MANAGER TEAM MEETING

8-10:40AM

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AGENDA

•I N DIV IDUAL •COMM U NI T Y •CONC EP T
20 m in u te s

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MCKENZIE: Good morning everyone, let’s get this meeting started. I know it’s been really tense in the office lately, so HR asked us to come talk to you guys for a bit.

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We’re here to help improve the quality of your career and work life by exercising creativity in the workplace. While SAM here hands out the agenda for today, we’re here to talk about creativity!

SHARED VALUES
Cooperation Earning Money Professionalism Diversity Time & Space

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All of us share particular values. We all value cooperation, earning money, professionalism, and our time and space. But do we value how our minds can change and be creative?

“In a 2010 ibm poll of ceo’s worldwide creativity was identified as the single most important leadership trait for success.”
Amanda Enayati, cnn

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In a 2010 IBM poll of CEO’s worldwide creativity was identified as the single most important leadership trait for success.

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If we want our company to continue moving forwards we all need to move from being...

SQ U A RE

CREAT I V E

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square to creative thinkers

W H AT I S C RE AT IVIT Y?

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But what is creativity?

W H AT I S C RE AT IVIT Y?

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If it’s so important then why does there seems to be a lack of understanding of what it is and how it affects us here?

W H AT I S C RE AT IVIT Y?

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Let’s get real, most people’s perception of creativity is...

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this...

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or this...

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but creativity doesn’t have to be this type of separate activity that’s done outside of the workplace.

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In fact it’s something we can all merge into our daily routines.

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and we don’t even have to get our hands messy.

MY TH S & B IAS ES

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[SAM] When it comes to creativity, myths are deeply embedded in our society and keeps most people firmly shore bound.

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Only artists (Click) have creativity and creativity is rare, we're told. It’s something mysterious, magical, and divine.

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Only artists (Click) have creativity and creativity is rare, we're told. It’s something mysterious, magical, and divine.

?

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This idea travels in the workplace. Many people believe creativity leads to too much uncertainty. It’s just not possible to have reliable and incremental results with it.

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Yet in actuality, most people say they want creativity, but because we don’t fully understand it we end up fearing it! But what are we really afraid of!?

WH AT I S C R EA T IVITY !?

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SO WHAT IS IT ALREADY? What is creativity? Well...

CREATIVITY
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CREATIVITY

IS
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IS

BEHAVIOR
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BEHAVIOR

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Scientifically speaking, our minds are generative.

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We never think or do the same thing twice.

CAPT URI NG

C H A L L E N GE

B ROAD ENI NG

SU RROU ND ING

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In order to increase our creative output we can utilize four strategies to change our behaviors for the better: Capturing, Challenging, Broadening and Surrounding.

C AP TU RING

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A part of what makes a person "creative" is their ability to pay attention, preserve, and continually capture new ideas that are valuable to a community.

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we need to physically document our ideas in some fashion in order to develop our capturing ability.

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Write it down, record a voice memo, take a photo, or any means that allows the idea to exist in our environment.

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And we understand that “new ideas” may be difficult to come by in most white collar jobs because it’s bit repetitive so in order for capturing to be most beneficial, we need to be challenged....

C H AL LE NGE

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One way to accelerate the flow of new ideas is by putting ourselves in difficult situations. Doing so extinguish our behavioral reinforces that keeps us in our patterns.

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In these situations, we begin trying out every other behavior that ever worked for us in the past, which enhances the flow of new solutions. It’s quite simple, Behaviors that are unsuccessful will get weaker, while successful ones get stronger.

B R O AD ENING

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Broadening. Learn about things you know nothing about.

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The more training you have and the more diverse that training is, the greater the potential for creative output.

S U RR OUNDIN G

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Lastly, we can enhance our creativity by surrounding ourselves with diverse stimuli and, even more important, by changing that stimuli regularly.

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Diverse stimuli promotes creativity because it gets multiple behaviors competing with each other which increases creative output.

CAPT URI NG

C H A L L E N GE

B ROAD ENI NG

SU RROU ND ING

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These four strategies are vital for creativity to flourish, but how do these relate to the current landscape of corporate america?

CO R PO R AT E S T RUC T UR E

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our corporate structure influences our interactions and how we work and behave.

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some companies are more collaborative and creative by nature while others more individualistic (CLICK), which influences how office environments are set up.

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some companies are more collaborative and creative by nature while others more individualistic (CLICK), which influences how office environments are set up.

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cubicles began as a common trend in the 60‘s and in some instances they are important for certain types of work, but for the most part they aren’t necessarily relevant to the way we do business today.

O F F I C E S PA CE T ODA Y

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so what do office spaces look like now? well lets take a look...

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[boring cubicle infomercial]

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[boring cubicle infomercial]

T H E C OR PO RAT E I N DI V I D UA L

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[MCKENZIE] We’re the one’s that have to sit in these gray cubicles all day, but you can always have your choice of cherry. But how is this structure influencing us?! So as much as we probably dislike the phrase we are the corporate individual we are not corporate drones, we are real people that have individual thoughts and values

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[cubicle parody video]

T HA T’ S YO U!

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That us! We are that person. There are so many of these videos online. Their environment is influencing them and their work. That just explains the need of what we want to do.

S TAT I C I N CU B I CLE

TOO M UC H S T R UC TU R E

W ORK ING I N I SOL AT IO N

D EADL I NES

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These video clips are examples of many of our creative barriers within the office space. We all react to these barriers in different ways.

TH E G E N E R AT IO NS

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Because we are all part of different generations

BABY BOOMERS
born between 1946–1964

GENERATION X
born between 1965–1980

GENERATION Y
mid 1980s and later

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Right now there are three generations that exist in America. Sam and myself included. Not that I want to talk about age

B A B Y B OO MER

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I want to introduce you to RHonda Parker

RHONDA PARKER
Vice President, Client Services Operations, American Century Investors

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RHONDA PARKER 47 years old Vice President, Client Services Operations, American Century Investors Being with American Century for 29 years she sees how the people and company must adapt to the technology. She does her best adjusting to the the new devices that are developing. She can see that the younger people in the office are very eager and interested where as she just doesn’t mind taking on a challenge

G EN E RA TION X

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Generation X is next

KRISTEN LOWELL
Manager, Application Management Services, Cerner Corporation

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Kristen Lowell who is 33 years old and a Manager in Application Management Services, at Cerner Corporation Kristen is always eager to learn new skills. She also doesn’t mind her cubicle. It gives her a sense of importance to have her own space, which she covers with fun imagery of her family and friends. She does however, work to live and support her family and does not live to work.

G EN E RA TIO N Y

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have Austin Williams who part of generation Y, the babies...

AUSTIN WILLIAMS
Software Quality Engineer, Sprint

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AUSTIN WILLIAMS 25 years old is a software quality engineer at Sprint Being a software engineer Austin is always very eager to see the new advances within technology. He does find his cubicle very constricting and wishes he could customize his space in some way to make it more personal. He does value teamwork and working with others, which his cubicle can tend to diminish.

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[SAM] All of these generations do need creativity in some way, shape, or form. We are creating a system that can work and be used by anyone while serving their specific needs.

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We have chosen to work with Insurance companies. We have found their work to be highly stressful and can tend to be a bit monotonous.

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We are specifically focusing on Car Insurance Agents. They have instances in which our system would create a new way for them to learn and work within this restrictive environment.

“Complex surroundings create a complex brain.”
Brain Death by Cubicle

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After researching many parts and pieces of the office atmosphere we have decided to focus on the most personal space for a corporate individual. The cubicle.

A ME RI C A N CE NT U RY

C I TY BA N K

MO RNIN GST AR I NSU RANCE

F ARME RS I NSU RANCE

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After talking to individuals in corporate america from companies such as American Century, City Bank, Morningstar & Farmers Insurance. we discovered that their personal workspace, their cubicle, is where they spend majority of their time.

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One of our goals was to cover the needs we believe one must have for creativity to flourish. These being diversity, interaction, and cooperation. To get the best results these three factors must come in to play. This led us to our proposed system...

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[Mckenzie] The Digital Cubicle. We want to change their behavior in how they interact with their surroundings. This system includes...

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a flexible/movable wall that resides within their space.

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a computer that acts as the hub

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and their phone

I N S PI R AT ION

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[MCKENZIE] These are some examples of other corporate interactive systems that are currently being developed by companies such as Microsoft.

S C EN A R IO #1
PERSONALIZING SPACE

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For the first scenario we are going to show how a user can completely customize their space.

CASE #1023

MEDIA

JESSIE J. REN
’98 RED HONDA CIVIC

ACCIDENT REPORT

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the hub is the central location for the system, it collects all of the content. One of the most important functions of the hub is the transferring of data to the wall.

CASE #1023

PERSONAL WALL MEDIA

JESSIE J. REN CLIENTS
’98 RED HONDA CIVIC

MEETING CLAIMS
ACCIDENT REPORT

RENEWELS PROCESSED NEW SPACE

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Users can drag any type of media to the main icon which will then place it within a specified space.

CASE #1023

PERSONAL WALL MEDIA

JESSIE J. REN CLIENTS
’98 RED HONDA CIVIC

MEETING CLAIMS
ACCIDENT REPORT

RENEWELS PROCESSED NEW SPACE

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by clicking on the main icon, you can also access the contents of your spaces under categories such as clients, meetings, claims, or processed data.

CASE #1023

PERSONAL WALL MEDIA

JESSIE J. REN CLIENTS
’98 RED HONDA CIVIC

MEETING CLAIMS
ACCIDENT REPORT

RENEWELS PROCESSED NEW SPACE

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In this instance we’re interested in customizing your personal wall so we click that.

PERSONAL WALL

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Here you can access, organize, and altar any of your files and upload new content by (CLICK) clicking the plus icon. We’re fascinated with outer space so let’s upload a space environment to our wall.

PERSONAL WALL

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(adding one more “file”)

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If we look at our wall, our space scene is now present.

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You can also add content to your wall by scanning documents directly on the wall, or by throwing media from your phone to the wall.

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You can add different types of objects that can be interacted with and arranged to your liking.

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Here the user has the ability to hide content temporarily by using hand gestures.

THU

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Calls can be stressful sometimes it’s nice to enjoy the view.

S C EN A R IO # 2
“THE WORKSPACE”

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[SAM] The workspace is the vital area for an insurance agent. They spend most of their days on the phone with clients and insurance companies to get quotes. So how can we create the most efficient and creative workflow.

DEBRA SMITH
ANSWER DECLINE

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Phones are essential to an agents workflow because you can receive a client call at a moments notice. If a client calls while you’re away from your desk, the phone will detect their contact number and open in the Digital Cubicle app. To ensure you don’t miss anything in the conversation, it is automatically recorded for later reference.

DEBRA SMITH
RECORDED: 1 hr 23 min

SAVE DISCARD

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However, at the end of a call you have the option to save or discard the conversation.

PERSONAL WALL CLIENTS MEETING CLAIMS RENEWELS PROCESSED NEW SPACE

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If you choose to save you’ll be taken to your workspace categories.

PERSONAL WALL CLIENTS ABBY CARR SAM MAK KELSEY PAIGE DEBRA SMITH MEETING

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You place the recording under the appropriate client folder which will automatically sync with your hub and wall.

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Back at the cubicle to access your client workspace where you can listen to the recorded conversation, use a swiping gesture to move from space to space.

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360˚ VIEW DEBRA SMITH
’98 RED HONDA CIVIC

ACCIDENT REPORT

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Here agents can pull up any data pertaining to a claim in one visible centralized location, which allows for quick and accurate evaluation. This provides them with a clear overview and different type of interaction with the clients information. If you receive a call within your cubicle, one spaces allow agents to quickly pull up all aspects of a case to make accurate quotes and evaluations. New car sensing technology even allows agents to interact with the vehicle in question to evaluate damages. Agents can take notes in real space using a stylus.

360˚ VIEW DEBRA SMITH
’98 RED HONDA CIVIC

ACCIDENT REPORT

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Because our focus is on auto insurance agents, we are proposing a new technological feature which allows a agents to evaluate the vehicle and damages in a 3 dimensional space as well as adding notes when needed.

360˚ VIEW DEBRA SMITH
’98 RED HONDA CIVIC

ACCIDENT REPORT

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If clients have questions, sometimes putting them on hold hurts your credibility. Agents need a quick method to ask other agents questions that could possibly be a few cubicles away. Screen sharing technology allows agents to share the client’s profile in question and it’s contents in a moments notice for a speedy response.

P E R S ON AL DEVICE

D IGITA L C UBICLE
C O MPU T E R ( HU B) I NTE RACT IV E W AL L

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This system merges the value of work and creativity together by giving both equal weight in our system. It allows creativity to become natural behavior for all corporate workers. Creativity often leads to happiness and happy people leads to a happier workplace.

“Creativity is doing something differently than you’ve done before.”
Beau Lotto, neuroscientist & founder of Lottolab

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Before we adjourn this meeting, we’d like to open the floor for any comments or questions

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