Progressive Research Paper

Today, students do not get to go in-depth with historical content, especially content that interests them. The idea of this research paper is that students will have:  multiple times to improve on their paper (learn how to edit and re-write);  will go in-depth on a topic instead of learn surface level information;  pick topics that interest them; and  research an enduring question. Here’s a brief timeline of how this will work:  With the help of a teacher, students will pick a topic to write about  With the help of a teacher, students will pick the essential question (thesis)  They will write their first draft with minimal research, based on one event or person in history  They will write their second draft with more research, based on two events/people  They will finish their paper with more research and multiple events/people and perspectives They will be writing on the same topic but adding content they are learning in class. For example, in World History 2 their thesis could be: has technology benefitted mankind?  First paper would be one paragraph and explain the printing press  Second paper would be two paragraphs on the printing press and steam engine  The third paper would discuss the printing press, the steam engine, and conclude with nuclear weapons. Essential Questions: According to Wiggins and McTighe, essential questions actually have one or more of the following meanings:     Essential questions are “important questions that recur throughout all our lives.” They are “broad in scope and timeless by nature.” Essential questions refer to “core ideas and inquiries within a discipline.” They “point to the core of big ideas in a subject and to the frontiers of technical knowledge. They are historically important and alive in the field.” Essential questions help “students effectively inquire and make sense of important but complicated ideas, knowledge, and know-how — a bridge to findings that experts may believe are settled but learners do not yet grasp or see as valuable.” Essential questions “will most engage a specific and diverse set of learners.” They “hook and hold the attention of your students.” (108-109)

Examples: No: What are the 3 branches of government and what does each do? Yes: How are the 3 branches of government dependent on each other?

No: Yes:

What is a community? How does my community affect my life?

Other examples: What problems and solutions does technology produce? How has immigration changed society in the United States? How did the ideas of nationalism clash with sectionalism? Was World War One avoidable? Why or why not? Here’s a link with more on essential questions: http://www.okcss.org/Ess%20Ques%20article.pdf Suggestions: 1. Have students begin with a question where their first piece of historical evidence has already been taught. 2. Use Google Docs. Once they share this with you, you can watch how their paper evolves, edit while they write, and you won’t have 100s of copies of paper to keep track of. 3. Have students keep a journal, or tag their notes during the year, for information they can use in their research paper. 4. Have students understand Wikipedia. Students can get ideas from Wikipedia, for example, what is missing from an article entry? Part of their paper can become contributed. 5. The whole class can work on the same question; or, you can have students pick from five questions. Depends on the level of your class. Students can then collaborate. It makes it more student-centered if you allow students to pick their own topic. However, even if you supply the topics, students can choose different evidence.

Research Paper Rubric Characteristic 4 Points Paper is 3-5 Requirements
Paper 1 should max at 2 points. Paper 2 should max at 3 points.

3 Points
Paper is 2-3 paragraphs, Times New Roman Font (12 pt.), doublespaced, pages numbered. Paper has 4-8 intext citations.

2 Points
Paper is 1 paragraph, Times New Roman Font (12 pt.), doublespaced, pages numbered. Paper has 2-4 in-text citations.

1 Point
Paper does not meet page, font, and other requirements.

paragraphs, Times New Roman Font (12 pt.), doublespaced, pages numbered. Paper has 6-10 intext citations.

In-Text Citations
Paper 1 should max at 2 points. Paper 2 should max at 3 points

Paper has 2 or less in-text citations.

Organization

Information is very organized with wellconstructed paragraphs and subheadings. No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors.

Information is organized with wellconstructed paragraphs.

Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed.

The information appears to be disorganized.

Mechanics

Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors Information clearly relates to the main topic. It provides 1-2 supporting details and/or examples.

A few grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors.

Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors.

Quality of Information

Information clearly relates to the main topic. It includes several supporting details and/or examples. The research paper clearly demonstrates understanding of the topic and the ability to support a thesis with relevant information. Fits all the standards for the rubric, but exceeds the expectations of the rubric.

Information clearly relates to the main topic. No details and/or examples are given.

Information has little or nothing to do with the main topic.

Argument

The research paper demonstrates understanding of the topic and the ability to support a thesis with information. Fits all the standards for the rubric, and needs little improvement.

The research paper demonstrates some understanding of the topic and/or the ability to support a thesis with information. Fits all the standards for the rubric, but could still be improved upon.

The research paper demonstrates little/no understanding of the topic and/or the ability to support a thesis with relevant information.

Teacher’s POV

Grading Scale: This rubric is designed for students to improve on their writing. For growth, record the Rubric Grade only. First Student Measure (24 points max): Rubric Grade Grade book Grade Less than 10 0 – 69 11 – 13 70 – 76 14 – 16 77 – 84 17 – 19 85 – 92 20 + 93 – 100 Second Student Measure (26 points max): Rubric Grade Grade book Grade Less than 12 0 – 69 13 – 15 70 – 76 16 – 18 77 – 84 19 – 21 85 – 92 22 + 93 – 100

Third Student Measure (28 points max): Rubric Grade Grade book Grade Less than 14 0 – 69 15 – 17 70 – 76 18 – 20 77 – 84 21 – 23 85 – 92 24 + 93 – 100 Rubric idea came from: www.combscoyotes.org

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