Equity and Inclusion Data Report–pilot

Burlington School District 2010-2011

In the next five years, the Burlington School District seeks to understand and eliminate race/ethnicity, class, disability, sex/gender, sexual orientation, and/or language background as predictors of academic success, discipline, and co-curricular participation by assessing academic achievement, climate and inclusion, and district resources.

Submitted to Burlington School Board of Commissioners October 9, 2012

Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION OF PILOT DRAFT OF EQUITY AND INCLUSION DATA REPORT ............. 3 ADVISORY COUNCIL – BACKGROUND AND CHARGE FROM SCHOOL BOARD ................. 5 ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP................................................................................................. 6 KEY TERMS............................................................................................................................................... 7 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY – EQUITY AND INCLUSION DATA REPORT (2010-2011) ................ 9 BURLINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS ............................................ 13
CHART 1: Student Demographics by Race/Ethnicity, by School Level.......................................................................... 14 CHART 2: Student Demographics by Free/Reduced Lunch Status by School Level ...................................................... 14 CHART 3: Student Demographics by Special Education Status by School Level........................................................... 15 CHART 4: Student Demographics by Sex/Gender by School Level................................................................................ 15 CHART 5: Student Demographics by English Language Learner Status by School Level ............................................. 16

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT .................................................................................................................. 17 STANDARDIZED TESTING ........................................................................................................................ 17
CHART 6: NECAP Math by Race/Ethnicity by School Level......................................................................................... 18 CHART 7: NECAP Reading by Race/Ethnicity by School Level.................................................................................... 19 CHART 8: NECAP Math by English Language Learner Status by School Level ........................................................... 20 CHART 9: NECAP Reading by English Language Learner Status by School Level ...................................................... 21 ACADEMIC PARTICIPATION AND SUCCESS ............................................................................................. 22 CHART 10: Grades 6-12 (District Overall)...................................................................................................................... 22 CHART 11: Grades 6-12 by Race/Ethnicity by School Level.......................................................................................... 23 CHART 12: Grades 6-12 by Free/Reduced Lunch Status by School Level ..................................................................... 24 CHART 13: Grades 6-12 by Sex/Gender by School Level .............................................................................................. 24

CLIMATE AND INCLUSION ................................................................................................................ 26 ATTENDANCE .......................................................................................................................................... 26
CHART 14: Attendance Rate (District Overall) by School Level.................................................................................... 27 CHART 15: Attendance Rate by Race/Ethnicity by School Level................................................................................... 27 CHART 16: Attendance Rate by English Language Learner Status by School Level ..................................................... 28 PARTICIPATION AND LEADERSHIP: EXPANDED LEARNING PROGRAM PARTICIPATION ............................ 29 CHART 17: After School Regular Attendees (District overall) by School Level ............................................................ 29 CHART 18: After School Regular Attendees by Race/Ethnicity by School Level .......................................................... 30 CHART 19: After School Regular Attendees by Free/Reduced Lunch Status by School Level...................................... 30 CHART 20: After School Regular Attendees by Special Education Status by School Level .......................................... 31 CHART 21: After School Regular Attendees by Sex/Gender by School Level............................................................... 31 CHART 22: After School Regular Attendees by English Language Learner Status by School Level............................. 32 BEHAVIOR AND DISCIPLINE: SUSPENSION RATE ..................................................................................... 33 CHART 23: Suspension Rate (District Overall) ............................................................................................................... 33 CHART 24: Suspension Rate by Race/Ethnicity by School Level................................................................................... 34 CHART 25: Suspension Rate by Socio-Economic Status/Class by School Level ........................................................... 34

BURLINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT STAFF DEMOGRAPHICS................................................... 35 DISTRICT STAFF RESOURCES .................................................................................................................. 35
CHART 26: Burlington School District Staff Demographics by Race and Position Type............................................... 35

AFFIRMATIVE HIRING ............................................................................................................................. 36
CHART 27: Burlington School District Affirmative Hiring by Race (Teacher Positions) .............................................. 36

RECOMMENDATIONS AND FUTURE ACTIONS ........................................................................... 37 APPENDIX A: DATA DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................... 38 APPENDIX B: SUB-GROUP DETAIL .................................................................................................. 40

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Introduction of Pilot Draft of Equity and Inclusion Data Report
This is a pilot version of the Equity and Inclusion Data Report. We appreciate your input to this version of a document that can help the Burlington School District become more intentional and data-driven in its decision-making. We anticipate that this document will provide a baseline for many conversations to identify places where we have been making progress as well as to highlight areas for improvement. Since the end of Spring 2012, a board appointed advisory council has been meeting with administration to develop a plan for implementation, solicit continuous feedback from key groups, encourage support from stakeholders, and ensure the structure and staff resources to make it happen. We have interacted with numerous stakeholders through focus groups—and particularly through the regular meetings of the advisory council—to prioritize what was most important and to what degree we had confidence with the data we collected for this pilot Data Report. We look forward to learning from this pilot report as a way to be more deliberate with collecting data, analyzing results, making meaning and drawing conclusion, informing practice, and then addressing gaps in performance. We know that this is a “work in progress.” We identified over 30 domains and corresponding data sources currently available to our District that could have been included in an unfiltered data collection process, which for obvious reasons, would have been unmanageable. As such, in the pilot version we focused on these three domains: (1) academic achievement; (2) climate and inclusion; and (3) district resources. In consultation and with guidance from many stakeholders and our advisory council, we have chosen to look at six data sources: NECAP scores, grades, attendance, participation in expanded learning programs, state-reported suspensions and behavioral judgments, and affirmative hiring. This draft (based on 2010-2011 data) is a pilot version to measure the direction and format as we develop our Year One Data Report coming out in February 2013. That Data Report will be our first attempt at a fully completed assessment. We anticipate many changes and fuller presentation of information. Indeed, our advisory council has provided a list of suggestions and areas of further analyses to consider. For example, we would want to intentionally hear from students directly about their experiences, which would complement much of the quantitative data collected and presented here…by adults. After the 2013 Year One version, future Equity and Inclusion Data Reports can facilitate longitudinal assessments and provide deeper focus on understanding both the “what” part of the analysis but also the “why.” For example, recommendations have been made for how to conduct

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secondary analyses that intersect key variables like race and language background. This Data Report is a starting point, and an important baseline step that will help the District become more data-driven in its decision-making. As you look through this report and have suggestions, please send them to us so we may improve this document as we move forward; please email us with your comments at: equityreport@bsdvt.org. Thank you to our central office team and the Advisory Council, made up of staff and community members who—on their volunteer time—contributed greatly and substantively to this pilot report and the executive summary, the process for engaging the community, and for their commitment to our students. Thank you all for your support of this Equity and Inclusion Data Report. Sincerely,

Jeanne Collins Superintendent of Burlington Schools

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Advisory Council – background and charge from School Board
Background In creating a Strategic Plan for Equity and Inclusion, the Burlington School Board has developed this draft mission statement: In the Burlington School District in the next 5 years we seek to significantly reduce race/ethnicity, class, ability, sex/gender, and sexual orientation as predictors of academic performance, discipline, and co-curricular participation. The Board directs the Administration to collect, analyse and share data, in the form of an Equity and Inclusion Report Card, as the primary tool to measure achievement of this goal. The Board also supports the creation of an Advisory Council to provide recommendations to the Administration regarding the Equity and Inclusion Report Card. Membership The Equity and Inclusion Report Card Advisory Group will be appointed by the Board and will be comprised of District Staff, at least one Board member, and community members. District Staff shall at a minimum include the Director of Diversity and Equity, the Director of Technology, and two teacher representatives. Student participation will also be considered. Community members will be selected who meet the following criteria: a) the individual possesses knowledge and expertise in the area of research, data collection and analysis, and/or b) the individual is a recognized leader in advocating for equity and inclusion of marginalized groups. By selecting a group that includes board representation, District staff, and community members, the Board in part seeks to demonstrate partnership and collaboration among these groups in achieving our goals for equity and inclusion in the Burlington School District. Purpose The purpose of the Advisory Council is to provide recommendations to the District regarding the creation of the annual Equity and Inclusion Report Card, including selection of data points, the process for data analysis, and conclusions. Founding members should be willing to make a two year commitment. Outcomes/Timeline The District has proposed a set of data points to collect, and intends to complete a pilot Report Card based on 2010/2011 data. The Advisory Group will assist in the creation of the pilot project by June 2012, with the goal of completing the first complete Report Card by February, 2013 based on 2011-2012 data. The Report Card will continue to be produced each year, with the advisory group playing a lead role in recommending ongoing process improvements.

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Advisory Council Membership

Many special thanks to our volunteers who were members of the 2012 Equity and Inclusion Advisory Council:

Dan Balón Denise Dunbar Jeff Fournier Paul Hochanadel Paul Irish Lillian Kimbell Roger Lebovitz Stephanie Seguino Fritz Senftleber Shawna Shapiro Alan Matson Laura Nugent David Rome Brent Sclafani Linda Walsleben

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Key Terms
Disability: Also commonly described in relation to students as having special needs, a student with a disability typically is a person who: (1) has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; OR (2) has a record of such an impairment; OR (3) is regarded as having such an impairment (source: Americans with Disabilities Act or ADA). A person may have a disability with be living with any of the following impairments: physical, emotional, learning, psychological, and so forth.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Our school district views diversity as the many ways we are different. Specifically, this includes and is not limited to differences based on race, ethnicity, language background and proficiency, sex/gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual beliefs, age, family structure, appearance, and physical and learning abilities. Equity is a measure of results, not of efforts. We will have achieved equity when all measures indicate an absence of disproportionality in participation and achievement in terms of race, class, and disability, among other salient social identities. Inclusion is the ideal where all children have the right to participate as guided by the District’s duty to accept the child, regardless of difference. Inclusion has meaning particularly for ensuring participation and acceptance of students with disabilities; a premium is placed upon full participation by students with disabilities and upon respect for their social, civil, and educational rights. In this report, when we refer to inclusion, we believe that inclusion is a concept that works towards ensuring that meet the participatory and achievement needs of all children, as suggested in our definitions of diversity above, and in particular in relation to the group characteristics measured in this report, namely: race/ethnicity, class, disability, sex/gender, sexual orientation, and language background/proficiency.

Language Background: Language background refers to the English language proficiency of an individual whose home language is a language other than English. English language proficiency means the ability to read, write, speak, and understand English, the dominant language and language of instruction in our District. Students who have a home language other than English and demonstrate a need to learn English are eligible for ELL services. There are three categories in this demographic: LEP (Limited English Proficient), FEPM (Fluent English Proficient Monitored), and NotRec (Not receiving ELL services). See Appendix A for specific definitions in this data report.

Sex/gender: Sex and gender are interrelated and distinct terms. Sex refers to a person’s biological status and is typically categorized as male, female, or intersex (i.e., atypical combinations of features that usually distinguish male from female).

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Gender refers to the attitudes, feelings, and behaviors that a given culture associates with a person’s biological sex. Behavior that is compatible with cultural expectations is referred to as gender-normative; behaviors that are viewed as incompatible with these expectations constitute gender non-conformity (source: American Psychological Association). The Burlington School District specifically addresses both gender identity and gender expression in its harassment prevention, non-discrimination, and commitment to diversity and equity policies.

Race, ethnicity: In this report, we follow the Department of Education’s Final Guidance on Maintaining, Collecting, and Reporting Racial and Ethnic Data to the U.S. Department of Education, which categorizes race/ethnicity as one of seven distinct categories: Hispanic or Latino of any race; American Indian or Alaska Native; Asian; Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; Black or African American; White; and Multiracial (two or more races).

Socio-economic status: Also commonly referred to as socio-economic status (SES) or class, Socio-economic status is evaluated as a combination of factors that can include income, level of education, and occupation. It is a way of looking at how individuals or families fit into society using economic and social measures that have been shown to impact individual’s well-being and capacity for success in this country. SES is usually categorized into three statuses: (1) low SES or “lower” or “working class” or poor; (2) middle SES or “middle class”; and (3) high SES or “upper class” or wealthy. While there are federally determined classifications for “poverty level,” these categories often do not capture the range and impact of food insecurity and basic needs issues that are present for individuals who are in poverty. In this data report, we use Free/Reduced Lunch as a measure for socio-economic status/class. See Appendix A for specific definitions in this data report.

Sexual orientation: Sexual orientation refers to the sex of those to whom one is sexually and romantically attracted. Categories of sexual orientation typically have included attraction to members of one’s own sex (gay men or lesbians), attraction to members of the other sex (heterosexuals), and attraction to members of both sexes (bisexuals) (source: American Psychological Association).

More information about these terms as used as indicators in this report may be found in the Appendix.

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Executive Summary – Equity and Inclusion Data Report (2010-2011)
This pilot data report on equity and inclusion evaluates outcomes by race, socioeconomic background, ability/disability status, gender, and English Language Learner (ELL) status, for the year 2010-11. The district’s goal is to work towards elimination of disparities by group status in these five categories over time. This report describes where our district stands in five categories that will be measured as a baseline so that we monitor our progress in closing any gaps over time. We measure outcomes in three key domains: 1) academic achievement, 2) climate and inclusion, and 3) district resources. The domain of academic achievement requires little explanation. We are concerned to ensure that academic outcomes for our students are equally high across groups. The domain of climate and inclusion reflects the degree of belongingness, which has been shown to impact academic performance. Finally, district resources, which reflect the diversity of the staff, is important to ensure a quality staff that provides role models to students to better meet their needs and aspirations. Within each domain, we present several indicators. For academic achievement, we present data from the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) scores and academic grades. Under the domain of climate and inclusion, our indicators are attendance rates, after school participation, and suspension rates. Finally, for district resources, in this version of the Report, we present data on racial demographics. We recognize that there are many additional indicators that will be useful to include in future versions of this report, and we are working toward gathering data for those indicators now for the first official report to come out in February of 2013. In any analysis of data, it is important to be mindful of the sample used, and the validity and reliability of the processes used to collect and interpret the data. In general, for the student data, the sample was all students active in the district on December 1, 2010. However, in the academic achievement domain samples were limited to the available information. The NECAP tests only grades 3-5 at elementary, grades 6-8 at middle, and grade 11 at the high school. Academic grades (averaged) are only given at middle and high school. In the climate and inclusion domain, attendance rates and after school participation include almost the entire sample of students, but the sample of suspensions is small, and conclusions drawn on small samples may not be justified. In general, samples of fewer than 20 students were redacted. With respect to the validity and reliability of the student data, we primarily used data submitted to the Vermont Department of Education as part of their annual data collection processes. This data is reviewed and certified by each school principal, and includes the spring student census (attendance and demographic data), the Combined Incident Report (behavior data), and NECAP scores. Student grades, which are part of the official student transcript at the high school, were not a required report until the 2011-2012 school year. We also recognize that there may be processes to be improved to increase the accuracy and reliability of the data. As a result, we present the results without interpretation or conclusion.

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2010-11 PILOT REPORT - 10/08/12 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This pilot report does not include all of the data, charts, and graphs analyzed. For future reports expanded information will available on the web. A summarization of the pilot report:

Comparisons by Race Academic Achievement • A significantly higher percentage of white and Asian students were proficient in NECAP math exams. That disparity carries through all grade levels measured by the test (grades 3-8 and 11). As an example, in high school, 46% of white students are assessed as proficient as compared to 25% of Asian students and 9% of black students. Reading disparities by race exist as well but are less pronounced. For example, 79% of white high school students are assessed as reading proficient, compared to 63% of Asian students and 41% of black students. Disparities in average course grades across racial groups are more narrow than NECAP scores. For example, among high school students, 76% of whites have an average grade of A or B, as compared to 81% of Asians, 88% of Hispanics, and 63% of blacks.

Climate and Inclusion • • Attendance rates also vary by race, with a higher percentage of blacks and Asians having the highest level of attendance (75%) than whites (60%) or Hispanics (62%). The participation rate in after-school programs varies by school level, but at all levels, black students have the highest attendance rates (44-56%), and white students the lowest (3%-35%). Suspensions of black students occur at more than triple the rate at which white students are suspended. For example, the black suspension rate at the middle school is 29.6% compared to 8.1% for white students (there is insufficient data to assess suspension rates for Asian or Hispanic students).

Comparisons by Socio-economic Status/Class Socio-economic status or class is inferred from data on whether a student is eligible for a free or reduced lunch cost (FRL). We compared that group of students to those not eligible for free and reduced lunch. Academic Achievement • The percentage of FRL students with average grades of A or B is lower than for nonFRL. The gap is widest in high school. There, 62% of FRL students have average grades of A and B compared to 85% of non-FRL students. At the middle school level, the respective percentages for FRL and non-FRL students are 84% and 98%.
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Climate and Inclusion • The participation rate in after-school programs varies by school level, but at all levels, FRL students have higher attendance rates, though the gap is small at the elementary school level. Suspensions of FRL students occur at almost four times the rate of non-FRL students at the high school (12.6% compared to 3.2%). We have too small sample sizes to make comparisons at the elementary and middle school level.

Comparisons by Ability Outcomes by ability/disability are assessed based on whether students receive special education services as compared to those who do not. Students who receive special education services have Individual Education Plans (IEPs) or 504 plans. Climate and Inclusion • • Special education students have a slightly lower rate of participation in after school programs than non-special education students (25% compared to 30%). Sample sizes for suspensions disaggregated by IEP or 504 status are too small to report.

Comparisons by Gender Academic Achievement • Female students also are more likely than male students to receive average course grades of A (41% compared to 28% in high school).

Climate and Inclusion • While boys and girls have similar rates of participation in after school programs, the gap widens through middle and high school with girls having a higher rate of participation in after school activities.

Comparisons by English Language Learner Status Outcomes by language background are based on whether students receive, have received, or have never received English language learning (ELL) services. Students who are limited English proficient (LEP) receive services and are classified LEP. Students who have learned English and tested out of the ELL program are reclassified as fluent English proficient and monitored for two years (FEPM). Students in both the LEP and FEPM groups are compared in this report to students who do not receive ELL services (NotRcv). Students not receiving ELL services are students who are no longer monitored former ELL students or who have never received ELL services.
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Academic Achievement • A significantly lower percentage of LEP students score proficient in math than FEPM students or those not receiving ELL services as measured by the NECAP assessment (e.g., 12% of LEP students scored proficient in math as compared to 53% of FEPM students and 62% of students not receiving ELL services). Students in all three groups scored higher in reading than math as measured by the NECAP assessment, but disparities exist across language background groups, with FEPM students scoring slightly better than students not receiving services (e.g., 20% of LEP students score proficient as compared to 80% of FEPM students and 77% of students not receiving ELL services).

Climate and Inclusion • Attendance rates for LEP and FEPM students are significantly higher than for students not receiving ELL services (e.g., at the high school, 82% and 76% of LEP and FEPM students, respectively, attended 96 to 100% of the days they were enrolled in school as compared to 62% of students not receiving ELL services. LEP and FEPM students have higher rates of after school attendance than students not receiving services (e.g., at the middle school level, 55% of LEP and FEPM students regularly attend after school programs compared to 36% of students not receiving services). The rate of suspensions for LEP students at the middle school level was higher than the rate for students not receiving ELL services (e.g., 22.5% for LEP students as compared to 9.5% for students not receiving services).

District Resources: Racial Diversity of Teachers and Staff • Our indicator in the District Resources domain examines racial demographics and hiring. While 72% of the district’s students are white, 94.3% of employees are white. Racial diversity is greatest at the staff level and weakest among teachers where 97.6% of teachers are white. Hiring patterns in 2010-11 show progress with 24% hired who are people of color, a closer percentage to the percentage of students of color in the District.

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2010-11 PILOT REPORT - 10/08/12 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Burlington School District Student Demographics
The sample of students for this report includes all students active on Dec. 1, 2010, enrolled and attending our schools, grades K-12. The source of this list of students is our Student Management System (SMS). This includes students who are attending our schools, but not alternative programs or independent schools. The total number of students in this sample is approximately 3600 students. This includes approximately 1100 high school, 800 middle school, and 1700 elementary school students. Information on the student demographic characteristics was part of the School Year 2011 Final Census sent to the Vermont Department of Education in July 2011. Information includes the Race/Ethnicity, Free or Reduced Lunch status, IEP or 504 status, Gender, and whether the student is receiving English Language Learner services. In some cases the numbers in the sample were too small to give reliable information, or could potentially provide personally identifiable information. In addition, specific sample sizes are not included, but characteristics are represented as percentages. Since this represents the whole student body, percentages should add to 100%, except where there is rounding of values.

Race/Ethnicity Race/ethnicity is determined by parent response to the annual student information sheet. Race/Ethnicity follows the U.S. DOE definitions for race and ethnicity, and include the following categories: (1) Hispanic/Latino of any race (Hispanic); and, for individuals who are nonHispanic/Latino only, (2) American Indian or Alaska Native (AMI), (3) Asian (Asian), (4) Black or African American (Black), (5) Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (NAT), (6) White (White), and (7) Two or more races (Two or more races). The district is distinctly different from the state demographics on race and ethnicity. The chart shows the distribution at each school level. The number of students who identified as American Indian or Alaska Native, or as Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, was too small to be included.

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CHART 1: Student Demographics by Race/Ethnicity, by School Level For example, 13% of the students at the elementary school level identify as Black or AfricanAmerican.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS/CLASS: FREE/REDUCED LUNCH STATUS Free or reduced lunch status is determined by two methods, based on an income eligibility formula. Families can submit an application to the Food Service program, and this needs to be renewed every October. Families who are part of 3SquaresVT program are automatically considered to be eligible, and are certified directly. This data does change from time to time, and in general participation in the program is higher at the elementary schools than the high school.

CHART 2: Student Demographics by Free/Reduced Lunch Status by School Level For example, 56% of the students at the high school level do not participate in the free or reduced lunch program.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

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DISABILITY: IEP/504 STATUS IEP and 504 status is collected annually through the Vermont Department of Education Child Count process, which looks at the students active as of December 1 of the school year. This status is determined by procedures managed by Special Education Services, as defined by Federal and State law. The status of individual students does not generally change. However, the number of students identified does not depend on their age or grade. In general, the numbers of students identified increases from elementary to middle/high school, from an average of 33 per grade to 53 per grade (IEP and 504 combined). The percent of students not on IEP or 504 is not included, so sums don't equal 100%.

CHART 3: Student Demographics by Special Education Status by School Level For example, 10% of the students at the high school are on an IEP.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

SEX/GENDER Sex or gender is determined by parent response to the annual information sheet, or collected upon student enrollment. This is reported as part of the Vermont Department of Education census, both in the fall and at the end of the school year. The state only allows two selections. The percent of any gender in any school is presumed to be 50%.

CHART 4: Student Demographics by Sex/Gender by School Level For example, 51% of the students at the high school are female.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

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LANGUAGE BACKGROUND: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER STATUS English language learners are students who have a home language other than English and who demonstrate limited English proficiency. Home language is determined at registration with the Vermont Department of Education Home Language Survey. English language proficiency is measured by assessments developed by the World-class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Consortium, of which the state of Vermont is a member. Schools assess English language proficiency with the annual English language proficiency assessment, ACCESS for ELLs, or with the screener, either the W-APT or the MODEL. The assessments measure students’ attainment of Vermont’s English language proficiency standards. Students with a home language other than English who demonstrate limited English proficiency, which in Vermont is a composite score less than 5.0 and scores less than 4.0 in reading and writing, are eligible for ELL services and categorized as Limited English Proficient (LEP). When ELL students score above the minimum criteria, they are reclassified as fluent English proficient and monitored for two years and are considered Fluent English Proficient Monitored (FEPM). Students who have completed two years of monitoring, or who were never eligible for ELL services, are non-ELLs so they do not receive services. The goal of ELL services is that students improve their proficiency in English, thus moving from limited to fluent English language proficiency. This means that group membership is dynamic; students move in and then out of language background categories as they improve in English. In any given year, the number of students in the language background categories is variable. FEPM numbers are small (~100 total) compared to LEP (~500). Conclusions based on FEPM numbers are not as likely to be statistically significant

CHART 5: Student Demographics by English Language Learner Status by School Level For example, 11% of the students at the high school are receiving services as LEP.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

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Student Achievement
There are many different measures of student achievement, including standardized test scores, academic participation and achievement, graduation and completion rates, and post-secondary success. For this initial pilot report, we are only looking at two measures, achievement on the state standardized NECAP test (grades 3-8 and 11) and Academic Achievement and Success as measured by report card grades (grades 6-12). Subsequent reports may continue to look at these measures, as well as investigating alternative measures.

Standardized Testing The current testing standard for students in Vermont is the NECAP test (New England Common Assessment Program). This test is given to all students in grades 3 through 8 and in grade 11. All students are tested on reading and mathematics. In addition, students in grades 5, 8, and 11 are tested on writing. Test scores range from 0 to 80 in any given year. The test scores are scaled so a score of 40 is considered proficient. The test is progressively harder from year to year, so students who are progressing on grade level should be getting the same scores. If student scores are increasing, students are progressing faster than their peers. The proficiency level of students ranges from 1 to 4, with 3 considered proficient, and 4 considered proficient with distinction. The percentage of students who were considered proficient or above was calculated. The sample of students includes approximately 800 elementary, 750 middle school, and only 250 high school students. As a result, comparisons of elementary or middle school performance to the high school performance must consider the different sample size. For samples that were below 20 results are noted as *

RESULTS Most results for NECAP performance are noted on the Department of Education’s website, and multiple years can be reviewed. In general, results for this year mirrored results from previous years. In general, Free and Reduced Lunch status students perform more poorly than those who are not. In general, more students are proficient in reading than in math. In general, females perform better than males on the reading test, and the same as males on the math test. With respect to disability status, students on IEPs perform more poorly than those who are not, while students with 504 accommodations perform more closely to the school average. Information on NECAP scores disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity and English Language Learner Status is on the following pages.

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NECAP SCORES and RACE/ETHNICITY Scores of students sorted by Race/Ethnicity are shown. Sample sizes smaller than 20 students are not shown.

CHART 6: NECAP Math by Race/Ethnicity by School Level For example, 25% of Asian Students at the high school are proficient or above in math.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

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CHART 7: NECAP Reading by Race/Ethnicity by School Level For example, 63% of Asian Students at the high school are proficient or above in reading.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

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NECAP SCORES and ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS The scores for students receiving English Language services are shown. Some sample sizes are small, especially for the FEPM category, so further study will be needed to determine if differences in the percentages are meaningful. However, it appears that FEPM students perform more closely to the school average, and LEP students are performing more poorly, which would be expected from a test which is predominantly language-based. A significant fraction of students who are receiving English Language services are of non-white race/ethnicity. There are a lot of possibilities for further study in this area, including looking at factors disaggregated by more than one category, or looking at students across several years (growth model). However, the NECAP test is being discontinued after the next school year. Also, the test relies on a measurement taken during a few days in October, and needs to be considered in concert with other measures of academic achievement.

Definitions: Not Rcv = Not Receiving Services LEP = Limited English Proficiency (attained composite score of less than 5.0 with reading and writing scores of less than 4.0 on ACCESS for ELLS test) FEPM = Fluent English Proficiency Monitored (monitored for two years after reclassification as fluent English proficient)

CHART 8: NECAP Math by English Language Learner Status by School Level For example, 43% of high school students not receiving English Language Services are proficient or above in math.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

CHART 9: NECAP Reading by English Language Learner Status by School Level For example, 79% of high school students not receiving English Language Services are proficient or above in reading.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

Definitions: Not Rcv = Not Receiving Services LEP = Limited English Proficiency (attained composite score of less than 5.0 with reading and writing scores of less than 4.0 on ACCESS for ELLS test) FEPM = Fluent English Proficiency Monitored (monitored for two years after reclassification as fluent English proficient)

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Academic Participation and Success Student grades are reported as part of the student transcript. For this report, only students in grades 6-12 were reviewed. In the next school year (2011-2012), grades from all students K12 will be collected by the Vermont Department of Education as part of its secondary-elementary course transcript process (SECT). All courses are identified according to the National Center of Educational Statistics (NCES) guidelines, and are given an NCES code by the school. As this is a new process for schools, we expect the course definitions and the corresponding codes to improve in accuracy in school year 2011-12 and subsequent years. However, for this first review, grades were not separated by content area, core courses, or elective courses. In addition, courses for specialized programs, such as those designated as special services, the technical center, or English Language learner courses were not included. The sample of students was approximately 1000 high school and 750 middle school students. Grades were averaged across all the courses for a student, and ranked as A, B, C, or less than C. Samples that were below 20 students scores are noted as *

RESULTS Chart 10 shows the distribution of grades for the entire sample, at high school and middle school levels. Since all students are included, the totals should add to 100%, with minor variation for rounding. In general, about 80% of students get grades of A or B, and more middle school students get average grades of A and B than their high school counterparts.

CHART 10: Grades 6-12 (District Overall) For example, approximately 35% of the high school students have an overall average of A.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

GRADES and RACE/ETHNICITY The chart below shows the percent of all students who get an overall average grade of A or B combined, disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity. Students who get an overall average of C or lower are not included. Therefore, the percentages will not add to 100%. In general, there are differences, similar to those in the NECAP scores, but the difference in average grades is smaller than the difference in NECAP proficiency levels. However, the NECAP is only given to one grade of students (Grade 11) at the high school level.

CHART 11: Grades 6-12 by Race/Ethnicity by School Level For example, about 81% of the Asian students at high school level have an overall average of A or B.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

GRADES and SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS/CLASS Students receiving free or reduced lunch are more likely to get lower grades than students not on free and reduced lunch. This is similar to national trends.

CHART 12: Grades 6-12 by Free/Reduced Lunch Status by School Level For example, 19% of Free and Reduced Lunch Status students get average grades of A in high school.

HS A = high school students receiving A grade; HS B = high school students receiving B grade; MS A = middle school students receiving A grade; MS B = middle school students receiving B grade

GRADES and SEX/GENDER Chart 13 below shows the percent of all students who get an overall average grade of A, and those who get an overall average grade of B, disaggregated by gender. Students who get an overall average of C or lower are not included. More females get overall average grades of A than males, at both the middle and high school level.

CHART 13: Grades 6-12 by Sex/Gender by School Level For example, 41% of female students receive average grades of A in high school.

HS A = high school students receiving A grade; HS B = high school students receiving B grade; MS A = middle school students receiving A grade; MS B = middle school students receiving B grade

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Grades by Disability Status and English Language Learner Status were not included. Sample sizes were small, and by definition, these students are receiving additional services. However, this is an area for possible further study.

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Climate and Inclusion
Attendance One measure of climate and inclusion is attendance. In the past several years, the district has implemented programs to improve student attendance. Attendance can be related to how students feel about school. Also, attendance is related to academic achievement. Attendance is recorded in the end-of-year census required by the Vermont Department of Education, which includes the number of days enrolled and number of days attended. Two measures of attendance are attendance rate and continuous enrollment.

ATTENDANCE RATE In the 2010-2011 school year, there were 175 days. For purposes of this pilot, only students who were enrolled at least half of a school year (88 days) were included. Over 99% of our enrollees fall into this category. The attendance rate for those students is calculated by taking the number of days attended divided by the number of days enrolled. Thus, a student who was enrolled for 88 days who attended 88 days would have a rate of 100%, while a student who was enrolled for 175 days who attended for 140 days would have an attendance rate of 80%. The overall district attendance rate for these students is 95.5%, which is an average of almost 8 days absent. Attendance rate was grouped for purposes of counting students. For example, all students with rates from 96-100% (rounded) were counted. The rate is reported as a percentage of all of the students in a category. For example, the district has an overall attendance rate of 63% in the 96-100% category. This means that 63% of all students attended at least 95.5% of the time they were enrolled In some cases the number of students is less than 20, and those results are represented by *

RESULTS Overall, about 63% of students attend more than 95.5% of the time. Students participating in the Free and Reduced lunch program have a lower attendance rate than those who don’t participate. There does not seem to be a relationship between attendance rate and gender, with about 64% of the students of each gender being in school more than 95% of the time. In general, students who identify as Asian or Black/African American have better attendance rates than white students, with as many as 10% more students attending more than 95.5% of the time. Of all the students, those receiving English Language services have the highest attendance rate, with a district average of almost 80% of the LEP students attending more than 95.5% of the time.

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

OVERALL

CHART 14: Attendance Rate (District Overall) by School Level For example, 64% of high school students attended 96-100% of the days they were enrolled.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

ATTENDANCE RATE and RACE/ETHNICITY Attendance rate is disaggregated by race/ethnicity. For this chart, only the percentage of students who have an attendance rate above 95.5% is shown. At the elementary level, Black students have the largest percentage. At the middle and high school level, Asian students have the highest percentage.

CHART 15: Attendance Rate by Race/Ethnicity by School Level For example, 76% of Asian high school students attended 96-100% of the days they were enrolled.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

ATTENDANCE RATE and ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Attendance rate is disaggregated by English Language Learner status. For this chart, only the percentage of students who have an attendance rate above 95.5% is shown. At all levels, Limited English Proficient students have the highest percentage.

CHART 16: Attendance Rate by English Language Learner Status by School Level For example, 82% of LEP high school students attended 96-100% of the days they were enrolled.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

Definitions: Not Rcv = Not Receiving Services LEP = Limited English Proficiency (attained composite score of less than 5.0 with reading and writing scores of less than 4.0 on ACCESS for ELLS test) FEPM = Fluent English Proficiency Monitored (monitored for two years after reclassification as fluent English proficient)

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Participation and Leadership: Expanded Learning Program Participation The Burlington After School program tracks attendance for each enrolled student. Research on the effects of after school program participation indicates that 30 days of participation is the minimum amount needed to observe positive outcomes. For purposes of this pilot, the percentage of students who participated more than 30 days during the 2010-2011 year was included. These are defined as Regular Attendees. The percentage of students who are regular attendees is reported. For example, there are over 1000 regular attendees district-wide, representing 30.6% of the student sample. Samples that were below 20 students scores are noted as * It is common nationwide for attendance at after school programs to drop during high school years, when students typically have jobs, sports, and other activities during the after school time.

CHART 17: After School Regular Attendees (District overall) by School Level For example, 9% of all high school students were regular attendees (more than 30 days) of the after school program.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

EXPANDED LEARNING PROGRAM PARTICIPATION and RACE/ETHNICITY The percentage of black students who attend the program regularly is highest among all groups and relatively consistent at all school levels (44-53%). All student groups of color have a higher percentage of regular attendees compare to white students.

CHART 18: After School Regular Attendees by Race/Ethnicity by School Level For example, 14% of high school students who were identified as Asian were regular attendees (more than 30 days) of the after school program.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

EXPANDED LEARNING PROGRAM PARTICIPATION and SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS/CLASS A higher percentage of students eligible for free or reduced price lunches were regular attendees, compared to students who were not eligible.

CHART 19: After School Regular Attendees by Free/Reduced Lunch Status by School Level For example, 18% of high school students and Free and Reduced Lunch Status were regular attendees (more than 30 days) of the after school program.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

EXPANDED LEARNING PROGRAM PARTICIPATION and DISABILITY A lower percentage of students on special education plans were regular attendees, compared to students who are not on such plans.

CHART 20: After School Regular Attendees by Special Education Status by School Level For example, 35% of middle school students who are on special education plans (504 or IEP) were regular attendees (more than 30 days) of the after school program.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

EXPANDED LEARNING PROGRAM PARTICIPATION and SEX/GENDER While regular attendance is roughly even between males and females at the elementary school level, a higher percentage of females are regular attendees at the middle and high school level.

CHART 21: After School Regular Attendees by Sex/Gender by School Level For example, 12% of female high school students were regular attendees (more than 30 days) of the after school program.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

EXPANDED LEARNING PROGRAM PARTICIPATION and LANGUAGE BACKGROUND Higher percentages of ELL students are regular attendees, especially at the high school level, when compared to non-ELL students.

CHART 22: After School Regular Attendees by English Language Learner Status by School Level For example, 44% of high school students who are English Language Learners (ELL) were regular attendees (more than 30 days) of the after school program.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Behavior and Discipline: Suspension Rate The Vermont Department of Education requires schools to submit information on suspensions annually as part of the Comprehensive Incident Report System (CIRS) report. This information is certified by the building principal. The information used for this report was derived from the CIRS information for the 20102011 school year. It includes students who were suspended, in or out of school, as defined by the CIRS reporting requirements. If a student was suspended, they were counted once and only once. This method does not take into consideration whether a student is suspended multiple times, nor whether the suspension was for a violent act (e.g., fighting) or non-violent act (e.g., leaving school grounds). For purposes of this pilot report, the percent of students of any category who were suspended will be defined as the suspension rate. For example, if 10 elementary students had any incident of suspension out of 100 elementary students total, then the suspension rate would be 10%. In some cases the number of students is less than 20, and those results are represented by *

RESULTS In general, the number of students who are perpetrators of behavior incidents is small. The suspension rate is 6.6%, so overall student behavior is good. In general, the suspension rate middle school is higher than the rate at high school, and it is lowest at the elementary school. It is expected that elementary school has a low rate – whether the middle school rate is typical requires further study. In many instances, the number of students in the sample was too low to include. This includes suspension rates for English Language Learners, students with IEP or 504 status, and females, with one exception. LEP Middle School Students had 20 or more students with an incident, a rate of 22.5%, compared to a rate of 9.5% for middle school students not receiving services.

CHART 23: Suspension Rate (District Overall) For example, 7.4% of the students at the high school were suspended at least once.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools.

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

BEHAVIOR AND DISCIPLINE and RACE/ETHNICITY Most of the categories under race/ethnicity had counts too small to be used. However, the rates for Black/African-American students were higher than that for white students at all levels.

CHART 24: Suspension Rate by Race/Ethnicity by School Level For example, 13.5% of high schools who identified as Black/African-American were suspended at least once.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools

BEHAVIOR AND DISCIPLINE and FREE or REDUCED LUNCH STATUS Students who participate in the free or reduced lunch program have a higher rate than other students.

CHART 25: Suspension Rate by Socio-Economic Status/Class by School Level For example, 12.6% of high school students who participate in the Free or Reduced Lunch program were suspended at least once.

HS = high school; MS = middle schools; ES = elementary schools * Samples size too small to report (n<20).

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Burlington School District Staff Demographics

District Staff Resources The Burlington School District has 1020 staff for the 2010-2011 school year, of which 422 are on teacher contracts, 570 are staff members, and 28 are considered administrators (principals and central office directors). Of all staff, 94.3% identify as white and 5.7% as staff of color with those identifying as black/African American comprising the largest racial group. For the 2010-2011 school year, 97.6% of district teachers are white. At the administrator and staff levels, there is slightly more racial/ethnic diversity, where 8.1% identify as staff of color. The Department of Human Resources takes an annual snapshot of personnel demographics each October 1st.

CHART 26: Burlington School District Staff Demographics by Race and Position Type
Asian Teacher Staff Admin TOTAL # TOTAL % 3 9 1 13 1.3% Black 2 23 1 26 2.5% Hispanic 3 7 0 10 1.0% Native 0 0 0 0 0.0% Other/MR 2 7 0 9 0.9% White 412 524 26 962 94.3% Total 422 570 28 1020

Teacher % Staff % Admin % TOTAL %

0.7% 1.6% 3.6% 1.3%

0.5% 4.0% 3.6% 2.5%

0.7% 1.2% 0.0% 1.0%

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

0.5% 1.2% 0.0% 0.9%

97.6% 91.9% 92.9% 94.3% N=1020

Reported: November, 2010 (October 1 snapshot) NOTE: There are none reporting to be Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Affirmative Hiring In the 2010-2011 academic year, The Burlington School District hired six staff of color hired among 38 teaching positions (not filled with internal transfers), including one administrator of color. This follows a second consecutive year of hiring six faculty in 2009-2010, unprecedented levels of affirmative hiring for our District.

CHART 27: Burlington School District Affirmative Hiring by Race (Teacher Positions)
Not Provided 3

Asian Teacher 2

Black 3

Hispanic 0

Native 0

Other/MR 1

White 29

Total 38

Data collected and reported October 2011 for 2010-2011 academic year (after October snapshot).

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Recommendations and Future Actions

Note about the pilot draft: Any Advisory Council and Administration recommendations and future actions/plans based on presented data will be included in this section.

This information would have several options by which it can be organized (e.g., following the domain ordering above, or perhaps using another organizational framework, such as the soon to be implemented Strategic Plan on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion).

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Appendix A: Data Definitions

Metric

Definition
Students who are receiving accommodations under Section 504 of IDEA Individualized Education Plan Attendance Rate is the total number of days present divided by the total number of days enrolled.

Calculation

504

Attendance Rate For this summary, attendance rate is divided into categories of <70%, 71-80%, 81-90%, 91-95%, and 96-100%. CIRS Common Incident Reporting System State required annual report on disciplinary incidents. Includes expulsions, weapons, bullying, harassment, suspensions (in and out of school). Rate of students who have any incident of suspension, bullying, or harassment as a perpetrator during the school year.

For example, if a student was present for 170 days and enrolled for 175 days, the rate would be 0.97 or 97%

CIRS Incident Rate

Student is counted once and only once if there is an incident. English language proficiency measured using WIDA ACCESS for ELLs, W-APT, or MODEL assessments. Students with composite scores < 5.0 and reading and writing scores < 4.0 are considered LEP. Students with composite scores of > 5.0 and reading and writing scores of > 4.0 are reclassified as Fluent English Proficient and monitored for two years. These students are FEPM.

LEP = Limited English Proficient

English Proficiency

FEPM = Fluent English Proficient Monitored

Not Rcv = not receiving ELL services (not LEP or FEPM). Students may be former FEPM students or never ELL students.

FRL Free or Reduced Lunch Gender

Students who are eligible for free or reduced lunch. Gender as required by the Vermont State DOE reporting, limited to male or female

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Metric
IEP Individualized Education Plan

Definition
Students who are on an IEP as described by IDEA Follows the U.S. DOE definitions for race and ethnicity, and include the following categories: (1) Hispanic/Latino of any race (HISP); and, for individuals who are nonHispanic/Latino only (2) American Indian or Alaska Native (AMI), (3) Asian (ASIAN) (4) Black or African American (BAA), (5) Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (NAT), (6) White (WHITE), and (7) Two or more races. (TWO+)

Calculation

Race/Ethnicity

NECAP New England Common Assessment Program SECT Secondary Elementary Course Transcript

Test given to all students in grades 3-8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8, and 11 in writing, grades 4, 8, and 11 in science. Report required by Vermont State DOE which includes grades and courses for all students

Scores range from 0-80, and are normalized (scaled) so a score of 40 is considered proficient.

New in 2011-2012

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

Appendix B: Sub-group detail

Note about the pilot draft: Our intention here is to include access to all the data collected for the purposes of an Equity and Inclusion Data Report. Based on the limitations of staffing, we may use this section to provide more information not already included in the body of the pilot report.

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Please send us your comments on this pilot report at: equityreport@bsdvt.org

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2010-2011 PILOT REPORT – 10/08/12

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