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Table of Contents Page No.

Table of contents Message from the Vice Chancellor Officers of the University Members of the University Council Members of University Senate A Brief History Faculty of Science Department of Computer Science Department of Biological Sciences Department of Sugar Technology Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry Department of Physics Department of Mathematics Faculty of Engineering Department of Production Engineering Department of Civil and Structural Engineering Department of Electrical and 1 2 3 3 4 7 8 8 17 31 42 48 56 68 68 74

Communication Engineering Faculty of Education and Social Sciences


Department of Language and Literature Education

77 81
93

Department of Journalism and Mass Communication Department of Criminology and Social Work Department of Science and Mathematics Education Department of Educational Planning & Management Department of Curriculum & Instructional Technology Department of Educational Psychology Department of Social Science Education Department of Educational Foundations School of Health Sciences Department of Nursing The Centre for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (CDMHA) School of Open Learning and Continuing Education (SOLACE) School of Graduate Studies (SGS The University Library Student Welfare Services Games and Sports Medical Services Offered Staff List

121 123 125 140 152 155 158 167 173 197 220 231 232 233 233 233 235

Department of Business Management

102

Message from the Vice Chancellor Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) is a university of Choice for those wishing to undertake university education. The institution is located along Kakamega-Webuye road on the Eastern outskirt of Kakamega town. It is easily accessible to any visitor wishing to pay a visit. Feel free to visit us and give us your views. We shall appreciate any comment made for improvement. MMUST appreciates the role of science and technology in the development of a country in the 21st century and through it vision and mission has striven to create a university that is responsive to the needs of the Kenyan community. Our vision at MMUST is to be a center of excellence in Science and technology and our mission is to generate, preserve and disseminate knowledge through research, teaching and innovation. In view of the vision and mission above, the academic spirit that we want to create at MMUST is the spirit of commitment to intellectual pursuit, devotion of our energy to research and teaching and to encourage practical approach to the solutions of problems in our local and national community. In other words, MMUST in her growth is avoiding the easy option of copying from the older Universities. She is evolving her own Philosophy and ethics. She is striving to be a leader in her own right in research publication and service to the local, national and international community.

We are grateful to the Government and the Public for providing the facilities we enjoy now. This makes our responsibility to our local community and the nation even greater. As the government strives to develop more facilities we shall strive to use these facilities in the most efficient and effective way possible for the benefit of the nation. To the students who wish to join MMUST, we provide the best scientific and technological knowledge. By joining us, your career choice will have been made and you will never be in doubt again. Other than academic work, you will enjoy other services such as counseling, medical, sports and games and recreational tours to the only remaining Equatorial forest in East Africa. I thank you for taking time to look at our prospectus. I am sure it will answer most of the questions you might have about MMUST and our academic programmes.

PROF. B. C. C WANGILA, Ph.D. VICE CHANCELLOR

Officers of the University: Chancellor H.E., Hon. Mwai Kibaki, C.G.H., M.P., B.A.(Makerere), B.Sc. (London), D.Sc. (Hon) (Eng.)(JKUAT), DLitt, LLD (Nairobi) DSc. (HR Devt) (MMUST), D. Ed. (Kenyatta) President and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Kenya Vice Chancellor Prof. B.C.C. Wangila,EBS, Dip. Ed. (Kenyatta), Dip. Aqua (ARAC), B.Sc.(Nairobi),M.Tech.(RSUST), Ph.D.(Manitoba) Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic Affairs) Prof. A. J. Sigot, B.Sc.,(Central Missouri State), Ph.D.(Kenyatta) Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration and Finance) Prof. S. K. Makhanu, B.Sc, ., (Nairobi), Cert. Jap.L (Osaka), Cert. Dis. Prep. (US Central Command), Ph.D.(Kyoto), MIEK, R. Eng. Deputy Vice Chancellor (Planning, Research and Extension)Prof. J.O. Shiundu, B.Ed., M.Ed.(Nairobi), Ph.D.(Mc Gill) Registrar (Academic Affairs) J. W.S. Mabonga, B.Ed, M.A. (Nairobi) Registrar (Administration) R.C. Atamba, B.A.(Nairobi), MBA (Egerton) Registrar (Planning, Research & Extension) O. Odhiambo, B.A.(Nairobi), PGD-HRM(UMI) Finance Officer O.Waluvengo, BBM.(Moi), MBA (Maseno), C.C.A., C.P.A.(K) Dean of Students Rev. L.E.A. Omwoha B.Ed.(Nairobi), M.Sc HRM.(Manchester) University Librarian G.G.Shibanda, A.L.A., (University of Central England), Dip.Info. Sc., M.L.S. (Loughborough), Advanced Cert. Inf. Sc. (Wales, Aberyst wyth), FLA (CILIP, UK), MKLA Members of University Council Chairman Prof. Douglas Odhiambo, EBS, Dip. Ed. (E.A), B.Sc. (Bristol), Ph.D. (London), LL.D. (Hons) (Bristol), D.Sc. (Hons) (Moi) Vice Chairman Arch. A.C.M. Simu, B.A. Arch., M.Arch (Nairobi), F.A.A.K. Hon.Treasurer Mr. J.N. Kesa, B.A. (Dar-esSalaam), . M.Sc.Econ. (London) Members Vice Chancellor: Prof. B.C.C. Wangila,EBS, Dip. Ed.(Kenyatta, B.Sc.(Nairobi), ), Dip. Aqua (ARAC)M.Tech.(RSUST), Ph.D.(Manitoba) 3

QS. J. N. Nyambane, B.A. (B.E) (Nairobi), M.A.A.K QS, RQS, ACI Arb, IQSK. Mrs Lucy M. Kambuni, LLB, LLM (Nairobi) Mrs Beatrice M. Soy, B.Ed, (Nairobi), M.Ed (Manchester) Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Higher Education, Science & Technology Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Finance Permanent Secretary, Ministry of State for Public Service Secretary, Commission for Higher Education Secretary R.C. Atamba, B.A.(Nairobi), MBA (Egerton) Co-opted Members Prof. F.A. Karani, B.A.(E.A), PGDE, M.A (Nairobi), Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) Mr. J. Mukavale, LLB (Nairobi), Dip. (Kenya School of Law) Two Senate Representatives Prof. A. M. Simiyu, B.Ed.(Nairobi), .M.Ed.., Ph.D.(State Univ. of New York) Dr.J.S.K.Achoka,B.Ed.(Nairobi),M.A.(McGill), PhD.(Kenyatta) UASU Representative Ms Susan Choge B.Ed., M.Phil.(Moi) KUDHEIHA, Representative: Mr. E.Kabaji,Trade Test (Directorate of Industrial Training) UNTESU Representative: Mr. F. Cheminingwa, B.Sc (Kenyatta) ALUMNI Representative: Mr. J. Kimutai, B.Ed (Moi) Two Students' Representatives: Mr. David Maloba Ms. Abby M.Wesonga Ex-Officio Members Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic Affairs)Prof. A. J. Sigot, B.Sc., .(Central Missouri State), Ph.D.(Kenyatta) Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration and Finance) Prof. S. K. Makhanu, B.Sc, ., (Nairobi), Cert. Jap.L (Osaka), Cert. Dis. Prep. (US Central Command), Ph.D.(Kyoto), MIEK, R. Eng. Deputy Vice Chancellor (Planning, Research and Extension) Prof.J.O.Shiundu, B.Ed., M.Ed.(Nairobi), Ph.D. (McGill)

Members of the University Senate Chancellors Office Vice Chancellor/Chairman Prof. B.C.C Wangila, Dip. Ed. (KU), Dip Aqua (ARC), B.Sc (UoN), M.Tech. (RSUST), PhD, (Manitoba). Academic Division Deputy Vice Chancellor (AA) Prof. A.J. Sigot, B.Sc., M.Sc.(Central Missouri State University), Ph.D. (KU) Registrar (AA) Secretary J.W.S. Mabonga, B.Ed, M.A. (UoN). Administration and Finance Division Deputy Vice Chancellor (A&F) Prof: S.K. Makhanu, B.Sc., M.Sc. (UoN), Cert.Jap.L (Osaka),Cert.Dis.Prep.(US Central Command),Ph.D (Kyoto),MIEK,R.Eng. Registrar (Administration) Ms. R. C. Atamba, B.A. (UoN), MBA.(Egerton). Finance Officer Mr. O. Waluvengo, C.P.A.(K), BBM (Moi), MBA (Maseno) Planning Research and Extension Deputy Vice Chancellor (P,R&E) Prof.J.O.Shiundu,B.Ed.,M.Ed.(UoN), Ph.D.(McGill) Registrar (PR&E) Mr.O. Odhiambo B.A. (UoN), PGD-HRM (UMI) Faculty of Education and Social Sciences Dean of Faculty Prof. A.M. Simiyu, B.Ed (UoN), Ed.M.,Ph.D.,(State Univ.of New York) Chairman, Department of Business Management Thuo,K.J., B.Com (UoN), MBA (UoN), PGDipM (CIM), CPA (K), CPS (K) Chairman, Department of Curriculum and Instructional Technology Dr. S.N. Mutsotso, B.Ed.,(Moi),Dip.PR &BE,MPhil.,DPhil.(Moi) Chairman, Department of Educational Foundations Mr. J.W. Nasongo, B.Ed, M.Ed (KU) Chairman, Department of Educational Psychology Dr.S.N. Maragia, B.A. Psy, M. A Psy, M. Phil, P.G, Dip. CCP and HRD,Ph.D. (MSU, Baroda)

Chairman, Department of Educational Planning and Management: Dr. Z.W.M.Sisungo Dip. Ed (ANU-Canbera), B.Ed. (Wales)), Ph.D. (Egerton) Chairman, Department of Social Science Education Prof.(Fr.) J.Njino, Dip.Phil.,Dip.Theo., (St.Thomas Acquinas), Dip.,B.A.,M.A., PhD.(Pontifical Urbanian Univ.) Chairman, Department of Language and Literature Education Dr.B.J.O.Mbori,B.Ed.,MPhil.(Moi), PhD.(UNISA) Chairman, Department of Science and Mathematics Education Dr.Amadalo, M.M., B.Ed., M.Ed (UoN),PhD.(KU) Chairman, Department of Criminology and Social Work Mr.O.M. Ntabo, LLB., MA.,(UoN), Dip. Law (Kenya school of Law) Chairman, Deparment of Journalism and Mass Communication Ms L.B. Anyonje, B.Ed.(KU) M.A. (UoN) (Acting) Board Representative Vacant Faculty of Science Dean of Faculty Prof.T.W.Sakwa,BSc.,MPhil.,DPhil.,(Moi) Chairman, Department of Biological Sciences Dr. H. B. O. Lungayia, B.Sc. (UoN), M.Sc., Ph.D. (VUB, Brussels) Chairman, Department of Computer Science Mr.Kilwake, H.J., B.Sc. Electrical (UoN), D.Sc. Computer Eng. (Rome) Chairman, Department of Mathematics Mr.V.Magero,B.Sc.,M.Phil.(Moi), M.Sc.(Belgium) Chairman, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry Dr.KOwino,I.O.,B.Ed.(KU),PhD.(Binghamtom Univ.,USA) Chairman, Department of Physics Prof.H. Othieno, B.Sc., (Kharkkow State Univ.), M.Sc.(Strathclyed), Ph.D.(North Caroline State Univ.) Chairman, Department of Sugar Technology Dr.N.C.O.Keya, B.Sc.(Cantebury), M.Sc. (Makerere), Ph.D. ( UoN) Chairman, Department of Nursing Sciences 4

Dr.Lt.Cl.(Rtd) J.M.O. Okoth, Dip.Midw.(KMTC), Dip. Adv. Nur.,(UoN), M.Phil.(Moi), Ph.D.(Breyer State Univ.) Board Representative, Faculty of Science Dr.Tsingalia,H.,BSc.(UoN),MSc.,PhD.(Berkley) Faculty of Engineering Dean of Faculty Dr.Ongor,B.T.I.,BSc.(Egerton),MSc.(Dar-essalaam),PhD.(Hohai) Chairman, Department of Civil and Structural Engineering Dr.Onchiri,R. M.Sc. (St.Petersburg),PhD.(Spbgasu,St.Petersburg) Ag, Chairman, Department of Electrical and Communication Engineering Mr.M.Okanya.BSc.,MSc.,(Petersburg) Chairman, Department of Production Technology Mr.B.O.Obondo,BTech.,MPhil,(Moi) Board Representative, Faculty of Engineering Mr.F.C.Nyongesa, BSc.(UoN),MSc. (Dundee) Centre for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance Director of the Centre Prof.S.B.B.Otengi, B.Sc., MSc., PhD. (UoN). Chairman, Department of Peace and Conflict Studies Prof.F.K. Matanga, B.A., M.A.(Nairobi), Ph.D. (Rhodes) Chairman, Department of Disaster Management and Sustainable Development. Dr.S.S.China, B.Sc.Agric.PGD.(UoN), MSc.Agric.Eng.(Penn State), PhD.(Southampton) Chairman, Department of Emergency Management and Humanitarian Assistance. Dr.K.Onkware,B.A.,Moi.,MA(KU).,PhD(Maseno) Chairman Department of Disaster Prepardness and Engineering Management: Dr.E.M.Neyole, BSc.Forestry(Moi),MSc.Env (Salford),DPhil Eng.(Moi) Department of Disaster Information and Response Unit: Ms.T.W.Mwaniki B.Ed(KU).,M.Ed (Egerton)

School of Open Learning and Continuing Education Director of school Prof. I. I. Odeo B.Ed (Nairobi), M.Ed (Kenyatta) D.Phil (Moi) Chairman, Department of Information and Documentation Dr.E.S.B.Abenga, B.Ed.(KU), M.Phil,DPhil.(Moi) Director, Information Communition Technology Mr. J. Karume, Dip. Ed.(KSTS), B.Sc.,(JKUAT), M.Sc.(Sunderland) Director, Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Prof. A. Wasike, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. (Nairobi) Director, Privately Sponsored Students Programme Prof.O.M.J.Nandi,B.A.,M.A.(Nairobi), PhD.(Maseno) Director, Science Technology Park and Industrial Linkages Omolo,M.V.,BSc.,MSc.,PhD.(KU) Dean, School of Graduate Studies Dr.H.K.Were,BSc.Agr.,MSc.(UoN), Dr.Ver.hort(Hanover) Director, Research Extension &Linkages Prof.Z.M.Getenga, BSc. MSc. (UoN), PhD.(Maseno) Library Department University Librarian Mr. G.G. Shibanda, ALA (Birmingham),Dip.Lib.and Info.Science, M.L.S. (Lougbourough), FLA,(UK).,MKLA. Student Welfare Dean of Students Rev.(Mrs.) L.E.A.Omwoha, B.Ed.(UoN), MSc.HRM(Manchester) Centre for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance Department of Research, Development &Documentation Prof.D.Ngare, B.A.(UoN), M.Publ.Health, D.Pubi.Health(California)

Professors Faculty of Education and Social Sciences Department of Social Science Education Prof. E.M Kasiera, Dip.(WPBC Vancouver), B.A.(CBC Springfield), M.A.,( Concordia), Th.M.(Priceton), Ph.D.(Aberdeen)

Student Governing Council Chairman of Governing Council Director of Academic Affairs

Faculty of Engineering Department of Production Technology Prof. C.K. Ndiema, Dip. Agr.(Egerton), M.Sc., D.Phil.(Leeds) Faculty of Science Department of Sugar Technology Prof. L. S. Wamocha, Dip.(Egerton), B.Sc. Agri.(California) M.Sc.(Clemson), Ph.D.(JKUAT) Coordinators of Campuses, Study Centres, Quality Assurance and Aids Control Unit Coordinator, Bishop Sulumeti Study Centre Dr. S. Odebero, B.Ed.(Egerton),M.Ed.(Maseno), Ph.D.(Egerton) Coordinator, Bungoma Campus Ms. M.I. Okombo, B.Sc., M.Sc.(UEA Baraton), M.Sc.(Egerton) Coodinator, Ebunangwe Study Centre Dr. J. Kobia, B.Ed. M.Phil.(Moi), Ph.D.(Kenyatta) Coordinator, HIV and AIDS Sub Unit Dr.E.Omukunda.,B.Ed.(Kenyatta),B.Sc., M.Ed.(Potch),PhD.(Maseno) Coordinator, Kipro Study Centre Dr. Omuterema Dip. (KSTC), B.Ed.,M.Phil., Ph.D. (Moi) Coordinator, Quality Assurance Mrs.B.Sabuni, B.Sc. Civil Eng. (UoN), M.Phil. (Glamorgan) Coordinator, Sangalo Study Centre Mrs. R. Salim B.Ed.(UoN), M.Ed. (Kenyatta) Co-odinator,University Timetable Dr.K.Y.Ayodoh, Dip.Ed.(Ketch), B.Ed., DPhil.(Moi) University Academic Staff Union Chairman of Union Ms. S. Choge, B.Ed.,M.Phil.(Moi) Union Representative Owiti,D., B.Ed, Mphil.,Dphil.(Moi) 6

A Brief History of the University Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) is situated in the east of Kakamega town along Kakamega-Webuye road. The University is successor of the former Western College of Arts and Applied Sciences (WECO). WECO was founded on 5th January 1972 based on the then Harambee spirit. Harambee spirit encouraged the establishment of regional technical Colleges on Self-help efforts in the country. The Colleges were to provide vocational training that aimed at producing persons with technical skills. Being a regional College, WECO developed progammes that were to be offer in the then three districts of Western Province as follows: Engineering and Business programmes in Kakamega, Medical Technology and Nutrition in Busia and Agricultural and Veterinary Technology in Bungoma. WECO site at Kakamega awarded certificates and diplomas in Mechanical and Motor Vehicle Technology, Electrical and Electronic Technology, Agricultural and water Technology, Agricultural and Forest Products Processing, Manufacturing Technology, Accounting , Finance, Insurance , Management Technology and Secretarial Technology. In December, 2002, WECO was upgraded to a constituent College of Moi University through a legal notice No 373. The name changed to Western University College of Science and Technology. A debate ensued on what the acronym of the University college should be. There were those who advocated for the acronym to reflect the original philosophy of the institution. They wished to have acronym slightly modified to WEUCO. The other group wished to have the acronym to reflect the new name Western University College of Science and Technology (WUCST). At the retreat of the University College Council and Academic Board, it was resolved that the acronym of the institution should be WUCST. Western University College of Science and Technology (WUCST) was further upgraded to full fledged university status through a parliamentary Act of 2006. The name changed to Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST). Currently, the University has three faculties, two schools and one Centre offering academic programmes. These are; Faculty of Education and Social Sciences, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Engineering, School of Open Learning and Continuing Education, School of Health

Sciences and the Centre for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance. In total there are twenty (20) academic departments. The University has also a School of Graduate Studies responsible for coordinating graduate programmes and research. MMUST also offers short courses some of which are tailor-made for specific groups or institutions. The students are admitted in two categories---through the Joint Admissions Board (JAB) and Privately Sponsored Students Progamme (PSSP) The necessary infrastructure has been put in place and efforts are being made to increase the existing facilities to cater for the increasing number of students.

In short period of existence, the University has grown tremendously both in student and staff population. The current student population is about 7000 and that of teaching staff is about 500.

Faculty of Science
1.0. Introduction The mission of the Faculty of Science is to produce graduates with practical and intellectual skills appropriate to the needs of the present and future Kenyan society. As Kenya gears towards industrialization, the Faculty of Science ensures that its students acquire skills and knowledge that will enable them to make a positive contribution to national development. In this context the Faculty will equip the students with skills appropriate for the transfer of modern information technology. The Faculty offers four-year programmes leading to the award of the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in the following disciplines: Computer science. Sugar Technology Agriculture Biology Biotechnology Physics Chemistry Mathematics Bioresources Management and Conservation Environmental Management and Conservation 2.0. Entry Requirements. To gain admission into the Faculty, the candidates must satisfy the common requirements for entry into the University. In addition, candidates must obtain at least the minimum cut-off points for the year at the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) as determined from one of the following four-subject clusters: Alternative A Mathematics Physics Chemistry Either Biology or Geography or any Group V (i.e technical group of subjects) Alternative B Mathematics Physical Sciences Biological Sciences Either Geography or any Group V (i.e technical group of subjects)

University of Science and Technology Senate may also be admitted. Department of Computer Science Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

1.0 Introduction
The mission of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology Faculty of Science is to produce graduates with practical and intellectual skills appropriate to the needs of the present and future Kenyan society. As Kenya gears towards industrialisation, the Faculty of Science ensures that its students acquire skills and knowledge that will enable them to make a positive contribution to national development. In this context the Faculty will equip the students with skills appropriate for the transfer of modern information technology to industry and the general public. The computer science curriculum reflects the multidisciplinary nature of science, and contains diverse courses ranging from basic physical sciences to applied courses in mathematics, physics, communication, information technology, business and management, economics and social science. The curriculum encourages the student to acquire the important skills of self-directed learning, problem solving and effective communication. The graduate is expected to be proficient in a variety of settings, which shall include management of computer information or systems, teaching and undertaking research activities.

The Faculty of Science offers postgraduate training at the Masters and Doctorate levels. This curriculum is therefore also intended to provide the students with a sound basis for the future postgraduate work. 2.0 Objectives 2.1. General Objectives
At the completion of the prescribed course, the Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology graduate will be able to:

2.1.1 Meet the ever increasing demand of trained personnel in computer science in various fields 2.1.2 Have adequate knowledge and skills so as to be able to work independently as Computer Hardware and Software specialists 2.1.3. Participate in research and development of ICT 8

The above clusters may change from year to year. Those holding qualifications equivalent to the above from institutions recognized by Masinde Muliro

2.1.4. Take up employment in computer industry, research institutions or any other relevant private and public sectors 2.2 Specific Objectives 2.2.1. Apply the process of critical reasoning in managing computer systems and information 2.2.2.Venture into entrepreneurship and marketing 2.2.3. Capture process and disseminate information 2.2.4. Maintain the highest professional standards in information technology 2.2.5. Contribute actively in the industrialization process of the Kenya Nation 2.2.6. Adapt to, participate in and act as agents of change in this age of information technology. 2.2.7. Effectively plan, supervise and mobilize human, financial, capital and information technology for efficient achievement of the goals of an Information Technology organization 2.2.8. Identify community needs and offer advisory and outreach services. 3.0. Admission Requirements Candidates with the following qualifications are eligible for admission: 3.1. Candidates with a mean grade of C+ at K.C.S.E or equivalent with a minimum grade of C+ in each of the subjects in either of the subject groupings listed below or 3.2. Candidates who have successfully completed a relevant diploma course recognized by the University and have attained a distinction or a credit with at least 2 years of field or research experience. Diploma holders who meet the admission requirements are eligible for admission on credit transfer. Satisfactory credit transfer will normally determine the year of entry. 3.3. Those holding qualifications equivalent to the above from institutions recognised by the MMUST senate may be considered.

4.0. Duration of the Programme The duration of the program shall normally be four academic years, unless Senate on the recommendation of the Faculty Board approves exemption. Students shall be expected to choose a specialization area at the beginning of third year. In third and fourth year the students shall be expected to take the prescribed compulsory core courses together with electives in their specialization areas. A student should take a minimum of least 21 units or at most 26 units per semester. In addition to the normal semesters, there are Industrial training and attachment programs at selected industrial or educational establishments. These programs are at the end of second year and third year. 5.0. Examinations 5.1. The University and Faculty of Science examinations regulations shall apply 6.0. Course Coding
The courses have course codes as follows The prefix of a course code is made of the three alphabetic letters CSC for Computer Science followed by four numerical digits. For the core courses, the first numeric digit signifies the year, the second signifies the semester and the third a serial number within the semester. The elective course form tracks within the program and appear at 3rd and 4th year of study. The 2nd numerical digit of the course code for these courses represents the track the course belongs to as follows as shown in the table below while the third digit is a serial number in the track: Number Track 5 Computer Engineering 6 Software Development

Networks and Security

7.0. Course Specialization


At the end of second year, students will be expected to specialize in one of the following computer science

disciplines/options subject to advice and prior approval of the department. Networks and Security Software Development Computer Engineering

8.0. Course Structure Year 1 Semester I Course Course Title Units Code IRD103 Development Concepts And Applications 3 ESM101 Quantitative Skills 3 CSC110 Fundamentals of Computing 3 CSC111 Introduction to Programming 3 CSC112 Discrete Structures I 3 ECC101 Scientific & Technical 3 Communication Skills MAT110 Basic Calculus I 3 SPH 110 Fundamentals Of Physics I 3 CSC109 Computer Applications 3 Total 27 Semester II Course Title Units Code CDM100 HIV/AIDS Prevention and 3 Management CSC120 Computer Organization 3 CSC121 Procedural Programming 3 CSC122 Discrete Structures II 3 IRD 102 Communication skills II 3 CSC 124 Internet Technologies 3 MAT 111 Geometry And Elementary Applied Mathematics 3 STA 106 Basic Statistics 3 SPH 111 Fundamentals o Physics II 3 Total 27 Year II Semester I CSC210 Object-Oriented Programming 3 CSC211 Principles of Operating System 3 CSC212 Introduction to Database Systems 3 CSC213 Research Methods 3 CSC214 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 3 MAT210 Calculus 3 MAT212 Linear Algebra I 3 SPH210 Electricity and Magnetism 3 Total 24 Semester II

CSC220 Electronics 3 CSC221 Operating Systems Design 3 CSC222 Systems Analysis and Design 3 CSC223 Data Communication 3 CSC224 Data Structures 3 CSC225 Logic Programming 3 CSC226 Client/Server Computing 3 STA205 Statistics and Probability 3 Total 24 CSC239 Industrial Training 6 Year III Semester I CSC310 Database Systems 3 CSC311 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3 CSC312 Digital Electronics 3 CSC313 Automata Theory 3 CSC314 Security in Computing 3 CSC315 Software Engineering 3 Total 18 Electives A candidate takes 2 courses from his/her track. Each track has one compulsory course unit. Networks and Security CSC370E Network and System Administration 3 CSC371E Network Programming 3 CSC362E Web Design 3 CSC363E Generic Programming with C++ 3 Software Development CSC362E Web Design 3 CSC360E Data Analysis Techniques 3 CSC363E Generic Programming with C++ 3 CSC361E Intelligent Agents 3 Computer Engineering CSC350E Microprocessors and Assembly Programming 3 CSC351E Signals and Systems I 3 CSC352E Semiconductor Devices 3 CSC370E Network and System Administration 3 Total 24 Semester II CSC320 Compiler Design CSC321 Computer Architecture CSC322 Computer Networks CSC323 Project Management CSC324 User-Interface Design CSC329 Computer Science Project I Total Year IV Semester I CSC410 Operations Research CSC413 Distributed Systems CSC412 Mobile Computing

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

3 3 3

10

CSC419 Computer Science Project II Total

3 15

Computer Engineering CSC454E Advanced Microprocessor Architecture CSC456E Digital Audio Technology CSC442E Security in Networks CSC464E Programming Languages CSC455E Wireless Systems and Protocols Total

Electives A candidate takes 3 courses from his/her track. Each track has one compulsory course unit. Networks and Security CSC461E Database Administration and Programming CSC471E Network Protocols and Standards CSC463E Programming with C# CSC470E Computer Forensics CSC472E Disaster Recovery Software Development CSC460E Expert Systems CSC463E Programming with C# CSC461E Database Administration and Programming CSC472E Disaster Recovery CSC462E Geographical Information Systems Computer Engineering CSC450E Computer Systems Engineering CSC451E Digital Signal Processing CSC471E Network Protocols and Standards CSC452E Microprocessor System Design CSC453E High Speed Multimedia Networks Total Semester II CSC420 Computer Graphics CSC421 Multimedia Technologies CSC422 Human-Computer Interaction CSC423 Legal and Ethical Issues in Computing Total

3 3 3 3 3 21

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 3 3 3 3 12

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology 1.0 Introduction The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology curriculum reflects the application nature of computer science, and contains diverse courses ranging from basic physical sciences to applied courses in mathematics, physics, communication, information technology, business and management, economics and social science. The curriculum encourages the student to acquire the important skills of self-directed learning, problem solving and effective communication. The graduate is expected to be proficient in a variety of settings, which shall include management of computer information or systems, apply computer technology in day to day life activities, teaching and undertaking research activities. The Faculty of Science offers postgraduate training at the Masters and Doctorate levels. This curriculum is therefore also intended to provide the students with a sound basis for the future postgraduate work. 2.0 General Objectives At the completion of the prescribed course, the Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology graduate will be able to: 2.1 Meet the ever increasing demand of trained personnel in computer science in various fields 2.2. Have adequate knowledge and skills so as to be able to work independently as Computer Hardware and Software specialists 2.3. Participate in research and development of ICT 2.4. Take up employment in computer industry, research institutions or any other relevant private and public sectors 2.5. Apply the process of critical reasoning in managing computer systems and information 3.0. Specific Objectives 3.1 Venture into entrepreneurship and marketing

Electives A candidate takes 3 courses from his/her track. Each track has one compulsory course unit. Networks and Security CSC455E Wireless Systems and Protocols 3 CSC473E Parallel and Cluster Computing 3 CSC474E Security in Networks 3 (CSC 215)CSC464E Programming Languages 3 CSC475E UNIX Systems Programming 3 Software Development CSC466E Neural Networks CSC465Mobile Application Programming CSC467E Software Metrics CSC475E UNIX Systems Programming CSC464E Programming Languages

3 3 3 3 3

11

3.2 Capture process and disseminate information 3.3. Maintain the highest professional standards in information technology 3.4 Contribute actively in the industrialization process of the Kenya Nation 3.5 Adapt to, participate in and act as agents of change in this age of information technology. 3.6. Effectively plan, supervise and mobilize human, financial, capital and information technology for efficient achievement of the goals of an Information Technology organization 3.7 Identify community needs and offer advisory and outreach services. 4.0 Target Group/Audience 4.1. Form four and diploma graduates for fulltime. 4.2. Diploma and qualified working class people on parttime i.e. evening and Saturday classes. 4.3. Diploma computer teachers with KNEC diploma in IT or any other relevant IT diploma for school based program. 5.0 Admission Requirements 5.1. To be admitted into the B.Sc. in Information Technology program, a candidate must satisfy the minimum entry requirements set for entry into MMUST. In addition candidates must have obtained a C+ grade in mathematics, any science or any business related subject 5.2 Those who have successfully completed the MMUST Diploma in Information Technology program or equivalent and have attained a distinction or a credit are eligible for admission. Admission will be into the second year of study 5.3 Those who have successfully completed a relevant diploma course recognized by the University senate and have attained a distinction or a credit. 5.4. Candidates with equivalent qualifications as approved by senate may be considered 6.0. Duration of the programme The duration of the program shall normally be four academic years, unless Senate on the recommendation of the Faculty Board approves exemption. In addition to the normal semesters, there are Field and Industrial attachment programs at selected industrial or educational establishments. These programs are at the end of second year and third year. 7.0 Examinations

The University and Faculty of Science examinations shall apply 7.1 The University Common Examinations regulations shall apply. 7.2. Examinations shall be held at the end of the semester in which courses are taught 7.3. Admission to Examination will depend on satisfactory attendance of the prescribed courses as per senate regulations. 7.4 Continuous assessment and the final three-hour written examination will unless specified, account for 30% and 70% of the final grade respectively. 8.0 Course Structure Year I: Semester I Code BBM100 CSC112 CSC111 CSC110 COS 100 MAT 110 CDM 100 Title Principles Of Financial Accounting I Discrete Structures Introduction To Programming Fundamentals Of Computing Communication Skills I Basic Calculus Hiv/Aids Prevention and Management Total Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Year I Semester II Code Title SPH 111 Fundamentals Of Physics II BIT 114 Computer Organization and Architecture CSC121 Procedural Programming MAT 111 Geometry And Elementary Applied Mathematics CSC109 Computer Applications IRD 104 Quantitative Skills II IRD 102 Communication Skills II STA 106 Basic Statistics Total Year II Semester I Code CSC210 CSC 211 CSC223 CSC212 CSC124 BIT 215

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Title Units Object Oriented Programming 3 Principles Of Operating Systems 3 Data Communications 3 Introduction To Database Systems 3 Internet Technologies 3 Electronic Commerce 3

12

MAT 211

Linear Algebra Total

3 21

Semester II Code Title Units CSC222 Systems Analysis And Design 3 BIT 221 Computer Networks 3 BIT 222 Data Structures And Algorithms 3 BIT 223 Database Management Systems 3 BIT 224 Business Application Softwares 3 CSC213 Research Methods 3 STA 205 Statistics And Probability 4 Total 22 230 Field/Industrial Training 6 Year III Semester I Course Code Description Units CSC315 Software Engineering 3 BIT 312 Operations Research 3 BIT 313 Transaction Processing Systems 3 BIT 314 Web Programming 3 BIT 315 Event Driven Programming 3 BIT 316 Information Technology Project I 3 CSC317 Network Programming 3 Total 21 Semester II Course Code Description Units BIT 320 Knowledge-Based Systems 3 BIT 321 Project Management 3 BIT 322 System Administration and Maintenance 3 BIT 323 Data Analysis Techniques 3 BIT 324 Data Warehousing And Mining 3 BIT 325 Multimedia Technologies 3 BIT 326 Enterprise Application Development 3 Total 21 BIT 330 Field/Industrial Training 6 Year IV Semester I Code CSC412 BIT 411 BIT 412 BIT 413 BIT 414 BIT 415 BIT 416 Total

Semester II Course Description Unit Code CSC 423 Legal and Ethical Issues in Computing 3 BIT 421 Information Management BIT 422 Information Technology Entrepreneurship 3 CSC 467 Software Metrics 3 BIT 424 Design Techniques for Websites 3 CSC 413 Distributed Systems 3 BIT 416 Information Technology Project II 3 Total 21

Master of Science in Information Technology 1.0 Introduction The Master of Science in Information Technology of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology is a unique post graduate program that equips candidates with the theory and practice of Information Technology. It aims to meet the increasing demand for IT professionals. The program blends theory with the latest state-of-the-art Industry-based courses, thus adequately preparing the candidates to make relevant contributions towards the national goal of industrialization. 2.0 Objectives 2.1 General objectives To provide an opportunity to students to acquire a broad background in the theory and practice of Information Technology. It is aimed at producing graduates with practical ability in dealing with emerging issues in Information and Communication Technology 2.2 Specific objectives At the completion of this program, the Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology graduate will be able to: 2.2.1 Conduct research in Information Technology

Title Units Mobile Computing 3 Information Assurance and Security 3 Auditing Of Information Systems 3 Management Information Systems 3 Human-Computer Interaction 3 Intelligent Systems 3 Information Technology Project II 3 21

and related areas 2.2.2. Teach Information Technology and related subject areas in Universities and other institutions of higher learning 2.2.3. Pursue a PhD program in Information Technology / Computer Science / Information Systems 2.2.4. Work in the industry as IT specialists, project managers, software developers, database administrators, network administrators, among others.

13

MIT 811 3.0 Admission requirements The common university regulations for Masters Degree shall apply.Additionally the applicants should be in possession of one of the provisions below: 3.1 Bachelors degree in a computing discipline, of at least Upper Division Second Class Honors of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, or an equivalent qualification from another institution recognized by Senate. In addition, prospective students must demonstrate proficiency in at least one of the object oriented programming languages. 3.2. Bachelors degree in a computing discipline or related discipline of at least Lower Division Second Class Honors (lower division) of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology plus at least two years relevant experience, or an equivalent qualification from another institution recognized by Senate. In addition, prospective students must demonstrate proficiency in at least one of the object oriented programming languages. 3.3. Bachelors degree in a relevant discipline of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology plus at least two years relevant experience, or an equivalent qualification from another institution recognized by Senate. In addition, prospective students must have a postgraduate Diploma in a computing discipline with at least a credit. 4.0 Course Duration 4.1 The full time program shall run for a period of two academic years, each with two semesters on full time based. 4..2 The evening program shall run for a period of two academic years during evenings and weekends. 4..3 The institution based programme mode shall run for a minimum period of eight residential sessions 5.0 Programme Requirement The minimum number of units of course works and thesis for MSc (IT) program shall be 57 units. 6.0 Examination Common University regulations shall apply. 7.0 Course structure Students will take all the core courses listed below with some electives Year I Semester 1 Code Title MIT 810 Database Systems & Information Modeling MIT 812 MIT 813 MIT 814 MIT 815

Information Technology Project Management Business Information Systems Object Oriented Analysis & Design Computer Networks Research methods TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 18

Year 1 Semester II Code Title MIT 820 Architectures for Software Systems and emerging issues MIT 821 Enterprise Application Development & Architectures MIT 822 Information Security Management MIT 823 Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems MIT 824 MIT 899 Security Architecture & Analysis MSc IT Thesis (Part I) Research Proposal writing Total Year II Semester I Code Title MIT 899 MSc IT Thesis (Part II) (Research) Total Year II Semester II Code Title MIT 825 Network Management MIT 826 Information Technology emerging issues Elective 1 Elective 2 MIT899 MSc IT Thesis (Part III) (Research and Thesis writing) TOTAL Grand Total

Units 3

3 3

3 3

18

Unit 9 9

Units 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3

15 60

14

Doctor of Philosophy in Information Technology 1.0. Introduction Information and Communication Technology skills play a key role in promoting the economic development of a country. Modern business is shaped by technological change, competitiveness and globalization. In many organizations, Information Technology (IT) is the strategic asset, which drives competitiveness and supports alliances and partnerships. All this dictate the need for highly qualified manpower capable of both training and conducting research in the field. Advances in Information Technology (IT) have dramatically transformed the way in which our entire society lives, works, learns, communicates, and does business. In particular, the conduct of Science and Engineering has been profoundly altered, so that it is possible today to work on problems in these areas at unprecedented levels of speed, precision, and detail. To enhance the positive effect of these transformations, the research in Information Technology explores new scientific, engineering and educational areas in Information Technology that enhance development as well as pursuing the discovery of principles and the development of e-governance technologies to support the engineering of large, complex software systems. The Doctor of Philosophy in Information Technology programme is therefore designed to propel the country towards meeting the 2030 vision and beyond as it provides students with relevant knowledge in Information Technology. 2.0 Objectives 2.1 General Objective To train competent professionals for the country and region equipped with theoretical and practical skills in understanding concepts, methodologies and strategies at advanced levels in Information Technology to serve national and regional development needs with respect to Information and Communication Technology. This would enable them to better understand and solve problems making them cope with the complex and fastchanging Information and Communication Technology (ICT) environment.

2.2. Specific Objectives At the end of the Doctor of Philosophy in Information Technology programme the candidate should be able to; 2.2.1. apply and conduct research in Information Technology, e-governance, software Engineering and Information Systems; 2.2.2. acquire research capacity in the areas of Information Technology, Information Systems, and Software Engineering 2.2.3. formulate, conduct and present scholarly research through the production of a research-based thesis and publications. 2.2.4.be equipped with research and publication skills to enable them publish research from high quality thesis in reputable journals and/ or present research findings at academic conferences. 2.2.5. develop and pursue the discovery of principles and the development of e-governance technologies to support the engineering of large, complex software systems. 2.2.6. Teach and supervise undergraduate and postgraduate Information Technology programme. 3.0. Target Groups The target groups are:3.1. Information Technology, Information Systems, and Software Engineering graduates from accredited universities 3.2. Graduate professionals within the ICT industry from both the public and private sectors in the country and region 4.0. Entry Requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university senate regulations, an applicant should satisfy the following requirements 4.1. Hold Masters Degree in Information Technology or Information Systems or Computer Science from MMUST or any other accredited university or 4.2. Hold Masters Degree in a relevant field as approved by the senate.

15

5.0. Submission and processing of application for registration The common procedures approved by SGS shall apply 6.0. Duration of the Programme The programme shall have two modes of study, Full time and part time. 6.1. Full time mode Shall normally take a minimum of three (3) academic years and a maximum of five (5) academic years full time distributed over six and ten consecutive semesters of full time attendance respectively. 6.2. Part time mode Shall normally take a minimum of four (4) academic years and a maximum of seven (7) academic years of attendance from the date of registration. 7.0. Programme Requirements
7.1. The programme requires a minimum of forty two (42) units of appropriate graduate coursework including a thesis 7.2. A candidate may take master level courses in the area of specialization or to close knowledge gaps. However, this should be done as directed by the supervisor 7.3. A candidate may take courses from other departments / faculties subject to approval by the department 7.4. A candidate may be audited from part or whole of coursework requirements provided the senate is satisfied that the candidate had done and passed at graduate level to the prescribed course(s).

Communication Technologies 3 PCT 911 Advanced Research Design and Methodology 3 PCT 912 Information Technology Project management 3 1 Elective Course PCT 913 Managerial Problems in Information and Communication Technology 3 PCT 914 Advanced Research Methods in Computing 3 PCT 915 Gender and ICT 3 Year One Semester II: Code Title Units Core Courses PCT 921 Scientific Writing and Research Ethics 3 PIT 921 Trends in Information Technology 3 PCT 998 Philosophy of Computing Research and Proposal development 3 1 Elective Course PCT 922 Trends in Information Systems 3 PCS 921 Trends in Computer Science 3 PCT 923 Trends in Software Engineering 3 Year Two Semester One and Two PIT 999 (I) Thesis writing I 6 Year Three Semester One and Two PIT 999(II) Thesis writing II 6 Department of Biological Sciences Bachelor of Science in Biology 1.0 Introduction The Bachelor of Science (Biology) is an instructional programme that provides classroom, laboratory and field experience in plant and animal sciences. In this programme, students have to take biology (Botany and Zoology) courses with other non-biology courses which have been appropriately selected for the first and second years of study to ensure that they attain sound understanding of modern Biology. 2.0 General Objectives The programme is designed such that by the end of the training (4 years), the student will have acquired basic biological knowledge and skills to tackle the problems associated with environmental, agricultural, medical, natural resource management and other scientific challenges encountered by biological scientists from day to day.

8.0. Evaluation
Evaluation shall involve coursework, examination and thesis. The evaluation of coursework and thesis shall be done following SGS graduate regulations.

9.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I


Code Title Core courses PCT 910 Philosophy of Information and Units

16

3.0 Specific Objectives The student should, on completion of the course competently undertake the following: (i) Research and extension work in biology (ii) Postgraduate work in biology (iii) Any biological engagements in private and public enterprise. 4.0 Admission Requirements All candidates admitted to the degree programme of Bachelor of Science (Biology) must satisfy the minimum entrance requirements stipulated in the common university entrance regulations. In addition, candidates MUST have passed in Biology/Biological Sciences with a minimum grade of C+ in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) or its equivalent with an individual score of at least grade C in English, Mathematics, Chemistry, Geography/Agriculture/Physics. Admission may be offered to diploma holders in Biological Sciences who passed with a credit or above or their equivalent. Those with credit and above will be admitted into second year of study. Those with pass will be admitted into the first year of study. Those holding qualifications equivalent to the above from institutions recognized by the Senate may also be admitted. 5.0 Course Duration The Bachelor of Science (Biology) degree shall normally take a full time student four (4) academic years. 6.0 Course Structure Year I Semester I Code SBT 111 SBT 112 SZL 111 SCH100 IRD 100 CSC 109 CUC 111 MAT 105 CDM 100 Course Title Survey of the Plant Kingdom Introduction to Genetics Lower Invertebrates Fundamentals of Chemistry I Communication Skills I Computer Applications Human Health Basic Mathematics I HIV and AIDS:Prevention and Management Units 3 3 3 4 3 3 2 3 3

Total Semester II Code SBT 121 SBT 122 SZL 121 SZL 122 SZL 123 SBL 121 SCH 101 CUC 121 CSC 110 Course Title Cryptogamic Botany General Microbiology Higher Invertebrates Vertebrate Zoology Fundamentals of Ecology Technical and Scientific Communication Skills Fundamentals of Chemistry II Science, Technology and Society Fundamentals of Computing II Total

27 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 27

Year II Semester I Code SBT 211 SBT 212 SBT 213 SZL 211 SZL 212 SBL 211

SBL 212 SBL 213

Course Title Plant Taxonomy Principles of Bacteriology Botanical Techniques Fundamentals of Cell Biology Introduction to Animal Physiology Fundamentals of Environmental Science Mathematics for Biologists Fundamentals of Biophysics Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 24 Units 3 3

Semester II Code Course Title Plant Ecology I SBT 221 SBT 222 Plant Structure and Function SZL 221 Fundamentals of Aquatic Ecology SZL 222 Immunology I SZL 223 Zoological Techniques SCH 212 Basic Organic Chemistry SCH 214 Biochemistry SBL 221 Basics of Laboratory Practice and Safety Total Year III (BSc Biology) Semester I Code Course Title SBT 311 General Mycology

3 3 3 3 3 2 23

Units 3

17

SBT 312 SBT 313 SZL 311 SZL 312 SZL 313 SBL 311 COS 103

Plant Physiology Botany Field Course Comparative Animal Physiology Developmental Biology Animal Genetics and Evolution Biostatistics Development Concepts and Applications Total

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Zoology Major Semester I Code Course Title Comparative Animal SZL 311 Physiology Developmental Biology SZL 312 SZL 313 Animal Genetics and Evolution Evolutionary Biology SZL 314 SZL 315 Immunology II SZL 316 Animal Histology Biostatistics SBL 311 Total Semester II Code Course Title SZL 321 Endocrinology SZL 322 Parasitology I Zoology Field Course SZL 323 Theoretical Ecology SZL 324 SZL 325 Ornithology and Mammalogy SZL 326 Fresh water Biology Research Methodology SBL 321 Total Year IV (BSc Biology) Semester I Code Course Title SBT 411 Plant Biochemistry SBT 412 Microbial Ecology SBT 413 Ecological Monitoring SBT 414 Botany Seminars Entomology 3 SZL 411 SZL 412 Animal Behaviour (Ethology) SZL 413 Marine Biology SZL 414 Zoology Seminars Total Semester II Code Course Title SBT 421 Ethnobotany SBT 422 Aquatic Botany SZL 423 Parasitology II SZL 421 Fish and Fisheries Biology SBL 421 Molecular Biology SBL 422 Biological Conservation SBL 423 Biotechnology Total Botany Major Semester I Code Course Title SBT 411 Plant Biochemistry Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Semester II Code Course Title SBT 321 Biosystematics and Palynology SBT 322 Plant Evolution SBT 323 Plant Ecology II SZL 321 Endocrinology SZL 322 Parasitology I SZL 323 Zoology Field Course SBL 321 Research Methodology Total Botany Major Semester I Code SBT 311 SBT 312 SBT 313 SBT 314 SBT 315 SBT 316 SBL 311

Course Title General Mycology Plant Physiology Botany Field Course Phycology Cytology and Cytogenetics Lichenology Biostatistics Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 25

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 22 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Semester II Code Course Title SBT 321 Biosystematics and Palynology SBT 322 Plant Evolution SBT 323 Plant Ecology II SBT 324 Plant Ecophysiology SBT 325 Microbial Metabolism SBT 326 Principles of Plant Pathology SBL 321 Research Methodology SBL 323 Industrial/Field Attachment Total

Units 3

18

SBT 412 SBT 413 SBT 414 SBT 415 SBT 416 SBT 417 Semester II Code SBT 421 SBT 422 SBT 423 SBT 424 SBT 425 SBL 421 SBL 422

Microbial Ecology Ecological Monitoring Botany Seminars Plant Development Morphogenesis Research Project Plant Virology Total

3 3 3 3 3 3 21 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Course Title Applied Mycology Aquatic Botany Plant Biotechnology Molecular Genetics Applied Mycology Molecular Fundamentals of Biological Conservation Applied Microbiology and SBL 423 Biotechnology Total Zoology Major Semester I Code Course Title Entomology SZL 411 SZL 412 Ethology SZL 413 Marine Biology SZL 414 Zoology Seminars SZL 415 Research Project SZL 416 Applied Parasitology SZL 417 Environmental physiology Total Semester II Code Course Title SZL 421 Fish and Fisheries Biology SZL 423 Parasitology II (Protozoology) SZL 424 Applied Entomology SZL 425 History and Philosophy of Biology SBL 421 Molecular Biology SBL 422 Fundamentals of Biological Conservation SBL 423 Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Total Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology

laboratory and field experience in Biotechnology. In this programme, students have to take biology as well as nonbiology courses, which have been appropriately selected for the first and second years of study to ensure they attain sound understanding of the science of Biotechnology. Opportunity exists for students to pursue Biotechnology specializations in their third and fourth years of study. 2.0 Course Objectives 2.1 General Objectives

The programme is designed such that by the end of the training (4 years), the student will have acquired basic knowledge and skills in preparation for the societal and scientific challenges associated with the interpretation and implementation of policies related to Biotechnology. 2.2 Specific Objectives
The student should, on completion of the course competently undertake the following: 2.2.1. Research and extension work in Biotechnology. 2.2.2. Postgraduate work in Biotechnology.

3 24

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

2.2.3. Employment in organizations and institutions engaged in biotechnology related work. 3.0 Admission Requirements
3.1. All candidates admitted to the degree programme of Bachelor of Science (Biotechnology) must satisfy the minimum entrance requirements stipulated in the common university entrance regulations. 3.2. In addition, candidates MUST have passed in Biology/Biological Sciences with a minimum grade of C+ in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) or its equivalent with an individual score of at least grade C in English, Mathematics, Chemistry, Geography/ Agriculture/Physics. 3.3. Admission may be offered to diploma holders in Biological Sciences who passed with a credit or above or their equivalent. Applicants with credit and above will be admitted into second year of study. Those with pass will be admitted into the first year of study. Applicants holding qualifications equivalent to the above from institutions recognized by the Senate may also be admitted. 4.0 Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Course Title SBT 111 Survey of the Plant Kingdom SBT 112 Introduction to Genetics

1.0 Introduction The Bachelor of Science (Biotechnology) is an instructional programme that provides classroom,

Units 3 3

19

SCH 100 SBL 112 COS 100 CSC 110 CUC 111 MAT 105 CDM 100

Fundamentals of Chemisrty I Introduction to Biotechnology Communication Skills I Fundamentals of Computing Human Health Basic Mathematics I

4 3 3 3 2 3 1 25 Units 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 21

SCH 232

Chemistry of Biomolecules Total

3 23

HIV/AIDS:Prevention and Management Total Semester II Code Course Title SBT 122 General Microbiology SZL 123 Fundamentals of Ecology Basic Zoology SZL 124 SBL 121 Technical and Scientific Communication Skills CUC 121 Science, Technology and Society SCH 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry II BBM 104 Principles of Management Total Year II Semester I Code Course Title SZL 211 Fundamentals of Cell Biology SZL 212 Introduction to Animal Physiology SBL 211 Fundamentals of Environmental Science SBL 212 Mathematics for Biologists SBT 211 Plant Taxonomy SBT 212 Principles of Bacteriology SBL 213 Fundamentals of Biophysics COS 103 Development Concepts and Applications Total Semester II Code SBT 220 SBT 222 SBT 223 SBT 224 SBT 225 SZL 222 SBL 221

Year III Semester I - Core Courses Code Course Title SBT 311 General Mycology Cytology and Cytogenetics SBT 315 IRD 305 Entrepreneurship SBT 318 Techniques in Molecular Biology I SBL 311 Biostatistics Total Options General Biotechnology Code Course Title Immunology II SZL 315 SBT 319 Bioreactors SBL 312 Forensics and Profiling Total Microbial Biotechnology Code Course Title SBT 312 Plant Physiology Bioreactors SBT 319 SBL 314 Microbial Diversity Total Plant Biotechnology Code Course Title SBT 312 Plant Physiology SBL 313 Phytohormones SBT 317 Plant Virology Total Medical Biotechnology Code Course Title SBT 319 Bioreactors SBL 312 Forensics and Profiling SBL 314 Microbial Diversity Total Semester II - Core Courses Code Course Title SBT 327 Techniques in Molecular Biology II SBT 328 Fundamentals of Biological Chemistry SBL 321 Research Methodology SBL 320 Bioenergetics Total SBL 326 Field/Industrial Attachment Options Biotechnology General Code Course Title

Units 3 3 3 3 3 15

Units 3 3 3 9 Units 3 3 3 9 Units 3 3 3 9

Units 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 24

Units 3 3 3 9

Units 3 3 3 3 12 4

Course Title General Virology Plant Structure and Function Microbial Genetics Introduction to Molecular Biology Environmental Microbiology Immunology I Basics of Laboratory Practice and Safety

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 2

Units

20

SBT 325 SBT 329 SBL 323 SZL 321

Microbial Metabolism Industrial Microbiology Enzymes and Cell Kinetics Endocrinology Total Microbial Biotechnology Code Course Title SBT 325 Microbial Metabolism SBT 329 Industrial Microbiology Enzymes and Cell Kinetics SBL 323 Total Plant Biotechnology Code Course Title SBT 326 Principles of Plant Pathology SBL 324 Plant Ecophysiology Morphogenesis and SBL 325 Developmental Anatomy Total

3 3 3 3 12 Units 3 3 3 9 Units 3 3 3 9

Plant Biotechnology Code Course Title SBL 413 Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture SBL 415 Molecular Evolution Total Medical Biotechnology Code Course Title SZL 418 Gene Therapy Animal Cell Biotechnology SBL 416 Total Semester II - Core Courses Code Course Title SBL 423 Genetic Engineering II SBL 424 Biopolicy SBL 425 Discovery Strategies in Biotechnology SBT 421 Enthnobotany SBT 424 Molecular Genetics Total Options General Biotechnology Code Course Title Bioprocess and Cellular SBT 426 Engineering SBT 427 Plant Breeding and Seed Technology SZL 426 Biopharmaceuticals Total Microbial Biotechnology Code Course Title Bioprocess and Cellular SBL 426 Engineering SZL 426 Biopharmaceuticals SBL 427 Applied Microbial Ecology Total Plant Biotechnology Code Course Title SBT 427 Plant Breeding and Seed Technology SBT 429 Secondary Metabolism SBT 425 Applied Mycology Total Medical Biotechnology Code Course Title SBL 426 Bioprocess and Cellular Engineering SZL 426 Biopharmaceuticals SZL 427 Molecular Immunology

Units 3 3 6 Units 3 3 6 Units 3 3 3 3 3 15

Medical Biotechnology Code Course Title SBL 322 Parasitology I Endocrinology SZL 321 SBT 329 Industrial Microbiology Total Year IV Semester I -Core Courses Code Course Title SBT 410 Introduction to Bioinformatics SBT 418 Biophysics SBT 419 Recent Advances in Biotechnology SBL 410 Genetic Engineering I SBL 411 Techniques in Preservation of Biomaterials SBL 412 Ethics and Risks in Biotechnology Total General Biotechnology Code Course Title SBT 412 Microbial Ecology SBL 413 Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture Total Microbial Biotechnology Code Course Title SBT 412 Microbial Ecology SBL 415 Molecular Evolution Total

Units 3 3 3 9

Units 3 3 3 9

Units 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 9

3 18 Units 3 3 Units 3 3 3 9

6 Units 3 3 6

Units 3 3 3

21

Total B.Sc. In Environmental Management and Conservation

1.0. Introduction The Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Management and Conservation is an interdisciplinary program offered by the Department of Biological Sciences that involves courses in chemistry, geological sciences, and geography and computer science. Environmental Management and conservation is about understanding our natural environment and how the activities of the ever-growing Human population affect it. Students of the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Management and Conservation therefore receive a solid background in the relevant natural science disciplines and a clearly defined specialization in environmental sciences. The program prepares students for challenging careers in environmental scientific research, management and conservation. 2.0. General objectives At the end of the four years of undergraduate training, a student will be properly equipped with skills and knowledge in environmental science. This knowledge will enable them to competently solve problems that are associated with the environment and its sustainable management and/or any other scientific challenges encountered by environmental scientists. 2.1. Specific Objectives On completion of the course, students are expected to competently understand and undertake the following: 2.1.1. Research in matters that deal with the environmental quality and sustainable management 2.1.2. Postgraduate studies in environmental management, Environmental Impact Assessment and Audit studies, and biodiversity 2.1.3. Provide advisory services on matters of environmental management. 2.1.4. Postgraduate studies in environmental management, impact assessment and biodiversity management. 2.1.5..Research and extension in matters that concern bioresources 2.1.6. Train manpower to work as environmental policy planners, scientists and regulators for government and industry. 3.0 Career Opportunities Graduates of Environmental Management and Conservation can find careers in or become: Teaching;

Environmental Consultants, Environmental or Field Laboratory Scientists, Environmental Health Managers/Scientists, Environmental Policy Developers, Protection and Regulation Managers, Geo-Environmental scientific researchers, Hazards Waste and pollution control Managers, Industrial Hygienists, Environmental Risk Managers, Soil Scientists, Water Managers and Wildlife Managers among others. 4.0. Admission Requirements 4.1. All candidates admitted to the degree program of Bachelor of Science in Environmental Management and Conservation must satisfy the minimum entry requirements as stipulated in the common university entrance regulations. 4.2. In addition the candidates must have obtained at least grade C+ in Biology/Biological Sciences and a C in geography, chemistry, physics, physical sciences or mathematics at KCSE or equivalent examinations. 4.3. Admission may be offered to diploma holders in environmental Science, Range Management, Animal Husbandry and Animal Health, Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries from recognized institutions with a distinction or credit pass or their equivalent. Such cases will, however, be treated on individual merit by MMUST Senate. 4.4. Diploma holder with a distinction or credit pass shall normally be admitted in the second year of study while those with a pass shall normally be admitted in the first year of study. 5.0. Duration of the course The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Conservation and Management degree shall normally take four (4) academic years. Each year shall consist of two (2) semesters. 60. Course Structure Year I Semester I Course Code Course Title CDM 100 HIV/AIDS:Prevention and Management COS 100 Communicationskills I SCH 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry I CSC 109 Computers Applications CUC 111 Human Health SBT 111 Survey of the plant Kingdom SZL 111 Lower invertebrates SBT 112 Introduction to Genetics Total

Units 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 24

22

Semester II Course Code Course Title Units SCH 101 Fundamentals of ChemistryII 4 CSC 110 Fundamentals of Computing 3 CUC 12 Science, Technology and Society 2 SBL 121 Technical and Scientific Communication 3 SZL.121 Higher invertebrates 3 SES 121 Environment Problems and Challenges 3 SES 122 Introduction to Natural Resources 3 SZL 123 Fundamentals of Ecology 3 Total Units 24 Year II Semester I Course Code Course Title Units SBL 211 Fundamentals of Environmental Sciences 3 SBL 212 Mathematics for Biologists 3 SBC 212 Basic Concepts in Soil Science 3 SBC 214 Principles of range and Forest Ecology 3 SES 215 Environmental Earths Science 3 SES 216 Introduction to Physical Geology 3 SES 217 Introduction to Physical and Biological Geography 3 SES 218 Human Population and the Environment 3 Total Units 24 Semester II Code Title SZL 221 Fundamentals of Aquatic Ecology SES 221 The Atmosphere and Environmental Pollution SES 222 Wild Species and Natural Habitat SES 224-Solid Toxic and Hazardous Wastes SBT 225 Environmental Microbiology SES 226 Introduction to Ecological Economics SES 227 Environment and Development SCH 232 Chemistry of Biomolecules Total Units Year III Semester I Course Code Course Title CDM 306 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote SBL 311 Biostatistics SES 313 Social Impact Assessment SES 314 Ecological Surveys and Techniques SES 315 Water Use 1: Freshwater Resources SCH 350 Environmental Chemistry SBT 313 Botany Field Course Total Units

Semester II Course Code Course Title CDM 312 Environmental Biotechnologies SBL 321 Research Methodology SES 321 Conventional and Sustainable Energy SBT 323 Plant Ecology II SZL 324 Theoretical Ecology SES 324 Food, Agriculture and Pests SBT 329 Industrial Microbiology SZL 323 Zoology Field Course SES 327 Field Attachments Total Units

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 28

Year IV Semester I Course Code course Title Units CDM 407 Environmental Law and Policy 3 CDM 408 Energy Resources and the environment 3 SES 411 Men and the Urban Environment 3 SES 412 Ecosystems Management and Restoration 3 SBT 413 Ecological Monitoring 3 SES 413 Land Use I: Forests and Rangelands 3 SES 414 Risk Analysis and Environmental Management 3 SES 420Project 4 Total 25 Semester II Course codeCourseTitle SES 421 Water Use II: Management and Pollution SBL 422 Biological Conservation SES422 Environmental Management and Project Analysis SES423 Urban Environments and Sustainable Communities SES424Biodiversity SES425 Land Use II: Mining and the Environment SES426 Meeting Environmental Challenges SES427 Current and emerging Issues in Environmental Science Total Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Master of Science in Environmental Biology 1.0 Introduction The Masters of Science (M. Sc.) in Environmental Biology is a multidisciplinary course that offers students

23

the opportunity to study any of the five areas of ecology: Savanna/Rangeland ecology, Wetland ecology, Environmental Conservation and Management, Forest Ecology, and Biodiversity. This program will prepare and equip students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are necessary in effective conservation, management and sustainable utilization of Bioresources at local and international levels; and careers in scientific research, university teaching, industry and public service. 2.0 Overall Objective The overall objective of this masters program is to develop decision-making knowledge and skills required to manage biological resources and natural environment. 2.1.Specific Objectives 2.2.1. To enable students to develop an understanding and knowledge of the conservation and management of biological resources. 2.2.2. To stimulate students into developing practical skills in the analysis of concepts and application that will enhance their career opportunities in biological conservation. 2.2.3. To expose students to key strategic issues that face contemporary organizations involved in conservation. 2.2.4.To enable and equip students with practical skills in the scientific investigation, data analysis and presentation. 2.2.5. To enable students to make a professional contribution to the conservation and management of natural resources at local, and international levels. 3.0 Target Groups 3.1. Those who are employed in forestry, wildlife, agriculture and related disciplines, and other sectors that are concerned with the environment. 3.2. Those in manufacturing industries relevant to natural resources. 3.3. Graduates who wish to pursue a career in conservation and sustainable use of bioresources. 3.4. People in training institutions. 4.0 Admission Requirements 4.1. The common regulations for eligibility for registration in M. Sc. Degree Programme at Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technologys School of Graduate Studies shall apply. 4.2. Holders of a bachelors degree with at least Second Class Honours (Upper Division) in any life sciences or its equivalent recognized by Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology Senate

4.3. Holders of at least a Second Class Honours degree (Lower Division) in any life sciences and with proven evidence of research ability with at least two publications. 4.4. In addition to producing evidence of eligibility for registration, candidates for the Masters degree shall normally be required to appear for an interview by the Institute of Graduate Studies Research and Extension so as to determine their suitability for registration. 4.5. Subject to the approval of Senate, departments through their respective Faculty Committees, and with the recommendations of the IGSRE Board, may formulate regulations requiring the applicant to have attained such academic or equivalent qualifications, which are consistent with the goals of the Masters programmes. 5.0 Programme Duration The program shall normally be administered through two modes of study: Full-time and part-time basis 5.1. Full-time Full time students will take four semesters (or two academic years) to complete the program. 5.2. Part-time Part-time students will take Eight (8) semesters (or 4 academic years) to complete the programmes. 6.0 Course Requirements 6.1.All course requirements shall be guided by rules and regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. 6.2. Each student shall undertake a minimum of 50 course units including a thesis in the duration of the course. 6.3. A student shall be considered to have passed an academic year after the successful completion of all the units prescribed within that year. 6.4. A student will undertake, in each semester, the five core courses and a minimum of two elective courses. The choice of the elective courses will be guided by the branch of environmental biology that the student wishes to specialize in. 7.0 Course Work and Examinations Assessment of students performance shall be conducted through coursework, assignments, periodic written tests, problem solving seminars, report writing, competitive examinations and oral defense of a written thesis: 7.1. All examination requirements shall be guided by the regulations of the School of Graduate Studies of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology.

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7.2. Candidates shall be required to pass in all the courses for which they are registered. The pass mark shall be 50% 7.3. Assessment at the end of the coursework shall consist of:
7.3.1. A written examination which shall normally constitute 60% of total marks in a course. 7.3.2. Continuous assessment based on essays, laboratory assignments and such other tests as prescribed by the lecturer. This will normally constitute 40% of the total marks.

according to the format approved by Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology Senate. 10.0 De-Registration An M. Sc. candidate shall be de-registered, if: 10.1. The candidate fails to live up to the academic requirements stipulated in sections 10.3, 10.4 or 10.5 of the regulations of School of Graduate Studies 10.2. The candidates conduct is in a manner that is contrary to the University rules and Regulations 10.3. The candidate or the candidates Sponsor fails to remit fund as to the University for the conduct of studies. 10.4. The candidate has not completed the prescribed studies after three years since the date of registration for full time candidates or after five years for part-time candidates. 10.5. The candidate has not submitted the final revised thesis after the prescribedtime prescribed timed decided during the Oral Defense 11.0. Award of M.Sc. Degree To be awarded a masters degree one MUST have completed and been examined in at least 10 (ten) core courses. In addition he/she must have submitted and successfully defended a dissertation from research work in the second year of study. The award of the M. Sc. Degree shall be guided by the regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. 12.0 Courese Coding The code SBL denotes a science course within the broad discipline of Biology. 12.0 Course Structure Year I Semester I Core Courses Code Title Units SBL 800 Quantitative Ecology 3 SBL 802 Advanced Biostatistics 3 SBL 804 Biodiversity 3 SBL 806 Communities & Ecosystems 3 SBL 808 Conservation Biology 3 Minimum of Two (2) electives B. Elective Courses Rangeland/Savanna Ecology SBL 810E Rangelands and Savannas: Structure and Function 3 SBL 812E Plant Systematics 3 SBL 824E Biogeography 3 Wetland Ecology SBL 814E Wetlands Ecology: Structure and

7.4. A candidate who fails more than one prescribed course in a given semester shall be discontinued. 7.5. A candidate who fails one semester course shall be eligible to take a Supplementary Examination provided that the mark obtained in the failed course is not below 40% 7.6. Continuous assessment marks shall count towards supplementary Examinations 7.7. A candidate who fails in any supplementary Examination shall be discontinued 7.8. A candidate who, for understandable and verifiable reasons such as sickness, fails to sit an examination, shall be allowed to sit a Special; Examination. Medical cases must be supported by documents form the University Chief Medical Officer.
8.0 Research and Thesis Writing 8.1. Each student shall during the degree program and at the successful end of the course work design a research project in which he/she shall collect data, analyze it and write a thesis on a specific topic related to conservation andsustainable use of natural resources. 8.2. Each student shall be assigned academic supervisors to help him/her through the whole course. 8.2. Where possible, collaborative links with relevant organizations shall be soughtfor purposes of research and fieldwork. 9.0Final Submission of Thesis Once a candidate has incorporated into the thesis all the recommendations of the Board of Examiners, normally the Main Supervisor shall check the thesis and then write to the Director, SGS certifying that all correction and amendments suggested by the Examiners have indeed been incorporated.This communication shall be copied to the respective Dean/Directors of Faculty/School/Institute and Head of Department. The thesis shall be prepared

25

Function SBL 816E Fresh Water Ecology Forest Ecology SBL 818E Tropical Forest: Structure and Function SBL 812E Plant Systematics SBL 824E Biogeography Biodiversity SBL 820E Methods in Biodiversity SBL 822E Biosystematics SBL 824E Biogeography

3 3

3 3 3

Environmental Conservation And Management SBL 854E Environmental Policy and Education 3 SBL 856E International Conventions and Environmental legislation 3 SBL 860E Biological Methods of Waste Recovery and Recycling 3

3 3 3

Year 2 SBL 895 Seminars in Research Proposal and Thesis Writing SBL 899 Research Project and Thesis Writing Master of Science in Crop Protection

6 9

Environmental Conservation And Management SBL 826E Impact Assessment and Risk Management 3 SBL 828E Environmental Audit and Economics 3 Semester II A. Core Courses Code Title Units SBL 830 Advanced Research Methodology 3 SBL 832 Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems 3 st SBL 834 Challenges of conservation in the 21 century 3 SBL 836 Conservation and Evolution 3 SBL 838 Biodiversity Conservation and Management3 Minimum of Two (2) Electives B. Elective Courses Rangeland /Savanna Ecology SBL 842E Rangelands and Savannas: Management and Conservation 3 SBL 854E Environmental Policy and Education 3 Wetland Ecology SBL 844E Wetlands: Management and Conservation 3 SBL 854E Environmental Policy and Education 3 Biodiversity SBL 846E Assessing Biodiversity SBL 850E Modern Museums Management SBL 854E Environmental Policy and Education Forest Ecology SBL 848E Tropical Forests: Management and Conservation SBL 846E Assessing Biodiversity SBL 854E Environmental Policy and Education Wetland Ecology SBL 852E Coastal Zone and Mangrove Ecology SBL 854E Environmental Policy and Education

1.0. Introduction The major challenge facing the agricultural industry today is to reduce crop losses from diseases, pests and weeds while safeguarding our environment. A large proportion of crop production expenses go to crop protection activities. Pesticides contribute to environmental pollution and economic loss as exemplified by fish poisoning and pesticide residues in horticultural products. As a result of market liberalization, different types of pesticides, crop products and planting materials are imported into the country. This calls for stringent measures to curb entry of insect pests, diseases, noxious and invasive weeds that are capable of destroying various crop enterprises and the environment. Improper use of pesticides has led to the country losing considerable foreign exchange. The course is therefore designed to offer training in all aspects of crop and environmental protection to produce holistic graduates well prepared and equipped to meet the current job market requirements. 2.0.Specific Objectives 2.1. Acquire knowledge and skills to offer advisory services in all matters related to crop and environmental protection. 2.2. Design and execute research programmes aimed at solving crop and environmental protection problems. 2.3. Collect, analyze, present and interpret data in crop and environmental protection experiments. 2.4. Acquire competence in pesticide safe handling, usage, disposal and monitoring their fate in the environment. 2.5. To manage crop and environmental protection issues including integrated pest and disease management (IPDM) and other environmental safe procedures. 2.6. To acquire entrepreneurial skills and be able to apply them in the area of crop protection.

3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3

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3.0 Target Groups 3.1. Those who are employed in forestry, wildlife, agriculture and related disciplines, and other sectors that are concerned with the environment. 3.2. Those in manufacturing industries relevant to agriculture. 3.3. Graduates who wish to pursue a career in plant protection. 3.4. People in training institutions. 4.0.Admission Requirements 4.1. The common regulations governing masters degree in MMUST shall apply. 4.2. A holder of a bachelors degree with at least Upper Second Class honours in Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, Botany and Zoology, Environmental Sciences, Forestry, Horticulture or related plant science degree or Bachelor of Education in Science with botany zoology option and any other subject from Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology or any other institution recognized by Senate. (iii) A holder of a bachelors degree with lower second class honours in any of thedegree specified in (i) above with two years of relevant experience or a postgraduate diploma in (i) or equivalent from Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology or any other institution recognized by Senate. 5.0 Course Structure and Duration The programme will be offered under full time and through Open Distance Learning (ODL) modes for students who cannot attend regular University programme. 5.1. Full time 5.1.1 The degree program shall consist of coursework, examination and thesis. 5.1.2. The course shall cover a minimum of 4 semesters and a maximum of 8 semesters and each semester shall be 16 weeks. 5.1.3.Each candidate will be required to take and pass in all courses. 5.1.4. A student shall be required to take a minimum of two courses in one semester and a maximum of five. 5.1.5. Each candidate will be required to undertake a research project leading to an examinable thesis. The choice of the thesis topic shall be made in consultation with the department and the academic supervisor. 5.1.6. Each course unit shall have 45 hours covered in one semester. 5.2. Distance Learning The delivery mode of this program will be, open and distance learning involving home and/or office based media and shall include:

5.2.1. Written self operational study modules shall be issued at the registration time and shall include: Study course materials (booklets etc) Relevant literature Interactive devices and self tests Face to face introductory tutorial Media learning materials such as: - Audio cassettes - E learning materials - Video clips Limited face to face sessions to provide overview of the course at commencement of semester, laboratory work, mid semester and revision before examinations. Support study centres as Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology. 5.2.2. Access to information through computers at ICT unit and other centres such as the library. 5.2.3. Use of libraries at MMUST and agricultural research institutions. 5.2.4. Orientation (immediately after registration) Orientation in ODL delivery 5.2.5. Study, reading and computer skills 5.2.6. Time management and techniques in handling assignments Mentorship, guidance and counseling Emphasis is on satellite centres that serve as a link between the University and the student in the following manner: Registration, Collecting reading materials, Collecting results and programmes, Examination information, posting timetable, holding meetings. 6.0. Duration and the course load of the programmes The Distance Learning programme will run for a minimum of 4 semesters of 16 weeks each and a maximum of 8 semesters of 16 weeks each. There will be two semesters per academic year; therefore the minimum calendar years for completion of the programme would be 2 years and a maximum of 4 years. The minimum course load per semester shall be 2 course units studied through the 16 weeks. Each course unit in the programme has a loading of minimum of 45 hours. The thesis shall be 9 course unit equivalents. 7.0. Transfer of Credits Applicants may apply for credit transfer for similar courses taken in other institutions approved by MMUST senate. Such a transfer shall be limited to 1/3 of the prescribed courses. Applications shall be made on payment of prescribed fees.

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8.0. Examination Regulations 8.1. University examination regulations shall apply. 8.2. Assessment at the end of the coursework shall consist of: 8.2.1. A written examination which shallnormally

account for 60% of total marks in a course.


8.2.2. Continuous assessment based on essays, laboratory assignments and such other tests as prescribed by the lecturer. This will normally constitute 40% of the total marks. 9.0 .Research and Thesis Writing 9.1. Each student shall during the degree program and at the successful end of the course work design a research project in which he/she shall collect data, analyze it and write a thesis on a specific topic related to conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. 9.2. Each student shall be assigned academic supervisors to help him/her through the whole course. 9.3. Where possible, collaborative links with relevant organizations shall be sought for purposes of research and fieldwork. 10.0. Final Submission of Thesis Once a candidate has incorporated into the thesis all the recommendations of the Board of Examiners, normally the Main Supervisor shall check the thesis and then write to the Director, SGS certifying that all correction and amendments suggested by the Examiners have indeed been incorporated. This communication shall be copied to the respective Dean/Directors of Faculty/School/Institute and Head of Department. The thesis shall be prepared according to the format approved by Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology Senate. 11.0. De-Registration An M. Sc. candidate shall be de-registered, if: 11.1. The candidate fails to live up to the academic requirements stipulated in sections 10.3, 10.4 or 10.5 of the regulations of School of Graduate Studies 11.2. The candidates conduct is in a manner that is contrary to the University rules and Regulations 11.3. The candidate or the candidates Sponsor fails to remit fund as to the University for the conduct of studies. 11.4. The candidate has not completed the prescribed studies after three years since the date of registration for

full time candidates or after five years for part-time candidates. 11.5. The candidate has not submitted the final revised thesis after the prescribed time prescribed timed decided during the Oral Defense 12.0. Award of M.Sc.Degree To be awarded a masters degree one MUST have completed and been examined in at least 10 (ten) core courses. In addition he/she must have submitted and successfully defended a dissertation from research work in the second year of study. The award of the M. Sc. Degree shall be guided by the regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. 13.0 Course Coding The code BCP denotes a science course within the broad discipline of Biology of Plant Protection. 14.0 Course Structure Year I Semester I Course code Course Title Units BCP 811 Plant Mycology and Bacteriology 3 BCP 812 Plant Virology and Nematology 3 BCP 813 Vertebrate and Invertebrate Crop Pests 3 BCP 814 Agricultural Research methodology 3 BCP 815 Scientific Communication and Seminars on Current Issues 3 BCP 816 Biotechnology and Crop Protection 3 Total 18 Semester II Code Title Units BCP 821 Weed Science and Management 3 BCP 822 Pest Management and Applied Pest Science 3 BCP 823 Environmental Protection and Management 3 BCP 824 Crop Disease Epidemiology and Management 3 BCP 825 Phytosanitary Legislation, Regulations and Standards 3 Total 15 Year II BCP 841 Entrepreneurship in Crop Protection BCP 899 Research Project and Thesis Writing Total 3 9 12

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Doctor of Philosophy in Environmental Biology 1.0. Introduction The Ph. D. program Environmental Biology is a multi disciplinary program with Multi-level approaches to education and research in ecology. The program is built on the current departmental strengths in terrestrial, forest, range/savanna, and aquatic ecology, environmental conservation and biodiversity areas of specialization. Research conducted by faculty in the program will contribute to fields such as aquatic ecology, environmental science, biodiversity and terrestrial ecology. While the students dissertation may be focused in one of the sub-disciplines, the program curriculum will provide a context for viewing this research in light of its relationship to other sub-disciplines. The curriculum will be individually tailored to each students, research interests and will be built around a set of core courses that emphasize the theme of environmental biology plus statistics, elective courses chosen by the student and his/her advisory committee, seminar course and thesis research. 2.0 General Objectives 2.1. To develop the creative abilities of exceptional students by training them for independent work that contributes to original research and scholarship at the forefront of their chosen fields. 2.2. To nurture Ph. D. candidate in order for them to be deeply involved in research efforts, defining and understanding critical natural and environmental resource problems, and developing new knowledge and management strategies to address these problems. 2.3. To train and produce leaders in research, in training of other professionals and in developing the scientific knowledge base for formulating policies and management practices that contribute to the sustainable use of natural resources. Research will be focused on four broad areas: Ecosystems Management and Conservation Climate Change and carbon trade Enabling sustainable production and consumption Ecosystems Dynamics. Biodiversity Environmental management and conservation 3.0. Specific objectives

3.1. Train highly qualified personnel for advanced level teaching and research 3.2. Train and develop the highest level of scholastic, research capability and creative thinking in the students area of specialization. 3.3. Train doctoral students to apply and conduct research in ecology, biodiversity, environment and related areas. 4.0 Admission Requirements 4.1. The Common University Regulations for the Ph. D. degree by the School of Graduate Studies of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology shall apply.

4.2. To qualify for admission into a Doctoral Degree Programmes, a candidate shall be a: 4.2.1. Holder of a Masters degree of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology in the relevant field, or 4.2.2. Holder of a relevant Masters degree from any other recognized University, or 4.2.3. Holder of other qualifications considered by MMUST Senate as equivalent to a relevant Masters degree. 4.2.5. In addition to the Masters degree, the candidate shall normally have a Bachelors degree.
Application for admission into a Doctoral Programme shall be submitted to the Office of the Director, SGS, on prescribed forms and an appropriate fee shall be charged. All relevant transcripts, certificates and testimonials must also be submitted. An applicant shall submit with the application forms a two-page statement of intended research to demonstrate personal interest and insight regarding the research topic, and ability to undertake research independently through a provisional conceptualization and design of the research. 5.0. Program Requirements 5.1. The Ph. D program in Environmental Biology emphasizes original research leading to thesis work. The candidate has to submit a research proposal within a period stipulated by the common regulations of the School of Graduate Studies of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology. 5.2. The Doctor of Philosophy program in Environmental Biology shall normally consist of course work; examination and thesis. The minimum units of coursework for a Doctoral programme shall be 21 units, and the maximum shall be 24 units, which will be made up of Doctoral level courses (level 9) and two (2) units from Masters level courses (level 8). All coursework

29

shall normally be done in their first year of study for both full-time and part-time students. 5.3. An applicant holding a Masters degree from an institution recognized by Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology Senate with long experience in research as evidenced by publications and/or long experience of continuous teaching at the university level may be considered for exemption from course work in which case, the Ph. D degree shall be offered by research and thesis only. 5.4. It is a mandatory requirement that all Ph. D students participate in Departmental seminars, workshops and conferences. This participation will be guided by their areas of academic interest. Depending on the area of interest, field visits and excursions will be essential part of the program. 6.0. Examinations 6.1. The common University Regulation of examinations shall apply. Evaluation shall involve course work, examination and Thesis. 6.2. Course work shall comprise continuous assessment and/or at least two seminar presentations in each course (40%). 6.3. All courses will be examined normally by a 3 hour written examination (60%) in each course. 6.4. The University Common Regulations shall apply for the examination of the Thesis. 7.0. Course Structure Year 1 Semester 1 Candidates will be required to have done biostatistics at undergraduate level in order to qualify to take SBL 802. SBL 900 Current and Emerging Issues in Biology of conservation 3 SBL 910 Human Dimensions in Conservation 3 At least three electives 6 Total 12 Year I Semester II SBL 802 Advanced Biostatistics SBL 920 Conservation and Biodiversity Management At least three electives Total SBL 990 Research Proposal (Defense) Year II Semester Iand II SBL 999 Research and Thesis

Year III, Semester I and II SBL 999 Research and Thesis Elective Courses SBL 902E Communities and Ecosystems SBL 903E Ecological Research Methods SBL 904E Rangeland Ecology and Management SBL 904E Tropical Forests SBL 905E Forestry, Fisheries and Wildlife Laws SBL 906E Tropical Forests SBL 908E Climate Change SBL 909E Restoration Ecology SBL 912E Plant-Animal Relations SBL 914E Behavioural Ecology SBL 916E Production Ecology SBL 918E Global Environmental Problems SBL 919E Environmental Decision making and Project analysis SBL 922E Waste Generation and Management SBL 923E Environmental Policy and Resource Management SBL 924E Wetland Ecology SBL 926E Coastal and Marine Ecology SBL 928E Costal and Mangrove Ecology SBL 930E Freshwater Ecology SBL 932E Fisheries Biology

15

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

3 3 6 12 2

15

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Department of Sugar Technology B.Sc. Sugar Technology 1.0 Introduction Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) is established on a Science and Technology premise with a focus on Rural Development platform emphasizing on Training, Research & Development and poverty alleviation. The proposed Bachelors Degree Course in Sugar Technology (B.Sc. Sugar Tech.) is in line with MMUSTs vision and mission. MMUST is expected to support and uplift the performance of the sugar industry sub-sector. This course in sugar technology shall provide quality human resource development in sugar technology on the road to successful industrialization of the country by the year 2020. 2.0 Objectives The specific objectives of the course are:

unit in course is defined as one contact hour of lecture or two contact hours of tutorial class per week or three contact hours of laboratory practical per week. Bachelor of Science Degree Course in Sugar Technology students also take within their 4 year academic training a two (2) months workshop practice, a two (2) months industrial attachment and a research project in the final year. In addition to core courses, all students must take all other required relevant courses offered by other departments in the University. 5.0 Course Structure Year 1 Semester I Code Course Title SUT 111 Mathematics for Technologists SCH 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry I COM 110 Introduction to Computers and Computing SUT 121 Basic Botany PHY 110 Fundamentals of Physics I PRD 161 Engineering Drawing I COS 100 Communication Skills I COS 103 Development Concepts and Applications Total Semester II Code Course Title SUT 122 Crop Science and History of Sugar Crops Technologists SUT 132 SUT 112 SCH 101 PRD 162 COS 102 ESM 104 CSC 109 Year II Semester I Code SUT201 SUT 211 SUT 221 SUT 231 SUT 241 PRD221 PRD241 MAT201 Fundamentals of Physics II Basic Statistics for Fundamentals of Chemistry II Engineering Drawing II Communication Skills II Quantitative Skills II Computer Applications I Total

Units 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 26

2.1. To equip sugar technology career students with modern skills in sugar crops production and processing. 2.2. To produce graduates who are all round in sugar
production and entrepreneurship capable of taking up challenging jobs in sugar and related agro-industries. 2.3. To provide opportunities for sugar technology career students to advance their training to post-graduate level. 3.0 Course Requirements 3.1 Admission requirement 3.1.1. All students admitted to the Bachelors Degree Course in Sugar Technology must satisfy the minimum entry requirements that are stipulated in the common university entrance regulations. Candidates in addition must score a minimum of C (plain) in the following cluster: Mathematics Physics Chemistry Biology OR 3.1.2. Advanced (A-Level) Certificate of Education with principal passes in Physics, Chemistry or Biology and at least one subsidiary pass or equivalent qualifications. OR 3.1.3. A diploma in a relevant area of study or equivalent qualifications. 4.0 Conduct of Studies The program shall run for the stipulated academic duration and students must take all required courses both in theory and practical. Scheduled examination(s) in each course must be taken before qualifying for graduation. A

Units

3 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 26

Course Title Agricultural Chemistry Agronomy of Sugar Crops Crop Protection Analog and Digital Electronics Chemistry of Carbohydrates Solid Mechanics I Mechanics of Machines I Engineering Mathematics I Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

31

Semester II Code Course Title SUT 242 Chemistry of Cane Juice SUT Electrical Technology 262 SUT 282 Agricultural Climatology MAT202 CHE212 PRD212 PRD232 PRD272 SUT 290 Engineering Mathematics II Basic Organic Chemistry Material Science I Fluid Mechanics I Thermodynamics I Workshop Practice (8 weeks) Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 28

SUT 451 SUT 461 PRD471 SUT 490

Safety Practice and Procedures Agricultural Management and Extension Thermodynamics IV Research Project Total

3 3 3 3 21 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 3 3 3 3 3 3

Year III Semester I Code Course Title SUT 301 Soil Science and Plant Nutrition SUT 321 Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering SUT 341 Sugar Manufacturing I SUT 371 Principles of Biotechnology SUT 381 Agricultural Mechanization and Cane Haulage IRD305 Entrepreneurship PRD371 Thermodynamics II MAT 301 Engineering Mathematics III Total Semester II Code Course Title SUT 312 Design and Plant Layout SUT 322 Waste Management in sugar industries SUT 332 Special Types of Sugar SUT 342 Sugar Manufacturing II SUT 352 Research Methods SUT 362 Instrumentation and Automation PRD372 Thermodynamics III IRD 301 Introductions to Engineering Economics SUT 390 Industrial Attachment (8 Weeks) Total Year IV Semester I Code Course Title SUT 401 Production Economics SUT 421 Co-Products of Sugar Industry SUT 441 Sugar Manufacturing III

Units 3 3 3 3 3

Semester II Code Course Title BBM 435 Agri-Business Marketing Systems SUT 412 Company Law and Work Legislation SUT 432 Quality Control and Instrumentation SUT 452 Industrial Management and Human relations Analytical Chemistry CHE 432 SUT 490 Research Project Total Elective I Elective II SUT 414E Industrial Chemistry CHE 415E Environmental Chemistry CHE 419E Chemistry of Natural Products PRD 472E Power Plant Engineering

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and Biotechnology 3 3 3 24 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 28 1.0. Introduction The Bachelor of Science degree programme in Agriculture and Biotechnology at Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) is intended to help provide highly trained manpower equipped with a broad range of both conceptual and practical skills geared towards enhancing crop and animal production. Graduates of agriculture and biotechnology will be employed as extension officers, agronomists, soil scientists, agricultural consultants, land use planners and managers, lecturers; agro based corporate managers, livestock farming systems officers, experts in food security programmes and researchers. 2.0. Objectives 2.1 General Objective The programme is designed to provide an in depth theoretical and practical understanding of agricultural biotechnology and also instill research skills in students. The graduates will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired to enhance agricultural production in Kenya and elsewhere through research, formal teaching, extension and management.

Units 3 3 3

32

2.2 Specific Objectives At the end of the programme, the graduate is expected to:2.2.1. Understand the role of crops and animals in providing food, fibre-clothing and cash income for the Kenyan population. 2.2.2. Effect proper methods of raising crops and animals either directly on his/her own farm, or indirectly through extension. 2.2.3. Conduct basic and applied research geared towards enhancing crop and animal production. 2.2.4. Integrate practices of crop and animal production in other farming enterprises in order to sustain human livelihoods. 2.2.5. each theory and practical skills in crop and animal production systems in appropriate agricultural institutions. 2.2.6. Pursue advanced training in relevant areas of specialization in the agriculture and biotechnology sciences. 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. To be eligible for admission, applicants must satisfy the minimum University entry requirements. In addition, applicants must have attained at least C+ (plus) in at least three of the following subjects: Mathematics, 3.2. Chemistry, English, Biology or B in Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences. 3.3. Admission may be offered to diploma holders in Agricultural sciences or related disciplines from recognized institutions, that passed with a credit and above or their equivalent into the second year of study. Those with pass and relevant experience will be admitted into the first year of study. 4.0 Examination Regulations 4.1. The common University examination regulations shall apply. 4.2. Examination shall be held at the end of the semester in which the courses are taught. 5.0. Duration of the programme 5.1 Full-time students shall normally take four academic years of two semesters each to complete the study; in addition part-time students may also take up to a minimum of four years or as determined by the senate. 5.2 A student will take a minimum of 42 and a maximum of 48 units in each year of study. Students wishing to take more than 48 units will require departmental approval.

6.0 Course Coding The courses offered to students of Agriculture and Biotechnology are coded IAB using three letters and three Arabic numbers (digits). The letters represent the department offering the course. Where the following applies I Institute of Sugar and Agro Research Management and Technology (ISARMAT) A- Agriculture B- Biotechnology The first digit in the course code is the year in which the course is offered. The second digit is the discipline in which the course falls. The following IAB codes denote the disciplines:0- General courses 1- Soil Science 2- Animal Science 3- Crop Science 4- Biotechnology/Engineering sciences 8- Agribusiness/Management 9- Research/Training The third digit is the serial number of the course within the discipline. Course Structure (All courses from first to fourth year are compulsory) Year I Semester I Code MAT 100 SCH 100 IAB 100 IAB 101 ESM 103 CSC 110 SBL 112 SBT 112 Title Mathematics for Technologists Fundamentals of Chemistry I Agricultural Communication Skills Agricultural Botany Development Concepts and Applications Fundamentals of Computing Introduction to Biotechnology Introduction to Genetics Total Units 3 4

2 3 3 3 3 3 24

33

Year I Semester II Code CDM 100 SCH 101 STA 106 SBL 121 SBT 122 SZL 123 SZL 124 IAB 140 Title HIV/AIDs Prevention and Management Fundamentals of Chemistry II Basic Statistics Technical and Scientific Communication Skills General Microbiology Fundamentals of Ecology Basic Zoology Farm Power and Machinery Total Units 3 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 24

Year III Semester I Code IAB 300 Title Agriculture Development and Rural Sociology Soil Morphology and Classification Olericulture Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition Biostatistics Floriculture Animal Nutrition Crop Protection Crop Physiology Financial Management in Agriculture Units 2

IAB 310 SHC 310 IAB 311 SBL 311 SHC 312 IAB 320 IAB 332 IAB 333 IAE 381

2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2 2 24

Year II Semester I Code IAB 200 IAB 211 SZL 211 SBT 211 IAB 220 IAB 221 IAB 230 IAB 234 IAB 235 IAB 280 Title Precision Agriculture and Organic Farming Agrogeology Fundamentals of Cell Biology Plant Taxonomy Animal Physiology Principles of Animal Husbandry Principles of Crop Husbandry Annual Crops I Perennial Crops. I Introduction to Agricultural Economics Total Units 3 2 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 24

Year III Semester II Code IAB 312 IAB 313 IAB 321 SBT 324 SBT 326 IAB 334 IAB 335 IAB 380 IAE 385 Title Soil Biology and Bioremediation Irrigation and Drainage Ruminant and Non-ruminant Production Plant Ecophysiology Principles of Plant Pathology Annual Crops II Perennial Crops II Agricultural Information Management and Extension Agricultural Marketing II (Applications) Research Methods Units 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 24 6

Year II Semester II Code IAB 210 CHE 212 IAB 213 CHE 214 IAB 231 SBT 223 SBT 224 IAB 232 IAB 233 IAE 284 Title Soil Physics Basic Organic Chemistry Soil Chemistry Biochemistry Agroclimatology Microbial Genetics Introduction to Molecular Biology Biotechnology and Crop Improvement Pasture and Fodder Crops Agricultural Marketing I (Principles) Units 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 2

IAB 390

IAB 392 Field Attachment Year IV Semester I Code IAB 400 IAB 410 IAB 411 Title Agricultural Law and Policy Fertilizer Manufacture and Formulation Agricultural System Nutrient Management

Units 2 2 2

34

IAB 412 SBL 412 SBL 413 IAB 420 IAB 430 IAB 432 IAB 490 Year IV Semester II Code IAB 401 IAB 415 IAB 416 SBT 427 IAB 481 IAB 482 IAB 484 IAB 491

Engineering Surveying Ethics and Risks in Biotechnology Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Animal Diseases Seed Science and Technology Post Harvest Physiology and Technology Research Project I

3 3 3 3 2 2 2 24

year of study students will thus be expected to specialise in one of the following disciplines; Sugar Manufacture Industrial Fermentation Technology Food Manufacture and Process Design

Graduates of food processing technology will be employed as brewers, food industry quality control technologists, managers and consultants, lecturers, agro-processing consultants, agro-based industry corporate managers, production managers and researchers. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. General objective
The programme is designed to provide in theoretical and practical understanding of the subject matter in Food Processing and also impart research skills in students. The graduates will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired to enhance post-harvest management and food processing in Kenya and elsewhere through employment, selfemployment, research, formal teaching and management. 2.2. Specific objectives At the end of the programme the graduate is expected to:

Title Agricultural Seminars Soil and Water Conservation Agricultural Processing and Farm Structures Plant Breeding Farm Management and Accounts Production Economics Organization, Management and Public Administration Research Project II

Units 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 2 21

Electives (Take at least one) Code Title IAB 413 Agricultural Waste Management IAB 414 Wet Land Soils and Conservation IAB 433 Biology and Ecology of Invasive Plants BBM 435 Agri-Business Marketing Systems SUT 451 Safety Practice and Procedures IAB 483 Project Planning, Management and Extension

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3

2.2.1. Appreciate the importance of food processing, sugar manufacturing and industrial fermentation in the provision of food, employment and income for the Kenyan population. 2.2.2. Effect proper methods of processing food and agricultural products at the rudimentary to the large scale industrial level. 2.2.3. Carry out basic and applied research geared towards the enhancement of food processing, sugar manufacture and industrial fermentation. 2.2.4. Teach theory and practical skills in food processing, sugar manufacture and industrial fermentation in appropriate institutions. 2.2.5. Pursue advanced training in relevant areas of
specialisation in appropriate institutions. 2.2.6. Be in the forefront in the topical national endeavour to achieve sustainable development. 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. To be eligible for admission, applicants must satisfy the minimum university entry requirements. In addition applicants must have attained at least C+ (plus) in at least three of the following subjects; Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology, or a B (plain) in Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences. 3.2.Admission may be offered to diploma holders in agricultural sciences, engineering sciences or related

Bachelor of Science in Food Processing Technology 1.0. Introduction The Bachelors Degree Course in Food Processing Technology (B.Sc. Food Proc Tech.) at Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) is intended to provide highly trained manpower with a broad range of conceptual and practical skills geared towards enhancing food processing and storage, sugar manufacture and industrial fermentation; At the third

35

disciplines who passed with a credit and above or equivalent into the second year of study. Those with pass and relevant experience will be admitted into the first year of study. 3.3.Admission may also be offered to Advanced (ALevel) Certificate of Education holders with at least two principal passes and one subsidiary pass in the following cluster of subjects: Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology.

8.0. Course Structure

Year 1 Semester I
Title Mathematics for MAT 100 Technologists Fundamentals of SCH 100 Chemistry I Fundamentals of CSC 110 Computing IPT 100 Human Nutrition Fundamentals of SPH 110 Physics I PRD 161 Engineering Drawing I IAB 121 Principles of Animal Husbandry Development Concepts and ESM 103 Applications Total Year 1 Semester II Code Course Title SPH 111 Fundamentals of Physics II STA 106 Basic Statistics SCH 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry II PRD 162 Engineering Drawing II SBT 122 General Microbiology Technical and Scientific SBL 121 Communication Skills CSC 111 Introduction to Programming HIV/AIDS Prevention and CDM 100 Management Total Code Units 3 4 3 2 4 3 2 3 24 Units 4 2 4 3 3 3 3 3 26

3.4.At the discretion of Senate other qualifications equivalent to the above may also be considered for admission. 4.0. Examination Regulations The common university examination regulations shall apply. 5.0. Duration of the programme
5.1. Full time students shall take four academic years of two semesters each to complete the study, 5.2. part time students may take up to a minimum of eight years. 6.0. Programme Requirements student will take a minimum of 42 d a maximum of 48 units in each year of study. Students wishing to take more than 48 units will require departmental approval. 7.0.Course Coding The courses offered by ISAMART for the Bachelor of Science in Food Processing Technology are coded IPT (Institute Process Technology) where the following applies: The first digit in the course code is the year in which the course is offered. The second digit is the discipline in which the course falls, while the third digit is the serial number of the course within that discipline. The following IPT codes denote the disciplines that fall under Bachelor of Science in Food Processing Technology programme of the Institute of Sugar and Agro Research Management and Technology 0 General Courses 1 Sugar Manufacture 2 Process Engineering 3 Industrial Fermentation 4 Food Technology 8 Management 9 Research

The third digit is the serial number of the course within the discipline.

Year II Semester I Code Course Title Units SCH 230 Chemistry of Bio-molecules 3 PRD 232 Fluid Mechanics I 3 PRD 221 Solid Mechanics I 3 Analogue and Digital SUT 231 3 Electronics Process Technology IPT 222 3 Thermodynamics I IAB 230 Principles of Crop Husbandry 3 PRD 241 Mechanics of Machines I 3 MAT 201 Engineering Mathematics I 3 Total 24 Year II Semester II Code Title Units SUT 262 Electrical Technology 3 Food Chemistry and IPT 242 3 Microbiology MAT 202 Engineering Mathematics II 3

36

PRD 212 IPT 224 IPT 225 IPT 243 IPT 244 IPT 290

Material Science I Sanitation and Waste control Process Technology Thermodynamics II Food Analysis and Quality Assurance Food Biotechnology Total Workshop Practice (8 Weeks)

3 3 3 3 3 24 4

Year III Semester II


Core Courses Code Title IPT 325 Plant Engineering Unit Operations in Process IPT 326 Technology II IPT 327 Heat and Mass Transfer Instrumentation and SUT 362 Automation IPT 391 Research Methods 3 Courses depending on the specialisation of the student Total Industrial Attachment (8 IPT 390 Weeks) Sugar Manufacture Option Courses Code Course Title Design and Capacities of IPT 315 Sugar Machinery Sugar Manufacturing IPT 314 Operations II Agricultural Mechanization IPT 313 and Cane Haulage Units 3 3 3 3 3

Year III Semester I Core Courses Codes Title IPT 320 Energy and Mass Balances IPT 321 Fluid Machinery BBM 305 Entrepreneurship Unit Operations in Process IPT 322 Technology I MAT 301 Engineering Mathematics III 3 Courses depending on the specialisation of the student Total Sugar Manufacture Option Courses Code Course Title Sugar Manufacturing IPT 312 Operations I IPT 311 Chemistry of Carbohydrates Agronomy of Sugar Crops IPT 310 Industrial Fermentation Option Courses Course Code Course Title SBT319 Bioreactors SBL 314 Microbial Diversity IPT 331 Bio-process Engineering

Units 3 3 3 3 3 9 24

9 24 4

Units 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3

Food Manufacture and Process Design Option Courses Course Code Course Title Units Physical Properties of IPT 323 Biological Materials 3 IPT 341 Fats and Oils Technology 3 Design of Food and Process IPT 324 Machinery I 3

Industrial Fermentation Option Courses Code Course Title Units Malting and Brewing IPT 332 Technology 3 SBL 320 Bioenergetics 3 SBT 329 Industrial Microbiology 3 Food Manufacture and Process Design Option Courses Code Course Title Units Malting and Brewing IPT 332 Technology 3 Meat , Poultry and Fish IPT 342 Technology 3 Design of Food and Process IPT 329 Machinery II 3 Year IV Semester I Core Courses Code Title Units Structural Design for Process IPT 421 3 Technology Industrial Organization and IPT 450 3 Production Economics IPT 451 Project Engineering of Process 3

37

IPT 422 IPT 490

Plants Quality Reliability Engineering Research Project I 3 Courses depending on the pecialization of the student

Industrial Fermentation Technology Option Courses 3 3 9 24 Code IPT 434 SBT 426 SZL 426 Title Distillery Operation and Maintenance Bioprocess and Cellular Engineering Biopharmaceuticals Units 3 3 3

Total Sugar Manufacture Option Courses Code Title IPT 410 Special Types of Sugar SUT 421 Co-Products of Sugar Industry Chemical Control in Sugar IPT 411 Manufacturing

Units 3 3 3

Industrial Fermentation Technology Option Courses Code Title Units IPT 431 Biomass Engineering 3 Biochemical Engineering 3 IPT 432 IPT 433 Pharmaceutical Technology 3 Food Manufacture and Process Design Option Courses Code Course Title Units Cereal, Starch and Protein IPT 441 Technology 3 IPT 442 Beverage Technology 3 IPT 443 Dairy Technology 3 Core courses Code Title Units Agri-Business Marketing BBM 3 435 Systems Company Law and Work SUT 412 3 Legislation Packaging and Filling IPT 423 3 Technology IPT 424 Environmental Engineering 3 IPT 491 Research Project II 3 3 Courses depending on the pecialization of the student 9 Total 24 Sugar Manufacture Option Courses Code Title Cogeneration in Sugar IPT 412 Manufacturing Distillery Operation and IPT 434 Maintenance IPT 412 Sugar Refining

Food Manufacture and Process Design Option Courses Code Title Units Post harvest Technology of IPT 444 Plantation Crops 3 Fruit and Vegetable IPT 445 Technology 3 Sugar and Confectionery IPT 446 Technology 3 Bachelor of Science in Renewable Energy and Biofuels Technology 1.0. Introduction

The Bachelors Degree Course in Renewable Energy and Biofuels Technology (B.Sc. Ren En & Biof Tech.) at Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) is intended to provide highly trained manpower with a broad range of conceptual and practical skills geared towards enhancing renewable energy, bio-fuel technology and energy consultancy. Graduates of renewable energy and bio-fuels technology will be employed as bio-fuel consultants, energy policy makers, renewable energy technologists, lecturers, agro-processing consultants, energy corporate managers, and researchers. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. General objective
The programme is designed to provide an in depth theoretical and practical understanding of the subject matter and also impart research skills in students. The graduates will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired to enhance bio-energy and renewable energy in Kenya and elsewhere through self employment, research, formal teaching and management. 2.2. Specific objectives At the end of the programme the graduate is expected to:

Units 3 3 3

38

2.2.1. Understand the importance of renewable and bio energy as a source of employment and income generation for the Kenyan population. 2.2.2. Effect proper methods of tapping the natural resources for green energy at the rudimentary scale to the large scale industrial level. 2.2.3. Carry out basic and applied research geared towards the enhancement of renewable energy, and bio-fuels processing and development. 2.2.4.Teach theory and practical skills in renewable energy technologies and bio-fuel energy development in appropriate institutions. 2.2.5. Pursue advanced training in relevant areas of
specialisation in energy centres. 2.2.6. Be in the forefront in the topical national endeavour to achieve sustainable development. 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. To be eligible for admission, applicants must satisfy the minimum university entry requirements. In addition applicants must have attained at least C+ (plus) in at least three of the following subjects; Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology, or a B (plain) in Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences. 3.2.Admission may be offered to diploma holders in agricultural sciences, engineering sciences or related disciplines who passed with a credit and above or equivalent into the second year of study. Those with pass and relevant experience will be admitted into the first year of study. 3.3.Admission may also be offered to Advanced (ALevel) Certificate of Education holders with at least two principal passes and one subsidiary pass in the following cluster of subjects: Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology.

6.0. Prpgramme Requirements A student will take a minimum of 42 and a maximum of 48 units in each year of study. Students wishing to take more than 48 units will require departmental approval. 7.0.Course Coding The courses offered by ISAMART for the Bachelor of Science in Renewable Energy and Biofuels Technology are coded IET (Institute Energy Technology) where the following applies: The first digit in the course code is the year in which the course is offered. The second digit is the discipline in which the course falls, while the third digit is the serial number of the course within that discipline. The following IPT codes denote the disciplines that fall under the Institute of Sugar and Agro Research Management and Technology 0 General Courses 1 Engineering Science 2 Energy Engineering 3 Bio-fuel/Bio-energy Technology 8 Management courses 9 Research and Training The third digit is the serial number of the course within the discipline. 8.0. Course Structure Year 1 Semester I Code Title Mathematics MAT 100 for Technologists Fundamentals of SCH 100 Chemistry I Fundamentals of CSC 110 Computing Principles of Animal IAB 121 Husbandry SPH 110 Fundamentals of Physics I IET 111 Survey of EnergySources PRD 161 Engineering Drawing I Development Concepts ESM 103 and Applications Total Semester II Code Title SBT 122 General Microbiology SPH 111 Fundamentals of Physics II STA 106 Basic Statistics Fundamentals of SCH 101 Chemistry II PRD 162 Engineering Drawing II

Units 3 4 3 2 4 2 3 3 24 Units 3 4 3 4 3

3.4.At the discretion of Senate other qualifications equivalent to the above may also be considered for admission.

4.0. Examination Regulations


4.1.The common university examination regulations shall apply.

4.2.Examination shall be held at the end of the semester in which the courses are taught. 5.0.Duration of programme
5.1.Full time students shall normally take four academic years of two semesters each to complete the study, 5.5. Part time students may take up to a minimum of eight years.

39

CSC 111 SBL 121 CDM100

Introduction to Programming Technical and Scientific Communication Skills HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management Total

3 3 3 26

301

III Total 24

Semester II Semester II Code Course Title IPT 325 Plant Engineering The Energy Market, Policy IET 384 and Environmental Law IET 313 Geothermal Energy PRD 372 Thermodynamics III IET 391 Research Methods Instrumentation and SUT 362 Automation IPT 327 Heat and Mass Transfer IET 312 Wind and Wave Energy Total Industrial Attachment IET 391 (8 Weeks) Year IV Semester I Course Code IPT 450 IET 421 SUT 451 IET 412 IPT 422 IET 411 PRD 471 IET 491

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 4

Year II Semester I Code SCH 230 IET 221 PRD232 SUT 231 IAB 230 PRD 221 PRD 241 MAT 201

Title Chemistry of Bio-molecules Engineering Surveying Fluid Mechanics I Analogue and Digital Electronics Principles of Crop Husbandry Solid Mechanics I Mechanics of Machines I Engineering Mathematics I Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 4

Semester II Code Title Operations Research for IET 281 Technologists SUT 262 Electrical Technology Environmental IET 281 Management MAT 202 Engineering Mathematics II Applied Biochemistry for IET 231 Bio-energy PRD 212 Material Science I IET 282 Energy Management PRD 272 Thermodynamics I Total Workshop Practice IET 291 (8 Weeks) Year III Semester I Code

Course Title Industrial Organisation and Production Economics Network Engineering, Modelling and Management Safety Practices and Procedures Energy Storage Technology Quality Reliability Engineering Hydro-electric and Tidal Energy Thermodynamics IV Research Project I Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Title Solar, Photovoltaics and IET 311 OTEC Energy. IPT 321 Fluid Machinery IPT 320 Energy and Mass Balances SUT Principles of Biotechnology 371 IPT 331 Bio-Process Engineering ESM305 Entrepreneurship PRD Thermodynamics II 371 MAT Engineering Mathematics

Units 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 3

Semester II Course Course Title Code Distillery Operation and IPT 434 Maintenance PRD 472 Power Plant Engineering Data Acquisition and IET 421 Control Energy generation from IET 431 biomass and waste Project Management for IET 481 Technologists IET 492 Research Project II Two elective courses

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 6

40

depending choice Total

on

student 24

Elective Courses (Students to choose any two)

Code
IET 414 IPT 424 IPT 412 CSC 415 IET 433 IET 423 IET 416 IEET 434 IET472 IET482

Title

Units

GIS for Renewable Energy 3 Environmental Engineering 3 Cogeneration in Sugar Manufacturing 3 Management Information Systems 3 Industrial Biotechnology in Bio-fuel Processing 3 Sustainable Architecture 3 Fuel Cells & Nuclear Renewable Energy 3 Biochemical Engineering in Biofuel.Production 3 Energy Auditing 3 Economic, Resource Assesment And Appraisal 3

41

Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 1.0 Introduction The Department of Physical Sciences offers a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. This is an instructional programme that provides classroom, laboratory and field experience in Chemistry. In this programme, students have to take chemistry related courses as well as nonchemistry courses which have been appropriately selected to ensure sound understanding of the science of Chemistry. The programme is sufficiently flexible to allow and encourage students to develop interests in relevant fields, which are specifically oriented to address certain key requirements in the society and fit in the overall pattern of employment of chemistry graduates around the world. 2.0 Objectives 2.1 General Objectives The general objective is to produce a graduate with basic and relevant knowledge in Chemistry, having refined and enhanced skills in preparation for the societal challenges associated with the interpretation and implementation of policies related to Chemistry. 2.2 Specific Objectives The student should on completion of the course competently undertake the following 2.2.1. Research and extension work in Chemistry. 2.2.2. Postgraduate work in Chemistry 2.2.3. Employment in organizations and institutions engaged in Chemistry related work. 3.0 Admission Requirements 3.1. General university regulations shall normally apply. 3.2. In addition, candidates MUST have passed in Chemistry/Physical Sciences with a minimum grade of C+ in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) or its equivalent with an individual score of at least grade C in English and Mathematics. 4.0. Duration of the course The programme shall normally take four years.

Theory Courses: (a) Continuous assessment of normally three tests (30%); (b) End of semester examination - a written paper of normally 3 hours duration (70%). Practical based Courses: (a) Continuous assessment tests (20%); (b) Laboratory exercises (10%); (c) End of semester examination - a written paper of normally 3 hours duration (70%). Research Project: (a) Assessment on the candidate's work and on the submitted Project Report (70%), (b) Oral examination (30%). The external examiner shall be involved in the assessment of the submitted report and may participate in the oral examination. Grading System and Degree Classification: The general University regulations shall normally apply. 6.0 Definition of Unit. 1 unit = 1 lecture hour per week per semester. 1 unit = 2 Tutorial hours per week per semester. 1 unit = 3 Hours of laboratory work per week per semester. 7.0 Course Coding The course codes have three letters followed by three digits. The first letter denotes the faculty under which the course is offered. The next letters denotes the discipline under which the course is offered. The first digit indicates the year of study. The second digit denotes the specialized field, i.e. digit 0 - General Chemistry field; 1 - Inorganic Chemistry field; 2 - Analytical Chemistry field; 3 - Organic Chemistry field; 4 - Physical Chemistry field; 5 - Environmental Chemistry field. The third digit indicates the serial number of the course in a given category and the letter E after the digits denotes an Elective course. For example: SCH 416 is a science course in the field of inorganic chemistry with serial number six. 8.0 Course Structure The department shall normally offer the core courses every academic year. Additionally, elective courses will be offered at the discretion of the department. Year one and two covers basic topics in all Chemistry fields. Students will be required to take all the courses offered by the department of physical sciences and any other courses as approved by senate. The third and fourth years are devoted to an intensive study of theoretical and practical courses and allow for a certain amount of specialized Chemistry fields. A

academic

5.0 Examinations 5.1. The general University Examination Regulations shall normally apply. 5.2. The weighting for each course is as follows:

42

Research project will be carried out in the final year of study for students majoring in chemistry. Year 1 Semester I Code Title Units SCH 100: Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 IRD 100: Communication Skills I 3 IRD 103 : Concepts of Development and 3 applications MAT 110: Basic Calculus 3 SPH 110: Fundamentals of Physics I 4 CDM 100: HIV/AIDS Prevention and 3 Management MAT 106: Applied Mathematics 3 Total 23 Semester II Code Title Units SCH 101: Fundamentals of Chemistry II 4 IRD 102 : Communication skills II 3 IRD 104 : Qualitative Skills II 3 MAT 111: Geometry & Elementary 3 Applied Mathematics SPH 111: Fundamentals of Physics II 4 CUC 121: Science, Technology and 3 Society STA 106: Basic statistics 3 Total 23 Year II semester I Code Title SCH 210: Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding SCH 230: Organic Chemistry I SCH 240: Basic Chemical Thermodynamics COM 205: Introduction to Computers MAT 210: Calculus I MAT 212: Linear Algebra I MAT 214: Vector Analysis STA 210: Probability & Statistics I Total number of Units Semester II Code Title SCH 211: Inorganic Chemistry SCH 220: Analytical Chemistry I SCH 231: Organic Chemistry II SCH 232: Chemistry of Biomolecules

SCH 241: Chemical Kinetics Code Title) MAT 213: Linear Algebra II STA 211: Probability & Statistics II Total Year III Semester I Code Title SCH 310: Comparative Chemistry of s and p Block Elements SCH 320: Analytical Chemistry II SCH 330: Organic Synthesis SCH 331: The Chemistry of Aromatic Compounds SCH 340: Statistical Thermodynamics SCH 350: Environmental Chemistry MAT 314: Ordinary Differential Equations Electives ( Students to take at least one elective) Course Code and Title SCH 322E: Advanced Instrumental Analysis SCH 334E: Medicinal Chemistry SCH 342E: Frontiers of Chemistry SCH 352E: Natural Resources, Energy and Environment Total Semester II Code Title SCH 311: The Comparative Chemistry of d-Block Elements SCH 312: Radiation and Nuclear Chemistry SCH 321: Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis SCH 332: Alicyclic and Heterocyclic Chemistry SCH 333: Streochemistry, Conformational Studies & Reaction Mechanisms SCH 341: Surface and Colloid Chemistry SCH 351: Aquatic Chemistry Electives ( Students to take at least one elective) Code Title SCH 313E: Inorganic Reactions Mechanisms of Complex Compounds

3 Units 3 3 21

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 24

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Units 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3

3 3 3

Units

43

SCH 343E: Crystallography SCH 353E: Wastes and Contaminated Solid Management Total Year IV Semester I Code Title SCH 410: Coordination and Organometallic Chemistry SCH 412: The Study of Lanthanide and Actinide Series SCH 430: Organic Spectroscopy SCH 432: Polymer Chemistry SCH 440: Electrochemistry SCH 450: Chemical Toxicology and Management SCH 461: Research Project Electives ( Students to take at least one elective) Code Title SCH 414E Chemical Applications of Group Theory SCH 433E: Chemistry of Carbohydrates SCH 452E: Chemical Risk Assessment Total Number of Units 8.4 (b) Year IV Semester II Code Title SCH 400: Industrial Chemistry SCH 413: Bio-inorganic Chemistry SCH 420: Scientific Instrumentation SCH 431: Chemistry of Natural Products SCH 411: Quantum Chemistry SCH 451: Atmospheric Chemistry SCH 461: Research Project Electives ( Students to take at least one elective) Code Title SCH 415E: Chemistry of Ceramics SCH 441E: Photochemistry SCH 453E: Chemistry and Life Total

3 3 24

Master of Science in Chemistry 1.0. Introduction The program offers specialized Chemistry training leading to the Master of Science degree in Analytical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry. Chemistry is the science that contributes most to the widest range of activities of modern life, from microelectronics to medicine and from foods to fuels. There is need for a better educated workforce to cope with the increasingly complex demands of a rapidly changing society. A diverse programme of graduate level courses would help to stimulate creative and flexible research interests. Such a programme would make the student grow in intellect, judgment, competence and confidence. 2.0. Objectives To equip candidates with adequate knowledge and understanding of the principles of Chemistry. 2.1. To contribute to the advancement of the subject of chemistry through high level training and research. 2.2. To develop creative thinking, enhance research capability and promote high level scholarship. 2.3. To conduct original investigations based on societal needs. 2.4. To enable acquisition of research skills by students. 2.5. To produce graduates with relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes to satisfy the high manpower requirements needed for the development of society 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. The common University regulations for the Master's Degree program shall apply. 3.2. In addition, the following shall be eligible for registration for the Master of Science degree in Chemistry. 3.2.1. Holders of a Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree with a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours degrees or their equivalent fro a recognized university and has studied Chemistry in relevant fields at BSc. Level. 3.2.2. A holder of a Bachelor of Education degree with a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours or its equivalent and has studied chemistry as a major subject. 3.2.3. Holders of a Lower Second Class Honours degree from a recognized university by the MMUST senate, who in addition to the degree, have a post graduate qualification in relevant field, or have postgraduate research experience.

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 24

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 24

4.0. Programme Requirements

44

4.1. The program emphasizes on an original research leading to thesis work. The candidate has to submit a research proposal within a period stipulated by the common regulations of the School of Graduate Studies for the MSc Program of the University. 4.2. Students shall participate in the departmental seminars, workshops and conferences. Depending on the area of research, industrial visits and excursions will be an essential part of the program. 5.0 Examinations 5.1. Common University examinations shall regulations shall apply. 6.0. Course Structure Students will take all the core courses listed below with some selected electives. Year I, Semester I SCH 800:Seminars in Chemistry 2 units SCH 810:Research Methods (Core) 3 units SCH 822:Advanced Separation Techniques 3 units SCH 854:Physico Chemical Analysis 3 units SCH 890:Research proposal I (writing) 2 units and Two Courses from the area of specialization; a core course and at least one elective analytical chemistry SCH 820:Advanced Analytical Methods I (Core) 3 units SCH 825 E:Environmental Analysis 3 units SCH 827 E:Analysis of Industrial Effluents 3 units inorganic chemistry SCH 830: Recent Advances in Inorganic Chemistry (core) 3 units SCH 834 E:Inorganic Crystal Chemistry 3 units SCH 835 E:Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis 3 units organic chemistry SCH 840: Advanced Organic Spectroscopy (Core) 3 units SCH 846 E:Advanced Physical Organic Chemistry 3 units SCH 847 E:Advanced Heterocyclic Chemistry 3 units SCH 848 E: Recent Advances in Organic Chemistry 3 units physical chemistry SCH 850: Recent Advances in Physical Chemistry (Core) 3 units SCH 855 E:Chemical Applications of Group Theory 3 units SCH 858 E:Phase Equilibria and Surface

Chemistry Year 1, Semester II SCH 800:Seminars in Chemistry SCH 891: Research proposal II (defence)

3 untis 3 units 2 units

and Four Courses from the area of specialization all core units and at least one elective analytical chemistry SCH 821:Advanced Analytical Methods II (core) 3 units SCH 823:Current Topics in Analytical Chemistry (Core) 3 units SCH 824 E:Biochemical Analysis 3 units SCH 826 E:Thermal and Radio-Chemical Analysis 3 units inorganic chemistry SCH 831:Modern Inorganic Chemistry (Core) 3 units SCH 832:Advanced Coordination Chemistry (Core) 3 units SCH 833:Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry (Core) 3 units SCH 836 E:Quantum Chemistry 3 units SCH 837 E:Magneto-Chemistry 3 units SCG 838 E:Mineral Processing Recycling Processes 3 units organic chemistry SCH 841:Modern Synthetic Organic Chemistry (Core) 3 units SCH 842:Stereochemistry and Conformational Analysis (Core) 3 units SCH 843:Advanced Natural Products Chemistry (Core) 3 units SCH 844 E:Vitamins, Antibiotics, Natural Dyes & Pigments 3 units SCH 849 E:Phytochemical Methods 3 units physical chemistry SCH 851:Advanced Chemical Thermodynamics (Core ) 3 units SCH 852:Advanced Electrochemistry (Core) 3 units SCH 853:Advanced Chemical Kinetics (Core) 3 units SCH 856 E:Theory of Molecular Spectroscopy 3 units Year 2, Semester I SCH 800:Seminars in Chemistry 3 units SCH 899: Research and Thesis 12 units YEAR 2, Semester II SCH 800:Seminars in Chemistry 3 units SCH 899: Research and Thesis 12 units List of Elective Courses

45

Analytical Chemistry SCH 824E: Biochemical Analysis SCH 825E:Environmental Analysis SCH 826E: Thermal and Radiochemical Analysis SCH 827E:Analysis of Industrial Effluents

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

Inorganic Chemistry SCH 834E:Inorganic Crystal Chemistry 3 units SCH 835E: Organometallic Chemistry 3 units SCH 836E: Quantum Chemistry 3 units SCH 837E: Magneto-Chemistry 3 units SCH 838E: Mineral Processing and Recycling Processes 3 units Organic Chemistry SCH 844E: Vitamins, Antibiotics, Natural Dyes and Pigments 3 units SCH 845E: Proteins and Carbohydrates Chemistry 3 units SCH 846E: Advanced Physical Organic Chemistry 3 units SCH 847E: Advanced Heterocyclic Chemistry 3 units SCH 849E: Phytochemical Methods 3 units Physical Chemistry SCH 855E: Chemical Applications of Group Theory 3 units SCH 856E: Theory of Molecular Spectroscopy 3 units SCH 857E: Phase Equilibria and Surface Chemistry 3 units Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry 1.0 Introduction The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Programme in the Department of Chemistry is designed to prepare candidates to undertake high-level independent research work and participate in a wide range of research projects. The students will carry out original research on welldefined problems in Chemistry and the findings reported in thesis form. The course work, together with research and thesis enhances the cognitive and theoretical understanding of the area of specialization. There are four areas of specialization being offered in Chemistry. Candidates for PhD shall choose anyone of the following areas: Analytical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry

2.0 Objectives The specific objectives of the PhD programme in Chemistry are to: 2.1 Train highly qualified manpower for advanced level teaching and research. 2.2 Develop the highest level of scholarship, research capability and creative thinking in the student's area of specialization. 2.3. Apply their expertise in finding solutions to problems of the society. 2.4. Further the frontiers of knowledge in chemistry 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. The common University regulations for the PhD degree shall apply. 3.2. Additionally, the applicant should be a holder of a Masters degree in Chemistry or a closely related field recognized by the University Senate. 3.1. Programme Requirements 3.2. The PhD programme in Chemistry emphasises on an original research leading to thesis work. The candidate has to submit a research proposal within a period stipulated by the common regulations of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension for PhD programmes of the University. 3.3. An applicant holding recognized master's degree with long experience in research as evidenced by publications and/or long experience of continuous teaching at the university level may be considered for exception of course work in which case the PhD degree course shall be offered by research and thesis only. 3.4. It is obligatory for the students to participate in the Departmental Seminars, Workshops and Conferences. Depending on the area of research, industrial visits and excursions will be an essential part of the programme. 4.0. Examinationsvaluation 4.1. Common University Regulation on examinations shall apply. 4.2. Examination shall involve Course work, Examination and Thesis. 4.3. Course work shall comprise Continuous Assessments or at least two Seminar paper presentations in each course (40%). 4.4. All courses will be examined normally by a 3 hours written examination (60%) in each course. 4.5. The University Common Regulations shall apply for the examination of Thesis.

46

6.0 Course Structure The PhD programme in chemistry shall normally consist of course work, examination and thesis. The minimum course workload shall be 24 units: at least 12 Units from the 800 Series courses and 12 units of the 900 Series courses described separately under each area of specialization. A candidate who had successfully taken the required 800 Series courses may be credited with no more than 12 units towards the PhD course units. The units distribution of course work, research and thesis are as follows: Year I Semester I Code Title SCH 810 Research Methods and Data Analysis SCH 811 Recent Advances in Instrumental Methods of Analysis SCH 990 Research proposal (writing)

Units 3 3

Organic Chemistry Code Title Units SCH 940 Total Synthesis: Strategies and 6 Case Studies or Physical Chemistry Code Title Units SCH 950 Catalysis,Surface and Colloid 3 Chemistry At least two relevant 900 Series courses 6 units Year II, Semester I and II Code Title Units SCH 999 Research and Thesis 15 Year III Semester I and II Code Title Units SCH 999 Research and Thesis 15 900 Series Elective Courses Code Title SCH 922E Advanced Analytical Instrumentation Advanced Analytical SCH 923E Chemistry of Pollutants SCH924E Advanced Electro-analytical Chemistry SCH 925E Advanced Ultra-trace Analytical Chemistry SCH931E Advanced Bio-inorganic Chemistry SCH 932E Current Topics in Inorganic Chemistry SCH 933E Reactive Intermediates, Metal clusters, and Catalysis SCH 941E Enzymology and Protein Chemistry SCH 942E Advanced Organic Synthesis SCH 943E Current Topics in Organic Chemistry SCH 951E Polymer Physical Chemistry SCH 952E Current Topics in Physical Chemistry SCH 953E Applied Electrochemistry SCH 954E Advanced Molecular Spectroscopy SCH 990 Research Proposal SCH 999 Research and Thesis Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

At least two 800 Series courses relevant to the area of specialization as described in the Master of Science programme YEAR I Semester II Code Title Units 3 SCH 920 Advanced Experimental Techniques in Chemistry SCH 990 Research proposal (defence) 3 and Three Courses of specialization from: Either Analytical Chemistry Code Title SCH 921 Analytical Approach Chemical Problems

Units to 3

At least two relevant 900 Series courses 6 units Or Inorganic Chemistry Code Title Units SCH 930 Advanced Physical 3 Inorganic Chemistry At least two relevant 900 Series courses 6 units Or

30

47

Department of Physics Bachelor of Science in Physics 1.0 Introduction The department of Physical Sciences offers a Bachelor of Science in Physics. This is an instructional programme that provides classroom, laboratory and field experience in Physics. In this programme, students have to take physics and physics related courses as well as nonphysics courses which have been appropriately selected to ensure sound understanding of Physics and its related fields. The programme is sufficiently flexible to allow and encourage students to develop interests in relevant fields, which are specifically oriented to address certain key requirements in the society and fit in the overall pattern of employment of Physics graduates around the world. Towards this end the programme is tailored to include what is universally perceived to be fundamental physics as well as suitably specialized fields of study dictated by contemporary technological and societal needs. 2.0 Course Objectives 2.1 General Objective The general objective is to produce a graduate with basic and relevant knowledge in Physics, having refined and enhanced skills in preparation for the societal challenges associated with the interpretation and implementation of policies related to Physics. 2.2 Specific Objectives 2.2.1. To promote and develop graduates who have a clear understanding of scientific knowledge, values and skills hence qualifying them to be strong policy practitioners. 2.2.2. To prepare graduates who will competently undertake research, consultancy, development and extension work in Physics and its related fields. 2.2.3. To prepare graduates who will have positive and responsive attitudes, initiatives and creative thinking oriented to the world of scientific work. 2.2.4. To produce graduates who will meet the increasing demand of trained personnel in organizations and institutions engaged in Physics related work. 2.2.5. To inculcate in the student a consciousness the needs and aspirations of the society and augment the sense of responsibility towards the same. 2.2.6. To instill into the students an appreciation of the necessity and desire to continue to learn both formally and informally. 2.2.7. To produce graduates who will competently undertake postgraduate work in Physics and its related fields.

2.2.8. To provide an enabling environment for students to capture, process and disseminate information with respect to the acquired Knowledge and skills. 3.0 Duration of Programme The programme shall normally take four academic years. 4.0 Admission Requirements The common university regulations of admission shall normally apply. In addition, candidates MUST have passed in Physics/Physical Sciences with a minimum grade of C+ in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) or its equivalent with a minimum score of grade C in English and mathematics. 5.0 Examinations The common University Examination Regulations shall apply. The weighting for each course is as follows: 5.1 Theory Courses: (a) Continuous assessment of normally three tests (30%), (b) End of semester examination - a written paper of normally 3 hours duration (70%). 5.2.Laboratory based Courses: (a) Continuous assessment tests (20%), (b) Laboratory exercises (10%), (c). End of semester examination - a written paper of normally 3 hours duration (70%). 5.3 Seminar Courses: (a) Continuous assessment based on oral presentation of at least three seminars (50%), (b) Evaluation of a written report (50%). 5.4.Research Project: (a) Assessment on the candidate's work and on the submitted Project Report (70%), (b) Oral examination (30%). The external examiner shall be involved in the assessment of the submitted report and may participate in the oral examination. 5.5.Technical drawing: (a) Continuous Assessment tests (60%), (b) End of Semester Examination a written paper normally taking 3 hours duration (40%). 5.6 Workshop practice and Field trips / Industrial Visits: (a) Workshop practical (60%) (b) Field Trips/ Industrial visits (40%).

5.7. Grading System and Degree Classification: The general University regulations shall apply. 6 .0 Course Structure
6.1.The department shall normally offer the general option of the BSc. programme every year. Additionally, specialized options will be offered at the discretion of the department. 6.2. Year one covers basic topics in Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Waves, Sound, Heat and Modern Physics. Students will have to take all the 8 units in physics

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offered by the department and the other courses as approved by senate. 6.3. Year two is basically a deeper study of the courses introduced at the first year level in Electricity and Magnetism, Vibration and Waves, Mechanics and Heat, Electronics, Optics and Modern Physics. Students opting to major in any areas of physics have to register for the 21 units in physics in addition to other courses as approved by senate. 6.4. The third and fourth years are devoted to an intensive study of theoretical and experimental physics courses and allow for a certain amount of specialized option courses in Materials Science, Theoretical Physics, Electronics and Renewable Energy together with core courses in Mathematical Physics, Thermodynamics, Solid State Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Classical Mechanics, Electromagnetism, Technical Drawing and Workshop Practice, Statistical Mechanics and the Research Project. 6.5. Seminar Courses: Topics which are not listed in the main Theoretical Physics curriculum or set of elective courses may be chosen for this seminar. During week one of the semester the student and the supervisor will agree on the topics. The student will make at least two presentations of about 40 minutes duration during the semester. A written report has to be presented to the tutor a week before the presentation dates. At least three lecturers of the department will compose the Presentation examination board. It is obligatory for the fourth year students to participate in the Departmental Seminars, Workshops and Conferences. 6.6. Industrial visits: Industrial visits and excursions is an essential part of the programme. 6.8. Course Coding: The course codes have three letters followed by three digits. The first letter denotes the faculty under which the course is offered. The last two letters denotes the discipline under which the course is offered. The first digit indicates the year of study. The second digit denotes the nature of the course (.i.e. digit 1 is for core courses and any other for a certain specialized field). In third and fourth year courses, second digit denotes the following; 2 - Material science option 3 - Theoretical Physics option 4 - Electronics option 5 - Renewable Energy option 6 - Any other field of physics 9 - Research and dissertation e.g. SPH 342 denotes a third year course with a bias in electronics within physics discipline offered in the faculty of science. The third digit indicates the serial number of the course in a given specialized field or

category. For elective courses, letter E is attached at the end of the code e.g. SPH 436E. 7.0. Definition of Unit: 1 unit 1 lecture hour per week per semester. 1 unit 2 Tutorial hours per week per semester. 1 unit 3 Hours of laboratory work per week per semester. Year 1 Semester I Course Code and Title Units IRD 100: Communication Skills I 3 CDM 100: HIV/AIDS Prevention and 3 Management SCH 101: Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 IRD 103 : Development Concepts and 3 applications MAT 106: Applied Mathematics 3 MAT 110: Basic Calculus 3 SPH 110: Fundamentals of Physics I 4 Total 23 Year I Semester II Course Code and Title Units SCH 102: Fundamentals of Chemistry II 4 IRD 102 : Communication skills II 3 IRD 104 : Quantitative Skills II 3 STA 106: Basic statistics 3 MAT 111: Geometry & Elementary Applied 3 Geometry SPH 111: Fundamentals of Physics II 4 CUC 121: Science, Technology and 3 Society Total 23 Year II Semester I Course Code and Title Units SPH 210: Electricity and Magnetism 3 SPH 211: Vibrations and Waves 3 SPH 212: Classical Mechanics I 3 COM 205: Introduction to Computers I 3 STA 210: Probability & Statistics I 3 MAT 210: Calculus I 3 MAT 212: Linear Algebra I 3 MAT 214: Vector Analysis 3 Total 24 Year II Semester II

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Course Code and Title SPH 213: Physics, Society and Development SPH 214: Physical Optics SPH 215: Modern Physics SPH 216: Electronics I STA 211: Probability & Statistics II MAT 213: Linear Algebra II MAT 215: Classical Mechanics Total Year III Semester I Course Code and Title Core Courses SPH 310: Mathematical Physics I SPH 311: Solid State Physics I SPH 312: Classical Mechanics II MAT 314: Ordinary Differential Equations and Option I: General Physics Course Code and Title SPH 320: Introduction to Material Science SPH 340: Electronics II and any Two of MAT 317: Numerical Analysis I MAT 318: Fluid Mechanics MAT 319: Advanced Calculus Total Or Option II: Material Science Course Code and Title SPH 320: Introduction to Materials Science SPH 321: Materials Testing and Evaluation SPH 322: Solidification and Working and any One of MAT 317: Numerical Analysis I MAT 318: Fluid Mechanics MAT 319: Advanced Calculus Total Or Option III: Theoretical Physics Course Code and Title

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

SPH 330: Atomic and Nuclear Physics SPH 331: Astronomy and Astrophysics SPH 332: Central forces and moving coordinates and any ONE of MAT 317: Numerical Analysis I MAT 318: Fluid Mechanics MAT 319: Advanced Calculus Total Or Option IV: Electronics Course Code and Title SPH 340: Electronics II SPH 341: Digital Electronics SPH 342: Physics of Semiconductors I and any One of MAT 317: Numerical Analysis I MAT 318: Fluid Mechanics MAT 319: Advanced Calculus Total Or Option V: Renewable Energy Course Code and Title SPH 350: Photovoltaics I SPH 351: Solar Energy Materials and Processes SPH 352: Biomass Energy and any One of Course Code and Title MAT 317: Numerical Analysis I MAT 318: Fluid Mechanics MAT 319: Advanced Calculus Total Year III Semester II Course Code and Title Core Courses SPH 313: Quantum Mechanics I SPH 314: Electromagnetism SPH 315: Mathematical Physics II COM 206: Introduction to Computer II MAT 312: Complex Analysis I and Option I: General Physics Course Code and Title

3 3 3

3 3 3 23

Units 2 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 23

Units 3 3 3 3 3 23

Units 3 3 3 Units 3 3 3 23

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 23

Units 3 3 3 3 3

Units

Units

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SPH 323: Phase Diagrams and any one of MAT 313: Abstract Algebra MAT 316: Methods I Total Or Option II: Material Science Course Code and Title SPH 323: Phase Diagrams SPH 324: Structural Changes SPH 325: The Steels Total Or Option III: Theoretical Physics Course Code and Title SPH 333: Sub-Atomic and Plasma Physics SPH 334: Low Temperature Physics I SPH 335: Systems of Particles Total Or Option IV: Electronics Course Code and Title SPH 343: Electronics III SPH 344: Microwaves SPH 345: Physics of Semiconductors II Total Or Option V: Renewable Energy Course Code and Title SPH 353: Photovoltaics II SPH 354: Solar Thermal Energy SPH 355: Wind Energy Systems and Technology Total

3 3 3 21

SPH 412: Technical Drawing SPH 413: Workshop Practice SPH 490: Research Proposal MAT 418: Partial Differential Equations I and Option I: General Option Course Code and Title SPH 423: Solid State Physics II and Course Code and Title Any Two relevant Elective courses Total or Option II: Material Science Course Code and Title SPH 420: The Ceramics SPH 421: Glass, Cement and concrete SPH 422: Polymers I Total or Option III: Theoretical Physics Course Code and Title SPH 430: Rigid Bodies SPH 431: Superconductivity SPH 432: Low Temperature Physics II Total Number of Units = 24 Units or Option V: Electronics Course Code and Title SPH 440: Radio Communication SPH 441: Digital Systems Design SPH 442: Microprocessor Total or

1 2 2 3

Units 3 3 3 23

Units 3 Units 6 23

Units 3 3 3 23

Unit 3 3 3 23

Units 3 3 3 23

Units 3 3 3 23

Units 3 3 3 23

Units 3 3 3 23

Year IV Semester I Course Code and Title Core Courses SPH 410: Mathematical Physics III SPH 411: Computational Techniques in Physics

Units 3 3

Option V: Renewable Energy Course Code and Title SPH 450: Photovoltaic system and Technology SPH 451: Geothermal Energy SPH 452: Hydro Energy Systems

Units 3 3 3

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Total Elective Courses Course Code and Title SPH 426E: Material Science & Polymer Physics SPH 436E: Seminar In Theoretical Physics SPH 446E: Advanced radio Communication SPH 447E: Special Circuits SPH 448E: Troubleshooting Digital Circuits Year IV Semester II Course Code And Title Core Courses SPH 414: Quantum Mechanics II SPH 415: Thermodynamics SPH 416: Statistical Mechanics SPH 499: Research and Dissertation MAT 419: Partial Differential Equations I and Option I: General Physics Course Code and Title Any Three relevant Elective Courses Total or Option II: Material Science Course Code and Title SPH 423: Polymers II SPH 424: Composites SPH 425: Thermodynamics and Selection of Materials Total Or Option III: Theoretical Physics Course Code and Title SPH 433: Elementary Theory of Scattering SPH 435: Computational Condensed Matter Physics And any one relevant elective Total or Option IV: Electronic

23 Units 3 3 3 3 3

Course Code and Title SPH 443: Measurements and Instrumentation SPH 444: Optoelectronic Devices SPH 445: Microprocessor Interfacing Total or Option V: Renewable Energy Course Code and Title SPH 453: Ocean energy Systems and Technology SPH 454: Energy Systems and Management SPH 455: Energy Economic and Policy Total Elective Courses Course Code and Title SPH 456E: Solar Energy Physics SPH 457E: Electronic Circuits and Microprocessors SPH 458E: Renewable Sources of Energy SPH 460E: Geophysics SPH 461E: Vacuum Techniques SPH 463E: Introduction to laser Physics SPH 464E: Fourier Optics Master of Science in Physics

Units 3 3 3 24

Units 3 3 3 24 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3

Units 9 24

Units 3 3 3 24

Units 3 3 3 24

1.0. Introduction The Department of Physical Science in accordance with the general objectives of the University, offers a programme of studies in line with its vision and mission, which are derived from the needs and aspirations of the society. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. To equip candidates with adequate knowledge and understanding of the principles of physics. 2.2. To contribute to the advancement of the subject of physics through high level training and research. 2.3. To develop creative thinking, enhance research capability and promote high level scholarship. 2.4. To conduct original investigations (or research) based on certain societal needs leading to thesis work. 2.5. To expose students to research skills through working on a thesis. 2.6. To produce graduates qualified enough to satisfy the high manpower requirements needed for the development of this nation and the world in general in the fields of science and technology.

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3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. The common University regulations for the Master's Degree shall apply. 3.2. Additionally, the following shall be eligible for registration for the Master of Science degree in Physics. 3.2.1. A holder of a Bachelor of Science degree or its equivalent with at least Second Class Honours with Physics either as a single subject or as one of the main subjects. 3.2.2. A holder of a Bachelor of Education degree or its equivalent who has studied Physics as a major subject and has attained at least Second Class Honours. 4.0. Submission and processing of applications for Admission Submission and processing of applications will follow common regulations for Master's degree.

5.0. Evaluation The following will apply;

5.1. Theory Courses: (i) Continuous assessment (30%), (ii) End of semester examination-a written paper of normally 3-hours duration (70%). 5.2. Laboratory Course: Continuous assessment based on practicals performed during the semester (100%). 5.3. Seminar Course: A series of at least four seminars
(100%) 5.4. Pass mark: In all the courses the pass mark is 50% of the total score. 5.5. Supplementary examinations: Common university regulations on supplementary examinations for Masters Programme apply. 5.6. Submission and examination of thesis: This is done according to the common regulations of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and extension for the Masters degree at the University. Where this is silent, the common University regulations will apply. The minimum number of units of coursework and Thesis for MSc. Programme shall be 39 and a maximum of 57units. 7.0.Course Structure Year I Semester I SPH 810: Classical Mechanics(core)

SPH 811: Mathematical Physics (core) SPH 812: Quantum Mechanics (core) SPH 813: Electrodynamics (core) SPH 814: Statistical Mechanics(core) SPH 815: Seminars in Physics(core) SPH 890: Research proposal I (writing) Semester II SPH 816: Advanced Laboratory work (core) SPH 817: Nuclear and Particle Physics (core) CDM 802:Research Methods (core) SPH 891:Research proposal II (defence) and Three courses of specialization from: Either Solid state Physics; Renewable energy: SPH 821: Elastic and Thermal Properties of Solids SPH 822: Energy Bands, Magnetism and Amorphous Materials ONE elective course or Electronics: SPH 823:Electronics SPH 824:Digital Electronics ONE elective course or Theoretical Physics: Any three electives Third Semester SPH 899:Research and Thesis Fourth Semester SPH 899:Research and Thesis Elective Courses SPH 842E:Electrical, Magnetic and Optical Properties of Solids SPH 843E:Theory of Superconductivity SPH 844E: Laser, Holography and Nonlinear Optics SPH 845E:Group Theory in Physics SPH 846E:Theory of Relativity SPH 847E:Applied Geophysics SPH 848E:Soil Physics SPH 849E:Microprocessors in physics SPH 850E:Theory of semiconductors SPH 851E:Theory of second quantization SPH 852E:Many-Body theory SPH 853E:Electron and Hole statistics in semiconductors SPH 854E:Electron Optics

3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 2 Units 2 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 2 Units

3 Units 3 Units 3 Units

3 Units 3 Units 3 Units

9 Units 9 Units 9 Units

3 Units 3 Units

3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units

3 Units

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Doctor of Philosophy in Physics 5.0. Programme Requirements 1.0. Introduction The Department of Physical Sciences in accordance with the general objectives of the University offers an advanced programme of studies in Physics. This programme will properly model upcoming scholars/scientists in their relevant fields to competently participate globally on any emerging issues in their respective fields. It is expected that a candidate who pursues this programme will at the end be a skilful and enthusiastic scholar that can move with the current scientific and technological advancements in their fields. The programme is structured to include what is universally perceived to be fundamental physics as well as highly specialised fields of study dictated by the dynamic contemporary technological and societal needs. The programme offered leads to a degree in Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in physics. The programme is offered by specialised elective courses in the fields of Material Science (e.g. photovoltaics) and/or Condensed matter physics (e.g. Superconductivity). Research will be done either experimentally or theoretically. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. To equip candidates with adequate Knowledge and understanding of the principles of physics. 2.2. To contribute to the advancement of the subject of physics through high level teaching and research. 2.3. To develop creative thinking, enhance research capability and promote high level scholarship. 2.4. To conduct original investigations (or research) based on certain societal needs leading to thesis work. 2.5. To refine research skills through working on a thesis. 2.6. To produce skilful and enthusiastic scientists/scholars who are well able to address emerging issues in the field of Science and Technology. 2.7. To produce graduates qualified enough to satisfy the high manpower requirements needed for the development of this nation and the world in general in the fields of science and technology. 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. The common University regulations for the Ph.D degree shall apply. 3.2. Additionally, the applicant should be a holder of a Masters degree in Physics or a closely related field recognized by the University Senate. 4.0. Submission and processing of applications for registration The submission and processing of applications will follow common University regulations for PhD degree. 5.1. The PhD programme in Physics emphasises on an original research leading to thesis work. The candidate has to submit a research proposal within a period stipulated by the common regulations of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension for PhD programmes of the University. 5.2. The candidates will be required to have passed the following courses at M.Sc. (or equivalent) level. a) SPH 810 Classical Mechanics (3 units) b) SPH 811 Mathematical Physics (3 units) c) SPH 812 Statistical Mechanics (3 units) d) SPH 813 Electrodynamics (3 units) e) SPH 814 Quantum Mechanics (3 units) 5.3. The candidates who dont meet the above requirement (i.e. (ii)) in one or more courses will be required to take and pass the respective courses at the M.Sc. (i.e. 800-series) level during first semester of the first academic year before proceeding to do the 900 - series courses. 5.4. The candidates who meet this requirement will automatically have the 15 units credited towards their first semester of the first year PhD programme upon the approval of the Senate. 5.5. A candidate holding recognized master's degree with long experience in research as evidenced by publications and/or at least an exemplary good teaching experience at the university level may apply for exception of course work in which case the PhD degree course shall be offered by research and thesis only provided that the candidate meets requirement (ii) above which may imply that the candidate is well grounded in physics. 5.6. It is obligatory for the students to participate in the Departmental Seminars, Workshops and Conferences. Depending on the area of research, industrial visits and excursions will be an essential part of the programme. 6.0. Examinations 6.1. Common University Regulation of examinations shall apply. 6.2. Evaluation shall involve Course work, Examination and Thesis. 6.3. Course work shall comprise Continuous Assessments and/or at least two Seminar paper presentations in each course (40%). 6.4. All courses will be examined normally by a 3 hours written examination (60%) in each course. 6.5. The University Common Regulations shall apply for the examination of Thesis. 7.0. Course Structure Year I

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Semester I Candidates who dont meet the above requirement (i.e. 5.2 in one or more courses will be required to take and pass the respective courses at the M.Sc. (i.e. 800-series) level. 15 Units ONE 900- series elective course at least 2 Units SPH 990: Research proposal(Writing) 2 Units Year 1, Semester II At least THREE 900-series Elective courses At least 8 Units(Student may be required to do more courses depending on the area of research) SPH 990: Research proposal (Defence) 2 Units Year II, Semester I and II SPH 999:Research and Thesis

Year III, Semester I and II SPH 999: Research and Thesis

15 Units

15 Units

7.5 Elective Courses Units SPH 910E:Second Quantization and Many BodyTechniques 3 SPH 911E:Statistical Mechanics II 3 SPH 912E:Quantum Theory of Solids 4 SPH 913E:Theory of Superfluidity 2 SPH 914E:Theory of Superconductivity 3 SPH 915E:Semiconductor Devices 3 SPH 916E:Optical and Photovoltaic enomena Semiconductors (PHY 916 is requisite) 3 SPH 917E:Properties of Modern Materials 4 SPH 918E:Fourier Optics 4 SPH 919E:Laser Physics 3 SPH 920E:Vacuum Techniques and Thin Films 3 SPH 921E:Plasma related processes 2 SPH 922E:Semiconductor Technologies 2 SPH 923E:Microprocessors in Physics 3 SPH 924E:Physics and Applications of SemiconductorNanostructure 3 SPH 925E:The Nuclear Forces and Binding Energy 3 SPH 926E: Nuclear Many-Body Theory and Diagram Techniques 3 SPH 927E: Nuclear Theory 3

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Department of Mathematics Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

1.0. Introduction Bachelor of Science programme in Mathematics offers courses in Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics as an integrated programme. In first and second years of study, most of the courses offered are core and are aimed at preparing the learner to specialize in any of the three disciplines in the integrated programme at third and fourth years of study. Graduates of this programme are expected to work in Research Centers, Banking sector, Central Bureau of Statistics and other related firms. 2.0. General Objectives: The main objectives of this programme are to: 2.1. Equip the student with a broad based mathematical knowledge and skills. 2.2. To train the learner for employment in both Public and Private Sectors. 2.3.Prepare the learner for graduate studies and research in Mathematics and other related disciplines. 2.1 Specific Objectives 2.1.2.To equip the learner with mathematical/technical skills that will enable them to work with other professionals in order to solve complex and practical problems using mathematical techniques/models. 2.1.2. To enable the learner have a broad based mathematical content in Applied Mathematics, Pure Mathematics and Statistical Mathematics. 2.1.3. To produce graduates who will appropriately teach and do research for socio-economic development. 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. A student wishing to study Mathematics must satisfy the minimum University entry requirements. 3.2. In addition, a student must have attained atleast a C+ (plus) grade in Mathematics. 4.0 Examinations 56

4.1. The University common examination regulations shall apply. 4.2. Examinations shall be held at the end of the semester in which the courses are taught. 5.0.Duration of the Programme The duration of the programme shall normally be a period of four academic years or 8 semesters. 6.0. Course Requirements 6.1. The Department offers three unit courses and an industrial attachment course of 6 units, where a unit is defined as 1 hour lecture or 2 hours tutorials or 3 hours of practicals per week. 6.2. A student will take a minimum of 42 units (14 courses) or a maximum of 48 units (19 courses) in each academic year of study. Students wishing to take more than 48 units will require departmental approval. 7.0. Course Structure
Year I

Semester I Core Courses Code Title MAT 101: Foundation Mathematics I MAT 121: Calculus I STA 141: Introduction to Statistics CSC 109: Computer Applications CSC 110: Fundamentals of Computing CSC 111: Introduction to Programming ECC101: Scientific and Technical Communication skills Semester II
Core Courses

Units 3 3. 3 3 3. 3 3 3 3 3 3 3. 3 3

MAT 102: Foundation Mathematics II MAT 104: Algebraic Structures I MAT 122: Elementary Applied Mathematics STA 142: Introduction to Probability CSC 120: Computer Organization CSC 121: Procedural Programming CDM 100:HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management

Year II

Semester I Core Courses Code

Title

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

MAT 201: Linear Algebra I MAT 203: Vector Analysis MAT 221: Calculus II MAT 223: Dynamics I STA 241: Statistics and Probability STA 243: Sample Surveys I IRD 200: State Society and development IInd Semester MAT 202: Linear Algebra II MAT 204: Real Analysis I MAT 206: Algebraic Structures II MAT 222: Calculus III MAT 224: Analytic Geometry MAT 226: Classical Mechanics STA 242: Probability and Distribution Models

MAT 328: Industrial Attachment Elective Courses Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 1 course) MAT 324: Numerical Analysis II MAT 326: Dynamics II STA 342: Test of Hypothesis I STA 344: Regression Analysis and Analysis of Variance STA 346: Quality Control and Acceptance Sampling STA 348: Statistical Computing Applied Mathematics Semester I Core Courses Code Title MAT 321: Ordinary Differential Equations I MAT 323: Numerical Analysis I MAT 325: Fluid Mechanics I MAT 327: Methods I MAT 301: Real Analysis II Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 2 courses) MAT 303: Linear Algebra III MAT 305: Group Theory I MAT 307: Number Theory STA 341: Theory of Estimation STA 343: Sample Survey II STA 345: Experimental Designs I 3 STA 347: Stochastic Process I 3 Semester II Core Courses MAT 322: Operation Research I MAT 324: Numerical Analysis II MAT 326: Dynamics II MAT 302: Real Analysis III MAT 304: Complex Analysis I MAT 328: Industrial Attachment

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3

Pure Mathematics Year III Semester I Core Courses Code Title Units MAT 301: Real Analysis II 3 MAT 303: Linear Algebra III 3 MAT 305: Group Theory I 3 MAT 307: Number Theory 3 MAT 321: Ordinary Differential Equations I 3 Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 2 courses) MAT 323: Numerical Analysis I 3 MAT 325: Fluid Mechanics I 3 MAT 327: Methods I 3 STA 341: Theory of Estimation 3 STA 343: Sample Survey II 3 STA 345: Experimental Designs I 3 STA 347: Stochastic Process I 3 Semester II Core Courses MAT 302: Real Analysis III MAT 304: Complex Analysis I MAT 306: Group Theory II MAT 308: Ring Theory MAT 322: Operation Research I

3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 6

3 3 3 3 3 57

Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 1 course) MAT 306: Group Theory II 3 MAT 308: Ring Theory 3 STA 342: Test of Hypothesis I 3

STA 344: Regression Analysis and Analysis of Variance STA 346: Quality Control and Acceptance Sampling STA 348: Statistical Computing Statistics Semester I Core Courses STA 341: Theory of Estimation STA 343: Sample Survey I STA 345: Experimental Designs I STA 347: Stochastic Process I MAT321: Ordinary Differential Equations I Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 1 course) MAT 303: Linear Algebra III MAT 307: Number Theory MAT 323: Numerical Analysis I MAT 325: Fluid Mechanics I MAT 327: Methods I MAT 301: Real Analysis II MAT 305: Group Theory I Semester II Core Courses STA 342: Test of Hypothesis I STA 344: Regression Analysis and Analysis of Variance STA 346: Quality Control and Acceptance Sampling STA 348: Statistical Computing MAT 322: Operation Research I MAT 328: Industrial Attachment Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 1 course) MAT 302: Real Analysis III MAT 304: Complex Analysis I MAT 306: Group Theory II MAT 308: Ring Theory MAT 324: Numerical Analysis II MAT 326: Dynamics II Pure Mathematics Year IV Semester I Core Courses

3 3 3

MAT 401: Topology I MAT 403: Complex Analysis II MAT 405: Measure Theory MAT 407: Functional Analysis MAT 421: Partial Differential Equations I MAT 431: Project in Mathematics Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 1 course) MAT 423: Ordinary Differential Equations II MAT 425: Fluid Mechanics II MAT 427: Numerical Analysis III MAT 429: Operation Research II STA 441: Time Series Analysis STA 443: Probability and Measure STA 445: Experimental Design II STA 447: Survival Analysis STA 449: Non-Parametric Methods

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 6

3 3 3 3 3 3

Semester II Core Courses MAT 402: Topology II 3 MAT 404: Differential Topology 3 MAT 406: Field Theory 3 MAT 426: Fourier Series 3 Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 2 courses) MAT 422:Partial Differential Equations II 3 MAT 424:Ordinary Differential Equations III 3 MAT 428:Mathematical Modelling 3 MAT 430:Operation Research III 3 MAT 432:Methods II 3 MAT 434:Differential Geometry 3 MAT 436:Bifurcations andDynamics 3 STA 442:Multivariate Analysis 3 STA 444:Sequential Analysis 3 STA 446:Bayesian Statistics 3 STA 448:Stochastic Processes II 3 STA 452:Categorical Analysis 3 STA 454:Large Sample Theory 3 STA 456:Statistical Methods in Econometrics 3 Applied Mathematics Core Courses Semester I Code Title Units MAT 421: Partial Differential Equations I 3
MAT 423: Ordinary Differential Equations II MAT 425: Fluid Mechanics II 3 3

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MAT 427: Numerical Analysis III MAT 431: Project in Mathematics MAT 405: Measure Theory MAT 407: Functional Analysis Elective Courses (students to choose at least 1 course) MAT 401:Topology I MAT 403:Complex Analysis II STA 441:Time Series Analysis STA 443:Probability and Measure STA 445: Experimental Design II STA 447: Survival Analysis STA 449: Non-Parametric Methods MAT 429: Operation Research II Semester II Core Course MAT 422: Partial Differential Equations II MAT 424: Ordinary Differential Equations III MAT 426: Fourier Series MAT 428: Mathematical Modelling MAT 432: Methods II MAT 434: Differential Geometry Elective Courses (students to choose at least 1 course) MAT 430: Operation Research III MAT 436: Bifurcations and Dynamics MAT 402: Topology II MAT 404: Differential Topology MAT 406: Field Theory STA 442: Multivariate Analysis STA 444: Sequential Analysis STA 446: Bayesian Statistics STA 448: Stochastic Processes II STA 452: Categorical Analysis STA 454: Large Sample Theory STA 456: Statistical Methods in Econometrics Statistics Core Courses Semester I STA 441:Time Series Analysis STA 443:Probability and Measure STA 445: Experimental Design II STA 447: Survival Analysis STA 449: Non-Parametric Methods

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

MAT 421: Partial Differential Equations I MAT 431: Project in Mathematics. Elective Courses (students to choose atleast 1 course) MAT 429: Operation Research II MAT 401: Topology I MAT 403: Complex Analysis II MAT 405: Measure Theory MAT 407: Functional Analysis MAT 423: Ordinary Differential Equations II MAT 425: Fluid Mechanics II MAT 427: Numerical Analysis III Semester II Core Courses STA 442: Multivariate Analysis STA 444: Sequential Analysis STA 446: Bayesian Statistics STA 448: Stochastic Processes II STA 452: Categorical Analysis STA 454: Large Sample Theory Elective Courses (students to choose at least 1 course) STA 456: Statistical Methods in Econometrics MAT 402: Topology II MAT 404: Differential Topology MAT 406: Field Theory MAT 422: Partial Differential Equations II MAT 424: Ordinary Differential Equations III MAT 426: Fourier Series MAT 428: Mathematical Modelling MAT 430: Operation Research III MAT 432: Methods II MAT 434: Differential Geometry MAT 436: Bifurcations and Dynamics Master of Science in Applied Mathematics

3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 59

1.0 Introduction The Master of Science (M.Sc.) programme in Applied Mathematics is intended to produce graduates whose areas of specialization are broad enough to carry out research, participate in national and international endeavors and disseminate knowledge through teaching. 2.0 Objectives To produce graduates:

2.1. With a wide background knowledge and basic techniques in Applied Mathematics 2.2. Who are able to carry out research and undertake Ph.D. research in their respective areas of specialization. 3.0 Admission requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university regulations, an applicant for the degree of Master of Science in Applied Mathematics should satisfy the following requirements. 3.1. Hold a Bachelor of Science degree BSc or its equivalent with at least a second class honours from a recognized university. 3.2. Must have taken Mathematics as a major subject in the first degree. 4.0 Applications for registration The common procedures approved by the senate shall apply. 5.0 Duration of the programme The programme shall normally take a minimum of two (2) years and a maximum of four (4) years. 6.0 Programme Requirements 6.1. The programme requires a minimum of thirty nine (39) units of coursework including thesis. 6.2. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also choose courses subject to the approval of the Department.

7.1.4 A candidate who fails at least half of the units taken shall be discontinued. 7.1.5 A candidate who fails less than half of the units taken shall sit for supplementary examination. 7.1.6. Each supplementary examination shall be awarded a maximum of 50%. 7.1.7. A candidate who fails any paper taken as a supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 7.1.8. Grades obtained in an extra or optional course shall be reflected in the transcripts. 7.1.9. A student who fails an extra or optional course shall not be penalized as long as he/she has passed the minimum prescribed course units. 7.1.10. Under exceptional circumstances, such as medical or compassionate grounds, supported by authentic written evidence, a special examination will be given to the student. 7.1.11. A special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination. 7.2. Grading System Percentage Grade Remarks 75 100 A Distinction 65 74 B Credit 50 64 C Pass Below 50 E Fail 7.3. Thesis Writing 7.3.1. student shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic in Mathematics. 7.3.2. Thesis supervisor(s) shall be appointed for the students at the start of the first year second semester, through the active involvement of the student. Where departmental rules are silent the common regulations for submission and examination of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension (IGSRE) shall apply. 8. 0 Learning and teaching methods A problem solving approach shall be used with emphasis on library research, internet, open problems, project, modeling and seminars. 9.0 Structure of Courses. A student in applied mathematics is expected to take a minimum of four courses per semester.

7.0. Examinations 7.1. Coursework and Examination 7.1.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3-hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 7.1.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising seminar papers, projects, reports, formal tests and participation in learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 7.1.3. The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%.

60

Year I Semester I Code Title MAT 813C Functional Analysis I Elective(s) Course (to select any 3) Analysis Code Title MAT 817E Complex Analysis I MAT 818E Numerical Analysis I Differential Equations MAT 830E Partial Differential Equations I MAT 832E Ordinary Differential Equations I Mechanics MAT 816E Methods in Fluid Mechanics I MAT 820E Methods in Fluid Mechanics I MAT 822E Fluid Mechanis I Semester II Core Courses Code Title MAT 814C Functional Analysis II MAT 890C Thesis Research Methodology Elective(s) Courses (select any 2) Analysis MAT 822E Complex Analysis II MAT 840E Numerical Analysis II MAT 846E Methods of Applied Mathematics I MAT 847E Methods of Applied Mathematics II MAT 851E Geometry of Manifolds I MAT 854E Finite Element Method I

Operations Research MAT 849E Operations Research I Units 4 Year II Semester I Core Courses Code Title MAT 891C Thesis Proposal Writing Elective(s) Courses (Optional) Analysis MAT Geometry of Manifolds 852E II MAT Distributions and 855E Fourier Analysis MAT Numerical Analysis III 842E Differential Equations MAT Partial Differential 838E Equation III MAT Finite Element Method 856E II Mechanics MAT Methods in Fluid 848E Mechanics II MAT Fluid Mechanics III 826E Operation Research MAT Operation Research II 850E

Units 4 4

Units 6

4 4

4 4 4

4 4 4

4 4

4 4

Units 4 6

4 4 4 4 4 4

Differential Equations MAT 834E Partial Differential 4 Equation II MAT 836E Ordinary Differential 4 Equation II Mechanics MAT 824E Fluid Mechanics II 4 61

Semester II Core courses Code Title Units 9 MAT 899C Thesis All courses are Elective(s) Analysis Code Title Units MAT 844E Numerical Analysis 4 IV MAT 853E Geometry of 4 Manifolds III Total 39 M.Sc. in Statistics 1.0..Introduction and aims of the programme

The graduate programme in the Department of Mathematics is intended to guide candidates to work independently, arrive at new insights and contribute to research in a wide range of research projects in Statistics. It is tailored to allow the student to make a distinct contribution to the knowledge and understanding of Statistics and afford evidence of ability to carry out original research in a well defined problem in Statistics. The course work shall be taken along with research and Thesis work for cognitive and theoretical understanding of the area of specialization in Statistics. 2.0 Objectives To produce graduates: 2.1. With a wide background knowledge and basis techniques in Statistics 2.2. Who are able to carry out research and undertake Ph.D. research in their respective areas of specialization. 3.0 Admission requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university regulations, an applicant for the degree of Master of Science in Statistics should satisfy the following requirements. 3.1. Hold a Bachelor of Science degree at least with a second class honours,upper division from a university recognized by Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST). 3.2 Must have taken Mathematics as a major subject in the first degree with relevant core courses in Statistics as determined by the Department. 4.0 Submission and processing of applications for registration The common procedures approved by the senate shall apply. 5.0 Duration of the programme The programme shall normally take a minimum of two (2) years and a maximum of four (4) years. 6.0 Programme requirements 62

6.1. The programme requires a minimum of thirty nine (39) units of coursework including thesis. 6.2. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also choose courses subject to the approval of the department. 7.0 Examinations 7.1. Coursework and examination 7.1.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3-hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 7..2.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising seminar papers, projects, reports, formal tests and participation in learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 7.1.3. The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. 7.1.4. A candidate who fails half or more than half of the units taken shall be discontinued. 7.1.5. A candidate who fails less than half of the units taken shall sit for a supplementary examination. 7.1.6. Each supplementary examination shall be awarded a maximum of 50%. 7.1.7. A candidate who fails any paper taken as a supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 7.1.8. Grades obtained in an extra or optional course shall be reflected in the transcripts. 7.1.9. A student who fails an extra or optional course shall not be penalized as long as he/she has the minimum prescribed course units. 7.1.10. Under exceptional circumstances, such as medical or compassionate grounds, supported by authentic written evidence, examinations may be held for the candidate. A special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination. 7.2 Grading System Percentage Grade 75 100 A

Remarks Distinction

65 74 50 64 Below 50

B C E

Credit Pass Fail

2.2. Who are able to carry out research and undertake Ph.D. research in their respective areas of specialization. 3.0. Admission Requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university regulations, an applicant for the degree of Master of Science in Pure Mathematics should satisfy the following requirements. 3.1. Hold a Bachelors degree at least at lower second class honours from a university recognized by Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST). 3.2. Must have taken Mathematics as a major subject in the first degree. 4.0 Submission and processing of applications for registration The common procedures approved by the senate shall apply. 5. 0 Duration of the programme The programme shall normally take a minimum of two (2) years and a maximum of four (4) years.

7.3.Thesis Writing 7.3.1. A student shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic in Mathematics. 7.3.2. Thesis supervisor(s) shall be appointed for the students at the start of the second semester, through the active involvement of the student. Where departmental rules are silent the common regulations for submission and examination of the School of Graduate Studies (SGS) shall apply. 8.0. Learning and teaching methods A problem solving approach shall be used with emphasis on library research, internet, open problems, project, modeling and seminar. 9.0 Course Requirements Each student in this program is required to take at least 8 (eight) courses at 800 level as well as undertaking an approved Thesis research on a topic of interest. The 800 courses consist of the following six core courses: STA 801, STA 803, STA 805, STA 811, STA 872 and STA 814 aswell as two courses from the areas of specialization (Mathematical statistics, Biometrics, Time series and Stochastic processes, Biostatistics, Statistical Modeling). M.Sc. Programme in Pure Mathematics 1.0. Introduction The Master of Science (M.Sc.) program in Pure Mathematics is intended to produce graduates whose areas of specialization are broad enough to carry out research, participate in national and international endeavors and disseminate knowledge through teaching. 2.0 Objectives To produce graduates: 2.1. With a wide background knowledge and basis techniques in Pure Mathematics

6.0. Programme requirements 6.1. The programme requires a minimum of thirty nine (39) units of coursework including thesis. 6.2. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also choose courses subject to the approval of the department. 7.0 Examinations 7.1. Coursework and examination 7.1.1Each course shall be examined by a 2-hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 7.1.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising seminar papers, projects, reports, formal tests and participation in learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 7.1.3. The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. 7.1.4. A candidate who fails half OR more than half of the units taken shall be discontinued. 63

7.1.5. A candidate who fails less than half of the units taken shall sit for a supplementary examination. 7.1.6. Each supplementary examination shall be awarded a maximum of 50%. 7.1.7. A candidate who fails any paper taken as a supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 7.1.8. Grades obtained in an extra or optional course shall be reflected in the transcripts. 7.1.9. A student who fails an extra or optional course shall not be penalized as long as he/she has the minimum prescribed course units. 7.1.10. Under exceptional circumstances, such as medical or compassionate grounds, supported by authentic written evidence, examinations may be held for the candidate. A special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination.

7.2. Grading System Percentage Grade Remarks 75 100 A Distinction 65 74 B Credit 50 64 C Pass Below 50 E Fail 7.3. Thesis Writing 7.3.1. A student shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic in Mathematics. 7.3.2. Thesis supervisor(s) shall be appointed for the students at the start of the second semester; Where departmental rules are silent the common regulations for submission and examination of the Schoolof Graduate Studies (SGS) shall apply. 8. 0 Learning and teaching methods A problem solving approach shall be used with emphasis on library research, internet, open problems, project, modeling and seminar. Course Structure Year I Semester I Core Courses Code Title MAT 811C Abstract Integration I MAT 813C Functional Analysis I

MAT 815C General Topology I Elective Courses (Optional) MAT 817E Complex Analysis I MAT 821E Group Theory Semester II Core Courses MAT 812C Abstract Integration II MAT 814C Functional Analysis II MAT 890C Research Methodology Elective Courses (Choose any two) MAT 839E Commutative Algebra MAT 819E Differential Topology MAT 823E Field Theory I MAT 825E Algebraic Geometry Year II Semester I Core Courses Code Title MAT 890C Proposal Writing Electives (Optional) MAT 829E Homological Algebra I MAT 831E Operator Theory I MAT 833E Banach Algebras I MAT 835E Operators on Banach Spaces Semester II Core Courses Code Title MAT 89IC Thesis Writing Electives (Optional) Course Title Code MAT 837E Topics in Operator Theory I MAT 841E Non-Commutative Ring Theory MAT 843E Coding Theory MAT 845E Algebraic Topology Total

4 4 4

4 4 6

4 4 4 4

Units 6 4 4 4 4

Units 9 Units 4 4 4 4 39

Ph.D in Statistics Units 4 4 64 1.0. Introduction The postgraduate programme in the Department of Mathematics is intended to guide candidates to work

independently, arrive at new insights and contribute to research in a wide range of research projects in Statistics. The course work shall be taken along with research and thesis work for cognitive and theoretical understanding of the area of specialization in Statistics. 2.0.Objectives 2.1. To allow the student make a distinct contribution to the knowledge and understanding of Statistics 2.2. To afford evidence of ability to carry out original research in a well defined problem in Statistics. 3.0.Admission Requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university regulations, an applicant for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Statistics should hold a Master of Science degree in Statistics or its equivalent, from a University recognized by Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST).

candidate had done and passed at Masters Level, course(s) equivalent to the prescribed course(s). 8.0. Examinations 8.1coursework And Examination 8.1.1. Each course shall be examined by a 2-hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 8.1.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising seminar papers, projects, reports, formal tests and participation in learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 8.1.3. The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. 8.1.4. A candidate who fails half OR more than half of the units taken shall be discontinued. 8.1.5. A candidate who fails less than half of the units taken shall sit for a supplementary examination. 8.1.6. Each supplementary examination shall be awarded a maximum of 50%. 8.1.7. A candidate who fails any paper taken as a supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 8.1.8. Grades obtained in an extra or optional course shall be reflected in the transcripts. 8.1.9. A student who fails an extra or optional course shall not be penalized as long as he/she has the minimum prescribed course units. 8.1.10. Under exceptional circumstances, such as medical or compassionate grounds, supported by authentic written evidence, examinations may be held for the candidate. 8.1.11. A special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination. 8.1Grading System for Coursework Percentage 75 100 65 74 50 64 Below 50 Grade A B C E Remarks Distinction Credit Pass Fail

4.0. Submission and processing of applications for registration The common procedures approved by the senate shall apply. 5.0. Duration of the Programme The programme shall normally take a minimum of three (3) years and a maximum of six (6) years. 6.0. Programme Requirements 6.1. The programme requires a minimum of thirty nine (39) units of coursework including thesis. 6.2. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also choose courses subject to the approval of the department. 7.0. Exemption Candidates for the Ph.D programmes may be exempted from part or whole of coursework requirement provided the senate is satisfied that the

8.2 Thesis Writing

65

8.2.1. A student shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic in Statistics. 8.2.2. Thesis supervisor(s) shall be appointed for the students at the start of the second semester. 8.2.3. Where departmental rules are silent the common regulations for submission and examination of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension (IGSRE) shall apply. 9. Learning and teaching methods A problem solving approach shall be used with emphasis on library research, internet, open problems, project, modeling and seminar. Course Requirements Each student in this program needs to take STA 990 and three other courses of the 900 level. The courses should be taken in such a way as to enhance the students knowledge of his or her area of research. The student must undertake an approved research thesis work.

Biostatistics STA 954E: Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials

Statistical Consulting, Computing and Modeling STA 954E: Statistical Computing 4 Semester II Core course STA 991: Proposal Writing 9 Elective Courses (Choose one course from one group) Biometry STA 908E: Sampling and Practise Mathematical Statistics STA 913E: Theory of Probability II STA 932E: Theory of Nonparametric Statistics STA 934E: Sequential Analysis STA 937E: Theory of Life Testing Reliability

4 4 4 4

Year I Semester I Corecoures Code Title STA 980C: Topics in Probability and Statistics STA 990C: Research Methodology Elective Courses (Choose any one group)Biometry STA 904E: Generalized Linear Models and Applications STA 906E: Decision Trees for Multivariate Analysis Mathematical Statistics STA 912E: Theory of Probability I STA 915E: Statistical Inference STA 917E: Asymptotic Inference Time Series and Stochastic Processes STA 942E: Time Series

Time Series and Stochastic Processes STA 945E: Stochastic Processes Units 4 9 Biostatistics STA 956E: Statistical Analysis of Genetic Data Statistical Consulting, Computing and Modelling STA 974E: Estimation of Functions from Data Year II Semester I STA 999C: Thesis Writing Semester II STA 999C: Thesis Writing Year III Semester I STA 999C: Research, Thesis Writing Semester II STA 999C: Research, Thesis Writing Total 66

4 4

9 9

4 4 4

9 9 39

67

Faculty of Engineering Department of Production Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 1.0 Introduction Kenyas Education and Industrial sector is growing and expanding rapidly. In order to meet this challenge, specialists in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering will be required. The graduates of BSc. In Mechanical and Industrial Engineering of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) are expected to provide part of the required expertise to meet this need. Mechanical and Industrial Engineering deals with design, manufacture, use and maintenance of machines as well as management of industrial systems used in industry. In addition, the training in this discipline includes new and improved production methods and materials. The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical & Industrial Engineering [B.Sc. MIE) degree programme puts a lot of emphasis on the industrial applications of theoretical knowledge through workshop practice, laboratory training, seminars, industrial visits and industrial attachments. 2.0. Aim The departments aim is to produce graduate engineers who are practically oriented to serve in the manufacturing, design, industrial, agricultural and service sectors of Kenya's economy. 3.0. Objectives The main objectives of the Programme are to, 3.1. Prepare graduate engineers for the industrial sector in the field of design and production so as to accelerate the growth of manufacturing industries. 3.2. Achieve a practical orientation in the Graduate Engineer 3.3. Encourage participation by the academic staff and students in research projects, consultancy services and other professional activities 3.4. Encourage positive and responsive vocational attitudes to the students field of work 3.5. Encourage initiative and creative thinking 68

oriented to the field of work 3.6. Impart management skills as a basis for entrepreneurial development and employment. 3.7. To prepare students for further training and carrier development. 4.0 Admission Requirements 4.1. To be eligible for admission into the degree programme, all applicants must satisfy the minimum entrance requirements stipulated in the common university entrance regulations of the Joint 4.2. In addition, applicants must have attained the minimum grades indicated in the following clusters of four subjects are eligible for admission; (i) Maths B-; Physics B-; Chemistry B-; Biology (or Geography or any Group IV) B-(ii) Maths B-; Physical Science B-; Biological Science B-; Geography (or any Group IV) B4.3. Holders of a recognised diploma in mechanical engineering or related' disciplines are eligible for admission into the programme as follows; 4.3.1. Higher National Diploma (HND) - 3rd Year 4.3.2. Ordinary diploma with at least a credit 2nd year 4.4. Those holding qualifications equivalent to the above from institutions recognized by the University Senate may also be admitted. 5.0 Duration of the Programme The duration of the Programme shall normally be five academic years each divided into two semesters. In addition, there is an 8-week Workshop Practice after the second year of study and two 8-week Industrial Attachments after the third and fourth years of study. 6.0 Design of the Degree Programme The degree programme is designed to offer sound training in the following core areas; Manufacturing Technology Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics Applied Mechanics and Materials Science Engineering Design

Industrial Engineering and Management

Engineering mathematics, computer-based analyses, fundamentals of electrical engineering and other courses are also offered as compulsory supportive courses in the programme. Selected courses from the Faculty of Education and Social Sciences are built into the programme to enable students develop a broad education outlook in their training. 7.0. Examination Regulations 7.1. To be awarded the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical and Industrial Eng (BSc MIE) degree the University Common Regulations and specific faculty regulations for undergraduate examinations shall apply subject to the exceptions in (2) below. Normally a University exam will take 3 hours written examination. 7.2. The exceptions to (1) are: 7.2.1. Research Methods (MIE 402) which shall be examined by course work only. 7.2.2. Engineering Drawing (MIE 161, MIE 162, MIE 261) ,which shall be examined by continuous assessment in form of exercises and/or drawings accounting for 40% and a four-hour written examination at the end of semester accounting for 60% of the final marks. 7.2.3. Design Courses (MIE 262, MIE 362, MIE 361 and MIE 362, MIE 461 and MIE 462) which are shall be examined by continuous assessment and end-of-semester examination accounting for 40% and 60% of the final marks respectively. 7.2.4 Workshop Practice (MIE 290) Marks from the assessment of practical work and technical report shall account for 70% and 30% of the final mark respectively. 7.2.5. Industrial Attachment (MIE 390, MIE 490) Marks from assessment of practical work at the place of attachment and final technical report shall account for 30% and 70% of the final mark respectively. Project (MIE 580) - The final mark shall be composed of; First seminar on the project (10%); second seminar on the project (10%); submitted final technical report (40%), Fabrication and/or Practical demonstration (30%), Final oral presentation (20%) 69

8.0 Course Coding The MIE course codes have three letters followed by three digits. The letters are abbreviations of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering department. The first digit indicates year of study. The second digit denotes the course discipline (as shown below). The third digit indicates the semester in which the course is offered odd numbers for the first semester and even numbers for the second semester) Second Digit Course Discipline 0 Introduction and General Engineering 1 Materials Science 2 Solid Mechanics 3 Fluid Mechanics 4 Mechanics of Machines 5 Metrology and Instrumentation 6 Engineering Drawing and design 7 Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer 8 Manufacturing Processes 9 Projects, Attachment and workshop Practice

9.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title CDM 100 HIV and AIDS Prevention and Management SCH 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry I MAT 101 Pure Mathematics I SPH 110 Fundamentals of Physics I CSC 110 Fundamentals of Computing MIE 101 Introduction to Mechanical & Industrial Engineering ECC 101 Scientific and Technical Communication Skills MIE 161 Engineering Drawing I Sub- Total Semester II SCH 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry II ECC 102 State Society and Development Concepts MAT 103 Pure Mathematics II STA 104 Statistics I CSC 109 Computer Applications Units 2 4 3 4 3 2 3 3 24 4 2 3 3 3

SPH 111 Fundamental of Physics II ECE 102 Circuit Theory I MIE 162 Engineering Drawing II Sub- Total Total Year II Semester I CSC 201 Computer Programming I MAT 201 Engineering Mathematics I STA 205 Statistics II MIE 221 Solid Mechanics I MIE 231 Fluid Mechanics I MIE 241 Mechanics of Machines I ECE 221 Electrical Measurements MIE 261 Engineering Drawing III ECE 231 Electrical Machines I Sub- Total Semester II MAT 202 Engineering Mathematics II MIE 212 Materials Science I ECE 202 Electrical Machines II MIE 222 Solid Mechanics II MIE 232 Fluid Mechanics II MIE 242 Mechanics of Machines II MIE 262 Engineering Design I MIE 272 Thermodynamics I MIE 282 Manufacturing Processes I Sub- Total Total MIE 290 Workshop Practice(8 Weeks) Year III Semester I CSC 302 Fundamentals of Software Engineering MAT 301 Engineering Mathematics III MIE 311 Materials Science II MIE 321 Solid Mechanics III MIE 341; Mechanics of Machines II MIE 351 Metrology MIE 361 Computer Aided Design MIE 371 Thermodynamics II Sub- Total Semester II MAT 302 Engineering Mathematics IV ECE 363 Industrial Electronics ECE 312 Control Systems I

4 3 3 25 49

MIE 322 Solid Mechanics IV MIE 332 Fluid Mechanics III MIE 362 Engineering Design II MIE 372 Thermodynamics III MIE 382 Manufacturing Processes II Sub- Total Total MIE 390 Industrial Attachment I (8 Weeks)

3 3 3 3 3 24 48 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 26 53 3

Year IV Semester I COS 305 Entrepreneurship 2 MIE 401 Industrial Engineering Management 1 3 CSC 402E Management Information Systems 3 MIE 421 Fracture of Materials 3 MIE 431 Machine Tool Technology 3 MIE 441 Foundry Technology 3 MIE 451 Instrumentation and Measurements 3 MIE 461 Flexible Manufacturing Systems 3 MIE 471 Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning 3 Sub- Total 26 Semester II MIE 402 Industrial Engineering Management II 3 ECC 402 Research Methods 1 3 MIE 412 Non-Destructive Testing Methods 3 MIE 422 Plasticity 3 MIE 442 Mechanical Vibrations 3 MIE 452 Manufacturing Processes III 3 MIE 462 Jigs and Fixture Design 3 MIE 482 Metal Forming Technology 3 Sub- Total 22 Total 48 MIE 490 Industrial Attachment II (8 Weeks) 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 3 3 3 70 Year V Semester I MIE 501 Industrial Organization and Finance ECC 501 Operations Research MIE 511 Polymer Engineering MIE 571 Power Plant Engineering MIE 573 Industrial Pollution and Control Elective I Elective II MIE 580 Project Part I 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4

Sub- Total 25 Semester II ECC 502 Law, Ethics and Professional Practice 3 MIE 502 Engineering Business Management 3 MIE 552 Manufacturing Processes IV 3 MIE 572 Renewable Energy Resources 3 Elective III 3 Elective IV 3 MIE 580 Project Part II 4 Sub- Total 22 Total 47 Electives Electives I to IV are courses selected from the following list, subjects to the advice and prior approval of the department. Students will be advised on the electives offered in any particular semester. This offer will generally depend on the availability of expertise, the students desired career specialization and the needs of the profession. MIE 503E MIE 512E MIE 513E MIE 515E MIE 516E MIE 521E MIE 522E MIE 552E MIE 574E MIE 575E Modeling and Simulation Composite Materials Surface Treatment of Metals Extractive Metallurgy Nano-Technology Finite Element Method Experimental Stress Analysis Industrial Robotics Internal Combustion Engines Thermal Design and Optimization 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Engineering Design Industrial Engineering and Management. Mathematics, Computer Science, Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering and other courses are also offered as compulsory supportive courses in the programme. Selected subjects from the Faculty of Science, the School of Social Cultural and Development Studies and from the Institute for Human Resource of Development are built into the programme during the first two years of study to enable students develop a broad educational outlook in their training. 2.0 Course Structure Year I Semester 1 Code Title Units MAT 101 Pure Mathematics I 3 MAT 102 Applied Mathematics 3 PHY 110 Basic physics I 3 PRD 161 Engineering Drawing II 3 IRD 100 Communication Skills I 3 IRD 103 Development Concepts and 3 Applications Total 21 Semester II Code Title Units MAT 103 Pure Mathematics II 3 STA 104 Basic Statistics 2 PHY 111 Basic Physics I 4 CHE 111 Basic Chemistry II 4 PRD 162 Engineering Drawing 3 IRD 104 Quantitative Skills 3 IRD 102 Communications Skills 3 Total 22 Year II Semester I Code Title Units MAT 202 Engineering Mathematics 3 I PRD 221 Solid Mechanics I 3 PRD 241 Mechanics of Machines I 3 PRD261 Engineering Drawing 3 III ELC 211 Circuit Theory I 3

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 1.0 Introduction The Mechanical and Industrial Engineering curriculum puts a lot of emphasis on the practical application of theoretical knowledge. This is achieved through extensive workshop training, laboratory training, seminars, industrial visits and industrial attachments.. The degree programme is designed to offer sound training in the following core areas of the discipline; Manufacturing Technology Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics Applied Mechanics land Materials Science. 71

ELC 231 IRD F200 ELC 261

Electrical Measurements State, Society and Development Basic Electrical Machines

Total PRD 390

22 Industrial Attachment I (12 weeks) Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

3 3 24 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Total Semester II Code Title MAT 203 Engineering Mathematics II PRD 212 Materials Science I PRD 232 Fluid Mechanics I PRD 242 Engineering Mechanisms PRD 272 Thermodynamics I ELC 252 Basic Electronics COM 202 Introduction to Computer Hardware and Software ELC 272 Basic Electrical Power Total PRD 290 Workshop Practice (12 weeks) Year III Code Title Semester I MAT301 Engineering Mathematics III PRD 311 Materials Science II PRD 321 Solid Mechanics II PRD 331 Fluid Mechanics II PRD 341 Mechanics of Machines II PRD 351 Metrology PRD 371 Thermodynamics II ELC 381 Digital Electronics I Semester II Code Title MAT 302 Engineering Mathematics IV STA 302 Statistics PRD 322 Solid Mechanics III PRD 332 Fluid Mechanics III PRD 362 Engineering Design I PRD 372 Thermodynamics III PRD 302 Research Methodology ELC 312 Control Systems I

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3

Year IV Code Title SEMESTER I PRD 411 Industrial Engineering I PRD 421 Solid Mechanics IV PRD 441 Fracture of Materials PRD 461 Engineering Design II PRD 471 Thermodynamics IV COM 401 Computer Programming PRD 451 Instrumentation Total Semester II Code Title PRD 412 Industrial Engineering II PRD 422 Plasticity PRD 432 Foundry Technology PRD 452 Welding Technology PRD 462 Machine Tool Engineering PRD 301 Introductory Engineering for Engineers PRD 442 Mechanical Vibrations Total PRD 490 Industrial Attachment II (12 weeks) Year V Semester I Code Title PRD 511 Industrial Law and ethics PRD 521 Operations Research PRD 551 Materials Forming Technology PRD 561 Computer Aided Design And Computer Aided Manufacture (CAD/CAM) PRD 580 Project Elective I Elective II Total Semester II Code Title PRD 512 Industrial Organization and Finance PRD 552 Non-Conventional Machining Processes PRD 562 Jig and Fixture Design 72

Units 3 3 3

4 3 3 22

Units 3

3 3

PRD 572 PRD 580

Renewable Energy Resources Project Elective III Elective IV

3 4 3 3 22

productivity and problem solving. Graduates produced will serve as effective leaders, supervisors, engineers and managers in technical enterprises. 2.0 Objectives The objectives of the program are: 2.1. Develop advanced competencies needed by technical managers, supervisors and engineers in world-class industries and related enterprises. 2.2. Broaden the career potential of individuals through the ability to implement systems, increase productivity, and improve product quality 2.3. Develop a broad perspective needed for those employed in, or aspiring to, positions of responsibility in industry, training and related organizations. 3.0 Admission requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university regulations, an applicant for the degree of Master of Science in Industrial Engineering and Management should satisfy the following requirements: 3.1.Hold a Bachelor of Science degree from a recognized university in industrial/mechanical engineering technology , or related disciplines at least at an Upper Second Class Honours. OR 3.2. Hold a Bachelor of Science degree at Lower Second Class honours having three (3) years of relevant industrial experience. Evidence of independent study will be an added advantage. 4.0 Submission and processing of applications for registration The common procedures approved by the senate shall apply. 5.0. Duration of the programme The program shall normally take a minimum of four (4) semesters and a maximum of eight (8) semesters. 6.0 Program Requirements The program requires a minimum of forty five (45) units of coursework including a thesis. Each unit is equivalent to one (1) lecture hour or two (2) practical hours.

Total Elective Courses Electives I to IV are courses selected from the list below of subjects below subject to the advice and prior approval of the department. Students will be advised on the electives offered in any particular semester. This offer will generally depend on the availability of expertise, the students desired career specialization and the needs of the profession.

Code PRD 511E PRD 512E PRD 514E PRD 521E PRD 522E PRD 523E PRD 571E PRD 573E PRD 574E PRD 575E PRD 576E

Title Non-Destructive Testing Methods Composite Materials Plastics Technology Introduction to the Finite Element Method Experimental Stress Analysis Tribology Power Plant Engineering Turbo-machinery Internal Combustion Engines Industrial Pollution and Pollution Control Refrigeration and Air conditioning

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3

Any other equivalently weighted electives as approved by Senate. M.Sc. Industrial Engineering and Management 1.0. Introduction The Master of Science degree in Industrial Engineering and Management is designed to serve technical managers, production engineers and related types of individuals who wish to enhance their leadership positions in industry and related enterprises. The emphasis of the program is on technological management for improved 73

A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. He/she may also choose courses subject to the approval of the department. 7.0. Evaluation 7.1.Coursework Examination The university examination regulations shall apply and in addition courses which are entirely practical in nature, shall be assessed by continuous assessments. 7.2. Research & Thesis A student shall submit a thesis upon completion of independent research study on topics relevant to industrial engineering and management. The submission and examination of the thesis shall be conducted according to the rules and regulations as stipulated by the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension. 4.0 Structure of Courses The program consists of core courses and electives from a group of courses listed below: 1. Production Management and Optimization 2. Process Systems Management 3. Industrial Environment, Health and Safety Year I Semester I Code IEM 811 IEM 814

IEM 832 Industrial Pollution Control IEM 841 Special Industrial Topic Electives (any two) IEM 824 Energy Systems and Management IEM 825 Applied Heat and Utility Services IEM 826 Robotic Systems IEM 831 Industrial Ergonomics and Safety IEM 833 Occupational Health and Safety Year II Semester I & II Code Title IEM 890 Research & Thesis Total

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 9 45

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering Bachelor of Science in Civil & Structural Engineering 1.0 Introduction The Department of Civil and Structural Engineering offers a Bachelor of Science in Civil and Structural Engineering degree. The programme lays emphasis on practical application of knowledge, while at the same time recognizes the importance of development of correct attitudes alongside theoretical and intellectual development of the graduate engineer. 2.0 Background The Department of Civil and Structural Engineering (CSE) admitted the first lot of undergraduate students on 2nd September 2002. The second lot was admitted in September 2003 in the 2003/2004 academic year. In addition to the Degree programme, the Department also conducts courses at Diploma, M. Sc levels and Ph. D levels. The mission of the Department is spelt out in Legal Notice No. 373 of 5th December 2002 under CAP 201A of Moi University. This mission is to provide education for Civil Engineering technology through 74

Title Numerical Methods Industrial Applications of Statistics IEM 816 Total Quality Management IEM 821 Computer Applications in Manufacturing Electives (any two) IEM 815 Production Management IEM 818 Industrial Marketing IEM 822 Industrial Controls IEM 823 Plant Design and Maintenance Year I Semester II Code IEM 812 IEM 813 IEM 817

Units 2 2 3 3

3 3 3 3

Title Research Methods Operations Research Human Resource and Financial Management

Units 3 3 3

teaching, research and development. Dissemination of technological information, its preservation and application form the core business of the Department. The above mission is achieved through the following innovative practice in addition to the conventional teaching. 2.1.Privately sponsored students This arises out of the need to provide the rare opportunities to offering and qualified people to pursue higher education through flexible schedules. 2.2. Work study arrangements This aims to assist those students who face financial difficulties. 2.3. Community service This helps to work closely with local communities in a participatory manner to find solutions to local problems. 3.0.Industrial Production This serves to link science and technology to create Engineering devises such as pumps water treatment units and low cost construction materials. 4.0.Civil works maintenance This aims at refurbishing the deteriorated infrastructure for economic growth and creation of wealth. 5.0.Consultancy services These give opportunity to staff to interact closely with industry in order to keep up with technological advancements. 6.0.Methods of Teaching The teaching methods include lectures, tutorials, group assignments, projects, community service, workshop practice and industrial attachments. Trainee engineers are attached to on going projects for on-job training and experience. 7.0. Entry Requirements To be admitted to any of the programmes at Diploma, Undergraduate, M.Sc or Ph.D degrees, the University entry requirements must be fulfilled. Details are available for each programme. To be admitted to the B. Tech. Degree, applicants must have obtained a minimum of C+ grade of K.C.S.E. To be admitted to M. Sc programmes, one

must meet the specific entry requirements for each programme. Details are available on request. 8.0. Programmes Offered Certified Courses (1 year) Diploma Courses (3years) Degree Course (5 years) M.Sc. Courses (2 years) Ph.D Course (3 years) 8.1. Certificate courses (proposed) Certificate in Civil Works Maintenance. 8.2. Diploma course Diploma in Building Construction Technology Diploma in Civil Engineering Diploma in Water Engineering. 8.3. Degree Courses. B. Tech. (Civil and Structural Eng.) 8.4. M.Sc/M. Phil. Courses (Proposed) Environmental information Systems Natural Disaster Management. Construction & Civil Engineering Materials Structural System Engineering Transportation Systems & Terminal Facilities Highway Construction Technology Labour based Construction Technology 8.5. Ph. D Programmes Candidates may register in any field of Civil Engineering and other related areas. 9.0. Course Structure Year 1 Semester I Code Course Title MAT 101 Pure Mathematics MAT 102 Applied Mathematics PHY 110 Basic Physics I CHE 110 Basic Chemistry I CVS 165 Engineering Drawing I IRD 100 Communication Skills I IRD 103 Development Concepts and Applications Total Semester II Code Course Title MAT 103 Pure Mathematics II STA 104 Basic Statistics 75

Units 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 23 Units 3 3

PHY 111 CHE 111 CVS 162 IRD 104 IRD 102

Basic Physics II Basic Chemistry II Engineering Drawing II Quantitative Skills II Communicative Skills II Total

4 4 3 3 3 23

Year II Semester I Code Course Title MAT Engineering 202 Mathematics I COM Introduction to Computer 201 Hardware and Software CVS Theory of Structures I 211 CVS Solid Mechanics I 213 CVS Engineering Geology 221 CVS Soil Mechanics I 223 CVS Engineering Surveying I 281 IRD 200 State, Society and Development Total Semester II Code Course Title MAT Engineering Mathematics 203 II STA 202 Statistics CVS 212 Theory of Structures II CVS 214 Solid Mechanics II CVS 224 Solid Mechanics II* CVS 232 Civil Engineering Materials I CVS 272 Fluid Mechanics I CVS 282 Engineering Surveying II CVS 290 Workshop Practice (12 weeks) Total Year III Semester I Code Course Title MAT Engineering Mathematics 301 III COM Computer Programming

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27

Units 3 3 76

Research Methods Theory of Structures III Civil Engineering Materials II CVS 351 Transportation Engineering I CVS 371 Fluid Mechanics II CVS 381 Engineering Surveying III PRD 381 Instrumentation Total Semester II Code Course Title MAT Engineering Mathematics 302 IV CVS 312 Matrix and Finite Element Methods in structural Analysis CVS 352 Transportation Engineering CVS 362 Structural Design CVS 372 Fluid Design I CVS 374 Hydrology IRD 301 Introduction Economics of Engineers CVS 390 Industrial Attachment I (12 weeks) Total Year IV Semester I Code Course Title CVS 411 Structural Dynamics CVS 441 Public Health Engineering I CVS 461 Structural Design II CVS 473 Fluid Mechanics II CVS 481 Engineering Surveying IV ELC 300 Control Systems IRD 305 Entrepreneurship (Elective) Total Semester II Code Course Title CVS 44 Public Health Engineering II CVS 452 Transportation Engineering III CVS 462 Structural Design III CVS 464 Elements of Building of

301 CVS 303 CVS 311 CVS 331

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27 Units 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 Units 3 3 3 3

CVS 474 CVS 492 CVS 494 CVS 490

Services and Architectural Sciences Water Resources Engineering I Operations Research Engineering Management I Industrial Attachment II (12 weeks) Total

3 3 3 3 24

Year V Semester I Code Course Title CVS Public Health 541 Engineering III CVS Transportation 551 Engineering IV CVS Structural Design I 561 CVS Water Resources 571 Engineering II CVS Civil Engineering Project 580 CVS Engineering 591 Management II Elective I (see note 1) Total Semester II Code Course Title CVS Foundations Engineering 512 CVS Composite Materials 522 Technology CVS Civil Engineering project 580 CVS Law, Ethics and 593 Professional Practice Elective II (see note 2) Elective III (see note 2) Elective IV (see note 2) Total Elective Courses Code Course Title COM 502 Computer Aided E Design CVS 513E Elements of Coastal

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3

Engineering and Bridge Structures CVS 531E Theory of Plates and Shells CVS 541 Public Health Engineering IV CVS 563 Advance Structural Design CVS 573 Water Resources Design III CVS 595 Advance operations Research CVS 596 Numerical Analysis MGT 454 Small Business Management Any other equivalently-weighted approved by Senate

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 electives as

Notes on Choice of Electives Elective 1 to be chosen from CVS 596E, 501E, MGT 454 subject to advice from the Department. Electives II,III, IV can be any of the electives subject to advice from the Department. Department of Electrical and Communication Engineering Bachelor of Science in Electrical & Communications Engineering 1.0. Introduction The Department of Electrical & Communication Engineering is one of the departments in the Faculty of Science and Engineering in Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST). The Department offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical & Communication Engineering. This degree program prepares students for a successful career in such sectors as manufacturing, operating, service, and research with emphasis on design and development. Our students pursue a general program with some specialization. Strong emphasis on design and development of an in-depth understanding of fundamental concepts. Importance is also placed on the use of and understanding of hardware and software tools.

18 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Units 3 3 77

2.0. Programme Focus The focus of the Electrical & Communication Engineering degree curriculum is on a general program that unites Analogue, Digital Communication, Microprocessor, Power Systems and Microelectronic technologies while offering specialization in the following areas: Digital Communication, Network and Digital Signal. Electrical Energy Systems Engineering Real-time Computing and Digital control Solid-state Devices, Microelectronics and Instrumentation. 3.0 Objectives The objectives of our Electrical & Communications Engineering program are ;to develop:Fundamental basics. In addition to the core Electrical Engineering fundamentals, develop firm foundation in mathematics and the physical sciences. Skills in analyzing, partitioning and solving complex problems. The students need to develop skills for solving both closed-ended (single solution) and open-ended (multi-solution) problems. 3.2. An understanding of the design process. This begins with a customer needs analysis and continues through to testable solution. Fundamental knowledge a wide range of Electrical Engineering areas together with a more detailed knowledge within a selected specialization. Working knowledge of the important hardware and software tools in the analyses, synthesis and implementation of Electrical Engineering solutions and designs. A general understanding of important current and likely future technology in Electrical Engineering. Professional attributes of written and verbal communication, social and ethical responsibilities, adherence to standards and quality, and teamwork and engineering management. An appreciation of topics that may or may not affect engineering directly. 3.0. Areas of Research. The current areas of research at the department are; 1. Development of high-power switching devices, converters and inverters. 2. Quality of electric power supply. 3. Electrical energy systems security evaluation & management.

4. Demand-side management and application in energy system planning. 5. Electric energy tariff design and implementation. 6. Microwave electronics and applications. 7. Engineering systems modeling and simulation. 8. Microwave sensors for industrial applications; design & technology development. 4.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Course Title Units MAT Pure Mathematics I 3 101 3 MAT Applied Mathematics I 102 PHY 110 Basic Physics I 3 CHE 110 Basic Chemistry I 3 3 PRD 161 Engineering Drawing I IRD 100 Communication Skills I IRD 103 Development Concepts and Applications Total Semester II Code Course Title MAT 103 STA 104 PHY 111 CHE 111 PRD 164 IRD 104 IRD 102 Pure Mathematics II Basic Statistics Basic Physics II Basic Chemistry II Engineering Drawing II Quantitative Skills II Communication Skills II Total 3 3 21

Unit s 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27

Year II Semester I Code Course Title MAT 202 COM 201 PRD 221 PRD 241 78 Engineering Mathematics I Computer Techniques I Solid Mechanics I Mechanics of Machines I

Unit s 3 3 3 3

ELC 211 ELC 213 ELC 261 IRD 200

Circuit Theory I Electrical Measurements Basic Electrical Machines State, Society and Development Total

3 3 3 3 24

ELC 372 ELC 382 IRD 301

ELC 390

Semester II Code Course Title MAT 203 PRD 212 PRD 232 PRD 242 PRD 272 ELC 212 ELC 252 ELC 272 ELC 290 Engineering Mathematics II Materials Science Fluid Mechanics I Engineering Mechanics Thermodynamics Circuit Theory II Basic Electronics Basic Electrical Power Workshop Practice (12 Weeks) Total

Power Systems Digital Electronics II Introductory Economics for Engineers Total Industrial Attachment I (12 Weeks)

3 3 3 24

Unit s 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27

Year III Semester I Code Course Title MAT 301 PRD 301 ELC 321 ELC 341 ELC 351 Engineering Mathematics III Manufacturing Process Signals Electromagnetic Fields Physical Electronics and Electrical Engineering Materials Analogue Electronics I Electrical Machines I Digital Electronics I Total

Unit s 3 3 3 3 3

ELC 352 ELC 361 ELC 381

3 3 3 24

Semester II Code Course Title MAT 302 ELC 312 ELC 314 ELC 342 Engineering Mathematics IV Control Systems I Transmission Lines Analogue Electronics II

Unit s 3 3 3 3 79

Year IV Semester I Code Course Title Units MAT Engineering Mathematics 3 401 3 ELC Communication Systems I 421 ELC Instrumentation 3 431 ELC Electromagnetic Waves 3 441 ELC Analogue Electronics III 3 451 3 ELC Electrical Mechanics II 461 MGT Small Business 3 454 Management Total 21 Semester II Code Course Title Units COM Computer Techniques I 3 402 3 ELC Control Systems II 412 ELC Communication 3 422 Systems II ELC Power Electronics 3 452 ELC Engineering 3 492 Management ELC Power Systems II 3 472 ELC Microprocessor 3 482 Systems ELC Engineering Project I 3 493 Practical ELC Industrial Attachment II 3 490 (12 Weeks) Total 27

Year V Semester I Code Course Title Operations Research Microprocessor Interfacing and Applications ELC 590 Engineering Project II Practical Elective I Elective II Elective III Either ELC 541 Microwave Engineering or ELC 563 Electric Drives and Industrial Applications Total Semester II Code Course Title ELC 594 ELC 552 ELC 590 Law, Ethics, and Professional Practice Television Engineering Engineering Project II ELC 592 ELC 591

Unit s 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Unit s 3 3 3

ELC 524E ELC 526E ELC 543E ELC 544E ELC 545E ELC 551E ELC 553E ELC 554E ELC 556E ELC 564E ELC 573E ELC 574E ELC 575E

Control Digital Signal Processing Data Communication Radio Wave Propagation Radio Systems Antenna Engineering Advances Television Engineering Electro acoustics Lasers and Optoelectronics Radio Frequency Circuit Design Electrical Machines Design Power System Analysis and Stability Electrical Power Generation Power Transmission and Distribution

Practical Elective I 3 Elective II 3 Elective III 3 Either ELC 523 Advances Communications 3 Engineering or ELC 576 Switchgear and Protection 3 Total 24 Elective Courses Elective I to VI are coursed selected from the list below of subjects, subject to the advise and prior approval of the Department. Students will be advised on the electives offered in any particular semester. This offer will generally depend on the availability of expertise, the students desired career specialization and the needs of the profession. Code COM 501E COM 503E COM 504E ELC 514E ELC 515E Course Title Software Engineering Computer-Aided Design Computer Systems Software State Space Design and Digital Non-linear and Multivariable 80

Faculty of Education and Social Sciences 1.0. Introduction The Faculty of Education and Social Sciences Programme is designed to produce practical, well informed, efficient and self-reliant teachers, capable of functioning in and contributing effectively to development efforts in the rural and urban areas where the schools are situated. The professional courses in the Faculty are designed to specifically expose students to practical work in real school situations as part of the learning process. The Faculty offers the following degree programmes: 1. Bachelor of Education (Arts), 2. Bachelor of Education (Science) 3. Bachelor of Education (French) 4. Bachelor of Education in Early Childhood Education 5. Bachelor of Science in Primary Education (BSc-PE) 6. Bachelor of Business Management (BBM). 7. Bachelor of Journalism & Mass Communication (BJM) 8. Bachelor of Criminology (BCR) 9. Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Bachelor of Education (Arts) The Bachelor of Education (Arts) Programme is designed to produce professionally qualified teachers who will be competent in teaching arts subjects at secondary school level. All students shall take an approved combination of the following teaching subjects from the Faculty of Education and Social Sciences. Kiswahili, Geography History, Literature, English, Economics and Religion, Guidance & Counselling, Mathematics, Botany, Zoology, Physics & Chemistry will be offered by the Faculty of Science & Engineering. 1.0. Entry Requirements All candidates admitted to the Degree of Bachelor of Education must satisfy the minimum entrance requirements of the University as stipulated in the 81

statutes. Candidates must also satisfy departmental requirements before registering for courses in a department. 2.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title ESM 101 Quantitative Skills I EDU110 Introduction to Education IRD 100 Communication Skills I CSC 110 Fundamentals of Computing IRD 103 Development Concepts & Applications Teaching Subjects 1,2,3 Total Semester II Code Title COS 102 Communication Skills II ESM 104 Quantitative Skills II EDU 111 Introduction to Education II SCS 109 Computer Applications Subjects 1,2,3 Total Year II Semester I Code Title PSY 210 General Education Psychology CIT 210 General Methods of teaching EDF 210 Philosophy of Education IRD 200 State, Society and Development Subjects 1,2,3 Total Semester II Code Title CIT 211 Educational Media and Resources EDF 211 History of Education CIT 210 Curriculum Development CIT 299 School Experience Subject 1 Subject 2 Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3 6 18 Units 3 3 3 3 12 21

Units 3 3 3 3 9 21 Units 3 3 3 3 6 6 24

Year III Semester I Code Title CIT 311 Subjects special method PSY 310 Human Growth and Development Subject 1 Subject 2 Total Semester II Code Title CIT 360 Educational Technology PSY 311 Educational Measurements and Evaluation IRD 306 Public Speaking Skills Subject 1 Subject 2 Total Elective courses Code Title IRD 300 Rural Development IRD 301 IRD 302 IRD 303 Introductory Economics for Engineers Development Planning Governance and Management of Development in Africa Purchasing Principles and Management Social change and Development in Kenya Management Theory Teaching Practice (12wks) Entrepreneurship Public Speaking Skills Advanced Research and Writing Skills Organizational Communication Advanced Research Skills in Home Science

Units 3 3 6 6 18

Units 3 3 3 6 6 21 Units 3 3 3 3

Sociology of Education and Comparative Education ESM 410 Environmental Education EPM 411 Educational Administration and Management Subject 1 Subject 2 Total Semester II Code Title EPM 412 Economics of Education & Educational Planning PSY 410 IRD 400 Guidance and Counseling Development Project Appraisal Subject 1 Subject 2 Total Electives (Any one) Code Title EDU 410E School Librarianship EDU 411E Basic Health and First Aid EDU 412E Stores Management EDU 413E Adult Education EDU 414E Family Life Education

EDF 410

3 3

6 6 21 Units 3

3 3 6 6 21 Units 1 1 1 1 1

IRD304 IRD 403

3 3 2.0. Teaching Practice All students shall be required to cover four weeks of Teaching Practice at the end of second year and twelve weeks of Teaching Practice at the end of the third year of study. Course Outlines for the following subjects: Economics, History, Kiswahili, Geography, Religious, Literature, English, Mathematics Economics 3.0 Entry Requirements Minimum entrance requirements for admission to the University shall apply. However, preference will be given to students who have at least C+ in Mathematics at Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education and a C+ in any of the following subjects:

IRD 405 CIT 399 IRD 305 IRD 306 IRD 307 IRD 308 HSE 316

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Year IV Semester I Code Title

Units 82

Economics, Commerce and Accounting or their equivalents. 4.0. Course Structure Year IV Semester I Code Title ECO 110 Introduction of Microeconomics Semester II Code Title ECO 101 Introduction to Macroeconomics Year II Semester I Code Title ECO 210 Intermediate Microeconomics ECO 212 Maths for Economists Semester II Code Course Title ECO 211 Intermediate Macroeconomics ECO 213 Economic Statistics 1 Year III Semester I Code Title ECO 214 African Economics Problems ECO 216 Accounting and Control Semester Code ECO 217 ECO 311 II Title Money and Banking Economic Statistics II

Units 3

Units 3

Units 3 3 Units 3 3

Units 3 3

Development II History Year I Semester I Code Title HIS 215 History of Africa Since 1888 Semester II Code Title HIS 221 History of Africa since 1884(core) Year II Semester I Code Title HIS 210 African Archaeology I HIS 211 History of Kenya to 1895 HIS 212 African Economic History to 1900 HIS 213 European History Since 1750 HIS 214 The World Since 1870 Semester II Code Title HIS 216 African Archaeology HIS 217 History of Kenya since 1895 (core) HIS 219 African Economic History Since 1900 Year III Semester I Code Title HIS 311 Africa and the Black Diaspora HIS 312 History of North Africa to 1800 HIS 313 History of West Africa to 1800 HIS 315 History of Russia to 1917 HIS 316 Philosophy of History (core) Semester II Code Title HIS 317 Issues in African Historiography (core) HIS 318 Constitutional and Legal 83

Units 3

Units 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3 Units 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3

Year IV Semester I Code Course Title ECO 314 Public Finance ECO 315 Economics of Planning and Development I Semester II Code Title ECO 312 International Trade and Finance ECO 317 Economics of Planning and

Units 3 3 3 Units 3 3

Units 3 3

HIS 322 Year IV Semester I Code Title HIS 410 Themes in East African History HIS 411 Economic History of the Third World HIS 412 History of Southern Africa to 1900 HIS 414 The Transformation of Modern Asia in the 19th and 20th Century HIS 415 History of Modern Japan Semester II Code Title HIS 416 Themes in East African History HIS 417 History of Southern Africa since 1900 HIS 418 History of Middle East in the 19th and 20th Centuries Kiswahili Year I Semester I Code Title KIS 100 Introduction to Language and Linguistics in Kiswahili Semester II Code Title KIS 102 Introduction to Literature in Kiswahili Year II Semester I Code Title KIS 200 Theory and Analysis of Kiswahili Literature KIS 210 Phonetics and Phonology in

History of Kenya U.S.S.R. Since 1917

Units 3 3

Kiswahili Oral Literature in Kiswahili Semester II Code Course Title KIS 212 Kiswahili Morphology KIS 213 Pre-20th Century Kiswahili Poetry KIS 215 Sociolinguistics in Kiswahili KIS 211 Year III Semester I Code Title KIS 300 Aspects of Kiswahili Syntax Kiswahili Literary Devices and Criticisms KIS 311 History and Development of Kiswahili Semester II Code Title KIS 313 Theatre Arts in Kiswahili KIS 314 Research Methods in Kiswahili KIS 316 Special Methods in Kiswahili Year IV Semester I Code Title KIS 413 Kiswahili Semantics KIS 411 Kiswahili Poetry KIS 400 Editorial Methods in Kiswahili Semester II Code Title KIS 415 Comparative Literature in Kiswahili KIS 408 Current Issues & Development Kiswahili KIS 416 Kiswahili Prose KIS 315

Units 3 3 3

3 3

Units 3

3 Units 3

3 3

Units 3 3 3

Units

3 Units

Units 3 3 3

Units 3 3

Units 3

84

Geography Year I Semester I Code Title GEO 100 Introduction to Geography (core) Semester II Code Course Title GEO 200 Fundamentals of Physical Geography (core) Year II Semester I Code Title GEO 210 Spatial Organization (core) GEO 213 Introduction to Geographic Thought (core) Semester II Code Title GEO 211 East African Environment (core) GEO 212 Map Interpretation and Descriptive Statistics (core) Year III Semester I Code Title GEO 300 Quantities Methods in Geography (core) GEO 310 Climatology (core) GEO 311 Population Geography GEO 313 Historical Geography GEO 312 Resource and Development GEO 314 Research Methods Semester II Code Title GEO 315 Geography of Kenya (core) GEO 316 Arid and Semi Arid Lands GEO 317 Economic Geography GEO 318 Hydrology (core)

GEO 319 GEO 320 Units 3

Units 3

Units 3 3

Units 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3

GEO 322 Year IV Semester I Code Title GEO 400 Geomorphology (core) GEO 410 Regional Development and Planning GEO 411 Agricultural Geography GEO 412 Rural Geography GEO 413 Industrial Geography GEO 414 Medical Geography GEO 321 Aerial Photography and Remote Sensing (core) Semester II Code Title GEO 415 Geography of Africa (core) GEO 416 Biogeography (core) GEO 417 Political Geography GEO 418 Transport Geography GEO 419 Research Project Religion Year I Semester I Code Title REL 215 The Life and Teaching of Jesus Or REL 216 The Life and Teaching of Prophet Mohammed Semester II Code Title REL 214 African Religion (core) Year II Semester I Code Title REL 211 Phenomenology of Religion REL 212 History of Religion I (core) REL 213 Religion, Culture and Communication REL 217 The Life and Teaching of 85

Urban Geography Cultural and Behavioral Geography Surveying (core)

3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3

Units 3

Units 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3

Gautama Buddha Semester II Code Title REL 218 Ethics REL 219 History of Religion II REL 220 Youth and Religion REL 221 History of Christianity I Year III Semester I Code Title REL 311 Philosophy of Religion (core) REL 312 Introduction of the Old Testament REL 313 History of Christianity II REL 314 History of Islamic Civilization and Culture REL 315 Religion and Science REL 316 Women in Religion Semester II Code Title REL 320 Research Methods REL 321 Psychology of Religion REL 322 African Mythology REL 323 Introduction to the New Testament REL 325 History of Christianity in Africa REL 326 History of Islam in Africa REL 327 Hinduism Year IV Semester I Code Title REL 411 Contemporary Religious Thought(core) REL 412 Issues in Social Ethics (core) REL 413 Religious Education and Development REL 414 Religion and Society REL 415 Belief Systems in Kenya REL 416 Theology of the Bible REL 417 Studies in the Old Testament

Units 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3

3 3 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

REL 418 Quran and the Hadith 3 Semester II Code Title Units REL 419 Research Project 3 REL 420 New Religious Movement 3 REL 421 Studies in the New 3 Testament REL 422 Development of Christian 3 Doctrine REL 423 Christian Theology in 3 Africa REL 424 Islamic Theology 3 REL 425 Islamic Mysticism 3 REL 426 Chinese Religions 3 Literature Year I Semester I Code Title Units LIT 100 Introduction to Literary 3 Studies Semester II Code Title Units LIT 110 Introduction to East 3 African Literature Year II Semester I Code Title Units LIT 200 Theory and Application 3 (core) Theatre in East Africa 3 LIT 211 (core) Semester II Code Title Units LIT 210 East Africa Poetic 3 Traditions(core) Urban Literatures from 3 LIT 212 East Africa (core) Year III Semester I Code Title Units LIT 300 Advanced Literary 3 Theory And Application (core) LIT 310 Teaching Literature 3 Methods LIT 311 Stylistics 3 LIT 316 European and American 3 Drama 86

Electives LIT 317 Carribean Literature LIT 311 Children and Youth Literature LIT 315 African- American Literature Semester II Code Title Units LIT 313 Drama from the Rest of the World 3 LIT 314 African Orature 3 LIT 318 African Drama 3 Electives LIT 319 Latin American Literature LIT 320 Creative Writing I LIT 321 Women in Literature LIT 322 Post Rennaissance European Poetry Year IV Semester I Code Title Units LIT 400 The Novel in Africa 3 (core) Afro-American Poetry & LIT 412 Drama 3 Electives LIT 406 Comparative Oral Literature LIT 411 African-American Literature II LIT 419 Chinese Literature LIT 422 Science Fiction Semester II Code Title Units LIT 413 Modern African Poetry (core) 3 LIT 423 Popular Media and Culture 3 Electives LIT 414 The Autobiography LIT 415 Studies in Post-Colonial Discourse LIT 416 Indian Literature LIT 417 Travel Writing LIT 418 Japanese Literature LIT 421 The History of the Book English Language and Linguistics Year I Semester I Code Title COS 100 Communication Skills I ENG 110 Introduction to the Study of Language

Semester II Code Title Units COS102 Communication Skills II 3 ENG 111 The Art of Writing 3 YEAR II Semester I Code Title Units ENG 212 English Morphology 3 ENG 211 Introduction to English Phonology and Phonetics 3 Semester II Code Title Units ENG 213 Introduction to Semantics 3 ENG 214 The Structure of the Modern English Phrase 3 Year III Semester I Code Title Units ENG 310 The Structure of the English Sentence 3 LIN 319 Second Language Learning and Acquisition 3 Semester II Code Title Units ENG 312 The English Prosody 3 ENG 317 Structure of the English Sentence II 3 Year IV Semester I Code Title Units ENG 411 Advanced Description of English Grammar 3 ENG 414 Functional Varieties of English 3 Semester II Code Title Units ENG 414 Practical English Stylistics 3 ENG 415 Discourse Analysis 3 ENG 416 English For Specific Purposes 3 Mathematics The courses are taught by the Department of Mathematics. Students should see the Faculty of Science curriculum for course descriptions. 87

Units 3 3

MAT 421 Year I Semester I Code Title MAT 101 Foundation Mathematics I MAT 121 Calculus I Semester II Code Title MAT 102 Foundation Mathematics II MAT 122 Elementary Applied Mathematics Year II Semester I Code Title STA 141 Introduction to Statistics MAT 221 Calculus II Semester II Code Title STA 142 Introduction to Probability MAT 104 Algebraic Structures I Year III Semester I Code Title MAT 201 Linear Algebra I STA 241 Statistics and Probability MAT 203 Vector Analysis Semester II Code Course Title MAT 202 Linear Algebra II MAT 204 Real Analysis I MAT 206 Algebraic Structures II Optional MAT 306 Group Theory II MAT 303 Linear Algebra III Year IV Semester I Code Title MAT 321 Ordinary Differential Equations I MAT 305 Group Theory I MAT 323 Numerical Analysis I Semester II Code Title MAT 304 Complex Analysis I MAT 324 Numerical Analysis II Optional MAT 401 MAT 403 MAT 405

Partial Differential Equations I Topology I Complex Analysis II Measure Theory

Units 3 3 Units 3 3

3 3 3

Bachelor of Education (Science) 1.0. Introduction The Bachelor of Education (Science) programme is designed to produce professionally qualified science teachers who will be competent in teaching science subjects at secondary school level. The undergraduate will pursue approved Bachelor of Education professional courses to ensure professional commitment to teaching and further development in the area. The same will also cover two science teaching courses one of which will be a major and the other a minor. While the student should be able to teach both the major and minor courses efficiently at secondary school level, an interested student may pursue postgraduate studies in the major course with minimal bridging course. Those who wish to pursue postgraduate studies will, therefore, have three avenues: M.Ed. (Psychology, Curriculum development, etc) M.Ed. in Science Education or in the Science major subjects (Physics, Maths etc) or M.Sc. in the science major. This will give the graduates of this programme better opportunities, both in furthering their studies and in the employment sector 2.0 Entry Requirements 2.1. All candidates admitted to the Degree of Bachelor of Education (Science) programme must satisfy the minimum entrance requirements of the University. 2.2. Candidates must also satisfy departmental requirements before registering courses in a department. 2.3. Candidates having a Diploma in Science Education, normally with distinction or credit from a recognized institution and a teaching experience of not less than two years may be considered for

Units 3 3 Units 3 3

Units 3 3 3 Units 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 Units 3 3 88

mature entry and the entry point will be the second year of study. The courses for the B.ED (Science) Programme will be jointly offered by the Faculties of Education and Social Science, and the Faculty of Science & Engineering. 3.0. Course Structure Year I During the first year of the B.Ed (Science) programme, each student shall take either a Physical (Maths-Physics-Chemistry/MPC) or Biological (Maths-Bot/Zoo[Biology]-Chemistry/MBC) course combination of the normal common first year courses in the Faculty of Education & Social Sciences. Semester I Code ESM 101 SBT 111 SZL 112 SCH 100 SPH 110 MAT 101 COS 100 IRD 103 EDU 110 GAC 101 GAC 102

102 SPH 110 COS 102 ESM 104 EDU 111 GAC 111

GAC 112 COM 111

Mathematics II Fundamentals of Physics II Communication Skills II Quantitative Skills II Introduction to Education II Professional Ethics and Public Law in Counseling services Institutional Counseling Introduction to Computer

4 3 3 3

3 3 3

Course Title Units Fundamentals of Biology I 3 Survey of Plant Kingdom 3 Invertebrate and Vertebrate Zoology 3 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 Fundamentals of 4 Physics I Foundation Mathematics I 3 Communication Skills I 3 Development Concepts and Applications 3 Introduction of Education I 3 Introduction to Guidance & Counseling 3 Evolution& Development of Guidance 3
Optional Introduction to Computer Studies

Studies II Year II, III, and IV During the second year, each student shall choose two science subjects comprising two secondary level teaching subjects. Each student shall select one of the following course combinations, which shall constitute the major and minor teaching subjects respectively: CHEMISTRY + Physics CHEMISTRY + Biology CHEMISTRY + Mathematics CHEMISTRY + Geography PHYSICS + Chemistry PHYSICS + Mathematics MATHEMATICS + Physics MATHEMATICS + Chemistry MATHEMATICS + Biology MATHEMATICS + Geography MATHEMATICS + Mathematics BIOLOGY + Chemistry BIOLOGY + Mathematics Optional Guidance & Counseling Courses Year II Semester I Code Course Title GAC 201 Psychology of Human Adjustment GAC 202 Counseling Theories, Models and Techniques Semester II Code Course Title GAC 211 Behavioural disorders 89

Units 3 3

COM 110

Semester II
Code ESM 102 SBT 122 SZL 123 SCH 101 Course Title Fundamentals of Biology I General Microbiology Fundamentals of Ecology Fundamentals of Chemistry II Units 3 3 3 4

MAT

Foundation of

Units 3

GAC 212 GAC 213

Practicum I (4 Weeks) Communication Guidance & Counseling

3 3 Major Subject Minor Subject EDU IRD TOTAL 12 3 9 0

r II 12 1 6 3 24 Max=48 hrs

Year III Semester I Code Course Title GAC 301 Counseling exceptional persons GAC 302 Group procedures & group dynamics in Counseling Semester II Code Course Title GAC 311 Family Sex & Marital Counselling GAC 312 Psychology Testing & Analysis of Data GAC 305 Practicum 11 (Along with School Attachment) Year IV Semester I Code Course Title GAC 401 Vocational Guidance & Counselling GAC 402 Behaviour Modification Semester II Code Course Title GAC 411 Geriatric Counselling GAC 412 Personal Contracts & Skills in Counselling GAC 413 Practicum (III) (Attachment) Year II Semester I Major Subject Minor Subject EDU IRD Total Total Year III 9-12 6-3 9 3 27 51 Semester I

Units 3 3

YEAR IV Semester I Units 3 3 Major Subject Minor Subject EDU IRD Electives TOTAL 12 3 9 0 0 24 Semester II 12 3 6 3 1 26 Max 49 Hrs

Units 3 3 Units 3 3

Semester II 12 6-3 9 0 24

Semeste 90

4.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Course Course Title Units Code ESM104 Quantitative Skills II 3 3 COS Communication Skills I 100 EDU Introduction to Education 3 110 I 3 Subjects MPC 10 or MBC 12 10 - 12 Semester II Course Course Title Units Code COS 102 Communication Skills II 3 IRD 103 Development, Concepts 3 and Applications ESM 104 Quantitative Skills II 3 EDU 111 Introduction to Education 3 II COM 210 Introduction to Computer Science 3 Subjects MPC 10 or MBC 13 10 1 3 Total 22-25MAX=46 hrs

COS 102 IRD 103

Communication Skills II Development, Concepts and Applications

3 3

Year II Semester I Code Course Title PSY 210 General Education Psychology ECT 210 EDF 210 IRD 200 General Methods of Teaching Phylosophy of Education State, Society and Development 9-12 Major subject 6-3Minor subject TOTAL

(12 weeks) Year IV Semester I Code EDF 410 ESM 410 EPM 411 Semester II Code EPM 412

Units 3 3 3 3

Course Title Sociology of Education and Comparative Education Environmental Education Educational Administration and Management

27

Semester II Code Course Title ECT 211 Education Media and Resources EDF 211 History of Education PAC 210 Curriculum Development Major Subject 9-12 Minor Subject 6-3 24 MAX = 51 hrs ECT 299 1st School Attachment

Units 3 3 3

4 Weeks

Year III Semester I Code Course Title ECT 311,321,322,323 (Two Subject Special Methods) PSY 310 Human Growth and Development Semester II Code Course Title ECT 360 Media Practices PSY 311 Educational Measurement and Evaluation IRD 305 Entrepreneurship Major subject 12 Minor subject 3 24 (MAX=48 hrs) One month laboratory practice ECT 399 2nd Teaching Practice 91

Course Title Economics of Education & Educational Planning PSY 410 Guidance and Counseling IRD 400 Development Project Appraisal Major subject 12 Minor subject EDU Two Elective 26 MAX=50 hrs Electives (Any one) Code Course Title EDU 410E School Librarianship EDU 411E Basic Health and First Aid EDU 412E Stores Management EDU 413E Adult Education EDU 414E Family Life Education EDU 415E Typewriting Degree programme total maximum Chemistry Year II Unit Pre. Req. Semester I Code Course Title SCH 210 Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding SCH 230 Organic Chemistry I SCH 240 Basic Chemical Thermodynamics Additional Maths Course Semester II Code Course Title SCH 211 Inorganic Chemistry SCH 220 Analytical Chemistry I SCH 231 Organic Chemistry II Year III Semester I Code Course Title SCH 350 Environmental Chemistry

SCH 310 Comparative Chemistry of S and P Block Elements SCH 320 Organic Chemistry II Semester II Code Course Title SCH 312 Radiation and Nuclear Chemistry SCH 311 The Comparative Chemistry of d-Block Elements SCH 333 Stereochemistry,Conformational Studies & Reaction Mechanisms Year IV Semester I Code Course Title SCH 430 Organic Spectroscopy Analytical/Organic Courses 2 Physical/Inorganic - Courses - 2 Semester II Code Course Title SCH 400 Industrial Chemistry Analytical/Organic Courses 2 Physical/Inorganic Courses - 2 Physics Year II Semester I Code Course Title SPH 210 Electricity and Magnetism SPH 211 Vibrations and Waves SPH 212 Classical Mechanics I Semester II Code Course Title SPH 214 Physical Optics SPH 215 Modern Physics SPH 216 Electronics I Additional Maths Course Year III Semester I Code Course Title SPH 310 Mathematical Physics I SPH 311 Solid State Physics I SPH 312 Classical Mechanics I Semester II Code Course Title SPH 313 Quantum Mechanics I SPH 314 Electromagnetism SPH 315 Mathematical Physics II

Year IV Semester I Code SPH 423 SPH 410 Semester II SPH 415 SPH 414

Course Title Solid State Physics II Mathematical Physics III Thermodynamics Quantum Mechanics I I

Mathematics Year II Semester I MAT 210 Calculus II STA 210 Probability and Statistics MAT 212 Linear Algebra Additional Maths Select one course from above for PC combination under Chemistry. MAT 214 Vector Analysis for MC combination under Chemistry. Semester II Code Course Title MAT 211 Calculus and Analytical Geometry MAT 210 Calculus II STA 211 Probability and Statistics II MAT 213 Linear Algebra II Additional Maths Select one course from above for PC combination under Chemistry. MAT 215 Classical Mechanics for MP combination under Physics. Year III Semester I Code Course Title MAT 310 Real Analysis MAT 314 Ordinary Differential Equation I STA 310 Advanced Probability and Statistics MAT 317 Numerical Analysis I Semester II Code Title MAT 312 Complex Analysis MAT 313 Algebra COM 310 Computer Programming MAT 316 Methods I Year IV Semester I Code Course Title MAT 311 Real Analysis II 92

MAT 315 COM 410 STA 410 STA 211 Semester II Code MAT 411 MAT 319 MAT 418 STA 415 Biology

Operations Research I Data Processing Tests of Hypothesis Probability and Statistics II Course Title Field Theory Advanced Calculus Partial Differential Equation I Design and Analysis of Experiments

Semester II Code SBL 412 SBT 421 SZL 421 SZL 2 Elective

Course Title Advanced Molecular Genetics Ethnobotany Fish and Fisheries Biology Arthropod Biology

Department of Language and Literature Education Bachelor of Education (French) Programme 1.0. .Introduction The Bachelor of Education (French) degree is intended to produce professionally trained teachers in French language and experts in both the cooperate and private sector. The programme provides theoretical knowledge and practical skills in French language and literature, and will also enhance critical thinking in the language, literature, culture and pedagogy. Graduates of the programme will have a high level of communicative competence and expertise to teach in secondary schools, tertiary institutions, work in media houses and be employable in embassies and Non-Governmental Organizations. 2.0. Objectives By the end of the programme, the graduate should be able to: 2.1. Exhibit essential language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in French 2.2. Carry out a critical analysis of French literature 2.3. Demonstrate knowledge of the French culture 2.4. Teach the French language 2.5. Compile, edit and publish information in French 2.6. Carry out research in relevant areas in French language and linguistics. 2.7. Demonstrate communicative competence in French for a multicultural society 3.0. Duration of the programme The programme will take a period of four academic years from the date of registration for those taking the programme on full time mode. For those wishing to take the programme during school 93

Year II Semester I Code Course Title SBT 211 Plant Taxonomy SZL 211 Fundamentals of Cell Biology SZL 212 Introduction to Animal Physiology Semester II Code Course Title Merge SBT 221 & SBT 323) SBT 222 Plant Structure and Function SZL 221 Biological Techniques SZL 223 Fundamentals of Aquatic Ecology Zoology Year III Semester I Code Course Title SBT 312 Plant Physiology SZL 311 Comparative Animal Physiology SZL 312 SZL 322 SZL Semester II Code SBT 321 SBL 326 SZL 322 SZL Year IV Semester I Code SBT 411 SBT 415 SZL 416 SZL 416 Developmental Biology Parasitology Immunology Course Title Biosystematics & Palynology Fresh Water Biology Parasitology Immunology

Course Title Plant Biochemistry Plant Development Morphogenesis Entomology Environmental Physiology

holidays, the programme will take sixteen school holidays.

FLS 121 CSC 110 EDU 110

4.0. Admission Requirements 4.1. For admission into the degree of Bachelor of Education in French Language Studies, a student must have the minimum entry requirements as stipulated in the Common University Admission Regulations, and must have passed the KCSE with a minimum of C+ in French, OR, 4.2. Have any other relevant qualifications recognized by the university senate. 5.0. Programme Requirements 5.1. The student will take a basic overall number of courses each year that s/he must .pass . 5.2. The student shall be required to take the common university courses, relevant courses in education that are offered to Bachelor of Education students, in addition to the French language and literature courses. 5.3. The student may combine French and any other teaching subject offered in the Faculty of Education and Social Sciences. 5.4. The normal full load for each academic year shall be a minimum of 42 units. 6.0. Assessment The University rules and regulations regarding Continuous Assessment and Examinations shall apply. 7.0. Degree Title This programme shall be under the Faculty of Education and Social Sciences. The title of the degree offered shall be B. Ed. (French). 8.0. Programme Structure Year I Semester I Code Title FLS 120 Introduction to Language and Linguistics in French (core) COS 100 Communication Skills I ESM 101 Quantitative Skills I IRD 103 Development Concept and

Application Reading in French (core) Introduction to Computer and Computing Introduction to Education I Total

3 3 3 21 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Semester II Code Title FLS 122 Introduction to French Literature (core) FLS 123 Writing in French (core) CSE 109 Computer Applications IRD 102 Communication Skills II ESM 104 Quantitative Skills II EDU 111 Introduction to Eduaction II CDM 100 HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management Total Year II Semester I Code Title FLS 200 Formal French Grammar (core) FLS 210 French Phonetics and Phonology (core) FLS 211 French Sentence Structure I (E) FLS 215 Introduction to African Oral Literature in French (E) IRD 200 State,Society and Development CIT 210 General Methods of Teaching EDF 210 Philosophy of Education Semester II PSY 210 General Educational Psychology FLS 212 Introduction to Translation(core) FLS 213 History of French Language in Africa FLS 214 French Sentence Structure II(E) FLS 216 Introduction to French Poetry (E) FLS 217 French Discourse Analysis (E) Total Number of Units Year III 94

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Units 3 3 3 3

Semester I FLS 310 French Literary Devices and 3 Criticism (core) FLS 311 African and Malagasy 3 Literature (E) FLS 313 French Morphology (core) 3 3 FLS 317 Special Methods in French 3 (core) IRD 305 Entrepreneurship for Small 3 Business PSY 310 Human Growth 3 andDevelopment 18 Total Semester II FLS 314 The African Drama (E) 3 FLS 315 The Caribbean Literature 3 (core) FLS 316 French Novel and 3 th Philosophical works in the 18 Century (core) FLS 312 French Applied 3 Linguistics (E) IRD 306 Public Speaking 3 CIT 360 Educational Media, Practicals 3 and Micro-Teaching PSY 311 Educational Measurement & 3 Evaluation 21 Total Year IV Semester I FLS 410 French Semantics and 3 Lexicology (core) FLS 413 French Textual Analysis (E) 3 FLS 414 African Prose in French (E) 3 3 FLS 415 French Novel in the 20th Century (core) PSY 410 Guidance and Counseling 3 EDF 410 Sociology of Education and 3 Comparative Education ESM 410 Environmental Education 3 EPM 411 Educational Admin and 3 Management 24 Total Semester II FLS 411 Translation and Interpretation 3 95

FLS 412 FLS 416 FLS 417 IRD 400 EPM 412 EDU 410 EDU 411

(core) Critical Analysis of Texts in French (core) The French Novel (E) Trends in Contemporary French (E) Programme Planning, Implementation & Evaluation Economics of Education & Educational Planning School Librarianship Basic Health Care Total

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

NB: Students will get other units from the subjects that they will combine with French. Master of Arts in Comparative Literature 1.0. Introduction This programme seeks to expose graduates to literatures from all over the world as a way of learning the societies that produce such literatures, hence the comparative component in the course title. By focusing on the correlations between experiences from different parts of the world, and the way these experiences have been captured in the respective literatures, graduates of this program will have a clearer view of the common aspects of humanity that link societies all over the world. 2.0. Aim This programme aims at exposing graduates to emergent trends in literary thought and practice. Its comparative nature will make graduates learn from other societies, and make them appreciate the respective societies contribution to the cumulative human civilization. Secondly, the program will also prepare them for rigorous research in literature in its varied compositions, hence increasing the stock of researchers globally. Equally important is the fact that such program will produce high level manpower in the humanities. 3.0. Objectives of the Programme The programme is mainly designed to assist graduates to be able to:

3.1. Acquire an in-depth understanding of theories and practices of literature in various parts of the world. 3.2. Acquire attitudes that will be helpful in their functioning within the multicultural world of disciplinary diversity. 3.3. Conduct research in literature and disseminate findings in intellectual forums. 3.4. Appreciate the various ways of intellectual self and group expression. 4.0. Target Groups 4.1. Graduates in literature from accredited universities 4.2. Media practitioners 4.3. High school teachers of literature 4.4. Researchers in cultural issues 5.0. Entry Requirements Apart from fulfilling the common University regulations, an applicant for the Master of Arts in Comparative Literature should satisfy the following requirements: 5.1. Hold a bachelors degree in literature with at least upper second-class honors from an accredited university. 5.2. Hold a bachelors degree in literature at lower second class honors from an accredited institution provided: the applicant has at least two years relevant experience after qualification, or has evidence of at least one literary-related publication. 6.0. Submission and Processing of Application for Registration The common university procedures approved by the senate shall apply. 7.0. Duration of the Programme The programme shall have two modes of study;-: full-time and part-time. 7.1. Full-time The full-time mode shall normally run for a period of two academic years distributed over four consecutive semesters of full-time attendance. 7.2. Part-time The part-time mode shall normally take a period of four academic years of attendance from the date of registration. 96

8.0. Programme Requirements 8.1 .The programme requires a minimum of 48 and maximum of 58 units of appropriate graduate coursework including a thesis. 8.2. A student shall be deemed to have passed an academic year after successful completion of all the units within that period. 8.3. A student shall have passed all the courses offered in the first year of study in order to proceed to second year of study. 8.4. The English language shall be used as the medium of instruction and writing of all assignments as well as the thesis. 9.0. Examinations 9.1. University common regulations governing graduate programmes shall apply. 9.2 Examinations shall involve course work, examination and thesis writing. 9.3. Course Work will include the formative and summative types conducted as here below: 9.3.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3-hour end-of-semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 9.3.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous course work assessment comprising seminar papers, projects and other reports, term papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 9.4.The pass mark in each course (Continuous Assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. 9.5. Each course shall be graded out of 100 marks and shall be translated thus: Marks Grade 75% and above A 65% - 74% B 50% - 64% C Below 50% D 9.6. A candidate who fails half OR more than half of the courses taken shall be discontinued. 9.7. . Research and Thesis Writing

A student shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic related to comparative literature. Thesis supervisors shall be identified for the students at the beginning of the second semester through the active involvement of the students themselves. Where the departmental rules are silent the common regulations for submission and examination of theses of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension shall apply. 10. Teaching and Learning Methods A student-centered approach shall be used with emphasis on seminars, field tours, problem-solving, directed and experiential learning, project work and research. 11.0. Course structure Core Courses Code Title Units LIT 810 Theories and Practice of Literary Criticism 3 LIT 811Narratives of Postcolonialism 3 LIT 812Literature and Life in the 19th & 20th centuries 1 3 LIT 813 Literature and Life in the 19th & 20th centuries 3 LIT 814 Research Methods in Literature 3 LIT 815 Research in Orature 3 LIT 827 Research and Thesis Writing 15 6.2 Electives LIT 816 Tragedy in Drama LIT 817 Performance and Theatre LIT 818 Narratives on Migrancy LIT 819 Literature from the Islands LIT 820Texts and Contexts LIT 821 Oriental Cultures and Literatures LIT 822 South American Writing LIT 823 Reading the Canon LIT 824 Literature and Translation LIT 825 Literature and Material Cultures LIT 826 Fiction and Faction 6.3Course Distribution By Semesters 1st Year 1st Semester 97

Core courses LIT 810 Theories and Practice of Literary Criticism LIT 812 Literature and Life in the 19th & 20th centuries 1 LIT 814 Research Methods in Literature Any one elective course from the following LIT 816 Tragedy in Drama LIT 817 Performance in Theatre LIT 820 Texts and Contexts Total Units in 1st Semester

3 3 3 3 3 3 12

2nd Semester Core courses LIT 811 Narratives of Postcolonialism 3 th th LIT 813 Literature and Life in the 19 & 20 centuries 2 3 LIT 815 Oral Literatures 3 Elective courses Any one elective course from the following LIT 818Narratives on Migrancy 3 LIT 819 Literature from the Islands 3 LIT 821Oriental Cultures and Literatures 3 Total Units in 2nd Semester 12 2nd Year 1st Semester LIT 827 Research and Thesis Writing 2nd Semester LIT 827 Research and Thesis Writing Elective courses Any two courses from the following LIT 822 South American Writing LIT 823 Reading the Canon LIT 824 Literature and Translation LIT 825 Literature and Material Cultures LIT 826 Fiction and Faction Total Units Master of Education in Kiswahili 1.0. Introduction Kiswahili is an important language not only in Kenya but in East Africa, Africa and other parts of the world. As a result, there is increasing demand for high level manpower in Kiswahili for university and other institutions of higher learning. In this regard, the Department of Language and Literature

15 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

6 6 6 6 6 48

Education offers a Master of Education degree in Kiswahili to prepare persons who would be able to: 1.1. Teach Kiswahili effectively at higher levels of education. 1.2. Conduct research which can provide significant solutions to problems related to Kiswahili language and literature, and make accumulative contribution to knowledge. 1.3. Participate in the management and supervision of programmes related to Kiswahili in Government institutions and in Non-Governmental Organizations. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. General Objective The objective of this programme is to provide an opportunity for students to acquire a broad background in the theory and practice of Language and Literature. It is aimed at producing graduates with the ability, hands on experience and desire to solve problems related to Kiswahili and contribute to its development as a subject and medium of communication relevant to the needs of information technology in the modern world. 2.2. Specific Objectives By the end of the course the students should be able to: 2.2.1. Discuss and apply the main theories of Kiswahili language instruction and acquisition. 2.2.2.Be able to define and utilize advanced theories of Kiswahili Literature in Literary Criticism. 2.2.3. Demonstrate knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to: 2.2.4. Contribute to Kiswahili curriculum design and development. 2.2.5. Participate in teaching supervising and conducting research on different aspects of Kiswahili at various educational levels. 3.0. Admission Requirements. In addition to fulfilling the common University regulations, an applicant for the degree of Master of Arts in Kiswahili should satisfy the following requirements:

3.1. Hold a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Education degree in Kiswahili with at least Lower Second Class Honours from an accredited institution. 3.2. Must have taken Kiswahili as a major subject in the first degree. 4.0. Submission and Processing of Applications for Registration. The common university procedures approved by the Senate shall apply. 5.0. Duration of the Programme The Programme shall have two modes of study: Full-time and Part-time. 5.1. Full-time The full-time mode shall normally run for a period of two academic years distributed over four consecutive semesters of full-time attendance. 5.2. Part-time The part-time mode shall normally take a maximum period of four academic years parttime attendance from the date of registration. 6.0. Programme Requirements. 6.1. The programme requires a minimum of forty nine units of appropriate graduate coursework including thesis. 6.2. Kiswahili shall be used as the medium of instruction and writing of all assignments as well as the thesis. 6.3. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also audit courses subject to approval by the department. 7.0. Evaluation. Evaluation shall include coursework, examination and thesis. 7.1. Coursework And Examination The common regulations approved by the Senate shall apply. 7.2. Thesis Writing 7.2.1. A student shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic related to Kiswahili Language and Literature.

98

7.2.2. Thesis Supervisors shall be appointed for the students at the start of the second semester, through the active involvement of the students themselves. 7..2.3. Where the departmental rules are silent the common regulations for submission and examination by the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension shall apply. 8.0. Learning and Teaching Methods. A student-centred approach shall be used with emphasis on seminars, field tours, problem solving, self-directed learning, project work, research, experiential learning and community based education. 9.0.Course Structure Year I Semester I LEK 800 LEK 804

Collection,Data Analysis and Thesis Writing Semester II LEK 802 LEK 899 Teaching African 3 Oral Literature Thesis Writing 2 Grand Total 44

Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili Programme 1.0 Introduction The enhanced status of Kiswahili globally necessitates the advanced scientific study of the language as an academic subject and medium of wider communication. However, despite its role in society, few higher education institutions offer Kiswahili Studies at this level. The number of those that offer programmes through the Kiswahili medium is even smaller. It is for this reason that the Department of Language and Literature Education has developed a Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili programme in order to contribute to further development of Kiswahili, its understanding and pedagogy. The Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili programme is oriented towards research, teaching and community service that will promote knowledge, skills and attitudes concerning Kiswahili and its role in development. More specifically, the Programme is aimed at producing practitioner-scholars able to bridge the gap between theory, policy and practice. Succesful completion of this programme of study prepares graduates to take up positions as scholars in institutions of higher education, educational programmes, administration and leadership, fieldoriented professions, consultancies, language policy and planning and teacher education where high intellectual capacity and research are integral to ones professionalism. The programme involves in-depth examination of critical issues related to Kiswahili literature , linguistics and language education and their 99

LEK 810 LEK 822 LEK 823 LEK 830

Teaching Kiswahili as a Second Language Instructional Methods and Resources in Kiswahili Advanced Kiswahili Grammar I Kiswahili Poetry criticism Literary Theory and Criticism Research Methodology Total Units

Units 3 3

3 3 3 3 18

Semester II LEK 801 LEK 803 LEK 820 LEK 821 LEK 831

Teaching Kiswahili as a Second Language Teaching Literature in Kiswahili Kiswahili Prose Fiction Kiswahili Drama Research Proposal and Seminar Total

3 3 3 3 3 15

Year II Semester I KIS 899

Research:Data

relationship to development. It also provides a solid grounding in research methodology appropriate in relevant fields. The Department shall offer the following options of the Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili programme: a) Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili (Kiswahili Education) b) Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili (Linguistics in Kiswahili) c) Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili ( Kiswahili Literature) 2.0 . Aim and Objectives 2.1. Aim The aim of the Doctor of Philosphy in Kiswahili programme is to prepare reflective candidates who are equiped with the necessary kowledge , skills , attitudes and values in Kiswahili educational, literary and linguistics studies. 2.2. Objectives 2.2.1 To equip graduates with relevant advanced knowledge, attitudes and skills necessary in the teaching of educational, linguistic and literary aspects of Kiswahili as well as initiating and supervising Kiswahili academic programmes. 2.2.2. To enhance graduates capacity critical in programme administration and consultancy. 2.2.3. To develop among graduates positive attitude towards Kiswahili and inspire their commitment to provide service necessary for the development of Kiswahili. 2.2.4. To impart the graduates with the expertise critical in the generation of scholarly materials necessary in the development of Kiswahili. 2.2.5. To nurture among graduates the acumen to identify development challenges related to Kiswahili and develop appropriate solutions. 3.0. Target The Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili programme is targetted at candidates in institutions of higher education , scholars seriously interested in Kiswahili studies , as well as teachers and education practitioners and administrators who wish to 100

enhance their careers. They are also suitable for those concerned with training and supervision of Kiswahili experts and the organization of Kiswahili language and literature training programmes. 4.0. Admission Requirements 4.1. The Common Regulations of MMUST for eligibility to doctoral studies shall apply. In addition, an applicant must be a holder of a Masters degree in Kiswahili Education, Kiswahili Literature or Linguistics in Kiswahili. Holders of Masters degrees in Kiswahili, Linguistics, Literature, Language Education or any other related field from a recognised institution of higher learning may also apply. 4.2. An applicant may also be required to attend an interview organized by the Department of Language and Literature Education. 5.0. Duration of the Programmes The Doctor of Philosophy in Kiswahili programme at MMUST shall be offered in two variants and two modes: By Course work, Examination and Thesis; and by Thesis alone. The Programme shall be either full-time or part-time. 5.1. Course Work, Examination and Thesis This variant requires a student to successfully complete a minimum of 21 units of coursework and examinations before embarking on research work and thesis. 5.2. Thesis Only This variant of Thesis Only shall have research as its main thrust. The candidate shall embark on fieldwork immediately after succesful presentation and defence of the Doctor of Philosophy research proposal. This variant shall be offered to candidates who will have covered adequate number of courses relevant to the programme at level 800 as shall be determined by the Departmental Postgraduate Studies Committee. In addition, candidates shall be required to have presented at least three seminars and published at least three articles relevant to their research in refeered journals. 5.3. Full-time The full-time mode shall take a minimum of six (6) semesters (three academic years) and a maximum of ten (10) semesters (five academic years). A

candidate must successfully complete a minimum of twenty one (21) units of study within the first two consecutive semesters or first year of registration. 5.4. Part-time This will take a minimum of eight(8) semesters (four academic years) and a maximum of twelve (12) semesters ( six (6) academic years. A candidate must successfully complete a minimum of twenty one (21) units of study within the first four consecutive semesters or two (2 )years after registering for the programme. 6.0. Examinations The regulations of MMUST pertaining to Examinations shall apply. 7.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Minimum 12 units of level 9 courses related to Thesis topic 12 6 units of Research Proposal 6 Total 18

Kiswahili Education Year I Semester I Course Code & Title Units LEK 900 Trends in the Development of Kiswahili Education 3 LEK 901 The Teaching and Learning of Kiswahili as a Second Language 3 LEK 902 Second Language Research 3 LEK 927 Field Linguistics 3 LEK 998A Research Methodology I 6 Total 18 Semester II LEK 903 Kiswahili Literature Education 3 LEK 904 Second Language Acquisition 3 LEK 925 Critical Discourse Analysis 3 Or LEK 928 Language and Ecology 3 LEK 942 Translation and Interpretation 3 LEK 998B Research Methodology II 3 Total 15 Year II LEK 999A Research Thesis I 12

Semester II Minimum 9 units of level 9 courses related to Thesis topic 3 units of Research Proposal 3 Total 12 Year II 12 units of Thesis I 12 Year III 15 units of Thesis II culminating in completion and submission of Thesis 15 The Department may give credit exemptions to students in some areas. 8.0 Course Distribution The Doctor of Philosophy programme in Kiswahili shall have the following options.

Year III LEK 999B Research Thesis II Linguistics in Kiswahili Year 1 Semester 1 LEK 920 Phonetics and Phonology in Kiswahili LEK 922 Kiswahili Syntax LEK 926 Kiswahili Morphology LEK927 Field Linguistics LEK998A Research Methodology I Total Semester 2 LEK 923 Kiswahili Semantics LEK 921 Kiswahili Lexicology and Lexicography LEK 925 Critical Discourse Analysis or LEK 928 Language and Ecology 101

15

3 3 3 3 6 18

3 3 3 3

LEK 942 Translation and Intepretation 3 LEK 998B Research Methodology II 3 Total 15 Year II LEK 999 A Research Thesis I Year 3 LEK 999B Research Thesis II Kiswahili Literature Year 1 Semester 1 LEK 927 Field Linguistics LEK 940 Oral Literature in Kiswahili LEK 941 Kiswahili Novel LEK 943 Kiswahili Drama LEK 998A Research Methodology I Total Semester 2 LEK 925 Critical Discourse Analysis LEK 928 Language and Ecology LEK 942 Translation and Intepretation LEK 944 Kiswahili Poetry LEK 998B Research Methodology II Total Year II LEK 999A Research Thesis I
Year III LEK 999B Research Thesis II

12

the challenge of producing quality graduates by utilizing best practices in management training which integrate theory and practice. Students engage in participatory learning, workplace exposure through corporate internships and are encouraged to develop leadership capacities through active participation in professional students associations. The academic curriculum offered from Certificate to Masters Programmes covers extensively the theoretical underpinnings and practical exposure on strategic management and key functional areas of business organizations. After covering an extensive overview of business organizations management and functions, students pursuing diploma, BBM and MBA eventually specialize in any one of the following concentrations: Accounting, Business Administration, Enterprise Development and Management, Finance, Human Resource Management, Insurance and Risk Management, Marketing, Purchasing and Supply Chain Management and Operations and Information Systems Management. The departments staff and graduates are highly regarded in the market for their competence. To further enhance its competitiveness and brand profile, the department has undertaken extensive strategic initiatives guided by the vision of being a world-class School of Business. The mission of the department is to create and utilize knowledge that enhances the understanding of the practice of management to educate and develop business leaders capable of making a real difference in the society. This is possible given the strong core values grounding of the department, namely: believing in the power of ideas and intellect; creating mutuallyengaging learning process; striving in excellence in all we do; acting with integrity and; community engagement. Bachelor of Business Management (BBM) 2.0. Entry Requirements 2.1. An applicant should meet admission requirements of the University: 2.2. Applicants should meet the entry requirements for the Bachelor of Business Management (BBM) 102

15

3 3 3 3 6 18 3 3 3 3 3 15 12
15

Department of Business Management 1.0. Introduction The Department of Business Management is committed to producing business leaders who are both agents and managers of change. Academic programmes offered by the department include Certificate in Business Management, Diploma in Business Management, Bachelor of Business Management (BBM), Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Science (MSc) in Human Resource Management. The training offered by the department is geared towards developing competent graduates who either may already be in practice or aspiring to pursue careers in competitive organizational management and enterprise development. The department meets

degree programme as stipulated by the Joint Admission Board (JAB), or 2.3. Have a minimum mean grade of C+ (Plus) at KCSE and at least a C (Plain) in Mathematics and C+ (Plus) in English, or 2.4. Principal passes and one Subsidiary at A level plus at least a credit in English and Mathematics at A level, or 2.5. CPA/CPS Part I 2.6. Diploma in Business related discipline from an accredited institution 3.0. Duration of the Programme The programme normally takes four academic years of study. However, holders of CPA/ CPS part II or KNEC three year business diploma may be admitted to second year and those with CPA/CPS part III or KNEC Higher National Diploma in business may join the programme in the third year of study. 4.0. Examination Regulations The general rules and regulations governing assessment/examinations of the university shall apply. 5.0. Structure of the Programme The degree programme covers university-wide courses, core departmental courses, specialization courses and electives. Each course carries 3 units/credit hours. To qualify for graduation a student will be required to pass a minimum of 168 units. A student is required to register for at least 42 units in each academic year. 5.1. University-Wide Courses All students in BBM are required to take Universitywide courses listed below: Code COS 100: ESM 101: COS 102: IRD 103: ESM 102: Title Communication Skills I Quantitative Skills I Communication Skills II National Development Concepts & Applications Quantitative Skills II 103

CDM 100: IRD 200:

HIV and AIDS Prevention and Management State Society and Development

5.2. Departmental Common Courses All students in the BBM programme are required to take departmental Common courses as listed below: Code Title BBM 100: Financial Accounting I BBM 101: Introduction to Business Management BBM 102: Introduction to Computer Studies ECO 110: Introduction to Microeconomics BBM 103: Financial Accounting II BBM 104: Principles of Management BBM 105: Management Mathematics BBM 106: Business Law I CSC 109: Computer Applications ECO 111: Introduction to Macroeconomics BBM 200: Financial Management BBM 201: Accounting for Assets and Liabilities BBM 202: Principles of Marketing BBM 203: Principles of Human Resource Management BBM 204: Business Statistics I ECO 310: Intermediate Microeconomics BBM 205: Management Information Systems BBM 206: Operations Research and Management BBM 207: Business law II BBM 208: Management Accounting BBM 209: Purchasing and Supplies Management BBM 210: Insurance and Risk Management BBM 211: Business Communication ECO 311: Intermediate Macroeconomics BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institutions and Markets BBM 301: Organization Behaviour BBM 316: Quality management BBM 317: Organizational Theory BBM 318: Electronic Commerce BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods

BBM 402: BBM 403: BBM 420: BBM 421: BBM 422: BBM 490: BBM 490:

Business Statistics II Company Law Business Ethics Strategic Management Tax Management Management Research Project I Management Research Project II

BBM 405: BBM 413: BBM 425: BBM 426:

Public Sector Management Meetings Law and Procedure Company Secretarial and Administration Law Contemporary Management Practices

5.3. Specialization Courses Students will be required to choose an area of specialisation (Option) in their third year of study. All courses designated as specialisation courses are core courses in the area in which a student is majoring. The department offers the following specialization options: Accounting, Business Administration, Enterprise Development and Management, Finance, Human Resource Management, Insurance and Risk Management, Marketing, Purchasing and Supply Chain Management and Operations and Information Systems Management. 5.3.1. Accounting Option Code BBM 302: Title

5.3.3. Enterprise Development and Management Option Code Title BBM 306: Innovation Planning and Management BBM 311: Customer Behavior BBM 312: Marketing Planning and Strategy BBM 323: Sales Management BBM 324: Social Entrepreneurship and Networking Skills BBM 329: Services Marketing and Management BBM 410: BBM 414: BBM 415: BBM 428: Retail Management Strategy Business Consulting and Development Enterprise Financing Brand Management Strategy

5.3.4. Finance Option Specialized Financial Accounting Techniques BBM 303: Corporate Finance BBM 346: Public Sector Accounting BBM 319: Advanced Financial Accounting I BBM 320: Principles of Auditing BBM 325: Financial Statement Analysis BBM 404: Advanced Financial Accounting II BBM 412: Asset Management BBM 423: Accounting Information System BBM 406:Advanced Management Accounting 5.3.2. Business Administration Option Code Title BBM 304: Public Relations BBM 312: Marketing Planning and Strategy BBM 334: Office Management BBM 321: Reward Management BBM 322: Industrial Relations Management BBM 329: Services Marketing and Management 104 Code BBM 303: BBM 307: BBM 335: BBM 325: BBM 326: BBM 336: BBM 407: BBM 412: BBM 429: BBM 430: Title Corporate Finance Monetary Theory and Practice Financial Law Financial Statements analysis Public Finance Financial Risk Management Security Analysis and Valuation Asset Management Portfolio Theory and Management International Finance

5.3.5.Human Resource Management Option Code Title BBM 308: Labour Economics BBM 309: Human Resource Procurement BBM 304: Public Relations BBM 321: Reward Management BBM 322: Industrial Relations Management

BBM 337: BBM 408: BBM 432: BBM 431: BBM 416:

Labor Law Personnel Training and Development Occupational Health and Safety Work Design and Measurement Contemporary Issues in Human Resource Management

BBM 343: BBM 437: BBM 418: BBM 419:

BBM 438:

Project Management Network Design and Management Business Software Design Contemporary Issues in Operations and Information Systems Management Web Design & Management

5.3.6.. Insurance and Risk Management Option Code Title BBM 303: Corporate Finance BBM 310: Strategic Risk Management BBM 338: Insurance Markets BBM 327: Retirement Benefits Management BBM 328: Insurance Law BBM 339: Marine Insurance BBM 409: Life Assurance BBM 417: Liability Insurance BBM 433: Actuarial Mathematics BBM 434: Property Insurance 5.3.7. Marketing Option Code Title BBM 311: Customer Behaviour BBM 312: Marketing Planning and Strategy BBM 340: Integrated Marketing Communication Strategy BBM 323: Sales Management BBM 329: Services Marketing and Management BBM 341: Customer Relationship Management Strategy BBM 410: Retail Management Strategy BBM 436:Applied Marketing Research BBM 435:Global Marketing Strategy BBM 428:Brand Management Strategy 5.3.8. Operations and Information Systems Management Option Code BBM 313: BBM 314: BBM 330: BBM 331: BBM 342: Title Advanced Operations Management Computer Programming Operating Systems Systems Analysis and Design Systems Security 105

5.3.9. Purchasing and Supply Chain Management Option Code BBM 310: BBM 315: BBM 344: BBM 332: BBM 333: BBM 345: BBM 411: BBM 410: BBM 424: BBM 427: Title Strategic Risk Management Strategic Supply Chain Management International Sourcing Logistics Management Materials and Storage Management Contracts Development in Purchasing and Supplies Supply Chain Project Management Retail Management Strategy Supply Chain Performance Measurement Procurement Law and Ethics

5.4. Electives These are additional courses within the specialization areas that reinforce the knowledge captured under the core specialization courses and/ or cover contemporary issues within the specialization areas. Level Three/Third Year Electives Code Title BBM 347E: International Business Management BBM 348E: Industrial Marketing BBM 349E: Transportation Insurance BBM 350E: Public Speaking Skills BBM 351E: Effectiveness in Purchasing and Supplies BBM 352E: Tourism and Hospitality Marketing BBM 353E: Treasury Management BBM 354E: Marketing Ethics

BBM 355E: BBM 356E: BBM 357E: BBM 358E: BBM 359E:

Management of Co-operatives AgribusinessMarketingSystems Mobile Computing Data Communication Marketing for Non-profit making Organizations Level Four/Fourth Year Electives Code Title BBM 439E: Gender Issues in Management BBM 440E: Strategic Financial Management BBM 441E: Re-insurance BBM 442E: Contemporary Issues in Insurance BBM 443E: Advanced Actuarial Science BBM 444E: Database management Systems BBM 445E: Marketing Metrics BBM 446E: Contemporary Issues in Entrepreneurship BBM 447E: Real Estate Finance BMS 448E: Managing Purchasing and Supply Relationships BBM 449E: Bankruptcy and Reorganization Accounting BBM 450E: Accounting Theory BBM 451E: Contemporary Issues in Auditing BBM 452E: Trust and Executorships Accounts BBM 453E: Organizational Leadership and Development BBM 454E: Contemporary Issues in Marketing BBM 455E: Societal Marketing 6.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title BBM 100: Financial Accounting I BBM 101: Introduction to Business Management BBM 102: Introduction to Computer Studies ESM 101: Quantitative Skills I IRD 103: National Development Concepts & Applications COS 100: Communication Skills I ECO 110: Introduction to Microeconomics CDM 100: HIV and AIDS: Prevention and 106

Management Year I Semester II Code BBM 103: BBM 104: BBM 105: BBM 106: COS 102: ESM 102: CSC 109: ECO 111: Year II Semester I Code BBM 200: BBM 201: BBM 202: BBM 203: BBM 204: IRD 200: ECO 310:

Title Financial Accounting II Principles of Management Management Mathematics Business Law I Communication Skills II Quantitative Skills II Computer Applications Introduction to Macroeconomics

Title Financial Management Accounting for Assets and Liabilities Principles of Marketing Principles of Human Resource Management Business Statistics I State Society and Development Intermediate Microeconomics

Year II Semester II Code Title BBM 205: Management Information Systems BBM 206: Operations Research and Management BBM 207: Business law II BBM 208: Management Accounting BBM 209: Purchasing and Supply Management BBM 210: Insurance and Risk Management BBM 211: Business Communication ECO 311: Intermediate Macroeconomics Year III Accounting Option Semester I Code Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets

BBM 301: BBM 302:

Organization Behaviour Specialized Financial Accounting Techniques BBM 303: Corporate Finance BBM 346: Public Sector Accounting * Any one level three elective Semester II Code Title BBM 316: Quality Management BBM 317: Organizational Theory BBM 318: Electronic Commerce BBM 319: Advanced Financial Accounting I BBM 320: Principles of Auditing BBM 325: Financial Statement Analysis * Any one level three elective Business Administration Option Semester I Code Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets BBM 301: Organizational Behavior BBM 304: Public Relations BBM 312: Marketing Planning and Strategy BBM 334: Office Management Any one level three elective Semester II Code BBM 316: BBM 317: BBM 318: BBM 321: BBM 322: BBM 329:

BBM 306:

Innovation Planning and Management BBM 311: Customer Behavior BBM 312: Marketing Planning and Strategy * Any one level three elective Semester II Code BBM 316: BBM 317: BBM 318: BBM 323: BBM 324:

Title Quality Management Organizational Theory Electronic Commerce Sales Management Social Entrepreneurship and Networking Skills BBM 329: Services Marketing and Management * Any one level three elective Finance Option Semester I Code Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets BBM 301: Organizational Behaviour BBM 303: Corporate Finance BBM 307: Monetary Theory and Practice BBM 335: Financial Law Any one level three elective Semester II Code Title BBM 316: Quality Management BBM 317: Organizational Theory BBM 318: Electronic Commerce BBM 325: Financial Statements analysis BBM 326: Public Finance BBM 336: Financial Risk Management * Any one level three elective Human Resource Management Option Semester I Code Course Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets BBM 301: Organization Behaviour 107

Course Title Quality Management Organizational Theory Electronic Commerce Reward Management Industrial Relations Management Services Marketing and Management Any one level three elective Enterprise Development and Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets BBM 301: Organizational Behavior

BBM 308: Labour Economics BBM 309: Human Resource Procurement BBM 304: Public Relations * Any one level three elective Semester II Code Title BBM 316: Quality Management BBM 317: Organizational Theory BBM 318: Electronic Commerce BBM 321: Reward Management BBM 322: Industrial Relations Management BBM 337: Labor Law * Any one level three elective Insurance and Risk Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets BBM 301: Organization Behaviour BBM 303: Corporate Finance BBM 310: Strategic Risk Management BBM 338: Insurance Markets * Any one level three elective Semester II Code BBM 316: BBM 317: BBM 318: BBM 327:

BBM 312: BBM 340:

Marketing Planning and Strategy Integrated Marketing Communication Strategy Any one level three elective Semester II Code BBM 316: BBM 317: BBM 318: BBM 323: BBM 329:

Title Quality Management Organizational Theory Electronic Commerce Sales Management Services Marketing and Management BBM 341: Customer Relationship Management Strategy * Any one level three elective Operations and Information Systems Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets BBM 301: Organization Behaviour BBM 313: Advanced Operations Management BBM 314: Computer Programming BBM 330: Operating Systems * Any one level three elective Semester II Code Title BBM 316: Quality Management BBM 317: Organizational Theory BBM 318: Electronic Commerce BBM 331: Systems Analysis and Design BBM 342: Systems Security BBM 343: Project Management * Any one level three elective Purchasing and Supply Chain Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets 108

Title Quality management Organizational Theory Electronic Commerce Retirement Benefits Management BBM 328: Insurance Law BBM 339: Marine Insurance * Any one level three elective Marketing Option Semester I Code Title BBM 212: Corporate Internship I BBM 305: Entrepreneurship BBM 300: Financial Institution and Markets BBM 301: Organization Behaviour BBM 311: Customer Behaviour

BBM 301: BBM 310: BBM 315:

Organization Behaviour Strategic Risk Management Strategic Supply Chain Management BBM 344: International Sourcing * Any one level three elective Semester II Code BBM 316: BBM 317: BBM 318: BBM 332: BBM 333: BBM 345:

BBM 413: Meetings Law and Procedure BBM 490: Management Research Project I *Any one level four elective Semester II Code BBM 420: BBM 421: BBM 422: BBM 425:

Title Quality Management Organizational Theory Electronic Commerce Logistics Management Materials and Storage Management Contracts Development in Purchasing and Supplies Any one level three elective Year IV Accounting Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 404: Advanced Financial Accounting II BBM 412: Asset Management BBM 490: Management Research Project I *Any one level four elective Semester II Code BBM 420: BBM 421: BBM 422: BBM 423: BBM 406: BBM 491:

Title Business Ethics Strategic Management Tax Management Company Secretarial and Administration Law BBM 426: Contemporary Management BBM 491: Management Research Project II Enterprise Development and Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 410: Retail Management Strategy BBM 414: Business Consulting and Development BBM 490: Management Research Project I *Any one level four elective Semester II Code BBM 420: BBM 421: BBM 422: BBM 415: BBM 428: BBM 491:

Title Business Ethics Strategic Management Tax Management Accounting Information System Advanced Management Accounting Management Research Project II

Title Business Ethics Strategic Management Tax Management Enterprise Financing Brand Management Strategy Management Research Project II

Business Administration Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 405: Public Sector Management 109

Finance Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 407: Security Analysis and Valuation BBM 412: Asset Management BBM 490: Management Research Project I

*Any one level four elective Semester II Code BBM 421: BBM 422: BBM 423: BBM 429: BBM 430: BBM 491:

Title Business Ethics Strategic Management Tax Management Portfolio Theory and Management International Finance Management Research Project II

Semester II Code BBM 420: BBM 421: BBM 422: BBM 433: BBM 434: BBM 491:

Title Business Ethics Strategic Management Tax Management Actuarial Mathematics Property Insurance Management Research Project II

Human Resource Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 408: Personnel Training and Development BBM 432: Occupational Health and Safety BBM 490 :Management Research Project I *Any one level four elective Semester II Code Title BBM 420: Business Ethics BBM 421: Strategic Management BBM 422: Tax Management BBM 431: Work Design and Measurement BBM 416: Contemporary Issues in Human Resource Management BBM 491:Management Research Project II Insurance and Risk Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 409: Life Assurance BBM 417: Liability Insurance BBM 490: Management Research Project I *Any one level four elective

Marketing Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 410: Retail Management Strategy BBM 436: Applied Marketing Research BBM 490: Management Research Project I *Any one level four elective Semester II Code BBM 420: BBM 421: BBM 422: BBM 435: BBM 428: BBM 491:

Title Business Ethic Strategic Management Tax Management Global Marketing Strategy Brand Management Strategy Management Research Project II

Operations and Information Systems Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 437: Network Design and Management BBM 418: Business Software Design BBM 490: Management Research Project I *Any one level four elective Semester II Code BBM 420: BBM 421: BBM 422: 110

Title Business Ethics Strategic Management Tax Management

BBM 419:

BBM 438: BBM 491:

Contemporary Issues in Operations and Information Systems Management Web Design & Management Management Research Project II

Purchasing and Supply Chain Management Option Semester I Code Title BBM 400: Corporate Internship II BBM 401: Business Research Methods BBM 402: Business Statistics II BBM 403: Company Law BBM 411: Supply Chain Project Management BBM 410: Retail Management Strategy BBM 490: Management Research Project I *Any one level four elective Semester II Code Title BBM 420: Business Ethics BBM 421: Strategic Management BBM 422: Tax Management BBM 424: Supply Chain Performance Measurement BBM 427: Procurement Law and Ethics BBM 491: Management Research Project II Master of Business Administration (MBA) 1.0. Introduction The Master of Business Administration (MBA) programme seeks to equip students with skills, techniques and understanding required to offer effective organizational management leadership. Graduates of MBA are usually already in management careers or aspiring to take up management positions in public and private sector organizations, operate as consultants, or pursue higher level academic programmes. 2.0. Target Groups The programme is designed for:

2.1. Those in business employment and practice but holding bachelors degree or equivalent in other specialization other than business studies. 2.2. University graduates from other disciplines who wish to develop a career in business management and acquire managerial skills. 2.3. Those with bachelor degrees in the area of business management who desire to advance academically or equip themselves with relevant business models and best practices to be more effective in their management careers. 3.0. Programme Objectives The programme is designed to: 3.1. Provide the students with critical insight into the functional areas of business management. 3.2. Enhance self-confidence and the ability to evaluate practical business challenges from academic, practical, and critical perspectives. 3.3. Develop awareness of the changing local and international business environment. 3.4. Provide specialized knowledge of the chosen areas of specialization, and 3.5. Instill a professional and problem-solving attitude in the practice of management. 4.0. Admission Requirements 4.1. Bachelors degree with 2nd Class Honors, Upper Division, or 4.2. Bachelors degree with 2nd Class Honors, Lower Division with 2 years relevant experience, or 4.3. Bachelors degree as above with a postgraduate diploma in relevant field 5.0. Duration of the programme The programme takes 2 academic years divided into four semesters and is offered in evenings (5-8pm) and weekends (Saturdays 8-5pm). 6.0. Assessment Rules and Regulations for University Examinations shall apply

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7.0. Courses Offered MBA 811 In the first year of study, students take compulsory core courses covering the main functional areas of business organization as well as other theoretical aspects required for effective management. In the second year of study, students take core and elective courses in their chosen areas of specialization as well as undertake a research thesis. The programme offers the following specialization options: 7.1. Accounting 7.2 Finance 7.3. Risk Management and Insurance 7.4.International Business Management 7.5. Marketing 7.6. Operations Management 7.7. Strategic Management 7.8. Entrepreneurship 7.9. Human Resource Management 10.0 Award of Degree The name of the degree to be awarded shall be Master of Business Administration and the degree certificate shall indicate the specialization option. 11.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Course Code MBA 801 MBA 802 MBA 803 MBA 804 MBA 805 MBA 806 Year I Semester II Code MBA 807 MBA 808 MBA 809 MBA 810 Title Management Accounting Financial Management Research Methods Managerial 112

Economics Strategic Management

Year II Semester I Accounting Option Code Title MBA 820 Principles of Auditing MBA 821 Advanced Financial Accounting MBA 822 Advanced Management Accounting MBA 823 Accounting Seminar Any one elective from the following MBA 824E Public Sector Accounting MBA 825E Taxation MBA 826E International Accounting MBA 827E Advanced Taxation MBA 829E Advanced Auditing i) Finance Option Course Code Course Title MBA 830 MBA 831 MBA 832 MBA 833 Financial Institutions and Markets Financial Economics Corporate Finance Financial Seminar

Any one elective from the following Course Title Human Resource Management Management Practice Financial Reporting and Control Quantitative Analysis Technology and Operations Management Marketing Management MBA 834E MBA 835E MBA 836E MBA 837E MBA 838E Capital Budgeting Monetary Management Investment and Portfolio Management Management of Financial Institutions International Financial Management

Risk Management and Insurance Option CodeCourse Title MBA 840 Risk and Insurance MBA 841 Legal aspects of Insurance MBA 842 Personal Insurance MBA 843 Insurance Seminar

Any one elective from the following MBA 844E Individual Life Assurance MBA 845E Group Insurance MBA 846E Pension Schemes MBA 836E Investment and Portfolio Management MBA 847E Actuarial Science ii) International Business Management Option Code Title MBA 850 Multicultural Management MBA 851 International Business Management MBA 852 Global Strategic Management MBA 853 International Business Seminar Any one elective from the following MBA 854E International Business Environment MBA 855E International Economics and Trade MBA 856E Global Marketing Strategy MBA 857E International Managerial Finance MBA 858E International Financial Markets Marketing Option Code Title MBA 860 Customer Behavior MBA 861 Integrated Marketing Communication MBA 862 Strategic Marketing Management MBA 863 Marketing Seminar Any one elective from the following MBA 864E Marketing Research and Information System MBA 865E Sales Management MBA 866E Global Marketing Strategy MBA 867E Marketing of Services MBA 868E Channel and Retail Management Operations Management Option Course Code MBA 870 MBA 871 MBA 872 Course Title Operations Research Production Management Project Management 113

MBA 873

Operations Management Seminar

Any one elective from the following MBA 874E Multivariate Statistics MBA 875E Simulation and Heuristics MBA 876E Inventory Management MBA 877E Total Quality Management MBA 878E Forecasting Strategic Management Option Course Code MBA 880 MBA 881 MBA 852 MBA 882 Course Title Advanced Strategic Management Strategic Management of Change Global Strategic Management Strategic Management Seminar

Any one elective from the following MBA 883E Leadership and Organization Behaviour MBA 890E Entrepreneurial Theories MBA 884E Techniques of Strategic Management MBA 885E Management of Small Business MBA 886E Business and Society Entrepreneurship Code MBA 890 MBA 891 MBA 892 MBA 893 Title Entrepreneurial Theories Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management Essential of Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship Seminar

Any one elective from the following MBA 864E Business Planning MBA 865E Micro- Finance MBA 866E Global Marketing Strategy MBA 867E Entrepreneurship MBA 868E Channel and Retail Management Year II, Semester II Code Course Title MBA 812 Business Law MBA 899 Research Thesis: Management problem conceptualization, data collection and analysis and

thesis report write-up Master of Science in Human Resource Management MSc (HRM) 1.0. Introduction This degree programme seeks to prepare and equip students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes that they need for effective management of the human resource required for maximum contribution towards achieving organizational goals. The programme will enable students to appreciate the overall purpose of human resource management to steer organizations to achieve success through its skilled and committed workforce. With the worldwide recognition and acceptance of the importance of people in organizations, it is now considered necessary to prepare human resource practitioners suited for the leadership of the profession. The programme will make a significant contribution towards narrowing the existing gap between the demand for and supply of formally trained Human Resource Practitioners. The graduates of this programme will be expected to fill positions of heads of the Human Resource functions in the public and private sector or operate as consultants, and pursue higher level of academic programmes. 2.0. Target Groups 2.1. Human Resource practitioners who hold university degrees in other fields and wish to receive formal training and a professional qualification in Human Resources Management field. 2.2. University graduates from any discipline who wish to start a career in Human Resources Management or others who are currently working in other occupations and wish to switch to Human Resources Management. 2.3. Managers and professionals with university degrees who have jurisdiction over other employees and wish to acquire skills of managing people. 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. Bachelors degree with 2nd Class Honors, Upper Division, or

3.2. Bachelors degree with 2nd Class Honors, Lower Division with 2 years relevant experience, or 3.3. Bachelors degree as above with a postgraduate diploma in relevant field 4.0. Programme Duration The programme takes 2 academic years divided into four semesters and is offered in evenings (5-8pm) and weekends (Saturdays 8-5pm). 5.0. Assessment Rules and Regulations for University Examinations shall apply 6.0. Courses offered The following compulsory and elective courses will be offered in the programme. 6.1. Core Compulsory Courses Code Title HRM 801 Foundations of Human Resource Management. HRM 802 Employee Resourcing HRM 803 Human Resource Development HRM 804 Reward Management HRM 805 Employee Relations HRM 806 Employment Practices HRM 807 Counseling at the workplace HRM 808 Human Resource Accounting HRM 890 Research Methodology HRM810 Accounting and Financial Management HRM 811 Legal Environment of Employment in Kenya HRM 820 Computer Application in Human Resource Management HRM 821 Consultancy in Human Resource Management HRM822 Human Resource Management Seminar HRM 823 Business Policy HRM 891 Research Thesis

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6.2. Electives Code HRM815E HRM816E HRM817E Management HRM818E Title Global Business Management Organizational Development Production and Operations Managerial Economics

Semester II Code HRM 891

Title Research Thesis: Human resource management research Problem conceptualization, data collection and analysis and thesis report write-up

Master of Science in Human Resource Management 1.0. Introduction The Master of Science in Human Resource Management (MSc in HRM) Programme has been developed by the department of Business Management of the Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST). The M.Sc programme seeks to prepare and equip students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes that they need for effective management of the human resource required for maximum contribution towards achieving organizational goals. The programme will enable students to appreciate the overall purpose of human resource management to steer organizations to achieve success through its skilled and committed workforce. With the worldwide recognition and acceptance of the importance of people in organizations, it is now considered necessary to prepare human resource practitioners suited for the leadership of the profession. The programme will make a significant contribution towards narrowing the existing gap between the demand for and supply of formally trained Human Resource Practitioners. The graduates of this programme will be expected to fill positions of heads of the Human Resource functions in the public and private sector or operate as consultants, and pursue higher level of academic programmes. 2.0. Aim The programme aims to equip the students with theoretical and practical skills, and knowledge and the right attitudes necessary for effective management of people at workplace. In addition, the programme will prepare the students for research on issues in human resource management. 115

7.0.Course Structure Year I Semester I Code HRM 801

Title Foundations of Human Resource Management HRM 802 Employee Resourcing HRM 803 Human Resource Development HRM 804 Reward Management HRM 805 Employee Relations Any one elective course Year I Semester II Code HRM 806 HRM 807 HRM 808 HRM 890 HRM 811

Course Title Employment Practices Counseling at the Work Place Human Resource Accounting Research Methodology Legal Environment of Employment in Kenya Any one elective course Year II Semester I Code Title HRM 810 Accounting and Financial Management HRM 820 Computer applications in Human Resources Management HRM 822 Human Resource Management Seminar HRM 823 Business Policy HRM 821 Consultancy in Human Resource Management Year II

2.0. Target Groups 2.1 Human Resource practitioners who hold university degrees in other fields and wish to receive formal training and a professional qualification in Human Resources Management field. 2.2..University graduates from any discipline who wish to start a career in Human Resources Management or others who are currently working in other occupations and wish to switch to Human Resources Management. Managers and professionals with university degrees who have jurisdiction over other employees and wish to acquire skills of managing people.

3.2. Be a holder of a Lower Second Class honours degree in any discipline provided the candidate has proven evidence of research ability or 3.3. Be a holder of a bachelors degree at pass level in any discipline from an accredited University with a Credit pass in Higher Diploma in Human Resources Management from Kenya National Examinations Council and other institution recognized by the University Senate 4.0. Submission and Processing for Registration The common procedures approved by the senate shall apply. 5.0 Duration of the programme The programme shall have two modes of study: Full-time and part-time. 5.1. Full-time Full-time mode shall normally run for a period of two academic years distributed over four consecutive semesters of full-time attendance. 5.2. Part-time The part-time mode shall normally take a maximum period of four academic years of part-time attendance, from the date of registration. 6.0. Programme Requirement 6.1. The programme requires a minimum of 54 units of appropriate graduate including a thesis. 6.2. A student shall be deemed to have passed an academic year after successful completion of all the units within that period. 6.3. A student shall have passed all the courses offered in Year One of the programme including Field Attachment in order to proceed to the next level. 6.4. A student wishing to temporarily suspend his/her studies must apply for leave. The leave becomes effective only after endorsement by the University senate. 6.5. English shall be used as the medium of instruction and writing of all assignments as well as the thesis.

2.0.Objectives of the Programme The programme is designed to: 2.1. To develop knowledge, skills, competence and attitude to the level where students can make a professional contribution to the management of human resources in an organization. 2.2. To Enable students to develop an understanding and knowledge of the management of people and its application to the total management of an organization. 2.3. Assist students to develop practical skills in the analysis of concepts and practices, and in policy formulation and application thus enhancing their career opportunities and achieving selfdevelopment. 2.4. Expose student to key strategic issues facing contemporary organizations in the field of Human Resources Management. Enable students to develop skills of investigation, analysis and presentation. 3.0 Admission Requirements 3.1 Be a holder of a bachelors degree with at least Upper Second Class honours in any discipline or its equivalent from a recognized university. or

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7.0 Evaluation The programme evaluation shall involve coursework, examination and a thesis. 7.1. Coursework and Examination Evaluation of coursework will include formative and summative types conducted as here below: 7.1.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3-hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in course. 7.1.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework- assessment comprising seminar papers, projects and other reports, term papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 7.1.3 The pass mark for each course (continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. 7.1.4. Grading system for coursework shall be as follows: Marks (%) 75 and above 65 - 74 50 64 Below50 Grade A B C D Remarks Distinction Credit Pass Fail

7.2 Research and Thesis writing 7.2.1. A student shall, during the degree programme, collect data, analyze it and write a thesis on a specific topic related to Human Resource Management. 7.2.2. Thesis supervisors shall be appointed for the students at the commencement of the second semester through active involvement of the students themselves 8.0. Courses offered The following compulsory and elective courses will be offered in the programme. 9.0 Core Courses Code HRM 801 HRM 802 HRM 803 HRM 804 HRM 805 HRM 806 HRM 807 HRM 808 HRM 890 HRM810 HRM 811 HRM 820 HRM 821 HRM822 HRM 823 HRM 891

Title

7.1.5. Candidates must pass in all papers before they proceed to the next level of study. 7.1.6.A candidate who fails half or more than half of the courses taken shall be discontinued. 7.1.7. A candidate who fails less than half of the courses taken shall sit for a supplementary examination. 7.1.8. Each supplementary examination taken shall be awarded a maximum of 50%. 7.1.9. A candidate who fails any supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 7.1.10. Under exceptional circumstances such as medical or compassionate grounds, supported by written evidence, special examinations may be held for the candidate. A special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination. 7.1.11. Examinations shall be conducted at the University or University approved-centre.

Foundations of Human Resource Management. Employee Resourcing Human Resource Development Reward Management Employee Relations Employment Practices Counselling at the workplace Human Resource Accounting Research Methodology Accountingand Financial Management Legal Environment of Employment in Kenya Computer Application in Human Resource Management Consultancy in Human Resource Management Human Resource Management Seminar Business Policy Research Project: Data Collection, Data Analysis and Thesis Writing

9.1. Electives HRM815 EGlobal Business Management HRM816 EOrganizational Development HRM817 Eproduction and operations Management HRM818 EManagerial Economics 117

The student will be required to take a minimum of two electives. 10. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title HRM 801 Foundations of Human Resource Management HRM 802 Employee Resourcing HRM 803 Human Resource Development 3 HRM 804 Reward Management HRM 805 Employee Relations Elective Course (Any One) Total Units Year I Semester II HRM 806 3 HRM 807 Employment Practices

Grand Total

Data Analysis and Thesis Writing 5 6

Masters in Business Administration 1.0. Introduction The Master of Business Administration (MBA) programme of the Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology seeks to equip students with skills, techniques and understanding required for successful managerial careers in the public and private sectors of economy. Students will be drawn from East African region and beyond Graduates of this programme will be expected to fill positions of managerial functions in the public and private sectors, operate as consultants, and pursue higher level of academic programmes. 2.0. Target Groups The programme is designed for: 2.1. Those in business employment and practice but holding bachelors degree or equivalent in other specialization other than business studies. 2.2 University graduates from other disciplines who wish to develop a career in business management and acquire managerial skills. 2.3 Those with bachelors degree in the area of business management and would like to further academically or in the relevant practical business management. 3.0. Aim The programme aims to equip the students with theoretical and practical skills, knowledge and the right attitudes necessary for managerial function in an organization. In addition, the programme will prepare the students for research on issues in the business management. 4.0 Objectives The programme is designed to: 4.1. Provide the students with critical insight into areas of business management. 4.2. Enhance self-confidence and the ability to evaluate practical business experience from academic, practical, and critical perspectives. 4.3. Develop awareness of the changing local and international business environment. 118

3 3

3 3 3 18

Counseling at the Work Place 3 HRM 808 Human Resource Accounting 3 HRM 890 Research Methodology 3 HRM 811 Legal Environment of Employment in Kenya 3 Elective Course (Any one) 3 Total Units 18 Year II Semester I HRM 810 HRM 820

HRM 822 HRM 823 HRM 821 Total Units Year II Semester II HRM 891

Accounting and Financial Management Computer applications in Human Resources Management Human Resource Management Seminar Business Policy Consultancy in Human Resources Management

3 3 3 3 15

Research Project: Data Collection,

4.4. Provide specialized knowledge of the chosen areas; and 4.5. Instill a professional and problem-solving attitude in the practice of management. 5.0. Admission Requirements University regulations shall apply. Lower 2nd Missing DurationThe programme shall have two modes of study: full-time and part-time. 5.1 Full-time Full time shall normally run for a period of two academic years distributed over four consecutive semesters of full time attendance. 5.2 Part-time Part-time mode shall normally take a maximum period of five academic years of part-time attendance, from the date of registration. 5.3. Award of Degree The name of the degree to be awarded shall be Master of Business Administration, and the degree certificate shall reflect the area of specialization. 5.4. Maintenance of student status University regulations shall apply 5.5. Programme specialization The MBA programme includes the following areas of specialization: 8. Accounting 9. Finance 10. Risk Management and Insurance 11. International Business Management 12. Marketing 13. Operations Management 14. Strategic Management 15. Entrepreneurship 16. HRM(Stand alone Programme) specialties 6.0 Courses offered The following compulsory and elective courses will be offered in the programme. Core Courses Code Title MBA 801 Human Resource Management MBA 802 Management Practice MBA 803 Financial Reporting and

MBA 804 MBA 805

MBA 806 MBA 807 MBA 808 MBA 809 MBA 810 MBA 811 MBA 812

Control Quantitative Analysis Technology and Operations Management Marketing Management Management Accounting Financial Management Research Methods Managerial Economics Strategic Management Business Law

3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

7.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title MBA 801 Human Resource Management MBA 802 Management Practice MBA 803 Financial Reporting and Control MBA 804 Quantitative Analysis MBA 805 Technology and Operations Management MBA 806 Marketing Management Total Semester II Code Course Title MBA Management Accounting 807 MBA Financial Management 808 MBA Research Methods 809 MBA Managerial Economics 810 MBA Strategic Management 811 Total

Units 3 3 3 3 3

3 18

Units 3 3 3 3 3 15

Units 3 3 3 119

Year II Semester I Specializations 7.1. Accounting Code Course Title MBA 820 Principles of Auditing MBA 821 Advanced Financial Accounting MBA 822 Advanced Management Accounting MBA 823 Accounting Seminar Elective I Total Electives MBA 824E Public Sector Accounting MBA 825E Taxation MBA 826E International Accounting MBA 827E Advanced Taxation MBA 829E Advanced Auditing

Units 3 3 3

MBA 842 MBA 843 I Elective I Total MBA 844E MBA 845E MBA 846E MBA 836E MBA 847E

Personal Insurance nsurance Seminar

3 3 3 15

Individual Life Assurance Group Insurance Pension Schemes Investment and Portfolio Management Actuarial Science

3 3 15 3 3 3 3 3

7.2. Finance Code Course Title Units MBA Financial Institutions and 830 Markets 3 MBA Financial Economics 3 831 3 MBA Corporate Finance 832 MBA Financial Seminar 3 833 Elective I 3 Total 15 Electives MBA 834E Capital Budgeting MBA 835E Monetary Management MBA 836E Investment and Portfolio Management MBA 837E Management of Financial Institutions MBA 838E International Financial Management 7.3. Riskmanagement and Insurance Code Title MBA 840 Risk and Insurance MBA 841 Legal aspects of Insurance

7.4 International Business Management Code Title Units MBA 850 Multicultural Management 3 MBA 851 International Business 3 MBA 852 Global Strategic Management 3 MBA 853 International Business Seminar 3 Elective I 3 Total 15 Electives MBA 854 EInternational Business Environment MBA 855 EInternational Economics and Trade MBA 856 EGlobal Marketing Strategy MBA 857 EInternational Managerial Finance MBA 858 EInternational Financial Markets

7.5 Marketing Code Title Units MBA 860 Customer Behavior 3 MBA 861 Integrated Marketing Communication 3 MBA 862 Strategic Marketing Management 3 MBA 863 Marketing Seminar 3 Elective I 3 Total 15 MBA 864E Marketing Research and Information System. MBA 865E Sales Management MBA 866E Global Marketing Strategy MBA 867E Marketing of Services MBA 868E Channel and Retail Management

Units 3 3 120

7.6. Operations Manage Ment Code Title MBA 870 Operations Research MBA 871 Production Management

Units 3 3

MBA 872 MBA 873 Elective I MBA 874E MBA 875E MBA 876E MBA 877E MBA 878E

Project Management Operations Management Seminar Multivariate Statistics Simulation and Heuristics Inventory Management Total Quality Management Forecasting

3 3 3

MBA 812 MBA 899 Total

Business Law Research Project (equivalence of courses)

3 9 60

Department of Journalism and Mass Communication Bachelor of Journalism and Mass Communication 1.0. Introduction: Few careers offer the challenges and opportunities Journalism and Mass Communication offer. The changing social, political and technological environment has opened new avenues for welltrained manpower in Journalism and Mass Communication in Kenya and beyond. Unfortunately those who wish to pursue these careers have to find opportunities abroad since no public university in Kenya offers a bachelors degree in these fields. To be relevant, a new university such as Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology has to take up the challenge and introduce such programmes that meet market needs. Emerging technologies have transformed the work of journalists, public relations practitioners and advertising experts and increased the need for high standards. This has created a demand for professionals schooled in ethics with the technical expertise capable of adapting to new media formats and the dynamics of a global audience. The Department of Journalism and Mass communication stresses a totally professional approach in the theory and practice of journalism and mass communication. 2.0. Objectives of the programme The Department aims at preparing students for a variety of careers including: journalism, broadcasting, advertising and public relations. It gives students an opportunity to study professional skills of journalism, broadcasting, public relations and advertising by considering the

7.7. Strategic Management Code Title Units MBA 880 Advanced Strategic Management 3 MBA 881 Strategic Management of Change 3 MBA 852 Global Strategic Management 3 MBA 882 Strategic Management Seminar 3 Elective I 3 Total 15 Elective 1 3 MBA 883E Leadership and Organization Behaviour MBA 890E Entrepreneurial Theories MBA 884E Techniques of Strategic Management MBA 885E Management of Small Business MBA 886E Business and Society 7.8. Entrepreneurship Code Title Units MBA 890 Entrepreneurial Theories 3 MBA 891 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 3 MBA 892 Essential of Entrepreneurship 3 MBA 893 Entrepreneurship Seminar 3 Elective I 3 Total 15 Elective 1 . MBA 864E MBA 865E MBA 866E MBA 867E MBA 868E Year II semester II Code 3 Business Planning Micro- Finance Global Marketing Strategy Entrepreneurship Channel and Retail Management

Title

Units 121

professional, legal, ethical and political issues and technological dynamics. Students graduating from the department should be able to: 2.1. Competently take up careers in print journalism by generating ideas, organizing, writing, editing and presenting information for various audiences. 2.2. Ably take up careers in broadcasting and organize, produce and edit data for broadcasting through electronic media. 2.3. Take up careers in public relations and apply knowledge in corporate communication, crisis management, personnel training and development, sales, business communication and international and intercultural relations. 2.4. Professionally advertise various products within corporations, business enterprises and advertising agencies. 2.5.Engage in meaningful research activities that advance knowledge in the area of journalism and mass communication 3.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I JMC 100: Language Use in Communication JMC 101: Introduction to Mass Communication JMC 102: Introduction to Creative Writing JMC 104: Receptive and Production Skills in Communication IRD 100: Communication Skills IRD 101: Quantitative Skills 1 IRD 103: Development Concepts and Applications COM 110 Introduction to Computers Semester II JMC 105: JMC 106: JMC 107: JMC 108: JMC 109: JMC 103: IRD 102: IRD 104:

Year II Semester I IRD 200: JMC 200: JMC 201: JMC 202: JMC 203: JMC 204: JMC 205: JMC 206: TOU 200 Semester II JMC 207: JMC 208: JMC 209: ENG 211: KIS 210: JMC 212: JMC 213: TOU 201: Year III Semester I JMC 300: JMC 301: JMC 302: JMC 303: JMC 304: JMC 305: JMC 306: TOU 300: Semester II JMC 307: JMC 308: JMC 309: JMC 310:

State, Society and Development Introduction to Public Relations Introduction to Advertising Print Media Practice Introduction to Radio/Television Performance News Writing and Reporting Writing Feature Articles 1 News Photography Beginners French

Media Theory and Influence Theories of Communication Introduction to Visual Communication English Phonology and Phonetics Kiswahili Phonology and Phonetics. Logic and Rational Thought Theory of Translation French Structure I

Writing for Kiswahili Audience Nonverbal Communication and Public Speaking Professional Editing Desktop Publishing Book Publishing Research Method Public Speaking and Talk show Presentation (Elective) French Structure II

Introduction to Journalism and the Art of Communication Communication Across Cultures Literary Language and Presentation Media History and Issues in Kenya Philosophy and Social Development Introduction to Computer Mediated Writing Communication Skills II Quantitative skills II 122

Media Laws and Ethic Conflict Resolution and Mediation Advertising Copywriting Persuasive Communication and Argumentation JMC 311: Research Project (Public Relations Advertisement, Print Media, Electronic Media) JMC 312: Kiswahili Morphology and Syntax JMC 313: English Morphology and Syntax

JMC 314: JMC 315:

Semantics Professional Field Attachment

Year IV Students to take courses in two of the following areas i.e. Public Relations and Advertisement or Broadcasting and Print Media Public Relations and Advertisement Semester I Public Relations JMC 400: Public Relations Psychology JMC 401: Public Relations Theory and Methods JMC 405: Language and Public Communication JMC 423: Internet and Electronic Publishing JMC 424: Gender and the Mass Media Advertisement JMC 407: Advertising to the Consumer JMC 406: Newspaper Advertising Semester II Public Relations JMC 402: Principles of Public Relations JMC 403: Public Relations and the Mass Media JMC 404: Public Relations Campaigns and Strategies Advertisement JMC 408: Business to Business Communication JMC 409: Radio-Television, Digital Interactive and Direct Advertising JMC 410: Advertising Layout and Production. JMC 425: Introduction to Digital Animation Broadcasting and print media Semester I Broadcasting JMC 411: News Writing for Electronic Media JMC 412: Radio Production JMC 413: Television Production Print Media JMC 416: Photojournalism JMC 417: Opinion Writing JMC 418: Feature Writing II JMC 423: Internet and Electronic Publishing JMC 424: Gender and the Mass Media 123

Semester II Broadcasting JMC 414: Electronic Media Management JMC 415: Documentary Production. Print Media JMC 419: JMC 420: JMC 421: JMC 422: JMC 425:

Advanced Editing Journalism and Literature Contemporary Magazine Publishing. Writing on Special Subjects Introduction to Digital Animation

Department of Criminology and Social Work. Bachelor of Criminology 1.0. Introduction Criminology is a subject that has grown significantly over the last decade and is now recognized as a specialist area of knowledge in its own right. The Bachelor of Criminology degree programme offers the students the opportunity to gain an overall understanding of the nature of crime and its prevention. 2.0. Objectives The objectives of the programme are to: 2.1. Provide the students with critical insight into areas of criminology as a social phenomenon; 2.3. Train professionals in criminology for employment within the criminal justice system, social care and welfare professions; 2.3. Build competencies for business, consultancies, teaching and research; and 2.4. Lay a foundation for policy formulation and implementation in contemporary society. Bachelor of Social Work 1.0. Introduction The Bachelor of Social work programme provides theoretical and practical knowledge creating an environment in which students can begin to develop an understanding of social welfare. In addition to providing an analysis of social work practice in

contemporary society, the programme develops a reputation for imbuing graduates with confidence, flexibility, intellectual curiosity and resourcefulness in social work. 2.0. Objectives The objectives of the programme are to: 2.1. Promote and develop an understanding of social work knowledge, values and skills. 2.2. Prepare students for careers in government, the private sector and non- governmental organizations; 2.3. Build competencies for consultancies, outreach and research, and 2.4. Equip students with appropriate skills for social work so that they become strong policy practitioners. 3.0. Admission requirements 3.1. The common University admission requirements shall apply. In addition 3.2. Candidates must also have obtained a C+ and above in English. 4.0. Duration of the programme The duration of the programme shall normally be four (4) academic years. 5.0. Student assessment 5.1. The common University examination regulations shall apply. In addition, to be considered for the award of the degree, a candidate must also pass the practicum and its associated report. During each practicum, students will be expected to write and submit a report on the agency at the end of placement. The report shall account for 40% of the marks. Regular supervision of students on attachment will account for 60%. 5.2. Research Project Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will approve the research topic by the end of week 3, year IV, semester I. The final essay is expected to be 20-30 pages long and have full citations and bibliography. It is due the last day of classes of that semester. A passing grade is necessary before the student receives their degree.

6.0. Programme structure Year I Semester I IRD 100 Communication Skills I IRD 101 Quantitative Skills I IRD 103 Development Concepts and Applications SSC 101 Introduction to Entrepreneurship SOC100 Introduction to Sociology COM 110 Introduction to Computers and Computing BBM 100 Principles of Accounting I BBM 101 Introduction to Business Year I Semester II IRD 102 Communication Skills II PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology SSC 105 Science, Technology and Society SSC 106 Philosophy and Social Development SSC 107 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology SCR 100 Introduction to Criminology SSW 100 Introduction to Social Work COM 111 Computer Applications Year II Semester I SSC 200 Culture and Personality PSY 200 Social Psychology SOC 202 Contemporary Cultural Relations in Kenya SOC 200 Social Structure and Change in Kenya SSC 207 Themes in Kenyan History SSC 201 Administrative Systems in Kenya SSC 202 Social Research Methods I Year II Semester II SSC 203 Social Research Methods II SSC 204 Health and the Community SSC 205 Formal and Informal Organizations and Behaviour SSC 206 Ethics ECO 211 Issues in African Economic Development GAC 202 Counseling Theories, Models and Techniques IRD 200 State, Society and Development 124

SCR 200 Kenyan Law and the Legal System SCR 299 Practicum (14 weeks) Department of Science and Mathematics Education Bachelor of Science in Primary Education 1.0.Introduction Research shows that there is a direct relationship between a nations economic development and the scientific literacy of its population. It was with this in mind that the government of Kenya introduced the 8 4 4 system of education to catalyze the production of a technologically oriented population in an effort to industrialize the country by the year 2020. However, a majority of Kenyas population is, and will be, exposed only to basic education. There was therefore a great need to establish a firm foundation of science education at the primary school level. This would promote basic technological and scientific literacy among them while at the same time providing opportunities for those who go beyond this level to specialize in the various science disciplines. Science is taught in primary schools as an integrated discipline. This approach is meant to allow the child to be progressively exposed to science concepts, ideas and principles in a holistic manner before being encouraged to specialize in the separate areas of physics, chemistry and biology or in sciencebased professions in later years. The assumption to this approach is that as a discipline science is fundamentally concerned with exploring and interpreting the natural world in a unified manner . This unity should be established at the primary school level. Unfortunately, the 8-4-4 system was implemented before adequate mechanisms were put in place to cater for this innovation and orientation. For example, science teachers in primary schools are prepared by trainers in teacher colleges who are mainly graduate teachers in the separate areas of Botany, Zoology, Chemistry, Physics and Computer Science. These teachers are ill-equipped to train 125

primary science teachers in an integrated manner. Because of this lapse, science teachers in our primary schools are not adequately grounded to help develop in the children requisite scientific skills for holistic understanding of the physical world. This programme will address this discrepancy. 2.0 Rationale In drawing up the programme the Department held consultations with primary school teachers, head teachers, parents/teachers associations and education officers. We also took into account the views expressed in the mass media and in educational seminar and workshop reports. The consensus was that teachers and other education officers with academic qualifications above the conventional PI certificate tended to be more confident and performed better. This is the case when teachers and education officers acquire more advanced content in their subject areas of specialization. The teachers Service Commission and the public service commission seem to be cognizant of this trend. Teachers and other education officers are encouraged to continuously upgrade themselves through further education. There are immediate rewards of promotion up to Job Group Q. clearly, professional requirements for primary school teachers and inspectors in the near future are set to rise. It is therefore not surprising that the trend worldwide is to train all teachers at university. This is evident in countries like, USA,UK,Canada, Australia and Japan. In Africa this practice is seen in Nigeria, South Africa, Rwanda and lately Uganda and Kenya. Whereas the content in the programmes differs from country to country, this programme offers a truly integrated science content. 3.0.Target Group The programme targets the following persons: 3.1. P1 teachers currently teaching primary science and mathematics and who wish to broaden their understanding of these subjects to effectively teach the same or to work as primary science and mathematics teacher trainers and inspectors. 3.2. Education officers holding PI, SI and Diploma in Education qualifications and currently working as

primary school inspectors and Teacher advisory center tutors who wish to improve their knowledge and supervision skills in science and mathematics. 3.3. Teachers and education officers holding Diploma in Education who wish to specialize in integrated science for the purpose of teaching in teacher training colleges or improving their supervision skills in science and mathematics. 3.4.All others who are interested in pursuing degree work in integrated science. 4.0.Entry Requirements Candidates eligible for the course should satisfy any one of the following admission requirements: 4.1. A minimum of mean grade of C+ in KCSE. In addition they should have a minimum grade of C+ in mathematics and any two science subjects. Candidates who do not meet this requirement may take bridging courses at the University. 4.2. A minimum of two principle passes in the relevant subjects in EAACE/KACE 4.3. Diploma in Education with at least credit passes in the relevant subjects. 4.4. P1 teaching certificate at least with distinction passes in the relevant subjects. Those with credit passes should show evidence of merit in teaching science and/or mathematics in primary schools. 5.0. Duration of the course 5.1. Candidates in the regular or full-time programme will take four academic years to complete the course. 5.2. Those who enroll in the part-time or Sandwich or school-based programme will use 16 school vacations covering four academic years (i.e four vacations for each academic year) to complete the course. Each vacation will consist of 24 contact hours (ie 6 hours x 4 weeks) for each course. Each semester (ie 2 vacations) will therefore consist of 48 contact hours (i.e. 6 hours x 4 weeks x 2 vacations) for each semester. Based on this information. the total number of contact hours for each semester is summarized in Table I. 5.3 Holders of Diploma in Education will enter the programme in the second year. 6.0. Mode of Teaching Teaching will consist of the following methods: 126

6.1. Lectures and demonstrations 6.2. Laboratory practicals and field work 6.3. Projects and assignments 6.4. Seminars and panel discussions 6.5. Library research 7.0.Examinations Examinations will consist of the following: 7.1. Continuous Assessment Continuous assessment for each course will be done through seminars, assignments, practical projects and written tests. It will account for 30% of the total marks. 7.2. Regular Examinations A three-hour written examination will be administered at the end of each course. It will account for 70% of the total marks. 7.3. Grading Grading will be based on university regulations and awards. 8.0. Course Structure Students in the B.sc in Primary Education shall take integrated science courses drawn from Botany, Zoology, Chemistry, Physics, Computer Science, Earth and Environmental Science and Mathematics in the Department and in the Faculty of Science and Engineering. They will also take recommended, required and common courses in the Faculty of Education and Social Sciences. The courses are distributed as follows: Year 1 Semester 1 (Vacations 1-2) Code Title Units EDF 110 Historical Bases of Primary 3 Education ESM 101 Foundations of Biology I 3 ESM103 Foundations of Chemistry1 3 ESM 105 Foundations of Physics 1 3 ESM108 Foundations of Mathematics1 3 COM110 Introduction to Computers and Computing 3 IRD100 Communication Skills1 3 IRD 103 Development Concepts and

Applications Total Semester II (Vacations 3 4 ) EDF 111 Philosophical Foundations of Education SZL 122 Vertebrate Zoology ESM102 FoundationsofBiologyII ESM 104 Foundations of Chemistry II ESM106 FoundationsofPhysicsII SZL122 FundamentalsofEcology ESM109 Foundations of MathematicII IRD102 CommunicationSkillsII IRD104 QuantitativeSkillsI Total

3 24 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27

Total for Year I 51 Year II Semester 1 (Vacations 5 6) Units SBT 112 Introduction to Genetics 3 SZL 211 Fundamentals of Cell Biology 3 COM 111 Computer Applications 3 PSY 210 General Educational Psychology 3 CHE 210 Atomic Structure and Bonding 3 CHE 211 Basic Analytical Chemistry 3 PHY 210 Electricity and Magnetism 3 IRD 200 State, Society and Development 3 CIT 210 General Methods of Teaching 3 TOTAL Vacations 7 - 8)Units Educational Media and Resources 3 Primary Science and Mathematics Curricula 3 ESM 204 Research Project in Science/ Mathematics Education 3 CHE 212 Basic Organic Chemistry 3 CHE 214 Biochemistry 3 PHY 213 Electronics I 3 PHY 212 Modern Physics 3 CIT 299 Introduction to Teaching and School Operations I 2 Total 26 Semester 3 (School-Based) CIT 299 Introduction to Teaching and School Operations II (8 weeks) 2 ESM 299 Practicum: Research and Field Studies (8 weeks) 2 Total for Year II 57 127 CIT 211 ESM 203

Year III Semester 1 (Vacations 9 - 10) Units SZL 212 Introduction to Animal Physiology 3 ESM 303 Learning and Assessment in Primary Science and Mathematics 3 ESM 306 Teaching Methods in Primary Science 3 ESM 307 Teaching Methods in primary Mathematics 3 PSY 310 HumanGrowthand Development 3 SBT 312 PlantPhysiology 3 CHE 311 Methods of Chemical Analysis 3 CHE 310 Chemistry of the S and P Block elements (Inorganic Chemistry) 3 One Course selected form the following: SBL 213 Fundamentals of Biosphysics 3 ESM 308 Systems, Organization and Classification in Nature 3 ESM 311 Variation and Adaptation in Nature 3 ESM 312 Cycles and Continuity in Nature 3 Total 27 Semester 2 (Vacations 11-12) Units ESM 305 Physical Education, Sports and Recreation 4 SBT 122 General Microbiology 3 COM121 ProceduralProgrammingI 3 CHE213 Basic Kineticsand Thermodynamics (Physical Chemistry) 3 PHY 316 Introduction to Materials Science 3 PSY 311 Educational Measurements and Evaluation 3 IRD 305 Entrepreneurship for small Businesses 3 CIT360EducationalTechnology 3 Total Semester 3 (School Based) Units 24 CIT 399 School Practice 12weeks) 6 Grand total for Year III 57 Year IV Semester I(Vacations 13 and 14) SM 401 Principles of Child Health and Care and First Aid CIT 415 Structure and Organization of Primary School Curriculum

Units 3 3

EDF 403 Sociological Foundations of PrimaryEducation 3 ESM 404 Environmental Education in PrimarySchools 3 PHY 211 Waves and Vibrations 3 PHY 312 Optics 3 SBT 411 PlantBiochemistry 3 SZL 313 Animal Genetics andEvolution 3 COM 210 Procedural Programming II 3 Total 27 Semester II (Vacations 15 and 16) Units IRD 400 Development Project Appraisal SBL 421 MolecularBiology COM222 InternetApplications ESM 415 Foundations of School Librarianship PSY410 GuidanceandCounseling EPM 413 Management of Primary Education One course selected from the following: ESM 408 Science and Technology in Society CHE 419E Chemistry of Natural Products PHY314 QuantumMechanicsI One course selected from the following: CHE 415 EnvironmentalChemistry GEO 310 Climatology GEO321 Aerial Photography and Remote Sensing ESM 410 Earths Evolution PHY 428E Geophysics GEO 318 Hydrology Total Total for Year IV 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 51

a need to prepare manpower in teaching, research and policy related aspects of early childhood education. It is in view of this that the department of Educational Psychology offers a program leading to the award of a Bachelor of Education degree in Early Childhood Education. 2.0. Objectives By the end of the program the graduate should be able to: 2.1. Utilize the acquired knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to teach at Early Childhood Education centers. 2.2. Assist in formulating education policies relevant to the proper development and implementation of Early Childhood Education 2.3. Do research in various aspects of Early Childhood Education and contribute new knowledge in education. 2.4. Identify and handle pupils with special needs, talents and disabilities and refer those in need of special assistance. 2.5. Assist teachers and parents to develop skills and attitudes to handle pupils individually and in groups in solving academic, social and psychological problems. 2.6. Assist educational curriculum planners develop syllabi in line with the learners developmental stages, aptitudes and needs. 2.7. Assist administrators of Early Childhood Education Centers/Institutes manage the various processes in the Centers/Institutes effectively. 3.0. Duration of the programme The program shall normally take a period of four academic years for those taking the program on full time mode. For those wishing to take the program during school holidays, it will take sixteen (16) normal school holidays/vacations. A school holiday normally takes four (4) weeks. 4.0. Admission Requirements 4.1. For admission into the degree of Bachelor of Education in Early Childhood Education, a candidate must satisfy the common University admission requirements. Those without the common direct entry requirements must meet the following conditions; 128

Bachelor of Education in Early Childhood Education 1.0. Introduction From time immemorial, a lot of importance has been attached to the socialization of children at the formative stages of life. The development of a child in his/her later life largely depends on the foundation laid down in early life. Early Childhood Education plays a central role as a link between the home and the school. There is

4.2. Diploma in Early Childhood Education (ECE) recognized by the University Senate.
(Those with credit pass and above at diploma in ECE will be admitted at second year of study)

IRD 103 EDU 110 ECD 100 ECD 102 ECD 103

Or 4.3. Diploma in Education recognized by the University Senate Or 4.4. PI certificate training in Education recognized by the University Senate. 4.5. Any other relevant qualification recognized by the University Senate. 5.0. Assessment The common University rules and regulations shall apply 6.0. Programme Requirement 6.1. The students shall be required to take the common University courses, and all other educational courses in addition to Early Childhood Education courses. 6.2. At the end of the second year of study, students shall be attached to an Early Childhood Education Institute/ Centre for a minimum duration of 8 weeks for institutional experience. 6.3. At the end of third year of study, students shall be attached to an Early Childhood Education Institution/Centre for a minimum of 12 weeks, for institutional practice.

Development Concepts and Application Introduction to Education I Child Development I (Pre-Natal and Infancy) Social Interaction in Early Childhood Development Health Education and Practice for child development

3 3 3 3 3 24

Sub- total Semester II CDM 100 HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management CSC 109 Computer Applications COS 102 Communication Skills II ESM 104 Quantitative Skills II EDU 111 Introduction to Education II ECD 101 Child Development II (Early, Middle, Late) ECD 104 Food and Nutrition for child development ECD 105 Pre- School Curriculum Sub- total Total For Year I Year II Semester I PSY 210 General Educational Psychology IRD 200 State, Society and Development CIT 210 Instructional Methods and strategies EDF 210 Philosophy of Education ECD 200 Historical Development of Early Childhood Education ECD 201 Language for Early Childhood Education ECD 202 Introduction to Art and Craft for Preschool Teacher ECD 203 Music, Movement and Dance in Early Childhood Education Sub- total

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 48

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

6.4. At the fourth year of study, students shall be required to take at least one elective course. 6.5. During the fourth year of study, students shall be required to conduct a research project in an Early Childhood Education related topic and write a project report. 7.0 Course Structure The following are the courses to be offered in each year of study Year I Semester I Code Title Units COS 100 Communication Skills I 3 CSC 110 Introduction to Computers and Computing 3 ESM 101 Quantitative Skills I 3 129

Semester II PSY 201 Personality Development 3 EDF 211 History of Education 3 CIT 211 Educational Media and Resources 3 CIT 212 Curriculum Studies 3 ECD 204 Science and Mathematics for Early

Childhood Education 3 Community Education and Mobilization 3 ECD 206 Materials Development for Early Childhood Education 3 ECD 299 Introduction to Institutional experience 3 Sub- total 24 Total for Year II 48 ECD 205 Year III Semester I IRD 305 Entrepreneurship for Small Business 3 IRD 306 Public Speaking Skills 3 ECD 300 Language Methods in Early Childhood Education 3 ECD 301 Art and Craft Methods in Early Childhood Education 3 ECD 302 Methods of Teaching Music, Movement and Drama in Early Childhood Education 3 ECD 303 Methods of Teaching Science and Mathematics in Early Childhood Education 3 ECD304 Social Studies in Early Childhood Education 3 Sub- total 21 Semester II CIT 360 Educational Media Practicals 3 PSY 311 Educational Measurement and Evaluation 3 ECD 305 Indoor and Outdoor Play Activity in Early Childhood Education 3 ECD 306 Research in Early Childhood and Family Studies 3 ECD 307 Organization and Management of Feeding Program in Early Childhood Education 3 ECD 308 Administration and Supervision of Pre-School Education 3 ECD 309 Comparative Early Childhood Education 3 ECD399 Institutional practice 6 Sub- total 27 Total for Year III 48 Year IV 130

Semester I EDF 410 Sociology of Education and Comparative Education 3 PSY 410 Guidance and Counseling 3 ESM 410 Environmental Education 3 EPM 411 Educational Administration and Management 3 ECD 400 Rights of Children and their welfare 3 ECD 401 Exceptional Children 3 ECD 402 Screening Procedures for Children 3 Sub- total 21 SEMESTER II PSY 401 Adolescent and Adult Psychology 3 EPM 412 Educational Planning and Economics of Education 3 IRD 400 Project appraisal 3 ECD 404 Role of Family in a Changing Environment 3 ECD 406 Literature in Early Childhood 3 ECD407 Maternal and Child Nutrition 3 ECE 499 Research Project/Work 3 EDU 410E School Librarianship 1 OR EDU 411E Basic Health Care and First Aid 1 Sub- total 22 Total For Year II Grand Total Master of Science in Science Education 1.0. Introduction The M.Sc programmes in science education provide students with advanced specialized knowledge and skills in science and education. This solid foundation enables acquisition of skills for designing, implementing, supervising, evaluating and teaching various science curricula and programmes at the secondary school and tertiary levels. The programmes are necessary because of the continuous development or revision of school and college syllabuses in science which require new knowledge and skills to implement. The central idea 43 187

is to extend the students knowledge of the specific subject within the context of education. They provide an enhanced worldview of the pedagogy currently utilized in the indicated subject areas. The aim of the programmes is to give students the opportunity to do advanced work and update themselves with recent developments in the individual science subjects from a professional perspective. This would enable them to be more confident in conducting research and teaching the content of these science subjects at both the school and tertiary levels. 2.0. Objectives The M.Sc programmes in science education are designed to: 2.1. Provide students with the theoretical and practical background for understanding and conducting research on issues associated with the teaching and learning of science. 2.2. Equip students with scientific knowledge and skills necessary for effective design, implementation, evaluation and supervision of programmes in science education at the secondary school and tertiary levels of education. 2.3. Prepare students to participate in solving practical problems in their communities relating to the overall human development in general and the teaching and learning of science in particular through research and extension services. 3.0. Target group The M.Sc programmes in science education are suitable for professionals from the following backgrounds: 3.1. Science teachers. 3.2. Curriculum developers in science. 3.3. Inspectors of school science. 3.4. Those interested in a career involving science education such as medical education, museum education, science textbook production and research in science education. 4.0 Admission requirements For the candidates to be eligible for admission to the programmes they must: 131

4.1. Hold at least a lower second class honours in the undergraduate degree in science education. OR 4.2. Hold a similar such qualification in science with postgraduate diploma in education. 5.0. Course requirements 5.1. Candidates may select one of the following programmes: 5.1.1.M.Sc in Biology Education 5.1.2. M.Sc in Chemistry Education, 5.1.3. M.Sc in Physics Education, 5.1.4. M.Sc in Environmental Education. 5.2 Students must complete a minimum of 41 credit hours (or units) of coursework distributed as follows: 5.2.1. 18 units of science education component, 5.2.2. 8 units of research methodology including proposal. 5.2.3. 15 units of science component in the subject area of specialization. 5.3. In addition, candidates must write a thesis. The thesis accounts for six (6) units of field work and thesis writing. The thesis will be written on educational aspects of science. 5.4. All in all candidates must complete a minimum of 47 units, including the thesis. 6.0. Duration 6.1. The Master of Science programmes in science education shall normally take four semesters, (or two academic years) to complete for full-time students. 6.2. Part-time (sandwich or school based) students shall normally take four years to complete the course (i.e 8 vacations). The sandwich/school based programme will coincide with the school vacations in Kenya. 7.0. Mode of teaching The courses in all the programmes will be taught through the following methods:

7.1. Lecturers, demonstrations and tutorials 7.2. Library and internet search 7.3. Panel discussions, seminars and assignments 7.4. Laboratory practicals and projects 7.5. Field work 8.0 Assessment 8.1. The assessment of students performance will be conducted through coursework examinations and oral defense of a written thesis. Evaluation of coursework will be conducted as indicated below: 8.2. Each course shall be examined by a three hour end of semester examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in that course. 8.3. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising of seminar papers, project reports, term papers, written tests and participation in the learning activities. These will account for 40% of the total mark in that course. 8.4. The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and the written exam) shall be 50%. Candidates must pass in all papers before they proceed to the next year of study. 8.5. A candidate who fails not more than three (3) courses for the entire study programme may be allowed to sit for supplementary examinations in the failed courses. 8.6. The maximum mark for any supplementary examination shall be 50% and shall not include continuous assessment. 8.7. A candidate who fails in more than three (3) courses in the regular examination shall be discontinued. 8.8 A candidate who fails in any of the supplementary examinations shall be discontinued. 8.9. Unless otherwise specified, the University rules and regulations shall apply to all the other aspects of examinations, including examination of the thesis.

9.0 Course Structure M.Sc in Biology Education Year I Semester I Code Title Units ESM 800 Nature of Science and Science Education 3 ESM 802. Learning in Science 3 ESM 816 EducationalResearch Methodology I 3 Elective courses (Select three): BOT 841 Molecular Genetics 2 ZOO 804 Biological Techniques 2 ZOO 835 Cell and Molecular Biology 2 ZOO 809 EnvironmentalPhysiology 2 ZOO 826 Genetics 2 ZOO 830 Cellular Physiology 2 BOT 855 Advanced Microbiology 2 Total 15 Semester II Code ESM 891

Title Units Seminar: Research Proposal in Science Education 2 ESM 811 Methods and Practice of Teaching Biology 3 ESM 817 Educational Research Methodology I1 3 Elective courses (Select three): BOT 801 Principles of Taxonomy 3 BOT 854 Biotechnology 3 ZOO 852 Comparative Animal Physiology & Biomechanics 3 BOT 851 PlantPhysiology and Biochemistry 3 BOT 852 Ecology and Evolutionary Mechanism 3 ZOO 823 Immunology 3 ZOO 853 Comparative Neurophysiology and Endocrinology 3 ZOO 850 Aquatic Ecology and Hybrobiology 3 Total 17 Total for year I 32

132

Year II Semester I Code Title ESM 898Field work and Thesis Writing Semester II Code ESM 801 Units 6

ESM 891

Title Units Curriculum Development in Science Education 3 ESM 808 Assessment of Learning in science 3 One elective course from the following: ESM 806 ICT in Science Education 3 ESM 807 Technology, Science and Society 3 ESM 809 Quality Assurance in Science Education 3 Total 9 Total for second year 15 Grand Total 47 M.Sc. in Chemistry Education Year I Semester 1 Code ESM 800 ESM 802

Seminar: Research Proposal in Science Education 2 ESM 812 Methods and Practice of Teaching Chemistry 3 ESM 817 Educational Research Methodology II 3 Elective courses (Select Three): CHE 851 Chemical Thermodynamics 2 CHE 854 Electrochemistry 2 CHE 855 Quantum Chemistry 2 CHE 862 Chemical Kinetics 2 CHE 863 Natural Products 2 CHE 840 Topics in Organic Chemistry 2 CHE 850 Topics in PhysicalChemistry 2 Total 14 Total for first year 32 Year II Semester 1 Code Title ESM 898Field work and Thesis Writing Semester II Code ESM 801

Units 6

Title Units Nature of Science and Science Education 3 Learning in Science 3

ESM 816

EducationalResearch Methodology I 3 Elective courses (Select three): CHE830 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 3 CHE 858 Instrumentation in Chemistry 3 CHE 856 Analytical Methods 3 CHE 857 Separation Techniques and Data analysis 3 CHE 852 Molecular Spectroscopy 3 CHE 861 Chemical Bonding 3 CHE 864 Stereochemistry and conformational Analysis 3 Total 18 Semester II Code Title Units 133

Course title Units Curriculum Development in Science Education 3 ESM 808 Assessment of Learning in Science 3 Elective course from the following: ESM 806 ICT in Science Education 3 ESM 807 Technology, Science and Society 3 ESM 809 Quality Assurance in Science Education 3 Total 9 Total for Second Year 15 Grand Total 47 M.Sc in Physics Education Year I Semester I Code ESM 800 ESM 802 ESM816

Title Units ature of Science and Science Education 3 Learning in Science 3 Educational Research Methodology I 3

Elective course (Select Three): PHY 811 Mathematical Techniques in Physics 2 PHY 852 Transport Phenomenon in Solids 2 PHY 853 Amorphous Solids and Liquids 2 PHY 856 Molecular Spectroscopy 2 PHY 857 Solid state Electronics 2 PHY 810 Classical and Statistical Mechanics 2 PHY 813 Electrodynamics 2 Total 15 Semester II Code ESM 891

ESM 807

Technology, Science and Society Quality Assurance in Science Education

ESM 809

Total Total for second year Grand Total

3 9 15 47

Title Units Seminar: Research Proposal in Science Education 2 ESM 813 Methods and Practice of Teaching Physics 3 ESM817 Educational Research Methodology II 3 Three elective courses selected from the following: PHY 812 Quantum Mechanics 3 PHY 815 Nuclear and Particle Physics 3 PHY 845 Group Theory in Physics 3 PHY 846 Theory of Relativity 3

PHY 855 Fundamentals of Experimental Physics 3 PHY 850 Ceramics and glasses 3 PHY 851 Solar Energy Materials 3 Total 17 Total for first year 32 Year II Semester 1 Code ESM 898 Semester II Code ESM 801

M.Sc in Environmental Education Year I Semester I Code Course title Units ESM 800 Nature of Science and Science Education 3 ESM 802 Learning in Science 3 ESM816 Educational Research Methodology I 3 Elective courses (Select Three): ESM 868 Current Environmental Issues 2 ESM 866 Philosophy and Development of Environmental Science 2 ESM 867 History and Philosophy of Environmental Education 2 ESM 869 Ecology, Conservation, and Management 2 ESM 877 Plant and Animal Communities in East Africa 2 Total 15 Semester II Code Course title Units ESM 891 Seminar: Research Proposal in Science Education 2 ESM 815 Methods and Practice of Teaching Environmental Education 3 ESM817 Educational Research Methodology II 3 Elective course (Select Three): ESM 870 Environmental Measurement andComputing Techniques 3 ESM 871 Soil and Water Science 3 ESM 872 Environmental Impact Assessment 3 ESM 873 Advances in Risk Management 3 ESM 875 Management of Energy Systems 3 134

Title Units Field work and Thesis Writing 6

Course title Units Curriculum Development in Science Education 3 ESM 808 Assessment of learning in science 3 One elective course from the following: ESM 806I CT in Science Education 3

ESM874

Fundamentals of Geographical Information Systems 3 ESM 876 Climate Change and Africa 3 Total 17 Total for first year 32 Year II Semester I Code Course title Units ESM 898 Field work and Thesis Writing 6 Semester II Code Course title Units ESM 801 Curriculum Development in Science Education 3 ESM 808 Assessment of Learning in Science 3 One elective course from the following: ESM 806. ICT in Science Education 3 ESM 807 Technology, Science and Society 3 ESM 809. Quality Assurance in Science Education 3 Total 9 Total for Year II 15 Grand Total 57

2.1. Provide students with advanced specialized knowledge, techniques and skills in mathematics necessary for teaching at the secondary school and higher levels. 2.2. Extend students knowledge and understanding of mathematics within the context of education for the purpose of designing, implementing, supervising, evaluating and teaching programmes as well as conducting research at the secondary school and higher levels. 2.3. Prepare students for admission into Ph.D degree programmes, careers in higher education or research and /or entry-level practice positions within a variety of private and public sectors where knowledge of mathematics education is required. 3.0. Target group The M.Sc programme in mathematics education is suitable for professionals from the following backgrounds: 3.1.Mathematics teachers 3.2. Curriculum in develops in mathematics 3.3. Inspectors of School Mathematics 3.4. Those interested in a career involving mathematics education such as mathematics textbooks production, research, banking, career guidance, etc.

Master of Science in Mathematics Education 1.0. Introduction Mathematics is a very dynamic discipline. It is therefore not surprising that countries throughout the world have experienced a continuous development or revision of school and college syllabuses in mathematics and there is always a need to bring their content up-to-date. Consequently teachers, curriculum developers and school inspectors may wish to pursue a course of study, which extends their knowledge of the subject within the context of education. The Master of Science degree in Mathematics Education meets their needs. 2.0. Objectives The M.Sc programme in mathematics education is designed to:

4.0 Admission requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university admission requirements, candidates must hold: 4.1. At least a lower second class honours degree in education (mathematics option) from a recognized university R 4.2. At least a lower second class honors degree in mathematics with a postgraduate diploma in education from recognized universities. 5.0. Course requirements 5.1. candidate will be required to complete a total of 53 credit hours or units inclusive of thesis. The load will be distributed as follows: 5.3.1. A minimum of 20 units in mathematics. 5.3.2. A total of 19 units in mathematics education including other professional component. 135

5.3.3. A total of 8 units of research methods in education, including proposal. 5.3.4. Six (6) units of fieldwork and thesis writing. The thesis will be written on educational aspects of mathematics. 5.2 All in all, candidates must therefore take a minimum of 47 credit hours or units for their coursework. 6.0. Duration 6.1 The Master of Science in mathematics education degree programme will takea minimum of four semesters or two academic years to complete for full-time students. 6.2. Part-time (sandwich) students will take a minimum of four academic years to complete the programme ( i.e. 8 school vacations). 7.0. Learning and Teaching Methods The objectives of the programme shall be addressed through the following teaching methods: 7.0.1. Workshops and Seminars 7.0.2. Problem solving and field work 7.0.3. Library and internet search 7.0.4. Projects and panel discussions 7.05. . Lectures and demonstrations 7.1. Assessment The assessment of students performance will be conducted through coursework examinations, examination of written thesis and oral defense of the written thesis. Evaluation of coursework will be carried out as indicated below: 7.1.1. Each course shall be examined by a three (3) hour end of semester examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in that course. 7.1.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising of seminar papers, project reports, term papers, and written tests. These will account for 40% of the total marks in that course. 7.1.3. The paper pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and the written exam) shall be 50%. Candidates must pass in all papers before they proceed to the next year of study. 7.1.4. A candidate who fails half or more than half of the courses taken shall be discontinued. 7.1.5. A candidate who fails less than half of the courses taken shall sit for a supplementary 136

examination, which shall be awarded a maximum of 50%. 7.1.6. A candidate who fails any paper taken as a supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 7.1.7. A special examination shall be given to a candidate who, under special circumstances such as medical or compassionate grounds supported by authentic evidence, fails to sit for an examination. The special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination. 7.1.8. Unless otherwise specified the senate rules and regulations shall apply to all other aspects of examinations including assessment of the thesis 8.0.Course Structure Year 1 Semester 1 Code Course title Units ESM 816 Educational research methodology I 3 ESM 841 Learning in Mathematics 3 Elective Courses (Select three): MAT 813Functional analysis 1 4 MAT 817 Complex analysis 1 4 MAT 811 Abstract integration 1 4 MAT 841 Group theory 4 MAT 842 Rings and fields 4 MAT 845 Quadratic forms 4 MAT 818 Numerical analysis 1 4 STA 877 Advanced Statistics and Probability I 4 Total 18 Semester 2 Code ESM 890 ESM 817 ESM 820 ESM 842 ESM 843

Title Units Seminar: Research Proposed in Mathematics Education 2 Educational research methodology II 3 Methods and practice of Teaching mathematics 3 Mathematics Education workshop 2 Seminar: Research Trends in Mathematics Education 2

Elective Courses (Select Two) MAT 814Functional analysis II 4 MAT 822Complex analysis II 4 MAT 830Partial differential Equations I 4 MAT 843Commutative algebra 4 STA 801 Experimental Design I 4 STA 814Statistical Inference I 4 STA 878Advanced statistics and probability I 4 MAT 851General topology I 4 MAT 840Numerical analysis II 4 Total for semester 2 20 Total for year 1 38 Year II Semester I Code Title Units ESM 899Field work and thesis writing 6 Semester II Code Course title Units ESM 840 Curriculum development in mathematics education 3 One elective from the following: ESM 848 History and nature of mathematics 3 ESM 844 Gender and individual differences in Mathematics education 3 ESM 846 Assessment of mathematics achievement 3 ESM 847 Quality Assurance in Mathematics Education 3 Total 9 Total for second year 15 Grand Total 53 Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics Education 1.0. Introduction The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) degree programme in Mathematics Education is individually designed to meet the candidates academic background, professional experience and career goals and aspirations. The programme is designed primarily for the following careers: 137

1.1. Teaching positions in Mathematics and Mathematics education in colleges and universities. 1.2. Supervisory and Curriculum specialist positions in the Ministry of Education and other related departments. 1.3. Research positions in the Ministry of Education, Industry and Medical institutions. 2.0. Admission requirements Applicants seeking admission to the Doctoral programme in Mathematics education must satisfy the following requirements: 2.1. A Bachelors degree in Education (Mathematics option) or a Bachelors degree in Mathematics with a Diploma in education. 2.2. A Masters degree in Mathematics education or Mathematics with other qualification in education as may be approved by Senate. 2.3. Related professional experience. 3.0. Submission and processing of application for registration In addition to the common procedures approved by Senate candidates shall provide the following information in support of their application: 3.1. A written statement of not less than 500 words of the individuals professional objective and purpose for seeking a doctoral degree. 3.2. Two letters of recommendation from persons qualified to appraise the candidates academic and professional potential. 4.0. Duration 4.1. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy may be undertaken on a full-time or a part-time basis. 4.2.Full-time students shall usually take a minimum of three years and a maximum of five years to complete their programme. 4.2. Part-time students shall usually take a minimum of four and a maximum of seven years to complete the programme.

5.0. Course requirements 5.1. The programme of study must include 49 credit hours (or units) inclusive of thesis. 5.2. The course work component of the programme requires a maximum of 35 units which shall be made of at least 12 units of level 9 courses (doctoral level) and the rest from level 8 (masters level) courses. 5.3. All course work shall normally be completed in the first year of study for both full-time and parttime students. 5.4. Students who have done relevant work as units in a variety of courses from other universities or from WUCST at Masters level may be granted credit transfer towards their Ph.D programme. This will be subject to examination of course syllabi and/or papers written by the student to determine mastery of the objectives. 5.5. Only an equivalent of one-half of the total number of credit hours required for the programme, exclusive of thesis credits, will be granted towards the programme. Putting into consideration other factors such as variation in the total number of credit hours for the Ph.D programme in other Universities, the minimum credits to be taken at MMUST is set at 21 credit hours or units. 5.6. A candidate may take extra courses over and above the required number of units and may also audit courses subject to the approval of the Department. 6.0. Expected pattern of study and assessment The structure of this Ph.D study combines structural intensive course work with a substantial thesis research. 6.1 The course work component 6.1.1. A candidate shall unless exempted by the committee on the recommendation of the faculty board, complete the required courses. 6.1.2. Candidates must demonstrate competence in all the courses undertaken. The candidates will be required to keep a thorough journal recording observations, analysis and reflections focused on specific issues arising from policy, practice and theory in their courses they undertake. These will be checked and graded by the course tutor. 138

6.1.3. The examination for any course shall comprise such combination of work: A critical essay arising from activity stated in 6.1.2 assignments, tests and formal examinations as the faculty board may determine from time to time. 6.1.4.A satisfactory level of achievement must be obtained by a candidate in all courses taken as outlined in the rules and regulations governing examinations. 6.2. Pattern of study The normal pattern of study expected is thus as follows: 6.2.1. Thesis Research 6.2.1.1. Once enrolled, students begin their thesis research immediately in the first year by undertaking intensive preparatory work: First, writing a critical review of literature in their selected field, and second actively participating in research methodology and Mathematics education courses. 6.2.1.2. The critical review of literature is undertaken to ensure that candidates have a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the ongoing contemporary research in their chosen area of study. The research methodology course provides a review of contemporary research methods and provides opportunities for the intensive development of research skills and techniques relevant to candidates specialized fields of study. This course together with courses in Mathematics education will provide ample opportunity for the candidates to prepare a detailed research proposal.. 6.2.1.3. The proposal will be discussed at the first doctoral seminar in the second semester and refined at the second year. The proposal (of not more than 5,000 words or 20 pages of 1.5 spacing excluding appendices) is defended in an oral examination taken between the second year and third year of candidature for part-time candidates or between the first and second year of candidature for full-time candidates. Students may not proceed to the thesis research until the proposal has been accepted and until they have completed their course work. 6.2.1.4. Following the successful defence of the research proposal and the course work, candidates begin research, for their thesis.

6.2.1.5. The research on the thesis is spread over four years for part-time candidates, forming half the overall work load for the degree. 6.2.1.6. The thesis, the original work of the candidate, is expected to make significant contribution to knowledge in the chosen field of study. 70. Supervision On the recommendation of the graduate school committee, at least two members of the academic staff shall be appointed as internal supervisors for each candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The responsibilities of the supervisors shall be as set down by Senate.

Education Elective Courses (Select One from the following): ESM 970

Curriculum Development in MathematicsEducation 3 ESM 916 Computers in Mathematics Education 3 ESM 915 Instructional Design and Technology 3 ESM 972 Teaching Exceptional children in Mathematics 3 ESM 973 Quality Assurance in Mathematics Education 3

8.0. Course distribution and selection Year I Semester I (A) Research Methods in Education Code Title ESM 904 Qualitative Research in Education ESM 966 Nature and Philosophy of Mathematics ESM 968 Teaching Mathematics: Appraising practice ESM 969 Learning in Mathematics Elective courses (Select One from the following): MAT 915 General Topology I MAT 917 Complex Analysis I MAT 921 Group Theory I MAT 925 Banach Algebra Total Semester II Code Course Title Units ESM 967 Doctoral Seminar Current issues in Mathematics Education 2 ESM 911 Quantitative Research in Education 3 ESM 912 Research Proposal in 139 Units 3 3 3 3

Elective Courses (Select two from the following): MAT MAT MAT STA 933 Abstract Integration II 937Representation Theory 923Operator Theory 980Topics in Probability and Statistics MAT 927Topics in Operator Theory Total Total for year I Year II Semester I Code ESM 992 4 4 4 4 4 19 35

4 4 4 4 16

Title Units Doctoral Seminar: Proposal Writing in Mathematics Education 2

Semester II Code Title Units ESM 990 Fieldwork and Thesis Writing 6 Total for year II 8 Year III Semester I ESM 990 Fieldwork and Thesis Writing 3 Semester II ESM 990 Fieldwork and Thesis Writing 3 Total for year III 6 Grand Total 49

Department of Educational Planning & Management Master of Education in Economics and Management of Education 1.0. Introduction Economic constraints such as inflation, economic stagnation poverty and unemployment affecting Kenya and other developing countries have far reaching effects on financing of education. This programme is designed to prepare personnel with competence and skills in analyzing and interpreting economic issues and situations and advise managers in matters regarding economics of education nationally and internationally. 2.0. Aim The purpose of this programme is to furnish the graduates with the concepts, skills and attitude in matters of economics and management of education, how they relate to and affect education in both developed and developing countries. 3.0. Objectives The programme is expected to: 3.1. Prepare students with relevant knowledge, skills, and attitude in economics of education. 3.2. Equip students with skills in research in economics of education. 3.3. Provide graduates able to apply modern technology in analyzing and interpreting economic situations and their impact on education. 4.0. Target Groups The programme targets the following groups: 4.1. Educational economists and statisticians at all levels 4.2. Economists in the NGO world. 4.3. Educational teachers at all levels. 4.4 Programme/Project officers in community-based organizations (CBO) and in the NGOs. 4.5. Fresh graduates from accredited universities. 5.0. Duration of the Programme The programme shall have two modes of study: Full time and part time. 140

5.1. Full time The full time mode shall normally run for a period of two academic years distributed over four consecutive semesters of full-time attendance. Common University regulations shall apply. 5.2. Part time The part time mode shall normally take a maximum period of four academic years of attendance from the date of registration. 6.0. Programme Requirements The programme requires a minimum of fortyeight (48) units of appropriate graduate course work including a thesis. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also audit courses subject to approval by the department. A student may take optional courses from other departments/faculties subject to approval by the department. 7.0. Evaluation Evaluation shall involve course work, examination and a thesis. Common University regulations shall apply. 7.1. Course Work and Examination Common University regulations shall apply. 7.2. Thesis Writing A student shall during the degree programme write a thesis on a specific topic related to Economics of Education. 8.0. Learning and Teaching Methods A student centered approach shall be used with emphasis on seminars, field tours, problem solving, directed learning, project work and research. 9.0. Distribution of courses Students will cover courses as follows: Year I Semester I Code Course Title

Units

EPM 811 EPM 815

EPM 833

Research Methods in Education I Financing and Management of Education Human Capital and Economics of Education

3 3

Year II Semester I Code EPM 898: Total Semester II EPM 899:

Title Field work

Units 6 6

Demand and Supply of 3 Education Electives EPM 826E Introduction to 3 Management Science EPM 828E Problems of Educational Planningand Management 3 in developing Countries EPM 829E Methodologies of 3 Economics of Education EPM 825E Management Information 3 Systems Any approved course from outside the department 3 Take one elective 3 Total 15 Semester II Code Course Title Units EPM 812 Research Methods in 3 ducation II Investment in Education EPM 835 EPM 836 Efficiency and Equity in 3 Education EPM 823 Proposal writing 3 Electives EPM 830E Quantitative analysis in Educational 3 planning/Economics EPM 831E Population studies for Educational 3 Planning/Economics EPM 837E Education and Economic 3 Growth Any approved course from outside the department 3 Take one elective 3 Total 15

EPM 834

Thesis Writing and organized tours 9 One elective 3 Total 12 Electives EPM 824E: EPM 832E:

Project Planning and Appraisal 3 Facility Management in Education 3 Any approved course from outside the department 3 Take one Elective 3 Master of Education in Educational Management and Policy Studies

1.0. Introduction Contemporary milestones in the education sector in Kenya and the world over necessitate need for high caliber personnel to execute roles in their Planning and Management. The department of educational planning and management is not only aware of such realities but also set to alleviate the challenges through training of relevant and quality personnel. For instance, changes in Education in terms of policies, nature of inputs (students, teachers, and finances among others) objectives, curriculum, technology, as well as relationships between school and community call for adoption of modern management practices of the Education sector and educational institutions. There is need to keep educational managers informed of the emerging changes and make projections of anticipated changes as far as educational management is concerned. 2.0. Aim The purpose of this programme is to equip graduates with theoretical and practical skills in Educational Management. These skills will enable them to better serve as administrators and managers in educational 141

institutions, research centers, and training centers as well as in consultancy. 3.0. Objectives The programme is designed to: 3.1. Prepare students in relevant theoretical and practical skills in educational management. 3.2. Assist students conceptualize educational policy frameworks in current educational management. 3.3 Equip students with relevant research skills in educational management and policy studies. 3.4. Produce students who can apply modern technology in management of educational institutions. 4.0. Target Groups The programme targets the following groups: 4.1. Education officers. 42. Professional teachers. 4.3. Programme/Project officers dealing with community based organizations (CBO) and in the NGO world. 4.4. Graduates from recognised universities. 5.0. Entry Requirements Common University regulations shall apply. 6.0. Duration of the Programme Common University regulations shall apply. 7.0. Examinations and Evaluation Examinations and common University regulations for graduate students shall be applied. 8.0. Learning and Teaching Methods A student centered approach shall be used with emphasis on seminars, field tours, problem solving, directed learning, project work and research. 9.0. Distribution Of Courses Students will cover courses as follows: Year I Semester I Core Courses and Electives Code a Title Units EPM 810: Theories and Practice in Educational Management 3 142

EPM 811: EPM 816: EPM 826: One Elective Total EPM 818E: EPM 819E:

Research Methods in Education I Strategic Management Introduction to Management Science

3 3 3 3 15

Organisational Theory 3 Adult Education Policy and Distance Learning Management 3 EPM 822E: Early Childhood Education Policy and Management 3 EPM 817E: Ethical Issues in Organisational Management 3 Any approved course from outside the department Semester II Core Courses and Electives Code Title Units EPM 812: Research Methods in Education II 3 EPM 814: Educational Policy Formulation and Plementation 3 EPM 815: Policy and Financing of Education 3 EPM 823: Research Proposal 3 One Elective 3 Total 15 EPM 813E: Management of Change in Education and Policy EPM 820E: Policy and Management of Non-Formal Education EPM 821E: Organisational Behaviour Any approved course from outside the department Year II Semester I Code EPM 898: Total

3 3 3 3

Title Units Field Work and Organised Tours 6 6

Semester II EPM 899: Thesis Writing One Elective Total Electives EPM 824E: EPM 825E:

9 3 12

Project Planning and Appraisal 3 Management Information Systems 3 EPM 827E: Human Resource Management 3 Any approved course from outside the department 3 Master of Education in Educational Planning 1.0. Introduction Modern constraint and issues affecting planning of education in Kenya and other developing countries call for training of personnel with the relevant skills in educational planning. Application of modern knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as technology in educational planning is necessary to assist educational planners collect, analyze and interpret data for educational planning purposes. This programme has been designed factoring in the relevant competencies in modern educational planning. 2.0. Aim The purpose of this programme is to equip graduates with theoretical and practical skills in understanding the concepts, methodologies and strategies in educational planning. This would enable them to better understand and solve the problems of educational planning in the education sector.

4.0. Target Groups The programme targets the following groups: 4.1. Educational planners and statisticians at all levels 4.2. Planners in the NGO world. 4.3. Educational teachers at all levels. 4.4. Programme/Project officers in communityBased organistionals (CBO) and in the NGO world. 4.5. New graduates from accredited universities. 5.0. Entry Requirements In addition to fulfilling the common University regulations, an applicant for the degree of Master of Education in Educational planning and management should satisfy the following requirements: 5.1. Hold a Bachelor of Education degree with at least upper second-class honors from an accredited University. 5.2. Hold a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with a graduate Diploma in Education with a minimum of a credit. 5.3. Hold a Bachelor of Education degree at Lower second class honors from an accredited institution provided: The applicant has at least 2 years experience after qualification or has evidence of at least one publication or special abilities in a relevant field. 6.0. Submission and processing of application for registration The common procedures approved by the senate shall apply. 7.0. Duration of the Programme The programme shall have two modes of study: Full time and part time. 7.1. Full time The full time mode shall normally run for a period of two academic years distributed over four consecutive semesters of full-time attendance. 7.2. Part time The part time mode shall normally take a maximum period of four academic years of attendance from the date of registration. 8.0. Programme Requirements 143

3.0. Objectives The programme is designed to: 3.1. Prepare students with relevant theoretical and practical skills in educational planning. 3.2. Equip students with relevant research skills in educational planning. 3.3. Equip students with skills in interpreting emerging issues in educational planning. 3.4. Provide students with competencies and skills in educational strategic planning.

8.1. The programme requires a minimum of forty eight (48) units of appropriate graduate course work including a thesis. 8.2. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also audit courses subject to approval by the department. A student may take optional courses form other departments/faculties subject to approval by the department. 9.0. Evaluation Evaluation shall involve course work, examination, and thesis. 9.1. Course Work and Examination Evaluation of course work will include the formative and summative types conducted as here below: 9.1.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3 hour of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 9.1.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous course work assessment comprising seminar papers, projects and other reports, term papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 9.1.3 The pass mark in each course (Continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. 9.1.3. Candidates must pass in all papers before they proceed to the second year of study. 9.1.4. Each unit shall be graded out of 100 marks and shall be translated as follows:

9.1.8. A candidate who fails any paper taken, as a supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 9.1.9. Under exceptional circumstances such as medical or compassionate grounds, supported by written evidence, a special examination may be held for the candidate a special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination. 9.2. Thesis Writing 9.2.1. A student shall during the degree programme write a thesis in a specific topic related to Educational planning. 9.2.2. Thesis supervisors shall be appointed for the students at the start of the second semester through the active involvement of the students themselves. Where the departmental rules are silent the common regulations for submission and examination of the theses of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension shall apply. 10.0. Learning and Teaching Methods A student centered approach shall be used with emphasis on seminars, field tours, problem solving, directed learning, project work and research. 11.0. Course Distribution Students will cover courses as follows: Year I Semester I Code EPM 811 EPM 815 EPM 828

Marks 75% above 65% - 74% 50% - 64 % Below 50%

Grade A B C D

Description Distinction Credit Pass Fail

9.1.5. A candidate who fails half OR more than half of the units taken shall be discontinued. 9.1.6. A candidate who fails less than half of the units taken shall sit for a supplementary. 9.1.7. Each supplementary examination shall be awarded a maximum of 50%.

EPM 829 Electives EPM 826E

Title Units Research Methods in Education I 3 Financing and management of Education 3 Problems of Educational Planning and management in developing countries 3 Methodologies of Educational Planning 3 Introduction to Management Science

144

Human Capital and Economics of Education 3 M 834E Demand and Supply of Education 3 EPM 825E Management Information Systems. 3 Any approved course form outside the department 3 Take one elective Total 15 Semester II Code EPM 812 EPM 823 EPM 830 Title Units Research Methods in Education II 3 Proposal writing 3 Quantitative analysis in Educational Planning /Economics 3 EPM 831 Population Studies for Educational Planning/ economics 3 Take one elective Electives EPM 824E Project Planning and Appraisal 3 EPM 832E Facility Management in Education 3 EPM 836E Efficiency and Equity in Education 3 Total 15 Year II Semester I Code EPM 898 Total Semester II EPM 899

EPM 833E

Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management and Policy Studies 1.0 Introduction The management of education and its institutions has in the recent past become complex. This has been occasioned by contemporary rapid changes in the education sector not only in Kenya but in the world over. This programme is designed to furnish graduates with relevant competences and skills to better administer, manage and analyze policies in the educational sector. 20. Aim The programme aims at equipping graduates with theoretical as well as practical skills in educational administration and management. Acquired skills will enable them to serve as administrators and/or managers in educational institutions, research centres, and training centers as well as in consultancy. 3.0 Objectives The programme is designed to: 3.1. Provide learners with theoretical and practical skills in educational management and policy studies. 3.2. Equip learners with relevant research skills in educational management and policy studies. 3.3. Produce students who can apply modern technology in administering and managing educational institutions. 3.4. Enable students to apply knowledge, skills and attitudes in handling educational issues. 4.0. Target Groups The programme targets the following groups: 4.1. Education officers at all levels 4.2. Education teachers at all levels. 4.3. Programme/project officers dealing with Community based Organizations (CBOs) and NGOs. 4.4. Graduates form accredited universities.

Title Field Work

Units 6 6

Thesis Writing and organized tours 9 One elective 3 Total 12 Electives EPM 835 EPM 837E

E:Investment in Education Education and Economic Growth

3 3 3 9 145

Take one Electiv Total

5.0 Entry Requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university senate regulations, an applicant should satisfy the following requirements. 5.1. Hold a relevant masters degree in education from an accredited university 5.2. Hold a masters degree with a graduate diploma in education. 6.0 Submission and processing of application for registration The common procedures approved by IGSRE shall apply. 7.0 Duration of the programme The programme shall have two modes of study: Full time and Part time. 7.1. Full time mode Shall normally run for a minimum period of three academic years and a maximum of five academic years distributed over six or ten consecutive semesters of full-time attendance respectively. 7.2. Part time Mode Shall normally take a minimum period of four academic years and maximum of seven academic years of attendance from the date of registration. 8.0. Programme requirements 8.1. The programme requires a minimum of forty-two (42) units of appropriate graduate coursework including thesis. 8.2. A candidate may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A candidate may also audit courses subject to approval by the department. 8.3. A candidate may take courses from other departments/faculties subject to approval by the department. 8.4. A candidate may be exempted from part of coursework requirement provided the senate is satisfied that the candidate had done and passed at a masters level the course(s) equivalent to the prescribed course(s).

8.5. The minimum units of course work for a Doctoral programme shall be 21 units, and the maximum shall be 24 units, which will be made up of at least 12 units of level 9 courses (Doctoral level) and the rest from level 8 courses (masters level). 9.0. Evaluation. Evaluation shall involve coursework, examination and a thesis. Examination of coursework will be done as here below: 9.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3 hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total score in each course. 9.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising: seminar papers, projects and other reports, term papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. These will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 9.3. The pass mark in each course shall be 50% 9.3.1. Candidates must pass in all papers before they proceed to the next year of study. 9.3.2. Each unit shall be graded out of 100 marks and shall be translated as follows: Percentage 75 100 65 - 74 50 - 64 0 - 49 Grade A B C D Remarks Distinction Credit Pass Fail

9.3.3. Examination of theses shall be done following common university postgraduate regulations. 10.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Course Title Units Core Courses EPM 901 Research Methodology 3 EPM 911 Strategic Management 3 EPM 915 Investment and policy issues in 146

Education 3 Financing and Management of Education 3 One Elective 3 Total 15 Electives EPM 910 E Organizational Theory 3 EPM 919E HIV and AIDS policy and Management Issues 3 In consultation with the chairman of EPM,any approved course from outside the department Semester II Course Title Units Core Courses EPM 902 Colloquium on Research in Education 3 EPM 912 Educational Policy Analysis 3 EPM 914 Ethical Issues in Management 3 One elective 3 Total 12 Electives EPM 913E Management Information Systems 3 EPM 916E :Leadership, management of Distance Learning 3 In consultation with the chairman of EPM, any approved course from outside the department 3 EPM 923

In consultation with the chairman of EPM, any approved course from outside the epartment 3 Semester II Core Course EPM 997 Planning, Management and Fieldwork 6 Total 6 Year III Semester I and II EPM 999 Data Analysis and Thesis Writing Total Doctor of Philosophy in Economics and Management of Education 1.0 Introduction Present day socio-economic problems such as poverty, unemployment and inflation impact on Kenyas ability to sufficiently finance education. Accordingly, a need exists to have knowledgeable people who are able to provide a workable framework for economics and management of education to facilitate Kenyas national development. This progamme is thus designed to provide personnel with competences and skills for analyzing and interpreting economic concepts and issues concerned in branches of the education sector. 2.0. Aim The aim of this programme is to: 2.1. Furnish graduates with concepts, skills and attitudes in matters of economics and management of education, how they relate to and affect education in both developed and developing nations. 2.2. Produce graduates who are able to demonstrate the use of acquired knowledge in relation to current economics and management of education. 3.0. Objectives The programme is designed to:

6 6

Year II Semester I Course Title Units Core Courses EPM 996 : Proposal writing, conferencing and Organized Tours 3 One elective 3 Total 6 Electives EPM 917E Policy issues and Management of Non-formal Education 3 EPM 918E Policy and Management of Early Childhood Education (ECE) 3 EPM 920E Policy and Management of Private Schools 3

147

3.1. Prepare students with relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes in economics and management of education. 3.2. Equip graduates with skills for research in economics and management of education. 3.3. Provide students who are able to apply modern technology in analyzing and interpreting economic situations and their impact on education. 4.0. Target Groups The programme targets various groups of prospective candidates. 4.1. Education economists and statisticians at all levels. 4.2. Teachers at all levels. 4.3. Programme/project officers dealing with Community Based Organizations (CBOs) and the NGOs. 4.4. Graduates from accredited universities. 5.0 Entry Requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university senate regulations, an applicant should satisfy the following requirements. 5.1. Hold a relevant masters degree in education from MMUST and/or any other accredited university. 5.2. Hold a masters degree with a graduate diploma in education. 6.0. Submission and Processing of Application for Registration The common procedures approved by SGS shall apply. 7.0 Duration of the Programme The programme shall have two modes of study: Full time and Part time. 7.1. Full time Mode Shall normally run for a minimum period of three academic years and maximum of five academic years distributed over six and ten consecutive semesters of full-time attendance respectively. 7.2. Part time Mode Shall normally take a minimum period of four academic years and maximum of seven 148

academic years of attendance from the date of registration. 8.0. Programme Requirments 8.1. The programme requires a minimum of forty-two (42) units of appropriate graduate coursework including a thesis. 8.2. A candidate may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A candidate may also audit a maximum of 3 courses subject to approval by the department. 8.3. A candidate may take courses from other departments/faculties subject to approval by the department. 8.4. A candidate may be exempted from part or whole of coursework requirement provide the senate is satisfied that the candidate had done and passed at a masters level the course(s) equivalent to the prescribed course(s). 8.5. The minimum units of course work for a Doctoral programme shall be 21 units, and the maximum shall be 24 units, which will be made up of at least 12 units of level 900 courses (Doctoral level) and the rest from level 800 courses (masters level).

9.0. Evaluation Evaluation shall involve coursework, examination and a thesis. Examination of coursework will be done as here below: 9.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3 hour of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total in each course. 9.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising; seminar papers, projects and other reports, term papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. These will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 9.2.1. The pass mark in each course shall be 50% 9.2.2. Candidates must pass in all papers before they proceed to the next year of study. 9.2.3. Each unit shall be graded out of 100 marks and shall be translated as follows:

9.2.4. Examination of theses shall be done according to SGS rules and regulations. 6.0 Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title Units Core Courses EPM 901 Research Methodology 3 EMP 910 Organization Theory 3 EPM 915 : Investment and Policy Issues in Education 3 EPM 923 Financing and Management of Education 3 Electives EPM 919E HIV and AIDS Policy and Management 3 EPM 923E Population studies for Economics of education 3 EPM 911E Strategic Management 3 One Elective 3 Total 15 In consultation with the Chairman of EPM, any approved course from outside the department 3 Semester Two Code Title Units Core Courses EPM 902 Colloquium on Research in Education 3 EPM 912 Educational Policy Analysis 3 EPM 921 Analysis of Methodologies of Planning of Education 3 One elective 3 Total 12 Electives EPM 913E Management Information Systems 3 EPM 922E Management Science 3 EPM 920E Policy and Management of Private Schools 3 In consultation with the Chairman of EPM, any approved course from outside the department 3

Year II Semester I Core Courses Code Title Units EPM 996 Proposal writing, conferencing and organized tours 3 One elective 3 Total 6 Electives EPM 916E Leadership, Management of Long Distance Learning 3 EPM 917E Policy issues and Management of Non-Formal Education 3 EPM 918E Policy and Management of Early Childhood Education (ECE) 3 In consultation with the Chairman of EPM, any approved course from outside the department 3 Semester II Core Courses Code Title Units EPM 997 : Planning, Management, and Fieldwork 6 Total 6 Year III Semester I and II Core Courses Code Title Units EPM: 999 Data Analysis, and Thesis Writing 6 Total 6 Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Planning and Management 1.0. Introduction Contemporary challenges in educational planning and management calls for new inputs in the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed for efficient planning and effective tackling of issues in our fast changing society. Acquisition and application of relevant knowledge and skills will facilitate educational planners in the intricate tasks of analysis and interpretation of information for the purpose of educational planning. This programme 149

is designed to enable graduates acquire competencies for contemporary educational planning. 2.0. Aim The aim of this programme is to equip graduates with theoretical and practical skills in understanding concepts, methodologies and strategies at advanced levels in educational planning and management. This would enable them to better understand and solve problems of educational planning in the educational sector. 3.0. Objectives. This programme is set to: 3.1. Equip students with advanced relevant theoretical and practical skills, attitudes, knowledge and concepts in educational planning and management. 3.2. Equip students with skills and concepts in interpreting emerging educational planning and management issues. 3.3. Provide students with knowledge, attitudes, and skills in strategic educational planning and management issues in Kenya. 3.4. Provide learning opportunities for students to learn and acquire competencies for effective personal interaction within the local society and beyond. 4.0. Target Groups The following groups are targeted: 4.1. Education officers at all levels. 4.2. Teachers at all level. 4.3. Programme/project officers dealing with Community-Based-Organizations (CBO) and in the NGO world. 4.4. Graduates from accredited universities. 5.0. Entry Requirments In addition to fulfilling the common university Senate regulations, an applicant should satisfy the following requirements. 5.1. Hold a relevant masters degree in education from MMUST and/or any other accredited university. 5.2. Hold a masters degree with a graduate diploma in education. 150

6.0. Submission and Processing of Application for Registration. The common procedures approved by SGS shall apply. 7.0 Duration of the Programme The programme shall have two modes of study: Full time and Part time. 7.1. Full time Mode Shall normally run for a minimum period of three academic years and a maximum of five academic years distributed over six and ten consecutive semesters of full-time attendance respectively. 7.2. Part time Mode. Shall normally take a minimum period of four academic years and maximum of seven academic years of attendance from the date of registration. 9.0. Programme Requirements 9.1. The programme requires a minimum of forty-two (42) units of appropriate graduate coursework including a thesis. 9.2. A candidate may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. 9.3. A candidate may also audit a maximum of 3 courses subject to approval by the department. 9.4. A candidate may take courses from other departments/faculties subject to approval by the department. 9.5. A candidate may be exempted from part or whole of coursework requirement provided the senate is satisfied that the candidate had done and passed at a masters level the course(s) equivalent to the prescribed course(s). 9.6. The minimum units of course work for a Doctoral programme shall be 21 units, and the maximum shall be 24 units, which will be made up of at least 12 units of level 900 courses (Doctoral level) and the rest from level 800 courses (masters level). 10.0. Evaluation Evaluation shall involve coursework, examination and a thesis.

Examination of coursework will be done as here below: 10.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3 hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total marks in each course. 10.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising seminar papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. These will account for 40% of the total marks in each course. 10.2.1. The pass mark in each course shall be 50% 10.2.2. Candidates must pass in all papers before they proceed to the next year of study. 10.2.3. Each unit shall be graded out of 100 marks and shall be translated as follows. 10.2.4. Examination of theses shall be done following SGS graduate regulations. 6.0 Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title Units Core Courses EPM 901 Research Methodology 3 EPM 910 Organization Theory 3 EPM 920 Problems of Educational Planning Analysis 3 EPM 923 Financing and Management of Education 3 One Elective 3 Total 15 Electives EPM 915E Investment and policy issues in Education 3 EPM 919E HIV and AIDS Policy and Management 3 In consultation with the Chairman of EPM, any approved course from outside the department 3 Semester II Core Courses EPM 902 Colloquium on Research in Education 3 EPM 912 Educational Policy Analysis 3 EPM 921 Analysis of Methodologies of Educational Planning/ Economics 3 151

One elective Total Electives EPM 913E

3 12

Management Information Systems 3 EPM 922E Management Science 3 EPM 911E Strategic Management 3 In consultation with the Chairman of EPM, any approved course from outside the department 3 Year II Semester I Core Courses EPM 996 Proposal Writing Conferencing and Organized Tours 3 One elective Total Electives EPM 916E 3 6

Leadership, Management of Distance Learning 3 EPM 917E Policy issues and Management of Non- Formal Education 3 EPM 918E : Policy and Management of Education 3 In consultation with the Chairman of EPM, any approved course from outside the department 3 Semester II EPM 997 Total Year III Semester I and II EPM 999: Data Analysis and Thesis Writing Total

Planning, Management and Fieldwork

6 6

6 6

Department of Curriculum and Instruction Technology Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction 1.0 Introduction This programme is both theoretical and practical, based on cognitive and related views of thinking and problem solving in Curriculum and Instructional Technology. The programme seeks to prepare and equip students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for effective management of educational systems for increased efficiency. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. General Objective To provide an opportunity for students to acquire a broad background in the theory and practice of curriculum and instruction which are core components of the teaching profession. It is aimed at producing graduates with practical ability in dealing with emerging issues in curriculum and instructional technology. 2.2 Specific Objectives By the end of the course, the students should be able to: 2.2.1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary for curriculum design and development. 2.2..2. Participate in media design, development and use it in instruction. 2.2.3. Carry out research on different aspects of curriculum and instructional media at various educational levels. 2.2.4. Provide leadership at various levels of education administration and management. 2.2.5. Participate in policy formulation in education 3.0. Admission Requirements In addition to fulfilling the common university regulations, an applicant for the degree of Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction should satisfy the following requirements: 3.1. Hold a Bachelor of Education degree with at least 2nd Class Honours. 3.2. Hold a Bachelors degree at least 2nd Class Honours with a Post Graduate Diploma in Education. 152

4.0. Duration Of The Programme The programme shall have two modes of study: full-time and part-time. 4.1. Full-time The full-time mode shall normally run for a period of two academic years distributed over four consecutive semesters of full-time attendance. 4.2. Part time The Part-time mode shall normally take a maximum period of four academic years parttime attendance from the date of registration. 5.0. Programme requirement The minimum number of units of coursework and thesis for M.ED programme shall be 39 units and a maximum of 57 units. 6.0. Evaluation 6.1. Evaluation shall involve course work, examination and thesis. 6.2. The common regulations approved by the senate shall apply. 7.0. Course Structure The course sequence per semester shall be as follows: Year I Semester 1 Core Courses Code CIT 801 CIT 802 Title Units Curriculum Theory 3 Theoretical basis of Curriculum 3 CIT 803 Theory of Instruction 3 CIT 804 Curriculum & Instructional Design 3 CIT 805 Research Methodology 3 Elective course 3 Total 18

Elective Courses Code Title Units LEK 810 Advanced Kiswahili Grammar 3 LEK 822 Kiswahili Poetry 3

MAT 813 ECO 804 ECO 817 REL 806 REL 815 HIST 804

HIST 809 MAT 811 Semester II

Functional Analysis I 3 International Economics 3 Economics of Labour 3 Religion of the Old Testament 3 African folklore and Mythology 3 Social & Economic History of Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries 3 African Labour History 3 Abstract Integration 3

CIT 899

Research and Thesis Writing

Semester II Core Courses Code Title Units CIT 814 Evaluation of Curriculum and Instruction 3 CIT 899 Research & Thesis Writing 3 Elective Course 3 Total 15 Grand Total 51 Elective Courses Code Title Units CIT 810 Designing and Developing Education Media 3 LEK 840 Psycholinguistics 3 LEK 841 Socio-linguistics in Kiswahili 3 MAT 825 Algebraic Geometry 3 MAT 827 Quadratic Forms 3 ECO 814 Public Finance 3 ECO 823 History of Economic Thought 3 REL 830 Christian Ethics 3 REL 834 Indigenous Religious Knowledge in Africa 3 3 HIST 814 Themes on African Diaspora
HIST 820 Technology & African Civilization 3

Code Title Units Core courses CIT 807 Curriculum Innovation and Change 3 CIT 808 Management of Educational Resources 3 CIT 809 Curriculum Implementation 3 CIT 811 Research Proposal writing 3 CIT 815 Instructional Methods 3 Elective Course 3 Total 18 Elective Courses Code Title Units LEK 811 Advanced Kiswahili Grammar II 3 LEK 823 Literacy Theory and Criticism 3 LEK 821 Kiswahili Drama 3 MAT 817 Complex Analysis I 3 MAT 821 Group Theory I 3 ECO 804 International Economics 3 ECO 813 Development Economics 3 ECO 821 Rural Development 3 REL 822 African Religion and Philosophy 3 REL 823 Religion and Science 3 HIST 811 Themes in the History of Science & Technology 3 HIST 818 African Intellectual History 3 Year II Semester 1 Code Title Units 153

Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction 1.0. Introduction This programme is designed to prepare candidates for teaching at the university or College levels, work with schools or other agencies in curriculum areas. The graduates should be able to hold leadership positions in organizations that emphasize Curriculum and Instruction. The programme is theoretical and practical based on cognitive and related views of thinking. It is also intended to instil knowledge that can be used with relevant technologies for instruction and research. The programme deals with developments in Curriculum and Educational Technology in a historical context. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. General Objective To provide an opportunity for students to acquire advanced knowledge in theory and practice of curriculum and instruction. It is intended to guide

candidates to work independently, arrive at new insights and contribute to research in a wide range of projects in Curriculum and Instruction. 2.2. Specific Objectives By the end of the programme, the students should be able to: 2.2.1. Demonstrate competence in the design, development and implementation of instructional systems and related research. 2.2.2. Participate in university curriculum design, development and implementation 2.2.3. Develop and use a variety of instructional media. 2.2.4. Contribute to policy formulation and implementation in matters related to curriculum and instruction 2.2.5. Provide strategic leadership skills in curriculum and instructional areas 2.2.6. Participate in research at all levels of educational management 3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. . Other common university regulations will apply.

5.2. The programme requires a minimum of thirty nine (39) units of course work including thesis. 6.0. Evaluation 6.1. Course Work and Examination 6.1.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 6.1.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous course work assessment comprising seminar papers, projects, reports, formal tests and participation in learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 6.1.3. The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. Candidates must pass in all papers before they proceed to the second year of study. 6.1.4. A candidate who fails more that half the units taken shall be discontinued. 6.1.5. A candidate who fails half or less of the units taken shall sit for a supplementary examination. 6.1.6. Under exceptional circumstances such as medical or compassionate grounds supported by authentic written evidence, examinations may be held for the candidate. A special examination shall be treated as regular written examination. 6.2. Thesis Writing 6.2.1. A student shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic in curriculum or instruction components of the programme, respectively. 6.2.2. Thesis supervisors shall be appointed for the students at the start of the second semester of year 1 of study, through the active involvement of the student. Where departmental rules on evaluation are silent, the common regulations of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension (IGSRE) shall apply.

3.2. Should be holders of a relevant Masters degree of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) or those recognised by the MMUST Senate in curriculum and Instruction or in related disciplines in education. 3.3. Only under special circumstances can a candidate
having a recognised Masters degree at least fifteen (15) years experience in research and postgraduate teaching at the university level be allowed to undertake a PhD programme with exemption of certain courses.

4.0. Duration of the Course 4.1. Full-time Students The PhD Programme shall normally take three years up to a maximum of 5 years. 4.2. Part-time Students The PhD programme for part-time students shall normally take four years up to a maximum of seven years. 5.0. Programme Requirements 5.1. The first year of the programme will be spent on course work, examinations and development of a research proposal. The rest of the duration will be used for research to be reported in the form of a thesis.

154

7.0. Course Structure: Year 1 Semester I Core Courses Code Title Units CIT 901 Comparative Educational Technology 3 CIT 902 Advanced Research Methods in Education 3 CIT 903 Instructional Systems Design 3 CIT 904 Curriculum Context 3 CIT 905 Curriculum Development and Management 3 Choose one Elective Course 3 Total Units 18 Elective Courses Code Title Units CIT 911 The Management of Educational Resources in Higher learning 3 CIT 912 History of Curriculum Development 3 CIT 913 Curriculum Needs Assessment 3 Semester II Core Courses Code Title Units CIT 906 Management of Educational Systems 3 CIT 908 Use of Media in Instruction 3 CIT 909 Evaluation Models 3 CIT 910 Research Proposal 3 CIT 914 Information Communication Technologies 3 Choose one Elective Course 3 Total Units 18 Elective Courses Code Title CIT 907 Seminars in Educational Evaluation CIT 915 Distance Education CIT 916 Instructional Television Year II 155

Semester I& II Core course CIT 999 Research and Thesis writing

Year III Semester I & II Core Course CIT 999 Research and Thesis writing 15 Grand Total 60 Department of Educational Pschology Master of Education in Guidance and Counselling M.Ed (GAC) 1.0. Introduction In recent times, the world has witnessed rapid changes in social, economic, political and technological spheres. These changes have seen the rise of hitherto unseen challenges. The traditional support systems have either been rendered ineffective or have simply become obsolete. New challenges have arisen due to teenage alcoholism, drug abuse, pre-marital sex, homosexualism, delinquency, arson and now the HIV/AIDS scourge. The use of corporal punishment in the inculcation of discipline among children has met stiff opposition from Child Rights crusaders. This has called for other practical and effective approach to child discipline. To achieve this practical approach, there is need for trained counselors. The proposed Master of Education degree programme in Guidance and Counseling will endeavour to deal with this emerging complex situation 2.0. Aim The aim of this programme is to equip students with relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes in guidance and couselling. The programme is tailored towards enabling the graduates counsel and guide the clients cope with personal and societal issues.

Units 3 3 3

3.0. Objectives At the end of the programme, students should be able to: 3.1 Apply the acquired knowledge and skills of guidance and counseling in Institutions of Learning. 3.2. Develop and teach guidance and counseling courses in institutions of learning. 3.3. Assist the government and Nongovernmental organizations in formulating guidance and counseling policies. 3.4. Conduct research and disseminate information on guidance and counselling. 4.0. Admission requirements. In addition to fulfilling the common university regulations, an applicant for the degree of Master of Education in Guidance and Counselling should satisfy the following requirements: 4.1. Hold a Bachelor of Education Degree at the Upper Second Class Honours level from an accredited institution. OR 4.2. Hold a Bachelor of Education Degree at Lower Second Class Honours level from an accredited institution provided: The applicant has at least 2 years experience after qualification or has evidence of at least one publication or special abilities in a relevant field. OR 4.3. Hold a Bachelors Degree with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education attained at a minimum of a Credit or its equivalent from an institution recognized by Moi University senate. 5.0. Submission and Processing of Application for Registration The common procedures approved by the Senate shall apply. 6.0 Mode of study and Duration of the Programme The Programme shall have two modes of study: Full-time and Part-time.

6.1. Full-time The full-time mode shall normally run for a period of two academic years distributed over four consecutive semesters of full-time attendance. 6.2. Part-time The part-time mode shall normally take a maximum period of four academic years part-time attendance from the date of registration. Note: Individual students will make arrangements with the department on how the mode of study will be conducted. 7.0. Programme requirements 7.1. The Programme requires a minimum of fiftyfour units of appropriate graduate course work including a thesis. 7.2. English shall be used as the medium of instruction and the writing of all assignments as well as the thesis. 7.3. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also audit courses subject to approval of the department. 8.0. Evaluation Evaluation shall involve coursework, examination and a thesis. 9.0. Coursework and Examination Evaluation of coursework will include the formative and summative types conducted as here below: 9.1. Each course shall be examined by a 3-hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 9.2.Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework-assessment comprising seminar papers, projects and other reports, term papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total score in each course. 9.3. The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. Candidates must pass in all courses before they proceed to the Second Year of Study. 156

9.4. A candidate who fails half OR more than half of the units taken shall be discontinued. 9.5.A candidate who fails less than half of the units taken shall sit for a Supplementary examination. 9.6. Each Supplementary examination shall be awarded a maximum of 50%. 9.7. A candidate who fails any paper taken, as a Supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 9.8. Grades obtained in an extra or audited course shall be reflected in the transcripts and shall be averaged. 9.9. However, a student who fails an extra or audited course shall not be penalized as long as he/she has the minimum prescribed course units and has a passing grade. 9.10. Under exceptional circumstances such as Medical or compassionate grounds, supported by written evidence, Special examinations may be held for the candidate. 9.11. A Special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination. 10.0. Thesis Writing 10.1. A student shall, along with coursework, write a thesis on a specific topic related to Guidance and Counselling. 10.2. Thesis Supervisors shall be appointed for the students at the start of the second semester through the active involvement of the students themselves. 11.0. Learning and Teaching Methods A student-centred approach shall be used with emphasis on seminars, field tours, problem solving, directed and experiential learning, and project work, research, and community based education. 12.0. Courses offered The following core and elective courses will be offered in the programme. 12.1. Core Courses Course Code Course Title 157

PSY 812 PSY 813 PSY 814 PSY 819 GAC 810 GAC 811 GAC 812 GAC 817 GAC 819 GAC 899 GAC 82

Research Methods I Measurement and Evaluation Research Methods II Personality and Personality Theories Counselling Techniques Psychological Assessment Counselling Theories Vocational & Occupational Counselling Health and Psychosexual Issues Proposal, Research and Thesis Writing. Counselling Practicum

12.2. Elective Courses PSY 810 Developmental Psychology PSY 818 Psychology of Exceptional Persons PSY 822 Social Psychology GAC 813 Pastoral Counselling GAC 814 Family and Group Counselling GAC 815 Geriatric Counselling GAC 816 Terminal illness and Bereavement Counselling GAC 818 Counselling Delinquents The students will be required to take a minimum of two elective courses. 13.0 Course Structure Year I Semester I Code PSY 812 PSY 819

Title Units Research Methods I 3 Personality & Personality Theories 3 GAC 811 Psychological Assessment 3 GAC 812 Counselling Theories 3 One Elective Course 3 Total Units 15 Year I Semester II PSY 813 Measurement and Evaluation 3 PSY 814 Research Methods II 3 GAC 810 Counselling Techniques 3 GAC 819 Health and Psychosexual Issues 3 GAC 899 Thesis Proposal Writing 3 One Elective Course 3

Total Units Year II Semester I GAC 820 GAC 899 Total Units Year II Semester II GAC 817 GAC 899 Total Units Grand Total

18

Counselling Practicum Research and Thesis Writing

6 6 12

3.0. Admission Requirements 3.1. The common regulations for graduate studies shall apply. 3.2. A holder of Bachelor of Arts degree in Religion with at least second-class honors from Moi University of from any other accredited Institution. 3.3. Any other qualifications recognised by the Senate. 4.0 Duration Of The Programme There are two modes of study: full-time and part time 4.1. Full time The full time mode shall normally extend for a minimum period of two academic years and a maximum of four academic years. 4.2. Part time The part time mode shall extend from four academic years to a period of six academic years. 5.0 Programme Structure 5.1. The programme shall consist of a minimum of fifty six (56) units and a maximum of fifty eight (58) units of appropriate course work including the thesis. 5.2. Each course consists of three units. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also audit courses subject to the approval of the department. 5.3. The M.A. in Religion programme consists of four distinct areas, namely African Religion, Islam, Christianity and Oriental Religions. 5.4. Students must select at least two courses from the electives in the preferred area of specialization and at least one from any of the other areas in each semester of the first year. 6.0. Examination Regulations The program shall be by coursework, examination and thesis. 6.1. Each course will be examined by a threehour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course.

Vocational andOccupational Counselling Thesis Writing

3 6 9 54

Department of Social Sciences Master of Arts (M.A.) in Religion 1.0. Introduction The program provides a wide range of courses designed to lead to specialization in any one of the four main branches of Religion, namely; African Religions, Oriental Religions, Christianity and Islam. The program is intended to meet the demands of institutions that may require professionals with specialized knowledge in Religion and Theology. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. Training manpower that will in turn make positive contributions to overall national development in both public and private sector; 2.2. Producing men and women who are wellinformed about the religious background of the various peoples of world. 2.3. Producing competent and analytical professionals in religion who can further knowledge through research and dissemination. 2.4. Empowering men and women with critical minds that are able to examine and analyze contemporary and emerging issues.

158

6.2. Each course shall be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising seminar papers, projects and other reports, term papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course. 6.3. The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and written examination) shall be 50%. Candidates must pass in all papers before they can proceed to the next year of study. 6.4. A candidate who fails half OR more than half of the units shall be discontinued. 6.5. A candidate who fails less than half of the units taken shall sit for supplementary examination(s) in the failed units. 6.6. Each supplementary examination shall be awarded a maximum of 50%. 6.7. A candidate who fails any paper taken as a supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 6.8. Grades contained in an extra course or audited course shall be reflected in the transcripts. 6.9. A student who fails an extra course or audited one shall not be penalized as long as he/she has the minimum prescribed course units. 6.10. Under exceptional circumstances such as medical or compassionate grounds, supported by written evidence, special examinations may be held for the candidate. A special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination. 7.0. Course Structure Year I Semester 1 Core Courses Code Title Units REL 801 Research Methodology 3 REL 802 Theories of Religion 3 REL 803 Phenomenology of Religion 3 Electives Christianity REL 804 Classical Hebrew 3 RE L805 History of Christian Doctrine 3 REL 806 Religion of the Old Testament 3 REL 807 Pentateuchal Studies 3 REL 808 New Testament Greek 3 REL 809 Prophetism in the Old 159

REL 810 Islam REL811 REL 812 REL 813 REL 814

Testament Theology of the New Testament Islamic History Islamic Ethics Quranic Arabic :Islamic worship, Festivals and Rituals

3 3 3 3 3 3

African religion REL 815 African Folklore and Mythology 3 REL.816 :African Ethics and Jurisprudence 3 Oriental Religions REL 817 Ancient Near East Religions 3 REL 818 :Judaism 3 REL 819 :Jainism 3 REL 820 Sikhism 3 Total 18 Year I Semester II Core Courses REL 821 Comparative Religion 3 REL 822 African Religion and Philosophy 3 REL 823 Religion and Science 3 REL 899 Research Proposal 2 Electives Christianity REL 824 History of Christianity in Africa3 REL 825 Poetry and Wisdom Writings of the OldTestament 3 REL 826 The Language and Literature of the New Testament 3 REL 827 New Testament in Modern Scholarship 3 REL 828 Pauline Theology 3 REL 829 Modern Trends in Christian Theology 3 REL 830 Christian Ethics 3 Islam REL 831 Studies in the Quran and Hadith 3 REL832 Islamic Movement 3 African Religion REL 833 Worship, Festivals and Rituals

in African Religion 3 Indigenous Religious Knowledge inAfrica 3 REL 835 :African Religion and Social Transformation 3 Oriental Religions REL 836 Religions of the Far East 3 REL 837 Hinduism 3 REL 838 :Buddhism 3 REL 839 :Zoroastranism 3 REL 840:World Bahai Faith 3 Total 20 Total For First Year 38 REL 834 Year II Semester 1 Core Course REL 899 Research, Thesis Data collection, Data Analysis Semester II Core Course REL 899 Thesis Writing and submission Total Minimum total units for the course Master of Arts in History 1.0. Introduction This programme provides a wide range of courses leading to specialization in several branches of history. A candidate can specialize in the History of Africa, Europe, Latin America, the USA or, with the guidance of the supervisor, a combination or variation of these areas. Thus, this programme attempts to meet the demands of a diverse of student population and at the same time cater to institutional needs of specialized knowledge in history. Universities, teacher training colleges and even the secondary schools are catered for. Indeed, aspiring politicians and diplomats may find some of the courses offered relevant and appropriate for them to take.

2.0 Aims The aims of the programme include the following:1.1. Training staff capable of manning departments of history in institutions of learning. 1.2. Producing competent professionals able to further historical knowledge through research and publication in learned journals or books. 1.3. vailing men and women the opportunity to acquire historical knowledge for mere enjoyment. 1.4. Producing a well-informed section of the society able to appreciate contemporary world affairs 1.5. To generate interest in the study of history which hopefully will be passed on to future generations of history students. 1.6 To provide an opportunity for students to acquire and appreciate the richness of their historical heritage at national, and international levels. 3.0. Admission Requirements. In addition to meeting the common university regulations, an applicant for the Master of Arts in History should also satisfy the following requirements: 3.1. Hold a Bachelor of Arts degree at least at the upper second class honours level from Muliro Muliro University of Science and Technology or any other accredited institution. OR 3.2. Hold a Bachelor of Arts degree in History at the lower second class honours level from Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology or any other accredited institution provided the applicant has at least two years working experience after graduation or has evidence of at least one publication or special abilities in a relevant field. 3.3. The Senate has the final say in approving a candidate into the M.A. programme in History.

9 18 56

160

4.0. Submission and Processing of Applications for Registration. 4.1. The common procedures approved by the Senate shall apply. 5.0. Duration of the Programme. 5.1. There are two modes of study: full-time and part-time. 5.2. Full-time: The full-time mode shall normally run for a minimum period of two years and a maximum of four years. 5.3. Part-time: The part-time mode shall extend from four years up to a period of six. 6.0.Programme Requirements. 6.1.The programme requires a minimum of fortytwo (42) units of appropriate graduate coursework including the thesis. The maximum is fifty one (51) units. 6.2. English shall be the medium of instruction and writing of all assignments as well as the thesis. 6.3. Each course consists of three units. A student may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also audit courses subject to the approval of the department. 7.0 Evaluation

50%-64% Below 50%

C D

Pass Fail

10.0 Thesis Writing. 10.1. A student shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic related to History 10.2. Supervisors of theses shall be appointed for the students at the beginning of the second semester of the first year. 10.3. The submission and examination of theses will follow the guidelines of the School of Graduate Studies (SGS). 11.0. Course Structure. 11.1.The programme requires a minimum of 14 courses (42 units) and a maximum of 17 courses (51 units) for the M.A. award. There is a total of 9 core courses (27 units); three (3) of these courses or 9 units, being set aside for research and thesis writing. The course sequence per semester shall be as follows: Year I Semester I Core Code: Title Units HIS 801 Research Methodology 3 HIS 802 Philosophy of History 3 HIS 803 Imperialism, Decolonization and Neo-Colonialism in Africa.3 ELECTIVES. Any two selected from the following:HIS 804 Social and Economic History of Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries. 3 Themes in the African Slave Trade 3 Themes in American History 3 Themes in Modern Asian History 3 African Labour History 3 Theories of Economic and Technological Development 3 15

7.1. Evaluation shall involve coursework, examination and the thesis. HIS 805 8.0. University Examinations 8.1.University regulations on examamintions shall apply. 9.0. Grading: Mark Letter Grade 75% and above A 65%-74% B HIS 806 HIS 808 HIS 809 HIS 819 Total 161

Description Distinction Credit

Year I Semester.II Cores Code: HIS 810 HIS 811

Doctor of Philosophy in History 1.0 Introduction Title Units 3 3 3 The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) is the highest degree that can be achieved by a course of study in the department. Thus the department requires a high degree of maturity and dedication among the students who plan to enroll. Apparently, current trends in the pedagogy of the discipline of history in universities around the world to day place great emphases on contemporary issues viewed as relevant to domestic and international needs and aspirations. Notwithstanding, the programme covers several other important themes. And the areas of specialization include the history of science and technology, historical parameters of economic and urban development, political issues touching on party discipline, freedom of speech, responsibility, and accountability of party spokespersons in African countries in general and our region in particular. The overall intention is to provide a wide choice commensurate with practices in universities elsewhere around the world. Thus the intention of the programme is to create the highest level of scholarship, research capability and creative writing in the students in their chosen areas of specialization. 2.0. Objectives The Doctor of Philosophy degree in History is intended to enable the students 2.1Acquire in-depth knowledge in an area (or areas) of specialization in history. 2.2. Develop a multidisciplinary perspective on historical issues and ideas. 2.3. Undertake independent research at the university or other institutions and organizations requiring specialized knowledge and skills. 2.4. Undertake teaching at the university or other institutions and organizations requiring specialized knowledge and skills. 2.5 Apply historical knowledge and expertise in solving societal problems. 2.6. To promote history as a necessary and relevant discipline in development.

frican Historiography Themes in the History of Science& Technology. HIS 812 A Thesis Proposal ELECTIVES. Any two selected from the following:Code HIS 813 HIS 814 HIS 815 Title History of International Relations Themes on African Diaspora Themes in Modern European History the 17th & 18th Centuries. Women in History and Development in the Modern World Themes in Russian History in the 19th & 20th centuries African Intellectual History Technology and African Civilization

3 3

HIS 816

3 3 3 3 15

HIS 817 HIS 818 HIS 820

Total Year II Semester I Core. Code HIS 899

Title Research, Data Collection, Data Analysis and Thesis Writing

Year II Semester II Core. Code: Course Title HIS 899 Data analysis and Thesis Writing 3 ELECTIVES One elective, selected from either the first or second semester(s) of the first year. 3 Total 12 Grand Total 42

162

3.0. Admission Requirements. 3.1. In addition to meeting the common university regulations, an applicant for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in History, should satisfy the following requirements:3.2. Hold a Master of Philosophy degree in History from Moi University or a Master of Arts degree in History from any other accredited institution. OR 1.1 Hold other qualifications considered by the Senate as equivalent to a Master of Philosophy degree in History. 2.0 Submission And Pr ocessing of Applicatiion for Registration. The common procedures approved by the Senate shall apply. 3.0 Duration of the Programme. There are two modes of study: full-time and parttime. 4.1: Full Time: The full time mode shall normally run for a minimum of three years and a maximum of five years. 4.2: Part Time: The part time mode shall extend from a minimum of four years and a maximum of seven years. 4.0 Programme Requirements.

5.5: Continuance of registration will depend on the satisfactory performance of the candidate. 5.6: A candidate may take extra courses over and above the required number of units. A student may also audit courses subject to the approval of the department. 5.7: English shall be the medium of instruction and writing of all assignments as well as the thesis. 6.0 Evaluation Evaluation shall involve coursework, examinations and a thesis. 6.1 Coursework and Examination

written

Evaluation of coursework shall include formative and summative types as follows:-

the

5.1: The programme requires a minimum of 21 units and a maximum of 24 units which shall be made of at least 12 units of level 9 courses (doctoral level) and the rest from level 8 courses (Masters level). 5.2: All coursework shall normally be completed in the first year of study for both full-time and parttime students. 5.3: Each course consists of three units. A unit is defined as one hour of lecture, two hours tutorial or three hours practical per week per semester. 5.4: Candidates for the Ph.D degree may be exempted from part of or all coursework requirement provided the Senate is satisfied that the candidate had done and passed at Masters level course/coursework equivalent to the prescribed load/course.

6.1.1: Each course will be examined by a three-hour end of semester written examination. This will account for 60% of the total mark in each course. 6.1.2: Each course will be examined by continuous coursework assessment comprising seminar papers, projects and other reports, term papers, formal tests and participation in the learning activities. This will account for 40% of the total mark in each course at the end of the semester. 6.1.3: The pass mark in each course (continuous assessment and written Examination) shall be 50%. Candidates must pass in all papers before they can proceed to the next year of study. 6.1.4: A candidate who fails half or more than half of the units taken shall be discontinued. 6.1.5: A candidate who fails less than half of the units taken shall sit for supplementary examination(s) in the relevant failed units. 6.1.6:Each supplementary examination, if passed, shall be awarded a maximum mark of 50%. 6.1.7:A candidate who fails any paper taken as a supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 6.1.8:Grades obtained in an extra or audited course shall be reflected in the transcripts. 6.1.9:A candidate who fails an extra course or an audited one shall not be penalized as long as he/she has the minimum prescribed course units. 6.2.0:Under exceptional circumstances such as medical or compassionate grounds, supported by written evidence, special examinations may be

163

held for the candidate. A special examination shall be treated as a regular written examination 6.2Grading System for Coursework: Percentage Letter Grade Description 75 100 A Distinction 65 74 B Credit 50 64 C Pass Below 50 D Fail

Total Year I Semester II Core Code HIS 905 HIS 912

15

Title Units Historiography of East Africa 3 Thesis Proposal 3

6.3 Thesis Writing. 6.1:A candidate shall, during the degree programme, write a thesis on a specific topic related to history upon the approval of the department. 6.2: In consultation with students and the teaching staff, academic supervisors on thesis writing shall be appointed by the department for the candidates at the beginning of the second semester of the first year. 6.3: The submission and examination of theses will follow the guidelines of the Institute of Graduate Studies, Research and Extension, IGSRE. 7.0. Course Distribution. The course sequence per semester shall be as follows:Year I Semester I Core Code HIS 901 HIS 902

Electives. Select any two from the following:HIS 904 Seminar in African Political Processes 3 HIS 906 Seminar in African Political Processes 3 HIS 910 Apartheid; The South African Separatist Administration, 19481994. 3 HIS 912 Seminar on Science, Technology and Industrial Development inEast Africa. 3 HIS 913 Urbanization and Urban Development in East Africa 3 Total 12 Year II Semester I Core Code HIS 999

Title

Units

Research, data collection, data analysis and thesis writing 6

Title Units Research Methodology in History 3 Science and Technology in History 3

Electives. Any three selected from the following:HIS 903 Women in History 3 HIS 907 Revolutions in World History 3 HIS 908 Conflicts and Conflict Management in History and Society. 3 HIS 909 Hitlers Third Reich; Germanys Third Empire, 1933-1945. 3 HIS 911 Politics and Party Discipline in Kenya, 1963 to the Present. 3 164

Year II Semester II Core Code Title HIS 999: Thesis Writing Year III Semester I Core Code Title HIS 999 Thesis; First draft Year III Semester.II Core Code His 999

Units 3

Units 3

Title Thesis; Final Draft

Units 3

Grand Total Doctor of Philosophy in Religion 1.0. Introduction

42

years. Continuance of registration will depend on evidence of satisfactory progress. 6.0. Programme structure 6.1. Courses are structured in units in which a unit is defined as one hour lecture, two hour tutorial or three hour practical per week per semester. 6.2. The programme shall normally consist of coursework, examination and thesis. 6.3. The minimum units of coursework shall be 24 units, the maximum shall be 27 units, which shall be made up of at least 15 units of level 9 (Doctoral level) and the rest from level 8 courses (Masters level). 6.4. All coursework shall normally be done within the first two semesters for both full time and parttime students. 6.5. candidate may be exempted from part of coursework requirement provided the senate is satisfied that the candidate had done and passed at Masters level, courses equivalent to the prescribed courses. 7.0 Examination 7.1 Examination of coursework. This shall consist of: 7.1.1. A written examination, which shall normally constitute 60% of the total marks in each course. 7.1.2. Continuous coursework assessment based on tutorials, seminars, essays, assignments and such other tests as may be prescribed. This shall constitute 40% of the marks. 7.2. Grading for coursework Percentage Grade 75 100 A 65 74 B 50 64 Below 50 D C

The Programme covers important themes that relate religion and the processes of modernization and development in the contemporary world and especially in Africa. 2.0. Rationale The Programmed Is Aimed At:2.1 Training of Man Power for teaching in universities and other institutions. 2.2. Empowering Men And Women With Critical Minds That Are Able To Examine And Analyse Contemporary And Emerging Issues. 2.3.To Train Social Science Researchers And Professionals with well-infirmed religious background of various peoples of the world. 3.0. Objectives The Programme aims at producing competent professionals in Religion who are able to: 3.1. Further knowledge through scholarship and research. 3.2. Enhance critical thinking in the examination and analysis of 3contemporary and emerging issues. 3.3. Undertake research and teaching at university and other higher institutions of learning. 3.4. Apply religious knowledge and expertise in solving societal problems. 4.0. Admission requirements To Qualify For Admission Into The Programme, The Applicant Shall Be: 4.1. Holder of a Masters degree in Religion from Moi University or any other recognized university: or 4.2. Holder of other qualifications considered by senate as equivalent to a Masters degree in Religion. 5.0. Duration of the programme. A fulltime student shall normally be registered for a minimum of three years and a maximum of five years. A part-time student shall be registered for a minimum of four years and a maximum of seven

7.3. Examination of Thesis The common university Postgraduate Studies regulations shall apply. 7.4. Course Structure Year I Semester I One or two of the elective courses and the core course 165

Core Code Title Units REL 901 AdvancedResearch Methodology 3 REL 908 Religion, Science and Technology 3 ELECTIVEs: Any three selected from the following REL 902 Youth and Women in Religion 3 REL 903 Issues in Contemporary Religion Thought 3 REL 904 Selected Themes in Comparative Religion 3 REL 905 Conflict Management and Peace in Religion 3 REL 906 :Religion and Human Rights 3 REL 907 Mystic Powers in African Religion 3

Year I Semester II REL 908

Religion , Ethics and Governance 3 Electives: Any three selected from the following: REL 909 Religious Non-governmental Organization 3 REL 910 African Pneumatology 3 REL 911 Modern Resurgence of Islam 3 REL912 Islamic Theory 3 REL913 African World View 3 REL 914 Christian Theology 3 Year II Core REL 999 YEAR III REL 999 Research/Thesis (core) Research/Thesis (core) 6 15

166

School of Health Sciences 1.0. Introduction There are many compelling challenges awaiting MMUST as a young University. These include extending effective health care to all around Kakamega, Western Kenya and beyond, providing innovative solutions to health care delivery, and financing of health services; improving the quality of life through better care delivered to all at a cost society can afford; dealing effectively with calamities and disasters and making the environment safer and more hospitable. 2.0 General Objectie The School of Health Sciences is designed to meet the growing needs, devise and implement better and less costly systems for the delivery of health care, to innovate and apply more effective means of preventing illness, disability and premature death, and to improve and restore the environment. 2.1. Specific Objectives The School will address current and future health problems at the local, national and international levels and will provide: 2.1.Educational opportunities for individuals interested in health and the relevant biomedical sciences 2.2. Research opportunities in subject areas vital to a better understanding of health and disease 2.3. Improve health care opportunities through generation, presentation, dissemination and application of health knowledge and skills. 3.0. Prorammes to be offerred The School of Health Sciences at MMUST is dedicated to the education of scientists, technologists and health professionals. The School is envisaged to offer various degree programmes in Health and Biomedical Sciences. At present it offers the following programmes; 3.1. Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Direct Entry) 3.2 . Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Upgrading) 3.3. Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietects 3.4. Bachelor of Science in Optometry and Vision Sciences 167

3.5. Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion and Sports Science 3.6. Bachelor of Science in Health Professionals Education (Upgrading) 4.0.Vision and Mission Statements The vision for the School of Health Sciences at MMUST is to create an interdisciplinary integration of student learning to address clinical practice in the health care systems. The mission of the School of Health Sciences at MMUST is to produce a graduate who is a professional and competent entry-level practitioner. The programmes are structured to support and develop essential qualities of caring, accountability, a credible work ethic, critical thinking, problem solving and effective interpersonal and public relationships. 4.0. Program Goals 4.1. The School of Health Sciences endevours to produce graduates that are well grounded both in theory and clinical practice to serve in the health care sector in Kenya and beyond. 4.2. To provide service to the community through, training, clinical practice, and research. 5.0. Philosophy Through the use of well structured curricula, the staff and administration are committed to embracing the following principles. 5.1. Respect the dignity and values of all health care recipients at any stage in the health-illness continuum; 5.2. Believe in education that promotes open academic discourse and critical analysis; 5.3. Adopt a theoretical and applied approach to health science education; 5.4. Expect the staff and students to be role models; 5.5. Value education as a lifelong process. 6.0. Purpose of the Health Science Programme The programmes of Health Science are proposed in response to; 6.1. The needs of a changing health care environment

6.2.The shift in health care philosophy from treatment to prevention and promotion of healthy living 6.3 The ever-increasing public expectations and demands for qualified health care professionals 6.4.The expressed need for programmes such as Anesthesiology, Diagnostic Cytology, Radiological Technology, Nutritional Therapy, Nursing Sciences, Mental Health, Epidemiology, Medical Laboratory and Environmental Health. The current and proposed programmes will offer an inter-professional approach to providing both the necessary discipline specific content and an array of basic science, clinical science, laboratory and health professionals learning opportunities within a university context. The key aspects of studying Health Science courses will include: 6.5. Values based curriculum 6.6.Practical orientation-integrating theory and research with practical settings 6.7. Student-centered holistic approach Department of Nursing Sciences 1.0. The School of Health Sciences at MMUST will offer a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) in two pathways: 2.0. RN to BScN designed for registered nurses who wish to earn a BScN degree (2 years) 3.0.. Direct entry to BScN from high school (4 years). The first programme introduced in 2008/2009 was Bachelor of Science Nursing Upgrading (RNBScN). The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Direct Entry) 1.0. Introduction The aim of the Programme is to produce highly competent nurse practitioners, nurse researchers, nurse educators and managers capable of serving in Kenya and the rest of the World. The need for the Bachelor of Science in nursing direct entry degree programme arose from several workshops held with stakeholders in the western Kenya region. The demand for the training of 168

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) was specifically expressed by branches of the National Nurses Association of Kenya (NNAK) in western Kenya, The Nursing Council of Kenya and the Office of Chief Nursing Officer in the Ministry of Health because of the big deficit of degree trained nurses in western province. The programme will target high school leavers who have successfully completed and passed Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education. The programme has both the basic sciences and the core clinical courses. It will integrate theoretical, clinical and community based learning with its clinical placements undertaken in NCK approved health facilities. It is hoped that graduates will get employment opportunities in Medical training institutions, hospitals and medical research institutes and NGOs among many other employers nationally and globally. The philosophy and conceptual framework of the Bachelor of Science in nursing degree at MMUST are in accordance with the vision, mission and core values of the University. The concepts identified in this philosophy are health, society, nursing, teaching, learning and professionalism. 2.0. Rationale 2.1. There is a growing need to meet the ever increasing demand for graduate nurses for the Kenyan market and beyond. It is for this reason that MMUST has taken the challenge to educate nurses to meet health challenges of the 21st century. 2.2. The dynamic and expanding roles of the nurse require the nurse to develop the capacity for independent clinical judgement, critical thinking and healthcare knowledge management skills to be able to provide complex care. These are important competencies and capability that would enable nurses to deliver quality health care services in a multitude of demographic and clinical settings. This direct entry program is a full time on-campus learning and clinical experience placement in NCK approved health facilities. The curriculum is designed to promote active learning and innovations to translate theory effectively into practical solutions of health problems. It is envisaged that the program will strengthen the health systems and

tremendously improve the quality of nursing services in the region and the country at large. 3.0 Vision To be a centre of excellence in nursing education, research and innovations, clinical practice development, leadership and healthcare knowledge management, evidence-based and reflective practice. 4.0. Mission Train highly skilled, scientific, versatile and innovative nurse practitioners of 21st Century and beyond 5.0. Core Values: 5.1. Development and improvement in clinical practice only occurs in the context of exploring new ideas and embracing change. 5.2. Inquiry is the key process in learning, enhancing student engagement and motivation. 5.3. A Student-centered learning environment supports individual learning styles, values diversity, and provides equity 5.4. A safe, orderly environment conducive to learning is based on trust, modesty, courtesy, and mutual respect. 5.5. Students, families, lecturers, staff and the entire community are accountable for student success. 6.0 Programme Goal The direct entry program (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) is designed to equip the learner with the capacity to provide leadership in clinical practice, nursing education, health care management and participate in research. 7.0. Programme Objectives The programme will prepare the graduates to: 7.1. Incorporate theoretical and empirical knowledge from the physical, social, behavioral, biomedical and clinical sciences into nursing practice and utilize the knowledge and skills to provide quality nursing care. 7.2. Provide holistic nursing care including medicalsurgical, pediatric, geriatric, and mental health to individual, family and communities using the nursing process, reflective practice, critical thinking skills and evidence based practice. 169

7.3. Demonstrate competence in midwifery practice including safe motherhood, managing sexual and reproductive health conditions based on ethical, moral and legal requirements for nursing practice. 7.4. Enhance the quality of nursing and health care through the use of leadership skills and participation in the design, provision and management of community health programmes and health services including policy formulation, implementation and making informed and responsible decisions both in life and professionally. 7.5. Incorporate respect for life and human dignity into nursing practice, advance social consciousness through involvement and advocacy in issues, which impact on the health care system in the community and society as a whole. 7.6. Demonstrate highest degree of professional competency, responsibility, creativity and value learning as lifelong process for continued personal and professional growth, utilize the knowledge base as foundation for graduate study and self-directing in seeking continuing nursing and professional development. 7.7. Demonstrate competence to manage epidemic, endemic, pandemic, emerging and re- emerging health problems and program including HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria and Gender issues in the provision of quality health care. 7.8. Conduct scientific and operational research, disseminate findings and utilize the results to provide quality nursing care and health services and contribute to the development of scientific body of knowledge of nursing. 7.9. Utilize basic knowledge and skills in information and communication technology for professional development and improvement of health care services. 8.0. Duration of the Programme The programme will take four (4) calendar years (four years of 12 semesters). The course is structured in trimesters (three semesters in a year). The Course will run by theory and clinical placements. Consisting of eight (8) semesters of theory at the University and three (3) semesters of clinical placements at NCK approved health facilities. The clinical placements/practices are clustered around the following:

A. B C D A 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. B 1. 2. 3. 4. C 1. 2. 3. D 1. 2. 3.

General Nursing Reproductive Health and Safe Motherhood Community Health Specialty areas General Nursing Medical Surgical Nursing 12 weeks Pediatrics - 4 weeks Gynecology - 2 weeks Casualty/Outpatient - 3 weeks Nursing Administration - 4 weeks Reproductive Health and Safe Motherhood Labour ward- 6 weeks Antenatal-2 weeks Postnatal- 2 weeks Newborn Unit- 2 weeks Community Health MCH/FP hospital experience-4 weeks Rural health experience -4 weeks District health experience 4weeks Special Areas Intensive Care Unit/Renal Area- 4 weeks Operating Theatre- 2 weeks Mental & Psychiatric Nursing- 4 weeks

e) Kiswahili C+ Alternative B a) Biological Sciences B+ b) Physical Sciences C+ c) Mathematics C+ d)English B e) Kiswahili C+ OR 10.4. 2 Principal passes in Biology and Chemistry and a subsidiary pass either in physics or Mathematics in A level Examination or its equivalent. 11.0. Examination Regulations 11.1. The general University Examination Regulations shall apply. In addition, the following will be specific requirements for programme. 11.2. In addition a candidate is expected to have a minimum of 80% attendance in class to sit a University examination. 11.3. All clinical rotations are compulsory in order for candidates to meet the minimum requirements of the Professional Regulatory Board 11.4. A candidate is expected to have a minimum of 80% clinical placement attendance 11.5. The overall assessment of the students performance in each course shall be done at the end of every semester and shall comprise of continuous assessments and written examinations. In some specific courses, oral and practical examinations will be administered as part of continuous assessments. 11.6. Written examinations of each course shall comprise of 2 CASs and End of Semester Examination of one paper of 3 hours as structured below 11.5.1 Multiple choice Questions (MCQS) - 20 % of the total marks. 11.5.2. Short Answer Questions (SAQS)- 8 questions of 5 marks each making a total of 40 marks. 11.5.3. Essay Questions- 2 question of 20 marks each Making total of 40 marks 11.6. Each theory course shall be marked out of 100 marks distributed as shown below End of semester written examination 70% Take- away CAS 20% Sit in CAS 10% 170

9.0. The students will have the following experiences in the last two semesters of the course 9.1. Teaching Practice- 4 weeks 9.2. Research Project- 12 weeks 10.0. Entry Rerquirements 10.1 The minimum requirements for admission to Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) must be met, 10.2. Joint Admission Board entry requirements. 10.3. Candidates shall have obtained a mean grade of at least C+ at K.C.S.E. and passed the subject clusters as indicated: Alternative A a) Biology b) Chemistry c) Mathematics or Physics d) English or B B C+ B

11.7. The pass mark for written examination shall be 50%. A candidate who obtains between 47% and 49% may be compensated up to a maximum of two courses to attain a pass mark of 50% by the departmental examination moderation board. The marks may be deducted from the related courses the student has passed well. 11.8. For all clinical placements, continuous assessments will be carried out. 11.9. The weighting for each placement is as follows:11.9.1.End of rotation appraisal -25% 11.9.2 Log Book - 5% 11.9.3. Practical examination -70% 11.10. In some specific clinical placements structured clinical examinations including oral test will be administered and will be marked out of 100%. The pass mark for these examinations will be 50%. 11.11. The letter grades for the marks scored per course shall be indicated as follows for inclusion in the Academic transcript. Letter Grade A B C E Range of marks (%) 75 and Above 65 to 74 50 to 64 49 and below Remarks Distinction Credit Pass Fail

15.1. A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in an academic year will repeat the whole year. 15.2. A candidate who fails in ANY course in the supplementary examinations will repeat the whole year. 15.3. A candidate who fails in up to half of courses taken after repeating the year will be given a chance to sit supplementary exam in the failed courses. If he fails in any of supplementary examinations he/she will be discontinued. 16.0 Discontinuation A candidate who fails in all the courses in any one semester will be discontinued. 17.0 The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing shall not be classified. 10.0 Definition Of Unit 1 Unit = 1 Lecture hour per week per semester. 1 Unit = 2 Tutorial hours per week per semester. 1 Unit = 3 Hours of skill laboratory/clinical practice per week per semester Course Structure Common Courses Code Title HSC 100 Basic Life Support & Pre-Hospital Care COS 101 Communication Skills I CSC 110 Fundamentals of Computing COS 103 Development Concepts and Applications COS 102 Communication Skills II COS 305 Entrepreneurship Year One Semester I HSC 100 NUR 100 NUR 101 NUR 102 NUR 103 171 Basic Life Support and Pre-hospital Care Cell Biology and General Genetics Regional Anatomy Fundamental Concepts of Nursing I Embryology 3 3 3 3 3 Units 3 3 3 3 3 3

12.0. Incomplete examination 12.1 All core courses offered in the programme are a pre-requisite to proceed to the next academic year. A candidate must pass in the courses before proceeding to the next academic year. The exam will only be complete together with all CAS marks. 13.0. Academic Warning 13.1. A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in any one semester shall be given an academic warning 14.0 Supplementary A candidate who fails in up to half of courses in an academic year will be allowed to do supplementary examinations in failed course(s) before proceeding to the next academic year. 15.0. Repeating

NUR 104 NUR 105 COS 101 NUR 113

Medical Biochemistry I 3 Human Physiology I 3 Communication Skills I 3 Introduction to Nursing Theories & professionalism 3 Semester II Systemic Anatomy 3 Medical Biochemistry II 3 Medical Microbiology 3 Human Physiology II 3 Fundamentals of Medical Sociology & Anthropology 3 Fundamental Concepts in Nursing Practice II 3 Communication Skills II 3 Fundamentals of Computing 3 Immunology 3

Semester III 217 Clinical Experience See master rotation for clinical schedule Year III Semester I NUR 300 NUR 301 NUR 302 NUR 303 NUR 304 NUR 305 NUR 306 COS 303 3 Semester II NUR 307 NUR 308 NUR 309 NUR 310 NUR 311 NUR 312 NUR 313 NUR 314 Semester III 1. Clinical Experience *See master rotation for clinical schedule Year Four Semester I NUR 400 3 NUR 401 3 3 3 3 NUR 402 NUR 403 NUR 404 NUR 405 NUR 406

NUR 106 NUR 107 NUR 109 NUR 110 NUR 111 NUR 112 COS 102 CSC 110 NUR 113 Year II Semester I NUR 200 NUR 201 NUR 202 NUR 203 NUR 204 NUR 206 NUR 207 COS 103

Medical Epidemiology Medical Biostatistics Pediatric Child Health Nursing Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing I Educational Psychology Medical - Surgical Nursing III Community Health Nursing III Entrepreneurship

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Medical and Surgical Nursing I 3 Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics I 3 Pathology I 3 Reproductive Health and Safe Motherhood 1 3 Community Health Nursing I 3 Health Assessment 3 Introduction to Psychology 3 Development Concepts & Application 3

Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing II Occupational Health Health Promotion Research Methodology Medical - Surgical IV (Specialties) Gynecology Forensic Nursing Community Health Nursing IV

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Semester II NUR 209 NUR 210 NUR 211 NUR 212 NUR 213 NUR 214 3 NUR 215 NUR 216

Pharmacology & Therapeutics II Medical And Surgical Nursing II Pathology II Hematology Medical Parasitology Community Health Nursing II HIV and Aids & STI Management Reproductive Health and Safe Motherhood II

3 3

Health Services management & Health Economics 3 Curriculum and Instruction in Nursing 3 Public Relations in Nursing Practice 3 Palliative and Home-based Care 3 Gender and Health 3 Critical Care Nursing 3 Trauma and Emergency Nursing 3

172

Semester II NUR 407 NUR 408 NUR 409 NUR 410 NUR 411

Research Project (6 units 6 Teaching Practicum 3 Management Practice Hospital Experience 3 Clinical Concentration I 3 Clinical Concentration II 3

this philosophy are health, society, nursing, teaching, learning and professionalism. 2.0. Rationale There has been limited opportunity for continuing nursing education to upgrade the skills of the working nurse especially in the institutions of higher learning. This trend has impacted negatively in the delivery of nursing services and management of health systems.The dynamic and expanding roles of the nurse require the nurse to develop the capacity for independent clinical judgement, critical thinking and healthcare knowledge management skills to be able to provide complex care. These are important competencies and capability that would enable nurses deliver quality health care services in a multitude of demographic and clinical settings. This upgrading program is a blend of part time oncampus learning and work-based clinical experience in NCK approved health facilities. The curriculum is designed to promote active learning and innovations to translate theory effectively into practical solutions of health problems. The program will strengthen the health systems and tremendously improve the quality of nursing services in the region.

Semester III Clinical Experience

Total

16 weeks

*See master rotation for clinical schedule Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Bscn) (Upgrading) Programme (Krchn Bscn) 1.0. Introduction: The aim of the Programme is to produce highly competent nurse practitioners, health researchers, health educators and managers capable of serving in Kenya and the rest of the World. The need for the Bachelor of Science in nursing programme arose from several workshops held with stakeholders in the region. The demand for the training of Registered Community Health Nurse (RCHN) to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSc.N) was specifically expressed by the National Nurses Association of Kenya, The Nursing Council of Kenya (Regulatory body) and the Office of Chief Nursing Officer in the Ministry of Health. The degree programme will be user- friendly in its implementation to accommodate the working nurses. The programme has both the sciences and the clinical courses. It will integrate theoretical, clinical and community based learning with its clinical placements undertaken in NCK approved health facilities. The graduates will get employment opportunities in the Medical training institutions, hospitals and medical research institutes and NGOs among others nationally and internationally. The philosophy and conceptual framework of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree at MMUST are in accordance with the vision, mission and core values of the University. The concepts identified in 173

3.0. Vision To be a centre of excellence in nursing education,research and innovations, clinical practice development, leadership and healthcare knowledge management, evidence-based and reflective practice. 4.0. Mission Train highly skilled, scientific, versatile and innovative nurse practitioners of 21st Century and beyond 5.0 Core Values: 5.1. Development and improvement in clinical practice only occurs in the context of exploring new ideas and embracing change. 5.2. Inquiry is the key process in learning, enhancing student engagement and motivation.

5.3. A Student-centered learning environment supports individual learning styles, values diversity, and provides equity 5.4. A safe, orderly environment conducive to learning is based on trust, decency, courtesy, and mutual respect. 5.5. Students, families, lecturers, staff and the entire community are accountable for student success. 6.0. Program Goal This upgrading program of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is designed to upgrade and equip the nurse with the capacity to provide leadership in clinical practice, nursing education, health care governance and participate in research. 7.0. Program Objectives The Programme will prepare the graduates to: 7.1 Incorporate theoretical and empirical knowledge from the physical, social and behavioural biomedical and clinical sciences into nursing practice and utilize the knowledge and skills to provide quality nursing care. 7.2. Provide holistic nursing care including medicalsurgical, pediatric, geriatric, and mental health to individual, family and communities using the nursing process, reflective practice, critical thinking skills and evidence based practice. 7.3 Demonstrate competence in midwifery practice including safe motherhood, managing sexual and reproductive health conditions based on ethical, moral and legal requirements for nursing practice. 7.4 Enhance the quality of nursing and health care through the use of leadership skills and participation in the design, provision and management of community health programmes and health services including policy formulation, implementation and making informed and responsible decisions both in life and professionally. 7.5 Incorporate respect for life and human dignity into nursing practice, advance social consciousness through involvement and advocacy in issues, which impact on the health care system in the community and society as a whole. 7.6 Demonstrate highest degree of professional competency, responsibility, creativity and value learning as lifelong process for continued personal and professional growth, utilize the knowledge base 174

as foundation for graduate study and self-directing in seeking continuing nursing and professional development. 7.7 Demonstrate competence to manage the epidemic, endemic, pandemic, emerging and reemerging health problems and program including HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria and Gender issues in the provision of quality health care. 7.8 Conduct scientific and operational research, disseminate findings and utilize the results to provide quality nursing care and health services and contribute to the development of scientific body of knowledge of nursing. 7. 9 Utilize basic knowledge and skills in information and communication technology for professional development and improvement of health care services. 8.0 uration of the Programme The programme will take 2 calendar years (Two and a half years of eight semesters). The Course will run by theory and clinical placements. Consisting of 3 days of theory at the University and clinical placements at NCK approved health facilities and NCK stipulated duration as shown in the Master Rotation Plan. The clinical placements/ practices are clustered around the following: A. B C D E F A 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. B General Nursing Reproductive Health and Safe Motherhood Community Health Special areas Teaching Practice Research Projects General Nursing Medical Surgical Nursing 12 weeks Paediatrics - 4 weeks Gynaecology 2 weeks Casualty/Outpatient - 3 weeks Nursing Administration 4 weeks Reproductive Health and Safe Motherhood

1. 2. 3. 4. C 1. 2. 3.

Labour ward- 6 weeks Antenatal-2 weeks Postnatal- 2 weeks Newborn Unit- 2 weeks Community Health MCH FP hospital experience-4 weeks Rural health experience -4 weeks District health experience 4weeks

D 1. 2. 3. E F

Special Areas Intensive Care Unit/Renal Area- 4 weeks Operating Theatre- 2 weeks Mental & Psychiatric Nursing- 4 weeks Teaching Practice- 4 weeks Research Project- 12 weeks

9.0 Entry Rerquirements 9.1. The minimum requirements for admission to Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST) must be met, 9.2. The applicant must have attained a mean Grade of C Plain at KCSE or Division II at KCE, 9.3. Must be a holder of a Diploma in General Nursing, Midwifery and Post-Basic Diploma in Public Health/Community Health Nursing 9.4. Or Diploma in Kenya Registered Community Health Nursing (KRCHN) 9.5. Or Diploma in General Nursing and Post Basic Diploma in Midwifery 9.6. Or Diploma in General Nursing and Post Basic Diploma in Psychiatry and Mental Health Nursing 9.6. Must be registered with the Nursing Council of Kenya (NCK) and hold a current Practice License and 9.7. A minimum of 2 (two) years of Practice experience 10.0 Examinations Regulations 10.1 The general University Examination Regulations shall apply. In addition, the following will specificy requirements for programme. 10.2. A candidate is expected to have 80% attendance in class to sit a University examination. 175

10.3. All clinical rotations are compulsory in order for candidates to meet the minimum requirements of the Professional Regulatory Board 10.4 A candidate is expected to have 80% clinical placement attendance 10.5. The overall assessment of the students performance in each course shall be done at the end of every semester and shall comprise of continuous assessments and written examinations. In some specific courses, oral and practical examinations will be administered as part of continuous assessments. 10.6. Written examinations of each course shall comprise of 2 CATs and End of Semester Examination of one paper of 3 hours as structured below 10.6.1.Multiple choice Questions (MCQS) - 20 questions of 20 marks. 10.6.2. Short Answer Questions (SAQS)8 questions of 5 marks each Making total of 40 marks. 10.6.3. Essay Questions questions of 20 marks each Making total of 40 marks 10.6.4 Each theory course shall be marked out of 100 marks distributed as shown below 10.6.5 End of semester written examination 70% 10.6.6. Take- away CAT 20 10.6.7 Sit in CAT 10% 10.6.8 The pass mark for written examination shall be 50%. A candidate whoobtains between 47% and 49% may be compensated up to a maximum of two courses to attain a pass mark of 50% by the departmental examination moderation board. The marks may be deducted from the related courses the student has passed well. 10.7 For all clinical placements, continuous assessments will be carried out.The weighting for each placement is as follows:10.7.1. End of rotation appraisal 25% 10.7.2. Log Book 5% 10.7.3 Practical examination 70% 10.8. In some specific clinical placements structured clinical examinations including orals will be administered and will be marked out of 100%. The pass mark for these examinations will be 50%. 10.9. The letter grades for the marks scored per course shall be indicated as follows for inclusion in the Academic transcript.

Letter Grade Range of marks (%) Remarks A 75 and Above Distinction B 65 to 74 Credit C 50 to 64 Pass E 49 and below Fail 11.0. Incomplete examination All core courses offered in the programme are a prerequisite to proceed to the next academic year. A candidate must pass in the courses before proceeding to the next academic year. The exam will only be complete together with all CAT marks. 12.0. Academic Warning A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in any one semester shall be given an academic warning. 13.0. Supplementary A candidate who fails in up to half of courses in an academic year will be allowed to do supplementary examinations in failed course(s) before proceeding to the next academic year. 14.0 Repeating 14.1. A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in an academic year will repeat the whole year. 14.2 candidate who fails in ANY course in the supplementary examinations will repeat the whole year. 14.3. A candidate who fails in up to half of courses taken after repeating the year will be given a chance to do supplementary in the failed courses. If he fails in any of supplementary examinations he/she will be discontinued. 15.0. Discontinuation A candidate who fails in all the courses in any one semester will be discontinued. 16.0 The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing shall not be classified. 17.0 Definition of Unit 1 Unit = 1 Lecture hour per week per semester of 14 weeks (14 units per semester). 1 Unit = 2 Tutorial hours per week per semester of 14 weeks (28 units per semester). 176

1 Unit = 2 Hours of skill laboratory/clinical practice per week per semester

18.0 Course Structure Semester I Common Courses Units hours IRD 102 Communication Skills IRD 103 Development Concepts and Applications IRD 305 Entrepreneurship COM 110 Introduction to Computer Studies and Computing Total Semester I NUR 100 NUR 101 NUR 102 NUR 103 NUR 104 NUR 105 IRD 102 Total Semester II NUR 106 NUR 107 NUR 108 NUR 109 NUR 110 NUR 111 NUR 112 COM: 110

3 3 3 3 12

Cell Biology and General Genetics 3 Regional Anatomy I 3 :Fundamental Concepts in Nursing Practice 3 Embryology 3 Medical Biochemistry 3 Advanced human Physiology 3 Communication Skills II 3 21

Systemic Anatomy II Medical Biochemistry II Clinical Pharmacology I and Therapeutics Medical Microbiology Advanced Human Physiology II Health Assessment Reproductive Health and Safe Motherhood 1 Introduction to Computer Studies

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Total Semester III NUR 200 NUR 201 NUR 202

Medical and Surgical Nursing I 3 Immunology 3 Pathology 3

NUR 203 NUR 204 NUR 205 IRD 103 Total Semester 1V NUR 206 NUR 207 NUR 208 NUR 209 NUR 210 NUR 211 NUR 212 Total Semester V NUR 300 NUR 301 NUR 302 NUR 303 NUR 304 NUR 305 NUR 306 Total

Fundamentals of Medical Sociology and Anthropology 3 Community Health Nursing I 3 Clinical Nutrition 3 Development Concepts and Application 3 21

NUR 402 NUR 403 NUR 404 NUR 405 IRD 303 Total

:Curriculum and Instruction in Nursing Public Relations in Nursing Practice Palliative and Home-based Care Gender and Health Entrepreneurship

3 3 3 3 3 21

Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics II Medical and Surgical Nursing II Pathology II Haematology Medical Parasitology Community Health Nursing II :HIV and Aids Management

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Semester VIII NUR 406 Research Project (6 units) NUR 407 Teaching Practicum NUR 408 :Nursing Management Practice Hospital Experience Clinical Concentration I Clinical Concentration II Total Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Sciences 1.0. Preamble

6 3 3 3 6 21

Medical Epidemiology Medical Biostatistics Pediatric Nursing Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing Educational Psychology for Nurses Medical and Surgical Nursing III Reproductive Health and Safe Motherhood II

3 3 6 3 3 3 3 24

Semester V1 NUR 307 Community Health Nursing III NUR 308 Occupational Health NUR 309 Health Promotion NUR 310:Research Methodology NUR 311:Medical Surgical IV (Specialties) Total Semester V11 NUR 400 :Reproductive Health & Safe Motherhood 111 NUR 401 :Health Services management & Health Economics

3 3 3 3 9 21

The school of health sciences aims at achieving the development of the appropriate manpower in health care delivery by emphasizing the introduction of new curricula which will produce practically and technologically oriented manpower responsive to the health care needs of our society. To fulfil this, the School of Health Sciences has embarked on training a wide variety of health professionals including medical laboratory professionals who will provide the appropriate quality health care. Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) is a health care profession with special expertise in laboratory medicine. The members of this professional discipline are responsible for providing accurate and reliable laboratory tests for monitoring health, diagnosing and treating disease. 1.1. Design The design of this curriculum is based on SPICES model. This implies that its implementation will be student cantered and problem based. The courses are as much as possible integrated, community oriented and systematically arranged.

3 3 177

1.2. Structure The structure of this curriculum is based on four levels that spiral from one to the other. The first level is the basic sciences whose knowledge is required to understand the later courses in the programme. This includes sciences such as physics, chemistry and biology. The second level comprises courses in biomedical sciences, the humanities, other supportive courses and Community based education services (COBES). Level two spirals into level three that concentrates mainly on pathology, laboratory management, other supportive courses and clinical concentrations. The final rang of the spiral, which forms level four comprises mostly laboratory attachment courses during which the practical aspect of the programme are undertaken to bring out the skill required. There is horizontal integration of the various courses at each level, while courses at different levels are also vertically integrated. It should be noted that levels referred to are level of knowledge and do not correspond to academic year of study. 1.3. Implementation During the implementation of this programme the students will act as the centre pieces around which all activities will revolve. To make this possible problem based learning will be used as the main strategy. However, a multifaceted approach that includes other learning strategies that encourage active learning will be adopted. 1.4. Teaching methods There will application of appropriate combinations of learning experience including Small group tutorials, overview lectures, laboratory practical, demonstrations and apprenticeship. Emphasis will be placed on innovative approaches, which include Problem Based Learning (PBL), community oriented, student-cantered and self-directed learning This will enable the students to gradually acquire through out the various levels, knowledge, skills and attitudes appropriate for laboratory management. 1.5. Electives ( MLE -6 units) 178 The medical laboratory sciences electives will be compulsory and each student must undertake an elective aimed at providing students with opportunities to acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes in areas of their interest, which will be useful in their career. 2.0. Objectives 2.1.Widen the students experience in undergraduate education and strengthen his/her areas of interest. 2.2.Develop ability to participate in planning and implementation of his/her learning activities and make rational decision. 2.3.Increase students responsibility for selfdetermination in his/her education. 3.0. General guidelines. 3.1.Students will be responsible for making arrangements (including finance) pertaining to the elective. 3.2.The student shall submit a plan of their activities for approval by the school board through the head of department to Dean. 3.3.Upon completion of the elective, the student shall submit a written report to the faculty board through the head of department to Dean. 3.4.A confidential report shall be submitted to the Dean from the host institution regarding the students performance. 3.5.The faculty board shall provide students with guidelines of their conduct during the elective period in addition to the senate guidelines on field trips. 3.6.Students shall conform to the rules and regulations of the host institution during their elective period. Where research is involved, there will be need for approval from the host institution. 4.0. Proposed areas of electives 1. Virology 2. Immunology 3. Bacteriology 4. Hematology 5. Blood transfusion 6. Clinical chemistry

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Histopathology Cytology Management Research Industrial laboratories Quality assurance.

6.0 Entry Requirements 6.1 A candidate pursuing B.Sc. (Medical Laboratory Science) must meet the minimum university entry requirements. 6.2 In addition, the candidate must have acquired the following grades in the subjects indicated below: Alternative A Biology Chemistry Mathematics English or Physics

5.0. Programme Objectives This program is designed to equip the graduates with the capacity to provide leadership in management, education, capacity and medical laboratory skills to enhance the delivery of quality health care by providing rapid, complex and accurate laboratory services, work in an integrated, multi-disciplinary, multi-sector health system and participate in health research. 5.1 Specific objectives At the end of the programme the graduate will be able to: 5.1.1. Apply the process of critical reasoning in the diagnosis of disease and hence in the management of illness. 5.1.2. Manage services in public health, industry and research laboratories. 5.1.3. Participate in multi-disciplinary Planning, implementation, co-ordination and evaluation of health care of the individual, family and community. 5.1.4. Apply knowledge gained in the diagnosis and prevention of illness. 5.1.5. Contribute effectively to the promotion and maintenance of good health and the prevention of ill health. 5.1.6. Apply principles of research in identifying and managing health problems including those brought about by the industrial products. 5.1.7. Plan and implement training/educational programmes for health laboratory workers. 5.1.8. Engage in and maintain productive Professional relationships to acquire, evaluate and communicate information appropriately. 5.1.9. Demonstrate ability to evaluate own Performance, plan and implement own continuing education for the maintenance and further development of own knowledge, skills and attitudes as well as adapting to change.

B B C+ C+ C+

Alternative B Biological Sciences B+ Physical Sciences B+ Mathematics C+ English C+ OR 6.3. Two (2) Principal passes in Biology and Physics and a credit either in Chemistry or Mathematics at KCSE. or 6.4. Candidates may also be holders of Higher Diploma in the relevant areas of Medical Laboratory Sciences. 6.5. Holders of diploma in Medical Laboratory Sciences and in addition 3 years of Medical Laboratory Experience. Diploma Holders must be registered with the Kenya Medical Laboratory Technicians and technologist Board. 7.0. Credit Transfer System 7.1. Candidates holding Higher Diploma and Diploma I medical laboratory sciences may have a credit transfer of up to 18 units. 7.2. Hospital attachments are eligible for credit transfer. 8.0. Duration of the programme 8.1 Each unit shall comprise sixty (60) contact hours. These will comprise lectures and hospital attachment. 179

8.2 Each graduating student shall proceed on a one year internship within designated health facilities preceding registration by the Kenya Medical Laboratory Technicians and Technologists Board. 9.0. Regulations Governing Examinations 9.1 The Common University regulations shall apply. 9.2 In order to graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Laboratory Sciences the candidate shall registered for and passed in all the units including those waived through the credit transfer system. 9.3 The assessment of a students performance in each unit shall comprise continuous assessment tests, practical examinations and written examination at the end of every semester. 9.4. Each unit shall be marked out of 100 marks distributed as follows: Continuous assessment tests 10% Practical examination 20% Written examination 70% 9.5. The pass mark shall be 50% of the total marks. 9.6. The overall assessment of the students performance in each course shall be done at the end of every trimester and shall comprise of continuous. 9.7In some specific courses, oral and practical examinations will be administered as part of continuous assessments. 9.8. Progression to subsequent year All core courses offered in the programme are a prerequisite to proceed to the next academic year. A candidate must pass in the courses before proceeding to the next academic year. The exam will only be complete together with all CAS marks. 9.9. Academic Probation A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in the first trimester shall be placed on an Academic Probation by the Dean 9.10. Supplementary Supplementary examinations are administered to candidates who fail to obtain a pass in the specified number of courses during an academic year. A candidate who fails one or more courses adding up to a maximum of 25% of the examinable courses for the year of study may be admitted to the supplementary examinations and will be allowed to do supplementary examinations in failed course(s) 180

before proceeding to the next academic year. A candidate who fails a supplementary examination shall repeat the year of study. In the final year of study, a candidate who fails a supplementary examination shall be allowed to repeat the year as a full time-internal student. A candidate who fails a supplementary examination after repeating the year of study shall be discontinued from the MLS programme. Final marks for candidates passing supplementary examinations and for candidates passing after repeating a year on academic grounds shall be 50% 9.11 Repeating 9.11.1 A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in an academic year will repeat the whole year. 9.11.2. A candidate who fails in ANY course in the supplementary examinations will repeat the course before proceeding to the subsequent year. 9.11.3 No candidate shall be permitted to repeat the year more than once. 9.11.4 A candidate who fails in up to half of courses taken after repeating the year will be given a chance to sit supplementary examination in the failed courses. If he/she fails in any of the supplementary examinations he/she will be discontinued.

9.12 Discontinuation 9.12.1. A candidate who fails 50% or more of the total number of examinable courses in an academic year shall be discontinued 10.0 Course Coding The courses offered to the Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Sciences programme will be coded using three letters MLS and three digits. The letters stand for M Medical L Laboratory S Sciences

11.0. Course Structure Year I Trimester I Code MLS 100 MLS101 MLS 102 MLS103 HSC100 MLS 104 COS 100 COM 110 Total Trimester II Code MLS 105 MLS 106 MLS 107 NUR 304 COS 102 ESM 104 MLS 108 HND 204 Total Trimester III MLS 110 MLS 111 Year II Trimester I Code COS 103 MLS 200 NUR111 HPE 108 MLS 201 MLS 202 Title Units Basics of Medical Education 4 Basics chemistry and chemical Analysis 4 Physics in Medical laboratory science 4 Cell Biology & General Genetics 3 Basic Life Support& Pre-hospital care 3 Behavioral sciences and ethics and law 3 Communication skills I 4 Introduction to computer Applications 4 32

MLS 203 MLS 204 Total

General and Systemic Pathology Hematology and Blood Transfusion I

4 4 30

Trimester II Code Title Units MLS 205 Medical Microbiology 4 MLS 206 Hematology and Blood Transfusion II 4 MLS 207 General Immunology 4 MLS 208 Basics of Nutrition, Dietetics and Nutritional Disorders 3 HPE 205 Disaster Management II 3 NUR 212 HIV and Aids Management 3 MLS 209 Pharmacology 4 MLS 210 Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis 4 Total 32 Trimester III MLS 211 Community Health and Diagnosis (COBES) MLS 212 Haematology and Blood Transfusion II Year II Trimester I MLS 300 NUR 301 MLS 301 HPE 301 MLS 302 MLS 303 MLS 304 Total

6 6

Title Units Human anatomy 4 Physiology 4 Biochemistry 3 Introduction to Psychology 3 Communication Skills II 3 Quantitative Skills 3 Basics of Pharmacology 4 Food Composition and Pre. Laboratory 4 30 Clinical Concentration I Clinical rotation

Title Units Medical Biotechnology 4 Medical Biostatistics 4 Clinical Virology I 4 Occupational health and Safety 3 Clinical Immunology 3 Nuclear Medicine I 3 Clinical physiology I 4 32

Title Units Development, Concepts and Applications 4 Medical Parasitology 4 Fundamentals of Medical Sociology & Anthropology 3 Disaster management I 3 Bioinstrumentation and quality management 3 Experimental Animal Science 3 181

Trimester II Code Title Units MLS 305 Nuclear Medicine II 4 NUR 401 Health Services Management and Health Economics 4 MLS 306 Clinical Virology II 4 MLS 307 Clinical physiology II 3 NUR 310 Research Methodology 3 COS 303 Entrepreneurship 3 MLE 4 Total 32

Trimester III MLS308 MLS309 MLS 310 MLS 311 Year IV Trimester I Code MLS 400 MLS 401 MLS 402 MLS 403 MLS 404 MLS 405 HND405 MLE Total

Clinical Virology Rotation Clinical physiology Rotation Clinical Immunology Rotation Nuclear Medicine II Rotation

nutritionists or dietitians. The program advances the discovery and translation of the roles of nutrition in optimizing health for people in the nation and the world. The programme takes a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach to discovering, integrating and extending and applying knowledge of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Human Nutrition and Dietetics is a broad, problemsolving field that draws upon biology, chemistry and the social sciences. The nutritionist/dietitian is responsible for translating the art and science of nutrition into sound practices for educating the population about the relationship between good nutrition and optimum health, and for assessing, planning, and evaluating the nutritional status of the population. With increasing recognition of the important role that nutrition plays in the prevention and treatment of health problems, nutritionists and dietitians are increasingly in demand. Nutritionists/Dietitians practice in a variety of settings including hospitals, clinics, extended care facilities, public health agencies, community programs, public and private industries, and research settings. Graduates are prepared to function as teachers, researchers, consultants, clinicians, dietitians, food service administrators, case managers, corporate personnel and community educators. With increasing recognition of the association between diet and disease and the importance of diet in health promotion, nutritionists and dietitians are needed to participate in research to clarify issues of diet and disease, to educate the public on ways to promote health through diet, and to educate individuals suffering from chronic diseases on ways to incorporate dietary modifications into their lifestyles. 2. Broad Objectives Train highly skilled, scientific and innovative Nutritionists/Dietitians to apply knowledge of food science, body metabolism, and health principles to promote wellness Make recommendations regarding nutrition interventions to the physician and evaluate results of nutrition therapies

Title, Units Clinical Bacteriology &Mycology I 4 Research Project 3 Clinical Parasitology I 4 Histopathology & Cytology 4 Clinical chemistry I 4 Forensic Medicine I 4 Molecular Epidemiology & Chronic Disease 4 3 32

Trimester II Code Title MLS 406 Clinical Bacteriology & Mycology II MLS 407 Clinical chemistry II MLS 408 Clinical Parasitology II MLS 409 Forensic Medicine II, NUR 405 Gender and Health MLS 410 Laboratory management Ethics and Law HND 407 Interprofessional Education MLE Total

Units 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 3 32

Trimester III MLS 411 Clinical Bacteriology &Mycology Rotation MLS 412 Clinical Parasitology Rotation MLS 413 Clinical chemistry Rotation MLS 414 Forensic Medicine Rotation Bachelor of Science in Human Nutrition & Dietetics 1.0. Introduction The programme of Human Nutrition and Dietetics is versatile and its graduates function professionally as 182

3.0. Specific Objectives 3.1. Conduct research to clarify issues of diet and disease. 3.2. Educate the public on ways to promote health through diet. 3.3. Provide health education to individuals suffering from chronic diseases on ways to incorporate dietary modifications into their lifestyles. 3.4. Plan, implement, monitor and evaluate nutrition programmes at all levels. 3.5 Provide nutrition counseling on the selection of proper food and food supplements for growth and development, vitality, resistance to infection, control of disease processes and recovery of health. 3.6. Plan and implement training programmes in Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 3.7. Participate in formulation and development of nutrition policies. 3.8. Participate in Continuing Education and professional development. 4.0 .Entry Requirements 4.1 The common University admission requirements must be met 4.2 Candidates shall have obtained a mean grade of at least C+ at K.C.S.E. and passed the subject clusters as indicated: ( i) a ) Biology/Biological Sciences b) Home Science/ Agriculture c ) Chemistry/Physical Science d ) English/Kiswahili e ) Mathematics OR C+ C+ C+ C+ C 6.0. Award of Bachelor of Science Degree in Human Nutrition and Dietetics B.Sc. degree in Human Nutrition and Dietetics shall be awarded to that person who successfully completes the programme as outlined in this curriculum. 7.0. . Classification of the Degree The degree shall be classified in accordance with the rules of MMUST 8.0. Learning Teaching Strategies A multifaceted approach shall be used, employing mainly those methods that encourage learnercentred active learning including small group discussions, tutorials, laboratory practical, field experiences, field trips and research projects. 8.1. Problem Based Learning (PBL) Human Nutrition and Dietetics being a problem solving field will emphasize problem based learning as the main strategy for teaching and learning process. Students will work in small groups to develop team building and leadership skills. The groups will be challenged using appropriate nutrition problems. Through the analysis of such problems, the students shall derive learning objectives. Students will also experience selfdirected independent learning during which they use all available learning resources including discussion with resource persons to acquire the relevant information. 8.2. Seminars/Large Group Discussions Course seminars and large group discussions will serve the purpose of clarifying areas found difficult by students during their own readings and in the small group discussions. 8.3. Laboratory Practicals/Demonstration These are related to ongoing tutorial problems to demonstrate specific and practical aspects of what students are studying. Some courses are mainly practical-based, whereas others have practical and theories. All these will help students acquire relevant skills. 8.4. Field Experiences and Attachment General guidelines are outlined for each Field Attachment at the end of second and Third years, as approved by Senate. Field experiences and Filed 183

(ii) A holder of Diploma or Higher Diploma in Nutrition from institutions recognized by MMUST Senate. 5.0. Duration of the Programme The duration of the Bachelor of Science in Human Nutrition and Dietetics degree programme shall normally be four academic years,

Attachment shall enable the students to apply the principles of nutrition and dietetics and offer opportunities for personal and professional growth. 9.0. Reading list 1. Roth, A.R. & Townsend, C.F. (2003). Nutrition and Diet Therapy (8th ed). Thompson Delmar Learning. ISBN: 0766835677 2 . Guthrie H. A ( 1986.) Introductory Nutrition 6th Ed, St. Louis, Times Mirror/Mosby College 3. Mudambi S.R., & Rajagopal M.V. (1990) Fundamentals of Food and Nutrition", 2nd Ed. Wiley Eastern Ltd 4. Swaminathan, M.( 1985) Advanced Textbook of Foods and Nutrition", Vol I,II (2nd Ed.revised) Bappco, Bangalore, 5. Wilson, E ( 1979)Principles of Nutrition", 4th Ed. New York, John Wiley & Sons, 6. Swaminathan, M (1998), Principles of Nutrition and Dietetics", Bappco, Bangalore. 7. Bogert, J.G. & Briggs, D.H. (1985) Nutrition and Physical Fitness", 11th Ed. W.B. Saunders & Co, Philadelphia. 8. Wardlaw, G.M. ( PH1990) Perspectives in Nutrition. Times Mirror/Mosby College Publishing Co., St.Louis. 9. William . (1985 )Nutrition and Diet Therapy", , 5th Ed. Mosby Co, St. Louis. 10. West, E.S. Todd, W.R. Moses, R.S. & Van Bruggan, J.B. 1968, Textbook of Biochemistry", The Macmillan company, New York. 11. Conn, E.E. & Stump, P.K. ( 1981) Outlines of Biochemistry", Wiley Eastern Private Ltd., New Delhi. 12. Varey. (1969)Practical Clinical Bio-chemistry", William Heinemann Medical Book, London Ltd., Interscience Books Inc. New York. 12. Maurice E. Shils, J. A. & Olson S. ( 1994) Modern Nutrition in Health and Diseases", 8th Ed., Volume I and II. Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia, A. Waverly Company. 13. Any other new editions 10.Assessment The common university examination regulations shall apply. In addition, the Bsc. Human Nutrition and Dietetics degree courses shall be examined as follows: 184

10.1. Continuous Assessment (CA) shall include a written paper, a practical field supervision assessment, log book marks, oral presentation of the report. 10.2. Courses involving field activities such as field attachment and research projects shall be examined as follows: 10.2.1. Individual oral presentation, logbook and group assignments including group presentation and shall constitute CA marks of 30%. 10.2.2. Final written paper by the student shall constitute 70%. 11.0. Course Coding The coursed offered to students of Bachelor of Science in Human Nutrition & Dietetics will be coded using three letters HND and three digits. The letters stand for H Human N Nutrition D - Dietetics 12.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code SCH 100 HND 100 HND 101 HND 102 COS 100 HND 103 HND104 NUR 100 Semester II COS 102 COM 101 IRD 103 ESM 104 Communication Skills II Introduction to Computers Development Concepts & Application Quantitative Skills 3 3 3 3 Course Title Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Fundamentals of Chemistry I Fundamentals of Human Nutrition I Macronutrient Nutrition, Health, and Society Nutrition in the Life Cycle Communication Skills I Introduction to Dietetics and Nutrition First Aid and Home Nursing Cell Biology & General Genetics

CDM 100 HND 105 HND 106

HIV/AIDS Prevention & Management Food Safety and Sanitation Fundamentals of Human Nutrition II - Micronutrient

HND301 3 3 3 HND 302 HND 303 HND 304

Year II Semester I Code HND 200 HND 202 HND 203 HND 204 HND 205 HND 206 3 HND 208 Course Title Maternal and Child Nutrition Molecular Biology & Immunology Food Composition and Preparation Food Composition and Pre. Laboratory Medical Nutrition Therapy I Nutritional Biochemistry Human Anatomy and Physiology Units 3 3 3 2 3

HND 305 HND 306 HND 307 Semester II HND 308 HND 309 HND310 HND311 NUR 312 COS 305 HND 312 HND 313 HND 314 Year IV Semester I Code Title HND 400 HND 401

Physiological & Biochemical Bases of Human Nutrition 3 Methods in Nutritional Sciences 3 Health Psychology & Sociology 3 Nutritional Problems of Developing Nations 3 Therapeutic Dietetics 3 Biology of Normal and Abnormal Behavior 3 Food Chemistry 3

semester II NUR 209 HND 210 Clinical Nutrition Nutrition for Exercise and Sport HND 211 Medical Biochemistry HND212 Medical Nutrition Therapy II HND 213 Pharmacology HND 214 Principles Immunology HND215 Food Service Systems Management I Field Experience HND 216 Experiences in community Nutrition HND217 Experiences in Food Service System Year III Semester I Code Title Units Nutritional & Physiochemical Aspects of Food 3 185 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Food Service Systems Management II Nutrition Education and Communication Food Microbiology Nutrition Assessment and Planning Medical Biostatistics Entrepreneurship Clinical Sciences Experimental Foods Field clinical Attachment

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6

Units Nutrition Behaviour and Counseling 3 International Nutrition, Food Security and Globalization 3 Mineral Nutrition and Chronic Disease 3 Nutritional Treatment of Disease 3 Public Health Nutrition 3 Molecular Epidemiology & Chronic Disease 3 Research Project I 3

HND 402 4 4 HND 403 HND 404 HND405 HND 406

HND 300

Semester II HND 407 Inter-professional

HND 408 HND409 HND 410 HND 411 HND 412 HND 413 HND 414

Education 3 Applied Dietetics in Food Service Systems 3 Directed Studies/Special Topics 3 Issues and Problems in Human Nutrition and Dietetics 3 Nutrition & Dietetics Workshops & Seminars 3 Education for Nutrition Sciences 3 Research Project II 3 Medical Nutrition Therapy III 3

3.4. Fabricate, fit and dispense appropriate optical devices 3.5. Participate within the multidisciplinary care team effectively. 3.6. Apply psychosocial, ethical considerations and community orientation in optical services 3.7 Assess, diagnose, manage or refer conditions that require the services of ophthalmologists and other medical specialists 3.8 Demonstrate appropriate managerial skills 3.9 Take responsibility for own learning and continuing professional development. 4.0 Entry Requirements 4.1 The common University admission requirements must be met 4.2 Candidates shall have obtained a mean grade of at least C+ at K.C.S.E. and passed the subject clusters as indicated: a) Alternative A Biology Mathematics English

Bachelor of Science in Optometry and Vision Sciences 1.0 Preamble Visual disability is a common problem in the general public. This disability does arise from ocular diseases or refractive errors. Ocular diseases are treatable by drugs while others are correctable by surgery. Refractive errors afflict all ages from childhood to adults. These range from myopia, hypermetropia, presbyopia, astigmatism and others. These refractive errors account for a significant poor performance of school age children. This program will not only train practitioners in the field of optometry and visual disability but will also raise awareness of this problem in the general public. 2.0 Program Goal To train optometrists and vision scientists who upon qualification will be able to use the knowledge, skills and appropriate attitude to make rational decisions in eye care, correction of visual impairment and other optometric services. 3.0 Program Objectives By the end of the programme, the student will have acquired the necessary skills and able to: 3.1. Apply comprehensive knowledge of anatomical and physiological concepts of the eye to effectively participate in eye care. 3.2. Demonstrate skills in optical procedures 3.3. Diagnose and correct refractive errors

C+ C+ C+

b) Alternative B Biological Sciences B Physical Sciences C+ Mathematics C+ English C+ OR 4.3. Two Principal passes in Biology and Physics and a credit either in Chemistry or Mathematics at KCSE OR 4.4. Diploma in optometry or its equivalent from an institution recognized by MMUST Senate 5.0 Duration of the Programme The programme will take four academic years offered on full time basis and comprising of lectures, group discussions, practical work in the eye clinics, optical workshops and clinical attachment at eye hospitals and other major optical facilities. 6.0 Examination Regulations

186

The common University Examination Regulations shall apply. In addition, the following will be specific requirements for programme. 6.1. All clinical rotations are compulsory 6.2. A candidate is expected to have a minimum of 80% clinical placement attendance 6.3. The overall assessment of the students performance in each course shall be done at the end of every semester and shall comprise of continuous assessments and end o f semester examinations 6.4. In some specific courses, oral and practical examinations will be administered as part of continuous assessments. 6.5. Written examinations of each course shall comprise of 3 Continuous Assessments (CA ) and End of Semester Examination of one paper of 3 hours as structured below 6.5.1. Multiple choice Questions (MCQS) 20 % of the total marks. 6.5.2. Short Answer Questions (SAQS) 8 questions of 5 marks each making a total of 40 marks. 6.5.3. Essay Questions 2 question of 20 marks each Making total of 40 marks 6.5.5. Each theory course shall be marked out of 100 marks distributed as shown below End of semester written examination 70% 2 Take- away CAs 20% Sit in CA 10% 6.5.6. The pass mark for the examination shall be 50%. A candidate who obtains between 47% and 49% may be compensated up to a maximum of two courses to attain a pass mark of 50% by the school examination board. The marks may be deducted from the related courses the student has passed well in accordance with the University rules on marks compensation 6.6. For all clinical placements, continuous assessments will be carried out. The weighting for each placement is as follows:End of rotation appraisal 25% Log Book 5% Practical examination 70% 6.7. Structured clinical examinations including oral test shall be marked out of 100%. The pass mark for these examinations will be 50%.

6.8. The letter grades for the marks scored per course shall be indicated as follows for inclusion in the Academic transcript. Letter Grade Range of marks (%) Remarks 75 and Above A Distinction 65 to 74 A Credit 50 to 64 C Pass 49 and below E Fail 6.9. Progression to subsequent year All core courses offered in the programme are a prerequisite to proceed to the next academic year. A candidate must pass in the courses before proceeding to the next academic year. The exam will only be complete together with all CAS marks. 6.10. Academic Probation A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in the first semester shall be placed on an Academic Probation by the Dean 6.11. Supplementary A candidate who fails in up to half of courses in an academic year will be allowed to do supplementary examinations in failed course(s) before proceeding to the next academic year. 6.12 Repeating a) A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in an academic year will repeat the whole year. b) A candidate who fails in ANY course in the supplementary examinations will repeat course before proceeding to the subsequent year. c) A candidate who fails in up to half of courses taken after repeating the year will be given a chance to sit supplementary exam in the failed courses. If he/she fails in any of the supplementary examinations he/she will be discontinued. 6.13 Discontinuation A candidate who fails in all the courses in any one semester will be discontinued. 6.14.The degree of Bachelor of Optometry and Vision Sciences shall not be classified. 7.0 Course Coding And Structure The courses offered in the programme of Bachelor of Science in Optometry and Vision Sciences will be 187

coded using three letters OPV and three digits. The letters stand for OP Optometry V Vision Sciences Year I Semester I Code HSC 100 OPV 100 OPV 101 Course Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

And Applications Total Semester II Code OPV 204 OPV 205 OPV 206 OPV 207 OPV 208 OPV 209 NUR 212 NUR 213 Total OPV 210

3 27 Units 3
3

OPV 102 OPV 103 OPV 104 OPV 105 COS 100 Total OPV 111: Clinical Experience Semester II NUR 109 OPV 106 OPV107 OPV 108

Basic Life Support and Pre-hospital Care Introduction to Optometry and Professionalism I Introduction to Optometry and Professionalism II Physics in Optometry General Human Anatomy General Human Physiology Medical Biochemistry I Communication Skills I

Title Refraction I Ophthalmology II Visual Optics II Optical Instruments Basics of Dispensing Optics Ocular Pharmacology II HIV & AIDS/STI Management Principles of Human Psychology Clinical experiences

3 3 3 3 3 24

CSC 110 OPV 109 COS 101 OPV 110 Total OPV 111: Clinical Experience Year II Semester I Code OPV 200 PV 201 OPV 202 NUR 111 NUR 203 NUR 204 NUR 205 OPV 203 IRD 103

Medical Microbiology Anatomy of the Eye Physiology of the Eye Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics Fundamentals of Computing General Optics Communication Skills II Pathology

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Year III Semester I Code NUR 300 NUR 301 OPV 300 OPV 301 OPV 302 OPV 303 OPV 304 OPV 305 Total Semester II

Title Units Medical Epidemiology Medical Biostatistics Refraction II Ophthalmic Examination I Ophthalmology III Lens Technology Contact Lenses I Pediatric Optometry I

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Title Ophthalmology I Visual Optics I Ocular Pharmacology I Health Assessment Fundamentals of Medical Sociology and Anthropology Community Health Human Nutrition Clinical Methods Development Concepts

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 188

Code Title Units OPV 306 Dispensing Optics II OPV 307 Refraction III OPV 308 Special Issues of Optometry NUR 306 Health Promotion/Education NUR 310 Research Methodology OPV 309 Paediatric Optometry II OPV 310 Ophthalmic Examination II OPV 311 Contact Lenses II Total OPV 312: Clinical Experience Year IV Semester I Code

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Title

Units

OPVV 400 OPV 401 OPV 402 OPV 403 NUR.404 NUR 405
OPV 406

Refraction IV Low Vision I Neuro Ophthalmology Primary Eye Care Occupational Health Gender and Health Clinical Concentration I

3 3 3 3 3 3 6

stakeholders in capacity building for the health care sector as well as create opportunities for further professional and career advancement.

Semester II Code OPV 404 OPV 405 NUR 401 NUR 403 OPV 407 COS 303 OPV408 Title Units Research Project 6 Low Vision II 3 Health Systems Management 3 Public Relations in Clinical Practice 3 Clinical Concentration II 6 Entrepreneurship 3 Clinical Experience

2. 0 Programme Objective The general objective is to develop relevant competencies to enable the learner to acquire the necessary skills and capability to design and implement health promotion, rehabilitation, physical interventions and sports talents for the individual and community at national and global levels 3.0. Specific Objectives By the end of the programme the learners should be able to: 3.1. Apply the concepts and principles of health promotion, rehabilitation and sports science 3.2. Identify and develop sports talents to elite status. 3.3. Enhance health promotion through mass participation in sports at all levels and settings 3.4. Diagnose performance in sports and prescribe training of elite athletes 3.5. Rehabilitate special populations 3.6. Develop health promotion, sport and allied fields through research 3.7. Utilize key skills and approaches necessary for designing health promotion rehabilitation and sports science in various settings. 3.8. Apply communication approaches for behaviour change and practice. 3.9. Conduct monitoring and evaluation in health promotion, rehabilitation and sports science interventions. 3.10. Demonstrate understanding of advocacy and networking skills appropriate for the development of health promotion, rehabilitation and sports science 4.0. Entry Requirements 4.1 The common University admission requirements must be met 4.2 Candidates shall have obtained a mean grade of at least C+ at K.C.S.E. and passed the subject clusters as indicated: a) Alternative A Biology 189 C+

Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion and Sports Science 1.0 Preamble Most of the diseases inflicting the majority of people in developed and developing countries are preventable. Management and control of these diseases and other public health problems require multi-disciplinary professionals. This programme is a unique blend that utilizes salient knowledge and competencies in public health and sports science to provide opportunities for learners to develop a critical perspective towards design and implementation of health promotion, rehabilitation and sports science within the context of dynamic social-cultural, economic and environmental realities. The programme is based on the concept of interdisciplinary approaches to health development by introducing participants to health promotion and sports science as a tool-kit for stimulating health actions that build synergy with the innovative biomedical health development model. The critical and unique contribution of the program is promotion of health for all and the prevention of disease through the empowerment of individuals, families and communities to take control over health-related risk factors and thereby improve their well-being. Further, the programme will contribute to the current efforts by the government and other

Mathematics Physics Chemistry English b) Alternative B Biological Sciences Physical Sciences Mathematics English OR

C+ C+ C+

B C+ C+ C+

Making total of 40 marks 6.5.4. Each theory course shall be marked out of 100 marks distributed as shown below 6.5.5. End of trimester written examination 70% 6.5.6. 2 Take- away CA 20% Sit in CA 10% 6.5.7. The pass mark for the examination shall be 50%. A candidate who obtains between 47% and 49% may be compensated up to a maximum of two courses to attain a pass mark of 50% by the school examination board. The marks may be deducted from the related courses the student has passed well in accordance with the University rules on marks compensation 6.6. For all clinical placements, continuous assessments will be carried out. The weighting for each placement is as follows:-End of rotation appraisal 25% Log Book 5% Practical examination 70% 6.7. Structured clinical examinations including oral test shall be marked out of 100%. The pass mark for these examinations will be 50%. 6.8. The letter grades for the marks scored per course shall be indicated as follows for inclusion in the Academic transcript. Letter Grade Range of marks (%) Remarks A 75 and Above Distinction B 65 to 74 Credit C 50 to 64 Pass E 49 and below Fail 6.9. Progression to subsequent year All core courses offered in the programme are a prerequisite to proceed to the next academic year. A candidate must pass in the courses before proceeding to the next academic year. The exam will only be complete together with all CAS marks. 6.10. Academic Probation A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in the first semester shall be placed on an academic probation by the Dean

4.3 Two Principal passes in Biology and Physics and a credit either in Chemistry or Mathematics at EAACE 4.4. Diploma in Health Promotion and Sports Science from an institution recognized by MMUST Senate. 5.0 Duration of the Programme The programme will take four academic years offered on full time basis 6.0 Examination Regulations 6.1. The common University Examination Regulations shall apply. In addition, the following will be specific requirements for programme. 6.2. All clinical rotations are compulsory and a candidate is expected to have a minimum of 80% clinical placement attendance 6.3. The overall assessment of the students performance in each course shall be done at the end of every semester and shall comprise of continuous assessments and end o f semester examinations 6.4. In some specific courses, oral and practical examinations will be administered as part of continuous assessments. 6.5. Written examinations of each course shall comprise of 3 CA and End of Semester Examination of one paper of 3 hours as structured below 6.5.1. Multiple choice Questions (MCQS) 20 % of the total marks. 6.5.2. Short Answer Questions (SAQS) 8 questions of 5 marks each making a total of 40 marks. 6.5.3 Essay Questions 2 question of 20 marks each 190

6.11. Supplementary A candidate who fails in up to half of courses in an academic year will be allowed to do supplementary examinations in failed course(s) before proceeding to the next academic year. 6.12 Repeating a) A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in an academic year will repeat the whole year. b) A candidate who fails in ANY course in the supplementary examinations will repeat course before proceeding to the subsequent year. c) A candidate who fails in up to half of courses taken after repeating the year will be given a chance to sit supplementary exam in the failed courses. If he fails in any of supplementary examinations he/she will be discontinued. 6.13 Discontinuation A candidate who fails in all the courses in any one semester will be discontinued. 6.14.The degree of Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion and Sports science shall not be classified. 7.0 Course Coding The courses offered to the programme of Bachelor of Science Health Promotion and Sports Science will be coded using three letters HSS and three digits. The letters stand for H Health promotion S Sports S - Science 8.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title Units HSS 100 Foundations of Sports Science 3 HSS 101 Functional Human Anatomy 1 3 HSS 102 Human Physiology I 3 HSS 103 Foundations of Health Promotion 3 HSS 104 Psychology of Sport and Exercise 3 HSS 105 Legal Issues in Health Promotion, Recreation and Sports 3 HSC 100 Basic Life Support and Pre191

Hospital Care Communication Skills I Total Semester II COS 100 Code HSS 106 HSS 107 3 HSS 108 HSS 109 HSS 110 HSS 111 HSS 112 HSS 113 COS1001

3 3 24

Tttle Units Exercise and Wellness 3 Human Physiology II Human Functional Anatomy II 3 Medical Biochemistry 3 Aerobics and Gymnastics 3 First Aid and Safety Education 3 Components of Fitness and Principles of Training 3 Fundamentals of Medical and Sports Socio-Anthropology 3 Communication Skills II 3 Total 24

Year II Semester I Code HSS 200 HSS 201 HSS 202 HSS 203 NUR 212 HSS 204 HSS205 HSS 206 COS 102 Semester II Code HSS 207 HSS 208 HSS 209

Title Units Exercise Physiology 3 Exercise Biochemistry 3 Sports Nutrition and Human Performance 3 Basket ball and Hand ball 3 HIV and Aids/STI Management 3 Communication in Health Promotion 3 Planning Community Health Promotion Programs 3 Biomechanics I 3 Communication Skills II 3 Total 27

HSS 210

Title Units Motor Development and Learning 3 Adapted Sport 3 Ergogenic Aids and Drugs Abuse in Recreation and Sports 3 Biomechanics II 3

HSS 211 HSS 212 HSS 213 HSS 214: COS 103:

Volley Ball and Soccer Athletics and swimming I Exercise Ergonomics and Occupational Health Human Population Dynamics and Health Development Concepts and Applications Total

3 3 3 3 3 24

Year IV Semester I Code HSS 400 HSS 401 HSS 402 HSS 403 HSS 404

Year III Semester I Code HSS 300 HSS 301 HSS 302 HSS 303 HSS 304 HSS 305 HSS 306 HSS 307 Title Computer Applications in Sport Exercise in Chronic Diseases Stress Management in Recreation and Sports Athletics and Swimming II Health communication and Behavior Change Sports Programming and Event Management Medical Epidemiology Fitness Evaluation and Exercise Prescription Total Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Semester II Code HSS408 HSS 409 HSS410 HSE411 HSE412 HSE413 Semester II Code HSS 308 HSS 309 Title Units Hockey and Net Ball 3 Statistical Analysis in Human Performance and Computer Applications 3 Sports Medicine 3 Contemporary Issues in Sports and Recreation 3 Sports Journalism and Broadcasting 3 Financial Management and Accounting in Sports 3 Introduction to Environmental Health 3 Talent Identification and Mentoring through Sports 3 Total 24 HSS414 HSS 415 HSS 405 HSS 406 HSS407

Tttle Units Tennis and Rounders 3 Advocacy and Networking in Sports 3 Coaching Science 3 Outdoor Education and Leadership 3 Advanced Concepts in Health Promotion 3 Exercise Environmental Physiology 3 Research Project 3 Occupational Health 3 Total 24

Title Units Sports Entrepreneurship and Marketing 3 Fitness Programmes for Special Populations 3 Sports Administration and Management 3 Exercise and Fitness Seminar 3 Coaching Management and Administration 3 Match analysis and Officiating in Sports 3 Sports Facilities and Equipment Management 3 Behaviour Change Concepts in Health Promotion 3 Total 24

HSS 310 HSS 311 HSS 312


HSS313

Bachelor of Science in Health Professions Education Upgrading 1.0.Introduction. The educational system for training health professionals recognizes the impact of national and international policies and strategies on education as well as the significant move towards multi-interprofessional training in order to respond to challenges affecting health man-power and services in Kenyan market and globally. 192

HSS 314 HSE 315

There is an increase in the number of public and private medical training institutions with over 3,000 health professionals deployed in training health care providers in Kenya. Majority of them require training in the field of Health Professions (Medical Teacher) Education in order to meet the growing demand for developing health man-power. This programme is designed for health care professionals who are involved in training health care providers. The graduates of this programme are being prepared to teach in a variety of settings including academic medical institutions, health care organizations and to variety of constituencies including students and professionals pursuing continuing education opportunities. It is a response to growing demands for wellprepared Health Professions Educator with a clinical focus. The programme blends the historical characteristics and development in the relevant professions in order to give direction to the core knowledge, professional values and competencies that professional educators in an academic or practice setting must posses and be a model to others as they perform their roles as teachers and scholars. The educator develops expertise in a clinical practice area by selecting a nine-unit concentration in an advanced clinical focus related to the relevant discipline. This will ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of the health training programmes for overall purpose of improving the delivery of health services. This upgrading programme is work-based. The students are supported to be autonomous educational practitioners, critical in analysing their work and be committed to personal development. 20. Rationale There are few qualified Health Professions Educators prepared at degree level to teach in medical training institutions. Most of the teachers are Diploma holders without preparation in teaching. It is for this reason that MMUST has taken the challenge to introduce Bachelor of Science in Health Professions Education to meet health training challenges of the 21st century and beyond. 193

3.0 Programme goal To utilize multi-disciplinary and innovative approaches in Health Professions Education to produce educationists with expertise in teaching and relevant clinical practice capable of providing training to health care providers. 4.0 Specific Objectives The programme will prepare the graduates to: 4.1 Integrate knowledge from the biomedical, physical and behavioral sciences, informatics and the humanities into expert clinical practice. 4.2 Ground learning-teaching strategies in educational theory and evidence-based research findings from clinical practice to enhance learning outcomes. 4.3 Utilize a variety of learning-teaching strategies and Information Communication Technology appropriate to train health care providers to develop their cognitive, psychomotor, affective, critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills. 4.4 Demonstrate ethical and professional values, continuing professional development and participate in political regulatory processes to influence healthcare systems and policy. 4.5 Design and provide learning resources to diverse learners that meet their individual learning needs. 4.6. Design and use a variety of tools and strategies to assess and evaluate learning in cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. 4.7 Use student assessment and evaluation results together with programme evaluation to enhance learning- teaching process. 4.8. Participate effectively in curriculum design, planning and evaluation 5.0 Duration of the Programme The programme will take two and half (2 ) calendar years of 8 semesters. The programme shall be covered by course work, clinical concentration, examinations, research project and teaching practice. 6.0 Entry Rerquirements 6.1. The applicant must be holder of a diploma in any health profession ( nursing, clinical medicine,

medical laboratory science, pharmacy, radiography, nutrition, physiotherapy, environmental health etc ) from an institution recognized by MMUST Senate 6.2. At least two (2) years relevant professional working experience preferably as a teacher/ facilitator in health care institution. 7.0 Examination Regulations The common University Examination Regulations shall apply. In addition, the following will be specific requirements for programme. 7.1 All clinical rotations and teaching practice sessions are compulsory 7.2 A candidate is expected to have a minimum of 80% clinical placement Attendance. 7.3. The overall assessment of the students performance in each course shall be done at the end of every trimester and shall comprise of continuous assessments and end o f semester examinations 7.4. In some specific courses, oral and practical examinations will be administered as part of continuous assessments. 7.5. Written examinations of each course shall comprise of 3 CA and End of Semester Examination of one paper of 3 hours as structured below: 7.5.1. Multiple choice Questions (MCQS)- 20 % of the total marks. 7.5.2. Short Answer Questions (SAQS)- 8 questions of 5 marks each making a total of 40 marks. 7.5.3 Essay Questions 2 question of 20 marks each Making total of 40 marks 7.5.4. Each theory course shall be marked out of 100 marks distributed as shown below End of semester written examination 70% 2 Take- away CAs 20% Sit in CA 10% 7.6.The pass mark for the examination shall be 50%. A candidate who obtains between 47% and 49% may be compensated up to a maximum of two courses to attain a pass mark of 50% by the school examination board.

7.6. For all clinical placements, continuous assessments will be carried out. The weighting for each placement is as follows:End of rotation appraisal 25% Log Book 5% Practical examination 70% 7.7. Structured clinical examinations including oral test shall be marked out of 100%. The pass mark for these examinations will be 50%. 7.8. The letter grades for the marks scored per course shall be indicated as follows for inclusion in the academic transcript. Letter Grade Range of marks (%) Remarks A 75 and Above Distinction B 65 to 74 Credit C 50 to 64 Pass E 49 and below Fail 7.9. Progression to subsequent year All core courses offered in the programme are a prerequisite to proceed to the next academic year. A candidate must pass in the courses before proceeding to the next academic year. The exam will only be complete together with all CAS marks. 7.10. Academic Probation A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in the first trimester shall be placed on an Academic Probation by the Dean 7.11. Supplementary A candidate who fails in up to half of courses in an academic year will be allowed to do supplementary examinations in failed course(s) before proceeding to the next academic year. 7.12 Repeating a) A candidate who fails in more than half of courses taken in an academic year will repeat the whole year. A candidate who fails in ANY course in the supplementary examinations will repeat course before proceeding to the subsequent year. A candidate who fails in up to half of courses taken after repeating the year will be given a chance to sit supplementary exam in the failed courses. If he/she fails in any of the supplementary examinations he/she will be discontinued. 7.13 Discontinuation A candidate who fails in all the courses in any one semester will be discontinued. 194

The marks may be deducted from the related courses the student has passed well in accordance with the University rules on marks compensation

7.14 The degree of Bachelor of Science in Health Professions Education shall not be classified. 8.0 Course Coding: The courses offered to students of Bachelor of Science in Health Professions Education will be coded using three letters HPE and three digits. The letters stand for H Health, P Professions , E Education

HPE 107 IRD 103 NUR 203 HPE 108 HSS 305 HPE 109 Total Year II Trimester I Code HPE 201 HPE 202 NUR 405 NUR 405 HPE 203 HPE 204 HPE205

9.0 Course Structure Year I Trimester I Code HPE101: NUR 100 NUR101 NUR105 NUR104 IRD 102 HPE102

Medical Learning-Teaching Strategies I 3 Developmental Concepts and Application 3 Medical Socio-Anthropology 3 Disasters Management in Medical Education I 3 Sports Programming and Events Management 3 Clinical Concentration 3 24

Title Foundations of Health professions Education Cell Biology and Genetics Anatomy I 3 Medical Physiology I Medical Biochemistry I Communication Skills II Human development and Behavior in Medical Education

Unit 3 3 3 3 3

Total Trimester II Code CSC 110 NUR 106 HPE 103 NUR110 NUR104 HPE 104 NUR 212 Total

3 21

Tittle Unit Fundamentals to omputin 3 Anatomy II 3 Medical Educational Psychology 3 Physiology 3 Medical Biochemistry II 3 Medical Ethics and Professionalism 3 HIV and AIDS/STI Management 3 21

HPE 206 Total

Title Units Medical Learning-Teaching Strategies II 3 Curriculum and Instruction in Medical Education I 3 Medical Biostatistics 3 Gender and Health 3 Counseling In Medical Education I 3 Human Nutrition for Health Professions Education 3 Disaster Management in Medical Education II 3 Medical Information and Communication Technology 3 21

Trimester III Code Title Unit HPE 105 Medical Instructional Design and Management 3 HPE 106 Psychological Basis of Learning- Teaching in Medical Education 3 195

Trimester II Code Title Units HPE 207 Innovative Medical Education 3 HPE 208 Introduction to Research 3 HPE 209 Medical Leadership and Management 3 HPE 210 Curriculum and Instruction in Medical Education II 3 HPE 211 Clinical Teaching 3 HPE 212 Counseling in Medical Education II 3 HPE213 Health Learning- Teaching

Materials Total

3 21

Total 24 Grand Total

123

1722

Trimester III Code Title Units HPE 214 Global Trends in Medical Learning- Teaching 3 NUR401 Health Service Management and Economics 3 HPE215 Health Education 3 HPE216 Quality Assurance in Medical Education 3 HPE217 Assessment of Medical Cognitive Performance 3 HPE218 Assessment of Clinical Performance 3 HPE219 Medical Epidemiology 3 HPE220 Discipline Concentration 3 Total 24 Year III Trimester I HPE 300 HPE 301 HPE 302 HPE 304 HPE 305

Mode of Study Full time programme for a period of 2 years consisting of two days of contact hours (theory) at the University and relevant clinical concentrations and teaching practice in approved health training facilities.

HPE 306

HPE 307

HPE 308 Total

Global Dimension and Medical Education Occupational Health and Safety Public Relations in Health Professions Project Management Open, Distance and Flexible Learning in Health Professions Application of Teaching and Managerial Skills in Medical Education Continuing Professional Development for Health Professions Entrepreneurship for Health Professions

3 3 3 3

3 3 24

Trimester II Code HPE 309 HPE 310 HPE 311

Title Uunits Discipline concentration III 3 Research Project 3 Teaching Practicum 18 196

Centre for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (CDMHA) 1.0. Background Information The Center for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (CDMHA) was established at WUCST in April 2004. It is the first center at WUCST and also a first of its kind in the region. It assumes the status of a regional centre. Natural and Human-Made disasters are increasingly becoming severe and frequent. This has led to increased human suffering and economic losses, especially in developing countries. Indeed more than 95% of all deaths in developing countries are caused by disasters, and the economic losses due to natural disasters are 20 times greater (as per GDP) in developing countries than in industrial countries. The main reason for this disparity is attributed to more vulnerability in developing countries. Some of the suggested causes of disasters in developing countries are: 1.1. Poorly planned development leaving out disaster prevention and mitigation efforts. 1.2. . Lack of strategic planning and rapid response to disasters. 1.3 Dense population in the flood plains. d. Degradation of natural resources. 1.4. . Defective or lack of disaster management policies. 1.5. Lack of disaster warning systems. 1.6. Low literacy levels on disaster warning and management. 1.7. Lack of research findings on disaster management to planners and affected communities. 1.8. Non-existent data bases upon which proper planning may be based. To tackle the above causes, proper disaster planning, management and response need to be put in place. In addition traditional methods in disaster management need to be developed. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. To provide students with the theoretical and practical background for understanding and 197

addressing the issues associated with sustainable development, in the context of both natural and man-made disasters. 2.2. To equip graduates with the awareness, understanding and skills essential for effective participation in action as individuals and as members of a team in crises situations. 2.3. To introduce students to ethics, codes and standards of good practice in disaster management. 2.4. To describe strategies for early warning and prevention of humanitarian crises. 2.5. To enable students understand the synergy between emergency development interventions and sustainable development programmes. 2.6. Prepare students to have the core knowledge and skills needed to assume leadership in responding to the multifaceted demands of sustainable development in emergencies and in normal development tasks and activities. 2.7. Assist students identify and analyse common successes and challenges related to sustainable development activities and apply their core knowledge in solving problems within their field of work. 2.8. Enable students participate in an interactive learning community with diverse participants and faculty from different communities/countries and various institutional settings. 3.0. Target Groups The programmes in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance are suitable for professionals from the following backgrounds and other related fields: a. Natural resource scientists b. Natural resource managers c. Engineers, architects and planners d. Commercial disaster managers. e. Uniformed services including the fire department, ambulance, police, nursing and armed forces. f. Form four school leavers g. International agencies such as UN, UNICEF, UNDP, WFP and WHO. h. NGOs and other disaster relief and aid agencies. i. Risk Managers and Insurance Providers. j. Health Service Managers.

k. Consultants in insurance, financial institutions and risk undertakers. l. Education Professionals m. Administrators Certificate Programmes Certificates in Disaster Management shall be offered in the following 8 options: a. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Audit and Planning Logistics. b. Disaster Preparedness and Engineering c. Reconstruction d. Conflict Management and Resolution e. Emergency Planning and Disaster f. Management g. Humanitarian Assistance and Conflict h. Resolution i. Disaster Preparedness and Risk j. Management k. Environmental Infrastructure and Engineering Maintenance. l. Disaster Epidemiology and Health Management 1.0. . Entry Requirements The following shall be eligible for registration for the Certificate Courses: Either 1.1. Holder of at least 3 months Course in the above areas. Successful completion of Certificate with Credit will enable the Candidate to join Diploma Courses at higher levels. Or 1.2 Holders of KCSE Certificate with mean grade C- (minus) or KCE Certificate at Division III Certificate and Diploma Programmes In Ethics and Corruption Studies 1.0. Background Information Corruption has been a frequent subject of discussion in several fora both locally and internationally. Its genesis is rooted in the earliest development of humankind and its manifestation spans several generations. Governments all over the world have declared war on corruption and the developed 198

countries have even pegged donor support on commitment by recipient countries to fight the vice. Corruption is deeply rooted in the fabric of society and has led to the deterioration of infrastructure in Kenya through embezzlement of funds and the misuse of resources. The lack of transparency and accountability has led to near breakdown of several institutions and organizations. 2.0. Rationale of courses in Ethics and Corruption Studies In spite of laudable efforts, it is a fact that the fight against corruption is still a daunting task and the vice is progressively approaching disastrous levels in society. One of the main reasons for this is the fact that Kenya has a shortage of well -trained personnel to deal with the situation professionally. Such organs as the Kenya Anti-Corruption Commission need to devolve at least to the district level, and in order to achieve that effectively, there is need for capacity building. There is an urgent need to train and impart anti-corruption skills, knowledge and attitude to people who will then steer the process of fighting the vice diligently. Apart from the Integrity Assurance Officers training programmes run by the Kenya Anti-Corruption Commission, there is currently no formal ethics and anti-corruption training to facilitate career development in the profession. As a centre that is deeply involved in research and dissemination of knowledge in disaster studies, CDMHA is obligated to make a contribution towards finding a solution to the problem. The centre has recruited competent staff with the ability of carrying out scientific analysis and dissemination of knowledge on a wide range of hazards including corruption. Some of them have undergone training in corruption studies and have experience in handling corruption issues in the public sector. The Centre intends to carry out capacity building by offering certificate courses in Corruption Prevention, Corruption Research, Monitoring and Evaluation, Corruption Detection, Reporting and the Legal Framework, and Forensic Science, Banking Fraud and Money Laundering Investigations. These

courses will also lead to a Diploma in Ethics and Corruption Studies. It is expected that the training will complement the efforts of the Kenya AntiCorruption by producing people who are well trained on ethics and corruption issues. The graduates from the training programmes will form the required human resource base to facilitate the decentralization of the activities of the Commission to the grass root level. The curricula focus on skills and capacities required in field situations and the Centre will strive to maintain links with other institutions involved in ethics and corruption studies at local, national and international levels. 2.0. Aim The aim of the programme in ethics and corruption studies is to impart skills and knowledge and produce qualified personnel capable of carrying out research and spearheading the fight against corruption in society. 3.0. Objectives 3.1. To provide students with the theoretical and practical background for understanding and addressing the issues associated with corruption. 3.2. To provide graduates with the awareness, understanding and skills essential for effective participation in action as individuals and as members of a team in dealing with corruption issues. 3.3. To introduce students to ethics, codes and standards of good behaviour. 3.4. Prepare students to have the core knowledge and skills needed to assume leadership and be proactive in dealing with corruption issues. 3.5. Enable students participate in an interactive learning community with diverse participants and faculty from different communities/countries and various institutional settings. 4.0. Special Skills to be acquired by Professionals in Corruption Studies Graduates of the program will be able to: 4.1. Carry out corruption risk analysis and design corruption prevention action plans.

4.2. Have a basic understanding of the natural/socioeconomic environment in which corruption takes place. 4.3. Identify specific needs of affected organizations in the fight against corruption, and plan and implement activities to meet these needs, and monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of assistance provided; 4.4. Plan and implement corruption prevention programmes. 4.5. Understand the law relating to the fight against corruption. 5.0. Target Groups The certificate and diploma courses in Ethics and Corruption Studies target people employed in public and private organizations as well as NonGovernmental Organizations, who are expected to manage corruption prevention programmes in their organizations. The courses also target non-employed people who wish to gain knowledge, skills and attitudes in corruption prevention and especially the youth who intend to pursue a career in corruption studies and seek employment in such organizations as the Kenya Anti-Corruption Commission as well as Non-Governmental Organizations. Other targeted groups are Law Enforcement officers, Investigators and bankers, who require special skills in forensic science, banking fraud and money laundering investigations. 6.0. Certificate Programmes Candidates may select any one of the following programmes: 6.1. Part I Certificate in Corruption Prevention Methods. 6.2. Part II Certificate in Corruption Research, Monitoring and Evaluation. 6.3. Part III - Certificate in Corruption Detection, Reporting and the Legal Frame-work. 6.4. Part IV - Certificate in Forensic Science, Banking Fraud and Money Laundering Investigations. 6.1.Certificate in Corruption Prevention Methods (CPM) Code CDM 094 199 Title Core Modules Fundamentals of Corruption

DDM 054

Corruption Risk Assessment and Management DDM 055 Corruption Prevention Techniques DDM 058 Financial Management DDM 059 Procurement of Goods and Services CDM 095 Field Project Elective Modules. (A candidate to choose at least one) DDM 060 Introduction to Computer Studies DDM 052 Ethics DDM 053 Communication Skills 6.2. Certificate in Corruption Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (CRME) Code Title Core Modules CDM 094 Fundamentals of Corruption DDM 053 Communication Skills DDM 063 Quantitative Skills DDM 054 Corruption Risk Assessment and Management DDM 056 Corruption Monitoring and Evaluation Methods CDM 095 Field Project Elective Modules. (A candidate to choose at least one) DDM 064 Introduction to Computer Studies DDM 057 The Legal Framework for Fighting Corruption DDM 061 State Society and Development

DDM 060 DDM 058 DDM 061

Introduction to Computer Studies Financial Management Ethics and Development

6.4. Certificate in Forensic Science, Banking Fraud and Money Laundering Investigations (FBML) Title Core Modules CDM 094 Fundamentals of Corruption DDM 053 Communication Skills DDM 067 Forensic Science DDM 066 Banking Fraud Investigations DDM 068 Money Laundering Investigations CDM 095 Field Project Elective Modules. (A candidate to choose at least one) DDM 060 Introduction to Computer Studies. DDM 057 The Legal Framework for Fighting Corruption DDM 065 Intelligence, Investigation and Surveillance Methods 7.0. Diploma Programme In Disaster Management Semester I Code Title Core Modules Introduction to Disasters Communication Skills Quantitative Skills Principles of Conservation Refugees and Displaced Persons Camp Organisation DDM 004 Earth History and Evolution DDM 005 Principles of Environmental Health, water and Sanitation Elective Modules. (A candidate to choose at least one) DDM 006 Fire Disaster Management DDM 007 Negotiations and Post-Conflict Rehabilitation DDM 008 Theory of Communication CDM 091 DDM 001 DDM 002 DDM 003 DDM 022 Semester II Code Title 200 Code

6.3. Certificate in Corruption Detection, Reporting and the Legal Framework (CDRLF) Code CDM 094 DDM 053 DDM 065 Title

Core Modules Fundamentals of Corruption Communication Skills Intelligence, Investigation and Surveillance Methods DDM 057 The Legal Framework for Fighting Corruption DDM 064 Human Psychology CDM 095 Field Project Elective Modules. (A candidate to choose at least one)

DDM 009 DDM 010 DDM 011 DDM O12 DDM 021 DDM 013 DDM 014

Core Modules Legal considerations in Disaster Management Gender Vulnerability in Disaster Management Teamwork in Disaster Operations Disaster Impact Evaluation and Recovery Strategies Humanitarian Interventions in Emergencies First Aid Skills and Practice Introduction to Computer studies

Elective Modules. (A candidate to choose at least one) DDM 015 Introduction to Public Relations DDM 016 Introduction to Emergency Water Supply Systems DDM 017 Human and Physical Geography Semester III Code Title Core Modules DDM 018 Environmental Impact Assessment and Audit DDM 019 Strategies in Crisis and Emergency Management DDM 020 Sustainable Community Development Strategies CDM 092 Case Studies and Project Report Elective Modules. (A candidate to choose at least one) DDM Peace Building and Conflict 023 Resolution DDM Local Post - Disaster Reconstruction 024 Materials DDM Introduction to International Relations 025 B.Sc. in Disaster Preparedness and Environmental Technology 1.0. Programme Design Year 1: Foundation courses which form the basic building blocks of earth sciences, with a basic introduction to disasters and environmental sciences.

Year 2: Students are introduced to Earth and human sciences, alongside disaster preparedness and planning. Year 3: Introduces applied sciences such as geographical information systems, remote sensing and risk assessment methodologies which equip students with specialist skills used to understand, monitor and predict natural hazards. They are introduced to the principles of hazard, risk and vulnerability assessment. This continues alongside environmental and technological themes which highlights the current technological advances, their uses and impacts on the environment; and engineering for sustainable development. Year 4: Core modules in this year are designed to develop candidates knowledge of disaster planning and management and to give them an understanding of technological approaches to resource management and sustainable development. Candidates tailor their studies through option modules. 2.0. Duration The degree programme for BSc in Disaster Preparedness and Environmental Technology shall be covered in four academic years, each consisting of two semesters. Students are also required to undergo a six-week field attachment at the end of their third year. 3.0. Entry Requirements The candidate must satisfy the Universitys general requirements for admission for undergraduate studies. In addition, they must have attained a mean grade of C+ at KCSE and individual score of at least grade C in the following subjects: Physics Chemistry Biology or Geography or any GROUP IV (Home science, Art and Design, Agriculture, Woodwork, Metalwork, Building Construction, Power Mechanics, Electricity, Drawing and Design, Aviation Technology, and Computer Studies) Mathematics Candidates with Diploma qualification from recognised institutions in an appropriate field, may also be considered for entry, and the entry point 201

shall be determined by the number of transferable credits. 4.0. Course Structure Year 1 Semester 1 Code Title MAT 105 Basic Mathematics I CHE 110 Basic Chemistry I CDM101 Introduction to Disasters PHY 110 Basic Physics I IRD 100 Communication Skills I CDS 104 Principles of Ecology I COM105 Introduction to Computers IRD 103 Development Concepts and Applications Total Semester II Code Title CHE III Basic Chemistry II STA 106 Basic Statistics PHY 111 Basic Physics II IRD 102 Communication Skills II IRD 104 Quantitative skills II MAT 106 Basic Mathematics II CDM107 Introduction to environmental science Total Year II Semester 1 Code Title IRD 200 State, Society & Development STA 205 Statistics CDM200 Natural Hazards and Disasters CDM201 Man-made & Technological Disasters CDM202 Environmental Analytical Chemistry CDM 203 Climatological aspects of disaster management CDM 210 Man and environment Total Semester II CDM 204 Disasters and Society CDM 205 Environmental ethics CDM 206 Environmental Geology CDM 207 EnvironmentalMicrobiology MAT 205 Numerical Methods

CDM 208

Units 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 28 Units 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 22

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 3 3 3 3 3 202

Principles of Disaster Management 3 CDM 209 Environmental Health Engineering 3 Total 21 Year III Semester 1 CDM 300 Survey and Photogrammetry 3 CDM 301 Disaster Risk & Vulnerability Assessment 3 CDM 302 ICTApplications in Disaster Preparedness 3 CDM 303 Principles of Environmental Technology 3 CDM 304 Environmental Pollution and Control 3 CDM 305 Environmental Hydrology 3 CDM 306 Geographic Information systems (GIS) and remote sensing I 3 Total 21 Semester II CDM 307 Disaster Response and Recovery 3 CDM 308 Environmental technology & sustainable Development 3 CDM 309 Process & System Safety Engineering 3 CDM 310 Simulation & Modeling in Disaster Preparedness 3 CDM 311 Environmental Modelling 3 CDM 312 Environmental Biotechnology 3 CDM 313 Fire safety Technology 3 CDM 314 Research Methods and Seminar 3 Total 24 CDM 306 Field attachment 4 Year IV: Semester 1 Core Courses CDM 400 Post-Disaster Rehabilitation & Reconstruction CDM 401 Environmental Law and Policy CDM 402 Disaster preparedness and Planning CDM 403 Research Project CDM 404 Hazardous materials & solid

3 3 3 2

waste Management Elective (candidate to choose two) CDM 405E Emergency Shelter & Construction CDM 406E Environmental Meteorology CDM 407E Flood Forecasting and Control Total (Max) Semester II Core Courses CDM 403 Research Project CDM 408 Energy Resources and Environment CDM 409 Disaster Management Technology CDM 410 Technological Forecasting and Management CDM 411 Safety and Emergency Response Electives (candidate to choose two) CDM 412E Industrial occupational Health and safety CDM 413E Quality Control & Assurance CDM 414E Building Design Technology Safety CDM 415E Basics of Fluid Mechanics CDM 416E GIS & remote sensing II CDM417E Industrial Waste Treatment Total (Max) B.Sc. in Disaster Mitigation and Sustainable Development 1.0. Objectives Objectives of the programme are to: 1.1. Provide a detailed understanding of the environment, including biological and nonbiological components; 1.2. Provide the relevant level of understanding of economic and social processes which lead to the need for conservation and the societal demand for such conservation; and 1.3. Impart skills and ability which will enable the analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of ecognize different conservation techniques/strategies for environmental/disaster management aims.

3 3 3 20

4 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 25

1.4. Describe strategies for early warning and prevention of humanitarian crises. 1.5. Understand the synergy between emergency development interventions 1.6. Prepare students to have the core knowledge and skills needed to assume leadership in responding to the multifaceted demands of sustainable development in emergencies and in normal development tasks and activities. 2.0 Entry Requirements The candidate must satisfy the Universitys general requirements for admission for undergraduate studies. In addition, they must have attained an individual score of grade C in the following subjects: Physics Chemistry English or Biology or Geography or any GROUP IV (Home science, Art and Design, Agriculture, Woodwork, Metalwork, Building Construction, Power Mechanics, Electricity, Drawing and Design, Aviation Technology, and Computer Studies) Mathematics Candidates with Diploma qualification from ecognized institutions in an appropriate field, normally with a Distinction or credit may also be considered for entry, and the entry point shall be determined by the number of transferable credits. 2.0.Course Structure Semester 1 MAT 105 IRD 101 CDM 101 CDS 100 IRD 100 CDS 104 IRD 103 Total Units CDS 102 STA 106 CDS 103 IRD 102 IRD 104 CDS 101 CDS 105 203 Earth History & Evolution Basic Statistics Minerals, Rocks and soils Communication Skills II Quantitative skills II Environmental Biology Principles of Ecology II Basic Mathematics I Quantitative skills I Introduction to Disasters Principles of Conservation Communication Skills I Principles of Ecology I Development Concepts and Applications 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

CDS 106 Total IRD 200 STA 205 COM 205 CDM 200 3 CDS 200 CDM 201 CDS 204 Total Semester II CDS 205 CDM 205 CDM 206 CDM 204 CDM 207 CDM 203 CDM 208 Total Units Year III Semester 1 CDS 307

Human & Physical Geography

CDS 303 3 24 3 3 3 CDM 310 CDM 311 CDS 304 CDS 305 CDS 306 CDM 314 CDM 306 Total Year IV Semester I CDM 400 CDM 401 CDM 402 CDM 403 CDM 404 CDS 401 CDS 405 Total

State, Society & Development Statistics Introduction to Computers Natural hazards and Disasters Theory of resource use Man-made & Technological Disasters Biodiversity and Ecology

3 3 3 21

Appropriate Development and Sustainability 3 Simulation & Modelling in Disaster Preparedness 3 Environmental Modelling 3 Disaster Logistics 3 Ecosystem Management and Conservation 3 Environmental Restoration 3 Research Methods and seminar 3 Field attachment 4 24

Principles of management Environmental ethics Environmental Geology Disasters and Society Agriculture, Food and Environment Climatological aspects of Disaster management Principles of Disaster Management

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Post-Disaster Rehabilitation and Reconstruction 3 Environmental Law and Policy 3 Disaster preparedness and Planning 3 Research Project 2 Hazardous materials and waste Management 3 Urban Disaster Planning 3 Globalisation, Trade & sustainable Development 3 20

Rural & Urban Development Planning 3 CDM 301 Disaster Risk & Vulnerability Assessment 3 CDS 300 Global warming and climate Change 3 CDS 301 Community Development 3 CDM 304 Environmental Pollution and Control 3 CDM 306 Geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing I 3 CDS 302 Disasters, environment and sustainable development 3 Total Units 21 Semester II CDM 308

Semester II Core CDM 403 CDM 408 CDS 403 CDS 404 CDS 406 CDS 407

Research Project Energy Resources and Environment Environmental Assessment Eco-tourism Corporate Disaster Preparedness & Risk analysis Emergency Management Leadership and Organizational Behaviour

4 3 3 3 3

Environmental technology for sustainable Development

3 204

Electives (a candidate to choose TWO) CDS 408 Integrated Community Disaster Planning (Elective) 3 CDM 416 GIS & remote sensing II (Elective) 3 CDM 410 Technological Forecasting and management (Elective) 3

Total Bachelor of Disaster Management and International Diplomacy DMI 100 Theory of Communication IRD 100 Communication Skills I ECO 110 Introduction to Microeconomics IRD 103 Development Concepts and Applications CDM 101 Introduction to Disasters IRD 101 Quantitative skills I DMI 106 Introduction to Public relations Total Units Semester II CDS 102 Earth History and Evolution DMI 103 Introduction to International Relations ECO 111 Introduction to Macroeconomics IRD 102 Communication Skills II DMI 105 Introduction to sociology & anthropology IRD 104 Quantitative Skills II CDS 105 Human and economic Geography Total Units Total Units/Year Year II Semester I IRD 200 COM 205 DMI 200 CDM 200 DMI 201 CDM 201 CRM 202 GAC 202

25

DMI 205 CDM 208

Interpersonal relations Principles of management Total Units Total Units/Year

3 3 21 45

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 42

Year III Semester I DMI 300 International Organizations CDM 301 Disaster Risk & Vulnerability Assessment DMI 301 Mediation in international politics DMI 302 Social theory DMI 306 Culture & communication DMI 307 Concepts in International Relations & Diplomacy And any one of the following or other approved foreign language DMI 303 French I DMI 304 German I DMI 305 Arabic 1 Total Units Semester II DMI 308 Multilateral trade systems CDS 302 Disasters, environment and sustainable development. DMI 309 Diplomacy DMI 310 Theory of international relation CDS 304 Disaster Logistics DMI 314 Negotiation and mediation skills CDM 314 Research Methods and seminar Any one of the following: DMI 311 French II DMI 312 Germany II DMI 313 Arabic II Total Units Semester II Core CDM 403 Research Project DMI 402 Public Relations DMI 403 Analysis of international relations DMI 404 Development and regional integration DMI 405 Public Policy Analysis Electives (candidates to choose two) DMI Current Issues in International 406E Law DMI Public Administration 205

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 21 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

State, Society and Development Introduction to Computers Statistics for social scientists Natural Hazards and Disasters Race and ethnic relations Human & Technological Disasters Introduction to world civilisation Counselling theories, models and techniques Total Units

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Semester II CDM 205 Environmental ethics DMI 203 Organisational communication skills CDM 204 Disasters and Society DMI 204 Communication and Public speaking skills CDM 208 Principles of Disaster Management

3 3 3 3 3

4 3 3 3 3

3 3

407E DMI International terrorism and 408E emergency management Total Units Bachelor of Conflict Resolution and Humanitarian Assistance

3 22

1.0. Introduction This Programme is designed to analyse theories on sources and nature of conflict, violence and peace. The programme further examines the application of principles of mediation and conflict resolution in diverse situations, at local level and internationally. It requires an understanding of the social sciences as well as the humanities. 2.0. Programme Objectives The main objectives of this programme are to: 2.1. Introduce students to historical and contemporary search for a peaceful and just society and world, and facilitate a working knowledge of many historic peace movements around the world 2.2. Attain practical knowledge on the role of peacekeeping, peacemaking, and peace-building during all phases of conflict: pre-conflict, conflict, and post-conflict. 2.3. Enable graduants of the course to function effectively as humanitarian workers, both as individuals and as members of a team, in situations of conflict and disaster. 2.4. Identify stakeholders and structures for coordinating emergency response and promote cooperation and dialogue between international, governmental or non-governmental agencies involved in humanitarian action, both in assistance and protection. 2.5. Evaluate interventions and identify examples of good practice in addition to examining ways in which humanitarian crises may be anticipated and prevented. 2.6. Assess post-disaster damage to infrastructure and livelihoods, identify needs in terms of emergency relief and initiate short-term response and recovery measures 2.7. Demonstrate knowledge of rehabilitation and reconstruction measures to ensure sustainable livelihoods. 206

3.0. Entry Requirements The candidate must satisfy the Universitys general requirements for admission for undergraduate studies. In addition, they must have attained a mean grade of C+ at KCSE and individual score of grade C in the following subjects: English or Kiswahili Any GROUP III (History and Government, Geography, Christian Religiously Education, Islamic Religious Education, Social Ethics and Education, Hindu Religious Education); Any GROUP IV (Home Science, Art & Design, Agriculture, Woodwork, Metalwork, Building Construction, Power Mechanics, Electrical, Drawing & Design, Aviation and Computer Studies) or GROUP V (French, German, Arabic, Music, Accounting, Commerce, Economics or Typewriting with Office Practice). Mathematics or any GROUP II Candidates with Diploma qualification from ecognized institutions in an appropriate field, normally with a Distinction or credit may also be considered for entry, and the entry point shall be determined by the number of transferable credits. Year I Semester 1 Course Title CDM 101 Introduction to disasters IRD 103 Development concepts and applications CRM 100 Introduction to conflict, justice, and peace DMI 100 Theory of communication IRD 100 Communication Skills I IRD 101 Quantitative skills I Semester II CRM 102 Geography of peace and war CRM 103 Religion, conflicts and peace building CRM 104 Water supply in emergencies & refugee situations CRM 105 Ethnicity and conflicts IRD 102 Communication skills II IRD 104 Quantitative skills II CRM 108 Globalisation, development and

Units 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

humanitarianism

DMI 309 Diplomacy DMI 314 Negotiation and mediation skills CDM 314 Research methods and seminar Year IV Semester 1 CDM 400 Post-disaster rehabilitation & reconstruction CDM 403 Research project CRM 400 Non-violent political alternatives CRM 401 Conflict and peace strategies CRM 402 International law, conflict and peace treaties Electives DMI 401E International disasters CRM 407E Refugee camp management CRM 408E Integrated community disaster planning Semester II CRM 403 Reconciliation & transitional justice CRM 404 Peace & conflict in Kenya CRM 405 Management of humanitarian programs and organizations CRM 406 Humanitarian interventions in disasters & complex emergencies CDM 403 Research project Electives: CRM 409E International humanitarian law DMI 402E Public Relations CRM 410E Nutrition in complex emergencies CRM 411E Public health in emergency management DMI 408E International terrorism and emergency management Bachelor of Disaster Management and International Diplomacy 3 3 3 3 207

3 3 3

Year II Semester 1 IRD 200 State, society & development CRM 200 Conflict resolution CRM 202 Introduction to world civilisation CDM 200 Natural hazards and disasters GAC 201: Psychology of human adjustment COM 205 Introduction to computer applications CDM 201 Human & technological disasters

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 2 3 3 3

Semester II CDM 205 Environmental ethics DMI 203 Organisational communication skills CDM 204 Disasters and society IRD 306 Communication and public speaking skills DMI 200 Statistics for social scientists CDM 208 Principles of disaster management CRM 201 Social policy & administration Year III Semester 1 CDM 301 Disaster risk & vulnerability assessment DMI 300 International Organizations DMI 301 Mediation in international politics DMI 302 Social Theory CRM 300 Cross-Cultural Conflict Management CRM 302 Emergency planning and management CRM 301 Economic growth & resource-use conflict

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Semester II CRM 303 Post-conflict counselling CRM 304 Gender, culture and conflict in humanitarian emergencies CDS 302 Disasters, environment and sustainable development CDS 304 Disaster Logistics

1.0. Objectives Objectives of the programme are to: 1.1. Expose students to fundamental modern-era developments in international law and diplomacy 1.2. Equip students with skills and knowledge pertinent to diplomatic relations, international law

norms governing international peace and security; and in negotiations and conflict resolution strategies 1.3.Impart skills in interpreting official documents and in ecognize some of the major debates that dominate the existing literature on diplomacy and international relations 1.4. Develop strong essay-writing and oral presentation skills and ability for expressing ideas and opinions based on sound evidence, whilst respecting the views of others 1.5. Provide insight into problems and causes of poor international relations between states and the wider application of diplomacy skills in the global context of disaster management and conflict resolution between states Students initially pursue a broad course of study giving them grounding in history, economics, political science, and international relations. In their final two years of study, they go on to apply their acquired analytical skills to key areas of current international concern. 2.0. Entry Requirements 2.1. The candidate must satisfy the Universitys general requirements for admission for undergraduate studies. 2.2. In addition, they must have attained an individual score of at least grade C in the following subjects: English or Kiswahili Mathematics Biology Any Group III (History and Government, Geography, Christian Religiously Education, Islamic Religious Education, Social Ethics and Education, Hindu Religious Education) or Group V (French, German, Arabic, Music, Accounting, Commerce, Economics or Typewriting with Office Practice) 2.3. Candidates with Diploma qualification from institutions recognized by Senate in an appropriate field, may also be considered for entry, and the entry point shall be determined by the number of transferable credits. 208

Year I Semester I Code DMI 100 IRD 100 ECO 110 IRD 103 CDM 101 IRD 101 DMI 106

Name Theory of Communication Communication Skills I Introduction to Microeconomics Development Concepts and Applications Introduction to Disasters Quantitative skills I Introduction to Public relations Total Units

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Semester II CDS 102 Earth History and Evolution DMI 103 Introduction to International Relations ECO 111 Introduction to Macroeconomics IRD 102 Communication Skills II DMI 105 Introduction to sociology & anthropology IRD 104 Quantitative Skills II CDS 105 Human and economic Geography Total Units Total Units/Year Year II Semester I IRD 200 State, Society and Development COM 205 Introduction to Computers DMI 200 Statistics for social scientists CDM 200 Natural Hazards and Disasters DMI 201 Race and ethnic relations CDM 201 Human & Technological Disasters CRM 202 Introduction to world civilisation GAC 202 Counselling theories, models and techniques Total Units

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 42

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Semester II CDM 205 Environmental ethics DMI 203 Organisational communication skills CDM 204 Disasters and Society DMI 204 Communication and Public speaking skills CDM 208 Principles of Disaster Management DMI 205 Interpersonal relations CDM 208 Principles of management Total Units Total Units/Year Year III Semester I DMI 300 International Organizations CDM 301 Disaster Risk & Vulnerability Assessment DMI 301 Mediation in international politics DMI 302 Social theory DMI 306 Culture & communication DMI 307 Concepts in International Relations & Diplomacy And any one of the following or other approved foreign language DMI 303 French I DMI 304 German I DMI 305 Arabic 1 Total Units Semester II DMI 308 Multilateral trade systems CDS 302 Disasters, environment and sustainable development. DMI 309 Diplomacy DMI 310 Theory of international relation CDS 304 Disaster Logistics DMI 314 Negotiation and mediation skills CDM 314 Research Methods and seminar Any one of the following:

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 45

DMI 311 DMI 312 DMI 313

French II Germany II Arabic II Total Units Total Units/Year

3 3 3 24 45

3 3 3 3 3 3

Year IV Semester I CDM 403 Research Project CDM 400 Post-Disaster Rehabilitation and Reconstruction CDM 402 Disaster preparedness and planning DMI 400 Law of international relations DMI 401 International Disasters CRM 400 Non-violent political alternatives CRM 401 Conflict and Peace Strategies Total Units Semester II Core CDM 403 Research Project DMI 402 Public Relations DMI 403 Analysis of international relations DMI 404 Development and regional integration DMI 405 Public Policy Analysis Electives (candidates to choose two) DMI 06E Current Issues in International Law DMI 07E Public Administration DMI 08E International terrorism and emergency management Total Units Total Units/Year

2 3

3 3 3 3 3 20

4 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 21

3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3

22 42

209

Graduate Diploma/M.Sc.Programmes 1.0. Aim The chief purpose of the programmes in Disaster Management is to train and produce qualified personnel and contribute towards capacity building for effective management of infrastructure against disasters for sustainable development of mankind and society. The Programme will seek to encourage cooperation and dialogue between different disciplines involved in development and among institutions, governmental, non-governmental, national and international agencies involved in humanitarian action. 2.0. Objectives 2.1. To provide students with the theoretical and practical background for understanding and addressing the issues associated with sustainable development, in the context of both natural and man-made disasters. 2.2. To equip graduates with the awareness, understanding and skills essential for effective participation in action as individuals and as members of a team in crises situations. 2.3. To introduce students to ethics, codes and standards of good practice in disaster management. 2.4. To describe strategies for early warning and prevention of humanitarian crises. 2.5. To enable students understand the synergy between emergency development interventions 2.6. Prepare students to have the core knowledge and skills needed to assume leadership in responding to the multifaceted demands of sustainable development in emergencies and in normal development tasks and activities. 2.7. Assist students identify and analyse common successes and challenges related to sustainable development activities and apply their core knowledge in solving problems within their field of work. 2.8. Enable students participate in an interactive learning community with diverse participants and faculty from different communities/countries and various institutional settings. 3.0. Special Skills Possessed by Professionals in Disaster Management Courses 210

Graduates of the program will be able to: 3.1. Assess emergency situation to identify immediate and long term assistance needs and additional resources required; 3.2. Have a basic understanding of the natural/socioeconomic environment in which population displacement occurs; 3.3. Identify specific needs of affected populations, and plan and implement activities to meet these needs, and monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of assistance provided; 3.4. Understand the principles of organization, and administration of relief services, be able to ollaborate and cooperate with local and international non-governmental organizations/agencies, government departments in the administration of relief services. 3.5. Understand the principles of research in disaster impacts with reference to humanitarian assistance activities. 3.6. Plan and implement disaster preparedness, response and mitigation activities; 3.7. Know the health consequences of natural disasters and the management of these; 3.8. Be able to outline the basic requirements for food and nutrition programmes for disaster-affected population; 3.9. Understand the basics of International Humanitarian Law, and Human Rights principles, and their abuses. Graduate/M.Sc. Programmes 1.0. Options offered Candidates may select one of the following programmes: 1.1. Graduate Diploma/M. Sc. in Disaster Preparedness and Engineering Management (DPEM) 1.2. Graduate Diploma/M. Sc. in Disaster Management and Sustainable Development (DMSD) 1.3. Graduate Diploma/M. Sc. in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (DMHA) 1.4. Graduate Diploma/M. Sc. in Conflict Resolution and Conflict Management (CRCM)

2.0. Entry Requirements The following shall be eligible for registration for the Graduate Diploma/M.Sc in Disaster Preparedness and Engineering Management, and Graduate Diploma/M. Sc. in Disaster Management and Sustainable Development. Either 2.1. a holder of Bachelors of Science degree of at least a second class honours Upper Division in a relevant field such as Engineering; Environmental disciplines, Water Resources, Geomatic Engineering, Geography, Natural Sciences, Agricultural Sciences, Education, Human Resources and Security. Or 2.2. a holder of Bachelor of Science degree of at least a Second Class Honours Upper Division degree from other institutions recognized by Moi University Senate in a relevant field; Or 2.3. a holder of a relevant Bachelor of Science degree of a second class honours Lower Division and 2 years working experience or evidence of at least one publication or special abilities in a relevant field. Or 2.4 under special circumstances, a holder of a pass degree with a Graduate Diploma in a relevant field and 2 years working experience with evidence of ability to carry out research as evidenced by at least one relevant publication. Or 2.5. a holder of similar qualifications recognized by Moi University Senate to be equivalent to either .2.1, .2.2, .2.3, or 2.4 above. The following shall be eligible for registration for the Graduate Diploma/M.Sc in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance. Either 2.6. a holder of Bachelors of Science degree of at least a second class honours Upper Division in a relevant field such as Engineering; Environmental disciplines, Water Resources, Geomatic Engineering, Geography, Natural Sciences, Agricultural Sciences, Education, Human Resources and Security. Or 211

2.7. a holder of Bachelors of Arts degree of at least a second class honours upper Division in a relevant field. Or 2.8. a holder of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree of Second Class Honours Upper Division degree from other institutions recognized by Moi University Senate in a relevant field; Or 2.9. a holder of a second class honours Lower Division and 2 years working experience or evidence of at least one publication or special abilities in a relevant field. Or 2.10. under special circumstances, a holder of a pass degree with a Graduate Diploma in a relevant field and 2 years working experience with evidence of ability to carry out research as evidenced by at least one relevant publication. Or 2.11. a holder of similar qualifications recognized by MMUST Senate to be equivalent to either 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, or1.9 .5 above. The following shall be eligible for registration for the Graduate Diploma/M.Sc in Conflict Resolution and Conflict Management. Either 2.12. a holder of Bachelors of Arts degree of at least a second class honours Upper Division in a relevant field such as Arts, Education, Geography, Human Resources, International Relations, Security and Law. Or 2.13. a holder of Bachelors of Arts degree of at least a second class honours upper Division in a relevant field. Or 2.14. a holder of Bachelor of Arts degree of Second Class Honours Upper Division degree from other institutions recognized by Moi University Senate in a relevant field;

Or 2.15. a holder of a second class honours Lower Division and 2 years working experience or evidence of at least one publication or special abilities in a relevant field. Or 2.16. under special circumstances, a holder of a pass degree with a Graduate Diploma in a relevant field and 2 years working experience with evidence of ability to carry out research as evidenced by at least one relevant publication. Or 2.17. a holder of similar qualifications recognized by MMUST Senate to be equivalent to either 2.12, 2.13, 2.14., 2.15 or 2.16 above. 3.0.Course Structure Graduate Diploma in Disaster Preparedness and Engineering Management Code Title Semester I (Core Courses) CDM 801 Disaster Theory CDM 802 Research Methods CDM 803 GIS & ICT in Disaster Management CDM 804 Field Skills DPE 801 Natural & Non-Natural Disasters DPE 802 EIA & Planning Logistics Semester II (Core Courses) CDM 805 Disaster Impact Evaluation DPE 808 Fire Disaster Engineering CDM 888 Research Project Semester II (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) DPE 803 Refugee Camps, Shelters & Construction Materials DPE 804 Environmental Health & Sanitation DPE 805 Emergency Water Supply Units 40 30 30 30 40 40

Systems. Electro-Mechanical Systems 40 in Emergency. DPE 807 Transport Organization, 40 Facilities & Logistics CDM 806 Prediction, Monitoring & 40 Management of Disasters Graduate Diploma in Disaster Management and Sustainable Development DPE 806 Code Title Semester I (Core Courses) CDM 801 Disaster Theory CDM 802 Research Methods CDM 803 GIS & ICT in Disaster Management CDM 804 Field Skills CDM Prediction, Monitoring and 806 Management of Disasters DMD 801 Famine & Food Security Semester II (Core Courses) DMD 802 Post Disaster Reconstruction DMD 803 Environmental Impact Assessment & Audit CDM 888 Research Project Semester II (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) DMD 804 Environmental Health, Water & Sanitation DMD 805 Community Development Strategies DMD 806 Legal Considerations in Disaster Management CDM 807 HIV/Aids & Other Human Disease Pandemics CDM 808 Displaced Persons Camp Organization & Administration Units 40 30 30 30 40 40 40 40 20

40 40 40 40 40

40 30 20

40 40 40 212

Graduate Diploma in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance Units Semester I (Core Courses) CDM 801 Disaster Theory 40 CDM 802 Research Methods 30 CDM 803 GIS & ICT in Disaster 30 Management CDM 804 Field Skills 30

DMH 801

DMH 802

Planning & Management of Humanitarian Interventions & Emergencies. Post Disaster Care & Counselling

40

40

Semester II (Core Courses) DMH 803 First-Aid Skills DMH 805 Environmental Health & Nutrition in Emergencies CDM 888 Research Project

30 40 20

Semester II (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) DMH 804 Indigenous Methods in 40 Debriefing of Disaster Survivor CDM 807 HIV/Aids & Other Human 40 Disease Pandemics DMH 806 Gender Issues & Girl-Child 40 Development CDM 808 Displaced Persons Camp 40 Organization & Administration DMH 807 Public Health & Response 40 to Disasters CDM 805 Disaster Impact Evaluation 40 and Recovery Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution and Conflict Management Code Title Semester I (Core Courses) CDM 801 Disaster Theory CDM 802 Research Methods CDM 803 GIS & ICT in Disaster Management CDM 804 Field Skills CRM 801 Peace Studies CRM 802 Emergency Response to Terrorism Semester II (Core Courses) CDM 809 Peace Building and Conflict Resolution CRM 803 Negotiations and Post Conflict Rehabilitation. CDM 888 Research Project Units 40 30 30 30 40 40

Semester II (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) CRM 804 Crisis & Emergency Management CRM 805 Conflict & Teamwork in Disaster Operations CRM 806 Mental Health Services and Support CRM 807 Gender Vulnerability in Conflicts CDM 808 Displace persons Camp Organization & Administration CRM 808 History of Conflicts. CDM 805 Disaster Impact Evaluation & Recovery

40 30 40 40 40

40 40

M.Sc. in Disaster Preparedness and Engineering Management Code Title Year I, Semester I (Core Courses) CDM 801 Disaster Theory CDM 802 Research Methods CDM 803 GIS & ICT in Disaster Management DPE 801 Natural & Non-Natural Disasters DPE 802 EIA & Planning Logistics Year I, Semester II (Core Courses) CDM 805 Disaster Impact Evaluation and Recovery CDM 804 Field Skills DPE 808 Fire Disaster Engineering CDM 806 Prediction, Monitoring & Management of Disasters Year I, Semester II (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose two) DPE 803 Refugee Camps, Shelters & Construction Materials DPE 804 Environmental Health & Sanitation DPE 805 Emergency Water Supply Systems. DPE 806 Electro-Mechanical Systems in Emergency. DPE 807 Transport Organization, Facilities & Logistics 213 Units 40 30 30 40 40 40 30 30 40

40 40 40 40 40

40 40 20

Year II CDM 899

Research Thesis

40

M.Sc. in Disaster Management and Sustainable Development Code Title Year I, Semester I (Core Courses) CDM 801 Disaster Theory CDM 802 Research Methods CDM 803 GIS & ICT in Disaster Management CDM Prediction, Monitoring and 807 Management of Disasters DMD 801 Famine & Food Security Year I, Semester II (Core Courses) DMD 802 Post Disaster Reconstruction DMD 803 Environmental Impact Assessment & Audit CDM 804 Field Skills CDM 805 Disaster Impact Evaluation and recovery Year I, Semester II (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose two) DMD 804 Environmental Health, Water & Sanitation DMD 805 Community Development Strategies DMD 806 Legal Considerations in Disaster Management CDM 807 HIV/Aids & Other Human Disease Pandemics CDM 808 Displaced Persons Camp Organization & Administration Year II CDM 899 Units 40 30 30 40 40 40 40 30 40

40 40 40 40 40

Management Planning & Management of Humanitarian Interventions & Emergencies. DMH 802 Post Disaster Care & Counselling Year I, Semester II (Core Courses) DMH 803 First-Aid Skills DMH 805 Environmental Health & Nutrition in Emergencies CDM 804 Field Skills CDM 805 Disaster Impact Evaluation and recovery Year I, Semester II (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose two) DMH 804 Indigenous Methods in Debriefing of Disaster Survivor CDM 807 HIV/Aids & Other Human Disease Pandemics DMH 806 Gender Issues & Girl-Child Development CDM 808 Displaced Persons Camp Organization & Administration DMH 807 Public Health & Response to Disasters DMH 801 Year II CDM 899

40

40

30 40 30 40

40

40 40 40

40

Research Thesis

40

M.Sc. in Conflict Resolution and Conflict Management Code Title Year I, Semester I (Core Courses) CDM 801 Disaster Theory CDM 802 Research Methods CDM 803 GIS & ICT in Disaster Management CRM 801 Peace Studies CRM 802 Emergency Response to Terrorism Year I, Semester II (Core Courses) CDM 809 Peace Building and Conflict Resolution CRM 803 Negotiations and Post Conflict Rehabilitation. 214 Units 40 30 30 40 40

40 Research Thesis 40

M.Sc. in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance Code Title Year I, Semester I (Core Courses) CDM 801 Disaster Theory CDM 802 Research Methods CDM 803 GIS & ICT in Disaster Units 40 30 30

40 40

CDM 804 CDM 805

Field Skills Disaster Impact Evaluation and recovery

30 40

Year I, Semester II (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose two) CRM 804 Crisis & Emergency Management CRM 805 Conflict & Teamwork in Disaster Operations CRM 806 Mental Health Services and Support CRM 807 Gender Vulnerability in Conflicts CDM 808 Displaced Persons Camp Organization & Administration CRM 808 History of Conflicts. Year II CDM 899 Research Thesis

40 30

2.1.4 Be a holder of other qualifications considered by Senate as equivalent to a Masters degree in the disciplines outlined in (2.1.1) above. 2.1.5 Be a holder of a MMUST Masters degree in any of the four M.Sc Programmes offered at CDMHA. 2.1.6. Candidates will be required to study all modules offered at the Ph D level. 3.0. Submission and Processing of Applications

40 40 40 3.1. Applications shall be submitted to the Director, Institute for Graduate Studies, Research and Extension (IGSRE) on the prescribed forms. 3.2. All applications for registration shall be processed in the first instance by IGSRE in consultation with CDMHA. 4.0. Duration of Ph.D. Programme, 4.1. The Ph. D. programme shall consist of one year of coursework and two years of research 4.2. A candidate may be registered as a full time student for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy for a minimum of three years and a maximum of five years. Part-time students should take a minimum of four years and a maximum of seven years. Registration will be reviewed from time to time by CDMHA and IGSRE. Continuance of the registration shall be dependent on the evidence of satisfactory progress. 5.0. Structure and Conditions of the Ph. D Programme at CDMHA Each student in this programme will be required to take the following common courses in the first year: Advanced Research Methods and applications (DMD 998); the Role of Weather and Climate in Disaster Management (DMD 905) and Disaster Theory and Applications (DMD 906). In addition, candidates shall take three other modules, one of which shall be a core module. The student must undertake an approved research thesis work during the second and third year of study. To earn a Ph. D in disaster management, the candidate MUST accomplish two things: first s/he must master a specific subject area completely. 215

40 40

Doctor of Philosophy 1.0. Objectives The doctoral programme will seek to develop the highest level of scholarship, research capability, and creative thinking in the students area of specialization. 2.0. Regulations for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in Disaster Management and
Humanitarian Assistance

2.1. Eligibility for Ph.D Programme 2.1.1. Common University regulations for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy of MMUST shall apply. 2.1.2. In addition any candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in CDMHA must: 2.1.2. Be a holder of a Masters degree of MMUST in any of the following disciplines: biological sciences, health sciences, physical sciences, social sciences, law, engineering, humanities and allied disciplines. 2.1.3 Be a holder of a Masters degree of a Kenyan Public University or any other University recognized by MMUST Senate as equivalent to the status of the qualifications in (2.1.1) above; or

Secondly, s/he must extend the body of knowledge about that subject. To master a subject, a student searches the published literature to find and read everything that has been written about the subject. In scientific disciplines, a student begins by studying general reference works such as text books. Eventually, the student must also search scholarly journals, the publications that scientists use to exchange information and record reports of their scientific investigations. To demonstrate complete mastery of the subject, a student in disaster management may be required to complete additional graduate-level courses (level 900 or level 800 courses), maintain a high grade average, or take a battery of special examinations. These examinations may include oral sessions or presentations to panels of experts. Other methods of ensuring mastery of the subject may involve comprehensive term papers: equivalent to scientific articles and problem solving sessions where one must express herself/himself concisely. The essence of a Ph.D., the aspect that distinguishes Ph.D. study from other academic work, can be summarized in a single word: research. To extend knowledge, one must explore, investigate, and contemplate. The scientific community uses the term research to capture the idea. On admission the student after consultation with the academic advisor, shall declare in writing and under his/her signature, one of the Divisions of study and programme of specialization he/she wants to pursue and its funding. The academic advisor will advise the student on the appropriate combination, including the availability of specific courses for the year. A registered candidate must submit to CDMHA and IGSRE at WUCST a research proposal within six months after provisional registration, and show how he/she intends to fund it to completion. WUCST through the advice of CDMHA and SGS may decline to approve the study or research if : 5.1. It is unsuitable in itself.

5.2. It cannot scholarly be studied under the supervision of the University or supervision outside the University which is acceptable to the Senate: or 5.3. The conditions under which the candidate proposes to work are unsatisfactory. The registration for the Ph. D programme will lapse if a candidate fails to submit an acceptable research proposal within six months after completion of requirements of coursework. 6.0. Conduct of Studies 6.1. A candidate registered in accordance with these regulations shall be required to pursue his/her programme of study through instructions or supervision by academic members of staff appointed in that capacity by MMUST Senate 6.2. All candidates shall be required to consult their supervisor(s) at least once a month. 6.3. Candidates will be required to give seminars throughout the one year of coursework period for all courses for which they are registered 6.4. All candidates shall be required to participate in all the Seminars arranged for them by WUCST. 7.0. Examination of Courses 7.1. A candidate shall be required to pass in all the modules for which he/she is registered. The pass mark in each course based on continuous coursework assessment and written examination marks shall be 50%. 7.2. A candidate who fails more than one module of the prescribed courses in a given semester shall be discontinued. 7.3. A candidate who fails one semester course shall be eligible to take supplementary examination provided that the mark obtained in the failed course is not below 40%. 7.4. A candidate who fails in any supplementary examination shall be discontinued. 7.5. Regardless of the pass mark obtained in a supplementary paper, a candidate shall be awarded 50% mark for purposes of the final degree classification. 7.6. Under exceptional circumstances, such as medical grounds, supported by a University College

216

Medical Officer, a special examination may, or authority of Senate, be set up for a student. 7.7. Continuous assessment will count towards the final grading of the special examination. 7.8. Each course shall be treated as complete paper subject to a three-hour examination, plus a practical examination, where appropriate. 7.9. A candidate shall take and pass a comprehensive oral examination at the end of his/her coursework. A candidate who fails in the comprehensive oral examination shall be allowed to resit the oral examination within a prescribed time period. A candidate who fails comprehensive oral examination twice shall be discontinued. 7.10. The oral examination shall cover the Four Course Divisions selected by the student, on admission to the Ph.D. Programme and must include the Division of the students specialization. 7.11. The Academic Board shall, on the recommendation of the CDMHA and the IGSRE appoint two supervisors to advice a candidate. One supervisor shall be designated as principal and one assisting. 7.12. At least one supervisor shall be a member of the academic staff of WUCST, preferably from CDMHA. 7.13. The Senate shall be satisfied that the candidate has adequate opportunities for consulting his supervisor at least once a month, and that the candidate can obtain access to materials relevant to his study, and that adequate facilities exist for practical work. 7.14. A candidate who is on research work must submit periodically, at the end of each semester, a written report to the Director CDMHS and Director IGSRE on the and the Registrar (Academic Affairs), on the progress of her/his research work. 7.15. Evaluation of the candidates progress is carried out frequently by the Centre through seminars and evaluation reports. 8.0. Submission and Examination of Thesis Common University regulations governing the submission of thesis shall apply. In addition: 8.1. A candidate for the doctoral degree (Ph.D.) shall be required to submit a thesis embodying the results of his/her research.

8.2. At least three months before the thesis is represented, a candidate shall give notice of submission to the CDMHA and the SGS and the Registrar (Academic Affairs). The notice should indicate the title of the thesis, and include an abstract of the work, outlining the general scope of the thesis. 8.3. Six copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Director, Institute of Graduate Studies Research and Extension and must accompanied by declaration on the part of the candidate, that the contents of the thesis are original work of the candidate, that the thesis has not been submitted for a degree of any other university, and the contents of the thesis are original work of the candidate, countersigned the supervisor(s). All six copies of the thesis shall remain the property of Western University College of Science and Technology. 8.4 The Senate, on the recommendation of WUCST shall appoint one external examiner and two internal examiners, and two CDMHA representatives for the oral examination of the candidate. 8.5. The Board of Examiners for the Oral Examination shall consist of at least seven (7) persons, namely: 8.5.1. The Director of Institute of Graduate Studies Research and Extension (IGSRE) or his representative as Chairman 8.5.2. The student supervisors 8.5.3. Two Internal Examiners 8.5.4. Two members of the Board of the Centre for Disaster Management and humanitarian Assistance (CDMHA). 8.6. A candidate shall be required to present himself/herself for an oral examination on a date to be announced by the Dean School of Graduate Studies after submission of this thesis. 8.7. The Board of Examiners shall submit a joint report on the thesis and oral examination and make a recommendation on the award of the degree or otherwise to the Senate Board of examiners. 8.8. The Senate Board may, on advice of examiners, invite a candidate to re-submit a revised form of a thesis, which has not been accepted in the original form within a period to be determined by the examiners. Correction of specific errors does not require formal resubmission.

217

8.9. A thesis accepted by MMUST and subsequently published in part or whole and in whatever form, shall bear the inscription: work forming parting of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree of MMUST. 9.0. Course Distribution Level-900 modules will be open to all students who will be admitted into the Ph. D degree courses in MMUST/CDMHA. Students will be required to take a total of six (6) modules during their coursework, three of which shall be common modules, one a core module and two elective modules as follows: Disaster Preparedness and Engineering Management (DPEM) Year 1 Semester I Common Modules Code Title Units DMD 906 Disaster Theory and Applications 6 DMD 998 :Advanced Research Methods and Applications 6 Elective Modules (to choose any TWO modules) DPE 901 :Institutional Frameworks for Disaster Management 4 DPE 903 :Computer Applications and Modeling in Disaster Management 4 DPE 904 Cyberspace for Disaster Management 4 Semester II Common Module DMD 905 Role of Weather and Climate in Disaster Management 6 Core Module DPE 902 Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Disaster Management 4 Year II DMD 999 Research and Thesis 15 Year III DMD 999 Research and Thesis Total number of units Disaster Management and Sustainable Development (DMSD) 218

Year I Semester I Common Modules Units DMD 906 : Disaster Theory and Applications 6 DMD 998 : Advanced Research Methods and Applications 6 Elective Modules (to choose any TWO modules) DMD 902 Education, Training and Public awareness for Disaster Management 4 DMD 903 DMD 904 Insurance in Natural and humanmade Hazards 4 Synoptic Meteorological and Climatological Systems as Prelude of Natural Hazards 4

Semester II Common Module DMD 905 : Role of Weather and Climate in Disaster Management 6 Core Module DMD 901 Environmental Vulnerability to Disasters 4 Year II DMD 999 Research and Thesis 15 Year III DMD 999 Research and Thesis Total number of units

15 60

Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (DMHA) Year 1 Semester I Common Modules Units DMD 906 Disaster Theory and Applications 6 DMD 998 Advanced Research Methods and Applications 6 Elective Modules (to choose any TWO modules) DMH 901 Environmental Pollution and Climate Change that Result in Disasters 4

15 60

CRM 904 DMH 904

Challenges for the Future on Disaster Management 4 Gender Issues and Girl-Child Development 4

Semester II Common Module DMD 905 Role of Weather and Climate in Disaster Management 6 Core Module DMH 902 Nutrition, Food Security and Disaster Management 4 Year II DMD 999

Research and Thesis

15

Year III DMD 999 Research and Thesis Total number of units

15 60

Elective Modules (to choose any TWO modules) DMD 901 Disaster Management Applications 4 DMH 902 Disaster Management and National Commitment 4 CRM 903 International Commitments and United Nations Role in Disaster Management 4 CRM 904 Challenges for the Future on Disaster Management 4 Semester II Common Module DMD 905 Role of Weather and Climate in Disaster Management 6 Core Module CRM 905 Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution 4 Year II DMD 999 Research and Thesis 15 Year III DMD 999 Research and Thesis Total number of units

Conflict Resolution and Conflict Management (CRCM) Year I Semester I Common Modules Code Title Units DMD 906 Disaster Theory and Applications 6 DMD 998 Advanced Research Methods and Applications 6

15 60

219

The School of Open Learning and Continuing Education [SOLACE] The School of Open Learning and Continuing Education (SOLACE) offers and coordinates a number of certificate and diploma programmes through a variety of learning modes. The main thrust of SOLACE is therefore to expand enrolment and increase access by providing opportunities for both professionals and nonprofessionals to acquire and keep up to date with new knowledge and skills in order to enhance their upward academic mobility as well as to improve human resource, enhance the quality of life and contribute to personal and national development.

1.0. Admission Requirements Applicants must satisfy the minimum entry requirements for admission to the programme namely C- or its equivalent. 2.0 Course Structure Code Title Units CCR 100 : Introduction to Methods of Social Investigation 3 CCR 101 : Introduction to Communication and Report Writing 3 CCR 102 : Introduction to Computer Applications for Criminology 3 CCR 103 : Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice 3 CCR 104 : Criminal Investigation and Evidence Gathering 3 CCR 105 : Introduction to Criminal Law and Legal Systems 3 CCR 106 : Corruption and Human Rights In Kenya 3 CSD 007 : Field Report 3 Total Units 24 Certificate in Sugar Agronomy Entry Requirements 1.0. Admission requirements: KCSE Mean Grade C- (minus) or KCE Division III or any other acceptable qualification 26,450/- per Programme Or Form IV leavers with D plain who have a working experience in sugar or related agro-based industries at supervisory, technician or similar position for a period of three years. Or Those with higher qualifications in related fields at certificate, diploma or degree who wish to upgrade their skills in Sugar technology. 2. Course Structure Candidates may select one of the following programmes: Sugarcane Agronomy Sugar Manufacture Factory Engineering Sugar Co-products Utilization 220

Certificate Programmes Certificate in Social Work and Community Development 1.0 Admission Requirements A KCSE certificate with a mean grade C- or its equivalent. Under special circumstances, people who have practical experience of three years in the field of Social Work and Community development may be considered for admission. 2.0. Course Structure Code Title Units CSD 001 Introduction to Social Work and Community Development 3 CSD 002: Basic Communication, HIV/AIDS and Counseling Skills 3 CSD 003: Industrial, Medical and Correctional Social Work 3 CSD 004: Computer Applications & Skills 3 CSD 005: Introduction to Project Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation 3 CSD 007: Field Attachment 1 Certificate in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Code CSA 001 CSA 002 CSA 003 CSA 004 CSA 005 CSA 006 CSA 007

Title Total Hours Agricultural Botany and Agro meteorology 40 Cane breeding and Cultural 40 Practices Crop Protection 40 Agricultural mechanization, 40 irrigation and drainage Soils and Crop Nutrition 40 Agricultural Management and Extension 40 Research Project 40

Certificate in Adult and Non-formal Education 1.0. Admission requirements: KCSE Mean Grade C- (Minus) or KCE Division III or any other acceptable qualification. 2.0. Course Structure Semester I Code Title Units CAE 001 Foundations of Adult & Non Formal Education 3 CAE 002 Teaching Methods 3 CAE 003 Basic Education 3 CAE 004 Information, Education & Communication 3 CAE 005 Adult & Non Forrmal Education 3 CAE 006 Introduction to Computers 3 Semester II Code Title Units CAE 007 Capacity Building in Adult 3 CAE 008 Project Research & Report Writing 3 CAE 009 Social Studies 3 CAE 010 Science & Mathematics Education 3 CAE 011 Language Education 3 CAE 012 Certificate in Adult & Non Formal Education 3 Bridging Certificate Courses Bridging Certificate Courses Bridging Certificate Course in Mathematics Bridging Certificate Course in Biology Bridging Certificate Courses in Chemistry and Physics Bridging Certificate Course in English 1.0 Admission requirements: English: Minimum mean grade of C (plain) and grade below C (plain) in English at KCSE. Mathematics: Mean grade of C (plain) and a grade below C (plain) in Mathematics at KCSE. Biology, Chemistry or Physics: Minimum mean grade of C+ (plus) and at least a D+ in the subject to be bridged. 221

Certificate in Sugar Manufacture Code CSM 001 CSM 002 Title Total Hours Cane handling and milling 40 Juice treatment and evaporation 40 process Sugar boiling 40 Crystallization, centrifugation and drying 40 Sugar branding and bagging 40 Waste management 40 Research Project 40

CSM 003 CSM 004 CSM 005 CSM 006 CSM 007

Certificate in Factory Engineering Code CFE 001 CFE 002 Title Total Hours Cane Extraction 40 Juice Treatment and Evaporation Equipment 40 CFE 003 Pan boiling including Condensation 40 CFE 004 Steam production and Distribution 40 CFE 005 General Engineering 40 CFE 006 Research Project 40 Certificate in Co-Products Utilization Code Title Total Hours CCU 001 Introduction to Co-Products Utilization 40 CCU 002 Baggasse Products and uses 40 CCU 003 Molasses Products and uses 40 CCU 004 Crop residue, Filter cake, and Waste Water 40 CCU 005 Special Types of sugar 40 CCU 006 Research Project 40

2.0. Course Content MAT 001B -Basic Algera Indices and Logarithms, Quadratic Expressions, Linear Inequalities, permutations and combinations, Binomial Theorem, Series and Matrices. MAT 002B - Geometry, Trigonometry and Vectors Geometrical Relationships, Angel Properties, Trigonometry, Vectors, Circles. MAT 003B -Basic Calculus Functions and their Graphs, Introduction to limits and the Derivative, Differential Technique, Integration MAT 004B - Basic Statistics Data Collection and Graphical Representations, Measures of Central Tendency, Measure of Dispersion, Classical and Axiomatic Probability. MAT 005B -Business Mathematics Numbers and Percentages, Profit and Loss, Interests and Annuities, Credit, Taxation and Exchange Rates. Certificate in Disaster Management 1.0 Admission requirements: KCSE Mean Grade C- (minus) Or KCE Division III Certificate in Disaster Management (EIA, Audit and Planning Logistics) Code Title Units CDM 001 Disaster Theory and Practice 3 DPE 002 Principles and Practice of EIA and Audits 3 DMD 003 Strategic Environmental Assessment Principles & Practice 3 DMD 005 Social Impact Assessment, Community, Stakeholder & Public Participation in EIA&EA 3 DPE 002 Special Topics in EIA& EAs 3 CDM 090 Case Studies and Project Report 3 (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) CMD 005 Disaster Impact Evaluation and 222

Recovery Strategies 3 Local Post-Disaster Reconstruction Materials 3 Certificate in Disaster Management (Disaster Preparedness and Engineering Reconstruction) DMD 002 Code CDM 001 DPE 003 DMD 002 Title Units Disaster Theory and Practice 3 Planning of Refugee Camps 3 Local Post-Disaster Reconstruction Materials 3 DMD 003 EIA and Audit Methodologies 3 CDM 090 Case Studies and Project Report 3 (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) DMD 005 Sustainable Community 3 Development Strategies 3 CDM 003 Displaced Persons Camp Organization 3 DMD 004 Principles of Environmental 3 Health, Water and Sanitation 3 Certificate in Disaster Management (Conflict Management and Resolution) Code Title Units CDM 001 Disaster Theory and Practice 3 CRM 001 Introduction to Peace Studies 3 CDM 009 Peace Building and Conflict Resolution 3 CRM 003 Negotiations and Conflict Rehabilitation 3 CDM 090 Case Studies and Project Report 3 (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) CDM 008 Displaced Camp Organization 3 CRM 005 Teamwork in Disaster Operations CRM 007 Gender Vulnerability in Disaster Management 3

Certificate in Disaster Management (Emergency Planning and Disaster Management) Code Title Units CDM 001 Disaster Theory and Practice 3 DMH 001 Humanitarian Interventions in Emergencies 3 CRM 004 Strategies in Crisis and Emergency Management 3 CDM 00 Prediction, Monitoring and

Management of Disaster Situations 3 CDM 090 Case Studies and Project Report 3 (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) CRM 002 Mechanisms of Response to Terrorism 3 DPE 003 Planning of Refugee Camps. 3 DPE 007 Transport Organization in Emergencies 3 Certificate in Disaster Management (Disaster Preparedness and Risk Management) Code Title Units CDM 001 Disaster Theory and Practice 3 CDM 008 Risk Management and Business Continuity 3 CDM 007 Coping with HIV/AIDS and other Human Disease Pandemics 3 DMD 001 Countermeasures to Famine & Food Security 3 CDM 090 Case Studies and Project Report 3 (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) CRM 007 Gender Vulnerability in Disaster Management 3 CDM 005 Disaster Impact Evaluation & Recovery Strategies 3 DPE 008 Fire Disaster Management 3 Certificate in Disaster Management (Environmental Infrastructure and Engineering Maintenance) Code Title Units CDM 001 Disaster Theory and Practice 3 DMD 005 Sustainable Community Development Strategies Special Topics in EIA & EAs 3 DMD 002 Local Post-Disaster Reconstruction Materials 3 CDM 090 Case Studies and Project Report 3 (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) DPE 003 Planning of Refugee Camps 3 DPE 005 Introduction to Emergency Water Supply Systems 3 DPE 006 Provision of Electro-Mechanical Systems in Emergency 3 Certificate in Disaster Management (Disaster Epidemiology and Health Management)

Title Units Disaster Theory and Practice 3 Coping with HIV/AIDS and other Human Disease Pandemics 3 CRM 006 Community Mental Health Services 3 CDM 090 Case Studies and Project Report 3 (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose one) CRM 007 Gender Vulnerability in Disaster Management 3 DMD 004 Principles of Environmental Health, Water and Sanitation 3 DMH 004 Indigenous Methods in Management of Disasters 3 Certificate in Ethics and Corruption Studies 1.0. Admission requirements: KCSE Mean Grade C- (minus) Or KCE Division III. Code: Title Units DDM 052 Ethics 3 DDM 054 Corruption Risk Assessment and Management 3 DDM 055 Corruption Prevention Techniques 3 DDM 058 Financial Management 3 DDM 059 Procurement of Credit IS and Services 3 CDM 060 Introduction to Computer Studies 3 CDM 094 Fundamentals of Corruption 3 CDM 095 Field Project 3 Certificate of Proficiency in Computer Applications 1.0. Admission requirements: English: Minimum mean grade of D (Minus) and at KCSE @ 2000/- per package. Code CA 01 CA 02 CA 03 CA 04 CA 05 CA 06 CA 07 CA 09 223 Title Units Introduction to Computers 3 Operating System and Windows 3 Internet E-Mail 3 Word Processing 3 Spreadsheets 3 Data Base Management and Systems 3 Presentation Packages 3 Computer Programming 3

Code CDM 001 CDM 007

CA 010 Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) CA 011 AutoCAD CA 012 Unix Essentials CA 013 Desktop Publishing CA 014 Project Management Software CA 015 Computer Hardware Maintenance CA 016 Networking Essential I CA 017 Networking Essential II CA 018 Accounting Software QuickBooks Certificate in Global Education & Linkages

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

ITC 017 Programming ITC 110 Introduction To Computers Certificate In Mushroom Production (Cert. Mushroom Prod.) 1.0. Admission Requirements

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SOLACE offers a Tailor made course Certificate in Global Education and Linkages. 1.0 Introduction Participants for this course are drawn from practicing teachers in either Primary or Secondary schools. 2.0 Course structure Code Title Units CGE 001 - Global Trends in Teaching and Learning 3 CGE 002 - Global Dimension and Education CGE 003 - Personal and Professional Development 3 CGE 004 - Information and Communication Technology in Education 3 CGE 005 -Action Research and Report Writing 3 Certificate in Information Technology 1.0. Admission requirements: KCSE Mean Grade C- or Division III or any other acceptable qualification. 2.0. Course Structure Semester I Code Title ITC 011 Introduction To Information System ITC 012 Introduction To Databases ITC 013 Internet Applications ITC 014 Computer Maintenance ITC 015 Desktop Publishing ITC 016 Business Communication

The following shall be eligible for registration for the certificate. Either 1.1. Holders of B. Sc. Degree or equivalent with a working knowledge in relevant areas. OR 1.2. Holder of a Diploma or equivalent in relevant area with at least three years experience in agricultural activity. OR 1.3 Farmer with a Form IV certificate pass C2.0. Course Structure Code Title Lectures Practical Hours CMP 001 Introduction to mushrooms: Mushroom Genetics CMP 002 Different types of mushrooms and Their Nutritional value CMP 003 Mushroom Seed Production (SPAWN) CMP 004 Cultivation structures and conditions of Growth CMP 005 Mushroom substrates and mushroom Growing CMP 006 Mushroom Marketing/Organic farming CMP 007 Research Project Certificate in Sugarcane Agronomy CSA 001 Agricultural Botany and Agrometeorology CSA 002 Cane breeding and Cultural Practices CSA 003 Crop Protection CSA 004 Agricultural mechanization, irrigation and drainage CSA 005 Soils and Crop Nutrition CSA 006 Agricultural Management and Extension 224

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3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3

CSA 007 Research Project Certificate in Sugar Manufacture CSM 001 Cane handling and milling 3 CSM 002 Juice treatment and evaporation Process 3 CSM 003 Sugar boiling CSM 004 Crystallization, centrifugation and Drying 3 CSM 005 Sugar branding and bagging 3 CSM 006 Waste management 3 CSM 007 Research Project Certificate in Factory Engineering CFE 001 Cane Extraction CFE 002 Juice Treatment and Evaporation Equipment CFE 003 Pan boiling including Condensation CFE 004 Steam production and distribution CFE 005 General Engineering CFE 006 Research Project Certificate in Co-Products Utilization CCU 001 Introduction to Co-Products Utilization CCU 002 Baggasse Products and uses CCU 003 Molasses Products and uses CCU 004 Crop residue, Filter cake, and Waste water CCU 005 Special Types of sugar CCU 006 Research Project 2.0 Diploma Programmes Diploma in Social Work and Community Development Course Structure Year I Semester I DSC 010: Introduction to Social Sciences 3 DSC 011: Social Work and Community Development, Theory and Practice 3 DSC 012: Introduction to Case Work and Group Work Methods of Social Work 3 225 3 3 3 3 3 3

DCR 011: Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Business and Basic Accounting 3 DSC 014: Introduction to Computer Skills & Applications 3 DSC 015: Introduction to Communication Skills 3 DSC 016: HIV and AIDS and Counseling 3 Total Units 21 Semester II DSC 017: Introduction to Law and Correctional Social Work 3 DSC 018: Introduction to Social Research Methods and Statistics 3 DSC 019: Child and Adolescent Development 3 DSC 020: Rural and Urban Settlements 3 DSC 021: Social Policy, Welfare and Administration 3 DSC 022: Project Planning, Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation 3 DSC 023: Community Mobilization and Social Action 3 Total Units 21 Year II Semester I DSC 029: Field Attachment

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Semester II DSC 024: Introduction to Community Health and Nutrition 3 DSC 025: Social Ethics and Human Rights 3 DSC 026: Introduction to Industrial Social Work 3 DSC 027: Introduction to Medical and Psychiatric Social Work DSC 028: Working with the Aged and Disadvantaged Groups DSC 030: Introduction to Gender and Development DSC 031: Project Paper Total Units

3 3 3 3 21

Diploma in Criminology and Criminal Justice 1.0. Admission requirements: 1.1. KCSE Mean Grade C (plain) or KCE Div. III, p1 or

1.2. Certificate in Criminology and Criminal Justice or any other Certificate recognized by MMUST. 2.0 Course Structure. Year I Semester I Code Title Units DSC 010 Introduction to Social Sciences 3 DCR 011 Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Business and Accounting 3 DCR 012 Principles of Criminology 3 DCR 013 Computer Applications for Criminologists 3 DCR 014 Communication skills and report writing for Criminology 3 DCR 015 Criminal Justice and Ethics 3 DCR 016 Introduction to Forensic Science and Law 3 Total Units 21 Semester II Code Title DCR 017 Community Organization and Action DCR 018 Introduction to Methods of Social Investigation DCR 019 Introduction to Criminal Psychology DCR 020 Penology and Judicial Sentencing DCR 021 Introduction to Kenya Law and Legal systems DSC 016 HIV and AIDS Counseling DCR 200 Introduction to Criminal Law and Procedure Total Units Year II Semester I DCS 031 Project Report. DCR 029 Field Attachment Year II Semester 11 Code Title DCR 024 Social Statistics 1 DCR 025 Deviance and Rehabilitation Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

DCR 026 Attitude and Behaviour Change 3 DCR 027 Applied Research Techniques and Evidence Presentation 3 DCR 028 Introduction to Criminal Investigations 3 DCR 029 Fundamentals of corruption and prevention 3 DCR 031 Community Policing and Advocacy 3 Total Units 21 Diploma in Public Relations and Creative Advertising 1.0. Course Structure: Semester 1 Code Title Units DPA 100 Introduction to Public Relations 3 DPA 101 Introduction to Advertising 3 DPA 102 English for Mass Communicators 3 DPA 103 Literary Communication 3 DPA 104 Introduction to Computer Applications 3 DPA 105 Public Relations and Psychology of Crisis Management 3 DPA 106 Consumer Behavior and Persuasion 3 Semester II DPA 107 Principles of Public Relations DPA 108 Advertising Strategies DPA 109 Feature Writing DPA 110 Communication and Culture DPA 111 Media Relations and Management DPA 112 Introduction to Copy Writing DPA 113 Creative and Applied Thinking Skills

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Units 3 3 226

Semester III DPA 200 Law and Ethics for Media Practitioner 3 DPA 201 Advertising Design and Layout 4 DPA 202 Public Relations and Organizational Communication 3 DPA 203 Use of ICT in Advertisement 3 DPA 204 Desktop Publishing 3 DPA 205 Film and Video Production 3 DPA 206 Research In Public Relations and Creative Advertising 3 DPA 207 Industrial Attachment 6

Semester IV DPA 208 Media and Advertising DPA 209 Public Relations and corporate Communication DPA 210 Dramatic Communication and Presentation DPA 211 Public Speaking DPA 212 Entrepreneurship DPA 213 Research Project Diploma in Information Technology

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DIT 021 Management Information Systems DIT 022 Web Technology DIT 023 Digital Electronics DIT 024 Introduction to Software Engineering DIT 025 Discrete Mathematics IRD 020 Quantitative Methods for Business Total Semester Credits DIT 031 Field Attachment

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1.0. Admission requirements: KCSE Mean Grade C Plain or its equivalent, with at least C Minus in English and Mathematics, or a certificate in IT related discipline with a Credit pass from a recognized institution. 2. 0.Course Structure Year I Semester I Course Code Course Title DIT 010 Introduction to Computers DIT 011 Computer Applications DIT 012 Programming I DIT 013 Internet Applications DIT 014 Operating Systems MAT 010 Basic Mathematics IRD 010 Communication Skills Total Semester Credits

Semester II Code Course Title Credit Units DIT 026 Introduction to Multimedia 3 DIT 027 Data Communication and Networks II 3 DIT 028 Computer Project 6 DIT 029 Object Oriented Programming 3 DIT 030 Professional Ethics in Computing 3 Total Semester Credits 18 Diploma In Sugar Cane Agronomy [Dip. Sugar Agron.] 1.0 Admission Requirements 1.1. Candidates must have a minimum mean grade of C ( Plain) with a C(Plain) in any of the following: Biology, Agriculture, Chemistry or Physical Science or alternatively, KCE Division II with a Credit in any of the following : Biology, Agriculture, Chemistry or Physical Science OR 1.2. Candidates who have a mean grade C- (Minus) with relevant training at Certificate level with credit pass or equivalent from a recognized institution will be considered. OR 1.3 Any other equivalent qualification recognized by the University Senate. 2.0. Course Structure Year I Semester I Code Title Units DSA 050 Introduction to Sugar Industry 2 COS 050 Communication Skills 3 227

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Semester II Code Title Units DIT 015 Visual Programming 3 DIT 016 Database Management Systems 3 DIT 017 Data Communication and Networks I 3 DIT 018 Computer Maintenance 3 DIT 019 Desk-Top Publishing 3 STA 010 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 3 IRD 011 General Economics 3 Total Semester Credits 21 Year II Semester I Code Title Units DIT 020 Programming II 3

DSA 052 Agricultural Climatology DSA 053 Cane Husbandry and Cropping Systems DSA 054 Introduction to Botany DSA 055 Introduction to Environmental Science DSA 056 Introduction to Soil Science DSA 057 Agricultural Mechanization, Harvest and Cane haulage machinery Total

3 3 3 2 2 Diploma in Business Management 1.0. Entry Requirements Candidates for admission into the Diploma in Business Management should satisfy one of the following minimum requirements: 1.1. A minimum Credit pass in Certificate programmes from Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology or any other accredited institution, or 1.2. At least KCSE aggregate grade C ( Plain) with C- in English and C- in Mathematics/ Business studies/ Commerce/, or 1.3. KCE Div. III (with a credit in mathematics and English) Or 1.4. KACE (with at least a principal pass) 1.5. Any other qualifications acceptable by MMUST senate as equivalent to any of the above. 2.0 Duration of the programme The programme takes two academic years of study or four semesters. It is offered in four stages which take one semester each. Students taking a Diploma in Business Management take common core courses in the first and second semesters and specialization courses in the second and fourth semesters. They proceed to industrial attachment in the third semester of study. The areas of specialization are: Accounting, Banking and Finance, Business Administration, Entrepreneurship, Human Resource Management, Marketing, Production and Operations Management, Purchasing and Supplies Management, and Risk and Insurance Management 2.1 Core Compulsory Courses Stage I/Semester I DIB 100: Introduction to Financial Accounting DIB 101: Principles of Management DIB 102: Quantitative Methods DIB 103: Elements of Economics IB 104: Business Communication and Information Systems Stage II/Semester II

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Semester II Course Title Units DSA 060 Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition 3 DSA 061 Introduction to Statistics 2 DSA 062 Physiology of the Sugarcane Plant 2 DSA 063 Crop Protection 3 DSA 064 Irrigation and Drainage in Sugarcane Farming 3 DSA 065 Introduction to Sugarcane Breeding & Biotechnology 3 DSA 066 Introduction to Research Methods 3 DSA 067 Farm Management, Accounts and Entrepreneurship 2 Total 21 Year II Semester I Code Title Units DSA 070 Industrial Attachment 6 DSA 080 Research Project II-Data analysis and Report writing 3 DSA 081 Introduction to Sugar Manufacture 2 DSA 082 Project Proposal and Assessment 3 DSA 083 Industrial Management and Human Relations 2 DSA 084 Agricultural Management and Extension 3 DSA 085 Agricultural Policy and Law 3 DSA 086 Organization, Management and Public Administration 2 DSA 087 Introduction to Precision Agriculture and Organic Farming 3 Total 21 228

DIB 105: Financial Management DIB 106: Principles of Marketing DIB 107: Research Methods Stage III/Semester III DIB 109: Industrial attachment Stage IV/Semester IV DIB 108: Management Research Project 2.2. Specialization Courses 2.2.1 Accounting Option Stage II/Semester II DAB 100: Cost Accounting DAB 101: Financial Accounting Stage IV/Semester IV DAB102: DAB103: DBA101: DAB 104: Taxation Principles of Auditing Business Law Management Accounting

DEN 100: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 2.2.4 .Entrepreneurship Option Stage II/Semester II DEN 100: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management DEN 101: Business Planning Stage IV/Semester IV DEN 102: Technology and Innovation DEN 103: Entrepreneurship Development DEN 104: Counselling and Consultancy in Small Enterprise DAB 102: Taxation 2.2.5. Human Resources Management Option Stage II/Semester II DHR 100: Principles of Human Resources Management DBA 100: Organizational Theory Stage IV/Semester IV DHR 101: Compensation Management DHR 102: Industrial and Labour Relations DHR 103: Employee Procurement DPM 102: Total Quality Management 2.2.6. Marketing Option Stage II/Semester II DMB 100: Marketing Ethics DMB 101: Agricultural Marketing Stage IV/Semester IV DMB 102: Strategic Marketing Management DMB 103: Global Marketing Strategies DMB 104: Industrial Marketing DMB 105: Services Marketing 2.2.7. Production and Operations Management Stage II/Semester II DPM 100: Principles of Production and Operations Management DAB 100: Cost Accounting Stage IV/Semester IV DPM 101: Logistics and Distribution Management 229

2.2.2. Banking and Finance Option Stage II/Semester II DBF 100: Financial Reporting and Analysis DBF 101: Money and Banking Stage IV/Semester IV DBF 102: Financial Institutions and Markets DBF 103: Investment Management DBF 104: Banking Practice and Law DBF 105: International Banking and Finance 2.2.3. Business Administration Option Stage II/Semester II DBA 100: Organization Theory DHR 100: Human Resource Management Stage IV/Semester IV DBA 101: Business Law DBA 102: Strategic Management DBA 103: Business Ethics

DPM 102: Total Quality Management DPM 103: Information Technology in Operations Management DPM 104: Materials Management 2.2.8. Purchasing and Supplies Option Stage II/Semester II DPS 100: Principles of Purchasing and Supplies Management DPS 101: Stock Control and Stores Management Stage IV/Semester IV DPM 101: Logistics and Distribution Management DAB 102: Business Law DPS 102: Supply Chain Management DBA 103: Principles of Auditing 2.2.9. Risk and Insurance Management Stage II/Semester II DRI 100: Risk Assessment DBF 100: Financial Reporting and Analysis Stage IV/Semester IV DRI 101: Management of Insurance Operations DRI 102: Risk Management DRI 103: Insurance Claims Management DBF 103: Investment Management Diploma in Adult and Non-formal Education 1.0. Admission requirements: Mean Grade C (plain) with C (plain) in English or Kiswahili OR any other certificate recognized by MMUST. Semester I Code Title Units DAE 001 Foundations of Adult and Non-formal Education 3 DAE 002 Communication Skills and Strategies in Adult & Non-Formal 3 DAE 003 Curriculum Skills Development in Non-formal Education 3 DAE 004 Research Methods in Adult and Non-formal Education 3 DAE 005 Psychology of Adult Education 3 230

Semester II DAE 006 Family Life Education DAE 007 Planning & Administration of Adult Education and NFE DAE 008 Community Development DAE 009 Learning Processes and Methods of Teaching DAE 010 Environmental Education for Adult & Non-formal Education DAE 011 Language Education DAE 012 Science and Mathematics DAE 013 Social Studies Education

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Semester III DAE 014 Health, Illness and Disease Prevention 3 DAE 015 Entrepreneurship in Communities & Economic Development 3 DAE 016 Human and Public Relations 3 DAE 017 Education For All 3 DAE 018 Research Project 3 Semester IV DAE 019 School Practice Diploma in Disaster Management 1.0. Admission requirements: KCSE Mean Grade C (Plain) or KCE Division II, or a Certificate in a related discipline, with a Credit pass from a recognized institution. 2.0. Course Structure Semester I Code Title Units CDM 091 Introduction to Disasters 3 DDM 001 Communication Skills 3 DDM 002 Quantitative Skills 3 DDM 003 Principles of Conservation 3 DDM 022 Refugees and Displaced Persons Camp Organization 3 DDM 004 Earth History and Evolution 3 DDM 005 Principles of Environmental Health, water and Sanitation 3 (Elective Modules: a candidate to choose at least one ) DDM 006 Fire Disaster Management 3 DDM 007 Negotiations and Post-Conflict Rehabilitation 3

DDM 008 Theory of Communication 3 Semester II DDM 009 Legal considerations in Disaster Management 3 DDM 010 Gender Vulnerability in Disaster Management 3 DDM 011 Teamwork in Disaster Operations 3 DDM O12 Disaster Impact Evaluation and Recovery Strategies 3 DDM 021 Humanitarian Interventions in Emergencies 3 DDM 013 First Aid Skills and Practice 3 DDM 014 Introduction to Computer studies 3 (Elective modules a candidate to choose at least one) DDM 015 Introduction to Public Relations 3 DDM 016 Introduction to Emergency Water Supply Systems 3 DDM 017 Human and Physical Geography 3

Semester III DDM 018 Environmental Impact Assessment and Audit 3 DDM 019 Strategies in Crisis and Emergency Management 3 DDM 020 Sustainable Community Development Strategies 3 CDM 092 Case Studies and Project Report 3 (Elective Courses: a candidate to choose at least one) DDM 023 Peace Building and Conflict Resolution 3 DDM 024 Local Post - Disaster Reconstruction Materials 3 DDM 025 Introduction to International Relations 3 Semester IV CDM 090 Case Studies and Project Report 3

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School of Graduate Studies University Library 1.0. Objectives 1.1. Co-ordinate the establishment and development of graduate programmes in fields and subjects of study along approved guidelines and in conformity with the general university regulations for higher degrees and its mission. 1.2. Co-ordinate graduate academic programmes and regulations relating to graduate studies. 1.3. Co-ordinate the admission of graduate students and the conduct of graduate programmes including examinations and award of graduate certificates, diplomas and degrees. 1.4. Co-ordinate matters pertaining to the welfare of graduate students and ensure that a conducive atmosphere exists for the conduct of their studies. 1.5. Co-ordinate the publicity of graduate programmes within and beyond Kenya through fliers, internet website and other means. 1.6. Provide stimulation and support of mutually engaged staff members and graduate students who share a common interest. 1.7. Negotiate and co-ordinate the distribution of research funds for graduate and other researches in the university. 1.8. Encourage the publication and dissemination of research findings and ensure that patents and other intellectual property rights are secured where appropriate. Today the Library captures one memorable academic landmark feature in the existence of MMUST. It is none other than purpose built ultramodern library phase one. Opening its doors to the University and community at large signifies tremendous efforts in planning and executing for an estimated 1,500 seating capacity. It is a manifestation of MMUST library strategic ten year plan period covering 2003/2013 which spelt it out as one of its performance targets within its mission as capacity building for the construction of ultra modern library building besides being counted as core towards quality assurance in the teaching, learning, research and community service of the University. Being the nerve centre of the academic life of the University, the librarys vision and mission is to support the quality of teaching, research and extension services of the university. This is achieved by providing relevant and timely access to knowledge and information. The library has frog jumped the ICT euphoria to ensure wider access to information through provision of e-journal services linked to over 35 databases plus other relevant electronic resources. At the moment, the library links its community of users to the worldwide web vide thirty workstations. The terminals are also used to browse a collection of over 1300 CD materials. The library is speedily automating its services by using KOHA, a web based open source library management system, which will not only ensure universal access to the library materials but also guarantee provision of more value added e-services. Over the last few years, the library adopted very innovative and proactive services. A case in point is a comprehensive electronic mailing system which has effectively been used to turn around the traditional SDI concept. Through the system, the library has at all times, delivered up to date information and instructional materials to users both on demand and in anticipation. The teaching of ICT literacy continue to be a major function of the library. 232

As part of its outreach and research activities, MMUST library has pioneered wireless internet link in remote rural areas of Shinyalu through Shinyalu Community Multimedia/ Telecentre project. The idea is to avail promptly developmental information to the farming communities using internet and radio. However, with the ever-limited resources, the library experiences enormous challenges in terms of facilitating full scale e-learning processes alongside repackaging authentic materials to support it. Nevertheless, the library is already seeking partnerships with relevant stakeholders to support the establishment of additional centres to widen the network, as well as launch new services to accelerate information access. Student Welfare Services The office of the Dean of Students caters for nonacademic aspects of the student life, in particular matters relating to welfare and conduct and it also maintains regular counseling to students. These aspects are part and parcel of student success in his/her academic life as these aspects have direct effect on the academic performance. Games and Sports The Games and Sports Department is a service department that caters for the whole of the student community. The objective of the department is to promote health through physical activities and also assist those who excel to engage in elite sports. The variety of Games offered include soccer (men & women) netball (men & women) scrabble and chess darts. There are plans to construct extra facilities that will include Basket Ball Court, Hockey and Rugby fields. Medical Services Offered Currently the department offers free out-patient services as outlined; 1.Consultation This includes - medical history taking,examination and diagnosis,Social Counselling,Treatment and

referral to the hospital for admission or specialized clinics. 2.Nurses Wide range of basic care which include; First aid treatment,administration of injections,wound dressing and provision of MCH/F.P(Maternal Child Health and Family Planning Services). 3.Laboratory All routine tests including tests for malaria,typhoid,pregnancy,HIV,Urine/Stool examination are done. 4.Pharmacy Dispensing Medicines,Compounding of some drugs,education and rationale use of drugs. 5.Public Health Promotive and Preventive Health Services e.g Examination of food at the catering unit,medical examination and vaccination of workers as per the Public Health Act,General cleanliness of the environment including Hostels and other buildings. 6.Records Medical Records including entrance medical examination forms and treatment at the University Clinic are confidentially maintained. 7.Ambulance For sick students/staff according to the need.Though essentially for referral of needy cases to hospital. 8.V.C.T (Voluntary Counseling and Testing) The centre is operational.Currently at Hall 1,plans are underway to relocate the site. 9.Eye Clinic Available,currently at the optometry Unit Star Annex Campus. Services which are not offered or catered for include; In-patient i.e hospitalization,dental,optical services.When need for such like services arise,parents/Guardians should be informed. Hours of Operation 8.00 am 5.00 pm Week days 233

24 hour services for emergencies. Future Plans Expansion of all exisiting facilities and services Construction of the University Hospital

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Staff List Academic Staff Faculty of Engineering Dean Ongor,B.T.I.,BSc.(Egerton),MSc.(Dar-essalaam),PhD.(Hohai) Administrative Assistant Chebon,D.,BSc.IS.(Moi) Department of Production Engineering Professor Ndiema,C.K.,HND.(Kenya Poly.),MSc.,PhD.,(Leeds Univ.) Lecturers Obondo, O.,B.Tech, M.Phil.(Moi)/Chairman Rotich, P., B.Sc., M.Sc. (UoN) Koech, K.R., B.Sc. (Egerton), M.Eng.(Southern Queensland) Kimani, P.K., M.Sc. Eng (Moscow) Langat, N.K., B.Sc. (Egerton), M.Sc (Moi) Murage, W.I.,B.Ed.Tech.,MPhil (Tech) (Moi) Omwando,T.,O.D.M.,H.N.D.,(Eld Poly.),B.Tech.,MPhil (Pro.Eng.)(Moi) Chirchir,J.,MSc.,PhD.(Russian Friendship Univ.) Graduate Assistants Kipkemoi,T.,B.Tech.(MMUST) Otieno,G.A., B.Tech.(MMUST) Korir,S., B. Tech Production Engineering (MMUST) Department of Civil and Structural Engineering Professor Makhanu, S. K., B.Sc, M.Sc. (UoN), Ph.D (Kyoto, ) Senior Lecturer Ongor,B.T.I.,BSc.(Egerton),MSc.(Dar-essalaam),PhD.(Hohai) Lecturer Onchiri,R. O. M.Sc. (St.Petersburg),PhD.(Spbgasu,St.Petersburg) /Chairman Khaemba, W.A., B.Sc Surveying, M.Sc.(UoN) Waweru, S.G., H.N.D. (Kenya Poly), M.Sc Civil (JKUAT) Sabuni, B.W., B.Sc. (UoN), M.Sc. (Hochschulafur), Gaya, C.O., B.Sc. (UoN), M.Sc (Sturtgart) Maritim, K.N., B.Sc. Civil Eng. (UoN), M.Sc. Civil Eng. (JKUAT)

Dr. J. R. Kosgey Mburu, N., B.Sc Civil Eng (JKUAT), M.Sc. Civil Eng. (JKUAT) Kipkemboi, K.J., B.Sc. Agric. Eng (Egerton), M.Sc (KU Leuven) Onyancha, C.K., B.Sc. Geology (UoN), M.Sc Geology (UoN), Graduate Assistant Fundi, I.S.,B.Tech.Civil Eng. (MMUST) Kanda,E., B.Tech. Civil Eng. (MMUST) Department of Electrical & Communications Engineering Professor Akello,J.R.,M.Sc (MICE), Ph.D (Wales) Lecturers Okanya,M.A.,B.Sc.,MSc.,Eng.(Petersburg)/ Chairman Wairoma,G.E.A.,BSc.,MSc.Eng.(Darmstadt) Nyongesa, F.C., B.Sc (UoN), M.Sc.(Bradford) Makokha, M.B., H.N.D. Systems Technology (UK), M.Sc (Dundee UK) Owuor,J.O.,B.Sc.MSc.Elect.Eng.(Vinnitsa) Mutai,W.K.,B.Tech),Mphil.,(Tech.Ed.)(Moi) Wanjekeche,T.,BSc.(Moi),MSc.(China) Wairoma,G.E.A., MSc. Telecommunications (Professional University Germany) Asst. Lecturers Njogu, M.F.,B.Sc., M.Sc.(Petersburg) Odundo,O.S., B.Sc., M.Sc. Graduate Assistants Onkundi,O.F., B.Tech.-ECE (MMUST) Owour,O.K., B.Tech.-ECE (MMUST) Oyie,O.N, B.Tech.-ECE (MMUST) Okava,U.A. B.Tech.-ECE (MMUST) Chief Instructor Andieri,A.M., Dip Electronics & Communications Engineering (University of Brandford),HND Electrical & Electronics Engineering,Postgraduate Diploma in Microelectronics Telecommunications (University of Liverpool),Advanced Telecommunications Technicians (Kenya Polytechni) Faculty of Science Dean: Sakwa,T.W., B.Sc, M.Phil, D.Phil (Moi) Administrative Assistant Nandi,M.,B.Ed.(MMUST) Department of Biological Sciences 235

Senior Lecturers Lungayia,H.B.O., BSc.(Nairobi), MSc, PhD.(VUB, Brussels)/Chairman Were, H.K., B.Sc. Agri (Nairobi), M.Sc. Plant (Nairobi). Ph.D (Plant) (Germany) Tsingalia,H.,BSc.(UoN),MSc.,PhD.(Univ.of Carlifornia at Berkeley) Palapala,V., BSc.(Egerton), MPhil (Moi), PhD(Hiroshima Prefecture University) Lecturers Mulambalah,S.C.,BSc.(UoN),Ph.D.,(Moi) Tank, P.S., B.Sc. (Mysore), M.Sc. Biotechnology (Mysore) Konje, M., B.Ed.(Nairobi), M.Sc.(Addis Ababa) Omukunda,E.,B.Ed.(KU),B.Sc.,M.Sc.(Potch), PhD.(Maseno). Siamba S.D., BVM.,MSc.(UoN),D.Phil(Moi) Cheruiyot,J., BSc.,MSc.(JKUAT) Ogutu,A.P.,BSc.(Mohanlal Sukhadhai), MSc.,(Annamalai),PhD.(Madras) Graduate Assistants Onyango,C. B.Ed.(Sci.) (MMUST) Agevi,H. B.Ed.(Sci.) (MMUST) Onyando,Z.O., B.Ed.(Sci.) (MMUST) Department of Mathematics Associate Professor Aywa, S., B.Ed, M.Sc (Kenyatta) PhD (Potchefstroom) Wasike,A(add details) Senior Lecturer Nyongesa,K., B.Sc., M.Sc (Nairobi), Ph.D (Sinchuon) Lecturer Magero,V., B.Sc., M.Phil (Moi) M.Sc. (Belgium)/Chairman Simiyu, A.N., B.Sc. (Moi) Mphil (Moi) Omukoba N., B.Sc. (JKUAT), M.Sc (Kenyatta) Okombo, M., Diploma in Education(KSTC), B.Ed., M.Sc (Baraton) Assistant Lecturers Lawi,G.O., BEd.(KU),MSc.(Maseno) Inyangala, E., B.Ed., (Kenyatta), M.Phil (Moi) Otwombe,K., B.Ed, M.Sc., (Kenyatta) Chikamai L.W., B.Ed (Nairobi) M.Sc (Kenyatta) Keli,R., BEd.(KU),MSc.(KU) Akinyi,C.O., B.Ed(KU).,M.Sc.(Maseno) Graduate Assistants Oganga,D.O., BEd.(Moi) 236

Nthiiri,J.K.,B.Ed.(Moi) Department of Physics Professor Othieno,H.,BSc.(Kharkov State Univ.),MSc.(Univ.of Strathclyde),P.Hd.(North Carolie State Univ.) Associate Professor Sakwa,T.W., B.Sc, M.Phil, D.Phil (Moi) Senior Lecturer Lecturers Ayodo, K.Y., Dip.Ed.,B.Ed, Mphil,PhD.(Moi) Gaitho, F. M., B.Ed, MSc (Egerton) Poly.),BSc.Comp.Sc.(Moi) Assistant Lecturers Mageto, M.J., Dip.Ed.,B.Sc (Moi), M.Sc (Moi) Department of Computer Science Associate Professor Ogao,O.P., B.Sc.,MSc.,Ph.D. Lecturer Kilwake, H.J., B.Sc. Electrical (UoN), D.Sc. Computer Eng. (Rome)/Chairman Wanyembi,G., BSc.Mathematics & Physics PhD in IT Nasokho P. W., B.Sc, M.Phil (Moi) Waliaro, A., B.Sc (JKUAT), MSc.Comp.Sci.(Makerere) Karume,S.,Dip.(Kenya Sci.),BSc.(JKUAT),MSc.Software Eng.(Sunderland) Wabwoba,F.,B.Ed.(Egerton),MSc.Comp.App.(KU), END.(EDU MGT)(UNISA) Matoke,N., B.Sc.,MSc. Assistant Lecturers Mbugua,S.M., BSc.ECE(UK),MSc.(Sunderland) Oenga,L.,BSc.(Karnatak),MSc.IT.(Madras) Rono,R., B.Ed.(Technology Education), M.Phil Ikoha,A.P.,B.Sc.,M.Sc. Kimanzi,S.,B.Sc.,M.Sc. Instructor Otanga,D.E.,Dip.(IT) (Eld), Diploma in Technical Education KTTC,BSc. Computer Science (Moi University)

Graduate Assistant Mutua,S.M., BSc. Computer Science (MMUST),Holy Rosary College CCNA I & II Omieno,K.K., BSc. Computer Science (MMUST) Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry Associate Professor Getenga,Z.M., B.Sc, M.Sc (UoN) Ph.D (Maseno) Tarus,BSc.,MSc.,PhD.(KU) Lecturers KOwino,I.O.,B.Ed.(KU),PhD.(Binghamtom Univ.,USA)/Chairman Omolo,M.V.,BSc.,MSc.,PhD.(KU) Ekisa, C.A.A., B.Sc, (KU),MSc (UoN) Kirui, W., B.Sc., M.Sc. (UoN) Lagat, S., B.Sc, M.Sc., (Marathwada),PGDE (Maseno) Baraza,L.D.,BSc.(UoN),MSc.,PhD.,(Univ.of Dares-Salaam) Juma,B.F.,BSc.,MSc.,(UoN),PhD.(Botswana) Njoki, N. A., B.Sc.,M.Phil (Moi) Ngige, A,N Orata,F.,B.Sc.(UoN),Ph.D.,(Germany) Assistant Lecturers Okello,V.,B.Ed.(KU),MSc.(JKUAT) Bwire,R.N.,BSc.(Maseno),Mphil.(Botswana) Graduate Assistant Wanyonyi,M.,B.Ed.(Sci.)(Moi) Wairimu,R.K., BEd.(MMUST) Graduate Assistants Mutua,S.,BSc.Comp.Sc.(MMUST) Department of Nursing Sciences Okoth,J.M., Diploma in Registered Nurse, Diploma in Registered Midwife, Diploma in Advanced Nursing MPhil(Medical Education) /Chairman Ambetsa,M., Registered Nurse Diploma, Diploma in Kenya Registered Midwifery,Dip in Advanced Nursing(Nairobi), MPh (Public Health & Epidemiology) Kipmerewo,M., Diploma in Registered Nurse, Diploma in Advanced Nursing (Nairobi),MPhil (Medical Edu.) (MU). Kipsang,J., BSc. (Nursing), MSc.(Nursing) Lusweti,N.C., BSc. (Nursing)(U.E.A.B) Mbunya,N.N., B.Sc.N, M.Sc.N Pediatrics(UoN)

Department of Sugar Technology Professor Wamocha,L.S., Dip.(Egerton), B.Sc.,(Florida,USA),M.Sc.,(Clemson USA), Ph.D.,(JKUAT) Associate Professor Wandahwa,P.J., Advanced Dip Studies in Soil Science(University of Gent),MSc(Nairobi),Ph.D.(Nairobi) Lecturers Keya,N.C.O., B. Agriculture Science (Lincoln College), MSc. Agriculture (Makerere),PhD(Nairobi)/Chairman Ndiema,C.A.,Dip.,B.Sc., M.Sc.,Ph.D.(Egerton) Aseka,N., BSc.(Nairobi), Postgraduate Certificate in Sugar Technology(Mauntains), Diploma in Company Direction (London University),MSc. Engineering (Brunel University),MBA (Rrunel University) Kariaga,M., BEd.(Nairobi),MSc.(Nairobi) Nyongesa,H.W., Diploma Agriculture,Certificate in Micro-Computer Application Packages,BSc. Agriculture,MSc., PhD (Egerton) Ogema,V., MSc. (Nairobi),PhD(Humbolat University,Germany) Konyole,S.O., BSc.(Nairobi),MSc.(Katholieke University ,Belgium) Assistant Lecturers Mukolwe,M.I., B.Sc.(Egerton),M.Sc.(JKUAT) Faculty of Education and Social Sciences Dean Simiyu A.M. B.Ed., (Nairobi), M.Ed., PhD., (State Univ. of New York) Administrative Assistant Okumu N.Praxedes, B.Ed.(KU), MA(UoN) Ayoti,C.,B.Ed.(Moi),Diploma in HRM Department of Curriculum & Instructional Technology Professor Shiundu J.O., B.Ed., M.Ed.(UoN), M.Ed., (KU), Ph.D.(McGill) Associate Professor Simiyu A.M. B.Ed., (UoN), M.Ed., PhD., (State Univ. of New York)

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Lecturers Mutsotso S.N. B.,Ed.(Moi), Dip. PR & PA, (IABE), Mphil.,Dphil.(Moi)/Chairman Ongeti K., B.Ed., (Nairobi), Mphil., (Moi) Salim, R.N., B.Ed.,M.Ed.(KU) Abenga E.S.B., B.Ed (Kenyatta) Mphil.,Dphil.(Moi), Koteng G., BA, PGDE, (Nairobi), M.Ed, (Manchester), D.Phil(Moi) Buluma S. B.Ed., MPhil., (Moi) PG.Dip. HRM (KIM) Graduate Assistant Lyanda, J., B.Ed.(MMUST) Department of Science and Mathematics Education Associate Professor Toili W.W., B.Ed.,M.Ed.(UoN),MSc.(Leeds),PhD.(Maseno) Senior Lecturers Amadalo, M.M., B.Ed., M.Ed (UoN),PhD.(KU)/Chairman Embeywa, E.H.,BEd., M.Ed.,(UoN), M.Phil, Ph.D.(London) Lecturers Wekesa,D.,B.Ed., M.Ed (Egerton) Odhiambo,O.O.,B.Sc.(Egerton), M.Ed.(KU), PGDE(Moi), Ph.D.(Maseno) Assistant Lecturers Michieka,R.,B.Ed.,M.Ed.(KU) Wanjala,M.S.,B.Ed.,Mphil.(Moi) Mwendwa,K.,BSc.,Mphil.(KU) Shikuku,N.B.,B.Ed.(KU),M.Sc.(MMUST) Graduate Assistant Aura,C.M.,Dip.Ed.Sci.(KSTC),B.Ed.Sci.(Moi) Edome, E.P. B.Ed.(Moi), M.Sc.(MMUST) Department of Social Science Education Professor Kasiera M.E.,B.A.(Springfield), MA.(Missouri),Th.M,(Princeton) Ph.D.(Aberdeen) M.A.,MPhil.(Yale),MPA.,DPA.,(USC) PhD. Associate Professors Njino J., Dip. Phil., Dip in Theology. (St. Thomas Aquinas) Dip.MC,, BA., MA, Ph.D., (Pontifical Urban Unv.Rome),HD Psy.Couns.(KIPC)/Chairman Mambo R., BA., M.A. (Binghamton,NY),Ph.D (Columbia,NY) Nandi O.M.J., BA, MA, (UoN), Ph.D (Maseno) 238

Byaruhanga,J.,B.A.(Makerere),MSc.(UoN), PhD.(Maseno) Senior Lecturers Runaku, J.B.R.,BA,Dip.Ed.,(Makerere) M.A. (London) Wekesa M. J. W., DPA,(University of Southern Califonia),MPhil (Economics) (Yale University), MA(Economics) ( University of Nortre Dame) BA(Economics ) (Nairobi) Emgeywa,H.E., B.Ed.(Nairobi), M.Ed.(KU), PhD.(University of London) Lecturers Mulusa J., B.A (UoN), M.A., (Botswana) Immonje M.M., B.A., (UoN), M.Ed.,(KU) Chavasu H.O., B.Ed., M.Phil(Moi) Waithanji M., B.Ed., M.Phil (Moi) Wesonga,M.J.W.,B.A(UoN),M.A.,(Notre Dame Ngala,C.,B.A.(CUEA),M.A.(UoN) Wepukhulu,R.N., BEd.(Moi),MPhil(Moi) Makhulo,S., B.A.(Nairobi), MA(Nairobi) Lianda.M.,B.Ed.(UoN), MA(UoN) Assistant Lecturers Nyakoe, M. J., B.Ed., M.A.,(KU) Mulinya,I.C., B.Ed.(Moi),M.A.,(Nairobi) Wasike,N., BA (Nairobi), M.A.,(Nairobi) Rev. Fr. Kizito,M.L., BEd.(KU),M.A.,(KU) Ms. Murejai.A, B.Ed.(KU), MA(UoN) Graduate Assistant Wanyama,R., Diploma in Education (Moi Teachers College),B.Ed.(MMUST) Department of Educational Planning and Management Senior Lecturers Achoka,J.S.K., B.Ed,(UoN),M.A.,(McGill Unv.) PhD, (KU) Sisungo,Z.W.,SI(Kenyatta College),B.Ed.(Univ.of Wales),M.Ed.(KU),PhD.(Egerton) /Chairman Lecturers Bota,K.N.,B.Ed.(KU),M.A.(McGill),PhD(Hamburg Univ.) Owano,A.,B.A(UoN), PGDE(UoN) Ndiku J.M., B.Ed., MPhil., (Moi) MA(London), Ph.D.,(KU) Odebero,.O.,B.Ed.(Moi),M.Ed.(Maseno), PhD.(Egerton) Ejakait,E.,B.Ed.(Moi), M.Ed.(KU) Maiyo, J.K.,B.Ed.,M.Ed.,(Moi) Obaki,S.,B.A.(New Jersey), Ed.D((Tenesee)

Kaberia,E.L.,B.Ed(KU),M.Ed.(KU) Assistant Lecturers Wamocha,L.M.,B.Ed.(KU),M.Ed.,(Maseno) Oduori,P.A.,B.Ed.(UoN),Mphil.(Moi) Buhere,P.W., BEd.(Moi),MEd. (Educational Administration & Planning) Wachiye,H.J., BSc.(Moi),PGDE(KU),Diploma in Project Management (KIM),MEd. Planning & Economics of Education(Maseno) Sang,K.A., BEd.(MU),MPhil Educational Administration Planning & Curriculum Development(MU) Nganyi,J.E., CPS Part II Section IV,BEd.(Nairobi),MEd. Educational Graduate Assistant Ogenga,P.A.,B.Ed.(Moi) Department of Business Management Lecturers Thuo,K.J., B.Com., MBA (UoN)/ Chairman Warentho,T., B.Sc (Vecennes), MPA (Indiana State), A.SC (Business Mgt.), Dip (Goods &Coaching) Odera,O., BA (UoN), MBA (UoN) Okaka,D., B.Ed (Kenyatta), MBA (UoN) Wanjere,D., B.Com (UoN), MBA (UoN), DipMgt (KIM) Kiongera,F., B.Com (CUEA), MBA (UoN), PGDip(Project Mgt), CPA (Sec.V). Musa,G., B.Ed (Egerton), MBA (UoN) Marube,C.G., LLB (UoN), LLM (Widener), CPS (K), Dip. Law (KSL) Odhiambo,A., B.Ed (Moi) MBA (UoN), CPA Graduate Kwendo,E., B.Com (UoN), MBA (UoN), PGDipM (CIM) Ngoze,M., B.Ed (Kenyatta) M.Phil (Moi), PGDip (HRM) Wawire,P., B.Sc (USIU), M.Sc (Strathclyde) Assistant Lecturers Muchilwa,D., B.Com (Kenyatta), MBA (Hope International), Higher Dip.(IMIS) Otuya,W., BBA (KEMU), M.Phil (Moi), Dip.Ed (KTTC) Manyasi,J., B.Ed (Moi), M.Phil (Moi), PGDip (HRM) Oseno,B., B.Ed (Maseno), MBA (Maseno), CPA(Sec.II) Graduate Assistants 239

Maingi,W., BBM (MMUST), CPA Graduate Goko,T., BBM (MMUST), CPA Graduate Kairu,E., BBM (MMUST), CPA Graduate Kitheka,S., BBM (MMUST), CPA (Sec V) Ngujiri,R., BBM (MMUST), CPA (Sec.III) Kiplimo,D.,EL BBM (MMUST) Mwau,J., BBM (MMUST) Kitili,E., BBM (MMUST) Instructor Aketch,J., BBM (MMUST), Dip (Purchasing & Supplies), HNDip (Entrepreneurship Development), Dip (Technical Ed. & Auto Engineering). Department of Language and Literature Education Associate Professors Odeo,I.I.,B.Ed.(UoN),M.Ed.(KU),DPhil.(Moi) Simala,K.I.,B.Ed.,MPhil.(Moi),PhD.(Maseno) Kazadi,M.B.Ed.,M.Ed.(Kisangani Univ.),PhD.,(Univ.of FrancheComte,Besancon(France) Egessa,R.,B.Ed(Arts)(UoN),MBA(KU) Senior Lecturers Mbori,B.J.O., B.Ed., M.Phil.(Moi),PhD(UNISA)/Chairman Luganda,M.,B.Ed.,M.Ed.(UoN) Kubebea,H.A.,B.A.,Dip.(Ed.)(Makerere),M.Ed.(Exe ter,UK) Lecturers Okwako, E.J.,B.Ed.(KU), M.Phil.(Moi) Atichi,A.,B.Ed.,M.A.,(UoN) Kobia, J.M., B.Ed.,Mphil,(Moi),PhD.(KU) Shikuku,T.M., B.Ed.,Mphil (Moi) Choge, S., B.Ed.,M.Phil.(Moi) Assistant Lecturers Barasa, S., B.Ed.(Baraton), M.Phil.(Moi) On study leave Wasike, C.J.C., B.Ed., M.A.(UoN) On study leave Department of Journalism and Mass Communication Associate Professor Kabaji, E., B.Ed., M.A.(Kenyatta),DPhil(UNISA) Lecturers Anyonje, L.B.., Arts (KU), M. Arts (UoN)/Chairman Mwangi, M.K. B.Eco.,M.Arts,Communication (UoN),PGD(MTC)

Ouko,T.O., B.Ed (Science), MPhil in Communication studies,Postgraduate Diploma in Mass Communication Wenje,P.,BA,MA,PGD-Mass Com.(UoN) Assistant Lecturers Gakahu,N. Postgraduate Diploma in Public Relations(MU), B.Ed (MU),MPhil in Communication Studies(MU) Omwoha,J., BA. in Communication ,MPhil. in Communication Studies Nyongesa,W.,Dip(Berlin),B.A(KU),M.A.(UoN) Department of Criminology and Social Work Lecturer Omosa,M.N.,LLB(Hons), M.A.(UoN),Dip.in Law(KSL)/Chairman Were,E.BA(Daystar),M.A.(UoN) Njeru,F.BA,MA(UoN) Adama, M.O.,B.Sc.(Egerton),M.A.(UoN) Olweny, J.O.F.,B.Ed.(CUEA),M.A.(UoN) Letting,K.M.,B.A.(Moi),M.Phil.(Moi), PGD HRM Department of Educational Psychology Lecturer Maragia S.N., BA, MA, M.Phil. PGDHRD, PGDCCP, Ph.D., (Baroda) Wesangula M.P., B.Ed, MPhil (Moi) Kenneth O. B.Ed, M.Ed, (Kenyatta) Matemba K.C. B.Ed, MPhil., (Moi) Graduate Assistant Were,D Kagendo,J.,B.Ed.(Moi) Department of Educational Foundations Senior Lecturers Wamocha N.J., B.Ed., M.Ed., (KU)/Chairman Ngome, C. K., B.A.(Makerere University), PGDE(Makerere), M.Ed. (KU),PhD. (KU) Lecturer Mukonyi P., B.Ed., M.Ed, (KU) Assistant Lecturer Vundi,S.K., B.Ed.(KU),M.Ed.(KU) Juma,I.N., BEd.(KU),M.Ed. Majanga,E.K., Diploma in Education(Siriba Teachers College),BEd.(KU),MEd. Masese,A., Diploma in Education(Kasomo Teachers College),BEd.(KU),MEd. Nyatuka,B.O., BEd.(KU),MEd (EU). Graduate Assistant Songok,R.,B.Ed.(MMUST) 240

Privately Sponsored Students Programmes (PSSP) Director: Nandi O.M.J., BA, MA, (UoN) Ph.D (Maseno) Centre for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (CDMHA) Department of Disaster Preparedness & Engineering Management (DPEM) Director Otengi S.B.B.,B.Sc.,M.Sc.,Ph.D. (UoN) Lecturers Neyole E.M., B.Sc (Moi), M.Sc.(Salford), D.Phil. (Moi)/Chairman of Department. Kiluva V.M. , B.Sc (JKUAT), M.Sc. (MMUST) Waswa G.W., B.Tech. (Moi), M.Sc.(JKUAT) Miima J.B., B.Sc., M.Sc.(UoN), Ph.D.(Braunschweig Tech) Department of Disaster Management & Sustainable Development (DMSD) Professor Hoorweg J.C Associate Professor Wakhungu J.W., Dip in Animal Breeding, (University of Edinburgh), B.Sc. M.Sc, Ph.D., (Nairobi) Senior Lecturer China S.S., B.Sc.(UoN), M.Sc.(Penn State), Ph.D (Southampton UK)/Chairman of Department. Lecturers Obiri J., B.Sc (UoN), B.Sc (Natal, SA), M.Sc & Ph.D(Pieterrmaritzburg, SA) Omuterema S.O, Certificate in Environmental Impact Assessment , B.Ed., M.Phil., Ph.D (Moi) Marinda P.A, B.Ed., M.Sc., Ph.D (University of Hohenhelm) Department of Emergency Management and Humanitarian Assistance (EMHA) Professor Ngare D Senior Lecturer Onkware K., B.A (Moi), M.Phil., Ph.D/Chairman of Department

Lecturers Mwaniki T.W., B.Ed.(KU), M.Ed (Egerton). Maiyo A..C., B.Sc.Econ.(UEA, Baraton) M.Phil (Moi) Assistant Lecturers Chilumo S.Z., B.Ed (KU), MPH (Wales) Oboka W., B.Ed., M.Phil (Moi) Department of Peace and Conflict Studies (PCS) Associate Professor Matanga F.K., B.A. M.A.(UoN), Ph.D (Rhodes Univ.S.A) Senior Lecturer Were E.M., B.A.(Makerere), M.A(University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada), Postgraduate Research Degree in Regional Planning/Regional Science (University of Karlsrule-Germany). Lecturers Kassilly J.N., B.Ed, M.A.(KU), Ph.D(Maseno) Kamoet A.S., B.A. (UoN), PGDE (KU), M.A.(Peking). School of Open Learning and Continuing Education (SOLACE) Director Odeo, I.I, B.Ed.(Nairobi), M.Ed.(Kenyatta), D.Phil. (Moi) Coordinator Abenga E.S.B., B.Ed (Kenyatta) Mphil,D.Phil. (Moi) Administrative Assistant Musera,G.,B.Ed.,M.Phil.(Moi) Co-ordinator,Bungoma Campus Okombo, M., Diploma in Education(KSTC), B.Ed., M.Sc (Baraton) Senior Administrative Assistant Waswa,O.W.,B.Ed.(Maseno) Co-ordinator,Kipro Centre Omuterema,S.O., Certificate in Environmental Impact Assessment,B.Ed.,M.Phil.(Moi) Senior Administrative Assistants Magonya,S.,B.Ed.(Moi),MBA(KU) Kivuva,L.N.,B.A.,M.A.(Nairobi) Co-ordinator Webuye Campus Simala,K.I.,B.Ed.,MPhil.(Moi),PhD.(Maseno) Senior Administrative Assistant Mutoka,R.,B.A.(Egerton) Administrative Assistant Lusweti,R.W.,B.Ed.(Nairobi) 241

Co-ordinator Bishop Sulumeti Study Centre Odebero, .O.,B.Ed.(Moi),M.Ed.(Maseno),PhD.(Egerton) Co-ordinator,Nambale Study Centre Achoka,J.S.K., B.Ed,(UoN),MA,(McGill Unv.) PhD, (KU) Senior Administrative Assistant Feisal,Abdi,BBM.(Maseno) Science and Technology Park & Industrial Linkages Director Omolo,M.V.,BSc.,MSc.,PhD.(KU) Assistant Registrar Moindi,J.O.,BA.,(UoN),MSc.HRM.(Manchester) School of Graduate Studies (SGS) Dean : Were, H.K., B.Sc. Agri (Nairobi), M.Sc. Plant (Nairobi). Ph.D (Plant) (Germany) Senior Administrative Assistant Iyaya, M.W.,B.Ed.,(Baraton),MA.Ed.(Andrews) Administrative Staff Office of the Vice Chancellor Vice Chancellor Wangila, B.C.C., Dip.Ed.(KU), Dip Aqua (ARC), B.Sc. (UoN), M.Tech. (RSUST), PhD, (Manitoba) Internal Auditor Rotich, S.,CPA II, (K), B.Com. (Nairobi)MBA.(Moi) Administrative Assistant Kabindio,B.N., B.A.(Mass Communication)(Uganda Christian University) Legal Officer Wanjala,J.,LLB(Nairobi),Diploma in Law (KSL) Legal Assistant Getrude M.L LLB(Moi) Academic Division Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic Affairs) Sigot, A.J., B.Sc., M.Sc. (Central Missouri State University), Ph.D.(KU) Registrar Mabonga, J.W.S., B.Ed, M.A. (Nairobi) Deputy Registrar Obengo,Z.,B.A.(Egerton),M.Sc.(Brunnel,UK) Examinations Assistant Registrar Welime, S.N., B.A, MPA (Aurangabad) PGDE (Maseno)

Senior Administrative Assistant Matofari,F.,B.Ed. (KU),M.Ed.(Egerton) Wasike,D.M.,B.Ed.(Moi),PGD (KU),MPhil.(Moi) Administrative Assistant Munyoki,J.,PGDE(KU),Bsc information Science(Moi) Admissions Assistant Registrar Maleche, M.S., B.A.(UEA,Baraton), MPhil.(Moi) Senior Administrative Assistant Mamuli,C.L.,B.Ed.(Moi) Administrative Assistants Kagucia,C.N., BSc.(Egerton), CPA Part I, Diploma in HRM (KIM) Nganga,B.W., B.Ed. (Nairobi), Diploma in HRM (KIM) Programmes Assistant Registrar Barasa,B.U.,B.Ed.(UoN) Senior Administrative Assistants Muluta,G.M.,B.Com/M.Com.(Shivaji) Asugo,B.,BEd.(KU),MSc.(Nairobi) Documentalist Nyamulu J.C., Dip. Librarianship, B.Sc Librarianship (Melbourne) Alumni Office Administrative Assistant Oloo,A.O.,B.Ed.(Moi) Library Services Librarian Shibanda, G.G., ALA (Birmingham) Dip Lib. and Info. Science, M.L.S. (Lougbourough), FLA (UK), MCILIP,MKLA. Assistant Librarian Ochoggia,R.,Dip.IS.(Botswana),BLIS(Southboroug h),Mphil.(Moi) Barasa, D. N., Dip. Lib. Sci. (Makerere) Wanambisi, M., BA.,BLS.,PGD.in Lib/Info.Studies(Lucknov),MKLA Chief Printer Imbusi,J.,HND.in Printing Technology (West Herts,UK) Documentalist Iddi,J.,BSc.IS,Mphil.(Moi) Senior Library Assistants Lugonzo, S.G., Certificate in Information Sci. (Kenya Polytechnic),Dip.Lib.Studies(Eld.Poly.)

Dean of Students Omwoha L.E.A., B.Ed (UoN) , M.Sc. HRM (Manchester) Senior Assistant Dean Of Students Kiboiy L.K., B.Ed.,Mphil.(Moi) CPS Part 1(kasneb) Students Counselor Muango G., BA (UoN.) PGDE (KU),Mphil.(Moi) Games Tutor Tuiga E. Dip. Ed, B.Ed. (KU) Senior Administrative Assistant Onzere,B.Ed.(Maseno University) Administration and Finance Division Deputy Vice Chancellor Prof: S.K. Makhanu, B.Sc., M.Sc. (UoN), Ph. D (Kyoto). Registrar(Administration) Atamba, R. C., B.A. (UoN), MBA(Egerton). Recruitment & Placement Senior Administrative Assistant Magonya,N.S B.Ed(Moi),MBA(KU) Agesa,P.,B.Ed.,MBA,(KU) Administrative Assistant Ongulu,R.A.,Dip.(KSTC),B.Ed.,MPhil.(Moi) Training & Development Amayi,I.Z.,B.A.(Nairobi),MPhil.(Moi) Ooko,B,,B.A,UoN Staff Establishment Owunza, D.J.,B.A (KU)PGDE(Egerton) Mugambi,A.L.,B.Ed.(KU) General Human Resources Senior Administrative Assistant Kundu, L.J., Bsc. AGEC (Egerton) Wangamati,M.,B.A,M.A(Delhi) Central Services Senior Administrative Assistant Namasaka,D.B.,B.Ed.(UoN) Borter,R.,B.A (Nairobi),CPS(K) Industrial Relations & Staff Welfare Senior Administrative Assistant Nabiswa, F. N B.Ed,MPhil Administrative Assistant Mukwa,J.,Dip.in HRM(Nairobi),Dip.in Secretarial Studies,BBM (MMUST) Council Secretariat Senior Administrative Assistant Shigogodi,J.M.,BA(KU),CPS (K) (Kasneb) 242

Administrative Assistant Were,S.O.,B.Sc.(JKUAT) Estates Senior Estates Officer Eng.Mukangula.M.K B.Sc Eng.UoN Project Development Unit Architect Busuru.R.M.,B.Arch(UoN) Security Chief Security Officer Kokonya P.W., BA(UoN) Security Officer Shitera.B.M.,BA Health Services Medical Officer Wanguche P.O .,MB CLB Med(UoN) Senior Clinical Officer Mate.A.S HND Orthopedics,Dip. Clinical Med & Surgery.(MTC) Transport Assistant Transport Officer Francis Ofisi.,Dip (KTTI) Catering Officer Angote, R.A., Dip Institutional Mgt., Dip in Institutional Mgt. Hotel Mgt. (Kenya Polytechnic) Dip in Tech. Edu. (Kenya Technical Teachers College). Tiany, E., Dip. Institutional Mgt, Higher Dip. Catering & Accomm. (Kenya Polytechnic) Ag.Hostels Officer Olweny, J .Catering & Accomodation Technology Finance Officer Waluvengo, O., BBM(Moi),CPA(K)(C.C.A).,MBA(Maseno). Deputy Finance Officer Ogama,B.,CPA(K),B.Sc.(Moi),MBA(Nairobi) Revenue Accountant Kadima, M., M. Com B. Com. (Delhi) Expenditure Accountant Apwoka,N.,CPA Part II(Kasneb),B.Com.(Daystar Univ.) Accounts Assistants Mutange, I., CPA I(KASNEB) Arunga, J.W., CPA I(KASNEB) 243

Mayenga, J., CPA I(KASNEB) Kuria,A.,CPA I (KASNEB) Mugasia,N.,CPA I (KASNEB) Shitanda,A, CPA II (KASNEB) Chebii,Winnie, CPA II (KASNEB),BBM(MMUST) Kaoko,C. CPA I (KASNEB) Muyumba,L.,CPA II (KASNEB) Procurement Officer Nyanza,D.,BBA (Maseno) Senior Administrative Assistant (Procurement) Shihemi, G., B.Ed.(Moi),M.A.(Nairobi) Senior Purchasing Assistant Mombo, R., CPA I (Kasneb),BBM(MMUST) , M.Sc. (Proc.& Log.) (JKUAT) Planning,Research and Extension Division Deputy Vice Chancellor Shiundu J.O., B.Ed., M.Ed.(UoN),Ph.D.(McGill) Director,Research and Extension Getenga,Z.M.,BSc.,MSc.(UoN),PhD.(Maseno),Hum boldt Fellow (Germany) Registrar Onyango O., B.A (UoN), PGD-HRN (UMI) Admnistrative Assistant Karanja,J.K.,M.A.,B.Ed.(Egerton) Wekulo,S.C.,B.Ed.,MPhil.(Moi)