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Mentoring Information Pack

Mentoring Information Pack


Mentoring has become an increasingly popular method of developing staff skills and knowledge. Its effectiveness is attributed to several key factors: 1. Timeliness: Mentee receives the information/skill they need when they need it 2. Relevance: real world issues can be discussed as progressed 3. Customisation: this relationship exists to meet the needs of the two parties involved and can therefore be customised to suit those changing needs The following pages outline what mentoring is and its benefits; the roles of those involved; formal programs currently running at UNSW and a toolkit for Mentors. If you are seeking further assistance, please contact OSDS on x53111 or email osds@unsw.edu.au

Contents of Pack
What is mentoring? Benefits of mentoring Roles of effective mentors and mentees Mentors toolkit Formal programs at UNSW Additional information Appendix 1 Mentoring Agreement template Appendix 2 - Mentoring Diary Sheet template Appendix 3 GROW Model of Mentoring Appendix 4 Stage of Change Model 2 4 6 7 11 11 12 13 14 16

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Mentoring Information Pack

What is Mentoring?
Defining Mentoring Mentoring is not a new phenomenon - The word mentor comes from an ancient Greek Myth. Odysseus, a king and hero, set off for the Trojan Wars knowing he might not return for many years. Mentor was the wise helper and teacher Odysseus chose to guide the development of his son while he was away. Today in most organisations, some form of mentoring is going on somewhere, formally or informally. Mentoring is a process of creating a supporting relationship that has benefits for both parties. A mentor will guide and support a mentee, often gaining new insights into their own operating style. A mentee will benefit from the support of a colleague who brings with them a higher level of experience.

Forms of Mentoring Mentoring can be formal in nature. For example, a mentoring program may be offered to participants as part of a leadership and management development program. This formalised approach to mentoring involves the selection, and matching of mentors with mentees, by the group who supports the program. Program guidelines are then established for the mentor/mentees, as well as resources to help identify career goals. A formal mentoring program also offers support to participants, and on-going monitoring of the program ensures outcomes are achieved. Informal mentoring has a less structured approach with the mentor relationship often developing in a more spontaneous way. However, the same mentoring process and principles (that underpin a formalised process) apply, providing the mentee with the opportunity to identify and develop plans to achieve career goals. At present UNSW provides a mix of formal and informal mentoring programs. Mentoring is NOT Counseling Whilst there are many similarities between counselling and mentoring, such as exploring personal issues to increase self awareness and facilitating personal goal achievement, there are also distinct differences that a mentor needs to remain aware of in order to keep parties, the mentor and the mentee, safe. Mentors needs to work within their area of personal competence and refer to other professional parties when appropriate. __________________________________________________________________
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Mentoring Information Pack

The key difference between counselling and mentoring is that mentors do not attempt to resolve deep underlying issues that are the drivers of low levels of motivation, low self esteem or poor performance. A mentor is primarily concerned with a more practical agenda such as assisting the mentee with setting goals, actioning plans and navigating barriers that exist in their immediate environment. It is important that mentors watch for signs and symptoms that a mentee may be in need of referral to a counsellor of psychologist. Effective mentors have the ability to assess when to approach this discussion with the mentee, and the ability to do so in a manner that is respectful, sensitive and empathic. If you believe counseling assistance is more appropriate for your situation, you can utlise our Employee Assistance Program (EAP) which is a free service available to all UNSW staff.

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Mentoring Information Pack

Benefits of Mentoring
Mentoring is widely recognised as a valuable personal and professional development strategy. Testimonials from staff in the tertiary sector also claim to have gained an enormous amount from an effective mentoring relationship. Mentees at the University of Auckland report that mentoring is: a mixture of career adviceuniversity structures, thinking about certain issues or directionsa sounding board. a creative way to energise me and develop my confidence. a safe place to get guidance. a great chance to reveal weaknesses and issues and get frank advice from someone in the know but independent in terms of the department.

In the same paper, mentors say: My main role has been as a sounding board, through the good times and the bad. A lot of acting as devils advocate I learnt things about myself, I enjoyed the personal contact, being in contact with someone outside my department and helping someone. Seeing someone elses ambitions and goals and reflecting upon ones own career and how you got where you are Being able to make a contributionfeeling useful and appreciated.

(Cited in Womens Group Mentoring Programs: Chit chat or effective professional development? West & McCorkmack, Centrelink and University of Canberra, Australia)

Key Benefits of Mentoring Are: For the mentee: Broadens your network Reduces isolation Increases self confidence Increases ability to perform your role Grows self awareness Clarifies career direction Progresses career goals Develops skill & knowledge Helps avoid making mistakes Develops organisational knowledge quicker

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Mentoring Information Pack

For the mentor: Develops leadership and mentoring skills Provides an opportunity to contribute and a sense of satisfaction Extends your networks Raises your profile Provides recognition of your skills and expertise It is a chance to critically reflect on your current practice Gains a broader perspective on UNSW issues

For UNSW: Facilitates a sense of community Provides the chance to make a difference to UNSW Increases staff understanding of the UNSW culture Leverages the strengths within the organisation Provides a practical mechanism to retain and grow great staff Improves communication across UNSW faculties and work units Enhances delivery of service through a more informed, confident and skilled staff

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Mentoring Information Pack

Roles of Effective Mentors and Mentees


Mentors: Listen Share lessons learnt and mistakes made Create a safe and confidential place Act as a sounding board Mentor and counsel Train and teach Challenge and nurture Open doors to new experiences and professional contacts Reflect and evaluate on the mentoring process on an ongoing basis Discourage dependency Work within their area of personal competence Have excellent self management skills Accept and enjoy differences in people Are non judgemental and maintain confidentiality

Mentees: Listen Take responsibility for their professional and personal development Sets goals and commit to an action plan Initiate meetings, respect time frames and act on decisions Reflect on what is learnt Seek feedback Participate with curiosity and enthusiasm Learn how to resolve their own problems Respect confidentiality

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Mentoring Information Pack

Mentors Toolkit
This section will take you through the key elements involved in setting up a mentoring relationship. Where appropriate, there are examples of templates you could use to support your program. The following has been developed with reference to PMCSUP382A Provide Mentoring/Mentoring in the Workplace Manufacturing Industry Skills Council and International Mentoring Federation Core Competencies, and outlines a mentoring framework as well as highlighting the key skills and capabilities a mentor needs to demonstrate to ensure the mentoring process is an effective one. Establish a Mentoring Agreement

Develop the Mentoring Relationship

Provide Mentoring Support

Manage the Mentoring Process

Evaluate Mentoring Effectiveness

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Establish a Mentoring Agreement

Establish the mentoring agreement by: Determining length of relationship, frequency of mentoring sessions, confidentiality, roles and responsibilities Discussing and clarifying expectations for both parties Referring mentee to another person or terminate the relationship if mentees needs are beyond mentors expertise Determining when and where you will meet, taking into account the need for confidentiality Discussing and determining the purpose of the relationship. For example, it may be: To gain organisational knowledge To apply for promotion To develop a new, specific skill To undertake a specific project To apply for a research grant

Appendix 1 has a template you can use for a Mentoring Agreement

Develop the Mentoring Relationship

You can develop this relationship by: Discussing and determining the purpose of the relationship. Using effective communication styles to develop trust, confidence and rapport Showing genuine concern for mentees welfare Demonstrating respect for mentees perceptions and skills Asking permission to mentor client in sensitive or new areas Exhibiting appropriate/ethical behaviours in accordance with UNSW Code of Conduct Using intuition and be open to not knowing Using humour effectively to create lightness and energy.

Appendix 2 has a template you can use as a Mentoring Diary Sheet to record your meetings. __________________________________________________________________
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Provide Mentoring Support

The mentor can provide support to the mentee by:

Helping the mentee to identify areas for learning, growth or change Establishing a set of specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time limited (SMART) goals to address identified areas for mentoring Helping mentee identify barriers and limiting beliefs Engaging the mentee in an exploration of alternative ideas and solutions Challenging assumptions and perspectives to provoke new ideas and possibilities for action Assisting mentee to identify opportunities and strategies that will lead to achievement of desired goal Monitoring mentee progress and make adjustments to mentoring plan as required.

The Grow Model in Appendix 3 is one you find useful during the support stage. Alternatively, if the mentee is operating in an environment of significant change, you may find the Stage of Change Model in Appendix 4 a useful reference.

Manage the Mentoring Process

Ways in which you can manage this process are: Asking the mentee to report on progress toward achievement of their goals Acknowledging progress and praise mentees successes Identifying barriers to progress and assist mentee to identify strategies to address these Preparing for sessions and organise and review information obtained during the session with mentee Keeping mentoring session on track by focusing on mentoring plan, strategies and achievement of agreed goals. Remain flexible to shift mentoring directions if required Positively confronting mentee when strategies/agreed actions not followed through Keeping written notes of mentoring plan and mentee progress. 9

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Mentoring Information Pack

Evaluate Mentoring Effectiveness

Finally, you can evaluate the effectiveness of the mentoring by: Making adjustments to the relationship to meet the needs of the mentee Seeking feedback from mentee on mentoring effectiveness Assessing your own mentoring skills by personally reflecting on the process

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Mentoring Programs at UNSW


Formal mentoring programs at UNSW UNSW has recently established formal mentoring programs as part of the: A Step Ahead Program (new Heads of Schools) Academic Women in Leadership Program Women In Research Program

All of the formal mentoring programs are aligned with the mentoring principles outlined in this toolkit, with some program specific customisation of processes and procedures to meet the differing needs of the program participants.

Additional Information
Additional links to useful sites: www.csu.edu.au (Charles Sturt University mentoring relationship process www.coachingnetwork.org.uk 12 habits of the toxic mentor www.uq.edu.au/hupp - principles www.mentoring-australia.com

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Mentoring Agreement
Instructions for use This Mentoring Agreement provides a template for completion at the first mentoring meeting. It allows for boundaries to be discussed and goals to be set and recorded. While not aiming to stifle the possible flexibility or informality of the arrangement, it is important that both parties understand the parameters of the relationship. By using questions posed in the template, you should be able to create a shared understanding of how the relationship will work.

Date of Initial Meeting: What is the purpose of Mentee creating this mentoring relationship? Mentor

Why do you want to be Mentee involved in this relationship? Mentor

Are there specific skills or knowledge you are hoping to build by being involved in this relationship? How long do you expect the mentoring relationship to last? What will be the time limit on your meetings and how frequent will these be? Where is a suitable place to meet? Please consider
the confidentiality of your discussions.

Mentee

Mentor and Mentee

Mentor and Mentee

Mentor and Mentee

Are there an identified Mentor and Mentee off limits topics for this relationship? Next meeting:

Signature of mentee

Signature of Mentor

This sheet is confidential to the two people involved in the mentoring relationship

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Mentoring Diary Sheet


Instructions for use This Diary Sheet can be used to record the meetings held and document actions arising from those meetings. Please complete at the conclusion of the meeting. It is an excellent way to summarise the meeting and create action points for both the mentor and mentee to work on before the next meeting.

Date of Meeting: Topics discussed:

Comments/reflections:

Mentee

Mentor

Actions/Where to next?

Mentee

Mentor

Next meeting:

Signature of mentee

Signature of Mentor

This sheet is confidential to the two people involved in the mentoring relationship

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Mentoring Information Pack

GROW Model of Mentoring


To support the information on managing the mentoring process, the following GROW model can be used to develop a practical approach to the mentoring session. The model will help the mentor prepare for the session, and will provide a useful structure to the discussion. A number of questions have been provided at each stage of the model, however they are suggested questions only, and it is important to adapt them to your own style to ensure an effective mentoring session. Each mentoring session should work through each part of the GROW process.

The GROW mentoring model will help the mentee to identify career goals, and options to move towards their goal, and importantly to discuss what might need to change to allow this to occur.

GOALS

REALITY

OPTIONS

WRAP UP

Using the GROW Model of Mentoring

GOALS

Set goals, write them down, establish what person wants out of the session What do you want to achieve out of this mentoring session/ relationship? What are the goals you want to achieve? (Make sure the goals are SMART i.e. specific, measurable, action oriented, realistic, time limited) What do you hope to achieve through this goal? What would make this goal even more meaningful for you? Which of your values do you need to consider when setting this goal? On a scale from 1 to 10 how committed are you to this goal? What are the expectations of others? Who else needs to know about your goal? How will you inform them?

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REALITY

Let them tell their story, invite self assessment, whats happening, when does this happen, what effect does it have, other factors) What is the context of the current situation? Tell me what is happening in regard to this goal at the moment. Tell me some more about that What has stopped you from reaching this goal in the past? Do you know anyone who has achieved that goal? What can you learn from them? On a scale from 1 to 10 how severe/ serious/ urgent is the situation?

OPTIONS

Brainstorm options, ask dont tell, empower, ensure choice, how can you move toward the goal, what has worked in the past What could you do as a first step? What else could you do? What would happen if you did nothing? What has worked for you in the past? How could you do more of what works for you? Who can support you in making this change? How could you redesign your work environment to support you in implementing this goal? What could you change or eliminate in your environment that is holding you back? What are the costs and benefits of this goal?

WRAP UP

Identify specific steps and any obstacles, write action plan Where does this goal fit in with your personal priorities at the moment? What obstacles do you expect to meet? How will you overcome them? What steps do you need to take to achieve this? What are you going to do? How can I help you in moving forward?

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Stage of Change Model


The mentor can play a key role in facilitating change, and the following Stage of Change Model (Adapted from Prochaska & DiClemente, 1986) may be helpful in establishing the stage of change point for their mentee. The Stage of Change table outlined below also provides some tips and hints to help both the mentor and mentee explore each stage of change, with the ultimate aim being to achieve their career goals.

Permanent Exit Relapse Maintenance

Enter Here Pre-contemplation Action

Determination Contemplation

Temporary Exit

Pre-contemplation
Contemplation Determination Action Maintenance Relapse

Not even considering change; happy with the way things are; or in denial In two minds; weighing the pros and cons of change versus staying same; dilemma; internal conflict Decision; commitment to change Act on decision; use strategies to make change The change now becomes the norm; comfortable, easy and familiar Slip back into the old pattern; usually temporary; normal part of the process

(Adapted from Prochaska & DiClemente, 1986)

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Working with the Mentees Stage of Change


Stage of Change How to identify
(if mentee is in this stage)
Happy with the way things are No concerns Dont want change dont see the need for change

What you can do


(to move mentee through the stages)
Raise awareness Ask questions eg. do you have any concerns at all in this area Encourage mentee to keep an open mind, be aware of feedback of others Ask questions about ways the mentee has dealt with changes in this area in the past and then not successfully implemented change. Why did this happen? Realise ambivalence is normal Dont avoid the uncomfortable feeling explore the reasons for it Weigh up the pros and cons of change vs staying the same Do not pressure your mentee into making a decision before they are ready Do not encourage action prematurely Ask questions to assist mentee be specific about their decision: what exactly is it that you want to change? Write it down, then move on to Action stage to support the decision Do things to increase chances of a positive outcome and feelings of effectiveness Set up support systems

Pre Contemplation

Contemplation

In two minds (ambivalent) Uncomfortable, in a dilemma Weighing the pros and cons of change versus staying the same Swing between the two views Feel discouraged about change Barriers seem too great Disadvantages outweigh advantages Feel like they need to do something about it Advantages of change now outweigh disadvantages Formulating decision about what to change May experience anxiety and trepidation, mixed with excitement and hope Becoming committed to the change Taking action to implement changes Using strategies to make the change Wanting support and encouragement in making changes

Determination

Action

Encourage action, Dont just talk about it, do it Develop strategies to try and keep adding to them Monitor progress and make adjustments as necessary Encourage mentee to enlist the help of others Praise and encourage mentee Continue to monitor progress Revisit original goals, adjust or set new ones

Maintenance

Relapse

The changes have now become more natural and easier A new habit/ pattern has been established Dont have to be actively managing the change but are still committed to the changes The new way has become difficult and a slip up has occurred to old ways Often feel bad but may be enjoying it as well Often feeling very guilty Can lose confidence in the process of change if you dont get back on track quickly May have lost sight of the original reasons for the change and need to reestablish these reasons

Acknowledge relapse as a normal part of the process Dont indulge in blame and allow self defeating attitudes Constructively problem solve by considering what can be learnt through the relapse and considering what could be done differently next time Revisit Contemplation stage and decide on reasons for change Recommit to the change/ goal

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