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112 E. Sixth St., PO Box 382, Gaylord, MI 49734 • www.WeeklyChoice.com • (989) 732-8160
Weekly Choice
A Choice Choice Publication
The Gaylord Area
Council (GACA)
for the Arts will be
celebrating this Arts Week,
and their 40th anniversary of
promoting the arts in Otsego
County, with a multi-faceted
event at the Arts Center on
Main Street in Gaylord this
coming Saturday, October
6th.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS.
HIDDEN TREASURES
Angels at Work
Resale in Gaylord offers a
warm, welcoming atmos-
phere and a wide array of
value-priced items.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS.
Positive News,
Sports and
Events
Thursday, October 4, 2012
Angels at
Work
Resale
By Jim Akans
Brett McVannel, a 1989
Gaylord High School
alumni, has been named
the new Chief of Police
for the Gaylord Police
Department. McVannel,
a 16 year veteran of the
Gaylord Police force, fol-
lows in the footsteps of
Joe FitzGerald, who has
served on the force for
over 23 years, the last
six-and-a-half as Chief of
Police.
“Brett has always done
a great job on the force,”
noted FitzGerald, “some-
one who can always be
counted on. He is a very
good choice, and I know
he will do a great job as
Police Chief.”
The announcement of
the appointment was
made by Gaylord City
Manager Joe Duff last
STORY
PAGE 12
By Jim Akans
It’s the most colorful time of
the year. Over the next few
weeks, hardwood forests across
Northern Michigan will continue
to reveal a dazzling display of
radiant red, brilliant yellow,
burnt orange, and vibrant violet
hues as leaves shut down the
photosynthesis process that has
been working from sunup to
sundown since the arrival of
spring.
During the summer, trees
absorb sunlight using chemical
pigments called chlorophyll and
carotenoids. All colors of the
light spectrum are absorbed by
chlorophyll during this process
except green…which is why
leaves look green all summer
long. As the autumn season
arrives, the trees production of
chlorophyll ceases, the green
color of the leaves slowly begins
to fade, and the remaining pig-
mentations start to show
through. It’s the same thing that
happens to bananas as they
ripen, turning from green to yel-
low as the chlorophyll disap-
pears.
The best autumn colors usual-
ly arrive after a warm, late sum-
mer followed by a mild early fall
that has seasonably warm days
and cool, but not freezing nights.
A combination of good
ground moisture, plenty of
sun and cooler temperatures
cause leaves to make lots of
SEE MOTHER NATURE PAGE 5A
STORY
PAGE 5
GAYLORD
1390 Main St. West
989-732-8200
GACA Arts
Week event
By Jim Akans
Here comes the Annual Grayling
Harvest Festival, sponsored by the
Downtown Development Authority, a
huge fall celebration held October
6th and 7th in Grayling that offers
lots of exciting things to see and do
for those of every age. Events will
include an Antique Tractor Show,
Parade and Tractor Powered Displays,
a Farmer’s Market, Hay Wagon Rides,
Pony Rides, a Craft Show and Kids
Games, and of course - lots of food
and shopping fun in Downtown
Grayling.
SEE HARVEST FESTIVAL PAGE 4A

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Antique tractors will line the street of downtown Grayling this
Saturday and Sunday as part of the annual Harvest Festival.
Don’t miss the opportunity to take a long walk or a
“Sunday drive” during the next couple of weeks and enjoy
the incredible autumn colors.
PHoto By AnGie CurnS
Brett McVannel
becomes new Gaylord
Chief of Police
Mother Nature’s
dazzling color show
begins
PHoto By JiM AkAnS
MIebIgan Norrbern
LIgbrs Cborus SAI
PRESENTS
Friday, October 5 • 7:00 pm
Trinity Luthern Church
1354 South Otsego Ave., Gaylord
Tickets available at Saturn Booksellers
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Bear Basketball Skills Classes Begin Saturday. Grades K – 6
Sign up at the Otsego County Community Center, Gaylord or sign up on-line at www.BearBasketball.org
Covering 40 Towns in Northern Michigan including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Lewiston, Mancelona, Mio, Indian River and surrounding area.
Brett McVannel, a
1989 Gaylord High
School alumni, has
been named the
new Chief of
Police for the
Gaylord Police
Department.
PHoto By JiM AkAnS
Check out
all the local
sports in
our second
section



















































































































































































































S
SECTION B



SPORTS




Page 2 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012
WEATHER:
Thursday
High 70
Low 42
Friday
High 51
Low 37
Saturday
High 48
Low 32
Sunday
High 49
Low 32
Monday
High 53
Low 35
Tuesday
High 57
Low 42
Wednesday
High 57
Low 40
By Jim Akans
The third annual “Making Change Run/Walk” event, a
fundraiser for the Guardian Gals, Inc. will take place this
Saturday, October 6th, starting at 9 am at the Environmental
Center located behind the Gaylord Intermediate School. This
year, men, women and children will be participating in one
of three different run/walk course lengths, 5k, 10k and 1-
mile, each following routes through the Environment Center
field and Aspen Park in Gaylord.
Guardian Gals, Inc, a non-profit organization, has an
ongoing mission to actively engage, educate and offer oppor-
tunities for young girls and women to learn skills, behaviors
and knowledge that enhance positive personal and societal
change. Their mission is carried out in community service
projects, philanthropy, self care lessons and mentoring by
area leaders. Since 2004, over 150 girls have taken part in
either monthly or weekly Guardian Gals sessions and activi-
ties in the community.
The 2011 Making Change event raised over $12,000 and
involved 146 participants, with ages ranging from 3 years old
to over 70 years old. This year, first time walkers or runners
are invited to make the 2012 Making Change event and even
bigger success. People are also encouraged to come to the
event this Saturday to help cheer the runners and walkers
on.
For additional details about this event, contact Abby
Hamilton at (989) 390-5749 or to register, visit Active.com
and search “Guardian Gals” – on line registration will end on
Friday, October 5th. Registration forms are also available at
Treetops Fitness Center, Saturn Booksellers, Powerhouse
Gym, Snap Fitness and Independent Bank.
Guardian Gals 2nd “Making Change”
Run/Walk fundraiser is this Saturday
CALL (989) 732-8160 FAX (888) 854-7441
EMAIL DAVE1@WEEKLYCHOICE.COM
LOCAL NEWS FROM NORTHERN MICHIGAN
Local News
Thursday, October 4, 2012 Local News Line (989) 732-8160
G A Y L O R D
PHoto By Alex CerVAniAk
Run, walk, stroll…or simply be a cheerleader. Either way, join in the 3rd Annual Guardian Gals “Making
Change Run/Walk” event this Saturday, October 6th. This is a great opportunity to join in a healthy, and help-
ful outing on an early fall weekend, plus help raise public awareness and funding for this energetic, communi-
ty focused non-profit group.
October 4, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 3
RECORD TEMPERATURES
Avg. Avg. Record Record
Oct. Sunrise Sunset High Low Mean High Low
4 7:40 AM 7:14 PM 62°F 41°F 51°F 79°F (1967) 24°F (1984)
5 7:42 AM 7:12 PM 61°F 40°F 51°F 80°F (2007) 21°F (1965)
6 7:43 AM 7:11 PM 61°F 40°F 51°F 81°F (1963) 21°F (1952)
7 7:44 AM 7:09 PM 60°F 40°F 50°F 85°F (1962) 21°F (1954)
8 7:45 AM 7:07 PM 60°F 40°F 50°F 85°F (2007) 26°F (1953)
9 7:47 AM 7:05 PM 60°F 39°F 49°F 80°F (2007) 21°F (1989)
10 7:48 AM 7:03 PM 59°F 39°F 49°F 78°F (1955) 21°F (1952)
11 7:49 AM 7:01 PM 59°F 38°F 49°F 79°F (1973) 23°F (1964)
12 7:50 AM 7:00 PM 58°F 38°F 48°F 81°F (1995) 25°F (1957)
13 7:52 AM 6:58 PM 58°F 38°F 48°F 79°F (1995) 24°F (2006)
14 7:53 AM 6:56 PM 58°F 37°F 47°F 80°F (1975) 24°F (1980)
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
By Jim Akans
There’s a whole lot of fall festivity tak-
ing place in the Straits area in October.
Whether your pleasure is shopping,
searching for the perfect pumpkin, an
opportunity to take a brisk 5-mile run
across the Mighty Mac Bridge, or sim-
ply admiring the gorgeous fall colors in
one of the most scenic of vista…it’s all
happening in October in Mackinaw
City
The 4th Annual Fall Colors Bridge
Race, sponsored by the Mackinaw Area
Visitor’s Bureau, will take place on
Saturday, October 6th. This is only one
of two times runners have the opportu-
nity to put their tennis shoes to the
roadway across the Straits, the other
being on Memorial Day weekend. The
jog across during the fall season, how-
ever, offers something that only hap-
pens once a year, the chance to see the
breathtaking fall colors from high
about the water of the Straits of
Mackinac, unencumbered by the shell
of their automobiles. On site registra-
tion for this event is $50 per person and
will be held from 5 to 9 pm on Friday,
October 5th at race headquarters in
Mackinaw City. Registration fee
includes an official race bib, race chip
technology, official race T-shirt, com-
memorative medal, transportation to
the starting area, awards for division
winners and a hot breakfast. The race
will begin at 7 am on Saturday, October
6th.
But that’s not all. The skies will be
bursting with color even after the sun
goes down in Mackinaw City on
Saturday. A approximately 9:30 pm on
October 6th, a truly awe-inspiring lake-
front fireworks display will light up the
night skies over Conkling Heritage Park,
and the Straits of Mackinac.
There will be a windfall of savings
offered at the 36th Annual Fall
Shopper’s Fest in Mackinaw City, spon-
sored by the Mackinaw City Chamber
of Commerce, which begins on Friday,
October 12th and continues through
Saturday, October 20th. Participating
businesses will be offering lots of great
savings on those always unique and
wonderful items available throughout
Mackinac City, and many will even
have some cider and treats on hand for
shoppers to enjoy. The Fall Shoppers
Festival, formerly known as
“Appreciation Weekend” was originated
in 1977 by businessman Bob Heilman
owner of the Fort Fudge Shop of
Mackinaw City.
To kick off the festival, “The Great
Pumpkin Hunt” will take place next
weekend, October 12th through the
14th. Participating businesses will be
displaying Great Pumpkin Hunt signs
in the windows of their establishments,
and each will have a small numbered
pumpkin placed somewhere inside the
store. Shoppers simply need to match
those numbers to the store names, and
turn in those completed entry forms by
the end of the shopping day on
October 14th. There will be a drawing
on Monday, October 15th, at the
Chamber of Commerce office, and win-
ners will receive gift certificates from
participating businesses. Entry forms &
drop boxes are available at the
Chamber of Commerce office and at
Souvenir’s Marugo.
Don’t miss this grand fall celebration
in Mackinaw City during the first two
weeks of October. For more informa-
tion on the Fall Shoppers’ Fest, the
Great Pumpkin Hunt, Fall Colors Bridge
Race, or other fall attractions in the
Straits area, visit www.mackinawcham-
ber.com.
Mackinaw City “heats up” with exciting
autumn events in October
M A C K I N A W C I T Y
Published Weekly on Thursday.
Afton, Alanson, Alba, Black Lake, Brutus, Burt Lake, Carp Lake, Cheboygan,
Conway, Elmira, Fairview, Frederic, Gaylord, Grayling, Harbor Point, Harbor
Springs, Indian River, Johannesburg, Lakes of the North, Levering, Lewiston,
Lovells, Luzerne, Mackinaw City, Mancelona, Mio, Oden, Onaway, Pellston,
Petoskey, Topinabee, Tower, Vanderbilt, Vienna Corners, Waters, Wolverine
Deadline Monday Noon.
Place Classified ads on-line at
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Notice to Readers: Typically, most advertising is honest and clear about special offers, howev-
er, please be sure to read the contents thoroughly to avoid misrepresentation. Choice
Publications does not warranty the accuracy or reliability of content and does not accept any
liability for injuries or damages caused to the reader or advertiser that may result from content
contained in this publication. Errors in advertising should be reported immediately. Damage
from errors will not exceed the cost of the advertise-
ment for one issue. Choice Publication employees and
family members and listed advertisers’ employees
and family members are not eligible to win. Choice
Publications reserves the right to publish or refuse ads
at their discretion.
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Published by:
Choice Publications, Inc.
112 East Sixth Street, PO Box 382, Gaylord, MI 49734-0382
Phone: 989-732-8160 Fax: 888-854-7441
Publisher:
Dave Baragrey 1
Dave1@WeeklyChoice.com
Dave Baragrey 2
Dave2@WeeklyChoice.com
Website Administrator:
Chad Baragrey
Chad@WeeklyChoice.com
News Editor:
Jim Akans
Jim@WeeklyChoice.com
Sports Editor:
Mike Dunn
Mike@WeeklyChoice.com
989-370-0605
Sports:
Jeff Baragrey
Jeff@WeeklyChoice.com
Ryan Bokas
Ryan@WeeklyChoice.com
SALES:
Phone: 989-732-8160
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Charles Jarman
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989-826-1053
Local.
Service-
Minded.
Call today for a FREE
Estimate.
Arrow Sanitation
(989) 732-4243
Roscommon - Kirtland
Community College (KCC) is hosting
a college night on Thursday, October
13 from 6-7:30 p.m. Representatives
from approximately 40 colleges and
universities will be on-hand to pro-
vide information to people interest-
ed in attending college next fall.
High school students, parents and
others are encouraged to attend the
annual event in the Student Center
on Kirtland’s main campus near
Roscommon. College Night 2011
offers students and parents the
opportunity to talk to college repre-
sentatives and collect information
needed to make informed choices.
“We encourage families, not just
high school students, to attend and
get involved in education decisions,”
said Marianne Kuzimski, student
recruitment specialist at KCC.
In addition to KCC and M-TEC at Kirtland-Gaylord, repre-
sentatives from Michigan State University, Ferris State
University, Oakland University, Saginaw Valley State
University, Delta College and several military branches are
scheduled to be in attendance. Financial aid advisers will be
available to offer assistance as well.
Kuzimski adds, “Kirtland’s College Night is a great oppor-
tunity for our local communities to visit our campus and talk
to KCC representatives about our programs firsthand. It also
offers a chance for the community members to see what
other colleges and universities are doing and what they have
to offer. “
Annually, more than 3,000 students attend a variety of cer-
tificate and two-year degree programs at Kirtland’s three
locations – near Roscommon, the M-TEC at Kirtland-Gaylord
and in West Branch. KCC offers a wide range of online cer-
tificate and degree programs as well, all of which can be
completed from home.
KCC provides open access to education, as well as cultural
opportunities, to enrich the lives of the people in Northern
Michigan. The faculty and staff of KCC seek to offer higher
education in a student-focused environment, providing
transfer and career technical programs; developmental stud-
ies; workforce development; personal enrichment and cul-
tural opportunities.
For more information about College Night 2011 or other
programs at Kirtland, call 989-275-5000, extension 258, or
visit online at www.kirtland.edu.
Kirtland Community College
Hosts College Night
Whether your pleasure is shopping, searching for the
perfect pumpkin, an opportunity to take a brisk 5-mile
run across the Mighty Mac Bridge, or simply admiring
the gorgeous fall colors in one of the most scenic of
vista…it’s all happening in October in Mackinaw City.
CourteSy PHoto
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Page 4 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Harvest Festival Continued...
The Harvest Festival will take place on
Saturday and Sunday from 10 am until 4 pm.
All day events include the hay wagon rides,
the tractor show, farmer market, pony rides,
kids games and inflatables and music by
Celebrations. There will also be plenty of
food vendors on hand, so bring your
appetite! There will be a Halloween Cookie
Decorating event both days from 11 am until
12:30 pm, and shortly thereafter, at 1 pm, the
parade of antique tractors will get underway
on Michigan Avenue, after which those vin-
tage machines will be parked downtown to
view. Attendees can also participate in a
Pumpkin Painting event, from 1:30 to 3 pm
both days.
On Saturday, an Arts and Crafts Show will
be held at the Grayling Elementary School
from 9 am to 2 pm. To make it easy for
attendees to see the many events going on
during Harvest Festival in Grayling, a shuttle
will provide transportation from downtown
to the school and back.
The Grayling Harvest Festival is a great
place to spend some time with the entire
family during an early fall weekend in the
north. For more information contact the
Grayling Visitors Bureau at 800-937-8837 or
visit www.grayling-mi.com
Monday, September 24th, after Gaylord City Council mem-
bers and Mayor John Jenkins unanimously nominated
McVannel for the position. Fellow officers on the force
greeted the announcement with their full support.
“I have received great support from all of the officers,”
related McVannel. “The department has run so well under
the direction of Chief FitzGerald I have no plans at this
time to make any major changes. My first priority is to get
familiar with my new position.”
McVannel, his wife Alicia, and two children are
Johannesburg area residents. The couple has been active
in Relay For Life fundraising events, and Brett has coached
junior varsity girl’s basketball at the Johannesburg-
Lewiston Area Schools for the past four years. He also
enjoys bow hunting and fishing.
He notes, “The announcement was truly a surprise. My
wife and daughters are very supportive. The welcomed
me home a few evenings ago with a kitchen fully decorated
with streamers and signs congratulating me. That meant
a lot to me.”
A retirement gathering was held at City Hall for outgoing
Police Chief FitzGerald on Friday. He related, “My plan is
to take some time off and enjoy relaxing with my wife and
kids. I will definitely be going back to work, but I plan on
taking time to look at my options.”
McVannel Continued...
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& & & & &
& & & &
& & & & & & & & &
& & & & & & &
& & & & & & & & & & & & &
& & & & & & &
1
1
1
1
1
&
&
&
&
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& &
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& & & &
& & & & & & & & &
& & & & & & &
& & & & & & & & & & & & &
& & & & & & &
1
1
1
1
1
&
&
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&
& &
& &
& & & & & &
& & & & &
& & & &
& & & & & & & & &
& & & & & & &
& & & & & & & & & & & & &
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1
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1
We buy unwanted, broken or scrap gold
and all collector coins.
We pay the public more than any other
dealer in Northern Michigan.
Check with the rest and then come to the best.
NO Games, NO Gimmicks, NO Altered Scales
Just honest cash value.
Give us a call at 989-448-2400
or stop in and see us at our new store in Gaylord.
1363 West Main St. You will be glad you did.
We are located next to Mancino`s and across the street from Ponderosa.
Remember, WE PAY MORE
than anyone in Northern Michigan.
Alpine Gold &
Silver Exchange
(Your hometown coin shop)
NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN
NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN
NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN
As an investor, you can sometimes
still feel you’re at the mercy of forces
beyond your control. This may be espe-
cially true today, when the Federal
Reserve has warned of an approaching
“fiscal cliff.” What can you do in the face
of such a dire prediction?
First of all, you need to under-
stand what led to the Fed's remarks.
Here’s the story: Some $1.2 trillion in
spending cuts are scheduled to begin in
2013 while, simultaneously, the Bush-
era tax cuts — including the reduction
in capital gains and dividend taxes —
are set to expire. This combination of
spending cuts and higher taxes could
take some $600 billion out of the econo-
my, leading to a possible recession —
and maybe something much worse, at
least in the eyes of the Fed.
Still, there’s no need for panic. Despite
its political infighting, Congress is likely
to reduce the “cliff” to a smaller bump,
though it probably won’t happen until
after the election. But as an investor, you
may need to be prepared for two signif-
icant events: market volatility, at least in
the short term, and higher taxes, proba-
bly for the foreseeable future.
To combat market volatility, you need
to own a broadly diversified portfolio
that can handle “bumps,” “cliffs” and
other rugged investment terrain. This
means you’ll need a mix of stocks,
bonds and other securities that are suit-
able for your needs. (Keep in mind,
though, that while diversification can
reduce the impact of market volatility, it
cannot guarantee profits or protect
against losses.) You may also need to
“rebalance” your portfolio to ensure that
it’s still aligned with your goals, risk tol-
erance and time horizon, despite the
impact of volatility.
Now, let’s turn to taxes. Even if taxes
on income, capital gains and dividends
do rise, they will still, in all likelihood, be
much lower than they’ve been at various
points in the past. Nonetheless, you
may want to consider a variety of steps,
including the following:
• Take advantage of tax-deferred vehi-
cles. Contribute as much as possible to
your traditional IRA, your 401(k) or
other employer-sponsored retirement
plan, and any education savings
accounts you may have, such as a 529
plan.
• Consider converting your traditional
IRA to a Roth IRA. A Roth IRA provides
tax-free earnings, provided you
don’t start taking withdrawals until
you’re 59½ and you’ve had your
account for at least five years. (Be
aware, though, that this conversion
is taxable and may not be appro-
priate if you don’t have money
readily available to pay the taxes.)
• Consider municipal bonds. If
you’re in one of the upper tax
brackets, you may benefit from
investing in “munis,” which pay
interest that’s free of federal taxes,
and possibly state and local taxes
as well.
Not all these choices will be suit-
able for your situation, of course.
Before taking action on these
items, you may want to consult
with your tax and financial advi-
sors. But give these options some
thought because they may prove
helpful in keeping your financial
goals from going “over a cliff.”
This article was written by
Edward Jones for use by your local
Edward Jones Financial Advisor.
Philip Hofweber is a Financial
Advisor with Edward Jones Investments
located at 100 West Main Street in
Gaylord. He can be reached at (989)731-
1851, or email him at
phil.hofweber@edwardjones.com. Tune
in Tuesday Mornings to Eagle 101.5 for
Phil Hofweber to hear his weekly
Financial Focus Topic. Edward Jones, its
financial advisors and employees do not
provide tax or legal advice. You should
consult with a qualified tax or legal pro-
fessional for advice on your specific situ-
ation.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
SHOULD YOU PREPARE FOR
“FISCAL CLIFF”?
Philip Hofweber, Financial Advisor with Edward Jones
GAYLORD, (989) 731-1851
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
You’re Invited
Preparing
for the Road Ahead
When:
Where:
Join us for our latest Outlook and Opportunities
presentation, Preparing for the Road Ahead.
We’ll discuss:
rExpectations for economic and job growth
rStrategies to address ination and changing
interest rates
rWhere to look for stock market opportunities
rThe dangers of playing politics with your portfolio
October 18th, 2012
Michaywe Inn the Woods
Lunch will be served.
Philip WHofweber
Financial Advisor
.
100 W Main St
Gaylord, MI 49735
989-731-1851
Call Jennifer or Patty at 989-731-1851 by October
15th, 2012 to reserve your seat for this event.
ed vit e In u’r o YYo


















s of pla The danger r
Where to look for stock mar r
interest rates
Strategies to address ination and changing r
Expectations for economic and job growth r
hen: W October 18th, 2012



tfolio ying politics with your por la
tunities et oppor k stock mar
ress ination and changing
economic and job growth
th, 2012



folio



e: her W Michaywe Inn the Woods
Lunch will be served.
Philip WHofweber
Financial Advisor
15th, 2012 to reserve your seat for this event.
Call Jennifer or Patty at 989-731-1851 by October



nn the Woods
ed.
WHofweber
l Advisor
rve your seat for this event.
tty at 989-731-1851 by October



ober



Financial Advisor
100 W M
Gaylord, MI 49735
989-731-1851



M om c djones. ar edw . w w w
l Advisor
Main St
MI 49735
-1851



Member SIPC
The Lewiston Area Chamber of Commerce will host the
15th Annual Harvest Auction & Wine Tasting on Saturday,
October 6. The event will take place at St. Francis Parish
Hall, 3060 W. Casey Street in Lewiston, beginning at 6:00
p.m. Harvest themed entrees will be available in addition to
wine and cheese.
The “Auction” segment of the Harvest Auction always
offers some wonderful entertainment for the evening.
There will be both Silent and Live Auctions, and volunteers
will be on hand to provide assistance to patrons when
needed. Auction items have been donated for this event by
area businesses and individuals.
Tickets can be purchased at the Chamber office or at the
door for $15 each. A portion of the proceeds will benefit
Relay for Life. For more information, contact the Lewiston
Area Chamber of Commerce at www.lewistonchamber.com
or 989-786-2293.
Lewiston Area Chamber of
Commerce presents 15th
Annual Harvest Auction
When: October 18th, 2012
Where: Michaywe Inn The Woods
Time: 11:30am to 1:30pm.





Mary Welsh, Master Stylist
27 years experience
Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10am-6pm
Saturday by Appointment
5517 Old 27 South, Gaylord
989.619.3029
Come see me at
The View Hair Salon
~ SPECIAL ~
Make an appointment with Mary Welsh and
receive $5.00 Off your haircut or
$10.00 off any chemical service.
FULL STEAM AHEAD
POWER WASHING
Chris (989) 350-0536
Jodi (989) 350-9040
Fully Insured
• Houses • Store Fronts • Gas Stations
• Concrete Driveways, Sidewalks & Parking Lots
• Steaming For Oil & Gas Companies
• And Any Thing Else You Can Think To Wash
Hot & Cold Water Up To 4500 psi
We can heat the water up to 250 degrees
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
October 4, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 5
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BOYNE ClTY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o 8esa|e
1158 S. M-75, Boyne City
231-582-5711
www.challengemtn.org
0oos|go 0es|go
100 Van Pelt Pl., Charlevoix
231-237-9773
www.consigndesign.net
CHARLEvOlX
8ergmaoo 0eoter 8esa|e Shop
8888 Ance Road, Charlevoix
231-547-9624
www.bergmanncenter.org
ke||y's Aot|g0es &
F0ro|t0re 8aro
06176 Old US 31 S.,Charlevoix
231-547-0133
www.dkellyantiques.com
EAST JORDAN
0rossroads 8esa|e Shop
205 Water Street., East Jordan
231-536-7606
Open Tuesday thru Saturday
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao
F0ro|t0re & Nore Store
6517 Center St.
Downtown Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao 8esa|e shop
9746 Main Street
Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
FREDERlC
P|oev|ew N|||tary S0rp|0s
7328 Old 27 North,
Frederic
989-348-8300
GAYLORD
A-2-I 8esa|e
1829 Old 27 South,
Gaylord
989-732-9500
6oodw||| 8eta|| aod
0ooat|oo 0eoter
1361 Pineview Dr. (near Lowes)
Gaylord
989-705-1747
www.goodwillnmi.org
GAYLORD
6reat 8ooms
00a||ty Pre-0woed F0ro|t0re
148 W. Main St.,
Gaylord
989-745-5184
www.greatroomsgaylord.com
Aoge|s at work
8esa|e
1523 S Otsego Ave.
Gaylord
989.448.8615
Veo0s & 8|0e Jeaos
340 West Main St..,
Gaylord
989-731-2600
www.venusandbluejeans.com
Fo0r Seasoos
8esa|e oI the horth
111 E. Main Street
Gaylord, MI 49735
989.306.1482
HARBOR SPRlNGS
hew 8eg|oo|ogs
Thr|It Shop
650 W Conway Rd.,
Harbor Springs
231-348-2980
HARBOR SPRlNGS
hab|tat Ior h0mao|ty 8estore
8460 M-119.,
Harbor Springs
231-347-8440
MANCELONA
Naoce|ooa Food Paotry
& 8esa|e Shop
201 N. Maple St.,
Mancelona
231-587-9606
MlO
Strawberry Patch
Downtown Mio
989-826-1503
PETOSKEY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o
8esa|e Shop
2429 US31 North,
Petoskey
231-348-3195
www.challengemtn.org
PETOSKEY
6oodw||| 8eta|| aod
0ooat|oo 0eoter
1600 Anderson Rd.,Petoskey
231-348-6947
www.goodwillnmi.org
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By Jim Akans
“People regularly tell us how much they
enjoy shopping here,” relates Theresa
Lauber, owner of Angels at Work Resale in
Gaylord. “The cleanliness of our store, the
variety of our inventory, and our very rea-
sonable prices are a pleasant surprise. They
feel very comfortable…it’s a warm, home-
style atmosphere.”
Indeed, the wide array of items offered at
Angels at Work Resale are presented in sever-
al comfortable rooms throughout the 2,400
square foot facility, each focusing on a tar-
geted range of goods, providing a effortless
way to browse items of interest.
When the store opened this past August, a
good portion of the original inventory was
purchased from another resale store that was
closing, and since that time countless addi-
tional items have been added from auctions,
estate and garage sales, and through dona-
tions.
“We offer quality, thoroughly cleaned
clothing at very reasonable prices,” notes
Lauber.
“We also have furniture, house wares,
tools, books, shoes, belts and accessories, a
wide assortment of knickknacks, antiques,
and much more.”
Those who donated items to Angels at
Work Resale receive a 25-percent discount
card for purchases that is valid for 30 days
from the time of their donation. The store
does not offer consignment sales.
Angels at Work Resale is located at 1523 S.
Otsego Avenue (U.S. 27 South) in Gaylord.
They are open Monday through Saturdays
from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday noon to 5
pm. For additional information, please call
(989) 448-8615.
PHoto By JiM AkAnS
Angels at Work Resale in Gaylord offers a warm, welcoming atmosphere and a wide
array of value-priced items.
sugar, which makes the changing colors look very sweet
indeed. Don’t look for Jack Frost to paint the leaves; an early
freeze will just make leaves fall more quickly (as will high
winds and torrential rains of course). A late arrival of spring
can even affect fall colors, potentially delaying the color
change in autumn by a week or more.
Part of the timing of the changing leaf colors relates to tree
species. Sugar Maples change earlier than Norway Maples,
Oaks change late in the fall and hold on to their tannin-filled
brown leaves most of the winter. It also has to do with the
amount of water the trees get; the more water, the longer the
leaves hang on. Physical injury, infestation, environmental
factors such as proximity to the street, salt damage, herbi-
cides and air pollution can also cause a tree to change leaf
color early.
While the process of creating those spectacular fall colors
is purely scientific, the panorama of visual delight is simply a
creation of Mother Nature at her artistic best. Whether a
brief glance at the trees framing the back yard (try not to
think about raking up those leaves) or a soul immersing
moment scanning across the wide valley expanses of the
Pigeon or Jordan Rivers, the early October outdoor palette is
a true northern treat.
There are a group of “foliage spotters” who take the unveil-
ing of the autumn color show very seriously. From
September through early November, over 550 spotters spread
across the Midwest, Northeast and Southeast United States
submit reports twice a week about foliage conditions in their
areas to an organization call The Foliage Network. This data
is compiled and plotted on a foliage map which is used gen-
erated autumn color percentage reports often utilized by the
media to help fall color seekers plan their color tour adven-
tures. As of September 29th, The Foliage Network rated
Northern Michigan at up to 60 percent color change, though
looking out at my yard I would place that number closer to
80 percent…but then leaves seem to be changing rather
quickly this year.
Don’t miss the opportunity to take a long walk or a
“Sunday drive” during the next couple of weeks and enjoy
the incredible autumn colors. The arrival of the fall season
in full Technicolor glory is just one more reminder just how
great it is to live in northern Michigan.
“How beautifully leaves grow old. How full of light and
color are their last days.” John Burroughs.
Gaylord – On Friday October 12, the North Affiliation,
AuSable Valley Community Mental Health, North Country
Community Mental Health, and Northeast Michigan
Community Mental Health will be presenting “A Day of
Recovery Education” from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the
Treetops Resort in Gaylord. The Day of Recovery Education is
focused on learning about and celebrating recovery from
mental illness and it is for people with disabilities, family
members, advocates and community mental health staff.
The Day of Education is being held in recognition of the
National Alliance on Mental Illness Awareness Week
(October 7-13). The purpose of the observance is to educate
the public about mental illness and to reduce the stigma that
motivates society to discriminate against people with mental
illnesses.
Keynote speaker is Marty Raaymakers and she will speak
on “Recovery that Rocks.” North Country CMH’s Medical
Director, Kathleen Phelps, MD, will speak on “Personality
Disorders” and the Northern Michigan Substance Abuse
Services Recovery Panel will speak on “Recovery from
Substance Abuse Disorders.” CMH staff will conduct sessions
on “Wellness Initiatives,” “Partnering with your Treatment
Team” and “Integrated Care.”
This is a free community event and lunch will be provided.
To register for the “Day of Recovery Education,” contact
Carol at 1-800-834-3393 or 231-439-1274 by Monday,
October 8. Community Mental Health provides services to
persons experiencing a severe emotional problem, serious
mental illness or developmental disability, including individ-
uals with a co-occurring substance use disorder. For more
information or to access services call the Access Center at 1-
800-834-3393.
Mother Nature Continued...
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www.greatroomsgaylord.com • facebook.com/greatrooms
148 W. Main St., Downtown Gaylord
989-748-4849
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&
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d

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stin
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H I D D E N T R E A S U R E S
ANGELS AT WORK RESALE IN GAYLORD
offers a warm, welcoming shopping experience
Petoskey - Super discounts, giveaways, goody bags,
amazing prizes, fabulous food, fashions, fun and fellow-
ship await at Shopping Scramble in Downtown Petoskey,
Saturday, October 6 from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Shoppers will enjoy the company of more than 80
women from Petoskey and around the state, with the
entire day to roam and see how many deals they can score.
Breakfast treats will be at Stafford's Perry Hotel and feature
their famous sticky buns. There will also be optional
mimosas. A noon fashion show is being coordinated to
accompany a luncheon at Palette Bistro and the 19th Hole
Celebration is being planned at White Caps Grille. A Locker
Room will be available in the Downtown Office where
shoppers will be welcome to stop in, use the facilities, and
check purchases.
Sponsored by the Downtown Management Board, the
Shopping Scramble is a local shopping initiative for
Downtown Petoskey. Dozens of businesses in Downtown
Petoskey will be offering special promotions exclusively to
Shopping Scramble participants.
Teams consist of up to four members. Tickets for the
event are $40 for each player and shoppers may register in
person at the Petoskey Downtown Offices, 216 Park
Avenue. Registration forms may also be downloaded at
www.petoskeydowntown.com and mailed or faxed to
231.622.8502.
For more information, contact Becky Goodman at 231-
622-8501 or e-mail becky@petoskeydowntown.com.
Shopping
Scramble
Day of Recovery
Education
In the Rough, Professionally Painted
or Completely Restored
Over 7,000 sq. ft. of Furniture, Antiques & Goodies
06176 Old U.S. 31 South, Charlevoix, MI 49720
E-Mail: donkellyantiques@yahoo.com
FURNITURE BARN
(231) 547-0133 • Cell (231) 881-0353
Web: dkellyantiques.com
CUSTOM & ANTIQUE
FURNITURE
4104 S. Straits Hwy Indian River, Mi 49749
(231)-238-4151
www.northstargardens.com
North Star Gardens, Inc.
GARDEN CENTER...
•High quality trees and shrubs •Annuals, perennials, herbs, and vegetables
•Grass seed, mulch, soil,& fertilizer •Pond supplies, fish & pond plants
•Patio furniture •Bird feeders & birdbaths •Garden decor •Giftshop
LANDSCAPING...
•Full landscape design & construction •Ponds
•Quality plant material •Patios & walkways
•New lawns •Bulk mulch •Trees up to 30' tall
•Outdoor Living rooms & Firepits
Serving Northern
Michigan for over
70 years!
Page 6 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
GAYLORD
Making change
Participants of all ages are
invited to join in the third
annual “Making Change
Run/Walk” on Saturday
morning Oct 6 in Gaylord
Michigan to benefit
Guardian Gals, Inc, a non-
profit organization. Men,
women and children can
choose to run or walk a more
adventuresome 1 mile or 5k
path this year and more
experienced runners will
have the option of running a
10k trail run through the
Aspen trails. Each 5k or 10k
runner/walker pledges a
minimum $100 donation. To
register for this annual Fall
event, visit
www.GuardianGalsInc.org
GRAYLING
On the Job Training
Michigan Works on the Job
Training Program can reim-
burse you for some of the
costs associated with train-
ing a new employee through
the On the Job Training
Program. Reimbursement
rate is at least 50% of the
wages paid during the con-
tract period. For more infor-
mation, contact Frances
Whitney, Business Liaison, at
989-348-8709 or email whit-
neyf@nemcworks.org.
CHEBOYGAN
Alzheimer’s
Discussion &
Information Group
This group is free and confi-
dential! Come and meet with
others who are walking the
same journey. Together we
can help each other under-
stand, cope, find resources
and build friendships.
Whether you are just begin-
ning this walk with
Alzheimer’s Disease or if
you’ve been a caregiver for
years, there is a place for you
in our group. Contact Jean
Lang at 231-238-5135 for
more information. Monthly
on 2nd Wednesday, Sand
Road Senior Center, 1531
Sand Rd.
GAYLORD
Help!
OCCOA presents an educa-
tional breakfast Oct. 4, 9-
11am at the University
Center. Personal Response
Systems with EMY Mike
Czykoski and Jim Driver from
Heritage Alert. Suggested
donation at the door is $5.
Reservation, Michelle, 989-
748-4068.
GAYLORD
Quilt show
Reflections in patchwork
show at Treetops Resort Oct.
5 & 6, 9am. Admission $6.
WATERS
Fundraiser
New Life Pregnancy Center
fundraiser at Bro's Bistro,
near I-75 exit 270, on October
4th from 4pm to 8pm. Bro's
Bistro will be donating a por-
tion of the sales to the New
Life Pregnancy Center.
GAYLORD
Snow White and the
7+ Divas
The Michigan Northern
Lights Chorus present Snow
White and the 7+ Divas Oct. 5
at 7pm. A night of barber-
shop harmony featuring
Michigan Northern Lights
Chorus, Light Hearted
Quartet and the Harmonie
Meisters. Held at Trinity
Lutheran Church, 1354 S.
Otsego. Tickets are $10 and
include dessert and door
prize.
GAYLORD
Good morning
Gaylord
Your invited to Good morn-
ing Gaylord, Friday, October
5th from 8-9am. This morn-
ing networking event is
sponsored by Otsego
Memorial Hospital who will
also be the featured speaker.
Our Host, Treetops Resort’s
Hunter’s Grille will provide a
breakfast buffet to enjoy dur-
ing the morning’s presenta-
tion. The cost is $10 for
Chamber Members / $15 for
Non-Members and includes
the breakfast buffet.
MACKINAW CITY
Fort Fright Nights
Colonial Michilimackinac
hosts fright nights October 5
- 6, 6:30pm - 9:30pm. Last
admission at 8:30pm. Prices:
Family $18, adult $6, Youth
(5-17) $3, free for children 4
and under and Mackinac
Associates friend level and
above. Mackinac State
Historic Parks closes for the
season on Sunday, October
7th.
WOLVERINE
Fishweb fundraiser
The Wolverine Lions club is
hosting a fundraiser Oct.
5,6,7 at Lumberjack park.
Craft show: Sat. & Sun. 10-4,
ATV parts swap meet, free
color tour hayrides, lots of
food. Beer tent - Fri. & Sat.
8pm - midnight.
Entertainment. $5 cover Fri.
featuring The Blitz. $5 cover
(2.50 w/costume) Saturday
featuring Whiskey Creek. ATV
parade Sunday at Noon. ATV
obstacle competition follow-
ing parade.
PETOSKEY
Shopping scramble
Super discounts, giveaways,
goody bags, amazing prizes,
fabulous food, fashions, fun
and fellowship wait at
Shopping Scramble in
Downtown Petoskey,
Saturday, October 6 from
9am until 5pm. Sponsored by
the Downtown Management
Board, the Shopping
Scramble is a local shopping
initiative for Downtown
Petoskey. Dozens of busi-
nesses in Downtown
Petoskey will be offering spe-
cial promotions exclusively
to Shopping Scramble partic-
ipants. Teams consist of up to
four members. Tickets for the
event are $40 for each player
and shoppers may register in
person at the Petoskey
Downtown Offices, 216 Park
Avenue. Registration forms
may also be downloaded at
www.petoskeydowntown.co
m and mailed or faxed to
231.622.8502.
MACKINAW CITY
Rolls-Royce Owners
Rolls-Royce Owners Club,
Motor Region from the
Clarkston area will have their
cars on display at the
Mackinaw Crossings Mall
east parking lot on S. Huron
Ave. Oct. 6, 2-5 pm.
CHARLEVOIX
Farm to plate
Esperance of Charlevoix will
be hosting a farm to plate
Harvest Dinner on Saturday,
October 6th to help raise
funds to support a location
for the Charlevoix Winter
Farmers Market. The Dinner
will take place at 7pm with an
opening reception to start at
6:30pm. The dinner will be
$75/plate with all tips bene-
fiting the Market. Esperance
will also be hosting a silent
auction of some select bot-
tles of wine to benefit the
Market. If you have questions
or wish to reserve your seat at
the Harvest Dinner please
call Esperance to make your
reservation at 231.237.9300.
Space is limited and reserva-
tions will be taken on a first
come first served basis.
GRAYLING
State American
Legion Commander to
visit Grayling Post
On Sunday October 7th at
2:30 pm, the American
Legion State Commander,
along with his entourage,
and various Auxiliary Staff
will be visiting the Grayling
American Legion Post #106.
We would like to invite all
members to come down and
offer a warm welcome, there
will be hor'dourves and a
social hour to follow.
GAYLORD
Mt. Hope Anniversary
The public is invited to
attend the 10 year anniver-
sary of Mount Hope Church,
1672 M32 East, Oct. 7,
10:30am. Dr. Dave Williams
will be guest speaker.
Appetizers and desserts fol-
low the service.
BOYNE FALLS
Boyne valley roller
is a 5k trail run through beau-
tiful, rolling terrain near
Boyne Falls, held at 1 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 7. It's designed
to be a family day event. Run
for fun or as a timed compet-
itive event. Proceeds will
benefit Challenge Mountain
Adaptive Recreation
Programs. The event will be
held at the Wisser-Saworski
Nature Preserve. Parking and
start/finish will be at the
adjacent baseball fields,
where restrooms will be
available. The address of this
facility is 3582 Metros Rd.,
Boyne Falls on the east side
of Highway 131 1.5 miles
south of Boyne Falls. Day of
registration is $20 per per-
son, or $30 for an entire fam-
ily. Online registration
through Oct. 5 is $15 per per-
son or $25 for the family. For
information, call No
Boundaries at (231) 582-
3200. Challenge Mountain
info.
GAYLORD
Medicare Part D
update
Loretta Miller and John Panci
from OCCOA will present
updates for Medicare on
Monday Oct. 8, 6-8pm at the
Gaylord meal site, Alten
Zimmer, 120 Grandview
Blvd. suggested donation $5.
BOYNE CITY
Harvest Festival
The Harvest Festival is held
Oct. 6 in Boyne City's down-
town with music, crafts and
fall produce, and is jointly
organized by Boyne City
Main Street and the Boyne
Area Chamber. The entire
Boyne City Farmers Market
will move to Water and Lake
Streets from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The farm market booths will
sell a variety of apples and
other harvest items including
pumpkins, squash, apple
butter, jam, honey and cider.
Portions of Water Street and
Lake Street will be closed to
traffic during the festival to
make room for the Farmers
Market, music and more
than 30 arts and craft ven-
dors. The festival will also
include folk art demonstra-
tions, children's games, hay
rides and a scarecrow-mak-
ing contest (application) for
residents and businesses.
Festival hours are 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday. Local church-
es and non-profit organiza-
tions that would like to par-
ticipate by organizing chil-
dren's games or harvest
crafts are encouraged to con-
tact the Boyne Area Chamber
at 582-6222.
GRAYLING
Country Music Show
Oct 6. Doors open at 6:30 /
Show starts at 7:30pm at
Wellington Farm Park. If you
enjoy old fashioned country
music and old fashioned
corny country comedy, then
this is a show you will not
want to miss. Admission is
just $12.50 per show or $50
for the entire season. Tickets
are available at the Visitor
Center during business
hours.
GRAYLING
Harvest festival
OCT. 6 & 7. Saturday &
Sunday, October 6 & 7, 10am
– 4pm daily in Downtown
Grayling. Tractor Show,
Parade (Sat & Sun at 1pm),
Farm Market, Hay Wagon
Rides, Craft Show (Sat only)
Kids Games & Pony Rides.
The Historical Society is
proud to present well known
author Raymond Goodwin
performing his new original
monologue, “Mr. Kricky’s
Bridge” on Saturday only, at 1
PM. There is no charge for
the show but seating is limit-
ed, so come early. Between
Mr. Goodwin’s monologue
and purchasing your
Grandmas’ goodies, be sure
and tour the museum and
the grounds. There is no
admission charge but dona-
tions are appreciated.
BAY HARBOR
Communicating In
Crisis
Please join us October 8 at
Bay Harbor Village Hotel &
Conference Center. Bay
Winds FCU is excited to
announce that we will be
hosting Anthony Huey,
President of Reputation
Management Associates, a
crisis communications
agency in Columbus, Ohio,
specializing in media and cri-
sis training. Anthony Huey
will be presenting a 4 hour
workshop featuring;
'Communicating in a Crisis'
and 'Media Relations 101:
Surviving the News
Interview.' Anthony's pres-
entation, interaction, live
mock interviews, and overall
takeaways are absolutely
phenomenal and applicable
to anyone who communi-
cates with the public, media,
and employees. This event
will begin with a light break-
fast at 7:30a.m. workshop
scheduled 8am-12pm. If you
are interested in attending
please contact: Shelley
DeYoung, Director of Human
Resources/ Bay Winds
Federal Credit Union 231-
547-3917
ROSCOMMON
Open auditions
Kirtland Community Theatre
will host auditions for roles
for adult men & women, and
children ages 8 - 13 in KCPA's
production of A Christmas
Story Dec 14, 15 & 16.
Auditions are Oct. 8 & 9, 7pm
at Kirtland center for the per-
forming arts.
GAYLORD
Hospice open house
Hospice of Michigan office in
Gaylord has moved to a new
location, 830 S. Otsego. Stop
by and visit on Oct. 9.
Refreshments & tours, 3-
7pm. Ribbon cutting cere-
mony at 3pm.
GRAYLING
Money Management
for Seniors and
Caregivers
The public is invited to
attend a free presentation on
Tuesday, October 9th at 6pm
entitled, Money
Management for Seniors and
Caregivers, the first in a
series of four financial pre-
sentations sponsored by the
Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center on Tuesdays in
October. Mr. Tom Ruden,
MBA, CFP, from Tomlyn
Advisors, will focus his pres-
entation on basic money
handling skills to help sen-
iors maintain their inde-
pendence and money man-
agement red flags to look for
in your elderly friends and
relatives. The presentation
will be held at the Senior
Center, 308 Lawndale St. Join
us for a chicken stir-fry din-
ner at 5 pm prior to the 6 pm
presentation. The cost for
those under 60 is $4.75 and
those over 60 eat for a sug-
gested donation of $2.50.
PETOSKEY
Building Better Bones
Class will take place from 6 –
8:30pm on Wednesday,
October 10 at the John and
Marnie Demmer Wellness
Pavilion and Dialysis Center
located at 820 Arlington
Avenue in Petoskey. The pro-
gram is free and open to all
individuals interested in the
prevention, early diagnosis,
and treatment of osteoporo-
sis.
GRAYLING
American Songbook
Concert
The Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center presents Live
and in person, singers Mark
VonDrak & Marie Cimarelli
and their accompanist, who
make up the Broadway
Classics concert trio. You are
invited to a 45 minute con-
cert on Wednesday, October
10th at 6pm at the Senior
Center. They will delight you
with brief stories and tunes
from classic songs & com-
posers – a musical stroll
down memory lane. Featured
composers will be George &
Ira Gershwin, Irving Berlin,
Cole Porter, Rodgers & Hart,
Jerome Kern & others. The
night will include some audi-
ence participation for those
who want to join in. The
Senior Center is located at
308 Lawndale St. There is no
admission charge for the
concert, but we invite you to
join us for a Baked Ham
Dinner at 5pm prior to the
concert. The cost of the din-
ner is $4.75 for those under
60 and a suggested donation
of $2.50 for those 60 and over.
GAYLORD
Country music
concert
Oct. 20, 7pm. Gaylord
Kiwanis & Eagle 101.5 pres-
ents Kountry Klassic at the
Gornick Auditorium Gaylord
High School Starring Tommy
Cash with guest Don Moyer.
A Tribute to his brother
Johnny Cash. For ticket infor-
mation call 989-732-2177 or
989-619-0027
GRAYLING
Road Commission
Ballot Proposal Forum
The Commission on Aging &
Senior Center is hosting an
opportunity for the public to
hear about the proposal on
the ballot to renew the cur-
rent millage for the Road
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October 4, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 7
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Commission. Mr. Dan
Babcock, Road Commission
manager, will be available to
answer questions from the
community. This free event
will take place on two dates:
Wednesday, October 10th at
4:45 pm, just prior to the 5pm
Baked Ham Dinner; and
Thursday, October 18th at
11:45am just prior to the 12
noon Salisbury Steak Lunch.
Both events will take place at
the Senior Center, 308
Lawndale St, and the public
is invited to attend. If you
join us for lunch or dinner,
the cost for anyone under 60
is only $4.75 and the suggest-
ed donation for those 60 and
over is only $2.50.
GRAYLING
House Fire Prevention
The Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center presents
Captain Steve Eddy of the
Grayling City Township Fire
Department discussing how
to prevent house fires. This
free presentation is open to
the public and no reserva-
tions are required. It will be
at 6pm on Thursday, October
11th at the Senior Center, 308
Lawndale St. Captain Eddy
will address topics such as
what conditions can lead to a
great probability of fire and
what can be done to make
your residence safer. Join us
for a great Tuna Steak Dinner
prior to the presentation at
5pm. People 60 and older eat
for a suggested donation of
$2.50. Those under 60 eat for
a cost of $4.75.
GAYLORD
Coats for Kids
Eagle 101.5 and Maier &
Associates Financial Group
are teaming up again for this
year’s Coats for Kids Drive on
October 11th from 6am-6pm
to collect new or lightly used
winter apparel items. Drop
off your donations at
Independent Bank’s Aspen
Branch.
GRAYLING
Business after Hours
October 11th from 5:30 –
7:30pm at Feeny Ford of
Grayling.
GAYLORD
Table talk
October 10-12 Michaywe
Players will present “Table
Talk” Dinner Theater at
6:30pm at Michaywe. Tickets
are available at the Michaywe
Clubhouse and at Saturn
Booksellers.
GAYLORD & PETOSKEY
Ghostly Halloween
Fun Night
The Gaylord Goodwill Store
at 1361 Pineview Dr. and
Petoskey Goodwill Store,
1600 Anderson Rd, Bear
Creek Plaza invite the com-
munity to their Ghostly
Halloween Fun Night,
Thursday, October 11, 5 –
7pm. Enjoy cider, treats, kid’s
activities and costume ideas.
Come as you are or as your
favorite character.
GAYLORD
Book collection
The American Association of
University Women Gaylord
Area Branch is collecting
books at Glen's, Oliver
Chiropractic, United Way,
Meyer Ace Hardware and
Alpine Chocolat Haus for its
Used Book Sale on October
12 (9 am to 6 pm) and
October 13 (9 am to noon) .
The sale is at the United Way
Building, 116 E. Fifth Street,
Gaylord. Proceeds from the
sale go to scholarships for
local women and girls. For
special pick-ups or questions
about the sale, please call
Mary at 732-4981.
INDIAN RIVER
100K Race
The Top of Michigan 2nd
Annual Ultra Marathon will
be held on Saturday, Oct. 13.
The Top of Michigan Trails
Council has announced this
event, both as an individual
Ultra race and 2-person and
6-person relay. With legs
from 5.6 miles to 16.9 miles,
this event has something for
everyone. Get your team
together today. The event
starts in Gaylord and runs the
entire length of the North
Central trail to Mackinaw
City. A beautiful, downhill
trail run on crushed lime-
stone with no chance of get-
ting lost. For more informa-
tion, please go to
www.TrailsCouncil.org.
GAYLORD
Book signing
Joseph Heywood, author of
nine popular mysteries set in
the U.P., will sign his latest,
Red Jacket, on Saturday,
October 13th from 11:30am
until 1:30pm at Saturn
Booksellers in Downtown.
Heywood’s signing is free and
open to the public.
EAST JORDAN
Fall color airplane ride
Rotary club Fall Color
Airplane Rides Saturday,
October 13 at the East Jordan
City Airport. 10 AM. Rain
Date October, 20th.
GRAYLING
Meet the Candidates
for State
Representative
The Commission on Aging &
Senior Center is hosting an
opportunity for the public to
meet the Michigan House of
Representatives candidates
in preparation for the
upcoming November elec-
tion. Mr. Bruce Rendon,
Republican, and Mr. Lon
Johnson, Democrat, have
been invited to attend, intro-
duce themselves, answer a
series of questions and be
available to answer questions
from the community. This
free event will take place on
Monday, October 15th at
6:00pm at the Senior Center,
308 Lawndale St. and the
public is invited to attend.
Join us for a Swiss Steak
Dinner at 5:00pm prior to the
presentation. Seniors age 60
and over eat for a suggested
donation of $2.50. Those
under 60 eat for a cost of
$4.75.
GRAYLING
Helping a Widowed
Parent Get Organized
Financially
The public is invited to
attend a free presentation on
Tuesday, October 16th at
6pm entitled, Helping a
Widowed Parent Get
Organized Financially, the
2nd in a series of four finan-
cial presentations sponsored
by the Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center on Tuesdays in
October. Mr. Tom Ruden,
MBA, CFP, from Tomlyn
Advisors, will focus his pres-
entation on helping widows
and widowers avoid hasty
financial decisions after the
death of a spouse and will
also focus on how to help a
friend or relative deal with
debt, insurance & retirement
accounts. The presentation
will be held at the Senior
Center, 308 Lawndale St. Join
us for a Liver & Onions
Dinner at 5 pm prior to the 6
pm presentation. The cost for
those under 60 is $4.75 and
those over 60 eat for a sug-
gested donation of $2.50.
PETOSKEY
Credit repair work-
shop
Northwest Michigan
Community Action Agency
(NMCAA) will be hosting a
workshop on Credit and
Credit Repair on October 16
from 6pm to 9pm, as part of a
series of six workshops on
financial fitness. This work-
shop is offered free to the
public at NMCAA’s Petoskey
office located at 2202
Mitchell Park, Ste.4. To regis-
ter or to find out about future
workshops, please call (231)
347-9070 or (800) 443-5518
or visit www.nmcaa.net.
ROSCOMMON
Homeschooler’s Event
Kirtland Community College
is presenting the “What Is
Your Path” Homeschooler’s
Event on Monday, October 15
from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at
Kirtland’s main campus near
Roscommon. This event is
free to attend and is geared
toward students in grades 7-
12 who are presently receiv-
ing their education through
homeschooling. Pre-registra-
tion for this event is required
and can be completed either
online or over the phone. To
learn more about the this
event or the programs, advis-
ing, testing, financial aid and
other services available to
students, contact Michelle
Devine, Admissions
Coordinator, at 989-275-5000
extension 284 or Ryan Madis,
Admissions Recruitment
Specialist, at 989-275-5000
extension 259.
GAYLORD
Gator's Tryouts
The Gaylord Gators Swim
Club will be hosting its annu-
al try-out night and registra-
tion October 16th and 18th,
6-7pm, at the Otsego County
Sportsplex. Any student
grades 3-12 who has com-
pleted Level III swim lessons
or can swim the length of the
25 yard pool, is encouraged
to try out. An information
meeting for parents will be
held during the try-outs. The
Gators Swim Club is a non-
profit competitive swim
team that competes with
other community teams
throughout northern
Michigan. The purpose of
Gators is to encourage a life-
long love of the sport while
developing individual swim
abilities, good sportsman-
ship, teamwork, self-disci-
pline and enthusiasm for
competitive swimming. For
additional information, con-
tact Lynda Rutkowski at 989-
939-7517, or Jennifer Hope at
989-390-0549.
GRAYLING
Free Divorce Clinic
The 46th Judicial Circuit Bar
Association, Legal Services of
Northern Michigan and River
House Women’s Shelter will
hold free monthly divorce
clinics open to community
members who cannot afford
to hire an attorney and are
representing themselves.
Clinic locations will alternate
between Otsego and
Crawford Counties. Clinics in
Crawford County are held at
the Crawford County
Courthouse, Oct. 18, 5:30pm.
CHEBOYGAN
Senior expo
The Cheboygan Catholic
Community is hosting the
Cheboygan Senior Expo on
Thursday, October 18 from 9
a.m. – 1 p.m. at the Knights of
Columbus, 9480 Straits
Highway at the corner of M-
72 and M-33. All community
members are welcome to
attend free of charge.
GRAYLING
Community Harvest
Dinner
The Community is invited to
attend a Harvest Dinner at
the Commission on Aging &
Senior Center on Thursday,
October 18th from 4-6pm.
Menu includes Cornish
Hens, Mashed Sweet
Potatoes, Corn & Peas Blend,
Pineapple Blend Mix and
Apple Pie. The meal is only
$4.75 per person for those
under 60 and a suggested
donation of $2.50 for people
60 and over. The dinner is
open to the public. The
Senior Center is located at
308 Lawndale St. For more
information contact Helen at
the Commission on Aging &
Senior Center at (989) 348-
7123.
ATWOOD to BOYNE FALLS
Breezeway Fall Color
Cruise
The 4th Annual Breezeway
Fall Color Tour will be held
Saturday, October 20 starting
at Friske Farm Market in
Atwood and ending at Boyne
Mt. in Boyne Falls with a
chairlift ride to view the fall
colors. Pick up your goodie
bags filled with coupons, fly-
ers and trip tips for your 26
mile self-guided cruise
across the Breezeway. Enjoy
the farm markets, corn
mazes, Ellsworth labyrinth,
artist galleries, resale and
specialty shops and dining
opportunities as well as tak-
ing in the 3rd Annual
Pumpkin Fest/Leaf Peeker
Craft Show in downtown East
Jordan. For more informa-
tion on this family friendly
weekend event contact the
East Jordan Area Chamber of
Commerce at 231-536-7351
or www.ejchamber.org
GAYLORD
Toy Challenge
Your participation is request-
ed for not only this event but
the 5th Annual Toy
Challenge. Work together to
collect new, unwrapped toys
for children of all ages so that
no child in Otsego County
has to go without a toy this
Holiday Season. Toys can be
dropped off at the Otsego
County United Way Building
or bring them with you to the
November 7th event. The
Business who collects the
most toys wins the Toy
Trophy
GAYLORD
Application for Habitat
home
The Otsego County Habitat
for Humanity is currently
accepting applications for
their 2013 build for house
#21 from October 1st thru
November 30th. Applications
are available at the Habitat
for Humanity ReStore. For
questions regarding the
application process and
income criteria, call 989-732-
6070.
NORTHERN MICHIGAN
Advertising funds the
Weekly Choice
We love to run community
announcements and news
releases about all the things
happening in Northern
Michigan in the Weekly
Choice. We help publicize
hundreds of events and
activities all across our area.
Readers love the fact that the
Weekly Choice is distributed
free to hundreds of locations.
However, it is expensive to
publish this newspaper each
week filled with positive
news and sports. Our only
source of revenue comes
from advertising. If your
business or organization has
an advertising budget, be
sure to include the Weekly
Choice in your plans. Our
advertising rates are far less
than most other papers and
your message will reach
readers all across Northern
Michigan. The Weekly Choice
is distributed free of charge
on news stands to 40 towns
including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Indian
River, Onaway, Mio,
Lewiston, Mancelona and all
surrounding towns. Contact
us at
Office@WeeklyChoice.com
or call 989-732-8160.
GRAYLING
Farmer’s Market
Saturdays from 9am – 1pm in
Uptown Grayling (open
through Harvest Festival in
October)
LEWISTON
Bazaar spaces avail-
able
There are spaces available to
crafters for the annual
Christmas in October Bazaar,
Saturday, October 20, 9:30-
3:30 at Lewiston Elementary
School. Crafters may call
Montmorency County
Habitat for Humanity, 989-
786-3385, for further infor-
mation and a registration
form.
INDIAN RIVER
Farm market
The Farm Market is back with
the wonderful fresh produce,
flowers, jams, breads and
other homemade items! Stop
in and support your local
farmers and vendors, and
enjoy home grown items. The
Farm Market will be every
Wednesday 2pm - 6pm and
every Saturday 9am – 1pm at
the Citizens National Bank
parking lot on the corner of S.
Straits Hwy and M-68. The
Farm Market will run
through October 31st.
PETOSKEY
Farmers Market
Join us each Friday morning
from 8:30 am - 12:30 pm for
fresh fruits and vegetables, as
well as other farm fresh prod-
ucts. 8:30 am to 12:30 pm,
400 block of Howard St.
between Mitchell St. and
Michigan St.
GAYLORD
Farmers Market
Michigan farm producers sell
fresh fruits and vegetables,
baked goods, herbs, and
much more under the
Pavilion on Court in
Downtown Gaylord. Open
every Saturday, 8am to 1pm,
through November 17 (possi-
bly through December) and
every Wednesday, 8am to
1pm, July through October.
Now on Old 27 South
Alpine Transmission
and Service
We moved from our location on M-32 West to Old 27 South
Same Great Service • Same Great People
Stop in and see Len, Derak or Karen for a Free Transmission Inspection
2240 South Otsego Avenue (across from Jim Wernig Chevy), Gaylord
989-732-8308
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Call Tom at J-N-J Construction to get
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LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
COUPLE NEEDS TO GET TO
THE 'CORE' OF THEIR
RELATIONSHIP
with Jim Daly and Dr. Juli Slattery
Q: My wife and I don't spend
a lot of downtime together. It's
not like we're out carousing
with other people. But jobs,
kids and other important
responsibilities are taking their
toll. How do we find time for
ourselves?
Jim: Your situation is not unique.
Many husbands and wives today are
running in opposite directions. We're
too wrapped up in work and even in our
kids' activities. It's like we're addicted to
being busy.
If you wait for life to "settle down" on
its own, you'll never make progress. You
have to take active steps to make time
for each other, and to foster genuine
intimacy in your relationship.
Dr. Harold L. Arnold Jr., an organiza-
tional psychologist, has developed an
acrostic -- C.O.R.E. -- to help couples
put intimacy back in their marriage.
Maybe you'll find it helpful.
"C" stands for commitment. Commit
to a specific day and time each week
when you and your wife can spend an
hour in conversation -- without any dis-
tractions. Unless there's an emergency,
stick to this commitment.
"O" represents openness. Be honest
with your spouse about your needs,
desires and fears. Open up with her;
don't hold it all in.
The "R" in C.O.R.E. stands for repent.
Many of the supposed flaws you see in
your spouse are associated with your
past behaviors. Own up to your mis-
takes and be willing to forgive your
spouse for hers.
Finally, the "E" represents empathy.
Your wife will only open up if she senses
that you really understand her and love
her unconditionally. Take time to listen
without prejudice and to respond
unselfishly.
Commitment, openness, repentance
and empathy -- the C.O.R.E. of mar-
riage. If you and your spouse will make
these behaviors a top priority, chances
are excellent that you'll feel more con-
nected even amidst the busyness of life.
** ** **
Q: My sister is getting married
next month, and I don't like the
guy she's marrying. I've hinted
that I don't like him, but I'm
wondering if I should say some-
thing or if I should just support
her decision.
Juli: My first question would be,
"What don't you like about your poten-
tial brother-in-law"? If your concerns
have more to do with superficial issues
like appearance, interests or even per-
sonality, it's probably better for you to
keep your opinions to yourself and work
on getting to know him better. If, how-
ever, your objections are more substan-
tial, relating to his character or how he
treats your sister, sharing these thoughts
may be very important. Do your parents
and others who know your sister's
fiance have similar concerns? If so, this
is another indication of red flags that are
worth bringing up.
This close to a wedding, no bride
wants to hear that a sibling is not com-
pletely supportive. So, be very careful
how you address the topic. It's much
better to have one very intentional con-
versation than to let criticism and con-
cern "drip out" over the years. As pas-
tors in the movies used to say, "Speak
now or forever hold your peace."
I recommend getting your sister
alone, uninterrupted. Tell her how
much you love her and care about her.
Sensitively share with her some of the
things you've noticed, and ask her if she
has any of these concerns as she
approaches her wedding. If so, suggest
the possibility of talking about these
with a pastor or counselor. Most impor-
tantly, tell your sister that whatever she
decides, you'll be 100 percent behind
her.
Once she's married, your job is to
support your sister and her new mar-
riage. Even if you're not thrilled about
the guy she chose, he's family
now. Become a safe place for
your sister to process the joys
and challenges of their new
marriage and do everything
you can to help them suc-
ceed.
** ** **
Jim Daly is president of Focus on
the Family, host of the Focus on the
Family radio program, and a hus-
band and father of two.
Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psy-
chologist, co-host of Focus on the
Family, author of several books,
and a wife and mother of three.
Submit your questions to:
ask@FocusOnTheFamily.com
Copyright 2012
Focus on the Family,
Colorado Springs, CO 80995
International Copyright Secured.
All Rights reserved.
Distributed by Universal Uclick
1130 Walnut St.
Kansas City, MO 64106;
(816) 581-7500
This feature may not by repro-
duced or distributed electronically,
in print or otherwise without writ-
ten permission of Focus on the
Family.
This good news for Your family brought to
you by Family Comfort Systems
For more good news about Your family's health contact us.
Kevin Westcott
989-732-8099

Ask about our
Senior Discount
St. Mary Cathedral Launches New Program for Families
St. Mary Cathedral Parish has launched a
new program to reach families and promote
the Catholic Faith in the Gaylord area. The
parish program BCI, which stands for Baptized,
Called and Informed, is a program focused on
faith and the family.
Under the leadership of Pastor Fr. James
Bearss and Pastoral Associate Phil Lawson, the
parish continues to energize and educate the
Catholic community in Gaylord. Mr. Lawson
recently moved to Gaylord from Wisconsin this
summer, along with his wife, Patty, and four
children (including recent newborn Thomas).
Mr. Lawson is looking forward to implement-
ing this program of catechesis through daily
prayer, Sacraments of the Catholic Church,
spiritual reading, and adoration of the Blessed
Sacrament.
“Our goal is to help our students reach
Heaven, which is ultimately the goal for all of
us as Catholic Christians,” Phil Lawson,
Pastoral Associate for St. Mary Cathedral said.
“I’m really happy to have the support from
Deacon Ron Rowe who has many years of
experience with implementing this particular
method of bringing the families together in the
Lansing Diocese.”
The sessions are offered twice a month at St.
Mary Cathedral, which includes a working
partnership with the parents. “We understand
that the parents are the primary teachers of
these children so we will be providing informa-
tion to the parents and help facilitate in areas
of need,” Fr. James Bearss commented. “We
really have a wonderful community in Gaylord
and we will continue to be here to offer sup-
port, education, and be a light of hope for
those who want to grow in their faith.”
Classes will be offered until April 2013 for
children in Preschool through 12th grade with
classes for adults. Topics include the life of
Jesus, respect for life, Church History, Human
Laws vs. Divine Laws, and more.
Breakfast is served at 8:45 a.m., with class
from 9:30-10:45 a.m. Families then will attend
Mass at 11:00 a.m. at St. Mary Cathedral.
Next class is Sunday, October 7. All families
interested in registering call 989-732-5448 or e-
mail Phil Lawson at plawson@stmarycathe-
dral.org.
Grayling - Because of the importance of finances for sen-
iors, as well as the general public, the Crawford County
Commission on Aging & Senior Center is putting on four free
presentations at 6pm on Tuesdays starting October 9th and
ending October 30th at the Senior Center, 308 Lawndale Street
in Grayling.
The presentation on October 9th is titled Money
Management for Seniors and Caregivers, presented by Tom
Ruden, MBA, CFP, from Tomlyn Advisors. His presentation
will focus on basic money handling skills to help seniors
maintain their independence and money management red
flags to look for in your elderly friends and relatives. On
October 16th, the topic is Helping a Widowed Parent Get
Organized Financially. Mr. Ruden will again be presenting
and will focus on helping widows and widowers avoid hasty
financial decisions after the death of a spouse and will also
focus on how to help a friend or relative deal with debt, insur-
ance & retirement accounts. The topic on October 23rd is
Defining Your Legacy and is presented by Rick Grisham,
AAMS, from Edward Jones Investments. This presentation
focuses on planning ahead - important even if you don’t have
a lot of money to ensure your wishes will be carried out. On
October 30th, Mr. Grisham will also present on the topic,
Smart Choices in Your Retirement Years. His focus will be
helping seniors or others on fixed incomes learn how to
stretch their dollars so their money will last through their
retirement years.
The presentations are free and open to the public. Join us
for dinner at 5 pm prior to the 6 pm presentations. The cost
for those under 60 is $4.75 and those over 60 eat for a suggest-
ed donation of $2.50.
Financial Seminars at Senior Center in October
Teachers for St. Mary Cathedral Parish BCI Program. Back row (left to right): Dick
Shavinski, Carrie Prendergast, Suzanne Williams, Kristi Kurncz, Jennifer Mankowski,
Phil Lawson, Heather Glasby, St. Mary School Junior Alice Kole. Front row (left to
right): Mary Mason, Ted Dzwik, Helen Theisen, Delphine Rogers, Patty Lawson,
Rosalie Makarewicz, and Deacon Ron Rowe. (Not pictured: Marie Hahnenberg).
Michael and Kristi Kurncz Family pose
after creating a family crest together dur-
ing the first BCI class. Back row (left to
right): Kristi Kurncz, Michael Kurncz,
Justin Kurncz. Front row (left to right):
Emily Kurncz and Cory Kurncz.
Page 8 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012
Gaylord Ford-Lincoln
1928 S. Otsego Ave.
Gaylord
www.gaylordfordlincoln.com
(989) 732-6737
1-800-732-6710
2000 BUICK LESABRE LIMITED
3.8L V6 – auto – White – Camel Leather – 89,800 miles - Stk# R5152A ....................
$
6,995
2008 CHEVY AVEO LS 4DR
1.6L 4cyl – auto – Red – Grey cloth – 69,809 miles - Stk# 6232B ................................
$
7,995
2008 CHEVY COBALT LT
2.2L 4cyl – auto – Silver – Grey Cloth – 85,600 miles - Stk# 6236B ...........................
$
9,495
2008 FORD FOCUS SE 4-DR
2.0L 4cyl – Manual – Black – Stone Cloth – 75,500 miles - Stk# R5172A .................
$
9,800
2004 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4WD
4.0L V6 – auto – Black – Grey Leather – 84,900 miles - Stk# 6174B .........................
$
9,999
2005 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS AWD
3.4L V6 – auto – Silver – Grey cloth – 77,800 miles - Stk# 6219A ..........................
$
10,555
2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4WD
4.0L V6 – auto – Silver – Stone cloth – 50,400 miles - Stk# 6273A.......................
$
16,900
2007 FORD F-150 4X4 S/C XLT 4WD
5.4L V8 – auto – Grey – Flint cloth – 72,200 - Stk# 6232A .......................................
$
17,222
2008 FORD EDGE SEL AWD
3.5L V6 – auto – White – Camel Leather – 44,900 miles - Stk# 6253A.................
$
19,999
2011 FORD
FUSION SE
FWD
2.5L 4cyl – Auto – Silver
Black Cloth – 8,500 miles
Stk# P5142
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LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
October 4, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 9
New IDF at Camp Grayling Completes First Year
It has been a very enjoyable first year of
operation for the employees at the new
Installation Dining Facility at Camp Grayling. A
brand new building with brand new equip-
ment greeted the seasonal employees when
they reported for work in April. The MI-ARNG
invested $1.2 million in the facility which
resulted in many improvements in the service
and product provided to the customers. One of
the most notable improvements was in the
increased seating from the old building that
they occupied. The new building will serve 200
individuals at once comfortably while the old
building was crowded when serving 100.
Located just inside the main gate, the new
IDF is the first building on the right when you
enter the Camp. It is located in the general area
of the old hospital that was demolished several
years ago.
The contractor for the facility is GW Services
which is managed by Goodwill Industries of
Northern Michigan, Inc. based out of Traverse
City.
Food Service Supervisor Ray Cormier says
that nine to twelve employees are employed at
the facility. All of them are from the Grayling
area. While shift supervisors/cooks are present
at all times, seventy five percent of the hours
worked must be worked by employees who are
employed through the Ability One Program
which is a Federal initiative to help people who
are blind or have other significant disabilities
find employment by working within a national
network of over 600 Nonprofit Agencies that
sell products and services to the U.S. govern-
ment. The Committee for Purchase from
People who are Blind or Severely Disabled is
the Federal agency authorized to administer
the AbilityOne Program. You may learn more
about the program at www.abilityone.org
The dining facility officially closed on
September 30th and will open again in the
spring to continue the mission of bringing
wholesome, healthy meals to the military per-
sonnel stationed at Camp Grayling who are the
primary customers of the IDF. Normally the
facility does not feed military units who are
training at Camp Grayling however those units
may request that they be allowed to receive
their meals at the IDF.
Over the past six months, the IDF has hosted
various groups which include Army, Navy, and
Air Force. They have fed Congressional Visits,
International Visits, and various federal and
state agencies which train at Camp Grayling.
Fall is in the air, which means that northern Michigan
orchards are busy harvesting bushels of fresh, ripe apples in
preparation for the
34th Annual Apple
Festival taking place
downtown Charlevoix
on October 12-14.
Apples are Michigan's
largest and most valu-
able fruit crop, and
although the unusual
spring weather took its
toll on many Michigan
growers, our local
orchards promise a
bountiful crop of
apples for the 2012
season.
More than 30 types of apples will be on hand as well as other
fall harvest items including pumpkins, mums, squash, jam,
honey, maple syrup, pies, cider and more. Warm up with hot
food items such as hot dogs, soup, frites, pasties, apple flappers,
and kielbasa provided by local non-profit organizations.
Our fall harvest celebration includes activities for the entire
family. You won't want to miss the holiday art & craft show fea-
turing 125 exhibitor booths, pumpkin carving contest, face
painting, pony rides, and petting zoo.
New this year, the Charlevoix Kiwanis Club will sponsor an
Apple Fest Family Fun Run on Saturday morning beginning at
9am. For race information or to register, visit www.Active.com
and search Charlevoix Apple Festival.
Experience the magic of autumn in northern Michigan at the
Charlevoix Apple Festival. Join the festivities and show your
support for our local farmers, orchards and non-profit organiza-
tions while celebrating the season in scenic downtown
Charlevoix this October. The Harvest is in!
For more information contact the Charlevoix Area Chamber
of Commerce or visit www.charlevoix.org.
New IDF at Camp Grayling
L to R Food Service Supervisor Ray Cormier, Server Tom Pilon, Cook Mark
Gingerick, Capt. Bryon Ries, & Lt. Col. Jim Gardiner
Dining Area of new IDF at Camp Grayling
Liz Harding
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Apples Abound at the 34th Annual Apple Festival
Fri October 12, 10 - 6:00 | Sat October 13, 10:00 - 6:00 | Sun October 14, 10:00 - 4:00
Boyne Mountain Resort is hosting the 4th
annual Skitoberfest on Saturday, October 6.
The event kicks off the coming snowsports sea-
son with a summit featuring four-time
Olympian, two-time U.S. National Downhill
Champion and World Cup winner, A.J. Kitt, and
includes an on-snow rail jam, new Burton
Riglet Park for the kids and a ski swap.
Skitoberfest also celebrates the best of fall in an
Oktoberfest style setting. Highlights include
great food, Michigan beer, wine and spirits plus
live music and performances, free scenic chair-
lift rides, parade, dancing in the streets, art,
drama and a party atmosphere making this day
festive for the whole family!
The Snowsports Summit takes place from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. in the resort’s Civic Center and
admission is free. The Summit is hosted by
Olympian and U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of
Fame inductee, Cary Adgate, and features
equipment, technique and physical condition-
ing tips, ski swap and special guest speaker, A.J.
Kitt. Skitoberfest’s on-snow Rail Jam offers the
opportunity to strap on skis or snowboard with
a competition starting at 3:30 p.m.
From 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. are live performances
by local dancers, mimes, gymnasts, storytellers
and musicians, plus art, face painting, pony
rides, petting zoo, laser tag, horse-drawn
hayrides, bonfire sing-alongs and more.
Skitoberfest also offers ways to enjoy the fall
foliage including Twin Zip Rides, two excur-
sions for $20, and free scenic chairlift rides.
Also from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., enjoy tastes of
more than 50 Michigan beers, plus wine, spirits
and eats from local restaurants and markets.
For $30, event goers receive a commemorative
Skitoberfest pint glass and 12 tickets good
towards food and beverage tasting.
Participating breweries include:
- Arcadia Ales
- Beards Brewery
- Bell's Brewery
- Jolly Pumpkin
- Mount Pleasant Brewing Co.
- New Holland Brewing Co.
- Right Brain Brewery
- Short's Brewing Co. and more.
Michigan wines are from Black Star Farms,
Chateau Fontaine, Chateau Grand Traverse,
Good Harbor and Mackinaw Trail.
Local restaurants and markets serving up
tastes and treats include:
- 42nd & Broadway Deli
- Alpine Chocolat Haus
- Blue Harbor Grille
- Boyne Highlands Resort
- Lake Street Market
- Morel’s Bistro
- Red Mesa Grill
- Shanahan’s Prime
- Skitoberfest Sweets
- Tannery Creek Meat Market
- The Thirsty Goat.
The fun continues well into the evening with
a DJ, dancing and cash bar from 7 p.m. to mid-
night. Admission is free. For complete
Skitoberfest details visit www.BOYNE.com or
call 800.GO.BOYNE (462-6963).
Boyne Mountain’s Skitoberfest
offers festive fun for all
Boyne Mountain Resort is hosting the 4th annual Skitoberfest on Saturday, October 6.
PHoto CourteSy oF CAry ADGAte
Page 10 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
The Dodworth Saxhorn Band, America's pre-
mier 19th century brass band is kicking off the
2012-2013 Crooked Tree Arts Center Performing
Arts Series with "Bringing America's Musical
Past to Life!" This patriotic concert and histori-
cal performance is Friday, October 5th at 8:00
p.m. at Crooked Tree Arts Center.
The DSB showcases a 17+ member ensemble
historical show which highlights musical virtu-
osity on 150 year old brass instruments. The
vocal styling of Julie Craigo, the 19th century
nightingale and Ted Badgerow, portraying Allen
Dodworth, leader of the original Dodworth
Band of New York City, promises that "the audi-
ence will be treated to mellifluous, euphonious
tones on these instruments, a virtual panoply of
sound and music!" The band’s repertoire
includes classic American songs as they were
meant to be performed such as
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp; Bonnie
Blue Flag; When Johnny
Comes Marching Home; The
Vacant Chair, The Battle Hymn
of the Republic; Lorena; We Are
Coming Father Abr'am;
Mother Kissed Me in My
Dreams and Wait for the
Wagon.
Based in Ann Arbor,
Michigan, the Dodworth
Saxhorn Band presents a slice
of American history through
music, song, audience partici-
pation, drama, poetry, dance
and theatre. While dressed in
period costumes, the band
plays music of the 19th centu-
ry on authentic period instru-
ments and has performed at
The White House and across the country during
its 27 year history. Returning to a time in
American history when there was no television,
no radio, or video games, the DSB is known for
their historical, musical, educational, and audi-
ence-loving concerts of American music from
the great conflict of the American 19th century-
SONGS THAT MADE A NATION "The American
Civil War; 1861-1865".
Bringing part of our American musical her-
itage to life, the Dodworth Saxhorn Band per-
formance will be at the Crooked Tree Arts
Center, Friday, October 5th at 8:00 pm for this
Civil War Sesquicentennial Commemoration.
Purchase your tickets online at
www.crookedtree.org, or by calling the Arts
Center at 231.347.4337.
One of the first tasks for stu-
dents returning to Bishop
Baraga Catholic School was to
elect the student council.
Students registered to vote, lis-
tened to the candidates’ cam-
paign speeches, and went to
the voting booths to cast their
ballots. When all the votes were
counted, Zach Gildner was
elected Student Council
President, Adam Grisdale vice-
president, Matthew Brisson
secretary, and Emma Archer
treasurer.
HISTORIC 19th CENTURY BRASS BAND TO PERFORM AT
CROOKED TREE ARTS CENTER
Student
Council
Elected at
Bishop
Baraga
The Dodworth Saxhorn Band
Upcoming Senior
Programs & Events











































For more information
or to register:
308 Lawndale Ave.,
Grayling
989-348-7123
Money Management for Seniors & Caregivers
Tuesday, October 9 · 6pm
This is the first in a series of four financial presentations sponsored by the
Crawford County Commission on Aging & Senior Center on Tuesdays in Oc-
tober. Mr. Tom Ruden, MBA, CFP, from Tomlyn Advisors, will focus his pres-
entation on basic money handling skills to help seniors maintain their
independence and money management red flags to look for in your elderly
friends and relatives. Join us for a chicken stir-fry dinner at 5 pm prior to the 6
pm presentation. The cost for those under 60 is $4.75 and those over 60 eat for
a suggested donation of $2.50.
American Songbook Concert
Wednesday, October 10 · 6pm
Live and in person, singers Mark VonDrak & Marie Cimarelli and their accom-
panist, who make up the Broadway Classics concert trio. You are invited to a
45 minute concert at the Senior Center. They will delight you with brief stories
and tunes from classic songs & composers - a musical stroll down memory
lane. Featured composers will be George & Ira Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Cole
Porter, Rodgers & Hart, Jerome Kern & others. The night will include some
audience participation for those who want to join in. There is no admission
charge for the concert, but we invite you to join us for a Baked Ham Dinner at
5:00pm prior to the concert. The cost of the dinner is $4.75 for those under 60
and a suggested donation of $2.50 for those 60 and over.
Road Commission Ballot Proposal Forum
Wednesday, October 10 · 4:45pm
& Thursday, October 18 · 11:45am
Mr. Dan Babcock, Road Commission manager, will be available to answer
questions from the community. This free event will take place on two dates:
Wednesday, October 10th at 4:45 pm, just prior to the 5pm Baked Ham Dinner;
and Thursday, October 18th at 11:45am just prior to the 12 noon Salisbury
Steak Lunch. If you join us for lunch or dinner, the cost for anyone under 60 is
only $4.75 and the suggested donation for those 60 and over is only $2.50.
House Fire Prevention
Thursday, October 11 · 6pm
Captain Steve Eddy of the Grayling City Township Fire Department will be
discussing how to prevent house fires. This free presentation is open to the
public and no reservations are required. Captain Eddy will address topics such
as what conditions can lead to a great probability of fire and what can be done
to make your residence safer. Join us for a great Tuna Steak Dinner prior to the
presentation at 5pm. People 60 and older eat for a suggested donation of $2.50.
Those under 60 eat for a cost of $4.75.
Meet the Candidates for
State Representative
Monday, October 15 · 6pm
Mr. Bruce Rendon, Republican, and Mr. Lon Johnson, Democrat, have been in-
vited to attend, introduce themselves, answer a series of questions and be avail-
able to answer questions from the community. This is a free event and the
public is invited to attend. Join us for a Swiss Steak Dinner at 5:00pm prior to
the presentation. Seniors age 60 and over eat for a suggested donation of $2.50.
Those under 60 eat for a cost of $4.75.
September terrific kids
from Gaylord St. Mary
Presented by Kiwanis members Rob Westerman, Sheriff Jim
McBride, and Jetre Ormsbee are:
(back row) Austin Vanderveer, Marilyn Harbin, Hayden Collins,
Danielle Cruz, Patrick Dorrance, Claire Gilling and Anna
Baker
(front row) Daniel Powers, Ian Oliver, Calvin Burns, Miriam
Murrell, Josie Alexander, LeMay Sullivan, Caroline Gilling and
Lucas Cherwinski.
TERRIFIC
KIDS
All kids are terrific and here at St. Mary elementary we are acknowledging kids for good character. The
Kiwanis club of Otsego County is helping us with this endeavor. Students who exhibit good behavior by fol-
lowing our school rules will be recognized by staff for doing so. Every Month one student per class will be
selected to receive a “Terrific Kid” award, button, and pencil. This is an excellent opportunity for staff, stu-
dents, parents and the community to connect on a social/emotional level because good character is just as
important as good grades!
|s |t t|me to re-I|o|sh yo0r o|d pre-I|o|shed I|oors?
989-619-6347 989-732-0403
SAh0|h6 º F|h|Sh|h6 º h£w 08 0L0 º |hSTALLAT|0h º 0£0kS º 00ST 00hTA|hN£hT
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October 4, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 11
The 32nd Annual Juried Fine Arts Exhibition at the Crooked
Tree Arts Center opened September 15th. Awards were pre-
sented to the following artists from across the state of
Michigan: The First Place Award sponsored by Mitchell
Graphics went to Jerry Ward of Delton for his woodwork
sculpture “Street Dance,” the Second Place Award sponsored
by Korthase Flinn went to Stephen Palmer of Flint for his
mixed-media work “JR Watkins” and the Third Place Award
sponsored by Personal Graphics went to Gary Mulnix of
Owosso for his bronze work “Stretch & Crunch” Honorable
Mentions were awarded to Bernard Park of Marquette for his
oil painting “Poplar Stand,” Delilah Smith of Onsted for her oil
painting “Hydrangeas in a Fruit Jar” and Beth Bynum for her
mixed-media work “Crow Girls Journey to Shanghai.”
This year’s exhibition was juried by John Kollig from
Kalamazoo, Michigan. John received his M.F.A. from the
Western Michigan University and has studied both at the
Atelier of Thomas Leighton and the Academy of Art in San
Francisco. John has been represented in numerous one per-
son and group exhibitions.
The 32nd Annual Juried Fine Arts Exhibition will be on dis-
play at the Crooked Tree Arts Center through November 2nd.
CTAC is located downtown Petoskey at 461 E. Mitchell Street.
For more information please call the Arts Center at 231-347-
4337 or visit www.crookedtree.org. This program supported in
part by the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and
Edward Jones Investments of Petoskey and Harbor Springs.
Two hundred-ninety
five children read 4,100
books and 2,885 hours
this summer as part of the
Petoskey District Library's
summer programs. Three
programs: one for chil-
dren who have just started
grades 1-6, one for young
adults (grades 7 and up),
and one for children who
had not yet attended
kindergarten were fea-
tured.
While 227 children
signed up for the elementary program, only 82 children recorded
reading 2,615 books and 1838 hours spent reading this summer.
Participating children recorded their books and hours in a special
folder and had the option to attend a variety of special events this
summer that related to the theme of "Dream BIG…Read!
Participation certificates were awarded when a child recorded
his/her first books, after 20 books or 10 hours of reading were
recorded, they each received a special sticker for their certificates
and a "Level I" prize bag. Of the library’s 82 active readers (those
reading at least 1 book), 71 of them reached this goal and earned
their stickers.
Children who reached the second level of achievement, 50
books or 25 hours of reading, received a "Level II" prize and have
had special reading achievement certificates sent to their
schools. Fifty-one readers reached the Level II goal. They were
allowed to record their reading until August 26.
Children could also qualify for a third level of prizes by com-
pleting a creative project related to the theme within the guide-
lines and suggestions outlined in the "Dream BIG…Read! Fun
Sheet 2012". These projects are on display on the library’s web
site: www.petoskeylibrary.org, click YOUTH SERVICES; click
KIDS and scroll down. Youth Services Supervisor, Ron Fowler
said that twenty children chose to turn in projects this year.
Over forty people attended a special awards night, hosted
by Youth services Supervisor, Ron Fowler, for both reading
achievement in the program and special project awards on
Thursday, September 20 at 6:30 p.m. in the Carnegie Building.
The top six readers by the number of books are: Marisa
Hoover (185), Amara Adrian (142), Olivia Nolff (101), Madeline
Frey (100), Charlotte Drinkall (89) and Trinity Rekasi (84). The
top six readers by the number of hours are: Gillian Gagnon
(120), Emily Dawson (113.5), Kailee Spalding (113), Amara
Adrian (109), Anna Armstrong (57.5), Tai Coveyou (56)
Other children who read at least 50 books or 25 hours this
summer are listed on the “Electronic “Wall of Fame” at the
library’s web site “Youth Services,” click “Kids” and scroll
down.
The Elementary Program featured the following special
events: Thursdays at the Movies, Tuesday “Crafternoons,”
children’s authors Mary D Bowman and Mary Agria, a puppet
show from “Once upon a Puppet,” Magician Jeff Wawrzaszek,
The Acting Up Theatre Company, The Organization for Bat
Conservation and a Scholastic Buy One, Get One Free Book Fair.
Four hundred and sixty-one children and their parents attended
the 23 events.
The library also sponsored a Teen (young adult) program for
seventeenth year. Fifteen teens signed up and five of them
recorded 1047.25 hours of reading and read 71 books. Teens who
recorded 10 hours of reading received a certificate recognizing
their achievement and those who recorded 25 hours or more
have had certificates sent to their schools. The top reader in the
program is Katrina Karsten (27 books and 874.25 hours). While
Emily Dudd, Ryan Sullivan and Mikayala Lowell each recorded
83, 52 and 26 hours respectively. The program was called “Own
the Night”
The Preschool Program followed the Elementary Program
them of “Dream BIG…Read!” The core of the programming fea-
tured the library’s regular Parent/Child “Lap Sits,” every Monday
and Thursday at 10:30 a.m. and ”Saturday’s Child” Story Hours
and a special summer Preschool Story Hour on Thursdays at 1:00
pm Attendance at these 31 events was 408 parents and their chil-
dren.
Parents kept track of books, tried some developmentally
appropriate early literacy activities and noted when they did
them; at 20 books and 5 activities and, again, at 32 books and 8
activities, the child received a certificate and a prize bag.
Fifty-three preschoolers and their parents read 1,414 books and
did 316 early literacy activities. 45 children and their parents
reached the Level 1 goal of 20 books and 5 activities, and 34
reached Level 2 36 books and 8 activities.
The 2013 summer theme will be “Dig into Reading” for the ele-
mentary program and “Beneath the Surface” for teens. The
Preschool program will be some developmentally appropriate
variant of the elementary theme.
By Debra Hagen-Foley
Wellington Farm, "Where It's Always 1932," is the
site for the Apple Butter Days Festival on Saturday,
October 6. Wellington Farm is a 60-acre depression-
era living history museum including a grist mill,
blacksmith shop, summer kitchen and general store.
Fresh apple pies and apple butter will be plentiful in
addition to pumpkins, squash and freshly ground
cornmeal, buckwheat and spelt flour at the farm
market.. The festival will take place between 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. The Corn Maze will be open from 2 p.m.
to 7 p.m. Admission to the Farm is: $7.50 for adults,
$5.50 for seniors and students.
The festivities continue with a Classic Country
Music Show beginning at 7:30. Doors will open at
6:30 and admission is $12.50 per person. Purchase
tickets for both the Apple Butter Days Festival and
the Country Music Show for a total of $13.50.
For additional information, contact Wellington
Farm at: www.wellingtonfarmpark.org or 989-348-
5187.
READ
Recreation, Entertainment, Arts, Dining
W W W . F A M O U 5 P O L ¡ 5 H K ¡ T C H F N . C O M
T R A D ¡ T ¡ O N A L P O L ¡ 5 H C U ¡ 5 ¡ N F
At the loíísh lítchen oí Hurbor Spríngs und letoskey, you'íí suvor
the ííuvors oí the oíd country: the rích, eurthy bíends oí meuts und
vegetubíes thut ure the stupíes oí loíísh home cookíng.
Buy Ibe flrsI maln dlsb and geI Ibe 2nd one balf off!!
8418 M-119,
Harbor Springs (Harbor PIaza)
231-838-5377
OPfN11AM- 8PM, MONDAYTHRUSATURDAY
307 Pctoskcy St ,
Downtown Pctoskcy
231-881-5987
OPfN11AM- 8PM, MONDAYTHRUSATURDAY
- Dinc ln, Takc Out or DcIivcry-
Now Two LocaIlons!
900 S. Otsego, Gaylord 989.732.9005
Open Everyday at 7:00 am
$
5.00
Turkey Meal
1/2 Turkey Sandwich &
Turkey Noodle Soup
Other catering menus also available.
Lunch & Dinner Specials
(10 meal minimum)
GOBBLERS
Catering
Person
$
6.00
Only
Ea.
8 oz. Turkey, Mashed Potato,
Stuffing, Gravy,
Veggie-Cranberry & Biscuit
Exit 270 Waters 989.705.1800
www.thebrosbistro.com
880$ 8l$180
0
8
l0
f


Catering - Ribs - Chicken - Pulled Pork
OPEN DAILY
AT 11 AM

$
12/8 oz. serving
Baked Herb Encrusted
Prime Rib Potato and veg.
Minimum 10 meals
Minimum
10 meals
$
9/meal
1/2 Chicken
Potato and veg.
$
17/
$
6
$
6
Rack Of Rib
Smoked out back with lb. potato salad
Pulled Pork.........................
Chicken Salad Wrap
Ienrh
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8pcr|z|s
0
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per rack
Feeds 2-3
October
6th
8:30 p.m.
Northern Michigan Music Legend
~Sneaky Peat¨
Open Daily At 4:30 p.m.
Early Bird Specials 4:30 - 6 p.m. Monday thru Thursday
(989) 786-4600 • Lewiston, Michigan
Located at the corner of County Rd. 489 & 612
www.theredwoodsteakhouse.com
Stephen Palmer, JR Watkins, Second Place Award
Gary Mulnix,
Stretch &
Crunch,
Third Place
Award
Jerry Ward, Street Dance, First Place Award
Juried Fine Arts Exhibition at
Crooked Tree
Library Announces Top
Summer Readers
Wellington
Farm hosts
“Apple Butter
Days” festival
this Saturday
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Page 12 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012
By Jim Akans
October is National Art and Humanities
Month, and the Gaylord Area Council
(GACA) for the Arts will be celebrating this
occasion, and their 40th anniversary of pro-
moting the arts in Otsego County, with an
“Arts Week” event this coming Saturday,
October 6th. GACA was founded in 1972,
and over the next four decades this non-
profit organization has presented and pro-
moted countless representatives from all
areas of the arts, including musical concerts,
painting, photography, jewelry, woodwork-
ing, workshops and more.
On Saturday, October 6th, the Arts Center,
located at 125 E. Main Street in Gaylord, will
host a fabulous, multi-faceted celebration in
commemoration of Arts Week and GACA’s
anniversary. From 6 to 8 pm, the public is
invited to stop by the Arts Center to enjoy
Poetry Readings by Sandra Hines and Steve
DieBold, learn about the Otsego County
Library’s “The Great Gatsby Art Contest”, a
part of The Big Read, which invites people to
create an original work inspired by the clas-
sic F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, and be treated to
songs presented by some of the original cast
members from this summer’s Gaylord
Community Production’s (GCP) “King & I”
play.
Charlie Bono, GCP and GACA board mem-
ber, states, “I invited the whole cast and we
plan to perform some of the songs from the
show that people are familiar with, such as
“Getting to Know You.” We may even wear
some of the costumes if they are still avail-
able. It will be nice to bring some of the cast
members together again…we usually don’t
get a chance to offer an encore perform-
ance.”
Attendees will also have an opportunity to
view the fascinating artwork on display at
the Arts Center that is part of the Juried Fine
Arts Exhibit running through October 31st.
This is the 10th year this exhibit has been
organized by GACA, and the works on dis-
play were all created by Michigan artists.
GACA is staffed by volunteers, and the Arts
Center is under the direction of part-time
Arts Coordinator, Lisa Lindgren, who may be
a familiar face to many through her contin-
ued position as office manager at the Otsego
County Sportsplex.
“This new position at GACA is a very excit-
ing,” she relates. “In addition to my admin-
istrative role, I also create promotional mate-
rials and the GACA newsletter. This is such a
wonderful working environment, with beau-
tiful artwork on display that is constantly
changing.”
She adds, “GACA is primarily funded by
grants and our loyal membership. We cur-
rently have a membership drive underway,
and those yearly memberships are available
for $40 for an individual, or $60 for a family.
We are also always looking for volunteers to
help out at the Art Center. If someone is
interested, even if it is just for a few hours a
month, they can contact us at (989) 732-3240
or email gaylordarts@gaylordarts.org.
GACA also has a musical arts event on the
horizon, with a special concert by the
Northern Michigan Brass Band on Sunday,
November 11th, at Gornick Auditorium. The
annual Christmas Collage Concert will be
held at the Gaylord intermediate School this
year, on Saturday, December 15th.
There is no admission fee for the Gaylord
Arts Week Celebration event on October 6th,
though donations are graciously accepted.
Further information about GACA can be
found at www.gaylordarts.org.
The Gaylord Area Council (GACA) for the Arts will be celebrating Arts Week, and their 40th anniversary of promoting
the arts in Otsego County, with a multi-faceted event at the Arts Center on Main Street in Gaylord this coming
Saturday, October 6th.
Lisa Lindgren, Arts Coordinator for GACA (at left), and Sandra Hines, Visual
Arts Committee Chairperson, at the Arts Center.
PHOTO By JIM AKANS
PHOTO By JIM AKANS
Area youth are invited to join 4-H and the
millions of young people across the nation
to become scientists for the day during the
fifth annual 4-H National Youth Science Day
(NYSD).
As part of 4-H NYSD, youth from Otsego
County will participate in the 4-H Eco-Bot
Challenge: the 2012 National Science
Experiment, which will demonstrate that by
utilizing engineering principles, youth can
have a positive impact on communities and
ecosystems. In addition to this science
experiment, youth will also have an opportu-
nity to generate power by designing their
own wind turbine and participate in other
hands on activities.
Designed by The Ohio State University
Extension, the 2012 National Science
Experiment will introduce youth to robotic
engineering concepts as they program an
autonomous robot to clean up a simulated
environmental spill. 4-H'ers will enhance
their engineering skills by assembling their
own Eco-Bots and surface controls to man-
age an environmental clean-up. Youth will
then test the interaction between the Eco-
Bot’s design features and various surface
control configurations to determine the
most effective clean-up solution for the sim-
ulated spill.
The event will take place on October 6th,
from 10 am – 2pm at the St Mary Cathedral
School Cafeteria. To request more informa-
tion or to RSVP to attend, please contact:
Patty Blanzy, 989/ 732- 6981 or Cyndie Cole,
989/390-1141 chey_80@yahoo.com
Otsego County 4-H hosting 4-H National Youth
Science Day to create Engineering Robotic Solutions
Gaylord Area Council
celebrates 40 years with
“Arts Week” event this Saturday
Sponsored by Seniors Helping Seniors (989) 448-8323
Choosing a locally owned store
generates almost four times as
much economic benefit for the
surrounding region as shopping at
a chain, a new study has conclud-
ed. The analysis also found that
eating at a local restaurant pro-
duces more than twice the local
economic impact of dining at a
chain restaurant.
The research firm Civic
Economics analyzed data from fif-
teen independent retailers and
seven independent restaurants, all
located in Salt Lake City, and com-
pared their impact on the local
economy with four chain retail
stores (Barnes & Noble, Home
Depot, Office Max, and Target) and
three national restaurant chains
(Darden, McDonald’s, and P.F.
Chang’s).
The study found that the local
retailers return an average of 52
percent of their revenue to the
local economy, compared with just
14 percent for the chain retailers.
Similarly, the local restaurants re-
circulate an average of 79 percent
of their revenue locally, compared
to 30 percent for the chain eateries.
What accounts for the difference?
Independent businesses spend
much more on local labor. They
also procure more goods for resale
locally and rely much more heavily
on local providers for services like
accounting and printing. This
means that much of the money a
customer spends at a local store or
restaurant is re-spent within the
local economy, supporting other
businesses and jobs.
October 4, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 13
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
4706 W. Otsego Lake Dr.
Gaylord, MI 49735
(989) 732-1785
www.golfthenatural.com Largest Engagement Ring Selection!
311 West Main, Downtown Gaylord
www.hogansjewelers.com
989.732.4444
ALPINE GOLD & SILVER EXCHANGE
1363 West Main, (next to Mancino`s) Gaylord

Highest Paying Coin &
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148 W. Main St.
Downtown Gaylord, MI 49735
www.greatroomsgaylord.com
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We Pay Cash for Clean Used Furniture
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COST: $40 PER MONTH (FIRST 3 FREE!)
3:30 - 4:15 PM BEGINNER
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658 EDELWEISS VILLAGE PKWY., GAYLORD, MI 49735
Between Walmart and Lowes in the Walmart Plaza
Jeff Morey,
Manager
upnorthelectronics@hotmail.com
PH. 989.732.6731
Dine In, Carry Out or Delivered to your door!
989-705-7332
1361 M-32 West, GayIord
Here`s what you get.....
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231-348-3700 989-354-7771
1 Large 16¨
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Feed the FAMILY or OFFICE
for only
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16
95
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Looking for
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JEFFERSON STREET
Next to Zion Lutheran Church
PETOSKEY • 231-347-7530
If you or your business are interested in sponsoring your favorite
non-profit organization, call our office at 989-732-8160 or e-mail us at
Office@WeeklyChoice.com.
We have a number of Non-Profit Groups who are waiting for
a sponsor to be a part of the 20/20 Project. Cost to sponsor a Non-Profit
Group is just $25 a month.
The Friendship Shelter, Inc.
We are a homeless shelter serving the Gaylord area.
In addition to providing food and shelter, a major focus of
The Friendship Shelter's program is training and education designed
to ensure continued success for our clients once they transition to
independent living.
Visit: http://www.thefriendshipshelter.org/needs.html
To find out how you can help
Underwritten by: Anonymous Donor
St Mary Cathedral School
321 N. Otsego, Gaylord, MI 49735 • 989-732-5801
Give online at:
http://www.gaylordstmary.org/about-us/fundraising
Underwritten by:
J-N-JConstruction, Inc.
(989) 731-1338 • Jim Jeffers, 2860 Kassuba Rd., Gaylord, MI 49735
Maintain your independence
NMS provides a wide array of services 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, to meet your needs at home
• Transportation
• Errand Services
• Medication Management
• Health Management
• Home Maintenance
• Companionship
• Housekeeping
• Respite Care • Personal Care
• Building solutions for barrier free living
Northern Management
Services/Access Unlimited
Nehemiah Project
Offering Shelter to Petoskey
Area Homeless
Underwritten by
B Jeremy Wills D.D.S.
God gave you your teeth...we help you keep them.
33 years in Petoskey at 204 State St., Petoskey
231-347-8980
Gaylord Area Council for the Arts
GACA 2012 CALENDAR
The Gaylord Area Council for the Arts 2012 Calendar is a major
fundraiser for the Arts Council. The theme for this year’s calendar is
“Black and White with a Little Red”; inspired by our annual exhibit in
February of the same name.
Calendars are available for $10.00 at the Community Arts Center,
125 E.Main St., Gaylord, MI,
Hrs: Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Phone: 989-732-3242 • www.gaylordarts.org
SALT & SAND ARE
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StOP BY tODAY tO kEEP
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1509 W. Main St., Gaylord
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Sponsored by Seniors Helping Seniors (989) 448-8323
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657 Chestnut Ct., Gaylord, MI 49735
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You Are Invited to...
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& Eatery
and Sport
Haus Pub
Michaywé
1535 Opal Lake Road
Gaylord, MI 49735
Phone 989.939.8911
Fax 989.939.8511
fixit@michaywe.com
www.michaywe.com
Whatever it takes!
200 S. Court Avenue, Suite 2
Post Office Box 1154,
Gaylord, Michigan 49734
Phone: 989.448.8828
Fax: 989.448.8829
curtr@ehtc.com
Curt A. Reppuhn
CPA PPLC
6461 Old 27 North,
Vanderbilt, MI 49795
989-966-2600
Weekend Entertainment Karaoke & Live Bands
Full
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220 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord • (989) 732-5444
Otsego County
United Way
116 East 5th St.,Gaylord MI 49735 • 989-732-8929 x14
Lorraine@otsegounitedway.org • www.otsegounitedway.org
The only way to end poverty is to build community
Underneath everything we are, underneath everything we do, we are all people.
Connected, Interdependent, United.
And when we reach out a hand to one, we influence the condition of all.
That's what it means to LIVE UNITED.
Catch the
20/20 Vision!
Page 14 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012
What is a Sinking Fund
Fairview - Times are tough and money is
tight, so it is getting harder and harder to
vote yes to millages and taxes. But knowing
how millage money is spent not only makes
your vote easier it may give you peace of
mind. For example when you see “Sinking
Fund” on the ballot you may be tempted to
vote no. “What the heck is a sinking fund
anyway” you may ask. Well, let me explain:
First of all it is important to know that the
Fairview Area School Sinking Fund millage
this year is a RENEWAL not an increase.
Currently the millage is set at 1 mil which to
Oscoda County residents means they pay $1
for every $1,000.00 home value. So, for
example, say my house is valued at
$60,000.00; I am paying $60.00/ year in taxes.
This $60 in tax money allows the School to
make necessary repairs and improvements
and saves General Fund money for students
and classrooms. The Sinking
Funds can ONLY be used for
certain projects and they all
involve the safety of our chil-
dren. Did you know since
2007, which was the last
time the millage was
renewed; the school has
been able to do the follow-
ing:
-Improve student safety and security
-Re-surface and maintain our prestigious
track
-Improved energy efficiency in the build-
ing
-Updated our classroom labs.
-Made emergency repairs to septic sys-
tems, boilers, water heaters and roof
-Updated the 1950’s restrooms for accessi-
bility
-Brought classroom doors up to code.
-Replaced faulty hallway flooring with low-
cost, low maintenance flooring
-Some re-wiring for updated technology
As homeowners we all know how emer-
gencies such as some of the above men-
tioned items can drain the bank, so you will
also know how much your tax dollars are
keeping your children safe, secure and up –
to –date with a constantly evolving culture.
Laws and regulations are changing and
demanding more from our schools every
day. Without your help we would not be able
to keep up! In the future we need these
funds for:
-Ongoing replacement of the flooring
-Re-shingling of the roof
-Replacement of the heating system
-Improve safety on the playground
-Emergency Mechanical systems repairs or
replacements as needed.
If you have ever visited Fairview Area
Schools we hope you have noticed that we
have a well-maintained school building and
grounds that this community can be proud
of. And the Fairview Area Schools Board and
staff recognize the efforts of our community
that make it all possible. They are, after all,
tax payers too.
Local Volunteers Make Store a Success
By Sharon Gardulski
What makes a good resale store? Lots of
things, but mainly the volunteers. The
Strawberry Patch Sore located in Downtown
Mio has local volunteers who make a differ-
ence.
"I feel like we are helping people in our com-
munity," says Larry Hack manger. "Its not
about how much we make, but rather about
how many people we can help with what we
have to sell," he added.
This local store currently has nine volun-
teers. Run as a charity store, the merchandise
is priced at reason prices. The store offers
items you can bring in on consignment or by
donation. "With the economy the way it is,
this store helps me buy clothes for my children
and furniture items I could not normally afford
to buy, they have it at a price I can afford,: said
local shopper Mary Price.
The store is open Monday through Friday
from 10 am to 6 pm. The store carries a variety
of merchandise from clothing for men, women
and children, books, tapes, music, house hold
items, furniture, curtains and drapes. Check
out the half priced sell room. Come see the
wide variety of coats and Halloween items.
For the next few months they are collecting
non-perishable food items, can goods, cereal,
just about anything. With Christmas and
Thanksgiving right around the corner the store
helps with food baskets, around 50 families a
year. Your donation of food or money will help
to feed the needy.
M.o.w's and congregate
O.c.c.o.a
(989)826-3025
Mondays-
thursdays
12:00 noon
Fridays
10:30 a.m.
veg./fruit:
(2) 1/2 cup
servings
Protein
3-4 oz.serving
Dessert
1 serving
1/2 cup
Milk
2%
garlic toast
peas
antipasta salad
Menu subject to change due to availability
tropical fruit dessert ( halloween treats )
chips mixed fruit grapes
pasta salad tossed salad
tomato & cuke slices asparagus
country tomato soup rice
grilled cheese salmon patties Goulash
yogurt & juice
29 30 31 Happy halloween !
dessert dessert
cottage cheese
mandarin oranges fresh fruit hot apples fruit cocktail raw veggies
kidney bean salad tossed salad cole slaw tossed salad
shredded hashbrowns
green beans carrots peas peas & carrots sausage patties
mac & cheese baked potatoes breadsticks mashed & gravy
26 ( 10:30 breakfast )
cheeseburger on a bun smothered chicken tuna casserole hot open face turkey sand. spinach quiche
22 23 24 25
oranges
dessert dessert juice
peaches baked apples apricots yogurt
bacon
3-bean salad tossed salad cole slaw tossed salad garden veggies
broccoli winter blend veggies brussel sprouts corn on the cob
scrambled eggs
rice garlic toast over noodles mashed & gravy hashbrown casserole
welsh rarebit stuffed peppers chicken alfredo bbq country ribs
fresh apples & juice
15 16 17 18 19 ( 10:30 breakfast )
peaches cherry cobbler pears dessert
sausage & hashbrowns
cole slaw tossed salad raw vegetable tray pineapple texas toast & string cheese
corn & peppers spinach mixed veggies tossed salad
(cowboy breakfast )
corn bread mashed & gravy rice garlic sticks bean & ham soup
beenie weenies breaded pork steak swedish meatballs homemade pizza
8 9 10 11 12 ( 10:30 breakfast )
fruit & juice pineapple oranges & dessert mixed fruit fruit & dessert
bacon
raw veggies tossed cole slaw tossed raw veggies
calif.blend veggies green beans corn italian blend veggies
french toast
baked mac & cheese mashed & gravy tator tot casserole garlic toast hashbrowns
chicken nuggets baked chicken chili dogs with a bun spaghetti & meatsauce
THURSDAY FRIDAY
1 2 3 4 5 ( 10:30 breakfast )
October-2012 CONGREGATE MENU
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
Pictured L to R: Larry Hack, Marie Vachow, Helen Wojciechowski, and Henry (Hank) Bartell
SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE
Oscoda County -- Mio, Luzerne, Fairview, Comins
SHOP, DINE, EXPLORE
BIack Bear
ReaIty
After a two year absence due to illness
we are now accepting listings.
131 Morenci Mio, MI 48647
(989) 848-2581 · (989) 808-5240
Sharon GarduIski, Broker · David GarduIski, SaIes Agent
Strawberry
Patch
Resale - Consignment Store
Downtown Mio - 826-1503
· Clothing (men, women, kids)
· Furniture & Household Items · Videos
· CD`s · DVD`s · Visit our 1/2 price sale room
· Coats · Hunting Clothes
MUSIC
JAMBOREE
Saturday, October 6, 2012 • 6 to 8 pm
_-». /.+- »+-, :--+: :.-,.-:.
e:+,.-, + -+-..:, -, »«:.-.
5-.-, ,-«- .-::-«».-:: -- _D
COME JOIN THE FUN!!!
Enjoy Hot Dogs, Pie & Ice Cream by donation
(fund raiser for the helps ministry)
Freedom Worship Center
611 Mt. Tom Rd. (M-33), JUST north of Kittle Rd. Mio

Ier yeer 0sre4z 0een!y Kcz| Is!z!c ncc4s
0z||
NORTH COUNTRY
REALTY
Rob McGregor
60 S. Mt. Tom
Mio, MI 48647
(989) 350-0568
Country
Corners
- Bulk Foods
- Bent & Dent Groceries, etc.
Baking Supplies
Everyday Low
cheese prices
1284 W. Kittle Rd. • Mio • (909)826-6063
HOURS: Mon. - Fri 8:30am - 5pm • Sat. 8:30am - 4pm
For all decorations, weddings, funerals, birthdays,
special occasions, holidays, proms or just because
Since 1974.
Current owner
Debby Bellow for 19 years.
A full service florist
“I specialize in custom arrangements”
Tuxedo Rental for Proms
We have a special offer for weddings
Rent 5 tuxes and the grooms tux is FREE
-Weekly Bouquet Specials
-Stop in and see our variety
Open 9 - 5:30
Monday - Friday
9 - Noon Saturday
1520 Caldwell Road, Mio
WE DELIVER
(989) 848-2994
Across
1- Subject to sizing, as fonts
9- Receipts
15- Tree specialist
16- Fishing nets
17- Comment at the bottom of a
page
18- Didn't exist
19- Old French coins
20- Pericarp
22- Like Fran Drescher's voice
26- Squid
27- Deranged
29- Suffix with glob
30- Mine find
31- Affable
33- Box
38- Historic county in E Scotland
39- Partial motor paralysis
41- Enthusiastic
42- Earphone
43- Actress Joanne
46- Comics bark
47- Abu Dhabi's fed.
48- High-spirited horse
52- Clan symbol
54- Radioactive chemical element
56- Lodge letters
59- Native of Hyderabad or Mumbai
60- Blood condition
64- ___ Fideles
65- Member of a lay society
66- Don't bother
67- Scalloped on the margin
Down
1- Securely confined
2- Gator's cousin
3- Teeming
4- ___ luck!
5- Prince Valiant's son
6- Life story
7- D-Day craft
8- French summers
9- Honest!
10- Needlework
11- About
12- Late bedtime
13- Brainy bunch
14- Fragrant compound
21- Green prefix
23- Belonging to a lower rank
24- ___ well...
25- Bottom of the barrel
27- Bring into existence
28- What ___ mind reader?
32- Exist
34- Blushing
35- Legal action over breach of
contract
36- ___ yellow ribbon...
37- Ferrara family
39- Excellent, slangily
40- Flying start?
44- Showered
45- Burma's first prime minister
48- Pertaining to bees
49- Sonata movement
50- Pilgrim John
51- Idaho capital
53- Deadly virus
55- Not fem.
57- River to the Seine
58- Cornerstone abbr.
61- ___ anglais (English horn)
62- Ox tail?
63- Rockers Steely ___
Go back | Print | Help
BestCrosswords.com - Puzzle #1 for September 30, 2012

Across
1- Subject to sizing, as
fonts; 9- Receipts; 15-
Tree specialist; 16-
Fishing nets; 17-
Comment at the bottom of
a page; 18- Didn't exist;
19- Old French coins; 20-
Pericarp; 22- Like Fran
Drescher's voice; 26-
Squid; 27- Deranged; 29-
Suffix with glob; 30- Mine
find; 31- Affable; 33- Box;
38- Historic county in E
Scotland; 39- Partial
motor paralysis; 41-
Enthusiastic; 42-
Earphone; 43- Actress
Joanne; 46- Comics bark;
47- Abu Dhabi's fed.; 48-
High-spirited horse; 52-
Clan symbol; 54-
Radioactive chemical
element; 56- Lodge
letters; 59- Native of
Hyderabad or Mumbai; 60
- Blood condition; 64- ___
Fideles; 65- Member of a
lay society; 66- Don't bother; 67- Scalloped on the margin;

Down
1- Securely confined; 2- Gator's cousin; 3- Teeming; 4- ___ luck!; 5- Prince Valiant's son; 6
- Life story; 7- D-Day craft; 8- French summers; 9- Honest!; 10- Needlework; 11- About; 12
- Late bedtime; 13- Brainy bunch; 14- Fragrant compound; 21- Green prefix; 23- Belonging
to a lower rank; 24- ___ well...; 25- Bottom of the barrel; 27- Bring into existence; 28- What
___ mind reader?; 32- Exist; 34- Blushing; 35- Legal action over breach of contract; 36-
___ yellow ribbon...; 37- Ferrara family; 39- Excellent, slangily; 40- Flying start?; 44-
Showered; 45- Burma's first prime minister; 48- Pertaining to bees; 49- Sonata movement;
50- Pilgrim John; 51- Idaho capital; 53- Deadly virus; 55- Not fem.; 57- River to the Seine;
58- Cornerstone abbr.; 61- ___ anglais (English horn); 62- Ox tail?; 63- Rockers Steely
__;
Pa e 1 of 1 BestCrosswords.com - Puzzle #1 for September 30, 2012
10/1/2012 htt ://www.bestcrosswords.com/bestcrosswords/ rintable/Home, rintable.sdirect?formids...
G o b a c k | P r i n t | H e l p
B e s t C r o s s w o r d s . c o m - P u z z l e # 1 f o r S e p t e m b e r 3 0 , 2 0 1 2

A c r o s s
1 - S u b j e c t t o s i z i n g , a s
f o n t s ; 9 - R e c e i p t s ; 1 5 -
T r e e s p e c i a l i s t ; 1 6 -
F i s h i n g n e t s ; 1 7 -
C o m m e n t a t t h e b o t t o m o f
a p a g e ; 1 8 - D i d n ' t e x i s t ;
1 9 - O l d F r e n c h c o i n s ; 2 0 -
P e r i c a r p ; 2 2 - L i k e F r a n
D r e s c h e r ' s v o i c e ; 2 6 -
S q u i d ; 2 7 - D e r a n g e d ; 2 9 -
S u f f i x w i t h g l o b ; 3 0 - M i n e
f i n d ; 3 1 - A f f a b l e ; 3 3 - B o x ;
3 8 - H i s t o r i c c o u n t y i n E
S c o t l a n d ; 3 9 - P a r t i a l
m o t o r p a r a l y s i s ; 4 1 -
E n t h u s i a s t i c ; 4 2 -
E a r p h o n e ; 4 3 - A c t r e s s
J o a n n e ; 4 6 - C o m i c s b a r k ;
4 7 - A b u D h a b i ' s f e d . ; 4 8 -
H i g h - s p i r i t e d h o r s e ; 5 2 -
C l a n s y m b o l ; 5 4 -
R a d i o a c t i v e c h e m i c a l
e l e m e n t ; 5 6 - L o d g e
l e t t e r s ; 5 9 - N a t i v e o f
H y d e r a b a d o r M u m b a i ; 6 0
- B l o o d c o n d i t i o n ; 6 4 - _ _ _
F i d e l e s ; 6 5 - M e m b e r o f a
l a y s o c i e t y ; 6 6 - D o n ' t b o t h e r ; 6 7 - S c a l l o p e d o n t h e m a r g i n ;

D o w n
1 - S e c u r e l y c o n f i n e d ; 2 - G a t o r ' s c o u s i n ; 3 - T e e m i n g ; 4 - _ _ _ l u c k ! ; 5 - P r i n c e V a l i a n t ' s s o n ; 6
- L i f e s t o r y ; 7 - D - D a y c r a f t ; 8 - F r e n c h s u m m e r s ; 9 - H o n e s t ! ; 1 0 - N e e d l e w o r k ; 1 1 - A b o u t ; 1 2
- L a t e b e d t i m e ; 1 3 - B r a i n y b u n c h ; 1 4 - F r a g r a n t c o m p o u n d ; 2 1 - G r e e n p r e f i x ; 2 3 - B e l o n g i n g
t o a l o w e r r a n k ; 2 4 - _ _ _ w e l l . . . ; 2 5 - B o t t o m o f t h e b a r r e l ; 2 7 - B r i n g i n t o e x i s t e n c e ; 2 8 - W h a t
_ _ _ m i n d r e a d e r ? ; 3 2 - E x i s t ; 3 4 - B l u s h i n g ; 3 5 - L e g a l a c t i o n o v e r b r e a c h o f c o n t r a c t ; 3 6 -
_ _ _ y e l l o w r i b b o n . . . ; 3 7 - F e r r a r a f a m i l y ; 3 9 - E x c e l l e n t , s l a n g i l y ; 4 0 - F l y i n g s t a r t ? ; 4 4 -
S h o w e r e d ; 4 5 - B u r m a ' s f i r s t p r i m e m i n i s t e r ; 4 8 - P e r t a i n i n g t o b e e s ; 4 9 - S o n a t a m o v e m e n t ;
5 0 - P i l g r i m J o h n ; 5 1 - I d a h o c a p i t a l ; 5 3 - D e a d l y v i r u s ; 5 5 - N o t f e m . ; 5 7 - R i v e r t o t h e S e i n e ;
5 8 - C o r n e r s t o n e a b b r . ; 6 1 - _ _ _ a n g l a i s ( E n g l i s h h o r n ) ; 6 2 - O x t a i l ? ; 6 3 - R o c k e r s S t e e l y
_ _ ;
P a e 1 o f 1 B e s t C r o s s w o r d s . c o m - P u z z l e # 1 f o r S e p t e m b e r 3 0 , 2 0 1 2
1 0 / 1 / 2 0 1 2 h t t : / / w w w . b e s t c r o s s w o r d s . c o m / b e s t c r o s s w o r d s / r i n t a b l e / H o m e , r i n t a b l e . s d i r e c t ; s e s s i o n i . . .
By Izzy Lyman
Petoskey – So you want to sweat, socialize, or
do both? There’s no bigger stage on which to
accomplish those goals than at the 71,000-
square-foot North Central Michigan College
Student and Community Resource Center
(SCRC), specifically the gymnasium and fitness
center.
On any given day, ‘gym rats’ of all ages and
abilities play basketball, volleyball, badminton,
tennis, or pickleball on the three regulation
size courts or even receive a karate or Tai Chi
lesson. Court fees are reasonable: Those 19
years and older pay $3 per day, 7 to 18-year-
olds pay $2 and children 6 and under are free.
Yes, tots are most welcome, as there are age-
appropriate toys and mats for the wee ones.
Emmet County coaches can rent the space
for, say, soccer practice or a just cause. Genesis
Church, of Petoskey, for instance, has spon-
sored an annual dodge ball tournament at the
SCRC gym. Proceeds from this year’s well-
attended tourney benefited a Central American
orphanage.
This fall the local YMCA has partnered with
the college to run an after-school program,
offering supervised games, arts and crafts, and
homework help for students, ages 8 to 17.
For the upcoming holiday, the SCRC has
scheduled an extramural Halloween Dodge Ball
day on October 27th, with trophy shirts being
awarded to the winning team. (There’s still
time, by the way, to put together an artfully-
clad team of five to hurl rubber balls at the
opposition!)
Dave Thom, an NCMC fitness center
employee and the organizer of open volleyball
nights, says that participating in group activi-
ties makes for a “stronger
community by getting people
involved.”
He has a good point.
However, for those preferring
solo workouts - maybe need-
ing to rehab after surgery or
just electing to burn calories -
the second floor of the gymna-
sium houses a state-of-the-art
fitness center and a walking
track. The track is available to
the public, at no charge. Anyone can use the
fitness rooms, which feature free weights, sta-
tionary bikes, treadmills, elliptical machines,
and nutrition tips by auditing a one credit
physical conditioning class, through the col-
lege, which means there’s no pressure to earn a
grade or stick to a fixed schedule. The cost to
district residents for the one credit course is
$116.
According to Dallas Culvahouse, assistant
recreation director, total overall usage of the
facilities for the 2011-12 school year was 28,450
people.
Adds Culvahouse: “I have seen all varieties of
physical conditions pass through our doors,
from individuals overcoming high blood pres-
sure and high cholesterol to diabetics and oth-
ers with obesity-related health issues. I have
heard inspiring tales of individuals recuperat-
ing after life- threatening accidents, as well as
students and community members training for
military service, fire and police service, profes-
sional and semi-professional sports teams, and
personal challenges to meet goals, like running
marathons.”
Perhaps the 21st century symbol for bringing
people of all walks together in a small town
should be a pair of sneakers.
For further information about the North
Central Michigan College Student Resource
Community Center, contact Maggie Daniels,
director, or Dallas Culvahouse at 231-439-6370.
Izzy Lyman can be reached at
izzylime@aol.com.
October 4, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 15
1447 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord
989.732.7000
sakswellnesscenter.com
‘The People’s
Gym’ Strengthens
Community Ties
830 S. Otsego Ave. • Gaylord
888-247-501 / www.hom.org
Health & Wellness
FOUR STAR NUTRITION
604 W Main St, Gaylord • Call 989-448-8618 to register
FALL LEARN AND
BURN
Weight Loss Challenge
- Earn $$$ for Losing
Pounds & Inches
- Registration Fee $29.00
- You Get Personal Coaching,
Body Analysis, Group Support,
Exercise and Fun
COMPETITION BEGINS WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 19 AT 6:00 PM
Have you ever wondered if your young child
is having trouble with speech, emotional devel-
opment, social skills, physical coordination or
problem solving? It can be difficult to know for
sure, especially for first-time parents and for
those without easy access to healthcare
providers.
To that end, the Health Department of
Northwest Michigan, in collaboration with
Great Start, has launched a portal to “Ages &
Stages,” an interactive online screening tool to
help parents connect with professionals and
assess the development of their children, from
birth through age five. The program is a confi-
dential, free service that can be completed
from the comfort of home.
According to Natalie Kasiborski, coordinator
for the Health Department of Northwest
Michigan’s Early Childhood Behavioral Health
Initiative (ECBHI), Ages & Stages is more than
just a questionnaire. “It’s an
opportunity to spot and
address problems before they
inhibit a child’s development,”
she said. “Parents take about
15 minutes to answer specific
questions about what they have observed in
their child. We review their responses confi-
dentially, and provide personalized follow-up
at no charge.”
Ages & Stages doesn’t end with the initial
screening. Additional screens may be provided
at two, four or six-month intervals; parents can
log in periodically to complete a new screen-
ing. The program can also be a critical step in
preparing for preschool and Kindergarten pro-
grams, which often require developmental
screening by the time children are enrolled.
“The first five years are incredibly impor-
tant,” said Maureen Hollocker, Director of the
Char-Em Great Start Collaborative. “By using
Ages & Stages to monitor simple behavioral
attributes during this time, parents are giving
their kids a much better chance to excel in
school, and later in life.”
The Health Department of Northwest
Michigan is mandated by the Michigan Public
Health Code to promote wellness, prevent dis-
ease, provide quality healthcare, address health
problems of vulnerable populations, and pro-
tect the environment for the residents and visi-
tors of Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet, and Otsego
counties. To participate in the FREE Ages &
Stages developmental screening program, visit
www.nwhealth.org/agesandstages, or contact
Kasiborski at (231) 347-5144 or
nkasiborski@nwhealth.org.
A six-session parenting workshop is being
offered by the Women’s Resource Center of
Northern Michigan (WRCNM) led by Joann F.
Townsend, ACSW. Sessions will take place 5:30
to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 10, 17, 24,
November 7, 14, 28, at the WRCNM administra-
tive offices, 423 Porter Street, Petoskey.
The workshop will offer parents simple and
effective techniques to help build self-esteem
in children and open the avenues for commu-
nication between parent and child. “Parents
will learn skills on how to set limits while main-
taining good will, cope with their child’s nega-
tive feelings, express anger without hurting,
engage their child’s willing cooperation and
create a family atmosphere of love and
respect,” said Townsend.
The workshop is based on the best-selling
book, “How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen
So Kids Will Talk,” by Adele Faber and Elaine
Mazlish. The authors wrote the book to come
to the aid of parents looking for practical and
sensible approaches to raising children.
“Parents are on the firing line seven days a
week. Yet, few of them have had any training
for this demanding job. No wonder even the
most well-intentioned parents often find them-
selves feeling frustrated, bewildered, guilty, and
alone,” said Faber and Mazlish.
“This workshop gives parents a chance to
learn practical, new skills and exchange ideas
and experiences with other parents. While the
techniques are scripted for use with children,
they can be used to communicate effectively
with friends, partners, co-workers, supervisors,
relatives—just about anyone,” said Townsend,
who has led many parenting workshops over
the years.
Hundreds of thousands of parents and pro-
fessionals have benefited from the How to Talk
So Kids Will Listen workshop. Studies in
Wisconsin, Colorado and North Dakota show
attending parents developed skills that signifi-
cantly and lastingly improved the quality of
their family life.
Advanced registration and payment is
requested because space is limited. The work-
shop fee is $80 per person or $90 per couple,
which includes materials. Participants will
receive certificates of completion at the end of
the program. To register, contact the WRCNM
administrative office at 231-347-0067.
Gaylord - Studies show that more than
90% of Americans want to know whether
or not their food contains GMOs, and
2012 has seen a groundswell in the “right
to know” movement. In the past year,
over 1.2 million Americans have contact-
ed the FDA asking them to implement
mandatory labeling of GMO foods. This
October, JoJo’s Natural Market will be
one of more than 1,500 grocery retailers
across North America participating in the
third annual Non-GMO Month—a cele-
bration of people’s right to choose food
and products that do not contain geneti-
cally modified organisms (GMOs).
During Non-GMO Month, JoJo’s will help
shoppers identify Non-GMO Project
Verified
choices
with
special
shelf
tags,
end cap displays and educational materi-
als.
Public concern about GMOs is rising
as studies increasingly raise doubts about
the long-term safety and environmental
impact of this experimental technology.
Genetic engineering forces DNA from one
species into the DNA of a different
species, resulting in unstable combina-
tions of plant, animal, bacterial and viral
genes that cannot occur in nature or
through traditional breeding.
“The right to know what we’re eating
and feeding our families is so basic,” says
Megan Westgate, Executive Director of
the non-profit Non-GMO Project, which
started Non-GMO Month. “Americans
deserve the same freedom to avoid exper-
imental GMO foods as people in other
countries.” GMO labeling is mandatory in
nearly 50 countries around the world,
including Australia, Russia, China, and all
of Europe, but no such requirements exist
in the U.S.
In response to the regulatory void,
more than a dozen states have taken up
GMO labeling bills in the last year,
including a voter initiative in California
that puts mandatory GMO labeling on
this November’s ballot.
While consumers fight for their right to
know at the polls, the Non-GMO Project
provides shoppers an immediate solution
to the presence of unlabeled GMOs. As
the only third party non-GMO verifica-
tion in North America, the Non-GMO
Project Verified seal is quickly gaining
popularity. It is now the fastest growing
label claim in the natural products indus-
try with more than 5,000 Non-GMO
Project Verified products.
For residents of Gaylord, JoJo’s Natural
Market will make it especially easy to find
Non-GMO Project Verified choices
throughout Non-GMO Month. “With
GMOs now contaminating as much as
80% of conventional packaged
foods, we are more committed
than ever to helping people
find safe, healthy non-GMO
choices,” says Lee Ann
Dunckley, store manager. “We
believe people have the right
to know what’s in their food,
and we will be celebrating that
all throughout Non-GMO
Month this October.”
Page 16 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012
Interactive “Ages and Stages” Web tools help
parents track child development
SELF HEAL MASSAGE
BODY WORK/ENERGY MEDICINE
Massage designed to meet client needs
for your over-all well-being.
CATHY BRINK, NCMP/AMTA
Reiki Master/Teacher; Touch for Health Instructor
989-619-6282
1029 Gornick Ave., Alpine Suites #103
Gaylord, MI 49735
DT Weber Hypnotherapy, LLC
Weight Loss, Stop Smoking, Phobias, Traumas
Sleep Issues, Anger, Stress, Pain and more.
Call nowto schedule your FREE first session
to see how hypnosis is right for you.
David T. Weber, CMS-CHt.
Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist · Certified Medical Support Adjunct
114 S. Center, Suite 105, Gaylord, MI Phone: 989-619-4395
dave@dtweberhypnotherapy.com Toll Free: 888-732-4409
Downtown Gaylord · info@cygnetfamilycounseling.com
Gaylord’s Right to Know – Emphasis
of Third Annual Non-GMO Month
How to Talk So Kids Will Listen
Specializing in
Oncology Massage
&
Elderly & Dementia
Massage
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315 S. Center, Gaylord
989-732-6521
www.otsegocountyparksrec.com
Saks we||oess 0eoter
1447 S. Otsego, Gaylord
989-732-5200
www.sakswellnesscenter.com
Powerho0se 6ym
1044 W. Main, Gaylord
989-732-0744
www.gaylordsgym.com
HOLlSTlC HEALTH
|hT we||oess Shop
416 W. Main
Gaylord
989-448-4717
www.ihtwellnessshopgaylord.com
HOME HEALTH CARE
hea|th 0ept. oI hw N|ch|gao
220 W. Garfield, Charlevoix
231-547-6092
www.nwhealth.org
HOME HEALTH CARE
horthero Naoagemeot Serv|ces
657 Chestnut Ct..Gaylord
989-732-6374
www.northernmanagement.org
HOSPlCE
hosp|ce oI N|ch|gao
1723 W. M-32, Ste. B
Gaylord
888-247-5701
www.hom.org
HOSPlTAL
Nercy hosp|ta|
1100 Michigan Ave., Grayling
989-348-5461
www.mercygrayling.com
0har|evo|x Area hosp|ta|
14700 Lake Shore Dr
Charlevoix
231-547-8630
www.cah.org
HYPNOTHERAPY
0T weber hypootherapy, LL0
114 S. Center
Suite 105, Gaylord
989.619.4395
dave@dtweberhypnotherapy.com
MASSAGE THERAPY
The hat0ra||st
1029 Gornick Ave., Gaylord
989-705-1451
Se|I hea| Nassagel
8ody workl£oergy Ned|c|oe
Cathy Brink NCMP/AMTA,
Reiki Master/Teacher
1029 Gornick Ave.,
Alpine Suite #103
989-619-6282
MONUMENTS
Aoger Noo0meots
7535 US 131,
Mancelona
231-587-8433
NUTRlTlON &
SUPPLEMENTS
6eoera| h0tr|t|oo
0eoters
1417 W. Main St.,
Pineridge Square
Gaylord, MI 49735-1755
989-731-6363
|hT we||oess Shop
416 W. Main. Gaylord
989-448-4717
www.ihtwellnessshopgaylord.com
Jojo's Narket
1459 S. Otsego,
Gaylord
989-705-8500
Fo0r Star h0tr|t|oo
604 W. Main,
Gaylord
989-448-8618
www.fourstarnutrition.net
PHYSlCAL THERAPY
Jordao Va||ey
8ehab|||tat|oo 0eoter
100 Main St # 9, East Jordan
231-536-1451
8oyoe 8ehab|||tat|oo 0eoter
197 State St, Boyne City
231-582-6365
PODlATRlST
0r Tom 0ekorte 0.P.N.
Podiatric Physician & Surgeon
1404 Bridge St, Charlevoix, MI
231 547 4662
1662 S Otsego Ave, Gaylord
(989) 732-6565
SENlOR ASSlSTANCE
0tsego 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
120 Grandview Blvd.
Gaylord
989-732-1122
www.otsegocountycoa.org
0rawIord 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
308 Lawndale St., Grayling
989-348-8342
www.crawfordcoa.org
Seo|ors he|p|og Seo|ors
221 E. Felshaw St., Gaylord
989-448-8323
www.seniorshelpingseniors.com/
northernmichigan
l: :JJ j:ª. .ªs.ª-ss ::ª|::| j:ª. s:'-s .-) :. |ë:.' ªs :| 1||.:-ch--t'j|ª:.:-.::¤
Joann Townsend, ACSW, is a
licensed therapist with the Women’s
Resource Center of Northern
Michigan, Inc.
Health & Wellness
Classes Available!
Visit
www.gaylordsgym.com
(989) 732-0744
GAYLORD FAMILY FITNESS CENTER
M-32 WEST
BEANERS
PG
D
IC
K
E
R
S
O
N
R
O
A
D
I-
7
5
I-
7
5
#
! Large Free Weight Room
! 2 Racquetball/Wallyball Courts
! Special Student, Senior
and Military Rates
! Trainers on Staff
! Racquetball Leagues
! 8 Different Aerobics Classes
! HEX Tanning Booths
FEATURING
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 5am - 8pm; Sat. & Sun. 8am - 2pm
1044 W. Main St.
Gaylord
Osteoporosis can be a silent disease,
one that causes the thinning of bones,
which then causes bones to become
fragile and more likely to fracture. “It’s a
disease that people often don’t realize
they have until they fracture their hip,
wrist, or ankle,” said Linda Linari, RN,
BSN, ONC, an orthopedic nurse clini-
cian with McLaren Northern Michigan.
Linari will share information on
osteoporosis prevention and treatment
during the “Building Better Bones”
class. It will take place from 6 – 8:30
p.m. on Wednesday, October 10 at the
John and Marnie Demmer Wellness
Pavilion and Dialysis Center located at
820 Arlington Avenue in Petoskey.
The program is free and open to all
individuals interested in the prevention,
early diagnosis, and treatment of osteo-
porosis. Bone biology, bone density
testing, treatment options, nutrition
instruction, exercise, and fall/fracture
prevention will be discussed.
Linari, who will provide an overview
of osteoporosis, will be joined by pre-
senters Janet Havens, a registered dieti-
tian, and physical therapist, Anne
Grimmer.
“(Anne) will go over exercises you can
do to strengthen muscles, which
strengthens bones and increases bone
density, and ways to keep yourself safe
so you don’t injure your back, or slip
and fall,” Linari said.
Havens will educate attendees on
making proper dietary choices to
increase calcium intake. “And she will
go over reading labels. There’s a lot of
information on food labels and it can
be confusing. She will discuss how to
read the labels appropriately,” Linari
said.
Women and men, particularly the
elderly, can both suffer from osteoporo-
sis, she added, though it does more
commonly affect women.
“It’s a disease we can prevent, or one
that we can halt the progression of with
appropriate medications and educa-
tion,” Linari said.
Pre-registration is requested and can
be arranged by calling 800.248.6777.
October 4, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 17
Health & Wellness
‘Building Better Bones’ Focuses on
Osteoporosis Prevention
Page 18 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! October 4, 2012

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