Newspaper of the students of the University of Surrey Issue 47 – Saturday 22

nd
September 2012
O
ver the next few days,
2,500 freshers plan
to join the other 13,000
students studying at Surrey.
Surrey has been shooting
up the league tables; it is
currently ranked 12
th
in the
Guardian’s University Guide
2013, climbing an impressive
seven places from 2012.
Surrey has also been voted
the Best New Student
Welcome Experience 2011.
Many students are
attracted to Surrey because
of its outstanding graduate
employability rate. The
University is number
one in the country for
employment, with 96.9% of
graduates in full-time work
six months after leaving
university. In the current
economic climate, more is
needed than just a degree
and Surrey caters to this.
Surrey is the only university
to offer a placement year
to all students, regardless
of their subject choice.
Between second- and third-
year, students are given the
unique opportunity to seek
work experience in their
chosen feld.
The range of placements
is vast, from HR roles to arts-
based ones. Jade Wheeler,
a Business Management
undergraduate, is doing her
placement year working for
the University. Jade is the
UK Student Recruitment
Placement Assistant, and
her job is to represent the
University at different
NEWS
Surrey’s student
acccommodation second
most expensive...Page 4
SCIENCE & TECH
Thalidomide 50 years on
Ruth Smithers documents
the history of the cruel
drug... Page 19
lITERaTuRE
Fifty Shades of Grey:
The Stag’s Literature team
discusses their views
... Page 25
FEaTuRES
Freshers Fashion with
Ellis Taylor tells you what
to wear this coming week...
Page 11
MuSIC
lorna Salmon, DJ Fauxlo
tells her story of BBC Radio
1 Superstar DJ
... Page 32
SaBBaTICalS SaY...
Introductions from your
2012 Sabbatical Team.
tell you what your union
can do for you...Page 7
Alex Smith writes a
touching tribute to Neil
Armstrong...Page 14
Becky Worley’s heart skips
a beat as she interviews
Scouting for Girls... Page 25
Continued on Page 3...
SURREY GREETS
2,500 FRESHERS
By Alexandra Wilks, Editor
ex
clusiv
e
s
t
u
d
e
n
t

surrey sports park student membership
*
£195
per year
5302-0912 SSP Stag Newspaper Student Membership Advert.indd 1 13/09/2012 13:30
NEWS
Sheffeld University bans
distribution of the award-
winning Forge newspaper
in halls... Page 4
EDITORIal 2 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 editor@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Editor | Alexandra Wilks
editor@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Editor-in-Chief | Abbie Stone
ussu.editor@surrey.ac.uk
Deputy Editor (Marketing) | Rebecca Richmond
marketing@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Deputy Editor (Design) | Hannah Roberts-Owen
design@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Design Team | Paul Richmond, Tina Morman
News Editor | Rachel Thomason
news@thestagsurrey.co.uk
News Team | Beth Goss, Hannah Craig, Jack White, Denise
Juvane, Kathryn Braid, Melissa Raske, Chris Sibthorpe
Opinion & analysis Editor | Justine Crossan
opinion@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Opinion & analysis Team | Melissa Bolivar, Sam King, Jack
White
Features Editor | Ellis Taylor
features@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Features Team | Bakita Kasadha, Sophie Vickery.
Science & Technology Editor | Alex Smith
sciencetech@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Science & Technology Team | Ruth Smithers
Dance & Theatre Editor | Tiffany Stoneman
dancetheatre@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Dance & Theatre Team | Emily Bourne, Annie Callahan, Cat
Horne, Sophia Neofytou, Abigail Oscroft, Freya Poole, Lucy
Smith, Rebecca Tubridy, Alexandra Vickerman
Film Editor | Candice Ritchie
flm@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Film Team | Kristie Marchant, Beth Goss
literature Editor | Emily Smart
literature@thestagsurrey.co.uk
literature Team | Rachel Thomason, Raisa Joseph, Sophie
Vickery
Music Editor | Becky Worley
music@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Music Team | Jack White, Laura Stoker, Lorna Salmon
Societies Editor | Shalini Thondrayen
societies@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Societies Team | Vacant
Sport Editor | Anna Giles
sport@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Sport Team | Vacant
Web Editor | Samantha Murray
webeditor@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Webmaster | Andy Smith
webmaster@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Campus Marketing | Charlie Taylor
campusmarketing@thestagsurrey.co.uk
The Stag is a newspaper editorially dependent on and published by
the University of Surrey Students’ Union.
The views expressed in the paper are those of the individual
authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the educational
team, the whole Students’ Union or the University of Surrey.
Trinity Mirror (South)
8 Tessa Road, Reading
RG1 8NS
The Stag reserves the right to edit all submissions and the right to
decide which articles are published.
letter from the Editor
I
’ve been sweating
writing this editorial
ever since I stood up at
The Stag AGM last year
and said, “My name’s
Alexandra Wilks,
please vote for me as
Editor!” What can be
said to Freshers’ that hasn’t been said before? I
could tell you to join as many societies as you can
and make loads and loads of friends. But really, just
pace yourself. I didn’t do much in my frst term, too
busy getting drunk unfortunately. Don’t worry if
you hate it. I did. I don’t want to write some cliched
editorial about having the best time ever, because
you are the frst year to pay the controversial
and eye-wateringly high £9,000 a year for your
education. So get involved with whatever you want
and challenge the University to give you the very
best time you can have. Work hard, play harder (for
the frst term anyway) and you will end up loving
it. I know I do. Welcome to The Stag, and to all those
returning, welcome back.
alexandra Wilks – Editor
editor@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Introduing the Deputy Marketing Editor
H
ello! I’m Becky and I’m
a second year English
Literature student from
Essex! (No, I’m not like the
people from TOWIE)!
I’m your new Deputy Editor for Marketing and
I’m so excited to be part of The Stag this year! After
writing for the Literature team last year I was eager
to become more involved in the production side of
the paper and hopefully start writing for some other
sections! Marketing is a new adventure to me, so
hopefully I can get all you lovely readers to carry on
reading our lovely newspaper and get some shiny
new readers too!
Rebecca Richmond – Deputy Marketing Editor
marketing@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Introducing the Deputy Design Editor
H
i I’m Hannah, The Stag’s
deputy editor in charge
of design for the coming year!
I’m from sunny Swanage (no
I don’t have 11 toes, I’m not
a mutant) and am a second
year English lit student here
at Surrey. Last year I was a designer on The Stag
so I’m really chuffed to have been upgraded. I’m a
big fan of making things look nice and am a slight
perfectionist, so this year I’ll be trying to make the
paper the best it’s ever looked. A snippet of info about
me; I’m into all things music, a keen reader (hence
the English degree) and not many people know that
I’m also a sailing instructor! Hoping to see as many
new faces as possible becoming involved with the
paper this year, so come introduce yourselves or
drop one of us an email. Cheers then!
Hannah Roberts-Owen – Deputy Design Editor
design@thestagsurrey.co.uk
From left to right: Paul Richmond (Designer), Sophie Vickery (Copy Editor), Hannah Wann (Copy Editor), Andy Smith
(Webmaster), Tina Morman (Copy Editor), Tessa Morgan (Copy Editor and Photo Editor), Charlie Taylor (Campus Marketing)
and Samantha Murray (Web Editor).
The Stag’s unsung Heroes
W
ithout our Copy Editors, Designers, Photo Editors, Campus Marketers and Web experts, we’d never get the
paper off the ground. These guys work tirelessly behind the scenes to create what you have in front of you.
NEWS 3 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 News Editor: Rachel Thomason | Copy Editor: Tina Morman
Hi, my name’s Rachel and I am your new News Editor! I’m a second year
English Literature student from Cambridge and I enjoy reading, writing
and horse riding. This year, I’ll be introducing a new feature to the section
and bringing a round-up of the latest local, national and international
news so you can get your news fx. Enjoy!
News
Surrey students
get a first for
BHF donations
T
his year, University of Surrey
students played an important
part in contributing to the
British Heart Foundation (BHF),
the leading UK charity fghting
heart disease.
The end of last academic
year saw students donate 11
tons worth of unwanted items
including clothes, books and
shoes generating £15,000.
Not only was a large amount
of money raised, the event also
generated an environmentally
friendly way of clearing out
rooms at the end of term.
Richard Wilkins, Portering
and Waste Supervisor at the
University, said many items were
donated to help a brilliant cause
rather than needlessly ending up
in landfll sites.
Last year BHF’s 700 shops
raised over £26 million to help
fund research and patient care
however they rely on donations
like the ones provided by the
students to continue this work.
The students’ generosity
did not go unnoticed. BHF Area
Manager, Julie Paffett said how
impressed she was with the
response to the scheme and
how much of a help it was to the
BHF shops in the Guildford area
including Godalming, Dorking
and Aldershot.
By Hannah Craig, News Team
Steve the Stag helps Artie Beat to fll a BHF Donation Bin
events, such as Higher Education
Fairs up and down the country. Jade
said, “I am getting on really well
here, I have learnt so much already
about how a large public sector
organisation operates. I believe
by the end of my placement I will
have grown hugely in confdence.”
Amelia Marchant, also a Business
Management student, is currently
conducting a placement with
Goldman Sachs in the Operations
Divisions as a Bank Loan Analyst.
Amelia said, “Goldman Sachs is
fast paced and has a great work
culture. I have been given many
opportunities to learn.”
Lorna Salmon, an English
Literature and Creative Writing
student, with a passion for radio
and a talent for DJing, has just
begun her year at Guildford-based
Eagle Radio as a Station Assistant.
Lorna describes her job as “far
reaching, with technical operations
tasks to journalism related ones.”
This is just a small cross section of
the many placement opportunities
at Surrey.
Employability is not all that
Surrey is famous for, it has also
been voted the 5
th
most picturesque
campus by allaboutcareers.com.
Surrey is also home to the UK’s
biggest student night, Flirt! which
operates in 25 venues and caters to
3,000 students, every week. Along
with Flirt! we have the incredibly
popular Citrus on a Wednesday.
As well as nights out we have 84
societies to join and 44 sports clubs.
Dave Halls, President of the
Students’ Union said, “You’ll hear it
from everyone during your frst few
weeks, but these really are some of
the best years of your life to be had
at university, and particularly here
at Surrey. Make the most of it, meet
loads of people, try anything that
interests you and most of all have
a fantastic time. Have a great year,
Surrey!”
Surrey aims to make all Freshers feel welcome
Comment...
This is an exciting, new feature to the News Section! ‘Comment…’
is a chance for you to have your say on the news topic of the
fortnight as each week a member of the News Team will be
going around campus and getting a sentence or two about your
opinions on the most recent news stories. Watch this space!
A cry for justice as
jewellers is robbed
A
t around 3pm on 10
th
August an
armed robbery occurred at the
jewellery store Cry For the Moon,
not far from Guildford City Centre.
The two men broke into the
store before escaping by car
towards Sydenham Road with an
unconfrmed amount of jewellery.
A terrifed member of staff was
forced to the foor and threatened
with what is believed to be a
frearm before the men escaped
from the store on Tunsgate. Both
raiders are described as white and
are believed to be between the ages
of 40 and 45.
Investigating Offcer Detective
Constable David Pellatt of Guildford
CID commented that, despite their
terrifying ordeal, the staff at Cry
For the Moon were working hard to
calculate what was missing while
also cooperating with the police to
come up with e-fts for the two men
in question.
There is evidence that the
getaway vehicle- driven by a
woman with auburn or light brown
hair- may have been driven out of
the Surrey area, echoing several
robberies that occurred in 2009.
These crimes were carried out by
men from London and Kent who
have since been arrested.
Offcers have been carrying
out enquiries and reassurance
visits within the local area and
are working to locate the vehicle.
The car in which the robbers
escaped was a silver Mercedes C180,
registration number LR52 LZF.
Guildford Police have urged anyone
with information to contact Surrey
Police immediately on their non-
emergency line 101 and to quote
reference GD/12/7360.
By Beth Goss, News Team
Rachel Thomason
News Editor
Continued from page 1...
NEWS 4 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 news@thestagsurrey.co.uk
G
uildford has been named
the second-most-expensive
place to live in Britain by the
Accommodation for Students web
site.
Up by one place from 2011,
Guildford’s average rent has gone
from £91 a week to £93 a week – a
2.2% increase. The average student
rent nationally is £69 weekly.
Surrey University accommodation
prices however have increased by
3.5%. Director of Accommodation
Tracy Smith said, “If you compare
other universities’ prices to ours,
you’ll fnd them very similar across
the board.”
Concerns have been raised
by the Students’ Union however,
who have discovered that due to
the depression and increasing
numbers of second and third
children at University, parents are
increasingly unable to give their
children money.
The Union recently made a
radical alternative proposal (see
right), calling for an average
campus rent of 55% of the
maximum available student
support, currently £7125. The
proposal states, “Rent is set
at the ability to pay, which is
the appropriate benchmark.”
University management rejected
the proposal.
University Director of Traded
Services & Business Support,
James Newby said, “We price…
and manage accommodation with
sustainability as the key driver
for us. The prices refect the cost
of managing and investing in
accommodation.”
President David Halls of the
University of Surrey Students’
Union said, “We know that
Guildford is one of the most
expensive places in the country,
but that doesn’t mean you should
be penalised for where you choose
to study. The proposal our [NUS]
delegates put forward last year
shows our commitment to…
regional weighting [in student
fnance].”
Mancunian Surrey student
Steven Abbott said, “You’re
probably not getting as good
quality [in Manchester], but I know
people who are paying £250 to £300
a month.”
Hannah Barratt stayed in
Guildford Court: “Alright overall,
my room was a little bit damp, but
my uncle had a dehumidifer, so
that sorted it. I thought the value
was good.”
Nearby university towns Oxford
and Reading have average rents
of only £86 a week and £74 a week
respectively, however London tops
the league table with an average
of £107 weekly. London students
however can receive up to £2,175
more in student loans and grants
than Guildford students.
Asked if the University
subsidises accommodation from
other income streams, Mr Newby
replied, “It’s entirely funded by rent.
There have been no conversations
that I’ve been aware of about
subsidising accommodation.”
Last year the Union successfully
proposed policy to the National
Union of Students (NUS), calling
for access to Housing Beneft for
students and for universities and
Government to do more to reduce
the cost of living for students. NUS
would not however comment upon
the policy’s implementation.
Guildford Borough Council has
been slow to respond to housing
demand. While Council spending
has increased on homes it owns,
private construction has crashed
due to the economic depression.
By Jack White, News Team
Guildford second for
student rental costs
The union’s Rent Proposal
• The average University rent should not exceed 54% of student support in 2012/13.
• A long term cap of 50% should be the goal.
• Introduce an added-extras system e.g. on insurance.
• Greater commercial freedom for the University with possibility for rent by court instead of rent by band.
• Would highlight Surrey’s advantage in keeping accommodation in-house.
Average rent now: £103.27 (71% of maximum loan)
Proposed average rent: £78.16 (54% of maximum loan)
I
nternational students at
London Metropolitan University
face an uncertain future, after
the government revoked the
University’s right to sponsor those
from outside of the EU. Students
have been given 60 days to make a
new application for at a different
university or to leave the country.
The 60 day countdown begins from
1
st
October, when the UK Border
Agency (UKBA) will begin writing
to those affected.
The decision to remove the
university’s license comes after
UKBA found that a quarter of
a sample of students studying
at the university did not have
permission to stay inside the UK.
UKBA’s fgures showed that out of
101 sample cases, 26 students were
studying at the institution despite
having no leave to stay in the UK.
This controversial legislation
threatens Britain’s reputation
as one of the world’s best higher
education sectors. Critics claim
UKBA’s decision sends a negative
message to those outside of the
EU suggesting that the UK deports
foreign students.
London Metropolitan have
declined to comment.
UKBA revokes London Metropolitan University’s
right to house international students
By Alexandra Wilks, Editor
“Rent is set at the ability to pay, which is an appropriate benchmark.”
C
ontroversially the University
of Sheffeld has banned
Forge Press, Sheffeld’s Student
Newspaper, from distributing
their paper to any University
owned residences, including
those off campus. This move
comes after Forge’s plans to
publish documents relating to
the University’s use of a legal
loophole, in order to pay their
staff less, came to light.
Sheffeld’s Accommodation
and Commercial Services (ACS)
has set up a subsidiary company
under the name of Sheffeld
Trading Services, allowing
them to bypass University
standards of pay and conditions.
ACS heard wind of Forge’s exposé
detailing their business proposal
and have banned this edition of
the newspaper from entering
any University halls of residence.
It has also been made clear that
Forge Press are unwelcome at any
moving in events this weekend.
Forge Press state that in 2011/12
ACS ran at a defcit of £98,000,
however, through this new
scheme they intend to achieve
an overall proft of £223,000 by
2016/17.
Sheffeld Trading Services
is a ‘Special Purpose Vehicle’,
essentially a business model
used for particular transactions
the offcial company is unable to
perform. In regards to ACS. this
allows them to pay staff less than
the University standards.
The Sheffeld Student’s Union
Offcers stated that they were
‘concerned‘ about this move by
ACS ‘due to [their] commitment to
the Living Wage Policy that was
voted in by our students.‘
Forge Press have previously
won the NUS Awards 2012 for Best
Student Media.
Alicia Rouse, Forge Press
Editor, said, “The University’s
attempt to censor its own student
newspaper is the worst attempt
at damage limitation....This poor
attempting at gagging [the paper]
has only made us pursue with
more vigour.”
Sheffeld’s treatment of Forge
Press highlights the thin ice
Student Newspapers must skate
over in order to give students
the news, whilst also toeing the
University’s line.
Sheffield Uni bans newspaper
to cover up cuts to staff pay
By Alexandra Wilks, Editor
The University of Sheffeld’s opulent environs say nothing about their wage
policy – the university is trying to cut its accommodation staff payroll.
NEWS 5 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 News Editor: Rachel Thomason | Copy Editor: Tina Morman
A
homeless man has died after
sustaining a serious head
injury in Guildford.
David Lucid, aged 51, was
taken to St George’s hospital in
Tooting on Tuesday 7
th
August with
what medics described as “life
threatening injuries.”
Despite a slight improvement
in his condition, Mr Lucid passed
away on Saturday 11
th
August due
to his injuries.
An inquest was opened and
adjourned on the 13
th
August.
Police investigated and arrested
two men on suspicion of inficting
grievous bodily harm. But the
23-year-old man from Woking
and the 20-year-old man from
Guildford were released and there
will be no further investigation.
The death is no longer being
treated as suspicious.
The force released this
statement: “A post mortem
revealed the cause of death was a
severe head injury but the injury
was not deemed to be suspicious.”
Mr Lucid had been a good
friend to many people in the town
and will be missed.
A second homeless man was
also found dead in Guildford aged
31 and known only as “Viktor”.
Joanne Tester, Chief Exec of
Guildford Action, a charity which
helps the homeless, has said the
problem of homelessness isn’t
being solved and more needs to be
done to protect vulnerable people
from attack and ill health.
A sponsored swim was held at
Guildford Lido on Thursday 30
th

August in memory of Mr Lucid.
Volunteers from the ages of seven
to 80 completed a 24 mile swim.
The swim took place between 6am
and 10pm and helped to raise more
than £300 for Guildford Action.
Death prompts increasing
concerns for the homeless
By Kathryn Braid, News Team
A
Guildford crackhouse has been
shut down after investigations
into reports of noise disruption,
violent behaviour and the use of
Class A drugs.
The incidents, at a property on
Woodbridge Road, were brought to
the attention of Surrey Police on
Thursday 16
th
August. Residents
provided Surrey Police with
anonymous evidence in order for
an effective sanction to be imposed.
The property will face an
entering restriction until the 13
th

November under Section 1 of the
Antisocial Behaviour Act 2003.
Getsurrey explains: “Anybody
who is seen entering the house will
be arrested and is liable to receive
a fne or face time in prison for
breaching the order.”
Local residents have
highlighted that the anti-social
behaviour associated with this
residence has been unacceptable;
the Guildford borough commander,
Matt Goodridge, added in a
statement: “I hope the community
will beneft from the closure order
served.”
It is hoped that this order
will demonstrate how anti-social
behaviour will not be tolerated
under any circumstances. Surrey
Police adds: “We will take positive
action to ensure residents
can live in a safe and peaceful
environment.”
If there is anyone wanting to
report anti-social behaviour in
their area, or would like advice,
contact the Safer Neighbourhood
team by calling 101.
By Denise Juvane, News Team
Guildford crackhouse
shut by Surrey Police
C
onfrmation has been recieved
that three family members
assainanted in the French Alps on
Wendesday 5
th
September are Mr
Saad Al-Hilli, his wife, Ikbal and his
mother- in- law. All three are from
Claygate, Surrey.
The three bodies were found
along with a French cyclist near
Lake Annecy, all of whom had been
shot with the same gun at least
once in the head.
Their two daughters have
survived and are currently in a
hospital in France. Zainab, aged 7,
was critically injured in the attack
whilst her four-year-old sister
Zeena hid under a body in the car
until discovered eight hours later.
The family, still in their BMW
and parked on the outskirts of a
forest with the engine running,
were discovered by a British cyclist
A search was made of the house
in Claygate on 8
th
September to fnd
any possible motives for the attack
on the family.
Surrey Police are working
closely with French offcers in the
investigation.
In a statement, Surrey Police
confrmed: “This is a complex and
on-going investigation being led by
the French authorities and Surrey
Police is providing any assistance
possible.”
“Concerns around items”
found in a garden shed during the
search of the house prompted an
evacuation of all nearby houses, a
closure of the street and the arrival
of a bomb disposal team.
However, Surrey Police later
said: “Items found at an address
this morning (September 10
th
),
in Oaken Lane, Claygate, are not
hazardous.”
French offcers, aided by Surrey
Police, continue to carry out their
investigation.
By Rachel Thomason, News Editor
Surrey family targeted
in French Alps shooting
©
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N
arrowly missing out on
winning the Radio 1
Superstar DJ competition may
seem like a kick in the teeth for
Surrey English Literature and
Creative student, Lorna Salmon.
However, it will no doubt open
many doors for her, Salmon
describes the experience as ‘a
springboard’ for her career.
Radio 1 Superstar DJ is a
nation-wide competition, giving
one aspiring DJ the amazing
chance of performing a set in
Ibiza. Salmon, DJ name Fauxlo,
beat thousands of other hopefuls
into the fnal six, who all
appeared on Radio 1.
The contestants were given
numerous tasks, such as re-
mixing one of Example’s songs.
Salmon made it to the fnal three,
which is an amazing feat, she
says, “Obviously I am upset I did
not get through to the fnal but
I was incredibly fattered to get
into the fnal three.”
You can catch Lorna on GU2
Radio and DJing at Rubix. She is
also currently on a placement at
Eagle Radio.
Surrey student in Radio 1
Superstar DJ competition
Lorna (far right) with three other fnalists at Radio 1 Studio
By Alexandra Wilks, Editor
For more up to the minute news, check out
our website:
www.thestagsurrey.co.uk
NEWS 6 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 news@thestagsurrey.co.uk
S
urrey Sports Park (SSP) was selected as an offcial
training base for athletes of both the London 2012
Olympic and Paralympic Games, this summer.
From 1
st
July, participants from countries such as
Great Britain and China, to Estonia and Malta, were
welcomed by SSP and attended a reception hosted by
the University of Surrey and SSP in late July.
In all, 250 athletes and their coaching teams
arrived at SSP in preparation for the Games, including
Swedish and Mauritian Paralympic teams.
There were some great achievements by the
athletes who trained at SSP.
The glamorous Chinese ‘Butterfy’ routine in the
synchronised swimming was awarded a silver medal.
Spanish swimmer Mireia Belmonte Garcia
achieved two silver medals after facing Rebecca
Adlington in one of her races and Singapore secured
two bronze medals in Table Tennis.
SSP received fantastic feedback from the athletes
who praised the service provided by the staff as well as
the vast range of food and the 4 star accommodation.
In celebration of a summer of sport, SSP also
took part in the Join In UK Weekend. On 18
th
and 19
th

August, the nation was encouraged to get active and
SSP provided free sessions in sports such as football,
basketball and tennis which were open to all ages.
Around 300 people attended the event and it was
hailed a success by Paul Blanchard, CEO of SSP, who
said that, with the Olympic fever hitting Guildford in
full force, it was the perfect opportunity to inspire
people to get into sport.
By Rachel Thomason, News Editor
T
eam GB and Paralympic
GB, Britain’s Olympic and
Paralympic teams, have this
summer become the most
successful group of athletes Britain
has ever produced.
At the Olympics, Team GB
fnished third in the medals
table behind only China and the
United States. Britain fnished
the competition with 65 medals
in total, of which 29 were gold, 17
silver and 19 bronze.
This easily surpassed the 47
medals won in Beijing 2008 and
the 2012 target of 48 medals set
by UK Sport, making it the best
GB performance since the 1908
London Olympic Games - where
one in three athletes competing
was British.
‘Super Saturday’ has widely
been recognised as the greatest day
in British athletics, with Mo Farah,
Jessica Ennis and Greg Rutherford
all winning gold medals.
Britain also continued to
dominate the cycling with the
likes of Sir Chris Hoy and Victoria
Pendleton amongst the biggest
winners.
The Paralympics were equally
successful for Paralympic GB, who
fnished third in the medals table
behind China and Russia.
GB brought home 120 medals
in total, with 34 gold, 43 silver and
43 bronze which also beat their
medal tally from Beijing 2008 of 102
medals and exceeded their target
of 103 medals set by UK Sport.
Ellie Simmonds took two golds
in the swimming, whilst the great
Oscar Pistorius was beaten in the
T44 100m by Jonnie Peacock.
David Weir won four golds, as
did Sarah Storey who now equals
the British record of 11 Paralympic
golds set by Baroness Tanni Grey-
Thompson.
The motto of the London 2012
Games was to ‘Inspire a Generation’.
Team GB and Paralympic GB
have certainly inspired many
generations to come.
By Chris Sibthorpe, News Team
G
uildford acted as the fnal stop
for the Olympic Torch, on the
20
th
July, before it entered London.
The relay through Surrey
culminated with a party in Stoke
Park which attracted around
25,000 people. The free event
required tickets for entry and
these had sold out four hours after
going on sale.
The streets between the start
of the leg at Godstone and the
fnish in Guildford on Friday 20
th

July were lined with an estimated
160,000 people. This included
a large number of University
of Surrey students, many of
whom had also celebrated their
graduation during that same
week.
Crowds along the high street
and other sections of the route
were entertained by street
performers and high-fving
policemen whilst they waited for
the torch to reach them.
The relay fnished at Stoke
Park, where a cauldron was lit and
a party organised and funded by
Guildford Borough Council took
place.
The torchbearer who lit the
cauldron in front of cheering
crowds was Guildford resident,
Austin Playfoot. He carried the
torch 64 years earlier in 1948, the
last time the Olympics were in
London.
Stage shows were performed
by students from the Guildford
School of Acting (GSA) and the
Academy of Contemporary Music
in Guildford among other family
entertainment. There was also a
live performance by Rizzle Kicks.
Counciller Jen Powell, Lead
Counciller for Culture and Leisure
spoke about the event: “I am
immensely proud of the warm
welcome given to the Flame and of
the sheer enthusiasm and Olympic
spirit. The atmosphere was
amazing; it was a really special
day and certainly something to
remember.”
The University of Surrey
was represented in the relay by
three torchbearers who had been
nominated and then selected as
part of a Torchbearing programme
set up by Samsung.
Becky Robinson, a student who
has made numerous contributions
to both the student body and local
community was selected to carry
the torch in Godalming.
Another student was chosen to
represent the University, Sophia
Neofytou, who has taken part in a
number of fundraisers during her
time at Surrey.
Dr. Lisa Roberts, Dean of
Faculty of Health and Medical
Sciences at the University, was
selected to run the frst leg of the
journey through Guildford.
Dr Roberts commented about
her experience as torchbearer:
“2012 is our “Celebrate Surrey”
year at the University and I feel so
proud to have been nominated to
be part of this once in a lifetime
Olympic experience.”
By Melissa Raske, News Team
Olympic Torch makes
last stop in Guildford
before entering host city
Austin Playfoot carries the Olympic Torch once again through Guildford
Great Britain’s
greatest moments
Surrey Sports Park plays host to
Olympic and Paralympic athletes
©
C
o
l
i
n
S
m
i
t
h
SSP was a training centre for both Olympic and Paralympic athletes
uNION 7 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 union Contact: ussu.information@surrey.ac.uk
S
o here we go again- another
year at Surrey! Welcome back
to those of you returning, and
welcome to all of you arriving for
the very frst time.
With a new year, come new
opportunities. Whether you’re
a frst year undergraduate, or a
fnal year PhD researcher; this
could be the year you discover
a new talent, a hidden passion,
or make some friends for life.
Your Students’ Union is home to
dozens of sports clubs, societies,
volunteering opportunities and
activities you can try during
your time at Surrey, and I
wholeheartedly encourage you to
throw yourself into the student
experience, and try anything
that interests you.
Of course, it’s not always so
rosy during university. Your
Students’ Union is here for that
too; with a wealth of experience,
academic and personal support is
available to all Surrey students,
so be sure to use it!
The crucial thing to know
about your Union is that it is
exactly that: your Union. The
moment you became a Surrey
student, you became a member,
and that makes you; your tastes,
your opinions and your student
life; central to everything that
happens on this campus. Your
Union represents your views
at the highest levels of the
University, whilst also providing
entertainments, venues and
activities- so be sure to let either
myself or one of the team know
what you think- how things
could be better, what you want
to see more of, or just a great
idea you’ve had. Maybe even get
yourself involved in the running
of the Union!
By getting involved in your
Students’ Union, a whole host of
opportunities open up to you.
I’d never have thought that fve
years after joining a new sports
club in my frst year, I’d be able to
directly correlate the path that
led me on to now writing this
article welcoming you to Surrey.
Great things can happen if you
throw yourself into the student
experience.
Have a fantastic year at
Surrey, and remember your
Union will be there with you
every step of the way.
W
elcome Freshers and
welcome back continuing
students. My name’s Bakita
and I will be your VP Welfare
for 2012/13 (based in the Union
Offces). It’s my job to make sure
that you are happy, safe and
healthy whilst here at Surrey. I
deal with the non-academic side
of your university life (whether
that’s related to health, security,
accommodation or campaigns)
to make sure that you are
getting the best Surrey student
experience.
Many Welfare campaigns will
be taking place over the year and
the frst semester will include
drink awareness, sexual health,
mental health and more.
Behind every successful
campaign, there are enthusiastic
campaigners. Right now I’m
recruiting Welfare Warriors
(WW). The role of a WW will
be to help out with campaigns
as well as leading and creating
their own smaller campaigns to
raise awareness and/or money
and issues benefcial to Surrey
or students as a whole. So get
involved, meet new people,
become a project manager and
better yours and others’ Surrey
student experience.
Take the opportunity to meet
some of your Union Offcers
who are here to look after your
wellbeing on Wednesday 26
th

September from 3:30pm. Just pop
into Chancellors to ask questions
or fnd out more information
about Surrey student life.
So if you would like advice
or more information, feel free to
come into the Union Offces for a
chat, email me on ussu.welfare@
surrey.ac.uk or head over to
Chancellors restaurant/bar on
Wednesday 26
th
September!
D
o you know who your
academic rep was last year?
If the answer was “I don’t know”,
“yes, but I don’t know what they
did” or “yes, but they weren’t
very good”, now is your chance to
stand and be an academic rep for
this year.
If you want to be a part of
making improvements to your
department and the wider
University, whilst having the
chance to develop personally;
being an academic rep is a great
way to do this.
Being VP Education involves
representing the views of 15,500
students on the quality of
teaching and teaching rooms
as well as other factors such as
technology in learning. Doing
this alone would be quite the
arduous task, so each year
the Students’ Union and the
University recruit over 400
Academic Reps, to support the
work I do.
Sound good? You will
all get a chance to stand for
election whether you be an
undergraduate or postgraduate
student, this will come within
the frst 3 weeks of teaching.
You will receive training and
both your department and the
Students’ Union will support you
in your role throughout the year.
Don’t miss out on this
opportunity and I look forward
to working with you.
Sabbaticals Say...
Dave Halls
Union President
Em Bollon
Union VP Societies &
Individual Development
W
elcome back if you’re a
continuing student, and
welcome to the best years of
your life if you’re a fresher!
It is my absolute pleasure to
get you all excited about the
84 amazing societies we have
here at Surrey - run by our
very own students. Why not
grab a few opportunities this
year to develop your passions
from college, pick up some you
left behind at school or even
unveil some talents you never
knew you had! It could just
change your life. It all begins
with Freshers’ Fayre on Friday
28th September. Be there. Get
inspired... and pick up some
freebies!
You’ll be hearing more
from me next week in your
Union Freshers’ talks and I’ll be
buzzing around Freshers’ Fayre
eager to meet you on Friday. Do
come say “Hi” and introduce
yourself, or even drop me an
email at ussu.societies@surrey.
ac.uk if you have any questions.
Sam Ratzer
Union VP Education
Arabella Gilby
Union VP Sports
and Recreation
H
ey guys welcome or welcome
back! I’m Arabella your VP
Sports and Recreation and I’m here
to represent you in everything
sports. Your frst opportunity to
meet the 44 sports clubs we have
here at Surrey is at Freshers Fayre
on Friday 28
th
where you can chat
to the clubs and fnd out more!
It doesn’t matter if you’ve never
played sports before or if you’re a
budding athlete, we cater for all!
And if you’ve been inspired by the
Olympics and can’t see your sport
available, please come and visit
me in the Union offces to discuss
starting a new club. We have Active
Freshers Fayre on Saturday 29
th

September at Surrey Sports Park
which is a great chance to try every
sport for free! So make the most of
every opportunity and give it a go!
Bakita Kasadha
Union VP Welfare

www.stagtv.co.uk
If it's happening on Campus,
it's happening on StagTV
Your University TV Station -
keeping you amused, entertained
and informed.
... a warm welcome to students old and new!
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OPINION & aNalYSIS 9 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 Opinion Editor: Justine Crossan | Copy Editor: Tina Morman
Opinion & analysis
The Grand Odd Party
M
itt Romney’s acceptance
speech on the last day of
the Republican convention last
week has marked the end of an
election campaign in which sheer
insanity has gripped the electoral
and general politics of the “Grand
Old Party”. It’s been building for
years, but the Republican Party
has gradually shifted right,
until around the time of Obama
assuming control of the White
House, it went far enough right to
fall off the scale and into an abyss
in which only a drastic change of
image and core ideas could bring
them out.
Tracing the roots of the
insanity of the campaign brings
us to January of this year. The
then candidate for Republican
nomination Newt Gingrich, bored
of his counterpart’s earthly
propositions, took unrealistic
promises to an extra planetary
level: “By the end of my second
term we will have the frst
permanent base on the moon and
it will be American,” he said. Do
you know how diffcult it is to craft
a sentence in which the phrase
‘moon base’ isn’t the craziest part?
If Gingrich had managed to seal the
Republican nomination and gone
on to beat Obama then I think most
observers would have agreed that
anything is possible.
The criticism often levelled at
Obama, by laymen and political
analysts alike, is that he has failed
to meet the hopes and dreams
that his election campaign had so
patronisingly instilled (“Yes we
can!”) in the nation. Yet what is
often ignored is the Congressional
Republican Party’s obstruction of
virtually every of his moves. Since
the election of 2010, the Republican
House has done little by way of
passing legislation that could
realistically aid economic recovery
of the USA, instead seeking to pass
endless anti abortion and birth
control bills and putting a vast
amount of energy into petulantly
blocking Obama’s agenda.
So what is to be done about the
economy? The GOP claim to have
the answer: slash spending and
cut taxes. What they hope voters
won’t notice is that it’s precisely
the policy that has been in place for
the past few years. The Republican
strategy therefore consists of
convincing voters that the bad
economy is a result of Obama
failing to implement changes that
the Republican House has blocked
him from making. This circular
reasoning to me represents a party
that has become so dominated by
the values of its fringe members
that its capacity to appeal to
voters with realistic promises has
somewhat been lost.
In defence of Romney’s
campaign, his recent speech will
have been more likely to strike a
chord with voters than any of those
that preceded it. By all accounts
he did well, and was sincere in
his raspy voiced recollections of
his family life as a young married
father. His normal tone of anger
when describing Obama was
in this instance underscored
by a sorrow that made, albeit
untruthful, accusations seem
believable. Whether or not this will
be enough to defeat Obama is an
open question. For me it is too little
too late in an election campaign
scarred by the constant exposure
of a party fraught with insane
decisions.
Hi! I am an International Politics
student from Camden, London.
I am the editor of the Opinion
& Analysis section of The Stag
which concerns current affairs
internationally and domestically.
I am aiming to give a balanced and
well rounded political opinion
so The Stag audience are never
told how to think but allowed
to make their own choices on
what is happening around the
world. I wish to bring culture and
interesting articles to The Stag to
get your mind racing every issue.
Being from an area like Camden
I am surrounded by controversial
characters and I’m sure this
will come across in some of the
articles just to spice things up.
Justine Crossan
Opinion & Analysis Editor
Nobody wants to
see the crown jewels
I
n the past few weeks I’ve seen
more of the Royals than I ever
wanted to. Regardless of whether
you love or hate the Royal Family
surely pictures of their wobbly
bits are not in the public interest.
Prince Harry’s had a fairly rough
ride, his Mother died when he
was very young and his grieving
was conducted under the public
eye. Yes, he’s made some foolish
decisions (that Nazi costume,
anyone?), but I’ve seen the way a
lot of young men act in the Army,
and although I can’t exactly
condone waving your bits around
in Las Vegas, it can feasibly be put
down to ‘high jinks’ or indeed, a
drunken mistake. Harry seems
to be a victim of the internet
generation more than anything
else. He was probably unwise
to get naked in front of near
strangers, but I still don’t think
grainy camera phone shots
of his Prince Albert are really
necessary. Considering most
newspapers worth their printing
costs deemed the photos not ft
for public consumption, they
probably aren’t.
As for the more recent
pictures of Kate Middleton
sunbathing topless in the French
version of Closer magazine,
there really is no excuse for
this invasion of her privacy. The
pictures were allegedly offered
to British papers before being
taken up by the French magazine
and Roy Greenslade, Professor
of Journalism at City University,
said, “I don’t think a British
newspaper or magazine would
dare to publish...that would be in
the breach of the editor’s code of
practice.”
Poor Kate. You can’t help
who you fall in love with, and
the future King of England was
never going to be an easy ride.
However, she’s excelled in her
role as Duchess of Cambridge,
be it giving out medals at the
Paralympics or giving her
support to charity events. I love
Kate. She’s dignifed, graceful and
above all, seems like the kind of
person I’d like to call my friend.
So what if she wants an even tan
line? Don’t we all? Her breasts,
and let’s face it, Harry’s cock,
don’t need to be splashed around
the internet for all to see. Harry
didn’t choose to be a Royal (and
I think he’d probably be much
better off if he was just a regular
civilian) and Kate comes from a
background worlds away from
that of the Windsor family. Let’s
not forget the press’s despicable
hounding of Princess Diana,
they’d do well to stir away from
similar treatment of the nation’s
beloved Kate.
“Well, at least I didn’t wake up with a tattooed face...”
©
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Alexandra Wilks
Mathew Haine
OPINION & aNalYSIS 10 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 opinion@thestagsurrey.co.uk
A
lot of people have written extensively about rape and
the culture of blaming the victim that surrounds it. You
might be bored of reading about it, but until people take
notice and things start to change these articles still need to
be written. Currently, only 6% of rapes reported to the police
lead to a conviction, and that’s just the ones that get reported.
It’s hardly a surprise that rape convictions are so low given
that public fgures keep coming out with statements about
‘real rape’ or, in the case of George Galloway, describing Julian
Assange’s allegations as no more than ‘bad sexual etiquette.’
There’s barely a month that goes by without either a celebrity
or government minister making some sort of ‘rape gaffe’.
After spending the summer at Edinburgh Festival I heard
more rape jokes than I ever wished, such as, “Statistically, 9
out of 10 people enjoy gang rape.” Not exactly side splitting is
it? Pretty bloody vile’s more apt.
The trouble is, if public fgures don’t start taking
rape seriously, then who will? It frightens me that so many
people believe that if a girl has too much to drink, wears
too small an outft and firts a little too much she is ‘asking
for it.’ (Except, she’s really not) We need to stop blaming the
victim, and start looking at the cause. What makes men rape
women? It’s not that all men hate women. I know plenty who
don’t. It’s the culture that surrounds sex, and rape. Websites
such as ‘UniLad’ portray rape as something funny or even
‘manly’. Although, what’s manly about sexual abuse I’m really
unsure. The Daily Mail loves to splash out on ‘exposes’ about
women who ‘faked’ rape. Last year, Feminists took the streets
in the infamously named ‘SlutWalk’ in retaliation to the
comments made by a Toronto Police Offcer who suggested
that for women to remain safe from rape they should ‘avoid
dressing like a slut.’ Or maybe men should avoid raping
someone, regardless of what they’re wearing. So yes, this may
have all been said before, but until we cut the crap, raise the
conviction rate and stop blaming the victim, we need to keep
saying it.
Socialism for the 21st Century
O
ur economy is barely moving; the
fnance capitalism that drove the
economic boom years of the 1990s and
2000s shows its inadequacy every day,
with struggling employment fgures, a
dive-bombing construction industry,
and banks still failing (despite their
inordinate bail-outs) to offer more than
paltry investment to businesses around
the world.
Yet the international public has
been slow to respond to the economic
crisis with demands for an alternative.
Might this be because no credible
alternative has gained traction? My
fellow left-wingers expend enormous
energies putting forward alternatives
ideologically based around a more
powerful state. I postulate that it
is exactly this state-centricity that
turns off the public when it comes to
socialism. And it is totally unnecessary!
It is a little-remembered fact
that when Karl Marx was advancing
his form of socialism, which has led to
so much suffering under totalitarian
or bureaucratic states, he did so in
the company of a libertarian strand of
socialism. It is one of the frst tragedies
of socialism that this group were
thrown out of the First International
following its conference in 1872, paving
the way for the takeover of Marx’s
authoritarian brand of socialism by
mass murderers like Stalin, Mao and
Pol Pot. This split confned libertarian
socialism to a quiet backwater of petty
liberal anarchism almost everywhere it
existed, throughout the 20th Century.
But now, it is the libertarian socialist
tradition which lights the way forward
for both socialist politics provides
the alternative to inhumanity and
irrationality of capitalist economics.
This new socialism says that it is
the people, not the state who should
be in charge of their destiny and their
welfare. It is about people taking
charges of their own lives and working
with other people who are in charge of
their own lives – working together for
their mutual beneft.
We see the beginnings of a new
form of socialism in the idea of the
community land trust, where a non-
proft cooperative holds ownership of
land and the individual householder
owns the house. We see it in community
groups – embryonic community
councils – where decisions are made
democratically at branch level, then
each branch voting on the policy of the
wider organisation.
Ultimately it is possible to have
more a responsible, democratic and fair
country by dispensing both with the
disaster of individualistic capitalism and
the corporatist big state. We must make
everyone democratically responsible
for their own community and the places
where they work – removing power
from the hands of small groups of self-
interested oligarchs and placing it in
the hands of all-encompassing social
organisations.
Why bother screaming ourselves
blue with bankers, when we can have
credit unions? Why suffer the cynicism
of a corrupt Parliament and more
corrupt Cabinet, when we can start
national and international decision-
making at the local level? Why work
our whole lives pouring money into
the pockets of the already rich, when
that money can be invested in us, our
families, communities, workplaces
and… universities?
Jack White
©
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r
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Alexandra Wilks
Stop blaming the victim,
start attacking the cause
OPINION & aNalYSIS 11 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 Opinion Editor: Justine Crossan | Copy Editor: Tina Morman
It’s a woman’s world
G
one are the days when men
would pay for everything
and be the sole breadwinner in
a household, as statistics are
showing girls have long been doing
better than boys in GCSEs and they
make up the majority of university
students. With those degrees they
will be in a better position to get a
steady job and climb up the fnancial
ladder in whatever industry they
choose to work in quicker than
men. Boris Johnson quotes: “Far
more women than men are now
receiving what is, in theory an elite
academic education... Possibly the
biggest social revolution of our
life time”. When these graduates
reach the peak of their careers the
institutional structure in Britain
could be dominated by females,
having a large social impact and
causing a total role reversal in the
work place.
The phrase ‘Pursewhipped’
has become a commonly used
one, colloquialising the idea of
fnancially inadequate men in
comparison to women. When
chivalry began to become less
important amongst men and
women over the past few years,
women have used this to their
advantage where they are now the
ones that can be in control and do
not need a man to take care of them
fnancially. Many women are happy
being single and independent, more
interested in pursuing careers
and less interested in pregnancy
and settling down. In increasing
numbers of partnerships women
are the breadwinners and, when
concerning marriage, choose to
marry beneath their social class
as money is no longer a vital
requirement due to their own self
suffciency, and will be marrying
for love rather than ‘stability’. Some
men may fnd they even require
marriage more than women. This
social shift is illustrating how
quickly and drastically the world
is changing. By looking at the
majority of womens’ positions in
society only a few decades ago,
anything is possible.
In the 1960’s only 25% of
medical students were women
whereas today that fgure has
risen to 56%. Looking at the royal
family’s history of women also to
demonstrate the change in society.
Princess Diana married at 20 whilst
Kate Middleton waited until 29,
indicating how women no longer
feel the need to get hitched so
quickly, even leaving time to ‘play
the feld’. Scientifcally females
mature quicker than boys and
have a greater ability to focus at
an earlier age, a trait that in this
fast paced society will be welcomed
with open arms.
Our economy is now mainly
knowledge based and looking at
statistics and university graduates
women seem better prepared for
this. Manual labour and typical
male jobs are no longer enough
to maintain a steady family wage.
Men are now embracing household
duties and masculinity is adapting
to take care of children and allowing
women to spend more time at work.
So a balance is forming not just in
the workplace but now at home as
well. We are an adaptable species
and so as womens’ abilities and
independence grow, so does the
crushing of gender stereotypes.
Gold diggers may not only be
applicable to women now and all we
need is for old fashioned thinkers
to embrace what is happening
and that the fairer sex may soon
become the richer sex.
Legacy of the Olympics
2
012, was always, and probably
will always, be known as
Britain’s year. The hugely popular
occurrences like the Jubilee, the
Olympics and the Paralympics
games have placed the nation, and
more specifcally London, for the
majority of the summer, at the
epicentre of the world.
The key focal point for
the time being is rightly, the
games. To say our Olympic and
Paralympic teams did well is a
shameful understatement. Not
only did the collective effort of
both GB teams reap a staggering
185 400g medallions of gold, silver
and bronze, but the current pride
of the nation seemed to possess
the ability for the duration of
what has become the ‘summer of
sport’ to bring the majority of the
nation together in conversation,
excitement, jubilation. The ever
eccentric and rather popular
Mayor of London, Boris Johnson
proclaimed at the close of the
Victory Parade in central London
on the 10
th
September: “You routed
the doubters, and you scattered
the gloomsters and, for the frst
time in loving memory, you caused
tube passengers to break into
spontaneous conversation with
their neighbours about subjects
other than their trod-on toes.” I
feel it reasonable to arrive at the
conclusion that the majority of
the country share the opinion
that the games was a huge success
and a period of a year that will not
be forgotten for a while to come,
an opinion clearly held by the
charismatic, fne exhibitor of dad
dancing (YouTube for Johnson’s
moves at the Olympic closing
ceremony), frantically hair-styled
Boris. With a little assistance from
the likes of Bolt, Farah, Ainslie,
Blake and Weir, to name but a few,
London 2012 was nothing short of
emphatic.
Unfortunately the games
are now going to have to be
enjoyed via memories following
yet another spectacular closing
ceremony consisting of further
frework expenditure and Chris
Martin and his merry men. The
two cornerstones of the games
may well be refected upon as
the terms ‘legacy’ and the games’
strapline: ‘Inspire a generation’.
These words should be considered
when refecting upon one of the
most successful Olympic Games in
history.
Yes, the Olympics lit up
London, Britain and the wider
world for a vast period of the
summer, but what next? What
will GB’s success mean for the
future of sport, and what political
impact will or has, the games
made?
The key aspect of the Olympics
is sport. When tying this world-
wide pastime with the previously
mentioned terms of ‘legacy’
and ‘inspire a generation’ an
uptake in sport at a grassroots
level is surely the aim. A post-
games infux of persons taking
part in sport at every level will
surely be a success. But how will
this be overseen and achieved?!
The advert and backdrop of a
massively successful games and
Team GB’s success should prove
to be the initial catalyst of this
process. For a continued sporting
culture in Britain money clearly
needs to be spent in funding
sports centres and national
governing bodies. On a political
note, sport needs to consume
a large proportion of political
parties’ manifestoes in years
to come. With further sporting
interest and involvement in the
UK, the legacy part of London 2012
will surely be fulflled. Only time
will tell if LOCOG has succeeded in
this aim.
The Olympic Park has been at
the centre of controversy even
before the opening ceremony way
back in July, with football clubs
such as Tottenham and Leyton
Orient all in the running to take
over the tenancy at Stratford.
This brings us onto the topic of
what will become of one of the
most iconic structures in the
metropolis. To let the site go in
the same direction of disuse and
to become a rust accumulator, as
has been seen with the Olympic
stadium in Athens would be a
shame to say the least.
London was sensible in using
temporary structures around
the stadium and facilities such as
Excel in London’s docklands, as
well as Eton Dorney for the rowing
and some canoeing events as well
as the coastal venues of Weymouth
and Portland for the sailing. The
white-water centre at Broxbourne
in North London is now open to
the public and will be a training
base for future canoeists but
the fate of the Olympic Stadium
is yet to be decided. In London
there is already Wembley and
Twickenham which serve as
two of the dominant venues for
sporting and cultural exhibitions,
so where does the Olympic site ft
in? In the future the stadium will
be used for athletics events, such
as the IAAF World Championships
in 2015. This is all very well and
good but for the next few years
the £468m structure must be put
to good use and once again, only
time will tell.
London 2012 was undoubtedly
a victory for not only Team GB,
but sport and the nation itself.
Team GB were outstanding and
exceeded expectations and
according to PM David Cameron,
the games “showed us [Brits] all
we can be”. The “Great British
summer that will be remembered
in hundreds of years to come” was
unquestionably fantastic, but,
there must be a legacy following
this summer, a legacy constructed
by those of us, who judging by the
reception received by London
2012, have been well and truly
inspired this year.
On a fnal and monetary
note, the games cost a whopping
£9.3bn, could we really afford
them? Probably not, but then
again can you place a price on the
euphoria the games manifested
this summer?
Sam King
Melissa Bolivar
are YOu opinionated?
If you’re interested in current affairs,
society, politics and anything else that can
be commented on, get involved by emailing
opinion@thestagsurrey.co.uk and you can see
your work in print!
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u
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5302-0912 SSP Stag Newspaper Student Membership Advert.indd 1 13/09/2012 13:30
FEaTuRES 12 The Stag | 22
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September 2012 features@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Features
Alan who?
A
World War II code breaker; mathematical
genius and the man behind the science
of computers! It is hard to believe that many
students walk past a statue of this man over
a thousand times during their degree, not
knowing who this extraordinary man was.
Unveiled on campus in 2004 the statue of
Alan Turing is displayed on the main piazza
and marked ffty years since his death. Known
as the ‘father of computers and artifcial
intelligence’, one of his frst contributions to
modern science was a mathematics paper
published in 1936 which forms the
hypothetical basis for computers. He
envisioned a universal machine that
could solve problems, combining all
individual devices into one machine.
Later Turing developed the Pilot ACE
which was the frst electronic
universal computer. But
these were not his only
achievements, his
most acknowledged
contribution to the
modern world was
his cryptology
work undertaken
at Bletchley Park
during World War
II where he was
part of the team
that deciphered the
encrypted messages
from the German Enigma
machine. If these messages
hadn’t been broken German
U-boats would have continued
to sink British supply ships and
it is highly probable that Britain
would have starved and lost the
war. He also developed with help
of colleague Gordon Welchman
machines called ‘bombes’ that
could decode the enemy’s
messages. Churchill said that
“Turing’s work was the greatest
single contribution to victory in
the Second World War” and in
1945 he was awarded an OBE.
Unfortunately in 1952 Turing became
a victim of discrimination. Following a
relationship with friend Arnold Murray,
Turing was indicted for ‘gross indecency’
as homosexuality was illegal at this time.
He was given a choice of prison or chemical
castration. It’s hard to believe that the man
who historians agree took at least two years
off the war was then treated so badly. He
chose chemical castration which involved
a series of oestrogen injections. A mere two
years later he was found dead by his cleaner
with a half-eaten apple at his bedside.
The autopsy revealed that the cause
of death was cyanide poisoning.
It was originally believed that
he committed suicide however
there have been many doubts
surrounding this diagnosis, the
apple was never tested for cyanide
and it was said that Turing regularly
ate an apple before bed and it was
very rare for him to not fnish
it. He also had reportedly
taken to the hormone
treatment with good
humour and had written
a list of tasks to do for
the following week. An
alternative explanation
has been suggested
that he inhaled
particles of cyanide after
experiments conducted
in his spare room. It seems
that along with many other
mysteries we may never know
the true cause of his death.
For many of us, computer
code is just gobbledygook seen
in ‘The Matrix’ and other
flms of the like and the fact
that Turing was behind
the theoretical basis for
these brilliant machines
makes him a legend to
be remembered for all
time.
By Katy Sawyer, Features Team
N
ot only were new Olympic champions
crowned in London this summer, but
the nation’s latest A-List celebrities were
founded, in the form of Team GB. Despite
a few of the British athletes being poster
guys and girls for London 2012 in the run
up to the event (such as Jessica Ennis, who
was the face of so many brands I’ve lost
count), many of the GB team were virtually
unknown by the British public pre-games.
However, due to our phenomenal success
in London, which had the nation glued to
their sofas for two weeks, many athletes
suddenly found themselves turned into
superstars overnight.
The public’s rapid support for, and
obsession with, competitors during the
games caused the number of followers of
Team GB’s twitter accounts to skyrocket,
with Tom Daley gaining 800,000 new
followers before the end of the competition.
Once the closing ceremony drew to an
end athletes were not at a loss of how to
celebrate their sporting victories, as an
Olympic medal proved to be the best VIP
pass around in the weeks following the
games. Before long British medallists were
receiving invitations and gaining access to
high profle events left right and centre, as
well as being asked to grace the couches
of many popular chat shows across the
country. They became the celebrity guests
that everyone wanted to meet, watch
and hear about. It quickly became clear
that they’d offcially stolen the spotlight
of the British media this summer. But,
for how long their limelight will last is
undetermined.
The ephemeral nature of fame means
that the celebrity status is feeting, and just
as quickly as you are erected a superstar,
you can be forgotten. Accordingly, we
can question whether this new fame of
GB athletes will be a lasting one. In a few
months, after the buzz of the Olympics
has settled down, will the British public
and media merely forget all about these
individuals? Will they just disappear, in a
puff of smoke, from our newspapers, our
magazines and our televisions?
Well, I for one hope not. It hardly
needs to be said that the GB team are both
inspiring and, above all else, great role
models. Which is a lot more than you can
say about many of our nation’s so-called
celebrities. The athletes’ fame is a well-
deserved recognition, one attained by
achievement, rather than cheap screams
for attention. I’m sure the majority of
Britain prefers our sporting heroes to be
the focus of our media attention rather
than the stars of reality TV shows and
washed-up ex-soap actors. After years
of gruelling training and exhausting
focus, they represented our nation and
did us proud; their performances causing
thousands to declare new found patriotism.
Surely they, more than anyone, deserve the
VIP treatment. I mean, c’mon, since when
did the cast of TOWIE last make you proud
to be British?
By Hannah Wann, Features Team
Olympic Celebrities
Jessica Ennis won gold in the heptathalon in the London 2012 Olympics
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FEaTuRES 13 The Stag | 22
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September 2012 Features Editor: Ellis Taylor | Copy Editor: Tessa Morgan
I
n 1936 a flm was released in the United
States called “Reefer Madness”, now regarded
as a cult classic due to its totally unbalanced
scare mongering around use of marijuana.
It would seem that we’ve reached a realistic
and balanced perspective since then, but
unfortunately we haven’t. 70 years later society
seems to be just as confused about recreational
marijuana or cannabis usage. And the messages
out there could not be more polarised, as one
side proclaims it’s totally harmless, the other
that it’s the devil’s work.
The law states that possession, supply or
use of marijuana is illegal. But recently the
government downgraded it (according to the
Misuse of Drugs act) to a less harmful Class C
substance before reinstating it as Class B (the
same level as codeine and methamphetamine).
It appears that even the law has a muddled
view on cannabis. Amidst all of the hyperbole
it’s no wonder the public can fnd themselves
untrusting of any claims made, especially in
light of the fact that other harmful substances
are legal and acceptable in society.
While it’s true that marijuana use has not
been found to be as harmful as, or more harmful
than, many other legal and illegal substances,
it’s also true that it is not harmless either. There
is disagreement in the scientifc community into
how harmful marijuana is to physical health. It is
generally accepted that it is physically harmful
(one study fnding pure marijuana smoke to be
30% more carcinogenic than cigarette smoke),
but that this is
offset by the fact
people tend to use
it less often than
cigarettes and for a
shorter period.
Whilst this may
be a calculated risk worth taking for many,
increased studies have shown three groups are
particularly at risk, which in part explains the
hardening stance of many previously tolerant
voices:
Those who may be susceptible to
mental illness and psychosis. It has
also been suggested that up to 10% of
those diagnosed with schizophrenia
could have avoided it had it not been
for cannabis use. The trouble is most
people don’t know if this is them until it
happens.
Those using cannabis before the brain is
fully developed, i.e. before reaching early
twenties. The most thorough long term
study to date showed an irreversible
reduction in IQ for those who started
smoking in their teens. The earlier
and more heavily it was used the more
pronounced the impact.
The third group are the 10% of those who
use cannabis and form a dependence on
it. Whilst the consequences of this are
often slower and initially less noticeable
than those becoming dependent on say
heroin, it is precisely because of this
that those affected are less likely to see
it as a problem and can therefore be
less motivated to stop. Again for most
people it is hard to know if this applies to
them until they fnd themselves in this
position.
The debate will continue to rage on around
the use of marijuana and cannabis and there
is very little sign
of consensus. The
majority of those
using it casually do
so without serious
consequences, but
this is not the case
for everyone by any means. Aside from legal
consequences some emerge far from unscathed
and it makes sense to be aware of the risks.
T
his was going to be called
‘housemate(s)’ but that would
have landed me into a lot of trouble,
so I thought I’d make the frst GMGs
of the year a tame one.
Living away from home will be
the time when you realise that all of
your parents’ nagging comments,
about your annoying habits are
actually justifed, because now
you may recognise those same
intolerable traits in the people you
encounter!
A student may share a
communal space with up to eleven
other people here at Surrey. Think
about it.
You actually have to be aware
of the people around you. I know
that may seem obvious but at
home you take it for granted. If I
do something odd/inconsiderate,
my mum just thinks ‘Oh that’s just
Bakita doing are Bakit-ery thing ’.
She has to love me; your siblings
have to tolerate you. Remember
that your housemates have only
just met you and do not have those
loyalties! Some tips:
• There is no washing-
up fairy – clean your plates and
cutlery and don’t leave pasta in the
sink.
• Nobody is asking you
take a vow of silence, just think
about the noise. It will give you
more credibility if you ever tell a
neighbour to shush too!
Don’t be that person, be the
change!
With independence comes great
responsibility: you are now the
master of your budget. So maybe
think again before you spend half
your loan on cheese? Seriously, in
my frst year, I live with a guy who
spent ¾ of his loan on a plasma
screen TV and had money problems
for the rest of the year!
But if you’re really struggling
to settle/budget, get advice. I hear
the people in the Students’ Union
are friendly and approachable and
there’s a nice new Support Service
Centre too.
I swear I’m not a moany mare
all the time; it’s just that I want the
same level of comfort, cleanliness
and replenished fridge stock that I
get at home with the independence
of an away from home lifestyle, but
it doesn’t always work like that,
and it just really grinds my gears!
©
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I’ve managed to persuade The Stag to let me moan for the fourth year running, with
the use of satire and sarcasm, with the hope of coming out with something comical.
It’s reached that point where I have to stress that all views are indeed my own and
not that of any awesome (down with the students) organisation that I may work for.
“Y’know what really grinds my gears...”:
Living away from home
By Bakita Kasadha
It’s time to pass on the column
and fnd out what really grinds
your gears.
Send an original* GMGs to
features@thestagsurrey.co.uk
and we’ll get Surrey students
to vote.
T&C: No more than 400 words
(no 10% margin); start with
“Y’know what really grinds my
gears...” and enjoy whinging.
*Original: you can write about
a topic I’ve ever covered, just
don’t use the same words in the
same order. Plagiarism is bad-
just ask Sam our VP Educa-
tion.)
Cannabis – Weeding out the Truth
By Rob Fenwick-Smith, Counsellor at the Centre for Wellbeing
1
2
3
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“increased studies have shown three
groups are particularly at risk”
FEaTuRES 14 The Stag | 22
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September 2012 features@thestagsurrey.co.uk
W
elcome to the University of
Surrey! So you’ve packed
your life into a car boot and you’ve
survived the choked tears and
sad (or perhaps joyful) goodbye
waves, as families disappear
into the sunset. And now you
face your frst week as a fresher.
Embrace it, enjoy it, after all it
is the only freshers week you’ll
ever have. But, for those trickier
fresher experiences, here is some
advice to help make the fresher
experience as smooth as can be.
Firstly, the dos. Speak to
everyone, smile at everyone (but
not in a creepy way). You never
know, they could become a life-
long friend. One of the best things
about university is it the vast
diversity of people in one place,
all from different walks of life,
each with intriguing stories to
tell. Need a conversation starter?
Remember the HATS rule; the key
questions to ask if conversation
dries or needs a helping hand. H is
for Home; ask them where they are
from. A is for Accommodation; ask
them where they are living on/off
campus. T is for title; don’t forget
to ask their name! Finally, S is for
study; ask them what degree they
are pursuing, it could even be the
same as yours! Remember that, at
university, any ghosts of the past
can be locked in the cupboard and
you can be who you want to be,
without the social groupings and
prejudice of school-days. Value
the opportunity for a fresh start.
And now for some more
specifc advice. Girls in heels, be
careful of the hill leading down
from Channies to University
Court and the railway bridge; it’s
fatal, especially in icy conditions.
To avoid lengthy Starbuck queues,
don’t go at ten to the hour, when
seminars and lectures fnish.
Remember the student loan is
for the year, not just for freshers
week. One from the Mums;
separate colours and whites
before doing laundry and keep
on top of your washing up; it’s
fascinating how quickly mould
spreads across a neglected plate.
If you’re from the Midlands, try
not to be offended when everyone
assumes you’re a northerner. If
you’re from the south, expect to
be called a farmer. Stock up on
hot lemon as fresher’s fu will
be imminent, it is not an urban
myth. Finally, join the union and
university Facebook and Twitter
pages, read, listen and watch
student media to keep up to date
with all the latest. And support
the union’s services as all the
profts go towards things for the
wonderful Surrey students.
Freshers week is certain to
be brilliant, but there are some
things to avoid. Don’t tell anyone
you initially spend time with that
they are your ‘best friend for life’,
a year later and you’ll be surprised
how friendships have developed
and changed. Similarly, don’t
arrange who you’ll be living with
until a few months into semester.
It takes time to become familiar
with true personalities, which
may confict or become perfect
matches with your own. Don’t
persistently ring the doorbell at
4am when you’ve lost your key;
security is open 24 hours. Be nice
to your cleaners! Don’t annoy
the Rubix bodyguards; you don’t
want to form a reputation in the
frst week and they are extremely
skilled at remembering a face.
And when you’re taking a shower,
don’t leave the door open; setting
off the fre alarm (especially at
8am) is not the best way to meet
your new house-mates!
The year will fy by and
soon you’ll be packing up with
saddened hearts that your time
as a fresher has fnished. Take all
the opportunities on offer, from
joining societies, volunteering,
exploring London to learning
a language, going on trips and
dressing up! Work hard to ease
the pressure in second year and
form relationships with academic
staff. But, after all the hard work
at A Level, relax a little, as you
will frequently hear the line “frst
year doesn’t count”, by stressing
older students and indeed staff.
C
ourt Life Mentoring is a unique service offered by
the University of Surrey to all students moving
into University accommodation. Each student will be
assigned a mentor and this mentor will visit you once
a week. The mentor’s role is to be a friendly face; they
can offer help and advice, act as a non-judgemental
listening ear, direct you to other specifc services and
just generally help you to settle into the University.
Mentors are students from various levels and
ages and with a mix of international and home
students. They will know how the University works
and will more than likely have experienced some
of the problems you might come across from living
a communal living environment themselves– or at
least they’ll probably know somebody who has! They
can help you with any day to day questions as well as
assisting you in resolving housemate disputes.
Social events are organised by the Mentors
throughout the year for all students living in
University accommodation, to encourage students to
get to know one another. Each courts’ Mentor team
will have organised their frst social event to take
place during Freshers week so look out for posters,
ask your mentor, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter
to fnd out more details:
http://facebook.com/courtlife and @surreycourtlife
Your mentor should come and visit you this
(moving in) weekend. If they don’t you can fnd the
mentors over at the Market Place (situated near the
Student Services Centre) or alternatively you can
email the central team at courtlife@surrey.ac.uk to
arrange a visit from your mentor.
Also, don’t forget to attend your Court’s Welcome
Reception this Sunday (23rd September) at 7pm.
There will be free soft drinks, wine and chocolates!
Locations of each court’s reception are as follows:
• University Court, Stag Hill Court and Millennium
House: Griffths Lecture Theatre (Lecture Theatre
Block)
• Cathedral and Guildford Courts: AP 1&2 (Austin
Pearce Building)
• Twyford Court and International House: AP 3&4
(Austin Pearce Building)
• Surrey and Battersea Courts: Hillside restaurant
• Manor Park and Bellerby Court: Surrey Sports Park
• Hazel Farm: Hazel Farm common room
If you have any questions about the mentoring
service then please email a member of the Court
life Mentoring central team (Carol, Stephen and
Jade) at courtlife@surrey.ac.uk or come and see
us in person in the Student Services Centre!
Court Life Mentoring Service
The dos and don’ts for freshers
By Sophie Vickery, Features Team
A
h Fresher’s week, you are quite
the experience. So much fun to
be had, so many tears to be shed,
and so many boys/girls that make
you feel awkward when you see
them on campus (try to remember
to take your pants, no one wants a
visual reminder on their foor).
I’m sure you’ve read many
“fresher’s guides”, including our
one (aka the best one), and now
you’re sat thinking “oh please don’t
tell me to keep my bedroom door
open to make friends, stop, please”
but wait! This is going to be the
most important piece of advice you
will receive, wear whatever you
want. Seriously, ignore what your
fatmates are wearing and go with
your own style! The one thing I
regret about fresher’s is my hiding
of my true dress sense, all the girls
in my building were wearing the
classic short/shirt combo, a body-
con skirt and heels and I did too
because I wanted to ft in. Everyone
does in fresher’s week; even the
people with loud personalities are
scared, they want to make friends
and be ‘normal’ as much as the next
person. But ‘normal’ is a made up
thing, it doesn’t exist, there is no
check list to being normal, instead
you can only do what is normal for
you.
Each night as a balanced on
my bed attempting to see if my
skirt covered my ass enough in the
mirror, I could hear my Dr Martens
calling out from under my bed. It
was horribly uncomfortable, fakery
is not a good thing and yet there I
was partaking in it. Oh god, Grace
Coddington would slap me around
the face if she knew; my friends
from home would do the same. So
I manned up and stopped all that
‘normal’ business and wore what
I liked and embraced my love of
Vogue over Heat. And from that
moment I had no friends at all. No
one in my building, or my course,
would talk to me…
That did not happen at all.
Nobody really cared, but I was a lot
happier. Soon after, I noticed that
other people started letting go too.
There was a clothing sigh of relief,
and seeing people’s true selves was
awesome. So many great clothes are
being hidden in campus wardrobes
because Freshers are too scared
that they won’t make friends
because of the way they look.
But you’re going to be spending
months/years with the people you
meet in your frst week and then
it’s all about personality. So why
worry about dressing differently?
Fashion is fun, not a prison.
Have a great freshers week, and
the one fashion rule you should
abide by is “boobs or legs, not both”.
Freshers fashion
By Ellis Taylor, Features Editor
Freshers Features
Welcome to the University of Surrey
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By Jade Foley, Court Life Mentoring
H
ello all and welcome to
Features! I’m Ellis, a Level
2 English Literature student
and a self-confessed magazine
junkie. I’m the Features
Editor and on-going fashion
columnist, so basically I get
people to write interesting
stuff, then I go shopping and
write about it*. This beautiful
section is full of ramblings,
advice, moaning and student
relevant topics… basically,
it’s awesome. I hope you
enjoy the section over the next
year, and please don’t hesitate
to contact me if you want to get
involved!
*I promise I actually do more
work than that.
Ellis Taylor
Features Editor
FEaTuRES 15 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 Features Editor: Ellis Taylor | Copy Editor: Tessa Morgan
Games
answers in the next edition of The Stag. Send correct answers to letters@thestagsurrey.co.uk to get a mention in the paper.
Sudoku Wordsearch
9 8 1
6 4 9 3
9 3 2
8 2 4 7
8 1
2 7 6 1
4 8 6
3 5 9 8
4 6 2
J N R u O M W W a F u F H I R
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D I G S W B W H T P Y K D P D
T l Y E R Y K M F M R N T K T
Z a V S E I T E I C O S u K a
T T M D R a O B E K a W R T B
R E C N Z D C K u B T a I V E
G R E F E E R J E B M J N F K
B a l G G T G P S O Y Y G K a
O l l H E K I M C I G a M K B
Q K V H Q G l E H a Y N E S a
l I Q V S G N O R T S M R a D
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T G B H G C C u F V u I D V G
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SOCIETIES
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T
he Careers Service provides
excellent guidance and
support to students at the
University and is introducing some
new features under the leadership
of a new Director, John Watkins.
This Semester’s highlights include
the Careers Fair on 11th October,
Welcome to my World talks every
Tuesday lunchtime, Employer CV
checks every Friday and Join John,
an employability session each
Tuesday before Champions league
football from 6-7pm.
There is a competitive team
exercise to start things off (with
practical employer prizes on
offer!) and you can look forward
to regular careers based features
in future.
Introduction to the Surrey Careers Service
University of Surrey Careers
Service presents
One hour Competitive Team
Exercise with prizes from major
companies for the winners, runners
up and most distinctive team
For a fun start to the semester, come to
the Marquee on the PATS Playing Field
Friday 5
th
October 4pm-5pm
and/or Saturday 6
th
October
10am-11am
Open to all Join the fun
For more information....
To fnd out more about the Careers Service at Surrey or to fnd out about Careers
Events taking place this year please visit http://www.surrey.ac.uk/careers
SCIENCE & TECHNOlOGY 17 The Stag | 22
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September 2012 Sci/Tech Editor: alex Smith | Copy Editor: Sophie Vickery
Science & Technology
Aloha, lovely readers! The Science & Technology section this year will be brought to you by the science and
tech team and I. As a second-year physicist (and as your editor) I will do my utmost to include news from
all the sciences without too much bias, as well as news from the world of technology. With a team of trusty
writers at my side, expect consistent content each week covering all aspects of science on and off campus.
T
ributes from across the world
have been dedicated to the
man who inspired a planet with
dreams of fight and aspirations to
take us literally out of this world.
Armstrong suddenly passed away
following complications from
a heart operation three weeks
earlier.
Recipient of the Congressional
Gold Medal, pilot for the US air force
during the Korean War and the frst
man to step foot on the moon; An
impressive resume, and one which
quite rightly left the world awe-
inspired by a man who quickly
became a poster-boy for science,
technology, and the world’s most
powerful country.
Taking to the air for the frst
time at age six with his father, left
an impression on the young Ohio-
born boy, and lead him into a career
in aviation. After joining the US
navy in 1949, he few a Grumman
F9F Panther on the USS Essex for
the frst time in 1951.
The carrier was then redeployed
to the sea of Japan and Armstrong
few as a reconnaissance pilot
against North Korea. His plane
was hit by anti-aircraft fre and
resulted in signifcant damage
to one of his plane’s wings. He
managed to fy to friendly territory
and eject safely, however the plane
was not recovered.
But Armstrong continued
to serve until resigning from
the Navy in 1952, and returning
to Purdue University, Indiana,
reading aeronautical engineering,
and soon after enlisted as a test
pilot in Cleveland, fying over 200
different models of aircraft designs
– and still getting himself involved
in life threatening situations in test
aircraft, despite being back in the
relatively safety of US airspace.
In 1962 he applied for the
second group of NASA astronauts,
with his application being handed
in a week after the deadline. He was
one of two civilian pilots selected,
but had already been beaten into
space by the Russians. After a few
missions into space, Armstrong was
selected for the Apollo programme,
and after being backup captain for
Apollo 8, he launched on the Apollo
11 mission on 16
th
July 1969 and
touched down on the lunar surface
on 21
st
July.
The frst man on the moon
shunned publicity after returning
to earth, as he believed he didn’t
deserve the credit for what was a
combined effort of thousands of
engineers and scientists.
He didn’t return to space but
became a university professor. He
declined offers to become involved
in political groups (unlike other
previous astronauts), and lived a
quiet life on his farm back in Ohio.
After a divorce in ‘94 and a second
wife, he became involved in legal
battles over his image, and even
got involved in a legal dispute with
his barber who sold some of his
hair for $3,000. Sadly, on the 25
th

August 2012, he died at a hospital in
Columbus after surgery to relieve
blocked coronary arteries.
Tributes have been given
by people from all walks of life
including President Obama, who
gave a picture tribute of himself
looking up at the night sky with a
caption: ‘Neil’s spirit of discovery
lives on in all the men and women
who have devoted their lives to
exploring the unknown - including
those who are ensuring that we
reach higher and go further in
space.’
His legacy will always live
on. His name will always inspire
generations who will look back at a
man who landed on a moon using
a computer less sophisticated than
the handheld phones we take for
granted. It’s been a sad day for
space science, after a giant leap for
mankind.
By Alex Smith, Science & Technology Editor
Offcial portrait of Neil Armstrong, the most famous of the three Apollo 11 crewmem, in his space suit posed infront of the lunar
surface – one of the few publicity shots of the world’s most famous astronaut.
Neil armstrong, the image of space exploration,
NASA and the scientifc achievements of
mankind, has passed away, aged 82.
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“One giant leap
for mankind”:
Death of an icon
Alex Smith – Science & Technology Editor
SCIENCE & TECHNOlOGY 18 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 sciencetech@thestagsurrey.co.uk
I
t’s a news story we’ve all been
awaiting for the best part of three
years now; Scientists at CERN’s
Large Hadron Collider claim to
have discovered the elusive Higgs
Boson.
Many were already suspicious
of the announcement, especially
when Peter Higgs, the man who
theorised the need for such a
particle, was fown to Geneva to
make a rare public appearance at
the annual update for the higgs.
And on the 4th July, Rolf Heuer,
director-general of CERN (The
European Organisation for Nuclear
Research), announced that “we
have a discovery” and emphasised
the importance of a global effort in
the hunt for the Higgs.
He went on to say that “At least
we know now that we can soon
close part of the chapter of the
standard model. We have found the
last missing cornerstone of it.”
The Higgs Boson, a particle
which is responsible for giving
objects in the universe mass, was
found to have a mass of around 125
GeV, and the result from the ATLAS
experiments was given with a 5
sigma level of certainty - enough
to remove the possibility of chance
and make this a formal discovery.
Joe Incandela, spokesperson for
the sister CMS experiment, said:
“This is indeed a new particle. We
know it must be a boson and it’s the
heaviest boson ever found.
“The implications are very
signifcant and it is precisely
for this reason that we must be
extremely diligent in all of our
studies and cross checks.”
This is still just the beginning
for the scientists at the 27km
particle accelerator. Although
they have made a discovery they
still need to identify the particle
further (does it have the expected
properties or is it something more
exotic?). Either way, it was the story
of the summer – and they did it all
without creating a black hole!
S
outh Korean technology giant,
Samsung, has hit back at
Apple after a court ruling in late
August deemed that Samsung had
infringed Apple’s patents on its
smartphones.
After losing a staggering
£7.6 billion from its share price
following the controversial court
ruling, Samsung’s management
sent out an angry internal memo
regarding the verdict citing court
rulings in Korea, Holland, Germany
and the UK, where it was found that
Samsung had not copied Apple’s
designs.
Samsung, rallying its customers
and employees, went on to maintain
the moral high ground, saying
“We trust that the consumers and
the market will side with those
who prioritize innovation over
litigation, and we will prove this
beyond doubt.”
Apple, seeing its own share
price rise 2% in the American
markets, will also be able to apply
for an injunction against the sale
of the 24 smartphone and tablet
products in a hearing on September
24th. It is widely expected that it
will seek such injunctions after the
late Steve Jobs said he would “go
thermonuclear” against Google’s
Android, as he and Apple saw it as
copy a of the iPhone software.
As the on-going war between
Apple and Google’s android
ensues it is expected Apple will
be empowered by the ruling and
become more ruthless in its attack
against handset makers running
android products; as refected in
the 1.6% fall in Google’s share price.
It is expected that Microsoft’s
Windows Phone will be the real
winner from such a ruling. It
currently only has about 5% of
the global market share, but
with Apple dismantling android
products Microsoft’s share could
grow, especially as Nokia have
committed to Windows Phone
and has already unveiled two new
models supporting the platform.
Samsung fights back
after share slump
By Alex Smith, Science & Tech Editor
Higgs update: “I think we have it.”
By Alex Smith, Science & Tech Editor
Rolf Heuer, director-general of CERN, formally announcing the discovery of the
Higgs Boson at a the LHC update press conference on 4
th
July: “As a layman I would
now say ‘I think we have it.’
O
ver the summer the
University of Manchester
announced that the celebrated
astronomer Sir Bernard Lovell
passed away, aged 98.
Sir Bernard is renowned for
developing the Lovell telescope
at the Jodrell Bank Observatory
in Cheshire. It was the frst radio
telescope capable of detecting
American and Soviet satellites
and was on the government’s
shortlist for World Heritage Site
status.
The Gloucestershire-born
physicist received his OBE in 1946
for his work on the H2S radar
used in World War II, and then a
knighthood in 1961.
A book of condolence has
been created in his honour at
the observatory (with an online
version available), where the
majority of submissions thank
him for his lifetime of work in
radio, astronomy and reiterate
that he will be sorely missed.
By Alex Smith, Science & Tech Editor
Sir Bernard Lovell dies
A
report, published in an
August edition of Current
Biology has found that zoos
provide a platform for pathogens
to opportunistically spread
between animals beyond their
normal host range.
The study illustrated how a
form of zebra herpes had passed
between different species of
mammal, including polar bears in
a German zoo which had no form
of direct contact with the zebras.
In June 2012, two polar
bears suffered from unexpected
seizures, with the 20-year-old
female, Jerka, dying eight days
after zookeepers frst detected an
illness and the male recovering
several weeks after medical
intervention.
Through applying the
polymerase chain reaction
technique and using high-
throughput DNA microarrays,
scientists tested for thousands of
known DNA and RNA sequences
to fnd that the only pathogen
detected in Jerka was related to a
form of herpes.
Now that the issue has
been raised, conservationists
and zookeepers can be better
prepared for unexpected illnesses
and can be more proactive in
treating the animals.
By Alex Smith, Science & Tech Editor
Zoos provide platform
for interspecies infection
Interested in science journalism?
I
f you have a keen eye for interesting news stories from the world of
science and technology and want to get involved in writing as part
of a proactive, enthusiastic team, then today is your lucky day. Get in
touch at sciencetech@thestagsurrey.co.uk and you could have your
news stories printed in The Stag!
©
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SCIENCE & TECHNOlOGY 19 The Stag | 22
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September 2012 Sci/Tech Editor: alex Smith | Copy Editor: Sophie Vickery
I
n 1946, Herman Wirtz, Sr. founded
Grünenthal, a pharmaceutical
company which would later
become the frst to market and sell
penicillin in Germany following
the lift of a nationwide ban.
Today, the company produces four
analgesic medications, which are
used in the treatment of chronic
and acute pain conditions in over
100 countries. However, in 1957,
Grünenthal released a medication
which had a devastating impact on
its users to create over ffty years
of resentment and anger towards
an otherwise unremarkable drugs
manufacturer.
The medication, Thalidomide,
was marketed under the brand
name Distaval. A sedative, Distaval
was effective in the treatment of
headaches and colds, and would
often be used as an aid to sleep
in the case of insomnia. As “The
sleeping pill of the century”,
350,000 Germans would administer
Distaval daily in 1959. By 1961, this
fgure was closer to one million
in Germany alone, with parents
administering the drug to children
in order to ease their sleep.
Thalidomide was also used in
compounds alongside other drugs
for a wide range of illnesses and
conditions, marketed accordingly;
Tensival to treat hypertension,
Valgraine to treat migraine, and so
forth. Overdoses of similar sedatives
would result in death; conversely,
an overdose of Thalidomide merely
resulted in a prolonged sleep. This
effect only served to maintain the
drug’s image as safe, reliable and
effective.
The most prolifc use of this
supposed “wonder drug” was
in the treatment of morning
sickness during pregnancy, as the
medication appeared to be a very
effective antiemetic. At the time of
the drug’s release, doctors believed
that the placenta surrounding an
unborn baby was impenetrable by
medication taken by the mother,
and so the harmful effects of
Distaval were not predicted.
Resultant nerve damage was
reported by adult consumers in
late 1959, but this was not enough
evidence to affect the drug’s
distribution and sale. In mid-1961,
doctors began noting some side
effects of its persistent use, with
the health authorities in Germany
advising that the drug be available
only under prescription. The side
effects presented by children,
however, were far more severe.
The effect the drug had on
infants slowly became evident,
although its link was not
immediately recognised. Two cases
of limb deformations in children
were presented at a paediatric
meeting in Kassel, Germany,
despite similar deformities rarely
been seen before. Gradually more
and more cases arose, with a
German doctor soon claiming
that the situation amounted to
an epidemic. Alongside deformed
limbs, the infants shared other
malformations, including
congenital heart disease, brain
damage and blindness.
Doctors began to link the
prevalence of such conditions
among infants to the use of
Thalidomide during pregnancy.
Initially, Lenz, a German doctor,
suggested his suspicions were
shared by doctors across the globe,
who had also experienced cases
of similar deformities and drew
the same conclusion. In November
of 1961, with no doubt that
Thalidomide had been the cause of
such awful side effects, Grünenthal
offcially recalled the drug.
Over 10,000 children were
born with disabilities resulting
from use of the drug. Despite its
sale being a mere ffty years ago,
there are only between fve and
six thousand sufferers alive today,
with Thalidomide UK claiming that
for every “Thalidomide baby” that
lived, ten had died.
During its sale in Germany,
Thalidomide was available over
the counter, not by prescription
as in many other countries.
Consequently, the number of
children affected by the drug
is higher there than anywhere
else, and in 1970 Grünenthal
paid the equivalent of £100m as
compensation for the German
citizens affected by the drug. The
impact of Thalidomide in England
is still evident, as it was prescribed
for many common symptoms
during early pregnancy, and so the
Thalidomide Trust was set up to
aid those affected. Compensation
to victims in Britain was provided
by Distillers Biochemicals Ltd, the
drug’s UK distributor, at around
£18,000 a year.
One thing which was noticeable
during the time since the drug’s
release was that Grünenthal did
not issue an apology, until now.
On Friday, 31st August 2012,
Harold Stock, Grünenthal’s chief
executive, apologised during a
memorial remembering sufferers
of Thalidomide in Germany. His
speech, available to read in full on
The Telegraph’s website, details
the company’s realisation that “it
is publicly desired that we express
our deep regrets to those affected
by thalidomide, and in particular
to their mothers.” Stock seemed
eager to appear sympathetic,
including statements such as: “We
see both the physical hardship
and the emotional stress that
the affected, their families and
particularly their mothers, had to
suffer because of thalidomide and
still have to endure day by day.”
Overall, his apology appeared
considerate and honest, even if it
was overdue.
Excluding the reaction of
Thalidomide sufferers, much
criticism has arisen, the majority
of which highlights Stock’s
use of a conditional apology.
“The thalidomide tragedy took
place 50 years ago in a world
completely different from
today”. He stated, “Grunenthal
has acted in accordance with
the state of scientifc knowledge
and all industry standards for
testing new drugs that were
relevant and acknowledged in
the 1950s and 1960s. We regret
that the teratogenic potential of
thalidomide could not be detected
by the tests that we and others
carried out before it was marketed.”
Many sufferers have reacted
angrily to the apology, labelling it as
“insulting” and “pathetic”. British
campaigners have said Stock’s
words were “insincere” and that an
apology should admit wrongdoing.
Freddie Astbury, president of
Thalidomide UK, responded by
saying: “We welcome the apology,
but how far do they want to go? It’s
no good apologising if they won’t
open discussions on compensation.
They’ve got to seriously consider
fnancial compensation for these
people.”
Examples of the lengths to
which sufferers would go to achieve
compensation are haunting; Kim
Fenton from Belfast, Northern
Ireland, commenced a hunger strike
in 1994 to try and pressurise the
government into granting higher
compensation. The government
fnally granted her request, six
years later, simultaneously issuing
an apology to those affected.
Similarly, since Grünenthal’s
initial £100m donation ran out, the
German government have provided
compensation to victims who
suffered the ‘Contergan-Skandal’,
as it is known in Germany.
The tragedy that resulted
from the production and sale of
Thalidomide will not be quickly
forgotten, and an apology from the
company which brought it upon
the world will do little to ease the
minds of its victims, sincere or
not. It shall remain a warning to
pharmaceutical companies for
many generations, and all we can
wish for is a comfortable quality of
life for all those affected.
Thalidomide: Half a century later
By Ruth Smithers, Science & Tech Team
Pregnant mothers who took Thalidamide had an increased risk of birth defects. The
child above was born with an extra appendage on the left foot.
“In a straight
glass please!”:
The new trick
for responsible
drinkers
H
ave you ever ordered a pint
at your local and sat in awe,
simply pondering quietly (or even
hysterically) about the design of
the glass?
The curved ones, the tall ones,
the ones which leave you with too
large a head, the square based ones,
and not forgetting those where the
bubbles only form from the centre.
It may seem like I have too much
time on my hands and perhaps this
just seems like another one of those
drunken conversations around the
pool table, but a recent study at
the University of Bristol has shown
that glass size does in fact have
an impact on the rate at which
alcoholic beverages are consumed.
The study monitored 159
men and women who randomly
drank a lager or soft drink from
a straight or curved glass over
two sessions. Their total drinking
time was recorded and the study
also measured how accurately the
participants judged the halfway
mark on the glasses.
It was found that the
participants were 60% slower when
it came to consuming an alcoholic
beverage from a straight glass than
a curved glass, while soft drinks
were drank at the same pace
regardless.
Both groups however had
diffculty accurately fnding the
halfway mark on the curved glass
compared to the straight glasses
and it is believed that this is the
main cause for the increase in
speed for curvy drinkers, as they
struggled to accurately judge how
fast they were consuming alcohol.
So next time you’re in
Chancellors on a night out,
remember to drink responsibly and
ask for a straight glass!
By Alex Smith, Science & Tech Editor
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lITERaTuRE 22 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 literature@thestagsurrey.co.uk
literature
T
his summer lost one of Hollywood’s stars who
brought us fantastic wit, comedy and joy, through
the art of brilliant writing. Nora Ephron passed away
in Manhattan, at the age of 71, after a battle with
leukaemia. Beginning a career as a journalist, she
soon developed a writing career in non-fction books
and essays before becoming a famous screenwriter.
Known for her romantic comedies, such as When
Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle and You’ve
got Mail many may not know that she was also
nominated three times for an Oscar and successfully
wrote several plays.
Tom Hanks took lead roles in both Sleepless in
Seattle and You’ve got Mail and paid tribute to Nora’s
writing talents as she knew ‘what was important
to know, how things really worked, what was
worthwhile, who was fascinating and why’. These
principles founded her sharp social perspective, to
form narratives which entertained the masses. Her
writing leaves a legacy of humour and brilliance,
diffcult for anyone to fulfl, as well as passing on
the incredibly insightful philosophy that a woman is
having an affair ‘if her legs are waxed when it’s not
even summer’.
Author Nora Ephron
dies at the age of 71
By Sophie Vickery, Literature Team
The Haynes Student Manual: The
Complete Guide to University Life
Hey! My name’s Emily, Literature Editor for this year. After writing my frst article for The Stag I
knew that I wanted to become a main part of this section and to my delight, I am. I am hoping to
bring you some controversy from the literary world and indulge you in genres that you haven’t
even thought about reading before. Enjoy!
Wilde’s house
on the market
J
ust moving into halls? How
about moving into Oscar Wilde’s
home instead? Picture yourself
as a struggling writer, in need of
inspiration. Where better to fnd
it, than in the writing room of
playwright, Oscar Wilde. For just
£1.295 million, one lucky (and
extremely rich) house owner is
living in the classic red brick town
house where Wilde famously wrote
his scandalous novel, The Picture
of Dorian Grey.
The current owner, an interior
designer named Myca Lee held in
mind Wilde’s famous quote ‘My
wallpaper and I are fghting a duel
to the death. One or other of us
has to go’ by keeping the look very
neutral. She recently informed
the Telegraph that “I slept in his
writing room last night ... there is a
creative presence still here.”
By Emily Smart, Literature Editor
M
any of you reading this article will be frst years,
eagerly awaiting the arrival of your fatmates, the
crazy nights out during fresher’s week and ultimately
the start to your life at the University of Surrey. Despite
all this excitement, it is only natural that you will have
many questions that parents simply cannot answer.
This is where the Student Manual comes in. The complete
guide to university life, written by James Thornhill;
founder of The National Student, provides an in-depth
look into every aspect of university that may trouble
you, excite you or even open your mind to things that
you simply had not even contemplated.
This is a well researched handbook which is easy
to read, informative while remaining extremely
interesting. Thornhill has used his own experience of
life at the University of Lincoln, where he studied for
a degree in Journalism. This knowledge not only helps
to provide a factual insight, but also offers thoughts
and opinions to give the book a personal touch, which
is extremely comforting to those who are a little less
enthusiastic at the prospect of leaving home for the
frst time.
The manual contains everything, from guidance
on writing at a university level standard, to cheap
and easy meal recipes, relationship and sexual health
advice and “making money ideas” for when loans
become tight.
What is impressive about the handbook is its ability
to be useful throughout the time at the University of
Surrey. For those moving into a house in second year,
there is advice on house hunting, DIY and it even
provides helpful informing on the best way to secure
an internship or a future career after graduation.
I would highly recommend this book to anyone
starting university and to those who are half way
through their degree. It is priced quite highly at £21.99,
however I would sincerely say that it is worth every
penny and will become an essential book among a
packed bookshelf.
By Emily Smart, Literature Editor
To be in with the chance of
winning this handbook, visit
www.gu2.co.uk/freshers2012
for more details
Emily Smart – Literature Editor
lITERaTuRE 23 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 lit Editor: Emily Smart | Copy Editor: Sophie Vickery
Literature in Laos
W
hile writers in the UK worry
about marketing their books
to the masses, Colin Cotterill is
fghting to merely publish his
crime novel the Asian country of
Laos.
While travelling to in the
unfamiliar country on work related
issues, Cotterill found himself in
the local hospital after suffering
from hepatitis on the plane over.
However, after a few weeks he
found that he became greatly
attached to the area. He began to
write a set of crime fction novels
set in 1970 Laos which have been
exceptionally welcomed by English
speaking readers and has also
received an award from the Crime
Writers Association. Nonetheless,
trouble occurred recently when
Cotterill decided to take action to
get his books published in the place
they are set.
Laos, bordered by Vietnam,
Cambodia and China, is governed
by a Marxist-Lennist single party
state. As a communist country, the
government holds huge restrictions
over what information is published.
The process is highly extensive and
involves seeking acceptance from
the Ministry of Culture who will
remove any part of the book that
they do not agree with. Cotterill
recently noted in an interview
with Channel 4 that it “may be a six
page book by the time everybody’s
put their hands on it”. Even if the
novels are accepted, there are still
worries concerning the Christian
owner of the only printing press
who turns down millions of dollars
if he dislikes the religious context
of the book.
This fght for literary freedom
in a country that contains very
little is going to be a tough and
possibly unsuccessful venture. Yet
more optimistically, Cotterill’s
experience has reminded those
fortunate enough to live in a
country with freedom, choice and
an extensive range of literature to
readily embrace.
By Emily Smart, Literature Editor
Book Review:
So It Is by Liam
Murray Bell
A
s an English Literature student
at Surrey I had a vested interest
in this book, due to the fact that it
is authored by the Liam Murray
Bell; the much loved English and
Creative Writing lecturer. Bell’s
debut novel focuses on the effect
of violence on women during the
Troubles in Northern Ireland.
We are introduced to two
seemingly very different women,
Aoife, a young girl struggling
to hold her family together and
Cassie, a Republican paramilitary
honey trap. Both of the narratives
are equally engaging and at times
really quite shocking. Not only does
the plot captivate, but Bell provides
the reader with a thorough history
of the complex struggles in Ireland.
An interesting read for anyone
who wants to learn more about
Ireland’s history.
By Alexandra Wilks, Editor
What you can do for the author
A
uthor, Penelope Trunk caused
literary controversy this
summer during an interview with
the Guardian. She stated that her
publisher and many other literary
associates are “foundering in
the digital sea” and becoming
incapable of marketing future
bestsellers in the most effcient and
effective way.
Blogger for the Guardian, John
Self, supported the claim, believing
that expensive marketing is not
always the key in helping books
of unknown, but potentially
bestselling, authors fy off the
shelves.
Self realised that the power
of the digital age was not in the
hands of the publishers or the
authors, but held by the readers
themselves, and began an
experiment to test his theory. He
found a new novel, one that would
usually be glazed over by book
chains, Hawthorn & Child by Keith
Ridgway, and was astonished to
fnd it “extraordinary; surprising,
dazzling, affecting and upsetting.”
After posting a review of the
book on his blog, he began to
inundate his followers on Twitter
with information on the book.
Shortly afterwards, he found
that this type of marketing was
beginning to work. He started
receiving comments such as “One
of the best books I’ve ever read ... If
it doesn’t win every literary award
going we should riot.” Amazon
sales also rose from “the tens of
thousands to the single thousands”
and soon after the Guardian
published a review, it rose once
more to the top 500.
The experiment was a huge
success, showing how easy it is for
the reader to give something back
to beloved authors. Despite negative
coverage of social networking
sites, they could be used to create
positivity and promote favourite
books, to bring surprising and
impressive results.
By Emily Smart, Literature Editor
E.l. James’ trilogy has taken the united Kingdom by storm this
summer. Selling over 100,000 copies, in seven days, it soon
became the fastest selling adult novel.
The book has joined the likes of instagram and thigh tattoos
in becoming the ultimate ‘follow the crowd’ hype of 2012. It’s
likely that every UK bus and train carriage had at least one
copy in the hands of its female passengers this summer. How-
ever, despite becoming exceedingly popular overnight, like
any other trend it came with a backlash of criticism. For each
copy read in public, there were inevitably three other commut-
ers looking on in disgust. Rachel Thomason and Raisa Joseph
give a positive and negative review of the controversial novel.
Fifty Shades of Filth?
I
t was a challenge to fnd
positives in E L James’
bestselling novel. Yet Fifty
Shades of Grey has enticed
millions of women worldwide
into its dark pages, allowing
them to indulge in their sexual
fantasies. In fact, I’m willing
to bet that as a direct result of
reading the book, thousands of
men and women everywhere
have had their sexual drives
reignited and that must be a
positive, right?
To avoid all of its
materialism, abuse and
patriarchy, I believe the novel
also addresses themes of
identity, strength and morality.
The protagonist, Anastasia, can
be criticised in so many ways,
but people forget that she is
young. Ana is on a journey of
self-exploration and everything
she once knew is challenged.
The very fact that she questions
the morality of her situation
highlights her realisation
that she has a choice, and as a
result, she chooses. Among the
feminist outrage surrounding
this novel, James allows
Ana to have the strength to
independently decide her own
fate. And, I’ll be honest; it’s
fun and sexy and has caused a
surge in the number of readers
throughout Britain. That’s a
pretty big positive.
T
aking her inspiration from
Twilight, which sent teens
all over the world crazy for
necrophilia, E L James hands us
a trilogy that grasps readers’
attention, with an unbelievable
BDSM (Bondage, Discipline,
Domination, Submission) romance.
I say unbelievable, not because
these relationships do not usually
occur, but because it just so
happens that Christian Grey is
portrayed as incredibly good-
looking, rich beyond belief and also
mysteriously haunted by his past...
not to mention his outstanding
stamina.
If Mr Grey were not all these
things, he would probably be in a
padded cell before the frst book
reached its end. As far as heroines
go, Anastasia Steele does not put up
much of a fght to this patriarchal
dominance and likens herself to
Hardy’s Tess, which sends out mixed
messages regarding feminism.
But that’s not why we’re all
blushing on the train and tucking
away copies of 50 Shades into our
handbags. What sold the millions
of dark-covered copies was the sex,
and even that gets tedious by the
end. It’s boringly repetitive and,
while writing about sex has always
been diffcult, James’ style and
technique is just not up to the job.
By Rachel Thomason, News Editor By Raisa Joseph, Literature Team
Author and Surrey University lecturer Liam Murray Bell held the launch party for
So It Is at the campus bookshop.
FOR: AGAINST:
DaNCE & THEaTRE 24 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 dancetheatre@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Dance & Theatre
Immersive Theatre – Get Involved
I
mmersive theatre has become
increasingly popular over the
past decade, with a rise in the
number of productions breaking
the traditional theatrical
boundaries. Shows such as Hair and
Mamma Mia lead patrons to sing
and dance with its cast, bringing
musicals to life and shifting away
from the paradigms of ‘proper’
theatre.
But, as well as bubbly karaoke-
style musicals, there are shows that
take you right into the heart of the
story. Theatre Delicatessen often
create sets with the audience at the
centre. Their recent production of
Henry V saw us sitting on beds and
benches within the trenches of the
British army, whilst Mercury Fur
(2009) gave a chilling, fy-on-the-
wall atmosphere within a tiny fat,
with chairs lining the walls as close
to the action as possible.
This summer, something new
came to London. In a world of
conspiracy, intrigue and murder,
Project X moves audiences from the
London Transport Museum through
Covent Garden, and back again in
a unique time-shifting whodunit.
My parole letter informed me that
it is illegal to divulge key pieces of
information to the wider public,
so I'm going to have to be discreet.
But, what I can say is that Project X
will completely change the way you
look at performance and your role
within it. Run by Tradesecrets,
a company building interactive
experiences for theatre and
business, this piece is undoubtedly
an organisational nightmare.
Yet, all things considered, it ran
fairly smoothly and is a credit to
the director, Sam Bond. Throwing
ffteen members of the public into
a wholly new environment is a
risk, but has proved rewarding.
The important thing to remember
is that, the moment you step into
the museum, you too are an actor
in a play and your role is not that
of the traditional observer. You
must be assertive, confdent and
intentional throughout the two-
hour experience and watch the way
your group respond to the unusual
events that unfold around you -
that in itself is half the fun.
Exploring the boundaries
between audience and actor, and
asking the question ‘when does the
observer become the observed?’,
this show is something that is
incredibly insightful and takes new
bold steps towards a dramatic and
innovative style of theatre.
Project X runs until 4
th
November.
By Tiffany Stoneman, Dance & Theatre Editor
The Taming of the Shrew
I
have, for so long, wanted to see
The Taming of the Shrew on
the stage, having both studied
the script and seen a televised
production, so I was delighted at
what director Toby Frow had to
offer the Globe on a warm August
bank holiday evening.
The story of The Taming of
the Shrew follows two sisters:
Bianca, a beautiful, courteous and
submissive woman who knows
her place in a world of men, and
her older counterpart, Katherina,
who is renowned throughout
Padua for her malicious and
ferocious qualities. When their
father rules that no man can
marry Bianca until Katherina has
a husband, chaos ensues; servant
and lord alike strive to fnd a man
brave (or mad) enough to take
on the infamous shrew. When
Petruchio succeeds in coercing
Katherina into marriage, their
relationship develops into a
hilarious competition of pride,
which concludes in an often
controversial ending.
I had a standing ticket in the
yard, which meant that I was
only rows away from the action
on the stage. This, along with the
audience participation, helped
to create a holistic experience
of both the setting of a 16th
century play and the imaginary
world of Padua. In addition, the
inclusion of musicians playing
original instruments helped to
embellish the fun mood of the
play and emphasise the historic
atmosphere that the Globe
recreates.
It was bawdy, playful and
full of energy - everything you
want a Shakespeare comedy to
be. This was due to the perfect
comic timing of the actors and
the way in which the relationship
between the lords and servants
was portrayed (in particular
that of Petruchio and Grumio,
whose mocking and insulting of
one another had a defnite feel
of Monty Python humour about
them). Shakespeare is often seen
as rather elitist and inaccessible
to those who haven’t studied it,
however, upon seeing the Globe’s
latest production of The Taming
of the Shrew, it has proved that
the same jokes, innuendo and
tales of mistaken identity can still
be easily understood and enjoyed
fve hundred years later.
By Emily Bourne, Dance & Theatre Team
©
P
r
o
j
e
c
t
X
2
0
1
2
The Project X Cocktail
The intrigue and mystery
of time travel has inspired the
creation of a new limited edition
cocktail – the X-iT – being
served at London Transport
Museum’s café-bar The Upper
Deck.
Served in a silver bucket
with dry ice billowing over the
sides, the cocktail is based on
a mixture of peach snaps and
vodka. Searcys, who operate
The Upper Deck, designed the
X-iT to celebrate the Museum’s
new immersive theatre show
Project X.
The X-iT is served at the
weekends and costs £6.50 or 2
for the price of 1 (£3.25 each) for
Project X audience members.
Tiffany Stoneman
Dance & Theatre Editor
Hello! I’m the new Dance & Theatre Editor,
and am currently in my second year on the
Uni’s Theatre Studies course (yes, it does exist
and no, I’m not GSA!). I’ve been involved in
theatre journalism for two years now, one with
a website and one with The Stag, so have gained
some experience within the world of artistic
criticism and writing. As well as this, I regularly
work the Ivy Arts Centre Box Offce, and so
have been treated to a wide range of live arts
presented by the uni and outside companies. I’m
really looking forward to building up The Stag’s
Dance & Theatre section, and bringing live arts
on campus into the limelight, whilst working
closely with student activities and societies.
Project X Deals

If Tiffany’s review
has made you curious
to check out some
Immersive Theatre
yourself, The Project
X has kindly offered
Stag Readers an
exclusive discount
for their show. If you
quote ‘The Stag’ and
show a valid student
ID, you can see the
show for a discount
price of £20! If you
love theatre this is too
good an oppurtunity
to pass up.
DaNCE & THEaTRE 25 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 Dance/Theatre Editor: Tiffany Stoneman | Copy Editor: Hannah Wann
T
he Yvonne Arnaud started its Autumn season with
an adaptation of the toe tapping and Tony award
winning How To Succeed In Business Without Really
Trying. The show details the journey of J. Pierrepont
Finch as he slickly cheats and manipulates his way
from a common window washer all the way to the
top of the business world. The production showcased
not only professional actors, but a dozen GSA second-
year students who were about to embark on their
fnal year of training. The students showed defnite
promise throughout the production and they blended
effortlessly with some of the more experienced cast
members. It really shows that GSA performances are
well worth a watch on campus this year, as they not
only entertain but also showcase up-and-coming talent
amongst our fellow Surrey students.
The business tycoon at the heart of the show was J.
Pierrepont Finch - played by the wonderfully talented
Greg Bernstein – who, throughout the musical, was in
nearly every scene. His singing voice was sublime and he
carried both the score and the narrative wonderfully.
It was, however, one of the supporting actors who
stole the show; Chris Kiely played Bud Frump, the boss’s
nephew and Pierrepont’s rival. His characterisation
as ‘the baddy’ was innovative and held the audience’s
attention throughout, his physical acting had the
audience giggling and his cheer was the greatest
cheer at the end of the night. The entire cast showed
huge potential and, despite some frst night jitters, the
ensemble worked very well together.
For me, the choreography made the show; Aidan
Treay’s innovative choreography was both creative
and humorous. For a show based in an offce, he really
thought outside the desk by adding dance elements in
to some otherwise low moments. The choreography
occasionally stole focus from the principal actors by
adding a tap dance to a set change and contemporary
dance to the background acting. These details added to
the rich show. The number ‘Coffee Break’ was the high
point of the show and allowed the ensemble to shine
as they showed the agony of desperately needing a
caffeine hit.
Overall, the production was hugely enjoyable and
highlighted the promise that both GSA and the Yvonne
Arnaud hold this Autumn. One of the fresher musts for
new Surrey students is a visit to The Yvonne Arnaud for
an exciting night of new theatre and, in this case, a little
bit of business advice thrown in.
Bits O’ The Bard
“For anything so overdone is from the
purpose of playing, whose end, both at the
frst and now, was and is, to hold as ‘twere
the mirror up to nature.”
– Hamlet, Hamlet, act 3 Scene 2
Another year begins, and the committees of
MADSoc, MTSoc, TheatreSoc, and the various
dance groups are getting ready for another
great year of student-run performances.
Watch this space for updates about what’s coming up
on campus, including fnal year GSA student showcases.
Coming up at the Ivy:
What: Merrily We Roll Along (GSA)
When: 17
th
-20
th
October
Cost: £9 (£10 full)
What: State of Emergency (Dance)
When:24th October
Cost: £5 (£12 full)
As part of Black History Month,
SoE present a unique performance
of exerpts and improvisations.
Watch This Space:
arts at Surrey
By Alexandra Vickerman, Dance & Theatre Team
How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying
Danny DeVito masterclass
T
he Theatre Royal Haymarket
is not only a beautiful venue
in the heart of London, but also
host to MasterClass, providing
workshops and theatrical insights.
Their July discussion was with
none other than Danny DeVito,
who has graced the stage for the
frst time in 40 years, alongside
Richard Griffths in The Sunshine
Boys.
From advice on how to keep
your audience awake – "Keep
'em cold!" – to his opinions on
Shakespeare - "I don't understand
that shit" – DeVito was full of jokes
and hysterical stories that had
the audience in cringing stitches.
Wearing a shirt and crocs (which
he took off 30 minutes in), he gives
off a feeling of immediate comfort
and familiarity. But it wasn't all
laughter; this master of acting,
direction and production shared
some of his wisdom alongside SB
director Thea Sharrock. Here are
his answers to some questions, as
best as I could scribble them down.
audience: Advice for those
entering the theatre industry/
study/career?
Danny Devito: It's about studying
the things you like, fnding your
path. Take it a piece at a time -
stay right in the moment and
concentrate on what you're doing
now. Don't turn things down
straight away; experience is a
good thing and it's about being
around everything. Keep your
eyes open and keep working. Give
them some representation of
yourself in the characters - that's
90% of it.
a: Which do you prefer, acting or
directing?
D: Acting. Unless I'm directing.
Here's something that I like to
remember - the reason to be a
director is because the position of
God is already flled. I didn't come
up with that.
a: What makes a good director?
DD: Knowing exactly what you
want. If the director knows their
perspective or point of view then
they can relate it. How are you
going to communicate that desire
to everyone involved? You've
gotta be able to assimilate all of
those ideas. If you're working
with those 10 people, 20 people,
80 people, all those ideas come
through the flter.
a: At the end of your ‘Inside
the Actors Studio’ interview
you talked about secrets. What
do actors beneft from these
'secrets'?
DD: We all have secrets. We don't
want to leave our bodies and
minds completely, you want to
be there. You are present, as a
character. There are secrets that
[the character] doesn't talk about.
It's not imperative that you tell
every actor what you have in your
mind.
a: How do you deal with shit days?
DD: If something good happens,
embrace it and let it go. If
something bad happens, embrace
it and let it go. I try to live in the
now. There's good things and
there's bad things - you've gotta
stay in the middle. If something
good happens, embrace it and let
it go. If something bad happens,
embrace it and let it go.
And just like most well-
rounded interviews, the session
ended with this meaningful, yet
blissfully simple, statement that
left us sighing happily at this
unassuming man on the stage.
By Tiffany Stoneman, Dance & Theatre Editor
©
k
e
v
i
n
d
o
o
l
e
y
©
S
t
u
a
r
t
A
l
l
e
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FIlM 26 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 flm@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Film
Review: Magic Mike
S
ome have loved its cheesiness, delved
into its energy and dribbled at its
imagery. Others have simply slated its
plot and mocked its vanity. Either way,
staring at the aesthetically pleasing
bodies of Channing Tatum and Alex
Pettyfer for one hundred and ten minutes
fails to disappoint.
Tatum stars as ‘Magic’ Mike Lane, a
stripper who works for nothing other
than “women, money and a good time.”
He takes up the task of introducing
Adam or ‘The Kid’ (Pettyfer), a nineteen-
year-old, to the world of stripping, and
training him to a standard as high as his
own. Many are correct to suggest that
the plot is dull. It’s predictable and lacks
development, although it’s likely that
the exterior of the actors is what enticed
audiences to the flm and engaged them
throughout. Undeniably, that’s all they
needed to make the flm a success.
Afterall, as soon as I saw the trailer, my
intention to see the flm was fxed.
Considering the advertisement
surrounding the flm, it was diffcult
to notice that Alex Pettyfer was even
starring in it, given the spotlight Tatum
received (and the fact that he had dyed
his hair brown!) It was, unsurprisingly,
a huge satisfaction when I realised. I
often think that Pettyfer is not given the
recognition he deserves. After playing
lead roles in flms such as Stormbreaker,
I Am Number Four and Beastly, one would
expect that his presence in the flm
industry is a substantial one. Yet, I know
many who would only recognise him
when googling his image – an activity
I would not discourage! I imagine that
his role in Magic Mike - whilst starring
alongside Tatum – is nonetheless one that
will raise his profle.
Channing Tatum, of course, lives up
to his usual excellence. It was never going
to be easy following up from the wonder
that was 21 Jump Street, yet he does it
superbly. The flm may not fourish in its
storyline, but Tatum’s acting skills are
ever present, and it’s refreshing to see
him exploit that body, rather than subtly
reveal it during a rom-com. Girls, there’s
no shame in going to see Magic Mike purely
for the naked men; take full advantage,
and fantasise about your “dream guy that
never came along.”
By Beth Goss, Film Team
Review: Expendables 2
By Kristie Marchant, Film Team
S
ylvester Stallone reunites his cast of ageing action-movie
veterans once again for the sequel to the 2010 flm Expendables.
This time, the team are drafted in to track down a computer
device before it falls into the wrong hands. Like all action flms,
however, things don’t go according to plan and one of the team
members is brutally murdered in the ensuing violence. Fuelled
by the desire for revenge, Sly leads the group on a bloody,
ruthless mission to track down the evil villain played by Jean-
Claude Van Damme, and single-handedly save the world from
nuclear destruction at the same time.
Expendables 2 is crammed full of terrible acting, bulging
biceps, bullets, explosions and all manner of cheesy lines that
fans can recognise from earlier action movies that the cast have
starred in. This flm certainly won’t be winning any Oscars.
But, it is worth a watch simply for a laugh at some of the cringe
moments and the occasional appearance from the bushy-
bearded legend that is Chuck Norris.
Brave
N
o matter your age,
you’re never too
old for a Pixar flm.
Even as two of my
friends and I settled
down among the shouts
and excited chatter
of masses of young
children, I couldn’t help
but feel the same levels
of anticipation as I did
when I went to see Toy
Story 2 all those years
ago.
Let me start
with saying that
the animation was
beautiful! I had to
constantly keep
pinching myself to
make sure that I hadn’t
stumbled into a different
movie by accident.
Both the landscapes
and the people were
breathtaking. Merida
(heroine of the movie)’s
hair looked so soft that I
wanted to reach out and
touch it! Unfortunately,
my budget wouldn’t
stretch to a 3D ticket;
otherwise maybe I
would have got the
chance. Yet, even
without 3D defnition,
the colours and textures
of the flm stood out
and were completely
believable.
As with most Pixar
flms, Brave makes sure
that it is not solely
directed at children,
with plenty of adult
humour. It resulted
in one of the most
comfortable cinema
experiences of my life,
with adults and children
laughing in unison.
Okay, maybe the plot
was a bit predictable (it
is basically Brother Bear
set in Scotland), and
the adverts kind of gave
away to the story, but in
the end, it didn’t really
matter. As one follows
the story of Princess
Merida, in her pursuit
to construct her own
fate and defy customs,
you fnd yourself really
identifying with the
character (minus the
magic, archery, and
thousands of guys
fghting for your hand
in marriage). I even
felt myself welling up a
couple of times, and let
me tell you, I’m not the
type to cry at movies
full stop, let alone in a
crowded cinema.
“...Brave makes sure
that it is not solely
directed at children,
with plenty of adult
humour...”
By Candice Ritchie, Film Editor
FIlM 27 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 Film Editor: Candice Ritchie | Copy Editor: Sophie Vickery
The Dark Knight Rises
By Beth Goss, Film Team
H
aving waited for The Dark Knight Rises for what felt like
years, I could hardly keep myself quiet as the adverts
rolled. I was anxious for what was in store, having read
numerous bad reviews in the newspaper. Complaints about
the length of the flm (3 hours, ouch!), incomprehensible
dialogue, and a dull plot, echoed in my mind.
Personally, I don’t see what the complaints were about!
The movie is incredibly well made and the special effects do
not disappoint. In terms of action and entertainment, you
couldn’t have asked for more. I’m not usually a fan of action
flms and their cliché chase scenes, but give me a Batman/
Bane bike chase any day! Surprisingly, you don’t get lost
within all the explosions and extravagant action scenes, like
in other flms (cough, Transformers, cough).
The flm introduces two main characters to Nolan’s
series: Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway), a cat burglar whose
appearance in Gotham City sets in motion a chain of events
which encourages Batman to come out of retirement, and
Bane (Tom Hardy), a mercenary whose objective is to destroy
Gotham with a nuclear fusion bomb. Anne Hathaway’s
portrayal of Catwoman was a hot topic between my friends.
Could Hathaway, who has a reputation for playing ‘nicey-
nice’ characters, handle the sneaky cat burglar? Once again,
I had to eat my words as I never once felt that she was out of
character (and here I must confess to being a bit of a comic
book nerd), as she really became ‘Catwoman’.
I understand that most will miss Heath Ledger as the Joker
(I know I do!), but I just hope Tom Hardy’s performance isn’t
compared to Heath Ledger’s, as the two characters are very
different. And despite the complaints, I never had a problem
with understanding what he was saying. The distortion of his
voice felt completely realistic.
If I had to offer a criticism, it would be the length of the
movie. I couldn’t help but think that maybe the flm could be
improved by perhaps cutting thirty minutes. Despite this, the
ending is amazing and unexpected (well … part of it anyway),
and brings the trilogy to a satisfying end. Now, call me a fan-
girl, but this is defnitely my number one flm of the year in
the way it exceeded my expectations. A true representation
of the Batman universe.
Hi, I’m Candice and I’m
your new Film Editor! I am
an English literature with
Creative Writing student.
last year I was a Copy Editor
and writer for the flm
section, and I just couldn’t
leave, so here I am with a
more involved role! Whether
it’s rom-com, horror or an
action-packed fasco, I never
tire of my love for flms. This
year I’m on placement as the
Editorial assistant for OPP
Media, meaning I’ll be
experiencing what it’s really
like to work with a magazine!
Combined with working for
The Stag, I’m hoping this year
I’ll learn the ins-and-outs of
InDesign, become semi-pro
at editing, ten-fold better at
writing, and my journalism
dream will be ever greater!
Candice Ritchie -
Features Editor
Interested in flms?
Whether you prefer Cannes, Hollywood or just your local Odeon, we are look-
ing for you! Get involved and become part of The Stag, just by reviewing re-
leases new, old or obscure. Get in touch through flm@thestagsurrey.co.uk.
FIlM 28 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 flm@thestagsurrey.co.uk
The Bourne
Legacy
By Kristie Marchant, Film Team
T
he Bourne Legacy is
the fourth flm in the
Bourne series and sees
a new agent replace the
iconic Jason Bourne (Matt
Damon). This time, Jeremy
Renner (who some may
recognise from his role
in the award winning
flm The Hurt Locker) steps
in as trained assassin
Aaron Cross. Cross is part
of a secret government
project called Operation
Outcome, which trains and
medically enhances its
participants for military
defence. However, due
to Bourne exposing the
project in the previous
flms, government offcials
have decided to kill off all
remaining participants of
the operation to prevent
the same thing happening
again.
Cross escapes after
a tracking missile fails to
destroy him at his training
base in Alaska. He arrives
in time to save Dr Marta
Shearing (Rachel Weisz)
from a team of assassins
who have been sent to kill
her. Shearing has found out
too much about the project
and is therefore considered
a threat.
The pair join forces and
head to Manila to fnd the
manufacturing company
that make the body
enhancing pills that Cross
has become dependent
on, so that he doesn’t
lose his mental ability.
However, with their moves
constantly being tracked,
the whole flm is a fght for
survival for Aaron Cross,
as the only survivor from
Operation Outcome.
H
ave you ever had that one favourite soft toy that you
would take everywhere? The one you would snuggle up
to when times got hard, or when thunder erupted? Have you
ever wished it could come to life and be your best friend?
Sometimes, as John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) found, wishes
do come true.
John Bennett is a 46 year-old man who still hangs out
with his teddy. With few friends, John’s teddy-bear became
his greatest companion at school, and when he wished for it
to talk, his wish materialised. Now, Ted is still the focal point
of his life. However, during adulthood, John fnds that having
Ted as his devoted best friend is harder than anticipated.
After four years of dating, his relationship with Lori Collins
(Mila Kunis) is becoming serious, and Lori wants a man whom
she can rely on; not a boy with a teddy-bear. Balancing the
two soon becomes a mammoth task, and John must choose
whether to distance himself from Ted or risk losing the love of
his life. Either one will have a tragic consequence.
The hype surrounding Ted was certainly huge when it was
announced that it would be the feature-length directorial
debut from Seth MacFarlane (creator of Family Guy). Having
never taken a particular liking to the popular animated
comedy, I was not expecting to enjoy Ted, but I was pleasantly
surprised. Macfarlane’s one-liners are genius, especially
when it comes to the overweight brute who is obsessed with
Ted.
Much of the enjoyment, in my opinion, arises from the
concept. We all want a Ted of our own. To play games with as
a child or a partner to smoke Marijuana with as an adult. A
talking teddy-bear is everybody’s cup of tea. I, certainly, was
extremely nostalgic when the flm ended, reminiscing my
teddy-days. I had never wished more for a teddy as an adult
either.
Although this is likely to attract a predominant female
audience, I’m certain male viewers will come in their masses,
if not for anything else, but Mila Kunis. Kunis was a predictable
star for Ted: she is largely familiar with Macfarlane owing to
her long-term role as the voice of Meg Griffn in Family Guy. Yet,
such a role did not grace us with the pure radiance that she
exhibits. Kunis’ debut flm role was in the 2008 hit Forgetting
Sarah Marshall, in which she played the role of Rachel Jansen,
and we have since been bombarded with her beauty in flms
such as Black Swan and more recently, Friends with Benefts. Ted
is no different. Even I developed a slight girl crush.
In my view, Ted was an extremely original idea. When a
talking teddy-bear arises, we expect it to be in an animated
flm, yet the brilliance of Ted is that it combines both adult
comedy and childhood nostalgia – perfect. It is one of the
funniest flms I’ve seen in a while, and its success is entirely
justifed. Please, someone get me a Ted!
Film Review: Ted
By Candice Ritchie, Film Editor
Youngs Kitchen
Youngs Kitchen is inside the Students’ Union
building in The Living Room.

Youngs Kitchen is the perfect venue to eat,
relax and chat with your friends. Youngs Kitchen serves a wide
range of hot food from early morning till 5pm in the evening.
The range includes breakfasts, lunchtime meals and take aways
that are also suitable for vegetarians and several dishes are Halal
too. Please do ask our chefs for more details

Serving the fnest and freshest
Chinese, Japanese, Thai and Korean food
on campus and in Guildford.
MuSIC 30 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 music@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Music
A Session With: Scouting for Girls
I
t’s half past one on the typically
drizzly 29
th
of August – the
perfect time of year to release an
upbeat summer song dripping with
British irony. Thankfully, there is
a reprieve from the grey misery of
Guildford’s streets in the glittering,
thumping world of the ACM
building. Scouting for Girls have
been rehearsing at ACM’s purpose-
built music studios on this day,
ready for their BBC1 Live Lounge
with Fearne Cotton, which went on
air on the 30
th
of August. For this
performance they hand-picked ten
members of ACM’s Gospel Choir
(who famously came fourth in
BBC1’s Last Choir Standing in 2008)
to join them in a rendition of their
new single Summertime in the City,
as well as a soulful cover of Little
Mix’s Wings. After sitting in on their
performances, I caught up with the
band in a rare quiet moment.
The Stag: So you’re going to
be playing your new single
Summertime in the City on Radio
One’s Live Lounge, how does the
song compare to your other hit
singles, such as She’s So Lovely
and This Aint a Love Song?
Roy: We released this record
because it kind of reminded us of
She’s So Lovely, and we’d been away
for such a long time, especially
in pop music, you know our last
record was two years ago, so we
wanted to do something that was
big and fun and kind of represented
what we’d always been. It’s a big,
hooky, pop anthem.
TS: and the new album’s called
The Light Between Us, what are
your favourite songs from it?
Roy: My favourite track is the frst
song, which is called Without You,
which was the frst song we wrote
for this album. When we started
this we wanted to write a record
which was in the direction of She’s
So Lovely, a big pop song done by a
band, with a strings section, quite
emotive ballads and that sort
of thing, so that’s my favourite.
Pete: There’s Down Tempo as well
which is a great song with a great
story to it... I’m not going to tell
you, you have to buy the album.
Roy: They’re all hits! The beneft
of spending two years writing an
album is that the duff ones you
have a long time to live with, so
there aren’t any duds on there.
TS: You had fve different
producers on this album. Do you
think this infuences the end
product at all?
Roy: I think yeah, in the end for
the better. It was quite nice to take
us out of our comfort zone, and
we worked with some amazing
guys who have made amazing,
beautiful records, like the guys
who produced some of The Script’s
records like Break Even and The Man
Who Can’t Be Moved. We worked with
an amazing guy who produced
some of the records I loved when I
was getting into music, like Manic
Street Preachers’ A Design for Life.
We recorded with a guy who co-
wrote Shine for Take That, so we
basically tried to spend as much of
the record labels money to make a
great record.
TS: Is there a theme running
through the album?
Roy: Well The Light Between
Us is basically a metaphor for
relationships, either the start
or the end of a relationship, ‘the
light’ either being a gap between
people moving apart, or love and
passion. I’ve always found that a
creative place to write from. As
the album took so long to record,
you get this over-arching theme of
determination and perseverance
which runs through with the
relationship songs.
TS: How is your live show shaping
up for your tour after two years
away?
Pete: We’ve done quite a few
festivals this summer, so we’re not
completely out of practice, we’re
only a little bit rusty...
Greg: We’re not rusty at all! We’ve
been working so hard.Roy: We
were really out of practice, we got
loads of summer shows and we
realised, we got nominated for a
Brit for being best live band and we
really love playing live, so we sat
down at the beginning of summer
and just practised non-stop for
about a month. We’ve been doing
shows pretty much every weekend
this summer, and now I feel we’re
playing better that we’ve ever
played before.
Pete: That’s because of the choir
though...
TS: How would you describe your
live show in three words?
Greg: Non-stop fun.
TS: are there any songs which you
particularly enjoy performing
live?
Greg: They’re all great live.
Pete: You always enjoy playing the
new songs, but then She’s So Lovely
comes in at the end...
Roy: Even when you’ve been
playing songs for years, when that
song connects with the audience
and makes people laugh or smile or
cry, you fnd something new about
those songs. When you play the big
ones, I love playing This Ain’t a Love
Song, it’s always good fun. With our
show we say you don’t just come
and watch a Scouting for Girls show,
you try and take part, we treat the
audience like another member of
the band, and they’ve got to pull
their weight.
By Becky Worley, Music Editor
©
A
c
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The single Summertime
in the City and album The
Light Between Us are both
now available for purchase
and download. Scouting for
Girls are playing Shepherds’
Bush Empire on the 18
th

October, which is the closest
arena for fans in Guildford.
Roy wasn’t so sure about being serenaded with “She’s So Lovely”
MuSIC 31 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 Music Editor: Becky Worley | Copy Editor: Hannah Wann
T
he band that’s been on
everyone’s lips this summer
haven’t even released their frst
album. Pussy Riot, the female
Russian collective, have been
making waves for the past year.
The group are fercely anti-
Kremlin, and their songs aim to
call into question President Putin’s
tyrannical and authoritarian
leadership style. Three members
of the band were sentenced to two
years in prison by a Moscow court
on 17th August this year, for staging
their song ‘Punk Prayer’ in the
Christ Saviour Church Cathedral.
‘Punk Prayer’ calls on the Virgin
Mary to remove Putin from Russia.
The band were accused of inciting
religious hatred, however they
state that rather than committing
an act of hooliganism, they were
simply staging a political protest.
Musicians around the world seem
to agree, with artists from Paul
McCartney to Madonna coming out
in support of Pussy Riot. Peaches,
fellow outspoken artist, wrote a
song in the lead up to Pussy Riot’s
trial this year entitled ‘Free Pussy
Riot’ in the same punk style of
the band themselves. Yekaterina
Samutsevich, a member of the
band, stated that, despite their
sentence, they have won as “the
whole world now sees that the
criminal case against us has been
fabricated... Once again, the world
sees Russia differently than the
way Putin tries to present it”.
Reading 2012: The
Epitome of the Great
British Festival
I
f you managed to be able to
hear the music over cries for
“Alan!”, Reading Festival had a
lot to offer over the August bank
holiday weekend. From Crawley-
based legends The Cure’s return
to rock, to a rumoured secret
appearance from Green Day,
Reading has been one of the most
talked about festivals of the year,
yet, somehow, it managed to live
up to its expectations effortlessly.
One of the most unique,
and arguably the best, things
about Reading is not only the
wide variety of genres it covers
– from hip-hop sensation Odd
Future to metalcore Bullet For
My Valentine – but the variety
of new and old bands on offer.
This year was no exception,
with bands such as Foo Fighters
(unsurprisingly with over a
decade’s worth of music) pulling
in an enormous crowd with their
infectious guitar riffs, loveable
frontman and freworks displays,
causing even the security guards
to get on peoples’ shoulders and
dance. However, the festival also
gives new bands on the scene
their chance to shine via the
BBC Introducing Stage, which
does exactly what it says on the
tin; promotes new bands to wide
crowds, encouraging people to
watch that space.
A highlight for many this year
seemed to be found in the place
you would almost expect it least;
12pm on a Sunday afternoon at
the NME tent. Despite the hugely
popular bands and comedians on
offer during the weekend - such
as Kaiser Chiefs, The Vaccines
and Stephen K Amos - many
woke up early that day (for the
average festival goer, at least)
in order to see Icelandic indie-
folk band Of Monsters and Men.
The band managed to pack the
NME tent with their supporters,
along with people who heard
their music and focked inside to
see them, leaving many to watch
the screens outside. This was a
clearly moving moment for both
the band and their fans, with
hundreds singing along.
Over the weekend we saw
people racing from their tents
to see Green Day, Florence from
Florence and the Machine kicking
off her shoes in the middle of the
rain and people whipping off
their tops for You Me At Six; it
was a truly spectacular weekend,
one which left many reeling for
Reading 2013.
By Laura Stoker, Music Team
Interested in Music journalism?
If you love listening out for new music, are passionate
about a certain artist or you just love to get your
opinion heard, you could become a member of the
music team for The Stag. If interested, please don’t
hesitate to contant me at music@thestagsurrey.
co.uk with questions, ideas and articles.
N
orway’s Leprous have
emerged from deep within the
Scandinavian underground with a
veritable tour de force of what can
only be called ‘poprockjazzprog’.
Where their debut album Tall Poppy
Syndrome was merely a note in the
margin of heavy metal, Bilateral
transcends it – and everything else
– in every way, bringing the far-out
into the mainstream.
Album opener and title track
Bilateral explodes out of the
speakers with a riff-laden rock
extravaganza, before Forced Entry
introduces us to Leprous’ prog
tendencies, with its eerie drum
tattoo and tight guitar rhythms.
Even this early in the album, it is
diffcult to understate how deft the
band’s craftmanship is, going from
heavy anthem to laid-back groove
and back again without so much
as blinking. Every player fexes his
musical muscles. Nothing is out of
place; everything fts perfectly.
Restless again shows the band’s
exceptional versatility, with its
twinkly opening giving way to a
pounding, almost discotheque,
chorus. Singer Einar Solberg can
be almost suave in the smoothness
of delivery one moment, but
then suddenly imbue the already
powerful instruments with such
energy that you think your record
player might take off.
It is Thorn where you can see
where some of this sheen comes
from, featuring backing vocals by
none other than producer Ihsahn,
whose musical pedigree could
hardly be more stellar. It is good to
see however that this track is only
one among many equals on this
album. This band knows how to
write songs!
The sheer depth of expression
across Bilateral is reminiscent
of great bands like Pink Floyd,
foating through the ethereal
(Mb. Differentia) to the dense and
suffocating (Waste of Air).
Bilateral belongs on the same
shelf as Dark Side of the Moon,
Thriller, Master of Puppets and Electric
Ladyland.
Simply put, Leprous is the best
band you have never heard of and
Bilateral is the best rock/pop/metal
album of the last ten years. Your
devoted scribe put off this review
by many months just to be sure.
By Jack White, Music Team
Album Review: Bilateral by Leprous
Pussy Riot: Putin’s Prisoners
By Alexandra Wilks, Editor
©
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MuSIC 32 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 music@thestagsurrey.co.uk
O
ne thing that I’ve learned since
being at University is that
opportunities will never fall at
your feet - it’s up to you to go out
and fnd them. That’s exactly what
I did with Radio 1’s Superstar DJ
Talent Search this year, and it sure
as hell paid off.
Anyone that knows me knows
how obsessed I am with Twitter, and
I can’t begin to praise it enough.
Since I’ve been DJing, I’d say about
80% of my work and competition
entries have been as a result of
knowing my way around social
networking. The Talent Search
was brought to my attention via
the Twitter account of DJ Danny
Howard (the winner of the 2011
search). I initially brushed it off
as it clashed with a long-planned
trip away, but after a push from
my housemate, Liam (who is also
involved in the radio industry), I
decided to give it a shot.
Entering was simple. You had
to upload a 60-second video to
Youtube/Vimeo, answering the
questions: ‘If you win the talent
search, what three tracks would
you open with at our Radio 1 parties
in Ibiza?’, ‘what do you love about
Ibiza?’ and fnally, ‘why should
we pick you?’. I made my video
as quickly as I could, and began
posting it all over my Facebook
and Twitter accounts, enlisting the
help of all my friends at Surrey,
GU2 Radio and my hometown,
Portsmouth. I built up hundreds of
video views, as well as many ‘likes’
on the video - enough to draw the
attention of Radio 1. I remember
the moment I found out; I’d just
fnished a mission of a shift in
Channies and was eating my dinner
when I got the call.
‘Hello, I’m calling from Radio 1.
Do you have any idea why I might
be calling?’
I pretty much screamed and did
a lap of honour around the outside
of Channies. A few days later I was
on a train to London, along with the
fve others who were shortlisted.
The next few days were a total
blur of people and dream-like
experiences. The daily routine was
as follows:
6am: Wake up.
7.30am: Leave the hotel.
8am: Live chat on The Chris Moyles
Breakfast Show (where our daily DJ
challenge was set)
8.30am: Challenges begin.
10am-4pm: Live chat on either
Fearne Cotton or Scott Mills shows
about your day so far.
5pm: Live chat on the Greg James
show, with the reveal of who is
staying/going.
Day one involved a mixing
challenge, in front of MistaJam
(1Xtra), Danny Howard and the
assistant producer of Annie Mac/
Pete Tong’s shows. Six CDs, 60
tracks, 10 minutes to fnd out what
the tracks were and 10 minutes to
show off your mixing skills. I was
physically shaking and opened
with a few off-mixes, but thankfully
pulled it back in the fnal fve
minutes. On Greg James’s show, two
of the DJs were kicked off, leaving
myself, DJ Liam Hincks, DJ Elliott
Kay and DJ Hannah Jacques.
Day two was my favourite - a
remixing challenge. We were given
Example’s track ‘Stay Awake’, and
put in a room for an hour with
the In New DJs We Trust DJ, Jordan
Suckley, to make a 60-second taster
remix. Having coined the phrase
‘Bring The Bass’, I pretty much
delivered what I’d been promising.
I received some incredible feedback
from the guest judge of the day, DJ
Fresh, as well as Example himself
who said the track made him “do
a screwface”. Praise indeed. Again,
I was saved, and through into the
fnal three with Elliott and Hannah.
Day three was so much tougher
than it sounded. We were put in a
room with six members of Radio
1/1Xtra staff with a camera pointed
at us, given a sheet of stock phrases
to shout out, and a fve minute Ibiza
mix to MC along to. The phrases
were totally ridiculous, including:
‘I love meat’, ‘put your hands up if
you love your Nan’ and, for a bonus
point (from Moyles), you had to
shout ‘Greg James is a moron’.
I tried my best, but sadly my time
was up. The judge of the day, Charlie
Sloth, sent me home, narrowly
missing my place in the fnal. All in
all, it was an incredible experience.
I made some great contacts and
ever since my bookings have gone
through the roof. I’m most proud
of the fact that I got to promote
bass music on a Radio 1 breakfast
show with my ‘screwface’ remix
(which you can hear on the Radio
1 website!), as well as introducing
the genre ‘Moombahton’ to Chris
Moyles (even though he thought I
said ‘Moonpig.com’ and called me
‘Moonpig’ for the rest of my time at
Radio 1...). Like I said on-air when I
got knocked out of the competition,
this is literally just the beginning
for me. Having only been a DJ for
a year and a half this was the best
start I could have ever asked for.
If you’re into your bass music,
my next big set will be at Surrey
Student Union during Freshers’
Week in support of DnB giant
Netsky. I’d love all your support
and I can promise I’ll be dishing out
glowsticks before my set.
Surrey’s New Superstar DJ
By Lorna Salmon, Music Team
©
B
B
C
Surrey’s own Lorna Salmon demolished the competition to come third in Radio 1’s
Superstar DJ Talent Search.
Facebook:
www.facebook.com/fauxlo
Twitter: @Fauxlo_
Soundcloud:
www.soundcloud.com/fauxlo
T
his début single from Surrey’s
own Syrenica is a strangely
prog mix of symphonic metal and
post-Skrillex beats and bass. This
leads to what can only be described
as a mahoosive production –
overwhelming oceans of swirling
pads, strings and saturated guitars.
It’s really quite something for a
début.
Perhaps though if criticism
can be levelled, it comes from
this huge sound. The triggered
and compressed drums struggle
to really cut through the heavier
sections and in fact, the mix lacks
a certain amount of defnition
between instruments.
Syrenica’s three vocalists bring
a lot to the party, with a mixture
of the almost gothic metal and a
more affected, semi-rap style that
has gained a lot of popularity over
the last three years. While all three
singers are more than just good,
none are really belters and their
laid-back vocal lines also suffer
from the suffocating mix.
Hide is ultimately a true beast
of a frst single and it is clear that
the band is talented and driven.
It’s a worthy addition to your 2012
personal soundtrack. Syrenica
themselves look like a longer-term
prospect; Hide is a rough diamond
in a way, and this listener expects
better and sure that it is yet to
come.
Single Review:
Hide by
Syrenica
By Jack White, Music Team
Welcome Freshers and returners!
My name is Becky Worley and
I am the new music editor for
The Stag. I am a third and fnal
year studying English Literature
with Creative Writing. As well
as writing I enjoy listening to an
eclectic range of music by old and
new bands alike, and so this role
combines two of my passions.
Music has the power tomake
people laugh, cry, sing, dance
and take their own meanings
from someone else’s lyrics.
Opinion will always be divided
over which music is best, but I
would be hard pressed to fnd
anyone who doesn’t love and
connect with any kind of music
at all, so hopefully my section
will have something to interest
everyone somewhere along the
line. Thanks for reading!
Becky Worley
Music Editor
SOCIETIES 34 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 societies@thestagsurrey.co.uk
W
hat is the SIFE
society? We
are students from a variety of
subjects that aim to improve
the lives of people in need, both
nationally and internationally.
We do this by setting up
sustainable projects to empower
these people in the long term. To
see project examples go to our
new website: www.sifesurrey.org.
uk.
Why join?
1. Make a difference – positively
change people’s lives
2. Self-Development – develop
your existing skills and learn
new ones
3. Career Development – gain
experience for your CV and
receive exclusive training
from professionals
4. Fun! – build great friendships
through regular socials and
fundraising events
Be sure to get your tickets
for our UV party in Rubix on
Monday 15
th
October. We want to
see you there with as many glow
sticks and as much UV paint as
possible! Tickets are only £3 in
advance from the Union shop. All
the ticket money helps to fund
our projects.
Like our Facebook page
(ht tps://www. facebook. com/
SIFE.SurreyUK) and follow us on
Twitter @SifeSurrey.
Societies
SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise)
By Lewis Hobday and Abtahee Islam, SIFE
Hello beautiful readers,
I’m Shalini Thondrayen,
the new Societies Edi-
tor for The Stag. a brief
low-down about me: I’m currently going
into my third year as an English literature
with Creative Writing student, whilst doing
my second year as Marketing Director for
LitSoc. As you may have already fgured,
you are at ‘thee’ hotspot for societies’ news,
events and updates where I hope you will be
left feeling in the know, and thus ravenous
for more juicy information.
If you’re an aspiring writer/journalist and
are dying to be part of my section, well,
SOCIETIES NEEDS YOu! (Yes, I’m pointing at
you.) I’m a one (wo)man band at the pre-
sent, and it would be a delight if those will-
ing to get involved join, so we can hypothet-
ically become an orchestra and make sweet
music. Simply drop me an email!
F
or Em Bollon, Friday 30
th

March will be a day she always
remembers in her diary. Following
her enthusiastic campaigning for
weeks, that evening will surely
be remembered for the Sabbatical
Elections in Chancellors, which
saw her take the crown as Vice-
President for Societies. After two
months into the role and term-
time commencing, I bring you this
exclusive interview with your VP
Societies.
The Stag: How would you defne
your role?
Em Bollon: My role title is Vice-
President of Societies and
Individual Development in the
Students’ Union, but it’s so much
more than that! I oversee all 84 of
our current societies and act as
their point-of-contact to the Union.
I assist with volunteering and
training, as well as being part of a
team that organises cultural events
on campus!
TS: What made you decide to
campaign for the role of Surrey’s
VP Societies?
EB: A dream, actually! I was home
around Christmas-time when I
woke up from a nap and decided I
should run in the elections. Sounds
crazy, but what an experience!
I don’t for one minute regret it.
Being part of societies absolutely
made my time here at Surrey! This
VP role gives me the opportunity to
give something back, you know? It’s
my pleasure to help others set up a
society they feel passionate about,
and support committee members
who are impacting the lives of
students.
TS: To all the freshers arriving
this month, Freshers’ Fayre on
Friday 28th September is a great
opportunity to see what societies
the University of Surrey has to
offer. From your own experience,
why should they join a society?
Do you believe it enhances your
Surrey experience?
EB: I can’t express in words how it
makes your experience. The thing
is, it doesn’t have to be a society,
it could be a sports club, or some
volunteering. The SU provides so
many incredible opportunities.
Employers these days aren’t looking
for just a degree; they want a well-
rounded person who can take on a
leadership role, be part of a team
and show social skills.
TS: What three pieces of advice
do you have for freshers that are
afraid to join a society?
EB: Just go for it! Don’t let anything
hold you back – you’ll regret it.
University is the time when you can
take risks, you can make mistakes
and it’s all good – it’s all part of the
journey of you becoming you.
TS: What spanking new societies
are there to keep a look out for
this year?
EB: There are a few new societies
in the Union family, including
Baking, Barbershop, Culinary and
CRAFTSoc. You can fnd the full list
on the societies’ homepage at www.
ussu.co.uk.
The Stag interviews your
new Union VP Societies
By Shalini Thondrayen, Societies Editor
Shalini Thondrayen
Societies Editor

VOTED Best Arts
Society 2012!!

The University of Surrey Gospel Choir is for any-
one who wants to sing and have fun among a great
community of people!
Whether you’re a pro, or just want to give it a go,
come along and find out!
Never sung before? Never been in a gospel choir?
No worries, we still want to hear from you! To
learn more about our gospel choir and to sign up,
check us out at the Freshers’ Fayre or online and
join our Facebook group!
Be inspired!
http://www.facebook.com/gospelchoir
http://soundcloud.com/gospelchoir
http://youtube.com/surreyunigospelchoir
http://twitter.com/USSUGospelChoir
="den
Trial session on Monday 1st October!!
The Students’ Union’s new Vice President, Societies: Em Bollon
That was your VP
Societies, which you will
no doubt be hearing from
over the next few weeks.
She can be found in the
Union Offces (below
Rubix) Monday-Friday. You
can contact her at
ussu.societies@
surrey.ac.uk
she assures she’s more
than happy to help!
SOCIETIES 35 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 Societies Editor: Shalini Thondrayen | Copy Editor: Hannah Wann
B
y now, you
may have
heard Surrey has
its very own student radio
station: GU2. However, you
may not be aware just how
much GU2 could do for you.
Aside from flling your
days at University with
tonnes of great music and
chat, GU2’s news bulletins
make sure you stay up to
date with everything that’s
going on around campus.
Your student radio station
also offers you the chance
to win tickets to both
Citrus and Flirt!, with
competitions taking place
every week. GU2 is also
the only place that you can
get hold of tickets to union
events before they’ve even
gone on sale!
As well as all the
things that you gain just
by being a listener, GU2
could also provide great
work experience in a media
environment. Your student
radio station not only
provides DJ training, but
also offers you the chance
to DJ at events both on and
off campus. GU2 DJs have
had their tracks played
on Radio 1 and 1Xtra and
just this summer, a Surrey
student made the top three
in Radio 1’s DJ Superstar
competition!
The Benefits of Student Radio
By Sophie Smith, GU2
Barbershop Society – Surrey’s Newest Choir!
C
ommon advice to
freshers is to try
something new, join all
the societies you can and
have fun in your frst year
at university. Well, why not
join Barbershop Society,
which is a brand new
society to Surrey this year?
We’re looking for new
singers and socialites alike
to come along and take
part in our barbershop-
style choir. This society is
perfect for casual singers,
or people who want to
perform this classic style
of music.
We’re also hoping to
start up a few barbershop
arrangement workshops
and get hands-on with the
music, discovering what
makes barbershop music
so unique and beloved by
so many. So, whether you
want to sing, come along
to listen or arrange some
music yourself, there is
something here that might
spark your interest.
BarberSoc is new and
will continue to mould and
adapt throughout the year,
so we’re looking for new
members to get involved
and shape the society with
ideas, suggestions and
participation.
Email us for more
information:ussu.
barbersoc@surrey.ac.uk
By Aaron Douglas,
President of BarberSoc
W
e are the Surrey Video
Gaming Society; a
group of friendly, welcoming
and likeminded individuals
who have been brought
together by our love of video
gaming. Our main objective
as a society over the last year
is to become more inclusive
of a wider range of gaming
platforms. We have held
plenty of LAN parties for
PC gamers – hosting three
on-campus LAN parties last
year. Wii party night is for
more casual gamers and
there are also focused events
for our weekly meetings
(such as our Call of Duty
tournament).
We have also run
successful socials to
celebrate the beginning and
end of the year, an annual
trip to the Eurogamer expo
in London and a road trip to
large external LAN parties.
We always welcome new
members, with our weekly
meetings encouraging
people to share their
favourite video games
with us. Our hopes for
the upcoming year are to
introduce a gaming leader
board within the University,
to organise trips to local
games developers and to
organize large multiday LAN
parties. Weekly meetings
are 6-9pm on Thursday
evenings in the Living
Room, with a social usually
held afterwards in either
Chancellors or Roots Bar. All
are welcome, and we hope to
see you there!
Surrey Video Game Society
By James Dobberson
I
n the past couple of
years, MADSoc has raised
the roof with a plethora
of shows. From award-
winning pieces such as the
genre-breaking Not Another
Pantomime and The Princess
and the Pauper, to the sell-
out blockbuster musicals
Little Shop of Horrors, Nine
and How to Succeed in
Business Without Really
Trying, there’s something
for everyone, regardless of
your experience or interest
in drama.
MADSoc also offers
fantastic weekly get-
togethers, in the form
of its Tuesday night
Drama Workshops. Led by
members of the committee,
and sometimes guest
teachers from the National
and Soho theatres, it’s
a great opportunity to
meet new and old friends
before heading for a drink.
Wednesday gives us the
Musical Workshops, led by
our own Musical Director,
which offer the chance
to hone musical skills
in a chilled atmosphere.
Regardless of your
previous experience, these
workshops make stars out
of newbies and are the
best thing for someone
who’s never done musical
theatre. We also throw in
some of the biggest and
most diverse social events
from bar crawls to theatre
trips, that pretty much
sorts out your whole week!
Whether you want to
practice stand up, write
scripts and sketches,
dance, sing or act, there’s
something to get involved
in. With a bunch of new
and returning faces,
you can fnd us at the
Freshers’ Fayre, or in TB18
at 6.30pm on Tuesdays and
Wednesdays!
By Laurence Williams
Got performance in the
heart? Join M.A.D Soc
I
f there’s any society to join
this year, make sure that
that society is Litsoc. We’d like
to present to you the offcial
society for English Literature
students. But hey, even if you’re
not one, we’re here with open
arms to welcome all those from
different departmental groups
too!
The committee has
worked hard to overcome the
reputation of being a small
Literature students-only-
group. By undergoing a whole
change of image last year,
Litsoc have made it their aim to
become one of the most active
societies across the whole
university.
Last year we witnessed
monumental coalitions with
other societies to host some
hugely successful events.
From this, we were clearly
recognised by the SU as we were
nominated and shortlisted for
‘Best Departmental Society’
and ‘Most Improved Society’ in
the Society Awards.
This year is destined to be
bigger and better than ever.
We have a fantastic variety of
events in-store, kicking off with
our legendary Litsoc ‘Quote
Crawl’ this semester. Be sure
to come and say hello over at
our stall during the Freshers’
Fayre. Our weekly meetings are
in the English common room on
Wednesdays at 1pm.
By Kristie Marchant
Spread the
Litsoc Love!
Musical Theatre Society
M
usical Theatre
Society is all about
providing students with
the opportunity to get
involved in high quality
musicals, showcases and
concerts. Whether you’re
a performer or not, if you
are interested in Musical
Theatre, our society will
have something for you!
We offer the
opportunity to act, sing
and dance in a large-
scale musical, as well
as showcases and our
upcoming Arts Evening.
We also offer the
development of skills such
as stage management,
set design, directing,
choreographing and
being the Musical
Director.
Following the
successes of RENT and
Guys and Dolls, and
claiming both the Society
of the Year 2011 award and
the Society Gold Award
2012 this year promises
to be bigger still. We are
doing a production of
Songs for a New World soon
and are also taking part
in a mixed society Arts
Evening. Our big musical
this year will be ‘Fame’
and everyone is welcome
to get involved.
We hope to see you
very soon!
ByJeni Brazier, Secretary of MTSoc
You can join our
Societies page at:
www.surreyvideogaming.
co.uk
To fnd out more, email
manager@gu2.co.uk
or come and see us at
the Freshers’ Fayre.
SPORT 37 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 Sport Editor: anna Giles | Copy Editor: Tessa Morgan
W
ith American football being
accepted into BUCS this year
after running an independent
league for the past 10 years, we
decided to fnd out more about
the sport by interviewing Surrey
Stingers President, Ben Tubbs.
The Stag: So Ben, what experience
did you have of American football
before you joined the team?
Ben Tubbs: I had no experience
before joining the team! I didn’t
play much contact sport during
school, and I had only watched the
odd Superbowl on TV! But the idea
of trying something completely
new at uni seemed like a great idea,
and now I love it!
TS: Isn’t all the equipment
expensive though? How much
does it cost?
BT: The Union is brilliant to us and
have given us the money to buy the
kit, so the club lends it to you for
the duration you are in the team!
TS: So what made you join the
team?
BT: I wanted to try something new,
and I had heard some brilliant
things about the team socials and
wanted to give it a go!
TS: Sounds good, do you have
your own coaches or do you
coach yourselves?
BT: We have one of the strongest
coaching staff in the country,
including individuals who have
played/coached at the highest level
in the UK, Europe and Collegiate
level in the USA.
TS: What league do you play in?
BS: We are an offcial BUCS sport
and play in a national league of
over 60 university teams. There
is also the opportunity to try out
for the GB Student National Team
who have a number of European
friendlies this year, including a trip
to Sweden.
TS: So why do you think freshers
should join the Stingers?
BS: American football is a great
way to make friends and have a
good time at uni whilst staying in
shape. University is one of the best
times to try a new sport and is also
one of the best avenues to get into
American football in the UK. We
have strong, experienced coaching
staff who are very patient and
welcoming to beginners.
TS: How do you join the team and
what do I need to join up? Is it
expensive?
BS: You can contact the team at
m00035@surrey.ac.uk for more
details and with any questions
you may have. Be sure to fnd us at
Freshers’ Fayre and Active Freshers
as well! Our ‘Rookie Sunday’ takes
place on Sunday 30
th
of September at
the world class Surrey Sports Park.
Registration is at 11.45am in the
reception with a 1pm start on our
game feld. All you need is a sports
kit and a pair of boots or trainers
and it’s free to try out! Also fnd us
on Facebook by searching “Surrey
Stingers American Football.”
Equestrian
F
ancy following in the footsteps
of Zara Phillips? From dressage
and showjumping, to cross country
and happy hacking, horse riding is
one of the most rewarding sports
you will ever try. Whether you’re
an experienced competitor or a
complete beginner, the University
of Surrey Equestrian Club is here
to provide a fun and friendly
environment for fellow horsey
people! Join us on Wednesdays
for riding lessons at Silvermere
Equestrian Centre where you can
take part in lessons suiting your
own ability. For more information
email ussu.equestrian@surrey.
ac.uk or fnd us on Facebook: Uni of
Surrey Equestrian.
American Football: the newest
addition to the BUCS league
By Will Anderson, Sports Team
By Rachel Thomason, Treasurer
Women’s Rugby
F
orget what you’ve heard or
you think you know about
the sport! We’re not scary at
all! This season we have lots of
opportunities to get involved
whether you are a seasoned pro
or have never picked up a ball
before.
Our frst six weeks will
have sessions run by the RFU
specifcally for girls brand new to
the sport to get you ready to start
playing some matches against
other Uni’s in the same position.
Look out for us at Freshers’ Fayre
and Active Freshers’ and come
and have a go!
Our social side is just as
exciting! We’re often found in
Roots Bar (the home of the Rugby
Club) on Wednesdays nights
before heading to the Union and
we LOVE fancy dress!Keep your
eyes open for our Freshers’ Special
Social on Weds 3rd October!
By Jordan Thomson, Chairlady
as the new Sport Editor, I will keep
you up to date with the sports news
from in and around the University.
My own involvement with sport at
Surrey started when I joined the
tennis club last year as a fresher,
and I’ve since been elected captain
of the Ladies’ First Team. This frst
issue gives a small insight into the
wide range of sports clubs on offer.
With the stunning Surrey Sports
Park down the road, and it being
the year of the london Olympics,
you really have no excuse.
Anna Giles
Sport Editor
2
011/12 was a year of
great success for USRFC,
with our unbeaten 1st team
being shortlisted for British
Universities Sports Team of the
Year and our 2nd team enjoying
their highest league fnish for
many seasons! However, last year
was just the beginning!
We offer rugby for all
abilities and accept all players
regardless of experience, from
complete beginners (in our
brand new development squad)
to international players! With
three men’s team and a women’s
team too there is something for
everyone! We also offer one of the
liveliest social scenes on campus,
with well attended socials every
week. How many more reasons do
you need to join?
Facebook: University of Surrey Men’s
Rugby- Freshers 2012/13
Twitter: @teamsurreyrugby
Men’s Rugby
By Joseph Winstanley
Last year’s A Team home competition
©
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SPORT 38 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 sport@thestagsurrey.co.uk
H
one your footballing skills,
keep ft, have a laugh, have a
drink (or a few). Sound like fun?
Then why not come along to the
University of Surrey Women’s
Football Club? Twice-weekly
training sessions at Surrey Sports
Park, competition in the BUCS
football league and cup matches,
and brilliant regular socials bring
all the girls on the team together.
Whether you’ve been playing for
years or are a complete beginner,
we have a place for you and you’ll
be hugely welcome. We guarantee
you a lot of fun, some great friends
and most likely a new nickname!
Women’s Football
I
f you love skiing and
snowboarding or you’ve always
fancied giving it a go, welcome
to the club! 2012-2013 is shaping
up to be the biggest and the best
year of snowy shenanigans EVER.
We offer a little something for
everyone over here- Racing for
those with the need for speed,
Freestyle for those who love to
do the odd back fip or two, and
of course, Beginner Lessons:
perfectly tailored for those who
want to fnd their feet in the
snow and make some new friends
while they’re at it! And, of course,
we have WhiteOut- our biggest
and best bar crawl, designed
perfectly to suit those who just
want to have fun. We’ll be eagerly
awaiting your arrival at Freshers’
Fayre and Active Freshers… So
what are you waiting for?!
Check us out on facebook
for all the updates:http://www.
facebook.com/SurreySnow
And visit our brand new
website: www.surreysnowsports.
com
And of course, if any of the
above appeals to you give us a
holler: tilly@surreysnowsports.
com
Snowsports
O
ne year ago, the University of Surrey Boat Club took a batch of
completely new rowers, all looking for a new experience they could
share with a group of great people. These freshers got everything they
wanted and more! They are now at peak physical ftness and have
been tremendously successful, coming 1st or reaching fnals in both
regional and national regattas. The club has also reached new heights,
ranking 13th in the British University and Colleges Sport medal table
for rowing. If you want to be a part of something big, the time to join
is now.
Boat Club
T
he University of Surrey
Basketball Club invites you
to come and shoot some hoops
with us.
We are looking to take the
BUCS league by storm in both
the men and women’s leagues
with regular training and
competitive matches!
Looking to join the team?
Come to trials….
Looking to play for fun?
Come to the jam session… All
Welcome!
Have any questions or just
want to give it a go? Come see
us at Freshers’ Fayre or the
Active Freshers’ Fayre. Find us
on facebook @ surreyunibball
Basketball
By Matilda Tasker
By Louie Over, Basketball President
Climbing
C
limbing, trips, pub, fun,
camping, drinking, friendship,
wacky traditions..... just 8
things the University of Surrey
Mountaineering Club (USMC) can
offer you. Sound good? Then the
USMC would love for you to check
us out at Freshers’ Fayre. Whether
you're a hardened climber or have
a fear of heights, all are welcome-
many people join us as novices
and by Easter are climbing cliffs
70m above the sea. As well as up a
mountain, we can often be found in
the pub.
Visit the club webpage to fnd
out about us and sign up to the
forum for updates on: FRESHERS’
PUB CRAWL AND FRESHERS’
CLIMBING TRIP.
www.surreyclimbs.co.uk
C
alling all netballers! Want to
be part of the ‘Best Club’ and
“Most Improved Club’ 2011/12?
With 4 teams in BUCS and
promotions last year, Surrey’s
netball is progressing thanks
to expert coaching by England
and Surrey Storm player Tamsin
Greenway. Trials will be held on 1st
October at SSP, so turn up and have
a go!
However, if that doesn’t take
your fancy, why not just enjoy
playing the game? Social netball
happens weekly and there is the
option of friendly matches and
tournaments throughout the year.
Its a great way to meet friends
and welcome to any ability, what
more could you want?
Visit our facebook page for
more information www.facebook.
com/univesityofsurreynetball or
Twitter @USSUNetball
Netball
Check us out at
www.ussu.co.uk/ClubsSocieties/
Sport/womensfootball
and fnd us on Facebook!
Mens Team Trials – Monday 1st
October 8:30-10:30pm arena a
womens Team Trials – friday 5th
October 6-8pm arena a
friday Night 8-10pm
S
urrey University Jitsu is
a friendly and inclusive
club whose focus is to use an
assailant’s own energy and force
against them. This is achieved
through a system of joint locks,
throws and strikes. Jitsu is
enjoyed and learnt by men and
women of all shapes and sizes,
the skills it teaches can be used
in a wide variety of situations
from unwanted harassment to
armed assaults and everything
inbetween. While emphasis is
placed on protecting yourself
in the real world we also offer
opportunities for competition
with our National and Varsity
events. We are a welcoming
club and organise regular and
varied social events.
Please see: www.surreyjitsu.
co.uk for more information
Training times are:
Jitsu
Surrey Snowsports at their beginner session this time last year.
By Fabienne V. Dörnberg
By Tom Hopkins
By Scott Sellars
Monday 20:45-22:30
&
wed 20:00-22:00
By Richard Nash
SPORT 40 The Stag | 22
nd
September 2012 sport@thestagsurrey.co.uk
T
his summer it has been almost
impossible to escape sport,
with the constant live coverage
from the BBC, thousands of tickets
on sale and big screens all over
the place, there’s no doubt it was
a success. It was not only the
unbelievable results of Team GB’s
athletes that made the games such
an achievement for London, but
the commitment and support from
the public and workforce behind
the scenes. I was lucky enough to
volunteer for the Olympic games
and the question everyone asked
was ‘why?’ My answer was always
‘why not’. But as I found out,
everyone had a different answer,
people had used up all 3 weeks
of their annual leave to give up
their time, some a passion for
volunteering, some hoping for a
sneak peek into the worlds best
sporting event and some just for
the free uniform!
But one thing I took from my
time at the Park - as cheesy as it
may be - is that it really did inspire
a generation. People who had never
watched live sport before were
coming out with smiles on their
faces and a huge GB fag and t-shirt,
kids with no idea really of what
they were watching but head to toe
in red, white and blue cheering.
But most of all the people who had
turned up to watch a sport because
‘it was the only one they could get
a ticket for’ who came out wanting
to try it themselves - especially
Handball!
For some of you competitive
sport may have always been your
interest, others will have loved
being the spectator, while some
will never have been involved in
sport. So now really is the time to
feel inspired by sport! We have 44
sports clubs for you to choose from
- look out for them at Freshers’
Fayre, so make the most of it and
sign up! If you’re not sure what
takes your fancy or want to try
something new come along to
Active Freshers Fayre at Surrey
Sports Park on Saturday 29th
September where you can try all
of our sports for free! We also have
some great social sports for friendly
non-committment introduction to
sports and we have Team Surrey
Sports Ambassadors - a great way
to volunteer in sports and maybe
for you to inspire others.
There are some great
opportunities at The University of
Surrey so why not make the most
of it!
My name’s Arabella and I’m
here to represent you in all aspects
of sport at your Student Union. If
you have any questions about sport
at Surrey please email me at: ussu.
sports@surrey.ac.uk or visit the
union website.
Sport
W
e all saw Andy Murray’s
fantastic triumph in the
Olympics this summer didn’t we?
Of course we did! If that’s got you in
the tennis mood, come and join the
University of Surrey Tennis Club!
We pride ourselves on many things;
strong BUCS performances, an
exciting social side, and providing
a great tennis experience for all
levels; so whether you’rea future
Wimbledon champion, or have
never picked up a tennis racket
before, we will have a place for you!
We’re one of the friendliest clubs
here at the university, and we look
forward to getting to know you
all this upcoming year! So come
and fnd us at Freshers’ Fayre and
Active Freshers’ Fayre, and see
what Tennis can give you this year!
By Arabella Gilby, Sports Team
Inspire a Generation
Tennis
By Owen Davis
H
i, my name is Jordan
and I’m your new Sports
Executive Chair. I work closely
with Arabella (our VP Sport and
Recreation), managing a team
of elected students collectively
know as the Sports Executive
Committee. This year our team is
made up of Hannah Waterhouse
(SE Secretary), Jenny Cusselle
(SE Club Development), Georgie
Smith (SE Events and Recreation)
and Dan Jacobs (SE Coaching
and Volunteering). Together we
are responsible for supporting
all sports clubs and ensuring
effective representation at higher
levels.
Another part of my job is to run
a monthly meeting called Sports
Standing which has a least one
representative from each sports
club in attendance. This meeting
is a very important platform for
us to communicate to the sports
clubs but more importantly for
representatives to ask questions
and vote on decisions. Anyone is
welcome to attend this meeting.
It is not limited to committee
members or just club members!
Our frst Sport Standing of
the year will be on Tuesday 9th
October at 6pm (Location TBC).
Here we will be electing the
two remaining positions on the
Sports Executive Committte;
SE communications and SE
Management.
Meet Jordan, your new
Sports Executive Chair
Jordan Thomson
Sports Executive Chair
T
he University of Surrey Canoe
Club offers many disciplines of
the sport. Our main focus is white
water kayaking (seen in the photo)
for which we organise monthly
trips across the country, with the
possibility of an Alpine adventure
in the summer. We also participate
in Canoe Polo, a challenging sport.
New to the 2012 academic year
we are offering Kayak Slalom- the
aspect that you saw during the
Olympics where we won both Gold
and Silver. Check us out on the
USSU sports page and like us on
Facebook to fnd out more!
Canoeing
H
ello and welcome to
Surrey University Surf and
Wakeboard Club! Every month
we run a trip for around 40
like-minded students, down to
England’s surf capital Newquay
for a weekend of surftastic
adventure. The main goal of
the weekend is to meet some
wicked people, learn some basic
surfng and sample the very
tasty Newquay nightlife. For
wake boarding, we run day trips
to several different clubs around
Guildford to teach groups of
around 15 people the joys of
being towed around a lake with
your feet strapped onto a piece of
2 x 4. Make sure you come along
next time!
Much love, your friendly surf
& Wake Committee.
Surf and Wakeboarding
By Stuart Skeldon
By Harriet Oliver
Interested in Sport?
whether you live and breathe Team Surrey or you’re more of an armchair sportsman Te
Stag needs you. If you love Sports and want to talk about it get in touch with anna at sport@
thestagsurrey.co.uk to fnd out what kind of oppurtunities there are for Sports journalists!

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