The Fourth Street Live! Entertainment District  Public Costs and Public Benefits    by  Paul A. Coomes, Ph.D.

  Professor of Economics  and  Shaheer Burney and Barry Kornstein  University of Louisville    August, 2012    his report was conducted on behalf of the Louisville‐Jefferson County government and  the Louisville Convention and Visitors Bureau to document the public costs and benefits  of the Fourth Street Live! entertainment district in downtown Louisville. The City issued a  $13.5 million general obligation bond in 2001 and used the proceeds to acquire Galleria  property for $4 million and the remaining $9.5 million was used to add infrastructure, including  a new street.     Prior to the development of Fourth Street Live!, the Galleria was a failed and basically vacated  development. By 2004, the core block, 4th Street between Liberty and Muhammad Ali streets,  was transformed to an entertainment district, packed with restaurants, bars, clubs, and  assorted retail outlets. The area continues to evolve with new businesses and events, and  seems likely to sustain itself for decades to come. In this study, we attempt to measure the  various economic and fiscal benefits that are associated with the district.     The main findings of our study are:  Fourth Street Live! has been a contributor to the revitalization of downtown, with large  crowds of restaurant and bar patrons at night and a bustling lunch business daily in the  block. The foot traffic into the area has had a spillover effect in adjacent areas and the  project has helped spur additional development in the downtown.   The most direct economic benefit has been the 500 or so jobs at restaurants and clubs  in the entertainment district ‐ jobs that are expected to remain there for several  decades. Moreover, the initial construction of Fourth Street Live! supported around 600  jobs during 2003. There are typically 25 construction jobs in the district at any time, as  the space is reprogrammed to meet changing customer demands.  Fourth Street Live! has played an integral role in the strong growth in Louisville’s  downtown hospitality industry over the last decade. Between 2004 and 2011, the  number of hotel rooms sold downtown rose by 63 percent and the value of rooms sold 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

rose by 112 percent, or $63 million per year, even throughout the recent recession.  According to Jim Wood, CEO of Louisville Visitor and Convention Bureau, FSL is an  important part of the package used in the competition for conventions, and has helped  Louisville win new business.   Fourth Street Live! has played an important role in spurring additional investment and in  the growth of hotels, restaurants and bars in downtown Louisville. According to the  Census Bureau, downtown zip code 40202 added on net 30 business establishments and  1,400 jobs in the ‘Accommodations and food service’ industry between 2002 and 2010.   We project that the total direct tax revenues across all jurisdictions considered to be  about $81 million over thirty years.  In terms of tax revenues received directly from FSL,  Kentucky state government appears to be the biggest beneficiary, primarily due to its six  percent tax on food and beverages in the district. Projected out thirty years, it appears  that state government will collect about $69 million in taxes from activity in the  entertainment district, while rebating about $11 million in sales taxes, for a net gain of  $58 million. We project that the Louisville‐Jefferson County government will collect  about $13 million in taxes from the district. Local property and occupational taxes will  also flow to the Jefferson County Public School system and the Transit Authority of River  City, adding another $10 million.   Local government costs for the Fourth Street Live! project will amount to about $19.6  million over twenty years. Additionally, the development has the potential to receive  approximately $1.1 million per year over a ten year period in rebated sales taxes from  the Commonwealth of Kentucky to the extent it generates incremental sales taxes to  the state above and beyond what the state was receiving prior to the development. So,  total public costs, including the state sales tax rebate, will likely be around $31 million.       

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

History of the project  Fourth Street Live! (FSL) replaced the old Louisville Galleria, which was constructed in 1982. The  Galleria was essentially a downtown mall, with a glass roof covering 4th Street, and shops on six  floors in the east and west buildings. The Galleria was  built and owned by Oxford Properties, who also built  two  office  towers,  one  each  at  the  north  and  south  ends  of  the  shopping  area.  Oxford  spent  about  $144  million on the whole development, plus carrying costs.  By  the  mid‐1990s,  the  Galleria  was  losing  retail  tenants, e.g., Laura Ashley and The Limited, and by the  late‐1990s  it  became  clear  that  the  business  model  would no longer work. Oxford was losing money, and  sold the two office towers at a loss to raise cash. Bacon’s department store had a lease through  the end of 2002, but most tenants were gone by then. By 2003, the only tenant left was a drug  store.     Then Mayor Dave Armstrong became involved in the late‐1990s as he became aware that the  space  was  losing  tenants  and  the  property  owners  were  seeking  an  exit  strategy.  A  detailed  study  by  Ernst  and  Young  documented  the  inevitable  decline  in  the  existing  programming  of  commercial space,  but  also  pointed  to  Louisville’s  lack  of  a  downtown  entertainment  district.  Convention  and  economic  development  officials  all  saw  the  need  for  an  entertainment  district,  both  to  give conventioneers something to do on foot and as a  draw  for  young  professionals  in  the  region.  Mayor  Armstrong  had  the  City  of  Louisville  issue  a  $13.5  million general obligation bond in November 2001 to  implement  the  deal  he  had  negotiated  with  the  Cordish  Group  for  the  development  of  the  entertainment  district.  The  City  used  the  funds  to  purchase the Galleria buildings from Oxford for $4 million, to make grants and loans to Cordish,  and  to  make  infrastructure  improvements  in  the  block.  Cordish  programmed  the  refurbished  facilities,  investing  along  with  their  tenants  perhaps  another  $55  million,  and  opened  FSL  in  June 2004.  FSL has inarguably revitalized downtown, with large crowds of restaurant and bar  patrons at night and a bustling lunch business daily in the block. The foot traffic into the area  seems to have had a spillover effect in adjacent areas, particularly to the north where several  new restaurants have opened over the past few years.   

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

As with all such projects, there has been some turnover of tenants. Borders closed its bookstore  as part of its bankruptcy. Red Star Tavern closed in 2011, and several others have changed  names and themes. However, each closing has been followed by reprogramming and new  tenants. For example, the Borders bookstore site at the corner of 4th and Liberty streets just  opened as a new brew pub. FSL projects steady investments by Cordish and tenants of $2‐3  million per year over the next two decades, to modify structures as themes and venues change.    Public costs  Both the City and the Commonwealth of Kentucky have directly or indirectly invested in the FSL  project. As mentioned the City used the proceeds of a $13.5 million bond issue to acquire  property and jump start the private investments. The City (the Louisville‐Jefferson County  government after the 2002 merger) is making debt service payments of roughly $1 million per  year for twenty years, 2002 through 2021.    FSL also qualified for the Kentucky Tourism Tax Credit program. This allows FSL to recover up to  25 percent of the project’s development cost over a 10‐year term. Under the incentives, the  Kentucky Department of Revenue returns to developers a portion of the state sales taxes paid  by out‐of‐state visitors to the attraction. Also, as part of the overall tax credit deal, the City  established a $3.5 million escrow account to be used in case FSL did not generate enough out‐ of‐state business to take full advantage of the tax credits. So far, FSL has drawn down about  one‐third the escrow account, and City officials expect to use a total of $2 million over the life  of the credit program.    So, the total public costs are about $19.6 million from the City plus the sales taxes rebated by  the State of Kentucky under the tourism tax credit program. These costs are spread out over  the lives of the City’s 20‐year bond issue and the 10‐year state tax credit. The amount of state  tax credits vary somewhat from year to year, ranging between $1.0 to $1.1 million so far. The  state tax rebates are only from incremental sales taxes generated directly from the  development above and beyond a threshold of what was previously generated by the site.  Given the history, a reasonable estimate is that the state will rebate around $11.0 million back  to the developers over the life of the tourism tax credit program. Thus, total (undiscounted)  public costs are likely to be about $30.7 million over the years 2002 through 2021. 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

The general importance of downtown entertainment districts  Why do city governments care so much about downtown entertainment districts? Why do they  routinely invest in supporting infrastructure and the developments themselves, but rarely take  the lead in hospitality and retail projects outside of downtowns? Some critics argue that these  policies redistribute economic activity to the center of a city, leaning against market forces. The  most vocal critics are often the owners of competing restaurants, bars and clubs, who feel they  pay taxes to a city government that then subsidizes their competition. Here are the arguments  we have heard for city government subsidy of downtown entertainment districts.  1. The suburbs will take care of themselves, since people will naturally go out to eat and  shop close to where they live. Relatively few people live downtown, but the downtown  is the heart of the region, and thus everyone in the region has a stake in keeping the  center healthy. An entertainment district provides a synergistic reason to be downtown  after the offices close during the week, and on weekends. If a strong agglomeration of  restaurants, bars and clubs does not emerge organically, the local government should  use its tools to make sure such a local draw exists.   2. Having a collection of scattered entertainment venues around downtown does not have  the impact of a concentrated district of venues. Urban economists call this force  “shopping externalities”, whereby the revenues and profits of a group of co‐located  firms are greater than if those firms were in disparate locations. The primary reason is  that consumers like to shop around, and prefer to make a trip to a district with many  options than many trips to isolated businesses. Much as customers like to shop at a mall  with four or five shoe stores (typically lined up down one wing of the mall) than drive  around to six scattered shoe stores, people looking for dinner, lunch, and entertainment  prefer to make the trip to a place that has many choices. Once they park their car, they  can walk around and decide which restaurant or club to patronize. Since most  downtowns, like Louisville’s, have been around for two or three centuries and already  have a built‐up environment, it is a challenge to convert older buildings into an  entertainment district. At a minimum, the city government needs to get involved in land  use permitting, planning, streets, lighting, and other infrastructure. Often the city  government will want, or need, to do much more, such as purchase property, demolish  property, and provide financial incentives to developers.  3. All major cities have convention centers downtown surrounded by large hotels. The key  to landing major conventions is to have a lot of hotel rooms within walking distance of  the meeting and exhibit areas. Moreover, there needs to be something else to do on  foot than go to a meeting hall. Prior to FSL, officials at Louisville’s Convention and  Visitors Bureau had documented visitors’ concerns about lack of walkable  entertainment. This was listed by downtown hotel customers as the number one deficit 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

in Louisville (today the concern is lack of retail outlets nearby). Conventions are much  easier to attract if a city can promote (walkable) amenities other than hotel rooms and  meeting space. It is probably not feasible to determine what conventions Louisville  missed prior to FSL, or gained later due to FSL, but there is no question FSL is an  important part of the package used in the competition for convention business.  4. Over the past fifteen years cities have increasingly tried to lure ‘young professionals’ to  their markets. These mobile, well‐educated, and creative people are seemingly the new  economic development prize, as human capital has superceded physical capital in  importance in the competition among cities. Young professionals are more likely than  others to take advantage of an entertainment district. Moreover, they are more likely to  live in flats, studios, apartments, and condos downtown. Having something to do on  foot downtown makes it easier to succeed in the downtown living dimension, which  then supports downtown retail. 
Downtown Entertainment Districts
Louisville and 15 Peer Cities City
Birmingham

Entertainment District
Birmingham–Jefferson Convention Complex Marketplace (Under Construction)

Attractions
Convention, Sports, Music Dining and Hotel Nightlife, Dining Music, Arts & Culture, Sports Music, Movies, Nightlife, Sports Nightlife, Dining Nightlife, Dining, Retail Arts, Entertainment, Retail Nightlife, Retail, Dining Retail, Dining, Nightlife, Music Sports, Art Nightlife, Dining Music (Blues) Music, Nightlife Art, Nightlife, Dining Nightlife Art, Retail, Dining City of Omaha 3CDC Bayer Properties

Developer

Organic?
No No Yes No No No Yes

Performa Entertainment Real Estate, Inc.

Charlotte Cincinnati Columbus Dayton Indianapolis

Uptown Entertainment District Fountain Square Arena District Oregon Arts District Massachusetts Avenue Wholesale District ‐ Georgia Street

Nationwide Realty Investors Downtown Dayton Partnership

Indianapolis Department of Public Works Rouse Company, sold to Sleiman Enterprises Cordish Space Group (Designer) Cordish

No No No No No Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Jacksonville Kansas City Lexington Louisville Memphis Nashville Omaha Raleigh Richmond

The Jacksonville Landing Power & Light District (KC Live!) Rupp Arena, Arts, and Entertainment District Fourth Street Live Beale Street Entertainment District Historic 2nd Avenue The Old Market Omaha Warehouse District Shockoe Slip

  Louisville is certainly not alone in nurturing a downtown entertainment district. We have  scanned our peer cities to see what they offer. See table for a summary. Of our fifteen peer  cities, only Greensboro appears not to have an entertainment district downtown. Birmingham  and Indianapolis appear to have two each. One could argue that several of these developed  organically, without explicit government policy. The Broadway‐Second Avenue district in  Nashville, and Beale Street in Memphis, are good examples where music‐oriented clubs sprang  up in older low‐rise buildings downtown, drawing traffic that subsequently fed restaurants and  retail. In Richmond, the Skockeo Slip district in the city’s old core dates back to the 1600s, and 
Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits    6 

was revived as a dining and shopping area by private investors in the 1970s. Certainly, local  government had to provide some infrastructure and basic city services to support these organic  entertainment districts, but the districts emerged to meet a market demand without  intentional government policy. Most of the entertainment districts listed are a result of  government policy. In any case, the table makes clear that FSL is not an outlier; nearly every city  has something similar. See Appendix A for descriptions of the comparable downtown  entertainment districts.    Louisville’s public investment in its downtown entertainment district is modest compared to at  least two of those in comparison cities. Kansas City issued $295 million in bonds to support  their Power & Light District, ten times the public exposure as Louisville. Birmingham issued $57  million in bonds for The Marketplace, with the debt service to be paid through an increase in  the hotel room tax there.            

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

Economic benefits  Some of the economic benefits of FSL are relatively easy to measure and some are very difficult  to discern in publicly available data. Perhaps the most obvious such benefit has been the  growth in business activity and jobs at restaurants and clubs, as compared to the essentially  abandoned Galleria during the 2002‐2004 period. We acquired data on jobs by industry in the  FSL block over the 2002 to 2010 period, and show the results for the ‘Accommodations and  food services’ industry in the next chart 1 . Since there were no hotels in the block, the data refer  to restaurants and bars. Note that employment fell from 84 to 39 as the Galleria closed, and  then moved to the 500‐700 job range after FSL opened. (See Appendix B for information on  jobs in other industries located at the north and south ends of the FSL block.) 
Jobs at Restaurants and Bars, Fourth Street Live block
800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100
Source: US Census Bureau, Longitudinal Employment‐ Household Dynamics program, using On The Map interface.

0
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

  There are no publicly available data on the wages and salaries of workers in the FSL block. The  developer estimates that the entertainment district supported 725 FTE employees in 2011, with 
                                                            
1

 The only publicly available job data at this small, block‐level, geographic area is from the Census Bureau’s   Longitudinal Employment‐Household Dynamics program (LEHD). Using its OnTheMap geographic interface,  one can define a small area and have the program retrieve employment data by place of work or place of  residence. The data are based on administrative records, primarily unemployment insurance filings by  employers and social security records on employees. The program only provides data back to 2002. It covers  almost all types of firms and employees, but does exclude federal government workers and self‐employed  persons. 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

an annual payroll of $28.3 million. This implies an average annual wage of $38,000. The annual  payroll number is an estimate, not an accounting figure, since each business establishment in  the district handles its own employment and payroll and there is no centralized accounting.  Their estimate of payroll is probably a bit high, but we do not know how high. The average  restaurant job in Jefferson County paid about $13,000, according to the last economic census  report for Jefferson County (see table). However, the jobs reported in the economic census are  mainly part‐time, and are not adjusted to a full‐time equivalent basis. And the FSL  establishments are likely to have higher sales and payroll activity than the Jefferson County  average. 
Restaurant and Bar Statistics for Jefferson County, Kentucky
Payroll  Jobs per  per  Jobs (part‐ Establish Establish Pay per  time and full‐ Sales per  ment Job ment time) Establishment 32,020 $935,544 $278,500 21.9 $12,690 14,705 $1,155,745 $383,400 30.2 $12,697 1,093 $466,205 $99,221 9.0 $11,075

NAICS  Business  Code Industry Description Establishments 722 Food services and drinking places 1,459 7221 Full‐service restaurants 487 7224 Drinking places (alcoholic beverages) 122
Source: US Census Bureau, 2007 Economic Census

  While clearly there are now 500 or so more jobs in FSL block restaurant and bars, it is a  contentious issue of whether those jobs are ‘net new’ to Jefferson County or the greater  Louisville regional economy. Some have argued that these new downtown entertainment  outlets have simply displaced spending that would have occurred elsewhere, for example at the  former Coyote’s downtown or along Bardstown Road, Frankfort Avenue, or in St. Matthews. It  is beyond the scope of this report to resolve this question with any precision. Even if spatial  displacement of spending has occurred, it seems clear that some of the growth in restaurant  and bar activity downtown is due to nonresidents, people that would not normally find the  neighborhood venues known by locals. Special events at FSL, such as music concerts or the  recent pole vaulting competition, draw visitors from hundreds of miles away. On weekends,  one can see license plates of cars from Lexington, Owensboro, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis –  primarily 20‐somethings who come into downtown Louisville for entertainment.   Perhaps a more important source of new dollars to the Louisville economy is the convention  and general hospitality business. FSL has been an important part of the draw that has lifted  downtown’s hospitality volume over the last decade. Prior to FSL, exit surveys of  conventioneers and convention planners revealed that visitors could find little to do in  downtown other than go to their meetings. They wanted a concentrated area within a few  blocks of their hotel where they could walk to a good selection of restaurants, clubs, and ideally  other general shopping. The typical downtown conventioneer or visitor does not want to spend 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

all their time searching for entertainment options around the region. Moreover, they do not  want to take their car out of the hotel parking garage, navigate the city, and return to the  garage. They want to walk out the front door of the hotel and head to a nearby and clearly  defined district containing several dining and entertainment options. FSL has clearly satisfied  that specific need for downtown hotel guests.   The existence of the entertainment district has in turn helped the Louisville Visitor and  Convention Bureau attract more conventions and room‐nights in downtown. The  accompanying chart shows the recent history of hotel room sales downtown. There is a clear  acceleration in number of rooms sold and the value of room sold beginning around 2005.  Indeed, according to room tax data compiled by the Louisville Revenue Commission, between  2004 and 2011 rooms sold downtown rose by 63 percent and the value of rooms sold rose by  112 percent. The red bars show the annual number of rooms sold, rising from less than 600,000  mid‐decade to over 900,000 by the end of the decade. The blue line shows the value of rooms  sold, with the scale on the left axis. One can see that the value rose from about $55 million to  $118 million annually between 2004 and 2011. This growth is even more impressive when one  recalls that there was a serious recession during 2008‐09, one in which the hotel business 

Hotel Room Sales in Downtown Louisville
$140,000,000
922,062  881,240  920,803  900,000 1,000,000

881,573  866,381 

$120,000,000
800,000 750,713  721,255 

$100,000,000

Value of Rooms Sold

666,729  663,199  645,383  638,666  637,423  623,900  623,446  606,528  605,366  600,059  603,510  608,918  596,257  564,391  560,697 

700,000

600,000

500,000

$60,000,000
400,000

$40,000,000

300,000

200,000

$20,000,000
100,000

Source: Louisville Metro Revenue Commission. $0
19901991 199219931994 1995199619971998 199920002001200220032004 200520062007200820092010 2011
0

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

Rooms Sold

$80,000,000

10 

nationally suffered. For the United States as a whole, rooms sold fell by 2.5 percent in 2008 and  6.2 percent in 2009 2 . And the Census Bureau reports that sales and employment in the  ‘Traveler accommodations’ industry fell in 2009 and again in 2010 3 . Comparing Louisville’s  downtown hotels to the national business, it appears the Louisville had much stronger growth  during the 2005 to 2008 period, but was hit by the recession in 2009 by a similar proportion as  the US as a whole. Both the US and Louisville’s downtown hotel business seem to have  bounced back strongly after the recession.  It is impossible to know precisely how much of this growth is due to FSL. There were major  investments in hotel facilities downtown last decade, resulting in nearly 1,600 more rooms, and  with increasing amenities and prices. These include the new 600‐room Marriott in 2005, which  is situated between the convention center and FSL.  New Hotel Rooms in Zip Code 40202 About 80 percent of the rooms added were  traditional short‐term stay rooms, most typically  Year  Opened Rooms used by conventioneers and travelers. The other  new rooms were for extended stays.  Courtyard 2000 140

The Marriot 2005 600 Our judgment is that the FSL and hotel projects  Hampton Inn 2005 173 have supported one another, and that the strong  growth in downtown convention business and  Residence Inn 2005 140 room‐nights sold would not have occurred without  The Galt House 2005 130 the entertainment district. Conversely, the  21 Century 2006 90 entertainment district would not have been as  Fairfield Inn 2008 122 successful without the new hotel capacity. This is a  Springhill Suites 2008 198 qualitative statement; it is not feasible to determine  quantitatively the contribution of FSL to the growth in the hospitality business. Certainly, the  Louisville Visitor and Convention Bureau believes the entertainment district is important to  landing conventions, as they feature FSL in their marketing materials – advertising campaigns,  their Convention Meeting Planner Guide, and in magazine placements. Also, the downtown  hotels list FSL prominently on their web sites, using the nearby entertainment district as way to  lure visitors. The Springhill Suites web site even goes so far as to call itself the “most convenient  of 4th Street Live hotels” 4 . 
As context for the general discussion of Louisville’s hospitality industry, we have organized  public data on employment at hotels, restaurants, arts, recreation, and entertainment 
                                                            
2

 See PWC report, Hospitality Directions US: Hospitality and Leisure, June 2012: www.pwc.com/en_US/us/asset‐ management/hospitality‐leisure/publications/assets/pwc‐hospitality‐directions‐q1‐2012.pdf   3  See The 2012 Statistical Abstract, Table 1266, by US Census Bureau,   www.census.gov/compendia/statab/cats/arts_recreation_travel.html   4  See www.marriott.com/hotels/hotel‐information/travel/sdfsd‐springhill‐suites‐louisville‐downtown/  

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

11 

establishments in Jefferson County KY as compared to our peer city central counties. This is  provided in Appendix B. We calculate employment on a per capita basis, to filter out the  impacts of locals eating out and going to events. Overall, Jefferson County KY has been  performing around the middle of the pack of competitors over the last decade.   Finally, there has been a significant number of construction jobs associated with FSL. The  development company reported there were about 630 workers involved in the original  construction in 2003, with an annual payroll of $22 million. And because of continuing re‐ programming there are on average about 25 construction jobs associated with the project each  year. 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

12 

Fiscal benefits  In this section, we organize what we have learned about tax revenues associated with the FSL  development. We have made estimates of the amount of property taxes, occupational taxes,  net profits taxes, and Kentucky state sales taxes paid to date. And we have projected these out  to 2031 so we can get a feel for thirty year tax stream relative to the public costs that have  been incurred.  

Estimated Public Revenues Associated with Fourth Street Live! by Jurisdiction
$4,000,000

$3,500,000

$3,000,000

$2,500,000

KY State government
$2,000,000

TARC Jefferson Public Schools City‐County

$1,500,000

$1,000,000

$500,000

  The next chart summarizes those estimates, distinguishing among the primary jurisdictions that  receive the tax dollars. The irregular pattern in the first few years is due the impacts of  construction, where for example the state of Kentucky received substantial sales taxes on the  purchase of construction materials, and all the governments received tax payments related to  the wages of construction workers. The jump in annual revenues starting in 2015 is due to  expiration of the Kentucky tourism tax credit. As is evident from the chart, the state of Kentucky  receives the biggest portion of the tax revenues, primarily due to its six percent sales tax on  food and beverage sales in the entertainment district. Over the thirty years considered, we  estimate that Kentucky state government will receive $69.0 million in tax revenues (of which  $11 million will be rebated to the developers), the Louisville‐Jefferson County government will 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031

$0

 

13 

receive $13.3 million, Jefferson County Public Schools will receive $8.6 million, and the Transit  Authority of River City (TARC) will receive $1.8 million. The total amount to all jurisdictions over  thirty years is $81.6 million.    After 2011, of course, these tax revenue estimates are based on assumptions about growth in  sales activity, jobs, pay, and real estate values. The primary assumptions used are as follows:  1. Taxable retail sales at FSL were about $33 million in 2011, the decline from $36 million  in 2010 due primarily to the closure of the Borders bookstore. We assume an annual  growth rate of one  Growth in Retail Sales, Food Services and Drinking Places, United States 8% percent going  forward. One can  7% see from the chart  6% that nationally  5% sales at  4% restaurants and  bars have been  3% growing in the  2% four to five  1% percent range  Source: US Census Bureau; sales were $494 billion in 2011. annually, with the  0% 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 large dip in 2009  ‐1% due to the  ‐2% recession.  However, this reflects faster population growth nationally than in Louisville. Moreover,  according to public data, there was no net growth in taxable retail sales at FSL between  2005 and 2010: it has fluctuated in a tight range around $36 million annually. So, it  seems prudent to use a lower sales growth rate than we observe nationally.  2. Similarly, we use an annual growth rate of one percent on the real estate taxes paid to  local and state governments by FSL properties. The entertainment district generated  $217,000 in property taxes in 2011. This is up significantly from the $61,000 paid before  FSL opened, but over the last few years property tax payments have fluctuated up and  down as properties have been reassessed. Currently, land in the entertainment district  is assessed at $8.7 million and real estate improvements are assessed at $7.5 million.  These assessments are revisited regularly, to reflect changing market conditions,  particularly in the commercial real estate market. The commercial real estate market  has been soft the past four to five years, resulting in some downward assessments at  FSL. It seems likely the market will return to modest growth in values over the horizon. 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

14 

3. For payroll‐based taxes, we use the job projections of the FSL managers and assume a  one percent annual increase in average pay. The managers project that FTE employment  will peak at 750 jobs by 2012. They estimate that the average pay for restaurant, bar,  and retail employees was $30,000 when FSL opened, and we let that pay grow by one  percent per year. We have no way to confirm that FSL actually supports 750 FTE  employees. The Census Bureau data shown in the section above on economic benefits  reflect 500 to 600 jobs in restaurants and bars, and these are a mixture of part‐time and  full‐time. However, FSL has employed some people in other industry sectors, like retail  (pharmacy, bookstore), administration, and security.  4. The FLS businesses are also liable for the Louisville‐Jefferson County net profits tax. The  tax rate of 2.20 percent is actually a combination of rates to three jurisdictions: County  (1.25 percent), Transit Authority of River City (0.20 percent), and Jefferson County Public  Schools (0.75 percent). The tax is applied to the net taxable income of the  establishments. There are no data publicly available on the net income of the companies  operating in FSL. We assume net taxable income is ten percent of retail sales, and apply  the rates for the different jurisdictions. This may be too high or too low. A helpful web  site of a consulting firm reports that the industry average for a restaurant’s income  statement reflects 26 to 36 percent cost of goods, 30 to 40 percent payroll and benefits,  7 to 12 percent operating expenses, 5 to 10 percent occupancy expenses, 1 to 5 percent  administrative expenses, and 0 to 19 percent earnings before interest, taxes,  depreciation and amortization 5 . The latter category includes taxable net income, along  with other items, and is a big range.  Restaurants that serve alcohol will have higher  profit margins than those without alcohol.       We are not able to say how much of these tax revenues would have been received by the  government jurisdictions had FSL never been developed. Certainly, some of the restaurant and  bar activity that generated the state sales taxes and local occupational taxes is a displacement  of sales that would have occurred elsewhere in Jefferson County or Kentucky. We do not have  sufficient data or tools to determine the magnitude of the displacement. On the other hand,  FSL needs to be given some credit for the strong growth in downtown hotel sales over the last  decade. Transient room tax receipts from downtown hotels were $8.8 million in 2011,  compared to just $4.2 million in 2004. These revenues go to fund the Louisville Convention and  Visitors Bureau, the Kentucky International Convention Center, and the Kentucky Center for the  Arts.   
                                                            
5

 See http://consulting.dloewi.com/analyzing‐restaurant‐income‐statement  

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

15 

Appendix A  Description of Downtown Entertainment Districts in Peer Cities    Birmingham, AL – Birmingham Jefferson Convention Complex (BJCC), The MarketPlace  The BJCC, constructed in 1976 at a cost of $104 million, houses a convention center, sports  arena, concert hall, theatre, and an entertainment complex, and adjoins the 759 guest room  Sheraton Birmingham Hotel. In FY09 the facility generated $41.5 million in revenue, held 966  events, and recorded attendance of 1.1 million visitors. The BJCC covers an entire block and is  juxtaposed with Interstate Highway 59. The Marketplace, currently under construction, is a  hotel and entertainment  district adjacent to BJCC being  developed by National  Ventures Group to support  the convention business. The  project will include a 303‐ room Westin Birmingham  Hotel and space for about 20  restaurants, nightclubs,  retailers and other tenants.  Total cost of the project is estimated at $70 million, $57 million of which will be financed  through the issuance of public bonds by BJCC Authority and will be backed by an extension of  the city’s existing 14% lodging tax for 30 years. The competitive advantage of BJCC comes from  providing convention halls, hotel space, and entertainment within the same block in the heart  of downtown.    Charlotte, NC – Uptown Entertainment District  The entertainment district in uptown Charlotte started developing in 1995 when a collection of  locally owned clubs decided to create an entertainment hub. Concentrated around Seventh and  College streets, the district is composed of numerous bars and nightclubs in close proximity to  each other. What makes the district unique from others is that it was built without attachment  to any big chain or publicly financed tourist attraction. The entertainment district has managed  to attract young professionals to spend time uptown after 5 p.m., despite failure of previous  efforts by others. About seven blocks up the street from the Charlotte Convention Center and  only three blocks from the Time Warner Cable Arena, the entertainment district is at a  convenient location and had encouraged the growth of bars and nightclubs close by. 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

16 

Cincinnati, OH – Fountain Square  Revitalized in 2006 by the Cincinnati  Center City Development Corporation  (3CDC), Fountain Square serves as a  downtown gathering place through  music, arts and culture, and sports  events held periodically in the district.  The total cost of the renovation was  $48.9 million, including $44.9 million  funded privately through the corporate  community, bank loans, the State of  Ohio loan and investments from  Cincinnati Equity Fund and Cincinnati  New Market Fund, the two private,  corporate‐funded loan funds. Only $4 million invested in the project was public money,  contributed in the form of a grant. The renovation has resulted in the investment of nearly  $125 million in additional private dollars around the Square and in the Fountain Square District.  The square covers four blocks and is owned by the city of Cincinnati. Located adjacent to the  Duke Energy Convention Center, Fountain Square was an ideal venue for an entertainment  district.    Columbus, OH – Arena District  The Arena District was created in the late 1990s and is centered on the Nationwide Arena,  home of the National Hockey League’s  Columbus Blue Jackets. Previously  designated a brownfield area, the  district used the creation of the  Nationwide Arena in 2000 as impetus  for redevelopment. The City of  Columbus contributed to the creation of  the Arena District by providing tax  abatements, demolition, environmental  work, and infrastructure improvements.  The net cost to the City for the  infrastructure improvements was  approximately $36 million. The district was developed and is managed by Nationwide Realty 
Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits    17 

Investors in partnership with the city. Between 1999 and 2008, the assessed value of property  per square foot in the district increased by 267% compared to a 22% increase in all of the  downtown 43215 Zip code. The Arena District is a mixed‐use development, combining  entertainment venues including a hockey arena; new baseball park; amphitheater; movie  theater; over 1 million square feet of commercial class A office space; restaurants and bars;  apartments and condominiums; green space; and parking garages. Overall, the Arena District  has attracted over $1 billion in investments, including $262 million that has gone into the block  that contains Nationwide Arena.     Dayton, OH – Oregon Arts District  Developed in 2008 by Downtown Dayton Partnership, the Oregon Arts District covers 2 blocks  and hosts a number of dining, nightlife, and other entertainment venues. The creation of the  district is based on the notion that effective use of the arts can be a catalyst for economic  development. Therefore, the district  showcases a conglomeration of art  galleries presented by local artists, along  with a mix of restaurants and night  clubs. To fund the redevelopment, the  city of Dayton contributed $850,000 to  invest in parking and infrastructure  improvement while $250,000 was  donated by a local philanthropist to  subsidize rent to make space affordable  for businesses moving into the area. In  return, artists and business owners were  made responsible for meeting very specific criteria for ensuring long term sustainability.  Participating building owners also agreed to provide affordable lease structures with long‐term  options that are compatible with keeping space affordable to artists into the future. The  Oregon Arts District is located one block away from the Dayton Convention Center.    Indianapolis, IN – Massachusetts Avenue  Known as the Arts and Theatre District, five performing arts theatres along with numerous art  galleries and independently owned restaurants operate within Massachusetts Avenue. The  district contains a blend of both commercial and residential properties and is a nightlife haven  for young professionals. Mass Avenue is located just a few blocks from Monument Circle, the 
Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits    18 

heart of Indianapolis’ downtown, and approximately three miles from Indianapolis’ convention  center. The district is one of the six designated cultural districts in Indianapolis.    Indianapolis, IN – Wholesale District (Georgia Street)  The Wholesale District is in the center of downtown  Indianapolis and covers the area including  Monument Circle and the Lucas Oil Stadium. The  district contains more than 85 restaurants and 20  nightspots. Since 1995 the district has attracted  more than $1 billion in investments resulting from  inflow of new businesses and a series of renovation  projects. Within the Wholesale District, Georgia  Street has emerged as the city’s thriving  entertainment district. In 2011, the Georgia Street  Improvement Project led to the reconstruction of  three blocks of Georgia Street, converting it from a  four‐lane street with curbs, gutters, and parking  along the sidewalk to a two lane curbless street.  Improvements included wide pedestrian facilities in  front of buildings, a pedestrian mall in the median, a  new convention venue, better infrastructure, and  aesthetic appeal. The goal of improving Georgia  Street was to support the entertainment industry  around Lucas Oil Stadium. Now, Georgia Street's three‐block street and walkway connects the  Indiana Convention Center, Bankers Life Fieldhouse, Circle Center mall, a collection of  restaurants, residences, hotels and the historic St. John's Church. Georgia Street was developed  by Indianapolis Department of Public Works and was revitalized at a total cost of $12.5 million,  80% of which was covered through the procurement of federal funding and the 20% difference  was filled by a local match. The City has engaged Indianapolis Downtown, Inc. (IDI) as the  Georgia Street manager. The City of Indianapolis retains ownership of the street and is a key  partner. Generated revenues will be dedicated to Georgia Street operations.        

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

19 

  Jacksonville, FL – The Jacksonville Landing  Originally developed in 1987  by Rouse Company, the  Landing covers 5 blocks and is  a shopping and dining complex  in downtown Jacksonville. The  Landing has 126,000‐square‐ feet of space and is a U‐shaped  pavilion on nine acres fronting  the St. Johns River. The  Landing was built at a cost of  $32 million and was sold to  Sleiman Enterprises in 2005 for  $5 million. In 2010, the  Jacksonville City Council agreed to contribute $3.5 million toward Sleiman’s purchase of a  parking lot in the vicinity of the Landing. By daytime, in addition to dining and entertainment,  the Landing acts as a hub of retail. After hours, the main attraction becomes the various  nightclubs and bars located in the district. The Prime F Osborn III Convention Center is located  about 4 blocks away from the Landing.   Kansas City, MO – Power & Light District (Kansas City Live!)  The Power & Light District is a dining, shopping and entertainment district in downtown Kansas  City. It was developed through a public‐private partnership between Kansas City and Cordish  Company at a cost of $850  million and was designed by  Beyer Blinder Bell and 360  Architecture. To finance the  development, Kansas City  directed future sales and  property taxes in the district  to pay back the $295 million  in bonds that the city issued  for the project, which went  toward infrastructure and to  directly support the  development. In the event 
Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits    20 

there weren't enough taxes, the city agreed to pick up the difference. Construction of the  Power & Light District started in 2005 and was completed by 2008. The district covers 9 blocks  and comprises of about half a million square feet. The district is located between the  Convention Center and the Sprint Arena and includes more than 50 restaurants, bars, shops  and entertainment venues. Kansas City Live! is located in the heart of the Power & Light  District. It is a one block area dedicated to live music and entertainment venues similar to  Fourth Street Live! Recently, due to shortfalls in revenue generated by the district, the city has  had to set aside $12.8 million in its budget to cover the 30 percent gap of what is needed to  cover the debt service on the bonds.    Lexington, KY – Rupp Arena Arts and Entertainment District  Development of the Rupp Arena Arts and Entertainment District is currently in the planning  stage. The project includes the renovation of Rupp Arena,  the building of a new convention center, and an  entertainment district in downtown Lexington to provide  visitors of the Rupp Arena an avenue for dining and  nightlife. The district is to be designed by Space Group and  the total cost of the project is estimated to be $260 million.  The financing plan for the project is yet to be determined.  The concept of the district originated from the belief that  considerable synergies exist between the Rupp Arena and the Convention Center that can be  exploited to revitalize Lexington’s downtown.    Memphis, TN – Beale Street Entertainment District  Beale Street comprises of four blocks of entertainment venues in downtown Memphis. The  main driver of Beale Street’s entertainment is blues music. Beale Street developed a brand  name as a hub of blues  music between 1920’s  and 1940’s when  several blues and jazz  legends, including B. B.  King, played at Beale  Street and helped  develop the sub‐genre  of blues music called  Memphis Blues. In  1977, Beale Street was 
Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits    21 

officially declared Home of the Blues by Congress. In 1983, Beale Street was redeveloped by  Elkington & Keltner (now Performa Entertainment Real Estate) which led to its economic  revitalization at a time when several businesses had shut their doors in the wake of economic  downturn. The developers were awarded a 52 year lease that included stringent requirements  for quickly recruiting tenants and achieving other specified goals. However, in 2011 John  Elkington, the man credited with the redevelopment of the Beale Street Entertainment District,  agreed to transfer management of the district to the City of Memphis.    Nashville, TN – The District  The District is a conglomeration of three entertainment districts in downtown Nashville: 2nd  Avenue, Printer’s Alley, and Broadway. The three districts are located adjacent to the Nashville  Convention Center. The District  features a collection of bars,  nightclubs, live music venues and  art studios and galleries. Although  the entertainment districts grew  organically with Nashville’s local  music at the forefront, in the  1980’s a collaboration called The  District was initiated between  Historic Nashville Inc. and the  Metropolitan Historic Commission. With the program aimed at synergizing efforts to further  develop the three districts, the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency provided a  three year block grant of $30,000 per year as seed money to fund the startup of the District  organization.     Omaha, NE – The Old Market  The  Old  Market  is  an  arts  and  entertainment  district  featuring  fine  dining, shopping, corporate meeting facilities, hotel accommodations,  night life, and sought‐after real estate.  The district, then comprised of  former light industrial and warehouse buildings and wholesale jobbing  houses,  served  as  the  distribution  center  for  a  variety  of  goods  shipped on the Union Pacific Railroad and its branch lines all the way  to  the  west  coast.  The  city  has  spent  nearly  $2  billion  in  new  construction  and  development,  including  the  $291  million  Qwest  Center  Omaha,  a  new  40‐story  First  National  Bank  Building,  a  riverfront  university  campus  for  the  world‐renowned  Gallup 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

22 

Organization, and a National Park Service Regional headquarters building for Union Pacific. The  district  was  developed  in  the  1980’s  using  city  funds  and  private  equity  from  relocation  of  headquarters into the area. The City of Omaha also offered property tax incentives to attract  big  name  companies  like  ConAgra  to  relocate  their  headquarters  to  Old  Market.  Arts  and  entertainment  venues  have  sprung  up  along  the  district  and  are  regularly  populated  by  business professionals after hours.    Raleigh, NC – Warehouse District  This 5 block entertainment was the city’s railroad and warehouse distribution hub from the  1850s to the 1950s. Characterized by its red brick warehouses, the Warehouse District has  transformed into a mix of restaurants, specialty shops, and antique stores. It’s slower pace and  quiet environment are a stark contrast to the neighboring Fayetteville Street District, but the  district’s confines come alive after dark as the restaurants and clubs open their doors to  patrons and entertainment seekers. The district is home of the Contemporary Art Museum and  one of downtown’s proposed commuter rail stations. Also notable in the Warehouse District  are its handful of establishments that cater to alternative lifestyles. The Warehouse District is  located only 3 blocks from the Raleigh Convention Center and two other downtown districts.    Richmond, VA – Shockoe Slip  Shockoe Slip is an entertainment district in downtown Richmond featuring art, retail and dining.  The Slip was redeveloped as an entertainment and commercial district in the 1960s and 1970s  when  a  group  of  entrepreneurs  and  architects  sparked  revitalization  in  the  area.  This  came  shortly after the passage of  liquor‐by‐the‐drink  law  in  Richmond.  In  1972  the  district  was  added  to  the  National Register of Historic  Places.  The  result  was  an  inflow  of  restaurants  and  bars  in  Shockoe  Slip.  Although  the  growth  of  Shockoe Slip as an entertainment district was natural, the City of Richmond has recently started  revitalization  efforts  to  enhance  the  district’s  development.  Public  investments,  coupled  with  the  State’s  successful  historic  tax  credit  program,  have  stimulated  extensive  new  private  investment,  particularly  in  residential  development,  resulting  in  combined  public  and  private  investment of more than $1 billion in the past 15 years.  

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

23 

Appendix B  Other Industry, Jobs in the Fourth Street Live Block  Of course, there have been other (non‐entertainment) industries present in the FSL block for  decades. The next chart uses more data from LEHD to show jobs in the restaurant and bar  industry, along with jobs in other industries. The large decline in the category called  ‘Manufacturing’ is due to the loss of the Brown and Williamson headquarters located in the  office building on the northeast corner of 4th Street and Muhammad Ali. The company’s  employment gets counted under manufacturing because its primary revenues are from tobacco  products. The loss of approximately 400 jobs at Brown and Williamson happened  independently of the transition from Galleria to FSL.     Across all industries, the number of jobs fell from 3,022 to 2,734 over the period shown. Note  that the number of total jobs in the ‘Professional and business services’ category has remained  fairly constant, at around 1,200 employees, reflecting the stability of non‐B&W activity in the  two office towers on the block. The FSL businesses were the only source of job growth in the  block over the last decade. 
Jobs by Industry, Fourth Street Live block
1,600
Source: US Census Bureau, Longitudinal Employment‐ Household Dynamics program, using On The Map interface.

1,400

Professional and business services

1,200

1,000

800

Manufacturing

600

Restaurants and bars

400

Administration and  support, waste mgmt

200

Retail Trade
0
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

     

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

24 

Appendix C  Hospitality Industry Comparisons  Jefferson County KY to Fourteen Peer Central Counties  We include here some public data on jobs and payroll in the hospitality industry for Jefferson  County KY and some comparison central counties. These data do not prove or disprove  anything about the contribution of FSL, but rather provide context for the more general  discussion of the relative health of Louisville’s hospitality industry. All data are from the US  Bureau of Economic Analysis, using their NAICS‐based industrial classifications available for the  2001 to 2010 period.    In the first chart we measure employment per capita in the accommodation and food services  industry, and construct an index to reveal the growth in each central county.  We divide by each  county’s population, so as to filter out the local demand for restaurants and events. A county  with strong growth in per capita employment is likely to be selling to an increasing number of  nonresidents. Jefferson County KY ranks near the center of the counties. The hotel, restaurant  and bar industrial category supported 36,100 jobs in 2001, rising to 38,600 in 2008, and falling  back to 37,900 in 2010. Jacksonville (Duval County FL) is the clear leader over the period, with a  growth from 31,100 to 40,300 during the decade. Davidson County TN (Nashville) gave up 17  percent of its per capita employment, presumably due to the closure of Opryland. 
Accomodation & Food Services Employment per Capita Index Jefferson County, KY and 14 comparison central counties
125
United States, US Jefferson, AL Duval, FL

120

115

Marion, IN Fayette, KY

110

Jefferson, KY Jackson, MO

105

Douglas, NE Guilford, NC

100
Mecklenburg, NC Wake, NC Franklin, OH

95

90

Hamilton, OH Montgomery, OH

85
Source: US Bureau of Economic Analysis

Davidson, TN Shelby, TN

80 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Henrico, VA

 
25 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

A related industrial category is ‘Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation’. This includes museums,  performing arts groups, sports venues, and the like. Typically, this industry only accounts for 20  to 25 percent of the number of jobs as the hotel and restaurant industry just discussed. But it  provides another indicator of the health of the overall hospitality industry. If employment is  rising faster than population this suggests that the county is selling more art and recreational  services to nonresidents. 
140

Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation Employment  per Capita Index Jefferson County, KY and 14 comparison central counties

United States, US Jefferson, AL Duval, FL

135

130

Marion, IN Fayette, KY

125

Jefferson, KY Jackson, MO Douglas, NE

120

115

Guilford, NC Mecklenburg, NC

110

Wake, NC Franklin, OH Hamilton, OH

105

100

Montgomery, OH Davidson, TN

95
Source: US Bureau of Economic Analysis

Shelby, TN Henrico, VA

90 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

 

  Again, Jefferson County tracks in the middle of the peer central counties, at least through 2009.  According to BEA, the arts, entertainment and recreation organizations in Jefferson County  lifted employment from 9,400 to 10,700 between 2001 and 2009, but gave nearly all the  growth back in 2010. This decline is presumably due to the closure of Kentucky Kingdom. The  fastest growing counties were Duval FL (Jacksonville), Mecklenberg NC (Charlotte), Shelby TN  (Memphis), Wake NC (Raleigh), and Davidson TN (Nashville). Franklin OH (Columbus) has lost  about ten percent of its per capita employment, while Marion IN (Indianapolis) lost about six  percent. 

Fourth Street Live! Public Costs and Benefits 

 

26 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful