exceeds three miles .in length and is
intended for foot traffic only.
05-32 Provide reasonable low-impact uses of Mission Trails
Nature Preserve for the enjoyment of its . natural
surroundings and plant and inhabitants.
P5-.138 Maintain and make available an up-to-date printed
brochure that offers 'Preserve users helpful
information. The brochure would also offer
appropriate explanations for Preserve use restrictions.
05-38 Manage environmentally sensitive habitats in Mission
Trail Nature Preserve to maintain and enhance their
natural integrity. Preserve and -protect the Mission
Trail Nature Preserve native plant, wild animal and
bird population.
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Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
G. LESTER ROWNTREE NATIVE PLANT GARDEN
The Lester Rowntree Native Plant qarden was created to provide a quiet
nature study area where native California trees, shrubs and plants are
grown for exhibition and study and displayed to enhance the natural
beauty of the area. It is located just off Hatton Road and is approximately
one acre in size.
05-33 Maintain the Rowntree Native Plant Garden, within
Mission Trail Nature Preserve as an area where the
general public can view and study native California
plants and trees. The goal is that the knowledge gained
will lead to an expanded use of California native plants in
private landscapes.
P5-144
P5-145
05-34
P5-146
PS-147
PS-148
Create and maintain a demonstration garden for
native flowers in Mission Trail Nature Preserve.
Label native plants arid areas in the garden at Mission
Trail Preserve with identifying and explanatory
information.
Consider establishing a Volunteer Committee to assist
the Forest, Parks, and Bea.ch Director and staff in the
responsibility for the garden at Missiqn Trail Nature
Preserve.
Maintain communication between Forest and Beach
Commission and Monterey Bay . Chapter of the
California Native Plant Society.
Recruit and train volunteers to plant, weed, water and
care for the garden in Mission Trail Nature Preserve
under the direction of the Forest, Parks, and Beach
Department staff.
Schedule and advertise volunteer work days as needed
to maintain the garden in Mission Trail Nature
Preserve.
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Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
H. FLANDERS MANSION
The Flanders' Mansion, called "Outlands" by Mrs. Grace Flanders, was
completed in May of 1925. At that time the Flanders family moved in
and the mansion remained in private hands until 1971 when tlie City of
Carmel purchased it for $275,000. The Mansion is an intrinsic part of
Mission Trail Nature Preserve and the surrounding area: Any use found
for the Mansion should. satisfy the following goals.
PS-141
PS-142
PS-143
If retained by the City, preserve the 'Outlands property
and grounds at Mission Trail Nature Preserve consistent
with its status as a nationally registered historical
resource.
If retained by the City, utilize the Outlands property at
Mission:Trail Nature Preserve in a manner beneficial to
the residents of Carmel-by-the-Sea while minimizing its
expense to the City.
If reta.ined by the City, support uses at the Outlands
property that are compatible with its location in Mission
Trail Nature Preserve and adjacent to the Rowntree
. Native Plant Garden and Hatton Road neighborhood.
I. . STEW ARDSIITP PROGRAM
1
The ESHA boundaries could net-be extended beyond the Preserve
boundaries to include adjacent private land. Habitats do not follow man
made area designations. Stewardship policies for ESHA and other areas
within the City in included in the ESHA section of the adopted Local Use
Plan of the Local Coastal Program.
J. PARKING AND ACCESS
There is no private vehicle access to the Preserve proper. Vehicles may
enter from Hatton Road via a driveway that _leaO.s to the Flanders'
Mansion. Space is available for parking near the Mansion for a limited
number of vehicles. The City has considered several parking alternatives
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Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan
around the Mansion. However, a consensus as to the most appropriate
location(s) has not been achieved.
Formalize a trail through Martin Meadows.
K. USE OF MECHANIZED EQUIPMENT
GS-11 Maintain M i s s ~ o n Trail Nature Preserve using great care
to avoid the degradation of resources.
05-35 Implement the Mission Trail Nature Preserve
maintenance provisions.
P5-149
PS-150
P5-151
P5-152
PS-153
P5-154
P5-155
Repair stream bank deterioration as it occurs, and
remove inert debris and new growth to the extent that
they prohibit water flow within the established
channel. (Annually: September- October.)
Clean and grade road shoulders and maintain culverts
to ensur!;! continuous drainage. Trim vegetation to the
extent necessary to allow access of equipment.
(Annually: September- October.)
Removal of fallen .limbs and trees from the stream
channels. (As needed.)
Place rip-rap to prevent erosion only in situations
where private property or public. safety is at risk. (As
needed.)
Mow of meadow grasses to reduce the risk of fire
(June.) if consistent with special status plant
management needs.
Maintain Serra trail to allow access of emergency
vehicles. (Semi-annually.)
Removal of dead/hazardous trees only as needed.
Leave dead trunks in place when not hazardous to
provide habitat for woodpeckers and other fauna.
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130 Mission Trail Nature PreserVe Master Plan
PS-156 Conduct trail maintenance and clearance. (June -
August.)
The Forest, Parks, and Beach Director is responsible for monitoring these .
activities and reporting to the Forest and Beach Commission scheduled
tasks and their results. An annual report will be prepared for the Forest
and Beach Conunission review before submittal to the Coastal
Commission.
L. MAPS
1. Jones and Stokes Associates, Inc. map: Location of Special -Status
Species, Vegetation Types, and ESHA Boundary at Mission Trail
Nature Preserve.
2. Map showing nature trail, service roads, and entrances to Mission
Trail Nature Preserve.
Map 1
3. Map of Park Overlay District adjacent to Mission Trail Nature
Preserve.
Page 12 of 15
131
Mission Trail Park (Nature Preserve) Master Plan
Map2
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Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Members Gallery
Joyce S. Stevens: Born in Seattle, Washington, Joyce spent her formative years
in Anchorage, Alaska; high school in Juneau Alaska; Bachelor of Architecture, 1954,
University of Washington; some post graduate at Harvard University; worked for
private architectural firms in Alaska, 1954 to 1957; architect with the Air Force until
1962; staff architect at Fort Ord from, 1962 to 1985; retired in 1985. She has three
architectural licenses from Washington, Alaska and California. Joyce has lived in
Carmel since 1962 and has a grown daughter, Robin Moran.
She is a founding member of the Alaska Chapter of American Institute of Architects
and is active in the Monterey Bay AlA Chapter 20 for the past twenty years. Joyce
was an active member of the Ventana Chapter of Sierra Club fi_-om 1970 to 1995; on
the Executive Committee from 1974 to 1977; led outings from mid 1980s to 2007.
Co-founded; Monterey.BayDunes Coalition 1985; Hatton Canyon Coalition 1989;
Fort Ord Parkland Group1991; Monterey Pine Forest Watch 1992 (currently
president); Carmel Open Space Task Force 1995; Fort Hunter Liggett Natural
Resources Group 1996; Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve 2009; Friends of
Jack Peak Park 2011. On the Board of Directors of Big Sur Land Trust for 9 years,
president in 1997.
Karen Ferlito: Karen lives in Carmel-by-the-Sea with her husband, Hugo Ferlito,
DDs, overlooking the Mission Trail Nature Preserve. A resident since 1989, Karen
has devoted time to various organizations. including Friends of Carmel Forest (past
and present), The Big Sur Land Trust (9 years, 2 years as Chair), The Big Sur .
International Marathon (1994-present), Monterey County Landwatch, Monterey
Pine Forest Watch, Carmel Forest and Beach Commission (1994- 2000, 2012-
present), The Statewide Pitch Canker Taskforce and Friends of Mission Trail Nature
Preserve.
An Ohio State University graduate with a B.A. in education, Karen is the mother of
three grown children. Karen was active in Santa Catalina parents' organizations and
Friends of Carmel Unified Schools when her children attended local schools.
. .
Marsha McMahan Zelus: Marsha Zelus is a community volunteer and former
teacher. She grew up in Fresno and started coming to Carmel with her family as a
child. She graduated from University of Southern California with a B.A. and
University of California - Berkley with a teaching credential. Marsha then moved to
Australia for 17 years where she taught high school English and History while .
raising two sons.
In 1989 Marha moved back to Carmel. While her sons attended local schools, she
was involved in parent activities and was on the Soard of Trustees for Chartwell
133
School. She joined the American Red Cross - Carmel Chapter (now part of the
Monterey Bay Chapter) and remains an active Disaster Volunteer. She was on the
Carmel Beach Task Force Committee. Marsha also served 9 years on the Big Sur
Land Trust Board of Trustees and continues to serve on the finance Committee. Last
year she completed the training to become a docent at Point Lobos State Preserve.
Gary Girard: A 37 -year resident of the Carmel area, has practiced landscape
architecture on the Monterey Peninsula since 1971. He has worked on a wide
variety of civic and commercial projects, including Del Monte Shopping Center, the
Highlands Inn, Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula and the City of
Seaside. In addition, he has planned and designed hundreds of private gardens
throughout the region, the majority of which are in the City of Carmel and
surrounding areas and Pebble Beach. As a community volunteer, he worked closely
with Harriette Rowntree to preserve the memorial garden recognizing the work of
the pioneering native plant authority and advocate, Lester Rowntree. He also served
the City of Carmel as a member of the Carmel Forest and Beach Commission for
seven years and as a board member for the Carmel Area Wastewater District in
2007-2008.
Gary received his B.A. in Landscape Architecture from California State Polytechnic
University at Pomona in 1968; he also received his department's Outstanding
Student award for that year. After training in two large landscape architecture firms
in Southern California, Gary and wife, Maureen moved to Carmel where Gary
worked for five years with Richard Murray and Associates. The Girards raised three
daughters in Carmel and were active volunteers at all levels, from Bay School to
Carmel High School; Maureen recently retired from the faculty at MPC, where she
taught for more than 25 years.
Because he maintains a vital interest in preserving native habitat in Mission Trail
Nature Preserve, Gary is an active member of the Friends of the Mission Trail Nature
Preserve and can be seen tending the Rowntree Memorial garden adjacent to the
Hatton Road entrance to the Preserve.
Greg D'Ambrosio: Raised and educated in the Illinois suburbs outside Chicago,
Greg earned a B.S. degree in Forestry and a B.A. degree in Urban Planning with a
focus in landscape design from Southern Illinois University. Graduating in 1970, he
migrated west settling in Carmel that same year.
In the fall of 1971, he was hired as Carmel's City Forester and continued in that
. position until1983. In the spring of that year, he was appointed to the position of
Director of Administrative Services /Finance Director and then Assistant City
Administrator. Greg held interim leadership posts in most of the city's departments
over the years, helping develop and shepherd new and diverse services for the
residents and businesses of the community. He also served as interim City
Administrator.
Throughout his career he has focused his attention and expertise on expanding and
improVing the environmental resources of the village, its urban forest, beach, public
open spaces, parks, trails and pathways.
134
He has been a staunch advocate for the preservation of our village and has been
instrumental in writing many of the guidelines, ordinances, master plans and
management programs that protect Carmel's iconic qualities. .
In retirement Greg has become a volunteer with the MEarth, Hilton Bialek Biological
Habitat and the Carmel Unified District involving students in environmental
restoration projects throughout the greater Carmel area.
He is a board member of the Carmel Area Waste Water District, Lester Rowntree
Native Plant Garden and a past board member of the Friends. of Carmel Forest and
the Carmel Residents Association.
Randell Kent BiShop: Randell is a Carmel native son attending Sunset School
and Carmel High School and then moving on to the California College of Arts and
Crafts and Sonoma State where he earned his secondary teaching credential. He was
a secondary teacher and a garden designer. He is a member of the Big Sur Land
Trust, the Califoniia Nature Conservancy and Life member of the Sierra Club.
For the past 28 years Randell has resided part time in the United
Kingdom restoring three cottages and gardens.
Lucinda "Cindy" Lloyd: Born, raised and educated in-Carmel. Cindy attended
UC Davis and Hartnell College Nursing School.graduating in 1977 achieving honors
as class Valedictorian, President. She retired from Commuruty Hospital of the
Monterey Peninsula in 2010.
Cindy has be(m a certified Master Gardener since 2008. Along with other Carmel
residents passionate about protecting Mission Trail Nature Preserve, Cindy was
instrumental.in preventing the proposed sale of the Martin Meadow from 1986
through 1989.
Among other activities, Cindy was a past member of Carmel Community and
Cultural Commission, is a volunteer_ gardener and Treasurer of the Carmel Woods
Neighborhood Association.
_________________ _,,.,,.._ ---------------
::
Francis P. ("Skip'') Lloyd
Skip was raised in Carmel. After graduating from Cannel High School, he spent ten years
away in law school, the U. S. Army and in practice with a San Francisco law
firm. He returned to Carmel in 1963 been a continuous resident of Carmel's
sphere of influence ever since. .
Since returning to live and work here, Skip bas practiced as an attorney at law Wlth the
Horan Lloyd law firm in Carmel and Monterey, where he is currently "'f Counsel"; after
over 48 years. -
Skip has been active in local enviromilental projects, such as serving as board member
and president of "Our Land Acquisition Fund", which, in the late 1960s, saved the .
western portion of the "Odello" artichoke fields from development, and as a director and
president of the Hatton Canyon Coalition, which defeated Caltans' proposal for a mega
freeway in Hatton Canyon, just east of C_arm.eL He has been active on other local non
profit boards, such as seivi.ng.as a director of the Big Sur Land Trust, as a founder,
director and president of the Carmel Residents Association (CRA) and as a board
member of the Carmel Citizens Committee, the Carmel chapter of the Red Cross and the
Carmel Library Board.
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Mary Anne Teed Lloyd
Home: Carmel (since 1971)
Education:
Post Grad Study, Academic Library Administration, UC Berkeley
Masters of Library and Information Science (MLS), UCLA
B.A., Long Beach State, Comparative Literature and Languages
Goethe Institut, Luneburg, West Germany, Language studies
U ofMaryland, College Park, MD
Academic and Board Background:
Board Member, Pacific Grove Museum ofNatural History
Emeritus Professor, Monterey Peninsula College
Library Director, Monterey Peninsula College
Major accomplishment: $25M Library and Technology Center
Co-Founder, MPC Foundation
MPC representative, CSUMB, University Visionillg Process
Consultant/Designer, Library, California State University, Monterey Bay
Faculty Senate President, Monterey Peninsula College
Accreditation Member, Western Association of Colleges and Universities
Chair, Monterey Bay Area Library Cooperative
Board member (former), Chamber Music Society, 12 years
MAlL Bio 120723
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Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve
2009-2011
Friends of Mission Trail Nature Preserve focus their energies
on identifying solutions to restore the land and landscape to its
highest natural condition. Our efforts not only restore the
natural landscape; we address invasive plant eradication,
erosion, fire fuel build .. up, trail deterioration and water quality.
Future efforts will address enhanced signage, nature displays
and walks, improving preserve entries and other
improvements. -
We implement and put into practice- the Goals, Objectives
and Policies of the Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan.
Weed Pulls/Invasive species Eradication
Winter 2010-168 hours
Winter 2011-195 hours
CUSD Freshman Project- 340 hours
Planning Meetings 2009-2010
Monthly- 108 hours
Special Meetings/Events- 49 hours
CUSD Regional Occupational Program Projects - 37 hours
Rowntree Native Plant Garden:
Meetings - 68 hours
Saturday Work Days - 171 hours
CUSD Regional Occupatiop.al Program Projects - 704 hours
Independent Work R&D:
Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow Document- 250 hours
Research Preserve Recreational Opportunities - 21 hours
Community Outreach - 19 hours
Total Volunteer Commitment- 2130 hours