BUSINESS AND IT/IRM TRANSFORMATION PLAN

ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY................................................................................................................................................................................13 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................................................................17 1.1 Purpose................................................................................................................................................................................................17 1.2 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................................................................17 1.3 Document Overview .........................................................................................................................................................................17 1.4 Associated Documents....................................................................................................................................................................18 2.0 BUSINESS AND IT/IRM GOALS AND STRATEGIES AND THE ROLE OF EA...............................................................................20 2.1 Goals of Enterprise Transformation...............................................................................................................................................20 2.2 Strategies for Enterprise Transformation.....................................................................................................................................21 2.3 The Role of Enterprise Architecture .............................................................................................................................................21 3.0 STATE OF HAWAI`I EA ............................................................................................................................................................................23 3.1 Context for the EA within the State of Hawai`i’s Government Transformation ....................................................................23 3.2 Current State EA Summary .............................................................................................................................................................23 3.4 Future State EA Summary ...............................................................................................................................................................24 3.5 Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary .................................................................................................................................25 4.0 ENTERPRISE BUSINESS ARCHITECTURE (EBA) .............................................................................................................................27 4.1 EBA Current State .............................................................................................................................................................................27 4.2 EBA Future State ...............................................................................................................................................................................28 4.2.1 Business Reference Model (BRM) ..................................................................................................................................29 4.2.2 Service Reference Model (SRM) .....................................................................................................................................32 4.2.3 Performance Reference Management (PRM) ..............................................................................................................32 4.3 EBA Transition and Sequencing (T&S) Planning Summary.....................................................................................................34 4.3.1 Reengineer Administration Operational Functions ......................................................................................................35 4.3.2 Replace the Existing Financial and Business Management Solution ......................................................................35 4.3.3 Upgrade the IT Infrastructure ...........................................................................................................................................35 4.3.4 Information Stewards/Leads, Participants, and Stakeholders ..................................................................................35 4.3.5 Remove Barriers to Information Sharing ........................................................................................................................35 4.3.6 Simplify and Secure Information Gathering from Citizens..........................................................................................35 4.3.7 Ensure Required Services are Delivered........................................................................................................................35 4.3.8 Promote Process Reengineering within the State .......................................................................................................35 5.0 ENTERPRISE INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE (EIA) .......................................................................................................................37 5.1 EIA Current State ...............................................................................................................................................................................37 5.2 EIA Future State .................................................................................................................................................................................38 5.2.1 Information Management and Usage .............................................................................................................................38 5.2.1.1 Semantic Web................................................................................................................................................................39

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5.2.1.2 Knowledge Management ............................................................................................................................................40 5.2.2 EIA Elements ...................................................................................................................................................................................41 5.2.2.1 Common Information Framework ..................................................................................................................................41 Enterprise Resource .....................................................................................................................................................................41 Integration Enabler .......................................................................................................................................................................42 Information Architecture Levels for Sharing ...........................................................................................................................................42 Stewardship/Leadership Responsibility and Governance Structure ................................................................................42 Information Description ...............................................................................................................................................................42 Information Confidentiality ..........................................................................................................................................................42 Information Integrity .....................................................................................................................................................................42 Information Availability ................................................................................................................................................................43 5.2.2 Conceptual Information Architecture........................................................................................................................................43 5.2.3 Requirements for Information Delivery and Sharing..............................................................................................................45 Operational Information Management Requirements ..........................................................................................................45 Information Sharing and Delivery Requirements ...................................................................................................................46 Analysis, Visualization, and Reporting Requirements...........................................................................................................46 5.3 EIA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary .................................................................................................................46 5.3.1 Establish the Enterprise Data and Services Administration.......................................................................................46 5.3.1.1 Governance Standards and Practices ..................................................................................................................46 5.3.1.2 Common Data and Services Architecture ............................................................................................................46 5.3.1.3 Data and Database Administration Standards and Practices .........................................................................47 5.3.2 Establish Enterprise Common Data and Services for the ERP Implementation.....................................................47 5.3.3 Establish Enterprise Common Data and Services for the Affordable Care Act .....................................................47 5.3.4 Establish Enterprise Common Data and Services for the Support Services ..........................................................47 5.3.5 Establish Enterprise Common Data and Services for the Core Mission LOBs.......................................................47 6.0 ENTERPRISE SOLUTION ARCHITECTURE (ESA) ..............................................................................................................................49 6.1 ESA Current State .............................................................................................................................................................................49 6.2 ESA Future State................................................................................................................................................................................50 6.2.1 Vision for the Future State ESA .........................................................................................................................................51 6.2.2 Guiding Principles for the Common Solutions Framework .........................................................................................52 6.2.2.1 Enterprise Integration................................................................................................................................................52 6.2.2.2 Use of Industry Standard Application Software within a Services-Oriented Architecture ......................52 6.2.2.3 Stewardship/Leadership and Governance...........................................................................................................53 6.2.2.3 Open Source Software and Compliance with Open Standards ......................................................................53 6.2.2.4 Service Orientation, Software Reuse, and Solutions Integration....................................................................53 6.2.2.5 Standard Enterprise Solution Patterns..................................................................................................................53 6.2.2.6 The Role of the ESA ...................................................................................................................................................54

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6.2.3 Conceptual Solutions Architecture ............................................................................................................................................54 6.2.3.1 LOB Services ...........................................................................................................................................................................55 Enterprise Services.......................................................................................................................................................................55 Enterprise Mission Support Services ................................................................................................................................55 Customer Management Services .......................................................................................................................................56 Business Management Services ........................................................................................................................................56 Knowledge Management Services ....................................................................................................................................57 ERP Services ...........................................................................................................................................................................58 Service Management Services...........................................................................................................................................60 Enterprise Common Services .....................................................................................................................................................61 Data Management Services ................................................................................................................................................61 Analytical Services........................................................................................................................................................................................61 Software Development and Integration Services...........................................................................................................63 Security Management Services.................................................................................................................................................................63 Collaboration Services ..........................................................................................................................................................64 Communication Services .............................................................................................................................................................................65 Search Services......................................................................................................................................................................65 Systems Management Services .........................................................................................................................................66 6.3ESA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary..................................................................................................................66 6.3.1 Stabilize ..................................................................................................................................................................................66 6.3.1.1 Address Current “Flagship” Opportunities...........................................................................................................66 6.3.1.2 Legacy Application Solution Upgrades .................................................................................................................67 6.3.2 Rationalize and Integrate ...................................................................................................................................................67 6.3.2.1 Implement ERP System .............................................................................................................................................67 6.3.2.2 Implement Other Enterprise Solutions ..................................................................................................................68 Enterprise Email System .......................................................................................................................................................68 Enterprise Collaboration Solution .......................................................................................................................................68 Enterprise Identity Management Solution ........................................................................................................................68 Enterprise Dashboard Solution ...........................................................................................................................................68 Open Government Solutions ................................................................................................................................................68 Knowledge Management Solution .....................................................................................................................................68 Customer Service Solution (Request and Incident Reporting).....................................................................................68 Enterprise System Management Solution ........................................................................................................................68 6.3.2.3 Establish Standard Enterprise Solution Patterns.......................................................................................................68 Enterprise Web Application Solution Pattern ..................................................................................................................69 Enterprise Mobile Application Solution Pattern ..............................................................................................................69 Enterprise Data Analytics Application Solution Pattern ................................................................................................69 Enterprise Application Integration Web Service Solution Pattern..............................................................................69 Community Application Software “Stores”, Repositories, and Directories ..............................................................69 6.3.2.4 Implement Enterprise Application Integration Services ..........................................................................................70
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Support Services – Security – Identity and Access Management ..............................................................................................71 Digital Asset Services – Document/Records Management ..........................................................................................................71 Business Analytics Services – Geospatial ........................................................................................................................................71 Business Analytics Services – Dashboard Reporting ....................................................................................................................71 Back Office Services – ERP ..................................................................................................................................................................71 Process Automation Services – Workflow........................................................................................................................................71 Process Automation Services – Case Management ......................................................................................................................71 Customer Services – Event/ Incident/Request Reporting ..............................................................................................................71 7.0 ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURE (ETA) ........................................................................................................................73 7.1 ETA Current State ..............................................................................................................................................................................73 7.2 ETA Future State ................................................................................................................................................................................76 7.2.1 Elements of the ETA Future State Vision .........................................................................................................................77 7.2.1.1 Infrastructure: Hawai`i Cloud Computing Centers (HC3)...................................................................................77 7.2.1.2 One Network for Hawai`i (OneNet) ........................................................................................................................78 7.2.1.3 Adaptive Computing Environment (ACE)...............................................................................................................78 7.2.1.4 Information Assurance and Privacy ......................................................................................................................78 7.2.1.5 Enterprise Operations ...............................................................................................................................................78 7.2.1.6 Collaboration and Messaging .................................................................................................................................78 7.2.1.7 IT Services Management (ITSM) Framework .....................................................................................................79 Current State SWOT for ITSM .......................................................................................................................................79 Future State Vision for ITSM ..........................................................................................................................................79 Service Management ......................................................................................................................................................79 ITSM ....................................................................................................................................................................................80 ITSM Best Practices ........................................................................................................................................................81 ETA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary for ITSM .....................................................................................82 7.2.3 Technology Domain Architecture.....................................................................................................................................87 7.2.3.1 Infrastructure Domain ......................................................................................................................................................................89 Current State SWOT for the Infrastructure Domain .................................................................................................89 Future State Vision for the Infrastructure Domain....................................................................................................89 Hosting, Cloud, Data Center Sub-Domain...................................................................................................................91 Hawai`i Cloud Computing Centers (HC3).................................................................................................................92 Disaster Recovery Sub-Domain....................................................................................................................................97 Backup - Restore ..........................................................................................................................................................97 Backup – Restore System Behavior ........................................................................................................................97 Servers and Storage Sub-Domain................................................................................................................................98 Directory Services Sub-Domain ...................................................................................................................................99 Enterprise Systems Management Sub-Domain ..................................................................................................... 100 ETA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary for Infrastructure Domain ..............................................101 Develop and Construct or Build Out a Primary and Backup Data Center Environment ....................................................... 101 Define Primary Data Center and DR Strategy Based on Three Alternatives ........................................... 102 Consolidate Data Centers .....................................................................................................................................102
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Develop Secondary Data Center (State Owned Facility)............................................................................................................. 106 Create Three Island Data Centers (State Owned Facilities) ............................................................................ 109 Migrate Applications from the Current Data Centers to the Primary Data Center ..................................... 111 Develop a State-Wide Active Directory Services Environment ............................................................................... 112 7.2.3.2 Network Domain ............................................................................................................................................................ 113 Current State SWOT for the Network Domain........................................................................................................ 113 Future State Vision for the Network Domain .......................................................................................................... 113 Wired Sub-Domain .................................................................................................................................................. 116 Wireless Sub-Domain ............................................................................................................................................. 117 Radio Sub-Domain ................................................................................................................................................... 117 ETA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary for the Network Domain............................................................. 118 Design and Implement OneNet .................................................................................................................................. 118 Provide Video Support ................................................................................................................................................. 119 Create IP Addressing – Removal of Network Address Translation from Departments ................................ 119 Create IP Addressing – Transition from IPv4 to IPv6 Initiative............................................................................ 119 Define and Implement Comprehensive Network Security .................................................................................. 120 Staffing Network Security Organization .................................................................................................................. 120 Implement Network Life Cycle Methodology ......................................................................................................... 121 7.2.3.3 End User Computing Domain....................................................................................................................................... 122 Current State SWOT for the End User Computing Domain ........................................................................................ 122 Future State Vision for the End User Computing Domain ........................................................................................... 122 Desktop, Laptop, and Mobile Sub-Domain .............................................................................................................. 124 User Productivity Software Sub-Domain................................................................................................................. 124 User Presentation Sub-Domain ................................................................................................................................. 125 Peripherals Sub-Domain ............................................................................................................................................. 126 ETA Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary for the End User Computing Domain ........................................ 126 Create Virtual Desktop Infrastructure ...................................................................................................................... 126 Conduct a Pilot Test of VDI .......................................................................................................................................... 127 Define and Implement Next Steps VDI Implementation....................................................................................... 127 7.2.3.4 Unified Communications Domain ............................................................................................................................... 128 Current State SWOT for the Unified Communications Domain..................................................................................129 Future State Vision for the Unified Communications Domain........................................................................................................... 132 Email and Collaboration Sub-Domain ....................................................................................................................... 133 Voice Sub-Domain ........................................................................................................................................................ 133 Video Sub-Domain ........................................................................................................................................................ 133 Broadcast Messaging Sub-Domain.......................................................................................................................... 133 Messaging and Social Media Sub-Domain ............................................................................................................ 134 Citizen Communication and Engagement ................................................................................................................ 134

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ETA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary for the Unified Communication Domain............................................ 135 Evaluate Leading Technology Platforms ............................................................................................................................... 135 Pilot VoIP ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 135 Implement VoIP State-wide ..................................................................................................................................................... 135 7.2.3.5 Information Management Domain ....................................................................................................................................... 137 Current State SWOT for the Information Management Domain ..................................................................................... 137 Future State Vision for the Information Management Domain ........................................................................................ 137 Digital Content Management Sub-Domain .................................................................................................................... 138 Document Management Sub-Domain ............................................................................................................................ 139 Data Management Sub-Domain .......................................................................................................................................139 Analytics Sub-Domain ............................................................................................................................................................................... 140 Geographic Information System (GIS) Sub-Domain .....................................................................................................140 ETA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary for the Information Management Domain....................... 140 7.2.3.6 Application Environment Domain ......................................................................................................................................... 141 Current State SWOT for the Application Environment Domain ....................................................................................... 141 Future State Vision for the Application Environment Domain .......................................................................................... 141 Application Development and Integration Sub-Domain ............................................................................................. 145 Client Server Applications Sub-Domain ......................................................................................................................... 145 Web Applications Sub-Domain ........................................................................................................................................ 146 Mobile Applications Sub-Domain .................................................................................................................................... 146 Embedded Systems Sub-Domain..................................................................................................................................... 146 ETA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary for the Application Environment Domain ............................... 147 Software Engineering Improvement ............................................................................................................................... 147 Formalize an Enterprise SDLC Methodology........................................................................................................... 147 Adopt Enterprise SDLC Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 147 Implement Software Engineering Project Management Improvement............................................................ 147 Implement Software Engineering Continuous Improvement Program ............................................................. 147 Implement Software Engineering Mentoring and Consulting Program............................................................ 147 Develop Solution Patterns........................................................................................................................................... 148 Implement Software Engineering Continuous Improvement Program Operations........................................ 148 Enterprise Data and Services Standardization and Sharing ..................................................................................... 148 Implement Software Development Community Ecosystem....................................................................................... 148 Implement EA Common Information and Solutions Architecture / Framework Administration ........................ 148 Create a Common Portal Implementation ...................................................................................................................... 149 Implement Enterprise Services ........................................................................................................................................ 149 Migrate Legacy Systems ................................................................................................................................................... 150 Create Project Registry and Reporting ........................................................................................................................... 150 7.2.3.7 Information Assurance and Privacy Domain ..................................................................................................................... 151 Current State SWOT for the Information Assurance and Privacy Domain ................................................................... 151 Future State Vision for the Information Assurance and Privacy Domain ...................................................................... 152
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Security Devices Sub-Domain.......................................................................................................................................... 159 Privacy Sub-Domain ........................................................................................................................................................... 160 ETA Transition and Sequencing Planning Summary for the Information Assurance and Privacy (IA&P) Domain............................................................................................. 160 Implement Network Data Loss Prevention (NDLP)...................................................................................................... 161 Create and Implement IT Security Policy....................................................................................................................... 161 Implement Data at Rest (DAR) Encryption ..................................................................................................................... 161 Initiate Server Configuration Stability Monitoring........................................................................................................ 161 Initiate Automated Security Configuration Compliance Monitoring and Reporting............................................. 161 Implement Privacy Program Staffing and Sensitive Information Protection Improvements ............................. 161 Implement Enterprise Security Operations Center(s) ................................................................................................. 161 Implement Computer Incident Response Centers (CIRCs) ........................................................................................ 162 Implement Enterprise Penetration Testing Capability ................................................................................................. 162 Common Standards for Protecting Privacy and Other Sensitive Data .................................................................... 162 Implement a Secure Applications Testing Program .................................................................................................... 162 Implement an Enterprise Identity Management Solution........................................................................................... 162 Implement Network-Based Network Access Control (NAC) .................................................................................... 162 Implement a Secure Wireless Access Solution ........................................................................................................... 162 Implement Network End-to-End Encryption Solution.................................................................................................. 163 8.0 ENTERPRISE LEVEL TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLAN ................................................................................................... 166 8.1 Approach Transition and Sequencing Planning...................................................................................................................... 166 8.2 Enterprise Level Transition and Sequencing Analysis ........................................................................................................... 166 8.2.1 Strategic Portfolio Views................................................................................................................................................. 167 8.2.1.1 Investment Status by LOB ............................................................................................................................... 167 8.2.1.2 Enterprise Support Systems and Enterprise Services.............................................................................. 167 8.2.1.3 ESA and ETA Investments ............................................................................................................................... 167 8.2.1.4 EA Compliance .................................................................................................................................................. 167 8.2.1.5 Strategic Value .................................................................................................................................................. 167 8.3 Specific Projects and Activities .................................................................................................................................................. 167 9.0 CONCLUSION ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 169

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1: Priority Transition and Sequencing Activities.........................................................................................................................15 Figure 2: Evolution of the EA for the State ................................................................................................................................................18 Figure 3: Business and IT/IRM Transformatin Vision for the State of Hawai`i .................................................................................20 Figure 4: Business and IT/IRM Transformation Strategy for the State of Hawai`i ..........................................................................21 Figure 5: State of Hawai`i EA Practice ......................................................................................................................................................21 Figure 6: EA Practice Context for the State of Hawai`i..........................................................................................................................23 Figure 7: Gartner’s Key Forces that are Shaping IT................................................................................................................................24 Figure 8: Priority Transition and Sequencing Activities.........................................................................................................................25 Figure 9: State of Hawai`i Future State Enterprise Architecture.........................................................................................................25
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Figure 10: Current State EBA .......................................................................................................................................................................28 Figure 11: BRM, SRM, and PRM Components of the EBA ....................................................................................................................28 Figure 12: Value Chain for the State of Hawai`i Featured Through the LOB .....................................................................................29 Figure 13: Detailed BRM and Business Functions within the LOBs ...................................................................................................30 Figure 14: LOB Leads, Participants, and Stakeholders..........................................................................................................................31 Figure 15: SRM Relationship to LOB Business Functions with the Added Dimensions of Enterprise Services.......................32 Figure 16: PRM Line of Sight from Input to Business Outcome ...........................................................................................................32 Figure 17: EBA Future State Vision.............................................................................................................................................................33 Figure 18: Business Transformation Strategies Required to Achieve the Future State EBA ........................................................34 Figure 19: Information Management Continuum ....................................................................................................................................37 Figure 20: Purpose and Role of the Future State EIA .............................................................................................................................38 Figure 21: The Future State Vision for Information Management and Usage in the State of Hawai`i ........................................39 Figure 22: Example Protocols for the Semantic Web from W3C .........................................................................................................40 Figure 23: Focus Areas of the Enterprise Information Architecture...................................................................................................41 Figure 24: LOBs Providing Support Externally Subject Area Diagram ...............................................................................................43 Figure 25: Representative View Support Area LOB Subject Area Diagram .....................................................................................44 Figure 26: Future State Vision for ESA.......................................................................................................................................................51 Figure 27: Current State ETA........................................................................................................................................................................73 Figure 28: ETA Future State Vision for Hawai`i ........................................................................................................................................77 Figure 29: Future State Vision for the ITSM Model ................................................................................................................................80 Figure 30: Roadmap for Achieving Future State ITSM ..........................................................................................................................87 Figure 31: Technology Architectural Domains and Sub-Domains for the State of Hawai`i ..........................................................88 Figure 32: Data Center Future State View ................................................................................................................................................90 Figure 33: Cloud Computing Paradigm ......................................................................................................................................................93 Figure 34: Proposed Cloud Computing Framework for the State of Hawai`i ....................................................................................94 Figure 35: Notional View of Cloud Computing Framework ...................................................................................................................96 Figure 36: Notional View of a Multi-Site Data Center Disaster Recovery Environment ................................................................97 Figure 37: Notional Representation of Data Center Storage (Gartner Developed) .........................................................................98 Figure 38: Roadmap to Achieve the Future State for the Infrastructure Domain ......................................................................... 112 Figure 39: Conceptual Model of the Network Domain Infrastructure............................................................................................. 114 Figure 40: OneNet Future State Vision ................................................................................................................................................... 114 Figure 41: Shared Service Center Vision for the ETA .......................................................................................................................... 115 Figure 42: Roadmap for Achieving the Future State Network Domain ........................................................................................... 121 Figure 43: Virtual Desktop Migration ...................................................................................................................................................... 122 Figure 44: Secure Managed Services with Virtual Desktop ............................................................................................................. 123 Figure 45: Roadmap for Achieving the Future State of the End User Computing ......................................................................... 128 Figure 46: Notional View of the Future State of Communications ................................................................................................... 130 Figure 47: Collaboration-as-a-Service – An Essential Future State Element of ETA ................................................................... 131 Figure 48: Roadmap to Future State for the End User Domain ......................................................................................................... 137 Figure 49: Elements of Future State Software Development Environment .................................................................................... 141 Figure 50: Transition & Sequencing Plan to achieve Future State Software Development Environment .............................. 150 Figure 51: Future State Notional View of the Hybrid Cloud Security Architecture ...................................................................... 152
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Figure 52: Roadmap for Achieving Future State Vision for the Information Assurance and Privacy Domain (1 of 2).......... 163 Figure 53: Roadmap for Achieving Future State Vision for the Information Assurance and Privacy Domain (2 of 3).......... 164 Figure 54: T&S Process ............................................................................................................................................................................. 166 Figure 55: Investment Components......................................................................................................................................................... 167

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Current and Future State Summaries by Architectural Layer ..............................................................................................14 Table 2: Current State Information Sharing Assessment Results From Two Information Sharing Perspectives.....................37 Table 3: Solution or Applications Assessment Results .........................................................................................................................49 Table 4: Common Set of Specification Areas for Each Solution Pattern ...........................................................................................54 Table 5: Customer Management Services Domain Description .........................................................................................................55 Table 6: Business Management Services Domain Description ..........................................................................................................56 Table 7: Knowledge Management Services Domain Description ......................................................................................................57 Table 8: ERP Services Domain Description ..............................................................................................................................................58 Table 9: Service Management Services Domain Description .............................................................................................................60 Table 10: Data Management Services Domain Description ................................................................................................................61 Table 11: Analytical Services Domain Description.................................................................................................................................61 Table 12: Software Development and Integration Services Domain Description ...........................................................................63 Table 13: Security Management Services Domain Description..........................................................................................................63 Table 14: Collaboration Services Domain Description ..........................................................................................................................64 Table 15: Communication Services Domain Description ......................................................................................................................65 Table 16: Search Services Domain Description ......................................................................................................................................65 Table 17: Systems Management Services Domain Description .........................................................................................................66 Table 18: Opportunities for Flagship Projects to Lay Enterprise Foundations ..................................................................................67 Table 19: Solution Pattern Operating Levels Indicating Evolution of Adoption within the Enterprise.........................................69 Table 20: Services-Oriented Operating Levels indicating Evolution of Adoption within the Enterprise .....................................70 Table 21: Technical Architecture Domain/Sub-Domain and Current State of Technology Details .............................................74 Table 22: Future State ITSM Best Practices ............................................................................................................................................81 Table 23: ITSM Implementation Actions ...................................................................................................................................................82 Table 24: Key Criteria and Requirements for the State of Hawai’i Data Center ...............................................................................91 Table 25: Future State Characteristics for the Hosting, Cloud, and Data Centers ...........................................................................92 Table 26: Hosting, Cloud, and Data Center Sub-Domain Description.................................................................................................96 Table 27: Disaster Recovery Sub-Domain Description..........................................................................................................................98 Table 28: Servers and Storage Sub-Domain Description .....................................................................................................................99 Table 29: Directory Services Sub-Domain Description .........................................................................................................................99 Table 30: Enterprise Systems Management Sub-Domain Description........................................................................................... 100 Table 31: Server Closets, Server Rooms, and Data Centers by Department ................................................................................. 102 Table 32: Estimated Costs to Complete a Data Center Consolidation ............................................................................................. 103 Table 33: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Data Center Consolidation ............................................................................ 103 Table 34: Estimated Costs to Develop Secondary Data Center ........................................................................................................ 106 Table 35: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Secondary Data Center ................................................................................. 107 Table 36: Estimated Costs for Development of the Third Data Center ............................................................................................ 109
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Table 37: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Development of the Third Data Center....................................................... 109 Table 38: Estimated Costs to Perform Application Migration............................................................................................................ 111 Table 39: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Application Migration .................................................................................... 111 Table 40: Wired Sub-Domain Description ............................................................................................................................................. 116 Table 41: Wireless Sub-Domain Description ........................................................................................................................................ 117 Table 42: Radio Sub-Domain Description .............................................................................................................................................. 118 Table 43: Desktop, Laptop, and Mobile Sub-Domain Description.................................................................................................... 124 Table 44: User Productivity Software Sub-Domain Description....................................................................................................... 124 Table 45: User Presentation Sub-Domain Description ....................................................................................................................... 125 Table 46: Peripherals Sub-Domain Description ................................................................................................................................... 126 Table 47: Email and Collaboration Sub-Domain Description ............................................................................................................. 132 Table 48: Voice Sub-Domain Description .............................................................................................................................................. 132 Table 49: Video Sub-Domain Description .............................................................................................................................................. 133 Table 50: Broadcast Messaging Sub-Domain Description ............................................................................................................... 133 Table 51: Messaging and Social Media Sub-Domain Description .................................................................................................. 134 Table 52: Citizen Communication and Engagement Sub-Domain Description .............................................................................. 134 Table 53: Typical LAN Upgrade Costs..................................................................................................................................................... 135 Table 54: Digital Content Management Sub-Domain Description ................................................................................................... 138 Table 55: Document Management Sub-Domain Description ........................................................................................................... 139 Table 56: Data Management Sub-Domain Description ...................................................................................................................... 139 Table 57: Analytics Sub-Domain Description ....................................................................................................................................... 140 Table 58: GIS Sub-Domain Description .................................................................................................................................................. 140 Table 59: Application Development and Integration Sub-Domain Description ............................................................................ 145 Table 60: Client Server Applications Sub-Domain Description ........................................................................................................ 145 Table 61: Web Applications Sub-Domain Description........................................................................................................................ 146 Table 62: Mobile Applications Sub-Domain Description.................................................................................................................... 146 Table 63: SWOT for Information Assurance and Privacy Domain ................................................................................................... 151 Table 64: Security Principles for the Future State ............................................................................................................................... 154 Table 65: Security Devices Sub-Domain Description ......................................................................................................................... 159 Table 66: Privacy Sub-Domain Description ........................................................................................................................................... 160

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
12 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This State of Hawai`i’s Enterprise Architecture (EA) document is an appendix to the Business Transformation and Information Technology (IT)/Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan. The purpose of the EA is to describe the To Be or future state EA that will guide information technology (IT) architectural directions and decisions within the State from this point forward. The EA defines the current state but focuses on the future state vision for each EA element or layer (business architecture, information architecture, solutions architecture, and technology architecture). In addition, the EA includes a strategic roadmap (Transition and Sequencing [T&S] Plan) of projects and initiatives that will close the gaps between the current state and future state vision. The T&S plan elements are described for each layer of the EA and for the State’s lines of business (LOB) and provides details relative to the: governments, other offices and entities, business partners, and the Federal government). This description includes the goals for the enterprise, business processes, roles, organizational elements or business alignment, business information, solutions or software applications and computer systems, and the IT infrastructure that supports the environment. Each of the EA layers is defined by taxonomies, diagrams, documents, and models to describe the components and their logical organization of business functions, business capabilities, business processes, people organization, information resources, business systems, software applications, computing capabilities, and the information exchange and communications infrastructure within the enterprise. These are presented in an ever increasing level of detail in an effort to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the State through:
• •

an improved organizational structure for service delivery, the integration/centralization or distribution of business processes, quality, availability, and timeliness of business information, that IT investments are aligned and justified.

• the

1. ongoing and planned investments and projects that will address the transition between the As Is and To Be states; and, 2. strategic order or sequence of the defined investments or projects to achieve or move the State of Hawai`i closer to the future state vision over the next ten years. The EA for the State of Hawai`i is a comprehensive description of the enterprise or all IT components of the State (each Department or more specifically each LOB) and the relationships of these components with one another (e.g., services delivered internally and services delivered to residents) as well as the relationships with external entities (e.g., the city and county

• ensuring

The EA is a living document and will be reviewed at least annually and updated in order to incorporate new technology advancements, as appropriate, and account for the changing needs of the State and especially the changing needs of the LOBs. The population of an EA tool, while underway, will require significant attention to ensure all information associated with the current environment is captured. The T&S Plan in particular will require continual update to account for new initiatives and projects.

Line of Business (LOB) is an approach for defining the activities performed and services provided within the enterprise. The LOBs are subdivided into Enterprise Mission Support Services that are citizen-facing services and Enterprise Common Support Service Areas that are provided internally to support the mission service delivery areas. The LOB is a critical entity for organizing business operations of the State from a functional perspective independent of the Departments, attached agencies, or programs that perform them in order to promote collaboration across the Departments to bring cross-cutting transformation. The LOBs are used in organizing all stewardship/leadership responsibilities for business service/process performance, information quality and availability, and information system functionality, usability, and integration.
1

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | 13

The foundation for EA is the State’s strategy for business transformation. This transformation is defined as part of the New Day Plan and identifies three key elements:

immediate job growth as Hawai’i’s economy is shifted to a sustainable foundation,

businesses, cities, counties, State employees, State government, business partners) in a manner they want/need; and operating in an aligned, streamlined, and integrated manner so that stakeholders’ service expectations and information needs are met in terms of quality, timeliness, reliability, and transparency. The current state environment for the State of Hawai`i was characterized in the Final Report published in 2011 and the key elements are identified by architectural layer in Table 1. In the future, each of the items identified for the current state architectural layers must undergo a transformation in order for the State of Hawai`i to more effectively and efficiently deliver services to people of Hawai`i, the citizens, and other stakeholders. The transformation will occur by addressing every action and activity (e.g., business processes, IT investment decisions, information use and utility, taking advantage of new less expensive hardware, software, and data management solutions) from an enterprise perspective. A summary of the future state vision by architectural layer is also summarized in Table 1.

invest in the education, skills, and well-being of Hawai’i’s people, and
• •

transform State government into an efficient and effective enterprise. Stated another way the strategy for transformation includes ensuring that State government is cost-effectively and efficiently managing all resources (e.g., investments, revenues, employees, IT) and delivering services and programs to all stakeholders (e.g., people of Hawai`i, citizens, residents,

Table 1: Current and Future State Summaries by Architectural Layer

Current State by Architectural Layer

Future State by Architectural Layer

Enterprise Business Architecture (EBA) - organized in a siloed, bottom-up approach with only pockets of Departments actually having or practicing EBA and primarily evolved due to the manner in which funding is provided at the program level and by default for IT.

Enterprise Business Architecture (EBA) - composed of a series of integrated value streams across the State’s Departments that can be further developed by LOB and by reference models. By using LOB and reference models to define the enterprise moves or transitions the State away from the siloed approach of functional processes and disconnected IT projects to an integrated environment Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA) – characterized by information and data that are recognized/acknowledged by everyone as a statewide asset and are managed and shared effectively among all State organizations Enterprise Solution Architecture (ESA) – features a dynamic mobile integration architecture that responds rapidly to change and delivers quality information from trusted sources to all stakeholders.

Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA) – characterized by a general lack of information sharing across Departments and organizations within the State even though some exceptions exist.

Enterprise Solution Architecture (ESA) - characterized by: few, true statewide solutions; large numbers of Department-specific applications have proliferated within the State; and, need to “right-size” the State’s applications portfolio.

Enterprise Technology Architecture (ETA) - decentralized because the technical infrastructure supports a very fragmented ESA and EIA.

Enterprise Technology Architecture (ETA) – enables rapid deployment of new services to LOBs, employees, and residents and fully supports the EBA, EIA, and ESA.

14 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture

As the current state was analyzed and the future state was defined, a number of high priority transition projects or initiatives were identified across the four architectural layers. Figure 1 identifies each of the priority items and its associated architecture layer(s). The business services provided within each LOB scope are also defined within the EA in terms of the future state vision for a comprehensive IT solutions architecture to deliver all required business services and functions and the investment initiatives required to achieve the targeted future state for each of the LOB segments is also included provided.
Figure 1: Priority Transition and Sequencing Activities

Of particular note, this version of the EA for the State of Hawai`i has addressed business analysis and planning at two levels: 1) the state-wide enterprise which established the LOBs, and 2) the individual LOB business segment architectures and two priority segments Health IT and the ERP. The primary accomplishment of this planning function and all associated meetings with LOB leads has been the building of cultural momentum for enterprise solutions and consolidated investment planning. Additional opportunities will exist in the years ahead for specific LOB Business Segments to be analyzed in more detail to expand and provide additional architectural detail to other priority areas. The LOBs, Health IT, and the ERP business segments are included in Appendix A – Line of Business Segment Architecture Transformation. The projects and initiatives required

to move the State from the current to the future state environment for each EA layer and by LOB are described at a high level as part of the T&S planning summaries by architectural layer and in Appendix A. Each project and initiative is then further described as a business case and with budgetary detail (i.e., description of specific activities and tasks associated with the initiative or activity; hours to perform the task by fiscal year; labor costs; equipment and hardware costs; estimated lease costs, and any other associated costs) as part of an Appendix B – Project Charters. This document is intended for IT practitioners to use when planning technology directions (i.e., development, modernization, enhancement (D/M/E); operations and maintenance (O&M) of existing technology/steady state (SS); or retirement) within the LOB

and Departments. The document also supports the evaluation of technology reviews/requests/approvals by the Chief Information Officer (CIO), Office of Information Management and Technology (OIMT), Department leadership and IT management, Executive Leadership Council (ELC), and CIO Council (CIOC) and IT Steering Committee.

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1.0

INTRODUCTION
Enterprise Architecture

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1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.1 PURPOSE 1.3 DOCUMENT OVERVIEW
The purpose of the State of Hawai`i’s Enterprise Architecture (EA) document is to describe the To Be or future state EA that will be guide information technology (IT) architectural decisions within the State from this point, and provide a strategic roadmap (Transition and Sequencing [T&S] Plan) to close the gaps between the As Is or current state and the To Be vision. This document is an appendix to the Business Transformation and Information Technology (IT)/Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan. The EA for the State of Hawai`i is a comprehensive description of the enterprise or all IT components of the State (each Department or more specifically each LOB) and the relationships of these components with one another (e.g., services delivered internally and services delivered to residents) as well as the relationships with external entities (e.g., the city and county governments, other offices and entities, business partners, and the Federal government). This description includes the goals for the enterprise, business processes, roles, organizational elements or business alignment, business information, solutions or software applications and computer systems, and the IT infrastructure that supports the environment. Each of these components is defined in terms of the As Is and To Be state. Taxonomies, diagrams, documents, and models are included to describe the components and their logical organization of business functions, business capabilities, business processes, people organization, information resources, business systems, software applications, computing capabilities, and the information exchange and communications infrastructure within the enterprise. These are presented in an ever increasing level of detail in an effort to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the State through:
• •

1.2

SCOPE

The EA for the State of Hawai`i includes a description of the current or As Is state as well as the future or To Be state for each EA element or layer (business architecture, information architecture, solutions architecture, and technology architecture). In addition, a transition and sequencing (T&S) plan has been developed and is included for each layer of the EA and the State’s lines of business (LOB). The T&S Plan provides details relative to the: 1. ongoing and planned investments and projects that will address the transition between the As Is and To Be states; and, 2. strategic order or sequence of the defined investments or projects to achieve or move the State of Hawai`i closer to the future state vision over the next ten years.

an improved organizational structure for service delivery, the integration/centralization or distribution of business processes, the quality, availability, and timeliness of business information, and ensuring that IT investments are aligned and justified.

This document also describes the gap closure activities or transition projects, through a T&S Plan, that are required to move the current or As Is state of the EA (and its four layers) to the To Be or future state EA. Further, these gap closure activities are sequenced in terms of timing and dependencies. The creation of the EA has been facilitated by engaging stakeholders (i.e., Departmental CIOs, IT managers, business entities within Hawai`i, citizens, residents, business partners, other governmental entities) in the development and review of each component. This engagement has validated the As Is state and ensured the To Be vision is aligned with and responsive to the needs of the enterprise or State going forward.

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The EA is a living document that will be maintained and updated at least annually and more frequently (depicted in Figure 2), as required. The intended audience for this document is any individual involved in decision making about IT within the State including the Chief Information Officer (CIO), Office of Information Management and Technology (OIMT), Department leadership and IT management, Executive Leadership Council (ELC), and CIO Council (CIOC) and IT Steering Committee. This document along with the EA Methodology is appendices to the Business Transformation and Information Technology (IT) Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan.
2

Figure 2: Evolution of the EA for the State

Line of Business (LOB) is an approach for defining the activities performed and services provided within the enterprise. The LOBs are subdivided into Enterprise Mission Support Services that are citizen-facing services and Enterprise Common Support Service Areas that are provided internally to support the mission service delivery areas. The LOB is a critical entity for organizing business operations of the State from a functional perspective independent of the Departments, attached agencies, or programs that perform them in order to promote collaboration across the Departments to bring cross-cutting transformation. The LOBs are used in organizing all stewardship/leadership responsibilities for business service/process performance, information quality and availability, and information system functionality, usability, and integration.

1.4

ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS
• Federal Segment Architecture Methodology (FSAM) • Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA), Business Reference

The associated documents listed below are those documents referenced by or related to this document. This includes guidance from State entities as well as reference documents from the Federal and other State governments.
• State of Hawai`i, Business Transformation Strategy and IT/

Model (BRM)
• State of Hawai`i, Business Process Reengineering (BPR)

IRM Strategic Plan, 2012 (referred to hereafter as the “Strategic Plan”)
• State of Hawai`i, Governance Methodology and Organizational

Methodology, 2012
• OIMT, Project Management Methodology, 2012 • State of Hawai`i , Administrative Directive Number 11-02, 2011 • DOH Business Services and Data Systems Service Oriented

Charters, 2012
• State of Hawai`i, Portfolio Management (PfM) Methodology, 2012 • State of Hawai`i, Enterprise Architecture (EA) Methodology, 2012 • OIMT, Project Management Methodology, 2012 • Baseline of Information Management and Technology and

Architecture (SOA) Diagrams and the Public Health Domain Matrix for IT Systems and Initiatives
• World Wide Web Consortium, http://www.w3.org/2001/sw/

Comprehensive View of State Services (known hereafter as the “Final Report”) prepared by SAIC

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2.0 BUSINESS AND IT/IRM GOALS AND STRATEGIES AND THE ROLE OF EA
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2.0 BUSINESS AND IT/IRM GOALS AND STRATEGIES AND THE ROLE OF EA
In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, the State of Hawai’i embarked on a significant journey to bring about dramatic business and IT transformation to improve efficiency, streamline government processes, and enhance service delivery to constituents. Key initial actions were the hiring of a CIO, the appointment of a Business Transformation Executive, and the establishment of OIMT. These executives and this organization were given the mandate to lead the overall transformation. In addition, the CIO was tasked by the Legislature to create the State’s Strategic Plan. To support the implementation of the Strategic Plan, the need for an EA and its implementation as a practice was identified in order to give structure and direction to the IT transformation efforts.

2.1 GOALS OF ENTERPRISE TRANSFORMATION
The foundation for EA is the State’s strategy for business transformation. This transformation is defined as part of the New Day Plan and identifies three key elements:
• immediate job growth as Hawai’i’s

To achieve business transformation a set of goals or business outcomes have been defined along with supporting information resource management (IRM) and IT goals. Each of these is discussed in detail in the Strategic Plan and is summarized in Figure 3.

economy is shifted to a sustainable foundation,
• invest in the education, skills, and

wellbeing of Hawai’i’s people, and
• transform State government into an

efficient and effective enterprise Stated another way the strategy for transformation includes:
• ensuring that State government is cost

effectively and efficiently managing all resources (e.g., investments, revenues, employees, IT) and delivering services and programs to all stakeholders (e.g., people of Hawai`i , citizens, residents, businesses, cities, counties, State employees, State government, business partners) in a manner they want/need; and
• operating in an aligned, streamlined,

Figure 3: Business and IT/IRM Transformatin Vision for the State of Hawai`i

and integrated manner so that stakeholders’ service expectations and information needs are met in terms of quality, timeliness, reliability, and transparency.

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2.2

STRATEGIES FOR ENTERPRISE TRANSFORMATION

ITo achieve the enterprise transformation goals, a number of strategies have been defined as part of the Strategic Plan. These strategies are aligned to each business transformation and IRM/IT goal. Figure 4 highlights these strategies for achieving the defined transformation goals.

Figure 4: Business and IT/IRM Transformation Strategy for the State of Hawai`i

2.3 THE ROLE OF ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE
With the foundation of EA established by the business transformation and IRM/IT goals and strategies, the role of EA is to describe the As Is and to define the To Be architecture for the enterprise from

four perspectives or architectural layers: business, information, solution, and technical. Figure 5 illustrates the elements of the EA practice. The EA also serves as the recipe for aligning resources to improve business performance and helps the State and each Department better execute their

core missions. In addition the EA defines a plan for transitioning from the current state to the desired future state. The State of Hawai`i, Enterprise Architecture Methodology describes the role and elements of EA in greater detail. To summarize, Figure 5 illustrates the EA practice as it is defined for the State of Hawai`i.

Figure 5: State of Hawai`i EA Practice

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3.0 STATE OF HAWAI`I EA

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3.0 STATE OF HAWAI`I EA
3.1 CONTEXT FOR THE EA WITHIN THE STATE OF HAWAI`I’S GOVERNMENT TRANSFORMATION
The EA helps organize, prioritize, achieve the future state for the IT environment, and then supports the management of the IT environment going forward. For the enterprise to achieve desired transformation or operational improvements, the EA must be fully integrated with the other elements, functions, activities, or practice areas. These related elements (annotated by number in Figure 6) include: 1. The management and oversight function that provides a governance structure/process that oversees all related business transformation activities, IT investments, and projects to ensure they achieve desired results. 2. The Strategic Plan that establishes the overarching goals, strategies, objectives, and performance measures for the transformation and drives the requirements for the EA. 3. The EA and projects, defined within the T&S Plan that are approved, funded, and initiated within the proposed sequence and timeframes. These include Business Process Reengineering (BPR) projects identified to streamline current business processes, and system and technology development implementation projects – categorized as Triage projects to address immediate needs; Pilot projects to pilot new enterprise capabilities; or Major Initiative Support projects to establish enterprise systems or technologies. 4. Portfolio Management (PfM) practice as the comprehensive inventory of all IT investments. Figure 6 provides an overview of this integration and other functions, practice, or program areas.

Figure 6: EA Practice Context for the State of Hawai`i

Finally, once specific projects are initiated, the EA future state guidance in the information, solutions, and technical architecture layers is used as a crosswalk to the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) within the context of an EA governance and change management process.

3.2

CURRENT STATE EA SUMMARY

The current state or As Is environment for the State of Hawai`i is characterized in the Final Report published in 2011 and is further described in the remainder this document. As a summary of the current state, the following provides a high-level summary of the As Is for each architectural layer:
• Enterprise Business Architecture (EBA) - organized in a siloed, bottom-up approach

with only pockets of Departments actually having or practicing EBA and primarily evolved due to the manner in which funding is provided at the program level and by default for IT.
• Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA) – characterized by a general lack of

information sharing across Departments and organizations within the State even though some exceptions exist.
• Enterprise Solution Architecture (ESA) - characterized by: few, true statewide

solutions; large numbers of Department-specific applications have proliferated within the State; and, need to “right-size” the State’s applications portfolio.
• Enterprise Technology Architecture (ETA) - decentralized because the technical

infrastructure supports a very fragmented ESA and EIA.

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A cornerstone of any EA program is an EA and Portfolio Management (PfM) integrated tool suite and an EA Repository. These tools will contain details regarding each of the current application software solutions and planned investments. The EA Repository will be the common information store for all digital data and content behind the EA program. The baseline of the “As Is” or current state was initially populated in an Enterprise Alignment Database (EAD). The EAD currently contains detailed information regarding the State’s over 200 business services, over 700 application software systems, server inventory of the three data centers and over 20 server rooms, and approximately 6400 different technology product types used within the State. Currently, a new EA and PfM tool suite is being acquired and implemented for the State, and all baseline data will be moved into a new EA repository database. This tool suite and integrated repository will provide a foundation for all future planning and system and technology investment decisions. The information made available via the tool suite will support making informed decisions regarding how to manage and move IT forward in the State through the:
• analysis of options relative to IT transformation activities; • development of the strategic plan;

• definition of a governance approach; • creation of training plans for staff; • resourcing of projects; and, • identifying and prioritizing IT investments.

3.4

FUTURE STATE EA SUMMARY

• Enterprise Information Architecture

• By 2015, 35% of enterprise IT expenditures

In the future, each of the items identified for the current state must undergo a transformation in order for the State of Hawai`i to more effectively and efficiently deliver services to its constituents. The transformation will be carried out by addressing every action and activity (e.g., business processes, IT investment decisions, information use and utility, taking advantage of new less expensive hardware, software, and data management solutions) from an enterprise perspective. As a summary of the future state, the following provides insight into the To Be vision for each architectural layer:
• Enterprise Business Architecture (EBA)

(EIA) – characterized by information and data that are recognized acknowledged by everyone as a statewide asset and are managed and shared effectively among all State organizations.
• Enterprise Solution Architecture (ESA)

for most organizations will be managed outside the IT department’s budget.
• Through 2015, more than 85% of

Fortune 500 organizations will fail to effectively exploit big data for competitive advantage.

– features a dynamic mobile integration architecture that responds rapidly to change and delivers quality information from trusted sources to all stakeholders.
• Enterprise Technology Architecture

(ETA) – enables rapid deployment of new services to LOBs, employees, and residents and fully supports the EBA, EIA, and ESA. The future state vision described by the previous list is supported by Gartner’s most recent list of the four forces that are shaping the future of IT (Figure 7) and within their four top predictions:
• By 2015, mobile application

- composed of a series of integrated value streams across the State’s Departments that can be further developed by LOB and by reference models. By using LOB and reference models to define the enterprise moves or transitions the State away from the siloed approach of functional processes and disconnected IT projects to an integrated environment.

Figure 7: Gartner’s Key Forces that IT are Shaping IT

Figure 1: Gartner’s Key Forces that are Shaping

development (AD) projects targeting smartphones and tablets will outnumber native PC projects by a ratio of 4-to-1.

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3.5 TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLAN SUMMARY
As the current state was analyzed and the future state was defined, a number of high priority transition projects or initiatives were identified across the four architectural layers. Figure 8 identifies each of the priority items and its associated architecture layer (s).

Figure 8: Priority Transition and Sequencing Activities

Figure 9 illustrates the future state EA and the priority items associated with each EA layer.

Figure 9: State of Hawai`i Future State Enterprise Architecture.

The following sections describe the EA for the State of Hawai`i within the four architectural layers. For each layer the current state is described and the target future state is defined. Additional supporting detail regarding the architectures is maintained in the State’s EA repository. These priority items are discussed throughout the EA and are highlighted by the assigned icons identified in Figure 8.

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4.0 ENTERPRISE BUSINESS ARCHITECTURE (EBA)

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4.0 ENTERPRISE BUSINESS ARCHITECTURE (EBA)
The Enterprise Business Architecture (EBA) is essentially a model of the components within the State that enable the execution of its mission. Key concepts modeled within the EBA or the characteristics of the EBA’s structure include:
• Business processes (i.e., value streams or value chains) that

create business outcomes.
• Business outcomes that are organized and managed as Lines

of Business (LOB) that involve both services to end customers (i.e. residents) and services provided internally as enabling or supporting the service delivery to residents.
• Business functions and sub-functions that further

define the LOBs.
• Organizations, governance formality, and the interaction of the

organizations responsible for executing business processes and creation of business outcomes.
• Business outcomes and value chains which are measurable

The following sections describe the As Is or current state, the To Be or future state, and the activities or projects required to close the gaps for the EBA.

through delivered value or quality or throughput.

4.1 EBA CURRENT STATE
The current state of the EBA for the State of Hawai`i is organized in a siloed, bottom-up fashion with only a few Departments actually having or practicing EBA. This current state has evolved primarily due to the manner in which funding is provided for programs. The Departments with larger overall funding also have a larger percentage of funding to dedicate to IT and IT maturity. Larger organizations, usually referred to as the “haves”, such as the Department of Education and Department of Health, are in this category. IT funding is often tied to an external program from a federal or special project, Departments with large exposure to federal funding are more likely to have some type of EBA. While the Departmental EBAs might not be considered “formal”, they do reflect many of the characteristics of a working EBA. Given the disjointed nature of federal funding to a State as well as special projects often the resulting EBA and related IT spending does not take the holistic view that a mature EBA would provide.

Another factor associated with the current state of the EBA, is the fact that the State has not (until July 2011) had a dedicated CIO or a chartered and tiered governance process. While the larger Departments such as Education and Health have a Departmental CIO and some remnants governance, the interactions and opportunities to work in a single strategic direction across the State have been limited. This lack of a State CIO and governance has led to a lack of a single vision for the State’s IT organizations to move towards. To offset the siloed and high variability in IT maturity the resulting business architecture from an organizational view has historically been managed by each Department through their Administrative Services Office (ASO). The ASOs in turn have worked to minimize or overcome the lack of an enterprise approach relative to: How business is conducted and services are delivered effectively and efficiently within the State (i.e., EBA),
• How information is required and shared

• How IT solutions and their supporting

infrastructure technology is planned, funded, created, integrated, deployed, maintained, and retired to maximize business outcomes (i.e., ESA and ETA). The lack of a statewide EBA has resulted in systems and processes that are not compatible and this often leads to manual entry, data errors, delays in service, duplicative systems and infrastructure, and aging technology that translates to escalated overall IT costs for the State. While many Departments feel they may be optimizing their IT spending it has been shown that this lack of an enterprise view provided by the EBA leads to greater overall IT spending for the State. Figure 10 illustrates the disjointed, inefficient, cost heavy, and fragmented service delivery environment across the State.

across the State (i.e., EIA), and

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Figure 10: Current State EBA

4.2 EBA FUTURE STATE
The defined future state of the EBA is composed of a series of integrated value streams across the State’s Departments that can be further developed by LOB and State of Hawai`i tailored reference models. By using LOB and tailored reference models to define the enterprise, the State will be positioned to move in an organized manner away from the siloed approach of repetitive processes, duplicated information, and nonintegrated IT solutions and infrastructure or technology. The EBA future state, depicted in Figure 11, provides a view of:
• LOBs that provide support services externally to

• quantitative indicators, defined within the Performance

Reference Model (PRM), to help determine what success means in the future state and whether the State is achieving success or not. The following sections discuss the BRM, SRM, and PRM in more detail.

residents and other stakeholders and the LOBs that provide required support to the mission delivery LOBs; defined within the Business Reference Model (BRM);
• cross-cutting or enterprise solutions that are

required for the State to more effectively provide services and conduct business defined within the Service Reference Model (SRM); and

Figure 11: BRM, SRM, and PRM Components of the EBA 28 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture

4.2.1 BUSINESS REFERENCE MODEL (BRM)
The BRM is the first step in: 1. identifying the opportunities for horizontal integration of IT based on mission support to residents and common services that support mission delivery, 2. improving the management of technology investments for the entire State using an enterprise portfolio perspective for selection of IT spending, and 3. providing a critical building block in defining the complete EA. The BRM provides an organized, hierarchical construct for describing the day-to-day business of the State of Hawai`i’s Executive Branch. While many tools exist for describing organizational constructs - organization charts, location maps, etc. – the BRM represents the business or services performed by Departments from a functional perspective. The various functional perspectives are outlined as individual LOBs with further detail given as sub-functions or services of each individual LOB. The BRM represents the link between the LOB and the final recipient of the LOBs’ services. This is the beginning point for the value chain development for the State and is a representation of how the business of the State is performed functionally. Figure 13 represents a summary and detailed level a representation of the BRM and business functions within each LOB. While many of the LOBs identified in Figure 13 correlate directly to a Department within the State, the LOB is not intended to represent a single Department. In most cases, a LOB will have business functions that are shared across multiple Departments. For example, the LOB for public health includes many of the business functions provided by the Department of Health (DOH) for the State, many of these functions for public health are shared with other Departments such as the Department of Education (DOE) which is responsible for the health of students while attending school. This is an example of how a single Department within the State is identified and designated as the lead for the LOB for public health while other Departments within the State are identified as being a LOB participant while still others are designated as stakeholders in the policy and other activities the LOB provides. The public

Figure 12: Value Chain for the State of Hawai`i Featured Through the LOB

The State’s EBA and its accompanying newly defined BRM is the first layer of the State’s EA and it is where analysis starts for other layers of the EA in terms of information, service components, solutions, and technology. Figure 12 depicts the BRM from a summary perspective and defines the high level business outcomes or value chain for the State as a whole. Additional definitions and details regarding each of the functions and sub-functions and functional interfaces or dependencies within these business services will ultimately be documented in the EA repository.

health example also illustrates how the BRM’s enterprise view supports the business of government and supports the integration of IT. Without the BRM view, the value chain that delivers public health services to the residents of Hawai`i would be narrower and lose the perspective of the LOB participants and stakeholders.

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Figure 13: Detailed BRM and Business Functions within the LOBs

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Figure 14: LOB Leads, Participants, and Stakeholders

Figure 14 depicts LOB lead with an identified Department, the relationships of other Departments with the LOB, and also the stakeholders for a LOB. The boxes marked as bright green depict Department that has been designated as the LOB lead with yellow shading indicating the Department(s) interest or information needs in the LOB (LOB participant). Blue indicates stakeholders for the LOB by Department.

or cross-cutting SRM services are translated into shared or common enterprise services; following an “everything is a service” paradigm which is explained further below. The SRM is a critical piece of the State’s EA due to the common services and activities associated with the SRM. These common activities and processes are where IT for the State will focus development efforts for common information, common data, common technology, and common infrastructure. It is in the SRM that IT investment has the highest Return on Investment and provides the greatest impact to automation of State services and processes. The SRM is where investment of IT starts for the State’s CIO.

4.2.2 SERVICE REFERENCE MODEL (SRM)
The next element of the future state EBA represents the enterprise services (those required across the State) and will be a key component to any direction for and investment in IT for the State and its Departments or LOBs. Enterprise services represent a business-driven approach for classifying the required business functions that are common across multiple LOBs (e.g., those functions described in EBA current state as being performed by the ASOs in each Department). These enterprise services are described in the Service Reference Model (SRM) and represent horizontal service components that span across multiple LOBs. Figure 15 depicts how the SRM and specifically the enterprise services relate horizontally to the LOBs. The SRM is organized across horizontal service areas (independent of the business functions) and provides a leverage-able foundation for reuse of information, applications, or solution components, and technologies. The BRM and SRM components are rolled forward into the ESA and further detailed. All BRM functional components are translated into LOB services within the ESA, and the horizontal

4.2.3 PERFORMANCE REFERENCE MANAGEMENT (PRM)
The PRM is designed to clearly identify and illustrate the cause-and-effect relationship or “line of sight” between inputs, outputs, and outcomes. PRM is built upon “line of sight” relationships and is critical for the executive leadership, IT management, project managers, and other key stakeholders to understand how, and to what extent key inputs enable progress toward desired business outcomes regarding mission achievement and delivery of services to residents. The PRM captures and reports, based on the “line of sight”, how value is created for each LOB as inputs impact outcomes. Guiding the entire PRM are the

Figure 16: PRM Line of Sight from Input to Business Outcome

“strategic outcomes” identified in the New Day Plan, Strategic Plan, and the Departments’ Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) and both are illustrated in Figure 16.

Figure 15: SRM Relationship to LOB Business Functions with the Added Dimensions of Enterprise Services

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Figure 17: EBA Future State Vision

The following areas define the PRM focus for the State of Hawai`i :
• Mission and Business Results Measurements - captures

the outputs Departments’ outcomes the State seeks to achieve. These measures commonly include New Day Plan directives, Strategic Plan strategies, and Departmental and Program MoE.
• Functional Effectiveness - captures how well a

These measures will be captured and communicated as part of an electronic dashboard to track and the outcomes will be monitored. These outcomes provide the indicators as to how well IT is supporting and enhancing the ability of LOB’s to accomplish their mission. For times when the performance of an LOB increases the changes made should be leveraged across other LOB’s to achieve similar results. In cases where a performance indicator decreases the change should be reversed. The PRM is critical in defining performance in a timely manner that allows for rapid and accurate decision making by the various IT governance committees. The composite view of the future state EBA is provided in Figure 17.

Department, LOB, program, or specific process is serving its identified user base/constituents. These measures commonly revolve around constituent benefit, service quality, service accessibility, etc.
• Process and Activity Indicators - consists of

outputs directly from the process supported by an IT investment. These measures commonly revolve around productivity, financial management etc.
• Technology - captures performance directly related to

the technology investment. These measures commonly involve cost, quality assurance, information and data availability, and reliability.
• Human Capital Management - related to the ability

of a Department to have the right people with the right skills in the right positions. This measurement area will be developed in accordance with bargaining unit rules to determine true effectiveness.

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4.3 EBA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING (T&S) PLANNING SUMMARY
The T&S Plan for the EBA is focused on areas that are not inherently technical in nature, but instead on areas such as organization of IT staff, process steps, development of meaningful measures and looking in to the future of IT trends. T&S Plan elements associated with the EBA start with alignment to the goals and standards established for business transformation and IT is depicted in Figure 18. The advantage to the EBA T&S activities is that many of these areas will be worked in parallel with emphasis not on the urgent and immediate actions but on strategic and long-term activities. The T&S goals associated with the EBA and also derived from the Strategic Plan have implications for the EIA, ESA, and ETA. The EBA transitioning and sequencing initiatives include the following:

Figure 18: Business Transformation Strategies Required to Achieve the Future State EBA

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4.3.1 REENGINEER ADMINISTRATION OPERATIONAL FUNCTIONS
As noted in the current state, the ASOs work to minimize or overcome the lack of an enterprise approach relative to reengineering existing processes and implementing associated systems is required beginning with those having the highest immediate return on investment (ROI) enterprise-wide:
• Time and attendance reporting

4.3.3 UPGRADE THE IT INFRASTRUCTURE
The need to plan and upgrade the State of Hawai`i IT infrastructure and the facilities that house this infrastructure to support information needs was identified repeatedly as an overarching business need. This upgrade includes not only the retirement of existing hardware but also the creation of a disaster recovery environment.

4.3.6 SIMPLIFY AND SECURE INFORMATION GATHERING FROM CITIZENS
Identify the complete set of information required from citizens and business entities within the State, gathering once and enforce re-use by across the State. Address and resolve information management, privacy, and protection issues associated with the management and use of the identified information set

and tracking
• Department of Labor and Industrial

Relations unemployment distribution via checks
• Enterprise-wide document management

4.3.4 INFORMATION STEWARDS LEADS, PARTICIPANTS, AND STAKEHOLDERS
As an extension of the BRM and the identified LOBs identify and assign information stewards/leads, participants, and identify all stakeholders for each identified LOB for all data sets within the State.

4.3.7 ENSURE REQUIRED SERVICES ARE DELIVERED
Within each Department define all services defined by statute/act or administrative directive and crosswalk these requirements to actual services being performed. Based on service identification results, evaluate the effectiveness of the current organizational structure for the Executive Branch of State.

and tracking and records management
• Enterprise-wide legislative bill tracking

4.3.2 REPLACE THE EXISTING FINANCIAL AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SOLUTION
The Final Report as well as the analysis of the LOBs and Departmental reporting needs clearly identified the overwhelming need to plan, procure, and implement a new financial and business management solution that accommodates:
• revenue collection/accounts receivable

4.3.5 REMOVE BARRIERS TO INFORMATION SHARING
Identify and reengineer existing processes that inhibit information sharing within the State with priority on newly identified needs including:
• Patient Protection and Affordable Care

4.3.8 PROMOTE PROCESS REENGINEERING WITHIN THE STATE
While numerous processes will be improved via the implementation of new systems, many of the activities performed within the State are independent from IT solutions. For these independent processes (e.g., tax collections, tax return receipt and processing, job requisition processing) perform reengineering prioritized based on projected ROI within each Departments. The investment initiatives to accomplish these T&S goals are defined and further specified within the following sections of the EA that describe EIA, ESA, and ETA.

Act (PPACA) implementation
• Geographic Information System

[Department of Taxation (DOTAX) and other organizations with revolving funds]; accounting, procurement and acquisition;
• inventory management; accounts

(GIS information utility
• Longitudinal information • Death Records information • Business License information • Unpaid Business Tax information

payable including payroll and time and attendance reporting, [Department of Accounting and General Services (DAGS) and Department of Human Resources Development (DHRD)];
• budgetary planning and financial

management [Department of Budget and Finance (B&F)]

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5.0 ENTERPRISE INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE (EIA)
36 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture

5.0 ENTERPRISE INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE (EIA)
The overarching Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA) for the State of Hawai`i is described in this section. The EIA is discussed in terms of the current or As Is state of information management, the future state or To Be vision for information management, and in terms of the implications for actionable focus areas to be expanded in the gap closure or T&S Plan. The State’s Strategic Plan has as its primary vision the realization of a State government that is operating as a fully integrated enterprise. This was echoed in the future state vision for the EBA as well. This vision of full integration includes: 1. the streamlined and efficient operation of all business processes, 2. secure and reliable access to information anytime, anywhere, and to anyone who is authorized to see it, and 3. the effective delivery of information to all citizens, state employees, and other stakeholders using a state-of-the-art, highly optimized, and standardized technology infrastructure. Consequently, the information management objectives for the State cited in this architecture were developed to facilitate the realization of that vision. The continuum in Figure 19 depicts the progression in the discipline of information management. This progression takes an enterprise through management of data, to the management of information, to the end goal of managing knowledge. Each element in the progression must be mastered before taking
Figure 19: Information Management Continuum

the next step. With this in mind, the EIA has been defined to support the State of Hawai`i in this progression in order to achieve the future state vision.

5.1

EIA CURRENT STATE

The current state of information management was characterized as part of the Final Report and the lack of information sharing across Departments and organizations within the State was noted. The assessment surveyed critical information needs and information flows used in conducting the Department’s business and the corresponding critical information sources and databases. In assessing information management and data sharing across Departments (or across divisions or programs within Departments), there were several noted instances where systems were dedicated to making critical data available for analysis and decision making on a broader scale. Examples included the Financial Accounting Management Information System (FAMIS) data mart and the Department of Health’s (DOH) data warehouse. However, across the State these noted instances or examples were the exceptions not the rule, and the overarching findings related to information management indicated that within the State a data sharing culture a was not present. These findings are summarized in Table 2 and are presented from two different information sharing perspectives:
• Perspective 1: Effective use of information at the individual or

user level for analysis and decision making.
• Perspective 2: Application or system integration used to

support the streamlining and integration of business process.

Table 2: Current State Information Sharing Assessment Results From Two Information Sharing Perspectives

Information Sharing Perspective 1.1 Individual analysis and decision making perspective

Assessment/Question of Need Do people have access to the information they need to effectively do their jobs and make key decisions, and more specifically, do the key user communities of State workers, workgroups or project teams, management, and the public have the requisite access?

Findings
• Across the enterprise, the facilitation of end user access to data through a data mart

warehouse approach including ad-hoc query and reporting tools was not common.
• IT systems in legacy mainframe environments were not well positioned to facilitate

end user analysis and reporting to minimize the need for manual intervention by already overtaxed employees.
• State workers were found to rely heavily on the content and presentation of pre

programmed reports. The continual maintenance of these reports is expensive and the entire approach is often inadequate to address rapidly changing needs and requirements.
• Solutions provided explicitly for “making information available to a broad user

community” were sparse, indicating that the engineering of solutions to support this level of sharing is not an area of emphasis within the State’s Business or IT culture.
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Information Sharing Perspective 2.1 Application or system integration perspective

Assessment/Question of Need Do applications that support mission execution have access to information that they need that might exist outside their own internally maintained set of data?

Findings
• The State’s current management of data and data sharing is characterized

by numerous silos of data and information, and a large number of complex and interdependent data feeds.
• Where no actual data feeds exist, interfaces are often accomplished via the

printing of information from one system and manual re-entry of that same data into another system, resulting in the effective use of resources, introduction of errors, and unnecessary time lags. Examples include the fixed asset inventory, personnel benefits, and time and attendance processes.
• There are essentially no shared databases within or across Departments. The GIS

database is one notable exception.
• The poor level of data sharing and information management is likely the result of the

natural tendency of Departments to adapt and address their own data needs without the benefit of any statewide, enterprise-level policies, approaches, and solutions that encourage, facilitate, and enable application data integration and sharing.

5.2

EIA FUTURE STATE
Future State Vision by 2022:

State of Hawai`i Information Management

Information management is optimized and information capital effectively captures, uses, and transfers knowledge.

The future state design for the State’s information management practices is one where information and data are recognized/acknowledged by everyone as a statewide asset and are managed and shared effectively among all State organizations. As with any critical statewide asset, appropriate management processes and methodologies will be established to enable and facilitate sharing and reuse. The purpose and role (as depicted in Figure 20) of the future state EIA is to:
• acknowledge or bring visibility to the

Figure 20: Purpose and Role of the Future State EIA
• develop a common information/data

structure to facilitate sharing across systems and organizations.
• establish policies, responsibilities,

...of Data and Services, on Everything, for Everyone”. A major component of a Web 3.0 environment is the establishment of a semantic web. In such an environment the web not only provides a linkage to and presentation of documents and files to people but it also serves as a vehicle to link and present data in a computer interpretable format for direct consumption by software systems. Both individuals and programmatic constructs such as web services or computer applications can easily integrate or “mash up” any kind of data. This semantic web of data provides an environment in which data is not embedded within systems, but rather exists independently from them. In addition, differences in vocabularies and formats are essentially overcome and result in real and significant opportunities for data reuse.

and practices that ensure the on-going security of data and information from the three requisite security perspectives of confidentiality, integrity, and availability.

concept that information and data as a critical state asset.
• recognize the fact that a data or

5.2.1 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT AND USAGE
The future state vision for information management and usage within the State of Hawai`i includes the realization of a Web 3.0 environment as characterized by the World Wide Web Consortium, “Evolution toward one Web

information asset is something apart from and not embedded within or captive to information systems that might use it.
• encourage or promote the identification

of critical information and data that has a high potential for shared use;

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The realization of this vision requires a common information framework within the State that:
• Represents a disciplined environment

that prevents the creation of redundant information, ensures the integrity of an “item of information” at the time and point of origin, and channels any subsequent use or update of the item of information to its single authoritative storage location.
• Promotes blending of structured

data (e.g. data content in relational databases), with semi-structured data (e.g. data and messaging content in an email); and unstructured data (e.g. textual and graphical content in a document or web page) in a manner that make search and traversal across these information structures are transparent as possible
• Promotes a mature management

Figure 21: The Future State Vision for Information Management and Usage in the State of Hawai`i

discipline that ensures all data: is well-designed and structured consistent with the “real world objects” of the State government. These objects would include all those from the operational and subject domain data for State business services, and would include all critical dimensions such as time and geospatial data to fully support historical analysis of operations at a point in time or location, or that support any associated trending analysis; is appropriately stored, secured, and protected; and, has no unnecessary boundary that hides or impedes access for any authorized person or business process.
• Allows people and processes, whenever

a preeminent value as a critical State resource and by extension provides for a corresponding emphasis on supporting the information and data assets that underlie that knowledge. A mature knowledge management discipline will support the capture of all operational and subject domain knowledge and facilitate its effective use for educating, problem analysis, and decision making for all State management and staff.
• The operation of all the above with

for the linking of computer interpretable data. Key elements of the Semantic Web framework and the related evolution are described below and have considerable implications for the State of Hawai`i . Several of these are discussed below. XML (eXtensible Markup Language) is a foundational element or a scheme for providing a format for tagging metadata or describing the attributes of a “real world object”, such as the author of a Web page. Prior to emergence and adoption of XML, data was almost exclusively stored in database or file formats, where only one or a limited set of applications understood the structure and format of the data to make effective use of it.. XML provides a more or less universal self-describing data syntax that is both human readable (to an extent) and machine interpretable. Presenting data in an XML format does in fact support and improve upon the exchange and sharing of data – but that exchange and sharing is still largely only accomplished within a limited community of applications in a single problem domain that share and understand the semantics of the data described with the XML syntax. The emerging protocols and technologies associated with the Semantic Web provide the next evolutionary step as a standard approach for describing “resources” (the real world objects referred to above) from a semantic perspective, enabling an ability to link across resources from multiple domains and establishing and leveraging semantic relationships. The foundational protocol
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the assurance that all necessary policies ensure that the confidentiality and integrity of the information is achieved at all time. The future state vision for information management and usage in the State of Hawai`i is summarized in Figure 21. Two key features of the future state vision – the Semantic Web and knowledge management. These are described in more detail below.

practical, to search and relate data and information across multiple LOB without having to design and program that capability in advance or in other words, boundaries across applications and organizations will, to the extent practical, be non-existent.
• Includes a common or universal

information standardization and mapping capability built on real world objects in the State government. Standardization of this mapping capability will facilitate web enabled traversal among information sources much like we navigate among document links in the environment of today.
• Supports the inclusion of all appropriate

5.2.1.1 SEMANTIC WEB
Standards, protocols, languages, and methods that support the ten-year vision for the State’s EIA was established using numerous standards and protocols originally created by organizations such as the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). These standards and protocols enable an effective transformation of the Web from a vehicle for the linking of human interpretable document content to a vehicle that additionally provides

State data and information into a mature knowledge management system or discipline where knowledge is given

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

is the Resource Description Framework (RDF); the RDF and other related standards and protocols can be seen in Figure 22 below. These standards and protocols enable the meaning (semantics) of the data to be embedded with the data in a computer interpretable manner that supports a semantic linkage among the data – creating the aforementioned web of data as to opposed to the simpler web of documents. From the W3C “Semantic Web Activity” Web site (http://www. w3.org/2001/sw/): “The Semantic Web is about two things. It is about common formats for integration and combination of data drawn from diverse sources, where on the original Web mainly concentrated on the interchange of documents. It is also about language for recording how the data relates to real world objects. That allows a person, or a machine, to start off in one database, and then move through an unending set of databases which are connected not by wires but by being about the same thing.” Semantic web’s Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) as a query language for accessing data/databases in order to retrieve and manipulate data stored in RDF format. It is considered as one of the key technologies of semantic web. Making effective use of these new standards and protocols to achieve the benefits of data with embedded semantics will require the State to make a significant investment and to place a real emphasis on the support of a st requisite polices, practices and technologies. Figure 22 provides additional examples of the numerous protocols for the Semantic Web from W3C.

relevant tailored information needed within a specific problem domain. Going forward, business processes will systematically incorporate new insight and knowledge into operational processes, policies, and actions. Given that the people involved in a community of practice around a business service are constantly learning, the intent of knowledge management is that their experience and expertise is institutionalized. The community’s experience is organized into operational histories that facilitate the analysis of trends over time and the relevant impact of any significant event. Initial implementations of both the EA and the LOB Segment Architectures are planned for development during the second half of FY2012. Moving forward these architectures will be maintained and used as the “north star” guidance for achieving the desired integration of all information assets, systems, and technologies. Individual information system projects will obtain integration and standardization requirements from these architectures and will design and implement the target systems in compliance with the architectures.

5.2.1.2 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
Knowledge is the last element in the information continuum and knowledge management is the discipline that outlines the lifecycle process of identifying, capturing, organizing, and leveraging knowledge assets to improve overall performance and efficiency. Further as noted above in the discussion of the information sharing perspectives, knowledge management discipline is when individual experience, expertise, and insight is captured, standardized, and then transferred or shared with others. This discipline effectively supports the expansion of organizational insight and knowledge and will facilitate the achievement the future state vision for the State. To achieve this vision, the State’s knowledge management capabilities will have overcome the data and information overload phenomenon and will facilitate targeted access to the

State of Hawai`i Knowledge Management Future State Vision by 2022: The State of Hawai`i will be widely recognized and characterized as a knowledge-based organization where mature data and information management process that supports a cultural awareness regarding the preeminence of knowledge as an enterprise resource to be harnessed and reused at an advanced level of problem solving. It is expected that the State will be widely recognized and characterized as a knowledge-based organization.

Figure 22: Example Protocols for the Semantic Web from W3C 40 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture

5.2.2 EIA ELEMENTS
To support the utilization of the EIA within the State, three primary focus areas are defined: 1. The Common Information Framework—establishes the common goals, end objectives, strategies, policies, and guiding principles for definition and management of enterprise information. 2. The Conceptual Information Architecture—establishes a classification system through a subject area hierarchy of the State’s information assets to facilitate stewardship leadership boundaries and associated responsibilities; and, supports the identification of authoritative and duplicative information resources. 3. The Requirements for Information Delivery and Sharing establishes requirements for the Enterprise Solution and Technology Architectures to achieve the future state vision for the EIA. Figure 23 illustrates the three focus areas and their purpose.

As a result, the State of Hawai`i manages this important resource or asset in a manner that will:
• control the quality of information at the point of origin, • facilitate the sharing of information across the enterprise, • minimize redundant information, • provide the timeliness of information for the intended

purpose, and,
• ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data

in compliance with State and Federal regulations and laws. In this context, information is defined to include structured data (data maintained within computer databases), semi-structured data (email), and unstructured information (documents, images, web content, etc.). To achieve the future state relative to information as an enterprise resource, government operations within the State must be conducted within an open and transparent environment, enhancing the public trust and empowering citizens, State employees, and other stakeholders through access to information. There will be a thorough and strong classification approach to ensure that data and information that should be protected from dissemination by law or regulation will be “marked” and managed appropriately. (Note: The majority of State’s information is already public in nature and the future state environment provides greater availability and transparency by facilitating open access to all public information.)

Challenge Faced by the State Relative to Treating Information as an Enterprise Resource To discuss the treatment of information as an enterprise resource is direct and straightforward; however, moving from discussion to action will require a cultural change throughout the State and within the Departments in terms of how information is viewed, treated, and managed going forward. There are two significant challenges to effecting this cultural change. First, because data and information are inherently less tangible than hard IT assets (e.g., systems and infrastructure components that have very evident cost drivers) executives/managers often equate “data” and “data management” to “bits and bytes” that are addressed in the context of storage and server infrastructure. Information and data management must be viewed as separate from hard assets and stand on its own as a discipline to address the classification and management of data at level above that of storage management. Second, in some instances the value of information and data has been recognized and elevated, but the culture has allowed significant autonomy at the Department or program level but not at the enterprise level. The Departmental or program manager is often allowed to be entrenched as the “owner” of information and therefore controls data availability. In reality, it is often a struggle to achieve appropriate data availability within a Department, much less across Departments.

FigureFigure 1: Focus Areas of the Enterprise Information Architecture 23: Focus Areas of the Enterprise Information Architecture

The following sections provide additional insight into these three focus areas:

5.2.2.1 COMMON INFORMATION FRAMEWORK
The guiding principles for the State’s Common Information Framework, while outlined above, are expanded upon below. This framework provides the foundation for achieving the future state vision.

ENTERPRISE RESOURCE
The first order of importance is the recognition of data, information, and knowledge for the State of Hawai`i as a critical, valuable resource or asset that must be managed consistent with any other valued resource.

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KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
A streamlined and efficient operation of all business processes is enabled through effective access and use of information. It is the intent of the State of Hawai`i to achieve optimal business performance through integrated business functions and using enterprise information provided by common information repositories. These repositories will not be unnecessarily constrained by organizational (i.e., Department, Agency, Branch, Attached Office, or Program) boundaries. Key tenets regarding integration enablement include:
• The State of Hawai`i will manage

STEWARDSHIP/LEADERSHIP RESPONSIBILITY AND GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE
For the benefit of all internal and external stakeholders, management and oversight of common information assets, systems, and supporting technologies will be based on a stewardship/leadership approach. Stewardship/leadership responsibilities for management and oversight will be established at two levels of integration – the enterprise level and the LOB level. The overarching responsibilities and requirements are:
• All information and data assets will be

INFORMATION DESCRIPTION
Information used within the State will have a uniform description to support information sharing. The development of the standard information description will enable Departmental stakeholders to agree on the structure (syntax) and meaning (semantics) of the information. The standard information descriptions are documented as artifacts of the EIA. Information description artifacts include metadata (data about data) and information/data models using industry standards such as entity-relationship (ER) models.

the design and implementation of integrated information repositories (e.g. operational and analytical databases based on its EA Methodology that works in tandem with the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC Methodology and promotes compliance with the EIA.
• To facilitate information enablement,

managed as valued assets to the State. Information and data assets will have appropriate stewardship responsibility assigned either at the enterprise or LOB level. Information stewardship leadership responsibilities are essentially the same at each level and vary only according to the body of stakeholders represented by the lead.
• Primary responsibility for establishing

INFORMATION CONFIDENTIALITY
All information lifecycle management activities and specifically information access and delivery will be done in a secure and reliable manner. In addition, all federal and state laws and regulations regarding information confidentiality and privacy will be complied with at all times. Industry best practices regarding information assurance, security, and privacy serve as standard practices within the State, and are performed as part of on-going operations, and routinely evaluated and assessed to ensure operations are being conducted in compliance with the practices. Items or portions of information that fall under confidentiality and privacy requirements will be appropriately classified and “marked”, and information access and delivery systems to ensure that appropriate access permissions have been granted and that appropriate computing boundaries for sensitive information are maintained and sensitive items of information would not cross these boundaries. Responsibility for information assurance, security, and privacy will rest with the CIO and the OIMT security officer.

emphasis will be placed on managing information architectures at both an enterprise level and LOB level. The CIO and OIMT will have primary responsibility for managing at the enterprise level and the Department Directors or other individuals designated as the LOB Lead will have primary responsibility for managing at the LOB level. The architectural components that exist at the LOB level will be referred to by the moniker of LOB Segment Architecture.
• Integration will be achieved through

analysis of integration requirements at both levels and architecting information solutions and technologies to satisfy those requirements.

the EIA resides with the CIO and OIMT. The CIO is supported by the OIMT EA Program. Governance of the EIA will be the responsibility of the OIMT EA Program. This organization will establish information architecture policy and standards that apply for the State. The CIOC has been established to provide initial direction and approval of the EIA. Whenever necessary, the CIO Working Group (a subcommittee of technical experts from a representative segment of the CIOC or other subject matter experts) will be formed to further clarify issues and propose standards. The role of “information steward/ lead” will be established within each of the LOBs. These individuals will have primary responsibility for an information subject area and its associated business processes and applications. The leads will be responsible for assuring the quality of information is enforced and enterprise standards are followed. Their primary role of the steward/lead will be to understand the data, business rules, and toolsets in order to properly define the data and monitor its quality, accuracy, consistency, security, privacy, and to facilitate information sharing.

INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE LEVELS FOR SHARING
As noted above, management of the scope of common or shared information across the State is done at two levels: the enterprise level and the LOB level. Corresponding management practices for associated governance across the stakeholder community will be applied at these same two levels.

INFORMATION INTEGRITY
LOB leads have primary responsibility for ensuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information. Business rules that define and establish the integrity of information will be adhered to in information creation and update operations. Items of information (or information objects) are managed to ensure a single point of origin and an authoritative source. Redundant information sources – the same intended
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information from multiple sources – must be avoided and eliminated when identified. Copies of information are controlled and information location is tracked and controlled to ensure traceability to the authoritative source and point of origin.

INFORMATION AVAILABILITY
Access to the right information anytime and anywhere to anyone who has an appropriate need for it should be enabled and assured. Information access is supported through the effective utilization of state-of-the-art technological interfaces such as the Web and mobile devices for citizens, State employees, and all other stakeholders through an optimized and standardized technology infrastructure.

the business functions and information perspectives. Further levels of decomposition identify key business information entities or objects for which information must be defined and maintained. A common information model streamlines information exchange processes within State government and between State government and external stakeholders (e.g., citizens, business entities, Federal government). In addition, the information taxonomy will support the sorting of existing data assets according to their authoritative sources and will facilitate the recognition and elimination of redundant information sources. The next two diagrams identify the top level subject areas for the core mission LOBs and the support service LOBs. These diagrams set the stage for assignment of stewardship or lead responsibilities and then moving through subsequent segment architecture and data/service standardization projects to continue the development and maturation of the EIA over time. Figure 24 identifies the top level subject areas and notional information dependencies for the core mission LOBs. Further expansion of the Core Mission LOB subject areas is accomplished through the segment architecture projects. Information sharing in these areas will mostly be within the LOB, with some exceptions indicated by the notional information dependencies crossing the LOB subject areas. Figure 25 identifies the top two levels of subject areas and notional information dependencies for the Support Service LOBs. All core mission LOBs have information dependencies with the support service LOBs. The level of sharing is predominately at the enterprise level.

5.2.2.2 CONCEPTUAL INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE

The Conceptual Information Architecture is an enterprise level information model that categorizes government information into a hierarchy of subject areas in greater levels of detail. The top two levels of the taxonomy mirror the top two levels in the Conceptual Business Architecture (LOB and Business Services), promoting a common stewardship/leadership structure between

Figure 24: LOBs Providing Support Externally Subject Area Diagram

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Figure 25: Representative View Support Area LOB Subject Area Diagram

It is the essence of the EIA to fully expand the enterprise information definition over time to establish common information descriptions, common data models, common data element definitions, and common data structures. Common data models may include ER models, National Information Exchange Model (NIEM), and in the future Semantic Web protocols such as Resource Description Framework (RDF). As the common definitions are implemented across the State, integration efforts and information quality will be improved. The EIA is further detailed, iteratively and incrementally, through segment architecture development, data/service standardization projects, and solution architecture projects. The EA program and LOB information leads work collaboratively within these projects to create information standards (models, data structure, service components, and business rules) that ensure that all Departments and stakeholders’ requirements are met. Pragmatic progress must be balanced with the evolution of stakeholder involvement through incremental version releases. The standard information models are stored in the EA repository within OIMT.

OPERATIONAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS
The operational information management requirements relate to the data and information management practices to support business operations, such as data storage, retention, and management. All State data is maintained within databases using standard Data Base Management Systems. Management practices for databases housing State data are common and standard to safeguard the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data. Database management standards and products are defined in the ETA. Databases and other legacy data assets must be identified, inventoried, and have their metadata cataloged for inclusion in the EIA. All databases are considered official in nature and managed as such. A common EA solution will be used for this purpose. Databases are recognized and managed as separate valued resources apart from the applications that use them. Databases are designed for use by multiple applications and positioned and managed to this end. The data management philosophy is that data about a business object would be created by one application but may then be referenced by multiple applications from the same database – with direct access to the database or through a service. The ESA will enforce these principles. State databases are categorized according to the two levels of sharing – enterprise and LOB and two primary types of databases will be established and used within the State:
• Operational database—primary support

5.2.2.3 REQUIREMENTS FOR INFORMATION DELIVERY AND SHARING
The EIA places requirements upon both enterprise solutions and technologies needed to realize the information architecture future state vision. This section outlines those requirements that would flow down to the ESA and ETA respectively.

of operations and characterized by optimization for transactional processing through normalization (Third Normal Form (3NF) or greater).
• Analytics database—primary support of

analysis and reporting and characterized by de-normalized design. An analysis and reporting database is principally built upon data derived from operational databases. Standards and practices related to the administration of official databases will be established in the ESA and ETA.

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INFORMATION SHARING AND DELIVERY REQUIREMENTS
Information sharing and delivery of shared informed will occur through three primary approaches within the State:

EIA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY
Investment initiatives for achieving the future state of the EIA include the following projects:

5.3.1 ESTABLISH THE ENTERPRISE DATA AND SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
1. official databases, 2. master data sets, and 3. web services. A catalog of data assets is maintained as part of the EIA within the EA repository as a tool in locating common data. Data assets may be located in an official database or in official master data set established for collaboration and sharing. Tools are present to allow for XML (or eventually RDF) data sets to be extracted from enterprise and LOB databases to support internal exchange of data across the LOBs. Data for public access is made available through XML data sets (RDF in the future) hosted in a data.Hawaii.gov domain. A catalog of web services is maintained as part of the ESA within the EA repository as a tool in locating common services. Standards and practices for data and web service implementation and access are established in the ESA and ETA. Within the EA Program, a series of activities and accomplishments must be completed to establish these enterprise-wide data and services management standards and practices. These include:

5.3.1.1 GOVERNANCE STANDARDS AND PRACTICES
Establish governance standards and practices which include the role of the information steward/LOB lead and the processes for collaboration, agreement, documentation, and change management of common enterprise or LOB data and services – a process the industry may refer to as master data management.

5.3.1.2 COMMON DATA AND SERVICES ARCHITECTURE
Establish the common data and services architecture within the EA tool and repository, inventories of enterprise and LOB data assets and services; and the approach and practices for defining shared (or master) data standards.

ANALYSIS, VISUALIZATION, AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
The ESA will establish a standard solution pattern for application solutions that support analysis, visualization, and reporting. The data analytics solution pattern will in turn establish requirements for the specific technology products needed for data derivation, and extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL); data query; analysis and trending; visualization including geospatial data; and dashboards and end user reporting.

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5.3.1.3 DATA AND DATABASE ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS AND PRACTICES
Establish data and database administration standards and practices for creating and maintaining official enterprise and LOB databases. The investment initiatives to accomplish these three activities are further defined and specified within Section 7 in the ETA.

5.3.4 ESTABLISH ENTERPRISE COMMON DATA AND SERVICES FOR THE SUPPORT SERVICES
In addition to the data and services standardization initiative for the ERP system implementation, establish data standards and shared services for key common business objects within the remaining support services LOBs to include: Legislation, Policies, Program Performance Reporting, and Grants. The initiatives to accomplish this are defined within Section 7 and Appendix A.

5.3.2 ESTABLISH ENTERPRISE COMMON DATA AND SERVICES FOR THE ERP IMPLEMENTATION
Within the scope of the support services LOBs to be included in an ERP system, establish standard data and services for key enterprise business objects. These include: Organizations, Programs, Employees, Citizens, Facilities, Assets; General Ledger Accounts; Projects; etc. The investment initiatives to accomplish this are defined within Appendix A, ERP Implementation.

5.3.5 ESTABLISH ENTERPRISE COMMON DATA AND SERVICES FOR THE CORE MISSION LOBS
As business needs drive priorities and opportunities, establish data standards and shared services for key common business objects within the each of the core mission LOBs. The initiatives to accomplish this are defined within Appendix A.

5.3.3 ESTABLISH ENTERPRISE COMMON DATA AND SERVICES FOR THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT
Within the scope of new business processes to support the Affordable Care Act, establish data standards and shared services for key common business objects. The initiatives to accomplish this are defined within Appendix A, Health IT.

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6.0 ENTERPRISE SOLUTION ARCHITECTURE (ESA)
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6.0 ENTERPRISE SOLUTION ARCHITECTURE (ESA)
The overarching ESA is described in this section and includes a discussion of the current state and future state of the solutions environment. For the current state the focus is on information systems/applications software and for the future state vision the focus is on a comprehensive set of services-oriented solutions to meet State’s business needs. This section also includes a summary of the T&S Plan to achieve the future state vision for the ESA. The ESA plays a critical role in enabling the State’s vision of realizing an integrated enterprise that consists of streamlined and efficient operations for all business processes. The ESA is also the most tangible and direct support layer of the EA in relation to the business mission and services. It also is the IT component that staff and the public directly interact with in automation of business process and information delivery. The ESA is considered as the driving force for the structure and complexity of the underpinning technology architecture layer and requires a robust multi-functional technological platform.

6.1

ESA CURRENT STATE

The current state of the ESA was characterized as part of the Final Report. The report noted the weaknesses and legacy condition of the few, true statewide solutions, the large number of applications that have proliferated within the State and the critical need for “right-sizing” the applications portfolio. The findings from the Final Report are summarized in Table 3 by the criteria that indicate the maturity of the application portfolio as a whole and the characterization of any single application within this spectrum.

Table 3: Solution or Applications Assessment Results

Application Portfolio Assessment Criteria Stability – the number and extent of failures, down-time, “break-fix” cycles, or general risk exist in an aged condition

Findings
• Numerous applications due to staff reductions and funding shortages

Many initiatives to upgrade or replace legacy applications and their supporting middleware and hardware infrastructures were postponed

Optimization – measuring redundancy, duplication, and “waste”

• Over 700 applications •

A significant set of older mainframe applications, based on the “batch processing” model, require numerous smaller applications to support data interface feeds and outputs A lack of enterprise-wide data governance and integrated databases results in numerous interfaces in order to support data mapping and translation A lack of effective central systems for many of the shared service areas cause the Departments to develop their own supporting systems to ease their interfaces with the central system Federal program-driven funding promotes solution architecture decisions that do not support enterprise application consolidation A lack of budget/funding creates an environment that proliferates single user or small work group applications that are easier and less costly to create

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Application Portfolio Assessment Criteria Standardization – measuring the underlying technologies (middleware and hardware/software platforms) required

Findings Lack of funds to support upgrades results in a broad set of older technologies continuing to be used in the environment, and this increases incompatibilities (e.g., desktops requiring older, unsupported version of Windows or Internet Explorer) Numbers of software product incompatibilities make it almost impossible to plan for enterprise-level upgrades, and this mixture of new and old software versions opens the enterprise to increasing levels of vulnerability from malware Point-solution approaches/situations have proliferated and work against enterprise or LOB integration Lack of an enterprise organization to champion integration and/or funding to support enterprise solutions reduces integration investments in the “have not” Departments to develop and maintain applications perpetuate an imbalanced environment

Integration – the characteristics and ability for an application to be well integrated with other applications and data within the enterprised

Alignment – to business mission, services, priorities, strategies – the value in achievement of critical, high priority mission objectives

• Significant investments within the “have” Departments and minimal

Fundamental capabilities expected in enterprise solutions are lacking (e.g., global address list, shared calendaring, paper-based processes, lack of emerging technology support such as mobile devices and social media) cause frustration Agility is limited because considerable customizations have been made to custom-off-the-shelf (COTS) software Reliance on one-off applications (e.g., the DCCA Lotus Notes-based Legislation Tracking System) and their proliferation as pseudo-enterprise systems are now preventing the application of vendor upgrades

Responsiveness and Agility – to changing business needs – ability to respond with relative ease to change versus being overly complex and awkward to supporting change

One of the weakest areas of the solutions or applications portfolio is the apparent lack of control in enterprise integration and consolidation for statewide support services. As noted in Table 3 many Departments have developed redundant capabilities. Creating the “right number” of enterprise support service solutions is the key challenge for the future state.

6.2

ESA FUTURE STATE

The State is facing an environment of continuous and rapid change due to technological surges and the need to transform old paradigms into new agent-based, service-oriented dynamic integration architectures. The demand for real time integration across disparate lines of business, enterprise applications, Web services, mobile interfaces, and networks, is driving industry toward pursuing standards that will enable open systems architectures to realize seamless access to multiple platforms and services. The desired outcome is the total integration of internal and external entities across the total enterprise.

The vision for the future ESA is a dynamic mobile integration architecture that responds rapidly to change and delivers quality information from trusted sources all stakeholders. This promising computing environment enables efficient services selection by LOBs delivering enterprise services while providing for the seamless integration with external stakeholders and in this case the citizens and residents of Hawai`i . The combination of intelligent Web services and mobile agents provides for the personalized demands needed by state employees to perform their missions and for the citizens and residents of Hawai`i to directly access information that is relative to their personal situations. The future state ESA will be implemented within a common solutions framework that achieves the desired interoperability and integration, as illustrated in Figure x below. The key elements of the future state vision are outlined Figure 26 .

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Figure 26: Future State Vision for ESA

6.2.1 VISION FOR THE FUTURE STATE ESA
The enabling of this vision occurs through a common solutions framework within the State that includes the following:
• Each individual’s user experience

with the State’s automated solutions is personalized through a “my Hawaii.gov” portal that knows the person’s roles, history of service usage, information interests, and tailors the portal accordingly – constantly changing based on usage. The user interface has shifted to mobile Smartphones and tablets with the portal look and feel consistent across all user devices. Solutions are built once with a user interface standard like HTML5 that works equally well across all mobile platforms. • The solutions within the State’s portfolio have been completely rationalized and transformed. All common support services have been reengineered with new service oriented solutions that effectively meet the needs of the core mission areas – all redundant support applications, like procurement or financial reporting have been eliminated.

• All of the support services have been automated through a common, integrated ERP system – resulting in broad integration across these shared services. The ERP scope includes planning and resource allocation, budgeting, financial tracking and reporting, time and attendance, payroll, accounts payable/warrants, accounts receivable, revenue collection, human resource management, procurement, asset management, facilities management, and other general services. • “Everything is a service” is the new solutions paradigm enabling full integration across the enterprise. Business process automation has moved to a to a full component assembly approach, like LEGOTM building blocks, implemented through services and linked resources supplying information (Semantic Web). • Cross-cutting services are organized into two subordinate layers for effective governance: – Enterprise Common Services – a “utility” layer for common enterprise IT services to include security services such as identity and access management; digital content services supporting documents and records; process automation supporting end-to-end workflow, robust search capabilities across the enterprise; and integrated collaboration, analytics, and geospatial visualization capabilities.
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6.2.2 GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR THE COMMON SOLUTIONS FRAMEWORK
The guiding principles for the State’s Common Solutions Framework were outlined above and are expanded below. The discussion identifies the common goals, end objectives, strategies, policies, and guiding principles of the State’s Common Solutions Framework to achieve the future state vision.

– Enterprise Mission Support Services – a layer for common business support functions and information persistence to include customer and case master information; business management master information for organizations, programs, plans, and portfolios; service management life cycle support for performance tracking and continuous improvement; ERP services for common budgeting, financial, human resources, and acquisition functions; and knowledge management for retention and reuse of problem domain knowledge.
• The enterprise data layer has been separated from the

6.2.2.1 ENTERPRISE INTEGRATION
It is the intent of the State of Hawai`i to achieve optimal business performance through business functions and processes being integrated through the use of common solutions. The solutions will be viewed as enterprise assets and not “owned by” individual Departments or programs. The State of Hawai`i directs and controls the design and implementation of integrated solutions through its EA Methodology. The emphasis for achieving integration is placed on managing architectures at an enterprise level and at a LOB segment level. Integration will be achieved through analysis of integration requirements at these respective levels and architecting solutions and technologies to implement them.

application software itself through a robust set of official enterprise and LOB databases and Web accessible data resources – the enterprise information and data has been liberated for widespread use within and outside the State government, and all State business solutions can make use of it.
• The people of Hawai`i and citizens are full stakeholders –

State information is published through “data.Hawaii.gov” and some of the most important new applications are created by citizens. The solutions portfolio for the core mission areas such as public health or land and natural resources has a true blending of support from joint partnerships with community, private businesses, and Federal and local governments.
• “App stores” or catalogs are maintained across these

6.2.2.2 USE OF INDUSTRY STANDARD APPLICATION SOFTWARE WITHIN A SERVICES-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE
Standard practice for the State of Hawai`i is to pursue the acquisition and implementation of industry standard application software. For State government, industry standards are found in both commercially available and government available off-the-shelf application software (COTS/GOTS). Industry standard application solutions should adhere to standards for services-orientation; so that they will be compatible with and interoperable with all service components within the ESA common solutions framework. Implementing comprehensive application software packages provides a significant advantage due to industry standard “best practices” and the scope of integration across the business functions they implement. Packages are chosen to address as many functions within the enterprise as is practical. As a result, the number of application packages is minimized. Customizations to the standard industry business processes and rules contained within the package are kept to a minimum. The State is an active participant in State and Federal communities of practice in order to collaborate on standard solutions. The State leverages and reuses applications from other States and the Federal government.

stakeholder communities for sharing and reuse. The application communities include the ability to leverage and reuse applications from other States and the Federal government. An applications development ecosystem model is used to support the collaboration and reuse of open source and community source software.
• Internal to the State’s portfolio management discipline,

solution patterns have been standardized resulting in optimized development approaches, tools, technical skills, and technology infrastructures, which reduces maintenance support costs and facilitates synergies in enterprise-wide knowledge and expertise. In a controlled manner, any recommendations for evaluating new emerging technologies are sanctioned, and an overall enterprise discipline for “new product/technology evaluation and insertion” has matured. The solutions portfolio includes a lifecycle perspective, incorporating refresh plans after a reasonable life expectancy.

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6.2.2.3 STEWARDSHIP/LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE
Management and oversight of common information assets, systems, and supporting technologies is based on a stewardship approach that continually assesses the benefit for the people of Hawai`i and citizens and internal and external organizational stakeholders. Stewardship/leadership responsibilities are established at the two levels of integration. 1. The CIO and OIMT will have primary responsibility for managing the EA, and 2. The Department Director/Deputy Director designated as the LOB lead or portfolio executive has primary responsibility for managing the LOB Segment Architecture. The overall management and oversight of the ESA is conducted in accordance with the established OIMT governance model with two primary bodies – the Executive Leadership Council (ELC) leading business strategy and architecture and the CIO Council (CIOC) leading IT strategy and architecture. The ELC governs decisions regarding customizations to COTS/GOTS software and function as a liaison to the Legislature for appropriate legislative adjustments to facilitate changes to business processes to minimize COTS/GOTS customizations.

• The building blocks are defined and structured to accomplish

discrete routine functions that are highly interoperable and facilitate reuse, and this very building block/assembly paradigm results in unique approaches within the software architecture, design, and implementation lifecycle activities.
• Each block is structured as an independent “black box” (i.e. self

contained) in accomplishing its function(s) and it presents a well defined and relatively simple “interface” to its users or consumers {loose coupling or loosely joined) in order to maximize reuse.
• Services go beyond object-oriented or component-based

development paradigms in achieving these goals of independence, loose coupling, and simplicity of interface. Services are independently published for use and stand on their own (no linking or builds of executables), have no specific development technology or platform constraints, and services have evolved relatively simple and elegant interface specifications through Web service technologies such as XML and Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). To achieve these benefits, the State’s common solutions framework incorporates a services orientation approach and framework within its software development life cycle (SDLC) – a set of principles, methods, and tools/technologies for architecting, designing, and developing enterprise solutions using highly interoperable services. To this end, the ESA features a horizontal services layer that implements these common reusable services to achieve extensive integration across the enterprise. It should be noted that the development of a services orientation or SOA framework for the State of Hawai`i is approached in a pragmatic manner. There is recognition in the value of the design principles of SOA even at a departmental level, and that benefits can be realized with a standardization of Web service oriented technologies, as opposed to implementation of a framework based on proprietary technology choices, an example being an enterprise service bus technology. It is this lightweight approach that the State will be pursuing. Effective reuse of services as well as open source or community source software requires knowledge within the development community of what services and software are available and how to effectively use them. The OIMT Enterprise Architect has the primary responsibility for maintaining a catalog of services and for steering the architecture of individual solutions towards use of the enterprise services and software.

6.2.2.3 OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE AND COMPLIANCE WITH OPEN STANDARDS
The State of Hawai`i should consider the use of software that incorporates or uses open standards when making decisions on software solution procurements. Open source software presents opportunities to implement solutions with minimal acquisition cost and maintenance of licenses. Decisions on use of open source software or software in compliance with open standards should be made in the context of total cost of ownership to include both acquisition and on-going operational costs.

6.2.2.4 SERVICE ORIENTATION, SOFTWARE REUSE, AND SOLUTIONS INTEGRATION
The EA development for the State of Hawai`i inserts itself into a “point in time” where the software development paradigm continues to evolve from object orientation to component-based development and now to service-oriented architecture (SOA). Each of these paradigms and frameworks share some common foundational goals for best practices in software development:
• Objects, components, and services all represent natural building

6.2.2.5 STANDARD ENTERPRISE SOLUTION PATTERNS
One of the primary objectives and standardization strategies of the ESA is the establishment and maintenance of standard enterprise solution patterns. Standard solution patterns include guidance and specifications on implementation methods, p latforms, tools/technologies, service/component reuse, available training, and available consulting support. Standard approaches and technologies for application software development are required to optimize human resource skills within the increasing complexity of the multi-tier development paradigm for Web and mobile applications (apps).

blocks. By moving software development to a building block and assembly paradigm, like LEGOTM building blocks, building of more complex structures is facilitated through reuse of solid, well formed, and tested pieces resulting in higher quality solutions.

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The cultural history of the State government has funded programs to create individual point solutions that are implemented on a dedicated technical infrastructure. Going forward programs “buy into” the standard solution patterns that are part of the ESA with necessary representation, participation, and collaboration from the CIOC. In the long run, the overall cost effectiveness of managing standard technologies and the ability for the enterprise to more effectively leverage technology for enhancing impact in business service delivery are optimized. Also, standard solution patterns support and are facilitated by the State moving to a cloud computing environment where standard application platforms can be rapidly provisioned through a service catalog request. Solution patterns are initially developed by a working group convened and empowered by the CIO and the CIOC to develop the details of the framework. The working group includes technical architects from a number of State Departments that have significant experience with software development and system integration.

The Enterprise Solution Patterns framework is used to give focus to the development and maintenance of solution patterns that have broad application across the State’s business lines. A list of potential solution patterns includes the following:
• Web Application • Mobile Application • Web Service • Analytics Application

Any given application or system might not fit cleanly into exactly one of these patterns. The patterns are not meant to concisely categorize an application, but rather to provide guidance to the design, development, and deployment of applications that have significant elements from any and all patterns. The fundamental idea is to provide guidance on how to effectively implement solutions that fit one or more of the standard patterns. Each solution pattern specification provides guidance for the common set of topics provided in Table 4.

Table 4: Common Set of Specification Areas for Each Solution Pattern

Guidance Area Implementation Methods and Best Practices

Description Guidance provided on extensions to the standard SDLC methodology specific for the pattern. Guidance provided (consistent with the State’s ETA) on platforms that are recommended for implementation. Guidance provided that outlines appropriate and recommended tools and technologies applicable to the pattern. Guidance provided on useful and available training relevant to implementation of the pattern. Where appropriate, sources of potential consulting or 3rd party assistance will be identified.

Implementation Platforms Tools/Technologies Available Training and Consulting Support

6.2.2.6 THE ROLE OF THE ESA
Initial implementations of both the EA and the LOB Segment Architectures were developed during the second half of FY2012. Moving forward these architectures will be maintained and used as the goal or “north star” guidance for achieving the desired integration of all information assets, systems, and technologies. Individual technical solution projects obtain integration and standardization requirements from these architectures and design and implement the target systems in compliance with the architectures.

The conceptual solutions architecture is characterized as follows:
• Formative – The conceptual solutions architecture establishes the

overarching structure of the ESA to organize vertical LOB solutions and horizontal services and to clarify stewardship leadership boundaries. It is an initial high level version implemented with the expectation that it will continue to be refined and expanded. The diagram organizes the solutions and services within three horizontal bands: 1) Enterprise Mission Systems or LOB solutions, 2) the Enterprise Support Systems, and 3) the Enterprise Services.
• Notional Approach – This set of solutions are notionally based

6.2.3 CONCEPTUAL SOLUTIONS ARCHITECTURE
The conceptual solutions architecture depicts the future state enterprise solutions architecture as a common model of the comprehensive set of services required to fulfill all business requirements for the State.

on the defined business functions within the LOBs. A primary goal of the ESA is to move the State towards a rationalized set of solutions recognizing that the current state has over 700 applications or systems. There are approximately 200 business services associated with the LOBs within in the EBA layer and one business solution per business function supported by Enterprise Services provides a more reasonable portfolio size. Additionally, the implementation of COTS/GOTS packages (e.g.,
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ERP system within the Enterprise Support Systems band of the future state model) further supports the consolidation.
• The set of Enterprise Services is also notionally based on the SRM

• The enterprise services are organized within 2 levels; the rationale

for this is to facilitate the appropriate stakeholder governance participation for requirements and change management. - The Enterprise Mission Support Services are business functional services that are common in support of LOB mission activities and feature the management and persistence of key shared data. Examples include customer (citizen, resident, state employee, business partner) data retention, or common functions within the enterprise resource planning realm such as financial tracking, asset inventory tracking, or procurement execution. - The Enterprise Common Services are common IT utility services such as collaboration, digital content management, or geospatial visualization.
• The level of the conceptual solutions architecture establishes

identified in the EBA and defines a set of shared services for further evaluation and refinement.

6.2.3.1 LOB SERVICES
Some Departments are further along in the development of a future state ESA architecture for their associated LOBs and in those cases the conceptual solutions architecture must be perpetually updated with that information. Additional refinement to the ESA also occurs as a result of the segment architecture development, and this information is discussed in Appendix A.

6.2.3.2 ENTERPRISE SERVICES
One of the most important elements of the ESA is establishing the approach and framework for integrating the State’s applications or solutions going forward. As discussed above, this integration is primarily achieved through the Enterprise Common Services band within the ESA. It supports the services oriented framework that provides – independent of business function – a leverageable foundation to support the reuse of applications, application capabilities, components, and business services. Key concepts and considerations for future action regarding the Enterprise Services are outlined here.
• The organization and content for the services structure is

an organizational structure, scope and boundaries, and business objectives for these services. Oversight of this architecture should move into a next phase to detail requirements and to determine opportunities to prototype/pilot, and to determine an overall implementation approach. Descriptions of each of the service domains are discussed below organized within the two layers of Enterprise Mission Support Services and Enterprise Common Services.

ENTERPRISE MISSION SUPPORT SERVICES
Customer Management Services The Customer Services Domain consists of the capabilities and persistent information that are directly related to the end customer, the interaction between the business and the customer, and the customer-driven activities or functions. Table 5 provides a description of these areas.

originally based on the Federal SRM. This provides the State a vetted starting point, while making some adjustments that streamline the set to those services oriented to common shared use. The initial set of services derived from the SRM need to be continually assessed, refined, and prioritized for use in the State. Table 5: Customer Management Services Domain Description

Service Types Customer Relationship Management

Service Components
• Customer / Account Management – retains identifying information about

the customers of the organization and their interest in specific services well as the scoring of third party information as it relates to an organization’s customers.

• Customer Analytics – the analysis of an organization’s customers as

• Contact and Profile Management – provides a comprehensive view of

all customer interactions, including calls, email, correspondence and meetings; also provides for the maintenance of a customer’s account, business and personal information.

• Partner Relationship Management – provides a framework to promote

the effective collaboration between an organization and its business partners, particularly members of the distribution chain (e.g., channel and alliance partners, resellers, agents, brokers, and dealers) and other third parties that support operations and service delivery to an organization’s customers; includes performance evaluation of partners. feedback from an organization’s customers.

• Customer Feedback – collect, analyze and handle comments and

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Service Types Customer Preferences

Service Components
• Personalization – defines the set of capabilities to change a user

interface and how data is displayed. join a forum, listserv, or mailing list.

• Subscriptions – defines the set of capabilities that allow a customer to

• Alerts and Notifications – defines the set of capabilities that allow

a customer to be contacted in relation to a subscription or service of interest. customers to sign up for a particular service at their own initiative. Reservations / Registration – defines the set of capabilities that allow electronic enrollment and confirmations for services. Multi-Lingual Support – defines the set of capabilities that allow access to data and information in multiple languages. solicitation of support from a customer.

Customer Assistance

• Self-Service – defines the set of capabilities that allow an organization’s

• Assistance Request - defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Scheduling - defines the set of capabilities that support the

plan for performing work or service to meet the needs of an organization’s customers.

Customer Case Management

• Customer Case Management – defines the set of capabilities for

identifying and tracking the history of claims or investigations for a customer and presumption of a particular case or investigation within its workflow

The Business Management Services Domain consists of the capabilities that support the management and execution of business functions and organizational activities that maintain continuity across the business and value-chain participants. Table 6: Business Management Services Domain Description

Service Types Organizational Management

Service Components
• Organizational Management – defines the set of capabilities that

support management of all levels of organization within the enterprise, including the organization hierarchy structure; all inherent levels such as departments, agencies, divisions, branches, etc.; and the identification of executives, managers, and staff members within the various sub-groups of the organization. support management of programs and projects, as well as more ad hoc workgroups of multiple users working on related tasks; and the associated executives, managers, and staff members. process for updates or modifications to the existing business processes of an organization. the environments, as well as documents of an organization.

Program/Project Management

• Program/Project Management – defines the set of capabilities that

Process Management

• Change Management – defines the set of capabilities that control the

• Configuration Management – defines the set of capabilities that control

• Requirements Management – defines the set of capabilities that gather,

analyze, and fulfill the needs and prerequisites of an organization’s efforts. intended to influence and determine decisions, actions, business rules and other matters within an organization.

• Governance / Policy Management – defines the set of capabilities

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Table 6: Business Management Services Domain Description

Service Types Process Management

Service Components
• Quality Management - defines the set of capabilities intended to help

determine the level of assurance that a product or service will satisfy certain requirements. management of the enterprise processes that support an organization and its policies. identification and probabilities or chances of hazards as they relate to a task, decision or long-term goal; includes risk assessment and risk mitigation support the determination of long-term goals and the identification of the best approach for achieving those goals. administration of a group of investments held by an organization.

• Business Rule Management – defines the set of capabilities for the

• Risk Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

Investment Management

• Strategic Planning and Management – defines the set of capabilities that

• Portfolio Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Performance Management – defines the set of capabilities for measuring

the effectiveness of an organization’s financial assets and capital.

Resource Planning and Allocation

• Resource Planning and Allocation – defines the set or capabilities that

support the determination of strategic direction, the identification and establishment of programs and processes, and the allocation of resources (capital and labor) among those programs and processes.

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SERVICES
The Business Management Services Domain consists of the capabilities that support the management and execution of business functions and organizational activities that maintain continuity across the business and value-chain participants. Table 7: Knowledge Management Services Domain Description

Service Types Knowledge Management

Service Components
• Categorization – defines the set of capabilities that allow classification

of data and information into specific layers or types to support an organization.

• Knowledge Engineering – defines the set of capabilities that support the

translation of knowledge from an expert into the knowledge base of an expert system. collection of data and information.

• Knowledge Capture – defines the set of capabilities that facilitate

• Knowledge Distribution and Delivery - defines the set of capabilities that

support the transfer of knowledge to the end customer.

Information Management

• Information Retrieval – defines the set of capabilities that allow access to

data and information for use by an organization and its stakeholders.

• Information Mapping / Taxonomy – defines the set of capabilities that

support the creation and maintenance of relationships between data entities, naming standards and categorization. use of documents and data in a multi-user environment for use by an organization and its stakeholders.

• Information Sharing – defines the set of capabilities that support the

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The ERP Services Domain consists of the capabilities that support the management of enterprise planning transactional-based functions. Table 8: ERP Services Domain Description

Service Types Financial Management

Service Components
• Billing and Accounting – defines the set of capabilities that support the

charging, collection and reporting of an organization’s accounts.

• Credit / Charge – defines the set of capabilities that support the use of

credit cards or electronic funds transfers for payment and collection of products or services. the management and reimbursement of costs paid by employees or an organization. determination of employee’s compensation.

• Expense Management – defines the set of capabilities that support

• Payroll – defines the set of capabilities that involve the administration and

• Payment/ Settlement – defines the set of capabilities that support the

process of accounts payable. [Component and definition discovered in CRM dated 5/05] of accounts receivable.

• Debt Collection – defines the set of capabilities that support the process

• Revenue Management – defines the set of capabilities that support

the allocation and re-investment of earned net credit or capital within an organization. methods and procedures used by the organization to safeguard its assets, produce accurate accounting data and reports, contribute to efficient operations, and encourage staff to adhere to management policies and mission requirements. [Added in FY06 submission; definition from CRM dated 5/05] verification of records for accuracy.

• Internal Controls – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Auditing – defines the set of capabilities that support the examination and

• Activity – Based Management – defines the set of capabilities

that support a defined, specific set of finance-related tasks for a given objective. calculations and differences among multiple mediums of exchange. and hiring of employees for an organization.

• Currency Translation - defines the set of capabilities that support the

Human Resources

• Recruiting – defines the set of capabilities that support the identification

• Resume Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

maintenance and administration of one’s professional or work experience and qualifications. support the monitoring of performance as well as the professional growth, advancement, and retention of an organization’s employees. submission, approval and adjustment of an employee’s hours.

• Career Development and Retention – defines the set of capabilities that

• Time Reporting – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Awards Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

recognition of achievement among employees of an organization.

• Benefit Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

enrollment and participation in an organization’s compensation and benefits programs. payment of benefits to retirees.

• Retirement Management - defines the set of capabilities that support the

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Table 8: ERP Services Domain Description

Service Types Human Resources

Service Components
• Personnel Administration –defines the set of capabilities that support

the matching between an organization’s employees and potential opportunities as well as the modification, addition and general upkeep of an organization’s employee-specific information. active building of employee competencies to include the range of training from professional development to general awareness training. security and physical well-being of an organization’s employees.

• Education / Training – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Health and Safety – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Travel Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

transit and mobility of an organization’s employees for business purposes.

Human Capital Management

• Skills Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

proficiency of employees in the delivery of an organization’s products or services. support the listing of employees and their whereabouts.

• Workforce Directory / Locator – defines the set of capabilities that

• Contingent Workforce Management – defines the set of capabilities that

support the continuity of operations for an organization’s business through the identification of alternative organization personnel.

• Workforce Acquisition / Optimization – defines the set of capabilities that

support the hiring and re-structuring of employees and their roles within an organization.

Assets/Materials Management

• Property / Asset Management – defines the set of capabilities that

support the identification, planning and allocation of an organization’s physical capital and resources. support the listing and specification of available assets.

• Asset Cataloging / Identification – defines the set of capabilities that

• Asset Transfer, Allocation, and Maintenance – defines the set of

capabilities that support the movement, assignment, and replacement of assets. the construction, management, and maintenance of facilities for an organization.

• Facilities Management – defines the set of capabilities that support

• Computers / Automation Management – defines the set of capabilities

that support the identification, upgrade, allocation and replacement of physical devices, including servers and desktops, used to facilitate production and process-driven activities.

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Table 8: ERP Services Domain Description

Service Types Supply Chain Management

Service Components
• Procurement - defines the set of capabilities that support the ordering

and purchasing of products and services.

• Sourcing Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

supply of goods or services as well as the tracking and analysis of costs for these goods. the balancing of customer service levels with inventory investment. listing of available products or services that an organization offers. placement of request for a product.

• Inventory Management – defines the set of capabilities that provide for

• Catalog Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Ordering / Purchasing – defines the set of capabilities that allow the

• Invoice / Requisition Tracking and Approval – defines the set of

capabilities that support the identification of where a shipment or delivery is within the business cycle. online equivalent of the supermarket cart, where orders and merchandise are placed.

• Storefront / Shopping Cart - defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Warehouse Management – defines the set of capabilities that provide

for the storage and movement of materials within a warehouse, including these processes: material receipt, order picking, packaging, labeling, and shipping.
• Returns Management – defines the set of capabilities for collecting,

analyzing, and resolving product returns or service cancellations. for efficient freight and traffic management.

• Logistics and Transportation – defines the set of capabilities that provide

SERVICE MANAGEMENT SERVICES
The Service Management Services Domain consists of the capabilities that support the development, management, execution, performance tracking, and continuous improvement of business services. Table 9: Service Management Services Domain Description

Service Types Service Portfolio Management

Service Components
• Service Portfolio Management – defines the set of capabilities that

facilitate the creation and maintenance of products and services, including the design of service levels.

• Service Demand Management – defines the set of capabilities that

facilitate the promotion of a product or service, and the management of customer needs and service demand, and the management of customer service agreements. extraction, aggregation, and presentation of information to facilitate decision analysis and business evaluation, specifically analysis of service performance, customer satisfaction, and continuous improvement.

Service Analytics

• Service Analytics - defines the set of capabilities that allow for the

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ENTERPRISE COMMON SERVICES
Data Management Services The Data Management Services Domain consists of the capabilities that provide for the usage, processing and general administration of structured data and databases. Table 10: Data Management Services Domain Description

Service Types Data Management

Service Components
• Data Exchange – defines the set of capabilities that support the

interchange of information between multiple systems or applications; includes verification that transmitted data was received unaltered. warehouse for a single department or function within an organization. archiving and storage of large volumes of data.

• Data Mart – defines the set of capabilities that support a subset of a data

• Data Warehouse – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Meta Data Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

maintenance and administration of data that describes data.

• Data Cleansing – defines the set of capabilities that support the removal

of incorrect or unnecessary characters and data from a data source. support the manipulation and change of data.

• Extraction and Transformation – defines the set of capabilities that

• Loading and Archiving – defines the set of capabilities that support the

population of a data source with external data.

• Data Recovery – defines the set of capabilities that support the

restoration and stabilization of data sets to a consistent, desired state. classification of data.

• Data Classification – defines the set of capabilities that allow the

ANALYTICAL SERVICES
The Analytical Services Domain consists of the capabilities that support the extraction, aggregation, and presentation of information to facilitate decision analysis and business evaluation. Table 11: Analytical Services Domain Description

Service Types Analysis and Statistics

Service Components
• Mathematical – defines the set of capabilities that support the

formulation and mathematical analysis of probabilistic models for random phenomena and the development and investigation of methods and principles for statistical inference. of data flow and data modeling diagrams for applying systematic analysis of data. radiation and x-ray technologies for analysis and scientific examination. physical elements using science and technology for investigative and legal purposes.

• Structural / Thermal – defines the set of capabilities that support the use

• Radiological – defines the set of capabilities that support the use of

• Forensics – defines the set of capabilities that support the analysis of

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Table 11: Analytical Services Domain Description

Service Types Visualization

Service Components
• Graphing / Charting – defines the set of capabilities that support the

presentation of information in the form of diagrams or tables. or electronic images from pictures or paper forms.

• Imagery – defines the set of capabilities that support the creation of film

• Multimedia – defines the set of capabilities that support the

representation of information in more than one form to include text, audio, graphics, animated graphics and full motion video. that provide for the representation of position information through the use of attributes such as elevation, latitude, and longitude coordinates. with computers.

• Mapping / Geospatial / Elevation / GPS – defines the set of capabilities

CAD Knowledge Discovery

• CAD - defines the set of capabilities that support the design of products

• Data Mining - defines the set of capabilities that provide for the efficient

discovery of non-obvious, valuable patterns and relationships within a large collection of data.

• Modeling – defines the set of capabilities that develop descriptions to

adequately explain relevant data for the purpose of prediction, pattern detection, exploration or general organization of data. real-world processes.

• Simulation – defines the set of capabilities that utilize models to mimic

Business Intelligence

• Demand Forecasting/Mgmt. – defines the set of capabilities that facilitate

the prediction of sufficient production to meet an organization’s sales of a product or service. listing and analyzing of both positive and negative impacts associated with a decision. support the analyze information and predict the impact of decisions before they are made. reports on an as needed basis.

• Balanced Scorecard – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Decision Support and Planning – defines the set of capabilities that

Reporting

• Ad Hoc – defines the set of capabilities that support the use of dynamic

• Standardized / Canned –defines the set of capabilities that support the

use of pre-conceived or pre-written reports.

• OLAP - defines the set of capabilities that support the analysis of

information that has been summarized into multidimensional views and hierarchies.

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SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT AND INTEGRATION SERVICES
The Software Development and Integration Services Domain consist of the capabilities that provide communication between hardware/software applications and the activities associated with deployment of software applications. Table 12: Software Development and Integration Services Domain Description

Service Types Software Development and Integration

Service Components
• Legacy Integration – defines the set of capabilities that support

the communication between newer generation hardware/software applications and the previous, major generation of hardware/ software applications. support the redesigning of disparate information systems into one system that uses a common set of data structures and rules. organization of data from separate data sources into a single source using middleware or application integration as well as the modification of system data models to capture new information within a single system. the validation of application or system capabilities and requirements.

• Enterprise Application Integration – defines the set of capabilities that

• Data Integration – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Instrumentation and Testing – defines the set of capabilities that support

• Software Development –defines the set of capabilities that support the

creation of both graphical and process application or system software.

SECURITY MANAGEMENT SERVICES
The Security Management Services Domain consists of the capabilities that protect an organization’s information and information systems. Table 13: Security Management Services Domain Description

Service Types Security Management

Service Components
• Identification and Authentication – defines the set of capabilities that

support obtaining information about those parties attempting to log on to a system or application for security purposes and the validation of those users. the management of permissions for logging onto a computer, application, service or network; includes user management and role/ privilege management. encryption and decryption processes, to ensure confidentiality and integrity of data.

• Access Control – defines the set of capabilities that support

• Cryptography - Support the use and management of ciphers, including

• Digital Signature Management – defines the set of capabilities that

supports the use and management of electronic signatures to support authentication and data integrity; includes public key infrastructure (PKI). prevent unauthorized access to a government information system.

• Intrusion Prevention - Includes penetration testing and other measures to

• Intrusion Detection – defines the set of capabilities that support the

detection of unauthorized access to a government information system. security incident that has allowed unauthorized access to a government information system.

• Incident Response - provides active response and remediation to a

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Table 13: Security Management Services Domain Description

Service Types Security Management

Service Components
• Audit Trail Capture and Analysis – defines the set of capabilities that

support the identification and monitoring of activities within an application, system, or network.

• Certification and Accreditation - supports the certification and

accreditation (C&A) of information systems, as described in NIST SP800-37. reporting of compliance with the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002. remediate infection of government computing assets.

• FISMA Management and Reporting - supports management and

• Virus Protection - provides anti-virus service to prevent, detect, and

The Collaboration Services Domain consists of the capabilities that allow for the concurrent, simultaneous communication and sharing of content, schedules, messages, and ideas within an organization. Table 14: Collaboration Services Domain Description

Service Types Collaboration

Service Components
• Email - defines the set of capabilities that support the transmission of

memos and messages over a network.

• Threaded Discussions – defines the set of capabilities that support the

running log of remarks and opinions about a given topic or subject. grouping and archiving of files and records on a server.

• Document Library – defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Shared Calendaring – defines the set of capabilities that allow an

entire team as well as individuals to view, add and modify each other’s schedules, meetings and activities. undertaking or function assigned to an employee.

• Task Management – defines the set of capabilities that support a specific

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COMMUNICATION SERVICES
The Communications Services Domain consists of the capabilities that provide communication between hardware/software applications and the activities associated with deployment of software applications. Table 15: Communication Services Domain Description

Service Types Communications

Service Components
• Real Time / Chat – defines the set of capabilities that support the

conferencing capability between two or more users on a local area network or the Internet. conferencing over a Local Area Network or the Internet between two or more people. audio communications sessions among people who are geographically dispersed.

• Instant Messaging – defines the set of capabilities that support keyboard

• Audio Conferencing – defines the set of capabilities that support

• Video Conferencing – defines the set of capabilities that

support video communications sessions among people who are geographically dispersed. monitor servers, workstations and network devices for routine and non-routine events. administration of online groups that share common interests.

• Event / News Management – defines the set of capabilities that

• Community Management - defines the set of capabilities that support the

• Computer / Telephony Integration - supports the connectivity between

server hardware, software and telecommunications equipment into a single logical system. telephony or other voice communications.

• Voice Communications – defines the set of capabilities that provide

SEARCH SERVICES
The Search Services Domain consists of the capabilities that provide for the probing and lookup of specific information and data from information and data sources. Table 16: Search Services Domain Description

Service Types Search

Service Components
• Query – defines the set of capabilities that support retrieval of records

that satisfy specific query selection criteria.

• Precision / Recall Ranking – defines the set of capabilities that

support selection and retrieval of records ranked to optimize precision against recall. and retrieval of records organized by shared characteristics in content or context. records generated from a data source by imputing characteristics based on patterns in the content or context.

• Classification – defines the set of capabilities that support selection

• Pattern Matching – defines the set of capabilities that support retrieval of

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SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT SERVICES
The Systems Management Services Domain consists of the capabilities that support the administration and upkeep of an organization’s technology assets, including the hardware, software, infrastructure, licenses, and components that comprise those assets. Table 17: Systems Management Services Domain Description Table 17: Systems Management Services Domain Description Service Types

Service Components
• License Management – defines the set of capabilities that support the

Systems Management

purchase, upgrade and tracking of legal usage contracts for system software and applications.

• Remote Systems Control – defines the set of capabilities that support

the monitoring, administration and usage of applications and enterprise systems from locations outside of the immediate system environment. support the balance and allocation of memory, usage, disk space and performance on computers and their applications.

• System Resource Monitoring – defines the set of capabilities that

• Software Distribution – defines the set of capabilities that support the

propagation, installation and upgrade of written computer programs, applications and components.

• Issue Tracking – defines the set of capabilities that receive and track

user-reported issues and problems in using IT systems, including help desk calls.

6.3 ESA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY
Considerations for “go forward” requirements and implications for the T&S Plan have been organized in two focus areas:
• Stabilize – to address urgent needs to stabilize the legacy

6.3.1 STABILIZE 6.3.1.1 ADDRESS CURRENT “FLAGSHIP” OPPORTUNITIES
Consistent with recommendations in the Final Report, the CIO and OIMT will pursue opportunities that exist with current funded systems development projects to lay enterprise foundations for solutions and infrastructure. As OIMT continues to move forward on development of the enterprise future state vision and architecture and in understanding in greater detail the scope of current funded initiatives, opportunities to jointly establish portions of enterprise solutions and infrastructure will be sought after. Opportunities may exist for potential reuse or consolidation with other efforts, in establishing enterprise standards or practices, or implementing key components of the future state enterprise infrastructure. Examples are outlined below in Table 18.

environment of the State’s application solutions.
• Rationalize and Integrate – to modernize the overall solutions

architecture by “right-sizing” the number and scope of the future set of solutions and implementing the long-term integration strategies. Activities will take place in these areas in parallel, but the activity emphasis moves from urgent and immediate actions to strategic and long-term.

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Table 18: Opportunities for Flagship Projects to Lay Enterprise Foundations

Service Types DHS

Key Project Description New MedQuest Eligibility System (Affordable Care Act) Pending Review million new eligibility system to increase timeliness and transparency, electronically verify information, and interface with health insurance exchange. Replaces current 23 year old system. Benefit, Employment, and Support Services Division BPR Project BPR evaluation of the existing financial assistance and SNAP eligibility process, redesign work flow processes for efficiencies in issuing benefits; address document imaging and e-forms and portable devices to allow DHS staff to be more mobile in addressing routine tasks (e.g. child care licensing) and for responding to emergency disasters (e.g. emergency food stamps); explore the possibility of expanding the concept of telecommuting with the availability of portable devices. Hawai`i Integrated Justice Information Sharing Program (HIJIS) Strategic initiative to build enterprise-wide integrated information sharing capabilities between justice agencies and other government entities throughout the State to improve public safety and enhance the efficiency of operations. Hawai`i Health Data Warehouse Strategic initiative to standardize the collection and management of Hawai`i’s health data; dedicated to providing useful data to support public health professionals, the community and health agencies to become more effective in the application of health data. Tax Modernization Strategic initiative to explore ways to streamline and modernize tax processing electronically so that it is more cost effective and efficient. Health IT Health information technology initiative to improve the quality and efficiency of health care through electronic health record (EHR). Hawai`i Broadband Initiative A major economic development initiative to provide statewide access to affordable ultra, high-speed Internet by 2018. Positions Hawai`i to be the first state in the nation with 1 gigabit per second broadband connectivity at every public school, every public library, and every public university and college campus by using about Pending Review of federal monies received through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

Implications for the Enterprise Establish and leverage enterprise application integration capabilities

DHS

Establish and leverage enterprise capabilities in BPR methodology, mobile apps, and telecommuting

AG

One of the largest, most successful information sharing initiatives in the State – pattern for broader adoption One of the most successful data sharing initiatives in the State – pattern for broader adoption Position enterprise for broader Financial Management improvements Establish and leverage enterprise application integration capabilities Leverage connectivity for State offices at remote islands and improvements for State NGN

DOH

DOTAX

HHSC

DBEDT/DCA

6.3.1.2 LEGACY APPLICATION SOLUTION UPGRADES
As the State modernizes its solution platforms, there will be a number of compelling drivers to re-platform sets of applications. Some notable reasons would be the age and condition of the platform, such as the legacy mainframe applications; or that a platform may be eliminated such as Lotus Domino. This initiative would assess and stabilize critical applications. An analysis of the overall applications portfolio will identify the top risk areas. Projects will be authorized to plan and work through conversions, upgrades, and refreshes to stabilize the applications. Examples include:

• Continue work underway to implement

near-term enhancements to the legacy payroll system to automate EFT to minimize demands for check printing.
• Stabilize the email system versions and

technology lifecycle management and refresh plans. This initiative is included in the ETA, Section 7 below.

enhance overall enterprise capabilities ncluding addressing a global address list and shared calendaring.
• Migrate current Lotus Domino applications

6.3.2 RATIONALIZE AND INTEGRATE 6.3.2.1 IMPLEMENT ERP SYSTEM
The State is moving forward with implementation of an enterprise-wide ERP system that will replace the large majority of the current “central” systems within the Enterprise Support Services band. The conceptual solutions architecture has established a notional set of current systems that should be replaced by the ERP system. The ERP implementation is a critical foundational component of the future strategy. As stated in the Final Report, the proliferation
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to a standard enterprise solution pattern for web applications. The portfolio management process and program is being established along with other IT/IRM programs in OIMT such as the EA program. The applications perspective of the portfolio management process will include considerations for the appropriate life cycle of all applications software and plan for its replacement at the proper time. Create application

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

of many applications within the current state architecture is the result of the significant issues that the Departments have with the common central systems. A significant percentage of the goals and objectives related to business and IT/IRM transformation can be accomplished through a successful ERP system implementation. The plan for ERP implementation is specified in more detail in Appendix A.

IDENTITY MANAGEMENT SOLUTION
Establish a standard solution for management of user account identity and authorized roles and access permissions integrated with standard user directory services and enterprise services for authentication.

CUSTOMER SERVICE SOLUTION (REQUEST AND INCIDENT REPORTING)
In conjunction with organizational changes to standardize on shared service centers such as an Enterprise IT Service Desk or other back office functions related to the ERP implementation, establish an enterprise-level service desk or call center solution with tracking for resolution of all customer or user service and support requests, incidents, and event resolution.

ENTERPRISE DASHBOARD SOLUTION
Establish a standard managementlevel dashboard reporting solution with supporting data aggregation and summarization capabilities. Implement “rolling up” program-level information for project and operational performance, and institute processes for projects and operations to begin reporting.

6.3.2.2 IMPLEMENT OTHER ENTERPRISE SOLUTIONS
Additional significant opportunities exist for standardizing on common systems to support enterprise needs. Specific investment initiatives should be considered for the following critical areas, and the working groups in alignment with the technology domains within the ETA provide additional detail on these initiatives.

ENTERPRISE SYSTEM MANAGEMENT SOLUTION
Establish and implement an enterprise systems management solution, such as the SolarWinds product used in some organizations today. The enterprise systems management solution would automate basic availability (systems, service, and server uptime); capacity management (CPU, disk space, bandwidth, etc.); and security and data center operations. The solution would perform life cycle tracking of all events related to these areas and integrate event management information with the customer service solution.

OPEN GOVERNMENT SOLUTIONS
Establish a State of Hawai`i data. gov internal and public-facing web site to facilitate the sharing of “master data sets” as defined above. Support internal-facing (for State use as w ell as application integration through web services layered on top of XML data sets) and external, public-facing (for publishing public-domain master data sets). Establish an internal-facing web site to facilitate sharing of “master data sets” for application integration through web services layered on top of XML data sets.

ENTERPRISE EMAIL SYSTEM
Evaluate options for upgrade or replacement of the current email system to address a number of current issues such as the lack of a global address list or shared calendaring and to enhance the overall future enterprise capabilities for greater collaboration, migration towards smartphones and tablets, and greater efficiency and cost savings in from Total Cost of Ownership including future provisioning models “as a service”.

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SOLUTION
Establish enterprise processes and system for knowledge management. Utilize for IT services knowledge management initially, but consider use and application in other service areas. For IT services, ensure that all documentation regarding IT environments; IT system and server configurations; and known problems, workarounds, solutions, and resolution scripts are all stored within the knowledge management repository. Ensure that IT workers at all levels use the knowledge management repository for environment and work instruction documentation.

6.3.2.3 ESTABLISH STANDARD ENTERPRISE SOLUTION PATTERNS
The State of Hawai`i will establish standard enterprise patterns for kinds of common solutions such as web applications, mobile applications, data analytics applications, and web services. As discussed above, the desired outcomes in establishing the patterns are as follows:
• Simplify and standardize to capitalize

ENTERPRISE COLLABORATION SOLUTION
Establish standard collaboration solutions across the State adopting technology platforms such as Microsoft SharePoint or Lotus Domino Quickr (in conjunction with the email system initiative). Implement necessary technical underpinnings and connectivity for cross-departmental workgroup and project collaboration.

on staff expertise, reduce support costs, and to facilitate reusable code and data across the environment.
• Rapidly baseline current assumptions

regarding sunset, legacy, preferred, and standard application platforms, architectural stacks, and technologies, and develop standards and guidance
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regarding future technology decisions, specifically with respect to application architecture, design, and implementation for use and adoption across the Departments, Divisions, and programs; and create a communication plan to “market” the standards and guidance within each Department. Upgrade needed human resource skills for growth including both advanced training programs for staff and putting in place contractor resources.

• Leverage successful models, such as HIC’s work for DLNR or

Ocean IT’s mobile app development for DOD, and adjust as needed to minimize the approaches used. The State will approach the adoption of solution patterns in an evolutionary manner that moves the State through what are defined as four different Operating Levels as described in Table 19 below.

Table 19: Solution Pattern Operating Levels Indicating Evolution of Adoption within the Enterprise

Service Types Opportunistic

Level Characteristics At this initial level the state is looking for projects to attach to the initiative and include the definition of pattern artifacts in the project scope. The idea is to attach to projects that are on task to create applications that are prototypical of one of the solution patterns, and to capture and document the best practice guidelines being used by that project. At this level, projects will be selected that might benefit from one or more of the documented solution patterns. The initiative will attach these projects and offer pattern guidance and validate and improve the pattern guidance. At this level, use of pattern guidance should be relatively routine part of the development process. The initiative will be more focused on interacting with projects to determine the patterns they are using and incorporate any feedback, rather than offering counseling and guidance. At this level the set of solution patterns are essentially complete and the initiative is focused on tracking the use of the patterns and recognizing the need for new patterns as technology advances.

Tactical Strategic

Managed

Tracking the state’s progress through these four operational levels will facilitate the ongoing process of selling and obtaining funding for the Solution Patterns initiative by providing some quantifiable measurement of the adoption of and use of the patterns across the enterprise. Within this implementation framework, the State should continue to review, refine, and expand its set of enterprise solution patterns. The initial set of priority patterns are outlined below and expanded in the ETA in Section 7.

ENTERPRISE DATA ANALYTICS APPLICATION SOLUTION PATTERN
Establish a standard data analytics solution pattern and approach with standard methods, skilled resources, and tools. Evaluate and leverage, as appropriate, notable implementations of end-user data access systems to make critical data available for analysis and decision making, specifically: FAMIS Data Mart, DOH Data Warehouse, and Juvenile Justice Information System (JJIS).

ENTERPRISE WEB APPLICATION SOLUTION PATTERN
Standardize on common solution methods, architectures, and technologies for web applications development. The most common in use today within the State include the Linux/Apache/ MySQL/PHP or Python (LAMP) stack, the Windows stack (Windows\IIS\SQL Server\.NET), and the Java web application stack (Linux or Solaris/Tomcat/JSP).

ENTERPRISE APPLICATION INTEGRATION WEB SERVICE SOLUTION PATTERN
Establish a standard enterprise solution for application integration that includes standard approaches, methods, knowledge/ expertise, skilled resources, and tools/technologies to enable and support web services implementation and use. Evaluate and leverage notable implementations of application data integration through advanced capabilities (e.g., SOA, specifically DOH Services Implementation and HIC).

ENTERPRISE MOBILE APPLICATION SOLUTION PATTERN
Establish a standard mobile applications solution pattern and approach with standard methods, skill development, contractor resources, and tools/technologies. Conduct in conjunction with adoption of preferred smartphones and tablets in the future state technology architecture. Since mobile application development has a very small footprint in the State at this time, this initiative will need to analyze, pilot, and invest/implement in a standard approach, capabilities, and tools for developing mobile applications.

COMMUNITY APPLICATION SOFTWARE “STORES”, REPOSITORIES, AND DIRECTORIES
In conjunction with establishing these standard application solution patterns, establish capabilities to facilitate application software subscription, download, or common source code reuse. There are two primary considerations: an app store to subscribe and download standard apps, and shared source code or web services for reuse in application development.

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• App Store – anticipate future mobile apps for the State and

establish “app stores” for internal marketing of existing application capabilities and the ability for organizations to reuse those applications – a version of an internal “apps store” catalog.
• Community Source Repository – anticipate reuse of

6.3.2.4 IMPLEMENT ENTERPRISE APPLICATION INTEGRATION SERVICES
The State of Hawai`i will achieve integration strategies across its enterprise and LOB application solutions through the implementation of an integration services layer within the ESA. Similar to the solution pattern implementation described above, these enterprise services, the State will approach the adoption of a services oriented applications development approach in an evolutionary manner that moves the state through the four different Operating Levels as outlined in Table 20.

considerable portions (services/components) of application code such as single sign on or payment processing. Ability to leverage shared source code across trusted communities within or outside the State using a SourceForge type collaboration environment. Include trusted specifications, component code, or application code from other states.
• Web Services Directory – anticipate future enterprise web

services for the State and establish web service directories using industry standards such as UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration) specifications. Table 20: Services-Oriented Operating Levels indicating Evolution of Adoption within the Enterprise

Operating Level Opportunistic

Level Characteristics At this initial level the state is beginning to prototype and defines its services-oriented development policies and procedures. Pilot projects are being selected based on their suitability for refining those policies and procedures, and for their suitability in proving out required technology elements of the EA. The focus is on selecting and investing in projects that will produce quick success and bolster the efforts to sell and fund an ongoing enterprise application integration initiative. At this level, rudimentary policies, procedures, and technology components are in place and are being refined based on lessons learned. Projects are being selected that focus the effort to build low level cross-cutting services that can be used by multiple lines of business. It is at this level that the details around versioning, testing, and deployment of services are being fleshed out. At this level, polices, procedures, and technology components are well established and the focus on investment in servicesoriented development is on the retirement of legacy applications and infrastructure using the SOA model that builds replacement software incrementally using the technique of service composition. At this level not only are the policy, procedure and technical components established and in widespread use, but there is an active and robust measurement and management program in place that tracks the use of developed services and focuses service development to improve performance and extend re-use opportunities.
can be roughly categorized into three different value categories:
• SOA Integration Projects

Tactical

Strategic

Managed

Tracking the state’s progress through these four operational levels will facilitate the ongoing process of selling and obtaining funding for the enterprise integration initiative by providing some quantifiable measurement of the adoption of services-oriented principles across the enterprise. Rather than define and build out a full governance and technology stack upon which to build SOA compliant services, the state will take an approach that provides for investment in projects that can incrementally fill out gaps in the EA, and incrementally bring governance processes and technology onboard. Consequently the selection of projects for SOA investment will be a critical success factor for the SOA implementation. Industry best practice research indicates that highly successful SOA based projects

SOA Integration Projects employ industry open and standardized service technologies (XML, WSDL, etc.) to provide synchronization of data flow among applications, most notably between custom written applications and COTS software packages. The use of open and standard service technologies and design approaches often result in a much improved cost profile over older point to-point custom interfaces or more traditional EAI software, e.g. SAP XI, Tibco, BizTalk, IBM MQSeries, MS MSMQ, etc.
• New Composite Application Projects

service level components. Existing legacy applications, on the other hand, are not generally well-suited to service composite solutions because of their dependence on proprietary technologies and their highly stovepipe design focused on automating specific business processes. Identifying new applications that can benefit from a SOA approach of development of low level and composite services will provide for applications that are more maintainable, and that provide opportunities for component reuse by other applications.
• Mainframe/Legacy

Modernization Projects Mainframes and associated legacy applications often consume the lion’s share of an organization’s IT budget. Retiring those applications and associated
Enterprise Architecture

New custom written applications are largely Web based and consequently are well positioned to make use of SOA

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infrastructure can be a daunting and long term proposition, high in cost and full of risk. An incremental approach that can be used is to build out new user facing applications that leverage the existing legacy applications by interfacing with SOA wrapped services that abstract the functionality of the underlying legacy application. Creating these wrappers provides a migration path toward applications with new user facing technologies that continue to use the legacy functions of the existing applications. Over time, these new user facing applications built as a composition of services can be redirected toward new back-end services that replace the legacy functionality. Unlike traditional approaches that use a rigorous waterfall approach to infrastructure build out, the SOA framework here is expected to be built out incrementally. It provides the State with the ability to select projects that can contribute to the SOA build out, regardless of the SOA operating level that is in play. Over time the state will realize a flexible SOA infrastructure and a rich inventory of services that provide for effective maintainability and high re-use. Consistent with the notional set of enterprise services included in the Conceptual Solutions Architecture, the initial set of priority services are outlined below and included in the ETA, Section 7.

BUSINESS ANALYTICS SERVICES – DASHBOARD REPORTING
Establish common services for reporting performance data against measures that need to be reported in a common dashboard reporting solution.

BACK OFFICE SERVICES – ERP
Establish common services within the financial management and human resource management domains in conjunction with the ERP implementation.

PROCESS AUTOMATION SERVICES – WORKFLOW
Establish common services to support enterprise workflow across application solutions.

PROCESS AUTOMATION SERVICES – CASE MANAGEMENT
Establish common services to support a case management life cycle and data reuse across application solutions.

SUPPORT SERVICES – SECURITY – IDENTITY AND ACCESS MANAGEMENT
Establish a standard set of authentication and single sign on services for use by all enterprise applications.

CUSTOMER SERVICES – EVENT/ INCIDENT/REQUEST REPORTING
Establish common services to support reporting of events, incidents, or requests that need to be tracked in a common customer service solution.

DIGITAL ASSET SERVICES – DOCUMENT/RECORDS MANAGEMENT
Establish common services for identification and submission of digital content to be managed as an official document or record. Investigate current capabilities that exist: KOFAX and/or IBM FileNet within DOT, B&F, (and the Judiciary), AG, DAGS, DOTAX.

BUSINESS ANALYTICS SERVICES – GEOSPATIAL
Establish common services for linking and visualizing State data with geospatial data. Investigate current capabilities such as ARCInfo within DOD, DAGS, DOT, DBEDT, DLNR, DOH, HDOA, AG, DOE, and UH.

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7.0 ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURE
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ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURE
The ETA is defined is a “logically consistent set of principles, practices, standards, and guidelines that are derived from business requirements and that guide the creation of an organization’s technical infrastructure.” For the State of Hawai`i , the ETA represents the technology infrastructure environment that must support the ESA in terms of the Enterprise Mission Systems, Enterprise Support Systems, and Enterprise Services bands. The following sections describe the current state of the ETA, the future state vision, and the gap closure activities that will be represented in the T&S Plan. In addition, the working documents that have been created by the various Technology Working Groups are available in a separate Supplemental Addendum to this document. A hyperlink to this addendum and the specific working group information is provided where appropriate.

7.1

ETA CURRENT STATE

The current state of the ETA, identified as part of the Final Report, is very decentralized because it supports a very decentralized ESA and EIA. The rationale for this decentralization is the same as described previously in the EBA, EIA, and ESA (i.e., funding sources, lack of standards provided by an EA, historic lack of a State CIO and governance). Figure 27 depicts the ETA and the lack of integration and alignment statewide.

Figure 27: Current State ETA

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The current state of technology within the State are summarized in Table 21 and organized by architectural domains associated with the ETA. In some instances, a number of Departments have strong technical solutions in place, those instances have been identified in the table but overall represent a very small portion of IT and still do not adhere to a consistent approach when viewed enterprise wide. The current state technology device type data within the EA repository includes approximately 6400 different product types being used at present. And currently the State has approximately: 15 server rooms (based on a < 500 square feet measure), five server closets (based on < 200 sq. ft.), and three data centers performing hosting services. Both of these factors indicate the opportunity for consolidation and consistency. Table 21: Technical Architecture Domain/Sub-Domain and Current State of Technology Details

Technical Architecture Domain Collaboration and Messaging

Sub-Domain Email

Current Environment Details Lotus Notes – most pervasive across all Departments, departments running 6.0, 6.5, 7.0 and 7.5 Some instances of Exchange (Employee Retirement System (ERA), Employee and Union Trust Fund (EUTF), DOE, DOH, Attorney General (AG)-HCJDC) UH is migrating to Google Mail (Cloud-based)

Broadcast, User Messaging, and Social Media

Emerging interest in and use of Twitter, Facebook (Governor’s and Lieutenant. Governor’s Offices, Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL)) Broadcast messaging products used in State Civil Defense and University of Hawai`i (UH) No standard enterprise solution selected for collaboration SharePoint purchased for use in DOE, DOH, Budget and Finance (B&F), Office of Hawai`i an Affairs (OHA) Minimal use of Lotus/Domino for collaboration UH is utilizing Google Apps DOT is utilizing Lotus/Domino TeamRoom

Collaborative Workspaces

Information Management

Document Management

No standard enterprise solution Document and imaging system components KOFAX and IBM FileNet being used in Department of Transportation (DOT), B&F, OHA, Department of Accounting and General Services (DAGS) Adobe and Microsoft Office products are prevalent across all Departments Global 360 Imaging and Workflow software are implemented and used by Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) AG and Department of Business Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) are utilizing DropBox

Data Management Analysis, Visualization and Reporting GIS

Oracle, SQL Server, MySQL, Adabas, APPX, DB2 Crystal Reports is used in DOTAX Oracle Discoverer is used by DOT ARCInfo used in DOD, DAGS, DOT, DBEDT, Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), DOH, Department of Agriculture (HDOA), AG, DOE, UH

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Table 21: Technical Architecture Domain/Sub-Domain and Current State of Technology Details

Technical Architecture Domain Application Environments

Sub-Domain Application Interaction and Integration Client Server Applications Web Applications Mobile Applications Embedded Systems

Current Environment Details Enterprise Services Bus technologies used in DOH and HIJIS IBM Rational Architect PowerBuilder is implemented. Java, .Net, PHP, Perl, Oracle Forms used across the State Emerging need identified with only Department of Defense (DOD) having a non-publicfacing one, MERCI Control systems for DOT External DNS servers reside on the Information and Communications Services Division (ICSD) network Most Departments have internal DNS servers Centralized Active Directory does not exist; numerous Departments deploy Active Directory to manage local infrastructure

Infrastructure

Directory Services

Enterprise Systems Management (configuration, performance, capacity, availability, licensing, patching) Servers and Storage Hosting Environments, Cloud, and Data Center Disaster Recovery

No enterprise-wide fault, configuration, performance, or capacity management tools exist in the State Each Department is responsible for monitoring and managing its own infrastructure Decentralized annual software license management Very diverse with no consistency in terms of vendor products Server-hosted environment at ICSD Very diverse with no consistency in terms of vendor products DLNR has an installation with DRFortress HIC recently migrated to SystemMetrics Endeavor data center ICSD uses Veritas and Tivoli to perform tape and data backups

Unified Communications

ICSD-managed video conference center established to support, schedule, and troubleshoot Contains multiple video bridges for large conference support DBEDT utilizes Skype to communicate with non-State business prospects Majority of the State utilizes Hawaiian Telcom (HATS) contract for Centrex phone services Some key systems exist as do small pockets of VoIP Many employees utilize their personal cellular and/or smartphones or iPhones for non-office voice service

Network

Wired

ICSD-managed Cisco-based MPLS network is structured to provide services to all Departments Each Department supports internal LAN with mixed vendor networks

Wireless

No Wi-Fi policy or enterprise solution is available to the Departments Departments have deployed Wi-Fi independently where required “Rogue” access points exist as end users install consumer WiFi devices

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Table 21: Technical Architecture Domain/Sub-Domain and Current State of Technology Details

Technical Architecture Domain Network End User Computing

Sub-Domain Radio

Current Environment Details Robust Radio Frequency (RF)-based network is in place; however, it is a single threaded organization with one person in charge of all infrastructure Departments have discretion to buy desktop/laptop devices (most use Western States Contracting Alliance [WSCA] vehicle) No standard operating system or enterprise image exists All purchasing and warranty support is done at the Department level Many employees utilize their personal Smartphones or iPhones for non-office email service

Desktops, Laptops, and Mobile Devices

User Productivity Software User Presentation Peripherals Information Assurance and Privacy Anti Virus/Spam Security (Authentication, Authorization, Credentials, etc.)

Operating system is being driven by legacy applications; new PCs ship with Windows 7 but in many cases the Departments must downgrade them to Windows XP to run native legacy applications No standard offerings exist for users to select software; the State is not leveraging enterprise-level discounts for common tools Printers, fax support. Each department is purchasing individual and workgroup peripherals All Departments have endpoint security deployed via Symantec or similar offerings There is no governance standard at the State level for secure authentication There is no hard-drive encryption policy Virtual Firewall and IPS deployed on NGN connections to each Department Some Departments engage third parties for penetration testing and security policy creation

Privacy Security Policy

Lacking common PII controls to manage and monitor the electronic release of PII data via means such as email Departments have standalone security devices which do not comply to a standard set of rules ICSD has virtual firewall on departmental edge of NGN which protect the backbone network

7.2

ETA FUTURE STATE

The future state vision for the State of Hawai`i’s ETA enables rapid deployment of new services to the Departments, employees, and citizens. It supports the EBA, EIA, and ESA. As the ETA future state is implemented the following items should guide all decisions:

Guiding Principles for Implementing the ETA Future State
• Align Business and Technology - A Department’s business and IT • Incorporate Security Elements in Every Design - Designs for all new

staffs understand its business functions and the role of technology in supporting these business functions. They jointly have the responsibility for defining IT needs and ensuring that the systems provide defined business benefits and that these systems are simultaneously aligned from a technical perspective with the ETA standards.
• Design for Sharing - Facilitating information sharing (within the

systems must include security (e.g., access and protection) requirements from the outset to ensure that the State is not vulnerable to threats.
• Design for Growth - Ensure the technical infrastructure investments

accommodate growth to create the lowest total cost of ownership while creating the greatest flexibility for future growth.
• Design for Performance and Reliability Metering – Implement technology

Departments, the LOB, and across the enterprise) is a key consideration for all IT implementation actions.

to capture performance measurements to support management and analysis of the IT environment.

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7.2.1 ELEMENTS OF THE ETA FUTURE STATE VISION
Given the vision and tenets cited above, Figure 28 illustrates the key technical elements of the future state vision.

Figure 28: ETA Future State Vision for Hawai`i

The Strategic Plan, EBA, EIA, and ESA of the EA document a vision for the use of organization and governance, information, solutions, and technology within the State. The following defines the key attributes of the ETA layer:
• Information Sharing: Every Department can exchange

The technology areas depicted in Figure 28 represent critical pieces of the overall technology domain. Each technology domain will be described in detail later in the ETA document but the following describe new levels of services and convergence going forward.

and access information electronically, both internally within government and externally throughout the State, nation, and world in a secure manner and as authorized. ETA sets the technology standards for sharing information.
• Collaboration: Formal and informal groups work to break

7.2.1.1 INFRASTRUCTURE: HAWAI`I CLOUD COMPUTING CENTERS (HC3)
The HC3 represents the infrastructure environment after the consolidation of the majority of Departmental applications and servers into a common set of special purpose data centers. The HC3 facilities provide hosting, virtualization, cloud computing, storage management, and disaster recovery services for the State. The upfront design of the HC3 facilitates public/private partnerships constructed to provide services to business inside and outside Hawai`i . The HC3 includes two data center facilities in Oahu (one State-owned and one non-State owned) to immediately support State computing requirements. To further leverage geographic separation of services, and to best serve the communities outside of Honolulu County, additional public/private facilities in each of the other three counties will provide enhanced services while leveraging consolidation, virtualization, common IT service management and the use of cloud computing throughout Hawai`i
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down barriers and provide consistent practices to share technology investments to support the delivery of business functions. ETA describes collaborative environments and content management approaches that brings together data and information to support physical and virtual collaboration across Hawai`i .
• Convergence: Every dollar expended on IT is maximized

through enterprise cooperation, coordination, and resource sharing. Supporting this convergence, the ETA describes the technology targets and the preferred future state technologies while identifying those technologies that have reached end of-life must be retired as quickly and smartly as possible. In addition, the ETA identifies emerging technologies for research and proof of concept analysis.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

7.2.1.2 ONE NETWORK FOR HAWAI`I (ONENET)
New network technologies are creating a revolution in technology that are fueling information access and communications needs. The Internet, as a global networking infrastructure, continues to make the world a smaller and more demanding place. Wireless computing paves the way for an “anytime, anywhere connected” networking environment. This has introduced an “always-connected” citizen community that has extensive requirements for mobility computing. Recent advances in convergence technologies not only promote the convergence of a single physical IP infrastructure, but also introduce convergence of feature-rich services that can be provided in a secure, reliable, cost effective manner to meet the State’s mission. A singled network, OneNet, fulfills the network needs of all State Departments to employees and citizens in the State of Hawai`i with guaranteed performance levels.

7.2.1.4 INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND PRIVACY
The State has a fully integrated Security Operations Center (SOC) and Computer Security Incident Response Center (CSIRC) to
• provide uninterrupted security services

tools such as smartphones, scanners, and tablets or laptops. These tools will allow dynamic access to the Incident Management System and the technical Knowledge Base and reduce times resolving issues and providing service for the users. Enterprise Operations also includes a “help desk” capability that extends beyond IT by providing the full scope of Enterprise Services band (discussed as part of the ESA).

while improving security incident response times,
• reduce security threats to the State, and • enable quicker, well-coordinated

7.2.1.6 COLLABORATION AND MESSAGING
Efficient communications and information access between the State and citizens is critical to the success of any program or service. Convergence technologies associated with collaboration and messaging play a pivotal role in bringing about a powerful and revolutionary change and render many devices obsolete (e.g., traditional telephone handset, facsimiles). Online convergence services provide integrated services in a single environment including:
• Integrated Multi-Media Online

notification to all State Departments regarding security threats or issues. The SOC applies ITIL practices and processes including incident, problem, change, configuration management, release management, and security management. Data mining and digital dashboard capabilities provide instant visibility into the security of the State enterprise. Security incident data mining capability enables the State to analyze and prevent future security incidents. Proactive monitoring of email and data services precludes the release of Personally Identifiable Information (PII) or the loss/leakage of other sensitive data sets which may compromise the State or an individual Department.

7.2.1.3 ADAPTIVE COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT (ACE)
The Adaptive Computing Environment (ACE) establishes a consistent configuration for computing devices across the State using pre-approved vendors. State employees can order standard systems that are engineered to operate most efficiently in the OneNet environment. Choices are provided based on job classification for mobile/ tablet solutions, laptop/desktop or a strictly virtual environment for certain work. These systems require fewer support resources than non-standard configurations, enhance overall support effectiveness, and reduce total cost of ownership. The State uses a multiyear lease cycle for computing assets to ensure personal computing assets periodic refresh of technology for every Department to minimize asset issues, and shifts maintenance support of the hardware to the vendor.

Communications Services: A common interface provides communications services including voice to data to video. This service is provided by an online application environment.
• Collaboration and Conferencing

7.2.1.5 ENTERPRISE OPERATIONS
A single interactive Help Desk using technologies such as Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), live chat, video conferencing, and remote management tools provides service to the State user community. Users speak with their Help Desk representative directly as well as desk side technicians, as appropriate. The use of the remote management software enables Help Desk staff to demonstrate solutions “live” for the client. The implementation of customer service improvements including a fully developed three-tiered service model enhances Help Desk response time for problem resolution and creates an increased number of completed calls while maintaining high quality service. Enterprise Operations also includes the provision of field support staff with

Services: An integrated solution provides voice, video, and Web collaboration services are provided via robust VoIP solutions.
• Multimedia Content and Information

Services: OneNet provides quick and efficient access services to media rich and diverse content by authorized users anywhere, any time. Seamless Transition Communication Services: With mobility dominating the landscape, non-interruption of services is a must. In the course of using a service, such as voice services, a mobile user transitions from one environment to another without any service interruption.

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The following section contains the details of one of the key elements, Information Technology Services Management (ITSM) proposed for the future state of the ETA. This section is organized with the following elements:
• Definition – A brief statement to set

perspective and define the need for the domain or sub-domain architecture.
• Current State – A description of current

environment is reactive to technologybased problems. Within the various Departments and specifically the “have” organizations, SAIC found operational examples of Level 2 (service-focused environments with aspects of repeatable processes) with definite movement toward Level 3 (customer focused environments with defined processes).

• Service Excellence – Have we defined

what service excellence means to our customers?
• Service Performance Measurement –

What are our measures, and how are we measuring them? The role of IT, specifically the solutions/ systems and supporting infrastructure, is woven very deeply into business service success. The predominant customer experience with a business service and his or her impression of it is defined through the IT solutions with which they interact. Therefore, it becomes imperative for us to understand the IT systems that we have and how they map to these LOBs and business services. Managing the overall portfolio of services, and the associated IT systems and investments is critical. Again, additional key questions regarding these systems?
• How well are these systems supporting

FUTURE STATE VISION FOR ITSM
The future state eliminates stove-piped IT services and infrastructure by employing state-wide IT Service Management (ITSM). IT governance for the State employs a philosophy of managing IT services through the use of industry best practices for the improvement of business functions. ITSM is the philosophy of managing IT services, through the use of industry best practices for the improvement of business functions. The goal of ITSM is to:
• align services with the needs of

Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) for the domain.
• Future State – A description of the

future state vision for the domain or sub-domain.
• Best Practices – A comprehensive

listing of the best practices to guide the implementation of the ITSM.
• Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary

– A list of initiatives and activities required to fully implement ITSM within the State.

the employee and/or citizen?
• What are the mission critical or

7.2.1.7 IT SERVICES MANAGEMENT (ITSM) FRAMEWORK
The future state for IT services management, and even a broader scope of a strong service management discipline across all business services provided by the State, is based upon the adoption of mature industry models and best practices such as the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) for ITSM, the ISO 20000 standard for ITSM, and the Capability Maturity Model – Integrated (CMMI) for Services. The goal is to align services with the customer needs. Through the creation of service level agreements and the associated performance measurement, customers know what to expect from service providers and have the assurance that the service expectations are met.

the customer;
• improve the quality of IT services

mission essential services, and associated systems?
• Have we categorized the priority and

whatever way the customer expresses quality and value,
• reduce the long-term cost of

criticality of our systems and protected them accordingly? Our service management discipline should incorporate the continuous feedback from our customer base regarding their expectations and satisfaction with the delivery of services. And it should include the two-way communications regarding the service levels to be expected to “level set” the customer expectations. This is the essence of a service level agreement. The customer should have a simple solution for contacting the State regarding any issue with the receipt of services – being able to contact a Service Desk through a standard phone number, or Web site, or email, text, or tweet.

service provisioning.

SERVICE MANAGEMENT
The future state vision for service management ensures that these industry best practices include the broader scope of the State’s 35 lines of business and approximately 200 defined business services provided to 1.4 million citizens/residents by over 40,000 employees. Service delivery team members (including vendors) focus on providing services as needed when and where needed at the appropriate level of quality and cost while always ensuring the alignment with the customer or business requirements. The fundamental elements of this service management discipline answer the following key questions:
• Service Definition – What are our

CURRENT STATE SWOT FOR ITSM
The current state or As Is environment for ITSM in the State of Hawai`i is characterized in the Final Report in detail. In summary, SAIC rated the State’s enterprise ITSM maturity at a Level 1 (service management processes initiated) where 50% of the time the

products and services?

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ITSM
The starting point for realizing the future state vision is to adopt an ITSM framework to manage IT service provision. OIMT will adopt a tailored ITIL-compliant service management model as a best practice for establishing enterprise-level IT services. The elements of the vision include:
• Implementing an ITIL-based systems management infrastructure • Proactive system monitoring to improve up-time

• A knowledgebase as a cornerstone component where IT staff

can share problem resolutions and environment knowledge to enhance everyone’s productivity and efficiency in providing service support
• Empowered users with a self-help portal that

is characterized by: – access into the knowledgebase where anyone can obtain assistance in compliance to information sensitivity – the ability to check the status an inquiry/request/problem, with transparency on who was last assigned the ticket – information about systems accessible anytime and anywhere – An overall IT service delivery environment characterized by timely response and feedback from the service providers and positive customer satisfaction Figure 29 illustrates the ITSM future state process model.

and user experience
• Consolidation of all service support and operations through

a Service Management Operations Center
• A one stop shop (service desk) for services anytime and

anywhere with 24x7x365 support, access, and availability, and secure remote access for problem resolution

Figure 29: Future State Vision for the ITSM Model

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ITSM BEST PRACTICES
Table 22 outlines the best practices to be adopted in ITSM as part of this vision. The practices are organized by the ITIL Version 3.0 life cycle phases Table 22: Future State ITSM Best Practices

ITSM Life Cycle Phase ITSM Process Area Service Strategy Service Portfolio Management Service Portfolio Management Financial / Budgeting and Accounting Management Service Strategy Service Level Management Service Catalog Management Availability and Capacity Management Service Continuity Management Information Security Management Supplier Management Service Transition Knowledge Management

Best Practices
• Full life cycle of new and planned services, broader than the Service Catalog • Includes life cycle of planning for new services • Includes validating demands for new and current services from all customers • Customer service reps would be great approach for this • Includes funding model and accounting for all planned and current services • Address “fee for service” planning and accounting • Service level agreements and operating level agreements

• Active service catalog with automated rapid provisioning

• Proactive analysis of availability and capacity trends and planning and designing response

through supply chain

• Proactive analysis, planning, policy, and design of service continuity solutions

• Proactive analysis, planning, policy, and design of information

security framework and technologies

• Supply chain components of service catalog • Most critical capability in all of ITIL V3 – all functions and organizations using a common

knowledge management system

• All processes, functions, and organizations incorporate knowledge capture

Change Management

• Common enterprise Request For Change (RFC) process • enterprise Change Advisory Board (CAB) • Forward Schedule of Change

Configuration and Asset Management Release Management Service Operations Incident Management

• Federated Configuration Management Data Base (CMDB) • Integration with enterprise asset management processes • Enterprise level process for approved RFCs • Release, deployment, validation, and testing • Full incident response model that drives response group and logic from incident categorization • Tailored response from High Priority outages requiring immediate notification and 24x7 response

team to lower priority Tier 1 response

Event Management

• Enterprise systems management capability – tracking all devices/components,

up-time, resource usage

• Automate the linkage of events from Enterprise Systems Management to the Incident Management

Problem Management Access Management Request Fulfillment

• Most important discipline to identify and capture solutions for new, recurring problems

and push resolutions to lowest tier

• Automation of account resets, account requests and associated approval workflows • Multi-channel request capability, (800 number, text, email, Tier 0 Web request,

mobile app, tweet, etc.)

• Service catalog integration and rapid provisioning models (Select-Provision-Manage)

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ETA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR ITSM
In terms of the transition and sequencing plan for ITSM the tasks and activities are identified in relation to the service elements that are inherent to the ITSM. Additionally, outcomes and deliverables as well as dependencies are provided to guide the implementation activities. Table 23 provides additional detail on the initiatives required to ensure the successful implementation of the ITSM in conjunction with the implementation of the “new” enterprise infrastructure.

Table 23: ITSM Implementation Actions

ITSM Initiatives ITSM Program Development

Tasks/Actions
• Survey enterprise for existing service management

Outcomes / Deliverables
• ITSM Implementation Plan

Dependencies
• Confirm staffing

operations (what do we have?), capacity evaluation / assessment / requirement

• Communication planning and execution • Training/consulting in ITIL • Certification program (initiation/planning) • Curriculum development including University (UHM, HPU,

including organizational change, architecture, implementation, operations and maintenance

• ITSM Organization • ITSM Consulting

included within People and Organization Plan – FTE for Program Communications and Training

and Training Contractor

Chaminade, CC, etc.)

• ITSM Training Program • Certification/training

program roll-out

• Curriculum development

including University (UHM, HPU, Chaminade, CC, etc.) including funding model with fee for service introduction methodology
• Confirm staffing

Service Portfolio Development

• Use as a basis for planning and expanding the new OIMT

enterprise services to be offered including their definition, price/cost/funding structure, and service level agreements; leverages and re-purpose ICSD’s service catalog work. part of overall funding strategy for OIMT.

• Service Portfolio / Catalog

• Establish services cost build-ups and pricing structures as • Adapt new services/product/technology evaluation and

• New service / technology

included within People and Organization Plan – FTE for Portfolio and Funding Model development of rolling out new enterprise IT services included within People and Organization Plan – FTE for Customer Liaisons – ramp up over multi-year period to 12 representatives

• Conduct in advance

insertion methodology for services portfolio management.
• Customer Liaisons staffed

Customer Liaison Implementation

• Establish customer liaison or customer relationship

management role within OIMT and include services input and demand planning as part of the overall responsibilities. from Departments

• Confirm staffing

• Validate demands for new and current services • Facilitate and support LOB portfolio management activities

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Table 23: ITSM Implementation Actions

ITSM Initiatives IT Service Accounting System Implementation

Tasks/Actions
• Develop needed IT services cost measurement and

Outcomes / Deliverables
• Enterprise IT Services

Dependencies
• Leverage State ERP

accounting processes and systems

Accounting System deployed and operational

Financial Management module when operational; consider interim or pilot capability till that point included within People and Organization Plan – FTE for Portfolio and Funding Model development included within People and Organization Plan – FTE for Customer Liaisons – ramp up over multi-year period to 12 representatives

Service Portfolio Oversight

• On-going service portfolio oversight • Services funding model oversight • New service / product / technology evaluation /

• On-going service portfolio

• Confirm staffing

insertion oversight

On-going Customer Relationship Management

• On-going department customer liaison /

customer relationship management

• On-going customer

relationships

• Confirm staffing

SERVICES On-line Service Catalog Implementation
• Service Catalog Management • Publish services catalog-level information regarding all • Published Service Catalog • On-line request and rapid • Enterprise IT

production services through the OIMT web site in conjunction with services portfolio management discussed above. on the technical architecture.

provisioning capability implemented

Hardware / Software Procurements

• Include IT hardware products defined/authorized based

• Expand service catalog capabilities in the future to include

on-line requests and provisioning, e.g., use of a web form to request a virtual server and an automated provisioning system that implements the virtual server for the requester in near real-time.
• Enterprise service level

Service Level Reporting Implementation

• Service Level Management and Reporting • Develop a program plan for service-level measurement and

dashboard and reporting capabilities operational

• Depends on enterprise

analytics capabilities

reporting in conjunction with services portfolio management. methods and techniques/tools. dashboards for OIMT.

• Identify all required service-level measures and measurement

• Implement service-level reporting systems and summary

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Table 23: ITSM Implementation Actions

ITSM Initiatives

Tasks/Actions

Outcomes / Deliverables
• Availability, capacity,

Dependencies
• Depends on Enterprise

Enterprise IT Services Service Availability and Capacity Management Analytics Implementation • Implement end-to-end service monitoring system and measure up-time and response-time for critical applications, databases, processes, servers, storage devices, and networks. Leverage existing SolarWinds Orion toolset as the foundation.
• Profile server and storage inventory data to include

continuity, and security event analytics

Systems Management Implementation below in Service Operations

• Integrate with

capacity attributes.

Information Assurance and Privacy program

• Implement server and storage monitoring systems to

track and trend usage data.

• Integrate demand planning and usage trend analysis into

ongoing capacity management plan.

Service Security Management
• Integrate security operations monitoring and event response

with enterprise operations center approach.

• Establish standard security monitoring solutions, approaches,

and reporting. Leverage ArcSight and other existing products.

Service Supplier Management Implementation

Service Supplier Management
• Documenting and maintaining relationship with third-party

• Extension of enterprise service • Depends on Service

suppliers when used.

level dashboard and reporting capabilities to include supplier tier operations system to include suppliers

Level Reporting Implementation

• Measuring supplier performance. • Ensuring that suppliers participate in service request and

• Extension of service

incident management.

• Providing supplier reimbursement based on service fulfillment. • Benefits include integrated service delivery team, corrective

action, and dispute resolution.

SERVICE TRANSITION IT Service Knowledge Management System Implementation Knowledge Management
• Establish enterprise processes and a system • IT services knowledge

for knowledge management.

management system deployed and operational

• Depends on enterprise

collaboration service

• Depends on enterprise

• Ensure that all documentation regarding environments, asset

configuration, known problems, workarounds, solutions, user requests for service, and resolution scripts are stored within the knowledge management repository. management repository for environment and work instruction documentation. use this approach.

knowledge management service / system approach

• Ensure that IT workers at all levels use the knowledge

• Begin by ensuring that OIMT central services

Federated CMDB Implementation

Configuration and Asset Management
• Implement federated Configuration Management Data Base

• Federated CMDB deployed

and operational

• In parallel with enterprise

infrastructure deployment

(CMDB) – base federation on existing enterprise systems management tools, and build appropriate linkages/services to aggregate asset and configuration perspectives Add, Change, Delete authorization asset management services chain services

• Augment configuration management actions with appropriate • Integrate asset management transactions with enterprise • Integrate supply chain transactions with enterprise supply

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Table 23: ITSM Implementation Actions

ITSM Initiatives Service Transition (Change Management) System Implementation

Tasks/Actions Enterprise Change Management
• Record, plan, route, review, and approve changes associated

Outcomes / Deliverables
• Service Transition System

Dependencies
• In parallel with new

deployed and operational

with a configuration item.

enterprise service implementation Federated CMDB

• Provide adequate capacity to support change. • Ensure that change meets security, availability,

• In parallel with

and continuity requirements. expertise and authority.

• Convene a change review board with a balance of technical • Create an emergency change review process. • Communicate planned service outages through a schedule of

change and transition project portfolio.

• Perform post implementation reviews, project lessons learned,

and impact of change on incident volume.

Transition Project Management
• Address project management and oversight of all key

elements of a service/product/technology insertion with well-planned roll-out and upgrades to existing service/product technology including communications to and involvement of all key stakeholders in schedule decisions and transition execution, and impact analysis, planning, and mitigation.

Release, Validation, Testing, Deployment, and Evaluation Management
• Establish enterprise standards and procedures for execution

of releases to the production environment. on the production environment.

• Ensure adequate impact analysis and testing to mitigate impact • Ensure appropriate deployment plans are developed, tested,

and executed including roll-back procedures.

SERVICE OPERATIONS Enterprise Service Desk Implementation
• Establish Tier 1 Service Desk Function and ITIL Service • Enterprise Tier 1 Service Desk • In parallel with

Operation processes

established and operational

• Incident Management Provide/restore service as

quickly as possible by classifying, prioritizing, routing, and escalating incidents. Establish tier/escalation definitions. Communicate status of incidents. Validate user satisfaction with incident resolution. through workflow and approval, and submitting requests for fulfillment through incident management. Benefits include self-help, automation, and efficiency. service desk implementation.

• Service Operations processes

deployment of initial enterprise IT services

• Request Fulfillment – Capturing requests, distributing requests

• Access Management – Include all access requests in central • Problem Management – Establish root cause analysis

approach and procedures as part of a problem management process within the service operations program plan. Over time, ensure that all IT critical failures at all levels include a root cause analysis.

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Table 23: ITSM Implementation Actions

ITSM Initiatives Service Operations System Implementation Operations solution

Tasks/Actions
• Evaluate, select, and implement Integrated Service • Modules include:

Outcomes / Deliverables
• Integrated Service

Dependencies
• In parallel with Service

Operations Solution Management and Incident Management

Desk implementation enterprise systems management (event management integration)

• Integration of Event

• Integration with

- Enterprise “Ticketing” - Knowledge management - Self-help Web portal and tools - User Service Request - Integration with federated enterprise systems management tools (event management) - Remote support tool Enterprise Systems Management Implementation Event Management and Enterprise Systems Management
• Enhance operational availability monitoring through monitoring

• Enterprise systems

service infrastructure using network and server management tools, such as SolarWinds, CiscoWorks and Tivoli. system for automated ticket creation and support staff notification, where they are then tracked to resolution by the Service Desk. and infrastructure events (e.g., a server outage) and initiate appropriate incident notification and resolution processes.

management deployed and operational management with incident management system

• In parallel with incident

management system

• Integration of event

• In parallel with roll-out

of enterprise services

• Automate alerts and forward to an incident management

• Design and implement needed monitors for application

Enterprise Identity Management System Implementation

Access Management
• Establish access management systems to provide self-service

• Identify management system

deployed and operational operational

• Integrate with

options for end users on password management and resets. credentials and role-driven access management.

• Role-based access control

Information Assurance and Privacy program

• Establish identity management systems for management of

CONTINUOUS SERVICE IMPROVEMENT ITSM Communications and Training Program Execution ITSM Continuous Service Improvement Program Execution
• On-going ITSM Communications and Training • On-going ITSM

Communications and Training

• Follows ITSM Program

Development

• On-going service monitoring and analysis, corrective action,

and continuous improvement initiatives

• Service improvements

• In parallel with all

enterprise service initiatives

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Figure 1 provides a roadmap for both development/implementation of an ITSM capability and on-going operations and maintenance across the planning horizon.

Figure 30: Roadmap for Achieving Future State ITSM

7.2.3 TECHNOLOGY DOMAIN ARCHITECTURE
The ETA embodies a vision or view of the future of IT in the State. It was crafted with the widest possible participation from members of the State’s IT community and the population at large. Architectures are not developed to bind organizations to inflexible rules; the goals of the architecture are coordination, simplification, improved performance, and greater efficiency. The ETA is a component-driven, technical framework that categorizes the standards and technologies to support and enable the delivery of services and capabilities. It also unifies existing Departmental technical models and eGov guidance by providing a foundation to advance the reuse and standardization of technology and service components from an enterprise wide perspective. The governance process will resolve any architectural variances that may emerge over time. The ETA will evolve as technology evolves and as new initiatives emerge.

For the technology domain architecture discussed in the following sections, there are references to specific products as current or emerging standards, although the goal was to have a standards-based architecture throughout. In a number of cases, products were chosen as the standard where no widely accepted architectural standard currently existed. Product equivalence determinations relative to the architecture will be made by the governance committees as they review investment requests going forward. Aligning IT investments to the ETA leverages a common, standardized vocabulary, allowing interdepartmental discovery, collaboration, and interoperability. Departments and the State government benefit from economies of scale by identifying and reusing the best solutions and technologies to support their business functions, mission, and target architectures. The technologies, tools and systems within the State of Hawai`i are organized into seven primary technology domains. These domains are depicted in Figure 1.

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Figure 31: Technology Architectural Domains and Sub-Domains for the State of Hawai`i

The following sections contain the details of the domains and sub-domain that form the ETA for the State of Hawai`i. Each section is structured to support access to the information and technical content required as part of architecting a solution and its accompanying infrastructure and/or as part of the investment selection, control, and evaluation process. Each section is organized with the following elements:

Standards – Categorical tables that list current supported products or standards, twilight products or standards, preferred products or standards, and emerging trends within the industry. Preferred Products and Standards represent the preferred directions and products that should be considered when making implementation and design decisions. IT investments within the State center on the elements of this category. Supported Products and Standards represent the current supported products or standards that will continue to be supported within the State’s technical infrastructure for the foreseeable future. This column may designate supported standards by Department as needed. Rationale or historical reasons may be included when there is a broad set of choices. Sunset Products and Standards (or technology retirement targets) are those that should not be used for future investment or implementation. This is not to imply that existing resources should be eliminated/replaced, but that the use of these products and services

should not be extended in future planning and development. Guidance should be provided on timeframes for when a product should no longer be used. – Emerging Trends (or newly identified or introduced technologies) include directions and options that need continued monitoring to find applicability within the State IT infrastructure as they mature Generally the technologies associated with emerging trends are not yet fully production-worthy, but are potential candidates for future investment and implementation. Advanced users of technology, such as academic researchers in the State Universities, are usually the first implementers of these technologies. Continued market acceptance and adaptation will move these solutions toward the ETA’s preferred products or standards.

Definition – A brief statement to set perspective and define the need for the domain or sub-domain architecture. Current State – A description of current Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) for the domain. Future State – A description of the future state vision for the domain or sub-domain. Guiding Principles – An expression of values to be used in guiding technical choices in any effort. The order of the values does not imply priority or importance but merely assists with consistent technical direction setting.

Transition & Sequencing Summary Plan

– A summary of initiatives that will move the domain from the current state to the identified future state vision.

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7.2.3.1 INFRASTRUCTURE DOMAIN
The infrastructure domain represents the physical hardware used to interconnect technology and users. The infrastructure includes transmission media such as telephone lines, cable television lines, satellites, routers, and antennas. Included in the infrastructure domain are any devices, hardware or software, which supports the flow and processing of information.

• Poor location of primary State

• Technology should “Just Work”

data center
• Lack of COOP and DR Plan • 72 hours backup power • Issues with cooling, power, space

for whomever, wherever, whatever, whenever using any device of choice to interface with the IT information required.
• Desirable outcomes include:

and capacity
• Lack of Help Desk Support • No fully supported wireless access • Limited Pipe • Single DNS • Disparate email systems

– Technology that is effective in supporting customers’ missions – Technology that is easy to use (give users the “Easy Button”) – Technology that is easily adapted to changing business needs – Technology that empowers the end user
• Outcomes that are measurable • Hawai`i First and Cloud First – the State

CURRENT STATE SWOT FOR THE INFRASTRUCTURE DOMAIN
Strategy, architecture, design, implementation, and operation of the State’s technical infrastructure are currently distributed across the Departments. As noted in the Final Report, the State’s technical infrastructure lacks collaboration on common solutions and standards, and is characterized by a diversity of technologies. As noted in networks, this diversity and distributed management results in a general lack of coordination, compliance to best practices in a comprehensive fashion, and a robust, universal 24/7/365 support model. The current technical infrastructure environment is characterized by:
• Budget constraints • Out dated and limited facilities,

Nevertheless, there are significant areas of opportunity as identified by the CIOC and its working groups for starting fresh to bring standardization and economies of scale to benefit the customer base, to include:
• Virtualization technologies are a

pivotal means to aide in standardizing computing platforms.
• Volume discounts for hardware and

has a vision for a premiere data center capability and technical infrastructure that is hosted here in Hawai`i, with the cloud computing paradigm as the cornerstone.
• Five Islands – Hawai`i First, Mainland

software and coordinated purchasing
• Consolidated Storage • Statewide wireless (Wi-Fi hotspots) • Opportunity to leverage resources intra

departmentally (databases, applications, staff knowledge, etc.)
• Statewide standards that are enforced

Offload – the cloud computing solution will be a joint private/public cloud capability featuring fully meshed computing centers distributed across the 5 major islands with load balanced provisioning, with additional computing capacity offloaded to public cloud capability on the mainland.
• Private Cloud – the Hawai’i Cloud

equipment, and applications; and general lack of tools
• Reactive management versus proactive

to assure compatibility with current environment and to simplify support
• Establishment of an enterprise private

• Cumbersome procurement process • Lack of standardization (hardware,

state governmental cloud.
• 24 x7 x365 support

software, processing, etc.) and direction and multiple technology platforms (hardware/software/OS); fragmented infrastructure
• Lack of adequate engineering and

FUTURE STATE VISION FOR THE INFRASTRUCTURE DOMAIN
The future state vision for the Infrastructure Domain is based on input from the Computing and Storage Working Group and has the following major elements:

Computing Center will feature a private cloud capability with virtual environments supported by rapid provisioning (minutes). Cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.
• One clock source – all computing

operations support staff and lack of training of our technical staff
• Lack of willingness of staff to

centers and servers will operate from a synchronized clock source.

accept changes
• Lack of inter-departments

coordination collaboration/ cooperation/communication
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• Mainframe Reconfiguration – the Mainframe assets across the

• Acquisition – new enterprise level contracts will streamline the

State and Local governments will be reconfigured to provide redundancy and backup support; and the future state will leverage zLinux as a preferred platform.
• Technology Refresh – a technology refresh plan will be a major

supply chain connected through the service catalog to enable rapid provisioning of standard devices.
• Rights management services – enterprise rights management

component resulting in servers being refreshed every 4 years; and end user devices every 3 years.
• Select-Provision-Manage – an on-line Service Catalog

services will enable consistent role-based access controls across the solutions and infrastructure. IT services for the State of Hawai`i reside in central data centers that will provide high bandwidth connectivity, redundancy, and rapid provisioning of new services. This assures the high level of interconnectivity between IT systems, workloads, and facility infrastructure required for the departments to remain agile and adapt to changing business and regulatory environments in the future; therefore, future data centers will be designed to deliver desired service levels in a flexible environment that reduces complexity and increases operational efficiency. The following is a “notional” high level drawing for the proposed New Primary Data Center for the State of Hawai’i, including hosting services, the Hawai’i OneNet infrastructure, storage, compute, backup/recovery, and cloud devices are illustrated in Figure 1.

will contain standard virtual server platforms and end user computing devices for user selection and rapid provisioning.
• Virtual Desk Top – user interface devices will be thin client with

exceptional bandwidth and server side compute capabilities.
• Service Management – automated enterprise systems

management capabilities and ITSM best practices will improve overall quality while saving operational costs.
• SLAs – service level expectations will be defined within service

level agreements, and service performance will be regularly reported against those measures.
• Sustainability – the data centers and technical infrastructure

will be engineered consistent with Green IT best practices with features such as auto shutdown and alternative fuel and power sources.

Guiding Principles for Infrastructure Domain 1. IT is an enterprise-wide resource. IT investments will be aligned with the strategic goals of the state of Hawai`i through planning and architecture processes. a. Reduce implementation and support costs, through a consistent enterprise-wide approach to IT solutions. b. Consolidate or integrate existing systems and technical infrastructure. c. Provide the IT foundation to support the business processes of state entities and local governing authorities. 2. State IT infrastructure and architecture will support the state’s long term business, strategies and plans. a. Align and optimize IT resources with changing needs of state entities and local governing authorities. Enable the effective implementation of state business strategies. b. Highlight and promote the value of IT to executives and policy makers. 3. State IT solutions that deliver products and services to stakeholders will leverage the shared technology infrastructure by providing an infrastructure and architecture which will enable the state to respond to agency changes in technology and business requirement to increase the consistency, accessibility, and sharing of data and ensure interoperability by eliminating technology silos.

Figure 32: Data Center Future State View

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HOSTING, CLOUD, DATA CENTER SUB-DOMAIN
In terms hosting, cloud, and data center environment, IT services for the State of Hawai`i will reside in central data centers (new or repurposed) that provide high bandwidth connectivity, redundancy, and rapid provisioning of new services. The data center environment will be based on the TIA-942 Telecommunications Infrastructure Standards for Data Centers. The TIA-942 covers Site Space and Layout, Cabling Infrastructure, Tiered Reliability, and Environmental considerations. Table 24 provides a partial list of data center requirements. Table 24: Key Criteria and Requirements for the State of Hawai’i Data Center

Data Center Criteria Internal Network Backbone Speed Connection to Current State Next Generation Network External Internet Connections Speed Multiple Trusted Internet Carriers Multiple Network Backbones Loading Dock/moving Traffic Impact Building accessibility Emergency Services Building Foundation Physical Security (Guards, Alarms, Video Surveillance) Uninterruptible Power Supply Backup power generator(s) Adequate fuel supply for generators Facility Power load requirement Cooling requirements IT Systems Monitoring (network, cyber security, servers) Land Location 100+gb Minimum

Minimum Notional Requirements

Multiple Multiprotocol Label Switching connections

T1 or larger Digital lines 2 or more ISP Trusted Internet Connection providers Production/Test/Development environments Handle Semi-trailers and forklifts Minimize any necessary changes to local traffic patterns Disabled access to all areas, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant Easy accessibility by Fire/Police/Sheriff/EMS services Able to support 1,000 pounds per SF 24/7/365 guard force and monitoring, card key access, person traps and fencing

4 hrs. minimum to critical systems Critical system support (1Mw) Daily tank top off deliverables 1.5 Mw, with multiple substations 1 Mw @ 72 degrees F with 70% humidity 24/7/365 Network/Security Operations Center, Shared Services and Help Desk Support personnel 25 or more acres, includes parking and secure perimeter Facility must be located outside the flood zones

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The following further characterizes the future state for the hosting, cloud, and data center environment: Table 25: Future State Characteristics for the Hosting, Cloud, and Data Centers

Area IT Core Infrastructure Fully Provisioned
• Facility is in place

Characteristic
• Data Center room is built and ready including raised floor • Fully redundant power including Generators, UPS, Power Busses and PDUs • Fully redundant cooling including redundant Chillers and Compressors • Fire suppression using desired technology with appropriate zoning and monitoring • Redundant communications penetrations, risers and distribution frames • Physical Security Infrastructure

Power

• Power is the most critical design element for data centers

– Power exhaustion occurs prior to space exhaustion – Resiliency and proximity to multiple sources
• Every equipment refresh drives increased power and reduced space usage power sources critical • Minimum 24-30” raised floor, 350 w/SF for new data centers being built today • Thermal challenges now exist at all levels of the data center: chip, server, cabinet, data center and facility

Cooling

• Energy Usage Profile varies based on whether cooling is localized or via centralized chiller plant • Centralized plants are considerably more efficient than distributed plants, resulting in lower electrical

operating costs

• Centralized plants are initially more expensive and require more space to deploy • Sizing of cooling supply is directly related to average energy density at a facility bulk load • Increasing incidence of asymmetric design for cooling distribution to accommodate spot loads well above

planned average energy density the desired processor density

Servers

• Blades demand higher electrical draw and greater heat than 1U servers, but more thermally efficient for • Equipment strategy drives data center requirements significantly impacting

power and cooling requirements

• SAN implementations remove low energy density disks from cabinets, allowing for more energy dense

processors and increasing cabinet level thermal loads

• CPU density is driven by ever increasing business volumes and computational complexity

Storage

• Increasing integration from vendors, e.g. Cisco MDS • Storage market has been driven to significantly increase rate of development for replication technologies • Connectivity between the servers and storage will be provided via SAN fabric with switches comprising

the core of the fabric designed to handle large port counts and reduce the need for multiple aggregation switches. This allows servers to connect to storage through a common connection point. provisioning, dynamic tiering, archiving, and the extension of these technologies to existing assets with storage virtualization.

• There will be a greater focus on storage efficiency technologies such as dynamic or thin

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As part of the future state vision for the hosting, cloud, and data center sub-domain will evolve into the HC3. Going forward the HC3 facilities will provide hosting, virtualization, cloud computing, storage management, and disaster recovery services for the State. The initial planning and design of the HC3 environment will facilitate public/private partnerships so that services to business inside and outside Hawai`i can be accommodated. The HC3 will include two data center facilities in Oahu to immediately support State computing requirements. To further

leverage geographic separation of services, and to best serve the communities outside of Honolulu County additional public/ private facilities in each of the other three counties will provide enhanced services while leveraging consolidation, virtualization, common IT service management and the use of cloud computing throughout Hawai`i . Cloud computing is the next “pay-as-you-go” utility model. As depicted in Figure 1, the cloud computing paradigm has four Deployment Models, three Service Models, and five Essential Characteristics.

Figure 33: Cloud Computing Paradigm

The four deployment models which the cloud model is composed of: include private cloud, community cloud, public cloud, and hybrid cloud. Below are definitions of each deployment model.
• Private cloud -- The cloud infrastructure is operated solely for

• Hybrid cloud -- The cloud infrastructure is a composition

an organization. It may be managed by the organization or a third party and may exist on premise or off premise.
• Community cloud -- The cloud infrastructure is shared by

of two or more clouds (private, community, or public) that remain unique entities but are bound together by standardized or proprietary technology that enables data and application portability (e.g., cloud bursting for load balancing between clouds). There are three basic service delivery models that together create the ‘Cloud’ which categorizes vendors and services provided according to Cloud Computing Architecture types:
• Software as a Service (SaaS): Software deployment model

several organizations and supports a specific community that has shared concerns (e.g., mission, security requirements, policy, and compliance considerations). It may be managed by the organizations or a third party and may exist on premise or off premise.
• Public cloud -- The cloud infrastructure is made available to

whereby a provider licenses an application to customers for use as a service on demand
• Platform as a service (PaaS): Delivery of computing platform

and solution stack as a service

the general public or a large industry group and is owned by an organization selling cloud services.
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• Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS): Delivery of computer

• Offers Web or programmatic control interfaces. • Enables full customer self-service on demand • Offers location independent resource pooling.

infrastructure (typically a platform virtualization environment) as a service The five essential characteristics of the cloud include:
• Is accessible via Internet protocols from any computer. • Is always available and scales automatically to meet demand.

Figure 1 depicts the segments within the Cloud infrastructure and an example of what each segment could contain.

Figure 34: Proposed Cloud Computing Framework for the State of Hawai`i

The essential implementation steps to assess, design, transition, and operate the State of Hawai’i cloud computing environment are described below:

Guiding Principles for the Cloud Computing Domain
• On-demand self-service. A consumer can unilaterally provision

computing capabilities, such as server time and network storage, as needed automatically without requiring human interaction with each service’s provider.
• Broad network access. Capabilities are available over the network

the provided resources but may be able to specify location at a higher level of abstraction (e.g., country, state, or datacenter). Examples of resources include storage, processing, memory, network bandwidth, and virtual machines.
• Rapid elasticity. Capabilities can be rapidly and elastically provisioned,

and accessed through standard mechanisms that promote use by heterogeneous thin or thick client platforms (e.g., mobile phones, laptops, and PDAs).
• Resource pooling. The provider’s computing resources are pooled to serve

in some cases automatically, to quickly scale out and rapidly released to quickly scale in. To the consumer, the capabilities available for provisioning often appear to be unlimited and can be purchased in any quantity at any time.
• Measured Service. Cloud systems automatically control and optimize

multiple consumers using a multi-tenant model, with different physical and virtual resources dynamically assigned and reassigned according to consumer demand. There is a sense of location independence in that the customer generally has no control or knowledge over the exact location of

resource use by leveraging a metering capability at some level of abstraction appropriate to the type of service (e.g., storage, processing, bandwidth, and active user accounts). Resource usage can be monitored, controlled, and and policy makers.

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The Cloud Service Life Cycle for the State of Hawai`i will contain four implementation phases and a series of activities. There are outlined below: 1. Strategy and Assessment – activities include: a. Providing orientation/training on cloud computing and vendors’ capabilities, experience, and approach b. Understanding customer culture, organization, and environment c. Defining, communicating, and obtaining acceptance of charter including: constraints (time, resources, scope) and deliverables

iv. Assessing service/application and licensing capability with virtualization/cloud and orchestration. v. Assessing service/application architecture for benefits from cloud automation. vi. Assessing and design integration of cloud with existing landscape. vii. Finalizing definition future-state architecture: vendor’s cloud reference architecture, cloud model, cloud type, cloud security. viii. Completing initial and detailed design: Cloud Network element design, Cloud Storage element design, Cloud Compute element design. ix. Completing traceability assessment of design to requirements. x. Documenting bill of materials. 3. Transition – activities include: a. Documenting transition and communicating the project plan/schedule b. Acquiring bill of materials c. Implementing, testing, and documenting infrastructure (network, compute, storage, virtualization), cloud services (self-service, charge back, measured service, cloud operating environment, and orchestration), and cloud storefront (catalog, portal, provisioning, management of workflow, approvals, financial controls

d. Assessing current-state e. f. Assessing if cloud makes good mission/business sense Assessing what capabilities, services, or use cases cloud will address

g. Assessing risk (security, cost, schedule, etc.) h. i. j. Assessing if a cloud solution is feasible Assessing cloud readiness Developing an operational vision/strategy (initial concept of operations) Developing and recommending cloud solution roadmap/timeline and obtaining acceptance of deliverables

k.

2. Design – activities include: a. Selecting strategic partnerships and suppliers (using cloud partner ecosystem) b. Defining roles and responsibilities in support of cloud operations, updating the service organization structure in support of cloud operations, and identifying cloud support communications and training (organizational and cultural change management ) c. Defining g services, service levels, and metrics for iCloud on-demand self-service service catalog / Cloud portal/store front; and ii) Cloud measured service. Engineer mission/business, service, and management policies, processes, and procedures for cloud broad network access, cloud resource pooling, and cloud elasticity

d. Integrating multi-cloud management and monitoring systems with customer systems e. Engaging cloud brokerage, if appropriate (intermediation, arbitrage, aggregation) Bundling applications for migration and scheduling migration events

f.

g. Migrating application and services to cloud h. Transforming organization (roles and responsibilities, knowledge transfer, and training) Facilitating creation/update of customer policies, processes, procedures for operations

i.

d. Technology: i. Updating current-state baseline collected during the strategy phase. ii. Developing/documenting requirements leveraging methodology’s cloud requirements set. Completing analysis (alternatives, technologies, brands) and assessing cloud brokerage (intermediation, aggregation, and arbitration

4. Operation – activities include: a. Ensuring available, reliable, and functional cloud service that meets requirements and demand resulting in higher user satisfaction b. Measuring cloud service performance c. Recovering cloud service operational costs

iii.

d. Optimizing and integrating the production support team
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e. f.

Provisioning of cloud service rapidly Responding to business/mission changes through a cloud services architect role

g. Documenting operating procedures facilitating disaster recovery, cross-training, etc. Figure 1 provides a notional view of the State of Hawai`i Cloud Computing Framework.

Figure 35: Notional View of Cloud Computing Framework

Table 26 represents the hosting, cloud, and data center sub-domain description. Table 26: Hosting, Cloud, and Data Center Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain Data Center Facility Site and Construction

Sunset Products / Standards Urban location

Current Supported Products/ Standards

Preferred Products / Standards ANSI/TIA-942 or TIA-942 (2005, 2008, 2010) Uptime Institute (1995) Tier structure

Emerging Trends

Non-flood plan, above grade

Movement toward Tier 3 Data Centers based on Design Documents, Constructed Facility, and Operational Sustainability NIST 500 and 800 publications

Cloud Services Reference Model

National Institute of Science and Technology. http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/ nistpubs/800-145/SP800-145.pdf. Revised 24 July 2011.

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DISASTER RECOVERY SUB-DOMAIN
Disaster recovery options are identified to ensure the ability to continue required operations post disaster.

protection process; if the application is protected by backups alone, then it means how often a backup is run.
• Recovery Time Objective (RTO) - The time required to recover

BACKUP - RESTORE
The backup environment design will implement leading technologies to provide data protection services. The design provides a diverse platform topology containing a software suite that integrates and manages disparate physical storage mediums for the sole purpose of protecting State of Hawai`i data. The selection of a single backup will resolve several crossdisciplinary design requirements. The backup/restore product will implement a distributed client-server application that provides data protection support for the State of Hawai`i’s enterprise servers. The solution will consist of a master server with associated software components, media servers with associated software components managing storage devices and client software that provides the capability to backup, restore and archive files or directories, and volumes or partitions that exist on State of Hawai`i data center enterprise servers. The following describes the future state of the backup-restore environment:
• Backup – Restore System Inputs and Outputs

the application or server to the RPO from the moment that a problem is detected. Many factors influence the RTO including the provisioning of hardware and the roll-forward time for application transaction logs—but one constant factor is the time needed to restore the data from the backup or snapshot that forms the RPO. Figure 1 provides a notional view of a multi-Site Data Center Disaster Recovery framework for the Hawai`i COOP/DR solution.

- During a backup or archive, the client sends backup data across the dedicated backup network to a server. The server manages the type of storage and retention period that is specified in the backup policy. - During a restore, users can browse, and then select the files and directories to recover. The backup/restore product finds the selected files and directories and restores them to the disk on the client via the dedicated backup network. - Policies determine when backups occur. Policies include schedules for automatic, unattended Backups of the clients (server-directed backups). Policies also define when to back up and restore files manually (user-directed operations). - Administrators can set up periodic or calendar-based schedules to perform automatic, unattended backups for clients across a network. An administrator can carefully schedule backups to achieve systematic and complete backups over a period of time, and optimize network traffic during off-peak hours.

Figure 36: Notional View of a Multi-Site Data Center Disaster Recovery Environment

In addition, the future state vision from Infrastructure Working Group regarding disaster recovery and continuity of operations plan (COOP) includes the following elements:
• Data Recovery/COOP

Real time backup and point in time recovery Time to restore requirements Revenue Collection, Accounting, Human Resources, Welfare, Health, Benefits and Pension Administration

• Protection of mission critical applications including: Financials,

• Load balancing between the primary and secondary sites • DR/COOP • Load Balanced Data Centers • Fault Tolerance, hot site, active-active

BACKUP – RESTORE SYSTEM BEHAVIOR
Backup system behavior will be predicated on recovery capability—there is no such thing as a “backup service level.” Two key concepts will underpin all recovery service levels:
• Recovery Point Objective (RPO) - The most recent state to

• Loss of connectivity between island data centers (radio, microwave)
• Loss of connectivity to mainland • Backup power • Test DR/COOP plans • Long term fueling issue (IT and Procurement) • Alternative power technology (fuel cell, geothermal, wind, etc.)

which an application or server can be recovered in the event of a failure. The RPO is directly linked to the frequency of the
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Table 27 represents the description of the Disaster Recovery Sub-Domain. Table 27: Disaster Recovery Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain Off Island Storage

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards Iron Mountain

Preferred Products / Standards
• Automatic Disparate

Emerging Trends

Cloud based solutions for “active-active” and • Bandwidth optimization “active-passive” array replication
• Consistency Sets

Application Recovery

Real time load balance

End-to-end redundancy Image-based or High fault tolerance snapshot technology SATA FireWire (IEEE-1394) RAID 6 SATA FireWire (IEEE-1394) LTO-3 Dual path multi-provider No single point of failure

Network Connectivity

Dual path multi-provider

SERVERS AND STORAGE SUB-DOMAIN
The services and storage sub-domain represent the hardware and operating systems where enterprise applications and systems reside. These platforms will be scalable, highly fault tolerant, and designed with failover capabilities for mission critical applications. Figure 1 is a notional representation of a data center storage environment that will be considered in the new Hawai`i data center implementation.

Figure 37: Notional Representation of Data Center Storage (Gartner Developed) 98 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture

Table 28: Servers and Storage Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain Mainframe Platforms

Sunset Products / Standards OS/390, Z/OS release 9 and below

Current Supported Products/ Standards Z/OS

Preferred Products / Standards ERP product suite; Virtualization to fullest extent Windows Server 8, Solaris 11

Emerging Trends Specialty blades; green equipment; Big Data analytics; Virtualization Windows Server 8, Solaris 11

Server Operating System

Windows 2003 and below, NT4, Novell Netware, Solaris 8, AIX 5.3 and below Compaq, 3rd party

Solaris 9 and above, AIX 6.1 and above, Windows 2008 and above

Server Platforms Server Virtualization Platforms Storage Platforms Storage Platforms (Backup) Enterprise Storage Platforms (Backup) Enterprise Software Storage Platforms (Backup) End User

Dell, HP, IBM, Sun VMware, Citrix EMC, IBM, NetApp StorageTek, IBM Tivoli Storage Manager Minimal

Cloud virtualization “cloud” integrated platform SAN SAN SAN

Converged solutions such as Cisco UCS “cloud” integrated platform SAN SAN SAN Cloud based storage, security and retrieval

DIRECTORY SERVICES SUB-DOMAIN
The services and storage sub-domain represent the hardware and operating systems Directory services are software systems that store, organize, and provide access to information (e.g., names, contact information, computer hardware). The resulting directory will be used by other systems to identify users and process information flows related to a person or group of persons. The future state will include directory services at the enterprise level for authentication and communications. Table 29 represents this sub-domain. Table 29: Directory Services Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain Enterprise Directory Services

Sunset Products / Standards Novell

Current Supported Products/ Standards Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) version 3, MS Active Directory Domain Services

Preferred Products / Standards X.500; Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) version 3, MS 802.11i authentication and encryption Digital certificates; Public key infrastructure

Emerging Trends Active Directory Domain Services

Web Authentication

SiteMinder

Emerging PaaS; graphical authentication techniques; image-based authentication

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ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT SUB-DOMAIN
Enterprise systems management refers to the activities, methods, procedures, and tools that pertain to the operation, administration, maintenance, and provisioning of networked systems.
• Operation deals with keeping the network (and the services

corrective and preventive measures to make the managed network elements run “better” such as adjusting device wconfiguration parameters.
• Provisioning is concerned with configuring resources in the

that the network provides) up and running smoothly. It includes monitoring the network to spot problems as soon as possible, ideally before users are affected.
• Administration includes tracking of resources in the network

network to support a given service. For example, this might include setting up the network so that a new customer can receive voice service. Data for enterprise systems management will be collected through several mechanisms, including agents installed on infrastructure, synthetic monitoring that simulates transactions, logs of activity, sniffers and real user monitoring. Table 30 describes this sub-domain further.

and how they are assigned and it includes all the “housekeeping” that is necessary to keep the networked systems under control.
• Maintenance is concerned with performing repairs and

upgrades (e.g. when equipment must be replaced, when a router needs a patch for an operating system image, when a new switch is added to a network). Maintenance also involves Table 30: Enterprise Systems Management Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain LAN Diagnostics LAN Monitor

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards WireShark, TCPdump SolarWinds Orion, SNMP compliant

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends

IEEE 802 LAN/MAN Standards Committee

Correlation and alarm de-duplication with impact analysis of alarms IPFIX or RMON SLA portal reporting Network based with auto data log capability Correlation and alarm de-duplication with impact analysis of alarms Synthetic modeling with proactive threshold model SLA portal reporting Stack based intrusion detection systems Integrated Network/ Wireless/Host based prevention in network. Integrated data Loss prevention platform

LAN Performance LAN Reporting WAN Diagnostics

SolarWinds Orion MRTG Cisco Works, Sniffer, WireShark, Ethereal

WAN Monitor

SolarWinds Orion, SNMP compliant

WAN Performance

MIB, SolarWinds,

WAN Reporting Intrusion Detection

MRTG Snort

Intrusion Prevention

Cisco IPS

Security Diagnostics

Vulnerability scanners, Nessus

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Table 30: Enterprise Systems Management Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain Security Monitor

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards ArcSight

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends Integrated Security information and event management Integrated Security information and event management Integrated Security information and event management Synthetic modeling with proactive threshold model

Security Performance

ArcSight

Security Reporting

ArcSight

Application Performance

ETA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR INFRASTRUCTURE DOMAIN
The following provides a list of the key projects and initiatives required to achieve the future state for the infrastructure domain. Develop and Construct or Build Out a Primary and Backup Data Center Environment Plan and create two new data centers (primary and a backup or disaster recovery site) with the participation of both the technology and business organizations. This activity will require a committed team that has technical depth in a number of areas:
• Complex Project Management • Information Assurance and Security • Business Relationship Management • Technology Infrastructure • Application Development, Database Management • Virtualization planning to reduce number of physical servers

and to drive improvements in Disaster Recovery
• Consolidation planning for database servers,

where appropriate
• Consolidation of storage onto SAN

• Reduction of the applications footprint by lowering the number of servers per application
• Identification of applications that require transformation • Reduction of capital requirements for Technology Solutions • Creation a systems standardization plan • Migration to a standardized platform (Cloud, Server Type, OS,

and Operations
• Application Testing • Data Replication • Systems Migration • Systems Consolidation

Database, etc.) where appropriate
• Server refresh cycle planning. • Develop an overall DR approach. • Determine where the primary data center should reside. • Perform a high-level cost analysis of bringing State facilities

Other required planning activities include:
• Performing a complete analysis of current servers and their

up to an acceptable level of performance versus cost of hosting services with an accredited and certified thirdparty facility.

utilization so they can be more effectively leverage in the new environment;

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Due to the criticality of the hosting, cloud, and data center sub-domain, a number of initiatives will be launched to make key determinations relative to the environment prior to the actual development. The following represent these activities and actions in detail. Define Primary Data Center and DR Strategy Based on Three Alternatives This initiative formalizes the strategy for the creation and location of the Primary Data Center and how disaster recovery will be addressed within the State. The following three alternatives have already been identified for further consideration.
• Remain in Kalanimoku

- Considerations - how to leverage a third-party facility as a co-location site for servers, storage, and network equipment; management adjustments; configuration and deployment for servers and applications; certified in environmental controls, power, 24x7 services, and physical security; near-term and long-term needs.
• Blended strategy between a third party and State facilities.

- Considerations – utilization of a third-party location as the primary data center while retaining an existing or new State facility for DR needs or vice versus. The strategy serves as the launching point for the other initiatives described below. The estimated cost of this initiative is Pending Review.

- Considerations - substantial expenditure to address cooling, airflow, structural inefficiencies, power distribution, and UPS requirements; flooding concerns; alternative locations within the building on the second or third floor to reduce the threat of flood water entering the basement.
• Utilize third-party facilities as a primary and DR data

CONSOLIDATE DATA CENTERS
This initiative builds off the direction set by the Primary Data Center and DR Strategy and addresses the consolidation of services, hardware, and physical data centers. The consolidation planning begins by using the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative (FDCCI) to classify the existing facilities and their overall footprint as illustrated in Table 31.

centee configuration

Table 31: Server Closets, Server Rooms, and Data Centers by Department

Departments CSEA (AG) HCJDC (AG) B&F DAGS (non-ICSD) DBEDT DCCA DHHL DHRD DHS DLIR DLNR DOD DOE DOH DOT DOTAX
4

Server Closet (<200 sq. ft.)

Server Room ( < 500 sq. ft.) X X

Data Center (> 500 sq. ft.)

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

The FDCCI definition of computing space - any room devoted to data processing servers, i.e., including server closets (typically < 200 sq. ft.) and server rooms (typically < 500 sq. ft.) within a conventional building, just like larger floor spaces or entire buildings dedicated to housing servers, storage devices, and network equipment are defined as data centers (typically >500 square feet).” 102 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture

Table 31: Server Closets, Server Rooms, and Data Centers by Department

Departments HDOA PSD UH ICSD GOV/LT GOV

Server Closet (<200 sq. ft.) X

Server Room ( < 500 sq. ft.)

Data Center (> 500 sq. ft.)

X X X X

Table 27 represents the description of the Disaster Recovery Sub-Domain. Table 32: Estimated Costs to Complete a Data Center Consolidation

Fiscal Year 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Total

Est. Total Hrs Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Hawai`i IT Labor Cost Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Equipment and Hardware Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Leases Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Other Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Total Cost Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

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Table 33: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Data Center Consolidation

Fiscal Year Activity Activity FY13 Planning and Project Management
• Gather Requirements

Description of Tasks Description

• Create the Engineering Design team structure and membership • Build and Maintain the Risk Matrix • Establish and Train to the Standard Engineering Design Process • Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Perform “Design Week” preliminary design activities, with vendor consulting support

Analysis of Alternative (AoA) for Cloud solution

• Prepare RFI/RFP • Perform Analysis of Alternatives (Trade Study) • Perform Procurement and Negotiation • Cloud Training and Certification

AoA for Non-State Owned Data Center Site and preliminary design of initial infrastructure

• Prepare RFI/RFP • Perform Analysis of Alternatives • Perform Procurement and Negotiation • Design Cage Build out • Design Cable/Cabinet Build out • Design Circuit plans for WAN, internet, MetroE, MPLS

Activity FY14 Planning and Project Management
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Establish and Train to the Standard Engineering Design Process • Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities

Cloud solution Non-State Owned Data Center Equipment Installation and Implementation

• Cloud Training and Certification • Issue final design and final Bills of Materials (BOMs) • Procurement and Installation • Foundation - Network Engineering • Foundation - Network Security • Foundation - Network Services • Traditional - Storage • Traditional - Physical Compute • Traditional - Backup • Cloud solution • Infrastructure Testing • Operations & Maintenance

Activity FY15 Planning and Project Management Cloud solution Non-State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the risk matrix

Description

• Empower business management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Cloud Training and Certification • Operations and Maintenance
• Test Continuity of Operations

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Table 33: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Data Center Consolidation

Fiscal Year Activity Activity FY16 Planning and Project Management Non-State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description of Tasks Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Secondary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Activity FY17 Planning and Project Management Non-State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities
• Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Secondary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Activity FY18 Planning and Project Management Non-State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Empower business management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Define Technology Refresh Cycle for Hardware • Load level with Secondary Site • Test Continuity of Operations • Operations and Maintenance

Activity FY19 Planning and Project Management Non-State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Secondary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Activity FY20 Planning and Project Management Non-State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Secondary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Activity FY21 Planning and Project Management Non-State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Secondary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

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Table 33: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Data Center Consolidation

Fiscal Year Activity Activity FY22–23 Planning and Project Management Non-State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description of Tasks Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Secondary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

DEVELOP SECONDARY DATA CENTER (STATE OWNED FACILITY)
The development of a secondary data center includes the build out of a mirrored production environment, while also serving as the recovery site for the primary data center. Maximum protection for the State’s continuity of operations will be addressed with the near-line data backup and recovery capability at the primary data center coupled with the mirrored production workloads at the secondary data center coupled with off-site backup capabilities to the outer islands as well as the Mainland. In turn, this effectiveness requires an alignment of business continuity planning with articulated business goals. Effective disaster recovery and business continuity planning depends on the State’s ability to identify critical processes and technologies, maintain and recover functionality after a planned or unplanned event, and balance the risks with the costs of continuity efforts. Table 34: Estimated Costs to Develop Secondary Data Center For example, Dell provisions more than 100 percent capacity for each application so that it can split application load balancing across multiple data centers. Each application has 75 percent of required capacity in each data center— lending each application 150 percent of its nominal capacity requirement. Not only does this load-balancing strategy translate to high-performance applications, but it also helps ensure that disaster recovery and failover capabilities are being tested every moment of every day. This way, when Dell needs to implement its disaster recovery plan, the company knows it will work because it is already part of the existing load-balancing strategy .

Fiscal Year 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Total
5

Est. Total Hrs Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Hawai`i IT Labor Cost Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Equipment and Hardware Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Leases Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Other Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Total Cost Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

http://www.dell.com/downloads/global/power/ps1q06-20060124-CoverStory.pdf

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Table 35 represents the initiatives and projects for the Secondary Data Center. Table 35: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Secondary Data Center

Fiscal Year Activity Activity FY13 Planning and Project Management Analysis of Alternative (AoA) for State Owned Data Center Site Activity FY14 Planning and Project Management Analysis of Alternative (AoA) for State Owned Data Center Site
• Update the Risk Matrix • Update the Risk Matrix

Description of Tasks Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Engage Architect Engineer • Engage process for Site Evaluation, Site surveys, building retrofit management, permitting, etc. • Engage appropriate Hawaiian Home Lands, as necessary

Description

• Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Engage Architect Engineer • Engage process for Site Evaluation, Site surveys, building retrofit management, permitting, etc. • Engage appropriate Hawaiian Home Lands, as necessary • Submit proper documentation to DAGS • Complete necessary documentation and receive approval to proceed with construction

Activity FY15 Planning and Project Management
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Establish and Train to the Standard Engineering Design Process • Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities

State Owned Data Center Infrastructure Design activities

• Work with Architect Engineer • Work with Site Evaluation, Site surveys, building retrofit management, permitting, etc. • Work with appropriate Hawaiian Home Lands, as necessary • Complete necessary documentation and receive approval to proceed with construction • Infrastructure design for Cage, Cable plant, Cabinets, Circuits • Begin Construction/Retrofit

Activity FY16 Planning and Project Management
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Establish and Train to the Standard Engineering Design Process • Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities

State Owned Data Center Construction and Design activities

• Complete Construction/Retrofit • Issue final design and final Bills of Materials (BOMs) • Procurement and Installation • Foundation - Network Engineering • Foundation - Network Security • Foundation - Network Services Traditional - Storage • Traditional - Physical Compute • Traditional - Backup • Cloud solution • Infrastructure Testing • Operations & Maintenance

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Table 35 represents the initiatives and projects for the Secondary Data Center. Table 35: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Secondary Data Center

Fiscal Year Activity Activity FY17 Planning and Project Management State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description of Tasks Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Primary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Activity FY18 Planning and Project Management State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Primary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Activity FY19 Planning and Project Management State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Primary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Activity FY20 Planning and Project Management State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Primary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Activity FY21 Planning and Project Management State Owned Data Center Construction and Design activities Activity FY22–23 Planning and Project Management State Owned Data Center O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix • Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Define Technology Refresh Cycle for Hardware

Description

• Establish Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Primary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

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CREATE THREE ISLAND DATA CENTERS (STATE OWNED FACILITIES)
Once the Primary and Secondary sites are fully implemented, this initiative resolves access issues to the outer islands by providing all the islands of that State with access to affordable ultra, high-speed Internet by 2018. This will position Hawai`i to be the first state in the nation with 1 gigabit per second broadband connectivity at every public school, every public library, and every public university and college campus by using about Pending Review of federal monies received through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This will provide the opportunity to leverage connectivity for State offices at remote islands and improvements for State NGN.

In addition, Hawai’i is unique among the 50 States in that it is remote, susceptible to emergencies and catastrophic events that would not affect the contiguous States, and removed from the contiguous States creating latency issues therefore, providing satellite data center sites that are fully meshed and networked with the Primary and Secondary Sites on Oahu will provide the State of Hawai`i with continuity of government and operations. The three island data centers initiative will include consideration of “Docking Centers” format where the “Data-Center-In-ABox” system can plug in. The “Docking Center” would provide cooling, power, and network connectivity to the “Data-CenterIn-A-Box”, along with staff workspace. This approach minimizes the need to build multiple large data centers and provide a mobile Data Center where or when needed.

Table 36: Estimated Costs for Development of the Third Data Center

Fiscal Year 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Total

Est. Total Hrs Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Hawai`i IT Labor Cost Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Equipment and Hardware Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Leases Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Other Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Total Cost Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Table 37: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Development of the Third Data Center

Fiscal Year Activity Activity FY17 Planning and Project Management AoA for Three Island State Owned Data Center Site Activity FY18 Planning and Project Management AoA for Three Island State Owned Data Center Site
• Update the Risk Matrix • Update the Risk Matrix

Description of Tasks Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Engage Architect Engineer • Engage process for Site Evaluation, Site surveys, building retrofit management, permitting, etc.

Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Engage Architect Engineer • Engage process for Site Evaluation, Site surveys, building retrofit management, permitting, etc. • Engage appropriate Hawaiian Home Lands, as necessary • Submit proper documentation to DAGS • Complete necessary documentation and receive approval to proceed with construction

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Fiscal Year Activity Activity FY19 Planning and Project Management AoA for Three Island State Owned Data Center Site
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description of Tasks Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Engage Architect Engineer • Engage process for Site Evaluation, Site surveys, building retrofit management, permitting, etc. • Engage appropriate Hawaiian Home Lands, as necessary • Submit proper documentation to DAGS • Complete necessary documentation and receive approval to proceed with construction • Infrastructure design for Cage, Cable plant, Cabinetry, Circuits

Activity FY20 Planning and Project Management Three Island State Owned Data Center Site Infrastructure Design and Build Activities
• Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Engage Architect Engineer • Engage process for Site Evaluation, Site surveys, building retrofit management, permitting, etc. • Engage appropriate Hawaiian Home Lands, as necessary • Submit proper documentation to DAGS • Complete necessary documentation and receive approval to proceed with construction

Activity FY21 Planning and Project Management Three Island State Owned Data Center Site Infrastructure Design and Build Activities O&M Activity FY22–23 Planning and Project Management Three Island State Owned Data Center Site Infrastructure Design and Build Activities O&M
• Update the Risk Matrix • Update the Risk Matrix

Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Primary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

Description

• Empower Business Management to handle IT procurement, contract, negotiation activities • Operations and Maintenance • Load level with Primary Site • Test Continuity of Operations

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MIGRATE APPLICATIONS FROM THE CURRENT DATA CENTERS TO THE PRIMARY DATA CENTER
Once the Primary Data Center is implemented during FY14 (see Primary Data Center development initiative above), the next Table 38: Estimated Costs to Perform Application Migration

activity will be migrating applications from the current data centers to the Primary Data Center, where data redundancy and disaster recovery considerations have been implemented as a high priority.

Fiscal Year 14 15 16 Total

Est. Total Hrs Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Hawai`i IT Labor Cost Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Equipment and Hardware Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Leases Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Est. Other Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Reviewt

Est. Total Cost Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Table 39 represents the key project for the Application Migration. Table 39: Projects and Initiatives Associated with Application Migration

Fiscal Year Activity Activity FY14 Applications Characterization
• Issue RFI/RFP

Description of Tasks Description

• Develop Rules of Engagement between vendor and State of Hawai’i • Develop Project Management function • Perform characterization, interdependencies, and scheduling function

Activity FY15 Applications Characterization Activity FY16 Applications Characterization
• Define Key Migration Execution Roles

Description

• Begin migration of applications to Non-State Owned Data Center

Description
• Complete migration of applications to Non-State Owned Data Center

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DEVELOP A STATE-WIDE ACTIVE DIRECTORY SERVICES ENVIRONMENT
Plan and create a State-wide active directory services environment. Benefits of deploying Active Directory in a Network Operating system (NOS) management role include:
• Ability to centrally manage very large networks. • Ability to eliminate resource domains, including the hardware

• Site topology mirrors network topology. • Dedicated use domain controllers • Multiple DNS servers

and administration they entail.
• Policy-based desktop lockdown and software distribution. • Ability to delegate administrative control over resources,

Active Directory allows administrators to organize elements of a network (such as users, computers, devices, and so on) into a hierarchical, tree-like structure based on the concept of containership. The top level Active Directory container is called a forest. Within forests, there are domains. Within domains there are organizational units (OUs). This is called the logical model because it is designed independently from most physical aspects of the deployment, such as the number of replicas required within each domain and network topology. Estimated cost for this project is Pending Review. It should be noted that all the above activities are inextricably linked the State of Hawai’i future network, OneNet.

where appropriate.
• Simplified location and use of shared resources.

Figure 38: Roadmap to Achieve the Future State for the Infrastructure Domain

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7.2.3.2 NETWORK DOMAIN
The Network Domain includes the network for the State and all associated services and technologies. The network consists of both wide-area network (WAN) and local-area network (LAN) components. The WAN extends the network outside buildings and beyond campuses. This is typically created by using circuits and routers to connect geographically separated LANs. The LAN interconnects devices over a geographically small area, typically in one building or a part of a building. The network architecture describes a common, high-performance, reliable, broadband network infrastructure providing data, video and voice communications for the State’s distributed information processing and publishing environment.

application and storage services, and full disaster recovery capabilities. OneNet, with guaranteed performance levels, will take full advantage of new network technologies and fulfill the needs of all State Departments’ employees and citizens in the State of Hawai`i for information access. The Internet, as a global networking infrastructure, continues to make the world a smaller and more demanding place. OneNet will be both wired and wireless and will truly create an “anytime, anywhere connected” networking environment. It will introduce an “always-connected” citizen community. Recent advances in convergence technologies not only promote the convergence of a single physical IP infrastructure, but also introduce convergence of feature-rich services that can be provided in a secure, reliable, cost effective manner to meet the State’s mission. The Network OneNet Working Group provided a detailed breakdown of activities by biennium with requirements as follows: 1. OneNet must be a highly redundant, reliable, and available backbone for the five Data Centers. 2. Data Center Connectivity 2.1. Data Centers provide POP for Internet and high speed interconnections to other Data Centers. 2.2. Redundant connections through private providers and State wireless systems i.e. microwave. 2.3. Integration of private carrier services to critical sites providing redundancy for immediate and surrounding sites. 2.4. Separate State fiber optic rings. 2.4.1. Networks based on access to dark fiber and optical Wave Division Multiplexers (WDMs providing additional bandwidth as needs grow. 2.4.2. Minimum requirements 2.4.3. 32 wavelengths

2.4.4. 1 and 10Gbps Ethernet 2.4.5. 2 to 10Gbps Fiber Channel 2.4.6. SONET OC-3 to OC-192 2.5. Negotiate with Private carriers for bandwidth (dark fiber, dim fiber, leased circuits, etc.). 3. High availability backbone sites must have the following: 3.1. 24x7 Access 3.2. Backup Power 3.3. Physical Security 3.4. Potential Candidates: 3.4.1. Utilize State facilities with existing infrastructure i.e. prisons and hospitals 3.4.2. Negotiate with the counties to utilize police, fire stations, and other facilities with the appropriate infrastructure. 3.4.3. Negotiate co-location terms in private carrier facilities and central offices. Benefit of allowing carriers to provided services faster and cheaper. 3.4.4. Create separate fiber optic ring infrastructure from other INET partners (DOE/UH) that is owned and controlled by the State. 3.4.5. DOE and UH can be customers of the State’s network. 4. Cost recovery based on telecom industry standard practices. 4.1. Line charges to customers based on subscribed bandwidth as well as optional subscribed services i.e. QoS/CoS. 4.2. Requirement for higher level of responsiveness (SLAs) 4.3. Non-recurring charges i.e. for infrastructure builds and engineering services.

CURRENT STATE SWOT FOR THE NETWORK DOMAIN
The State currently has specific centers of excellence in networking solutions and management practices. In its entirety, the State lacks collaboration on common solutions and standards, and has limitations on providing consolidated network management. This results in a general lack of: coordination, a centralized knowledgebase, compliance to best practices in a comprehensive fashion, and a robust, universal support model that is 24x7x365. Also, underlying system capacity knowledge is not being tracked and not readily available. In general the demand for network service provision overwhelms the current capacity and resource base.

FUTURE STATE VISION FOR THE NETWORK DOMAIN
The future state vision for the network domain is a single State of Hawai`i network (OneNet) which is deployed to provide every Department and its entire staff on every island with a high speed secure and highly reliable voice, video, and data services. At the heart of the OneNet will be a multi-path, mesh data center solution to provide virtual computing power, cloud-based

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Figure 39 depicts Hawai`i’s OneNet enterprise network with complete end-to-end governance frameworks and support services. The enterprise LAN will provide users with all services on the private cloud while the WAN will provide redundant high speed links through three different carriers. Network Operations and Security Operations Centers will provide proactive continuous monitoring of the entire network keeping assets secure and available.

Figure 39: Conceptual Model of the Network Domain Infrastructure

The Hawai`i OneNet, further illustrated in Figure 40, will be modeled after validated designs based on industry standard best practices. The goal of the enterprise network is to provide a unified, common, and centrally managed infrastructure for IT services to run on. Using a common framework, this modular design will be scaled to accommodate different size needs quickly and easily. For the future state vision the goal will be to have five fully meshed functional shared services centers (SSC) distributed across the islands to provide high availability, redundancy, fault tolerance, data backup and replication, disaster recovery, and always-on services to the State of Hawai`i (Figure 41).

Figure 40: OneNet Future State Vision 114 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture

Connections between shared services centers will be provided with dedicated high-speed fiber optic lines with service providers and state wireless connections acting as redundant and backup links respectively.

Figure 41: Shared Service Center Vision for the ETA

Guiding Principles for the Network Domain 1. Networks are able to adapt to growth and technology change when they support multiple traffic types (e.g. data, video, voice).
• The increasing investment in network infrastructures dictates that

• As business expands, networks expand. A flexible, open network design

allows a business to minimize the costs and disruptions of configuration management while providing timely and responsive network changes when and where required. 2. Network access is a function of authentication and authorization, not of location.

the life span of each additional component or enhancement be as long as possible. This will be accomplished if the design supports both current needs and anticipated growth potential.
• As business expands, networks expand. A flexible, open network

All users must obtain authentication via a user identification method consistent with the standards and usage guidelines set by Hawai’i. Authorization of users must be performed according to the security rules of Hawai’i. In order to perform their job functions, users need to access services available from multiple sites within the enterprise, from a variety of public and private networks, and from the Internet.

design allows a business to minimize the costs and disruptions of configuration management while providing timely and responsive network changes when and where required. 1. Network access is a function of authentication and authorization, not of location.
• All users must obtain authentication via a user identification method

3. Fully available networks are essential to the enterprise.

consistent with the standards and usage guidelines set by Hawai’i
• Authorization of users must be performed according to the security

rules of Hawai’i.
• In order to perform their job functions, users need to access services

Networks provide an increasingly important and necessary role in the execution of business functions and processes. The availability of the network 7/24/365 must be maintained in a consistent and complete manner up to 5-sigma uptime and availability. Networks consist of and rely on many interrelated and highly complex components distributed across a wide geographic area. Failure of any single component can have severe adverse effects on one or more business applications or services. Reliable networks contain no single point of failure. Networks are comprised of many components, and are often only as reliable as the weakest link. Therefore, reliability and redundancy must be built into the design, not added-on in an ad hoc manner.

available from multiple sites within the enterprise, from a variety of public and private networks, and from the Internet.
• Networks are able to adapt to growth and technology change when

they support multiple traffic types (e.g. data, video, voice).
• The increasing investment in network infrastructures dictates that •

the life span of each additional component or enhancement be as long as possible. This will be accomplished if the design supports both current needs and anticipated growth potential.

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• Bandwidth must be sufficient to accommodate new and expanding

applications, different types of data (e.g., voice, data, image, and video), and a variety of concurrent users.
• The network must support software distribution and installation to a •

Open, vendor neutral networks provide the flexibility and consistency that allows departments to respond more quickly to changing business and regulatory requirements. An open, vendor-neutral network to allow the State to choose from a variety of sources and select the most economical network solution without impacting applications and insulates the State from unexpected changes in vendor strategies and capabilities. Design applications to be transport-independent.

widely dispersed user community.
• The network must be designed to minimize latency.

4. Properly designed networks accommodate multi-vendor participation and support common, open, vendor-neutral protocols.
• Open, vendor-neutral protocols provide the flexibility and consistency

that allows departments to respond more quickly to changing business requirements.

WIRED SUB-DOMAIN
This sub-domain includes wired WAN and LAN technologies and is described in Table 40. Table 40: Wired Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain Physical Layer

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards

Preferred Products / Standards 1000BASE-T –IEEE 802.3 (40), 1000BASE-TX – TIA/EIA 854

Emerging Trends 10GBASE-T - IEEE 802.3an-2006 with Category 6A ANSI/ TIA/EIA-568-B.2-10 cables or better, WSON (Wavelength Switched Optical Networks) NSIS, MPLS-TP Multi-chassis capable switches 5G Pervasive Networks Microsoft DirectAccess Next Generation IGP with IPv6 support UCaaS (Unified Communications as a Service) MPEG-DASH Enterprise NCCM (Network Configuration and Change Management) tools

Traffic Engineering LAN

MPLS, QOS, COS SNMP managed switches

MPLS-TE, RSVP-TE SNMPv3 managed multilayer network devices Broadband, 4G-LTE VPN, SSL VPN OSPF, IS-IS

Remote Access – Physical Layer Remote Access – Protocol Layer Interior Gateway Protocol Video Teleconferencing

Broadband SSL

H.323

Unified Communications

Video Streaming Remote Management

MPEG 4 SNMP, MIB

H.264 SNMPv3

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Table 40: Wired Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain Voice Mail Gateways Domain Name Servers

Sunset Products / Standards Centrex

Current Supported Products/ Standards VoIP Cloud Based with central filtering Single statewide primary and secondary with geographically separated failover

Preferred Products / Standards Unified Communications Cloud Email Solution Distributed DNS NIST Special Publication 800-81 Secure Domain Name System (DNS) Deployment Guide NIST SP800-53

Emerging Trends IP-PBX, Hosted Voice UCaaS SaaS Email Hybrid Delivery Solution Secure Distributed DNS

WIRED SUB-DOMAIN
This sub-domain (Table 41) includes technologies (e.g., Bluetooth, WiFi, satellite and cellular) that will be used by employees as required. Table 41: Wireless Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain WiFi WiFi- Security Cellular Satellite Bluetooth

Sunset Products / Standards 802.11b/g WEP, WPA

Current Supported Products/ Standards 802.11n 802.1x w/ WPA2

Preferred Products / Standards 802.11n WPA2-Enterprise (802.1x / EAP-TLS)

Emerging Trends 802.11ac, 802.11ad Femtocells

Versions 1 and 2

Radio defaulted to off unless user activates. Version 3.0 and 4.0

Version 4.0

Pending Review

RADIO SUB-DOMAIN
The radio sub-domain will include any microwave or RF platforms in use for primary or emergency communications inter- and intra- island. Included are the facilities which support the transmission and reception as well as frequency management and required regulatory reporting. In the future today’s system’s limitations will be eliminated for the individuals representing transportation, public health, utilities, and public works, and public safety who rely on it. The Radio Program mission is to ensure the effective use of Radio and microwave equipment and licensed spectrum, to oversee radio compliance by the Executive Branch, and to fill all State and

Federal legal requirements associated with radio matters. The following further describes the future direction for the Radio Program:
• Creating a Statewide Governance and

• Providing Oversight of Radio Training

Programs and other types of outreach for both Agency Radio Officers and for all Departmental radio personnel.
• Coordinating with others in promoting

Implementation process to the support the implementation of an Emergency Communications Plan
• Establishing goals and priorities for

adherence to sound radio practices and procedures within and beyond the Executive Branch.
• Serving as central point of information

addressing deficiencies in the State’s emergency communications structure.
• Monitoring all Agencies’ Radio licensing,

on radio matters. The Radio Sub-Domain description provided in Table 42 will not be populated until OIMT and the State of Hawai`i provide a Governance oversight for this sub-domain, which has been started (refer to the additional information and url below this table), but is incomplete. In addition the Radio SubEnterprise Architecture | 117

procurement, and FCC notices for ensuring statutory compliance.
• Assisting proper fulfillment throughout

the State of reviews and reporting requirements for the Radio Program.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Domain primarily has a Law Enforcement component that links the State, Counties, DOD, and Homeland Security that will remain confidential and will not be part of any published information. Table 42: Radio Sub-Domain Description

Infrastructure Hosting, Cloud and Data Center Sub-Domain RF/Microwave Diagnostics RF/Microwave Monitor RF/Microwave Reporting Spectrum Testing Spectrum Management Platform RF Facilities Structure – exterior Data Facilities Structure – interior Mechanical Systems – Inside RF facility Mechanical Systems – Fire Suppression Mechanical Systems – backup power generation

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends

Radio Sub-Domain Addendum Information http://idea.hawaii.gov/userimages/accounts/90/907159/panel_upload_18993/SupplementalAddendumRadioSystemsPlan2.0.pdf

ETA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR THE NETWORK DOMAIN
The Network T&S Planning Summary is inextricably tied to the Infrastructure Domain’s activities and initiatives. All the elements of Network Domain planning related to the Data Center, O&M resources, and inter-island communications leases are discussed in the Infrastructure Domain. Transition and sequencing initiatives and activities for the Network Domain are based on industry best practices and validated designs, includes input from the Network Working Group, and the creation of quarterly performance milestones for IPv6 adoption.

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENT ONENET
This initiative occurs in four phases. Estimated ring separation cost is Pending Review for Oahu, Pending Review per island of Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai for a total of Pending Review total.

Phase I (Years 1-2) – • Negotiate with Oceanic (Cable Franchise Agreement or independent agreement). - At least two route diverse dark fiber connections between the two main Oahu Data Centers
- Establish separate State rings on each of the major islands of Oahu, Kauai, Maui, and Hawai`i . The design is based on at least one high availability ring per island (2 on Oahu) with subtending rings and spurs connected to sites on the main ring. - Additional high speed interisland connectivity (Oceanic currently provides a shared 10Gbps link between the islands for the State, DOE, and UH. Terminations of these connections will be at the designated island’s data center and telecom center.

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- As part of standard franchise agreement with Oceanic, request connectivity to interim, private data centers.
• Establish pricing with other carrier between interim data

CREATE IP ADDRESSING – REMOVAL OF NETWORK ADDRESS TRANSLATION FROM DEPARTMENTS
This initiative occurs in four phases with an estimated cost of Pending Review Phase I (Year 1-2) • Departments will develop their respective transition plans if they are not currently using their NGN assigned addresses. • ICSD/OIMT to develop removal of NAT Transition Plan. - Determine order that departments will migrate off of NAT. - Develop policy to determine what traffic is not allowed in and out of departments for security purposes. This allows for transparency and safeguards in the event there is a security event/outbreak at a respective department location and there needs to be the ability to segment quarantine a portion of the network to prevent further outbreak. Phase II (Years 3-4) • Migration to NGN assigned addresses by departments not currently in compliance. • Implementation of NAT Transition Plan for departments in compliance. Phase III (Years 5-6) • Implementation of NAT Transition Plan for departments who were required to achieve compliance in Phase II.

centers on Oahu for network diversity.
• Establish SLA, chargeback process • Establish basic NOC/SOC 24x7 staffing

Phase II (Years 3-4) • Establish full NOC/SOC support with 24x7 onsite support. • Implement Oahu high availability backbone and connectivity to interim data centers. Phase III (Years 5-6) • Implement high availability backbone and data center connectivity (1 island) Phase IV (Years 7-8) • Implement high availability backbone and data center connectivity (1 island) Phase V (Years 9-10) • Implement high availability backbone and data center connectivity (1 island)

PROVIDE VIDEO SUPPORT
Video conferencing includes support for facility specific locations (Video Conference Centers), desktops, and mobile devices. Self-scheduling allows users to schedule conferences without the need for centralized oversight. Deployment of multicast systems allows for organizational wide announcements, training, etc. This initiative includes four phases with an estimated cost of Pending Review. Phase I (Year 1-2) • Upgrade existing video conferencing centers that will serve as enterprise models for room conferencing. • Develop cost recovery plans and acquire automated system for cost recovery Phase II (Years 3-4) • Upgrade/acquire additional bridging capabilities to support larger user base including desktops, notebooks, and mobile devices i.e. tablets and smartphones. • Deployment user based scheduling. Phase III (Years 5-6) • Deployment of VoIP and video integration (answer calls via video/voice or simply voice). Phase IV (Years 7-8) • Implementation of multicast capabilities on the network • Acquisition of multicast video equipment Phase IV (Years 9-10) • Technology refresh

CREATE IP ADDRESSING – TRANSITION FROM IPV4 TO IPV6 INITIATIVE
This initiative occurs in five phases with an estimated cost of Pending Review. The key activities include:
• Replacing and/or upgrading equipment and software to be

IPv6 ready.
• Training for staff on IPv6. • Designing the network to allow for renumbering. • ARIN recommends upstream providers enter into

contractual arrangements with their customers stipulating that the address space may have to be returned, requiring all end-sites to be renumbered. • Obtaining IPv6 address space. • Replacing/upgrading/procuring OS, software, network management tools, routers, firewalls, etc. to be IPv6 compliant. • Training for IT staff on IPv6. Phase I (Year 1-2): • Determine cost of IPv6 Address Space, Training, and Network Equipment upgrades. • Obtain IPv6 Address Space. • Training for staff on IPv6. • Establish test network/lab for IPv6.

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Phase II (Years 3-4: • Develop IPv4 to IPv6 Transition Plan. – Determine how IPv6 addresses will be distributed. – Develop order as to which departments will migrate off of IPv4. Phase III (Years 5-6): • Replacing and/or upgrading network equipment to be IPv6 ready. • Procuring IPv6 Management Tools not used in the IPv4 arena. • Replacing and/or upgrading of operating systems, software, and applications to be IPv6 compliant. Phase IV (Years 7-8): • Assignment of IPv6 addresses for existing hosts. • Assignment of IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to new hosts. Phase V (Years 9-10): • Implementation of IPv4 to IPv6 Transition Plan.

Phase III (Years 5-6):
• Complete the tasks involved with the sequencing

plan of the removal of Network Address Translation for Departments.

STAFFING NETWORK SECURITY ORGANIZATION
The ability to support the vision of OneNet is critically dependent upon the ability to recruit, hire, staff and train employees on an ongoing basis. Staffing levels must be sufficient to support Network Operation Centers (NOC) on a 24x7x365 basis. The identification and/or hiring and training additional network security occurs during the next 10 years and the estimated cost is Pending Review. Phase I (Years 1-2): • Development of OneNet Support Staff organizational structure: * Oahu – Engineering & Design Section (5) – Network Security Section (5) – Routing & Switching Section (5) – Transport Section (5) – Data Center (5) – Technicians (5) – At least two staff employees will be on site during evening and early morning hours. • Neighbor Islands: – Big Island (5) – Maui (5) – Supports Molokai and Lanai – Kauai (5)
• Development of position descriptions along with:

DEFINE AND IMPLEMENT COMPREHENSIVE NETWORK SECURITY
*Proper network security controls are required to protect the
availability of the OneNet. Network security controls allow for the ability to:
• Segment/quarantine portions of the network in the event

• •

• • • • •

there is a security outbreak at a Department attached to the OneNet. Provide protection from external and internal threats (Firewall, IDS, IPS, Secure Web Gateways, DLP). Perform health checks (e.g., Virus Signatures, Patching Levels, etc.) of devices attempting to connect to OneNet internally or externally. Support SSL VPN services. Support Role Based Access Control. Forensic/Data Retention of network events (logs) at all layers (CDA) for a minimum of two weeks. Provide flow based security incident and event monitoring. Provide application rate shaping/ flow control.

– Recruitment above the minimum. – Shortage Differential – Merit pay with opportunity for advancement.
• Begin the process of filling positions for the OneNet

Network Support Staff.
• Provide training for staff positions that are filled. This will

This initiative occurs in three phases. Estimated is Pending Review independent of the infrastructure costs. Phase I (Years 1-2): • Evaluation of existing network security tools (e.g., IPS, Next Generation Firewalls, UTM, NAC, etc.) to determine their role in OneNet. • Begin the implementation/upgrading of network security tools identified in the evaluation. - Guidance/Requirements/Recommendations will be needed from the Information Assurance Branch (IAB). Phase II (Years 3-4): • Complete the implementation/upgrading of network security tools. • Align network security tools with the sequencing plan of the removal Network Address Translation for Departments.
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include travel expenses for training conducted outside the State of Hawai`i . Phase II (Years 3-4): • Continue the process of filling positions for the OneNet Support Staff. • Provide training for staff positions that are filled. This will include travel expenses for training conducted outside the State of Hawai`i . Phase III (Years 5-6): • Continue the process of filling positions for the OneNet Support Staff. • Provide training for staff positions that are filled and continuous training for existing staff. This will include travel expenses for training conducted outside the State of Hawai`i .

Enterprise Architecture

Phase IV (Years 7-8): • Continue the process of filling positions for the OneNet Network Support Staff.

Phase II (Years 3-4): • Deployment of network support equipment/structure to support the Self Sustainment Model. Phase III (Years 5-6): • Begin the implementation of Self Sustainment Model. – Perform analysis of Self Sustainment Model and determine whether charge backs fair, consistent, and adequate
• Refresh of equipment older than 5 years.

IMPLEMENT NETWORK LIFE CYCLE METHODOLOGY
To properly maintain OneNet, implementation of a network life cycle methodology and sustainment mechanism is required. This also allows OneNet to become self-sufficient due to the implementation of a Self-Sustainment Model where charge backs are issued to Departments. The funds received will allow for equipment maintenance, upgrades, and refreshes to occur on a scheduled basis. Determination of cost items will be based on current industry standards. This implementation occurs in five phases and will cost approximately Pending Review. Phase I (Years 1-2): • Development of Self Sustainment Model (Charge Backs – Model similar to that of private carrier charges) – Recovery of NRC, ICB and special builds costs. * Bandwidth with enforcement through rate-limiting – Drops/Locations – Qos/Cos – MRC to be a percentage discount from average cost of private carriers.

Phase IV (Years 7-8): • Complete implementation of Self Sustainment Model. • Continue analysis of Self Sustainment Model. • Implement necessary changes for Self Sustainment Model. • Refresh of equipment older than 5 years. Phase V (Years 9-10): • Continue analysis of Self Sustainment Model. • Implement necessary changes for Self Sustainment Model. • Refresh of equipment older than 5 years. Figure 42 represents the roapmap to achieve the future state vision for the Network Domain.

Figure 42: Roadmap for Achieving the Future State Network Domain State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture | 121

7.2.3.3 END USER COMPUTING DOMAIN
The EUC is an agent (human or machine) which consumes services provided by software packages or programs. Generally, end users are dependent on this technology to complete daily work tasks.

“PC vendors must prepare for the growth in demand for this client computing architecture by adjusting sales strategies and compensation models or they risk losing expenditure share with enterprise customers,” said Annette Jump, research director at Gartner. Figure 43 depicts how various operating systems, various releases, and various vendors’ software can be standardized and consolidated to Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI). VDI extends server virtualization to desktop operating systems that are hosted on virtual machines (VMs) running is a secure datacenter. Users’ access to virtual desktops is through open Internet based protocols.

CURRENT STATE SWOT FOR THE END USER COMPUTING DOMAIN
The State currently has specific centers of innovation (Hawai`i Public Library System) in providing for end user pilots, bring your own device (BYOD) solutions, and collaborative practices. In its entirety, the State lacks end user computing common solutions and standards. This results in a general lack of coordination, a centralized knowledgebase, compliance to best practices in a comprehensive fashion, and a robust, universal support model that is 24x7x365. This EA document addresses several EUC areas that are in other sections, such as Message and Collaboration Services and End-User Development. Underlying system capacity knowledge is not being tracked and not readily available. In addition, in general the demand for network service provision overwhelms the current capacity and resource base.

FUTURE STATE VISION FOR THE END USER COMPUTING DOMAIN
Incorporation of End-user perspectives is quite complex. This is primarily due to the inability to have a clear boundary for what the term “End-user perspective” represents. Consequently, key concepts such as End-User Computing, End-User Development, and Usability all are related concepts which fall within the boundary of ‘End-user perspective’. End-User Computing has been defined as “direct interaction with application software by managerial, professional, and operating level personnel in user departments” (Torkzadeh and Lee, 2003), while other have noted that End-user computing “means that the user of the results of the computing also creates the software specifications necessary to effect the computing itself”. End-User Development has been defined as a set of methods, techniques, and tools that allow users of software systems, who are acting as non-professional software developers, at some point to create, modify or extend a software artefact (Lieberman, Paternò, and Wulf, 2006). The academicians try to define what End-User Computing is while the worldwide hosted virtual desktop (HVD) market will accelerate through 2013 to reach 49 million units, up from more than 500,000 units in 2009, according to Gartner. Worldwide HVD revenue will grow from about Pending Review to Pending Review in 2009, which is less than 1 percent of the worldwide professional PC market, to Pending Review in 2013, which will be equal to more than 40 percent of the worldwide professional PC market.
Figure 43: Virtual Desktop Migration

A VMWARE BLOG FROM 6/8/2012 SAYS:
“ …the consumerization of IT is a force in IT that can’t be stopped. It can be managed, but not stopped (nor should it). Increasingly employees are choosing the devices and the services they want to use to get their jobs done. The people you really want to work for you no longer want to be forced to work on dull corporate issued notebooks or mobile devices. They want to use the same phones and tablets at work as they and their friends do at home. Let’s face it, when it comes to devices - they’re no longer viewed as just something to get work done with. They’ve grown to become a statement, or extension of oneself, or selfimage. That is: they’re now viewed by many as fashion. Who wants to be seen with a stodgy black notebook when they can have the latest flashy netbook or tablet? However, the more important trend, at least when it comes to security and regulatory compliance - is happening under the surface of the device. It is how employees are choosing the cloud-based applications they want to use. These impulse application selections means, too often, that proprietary data or data that should be protected actually ends up scattered through many online services and accessed on devices the enterprise doesn’t manage.”

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Figure 44 provides a high level graphic depicting the capability for VDI to protect proprietary data from being scattered through many online services and accessed on devices the State does not manage.

Figure 44: Secure Managed Services with Virtual Desktop

Guiding Principles for End User Computing Domain 1. Technology is viewed as an enabler of productivity; all computing devices support mobile applications and work seamlessly throughout the technical environment. 2. End user devices are kept current with security and Operating System updates and patches. 3. “End-User Empowerment, enhancing traditional user service interaction by facilitating the selection, creation, composition, customization, reuse and sharing of applications in a personalized operating environment. 4. “Seamless Context-Aware User-Service Interaction. New-generation service front-ends should have the capability to detect, represent, manipulate, and use contextual information to adapt seamlessly to each situation, supporting human users in a more effective, personalized and consistent way. Novel engineering tools and methods should be devised in order to support context-aware service front-ends. 5. “End-User Knowledge Exploitation. This principle aims to exploit users’ domain knowledge and collective intelligence to improve service front-ends. End users’ knowledge can be used to tag resources using

light semantics, assist while interacting with services, enrich contextual information (e.g. by means of automatic user profiling) and infer new candidate processes to be later automated (on the back-end). 6. “Universal Collaborative Business Ecosystems. Enterprise systems should incorporate advanced user-centric, context-aware front-ends to enable their employees and other stakeholders to exploit and share their extensive domain expertise, and their thorough business knowledge. Employees, customers, developers and providers will collaborate to create and improve enterprise applications, sharing, reusing, changing and combining existing context-aware components.”*

*“End-User Development Success Factors and their Application to Composite Web 1Development Environments” David Lizcano, Fernando Alonso, Javier Soriano and Genoveva L´opez ICONS 2011 : The Sixth International Conference on Systems

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DESKTOP, LAPTOP, AND MOBILE SUB-DOMAIN
This sub-domain requires standardization of computing hardware to simplify maintenance and offer economies of scale for purchasing hardware. Table 43 describes this sub-domain. Table 43: Desktop, Laptop, and Mobile Sub-Domain Description

EUC Desktop, Laptop and Mobile Sub-Domain Desktop/Workstation

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards

Preferred Products / Standards 64 bit x86 architecture with multicore CP

Emerging Trends 64 bit architecture with multi core CPU Thin or Ultra-Thin clients with virtual desktop Ultrabook with local SSD and cloud storage

Laptop

Need to be at a specification level and not call out vendors on this. Meet need multiple levels based on a short list of types of roles: Entry-level, User, Super-User. RIM Blackberry RIM Blackberry iOS, Android 4.0, Windows Mobile 8 Apple, Android

(Example:) WinTel Desktop, 8GB RAM minimum, Windows 7 Professional

Wireless/PDA

Latest stable release of iOS, Android, or Windows Mobile Tablet with Wi-Fi + 4G-LTE

Multi-core processor smartphones with high res touch displays Tablet computing with cloud storage

Tablet

USER PRODUCTIVITY SOFTWARE SUB-DOMAIN
This sub-domain includes core applications installed on the majority of computing devices to enable employees to perform work tasks and communicate electronically. This sub-domain is described in Table 44. Table 44: User Productivity Software Sub-Domain Description

EUC Desktop, Laptop and Mobile Sub-Domain Desktop Operating System

Sunset Products / Standards Windows 2000, Windows NT, Windows XP SP3

Current Supported Products/ Standards Windows 7, Mac OSX 10.6 or above

Preferred Products / Standards 64-bit standard; virtual desktops

Emerging Trends Windows 8 up Virtualized Desktop Infrastructure, Cloud based OS MS Office 2012; Hosted solutions Cloud based productivity applications

Productivity Tools

MS Office 2003, MS Office 2007

MS Office 2010, Adobe Reader X

Virtual productivity tools

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USER PRESENTATION SUB-DOMAIN
This sub-domain identifies applications and tools used to provide multi-media content to the end users. Table 45 provides additional detail about the User Presentation Sub-Domain. Table 45: User Presentation Sub-Domain Description

EUC Desktop, Laptop and Mobile Sub-Domain Web Browser

Sunset Products / Standards IE 6,7

Current Supported Products/ Standards IE 9, Firefox 9, Safari 5

Preferred Products / Standards W3C Consortium, http:// www.w3.org

Emerging Trends IE 10, Firefox 14+, Google Chrome, Opera, HTML 5 compliant WebKit2 based mobile browsers CORBA - Common Object Request Broker Architecture is an architecture and specification for creating, distributing, and managing distributed program objects in a network. AIFF(uncompressed) (*.aif, *.aiff) WAVE (LPCM only) (*.wav) Hardware design of multiple engine compression and decompression

Video

QuickTime Ver7 (Win) and X (Mac), MPEG-4

Motion JPEG2000 (*.mj2) AVI (*.avi) (uncompressed) Motion JPEG (*.avi, *.mov)

Audio

MP3

AIFF(uncompressed) (*.aif, *.aiff) WAVE (LPCM only) (*.wav)

Picture/Image

JPEG, GIF 89a, PNG

JPEG, GIF 89a, PNG

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PERIPHERALS SUB-DOMAIN
The Peripheral Sub-Domain includes external devices that provide input and output for computers. Table 46 describes this sub-domain. Table 46: Peripherals Sub-Domain Description

EUC Desktop, Laptop and Mobile Sub-Domain Printer

Sunset Products / Standards Impact Printers

Current Supported Products/ Standards Laser, Inject Printer

Preferred Products / Standards Laser, Inject Printer; ISO/IEC 24711 ISO/IEC 19752

Emerging Trends Multi-function devices which incorporate print, copy, fax, scan, email capabilities. Group printing to MultiFunction device unless business justification is satisfied. OLED (Organic Light-Emitting Diode) display, QD-LED (Quantum Dot) display External media (USB drive, SSD, etc.) with full encryption; intelligent infrastructures ready to support cloud-based environments

Personal Printer

Laser, Inkjet Printer

Color Laser, Inkjet; ISO/IEC 24711 ISO/IEC 19752

Monitor

CRT

LED, LCD

LED, LCD; ENERGY STAR program requirements for computer monitors Encrypted devices; 100 Gigabit Ethernet (100GE) and 40GE capabilities to the Cloud

External Hard Drive

Unencrypted attached storage

ETA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLAN SUMMARY FOR THE END USER COMPUTING DOMAIN
Transition and sequencing is based upon a thorough assessment of the current end user posture, including looking at some of the Centers of Innovation within the State. This transition and sequencing is dependent on decisions to create Virtual Desktops and Network processes within the larger initiative. The identified initiatives have been created in participation with the End User Planning Working Group to provide a road map and project phasing to address a comprehensive integrated capability.

based protocols. Since the desktop VM is maintained in a secure datacenter, there is better containment of State information and more efficient usage of centrally managed, pooled and shared IT resources. Within the VDI infrastructure, desktops can be persisted or be taken offline; therefore, users have the flexibility to customize and access with their desktops from multiple locations. With more than 41,000 employees in state offices, the State of Hawai`i faces significant challenges from threats that may disrupt efficient operations. Vital to Hawai’i is the dependence on IT services needed to deliver adaptive and secure solutions in the future. To provide continual growing support for mobile workforces and to diminish disruptions in the workplace caused by natural disasters, pandemics, and security threats, a VDI pilot is included as part of the initiative. This pilot will enable secure and reliable web-based access to virtualized State desktops. Through VDI, desktops and data are centrally managed and contained in a secure datacenter; therefore, safeguarding information and preventing accidental data leakage to unmanaged client physical devices. The EA strategy aligns with industry trends where the rigid enterprise perimeter starts to dissolve and the need to provide a business-ready adaptive infrastructure that supports the endpoint demands between employees, customers, partners, mobile workers and outsourced functions and services is required. The pilot steps are:

CREATE VIRTUAL DESKTOP INFRASTRUCTURE
Creating Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) extends server virtualization to desktop operating systems that are hosted on virtual machines (VMs) running is a secure datacenter. Users’ access to virtual desktops is through open Internet
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• Start using Virtual Desktops as a complement to existing

desktop environment, complementary use cases might be desktop users who want to work from home, contractors or suppliers who need access, and building disaster tolerance (fire, flood etc.). Keep this environment as inexpensive and simple as possible. Manage it like a physical environment. A few hundred concurrent users of a product like VDI in a Box are perfect for this. Continue to use roaming profiles. Provide just a core set of common applications installed in the image.
• Start to stream top 10-20% of applications into this

VDI Pilot Steps from June 12, 2012 Blog Posting following Apple Working Group Meeting http://www.whyvdi.com/
7

CONDUCT A PILOT TEST OF VDI
The Pilot Test addresses the following commonly required aspects of an enterprise class solution: Standardization, Repeatability, Scalability, Availability, Security, and Integration. The client access device layer for the Pilot Test is comprised of the hardware and software components needed to deliver a PC-like experience. Estimated cost of the Pilot Test is Pending Review.

environment, making it increasingly useful, while still keeping the environment simple and clean. Keep using roaming profiles or a simple profile management solution that just does a like for like replacement. Once the top 20% of applications are streaming approximately 50% of the users’ core needs swill be met.
• Monitor event logs for application crashes and hangs to ensure

DEFINE AND IMPLEMENT NEXT STEPS VDI IMPLEMENTATION
This initiative supports the EA and uses common components and a standardized design to reduce the overall cost of implementation and management. The client access device layer is comprised of the hardware and software components needed to deliver a PC-like experience. The process for choosing the appropriate client device varies from deployment to deployment; mixed client environments are not uncommon. In most cases, users are segmented based on their needs and requirements during the planning and design phases, and business requirements and goals are also taken into consideration and mapped to the needs of the user segments. For example, a Department might have personal computers (PC) that are on a staggered depreciation schedule. Depreciated assets can be replaced by thin client devices right away, but assets that have not fully depreciated are often converted into unmanaged end-points, typically by converting them to PXEbooted clients using a Linux-based solution. An alternative to be considered includes the “lock down” of the currently installed Windows OS and then repurposing. Either approach can offer the flexibility to gain the highest return on PC hardware investment. Estimated costs for this planning activity are Pending Review. Figure 45 represents the roadmap for achieving the future state for end users computing.

performance and consider making these streamed applications the strategic delivery method for all users and optionally consider piloting virtual desktops for mainstream use, with thin clients. Keep virtualizing remaining applications in batches and 30% of applications are virtualized approximately 70% of users’ needs will be fulfilled. Virtualizing the remainder of the applications is harder because these, these are used by less than 10% of the users. [In Hawai`i, this will likely include many of the applications that will be absorbed into ERP].
• Finally, mature the rest of the desktop environment by moving

get master data off the physical PCs and onto the network, ensure user entitlements are all defined in AD, begin using a more sophisticated solution for user state virtualization (not roaming profiles). At this point, the State will have one way to deliver applications, data, policy, configuration, user state and applications to virtual and physical desktops.” The VDI test pilot initiative targets a number of users for the initial capability scoped at 1,500 users serving a maximum of 350 users concurrently. This requires the purchase of new server infrastructure and new licenses, as well as training and security enhancements. The summary required steps include: • Service Design • Service transition – Test Readiness Review – Testing – Test Completion Review – Production Readiness Review – Operational Readiness Review
• Service Operations • Organization Change Management/

Communications/Training – OCM requirements and Analysis – Communications – Training

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Figure 45: Roadmap for Achieving the Future State of the End User Computing

7.2.3.4 UNIFIED COMMUNICATIONS DOMAIN
According to the International Engineering Consortium, Unified Communications (UC) is an industry term used to describe all forms of call and multimedia/cross-media messagemanagement functions controlled by an individual user for both business and social purposes. This includes any enterprise informational or transactional application process that emulates a human user and uses a single, contentindependent personal messaging channel (mailbox) for contact access. Unified Communications is orchestrated communication and collaboration across locations, time, and medium to accelerate business results. Unified Communications is achieved through the convergence of real-time, near-real-time, and non-real-time business communication applications. These applications include: calling, conferencing, messaging, contacts,

calendaring, collaboration, and rich presence with voice, video, text, and visual elements. It is a State of Hawai`i goal to access these capabilities using multiple access methods including voice, data, and speech access through telephones, PCs, and mobile devices. Components of collaboration/ communication technology include:
• Electronic Mail (Email) – Email

(Electronic mail) is the exchange of computer generated and stored messages by telecommunication. An email can be created manually via messaging applications or dynamically programmatically such as automated response systems.
• Workflow - At its simplest is the

are synchronized, how information flows to support the tasks, and how tasks are being tracked. As the dimension of time is considered in Workflow, Workflow considers “throughput” as a distinct measure. Workflow problems can be modeled and analyzed using graph-based formalisms like Petri nets. While the concept of workflow is not specific to information technology, support for workflow is an integral part of document management and imaging software.
• Facsimile (Fax) – A fax is the

digitized image of text and/or pictures, represented as a series of dots (bit map). Faxes are sent and received through telecommunication channels such as telephone or Internet.

movement of documents and/or tasks through a work process. More specifically, workflow is the operational aspect of a work procedure: how tasks are structured, who performs them, what their relative order is, how they
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• Fax Server - A fax server is a set of

software running on a server computer which is equipped with one or more fax capable modems attached to telephone lines. Its function is to accept documents from users, convert them into faxes, and transmit them, as well as to receive fax calls and either store the incoming documents or pass them on to users. Users may communicate with the server in several ways, through either a local network or the internet. In a big State department with heavy fax traffic, the computer hosting the fax server may be dedicated to that function, it which case the computer itself may also be known as a fax server. * For outgoing faxes, several methods are available to the user: – An e-mail message (with optional attachments) can be sent to a special e-mail address; the fax server monitoring that address converts all such messages into fax format and transmits them. – The user can tell his computer to “print” a document using a “virtual printer” which, instead of producing a paper printout, sends the document to the fax server, which then transmits it. A web interface can be used, allowing files to be uploaded, and transmitted to the fax server for faxing. – Special client software may be used. – For incoming faxes, several user interfaces may be available: – The user may be sent an e-mail message for each fax received, with the pages included as attachments, typically in either TIFF or PDF format. – Incoming faxes may be stored in a dedicated file directory, which the user can monitor. – A website may allow users to login and check for received faxes. – Special client software may be used.
• Kiosk – A kiosk is a small physical

CURRENT STATE SWOT FOR THE UNIFIED COMMUNICATIONS DOMAIN
Similar to other technology domains, the Unified Communications Domain is characterized by a lack of collaboration on standard solutions and technologies. Collaboration solutions within this domain have progressed significantly in recent industry history; at the same time that the State has experienced budget constraints and cuts. A few centers of excellence such as DOH and the Hawai`i Public Library System exist as models for lessons learned.

• The State of Hawai`i’s use of VoIP

will make it possible to communicate via telephone over an IP network using Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) instead of using traditional PBX telephony infrastructure.
• The State of Hawai`i Strategic

direction requires network traffic to be effectively managed using Quality of Service (QoS) and other network optimization techniques.
• State departments will have the

FUTURE STATE VISION FOR THE UNIFIED COMMUNICATIONS DOMAIN
The pattern listed below conveys how any State department may implement a Unified Communications capability using a unified solution. It also shows how specifically the interaction may occur between different department implementations.
• A single State Department Registry

option of selecting from a single vendor solution for a fully integrated UC capability, or leverage a federated model. Federated model requires a connector to interconnect multiple UC solutions, with the ability to translate and offer presence information from the central repository to all end point and UC solutions.
• End Point Devices will require use of

Open Standards (e.g., SIP). This will allow multiple vendors, though State of Hawai`i should have a preferred vendor list.

made up of a State Directory, LDAP (w/ Integrated Active Directory), and integration into email messaging to support collection of presence information, serves as the foundation for a Unified Communications capability. – Active Directory (LDAP) will provide authentication, directory, and other infrastructure security services. – State Directory will be enhanced to provide Rich Presence Information and other, as needed, user information. – Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Proxy server will provide the VoIP integration to State Directory and LDAP services.
• State of Hawai`i users will leverage

THE FOLLOWING BENEFITS ACCRUE FROM UNIFIED COMMUNICATIONS
• Centralization of a single State

Department Registry will support collection of presence information to ensure easier integration with existing Hawai`i Login and integration of presence into Hawaii’s consolidated E-Mail and calendaring. This centralized capability will also ensure that authentication is done once and credentials are passed along to the appropriate UC capability.
• Hawaii’s use of VoIP will make it possible

Unified Communications through End Point Devices that comply with State telecommunications and Security standards.
• Once authenticated, presence

to communicate via telephone over an IP network using Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) instead of traditional PBX telephony infrastructure. Thus avoiding certain call charges and reducing overall calling costs.
• Implementing WAN-Optimization

structure (often including a computer and a display screen) that displays information for people walking by. Kiosks are common in public buildings. Kiosks are also used at trade shows and professional conferences .”

information will be passed back to allow other users to determine which communication mechanism(s) can be used (Voice, Video or Web Conferencing, Instant Messaging).

technologies such as QoS will ensure that traffic is managed appropriately so that video and voice traffic can be transferred as required at the State of Hawaii.

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• State departments will have the option of selecting from

a single-vendor solution for a fully integrated UC capability, or leverage a federated model. Federated model requires a connector to interconnect multiple UC solutions, with ability to translate and offer presence information from the central repository to all end point and UC solutions. The following summarizes the impact and implications of State of Hawai`i implementing UC as described in the pattern above. Implications include process changes to accommodate UC, security changes, policy changes, and / or other technology changes to ensure the success of UC in Hawai`i .
• Increased technology support demands • Additional computing and storage capacity • Additional network bandwidth needs • More advanced network management • Multiple UC solution interconnectivity support • License management • New models for usage chargeback and support • Increased training needs for support personnel

* Additional need for end user training and information dissemination as UC capabilities and end-points are deployed For the purposes of the ETA, focus is on the technical standards that support the policy and enforcement of UC. Enhances services for citizens and increases efficiency by using technology to improve business processes. • Provide world-class technology for citizen-centered, integrated, and secure services. • Information sharing can be achieved when the information is designed to be discoverable, accessible, and reliable. • Heighten customer-centric research and analysis. Figure 46 provides a high level view of the current “stove piped” and “siloed” communications systems using multiple products, various vendors, various releases, various versions, and inadequate capability versus the view on the right of Unified and Integrated Communications as the notional future state.

– Need for improved IT operation’s monitoring – Need for improvements in metrics management

Figure 46: Notional View of the Future State of Communications

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Figure 47 depicts the future state view of Collaboration-as-a-Service.

Figure 47: Collaboration-as-a-Service – An Essential Future State Element of ETA

Guiding Principles for Unified Communications Domain 1. Flexible methods of communication to one or many individuals with the State of Hawai`i government. 2. Capabilities to easily communicate with citizens in the manner in that are most productive for both the State and the citizen.

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EMAIL AND COLLABORATION SUB-DOMAIN
This sub-domain, described in Table 47, includes all communication functions associated with email and collaboration tools. Table 47: Email and Collaboration Sub-Domain Description

UC Email And Collaboration Sub-Domain Mail Servers Mail User Interface

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards SMTP, POP, IMAP

Preferred Products / Standards IMAPS – IMAP over SSL Mail Application, Browser Based, Mobile Based

Emerging Trends P-IMAPS or XMPP Unified inbox via sms, email, or chat where messages are sync’d and received through whatever medium or device that is convenient for the end user Cloud Email with large storage capacity (ex: Google Mail or Microsoft Exchange Online) Google, Microsoft, IBM Cloud based with storage and backup Workflow apps with cloud integration that can extend core ERP applications (ex: RunMyProcess) Cloud based content and document management system with integrated voice/ video/IM/forums/wiki

Thick Client

Browser Based

Mail (Proprietary)

Lotus Notes, MS Exchange

Enterprise Messaging System with Global Address Book and Directory Services Integration Gartner Magic Quadrant preferred vendor

Mail (Hosted)

Workflow

Pending Review

Collaboration Environment

MS SharePoint 2010

Gartner Magic Quadrant preferred vendor

Table 48: Voice Sub-Domain Description

UC Voice Sub–Domain VoIP

Sunset Products / Standards Individual department VoIP solutions with no state wide integration

Current Supported Products/ Standards Single vendor platform with integrated voice, data and directory services, G.711

Preferred Products / Standards Pending Review

Emerging Trends VoIP PBX to mobile device integration, SVoIP – Secure Voice over IP, MoIP (Mobile communications over IP) apps Pending Review Pending Review Bring your own mobile (BYOM) with monthly employee allocation for service. Virtualization at mobile OS for separation of work/personal data
Enterprise Architecture

Landline carrier Centrx Provider Wireless Provider Departmental purchase

Hawai`i Tel Hawai`i Tel Central procurement from dual provider with standard contract offering and pricing

Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

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VIDEO SUB-DOMAIN
The video sub-domain (Table 49) includes communications tools and systems that support and transmit video. Table 49: Video Sub-Domain Description

UC Video Sub–Domain Video teleconference room

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards
• Standalone high bandwidth

Preferred Products / Standards Pending Review

Emerging Trends
• Tele-presence rooms

H.323/H.320 with G.711/722 • Multi-point capable

with High Definition video capability • Centralized VTC monitoring and support Pending Review Video integration into desktop collaboration tools

Video teleconference desktop

• IP based, multi-point capability • Open standards

BROADCAST MESSAGING SUB-DOMAIN
The broadcast messaging sub-domain includes the various communications mediums and tools often considered in today’s environment as social media. Table 50 provides a description of the sub-domain. Table 50: Broadcast Messaging Sub-Domain Description

UC Broadcast Messaging Sunset Products Sub-Domain / Standards Real Time Communication

Current Supported Products/ Standards
MS Office Communicator (OCS)

Preferred Products / Standards Pending Review

Emerging Trends Messaging integration with VoIP and video conferencing Enterprise level social tool that streams information proactively via a real-time news stream (Ex: Chatter by salesforce.com, Jive, or CiscoQuad) Enterprise level social tool that sends information proactively via a real-time news stream (Ex: Chatter by salesforce. com, Jive, or CiscoQuad) Software publishing platform with blogging/content management capability (Ex: Squarespace) Public wiki software for external knowledge sharing and enterprise wiki software for internal knowledge sharing Cloud WCM (Ex: CrownPeak SaaS WCM, Autonomy, SDL Tridion, Sitecore WCM)
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External IM

Google IM

Pending Review

Social Media

Twitter

Pending Review

Blog

Blogger

Dynamic web based CMS (Content Management System) solution Pending Review

Wiki Services

MediaWiki, WikiSpaces

Web content Management

Plume

Pending Review

Pending Review

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MESSAGING AND SOCIAL MEDIA SUB-DOMAIN
Closely associated with the broadcast messaging sub-domain is the messaging and social media sub-domain described in Table 51. The key characteristic of this sub-domain is the non-broadcasting but more personal one-on-one communication activities. Table 51: Messaging and Social Media Sub-Domain Description
UC Messaging and Social Media Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards Google IM

Preferred Products / Standards Pending Review

Emerging Trends
Enterprise level social tool that sends information proactively via a real-time news stream (Ex: Chatter by salesforce.com, Jive, or CiscoQuad)

External IM

Social Media

Twitter, Facebook

Pending Review

Enterprise level social tool that sends information proactively via a real-time news stream (Ex: Chatter by salesforce.com, Jive, or CiscoQuad) Pending Review

Blog

Blogger

Pending Review

CITIZEN COMMUNICATION AND ENGAGEMENT
Citizen communication and engagement sub-domain is intended to attract comments and opinions from the citizens as well as provide significant information in a form and format that is useful. This domain is described in Table 52. Table 52: Citizen Communication and Engagement Sub-Domain Description
UC Citizen Communication and Engagement Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards Open government framework

Preferred Products / Standards Enterprise Web Portal

Emerging Trends
Enterprise web portal utilizing WSRP (Web Services for Remote Portlets)

External portal

Collaboration Engagement

Open government framework Web-based tools (e.g., IdeaScale, Constant Contact, Survey Monkey)

Pending Review Pending Review

Pending Review DCM (Digital Communication Management) platform that enables government to maximize direct connections with the public

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ETA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR THE UNIFIED COMMUNICATION DOMAIN
The transition and sequencing plan for the Unified Communications Domain is based a thorough assessment of the current product base and decide status and evaluate strategic alignment options.
• Select pilot project (e.g. Voice over IP) to demonstrate near

Key Points
• Unified communications requires a phased approach, beginning with small steps that target the low-hanging fruit. • UC projects should start with harnessing existing assets and building from there rather than attempting a one-size-fits-all approach. • End-user communication is vital for project success.

term solutions using cloud based technology that integrates with the new EA.
• Participate with the Messaging and Collaboration planning

team to provide a road map and project phasing to address a comprehensive integrated capability.

• Switches – This covers the cost of IP PBXs or the cost to IP

enable an existing PBX.
• Handsets/End-Unit Devices or Applications– This includes IP

hardphones or softphones.
• Gateways – Often, companies require gateways for TDM

to-IP traffic, unless they’re using SIP trunking throughout the organization (which is rare still).
• LAN upgrades – VoIP requires Power-Over-Ethernet switches,

EVALUATE LEADING TECHNOLOGY PLATFORMS
This investment selects a standard collaboration solution across the State. Project activities include evaluation of leading technology platforms such as Microsoft SharePoint or Lotus Domino Quickr or open source offerings. This effort should be executed in conjunction with the email system initiative. Considerations will be given to solutions on Gartner Magic Quadrant. The scope includes implementation of necessary technical infrastructure and connectivity for cross-departmental workgroup and project collaboration. Estimated costs for this initiative are Pending Review.

and most companies provide Uninterrupted Power Supplies to provide for backup. When organizations upgrade their LANs, the costs account for 32% to 47% of an overall VoIP project. Table 53 highlights the typical LAN upgrade costs. These figures include the POE switches, UPS, management tools, and staffing costs, as well as first year of maintenance. Table 53: Typical LAN Upgrade Costs

IP Telephony Implementations
Cost per end unit*
IPT Hardware LAN Upgrade

Less than 500
Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

501 – 5,000
Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

More than 5,000
Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

All sizes
Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

PILOT VOIP
The State will initiate a 400-person pilot, based on vendor experience, at an estimated cost of Pending Review.

LAN Upgrade Total Average Capital LAN Upgrade % of Total Capital

45%

41%

32%

42%

IMPLEMENT VOIP STATE-WIDE
The VoIP pilot provides the implementation initiative lessons learned and a solid basis for the actual implementation schedule and costs. As an additional data point, a vendor-provided estimate to the State of Hawai`i to extend VoIP to every State building was estimated to be Pending Review for a “turnkey” engagement for 26,000 end points and as planning progresses the following provides a list of cost considerations: • Implementation – Typically, companies spend about 20% more in the first two years of their VoIP deployments on the actual implementation than they would have spent in TDM. After they gain expertise, implementation costs are equivalent to TDM rollouts.

*End unit is IP handset, audio bridge, softphone or other end-user device.

• Management/monitoring tools – Many companies don’t budget for management and monitoring tools, which is a mistake. Acquisition costs range from free (with open-source tools) to several million dollars. On average, small and midsize companies spend about Pending Review for each third-party monitoringtool, and large companies spend about Pending Review per tool. • Training – Many vendors are including training with the sale of equipment. But when they don’t, companies spend between Pending Review and Pending Review per IT staff member for training, and they find the most success by training their end users with internal IT staff.
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• Equipment licensing and maintenance – Vendors are shifting more to a software model in which the initial acquisition cost is lower, but maintenance and licensing is higher. Whereas vendors once charged about 10% to 14% for maintenance, those fees now are 16% to 22%. • Ongoing WAN costs – This includes the cost of the converged WAN. Typically, this includes the circuit costs for services such as MPLS, Ethernet, and/or SIP trunking. • Ongoing operational costs – This includes the cost to manage and maintain the network from a staff perspective. It includes the total compensation of internal staff members devoted to VoIP, plus the cost of any third-party MSPs managing the VoIP system. Also included are power and cooling costs. • Ongoing network costs – Companies that have not converged voice and data traffic onto a single WAN can save money by eliminating idle capacity and combining access lines. The typical savings is 23%. – Staff changes (non-IT) – Some companies are able to reduce staff in other areas because of VoIP. For example, one receptionist can handle multiple locations when he or she can transfer calls and intercom between locations, rather than having to tell a caller to hang up and dial a different number. Or, by using automated attendant, companies have been able to reduce the need for a receptionist at every location, as well. This typically translates into a Pending Review to Pending Review annual savings. – Turnover Rates – By allowing employees to work from home, particularly those who work in a contact center, companies are reducing turnover rates. Typical contact-center turnover rates are 35% to 45%, but by giving those employees more flexible work schedules from their home offices, they are dropping turnover rates to 10% to 20%. VoIP allows companies to do this cost-effectively by paying for just a broadband access line (Pending Review to Pending Review per month, depending on service level) and eliminating the Pending Review to Pending Review monthly POTS charge for voice service.
• Savings from SIP trunking – Replacing PRI lines with SIP trunks

– Softphones vs. hardphones – There is a small but growing

trend among companies to continue using existing analog or digital handsets with their IP or hybrid switches and move directly to IP softphones. Licenses for softphones range from about Pending Review to Pending Review, compared to a range of Pending Review to Pending Review IP hardphones, so companies can save money with this approach. Among companies using softphones, 53.6% are using them as an adjunct to hardphones, and 35.7% are using them as a replacement to softphones. The balance is in pilot phase. – Centralizing servers – By centralizing servers at the data center, organizations report savings in the number of servers they need to buy, along with reduced tools and resources to manage applications such as unified messaging, conferencing, and even the IP PBX itself. By using fewer servers than would be used in a distributed model, companies can save on power and cooling costs, as well. – Audio conferencing – By replacing audio-conferencing services with an internal audio-conferencing bridge, companies can eliminate their monthly charge for audio conferencing services. For organizations with limited audio conferences, most vendors offer bridges that are integrated with the IP telephony system (albeit limited to the number of participants). – Hosted services – Companies concerned about capital outlay find savings through the use of hosted services. They eliminate the up-front costs of the IP PBXs and handsets because they are included in the monthly service fee. But, the overall service may or may not be less expensive. The point here is that hosted services eliminates the up-front capital cost and depreciation but typically costs more monthly to operate than in-house deployments. – Moves, Adds, and Changes – Many companies have justified their entire IP telephony rollout though MAC savings alone. Externally provide MACs cost Pending Review to Pending Review, depending on the city. Internally managed IP telephony MACs cost about Pending Review, based on average telecom salaries. – Staff changes (IT) – Though we do not see huge reductions in the staff required to manage VoIP vs. TDM environments, more companies decrease their staff than increase it. Among those who decrease the telecom staff, they lose about 2.8 people on average. Attrition is more common than layoffs; IT staffs frequently reassign their telecom staff to other areas of IT or don’t replace retirees. Those who increase their staff do so by one person. (Please see Figure Z: Staff Changes with VoIP).

can save about 40% off the monthly circuit costs.
• Fixed Mobile Convergence – Companies with many mobile

employees eliminate costly roaming charges by moving mobile calls to the corporate IP backbone (calling a local number and routing the call from the IP PBX through the corporate WAN).
• IT Cost Considerations

– Cabling – With IP telephony, there is no longer a need for three to four drops (two Ethernet; two RJ-11) per desktop Companies typically save about 40% on cabling costs in new buildings (and average spend per drop is about Pending Review).

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Figure 48: Roadmap to Future State for the End User Domain

7.2.3.5 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DOMAIN
The goals, objectives, strategies, policies, and principles defined within the EIA and the associated solutions within the ESA are supported by the technology principles, standards, and products defined within the Information Management Domain of the Enterprise Technology Architecture. The information management domain considers relevant technologies related to the scope of data, information, and knowledge assets of the enterprise – both structured and unstructured data as defined within the EIA, and the full life cycle and management discipline of information from creation, to storage and retention, to use, archival, and deletion.

FUTURE STATE VISION FOR THE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DOMAIN
The future state vision for Information Management was discussed above in the EBA, EIA, and the ESA outlined the related enterprise service areas of knowledge management, data management, analytics, digital content management, and search. This section highlights additional detail regarding the future state services and technology vision, principles, and standards within the sub-domains. The summary elements of the future state vision for Information Management include:
• Data Management Services

CURRENT STATE SWOT FOR THE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DOMAIN
The current state of information management practices within the State was discussed above in the EIA. The current state is characterized by a lack of standardization in technologies used in any of the sub-domains below. This area provides a significant opportunity to vault forward with enhanced cultural values in the importance of sound information management, and new processes, practices, and technical solutions.

– Enterprise and LOB operational databases implemented using relational database management systems technology – Enterprise and LOB analytical databases (data warehouses or data marts) implemented using de-normalized relational databases or On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) cube technology – Enterprise and LOB data management services for create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) of enterprise or LOB data entities

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• Digital Content Management Solutions

• Business Intelligence and Analytics Solutions

– Electronic documents – Document management services to store and manage electronic documents including all media types (text, images, video) – Document management repositories – Document metadata maintained over the life of the document – Other content (unstructured data) – Content management services to store and manage other unstructured data within defined stores, such as Web page or collaboration content to include all media types – Automated content indexing to facilitate search and retrieval • Records Management – Record management services to create and extract digital records and link to and partition within underlying data and information (digital content) stores – Records metadata maintained over the life of the record
• Search

– Utility services to support the creation of analytics solutions to include analysis and statistics, visualization, graphics, dashboards, drill-downs, ad hoc query, and reporting
• Knowledge Management Solutions

– The utilization of all capabilities above + collaboration services to build knowledge management solutions for specific problem domains within the enterprise or LOBs.

Guiding Principles for the Information Management Domain 1. The State will continue to have a need to manage official documents and records within its operations. The future direction is for the official authoritative source of all documents or records to be electronic. An enterprise document management solution will address this need, but associated technology standards and products are specified here. 2. Within the operations tier, relational database management systems will be the standard for storing all State data. 3. Analytics and visualization capabilities will integrate geospatial data. Geotagging of data should be evaluated for use in all State database implementations.

– An enterprise search capability that integrates search across all information management sub-domains discussed here – data, documents, and other digital content

DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGEMENT SUB-DOMAIN
The Digital Content Management Sub-Domain is described in Table 54. Table 54: Digital Content Management Sub-Domain Description
Information Management Document Management Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards
• Microsoft Office • PDF

Current Supported Products/ Standards
• Microsoft Office • PDF • XML • HTML5
• FileNet • Documentum • Microsoft SharePoint

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends HTML5

Electronic document formats

Electronic document workflow

• FileNet • Documentum • Microsoft

SharePoint Document integration with other structured data

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DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT SUB-DOMAIN
The Document Management Sub-Domain is included in Table 55. Table 55: Document Management Sub-Domain Description
Information Management Document Management Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards
• Microsoft Office • PDF • XML • HTML5

Preferred Products / Standards ISO 19005-1. Document management - Electronic document file format for long-term preservation - Part 1: Use of PDF 1.4 (PDF/A) ISO 19005-2:2011 specifies the use of the Portable Document Format (PDF) 1.7, as formalized in ISO 32000-1 ISO 19005-2:2011 specifies the use of the Portable Document Format (PDF) 1.7, as formalized in ISO 32000-1

Emerging Trends HTML5

Electronic document formats

Electronic document workflow

Microsoft Office 2010

Document integration with other structured data

DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT SUB-DOMAIN
Table 56 described the Data Management Sub-Domain. Table 56: Data Management Sub-Domain Description
Information Management Document Management Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards
• ISAM

Current Supported Products/ Standards
• Oracle • SQL Server • DB2 • Adabas • Microsoft Access • Relational DBMS integrity rules;

Preferred Products / Standards
• Relational DBMS

Emerging Trends

Database management

Data integrity

• Application

software Data modeling Metadata management – dictionaries, directories, or repositories Data query Data exchange

web services
• ER models • EA repository • RDF

• SQL • XML

• SPARQL

• RDF extractions from Databases, NIEM

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ANALYTICS SUB-DOMAIN
Table 57 describes the Analytics Sub-Domain. Table 57: Analytics Sub-Domain Description
Information Management Analytics Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards
• ISAM

Current Supported Products/ Standards
• Pending Review

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends

Data storage for analytics data or “big data” Data extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) and cleansing, Dimensional data cubes Analysis and visualization Dashboards End user ad hoc data query and reporting

Hadoop

• Pending Review

• Pending Review • Pending Review • Pending Review • Pending Review

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) SUB-DOMAIN
Table 58 represents the GIS Sub-Domain Table 58: GIS Sub-Domain Description
Information Management GIS Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards

Preferred Products / Standards OpenGIS© Standards: http://www. opengeospatial.org/standards OpenGIS© Standards: http://www. opengeospatial.org/standards OpenGIS© Standards: http://www. opengeospatial.org/standards

Emerging Trends ArcGIS Online (in the cloud) ArcGIS Online (in the cloud)

Geospatial data formats and frameworks Geospatial data interoperability and transformation Geospatial data sets and services Geographic information systems ESRI ArcGIS

ArcGIS Online (in the cloud) ArcGIS Online (in the cloud)

OpenGIS© Standards: http://www. opengeospatial.org/standards

ETA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR THE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DOMAIN
Transition and sequencing will be based upon a thorough assessment of the current data management and GIS posture. This assessment is a critical input to the development of a sequencing plan that organizes all of the major elements of GIS, Data Management, and Analysis and Visualization as subprojects within the larger initiative

The Information Management Working Group is identifying a roadmap and project phasing to address a comprehensive integrated capability. Additional directional information is provided at the below url. Information Management Domain Addendum Information http://idea.hawaii.gov/userimages/accounts/90/907159/panel_ upload_18993/SupplementalAddendumDigitalArchives.pdf

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7.2.3.6 APPLICATION ENVIRONMENT DOMAIN
The goals, objectives, strategies, policies, and principles defined within the ESA are supported by the technology principles, standards, and products defined within the Application Environment Domain of the Enterprise Technology Architecture. The application environment domain considers relevant technologies related to the environments, platforms, and technology stacks that the enterprise application solutions are built upon. As directed in the ESA, the State will move towards standard enterprise solution patterns that will in turn lead towards on optimum set of standard application environments.

FUTURE STATE VISION FOR THE APPLICATION ENVIRONMENT DOMAIN
To achieve the future state vision for the ESA, the State will require considerable standardization and maturity within the software development and integration service area. The key elements for this service area are depicted in Figure 49 and discussed in more detail below.

CURRENT STATE SWOT FOR THE APPLICATION ENVIRONMENT DOMAIN
The State currently has individual areas of strength in applications development maturity, but the overall environment lacks standardization for process, methodology, skills development, knowledge exchange, or tools and technology.

Figure 49: Elements of Future State Software Development Environment

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The elements related to achievement of the future state vision are organized within the three major focus areas of Governance, Architecture and Engineering, and Projects. Governance Key elements of governance related to the Application Environment Domain include the SDLC, the PMO, and Organization, Culture, and Professional Development. Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Methodology The vision for the State’s new SDLC includes these elements:
• Agility – the most critical aspect is

• Experienced Project Managers – the

• Knowledge Collaboration – software

State develops over time a strong PMO with experienced and certified IT project managers. These project managers facilitate the strong execution of the SDLC within their teams. They are engaged early on, and help navigate through requirements development and software package procurement.
• Defined Project Teams – all software

development becomes a model discipline for effective knowledge management. The software development community promotes knowledge sharing of environments, platforms, and specific application problem domains. Collaborative wiki style tools are used across the software development community.
• Centers of Excellence – organizations

development and system implementation projects are managed as a project effort with a defined project team.
• Project Performance Incentives – the

the incorporation of agile methods to facilitate a responsive environment for making rapid decisions, course corrections, and establishment of new directions quickly with system implementation projects within the State.
• Tailorable – the SDLC methodology is

successful execution of a project is a critical competency for the State, and project performance is measured and reported, and cultural factors have been enhanced to provide significant incentives for success
• Organizational Change Management

or teams are recognized for expertise in specific application development approaches and patterns, and facilitate project team success through training, knowledge exchange, and mentoring. (Example of AG Justice for J2EE development.)
• SWAT Teams – skilled, experienced

organized in such a manner to facilitate tailoring of project activities and deliverables based on project size, e.g. small, medium, or large.
• Software Packages – the methodology

– the extent of change for the user community as the new solutions are deployed is significant, and a robust organizational change discipline ensures user involvement, awareness, and education.
• Project Collaboration – collaboration

teams from the Centers of Excellence support projects with inexperienced staff to facilitate mentoring and project delivery success.
• Skill Registry – a skill registry provides

a critical tool for location of expertise within the State for help and assistance.
• Just-in-Time Training – a continuous

addresses both software package implementation and custom software development.
• Usability – the methodology is

services enable each project to effectively share information, knowledge, and status, and coordinate activities and schedules.
• Project Dashboard – project status

developed and maintained with helpfulness and usability in mind, and ncludes process overviews, activity and deliverable instructions and helpful guidelines and suggestions for use, including templates and examples.
• Requirements Focus– a key focus area

is reported through a dashboard for visibility into performance and risk/issues.
• Continuous Improvement – a continuous

throughout the SDLC is on developing and managing appropriate measurable requirements for both business and technical perspectives.
• The goal for overall software

improvement program surrounds project execution enabling lessons learned, customer and participant feedback, and performance measurement to weave back into improvements of the SDLC methodology, project culture, and tools and technologies. Knowledge Management and People Development The vision for the development of people, skills, capabilities, and knowledge for software development as a whole includes these elements:

education program for software development integrates with staff annual performance plans, focusing on development of new skills and enhancement of skills. Various incentives approaches are inculcated into the culture. A variety of educational approaches are used such as mini classes, brown bags, informal sharing and collaboration, social network, wiki’s, as well as formal training. The variety enables the project to ensure that education is provided just-in time. Partnering with UH provides new programs tailored to developing skills for State employees.
• Contractor Support and Mentoring –

development maturity within the State is to achieve a CMMI Level 3 maturity within 5 years. Project Management Office The vision for the State’s new PMO with respect to systems implementation projects includes these elements:

contractors are strategically used to bring in expertise and experience; but project teams incorporate the needed mentoring and knowledge capture activities to transfer the expertise to State team members.

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Software Package Implementation The vision for incorporating packaged software includes these elements:
• Standard Technical Requirements –

consistent with the ETA and standard platforms, technical requirements are standardized for reuse in RFPs. These requirements are managed adequately within the evaluation to not stop but steer decisions.
• Environment and Ecosystem

Common Solutions Framework and Patterns The vision for a common solutions framework and solution patterns or reference architectures includes these elements:
• Common Solutions Framework – a

Integrated Development Environment The vision for the integrated development environments for software development includes these elements:
• Visualization and Modeling – draw it to

code it.
• Development Automation / Generators

Requirements – standard requirements in software RFPs include making sure package or system procurements include life cycle support such as test (QA/QC), staging, production environments, and training environments.
• Integration Requirements –

common solutions framework, including architecture and development approach facilitates software development. The framework incorporates standard enterprise services for a common user interface (my.Hawaii.gov), authentication, role-base authorization, data access, and shared enterprise services.
• Standard Application Patterns –

– automate as much of the SDLC as possible, including code generation and automated testing.
• Development Languages – standardize

on technologies used.
• Testing and Deployment –

requirements are included for providing data models, compliance with industry standard data such as NIEM, use of Web services or APIs, standard data access (like ODBC), providing reporting capabilities or a data mart/warehouse.
• Viability of Software Vendor – include

convergence on standard platforms environments and strategic solution patterns with associated technologies such as mobile applications streamline the overall development approach. Software Development Ecosystem The vision for a software development ecosystem supporting collaborative development and reuse includes these elements:
• Enterprise Services – inclusion

standardize on approaches, tools, and technologies used. Platform as a Service The vision for provision of platforms as a service includes these elements:
• Research, Development, Test

Environment (RDTE) – provisioning of platforms for the RDTE.
• Hybrid Cloud Platform Provisioning

an evaluation of the viability of the vendor to enhance the probabilities that the vendor will support the package for the life expectancy needed.
• Open Software / Escrow Code – use

of enterprise services within the development ecosystem for integration into the common solutions framework.
• Community and Industry Software

– rapid provisioning of private (or public) virtual environments for system environments.
• Target Private Cloud Application

open software to have access to the source code or require the vendor to put the source code into escrow.
• Support Agreement – include a support

agreement in the procurement. Include provisions to bring support in house, or with consultants to keep those options open.
• Customization Change Management

Collaboration – a SourceForge or “Force.com” or “Google App Engine” or “Github” type environment for community development and sharing reuse of trusted, certified source code. Also, a State “apps store” for release of trusted, certified apps to the customer base.
• Legacy Systems Services – specific

Platforms – standard target application environments (platforms) are provisioned within minutes within the State’s private cloud.
• Target Public Cloud Application

– use an Executive Steering Team for guidance and escalation of requirements issues, specifically with respect to minimizing customizations to industry standard software. Architecture and Engineering Key elements of architecture and engineering related to the Application Environment Domain include the ESA Common Solutions Framework, Solution Patterns, the Development Ecosystem, the Integrated Development Environment, and Platforms as a Service.

services to support the wrapping and inclusion of legacy software into the enterprise services, and migration approaches or tools for migrating legacy code into the modernized environment.
• Full Life Cycle Planning – planning

Platforms – for specific public or non sensitive uses, standard target application environments (platforms) are provisioned within minutes within secure, trusted public cloud environments such as Amazon Web Services, Windows Azure, or Google App Engine. Projects Key project elements related to the Application Environment Domain include the Hawai`i Common Portal and Enterprise Services Implementation, Project Registry and Reporting, and Legacy Systems Migration. Hawai`i Common Portal The implementation of the Hawai`i Common Portal, the my.hawaii.gov, includes the following:

for the life expectancy of a software application and building refresh upgrade into the planning. Having metrics on application system “soundness”, to include break fix frequency, difficult to fix/sustain, and down-time.

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• Implement new my.hawaii.gov

standards, solution, technologies – Develop governance structure over common requirements gathering and management for shared services. – Pilot initial implementations; pilot potential future state technologies. – Standardize and finalize overall governance and implementation approach, and scale out to broader set of capabilities and implementation stakeholders in an on-going implementation.
• Monitor on-going use and

broader set of services and implementation stakeholders in an on-going implementation.
• Monitor on-going use and

• The legacy systems portfolio is

continuous improvement. Project Registry and Reporting The implementation of the Project Registry and Reporting approach, standards, and tool set includes the following:
• Implement new IT project registry and

characterized by numerous small point solutions that often times are intended to address shortcomings of the mission support systems – such as departmental tracking systems in Lotus Domino for procurements, time and attendance, financial transactions, etc.
• Perform Analysis of the overall legacy

reporting approach, standards, solutions, and technologies – Develop governance structure over common requirements gathering and management for project oversight and reporting. – Scope includes life cycle reporting of IT projects, focused on initial authorization, governance, and reporting through consolidated dashboard capabilities. – Pilot initial implementations; pilot potential future state technologies. – Standardize and finalize overall governance and implementation approach, and scale out to broader set of capabilities and implementation stakeholders in an on-going implementation.
• Monitor on-going use and

systems portfolio. Determine future action on current apps, ERP impact, etc. Examples for consideration – Mainframe apps, Lotus Domino apps. Use a graded approach – some need to be redesigned, some need to be killed, some could be ported.
• Re-platform the targeted set

continuous improvement. Enterprise Services The implementation of the Enterprise Services within the Common Solutions Framework includes the following:
• See Enterprise Services Section 6

of apps – some subset of apps ported off a legacy platform to a modernized platform.

Guiding Principles for the Application Environment Domain 1. Target technology platforms for State application solutions shall be based upon open industry standards and shall avoid being “locked into” specific vendor products, and therefore able to operate on a variety of technology platforms. This standards-based approach allows for vendor independence which promotes cost savings. 2. The target architecture for future applications will be thin client requiring only network access and a web browser for end-user access. Application solutions targeted for thick client, client/server, or the desktop are no longer preferred and should not be developed. 3. XML web services are the preferred future state application integration technology. Business logic and data access should be implemented through XML web services.

to see the potential scope of the services needed.
• Prioritize the initial set of services for

implementation –suggested initial focus includes identity management, role based access, customer management, business management (e.g. organizations), document management, geospatial, and dashboards/drill-down reporting.
• Develop governance structure over

common requirements gathering and management for shared services.
• Pilot initial implementations; pilot

continuous improvement. Legacy Systems Migration The implementation of a consolidated Legacy Systems Migration project includes the following:
• Goal of Legacy Systems Migration

potential future state technologies – e.g. whether an enterprise services bus needs to be used.
• Standardize and finalize overall

governance and implementation approach, and scale out to

project is to help achieve overall reduction by tenfold of the applications portfolio (reduce 705+ applications).

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APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT AND INTEGRATION SUB-DOMAIN
The Applications Development and Integration Sub-Domain is described in Table 59. Table 59: Application Development and Integration Sub-Domain Description
Application Environment Application Development and Integration Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards
• XML Web services • Direct SQL access

Preferred Products / Standards
• Relational DBMS

Emerging Trends

Application Integration

to Enterprise and LOB Databases Integrated Development Environment Visualization and Modeling
• UML • ER models • XML transfers • UML • XML transfers

Requirements Management Software Configuration Management

CLIENT SERVER APPLICATIONS SUB-DOMAIN
Table 60 describes the Client Server Applications Sub-Domain. Table 60: Client Server Applications Sub-Domain Description
Application Environment Client Server Applications Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards
Pending Review

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends

Development Environment and Tools Quality Assurance and Testing Production Platform

Pending Review

Pending Review

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WEB APPLICATIONS SUB-DOMAIN
This sub-domain is described in Table 61. Table 61: Web Applications Sub-Domain Description
Application Environment Web Applications Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards
• IBM WebSphere • MS Visual Studio

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends

Development Environment and Tools Quality Assurance and Testing Production Platform

• Java 2 Enterprise Edition • Microsoft .NET • LAMP

User Interface Business Logic Data Access

• HTML5

• SQL

MOBILE APPLICATIONS SUB-DOMAIN
Table 62 describes the Mobile Applications Sub-Domain. Table 62: Mobile Applications Sub-Domain Description
Application Environment Web Applications Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards
Rhodes, RHOStudio

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends

Development Environment and Tools Quality Assurance and Testing Production Platform User Interface Business Logic Data Access
RHOHub

RHOHub

RhoConnect HTML5 Pending Review Pending Review

EMBEDDED SYSTEMS SUB-DOMAIN
Table 63 describes this sub-domain. Table 62: Mobile Applications Sub-Domain Description
Application Environment Embedded Systems Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards

Current Supported Products/ Standards Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends

Development Environment and Tools Quality Assurance and Testing Production Platform

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ETA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR THE APPLICATION ENVIRONMENT DOMAIN
The Development Working Group consists of representation of the software development community across the state and has been active in providing direction in future state visioning and in implementation planning for this area. The work plan enables the continued development and detailing of the elements of the future state vision, in addition to implementation of the vision.

IMPLEMENT SOFTWARE ENGINEERING PROJECT MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT
This initiative has to the goal of improving overall project management approach, expertise, practices, and tools for software engineering projects within the state. Achieves the vision for the Project Management Office defined in Section 7.2.3.6. Focus areas include PM best practice development, training program development and execution, project performance measurement and reporting, and resource development in a collaborative environment. The initiative will be done in close collaboration with Project Registry and Reporting System Implementation. The cost estimate for this project is Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM SOFTWARE ENGINEERING IMPROVEMENT
Several identified software engineering improvement initiatives have been identified and detailed separately below and are consolidated together in one initiative within the T&S Plan. This activity is a one-time implementation of a software engineering continuous improvement program within the State. This initiative includes tasks to establish the organization, staff the organization, and establish the program. Goals of the program include establishing performance service levels and measures, on-going monitoring of progress, administering performance and compliance assessments against industry best practice frameworks and maturity models such as CMMI, and sponsoring desired audits from external organizations. This task also provides guidance and assurance of achieving industry best practices in software engineering for optimized performance in responsive automation of business processes, achieving strategic integration, and interoperability. The estimated cost for this project is Pending Review.

FORMALIZE AN ENTERPRISE SDLC METHODOLOGY
This initiative formalizes the State’s new enterprise SDLC methodology and achieves the vision for two key areas defined in the Section 7.2.3.6 – Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Methodology and Software Package Implementation. (Refer to the requirements listed there for inclusion in project scope.) The formulation initiative ensures appropriate review and feedback on the draft SDLC developed by OIMT, and will accomplish suitable piloting of the SDLC within initial projects with the goals of further refining the methodology and building teams of experts to accomplish broader adoption in the follow on initiative. Methodology is delivered through Web collaborative environment. The estimate of costs for this initiative is Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT SOFTWARE ENGINEERING MENTORING AND CONSULTING PROGRAM
This initiative establishes a standard mentoring and knowledge transfer approach for the software engineering community and pilot the approach with refinement and adoption for use across the State. Activities include establishing a skills and expertise registry for locating expertise for assistance; and would put in place appropriate acquisition channels for access to external consultants. Project startups with new approaches, tools, or technologies are supported by a formal mentoring process including special mentoring or SWAT teams to assist. See Knowledge Management and People Development in Section 7.2.3.6 for additional information. The estimate for this initiative is Pending Review

ADOPT ENTERPRISE SDLC METHODOLOGY
This activity serves as the process to adopt the State’s new enterprise SDLC methodology through focused use of new methodology on projects across the departments in an incremental fashion using expertise from mentoring teams and training to equip project teams and staff across the state. This task also includes further refining of the methodology through lessons learned approach. The cost estimate for this project is Pending Review on-going O&M annually.

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DEVELOP SOLUTION PATTERNS
This project expand the SDLC to include guidelines, how-to’s, techniques, tools, and training/mentoring to do software engineering in strategic solution patterns: Web, Mobile, Services, and Analytics. Refer to Section 6.2.2.5 Standard Enterprise Solution Patterns and Common Solutions Framework and Patterns in Section 7.2.3.6. The activities for this project optimize effectiveness of software engineering efforts/projects in use and development of skilled resources for overall improvement in responsive automation of business processes, achieving strategic integration and interoperability. The estimated cost is Pending Review.

ENTERPRISE DATA AND SERVICES STANDARDIZATION AND SHARING
This investment centers on establishing a program to support the standardization and sharing of enterprise data and services. See EIA Common Information Framework in Section 5.2.2.1 and the ESA Common Solutions Framework in Section 6.2.2. The investment supports the Enterprise Architecture Program, and implements a series of activities and accomplishments to establish these enterprise-wide data and services management standards and practices. These include:
• Establishing governance standards

IMPLEMENT SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY ECOSYSTEM
This initiative has the goal of implementing tools and an environment to support collaboration and code retention and sharing within the software development community for the State of Hawai`i. It achieves the vision for the software development community ecosystem and integrated development environment (IDE) defined in Section 7.2.3.6; similar to environments such as SourceForge.com; force.com; and Google apps development communities. It also streamlines, standardizes, agile processes and the methodology for developing application software for responsive automation of business processes, achieving strategic integration and interoperability, and maximizing reuse of existing software components. The cost estimate is Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM OPERATIONS
This activity formalizes the on-going administration and operation of software engineering continuous improvement program within the State. It includes ongoing emphasis and activities within the following focus areas: on-going training and skill development; compliance to industry best practices and maturity models; and on-going assessments and improvements. It also optimizes effectiveness of software engineering efforts/projects in use and development of skilled resources for overall improvement in responsive automation of business processes, achieving strategic integration and interoperability. The estimated cost is Pending Review

and practices which include the role of the information stewards and the processes for collaboration, agreement, documentation, and change management of common enterprise or LOB data and services – an area similar to what the industry may refer to as master data management.
• Establishing the common data and

services architecture within the EA tool and repository, inventories of enterprise and LOB data and services assets; and the approach and practices for defining shared (or master) data and services standards.
• Establishing the administration

IMPLEMENT EA COMMON INFORMATION AND SOLUTIONS ARCHITECTURE / FRAMEWORK ADMINISTRATION
The on-going support of common information and solutions architecture and framework within the State is included in this project. Activities include administration of common architectures to support standardization and sharing across the State; and oversight and maintenance of data and services information within EA repository. Refer to the EIA Common Information Framework in Section 5.2.2.1 and the ESA Common Solutions Framework in Section 6.2.2 for more information on this project. The cost estimate for this work is Pending Review.

standards and practices for creating and maintaining official enterprise and LOB databases and services. The budgetary estimate for this is Pending Review.

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CREATE A COMMON PORTAL IMPLEMENTATION
This project include the implementation of the common user interface portal for all end users – state employees, citizens, residents, and other government staff – federal and local, and business partners. The portal is envisioned as a “my.hawaii. gov” implementation – a customized common interface across any end user device platforms – desktop, laptop, tablet, and mobile. This is a critical element of the ESA Common Solutions Framework as defined in Section 6.2.2. Portal implementation has significant standardization issues from a people, culture, and organization perspective as well as from a technology perspective. Suggested implementation approach would generally require working through a phased approach such as:
• Phase 1: Group research, information

IMPLEMENT ENTERPRISE SERVICES
Implementation of the “infrastructure” to support enterprise services within the common services-oriented architecture to be used across the State is included in this set of activities. This is a critical element of the ESA Common Solutions Framework as defined in Section 6.2.2. Similar to the portal implementation above, moving to common enterprise services has significant standardization issues from a people, culture, and organization perspective as well as from a technology perspective. Suggested implementation approach would generally require working through a phased approach such as:
• Phase 1: Group research, information exchange, and education

on what a services-oriented environment would require organizationally and technically.
• Phase 2: Group deliberation, visioning, establishing

exchange, and education on what a common portal environment would require organizationally and technically.
• Phase 2: Group deliberation, visioning,

governance, and planning towards the common approach.
• Phase 3: Corporate technology decisions and

establishing governance, and planning towards the common approach.
• Phase 3: Corporate technology

acquisition actions.
• Phase 4: Implementation –piloting and initial scope

decisions and acquisition actions.
• Phase 4: Implementation –piloting and

initial linkage; phased roll-out with full application integration. This project will result in enhanced user productivity and efficiency through portal-driven individual customization for stream-lined access to functionality and self-service applications for employees, customers and partners. Examples include employee benefits, vacation time, loans, procurement, interactive training, expense processing, service desk, access to state services and associated case tracking, etc. The cost estimate for this activity is Pending Review.

implementation; structure for on-going future scope areas such as ERP. Web services would be a primary approach for implementation, but other technological models need to be assessed such as messaging, enterprise service bus, open source versus proprietary, etc. The cost estimate is Pending Review.

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MIGRATE LEGACY SYSTEMS
This investment funds the upgrade of legacy applications to address immediate areas of risk to the State due to the age and condition of the application software and platform, or due to needs to reposition our application software off of legacy platforms in order to enable modernization initiatives to move forward. This initiative will include an analysis of the overall applications portfolio and identify the top risk areas. Projects will be authorized to plan and work through conversions, upgrades, and refreshes to stabilize the applications. Examples of efforts that may already be underway but need to continue to move forward include:
• Continue work underway to implement near-term

CREATE PROJECT REGISTRY AND REPORTING
This project creates a project registration and reporting system and identifies all required project measures and measurement methods and techniques/tools. Implement project management reporting systems and summary dashboards for OIMT. Outcomes: Enterprise project management dashboard and reporting capabilities operational. This project depends on enterprise analytics capabilities. The cost estimate is Pending Review. Figure 50 below identifies and organizes the needed initiatives for establishing the enterprise methodology, processes, and practices for software engineering, the common solutions framework, and the applications environment technologies. As described above, the initiatives are organized within the areas of governance, architecture and engineering, and projects.

enhancements to the legacy payroll system to automate EFT to minimize demands for check printing.
• Stabilize the email system versions and enhance overall

enterprise capabilities including addressing a global address list and shared calendaring.
• Migrate current Lotus Domino applications to a standard

enterprise solution pattern for web applications. Estimate of costs for this project are Pending Review.

Figure 50: Transition & Sequencing Plan to achieve Future State Software Development Environment

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Figure 1: Transition & Sequencing Plan to achieve Future State Software Development Environment

Enterprise Architecture

7.2.3.7 INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND PRIVACY DOMAIN
The IA domain represents the rules for maintaining information privacy, protecting information soundness, and ensuring information accessibility by mandating that there is accountability for the creation and maintenance of organizational policies, standards, and procedures to match the mandatory regulatory controls and that IT is are properly aligned with these policies, standards, and procedures.

CURRENT STATE SWOT FOR THE INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND PRIVACY DOMAIN
Table 63 provides a description of the SWOT for this domain. Table 63: SWOT for Information Assurance and Privacy Domain
Information and Privacy Domain Strengths • Knowledgeable Current Cyber Security Staff • Information Privacy and Security Council • Vulnerability Scans of ICSD Tier 1 – 2 Systems • Secure Web Gateway • Intrusion Prevention Systems • SEIM • Website App scanning • Virtual Firewalls between Departments • Enterprise SSL Certificate Available • Security Awareness Training (ICSD UH Only) • Spam Filtering for ICSD Lotus Notes • Two-Factor Authentication for Remote Access • Several ICSD IAM Policies • Partnership with MS-ISAC • Albert Project • DNSSEC Opportunities • Security as a Service model. • New skills and opportunities for current and new staff. • Collaborate with Local and Federal IA organizations. • Data Governance, defining the classification of data • Culture • Change • ‘Untrusted’ Insider • Unions Acceptability • BYOD • Compensation does not align with industry standards. • State IA/Cyber PDs Threats Weaknesses • Any known weaknesses have been intentionally omitted for this

public domain report

during the lifecycle.

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FUTURE STATE VISION FOR THE INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND PRIVACY DOMAIN
Hawai`i’s future state vision is to offer world-class technology for citizen-centered, integrated, and secured services. This will be achieved by utilizing the Security as a Service model to provide secure end to end transformation of data for all its employees and citizens. Figure 51 offers a notional view of this future state vision.

Figure 51: Future State Notional View of the Hybrid Cloud Security Architecture

The future state vision will view Security as a Service and will include the provision of security applications and services via the cloud either to cloud-based infrastructure and software or from the cloud to the customers’ on-premise systems. This will enable enterprises to make use of security services in new ways, or in ways that would not be cost effective if provisioned locally. The following security service categories will be of the most interest to the State of Hawai`i going forward:
• Identity and Access Management (IAM) • Security Assessments • Encryption • Intrusion Management • Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery • Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) • Data Loss Prevention (DLP) • Network Security • Web Security • Email Security

Guiding Principles for the Information Assurance & Privacy Domain

1. Security is the first design consideration for all projects, products or services used by the State of Hawai`i. 2. Employees use a straightforward mechanism for gaining physical access to the work environment while providing electronic authentication to the appropriate electronic work environment. 3. Every device (server, computer, phone, wireless device, etc.), which connects to the States network, is considered a threat until credentials are validated.

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Table 64 provides information that is based on “best practices” and “guiding principles” from the Technical Architectures Security Domains of North Carolina, Kansas, Oregon, and includes Security Principles, Security Identification and Authentication Practices, and Security Authorization and Access Control Practices. This information will supplement the OIMT Information Assurance and Cyber Security Strategic Plan (IA and CS) dated July 2012. This IA and CS Plan recommends both a strategic and tactical approach to IT security improvements that address current and future needs of the State’s security posture while recognizing the technical, financial, and cultural needs of State’s organizational subcomponents. The plan includes initiative and project recommendations that specifically focus on enhancements and advancements that address specific security needs and establish a long-term (3-5 year) strategic direction for the overall IA and CS Program. Table 64: Security Principles for the Future State
Security Principles

1.1. Implementation of proven security policies, procedures, and controls greatly improves the security posture of an organization.

Rationale: – Security policies are management directives for directing, governing, and regulating an organization’s security requirements. Security procedures and controls detail the processes required to implement the types and levels of protection necessary. – Successful security efforts depend on management and staff commitment to the protection of resources. – Security is only as strong as its weakest link. A lack of alignment opens opportunities for exploiting differences in commitment to and implementation of security processes and solutions.

1.4. Focusing on assuring data confidentiality, availability, integrity, and accountability ensures that State’s business objectives and security policies are satisfied. 1NIST Special Publication 800-33 – Underlying Technical Models for Information Security.
• Rationale:

– The availability of data is essential in ensuring security. If data is inaccessible by authorized personnel important decisions or processes are delayed. Furthermore, confidence is easily lost when data cannot be accessed. – It is critical to ensure that data or systems have not been altered in an unauthorized manner. Corrupted data jeopardizes all business functions and requires that recovery processes be invoked when discovered. – Data confidentiality is more important than ever. Only authorized entities can be allowed to access data. Agencies must comply with privacy laws; failures in this area could result in fines or the need to notify the citizenry of data exposure

1.2. Security controls for Hawai’i assets must be commensurate with their value and sufficient to contain risks to an acceptable level.
• Rationale:

– Security is a business necessity with associated costs. Security expenditures should be a balance between cost and risk. – Qualitative or quantitative analysis techniques can be utilized to determine the proper amount of money to budget to protect assets. – Requirements for security vary depending on the information system, connection to other systems, sensitivity of data, and probability of harm.

1.5. Classifying information as either Public or Confidential helps to ensure compliance with legal and regulatory requirements and protects the privacy of citizens, businesses, and employees.
• Rationale:

1.3. Comprehensive security programs are essential. Program operation should occur within a Statewide Security Office.
• Rationale:

– By law, the general public has the right to request access to government information. If the information has been classified as Public, then the information can be made available according to established procedures. Access to Confidential information must be authorized on a strict “need to know” basis, in conformance with legal requirements for allowable access. – Confidentiality is to be determined in accordance with Hawai’i Public Records Law and all other applicable legal and regulatory requirements. – Occurrences of identity theft continue to rise. Public and confidential information must be secured and only revealed to requestors according to approved procedures. – Government has a responsibility to perform its duties as required by law; however these duties must be performed in a manner that ensures privacy.

– Recent policy-based internal security assessments have shown the need to establish a security program or security office. Without a coordinated and on-going security initiative in place, the ability to adequately secure State’s IT assets over time becomes increasingly less possible. – Security programs should focus on accomplishing both the strategic and tactical aspects of security which include identifying and prioritizing security related needs, providing Department CIOs with professional guidance on the best ways to better secure an organization, developing and implementing a security training program for both IT and end users, and performing incident response activities.

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Table 64: Security Principles for the Future State
Security Principles

1.6. Security is an integral part of all stages of the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). NIST Special Publication 800-27 – Engineering Principles for Information Technology Security.
• Rationale:

1.9. Security risk assessments are effective in identifying vulnerabilities; once identified, actions can be taken to mitigate unacceptable levels of risk.
• Rationale:

– Security must be planned from the very beginning of the SDLC (i.e. Initiation Phase); otherwise securing the system is much more costly and inefficient. – Systems already in production (Maintenance Phase) must also be secured. – Even when systems are being retired (Disposal Phase) the proper actions must be taken to ensure the system is decommissioned securely – Designing for security from inception to implementation is significantly less costly than post-implementation attempts to retrofit security into applications.

– A security risk assessment should be performed for all new and ongoing business systems. To determine the appropriate security requirements, departments should assess the value of system assets, risk exposure to those assets, and evaluate the mitigation measures and costs of protecting those systems. – Understanding the value of assets and associated risks is essential to determining the level of security required. – Security requirements should be included when designing or purchasing new applications. – Security requirements should utilize enterprise security resources where available

1.7. Utilizing defense-in-depth and layered security approaches protects State’s information assets. NIST Special Publication 800-27 – Engineering Principles for Information Technology Security.
• Rationale:

1.10. Security risk assessments are effective in identifying vulnerabilities; once identified, actions can be taken to mitigate unacceptable levels of risk.
• Rationale:

– The use of layered security controls across all aspects of network and application better protects resources from various security threats and vulnerabilities, thereby reducing the overall risk of a potential security incident. – The use of layered security controls and mechanisms better protects the asset if security controls are circumvented. – Protection of a resource is best accomplished by placing controls as close to the resource as possible. Additional layers of security help to protect the resource in the event that the primary means of protection fails for any reason. – Due to the diverse needs of the Hawai’i, a single security perimeter that protects the entire network and all related systems may not be feasible. A Security Zoning model will be developed, which is consistent with a layered security approach.

– A security risk assessment should be performed for all new and ongoing business systems. To determine the appropriate security requirements, departments should assess the value of system assets, risk exposure to those assets, and evaluate the mitigation measures and costs of protecting those systems. – Understanding the value of assets and associated risks is essential to determining the level of security required. – Security requirements should be included when designing or purchasing new applications. – Security requirements should utilize enterprise security resources where available

1.11. Maximum effectiveness and usability is ensured when security controls are located in the appropriate communication layer.
• Rationale:

1.8. A security architecture that leverages an integrated set of enterprise services permits Hawai’i agencies to focus on the business goals rather than on the implementation of security.
• Rationale:

– Utilize State’s infrastructure security services. – Integration of security services will enable interoperability and provide flexibility in conducting electronic business across and beyond the enterprise. – Integration will reduce the costs of protecting State’s resources. – Integration will increase the reliability of security solutions.

– Whenever security is required, the location in a communications protocol will have an impact. The impact may be on performance, reliance on an underlying network protocol, and on developers. Choosing the appropriate OSI layer in a communications protocol will maximize usability and minimize future changes. – Security services can have an impact on performance. The impact is minimized when security services are located at lower layers of a communications protocol. – Security services can have an impact on developers. For example, services provided at the transport layer have less impact on application programmers than services that run above that layer. – Security services can increase reliance on a network protocol. An appropriate choice depends on the communication requirements of the business system.

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Table 64: Security Principles for the Future State
Security Principles

1.12. Formalized trust agreements between Agencies and/or external entities establish the criteria for conducting business securely.
• Rationale:

Security Identification and Authentication Practices

2.1. Establish and follow industry accepted user-id and password management practices.
• Rationale:

– The security posture of external entities should be carefully evaluated prior to establishing network communications to conduct business-oriented transactions or processes. – Agreed upon minimum security standards must be verified by each entity annually. – Even after trusted communications are allowed, most often these communications occur via a dedicated circuit or VPN into a tightly controlled area of the network, which then relays the information into other portions of the internal network for further processing.

– User-ids and passwords are the most common means, but weakest form, of identification and authentication to Hawai’i services. When not managed properly, unauthorized access is possible. – User-ids and passwords must be carefully administered to ensure proper management (selection, aging, retirement, etc.) occurs. – Examples of good management practices include requiring that passwords consist of upper and lower case characters, special characters, and numerics, which are at least 8 characters in length; required password change on a regular basis (e.g. quarterly); required password rotation; disabling user-ids after three to five failed access attempts; not sharing user-ids and passwords with others; and not writing down passwords and hiding them in places that can be easily accessed.

1.13. Systems are resilient to threats, vulnerabilities, and cyber attacks4 from both internal and external sources when properly designed and implemented.
• Rationale:

– Zero-day vulnerabilities and Distributed Denial of Services attacks can occur at any time. Networks and systems must be designed such that operations can continue at acceptable levels. – Government entities are primary targets for cyber attacks and cyber warfare. – It is critical that the necessary actions are taken to protect information assets from internal as well as external attacks. Attacks or unauthorized access to information by employees can be very damaging, since they are more knowledgeable of the internal workings of an entity. Separation of duties and rotation of responsibilities can be used to protect against these types of attacks. Unannounced external third party reviews by security professionals are also very effective.

2.2. Use vendor neutral, standards-based, APIs for identification and authentication.
• Rationale:

– Avoid proprietary identification and authorization APIs, which promote vendor lock-in.

– Examples include NIST 800-63, Office of Budget and Management memoranda M-04-04, and GSA E-Authentication Technical Architecture standards. 2.3. Encrypt user-ids and passwords during transmission. In addition, passwords must be stored in an encrypted or one-way hash format.
• Rationale:

1.14. Obtaining superior levels of information assurance within Hawai’i government depends on the use of properly trained security professionals.
• Rationale:

– User-ids and passwords are the weakest method of identification and authentication. Transmitting or storing this information in the clear places the associated systems or data at great risk of unauthorized access. – User-ids and passwords are easily captured when transmitted over IP networks. – Legacy applications, that transmit passwords in the clear when encapsulated over IP networks, must also be securely transmitted. – Security protocols such as SSL and IPSec and security solutions such as VPNs can be used to protect passwords in transit over networks.

– The expertise level of hackers is ever increasing. In addition hacking tools are widely available. Therefore, even novice hackers can cause significant damage to IT resources with very little effort. In many cases these types of attack have tended to be disruptive in nature, however, there is a second generation of hackers emerging that are focused on releasing destructive viruses and worms, or stealing monetary funds from e-commerce systems. – Without the proper expertise and training, security implementations can be faulty and ineffective.

2.4. Authenticate users prior to accessing controlled services or data.
• Rationale:

– Allowing only authenticated users to access system resources protects those resources from inappropriate access. – Authenticating users is the basis for providing accountability while permitting access.

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Table 64: Security Principles for the Future State
Security Principles Security Identification and Authentication Practices

2.5. Perform two-factor authentication when strong authentication is required.
• Rationale:

2.10. Follow PKCS #11 or PC/SC standards to interface smart cards to smart card readers.
• Rationale:

– There are three accepted factors of authentication. The factors are “something you know” (e.g. password, passphrase, or PIN), “something you have” (e.g. token or smart card), and “something you are” (e.g. fingerprint, retina scan, or hand geometry). – The authenticating factors listed above are a means of proving your Hawai’i identity. Strong authentication is accomplished when any two of these factors are provided during the authentication process.

– PKCS #11 from RSA is a widely accepted standard for integrating smart cards to applications supported by many vendors. – PC/SC is widely accepted for integration of smart cards on Intel platforms.

2.11. Follow the BioAPI when interfacing applications and biometric information other than fingerprint biometrics (e.g. voice, face, iris, etc.).
• Rationale:

2.6. Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) initiatives must interoperate with other PKI solutions, utilize a Statewide approach, and conform to any relevant Hawai’i law or Statewide policy.
• Rationale:

– A consortium of vendors, technology developers, researchers, VARs, and end-users developed the BioAPI. – The BioAPI offers interoperability over distributed environments with related APIs. – They include SAPI, HA-API, the telecom industry’s S100 (a standard architecture for developing computer-telephony applications), and JavaSpeech (a standard for speech recognition using Java). – Fingerprint biometrics must utilize standards specified by the NC SBI. – Refer to the BioAPI Consortium for specific references to the BioAPI standards.

– The establishment of any PKI infrastructure is complex and must only be pursued after proper analysis and approvals have occurred. Agencies must leverage statewide services if they exist. – Collaboration and co-operation will be required to support security services across the enterprise. – A unified approach to a Public Key infrastructure enables the Hawai’i to respond to changing requirements and conditions. – A fragmented approach to a public key infrastructure will complicate administration and management of security across the enterprise

2.12. Follow the X.509v3 standard for Public Key Certificates.

2.7. Use industry accepted products for applications requiring digital certificate authentication.
• Rationale:

Rationale: – Public Key authentication must be based on Public Key Certificates. – Public Key Certificates must be based on the X.509v3 standard. – Despite the widespread acceptance of this standard, care must be taken when dealing with vendors. Projects should require proof of interoperability with existing or proposed enterprise implementations using X.509v3 certificates. Proprietary extensions to certificates could inhibit interoperability and should be avoided.
Security Authorization and Access Control Practices

– Certificates for web-based applications are provided by a number of major vendors. This approach is less risky and more cost effective than internal creation of digital certificates. – Use of proprietary certificate extensions must be avoided to ensure interoperability.

2.8. Follow ISO/IEC 7816 standards for contact smart cards.
• Rationale:

– ISO 7816/1-4 standards define the electrical resistance, positioning of electrical contacts, communication protocol between card and card reader, and command set recognized by smart cards. – They correspond roughly to the OSI layered model. – The command set defined by the ISO 7816-4 standard are included in whole or in part by most smart cards on the market.

3.1. Only authorized users and devices are allowed to access State’s assets.
• Rationale:

– Unauthorized access or use of Hawai’i property such as a network, infrastructure device, or service is a violation of OIMT policy.

3.2. Authorize users according to the principle of least privilege. Security controls must be established that verify this requirement is satisfied on a regular basis.
• Rationale:

2.9. Follow ISO/IEC 14443 and 15693 and NIST Government Smart Card Interoperability Specification V2.1 standards for contactless smart cards.
• Rationale:

– Authorize users to the minimum set of resources appropriate to their role. – Authorizing users on least privilege minimizes the impact of security violations. – Authorizing users to a minimum set of resources necessary to their function makes it easier to establish accountability. – Authorization levels must be checked at least annually. A check on a monthly or quarterly basis is recommended

– ISO 14443 standards, such as such as HID’s iCLASS and NXP’s, for contactless smart cards define the characteristics and communication protocols between contactless cards and the card reader.

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Table 64: Security Principles for the Future State
Security Principles Security Authorization and Access Control Practices

3.3. All portable devices such as laptops, PDAs, smartphones, portable storage devices, other mobile devices, etc. must be scanned and cleaned of any viruses by up-to-date anti-virus software prior to connecting to State’s network.
• Rationale:

3.7. Mitigate security vulnerabilities that exist within various TCP/IP protocols.
• Rationale:

– Employees, contractors, consultants, sales representatives, etc. can be exposed to viruses while not behind firewalls or protected by out-of-date anti-virus software. In many cases, this is how viruses are introduced into the internal network.

– IP uses various protocols to provide and manage services. Due to the increased security requirements related to using the Internet, many of these protocols have security weaknesses that can negatively impact State’s network, especially when uncontrolled entry into State’s systems and networks is allowed. – Insecure and/or unauthorized network protocols must not be allowed to enter into State’s network. If use of network protocols is required either internally or externally then it must be tightly controlled or proxied from the Transaction Zone. Examples of insecure and unauthorized network protocols include NetBIOS, ICMP, and SNMP. – The use of IPX poses significant risks across State’s WAN. For that reason, routing IPX across State’s network is not acceptable.

3.4. Remote access to the internal network over a public network must occur through a VPN.
• Rationale:

– Accessing application services securely across public networks require encrypted communications. – Mobile workers (users that access the network from unpredictable locations), telecommuters and remote workers (users that routinely or occasionally work from a specific location), contractors, consultants, and vendors can easily expose userids, passwords, sensitive data, etc. over public networks. – VPN technology is not required for web-based applications (e.g. email and calendar) if the communications are secured via SSL.

3.8. Use encryption technologies to provide information assurance and recoverability.
• Rationale:

– Sensitive information may be susceptible to unauthorized access or viewing unless protected by encryption technologies. – Many applications and operating systems create temporary files, which allow access to encrypted and even unencrypted information. Use of State supported encryption technologies ensure that this type of exposure is avoided.

3.5. Remote access to the internal network must be properly authenticated.
• Rationale:

– Remote access users must be minimally authenticated using proper userid and password management practices. Additionally, strong (i.e. two-factor) authentication can be implemented, using technologies such as tokens or smart cards, to further secure the remote access. – Direct dial-in connections to modems located in desktops provide back door access to the internal network. Agencies must provide secure solutions to mobile workers, telecommuters, remote workers, contractors, consultants, and vendors to avoid this situation. – Applications and file systems must be protected from unauthorized access.

– Organizations must have the means to recover data encrypted by an employee after the employee leaves or when encryption keys are lost or stolen. Many products do not provide data recovery services. Data recovery techniques must be developed whenever data encryption is used. 3.9. Protect desktops, laptops, PDAs, smartphones, other mobile devices, etc. that are used by mobile and remote workers through the use of personal firewalls (hardware and/or software), encryption software, anti-spyware, and anti-virus software.
• Rationale:

3.6. Virtual Private Network (VPM) solutions must utilize either SSL or IPSec technology.
• Rationale:

– Remote Access and telecommuting are becoming more and more common and therefore the data located on the devices used during remote access must be protected. – Hackers looking for easy targets frequently scan remote users. These hackers may commandeer home systems to launch attacks, to destroy data, or to obtain access to the user’s work network. – Personal firewalls, desktop encryption, virus protection, anti spyware, and anti-virus software are a means of protecting remote users. End-users must be adequately trained in the use of these products. – Use of fully functional purchased software is recommended for this critical function. Shareware products are generally not intended for wide spread use by a Department, and in many cases this may be in violation of the software license agreement. – Centrally configured firewalls and desktop encryption simplify the remote user’s need to manage potentially confusing products. – Some firewall/VPN products provide configuration and administration support for personal firewalls.

– VPN solutions must be either SSL or IPSec based. While SSL is an open standard and therefore preferred, there may be times where IPSec would be a better choice based on the function being performed. IPSec, while a more proprietary solution, is also a recognized de facto standard. – IPSec is an extension to the IP communications protocol, designed to provide end-to-end confidentiality for packets traveling over the Internet. – IPSec works with both the IPv4 and the IPv6 protocol

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Table 64: Security Principles for the Future State
Security Principles Security Authorization and Access Control Practices

3.10. Secure transmission of sensitive data in both wired and wireless environments.
• Rationale:

– Data in transit to and from the enterprise must be protected in compliance with legal requirements for confidentiality and privacy. – Web-enabled applications must protect confidential or critical data from unauthorized access. – Use secure server-to-server communication to protect confidential or critical data transmissions. – Examples of PII and other sensitive data include SSN, Dates of Birth, Credit Card numbers, health related information, etc. – Examples of security protocols include SSL, VPN, Secure FTP, and WiFi Protected Access 2 (WPA2).

3.11. Use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) when secure communications between the web client and server is required.
• Rationale:

– SSL/TLS is the most commonly supported protocol for communication between a Web Server and a browser. – SSL/TLS authenticates the Web Server and optionally authenticates the user. – Current implementations allow for client authentication support using the services provided by Certificate Authorities.

3.12. Cryptography must be based on open standards and utilize a key of sufficient length to adequately protect data.
• Rationale:

– Cryptosystems and their associated cryptographic algorithms must be publicly reviewed and accepted by the security industry prior to any production usage, otherwise the validity and strength of the cryptosystem cannot be considered as a viable solution. – The key lengths for these algorithms can vary; therefore the selection of an appropriate key size is critical to adequately protect data. In other words, select a key length large enough to ensure that the “work factor” (i.e. time and effort) required to defeat the protection is greater than the value of the “material being protected”. – Cryptography must be based on open standards and utilize a key of sufficient length to adequately protect data. – The Cryptography Categories and Standards Table highlights open, industry accepted, cryptographic standards.

Cryptography Categories
Symmetric (“Shared” Secret Key) Asymmetric (Public Key / Private Key) Hash Functions

Cryptography Algorithm Standards
AES, 3DES, IDEA, RC4, RC5, RC6, Blowfish, Twofish RSA, ECC, El Gamal, DSA MD5, SHA-1, SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, SHA-512

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SECURITY DEVICES SUB-DOMAIN
Security defines the methods of protecting information and information systems from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, or destruction in order to provide integrity, confidentiality and availability. Software is available and used by a certification authority (CA) to issue digital certificates and ensure secure access to information. The evolution of Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is based on the verification and authentication of the parties involved in information exchange. Table 65 provides a description of this sub-domain. Table 65: Security Devices Sub-Domain Description
IA Security Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards Stateful Inspection FW

Current Supported Products/ Standards Cisco Virtual FW Checkpoint NG

Preferred Products / Standards

Emerging Trends

Firewalls

Host and network based deep Cloud based web packet inspection application application firewalls, layer firewall Distributed web application firewalls IPSec VPN SSL VPN IDPS – Intrusion Detection and Prevention System IDPS – Intrusion Detection and Prevention System Endpoint protection against zero day threats, antiphishing, antispam, web based protection, and malware removal WIPS - Wireless Intrusion Prevention System NIST RBAC (Role Based Access Control) model, FIPS 201 mVPN – mobile VPN based on Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Stack based intrusion detection systems Integrated Network/ Wireless/Host based prevention in network. Integrated Anti malware/ virus for mobile devices. Central A/V deployment and push, Cloud anti-virus WiFi intrusion prevention and rogue AP detection Identity Management with single sign on, dual factor authentication and defined privilege classes within enterprise

Virtual Private Networks (VPN) Intrusion Detection System (IDS) Intrusion Protection System (IPS) Anti-Virus

Client based VPN

Vendor Specific Checkpoint VPN Cisco VPN Cisco

Network based IDS

Cisco

End user controlled A/V lacking central update capability

Symantec Endpoint

Wireless

Rogue or standalone WiFi deployments Departmental authentication systems

Secure WiFi integration with LAN authentication Single Active Directory for State, LDAP v3, Kerberos 5

Authentication and Authorization

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PRIVACY SUB-DOMAIN
Where security focuses on protection of the network from an outside in perspective, the privacy sub domain is concerned with the protection of information that could compromise an individual, system, or the State as a whole. Personally Identifiable Information (PII) is an example of data that must not be returned in a common query or data set or leaked outside the State. Table 66 provides a description of the Privacy Sub-Domain. Table 66: Privacy Sub-Domain Description
IA Security Sub-Domain

Sunset Products / Standards N/A

Current Supported Products/ Standards N/A

Preferred Products / Standards Network DLP Data in Motion DiM Storage DLP Data at Rest -DaR Endpoint DLP Data in Use - DiU AES-256 bit encryption

Emerging Trends Content inspection system to prevent transmission of PII or other sensitive data

Data Loss Prevention (DLP)

Encryption

Departmental encryption solutions for data at rest N/A

Encryption of data in transit and at rest. 3DES, AES-128

Full Disk Encryption extended to portable media devices. AES256 3rd party assessment and creation of risk management plan

IA / Risk Assessment

Risk IT, CobiT, ISO 27000

COBIT FISMA

ETA TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR THE INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND PRIVACY (IA&P) DOMAIN
Transition and sequencing is based upon a thorough assessment of the current security posture. This assessment is a critical input to the development of a sequencing plan that organizes all of the major elements of IA&P as sub-projects within the larger initiative. This list of initiatives and activities was created in conjunction with the Information Assurance and Privacy Working Group to provide a road map and project phasing to address a comprehensive integrated capability. The OIMT Information Assurance and Cyber Security Strategic Plan (IA and CS) dated July 2012 indicates that “The IA initiatives identified in this Plan largely fall into one or more of six strategic goal areas:
• Protect Data – As demonstrated in a succession of well

– anywhere, anytime, and any mission – securely and reliably” is fundamental to State’s ability to preserve and improve its mission capabilities. Meeting this objective, however, increases the complexities associated with protecting our sensitive information.
• Proactive Continuous Monitoring – The goal of continuous

monitoring is to provide real time awareness of a department’s security posture, enabling departments to address threats and to proactively remediate vulnerabilities before they can be exploited.
• Network Centric – The network centric approach focuses on

providing defense at the periphery. This is what many would consider the traditional approach to provide security to the enterprise. While this method of protection is still valid, a more radical approach to security must include the life cycle of data, from creation, now it is used while valid, during any archival or retention requirements, through proper method of destruction.
• Data Centric – The data centric approach focuses on the data

publicized security events, the protection of privacy and other sensitive information is one of the most significant challenges faced in organizations today. This becomes even more challenging when addressed in the context of Protecting Access. Opening the information infrastructures to provide improved “access to the right information for authorized users

itself and where it lives; the database. Data centric continuous monitoring protects the data by identifying and fixing database vulnerabilities before exploitation occurs.
• Protect Access – In meeting the two significant objectives

of protecting access – by authorized users – to the right information, State must first strengthen its ability to granularly establish and enforce access rules and then tie these rules to
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its information assets so that only those individuals with rights to information have those rights. In addition, to address the access objective of reliability, State must deploy secure, reliable, capacious, and diverse access solutions that allow users access to needed information from “anywhere” and at “anytime.”
• Situational Awareness – To support an awareness of

State owned laptops, it is essential that Data at Rest be encrypted. The estimate for this project is Pending Review

INITIATE SERVER CONFIGURATION STABILITY MONITORING
This investment helps identify alterations in operating system, database, applications, and security configurations that result in State’s assets being more susceptible to threats. This includes the ability to examine, evaluate, and report on the level of compliance with security hardening requirements (often referred to as Security Technical Implementation Guides, or STIGs) that are established for equipment and systems across State’s infrastructure. This provides mitigation for exploiting vulnerabilities in devices connected to networks and connecting non-compliant devices to networks without compliance monitoring. The cost estimate for this activity is Pending Review.

infrastructure or information risk related to configuration or patching weaknesses, exposure, attacks, and deliberate or accidental misuse, through implementation of security monitoring technologies and operational monitoring of these technologies. “The ‘New Day Plan’ presented established a “Unity of Purpose” with One Team – One Mission – One Vision – One Set of Goals and Objectives. This plan was one of the six focus areas identified as part of the proposed 4 phases to be completed over the next four years of the current administration.”

IMPLEMENT NETWORK DATA LOSS PREVENTION (NDLP)
This investment implements a system to protect Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and other sensitive data from inadvertently leaving State’s network without authorization or other appropriate protections. This investment includes implementing software, processes, procedures, and support personnel to protect Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and other sensitive data types from unauthorized use, access, disclosure, and to report on any perceived or confirmed exposure of PII. Benefits of this initiative include:
• Prevent network data loss regardless of protocol • Monitor and inspect all TCP protocols – SMTP, HTTP/S, FTP/S,

INITIATE AUTOMATED SECURITY CONFIGURATION COMPLIANCE MONITORING AND REPORTING
This investment helps identify alterations in security configurations that result in State’s assets being more susceptible to threats. This will provide the ability to examine, evaluate, and report on the level of compliance with security hardening requirements (often referred to as Security Technical Implementation Guides, or STIGs) that are established for equipment and systems across State’s infrastructure. The cost estimate for this is Pending Review.

IM, P2P, and other TCP
• Inline MTA inspects and controls email messages • ICAP integration controls Webmail, Web 2.0, and FTP,

IMPLEMENT PRIVACY PROGRAM STAFFING AND SENSITIVE INFORMATION PROTECTION IMPROVEMENTS
This investment enables improvements to be made at all levels within State by supporting targeted Privacy Program staffing increases and the development of improved information protection policies and procedures. This investment will be approximately Pending Review.

including SSL-enabled sessions
• Policy-based email encryption secures communication and

ensures regulatory compliance The estimate for this investment is Pending Review.

CREATE AND IMPLEMENT IT SECURITY POLICY
This investment supports the development and promulgation of revised policies better articulating the responsibilities of organizational components to more effectively manage their IT security programs, internal security configurations and risks. The estimated cost for this activity Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT ENTERPRISE SECURITY OPERATIONS CENTER(S)
This investment supports State’s ability to monitor threats presented by data loss from mission critical systems resulting from misconfigurations or unauthorized data transfers initiated by malicious actors. The lack of appropriate tools and personnel to identify hostile traffic, vulnerabilities that can be exploited and non-compliant configurations that expose the State to hostile parties could result in significant disruption of network access and services and of destruction and abuse of sensitive data. The estimate for this set of activities is Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT DATA AT REST (DAR) ENCRYPTION
This investment protects data resident on assets outside of the physical protection boundaries of State’s facilities – typically resident on mobile devices that can be lost or stolen. With the increasing utilization and usage of mobile devices, including
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IMPLEMENT COMPUTER INCIDENT RESPONSE CENTERS (CIRCS)
This investment improves computer incident detection, reporting, prioritization, response, collaboration, and resolution capabilities throughout the Department. Currently, known incidents take too long to detect, report, respond and collaborate at the State level. Incident reporting arrives too late for appropriate preventative actions to take place. All of this can pose a risk to much higher incident management costs than required; lack of uniform handling of detection, reporting, response, collaboration and resolutions; and, incident-based legal action failing due to inappropriate forensic evidence collection. The cost estimate for this effort is Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT AN ENTERPRISE IDENTITY MANAGEMENT SOLUTION
This investment establishes a standard solution for management of user account identity and authorized roles and access permissions integrated with standard user directory services and enterprise services for authentication. The expectation is that an industry standard commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) application software package will be selected and procured and implemented. The estimate for this initiative is Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT NETWORK-BASED NETWORK ACCESS CONTROL (NAC)
This investment implements a network-based solution to prevent unauthorized systems from inappropriately accessing State’s network(s). A significant risk to all missions dependent on the information technology that supports them is a lack of network-based network access control (NAC). Without network-based NAC, any hostile party can connect any device to the network and attack it and the sensitive and PII data on it and all the devices connected to the network. Selected and deployed adequate network-based NAC solutions will be installed throughout selected bureau and office internal Local Area Networks (LANs). The network-based NAC is integrated with the host-based NAC solution within the Common EndPoint Protection Platform investment. The estimate for this initiative is Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT ENTERPRISE PENETRATION TESTING CAPABILITY
This investment defines, documents, and implements a core capability enabling State to assess the effectiveness of security controls, when evaluated from an attacker’s perspective, to deny the compromise of mission critical systems. These activities total approximately Pending Review.

COMMON STANDARDS FOR PROTECTING PRIVACY AND OTHER SENSITIVE DATA
This investment funds the development and promulgation of common standards for protecting privacy and other sensitive information. This initiative will cost approximately Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT A SECURE WIRELESS ACCESS SOLUTION
This investment will support the selection, development, implementation, and migration to a standardized State-wide wireless access solution(s) for both remote and local area network access. With the advancement into wireless access solutions to support mission-needed remote and local wireless access to State network assets, servers and data, the State is at risk of having a diversified environment of solutions implemented across the various departments, divisions, branches, and offices leading to costly adaptations for secure configurations across the multitude of products. This initiative will select, develop, implement, and migrate pilot organizations to a State-wide wireless access solution performed incrementally in coordination with all “Remote Access” related initiatives/projects. The estimate for this initiative is Pending Review.

IMPLEMENT A SECURE APPLICATIONS TESTING PROGRAM
This investment develops and implements solutions and testing regimens within application lifecycle development processes to help identify vulnerabilities and weaknesses in all custom source code. Application security should be built-in not added “after market” (much like airbags in cars). Attempting to add security to an application after the requirements have been fulfilled and the application has been developed is rarely successful and typically creates vulnerabilities that cannot be addressed within the application hence incur significant infrastructure costs to remediate. Without a robust application testing regimen, the State is at risk of continuing to deploy applications into the mission-dependent environment that are making the information technology environment less secure rather than more secure and thereby putting the mission data and mission at risk. Further, a lack of uniform testing across all development shops at the State exposes all mission data stores to the vulnerabilities in one insecure deployment. Vulnerabilities could include input validation, cross site scripting, SQL injection, cookie modification, code execution, buffer overflow, URL manipulation, and authentication bypass. The estimate for this initiative is Pending Review.
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IMPLEMENT NETWORK END-TO-END ENCRYPTION SOLUTION
This investment will support the design and implementation of secure internal network communications between mission critical servers and locations. Information Exposure, Unauthorized Use, Unsecured Operating Environments, Loss of Public Confidence, Exposure to Legal Action an . Data traveling across the State network is available for snooping and capturing by hostile parties that connect locally or remotely to the network. A significantly worse risk lies in the traffic that leaves segments of State’s network to reach field offices or other legitimate parties (e.g. remote teleworkers) that is not encrypted while in transit. This information includes login and password information, sensitive and PII data. Hostile parties can read this unencrypted and abuse the credentials and sensitive information, potentially to embarrass State or to interrupt and destroy its network and data. The estimate for this initiative is Pending Review. Figure 52 and Figure 53 represent the roadmap for achieving future State vision for the Information Assurance and Privacy Domain.

Figure 52: Roadmap for Achieving Future State Vision for the Information Assurance and Privacy Domain (1 of 2)

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Figure 53: Roadmap for Achieving Future State Vision for the Information Assurance and Privacy Domain (2 of 3)

Information Assurance and Privacy Domain Addendum Information http://idea.hawaii.gov/userimages/accounts/90/907159/panel_upload_18993/SupplementalAddendumIA.pdf

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8.0 ENTERPRISE LEVEL TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLAN
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8.0 ENTERPRISE LEVEL TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLAN
This section provides a high-level view of the transition and sequencing activities for the enterprise while Appendix A provides a detailed view of the transition and sequencing actions from the LOB perspective.

8.1

APPROACH TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING PLANNING

The State’s EA characterizes and documents the current state and more importantly defines the standards that will create the desired future state. The T&S Plan is the “how” this transition or transformation occurs in a logical and sequenced or prioritized manner. The T&S process is depicted in Figure 54.

Figure 54: T&S Process

When the T&S Plan is then coupled with the requirements defined in the IT investment Portfolio Management (PfM) Methodology (and its accompanying toolset) along with IT governance and the defined OIMT management practices, the resulting roadmap of activities and projects ensure that IT investments efficiently and cost effectively support the delivery services and programs to all stakeholders (e.g., people of Hawai`i, citizens, business entities, cities, counties, State employees, State government) in a manner they want/need in terms of quality, timeliness, reliability, and transparency. This T&S Plan covers ten years and each year the T&S Plan will be reviewed updated on at least an annual basis.

8.2 ENTERPRISE LEVEL TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING ANALYSIS
The progress of the transition is characterized using a number of perspectives or views. These views summarize the key investments and their resulting projects and activities to ensure alignment with the overarching goals and objectives identified in the future state vision defined in the EA. The details that create these views are maintained in the PfM toolset. The views also offer perspectives that assist OIMT, CIO, CIOC, and ELC in evaluating new investments to ensure they are aligned with the strategic direction set for IT as part of the Strategic Plan and the EA and in monitoring the progress of the transition to the future state definition. As an evaluation tool, the views should be “refreshed and regenerated” on a regular basis.

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The following sections describe a sample of the views that will be used in the evaluation and assessment of IT investments. The actual tables and graphics depicting these views are provided in Appendix C.

8.2.1 STRATEGIC PORTFOLIO VIEWS
This section details the description of the various portfolio views and notional graphic of how the specific views work.

8.2.1.1 INVESTMENT STATUS BY LOB
IT investment dollars are aligned between operations and maintenance (O&M) or Steady State (SS) activities and Development, Enhancement, and Modernization (D/M/E) projects and initiatives by LOB. This view indicates the portfolio’s imbalance in terms of operating and maintaining the more than 700 existing (and often duplicative) systems and their supporting infrastructures. This alignment between O&M or SS and D/M/E indicates that the cost operating and maintaining the current environment is based on technology that is inefficient and ineffective in its application at the enterprise level. Going forward, the funding must be realigned to move more investments to D/M/E (or actively and expeditiously retiring current systems and technology in O&M or SS) especially in the next ten years in order to transform the environment. The OIMT, CIO, CIOC, and ELC should use this view to monitor the investment results.

Figure 1: Investment Components Figure 55: Investment Components

8.2.1.4 EA COMPLIANCE
The enterprise technologies provides the opportunity to make informed decisions on IT activities and investments that are in compliance with the defined technology domains, standards and products outlined in the EA. This understanding of investments and their alignment with the EA help achieve faster deployment with fewer complexities at a lesser cost to the taxpayer. This view focuses the attention of OIMT, CIO, and CIOC on current investments that should be reviewed as part of the Control/Evaluate Phase for retirement or recommendation regarding D/M/E. This view used in conjunction with the Enterprise Support Systems and Enterprise Services view also supports project sequencing.

8.2.1.2 ENTERPRISE SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND ENTERPRISE SERVICES
The EA and specifically the ESA for the State identifies enterprise systems and services that support multiple LOBs (and Departments) due to the shared nature of the activity. As IT investments are identified/architected/ proposed this view supports CIO, CIOC, and/or ELC in making Selection decisions as part of PfM by highlighting the number of LOBs that benefit from the investment, amount of funding, against timeframe that IT solutions are projected to attain economies of scale and cost reduction for the State (based on business case and other provided information in the PfM toolset). This view also supports sequencing decisions. This view is based on the biannual budget submissions for FY2014. From this view the enterprise investments are substantially more effective in the achievement of the EA future state vision.

8.2.1.5 STRATEGIC VALUE
The strategic value view depicts where IT investment for the State is positioned to achieve the strategic objectives as outlined by the EA (and its alignment to the New Day Plan). This view provides the means for the CIO, ELC, Governor, and Legislature to make informed decisions in moving funding of IT from investment to investment to close business or functionality gaps that are inhibiting fulfillment of goals and objectives. All investments with low compliance with regard to strategic objectives and minimal enterprise utility are evaluated for retirement while all investments with high enterprise utility and extensive compliance with strategic objectives should be fully funded.

8.2.1.3 ESA AND ETA INVESTMENTS
This view provides insight into the distribution of investments between the ESA and ETA.

8.3 SPECIFIC PROJECTS AND ACTIVITIES
This view communicates the individual investment initiatives that are required to implement the future state EA. Initiatives are organized within each architectural layer of the EA. A high level Gantt chart depicts all the initiatives and their timing and dependencies by Fiscal Year.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | 167

9.0 CONCLUSION
168 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture

9.0 CONCLUSION
Finally, the EA and the defined projects, initiatives, and activities will serve as a resource and guide for the State’s IT practitioners within the LOBs and Departments as they make tactical and strategic decisions about the development, modernization, enhancement, maintenance, retirement of technology. It also provides a basis for the evaluation of technology plans by the Chief Information Officer (CIO), Office of Information Management and Technology (OIMT), Department leadership and IT management, Executive Leadership Council (ELC), and CIO Council (CIOC) and IT Steering Committee who are ultimately responsible for ensuring:
• State government is costeffectively and efficiently managing all resources (e.g., investments, revenues, employees, IT) and

delivering services and programs to all stakeholders (e.g., people of Hawai`i, citizens, residents, businesses, cities, counties, State employees, State government, business partners) in a manner they want/need; and
• operating in an aligned, streamlined, and integrated manner so that stakeholders’ service expectations and information needs

are met in terms of quality, timeliness, reliability, and transparency.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | 169

ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE (EA) – A BLUEPRINT FOR CHANGE APPENDIX A–LINE OF BUSINESS SEGMENT ARCHITECTURE TRANSFORMATION

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
A. LINE OF BUSINESS SEGMENT ARCHITECTURE TRANSFORMATION .........................................................................................12 A.1 Core Mission Areas .........................................................................................................................................................................13 A.1.1 Defense..................................................................................................................................................................................13 A.1.1.1 Future State Vision for Defense .............................................................................................................................13 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................14 A.1.1.2 Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary for Defense......................................................................................14 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................14 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................16 A.1.2 Homeland Security .............................................................................................................................................................16 A.1.2.1 Future State Vision for Homeland Security ........................................................................................................17 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................17 A.1.2.2 Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary for Homeland Security .................................................................18 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................18 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................19 A.1.3 Disaster Management .......................................................................................................................................................19 A.1.3.1 Future State Vision for Disaster Management...................................................................................................20 Information Exchange .....................................................................................................................................................21 A.1.3.2 Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary for Disaster Management ...........................................................21 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................21 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................24 A.1.4 Law Enforcement ................................................................................................................................................................24 A.1.4.1 Future State Vision for Law Enforcement ...........................................................................................................25 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................25 A.1.4.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Law Enforcement ............................................................26 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................26 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................27 A.1.5 Correctional Activities/Public Safety ............................................................................................................................28 A.1.5.1 Future State Vision for Correctional Activities/Public Safety .......................................................................29 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................30 A.1.5.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Correctional Activities/Public Safety ........................30 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................30 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................33 A.1.6 Legal Services .....................................................................................................................................................................34 A.1.6.1 Future State Vision the Legal Services................................................................................................................34 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................35 A.1.6.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Legal Services .................................................................35 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................35 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................37

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A.1.7 Justice ...................................................................................................................................................................................38 A.1.7.1 Future State Vision for Justice ..............................................................................................................................40 Information Exchanges.................................................................................................................................................................................41 A.1.7.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning for Justice..................................................................................................41 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................41 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................44 A.1.8 Child Support Services ......................................................................................................................................................45 A.1.8.1 Future State Vision for Child Support Services .................................................................................................46 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................46 A.1.8.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Child Support Services..................................................47 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................47 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................48 A.1.9 Stadium Operations............................................................................................................................................................48 A.1.9.1 Future State Vision for Stadium Operations .......................................................................................................49 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................49 A.1.9.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Stadium Operations........................................................49 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................49 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................49 A.1.10 Transportation....................................................................................................................................................................49 A.1.10.1 Future State Vision for Transportation ...............................................................................................................49 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................50 A.1.10.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Transportation................................................................52 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................52 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................56 A.1.11 Economic Development ..................................................................................................................................................58 A.1.11.1 Future State Vision for Economic Development..............................................................................................59 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................60 A.1.11.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Economic Development ..............................................60 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................60 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................63 A.1.12 Commerce and Consumer Affairs .................................................................................................................................63 A.1.12.1 Future State Vision for Commerce and Consumer Affairs ............................................................................65 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................66 A.1.12.2 Transition & Sequencing Plan for Commerce and Consumer Affairs ........................................................66 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................66 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................69 A.1.13 Human Services ................................................................................................................................................................71 A.1.13.1 Future State Vision for Human Services ...........................................................................................................73 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................74 A.1.13.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Human Services ............................................................75 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................75 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................77
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A.1.14 Employment Rights and Benefits ..................................................................................................................................79 A.1.14.1 Future State Vision for Employment Rights & Benefits..................................................................................81 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................82 A.1.14.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Employment Rights and Benefits ..............................83 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................83 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................92 A.1.15 Education ............................................................................................................................................................................94 A.1.15.1 Future State Vision for Education .......................................................................................................................94 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................95 A.1.15.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Education ........................................................................95 Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................95 Transition and Sequencing ............................................................................................................................................98 A.1.16 Higher Education ..............................................................................................................................................................99 A.1.16.1 Future State Vision for Higher Education..........................................................................................................99 Information Exchanges ...................................................................................................................................................99 A.1.16.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Higher Education ..........................................................99 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 100 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 101 A.1.17 Public Health .................................................................................................................................................................. 102 A.1.17.1 Future State Vision for Public Health.............................................................................................................. 105 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 106 A.1.17.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Public Health .............................................................. 107 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 107 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 109 A.1.18 Environmental Health Management ......................................................................................................................... 111 A.1.18.1 Future State Vision for Environmental Management .................................................................................. 112 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 113 A.1.18.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Environmental Management................................... 113 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 114 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 116 A.1.19 Agriculture....................................................................................................................................................................... 117 A.1.19.1 Future State Vision for Agriculture .................................................................................................................. 118 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 120 A.1.19.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Agriculture .................................................................. 120 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 120 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 122 A.1.20 Land and Natural Resources....................................................................................................................................... 124 A.1.20.1 Future State Vision for Land and Natural Resources .................................................................................. 125 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 125 A.1.20.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Land and Natural Resources .................................. 125 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 125 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 131
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A.1.21 Hawaiian Home Lands ................................................................................................................................................. 133 A.1.21.1 Future State Vision for Hawaiian Home Lands............................................................................................. 133 Information Exchanges .................................................................................................................................................134 A.1.21.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Hawaiian Home Lands .................................................................... 134 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 134 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 137 A.1.22 Hawaii State Public Library System ......................................................................................................................... 137 A.1.22.1 Future State Vision for the Hawaii State Public Library System.............................................................. 139 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 140 A.2.1.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for the Hawaii State Public Library System ................ 140 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 141 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 142 A.2 Support Service Areas ................................................................................................................................................................. 142 A.2.1 Legislative Relations....................................................................................................................................................... 142 A.2.1.1 Future State Vision for Legislative Relations .................................................................................................. 143 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 144 A.2.1.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Legislative Relations .................................................. 144 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 144 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 146 A.2.2 Public Affairs .................................................................................................................................................................... 146 A.2.1.1 Future State Vision for Legislative Relations .................................................................................................. 147 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 147 A.2.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Public Affairs ................................................................... 148 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 148 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 151 A.2.3 Policy, Controls, and Oversight .................................................................................................................................... 152 A.2.3.1 Future State Vision for Policy, Controls, and Oversight................................................................................ 152 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 153 A.2.3.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Policy, Controls, and Oversight ................................ 153 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 153 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 154 A.2.4 Planning & Resource Allocation ................................................................................................................................. 155 A.2.4.1 Future State Vision for Planning & Resource Allocation ............................................................................. 155 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 156 A.2.4.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Planning & Resource Allocation ............................. 156 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 156 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 158 A.2.5 Grants Management........................................................................................................................................................ 158 A.2.5.1 Future State Vision for Grants Management ................................................................................................... 158 Information Exchange .................................................................................................................................................. 159 A.2.5.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Grants Management ................................................... 159

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Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 159 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 161 A.2.6 Revenue Collection ......................................................................................................................................................... 161 A.2.6. 1 Future State Vision for Revenue Collection.................................................................................................... 162 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 163 A.2.6.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Revenue Collection ..................................................... 163 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 163 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 164 A.2.7 Budget & Finance ............................................................................................................................................................ 166 A.2.7.1 Future State Vision for Budget and Finance .................................................................................................... 168 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 168 A.2.7.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Budget and Finance .................................................... 168 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 169 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 170 A.2.8 Financial Management .................................................................................................................................................. 170 A.2.8.1 Future State Vision for Financial Management .............................................................................................. 171 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 172 A.2.8.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Financial Management .............................................. 172 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 172 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 174 A.2.9 Human Resource Management .................................................................................................................................... 174 A.2.9.1 Future State Vision for Human Resource Management ............................................................................... 176 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 176 A.2.9.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Human Resource Management................................ 176 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 177 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 179 A.2.10 Procurement.................................................................................................................................................................... 179 A.2.10.1 Future State Vision for Procurement ............................................................................................................... 180 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 180 A.2.10.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Procurement Management ..................................... 181 Initiatives ........................................................................................................................................................................ 181 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 182 A.2.11 Asset Management & Inventory Control .................................................................................................................. 182 A.2.11.1 Future State Vision for Asset Management and Inventory Control ......................................................... 183 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 184 A.2.11.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Asset Management and Inventory Control .......... 184 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 184 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 185 A.2.12 General Services ........................................................................................................................................................... 185 A.2.12.1 Future State Vision for General Services....................................................................................................... 186 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 187 A.2.12.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for General Services ....................................................... 187
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Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 187 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 191 A.2.13 Information Technology Management...................................................................................................................... 191 A.2.13.1 Future State Vision for Information Technology Management ................................................................. 192 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 192 A.2.13.2 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for IT Management .......................................................... 193 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 193 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 195 A.3 Strategic Business Segments .................................................................................................................................................... 196 A.3.1 Health IT Business Segment ......................................................................................................................................... 196 A.3.1.1 Current State for Health IT ................................................................................................................................... 196 HHTI Roadmap ............................................................................................................................................................... 197 A.3.1.2 Future State Vision for Health IT ........................................................................................................................ 200 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 203 A.3.1.3 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for Health IT ......................................................................... 204 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 204 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 208 A.3.2 Enterprise Resource Planning ...................................................................................................................................... 211 A.3.2.1 Background and Scope ........................................................................................................................................ 211 A.3.2.2 Current State of Systems for Common Mission Support Business Functions ........................................ 212 A.3.2.3 Future State Vision for ERP .................................................................................................................................. 213 Information Exchanges ................................................................................................................................................ 215 A.3.2.4 Transition & Sequencing Planning Summary for ERP .................................................................................. 215 ERP Implementation Considerations ........................................................................................................................ 215 ERP Implementation Challenges .......................................................................................................................... 215 ERP Implementation Considerations in State Government as Industry Segment..................................... 217 ERP Implementation Guiding Principles ............................................................................................................. 217 ERP Program Management Considerations ...................................................................................................... 217 Considerations on ERP Implementation Approach .......................................................................................... 220 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................................... 220 Transition and Sequencing ......................................................................................................................................... 221

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1: Defense Future State Solutions Architecture ........................................................................................................................14 Figure 2: Defense Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary.............................................................................................................16 Figure 3: Homeland Defense LOB and Architecture Layers ................................................................................................................17 Figure 4: Homeland Security Future State Solutions Architecture.....................................................................................................17 Figure 5: Homeland Security Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary.........................................................................................19 Figure 6: Disaster Management Future State Solutions Architecture...............................................................................................21 Figure 7: Disaster Management Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary...................................................................................24 Figure 8: Law Enforcement Future State Solutions Architecture .......................................................................................................25
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Figure 9: Law Enforcement Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary ...............................................................................................27 Figure 10: Correctional Activities/Public Safety Future State Solutions Architecture ...................................................................30 Figure 11: Correctional Activities/Public Safety Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary ...........................................................33 Figure 12: Legal Services Future State Solutions Architecture...........................................................................................................35 Figure 13: Legal Services Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary...............................................................................................37 Figure 14: Justice Future State Solutions Architecture ........................................................................................................................41 Figure 15: Justice Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 2) ...................................................................................................44 Figure 16: Justice Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 2) ...................................................................................................45 Figure 17: Child Support Services LOB Future State Solutions Architecture ...................................................................................46 Figure 18: Child Support Services Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary....................................................................................48 Figure 19: Transportation Future State Solutions Architecture ...........................................................................................................51 Figure 20: Transportation Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3)......................................................................................56 Figure 21: Transportation Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3)......................................................................................57 Figure 22: Transportation Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3)......................................................................................57 Figure 23: Economic Development Future State Solutions Architecture ..........................................................................................60 Figure 24: Economic Development Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary ..............................................................................63 Figure 25: Commerce and Consumer Affairs LOB Future State Solutions Architecture................................................................66 Figure 26: Commerce and Consumer Affairs Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3) ...............................................70 Figure 27: Commerce and Consumer Affairs Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3) ...............................................70 Figure 28: Commerce and Consumer Affairs Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3) ...............................................71 Figure 29: Human Services Future State Solutions Architecture .......................................................................................................74 Figure 30: Human Services Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 2) ..............................................................................78 Figure 31: Human Services Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 2) ..............................................................................78 Figure 32: Employment Rights and Benefits Future State Solutions Architecture ..........................................................................82 Figure 33: Employment Rights and Benefits Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3).................................................92 Figure 34: Employment Rights and Benefits Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3).................................................93 Figure 35: Employment Rights and Benefits Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3).................................................93 Figure 36: Education Future State Solutions Architecture ...................................................................................................................95 Figure 37: Education Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary .......................................................................................................98 Figure 38: Higher Education Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary ....................................................................................... 102 Figure 39: Public Health Future State Solutions Architecture .......................................................................................................... 106 Figure 40: Public Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3) .............................................................................................. 109 Figure 41: Public Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3) .............................................................................................. 110 Figure 42: Public Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3) .............................................................................................. 110 Figure 43: Environmental Health Management Future State Solutions Architecture ................................................................. 113 Figure 44: Environmental Health Management .................................................................................................................................... 116 Figure 45: Environmental Health Management .................................................................................................................................... 116 Figure 46: Agriculture LOB Future State Solutions Architecture ..................................................................................................... 119 Figure 47: Agriculture Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary .................................................................................................. 122 Figure 48: Land and Natural Resources Future State Solutions Architecture .............................................................................. 124 Figure 49: Land and Natural Resources Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3)..................................................... 131 Figure 50: Land and Natural Resources Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3)..................................................... 132
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Figure 51: Land and Natural Resources Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3)..................................................... 132 Figure 52: Hawaiian Home Lands Future State Solutions Architecture ......................................................................................... 134 Figure 53: Hawaiian Home Lands Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary ............................................................................. 137 Figure 54: Hawaii State Public Library System LOB Future State Solutions Architecture ......................................................... 140 Figure 55: Hawai`i State Public Library System Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary..................................................... 142 Figure 56: Legislative Relations Future State Solutions Architecture ............................................................................................. 143 Figure 57: Legislative Relations Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary ................................................................................. 146 Figure 58: Public Affairs Future State Solutions Architecture .......................................................................................................... 147 Figure 59: Public Affairs Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary .............................................................................................. 151 Figure 60: Policy, Control, and Oversight Future State Solutions Architecture............................................................................. 153 Figure 61: Policy, Controls, and Oversight Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary............................................................... 154 Figure 62: Planning and Resource Allocation Future State Solutions Architecture .................................................................... 156 Figure 63: Grants Management Future State Solutions Architecture............................................................................................. 159 Figure 64: Grants Management Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary................................................................................. 161 Figure 65: Revenue Collection Future State Solutions Architecture ............................................................................................... 163 Figure 66: Revenue Collection – Tax Modernization Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary ............................................ 166 Figure 67: Budget and Finance LOB Future State Solutions Architecture ..................................................................................... 168 Figure 68: Budget & Finance Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary...................................................................................... 170 Figure 69: Financial Management LOB Future State Solutions Architecture ............................................................................... 172 Figure 70: Financial Management Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary ............................................................................ 174 Figure 71: Human Resource Management Future State Solutions Architecture ......................................................................... 176 Figure 72: Human Resource Management Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary................................................................. 179 Figure 73: Procurement Future State Solutions Architecture........................................................................................................... 180 Figure 74: Procurement Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary................................................................................................... 182 Figure 75: Asset Management and Inventory Control LOB Future State Solution Architecture............................................... 183 Figure 76: Asset Management & Inventory Control Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary ................................................. 185 Figure 77: General Services LOB Future State Solution Architecture ............................................................................................ 187 Figure 78: Information Technology Management LOB Future State Solution Architecture ...................................................... 192 Figure 79: Information Technology Management Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary ..................................................... 195 Figure 80: Current State of Health Information Technology in Hawaii among All Internal and External Stakeholders ....... 197 Figure 81: Governor’s Hawaii Healthcare Transformation Initiative Four Point Strategy ........................................................... 198 Figure 82: Health IT Vision with the Hawaii Health Information Exchange’s gateway interface through a Statewide Community Master Patient Index (MPI) and Master Provider Directory (MPD) ................................................................... 201 Figure 83: Health IT Future State Solutions Architecture .................................................................................................................. 202 Figure 84: Health IT Future State Information Interactions ............................................................................................................... 203 Figure 85: Health IT Business Segment Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 5) ..................................................... 208 Figure 86: Health IT Business Segment Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 5) ..................................................... 209 Figure 87: Health IT Business Segment Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 5) ..................................................... 209 Figure 88: Health IT Business Segment Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (4 of 5) ..................................................... 210 Figure 89: Health IT Business Segment Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (5 of 5) ..................................................... 210 Figure 90: Federated ERP Future State Solutions Architecture........................................................................................................ 214 Figure 91: ERP Solutions Architecture supporting Derived Subject Databases........................................................................... 215
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Figure 92: ERP Program Organization Chart ......................................................................................................................................... 218 Figure 93: ERP Business Segment Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary............................................................................ 222

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Defense LOB Business Services.................................................................................................................................................13 Table 2: Defense LOB Investment Initiatives ...........................................................................................................................................15 Table 3: Homeland Security LOB Business Services.............................................................................................................................16 Table 4: Homeland Security LOB Investment Initiatives .......................................................................................................................18 Table 5: Disaster Management LOB Business Services.......................................................................................................................20 Table 6: Disaster Management LOB Investment Initiatives .................................................................................................................22 Table 7: Law Enforcement LOB Business Services ...............................................................................................................................24 Table 8: Law Enforcement LOB Investment Initiatives ..........................................................................................................................26 Table 9: Correctional Activities/Public Safety LOB Business Services .............................................................................................28 Table 10: Correctional Activities/Public Safety LOB Investment Initiatives......................................................................................31 Table 11: Legal Services LOB Business Services...................................................................................................................................34 Table 12: Legal Services LOB Investment Initiatives .............................................................................................................................36 Table 13: Justice LOB Business Services ................................................................................................................................................39 Table 14: Justice LOB Investment Initiatives ...........................................................................................................................................42 Table 15: Child Support Services LOB Business Services....................................................................................................................45 Table 16: Child Support Services LOB Investment Initiatives ..............................................................................................................47 Table 17: Stadium Operations LOB Business Services .........................................................................................................................49 Table 18: Transportation LOB Business Services ...................................................................................................................................49 Table 19: Transportation LOB Investment Initiatives ..............................................................................................................................52 Table 20: Economic Development LOB Business Services ..................................................................................................................58 Table 21: Economic Development LOB Investment Initiatives.............................................................................................................61 Table 22: Commerce and Consumer Affairs LOB Business Services ................................................................................................63 Table 23: Commerce and Consumer Affairs LOB Investment Initiatives ...........................................................................................67 Table 24: Human Services LOB Business Services ...............................................................................................................................71 Table 25: Human Services LOB Investment Initiatives ..........................................................................................................................76 Table 26: Employment Rights & Benefits LOB Business Services ......................................................................................................79 Table 27: Employment Rights and Benefits LOB Investment Initiatives.............................................................................................83 Table 28: Education LOB Business Services ...........................................................................................................................................94 Table 29: Education LOB Investment Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................96 Table 30: Higher Education LOB Business Services ..............................................................................................................................99 Table 31: Higher Education LOB Investment Initiatives...................................................................................................................... 100 Table 32: Public Health LOB Business Services .................................................................................................................................. 102 Table 33: Public Health LOB Investment Initiatives ............................................................................................................................. 107 Table 34: Environmental Health Management LOB Business Services ......................................................................................... 111 Table 35: Public Health LOB Investment Initiatives ............................................................................................................................. 114 Table 36: Agriculture LOB Services ........................................................................................................................................................ 117 Table 37: Agriculture LOB Investment Initiatives ................................................................................................................................. 120 Table 38: Land and Natural Resources LOB Services ........................................................................................................................ 122
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Table 39: Land and Natural Resources LOB Investment Initiatives................................................................................................. 125 Table 40: Hawaiian Home Lands LOB Services ................................................................................................................................... 133 Table 41: Hawaiian Home Lands LOB Investment Initiatives ............................................................................................................ 135 Table 42: Hawaii State Public Library System LOB Services ............................................................................................................ 137 Table 43: Hawaii State Public Library System LOB Investment Initiatives..................................................................................... 141 Table 44: Legislative Relations LOB Services ....................................................................................................................................... 143 Table 45: Legislative Relations LOB Investment Initiatives................................................................................................................ 144 Table 46: Public Affairs LOB Services .................................................................................................................................................... 146 Table 47: Public Affairs Current Systems............................................................................................................................................... 148 Table 48: Public Affairs LOB Investment Initiatives ............................................................................................................................. 150 Table 49: Policy, Control, and Oversight LOB Investment Initiatives ............................................................................................... 153 Table 50: Planning and Resource Allocation LOB Business Services ............................................................................................ 155 Table 51: Planning and Resource Allocation Current Systems ........................................................................................................ 156 Table 52: Grants Management LOB Business Services..................................................................................................................... 158 Table 53: Grants Management Investment Initiatives ........................................................................................................................ 160 Table 54: Revenue Collection LOB Business Services ....................................................................................................................... 162 Table 55: Revenue Collection – Tax Modernization Investment Initiatives .................................................................................... 164 Table 56: Tax Modernization Project Phasing....................................................................................................................................... 165 Table 57: Budget and Finance LOB Business Services ...................................................................................................................... 166 Table 58: Budget & Finance Investment Initiatives ............................................................................................................................. 169 Table 59: Financial Management LOB Business Services ................................................................................................................ 170 Table 60: Financial Management Investment Initiatives .................................................................................................................... 173 Table 61: Human Resource Management LOB Business Services ................................................................................................. 174 Table 62: Human Resource Management LOB Investment Initiatives............................................................................................ 177 Table 63: Procurement LOB Business Services................................................................................................................................... 179 Table 64: Procurement LOB Investment Initiatives ............................................................................................................................. 181 Table 65: Asset Management and Inventory Control LOB Business Services ............................................................................. 183 Table 66: Asset Management & Inventory Control LOB Investment Initiatives ............................................................................ 184 Table 67: General Services LOB Business Services ........................................................................................................................... 186 Table 68: General Services LOB Investment Initiatives...................................................................................................................... 188 Table 69: Information Technology Management LOB Business Services ..................................................................................... 191 Table 70: Information Technology Management LOB Investment Initiatives ................................................................................ 193 Table 71: Health IT Stakeholders Roles & Responsibilities ............................................................................................................... 199 Table 72: Health IT Investment Initiatives .............................................................................................................................................. 204 Table 73: ERP Functional Components and Scope .............................................................................................................................. 211 Table 74: Potential Consolidation of Current Applications within the ERP Implementation....................................................... 213 Table 75: Survey on ERP Implementation Cost within State Government...................................................................................... 216 Table 76: Survey on ERP Packages Implemented within State Government ................................................................................ 216 Table 77: ERP Implementation Life Cycle Model.................................................................................................................................. 218 Table 78: ERP Investment Initiatives ....................................................................................................................................................... 220

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A. LINE OF BUSINESS SEGMENT ARCHITECTURE TRANSFORMATION
State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 12

A. LINE OF BUSINESS SEGMENT ARCHITECTURE TRANSFORMATION
This appendix to the State of Hawai`i’s Enterprise Architecture (EA) provides additional detail regarding each of the State’s Lines of Business (LOB). The intention is to capture and communicate additional detail for each layer of the EA – primarily the Enterprise Business Architecture (EBA), the Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA), and the Enteprise Solutions Architecture (ESA), with increasing levels of alignment with the Enterprise Technology Architecture (ETA) over time; and also to factor in LOB investment initiatives into the Transition and Sequencing (T&S) Plan. The business services provided within each LOB scope are defined; the future state vision for a comprehensive IT solutions architecture to deliver all required business services and functions is described, and the investment initiatives required to achieve the targeted future state for each of the LOB segments is provided. Additional information about each initiative is included in Appendix B of the EA. This version of an Enterprise Architecture for the State of Hawai`i has addressed business analysis and planning at two levels – first, the state-wide enterprise which established the LOBs, and then secondly, the individual LOBs. The primary accomplishment of this planning function and all associated meetings has been the building of cultural momentum for enterprise solutions and consolidated investment planning. Additional opportunities will exist in the years ahead for specific LOB Business Segments to be analyzed in more detail to expand and provide additional architectural detail to significant priority areas – both Health IT and the ERP business segments are two areas addressed in Section 8.3 that have begun this detailed business segment architecture development. As the EA content is evaluated and used, recommendations for changes to the LOB architectures will occur and will be addressed as part of an EA change control process going forward. Additional planning documents that have been created by the various LOBs are available in a separate Supplemental Addendum to this document. A hyperlink to this addendum and the specific LOB information is provided at the end of each LOB area. of federal, state, Active Guard/Reserve, and drill-status National Guard members. This force totals approximately 5,500 Army and Air National Guard members. Table 1: Defense LOB Business Services

LOB: Defense Service Name State Active Duty Activation

Service Definition

The National guard may be activated to State Active Duty by the Governor or the Adjutant General to help respond to domestic emergencies and disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes.

A.1.1.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR DEFENSE
The future vision for Defense is to apply state-of-the-art technology to the fullest extent to accomplish the following critical business objectives and to address current state issues.
• Organize, train and equip all Hawaii National Guard units • Continue to use Federal Department of Defense (DOD)

systems, services and infrastructure
• Effective collaboration solutions and protocols for DOD

across Federal and State networks that bridges information technologies and communications services to include voice, email/calendaring, and video services, email across DOD executive leadership and staff.
• Integration of State mission critical IT systems to DOD

Continuity of Operations (COOP) capabilities.
• With the exception of publishing State Active Duty orders

A.1

CORE MISSION AREAS

and email/file sharing services during emergency operations, the majority of automated services support for this LOB is obtained from Federal DOD systems.
• Operations and training of all National Guard units both

A.1.1 DEFENSE
The State of Hawaii Defense LOB protects and advances the State of Hawaii’s interests by rapidly assisting State and County civil authorities in providing for the safety, welfare, and defense of the people of Hawaii. The department maintains its readiness to respond in the event of disasters, either natural or humancaused. The Department of Defense represents a varied mixture
13 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Army and Air Force. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 1 below. Key features of this solution include:
• Dual infrastructures for Federal DOD and State. • “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture.
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 1: Defense Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Need for the integration of processing State Active Duty

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 2 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

orders with the state payroll and accounting system.
• Need for the integration of day-to-day cross-domain

information sharing both within and between departments.
• Need for the integration of emergency response cross-domain

information sharing both within and between departments.

A.1.1.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLAN SUMMARY FOR DEFENSE
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 14

Table 2: Defense LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Alignment: EDOPS – Emergency Duty Orders and Pay System.

Description

Cost

Notes

State Active Duty Orders and Payment System

On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Replace EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Department of Defense Web Site

hawaii.gov/dod (hosted by ICSD)

On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As-Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

In Progress: None

New: EDOPS – Emergency Duty Orders and Pay System. State Active Duty – major issue to work State Active duty and then getting paid in a timely manner. No interface with State Accounting. Manual process – Fiscal Officer (Tom) has to specify General Funding $ set aside for special mission – not normal State employ One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review Status: Replace with State Active Duty COTS EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: None In Progress: None

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Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Defense Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.1.2 HOMELAND SECURITY
The Homeland Security line of business protects the state and the nation against terrorist attacks. This includes analyzing threats and intelligence, guarding borders and airports, protecting critical infrastructure, and coordinating responses to emergencies. Table 3: Homeland Security LOB Business Services

LOB: Homeland Security Homeland Security Intelligence Collaboration Homeland Security & Law Enforcement Support

Service Definition This is represented by the State all hazard Fusion Center. Key Asset and Critical Infrastructure Protection – involves assessing key asset and critical infrastructure vulnerabilities and taking direct action to mitigate vulnerabilities, enhance security, and ensure continuity and necessary redundancy in government operations and personnel. • Intelligence collaboration within a sensitive zone between Federal, State, and Local entities • Support for significant law enforcement activities • Protection of homeland critical infrastructure • Buffer zone planning

Homeland Security Outreach Homeland Security Strategy and Planning

Collaboration through Citizen Corp program, private sector, and whole community. Involves the development of Homeland Security strategy that involves preparedness, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery activities.
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 16

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

A.1.2.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR HOMELAND SECURITY
The future state of Homeland Security for the State would include world class:
• Support for intelligence collaboration • Security requirements for elevated levels of sensitive information.

The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 4 below. Key features of this solution include:
• Dual infrastructures for Federal DOD and State • “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 4: Homeland Security Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Federal Department of

• State and Local Law Enforcement • All State Agencies • Private Sector (i.e. utilities, retail associations, tourism,

Homeland Security
• Federal Department of Commerce • US Coast Guard • Federal Department of Justice

security, malls, etc.)
• State and county emergency management

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Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

A.1.2.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLAN SUMMARY FOR HOMELAND SECURITY
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 4 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

Table 4: Homeland Security LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Alignment: None In Progress: State Fusion Center

Description

Cost

Notes

The collection, synthesis, dissemination of intelligence information for all hazards.

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Infrastructure and Analysis Function

Continue the assessment of critical infrastructure and prioritization of critical infrastructure for equipment and funding, identification of Group 2 assets (Ports, Harbor, Airport, Hospitals, etc.) development of buffer zone plans, identification of PII private sector activities. Identification and collection of ACAMS/Pacific Disaster Center for the assessment and identification of critical infrastructure. Development of a threat/hazard identification risk assessment on an annual basis. Management of Homeland Security grant funding for the State of Hawaii. Includes: Homeland Security funds, emergency management performance grant, pre-disaster mitigation, and others as opportunities arise. Improve the development of internal grant management system that host all the Homeland Security grants with the ability to expand to other grant programs. Development of portal base interagency collaboration tool. Includes: law enforcement, fire, emergency medical, health, public works, emergency management, transportation, private sector.

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Homeland Security Grant Management

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 18

Name HRSS – Hawaii Region Secure System

Description Facilitated by Pacific Disaster Center. SharePoint portal. Requested “Pending Review” from Homeland Security grant to refresh platform. DHS grant funded.

Cost One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

New: None LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: None New: None

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 5.

Figure 5: Homeland Security Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

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Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

A.1.3 DISASTER MANAGEMENT
The Disaster Management line of business prepares for, mitigates, responds to, and repairs the effects of all disasters, whether natural or manmade. NOTE: Need to confirm that the boundaries of Defense LOB, Homeland Security LOB, and Disaster Management LOB are appropriate. These may need to be combined into one LOB. Disaster Management as a LOB has considerable interaction with other areas such as Transportation, Health, etc.

NOTE: The level of sensitive information may restrict LOB business and solutions descriptions.
• The DOD supports Civil Defense activities and provides

infrastructure for assigned and volunteer personnel.
• There are Emergency POCs in each of the Departments;

regular meetings are conducted with them.

Table 5: Disaster Management LOB Business Services

LOB: Disaster Management Service Name Civil Defense Infrastructure Management

Service Definition

Continue to develop and improve statewide civil defense infrastructure which emphasizes emergency operating center preparedness; redundancy of systems and multiple means of communication; enhancement of the State siren system and the Emergency Alert System/ Common Alerting Protocol.

Damage Assessment

Assesses the Damage after a Disaster – involves determining the amount of cleanup and restoration activities that will be needed after a disaster. Includes assessing damage to homes, buildings, roads, environmental resources, or infrastructure that may be damaged due to a disaster.

Disaster Mitigation

Disaster Monitoring and Prediction – involves the actions taken to predict when and where a disaster may take place and communicate that information to affected parties. Note: Weather forecasting, while central to Disaster Monitoring and Prediction, is more closely aligned with the “Environmental Monitoring and Forecasting” Sub-function in the Environmental Management Line of Business.

Emergency Communications, Alerts, Notifications

Provide emergency communications, alerts, and notifications using emergency communications systems.

Emergency Management, Response, and Operations

Emergency Response – involves the immediate actions taken to respond to a disaster. These actions include, but are not limited to, providing mobile telecommunications, operational support, power generation, search and rescue, and medical lifesaving actions. This includes the training required to accomplish necessary response activities.

Emergency Preparedness Planning

Disaster Preparedness and Planning – involves the development of response programs to be used in case of a disaster as well as pre-disaster mitigation efforts to minimize the potential for loss of life and property. This involves the development of emergency management programs and activities as well as staffing and equipping regional response centers, and mitigation focused construction and preparation.

Disaster Recovery

Involves the actions taken to permanently recover capabilities and facilities which have been impacted by a disaster. This includes the management of project worksheets for each site which has been identified and validated for recovery funding.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 20

A.1.3.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR DISASTER MANAGEMENT
The future vision for Disaster Management is to apply stateof-the-art technology to the fullest extent to accomplish the following critical business objectives and to address current state issues.
• Provide multi-lingual communications in times of emergency. • OD acknowledges the need to increase bandwidth across the D

The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 6 below. Key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

islands and across the .mil to the State’s network to support greater use of video and imaging as part of disaster response.

Figure 6: Disaster Management Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGE
• State Department of Defense • Federal Department of Defense • State Homeland Security • Federal Homeland Security • Citizens of Hawaii

A.1.3.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLAN SUMMARY FOR DISASTER MANAGEMENT
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 6 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

21 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

content management, and collaboration& email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing. Table 6: Disaster Management LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Application Alignment: WebEOC – Web-based Emergency Operations Center

Description

Cost

Notes

Emergency Management key support system. Includes needed data, documentation, collaboration. Enables Request for Assistance – State, counties, etc. Mission response tracking – level tracked, tasking, etc. COTS, developed by ESI – accepted by most States. Training Development Developed through Congressional Ad – Fed level, graphics based, GIS like, but not really used.

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Command Responder

On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Retire EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 5 Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

EAS/CAP – Emergency Alert System

V/Radio. Have special client to send out notifications. EAS customized. CAP Server – off the shelf. CAP – Common Alerting Protocol, standardized messaging format.

On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

HRSS – Hawaii Region Secure System

Facilitated by Pacific Disaster Center. SharePoint portal. Requested “Pending Review” from Homeland Security grant to refresh platform. DHS grant funded.

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

VTC - Video Teleconferencing

Support of statewide disaster response activities.

Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Hawaii Tsunami Evacuation Zone Maps

This application is based on recent scientific analysis by the University of Hawaii that utilizes bathimetry data with GIS presentations. The State interaction points include the U of H, NOA, Insurance Companies, and .County Emergency Management Agencies www5.hawaii.gov/tsunami (hosted by ICSD)

On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Mobile Emergency Response Command Interface (MERCI)

MERCI – Mobile Emergency Response Command Interface – Damage Assessment – iPhone app. Information is used to assist and evaluate the amount of damage sustained to determine if a Presidential declaration is warranted. Initially supported by a Federally funded Hi-Tech Grant which OceanIT received in collaboration with the Hawaii State Civil Defense. GIS Applications - Use of off-the-shelf ESRI products to support situational mapping. (ARC INFO)

On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

ESRI GIS

On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 22

Name Strategic Telecom Reserves

Description Federally Funded initiative to establish capacity to employ reserve systems to enhance or restore communications support. Reserves include: (1) Transportable repeater interoperable communications (TRIC) fielded low site cross band repeater capabilities. (2) Broadband Global Access Network (BGAN) SAT phones/data terminals to provide State-Wide communications. (3) Sixty (60) unit radio cache establish to access the State shared blended 700/800 MHz trunk radio system.

Cost On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Emergency Backup Satellite Phone System

Push to talk, satellite based radio network which ties the State Emergency Operating Center to all county Emergency Operating Centers and County warning points (Police Dispatch) State-Wide

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

In Progress: None New: State Wide Disaster Warning System Modernization (Outdoor Siren System) State Wide Disaster Warning System Modernization (Outdoor Siren System) One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Incident Command Information Reporting System Implementation

An incident command information system to support public safety and other incident responders. Leverages public safety broadband initiatives (firstNet). This system will include field /mobile access devices that provide situational status reports to enable real-time data collection at remote sites that integrates across state agencies. Public Safety and Disaster Response information systems. Deployment of Mobile Technology and High Speed Wired and Wireless Networks.

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M:Pending Review

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: None In Progress: None

23 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 7.

Figure 7: Disaster Management Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.1.4 LAW ENFORCEMENT
The purpose of the Law Enforcement LOB is to uphold justice and public safety by providing law enforcement services to Hawaii’s communities with professionalism,integrity and fairness. Table 7: Law Enforcement LOB Business Services

LOB: Law Enforcement Service Name State Law Enforcement

Service Definition

Carries out law enforcement services statewide; Preserves the peace by protecting all persons and property within premises under the control of the Judiciary and all State facilities; providing process services and execution of court documents; handling detained persons; and providing secure transportation for persons in custody. Provides law enforcement services at various stages of the criminal justice system and at the Honolulu International Airport and a number of public hospitals. Assists the Department of Transportation Harbors Division with security and law enforcement functions. Protects the public by enforcing laws relating to controlled substances and regulated chemicals. Responsible for the registration and control of the manufacture, distribution, prescription, and dispensing of controlled substances and precursor of essential chemicals within the State.

Narcotics Enforcement

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 24

A.1.4.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT
The systems used by this line of business are antiquated and most of their applications are over 10 years old. This LOB is in need of modernizing and upgrading their applications with migration and increased use of web applications and open source systems. Currently, all applications are developed in MS Access or Visual Studio and need to migrate to Web 3.0. Remote access to systems and document sharing is important for this LOB. The future state for this LOB includes the following considerations:
• The Justice Reinvestment Initiative

Data Sharing Focus Group is identifying statute changes to address the blockage of pertinent information which is contributing to the problem.
• Expand the use of server virtualization • Investigate Cloud solutions for

• “Everything as a Service” common

some services
• Work with Hawai`i Broadband Initiative

solutions framework that facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

to migrate PSD frame relay sites to high-speed connections n electronic records management system would result in savings in paper, time, space, and create overall efficiencies in the work force
• Need automatic software upgrades

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Interfaces with all State departments

and State judicial buildings to provide assistance with necessary security through law enforcement.
• Partners with the Federal government:

across the board
• Need more help desk support; current

U.S. Probation/Pretrial Services, U.S. Attorney Offices, Immigration and Naturalization.
• Partners with various city, county,

(JRI) to review Hawai’i’s criminal justice system has just begun; The Public Safety Department is trying to solve the problem of a lack of a common system for law enforcement and corrections; some data is being collected by PSD while some is reported by contractors. However, there is central collection of data. A central database is needed. A

backlog of 60 calls The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 8 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and

community, and private agencies through contracts and volunteer services to provide additional services for both staff and inmates.
• Interfaces and collaborates with

mobile user interface architecture.

HCJDC regarding Hawai`i Justice Information System

Figure 8: Law Enforcement Future State Solutions Architecture 25 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

A.1.4.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

– Identify strategies to reduce overall prison population – Identify high risk offenders – Quantifying the number of programs slots available – Identifying strategies to improve the effectiveness of supervision by probation and parole staff – Examining the extent to which probation and parole revocations are using the best practices to respond to violations – Examining the reported crime and arrest trends and engaging law enforcement agencies – Examining any crime labs backlogs – Mapping out geographically where crime is occurring can help to target hot spot areas – Determine what percent of those arrested are on probation and parole at the time of their arrest and strengthening collaboration and data sharing among police, probation and parole.
• This initiative can be augmented by the State’s segment

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 8 below.
• Initiate NED’s controlled substance prescription monitoring

database (Electronic Medical Records) to authorize physicians to have 24/7 access to improve patient treatment and deter attempts to visit multiple physicians to fraudulently obtain controlled substances (to be released soon).
• eed a solution to address the sun setting of XP in 2014 N • Justice Reinvestment Initiative: This LOB is currently in

the beginning phases of the Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI), which will review Hawaii’s criminal justice systems by: – Collecting and examining data that drive prison admissions and the length of time that the offenders are incarcerated Table 8: Law Enforcement LOB Investment Initiatives

architecture methodology to assess and recommend needed restructuring of the current systems to achieve the new strategic direction.

Name LOB Solutions: Production Application Alignment: Department of Public Safety Training and Staff Development

Description

Cost

Notes

hawaii.gov/psd/tsd (hosted by ICSD)

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Status: Replace Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium

Crime Victim Compensation Commission

hawaii.gov/cvcc (hosted by ICSD)

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Department of Public Safety Web Site

hawaii.gov/psd/ (hosted by ICSD)

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Records Management System

Incident Reporting to Sheriffs - Recently Implemented with new DB and WEB App.

Annual O&M: Pending Review

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 26

Name In Progress: None New: None LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: None New: None

Description

Cost

Notes

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 9.

Figure 9: Law Enforcement Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary

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Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

A.1.5 CORRECTIONAL ACTIVITIES/PUBLIC SAFETY
The Correctional Activities/Public Safety LOB provides services for correctional activities to Hawaii’s prison population and communities with professionalism, integrity and fairness.

Table 9: Correctional Activities/Public Safety LOB Business Services

LOB: Correctional Activities/ Public Safety Service Name Community Supervision of Offenders

Service Definition

Responsible for community supervision of offenders in each of the four counties. Provides pretrial evaluations, assessments, and supervision. Provides evaluations, assessments of sentenced felons returning to the community. Oversees prison and jail diversion programs throughout the state and works closely with the Courts and the Adult Mental Health Division of the Department of Health in an effort to divert offenders with mental health needs to appropriate community-based programs. Note: this is an interface to Health. Oversees prison and jail diversion programs throughout the state and works closely with the Courts and the Adult Mental Health Division of the Department of Health in an effort to divert offenders with mental health needs to appropriate community-based programs. Note: this is an interface to Health. Coordinates the various programs available to inmates in the correctional facilities and offenders in the community. Implements and monitors a variety of programs, aimed at providing inmates with education, workforce development, nutrition, religion, substance abuse counseling, and sex offender treatment. Coordinates with all courts and other law enforcement agencies, both state and federal, to ensure that all appropriate documentation is obtained to compute all inmates sentences accurately and in a timely manner and oversees the Public Safety policy and practices on sentence computation. Trains Public Safety Staff in proper sentence computation. Insures that sentences imposed by the Courts are properly applied during the offenders’ incarceration time. Continually train department staff in policy and practices and best practices for Corrections. Monitors statewide custody designations and facility placement of inmates in accordance to Policies and Procedures to ensure uniformity in its application and integration into the operations of statewide correctional facilities. Develop and maintain health care programs involving both in-house and community resources (public health, private and contract specialty care providers and volunteers) for all correctional facilities. Provides a vocational rehabilitation program in Hawaii’s correctional facilities that provides real world work experience to inmates, teaching them transferable job skills and a positive work ethic to help them prepare for post release, reentry, and employment in the community. The ultimate goal is to return an economically self-sufficient individual to the community who will be able to immediately join the work force and become a productive, law-abiding member of society.

Community-based Mental Health Programs

Community-based Mental Health Programs

Corrections Program Services Management

Courts and Law Enforcement

Departmental Staff Training Inmate Classification

Inmates Health Care Program

Inmates Vocational Rehabilitation

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 28

LOB: Correctional Activities/ Public Safety Service Name Prison Management

Service Definition

Overseeing the following three prisons: Halawa Correctional Facility, Waiawa Correctional Facility, and Women’s Community Correctional Center Oversees the Public Safety Re-Entry and transition services. Works collaboratively with PSD and other external agencies to improve case management services for offenders. This includes improved evaluation and assessment techniques and application for case management and proper data management source to better serve the offenders. Offers victims and concerned citizens free, anonymous, and confidential access to timely information and notification 24-hours a day, 365 days a year on the custody and parole status of offenders under the jurisdiction of the State Of Hawai’i.

Re-Entry Services

SAVIN - State Automated Victims I nformation Network

A.1.5.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR CORRECTIONAL ACTIVITIES/PUBLIC SAFETY
The near term vision is to upgrade applications to add new functionality and replace legacy desktop computers. Additionally, the future state vision includes the following considerations:
• All applications currently developed in MS Access or Visual

for authorization. Note: a system like this could also meet the needs of the Law Enforcement LOB.
• More real-time data is needed in most of the systems used by

this LOB, especially Offender Track.
• The Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI) is on-going to

improve justice systems across the state in conjunction with federal initiatives which will provide for improved data sharing.
• Expand the use of server virtualization to reduce costs. • Investigate Cloud solutions for some services. • Work with Hawai`i Broadband Initiative to migrate PSD frame

Studio need to be upgraded to support Web 3.0 and current database technology.
• Use the Statewide Automated Victim Information

relay sites to high-speed connections.
• An electronic records management system would result in

Notification (SAVIN) application as a model for redesigning other applications used by this LOB. It is web-based application that gives victims and the public the ability to register to receive notifications when an inmate is moved or released. It is available 24x7 and notifies subscribers either by phone or email. The system also checks that data is being sent on a timely basis to ensure the data is current.
• eed to update systems so they can status the overall N

savings in paper, time, space, and create overall efficiencies in the work force.
• Need automatic software upgrades across the board.

The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 10 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

prison population (location, health, prison records, etc.) and meet the Electronic Medical Record federal directives for meaningful use.
• This LOB has a critical need for a system to use swipe cards

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

when entering/leaving facilities to determine hours worked and provide for grace period or mechanism to prevent erroneous overtime to be automatically generated and tie to time sheets

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

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Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Figure 10: Correctional Activities/Public Safety Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Correctional Activities partners with the Federal government:

INITIATIVES
Near term projects include the following:
• Electronic Medical Records (eClinical Works) for Inmate

U.S. Probation/Pretrial Services, U.S. Attorney Offices, Immigration and Naturalization.
• Partners with various city, county, community, and private

Healthcare Program
• Installation of new Video conferencing equipment. • Upgrading “Offendertrak “ to accept gang information • Pursuing replacements for older PCs

agencies through contracts and volunteer services to provide additional services for both staff and inmates.
• Interfaces and collaborates with HCJDC. • Need more information sharing with other agencies and within

the Department from medical services to inmate re-entry.

The needed initiatives for the LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 10 below.

A.1.5.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR CORRECTIONAL ACTIVITIES/PUBLIC SAFETY
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 30

Table 10: Correctional Activities/Public Safety LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Application Alignment: Statewide Automated Victim Information Notification (SAVIN)

Description

Cost

Notes

Victims can register to receive notifications of when an inmate is moved or released, the system uses automatic emails, and notifies data owners if their data has not been updated in a timely manner (hosted by APPRISS) hawaii.gov/psd/tsd (hosted by ICSD)

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Status: Retire Priority: Low EA Compliance: Medium Status: Retire Priority: Low EA Compliance: Medium Status: Retire Priority: Low EA Compliance: Medium Status: Use As IsPriority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Use As Is Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Use As Is Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Replace Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Replace by ERP Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Replace

Department of Public Safety Training and Staff Development

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Crime Victim Compensation Commission

hawaii.gov/cvcc (hosted by ICSD)

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Department of Public Safety Web Site

hawaii.gov/psd/ (hosted by ICSD)

Annual O&M: Pending Review

PSD Integrated Web Site

Web site integration Public Safety, Correctional Activities, and Law Enforcement (HTTP://Hawaii.gov/psd) replace three previous Web sites. ICSD

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Inmate Trust Account System

Individual inmate monetary accounts - Oracle 9 been around since 2000

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Intake Service Center System

Offender intake data capture, evaluation, and selective tracking - SQL DB C/S

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Hawaii Paroling Authority

Board decision making regarding setting of minimums and conditional release from prison; Community supervision and case management; revocation information - Currently an Access DB - Replace with SQL Personnel Operations Employee Management System imports info from HRMS (DHRD)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

POEMS

TAU-OCCC

Time & Attendance

Annual O&M: Pending Review

31 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Name

Description

Cost

Notes by ERP Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

TAU-HCF

Time & Attendance

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Replace by ERP Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Replace by ERP Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Replace by ERP Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Replace by ERP Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Status: Replace by ERP Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

TAU-WCCC

Time & Attendance

Annual O&M: Pending Review

TAU-HCCC

Time & Attendance

Annual O&M: Pending Review

TAU-CPS

Time & Attendance

Annual O&M: Pending Review

FIS

Financial Information System (Purchase Order Management)

Annual O&M: Pending Review

In Progress: eClinical Works Electronic Medical Records One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

New: Gang Information Upgrading Offendertrak to accept gang information One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: High (2) EA Compliance: Medium

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: RCUH Networking Increase the bandwidth of all PSD facilities; some sites on the network at all One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 32

Name HPA-VCC

Description Installation of new Video conferencing equipment

Cost One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: Pending Review EA Compliance: Pending Review

New: PC Upgrade Rotate older PC with new PC and standards One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: Medium-High EA Compliance: High

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 11. These initiatives include:
• Expanding our database, Offendertrak, to include gang

In addition, Correctional Activities/Public Safety LOB solutions have critical needs for the following new Enterprise-wide Solutions:
• Robust st email system that enables mobile access and

integrates easily with enterprise systems
• Enterprise Data Management Services - robust database

information.
• Currently implementing a database to track medical

servers with data definition and data warehouse services
• Platform as a Service to support server virtualization • Improved network and security services.

information for offenders.
• Continue to improve our network connection with the facilities.

Figure 11: Correctional Activities/Public Safety Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary

33 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

A.1.6 LEGAL SERVICES
The Legal Services LOB provides legal and other services to the State, including the agencies, officers, and employees of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the Hawaii government. In addition, the Office of Public Defender provides legal services to indigent persons needing legal assistance. Table 11: Legal Services LOB Business Services

NOTE: These two business services are organized in two separate departments (Executive Branch Legal Representation in the Department of the Attorney General and Public Defender in the Department of Budget and Finance). The IT needs are similar enough for joint consideration in one Line of Business but the significant separation of organizational responsibility makes the common direction problematic.

LOB: Legal Services Service Name Executive Branch Legal Representation

Service Definition

Provides advice and counsel; legal representation. A law firm for the State. Conducts client discussions, surfaces problems, performs research, and provides advice, communications, provides a significant amount of litigation. Represents Governor, Legislature, and Departments. Provides mostly defense. Represents all of State Government. Implements Federal and State constitutional mandates that any indigent person charged with a criminal offense or threatened with the loss of liberty shall be provided with the assistance of legal counsel.

Public Defender

A.1.6.1 FUTURE STATE VISION THE LEGAL SERVICES
The future State vision needs to correct some of the following problems:
• Legal Services operates like a very large law firm (170 attorneys),

• Confidentiality and security are serious concerns for this

Department; eDiscovery, digital signatures, etc. The IT needs for the attorneys and legal support within this Line of Business envisions an aggressive use of the most current professional tools and technologies. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 48 below.
• A mobile environment that fully supports the attorneys

legal management tools like calendaring/scheduling across the line of business is currently non-existent. Need calendar/ scheduling software (something with the functionality of TimeMatters to provide reminders for complaint/answer dates)
• There are issues with storing documents in native formats

providing access to case files, research and real-time access to court calendars, reports, and orders – future state implementation depends on the Hawaii Anywhere vision – the common user interface supporting any access device
• A near paperless environment supported by reliable privacy

causing difficulty locating information and document retrieval due to the fact that searching does not work well in current COTS (e.g. iManage).
• Attorneys need remote access to case documents. Many

attorneys work from remote locations or home as needed. There are barriers such as, lack of appropriate security measures and current policies that prevent this capability.
• Want to become a paperless office but need to think through

and security services that provide access to case files and court records as needed by the attorneys – future state implementation depends on the enterprise digital asset (document) management service, and the enterprise security service providing role-based access control and the enterprise data management services providing data/ information security markings
• The use of digital signatures, digitized case files, storage and

the impacts; the goal should be an all-digital, paperless environment. There are challenges with tying information to case documents.
• Need to look at moving to better legal services’ software

packages that support trial documentation, research support, and practice management. (This LOB is heavily dependent upon COTS products, iManage and ProLaw. iManage has significant customization built on it inhibiting upgrades.)

retrieval services that facilitate the paperless vision – future state implementation depends on the enterprise digital content management service. Further, since the legal services LOB serves every other LOB in the state, it is imperative that this LOB provide legal interface services, refined over time, to every other LOB.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 34

Figure 12: Legal Services Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• AG Legal Services interfaces with all other Departments

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 12 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

in the State plus the Governor’s office and the Legislature; Information consists of case records, legal memos, legal service requests.

A.1.6.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR LEGAL SERVICES
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

35 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Table 12: Legal Services LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: Upgrade ProLaw

Description

Cost

Notes

Upgrade Case Management System from ver. 9.6 to ver. 11 (support for existing version ended in Dec. 2011)

One-time DME: SW: Pending Review + 900 hours Annual O&M: SW: Pending Review + 100 hours One-time DME: Pending Review + 2000 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review + 100 hours

Priority: High EA Compliance: Low

Legal Services Case Management Software

Procure new case management software for legal services

Priority: High EA Compliance: Low

New: Upgrade iManage Upgrade Document Management System from ver. 8.0 to ver. 9.0. One-time DME: Pending Review + 900 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review + 100 hours One-time DME: Pending Review + 2000 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review + 100 hours One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review + 100 hours Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Low

Litigation Support Software

Acquire New Litigation Support Software (i.e., Summation) 9.0.

Priority: Medium EA Compliance: High

Westlaw

Legal Research Software

Status: Keep for Now & Use As Is; Plan for Future Replacement Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Low Status: Keep for Now & Use As Is; Plan for Future Replacement Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Low Status: Keep for Now & Use As Is; Plan for Future Replacement Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Low

AG Website

Department’s Public Web Site (hosted by ICSD)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Charities Website

Charity Registration System (developed and hosted by HIC)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Legal Services Case Manager and eDiscovery

Modernize Legal Services Case Management System. Implement integration of digital imaging, case management, and email services for full picture of a case content manager. Implement a consistent and integrated capability using electronic legal services and document management system to maintain all documents and files related to a legal case.

One-time DME: SW: Pending Review + 2000 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review + 200 hours

Status: Plan for Future Replacement Priority: Medium EA Compliance: High

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 36

Name LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: Upgrade PCs for Legal Services

Description

Cost

Notes

Acquire 389 Dell Optiplex PCs (i5, Windows 7).

One-time DME: Pending Review + 2000 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review + 200 hours One-time DME: Pending Review + 200 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review + 100 hours One-time DME: Pending Review + 200 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review + 100 hours

Priority: High EA Compliance: Low

Enable Mobility for Deputies

Acquire 16 Dell Latitude E6320 & MacBook Airs for Mobility

Priority: High EA Compliance: Low

Upgrade Standalone Servers for Legal Services Program

Upgrade & Virtualize Existing Servers

Priority: High EA Compliance: Low

New: Upgrade Microsoft Office Upgrade Microsoft Office 2003 to Microsoft Office 2010 One-time DME: Pending Review + 200 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review + 200 hours Annual O&M: Pending Review + 100 hours Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

Upgrade Network Printers

Replace Existing HP 4100 B/W Network Printers

Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Low

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 13: Legal Services Transition and Sequencing Plan SummaryFigure 13. In addition, Legal Services LOB solutions have critical needs for the following new Enterprise-wide Solutions:
• More robust email system (than Lotus Notes) that enables

• Need to upgrade to latest versions of iManage and ProLaw

(support for current version ended in December 2011); caution – there are issues in later versions of ProLaw that require administrative rights to Lotus Notes in order for the new versions of ProLaw to work with Lotus Notes. ICSD has to grant rights and is not satisfied with documentation from the ProLaw vendor; ProLaw does not have many accounts using Lotus Notes.
• Need to upgrade to Microsoft Office 2010 before support for

mobile access (attorneys must have access to email at all times) and integrates with ProLaw and iManage; this is a dire need.

our existing Microsoft Office 2003 release ends in 2014.

37 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Figure 13: Legal Services Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.1.7 JUSTICE
The mission of the Justice LOB is to improve the administration of justice in the State by assuring relevance, uniformity, reliability and timeliness in the collection, reporting and exchange of justice information between justice agencies, the public, chief executives, legislative and judicial bodies; to provide a statewide system of positive identification based on fingerprints; and to provide computerized justice information. The major activities of this LOB are as follows:
• Criminal Justice Information System-Hawaii (CJIS-Hawaii) –

and to leverage national information sharing standards and best practices. HIJIS is providing statewide information sharing that will enable federated access and exchange of data between agencies systems in an efficient, timely and secure manner with the principal aim of getting the right information to the right people all of the time.
• Juvenile Justice Information System (JJIS) - provides the

provide for the maintenance and operations of this automated information system which collects and disseminates individual criminal history record information for offenders arrested and fingerprinted statewide. Identification of arrested individuals is real-time via a “lights out” process. Electronic fingerprint images captured at the time of booking along with the associated demographic data is searched automatically against the State Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and CJIS-Hawaii, thereby allowing an identification of the individual within minutes (at the State level) and hours (at the Federal level).
• Hawaii Integrated Justice Information Sharing (HIJIS)

status of individual juveniles at any time or point in state’s juvenile justice process to police officers, probation officers, judges, prosecutors, and correctional workers. Provides background information on arrest and court data, personal data, and social services provided, and can identify juveniles who are suicide risks or involved with drugs. The repository for statewide information on missing children. JJIS also provides recidivism reports on juveniles in rehabilitative programs.
• National Crime Information Center (NCIC) - provide

connectivity and oversee operational responsibilities associated with access to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) NCIC System which contains national criminal justice information provided by all 50 states, U.S. territories and other agencies and the FBI Interstate Identification Index (III) which provides national criminal history record information via NCIC.
• Criminal History Record Checks – Includes the processing of

program – is designed to build statewide information sharing capabilities across the whole of the justice and public safety enterprise, facilitate information exchange with key agencies,
State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

criminal history record checks mandated by law for specific

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 38

programs, services or employment as outlined in Chapter 846, HRS. Public information includes conviction and sex offender registration information and is accessible via Public Access facilities at designated county police stations and the Internet.
• Expungements – Processing of an applicant’s expungement of

• Research - Provides criminological data and other objective

arrest records, pursuant to Section 831-3.2, HRS, which consists of the research of an applicant’s criminal history, the evaluation of expungement criteria, the issuance of expungement orders and certificates and the sealing of records.
• Fingerprint Identification – Operation and coordination of the

information on the nature and extent of crime in Hawaii. Available publications include the annual Crime in Hawaii Uniform Crime Report. The research provide critical, comprehensive data and analysis to criminal justice agencies and professionals, legislators, crime prevention and community mobilization groups, academic and research institutions, service providers, news media, and the general public.
• Community & Crime Prevention - Provides planning and

statewide fingerprint identification system of those arrested or adjudicated and other records from law enforcement, custodial and judicial agencies in the State. Included is the maintenance of the AFIS which stores the electronic fingerprint images of adult offenders and juvenile law violators, palm prints, with enhanced latent search capabilities.
• Sex Offender Registration - Maintenance and verification

implementation of informational and educational workshops and activities focused on community crime prevention. Facilitates information sharing and training on how individuals, businesses, agencies/organizations, neighborhoods and communities can prevent and reduce crimes.
• Missing Children - Locates and recovers missing children,

of information and records of individuals who are classified as covered offenders under Chapter 846E, HRS. Includes timely entry of covered offender information into the Registry, dissemination of covered offender information to law enforcement and the public, and tracking compliance of registered covered offenders.

reunites missing children with their families, and prevents child abductions. Coordinates the efforts of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies as well as other public and private agencies, in the protection of children; develops and implements programs that promote community awareness about child abduction; and, maintains a system to notify the public when a child is missing.

Table 13: Justice LOB Business Services

LOB: Justice Service Name Criminal History Record Checks

Service Definition

Provides criminal history record checks for positions such as school teachers, foster parents, care givers, and other positions who serve our vulnerable populations, as well as offering public access to conviction-only information. Facilitates expunging of criminal records, pursuant to 831-3.2, HRS. Provides the statewide Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) for positive identification. Leads coordination of enterprise level integrated justice sharing program (HIJIS). The Statewide Mugphoto System (SMS) is the statewide repository for mugphotos captured at the time of booking from all law enforcement agencies statewide. The SMS is used as an investigative tool to create lineups and mugbooks to identify possible suspects. Provides access to national criminal justice information. Provides the statewide sex offender registry.

Expungements Fingerprint Identification

Integrated Justice Information Sharing Mugphotos

National Crime Information Center Sex Offender Registration

Juvenile Justice

Provides online access to the entire history of a juvenile within the justice system, from initial arrest through rehabilitation programs and additionally the statewide missing/runaway children repository.

39 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

LOB: Justice Service Name Research

Service Definition

Provides criminological data and other objective information on the nature and extent of crime in Hawaii. Provides planning and implementation of informational and educational workshops and activities focused on community crime prevention. Locates and recovers missing children, reunites missing children with their families, and prevents child abductions.

Community & Crime Prevention

Missing Children

A.1.7.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR JUSTICE
The future state vision includes the following considerations:
• Launch of the Hawai`i Integrated Justice Information Sharing

• Utilize strategic “partnerships” to further the capabilities of

HCJDC
• Stay current with technology and standards • Coordinate efforts with new State CIO and participate in his

(HIJIS) program is one of the largest information-sharing initiatives in the State and includes all justice agencies in the State and also non-justice agencies participating at all levels.
• Facial Recognition – offer service along with mugphotos • Launch of the Next Generation JJIS, a web-based information

strategic efforts The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 14 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user interface

system for juvenile justice agencies (upgrade from mainframe system).
• Increased collaboration and data sharing • Utilize IT to enhance the business goals and processes for

architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

criminal justice

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 40

Figure 14: Justice Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Systems must be available 24/7, due to justice

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 14 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and enduser computing.

information needs
• Collaboration with Judiciary, law enforcement, intake

services, prosecution, public safety, and affiliated State, County and Federal agencies
• Support the National Juvenile Justice Information

Sharing Initiative – Information sharing and collaboration for better youth outcomes

A.1.7.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING FOR JUSTICE
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

41 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Table 14: Justice LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Applications Alignment: National Crime Information Center/Nlets

Description

Cost

Notes

Provides access to national criminal justice information maintained by the FBI.

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Upgrade Priority: High EA Compliance: High

Statewide Mugphoto System/ Facial Recognition

The SMS is the statewide repository for mugphotos captured at the time of booking from all law enforcement agencies statewide. The SMS is used as an investigative tool to create lineups and mugbooks to identify possible suspects. Enhancement to include facial recognition identification. The LOTC is responsible for managing the work flow for the automated lights out identification process. Through a set of business and work flow rules, the LOTC directs the AFIS, Green Box, CJIS-Hawaii, and Mugphoto systems to perform various tasks required for the lights out process. The LOTC also manages the sending of electronic fingerprint files to the FBI and receiving and distributing the identification results. Green Box is an integrated statewide booking system. Arresting agencies enter booking information directly into the Green Box system or information is transferred from the arresting agency’s records management system to Green Box. Information is then used to populate CJIS-Hawaii. Green Box is one of the key components of the Lights Out process. https://www.ehawaii.gov (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Upgrade Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-High

Lights Out Transaction Controller

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium-High

Green Box

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Upgrade Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

Sex Offender Registry

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium-High EA Compliance: Medium-high Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-high

Sex Offender Bulk Data

https://www.ehawaii.gov/SecureDownload/sof (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

eCrim - Limited Criminal History Search

http://ecrim.ehawaii.gov (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-high Status: Replace Priority: Medium-low EA Compliance: Medium-low

Hawaii Integrated Justice Information Sharing

hawaii.gov/hijis (hosted by ICSD)

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 42

Name In Progress: Automated Fingerprint Identification System

Description

Cost

Notes

The AFIS is the State’s central repository for digitized fingerprints captured at the time of booking.

One-time DME: SW: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: SW: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: SW: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium-High

Criminal Justice Information System - Hawaii

Migration of the State’s criminal history central repository to a more industry standard application server and user interface.

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium-High

Hawaii Integrated Justice Information Sharing (HIJIS)

Provides statewide information sharing capabilities across the whole of the justice and public safety enterprise.

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

New: None LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: None New: None

More detail regarding the initiatives for this LOB are described below:
• The HIJIS program was launched in March 2007 to integrate

• The NCIC program is working to upgrade the hardware and

various criminal information systems and support data sharing with various other departments to reduce redundancies and delays in getting data to key decision makers representing the principal justice agencies throughout Hawaii including judiciary, law enforcement, prosecution, intake services, public safety and affiliated State, County, and Federal agencies. This program has been very successful at getting disparate departments and systems to share and integrate data using service oriented architecture (SOA) technology (e.g. Open Justice Broker) and standards. (See the HIJIS Strategic Plan 2008 and HIJIS Overview brief June 2011.) Several pilot programs are underway. – See supplemental budget.
• The HIJIS program is incorporating the use of SOA and an

software used to support the NCIC System. The system hardware is over 10 years old and without a hardware upgraded, we are unable to upgrade our existing software applications used by justice and law enforcement agencies statewide or the software used. Upgrade of the hardware and software will also allow better support and compatibility with national standards such as the National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) and information sharing initiatives.
• The CJIS-Hawaii system is currently being migrated to an

enterprise services bus; these are complex requirements that cause issues with the lack of expertise within HCJDC division, ICSD, and with those organizations with whom they are trying to interface. HCJDC recently joined the Open Justice Broker Consortium (OJBC) which will provide much needed expertise including training at a significantly reduced price than previously researched or piloted options.

industry standard application server and user interface software. The migration will enable CJIS-Hawaii to utilize current technologies such as server virtualization to reduce operating costs, increase reliability and performance, and establish a more robust and reliable disaster recovery environment. The migration will also enable CJIS-Hawaii to more freely exchange information with other criminal justice agencies through the HIJIS Program.
• The Next Generation Juvenile Justice Information System is

currently being re-written using J2EE web server technologies and is planned to be deployed in 2013. Besides consolidating over 40 inquiry screens into one user customizable web page, the new system will include new subscribe and publish capabilities which can alert probation and parole officers of
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

43 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

events such as a specific juvenile’s re-arrest or escape from a facility. The NG JJIS will also be able to display juvenile photographs. Additionally, the NG JJIS is designed with extensive new security capabilities that allow data providers to authorize display of juvenile data at very granular level.
• Following the 2013 release of the NG JJIS, future capabilities

• Dependent upon security & privacy capability • The following is HCJDC’s sequencing in groupings based

on each initiatives current status: – #1 = already underway – CJIS-Hawaii – HIJIS – LOTC – #2 = just underway – AFIS – NCIC – #3 = to be started soon – SMS/Facial Recognition – Green Box

will include: – Document image retrieval – User research tools – Dashboards – Electronic forwarding of data via HIJIS

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 15 through Figure 16. The following items should be considered by the enterprise for the future state initiatives:

Figure 15: Justice Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 2)

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 44

Figure 16: Justice Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 2)

A.1.8 CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES
The Child Support Services LOB strives to promote the well-being of children and the self-sufficiency of families through the timely and accurate delivery of Child Support Services, while providing excellence in customer care.

Table 15: Child Support Services LOB Business Services

LOB: Child Support Service Name Child Support Enforcement

Service Definition

Provides assistance to children by locating parents, establishing paternity and support obligations (both financial and medical), and enforcing those obligations.

Child Support Hearings Services

Provides fair and impartial administrative forum for the expeditious resolution of child support disputes; concurrent jurisdiction with the court in proceedings in which a support obligation is established, modified, or terminated. Attorney/Hearings Officers issue orders establishing, modifying, terminating, and enforcing child support obligations. Support Application to generate internal reports based on data extraction from the child support enforcement system.

Decision Support to track cases with and without orders

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A.1.8.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES
The future state vision needs to factor in the following considerations:
• The mainframe-based application, KEIKI will be replaced

improvements/replacements will be considered for implementation.
• Research will continue in implementing solutions that

would result in improving operating efficiency and/or services to the public. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 17 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user interface

utilizing the latest technology.
• CSEA’s & ICSD’s infrastructure will meet all IRS and NIST

security requirements to protect Federal Tax Information.
• CSEA is rated (by Federal law) every year on cost

architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

effectiveness: amount spent vs. amount collected (collect ~”Pending Review”/year and spend ~”Pending Review”/year) ß this needs to continue or improve further
• All desktop/server hardware and software will be replaced

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

as it reaches the end of its life cycle, and technological

Figure 17: Child Support Services LOB Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• DHS, DOL, OCSE, DLIR, DAGS, DMV, DCCA, C&C DIT, Financial Institutions, Credit

Bureaus, HIC, Employers for New Hires

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 46

A.1.8.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

• Digital project underway for content management for all case

records.
• Decision support system that looks across all cases to see

trends and trouble spots.
• Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA) “Keiki” Hawaii

Case Tracking System Modernization – Keiki software code maintenance is problematic. Expanded the overall system to include data warehousing and ad hoc reports, and Business Objects for data mining. Keiki was developed by another contractor in the Virgin Islands – the child support software must be certified. The contractor is no longer providing support. Software cost “Pending Review” to develop in 1988. Keiki contains millions of lines of code. (Project is for consideration and is not currently requested or funded.)

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for the Child Support Services LOB are outlined in Table 16 below. These initiatives are currently performing the following activities:

Table 16: Child Support Services LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Alignment: See below. In Progress: Child Support Enforcement Services

Description

Cost

Notes

https://csea.ehawaii.gov (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M:Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: High Priority: High

KEIKI Maintenance / Enhancements

Federally certified system; Supported by ICSD. Improve documentation & enhance application & related processes per user requests (e.g. imaging) & external requirements (e.g. IRS Audit)

EA Compliance: Pending Review Priority: High

New: SharePoint - Child Care Workflow Implementation SharePoint - Child Care Workflow Implementation New initiative to streamline business processes for Child Care Services One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review EA Compliance: High Priority: High

KEIKI Replacement Project

Federally certified system; Supported by ICSD.

EA Compliance: Pending Review Priority: Medium

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: Infrastructure Maintenance Hardware/software maintenance, licenses & fees; ongoing professional service fees; circuits, etc. On-going annual O&M: Pending Review Status: Pending Review EA Compliance: Pending Review Priority: High

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Name New: Interactive Voice Response Enhancement Project

Description

Cost

Notes

Interactive Voice Response unit to deliver case information and forward callers to customer service representatives.

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: Pending Review Priority: Med-High

CSEA Infrastructure Enhancements

Hardware/software infrastructure; professional services; circuits, etc. Replace server / desktop hardware & software

EA Compliance: Pending Review Priority: High

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 18. The following items

should be considered by the enterprise for the future state initiatives:
• Content Management • Decision Support System.

• SharePoint • KEIKI Replacement Project

Figure 18: Child Support Services Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary

A.1.9 STADIUM OPERATIONS
The Stadium Operations LOB manages, administers, and operates the State of Hawai`i’s Hula Bowl Stadium.

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Table 17: Stadium Operations LOB Business Services

LOB: Stadium Operations Service Name Stadium Operations

Service Definition

Administers, plans, assists and coordinates activities related to the State of Hawaii’s Hula Bowl Stadium. Services administered are scheduling, facilities maintenance, parking, planning of events, safety and control and promotion of events happening at the stadium and adjoining property.

A.1.9 STADIUM OPERATIONS
The Stadium Operations LOB manages, administers, and operates the State of Hawai`i’s Hula Bowl Stadium.

A.1.9.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR STADIUM OPERATIONS INITIATIVES
Pending Review.

A.1.9.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR STADIUM OPERATIONS
Pending Review.

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
Pending Review.

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Financial data • Facilities, equipment, and assets • Maintenance

A.1.10 TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is responsible to plan, design, construct, operate, and maintain State facilities in all modes of transportation, including air, water, and land. Coordination with other State, County, and Federal programs is maintained in order to achieve the objective.

Table 18: Transportation LOB Business Services

LOB: Transportation Service Name Construction Management

Service Definition

Reviews detailed plans and specifications, and administration of construction projects; develops uniform standards and procedures for construction control; conducts periodic inspections and evaluations of field activities; coordinates Attorney General’s requests for investigation of construction contract litigation with the divisional branches and district offices. Monitors construction contract administration. Reviews and processes federal-aid construction administration requests to the Federal Highway Administration for approval of contract change orders, time extension justifications, extra work item justifications, problem solutions or actions, and county federal-aid construction contracts. Manage, maintain, and operate a High Quality Integrated Statewide Air Transportation System and public airports with the Spirit of Aloha for Hawaii’s Residents and visitors. Provides airport facilities that accommodate the safe, orderly and efficient movement of aircraft, vehicles and air travelers. Manages the operations and maintenance of the State Highway System. Selects, designates or lays out, in line with the requirements of the Federal Highway Act, a system or systems of highways in the State upon which Federal-Aid funds may be expended together with State and/or county funds. Maintains and/or directs and supervises the maintenance of highways

Airport Operations

Highways Operations & Maintenance

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LOB: Transportation Service Name

Service Definition

upon which Federal-Aid funds have been expended. Provide services to the public in fulfillment of the mission of the Highways Division to provide a safe, and efficient and accessible highway system. Manages approximately 2,433 miles of paved freeways, highways and roadways on Hawaii’s six major islands. Harbors Operations Maintain, repair and operate the ten commercial harbors which comprise the statewide harbors system; plan, design and construct harbor facilities; provide program planning and administrative support; manage vessel traffic into, within, and out of harbor facilities; provide for and manage the efficient utilization of harbor facilities and lands, and maintain offices and facilities for the conduct of maritime business with the public. Effectively manage and operate a statewide commercial harbors system that facilitates the efficient movement of people and goods to, from and between the Hawaiian Islands; Support the State’s economic prosperity and quality of life as well as promote the well-being of our cargo, fishing and passenger cruise industries, other maritime related service and support activities, and the enjoyment of certain waterfront facilities by the general public.

NOTE: Within each of these Lines Of Business other services exist that can be considered subcomponents of each Line of Business. The Department has taken an action item to examine each of these services in greater detail, evaluating them as possibilities to consolidate versus keeping them separate.

• DOT-HAR’s primary mission is to manage and maintain the

state commercial harbor piers and landings, and another mission is to manage public lands under harbor facilities.
• Manage plans, control resources and schedules for

A.1.10.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR TRANSPORTATION
The future state vision includes the following considerations:
• Significant opportunity exists to improve overall integration

multiple planning, design and construction projects; manage contracts, budgets and expenditures; monitor critical paths and project status.
• Provide reports on CIP status for executive management,

Governor and the Legislature
• To allow customers to interface with our core applications,

of services at the LOB level to reduce redundancies when duplicating efforts to automate office automation processes such as electronic approval process and document tracking, project management and reporting, enterprise accounting practices, accounts receivables linked to concession and lease rent agreements, and others. Streamlining these work processes will result in quicker processing of project requests to support the capital improvement and construction management projects, posting of accounts receivables, and transportation planning initiatives.
• Maintain, repair and operate the ten commercial harbors

and provide customers with on-line access to look up account information and submit payments on line or by electronic funds transfer.
• The data uploaded from our customers are integrated into the

Harbor core applications to help us analyze if our facilities are meeting our customer needs.
• Provide on-line access to pier assignments and apply to

which comprise the statewide harbors system; plan, design and construct harbor facilities; provide program planning and administrative support; manage vessel traffic into, within, and out of harbor facilities; provide for and manage the efficient utilization of harbor facilities and lands, and maintain offices and facilities for the conduct of maritime business with the public. Effectively manage and operate a statewide commercial harbors system that facilitates the efficient movement of people and goods to, from and between the Hawaiian Islands; Support the State’s economic prosperity and quality of life as well as promote the well-being of our cargo, fishing and passenger cruise industries, other maritime related service and support activities, and the enjoyment of certain waterfront facilities by the general public.

schedule the assignment of piers in a Harbor Management system. After a ship has docked customers can look up and submit wharfage and storage reports for that voyage.
• These wharfage and storage reports should be automated

to upload reports into our Harbor Management and Accounting system. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 19 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as

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Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 50

LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support(functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 19: Transportation Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
Major Interfaces:
• Federal government agencies include:

– U.S. Maritime Administration – U.S. Department of Homeland Security – U.S. Treasury Department – U.S. Department of Agriculture – U.S. Customs and Border Protection – Environmental Protection Agency – Federal Transportation Security Administration – Federal Aviation Administration – Federal Drug Enforcement Agency – Federal Center for Disease Control and Prevention – Air Force (Hickam Air Force Base, Kona)
• State agencies include:

– U.S. Department of Transportation – Federal Highway Administration – National Highway Traffic Safety Administration – Bureau of Transportation Statistics – Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – U.S. Fish and Wildlife – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationn – Federal Maritime Commission – U.S. Coast Guard
51 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

– Department of Land and Natural Resources
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

– Department of Public Safety – Department of Agriculture – Department of Health – State Civil Defense – Department of the Attorney General – Criminal Justice Data Center – Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism – Department of Human Resources Development – Department of Accounting and General Services – Department of Budget and Finance
• All island counties • Shipping lines and agents, cruise ship operators and agents,

• Hawai`i Visitors Bureau • Hawai`i Tourism Authority (HTA) • Hawaii`i Harbor Users Group

A.1.10.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR TRANSPORTATION
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 19 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end -user computing.

vessel operators, tugs, and other maritime and maritime business operators and transportation service providers
• Airlines, concessionaires, airport tenants

Table 19: Transportation LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: Financial Management System

Description

Cost

Notes

Financial Management Systems needs to be maintained and upgraded for continued vendor support. These systems may be replaced with Statewide ERP if requirements are met. The Transportation financial reporting requirements vary between the Divisions which are mandated for annual financial audits. The Highway and Airports financial management systems projects are currently being worked on. Highways legacy financial system and cost accounting system HWYAC replacement is FAST. Airports Financial Management System upgrade project is called AIRMIS21 Upgrade.

HWY-FAST Pending Review AIR AIRMIS21 Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

PropWorks Upgrade

Upgrade Property and Lease Management System for Airports

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

Intranet Portal

Transportation intranet portal for information and collaboration (i.e., desktop video conferencing, virtual workplaces, etc.)

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Name New: HAR - GIS

Description

Cost

Notes

GIS/Asset Management for Harbor Management working with the Army-Corp of Engineers and is the State match to the program. Mapping assets with the first layer being storm water systems.

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

DOTCMS

Enhance the Transportation’s Content Management System (DOTCMS). Introduce records management and paperless workflow. Transportation Capital Improvement Project Tracking with interface to Transportation portal

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

CIP Tracking

Pending Review

Work Order/Trouble Call Tracking

Enhance and expand the Airports work order and trouble call tracking system to support the Airport Operations. Used to record and track progress and completion of work orders and trouble calls. Used as reference for liability claims against the Airports. Monitoring and tracking all Airport Operations employees (State and non-State) for compliance with airport certification classes Replacement of Kona International Airport’s GasBoy System.

Pending Review

Certification Tracking/Training

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

KOA Fuel System

Pending Review

Hawaii Aviation History Website Upgrade

Upgrade of the Hawaii.gov/hawaiiaviation website hosted by ICSD. The current website is built on unsupported application code. Update look, and feel (navigation)of the current Hawaii.gov airport webpages that services the traveling public. Website hosted by ICSD. Electronic Way Finding in public spaces Facilities asset management system System to track and analyze traffic accidents by statistical analysis Pending Review

Pending Review

State Airport websites

Pending Review

Electronic Terminal Maps AxiSM Traffic Accident Reporting System Harbors Comprehensive Financial System HAR Mgt - Automated cargo tracking system

Pending Review Pending Review Pending Review

Pending Review

Develop and implement automated cargo tracking system to ensure that all cargo is correctly reported and charged focus on cargo.

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

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Name HAR Hardware and Software license audit inventory system

Description Computer Hardware and Software Inventory database for Harbors Division

Cost Pending Review

Notes Priority: High EA Compliance: High

HAR Help Desk System

A web based Help Desk management application to track and manage IT user request and trouble tickets with status/ progress updates and reporting via email or web interface. It’s also a reference database for IT equipment’s life cycle and maintenance contracts. To manage the scheduling and assignment of berths for homeported ships and vessels visiting our state harbor facilities. Develop a statewide cruise ship scheduling system with on-line access provided to cruise ship agents to book port calls at any of the statewide commercial harbor ports Manage and maintain statistical information on harbor activities, including vessel traffic, tonnage, cargo, commodities, etc. for all shipping inbound and outbound. Automated database of all permits, leases, easements and property dispositions of harbor properties; captures tenant history, monitor rent reopening, rental step-ups, insurance renewal information, security deposit information. This system has to Interface with Accounting Billing module to generate charges based on individual rental agreements, and to identify revenues received from use of ceded harbor properties due to OHA under section 5(f) of the Admission Act, as well as to interface with GIS. Harbors initiative to establish a system to manage major assets, infrastructure, utility systems, roadways, easements, etc. to capture life cycle history and major repairs and renovations made to such assets and infrastructure. This system will monitor the remaining life of harbor infrastructure to enable more effective planning, budgeting and scheduling of repairs, renovations or replacements, and to interface with GIS. Potential for Departmental solution.

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

HAR Mgt - Web based ships and Vessels Scheduling

Pending Review

HAR Mgt - Web based Statewide cruise ship scheduling system HAR Mgt - Harbor Operations management and maintenance system HAR Property Management system

Pending Review

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

Asset Management System

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

HAR Project Management System

Manage plans, control resources and schedules for multiple planning, design and construction projects; manage contracts, budgets, expenditures and forecasts of future needs; monitor critical paths and project status. Provide reports on CIP status for executive management, Governor and the Legislature.

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

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Name HAR Environmental Management System

Description Harbor’s initiative to capture environmental data related to harbor properties such as pre-existing soil conditions, maintain record keeping and documentation of environmental inspections and enforcement actions; monitor storm water discharge and the surrounding environment, as the responsibility to manage public lands also includes compliance with all federal and state environmental laws and regulations to protect the land and surrounding areas from pollution. This system is also to Interface with GIS. An electronic Tracking and Approval system for Staff Study documents, Travel Requests, Purchase Requisitions and Purchase Orders, Recommendations on Contract Award and Statements of Completed Travel This system is to provide timely updating of leave records which will result in near-real time leave balances for all Harbors employees. The benefits that will result from this application are that leave hours taken or requested to be taken that are submitted via Forms G-1 will be posted and deducted from employees’ leave balances as soon as the appropriate supervisor approves the leave request in this system.

Cost Pending Review

Notes Priority: High EA Compliance: High

HAR Office Automation Approval Tracking System

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

HAR Office Automation Electronic Leave Record & Request system

Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: Statewide Maritime Wireless Network System (MWNS) Develop and implement a statewide regulated ports NWNS to enhance public safety throughout the regulated port infrastructure with respect to data and video signals. The MWNS will provide DOT with the opportunity to achieve meaningful and measurable improvements to the public safety surveillance system within the port infrastructure through the use of telecommunication resources and connectivity to the Hawaii Homeland Security Command Information Surveillance System. “Pending Review” has been released by the Governor for the MWNS Design and Construction, statewide with the Department of Defense being the lead agency to coordinate and manage the project. Pending Review DOD and Homeland Security are looking into to see if they have captured this.

New: Data Center Upgrade Replace hardware and software in the Transportation data center Update disaster and recovery plans (e.g., Continuity of Operations Planning, COOP) for federal funding and to support financial system audits HAR is to accommodate a fiber optic cable to be replaced in accordance with NGN connection requirements, as long as Nimitz Highway conduit crossing. Pending Review

DR Planning & Testing

Pending Review

HAR Fiber Optic Cable Replacement

Pending Review

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 15 through Figure 16. The following items should be considered for the future state initiatives:
• Capital Improvement Project Tracking System • Highways Financial System (FAST) • Airports Accounts Receivable and Database Upgrade and

• Replace the aging hardware in Transportation data center • Collaboration and Social Networking Tools • Traffic Accident Reporting System • Improved communications with the State Civil Defense and

possible County offices to support emergency response services and DOT centers
• Upgrade network bandwidth to neighbor island offices • Airports Warehouse System upgrade

Migration project
• Update Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity Plan • Transportation Intranet Portal, to include dashboard for

project tracking

Figure 20: Transportation Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3)

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Figure 21: Transportation Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3)

Figure 22: Transportation Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3)

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A.1.11 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
This LOB provides Hawaii’s resource center for economic and statistical data, business development opportunities, energy and conservation information, and foreign trade advantages. Table 20: Economic Development LOB Business Services

LOB: Economic Development Service Name Economic Industry Development

Service Definition

Promotes industry development and economic diversification in Hawaii by supporting existing and emerging industries, attracting new investment and businesses that can create more skilled, quality jobs in the state, and work to increase exports of Hawaii products and services. Business support provides new and existing businesses direct loans, licensing and permit information and referral, business advocacy, planning and coordination of programs and projects aimed at specific business sectors or economically-distressed areas (including rural areas and areas affected by natural disaster).

Economic Research & Analysis Services

Works to enhance and contribute to the economic development of the State by providing analyses and policy recommendations on economic issues. Provides economic forecasts that contribute to long-term statewide planning and infrastructure needs assessment, and also conducts and reports on basic research into the economy of the state. These functions are conducted by collecting compiling, interpreting, and publishing data and statistics on all aspects of business activity, the economy and demographic characteristics of the State. Also develops and maintains a statewide statistical reporting system.

Economic Strategy and Planning

Supports statewide economic efficiency, productivity, development and diversification by promoting, attracting and facilitating the development of Hawaii Technology-based industries which engage in the sustainable development of Hawaii’s energy, environmental, ocean, recyclable, and technological resources. Develops a sustainable venture capital industry in Hawaii which will stimulate the growth of viable new businesses.

Tourism Services

Creates a vision and develops a long-range plan for tourism for the State of Hawaii. Provides a board of directors to oversee the Tourism Special Fund.

Creative Industry Services

Promotes the development and growth of Hawaii’s Creative Economy, whose primary and core sector consists of Copyright Based Industries, with a focus on businesses that create/design exportable products and services and depend on the protection of their Intellectual Property in order to market to a global community. IP protection is a crucial base to profitability and survival. These are the core businesses that contribute to our economy with job creation and tax revenue. This cluster is comprised of producers and service providers in film, video and digital media production, commercial and applied design firms and diverse range of creative (visual and performing) and cultural businesses in Hawaii. Surrounding this core sector are a great variety of arts and cultural organizations, service organizations, educational institutions, foundations, community groups and a variety of individual artisans.

Renewable Energy

Participates in the development and diversification of the economy of Hawaii by providing resources and facilities for energy and ocean related research, education, and commercial activities in an environmentally sound and culturally sensitive manner. Facilities are located at Keahole Point in Kona and in Puna, both on the Island of Hawaii. NELHA at Keahole Point

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LOB: Economic Development Service Name

Service Definition

is the only location in the world, which consistently pumps large quantities of warm and cold seawater ashore for use in aquaculture, marine biotechnology, and other related technologies. Foreign-Trade Zone Services Increases the amount of international trading activity in Hawaii, to encourage value-added activities, stimulate capital investment and generate employment opportunities by using the federal trade development program to reduce the costs associated with international trade. There are currently 13 sites on the islands of Oahu, Maui, and Hawaii that have received FTZ designation. Of the 13 sites, three general-purpose zones and four special-purpose subzones are active. Responsible for ensuring that U.S. Customs and Foreign-Trade Zones Board regulations are followed at these sites.

A.1.11.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
The future vision for the Economic Development LOB is to apply state-of-the-art technology to address the following business objectives and issues:
• Diversity in terms of its mission and service delivery

• Ability to work with external people via email, etc., and

send large files
• Getting to a paperless environment • Case management

activities; the common thread is the need to reach beyond the boundaries of the islands.
• Produces the State of Hawai`i Data Book (900K hits/month). • GIS governance and planning – by statute (Chapter 225M-

The organization is very creative as they identify ways to use social media, forwarding their email to Gmail to enable receipt on an iPhone or Droid-type phone and increase email storage; saving mail to personal hard drives; using WIKI forms; outsourcing VOIP; using Google Docs for file share; using Skype. For the State’s GIS, historically ICSD provided file server and IT technical support, OP provided overall policy direction, database management, and user application support. Note that the file servers and databases are used by all State agencies. OP and ICSD jointly planned for system upgrades/growth/evolution. Infrastructure was generally part of ICSD’s budget. In recent years, due to budget and staff cuts, ICSD has found it difficult to maintain previous level of support. In addition, there has been a significant deterioration in the partnership that had been in place for many (15+) years. There have been many system problems, with significant down time, so that State GIS users would like ICSD removed from support of the State GIS.” OP has been investigating alternatives. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 23 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

2(4)(B)), OP is the statewide coordinating agency for GIS in State government.
• Largest and most diverse constituent pool of any agency

in the State. The need for multi-language approaches in dealing with foreign countries, as well as multi-cultural aspects, is an implied business concern in development of the State economy.
• Better email solutions • Ability to do email blasts • Ability to store email greater than 20MG • Electronic signatures coupled with Document Tracking

System (DTS)
• Improved document management system • Additional video conferencing capabilities, especially with

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

neighbor islands and the mainland
• IT solution that supports use of credit cards • Electronic signatures/paperless transactions • Ability to handle video-intense files (videography) • Faster network speeds

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

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Figure 23: Economic Development Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• State GIS data • State Data Book

INITIATIVES
The primary initiative for this LOB is the Hawai`i Broadband Initiative:
• Jointly sponsored by DBEDT and DCCA.

Opportunity to leverage connectivity for State offices at remote islands and improvements for State NGN. The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 21 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

A.1.11.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

• A major economic development

initiative to provide statewide access to affordable ultra, high-speed Internet by 2018. Positions Hawai`i to be the first state in the nation with 1 gigabit per second broadband connectivity at every public school, every public library, and every public university and college campus by using about “Pending Review” of federal monies received through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

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Table 21: Economic Development LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Applications Alignment: GIS Various databases

Description

Cost

Notes

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: GIS Deployment EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 2 Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Land Use Commission

hawaii.gov/luc (hosted by ICSD)

Aloha Tower Development Corporation

alohatower.org (hosted by ICSD)

Coastal Zone Management

hawaii.gov/dbedt/czm (hosted by ICSD)

Hawaii Statewide GIS Program

hawaii.gov/dbedt/gis (hosted by ICSD)

Office of Planning

hawaii.gov/dbedt/op (hosted by ICSD)

Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism

hawaii.gov/dbedt (hosted by ICSD)

Hawaii Community Development Authority

hcdaweb.org (hosted by ICSD)

Hawaii Film Office

hawaiifilmoffice.com (hosted by ICSD)

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Name Clean Energy Initiative

Description hawaiicleanenergyinitiative.org (hosted by ICSD.)

Cost One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Status: Production Web Site EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Application – Move to Web App EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Production Application – Replace with Central Legislative Tracking System EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 2

DBEDT - Document Tracking System (DTS)

Custom Lotus Notes based application for tracking a documents life-cycle within the department

DBEDT Legislative Tracking System -Lotus Notes Application being maintained by ICSD in DAGS

DBEDT Legislative Tracking System is a revised version of their Lotus Notes tracking system. This database allows the creation of a tracking document for a bill or resolution. The tracking document is then circulated within the department to gather testimonies and comments. This Lotus Notes application resides on DBEDT’s Notes server.

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: Infrastructure Infrastructure upgrade One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Wireless

wi-fi installation

Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Network Upgrades

firewall/router upgrades

Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

New: VOIP

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 24.

Figure 24: Economic Development Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.1.12 COMMERCE AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
Commerce and Consumer Affairs promotes a strong and healthy business environment by upholding fairness and public confidence in the marketplace, and by increasing knowledge and opportunity for our businesses and citizens.

Table 22: Commerce and Consumer Affairs LOB Business Services

LOB: Commerce and Consumer Affairs Service Name Broadband Infrastructure

Service Definition

Responsible for implementing activities to promote ubiquitous access to high speed broadband at affordable prices throughout the State by expanding and accelerating the deployment of broadband infrastructure. Maintains the business registry for corporations, limited liability companies, general partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, and limited liability limited partnerships. In addition, the registry contains publicity rights, trade names, trademarks and service marks. This is a ministerial registry with no substantive review. Also runs one-on-one sessions to assist businesses in their business registrations needs.

Business Registry

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LOB: Commerce and Consumer Affairs Service Name Cable Television Services

Service Definition

Determines whether the initial issuance, renewal or transfer of a cable franchise is in the public’s best interest, and enforces obligations of a cable franchise and ensures cable operators’ compliance with rules and regulations relating to their practices and procedures. Represents consumers of utility and state-regulated transportation services before the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission and various federal regulatory agencies. Consumer counsel for the State of Hawaii: Investigates consumer complaints and enforces a broad range of consumer protection statutes prohibiting unfair or deceptive acts or practices against consumers; promotes consumer awareness, educates the general public on consumer protection issues and provides information to the public about the Hawaii Residential Landlord-Tenant Code. Conduct hearings and issue recommended decisions for all divisions within DCCA that are required to provide contested case hearings; administer medical tort claims through the Medical Claims Conciliation Panel; administer tort claims against design professionals through the Design Claim Conciliation Panel; hear and decide disputes arising from the State’s procurement laws; hear and decide due process hearings involving the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act and the Department of Education; and hear disputes among manufacturers, distributors, or dealers of motor vehicles. Regulates state-chartered or state-licensed financial institutions in the State of Hawaii (including banks; savings banks; savings and loan associations; foreign bank branches, agency and representative offices; trust companies; depository and non-depository financial services loan companies; and credit unions), all escrow depositories, and all money transmitters, mortgage servicers, mortgage loan originators and mortgage loan originator companies. Oversees the Hawaii insurance industry; issues licenses, examines the fiscal condition of Hawaii-based companies, reviews rate and policy filings, investigates insurance related complaints. Specializes in the licensure, regulation, and administration of Hawaii-based captive insurance companies, as well as, the prudent development of the State’s captive insurance industry. Oversees the regulatory activities of 25 boards and commissions and 22 licensing programs. Receives complaints, conducts investigations, and prosecutes licensing law violations for various licensed professions and vocations; prosecutes unlicensed activity through the issuance of citations and by filing civil lawsuits in the Circuit Courts; works to resolve consumer complaints where appropriate and provides consumer education about various issues relating to licensing and consumer protection; administers the State Certified Arbitration Program (SCAP) for “lemon” motor vehicle claims and provides the public with both licensing and enforcement (complaint) information. Conducts substantive registration for securities, franchises, broker-dealers, sales agents, investment advisers and their representatives; conducts examinations of investment a dvisers and broker-dealers. Runs an investor education program. Investigates complaints regarding potential violations of the Hawaii securities laws; prosecutes securities violations.

Consumer Advocacy Services

Consumer Protection Services

DCCA Administrative Hearing Services

Financial Institution Services

HI Insurance Industry Oversight

Professional & Vocational Licensing Regulated Industries Complaint Services

Securities Compliance

Securities Enforcement

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 64

A.1.12.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR COMMERCE AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
The future state vision needs to correct some of the following problems:
• Annually, May–June bills are passed that can require expedited

Processing guarantees on these systems is measured in days so they can handle disruptions of up to one week.
• Status of servers: HP stand-alone servers are ~6 years old; the

SAN is ~6 years old. They are actively migrating to an HP Blade server running VMware. The SAN is planned for replacement next year.
• Refresh cycle on other IT: PCs are refreshed every 4 years;

work on systems which causes surges in backlog of work requests to the ISCO.
• This LOB is able to leverage funding to make significant

printers every 5 to 6 years. PCs are currently running Windows XP due to problems with Oracle. MS Office is budgeted for replacement in FY13.
• Attempts to unify business information across Departments by

IT improvements through careful strategic planning and prioritizing improvements. A major goal for this LOB is to provide for paperless, streamlined business processes supported by integrated automation.
• Interdependencies between software and incompatible

creating a central repository, have floundered due to lack of agreement by divisions to agree on the management of master data. However, successful implementation was completed for automated exchange of business-entity information and a standardized database model.
• IT staff for this LOB are dedicated, very knowledgeable, and

versions can slow progress and improvements to service delivery. Examples: current Oracle screens will not run on Windows 7, Oracle Reports only runs on IE 8 or lower, IBM Host on Demand only runs on IE 7, and some packages will not run with lower versions of MS Office.
• ICSD maintains the PVL license for system screens, maintains/

experienced therefore, would like to participate in making the future state vision a reality for the State.
• This LOB is interested in moving some services to a Cloud-

backs up the main Oracle server (P590 AIX), maintains the web server, provides web site programming, and provides WAN and bridging services for VCC. ISCO provides all other maintenance and helps support ICSD.
• DCCA is agile in terms of IT but finds that interfaces to other

based model; funding from this LOB could provide the first State Cloud-based solution. However, the AG’s review and approval is required.
• Need better data sharing between LOBs. For example,

departments cause bottlenecks due to paper processes and antiquated systems.
• DCCA focused on internet services and incurred significant

Commerce and Consumer Affairs holds business filing information that Revenue Collection needs; however, their applications do not have access to enable correlating business-owner individual tax with business tax paid.
• ISCO is seeing a growing trend toward use of national

costs to move off of ICSD’s mainframe and Wang systems to a more internet-friendly platform.
• The licensing and registration databases are considered

databases; with registrations, they are moving toward a strategy that uses the national databases and will keep only Hawai`i-specific information locally.
• Need better video conferencing to drive down the cost of

critical information and are relied on by businesses and government agencies to check on the licensure of business entities including new transparency initiatives being implemented by Hawaii Insurance Exchange.
• ISCO has requested replacement of the AIX system, but

flying people from neighbor islands.
• Need better communication and more timely input of data

between legislature and Commerce and Consumer Affairs. The IT needs for this Line of Business envisions an aggressive use of the most current application development environments, database servers, cloud service, tools and technologies. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 48 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user interface

its replacement depends on ICSD and their ability to move forward.
• ISCO has a stable backlog of 350 work requests. One or two

additional IT staff could reduce or eliminate the backlog, but improvements are needed in the business processes and the systems that support them.
• The connections between DCCA and HIC, located at

architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

DRFortress, are critical to maintain processing guarantees. DCCA also maintains data connectivity to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, synchronizing the insurance data. (Synchronizing the data between the systems is complex so they are trying to move to the National format).

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

65 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

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Figure 25: Commerce and Consumer Affairs LOB Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• State legislature is a critical interface to this LOB; tracks

• Future State – provider licensing information needs to be

bills and makes preparations to support new laws and requirements; often there is a short cycle between bill passage and enforcement of new policies. This demands immediate attention and quick response from DCCA’s Information Systems and Communication Office (ISCO).
• Hawai`i Information Consortium (HIC) takes in Commerce

shared with Hawaii Health Information Exchange (HHIE) and insurance licensing information needs to be shared with Hawaii Insurance Exchange (HIX).

A.1.12.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLAN FOR COMMERCE AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

and Consumer Affairs online transactions for a fee (“Pending Review”).
• Information should be shared in a common database with

other LOBs such as Revenue Collection and Employment Rights and Benefits.
• DCCA Insurance Division shares data with the National

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 23 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 66

Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC). This is a two-way exchange as there are Insurance providers who file with NAIC and we pull those filings back into our HIDS system.
• DCCA Insurance Division shares Insurance Premium Tax

information with TriTech a private sector data clearing house for Tax compliance purposes.
• Information is exchanged with First Hawaiian Bank for

ACH transactions.
State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Table 23: Commerce and Consumer Affairs LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: Health Insurance Premium Rate Review BPMS Pilot

Description

Cost

Notes

Pilot Business Process Management System (BPMS) to update portions of the existing HIDS system that deal with Health Insurance rate filings, data collection, validation, analysis and reporting. The new system will be replacing the outdated Oracle Forms technology and transforming the user interfaces by re-engineering the processes and creating Microsoft.Net persona oriented browser-based information worker portals.

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

New: ALIAS Migration Applicant/Licensee Interactive Automated System (ALIAS) Forms Migration Project - Business Process Management System (BPMS) to update the existing ALIAS system. The new system will be replacing the outdated Oracle Forms technology and transforming the user interfaces by reengineering the processes and creating Microsoft.Net persona oriented browser-based information worker portals. Database as a Service (DaaS) in order to meet DCCA’s SLA requirements. One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: High EA Compliance: High

Oracle Managed Services – Database as a Service

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

Complaint Management System (CMS) Forms Migration Project

CMS Forms for RICO, OCP, CATV, DFI and BREG-SEB Migrate existing Oracle Forms user interface to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate.

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

BRIMS Migration

Business Registration Information Management System (BRIMS) Forms Migration Project

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

RDPMS Migration

Registration Document Processing and Management System (RDPMS) Forms Migration Project - Migrate existing Oracle Forms user interface to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Financial Institutions Management System (FIMS) Forms Migration Project - Migrate existing Oracle Forms user interface to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Computer Account Request (CAR) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. ISCO Request For Action (RFA) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: High EA Compliance: High

FIMS - Financial Institutions Management System Migration Computer Account Request (CAR) Application Modernization RFA – ISCO Request for Action

DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

67 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Name BPMS candidate. LTS – Legislative (Bill) Tracking System

Description

Cost

Notes

Legislative (Bill) Tracking System (LTS) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Employee Leave System (ELS) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Director’s Office Referral System (DRS) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. IN-OUT Board - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Incident (Bug) Tracking System (ITS) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate.

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

ELS - Employee Leave System Modernization

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

DRS - Director’s Office Referral System

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

IN-OUT Board Application Modernization

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

ITS – Incident Bug Tracking System

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Licensing Advisory Board Members Database

Licensing Advisory Board Members Database (License Boards) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. RICO Citation Database (Citation) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Request for Services (Insurance Office Services/Clerical) (RFS1) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Request for Services (Insurance Legal) (RFS2) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Conference Room/Equipment Reservation System (CRERS) - Lotus Notes Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) Migrate existing Lotus Notes database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate.

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

Citation - RICO Citation Database

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

RFS1 – Request for Services (Insurance Office Services/Clerical)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

RFS2 – Request for Services (Insurance Legal)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

CRERS – Conference Room/Equipment Reservation System

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 68

Name SCAP - State Certified Arbitration Program (Auto Lemon Law Database)

Description State Certified Arbitration Program (Auto Lemon Law) (SCAP) - MS Access Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) Migrate existing MS Access database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. IA/BD/MF/FR - Investment Advisors / Broker Dealers / Mutual Funds / Franchises - MS Access Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) - Migrate existing MS Access database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate. Real Estate Continued Education Tracking System - MS Access Application Modernization (Migrate to .Net) Migrate existing MS Access database application to MS.Net platform possible BPMS candidate.

Cost One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

IA/BD/MF/FR Application Modernization

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

Real Estate Continued Education Tracking System

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: None New: None

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 26 through Figure 28. The following items should be considered by the enterprise for the future state initiatives:
• DCCA has a strategic plan with weighted priorities. There

virtual desktop (financial institution inspectors use them successfully now).
• Need to perform business process re-engineering to provide

efficiencies and upgrades to enable analysis and reporting of business performance.
• Allow online applications for (initial) Professional and

are active projects for each initiative in the strategic plan.
• DCCA has mature custom applications built on Oracle

Vocational Licensing for both Condominium Associations and Continued Education purposes. In addition, Commerce and Consumer Affairs LOB solutions have critical needs for the following new Enterprise-wide Solutions:
• Robust email system • Cloud service • Data Management services • Mobile technologies • Web application servers • Application Development Environments

databases. Each system is currently undergoing at least three major enhancements.
• Use of national databases; with registrations, moving toward

a strategy that uses the national databases and maintaining only Hawai`i-specific information locally
• ISCO is looking at ways to improve the financial system; the

biggest problem is that DAGS will not give them additional accounts for payments; insurance, financials, etc., are all entered into one account. Paper money is not deposited quickly. To eliminate duplicate data entry, DCCA’s financial system needs to be integrated with FAMIS.
• XP will sunset in 2014 and their screens only run in XP; they

are looking at using VMV - Virtual PCs as part of remote

69 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

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Figure 26: Commerce and Consumer Affairs Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3)

Figure 27: Commerce and Consumer Affairs Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3) State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 70

Figure 28: Commerce and Consumer Affairs Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3)

A.1.13 HUMAN SERVICES
The purpose of the Human Services LOB is to provide timely, efficient and effective programs, services and benefits, for the Table 24: Human Services LOB Business Services

purpose of achieving the outcome of empowering those who are the most vulnerable in our State to expand their capacity for self-sufficiency, self-determination, independence, healthy choices, quality of life and personal dignity.

LOB: Human Services Service Name Human Services Case Management

Service Definition

Case management services support the case life cycle of a client’s application, placement, and participation in one or many DHS programs. Provides eligibility determination and payment of medical, long term care, dental, and behavioral services through contracted managed care health plans and individual practitioners and facilities for Title XIX, Title XXI and state funded health care programs. Eligibility determination and benefit authorization for and issuance of financial assistance (TANF, TAONF, GA and AABD) and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly foods stamps). This service also includes medical evaluation and assessment through a contractor. Case management, work preparation and job placement services to TANF, TAONF and SNAP recipients. Provides emergency and/or transitional shelter to stabilize the homeless. Makes available to eligible homeless families and individuals, monetary assistance to prevent, avoid, or remedy

Medical Assistance

Financial Assistance

Homeless Services

71 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

LOB: Human Services Service Name

Service Definition

homelessness. Provides services to homeless individuals and families including adequate meals or cooking facilities; client assessment/social services planning; case management; job training; medical and social services referrals; childcare; educational and life skills classes; and monitoring and follow-up after transitioning to permanent housing. Provides supplementary funding for shelter operations and special programs which include job training, education to attain a GED, substance abuse counseling programs and help in transitioning to employment. Child and Adult Protective Services Provides protection from abuse and neglect for children and dependent adults. Also provides safe living arrangements with the goal of reducing abuse, neglect and maltreatment. The main goal of the foster care and adoptive services is to find forever families for children and connect those interested in adoption with a committed entity that will ensure a child (or children, hopefully) has a loving permanent home. Includes managing individual foster child cases; selection and licensing of resource families; care oversight; and financial support. Provides Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) which provides low-income households with coupons that can be used like cash at most grocery stores to ensure that they have access to a healthy diet. SNAP represents the pledge that hunger will not be tolerated in America. It is the tangible expression of the unalterable belief that everyone has a right to food for themselves and their families. The program is the cornerstone of the Federal government’s food assistance programs. The U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) administers the SNAP at the Federal level through its Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). State agencies administer the program at the State and local levels, including determination of eligibility and allotments. The goal of the child care licensing is to protect the health, safety, and well-being of children enrolled in licensed facilities by developing and enforcing minimum standards for licensed facilities. Licensing staff monitors compliance with the law and the administrative rules and provides consultation and technical assistance to child care providers. Child care assistance provides families with: subsidies to help with child care expenses; guidance in selecting a child care provider; information about quality child care programs; and referrals to community resources for help with other concerns. The highest priority is given to children who need out-of-home care for protective service reasons, to assure children safety, comfort, and health. Provides work programs and employment and training designed to assist able-bodied adults to become attached to the workforce. Puts emphasis on: employment, skill-building, training, on-the-job training, and job search activities. Also provides supportive services such as child care, transportation reimbursement, and work-related expenses. Includes several work-incentive and job-readiness programs to recipients through partnerships and contracts with public and private agencies. Vocational rehabilitation and independent living services for individuals with disabilities, who require assistance to prepare for, secure, retain or regain employment. Provides rehabilitation and related services for persons who are blind and visually impaired to persons who are deaf or hard of hearing statewide. These services include, but are not limited to, education, vocational rehabilitation services leading to job placement, clinic examinations, and skill training to empower consumers toward independence and success in their vocations and their lives.

Foster Care

Food and Nutrition Assistance

Child Care Assistance

Work and Employment Placement Programs

Vocational Rehabilitation

Services for the Visually and Hearing Impaired

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 72

LOB: Human Services Service Name Affordable Housing Assistance

Service Definition

Provides the development and management programs that provide housing to those who are unable to provide housing for themselves including the rental of single-family or multifamily properties, and the management and operation of federally supported housing properties.

Youth Services

Provides and coordinates a continuum of services and programs for youth-at-risk to prevent delinquency and reduce the incidence of recidivism. Also strives to provide a clear sense of responsibility and accountability for all youth services in Hawaii.

A.1.13.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR HUMAN SERVICES
The future vision for Human Services is to apply state-of-theart technology to the fullest extent to accomplish the following critical business objectives and to address current state issues.
• Key processes: Eligibility determination and benefit issuance,

• Provide online access for consumers and modern

communication tools/applications such as texting, emailing, or tweeting.
• Explore the possibility of a new phone system (e.g., VoIP)

and telecommuting.
• Provide online access and depository for foster children

case management, procurement of health and human services, consulting contracts, fiscal management and reporting, budget management, program audit, quality control, IT support, and personnel management.
• Key process issue to improve: Dealing with lawsuits

and BESSD clients to save their vital records, photographs, employment records, resumes, etc., so that they have portable digital files/records.
• Ability to oversee, monitor, and audit service provision

related to lack of timely processing and backlog of people receiving benefits.
• New processes, working relationships, and interfaces need

partners. Need improved data about those companies providing services from either the State procurement system or DCCA.
• Better Access to Department (Gateway Portal). (Provides

to be addressed for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) such as an insurance exchange worked through DCCA.
• Treaty with Pacific Island Nations and impact upon DHS:

access to DHS both internally and externally [Fed partners].)
• Dashboard (Data Warehouse—not yet started). • Need language accessible services and disability access. • Medicaid staff are on a separate implementation of Lotus

people can freely migrate and the U.S. is required to provide State services, healthcare, and education to 7,000-12,000 people. This is an uncompensated cost of “Pending Review” a year.
• Department’s staff is geographically distributed in each of the

Notes which creates issues in communications with them and other DHS staff. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 29 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

counties (namely Oahu, Maui [including Lanai and Molokai], Kauai [including Niihau], and Hawai`i).
• BESSD, electronic forms, need help with language proficiency;

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

nine languages need to be supported in Hawai`i.
• Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act Compliance is required

due to constituency.
• Electronic consumer interface and management tools, with

website that is easy to navigate, and interfaces with various databases and systems to manage the work flow process more efficiently.

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services

73 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

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Figure 29: Human Services Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• State: B&F, DAGS, DOE, DOH (death records), DLIR, DCCA

providing services from either the State procurement system or DCCA.
• Electronic availability of demographic data, case load, reports,

(contractors), UH, DOD State Civil Defense
• City and County of Honolulu, County of Kauai, County of

Maui (includes Molokai and Lanai), County of Hawai`i
• State of Hawai`i Judiciary • US DHHS (Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services,

real-time fiscal (revenue and expenditure) information, DOH death records, and electronic records related to companies doing business with the State.
• VR works with the following departments but does not have

any information-sharing capabilities: – Department of Labor: VR is reimbursed approximately “Pending Review” per year by the Social Security Administration when SSI/SSDI recipients are employed. VR needs the client’s current wage information that DOL possesses. If VR were able to access the client’s wage information, the SS reimbursement rate would be greater. – Department of Education: VR works with DOE students with disabilities ages 14 -21. – Department of Health: VR works with adults and students with developmental disabilities and/or with mental health disabilities.
• Need an interface with Judiciary.

Administration for Children and Families – Office of Family Assistance, Child Care Bureau, and Head Start Bureau), USDA (Food and Nutrition Service), US DOI (Compact of Free Associated matters), SSA (income and eligibility verification)
• Multiple private for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. • Needs among the DHS Divisions and administratively attached

agencies as well. (Example: internal awareness of enrollment of a person in one program when they apply for another – when someone applies for a childcare license knowing that they are already registered as a foster care home.)
• Ability to oversee, monitor, and audit service provision

partners. Need improved data about those companies

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 74

A.1.13.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR HUMAN SERVICES
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

– Address document imaging and e-forms as well as portable devices to allow DHS staff to be more mobile in addressing routine tasks (e.g. child care licensing) and for responding to emergency disasters (e.g. emergency food stamps). – Explore the possibility of expanding the concept of telecommuting with the availability of portable devices. This would address some of the lease rental issues.
• Request for grant (“Pending Review”) from USDA to

INITIATIVES
• New MedQuest Eligibility System

demonstrate content and imaging via Xerox machines they already have.
• Implement new application and database (Maximo) to capture

– “Pending Reivew” new eligibility system to increase timeliness and transparency, electronically verify information, and interface with health insurance exchange, in alignment with Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Replaces current 23 year old system. Opportunity to establish and leverage enterprise application integration capabilities. – MQD has “Pending Review” budgeted to comply with the Affordable Care Act requirements by redesigning the eligibility system.
• Benefit, Employment, and Support Services Division BPR

inventory and manage civil defense emergency preparedness.
• New Purchase Order Log, in addition to the Hawai`i

Compliance Express, repository for procurement documents that are routinely needed to execute contracts and make payments. Investigate use of Maximo.
• Better Access to Department (Gateway Portal). (Provides

access to DHS both internally and externally [Fed partners].)
• Dashboard (Data Warehouse-not yet started). • Need language accessible services and disability access. • Medicaid staff are on a separate implementation of Lotus

Project – BPR evaluation of the existing financial assistance and SNAP eligibility process, redesign work flow processes for efficiencies in issuing benefits; address document imaging and e-forms and portable devices to allow DHS staff to be more mobile in addressing routine tasks (e.g. child care licensing) and for responding to emergency disasters (e.g. emergency food stamps); explore the possibility of expanding the concept of telecommuting with the availability of portable devices. Opportunity to establish and leverage enterprise capabilities in BPR methodology, mobile apps, and telecommuting.
• Replacement Applications Systems (BESSD, MQD, VR, SSD):

Notes which creates issues in communications with them and other DHS staff.
• VR virtual desktop environment • BESSD document imaging and content management • Short term/immediate needs:

– Old equipment and software – Routine repair and maintenance of hardware such as PCs, servers and routers need to be done or new equipment purchased – Purchase backup tapes for the mainframe – Basic software maintenance costs – Equipment and infrastructure needed for relocated staff due to the SSD consolidation and reorganization
• Longer term needs:

– Integration with Hawai`i Health Insurance Exchange – Hawai`i Prepaid Medical Management Information System (HPMMIS) enhancement/replacement – VR has just begun the process of procuring the services of a vendor to build an Automated Case Management System (ACMS). – SSD is in the intermediate stages of building their new Child Protective Services System. (Note: new development is being done with Ruby on Rails, SQL Server database, and .Net - all technologies that would be non-standard today.)
• Business Process Re-engineering Project. BESSD has hired a

– BESSD needs to review and assess the viability of the HAWI and HANA systems on the mainframe. BESSD needs to address the cost issues and the potential inability to maintain the legacy system as-is. – Online training would assist the Division in addressing staffing needs and ability of the Division to maintain operations. – Moving to the IFL and considering Cloud computing would address some cost issues.
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

consultant to evaluate the existing eligibility process pertaining to financial assistance and SNAP benefits and help redesign the work flow processes to accomplish the goal of issuing benefits in a timely manner with diminished resources:

75 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

– Long-term decision for MQD network and email; i.e., join DHS network or remain independent. (Medicaid staff are on a separate implementation of Lotus Notes which creates issues in communications with them and other DHS staff.) – SSD: Complete building and implement the new child protective services system (SHAKA) – SSD Adult Community Care Services Branch (ACCSB): CPSS data system needs to be replaced. Discussion is to have ACCSB data from CPSS included in CWSB’s new SHAKA information system. Cost estimate to modify SHAKA to accommodate ACCSB-APS information is not known.

The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 25 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

Table 25: Human Services LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Applications Alignment: Health Insurance Premium Rate HANA - Hawaii Automated Network for Assistance HAWI - Hawaii Automated Welfare Information System

Description

Cost

Notes

Re-Platform Database, Mandated & Productivity Enhancements

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review (Covered by HAWI O&M)

Status: Enhancement EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1 Status: Replace EA Compliance: 4 Priority: 1

Phase 1: Replace HAWI to meet new Federal ACA Requirements, “Pending Review” Phase 2: Move remaining programs from HAWI “Pending Review”

HAWI - Hawaii Automated Welfare Information System

Phase 1: Replace HAWI to meet new Federal ACA Requirements, “Pending Review” Phase 2: Move remaining programs from HAWI “Pending Review”

Status: Replace EA Compliance: 4 Priority: 1

HARI - Hawaii Accounts Receivable Information System

Supports the Entitlements & Benefits Overpayment Claims generated from HAWI, HANA, CPSS, etc.

Status: Use As-Is EA Compliance: 4 Priority: 3 Status: Replace EA Compliance: 4 Priority: 1

CPSS - Child Protective Services System

Supports the Child Welfare Services Abuse & Neglect, Foster Care and Adoptions Programs, supports the Adult Protective Services Adult Day Care, Foster Grandparent, Respite Companion Service, Nursing Home Without Walls, Developmentally Disabled/Mentally re (Project evaluation to determine a path forward) Supports the Assessment, Counseling & Guidance for Rehabilitative Services, Supported Employment Services, Job Placement, Services for the Blind and the Disability Determination (Title II and Title XVI) programs. hawaii.gov/missing-children (hosted by ICSD.)

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

VRISS - Vocational Rehabilitation Information & Statistical System

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Replace EA Compliance: 4 Priority: 1

Missing Children

Status: Use As-Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

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Name Department of Human Services Website

Description hawaii.gov/dhs (hosted by ICSD.)

Cost On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Status: Use As-Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Use As-Is

Adult Abuse and Neglect Registry Electronic Benefit Transfer Benefits Transfer Services

Covered by CPSS.

On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As-Is

Document Imaging and Content Management

Electronic Client and Case Folders

Status: In-Progress EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

POLog

Automate DHS Purchase Process

Status: Replace EA Compliance: 5 Priority: 1

Budget Creation & Tracking

Pilot to Automate DHS Budget Process

Status: In-Progress EA Compliance: 5 Priority: 1

HPMMIS

Pilot to Automate DHS Budget Process

Status: Enhancement EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Hawaii Housing Authority Accounting System (migration) LOB Infrastructure: New: DHS Portal Upgrade System Software Version and Enhance Functionality One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

PC Replacement

Meet immediate needs to replace and upgrade old equipment and software. Routine repair and maintenance of hardware such as PCs, servers and routers need to be done or new equipment purchased.

Status: Upgrade EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 30 and Figure 31.

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Figure 30: Human Services Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 2)

Figure 31: Human Services Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 2)

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A.1.14 EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS AND BENEFITS
The Employment Rights & Benefits line of business protects the economic security, physical, economic and social well-being of workers and supports good labor-management relations. This includes developing and disseminating labor market information and assisting job seekers, workers and employers to facilitate workforce development. Table 26: Employment Rights & Benefits LOB Business Services

LOB: Employment Rights & Benefits Service Name Workforce Development

Service Definition

Develops and maintains various partnerships with the private sector, educators, and labor unions to identify emerging employment trends and needed skill sets, technological advances, declining industries and economic issues. Assists job seekers (including disadvantaged, lowincome, dislocated, immigrant, and refugee residents), workers and industries by providing employment related services, including but not limited to, adult basic education, employment referral and placement service, job training that links qualified job seekers with employers. Develops grant proposals in coordination with other agencies to acquire additional resources to carry out employment and job training activities. Also involved in strategically planning for economic dislocations of workers in declining industries, making appropriate services available to dislocated workers. Provides career and jobs information online: HireNet Hawaii, Hawaii Workforce InfoNet (HIWI), greenjobshawaii.org, careerkokua.org, myfuturehawaii.org, Kumu Au (State Eligible Training Provider list), America’s Career ONESTOP, America’s Career InfoNet, My Next Move, the Hawaii Directory of Green Employers, and mySkills myFuture or O*NET OnLine.

Occupational Safety and Health

Provides Hawaii Occupational Safety and Health services and enforces that portion of HRS that regulates safety and health in the workplace. Adjudicates appeals from decisions rendered by the Director of DLIR relating to Boiler and Elevator Safety Law. Provides information that can help with research, business planning, job search and career decisions; produce data such as: wages, employment, unemployment, work injuries and illness, labor market information, career information, education and training, as mandated by the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) and HRS 373C; and Act 68 (SLH, 2010) to determine work shortages in the construction industry. Administers the Prepaid Health Care (PHC) laws by establishing necessary policies and guidelines for program effectiveness and efficiency; and conducting evaluations and developing procedures, standards, and methods to improve operational areas. Proposes legislative and rule changes to improve, clarify, or expand the PHC program. Administers the Prepaid Health Care Premium Supplementation Fund, by processing and directing payments to qualified disabled workers from the fund. Prepares and conducts statewide Chapter 91 PHC hearings. Conducts statewide activities related to PHC plans, appealed case management, insurance, statistical reports, computer inputs and outputs, payments and management of the PHC Premium Supplementation Fund and financial audits, and enforcement of the PHC laws and regulations. Administers the Prepaid Health Care (PHC) laws by establishing necessary policies and guidelines for program effectiveness and efficiency; and conducting evaluations and developing procedures, standards, and methods to improve operational areas. Proposes legislative and rule changes to improve, clarify, or expand the PHC program. Administers the Prepaid Health Care Premium Supplementation Fund, by processing and directing payments to qualified disabled workers from the fund. Prepares and conducts statewide Chapter 91 PHC hearings. Conducts statewide activities related to PHC plans, appealed

Labor Research and Statistics Analysis

Prepaid Health Care

Prepaid Health Care

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LOB: Employment Rights & Benefits Service Name

Service Definition

case management, insurance, statistical reports, computer inputs and outputs, payments and management of the PHC Premium Supplementation Fund and financial audits, and enforcement of the PHC laws and regulations. Prepaid Health Care Administers the Prepaid Health Care (PHC) laws by establishing necessary policies and guidelines for program effectiveness and efficiency; and conducting evaluations and developing procedures, standards, and methods to improve operational areas. Proposes legislative and rule changes to improve, clarify, or expand the PHC program. Administers the Prepaid Health Care Premium Supplementation Fund, by processing and directing payments to qualified disabled workers from the fund. Prepares and conducts statewide Chapter 91 PHC hearings. Conducts statewide activities related to PHC plans, appealed case management, insurance, statistical reports, computer inputs and outputs, payments and management of the PHC Premium Supplementation Fund and financial audits, and enforcement of the PHC laws and regulations. Administers the Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI) laws by establishing necessary policies and guidelines for program effectiveness and efficiency; and conducting evaluations and developing procedures, standards, and methods to improve operational areas. Proposes legislative and rule changes to improve, clarify, or expand the TDI program. Administers the TDI Special Disability Fund by processing and directing payments to qualified disabled workers from the fund. Conducts statewide activities related to TDI plans, appealed case management, insurance, statistical reports, computer inputs and outputs, payments and management of the TDI Special Fund and financial audits, and enforcement of the TDI laws and regulations. Includes the collection of contributions from subject employers and the payment of unemployment benefits to eligible persons in order to alleviate the economic hardships that result from loss of wage income during periods of involuntary unemployment. Also, conducts quasi-judicial hearings on appeals by claimants and employers relative to the DLIR’s decisions on unemployment benefit, coverage and related matters, and renders formal decisions to affirm, reverse or modify the department’s decisions. Assures a lawful working environment by equitably administering and enforcing the following labor laws: overtime, minimum wage, child labor permits, on-site drug testing, Hawaii family leave, payment of wages, illegal termination due to suffering a work injury, deduction from wages, lie detector tests, prevailing wages on Public Works, direct deposit, and breaks. Administers the Workers’ Compensation (WC) Law by establishing necessary policies and guidelines for program effectiveness and efficiency; enforcing the WC laws and regulations; and conducting evaluations and developing procedures, standards, and methods to improve operational areas. Proposes legislative and rule changes to improve, clarify, or expand the WC program. Administers the WC Special Compensation Fund (SCF) by processing and directing payments to disabled workers from the SCF. Conducts statewide case management activities related to WC claims, insurance, records management and control, statistical reports, computer inputs and outputs, payments and management of the SCF and financial audits. Conducts statewide activities related to WC guidelines on frequency of treatment and the qualification of health care providers. Prepares and conducts statewide administrative WC hearings. Adjudicates WC claims for benefits, coverage and related matters, and WC appeals from decisions rendered by the Director of DLIR pursuant to the State workers’ compensation law (Chapter 386, Hawaii Revised Statutes).

Temporary Disability Insurance

Unemployment Insurance

Wage and Standards Enforcement

Workers’ Compensation

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LOB: Employment Rights & Benefits Service Name Hawaii Labor Relations

Service Definition

Administers the Hawaii Employment Relations Act (HRS Chapter 377) and Collective Bargaining in Public Employment (HRS Chapter 89) by conducting union representation elections and adjudicating unfair labor and prohibited practice complaints. Also administers appeals to occupational safety and health citations issued by the DLIR Director under HRS Chapter 896. Investigates, conciliates, and litigates complaints of discrimination in employment, housing, public accommodations, and access to state services. Investigates, conciliates, and litigates complaints of discrimination in employment, housing, public accommodations, and access to state services.

Equal Opportunity and Civil Rights Enforcement Equal Opportunity and Civil Rights Enforcement

A.1.14.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS & BENEFITS
The future vision for Employment Rights & Benefits is to apply state-of-the-art technology to the fullest extent to: 1. Increase efficiency, effectiveness and productivity; 2. Expedite/facilitate and enhance delivery of service to clients/customers; 3. Maximize utilization of scarce resources (dollars and employees); 4. Minimize data redundancy and maximize information sharing across programs, divisions, offices and governmental departments/agencies;

5. Utilize the Internet capabilities in a secure environment; and 6. Aggressively protect confidentiality, security and integrity of data. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 32 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

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Figure 32: Employment Rights and Benefits Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
The Wage Standards Division (WSD) currently uses Disability Compensation Division’s (DCD) employer data to identify the correct employer in their investigations. In addition, WSD provides notification of unregistered employers that are found in the investigations to DCD and Unemployment Insurance (UI). The UI Division currently uses information from the State and National Directory of New Hires to insure that claimants are not receiving UI benefits while employed. The State’s child support agency processes the new hire reports received from Hawaii based employers. The UI Division also cross matches all new claims with the Social Security Administration to insure that the claimant’s social security number is valid. The UI Division provides all UI Benefit and Quarterly Wage information to the following agencies on a quarterly basis:
• Internal Revenues Service • Social Security Administration • National Directory of New Hires

• State Department of Labor Work Force

Development Division
• State Department of Labor Disability

Compensation Division
• State Department of Labor Research

The UI Divisions provides online access to the UI Benefit and Quarterly Wage information to certain agency staff of the Department of Human Services. The UI Division provides extracts of UI Benefit, UI Tax and/or Quarterly Wage information to the following agencies at regular intervals or as one-time requests:
• State Department of Taxation • University of Hawaii • Federal Department of

and Statistics
• State Department of Business Economic

Development and Tourism
• State Department of Transportation

HIOSH uses statistics compiled by the Research and Statistics Division and the Worker’s Compensation Division to schedule occupational safety and health inspections. The HCRC Enforcement Database is designed to capture information on complaint investigations, maintain records, and produce reports. The system interfaces with web-based U.S. EEOC IMS and HUD TEAPOTS databases. Labor Research and Statistics (R&S) Analysis information exchange:
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Homeland Security
• Federal Bureau of Investigation • State Attorney General • City and County of Honolulu Prosecutor

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

• Provides access to the Career Kokua website to schools and

• Unemployment Insurance (UI) Tax employer information that is

organizations statewide and to the general public. Surveys employers to gather updated occupational information. Surveys schools and training providers to gather updated training programs and related educational information.
• Ability to access data sources such as R&S, BLS, employer web

passed to the Employer file and shared by the DCIS. • Employer/MIF Database: that is shared with DC employer demographics.

sites, other state agencies such as DCCA, and other sources to gather occupational, employment, and industry data.
• R&S information for Quarterly Census of Employment and

A.1.14.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS AND BENEFITS
The DLIR programs are responsible for prioritizing and planning their initiative(s). Each of the DLIR programs will be supported by contracted consultant services and in-house IT support staff (EDPSO). Consideration will be given first to unemployment applications and secondly to disability compensation systems.

Wages (QCEW) program information is extracted from Unemployment Insurance (UI) Tax System and Quarterly Wage Reporting System (QWRS).
• R&S information for Local Area Unemployment Statistics

(LAUS) and Mass Layoff Statistics (MLS) programs are extracted from Unemployment Insurance (UI) Benefit System.
• R&S information on employment and wages for employers

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 27 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

covered under Hawaii Unemployment.
• Insurance; monthly job count, hours and earnings survey

data; potential mass layoff events, and summary reports on unemployment insurance claims are provided to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) under Cooperative Agreement. The Disability Compensation Information System (DCIS) uses the following data or information that is external to its environment:

Table 27: Employment Rights and Benefits LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Applications Alignment: Agent Reporting System

Description

Cost

Notes

The Agent Reporting System gathers information from the Internet system. This information is used for such things as calculating insured unemployment rates by county and producing reports detailing the characteristics of unemployment insurance claimants.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Child Support Enforcement Intercept

The Child Support Enforcement Intercept gathers information which will be used by the Department of the Attorney General, Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA). The project cross matches the DLIR-UI Benefit Master file against a CSEA individual file. The extract information is written to an extract file which is used by CSEA. The system was designed as a vehicle to cross match social security numbers obtained from the Department of Human Services (DHS), Vocational Rehabilitation and Services for the Blind Division and matched to the Unemployment Insurance wage record and employment data bases.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Cross Match of DHS & UI Wage & Employment Data Base

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

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Table 27: Employment Rights and Benefits LOB Investment Initiatives

Name ES-202 Employment and Wages Program

Description The ES-202 is a federal and state cooperative program between the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) and the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. This system extracts base information from the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Contributions file and generates mandated Federal reports on UI-covered employment, wages, and contributions. The ES-203 system is a federally mandated program of the Research and Statistics Office of the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR). This system extracts base information from the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Benefits system. The information is then used to produce tables used in reporting on the characteristics of the insured unemployed. The ETA-204 system is a federally mandated program of the Research and Statistics Office of the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR). This system provides the Research and Statistics Office with various reports concerning employer information such as total taxable wages earned, taxes paid, benefit payments made, total covered employees, and the employer’s status. Also, reports showing employers categorized statewide by account number, industry code, and island are generated. This application is part of a nationwide network. The system was designed as a vehicle for participating states to transmit Interstate Benefits (IB) Internet data from one state to another.

Cost One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Notes Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

ES-203

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

ETA-204 Research and Statistics System

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Interstate Benefit Internet

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Unemployment Insurance Benefits

The Unemployment Insurance (UI) Benefits system is a fully integrated system featuring extensive on-line update and inquiry facilities. This system automates most of the tasks involved in keeping track of UI Benefit claims. The system is designed to allow complex on-line inquiries, as well as the editing and validation of data before updating the files. The Quarterly Wage Reporting System services the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Division of the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations. The primary function of this system is the capture and maintenance of employee quarterly wage data for use and distribution by the UI Benefit and UI Tax systems. Other functions include controlled distribution to other qualifying agencies, penalizing non-compliant employers, and providing summary data for statistical evaluations.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Unemployment Insurance Quarterly Wage System

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

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Name Unemployment Insurance Tax System

Description The Unemployment Insurance (UI) Tax System will maintain the UI employer data base, track the accounting and collection of UI taxes, penalize delinquent employers, assist in the tracking of audits, assist the auditors in their functions, and maintain statistics for Federal and State reports. http://hui.ehawaii.gov/hui/app/ (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Cost One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Notes Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium (2) EA Compliance: Medium (2) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: Low (4) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: Low (4) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Hawaii Unemployment Insurance Express (Quarterly Wage Reports)

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Department of Labor and Industrial Relations

hawaii.gov/dlir (hosted by ICSD)

State Employment Security Fund

Supported by ICSD. - State employee security fund. Unemployment Benefits

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Federal Parent Locator

Supported by ICSD. Locating parents that are delinquent with child support

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Unemployment Insurance Interactive Voice Response System

Front end system which allows users to request benefits via telephone. (AIX Server/Client)

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Certificate of Age Registration System

Certificate of Age Registration System is operated from the director’s server and is a MySQL based program to take in requests and issue Child Labor Work Permits for minors ages 16 to 17

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

WSD Information Management System

WSD Information Management System is the division’s data base system for all hearings, wage investigations, child labor work permits for minors age 14 to 15 years old, and special minimum wage & payment of wages exceptions.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

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Name Disability Compensation Lotus Notes DCDNet Program

Description The DCDNet program is a client-server program developed to utilize data from the Division’s mainframe program (DCIS) to manage the WC case and hearings systems, and to provide robust and responsive management reports. This system was developed in response to the division’s IT Master Plan (2002) to migrate off of the mainframe (DCIS). The Disability Compensation Information System (DCIS) is a mainframe application that maintains case, claimant, entity, insurance and employer information for the Workers’ Compensation (WC), Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI), and Prepaid Health Care (PHC) programs. The DCIS provides a full range of real-time update/query and batch reporting capabilities and shares an employer data base with the information processing systems of the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Division. Supported by ICSD. This application is part of a nationwide network. The system was designed as a vehicle for participating state and federal programs to transmit data to a national database. The system is based on Unix programming language, is text based only with no graphics, icons or color. Data can be retrieved either through the system or by accessing a website, http://www.osha.gov. The Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS) is a federal and state cooperative program between the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) and the USDOL Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to produce total unemployment estimates for the state, counties and islands. These systems extract claims information from the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Benefits system. The main applications used to process data are PROMIS (see below), LAUSOne, and Stars. LAUSOne and Stars are web-based systems. LSS-Plus is a pc-based system that is being discontinued and replaced by LAUSOne. PROMIS is a pc-based system that uses claims data extracted from UI Benefits system and formats it for input to the LAUS program LAUSOne system and the MLS program WinMLS system.

Cost One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Notes Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: Low (4) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: High (2) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Disability Compensation System

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Hawaii Occupational Safety and Health Division

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Web App and Virtual Servers Priority: Low (4) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Local Area Unemployment Statistics

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: Low (4) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Program Management Information System

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Mass Layoffs Statistics

The Mass Layoff Statistics Program (MLS) is a federal and state cooperative program between the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) and the USDOL Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to produce data on mass layoffs. These systems extract claims information from the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Benefits system. The main applications used to process data are PROMIS (see below), WinMLS, MLSTRS and MLS-LTS. WinMLS

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

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Name

Description is a pc-based system and MLSTRS is an add-on application to WinMLS and MLS-LTS runs on a network server.

Cost

Notes

Alchemy Document Imaging and Management System

Alchemy is a pre-packaged software document imaging and management system used to reduce paper and manage document filing and retrieval.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3) Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Estimate Delivery System

The Estimate Delivery System utilizes data files from the SPAM output to produce customized employment and wage reports for the state, county, and support the ALMIS and Labor projection units.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Career Kokua, the Hawaii Career Information Delivery System

Career Kokua is the State’s statutorily authorized career information delivery system. It provides localized career and related educational information for career planning and career decision making. Career Kokua’s information and assessments are used by over 230 schools and agencies statewide. The Projections Suite software is used to generate both shortterm and long-term industry and occupational employment projections for the State and counties. It was developed through the PMP (Projections Managing Partnership) which is a partnership between the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (ETA), the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the National Association of State Workforce Agencies (NASWA), and the State Projections Consortium. The HIWI website provides labor market information for the State and counties which is utilized by employers, job seekers, career counselors, education providers, students, planners, and others. The web site is hosted by Geographic Solutions, Inc. (GSI)

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Projections Suite

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Hawaii Workforce Infonet

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (1) Status: Move to Web App & Virtual Servers Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Hawaii Directory of Green Employers

The Directory of Green Employers features information on local green employers. Employers themselves are able to post and update profiles that describe their operations, specify their core occupations, and describe the skills and education they want in employees. The web site is hosted by the Hawaii Information Consortium (HIC).

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

HireNet Hawaii

Capture all participant and employer data, produce federal, state, and local reports; develop and maintain job board with self-entry portals for employers and jobseekers.

Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is Priority: Medium (3) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

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Name In Progress: OCS Contract Tracking System

Description

Cost

Notes

Services (DHS), Vocational Rehabilitation and Services for the Blind Division and matched to the Unemployment Insurance wage record and employment data bases.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Direct Deposit of UI Benefit Payments

Provide claimants with the option of having their UI benefit payments directly deposited into their bank accounts. This initiative will result in increased productivity, reduce fraud, and improve the timeliness of delivering benefit payments to its claimants. Estimated implementation is 9/30/2012.

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

UI Online Appeals Filing and Scheduling System

Provide claimants and employers with the option of filing their appeals online. The system will also include an appeals scheduling system. This initiative will result in increased productivity and improve the timeliness of completing appeal decisions. Estimated implementation is 3/31/2013. Provide agency staff with a desktop application, which is an enhanced version of the internet application that claimants use to file their initial claims. This initiative will improve the timeliness of delivering initial claims filing services to claimants who report in person or use the telephone to file their claims. Estimated implementation is 6/30/2012. This project initiative is designed to help reduce administrative cost by developing an HCRC Enforcement database that is connect through a Web-based application that will electronically collect, process, file, store, track, and create reports from information captured on complaint investigations. HIOSH’s Boiler/Elevator Section has started a Web-based application project that will be hosted and developed by Hawaii Information Consortium (HIC). The application is designed to provide B&E inspectors with the ability to post schedules of their upcoming inspections. The web-based application will simplify the process to request inspection, view possible findings and make it easy to access archival or historical data. The application will also provide the B&E section with the ability to levy fees for their inspections. The cost for the development and the hosting of the webbased application by HIC will be paid by the fees collected. Inspectors in the entire division, not just B&E Branch, will be able to use mobile devices such as a Macintosh iPads to document and offload the inspection information to a collection database.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: v

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Internet Initial Claims Desktop Application

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Low (5)

HCRC Electronic Filing and Document Storage

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

HIOSH (Hawaii Occupational Safety and Health) Boiler/ Elevator (B&E) Web Development

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 88

Name New: Electronic Low Earnings Report System

Description

Cost

Notes

Enable employers to file their weekly low earnings report online instead of having to complete and submit hardcopy reports which agency staff must data enter into our UI benefit system. The system will also notify employers who have not submitted their reports in a timely manner. This initiative will result in increased productivity, reduce fraud and improve the timeliness of making benefit payments to its claimants. Status: In the process of selecting a vendor via RFP. Enable agency staff to modify employer tax records to include partially transferring employer experience rate information and to assess penalties for violating employer reporting requirements. This initiative will result in increased staff productivity in administering the UI Tax laws. Status: In the process of acquiring the services of a vendor. Enable employer to submit their Separation Information online instead of having to complete and submit hardcopy reports that agency staff must review. This initiative will result in increased productivity, reduce fraud and improve the timeliness of making benefit payments to its claimants. Is designed to help reduce administrative and operational cost by developing a Collective Bargaining (CB) web-based application that will electronically collect, process, file, store, and track documents and also integrate with the Appellate Court’s JIMS and JEFS systems. This application will allow for electronic processing of complaints, decisions, orders and reports. Additionally, it will allow parties to file and receive documents including complaints, answers, motions replies, exhibits and to receive Board notices, decisions and orders and to review a trial and conference calendar. This project initiative will help HLRB to reduce administrative and travel cost to conduct hearings remotely using video conferencing and to digitally record the hearings. It will also enable non-Oahu employees to reduce their travel costs generated by filing a prohibited practice complaint and non-Oahu employees who are subpoenaed to testify before the Board. Safety, Health and Consultation & Training Branches have NCR/Informix database collection systems that are currently uploaded to a mainframe on the East Coast. This is an old system that is text based. During the new 2 -3 years the system will be migrating to a web application. The transition is being managed by OSHA, the Federal agency that partially funds the state program through grants. Computer requirements for the web application may or may not be compatible with State systems.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Unemployment Tax (SUTA) Dumping

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

State Information Data Exchange System (SIDES)

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

HLRB Electronic Filing and Document Storage

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

HLRB Video Conferencing and Digital Recordings

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

HIOSH Safety, Health and Consultation & Training Migration to Web-Based Application

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

89 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Name LIRAB Electronic filing and Document Storage

Description This project initiative is designed to help reduce administrative and operational cost by developing a Workers’ Compensation (WC) web-based application that will electronically collect, process, file, store, and track documents and integrate with the Appellate Court’s JIMS and JEFS systems and DCD (Disability Compensation Division). This application will also allow for electronic processing of claims, reports, and treatment denials or approval. Additional capabilities of the WC web-based application: Allow secure access for WC litigants to access trial and conference calendar and to view case files; and Capability to send text message reminders to WC litigants of upcoming conference and trials. The LED system is a partnership between the DLIR and the Census Bureau to produce quarterly workforce indicators for the counties in Hawaii, create maps and tabulations. The system extracts wage records from the UI Quarterly Wage Reporting System (QWRS).

Cost One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Local Employment Dynamics

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Dashboard Analytics App Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (1)

Workforce Longitudinal Data System

The WorLDS is a statewide longitudinal data system to provide greater information about the state’s workforce, education, and training. WorLDS will integrate data sets from within the DLIR, DHS, DOH, Public Safety, County Workforce Development Programs, and non-profit agencies. These data sets will also be integrated with the UH and DOE. The Construction Building Permits Database will collect data from all counties in the state to help with the inspection scheduling of construction sites. One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Construction Building Permits Database

iQ System

Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program processing system will be updated from a mainframe application to a web-based system called iQ in summer 2013. The MLS-LTS provides an automated and standardized method of analyzing layoff events for longer-term impact of such dislocation on employment and wages. Hawaii is part of a pilot program developing this system for potential deployment of a nationwide system.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Mass Layoff Statistics – Longitudinal Tracking System

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: Alternative Site for UI IVR and Internet Servers (In Progress) Relocate the UI IVR and Internet servers to the basement of the State Kalanimoku Building in order to eliminate a single point of failure for UI’s critical Internet and IVR claim filing systems in its current location in the Keelikolani building. This initiative will enable agency staff in remote offices to continue to process claims and tax information and enable claimants to continue to access critical unemployment claim filing and benefit payment services in the event of One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Low (5)

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 90

Name

Description a power outage in the Keelikolani building. Estimated implementation is 12/31/2012. Estimated cost is “Pending Review.”

Cost One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

DCD Network and Data Migration

This is a network and data migration of the existing wide area network (WAN) to a virtualized platform WAN and upgrade of the Domino server and SQL applications. The purpose of this engagement is to provide comprehensive network and data migration of an existing WAN to a virtualized platform WAN and upgrade of its Domino Server and SQL applications. The Contractor will be replacing and upgrading the existing server environment for the State of Hawaii, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Disability Compensation Division (DLIR DCD). The current information technology environment is a client-server setup that primarily runs a Windows Server system, with adjunct Linux servers. Upgrading our server applications is critical as the DLIR DCD utilizes a proprietary Domino application that interfaces with Microsoft SQL and Lotus Enterprise Integrator. The new LAN/WAN system will be a Virtualization Platform, replacing all servers in the present setup. Contractor will be designing, specifying, configuring, testing, installing, documenting, training, and deploying the hardware components, utilizing Windows 2008 R2 Enterprise, Active Directory, virtualization software (VMware, vSphere 5), application software (Domino 8.5, SQL 2008 R2, Office 2010). The contracting will also be migrating existing data to a new environment and backup system. The DLIR DCD Domino/LEI application presently is running Domino 6.5 and LEI 6.5 on a Windows 2000 Advanced server platform and must be upgraded to the latest version, which are presently Domino 8.5 and LEI 8.5. The application is written in Lotus Script and uses its agents extensively. The Domino/LEI application database interfaces with a Microsoft SQL server using it as a back-end database. The Contractor will also be recommending and installing other new features that would be appropriate to expand or leverage Domino/ LEI capabilities.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Low (5)

DCD Replacement/Virtualization for Servers, Network Equipment, PC Client Equipment

This project is to replace the division’s PCs, Printers, Servers, and Network Switches with equipment that will create a virtual environment.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

WSD Workstations/ Server Upgrade

This project will replace existing aged workstations, laptops, and server to include the upgrading of existing Microsoft systems. It will also include the procurement of new types of IT equipment or hardware to support the daily office activities such as educational workshops, seminars, and meetings.

91 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Name WDD IT Equipment Updating

Description Desktops, laptops, network printers, servers, and other peripheral equipment will be replaced as they age and funds become available.

Cost One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

New: HIOSH Inspectors’ Desktop and Laptop Procurement The branch must also obtain 11 more desktop CPU computers or docking stations and plan to get laptops for inspectors. One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 33 through Figure 35.

Figure 33: Employment Rights and Benefits Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3)

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 92

Figure 34: Employment Rights and Benefits Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3)

Figure 35: Employment Rights and Benefits Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3)

93 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

A.1.15 EDUCATION
The mission for the Department of Education is for all public school graduates to:
• Realize their individual goals and aspirations;

• Possess the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary to

contribute positively and compete in a global society;
• Exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship; and • Pursue post-secondary education and/or careers

Table 28: Education LOB Business Services

LOB: Education Service Name Primary, Secondary Education

Service Definition

The provision of facilities, teachers, curriculum, and supplies to educate children in grades Kindergarten to 12th grade The provision of facilities, teachers, curriculum, and supplies to educate people in vocational trades and crafts. Promotes the education of the adults, including both earned and unearned benefit programs.

Vocational Education

Continuing Education

A.1.15.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR EDUCATION
The future vision for the Education LOB is to apply state-of-theart technology to the fullest extent to accomplish the following critical business objectives and to address current state issues.
• To begin to use SharePoint beyond it simply being used to it

by the Governor; the last appointment was May 2011.) so as to optimally support the education and management of Hawai`i’s school system. Hawaii’s school system is unique among the states and serves more than 178,000 students (255 regular schools, two special schools, and 31 charter schools). Hawai`i’s school system is approximately the tenth largest school system in the nation.
• Hawai`i’s state Board of Education formulates policy for the

being maximized for collaboration and reporting/coordination for Race to the Top. As well as to effectively implemented Kronos as a time and attendance solution and has created a payroll module to feed the ICSD payroll application.
• The DOE collects comprehensive metrics and feedback from

their Centralized Support Desk on services provided. The DOE uses a balanced score card approach to measure performance against strategic plan targets and to be able to hit the targets and performance measures outlined.
• OITS uses Solar Wind’s Orion Network Management System

public schools and state library system. DOE is treated almost independently in that they do their own building and grounds maintenance (not DAGS Central Services); they also do their own procurement functions with only some oversight from the Office of Procurement.
• For DOE to build a new data center in the cafeteria of an old

to monitor traffic in the Wide Area Network (WAN). To have a fully implemented and functioning BMC Remedy system for used along with Atrium Configuration Management Data Base (CMDB), which is part of BMC’s Remedy system, was purchased but not fully implemented.
• Centralizing on Cisco equipment as well as effectively

elementary school that has space available for ICSD to use as an alternate site (Phase 1 will house 2,000 to 3,000 square feet with Phase 2 expandable to 5,000 square feet). With a DOE CIO has advisory council of key CIOs in the public and private sectors that meets monthly to review plans and strategies and to provide their opinions and recommendations.
• A seamless teaming relationship between DOE and UH

implementing video conferencing between schools to maximize teaching talent and student-to-teacher ratios.
• Two data centers (one primary and one backup; McKinley

has and continues to improve both organizations. DOE is looking closely at UH Google Mail and Apps deployment as a model for them. Along with the Superintendent is extremely engaged and involved in IT governance/ direction setting within the Department. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 36 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

High School is the backup, and the primary is in the DOE Building on Miller Street), plus ICSD and space within a third-party data center.
• The superintendent or CEO is appointed/hired by the

interface architecture

Board of Education (BOE). (The BOE is now appointed

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 94

• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB

services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 36: Education Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• UH – graduates from DOE as Federal grant partners. • Other critical interfaces are with the Department of Human

A.15.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR EDUCATION
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

Services (DHS) and Department of Health (DOH) to be able to understand a child’s holistic environment and better serve the student to achieve goal One. (This interface is not as robust as it should be.)
• Department of Hawai`i Homelands (DHHL) from a cultural

basis relative to DHHL’s mission.
• Other critical interfaces on the non-mission side are with the

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 29 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism to understand changes to community environments.
• Budget and Finance from a budgeting perspective. • DAGS and its Office of Accounting (FAMIS, payroll, warrants)

and to some extent the Office of Procurement.
• Office of Hawaiian Affairs.

95 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

The implementation roadmap should include:
• Longitudinal Data Enterprise Solution

• New financial system, specifically an ERP solution, is on top

of the DOE list (leveraging Gartner Study from 2009 and upgrading the specifications).
• Building out a new primary data center. • Organization is pursuing a form of electronic signatures via

– DOE and UH working a longitudinal solution (e.g., DOE, UH). Multiple organizations must provide information/files in order to ensure accurate and complete longitudinal reporting as required by Federal grants. Assess how to more effectively collect longitudinal information in an automated manner from a truly enterprise perspective.

two pilot projects.
• Organization is pursuing a form of electronic signatures via

two pilot projects.

Table 29: Education LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Applications Alignment: T-SEAS Substitute Teacher System

Description

Cost

Notes

SubstituteTeacher Finder/Call-Out System based on priority lists -Owned by HR

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Use-As-Is Priority: 5 EA Compliance: 5

PDE3 Professional Development System

Course Registration and Tracking for Professional Development (Subscription License including license usage, hosting, and maintenance/enhancements. Supports race to the top initiatives. Transaction system for student enrollment, demographics, attendance, grading, report cards, etc. (Replacement strategy will replace as part of an integrated Instructional Improvement System (IIS)) Integrates student data from multiple student information systems in use at DOE regular schools and charter schools. Transaction Case Management System for all student support services and interventions. (Replacement strategy will replace as part of an integrated Instructional Improvement System (IIS)) System for classroom teachers to develop and deliver formative assessments based on standard assessment item banks. (Replacement strategy will replace as part of an integrated Instructional Improvement System (IIS)) Statewide high stakes annual student assessments (What do the students know?) Replaced strategy : DOE is part of the National Smarter Balanced Consortium which is developing a common assessment content and delivery platform that Hawaii will adopt. Collects and stores on-going data for students, employees, financial information, facilities, etc. and provides analytics and dashboard/business intelligence.

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Enhancement Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

Student Information System (eSIS)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Pending Review

Replace Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

Statewide Student Enrollment System (SSES) Electronic Comprehensive Student Support System (eCSSS)

Use-As-Is Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3 One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Replace Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Data for School Improvement System (DSI)

Hawaii State Assessment

Replace Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

Data Warehouse/Longitudinal Data System

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Upgrade Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 96

Name e-HR

Description Human Resource Management System for certificated (teachers & principals) classified, support services personnel (Replaced eventually with State’s future ERP system) On-line purchasing, payments, fixed assets, cash receipts, and DOE general ledger accounting system. (DB2)

Cost Annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Replace with DOE ERP Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3 Replace with DOE ERP Priority: 4 EA Compliance: 3

Financial Management System (FMS)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review See DOE ERP. Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Budget Execution and Preparation System

Budget Execution and Preparation System (Replacement cost included in DOE10)

See DOE ERP. Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Replace Priority: 4 EA Compliance: 3 Use-As-Is Priority: Pending Review EA Compliance: Pending Review

Financial Reporting System (FRS)

Data from financial and budgeting systems are populated in a DOE data-warehouse. This is modern technology that will be a bolt on to a new ERP.

Lotus Notes

Provides email, central workflow, school newsletters, lunch counts, etc. Facilities maintenance and build project management system

Maximo

In Progress: SIF-Operational Data Store School Interoperability Framework compliant ODS/Enterprise Service bus One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Pending Review Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

DOE Enterprise Portal

DOE Enterprise Portal WEB based site structure for internal and external communications. (Race to the top funding)

Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

1DOE Identity Management/ Single Sign-On

Implementation single sign on and identity access management for all core DOE data systems

Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

Electronic Signature

Organization is pursuing a form of electronic signatures via two pilot projects The Superintendent has just launched a data governance council.

Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3 Estimated Labor by hours and loaded rate

Data Governance Council

Annual O&M: Pending Review

New: Longitudinal Data Enterprise Solution DOE and UH working a longitudinal solution (e.g., DOE, UH). Multiple organizations must provide information/files in order to ensure accurate and complete longitudinal reporting as required by Federal grants. Assess how to more effectively collect longitudinal information in an automated manner from a truly enterprise perspective. One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

97 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Name Financial Management System

Description New financial system, specifically an ERP solution, is on top of the DOE list (leveraging Gartner Study from 2009 and upgrading the specifications)

Cost One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

LOB Infrastructure In Progress: School Networking Upgrading the network in every school over the next 3 years – 3 schools per month (wireless is also part of the equation) Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

New: Data Center Building out a new primary data center One-time DME: Pending Review Priority: 1 EA Compliance: 3

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 37. The following items should be considered by the enterprise for the future state initiatives:
• FMS – current financial system (interfaces via FTP transmittals

• Educational Focused Systems: DSI (Learning Management),

eSIS (Student Information Management), eCSSS (Student Case Management), FMS (ERP Financials and Procurement) and K-12 LDS (Longitudinal Data Analysis)
• Maximo for facilities repair and capital dollar tracking • Replacement of E-HR system to recruit and hire teachers,

to FAMIS and Payroll)

aides, and administrators

Figure 37: Education Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 98

A.1.16 HIGHER EDUCATION
The primary mission of the University is to provide environments in which faculty,

staff and students can discover, examine critically, preserve and transmit the knowledge, wisdom, and values that will help ensure the survival of present and

future generations with improvement in the quality of life.

Table 30: Higher Education LOB Business Services

LOB: Higher Education Service Name Higher Education – Educational Capital

Service Definition

Increase the educational capital of the State through the provision of education and training beyond the secondary level including community college through graduate and professional programs for degrees, certificates and lifelong learning Increase the role and impact of research and innovation in expanding and diversifying the state’s economy and addressing the challenges that face Hawaii today

Higher Education – Economic Development

A.1.16.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
Hawaii’s citizens have a high level of educational attainment, our workforce is globally competitive, and research drives our economy and provides solutions to our communities’ challenges.
• Innovative technologies for teaching and learning (UH

• New building being built for IT organization. • UH has constitutional autonomy.

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
State Government: Department of Accounting & General Services Information and Communication Services Division Budget and Finance Research Corp of the University of Hawaii Department of Human Resources Development Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Employees Retirement System Department of Attorney General-Child Support Enforcement Agency Federal Government: Various federal agencies depending on multiple funded research projects Private Sector: Various financial institutions Other: Various universities

focus area).
• Uses real-time web conferencing (Adobe Connect Pro); also

has conventional H.323 videoconferencing.
• Has VoIP (Avaya). • Has WiFi authentication service for laptops, smart

phones, PDAs.
• Establishing an advanced broadband capability. • ICSD does their payroll and DHRD helps with

miscellaneous hiring.
• Dr. Greenwood created the President’s Advisory Council on

Hawai`i Innovation and Technology Advancement.
• Key research university with involvement in High Performance

Computing and Internet2.
• Dr. Lassner chairs the Business Process Committee (BPC)

at UH: – Meets once a month; canceled if no agenda items. – In existence for six years. – Members: CFO, Budget, HR, Controller, VP Admin, Disbursing, and IT. – Right level of authority and representation to make actionable decisions. – http://www.Hawaii.edu/bpc/.
99 | State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

A.1.16.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

INITIATIVES
The initiatives are structured to address the following key needs:
• Cloud: moving to Google for email and calendaring for 80,000

• IT-enablement of research “big data:” high-performance

computing; data visualization; analytics; support of economic development; suite of technologies and interactive distance learning. FY13/14
• 100% hit rate on ARRA broadband grants: faster connections

students, faculty, and staff; working to shut down current email system later this year; students moved to Google mail in February 2011.
• Financial system: Java, web-based; switching to new system

to mainland and now connecting schools, libraries and UH sites on all islands at gigabit speeds and- need to check with DOE and library for counting purpose FY13
• Security: Information security program has implemented

July 1, 2012; Kuali is the new system which is open source and web-enabled; already used by Michigan St., Cornell, Colorado St., USC, and the University of Arizona. Significant enhancements slated for upcoming FY13.
• Research administration: The Kuali Research Administration

training, server registration, scanning and remediation for identified risks.
• Document imaging is on the future plan.

system (Coeus) was implemented in November 2012. Interface with the financial Kuali towards the end of FY13/14.
• Web enablement initiatives: get applications off the

The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 31 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

mainframe including leave accrual; 100% hit rate on grants and delivering on those, especially with broadband; information security. Redesigning system wide portal to include mobile access FY13/14
• Data governance: System wide data governance effort

underway within the University/ coordinates with DOE Data Governance FY13. Table 31: Higher Education LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: e-Mail Migration

Description

Cost

Notes

The University is moving to Google for email and calendaring for 80,000 students, faculty, and staff; working to shut down current email system later this year; students moved to Google mail in February 2011 with the rest of the University moving in late FY13 Java, web-based; switching to new system July 1, 2012; Kuali is the new system which is open source and webenabled; already used by Michigan St., Cornell, Colorado St., USC, and the University of Arizona. The Kuali Research Administration system (Coeus).

Pending Review

Google higher education offering

Financial Management System

Pending Review

Labor participation in Kuali

Research Administration

Pending Review

Labor participation in Kuali Labor

Data Governance

System wide data governance effort underway within the University also coordinates with DOE Data Governance

Pending Review

New: Web Enablement Initiative Migration of web applications off the mainframe including leave accrual. Pending Review

State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan

Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 100

Name Document Imaging LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: ARRA Broadband Grant

Description Document imaging capability for the University

Cost Pending Review

Notes

Faster connections to mainland and now connecting schools, libraries and UH sites on all islands at gigabit speeds. Information security program has implemented training, server registration, scanning and remediation for identified risks ongoing. Pending Review Labor

Cyber Security

New: Big Data IT-enablement of research “big data:” high-performance computing; data visualization; analytics; support of economic development; suite of technologies and interactive distance learning. Pending Review Industry number

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 38. The following items should be considered by the enterprise for the future state initiatives:
• Cloud: moving to Google for email and calendaring for 80,000

• Data governance: System wide data governance effort

underway within the University/coordinates with DOE Data Governance FY13, labor
• IT-enablement of research “big data:” high-performance

students, faculty, and staff; working to shut down current email system later this year; students moved to Google mail in February 2011.
• Financial system: Java, web-based; switching to new system

computing; data visualization; analytics; support of economic development; suite of technologies and interactive distance learning.FY13/14.
• 100% hit rate on ARRA broadband grants: faster connections

July 1, 2012; Kuali is the new system which is open source and web-enabled; already used by Michigan St., Cornell, Colorado St., USC, and the University of Arizona. Significant enhancements slated for upcoming FY13.
• Research administration: The Kuali Research Administration

to mainland and now connecting schools, libraries and UH sites on all islands at gigabit speeds and- need to check with DOE and library for counting purpose FY13.
• Security: Information security program has implemented

training, server registration, scanning and remediation for identified risks ongoing 3FTE +1.
• Document imaging is on the future plan.

system (Coeus) was implemented in November 2012. Interface with the financial Kuali towards the end of FY13/14.
• Web enablement initiatives: get applications off the mainframe

including leave accrual; 100% hit rate on grants and delivering on those, especially with broadband; information security. Redesigning system wide portal to include mobile access FY13/14.

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Figure 38: Higher Education Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.1.17 PUBLIC HEALTH
The Public Health LOB strives to eliminate disparities and improve health of all groups throughout the state. This LOB provides direct services to “at risk” population and other community groups, as well as, providing supporting services related to Health. This LOB is moving

from a reactive focus (driven largely by federal funding) to a more strategic approach for all of its business services. The table below describes each of the business services provided by the LOB. Note: DOH has developed additional details on its business and information management solutions for public health

and environmental management in the DOH Business Services and Data Systems Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) Diagrams and the Public Health Domain Matrix for IT Systems and Initiatives. These documents are provided in the Supplemental Addendum links at the end of this section.

Table 32: Public Health LOB Business Services

LOB: Public Health Service Name Health Systems Planning and Development

Service Definition

• Develops and maintains strategic planning for health systems, planning, development and implementation • Adult Mental Health Services: Provides a comprehensive, integrated mental health system supporting the recovery of adults with severe mental illness both, inpatient and outpatient. • Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services: Provides mental health services to children and youth through a system of care that includes both school-based services provided by the Department of Education (DOE) and an array of more intensive mental health services contracted by the Department of Health (DOH) Child and Adolescent Mental Health Division (CAMHD).

Health Services for at Risk Underinsured Populations

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LOB: Public Health Service Name

Service Definition

• Developmental Disability Services: Planning, coordinating, monitoring, evaluating, advocating, and reporting on behalf of individuals with DD; engages in advocacy, capacity-building, and systems change activities to improve system of care for DD individuals. • Developmental Disability Services: Planning, coordinating, monitoring, evaluating, advocating, and reporting on behalf of individuals with DD; engages in advocacy, capacity-building, and systems change activities to improve system of care for DD individuals. • Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Services: Provides the leadership necessary for the development and delivery of quality substance abuse prevention, intervention and treatment services for the residents of the State of Hawaii. • Dental Health Services: Develops public policy to help assure adequate access to basic dental care and through the development and implementation of early detection, disease prevention and treatment programs targeting high risk populations. • Public Health Nursing Services: Administers the public health nursing services through the Public Health Nursing Sections, statewide. The staff is made up of Public Health Nurses, who are Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, Para-medical Assistants, and Health Aides in the public schools, and clerical support staff. • Family Women and Children Service: Reduces health disparities for women, children, and families of Hawaii. Programs provide core public health services which include: assurance activities through contract monitoring; systems development through mobilizing community partnerships and coalitions; monitoring health status, service delivery and utilization; and developing strategies to improve health status • Women Infant Child and Nutrition Services: Provides Hawaii residents with nourishing supplemental foods, nutrition education, breastfeeding promotion and health and social service referrals through the federally funded Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). Participants of WIC are either pregnant, breastfeeding, or postpartum women, and infants and children under age five who meet income guidelines and have a medical or nutritional risk. Safeguards the health of low-income women, infants and children ages 1-4 who are at nutritional risk; provides supplemental food, nutrition education and referral to health care and other social services. • TB/STD/Aids Hansen (Screening/Registry): Monitors the number of cases of tuberculosis and Hansen’s disease, and other transmittable diseases (such as STDs and AIDS). • Primary Care in Rural Health: Coordinates local, state and federal resources to improve primary care service delivery and workforce availability to meet the needs of underserved populations. Monitoring Health Events and Health Forecasting • Epidemiological Services: Provides epidemiological profiles for substance abuse prevention. • Vital Records Registry: Maintains Vital Records. Issues marriage, birth, death certificates, and civil unions. • Health Surveillance: Health Case Management - Assists people with developmental disabilities and/or intellectual disabilities, and their families or guardians by tracking cases. Health Related Quality Assurance and Control • Emergency Medical Services: Minimizes death, injury, and disability due to life threatening situations by assuring the availability of high quality emergency medical care through the development of a system capable of providing coordinated emergency medical and health services.

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LOB: Public Health Service Name

Service Definition

• Licensing / Accreditation and Certification • DCAB - American with Disabilities Act (ADA) Support • EOA – Elderly • SHPDA - Service Delivery • OEQC – Environmental Impact • OHCA – Health Care Facilities • Community Relations: Facilitates community coalition building and partnership mobilization with volunteer organizations. Emergency Preparedness and Response • All Hazards: Monitor and respond to hazards. • Disease Outbreak Control: Works together to monitor, investigate, prevent, and control infectious diseases in Hawaii, especially those preventable through immunizations, and to ensure Hawaii’s ability to respond to emergencies that threaten the public’s health; works to strengthen the relationships between the Department of Health and other partners including laboratories, hospitals, schools, emergency response agencies, private organizations, and the military. – Disease Surveillance: conducts investigation, surveillance, prevention, and control of general communicable diseases of public health importance. Monitors incoming disease reports for occurrence of unusual or rare diseases, disease clusters, and outbreaks in the community. – Immunization: Provides immunizations for qualifying children; those with no health insurance, have Medicaid or QUEST, or those whose health insurance does NOT pay for childhood immunizations, or your child is American Indian or Alaska Native, your child may qualify to receive free/low cost shots through the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program. Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention • Chronic Disease: Chronic disease Prevention, management and control services that focus on risk areas of nutrition, physical activity and tobacco; chronic disease areas of asthma, cancer, diabetes, heart disease and stroke; conducts public health surveillance, data analysis and programmatic evaluation. • Injury Prevention and Control: Provides statewide leadership in preventing death and disability associated with injuries in Hawai‘i. This is accomplished by educating, supporting and mobilizing individuals and organizations to incorporate comprehensive injury prevention strategies in their on-going efforts. • Healthy Lifestyle: Educate and promote healthy lifestyles (Healthy Hawaii Initiative). • Behavioral Risk Reduction: Provide services to assist in the care of children with Special Health Care Needs. Children with Special Health Care Needs are children who have or are at risk for chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional conditions and require health and related services beyond that required by children generally.

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A.1.17.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH
The future state vision for Public Health needs to correct the following problems:
• liminate duplication of data in disparate databases E • liminate duplication of functions within applications E • liminate or reduce the manual efforts to generate paper E

where applicable; Need to migrate toward more Web 3.0 applications/services especially for public facing applications
• Using integrated strategy regarding Microsoft Exchange,

SharePoint, and Office; upgrading and maintaining software to the latest levels.
• Increased use of video conferencing and facilitate increased

reports and interim files for distribution by manually generated emails to other departments in the state
• liminate or reduce the replication of databases in E

external locations
• educe the manual implementation of generating and R

use of video streams where appropriate to increase frequency of mental health services while reducing travel cost especially in remote areas: for example, Behavioral Health is developing/ piloting TeleHealth using telepresence to provide psychiatrists in group therapy; catalyst for sharing to provide care for kids in Special Ed
• Providing an interface point for Electronic Medical Records

forwarding federally required, periodic reports
• educe overall risk to the state in terms of disaster recovery R

and protection of personally identifiable information (PII) used on a daily basis. The IT needs for managerial, clinical, case workers, providers within the Public Health LOB envision aggressive use of EMR initiatives and the enterprise infrastructure to play a major role in meeting the state’s goals for health transformation. The Health Information Systems Office (HISO) is working with the DOH Director’s Committee and the Department Executive Committee to ensure a shared vision for how IT can support their mission and that IT is moving forward to improve the technical infrastructure, SOA, systems, network, and the end user access. This includes:
• Standards-based enterprise architecture • SOA and web services deployed and continue to migrate to

(EMR) especially Client EMR; creating information exchange capability by providing a single point of entry to Public Health from and to related LOBs as well as approved external organizations such as, HHIE.
• Migrate to Electronic Bank Transfer (EBT) especially for WIC

services and migrate to a web-enabled approach.
• Integrate social media into public information dissemination/

education with assigned staff to maintain the information and keep it current
• Increase use of video and audio files to share information. • Enhance Vital Records to ensure that organizations within the

state are notified upon death and other changes in vital status as appropriate
• Use of SharePoint (underway) to increase collaboration and

and improve the SOA vision defined for Public Health
• DOH stores and utilizes personally identifiable information (PII)

document sharing/tracking, documentation management.; increase user-developed applications that can leverage the capability of SharePoint
• Expand the use of server virtualization • Investigate Cloud solutions for some services; explore

on a daily basis, likelihood of breaches; DOH has information assurance/security policies in place that are well-documented (based on HIPPA guidelines). (See DOH Security Policies and Procedures.) (HISO is sharing these policies and procedures with other Departments); need to continue to improve and enforce security and privacy protections.
• Improve project management, tracking and oversight of 206

replacing HISO bank of servers in the Cloud
• Work with Hawai`i Broadband Initiative to migrate DOH frame

relay sites to high-speed connections
• Begin strategic move to paperless environment and automate

Agency contractors and more than 10,000 vendors
• Need DR for all critical applications and services; DOH has

document workflow and tracking.
• Improve intranet; improve outlying offices’ connectivity • Upgrade Department website • Cell phone consolidation • Incorporate enterprise social networking policies, procedures,

replication sites but not a formal disaster recovery plan; DOH relies on real-time data to perform critical tasks that have farreaching implications for the public
• Approximately 50% of the Department’s applications

are COTS; would like to increase this number and lessen customization
• Microsoft ASP .NET is the primary development environment

and training to facilitate appropriate use of social networking (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 39 below. Two key features of this solution include:

and Oracle ADF is secondary. SharePoint is also used as a portal framework and development environment

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• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture.
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

“services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

facilitates application assembly through reusing application

Figure 39: Public Health Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Critical interfaces with organizations

– Federal: CDC, HRSA, DOE, ACF, SAMSHA, CMS, USDA, FEMA, EPA, FDA, and the Army Corps of Engineers – Private: HI Primary Care Assoc., HI Disease Surveillance Assoc. of Hospitals, Health/Human Service Organizations, HI Medical Assoc., Papaolokahi Child Care Centers, Substance Abuse Treatment |Coalition, and the Mental Health Assoc. of Hawai`i – Non-profits: Hawai’i Health Information Exchange (HHIE), Hawai’i Health Systems Corporation (HHSC).
• Systems that interface with other

and stakeholders is broad and farreaching; encompasses coalitions, working groups, businesses, non-profits and others making up the health care community, environmental protection, and human services safety net. Interfaces include: – State: Human Services, Public Safety, Education, Defense, DLNR, DAGS, B&F, DHRD, HHSC, DHHL, SCD, UH/ JABSOM, SPH, DOA, DBEDT, and the DOT. –City and County: Kauai, Maui, Hawai`i, Honolulu: Emergency preparedness and emergency response

– Client Tracking: Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement from DHS assists HI State Hospital with understanding treatments/needs of people. – Immunization Records: School entrance requirements. – Need increased access to data: – Hospital and community health data – Insurance/claims data – County-level data – DOE student data – DHS Medicaid and child welfare data.

State agencies: – Vital Records: tracks births, marriages, and deaths.

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• Other important interfaces:

– Program accomplishments/success stories, best practices, and case studies – Current/future sponsored conferences, speaker sessions, trainings, public meetings and events – Employee dialog and views on public health initiatives.

providing useful data to support public health professionals, the community and health agencies to become more effective in the application of health data. – One of the most successful data sharing initiatives in the State – opportunity to establish as a pattern for broader adoption.
• Syndromic Reporting

A.1.17.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

– Data mining and real time analysis of cases reported across Hawaii medical facilities for early warning and health response.
• Public Health Social Media Applications

– Integrate social media into public information dissemination/education
• Vital Records

INITIATIVES
The initiatives for Public Health strive toward the Strategic Vision for this LOB outlined in the Department of Health Strategic Plan (need to get correct reference). The initiatives support the following objectives:
• Health IT

– Provide increased automation and data sharing with other LOBs; especially automatic notifications of deaths to all applicable systems – Electronic Verification of Vital Events (EVVE); HI is one of eight states participating in the national initiative. The needed initiatives for LOB solutions are outlined in Table 33 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

– Health information technology initiative to improve the quality and efficiency of health care through electronic health record (EHR), in alignment with Federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Opportunity to establish and leverage enterprise application integration capabilities.
• Hawai`i Health Data Warehouse

– Strategic initiative to standardize the collection and management of Hawai`i’s health data; dedicated to

Table 33: Public Health LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: MAVEN

Description

Cost

Notes

Replace PHS3 as the Disease Surveillance System

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review/year DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review over next 3 years (Pending Review/year)

Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High

ELR

Replace Current Electronic Lab Reporting

Hawaii Immunization Registry (HIR)

Increase participation in Hawaii Immunization Registry and modify system to conform to CDC new requirements

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Name Behavioral Health Management Information System (BHMIS/AVATAR/ ECURA) Child Adolescent Mental Health Information System (CAMHIS) eVista WEB Information for Treatment Service (WITS)

Description Upgrade electronic medical records system to an EMR certified version

Cost DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High

Upgrade electronic medical records system to an EMR certified version

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review/year

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium to Medium High

Implement WITS to be in compliance with Federal Funding Requirements

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

TB Screening / Registry (TIMS/TBMIS) Vital Statistics System (VSS)

Replace DOS based system with a WEB based system

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

Upgrade client server based system to web based and virtualize servers General support for existing applications

Production Alignment

New: HIEAMHD Health Information Exchange interface for DOH Electronic Medical Record for AVATAR Health Information Exchange interface for DOH Electronic Medical Record for eVista Syndromic Surveillance Information Exchange for Meaningful Use Electronic Lab Reporting Information Exchange for Meaningful Use Immunization information exchange for Meaningful Use DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review/year Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High

HIECAMHD

HHESS

HIEELR

HIEHIR

WICEBT

WIC System Replacement to a Web Based one with Electronic Benefit Transfer Capabilities Socio-ecological Assessment System using the Hawaii Health Data Warehouse Mobile Apps for reporting Health irregularities

HEQSYS

Mobile Apps

LYNC Integration

Integrate and Implement LYNC capabilities with MS Exchange and SharePoint

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Name eBirth

Description Upgrade eBirth Application

Cost DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review/year

Notes Priority: High EA Compliance: High

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: None Known New: None Known

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 40 through Figure 42. In addition, Public Health LOB solutions have critical needs for the following new Enterprise-wide Solutions:

• Enterprise Mission Support Services – Case Management • Enterprise Common Services - Collaboration tools (e.g.

SharePoint and Workflow tools) and Analytics
• Enterprise Data Management Services – Data definition and

Data warehouse services

Figure 40: Public Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3)

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Figure 41: Public Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3)

Figure 42: Public Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3)

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A.1.18 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH MANAGEMENT
The mission for Environmental Health Management is to protect and improve the environment for all people in the State of Hawaii. The strategic goal of this LOB is to create social and physical environments that promote and support good health.

Note: DOH has developed additional details on its business and information management solutions for public health and environmental management in the DOH Business Services and Data Systems Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) Diagrams and the Public Health Domain Matrix for IT Systems and Initiatives.

Table 34: Environmental Health Management LOB Business Services

LOB: Environmental Management Service Name Air/Water (Clean, Safe Drinking, Waste) Solid (Hazardous, Waste) Monitoring

Service Definition

Protects the environment, workplace, air, food and water. Provides consumer protection, hazardous material and solid waste management, risk surveillance which includes Clear Air, Clean Water, Safe Drinking Water, Waste Water, and Solid Hazardous Waste. Conducts laboratory testing in support of environmental and public health programs statewide. Provides consultation, licensing, and other related laboratory services focused on environmental health and communicable disease control provided to various federal, state, city, county, and private organizations; also, conducts research, laboratory science investigations, and participates in emergency response efforts such as bioterrorism preparedness and monitoring air quality effects of volcanic activity. Works with agency such as the EPA to determine compliance with Clean Air and Clean Water Acts and to request variances as appropriate; Provides compliance tracking and enforcement of EPA standards. Includes: • Regulatory Enforcement: Assists small businesses to overcome the hurdles they face in their efforts to succeed in business while following environmental regulations. • Hazard Evaluation & Response Services: Provides leadership, support, and partnership in preventing, planning for, responding to, and enforcing environmental laws relating to releases or threats of releases of hazardous substances.

Public Health Laboratory

Variance Permitting

Environmental Health Services Permitting / Inspection & Compliant Tracking / Enforcement

Protects the environment, workplace, air, food, and water. Provides consumer protection, hazardous material and solid waste management, risk surveillance which includes Food and Drug, Noise Radiation Indoor Air, Sanitation, and Vector Control. Includes: • Food and Drug • Sanitation • Vector Control • Noise Radiation • Indoor Air Permitting • Inspection & Compliant Tracking • Enforcement

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A.1.18.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
The future state vision needs to factor in the following considerations:
• Standards-based enterprise architecture • SOA and web services deployed • Lack of DR for all critical applications and services • Relies on real-time data to perform critical tasks that have

Expand/facilitate SharePoint initiatives; Continue to build on the SharePoint intranet portal; Continue to leverage features that promote document sharing and collaboration; More user-developed applications that can leverage the capability of SharePoint.
• Expand the use of server virtualization • Investigate Cloud solutions for some services; explore

replacing HISO bank of servers in the Cloud
• Work with Hawai`i Broadband Initiative to migrate frame relay

sites to high-speed connections
• Begin strategic move to paperless environment and automate

far-reaching implications for the public
• Microsoft ASP .NET is the primary development

document workflow and tracking.
• Improve intranet; improve outlying offices’ connectivity • Upgrade Department website. • Cell phone consolidation. • Facilitate increased use of video streams • Create social networking policies, procedures, and training

environment and Oracle ADF is secondary. SharePoint is also used as a portal framework and development environment where applicable.
• Using integrated strategy regarding Microsoft Exchange,

SharePoint, and Office
• OITS uses SolarWinds’ Orion Network Management System

(e.g., Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 39 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user interface

to monitor traffic in the WAN
• Permits and Licensing: ePermitting System soon to

be released.
• Complaints Tracking, Compliance Enforcement. • Integrate social media into public information dissemination/

architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

education with assigned staff to keep information current
• Increase use of video and audio files to share information. • Use of SharePoint (underway) to increase collaboration and

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

document sharing/tracking, documentation management;

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Figure 43: Environmental Health Management Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Critical interfaces with organizations and stakeholders is broad

• Increased access to data: – Hospital and community health data. – County-level data. – Program accomplishments/success stories, best practices, and case studies. – Current/future sponsored conferences, speaker sessions, trainings, public meetings and events. – Employee dialog and views on public health initiatives.

and far-reaching; encompasses coalitions, working groups, businesses, non-profits and others making up the health care community, environmental protection, and human services safety net. Interfaces include: – State: Human Services, Public Safety, Education, Defense, DLNR, DAGS, B&F, DHRD, HHSC, DHHL, SCD, UH/JABSOM, SPH, DOA, DBEDT, and the DOT. – City and County: Kauai, Maui, Hawai`i, Honolulu: Emergency preparedness and emergency response. – Federal: CDC, HRSA, DOE, ACF, SAMSHA, CMS, USDA, FEMA, EPA, FDA, and the Army Corps of Engineers. – Private: HI Primary Care Assoc., HI Disease Surveillance Assoc. of Hospitals, Health/Human Service Organizations, HI Medical Assoc., Papaolokahi Child Care Centers, Substance Abuse Treatment Coalition, and the Mental Health Assoc. of Hawai`i.

A.1.18.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

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INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 35 below.

Table 35: Public Health LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: Air Monitoring Reporting System

Description

Cost

Notes

Capture air quality data for statewide reporting of air quality. (Air Data Management System (ADMS)) Public Health Domain: Environmental Health Monitoring and Reporting Provides online permit & licensing applications

O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

ePermitting System

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High

Hawaii Environmental Information Exchange (HEIX)

EPA exchange network allowing the exchange of Hawaii a regulated environmental data with EPA and other states. Public Health Domain: Environmental Health Monitoring and Reporting Profile of every environmental interest in Hawaii from facilities to sites with special viewer for water quality and safe drinking water. Public Health Domain: Environmental Health Monitoring and Reporting Add environmental sample testing into this laboratory management information system Food establishment Inspection and complaint tracking

Hawaii Environmental Health Warehouse (HEHW)

O&M: Pending Review/ year

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

Starlims Environmental Lab Testing Inspection and Complaint Tracking System Water Pollution Control System (WPC)

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High

Application to manage Pollutant elimination systems and Water Quality Certification including permit complaints, inspections, and enforcement processing. Manages the process of testing analyzing and reporting drinking water quality throughout the State’s water testing points A reference library data base of every environmental impact statement in Hawaii. Public Health Domain: Permits and Licensing Food establishment Inspection and complaint tracking

O&M: Pending Review year

Safe Drinking Water Information System

O&M: Pending Review year

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)

O&M: Pending Review year

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

Inspection and Complaint Tracking System New: Complaints Tracking and Compliance Enforcement of Environmental Variances

O&M: Pending Review year

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

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Name Hazardous Evaluation and Emergency Response Information Systems LOB Solutions: In Progress: Clean Air Branch Management Information Systems Upgrade to the Environmental Health Data Warehouse to implement a public facing version of the existing EHDW Safe Drinking Water Information System phase II - Sample collection and Reservation System LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: None Known New: None Known

Description

Cost DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: High EA Compliance: High

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review/ year DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review/ year

Priority: High EA Compliance: High Priority: High EA Compliance: High

DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing initiatives is depicted below in Figure 2.

Figure 44: Environmental Health Management Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 2)

Figure 45: Environmental Health Management Transition & Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 2)

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A.1.19 AGRICULTURE
Agriculture line of business works to support, enhance, and promote Hawai`i’s agriculture and aquaculture industries and is responsible for animal quarantine, plant, and pest control, and are a resource for travel and shipping information. The business services are described in the table below. Table 36: Agriculture LOB Services

LOB: Agriculture Service Name Plant Quarantine and Importation Control

Service Definition

Protects agricultural industries, natural resources, and the public of Hawai`i from the entry and establishment of detrimental plants, animals, insects, weeds, and other pests through inspections and certification programs. Also, provides service for fee inspections for the seed industry. The service involves field and seed inspections to preserve genetic purity and identity. Protects the public and animal population from potentially serious health problems associated with the introduction and spread of rabies and other agents through its Animal Quarantine program. Prevent, detect, diagnose, control and eradicate livestock and aquaculture diseases in order to promote the health and economic well-being, marketing and export of Hawai`i’s livestock, poultry and aquaculture industries and their products. Surveillance for regulatory diseases is conducted routinely to identify diseases which constitute a threat to the State’s animal industries and public health. Reviews brand applications and approves brands after determining that the brand is not the same or similar to others that are registered and provides book of brands. Branding continues to be the most practical and approved means by which cattle ownership is determined. Administers the Agricultural Loan Program and the Aquaculture Loan Program to promote agricultural and aquacultural development of the State by providing credit at reasonable rates and terms to qualifying individuals or entities. Through the establishment of a revolving loan fund, credit is made available by supplementing private lender sector loan funds or by providing direct funding. Provides assistance in the marketing of quality agricultural commodities through local, domestic and international programs and activities, promotes the economic viability of commercial agriculture in Hawai`i by sponsoring joint marketing programs for agricultural products with high revenue growth potentials. Administers the Seal of Quality program. • Looks after the interests of the consumer by inspecting and grading commodities in wholesale and retail establishments assisting in the marketing of quality agricultural commodities and promotion of fair trade and honest business practices. Assists in the development of agricultural industries through quality assurance of agricultural commodities; licensing of dealers in agricultural products; and milk producer price and quota control to maintain stability within the dairy industry. • Assures accuracy of measurement, packaging, labeling and pricing of commercial goods to prevent unfair practice. Works to minimize losses to both the buyer and seller in transactions of goods or services based on a measurement process or quality standards enforced by the Measurement Standards Branch such as “Made in Hawaii” products, scales, gasoline, taximeters,. Octane levels, and pricing at grocery stores.

Animal Quarantine and Importation Control

Animal Health

Brand Registration

Financial Assistance – Agricultural Loan

Agricultural Development

Quality Assurance Commodities and Measurement Standards

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LOB: Agriculture Service Name Plant Pest Control

Service Definition

Eradicates, contains, or controls pests of plants which could cause significant economic damage to agriculture, our environment, and quality of life. This is achieved through statewide programs using chemical, mechanical, biological, and integrated control measures to eradicate or control plant pests, including insects and mites, mollusks, weeds, and plant pathogens. Regulates the manufacture, sale, and use of pesticides in the State of Hawaii Regulates to ensure safety and availability of important pesticides. Charged with preserving land and water resources to sustaining agricultural operations and ensure the viability of Hawai`i’s diversified agricultural industry. Operates the State’s Agricultural and Non-Agricultural Park Lands Program and the State’s Irrigation Systems to assist people who are interested in leasing land for farming ventures by providing reasonably priced farmland and agricultural water to encourage competition within the industry. There are currently over 1,000 parcels of leaseable land and/or parcels receiving irrigation water. Facilitates and coordinates the development and expansion of Hawaii’s agricultural industry by directly participating in the shift from plantation-based production and infrastructure to a multi-farm/multi-crop industry.

Pesticides

Agricultural Resource Management

Agribusiness Development

A.1.19.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR AGRICULTURE
The following represents the foundational elements for the Agriculture LOB future state:
• Provide better tools to enable the IT staff for this LOB to

• Implement and facilitate collaboration to participate more

efficiently in research (pesticides, insect identification, etc.) with the University of Hawai`i.
• Improve Business processes and use technology to reduce

work seamlessly with ICSD, contractors (under maintenance contracts), and other IT staff in other Departments increase efficiency of IT support
• Implement new technologies effectively to enable access to

the amount of paper used and provide more efficient use of storage and retrieval.
• The DOA would like to implement online submittal of forms

agriculture services to a wide diversity of people across the state. One example is how to provide access for poor farmers.
• Enable common internal business functions and remove

and payments similar to DCCA. Programs. Areas that would benefit include Animal Quarantine (quarantine fees) and Plant Quarantine (permits and inspections). Currently, only the Animal Quarantine Branch accepts credit card payments.
• The DOA is very interested in adopting a system used in CA

variation in the processes from division to division.
• Facilitate more private sector/businesses that are industry

because it tracks produce statistically; food safety is Federally mandated so a process must be developed; Invicta is working toward this.
• Foster and facilitate the vision to lessen HI’s dependence

partners with them to co-develop solutions.
• Need more inspection facilities; sometimes producers wait too

long to get an inspection.
• Improve web development and phase out Plone – the tool that

is used to manage the State’s websites (difficult to use and they get a lot complaints about it).
• Develop more efficient ways to reduce the manpower required

on imports, UH/College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) have been tasked with developing a statistical analysis of imports and the economy. People want to buy locally grown produce, but farmers have to make money or it won’t work.
• Transfer ARMIS accounts to DLNR’s SLIMS. HDOA user

to check scanners and scales in stores to see if correct pricing, correct labeling, and product measurements/weights are accurate.
• Facilitate more efficient ways to calibrate scales, taxi meters,

accounts were setup and training was conducted but work to establish customer accounts was not done. SLIMS is more comprehensive and will improve land management and inventory of State’s land.

and gas pumps.

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• Develop more public-facing web applications to get

• Introduce and expand the use of AutoCad and GIS capability

information out to the community (e.g. farmers markets, product available, agricultural regulations) and better web management; currently treated like an afterthought.
• Investigate and implement Cloud solutions for some services. • Expand the use of server virtualization. • Need failover for all applications supporting critical services

to help improve irrigation, dams, reservoirs, etc.
• Introduce use of social media such as, Facebook and Twitter.

The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 46 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user interface

architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

such as, food safety inspections.
• Enable receipt and processing of online payments for existing

applications.
• Increase use of mobile technologies and strategies for the

inspectors in the field.

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 46: Agriculture LOB Future State Solutions Architecture

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INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Agriculture interfaces with Federal government agencies

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 37 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

especially USDA and provides a number of reports to them.
• Agriculture interfaces with Federal government agencies

especially USDA and provides a number of reports to them.
• Agriculture interfaces with Land and Natural Resources

A.1.19.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR AGRICULTURE
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

Table 37: Agriculture LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: Invicta

Description

Cost

Notes

The Invicta system supports the agricultural permit and inspection process in the State of Hawaii. Logs inspection results, allows online access to permits conditions and provides statistics to assist administrators in monitoring daily activities. (.net) A Food Safety RFID pilot system that is currently operational at Armstrong Produce; tracks food temperature.

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-High

ColdChain

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium

Department of Agriculture

hawaii.gov/hdoa Plone; Hosted by ICSD; hdoa.info@hawaii.gov

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Pesticides Registrations (PESTREG)

Registration processing of pesticides in Hawaii.

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Dealer Licensing

Processing of Dealer licensing for Commodities.

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Brand Database

Compilation of registered livestock brands mandated by law. Generates Brand Book with brand images and index. Report published to the web. Compiles data generated from tests performed at the Veterinary Laboratory.

Annual O&M: Pending Review

Veterinary Laboratory Information System

Annual O&M: Pending Review

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Name Hawaii Agricultural Food and Products Database

Description Searchable database of producers, wholesalers of Hawaii’s food and products. (Created by ICSD from HDOA’s Access Database) Inventory records uploaded from DAGS and allows inventory managers to indicate users, location and/or actions regarding an item. Keeps track and saves telecom requests and disposal requests submitted to DAGS.

Cost Annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium

HDOA Inventory

Annual O&M: Pending Review

HDOA Property Management

Annual O&M: Pending Review

New: Agriculture Resource Management Information System (ARMIS) Customer information and accounting for Ag park and irrigation systems. Updates payments and prints invoices. Databases include Waimea Irrigation, Honokaa/Paauilo Farms, Honokaa/Paauilo Livestock, Molokai Irrigation, Non-Ag Parks, Ag Parks, Waimanalo Irrigation. Customer information and accounting for ag park and irrigation systems. Databases include Ag Loan General, General Fund Emergency Loans, Kauai Task Force Loans, North Kohala Loan & Grant, Hawaii Ag Products, Aquaculture, Act 19 Sugar Loan, and Special. Individual Pet/owner information and accounting for the Animal Quarantine Station. Databases incl. Animal entry information, Quarantine Operations, Accounts Receivable, animal veterinary qualification data for quarantine programs (incl. vaccination, rabies). ASO APPX Applications Conversion and Enhancement One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-High

Agricultural Loan Management System (ALA)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-High

Animal Quarantine Information System (AQSIS)

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-High

ASO APPX

One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review

Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-High

WINWAM

Weights and Measurements application to monitor Taxi Meters, track and license devices. (APPX Client/Linux Server) COTS: WinWam/Datahouse

Priority: Medium EA Compliance: Medium-High

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: Agriculture LAN Conversion Conversion from Novell/Linux to Microsoft AD One-time DME: Pending Review Annual O&M: Pending Review Priority: High EA Compliance: High

New: None

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 47 through Error! Reference source not found.. In addition, Agriculture LOB solutions have critical

needs for the following new Enterprise-wide Solutions:
• GIS • Mobile technology • Computer aided Design tool

• Web 3.0 capability • Cloud solution • Social Media Policies and access • Training (current training for IT staff

ends in 2014)

Figure 47: Agriculture Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

Table 38: Land and Natural Resources LOB Services

LOB: Land and Natural Resources Service Name Boating and Ocean Recreation

Service Definition

Registers vessels, trailer stickers, commercial boating permits, and event permits. Vessel registration system, accounts receivable system. Processes Conservation Land Use Applications, enforces violations of uses in conservation district (usually by contested case now starting Civil Resource Violation System). Approximately 2 million acres falls into the conservation district, not all of it is State lands and not all State lands are conservation either. Responds to administrative penalties as enforcement officers for State lands. Enforcement Management Information System, utilizes DLNR radio system.

Conservation & Coastal Land Services

Conservation and Resources Enforcement

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LOB: Land and Natural Resources Service Name Aquatic Resources

Service Definition

Manages three programs: (1) Commercial Fishery and Resources Enhancement, (2) Aquatic Resources and Environmental Protection, and (3) Recreational Fishery. Issues commercial fishing licenses, freshwater fishing license, aquarium collection permits, various other collecting permits, and receives commercial catch reports. Manages 5 major program areas: (1) Forestry, (2) Wildlife, (3) Native Ecosystems Management, (4) the Na Ala Hele Trail system, and (5) Fire management. Management jurisdiction includes approximately, 1,000,000 acres of Forest Reserves, Wildlife Sanctuaries, Game Management Areas, and Natural Area Reserves and approximately 1,000,000 acres of private lands in watersheds partnerships. In addition, has regulatory jurisdiction and authority statewide for the protection of terrestrial wildlife and endangered plants. For these services, issues commercial trail permits, NARS and Forest Reserves access permits, collecting permits, Habitat Conservation Plans, Forestry support services (CREP, etc.), Forest Reserve camping permits, wildlife sanctuary permits, land acquisition, legacy land program grants, support services for watershed partnerships. Manages 3 major program areas: (1) Architecture, (2) Archaeology, and (3) History and Culture. Responsible for reviewing approximately 6,000 projects annually with the potential to affect a historic resource. Also keeps a register of historic properties, inventory, and surveys, public library (all need to be available electronically to the public.) GIS, intake system. Manages 1.3 million acres of state lands, database is critical to keep track of leases, E.O.s to other departments, etc. Also processes lease applications, beach wedding applications, and shoreline certifications (working with OCCL). Also serves as an office of record dating back to the Great Mahele of 1848. Surveys state lands to keep accurate records for land management. Land Information Management System, Land trust information system Manages 3 programs (1) Water and Land Development, (2) Mineral Resources development, and (3) Prevention of Natural Disasters. The Water and Land Development program is responsible to update the State Water Projects Plan as required under the State Water Code (Chapter 174C, HRS) and provides administrative support to the 16 soil and water conservation districts. The Mineral Resources program is responsible for the effective management of geothermal resources. The Prevention of Natural Disasters administers programs for Dam Safety, National Flood Insurance (NFIP), and General Flood Control. The Engineering division also coordinates CIP with the divisions and contractors. Records property transactions, and public records. The Bureau of Conveyance is the States sole recording office for deeds, mortgages, assignments, modifications, notices of lien, releases of lien, uniform commercial code financing statements, security agreements, judgments and decrees from courts, military discharge papers (DD-214), Federal and State tax liens, child support enforcement liens, satisfactions and releases of such liens. The Bureau staff examines, records, indexes and digitizes Regular System and Land Court documents and maps; issues Land Court Certificates of Title; certifies copies of matters of record; and researches uniform commercial code information. Records an average of 370,000 documents per year. Records system Manages the State Parks system; includes 67 state parks and other areas of responsibilities that encompass nearly 34,000 acres ranging from landscaped grounds with parking areas, rest rooms and other developed facilities to wild land areas and cultural sites with only trails and primitive facilities. Issues permits to individuals for recreation use includes camping permits, group gathering permits, photography/film permits, in some cases access is by permit only (e.g. Kaawaloa at Kealakekua Bay). Also, issues concession contracts/permits for commercial uses. Parks reservation system.
Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A

Forestry & Wildlife Management

Historic Preservation Services

Land Management Services

Natural Development Engineering Services

Bureau of Conveyances Property Records

State Parks Services

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LOB: Land and Natural Resources Service Name Water Resource Management

Service Definition

Protects, conserves and enhances the water resources of the State through wise and responsible management and provides for the maximum beneficial use of water by present and future generations. Performs data collection, inventory, assessments and long term planning and regulates and protects water resources by responding to petitions for new and manage water use in existing designated water management areas, issues permits for well construction, pump installation, water use, stream channel alterations, and stream diversion works statewide, and investigating complaints and violations. Water management reporting system.

NOTE: Land Survey Services was removed from the Land and Natural Resources LOB due to organizational alignment issues. All the business services above are within DLNR, and the Land Survey Services business service is in DAGS. The potential overlap of common land management functionality resulting in duplicative and non-interoperable information system investments should lead to greater cooperation and coordination across these two related areas.

implement systems currently in development; meet FCC radio requirements for narrow banding; increase the network bandwidth for remote offices; and develop the geographic information system to provide greater management capabilities and services to the public. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 48 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

A.1.20.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
Technology services will continue to coordinate the computerization of departmental business functions;

interface architecture.
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 48: Land and Natural Resources Future State Solutions Architecture State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan Enterprise Architecture | Appendix A | 124

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
Receives and provides information to the public and government agencies.

• Establishing FCC narrowbanding

• Under development/recently deployed:

compliance for DLNR’s radio system; used to provide enforcement to the State’s natural resources.
• DLNR uses GIS for program decision

A.1.20.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

making, participated in the statewide strategic planning process for enterprise GIS and OIMT’s working group and plans to develop GIS interfaces to DLNR databases as well as mobile technologies.
• DLNR uses HIC for a variety of

Bureau of Conveyances’ electronic recordation and management system; Boating’s accounts receivable system; Conservation and Resources Enforcement’s electronic management information system; Water Resources’ well reporting system; Public land trust information system.
• Provide data replication through

virtualization and storage area networks.
• A new initiative is to acquire in-house

INITIATIVES
• Utilizes DRFortress as a disaster

transaction-based web applications providing online services to the public; HIC receives a portion of the collected fee and is also paid by DLNR; HIC has created more than 10 systems for DLNR.
• Systems development projects in

business analysts and application. developers. The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 39 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

recovery off-site location. The second stage consists of developing a business continuity structure that will create a network system for backup and remote accessibility utilizing replication and virtualization services in an effort toward real-time data retrieval.
• Implemented a Polycom HDx8000

progress for enhanced automation of division programs.
• Improve the network infrastructure

in the areas of bandwidth, services, and security. There are more than 40 remote sites using DSL; upgrading to an Ethernet solution to increase work productivity.
• Expand the Civil Resource Violation

statewide video conferencing system including the RMX2000 bridge, which serves as a backup to ICSD’s bridging capabilities. In the process of expanding video conferencing sites on the neighbor islands.

System to improve compliance with State laws and rules protecting Hawai`i’s natural resources, in support of the Office of Civil Compliance.

Table 39: Land and Natural Resources LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Applications Alignment: Payroll Database DLNR

Description

Cost

Notes

Fiscal backend database, monitors payroll funding source / DLNR

One-time DME: (in ERP) On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: (in ERP) On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Replace with ERP EA Compliance: 1 Priority: 1 Status: Replace with ERP EA Compliance: 1 Priority: 1

Automated Revenue Accounting System

ICSD

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Name Time and Leave System for DLNR

Description Lotus Notes leave reporting system / ICSD

Cost One-time DME: (in ERP) On-going annual O&M:Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review

Notes Status: Replace with ERP EA Compliance: 1 Priority: 1 Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Recreational Freshwater Game Fishing License

Online freshwater fishing license. https://www.ehawaii.gov/ dlnr/fish/exe/fresh_main_page.cgi. (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Commercial Fisheries Licenses & Permits

Online commercial fishing license. https://dlnr.ehawaii.gov/ cmls-fr/app/license-search.html. (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Conveyance Recording

Land recording. Every land Real Estate Transaction is recorded via this application. https://boc.ehawaii.gov/ landlink. (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC. )

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Conveyance Documents Search & Order

Online land title records search and ordering. https://boc. ehawaii.gov/docsearch/nameSearch.html. (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Uniform Commercial Code Recording

Online UCC financing statement recording. https://boc. ehawaii.gov/ucc-recording/index.html. (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Vessel Registration

Online vessel renewals. http://vessel.ehawaii.gov. (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Civil Resource Violation System

Online citation or case status / HIC - Very Large. Integrate department’s permits and licensing systems with Civil Resource Violation System.

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Well permit applications & forms

Online water resource forms / DLNR

Status: Use As Is – Web page EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Hunter Education Student & Exceptions Database

Conservation and Resources Enforcement backend database Hunter Ed course, ID, FW use / DLNR

FEMA Flood Designation

Engineering, public properties with GIS to reduce future flood risks in hazard areas / DLNR

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3

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Name

Description

Cost On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Priority: 1

NFIP: National Flood Insurance program

Engineering assessment tool for plain management of Federal, State & local flood regulations, ordinances and a newsletter / DLNR

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

NaAlaHele Commercial Hiking Permits

Online trail and access system. http://hawaiitrails.org. (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Reports to City Tax Office

Additions, deletions, changes to encumbrances on State land / DLNR - Older Oracle database and report generation application. Tied to SLIMS

Status: Replace EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Appropriation Ledger

This batch system produces monthly fiscal reports for DLNR from tapes produced by FAMIS. The system provides Operating Fund and CIP reports on expenditures, appropriations, allotments, & encumbrances by division cost center and project levels / DLNR https://boc.ehawaii.gov/LandShark. (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Replace with ERP EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

BOC Subscriber Services

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Commercial Marine Licensing System

http://dlnr.ehawaii.gov/cmls (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Online Hunting Licenses

http://hunting.ehawaii.gov (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Land Use Permits

http://dlnr.ehawaii.gov/permits (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Land Use Permits

http://dlnr.ehawaii.gov/permits (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Statewide Camping Reservation System

https://camping.ehawaii.gov/camping/welcome.html (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

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Name Department of Land and Natural Resources

Description www6.hawaii.gov/dlnr (hosted by ICSD)

Cost One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Commission on Water Resource Management

hawaii.gov/dlnr/cwrm. (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation

hawaii.gov/dlnr/dbor. (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Division of Forestry & Wildlife

www6.hawaii.gov/dlnr/dofaw. (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Historic Preservation Division

hawaii.gov/dlnr/hpd. (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Maui Forest Bird Recovery Project

www6.hawaii.gov/dlnr/mfbp. (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands

www6.hawaii.gov/dlnr/occl. (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands

www6.hawaii.gov/dlnr/occl. (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Registration Index System Land Court System DLNR Legislative Tracking System

Not used - Retired Not used - Retired “The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Legislative Tracking System is based on the Department of Business Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) Lotus Notes Legislative Tracking System / ICSD Supported by ICSD. One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

FAMIS Vendor Database

Status: Replace with ERP

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Name

Description

Cost On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1 Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Correspondence Log DLNR

Tracks all correspondence via the Chairperson’s Office / DLNR

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Track Referrals, Activities, and Correspondence for DLNR

“The Track Referrals, Activities, & Correspondence (TRAC) system monitors items requiring a response, records various activities within the organization, and logs notices received/ sent / ICSD

Status: Replace with Central Legislative Tracking System EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3 Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Accounts Receivable System

Boating commercial licensing and fees for small boat harbors / HIC In-Progress - Automate Boaters Fees and Licensing for payment on-line. See Harbor Pro/BARS.

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

In Progress: Enforcement Management Information System Conservation and Resources Enforcement System / DLNR One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Harbor Pro/ BARS

http://dobor.ehawaii.gov (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Enforcement Management Information System

Systems development projects in progress for enhanced automation of division programs. Enforcement IMS, Water Resources Well Reporting, and HIC Web Based applications Expand the Civil Resource Violation System to improve compliance with State laws and rules protecting Hawai`i’s natural resources, in support of the Office of Civil Compliance. HIC Supported - Need to add additional HIC applications to the Violation System Under development/recently deployed: Bureau of Conveyances’ electronic recordation and management system; Boating’s accounts receivable system; Conservation and Resources Enforcement’s electronic management information system

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Civil Resource Violation System

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Electronic Recordation Management System

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Move to Web App EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

New: DLNR GIS DLNR uses GIS for program decision making, participated in the statewide strategic planning process for enterprise GIS and OIMT’s working group and plans to develop One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

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Name

Description GIS interfaces to DLNR databases as well as mobile technologies.

Cost

Notes Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Land Trust IMS

Public Land Trust IMS

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: DNLR Disaster Recovery Utilizes DRFortress as a disaster recovery off-site location. The second stage consists of developing a business continuity structure that will create a network system for backup and remote accessibility utilizing replication and virtualization services in an effort toward real-time data retrieval. Implemented a Polycom HDx8000 statewide video conferencing system including the RMX2000 bridge, which serves as a backup to ICSD’s bridging capabilities. In the process of expanding video conferencing sites on the neighbor islands. Establishing FCC narrowbanding compliance for DLNR’s radio system; used to provide enforcement to the State’s natural resources. One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Video Conferencing

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

DLNR Radio System

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Network Infrastructure Upgrade

Improve the network infrastructure in the areas of bandwidth, services, and security. There are more than 40 remote sites using DSL; upgrading to an Ethernet solution to increase work productivity. Provide data replication through virtualization and storage area networks

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Data Visualization System

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The first 10 initiatives above are in various stages of its lifecycle and are funded. Funding is needed for the initiative to acquire in-house business analysts and application developers. The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 13 through Figure 49.

Figure 49: Land and Natural Resources Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (1 of 3)

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Figure 50: Land and Natural Resources Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (2 of 3)

Figure 51: Land and Natural Resources Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary (3 of 3)

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A.1.21 HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS
The Hawaiian Home Lands LOB manages the Hawaiian Home Lands trust effectively and develops and delivers lands to native Hawaiians.

Table 40: Hawaiian Home Lands LOB Services

LOB: Hawaiian Home Lands Service Name Development & Demographic Research & Planning

Service Definition

Conducts research and planning studies in DHHL program development. Provides for review and updating of the DHHL General Plan. Produces master plans for the development of planned communities and subdivisions. Develops and administers approved pilot projects. Conducts studies to compile and evaluate data about native Hawaiians, including demographics, needs, as well as current and future trends and developments affecting beneficiaries and their communities. Compiles and disseminates information on DHHL resources, including, but not limited to, land, water, minerals, archaeological and historic sites, and other resources. Manages the list of people eligible for DHHL programs. Strive to move as many Hawaiians off the list as possible. Important component is functioning of Hawaiian Homes Commission. Oversight body that sets policy, a judicial body making decisions on awards and cancellations, and approves contracts. Managing the Commissions data is an important need. Development of Hawaiian home lands for homesteading and income-producing purposes. Maintains DHHL grounds, common areas, buildings and facilities, roads, and other public works. Provides lease life cycle management for Hawaiian Home Lands. Recommends actions relating to surrender, transfer, cancellation, and designation of successors to homestead leases. Provides for the receipt, processing, and review of loan applications and applications for loan guarantees; recommends approval or disapproval of for documentation of loans approved by the Commission; administers and enforces applications and provides terms and conditions of loans, including the monitoring of and collecting on delinquent loan accounts.

Hawaiian Home Lands Applications & Eligibility

Hawaiian Home Lands Commission Support

Hawaiian Home Lands Development Planning Hawaiian Home Lands Maintenance

Hawaiian Home Lands Lease Management

Hawaiian Home Lands Loan Administration

A.1.21.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS
The future vision for Hawaiian Home Lands is to apply state-ofthe-art technology to the fullest extent to address the following key areas:
• There are defined beneficiaries with a defined trust. The

opportunities of three kinds: residential, agricultural, and pastoral.
• Keeping the eligibility list current and accurate is a real need;

at present there are multiple lists with no authoritative source.
• DHHL generates revenue through rents and delinquencies

and gets to keep the monies generated.
• Revenue collection is a major activity. There are 740 general

purpose is to provide beneficiaries with homesteading

lease, license, and revocable permit accounts that need to be managed.

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The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 52 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

interface architecture.

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 52: Hawaiian Home Lands Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
The Hawaiian Home Lands core mission LOB shares common information exchanges with the mission support areas to include Planning & Resource Allocation, Budget & Finance, Financial Management, Human Resources Management, Procurement, Asset Management & Inventory Control. The Hawaiian Home Lands LOB shares unique needs for geospatial imaging and land and property information with DLNR and DAGS. Common information shared within the LOB include Land Inventory and

Management, Property Management, Client (Applicant) Information and Genealogy, Homestead Lease Management, Loan Management, and Document Imaging and Management.

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 39 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

A.1.21.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

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The initiatives are structured to address the following key needs:
• Document Imaging of Applicant and Lessee files as well as

other important shared documents is needed.
• DHHL needs a concrete electronic methodology for managing

of success is how many applicants have been moved off the list. There is no means for applicants to apply/status information online. Managing the list is an issue due to lack of information between entities.
• Wait List Improvements

the Eligibility List
• DHHL would like to devise a way to track and/or communicate

why lands are handled in a certain way. They need to be able to provide rationale so that outside entities will understand and to help address the backlog.
• A real need is integrated data (GIS, loans, demographic

information, leases, applications, and genealogy).
• Another area of need is the ability to view online who owns

surrounding lands to be able to work with other departments.
• Would like to be able to provide central servers for sharing

– Biggest data need for DHHL is managing the list of those people eligible for their programs. At present, there are multiple sources of the list being maintained with siloed processes. Need to assess improvement options, and implement a “master data management” approach regarding the Wait List which is the integration point with all other systems. Need a better picture of the profile of the people on the list. Need to support being market driven. Need to be able to have models to meet different requirements. Need to know demographic details about the people. (Supplemental budget request for Assessment of Waitlist. “Pending Review.”)
• Provide online access for current constituents including

information among distributed teams as well as provide a system upgrade due to capacity issues.
• In working toward the mission, applicants qualify by being

minutes and community information.
• Provide an interface for current constituents to add/update

50% Hawaiian and by meeting financial qualifications.They are then put on a waiting list (i.e., “the list”). A measurement

their information.

Table 41: Hawaiian Home Lands LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: Integrated Data (MIS) DHHL

Description

Cost

Notes

The DHHL Integrated Data consists of major system functions that provide a related set of services or capabilities. Also known as the Management Information System (MIS). It includes Asset Management, Client Services, Financial Management, and Office Automation and Administrative Support Systems. Replaces current APEX based systems: Applicant/Lessee System, and Mortgage Loan System.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

New: Land Handling Tracking DHHL One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Digital creation, management, and storage of documents enabling employee access in a timely and efficient manner. To convert documents to electronic and/or digital documents supported by automated business rules and workflow management integrated with internal systems as well as external systems. One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium Priority: High EA Compliance: Med

Land Ownership Online DHHL

Document Imaging

Priority: High EA Compliance: Med

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Name Production Applications Alignment: Financial Management System

Description

Cost

Notes

General Ledger, Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable, Purchasing Based on Oracle Financials modules. Use As Is. Evaluation of future state financial management modules of ERP for integration/consolidation.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

Utility 2000

Water Billing System. Continue and use as is.

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

Lotus Notes w/Collaboration

Email and collaboration system. ICSD handles all the overhead One time DME: and support. DHHL houses the clients only. Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review The website on hawaii.gov/dhhl replaced by www.hawaiianhomelands.org site. One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

Department of Hawaiian Home Lands Website

Priority: High EA Compliance: Medium

LOB Infrastructure: In Progress: Virtualize Desktops & Servers DHHL This project virtualizes the neighbor island branch offices, select Oahu office servers and upgrades the Oahu office physical servers, tape libraries and Storage Area Network (SAN). One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

New: Online Access DHHL The branch must also obtain 11 more desktop CPU computers or docking stations and plan to get laptops for inspectors. One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Priority: High (1) EA Compliance: Medium (3)

Provide Central Servers DHHL System Upgrades DHHL

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 53.

Figure 53: Hawaiian Home Lands Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.1.22 HAWAII STATE PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM
The mission of the Hawaii State Public Library System is to provide Hawaii’s residents, in all walks of life, and at each stage of their lives, with access to education, information, programs, and services and to teach and nurture the love of reading and the habit of life-long learning. Table 42: Hawaii State Public Library System LOB Services

Hawaii State Public Library System Services LOB: In-house Patron Services

Service Description

State “New Day/Recovery & Reinvestment” Plan objectives that inspire technology initiatives within service • Being a focal point for statewide pride, simultaneously providing learning opportunities and valuable community services

Federal Objectives that inspire technology initiatives within service • Libraries as strong community anchors that encourage civic engagement • Strategic alignment of resources and prioritization of programmatic activities, maximizing value for patrons

• Physical collection distribution • Physical collection distribution • Reference/reader’s advisory • Weekly Programs and Events • Passport application services • Meeting Rooms Service

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Hawaii State Public Library System Services LOB:

Service Description

State “New Day/Recovery & Reinvestment” Plan objectives that inspire technology initiatives within service

Federal Objectives that inspire technology initiatives within service

• Fines & fees • Microfilm Reader, Copier, TeleCopying services • PC Reservation/Sign-Up • Wireless access based upon patron status • Use of public computers with privacy assurance components Remote Access Patron Services • Electronic Media Collections (audio-books, e-books, mp3, etc.) • Reference/reader’s advisory • Delivery of Academic Databases • Comprehensive Portal services • Inter-library Digital Social Communities that foster literacy Outreach & Bookmobiles • Outreach circulation & reference services to rural communities • Use of virtualization • Cloud services • Commitment to early childhood education • Maximum participation of the private sector • Investment in workforce development • Access to information services in underserved communities • Develop opportunities for the aging communities • Increase digital services • Teach business skills • Increase public access to information and ideas • Build digital communities • Facilitate the discovery of knowledge

Life-long Educational Services

• HI-Tech Academy (Digital Literacy and IT Academy) • Computing Centers across the state • Summer Reading Program • Children Story-time Services • Targeted Outreach (demographic specific (seniors, college, etc.)) • Non-targeted outreach (theme specific)

• Create a nation of learners • Citizens that learn continually, adapt to change readily, evaluate information critically

Materials Collection Development

• Time sensitive, publisher specific materials acquisition. Development, decision-making, logistics, delivery of materials

• Strict spending philosophy requiring comprehensive vision of use • Comprehensive consolidation of workloads • Partial move to cloud paradigm • Green IT and reduction of carbon footprint

• Open Data - Promote greater transparency and accountability

Digitization

• Audio oral history collections • Unique and fragile archive of rare historical/cultural materials

• Stewardship of Cultural Heritage • Support the care and management of the nation’s collections

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Hawaii State Public Library System Services LOB: Distribution hub for Government Information

Service Description

State “New Day/Recovery & Reinvestment” Plan objectives that inspire technology initiatives within service • Assistance in the advancement of the high tech sector • Create inter-agency collaboration

Federal Objectives that inspire technology initiatives within service • Support and extend national digital information infrastructure with reliable, persistent and widely available access

• Community, State and Federal hub of information for residents and citizens • Federal Depository Collection

Specialty Library Services

• Acquisitions, Circulation, and Special Services for the Blind and Physically Handicapped • Daily Radio Program (broadcasting and digital receiver equipment services) • Regional service provider for sub-regionals in the U.S. Affiliate Pacific Island States • Assistive Software for all public stations

• Use the bonding power of the state to help fund necessary improvements in information technology systems • Accessibility for all customers

• Investment in projects that provide inclusive and accessible learning opportunities

A.1.22.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR THE HAWAII STATE PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM
The future state vision for the Hawaii State Public Library System is: “A society where communities and individuals thrive with broad public access to knowledge, cultural heritage and lifelong learning” The future vision for the Hawaii State Public Library System is to apply state-of-the-art technology to the fullest extent to address the following key areas:
• The Public Library System is to sustain its strong strategic

• HSPLS must persevere in being a community anchor that

enhances civic engagement, cultural opportunities, and economic vitality.
• The libraries will act as communication centers providing

teleconference and other technology services to fulfill the needs of communities and continue to be a key institution in the state.
• HSPLS is to support and extend a local and national

digital infrastructure that leverages libraries as key providers of access to digital information and services. The libraries are to partake in the national effort to build digitally inclusive communities.
• HSPLS is to increase its partnerships with more state

technology alignment with state and federal goals and initiatives, and to cultivate a culture of planning, evaluation, and evidence-based practice to maximize the impact of public technology investments
• HSPLS must continue to support inclusive and accessible

agencies to further the workforce, educational, and social needs of the communities.
• The library system is to garner more support for providing

safe conditions to rare collections learning opportunities to the state and meet the needs of diverse communities in the rapidly changing digital environment.
• HSPLS will continue to add no-charge educational services • HSPLS will continue to act as a resource center for

government information and dissemination of data, along with live capitol webcasts and other pertinent resources
• HSPLS is committed to increase the technology services

to the existing informational ones, providing unique and necessary community resources for workforce skill augmentation and educational growth. HSPLS is committed to developing a nation of learners and provide the necessary technological means to accomplish it.

and education that promote life-long learning – from keiki to kupuna - and that position the agency as a vital part of the state.

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• HSPLS is to become a center of attraction for developers and

• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

other IT citizens that wish to collaborate and have technology development civic engagement through the libraries.
• The libraries are to propel state initiatives with regards to

interface architecture.
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

matching a civic need with an existing resource, as in the case of inter-agency collaborations. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 54 below. Two key features of this solution include:

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 54: Hawaii State Public Library System LOB Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• G2C: HSPLS is committed to engage in the open data state

initiatives to increase government visibility to citizens
• G2G: Presently all data exchanges with other agencies within

A.2.1.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR THE HAWAII STATE PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM
The Public Library System presently possesses technology that already complies with most of the state and federal ‘best practices’ recommendations. With almost complete virtualization, consolidated storage, digitization, and other modern practices, its IT equipment has been upgraded to the latest versions and its infrastructure has been re-built, leaving HSPLS in good condition to be able to easily

the state reside in the shared services category and not in the line of business. These include payroll, financial services, and human resources.
• C2G: HSPLS is to act as a repository and promoter of IT civic

engagement by providing the ability and resources to patrons to shape and improve government services.

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migrate to the state the elements that will become part of shared IT services. The line of business technology will need to undergo yearly upgrades to ensure that the public facing components are delivering the services that the public has come to expect and demand. This is a summary of what will be needed in the coming years:
• Backend yearly upgrades for ILS – Integrated Library Systems

software
• All portal services maintenance and upgrade • Digitization efforts and augmentation of practice • Continued use of shared platform for workflow development,

NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.
• Cultural and Civic Engagement – Technologies that allow for

digital solutions for Libraries in an era of participatory culture
• 21st Century Skills – Learning Transformed – enabling a culture

of digital transformation through public library services
• Demonstrating Public Value – through purpose driven

such as SharePoint
• Continued use of private cloud services for innovative use and

development
• Mobility services

technology deployments that meet immediate needs of public service
• Building digital communities – inter-library and inter-agency

communications amongst government customers
• Preserving State’s Cultural Heritage through Digitization

The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

efforts in public libraries
• Partnerships with state departments to improve early

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 43 below.

learning, special conditions, elderly education, among others.
• Development of modern technology enabled-libraries in

upcoming new buildings

Table 43: Hawaii State Public Library System LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: In Progress: Integrated Library System

Description

Cost

Notes

Modular system including: acquisitions, cataloging, serials, circulation, cluster services

One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review One time DME: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review Annual on-going O&M: Pending Review

Priority: (3) EA Compliance: (3)

Comprise - Patron Reservation Management

Management of public units, reservations, sign-up, authentication based on patron type and status

Priority: (1) EA Compliance: (1)

Portfolio

Repository of digitized items, reports, links, etc. Private/Public cloud service for all archival purposes that face public view

Priority: (1) EA Compliance: (1)

HI-Tech Academy

Digital Literacy Program and IT Academy Program

Priority: (1) EA Compliance: (1)

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The following is the sequencing strategy for the Hawaii State Public Library System:

• Capacity Planning • Digitization Efforts • Development, Modernization, and

• Infrastructure improvements

Enhancements of Present Technology

The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 53.

Figure 55: Hawai`i State Public Library System Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.2

SUPPORT SERVICE AREAS

A.2.1 LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS
Legislative Relations coordinates legislative activity for the Department of State and advises the Secretary, the Deputy, as well as the Under Secretaries and Assistant Secretaries on legislative strategy. Legislative Relations facilitates effective communication between State Department officials and the Members of Congress and their staffs.

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Table 44: Legislative Relations LOB Services

LOB: Legislative Relations Service Name Legislative Tracking

Service Definition

Monitors and tracks legislation from introduction to enactment. Includes tracking hearings and testimonies. Involves all activities associated with supporting the formal relationship between a state agency and the State Congress. Responsible for inspections and auditing – involves the methodical examination and review of regulated activities to ensure compliance with standards for regulated activity.

State Congressional Interaction

Audit Services

A.2.1.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS
The Legislative Relations Line of Business needs an automated legislative tracking system to effectively support the flow of legislation through the State Government. The complete life cycle from inception, proposal, review, approval, disapproval, and final disposition of legislative activities is needed to efficiently serve constituents, stake holders and citizens. In addition, an integrated workflow and document management system will support automation of efficient business processes and official document life cycles.

The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 48 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture.
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 56: Legislative Relations Future State Solutions Architecture

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INFORMATION EXCHANGES
Information exchanges occur within the State Government, with State Agencies, and with the citizens of Hawaii.

INITIATIVES
Procure, install and configure a Legislative Tracking system that support the complete life cycle of legislative activities. In addition workflow and document management capabilities are needed to support efficient workflow process and tracking and disposition of official documents. The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 45below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB nfrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

A.2.1.2 RANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

Table 45: Legislative Relations LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Applications Alignment – Kept: Accounting and Audit Review Committee Web Site

Description

Cost

Notes

aarc.hawaii.gov. (hosted by ICSD)

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Office of the Auditor Web Site

hawaii.gov/auditor (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Office of the Ombudsman Web Site

ombudsman.hawaii.gov (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Legislative Reference Bureau Web Site

hawaii.gov/lrb (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Hawaii State Ethics Commission Web Site

hawaii.gov/ethics (hosted by ICSD)

Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

Production Applications Alignment – Replaced by Enterprise Legislative Relations System: DAGS Legislature Bill Tracking Tracks legislative bills generated by the department or related to the department - [Lotus Scripting] One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

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Name DBEDT Legislative Tracking System

Description Lotus Notes Application being maintained by ICSD in DAGS. DBEDT Legislative Tracking System is a revised version of their Lotus Notes tracking system. This database allows the creation of a tracking document for a bill or resolution. LTS tracks bills in the Hawaii State Legislature in which DCCA has an interest. LTS is used throughout DCCA as a collaboration tool.

Cost One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

DCCA Legislative (Bill) Tracking System

Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

DLIR Legislative Tracking System

The Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) Legislative Tracking System is based on the Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) Lotus Notes Legislative Tracking System. This database allows the creation of a tracking. The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Legislative Tracking System is based on the Department of Business Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) Lotus Notes Legislative Tracking System. Track legislative bills during session and support hearing .

Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

DLNR Legislative Tracking System

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

DOH Legislative Tracking System (LTS)

Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

DOT Legislative Tracking System

The Department of Transportation (DOT) Legislative Tracking System is based on the Department of Business Economic Development and Tourism Lotus Notes Legislative Tracking System. The Department of Agriculture (HDOA) Legislative Tracking System is based on the Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) Lotus Notes Legislative Tracking System. The Department of Public Safety (PSD) Legislative Tracking System is based on the Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) Lotus Notes Legislative Tracking System.

Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

HDOA Legislative Tracking System

Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

PSD Legislative Tracking System

Status: To be Replaced EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 3

New: Enterprise Legislative Relations System Implement an enterprise-wide automated legislative relations system to effectively support the flow of legislation through the State Government. The complete life cycle from inception, proposal, review, approval, disapproval, and final disposition of legislative activities is needed to efficiently serve constituents, stake holders and citizens. In addition, an integrated workflow and document management system will support automation of efficient business processes and official document life cycles. One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review Status: Use As Is EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 57. The implementation roadmap should address the following considerations:

• Pursue a comprehensive legislative tracking system • Pursue a workflow management system • Pursue a document management system that is

integrated with legislative tracking, workflow management and document management.

Figure 57: Legislative Relations Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.2.2 PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Public Affairs involves the exchange of information and communication between the state government, citizens and stakeholders in direct support of citizen services, public policy, and/or state interest.

Table 46: Public Affairs LOB Services

LOB: Public Affairs Service Name Customer Service

Service Definition

Supports activities associated with providing an agency’s customers with information regarding the agency’s service offerings and managing the interactions and relationships with those customers. Includes all efforts to provide official government information to external stakeholders through the use of various types of media, such as video, paper, web, etc.

Public Communications

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LOB: Public Affairs Service Name Public Outreach

Service Definition

Relates to the marketing of government services products, and programs to the general public in an attempt to promote awareness and increase the number of customers/beneficiaries of those services and programs. Involves the efforts to promote an organization’s image through the effective handling of citizen concerns.

Constituent Response

A.2.1.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS
The Public Affairs Line of Business needs to improve the capabilities for all state departments, agencies, and programs to interact with the public – citizens, residents, and tourists – regarding the state’s service offerings, including support for general public communications and

outreach programs, and managing the life cycle of service or support request from a constituent. Future state considerations for such a capability include a single point of contact for constituents through defined channels such as a common phone number, web portal, texting, and other social media such as Twitter. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 58 below. Two key features of this solution include:

• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and

mobile user interface architecture.
• “Everything as a Service” common

solutions framework that facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

Figure 58: Public Affairs Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
Information exchanges occur within the State Government, with State Agencies, and with the citizens of Hawaii.
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A.2.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

INITIATIVES
The current systems spread across the departments today with overlapping capabilities for tracking constituent response and correspondence are listed below in Table 47.

Table 47: Public Affairs Current Systems

Name LOB Solutions:

Description

Production Applications Alignment – Replaced by new enterprise web portals
NOTE: The applications below come from several different departments and represent potential cost savings and operational streamlining by moving to a common enterprise solution for tracking constituent service management and response. Annual O&M cost for each application is estimated at “Pending Review” That represents a total of approximately “Pending Review. . ”

TRAC for DAGS/Public Works Division

The Track Referrals, Activities, & Correspondence (TRAC) system for DAGS/Public Works Division monitors items requiring a response, records various activities within the organization, and logs notices received/sent. The TRAC system helps ensure timely re The Track Referrals, Activities, and Correspondence (TRAC) System monitors items requiring a response, records various activities within the organization, and logs notices received/sent. TRAC helps ensure timely responses, provides status on items of i hawaii.gov/icis (hosted by ICSD)

Track Referrals, Activities, and Correspondence

Interagency Council on Intermediate Sanctions Correspondence Log DLNR Track Referrals, Activities, and Correspondence for DLNR

Tracks all correspondence via the Chairperson’s Office. “The Track Referrals, Activities, & Correspondence (TRAC) system monitors items requiring a response, records various activities within the organization, and logs notices received/sent. TRAC helps ensure timely responses, provides status on items of interest Administrative Support This Correspondence Log supports logging functions for both Outgoing and Incoming documents. It will keep track of documents originating from and received by your section. The fields for each document will provide information on dates and persons involve This letter log will keep track documents originating from this section The DOT stores its contracts, correspondence, project documents, program documents, etc. in DOTCMS. Runs on IBM FileNet, Kofax Ascent Capture, Oracle Database. DOT is in the process of updating the DOTCMS application with Filenet version 4.5. Letter Log for the DIR-C office Tracks issues, complaints, and notifications having to do with the public or the media, for the Public Affairs Office

Correspondence/Contract Log AIR Correspondence Logs

CSS Letter Log Department of Transportation Content Management System, DOTCMS DIR-C Letter Log DIR-P Request Log

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Name Harbors Correspondence log

Description This database is for the use of the Harbors Division Administrator and Office Service Staff in maintaining a log of correspondence. Harbors Discussion Issues Meeting minutes of the DOT IT Advisory Committee, ITAC. This letter log keeps track of documents originating from the Office of Civil Rights. The fields for each document will provide information on dates and persons involved for tracking purposes and historical information for archiving. This letter log keeps track of documents originating from the Personnel Office. The fields for each document will provide information on dates and persons involved for tracking purposes and historical information for archiving. Log used to track complaints during the H-1 Widening Project for the Public Affairs Office http://hawaii.gov/gov/contact/msg-comm-proc (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Harbors Discussion Issues ITAC Discussion Items OCR Letter Log

PER Letter Log

Public Affairs Office Log Request a Message, Commendation or proclamation Request a meeting with the Governor Governor Flag Requests Email Signup for Governor Contact the Governor Online Volunteers in Public Services Stay Connected Office of the Governor Office of the Governor Photo Gallery 50th Anniversary of Statehood Robotics Organizing Committee Correspondence Log

http://hawaii.gov/gov/contact/request-meeting (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

http://hawaii.gov/gov/contact/flag-requests (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC) http://hawaii.gov/gov/contact/email-updates (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC) http://hawaii.gov/gov/contact/contact-gov (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC) http://vips.ehawaii.gov (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

stayconnected.hawaii.gov (hosted by ICSD) hawaii.gov/gov (hosted by ICSD) hawaii.gov/govgallery (hosted by ICSD)

statehood.hawaii.gov (hosted by ICSD) robotics.hawaii.gov (hosted by ICSD) Tracking of incoming and outgoing correspondences from the Chairperson’s Office with PDF files of correspondences. (Microsoft Access Client/Linux File Server) http://www.ehawaii.gov/calendar (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Online State Calendar System

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Name Request a meeting with the Lt. Governor Email Signup for Lt. Governor Contact the Lt. Governor Office of Information Practices Office of the Lieutenant Governor Vivian Aiona Hawaii Drug Control Strategy Enterprise Legislative Relations System

Description http://hawaii.gov/ltgov/contact/request-meeting (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

http://hawaii.gov/ltgov/contact/email-updates (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC) http://hawaii.gov/ltgov/contact/contact-lg (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC) hawaii.gov/oip (hosted by ICSD) hawaii.gov/ltgov (hosted by ICSD)

hawaii.gov/vivian_aiona (hosted by ICSD) hawaii.gov/hawaiidrugcontrolstrategy (hosted by ICSD) Implement an enterprise-wide automated legislative relations system to effectively support the flow of legislation through the State Government. The complete life cycle from inception, proposal, review, approval, disapproval, and final disposition of legislative activities is needed to efficiently serve constituents, stake holders and citizens. In addition, an integrated workflow and document management system will support automation of efficient business processes and official document life cycles.

The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 48 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of

Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

Table 48: Public Affairs LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: New: iQ Implementation

Description

Cost

Notes

Internet Quorum - Data Capture System to manage inputs and responses. Basically a CRM type application for constituent response tracking.

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Enterprise Mail Improvements

Need a replacement for Lotus Notes (Takes too long to send mass mailings) 100s of emails per day brings staff desktop computer to a slow crawl. Issues with administration of Lotus Notes – deletes emails after 60 days. Need a good collaboration, scheduling, and tracking system. SharePoint would be a good choice.

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Public Affairs Collaboration System Implementation

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

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Name LOB Infrastructure: New: LG LAN Improvements

Description

Cost

Notes

Need a good LAN system (60 users)

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

LG Phone System Improvements

Need a phone system with voice menuing.

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

LG Mobile Device Deployment

Mobile Devices with camera, video conferencing and voice for Field Support (10)

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 59.

Figure 59: Public Affairs Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

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A.2.3 POLICY, CONTROLS, AND OVERSIGHT
The Policy, Controls, and Oversight LOB involves activities associated with developing regulations, policies, and guidance to implement laws and ensuring that the operations and programs of the state government and its external business partners comply with applicable laws and regulations and prevent waste, fraud, and abuse.

LOB: Policy, Controls and Oversight Service Name Policy Creation and Rule Development

Service Definition

Policy and Guidance Development involves the creation and dissemination of guidelines to assist in the interpretation and implementation of regulations. Involves the data gathering activities required to determine the effectiveness of internal and external programs and the extent to which they comply with related laws, regulations, and policies.

Program Monitoring, Evaluation, Compliance, and Reporting

A.2.3.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR POLICY, CONTROLS, AND OVERSIGHT
The Policy, Control, and Oversight (PCO) Line of Business needs to improve common capabilities for all state departments, agencies, and programs in governance and assurance of compliance to all applicable laws and regulations. NOTE: Policy Control and Oversight (PCO) does not have applications within the LTG organization. The PCO LOB needs to be centralized to enable the creation, review, approval and notification of standards for the State of Hawaii and its internal agencies.

The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 60 below. Two key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture.
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

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Figure 60: Policy, Control, and Oversight Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
Information exchanges occur within the State Government, with State Agencies, and with the citizens of Hawaii.

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 49 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

A.2.3.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR POLICY, CONTROLS, AND OVERSIGHT
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

Table 49: Policy, Control, and Oversight LOB Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: New: Statewide Policy Control Workflow System

Description

Cost

Notes

A Policy control Workflow System will provide for the tracking of the complete lifecycle of Statewide and Agency specific policies, standards, and guidelines. This includes creation, review, approval and dissemination of policies and guidelines

One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 2

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Name Statewide Policy Control Document Management System

Description A document management system is needed to manage the complete set of polices, standards, and guidelines

Cost One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: v One-time DME: Pending Review On-going annual O&M: Pending Review

Notes EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

Statewide Policy Control Notification System

A Web based Policy Control Notification System is needed to provide on-line access to the State’s policies and information regarding standards, and guidelines. Essentially, this Web application will become an information center supporting statewide policy control and oversight.

EA Compliance: 3 Priority: 1

TRANSITION AND SEQUENCINGV
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 61.

Figure 61: Policy, Controls, and Oversight Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

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A.2.4

PLANNING & RESOURCE ALLOCATION

Planning and Resource Allocation involves the activities of determining strategic direction, identifying and establishing programs and processes, and allocating resources (capital and labor) among those programs and processes. Strategic Planning, Enterprise Architecture, Capital Planning, Budget Formulation, Workforce, Management Improvement,

Program/Project Planning, and Contract Management are services provided by this LOB. A unique activity that cross cuts all services is budget planning, development, roll up, review, and approval. It is the essence of business management services. The Planning and Resource Allocation Line of Business is included in the Budget and Finance ERP estimates. A project team will be formed to represent the requirements for these services.

Table 50: Planning and Resource Allocation LOB Business Services

LOB: Planning and Resource Allocation Service Name Capital Planning

Service Definition

Capital Planning involves the processes of ensuring that appropriate investments are selected for capital expenditures. Budget formulation involves all activities undertaken to determine priorities for future spending and to develop an itemized forecast of future funding and expenditures during a targeted period of time. Strategy management; performance improvement activities; oversees policy analysis and development; assures compliance; risk management practices; grant tracking; and legislative tracking. Workforce Planning involves the processes for identifying the workforce competencies required to meet the agency’s strategic goals and for developing the strategies to meet these requirements. Strategic Planning entails the determination of annual and long-term goals and the identification of the best approach for achieving those goals. Contract Management involves the oversight and/or management of contractors and service providers from the private sector.

Budget Formulation

Program/Project Planning

Workforce Planning

Strategic Planning

Contract Management

A.2.4.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR PLANNING & RESOURCE ALLOCATION
Planning & Resource Allocation services will provide the leadership, planning, scheduling, and implementation of a layered planning and budgeting process. This process will be implemented with integrated solutions to support local budget developments, roll ups, standard summaries, and an online review and approval capability.

The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 62 below. Key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

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Figure 62: Planning and Resource Allocation Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Strategic Planning cross cuts all

segments of the State enterprise
• Program and project authorization

processes are results of planning, budgeting, and approvals for all services for State employees and Hawaii citizens.
• An information exchange occurs with

A.2.4.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR PLANNING & RESOURCE ALLOCATION
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

INITIATIVES
The current systems that support various aspects of the support services within this LOB are spread across the departments today with overlapping capabilities for planning, budgeting, and resource allocation. A sampling of those current systems are listed below in Table 51.

each LOB to enable an orchestrated planning and budgeting process.

Table 51: Planning and Resource Allocation Current Systems

Name LOB Solutions:

Description

Production Applications Alignment – Potential for Replacement by the ERP Implementation
NOTE: The applications below come from several different departments and represent potential cost savings and operational streamlining by moving to a common enterprise resource planning solution. Annual O&M cost for each application is estimated at “Pending Review. That represents a total of approximately “Pending Review. ” ”

Planning System

Tracks the status of Project Initiation Requests, Request for Planning Studies, and informal requests for Planning - [Java]

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Name Capital Improvement Projects System (CIP) RFA - ISCO Request for Action

Description http://cip.ehawaii.gov (developed, supported, and hosted by HIC)

Allows IS contacts to submit work requests to ISCO. Work requests are automatically routed to ISCO staff based on subject. Also allows for IS contact and ISCO staff feedback during processing with acceptance and rejection processing. The RFA system is a Copy of ISCO RFA system for Insurance’s Office services branch

RFS1 - Request for Services (Insurance Office Services / Clerical) RFS2 - Request for Services (Insurance Legal) BUS DataMart

Copy of ISCO RFA system for Insurance’s legal branch

This database provides the PPB Management Office of the Department of Transportation a budget expenditure plan. This database is a tool to create a budget expenditure plan and communicate this plan between the PPB Management Office and the Staff offices. Custom Access application used by the Computer systems & Services Office to create, maintain, report, and submit yearly budget requests. DOT Budget System Project Information Repository The DOT O&M Budget System is used by the DOT’s budget analysts to create and maintain Operations & Maintenance budget information that is submitted to the Dept of Budget & Finance. Data is stored in an Oracle database on a IBM P-Series Server. This database was originally named HAR 03 Expenditure Plan to provide the Harbors Division of the Department of Transportation with an shared budget expenditure plan. This database was intended to be a tool to create a budget expenditure plan and communicate it District-Level financial system used to maintain budgets, generate and approve purchase orders, track vehicle maintenance costs, and employee timesheets. This database provides the Highways Division of the Department of Transportation a budget expenditure plan. This database is a tool to create a budget expenditure plan and communicate this plan between the PPB Management Office and the Highways Division. Tracks budget requests related to the DOT’s Capital Improvements Program (CIP) Projects, for the PPB Management Analytical Office. Tracks budget requests related to the Operations & Maintenance (O&M) program, for the PPB Management Analytical Office. Tracks budget requests related to travel (intra- and inter-state) for the PPB Management Analytical Office. Project documentation database for a dynamic workflow application.

CSS Budget

DOT Budget System Library DOT O&M Budget System

HAR Datamart

Highways AS/400

HWY Budget Expend Plan

PPB Management Database

PPB Operating Log

Travel Request Log Workflow Project Documentation

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
As part of the ERP implementation, these critical cross-cutting business functions which every program performs will be included in the scope of the ERP. Functional support through the ERP package will be evaluated. Any substantial functional “gap” will be identified – as represented by the functionality of the above systems, and an overall solution architecture and implementation plan will be developed to address the needed functionality in a common manner.
• The sequencing of these initiatives will be part of a

A.2.5

GRANTS MANAGEMENT

The management of federal and state grant services provides provision, management and reporting to federal and state agencies and congress. Grant management depends on a sound financial system, purchasing system, merit-based personnel practices, appropriate property management capability, sound security, health and safety practices, the ability to perform audit and resolution services, and to provide quality review and control activities. All departments in the Hawaii State Government participate in Grants Management At present each organization provides grant management services. While each organization should be responsible for pursuing grants, a central Grants Management service will provide standards, guidelines, subject areas of interest, grant proposal examples, and a public offering organizing and describing State Grant opportunities for the citizens of Hawaii. Examples can be extracted from other State’s experiences.

comprehensive modernization road map.
• A priority scheme will target flagship initiatives such

as infrastructure modernization, ERP planning, and Health IT requirements.
• The Planning and Resource Allocation Line of Business

is included in the Budget and Finance ERP estimates.

Table 52: Grants Management LOB Business Services

LOB: Planning and Resource Allocation Service Name Federal Grants Pursuit and Oversight

Service Definition

The management of federal grant services provides provision, management and reporting to federal agencies and congress. Grant management depends on a sound financial system, purchasing system, merit-based personnel practices, appropriate property management capability, sound security, health and safety practices, the ability to perform audit and resolution services, and to provide quality review and The objective of managing state grants is to standardize, streamline, and improve state grant-making practices to improve public awareness about state-grant opportunities.

State Grants Transfers and Oversight

A.2.5.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR GRANTS MANAGEMENT
The future vision for Grants Management is to apply state-of-the-art technology to the fullest extent towards a common capability across the state departments, agencies, and programs to accomplish the following critical business objectives and to address current state issues.
• Provide central grants management

• Provide grant management tools and

services to support the complete life cycle including reporting, milestone tracking, and expenditures.
• Provide collaboration capabilities to

the ability of the State to increase the percentage of acceptances with regard to submissions. The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 63 below. Key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web

support grant preparation, reviews, approvals, initial submissions, responses to questions, and final approvals and authorizations.
• Manage associated funding, expenditures,

and mobile user interface architecture.
• “Everything as a Service” common

and financial transactions associated with grant monies.
• Integrate Grants Management with

services with a central Web site to provide support to each organization with regard to grant opportunities, standards, contact information, grant examples, and training.

the new ERP. Transition and Sequencing from a disparate grant life cycle to a Central support service for each LOB will increase

solutions framework that facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

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Figure 63: Grants Management Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGE
• Grant management is a service area that touches all core

mission LOBs. Each area has need for support to move efficiently and effectively in the delivery of a quality product.
• Leveraging the collective experience of the best of the best

across the enterprise will only enhance the State of Hawaii’s opportunities to realize successful grant approvals.

NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing. The implementation roadmap should include:
• Initiate planning to establish a central grant management

A.2.5.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR GRANTS MANAGEMENT
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

service for each LOB.
• Extract the best of the best expertise in establishing

standards, guidelines, examples, contact information, and grant categories available from the Federal Government.
• Establish a central Web portal for the citizens of Hawaii

to examine grant opportunities that may be of interest.

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 53 below.

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Table 53: Grants Management Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Alignment: Grants Management Services Production Applications Portfolio

Description

Cost

Notes

There are currently no central Grants Management applications. Each State Agency has embedded applications that are essentially operating separately without support from a central financial, budgeting, or project management capability. The Federal government is calling for increased transparency and accountability regarding the use of federal funds. In June 2011, the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2011 (DATA Act) was introduced and referred to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. If enacted, the DATA Act would apply the type of intensive recipient reporting that is required for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) awards to all federal grants, contracts and loans and establish an independent body to track all federal spending on a single website. It is critical that the State of Hawaii maximize the federal funds that the State receives and use these funds efficiently. Therefore a Grant Management capability as part of the new integrated ERP is essential to the future success of all Federal Grant activities. The estimated O&M is based on embedded project activities for each State Agency, Division, and Section pursuing and managing Grants.

One-time Annual DME: Pending Review O&M: Pending Review

Priority: High EA Compliance: Low

New: ERP Phase II Grants Management Architecture and Project Planning Initiate planning, perform Business Process Re-Engineering, prepare vendor specifications, evaluate and select vendor, and initiate conference room pilots One Time DME: SW$ HW: Effort: Pending Review Portfolio Costs are captured in the ERP Section. One Time DME: SW: Pending Review HW: Pending Review Effort: Pending Review Portfolio Costs are captured in the ERP Section. Priority: High EA Compliance: High

ERP Phase II Grants Management Project Life Cycle

The management of federal and state grant services provides provision, management and reporting to federal agencies and congress. Grant management depends on a sound financial system, purchasing system, merit-based personnel practices, appropriate property management capability, sound security, health and safety practices, the ability to perform audit and resolution services, and to provide quality review and oversight. The objective of managing state grants is to standardize, streamline, and improve state grant-making practices to improve public awareness about state-grant opportunities.

Priority: High EA Compliance: High

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TRANSITION AND SEQUENCING
The plan for future state transition and sequencing of initiatives is depicted below in Figure 57. The implementation roadmap should address the following considerations:
• Form a Grant Management Project team • Create grant life cycle content supporting each phase of the

• Research grant management tools for preparation, review,

approvals and submissions
• Provide project and financial life cycle management to support

the complete life cycle
• Pursue working with the new ERP team to ensure the Grant

Management Life Cycle requirements are included in the specification and follow on pilots and deployments.

grant management process

Figure 64: Grants Management Transition and Sequencing Plan Summary

A.2.6

REVENUE COLLECTION

• System Administration Office –Liaison between the user and

ITSO. Performs testing, users assistance, and business analysis.
• Rules Office – oversees all tax laws and ensures their

Revenue Collection includes the collection of Government income from all sources. For the State of Hawaii this includes collections, receivables, fund transfers, asset sales and debt collection.
• Administrative Services Office – facilitates the internal business

implementation within the State and performs enforcement (civil and criminal) activities
• External Training and Outreach Office – performs training

of DOTAX; e.g., human resources/personnel, procurement, Departmental budget.
• Information Technology Services Office – provides IT support

relative to tax law, etc.
• Tax Services & Processing Division – provides document

processing, taxpayer services, and revenue accounting
• Compliance – oversees collections, audit, field audit,

for the entire Tax organization.
• Tax Research and Planning Office – performs tax research

and provides forecasts.

and the oversight of the district offices relative to the tax collection activities

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Table 54: Revenue Collection LOB Business Services

LOB: Revenue Collection Service Name User Fee Collection

Service Definition

User fee collection involves the collection of fees assessed on individuals or organizations for the provision of Government services and for the use of Government goods or resources. (i.e. National Parks) Tax collection oversees collections, audit, field audit, and the oversight of the district offices relative to the tax collection. Activities include tax research, forecasts, collections and refunds. The service is responsible for overseeing all tax laws and ensures their implementation within the State and performs enforcement (civil and criminal) activities. Asset sales encompasses the activities associated with the acquisition, oversight, tracking, and sale of non-internal assets managed by the State Government with a commercial value and sold to the private sector. Debt Collection supports activities associated with the collection of money owed to the State Government from both foreign and domestic sources.

Taxation Collection

State Asset Sales

Debt Collection

A.2.6.1 FUTURE STATE VISION FOR REVENUE COLLECTION
The overarching objective is to modernize the revenue collection (tax) system. An integrated Tax Information and Management System is a high priority. As the Tax Modernization Team aggressively assesses the need for new software, coordination with DAGS/Accounting and B&F regarding integration of a new Tax system with an ERP solution is critical. NOTE: Following the Federal Business Reference Model, all services related to the collection of income from all sources are included in the scope of this LOB. However, the focus for modernization in alignment with the DOTAX mission is modernizing Tax Collection. The other revenue collection services are very distributed across many departments today, and considerations for consolidation of those services will be addressed appropriately as part of the ERP implementation. The expectation of the Tax Modernization is to build a more stable and robust Integrated Tax Processing system that can provide:
• Speedier processing,

• Better tax analytic functions to improve the tax audit

and collection
• More flexible and efficient to handle the tax law changes • Provide better services for tax payers, such as on-line tax

information system
• Desired services include:

– Increased e-filing – Electronic payments – Improved collections analytics – Tax information management system – Improved case management processes – Improved network connectivity – Improve the revenue accounting system in DOTAX The future state solutions architecture is depicted in Figure 65 below. Key features of this solution include:
• “Hawai`i Anywhere” common web and mobile user

• Greater integration among tax processing, tax collection, and

interface architecture
• “Everything as a Service” common solutions framework that

tax audits
• More accurate and better accounting functions such Account

Receivable and account Payable.
• Better reporting system for the decision making

facilitates application assembly through reusing application “services” to include various “levels of sharing” such as LOB services, common LOB services, enterprise mission support (functional) services, and enterprise common (utility) services.

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Figure 65: Revenue Collection Future State Solutions Architecture

INFORMATION EXCHANGES
• Information exchanges include interfaces with Federal

The steps include:
• Evaluate and select a path forward to replace and modernize

agencies such as the IRS and FBI as well as other State agencies (specifically, B&F, DAGS, DCCA, DBEDT, AG, and the Legislature).
• Additionally, there are interfaces with tax software vendors

tax collection services.
• For short term improvements apply Business Process

Engineering to analyze priority areas to improved revenue collection
• Disaster recovery planning is essential as part of the

(e.g., Quicken Books, TurboTax, etc.), tax form preparers, and local financial institutions and citizens.
• Approximately “Pending Review”in tax revenues are

Technology Domain.
• A new data center is needed to support the operations

processed daily.
• Revenue collection services have the largest customer base. • Millions of forms and checks are processed each year,

of this LOB.

INITIATIVES
The needed initiatives for both LOB solutions and infrastructure are outlined in Table 55 below. NOTE: Future LOB solution initiatives should adhere to the ESA Common Solutions Framework for interoperability with the Hawaii Anywhere common user interface and the use of Enterprise Services such as common security, digital content management, and collaboration & email services. Future LOB infrastructure solution initiatives should adhere to the ETA Adaptive Computing Environment for enterprise and end-user computing.

collecting over “Pending Review” in revenue with a budget of only “Pending Review.”

A.2.6.2 TRANSITION & SEQUENCING PLANNING SUMMARY FOR REVENUE COLLECTION
The plan for needed transition initiatives to achieve the future state vision and the sequencing of those initiatives is described below.

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The implementation roadmap should include:
• Tax system modernization. • Work with the enterprise ERP team to evaluate tax

collection options
• Develop a road map to guide strategic alignment

with the Enterprise Architecture. Table 55: Grants Management Investment Initiatives

Name LOB Solutions: Production Alignment: Revenue Collection TAX modernization Services Current O&M costs

Description

Cost

Notes

The suite of thirty-six (36) Revenue Collection Applications will be replaced by a new TAX modernization project. The current tax system (Integrated Tax Information Management System ITIMS) was poorly implemented and requires significant hands on technical support to ensure 24x7 operations. The current system poses a high risk of failure that requires a high pr