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1823 18th Avenue

1890

1823 18th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122
THE NORTH 12’ OF LT 11, & ALL OF LT 12, BLOCK 15, SUMMIT SUPPLEMENTAL ADDITION TO THE CITY OF SEATTLE, VOLUME, 3 PAGE 125.

808090-0056

Summit Suppl. Addition

15

11 & 12

Denny 18 LLC. 4000 E. Madison St., Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98112 John E. Bigelow, Prudence Bigelow Residence unknown Johnathan E. and Benjamin D. Bigelow

Duplex

E. Marc Rudd/Rudd Development Co. 4000 E. Madison St., Suite 200 206-861-0100, marc@rudddevelopment.com

1823 18th Avenue

Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18th Avenue, Seattle, WA July, 2012

Prepared by:

The Johnson Partnership
1212 NE 65th Street Seattle, WA 98115-6724 206-523-1618, www.tjp.us

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. INTRODUCTION .....................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ................................................................................................................1 1.2 Methodology...............................................................................................................1 PROPERTY D ATA .....................................................................................................................2 ARCHITECTURAL D ESCRIPTION ...............................................................................................3 3.1 Location and Neighborhood Character ..........................................................................3 3.2 Building Description ..................................................................................................3 3.2.1 Building Site ..................................................................................................3 3.2.2 Structure and Exterior Features .........................................................................3 3.2.3 Plan and Interior Features ................................................................................4 3.2.4 Documented Building Alterations ....................................................................5 SIGNIFICANCE ........................................................................................................................6 4.1 Historical Context .......................................................................................................6 4.1.1 Neighborhood Historical Context: Capitol Hill and Madison-Miller ...................6 4.1.2 Building History.............................................................................................8 4.2 Building Ownership ...................................................................................................9 4.2.1 Original Building Developer and Owners: Benjamin D. Bigelow, Prudence R. Bigelow, and John E. Bigelow ......................................................................9 4.2.2 Subsequent Occupant/Owner: Frank Pardee Lewis and Eugenie C. Lewis ...........10 4.3 Architectural Context.................................................................................................11 4.3.1 Historical Architectural Context: Queen Anne style and Plan Book Houses.........11 4.3.2 Building Architect or Designer: Unknown.......................................................12 4.3.3 Building Contractor: Benjamin D. and John E. Bigelow...................................12 B IBLIOGRAPHY......................................................................................................................13

2. 3.

4.

5.

APPENDIX 1—FIGURES.................................................................................................................... A

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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 31 Figure 32 Figure 33 Figure 34 Figure 35 Figure 36 Figure 37 Figure 38 Figure 39 Figure 40 Figure 41 Figure 42 Figure 43 Figure 44 Figure 45 Location.................................................................................................................. A-1 Aerial View ............................................................................................................. A-2 Site Plan ................................................................................................................. A-3 View A – Viewing west from the intersection of E. Denny Way and 18 th Ave. ............... A-4 View B – Viewing west down Cherry St. from the intersection of 26 th Ave. ................... A-4 View C – Viewing west down E. Denny Way from 19th Ave. ..................................... A-4 View D – Viewing south down 18th Ave./18 th Ave. E. ............................................... A-4 View E – Viewing southwest from E. Glen St. and 18 th Ave. E..................................... A-4 View F – Viewing east down E. Denny Way .............................................................. A-4 View G – Viewing east down E. Denny Way from 17 th Ave. ....................................... A-5 View H – Viewing northwest down 18 th Ave./18 th Ave. E. .......................................... A-5 View I – Viewing north down 18 th Ave./18 th Ave. E. .................................................. A-5 View J – Viewing north from 18 th Ave. and E. Howell St. ........................................... A-5 1823 18 th Ave., eastern façade with single family residence to the south........................ A-5 1823 18 th Ave., northern façade ............................................................................... A-5 1823 18 th Ave., western façade ................................................................................. A-6 1823 18 th Ave., southern façade ............................................................................... A-6 1823 18 th Ave., detail of upper floor projecting over bay on eastern façade.................... A-6 1823 18 th Ave., detail of non-original porch railings and stairs ................................... A-6 1823 18 th Ave., detail of windows on main floor of northern façade ............................. A-6 1823 18 th Ave., detail of gable at western portion of northern façade ............................ A-6 1823 18 th Ave., view of gable at western façade........................................................... A-7 1823 18 th Ave., detail of non-original doors at southern end of western façade .............. A-7 1823 18 th Ave., detail of asbestos siding on southern façade ........................................ A-7 1823 18 th Ave., detail of original window on first floor of southern façade .................... A-7 1823 18 th Ave., detail of non-original door and window on southern façade ................. A-7 1823 18 th Ave., entry hall and stairway at main building entry ................................... A-8 1823 18 th Ave., possible receiving room at building’s northeastern corner ................... A-8 1823 18 th Ave., interior room with fireplace at northern side of building ..................... A-8 1823 18 th Ave., small bedroom at building’s northwestern corner............................... A-8 1823 18 th Ave., kitchen at southwestern corner of building......................................... A-9 1823 18 th Ave., room at southeastern corner of building with bay window................... A-9 1823 18 th Ave., upper floor hallway viewing southwest .............................................. A-9 1823 18 th Ave., upstairs bedroom at northwestern corner of building.......................... A-9 1823 18 th Ave., upstairs bathroom ........................................................................... A-9 1823 18 th Ave., details of Douglas fir flooring ......................................................... A-10 1823 18 th Ave., detail of interior door trim ............................................................. A-10 1823 18 th Ave., detail of secondary entry door ......................................................... A-10 1823 18 th Ave., detail of window trim .................................................................... A-10 1823 18 th Ave., detail of interior doors and trim...................................................... A-10 1823 18 th Ave., detail of wainscoting ...................................................................... A-11 1823 18 th Ave., detail of window and hardware ....................................................... A-11 1823 18 th Ave., Tax Assessor’s Photo, ca. 1937 ....................................................... A-11 1823 18 th Ave., Tax Assessor’s Photo, ca. 1957 ....................................................... A-11 James Moore (1861-1929) .................................................................................... A-11

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Figure 46 Figure 47 Figure 48 Figure 49 Figure 50 Figure 51 Figure 52 Figure 53 Figure 54 Figure 55 Figure 56 Figure 57 Figure 58 Figure 59 Figure 60 Figure 61 Figure 62 Figure 63 Figure 64 Figure 65 Figure 66 Figure 67 Figure 68 Figure 69 Figure 70 Figure 71 Figure 72 Figure 73 Figure 74 Figure 75 Figure 76

William Grose (1835-1898) ................................................................................. A-11 1893 Streetcar map, detail ...................................................................................... A-12 Madison Street Cable Railway Co., ca. 1889 ............................................................ A-12 Madison Street cable car off its track, Seattle, n.d....................................................... A-12 Sanborn Insurance Maps 1893............................................................................... A-13 Sanborn Insurance Maps 1904-1905. .................................................................... A-14 1915 Streetcar map, detail ...................................................................................... A-15 African Methodist Episcopal Church, n.d................................................................ A-15 Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 1934 ............................................................................. A-15 14 th Ave. E. and E. Madison St. after a snowstorm, winter 1916 ................................ A-15 E. Madison St. from 22 nd Ave., May 25, 1925 ........................................................ A-15 T. T. Minor School, 1906 ..................................................................................... A-16 Walla Walla School, ca. 1904 ................................................................................. A-16 Longfellow School, ca. 1905 ................................................................................... A-16 Holy Names Academy and Normal School, 1908 .................................................... A-16 St. Joseph’s, n.d. ................................................................................................... A-16 Sanborn Insurance Maps 1905-1951 ..................................................................... A-17 Typical characteristics of a Queen Anne style house................................................... A-18 Queen Anne style parlor interior, ca. 1900 .............................................................. A-19 Radford Kit house number 54, Queen Anne style.................................................... A-19 William and Mause Franklin House, Spokane, WA.................................................. A-20 E. J. Roberts Mansion, Spokane, WA ...................................................................... A-20 1102 18 th Ave. ..................................................................................................... A-20 926 18 th Ave. ....................................................................................................... A-20 934 18 th Ave. ....................................................................................................... A-20 917 18 th Ave. ....................................................................................................... A-21 936 19 th Ave. ....................................................................................................... A-21 Corner of E. Howell St. and 17 th Ave. ..................................................................... A-21 1803 18 th Ave. ..................................................................................................... A-21 1811 17 th Ave. ..................................................................................................... A-21 1728 E. Olive St. .................................................................................................. A-21

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1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
AUGUST 2012 1. INTRODUCTION
This historic resources report provides information regarding the architectural design and historical significance of 1823 18 th Avenue, Seattle, Washington. The building is located between the Capitol Hill Neighborhood and the Madison-Miller Neighborhood. The Johnson Partnership prepared this report at the request of the current owner of the property, Denny 18 LLC. 1.1 Background The City of Seattle’s Department of Planning and Development (DPD), through a 1995 agreement with the Department of Neighborhoods, requires a review of “potentially eligible landmarks” for commercial projects over 4,000 square feet in area. As any proposed alterations or demolition of the subject building described within this report will require a permit from DPD, the owner of this building is providing the following report to the staff of the Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board to resolve the property’s eligibility as a City of Seattle Landmark. To be eligible for nomination as a City of Seattle Landmark, a building, object, or structure must be at least 25 years old, have significant character, interest, or value, the integrity or ability to convey its significance, and it must meet one or more of the following six criteria (SMC 25.12.350): A. It is the location of or is associated in a significant way with an historic event with a significant effect upon the community, city, state, or nation. B. It is associated in a significant way with the life of a person important in the history of the city, state, or nation. C. It is associated in a significant way with a significant aspect of the cultural, political, or economic heritage of the community, city, state, or nation. D. It embodies the distinctive visible characteristics of an architectural style, period, or method of construction. E. It is an outstanding work of a designer or builder. F. Because of its prominence of spatial location, contrast of siting, age, or scale, it is an easily identifiable feature of its neighborhood or the city and contributes to the distinctive quality or identity of such neighborhood or city. 1.2 Methodology Larry E. Johnson, AIA, Principal of The Johnson Partnership, 1212 NE 65th Street, Seattle, WA, completed research and development of this report in August, 2012. Other research was undertaken at the Seattle Public Library, the Museum of History and Industry, the King County Archives, and the University of Washington’s Library, Special Collections. Research also included a review of Internet websites, including HistoryLink.com. The buildings and site were inspected and photographed in July 2012, to document the existing conditions.

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2. PROPERTY DATA
Building’s Historic Names: Hyde SW Corner Depot. Building’s Current Name: 1823 18 th Avenue. Address: 1823 18 th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122. Location: Capitol Hill/Madison-Miller Neighborhoods Assessor’s File Number: 808090-0056 Legal Description: THE NORTH 12’ OF LT 11, & ALL OF LT 12, BLOCK 15, SUMMIT SUPPLEMENTAL ADDITION TO THE CITY OF SEATTLE, VOLUME, 3 PAGE 125. Date of Construction: 1890. Original Use: Single-family residence. Present Use: Duplex. Original Owner: John E. Bigelow, Prudence Bigelow. Present Owner: Denny 18 LLC. Original Designer: Unknown. Original Builder: Johnathan E. and Benjamin D. Bigelow. Property Size: 6,240 sq. ft. (0.14325 acres) Building Size: 3,900 gross sq. ft. Current Zoning: LR3

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3. ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION
3.1 Location and Neighborhood Character The subject site is located at the southeastern edge of the Capitol Hill Neighborhood, and just inside the western boundary of the Madison-Miller Neighborhoods, a portion of the East Central planning area as defined by the City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. See Figures 1-2. At the edges of two neighborhoods, the subject site is located four blocks north of the Madison Street commercial area, three blocks east of the 15 th Avenue commercial area, the Capitol Hill Group Health medical complex, and three block southwest of the Edmund Meany School and Pendleton Miller Playfield. Holy Names Academy, a major Seattle Catholic institution, is located an additional three block north of the Edmund Meany School. The recently renovated First Church of Christ Scientists (1909, Frederick Heath, City of Seattle Landmark) is located two blocks west of the subject site. The area surrounding the subject property is a mixture of late 19 th century and early 20 th century homes, with older apartment buildings dating from the early 1900s to the 1920s sprinkled in. Some newer multi-family developments are also present, one across the street to the east (Fortune View Condominiums). 3.2 Building Description 3.2.1 Building Site The subject site is a corner lot of 6,240 square feet located on the southwestern corner of the intersection of E. Denny Way and 18 th Avenue. The property fronts onto 18 th Avenue with a width of 53 feet, and the lot has a depth of 118 feet along E Denny Way. Both streets have sidewalks. A 16 foot wide improved alley marks the western property line, and a small single-family residence is located immediately to the south. The site slopes up to the west, with a landscaped slope on the east and north. A concrete stair is located on the southeastern corner of the site providing access to the building’s entrance porch. The western rear yard contains a level paved parking area. The building is setback 22 feet from 18 th Avenue and 12 feet from E Denny Way. See Figures 3–13. 3.2.2 Structure and Exterior Features The building measures overall approximately 54 feet east-west and 36 feet north-south. In plan the building can be seen as two offset rectangles, with the thinner, approximately 15-foot wide southernmost rectangle slid forward and eastward from the wider northern rectangle, allowing for the construction of an entrance porch that wraps around the northeastern corner of the building. The building was constructed as a wood-frame one-and-a-half story Queen Anne style bungalow, with a mixture of gable and hip roofs. The highest point of the building is the main hip roof over the northern portion that is approximately 26 feet from the adjacent grade. The eastern portion of the house rests on a post and pier foundation covered by a skirt of vertical V-groove boards. The main portion of the house rests on an unreinforced concrete foundation enclosing an unfinished cellar. The first floor of the building on the eastern and northern sides is sheathed with horizontal V-groove tongue and groove boards or narrow diagonal boards, while the western and southern sides have asbestos or cement fiberboard over the original siding. The gable ends and dormers on the upper floor have fancy-butt shingles, spaced shingles, or narrow diagonal boards. Most corners on the eastern and northern façades have corner boards. The roofs of the building are covered with recently installed architectural grade asphalt three-tab roofing. Most windows are original cased wood-sash double-hung windows unless noted. Some windows, most notably in the main floor main bay window, have been modified to remove original muntins and stained-glass perimeter lights. See Figures 14–26. The eastern façade is primary. The southern portion has a large projecting bay window with upper

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panels containing spaced round (replacement) paterae. The upper floor projects over this bay, leaving diagonal cantilevers at the corners that once featured, ornamental “gingerbread” corbels, now absent. The gable end has a central tripartite window with a taller central window. The gable endwall is sheathed with fancy-butt fish-scale shingles. The gable bargeboards are wide and feature a sunburst ornament at their crown and additional paterae at the ends. The northern portion of the façade has a covered porch with spaced square columns supporting a low-slope roof with a curved fascia on its northeastern corner. The porch has non-original railings and the porch stair now descends down toward the east, rather than the original configuration descending down to the north. The porch originally had turned posts with a row of upper spindles. The first floor has its main entrance with a non-original door at the southern side of the porch. There is a small window adjacent and to the north of the entry doorway, and a pair of windows on the northern side of the building wall. The main hip roof has a small blister window near the eave line. See Figures 14–26. The northern façade is also primary. The façade has the covered porch on its eastern side and a slightly projecting western portion. The building wall of the porch has a secondary entry (the door was relocated from the building’s western side during recent renovations 1 ) on its western side and a pair of windows on the eastern side. A small gabled dormer is located above the porch on the roof of the main hip roof. The western side on the main floor of the northern façade has a single window on the east and a pair of windows on the western side. An upper floor medium-size gabled end is centered on this portion of the façade. There is a single window centered within the gable end and the end wall is sheathed with narrow diagonal boards. The gable bargeboards are wide and feature a sunburst ornament at their crown and applied paneling along their length and lower square bullet blocks. The basement walls have two horizontal glass block windows. See Figures 14–26. The western façade is secondary with the lower floor sheathed with wide spaced fiber-boar panels. The projecting northern side has a single window on its northern side. An upper floor medium-size gabled end is above this portion of the façade. There is a single pair of windows centered within the gable end and the end wall is sheathed with narrow diagonal boards. The gable bargeboards are wide and feature a sunburst ornament at their crown and applied paneling along their length and lower paterae. A concrete stairway descends to the basement at the northern end of this portion of the façade. The southern end of the façade has a pair of non-original doors near the center of the wall portion. See figures 14–26. The southern façade is non-primary and retains the asbestos siding installed between 1937 and mid-1950s. The lower floor has a non-original single window near the western side of the main floor with a smaller original window located several feet to the east. A non-original doorway with adjacent widow is located near the center of the façade. A basic wooden porch and stairs provides access to the doorway. An upper floor medium-size gabled end is nearly centered on this portion of the façade. There is a pair of non-original wood-sash double-hung windows centered within the gable end and the end wall is sheathed with narrow diagonal boards. The gable bargeboards are wide and feature a sunburst ornament at their crown and lower paterae. There is a small dormer located on the roof to the west of the gable. See figures 14–26. 3.2.3 Plan and Interior Features In plan the building can be seen as two offset rectangles, with the thinner, approximately 15-foot wide southernmost rectangle slid forward and eastward from the wider northern rectangle, allowing for the construction of an entrance porch that wraps around the northeastern corner of the building. The main building entry located at the entry porch’s southern end provides access to an entry hall that has an original stairway running up its northern wall. The stairway has an original large turned newel and the turned balusters appear original. A doorway at the base of the stairs that led to the northern portion of the house has been filled in. A doorway under the stairway leads to the southern side of the building, and a doorway on the western side leads to the rear of the house. A narrow room, possibly a receiving room, is located at the building’s northeastern corner. A large room to
1

David Wiseman, telephone interview with Larry E. Johnson, July 17, 2012.

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the west of this room has an exterior door leading to the porch on the northern side and a fireplace on its western wall. A small bedroom is presently located at the building’s northwestern corner, with a bathroom located to its south. A doorway on the southern side of large room leads to a kitchen at the building’s southwestern corner. The building’s southeastern corner has a large room with an adjoining room and private bathroom that share a common wall with the kitchen. The upper floor has an upper floor hallway providing access to five bedrooms a shared bathroom is located in the building’s southwestern corner above the kitchen. The interior of the building has been remodeled several times and all finishes have been altered. The building retains some of its original Douglas fir flooring. Most of the window and door trim was removed during renovations and reinstalled after the accumulated paint was stripped. See Figures 27–42. 3.2.4 Documented Building Alterations The building has been altered many times since its original construction in 1890. Significant changes include covering the house with non-original siding on the western and southern sides, reconstruction of the porch and stairway, including replacement of porch turned columns, guardrail detailing and upper spindles; alterations to original windows removing stained glass portions, removal of Queen Anne gingerbread details including main bay decorative support corbels and removal of original paterae above the main lower floor bay window, and the installation of new windows on the southern façade. Interior changes are numerous and at this time difficult to determine lacking original drawings. See Figures 43–44. Significant Recorded Building Permits Date Designer Description Permit 1903 unknown Alterations #23748 1951 unknown Convert sf residence to two #409022 apartments and 3 housekeeping rooms 1998 Barbara Rose-Leigh Alteration to convert 5 units to #692159, duplex. #703194, #724798

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4. SIGNIFICANCE
4.1 Historical Context 4.1.1 Neighborhood Historical Context: Capitol Hill and Madison-Miller The project site is situated within a mixed single-family and multi-family residential area located near southeastern edge of the Capitol Hill Neighborhood, and just inside the western boundary of the Madison-Miller Neighborhoods, Seattle, Washington. The Capitol Hill neighborhood is located on a long north/south ridge that overlooks the central business district and Lake Union on the west, and the Madison Valley and Lake Washington on the east. The first known use of the area by European/American settlers was for a cemetery, later named Lake View Cemetery, at the area’s highest point, near its northern end. Logging of the area began in the 1880s, followed soon after by residential subdivisions. James Moore (1861-1929), Capitol Hill’s chief developer, gave the hill its name in 1901, the area having previously been know as Broadway Hill. Moore is thought to have chosen the name for the quarter section of land he purchased in 1900, primarily because his wife came from Denver, another western city that had its own Capitol Hill. See Figure 45. In 1882, African-American pioneer William Grose (1835-1898) acquired a 12-acre tract of land in the original Boren claim northeast of the Edes Plat, near E. Madison Street and between 21 st and 23 rd Avenues.2 Gross and his family moved to the E. Madison property in 1891, encouraging other African-American families to do the same, with their residences and businesses spreading south along 23 rd Avenue between Yesler Way and E. Roy Street.3 See Figure 46. Many of the new plats were laid out in conjunction with streetcar lines, specifically to attract new property owners. The Yesler Way cable car line to Lake Washington opened in 1888, going to Lake Washington; within 12 months, builders constructed about 1,569 homes within about three blocks of the cable car line. By 1890, streetcar lines were running to South Seattle, Madison Park, Fremont, Phinney Ridge, Green Lake and Ballard. The following year lines were running along Rainier Avenue past Columbia City, to Broadway, First Hill, and Beach Hill. In 1892, lines were running to Brooklyn (University District), Ravenna, Madrona Park, and Duwamish (Georgetown). In 1893, a line to Rainier Heights was completed.4 See Figures 47-50. In 1901, the City Park trolley line was constructed from downtown to what would become Volunteer Park. By 1909, the Puget Sound Traction Light and Power Company would extend three more lines north along the Capitol Hill Ridge. Similar to the City Park line, the Capitol Hill line approached the ridge along Pike Street to reach the last long leg of its route on 15 th Avenue. The 19 th Avenue line followed in 1907. The 23 rd Avenue line was constructed in 1909, laid along the line of the old wagon road as far north as Portage Bay and to the entrance of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition on the University of Washington Campus. Capitol Hill was quickly becoming a “streetcar suburb” with residential areas constructed to the sides of the business and transportation strips of Broadway, 15 th, and 19 th Avenues. By 1912, there were more than 40 platted additions within the Capitol Hill area, including Fourth, Yesler, and Moore’s seven Capitol Hill tracts, and the several Pontius additions. Capitol Hill became a mix of large grand houses, and modest family houses, often sharing the same block. As platted, the lots are generally small, usually around 60' x 120'. Many of these homes were built in the form of the efficient “Seattle Box” style.
Calvin F. Schmid, Social Trends in Seattle, (Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 1944), pp. 137, 140. Schmid, pp. 137, 138, 140. 4 Mimi Sheridan, “Landmark Nomination Application, George Washington Carmack House.” City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, 2008-2009, pp. 4-5.
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By 1900, the East Madison area became known as the “colored colony.”5 To serve its members, the African Methodist Episcopal Church was established in 1891 at 1522 14th Avenue, and the Mt. Zion Baptist Church relocated to 1634 19th Avenue E. in 1918.6 The African-American population remained relatively small in Seattle, not exceeding 4,000, until the demand for military/industrial workers during World War II attracted many workers from the East and South, many of whom were African-Americans.7 At that time the Central Area was one of the few locations where African American residents could purchase property and avoid hostility from neighbors. The Central Area and Squire Park have been particularly associated with the African-American community from the mid-20 th century to the present. See Figures 51-56. The first public school located in the Central Area was T.T. Minor School. As a result of rapid growth in the new residential areas, two additional schools were opened in 1902, the Walla Walla School (Saunders & Lawton) at 2410 E. Cherry Street, and the 20 th Street School (William E. Boone and J.M. Corner, renamed Longfellow, later Edmund S. Meany Middle School, now demolished) at 301 21 st Avenue E. The Colman School (James Stephens, now the African American Museum) at 1515 24 th Avenue S, opened in 1909. The area’s first high school, James A. Garfield (Floyd A. Naramore) opened in 1923.8 See Figures 57-59. Because of the proximity of large Catholic churches and schools built in the area at that time; including Holy Names Academy (1907) at 22 nd Avenue and Aloha Street, St. Joseph’s Church (1907) and School (1908) on 18 th Avenue, and Forest Ridge School (1907) on Interlaken Boulevard; many large Catholic families moved into the neighborhood. See Figures 60-61. Other areas developed a more unified character of grander houses; first “Millionaire’s Row” developed by Moore on 14 th Ave. just south of Volunteer Park, but later in what became known as the Harvard/Belmont district. St. Lukes Hospital, the future home of the Group Health Cooperative was built in the 1920s on 15 th Avenue E., but was purchased in 1947, as one of the first medical facilities for the Group Health Cooperative. Apartment house development occurred parallel and in some cases immediately adjacent to single– family residential development. Many of the early multi-family buildings provided large units within handsome structures with garden areas, providing housing for families. Later, many of these larger apartments were divided into smaller units for single occupants. Likewise, many larger singlefamily residences were converted to rooming houses. A few bungalow courts in their various forms were also built in the area within easy walking distance to streetcar lines in the 1920s. See Figure 62. Capitol Hill is now a vibrant community, with a thriving business district along Broadway Avenue and along 15 th and 19 th Avenues. It is home to Volunteer Park and the Seattle Asian Art Museum, St. Mark's Episcopal Cathedral, as well as other churches, Seattle Central Community College, Cornish College for the Arts, as well as many shops, restaurants, night classes, and coffeehouses. Madison Street has also seen major redevelopment. The Miller Park area has an active neighborhood organization that has worked over the last twenty odd years on improving social problems and urban design issues. Note: No detailed history of the Capitol Hill is available in the form of a “context statement” for the City of Seattle’s Historic Preservation Program. A more detailed history of the Central District, with some discussion of the Madison-Miller Neighborhood, is available in the form of a “context statement” for the City of Seattle’s Historic Preservation Program, Thomas Veith’s “History of the Central Area,” is available online at:
http://www.cityofseattle.net/neighborhoods/preservation/documents/ContextCentralAreaHistoric.pdf
Esther Hall Mumford, Seattle’s Black Victorians 1852-1901, (Seattle, WA: Ananse Press, 1980), pp. 111-113. Schmid, p. 140. 7 Schmid, pp. 137-140. 8 Nile Thompson and Carolyn Marr, Building for Learning, (Seattle, WA: Seattle Public Schools, 2001), pp. 101-104, 195-196, 205-207, 213-215, 219-222,
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4.1.2 Building History The subject property, 1823 18 th Avenue, occupies lot 12 and a portion of lot 11, of Block 15 of the Summit Supplemental Addition to the City of Seattle, filed by George and Angie E. Kinnear, and recorded by the King County deputy auditor on May 22, 1889. 9 John E. Bigelow purchased Lots 11 and 12 for $1,500 on November 5, 1889.10 The following month, John sold the two lots for $2,000 to his mother Prudence Ruth Bigelow11 . The two houses, now addressed as 1819 and 1823 18 th Avenue, were built on lots 11 and 12, probably in 1890, as the Bigelows took out a mortgage with the New England Northwestern Investment Company on September 2, 1890, to pay for two house on lots 11 and 12, for $800 and $1,400 respectively.12 Benjamin D. Bigelow, Prudence’s husband, is listed in the 1890 Polk’s Seattle City Directory as residing at the southwest corner Hyde Street (18 th) and Depot Street (Denny Way).13 This location corresponds to lot 12 and 13 of Block 15 of the plat noted above. Prudence Bigelow sold lot 12 to Frederick L. Fehren, a bank cashier and later developer, on January 24, 1893.14 The Bigelows relocated to Fruitvale, California between 1893 and 1894.15 It is presently unknown who owned and/or occupied the house between 1893 and 1898, or when Fehren sold the property. Seattle attorney Frank Pardee Lewis and his wife Eugenie moved to the subject property in 1898.16 The house was remodeled in some way in 1903.17 The couple resided there until their deaths in 1938 and 1933, respectively. 18 Walter D. Fullaway purchased the property from Frank P. Lewis’s estate, on November 30, 1938. 19 Fullaway rented out the house, by then divided into two apartments, to several people over the years including William and Anna Keller (1939), Claude W. White (1939), Eugraph Piskoulin (194248), Earl Van Law (1942), and William Erickson (1948).20 The house was remodeled in 1951 to create two apartments and 3 housekeeping rooms.21 Renters during this period include Jos and Annie Beirlein (1954), V.L. Bird (1954), Robert and Dolores Bumgarner (1958), Dixie Fuller (1958), B. Hanak (1961).22 The house was vacant in 1966, when it was sold to Paltiel E. and Zeta A. Mitchell. 23 Renters during this period include Samuel Fuller (1970), Geraldee Youns (1970), James Williams (1976), and E. Miller (1976).24

George Kinnear and Angie Kinnear, “Summit Supplemental Addition,” May 22, 1889. Warranty Deed, No. 41224, King County, November 5, 1889. 11 Warranty Deed, No. 43543, King County, December 9, 1889. 12 New England Northwestern Investment Company, Mortgages filed with W.R Forrest, Deputy County Auditor, September 2, 1890. 13 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., “Seattle City Directory for 1890, Vol. II,” (Seattle, WA: Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1890), p. 156. 14 King County Plat Index, Deed, Prudence Bigelow to Frederick L. Fehren, January 24, 1893. 15 California State Library, “California, Voters Registers, Alameda County, Brooklyn Township, Fruitvale Precinct No. 2, 1894,” http://search.ancestry.com/cgibin/sse.dll?db=cagreatregisters&h=6284109&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7617979_p1044568528_kpidz0q3d-1044568528z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgPLz0q3dpid, accessed July 9, 2012, p. 1. California State Library, “California, Voters Registers, Alameda County, Berkeley, Precinct No. 8, 1898,” http://search.ancestry.com/cgibin/sse.dll?db=cagreatregisters&h=360050&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7617979_p1044568528_kpidz0q3d-1044568528z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgPLz0q3dpid, accessed July 9, 2012, p. 1. 16 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1898, p. 602. 17 City of Seattle Building Permit, #23748. 18 Seattle Times, “Lewis,” January 19, 1933, p. 20. Seattle Times, “Frank Lewis, Attorney, Dies At His Home, April 11, 1938, p. 8. 19 City of Seattle, Property Abstract, Summit Supplement, Plat Book 3, November 30, 1938, p. 125. 20 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1939, p. 1,790. Polks, 1942, p. 1,294. Polks, 1948-49, p. 1595. 21 City of Seattle Building Permit, #409022. 22 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1954, p. 1,997. Polks, 1958, vol. 2, p. 571. Polks, 1961, vol. 2, p. 475. 23 King County Assessor, Property Record Card 808090-0056, p.1. 24 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1970, vol. 2, p. 432. Polks, 1976, vol. 2, p. 400.
10

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Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18 th Avenue August 2012, page 9

David M. Wiseman purchased the house on February 26, 1997.25 Wiseman began alterations to the house in November 1998, from plans prepared by Barbara Rose-Leigh that turned the house into a duplex.26 Wiseman sold the house to Sherman and Dorothy Esses, and Marc Rudd on July 20, 2011, who transferred the property to Denny 18 LLC, the current owner, the following month.27 4.2 Building Ownership 4.2.1 Original Building Developer and Owners: Benjamin D. Bigelow (1835-1901), Prudence R. Bigelow (1814-1919), and Jonathan E. Bigelow (1868-1932) Benjamin D. Bigelow (a.k.a. David B. Bigelow) appears to have been the builder and original occupant of the subject property, 1823 18 th Avenue. Benjamin David Bigelow was born in Kingsport, Nova Scotia on January 18, 1835, the son of David and Martha Jane (Weaver) Bigelow.28 He married Prudence Ruth Cox (1841-1919) in 1860, in Kingsport.29 The couple had five children, Luzana (1862-1953), Mary Blanche (18681942), David E. (1863-?), Jonathan Edwin (1868-1932), and Emma Daisy (1874-1953).30 The Bigelow family relocated to Seattle, Washington Territory in 1868.31 Benjamin and Jonathan applied for and were granted citizenship in 1876. He identified himself as shipwright in 1879.32 Bigelow and his family were living in San Francisco, California, in 1882, with Benjamin employed as a shipwright.33 The family lived in Oakland, California, in 1887.34 By 1890, most of the family had moved back to Seattle, with Benjamin and Prudence living at the southwest corner of Hyde Street and Depot Street (the subject property), with Benjamin identifying himself as a carpenter.35 At that time, Benjamin’s son Jonathan, then 21years old, was working as a superintendent with his cousin David E. Bigelow for shipbuilder M.J. Carkeek.36 David’s father and Benjamin’s brother was Isaac Newton Bigelow (1838-1922) a realtor, investor, and small time banker.37 Benjamin and Prudence moved Fruitvale, CA in 1894, and then to Berkeley in 1898. 38 He died in Lake County, California in 1901.39 Prudence died Alameda County on August 16, in 1919.40
King County Dept. of Assessments: eReal Property, “Sales History, 808090-0056,” p. 3. City of Seattle Building Permits, #692159, 703194, and 724798. 27 King County Dept. of Assessments: eReal Property, “Sales History, 808090-0056,” p. 3. 28 Rod Bigelow, “Benjamin David 8 BIGELOW,” Bigelow Society bibliographical notes. http://bigelowsociety.com/rod8/ben8c141.htm, accessed July 9, 2012, p. 1. 29 Bigelow, p. 1. 30 Bigelow, p. 1. McAlister Family Tree, “Benjamin David Bigelow,” http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/7617979/person/1044568528?ssrc=, accessed July 9, 2012, p. 1. 31 Bigelow, p. 1. 32 Washington State Territorial Census, 1879, http://search.ancestry.com/cgibin/sse.dll?db=washterrcen&h=41409&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7617979_p-1044568528_kpidz0q3d1044568528z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgPLz0q3dpid, accessed July 9, 2012. 33 The San Francisco Directory, p.204. 34 McAlister Family Tree, “Benjamin David Bigelow,” http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/7617979/person/1044568528?ssrc=, accessed July 9, 2012, p. 1. 35 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1890, p. 156. 36 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1890, p. 156. 37 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1894-95, p. 177. Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1889, p. 121. Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1897, p. 141. 38 California State Library, “California, Voters Registers, Alameda County, Brooklyn Township, Fruitvale Precinct No. 2, 1894,” http://search.ancestry.com/cgibin/sse.dll?db=cagreatregisters&h=6284109&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7617979_p1044568528_kpidz0q3d-1044568528z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgPLz0q3dpid, accessed July 9, 2012, p. 1. California State Library, “California, Voters Registers, Alameda County, Berkeley, Precinct No. 8, 1898,” http://search.ancestry.com/cgibin/sse.dll?db=cagreatregisters&h=360050&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7617979_p1044568528_kpidz0q3d-1044568528z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgPLz0q3dpid, accessed July 9, 2012, p. 1. 39 Bigelow, p. 1.
26 25

Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18 th Avenue August 2012, page 10

Jonathan E. Bigelow also relocated to the Berkeley area with his parents, marrying Ethel Fairchild around 1889. The couple had two children before Ethel died in childbirth in 1903. Jonathan, now known as Jack, remarried in1906 to Lena Tabor Hughes. The family moved to Signal Hill above Long Beach in 1908, and then to the Calistoga area in 1913.The family returned to the Berkeley area in 1918. In the early 1920s, Jack’s sons formed John E. Bigelow and Sons, a construction company that built many homes in Berkeley and in Kensington in the Berkeley Hills. Jonathan died in 1932.41 4.2.2 Subsequent Occupant/Owner: Frank Pardee Lewis (1851-1938) and Eugenie C. Lewis (1844-1924) Frank Pardee Lewis and his wife Eugenie occupied the subject property, 1823 18 th Avenue, from around 1898, until their deaths in 1938 and 1933, respectively. Frank Pardee Lewis was born in Triangle, Broome County, New York, on March 10, 1851.42 His parents were James Randall Lewis and Mary Elizabeth (Leach) Lewis, both of colonial ancestry.43 Frank P. Lewis graduated from Whitings Point High School and attended, but did not graduate from, the University of Rochester in New York.44 After serving as a clerk for Alexander McDowell, he was admitted to the bar in Binghamton, New York in 1874.45 Lewis married Sarah Stoddard in 1875, although she died two years later.46 Sarah passed away in 1877. Lewis remarried in 1884, wedding Eugenie (Cole) Personeus, a widow with three children.47 He practiced law in Lisle, New York until 1889, when he and his family relocated to Seattle.48 Frank, Eugenie, and Frank’s father James R. Lewis, left New York in November 1889, arriving in Seattle in April 1890, two months prior to the Great Seattle Fire on June 1890.49 The Lewis family initially lived at 601 University Street.50 Lewis initially joined John T. deBolt, forming the firm Lewis & deBolt.51 By 1891, Lewis was in partnership with Burt J. Humphrey, with offices at 24 Occidental Block.52 By 1894, Lewis was practicing alone at 208-209 New York Block.53 Lewis formed a partnership with Frederick D. van Wagenen around 1898.54 Lewis was elected on the Republican ticket to the Washington state Senate in 1895, serving one four-year term.55 Frank and Eugenie moved to the subject site around 1898.56 Lewis formed a long-lasting partnership with Louis L. Legg by 1923, with offices on the eighth floor of the Lowman Building.57 Frank was active in several clubs and organizations including the Puget Sound Alumni Association of Delta Kappa Epsilon and various Masonic lodges and orders.58 Frank was interested in genealogy,
McAlister Family Tree, “Prudence R. Cox Bigelow,” http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/7617979/person/-1044568884, accessed July 9, 2012, p. 1. 41 Bigelow, p. 3. 42 Clarence B. Bagley, History of King County Washington, Vol. II, (Seattle, WA: The S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1929), p. 527. 43 Bagley, p. 527. 44 Frank P. Lewis, “Frank Pardee Lewis,” “Lewisiana, or the Lewis Letter,” Vol. 5, No. 9, Gilford, CN, March1895, p. 132. University of Rochester, General Catalogue of The University of Rochester, 1850-1911, (Rochester, NY: The University of Rochester, 1911), p. 53. 45 Lewis, p. 132. 46 Bagley, p. 528. 47 Bagley, p. 528. 48 Lewis, p. 132. 49 Lewis, p. 132. Bagley, p. 528. 50 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1890, Vol. II,” p. 442. 51 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1890, Vol. II,” p. 442. 52 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1891, Vol. III,” p. 427. 53 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., “1894-5, Vol. IV, p. 511. 54 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1897, p. 484. 55 Bagley, p. 529. 56 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1898, p. 602. 57 Polk’s Seattle City Directory Co., 1923, p. 932. Seattle Times, “Frank Lewis, Attorney, Dies At His Home, April 11, 1938, p. 8. 58 Bagley, p. 529.
40

Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18 th Avenue August 2012, page 11

and served as publisher of “Lewisiana, or The Lewis Letter,” a genealogy newsletter concerning the history of the Lewis Surname.59 He was the author of Lafayette and Lisle, and Randall Lewis of Hopkinton, Rhode Island, and some of his descendents: a biographical and genealogical record,” published in Seattle in 1924 and 1929 respectively by the Argus Press. He was also the author of Random Rainbow Reflections, a group of seven leaflets comprising a memoir that he published in 1934.60 Lewis retired from his law practice in 1931.61 Eugenie was active socially, entertaining frequently at their residence.62 Eugenie passed away on January 17, 1933.63 Frank died on April 10, 1938, and he was buried in Lisle Village Cemetery in New York.64 4.3 Architectural Context 4.3.1 Historical Architectural Context: Queen Anne style and Plan Book Houses The subject property, 1823 18 th Avenue, was constructed in 1890, in what is now known as the Queen Anne style. The Queen Anne style of construction was popular throughout the United States, beginning around 1880 to just after the turn of the last century. The style was a sub-set of the Victorian style, a general category that also encompassed late Gothic revival, Second Empire, and Italianate styles, and roughly coinciding with the reign of England’s Queen Victoria (1837-1901). The term Queen Anne was first coined in England in the late nineteenth century to describe buildings inspired by the transitional architecture of the pre-Georgian period, during the reign of Queen Anne (1702-14), when the originators of the term observed buildings with basically medieval and Classically inspired ornamentation.65 Richard Norman Shaw (1831-1912), a widely published English architect known for his extravagant eclectic stone and brick manor houses, is often credited for introducing the style to American architects and building designers. More effusively embellished Queen Anne style houses are usually referred to as “Eastlake,” after Charles L. Eastlake, another English architect whose book, Hints on Household Taste, was available in the United States after 1872. A competing variant, the Shingle style, with its simplified Colonial inspired detailing, was primarily restricted to the Eastern Seaboard and was first championed by H. H. Richardson. The Romanesque style, with its more expensive stone and brick construction, was primarily used for commercial building. Exterior characteristics of the Queen Anne style in residential construction include: • Asymmetrical compositions with wings, verandas, porches, gables, and towers protruding horizontally and vertically from the central mass. • Contrasting materials quite often layered by story with stone or brick on the first story, and clapboard or shingles on the second story, with half-timbering or decorative shingles on gable ends. • Multi-colored earth-tone painting. • Application of factory-made carved, turned, and appliqué ornamentation. • Turned porch columns. • Roofs are gabled and hipped, often with second-story projections and corner turrets.
Frank P. Lewis, “Frank Pardee Lewis,” “Lewisiana, or the Lewis Letter,” Vol. 5, No. 9, Gilford, CN, March1895, p. 132. 60 University of Rochester, Alumni Review, Vol. XVI, No. 4.(Rochester, NY: The University of Rochester, 1938), p. 24. 61 Seattle Times, “Frank Lewis, Attorney, Dies At His Home, April 11, 1938, p. 8. 62 Seattle Times, numerous articles in social pages. 1900-1919. 63 Seattle Times, “Lewis,” January 19, 1933, p. 20. 64 Seattle Times, “Frank Lewis, Attorney, Dies At His Home, April 11, 1938, p. 8. Washington State Death Certificate Index, DA. Ref. {23D546774-949A-4449-8748-29433666DDDA6}. Find A Grave, “Frank Pardee Lewis,” http://www.findagrave.com/cgibin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Lewis&GSfn=Frank&GSby=1851&GSbyrel=in&GSdy=1938&GSdyrel=in&GSob=n&GRid =72465409&df=all&, accessed Jun2 26, 2012. 65 John C. Poppeliers and Allen Chambers, Jr., What Style Is It (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003), p. 72.
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Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18 th Avenue August 2012, page 12

• Accentuated chimneys, often with medieval form. • Groupings of windows, usually double-hung, with upper panes often outlined with stained glass or clear squares. • Stained glass windows in entries and stair halls. Interiors of Queen Anne style houses eschewed symmetry with the main rooms flowing freely together, with large sliding doors opening up the rooms to each other, or shutting to allow privacy. A large living hall with a grand staircase and fireplace was a common feature. The interiors had high ceilings, allowing light penetration and air circulation. Room interiors often were paneled and ceilings coffered with dark wood. See Figures 63-64. During the latter part of the nineteenth century, North American architects adapted the Victorian Queen Anne style for wood-frame construction by adapting the previous Stick style, which had previously dominated residential construction. Utilizing balloon framing, and later Western platform framing, most houses could be erected quickly and inexpensively by any competent crew of carpenters. Pattern books including all sizes of residences were readily available, bringing the style to families who could not afford custom designs. Factories throughout the United States turned out the various exterior details particular to the style for national distribution. Sears, Roebuck and Co., Montgomery Ward and Co., the Aladdin Co., and others, produced hundreds of thousands of Queen Anne style kit homes that arrived by railroad with everything needed to construct a house, including the hardware, screws, and nails. See Figure 65. Thousands of Queen Anne style houses were built throughout North America in the later part of the nineteenth century and extant examples ranging from large mansions to modest houses exist in nearly every older community. In Washington State, good examples are numerous in Spokane, Walla Walla, Coupeville, and Port Townsend. See Figures 66-67. In Seattle, well-preserved examples of Queen Anne style residences are primarily located in older established single-family neighborhoods that avoided large-scale redevelopment, including portions of First Hill, Capitol Hill, the Central District, and Queen Anne Hill. See Figures 68-76. 4.3.2 Building Architect or Designers: Unknown The design of the subject property, 1823 18 th Avenue, most likely was taken from stock plans found in a contemporary plan book. 4.3.3 Building Contractor: Benjamin D. Bigelow Benjamin D. Bigelow appears to have been the builder and original occupant of the subject property, 1823 18 th Avenue. See 4.2.1.

Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18 th Avenue August 2012, page 13

5. Bibliography
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation; Appendix 1, Memorandum of Agreement; October 1978. Bagley, Clarence B. History of King County Washington, Vol. II, Seattle, WA: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1929. Blanchard, Leslie. The Street Railway Era In Seattle: A Chronicle of Six Decades. Harold E. Cox, Forty Fort, PA. 1968. Bigelow, Rod, “Benjamin David 8 BIGELOW,” Bigelow Society bibliographical notes. http://bigelowsociety.com/rod8/ben8c141.htm, (accessed July 9, 2012). Bigelow, p. 1. McAlister Family Tree, “Benjamin David Bigelow,” http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/7617979/person/-1044568528?ssrc=, (accessed July 9, 2012). California State Library, “California, Voters Registers, Alameda County, Brooklyn Township, Fruitvale Precinct No. 2, 1894,” http://search.ancestry.com/cgibin/sse.dll?db=cagreatregisters&h=6284109&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7617979_p -1044568528_kpidz0q3d-1044568528z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgPLz0q3dpid, (accessed July 9, 2012) California State Library, “California, Voters Registers, Alameda County, Berkeley, Precinct No. 8, 1898,” http://search.ancestry.com/cgibin/sse.dll?db=cagreatregisters&h=360050&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7617979_p1044568528_kpidz0q3d-1044568528z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgPLz0q3dpid, (accessed July 9, 2012) City of Seattle Building Permit Numbers: 23748, 409022, 692159, 703194, and 724798. City of Seattle, Property Abstract, Summit Supplement, Plat Book 3, November 30, 1938. King County Plat Index, Deed, Prudence Bigelow to Frederick L. Fehren, January 24, 1893. King County Assessor, Property Record Card 808090-0056. King County Dept. of Assessments: eReal Property, “Sales History, 808090-0056,”. Kinnear, George and Angie Kinnear “Summit Supplemental Addition,” May 22, 1889. Lewis, Frank P. “Frank Pardee Lewis,” “Lewisiana, or the Lewis Letter,” Vol. 5, No. 9, Gilford, CN, March 1895. McAlister Family Tree, “Benjamin David Bigelow,” http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/7617979/person/-1044568528?ssrc=, (accessed July 9, 2012). McAlister Family Tree, “Prudence R. Cox Bigelow,” http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/7617979/person/-1044568884, (accessed July 9, 2012). Mumford, Esther Hall. Seattle’s Black Victorians 1852-1901, Seattle, WA: Ananse Press, 1980. New England Northwestern Investment Company, Mortgages filed with W.R Forrest, Deputy County Auditor, September 2, 1890. R. L. Polk Co. Polk’s Seattle City Directory. Co., 1890, 1891, 1894-1895, 1889, 1897, 1898, 1923, 1939, 1942, 1948-49, 1954, 1958, 1961, 1970, 1976. Poppeliers, John C. and A. Allen Chambers Jr. What Style Is It?: A Guide to American Architecture. Hobeken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2003. Sanborn Map Co. Insurance Map of Seattle, Washington. 1893, 1904-1905, 1905-51.

Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18 th Avenue August 2012, page 14

The San Francisco Directory, p.204. Schmid, Calvin F. Social Trends in Seattle, Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 1944. Seattle Times, “Lewis.” January 19, 1933, p. 20. ——. “Frank Lewis, Attorney, Dies At His Home.” April 11, 1938, p. 8. ——. numerous articles in social pages. 1900-1919. Sheridan, Mimi. “Landmark Nomination Application, George Washington Carmack House.” City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, 2008-2009. Thompson, Nile and Carolyn Marr. Building for Learning, Seattle, WA: Seattle Public Schools, 2001. University of Rochester, General Catalogue of The University of Rochester, 1850-1911, Rochester, NY: The University of Rochester, 1911. University of Rochester, Alumni Review, Vol. XVI, No. 4. Rochester, NY: The University of Rochester, 1938. Veith, Thomas. “History of the Central Area.” City of Seattle’s Historic Preservation Program, 2009. http://www.cityofseattle.net/neighborhoods /preservation/documents/ContextCentralAreaHistoric. pdf (accessed May 23, 2012). Walker, Lester. American Shelter. Woodstock, NY: Overlook Press, 1996. Warranty Deed, No. 41224, King County, November 5, 1889. Warranty Deed, No. 43543, King County, December 9, 1889. Washington State Death Certificate Index, DA. Ref. {23D546774-949A-4449-874829433666DDDA6}. Find A Grave, “Frank Pardee Lewis,” http://www.findagrave.com/cgibin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Lewis&GSfn=Frank&GSby=1851&GSbyrel=in&GSdy=1938&GSdyrel =in&GSob=n&GRid=72465409&df=all&, (accessed Jun2 26, 2012). Washington State Territorial Census, 1879, http://search.ancestry.com/cgibin/sse.dll?db=washterrcen&h=41409&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7617979_p1044568528_kpidz0q3d-1044568528z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgPLz0q3dpid, (accessed July 9, 2012).

Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18 th Avenue August 2012, page 15

APPENDIX 1 FIGURES

Landmark Nomination Report 1823 18 th Avenue August, 2012, page 41

Capitol Hill Neighborhood

Site Location

Madison-Miller Neighborhood

Figure 1 • Location Map

N

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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E D G F Subject Site A H I J B C

Figure 2 • Aerial View

view reference in this document

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1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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Subject Site

Figure 3 • Site Plan

N

0

20'

40'

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Subject Site

Subject Site

Figure 4 • View A - Viewing west from the intersection of E. Denny Way and 18th Ave.
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 5 • View B - Viewing west down E. Denny Way

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Subject Site

Subject Site

Figure 6 • View C - Viewing west down E. Denny Way from 19th Ave.

Figure 7 • View D - Viewing south down 18th Ave./18th Ave. E.
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Subject Site

Subject Site

Figure 8 • View E - Viewing southwest from E. Glen St. and 18th Ave. E.

Figure 9 • View F - Viewing east down E. Denny Way

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Subject Site

Subject Site

Figure 10 • View G - Viewing east down E. Denny Way from 17th Ave.
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 11 • View H - Viewing northwest down 18th Ave./18th Ave. E.
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Subject Site

Subject Site

Figure 12 • View I - Viewing north down 18th Ave./18th Ave. E.

Figure 13 • View J - Viewing north from 18th Ave. and E. Howell St.
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 14 • 1823 18th Ave., eastern façade with single family residence to the south

Figure 15 • 1823 18th Ave., northern façade

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 16 • 1823 18th Ave., western façade

Figure 17 • 1823 18th Ave., southern façade

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 18 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of upper floor projecting over bay on eastern façade

Figure 19 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of non-original porch railings and stairs
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 20 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of windows on main floor of the northern façade

Figure 21 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of gable at western portion of the northern façade

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 22 • 1823 18th Ave., view of gable at western façade
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 23 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of non-original doors at southern end of western façade
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 24 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of asbestos siding on southern façade
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 25 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of original window on first floor of southern façade

Figure 26 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of non-original door and window on southern façade

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 27 • 1823 18th Ave., entry hall and stairway at main building entry

Figure 28 • 1823 18th Ave., possible receiving room at building’s northeastern corner
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 29 • 1823 18th Ave., interior room with fireplace at northern side of building

Figure 30 • 1823 18th Ave., small bedroom at building’s northwestern corner

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 31 • 1823 18th Ave., kitchen at southwestern corner of building
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 32 • 1823 18th Ave., room at southeastern corner of building with bay window
The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 33 • 1823 18th Ave., upper floor hallway viewing southwest

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 34 • 1823 18th Ave., upstairs bedroom at northwestern corner of building

Figure 35 • 1823 18th Ave., upstairs bathroom

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 36 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of Douglas fir flooring

Figure 37 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of interior door trim

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 39 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of window trim

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 38 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of secondary entry door

Figure 40 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of interior doors and trim

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
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July 2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 7/3/2012

Figure 41 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of wainscoting

Figure 42 • 1823 18th Ave., detail of window and hardware
Puget Sound Regional Archives

Puget Sound Regional Archives

Figure 43 • 1823 18th Ave., Tax Assessor’s Photo, ca. 1937
UW Spec Coll. A-Y-P-E Coll., AYP1242

Figure 44 • 1823 18th Ave., Tax Assessor’s Photo, ca. 1957
Esther Mumford, Seattle’s Black Victorians

Figure 45 • James Moore (1861-1929)

Figure 46 • William Grose (1835-1898)

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-11

July 2012

Leslie Blanchard, The Street Railway Era in Seattle

UW Spec Coll. Seattle Photograph Coll., SEA0540

Subject Site
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Madison Street cable car off its track, Seattle, n.d.

UW Spec Coll. MOHAI Coll., SHS9157

Figure 47 • 1893 Streetcar map, detail

Title Photographer Date Notes Subjects

Figure 49 • Madison Street cable car off its track, Seattle, no date Madison Street cable car off its track, Seattle, n.d.
Unknown n.d. Typed on verso: Madison Street Cable Car off track, Seattle. Cable railroads--Washington (State)--Seattle; Bicycles & tricycles--Washington (State)--Seattle; Children-Washington (State)--Seattle; Railroad employees--Washington (State)--Seattle United States--Washington (State)--Seattle Museum of History & Industry Photograph Collection SHS9157 To order a reproduction or to inquire about permissions contact photos@seattlehistory.org or phone us at

Places Digital Collection Image Number Ordering Information

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/imlsmohai&CISOPTR=2892&CISOBOX=1&REC=11

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1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-12

July 2012

Project Site

Figure 50 • Sanborn Insurance Maps 1893, Vol. 2 Sheets 84, 85.

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-13

July 2012

Project Site

Figure 51 • Sanborn Insurance Maps 1904-1905, Vol. 2 1905, Sheets 195-197, 223-225, Vol. 3 1905, Sheets 266-268.

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-14

July 2012

Leslie Blanchard, The Street Railway Era in Seattle

unknown

Subject Site

Figure 53 • African Methodist Episcopal Church, n.d.

Black Heritage Society 2001.14.2.31B

Figure 52 • 1915 Streetcar map, detail

Figure 54 • Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 1934.

UW Spec Coll. Seattle Photograph Coll., SEA0579

UW Spec Coll. Seattle Photograph Coll., SEA0157

Figure 55 • 14th Ave. and E. Madison St. after a snowstorm, winter 1916

Figure 56 • E. Madison St. from 22nd Ave., May 25, 1925

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-15

July 2012

UW Spec Coll. Asahel Curtis Coll., CUR109

UW Spec Coll. Asahel Curtis Coll., CUR314

Figure 57 • T. T. Minor School, 1906

Figure 58 • Walla Walla School, ca. 1904

UW Spec Coll. Asahel Curtis Coll., CUR325

UW Spec Coll. Seattle Photograph Coll., SEA1085

Figure 59 • Longfellow School, ca. 1905

UW Spec Coll. Asahel Curtis Coll., CUR509

Figure 60 • Holy Names Academy and Normal School, 1908

Figure 61 • St. Joseph’s, no date

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-16

July 2012

Project Site

Figure 62 • Sanborn Insurance Maps 1905-1951, Vol. 2 1905, Sheets 195-197, 223-225, Vol. 4 1917, Sheets 490, 491.

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-17

July 2012

Lester Walker, page 153

Figure 63 • Typical characteristics of a Queen Anne style house

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-18

July 2012

MOHAI 18784

Figure 64 • Queen Anne style parlor interior, ca. 1900 (Anne Burwell Residence)

The Radford Architectural Company. Dover Publications

Figure 65 • Radford Kit house number 54, Queen Anne style

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-19

July 2012

Historic Spokane

www.ejrobertsmansion.com

Figure 66 • William and Mause Franklin House, Spokane, WA (ca.1904, James Franklin)
The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

Figure 67 • E.J. Roberts Mansion, Spokane, WA

The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

Figure 68 • 1102 18th Ave.

The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

Figure 69 • 926 18th Ave.

Figure 70 • 934 18th Ave.

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-20

July 2012

The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

Figure 71 • 917 18th Ave.

Figure 72 • 936 19th Ave.

The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

Figure 73 • Corner of E. Howell St. and 17th Ave.

Figure 74 • 1803 18th Ave.

The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

The Johnson Partnership, 8/3/2012

Figure 75 • 1811 17th Ave.

Figure 76 • 1728 E. Olive St.

1823 18th Avenue Landmark Nomination Report
A-21

July 2012