County planning park at old Johns’ family site

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Nearly 200 years old, the Johns homestead, located on Lawrenceville Highway in Tucker, is part of 50 acres that DeKalb County is planning to develop into a park. The house was occupied by Johns family descendants until the 1980s. Photos by Andrew Cauthen

IS SHE HYW HAPPY ?
hen the Johns family received its land grant in approximately 1827, the property was 202.5 acres along what is now Lawrenceville Highway in Tucker. The family built a house on the property and Johns’ family descendants farmed the land until the 1980s, according to Dave Butler, DeKalb County’s greenspace environmental manager. Now DeKalb County, which purchased the last 23 acres of the Johns family property in 2004 at a cost of $4.72 million, is planning a park at the site located at 3071 Lawrenceville Highway. In 2006, the county purchased the adjoining Twin Brothers Lakes property for $2.31 million, making the park approximately 50 acres in all, including other smaller acquisitions. What was the family’s original acreage now contains the Floral Hills cemetery, Rehoboth Baptist Church and several neighborhoods. The Johns’ family assisted with the construction of the first church building at Rehoboth, a

by Andrew Cauthen andrew@dekalbchamp.com

WHYIS SHE WHYIS SHE SO SO HAPPY ? HAPPY ?

WHYIS SHE SO HAPPY ?

Ducks, beavers, geese and other wildlife populate the Twin Brothers Lake property, part of the tract the county plans to develop.

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The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Sneiderman allowed to attend synagogue
by Daniel Beauregard daniel@dekalbchamp.com “I’m going to give her permission with the understanding that she will need Andrea Sneiderman, to depart 15 minutes prior who was arrested Aug. 2 to attending the service and and charged as an accomreturn within 15 minutes of plice in the 2010 murder of leaving the service,” Adams her husband Rusty Sneider- said. man, recently won two miOn Sept. 19, lawyers for nor court victories on Sept. Sneiderman filed a motion 19 and 20. to contest the freezing of the Superior Court Judge $2.2 million in assets, which Gregory Adams signed a she received from the death motion Sept. 20 allowing of her late husband. When Sneiderman to leave her Sneiderman was first taken home to attend a synagogue into custody the court froze approximately a mile-and-a- her assets. Sneiderman’s half from her parents’ home, lawyers argued that since where she is currently living the bank that controlled under house arrest. those assets, Bank of Sneiderman, who was re- New York Mellon, didn’t leased on $500,000 bond in have a branch in DeKalb August, is accused of having County, the court had no an affair with Hemy Neujurisdiction. man and conspiring with However, Geary didn’t him to murder her husband contest the motion and for his approximately $2.2 informed the court that million in assets. Neuman a second freeze was belater admitted to the murder ing granted by a judge and was charged and is serv- in Fulton County, where ing a life sentence without there is a branch of the the possibility of parole. bank. Meanwhile, Esther “In addition to the highPanitch, the attorney holidays, we have asked for Rusty Sneiderman’s permission for her to attend brother Steve Sneiderthe first candlelight service man, filed a motion Sept. of Chanukah which is Dec. 19 asserting a claim for 8,” Sneiderman’s attorney the insurance money, John Petrey said. “She has which he reportedly been out on bond just short doesn’t want “wasted” on of a month now and she has lawyer fees for Andrea complied with each and ev- Sneiderman. ery individual order in relaJudge Adams distion to that.” missed the motion, ruling Adams granted the moit a “moot” point due to tion, which Chief Deputy the freeze order in Fulton District Attorney Don County. Yom Kippur, Geary and District Attorney Sept. 26, will be the first Robert James didn’t conof several services Sneitest. derman has asked permisPrior to attending any of sion to attend. the services, Sneiderman is Sneiderman is schedrequired to contact the ankle uled to be arraigned in monitoring company and let Adams’ courtroom Oct. 8 it know the address and exat 8:30 a.m. act times of each service.

Local News

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Andrea Sneiderman, shown here in an Aug. 2 bond hearing, has been granted permission to attend synagogue while under house arrest. A DeKalb judge also released a freeze on $2 million in insurance money, but Fulton County still has a freeze on the funds. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Kent D. Johnson)

Proposed Substantial Amendment to the 2008-2012 Consolidated Plan, including the 2008 Annual Action Plan For the Neighborhood Stabilization Program 1
The DeKalb County Human and Community Development Department is proposing a substantial amendment to the 2008-2012 Consolidated Plan, including the 2008 Annual Action Plan. This substantial amendment will amend the budget of Neighborhood Stabilization Program 1 (NSP1) Application submitted to HUD in 2008. In accordance with the Housing and Economic Recovery Act 2008, the Department of Housing and Urban Development has allocated $18,545,013 in emergency funding for assistance with the redevelopment of abandoned and foreclosed properties. The purpose of this amendment is to revise the budget to show the planned use of additional program income and any subsequent changes that may be necessary on the use of NSP1 funds. The budget categories include acquisition, rehabilitation and disposition of foreclosed homes; establishment of land banks; demolition of blighted structures; redevelopment of vacant properties; and, complying with all Neighborhood Stabilization Program 1 (NSP-1) requirements. All citizens are invited to review the Proposed Substantial Amendment to the 2008-2012 Consolidated Plan, including the 2008 Annual Action Plan for the Neighborhood Stabilization Program 1 from September 13, 2012 – September 28, 2012 on the DeKalb County website, http://www.co.dekalb.ga.us/commdev/publicNotices.html, and at the location identified below.

DeKalb County Human and Community Development Department 150 East Ponce de Leon Avenue, Suite 330, Decatur, Georgia 30030 Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Comment forms may be obtained and completed at the above listed location. Comments may also be faxed or emailed to the Human and Community Development Department.

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The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

County names new top technology chief

NEWS BRIEFS

DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis has named John Matelski as the county’s new chief information officer and director of information technology. Matelski, who currently is the chief information officer and director of Information Technology(IT) Services for Gwinnett County, has more than 25 years of professional IT experience. Previously, he spent 11 years as the city of Orlando’s deputy chief information officer and chief security officer. Matelski has also served as the management information system operation director and senior network engineer for Coleman Research Corporation, which contracted with the Department of Energy, NASA, Mobil Oil and others. “Matelski is known for managing a service-oriented team that delivers exemplary customer service, education, troubleshooting and issue resolution with expertise and consideration,” Ellis said. Matelski graduated summa cum laude from Arizona State University with bachelor of science and MBA degrees. His new position is effective Sept. 24.

animals, I am excited that she is joining us in this critical capacity.” In addition, Rawls served as president for the Florida Animal Control Association and remains involved in the Society of Animal Welfare Administration, the Humane Society of the United States and the American Society of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Woman sentenced to 20 years for theft at church
A woman was sentenced to 20 years and ordered to repay $143,955 to Dunwoody Baptist Church for funds stolen between 2006 and 2009. On Sept. 21, Judge Tangela Barrie accepted Patricia Padgett’s guilty plea to four counts of theft by taking. Padgett will spend three years in prison and the remainder of her 20-year sentence on probation. “The defendant knowingly and willfully deceived her former employer and stole more than $140,000 over a three year period,” said DeKalb County District Attorney Robert James. “We are encouraged by the outcome of this case and by the prospect that the parishioners of Dunwoody Baptist Church will recoup a portion of the funds stolen by Patricia Padgett.” Padgett was the former accounts payable manager for Dunwoody Baptist Church. She was responsible for collecting the income from the church’s various activities, including cash collected at Sunday services, the day care facility, the fitness facility, and mission trips. Padgett’s duties included depositing that money in the church’s bank account. Assistant District Attorney Angel Riley served as lead prosecutor.

customers already present.” “An armed security guard employed by the bank confronted the suspect,” according to Lt. Pam Kunz, of the DeKalb County Police Department. “The suspect made an aggressive movement toward the guard and the guard fired multiple shots at the suspect. The suspect was struck in the knee. He was taken into custody and has been transported to a local hospital for treatment.” A bank employee was hit by debris or shrapnel during the incident. She has been treated and released from the hospital, according to the police statement. The incident is being investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which will release the suspect’s identity when federal charges are filed.

DCSD uses federal grant money to send administrators back to school
by Daniel Beauregard daniel@dekalbchamp.com The DeKalb County School District (DCSD) is planning to send several administrators back to college using Race to the Top grants. DeKalb schools spokesman Jeff Dickerson said the district is using approximately $345,000 in Race to the Top leadership development funds, which are specifically designated for such training. “This is part of a larger program that will help provide leadership and development training to more than 200 employees,” Dickerson said. Dickerson said the funds, which are a fraction of the approximately $34 million in Race to the Top money the district will receive over the next few years, will be used to send eight administrators to Mercer University. “It’s an experiment but it’s an interesting one,” Dickerson said. Each staff member attending the program has been an administrator for more than 10 years, Dickerson said. The program at Mercer is tailored for DeKalb County school administrators and is specific to the district, which will benefit both the administrators as well as those teaching them. “It helps the researchers focus on training educators in a way that’s specific for the school district,” Dickerson said. Carl Martray, dean of the Tift College of Education and a professor at Mercer, said the administrators are enrolled in a Ph. D. program in educational leadership, which focuses on current trends and research worldwide. “It’s heavily research based and the students in it will be mixing with administrators from other districts because that’s the best way for them to learn from each other,” Martray said. Martray said the program started as an educational leadership master’s program, which blossomed into the Ph. D. program approximately seven years ago. Over the three years, Martray said, the DCSD administrators will have the chance to work with each other on a regular basis, in some cases collaborating on research projects that relate directly to DCSD. “We’ve had very good success with it so far,” Martray said.

Johnson recognized for contribution
Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga) received the Vanguard Award from the Movement is Life Steering Committee at the 2012 Caucus on Arthritis & Musculoskeletal Health Disparities. Johnson received the award at the group’s annual conference in Washington for his dedication to health care reform and reducing health disparities, “Having access to quality care when dealing with my own health issues, I think everyone deserves the right to quality, affordable healthcare,” said Johnson, who fought and beat hepatitis C. “It’s the mission of Movement is Life that makes a difference in the lives of individuals and their families battling health issues related to obesity. I’m proud to receive this honor.” Johnson was the southeast regional whip during the push for President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, which is designed to insure 30 million Americans. “The entire group thanks Congressman Johnson for helping to pass the Affordable Care Act and closing the health gap,” the Caucus stated in a media release. “The ACA is a major part of what Movement is Life is working toward. Besides providing access to quality healthcare for our underserved communities, it also provides new opportunities for community intervention programs that many of our stakeholders hope to participate in as we move forward.”

DeKalb Animal Services gets new deputy director
DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis has named Betty Xan Rawls to serve as director of Animal Services and Enforcement effective Oct. 1. Rawls served at the YoungWilliams Animal Center in Knoxville, Tenn. as the shelter operations director and human resources and compliance coordinator. Previously, Rawls served as the director of animal services for Citrus County, Fla., and Brevard County, Fla., as well as vice president for Labrador Retriever Rescue of Florida. “Rawls brings more than 25 years of progressively responsible animal welfare experience with her to DeKalb County,” Ellis said. “With her proven track record of successful programs based on external audits and satisfaction surveys as well as her commitment to the health and wellbeing of

Suspect shot in attempted bank robbery
A man was shot when he pulled out a toy gun during an attempted bank robbery Sept. 19. The incident occurred at Citizens Trust Bank at 2592 S. Hairston Road shortly after the bank opened. According to the DeKalb County Police Department, “a suspect armed with what appeared to be a handgun entered the bank, aggressively making demands of the employees and

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The Legislature and MarTa’s Ceo
to the agency who it should hire to run the place. This smacks of plantation politics and the citizens of DeKalb, Fulton and the City of Atlanta ought to be sick and tired of it. Why doesn’t the state provide the same scrutiny over the billions of dollars the Department of Transportation rakes in? Why doesn’t major media make it a priority to provide the “taxpaying” public with the same fiscal analysis of GDOT that it does MARTA? Do the citizens of DeKalb, Fulton and the City of Atlanta not pay taxes? One would think not given the incessant meddling of MARTA affairs. The contract with MARTA Chief Executive Officer Beverly Scott is about to expire and she has indicated she will retire. The MARTA board is in the process of hiring a new person to take over the reins of the agency. One has to agree with Rep. Jacobs on one thing. The next CEO does need to immediately address MARTA’s “very serious financial situation. There is no time for a learning curve.” The selection of a new leader is crucial and the MARTA board should proceed with due caution in making that choice. Ideally, the new CEO must know bus and rail operations, be able to work with all stakeholders in the region, especially the business community and lawmakers (commissioners and legislators) and possess a proven track record of balancing budgets and setting transit fiscal houses in order. Rep. Jacobs mentioned MARTA Deputy Chief Dwight Ferrell as a likely candidate. Ferrell is reportedly on the short list. Citizens should be scared of that possibility, very scared. Ferrell’s selection would be a disaster on many fronts. He does not have a reputation in the industry of having the skill level necessary for a job of this magnitude. Also, he like Jacobs is in favor of privatizing the agency. The last thing MARTA needs is a hand-picked operative to turn over our multi-billion dollar asset to private concerns. That is putting it mildly and as politely as my vocabulary will allow. MARTA board be careful. Be very careful. The decision you make may very well indeed determine your relationship with the General Assembly. Moreover, your decision will determine the future of thousands of the riding public who depend on MARTA for transportation to jobs, doctors, schools and leisure activities. Who do you represent? The people or politicians who have demonstrated they do not have the Authority’s best interests at heart. Rep. Jacobs has thrown down the gauntlet, threatening more state control if MARTA doesn’t hire the right person and get its fiscal affairs in order. Most of MARTA’s financial woes are directly attributable to the downturn in the economy and state law which does not allow the authority to spend its funds as it sees fit. MARTA relies heavily on sales tax revenues from DeKalb, Fulton and the City of Atlanta. Here it is the ninth-largest transit authority in the nation that gets nothing from a state that dictates how it spends its money. That law, by the way, that allows MARTA to spend only half of its revenue on running the authority and the other half on capital improvements was spearheaded by segregationist lawmakers who wanted to maintain control of the authority they begrudgingly approved. It was about control of the money 40 years ago and it remains so to this day. So many of our lawmakers do not know history and when one doesn’t know his history, he is are bound to repeat the mistakes of the past. The best thing the legislature can do is get out of MARTA’s business and concentrate on the DOT which does get money from the state and does need its oversight. Let Fulton Atlanta and DeKalb control their own destinies. We’re following the money. Steen Miles, The Newslady, is a retired journalist and former Georgia state senator. Contact Steen Miles at Steen@dekalbchamp.com.

Opinion The Newslady

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28 , 2012

A recent article in the Atlanta Journal Constitution indicated MARTA’s choice for a new CEO could determine whether the Legislature exerts more control over the transit authority. Are we serious here? The state legislature exerts enough control over MARTA operations already without paying the cost to be the boss. The state of Georgia provides precious little funding to MARTA. The DeKalb, Fulton and Atlanta legislative delegations ought to be fighting tooth and nail to get the state out of MARTA’s business. The rest of the state cares not a tinker’s darn about MARTA. State Representative Mike Jacobs deserves our respect. He is a hard-working, well-meaning lawmaker who always does what he believes is in the best interests of his constituents. That said, he is way off the mark when it comes to MARTA. Not only is the state not entitled to run MARTA’s operations as it often attempts to do, but Rep. Jacobs and others have absolutely no business trying dictate

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Opinion One Man’s Opinion

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Cut to the Curb is the WorD!
how many “presents” neighboring dogs could leave in that little strip of grass running between the sidewalk and curb, nearly 100 yards on the west side, and probably 20 or 30 more across the front. As I noted DeKalb CEO Burrell Ellis’ initiative to clean and Cut to the Curb, I almost stood and spontaneously applauded. Instead of issuing an empty press release or simply making a gesture or statement about code enforcement, the CEO traveled to south DeKalb, loosened his tie, rolled up his sleeves and did quite a bit of shoveling, weeding and curb cutting. Trust me, this is strenuous, never-ending and occasionally back breaking work. Without gloves, some of these plants will shred your flesh when you attempt to pull them out at the root. Several others excrete smells, sticky goo, thorns or harbor fire ants as defense mechanisms. But NOT pulling these weeds matters. As former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani championed, a few broken windows, some graffiti on buildings and trash in the street or on the curb and a neighborhood can very quickly begin to go to seed. People witness debris and lack of maintenance and lawlessness quickly follows. Property is further damaged or stolen and the downward spiral begins. There is a reason they call it “curb appeal.” A statewide campaign for U.S. Senate in 1992 had me traversing the state most days, often returning to the little shotgun house around 9:30 or 10:00 p.m. at night. My now ex-wife Nancy was then pregnant with our daughter. Some heavy rains and weeks of neglect led the weeds and grass to approach mid-calf height. One of the lowest moments of that year was returning one evening at dusk, around 7 p.m., to see Nancy well into her second tri-mester mowing our lawn, after earlier making the side lawn and curbs again presentable. I felt like a felon, and a few neighbors witnessing me letting a pregnant woman do the yard work cast more than a few cutting glances my way as well. I can’t say that we never had weeds or crab grass again, but that summer night I gained a whole new respect for the relevance and importance of cutting to the curb and keeping the look maintained. Nancy explained that as part of her own ‘nesting phase’ she couldn’t stand to come home at night and walk through a yard or down the sidewalk with the place looking so rough. When I sold the place in 1997, it still saddened me to drive by and occasionally see the weeds again winning the war down along that sidewalk. This battle is personal, and it occurs house by house, block by block and street by street. I want to give a shout out to the Wesley Chapel Curb Appeal Task Force as well as Keep DeKalb Beautiful for assembling volunteers, tools and supplies to improve several major thoroughfares and Cut, Weed and SCRAPE to the Curb in South DeKalb. We need more out there like you. Cut to the Curb is the WORD...but actually doing that work is deed. Fall is my favorite season, in part because the change in season often weakens quite a few strains of weed. Take advantage of this opportunity at your place, in your neighborhood, or even help an elderly or struggling neighbor next door. Their rangy weeds or trash at the curb also trash your property values. Bill Crane also serves as a political analyst and commentator for Channel 2’s Action News, WSB-AM News/Talk 750 and now 95.5 FM, as well as a columnist for The Champion, Champion Free Press and Georgia Trend. Crane is a DeKalb native and business owner, living in Scottdale. You can reach him or comment on a column at billcrane@ earthlink.net.

“Consider a building with a few broken windows. If windows are not repaired, the tendency is for vandals to break a few more windows... Or consider a sidewalk. Some litter accumulates. Soon more litter accumulates. Eventually people start leaving bags of trash from take-out restaurants there, or breaking into cars,” from an article titled “Broken Windows” in the March 1982 edition of The Atlantic Monthly, written by social scientists James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling. The first home I bought was a little shotgun house in Decatur on West Howard Avenue. The property lot was long and slender... sort of like a shoe box, surrounded on two sides by sidewalks, as the house sat on a corner. Near a neighborhood park, the area was popular for folks walking their dogs, and before and after the Decatur “poop” ordinance went on the books, I often marveled at just

Clarkston’s greatness revealed
On Sept. 23 and 24, PBS broadcast America By The Numbers with Maria Hinojosa, a documentary that looks at how the dramatic demographic changes in America are affecting individual communities and the political landscape of the country. This pilot episode, titled Clarkston, Georgia was filmed locally and featured interviews with Mayor Emmanuel Ransom, the first Black mayor in Clarkston, as well as prominent leaders of the Somali and Bhutanese communities who talked about the importance of citizenship, civics, voting and the U.S. Constitution. Those featured reflected on how Americans take their freedoms for granted and how important these freedoms are to those who have lived under tyranny. The show also included an interview with a long time White resident of Clarkston who talked openly about his concerns with the influx of refugees. The PBS show revealed to audiences across the United States what we here in DeKalb County already know. The region of our country with the most dramatic demographic shift is right here in the South. Over the past seven years, DeKalb County has welcomed 69 percent of refugees resettled in Georgia. These refugees come from countries including Burma, Bhutan, Somalia, Iraq, Sudan and many more. While the community does not have an infallible record of open arms acceptance of its newest and proudest citizens, it has done more to embrace these dramatic demographic changes than not. Hinojosa’s documentary is a tribute to Clarkston’s greatness. As the largest resettlement site in the state, which is itself the sixth largest site in the nation, Clarkston is a tribute to Georgia’s legacy of human rights and international service. Refugees come thanks to our strong faith community and growing manufacturing sector. Refugees are our newest U.S. citizens who deserve all the rights and privileges granted them by our Constitution and by God. And if God and Constitution aren’t reason enough, then let the goodness of who we are cause us to welcome with open arms those who have given more than we could ever imagine to be numbered among the citizens of this greatest country. Please join me in informing your elected officials that you support creating a more welcoming DeKalb and get involved with a local refugee resettlement agency such as RRISA (www.rrisa.org). Kevin Abel Board member, Refugee Resettlement and Immigration Services of Atlanta (RRISA)

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Publisher: Dr. Earl D. Glenn Managing Editor: Kathy Mitchell News Editor: Andrew Cauthen Production Manager: Kemesha Hunt Graphic Designer: Travis Hudgons The Champion Free Press is published each Friday by ACE III Communications, Inc., 114 New Street, Suite E, Decatur, GA. 30030 Phone (404) 373-7779.

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We sincerely appreciate the discussion surrounding this and any issue of interest to DeKalb County. The Champion was founded in 1991 expressly to provide a forum for discourse for all community residents on all sides of an issue. We have no desire to make the news only to report news and opinions to effect a more educated citizenry that will ultimately move our community forward. We are happy to present ideas for discussion; however, we make every effort to avoid printing information submitted to us that is known to be false and/ or assumptions penned as fact.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Opinion

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The 'self-made' hallucination of America's rich
Like Mitt Romney, most Americans who amass grand fortunes have a substantial head start.
rich were born on third base and think they hit a triple. United for a Fair Economy(UFE) extends this baseball analogy in its new Forbes 400 analysis. UFE defines as “born in the batter’s box” those Forbes 400 rich who hail from poor to middle-class circumstances. Some had nothing growing up. Others had parents who ran small businesses. About 95 percent of Americans, overall, currently live in these “batter’s box” situations. Just more than a third, 35 percent, of the Forbes 400 come from these backgrounds. Just more than 3 percent of the Forbes 400, United for a Fair Economy found, have left no good paper trail on their economic backgrounds. Of the over 60 percent remaining, all grew up in substantial privilege. Those “born on first base” — in upper-class families, with inheritances up to $1 million — make up 22 percent of the 400. On “second base,” from households wealthy enough to generate inheritances in excess of $1 million, UFE found another 11.5 percent. On “third base,” with inherited wealth of more than $50 million, sits 7 percent of America’s 400 richest. Last but not least, is the “born on home plate” crowd. These high-rollers, 21.25 percent of the total Forbes list, all inherited enough to “earn” their Forbes 400 status. Forbes, the United for a Fair Economy researchers sum up, has glamorized the myth of the “self-made man” and minimized “the many other factors that enable wealth,” including tax breaks and other government policies that help the really rich get ever richer. The narrative of wealth and achievement that Forbes is pushing, the new UFE study adds, “ignores the other side of the coin — namely, that the opportunity to build wealth is not equally or broadly shared in contemporary society.” And many of those who do have that opportunity — like the mega millionaires in Boca Raton who applauded Mitt Romney’s bogus assertion that he “inherited nothing” — see absolutely no reason to turn that coin over. OtherWords columnist Sam Pizzigati edits Too Much, the Institute for Policy Studies’ weekly newsletter on excess and inequality. OtherWords. org.

by Sam Pizzigati Columnist

Let’s cut Mitt Romney some slack. Not every off-the-cuff comment he made at that now infamous, secretly taped $50,000-a-plate fundraiser in Boca Raton reveals an utterly shocking personal failing. Take, for instance, Mitt’s remark that he has “inherited nothing.” A variety of commentators have jumped on Romney for that. They’ve pointed out that Mitt, the son of a wealthy CEO, has enjoyed plenty of privilege — everything from an elite private school education to a Rolodex full of rich family friends he could tap to start up his business career. On top of that, the struggling young Mitt had $1 million worth of stock his father threw his way to tide him over until the big paydays started arriving. Not quite “nothing.” But there’s no reason to pick on Mitt either. Most deep pockets, not just Mitt, consider themselves “self-made.” The best evidence of this predilection to claim “self-made” status? The annual September release of the Forbes magazine list of the 400 richest Americans. Each year Forbes celebrates the billionaires who populate its 400 list as paragons of get-up-and-go. The latest list, according to Forbes itself, “instills confidence that the American dream is still very much alive.” Of America’s current 400 richest, says the magazine, 70 percent “made their fortunes entirely from scratch.” Forbes made the same observation last year, too, and most news outlets took that claim at face value. But United for a Fair Economy did not. The Boston-based group’s analysts took the time to investigate the actual backgrounds of last year’s Forbes 400. They released their findings on the same day Forbes released the new 2012 list. The basic conclusion from these findings: Forbes is spinning “a misleading tale of what it takes to become wealthy in America.” Most of the Forbes 400, like Mitt, have benefitted from a level of privilege unknown to the vast majority of Americans. As commentator Jim Hightower has colorfully put it, most of our super

The following comments are pulled straight from our website and are not edited for content or grammar.

More mounting legal fees in DeKalb schools
I think that the superintendent can take a pay cut..... she was on tv the other day stating that she’s going to be cutting pay (never mentioning her own pay, but the teachers.) THAT is the wrong way to go about it any way you slice it. I’m pretty sure she can do without a half a million dollars a year +food allowance, etc. The teachers can’t afford a pay cut, SHE CAN. That’s what frustrates me the most. Mismanagement of funds is completely on her lap, it should never affect the teacher’s pay because they don’t get paid enough to begin with. –Lawlerskates posted this on 9/21/12 at 9:36 a.m. ....and still people think we don’t need change??? Parents, get the facts and vote YES for choice on November 6th! I am tired of being #49. – Rae Anne posted this on 9/20/12 at 9:58 p.m.

DCSD bus drivers demand health and retirement benefits
They should be thankful they have a job and leave it at that. – Hook posted this on 9/14/12 at 10:37 p.m. They should go on strike. Then, they won’t be taken for granted. – Curtis posted this on 9/14/12 at 8:23 a.m.

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The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Local News

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McCollum

Fennell

Tellis

George

Four suspects arrested for Sept. 2 murder
by Andrew Cauthen andrew@dekalbchamp.com Four men have been arrested for the Sept. 2 murder and armed robbery of a DeKalb County man. Craig Tellis was arrested Sept. 18 at 1454 Everhart Street, Atlanta. Tellis, 22, was found hiding in a back room of the residence by the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office Fugitive Squad. Tellis, Chenjavious McCollum, Iman George and Christopher Fennell are all accused of murdering 34-yearold Antorey Harris of Decatur at the Walden Pond apartment complex located at 2826 Shell Bark Road, Decatur. Harris was standing on the balcony of an apartment when he was killed, according to police reports. “According to the warrant, robbery was the motive as drugs were taken from the victim’s home,” stated a media release by Sgt. Adrion Bell, spokesman for the DeKalb Sheriff’s Office. An AK-47 was used in the murder, Bell stated. When DeKalb County Police officers responded to the scene, Harris was “lying outside the apartment suffering from a shot,” said DeKalb Police spokeswoman Mekka Parish. Witnesses reported that the victim was standing on a porch when they heard multiple shots then saw people fleeing the scene, she said. “A video recording captured the incident and showed the suspects,” Bell stated. Early on Sept. 5, fugitive investigators and the DeKalb Sheriff’s SWAT team were called to a home on Hollow Tree Drive in Decatur after receiving reports that Tellis may have been hiding in an attic, Bell stated. “Proper precautions were taken to evacuate parts of the neighborhood, yet the search did not produce a suspect,” he said. McCollum was arrested on Sept. 7 and Fennel and George turned themselves in on Sept. 11. All four suspects are in the DeKalb County jail. Three of the suspects have prior arrest records. Tellis, 22, has been arrested for theft by receiving stolen property, giving a false name to police and probation violation; George, 19, of Decatur has had charges of marijuana possession and violation of parole; and Fennell, 21, has had a charge of driving while license suspended or revoked. McCollum, 21, of Lithonia does not have prior arrests in DeKalb County, Bell said. The shooting victim also had several run-ins with law enforcement dating back to 1997 for possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute, cruelty to children, battery, simple assault and disorderly conduct. “Today’s arrest of Tellis produces a major step in the case,” Bell stated.

Delphyne Lomax
lege in Alliance, OH, where she majored in business administration; soon after she moved to Atlanta in 1985. When her sons were aged 7 and 10 they started playing basketball for the South DeKalb YMCA. She soon became a team mom, which is what started her career in volunteerism. “A few years later I was askes to serve on the board and have been on that board ever since,” Lomax said. Previously the president of the South DeKalb Business Association on two different occasions, Lomax has also volunteered for the DeKalb County Board of Health and is a community investment volunteer with United Way. Lomax said she can still remember when the Hillandale community didn’t have a hospital. Now that it does, Lomax said seeing the people it helps makes her appreciate her time spent volunteering there. “I really believe in giving back,” Lomax said. “I might not have the resources but I give all of my time.” Lomax said her favorite thing about volunteering for any organization, especially when feels she very passionate about its mission, is seeing a smile on someone’s face.

Champion of the Week

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Delphyne Lomax said both of her parents played an important role in her life; they were such “givers” that when she got older, it made her want to give back to the community. Currently, Lomax works in the market research industry and serves on the advisory board for the DeKalb Medical Center at Hillandale, the board of the South DeKalb YMCA and the Metro Atlanta YMCA Head Start program. Additionally, Lomax volunteers her time to Unconditional Love for Children, Inc. (ULC), run by The Champion publishers Earl and Carolyn Glenn. ULC provides opportunities to disadvantaged children through educational enrichment programs. “I look up to the Glenns and the way they give back,” Lomax said. “If I ever have the resources when I’m older I want to do the very same thing.” Lomax obtained an undergraduate degree from Mount Union Col-

If you would like to nominate someone to be considered as a future Champion of the Week, please contact Kathy Mitchell at kathy@dekalbchamp.com or at (404) 373-7779, ext. 104.

Return to: The Champion, P.O. Box 1347, Decatur, GA 30031-1347

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The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Local News

Page 8A

CSD begins drafting petition for charter renewal
by Daniel Beauregard daniel@dekalbchamp.com City Schools of Decatur is in the process of drafting a petition to the Georgia Board of Education to renew the system’s charter status, Superintendent Phyllis Edwards said. Edwards said school officials have yet to decide whether to ask for a five-year, or 10-year charter renewal, but the system is in the process of coming up with a draft to submit to the board of education no later than Nov. 1. At a Sept. 19 information session for parents and community members, officials including Edwards, discussed how CSD’s charter status has helped strengthen CSD over the past four years. Edwards said the biggest positive change she has seen is the way the charter status has affected CSD’s governance model. “It has spread the decision making out further so that school leadership teams—and each school has one—actually follow a similar agenda as to what we do at the board meetings,” Edwards said. Edwards said now schools are starting to realize they have the opportunity to make decisions that are specific to their needs such as the Decatur High School’s decision to have block class scheduling, or other schools creating mentorship programs. “It has enhanced the decision making and input the parents and community members have had on a number of issues,” Edwards said. The decisions made by individual schools must still be brought before the board of education for approval. CSD’s charter status has also allowed it to use Measurement of Academic Progress (MAP) testing to determine each student’s instructional level and track his or her academic growth throughout the school year. The tests are given on a computer and allow schools and parents to monitor year-to-year growth. Additionally, Edwards said during the meeting officials and parents discussed what changes the system will need to have the flexibility of a charter status to implement over the next 10 years. “That’s where we’re trying to be very creative and innovative,” Edwards said. She said one of the ideas being discussed is how to allow Decatur High School students to get two credits for taking one course that covers two subjects in-depth. For example, Edwards said the system is interested in looking at whether students could be eligible to take a combined history and literature course. During the meeting, officials and parents also discussed improving CSD’s world language courses. Edwards said some parents have expressed interest in the possibility of the system also having an immersion school. “We could choose a different language such as Chinese and have that school be a choice model school where parents that wanted to could send their students,” Edwards said. Additionally, she said the system is exploring new ways students can get more instruction outside of the classroom by expanding CSD’s technological and local business partnerships. CSD officials said the system will write a draft and then have another public meeting before submitting the charter renewal application to the board Nov. 1. “Out of all the things that we said we were going to do within the first five years, I think we’ve done 95 percent,” Edwards said.

Oliver House, the third phase in a Decatur Housing Authority revitalization project, celebrated its grand opening Sept. 26. The new building is an 80-unit elderly housing community with affordable rent that was built as part of the ongoing revitalization of the Allen Wilson Community in downtown Decatur at 1450 Commerce Drive. Photo by Daniel Beauregard

Decatur Housing Authority finishes second phase of revitalization project
by Daniel Beauregard daniel@dekalbchamp.com Faust said the building uses its rainwater collection system for all the irrigation The Decatur Housing in the facility and for flushAuthority (DHA) celebrated ing toilets, which makes the the opening of Oliver House units more energy efficient. Sept. 26. The new facility Additionally, Faust said is an 80-unit senior housthere are solar panels on the ing community, which was roof of the facility to defray built as a part of the ongoenergy costs. ing revitalization of the AlThe new site is located len Wilson Community in off Commerce Drive within downtown Decatur. two blocks of downtown The opening of Oliver Decatur’s commercial and House marks the completion business district. It’s also of the second phase of the located close to the Decatur three-phase revitalization of MARTA station. Faust said Allen Wilson Terrace, a for- the facility includes an exermer 200-unit public housing cise room, craft rooms and a community originally built garden for the seniors. in 1941. Several years ago, DHA The first phase was com- began a revitalization propleted in spring 2011 and cess that was designed to consists of 40 units with retain the residents in the buildings housing one-, area while constructing the two- and three-bedroom new housing. Many families apartments. All of the new were able to move directly buildings have a state-ofinto the new Oliver House, the-art rainwater collection named for a distinguished system as well. Black businessman, Henry “We’re very excited and Oliver, who lived in the it’s a wonderful facility for area in the 1800s. our seniors,” said Doug The overall Allen Wilson Faust, executive director campus includes a one‐half of the Decatur Housing Au- mile paved walking trail to thority. provide a place for residents

to walk for exercise and to socialize outdoors. Full occupancy of Oliver House is expected by Sept. 30, with more than 40 of the 80 homes being leased by current senior DHA and Allen Wilson residents who are being assisted to move into the new community. The total cost of the Oliver House was approximately $12.3 million, which was paid for by federal low income housing credits, Georgia tax credits, HUD funds and DHA reserves and partner contributions. Faust said the DHA is currently pursuing lowincome housing credits for the development of the third and final phase of the Allen Wilson Terrace project, which is estimated to cost $10 million and include 71 housing units. “We’ve applied for tax credits in June and if we’re awarded we’ll be able to start construction at the beginning of next year and hope to be done the end of 2013,” Faust said.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Local News

Page 9A

Trial looming for karate teacher accused of rape
by Daniel Beauregard daniel@dekalbchamp.com A Lithonia martial arts instructor accused of raping one of his students is scheduled to go to trial Oct. 16. Adrian Spellen, 29, was indicted on two counts of rape and one count of child molestation for allegedly raping a Spellen 9-year-old. Spellen, the owner and head instructor of Powerkick Martial Arts was also a 2012 Olympic hopeful. Spellen was charged in July 2011 with attacking the girl sometime between May and June of last year, according to an indictment from July 2011. According to Spellen’s company website, he has been competing and training in Tae Kwon Do for nearly 20 years. He is a certified instructor, has a black belt, and has coached 38 state and regional champions five national champions. Spellen is a five-time national champion and won a silver medal at the 2010 South American Games in Medellin, Colombia. Spellen was initially released on $100,000 bond and ordered not to have any contact with minors except family members, but his bond was revoked in March when prosecutors accused him of violating those conditions. Since then, Spellen has remained in jail and faces life in prison if found guilty of the charges. Spellen’s case will be tried in Superior Court Judge Clarence Seeliger’s courtroom.

Two Walmart Neighborhood Markets are going up in Tucker and Dunwoody. The stores, which offer groceries, general merchandise and a pharmacy, join two others under construction in metro Atlanta and three already built. Photo provided.

by Andrew Cauthen andrew@dekalbchamp.com

ville and Lawrenceville. Two other markets are under construction in Marietta. SulWalmart continues to exlivan said additional Neighpand its presence in DeKalb borhood Markets are likely County with two Neighborin the Atlanta area and will hood Markets under conbe announced later. struction. Sullivan said that the Work has begun to clear seven Atlanta-area Neighborthe sites for Neighborhood hood Markets will employ Markets in Dunwoody at more than 650 associates. 5025 Winters Chapel Road First opening in 1998 in and Tucker at 3201 Tucker Bentonville, Ark., the store’s Norcross Road. format is designed to provide “Basically, these are groconvenient shopping for cery stores,” said Walmart groceries, pharmacy items spokesman Bill Wertz. and general merchandise. “They differ from a Walmart Currently, there are approxiSupercenter in that they are mately 200 Neighborhood smaller.” Markets throughout the naThe Tucker store will be tion. 42,000 square feet while “Like our supercenters, the Dunwoody store will this is a format that has provbe 35,000 square feet. The en to be very popular with stores are expected to open our customers,” Sullivan by the summer of 2013. said. “The two formats work “We find that Neighborwell together. Customers can hood Markets are well retake advantage of the wide ceived because they’re very selection of merchandise convenient to shoppers when available at our supercentthey are pressed for timed.” ers and visit the NeighborWertz said. hood Markets when they are “We have been working pressed for time and need hard at Walmart to make aconly a few grocery or pharcess to our brand more conmacy items.” venient to customers,” said Neighborhood Markets Greg Sullivan, Walmart’s se- average approximately nior vice president for com40,000-square-feet and empany operations in the South- ploy 90 associates. east. “In communities like The stores feature a selfAtlanta, we are incorporating serve deli with pre-packaged a more flexible approach that foods, a wide variety of includes both large and small fruits, vegetables, meats, store formats. cheeses and prepared foods. “Neighborhood Markets In addition to fresh produce, offer a quick and convenient including Georgia peaches, shopping experience for cus- watermelons and strawbertomers who need groceries, ries, the store will carry a full pharmacy items and general line of groceries, including merchandise,” Sullivan said. frozen foods, meat and dairy So far this year, Walmart products and organic items. has opened Neighborhood The markets will offer Markets in Alpharetta, Snell- an expanded selection of

Two Walmart Neighborhood Markets under construction in DeKalb

general merchandise, including beer and wine, baby items, storage containers, stationery, paper goods, pet products, hardware items, gift wraps and bags, greeting cards and party supplies. The stores, which will be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, will also have a pharmacy. “We always try to make them reflect the neighborhood,” Wertz said. “For example, a store in a Hispanic neighborhood would have more Hispanic products.”

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Local athletes show off Olympic bling
said. “Imagine my surprise to find out that she was a trackand-field star, because one place I don’t remember her running to was my class.” Carolyn Williams, principal at Southwest DeKalb High School, where Taylor attended, said, “Thank you for being courageous enough to take risks and accomplish so much. We at Southwest DeKalb…love you so much and we’re so proud that you’re a lasting legend for us at SWD.” Taylor thanked the participants for attending, saying, “As I look out into this crowd, I see many faces that have inspired me, encouraged me and supported me throughout my long career. “I’ve had some challenges along the way,” Taylor said. “I’ve had some ups and I’ve had some downs. It’s been a long road. It’s been a long career and I have all this hardware to show for it.” Trotter, whose Olympic career was put on hold after major knee surgery in 2008, encouraged the many students at the event to persistently pursue their dreams. “There is a lot that goes into being a world-class athlete,” Trotter said. “But there’s more that goes into being a world-class person. “If it were not for my faith in God, if it were not for my strength in him, I would not be here standing today talking to you with these medals around my neck,” Trotter said. “No matter my dream, I worked hard at whatever I was doing,” Trotter said, fighting back tears. “I never, ever, ever one time gave up. Even when my knee didn’t work, I didn’t give up. Even though trials and tribulations came and they tried to slow me down and the hurdles kept jumping in my way, I never gave up. “I fell; I got back up. I fell; I got back up. If you fall, get back up. Never give up,” Trotter said. “And you can do all things through Christ who strengthens you.”

Local News

Page 10A

by Andrew Cauthen andrew@dekalbchamp.com Hundreds of fans and supporters crowded the square in Decatur Sept. 20 to celebrate two 2012 Olympic medalists from DeKalb County. Dee Dee Trotter, a Cedar Grove High School graduate, won both gold and bronze track and field medals in the 4x400m and 400m, respectively. Angelo Taylor, a graduate of Southwest DeKalb High School, won a silver track-and-field medal in the 4x400m during the Games of the XXX Olympiad in London, England. DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis said, “Every four years at the summer Olympic Games, the strongest, most dedicated and most accomplished athletes among us represent the United States on the world stage. To don the U. S. Olympic team uniform is an honor that very few achieve. “To stand on the podium during a medal ceremony is an extraordinary feat,” Ellis said. “You are among an elite group of athletes—the best in the world.” Dr. Eugene Walker, chairman of the DeKalb County Board of Education, said, “This is a tremendous honor for the parents of these Olympians, the families of these Olympians, for the schools of these Olympians and for this fantastic community of these Olympians. This is a moment we can all share.” “This is what bling looks like,” said Rep. Howard Mosby, referring to the medals the Olympians were wearing. During the ceremony, Trotter and Taylor received several proclamations and awards from their schools and various government and athletic organizations. Cedar Grove High Principal Pamela Benford, who was Trotter’s science teacher, said Trotter was a “stellar” student. “One of my first memories of Dee Dee is my reprimanding her for being late to my science class,” Benford

Dee Dee Trotter and Angelo Taylor, DeKalb natives who both won medals in the 2012 Olympics, were honored by hundreds of participants during a celebration Sept. 20 in Decatur. Below, DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis tells the gathering that the DeKalb Olympians are among an elite group of athletes. Photos by Travis Hudgons

DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis reminds you of the Best Practices for Proper Disposal of

F.O.G. enters plumbing through garbage disposals, sinks and toilets. It coats the inside of plumbing pipes and also empties into DeKalb County’s sewer system. Here are three simple guidelines to help keep F.O.G. out of our pipes and sewers:

1. 2. 3.

POUR fats, oils or grease into a sealable container, allow it to cool and throw it in the trash. Do not pour down the drain or toilet. SCRAPE plates and cookware before washing. Do not throw scraps of any kind down the drain. Instead, place them in waste containers or garbage bags. WIPE excess grease from all plates, pots, pans, utensils, and surfaces with a paper towel before washing. Throw the greasy paper towel away.

Plumbing and sanitary sewer systems are simply not designed to handle the F.O.G. that accumulates in pipes. When it gets into the pipes and hardens, blockages occur and cause sewage to backup and overflow out of manholes or into homes. This is expensive for you, and for the County. The damages caused by fats, oils and grease in the sewer system are costly to repair. Over time, they increase the costs of our water and sewer services.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Local News

Page 11A

The Brighter Tomorrows Foundation held its sixth annual Walk of HEROes 5K, charity run/walk and tot trot benefiting the DeKalb Community Service Board on Sept. 22. The event, held in Kirkwood, was held to raise community awareness and funds to support and assist DeKalb citizens receiving mental health, addiction and developmental disability services. Photos by David DiChristina

Walk of HEROes

DeKalb County Wants to Hear From You Regarding the Proposed Franchise Agreement Renewal with Comcast Cable Communications
Send your comments and/or concerns regarding Comcast’s current performance under the current franchise agreement and/or the future cable-related needs and interests of your community to www.dekalbcountyga.gov.

The Champion Weather
Seven Day Forecast THURSDAY
Sunny High: 85 Low: 62

Sept. 27, 2012
Today's Regional Map Weather History
Sept. 27, 1987 - While those at the base of Mount Washington, N.H. enjoyed sunny skies and temperatures in the 70s, the top of the mountain was blanketed with 4.7 inches of snow, along with wind gusts to 99 mph and a temperature of 13 degrees. Sept. 28, 1987 - Thunderstorms produced up to ten inches of rain in southern Kansas and north central Oklahoma overnight. The Chikaskia River rose 2.5 feet above flood stage at Blackwell, Okla. during the day, causing flooding in Kay and Grant counties of Oklahoma. Dunwoody 83/61 Lilburn Smyrna Doraville 84/62 84/62 84/62 Snellville Decatur 85/62 Atlanta 85/62 85/62 Lithonia College Park 86/62 86/62 Morrow 86/62 Union City 86/62 Hampton 87/63

In-Depth Local Forecast
Today we will see sunny skies with a high temperature of 85º, humidity of 54%. Northeast wind 5 mph. The record high temperature for today is 93º set in 1954. Expect partly cloudy skies tonight with an overnight low of 62º. The record low for tonight is 44º set in 1940.

FRIDAY
Mostly Cloudy High: 84 Low: 62

*Last Week’s Almanac
Hi Lo Normals Precip Date Tuesday 78 63 82/64 0.84" Wednesday 81 53 82/64 0.00" Thursday 77 62 81/63 0.00" Friday 83 62 81/63 0.00" Saturday 85 61 81/62 0.00" Sunday 79 51 80/62 0.00" Monday 77 44 80/62 0.00" Rainfall . . . . . . .0.84" Average temp . .68.3 Normal rainfall . .0.98" Average normal 71.9 Departure . . . . .-0.14" Departure . . . . .-3.6
*Data as reported from De Kalb-Peachtree Airport

SATURDAY
Isolated T-storms High: 81 Low: 61

SUNDAY
Partly Cloudy High: 79 Low: 60

MONDAY
Partly Cloudy High: 79 Low: 58

TUESDAY
Mostly Sunny High: 83 Low: 59 Full 9/29

Local Sun/Moon Chart This Week
Day Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Sunrise 7:29 a.m. 7:29 a.m. 7:30 a.m. 7:31 a.m. 7:32 a.m. 7:32 a.m. 7:33 a.m. Sunset 7:27 p.m. 7:25 p.m. 7:24 p.m. 7:22 p.m. 7:21 p.m. 7:20 p.m. 7:18 p.m. Moonrise 5:53 p.m. 6:26 p.m. 6:58 p.m. 7:31 p.m. 8:05 p.m. 8:41 p.m. 9:21 p.m. Moonset 5:03 a.m. 6:03 a.m. 7:01 a.m. 7:58 a.m. 8:55 a.m. 9:51 a.m. 10:45 a.m. New 10/15

Tonight's Planets
Mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Rise 8:32 a.m. 4:12 a.m. 11:24 a.m. 11:03 p.m. 9:23 a.m. 7:26 p.m. Set 8:00 p.m. 5:33 p.m. 9:41 p.m. 1:16 p.m. 8:38 p.m. 7:44 a.m.

WEDNESDAY
Partly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 61 Last 10/8

First 10/21

Local UV Index

National Weather Summary This Week
The Northeast will see mostly clear to partly cloudy skies today, isolated showers and thunderstorms Friday and Saturday, with the highest temperature of 82º in Harrisburg-Raleigh, Ill. The Southeast will see mostly clear to partly cloudy skies with a few thunderstorms today through Saturday, with the highest temperature of 92º in Ft. Myers, Fla. The Northwest will see mostly clear skies today through Saturday, with the highest temperature of 88º in Medford, Ore. The Southwest will see isolated thunderstorms today and Friday, mostly clear skies Saturday, with the highest temperature of 100º in Bullhead City, Ariz.

Weather Trivia
How many thunderstorms happen at the same time?

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+

?

UV Index 0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High 11+: Extreme Exposure

Answer: On average, over 1,800 are in progress across the Earth.

www.WhatsOurWeather.com

StarWatch By Gary Becker - Sundogs, Halos Herald Autumn
Driving home from church on the ides of September, my wife, Susan, and I were greeted by the sight of an incredibly bright sundog to the left of a nearly setting sun. A friend of mine, Willard Clewell, had once remarked that he had seen a sundog that was so intense that it was hard to view. The brightness of this apparition, as in Clewell’s description, made me want to turn away, even through it would not have caused any eye damage. Sundogs and halos will become more common as we head into the autumn and winter months because they are not the result of sunlight being refracted through raindrops, like a rainbow, but rather light being bent inside hexagonally (pencil) shaped ice crystals. Indeed the deeply saturated lapis sky of September 15 was filled with high altitude, wispy cirrus clouds which were perfect for creating these effects. When sunlight enters a tiny ice crystal, there is a concentration of light refracted at an angle of 22 degrees, causing sundogs which are bright rainbow colored spots in the sky, and halos which appear to surround the sun, to begin their visibility at this angle from Sol. Whether or not a dog or halo is seen depends solely upon the length and orientation of the ice crystals. Halos represent a random orientation of long hexagonal crystals so that everywhere in the sky there are some crystals at the proper position to refract light back to the eye. Sundogs are different. Here, the hexagonal crystals are like plates, still six-sided but not very thick. These crystals fall through the air like leaves from a tree keeping an orientation which is essentially parallel to the ground. Because all or most of the ice crystals are positioned in the same manner, they refract light back to the eye in only one direction causing bright spots called sundogs to become visible at 22 degrees on either side of a low sun. Luckily, I had my camera. A picture of my sundog is posted online at www.astronomy.org

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Health

Page 12A

DeKalb County offers food, water safety tips in anticipation of severe weather
Severe storms and hurricanes can lead to power outages and flooding. This can also lead to unsafe food and contaminated drinking water. Prior planning can help area residents weather the storm with safe food and water. Here are some tips to follow before the storm: Place a refrigerator/freezer thermometer in your refrigerator and freezer before losing power. • Make sure the temperature of your refrigerator is 40 degrees F or colder and your freezer is at 0 degrees F or colder. • Freeze containers of water for ice to help keep food cold in the refrigerator, freezer or coolers once the power goes out. • Purchasing blocks of ice may be an option or dry ice may be used instead. • Keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible when the power is off. This will help them stay cold inside. A refrigerator will keep food safely cold for about four hours if the door remains closed. • Have coolers available to keep refrigerated foods cold if power is out for more than four hours. • Freeze such refrigerated foods as leftovers, milk and fresh meat that you may not need immediately. • Group foods together in the freezer to help them stay cold longer. • A full freezer will hold its temperature for about 48 hours, while a freezer that is half full will only maintain its temperature for about 24 hours if the door remains closed. • Store boxed and canned foods and bottled water on high shelves to keep them away from contaminated water in case of flooding. • Have a supply of plain, unscented chlorine bleach on hand that can be used for cleaning, sanitizing and treating drinking water. After the storm and after power has been restored, here are some helpful tips to make sure that you properly salvage stored foods and safe drinking water: • Do not eat any food that may have come in contact with flood waters. • Discard food not in a waterproof container if you suspect it may have come in contact with flood waters (including containers with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops and crimped caps.) • Home canned foods, boxes and bags of food and cardboard boxes containing juice, milk and baby formula should also be discarded if they come in contact with flood waters. • Discard commercially canned food in metal cans if damaged. Examine the can for evidence of swelling, leakage, extensive rusting or severe dents. • Remove labels from undamaged cans, and wash the cans well with soap and hot water. Rinse with water safe for drinking. Place cans for 15 minutes in a mixture of 1 tablespoon chlorine bleach per gallon of water suitable for drinking. Allow cans to air dry at least one hour before using or storing. • When the safety of drinking water supplies are in question, use bottled water that has not been exposed to flood waters. • If bottled water is not available, treat water to destroy disease-causing organisms that could be present. • Filter cloudy water through clean cloth. Boil the water for one minute. After cooling for at least one minute, store the water in clean containers with lids. • If boiling is not an option,

disinfect the water using unscented chlorine bleach. Add 1/8 teaspoon (eight drops) for each gallon of water and let stand for 30 minutes. • Discard perishable refrigerated foods such as meats, poultry, fish, soft cheeses, milk, eggs, leftovers and deli items if the power stays off for more

than four hours and the temperature of the food is not kept at 40 degrees F or colder. • If power has been out several days, check the thermometer in the freezer. If the temperature is 40 degrees F or colder or if the food still contains ice crystals, then it can be safely used.

• If you are ever unsure about the safety of your food after a power outage, throw it out. For more information about food and water safety, family and consumer science agents may be contacted at DeKalb County Cooperative Extension at (404) 298-4080 or by visiting www.ugaextension.com/dekalb.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Local News

Page 13A

DeKalb County officials have scheduled a public meeting Oct. 9 to allow residents to give recommendations on what they would like to see as a part of the planned 50-acre park in Tucker. The land is made of the Johns Homestead property and Twin Brothers Lake tract. Photos by Andrew Cauthen

House Continued From Page 1A
log cabin, Butler said. When the family vacated the house in the 1980s, it was one of the longest continually occupied structures in DeKalb County. The historic farmhouse still stands on the property. As the Johns’ family grew, the family added onto the original structure and built a second home, Butler said. “We ended up tearing that down because it was in bad shape,” he said. Butler said the county is hoping to stabilize the existing structure and eventually restore the building. The county also plans to improve Twin Brothers Lakes, which were developed for fishing, and the dam on the property. The Twin Brothers Lakes property has two lakes, a dam and wildlife including beaver, blue herons, hawks, Canada geese and many fish species. Years ago when the property was open to the public, fisherman paid a small fee to fish there. Because of trash and debris at the site, last year the lakes were the subject of a volunteer clean-up effort. The DeKalb County Department of Recreation, Parks & Cultural Affairs and the DeKalb County Natural Resources Management Office will hold a meeting to discuss the future of Johns’ Homestead Oct. 9, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., at Rehoboth Baptist Church, 2997 Lawrenceville Highway, Tucker. The county is soliciting public involvement to discuss management of the historic house, proposed improvements at the park and ideas for the vision of the park. “We’re going to have to have a lot of help from the community,” Butler said. “We want to get public input.”

‘We’re going to have to have a lot of help from the community.’
DeKalb County’s greenspace environmental manager

–– Dave Butler

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Magic Johnson opens school for at-risk youth
by Daniel Beauregard daniel@dekalbchamp.com Earving “Magic” Johnson recently opened a center in Atlanta designed to help high school students who have left school, or are at risk of leaving, earn a high school diploma. Located at 100 Edgewood Avenue NE in Atlanta, the Magic Johnson Bridgescape Center is free and open to students ages 14 to 20. The center is partnering with Provost Academy Georgia, a statewide charter high school. The Magic Johnson Bridgescape Center will offer a blend of one-on-one and small group instruction. The center is staffed with on site education teams to assist students in their daily studies and includes teachers, counselors and other professionals, who work together to provide academic support and post-graduation assistance for students, including those with learning disabilities. Jennifer Parker, executive director of product development and training, said the school’s learning model is based on 80 percent online curriculum. Additionally the Magic Johnson Bridgescape program is open for morning and afternoon sessions. The program is aligned with EdisonLearning, an education management company that operates schools worldwide. At a recent news conference, the former NBA All-Star said the goal of the school is to ensure that no student falls through the cracks. “All students should have the opportunity to receive their high school diplomas and be fully prepared for college or the workplace,” Johnson said. In addition to providing normal access to course high school-level courses online and tutoring help, Bridgescape also teaches students about financial literacy and provides support to those who come from troubled backgrounds. “We work with students who aren’t experiencing success in high school for a variety of reasons,” Parker said. “They may be reading below grade level and it’s not unusual that our students are already parents or they may be raising siblings. They may need more flexibility with their scheduling and we can provide that for them.” Since the Bridgescape program is housed in Provost Academy, a state-run school, any student interested in attending can apply for the school, including those in DeKalb County and other areas throughout metro Atlanta. “It’s definitely a work-atyour-own-pace school and we try to get students to stay focused at just a couple classes at a time,” Parker said. “We also focus on post-secondary transitioning so that when they graduate they’ve already got a plan.” Currently there are 16 students enrolled in the Bridgescape program in Atlanta and new centers are soon opening in Ohio, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Additional Georgia locations are planned for Augusta, Macon and Savannah. Students interested in attending the Magic Johnson Bridgescape center can enroll by calling (888) 725-9501. For more information, visit ga.provostacademy.com.
Earvin “Magic” Johnson recently opened a center in Atlanta for students who are at-risk of dropping out of high school, or those that already have and want to return to get their degree. Photo provided

Education

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DCSD releases proposed calendars for public comment
by Daniel Beauregard daniel@dekalbchamp.com The DeKalb County School District (DCSD) has released two proposed calendars and is asking the public to comment on the options. Last year, Superintendent Cheryl Atkinson proposed calendar changes for this fall but decided to wait to implement any changes until next year after parents and community members voiced concerns. According to a media release, the two proposed calendar options are a result of collaboration among parents, teachers, principals and administrators. The first calendar is a “traditional” calendar with a start date of Aug. 12 and an end date of May 23. The second option is a balanced calendar, which begins the school year on Aug. 5 and ends it on May 29. Each semester includes an additional week of vacation. Both calendars have 180 school days for students and an additional 10 days for teachers, composed of nine work days and four twohour teacher conference nights. Currently, City Schools of Decatur and Rockdale County Public Schools have a balanced calendar. Among other considerations is a weekly one-hour early release to allow for professional development for all teachers and administrators. “To provide the best possible education for our students, our teachers must also be life-long learners,” Atkinson said. “These professional learning opportunities will help our staff help our children.” The district is taking public comments on the two calendars and a survey is available until Sept. 29. DeKalb schools spokeswoman Lillian Govus said the results of the survey and comments will be reviewed by the calendar committee, which will then make a calendar recommendation to Atkinson. “The committee is made up of a parent, a teacher and a principal from all of the five districts in the school system,” Govus said. “It’s also made up of human resources representatives.” Govus said the calendar committee has researched what other districts in the surrounding area have done with their calendars. Once the committee makes its recommendation to Atkinson, she will then present the findings and recommendation to the school board at its Oct. 1 work session. The board is expected to finalize the calendar at its Oct. 8 business meeting.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

MARTA on Sept. 24 released the full draft report by the auditing firm KPMG focused on significant measures to cut costs, improve efficiency and generate revenues to re-position the authority for long-term fiscal sustainability and growth. MARTA officials say the authority voluntarily undertook the evaluation as part of a comprehensive review of its internal management and operations that began last fall. KPMG, one of the nation’s leading audit firms, was charged with first assessing the opportunities and challenges facing MARTA and then making specific recommendations to address them. The resulting 114-page draft details MARTA’s economic impact on the state and regional economy. For example, the agency had contracts with private companies totaling $288 million between fiscal years 2010 and 2011 and is also responsible for supporting approximately 20,500 jobs across Georgia. Aspects of MARTA’s operations were also ranked against transit agency peers in San Francisco, Denver, San Diego, Philadelphia and Utah as well as other regional transit providers in metro Atlanta. The draft report identifies steps MARTA has already taken to reduce costs and enhance efficiency such as freezing employee wages for five years, implementing unpaid furloughs for non-union staff, laying off 400 employees and raising the cost of employees’ medical premiums. As part of its analysis, however, KPMG found that MARTA’s current economic model is “unsustainable” therefore requiring the agency to cut expenses by $25 million annually. Among the other key findings: • MARTA is projected to exhaust its reserves by fiscal year 2018, and will fall below its mandated reserve levels by fiscal year 2016. • MARTA has an estimated $7.1 billion in unfunded capital needs through fiscal year 2021. • High rates of employee absenteeism cost MARTA

KPMG report identifies ways for MARTA to cut costs, raise revenues

Business

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about $11 million annually in additional benefits. • MARTA’s annual retirement costs are $22 million more than the national average in the public and private sectors. The draft report detailed 12 operational areas that could be “sourced” by hiring third-party firms to perform specific functions, internally or externally. Those areas include payroll, computer support, customer service, recruiting, cleaning services and mobility for paratransit customers. To generate new revenues, the KPMG draft report states that MARTA should consider wrapping more of its vehicles with advertising, developing a billboard program for its properties and facilities, expanding food and beverage concessions, implementing a program for station naming rights, website advertising and charging fees for reserved parking at its lots. “MARTA must make significant and fundamental changes to operations to avoid across-the-board cuts that will adversely affect operational and customer service,” the KPMG draft report concludes. Frederick L. Daniels Jr., chairman of the MARTA Board of Directors, said the draft report represents a critical step in preserving the $6.4 billion infrastructure investment MARTA represents and maximizing its value for the future. “I cannot overstate the importance of this report,” Daniels said. “This study is very important to all of us who are committed to ensuring that MARTA’s financial house is in order and transforming this agency for the benefit of customers who want and need the essential transit services we provide.” An audit committee meeting to discuss the draft report was postponed. Once the draft has been presented to the full MARTA Board, staff will determine the feasibility of implementing its recommendations. A full copy of the KPMG draft report is available at www.itsmarta.com.

Helping celebrate the “office warming” are, front from left, Liz Bankston, Chris Chiddix, Teressa Wood, owner Eileen Brewster, Dunwooody Mayor Mike Davis, Alla Ladyko, Lynn Mazzurra and Daniel Mastrodonato. On the back row are, Bill Mulcahy, Jason Hall and Fran Farias. Photo courtesy of the Dunwoody Chamber of Commerce

Insurance agency holds grand re-opening
A recent ribbon cutting marked the official grand re-opening of Eileen Brewster State Farm Agency at its new location on Peachtree Dunwoody Road. State Farm now occupies a newly remodeled space in the Lake Ridge 400 Office complex. Eileen Brewster, who grew up in Atlanta, opened the agency in 1988. She and her team have a combined 50 years of insurance experience. Brewster said that she looks forward to getting more involved, “now that my youngest child has started college.”

There to host black and white exhibit
There, a bar and eatery in Town Brookhaven, will host “The ink is Black: The page is White,” where guests can experience the depth of a simple black and white image. Six photographers, Brian Albini, Gracie Demarest, David Hollander, Juliette Mansour, Christy Murray and Stephanie Nelson, will be represented in 25 images. The exhibit will be on display Sept. 29 – Oct. 27. An opening reception will be held Tuesday, Oct. 2, 6 – 9 p.m. Guests will be able to meet the artists, peruse the artwork and experience music and light refreshments. The exhibit will be available for viewing during There’s regular business hours.

is free. The Mercantile is located at 1660 DeKalb Avenue, Suite 150, Atlanta. For more information, call (404) 378-0096 or visit www.themercantileatl.com.

Property tax installment due
DeKalb Tax Commissioner Claudia G. Lawson issued a reminder to all DeKalb County taxpayers that the due date for the first installment of 2012 real estate and personal property taxes is Monday, Oct. 1. First installment taxes that are not received or postmarked by the Oct. 1 deadline will by law incur a 5-percent late payment penalty. If a payment is mailed, the postmark or cancellation stamp from the United States Postal Service is the only accepted evidence of timely mailing. There is also a drop box located on the front and side of the central office located at 4380 Memorial Drive in Decatur, which may be used for last minute dropoffs. Property taxes also can be paid by electronic check or credit card—for which a 2.5 percent service fee is charged—via the Internet at www.yourdekalb.com/ taxcommissioner or by telephone at (404) 298-4000. Walk-in customers to the central, north or south satellite offices may pay by cash, check, debit card, with which a $1.50 service fee is charged, or credit card, with which a 2.5 percent service fee is charged. Property owners with questions should contact the Tax Commissioner’s Office at (404) 298-4000 or email proptax@ dekalbcountyga.gov for assistance.

The Mercantile announces Chilean wine event
Chuck Squires of Vici Wine & Spirits will be at The Mercantile in Candler Park Thursday, Sept. 27, 6-8 p.m., to talk about his work as an importer of Chilean wines and share some wines from his portfolio. He will offer firsthand insight into the direction of Chilean wine production and guidance on Chile’s appellations. Those attending will have an opportunity to taste six sustainably produced wines by one of Chile’s most ambitious wineries, VIA Wines. During Squires’s visit, the store’s entire wine collection will be 10 percent off. The event

The Voice of Business in DeKalb County
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DeKalb Chamber of Commerce
404-378-8000 www.DeKalbChamber.org

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The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

AROUND DEKALB
ATLANTA
District 3 commissioner to hold town hall meeting DeKalb County District 3 Commissioner Larry Johnson will hold his annual town hall meeting Oct. 4 at 6:30 p.m. at Drew Charter School, 301 East Lake Boulevard, Atlanta. “This is an opportunity for citizens to come out get information,” Johnson said. “The district encompasses a portion of the city of Atlanta and each year, I like to hold a meeting in the area. I am celebrating 10 years of service to the community this year, and wish to extend my thanks to everyone in the district for helping to make District 3 the place to be.” The DeKalb Solicitor General’s Office and the animal services division will be a part of the line-up. Residents interested in adopting a pet can do so at the meeting. For more information call Johnson’s office at (404) 371-2988. Church to hold fall festival Shallowford Presbyterian Church will host a fall festival in the church’s front parking lot Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. The community is invited. Admission is free; attendees pay to play games. There will be a bounce house, face painting and food trucks with a variety of offerings. Shallowford Presbyterian Church is located at 2375 Shallowford Road, Atlanta. For more information, visit www.shallowford.org or call (404) 321-1844. appearing will be Sonia Noel, a native of Guyana who has recently shown her designs at the London Olympics and in New York during the recent fashion week; she has also outfitted the current Miss Universe Leila Lopes. John said, “Fashion is just the beginning of the night. DeKalb will be in for a truly international evening. In some ways the night can be considered as a sampling of the world of creative arts. Two shows in their own space on the same night.” The stand-up comedy and variety show will bring award-winning comedian Gina Yashere, a staple of the British comedy scene. She has appeared on The Jay Leno Show, Conan O’Brien, Chelsea Lately, Def Comedy Jam and more. Comedian Fatman George, a regular on the Caribbean circuit, will also appear. In addition to fashion and comedy, The Soweto Street Beat will bring traditional African dancing to the stage. The group began with the aim of taking at-risk youth off the street in South Africa and channeling their energy into dance. The Soweto Street Beat group has performed at Disney World for six years, the opening of the Atlanta Olympic Games and the 2010 World Cup Soccer Games. Their drumming, singing and dancing have been noted to be among the best to emerge out of South Africa, according to John. Radio personality Casual Cal, along with King Danskie, will also perform. “Coming back to the Porter Sanford Center gives us a wonderful feeling, “John said in a release. “We like and appreciate the way that the management and staff treats us at the venue. That level of ease help to motivate the show to go bigger; deliver more. Oct. 6 should be a very entertaining evening based on previous shows,” John continued. For additional information, visit www.ticketalternative.com or www.theramblerstales.com Police to participate in national drug take-back event The City of Decatur Police Department is participating in the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) National Drug Take-Back Day on Saturday, Sept. 29. This event allows residents to turn in unwanted, unused or expired prescription drugs to have them disposed of safely. In April 2012, citizens turned in a record-breaking 552,161 pounds (276 tons) of unwanted or expired medications for safe and proper disposal at the 5,659 take-back sites that were available in all 50 states and U.S. territories. Prescription drug abuse continues to be a national battle. Properly disposing of unused medication will ensure the medication is disposed of properly. Those who would like to dispose of any unwanted, unused or expired prescription drugs can bring them to the Decatur Police Department between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 29. The Decatur Police Department is located at 420 West Trinity Place, Decatur, Ga. 30030. If you have any questions, contact Capt. Richards at (404) 373-6551. Church to hold yard sale/fish fry Gresham Park Christian Church will host a Yard Sale and Fish Fry on Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., at 2819 Flat Shoals Road, Decatur. A wide assortment of items will be available for sale as well as an opportunity to fellowship, browse and buy fish dinners. Those who have items they wish to sell can get a vendor tables for $15. Vendor tables are available on a first come, first served basis and should be reserved early. For more information or to reserve a vendor table, contact the Gresham Park Christian Church yard sale coordinator at (404) 241-4511.

STONE MOUNTAIN
Stone Mountain to hold Granite Grasshopper 5K run, 1-mile walk The second annual Granite Grasshopper 5K Run and 1-Mile Walk will be held Oct. 13 in the village of Stone Mountain. The run/walk will start at the old train depot. Register in advance to receive a sweatshirt or long sleeve T-shirt. Registration on the day of the event is also available but shirts are not guaranteed. Registration forms are available at the Stone Mountain Municipal Building, 875 Main Street, the Visitor’s Center or at the Stone Mountain Old Post Office Emporium, 5379 E. Mountain Street. Registration forms can also be downloaded from the city’s website at www.stonemountaincity.org. YMCA to hold area’s largest nonprofit golf event Atlanta’s largest nonprofit golf event will be held by the YMCA of Metro Atlanta Oct. 8 - 9. The Cowart Family/Ashford Dunwoody YMCA, Decatur Family YMCA and East Lake Family YMCA are hosting their tournament at the Smoke Rise Canongate Golf Course in Stone Mountain. The event is open to all. “The money raised by the golf tournament goes immediately to local kids and teens,” said Scott Doll, executive director of mission advancement at the YMCA of Metro Atlanta. For more information, visit www.ygolfevent.org or call the Cowart Family/Ashford Dunwoody YMCA, (770) 451-9622; the Decatur Family YMCA, (404) 377-9622; or the East Lake Family YMCA, (404) 373-6561. Ghosts to be introduced at ART Station ART Station in Stone Mountain Village in an upcoming edition of “Lunch Time at ART Station” is presenting “A Tour of Southern Ghosts, A Sampler Plate.” In a presentation Oct. 15, noon – 1 p.m., ART Station storytellers will offer a ghostly sampling of haunting tales from the 26th annual “A Tour of Southern Ghosts.” Each Lunch Time at ART Station presentation showcases a performance, lecture or art experience. Tickets are $10 for the presentation and boxed lunch or $5 for the presentation only. Water, iced tea and lemonade will be provided at no additional charge. Reservations are required for groups of 10 or more and should be made two days in advance. ART Station is located at 5384 Manor Drive, Stone Mountain. For more information, call (770) 469-1105 or visit www.artstation.org. ART Station hosts “Lewis Grizzard: In His Own Words” ART Station will bring “Lewis Grizzard: In His Own Words” to the stage on two separate billings this theater season. Bill Oberst, Jr. will be performing as Lewis Grizzard on Sept. 28-30 and Jan. 18-20, 2013. “Lewis Grizzard: In His Own Words” has played at ART Station to sold out audiences for the past 11 seasons. Over the past decade the show has sold out more than 850 shows across the United States. Oberst pays respect to Grizzard with the best of Grizzard’s stand-up comedy and selections from his books and columns. Four wives, 450 daily newspapers, millions of fans, hundreds of concerts, oceans of vodka, thousands of prayers and at the beginning and the end of it all, Moreland, Ga. ART Station is located at 5384 Manor Drive, Stone Mountain. For more information, go to www.artstation. org or call (770) 469-1105.

CONLEY
Weight loss group to meet at church Weight Loss Community Support Group is starting a Weight Loss Challenge with a goal of participants safely losing up to 36 pounds. Starting Oct. 4, the group will meet at Cedar Grove Methodist Church once a week for six weeks. Although a fee will be charged, this is a non-profit endeavor. Money collected will be used to cover expenses. Participants can lose weight with a coach and lots of support and have a chance to win money. Cedar Grove United Methodist Church is located at 3430 Bouldercrest Road, Conley. For more information, call Phyllis at (404) 409-8153.

DECATUR
Community festival Chapel Hill Subdivision will host its third annual Harvest Festival. There will be family-friendly entertainment, games, food, prizes and a costume contest. The event will be at the intersection of Pepperdine Drive and Tufts Run, Decatur, Oct. 27, 2 – 6 p.m. For more information, contact Rose Wilcox at (404) 668-7143. International evening scheduled at Porter Sanford Center The Ramblers Tales Show returns to DeKalb with a fashion show, stand-up comedy, music and dance on Oct. 6, 6 - 11 p.m. at the Porter Sanford Performing Arts Center. Lashley John, the producer of the show, said “You should get an international feel from the whole evening of events. It’s like the world is coming to DeKalb.” The fashion show will feature designers from the United States, Caribbean and west Africa, including Atlanta-based designer Michael Emmanuel and Erica Appleby with her New York-based label ETA Lux and from Sierra Leon will be James Nicol. Also

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

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The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

Sports

Page 18A

Snedeker pulls away to win FedEx Cup
by Doug Ferguson ATLANTA (AP) With the biggest round of his career, Brandt Snedeker won something far more valuable than money Sept. 23. He proved to himself he could beat the best in the world. Snedeker knew his best chance to be the FedEx Cup champion was to win the Tour Championship, no simple task with East Lake as tough as ever and Rory McIlroy and Tiger Woods going after the same prize. Snedeker was the only player in the last five groups to break par. He answered the final challenge with three big birdies on the back nine, building such a big lead that his final tee shot sailed into the grandstands to the left of the 18th green and it didn’t even matter. Snedeker still closed with a 2-under 68 for a threeshot win in the Tour Championship, and a $10 million bonus for winning the FedEx Cup. But this was never about money. “I think it solidifies what I already know,” Snedeker said. “I think when I play my best golf, my best golf is some of the best in the world. I’ve never had more confidence in myself than I have the last five weeks, and I made sure that I kept telling myself that all day: ‘I am one of the best players in the world. This is supposed to happen. It’s OK to feel nervous, and no matter what I feel today, everybody else in the field feels exactly the same way I do. So go out there and get it done.’ “I did a great job of that.” McIlroy, the best player in golf this year and the No. 1 seed going into the Tour Championship, faded early by dropping four shots in a four-hole span on the front nine. So did Woods, who already was 3 over on his round before making his first birdie on the par-5 ninth. Snedeker wound up with a three-shot victory over Justin Rose (71) to win the Tour Championship, his second win this year and a trophy that came with $1.44 million. Add the $10 million bonus from the FedEx Cup, and it’s the richest payoff in golf. Big deal. The 31-year-old from Nashville, Tenn., calls that kind of money “crazy talk ... like winning the lottery.” Far greater perspective came from a 30-minute hospital visit Sunday morning with Tucker Anderson, the son of his swing coach who was critically injured in a car accident and is in a responsive coma. “I asked him if he thought I was going to beat Rory McIlroy, and he gave me a wink,” Snedeker said. He beat McIlroy out of the FedEx Cup, and everyone else in his way at East Lake. Ryan Moore was tied for the lead with birdies on the 14th and 15th holes, only to make bogey on the last three holes for a 70 to tie for third with Luke Donald (67). McIlroy had won the last two playoff events and three of his last four tournaments dating to his record eight-shot win at the PGA Championship. He still is virtually a lock to be voted PGA Tour player of the year, but he had to settle for second place—and a $3 million bonus—in the FedEx Cup. And so ends the most successful year yet in the FedEx Cup—four wildly entertaining playoff events packed with the biggest names, even if the No. 1 player in the world wound up at No. 2. “I’m a little disappointed, but at the same time, Brandt really deserves to win,” McIlroy said. “He played the best golf out of anyone. He knew what

Brandt Snedeker reacts after sinking his putt on the 18th hole to win the Tour Championship golf tournament and the FedEx Cup. AP Photo/David Goldman

he needed to do. He needed to come in here and win. He controlled his own destiny, just like I did. And he was able to come and do that. So because of that, he really deserves it.” How can Snedeker explain winning the FedEx Cup over a player who won twice during the playoffs? “Life is all about timing,” he said, grinning. Snedeker, who finished on 10-under 270, won for the fourth time in his career and moved into the top 10 in the world for the first time. It also was his first time winning with a share of the lead going into the last day. In his previous three wins, he came from five shots, six shots and seven shots behind, the latter at Torrey Pines this year. That’s what made Sept. 23 feel more valuable than the cash. That’s what he takes to the Ryder Cup next week at Medinah, where no one can question why U.S. captain Davis Love III picked him for the team. “I’m a lot better under pressure than I gave myself credit for,” Snedeker said. “I learned that over the last four weeks. I’ve had a lot of pressure the last four weeks and a bunch of different stuff going on in my life. To be able to focus in and do what I did was pretty impressive.” Snedeker joins Woods (twice), Vijay Singh, Jim Furyk and Bill Haas as winners of the FedEx Cup in its six-year history. It was an emotional week in so many ways for Snedeker, already a high-strung personality. His father, Larry, flew in to watch final round at East Lake, only the second tournament he has attended since having a liver transplant last year. And then came the visit with Tucker. “It just made me realize ... as much as I made today out be important, how unimportant it really is,” he said. “It got me focused on the small stuff, which I did a great job of doing today.” But he delivered some big shots—a 40foot birdie putt on No. 8, just two holes after he dumped his tee shot into the water on the par-3 sixth and made double bogey; the 18-foot birdie putt on No. 13 that gave him momentum on the back nine; and a chip-in for birdie from short of the 17th green that effectively clinched it. “I had complete confidence in what I was doing,” Snedeker said.

Rose was within one shot on the back nine, but he never caught up after Snedeker’s big birdie on the 13th. Rose will look back on the final round and regret a series of missed putts, mostly for birdies and one for par, all of them costly. He missed four putts inside 10 feet. “He’s mentally tough, Brandt,” Rose said. “It’s kind of a different pressure, playing for $10 million. It gets in your head more than other golf tournaments. Other golf tournaments, it’s more routine. But this week, it’s not routine. We talk about it all year long, and suddenly you have to walk the walk. And he did a great job of that today.” Snedeker, McIlroy and Woods were separated by four shots going into the final round. All any of them had to do was win to capture the FedEx Cup. Woods, who was four shots behind, was the first to leave the picture. He missed the first fairway with a 3-wood and made bogey, hit into the water on the par-3 sixth hole and was never a factor the rest of the way. He birdied the last hole for a 72 and finished eight shots behind in a tie for eighth. “I just didn’t have it this weekend,” Woods said. McIlroy, three off the lead, also came undone early. He had 11 consecutive rounds in the 60s during the FedEx Cup playoff, but with a strong breeze and a fierce golf course, that was bound to end. He sped the process along by getting caught up in the rough on No. 4 for bogey, hitting into the water on the sixth for double bogey, and driving into a bunker on the next hole for yet another bogey. He shot a 74 to finish nine strokes back. The toughest part for Snedeker is figuring out what to do with such a windfall. The only thing he has ever splurged on was his home in Nashville, which he said was “not grandiose.” He still drives the SUV he bought when he first joined the PGA Tour in 2006. “I’m not by any means a flashy guy,” he said. “Of anybody that I know, I do not need $11 million. So there are going to be things we can do to really help people. So that’s the way I look at it. This is unbelievable to be financially stable for the rest of my career. As long as I’m not an idiot, I should be fine, really. I really think we can make a difference and help a lot of people out in Nashville and Tennessee and the surrounding areas.”

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

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Miller Grove rallies for 21-20 victory over Arabia Mountain
by Mark Brock Quarterback Ken Allen snuck into the end zone from one yard out and Kwame Simon added the point after trying to complete Miller Grove’s rally from a 20-0 third quarter deficit in the Wolverines’ 21-20 victory over the Arabia Mountain Rams. This was the first meeting between the Wolverines (3-1) and Rams (1-3) and the win kept the Wolverines in the Region 6-AAAAA playoff race. The Rams looked to have the game in hand following a 62-yard fumble return by Kwame Bowens for a 20-0 advantage with 4:29 left in the third quarter. Miller Grove reversed the momentum driving right back down the field and scoring on a 28-yard pass play from Allen to Devante Parks with Simon’s point after making it 20-7 with 1:30 left in the third. Allen helped pull the Wolverines within 20-14 as a Jordan Cathey interception set up a 25-yard pass to Myles Hughes to cut the gap to six with 10:15 to play. Allen’s game-tying touchdown to set up Simon’s game-winning extra point came with 5:22 to play following a fumble return by Justin Swift to the Arabia 26. The Rams drove down to the Miller Grove 27, but a holding penalty put them in a first and 28 they could not overcome and Miller Grove took over on downs and ran out the clock to seal the win. Chamblee 29, South Atlanta 7 The Chamblee Bulldogs improved to 4-0 on the season for the first time since 2007 with a 29-7 victory over previously undefeated South Atlanta (3-1) at Lakewood. The Bulldogs now take a week off before getting into Region 6-AAAA. Tucker 56, Dunwoody 0 Yusef Minor returned to the No. 2 ranked Tucker Tigers lineup in a big way as he ran for 156 of the Tigers’ 376 rushing yards in a 56-0 Region 6-AAAAA win over the Dunwoody Wildcats (0-4) on Sept. 21 at North DeKalb Stadium. Minor made a quick contribution as he ran for a 40-yard touchdown to give Tucker (4-0) an early 7-0 lead. Dallas Rivers and Dominique Sanders also had two touchdowns each in the win. Rivers two touchdowns came via the rush while Sanders had one rushing and the other on a punt return. M.L. King 46, North Atlanta 0 The Martin Luther King Jr. Lions won their 14th consecutive regular season game as the defense pitched its third shutout of the season in a 46-0 win over North Atlanta (0-4) in Region 6-AAAAA play on Sept. 22 at Lakewood. The offense was led by Monqavious Johnson as the Lions’ quarterback tossed three touchdown passes, two to senior Demarquis Polite, in the 46-0 victory. The Lions improved to 4-0 on the season and 3-0 in region action.

St. Pius’ Jack Pelt (22) tries to evade Lovett’s Jack McGranahan (8) in the battle of the two state-ranked Lions Sept. 21. St. Pius won the matchup 24-0. Photo by David DiCristina

St. Pius X blanks Lovett in battle of Lions
by Wade Marbaugh n a showdown between state-ranked high school teams, the St. Pius X Golden Lions proved more golden than the Lovett Lions. Ryan Braswell scored two touchdowns and Jack Spear and Thomas O’Leary added six points apiece as the St. Pius X Golden Lions blanked the Lovett Lions 24-0 Sept. 21 at George B. Maloof Stadium. The matchup drew considerable pregame hype as it was the first time the two schools met on the gridiron since 1983, and both entered the season with bright outlooks. Under head coach Paul Standard, St. Pius (3-1) has made the playoffs nine times and has racked up a 45-8 record over four seasons and four games into the 2012 campaign. The Golden Lions entered the game ranked fifth in the Class AAA state poll. Lovett (2-2), which boasted victories over two ranked AAA teams—Woodward Academy and Blessed Trinity—came into the game ranked No. 4 in Class AA. The Lions have made the playoffs every year since Mike Muschamp took the head coaching job in 2005. However, throughout the contest, Lovett’s offense and

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quarterback Willie Candler were stymied by St. Pius’ stout defense, led by junior defensive backs Nick Spear and Nick Glass and senior tackle Quincy Nieporte. Working off its patented wishbone offense, St. Pius lit up the scoreboard in the first quarter with a 43-yard field goal by junior kicker Thomas O’Leary. A shanked 16-yard punt by Lovett had given St. Pius excellent field position, but the visitors’ reputed defense held the damage to a field goal. It was the last bright spot for Lovett. When its offense fumbled on its next possession—after committing only two turnovers in the first three games—the St. Pius offense went back to work a mere 13 yards from goal line. Braswell, a senior fullback, barged into the end zone from the one-yard line. O’Leary booted the point-after, and the Lions took the 10-0 lead into the locker room at halftime. Standard and his staff apparently made adjustments during the intermission. The Golden Lions came out roaring in the second half. Jack Spear, a senior in his first year as starting quarterback for the Golden Lions, applied a little innovation with the wishbone early in the third quarter to

break the game open. Running back Brandon Mitchell and Spear botched an option play to the left by bumping each other in the backfield. But Spear kept the ball, reversed to the right side and galloped 56 yards to pay dirt, making the score 17-0 with O’Leary’s point-after kick. The Lions maintained possession most of the period, getting six first downs, while they had managed only four in the entire first half. At the beginning of the fourth quarter, Braswell scored on another one-yard plunge, his eighth touchdown of the season. O’Leary finished the night’s scoring with the PAT. Nick Spear intercepted a Candler pass in the closing minutes to preserve the shutout. The victory puts the Golden Lions back on track after the previous week’s 21-14 loss to No. 2 Thomson, only its third regular-season loss in four years. The victory improved St. Pius to 9-4 over Lovett in their 13 meetings over the decades. Each program has won a state championship, St. Pius in 1968 and Lovett in 1970. St. Pius opens its Region 6-AAA schedule, hosting Towers Sept. 28 at 7:30 p.m.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 28, 2012

PHOTO HIGHLIGHTS
Decatur 27, Clarkston 7

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Clarkston quarterback Noah Harrell, above, tries to escape the defensive pressure from Decatur. While Devontae Carter (9), below, get sacked by Christian Johnson (52) and Jerrod Carter (11). Photos by Travis Hudgons

Devontae Carter connects with Terez Cowan (6) for a touchdown. Cowan had three touchdowns for Decatur in its Sept. 21 victory over Clarkston at Hallford Stadium.