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11 – 18 October 2012
Vol 18 Issue 41
Homes in the High One Fives
These four properties are all listed under $1.6
million; two have expansive ocean views and all
have at least half an acre of land, p.52
Fear the Boom
and Bust
The man who
wrote the Hayek/
Keynes rap videos
seen by 6 million
viewers to speak
at UCSB Oct 17;
our interview with
Russell Roberts
begins on p.40

THIS WEEK IN MONTECITO, P. 10 • MONTECITO EATERIES, P. 44 • CALENDAR OF EVENTS, P. 50
The Voice of the Village
S SINCE 1995 S
Gene Sinser and maestro Nir
Kabaretti in search of four art-
ists to paint each of Vivaldi’s
Four Seasons… on stage…
at the Granada… while the
orchestra plays… p. 6
Mineards’
Miscellany
ChIEf hICkmaN
makES a PlEa for
fIrE StatIoN thrEE
“Everything we do is time sensitive,” he says at
packed MA meeting, insisting that “the time is now;
the justification is here” (see pages 5 & 13)

11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 2 • The Voice of the Village •
A MODERNIST COUNTRY RETREAT
An architecturally significant Modernist-style country retreat on approximately 6.34 acres with ocean and mountain views, impeccably restored
or rebuilt. The home features a beautiful living room, dining area, office, gourmet kitchen, a stunning master wing plus 3 family bedrooms and
a 5th possible bedroom/gym/office in main house, and a 2-bedroom guest house, sprawling gardens, orchards, olives and Oaks.
Ofered at $5,995,000
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 3
Call: (805) 565-4896
Email: danencell@aol.com
FI NE PROPERTI ES REPRESENTED BY
DANIEL ENCELL
• “Top 10” Prudential Agent Worldwide - 7 consecutive years
• Graduate of UCLA School of Law and former attorney
(with training in Real Estate law, contracts, estate planning, and tax law)
• Dedicated and highly trained full-time support team
• An expert in the luxury home market
REMEMBER, IT COSTS NO MORE TO WORK WITH THE BEST
(BUT IT CAN COST YOU PLENTY IF YOU DON’T)
Visit: www.DanEncell.com for market information & to search the entire MLS
1.9 ACRE MONTECITO ESTATE
W/ OCEAN & MOUNTAIN
VIEWS- $5,950,000
STUNNI NG MEDI TERRANEAN
I N PRI ME MONTECI TO
LOCATI ON - $3, 950, 000
NEW LISTING!
INCOMPARABLE SI NGLE-LEVEL MONTECI TO ESTATE WI TH EXQUI SI TE VI EWS! - $7, 200, 000
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 4 • The Voice of the Village •
Take a break in your own backyard.
Extend summer with a
Midweek Retreat featuring
luxurious accommodations, two spa services
and a poolside cabana
from $435 a night.
Reserve now at 877.422.4245
or BacaraResort.com/Retreat
minutes away.
worlds apart.
8301 Hollister Avenue, Santa Barbara, California 93117 Watch the video
5 Guest Editorial
MFPD Fire Chief Chip Hickman on why Montecito needs Fire Station #3
6 Montecito Miscellany
New symphony season making a splash; Nacho Figueras’ unexpected visit to
SB Polo Club; Huguette Clark’s fortune revealed; SB Choral Society flmed;
Nooners plaque rededicated; Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation patrons party; Lang
Lang kicks of CAMA season; ETC’s Crime and Punishment; Arts of the Palette
fundraiser; Tango On the Riviera at Biltmore; Aspen Santa Fe Ballet at Granada;
Music Academy’s Rhapsody in Bloom event; Bob Bryant honored
8 Letters to the Editor
Dolly Granatelli catches Obama with no clothes on; Honorine Gordon encourages
the news media to bring it on; Dale Lowdermilk’s rules for future debates
10 This Week in Montecito
MERRAG meets; Montecito YMCA golf tournament; MOYO movie night; Becky
Gail signs book; MTF hike; Tall Ship Public Sail; Ojai Peddler’s Fair; Cancer
Center Walk/Run; open house at Providence Hall; Antioch University Healthcare
Forum; Golf Classic 2012; illustrated lecture at Lotusland; MUS board meeting;
Lotusland Fall Twilight Tour; upcoming and ongoing events
Tide Guide
Handy guide to assist readers in determining when to take that walk or run on the
beach
13 Village Beat
Montecito Association meeting updates; Shawn Shaw welcomed as new MUS
Dean of Students; Montecito Fire Chief Chip Hickman clears up fnancial
misunderstanding; Fire Prevention Week; Advanced Veterinary Specialists opens
downtown
14 Seen Around Town
United Boys & Girls Clubs’ 30
th
annual “Stand Up For Kids” auction; State Street
Ballet Company’s annual gala; Antioch University Santa Barbara’s new Women &
Leadership certifcate program; MNH League’s ArtWalk
26 Coming & Going
CEO of Vietri Susan Gravely visits Coast 2 Coast; Russell Roberts speaks at UCSB;
Dr. Gregory Chamitof’s presentation of his time living aboard ISS
27 Book Talk
Live by Night, Dennis Lehane’s ninth novel, is set in Prohibition-era Boston
Seniority
Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program protects residents in LTC facilities
32 Ernie’s World
Ernie continues his exploration of Québec
Library Corner
Jesse Aizenstat to speak about his book, Surfng the Middle East; upcoming library
events
34 On Entertainment
Fran Lebowitz speaks at UCSB; “Whose Live Anyway?” at Granada; Genesis West’s
pop up play, Endgame
35 Your Westmont
Museum exhibits alumni; Dr. Tom Knecht lectures on voting
44 Guide to Montecito Eateries
Te most complete, up-to-date, comprehensive listing of all individually owned
Montecito restaurants, cofee houses, bakeries, gelaterias, and hangouts; others in
Santa Barbara, Summerland, and Carpinteria too
46 Public Notices
49 Movie Showtimes
Latest flms, times, theaters, and addresses: they’re all here, as they are every week
50 Calendar of Events
Jazz at La Cumbre; Screenwriters Association lecture; Camerata Pacifica
program; EDC’s TGIF; Met Live season begins; Old Time Fiddlers’
Convention and Festival; San Jose Taiko returns; Akram Khan performs;
Lobero Theatre’s Roots Music series
52 Real Estate
Mark Hunt’s “high one fves” best buys
53 93108 Open House Directory
Homes and condos currently for sale and open for inspection in and near
Montecito
54 Classifed Advertising
Our very own “Craigslist” of classifed ads, in which sellers ofer everything from
summer rentals to estate sales
55 Local Business Directory
Smart business owners place business cards here so readers know where to look
when they need what those businesses ofer
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 5 If you’re hungry enough, roadkill will make for a king’s feast – Jonah Goldberg
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Building
Peace of
Mind
Awa r d Wi n n i n g B u i l d e r s S i n c e 1 9 8 6
GIFFIN & CRANE
GE NE R A L C ONT R A C T OR S , I NC
Vi si t Our Websi te
www. Gi ffi nAndCrane.com
Phone (805) 966-6401 License 611341
gcr03785_MJ_2011_52weeks_FNL2.indd 15 2/22/11 3:08 PM
GUEST
EDITORIAL
Mr. Hickman is the Montecito Fire Protection District Fire Chief
Fire Station # 3
A
third fre station in Montecito’s east end is on the horizon and I would
like to give a little overview and history of the project thus far. Before I
do, I would like to introduce myself as your newly appointed Fire Chief.
I was appointed to the position of Fire Chief on June 1 of this year. I
have 30 years’ experience delivering emergency services. My first-responder
career began on an ambulance in Ventura County, followed by six years as a
Paramedic in Santa Barbara; I’ve now been a licensed Paramedic for 28 years. In
1990 I started my career with Montecito Fire Protection District as one of its first
Paramedic Firefighters. More recently I was the initial Incident Commander on
the Tea Fire and was assigned as a Structure Protection Group Supervisor on the
Jesusita Fire. I am also on the board of Fire District’s Association of California
(FDAC). That is some of my history, but let me get to what I’d really like to talk
about: the Station Three project.
The vision of a third fire station on the east end of the district has been a plan
of the District’s for more than 20 years. We are committed to protecting you,
your property and the environment. We all know that residential growth on the
east end is possible, and is already part of the Montecito Community Plan. The
District’s mission is to deliver professional and timely emergency services to the
current and future needs of the community. The addition of Station 3 addresses
the areas in eastern Montecito that do not currently meet our response stan-
dards, and supports the community’s long-term plan.
A Perfect Location
Land acquisition will not get any less expensive, more available, or less con-
tentious in the future. The extensive site study (available on our website: www.
montecitofire.com) performed by the District in 2007 identified 14 possible sites.
Of these 14 properties, there were only two that met the majority of essential
and desirable criteria, both being on the Jackson Ranch. The proposed loca-
tion is directly across the street from 2349 East Valley Road. It is ideal because
of location, size and the fact that it has very few neighbors in close proximity.
Additionally, this location was the only location that had the closest thing to a
willing seller. The parcel is 2.55 acres of a much larger existing parcel. Currently,
the property is used as a lemon orchard but has been zoned Residential 2-E-1
for many years.
An Environmental Impact Report (EIR) has been completed and certified for
the property. The project has been reviewed by the Montecito Association’s
Land Use Committee four times prior to going to the Montecito Board of
Architectural Review (MBAR). The MBAR gave conceptual approval with
Board Member Sam Maphis stating, “I would want this to be an exhibit of how
people should design their properties.” Our next presentation will be to the
Montecito Planning Commission on October 24th.
The challenge we now face is a lawsuit that has been filed by an entity recent-
ly formed by the owner of property directly across the street from the proposed
fire station site. The entity is called the “Montecito Agricultural Foundation.”
The Foundation’s complaint is that the EIR was procedurally flawed. The
District’s counsel feels very strongly that the lawsuit is without merit and that
the EIR was processed properly, and we are more than willing to address any
issues if it is determined to need additional attention.
Other Neighbors Unaffected
We understand and are sensitive to neighbor concerns regarding views, aes-
thetics, or diminution in value and want to minimize any negative impacts the
introduction of a fire station in that area may cause.
However, the District has experienced these same concerns from neighbors
in the past, with both of our other station developments. I am unaware of any
neighbor suffering ill effects from our existing fire stations and a few have even
expressed to me that they enjoy our presence. Regardless, the lawsuit exists
and it is costing the District tens of thousands of dollars per month to defend
the EIR.
Over the past seven years the District’s governing board and staff have put
aside the funds to fully pay for the purchase of the land, the estimated construc-
tion costs of the fire station, and a new fire engine. It is our intention to absorb
by Chip Hickman
EDITORIAL Page 334
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 6 • The Voice of the Village •
I
f board member Gene Sinser has
anything to do with it, the Santa
Barbara Symphony will be making
a very big splash in the spring!
The orchestra, which kicks off its
60th season at the Granada on October
20 with a festive tribute to our tony
town by former composer-in-resi-
dence Emma Lou Diemer and inter-
national pianist André Watts, will
be performing Vivaldi’s ever popular
The Four Seasons and Glazunov’s The
Seasons in April, but while the talent-
ed musicians are playing the second
piece, in five movements, an artist
will be on stage recording his or her
impressions on canvas.
“Each movement is ten minutes long,
which means the artist must really get
a move on,” says Gene, who is also
busy electioneering for membership of
the Montecito Fire District board.
“The painting will be shown live
on a giant video screen behind the
orchestra for the benefit of the audi-
leggiadro.com
1268 Coast Village Road, Montecito, CA 93108
Manager: Rosa Maria Klaus (805) 565-1300
Symphony Season Will Soar
Monte ito
Miscellany
by Richard Mineards
Richard covered the Royal Family for Britain’s Daily Mirror and Daily Mail before moving to New York
to write for Rupert Murdoch’s newly launched Star magazine in 1978; Richard later wrote for New York
magazine’s “Intelligencer”. He continues to make regular appearances on CBS, ABC, and CNN, and
moved to Montecito five years ago.
MISCELLANY Page 184
Symphony board member Gene Sinser plans a
memorable musical splash
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 7
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PO Box 41459 Santa Barbara, California 93140
dwb@elocho.com | Phone.805.965.9555 | Fax.805.965.9566 | www.elocho.com
studios
BECKER
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812 State Street

Santa Barbara

966.9187
1482 East Valley Road

Montecito

565.4411
BryantAndSons.com
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 8 • The Voice of the Village •
1137 Coast Village Road Montecito, CA
www.legacy-montecito.com 805.845.3300
LEGACY
1137 Coast Village Road Montecito, CA
www.legacy-montecito.com 805.845.3300
LEGACY
LETTERS Page 304
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Publisher Timothy Lennon Buckley
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Published by Montecito Journal Inc., James Buckley, President
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CA 93108; E-MAIL: news@montecitojournal.net
The best little paper in America
(Covering the best little community anywhere!)
Y
ou’ve now seen Obama
without clothes and it’s not a
pretty sight. The contrast was
astonishing. Even many in the media
were left speechless. The election was
not won last night, but the country
will now look at both men with eyes
and ears wide open.
Someone (Romney?) brilliantly dis-
covered Obama’s major weakness (he
has many). He doesn’t know what to
do when challenged and can’t resort
to his normal tactic of shutting down
the debate. There were signs of this
behavior in the few public instances
when he was challenged. In the meet-
ing when Ryan challenged him over
the budget and in the White House
meeting with Netanyahu when the
Israeli Prime Minister scolded Obama
in front of the press.
Normally, Obama is speaking to
stacked audiences that he can control,
including the press, and in formal
remarks with a teleprompter. Romney
either instinctively felt this or was
prompted, but it worked. Obama
wanted to shut down the debate but
couldn’t and his anger and frustration
was revealed to everyone. He became
disoriented because he couldn’t have
his way. He showed that he is an
empty suit and not a leader, in front
of the whole world. A devastating
performance and if Romney contin-
ues this tactic, he will be the next
President. However, Obama is capa-
ble of dirty tricks but time is short.
Look for Ryan to make a fool of Biden
this week.
Dolly Granatelli
Montecito
(Editor’s note: C’mon Dolly, I know
you are trying to be diplomatic; tell us
how you really feel! – J.B.)
Nothing To Say
The news media lost almost as big
as Obama in the opening debate. The
nation saw an energized and aggres-
sive Mitt Romney trounce a president
who clearly has nothing to say and
no record to run on. Was this a new-
and-improved Romney, a guy we had
somehow never seen before? Of course
not. It was the same old Mitt Romney,
but this time, for 90 shining minutes,
unfiltered by a press that has been
trying to snuff the life from Romney’s
campaign since the day he became the
GOP frontrunner. Although the news
media would have us believe that
Romney is weak, clueless and bereft
of ideas, the Massachusetts gover-
nor comes across as very presidential
when his words, deeds and ideas are
not being reported to us by the con-
spiratorial likes of The New York Times,
Washington Post, L.A. Times, MSNBC,
et al.
The fact that Obama supporters
have seized on the lack of specific
details in Romney’s arguments is as
pathetic as it is laughable. This elec-
tion is not about details, it is about
whether government should be
allowed to run our lives even more
than it is already doing. If Obama
has any more Big Ideas to present in
the next debate, then bring ‘em on!
In the meantime, with their candi-
date bruised and bloodied, expect
the news media, abetted by Obama’s
handlers, to do the only thing they
can do: play dirty. Very dirty. Once
again, we say let ‘em bring it, since
any attempt to tar a fundamentally
decent man like Romney is bound to
backfire.
Honorine Gordon
via Internet
Where’s The Money?
I want to thank the Montecito Journal
for endorsing my candidacy to the
Montecito Fire Protection District and
urging voters to vote Yes on Measure
F to expand the Fire District Board
from three to five members.
To maintain the best fire and emer-
gency services for Montecito the new
Board must plan for the future and not
be caught by unanticipated expenses.
In 2011 the district had a deficit of
over $2 million.
In the District’s campaign for a new
fire station, to handle potential future
growth in the East end of the Valley,
they claim that it will not cost the
taxpayers any additional funds. That
is true to the extent that indeed their
income is fixed to a portion of the
property taxes collected. However,
they currently spend an amount
almost equal to their income running
two stations, property tax is relatively
flat, and the area is not growing so
no new taxes are being generated; so
where would the money come from to
run a third station?
I will work diligently to ensure that
the District plans for the future and
continues to use its funds wisely to
maintain the best services for all resi-
dents. I will work to see that our
District’s fine reputation and perfor-
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 9
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FOUR SEASONS BILTMORE HOTEL I 805.969.3167 I MONTECITO, CA 93108
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Montecito’s Upper Village
Exclusively in Montecito
Vietri • Simon Pearce • Mariposa • Arte Italica
Palecek • Julia Knight • Reed & Barton
Vagabond House • Le Jacquard Francais
Feels Like Fall....
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 10 • The Voice of the Village •
Where: Montecito Union School,
385 San Ysidro Road
Info and registration: www.ccsb.org
Providence Hall Open House
Providence Hall invites anyone interested
in their college preparatory grades 7-12
program to attend an open house, which
provides families opportunities to meet
and talk with faculty and administrators
about the school’s Christian faith-
based program and curriculum. Student
ambassadors will provide personalized
campus tours, and teachers will present
mini-classes.
When: 2 pm
Where: Interim downtown campus,
630 East Canon Perdido Street
Info and Registration: www.
providencehallsb.org/rsvp
MONDAY OCTOBER 15
Antioch University Healthcare Forum
Antioch hosts forum on the Affordable Care
Act. California Insurance Commissioner
Dave Jones and panel of local healthcare
leaders will assess its impact.
When: 5 pm
Where: Antioch University’s Community Hall,
602 Anacapa Street
Admission: Free
RSVP: Not required, however seating is
limited. A live webcast of event will also be
provided. See www.antiochsb.edu/events
for more details.
FRIDAY OCTOBER 19
Golf Classic 2012
Be a player, sponsor, or fan at the Golf
Classic 2012 to beneft Special Olympics
Santa Barbara County Sports Programs and
Golf Teams
When: 10:30 am
Where: 405 Glen Annie Road
Info, Registration and Sponsorship:
www.sosc.org/sbgolfclassic
TUESDAY OCTOBER 16
Illustrated Lecture at Lotusland
“Historic Landscape Estates of Santa
Barbara: A Reproduction of Elizabeth
FRIDAY OCTOBER 12
Golf Tournament
Montecito YMCA announces a golf
tournament at Glen Annie Golf Club to
beneft Montecito Family YMCA programs.
Activities include a Hole-in-One contest,
a BBQ dinner, cocktail reception, raffe
prizes, auction, and children’s putting
contest.
Where: 405 Glen Annie Road
Info: 969-3288 or www.ciymca.org
SATURDAY OCTOBER 13
MTF Hike
Montecito Trails Foundation hosts a 4-mile
hike up Buena Vista Canyon to Edison
Catway, then west to San Ysidro Trail,
down to Old Pueblo Trail, east to Park Lane
and back, with Paul Cronshaw. Bring
food and water for this intermediate hike.
When: 8:20 am for check-in and release
forms
Where: Buena Vista Trailhead on Park Lane
Info: 568-0833
Tall Ship Public Sail
During this weekend’s Harbor & Seafood
Festival, a Tall Ship Public Sail will be held
on the Spirit of Dana Point
When: Festival is open 10 am to 5 pm, sail
is from 3:30 pm to 6 pm; boarding at 3 pm
Cost: $22 children, $40 adults
Info: www.HarborFestival.org
Ojai Peddler’s Fair
The 28th Annual Ojai Peddler’s Fair is held
rain or shine, and is chockfull of quality
antiques, collectibles, handcrafts and
international crafts. This is a beneft for the
Mira Monte PTO. Vendors are sought.
When: 9 am to 4 pm, Saturday and
Sunday, October 13 & 14
Where: Chaparral Auditorium
at 414 East Ojai Avenue
Info: Pat, 964-8915
SUNDAY OCTOBER 14
Cancer Center Walk/Run
The Cancer Center of Santa Barbara
and the Biltmore present the 20th Annual
Cancer Center Walk/Run, a 5K run or walk
or a 10K run (and Kids’ Fun Run).
MJ Associate Editor Lily Buckley invites
one and all to join her and other runners
and walkers this morning in support of
the Cancer Center’s Clinical Research
Program. Participants will be raising money
based upon the support each receives
from friends, neighbors, family members,
local businesses and others. One hundred
percent of the proceeds from the Walk/Run
beneft Cancer Center of Santa Barbara’s
Clinical Research Program.
The course begins at Montecito Union
School before heading down Santa Rosa
Lane, turning on Miramar Lane, down San
Leandro, up San Ysidro, down Wyant Road
to the trail that leads to Hot Springs Road,
back down School House Road and back to
MUS. Each loop is 5K and each participant
will do two loops.
If you’d like to access Lily’s sponsorship
page, please go to www.ccsb.org/
participant/view/4603.
When: 10K run begins at 8 am; 5K walk/
run begins at 8:30 am;
Kids Fun Run at 10 am
(If you have a Montecito event, or an event that concerns Montecito,
please e-mail kelly@montecitojournal.net or call (805) 565-1860)
FRIDAY OCTOBER 12
Movie Night
Head to Montecito Yoga to view Wake Up; popcorn and
Pellegrino will be served
When: 7 to 9 pm
Where: 1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 10C
Cost: free
Info: 845-1301 or www.montecitoyoga.com
THURSDAY OCTOBER 11
MERRAG Meeting and Training
Network of trained volunteers that work and/or live in the
Montecito area prepare to respond to community disaster
during critical frst 72 hours following an event. The mutual
“self-help” organization serves Montecito’s residents with
the guidance and support of the Montecito Fire, Water and
Sanitary Districts. This month: Fire Chemistry.
When: 10 am
Where: Montecito Fire Station, 595 San Ysidro Road
Info: Geri, 969-2537
This Week
Montecito
in and around
Montecito Tide Chart
Day Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt
Thurs, Oct 11
1:15 AM 0.7 7:48 AM 4.7 01:35 PM 1.8 07:28 PM 4.9
Fri, Oct 12
1:47 AM 0.6 8:11 AM 5.2 02:14 PM 1 08:14 PM 5.1
Sat, Oct 13
2:18 AM 0.6 8:37 AM 5.6 02:53 PM 0.4 08:59 PM 5.1
Sun, Oct 14
2:50 AM 0.7 9:06 AM 6.1 03:35 PM -0.2 09:44 PM 5.1
Mon, Oct 15
3:23 AM 0.9 9:39 AM 6.4 04:18 PM -0.6 010:32 PM 4.9
Tues, Oct 16
3:58 AM 1.2 10:15 AM 6.6 05:05 PM -0.8 011:23 PM 4.5
Wed, Oct 17
4:35 AM 1.6 10:55 AM 6.6 05:57 PM -0.7
Thurs, Oct 18
12:21 AM 4.2 5:16 AM 2.1 11:39 AM 6.4 06:54 PM -0.5
Fri, Oct 19
1:29 AM 3.9 6:05 AM 2.5 12:31 PM 6 08:00 PM -0.2

de Forest’s Illustrated Lecture to the
Garden Club of America” is the title of
a performance by landscape architect
Sydney Baumgartner to take place at
Lotusland.
Ms Baumgartner’s performance, in
Elizabeth’s ‘uniform’ of cashmere sweater,
pearls, and denim jacket and in character,
will cover prominent historic gardens, many
of which no longer exist or are now divided
into smaller estates, and discuss why Santa
Barbara has long been considered a
destination for garden-lovers. Landscape
architect Elizabeth de Forest was Ms
Baumgartner’s mentor, as well as her aunt
by marriage.
When: 3 pm
Cost: $25 for members,
$35 for non-members
Registration: 969-9990
Montecito Union School Board
Meeting
When: 6 pm
Where: 385 San Ysidro Road
Info: 969-3249
SATURDAY OCTOBER 20
Fall Twilight Tour
A Twilight Tour will take place at Ganna
Walska Lotusland. The colors and light in
the garden change dramatically as the
evenings grow longer, and a twilight tour
provides the perfect opportunity to explore
Lotusland late in the day. Hors d’oeuvres
and wine will be served on the geranium
terrace, overlooking the main lawn, from
4:30 to 5:15 pm.
Guests may choose to reserve a docent-
guided tour or explore the garden on their
own. Lotusland, a 37-acre botanical garden
in Montecito, offers this opportunity to enjoy
the garden at twilight only a few times each
year.
When: 3:30 pm to 6 pm
Cost: $55 for members,
$65 for non-members
Registration: 969-9990
SAVE THE DATE
Sharon Gardner and Karen Drucker
will co-facilitate a women’s retreat at La
Casa de Maria Retreat and Conference
Center, October 21-25. This retreat will
focus on taking time to replenish, restore
and balance through meditation, music
and movement. Participants will learn to:
align with your true self (Highest Self/
Spiritual Self) and to listen and trust your
intuitive wisdom/guidance; balance the
feminine and masculine within and “Be”
in your doing; release limiting beliefs
and negative self-talk, love and accept
Your Self; and open to having more fun.
Registration for this all-inclusive, 5-day
retreat is limited.
When: October 21-25
Where: 800 El Bosque Road
Info and registration: Sharon, 969-2632
or www.sgconnects.com
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 11
You’ll want to attend
Bring your student
and attend this FREE,
informative evening.
FRIDAY OCTOBER 12
Book Signing
Local author and healer Becky Gail will sign her book,
Father Earth, Daughter Sky, about her journey to distant
places and quest for living an authentic life. Proceeds from
this book will be contributed to GATE (Global Alliance
for Transformational Entertainment), Audubon Society,
Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Native American School of
Sacred Ceremonies and Ojai Raptor Center.
When: 4 to 6 pm
Where: Lily, 1131 Coast Village Road
Info: 695-0625
SAVE THE DATE
Crane’s Annual Country Fair
The 17th annual fair is farm-themed, and features music,
BBQ, games, face painting, a bake-off and more. Everyone
is welcome, admission is free!
When: Sunday, October 28, 10 am to 3 pm
Where: Crane Country Day School,
1795 San Leandro Lane
Info: 969-7732
Westmont Anniversary Lecture &
Reception
Celebrate Westmont’s 75
th
anniversary at
Santa Barbara Historical Museum
When: Wednesday,
October 24, 5:30 to 7:30 pm
Where: 136 East De La Guerra
Info and RSVP: www.westmontlecture.
eventbrite.com
Ghost Village Road
Coast Village Road Business Association’s
annual trick-or-treat event
When: Wednesday, October 31,
3:30 pm to 6:30 pm
Where: Coast Village Road
ONGOING
MONDAYS AND TUESDAYS
Art Classes
Beginning and advanced, all ages and by
appt, just call
Where: Portico Gallery,
1235 Coast Village Road
Info: 695-8850
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS
Adventuresome Aging
Where: 89 Eucalyptus Lane
Info: 969-0859; ask for Susan
WEDNESDAYS THRU SATURDAYS
Live Entertainment at Cava
Where: Cava, 1212 Coast Village Road
When: 7 pm to 10 pm
Info: 969-8500
MONDAYS
Story Time at the Library
When: 10:30 to 11 am
Where: Montecito Library,
1469 East Valley Road
Info: 969-5063
Connections Brain Fitness Program
Where: Friendship Center,
89 Eucalyptus Lane
Info: Jackie Kennedy,
969-0859
TUESDAYS
Boy Scout Troop 33 Meeting
Open to all boys ages 11-17;
visitors welcome
When: 7:15 pm
Where: Scout House,
Upper Manning Park,
449 San Ysidro Road
WEDNESDAYS
Story Time
Stories read to little ones at Montecito toy
store, Toy Crazy. All books are discounted
10% for purchase during story time
mornings.
When: 11 am to 11:30 am
Where: 1026 Coast Village Road
(in Montecito Country Mart)
Info: 565-7696
THURSDAYS
Adventuresome Aging Program
Community outings, socialization, and lunch
for dependent adults
When: 10 am
Where: Friendship Center,
89 Eucalyptus Lane
Info: Jackie Kennedy, 969-0859
Casual Italian Conversation at the
Montecito Library
Practice your Italian conversation amongst
a variety of skill levels while learning about
Italian culture. Fun for all, and informative,
too!
When: 1 pm to 2 pm
Where: 1469 East Valley Road
Info: 969-5063
Pick-up Basketball Games
He shoots; he scores! The Montecito Family
YMCA is offering pick-up basketball on
Thursdays at 5:30 pm. Join coach Donny
for warm-up, drills and then scrimmages.
Adults welcome too.
When: 5:30 pm
Where: Montecito Family YMCA,
591 Santa Rosa Lane
Info: 969-3288
FRIDAYS
Farmers’ Market
When: 8 am to 11:15 am
Where: South side of Coast Village Road •MJ
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 12 • The Voice of the Village •
Call: 805.898.2870
Visit: AAA TRAVEL – SANTA BARBARA
3712 STATE STREET - SANTA BARBARA, CA
Call: 805.898.2870
Visit: AAA TRAVEL – SANTA BARBARA
3712 STATE STREET - SANTA BARBARA, CA
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 13 “Shovel-ready jobs” were magic beans sold to [President Obama] by party hacks hungry for pork – Jonah Goldberg
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VILLAGE BEAT Page 224
Montecito Association
Village Beat
by Kelly Mahan


A
t their board meeting on
Tuesday, October 9, Montecito
Association directors voted to
send a letter to the Montecito Planning
Commission asking them to defer any
decisions about Fire Station 3 until
after the November election. The
proposed station will be in front of
MPC on October 24.
During the standing-room only MA
board meeting, Montecito Fire Chief
Chip Hickman showed a video show-
ing a fire starting in a living room
and growing rapidly to engulf the
entire home in less than five minutes.
“Everything we do is time sensitive,”
Chief Hickman explained, adding
that fires and all medical emergen-
cies require quick response times.
According to MFPD, the eastern por-
tion of the district is outside of a five-
minute response time, hence the need
for a third station. Fire personnel also
need a place to train for emergencies,
which will take place on the grounds
of the new station, slated to be built
on a 2.55-acre lot on the 2500 block of
East Valley Road.
“We’ve made a plan to accommo-
date both the goals and needs of the
station as well as buffers to ensure
neighborhood compatibility and oak
woodland restoration,” said land use
planner Rita Bright, who is consulting
on the station. The project includes
15 parking spaces, living quarters,
administrative offices, apparatus
bays, a 35-foot hose-drying tower, and
two driveways to be used for ingress
and egress for fire vehicles and two-
way for civilian vehicles. It has been in
front of the MA Land Use Committee
six times, and in August, received con-
ceptual review from Montecito Board
of Architectural Review. “The time is
now; the justification is here. It’s never
going to get less contentious or less
expensive,” Chief Hickman said.
MFPD is currently in litigation with
a group calling themselves Montecito
Agricultural Foundation, which is
comprised of three nearby homeown-
ers who are calling the Environmental
Impact Review (EIR) on the project
incomplete and calling the project’s
compatibility with the neighbor-
hood into question. Mary Rose and
Joe Cole, representing Montecito
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 14 • The Voice of the Village •
SOFA
FACTORY
1117 State St.
Santa Barbara, CA
(805) 962-8555
Fall
into
Comfort
High End Furnishings
at Wholesale Prices
Available in any
style
size
color
fabric
Specials of This Week
Scarlett
Sale: $1499
Slade
Sale: $1699
Franklin
Sale: $2199
Ms Millner is the author
of “The Magic Make
Over, Tricks for Looking,
Thinner, Younger,
and More Confident –
Instantly!” If you have an
event that belongs in this
column, you are invited to
call Lynda at 969-6164.
Seen Around Town
by Lynda Millner
Stand Up For Kids
SEEN Page 164
T
he United Boys & Girls Clubs
of Santa Barbara County
welcomed guests to their 30
th

annual “Stand Up For Kids” auction
held at Fess Parker’s Doubletree
Resort. I must say they did a frst-class
job. It was the perfect evening to be
at the top of the rotunda for cocktails
with enough bars so there were no
lines. The beef and brie appetizers
were delicious and the silent auction
went on and on – so many items to bid
for. On one of the tables was a picture
of some of the founders and early
presidents where Jim Dow was listed
as unknown. He laughed and left a
note identifying himself.
Also, there were Rick and Sasa
Feldman who own the Eyeglass
Factory. I didn’t know that they give
glasses to any child in need, veterans
and homeless. Rick would like to see
more businesses involved in philan-
thropy.
Real stars and blue and white lan-
terns glowed over the dinner tables
and stage in the rotunda. Each table
place had a charming handwrit-
ten thank you note from the kids
at the Clubs. Mine was from Leo in
Carpinteria and said, “Thank you for
donating to the Boys & Girls Clubs!”
United Boys & Girls Clubs director of finance Judy Jennings, guest of honor George Chelini and wife,
Margie, with CEO Michael Rattray at their gala
Boys & Girls Clubs board secretary Jim Lisi, Cindy Rehage and board president Steve Rehage at Fess
Parker’s Doubletree
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 15
©2012 Union Bank, N.A. Union Bank has entered into an agreement to acquire SBB&T, which is subject to required regulatory approvals and other closing conditions.
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We don’t just work in this community, we live here, too. That’s why we’re committed to keeping local traditions
alive, and as we’ll soon be uniting with Santa Barbara Bank & Trust, it’s even more important that we do our part.
We’ve celebrated at Old Spanish Days Fiesta in Santa Barbara, helped bring back the Monterey 4th of July Parade,
and gotten in touch with our wild side at the Santa Barbara Zoo’s Zoofari Ball. While traditions like these are lots of
fun, they also do a lot of good for local businesses and nonprofits—as well as boost local spirit. Of course, there are
other ways a bank can support its communities. So Union Bank also commits millions of dollars and thousands of
volunteer hours to local philanthropic causes that support education, economic development, the environment,
the arts, human services, and more. It’s the right thing to do—after all, it’s our home.
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 16 • The Voice of the Village •
WHAT’S NEXT?
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Montecito enchantMent
SEEN (Continued from page 14)
There were also kids at the event to
greet and say thanks.
Master of Ceremonies Randy Weiss
kept the program moving. CEO/CPO
Michael Rattray and board president
Steve Rehage told us, “In 1975 there
was a board and George Chelini was
appointed executive director uniting
all the different clubs (Carpinteria,
Goleta, Lompoc and Westside). Now
we have ten locations including club-
houses, school campuses after hours
and our beautiful Camp Whittier.
Collectively we touch the lives of
over five thousand members.” They
have researched the best programs
and curriculums to enhance their after
school and summer programs includ-
ing making them fun. These programs
are making a positive difference in the
lives of young people throughout the
county.
Honored this evening with the
Lifetime Achievement Award was
George Chelini who founded a first
day camp and baseball league in 1958
and has been involved ever since. As
Mike said, “George is the godfather of
the Boys & Girls Clubs.” George told
us, “My wife, Margie, was a volunteer
at one of the clubs and that’s how we
met.”
A big present came from the
Chumash, who presented the Westside
Boys & Girls Clubs with a check for
$100,000 they had made from a golf
tournament. The live auction was
done with father and son profession-
als Bill Hoffer and Bill Hoffer and a
very responsive audience. The rotun-
da rocked as Area 51 took over to
provide music for dancing.
The event committee was Jim
Crook, Melissa Gough, Judy
Jennings, Diana Starr Langley, Jim
Lisi, Michael Rattray, Kevin Redick
and Sal Rodriguez.
For more information about the
clubs, visit www.unitedbg.org.
Tango On The Riviera
The State Street Ballet Company
held its annual gala, this year with
the title “Tango on the Riviera,” in
the Loggia Room of the Biltmore. The
company was honoring one of its most
benevolent donors, Margo Cohen-
Feinberg, who loves the tango. It was
also celebrating a taste of the theme
looking forward to the world pre-
miere of An American Tango by New
Owners of the Eyeglass Factory Rick and Sasa Feldman with First District Supervisor Salud Carbajal at
United Boys & Girls Clubs of Santa Barbara County’s 30
th
annual “Stand Up For Kids” auction
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 17 The hunger for Obama has been replaced with the indigestion that follows after four unimpressive years in office – Jonah Goldberg
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SEEN Page 204
York choreographer William Soleau
on October 27 and 28 at the Lobero.
As Peter and Dallas Clark said,
“The Royal Ballet had dame Margo
Fonteyn and State Street Ballet has
its own Margo who danced in her
youth.” She danced this night as well
with four handsome dancers from the
company.
Tango attire was suggested and
guests looked ready to compete in
their own Dancing with the Stars as
they sipped wine to the sounds of
Chris Fossek playing Spanish guitar
on the veranda.
“The right shoe can make a big
difference,” so says Cinderella. This
night each table was centered with a
fancy black shoe filled with dark red
roses and a rose at each place “to put
between you teeth.” There was a large
inviting dance floor and Bent Myggen
also played background music. King
Communications Producers and
emcees Jonatha King and Lance Jones
told us, “Thousands of children see
the programs and are inspired and the
company has a ninety-percent rebook-
ing rate.”
Executive Director Rodney
Gustafson told me, “I founded the
group seventeen years ago and am
grateful for all the donors like Leni
Fe Bland, Tim Mikel, Sara Miller
McCune, Michael Towbes, Morrie
and Irma Jurkowitz and Van Cleef &
Arpels, who are sponsoring our very
first appearance in New York City this
fall.”
Energetic auctioneer Andrew
Firestone reminded us, “I am the son
of a ballerina.” His mom performed
in England where future husband
Brooks first saw her on stage and
“the rest is history.” Besides the usual
State Street Ballet honoree Margo Cohen-Feinberg
with the event chair Jill Dexter at the “Tango on
the Riviera” soirée
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 18 • The Voice of the Village •
r e s t a u r a n t
8 0 5 . 5 6 4 . 2 6 2 6
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mon- f ri 1 1 a m – 9 p m • S at- S un 9 a m- 9 p m
unique mexican dining experience
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Susan Keller
Montecito Fire Protection District Board
Elect
KEY ENDORSEMENTS
Judy & Bruce Anticouni
Jan & Ralph Baxter
Jill & Arnie Bellowe
Darlene Bierig,
Montecito Water Board
Laura Bridley
Karen & Peter Brill
J’Amy Brown
Merryl Brown
Susan & Claude Case
Jane & John Dailey
Ann Daniel
Phyllis de Picciotto
Jane & Bruce Defnet
Mimi DeGruy
Jelinda & Barry DeVorzon
Emmy Dunn
Dan Eidelson, Montecito
Planning Commission
Colette Eyears
Judy Foreman
Susan French
Ruth & David Green
Pamela Dillman Haskell,
Montecito Union School
PTA President
Daniela Johnson
June & Jorgen Kjaempe
Beverlie Latimer
Dawn & David Ligon
Lisa Loicano
Debra Manchester &
Don MacMannis
Frances Marsh
Brett Matthews,
Montecito Union
School Board
Marilyn & Dick Mazess
Maggie Mixsell
Diane Morgan
Doug Morgan,
Montecito Water Board
Bill Palladini, Montecito
Board of Architectural
Review
Michael Phillips, Montecito
Planning Commission
Carol & Ned Quackenbush
Christine & Stefan Riesenfeld
Ginger Salazar
Abbe & Dennis Sands
Deborah Schwartz
Richard Shaikewitz,
Montecito Water Board
Myron Shapero
Ted Simmons
Tony Spann, Montecito
Board of Architectural
Review
Lynne Sprecher
Kay & Ted Stern
Pru & Rob Sternin
Mardee & George Tamas
Dick Thielscher
Anne & Michael Towbes
Joan Wells
Amy & David Wilson
(partial list)
Endorsed by the Montecito Journal — Make Susan Keller
one of your four votes for Montecito Fire District Board!
• Member – Montecito
Board of Architectural
Review
• Chair – Montecito
Association Land Use
Committee
• Offcer – Montecito
Association
• Chair – Manning Park
Youth Center
Renovation Project
• 2002 Vocational
Citizen of the Year –
Montecito Rotary Club
• Community Volunteer,
Non-proft Founder &
CEO, Attorney
• Wife, mother, 18 year
Montecito Resident
• B.A. Stanford
University,
J.D. UCLA Law School
Vote Yes on
Measure F2012
Improve Fire Board
Efectiveness
Vote-By-Mail begins Oct. 8
Election Day is
November 6
Paid for by Susan Keller for Montecito Fire District Board 2012, 1482 East Valley Road, # 654 Montecito, CA 93108
MISCELLANY (Continued from page 6)
ence. The pieces will then be acquired
for the symphony and auctioned off at
a gala scheduled the following month
at a private home in Montecito.”
The selection process of the art-
ists – one for each performance – has
already begun, with the Arts Fund
forwarding names to the selection
committee.
“Our maestro, Nir Kabaretti, sug-
gested this at an artistic committee
after seeing it on a website,” adds
Gene. “The initial response from vari-
ous art organizations has been posi-
tive. I have set myself a deadline of
New Year’s Eve to have the artists
lined up.”
The symphony’s executive director,
David Grossman, describes the plan
as “a blend of visual and aural art
forms” promising a unique experi-
ence.
“We immediately embraced Nir’s
idea. Music naturally creates images
in our minds, but how interesting it
will be to watch those ideas come to
life in real time through the hands of
a local artist.
“Glazunov’s work is the perfect
vehicle to take a journey with the art-
ist as we watch sonic textures translate
into brush strokes... It provides a won-
derful dimension to a concert season
filled with extraordinary moments.”
A spectacular canvas, to be sure...
Nacho News
Dashing Argentinian polo player,
Nacho Figueras, is known worldwide
as the model for Ralph Lauren’s line
of fashions and fragrances.
But he was hardly ready for his
close-up when he made an unexpect-
ed stop at the Santa Barbara Polo Club
last week, sporting a black eye from
a mallet accident from a match in
Buenos Aires a few days before.
Nacho, who was accompanied
by his wife, photographer and for-
mer model, Delfina, played for Ben
Soleimani’s Mansour team against
Wildcat, losing 14-10.
“It was a great exhibition, although
he was on strange horses lent by
Ben and Santiago von Wernich, and
had just arrived from Argentina that
morning and drove straight up here,”
says Melanja Jones, the Carpinteria
club’s polo manager. “He has had
quite a schedule of late, having com-
peted in China just ten days previ-
ously and then flying to Buenos Aires
to play before jetting to Los Angeles.”
Nacho, voted the second most hand-
some man in the world by readers of
Vanity Fair four years ago after British
actor Robert Pattison, was at the third
annual Veuve Clicquot Celebrity Polo
Classic at Will Rogers State Park in
Pacific Palisades on Saturday play-
ing for Lauren’s Black Watch Team,
watched by the likes of Minnie
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 19 On 16 September 1985, when the Commerce Department announced that the United States had become a debtor nation, the American Empire died – Gore Vidal
Santa Barbara Premiere
Akram Khan
Company
Vertical Road
Akram Khan, Artistic Director
SUN, OCT 14 / 7 PM / GRANADA THEATRE
SUN, OCT 14 / 3 PM / CAMPBELL HALL
Powerful World Rhythms
TICKETS
$10 Children
$15 Adults
This exciting percussion ensemble is
a sure-fre kid-pleaser. (Best for ages
4 and up. Approx. 60 min.)
Author, Journalist and Social Commentator
Fran Lebowitz
FRI, OCT 12 / 8 PM / CAMPBELL HALL
“Her appeal comes from her ability to
lampoon any trend of the day in the
most politically incorrect manner
possible.” The New York Times
An Evening with David Byrne
& St. Vincent
THU, OCT 11 / 8 PM / ARLINGTON THEATRE
“Perhaps the single greatest infuence
on the current generation of indie
rockers.” The New York Times
Ryan Stiles, Greg Proops,
Chip Esten and Jef Davis
TUE, OCT 16 / 8 PM / GRANADA THEATRE
“Standup is
fun, improv
is funnier.
And these
guys are
the world’s
best!”
The Oregonian
(805) 893-3535
www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
Murray Perahia, piano
THU, OCT 11 / 8 PM / CAMPBELL HALL
“Perahia is a marvel.” Los Angeles Times
Performing works by Haydn, Schubert,
Beethoven, Schumann and Chopin
Event Sponsor: Carla Hahn
From the
United
Kingdom
MISCELLANY Page 284
Driver, Selma Blair, Mandy Moore,
Rose McGowan and Jerry O’Connell.
His prominent black eye was, thank-
fully, a distant memory....
The Clark Abodes
The estate of eccentric copper heir-
ess Huguette Clark was worth more
than $300 million when she died last
year aged 104, it has been revealed.
Her fortune, which has now come to
light in court documents, includes her
most valuable asset, Bellosguardo, an
$84.5 million mansion on 23 acres on
a bluff overlooking the Pacific in our
Eden by the Beach.
The reclusive tycoon abandoned all
five of her homes during her last 20
years, instead setting up residence in
a New York hospital.
The pricey real estate also includes
three apartments in Manhattan, over-
looking Central Park, with a total of 42
rooms between them. They are valued
at $53 million – with the penthouse
property already sold for $24 million.
Another estate, the nine-bedroom Le
Beau Chateau, in affluent New Canaan,
Connecticut, is worth $14.3 million,
while other personal property, includ-
ing a painting by Monet and a multi-
million doll collection, is valued at
$75.4 million.
The valuation, which will be subject
to taxes, comes as part of the current
well-publicized court case between
Clark’s longtime nurse, Hadassah
Peri, and her great-nieces and great-
nephews.
Clark drew up two separate wills in
2005, aged 98.
The first gave $5 million to Peri, but
left the bulk of the estate to “intestate
distributees,” meaning her closest liv-
ing relatives.
But the latest, written just six weeks
later, deliberately excluded Clark’s
family and left most of the fortune
to an art foundation to be set up at
Bellosguardo.
It also included a bequest of $30
Polo man Nacho Figueras pictured with Richard
Mineards on his last visit to Santa Barbara two
years ago
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11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 20 • The Voice of the Village •
POWELL’S PLAN FOR
COMMUNITY-ORIENTED SAFETY
1. Safety First. Ensure that life-saving emergency
response times are achieved throughout the district.
2. Next Generation Technology. Maintain a program of
updating fre equipment that is modern and designed for
the specifc needs of our semi-rural community.
3. Fiscal Responsibility. Maintain a balanced budget and
use modern business techniques to forecast and plan
for future needs.
4. Community Oversight and Involvement.
Third-generation community service for Montecito.
Deep Roots – Fresh Ideas
Volunteer Fireman • Director of Tea Fire Relief Services
Local Business Owner • Third Generation Montecito Resident

Montecito Fire Board
A New Generation of Leadership

JOHN ABRAHAM POWELL
KEY ENDORSEMENTS
Santa Barbara Women’s
Political Committee
Henry Childs, Former
Director, Montecito Fire
Board. Chief, MDVFC.
Brett Matthews, Montecito
Union School District Trustee
Deborah Fuss, Montecito
Union School District Trustee
Gwyn Lurie, Montecito
Union School District Trustee
Claire Gottsdanker, Montecito
Planning Commissioner
Jeff Shelton, Architect
Vote by mail begins Oct. 8
Election Day Nov. 6
Montecito Journal endorses ABE POWELL
Proven in Crisis & Fiscal Management
“I am running for the Montecito Fire Protection District Board to ensure that
our Fire Department benefts from active community oversight and stands ready,
equipped with the next generation of technology, training and equipment, to provide
unsurpassed emergency protection to the entire community.” – John Abraham Powell
Paid for by John Abraham Powell for Montecito Fire Protection District 2012, PO Box 5700, Santa Barbara, CA 93150
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SEEN Page 364
SEEN (Continued from page 17)
auction items, it always amazes me
how many toe shoes are required for a
season – they cost $100 and only last a
week or two. Many people bid to give
the $2,500 each ballerina needs.
The ballet company treated us to
a 1910 dance that was around before
the foxtrot, called the Castle Walk. The
gala committee who planned all this
was chaired by Jill Dexter with Alex
Nourse, Arlyn Goldsby, Beverly
Koobatian Johnson and Denise
Caracas helping. Don’t forget to check
the season performances calendar at
www.StateStreetBallet.com.
Women & Leadership
Antioch University Santa Barbara
(AUSB) invited guests to join the “Fan”
Club (Fundraising and Networking) to
hear about the university’s new certif-
icate program, Women & Leadership.
The location was the unique contem-
porary home of architect John Mike
Cohen and his wife, Marcia, complete
with an infinity pool and stunning
views of the ocean. There to greet us
was their dog, Weber. The story goes
that John wanted a barbeque and
Marcia wanted a dog, hence the name.
More hosts for the wine and hors
d’oeuvres event were Judy Bruton,
Patricia Chavez-Nunez, Marcia R.
Cohen, Kathryn Downing, Dale
Kern, Vicki Riskin and Susan Rose,
along with a huge committee.
The large living room was over-
flowing as AUSB’s board chair
Vickie Riskin spoke and introduced
Part of the ballet troupe Ryan Camou, Leila Drake, Anna Carnes with Justine Thompson and president
of the board Roger Thompson, and performers Cecily Stewart and Jack Stewart at the Biltmore
Founder and
director of the
State Street
Ballet Rodney
Gustafson and
board member
and head of the
“Tango on the
Riviera”event
committee Alex
Nourse
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 21

We’re proud to
welcome Andrew R.Wilson
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With the recent addition of Andrew R.Wilson, our
office is even more powerfully aligned to guide you
through all kinds of market conditions and help you
reach your financial goals with confidence.

Advice you can trust starts with a conversation.

Andrew R. Wilson
Vice President-Investments
andrew.wilson@ubs.com

UBS Financial Services Inc.
222 E. Carrillo St.
Suite 106
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
805-730-3416

ubs.com/fs
UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. ©2012 UBS Financial Services Inc. All rights reserved. Member SIPC. D-
UBS-CF1864B7

We’re proud to
welcome Andrew R.Wilson
to our Santa Barbara, CA office.

With the recent addition of Andrew R.Wilson, our
office is even more powerfully aligned to guide you
through all kinds of market conditions and help you
reach your financial goals with confidence.

Advice you can trust starts with a conversation.

Andrew R. Wilson
Vice President-Investments
andrew.wilson@ubs.com

UBS Financial Services Inc.
222 E. Carrillo St.
Suite 106
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
805-730-3416

ubs.com/fs
UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. ©2012 UBS Financial Services Inc. All rights reserved. Member SIPC. D-
UBS-CF1864B7
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 22 • The Voice of the Village •
VILLAGE BEAT Page 244
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 13)
Agricultural Foundation, urged the
MA board to ask MPC to question
the need and location of Fire Station
3. Cole said that 92% of the District is
within the five-minute response time,
and it does not make financial sense
to build the station, estimated to cost
$8.7m in land and building materials.
Land Use Chair Dave Kent said the
need for the station, as well as its size
and the cost to run it are outside the
MA’s purview of the project, saying
its Spanish Colonial Revival style is
compatible with the neighborhood.
“It is not a house. It does not need to
be screened with hedges and a ton
of trees,” she said. “I want everyone
to know it’s there, to drive by and
see this community’s commitment to
safety. We are proud of it.”
The letter, which was approved
unanimously with the exception of
abstentions from Mindy Denson and
Ted Urschel, also asks MPC to review
the appropriateness of the training
facility and associated uses on the
property, and ask that the district do
what it can to further screen the prop-
erty. The MA board noted in the letter
that it is advisable for MPC to defer
any decision about the project for 30 to
60 days to give the new MFPD board
members an opportunity to review the
project after the November 6 election.
HOV Lane Update
On October 18, the MA Transportation
Subcommittee will be in front of the
Santa Barbara County Associations of
Governments (SBCAG) board to pres-
ent an interchange configuration plan
they hope to have added to Caltrans’
environmental document on the High
Occupancy Vehicle project slated to
begin in 2016. The MA’s plan is an
alternative to several already outlined
by Caltrans showing options for the
configuration of Montecito on-ramps
and off-ramps.
According to board member
Bob Short, the Transportation
Subcommittee hired several consul-
tants to study the configurations laid
out by Caltrans, and the committee
has come up with an alternative plan
that will lessen construction disrup-
tion, cost less money, and simplify
the highway expansion through
Montecito.
The subcommittee’s plan, which
calls for keeping one left hand exit – a
move Caltrans has rejected numer-
ous times – at Hot Springs/Cabrillo,
calls for the closure of the Los Patos
exit, and adds a southbound on-
ramp at Los Patos, under the railroad.
Northbound, the plan calls for keep-
ing the Hermosillo Road exit open,
closing the Cabrillo Blvd left hand
exit, and adding a right hand exit at
Hot Springs Road, which will feed,
into the roundabout.
In adding the exit that feeds into the
roundabout, the roundabout will need
to be moved and enlarged, which
would require the acquisition of about
a quarter of an acre of property from
Montecito Country Club, owned by
Ty Warner. Bill Medel, speaking on
Warner’s behalf, told the MA board
on Tuesday: “We cannot support any
plan which takes part of our prop-
erty.” He went on to say, “We very
much want to come to a community
solution, but the property is not for
sale, at any cost.” MA president Dick
Nordlund contended that the MA’s
plan, which would cut construction
from 51 months to 19 months, would
greatly reduce the financial impact
to Warner’s properties, including the
Biltmore and San Ysidro Ranch.
“We appreciate the fact that you
are going to present this alternative to
SBCAG board, and we look forward
to seeing it,” said spokesperson Gregg
Hart.
We will have more on this important
issue after the October 18th meeting.
Community Reports
At the MA board meeting on
Tuesday, MUS superintendent Tammy
Murphy and Cold Spring School
superintendent Dr. Tricia Price urged
the board to look into Proposition 30
and Measure A, which will both be
on the November ballot. The women
said the passing of both of the items
would stop the cutting of school fund-
ing from the State. If Proposition 30
fails, Murphy said MUS would lose
$250,000 in State funding, while Dr.
Price said CSS would lose $82,000.
Citizen of the Year
Bill Palladini has been selected as
this year’s Citizen of the Year. He
will be honored at Beautification Day
on Saturday, November 3. Palladini
is a former Montecito Association
president, and currently sits on the
Montecito Board of Architectural
Review.
Nominees for MA
Board
The Montecito Association released
the names of six people nominated to
be elected to the board for 2013. They
are: Frank Abatemarco, Dr. Barbara
Mathews, Kathleen St. James, Carla
Tomson, and incumbents Jean von
Wittenburg and Cindy Feinberg.
MUS Welcomes
New Dean of Students
Montecito Union School families
and staff have warmly welcomed
Shawn Shaw, the school’s new Dean
of Students, who was hired to replace
Dave Williams after his retirement in
June, after 38 years at MUS. “Those
are big shoes to fill!” Mr. Shaw said
during an interview last week.
Mr. Shaw hails from Loomis,
California, where he was the principal
at a 500-student K-8 school, and before
that, vice principal of an 800-student
junior high school. “I appreciate the
structure here,” Shaw said, adding
that the Dean of Students role focuses
more on coaching and supporting stu-
dents, while leaving the role of teacher
interaction and instructional leader-
ship to Chief Academic Officer Nick
Bruski. The principal position was
split two years ago when the school
board implemented an administrative
restructuring; superintendent Tammy
Murphy was hired to oversee both the
Chief Academic Officer and Dean of
Student roles.
Mrs. Murphy tells us that over 40
candidates were considered for the
Dean of Students position, and after
whittling the pool down, the final
two candidates spent separate days
on campus. “Mr. Shaw immediately
gravitated towards the students, he
fit right in,” she said. Shaw, who
completed his undergraduate work
at the University of Iowa and earned
two master’s degrees from California
State University Sacramento, says he
looks forward to working with MUS
students, helping with self esteem,
sense of self, and coaching them to
make good decisions. “The quality of
the people I’ve met so far is amazing,”
he said, “I’m happy to be here.” Mr.
Shaw has two of his own daughters,
Riley, 4, and Paige, 3, who live in
Roseville.
Mr. Bruski was recently recognized
at UCLA with a departmental prize for
his Ed.D. dissertation, which explored
the effects of using an action research
process to examine and develop a sys-
tem of teacher evaluation. Bruski was
also asked to join the faculty at UCLA,
teaching a leadership course to adults
finishing their doctorates in educa-
Bill Palladini, seen here with First District
Supervisor Salud Carbajal, has been chosen as the
Montecito Association Citizen of the Year
Third graders
at Montecito
Union School
prepare to run
the track for the
annual Jog-a-
Thon
Montecito
Union School
administration
Nick Bruski,
Chief Academic
Officer; Tammy
Murphy,
Superintendent;
and Shawn
Shaw, Dean of
Students
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 23
One in 8 women
will be diagnosed
with breast cancer
during her lifetime.
To learn more about breast cancer risk factors, warning signs, diagnosis
and treatment options, visit www.cottagehealthsystem.org.
For more information, contact Traci Rodriguez at (805) 879-8536
or email: advancedimaging@sbch.org.
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6:00-7:30 p.m.
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Ashton Center
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sanTa Ynez ValleY
Wednesday, October 17
6:00-7:30 p.m.
St. Mark’s-in-the-Valley Episcopal Church
2901 Nojoqui Avenue, Los Olivos
Dr. Kim Grafton
Dr. Winifred Leung
sanTa BarBara
Tuesday, October 23
6:00-7:30 p.m.
Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital
Conference Room E/F
Dr. Rosa Choi
Dr. James Benzian
To reserve a seat, register online at www.cottagehealthsystem.eventbrite.com
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 24 • The Voice of the Village •
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VILLAGE BEAT Page 334
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 22)
compiled by Kelly Mahan from information supplied by Santa Barbara County
Sheriff’s Department, Carpinteria Division
SHERIFF’S
BLOTTER
Suspicious Circumstances in Summerland
Wednesday, 3 October, 9:18 am – Deputy Vanwinkle spoke on the phone to a
man calling from a residence on Golden Gate Avenue in Summerland to report
suspicious circumstances. The man said he had parked his two vehicles in his
driveway the night before; when he returned the next morning he discovered
that both of his vehicles had been rummaged through. It appeared that nothing
was stolen from either vehicle; an incident report was taken.
Burglary on Padaro Lane
Thursday, 4 October, 9:58 am – Deputy Tchobanoff was dispatched to an estate
on Padaro Lane on report of a burglary. A hole had been cut in the fence around
the property, and footprints showed a path from the fence to nearby storage
facilities, which had been broken into. A maintenance man on the property
noticed the locks had been cut off the facilities early the next morning; it was
unclear what had been stolen from the storage containers, as they were dishev-
eled. A report was taken.
Vegetation Fire on Highway 101
Saturday, 6 October, 5:08 am
– The Santa Barbara City Fire
Department responded to a veg-
etation fire along Highway 101.
Battalion Chief Robert Mercado
arrived first on scene and report-
ed the fire to be Southbound,
between the Los Patos off-ramp
and Olive Mill Road. Two engine
companies were able to quickly
extinguish the fire which had
begun to spread into the sur-
rounding Eucalyptus trees. With
support from the CHP, the #3
southbound lane was closed
during mop up operations. Fire crews used brush tools and a chain saw to
ensure complete fire extinguishment. This area, between the highway and
railroad tracks, has been a frequent gathering place for transients. Evidence of
a homeless camp was found by fire investigators. This fire is currently under
investigation. •MJ
An early morning brush fire on the 101 in Montecito is
still under investigation
tion; he began teaching the once-per-
month course last week.
When we visited the administration
at MUS last Friday, they, along with
the entire student body, were donning
their red Jog-a-Thon t-shirts. One of
two major fundraisers of the school
year, the Jog-a-Thon typically raises
$35,000 for PTA-sponsored programs,
and is a chance for students to get out
of the classroom, get some exercise,
and raise funds for their school. The
school is nearing 500 students, which
is a ten-year high.
MFPD Disputes
Financial Mishandling
On Tuesday, October 9, Montecito
Fire Protection District released a
statement to the public in response to
statements made at the recent forum
held for candidates running for the
MFPD board. “I just want to get the
right information out there and give
the correct facts,” Chief Hickman told
us during a recent visit to the fire sta-
tion. The District has released the fol-
lowing statement:
“It has been brought to our attention
that there are misstatements being dis-
seminated throughout the community
relating to the District’s financial and
budget status.
“First, it has been stated that
Montecito Fire District is operating
under a $2 million dollar deficit. This
is false. The District is not currently,
nor has it ever operated under a $2
million dollar deficit.
“Government accounting standards
are somewhat different than what one
might be accustomed to in regular pri-
vate business, and if one is not famil-
iar with these practices, the District’s
annual financial reports might eas-
ily be misconstrued or misread. As
explained by Heather Fletcher, CPA,
Audit Manager of the Santa Barbara
County Auditor’s office, the District’s
annual financial report for Fiscal year
2011 shows ‘a deficiency of revenues
under expenditures amounting to
$2,177,983.’ The deficiency occurred
solely during this fiscal year because
MFPD refinanced its CALPERS side
fund. To do so, the District used a pen-
sion obligation bond, which result-
ed in a net savings to the District of
$162,779.
“The proceeds related to this bond
were documented on the finan-
cial statement as an ‘other financ-
ing source’ as opposed to a ‘regular’
revenue. To the untrained reader, this
would make it appear as a deficit,
when in fact, there was none.
“Another misunderstanding relates
to the District’s accounting practice
of borrowing funds; this specifically
relates to cash flow issues. Government
entities employ a number of tech-
niques to meet cash flow needs that
arise prior to the receipt of semi-
annual property tax revenues in order
to cover normal operating expenses.
The District routinely borrows from
its Land & Building Fund (Station 3
Fund) to cover General Fund expendi-
tures until tax revenues are received.
“Because the District has enough
funds in its own accounts, it has been
financially prudent to borrow from
its own funds, instead of from the
County Treasurer or through issu-
ance of other debt instruments, result-
ing in zero interest. According to Ms
Fletcher, borrowings, including tax
and revenue anticipation notes, are
common financing instruments used
by governments to provide for cash
flow needs.
“And finally, the funding for Station
3. This is a topic of much discus-
sion. But as it relates to finances,
the District has been setting aside
funds since 2006 for the purchase of
land and construction costs. In April
of 2011, the District entered into an
Option to Purchase Agreement with
the Petan Company to purchase the
identified property on East Valley for
$1,273,862. The District received con-
struction estimates from the archi-
tects of approximately $7,428,475 to
build the station as it was conceptu-
ally drawn for a total estimated cost to
purchase and build of $8,702,337.
“Since 2006, the Board of Directors
has set aside $8,548,261 for Station
3. There are several years before the
project is scheduled to break ground,
enabling the District to set aside addi-
tional funds to complete the project.
It is also important to note that the
District also has the necessary funds
set aside to purchase a Structure Fire
Protection Engine and a Wildland Fire
Engine for the new station.
Montecito Fire
Chief Chip
Hickman hopes
to clear up
misinforma-
tion about the
District’s finan-
cial status
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 25
For more information and open house dates visit:
Montecito.SheldonGood.com
800-480-0062
L U X U R Y R E S I D E N C E S
The Ortega Ridge Ranch
Montecito, California
Income-Producing 84-acre Agricultural Estate
with Villa offering commanding views of the
California Coast and Pacific Ocean.
Previously listed at $25,000,000,
now name your own price on this,
the last significant land parcel of its kind
available in Montecito.
James R. Cote, Jr.,
Licensed CA Broker #01819672
Auctioneer Bond #14903877
Nov. 15
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 26 • The Voice of the Village •
RCFE #565800683
Áegis of Ventura
4964 Telegraph Road
Ventura, CA 93003
805-290-4571
AegisofVentura.com
Dreaming of Being Rockettes
Since they were little girls, my mom and her
sisters were always best friends. They spent
hours on their roller skates choreographing
routines and performing for the neighbors.
They dreamed of one day having their own
stage show.
Over the years, their dreams changed. They
each married and had children, but they always
remained close. Holidays and family dinners
were well orchestrated events, much like their
skating routines. Each would make a dish for
our elaborate meals with table decorations to
match. The night would not be complete without
songs and dancing around the piano.
I can see the loneliness in my mom’s eyes,
as my aunts are gone now. She has not been
herself since the loss of her best friends.

She seems depressed and does not leave her
home. She needs help with daily tasks: food
prep, housework and transportation. I want her
to have joy and companionship again.
If an elderly parent genuinely needs daily
assistance – maybe they’re not independent
any more.
Please consider Áegis Living. We are the trusted
local senior care provider specializing in assisted
living and memory care. We offer the finest care,
given by the most committed staff. Come in for
a tour and lunch with your parent. Let them
experience our community filled with warmth
and new friends.

Call our residence for an appointment
or more information.
Coming & Going
by James Buckley
Vietri at Coast 2 Coast
COMING & GOING Page 404
N
o one – not even Coast 2
Coast Collection co-founder
Holly Murphy – could have
predicted the rapid popularity of the
upscale specialty shop she opened in
La Arcada only one year ago. Coast 2
Coast concentrates upon high-quality
items made by companies such as
Christofe and its fne silver pieces,
Juliska’s hand-blown glassware from
Prague, dinnerware from Mariposa
and Match, Stanley Hagler jewelry,
and Vietri handcrafted tableware.
The shop has hosted Christofe
Americas CEO Nicolas Kraft as
he demonstrated the art of sabrage
(plucking of the head of a champagne
bottle with a silver saber), and has
Introducing Vietri’s Christmas 2012 collection, co-founder Susan Gravely was on hand on a busy Sunday
afternoon at Coast 2 Coast Collection in La Arcada (1114 State Street)
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 27 I never miss a chance to have sex or appear on television – Gore Vidal
Protecting the Rights of LTC Residents
SENIORITY
by Patti Teel
Patti is Director of
Community Relations for
Senior Helpers, providers
of care and comfort at a
moment’s notice. She is
also host of the Senior
Helpers online video
show. www.santabar
baraseniors.com. E-mail:
patti@pattiteel.com.
M
ost people are unaware of the
fact that residents in long-
term care facilities have a set
of legally protected Residents Rights.
The Long-Term Care Ombudsman
Program has people go into long-term
care facilities to uphold these rights,
to advocate for the residents, and to
ensure that they are well cared for and
treated with dignity.
People who live in long-term care
(LTC) facilities are more vulnerable
than those of us who live indepen-
dently. The U.S. Congress recognized
this fact and passed the Nursing
Home Reform Act in 1987, giving
nursing home residents legal protec-
tions, which included a set of Resident
Rights. In 1995, the Long-Term Care
Ombudsman Program was successful
in persuading the legislature to extend
Resident Rights to other LTC facili-
ties: boarding homes (“assisted living
facilities”), adult family homes, and
state operated veterans’ homes. These
rights include: a right to privacy, a
right to self determination, a right to
be informed of medical treatment as
well as the plan of treatment, the
right to refuse that treatment, a right
to have visitors and the right to be
treated with dignity.
Ombudsmen make unannounced
visits to residential care facilities. If
they see a violation, they educate the
staff and facility owners as to the resi-
dent’s rights. They try to work with
them to correct any problems before
involving the State of California. Their
primary mission is to speak for the
residents. Before the budget cuts,
Community Care Licensing – the peo-
ple that monitor these facilities – were
visiting facilities annually to be sure
that they were being run correctly.
After the budget cuts, they were only
required to visit facilities once every
five years. This created a recipe for
disaster. Linda Hardy, the program
manager of the LTC Ombudsman
Program in Santa Barbara County,
noted that facilities could get pretty
lax about not giving residents their
rights under this schedule. It also
made the Ombudsman Program vital-
ly important. There are 152 long-term
care facilities in Santa Barbara County
ranging from six bed homes to 250 bed
facilities. The Ombudsmen visit the
sixteen skilled nursing facilities week-
ly and the 136 residential care facilities
monthly. Their territory extends from
Santa Barbara to Santa Maria.
If you are trying to choose a residen-
tial facility for yourself or a loved one,
Linda recommends that you speak
with residents and their family mem-
bers. Ask yourself if the facility is
clean and if one-on-one care is being
provided for the people who need it.
Go back and see what is happening
at night. You can also check with the
Ombudsman Program to see a record
of a facility’s deficiencies.
The program is in dire need of vol-
unteers. When I spoke to Linda they
had seven volunteers but were in
need of 25-30. It involves a significant
commitment but many people find
it extremely rewarding. It’s impor-
tant for Ombudsmen to develop a
relationship with residents so they’ll
feel comfortable enough to tell them
about anything they need help with.
Volunteers have the chance to get
to know wonderful seniors who can
personally tell them about historical
events that we’ll soon only be able
to read about. Ombudsman volun-
teers receive 36 hours of class training
followed by ten hours of shadow-
ing more experienced volunteers in
residential facilities. They don’t visit
facilities on their own until they feel
comfortable and confident. There is
flexibility in the positions. Some vol-
unteers choose to concentrate on only
one facility while others visit several.
If you have a heart and a respect for
the elderly and time to devote to this
worthy cause, contact The Long Term
Care Ombudsman Program at 805-
922-1236. To listen to my interview
with Linda Hardy, visit www.youn
gatheartradio.com. •MJ
Linda Hardy, program manager of the Long-Term
Care Ombudsman Program in Santa Barbara
County
Shelly Lowenkopf blogs
@ www.lowenkopf.com.
He has held executive
editorial positions with
literary, scholarly, general
trade and massmarket
book publishers. His latest
book is The Fiction Writer’s
Handbook.
BOOK TALK
by Shelly Lowenkopf
Back in the Day
J
oe Coughlin, the youngest son of a
high-profle Boston police captain,
had the intelligence, drive, and
support to follow his older brothers
into the profession. Instead, he has
chosen an entirely diferent path, the
swirl and eddy of Prohibition-era
Boston, brimming with speakeasies,
gangsters, rum running, and cops on
the take.
A protégé of Tim Hickey, one of the
major crime lords of late 1920s Boston,
Joe has his first run-in with true love
while on the job, where it occurs to him
“that almost everything of note that
had ever happened in his life – good or
bad – had been set in motion the morn-
ing he first crossed paths with Emma
Gould. They met shortly after dawn in
1926, when Joe and the Bartolo broth-
ers robbed the gaming room at the
back of an Albert White speakeasy in
South Boston.”
Joe Coughlin’s creator, Dennis
Lehane, has published nine novels to
date, six of them set in the more-or-
less immediate present. Three of them,
including his latest, Live by Night,
whisk us into a seamless past, vibrant
in its plausibility. This is so because
Lehane does not inflict his research
upon the reader; he makes the past a
vibrant part of the story. We may not
have willingly bought a ticket to South
Boston, 1926, to partake of gang wars,
revenge, and betrayal, but we are there
from page one because we care about
the characters.
Here’s how Lehane alerts us to the
depth of connection between Joe and
Emma we’d already begun to suspect:
“Behind Emma’s pale eyes and pale
skin lay something coiled and caged.
And not caged in a way that it wanted
to come out… Didn’t matter, though.
He was starting to suspect he was in
love with her. In those rare moments
when the cage was opened and he was
invited in, he found a person desperate
to trust, desperate to love, hell, desper-
ate to live. She just needed to see he
was worthy of risking that trust, that
love, that life. He turned twenty years
old that winter and he knew what he
wanted to do with the rest of his life.
He wanted to become the one man
Emma Gould put all her faith in.”
Awareness of this smacks Joe in the
viscera early in the narrative, setting
the hook of expectations for emerging
complications.
Although Live by Night is about love
– many aspects of that state – it is
also about a fraught, lock-step march
of intertwined and relevant dramatic
events across the pages. Here’s how
Lehane handles those:
“Tim Hickey [Joe’s ‘boss’] once told
Joe the smallest mistake sometimes
casts the longest shadow.” Definite
thematic clue here.
A disturbing scene where Timothy
Coughlin, Joe’s Deputy Police
Superintendent father, joins Joe and
Emma, while having dinner at a res-
taurant.
“Tim Hickey got his hair cut once a
week at Aslem’s on Charles Street. One
Tuesday, some of those hairs ended
up in his mouth when he was shot in
the back of the head on his way to the
barber’s chair.”
Hickey’s successor, Albert White,
makes his new position clear to Joe.
After Hickey’s assassination, we wit-
ness a bungled bank robbery, con-
ducted by Joe and the Bartolo brothers.
Three policemen are killed during the
getaway chase, but the shooters were
not Joe or either of the Bartolos, nor
does the tragedy lack a deep vein of
irony.
Here is Emma, in conversation with
Albert White: “You said you wouldn’t
kill him.” And then, “Albert shrugged.”
Followed by, “‘Albert,’ Emma said.
‘That was the deal.’”
The state’s attorney tells Joe’s father,
“You turned your son the criminal into
a victim. That’s an amazing trick. Are
you that smart?” To which Joe’s father
replies, “Nobody’s that smart.”
We still have pages to go, some of
them with Joe in prison, some later, in
Florida, in the rum trade, all propelled
by awl-like probing of motives, hidden
agendas, and Dennis Lehane’s gift for
dialogue as it should be written.
Live by Night lifts a story of social
and personal crimes to the howl-
ing voices of need and discovery in
Saul Bellow’s The Adventures of Augie
Marsh; it is no less literature and it is
even more story. •MJ
Lehane does not inflict
his research upon the reader;
he makes the past a vibrant
part of the story
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 28 • The Voice of the Village •
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MISCELLANY (Continued from page 19)
million to Peri, a 62-year-old Filipino
who earned $131,000 annually as the
millionaire’s private caretaker.
Stay tuned...
Men (and Women) in Black
The recent appearance of a phalanx
of tuxedo-attired men and women in
long black dresses on the shoreline at
Butterfly Beach was no mirage!
Nor was it a wedding party from
the Biltmore, just a tiara’s toss away.
Nearly 50 members of the Santa
Barbara Choral Society had assem-
bled, many barefoot, in their formal
concert attire to be filmed for a video
being produced by TVSB in partner-
ship with the choir.
“Hallelujah Santa Barbara” is a
musical ode to our tony town fea-
turing various configurations of the
100-member troupe at iconic locations,
including the zoo, Mission, Presidio,
the Santa Barbara Bowl, the Granada,
the Chase Palm Park carousel, and the
art and natural history museums.
The singers, as you can see from
the accompanying photo, “flash”
signs that spell out the words to the
“Hallelujah Chorus” from Handel’s
Messiah in time to pre-recorded music.
Mayor Helene Schneider and
County Arts Commission executive
director, Ginny Brush, have cameos
in the video, which will be released on
YouTube on November 1 and linked
to the society’s website and those of
participating sponsors.
“We have high hopes it will go
viral,” says the choir’s Marylove
Thralls.
Music to everybody’s ears, no
doubt...
Remembering Nooners
It was a solemn but celebratory
gathering of the old Nooners at the
East Beach courts when a plaque,
remembering four past members, was
rededicated.
The Nooners go back four decades
when six young volleyball fanatics
would play between 12 and 2 pm each
weekday, with the number of players
– an eclectic mix of lawyers, doctors,
gardeners, accountants, teachers, fire-
fighters, realtors and postmen – grow-
ing to 90 within a few years.
“We all had ‘handles’ like
Terminator, Hoof, Mastadon, Romeo,
Tijuana Tiger and the Flying Burrito,”
says veteran John Blankenship.
“Rules weren’t written down, but
were understood.
“A certain level of skill was required,
but also a decorum of civility, despite
the incessant chatter, name calling and
balls being kicked into the ocean after
a bad shot. If you lost three games in
a row you became a ‘goat’ and had to
bring a six-pack of beer for the next
match. You didn’t last long if you
didn’t ‘get it.”
“To be a Nooner branded one’s
level of play and the group’s sense
of camaraderie. Loyalty grew strong,
as did the existing bond that brought
them together every day. Most of the
Choral society
makes video
lauding Santa
Barbara (photo
credit: Kate
Priest)
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MISCELLANY Page 384
original ‘Band of Brothers’ are deep in
their 60s and 70s now and no longer
play, but the tradition continues with
younger newcomers.”
The New Nooners uphold the tradi-
tions by holding an annual E. Terry
Wells Tournament for the veterans
that has been held every October for
the past 18 years.
Wells, Norm Hendry, Ray Yoast and
Ford Joy were the late members com-
memorated on the new plaque, replac-
ing one that had been stolen...
Teddy Bear’s Tenth
Mike and Kathy McCarthy opened
the doors of their splendiferous
Montecito aerie for a patrons party for
the Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation,
which threw a glittering tenth anniver-
sary gala at the Bacara at the weekend,
expected to raise around $300,000.
Artist-illustrator Jami Darwin-
Chiang was flown in from Chicago
by her friend and foundation board
member, Sarah Luri, spending three
Nooners, past and present, gather at East Beach to rededicate a plaque to players past
Jim Bechtel
and Debbie
Kass, Lori Moll
and Kathy
McCarthy, Teddy
Bear Cancer
Foundation gala
co-chairs (photo
by Priscilla)
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 30 • The Voice of the Village •
LETTERS (Continued from page 8)
mance record will not only be contin-
ued, but enhanced.
Gene Sinser
Candidate for Board Seat
Montecito Fire Protection District
For Measures A & B
First let me thank you again for your
endorsement of me to be elected four
years ago to the Santa Barbara School
Board. I sincerely believe my actions
have proved worthy of your paper’s
endorsement and I hope you agree. I
am running for re-election at this time
and would ask for your endorsement
once again. It would also be appropri-
ate to discuss with you my feelings on
the need for Parcel Tax Measures A &
B on the ballot.
I realize you recommended opposi-
tion to W & X in June and I tried really
hard to convince the board to lower
the amounts recommended for A & B
and was a little successful but not as
much as I hoped. My intention was to
get them lower in the hopes of gaining
support or at least no position from
those in opposition such as yourself,
the Santa Barbara News-Press and the
Republican Central Committee.
Thanks so much for your obvious
concern about our students having
a quality education with a reminder
that the students in Montecito are
the beneficiaries of funds for a high
level of education and a great many
of them will be continuing their sec-
ondary education in the secondary
schools in the Santa Barbara Unified
School District. It is my hope that we
have the funds available to continue
their education in a very high quality
atmosphere. Thanks so much for your
consideration.
H. Edward Heron
Member, Santa Barbara Board of
Education
SB Unified School District
(Editor’s note: We are please to endorse
Mr. Heron for re-election, however, we
remain in opposition to any tax hike,
particularly on property owners. These
extra funds simply make it easier for
school administrations to avoid making
fundamental changes to pensions and
other critical budgetary matters. We do
realize, though, how difficult it would be
for someone so close to the educational
establishment to buck the opinions of the
great majority of his fellow members. Best
of luck. – J.B.)
“Too Much To See Here.”
I am responding to David S.
McCalmont’s letter to the editor
(“Nothing to See Here,” MJ # 18/40)
Yes, Mr. McCalmont, we are better
off now that we were four years ago.
First, I looked at the statistics com-
piled by U.S. Bureau of Labor. “The
United States went through its longest
and, by most measures, worst econom-
ic recession since Great Depression
between 2007 and June 2009.”
The stats are clear. The economy
started losing jobs in early 2008 and
bottomed out between November
2008 and March 2009. During those
five months the economy was losing
about 800,000 jobs per month.
A slow, modest but steady increase
in job creation has produced an
increase of more than 4.6 million jobs
and the unemployment rate had fallen
from 10% to 7.8% between October
2009 and the present. And the work-
force didn’t decline during that period
of time, either. It grew by more than
600,000.
This job increase has occurred
despite a very substantial reduction in
public sector jobs such as school teach-
ers, firefighters and police officers.
The Dow Jones Industrial index is
among the most relevant indicators of
the health of the economy.
On Sept. 15, 2008, the day after the
Lehman Brothers collapse, the DJIA
lost more than 500 points. The index
closed on March 9, 2009, at 6,547.05.
Many Americans saw their retirement
savings virtually cut in half. Since that
time the Dow has soared and present-
ly bounces around above 13,000, obvi-
ously double the value it had from its
lowest point. If you have an IRA, a
pension or other retirement account,
the benefits to you are obvious.
Lest we forget what else was going
on in late 2008, the entire financial
system was in jeopardy of implod-
ing. The American auto industry, i.e.
GM, Chrysler and Ford, were teeter-
ing on the brink of bankruptcy, hous-
ing prices in every city and state in
the country were in a state of free fall
and housing foreclosures were rocket-
ing upward at rates unprecedented in
American history.
In addition, the budget deficit
was completely out of control and
undetermined due to the actions of
George Bush and the Congress to fail
to include the cost of two wars in the
budget.
The USA was fully engaged in two
wars –Afghanistan and Iraq – with no
exit plan whatsoever, to say nothing of
the foolishness that led to the invasion
of Iraq based on lies.
Four years ago everything was
going down and we were on the brink
of disaster.
Our nation is still recovering from
the 2008 economic meltdown, but we
are definitely on the right track and
better off today than four years ago.
Today, largely because of
Republican intransigence, we still
have a long way to go to return to a
really healthy economy, but Obama
has stopped the bleeding and we are
demonstrable on way up, not down.
So, Mr. McCalmont, now we are
reminded of what things were like in
the good ol’ USA in late 2008.
Are we better off now that we were
four years ago? You decide.
And finally, Barack Obama has
earned my enthusiastic support in
2012.
Sincerely,
Leoncio Martins
Montecito
(Editor’s note: This letter was edit-
ed; we excised Mr. Martins claim that
every Democrat president (including
Johnson and Carter!) reduced the national
debt, while – who’d ‘a thunk? – every
Republican president, naturally, piled on
debt. But, we’ll let that go. Let’s take
the other claims one by one: the “Great
Recession” had already bottomed out by
March, ’09, barely one month into the
Obama presidency, and ended by June,
three months later. In other words, the
recession was over. All we had to do was
wait for the American people to make
things right again. But no, we elected an
agitator, a community organizer, so things
would simply not be allowed to get better
all by themselves. Hence the Stimulus,
QE1, QE1, QE3 (“quantitative easing”
of the money supply), the bank, insurance
company, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
bailouts, the bailout of the United Auto
Workers Union, etc.
As for the budget, Mr. Bush, along with
a compliant House and Senate, pushed
spending to the outer limits, granted, but
once Mr. Obama got behind the wheel, he
put spending into hyper-drive.
Your suggestion that “Republican
intransigence” is preventing the U.S.
from returning to a “really healthy econo-
my,” is laughable.
As for being better off, the average fam-
ily makes about $4,000 less than it did
when Mr. Obama took office, and the aver-
age family’s medical insurance has gone
up at least $1,500. So, at a $5,500 loss for
every U.S. family every year over the past
four years, I’d have to determine that we
are indeed not better off. – J.B.)
The Unqualified
President
For once, most Democrats and
Republicans have something they
can agree on: Mitt Romney did a
masterful job in the first debate with
Barack Obama. Even the most ardent
supporters of the President grudg-
ingly had to admit that Governor
Romney beat the incumbent on both
style and substance. Many will say the
President was distracted or suffering
from oxygen deprivation (thank you
Mr. Gore for continuing to be wrong).
I for one say that our current
President was suffering from idea and
intelligent governing deprivation. For
the first time since the 2008 Democratic
primary against Hillary Clinton the
President was challenged; to say he
lost the challenge would be an under-
statement. Barack Obama was elected
in 2008 for a number of reasons unfor-
tunately not one of those reasons was
because he had any qualifications to
lead this country. He has taken a bad
economy and made it worse. As a
result of his naïve approach to foreign
policy he has caused our country to be
viewed with more disdain around the
world than in any time of our history.
In addition, he has emboldened our
enemies but not addressing interna-
tional problems with directness and
resolve. The President has not learned
that there is a difference between
campaigning and governing. As men-
tioned, everything went right for him
in 2008. Based upon his performance
in 2012, one would hope the American
people understand that four more
years of an Obama administration
would not serve the hard working
men and women in this country.
Ralph T. Iannelli
Montecito

No Notes Allowed
After the disappointing perfor-
mance from our Dear Leader and
“in-depth” political analysis, here are
some ideas to make the next, and
perhaps all future debates more equi-
table and less shocking to our national
psyche.
1) No “notes” allowed. Romney
obviously used his handkerchief to
hide “trick questions”... Obama was
distracted by a piece of paper and
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 31 The abdomen is the reason why man does not readily take himself to be a god – Friedrich Nietzsche
Liza DiMarco
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All-star Cast:
Ryan Stiles, Greg Proops,
Chip Esten and Jef Davis
TUE, OCT 16 / 8 PM
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(805) 899-2222
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funnier. And these guys are
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“Genuinely
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pencil on top of the podium masquer-
ading as a “teleprompter.”
2) No tough questions unless the
debates are held at sea level. Al Gore
suggested it was Colorado’s altitude
that caused you-know-who’s neurons
to misfire.
3) Debates should not be held within
two weeks of a terrorist attack or if
when any U.S. Ambassadors are mur-
dered. (According to Bob Woodward
this could be why the President was
“distracted”... or was it because anoth-
er Border Agent may have been killed
with “Fast-And-Furious” firearms?)
For 12 days following the Benghazi
attack, we were told that an incendi-
ary anti-Islamic parody caused the
Arab Spring to “spontaneously” blow
a gasket. Some have suggested that
banning all “religiously offensive”
YouTube videos or applying stringent
FCC “standards” to internet content
will indeed make “Obama’s World”
safer than Wally’s World. Anything
that might make an incumbent presi-
dent feel distracted, uncomfortable,
or look incompetent, prior to a presi-
dential debate, should not viewed by
a national audience. Forget about that
outdated First Amendment thing.
5) For national security reasons, all
questions should be submitted in writ-
ing to incumbent presidential candi-
dates four days prior to any debate or
press briefing. This will allow time for
thorough background checks and pos-
sible “subliminal message violations”
by uppity moderators or reporters
who may be sending dangerous com-
mands over the airways. Conspiracy
theorists... where are you when your
county needs you?
Several political pundits have
declared that the “real” Mitt Romney
didn’t attend this first debate, I’m not
so sure about that, but I’m pretty sure
the real Obama did.
Dale Lowdermilk
Founder NOTSAFE (dot) ORG
Montecito
His Mind Is Clear
I wish Joy Knapp was the only per-
son questioning my memory (Letters
to the Editor MJ # 18/39). But in
regard to the years 2004 through 2008,
and the last four years, my mind does
not seem too fuzzy.
I am a lifelong Democrat. I believe
G. W. Bush missed the opportu-
nity of a lifetime (his) by not leading
this country away from retaliation
and instead capturing the incredible
unity available after the attack of
9/11. I believe this country was ready
to pursue independence from oil
producing tyrants and despots; was
ready to take the hard steps neces-
sary to make us stronger and endure
any sacrifices required. We needed
programs for a real energy policy,
for a health care system and atten-
tion to our crumbling infrastructure.
President Bush did not take these
on and misspent the opportunity.
Instead we pursued wars of retali-
ation and demonstrated arrogance.
How wars and revenge could be
more important than nation building
at home is incomprehensible.
But four years ago a bright young
voice came on the scene. A man with
promise (and promises) that we hoped
could unite our people, pull divisions
together and be a strong leader. With
so many problems to face, the oppor-
tunity to make a significant difference
to the country and achieve greatness
had not been that strong since 1960
and JFK.
But now four later, we are more
divided, the wars go on, we have dis-
appointed our allies and alienated the
undecided.
We have no energy policy. We
have neglected our infrastructure.
We have a healthcare program that
has doctors fleeing the profession.
And the promises and hopes that
came from this young and articulate
neighborhood organizer have not
come to fruition.
So if you believe four more years of
the same leadership will bring about
the fulfillment of the promises of four
years ago, then you know your voting
choice.
But if you doubt the current team
can lead the country and the govern-
ment to achieve those promises, well,
change seems appropriate.
A popular definition of insanity is
to keep doing the same thing over
and over again and expect different
results.
David Evans
Montecito
(Editor’s note: We hope and pray there
are more Democrats such as you out there!
– J.B.) •MJ
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 32 • The Voice of the Village •
Surfing the Middle East
Library Corner
by Jody Thomas
Jody Thomas is the
Montecito Branch
Library Supervisor
O
ur travel series this month
takes us to the Middle East.
Jesse Aizenstat comes to the
Montecito Library on Friday, October
12 at 4:00 pm to talk about the
experiences that led to his new book,
Surfng the Middle East. A political
science major who graduated with
honors but was unable to fnd a
job in his feld after graduation,
Aizenstat decided to combine his
passion for Middle East politics and
his passion for big waves and take
the trip of a lifetime: surfng from
Israel to Lebanon.
The Middle East is thought of as
“impossible” by many Americans,
and that is exactly why Jesse Aizenstat
set out to experience it through
surfing. In Surfing the Middle East,
Aizenstat passes through some of
the most combustible places along
the Eastern Mediterranean, studded
by rocket craters, barbed wire, tear-
gassed protesters, gunfire, and night
patrols. Finding a shoreline touched
by the best swell in the Mediterranean
proves a welcoming counterpoint to
the tension. But peace, like riding a
perfect wave, never lasts long. Join
us at the Montecito Library at 4:00
pm this Friday, October 12 to hear the
stories behind Surfing the Middle East.
Upcoming Events
Dr. Patricia Bragg founded the
Bragg Health Institute as a living
legacy to honor her father, Dr. Paul
Bragg, and to continue the health edu-
cation and outreach work he began
100 years ago. The Montecito Library
will host a lecture by Dr. Bragg and
Dr. John Westerdahl which includes
an exercise and recipe demonstration.
“Health and Longevity” is the subject
of the lecture at 4:00 pm on Wednesday,
October 17 at the Montecito Library.
Spiders and bats and ghosts, oh my!
The library is pleased to have Jane
Hankey back for Halloween paper
craft making. This is a fun holiday
activity with lots of artful, hands-on
projects to make. Jane will be here on
Wednesday, October 24 from 3:00 to
5:00 pm. Drop in when you can. Then,
on Friday, October 26, at 4:00 pm, sto-
ryteller Ann Wisehart delivers more
treats than tricks at this old-fashioned,
spooky Halloween tale telling! Come
in costume! Best for ages 4 and up.
Thursday Crafternoons continue on
all Thursdays in October at 3:30 pm.
The library provides patterns, tools,
yarn and a teacher to learn fiber arts
like crochet and knitting. This drop-in
activity is for ages 8 and up and all
skill levels. If you are already a knitter
or crocheter and want to bring a proj-
ect already in process, that works, too!
Make something for a holiday gift or
make a new friend. As are all library
events, this is free.
Beginning Saturday, October 20 at
10:30 am, and continuing on Saturday
mornings, the library will host an
English language conversation circle.
All those interested in practicing con-
versational English can do so in this
supportive, non-judgmental setting.
This will be a facilitated, learning
environment for those who would
like to improve their English lan-
guage skills.
Then, Thursday, November 1, local
author Selden Edwards will be at the
library discussing his new book, The
Lost Prince. Edwards was formerly
headmaster of Crane School, and tran-
sitioned from educator to author. Join
us for an enjoyable afternoon begin-
ning at 4:00 pm.
The library is open Monday
through Saturday, from 10:00 am to
5:30 pm. Inside the doors are books,
magazines, newspapers, DVDs,
audiobooks, computers with internet
access, free WiFi and friendly staff.
We welcome you to come in and
check out some of our materials. The
quotation this month comes from
Denis Parsons Burkitt, “It is better to
read a little and ponder a lot than to
read a lot and ponder a little.” •MJ
Gavin Peifer, Connor
and Lawlor Jackson
and a friendly snake
at the library (photo
credit: Katie Sarpolis)
New Day, Old Town
Ernie’s World
by Ernie Witham
Read more home and garden adventures in Ernie’s book: “A Year in the Life of a
‘Working’ Writer” available in print and e-book versions at amazon.com
S
aturday we walked to Old Town
Québec – not from Santa Barbara
of course, but from our exchange
house in Canada. Old Town Québec
has two levels, conveniently called
upper and lower. The upper level
has lots of restaurants, shops, street
musicians, and a promenade in front
of the huge, see-it-from-everywhere-
in-Québec, Hotel Frontenac, which
I now have more photos of than all
my grandchildren combined. The
lower level also has many restaurants,
shops, more street musicians, and the
occasional hat blown of a tourist on
the upper level.
We took the funicular to the lower
level. The funicular is like a cable car
on tracks that go almost straight down
and is completely glassed in so you can
see exactly where you will end up if the
thing breaks.
“Please push forward. More people
coming,” the attendant said, as my face
mashed against the glass.
“I mow wheb all the nose prints
come frub now,” I told my wife.
“Oomph,” she said.
At the lower level, my wife found
a (surprise!) museum. It was called
Maison something or other. Mainly,
they had a movie that explained the
history of Québec. First explored by
Jacques Cartier in 1500 or so, who
had trouble settling the place because
everyone kept dying from the elements
– some of them probably fell down the
cliff where the funicular is now – it
was settled by Samuel Champlain in
1608. He built a fortress to prevent the
British from taking over. That worked
until 1759 when General Wolfe beat
the French and built a new fortress of
stones instead of wood – kind of like
the smart pig in that nursery rhyme.
After absorbing as much history as I
could in one sitting, we got on the Eco
bus for our return trip. At first there
were just four of us on the bus, which
had a total of 12 seats – four along the
back, four behind the driver facing
backwards and four along one side.
All these surrounded the large auto-
pay machine. Another couple had the
back seats, so we squeezed past the
pay machine into two window seats
facing backwards. This was great until
a couple dozen or so older Americans
from one of the enormous cruise ships
anchored in Old Port got on and wig-
gled their way into the remaining seats
and all the standing room.
“How much?” a man asked loudly,
pointing at the auto pay machine.
“It’s free today.”
“Three?” He took out a handful of
coins.
“What? My watch says two.”
“Actually it’s one, you must be on
the wrong time zone.”
“Phone? Who you gonna call? We
don’t know anyone here.”
“They serve beer? I’ll have a lager.”
“How much,” the guy asked again,
this time louder.
“It’s free on Saturdays,” a local
woman yelled. “They are trying to
save gas.”
“Who’s got gas?
“Not me this time. I took Beano.”
They starting asking a lot of ques-
tions about where they were and
where they were going but the driver
only spoke French. Fortunately one
passenger was able to translate and
got everyone straightened out. Then
she got off.
“This our stop?”
“No we are going to the Frontenac.”
“Doesn’t seem to be a front and back,
just this part we are in.”
“They sell gin? Skip the beer, I’ll have
a Greyhound.”
That’s about the time we decided to
get off. But we were wedged in.
“You stand,” they told my wife.
“We’ll move left, then you,” they point-
ed at me “can climb over my wife – be
careful of her bunion. Ready? On my
count... one... two... three.”
Took several attempts and I got
goosed repeatedly by the pay machine
– at least I hope it was the pay machine
– but we finally made it back onto Rue
Saint Jean. We stopped at Notre Dame
to listen to the church bells, visit the
basilica and pray for cruise ship staff
everywhere. On the way home we
stopped for wine, bread and cheese –
the staples of French culture – and gin.
There were two competing musi-
cians playing trombones on the corner
by the fortress wall.
“I’m going to make a new drink
called the Eco. Four ounces of gin in a
three-ounce glass.”
“How much?” my wife yelled.
“Free!” I yelled back.
She held out three coins. •MJ
Ernie’s view
from the
Old Quebec
Funicular
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 33 Never have children, only grandchildren – Gore Vidal

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its annual costs for maintenance and
staffing within the allocated revenues
we receive. What this means to you is
more service at no additional cost to
the tax payer.
Your taxes will not increase and
no fees will be assessed to build and
equip this new fire station.
Why Montecito Needs
Station # 3
The following bullet points address
the justifications for the addition of a
third station:
• The east end of the District has
emergency response times in excess of
the five-minute standard;
• Brain cells start to die without
oxygen after five minutes;
• Structure fires will develop from
an incipient fire to a fully involved
single room fire within four minutes
(see video at www.montecitofire.
com). Minutes matter;
• Response time to the Bella Vista
area can be as much as 12 minutes
currently and would be reduced to
5-6 minutes. A six-minute delay could
be the difference between an offensive
or a defensive approach to a wildland
fire.
• It is reasonable to expect a struc-
ture fire to be well involved by the
time we currently arrive on scene in
the eastern end of the District. If it
can be caught early, there is a greater
chance of keeping it to a room-and-
contents fire. A third station would
also increase the chance of survivabil-
ity for the occupants.
• The east end residents would be
provided response times equal to the
rest of the District;
• Homeowners on the east end of
the District may benefit from lower
insurance premiums due to the closer
proximity of a fire station;
• A third station improves overall
fire response and protection through-
out the entire District by increasing
the weight (number of firefighters
and engines) and speed of the fire
attack;
• A third station reduces our depen-
dency on mutual aid resource assis-
tance by 50% on an initial structure
fire response;
• The proposed location would be a
much more efficient response to free-
way incidents.
• The training component includ-
ed in the new station is something
our District desperately needs.
Training is absolutely vital to deliv-
ering the best emergency service.
Currently we are dependent on pri-
vately owned property to accom-
plish training;
• The size of the property enhances
our ability to park and store the equip-
ment needs of the District.
We’d like to hear your opinion on
this issue.
Email us at: Station3@montecitofire.
com
Or write us:
Station 3 Input
c/o Montecito Fire Protection
District
595 San Ysidro Road
Santa Barbara, CA 93108 •MJ
EDITORIAL (Continued from page 5) VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 24)
“The District has made every effort
to be fiscally responsible, and not defi-
cient in the balancing of its budget, or
in its planning for the addition of a
third fire station.”
MFPD will discuss its finances at the
District’s monthly board meeting on
October 25 at 8:30 am. The public is
welcome to attend.
Fire Prevention Week
In other MFPD news, firefighters
from the department will be teaching
fire safety to elementary school chil-
dren within Montecito as part of Fire
Prevention Week.
Through October 19, the fire engine
companies will visit seven schools
teaching over 800 children how to be
prepared in the case of an emergency.
Topics include how to react in the case
of a fire: “Stop Drop and Roll” and
“Crawl Low in Smoke” for preschool
age through second grade. For the
third and fourth graders, the “Fire
Safety Trailer” is used to simulate real
fire situations within the home. The
children learn how to spot fire hazards
in the home, the five most important
things to say when dialing 9-1-1, and
how to exit the home quickly and
safely.
Parents are encouraged to discuss
and practice their “Emergency Plan”
as a family.
The schedule is as follows: Montecito
Union, October 11 and October 17;
All Saints Pre-School, October 12; El
Montecito Presbyterian and Mount
Carmel, October 15; Crane Country
Day School, October 16; Laguna
Blanca, October 18; Cold Spring
School, October 19. For more informa-
tion visit www.montecitofire.com.
In Business: Advanced
Veterinary Specialists
A new specialized veterinary care
practice and 24-hour emergency
pet hospital has opened in down-
town Santa Barbara, at 414 East
Carrillo Street. Advanced Veterinary
Specialists (AVS) opened last month;
this Sunday, October 14, the public is
invited to attend a Grand Opening to
meet the doctors and tour the state-of-
the-art facility.
Owner of the practice, Dr. Andrea
Wells, DVM, DACVIM, gave us a tour
of the new 5,000-sq-ft hospital earlier
this week. “We are the only multi-
specialty hospital in Santa Barbara
County, with board-certified doc-
tors and specialized equipment,” she
explained. The practice, much like
human medicine, is referral-based;
when a pet has an illness or injury,
which requires specialized care, a gen-
eral veterinarian will refer the patient
to AVS. The practice boasts two inter-
nists, Dr. Wells and Dr. Shannon
Carley, one oncologist, Dr. Rodney
Ayl, and a surgeon, Dr. Sharon
Shields. Three emergency medicine
veterinarians, Dr. Sondra Elson, Dr.
Kristi Gibbs, and Dr. Matie McPeters
are also on the team, along with 25
veterinary technicians. “We consider
ourselves an extension of a general
veterinarian,” Dr. Wells said.
The hospital, located in the former
site of Santa Barbara Channels, has
been in the works for years, as Dr.
Wells waited to find the ideal location.
“With eighteen dedicated parking
spots, a large enough space, and free-
dom to remodel, this was the perfect
space for us,” she said.
The hospital has a generous waiting
area, five exam rooms, an ultrasound
room, a operating room, an in-house
laboratory, an oxygen therapy cage,
a large care area with multiple exam
tables, separate hospitalization areas
for dogs and cats, a critical care area
that is sound insulated for greater
comfort for pets, and a quarantine
room for animals with infectious dis-
eases.
The clinic gives the specialists
access to advanced equipment to
perform surgical procedures, cancer
therapy, ultrasounds, echocardio-
grams, endoscopy, chemotherapy,
biopsies, bone marrow sampling,
and more. A digital radiology was
also installed, allowing veterinarians
and patients to download x-rays and
medical information on their smart
phones, computers, and iPads. Dr.
Wells plans to add CAT scan equip-
ment in the near future.
The critical care hospital is open 24
hours a day, seven days a week, and
all holidays. The emergency staff is
prepared to handle a variety of medi-
cal emergencies, including trauma,
breathing problems, toxin ingestion,
vomiting, and more, when other vet-
erinarian offices are closed.
Dr. Wells spent over a year working
with veterinary architects and design
specialists gutting and remodeling the
space; before the space opened she
ran the practice portably, bringing her
own equipment to other vet offices to
give second opinions and specialized
care. After graduating from the UC
Davis School of Veterinary Medicine
in 1997, she completed a medical
and surgical internship at Purdue
University, and her internal medicine
residency at UC Davis. She has been
practicing internal medicine in Santa
Barbara since 2004.
For more information about
Advanced Veterinary Specialists, go
online at www.avs4pets.com. The
Grand Opening celebration takes
place this Sunday, October 14, from 11
am to 3 pm. The hospital is located at
414 East Carrillo Street, (805) 729-4460.
Corrections
& Omissions
In last week’s Village Beat
(MJ #18/40) we mentioned that
Montecito’s wood street signs are
maintained by the Montecito Trails
Foundation. It was brought to our
attention that the signs are actual-
ly sponsored and maintained by the
Montecito Community Foundation.
We regret the error. •MJ
Dr. Andrea Wells, DVM, DACVIM at Advanced
Veterinary Specialists, which opened last month
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 34 • The Voice of the Village •
Follow us on Facebook
At the Earl Warren Showgrounds in Santa Barbara, CA
to beneft CALM (calm4kids.org)
Antiques & Vintage
Show and Sale
Celebrating 20 Year
October 19, 20 & 21, 2012
Friday & Saturday 11 a.m.-6 p.m. • Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
$6 Admission at the door • ($5 Adults, 1 or more, with this ad)
$5 Senior (62+) / Child (Under 12 Free)(One time purchase applies to all 3 days)
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Antique Rug Connection Sales, Repair, Cleaning of Orientals
Spcial Event with Honorary Hosts
Mary Ellen Trainor Zemeckis, Jonathan Winters, and Tab Hunter
with the CALM Auxiliary invite you to the 20th year anniversary
celebration of CALM’s Antiques & Vintage Show and Sale
Thursday, October 18, 2012, 5:30pm-8:30pm
Cocktail Party & Preview Shopping
Go to www.calmantiqueshows.com for ticket information.
ENTERTAINMENT Page 454
Out of the Mouth of Fran
On Entertainment
by Steven Libowitz
Steven Libowitz has
reported on the arts and
entertainment for more
than 30 years; he has
contributed to Montecito
Journal for over ten
years.
F
ran Lebowitz, the
unapologetically opinionated
New York-based writer, was the
unabashed chronicler of the 1970s. As
a poster child of “The Me Decade,”
she employed sarcasm, satire, wit and
sharply taut observations to skewer the
culture, the people, the movements and
the resistance.
For those of you not old enough
to remember, think of a combination
of a wryer and wittier David Sedaris
and a more politically incorrect “The
Onion,” with the levelheaded politics
of Jon Stewart combined with the
self-righteous fervor of a Fox com-
mentator.
Lebowitz was the toast of the
town when her collection of essays
“Metropolitan Life” was published in
1978. But after penning its follow up,
“Social Studies,” in 1981, Lebowitz
started suffering what she refers to as
a 30-year case of “writer’s blockade.”
But she continued to talk, wherever
people would listen, including late-
night talk shows, and on a 2010 docu-
mentary called Public Speaking.
On Friday, Lebowitz makes her
long overdue Santa Barbara debut
at UCSB’s Campbell Hall, where
she’ll be interviewed onstage by an
as-yet unconfirmed media personal-
ity followed by an audience Q&A. Be
warned: you may never see yourself
or your world the same again.
Q. I’ve got to start off with Lebowitz &
Libowitz. They misspell my name all the
time, even when someone emails me after
seeing my byline. As someone famous,
does that still happen to you?
A. They misspell my name constant-
ly. In seventeen different ways.
I also get asked if I’m related to Annie
(Leibovitz).
They don’t ask me if I’m related to
Annie – they think I am Annie. And
when I say “No, I’m not,” they say
“But you look just like her.” She’s a
foot taller than me and she’s a blonde!
… And numerous people think there’s
only one person. It happens also to
Annie. Apparently there are a signifi-
cant number of people who think that
it’s the same person who takes those
pictures and writes what I write…
But I’m used to it. The first time I met
Annie’s mother, she said, “Oh, here’s
my other daughter.”
Do you wake up thinking of witty
things to say? Is it an option or do they
just pour out of you? Can you turn it off
when you want to?
I never think about it. The only time
it stumps me is when I have a pen
in my hand. From a talking point of
view, I never think about it. I don’t
know where it comes from, and I don’t
care. It’s like being tall: you don’t
wake up every morning and think,
“Will I be six-four all day?”… The rea-
son it’s fine with me is because there’s
no effort required, and there’s never
been a lazier person on the planet.
Mostly I lay around on the couch all
day reading.
You’ve alluded to writer’s block, how
did that happen? You just suddenly
couldn’t write?
I don’t know. If I knew, obviously
Journalist and author Fran Lebowitz makes her Santa Barbara debut Friday, October 12 at UCSB
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 35 Who ever loved that loved not at first sight? – Christopher Marlowe
1221 Chapala St. Santa Barbara • (805) 845-5247
The Winehound is
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Scott Craig is manager of media relations at
Westmont College
Your Westmont
Museum to Feature
Diverse Works of Alumni
by Scott Craig (photos by Brad Elliott)
F
or the frst time, Westmont
dedicates an entire art show to
its talented alumni in “Journeys:
Westmont Alumni Artists’ Invitational”
on October 18-November 17 in the
Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of
Art. An opening reception with the 12
artists on Thursday, October 18, from
4-6 pm at the museum is free and open
to the public.
The alumni, including Ben Caldwell
’06, Robin Eley ’01, Cheyenne Ellis
’00, John Morra ’85 and Cheryl Ann
Thomas ’65, will display several dif-
ferent types of art such as painting,
photography, sculpture, furniture
design, assemblage and drawing.
“They’ll be some great art in varying
media – it will be diverse,” says Judy
L. Larson, Askew professor of art
history and director of the Westmont
Ridley-Tree Museum of Art. “All the
artists have a similar undergraduate
education, yet they have gone in dif-
ferent directions. The work speaks to
the foundation in art that our students
are receiving here.”
“The show is an important reflec-
tion of some success stories from our
art department over the past twenty-
six years,” says Christopher Rupp
’00, museum collections manager who
will also be exhibiting his artwork.
“The show is in conjunction with the
college’s 75th anniversary and is a
retrospective of where we have come
and where we are going. By no means
is this an all encompassing show – it’s
merely a selection of some featured
alumni. There are many more doing
great things.”
Other alumni who will be showing
their work include David Shelton ’70,
Judy Neunuebel ’69, Joel Phillips ’11,
Nicholas Price ’06, Sharon Schock
’06, and Cory Steffen ’97.
The final day to view the current
exhibition, “Jan Albert Fürst Kolstad:
Prints,” is Saturday, October 13.
The museum is open Monday
through Friday from 10 am to 4 pm
and 11 am to 5 pm on Saturdays. It
is closed Sundays and college holi-
days. For more information, please
visit www.westmontmuseum.org or
contact the museum at (805) 565-6162.
Knecht to Shed Light
on Election Fallacies
Tom Knecht, Westmont associate
professor of political science, examines
the U.S. election process and voter’s
misguided approach to the system in
“You’re Voting Wrong! How Americans
Get Elections Wrong And Why It
Matters,” on Monday, October 15, at 7
pm at Kerrwood Hall in Hieronymus
Lounge.
The Paul C. Wilt Phi Kappa Phi
Faculty Lecture is free and open to the
public. Jesse Covington, assistant pro-
fessor of political science, and Wayne
Iba, professor of computer science, will
respond to Knecht’s talk.
As the 2012 presidential election
approaches, Americans’ confidence
in government has never been lower,
but Knecht says much of the blame is
attributable to voters, not politicians.
“To view elections as a selection pro-
cess means you believe a single vote
might affect the outcome of an elec-
tion,” Knecht says. “It won’t. In fact,
you have a greater chance of being
struck by lightning on your way to the
polling booth than your vote mattering
in an instrumental sense. Instead of
instrumental voting, I argue that voting
only makes sense as an expressive act.
“I hope my talk will lead people to
reevaluate their philosophy of voting
and elections.”
Knecht, a Stanford graduate who
earned a master’s degree and doctor-
ate at UC Santa Barbara, has writ-
ten a book, Paying Attention to Foreign
Affairs: How Public Opinion Affects
Presidential Decision Making. He has
also published research papers, “A
Pragmatic Response to an Unexpected
Constraint: Problem Representation in
a Complex Humanitarian Emergency”
to Foreign Policy Analysis, Vol. 5 and
“Humanizing the Homeless: Does
Contact Erode Stereotypes,” for the
journal Social Science Research. An arti-
cle, “Engaging the Reluctant? Service
Learning, Interpersonal Contact and
Attitudes Toward the Homeless,” was
recently published in the journal, PS:
Political Science & Politics. •MJ
Robin Eley’s “Hypostasis 2”
Judy Nueneubel’s “War Department”
Robin Eley’s “Hypostasis 2”
Robin Eley’s
“Hypostasis 2”
Dr. Tom Knecht
will speak about
the election pro-
cess on Monday,
October 15, at
Kerrwood Hall
Joel Phillips’ “Jason
on a Couch”
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 36 • The Voice of the Village •
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SEEN (Continued from page 20)
president Nancy Leffert “who has
a big heart.” Nancy reminded us
that Antioch University was the first
to offer the same programs to men
and women and the first to offer
women tenure. She said, “Trustee
Susan Rose was the impetus behind
the program.” Judy Bruton created
the program. AUSB needs $250,000
for the first year, including $50,000 in
scholarships and has raised $70,000
already.
This is a certificate, not a degree
program and is designed to fit into
busy lives, taking place over an aca-
demic year. The mission is to teach
the principles of values-based lead-
ership as it relates to women, built
on a platform of self-knowledge,
respect, confidence, and passion
across professional and community
contexts, and to further and enhance
the development of necessary skills
to promote and create meaning-
ful and effective change. There is a
planned launch for 2013. The beauti-
ful new campus is at 602 Anacapa
Street. For information, call 962-8179
ext. 5176.
ArtWalk
The annual Museum of Natural
History (MNH) League’s ArtWalk
began with a gala reception for
the indoor show in Fleischmann
Auditorium. The next two days there
would also be art, jewelry, pottery,
fashion, music, food and wine out-
side along Mission Creek including a
Children’s Art Walk.
The indoor show featured The
Oak Group and more than 100 jur-
ied works of art curated by Diane
Antioch hosts John Mike Cohen and Marcia with school president Nancy Leffert at the event to learn
about the new Women & Leadership certificate program
Antioch donor Sara Miller McCune with her friend Duke and board chair Vicki Riskin at the new campus
located at the home of John and Marcia Mike Cohen
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 37 Sleeping is no mean art; for its sake, one must stay awake all day – Friedrich Nietzsche
2012-2013
PAGE YOUTH CENTER
WINTER BASKETBALL
Sign-up Now!
Boys and Girls 1
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th
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Evaluations in November, Practices start in December.
Games December – March • Separate boys and girls divisions
League divided by grades, 1
st
thru 8
th
• Games played at Page Youth Center
Practices held at local schools, churches and community sites
Last ofcial day to sign up is October 20
REGISTRATION FORMS AVAILABLE:
PAGE YOUTH CENTER
4540 Hollister Ave in Goleta.
For further information call 967-8778
www.pageyouthcenter.org
Coast 2 Coast Collection
La Arcada Courtyard
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Featuring Juliska Barware for Holiday Entertaining!
Waterhouse. The blue ribbon went
to Nancy Davidson. A handful of
friends has grown to a group of 23
active members of The Oak Group,
who have helped to preserve endan-
gered landscapes around our county.
Their painting sales have reached
nearly $1.5 million, half of which has
been donated to MNH, The Nature
Conservancy, The Land Trust for
Santa Barbara County and The Marin
Agricultural Land Trust.
ArtWalk is managed by a group
of volunteers, this year co-chaired
by Sue Adams and Patti Ottobani
with a committee of Terry Behrens,
Claire Chytilo, Mary Garton, Beverly
Hanna, Mary Anne Harrison, Nancy
Hutterer, Jane Litchfield, Lenore Los,
Lisa Lunsford, Loyda Solis Marquez,
Maureen Masson, Nan Mills, Anne
Murray Christine Nail, Lil Nelson,
Nancy Pierson, Jill Vander Hoof and
Randee Winitzky. Proceeds benefit
exhibits and education programs for
the Museum. •MJ
ArtWalk co-chairs Patti Ottobani and Sue Adams with artist Peggy Fletcher (center)
Museum
of Natural
History direc-
tory Karl
Hutterer with
first place
winner Nancy
Davidson
and ArtWalk
curator Diane
Waterhouse
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 38 • The Voice of the Village •

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MISCELLANY (Continued from page 29)
days making the all-paper floral
arrangements for the tables, while
singers from Janet Adderley’s School
for the Performing Arts sang a selec-
tion of popular pieces.
“This is easily the biggest thing we
have ever done and we’ve had enor-
mous support,” says Debbie Kass,
who attended the patrons soiree along
with Lori Moll, Carla Tomson, Jenise
Tremblay, Kyle Brace, Pati Kern, and
Michelle Niemela.
Foundation chairman Jim Bechtel
was also at the bash with other sup-
porters, including Tina Frontado,
Beverly Clark, Betsey von Summer
Moller, Donna Buchanan, Kathy
Kelley, Sheree Smyle and Nikki
Greene...
Lovely Lang Lang
CAMA, the Community Arts Music
Association, kicked off its 94th season
at the Granada in spectacular style,
Pianist Lang Lang, who exploded
on to the international scene as a clas-
sical music superstar when he played
at the opening of the Olympic Games
in Beijing in 2008 watched by five
billion people, was making his third
CAMA appearance, having also per-
formed with UCSB’s Arts & Lectures
twice.
The 30-year-old musician doesn’t
so much play the Steinway keyboard,
as caress it, bringing out the very best
in everything he performs, in this
case two of his favorite composers,
Mozart’s sonatas – No. 5 in G Major,
No. 4 in E-flat Major and No. 8 in A
minor – and Chopin’s ballades – in
G minor, F Major, A-flat Major and F
minor.
His charmingly dramatic flourishes
just added to the sold-out show, which
ended with an encore of a Chopin
nocturne.
As I’ve said before, and I’ll say it
again, he is so mesmerizing it is no
wonder they named him twice!...
Crime and Punishment
Ensemble Theatre Company launched
its final season at the Alhecama Theatre
with an imaginative 90-minute adapta-
tion of Dostoyevsky’s 1866 novel, Crime
and Punishment.
“This season is all about the power
of love in its many different forms,”
says director Jonathan Fox.
“It may seem odd to think of Crime
and Punishment as a story of love, but
its force is felt through much of the
play’s action. On one level the produc-
tion is a thrilling detective story, but
it’s also a fascinating psychological
and philosophical journey.”
The award-winning adaptation is
cleverly told in flashback sequences,
with an excellent and intense Brian
Patrick Monahan as the tortured
soul and former student Raskolnikov,
with Peter Van Norden and Kwana
Martinez playing a variety of other
roles.
Stephen Gifford has designed an
austere thought provoking set while
J. Kent Inasy’s lighting evokes the
solitary anguish the central character
is going through.
The show runs through October 21.
It would be a crime to miss it!
Palatable Arts
The courtyard of the charming
Spanish Garden Inn suffered major
social gridlock with its “Arts of the
Palette” fundraiser to benefit the Kid’s
Farmers’ Market Program, an interac-
tive approach to improving the long-
term health of low-income children
and part of the Foodbank of Santa
Barbara County.
Chefs Greg Murphy, Brandon
Hughes and Nik Ramirez of Bouchon,
Wine Cask and Intermezzo, prepared
the food, paired with wines from the
Margerum Winery and complement-
ed with farmstead cheeses from C’est
Cheese.
“We’ve done backpacks for kids for
several years and wanted something
different this time,” explained res-
taurateur Mitchell Sjerven. “This is
a very healthy alternative which kids
seem to enjoy participating in.”
Artists adding to the “palette”
included Elle Yeomans, Cathy Quiel,
Susan Belloni, Rich Untermann, Fritz
Phinney and Ken Pfeiffer.
The event, which attracted more
than 100 guests, was a sell-out, raising
around $15,000 for the cause.
The perfect fusion of fine foods and
fine art...
Montecito Tango
State Street Ballet’s sold-out “Tango
On the Riviera”gala at the Biltmore
honoring Montecito philanthro-
pist Margo Cohen-Feinberg raised
around $100,000 for the popular dance
company.
“We’ve been around for seventeen
years and it’s been seventeen years of
being in the black!” boasted executive
director Rodney Gustafson. “That’s
a pretty extraordinary record by any
standard.”
The event, emceed by Jonatha King
and her husband, Lance Jones, oozed
a South American theme, given the
company’s world premiere of An
American Tango by choreographer
William Soleau at the Lobero on
October 27.
Honoree Margo kicked off the boffo
bash dancing with the troupe’s latest
import, Chilean Mauricio Vera, who
joined SSB earlier this year, along with
Sergey Kheylik, who studied at the
Bolshoi Ballet Academy in Moscow
and won the gold medal at Varna
in Bulgaria, with previous recipients
including Mikhail Baryshnikov and
Fernando Bujones, both former prin-
cipals with New York’s much lauded
American Ballet Theatre.
The ubiquitous Andrew Firestone
conducted the live auction, which
included two tickets to the hot ABC
show Dancing With The Stars, a
“Papillon” gold and diamond pen-
dant from Van Cleef & Arpels, and
dinner for ten and a performance
by the ballet snapped up by Mike
Towbes for $4,000.
Among the guests were Robert
Feinberg, Corinna Gordon, Peter
Clark, Marlowe and Arlyn Goldsby,
Carla Hahn, Carter and Victoria
Hines, Frank and Tricia Goss, Chris
Lancashire, Adrian Spence, Patricia
Gregory, Morrie and Irma Jurkowitz,
Guy Veloz, Sara Miller McCune,
Leni Fe Bland, Mary Ellen Tiffany
and Tim Mikel...
Keyboard
supremo Lang
Lang capti-
vated at the
Granada
Spanish Garden Inn owner Gail Elnicky, restaura-
teur Mitchell Sjerven and Christine Piper at the
“Arts of the Palette” event
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 39 It is not enough to succeed; others must fail – Gore Vidal
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US Congress US Senate
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Aspen Santa Fe Impresses
UCSB’s popular Arts & Lectures
dance series with the Aspen Santa Fe
Ballet at the Granada.
The 16-year-old company, which
promotes the latest in modern dance,
didn’t fail to please with three enter-
taining, but very different pieces –
Square None, Stamping Ground and
Over Glow.
The trio of works showed the influ-
ence of three very different choreog-
raphers, 23-year-old Norbert De La
Cruz, Jiri Kylian and Jorma Elo.
De La Cruz’s Square None, with
music by Handel, among others,
was a sleek and refined work, while
“Stamping Ground” was sans music
until the end, with booming tym-
panis adding the beat, while Over
Glow had a more traditional, classical
feel with music by Mendelssohn and
Beethoven to match.
As they well might say in the
Rockies, the sky’s the limit!
Rhapsody in Bloom
The Music Academy of the West
was swarming with 250 guests for the
48th annual Santa Barbara Beautiful
Awards.
The party, themed “Rhapsody in
Bloom,” featured a new award – the
Griswold Award for Philanthropy –
which was presented to Duncan and
Suzanne Mellichamp, a longtime
board member, by president Robert
Adams and UCSB vice chancellor
Gene Lucas.
KEYT-TV anchor, Paula Lopez,
emceed the event, while fellow anchor,
Shirin Rajaee interviewed invitees on
their thoughts of what makes our
community so utterly unique.
Lynda Weinman and Bruce Heavin,
co-founders of lynda.com, also
received the Business in Art Award
from the City of Santa Barbara Arts
Advisory Committee.
A blooming good time was had by
all...
Bob Bryant on the Bayou
Montecito bling king Bob Bryant
was honored at the Santa Barbara
Rescue Mission’s 11th annual
“Downfield on the Bayou” football-
themed benefit at the Rancho Dos
Pueblos, a 3,000-acre ranch on the
Gaviota Coast.
The bash, which attracted 322
guests, raised more than $300,000 for
the mission, which helps more than
1,500 needy folk annually, with food,
accommodation and job help.
“Our annual budget is more than
$2 million and the amount raised here
runs us for two months,” says Rolf
Geyling, president. “The numbers we
help goes up about ten percent annu-
ally and really stretches our funding.
We also have a thriving drug and
alcohol recovery program, which has
a huge impact on people.
“While only twenty-one percent
of those completing treatment pro-
grams nationally maintain their sobri-
ety beyond five years, we are proud
that fifty six percent of our graduates
remain in recovery over this same
time period.”
The honoree, who has jewelry stores
in the Upper Village and on State
Street downtown, and his wife, Patty,
have just returned from Bosnia from
his latest “Summit for Danny” climb
in memory of his late son, who died
from a drug overdose in 1995. In
his memory he founded the Daniel
Bryant Youth and Family Treatment
Center.
“The peaks weren’t particularly
high, but the inclines were very, very
steep,” says Bob, who was elected
Santa Barbara’s Man of the Year in
2000 for his community leadership in
the prevention and treat-
ment of alcohol and drug
abuse.
The next locale, two
years hence, will be on
the south island of New
Zealand.
Among those joining
in the footballing frolics
were emcee Gerd Jordano,
co-chairs Suzi Ryan and
Susan Hughes, sheriff Bill
Brown, district attorney
Joyce Dudley, police chief
Cam Sanchez, Leni Fe
Bland, Peter MacDougall,
Pamela Haskell, Penny
Jenkins and Silvio Di Loreto...
Sightings: Comedian Steve Martin
sitting quietly at a corner table at
Pierre Lafond’s Wine Bistro... Carol
Burnett checking out the crowd at
Lucky’s... Rocker David Crosby order-
ing a sandwich at the Three Pickles on
East Canon Perdido
Pip! Pip! for now
Readers with tips, sightings and
amusing items for Richard’s column
should e-mail him at richardmin-
eards@verizon.net or send invita-
tions or other correspondence to the
Journal •MJ
Duncan and Suzanne Mellichamp, Robert Adams and Gene Lucas
at the Santa Barbara Beautiful Awards (photo by Priscilla)
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 40 • The Voice of the Village •
COMING & GOING (Continued from page 26)
brought in Valentina Belyayeva St.
Gilear, President and Head Designer
of Stanley Hagler NYC. Most recently,
Ms Murphy arranged for Susan
Gravely, president and CEO of Vietri,
to spend an afternoon at Coast 2 Coast.
Ms Gravely founded her com-
pany 29 years ago, along with her
sister Frances and their mother, Lee
Gravely. The name came from Vietri
sul Maré, the village where her first
orders were placed. “We thought it
was a perfect name,” she says as we sit
down during her Sunday, September
30
th
appearance at Coast 2 Coast in La
Arcada. “Once people can pronounce
it,” she adds. She says it was “perfect”
because the syllables taken separately
and reversed in Italian or in French
“trois vies,” means three lives. The
three of them saw it as an omen of
good luck.
Two years after her father died unex-
pectedly of a heart attack at the age of
60, Susan and her mother took a trip
to Italy “and that’s when this whole
concept occurred,” she recounts.
Susan was studying at the New
York School of Design, “thinking I was
going to be in interior design. My
sister (Frances) had two young babies
and she had her masters in structural
design, so she did lots of graphics, a lot
of marketing things at the university.”
Because Frances had children to
take care of, Susan became head of
sales and president of the new com-
pany, even though she was the young-
er sister. She moved back to Chapel
Hill, North Carolina (Frances lived
there with her two young children)
and started out of an extra room in
Frances’ house.
Thanks to a serendipitous meeting
with a man named Fabio Puccinelli
on their flight to Italy, who later
helped them get a new passport and
replace some of the traveler’s checks
lost when Susan’s mother’s handbag
was stolen, Vietri was on its way.
Fabio became their agent and negoti-
ated their first contract.
“We came back (this was in 1983),
started researching what was in the
market and (with the help of Mr.
Puccinelli) negotiated our first $20,000
contract (which seemed like $20 million
at the time). All these pieces were com-
ing and we didn’t have a warehouse,
and we didn’t know how we were
going to sell them, but we knew there
was some way people got things.”
The ceramic plates came by ship and
were dropped off in Norfolk, Virginia.
Susan found a trucker to bring them
to North Carolina, and convinced a
friend with a small coffee shop who
had a warehouse in Durham to rent
her space. “It was March 21, 1984, and
we hired students, my mother brought
friends, we went to a bus station and
got people who were just hanging
out and we opened every box, hand-
counted ten thousand pieces and
created our first inventory list. We
shipped our first order in October that
we had gotten from Neiman Marcus,
a $12,000 order. And they’ve been an
account of ours for 29 years.”
Vietri now sells to about 2,000
specialty independent stores in the
U.S., along with major department
stores such as Neiman Marcus, Saks,
Bloomingdale’s, and others. Vietri also
has outlets in Canada, Australia, Chile
and Saudi Arabia, and just shipped an
order to Korea.
Vietri’s appeal?
“We work with factories that are still
run by family craft people or maestros
and we try to be respectful of their
expertise,” Susan explains. “Some fac-
tories deal in molds and shapes, oth-
ers in hand painting, others in black
clay, others in red clay,” she continues.
“We try to create a product that has a
story behind it. If it is from the Veneto
region it has markings from Venice. If
it’s Tuscan, it’s paintings of Tuscan life
or the clay is from Tuscany.
“What makes Vietri special is that
every pattern is unique for Vietri and
unique for the market. Some have lim-
ited runs, some we’ve had for thirty
years. We keep a dinnerware pattern
for at least six to seven years, and
we keep accessory lines two to three
years.”
Groups of (mostly) women move
through the shop on a busy Sunday,
and many purchase a Vietri item that
Ms Gravely very carefully signs (“put
it in an oven at about 200 degrees for
fifteen minutes to bake the signature
in,” she advises).
Coast 2 Coast Collection may only
be a year old, but it has already
become one of Vietri’s VIP locations.
Congratulations to all.
It’s A Rap
From Russell Roberts
The date: Wednesday, October 17;
the time: 8 pm; the place: Campbell
Hall on the campus at UCSB; the
reason: a talk called “What’s Wrong
with Capitalism – Do-overs and the
Death of Responsibility”; the speak-
er: Russell Roberts, a George Mason
University economics professor and
now fulltime Hoover Institution
research fellow. He is already the host
of EconTalk, a popular weekly pod-
cast, has written several novels featur-
ing economics, and is a frequent NPR
commentator.
Roberts tells us by phone that he is
“going to talk about crony capitalism,
try to give people a feel for a lot of
the causes of the financial crisis. The
coddling of banks, even in the past
and how that created the seeds of the
crisis.”
Russell Roberts is also the guy
that wrote the now-famous fic-
tional YouTube “rap” between John
Maynard Keynes and F. A. Hayek that
has so far been viewed by nearly six
million souls. His most recent book
– a novel – is: The Price of Everything:
A Parable of Possibility and Prosperity.
Another of his novels – The Choice –
was named by Business Week as one of
the top ten books of 1994, and chosen
as one of the best books of 1994 by the
Financial Times.
I conducted the following short
interview with Mr. Roberts via tele-
phone last weekend:
Q. With a $16 trillion debt and climb-
ing at least to $20 trillion even if the flow
of money is stemmed, and with the only
other currency with worldwide circulation
– the euro – printing “money” as fast as
the U.S., what is the end game?
A. Where are we going? Right now,
for reasons that are not fully under-
stood, the world is happy lending
money to the U.S. government. For
whatever reason, the world is not
as scared about this as you might
think. One explanation is that we are
the tallest pigmy. There is so much
uncertainty in the world that the U.S.
Treasury is seen as a pretty safe invest-
ment. Other than that, I’m concerned.
When you are the world’s dominant
currency, you can print money until
people don’t want your debt anymore.
I don’t know when that will happen. I
Susan Gravely’s signature will be baked into the clay after spending just 15 minutes in your oven at
200 degrees
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 41 He that humbleth himself wishes to be exalted – Friedrich Nietzsche
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COMING & GOING Page 424
think the U.S. government is playing
with fire.
Since the $800-billion-plus “stimulus”
was added to the budget the following year
and the years after that, is it still consid-
ered stimulus?
Beats me. It’s all just a marketing
game. If State governments spent less
because of the stimulus, what do you
call that? If you look at total spend-
ing, it went up by $820 billion at the
federal level for two or three years, so
there is an ongoing debate on whether
the net stimulus was large or small.
It’s just sort of the new baseline.
Most of the deficit is due to the auto-
matic spending that ‘can’t be changed
by Congress.’ I don’t think that’s true.
It is true that a lot of governmental
decisions have been made about how
much the government spends. We
spend 3.7 trillion dollars, which is
about a trillion more than we take in,
and a lot more as a percentage of the
economy than we did five years ago,
and it doesn’t seem to have made
the economy particularly healthy. It
Filmmaker John Papola put together the popular rap videos “starring” John Maynard Keynes and F.A.
Hayek, written by Russell Roberts; rounds one and two have had nearly six million views on YouTube,
been subtitled in eleven languages, and used in high school and college classrooms around the world.
Keynes is played by Billy Scafuri; Hayek is played by Adam Lustick.
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 42 • The Voice of the Village •
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COMING & GOING (Continued from page 41)
is possible it would have been even
worse without it, but there’s no evi-
dence for either side. It’s just a bunch
of people yelling at each other, pre-
tending they’re talking about science,
but they’re not really.
Why hasn’t there been a bigger outcry
against Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac?
Political hacks were put in charge and
walked away with tens of millions of dol-
lars. No one, as of yet, has even insisted
upon an investigation or in clawing back
some of that fraudulently gained money.
Why not?
The political demand for doing
something about it is very small,
because most people don’t under-
stand it. Increased home ownership:
who could be opposed to that? The
rise in the price of homes began in
the late 1980s, but starting in ’95, both
Clinton and then Bush got behind
increased home ownership and it real-
ly accelerated. People believe Fannie
and Freddie have something to do
with holding down interest rates but
other than that, there isn’t any under-
standing of what exactly they do.
Is there any chance that Keynes gets
taken off the pantheon of economists and
is replaced by Mr. Hayek?
I’m just happy that Hayek is now
in the pantheon. Keynes’ opinions are
always going to be popular because
they offer easy short-term solutions.
What is the first thing you would do if
you were elected president?
If I were president, my campaign
slogan would be: Back To Normal.
It wouldn’t be a Giant Tax Cut; it
wouldn’t be a big Spending Increase.
I would try to get the government’s
profile down so that people could
make decisions about the future with
some reasonable expectation that
what’s going to happen is not going
to be so unpredictable.
I would get rid of the government’s
stake in every single private company;
I’d sell off the GM stake and the AIG
stake. Make it clear that we’re going
Back To Normal. The very first thing I
would do is to try to change the rela-
tionship between the government and
the banking system. That, I think, is
the biggest, most pernicious, poison-
ous thing we have to deal with. It’s
been a disastrous public policy. It’s the
underlying cause of the mess we’re in.
Does it matter who is elected in
November?
Not as much as most people think.
I always like to point to Obama’s for-
eign policy. If you went back in time
to November 2008 and said, ‘Let me
tell you what it will be like in the fall
of 2012. The United States will have
bombed Libya, assassinated Osama
Bin Laden on the soil of an ally with-
out involving them in the decision,
Guantanamo Bay will still be open,
and we’re still in Afghanistan. Who
would you say won the election? All
those things were expected of McCain.
I have a dream that Romney, coming
from Bain Capital, could actually be
tough on the banks. But it’s a dream,
not a reality. I do think if Romney is
president it is probably likely there
will be smaller increases in spending
in the future than under Obama, but
I don’t think he’s going to shrink gov-
ernment. As for his promise to clean
up the tax code, I’ll believe it when I
see it.
It’s shameful that President Obama
hasn’t put forward a workable budget.
Could we really get serious about spend-
ing and lop off, say, $700 billion from the
budget without sending us back into reces-
sion?
Well, I don’t believe lopping off $700
billion from the budget would neces-
sarily put us back into a recession. It
would, however, be a sign to the rest
of the world that we are serious about
getting our budget into shape.
If government inaction is the best course
of action – and it often is – how do you
present that to the public without being
charged with indifference?
We get the government that we
deserve. Kicking the can down the
road is very appealing. If you raise
your kids that way though, how does
it turn out? The impulse to spoil your
kids is very attractive. But, most of
us don’t spoil our kids all the time
because the consequences down the
road are bad.
My last question concerns something
Ben Stein said this morning on FOX
News: that no president could or would
have done anything differently than what
Obama did. Do you believe that?
I think the more interesting question
is: were there choices that we could
have imagined. I understand [Stein’s]
point. There’s a lot of political pres-
sure to act dramatically and to keep
banks from failing. I think what we
did to prop up the banks was a terrible
mistake. It was bad for capitalism. It
was bad for democracy and I think the
costs will be paid down the road. And,
I certainly don’t think we needed to
bail out the auto industry and I don’t
think we needed to spend an extra tril-
lion dollars above and beyond what
we were taking in. I can see the politi-
cal pressure for all those things, but I
think they were all mistakes.
The Man
On The Space Shuttle
We thank Helga Morris for the follow-
ing report written by Valerie Harrison:
For millions of central and southern
California residents, the site of the
Shuttle piggybacking on a giant 747
would be the first and last time they
witnessed a spacecraft in flight. The
Endeavour flew over our skies on
September 21.
With remarkable timing, one of the
astronauts of the last crew to fly the
Endeavour visited Santa Barbara on
September 27 for a luncheon presen-
tation at the Santa Barbara Club. Dr.
Gregory Chamitoff, a graduate of
Cal Poly, MIT, and Cal Tech had the
audience captivated with his descrip-
tions of living in space aboard the
International Space Station (ISS).
Though the topic is complex, Dr.
Chamitoff capably told of the advanc-
es to science, health, astronomy, engi-
neering, the climate, and the current
experiments being conducted on the
ISS. From vaccines to shingles, the
unique gravity-free environment has
provided scientists with capabilities
not possible on earth.
The movie shown and produced by
Dr. Chamitoff had the audience feel-
ing as though they were riding along
with him on the Endeavour and work-
ing in the space station. The views
of the earth and the black sky only
possible from outside our atmosphere
were astonishing.
Dr. Chamitoff makes his home
in the Houston area with pediatri-
cian wife, Chantal Caviness, and
seven-year-old twins Dimitri and
Natasha. The ISS flies over Earth
about every 90 minutes and for
six months during 2008, with their
father on board, the children were
able to view their father’s home
from their backyard. During that
time, Greg lived on the ISS, con-
ducting hundreds of experiments,
speaking to schoolchildren in the
U.S., and performing ISS duties.
The ISS is the brightest object in the
sky, circumnavigates the Earth at 240
miles high and moves quickly from
Russell Roberts speaks at a free event sponsored
by Susan and Craig McCaw on Wednesday, October
17 at 8 pm, Campbell Hall at UCSB
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 43 If a woman possesses manly virtues one should run away from her; if she does not possess them she runs away from herself – Friedrich Nietzsche
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west to east. Being the size of a foot-
ball field, including the end zones, it is
a very large structure. It has the living
space of a five-bedroom home with
two bathrooms.
While the space shuttle program has
come to an end, the ISS is expected
to grow in use. It is inhabited by six
to seven astronauts at all times, 20
countries form an unprecedented sci-
entific and engineering consortium.
The latest country to join the princi-
pals – U.S., Russia, Canada, Japan,
and Europe – is Poland, which joined
in July 2012.
The last shuttle mission flew in
July 2011. Dr. Chamitoff flew the
Endeavour on May 16, 2011, becom-
ing the last man transported by the
shuttle to walk in space. To date,
204 people have been to the space
station.
The space station can be seen
overhead on Friday, October 12 for
four minutes from 6:53 pm about 10
degrees to the north/northwest, and
again Saturday, October 13 beginning
at 7:41 pm for three minutes at about
15 degrees in the NW sky. For more
info on this, go to: spaceflight.nasa.
gov/realdata/sightings. •MJ
Dr. Gregory Chamitoff and Valerie Harrison, the
lady responsible for Dr. Chamitoff’s visit

Z Y

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805-770-2143 or epicuresb.com
Seatings from 6:00 - 8:00pm
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First course
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Second course
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Third course
braised pork belly
fuyu persimmon kimchi salad,
crispy rice
with paired wines
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 44 • The Voice of the Village •
Bella Vista $$$
1260 Channel Drive (565-8237)
Cafe Del Sol $$
30 Los Patos Way (969-0448)
CAVA $$
1212 Coast Village Road (969-8500)
Regional Mexican and Spanish cooking
combine to create Latin cuisine from tapas and
margaritas, mojitos, seafood paella and sangria
to lobster tamales, Churrasco ribeye steak and
seared Ahi tuna. Sunfower-colored interior
is accented by live Spanish guitarist playing
next to cozy beehive freplace nightly. Lively
year-round outdoor people-wat ching front
patio. Open Monday-Friday 11 am to 10 pm.
Saturday and Sunday 10 am to 10 pm.
China Palace $$
1070 Coast Village Road (565-9380)
Giovanni’s $
1187 Coast Village Road (969-1277)
Los Arroyos $
1280 Coast Village Road (969-9059)
Little Alex’s $
1024 A-Coast Village Road (969-2297)
Lucky’s (brunch) $$ (dinner) $$$
1279 Coast Village Road (565-7540)
Comfortable, old-fashioned urban steak-
house in the heart of America’s biggest little
village. Steaks, chops, seafood, cocktails,
and an enormous wine list are featured, with
white tablecloths, fne crystal and vintage
photos from the 20th century. The bar
(separate from dining room) features large
fat-screen TV and opens at 4 pm during the
week. Open nightly from 5 pm to 10 pm;
Saturday & Sunday brunch from 9 am to
3 pm. Valet Parking.
Montecito Café $$
1295 Coast Village Road (969-3392)
Montecito Coffee Shop $
1498 East Valley Road (969-6250)
Montecito Wine Bistro $$$
516 San Ysidro Road 969-7520
Head to Montecito’s upper village to indulge in
some California bistro cuisine. Chef Nathan Heil
creates seasonal menus that include fsh and
vegetarian dishes, and fresh fatbreads straight
out of the wood-burning oven. The Bistro of-
fers local wines, classic and specialty cocktails,
single malt scotches and aged cognacs.
Pane é Vino $$$
1482 East Valley Road (969-9274)
Plow & Angel $$$
San Ysidro Ranch
900 San Ysidro Lane (565-1700)
Enjoy a comfortable atmosphere as you dine
on traditional dishes such as mac ‘n cheese
and ribs. The ambiance is enhanced with
original artwork, including stained glass
windows and an homage to its namesake,
Saint Isadore, hanging above the fre-
place. Dinner is served from 5 to 10 pm
daily with bar service extending until 11 pm
weekdays and until midnight on Friday and
Saturday.
$ (average per person under $15)
$$ (average per person $15 to $30)
$$$ (average per person $30 to $45)
$$$$ (average per person $45-plus)
MONTECI TO EATERI ES . . . A Gu i d e
Sakana Japanese Restaurant $$
1046 Coast Village Road (565-2014)
Stella Mare’s $$/$$$
50 Los Patos Way (969-6705)
Stonehouse $$$$
San Ysidro Ranch
900 San Ysidro Lane (565-1700)
Located in what is a 19th-century citrus
packinghouse, Stonehouse restaurant features
a lounge with full bar service and separate
dining room with crackling freplace and
creekside views. Chef Matthew Johnson’s
regional cuisine is prepared with a palate of
herbs and vegetables harvested from the on-site
chef’s garden. Recently voted 1 of the best 50
restaurants in America by OpenTable Diner’s
Choice. 2010 Diners’ Choice Awards: 1 of 50
Most Romantic Restaurants in America, 1 of
50 Restaurants With Best Service in America.
Open for dinner from 6 to 10 pm daily.
Sunday Brunch 10 am to 2 pm.
Trattoria Mollie $$$
1250 Coast Village Road (565-9381)
Tre Lune $$/$$$
1151 Coast Village Road (969-2646)
A real Italian boite, complete with small but
fully licensed bar, big list of Italian wines, large
comfortable tables and chairs, lots of mahogany
and large b&w vintage photos of mostly fa-
mous Italians. Menu features both comfort food
like mama used to make and more adventurous
Italian fare. Now open continuously from lunch
to dinner. Also open from 7:30 am to 11:30 am
daily for breakfast.
Via Vai Trattoria Pizzeria $$
1483 East Valley Road (565-9393)
Delis, bakeries, juice bars
Blenders in the Grass
1046 Coast Village Road (969-0611)
Here’s The Scoop
1187 Coast Village Road (lower level)
(969-7020)
Gelato and Sorbet are made on the premises.
Open Monday through Thursday 1 pm to 9 pm,
12 pm to 10 pm Friday and Saturday, and
12 pm to 9 pm on Sundays.
Jeannine’s
1253 Coast Village Road (969-7878)
Montecito Deli
1150 Coast Village Road (969-3717)
Open six days a week from 7 am to 3 pm.
(Closed Sunday) This eatery serves home-
made soups, fresh salads, sandwiches, and its
specialty, The Piadina, a homemade fat bread
made daily.
Panino
1014 #C Coast Village Road (565-0137)
Pierre Lafond
516 San Ysidro Road (565-1502)
This market and deli is a center of activity
in Montecito’s Upper Village, serving fresh
baked pastries, regular and espresso cofee
drinks, smoothies, burritos, homemade
soups, deli salads, made-to-order sandwiches
and wraps available, and boasting a fully
stocked salad bar. Its sunny patio draws
crowds of regulars daily. The shop also
carries specialty drinks, gift items, grocery
staples, and produce. Open everyday 5:30 am
to 8 pm.
Village Cheese & Wine
1485 East Valley Road (969-3815)

In Summerland / Carpinteria
Cantwell’s Summerland Market $
2580 Lillie Avenue (969-5893)
Garden Market $
3811 Santa Claus Lane (745-5505)
Jack’s Bistro $
5050 Carpinteria Avenue (566-1558)
Serving light California Cuisine, Jack’s ofers
freshly baked bagels with whipped cream
cheeses, omelettes, scrambles, breakfast bur-
ritos, specialty sandwiches, wraps, burgers, sal-
ads, pastas and more. Jacks ofers an extensive
espresso and cofee bar menu, along with wine
and beer. They also ofer full service catering,
and can accommodate wedding receptions to
corporate events. Open Monday through Fri-
day 6:30 am to 3 pm, Saturday and Sunday
7 am to 3 pm.
Nugget $$
2318 Lillie Avenue (969-6135)
Padaro Beach Grill $
3765 Santa Claus Lane (566-9800)
A beach house feel gives this seaside eatery its
charm and makes it a perfect place to bring the
whole family. Its new owners added a pond,
waterfall, an elevated patio with freplace and
couches to boot. Enjoy grill options, along with
salads and seafood plates. The Grill is open
Monday through Sunday 11 am to 9 pm
Sly’s $$$
686 Linden Avenue (684-6666)
Sly’s features fresh fsh, farmers’ market veg-
gies, traditional pastas, prime steaks, Blue Plate
Specials and vintage desserts. You’ll fnd a full
bar, serving special martinis and an extensive
wine list featuring California and French wines.
Cocktails from 4 pm to close, dinner from 5 to 9
pm Sunday-Thursday and 5 to 10 pm Friday and
Saturday. Lunch is M-F 11:30 to 2:30, and brunch
is served on the weekends from 9 am to 3 pm.
Stacky’s Seaside $
2315 Lillie Avenue (969-9908)
Summerland Beach Café $
2294 Lillie Avenue (969-1019)
Tinkers $
2275 C Ortega Hill Road (969-1970)
Santa Barbara / Restaurant Row
Bistro Eleven Eleven $$
1111 East Cabrillo Boulevard (730-1111)
Located adjacent to Hotel Mar Monte, the
bistro serves breakfast and lunch featuring
all-American favorites. Dinner is a mix of tradi-
tional favorites and coastal cuisine. The lounge
advancement to the restaurant features a big
screen TV for daily sporting events and happy
hour. Open Monday-Friday 6:30 am to 9 pm,
Saturday and Sunday 6:30 am to 10 pm.
Cielito $$$
1114 State Street (225-4488)
Cielito Restaurant features true favors of Mexi-
co created by Chef Ramon Velazquez. Try an an-
tojito (or “small craving”) like the Anticucho de
Filete (Serrano-chimichurri marinated Kobe beef
skewer, rocoto-tomato jam and herb mashed po-
tatoes), the Raw Bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh
shellfsh, or taste the savory treats in handmade
tortillas at the Taqueria. It is located in the heart
of downtown, in the historic La Arcada.
Chuck’s Waterfront Grill $$
113 Harbor Way (564-1200)
Located next to the Maritime Museum, enjoy
some of the best views of both the mountains
and the Santa Barbara pier sitting on the newly
renovated, award-winning patio, while enjoy-
ing fresh seafood straight of the boat. Dinner is
served nightly from 5 pm, and brunch is ofered
on Sunday from 10 am until 1 pm. Reservations
are recommended.
Enterprise Fish Co. $$
225 State Street (962-3313)
Every Monday and Tuesday the Enterprise Fish
Company ofers two-pound Maine Lobsters
served with clam chowder or salad, and rice or
potatoes for only $29.95. Happy hour is every
weekday from 4 pm to 7 pm. Open Sunday
thru Thursday 11:30 am to 10 pm and Friday
thru Saturday 11:30 am to 11 pm.
Los Agaves $
600 N. Milpas Street (564-2626)
Los Agaves ofers eclectic Mexican cuisine, using
only the freshest ingredients, in a casual and
friendly atmosphere. Serving lunch and dinner,
with breakfast on the weekends, Los Agaves fea-
tures traditional dishes from central and south-
ern Mexico such as shrimp & fsh enchiladas,
shrimp chile rellenos, and famous homemade
mole poblano. Open Monday- Friday 11 am to
9 pm, Saturday & Sunday 9 am to 9 pm.
Miró $$$$
8301 Hollister Avenue at Bacara Resort & Spa
(968-0100)
Miró is a refned refuge with stunning views,
featuring two genuine Miro sculptures, a
top-rated chef ofering a sophisticated menu
that accents fresh, organic, and native-grown
ingredients, and a world-class wine cellar. Open
Tuesday through Saturday from 6 pm to 10 pm.
Olio e Limone Ristorante $$$
Olio Pizzeria $
17 West Victoria Street (899-2699)
Elaine and Alberto Morello oversee this
friendly, casually elegant, linen-tabletop eatery
featuring Italian food of the highest order. Of-
ferings include eggplant soufé, pappardelle
with quail, sausage and mushroom ragù, and
fresh-imported Dover sole. Wine Spectator
Award of Excellence-winning wine list. Private
dining (up to 40 guests) and catering are also
available. It is open for lunch Monday thru
Saturday (11:30 am to 2 pm) and dinner seven
nights a week (from 5 pm).
Next door at Olio Pizzeria, the Morellos
have added a simple pizza-salumi-wine-bar
inspired by neighborhood “pizzerie” and
“enoteche” in Italy. Private dining for up to
32 guests. The Pizzeria is open daily from
11:30 am to close.
Pierre Lafond Wine Bistro $
516 State Street (962-1455)
The Wine Bistro menu is seasonal California
cuisine specializing in local products. Pair your
meal with wine from the Santa Barbara Winery,
Lafond Winery or one from the list of wines
from around the world. Happy Hour Monday
- Friday 4:30 to 6:30 pm. The 1st Wednesday of
each month is Passport to the World of Wine.
Grilled cheese night every Thursday. Open for
breakfast, lunch and dinner; catering available.
www.pierrelafond.com
Rodney’s Steakhouse $$$
633 East Cabrillo Boulevard (884-8554)
Deep in the heart of well, deep in the heart of
Fess Parker’s Doubletree Inn on East Beach in
Santa Barbara. This handsome eatery sells and
serves only Prime Grade beef, lamb, veal, hali-
but, salmon, lobster and other high-end victuals.
Full bar, plenty of California wines, elegant
surroundings, across from the ocean. Open for
dinner Tuesday through Saturday at 5:30 pm.
Reservations suggested on weekends. •MJ
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 45 You could afford your house without the government if it weren’t for the government – Rush Limbaugh
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ENTERTAINMENT Page 514
ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from page 34)
it would no longer exist. If you know
what’s wrong you can fix it. But I
don’t know. So I don’t have an answer.
Can’t you just talk into a tape recorder
and transcribe it?
It wouldn’t work. Talking and writ-
ing aren’t the same. I wish they were.
But they are not. I know this because
I’ve tried to do these pieces on a single
subject for Vanity Fair. Someone inter-
views me, and back come one hun-
dred pages that I have to take down
to ten. Here’s what you discover: no
human being speaks in sentences that
go into paragraphs that you would
want to read. There are certain people
who think they are the same thing,
and that’s why so much of what we
read nowadays seems like what you
would overhear in a bar. That isn’t
writing in my estimation.
How was the experience of making the
documentary with Martin Scorsese?
(Pauses) I can truthfully tell you
that we’re still friends. All the Marty
aspects of it were incredibly enjoy-
able, because I really had a good time
talking to him. All the movie aspects,
by which I mean – well, here’s what
I know about Marty: if they had not
taken Taxi Driver away from him, he’d
still be editing it. I saw the movie that
Marty made about me seven times; I
saw seven completely different mov-
ies. He’s such a perfectionist, which
makes him a great artist. But after
the sixth time, I told him, “Marty, it’s
perfect,” because I realized neither
one of us might live long enough for
him to finish it. And he goes, “Really?
Didn’t you think the music during the
National Book Awards made it differ-
ent to hear what you were saying?”
And I said, “Marty, you put the music
on there. If you think it’s too loud,
take it off!”

More recently you recorded the audio
version of the “Fran Lebowitz Reader,”
compiled from your two early books. How
was it to revisit the time when you wrote
those essays? Do you still feel the same
way?
Some of those were written in 1971
when I was twenty-one. It’s a com-
pletely different world, as different as
if I’d move to Pluto. But from a writ-
ing point of view, I thought “That’s not
bad for twenty-one!”… I am cursed
with an excellent memory, so I did
remember many things even about
my life from that time as I was writ-
ing them. So it was a highly unusual
experience. I’ll say that at least.
But how have you changed over the
years? Have you mellowed?
No, I’m more radical, which is a
shocking thing, and not a natural one.
Because it has nothing to do with me,
and everything to do with the era. I’ve
always been just a pretty standard
liberal Democrat. I still am. When I
was young, most of my friends were
more radical than I was. As we got
older they became more conservative.
The whole country did. So now I seem
to be some sort of wild-eyed radical!
I don’t think I’ve ever changed my
mind about politics, but the world has
moved very much to the right.
You’ve always been a sharp-tongued
observer of modern manners. I’m thinking
the mobile phone and iPad must be the
bane of your existence.
I don’t have any of these things.
But it’s not deliberate. It’s because
they’re machines. I don’t even have a
typewriter. When they first invented
the computer, it was called a word
processor. I went to look at it and
thought it’s just a very fast typewriter.
I don’t need this. Now, it’s too late for
me to get these things. But with the
iPad, I notice these machines seem
to be getting closer to the old yellow
legal pad. So at some point, I think it
will be close enough to an actual pad
that it will be easier to use and I’ll get
one then.
You’re coming to speak in Santa Barbara
for the first time. I think a place this laid
back and slow and where we’re into hiking
and biking and surfing, where everyone
thinks they’re a writer and nobody reads
would be the opposite of paradise for you.
I’ve been there before; I just didn’t
call you. But this is my first time
speaking… And yes, those are not
things I ever do. I do have to agree
that Santa Barbara is exceptionally
beautiful. But what other people think
of as nature and a wonderful place for
outdoor sports, I think of as a great
view.
Have you ever found yourself not hav-
ing an opinion about something?
(Pauses) Not really. Like most of my
fellow Americans, I do not have to
have knowledge to have an opinion.
Everyone’s entitled to an opinion. Not
everyone is worth listening to. In fact,
no one is worth listening to.
I think you just explained how
Americans vote.
And pretty much everything else.
Whose Live Anyway?
Ryan Stiles loves to drive. Well, it’s
not so much that he likes driving as
that he hates flying. Which is partly
why the former star of the popular
ABC-TV improv comedy series Whose
Line Is It Anyway? refused advances
to join any of producer-creator Dan
Patterson’s new shows in Britain after
the series ended. Also why, most of
the time, the “Whose Line” alumni,
who tour as “Whose Live Anyway?”
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 46 • The Voice of the Village •


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5195

DUE DATE & TIME: OCTOBER 25, 2012 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

Cabrillo Ball Field Drainage Maintenance Project

A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on October
17, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., at the Cabrillo Ball Field, located at
800 E. Cabrillo Blvd, Santa Barbara, CA, to discuss the
specifications and field conditions. Bid Documents are
available at the Purchasing Office and at the pre-bid
meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The project is funded through a Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG). This is a federally-assisted project and Davis-
Bacon (DBRA) requirements will be strictly enforced. In the
event of a conflict between Federal Prevailing Wage
(Davis/Bacon Act) and Prevailing Wage,
Contractor/Subcontractor shall pay the higher of the two rates.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California A Contractors License. The
company bidding on this must possess one of the above
mentioned licenses and be otherwise deemed qualified to
perform the work specified herein. Bids submitted using the
license name and number of a subcontractor or other person
who is not a principle partner or owner of the company making
this bid, will be rejected as being non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.

____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: Oct. 10, 2012
General Services Manager Montecito Journal


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5190

DUE DATE & TIME: OCTOBER 30, 2012 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

Santa Barbara Airport Baggage Handling System
Maintenance and Repair

A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on October
17, 2012 at 9:00 a.m., at the Airport Maintenance
Conference Room, located at 1699 Firestone Road, Santa
Barbara, CA, to discuss the specifications and field
conditions. Bid Documents are available at the Purchasing
Office and at the pre-bid meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California D-21 Contractorʼs License.
The company bidding on this must possess one of the above
mentioned licenses and be otherwise deemed qualified to
perform the work specified herein. Bids submitted using the
license name and number of a subcontractor or other person
who is not a principle partner or owner of the company making
this bid, will be rejected as being non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Performance Bond in the
amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the
successful bidder for bids. The bond must be provided with ten
(10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to the
performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Bid Guaranty Bond in the
form of a money order or a cashierʼs certified check, payable to
the order of the City, amounting to ten percent (10%) of the bid,
or by a bond in said amount and payable to said City, signed by
the bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue
bonds in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.


____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: Oct. 10, 2012
General Services Manager Montecito Journal


ORDINANCE NO. 5599

AN ORDINANCE OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
SANTA BARBARA APPROVING A SEVEN-YEAR LEASE
AGREEMENT WITH ACCURATE AVIATION GROUP, INC.,
AT A MONTHLY RENTAL OF $6,066 FOR TWO
MAINTENANCE HANGARS OF 3,000 AND 3,522 SQUARE
FEET, RESPECTIVELY, 51,548 SQUARE FEET OF RAMP
SPACE, AND ASSOCIATED PARKING AT 101 CYRIL
HARTLEY PLACE, AT THE SANTA BARBARA AIRPORT,
FOR OPERATION OF A GENERAL AVIATION
MAINTENANCE SHOP

The above captioned ordinance was adopted at a regular

meeting of the Santa Barbara City Council held on

October 2, 2012.

The publication of this ordinance is made pursuant to the

provisions of Section 512 of the Santa Barbara City Charter as

amended, and the original ordinance in its entirety may be

obtained at the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, Santa Barbara,

California.


/s/
Gwen Peirce, CMC
City Clerk Services Manager


ORDINANCE NO. 5599


STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
)
COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ) ss.
)
CITY OF SANTA BARBARA )


I HEREBY CERTIFY that the foregoing ordinance

was introduced on September 25, 2012, and was adopted by

the Council of the City of Santa Barbara at a meeting held on

October 2, 2012, by the following roll call vote:

AYES: Councilmembers Dale Francisco, Frank
Hotchkiss, Grant House, Cathy Murillo,
Randy Rowse, Bendy White; Mayor
Helene Schneider

NOES: None

ABSENT: None

ABSTENTIONS: None


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto set my

hand and affixed the official seal of the City of Santa Barbara on

October 3, 2012.


/s/
Gwen Peirce, CMC
City Clerk Services Manager

I HEREBY APPROVE the foregoing ordinance on

October 3, 2012.


/s/
Helene Schneider
Mayor


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Dairyman’s Daughter, 2811 Lewis
Drive, Lompoc, CA 93436. Mary Anne
Janecek, 2811 Lewis Drive, Lompoc, CA
93436. This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara County
on September 20, 2012. This statement
expires fve years from the date it was fled
in the Offce of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on fle in my offce. Joseph
E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Carol
Kraus. Original FBN No. 2012-0002838.
Published October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Bookkeeping Experts, 215 W. Figueroa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Blueisle
Bookkeeping, Inc., 215 W. Figueroa Street,
Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This statement
was fled with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on October 1, 2012. This
statement expires fve years from the date it
was fled in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on fle in my offce. Joseph
E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa
Mercer. Original FBN No. 2012-0002847.
Published October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as: Roston
& Rogers, 215 W. Figueroa Street,
Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Blueisle
Bookkeeping, Inc., 215 W. Figueroa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This
statement was fled with the County Clerk
of Santa Barbara County on October 1,
2012. This statement expires fve years
from the date it was fled in the Offce of
the County Clerk. I hereby certify that this
is a correct copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer.
Original FBN No. 2012-0002846.
Published October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as: Metro
Marketing, 1086 Garcia Road, Santa
Barbara, CA 93103. Christopher Zerbe,
1086 Garcia Road, Santa Barbara, CA
93103. This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on
September 28, 2012. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was fled in the
Offce of the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Catherine
Daly. Original FBN No. 2012-0002831.
Published October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
STYLEPUKU, 814 E. Pedregosa Street,
Santa Barbara, CA 93103. Sugna
Ventures, LLC, 814 E. Pedregosa Street,
Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This statement
was fled with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on October 2, 2012. This
statement expires fve years from the date it
was fled in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on fle in my offce. Joseph
E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Miriam
Leon. Original FBN No. 2012-0002865.
Published October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as: S.B.S.
Creations, 102 W. Constance, Apt
#10, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Sarah
Strassburg, 102 W. Constance, Apt
#10, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This
statement was fled with the County Clerk
of Santa Barbara County on September
25, 2012. This statement expires fve
years from the date it was fled in the
Offce of the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel
Cabello. Original FBN No. 2012-0002764.
Published October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Clay Education, 5480 Hales Lane,
Carpinteria, CA 93013. Georgia Owen
Clay, 5480 Hales Lane, Carpinteria,
CA 93013. Nathan Aaron Clay, 5480
Hales Lane, Carpinteria, CA 93013. This
statement was fled with the County Clerk
of Santa Barbara County on September
19, 2012. This statement expires fve
years from the date it was fled in the
Offce of the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy
Miller. Original FBN No. 2012-0002707.
Published October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as: The
Hair Lounge of Montecito, 1807-A
E. Cabrillo, Santa Barbara, CA 93108.
Pamela Renee, LLC, 1807-A E. Cabrillo,
Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This statement
was fled with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on September 26, 2012.
This statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce of the
County Clerk. I hereby certify that this is
a correct copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong.
Original FBN No. 2012-0002794.
Published October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Cornerstone Data Group, 5308
Berkeley Road, Santa Barbara, CA
93111. Andrew Manalis, 5308 Berkeley
Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This
statement was fled with the County Clerk
of Santa Barbara County on September
27, 2012. This statement expires fve
years from the date it was fled in the
Offce of the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy
Miller. Original FBN No. 2012-0002813.
Published October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as: Mesa
Salsa Company, 848 Calle Cortita, Santa
Barbara, CA 93109. Anne Altamirano,
848 Calle Cortita, Santa Barbara, CA
93109. This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara County
on September 17, 2012. This statement
expires fve years from the date it was
fled in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
PUBLIC NOTICE
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 47 In writing and politicking, it’s best not to think about it; just do it – Gore Vidal


MONTECITO PLANNING COMMISSION
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING*

DATE OF HEARING: OCTOBER 24, 2012

PLACE: SANTA BARBARA COUNTY ENGINEERING BUILDING
123 EAST ANAPAMU STREET
SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101

The Montecito Planning Commission hearing begins at 9:00 a.m. The order of items listed on the agenda is subject to change by the
Montecito Planning Commission. Anyone interested in this matter is invited to appear and speak in support or in opposition to the projects.
Written comments are also welcome. All letters should be addressed to the Montecito Planning Commission, 123 East Anapamu Street,
Santa Barbara, California, 93101. Letters, with nine copies, and computer materials, e.g. PowerPoint presentations, should be filed with the
secretary of the Planning Commission no later than 12:00 P.M. on the Friday before the Montecito Planning Commission hearing. The
decision to accept late materials will be at the discretion of the Montecito Planning Commission.

Maps and/or staff analysis of the proposals may be reviewed at Planning and Development, 123 East Anapamu Street, Santa Barbara,
California, 93101 a week prior to the public hearing.

If you challenge the projects (12LLA-00000-00002, 12CDH-00000-00018, 12CDH-00000-00028, 12CUP-00000-00015, 12GOV-00000-
00019, 12GOV-00000-00000-00020, 12ORD-00000-00003, or 12ORD-00000-00004) in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues
you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence to the Montecito Planning Commission
prior to the public hearing.

* This is a partial listing of the items to be heard at the Montecito Planning Commission Hearing of October 24, 2012. Previously noticed
Case Nos. 12ORD-00000-00003 and 12ORD-00000-00004 (Temporary Use/Special Events Ordinance Amendments) were continued to this
hearing from the hearing of July 25, 2012 and September 26, 2012. See previous notice for full descriptions of these items. If you have any
questions, call Planning and Development at (805) 568-2000.

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the Hearing
Support Staff (805) 568-2000. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable the Hearing Support Staff to make reasonable
arrangements.

12CUP-00000-00015
12GOV-00000-00019 Montecito Fire Protection
12GOV-00000-00020 District New Fire Station #3 2500 E. Valley Road
EIR SCH #2011031094 Anne Almy, Supervising Planner (805) 568-2053
Julie Harris, Planner (805) 568-3518
Hearing on the request of Rita Bright, AMEC, agent for the Montecito Fire Protection District, to consider the following:

a) 12CUP-00000-00015 [application filed on May 14, 2012] for a Conditional Use Permit to allow development of a new fire station in
compliance with Section 35.472.060 of the Montecito Land Use and Development Code, on property zoned Residential 2-E-1;

b) 12GOV-00000-00019 [application filed on October 4, 2012] to determine that the acquisition of a 2.56-acre parcel of land zoned
Residential 2-E-1 to the Montecito Fire Protection District and construction of a new fire station is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan,
including the Montecito Community Plan, in compliance with Government Code Section 65402(c); and

c) 12GOV-00000-00020 [application filed on October 4, 2012] to determine that the offer to dedicate a 10-feet wide riding and hiking trail
easement from the Montecito Fire Protection District to the County of Santa Barbara is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan, including the
Montecito Community Plan, in compliance with Government Code Section 65402(a);

and to accept the Final Environmental Impact Report (SCH # 2011031094) prepared by the Montecito Fire Protection District pursuant to the
State Guidelines for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act. As a result of this project, significant but mitigable effects on
the environment are anticipated in the following categories: Biological Resources; Geologic Processes; and Water Resources, Supply and
Service. The EIR and all documents referenced therein may be reviewed at the Planning and Development Department, 123 East Anapamu
Street, Santa Barbara. The EIR is also available for review at the Central Branch of the City of Santa Barbara Library, 40 East Anapamu
Street, Santa Barbara; the Montecito Public Library, 1469 East Valley Road, Montecito; and the Montecito Fire Protection District
Headquarters, 595 San Ysidro Road, Montecito. The application involves a 2.56-acre portion of AP No. 155-070-008, located at 2500 East
Valley Road, in the Montecito area, First Supervisorial District.

12LLA-00000-00002 880 Picacho Lane Trust Lot Line Adjustment 880 Picacho Lane
Exempt, CEQA Guidelines Sections 15305(a) Anne Almy, Supervising Planner (805) 568-2053
Nicole Lieu, Planner (805) 884-8068

Hearing on the request of Steve Fort, agent for the owner, 880 Picacho Lane Trust, to consider Case No. 12LLA-00000-00002, [application
filed on March 13, 2012] for approval of a Lot Line Adjustment in compliance with Section 21-90 of County Code Chapter 21 and Section
35.430.110 of the Montecito Land Use and Development Code to adjust the line between two lots of 2.84 acres (existing Lot A) and 1.01
acres (existing Lot B) to reconfigure into two lots of the same size but a different configuration (2.84 acres proposed Parcel 1 and 1.01 acre
proposed Parcel 2), on property located in the 2-E-1 Zone; and to determine that the project is exempt pursuant to Section 15305(a) of the
State Guidelines for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act. The application involves AP Nos. 011-100-034 and 011-100-
035, located at 880 Picacho Lane, in the Montecito area, First Supervisorial District.

Sheldon Single Family Dwelling
12CDH-00000-00028 Demo/Rebuild & Garage Alteration 1530 Miramar Beach Drive
Exempt, CEQA Guidelines Sections 15301, 15303 Anne Almy, Supervising Planner (805) 568-2053
& 15304 J. Ritterbeck, Planner (805) 568-3509

Hearing on the request of Clay Aurell, agent for Michael Sheldon, owner, to consider Case No. 12CDH-00000-00028 [application filed on
September 24, 2012] for a Coastal Development Permit in compliance with Section 35-169 of Article II, the Coastal Zoning Ordinance, on
property zoned 7-R-1 to allow the demolition of an existing 1,178 square foot one-story single family dwelling and construction of a new 3,226
square foot two-story dwelling, and to structurally alter the roof pitch on an existing garage, remove one hazardous pine tree from the hillside,
and grade approximately 250 cubic yards; and to determine the project is exempt from CEQA pursuant to Sections 15301(l)(1), 15303(a&e)
and 15304(b) of the State Guidelines for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act. The application involves AP Nos. 009-
345-018 and 009-345-020, located at 1530 Miramar Beach Drive, in the Montecito Community Plan area, First Supervisorial District.

Van Wolfswinkel Demo/New
12CDH-00000-00018 Dwelling and Accessory Structure 1210 Channel Drive
Exempt, CEQA Guidelines Sections 15301 & 15303 Anne Almy, Supervising Planner (805) 568-2053
Brian Banks, Planner, (805) 568-3559

Hearing on the request of Raymond Appleton, agent for Randall Van Wolfswinkel, to consider Case No. 12CDH-00000-00018, [application
filed on June 22, 2012] for a Coastal Development Permit in compliance with Section 35-169 of the Article II Coastal Zoning Ordinance, on
property zoned 1-E-1 to allow for demolition of the existing 1,114 square foot one-story single family dwelling and construction of a new two-
story single family dwelling 2,554 net square feet in size with a basement 1,639 net square feet in size, a detached garage 479 net square
feet in size, a cabana 800 net square feet in size, a swimming pool and spa, rainwater cisterns, and grading of 800 cubic yards of cut, 150
cubic yards of fill, with 650 cubic yards of export; and to determine the project is exempt from the provisions of CEQA pursuant to State
CEQA Guidelines Sections 15301 and 15303. The application involves AP No. 009-352-010, located at 1210 Channel Drive, in the Montecito
area, First Supervisorial District.

MONTECITO COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION
RECORDING SECRETARY (568-2000)


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5196

DUE DATE & TIME: OCTOBER 25, 2012 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

SOIL EXCAVATION AT 101 STATE STREET

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California A Contractors License. The
company bidding on this must possess one of the above
mentioned licenses and be otherwise deemed qualified to
perform the work specified herein. Bids submitted using the
license name and number of a subcontractor or other person
who is not a principle partner or owner of the company making
this bid, will be rejected as being non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.

____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: Oct. 10, 2012
General Services Manager Montecito Journal


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5187

DUE DATE & TIME: October 24, 2012 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

Yearly Preventative Maintenance for Dresser Roots Blower


Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.



____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: October 10, 2012
General Services Manager Montecito Journal

PUBLIC NOTICE
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 48 • The Voice of the Village •


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
BID NO: 3652


Sealed proposals for Bid No. 3652 for the FY 2012-13 ACCESS RAMP PROJECT will be received in the Purchasing Office, 310 E. Ortega
Street, Santa Barbara, California 93101, until 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, October 24, 2012, to be publicly opened and read at that time. Any
bidder who wishes its bid proposal to be considered is responsible for making certain that its bid proposal is actually delivered to said
Purchasing Office. Bids shall be addressed to the General Services Manager, Purchasing Office, 310 E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara,
California, and shall be labeled, “FY 2012-13 ACCESS RAMP PROJECT, Bid No. 3652".

The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plant and equipment necessary to construct and deliver a finished sidewalk access ramp
project, including curbs, gutters, sidewalks, access ramps, existing access ramp retrofitting, cross gutters, spandrels, driveways, curb drains,
drop inlets, root pruning, root barrier installation, landscape improvements, conforms, pavement delineation, and sign relocation. This work
includes but is not limited to mobilization, bonds, insurance, traffic control, traffic striping, clearing and grubbing, surveying, shrub trimming,
concrete saw cutting, removal of hardscape, placing of asphalt concrete, clean up, public notices, and incidentals per the project plans and
specifications. The Engineerʼs estimate is $270,000. Each bidder must have a Class A license to complete this work in accordance with the
California Business and Professions Code.

Contaminated soils may be encountered at the intersection of Carrillo and Chapala Streets. Per OSHA regulations (Federal Standards – 29
CFR, Part 1926 and CCR Title 8 Section 5192), if the soil is classified as a hazardous waste then the Contractorʼs employees working on the
site are required to be 40-hour trained in Hazardous Materials and Waste Operations (HAZWOPER) prior to conducting excavation activities
at the site. Proof of the required training for each of the onsite excavation contractorʼs employees will be maintained at the site. The
Contractor must submit verification that they have employees with HAZWOPER training as part of their bid.

The plans and specifications for this Project may be viewed online at CyberCopyʼs Website (www.cybercopyusa.com) under the City Of
Santa Barbara Plan Room. To obtain a copy of the plans and specifications for this Project and become a registered plan holder, download a
Bid Package Request Form from the City Of Santa Barbara Plan Room site above by clicking on the Project or by calling Alex Gaytan,
CyberCopy Shop Manager, at (805) 884-6155. The Cityʼs contact for this project is Malinda Reese, Project Engineer, 805-897-1918.

Project Addendum notifications will be issued through Ebidboard.com. Although Ebidboard will fax and/or email all notifications once they are
provided contact information, bidders are still responsible for obtaining all addenda from the Ebidboard website or the Cityʼs website at:
http://www.santabarbaraca.gov/Business/Purchasing/Projects/.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of California, the Contractor
shall pay its employees the general prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations. In
addition, the Contractor shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

Per California Civil Code Section 3247, a payment bond in the amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful bidder for
bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided within 10 calendar days from notice of award and prior to the performance of any work.

The proposal shall be accompanied by a proposal guaranty bond in the sum of at least 10% of the total amount of the proposal, or
alternatively by a certified or cashierʼs check payable to the Owner in the sum of at least 10% of the total amount of the proposal.

A separate performance bond in the amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful bidder. The bond must be provided
within 10 calendar days from the notice to award and prior to the performance of any work.

The City of Santa Barbara hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this
advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be
discriminated against on the grounds of race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, political affiliations or beliefs, sex, age,
physical disability, medical condition, marital status or pregnancy as set forth hereunder.

GENERAL SERVICES MANAGER
CITY OF SANTA BARBARA


William Hornung, C.P.M.
PUBLISHED October 3 & 10, 2012
Montecito Journal





CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5188

DUE DATE & TIME: October 29, 2012 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

Cabrillo Ball Field Lighting Project

A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on Thursday,
October 18, 2012 at 9:00 a.m., at the Building Maintenance
Conference Room located at 616 Laguna Street, Santa
Barbara. The conference will progress to the Cabrillo Ball Field,
located at 800 Calle Puerto Vallarta, Santa Barbara, to discuss
the specifications and field conditions. Plans and specifications
are available at the Purchasing Office and at the pre-bid
meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California C-10 Electrical, and a General
A or General B Contractors License. The company bidding
on this must possess one of the above mentioned licenses and
be otherwise deemed qualified to perform the work specified
herein. Bids submitted using the license name and number of a
subcontractor or other person who is not a principle partner or
owner of the company making this bid, will be rejected as being
non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Performance Bond in the
amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the
successful bidder for bids. The bond must be provided with ten
(10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to the
performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.


____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: October 10, 2012
General Services Manager Montecito Journal


PUBLIC NOTICE
City of Santa Barbara

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of
Santa Barbara will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday,
October 23, 2012, during the afternoon session of the meeting
which begins at 2:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber, City Hall,
735 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara. The hearing is to consider
the recommendation from the Historic Landmarks Commission
that the Central Library, the Faulkner Gallery, and the 13
Corymbia (Eucalyptus) Citriodora trees located at 40 East
Anapamu Street be designated as City landmarks.

You are invited to attend this hearing and address your verbal
comments to the City Council. Written comments are also
welcome up to the time of the hearing, and should be
addressed to the City Council via the City Clerkʼs Office, P.O.
Box 1990, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-1990.

On Thursday, October 18, 2012, an Agenda with all items to be
heard on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, will be available at 735
Anacapa Street and at the Central Library. Agendas and Staff
Reports are also accessible online at www.santabarbaraca.gov;
under Quick Links, click on Current Council Agenda & Packet.
Regular meetings of the Council are broadcast live and
rebroadcast on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. and
on Saturday at 9:00 a.m. on City TV Channel 18. These
meetings can also be viewed over the Internet at
www.santabarbaraca.gov: Click on the Government tab, click
City Council Meeting Videos (under Quick Links), and then click
on the Video link for the meeting date.

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you
need special assistance to gain access to, comment at, or
participate in this meeting, please contact the City
Administrator's Office at 564-5305 or inquire at the City Clerk's
Office on the day of the meeting. If possible, notification at
least 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make
reasonable arrangements in most cases.



/s/
Gwen Peirce, CMC
City Clerk Services Manager


hereby certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle in my
offce. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Joshua Madison. Original
FBN No. 2012-0002679. Published
September 26, October 3, 10, 17, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as: Nick
Gosnell Tree Service, 228 W. Victoria
Street, Apt. 7, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Nicholas Alexander Gosnell, 228 W.
Victoria Street, Apt. 7, Santa Barbara,
CA 93101. This statement was fled
with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on September 19, 2012. This
statement expires fve years from the date
it was fled in the Offce of the County
Clerk. I hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement on fle in
my offce. Joseph E. Holland, County
Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy Miller. Original
FBN No. 2012-0002714. Published
September 26, October 3, 10, 17, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Forever Beautiful Spa; Santa Barbara
Eyelash Extensions, 6 Harbor Way,
Santa Barbara, CA 93109. Stephanie
Gombrelli, 6 Harbor Way, Santa Barbara,
CA 93109. This statement was fled with
the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County
on September 14, 2012. This statement
expires fve years from the date it was
fled in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle in my
offce. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Joshua Madison. Original
FBN No. 2012-0002669. Published
September 19, 26, October 3, 10, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Sturgeon Enterprises; Sturgeon Real
Estate Investments; Sturgeon Rentals,
1207 Diana Lane, Santa Barbara, CA
93103. Judy E. Sturgeon, 1207 Diana
Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This
statement was fled with the County Clerk
of Santa Barbara County on September
17, 2012. This statement expires fve years
from the date it was fled in the Offce of the
County Clerk. I hereby certify that this is a
correct copy of the original statement on
fle in my offce. Joseph E. Holland, County
Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy Miller. Original
FBN No. 2012-0002672. Published
September 19, 26, October 3, 10, 2012.
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME: CASE No.
1413367. To all interested parties:
Petitioner Basilisa Figueroa fled a
petition with Superior Court of California,
County of Santa Barbara, for a decree
changing name of child from Gissel
Figueroa to Gissel Figueroa Estrada.
The Court orders that all persons interested
in this matter appear before this court
at the hearing indicated below to show
cause, if any, why the petition for change
of name should not be granted. Any person
objecting to the name changes described
about must fle a written objection that
included the reasons for the objection at
least two court days before the matter is
scheduled to be heard and must appear
at the hearing to show cause why the
petition should not be granted. If no written
objection is timely fled, the court may
grant the petition without a hearing. Filed
September 14, 2012 by Terry Chavez,
Deputy Clerk. Hearing date: November 29,
2012 at 9:30 am in Dept. 6, 1100 Anacapa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Published 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME: CASE No.
1403387. To all interested parties:
Petitioner Lisa Bluma Dana fled a
petition with Superior Court of California,
County of Santa Barbara, for a decree
changing name to Lisa Bluma Love. The
Court orders that all persons interested
in this matter appear before this court
at the hearing indicated below to show
cause, if any, why the petition for change
of name should not be granted. Any person
objecting to the name changes described
about must fle a written objection that
included the reasons for the objection at
least two court days before the matter is
scheduled to be heard and must appear
at the hearing to show cause why the
petition should not be granted. If no
written objection is timely fled, the court
may grant the petition without a hearing.
Filed September 7, 2012 by Terry Chavez,
Deputy Clerk. Hearing date: October
25, 2012 at 9:30 am in Dept. 6, 1100
Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA
93101. Published 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME: CASE No.
1413222. To all interested parties:
Petitioner Velia Razo fled a petition with
Superior Court of California, County of
Santa Barbara, for a decree changing name
of child from Evan Nathaniel Ochoa-
Razo to Evan Nathaniel Razo. The
Court orders that all persons interested in
this matter appear before this court at the
hearing indicated below to show cause, if
any, why the petition for change of name
should not be granted. Any person objecting
to the name changes described about must
fle a written objection that included the
reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to be
heard and must appear at the hearing to
show cause why the petition should not
be granted. If no written objection is timely
fled, the court may grant the petition without
a hearing. Filed September 10, 2012 by
Terry Chavez, Deputy Clerk. Hearing date:
November 15, 2012 at 9:30 am in Dept. 6,
1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA
93101. Published 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME: CASE No.
1403426. To all interested parties:
Petitioner Mary Jane Kandler fled a
petition with Superior Court of California,
County of Santa Barbara, for a decree
changing name to Jane Watkins Kandler.
The Court orders that all persons interested
in this matter appear before this court at the
hearing indicated below to show cause, if
any, why the petition for change of name
should not be granted. Any person objecting
to the name changes described about must
fle a written objection that included the
reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to be
heard and must appear at the hearing to
show cause why the petition should not
be granted. If no written objection is timely
fled, the court may grant the petition without
a hearing. Filed September 7, 2012 by
Narzralli Baksh, Deputy Clerk. Hearing date:
October 25, 2012 at 9:30 am in Dept. 6,
1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA
93101. Published 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10
PUBLIC NOTICE
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 49 Whoever has provoked men to rage against him has always gained a party in his favor too – Friedrich Nietzsche
Gloria Kaye, Ph.D.
314 East Carrillo Street, Suite 10
Santa Barbara, California 93101
805-701-0363
www.drgloriakaye.com
drgloriakaye@aol.com
Dear Dr. Kaye,
Thanks so much for taking away my aches and
pains.  Because of my arthritis some body part was
always in pain.
I was on a camping trip and because of my
Parkinson Disease I tripped and fell on my right
side injuring my face hand and shoulder.  After
a couple of treatments I fully recovered. One of
the most notable events occurred when I had a
herniated disc and couldn’t walk.  After a shot
of cortisone I didn’t have pain but I couldn’t lift
my toes to walk properly.  When my neurologist
examined me he was delighted that my recovery
was so dramatic and quick,
Tank you for taking your time and listening to what
I have to say.  You genuinely enjoy helping people.
– Dorothy Littlejohn
ENTERTAINMENT Page 514
ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from page 45)
perform on tours of the West Coast,
easy driving distance from Stiles’
home in Washington State.
When it comes to actually perform-
ing with the gang on stage, however,
Stiles definitely loves to be the man
in charge.
“You need someone to drive the
scene,” Stiles explained over the
telephone last week in advance of
the UCSB A&L show that will bring
“Whose Line” veterans Stiles, Greg
Proops, Chip Esten and Jeff Davis
to the Granada Theatre on Tuesday,
October 16. “Colin [Mockery, his
longtime improv partner] and the oth-
ers can be great at coming in and
doing jokes, but if it gets on the wrong
track, I can bring it back to where it
should be. I’ve always been good at
finding humor in realism, and I like
to do it. I get to set who and where
we are.”
As executive producer of “Whose
Live,” Stiles also gets to set which
games the troupe will play at each
tour stop. Which is why you won’t see
“Hoedown” too often, despite the fact
that it was one of the most popular
segments on the TV show.
“That was one of the ones I got sick
of because they didn’t allow you to do
a scene,” he explained. “The stage [on
TV] was only ten feet wide, so we had
to do things like Prop, World’s Worst
and Hoedown, because we didn’t
have room to do big scenes. They
were really just jokes. The things with
a story were the funnier ones for me.”
This despite the fact that he always
went last on Hoedown and thus had
lots of time to come up with a stanza
that both fit and rhymed. “People
think it was easy but unfortunately
everything I would think of some-
body else would do. By the time it got
to me, everything easy was used up.
So I’d just throw away the first thing
that came to mind and find something
else.”
It’s not that Stiles has anything
against music. In fact, Greatest Hits,
in which Stiles plays an infomercial
host hawking a made-up CD package
while Esten and Davis compose and
perform invented songs on the spot
(accompanied by longtime pianist
Bob Derkach), is one of his favorite
moments in the show.
“Those segments were only forty-
five seconds on TV,” he said. “Now
they can take their time. And we can
go as long as we like without having
to stop the action for commercials. I’m
always amazed at what they come up
with.”
Also among his favorites: Sentences
(in which the cast reads random lines
contributed by the audience, inserted
willy-nilly into the scene) and Freeze
Tag, where cast members sub out for
each other having to assume the same
physical position and the person they
replace while totally altering the sub-
ject of the scene.
“Those are all long form, which give
us plenty of time to get into it and
actually act a bit,” Stiles said.
The secret to success is remembering
the two rules of improv: Listen and
always add information, never negate.
“You can’t go out with something in
mind of what you’re going to do. You
can’t look for a scene, you have to add
info and see where it goes. If you say
‘I really love those shoes,’ I can’t just
The cast of
“Whose Live
Anyway”: Chip
Esten, Jeff Davis,
Greg Proops, and
Ryan Stiles
Ryan Stiles and
Greg Proops will
perform with
“Whose Live
Anyway?” at
the Granada on
Tuesday, October
16
ARLINGTON
1317 State Street - 963-4408
Courtyard Bar Open
Fri & Sat - 4:30 - 8:30
PASEO NUEVO
8 W. De La Guerra Pl. - S.B.
RIVIERA
2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.
PLAZA DE ORO
371 Hi t chcock Way - S. B.
 Denotes ‘SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT’ Restrictions
877-789-MOVIE www.metrotheatres.com
Information Listed for Friday thru Thursday - October 12 - 18
FIESTA 5
Features Stadium Seating
916 Stat e St reet - S. B.
CAMINO REAL
Features Stadium Seating
CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE
Hollister & Storke - GOLETA
METRO 4
Features Stadium Seating
618 Stat e St reet - S. B.
FAIRVIEW
Features Stadium Seating
225 N. Fai rvi ew - Gol eta
 ATLAS SHRUGGED:
PART I I (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:30 4:15 7:00 9:45
Mon-Thu - 2:00 5:00 7:40
 SINISTER (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:45 4:30 7:20 9:55
Mon-Thu - 2:10 5:20 8:00
 TAKEN 2 (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 2:20 4:45 7:10 9:35
Mon-Thu - 2:20 4:45 7:10
LOOPER (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:15 4:00 6:45 9:25
Mon-Thu - 2:30 5:10 7:50
Starts Thursday, October 18
 PARANORMAL
ACTIVITY 4 (R)
Thu 10/18 - 9:00 pm
Kevin James (PG)
 HERE COMES THE BOOM
Fri & Mon-Thu- 2:25 5:10 7:45
Sat/Sun- 12:00 2:25 5:10 7:45
FRANKENWEENIE (PG)
Daily - 7:20
Sat/Sun -
12:20 2:35 4:50
Fri & Mon-Thu - 2:35 4:50
PITCH PERFECT (PG-13)
Sat/Sun- 12:10 2:45 5:20 8:00
Fri & Mon-Thu- 2:45 5:20 8:00
SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN
Fri - 7:30 (PG-13)
Sat/Sun - 1:00 3:10 5:20 7:30
Mon-Thu - 7:15
JUST 45 MINUTES
FROM BROADWAY (R)
Fri - 7:45
Sat/Sun - 1:15 4:30 7:45
Mon-Thu - 7:00
 TAKEN 2 (PG-13)
Fri-Tue & Thu -
1:15 3:30 5:45 8:15
Wed - 1:15 3:30
Saturday, Oct. 13 - 9:55 am
MET OPERA - LIVE IN HD
 Donizetti’s
L’ELISIR D’AMORE
Wednesday, October 17
 LED ZEPPELIN:
CELEBRATION IN HD
5:30 & 8:00
Kevin James (PG)
 HERE COMES THE BOOM
Fri-Sun - 1:20 4:10 6:45 9:20
Mon-Thu - 2:00 4:50 7:30
A Tim Burton Film
FRANKENWEENIE (PG)
Fri-Sun - 4:00
Mon-Thu - 4:30
Fri-Sun -
1:30 6:25 8:40
Mon-Thu - 2:10 7:10
HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG)
Fri-Sun - 1:00 3:35 6:15 8:30
Mon-Thu - 2:00 4:15 7:00
PITCH PERFECT (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:10 3:45 6:35 9:10
Mon-Thu - 2:30 5:10 7:45
SAMSARA (PG-13) 5:00
END OF WATCH (R)
2:20 8:00
A Ben Affleck Film
 ARGO (R)
1:20 4:10 7:00 9:50
Ethan Hawke
 SINISTER (R)
2:15 4:50 7:30 10:10
Liam Neeson
 TAKEN 2 (PG-13)
Fri & Mon-Wed -
2:00 3:00 4:20 5:20
6:45 7:45 9:10 10:20
Sat/Sun -
12:40 2:00 3:00 4:20 5:20
6:45 7:45 9:10 10:20
Thu 10/18 -
2:00 3:00 4:20 5:20
6:45 7:45 10:20
Playing on 2 Screens
HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG)
Fri & Mon-Thu -
2:40 5:00 7:20 9:35
Sat/Sun -
12:25 2:40 5:00 7:20 9:35
Bruce Willis.....Emily Blunt
LOOPER (R)
1:40 4:30 7:10 10:00
Starts Thursday, October 18
 PARANORMAL
ACTIVITY 4 (R)
Thu 10/18 - 9:00 pm
THE MASTER (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 4:30 7:40
Sat/Sun - 1:20 4:30 7:40
A Ben Affleck Film
 ARGO (R)
Fri-Sun -
1:30 4:45 6:40 8:00 9:30
Mon-Thu -
2:20 5:10 6:40 8:00
Playing on 2 Screens
 SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:20 4:10 7:00 9:40
Mon-Thu - 2:00 5:00 7:45
THE PERKS OF BEING
A WALLFLOWER (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:45 4:20 6:50 9:20
Mon-Thu - 2:10 4:50 7:30
TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE
Fri-Sun - 1:10 3:50 (PG-13)
Mon-Thu - 4:00
SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN (PG-13)
Plaza De Oro
JUST 45 MINUTES FROM BROADWAY
Plaza De Oro (R)
 ATLAS SHRUGGED: PART I I (PG-13)
Metro 4
 SINISTER (R) Metro 4 Camino Real
 SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS (R) Paseo Nuevo
 ARGO (R)
Paseo Nuevo on 2 Screens Camino Real
 HERE COMES THE BOOM (PG)
Fiesta 5 Fairview
in 3D:
in 2D:
in 3D:
in 2D:
in 2D:
in 2D:
DIGITAL
BARGAIN TUESDAYS AT ALL LOCATIONS!
Showtimes - Before 6:00 pm - ALL SEATS - ALL SHOWS - $5.50
Showtimes - 6:00 pm and Later - Children....Seniors (60+) - $5.50 Adults - $7.50
3-D: add $3.00 Premium Charge to All Advertised Pricing
ARLINGTON
1317 State Street - 963-4408
Courtyard Bar Open
Fri & Sat - 4:30 - 8:30
PASEO NUEVO
8 W. De La Guerra Pl. - S.B.
RIVIERA
2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.
PLAZA DE ORO
371 Hi t chcock Way - S. B.
 Denotes ‘SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT’ Restrictions
877-789-MOVIE www.metrotheatres.com
Information Listed for Friday thru Thursday - October 12 - 18
FIESTA 5
Features Stadium Seating
916 Stat e St reet - S. B.
CAMINO REAL
Features Stadium Seating
CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE
Hollister & Storke - GOLETA
METRO 4
Features Stadium Seating
618 Stat e St reet - S. B.
FAIRVIEW
Features Stadium Seating
225 N. Fai rvi ew - Gol eta
 ATLAS SHRUGGED:
PART I I (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:30 4:15 7:00 9:45
Mon-Thu - 2:00 5:00 7:40
 SINISTER (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:45 4:30 7:20 9:55
Mon-Thu - 2:10 5:20 8:00
 TAKEN 2 (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 2:20 4:45 7:10 9:35
Mon-Thu - 2:20 4:45 7:10
LOOPER (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:15 4:00 6:45 9:25
Mon-Thu - 2:30 5:10 7:50
Starts Thursday, October 18
 PARANORMAL
ACTIVITY 4 (R)
Thu 10/18 - 9:00 pm
Kevin James (PG)
 HERE COMES THE BOOM
Fri & Mon-Thu- 2:25 5:10 7:45
Sat/Sun- 12:00 2:25 5:10 7:45
FRANKENWEENIE (PG)
Daily - 7:20
Sat/Sun -
12:20 2:35 4:50
Fri & Mon-Thu - 2:35 4:50
PITCH PERFECT (PG-13)
Sat/Sun- 12:10 2:45 5:20 8:00
Fri & Mon-Thu- 2:45 5:20 8:00
SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN
Fri - 7:30 (PG-13)
Sat/Sun - 1:00 3:10 5:20 7:30
Mon-Thu - 7:15
JUST 45 MINUTES
FROM BROADWAY (R)
Fri - 7:45
Sat/Sun - 1:15 4:30 7:45
Mon-Thu - 7:00
 TAKEN 2 (PG-13)
Fri-Tue & Thu -
1:15 3:30 5:45 8:15
Wed - 1:15 3:30
Saturday, Oct. 13 - 9:55 am
MET OPERA - LIVE IN HD
 Donizetti’s
L’ELISIR D’AMORE
Wednesday, October 17
 LED ZEPPELIN:
CELEBRATION IN HD
5:30 & 8:00
Kevin James (PG)
 HERE COMES THE BOOM
Fri-Sun - 1:20 4:10 6:45 9:20
Mon-Thu - 2:00 4:50 7:30
A Tim Burton Film
FRANKENWEENIE (PG)
Fri-Sun - 4:00
Mon-Thu - 4:30
Fri-Sun -
1:30 6:25 8:40
Mon-Thu - 2:10 7:10
HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG)
Fri-Sun - 1:00 3:35 6:15 8:30
Mon-Thu - 2:00 4:15 7:00
PITCH PERFECT (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:10 3:45 6:35 9:10
Mon-Thu - 2:30 5:10 7:45
SAMSARA (PG-13) 5:00
END OF WATCH (R)
2:20 8:00
A Ben Affleck Film
 ARGO (R)
1:20 4:10 7:00 9:50
Ethan Hawke
 SINISTER (R)
2:15 4:50 7:30 10:10
Liam Neeson
 TAKEN 2 (PG-13)
Fri & Mon-Wed -
2:00 3:00 4:20 5:20
6:45 7:45 9:10 10:20
Sat/Sun -
12:40 2:00 3:00 4:20 5:20
6:45 7:45 9:10 10:20
Thu 10/18 -
2:00 3:00 4:20 5:20
6:45 7:45 10:20
Playing on 2 Screens
HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG)
Fri & Mon-Thu -
2:40 5:00 7:20 9:35
Sat/Sun -
12:25 2:40 5:00 7:20 9:35
Bruce Willis.....Emily Blunt
LOOPER (R)
1:40 4:30 7:10 10:00
Starts Thursday, October 18
 PARANORMAL
ACTIVITY 4 (R)
Thu 10/18 - 9:00 pm
THE MASTER (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 4:30 7:40
Sat/Sun - 1:20 4:30 7:40
A Ben Affleck Film
 ARGO (R)
Fri-Sun -
1:30 4:45 6:40 8:00 9:30
Mon-Thu -
2:20 5:10 6:40 8:00
Playing on 2 Screens
 SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:20 4:10 7:00 9:40
Mon-Thu - 2:00 5:00 7:45
THE PERKS OF BEING
A WALLFLOWER (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:45 4:20 6:50 9:20
Mon-Thu - 2:10 4:50 7:30
TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE
Fri-Sun - 1:10 3:50 (PG-13)
Mon-Thu - 4:00
SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN (PG-13)
Plaza De Oro
JUST 45 MINUTES FROM BROADWAY
Plaza De Oro (R)
 ATLAS SHRUGGED: PART I I (PG-13)
Metro 4
 SINISTER (R) Metro 4 Camino Real
 SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS (R) Paseo Nuevo
 ARGO (R)
Paseo Nuevo on 2 Screens Camino Real
 HERE COMES THE BOOM (PG)
Fiesta 5 Fairview
in 3D:
in 2D:
in 3D:
in 2D:
in 2D:
in 2D:
DIGITAL
BARGAIN TUESDAYS AT ALL LOCATIONS!
Showtimes - Before 6:00 pm - ALL SEATS - ALL SHOWS - $5.50
Showtimes - 6:00 pm and Later - Children....Seniors (60+) - $5.50 Adults - $7.50
3-D: add $3.00 Premium Charge to All Advertised Pricing
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 50 • The Voice of the Village •
ONGOING
Jazz at the Plaza – The series of free
jazz concerts on Thursdays at La Cumbre
Plaza continues this week with music from
Gilberto Gonzalez Jazz Trio. Each
week also features artwork from a chosen
artist (Oct. 11: glass artist Virginia
Covalt), focuses on a Plaza retailer who
offers special discounts that day (Oct. 11:
Williams Sonoma) and gives a percentage
of proceeds to a chosen charity (Oct. 11:
Santa Barbara Dance Institute). Optional
wine tasting, featuring various area
vintners on a rotating basis, costs $15 (The
Winehound on Oct. 11). Limited seating
is available on a frst come-frst served
basis, so feel free to bring your own chairs.
Next week: music from the wonderful
Goleta-based Brazilian singer-songwriter-
guitarist Teka & New Bossa, with wine by
The Winehound, art from jewelry-maker
Marilyn Dannehower, Lane Bryant as
the featured retailer and nonproft Angels
Bearing Gifts reaping the rewards. WHEN:
5-7pm every Thursday through October 25
WHERE: 121 South Hope Ave. COST: free
INFO: 687-6458 or www.shoplacumbre.
com/events/jazz
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11
Ooh, scary! – Just in time for
Halloween, the Screenwriters Association
hosts a lecture on “Making a Thriller
Film,” with Ridiculous Pictures’ Marty
Thomas and Jon Zuber. Thomas
directed documentaries, national TV
commercials and more than 250 MTV
music videos before moving to movies
while Zuber has written, directed and
produced a slew of award-winning
documentaries, including Impressions in
Time, which won an Emmy, and Recycle
That Trash, plus a whole lot more music
videos. His upcoming psychological
thriller, Blood Lake, is expected to begin
flming soon in Michigan. WHEN: 7pm
WHERE: Brooks Institute, 27 East Cota
Street COST: free INFO: 617-4503 or
www.screenwriterssb.org
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12
Jones-ing for piano & cello – When
Camerata Pacifica’s principal pianist
Warren Jones was asked by the
ensemble’s artistic director Adrian
Spence to be the featured artist for
this month’s program, the ever self-
effacing musician – also much loved
locally for his role as the chair of the
vocal piano department at the Music
Academy of the West summer festival –
decided to share the program with Ani
Aznavoorian, Cam Pac’s longtime
principal cellist. The result is a dynamic
and intensely romantic evening opening
with Aznavoorian playing George
Crumb’s early Solo Cello Sonata,
closing with Jones’ performing one
of Brahms’ last compositions, Sechs
Klavierstücke, Op. 118. In between,
after Anton Webern’s teasingly
short Op. 11: Three Short Pieces
provides the program’s only piquancy,
the duo plays Frédéric Chopin’s last
major composition, the G Minor Cello
Sonata, Op. 65. WHEN: 1 & 7:30pm
(no Crumb or Webern at 1) WHERE:
Hahn Hall on the campus of the Music
Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway
Road COST: $45 INFO: 884-8410 or
www.cameratapacifica.org
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Note to readers: This entertainment calendar is a subjective sampling of arts and other events taking place in the Santa
Barbara area for the next week. It is by no means comprehensive. Be sure to read feature stories in each issue that complement
the calendar. In order to be considered for inclusion in this calendar, information must be submitted no later than noon on the
Wednesday eight days prior to publication date. Please send all news releases and digital artwork to slibowitz@yahoo.com)
by Steven Libowitz

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11
Poet of piano – Murray
Perahia’s tone on the piano has
been called “warm and silky” by
The New York Times, and indeed
the pianist is known for the fuency
of his style as well as his pristine
articulation. The double Grammy
award winner (for his recordings
of Chopin’s complete Etudes and
three of Bach’s English Suites) has
also won several Gramophone
awards and was awarded the title
of KBE (Knight Commander of the
British Empire) in recognition of his
outstanding service to music. One
of the most cherished pianists of the
past 35 years, Perahia – who is also
the principal guest conductor of the
Academy of St. Martin in the Fields
– has appeared with every leading orchestra and toured the major international
music centers; this season he’s appearing with the Boston Philharmonic and in recital
at Carnegie Hall. UCSB’s Campbell Hall has Perahia’s only California recital this
season, during which the virtuoso will perform works by Haydn, Schubert, Beethoven,
Schumann and Chopin. WHEN: 8pm WHERE: UCSB’s Campbell Hall COST: $55
INFO: 893-3535 or www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13
Met Live launches new season – A
new production of Donizetti’s comic opera
L’Elisir d’Amore (“The Elixir of Love”) kicks
off the seventh season of Metropolitan
Opera “Live in HD” simulcasts, now
bigger and bolder than ever. Set in the
Italian countryside, “L’Elisir” is directed by
Bartlett Sher, with Maurizio Benini
conducting. Megastar soprano Anna
Netrebko makes her Met role debut
as the beautiful landowner Adina, with
Matthew Polenzani as Nemorino,
the simple peasant who falls in love with
her. Mariusz Kwiecien sings Adina’s
arrogant fancé, Sergeant Belcore,
while Ambrogio Maestri plays the
magic potion-peddling Doctor Dulcamara.
The New York Times recently praised the
production as “A handsome and insightful
new staging.” The season features 11 more
operas simulcast live on Saturday mornings
(and repeated again on Sunday at Hahn Hall only), including Otello (October 27
and 28), The Tempest (November 10 and 11), La Clemenza di Tito (December
1 and 2), Un Ballo in Maschera (December 8 and 9), Aida (December 15 and
February 3), Les Troyens (January 5 and 6), Maria Stuarda (January 19 and
20), Rigoletto (February 16 and 17), Parsifal (March 2 and 3), Francesca da
Rimini (March 16 and 17), and Giulio Cesare (April 27 and 28). The operas are
shown in more than 1,900 movie theaters in 63 countries around the world. But local
audiences have a choice of more unusual venues: the intimate 300-seat Hahn Hall on
the Music Academy of the West campus, or the massive Arlington Theatre downtown.
WHEN: 9:55am (and 2pm tomorrow at Hahn) WHERE: 1070 Fairway Road, or
1317 State Street COST: $27 (Hahn), $22 general/$20 seniors (Arlington) INFO:
969-8787/www.musicacademy.org or 963-4408/www.thearlingtontheatre.com
Fall Feast – The Environmental
Defense Center’s fnal TGIF event of the
season extends one of the area’s best
happy hours past its usual offerings.
The second Friday mixer-gathering still
features opportunities to connect with
environmental activists, elected offcials,
friends and family to the sounds of live
music (The Kinds play tonight) in the
EDC’s charming casual courtyard, and
includes the usual two drink tickets (craft
beers from New Belgium Brewing Co.
on tap, wines from The Ojai Vineyard,
soft drinks or sparkling water) and a
raffe offering prizes from Patagonia
and other sponsors. But instead of light
locally grown appetizers from area food
places, there’s a complete catered meal
for the fnal buffet. Big Easy Catering
serves grilled catfsh, Jamaican jerk
chicken, vegan jambalaya, and garlic
bread while delicious side dishes come
from Duo Catering prepared with organic
seasonal produce donated by local
farmers Fairview Gardens, Shepherd
Farms, Miradero Ranch and Hilltop &
Canyon Farms. Coastal Fund, Santa
Barbara Channelkeeper, and the Surfrider
Foundation get the honor of sponsoring
the Fall Feast – which is extended
another hour from the usual TGIF – and
representatives will update you with brief
comments on their efforts to protect the
local environment. And remember you
can do your part by riding your bike
to the event to take advantage of the
free bike valet in TGIF’s parking lot on
Canon Perdido. WHEN: 5:30-8:30pm
WHERE: 906 Garden Street COST: $20
INFO: 963-1622 ext. 100 or www.
environmentaldefensecenter.org
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14
Khan you feel it? – The Persian
poet-philosopher Rumi usually inspires
quiet meditation more than mesmerizing
movement. But that hasn’t stopped
Akram Khan, the artistic director of
the U.K. dance company that bears
his name, from creating an evening
length work that draws inspiration from
Rumi and the Suf tradition. In “Vertical
Road,” which gets its Santa Barbara
debut, Khan – who frequently infuses
his modern works with classical Kathak
dance idiom and who choreographed
a segment in the Opening Ceremony
for the recent London Olympics – has
created a riveting dance investigation
of humanity’s journey between the
earthly and the spiritual. Lauded by
a critic as “A fantastic feast for the
senses,” “Vertical” is a profound, visceral
meditation on human nature, rituals and
the consequences of actions, featuring
a pulsating score by longtime Khan
collaborator Nitin Sawhney. WHEN:
8pm WHERE: Granada Theatre, 1214
State Street COST: $35 & $45 INFO:
899-2222/www.granadasb.org or 893-
3535/www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 51 Compassion is no substitute for justice – Rush Limbaugh

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14
Over 40 & still fddling around – No
fooling, the Old Time Fiddlers’ Convention
and Festival is in its 41st year, and
while it’s gone through some changes in
recent years, the basic format has stayed
pretty much the same since bluegrass/
old time music pioneer launched the
event on UCSB’s campus back in 1971.
What’s changed is a greater emphasis on
professional entertainment, as the festival
now provides a second main stage for
live bands to play: This year boasts a
fne mix between locals and touring acts,
including Laurie Lewis & the Right
Hands, Genticorum, Cache Valley Drifters,
Modal Tease, Kalinka, Nick Bachman &
King Baby, Jim Wimmer & Stu Mason,
and the Honeysuckle Possums. But there’s
still plenty of time for musicians and all
sorts of old time instruments – from guitar
and fddle to banjo, upright bass and musical saw – to vie for prizes and applause
during the day-long competition, and even more opportunities to jam the day away
at impromptu gatherings all around the grassy grounds at the Stow House, or take
a workshop in a variety of instruments and styles. While the focus remains on old
time songs on the competition stage, Irish, bluegrass, Gypsy jazz and pop tunes are
spoken in the jam session as the players see ft. And if you’re lucky, you might see
some truly virtuoso musicians (like the famous French violinist Gilles Apap, who
loves to hone his mountain music skills at the event) accompanied by talented if rank
amateurs at any given moment. And you can feel good knowing you’re doing good
just by attending: all proceeds support Rotary Club of Santa Barbara Sunrise local
and international community service projects. WHEN: 10am-5:30pm WHERE: 304
N. Los Carneros Road, Goleta COST: $20 general, $15 seniors/students, free under
18 INFO: 450-2243 or www.fddlersconvention.org

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14
Taiko me out to UCSB – San
Jose Taiko, the non-stop high-
energy rhythm ride from Northern
California inspired by traditional
Japanese drumming, returns to
Santa Barbara to kick off the
2012-13 Family Fun Series at on
UCSB’s campus. The ensemble
incorporates percussive sounds
from around the world in a show
that’s sure to get kids of all ages
tapping their toes, clapping their hands and moving to the beat while learning about
the sounds of African, Balinese, Latin, Japanese and jazz rhythms. Coming later this
season: Disney Channel’s Choo-Choo Soul with Genevieve!, the Golden Dragon
Acrobats in Cirque Zíva, Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia, a totally kid-friendly
production of Beauty and the Beast and Kid Flix Mix, animated and short flms
handpicked from the New York International Children’s Film Festival. An hour before
each show begins, kids can dive right into the fun with free balloons, face painting
and craft-making parties. Arts & Lectures provides the materials and project ideas:
children just need to bring their imaginations. And remember to stick around after the
shows, when kids can meet their favorite performers in person while parents snap a
photo or two. Series subscribers save 20 percent on single ticket prices. WHEN: 3pm
WHERE: UCSB’s Campbell Hall COST: $10 children, $15 adults ($48 & $72 for the
six-show series) INFO: 893-3535 or www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
MONDAY, OCTOBER 15
Spirituals to Funk – The Lobero Theatre’s
Roots Music series pairs The Blind Boys
of Alabama with the great Dr. John, their
neighbor both geographically (New
Orleans) and musically. Dr. John, aka The
Night Tripper aka Mac Rebennack,
Jr., serves as musical director for this
exploration of the connections between
jazz, blues, and gospel, a partnership that
began when the good Dr. appeared on the
Blind Boys Grammy-winning CD Down in
New Orleans. Rock and Roll Hall of Famer
Rebennack’s gravelly drawl compliments the
living legends of gospel – the group was
formed in 1939 at the Alabama Institute
for the Negro Blind and founding member
Jimmy Carter is still singing! – for a night
that should dispel any bouts of depression
and dig deep into the soul. WHEN: 8pm
WHERE: Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon
Perdido St. COST: $50 & $60 INFO: 963-
0761 or www.lobero.com •MJ
ENTERTAINMENT Page 534
ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from page 45)
say ‘Thanks.’ So I’ll go, ‘Yeah, me too.
I bought sixty-four pairs.’ Then the
jokes show up by themselves. If some-
one asked me that, I’d say, ‘Do you
ever mix them up?‘”
As talented as the members of the
cast – who have known each other
anywhere from 14-38 years – the real
star of the show, Stiles said, is the
audience, who makes up all the sug-
gestions for each segment. But some-
times he’s not even aware they’re
there, Stiles said.
“I get so into what I’m doing, try-
ing to be myself in these situations. I
don’t have ongoing characters. I don’t
have the salty sea captain I can pull
out when I need it. I don’t keep the
best ones. I want to do different things
every night, and get so far inside the
character that sometimes I don’t even
see the crowd. And I never know what
I’m doing until I walk on stage.”
Dying to See the Show
In recent years, local theater compa-
nies have joined a new trend of per-
forming plays pop up style, meaning
in various venues outside of the tradi-
tional proscenium or black box. We’ve
seen shows in parking lots behind
book stores, at the courthouse jail, in
warehouses and churches, tucked into
the tiny space of a storefront winery in
the Funk Zone, crammed up against
couches in a hookah lounge, and even
in an empty swimming pool at a pri-
vate house.
But a funeral home?
Morbid perhaps, but an inspired
setting for Endgame, Samuel Beckett’s
absurdist drama where the open-
ing lines repeat the word “finished,”
while the rest of the play explores
the idea that existence is cyclical with
beginnings and endings inextricably
intertwined. Genesis West, which
began the pop up theater trend a few
years ago, takes on Endgame in the liv-
ing room at McDermott-Crockett and
Associates Mortuary (2020 Chapala
Street) October 12-27 (Call 969-5637 or
visit www.genesiswest.org for tickets
and information). Gen West founder
Maurie Lord, who also directs, gave
us the gritty details on the show.
Q. A mortuary? Really?
A. Fun for the whole family, and
aisles of smiles… Seriously, it works
really well for the piece. It’s a great
location and this work has a lot more
stuff, garbage cans, etcetera, so it
needs a space with a little more gravi-
tas than a totally mobile show.
Why Endgame?
It’s Beckett’s absurdist masterpiece,
about two ailing people who drive
each other crazy at the end of the
world. It touches upon the human
condition and our need for connec-
tion and each other. It’s considered
absurdist but at the root of it there’s
nothing more true. Everything makes
perfect sense. Just not on the surface –
much like real life.
But it’s also a well-known classic, some-
thing you rarely do.
It’s the Rosetta Stone of modern
theater. Everything that’s great comes
from this play. So many of the shows
I’ve done were clearly inspired by
this piece. So this is the only classic
I would do. It’s the one. And it’s an
honor to work with such rich material.
With Brian Harwell, Tom Hinshaw,
David Brainard and Julie Anne
Ruggieri, you’ve got some of your com-
pany favorites in the cast, too.
It’s a stellar group who are real-
ly embracing the challenges and the
importance of taking on these iconic
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 52 • The Voice of the Village •
The High One Fives
Real Estate by Mark Hunt
Mark and Sheela Hunt are real estate agents with Village Properties in Montecito. They live in
Montecito with their daughter Sareena, a freshman at SBHS. His family goes back nearly one
hundred years in the Santa Barbara area. Mark’s grandparents – Bill and Elsie Hunt – were Santa
Barbara real estate brokers for 25 years.
B
ased on recent activity, and
following up last week’s article
(“New On The Market”), a
number of the best buy picks we’ve
highlighted continue to sell. Last issue
I wrote about four diferent properties
and two of them are already in escrow.
The issue before that, three out of four
of the properties highlighted went into
escrow. Here’s hoping this is a sign of
increased sales activity for the area.
This week, we are featuring four
homes in the $1.5 million range, all
just under $1.6 million, or in Real
Estate parlance, homes in the “high
one fives.”
This $1.5+ million price range seems
to be a current sweet spot, meaning
that one can get perhaps a half acre
or more, or a guest unit and spacious
lawn, or a big ocean view, or a full acre
with five bedrooms and ocean views
in the Cold Spring School District,
etc… advantages that more recently
would be associated with more expen-
sive homes.
2780 Torito Road
$1,575,000 (recently reduced from
$1,675,000)
This is a smaller (two bedrooms,
two baths) home on a 1+ acre lot in the
foothills of Montecito, on the border
of Summerland and Carpinteria. The
ocean views are stunning and unique,
as there are very few other view
homes in this immediate area this
high up and this close in to the ocean.
This king-of-the-mountain view home
is hit directly with the early morn-
ing light. It features a sunny location
and views of the Channel Islands
and Montecito foothills from dawn to
dusk. There is a veranda overlooking
the spectacular Santa Barbara South
Coast, a private driveway with park-
ing for guests and you are near the
end of the road, so there is very little
if any traffic. Torito Road is just a few
minutes from the 101 freeway, just off
of lower Toro Canyon Road, at the
eastern edge of the Montecito foot-
hills. It is not in a Montecito school
district, but it is in the highly desirable
Summerland School District.
116 Palm Tree Lane
$1,595,000
This recently remodeled Montecito
cottage is on one half acre, at the end
of a cul-de-sac in the lower Montecito
village! There is a private fenced area
and attractive gate for guests, lead-
ing to the front yard and entrance,
in addition to a driveway and park-
ing area for cars. The home offers a
versatile floor plan that includes two
bedrooms plus an office, two baths,
a family room, kitchen and dining
area with hardwood floors, and a
fireplace in the living room. There is
a separate guest room and bath with
a private entrance for visitors or
extended family. There is also a two-
car garage, sprawling lawns, mani-
cured gardens, and fruit trees. This
home is convenient to the shops and
restaurants on Coast Village Road
and is located in the Cold Spring
School District.
1907 San Leandro Lane
$1,595,000
This home has three bedrooms and
three baths and features a single-level
contemporary design on over half an
acre of land. Located at the end of a
shared drive, near Crane School and
the beach, I feel this is an opportunity
to own a rarely-available-in-this-price-
range upgraded contemporary home
in Montecito with privacy and a close-
in location. High ceilings with walls of
glass and French doors access a court-
yard, backyard deck, and side-yard
wooded setting. Hardwood floors in
the living room, dining room and
more, help to give the home the feel-
ing of a private, warm and inviting art
gallery. There is off-street parking for
guests and a car port. One note is that
a portion of the home is set up to have
a separate entrance, if more privacy
and certain dual living features are
desired. This home is very new to the
market and is located in the Montecito
Union School District.
528 Barker Pass Road
$1,595,000
This home is also newer to the mar-
ket and features just over an acre of
land, toward the end of a private lane
off Barker Pass Road. The home is in
a private setting and boasts a compel-
ling tucked-away view of the ocean,
islands and Santa Barbara Harbor. Part
of the house has been recently re-mod-
eled including the brand-new kitchen
with stainless steel Bosch appliances.
There are five bedrooms and three
bathrooms in the house and excellent
views from the main living room,
kitchen and family area. The prop-
erty includes a two-car garage and
additional parking areas for guests.
Additionally, there is an upper pad,
where the house sits now, and a lower
pad, that the listing agent is advertis-
ing could take an accessory structure
or provide an area for animals. It is
situated in the Cold Spring School
District, per listing information.
•••
If you have questions regarding, or
interest in, any of the properties listed
here, please contact your realtor. If
you are not working with someone,
please feel free to call or text Mark at
805-698-2174 or email - mark@villag
esite.com, and please visit our website
www.montecitobestbuys.com to see
other listings in the area. •MJ
Not long ago, an
expansive view
such as this one
on Torito Road
would have been
out of range for
potential home
buyers in the
less-than-two-
million-dollar
range
Two-bedroom,
two-bath cottage
on a half acre
on Palm Tree
Lane features a
private hideaway
lawn plus a guest
room with sepa-
rate bath and its
own entrance
This modern con-
temporary single-
level 3-bdr, 3-bth
home is near
Crane School and
the ocean, and is
in the Montecito
Union School
District
Views such as
this from the
home on Barker
Pass Road just
don’t come along
that often, espe-
cially at less than
$2 million
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 53 The four most beautiful words in our common language: I told you so – Gore Vidal
ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from page 51)
If you have a 93108 open house scheduled, please send us your free directory listing to realestate@montecitojournal.net
93108 OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY

SATURDAY OCTOBER 13
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
1206 Channel Drive 12-3pm $10,500,000 3bd/2ba Omid Khaki 698-1616 Sotheby’s International Realty
670 Hodges Lane By Appt. $5,875,000 4bd/4.5ba Sandy Stahl 689-1602 Sotheby’s International Realty
875 Rockbridge Road 1-4pm $3,950,000 3bd/3.5ba Lori Ebner 729-4861 Prudential California Realty
1940 East Valley Road By Appt. $3,495,000 6bd/7.5ba Sandy Stahl 689-1602 Sotheby’s International Realty
1444 School House Road 2:30-4:30pm $3,260,000 5bd/5ba Wilson Quarre 680-9747 Sotheby’s International Realty
620 Oak Grove Drive By Appt. $2,350,000 3bd/3.5ba Randy Solakian 565-2208 Coldwell Banker Previews
2150 East Valley Road 1-4pm $1,999,995 4bd/3ba Jason Streatfeild 969-1122 Prudential California Realty
1345 Santa Clara Way 1-4pm $1,085,000 2bd/2ba John Comin 689-3078 Prudential California Realty
118 Coronada Circle 3-5pm $899,000 2bd/2ba Brian Felix 455-3669 Sotheby’s International Realty
197 Canon View Road By Appt. $699,995 2bd/2ba Jason Streatfeild 969-1122 Prudential California Realty

SUNDAY OCTOBER 14
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
1685 Fernald Point Lane By Appt. $28,000,000 6bd/6ba Maureen McDermut 689-6800 Sotheby’s International Realty
1206 Channel Drive 12-4pm $10,500,000 3bd/2ba Peggy Olcese 895-6757 Sotheby’s International Realty
945 Park Lane 2-4pm $8,700,000 5bd/6ba Scott McCosker 687-2436 Coldwell Banker
670 Hodges Lane By Appt. $5,875,000 4bd/4.5ba Sandy Stahl 689-1602 Sotheby’s International Realty
1821 Fernald Point Lane 1-4pm $5,450,000 3bd/3ba Ron Dickman 689-3135 Sotheby’s International Realty
900 Park Lane West 2-4pm $5,195,000 4bd/5ba Cecilia Hunt 895-3834 Village Properties
1 Seaview Drive By Appt. $4,650,000 3bd/3ba Bob Lamborn 689-6800 Sotheby’s International Realty
302 Woodley Road 1-3pm $4,495,000 4bd/6ba Beverly Palmer 452-7985 Village Properties
1595 Ramona Lane 2-4pm $3,995,000 5bd/5.5ba Maureen McDermut 570-5545 Sotheby’s International Realty
875 Rockbridge Road 1-4pm $3,950,000 3bd/3.5ba Sherry Zolfaghari 386-3748 Prudential California Realty
730 Arcady Road 1-4pm $3,595,000 4bd/4.5ba Daniela Johnson 453-4555 Sotheby’s International Realty
1940 East Valley Road 2-4pm $3,495,000 6bd/7.5ba Sandy Stahl 689-1602 Sotheby’s International Realty
513 Crocker Sperry By Appt. $3,250,000 4bd/4ba Bob Lamborn 689-6800 Sotheby’s International Realty
451 Live Oaks Road 2-5pm $2,999,995 3bd/2.5ba Louise McKaig 637-4774 Village Properties
2140 Veloz Drive 2-4pm $2,995,000 4bd/4ba Katinka Goertz 708-9616 Sotheby’s International Realty
2860 East Valley Road 1-4pm $2,950,000 4bd/3.5ba David Kim 296-0662 Village Properties
237 Eucalyptus Hill Drive 1-4pm $2,850,000 4bd/5ba Wes St. Clair 886-6741 Prudential California Realty
940 Channel Drive 2-5pm $2,850,000 4bd/3.5ba Randall Kempf 331-4389 Prudential California Realty
747 Via Manana 2-4pm $2,850,000 4bd/4.5ba Dana Zertuche 403-5520 Coldwell Banker
722 Via Manana 1-4pm $2,750,000 5bd/4.5ba Jo Ann Mermis 895-5650 Prudential California Realty
27 Seaview Drive By Appt. $2,295,000 3bd/2.5ba Bob Lamborn 689-6800 Sotheby’s International Realty
2150 East Valley Road 1-4pm $1,999,995 4bd/3ba Jason Streatfeild 969-1122 Prudential California Realty
667 Cold Spring Road 1-4pm $1,935,000 3bd/3ba Brian King 452-0471 Village Properties
1395 Greenworth Place 1-4pm $1,749,500 5bd/3ba Wilson Quarre 680-9747 Sotheby’s International Realty
1325 Virginia Road 2-4pm $1,675,000 3bd Betsy Zwick 452-5501 Coldwell Banker
116 Palm Tree Lane 1-4pm $1,595,000 3bd/3ba Jake Ralston 455-9600 Prudential California Realty
1221 East Valley Road 1-4pm $1,220,000 3bd/2ba Lori Ebner 729-4861 Prudential California Realty
838 Toro Canyon Road By Appt. $1,200,000 Land Maurie McGuire 403-8816 Coldwell Banker
1345 Santa Clara Way 1-4pm $1,085,000 2bd/2ba Joe Stubbins 729-0778 Prudential California Realty
100 Arroqui St 1-4pm $975,000 3bd/2ba Jim Witmer 448-3921 Village Properties
118 Coronada Circle 2-4pm $899,000 2bd/2ba Marilyn Rickard 452-8284 Sotheby’s International Realty
161 Hermosillo 1-4pm $895,000 3bd/2ba Francoise Morel 252-4752 Coldwell Banker
197 Canon View Road By Appt. $699,995 2bd/2ba Jason Streatfeild 969-1122 Prudential California Realty
roles. Julie is mostly known for musi-
cal theater, and she’s totally too young
for the role, so we’re aging her up and
throwing her in a trash can. I totally
abuse actors.
So will you be using caskets and cadav-
ers as additional props?
They‘ll be interspersed in the audi-
ence. No, I’m just kidding. Seriously,
we’re very respectful of the space.
People do have emotional ties to it.
We’re not going to make light or mock
the space we’re in. We have a rever-
ence towards it and to the material,
which ties in together. It adds to the
nature of the piece, making it a more
immersive experience. It really trans-
forms the standard night of just going
out to see a play.
Pop up is all you’re doing now. Will you
ever go back to Center Stage again?
Never say never, but no. I think
my days of doing black box stuff
are behind me. I’ve done forty plays
there. And this is way more interest-
ing. The audience listens more. Doing
it in a special space with lots of feeling
makes the actors step up and the audi-
ence pay attention. No matter how
good you are in a theater, you can only
hit a certain height. But here the sky is
the limit of what we can do in terms
of touching people. We’re all sharing
this experience.
Elsewhere:
Santa Barbara actor Henry Brown
reprises his title role as an African-
American slave who served as George
Washington’s valet in “The Ballad
of Billy Lee” at the Plaza Playhouse
Theater in Carpinteria Friday-Sunday.
Brown played the character when Len
Lamensdorf’s play premiered in a pub-
lic reading in town nearly six years
ago….The roots band Birds of Chicago
– featuring JT Nero of the Chicago
rock and soul band JT and the Clouds
and Allison Russell of the Canadian
urban folk band Po’ Girl – makes its
Santa Barbara debut at SOhO Friday
night. There’s also roots music to the
east and west on Saturday, as Small
Potatoes return to the Song Tree in
Goleta while Leo Kottke plays Ojai’s
Libbey Bowl….Sammilan plays Indian
music out at UCSB’s MultiCultural
Center as the new academic season gets
underway on Friday. In more world
music, Viva El Arte presents Troker in
Isla Vista tonight and at the Marjorie
Luke on Sunday… North Carolina’s
indie band Bowerbirds return to SOhO
sporting its third CD, the bigger and
bolder “The Clearing”, on Tuesday. •MJ
Maurie Lord and
Genesis West
present Endgame,
a pop up play
at McDermott-
Crockett and
Associates
Mortuary (photo
credit: David
Bazemore)
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 54 • The Voice of the Village •
MONTECITO
ELECTRIC
EXCELLENT REFERENCES
Over 25 Years in Montecito
• Repair Wiring
• Remodel Wiring
• New Wiring
• Landscape Lighting
• Interior Lighting
(805) 969-1575
STATE LICENSE No. 485353
MAXWELL L. HAILSTONE
1482 East Valley Road, Suite 147
Montecito, California 93108
Over 25 Years in Montecito
MONTECITO
ELECTRIC
EXCELLENT REFERENCES
• Repair Wiring
• Remodel Wiring
• New Wiring
• Landscape Lighting
• Interior Lighting
(805) 969-1575
www.montecitoelectric.com
STATE LICENSE No. 485353
MAXWELLL. HAILSTONE
1482 East Valley Road, Suit 147
Montecito, California 93108
Stressed? Anxious?
Feel relaxed & calm
Biofeedback training is
fast & effective
Tina Lerner, MA
Licensed HeartMath &
Biofeedback Therapist
The Biofeedback
Institute of Santa Barbara
(805) 450-1115

SENIOR CAREGIVING
SERVICES
In-Home Senior
Services: Ask Patti
Teel to meet with
you or your loved
ones to discuss
dependable and
affordable in-home
care. Individualized
service is tailored to meet each client’s
needs. Our caregivers can provide
transportation, housekeeping, personal
assistance and much more.
Senior Helpers: 966-7100
TUTORING SERVICES
PIANO LESSONS Kary and Sheila
Kramer are long standing members of
the Music Teachers’ Assoc. of Calif.
Studios conveniently located at the
Music Academy of the West. Now
accepting enthusiastic children and/or
adults.
Call us at 684-4626.
PARLEZ-VOUS FRANÇAIS?
Learn the language with a native.
Exam prep, conversation, translation,
trip planning etc... Contact Bénédicte
Wolfe 455 9786
or bebe1415@verizon.net
Piano & Guitar
Lessons, 1
st
month half
price & noon to 3:00
only $37.50 an hour!
Have fun learning the
correct way to play
your favorite songs.
www.martismusic.com
martirichter@live.com 805-220-6642
FOOD/CULINARY SERVICES
5 days worth of Fresh Meal
Delivery
More than 150 delicious meals. call:
805-244-2020
www.devitagourmet.com
Poulet Creole-805 477-9774
Haitian Cuisine: Plaintains, rice n beans
I’ll cook for you & your friends
FritzLeon53@gmail.com
COMPUTER/VIDEO SERVICES
VIDEOS TO DVD TRANSFERS
Hurry, before your tapes fade away.
Only $10 each
969-6500 Scott
PERSONAL/SPECIAL SERVICES
GLASS SCRATCH REMOVAL
Window • Door • Table • Shower • Car
SAVE $$$_____YOU will be Amazed!!
FREE Quote Call Ron Cook 805
683.4434
Do you seek purity and healing?
I give prayerful treatment using
Christ Jesus’ ways and means to
bring a more abundant day/life!
Christian Science Practitioner.
Susan 450-4135 - 7-9 a.m. or 7-9 p.m.
I will walk your dog, I will cook his
dinner, I will cook your dinner. I love
dogs, I love to cook, also do your
laundry.
Please call 845-8686
FINANCIAL SERVICES
FHA/HUD
REVERSE MORTGAGES
MAKE SENSE.
969-7735
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY”
PHOENIX ARIZONA 181 CONDO
APARTMENTS. 9% UN LEVERAGED
RETURN. UPSIDE A STEAL AT 6
MILLION. ORIG 18M. POF. ASAP.
LEO 805-569-5402
POSITION WANTED
Property-Care Needs? Do you need
a caretaker or property manager?
Expert Land Steward is avail now. View
résumé at: http://landcare.ojaidigital.net
BOOKKEEPING SERVICES
Bookkeeper/Personal Financial
Assistant 17 yrs exp. A/P, A/R,
P&L, payroll, etc. QuickBooks.
Licensed CTEC Tax preparer. Audited
by IRS? I help organize documents
correctly.
Call Susie at (805) 766-2888
Bookkeeping Services Quickbooks Pro
Advisor
A/P, A/R, Account reconciliation,
Account Clean up, Financials
20 years experience
805.259.6640
sonnest@gmail.com
ESTATE/MOVING SALE
SERVICES
THE CLEARING HOUSE
708 6113 Downsizing, Moving &
Estate Sales
Professional, effcient, cost-effective
services for the sale of your personal
property Licensed. Visit our website:
www.theclearinghouseSB.com
ESTATE/GARAGE SALE
Saturday, Oct. 13, 9-3, 3536 Los
Pinos, Santa Barbara, corner of
Ontare. PARK AND ENTER ON LOS
PINOS-NO PARKING ON ONTARE.
Collectibles, Majolica, books, indoor/
outdoor/offce furniture,
music system, garden plants and
accents, kitchen/household items,
washer, dryer, bookshelves. No early
birds.
MONTECITO ESTATE/GARAGE
SALE
Saturday October 13~ 9am to 3pm
Sunday October 14~ 10am to 4pm
163 Santo Tomas Lane.
Beauty salon furniture, artwork, clothes,
bed, suitcases, microwaves, plants,
patio furniture & much more.
SPECIAL REQUEST
Looking for a driver to San Diego
on November 17
th
, 969-1417 .
CLASSIC CARS WANTED
Retired hobbyist would like to fnd a
couple of old cars to play with. Please
call Bob Fox. 805 845-2113.
HEALTH SERVICES
Lisa Trivell Massage
,Yoga and mini facials
.Yoga and Wellness
practitioner at the
Montecito YMCA &
Lash Day spa Studio in
Summerland close to
the ocean
917-923-5504
www.trivelltechnique.com
THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE
Enhancement of Health, Fitness and
Relaxation by a professional CMT. R.N.
In the comfort of your home or suite.
Seniors welcomed. Reasonable rates.
805 698-3467.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING (805) 565-1860
(You can place a classifed ad by flling in the coupon at the bottom of this section and mailing it to us: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108. You can also FAX your ad to us at: (805) 969-6654.
We will fgure out how much you owe and either call or FAX you back with the amount. You can also e-mail your ad: christine@montecitojournal.net and we will do the same as your FAX).
REAL ESTATE SERVICES
Nancy Hussey
Realtor ®
“Calm, Steadfast,
Effective, Loyal….”
~Clients’ Comments
805-452-3052
Coldwell Banker
/ Montecito
DRE#01383773
www.NancyHussey.com
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
Residential Income Property
Hedgerow area of Montecito
2.98 Mil , Proforma NOI 147,500,
5% CAP
2 Year secured lease.
Contact: Frank 805 565 9025
www.crelisting.net/EdW7VfO5A
HOUSING WANTED
Excellent Cook/Animal Caretaker/
Personal Trainer desires to
Xchange services for guesthouse.
Pls contact julie@ 452-1122
SHORT/LONG TERM RENTAL
HOPE RANCH Old world charming
cottage. 4bd/3.5ba with studio, light
& spacious rooms, hardwood foors,
freplace, large private yard with mature
trees & rose garden. $5500/mo.
Negotiable. 805 967-5150 msg.
Small, stylish, furnished East Beach
Studio – ideal for part-time personal
use. Private, gated entrance. One block
to the water! $995/mo.
(805) 448-5666.
Montecito Rental
Looking for single person to rent
a beautiful one bedroom poolside
furnished guest house on estate.
$2400/mo.
Please call (805)455-2925
Emerald Estates private villa
Vacation rental by private Owner
Luxury beach and golf community
Private pool/beach/tennis/spa
3-bed, 2-bath, sleeps 8-10
Gated beach and golf community
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Dates: 16 Dec - 2 Jan, 2013
Details, photos, booking at:
http://www.vrbo.com/435564
WOODWORK/RESTORATION
SERVICES
Ken Frye Artisan in Wood
The Finest Quality Hand Made
Custom Furniture, Cabinetry
& Architectural Woodwork
Expert Finishes & Restoration
Impeccable Attention to Detail
Montecito References. lic#651689
805-473-2343 ken@kenfrye.com
11 – 18 October 2012 MONTECITO JOURNAL 55 Some are made modest by great praise, others insolent – Friedrich Nietzsche
LOCAL BUSINESS DIRECTORY (805) 565-1860
Live Animal Trapping
“Best Termite & Pest Control”
www.hydrexnow.com
Free Phone Quotes
(805) 687-6644
Kevin O’Connor, President
$50 off initial service
Voted
#1
Termite Inspection 24hr turn around upon request.
Got Gophers?
Free
Estimates
• 24-Hour Problem Resolution
• Grounds Supervision
• Contractor Management
• Preventative Maintenance
• Vendor Oversight
• Tenant Management
Put your trust in us.
Arnaud Barbieux (805) 886-7428
abestmgt.com • Montecito, CA. • Lic # 881251
It’s Simple. Charge is $2 per line, and any portion of a line. Multiply the number of lines used (example 4 lines x 2 =$8) Add 10 cents per
Bold and/or Upper case character and send your check to: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108.
Deadline for inclusion in the next issue is Thursday prior to publication date. $8 minimum. Email: christine@montecitojournal.net
Yes, run my ad __________ times. Enclosed is my check for $__________
$8 minimum TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD $8 minimum
PAVING SERVICES
MONTECITO ASPHALT & SEAL COAT,
•Slurry Seal• Crack Repair• Patching•
Water Problems• Striping• Resurfacing•
Speed Bumps• Pot Holes • Burms &
Curbs • Trenches.
Call Roger at
(805) 708-3485
Multi skilled 25 yrs exp. Doors,
Windows, Roofs, Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical, Hardscape, landscape,
Decks, Waterproofng, Just Ask. Call
Eric DeCook (805) 450-3290 Eric.
DeCook@yahoo.com
GARDENING/LANDSCAPING
Estate British Gardener
Horticulturist Comprehensive
knowledge of Californian,
Mediterranean, & traditional English
plants. All gardening duties personally
undertaken including water gardens &
koi keeping. Nicholas 805-963-7896
Rico’s organic gardening
805 689-9890
Veggie gardens – fruit trees care.
Topical tree feeding, maintenance,
organic soil amendment/compost.
HANDYMAN/CONSTRUCTION
Home Repairs. Highly skilled and
knowledgeable. Creative and effcient.
I will save you money! I do service
calls. Fix-it’s to Remodels. Licensed.
DINNER IN A POT!
Enjoy the best
HOME-MADE
CHICKEN MATZO BALL SOUP
this side of anywhere.
A healthy dish of comfort food
that serves 8 to 10; left over’s
all week or freezes beautifully.
$60.00 for this yummy meal
accompanied with a french baguette.
For more info call Carole at
(805) 452-7400
or e-mail me at
carolebennett@cox.net
A portion of my proceeds will be donated to the Santa Barbara Rescue Mission
santabarbarastickers.com
GIMME
FIVE
1% REAL ESTATE FEE
Santa Barbara • Montecito
SOLD
PATRICK JOHN MAIANI
805•886•0799
patrikpiano@gmail.com
www.OnePercentRealEsateAgent.com
New Century Real Estate
DRE #01440541
$35.00 Thurs. at Bikini Factory
805 708 2253
gl owt an@cox. net
$50.00 In Home Appts.
Mobile Spray Tan
www. gl owt ansb. com
MUNYON & SONS
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
PROFESSIONAL ESTATE
SALE SERVICES
SINCE 1977
www.munyonandsons.com
PH: 805-402-0350
Dramatically boost
your investment
income in virtually
any kind of market.
ETF’s yielding 6% plus capital gains.
International funds with a 4% yield
paid out monthly.
F.T. Fereday
805-896-4584
ft@feredayconsultants.com
105 East De La Guerra Suite 4 Santa Barbara, CA 93101
www.feredayconsultants.com 805-962-9535
Joann Younger
1118 State street
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
tel (805) 963-7800 Fax (805) 963-7804
renaissancejy@gmail.com
ART
CLASSES
beginning to advanced
681-8831
classes@rivierafinearts.com
INTERIOR DESIGN
Call or text for your
FREE design consultation
1-630-248-4042
Debi Helm
STEVEN BROOKS JEWELERS
Custom Design • Estate Jewelry
Jewelry Restoration
Buyers of Fine Jewelry, Gold and Silver
Confidential Meeting at Your
Office , Bank or Home
SBJEWELERS@GMAIL.COM (805) 455-1070
“ F o r m i d a b l e ”
L U C K Y ’ S
s t e a k s / c h o p s / s e a f o o d / c o c k t a i l s
D i n n e r & C o c k t a i l s N i g h t l y , 5 t o 1 0 p m . B r u n c h S a t u r d a y & S u n d a y , 9 a m t o 3 p m .
M o n t e c i t o ’ s n e i g h b o r h o o d b a r a n d r e s t a u r a n t . 1 2 7 9 C o a s t V i l l a g e R o a d M o n t e c i t o C A 9 3 1 0 8 ( 8 0 5 ) 5 6 5 - 7 5 4 0
w w w . l u c k y s - s t e a k h o u s e . c o m
P h o t o g r a p h y b y D a v i d P a l e r m o

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