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THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
III

G RENFELL AND HUNT

^

'63\b
..0%

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND
GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
III
EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES

BERNARD
HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN
;

P.

GRENFELL,
;

D.Litt.,

M.A.

HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG

FELLOW OF QUEEN's COLLEGE, OXFORD

ARTHUR

S.

HUNT,

D.Litt., M.A.

HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG; FELLOW OF LINCOLN COLLEGE, OXFORD

WITH

SIX

PLATES

1^%5?)
LONDON
SOLD AT
.•;.;
•.
:

:;
St.,

:

:

The Offices of the EGYPT
AND
8

EXPLORATION FUND,
;

37

Great Russell

W.C.

KEGAN
BERNARD

Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., Paternoster House, Charing Cross Road, W.C. QUARITCH, 15 Piccadilly, W. ASHER & CO., 13 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C.

and

henry FROWDE, Amen
1903

Corner, E.C.

OXFORD
HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

PREFACE
In accordance with the chronological arrangement adopted by
us in the publication of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri, the present volume
is

devoted to second century

texts,

with the exception of the theo-

logical

and some of the

classical

papyri.

The

selection of

documents

here published

in full or

described probably represents less than half
t>ut it is

the second century material discovered in 1897,
in future

our intention
to the sixth,

volumes
10

to deal with successive centuries

up

and then

return

to the older papyri temporarily passed over.

In the spring of this year excavations at Oxyrhynchus were resumed,

and another large
the
in

find of papyri

was made, including a
from the new

certain

number

of the late Ptolemaic

period.

These, together with a selection of
find, will

more important
Part IV, which

literary texts

be published

we hope

to issue vithin a year.

In proportion to the space in the present volume occupied by

the literary fragments
to

our debt

is

the

greater to Professor Blass,

whom
to

is

due the
large

identification

of several of the classical pieces,
together

and

a

extent

their

reconstruction,

with

many

suggestions in the commentary.

Mr.

J.

G. Smyly has rendered us
received

much

assistance,
;

especially in

connexion with questions of ancient

mathematics
papyri.

the help \vhich
is

we have
in

on special points

from other scholars

acknowledged

connexion with the individual

BERNARD

P. S.

ARTHUR
Oxford,
June, 1903.

GRENFELL. HUNT.

a 3

CONTENTS
Preface
List of Plates
vii
viii
.
. . .

Table of Papyri Note on the Method of Publication' and List of Abbreviations

xi

TEXTS
L
II.

III.

IV.

Theological (401-407) New Classical Fragments (408-444) Fragments of Extant Classical Authors (445-463) I\Iiscell.«eous Literary Fragments (464-470)
Second Century Dccuments
(a)
:

13

84
123 147

V.

Official (471-476)

{) Returns
(f)
((/)

()
.

(477-483)

i6i

Petitions (484-488)

1/4
187 208
241

(

Wills (489-495) Contracts (496-509)

(/) Receipts (510-518) (g) Accounts (519-522)

254

() Private Correspondence (523-533)
VI.
VII.

260
.

Coll.\tions of Homeric Fragments (534-573)

274

Descriptions of Second Century Documents (574-653)

279

INDICES
I.

New

II.

III.

Literary Fragsients Emperors Months and Days
.

.

291

304
305 305

IV.

V.
VI.

Personal Names Geographical
Religion

313 316

CONTENTS
VII.

VII

PAGE
Official and Military Titles

VIII.

Weights, Measures, and Coins

317 318

IX.

X.

Taxes General Index of Greek Words

319 319

LIST OF PLATES
I.

403

redo,

405, 406 verso
(Col.
ii)

II.

408, 409

iii)

....
i-ii),

III.

409
412

(Col.

IV.

404(c) redo, 410 (Cols,
420, 446, 447, 455

445

al the end.
(a)

V.

VI.

...

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A.D.

401.

Gospel of

St.

Matthew

i-ii

.

5th or 6th cent.

402.

First Epistle of St.

John

iv
I)

Late 4th or 5th cent. Late 4th or 5th cent. Late 3rd or 4th cent.
1)

403.

Apocalypse of Baruch xii-xiv (Plate

404.
407.

Shepherd of Hermas (Plate IV)
Christian Prayer

.

405-406.
408.
409.
410. 411.
412.
413. 414.
415.

Theological Fragments (Plate

3rd cent.

Late 3rd or 4th
Early 2nd cent.

cent.

Pindar Odes (Plate II)

13 17

Menander

(Plates II

Rhetorical Treatise (Plate
Life of Alcibiades
Julius Africanus

and IV)

III)
.

2nd 2nd

cent.
cent.

26
31

5th or 6th cent.
(Plate

V)

Farce and IMirne
Philosophical Fragment

Isaeus

?
. .
.

225-265 2nd cent. Late 2nd or 2nd cent.
.

36
41
early 3rd cent.

57

4ie.
417.

Romance ? Romance ?

3rd cent.

59 60
61

.

.

.

.

Early 3rd cent.

418.
419.

Scholia on Iliad

i

.

.

.

Late

I St

or early
cent.

2nd
.

cent.

63

Euripides Archelmis

.

2nd or 3rd
(Plate

65
66
67 76

420. Argument of Euripides' Ekcira 421-434. Poetical Fragments 435-444. Prose Fragments
445.

VI)

3rd cent.

2nd or 3rd
Late
I St

cent.

.

to early 4th cent.

446. 447.

448. 449.
450. 451.
452.

Homer Homer Homer Homer

Iliad Iliad

vi

(Plate

IV)

.

2nd or 3rd

cent.

.

84
91
.

xiii

(Plate

VI)

Late 2nd cent.

Iliad xxiii (Plate VI)

2nd or

early 3rd cent.

93
94 lOI 103 103

Odyssey xxii and xxiii

3rd cent.
3rd cent. 3rd cent. 3rd cent.

Euripides Andromache

Euripides Medea

Thucydides Thucydides Thucydides

ii

.

iv
vi

.

2nd or 3rd
Late
ist or

cent.

.

104
105 105 109

453. 454.
455. 456.

Plato Gorgias

....
.

2nd cent.

2nd

cent.

Plato Republic

iii

(Plate VI)
. . .

3rd cent.

Plato Republic

iv

Late 2nd or early 3rd cent.

no

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A.D.

457.

Aeschines In Ciesiphonlem Aeschines

.

458.

De Falsa

Legatione

.

459.
460.
461.

Demosthenes Contra Aristocratem Demosthenes De Pace

462.
463.

Demosthenes De Corona Demosthenes De Corona

.

.

Xenophon Anabasis
Astrological

vi

464.
465.
466.
467.

Epigrams

Astrological Calendar

Directions for Wrestling

Alchemistic Fragment

468.

Medical Fragment
.Grammatical Rules
.

469.
470.
471.

Mathematical Treatise

Speech of an Advocate Speech of an Advocate Decree
in

472. 473.

Honour of a Gymnasiarch
.

474.
475.
476.
477.

Circular to OflScials

Report of an Accident
Report of Mummifiers
Registration of an
Selection of

Ephebus
{fnUpiait)

478.
479.

Boys

Census-Return

480.
481.

Census-Return

.... ....
and Praefect

Property-Return

482. 483.

Property-Return
Application for Leave to Mortgage
Petition to the Strategus

484.
485. 486.
487.

Notification to the Strategus
Petitions to the Epistrategus

Petition to the Epistrategus Petition to the Epistrategus

488. 489.
490.
491.

Will of Dionysius
Will of Tastraton

Will of

Eudaemon

492. 493. 494.
495.

Will of Thatres

....
.

Will of Pasion and Berenice
Will of Acusilaus

Will of Petosorapis

496.
497.

Marriage Contract Marriage Contract

TABLE OF PAPYRI

NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
In the following pages the same general method
volumes.
is

followed as in preceding

Of

struction in

new literary texts a few are modern style being appended to a
the

printed in a dual form, a reconliteral transcript.

In most other

fragments of extant authors, the originals are reproduced except for division of words, addition of capital initials to proper names, expanIn 413, sion of abbreviations, and supplements, so far as possible, of lacunae.
cases, as well as in the

however, accentuation and punctuation have been introduced for the sake of greater clearness, and this system has also been adopted with the majority of
the
literary

fragments

in

the 'miscellaneous'

section

(IV).

Additions or

by the same hand as the body of the text are in small thin type, those by a different hand in thick type. Non-literary texts are given in modern style only. Abbreviations and symbols are resolved, the latter being all of the common kind. Additions and corrections are usually incorporated in the text and their occurrence is recorded in the critical notes in the few instances where it was desirable to reproduce alterations in the original, a later hand is distinguished, as in the literary texts, by thick type. Faults of orthography, &c., Iota are corrected in the critical notes wherever any difficulty could arise. Square adscript is printed when so written, otherwise iota subscript is used.
corrections
;

brackets

[ ]

indicate a lacuna, round brackets

( )

the resolution of a symbol or
;

double abbreviation, angular brackets { } a. mistaken omission in the original square brackets [[ J] mean that the letters within them have been deleted in
}, that the letters so enclosed, though actually written, Dots placed within brackets represent the approximate number of letters lost or deleted. Dots outside brackets indicate mutilated or otherwise illegible letters. Letters with dots underneath them are to be considered doubtful. Heavy Arabic numerals refer to the texts of the Oxyrhynchus papyri published in this volume and in Parts I-II ordinary numerals to lines;

the original, braces

{

should be omitted.

;

small

Roman

numerals to columns.

xii

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
The
abbreviations used in referring to papyrological publications are prac-

tically the

same as those adopted by Wilcken
I

in

Archiv

I.

i.

pp. 35-38, viz.:

P.

Anih.

and

11 = The

Amherst Papyri
Hunt.

(Greek), Vols. I

and

II,

by B.

P.

Grenfell and

A.

S.

Archiv = Archiv fur Papyrusforschung. B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den Konigl. Museen zu Berlin, Griech. Urkunden. P. Brit. Mus. I and II = Catalogue of Greek Papyri in the British Museum, Vols. I and II, by F. G. Kenyon. C. P. R. = Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. P. Cairo = Greek Papyri in the Cairo Museum, Catalogue by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. P. Fay. Towrns = FayQm Towns and their Papyri, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and D. G. Hogarth. P. Gen. = Les Papyrus de Geneve, by J. Nicole. P. Grenf. I and II = Greek Papyri, Series I, by B. P. Grenfell Series II, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. P. Oxy. I and II = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I and II, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. Rev. Laws = Revenue Laws of Ptolemy Philadelphus, by B. P. Grenfell, with Introduction by the Rev. J. P. Mahaffy. P. Tebt. I = The Tebtunis Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and J. G. Smyly. Wilcken, Ost. = Griechische Ostraka, by U. Wilcken.
;

I.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

401.

St.

Matthew's Gospel,
7

I-II.

X 9-5

c"i•

These few verses from the end of the first and the beginning of the second chapter of the Gospel according to St. Matthew are contained on part of a leaf from a vellum book. Unless the text was in double columns, which would make
the book a very unlikely .shape, the leaves were unusually small in size
;

for

though the columns are incomplete at both top and bottom only two or three lines are missing between the last line of the verso and the first of the recto. The handwriting, which is in well-formed slightly sloping uncials of medium size, may be assigned to the fifth or sixth century. It is somewhat faded, and a second hand has here and there rewritten letters and lectional signs with a darker ink,

made by the original scribe, who was not very careful. judge from this fragment, the te.xt followed by the MS. was a good one, having af¥inities with the Codex Sinaiticus. We give a collation with the text of Westcott and Hort and with the Textus Receptus.
besides correcting mistakes

To

Verso.

Redo.

\• \>

\\\(

5
ei>

[ [
[(
revere

[]
20

[]] [

(([
ev ev

ecoy

»

Xe

[[]]

( ?
(€

[
L
J

»'0»'1
J

'^

• ^
^
..

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
6

trapeyevovTO

eij

eyep
.,

\(
L

\ €\<
L
J

Se] J

(
j(^y

\

/^
TeMtJJxWets
rs
,

^
\

ir

<

\eTaiev "
<

]
'^
'

wpocr 1^
25

avveXlos 1
1
\.

€[ [

(

r

-.

r.

i^jj^

. The
5.
6.

supplement
is

at the

end of the
f

Above and below
for

was also apparently the
7.
:

10. eyip[(9«t: so
11.

^
;

the superfluous
;

the final

fills the available space. are short horizontal strokes by the second hand. has been partially rewritten by the later hand, but

line hardly

original reading.

W-H., with most MSS.
;

NBCZ, W-H. The spacing suits St]
[6]

Sityipue'is

[>]

&c.,

T-R.

W-H.

(,

C'DEKLM,

&c., T-R. &c.) better than i< o]

[] (BCDELM,

14-5. The vestiges are indecisive between mov (t^BZ, W-H.) and (CDEKLM, T-R.), since with either reading the letters av would come where they appear to do in 1. 14, and there is not enough at the beginning of 1. 15 to show whether the word to which belongs was abbreviated or not. 15. Or perhaps tKoktae [, which would suit the length of the line rather better. 22. The final s of XtyovTts seems to have been accidentally omitted by the original
scribe.

:

23.

The

correction of

is

by the second hand.

402.

First Epistle of St. John, IV.
8x5-2
cm.
wfritten in a clear semi-uncial

A

fragment of a leaf from a papyrus book,

hand towards the end of the fourth or in the fifth century, and containing part The usual contractions found in biblical MSS. occur, and of I John iv. 11-7.
a horizontal stroke at the end of
tions.
lines is

used apparently to indicate abbrevia-

The

text

is

curiously corrupt, considering

evidence of extremely careless copying.
Recto.

6s

[

[ (

]]

its

early date, and bears

Verso.

[
[oy

eav

ovSeti

Toyeiu eav
5

e{v)

[]

\( ^[
403.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
'^'
ef

Os fv]

] (€yl []
earif
€j(t

r.

[

[€€€6'

^]^

]>

]

/
?

!
^ ~
[]!

] [•\ €<
iv
i]r

eV
iv

€v T0VTCO TeT]eX[fia>Tai

Redo.
3-4. end of 1. 2
is

I.

ranpiaev

is

Corrupt for

T/yairijffiV.

the Order of the MSS., but the supplement at the already long enough, and roveiv is an easy corruption of iv the reading of the MSS., the papyrus seems Verso. 4-5. Instead of 5eot (V i. e. a repetition of the preceding words with the substitution to have of for /xi'ffi. is of is Written above the line, owing to want of spacej_ and St. Gtos is the 7. The scribe seems to have mixed up the contractions reading of the MSS. 8. KoT stands for have which is omitted by A, the other MSS. being 10. After fV {^ and divided. It is not certain that a letter is lost after but since (v is required to iill up the lacuna in I. 11, and the. horizontal stroke is used by this scribe merely as a sign

(6

oiSfh

is

\

, !

«

.

(,

.

,
(~,

of abbreviation

(of.

1.

8),

[/i]f(>/(t) is

more probable than

i.

e. «V.

403.

Apocalypse of Baruch, XII-XIV,
14x11
cm.

Plate

I {recto).

Of

the numerous theological works of an Apocalyptic character composed
or after the

shortly before
interesting
is
is

beginning of the Christian

era,

one of the most

the Apocalypse of Baruch, which like many other apocryphal works preserved only in a translation from the Greek. To the recovery of a con-

siderable fragment of the

Greek original of the Ascension of Isaiah
only from the Ethiopic version,

(P.

Amh.

1. 1),

previously

known

in its entirety

now

succeeds

a small fragment of the Apocalypse of Baritch in the language from which the extant Syriac translation is derived, though whether the Greek text is itself
derived from

Hebrew

is

disputed.

Prof. Charles,
is

who

has published the latest

and

fullest edition

of that Apocalypse,

strongly in favour of a

Hebrew

original,

4

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

but his reasons are not very convincing, and the present fragment illustrates the
precarious character of arguments based on retranslations into a supposed original

through a version which is itself not extant. The papyrus is part of a leaf from a book, written in brown ink in a large slightly sloping uncial hand of a moderately early Byzantine type, probably
not later than the

The high
of the

point

is

initial letters

{($
by another
created

imperfect condition of the lines preserved,
for

in 1. 4. The curious is mis-spelt person, and tendency to omit the definite article (cf. 11. 16 and 34), which produces a certain But in spite of its harshness, is, however, not likely to be due to the scribe. smallness the fragment is of much interest as affording for the first time a direct

^
fifth

century, and perhaps as early as the end of the fourth.
is

frequently used, and there of lines.

The
in

text, so far as
is

not very good
first

1.

28)

of the

^
II.

a tendency to increase the size can be judged from the very
;

one certain error

hand has been corrected

opportunity of testing the fidelity of the Syriac translation.

The impression
was

by a comparison
In one passage

of the two versions

is

that the Syriac translator

much

less accurate than, for instance,
(11.

Isaiah.

the Ethiopic translator of the Ascension of 6-8) he has expanded the three verbs of the Greek

by adding a synonym in each case. In another he seems to have misapprehended the meaning of the Greek, and to have introduced an idea
into six

which

is

quite inappropriate to the context

(cf.

note on

35-7).

The

references at the side of the text

and the translation of the Syriac

version are taken from the edition of Prof. Charles,

whom we

have to thank
first

for

several suggestions in the reconstruction of the fragment.

The

ten lines

of the verso are the conclusion of a prophecy of Baruch
(i.e.

against

Babylon

Rome).

The

recto is part of a

from the height,' and is but which the Greek helps to explain.

prophecy against the Gentiles by 'a voice a passage which has caused commentators much difficulty,

Verso.

\€ [
[

17 letters

7;]
]
ovSje

]

oio[v]

5

[

^
km

[ves

]>'

[SoKa

10

15

? ^ (\ [( ] ]' [ [ [ \ ]( [npos
t]t)S

[

^]
eine

403.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
en[i]

ef]

[?

^ (
e^

5

[]
xiii.

4

g

eyw]

<]}

em

tovs

2

[5?

[
•[

aKove]

Recto.

[
20

T01S fv

[ €
[
€!'
fi^[e]i

[ • ^[€
eino[v

14 letters

evep
aei

[

25

[€](•

[]•

€)(^]([

(
30
Tois

[ •
(

[( [(
[
7r[Aeoi'

[

^ [

ev eKCivoii

ovs emei

/y•

(v

\\[

^-

2-5• 'But will say this as I think, and speak against thee, the land which is prospering. Not always does the noonday burn, nor do the rays of the sun constantly

6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
light.'


give
'

The
is

which

translated as

Syriac here agrees verbally with the Greek, for the equivalent of an adjective by Prof. Charles, who supplies ' always with
'

the verb, is, as the Greek shows, to be constructed adverbially. 6-8. ' And do not thou expect to rejoice, nor condemn greatly.'

The

Syriac has
'

not conclude or expect that thou wilt always be prosperous and rejoicing, and be not and do not oppress ' (the last verb emended by Prof Charles to be not boastful '), thus duplicating all the three verbs of the Greek, but no doubt wrongly.
greatly uplifted

Do

6([€
now
Prof.
is

IS

equally possible in

11.

7-8.

8—10. 'For assuredly in
restrained
'

its season the wrath will be awakened against thee which by long-suffering as it were by a rein.' This agrees with the Syriac. Charles translates which now in long-suffering but the traces before
. . .

6[! are incompatible
the mighty God."
1 8.
crrnj[:

'

;

the second letter being either r or t. 10-6. 'And having said these things I fasted seven days. And it came to pass after this that I, Baruch, was standing upon Mount Zion, and lo a voice came forth from the height and said to me " Stand upon thy feet, Baruch, and hear the word of

with

-

eu,

I

'

Here too the Syriac shows no
cf.
1.

definite article before

the
'

first

letter

may

24 be

:.

variation.

For the omission of the

,

and the second

but not

.

The

Syriac version

lo-i has They were therefore chastened then that they might receive mercy. But now, ye peoples and nations, ye are debtors because all this time ye have trodden down the earth, and used the creation unrighteously.' 21-2. 'For ye were always being benefited but were always ungrateful.' The Syriac has For I have always benefited you and ye have always denied the beneficence,' which differs by the introduction of the first person, and the use of an active instead of a passive verb in the first half of the sentence. Prof. Charles notes that the order of the words in the Syriac is unusual, and a corruption may be suspected. 23-5. 'And I answered and said "Behold, thou hast shown me the methods of the times and that which will be." The Syriac differs slightly by having a singular word for and by inserting after these things after will be.' The 25-7. It is clear that the Greek and Syriac here diverged from each other. Syriac has and thou hast said unto me that the retribution which was spoken of by thee will be of advantage to the nations.' As Prof. Charles acutely remarks, the idea of a remedial chastisement of the Gentiles seems out of place, and something is probably wrong with the Syriac text. The verb found in the Greek, does not suggest anything like be of advantage to,' and taken in conjunction with the meaning ' endured is in every way more satisfactory. Of the two doubtful letters at the beginning of 1. 26 the second could be , , or t, but the first, if not , can only be p, and or p[o]i is very intractable, while a compound of is required. The phrase will be of advantage to,' to which Prof. Charles objected, may therefore be regarded as an error of the Syriac translator. In some other respects Prof. Charles seems to us to have slightly exaggerated the inconsistencies in chapters x-xiv cf. p. 34 of his edition, does not seem an impossible description of the prophecy in ch. xiii, and if the retribution spoken of by thee is first mentioned by the cities, not by God, nevertheless it occurs in a speech put by the voice from the height into the mouth of the prosperous cities,' of whom the abrupt mention (cf. Hid. p. 22) is not so very surprising after a section devoted to Babylon and the land which is prospering.' 27-32. The Syriac has And now I know that those who have sinned are many and they have lived in prosperity and departed from the world, but that few nations will be left in those times to whom those words shall be said which thou didst say.' The Greek does not materially differ. In 1. 27 there is room for a word not expressed
of
vv.
'

(!

'

'

'

'

'

'

,

'

^

'

(5

;

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

404.
in the

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

"
being

Syriac, but (corresponding to oXt-ya 8f in 1. 30) would perhaps be sufficient. phrase meaning 'in prosperity' is required at the end of 1. 28 ; but it is difficult to find a word short enough if 01 is the article, so it should perhaps be regarded as the relative, The erroneous reading of the first hand when there will be no need for by a different writer who used much blacker ink. In 1. 31 is corrected to Perhaps f/jfi nt. is rather too long for the lacuna. 32-3. The Syriac has ' For what advantage is there in this or what (evil) worse than what we have seen befall us are we to expect to see ?

A

.

(!

404.

Shepherd of Hermas.
Fr. (f) 7-8

X

5-3 cm.

Plate IV

(Fr. {c) recto).

Three fragments of a

leaf from a papyrus book, inscribed

on both sides

in

a sloping uncial hand of the late third or fourth century, the surface of the verso

much damaged.

No
all

line

is

complete, and indeed very few complete words
is

are preserved, so that nizing the

the greater credit

due

to Mr. V. Bartlet for recog-

scraps as belonging to the lost Greek ending of the Shepherd of
3.

Hermas
190, Fr.

[Simil. x.

3

4. 3).

They

thus form a useful supplement to P.

Amh.

()

verso,

another papyrus fragment of the missing Greek portion of the

same work, and demonstrate with equal clearness that Simonides' version of the cf. P. Amh. 190 introd. last leaf of the Athos codex was a forgery
;

The
detail

text of the present papyrus seems to have dififered in

many

points of

from those which were the basis of the extant translations of the last chapters of the Similitudincs, and only a few lines on the recto can be restored
is for the most part illegible. Fragments (a) and [b) all but join each other but there seems to be a narrow and the top of Fr. (c), causing the loss of lacuna between the bottom of Fr. a whole line on the recto. In Fr. (i) the ends of 11. iS-aa are preserved, and since these arc by no means even the number of letters lost at the ends of 11. 11-17 may vary from 0-3. We have reconstructed 11. 15-21 on the hypothesis that

with any approach to certainty, while the verso
;

)

about II
Frs. {a)

letters
{b) it

are lost at the beginnings.
is

From

the lines of breakage in
11.

and

probable that the lacunae at the end of
11.

same

size as those in

11-17, and that the lacunae at the beginning of
11.

4-8 are of the 11. 2-6

correspond to those at the beginnings of

15-22.

We

are indebted to Mr. V. Bartlet for several suggestions in the reconstruction

of the fragments.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Recto.
Verso.

Fragments

{a)

and
iv

{b).

[

{ \(\[ [ \ ][
\
eav
[
[

[<
.

ovv

[

]v{•
{•]'

.][
[•]"[
[

[•••]•
25
[•

eav Se

•][•]
•]

5

[.

.

.

.

[4

letters

[
9 [19
II

„ »

)(\[ ]€[] ]

]
]?

[-^[,]
.

?^[

[.

.

€[. .]«..[
.

[.])

[

[.

.

[••]••[
3° [••]•[
[•]•••
[.]
.

Xeycu

€7[]^ [«

[•

[•
.

line lost.

6[
.

Fragment {.

15

[ [ [ [
[
[

20

] ][ [ ] [ [ ] [ [\] ]
[.]
. .

[.]y

[

[14 letters ]Tas

[

]

ets

[.

.

[•]••• VT"[

[ovTOS

ovSe

ray

[

[ 6[ ] ] [ ] [][ [] > '[\
Xjeyet

35

[•]

i'f
rrj
.

[

[.]
[.

.

.

.

.

[

.]

;€'[
.

.

.

[•]o-ej'a

[
[

[.]
<»?

[']

eco^oi

[]5

ras

avTais

(i) Versio x. 3. 2-5) are as follows omnes habentes gratiam apud dominum. igitur si habuennt donium iuam puram, tecum permanebunt ; sin autem pusillum aliquid inquinaiionis accident, protinus a domo dico ei: Spero me, hae enim virgines nullam oninitto diligunt inquinationem. tua recedent. et sicut hie, cui vie tradidomine, placiturum eis, ita iit in domo mea libenter habiient semper,

1-22. Vulgata:

The
.

extant versions of this passage {Simil.

:

.

.

et

disti,

nihil de

me

queritur, ita neque illae querentur.

servum dei
caturum.
eas
. .

velle vivere et

haec

cum

ait ad pastor cm ilium : Video, inquit, custoditurum haec mandata, et virgines has habitatione munda conlodixisset, iterum pastori illi me tradidit, et vocavit eas virgines et dixit ad

.

404.
:

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
.
. .

9

si ergo habuerint el cunclam habentes gratiam apud dominum. (2) Codex Palatinus domum tuam puram, iectun permancbunl ; sin aulem in aliguo spurca fuerit domus lua, prolinus

hae enim virgines spurcitiam tion amanl. et ego dixi : Domine, spero domo mca lihenler ct semper habitent. et sicul hie, cui me Iradideinde ait ad disti, nihil de me qitcritur, ila nequc illae virgines aliquid de me querentur. ilium pastorem : Scio hunc mandata cuslodire, el virgines has in habilalionem mundam eonlocaturum. haec cum dixissel, riirsus eidem paslori me Iradidit, et virgines illas vocavit dixitqut

recedunt a domo tua.

me placiturum

eis ila [«/] in

ad

illas

.

.

.

gratiam apud dominum. el simul atque te ; si aulem paululum immunda fuerit aliqua re, prolitius dcrelinquent domum tuam. nam omnino tion desiderant impuritatem illae virgines. et dixi ei : Confido, domine, me placiturum eis ut laetantes habitent in domo mea
el habenl (3) Versio Aethiopica Latine invencrinl puram domum tuam, permanebimt apud
: .

.

.

semper ; sicul ilk cui me tradidisti nihil habet quo increpet me, sic illae nihil habebunt quo increpent me. et dixit paslori : Scio vitam velle servum domini, et servalurum esse haec mandata, et virginibus placiturum in pur Hate, et postquam rursus Iradidit me, virgines vocavit et
dixit eis
.
. .

(),
the line

in this line ought to correspond to pusillum -), inqui?iationis or acciderit (yfnjTni or Those of the but the vestiges are very intractable. third letter suit a better than anything else, but unfortunately no occurs elsewhere in the papyrus. The fifth letter is very uncertain The last letter of is possible, but not v.
4.

The word

,,,
is
.

represented only by the bottom of a vertical stroke and may be i. Neither nor are admissible. 5. Possibly 7—8. Perhaps but the substantive in 1. 8 doubt corresponded to the adjective in 1. 4 which seems not to have been pvrrapos. 1 1 Perhaps rnujras as t[ov aKOfa I the has been corrected from t (?). The papyrus thus agrees with the Codex Palatinus and Ethiopic version (scio) against the Vulgate (video). 18. fv SO the Ethiopia in puritate; the Latin versions have habitatione munda or in habilalionem mundam. 22. The word or words lost at the beginning of this line have nothing corresponding

^
:
:

(),

(

\(]' {^ |.

.

[:

, \.
;

\[

to

them

in the versions.

40-2. The corresponding passages of the versions (Simil. x. 4. 3) are as follows: Versio Vulgata qui ftovit igitur cala?nitatem huiusmodi hominis et non eripit eum, magnum peccatum admiltit et reus fit sanguinis eius. facile igitur, &c. (2) Codex Palatinus: [qui novit igitur^ angustiam eius et non redimit eum magnum peccatum admiltit et fit reus sanguinis eius. (3) Versio Aethiopica Latine: qui aulem novit adflictimiem eius qui ila se habet nee salvat eum, magnum peccatum admiltit et fit occisor eius. The papyrus differs from these considerably not only is the plural found in place of the singular (reus), but the remains of 1. 40 do not in the least support anything like magnum peccatum admiltit. Apparently the papyrus omitted that phrase and in its stead had a participial phrase depending upon the preceding words which is not represented in the translations, y of ytii\ovrai has been corrected, probably from or .
(

) I

;

(«)

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
405-406.
Theological Fragments.
Plate
I

(405 and 406

verso).

We here group together fragments of two different theological works, which we have not been able to identify, both containing quotations from the New Testament. 405 consists of seven fragments written in a small neat uncial hand, which is not later than the first half of the third century, and might be as old as the and it is "js occur The ordinary contractions Bs, latter part of the second.

,

;

clear that the use of these goes

back

far into the second century.

Besides

its

early date

probably the oldest Christian fragment yet published), 405 is interesting on account of a quotation from St. Matthew iii. 16-7 describing the Baptism, which is indicated by wedge-shaped signs in the margin similar to
(it is

those employed for

up short hues, e.g. in ¥r.{a) 11. 9 and 13. book and contains the quotation from The citation Isaiah vi. 10 also found in Matthew xiii. 15 and Acts xxviii. 27. found after appears here in its New Testament form, omitting the The large and upright uncial hand is comparable with in the LXX version. Besides that of 25 and 224 and is probably to be assigned to the third century. in 1. ai. the ordinary contractions we have Jarpvos for
filling

406

is

part of a leaf from a papyrus

43
4-8 cm.

406.
(a)

Ft. (a) 8•3

Plate

I.

Col.

i.

Col.

ii.

]

.

.

[.

.

\
\
emOi
]•[]•

.

[.]

> >

>

2

> >

^ ([
C[

[][

]([
30

eiSev

[(
[

[

][

nepiarepav

€7

)[
[
.

>
>

[

] ]\

.
|

405-406.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

]
25

aWoi

[
Se

[l]i]y

[

]oXy
35

[

pifva)[

(d)

(e)

i«r<-]f[
[TToy

7•[
ai;[
.

Ijov
,

40
y

[
/cat

.

[.

.

.\

av[

]

\-[][
45

[
]

£

•[
.
'

[.]

[

[

'7[

]•7[

[
.

(/)

[

55

]
]
.
.

]<[
a>fOS
.

[

[

][

1 6-22. Owing to the number of variations in the text of this passage (Matt. iii. 16-7) and the irregularities of the papyrus with regard to the ends of lines, as shown by Col. i, in 1. 18 in 1. 14 and some of the restorations are rather doubtful. Both which was written out in full, ro and may have been contracted. In 15, if and that are omitted by and B, may have been also omitted by the papyrus papyrus is fairly certain. was not in the which is found in some MSS. beTore The supplement in 1. 17 is rather short. The only known variant which would Ise longer is for tV, found in several cursives. In 1. 19 there is certainly not room for the best1.

attested reading oJros cWik 6 vios

reading

e7 for ovtos

ianv, or else

, :
6

;

, ,
D

either the

papyrus agreed with
after

was omitted or placed

.

in

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
406.
I

- 1 X 7-5

COT.

Plate

I

(z'd'rji)).

[]
5

Verso.

Redo.
KapSia
]
. .

[ ![ €
[
tois

yap

[

-

]

.

.

.

tovs

15

[]
10
7•[.
.

8 <[[(
tois

\€

]
]
.

]

?

.[•].•

[•]i''a»'f

]

]••/?[

[]
.

2
]os

jwttou v'ios

a[vT0us

Xs
][

.]€[.]

[.]oie[

]
.
. .

[•

•••]«[••>[

.

[

6.

[

is

found here only in a few inferior

MSS.

407.

Christian Prayer.

A
of

short

regular, uncials,

century.

On

in rather elongated and ornate, though not very which we should assign to the end of the third or to the fourth prayer,' and below a brief memorandum the verso is the title

prayer written

'

A

some amounts
fleoy

!
5

[]
in cursive.

[[^]]

ev

[]

[]

! !
ev

5
eis

ev avTOts

!

408.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

13

On

the verso

lo

() ()(
X^p{
)
:

'/^)

[
cxlvi.

?).

God Almighty, who madest heaven and earth and sea and all that is therein, help me, have mercy upon me, wash away my sins, save me in this world and in the world to come, through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, through whom is the glory and the power for ever and ever. Amen.'
I.

3.

.

... ...

the phrase
cf.

is

from Psalm
doubtful;

:

Ps.

The meaning of
ii.

unlikely to be the liquid measure found in the forms
a 6, 531.
5.

{
1.

9
)

!

is

with

,
6;
cf.

Neh.

ix. 6,

Apoc.

xiv. 7.

&C. immediately following, it is in B. G. U. 248. and

/)(€)

or xap^is)

is

more probable.

II.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
408.

Odes of Pindar.
13x15
in
COT.

Fr. (a)

Plate

II.

Four

fragments of a lyric work

Pindaric dialect written in medium-sized

uncials, with

a few corrections and marginal notes in various hands. On the verso are some money accounts in a second century cursive. The writing on the recio, which bears much resemblance to that of the semi-uncial contracts

from Oxyrhynchus of the Domitian-Trajan period (e. g. 270), belongs to the early part of the second century or even to the end of the first. Sub-divisions of the poern are indicated by paragraphi, while an elaborate coronis apparently marks the beginning of a new poem, as in the Bacchylides papyrus; the high stop is

employed, and occasional breathings, accents, and marks of elision and quantity occur. Fragment (b) probably belongs to the second column of fragment (a), and since this arrangement accounts for forty-eight lines in this column, it is
unlikely that

more than two or

three,

if

any, lines are lost between those two

fragments.

The

position of fragments

(c)

and

(d) is obscure.

14

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

The authorship of the piece is made certain, as was perceived by Blass, with the by the correspondence of the last line of fragment {b) ]v beginning of Pindar, Fr. 235 (Christ), a quotation in Flat. Quaest. Symp. vii.

5.

a

(cf.

De

soil.
:

auim. 36) of a passage in which the poet compares himself

to a dolphin

(

(.\<\.

-nphs

(
11.

kparbv

Pindaric fragment (aoo) occurs in

58-9

;

cf.

note ad

? .;
11.

[

Another extant
first

loc.

Dismissing the

twenty-two

lines, of

most of the last and in 11. 54-69 part of the first strophe of the next. The subject of the antistrophe, which has sufi'ered much damage through the obliteration of the ink in the latter parts of several lines, is the vengeance taken by Heracles upon

which the merest fragments remain, we have in 11. 23-43 antistrophe and in 11. 43-54 part of the last epode of one poem,

Laomedon.

Though

the general thread of the construction in
is

23-35 has yet

to be discovered, their restoration

a by no means hopeless undertaking, for

the vestiges of letters in the effaced parts are generally sufficient to verify the
right conjectures

when they

are made.

The second poem
its title,

has in the margin at

the beginning traces of what seems to have been
to give a clue to the subject.

but these are too slight

The

first

strophe contains an interesting tribute

by Pindar to one of his predecessors in the field of lyric poetry, which may be compared with the conclusion of the recently discovered Persae of Timotheus. In this, as in the other new classical fragments, many of the restorations of lacunae and suggestions in the commentary are due to Blass.
{a)

Col.

] ][.
i.

.]

jreNtON

] ]
]

]
jMeTePAi

]06

]•

/€;[]'

]•

6 lines

lost.

]••

]
. .

][.
Col.
.
. .

[. .!
.

. ![

.]NAICANA[
.

QYTAT

[

25

HPAKAeHC-

AAIAJ[.

..]..[

.

7/9'5[]'
.
. .

.

.

[
30

408.

NEW
.]HC[.]
.

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
[.]
.

15

[.]! €€[.][.]
.

NAiMOAONTAC[.]r[.

C06N

]•[•]•••
. .

€[
.
.
.

^[.][. [.][
.

[

.]

^[] yap

/ []05
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Kiveu>[v]

e

.

.

.

OCATA|[N]10AAIAI

0S

1[]16[.]0
.]
.

€[. [.]0

35

nAPOYeNrYAAOICeCCATOA[.]AKTI

€€
.

[]
.

[. .jiaaec
. •

.

.

c[.]

nay

,

40


.]

0€060
.... ON

[] ,. ' ,-,
re
.

[/1]
.

.

.

.

(V

&[]

6€

45

[.][.] [. .[.] [
]![.
.]

.
. .

.

€€
.
.

.

.

![
]
.

Tpeis
.


-

.

[

[

.

[
50
53

]<«[
]«>

[ [ [ 0[ [
[.
.

.

.

re

[.
. . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

OPriOICA[
. . .

.

.

.

].77[

.]

{]
. .
.

.

.

.

i6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

]

[ [
.

AY

[.

.

.

.]€[

][ ]00[
.

[ [.
.

6[
![

]PAYCONIA[

65

[.]0[ 61[ •[
[.
.

[.][

]ICAN0

[

[
Kes

] ] [/, []
[.
.
.

€],[
Tti

.

.

['

Avaopia[s

Tr6\]i9,
. .

Se
.

[6]\
irairjd^ya

€[.][ .]0€0[ .]€[
[.
.

([ .€[][>[] 4[

. .

,

.]OMAinPOCAYTA[

[.

.

[]
{d)

[]

TTpbs

[ [6
-

70

]/^[

{
]NOCA[
jATec
]

]0€[

][
][
more
like N.

][
11.
12.

[

The supposed
/jai/Tft;/ia[r]ioi' is

at the

end of the

line are really

and so

hand in the margin between 11. 12 and 30, Probably it and the marginal adscript goes might refer to either. at the beginning of the new poem (1. 55) were due to the same person, who may be identical The note below 1. 69 is almost certainly in a dififerent with the writer of the main text. hand, and the corrections in 11. 31, 32 and 63 seem to be by a third person. occurs in Eur. or 5s can be read. either 30. BACIAH[ Here. Fur. 391 as an epithet of Cycnus, who was killed by Heracles. But here the king
written in a semi-uncial
far as its position
:

[\\
1.

!
is

'

who murders strangers is Laomedon cf. 40. 32. The founder of Delos is no doubt Apollo. 33. The doubtful € after HAYC may be A.
'

;

'

'

34.

Hymn
and
side,

to

Hermes, but
'

occurs in Pindar, Is/A. is new.

[]!

8.

47, and

(-!

found

in the

Homeric

36-42.
to his

Remember that he set up an altar in the dells of holy Paros to thee, the king, honoured father, son of Cronos, having passed over the isthmus to the other when he came a herald of fated doom to Laomedon.'

.

addressed ; cf. 1. 35 The subject of is Heracles, who, according to Apollodorus ii. § 99, came to Paros when on his quest for Hippolyte's girdle, after which enterprise he went to Troy, means 2. 13 Kpovu nai. Zeus; cf.
36.
is

& ,
409.
for

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
(\(.

17

ApoUo being

.

-

song and harmony were devised by one of the Locrians who dwell 55 sqq. ' . beside the white-crested hill of Zephyrium in furthest Ausonia, a rich city ; he dedicated
. .
.

.

.

.

.

a single paean meet for Apollo and I hearing his brief melody, plying an words, am moved to song like a sea-dolphin
. . .

:

art

of ceaseless

.'

.

.

55. Perhaps the doubtful in the

a might be there
is

6(](/)
may be

but would be the form expected. In the marginal adscript first line might be or preceded by another letter, and the doubtful while a narrow letter such as « may have been lost between them. For u]/i[f]or not space enough. Instead of in the third line is possible, and the last word
o,
;

>{,
cf.

1.

64.
adeiv

Pindar wrote several
€s

TlivSapov

();
58.

and

the next

(Locri)

6. AOYCYire
be read.
61.
62.

/ !'
cf. cf.

The

reference

is to Xenocritus (or Xenocrates) invented the Locrian mode Westphal, Meirik der Griechen, I. p. 286. For the restorations of this line Find. Fr. 200 quoted by the scholiast on 01. x. 17 Se

»5; . who

to Apollo;

cf.

Pausan.

x. p.

858

is

yap ! rather long for the lacuna, and possibly
is

'

^'.
fs

should

AN

.

[

:

above A

what may be a mark

in place of

niv&apot eavTov The next WOrds WOuld be expected to be n-poj aoiSav the quotation as given in the introd.), but instead of this the papyrus has TTP0CAYTA[ , the last letter being extremely doubtful. Possibly is corrupt for if not, it must
(cf.

For cf. Pind. Fr. 124 iparav cf. Bacchyl. 15. 8. 63. For the form cf. Plut. Z>e soil, anivi. 36 67. For

[^ 7[ ... () ((]

.

/
in
1.

'

of quantity, probably ^.

€ can be read

aot&av.

^{

[

(
last

(((

:

refer to

56.
refers to
1.

70.

This note probably

53.

409.

Menander,
21-5

.
Plates
II

X

34-1 fw•

and

III.

A

notable

increase

has been

effected

during the

few years

in

the

fragments of Menander, the discovery of the Geneva fragment of the being rapidly followed by that of the Oxyrhynchus fragment of the

Another welcome addition
of the

a comedy previously represented only by a few short quotations, and some mutilated lines in P. Petrie I. iv. i assigned with much probability to this play by Blass [Hermes, xxxiii. p. 654, Rhcin. Museum, Iv. p. 02). The identification is established by the fortunate occurrence in the papyrus (11. 42-4) of

,

(((.

is

now made by

the following considerable fragment

c

:

i8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

three lines quoted from the KoXaf

by Stobaeus, Floril. lo. ai (Fr. 294 of the while another line Menander fragments in Kock's Fragmenta Comicoruni) (Kock, Fr. 731) occur in and a half formerly placed among the

\

;

11.

49-50.
in his Etimichus,

As is well known, this play was utilized by Terence which he himself states in the prologue (11. 30-2)
Colax Menandri
est
:

a fact

in ea est parasitus

eos se non negat et miles gloriosus. personas transtulisse in Eunuchum suam,
the
'

gloriosus,'

and the miles Gnatho representing Menander's was called Bias (cf. 1. 32), appearing as Thraso the But not much can be inferred from (cf. Kock, Fr. 293, Plutarch, Mar. 57 a). since the Enmichns was the product of this concerning the plot of the and a contaminatio of two Menandrian dramas, the second being the where Terence was following the one and where the other cannot be accurately
parasitus
'

who

in

^

,
;

,

Colax

'

?
;

;

determined.
its

length, does not bring

Unfortunately on this point the present papyrus, notwithstanding much enlightenment. Throughout the first column

the beginnings of the lines are lost
distinguished,
it is

and the sense of a
In
11.

and though different speakers are occasionally line or two may here and there be caught,
is

impossible either to follow the course of the dialogue or evolve a connected

idea of the action.

1-13 the speaker

possibly Struthias, the parasite,
;

and a comparison with Terence, Eunuchus ii. 2, would then suggest itself but the resemblance, if indeed there can be said to be a resemblance, was not more closer parallel is obtainable between 11. 11-3 and Terence, than a general one. Eu7iuch. iii. 4, a speech by Antipho. Lower down in the column other characters perhaps appear and the names Doris and Phidias (11. 18-9) are mentioned therefore a change of scene occurred in the course of this column, and the transition may be marked by the space between 11. 13 and 14. Column ii, which succeeds without a break, is in a more satisfactory condition. Probably a new scene opens at 1. 39, from which point as far as 1. 53 we have a dialogue between

A

(1.

two persons who are walking in the street followed by a slave carrying wine-jars One of them is infuriated by the sight of the parasite, Struthias, whom 47). he declares (11. 45-53) he would like to unmask in the open market-place. Below 1. 53 is a coronis and a short line; and then another dialogue succeeds in which the speakers are the familiar young man (A.) and his tutor (B. ; cf. 1. 55 the latter of whom makes a speech of some length upon the iniquities It would at first sight be natural to suppose of the race of parasites (11. 55-63). that a change of scene occurred at 1. 54, and that the short line is a stage But what remains of 1. 54 does not seem to suit this view, while direction.

),

;

409.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
;

19

on the other hand

and, moreover, the speech of the tutor would succeed so appositely upon the outburst in
it
11. 45-53 ^s to give strong support to the hypothesis that the speakers in the upper half of this column are the same as in the lower. Line 54 must then be assumed to be defective. In the third column a different and apparently more dramatic scene opens, the transition to which is lost with the first few lines. This column is detached from the preceding two, but that it followed them immediately is rendered almost certain by the fact that this accords not only

can be easily connected with what follows

recto, where we have the correct amount of margin, but also with the which has been used for an account. The break in the papyrus separates the figures of a column from the items to which they relate, and though the

with the
verso,

latter are too much defaced for the connexion to be established with certainty, the coincidence of the lines with the figures and the width of the resulting column, which exactly corresponds with that following it, suffice to make this relation

of the fragments extremely probable.
this
;

There is then hardly room for doubt that was the next scene of the play but although twenty lines remain, of which not more than a few letters or syllables are missing, the situation is very obscure. There is apparently only one change of speaker (1. 89) the soldier Bios, a leno, and a girl seem to be involved but their relations are not made clear, and the Eunnchns seems to provide no definite clue. The mention of in 1. 82, with the passage in the next speech (11. 91-4) If he perceives it he will come bringing sixty comrades, even as many as Odysseus took with him to Troy, with shouts and threats,' may recall the scene {Eunuch, iv. 7) where Thraso with his comrades prepares to attack the house of Thais, a passage with which Blass also connects the Fayilm fragment referred to above but it is difficult to work out the
; ;

'

;

analogy.

The MS.

is

written in rapidly formed medium-sized uncials which

we should
by
original

assign to about the middle of the second century.

This date

is

also indicated

the two marginal notes, one of which
scribe in a smaller

is

of

some

length, written

by the

and more cursive hand, and also by the accounts already mentioned on the verso, which are not later than the first half of the third century, and may belong to the end of the second. Changes of speaker are marked by double dots and paragraphi as in the fragment (211) stops are frequently added, the high point as a rule being used, though the middle (so apparently at the ends of 11. 6 and 35) and low point (1. 44) also occur, and accents, breathings, &c., are found here and there most or all of these lection signs are by the first hand. The text is but mediocre in quality, for in addition to minor errors half a line may be missing at 1. 54 (see above), and the
:

blank space after

1.

13

is

suspicious.

C 2

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
nalSes,

, []
90

),

,, . , [ • ' ^\, ' ' [
&
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Se

,
7ro€£[y
;

€[' [? ([ $• 6[
noelv

ay,

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.

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.

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['
'>
;

T[ais]

)(,

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8\

95

[/^

105

..
also

4-8. Blass suggests the following restoration of this passage
Ttvas

(
|

[6

, €' ! ( [ '& ,' [ '[] [][] {) ] [) () [[) ] {) ! () , . ! \^ . ' ^ €
[ ']€
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yap

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cf.

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|

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((\((\

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ev]

ainos

|

[fVerpr^-f

.

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11.

67 and 85.

Attic

form

is

also preserved in the

papyrus, 211.

^(
it

[eVopi-

13. The blank below this line may indicate a change mean that there was some omission at this point cf. 18.

no doubt about the reading. Either ing the speaker (cf. 211) which has been incorporated into the the loss of a foot at the end of the line. 23. There is a blank space before in which there are no clear enough ; but it is possible that the ink has scaled off.
:

,

of scene (cf introd.), but
1.

;

54.

there

is

?

might

an adscript concerntext or we must suppose
is

traces of ink, though

is

"

409.
28.
:

NEW
vvv\

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
is

25
;

the

meaning of the word

explained in the marginal note

it

is

equi-

valent to the Latin duplicarius.
31.

The

line

probably ran

«
. . .

...,
has swooped

as Blass suggests.

39-67,
.
. .

A
is

(a

young man).
is

'

What

down on

us and

whence

is

it ?

that he

a knave

evident.
?

£ (tutor of A). How
A.
thriftily,

the

No honest man ever grew rich quickly. For while he is putting by and man who lays a trap for his patient watchfulness gets everything.

living

£. How unjust it is what you say. A. I swear by the sun that if the slave were not following me carrying the Thasian jars and there were no suspicion of my being drunk, I would at once pursue him in the market-place crying: "Fellow, last year you were poor and an outcast, but now you are rich. Say what trade you have been working at answer me this, whence have you got all this ? Won't you be off somewhere else ? Why do you teach men wrong ? Why do
;
.
.

.

you

declare to us that there

There is one character, my boy, only one which has brought utter ruin upon the world, and so I tell you. This alone it is that has ruined all the cities which you have seen
have now discovered. All the tyrants, all the great rulers, satraps, captains, founders, generals I mean those who have come to complete ruin this alone has been their destruction, namely the miserable parasites who attend them. A. That is a violent speech ; but I am not sure what is the meaning of this.
laid waste, as I

.

is

profit in evil-doing

?

£.

Any one might be
be
his friend.

so mistaken as to suppose the

man who was

intriguing against

him

to

A. £.
34.

But if the intriguer is powerless ? Every one has power to do evil.'

point after 61 may be a vestige of another letter. would be suitable, but it would then be quite impossible to get two more feet into the remaining space, which seems in any case almost too short for the exigencies of the verse but something may have dropped out. oieds is also found in the Parisinus; oi8eis Kock. Stob. F/or. 10. 21. 42-4 in 1. 43 is the reading in Stobaeus, but airos is a probable correction. Eustathius 1833. 58. Grotius' emendation of mv to vivi is confirmed by the 49-50
39.

The supposed

[6
=

.

.

.

;

=

papyrus.
52. (K
54. 58. 62.
TTjs
;

[(!
ayopas

is

an obvious restoration, but
also too long.

into the lacuna

is

For a discussion of this passage see introd. The vestiges would suit and 6 mv is a just possible reading. ANHPHKAN must be altered to the mistake was a natural one, with

KoXoKft in the next line.

..
89.

63. To find a restoration of this passage which at once suits the sense and the papyrus not easy, oi naturally suggests itself, but the letter after is almost certainly Y, not I, and before 61 CI the traces would be consistent with the tip of a letter like A, A or but hardly with P. On the other hand, seems a fatal obstacle to the alternative of making refer to the Sec, and reading ofir
is
. . .
.

:

'

starvelings

For

[]

as in Poseidipp. Fr. 26. 12 (Kock, iii. 343) cf. the Compounds ;({]( tu i{ais]
'

, ^; , »

it

seems impossible

to get so

much

oJ

,

.

.

!

and

-

26
92.

is the name of the girl who is referred to by eVi" 'n the previous A paragraphus may be lost between 11. 95-6 and there 97-9. is very likely a change of speaker at this point. 97. The final letter may be I, but some correction of the latter part of this line is in any case necessary, is a simple alteration. 102-6. must have occurred in one of the lines lost at the top of this column, the note being added at the bottom to explain the reference. For Astyanax cf. ' Athen. X. 413 Tp\s AthenaeUS tells a story of his eating a dinner which was intended for nine persons. 103. y': this abbreviation of yap is the same as that found in the papyrus of the

96. In the right lessly effaced
line

'^
:

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Epit.
5.

cf.

ApoUod.

14

els

toCtok (the

Tovs

margin opposite

wooden *( ,

[]
11.

this line are traces of a

and

is

the subject of

"

^

104.

Euergetes I and Philopator. Diog. Laert. viii. 51.
105. 106.

, !
The
letter

,( .
horse)

.

neieu

marginal note, but

it

is

hope-

like those for
:

i.e.

and in 1. 104. Eratosthenes of Cyrene, the librarian at Alexandria under
His
is

: .

referred

to

by Athenaeus
the book.
x.

iv.

154 ,

before
i.e.

was the

figure giving the

number of
cf.

the four great public

games;

e.g.

Athen.

415a

»
i-ii).

hi

410.

Rhetorical Treatise.
25-4

X

23-2 cm.

Plate IV

(Cols.

on Rhetoric in the Doric dialect is something of a surprise, but that such was the character of the work from which these fragments are derived admits of no doubt. The dialect, though occasionally corrupt, is the same as that found in the fragments of Archytas of Tarentum and other the composition of which Pythagoreans, and in the anonymous AiaXe'^eis
treatise
is

A

attributed to the beginning of the fourth century B.C.
i.

,
is

(cf.

Mullach, Fragm.

Phil. Graec.

to the

inculcated

same by the
is

pp. 544 sqq.; ii. pp. 9 sqq.). To the same period and probably school the present treatise is also to be assigned. The precepts
writer are of a simple and practical

principal object

the attainment of

(\4(,

character,

and

their

which, as

Quintilian (Inst.
(cf. 1.

15 Iv

are freely

was specially included by certain authorities. Poetical quotations introduced, a circumstance which forms another connecting link with
Or.
[rai]

]\)

iv.

61-3),

we also know from among the narrandi

virtutes

the AtoXe'feiy

The
uncial

cf. Mullach, op. cit. i. pp. 546, 548. greater part of four consecutive columns
;

preserved, the

first

of these

being practically complete.

They

are written in a neat, rather small, round

hand which we should place in the latter half of the second century A.D., though the contents of the verso, a series of epigrams (464) in a semi-uncial

410.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

27

hand, appear to be of a considerably later date.

The columns lean over rather markedly to the right. Quotations usually, though not always, project by a letter or two into the left margin, as in other papyri of this period (cf. e.g. 220). The text is not very good, and in several passages the corruption has gone considerably deeper than the mere debasement of the dialect.

5

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

los

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1-20. And others will esteem you; and also if in speaking at the commencement of the address of ingratiation one appears to use common phrases and not written ones, and speaks of nothing as a matter of certain knowledge, but of opinion and hearsay, whether

from the jury or others. Such are the points in the exordium which are useful as giving an impression of fairness. In the narration of facts, the following directions serve to produce an appearance of a superior and high-minded character.'
I.
(tai

Toi
:

4.

?8
Cic.

perhaps preceded cf. 11. 11-2. was a technical term in Rhetoric, corresponding to the Latin
;

20 insinuatio est oratio quaedam dissimulatione circumitione obscure subiens auditoris animum,' and ad Herenn. i. 7. 11. is not wanted and is perhaps corrupt, and the construction of yfypaft^fVait 5. difficult. Something may have dropped out as in the previous line ; cf. also 1. 8. 22. The letter before ON must apparently be either € or
insinuah'o
;

cf.

De

Invent,

i.

15.

'

et

is

.

29.

The

doubtful

TT

may

be

and ^[]*^
at the

is

a possibility.
line is

31.

Above

the supposed

6

end of the

what looks

like

a curved stroke

'

411.

NEW
part

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
;

31

or X but it is perhaps meaningless. in different ink which might represent other abbreviation used in the papyrus is the horizontal line representing N.

The

only

column is mostly occupied with quotations. Lines 48-54 are from Iliad ix. 389, 404, 381, and 385, and 11. 55-7 from //. iv. 443; ix. 389 instead of e'8uy We have not is the ordinary reading in
38 sqq.
intelligible

The

of this

('

(.

succeeded in identifying the citation from Sophocles in

U.

59 sqq.
insolent statements, for
is

71-85. 'Moreover take no pleasure in mean and a sign of an intemperate mark of high-mindedness and an ornament you must have a good object and a good opinion or desire.'
that
is

making indecorous or
of speech.
intent,

disposition, while the avoidance of abuse

a

Next to this, in all your narration whether you are ... or expressing an

72.

'[?]:

or

€(£')•]

or

Q8e[a>r].

80-1. AIA[.]AC cannot be in 1. 82. confirmed by

[]
'.
. .

right,

and

bia[y]fj

(=

Sujyn) is a simple correction,

which

is

93-107.

and blaming the wicked.

For men

will

suppose that you resemble

whomever you praise, or blame, or hate, or welcome. For most men approve of their like. Hence the saying " I never asked, knowing that he is like those whose company he
enjoys."
93.

^^!

?
;

yap 95-6. Something has evidently gone wrong with the text Blass suggests aUi At the end of the line C might be read instead of IT. 98. XPHZOI must be a mistake, and probably more is wrong than the mood, for Perhaps XPHZOI has in the sense of 'converse with' does not seem very likely. got in here from 1. 85. ' 103-7. The quotation is from Euripides' Phoenix, Fr. 803. 7-9

^
for

.

>
'

..

&(

114-23• This conduces also to persuasiveness for to have forgotten produces credit Occasionally this is to be simulated. And absence of malice and for spontaneousness. almost all irony is high-minded.'
;

120. Ml is here a vox nihili no doubt it represents some other word or words, be simply omitted. Blass suggests «ort ' though the sentence would run quite well if Ml 8' elbrjpev Sometimes pretend not to have even a knowledge of such
;
'

things.'

,

122.

t?p[w]>{t](coV is

used

in the Aristotelian

sense as opposed to

.

411.

Life of Alcibiades.
21-6

X

18 cm.

from a vellum codex of a historical work, written in double columns The in a calligraphic uncial hand resembling that of the Codex Alexandrinua. fragment was found with papyri of the later Byzantine period but is certainly not
leaf
later

A

than the sixth century, and more probably

it

is

to be assigned to the

fifth.

32

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
leaf
is

The

a good deal worm-eaten, and the writing being on very thin vellum

has a tendency to come through on to the other side. There are no lectionmarks of any kind, nor are initial letters of lines larger than the rest. at the

end of a
of

line is generally represented by a horizontal stroke. The fragment, which despite its brevity covers the period from the mutilation the Hermae to Alcibiades' arrival at Sparta, clearly belongs to a life of

Alcibiades rather than to a general history.

This
(11.

fact,

coupled with the use
is

of such a phrase as

2^-6), which

found in Lucian,
in

Achilles Tatius, and other late writers, indicates that the

work

question

was a composition of the Roman period. Thucydides is the principal authority, several phrases from him being incorporated but that he was not the exclusive whose name is recorded by source is shown by the mention of Andocides {De Mysteriis, p. 7, Reiske) and Plutarch {Alcib. 19, 22), but not by Thucydides cf. 1. 57, where the papyrus comes into conflict with Thucydides. There is no reason to think that the writer borrowed from the much more

';,
;

;

detailed narrative of Plutarch,

whom it is as likely as not that he preceded. an account of well-known events could hardly be expected to contain new historical information, but the papyrus is interesting as a specimen of one of Plutarch's rivals in the sphere of biography who must have enjoyed considerable vogue for a time. There are a few errors on the part of the copyist, but the style of the fragment is fairly good. The sympathies of the writer were
So
brief

obviously on the side of Alcibiades.
Recto.

Col.

i.

3 lines lost.

[ ?

[

15 letters

)[][ i]v
.

\\
[]

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ye

[

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.

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€[ [

awe

411.
rofy
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3 6
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iii.

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34

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
75

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9

'(The Athenians) considering that (the mutilation of the Hermae) was not only an (outrage) but a conspiracy to establish a tyrann)', and recalling the brutality of the Pisistratidae, sought to discover the authors by large rewards for information. Alcibiades in particular they held in suspicion, judging from his pride and position that he was An informer gave evidence in no way bearing on the ambitious of a great career. Hermae, but accusing Alcibiades of having betrayed the mysteries at the house of whereupon Alcibiades came forward in the assembly and defended himself, Pulytion demanding that the case should be decided before he became general. But his accusers
;

urging the people not to delay the prospects of the (expedition) firstly because both Mantineans and Argives were joining in the expedition (owing to him) and were already present at Athens, and secondly because they knew that the Athenians, in their desire to start for Sicily, would acquit him. Such were the circumstances under which Alcibiades departed, after making many just protestations that they should pay no and having sailed to Sicily he won over nearly all the cities settled attention to slanders there through their friendly intercourse and relations with him. But while he was still with the expedition at Catana, the events at Athens intervened for his calumniators again accused him before the ecclesia of the mutilation of the Hermae, ... the Athenians imprisoned amongst others Andocides the orator, and sent to fetch Alcibiades the ship called the Salaminia, which, on account of its great speed and because it was equipped at the public charge, was usually employed on sudden emergencies. Alcibiades however, on being summoned for trial, was aware that the Athenians had already condemned him in advance and would not wait for his defence, and (accompanied the Salaminia as far as) Thurii, where he took flight and sailed to the Peloponnese, voluntarily surrendering himself to the Lacedaemonians. There he subsequently made
resisted,
. .
. ,

;

'

411.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

35

a public speech in defence of the injuries which he had inflicted upon the Peloponnese, alleging that they (the Lacedaemonians) had passed him over and honoured Nicias, and urging the Lacedaemonians to help the Sicilians at once on the ground that, if they
failed to assist them speedily, the hopes of the Athenians would be realized. He inspired the Lacedaemonians with the strongest desire for war, and further advised them to make a fortified outpost of Decelea
. . .

9-12. Cf. the digression of Thucydides upon the Pisistratidae
:

16. vwo^iat(t)•.
iota adscript
is

!
.
a
is
vi.

at this

point

(vi.

54-9).

cf.

Thuc.
is

vi.

27. 2.
likely,

less

elsewhere omitted in
oiihtv:

this

,
34.
1

23.

cf.

Thuc.

25-7. Cf. introd.

\\(:
Si

cf.

Thuc.
vi.

vi.

29. 3

40—3. Cf. Thuc.
intivov

29. 3

7€
and
€if

6l. 5

in

1.

42 can be
letters.

\ ,
vi.

both on account of the hiatus and because MS., as usual at this period.
28.
I.

-•.
Tois MavTivtas Koi 'Apyttovs

<"^X

and

Plut. Alctb.

1

9.

The

\(
doubtful

48. oveK

more

57.
Cf,
Plut,

(6
Alcih.

by Thucydides,

...
6 1.
74. 80.

:^ ^
little

short for the

lacuna, in which there

is

room

for

one or two

this Statement is in flagrant contradiction with the facts recorded 50-2, from which it appears that the Athenians met with little support.

20

«
number

ov5fV

errpa^f

-

Above

this line are
vi.

some
I,

traces of ink, perhaps the

of the page.
this too is

62-3. Cf, Thuc.
not satisfactory.

the correction seems necessary, for the perfect used as a present could not be true of the period at which this work was composed. The fact that the Salaminia required an explanation is an indication of the late date. The division is noticeable, for the MS. elsewhere follows the ordinary rules concerning division of words,
:

)
The

53.

vestiges

do not

suit [oXXjour [xf].

Possibly

[]

[], though

cf. Thuc. 95. 96, anobpas (is vaTfpoV. cf. Thuc.

.

\:

vi.

61. 6.
:

cf.

Plut. Alcib. 23.
. .
.

vi.

88.9

CK TTfi

'HXfi'ac

some corruption in II. 101-2, for of some words be supposed, the simplest

(0;((\

((.

6

105-7. Cf. Thuc.

Thucydides does not mention Nicias by name in

''
vi.

Unless the loss has nothing to govern it. alteration is to read ivep for vartpov. 89. 2 (speech of Alcibiades)

^
(

(\66
(V pev

stances see Plut. Alcib. 14.

',

107—20. Cf. Plut. Alcib. 23
e'ydpas
fie

\

(
.
. .

8
,

\
**

. 86
(!
«Vi
ts

\

There

iS

(^
;

(\
circum-

this

passage

for the

(( ''

\

«

acKtXttav, the SOUrce

of bOth passages being

of course Thuc.

vi,

89-92.

36

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

412.

Julius Africanus, Kearoi.
26-5

X

2 2-3

<-OT.

Plate V.

Two
title clears

columns containing the conclusion of Book
is

Julius Africanus, as

expressly stated

in

the

title

preserved at the end.

up

at

once two moot points concerning the

{Aiiimadv. in Chron. Eicsebii) in spite of the unanimous testimony of antiquity
distinguished between Sextus Africanus the author of the

.
xviii

of the

of

This

Joseph Scaliger

and Julius
This view has

Africanus the Christian chronographer and friend of Origen.

little favour with subsequent critics, and is controverted at length by H. Gelzer in his recent book on Africanus. Its baselessness is finally proved by this papyrus, whose testimony must carry the utmost weight in view of the fact that it is separated by little more than a generation at most from the floruit of the author. The chronological work of Africanus was brought down to the year 2ai, and the are supposed to have been composed subsequently; while this MS. is anterior to the year 275-6, since on the verso is a document dated in the reign of the Emperor Tacitus. Secondly, a doubt has existed as to the number of the books of the Kearo^, which is given by Photius {Bibl. 34)

found

as fourteen,

of the work as copy.

as twenty-four Syncellus, who speaks 359 ), no doubt only knew it in an incomplete The similarity of the figures fourteen and twenty-four naturally suggested

and Suidas

((
We

(s.v.

.)

;

(p.

that the difference was due to a clerical error, but there was no reason to prefer

one to the other.

accordingly accept the higher figure.

of excerpts have survived dealing with military matters, the care of animals,

(

now know

that there

was an i8th book, and may

The

are described

by Suidas

as olovei


embodied
in the Geoponica.

, (.
and on the
lines,

re

number

and

agriculture {Math. Vet., ed. Thievenot, pp. 275 sqq.),

latter subject

large extracts are

The

present fragment exhibits

another side of this multifarious composition, being concerned with a question
of literary criticism.

The author produces twenty-seven
in

mainly consisting

of a magical incantation, which were to be inserted
the Odyssey where Odysseus calls up the ghosts.
authority
is

the passage in

Book

xi of

For these new

lines definite

cited, references
is

being given to

MSS.
'
!

in Palestine, Caria,

and a doubt

expressed as to whether this

precious product

'

and Rome was cut out
;

by

the poet himself or by the Pisistratidae
will

scholars

We do not suppose that Homeric be inclined to accept either of those alternatives. They will

412.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
in

37
av^]p

perhaps be more likely to include this passage
ovTos h> Tots KeoTois

the

list

Sie'^eiai (Psellus,

.

of things which
]\Iatli.
\

ct.

p. xvij.

methods and standards is no ground for suspecting his facts. Of especial interest is the statement (11. 65-8) that he had arranged a library in the Pantheon at Rome for the Emperor.' According were dedicated to Severus Alexander, from to Syncellus {loc. cit.) the
Nevertheless
;

it

affords a valuable insight into the writer's

of criticism

and though we

may

not admire his judgement, there

'

which Gelzer has inferred that Africanus was on a footing of friendship with the imperial house, a conclusion to which the new autobiographical detail of the papyrus gives strong support. The MS. is written in well-formed round uncials of medium size, and being
dated within such narrow
limits, its

palaeographical evidence

is

of

much

value.

suppose an interval of ten years between the writing of the literary text on the recto and the cursive document on the verso would be a very moderate The date of the former therefore is fixed with certainty in the period estimate. between the years 225 and 265 A.D. But notwithstanding its proximity in time
to the author the text
is

To

far

from being a good one

;

several lines of the
is

incantation especially are clearly corrupt, and one of

them

incomplete.

In

these circumstances
text in

weight can be attached to the variants from the ordinary The two columns are numbered at the top the quotations from Homer.
little
;

respectively 35 as
is

and 36 thirty-four columns had therefore preceded, and if, most probable, these all formed part of the same book, its total length would be about 1530 lines.

5

10

[ [ [] ^^ ^ \[ ( 7] -^ ( []
[ey

[
[royy

Col.

i.

«Tret

]
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]

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edvea vtKpwv

pee]

K(\aiv«p(s at

aytpovTO

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re

re yepouTes

[napOeviKM

vionevOt

eyovaai

[av8p]es

[(]('
5e

(^( €)^€

[

aXXoufv aXXos

[] (

layr)

e/xe

[]

[]€5

eiwv

38

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[\$
[

15

[

[(\^ []

] [] 5
]

enos

(

[]
[

[\(\•)(
20

^^
ye

[]'
eis

^^^
[8]

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yaiav

em

\€\

[\
.

eov
]

[]
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(Set

eiraaai Aeyet

ee5
]avXXinae

[

](

25

[

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]

[

[

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[

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30

[

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ep ev\oae

(€ ]
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evaiTe[.
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.

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.]

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H\ie Teirav

ei<Ti

[

[

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[


.

evKpaTeia

(

[

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?

35

[

[

[]
[ev

[ ] [] []
]
[

]s

([] []
rj'icra

[ []
]

]

[]

412.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
Col.
ii.

39

45 CWTOS

yov
Sia

50

^~ 8 ^^
nepup

? ?( ^
(
€[']
([]

oi/rcoy

^

ol

are

[] 6~ [][]€
ewiKpei

55 poy €7€[77]

(

[.]'

€[1/0€6£

6
(
65

€[] []
(
ev

?

[]
(

€[5]

^


7
4.

Xe

5-10. These Unas in small type by Lud.

((
=
Odyssey

xi. 34""43•
:

Lud(wich) with Aristarchus. SO most MSS. athetized by Zenod., Aristoph., and Aiistarch., and are printed
;

/

40
6.
7.

9•

\
veowevSe
:

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
:

veonevBia

MSS.

is

unintelligible here.

:

xi. 48-50. 1 1-3 eyo) the same reading has been entered by the second hajid in the margin II. of F; airbs hi other MSS., Lud. MSS. The variation of the cnos 13.

[]
=

=

SO Odyssey
;
:

is also found in the doubled mp'i Other MSS., Lud.

FGT

;

1.

\(.

papyrus provides an introductory formula for what follows. Sei, which 14. Neither here nor in 1. 21 was apparently anything written before in both cases is preceded by a short blank space. replacing in I. 15, and TeXetcTe for Ih'ad iii. 278-80, with 15—7

8
!
;

:

'

6. (so Lud.) or does not seem to be found elsewhere.

. {\(:

..

19. Cf. //. vi. 467 22-36. For this incantation cf. the magical papyri, e.g. Wessely, Benkschr. der Wien. Akad. Ph.-Hist. CI. xxxvi, xlii Kenyon, Catalogue L pp. 62 sqq. But the analogy does not extend beyond a general resemblance and the identity of a few names, e. g. and in- 1. 28 is a variant of the form common in the magical papyri can be read. in 29 is a mistake for (. In 1. 31 //. xi. 741, with oidfv for ^8. 39 Od. xi. 51. 43

.
mean
the
;

(.
is

the reading of most

MSS.;

. ( =
'
.

1.

and so on. Whether then the superfluous part of the incantation stood 44-68. thus and the poet himself passed over it on account of the dignity of his work, or whether the Pislstratidae, when they combined the various poems, cut out these verses judging them to be alien to the march of the poem, I should much like to know. I have myself set them down here as being a most valuable product of the epic art (?) ; and you will find the whole work preserved in the archives of your (i) old home, the colony of Aelia Capitolina in Palestine, at Nysa in Caria, and as far as the thirteenth verse at Rome, near the baths of
.
.

Alexander, in the beautiful library

at the

Pantheon which

I

myself designed for the Emperor.'
fxot»

44-6. This passage may be construed as it stands by taking as an accusative absolute, but the order is then very awkward, and

omitted

much simpler construction is same as the words may have come in from 1. 49. and suppose the loss of a conjunction take eyvwv as equivalent to &v 53-4. Perhaps the sign in the after Se may easily have dropped out after the preceding Te. ; margin opposite this line indicates that there was some omission. BlaSS SUggeStS (()€[], Or if right, is for SC. 55.

.
;

...

nepifpyov

A

(

We

,

aXKa ought not to is obtained if

but there does not seem to be room in the lacuna for . The letter after in the mutilated word must 56. This is another difficult passage. be either e or o, and there is not room for more than one letter, which ought not to be tc Blass suggests is therefore not suitable. a broad one, in the lacuna ([] (or 8f) [], taking the person addressed in e\y]pfc(is (1. 58 ; 1. f\y\pria(ii) to be a Jew to whom this was dedicated and the author of the work in question. This suits Tijr though the supposition which would then mean 'your old native country that the author required to be told where his own work was to be found is not quite as the native land of Africanus himself, satisfactory. To understand ti/s apxmas unless the phrase is interpreted in the unnatural sense of ' the country in which I used

(^],

([],

(!

!.

[],

'

;

[]^!

413.
to

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

41

live,' referring to his settlement at Enimaus-Nicopolis, would of course involve the inference that he was of Syrian origin. This has already been maintained by Valesius {Adnol. in Euseb. H.E. p. 113) and others, though on grounds quite insuflicient to overAi'/3ur. ride the statement of Suidas that Africanus was a On the otlier hand

Gelzer's argument (op.

knew

Latin,

Einleitung) in support of this testimony, namely that Africanus seems hardly more conclusive on the one side than Africanus' probable
a'/.,

knowledge of Hebrew on the
60. [AJtXias
64. 65.

\(& /5:

!
:

!
its

other.

:

i.

e.

the

the name of Jerusalem after Emperor Severus Alexander.

restoration

by Hadrian.

the famous Pantheon built by Agrippa and restored by Hadrian

and

other emperors.

413.

Farce and Mime.
22-9

X

42-3 mt.

Both
latter are

sides of this

positions of an unusual type.

remarkable papyrus are occupied with literary comOn the redo are three columns, of which the two
in a

almost complete, of a low comedy or farce, written

good-sized

semi-uncial hand, the dramatis personae being carefully distinguished and stage

Adhering to the right of the third column about halfway an uninscribed fragment of some size, showing that the work did not extend beyond half a column more at most. On the verso are, firstly, two columns in a much smaller and more cursive hand, preceded by a few letters of a third upon the projecting fragment already referred to, from what may best be described as a mime, which is mainly, at the least, a monologue. The second of the two complete columns is shorter than the other, and there are some 6 centimetres of blank space below it. Secondly, adjoining this to the right
directions added.

down

is

recto, and with the same somewhat larger and more careful hand, but evidently by This column the same person who was responsible for the foregoing mime. was intended to supersede the latter portion of the first column of the recto
is

another column of dialogue in the style of the

characters, written in a

;

cf.

note on

11.

30-6.

To
we

assign both sides of the papyrus to one scribe

is

out of

the question, but

are not inclined to think that the two documents were

separated by a considerable interval of time.

The hand
;

of the recto

we

attribute

with

little

hesitation to the

Antoninc period

that of the verso no doubt falls

within the second century.

As we
a few
lines

have already seen, the MS. apparently was not continued more than beyond the third column of the recto, if it did not actually end
This fact
is

at that point.

quite in accordance with the internal evidence, for the

42

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
is

impression given by the lower part of this column
or conclusion of the whole piece. of Sotadean verses in
trochaic tetrameters
11.

that

it

is

the exodium

Metrical passages are introduced, a system

88-91 being followed after a short interval by a series of

and there was an accompaniment of music and close of the play is also probably indicated The scene in 1. 95, which heads the concluding section. by the word is the coast of a barbarian country bordering upon the Indian ocean (cf. 11. 88-91), and the subject is the adventures in those remote regions of a party of Greeks Such themes are chief among whom is Charition, the heroine of the drama. familiar from the pages of the early Greek romances, and the plot of this piece seems to have run on lines very similar to theirs. Charition had not improbably been carried off in the usual way by pirates, and had so come into the hands of the barbarians, whose Greek-speaking king (cf. 11. 88 sqq.) is one of the characters of the play. She had apparently taken up her abode in a temple
(11.

96-106)

;

dancing

(cf.

11.

88-9, 9i-3).

The

215, 225); and the present fragment describes her rescue by her brother and others who had arrived by sea, and who succeed in effecting their escape after
(cf. 11.

making her captors drunk. Professor Crusius, to whom we are much indebted in the reconstruction and interpretation of this papyrus, acutely suggests that the
position in which Charition found herself placed
of the heroine in the

may

have been similar to that

romance of Xenophon of Ephesus, Antheia, who in order to repel the advances of the Indian prince Psammis represented herself as dedicated and lived and 1. 106 to the goddess Isis (cf. 1. 88 Qta for some time in that capacity under Psammis' protection {Ephes. iii. 11). A large

',
cf.

]

'[']),
whom

number

of

characters

are

introduced.
11.

Besides Charition,

the stage

directions call A, her brother (,

{(), we have
are assigned to

97-9), and the barbarian

king, called

the buffoon (B)
is

who

largely supplies the comic element.
is
;

This,

as might be expected,

often of a coarse kind.
(cf.
11.

of the Greek party and does

not understand the barbarian language

58, 66)

but some non-Greek words
is

him

in
(1.

11.

y^ and 79-80.

Another

well-identified character
is

, the

captain of the ship

101).

The
is

personality of others

less

easy to ascertain.

In the fourth column of the verso
to the brother's party,

, who

goes to fetch the ship, seems to belong

consequently to be distinguished from the speaker in 11. 70-1 and 74, who uses only the barbarian language, but is designated by a symbol which might otherwise be supposed to represent . It is, however,

and

formed quite differently from the - on the verso, and is more like the sign for 200. There remains Z, who figures only in 11. 31 and 71-3, is another barbarian. Koi( ), whose remarks are also with one exception (1. 104) in the barbarian
tongue.

We
is

are indebted to Prof. G.
to be

Wissowa
all
'

for the suggestion that the

abbreviation

expanded

Koi(vfi),

'

or

'

altogether,' referring either to

;

413.

NEPV CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
or of the Greeks as the case

43
be.

the

body of the barbarians
104, which

may

This hypo-

conditions, and accounts for the appearance of ) would on any other view be a difficulty. In 11. 195 sqq. a party of barbarian women, who have just returned froni a hunting expedition, is introduced. They are armed with bows and arrows, and nearly succeed in
thesis satisfies all the
in
1.

{

shooting the buffoon

(11.

207-8).

Apart from the distribution of the various parts the MS. includes a number of symbols and abbreviations which are to be interpreted as stage directions. with a dot and a horizontal dash above it The commonest of these are a (in 1. 211 there is no dash), and a pair of short strokes curving towards each other at the centre (e.g. 1. 11) which is sometimes followed by a straight stroke
(e.g.
1.

39).

The

(which

we

print simply as r)
;

with the music, and might stand for

{!9)
or after

Kpova(is),

11.

1. 92 is similarly combined with 1. 87 69 and 95 where ), and (nevTMis ?). The two curved strokes, which sometimes stand before

{)

is

probably to be connected

cf.

{09) (),
7(

(e.g.

11.

65, 72), but

a musical signification, or
action
o|b{r|)
;

their use

is

more commonly are by themselves, may also have refer in some other way to the accompanying The word not like that of mere marks of punctuation.

may

which is repeatedly associated with the remarks of B, the buffoon, seems The speeches also to be of the nature of a stage direction; cf. 1. 22 '(€)'. in the barbarian language are usually written continuously, like the Greek, without separation of words but in one passage (11. 61-4) the words are divided by points, while in others the insertion of one of the symbols described above The language is no doubt to a large extent of an serves a similar purpose. imaginary nature, but it may include some genuine non-Hellenic elements
;

cf.

note on

1.

83.

The mime
papyrus
is

of which two columns are preserved

of a simpler character.

The
;

chief figure here

is

upon the verso of the again a woman, upon

whom

most of the other actors are slaves. The that of the fifth mime of Hcrondas, the The young mistress makes proposals to one of her slaves, Acsopus which he declines to listen, whereupon she orders him to be put (1. 115), to to death along with a female slave (PApolIonia, 1. 120) whom she supposes to be the object of his affections. These cruel commands, however, are not actually carried out, for the male slave manages to escape, and his assumed paramour is only placed in confinement. In the next scene (Col. iii) the bloodthirsty mistress is engaged in plotting the death of an old man, to whom she appears
the action centres throughout
first

motive of the

^.

scene (Col.

ii)

is

' Cf. E. Littmann ' £iH arabisches Karagot-spiel GesellschafI for 1900, where the citch-word of the buffoon

'

in
'

the

Zeitsck.

<Ur Deutschcn

Morgenland.

is

Scheiss.'

44

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Her accomplices
;

to have been unhappily married.

are two slaves, Spinther and
'

who also figured in between. The column ends
Malacus,
unfinished.

the previous scene
in

and a

parasite

'

acts as a go-

a rather obscure manner without her nefarious
left

purpose having been accomplished, and the piece seems to have been

any point in these two columns the monologue of the mistress by other speakers is a matter of some doubt. The sentences are in the original divided off by an oblique dash (see the critical notes) and at two points (at the end of 1. 117 and in the middle of 1. 185) the dash is preceded by three short horizontal strokes. Possibly this sign should be interpreted as an indication of a change of speaker, which would in either case suit the context. Thus in 1. 117 KvpC would = the natural mode of address from a slave to his mistress and in 1. 187 implies the entrance of a new character (the old husband ?), to whom may be attributed the words ovai But if so the scribe was not consistent in the use of this sign, which should have been repeated when the previous speaker resumed and if omitted in these cases, it may be absent entirely in some others where an interchange of speakers might be supposed to occur, e.g. 1. 172 ro ... 1. 178 at ; But this is not necessary, and we do not feel satisfied that the other two passages cannot be explained on the hypothesis that the piece is a monologue
at
is

Whether

interrupted

;

;

, '-

.

;

-,

,

throughout.

With regard
be rather

to the date of the composition of these

two productions, Crusius

considers that the
earlier,

mime

belongs to the

Roman

period, while the farce

may

though not a product of the better Hellenistic age. Their literary quality cannot of course be ranked very high, but they are not devoid of merit. The situations disclosed in the farce shows some skill in construction, and when on the stage may have been amusing enough even without the coarser elements while the mime, though without the accompanying action it is sometimes obscure, has considerable vigour and dramatic force. Not improbably these two pieces were once performed in the theatre of Oxyrhynchus, and they may be regarded as typical of the performances upon the provincial stages at this time. In short, they afford a most interesting glimpse into the music-hall of the period immediately following that which is represented by the Alexandrian
;

Erotic Fragment (P. Grenf.

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195

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

230

SiSovs,

') .\[<\.
S\
.

[

oivov

7—8. buffoon, who
saint
10.
if

13.
19.
fcai

iptypos.

cf. II. 40 and 210. 27. The name is formed from \0!. 30-6. These lines are enclosed in the papyrus by a circular stroke which passes through 1. 30, and there can be no doubt that it was intended that their place should be taken by Col. iv of the verso. This is indicated by the note at the bottom, which is in the same handwriting as the verso. The fact that in relation to the foregoing column the letters of the note are upside down is unusual, and would be expected rather than but would represent the point of view of the writer of the ; mime, and the practical identity of 1. 30 with 11. 188-9 ^dds a conclusive proof that the column on the verso was meant to be inserted at this point. Line 30 is accordingly to be restored the Speaker being • as in 1. 188; it may also be noted that the word found in 1. 35 also occurs in 1. 205 in the scene with the barbarian women, to whom airac in 1. 33 probably refers, i>s in the footnote suggests that the longer passage on the back was an alternative draft. is obscure ;

\ [» ( '\ :
.
.

28. Second

of

corr.

from

,

iav

,

aS BlaSS SUggeStS,

/

is

evidently the speaker, apparently
his perils.

vows

to erect a silver statue of his patron

[
a.

/8]?

The

he escapes from
correction

are the barbarians,

The

who are seen approaching. may be by the hand of the verso.
;

m

cf.

Etym.

.

i'/jf^/iiof leai i'pey/jo'i•

fpfvys^

os

Xeyerm

<

6

6

\(\(,

31. /3a[atXei;r?

188-230.

'

F.

Lady

Charition, rejoice with
* * *

me

at

my

escape

!

gods, fool ? Cease, fellow! for me here and I will go and bring the ship to anchor. Go; for see, here come their women from the chase. JS. Oh what huge bows they have woman. Kraunou. Another. Lalle. Another. Laitalianta lalle Another. Kouakos anab iosara.

£ (buffoon).
A. F. A,
Wait
!

A

(Charition).

Great are the gods.

What

A

.

.

.

.

B.
All.

Hail

1

Laspathia.

Athena, there is no from us. Wretch, they took you for an enemy and nearly shot you. I am always in misfortune. Will you then ... to the river Psolichus ? As you like. {Drums.) B, * * * Minei. All. F, Lady Charition, I see the wind is rising, so that we may cross the Indian ocean
. . .

B. A. B. A. B.

Ah! Lady,
Alemaka.

help!
All.

Alemaka.

By

A

.

413.

NEW
I

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
and
if

53
off

and escape.

So enter and

fetch your property,

you can, carry

one of the

offerings to the goddess. A. Prudence, fellow
petitions to the

Those in need of salvation must not accompany their For how will the gods listen to men who try to gods with sacrilege. win mercy with wickedness ? will fetch it. B. Don't you touch, I F. Well, fetch your own things then. A. I do not need them either, but only to see my father's face. and give them their wine strong, for here F. Enter then ; and do you serve them
.

.

.

they come.'
is evidently an exclamation, like 198. 204. At this point the women begin an attack on the buffoon, who cries out to alemaka (1. 205), Charition accordingly intervenes with the word Charition for help. which is repeated by the rest and apparently has the effect of restoring peace. seems to be corrupt ; there was perhaps some makes no sense and 206. ovK might be read, but this hardly in the previous line (cf. U. 92-3). play on
' '

.

(

improves matters. 213. The marginal note seems to refer to this column, to which it is closer than aya>v(la) or would suit but the meaning is obscure. to Col. iii of the mime the upper part of the column, but is hardly apposite at this point. the same request is put into the mouth of the buffoon, 216-25. Cf. 11. 42-9, where Charition again declining in words almost identical with those used here. 228-30. Cf. 11. 52-7.
;

•>()

rid of.

these too I will get 38-106. B. I think that they are the daughters of swine {Drums, * * *). Ai arminthi. [Drums.) All, B. They also have run away to the Psolichus. Yes but let us get ready, if we are to escape. C. B. Lady Charition, get ready if you can to take under your arm one of the offerings
'

;

;

to the goddess.

A.
gods with

Hush!

sacrilege.

Those in need of salvation must not accompany their petitions to the For how will they listen to the prayers of those who are about to
;

The property of the goddess must remain sacred. gain mercy by wickedness ? B. Don't you touch I will carry it. A. Don't be silly, but if they come serve them the wine neat. B. But if they will not drink it so ? Consequently, if they get hold of this Fool, in these regions wine is not for sale. C. kind of thing they will drink it neat against their will (?).
B.
C.
serve them lees and all. {Drums.) Here they come, having bathed, with King. Brathis. All. Brathis. B. What do they say ? draw lots for the shares, he says. B. Yes, let us. Let us C. King. Stoukepairomellokoroke. B. Back, accursed wretch
I'll
. .

.

.

.

.

I

King.

Brathie.

{Drums.) Here konzei damun petrekio paktei korlames bere ialero depomenzi
petrekio

damut kinze paxei zebes
All.
'

lolo

bia bradis kottos.

Kottos.

B,

May you

be kicked by

kottos.'

King.

Zopit.

[Drums.)

;

!

'

54

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Give them a drink, quick. C. B. What do they say ? B. Are you afraid to speak then ? Hail, thou whose days prosper Not if I know it King. Zeisoukormosede. {Drums.) B. Ah {Much drumming.) put in some wine. It is watery C.
!
!

{Drums)

;

G.

Skalmakatabapteiragoumi.

H. B.

Tougoummi nekelekethro. G. Eitoubelletrachoupteragoumi. Stop {Drums.) Ah None of your disgusting ways Ah
! I !

!

What

are

you

doing? H. Trachountermana. G. BoulHtikaloumbai platagoulda bi[ toumionaxiz{Drums) King. Chorbonorbothorba B. Apuleukasar. {Drums.) King. sesorachis. orado satur[ despit platagoulda bi King. Ouamesaresumpsaradara ei ia da[ thamouna martha marithouma. B. Martha marithouma edmaima'i mai'tho
.

.

.

{Drums)
King.
All.

tun[
. .
.

ra. Malpiniakouroukoukoubi karako Aba. King. Zabede zabiligidoumba. All. Aba oun[ King. Panoumbretikatemanouambretououeni. Panoumbretikatemanouambretououeni All. Parakoumbretikatemanouambretououeni Olusadizapardapiskoupiskateman areiman[ ridaou oupatei a. {Five drummings.) goddess moon, King. A boundless barbaric dance I lead, With wild measure and barbaric step
.

All.

Ye Indian chiefs, bring the drum (?) of mystic sound, {Much drumming, healing) The frenzied Seric step B. What do they say again ? Orkis[.].
. .

.

C
A.

He

says, dance.

B.

Just like living

down and bind him with the sacred girdles. B. They are heavy now with drink. Good Charition, come out here. C.
;
:

men. {Drums * * *). {Much drumming. Finale)

C.

Throw him

Come, brother, quickly; is all ready? Helmsman, I bid C. Yes all the boat is at anchor close by ; why do you linger ? you bring the ship alongside here at once. Wait till I give him the word. {captaiti). B. Are you talking again, you bungler ? let us leave him outside to kiss the ship's

D

bottom.
C.
seizes

Are you

my

all aboard? All. Aboard. A. wretched body. Be propitious, lady goddess

and a comic must be read for ftAXoiTfj. is quite 53. &v(p does not seem right, and there may be some corruption, uncertain, and perhaps mrti was Avritten twice by mistake ; but a broader letter would be would give a more suitable meaning. expected, seems to be filled with stage 57. The latter part of this line after Above the doubtful ou of is a stroke like an accent, which may indicate directions. an abbreviation. avanea{ ) is perhaps for 6']. This remark is addressed to one of the barbarians. cf. 1. 72 where 70. The words should perhaps be divided ; recurs. On the speaker here and in 11. 71 and 74 cf. introd. p. 42.
42-9. Cf.
11.

equivalent of

216-225, note.
(cf.
1.

is

218).

In

1.

47

^
a

!

unhappy me! A great trembling save thy handmaiden

new verb formed from

,

I

-{6).

({)

{)

413.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

55

75-80. The distribution of the parts in this passage causes some difficulty. B., the buffoon, elsewhere speaks Greek only, and appears not to understand the barbarian language. Yet in 11. 75 and 79 he is assigned non-Greek speeches, and the speaker who It will be noticed that in intervenes either at the end of 11. 75 or 76 may also be B. but in both instances the letter either case there is a /3 near the end of the line was meant to represent the character. following is closer than it should be if the If the attribution of 11. 75 and 79-80 to B. is correct, he may be supposed to be emboldened by the conviviality of the barbarians to address them in a meaningless jargon intended to imitate their language. 82. At the end of the line we should perhaps read (/)[, as in 11. 83-5. 83. Assuming that it is worth while to attempt to bring the barbarian language in this piece into relation with any known speech, the key is possibly to be found in late Pali or old Prakrit. We owe to Dr. G. A. Grierson the suggestion that in the present passage, may represent pano amrta, drink (or life ') and nectar,' which for instance, in 11. 35 and 205 Similarly he would connect suits the context remarkably well. with the Pali alam enough,' stop,' -ka being a substantival suffix which an ignorant Greek
;
'

'

({)
'

'

'

'

might use
scholars.

incorrectly.

But we must leave the consideration of

this

1. Sverovi Some cf. &c. 90. l[f]poepovv, though a new compound, seems certain syllables are missing at the end of the line, and a substantive is required to complete

89•

;

,
;
11.

question to Sanskrit

the

followed by a long syllable. At very attractive, though it hardly fills the available space. may be v. reproduces the sound of the barbarian /«[.]. 93• is probably still the speaker. 94. 96-106. The verses with which the scene closes are trochaic tetrameters, but the text seems faulty in places, and some alteration is required to reduce the metrical system Thus II. 98 and 104 are each a syllable short, and 11. 10 1-2 are considerably to order.
the sentence
91.

[2]
;

perhaps

(Crusius)

is

end of

the line the doubtful

.

too long.

Crusius suggests that in

and (for two words be omitted and pa (or Line 98 may be amended by reading The iambic trimeter in 1. 105 is unexpected, and a
but it is perhaps better not to not trochaic tetrameters.

^^

1.

loi

))

',

and if these is a gloss on transposed, the metre is restored. which also improves the sense.

cretic

demand

exact regularity, especially since

in the original is written after the manner of a title in larger letters, 95. as in It is probably equivalent to with little dashes above and below. ToC Si Schol. on Aristoph. Pax 1204 100. The first letter may be or 1 1 6. The word before ) seems to be some part of either according to the view taken as to whether 117. Kvpi may be either Kvpie or a change of speaker occurs at this point ; cf. introd. It is not quite clear where the words added above 1. 118 and in the margin were intended to be inserted. Crusius is resumptive of the previous conditional senovv supposes that

50!

(
is

.

'(. » €, .
lost at the

may be

beginning;
also

95-6 are

.

.

.

/({(')
«rat
. .

tences, to which the apodosis

.

(<;,

the general sense being
inclined to love as
I.'

'

If

women had
«

the
is

hard work to do that
quite doubtful
;

I

have,

you would be as
for

little

a{t] after

the fibres of the papyrus are displaced.
is

119. There
of

barely
o.

room

an a

at the

beginning of the

line,

and the supposed a

<;(()

is

more

like

56

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

120-152. 'So seize him, slaves, and drag him off to his fate; now bring out her also, is. I bid you take them away to the two promontories, and bind them to the trees that lie there ; then drag them far apart and take care that you keep each out of the other's sight, lest they die happy feasting their eyes upon each other ; and when

gagged as she

slain them, come in to me. I have said ; and I will go within. What do you say ? The gods have really appeared to you, and you were afraid ? Although he has escaped you, they shall not elude the desert guards. Now I wish to propitiate the gods, Spinther. Swear say the sacrificial prayers. Since the gods are about to appear to us auspiciously, sing the praise of the gods in expectation. Knave, won't you do as you are told ? What has happened ? Go in and see who it is. What does he say Look, lest the proud one too be within. I bid you remove this woman, and hand her over to the desert with iron and keep her carefully. guards, and tell them to load her Take her, drag her off, away with her And do you search for him, and having slain him, cast out his body that I may see him dead. Come, Spinther and Malacus, with me. I will now go out and try to see with certainty if he be dead, that I may not again be carried away Oh, poor wretch would by strife. Thus will I address him (?). " Ah, see him here you be thus cast out rather than love me ? How shall I mourn him as he lies deaf to my ' voice ? , All strife is over Cease ... I will ease my ravished heart (?)."

you have

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.'

!

!

:

.

.

!

interferes with their decipherment.

At the end of 1. 131 the letters «« ot are certain, seems almost inevitable, though the singular S^ii\ipvy(v is awkward. It appears, however, from 11. 140 sqq. that only the male slave had escaped. In 1. 130 would suit the context, though not the traces on the papyrus. but this is not very satisfactory. seems certain and is perhaps for 138.
.

and

(

130-1.

The displacement

of the fibres of the papyrus

at the

ends of these lines

much

cannot be read. seems to mean the slave who had scorned his mistress's attractions, 139. and who had evidently succeeded in eflfecting his escape cf. 1. 143 147-152. It would at first sight appear from this passage that the slave had actually been caught and put to death, and that the sight of his dead body had filled his mistress with remorse. But the analogy of 11. 181 sqq. suggests that this lament may be only imaginary, a forecast of what would be appropriate when the occasion came, in 1, 187 is also in favour of this explanation. The doubtful is more like y, and ]&[ might be 152. The first word is very uncertain. read for ]«[, but hi\&yvas does not fill up the space. is also unsatisfactory.
Ti yeyoiiffi/ cjwii/j
;

!
line

\\()

»,

€5.

\(\\\

At the end of the

hardly seems right.

153-87. 'Spinther, whence that crest-fallen look? Come up to me here, knave, may strain some wine. Come in, come in, knave come here Where are you walking from ? Turn in here. Where is the half of your tunic, the half of it, I say ? This is my resolve, Malacus I will pay you in full for everything. to kill them all and sell their property, and then to vithdraw somewhere or other. Now I wish
in order that I
;
!

:

to get the old man into my power before he has any idea of this and I conveniently have a deadly drug which I will mix with some mead and give him to drink. So go to the broad door and call him as though for a reconciliation ; let us too go, and
;

communicate the
parasite.

—Who

affair

is

this
I

?

of the old And she

that I

may

see her.

require

man to the parasite. Ho slave The case is this, What is the matter with her then ? Unveil her your help. The case is this, parasite. I have repented
!

?

and wish

to be reconciled to the old

man.

Go

then and see him, and bring him to me,

'

414.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

57

and prepare your dinner. I commend your speed, Malacus. Have you What ? Malacus here, take the mead. got the drug mixed and is the dinner ready ? Go Unhappy man, I think the parasite is panic-stricken. Unhappy man, he laughs along with him lest anything happen to him. This has been done as I wished let us go in and deliberate more securely about the rest. Malacus, everything has gone as Parasite, what has happened ? I intended, if we also make away with the old man. What Ah, how ? Certainly, for I now have them all in my power. Come, parasite do you want then ? Spinther, give me poison enough. Parasite, I am afraid I shall laugh. You are right. I say what ought I to say f My father and lord, to whom are you You were leaving me? I have lost my freedom of speech, my glory, my light of liberty my lord. Thus let me mourn him (though I speak not truly). Woe to thee, wretched, you, woe to me For I know who you are. Woe to hapless, miserable, loveless one and
I will

go

in

!

!

;

\

!

I

I

Hateful Spinther, bring the block for master
1

this

man

I

Who

is

this

again

?

— They are

still

safe,

must in any than i, but looks more like in 154. The letter before case have been intended. 166. A female character enters at this point, but there is no clue to her identity. may be addressed either lo her or the parasite, in the sense of nuviKOs appears to be a new word, 173. might equally well perhaps better be read, but is more difficult. is very doubtful and hardly fills the available space, but the letters at the 184. beginning of this line, being over an erasure, are larger than elsewhere.

!
(

On

185-7.

the interpretation of this passage see introd. p. 44.

414.

Philosophical Fragment.
Fr. (a)

143 X

1

1-8 cm.

Several fragments from a work of a philosophical nature, written in a good-

and well-formed hand which seems to be a rather early specimen of the In the formation of the letters and general appearance this MS. bears a decided resemblance to 26, and probably falls within the second century rather than the third. Columns iii and iv are on a detached piece
sized

oval sloping style.

of papyrus, but very likely succeed Col.
discussion
treatise
is

ii

immediately.

The

subject under

poets and the poetic faculty.
in

There

is

no indication that the

was cast

the form of a dialogue.
i.

(a)
[.
.

Col.
.]

[.

.]. .

[.

.]•

[])
nepi

[ ]6

[
Col.
nef^t

ii.

58

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
5

( [] € [] €^ 8 [] ([ [] €
[]
Se
[to]is
[.
.

[ []

reo?

20

[]

^
ev

€[\
25

[
€77-[.]^[.

7/[

7re[p]t

[

[

.

.

.

[.
Trep

•]•[

[

.]eiv

[ ]ۥ
[.
.
.

[

[

15

[

] ]
.

^[
3° F[
.
.

eivai

hSi

()

Col.
[

iii.

Col.

.

[]€7£
[]
35
nepi

[]
[] €€•
S[e
]
'

[ []
e[

[

[
T01S
[

45

[

<[
[

40

€[ €[
55

[
4

[ [

[

415.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
{^
{e)

59

i«^)

][
]

6

8](!

[

[

6

[ ] €[
.

]€

[

[
(>[
Xwue'i

]•

eivai

]tovs ivf[

][

(end of column)

(/)

70

][
]«[
]ev

]•

young man would not practise such a thing in the least. 3-13. I will state my opinion concerning them. I have often been told that acquainted with the poems which are legacies of the past.'
3.
1

As
it

for the poets

is

useful to be

The stop after which is naturally connected with av, 1-2. Blass suggests [(\](, but though there 1. 1 1 is already long enough.

,

is is

misplaced. a small lacuna after
obscure.

52.

The meaning

of the sign in the margin opposite this line

is

415.
10-4

ISAEUS
X 39
cm.

.''

A fragment from
of Isaeus against

a lost speech of an Attic orator, which,
in
11.

if

the restorations

proposed by Mr. Smyly

6-8 are correct,

is

to be identified with the oration

Elpagoras and Demophanes.
uncial,

a dozen letters appear to be missing at the ends of the
is

Not more than about half lines. The handwriting
attributed
in

a small

and neat round

which

may be

to the second
11.

century.

All three kinds of stops occur (the middle point

lo and 15)

and occasional accents, which

may

be by the original scribe,

6
[i\va

8[\

[{\.
5

[]
[ei]

[]
['/]
,

[]()[
6.

-

[ €,
6
[ .

•[ [ [
[

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
avS[pes

[ [^ [\<$ ([5
re
ev

.

ig

[^]ۥ
[.

StS[a^ai

.]

[.

.]
.]


ei
•]'-0'Tas

e[.
[.
.

[.
ev[.
.

.

.

[.

.

.

[•]?.'[•

20

€[,
[

.]e?v

[

[.
«

.

,

[

[]
]y

([.
, o, 7[ in
or
1.

.

.

[.

The

traces after

10 suggests that proper name.
in
1.

\[

would

suit

any round

letter

€,

.

The

plural

should be read, in which case

7

must be another
either side of

9.

The meaning

of the semicircular signs placed below the line
11.

on

ovdev is obscure.
1

1-3. For the lacunae at the ends of

1 1

and 13 Blass suggests yap

airovs

and oU

Sv.

416.
12

Romance
xg cm.

?

On

the redo of this papyrus are parts of two columns of an alphabetical

vocabulary, written in sloping third century uncials.
deals with words beginning with

[](.

, [](
is

,

The

portion preserved

e.g.

ot

[,

€[,
is

[,

btvpe[,

[.

On

the verso of this

the fragment
is

printed below which seems to

come from some romance.

This

written in

a late third or early fourth century semi-uncial hand, with stops and occasionally Paragraphi apparently occur below 11. 9, 13, and 15, showing other lection signs.
that not

more than a few

letters are lost at in front of

the beginnings of the lines
11.

;

possibly

indeed there

nothing missing

4-5.

But there

is

no sign of the
not attainable.

termination of the lines to the right, and a connected sense

is

Lines 8 sqq. describe a supernatural appearance of some deity.

]

]7[.

,]('[
eis

)(^]

ei/)[a]»'»?

[•

.

.]-[.

.

?jj.[

417.
'\vivuv•
]

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
f^fxpi•

6l

SiaSoyov
]
.

([€]•
yepay

5

\\ (
[[
]
.

ffil•-]]

]»'

\
(
.

Vfiiv

8(\
[.]
. .

[(]
.
.

[ [
.

[.][.'\

.

«[
.

.

,

\[

]

€[\)
etnev

](5
]
]
.

€^ []

,

,

.

€[

](•
15
]

€£(^ (([] [] ]' • [] )[
[.]tikos
[

! €
Seos

'

[.]•«•[

ovtos
[.][
]

•[•]•[

[

[...].
.]
.

[.]

.

[

[.

.]([

.

.

[

]
]

e[
.

(\<
20

[.

.

.

.]^[.
.

e6ei

.

c

]> ]
]e[i]v
is

Tas laas

(([€]! >[
....

[

•][

[.]
. .

.

[.]

.

e[
.

[.
.

.

.

.]€<TTa>Tas

[.

.

.]

e7r_tTo[.]€[.]
.

]a<f)[,

.

.]>(•

[[
.

151

There

a light

and apparently accidental stroke drawn diagonally through
breathing over
1

.

9.

21.

Or perhaps ]fv rat. The diaeresis and rough
1.

are

somewhat

doubtful.

The

breathing

over » in

18

is

rather different.

417.
14-3

Romance
<^«•

?

X 9-7

(Fr. a).

Parts of two columns, with

some small detached
Col.
ii,

of a rather uncertain character.

complete

lines, is

concerned with a

woman

pieces, from a prose treatise which contains twenty more or less named Theano whose son was carried

off from the Scythians

by a

certain

Hippasus (?).

Theano,

after being assured

62
in

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
a dream by
or
'

the goddess

'

that she

with Eunice, apparently a friend.

would recover her son, went to Oropus This looks rather like a fragment of some

romance

;

it

might perhaps be the work of a scholiast or mythologer

— though

the characters are otherwise

unknown

to fame.

The

text

is

in a rather small

round uncial hand strongly resembling that of 404, and probably dating from the earlier decades of the third century. The high and middle stops occur.
{a)

Col.

i.

Col.

ii.

]k[.]

.

[.

.],

]/^'
]«/

(

[.

]•
5
]vco

?
Tovs

[
20
Se

^

ovSif

'
naiSos

]

].•

].[•••••>

[]
[...].

[]?
25

.[]'
(

[^]6<


Se Ke
,

tKjTis

5

€[€]] []
["j^povov
]
.

]eiv

?[•

']<

]5•
15

]
of a column)

30
Xevei

([]-^
[•

05
ei
.

[.]
(b)

[]•
[Sjr}

[] []8
Se ire

(Top

35

]^€[

] ]

.

[.][

[•

evo[
.

[] [\• .] [,] [
€7

[<]/>'7

^[
[.
. .

]?;»'
45

[

[]<
.]

ye

.

.

[.

.]y

.

].[

40

[.

€[]

[

418.

NEIV CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

63

]Rr[

]

]<^
. .

[

]Si

[

]

]•[

50

suits the

would suit or i, but not a, or . traces of the letter before []/ lacuna better than a preposition, but then a title instead of a proper name is however, cannot be read. required after 39. The vestiges following pfw do not suit upon very well, but pewt Up[ov is a possible
23.

The

[/

[]> [][\,
;

reading.

418.

Scholia on Homer, I/zad
27-7

I.

X

12 cm.
//tad, written
in the

An
century.

imperfect column of a

in a large

and

clear cursive

commentary upon Book I of the hand at the end of the first or early
is

second

The
1.

information provided
is

principally of a mythological character,

and

1. 264 the papyrus very likely There are very close resemblances to Schol. A, which in several passages exhibits an inferior text and considering the early date of the papyrus it is not unlikely that the commentary in question was one of the sources used in compiling the scholia in A which give mythological details. It shows traces of Didymean influence (cf. 1. 24, note), but was probably derived directly or indirectly from ApoUodorus (cf 11. 9-22, note). The lines commented on are for the sake of clearness printed in capitals.

since

399

discussed immediately after

consists of a series of excerpts.

;

[ [
[

1 1

letters

yv]vaiKas•

[(']

5

[yap

[

opovs

6]
S]i
]

! 8{
eii

^
irais

avrovs

[01

(

[
[

(i.

263)

MaXaiau
avrovs
Sie[

/6/3[[]]«'[

64

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[ [] [ €]
[
KaLvfvs
[

\\ [€ (]5 ^
€]5
]'

15

€ ! [€ [ ^ [
et]y

nrnou

€[
Se

\€[
y[ev

264

eyeveTo-

[.

.

[
[

ve]ai>^€i^ai

yeiveTai'

Se

[Xiaas Se

[

13 letters

[^€

20

[ \• [ 0[0€ ] []€
[\eipiov

[ \]
to]vs

€]9 ]5
Kamep

eavTov vrrap^as top

€[
[

ov[Sei>

ev

]

[< [€

Zev]i Se

KevTav

\^^[
eis

eXaTais

[

KfvTavpoi]

<[]
Aios

25

!
3
Zeus
3•

€(( •
as

€( -^ [ [
Tivfs

[ [€][0
Se

399

30.

1.

.
1.

[]
26.

^\€€(
ptv
of
COrr,
corr.

^
from
t.

[ [
[

[
of

( €[
from

[ [
£
corr.

UaXtav.
^2.

.

28.

from

.

1—8. Cf. Schol.

A

on

1.

263

.

.

.

avToiis fls

MaXcav Spos

'' !

yvvaiKwV

IIe\onovi'f)aov.

ds
ts
nfpiOeiv

/

iv

papyrus omits the explanation of Pirithous' name, but is much more explicit regarding makes be has nothing to refer to, while his parentage than the scholium, in which no sense and is probably corrupt for

-^ « .

Ueiptuovv

.

9—22.
npoTfpov
veavts

Cf.

' ('
is

! "^ .,
Schol.

419.

NEW
1.

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
Maivtis
hi

65

A

ivirpcn^t,

yiveraL

Bfov

,
on
yap
in

264

!,
\
Zfuf
Kfvravpois
fls tic

/jiyeVros

SvSpa
iv

yap

re

.

This

,'
related

almost identical with the papyrus, but is more compressed in some parts and more in others. As before, the papyrus e-xhibits the better te.xt, (i) by avoiding the repetition of viuvis which is in the first sentence, (2) by having viavias in place of detrimental to both sense and construction, and in the light of the papyrus should for the lacuna in 11. 11-2, and ro» be corrected to veaviat. Blass suggests Sja St for that in 11. 14-5. In the epitome of Apollodorus I. 22 (ed. Wagner, p. 181) the story of Caeneus is

expanded

17

['

\

more

briefl}'

:

\

on

papyrus

may

well represent another epitomizing of Apollodorus.

between this and the papyrus is marked, though the papyrus is somewhat shorter and varies the phraseology. The mention of Athena in the scholium, but not in the papyrus, is due to the slightly different If the scholium gives the actual point of view from which the legend is brought forward. words of Didymus, the papyrus would seem to be a secondary commentary based upon his notes but on the other hand the papyrus may express Didymus' language more exactly, and the scholium be an expansion.
parallelism
;

^ ') . .
inappropriate.

of occurs 24. in 1. 400 not in 1. 399, and that the story of the conspiracy of Hera, Posidon, and Apollo against Zeus follows as a kind of justification for the variation. As Apollo played an important part in the legend, this order is really more logical than that found in Schol. A, which first gives the story of the plot in connexion with 1. 399 and then discusses the variant which is ascribed to Zenodotus but rejected as
It is

remarkable that the variant

/3

The account

(^

'

' , ' , ?
/3£
.Schol.

,

&

.
in place

The

version of the

; (
"

A

is

as

.^'^'

"

'

., .
follows
:

GfViy

;(

The

419.

Euripides, Arc/ic/ans.
9•2

X

4•6 cm.

A

narrow

strip

Euripides, written in round rather irregular uncials of

containing parts of sixteen lines from the Arc/iclaiis of medium size, which are

of the second or third century.

The

identification of the fragment,
11.

which we

owe

to Blass, rests

upon the coincidence of what remains of F

8-y with a quota-

66
tion

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
from the Archelaus
in Stobaeus, Flor. 7. 5 (Fr. 275,
1.

are trochaic tetrameters, which are succeeded at
rections

13

by a

have been made

in

the text, perhaps

by the

original hand, to

.

Nauck).

Lines 1-12
Several cor-

which also

the stops and occasional accents, &c.,

may

be due.

]'[
?
5

JicreijOi/r'

avijapms

[' (^

])€

iv Se

\( ]
]'

]

[

?

7[

\
1

5

'
^

[

[

)^[

]

7[

7//3[6

10

.

^^ [ [
Argument of
15-7

[

SovXeiay

(

^/0€[[]][

eXevOepcos

420.

Euripides' Eledra.
Plate VI.

9-2 cm.

fragment of a brief account of the recognition of Orestes by Electra through the intermediary of an old man, and almost certainly part of a hitherto

A

unknown

of Euripides' Electra, covering 11. 341-584. The verso has been used for writing an account in a cursive hand of the late third century. The writing on the recto, which is of a common type (cf. Plate VI), probably

(5

dates from about the middle of the

same

century.

...[..].. Tovs avSpas eiaayeiy
.

[,

.

.]a)v

^evmv
TOS Se

^

[

[
15

[
[ [ [

13 letters
15
..

]€ ]
]i>s

([(
[.
.

.

.

.

.[.].[.
--roi

.

.

[]

]

<^

1

6 letters

68

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

rather large and well-formed uncials of the square sloping type, and dating

probably from the third century.
Heracles
is

A

battle scene

is

apparently being described

;

and part of another name occurs in 1. 4. The vocabulary suggests that the fragment comes from some Alexandrian epic. 423 is a strip from the bottom of a column, containing on the verso parts of thirteen hexameters in a large and rather rough uncial hand apparently of the third century. The }-ecio of the papyrus is blank. The high stop occurs several times and marks of elision and accents were used. The subject of the
mentioned
in
1.

9

fragment
is

is

obscure
in
1.

;

a reference to the Nile

is

noticeable in

1.

13,

while

Hermes

mentioned

4.

424 contains a fragment of three stanzas in Sapphic metre, probably by Sappho herself, written in a heavy uncial hand of the third century resembling that of the Oxyrhynchus Sappho fragment already published (7). Accents and
stops are found, the high point in
11.

6 and 10, the middle point in
interest, since

1.

5

(?).

The

form

artpais (=er£'pas) in

I.

9

is

of

some

the

was hitherto doubtful

for the

Lesbian dialect
is

;

cf.

Meister, Greich. Dial. p. 41.

exercise.
is

in

some lyric poem copied out as a school by the character of the handwriting, which a large irregular uncial, partly by the fact that the papyrus is complete Below the last itself; and the inferior spelling points to the same conclusion.
425
a short extract from
is

This

indicated partly

line are a series of dashes.

The excerpt is of the nature of an invocation such as might have come at the beginning of the poem, which does not appear from this specimen to have been of a very high-class quality. The metrical scheme is
^^^

- ^^ — — '^w-. The date of the S. is second or third century. A more valuable fragment is 426, a long narrow strip containing

parts of

thirty-two lines from a lyric

which
piece

is

is

metre and Pindaric style, not improbably to be attributed to Pindar himself Unfortunately the so mutilated that little can be done in the way of restoration, though
in dactylo-epitritic
intelligible.

poem

a few lines in the middle which concern Melampus are
is

The

text

written on the verso of the papyrus in a rather uncultivated uncial hand which

may

be assigned to the third century

;

on the recto

is

part of a cursive

document

dating from the latter half of the century preceding.

427
can be

is

also a fragment of

some importance.
is
is

It consists of the latter parts of

the three closing lines of a play, below which
little

the

title
\

\:-,.

There

question that Blass

right

\\\

reading this ^kvri<^avovs ^ kvQp(y?\'noyovia,

and that the papyrus furnishes another example of the dangers of rejecting definite ancient evidence on a priori considerations. A of Antiphanes is mentioned by Irenaeus (ii. 14), who gives a lengthy excerpt from it this, however, was rejected by Meineke (i. pp. 3 8 sqq.), who maintained that it was derived from
;
1

421-434.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
Keck

69

the Birds of Aristophanes, and

accordingly omits the extract given by

But it can hardly be doubted after the actual occurrence of the title that the testimony of Irenaeus concerning the ©eoyoi'ia of the same writer is perfectly trustworthy though whether they were two distinct works, or one work known by two names, remains uncertain. The text is written on the verso of the papyrus

Irenaeus from his collection of the Conikortmi Fragmcnta.

^'t^s

^^

;

in

a square or oval sloping uncial hand (cf 420) of the third century

;

on the

recto are parts of three lines in

second century cursive.
lines of a

428 contains the ends of nine iambic
to the second century than to the third. of the line
is

tragedy, written in a small semi-uncial hand, which

A

comedy, or possibly a more likely to belong short diagonal dash at the top
is

used as a mark of punctuation.
in

429
lines

is

another comic fragment, containing the beginnings of fourteen iambic
a
large

written

and handsome uncial
cf.

of the

square sloping type
is

characteristic of the third century;
in cursive dating

420.

On

the verso

part of a

document

from the end of the century. A paragraphus below 1. 9 marks In 11. lo-a a marriage is being arranged, which may a change of speaker. indicate that the conclusion of the play was not far off. very deep margin at

A

the top of the column

is

noticeable.

430

consists of parts of eight lines in

comic iambics from the top of a column,

written on the verso of a second or early third century account.

Marks of

elision
is

and high stops occur, but no breathings or accents. probably but little later than that on the redo.
in

The

writing on the verso

431 consists of parts of twelve lines of a dialogue in comic iambics, written an uncial hand resembling the square sloping type, but more probably second century than third. Changes of speaker are indicated by paragraph! and, when in the middle of a line, by blank spaces. 432 contains the beginnings of seventeen lines apparently from a comedy,

hand upon the verso of a second or early third century 1. 15 and marginal notes opposite 11. 2 and 8 have been added in a more cursive hand, but probably by the original scribe. Changes of speaker are indicated by paragraphi and, when in the middle of a line, by double dots (cf 409). The marginal notes seem from their position to refer or to the speakers, but the names ('](<'$) or /)]7}(!,•) and
written in a small uncial

account.

A

correction in

(/<)$))

are curious.

The

writing on the I'erso

may

be assigned to the

)

third century.

Between 11. 13 and 14 is a blank space sufficient for two lines. 433 contains the ends and beginnings of iambic lines from the upper parts of two columns. The MS. seems to have been of a magical character, giving directions for a series of spells or incantations, the objects of which are indicated

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
by
short marginal notes

which

third century.

or

which

.
434
is

may

cf. 11. 22, 28, and 2,?,• The hand is a small semi-uncial be of the end of the second or more probably of the first half of the
;

apparently a fragment from a hexameter poem, perhaps a Groups of a few lines (usually four) are separated by a shorter
contained a refrain.
uncials,
in a similar

line,

may have

Parts of two columns remain, written in

rather large coarse

some more writing

probably of the third century. but more cursive hand.
7-8

On

the verso

is

X

4-7 CM.

]

ov

[

n.av]S(LoviSao

]^
]€
JS*

€]

]
*

]5

(• [
^
eiioy

\

er]

15

] ] ] .•[
]

[ ]8[ ]
]

€7

[
Zev[i
?

?

nlovToy

nope

€77[ ?

'\)[

at the beginning of the line, comparing 3. Blass suggests Hyginus, Fab. 157, where Eurynome (called by ApoUodorus I. 85 Eurymeda) is said to have been the mother of' Bellerophon. Lines 4-15 refer to the wooing of her by Glaucus son of Sisyphus and father of Bellerophon. 6. Cf. Hesiod, Theog. 574 ' 7. Cf. Hesiod, Scut. "J—S ttjs kcu
cf. //. 12. Probably aveveve 205• him Pegasus. i. e. Posidon, who gave 1 7. xiii. 98 ing Bellerophon's parentage cf. Schol. Pind. fWi, TTJ '
: :

, •
]
.

'[

, ]
^^6
]
. . .

. ^
.
2-8
.
.

'

/.

For the

\ (\(
different stories

concern-

422.

] []

]

ro/c[.]iTeXt

[
1
.

17 cm.
.

.]
.

[.]i'/c[.]5i.

.]

nep

)(aT[€oVr6S• ap[(oy]'ris

421-434.
jetiao

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
.

71

]

(\( [\(
Trj[.
.]
.

ya

aXXiros

]

.

.

.

[.
j
.

.]

.

[.]
]XX€/ief

[ [
[

][
. .

8] ^^[.]
.

;[.]<

/tij;f[et

]

.

7;].
letters
5.

.

W. Allen suggests that the line may be completed The second supplement is too long for the lacuna, but the repetition of the might have caused an omission in the papjrus. for like nfp is for Cf. //. xxiv. 428 fV in Callim. Ap. 80, Del. 316, &c.
Mr.
.

.

]
[

.

.

-

].

423.

9•8

X

6•6 cm.

]
5

]•[
]'/€'€[.
.]
.

[

]5'

1

\
]

]'•

^ [
[
'

[

[

(^[

\\{)

]
]v
]J7

]' [ ] ](
]

avTot

aoiSo[v

[

e[

NiXos

Sie[

3.

What we

have supposed to be a stop might perhaps be the top of the cross-bar

of a

424.

6x3-1

cm.

]([
]

arepais

?ii

10

9•

([
([

]kov\

]

[

72
5
]

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
^•

]•
]
.

]6
425.

[ [
[

•49'5

('"

[]
Twves
5

[]8
re

/
N(XwTf
1.

( ?
.

Ye sailors who skim the waves' depths, Tritons of the briny waters, and Nilots 'who sail in happy course upon the laughing waters, tell us, friends, of the formation (?) of the sea and of the fruitful Nile.'
'

4.
6.

.

is

for

«(.

The second

of

is

corrected from

426.

] ]<€€[ ]((
]

[
[

24-3X5

««•

]
]y

]([ ?]

]

6*:

]l

]

]
.

evi

{ {)'
re
eis

[

]
[

^[
]oves

[
?

[(

'

]

]('
]es
]s

ev

|

>[ [
([

][
25
]

][

[

([

[ ][ ](
'[[
€[
]
.

]

]

T€veo[

][

421-434.
15
]

NEW
Se

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
]

Joy

!

5e

[
.
13.
iv.

[
from
;

73

]7€[
.

.
13.

'

!'

14—7• BlaSS restores these lines
it
|

and
1

{ ! [!
12.
(V

of opyiM corr. from cf Pindar, PyiA.
for

corr.

!, .^ (\ ', (. '.
(
:

291, &c.

is

the patronymic of
re Ilir^nfi

Melampus
\

cf Pindar Fr. 179

([ ]
vi.

I

\<
ii.

comparing Pind. Nem.
in the sense of

35
cf 01.

ix.

69

For

/5ifa

j/Zr/^i

50

oflei»

8.

may

perhaps contain a reference to Aglaea

who was

the wife of

Amythaon

according to Diod.

Sic. 4. 69.

427.
]

9-9

avSpts

01

5
1-3.

The

sense seems to be

\ \
]

Toy]

Sia^iTi

(
X

6-7 an.

'You

shall all enjoy prosperity

if

you applaud

my

play.'

428.

5-iX5<r«.

^\[] []•
joy

][.]

"[
5
]

S'

S

^'
15
10-4

(] ]' ^
^
OVTOS
trm-

tovs

]•

429.

S[.]t\
.

\

8 [
[

{

S

(8[
en

74

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


5

apna\y
fv[
.


.

}[
[
.

[

[][.
npoTef)
[

.

.][

m'

yiToyes avve8[

7. The doubled dots at the top of the line after as are remarkable, for neither a change of speaker or a stop seems at all likely at that point. 10. Cf. 211. 38-9.

11.

:
/
]\

SC.

?
e/f[

430.
]a>r
]

54• cm.
avSpes ov[

nap

[.]'

]
5

]/)

'\<

]• \>5 •' €
6x6-2

^ ''(

{ [
[

12-8x3

^'"•

](^

)

ovtos

irp[
[

[ [ €[
avSpfS
:

Tcoyl

[
[

KiKpafi[

]{
431.

)

[

[

15 letters

[

8 letters
8 »

€ !
cm.
][
]

[ [ [
[
7}[
[
[

/[

[

5

[

[

6

(]
]at
]

]' [
15

[
[

^{

[

yi{

[

"/^

[

421-434.
to
[

NEW
[

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

75

lo letters
»
..

]y

[

[
]^•[

[

431.

3•

Second

t

of

!
9 cm.

inserted later.

433.
Col.
i.

8-7

X

Col.

ii.

yv]vai^i re

]85
]

TTOVTOV

^[
(^
4 lines

6' [

]9hml

3 lines lost.

]7/
iSiov

.

[.

.

(
30

]€5
].

]9

]
^CDC

15

]«/

] ]
]?

€7

^ /
V

8€

(
35

[ [[
lost.

eivai

[
.

.][

fie

[.',.][
v€Kpas
[

(

fFfl•

76

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
epov
1•

(:
33•

TO

^, ({) and (:.
Se

fSiSa^aro,

^ €6 /,
/0!
inav
old'

\
oiS'

34"'5• Cf.

Antiphanes Fr. 273

(
1

.
If,

,,
(( =
i\|/-f,

inepava

,

from the form

/.

434.
Col.

2-5

X

8•6 cm.

€/[

.

[

]/
5
]•

]']1'

.J

.

ejOTTi

.

[

TV

\\[

.]_/»'[

.]

.[

Col.

ii.

.]o7rifai^[

.]7€
i[

.

[

25

.

.][
.]\_
[.
.

[.

[.

.

.

.](7

.

[

.

.

.]{

.]

.]6[

[.]??'[

>^('
'

.

[

...
at the

?/[

[

28.

There may have been a blank

beginning of

this line.

435-444.

Prose Fragments.

Under these numbers are included a variety of small prose fragments which we have not succeeded in identifying. Two (435-6) are historical, three (437-9)
of a philosophical character, the remainder, with the possible exceptions of 441

and 444, are oratorical. 435 contains parts of two columns written

in

an informal uncial hand

435-444.

NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

77

probably towards the close of the second or in the first half of the third century. The Corcyraeans are mentioned in connexion with some one whose name began

and who persuaded them to provide a talent (of silver) and there seems to have been some question of a marriage. 436 is a third century fragment from the bottom of a column, written in square sloping uncials (cf. 420 and 447) of good size. The general sense of 11. 5-10 is fairly clear, and the passage is evidently part of a description of some distinguished general, which might come either from a biographical monograph
with
;

/,

or from a

more comprehensive historical work. 437 comprises parts of fifteen lines from the bottom of a column, the subject of which seems to be the practice of surgery, though it is not clear whether the fragment belongs to some professedly medical treatise or to a philosophical work of a more general character. The hand is a medium-sized sloping uncial probably dating from the third century. 438 consists of parts of twenty-three lines written upon the verso of a second
century account
line,

in

a semi-uncial hand, also of the second century.

The

first

and apparently in a more cursive hand than the rest and has a space below it, is more likely to be a marginal note than the title of the work, which seems to have been of a philosophical character, the author
which
is

shorter

using the

first
is

person very frequently.
Parts of fourteen lines are preserved, written in rather
;

439
as
is

written on the verso, the recto having only a diagonal stroke such
in accounts.

found

small third century uncials of the usual type

cf 420.

A breathing and
writer,

elision

mark

occur.

The fragment comes from

a philosophical

apparently
the

not Plato.

440.

Two
;

fragments which were found together and are apparently

in

same hand
papyrus of
blank.
(cf.

but whether they belong to the same
{b) is

MS.
and

is

doubtful, for the

somewhat thicker than
is

that of [a),

{b)

has on the verso
is

parts of six lines written in a good-sized uncial hand, while the verso of {a)

The

writing on the recto

a third century uncial of a
is

common

tj-pc

447).

(), which

was a carefully punctuated papyrus,
lines

probably a fragment

of an orator.

441 contains the ends and beginnings of
consecutive columns, written
century.
in

from the upper parts of two

a

small sloping hand probably of the third
(1.

The

use of the second person plural
20) suggest a
19 followed

16)

name

Philip

(1.

rhetorical composition
1.

and the occurrence of the but it might also be
;

inferred from the short line at

by a name

in

the genitive case

that the

MS. comprised

a collection of

or anecdotes.

442.

A

long strip containing the latter halves of lines from one column and

78

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
The
piece seems to be in
it is

a few letters from the beginnings of lines of the next.
the oratorical style, but

too mutilated for the drift to be caught.

443

is

apparently a fragment of a private oration, and contains the beginnings
in

of twenty-four lines written

a round uncial hand of a calligraphic type

;

it

more probably belongs
and high points occur
it

to
11.

the

second century than to the third.

The low

in

4 and 6 respectively.

444 is a fragment mentioning Philip and the Macedonians, but whether comes from a public oration or from a historical work is uncertain. The
is

handwriting

a medium-sized uncial of the second century, probably of the
it.

early or middle part of

435.
. . .

I2-5X

•8

cm.

.]'
V

01

Se

KepKvpaiOL
rov

vcuTepa yevo[

5

\\
. . .

( ] €[] €
aKo\vcravTe[s]

we[

[.][. .1/)[

.]
.]
.

ey

Hvai
.
.

\ovTO

[.

.]
.]
]6ev

.

.

][.

.....

]('[
15 letters

][
.
.

ie

]
]ye

]

.] [.
15
.]

)[.

10X5-5

<^'"•

]?;•/

]

[
[
.

'\

[
.
.

]7;•€_'[.

.]7€

(

tJTTTToy
[

435-444.

NEW
5
]

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS
, .

79

^ \.
]
e]v

.]

;/[)[]?
Se

(€[
e[
[

\
[

?

Tais

[]€9
[
i'-mros

]

]

]fTais

vn^puytv

[

](v

(€

([
,][

]...[..

][
15
4-

][

][

Apparently not

{.

7—9• BlaSS suggests

[]«»5

[atiTos re rais

] ((
][ ][
Jr

To[vs

aWovt

\!.

437.

8-7

7•

]

]

.

[

[

12 letters
]

]<

]€[

[
[

[•

]^}'
0€[

Xeiv

\5

\

^ !
ev

5€

[
[

[

T(\ys

0«[

fivai

[€
]([

r[-]

-rpl

.]uya

15

Jai

[

13 letters

8
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a blank space before the lacuna.

82
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NEW

CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS

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This sign was 52. The occurrence of an asterisk in a prose work is noteworthy. used to mark passages which were found elsewhere, but were rightly placed as they stood cf. 445. 490-2.

443.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

in.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
445.

Homer, Iliad VI,
Height 30-5 cm.

Plate IV

(Fr. a).

Of

the numerous

Homeric papyri of the Roman

period which have been

points of interest and importance as the book of the Iliad, written in a medium-sized uncial hand with critical marks and occasional marginal notes, and containing While the critical marks, parts of 11. J 28, 134-7, 148, 173-94, 199, and 445-end. which include the diple, antisigma, and asterisk, are all due to the first hand, in the marginal notes two or three hands are probably to be distinguished, though owing to the paucity of the material for forming a judgement it is impossible to classify them with certainty. To the first corrector, whom we will call A and who employed a small semi-uncial hand, we should assign the notes on 11. 128, 148, and 449. together with all the superscribed variants. To the second (B), who wrote a small more cursive hand, belongs the note on 1. 464; and to a third (C), who wrote a larger cursive, that on 1. 478. The figure at the end, giving apparently the number of lines in the book, is cursively written but apparently by the first hand, and it is possible that either A or
di.scovered, very few present so

many

following fragments of the sixth

(but not C),

is

also identical with the original scribe.
is

The

question

is,

however,

not of great importance, for there
readings.

certainly no appreciable difference of time

between the writing of the text and the addition of the scholia and interlinear

The

first

century

is

out of the question as the date of the papyrus,

and both text and notes suggest the second century or the beginning of the third. Breathings and accents are occasionally, and elision-marks generally, used, and the punctuation is careful, the high point being employed, except in 11. 477 and 496, where the middle point occurs, indicating a slighter pause. In its disposition of critical marks the papyrus as a rule accords with the Venetus A, but there are some divergences cf. notes on 11. 183 and 189. The marginal notes are, however, very scanty compared with Schol. A, though such
;

information as they give

is

of considerable value, since they are all concerned

with various
in

readings.

Most of these
scholia,

notes record

differences
is

between the

papyrus and the
the
passages.

or generally accepted text, which

occasionally mentioned
\vith

extant Homeric

but not

in

connexion

these particular

Besides the readings ascribed to a definite source in the marginal

445.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

85

between the lines without any indication of their origin. Since they are sometimes rare, sometimes the common readings, it is not probable that they were all derived from any one text. The papyrus, which is remarkably free from errors and has more affinity with A than with any other extant manuscript, presents in spite of its extremely mutilated condition a number of important readings which are either altogether
notes, other variants are inserted

new

(see notes
(1.

on

11.

scholia

'
in

(

187), or

from quotations

487, 494, and 523), or are known to have existed only from in other authors (1. 493)• Of these, one

instead of

(

(
to

Be

in

1.

49,3)j

'''

distinctly superior to

the traditional text, and affords one of the rare instances of an emendation the text of

made

modern editor being confirmed by a papyrus. In our commentary upon this papyrus we owe several suggestions
a

Homer by
who

Mr. T.

W.

Allen,

has also very kindly placed his
is

own

collations at our

disposal.
(a)

Our

collation

with the text of Ludwich.

Col.

i.

)

>

-8

^"^^^^. «•
]

[€/ [
Col.

ii,

173

ivvea

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175

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uae
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ye

185

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[^'^^(

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190

86

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

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iii.

445

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455

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445.

475

\
[
480
,

( \ [
[
(>
[(infv

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
twi
«Tret

[ '
[Z(V
re

6\ '•
re

87

(€
eyco

An

\•
8(5)

re y^epaif]

rovSe yereja^at

\• ?

(

apnrpenea

(

][ ][(]•
y
o8]e

() [

]'

[e/c

485

[
490

^•

"•^

y^epyov
-

[ € ][ [ (((€\ (• . [ (( [ [
[
ev]

[€

^

t\vapa

(• •
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]

2 lines lost

[*'

''*

/'"'

€[

((

€)((•

495

[] ' []• [](• € []^
[ ][]
(
tiTdff

(

etXero

[ [
([

[85 [

[][
500

[]

[(
2 lines lost
[

[](
504

507

>

[

[

2 lines lost

88

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

6[?
KvSLOWyV

510

>/[?
2 lines lost

513
518

['«^>

.'
86[(
S

4

lines lost
[

520

525

TTpos

6]
eK

'[
e[v
[

[/9 [ [6 ? [

€[
-,

marginal note refers to the ancient variant for the common reading A has (leading in the text) The reading of Aristarchus is found in several families of MSS. ; whether the text of the papyrus had ovpavov is uncertain. &pr) was according to Schol. A 148. The marginal note presents much difficulty. the reading of Aristophanes, while the nominative is found in nearly all the MSS. The iota before at and is preferred by Lud. apparently belongs to the main text (which therefore agreed with Aristophanes), not to the note, and since at would most naturally refer to the reading of Aristophanes, we should expect the authority for the other reading to be given by the intervening word or words. But it is not The reading of the first letter is by no means easy to interpret the meaning of is larger than the usual omicron of this scribe and might represent a certain, for the and it is moreover placed underneath the of viihich is above the line. But the following has been corrected from apparently, so that what seems to have happened is that the scribe first wrote apx and then converted the into 17, inserting in the blank space underneath the . The obvious division is open to the objection that after is not written above the line as in the marginal notes on 11. iz8 and 478. the Mr. Allen suggests comparing the use of in Anecd. The scholium would then mean that the Bek. II. p. 600 for the omission of iota. ancient copies read but the common reading was with no iota. This gives very
128.
Schol.

. .

[ [ [
C

The

.

>

{)

{.)
,

".

"
'

(),

{.)

{/) ()[(),

,

'

;

445.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
1

89

good sense, but v" is hardly the kind of abbreviation of on a papyrus of this period, and the construction of (sc. the

€^/)
cult.

;(

)
it

as

and though

is

One word, however, suggests nothing but the noteworthy that in Schol. A on this line
fVt

here makes or scholia of this character.
174.
iyiiia

in a
e^^f

?

grammarian
Tf

.
A

no

sense,

and

for

{),
6
Se

pera
'

as I heard,' there
Sti

For the

diple

The papyrus adds an
ap. Dindorf, Schol.

before this line cf. Schol. A antisigma as well
I.

;

cf.

^.
A

p. xlvi

176.

The diple before this line, like that before 1. 186, has a dot above it and possibly is meant for a which should have a dot below as well. That sign was used to denote the readings or transpositions of Zenodotus, Crates, and Aristarchus. But since has an ordinary diple against 1. 181 with the remark on tv and none at all against 1. 186, and since no variation of reading among the ancient critics is recorded in connexion with those two lines, it is more probable that the diple with one dot has the same meaning as the plain diple, or at any rate means

178. i8x.

has the diple against this line with comments upon has a diple against this line, but no comment.

, ( {! , ; 6 \ (
of
is

which would be expected

)

somewhat
of

diffi-

first

aorist

occurs
is

^),
no

t'JKOvaifv)

{parallel in

the explanation of this sign

('peavt

and

aijpa.

,

^-,

from the Ven. A has a diple with the remark on nep\ Possibly the diple which is found in the papyrus before 1. 186, where the Ven. A has none, has been misplaced and should have preceded 1. 183. But there areseveral instances of divergence between the papyrus and A with regard to the diple cf. note on 1. 189. 187. The reading of the first hand is ascribed to nlXXot by Schol. A, but is not found in any MS. The reading of the corrector (ascribed to Aristarchus by Schol. V) occurs in the Lipsiensis and apparently in I\Ir. Allen's L 20. It is curious that the papyrus seems to ignore the ordinary reading and that ascribed to Aristarchus by Schol. A. It is now clear that the variant (which is not even mentioned by Ludwich or Monro and Allen) rested on considerable
something
183.
different

.
Here

the

.

'

(^^ ^(,
this

^^
\

(((

authority.

189.
in the
1

The papyrus has no

diple before

line

and

1.

191

where they are found

Ven. A.
94• Cf. Schol. 99•

A
cf.

napfTvpoXoyel

\
on

opoypaa. The papyrus had (V (genitive) in the text with most I\ISS. Mr. Allen informs us that besides A, his D, V 16, and P, and probably a few more have and this reading is indicated by the remark . The papyrus (()[) seems unique in calling dative, perhaps from false analogy with (r. sup.), Avhich in spite of the scholiasts is probably to be interpreted as dative. The dash after is apparently a mark of punctuation. Whether y{(vt) (if that be the right expansion of y in the text) tv<o^o means that is to be regarded

,(! \
449.

1

For 'he
(

The

B.

461

A, which has a comment on the parentage of Sarpedon. scholiasts have no note on the reading on this line, but cf. Schol. e'v yap vyits ioTiv
diple

()
tbid.
e'v

, Schol.

,

.

.

fv ytviKrj

('

i>s

yiviKri^

fori.

o6fv

(',

(

^^ ( !, , ! (
\{

.
i>s

'(.
.

A

^ ((
t
.

Trepi

and Schol.

(( D /.
.
.

.

.

ci'^eXmy

{)

as a genitive, equivalent to

«,

or that there was a variant

(( (,

is

not

made

9b
clear.

MS.; but the first it does not scan, is actually found in one though would be expected. Lud., the MSS. being divided, (Lud.) is the reading of all 456. 'A/)yei as here. the MSS. except one at Vienna (W) in which npos is corrected to of is a circular mark resembling the sign for a short syllable. 464. Over The marginal note here is in a more cursive hand than that employed in the other cf. Schol. A on H. 409, I. 633, P. 161, &c., The vulgate does in fact read cases. has been the only So far from which it appears that Aristarchus read which is read in the majority of the MSS. source assigned to the form Lud. 475• e]foiaLv•. the reading of other MSS. 477. Cf A, where fw is superscribed above and Lud. is a spot of ink at the top of the line, which 478. After the lacuna following we have considered to represent an elision-mark after . If this is correct, the note (the best-supported reading, probably refers to the alternative readings by Schol. A). re (ascribed to (so many MSS.) or so Lud.) and is that most likely to have stood in the text of the papyrus, since Of these re ignores the digamma before is recorded in the margin and the reading whereas in 1. 493 the papyrus preserves a digamma which is ignored by the MSS.
hypothesis
is

(,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

more

(

though
likely,

('

,

^,

^; (.

,
)
and

',
But

a stop or

the spot of ink represents in the (or 4. text or to ), a reading found in D, two Vienna MSS., and Mr. Allen's is in comment on the position of but The fact that the scholia do not mention
it

is

possible that after

[

there

was no

that

is

even accidental.

Then

the marginal note

may

refer either to

not./3i7;i/. favour of the view that the note here referred to a variation concerning over the line refers to the variants y' 5Se (Aristarchus) and ' 5 yt (the 479. reading of nearly all MSS.). It is quite uncertain which of the two was found in the text of the papyrus. are traces of ink which apparently indicate 485. Above the last two letters of and the vestiges do not something superscribed. The only variant known is suggest either or a horizontal stroke meaning v. inserted The variant of has been corrected from a (J). 487. The there above the line is not recorded in connexion with the present passage, but in

(5)

,

, ^
A

was an ancient dispute whether 490-2. For the asterisks before

(^
S(

Trjs (. 35°) *'" omits the asterisk before 1. 493. f/iot this reading, which is superior to that of all the 493. Sf because it preserves the digamma before MSS. (and Lud.) is found in Epictetus, Diss. III. 22, 108, and had been restored in the present For another Hoffmann and Bekker, comparing a. 359, . 353, and passage by 353. example of a conjecture in the text of Homer being confirmed by a papyrus see P. Grenf. Se 'l/jif instead of the MSS. reading II. p. II, where in 198 Nauck's conjecture

'8(
.

(356-9)

: .
:

was to be read. or on 490-3 these lines cf Schol.
Kflvrat

\

The papyrus

:
.

. no

',

found in a third century b. c. papyrus. It is noticeable that there, as here, digamma which had been ignored by the MSS. Lud. cf A, where too V is superscribed, is the reading of all the MSS. and Lud. At the end of the line 494. is found in the Ambrosianus cf For the variant 403, where in place of the ordinary reading and a Vatican MS. (cf Schol. A iv here, for COUld would SUit jUSt aS well as not refer to any one but Hector.
is

' ^ipis

the papyrus preserves a

([(

:

([

.

"

(\ (]. (\

) "

;

446.
507-9.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
The papyrus

91

omits the asterisks which are found in A against these lines, but has the diple against 1. 507, as in A. in the margin before this line is what looks like the top of a critical 510. mark, of which the rest is lost. A has a diple against tiiis line. The smooth breathing above the initial is uncertain, but the vestiges suit that 518. There is a diple before this line in A. better than a circumflex. and of iai/ion [ have possibly been corrected. 521. The JISS. Cf. . Ill, where Rhianus read for 523. makes good sense here. for is not uncommon in MSS. This error is corrected from 1. of 527. 529. Below the coronis is a number, apparently referring to the lines in the book. But If 525 is correct. Book vi in this papyrus was four lines shorter than in our te.xts. in view of the carelessness of scribes in numbering successive hundreds of lines (cf. 223), not much reliance can be placed on the figure here, though cf. 448. 302, note.

[•.

( ) 7[(
([:

.

446.

Homer, Iliad Kill.
1

8-4

X 43

cm.

Plate VI.

The

narrow strip of papyrus containing parts of 11. 58-99 of Iliad xiii. was unusually careless, and the fragment has no critical value but palaeographically it is interesting, since a portion of a cursive account on the verso of the late second or third century supplies an approximate icniiiniis
scribe

A

ad

qticm for the date of the literary text on the recto.

The

latter,

written

in a

square and upright uncial hand,

may

be placed near the end of the second

century,

60

0];^[ ^] [€ eo9
et
[tj

\7(
[yvia 8
[avTOS S

auroy eyitpet

ey[iO(riYaioi

^[ (] [ ]()€
reoiSas
coi

[
65

[(By

[] ]
['
[

[ (( ]\^ [] [(09
][^
TloaeiSamv
]

noSioio SicoKdu op[viov

66
68

7

[ (]((
8

•\)

[

KiXerai

ye

Ka\)(^a]s

tan

[ ^[
[(

[ [
aWo

apOeis

Aias

92

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

75

80

€] ].]([ ^ [ ]\ ([[ ^ [ ][ ] ] [^ ( \
pel

(]
S

yap]

aniofTOS

8 ^'[[ \
[8
Se
6eot
eyi

eyepOe woSes

S

ovTCu

\

[][(

[^
5e

Atas

€€

vepOe

.

rojuy

85

Tovs

90

peia

95

[ €\][
€][
eiSeJTai

]
is
is

€] [ ] ()[ [ {]€
]
]
re

!]

][ ( ] [
[•^)(

[] [][
veoi

[ [
(

[Oeoi

€€

.

[
(
ye

re

>[

€1

]([
6 1.

[
8.

a mistake for a graphical error for neSwto. probably by another hand. has been corrected from f-yvV' 66. 68. The omission of I. 67 may have been caused by the fact that both it and 1. 68 But something has also gone wrong with the beginning of begin with the letters
64.

f
(]

(,

.

447.
1.

errfi nc 68, for it is impossible to get as that in the preceding and following lines.

71.

is probably a mere accident, since the iota is already in 73. The doubled long by position; the passage is therefore hardly parallel to e.g. P. Brit. ]\Ius. 732 11. xiv. 1. {Journ. of Phil. xxvi. p. 49). 183

^. [(
',

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
into the lacuna,

93
size

which

is

of the

same

1.

75. 80.

82.

word.
83. 84. 87.

\
:

[(] \ MSS. 1^( ]).
:

1.

is

of course another blunder, due to the termination of the preceding

:

similar mistakes (for onidev) occur in
1.

>]>

:

],
:'
:

DG

{() and
hand
in
1.

Vrat.

A

().

vf^^^afav

MSS.

On

has vnep «[)/(?) in place of the regular vn
a graphical error.
89. vnep 94.

No

papyrus before

.
Jk;

'

.

the Other

89
is

The

variation

papjTUS no more than
the

cf.
is

the previous note.

variant

known
is

in

this

line,

which should be

tolis

5

It

quite impossible

that

twelve letters should have stood in the

perhaps the scribe confused the two omicrons and wrote tovs

.

447.

Homer, I/md XXIII.
7-3

X

4-2 cm.

Plate VI.

The

following small fragment from the twenty-third

has, like the preceding papyrus, a palaeographical interest.
recto, written in

Book of the Iliad, The text on the

square slightly sloping uncials, represents a
especially

common

type of

literary

hand cursive which

(cf.

2)

;

while on the verso

is

part of an account in

is not later than the beginning of the third century, and more probably belongs to the second. It is, therefore, not at all likely that the MS. on the recto was written later than the latter part of the second century. A few

accents &c. occur, apparently added

[ [
8,5

[7€€ /7]

{]
tJut^oi'

[] €
e/i]a

[ [( ([

[(
. .
.

[evTe

[]
[ei'^ja

[] []

/i€

([

[ ([
[

[

(€
ev

by the

original scribe.


OnoevTOt

MfvoiTios

(

/

//

94
90
[er/3a]0e

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ei^SvKecos

[?

Se]

[]
;

[
vctiiv

[

/
with

84.

with

CEGL
88.

([
and
:

.

.

.

:

the papyrus
Vrat. d

may

have read
(so

Brit.

[]'

Mus. Add. MSS. 172 10 (6th or 7th

(

ADHS, &c.,
nep

or

cent.)

;

La Roche.

(

so

D

La

R.) or

other

MSS.

448.

Homer, Odyssey

XXII

and

XXII

I.

Height of Column 29-6 cm.

The following fragments are from a roll comprising Books xxii and xxiii of Homer's Odyssey. Of the twenty- second Book portions of seven consecutive columns remain, covering with some intervals II. 31-317. Book xxiii is represented only by two small pieces from a couple of columns, nine intermediate columns being wholly lost. The text is on the verso of the papyrus, the recto having been previously utilized for a prose literary work which has been carefully
cleaned off

— unfortunately

so

effectively that

the

writing

is

quite illegible.

and there traceable are formal rather heavy upright uncials of good size, probably not earlier than the third century, to which the hand of the verso may also be attributed. This is also upright and rather large, but lighter and more ornate. Accents, breathings (usually acute-angled), marks of elision, &c., and high stops have been added with some frequency, mostly by a second hand, which has also introduced some corrections into the text the marks of elision, however, seem to be mainly due to the original scribe. The system of accentuation is generally similar to that found in 223, the long papyrus of Iliad V in oxytone words, however, all the syllables except the last bear
letters here
;
;

The

a grave accent (though not in xxii. 184 tvpi yepov), as in the Eacchylides papyrus,

whereas in 223 only the penultimate syllable has the grave accent. As in 223, perispome words followed by enclitics become oxytone. In the case of diphthongs the second vowel is usually accented, while in 223 the reverse is the case, but the writer was not very careful, and it is sometimes a matter of doubt for which peculiarity is the method of writing the letter an accent was intended.

A

which are as a rule nearly, and sometimes quite, horizontal. The papyrus shows on the whole a good text, which is of interest on account of some agreements with X (Vindobonensis 133), or U (Monacensis 519 B),
accents,

448.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
MSS.
Our
collation
is

95

or both, against the rest of the

with the edition of

Ludwich.

Book

xxii.

Col.

i.

Col.

ii.

[]
[
SjTj

[,]
[tovs]

[

KaraKrelivai

dp

[ [
[

35

Kvves

[\ €

40 [ojure

[]

[

[]'[^

] 6[ [€ ^] € ^(^^(\
]

0\([

]

[(

8d

XYvfv

([€
'

85

Oeovi

\][]

42

44 45

• [•^09
[]
[coy]

[\
€v

tovs

[]

[[
[

[

[fi

[]»

[] ^

^]

([
[\
nepi

€[

[(

[ €]
]

]

]

(•
go

(]€

[ ]?
[]
H5
£e

(f^]pv'

[a]vTOS

[] ' ( [\ []( [\ (( ^»'
[\^

(.

S

120

([

[ [(

( ($€( [ (
Col.
iii.

K[vveas

[

0[ [

^<
y

(

tot

((

(

(

g6

125 [et]\6To

[( €[^ [\ [ [ [/ ] 6[
[ej/cXeii/'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
irpos

[a\vTOS

'

(]

[ [] [
"
'€

(

']^

5e

][€]

[]
'

[] \\ ]€^^[ [ ]' [€ [
€][€]
oSos es
ecT|[jo]]ecu7'

[ [
evevey
eui

130

TOts

[]
[])
135


'

? [€] ^ ^ []
' [6]
€[7ros
/i[€re€£7re]i'

[' ]

Ke •)(^

wpoaeeiire \] [ ]? €' AyeXae \[(5

0VT05

[] [

[ ][ [^ [ 5 [9\
^

€Vt]os

([

]€.

ye[ti'€T]'

\

[
Col.

et]y

navTas epvKoi

^'^[

oy

(

iv.

[
140

[(

[)(€

[
[es

[evOev

145

['("'

[
[

[

€]

![ ][ € ] [
5e

(]€ ^^.

(]• ]€9
Ttvye] eveiKw

!'
ainoXos

]9 ( ](
'

[

Kvveas]

]

[]^^€[9
re

[(

€€

448.
182

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
vnep ovSov
«/3]<

[
[

[ €( .
8

] [9 / [
ainoXos
(pepo)!/

^

€0£€'

97

(€\
y

185

[^1€€]
[8
TOT]e

^^

[\ ( ]
Se

[( [€
Col.

.

190 [ev
192

[ [' ^ [][€ € ]€£ ]€[] [(? ? €\(( [ €[ ( € [ [ \([^[
[<

[\
[trvf

S

]

[8 ^• 7[']' €'

[

ev

Se

re Seov

(]

195

["'"'

[
[]

/*«"

][ ]
^] )^[«]

230

S'

'-

[\<

oVfTtlle

[ [
[""«yx^
e

^
.

/3['

^

^
iKavets

'
235

[[a]]Xo0[i'pcat

aye

.['\

?

6i6s

ev

240

[(

€]'[ [][ [][ [] [][] .[^
»']£'^[ ]
re

5

[] []([] []\[ ^( [\ ' 6\] [\ [][
(

evepyecias

[

•[ [ ^ ( ] [( (
Col.

]

aX/(t/io]y

\.(/,\

([\•

[\

[]

[(6]
/*

6]€;

^^

A[ye]\aos

98

TIeiaavSpo'i re

245
Tovs
Tois

er

'


]
v)jv

([ ^ (€ ^
\.[\
(

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[]• \\
re
eioi

[]]

[]?

]€
MevTcop

/iereeiTref

enos

(

250

[
[<

([ ^
-^
[]['\ [][\•
/ce

\^(\>'

[ ](' ^ [] [] []
[>

265

'

€€€

[]
[Z]evs

200

265

270

]•• € €\ \^ [ € ] ] [ ] ] [ ] [ ] ]€ [ [ ] [^ €] [? [
^.[ [ [ [( [
]
5e

]?

ye

iravres

€]

eKeXtvae

aWos

tv

)(^]•

enei

aXevavTO

[

Kev

ey

e^evapi^ai

[?

(

OSvaaevs

'

€]6
(^

[

i\Xov

[

(

[

Se

(]

e^ ^yX^]

o^e]a

448.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
Col.
[

99

275

9 [] []
[<\
S
€«/

vii.

aXXos

8e

[(]'
[]' []

28

( [^
[ey

[ \ [> []9
[\
[5e

([
(/[€//' 30

[

8e pliyof

285

[]70'

[] [ ]([ ' [] [ ] ([(( [][ \][(
8[>] [€
eTrejtra

' ^^[.] [< {\\[
305

[ [[ ( [ [(
[

[]\€' €
[]

[]
(
01

^
ey

'

?

[

tv

S

Si

[[]]

(

[
[

€7[/>6••

310

\\(^ [(. -[
&

[\

[
[

\[
[

290
[

\[\[\[^ [] '^]{)[
[

[]^09
295

,

3

1

5

//6['
9 columns

^
]]
yap

[][

[

\[

lost.

Book

xxiii.

Col. xvii

Col. xviii.

185 auTojy

]• ' [

230

]
]

](

TIS

aXXos

(€

( • €\ [ € ' ([!
[

" ([

'

"

€['

lOO
190

]
]
1
""

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
euros

235

el

J"


'
'-

apap]via\s "^ '^•'

"^^ [€ []
- r

([
[

r

[tBjy

240

[]
[]

rij'

3*

[ [
"
t

r

5 [)

.
to write

[

^ ^\(\
:

has been corrected, the scribe having begun to write a round letter. 35• 37-8. These two lines are transposed in a number of MSS. (t/) Eust. ; Lud. with other MSS. so 37. Tc 44. The papyrus agrees with the majority of MSS. (so Lud.) in omitting the line anriiv oKeBpov found in DLW. Si
of
«'^''fs

U

87• 88. vs of

over an erasure of , by the first hand. is probably by the second hand. " " EuSt. ; ev " ei'8ov Other MSS., Lud. XU, " The e of Se]tov seems to have been deleted. 129. 1. oSiifffus: cf. 141, 281. Other MSS. 701. 130. so Lud. with H, and GP (c.); cf. Aristarchus written in place of r by vary between and fVreor'. The (or
114. "" of
is

.
f

:

MSS., Lud.
ev,
i.

has been corrected by the original scribe from

e.

he began

119. 128.

The

(^
:

the original scribe

ayxou

,,, [ :

] ^[

correction SO
:

!

.

The manner in which the correction has been made without the (so FZ) rather than addition of any elision-mark indicates that the corrector read 8e ' eXcXui/To (other MSS., Lud.); cf. x.xiii. 192. Aaeprao, Sios is in agreement with 192. The omission of the line
the majority of the

141. 1. 186. Sf

: :
is
:

)

was a mere blunder.
is

not found here in any
1 2 9,

MS.

;

ay^

is

the ordinary reading.

cf.

28 1.

.
252. 264. 274. 275. 278.

Lud. with H, cf. Did. ; SO 291. corrector has only actually crossed through the e of €, but was meant to be included, f of has been corrected. ; I. otoi. 250. 0101 apparently has the rough breathing, as in ' after is peculiar to the papyrus. 251.
233. 245.

]•.
The

MSS.

;

so Lud.

FDULWP

in
:

.

no doubt the

254• 255. «eXfuae SO 257-9. Lud. prints

: /^
'. [] :
\:
[\(•.

FH

a mistake for

.
;

Lud,
((CfXfuei'

X (-)
these

lines

Other MSS., Lud. small type comparing Eust.

tii/es

as

.

MSS., Lud. om. MSS., Lud. ; cf. I. 251. Lud. with other MSS. and Bekker so re appeviKS>s so U (first hand) and X ; cf. Eust. Lud. with Other MSS., AristOH. P. 599.

((

Xt'yirai puibc

449.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
[)

loi

in 0;[[]] il may be noted that 281. In connexion with the deleted first above the line is found in F, while the second hand has added a. second
cf. 1. 129. Other MSS., Lud. SO 287. ; as usual marks the 300th line; cf. 223, 302. The marginal opposite 1. 302 here is accounted for by the omission of II. 43 and 191. has been corrected. of 307. The second xxiii. 192. SO ]3ekker (second ed. 1858);

in

H;

\\[€(

:

MSS.

Cf. xxii. 186.

237.

in

(
first

(([•.

[!

&c.

Its

position

' \€

Lud. with most

has been corrected from

.

449.

Euripides, Andromache.
Largest fragment

9x7

cm.

These fragments of a single column from the beginning of Euripides' Andromache provide what appears to be an early example of the use of the book form (cf. 45). The writing a medium-sized not very regular uncial,

probably of the

half of the third century

is

on the verso of the papyrus,

while on the redo

in

the centre of the page are the letters

[

or pi

.

[

with a short
line

horizontal stroke above

These letters Supposing this MS.
about

them and a lacuna sufficient for another may represent a number or perhaps a title, e.g.
to have been a

/^ -)?.

below.

28x14

cm.

The

text

codex the size of a page would have been An seems to have been a fairly good one.
1.

otherwise unrecorded variant occurs in

27.

5

6

8

5 7[' ^
ei

[^ \
en€L

ev ye rcot
Tis

(
15

[] [[(]( - \9
fiXov]

[(

^ ]] [ ^ [ '
(

8^ ^ ]
.4€]
of

rraiSa

['(5

(\\(<[](
e^aiperov

yepas

€[9

^[

]

]

"'

'/

I02

20

25

( [ )^ [ ]?[^][ [\\ [ [( ? \ ?] [ ? " ([ ( [ ?] [
[]5
(Se

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Bias]

([

€€ rjovie '€]'

eai

[
v[l\v

\\[

][(

2

8

3

[ ][ [ ? ?\? ^ ^ (] [ [ ]? [€?
[(9

[

] €[ ?
apaeva

]5€'[

evpeiv

(] [? \ ^ (] [(^ [ [€ [ ( ][ [ 4 [€ ? € ]? [ [ €(] vaieiv

[ [
[Xeyet

?

] €[€ ]?[

35

39

[(

45

] [ (? ]?• [?
[?

?
ei?

]€

[? ? ? ]

Oaveiv

[? ?
omits

'^? ^

]

[]
yevrjaeraL

On

the recio

Wi
6.

The papyrus

1.

7 as

found in the

the scholiast states

and

is

was an insertion of bracketed by W(ecklein).

the actors.

MSS. (' The verse was

rejected

which by Valckenaer

€,

451.
I

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
:

103

o.
7.

SO

AEP
a

;

LB, W.

1

24.
27.

\(({!

(>
The

TTfit• is
:

the ordinary reading.
is

The papyrus
MSS.

variant

was considerably longer.

the elision
:

not elsewhere neglected in the papyrus.

new

variant;

show

and < 35. The accent and the fact that a wider space than usual is left between to be a crasis, which is of course necessary that the scribe did not understand
47.
scribe regarded

for the scansion.

{
X

as two words.

450.

Euripides,
4-1

.
The
literary

5-3

«TOT.

fragment from the top of a column, containing parts of lines 7'°~5 of Euripides' Mcdca, written on the verso of the papyrus. On the recto are two or
three mutilated lines of cursive, of the second or third century.

A

text on the verso, which

is

in a

somewhat

rapid, sloping uncial hand,

may

be

assigned to the third century.
710 [yova\Tu>v re
oiKTeipov

[] []
[]

[]
:

Se

^^

6/30)?

7

'5

[y(-VOL\TO

[]

npos

[[ [
re
;

[88 [ ( 8[ ^
[.

the papyrus thus agrees with the MSS. reading; Rnpwv Prinz-Wecklein. 713• 714-5. These two lines were excised by L. Dindorf and are bracketed by PrinzWecklein. 1. 715. itnt avT[os: the reading is fairly secure

[5

451.

TlIUCYDIDES
7

II.

X

3-4 cm.

A
text,

small fragment from the top of a column containing parts of 10 lines from

the end of Chap. 73 and the beginning of Chap. 74 of Thucydides, Book ii. The which is written in a third century uncial hand of rather small size, shows

I04

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1.

a slight divergence from the usual order in
divided
is

not certain

though the lacuna

\
;

9.

How

exactly the lines were
is

the distribution proposed below

fairly satisfactory,

at the beginning of

Tept^eiy]

5

]]9 '^'^ €[ 7[
ovs 01 7r]aT€pes

vaiovs

€ \ ! 7][ [
[

.
5.

]

[ ([ ]^
T[e]

\([
ei

1.

2

is

somewhat overcrowded.

npos twv op

wepi

]

Sei

e^

([:

]£)5

9• «Jrt

. ^ ^/
:

H(ude). with so

;

MSS.,

.

CFMG.

452.

Thucydides IV,
7

3-8

C7II.

This

is

another scrap from Thucydides

(iv.

87) written in medium-sized square

uncials which

we should

assign to the end of the second or to the third century.

The

identification of the

fragment

to Blass

—was

— due

like that of the

preceding and following
in in
1.

rendered the more

difficult

by

the fact that

11,

which is the only uncommon word in the text, is a new variant found Another otherwise unrecorded reading occurs in 1. 3.

no MS.

Tep6\vi

] <[ )[(
ei]

[

e

[

][ ]
e]puo[ev
ev Tois re

^

€[(

454.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

5 av] eni(pe[poyTes To]vs

3•
8.

]« ]((
:

!
n\eiovas
.

] •[
,][€]•
.

105

M[G],
:

.

.

\((

H(ude) with Other MSS.
. .

in the

papyrus
It is

may be due

to a confusion of the construction or be merely a case of the

-

[
.
The
infinitives

MSS,

common
10.

interchange of and t. began the line, since the papyrus is broken away immenot certain that but the division of the lines proposed in the text works well on that diately before the ;
hypothesis.
11,

\\

AISS.,

.
Thucydides VI.
8-7

453.

X3

cm.

fragment from Thucydides, vi. 32, written in an upright uncial hand of medium size which may date from the early part of the second century or even from the end of the first. The text coincides so far as it goes with that of Hude
except for the use of
in place of in
1.

A

9.

T€i Se

Te\]e[(oaav

5

[ ]]\[ \] ([
T€S Tas <nTov]Sa[s
ew[t]
I/JJS

lo

€]([ [ ]
ot

€S

nep

]

[
454.
2

([ [
15

( (] « ] ......
([
[

] ?

((]

({> ] €> [
es

avfe

? ()[

7;]€€[

Plato, Gorgias.

7•54•5

<^'«•

The recto of this papyrus contains part of a money account in Latin, written a good-sized cursive hand of the second century. On the verso are parts of three columns containing pp. 507-8 of Plato's Gorgias, written in a mediumin

io6
sized uncial

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
hand of the middle or
later part of the
11.

second century.

Stops are

63 and 87, and a point opposite the middle of the preceding letter in 11. 50 and 1 8, though whether these were really intended to represent a different pause is doubtful. There are a few corrections,
occasionally found, a high point in
1

sometimes in a different hand. Being the first papyrus of part of the Gorgias to be discovered, the fragment is of considerable interest, though the text is not very good. There are numerous minor variations from the later MSS., but most of these It is noticeable, cf notes on 11. 9, 18, 34, 40, 79, 105, and 116. are clearly wrong however, that in one passage (1. 51) the papyrus agrees with the text of
;

lamblichus and Stobaeus against the readings of the MSS., and that in another (11. 1 1 3-5) it removes a slight difficulty where an error in the text had already

been suspected.
nensis

It is also

a matter of
(11.

some importance

for the textual criticism

of Plato that in two places
against

48 and 105) the papyrus supports the Vindobo-

the other

MSS.

The

conjectures of various scholars in the

,
where
the

part covered

by the fragment gain no support from
clearly

it, and even in a passage seems to have dropped out of the text before or after ot

the papyrus agrees with the later

MSS.

in

omitting
;

it

;

cf.

1.

76, note.

We

give a collation with the text of Bekker (1826)

but for the readings of

MSS. and

who

of lamblichus and Stobaeus we are indebted to Prof J. Burnet, has very kindly placed his collations of this passage at our disposal.

=

the Clarkianus,

=

cod. Ven.

Bibl.

Marc. App.

suppl. gr. 39.

[/] ] €]!
5

[ (] 6( []
[

Sei

]
\
\
]

Col.

i.

\

[

7[7

[ [
ei;

5

avSpei

[

[

[ [

fivai

((]
(

(
>-"%
20

]8] [9 ] []^
re

class.

4.

i,

F=

Vind.

[
[

<Se]

ovtos] S

evavTicos

(]> []

[<"^^®

[

) [[

]

pev

line lost.

454.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
Col.
ii.

107

25

.[
kt[€Ou
To[s

3 lines lost.
Se]

Of

30

olce^[^'

\€ [ ]{
[et

[ ]( [€ \ [] \
€€ ]!/
(.

(

[(]

[]\^ \
[9]
50 vei[v

6(<

[
55

]•
[ۥ]
evi

eaf] 8e Se

€[•]

]
8e

Se

[avTOS

aXXos] Tty

/lieXXjit

ei/^at

^
8oKfis

ovTOS

35 SoKd

[5
[

fii>]ai

/3€70'[
eis

40

4

[] €] ] [ ] []
[9

[[ ] (]
8[
[ ( [5 [] ][
2 lines lost.

[ ] ?
(\\

]

6

( []
[][
[]

?
][•]
ev 8e

65

[]
[
7

ye

[
[

[ ][ (
2 lines lost.

75

[ ([
[it

Col.

iii.

[(
100

^^ [!

(

(

(
OS

'6[]^€£

[
[toy

^

(
Xe
f

(

io8
TLv

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

8

(

85

go

95

[]
9•
1 8.

[9 [ [ ^ [[ [[ 8 [ [ [ \ ^[[ [ [ [ €[ [( ? \ [ ^ [ [[ [
\\
[o]iS

![\ [

[ [
[
\
ei[vai

6[ [€
[
vieoy

105

[ [

o[iire

et

(

(.

[^^
[?

!

115

^

[

yoy.

1

20

]

/,
(•.

20.
27.

( MSS., Bek. ]«6>' BTF
]

the reading of the
e[i]i/[ai
;

first

hand,

is

a mere error.
',

MSS., Bek. But 15 letters would be too 28. lacuna, which should contain 12 or 13. [avTos Stob., Bek. ; so Iambi. 30.
:

:
f[ti'ai
: : : :

:

BF

Stob.
;

;

Bek.
Stob.

SO

Iambi., Bek.

much

for the

BTF

34. euros 35.

37. 40. of the MSS.

8[
«

7[

(](
so SO
this

;

flvai ovtos f/Lioiyf

MSS., Bek.
Stob.

BTF Iambi., BTF Stob.
;

Bek.

;

is

Iambi. ; Laur. 85, 6 and Bek. repeated from 1. 39 by an error for the reading

SO TF Stob., Bek. 44. TavTa[s which was the reading of the papyrus. 46. The two dots indicating the
;

€\]

,

:

MSS., Bek.
Iambi.
t

It is

unfortunately impossible to say
it

of
Stob.

are so high above the line that

is

probable that the
47. 48.

was a subsequent

insertion.

[]:
:

7][) €]

51. yap

so Iambi., Bek.; so F Iambi., Stob.; so Iambi., Stob. ; be BT, Bek.
:

BTF

f'l'i)

BT, Bek,

;

om. F.

455.
52. Se

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

109

Stob. SO BTF Iambi., Bek. ; Above the end of the line is a horizontal stroke have (i. e. [), inserted probably by the considered to be the cross-bar of which we have second hand. ! Bek., adopting the conjecture of Heindorf. so MSS. ; 76. 01] eVri Bek. 7 7. (Keiva 5 : MSS., Bek. There is room 79. for one or two more letters in the lacuna, but not for «Kcira. oih' BT, Bck. ovbe SO F 105. € MSS., Bek. diroitTcirat (1. 115) has been altered by 113. in Schanz) in order to balance But Badham to the papyrus supports the aorist infinitive there. MSS., Bek. 116.
68.

63. ov 66.

: : [
: :

* Bek.
ovhe

Bek.

The MSS.

;

.

(]

:

.

[ (([

]\(!
: :

(( ((>
455.

(^.

(

Plato, Republic III.
9

X

6-6 cm.

Plate VI.

A
which

fraginent of the third

book of

Plato's Republic, p. 406, written in a not

very regular uncial hand of
is

medium

size.

On

the verso are parts of nine lines
;

of a document in late third or fourth century cursive

the writing on the recto,

somewhat

late in style,

may

accordingly be assigned to the middle

or latter part of the third century.

double dots.

Changes of speaker are marked by the usual There are practically no variants from the text of Bekker.

]

€i

ye tvvoi^s

\jimov\

[;]/
5
[""/jo]

[]
oTi

[] HpoSiKov [€ [] HpoSiKOi

[

[ [ 8[
8[(
<f>a[ai

[] \\ۥ
[
[]
15

y]evopevoi

eJxpcuiTO coy

[]5

Se ira[i

€[ ([ [] [] [](][ [] [][(
[(](
:

(([

;

.

tiyt:

Bek., but the reading here

is

uncertain.

no

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
456.

Plato, Republic IV.
5-8x7
cm.

fragment from Plato's Republic, IV p. 422 D, written in a mediumhand probably towards the end of the second or in the early part of the third century. A change of speaker is indicated, as commonly, by double There are no variants from Bekker's text. dots.
sized uncial

A small

\7aL

[ \•)( [^\
[aiois]

(K

etlKOTCuv

T€

5

[k€is

[
[] [\

]

[^-ajirey ets

'
;

[
^
[
(Tfpav

SiTr[\a

\

Xeyeif

[

:

[]

oy[S

457.

Aeschines,
13-4

/

Ctesiphontem.

7-3 <:m.

column from a

roll

containing the speech of Aeschines against Ctesiphon,

written in a round uncial

hand of medium

size

probably

in

the second century.

part preserved corresponds with § 167, and shows an interesting text with while a claim for several readings not found in any of the existing manuscripts

The

;

the consideration of these

is

made by

the fact that the papyrus agrees with the

Our collations of this and best group of MSS. in a crucial passage (11. 13-5). the other oratorical fragments are with the Teubner editions of Blass.
axnrep Tas
eipovaiv

[€

[9[

[]
§

]

[

167

5

[] €[] [ ]

458.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

in

5

\lv

[]//
em
eXeyes

[
nepiSei
coy

[
2

[]

au

[^] [\\
\\ []
5[€]

[ ] '[ [ [] €
«t

10

[] [] [][]
AXi^av

[
.
2.

©eVraXous•

[ [
:
:

[^ijty

([
B(lass).

25

[]
make
MSS.,

[\[\ [ ] [ [\ [
iav

[
e
c.

([(
Bem.

]/

Considerations of space probable than t[ii'os or [|'.

. ;[][\
13-5•
,
.

.

(moar^afias Or read

1

8.

in the lacuna after and not there is not room for It is therefore probable four or five letters are wanted at the end of the line. (Zonar. (Lobeck, Bekker, Franke, B.), that the papyrus read

21.

<[][(:

^^ ^ ! (!.
.
The papyrus
:

[

(.

with ekl Dionys.

57)

much more

here

agrees with ekl (followed by B.).

Other MSS. omit

more than

1 169) or Other JMSS.

((
Above • .
:

(V);

the line to the right of the

(
MSS.,

.

(
els

(or -eiv)

ehkl,

, !
df,

is

an oblique dash

like

an accent.

23. «f:

24. 25•

[\( ([

:

MSS.,

.

MSS., ., omitting

/.

458.

Aeschines,

De
X

Falsa Legatione.
4-6 cm.

Fr. (a) 7-3

Three fragments written
century type
(of.

in

a good-sized uncial hand of a

common

third

and 29-30 of Aeschines' oration De Falsa Legatione. The text contained several errors, which have been
447), comprising parts of §§ 3i, 26-7,

corrected in a small uncial hand, probably that of the original scribe.

§ 21

\'^'^y<-

€(
X/"?

Xiyii[v

T<u[v

roy OTL
5

yivolTO

[ [ €'[ [
[

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
eiwov
Si

T01S

[]>
\)(\

€77;'[€€

[]
[6/3]

5\ [\[
eis

[ [
Se

nepi
5

[€ ^ ^^
(^
vya[o9

§

27

TOS

[

ovtos

e

5

\€[€ € ]
coy

[ ][
MSS.
and
8e
11.

\][ ][[€ ] [£ \
?
§

.), but
4.

{)

1-2.
is

:

is the reading of the omitted by B(lass), following Taylor. is the reading of the MSS. and B.

(except one which omits

tS>v

is

uncertain

be supplied, but
8-9.
or

![ !
7.
;

The MSS.
in

are divided between

fie',

6

(so B.)

.

What

for in the

corresponding lacuna at the end of that at the end of 1. 6 only four.

4, 5,

and 9

the papyrus read six letters are to

ifi)

5.

homoioteleuton. (f) 6-7.

[
1-2.

txeiv,

with one MS. ; the other MSS. have e^eiv om. after eVij-yycXXero. except One which places with mOSt MSS. ovtos supplied above the line had obviously been omitted through
: :

(]
I

8
.

(. (
is

!

the reading of

all

the

MSS. and

B.

459.

Demosthenes, Contra Aristocratem,
20-5

X

14-3 cm.

A

leaf from a

sthenes' speech against Aristocrates.

papyrus book containing pp. 657-9, §§ 110-19 of DemoThe hand is a small sloping uncial which
;

we should

attribute to the third century

this

is,

therefore,

an unusually early

459.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
classic in

113

codex form. Several alterations have been made in the text, some of which may be by the original scribe, while others seem to be by a second hand to the latter probably are also to be attributed the occasional marks of punctuation, breathings, and elision signs. Neglect of the principle of elision is, however, very common in this MS., the divergences of which in this respect from the text of Blass are omitted from the collation given below.
;

example of a

Verso.

[\\

[
[etjTreif

uvai

([ (

S

[]
[]
5 \^](•

[] [(]
€[]'
[€

[ []
[

8]
«

15

[(( \(][ []\
[]

20

[] [(
'[)(

^[ [9 [][] [] ^ ([ ([ ] ][[ [ ! [ (] ] ^ [(]] [ ] ? ] [ [] [ ([
MaKeSovias
aieoy

]

M]aKeSova•

7r[oX]i'

^ \ []7] [ [ ] €( '[] [](
eKeivov ea[v
6

8(

[8

€ 6[
//e

[arSl/sey

T[as e^ a

[

[](• €
t[ois

7[]€

(^[]
avSpjes

avev Se

(

i8ei[v

ovSeva

Se ovS[eva

][<
[]

o^paTe

[''[

])(^([]

[ ^ []([][]
[ ][][]

€[€

(

]([ (
]9
ie

(5 (

]

e[vTU)(eiv

[(]

[]'

[9

] ] ^• (^

114
25

T^HE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Xeye[t]i'

[]•

[

[\
av\Tos

([]
Se[i]

7

aXkov
pev
e

Korvs•

[\
30

[?]

Tivas

[\^
[\
[fJTrei

?
^

[]\'

8
Tas
eis

?

^^^

eavToo

[\]€ ['] [ €]•
/i[e]z'

[ []5 8[ ' ] [^ « ^ ^^ [' [] [\(] [] [ \] [] ] 8]• [][ [] [\ [\ [ [8 [€\ [( [^ [ ]• [ 4 [ !:^9 ][] []
Redo.

35 [if]''f

[( •
[]

(
eis

«[[']]

•[]
ois
oi[/iat]i

^•

'
vnep
[Kepcro
S]

€5

45

[[ (] [ € \[
[]•
[

? (
^^
5'

p[ev

[]/'

ore

[

6]77[]£

[

[]
[

]

avSpes

]

.

ei5o7{ey

50

\] (\ € €( (]{ [] []] [[[€]] ( [ € ] [ ]€ [ ]€[] ] [
(J)

ore

([€ ]

Keiv

^

(€(]

[e]i

Sei^[€iav

]

[enei

]

459.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
eii

115

[j^aii/teii']]

55

-

eiSefai-

eav

«?

ei

?
(

6

8(
<os

SKetvov

[[(/)/]]•

65

ei


:

^ []9 ^ • []( €([] € ( [
evv[o]vv
[[faiTj

[] [(] €[]€ )(
SO.

^€ >
w[p]os

8\<\ [][](
SiSovai

[]^((
(iSeuai

-/

ovSe

[]

[]

[]>• [€

]

([]

}^]

tovs

a]7r[o]

5.

[av8]pfs

8.

f|

\(,
or
:

om.
is

B(lass), with

the allernalive reading here,

is

found in

all

the

MSS.

9.

10. avev 8e

read in the MSS. uvfv yap B., with the MSS.
:

16. TO [a^ifTiOf

TiuTiov B.

papyrus
as B.

line was apparently written for rubbed, but there does not seem to be room for the v. 21. Considerations of space make it very improbable that the final a of

20.

At the end of the

\[\

is

.
I\ISS.

The
elided,

was

23.
of.

P. Grenf. II. 11.

24.
2 6.
2-j.

!
:

The numeral
ii.

16 in the margin marks the beginning of a
4.

om.
is

MSS.,

.

What was
Still

first

a mistake for written after the

.
.

new chapter or

section

;

apparently makes no word; the scribe perhaps
correction

had
29.

(;
;

in his mind.

om.

B., with

MSS.

The
Ov;

usual reading

cVfiSaf

FS.

;

is

in

accordance with the
written here,
is

most MSS.; reading of Wolf and Dindorf (f'^f).
so B., with
32.

(':

(^,

which was

first

the

[ (]•.
:

SO krsv

;

[€<]
ut(,

(B., with

S &c.) would not

fill

the lacuna, and the

vestiges suit

better than

.
with Dindorf.

so 41. i|fiX]f
40. oTf
42.
:

MSS.
i'|fiXfx

;

B. omits
B.

Xfyc om. MSS., B.

(,
nearly
fill

with the 43. [touJto Totui»': toCt' B., omitting with pr. S, AY. so rsv 44.

([(•.

«
I

MSS.

;

which is all that intervenes up the available space. 48-9. The MSS. vary between

in the ]MSS.

between

(SYO) and
2

^ ',

and

<&6,
all

does not

and

have

Il6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

at the end of 1. 48, but then the lacuna It would be possible to read beginning of the following line is not satisfactorily filled, and the position of the Moreover the traces on the papyrus suit unaccounted for. is overwritten much better; and we therefore suppose that this word was placed later in the sentence, and its loss perhaps being compensated for by the insertion of tovs before was (which is preferable on account of the space to that being subsequently inserted above originally written at the beginning of 1. 49, at the

.

]

the line by the corrector. 53. y 061 which is inserted above the line
aBiKfiv after

av B. 55• fv so krsv ; 56. TovTovi seems to have been written for
:
:

.ft

,
is
t

.
is

,
.)
.

the reading of the MSS., which also omit

S

57• Twa av in marg.).
58. 60.

!

.,

apflev: this

with other MSS. At the end of the line there is not room for ; is the USUal reading; nV av

[(].
]!

^
(|
S.

bracketed by B.

.

63-4. The words They are accepted by B.

/, which

have here been crossed through, are omitted in

460.

Demosthenes,
IO-8

l)e Pace.

X

IO-2 cm.
Trept

Parts of two colitmns from a copy of the
(pp. 62-3, §§ 21

^;?
A

of

Demosthenes

and

23),

written in good-sized square sloping uncials (cf 447),

An

probably near the beginning of the third century or even somewhat earlier. noticeable variant angular stroke is used to fill up a short line in 1. 5.

from the ordinary text occurs
Col.
i.

in

11.

5-6.

Col.

[ [^
[
5
[Soy

\9 ] ( )( [] (
[]

] [
npos Se

]>
et

]

10

[1/

[

]

ovTf.

.[
15

[]' (

[! ][
ii.

ov

y[ap

,

avTovs

UvXatas

[ewe

[(][

[

[][
[

461.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

[^
[veiav

]
20

8e

\\8

[]
[]€

TOLVVV

€0[ ([ <
€[(

117

2. The vestiges at the end of this line give no real clue to the letters, and it is impossible to determine whether the papyrus agreed with S in reading against the of Other MSS. aUTois flvai is the reading of the MSS. 5-6. 6. so other MSS., Blass. ; (avTovs B. 1 3. avTovs 14. The papyrus agrees with S (so B.) in omitting «/, which is found in other MSS.

after

I'j.

.

\{
:

('(

:

V

to see

There would be room for from three to five letters after &vo\y, but what could have been added here. Perhaps there was some correction.
[eJi'fX
:

it is

difficult

22.

(Ivex

B.

461.

Demosthenes,
7-5

De

Corona.

X

5-5 <:m.

This fragment from the top of a column contains part of Demosthenes'

De

Corona, p. 227, §§ 7-8, written in rapidly formed sloping uncials which are more likely to date from the third century than from the end of the second.
variant occurs in
1.

An unknown

9,

but the passage

is

mutilated.

8[\ ~ [€]5
[]
[ovs
5

[

€€]
npos tovs
Sia<f)V

et

ixr/

[]
[tos

€]€

[]

[]) ]
[

] ]
.

Xeyov
evvo

[]
.

[]

ii8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[>]

[yvcoaiv]

\\
['
,
MSS.,

vepi
Se

[
[a>S

/ieXX[cu]f

iSio]v
eoiicje

[]'

2—3.
4.

.
8.
g.

[]' (8€ ^^ .
[eicaffr]oi
: :
'.

!

B(lass).

The interlinear c The MSS. have

is

with S L. 1MSS., by the original scribe

Xa-ov

\

the

first

hand) above the

line.

The

, »
;

.

.
is

and

probably the word here inserted (by

adjective

first

written certainly ended in
?

vestiges of the letter before

would

suit a,

, ,

or

:

].

-lov,

and the

462.

Demosthenes,
17-7

De

Corona.

X

8-6 cm.

Parts of two columns containing portions of §§ 25-8 (pp. 233-4) of the De Corona, written in a good-sized third century uncial hand resembling that of 223

and 420.

There are a few
1.

variants, but the text of the

papyrus

is

a poor one.

An

erroneous reading in

28 has been corrected in a different hand.
lines.

Two

kinds of

stops (the high and low points) occur, and a wedge-shaped sign of varying size
is

used for

filling

up short
Col.
i.

Col.

ii.

[i/Trep

[ \ ] [
[••<^

5 [nXeiu

\ [ [ [ ^ [ []' [ [ (]
[

t]tj

€]5 (
ev ols]
o]v8e

eKeivos

e

tovs

[

25

^ )([
Se

[70S

463.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
Se
ai']Spes
§

119

[] [(] [
[i/atoi
1

26

5

[ []

]8'
ye

^€8^[ ^ (^[
paSi[uus

eK

[ [
[
[pas
8—919.

]€

2

](]€
>]

]

35 'Ofy

'

]|/'[
:

:

1.

(MSS., Blass).
II. TOVTO

TOVT B.

28.

(MSS.,
line to

36.

[ .
B.).

(8!,
:

*

the

. ^
reading
hi

^

[[• ( [
€[€
(
Xey€t

§

28

.

([
]\ISS.

7[(

After this the papyrUS omits

roiis

opKovs

., with
first

of the

hand, has been corrected

to

^

-

.

(following Isidor. III. 259),

who

alters

('

in the next

463.

Xenophon, Anabasis VI.
Width of column 5 cm.

Part of Xenophon's Anabasis VI.
short columns
is
;

vi.

§§ 9-24, written in narrow and rather

the lower portions of seven are preserved.

The handwriting

a good and apparently rather early specimen of the square sloping style, and may be assigned to the end of the second or the first half of the third
century.

The middle
fill

point occurs irregularly and the

common

angular sign
for

is

used to
1900),

up short

lines.

Our collation

is

with the edition of Gemoll (Tcubner,
edition,
J>^55);

supplemented by that of Dindorf (Oxford

some

additional information concerning the readings of
to Mr. E. C. Marchant.

D

and

we

are indebted

papyrus is of considerable interest. two well-defined divisions, a small group the Parisinus (C), and a more numerous group, generally recognized The as inferior to the other, but containing readings which all editors accept. peculiarity of the papyrus lies in the fact that it combines lections characteristic

For purposes of textual
of the Anabasis

criticism this

The MSS. headed by

fall

into

I20
of both
classes

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
of

MSS.

superior family against the inferior,
inferior class against the

characteristic of partial

(Preface

to the Oxford
in

Anabasis

Athenaeus.

Thus, while agreeing in several cases with the it shows six instances of agreement with the The same superior where the latter is plainly wrong. coincidence with both groups was traced by Dindorf edition of 1855, p. viii) in the quotations from the This however is a debateable point and need not be

insisted upon.

In any case the papyrus

may

fairly the tradition of the first

few centuries of the Christian era
critics

be taken to represent not unand it becomes
;

very questionable whether modern

have not carried their preference for one group of MSS. somewhat too far. Gemoll, for instance, makes it the principle of his recent edition only to have recourse to other evidence where the reading
of

C

is
;

patently erroneous.

This

is

no doubt a convenient and practical
of.

method

but

its

defects should not be lost sight

Col.

i.

Col.

.

lost.

[ ][
[']'
5

\ []
eSoKei

Col.

iii.

§10

[ \] [
[/ /]
15
[€//]e

€]

[

§

15

eifai tois

eSeof

[\ [\
ei

aiTLa[s

[

[
§

(
[]

8

TIS

(
ei

\\^[
iv.

[] []
\'\
30

eivai-

[
iS

Col.

Col.

[]

[^]^]
[7](

(] [
e[K]
§ 17

[ [

[irep

[yet

] [ €] €][ [] [
] [€
[
e

]•)([

463.

FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

[
25

[]• (
[Spes
[ovs

]
Col.

121

einfp

35

\8(\

]'[ ]

[(]

] [] '8[^
40
vi.

[€](
[€
[OeXeji

[] []

€ [][0] ]
[]9
Col.

[
[•/]
45

[][]€ \[\
vii.

[(\]

rj

[,] V o"r[pa]Tia [€ ] KXfavSpe

wpos
55

[€] [] [^

ctre

[] [ ]€ [( [ (] [ [ ]( [
[] [(€] []^
[]
[^

at

50

[]](€ [

[][]

eav
e[va

6 [5

[(

[]

^ ]
e]0

[

§

22

[^

Tpane

[]

Col.

viii.

65

[]

[ ] [
(is

])

TojvToy

[
(

7

]([ 9
[1
[]

§

24

[

123
3-4. TO
cSoKfi TO

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(.
:

with the former
5.

in

;/ [: ABCE,
15.

in omitting

so D but it is unlikely. 16. Ti: so BCE, G. ; SO and the 18.
;

"
: :

e80Ku

is

the reading of

The papyrus
(Wra. MSS., G. the papyrus

(so G(emon)), the other MSS. having thus follows the order of the latter, while agreeing

ABCE

may

of course have had the ungrammatical
'

/

found

([]:
fiTrcv

and the
'

deteriores.'

deteriores,'

G.

24-5.
30.
it

[Ayaalias
[/If

:

this is the

Order of

ABCE

(]&(
for

since a single letter after

is

probable that the papyrus read [€, with

ABCE.

«
;

ABC.
;

the other IMSS. transpose the words. would make an unusually short line,

(ex 8oT£

B)

66, which the papyrus rightly reads with the
ABCDEFH
;

These MSS., however, have This is a good deteriores.'
'

instance of the eclectic character of the present text. 5 other MSS. so 35. oTi the deteriores.' SO ; 38. [noXipuTe G. with the reading of the 'deteriores'; 39. other MSS. ABCE, Sffoi (so G.), 40.
:

eVeSre pe G.

^•.
:

ABCE

'

DFHIKTZ

MSS.

43. The papyrus certainly agreed with omit. 47.
(ire
:

[6]:

so G., with the

^
'

ABCDEHIKL
Other

,

ABC

{
,
L).
:

A).

in reading

ABCE,

G.
'
;

;

KfXcvtivai the

MSS.

50. (av
52.

which is found in all MSS. after Se 57-8. The papyrus has omitted and is necessary for the sense. The error was perhaps due to the homoioteleuton of otSa had just preceded. It is noticeable that the omitted assisted by the fact that and words are together just the length of one of the papyrus lines. We may then assume

:

:

1.

.

deteriores

so

D

;

other MSS., G.

,
the
61.
71.

^
ci

ABCE.

which other

',

that

archetype followed

the

order

found

in

ABCE
BCE

other

MSS.
69-7°-

(
'/yfS'

^

aipeOivTa

',

(,,
Tii
:

Tis

{)
;

;

?>es

Tis

G., with

the

'

deteriores.'

:

so again the

'

deteriores'

and G.

ABCE.

464.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS

123

IV.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS
464.

Astrological Epigrams.
25-4

X

23-2

£;«.

Late third century.

The

following series of epigrams

is

written upon the verso of the papyrus the

redo of which contains the fragment of a rhetorical treatise in Doric dialect (410). They arc in hexameters or elegiacs and of varying length, the longest preserved not exceeding six lines. Unfortunately the papyrus is both broken and rubbed, and the difficulties of decipherment are increased by the character of the hand,
an irregular sloping semi-uncial of about the end of the third century, and by
the badness of the Greek.
intelligible,

and that

first

requires

Thus but one of the epigrams (11. 12-6) is really some emendation. Enough .however remains
it,

to

show that the

collection, or at least this part of
11.

was primarily astrological
is

in character; see e.g.

5,

13-6, 48, 58.

Prefixed to each epigram

a short

heading giving the subject of what follows, the prevailing topic being the family healthy or unhealthy children (11. 13-23), childlessness and its opposite (11. 40ro, 57 sqq.). The literary merit of the composition is small. The several verses

are often written continuously, and the lines are irregular in length.
elision are occasionally inserted,

Marks of

and a stop occurs
Col.
i.

at the

end of

1.

46.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
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but this is unlikely. may be lost before the dogstar. probably for [(\\!. cannot be read ; perhaps 12. was probably the word intended. 15. part of the line appears to be corrupt. 16. The latter [.] is probably ['[, with the the sense requires something like is more diiScult common interchange of 01 and . and in 1. 15. which may be supported by another case of confusion between TO at the 18. 1. firiKpaTfuvTa ; cf. Ptolem. CciUil. p. 216 (/, &C. Moreover somctliing being too cramped. end of the line is quite doubtful, the supposed not scan. is wrong with the beginning of 1. 19, which docs
45.

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i

The meaning
:

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26.

31.
38.

of «» of the horizontal stroke above the final would be represented in this way in the middle of a line. cf. 37, where Horus apparently recurs ; but the context is very likely a nomcn proprium, i.e. Saturn.
1.

is

obscure.

It is

is

equally obscure.

vaioTijTi is for vf{tTi]Ti,

50.

[]

:

cf.

1.

6.

58. t of 60.

is

has been corrected from p. cf. note on perhaps for

;

I.

16.

126

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Astrological Calendar.
Height 26-5
ctn.

465.

Late second century.

The
is

recto of this long but imperfectly preserved

papyrus contains a

list

of persons with their ages, written in second century cursive.

On

the verso

an astrological calendar

in

an uncial hand which
first

we should

also ascribe to

the second century rather than to the third.
in all,

There are parts of nine columns

but of these only the

is

tolerably complete.

We

omit the second

and those parts of the other columns which are too fragmentary to yield any sense. The scheme of the calendar is as follows. The year is divided into weeks Each of these weeks of of five days, instead of the more usual seven or ten. and
ninth,
five

the zodiac.

days corresponds to the sixth part of one of the signs or constellations of Lines 10-44 refer to Pharmouthi 16-20; the details concerning

Pharmouthi 30-25 probably began in Col. ii and were continued in one or more columns which may have been lost between Cols, ii and iii. Lines 60-98 refer With I. 13.5 begins the account to Pharmouthi 26-30, 11. 99-134 to Pachon 1-5. this of Pachon 6-10, as is indicated by the remaining letters na[xci)r The account of Pachon 11- 15 occupies 11. 197-212 continues up to 1. 196. The same formula is followed in the entries and perhaps Col. viii as well. concerning each group of five days. First comes a brief astronomical statement of the relation between the part of the month under consideration and one of the signs or constellations of the zodiac, probably, as Mr. Smyly has suggested

?

t

;

(1.

II, note),

the constellation which was rising just before
of the presiding deity

dawn during
is

that

period.

Next we have the name

who

sometimes male,

sometimes female, and the interpretation of it, generally introduced by the This is succeeded by a detailed phrase (e.g. 11. 13 and 200).
description of the rvnos of the divinity,

who

is

represented as a statue, partly

human, partly animal. Then follows an elaborate account of the omens, signs, portents, and favourable and unfavourable influences, characteristic of the period presided over by the deity in question, which is introduced by the words

; ()
ovv,
is

and concludes with a statement of the particular form of sickness
peculiar to the period.
(11.

To

this

account of the presiding deity

159 sqq.) added a description of her son, which proceeds on the same lines as that of the goddess herself, and ends with directions for
in

one place

making medical prescriptions

(11.

190-6;

cf.

1.

195, note).
its

The papyrus, which

bears distinct marks of

Egyptian origin

(cf.

the local

;

465.
references in
11.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS

127

25 and 222), presents a striking resemblance to an astrological

fragment from Egypt now at Munich, recently published with a commentary
Boll (Archiv, I. pp. 492 sqq.). The Munich fragment, which is written on vellum and is several centuries later than the papyrus, also gives a list of deities with an account of the signs, events, and sicknesses associated with them, but is arranged on a somewhat different plan, the deities being connected not with particular groups of days, but with various stars or constellations, which

by

Both the Munich and Oxyrhynchus which is known from the Tctrabiblos of Ptolemy and the fragments of Porphyry cf. the references given by Boll for the Munich fragment {Archiv, I. p. 498) witli the parallel passages in the papyrus, which supplies more astrological and less
are
so as to form a series.
in

numbered

fragments recall

many

details the technical phraseology of astrologers

astronomical information.
suggestions

Dr. Boll, to

whom we

are indebted for several valuable

and references, observing that the god of the iith-i5th degrees of Pisces is the second, not, as might be expected, the third (1. 199), infers that a distinction is drawn in the papyrus between (i) the superior who
days, but more especially over the first five, and mentioned in each month seems to be described as the god of the month (1. 105), and (2) the inferior divinities called i2) (1.

preside

of

or

days

,
whom
in

over each ten
the
first

decans,

who preside over the 6th-ioth, i6th-20th, and 26th-30th The superior deities he identifies with the Egyptian whose fantastic names, known from Egyptian inscriptions, Greek and
(1.

20, note)

each month.

and magical papyri, have a resemblance to those of the divinities (11. 13, 160, and 2co), especially, as Mr. Smyly has pointed out (1. 200, note), in one instance. With regard to the the only source of information hitherto known was a remark by Porphyry in the letter to Anebo (Euseb. Pracpar. Evang. iii, 4), referring to Chaeremon (who wrote in the time of Nero) /)//'
writers,
in

Roman

mentioned

the papyrus

^ ,

((.

so clearly with the contents of the papyrus that the latter
either as a

^ ( ^ ,'
ovb

TOVS

ovb'

Oeovs

,

iv ipxiji

((obiaKov

rovs

tovs

(5

(

tovs bfKavovi

Kparaiovs

(

This description of the fragment of the

as Boll remarks, corresponds

intermediary author.
to lamblichus were

is to be regarded from it through an The Salmenichiaka (or Salmeschoinaka), which according

or as derived

^,

must have been

written not later than in the second century B.C., for the astrological treatises

128

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
of the remarkable
title
is

of Nechepso-Petosiris (about loo B.C. according to Kroll) are based on them.

The explanation

a

difficult

problem

;

cf.

Boll in Zeiisch}•. f. Aegypt. Sprache, xxxix. p. 152, and his Sphaera, pp. 376 sqq. This view of the early date of the Salmenichiaka is confirmed by a study

of the papyrus.

Though
(cf.
1.

the scanty astronomical details
is

probably afford no

indication that the present arrangement of the text

the second century
that
it
is

11,

note), there

are

any reference
the

based on much older material. It is to the Romans, or even to any
period in

than the end of grounds for supposing noticeable that there is nowhere
earlier

other

titles

or institutions peculiar to

Roman
The

Egypt

;

while the frequent mentions of

/3$

suggest

a Ptolemaic background.
text contains numerous errors, and the archetype from which the scribe
to have been in parts illegible or imperfect, for he sometimes
;

was copying seems

leaves blank spaces indicating a lacuna

cf.

1.

24, note.

{a)

Col.

i.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

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II. vbpoxotf•. 1. cf. 1. 198 'From Pharmouthi 16-20. From 16th20th of Aquarius, which (sc. is the month Pharmouthi.' The interpretation of the astronomical data in the papyrus turns upon the question whether by ... the signs or the constellations of the zodiac are meant '. We arc indebted to Mr. J. G. Smyly

^)

.

lines.

,

'

For those who are nnfamiliar with ancient astronomy we quote Mr. Smyly's explanation of the
;

' difTcrence between the signs and constellations of the zodiac. The constellations of the zodi.ic are twelve in number, represented by somewhat arbitrary figures of men and animals, of unknown antiquity they are irregular in size and position, and some consider that in Kgypt they were connected with the equator rather

than with the ecliptic.

The

signs of the zodiac, on the otiier hand, are exactly equal In size, each con-

134

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

His explanation of the relation of for the following valuable note upon the passage. the zodiac to the Egyptian year is not only new but serves to clear away many difficulties It is clear from and apparent inconsistencies arising from the various references to it. thus the compiler of the calendar identified the too that Pisces began with Pachon i 1. months of the Egyptian year with the signs or with the constellations of the zodiac Thoth — Cancer, Phaophi = Leo, Athur=Virgo, Choiak=Libra, Tubi=Scorpio, echeir= SagitAries, Pisces, Pauni tarius, Phamenoth= Capricorn, Pharmouthi= Aquarius, Pachon Epeiph= Taurus, Mesore = Gemini. At first sight this would seem to indicate a tropical solar year beginning with the summer solstice on Thoth i, the months being determined by the signs of the zodiac through vhich the sun was passing. There is, however, very little evidence for an Egyptian year which began at the summer solstice and much for one beginning at the heliacal rising of Sirius, and in the second century these dates differed by nearly a month, the solstice taking place on June 24 (Julian) and the rising of Sirius on It is therefore much more probable that the year in question was a July 20 (Julian). sidereal year regulated by the heliacal rising of Sirius (cf. the circumstance that in all the lists Sothis was the first decan of Cancer), and that the month in relation to the zodiac was determined not by the sign through which the sun was passing, but by the constellation at the which was the last to rise before dawn. The decans would thus be birth of the days over which they presided, and this suggestion is confirmed by the fact that in P. Brit. Mus. 98. 15 the decans are called oi If the calendar refers to a year of this kind the five intercalary days must have been taken into account,
' ;
:

=

=

.(-(

as well as a sixth intercalary day every fourth year; but these days were always regarded by the Egyptians as outside the year, and did not interfere with the convenient but inaccurate practice of dividing the ecliptic into 360 degrees, each of which corresponded Moreover the difficulty is considerably diminished if, as is probable, the to one day. decans are regarded not as fractions of the circle of the ecliptic, but as stars or groups

In this calendar the intercalary days would not have been of stars rising just before dawn. under the presidency of any of the thirty-six decans or their but each of them would have been dedicated to one of the five great gods of the Osirian circle, Osiris, Aroueris, Typhon, Isis and Nephthys, who were said to have been born on those days. It has long been a matter of dispute whether this year, supposing it to have existed, was divided into months bearing the same names as the montiis of the ordinary annus vagus. The papyrus seems 10 indicate that this was the case ; but its late date prevents the evidence from being conclusive, for it may well have been drawn up by someone who was acquainted with the two traditions that the Egyptian year began with Cancer and also that it began with Thoth I, and who combined his information by identifying the two years. It is just possible to explain the papyrus from the usual point of view that the month is determined by the sign of the zodiac through which the sun was passing, but this involves In the Pseudo-Gemim Cakndarium. (Wachsmuth's ed. of Lydus, very great difficulties. hi 6 tjXios iv fjpepais . These thirty days correspond p. 183) we find
to Jan.

,

23-Feb. 21 on the Julian calendar, and since Pharmouthi 16-20 on the same
;

&

taining 30 degrees of the ecliptic they are measured from the spring equinox, which is determined by The position of this point among the stars is not fixed, the intersection of the equator and the ecliptic. With a most unbut slips slowly backward along the ecliptic this is the precession of the equinoxes. fortunate lack of imagination astronomers since the time of Ptolemy have called these divisions by the same names as the constellations, which often gives rise to great confusion unless we know definitely which is referred to. Thus at present the vernal equinoctial point, though retaining the name " First point of Aries," is not in the constellation of Aries, but owing to the precession has shifted about 30° into the constellation Pisces. The constellations of the zodiac however (apart from variations in size) very nearly coincided ivith the signs in the second century of our era.'
;

465.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS

135

calendar correspond to April 11-15 the sun cannot have been in Aquarius during those five days if the papyrus was drawn up according to the Alexandrian (i. e. Julian) calendar. But especially in astrological calculations in papyri of the Roman period the calendar

found (cf. P. 0.\y. II. p. 138), and if we suppose that is frequently was employed by the writer of this papyrus, we find that the sun was Similarly with regard to the in Aquarius during Pharmouthi 16-20 from a. d. 196-291. corresponding entry concerning Pachon 11-15 (1. 198), the sun would on the calendar be in Pisces during those five days from a. d. 168-268. These dates are only approximate because the time at which the sun enters the signs of the zodiac varies (in the Julian calendar) from century to century.'
that reckoning

Nebu, of which the is represented by an upright statue with the face of a vulture, wearing a diadem upon his head, and with the face of a serpent behind, having two wings and the feet of a lion and holding four
12-42.
presiding
deity

'The
is

of that

season,

his

name

is

interpretation

that

he

is

the lord of wars and of reason.

He

governor will evils there shall take counsel with the people as a friend. And during his rule there shall be a rebel and there shall be war, and many cities of Egypt will perish on account of the rebel, for the signs of the time are of war and dislike and In this time many shall live by battle, and there shall be destruction (of many ?).
swords, both faces being of gold.
dislike
signifies that the
. . .

He

;

be war,

and

battle,

and he

will

stealth

(?),

and some

shall

live

by singing and dancing, and some by chanting

in the

This temples, and some by singing at banquets with sweet voices and they end well. deity causes by reason the conqueror to be conquered and the conquered to conquer, and many live by receiving gratuities and registering and collecting from men what He causes men to be lame they have drunk up, and some live by ... as servants.

The sickness because one foot there shall be many deaths.'
.

16.

Ionic

(?)

:
form
cf.
<5 '

.

.

in this

season

is

in the intestines

and bowels, and

cf the description of the 35th decan quoted
1 1
:

1.

^

and

1.

30

20.

Boll refers this to the presiding deity

.

in

1.

200, note.

For the
in the

;

cf.

the

seems to be the subject of But passage from Porphyry quoted in introd. in 1. 2 2, and though the corruption in 1. 21 renders the whole passage
. . .

uncertain,
24.

\<>({) an ():
letters

«»

earthly ruler seems to suit the context better. is a blank space indicating a lacuna in before

the
11.

archetype or
152, 160, 161,

some

which the scribe could not read.

Similar omissions occur in

174, 175, 176, 183, 184, and 198. but it In the next line there is not room for 28. Perhaps \\ may have been abbreviated. The reading </[ is however very uncertain ; and we should verb referring to singing or dancing. rather expect a 35-7. The meaning seems to be that men will be forced by tax-collectors to disgorge

![]'.

}\6<,

what they had already spent.
60-72. He is represented by an upright before upon young pig behind, having a His tongue and face are fire. hands and
a
. . .
.

statue with the
his
face,

face of a that
this

...

,

and of
in his

and holding four swords

season causes . . many to make their living by the mouth. And many shall be advocates and others magicians and many singers of gods and kings and many interpreters of languages and
signifies

He

many

.

.

.

and changing from place

to place.'

;

136
60.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[,^ \cywv
The
is

'J'J—8.

[((
'

ovtos] is to
?

be restored before

[

on the analogy of

11.

13-4.

if

! ()
105.

loo-i.

the

MS.

lacunae are restored on the analogy of 1. 198-9. perhaps the name, or the beginning of the name, of the goddess, and, the name of the 35th decan in be read, may be connected with of Hermes Trismegistus quoted in the note on 1. 200.

,
'

107-20. She is represented by an image in real lapis lazuli of a woman seated upon and one like that of Typhon, her face being a throne having one eye like that of of gold and her hands adorned (?)..., having a diadem upon her head. She signifies that this time causes hidden writings to many foolish men, being unskilful in mind. For this season also produces men ignorant of writing, and again those who know writing very different in character from this kind and from the hieratic (?) writings.'
.
.
.

.

.

.

no. .\(!•.
112. Perhaps

possibly the genitive of

120. Boll suggests

[{€), (<]\£> 1[(<].

or then meaning

!

was intended.
folded.'

145-65. 'In this season men fall upon women, and many children are born, and male child of them which shall be of service to him, but the rest shall even the male children. This season causes men to have intercourse with their own female slaves, and they beget children, and these shall rule the lives of their fathers and of the free women. This god causes women to be childless and other children to be The sickness in this season is in the shoulders (.'') begotten and these to rule their lives. and The son of the goddess, his name is torsense eutoououophi, which means He is represented by a statue with a lion's face, the hair of a god, terrible speaker. , with the tail of a crocodile.' holding a sceptre in his left hand, and in his right
there shall be one
die,
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

is not room for if it is not superfluous or a mistake for airols, sc. 147• refer to the presiding deity. in\ 154. erepa: i.e. born of other mothers; cf. Eur. Medea 639 contrast is between the fruitfulness of the slaves and the barrenness of the free

146. There

,

[\.

.

.

.

&,

156. Probably to[vs 164. ovjpa

,
is
:

\!
:

or Tojvr

\!.
p.

cf Boll, Sphoera,

295.

[
.
.

.

seems

to

The

vomen.

)

in

1.

157

IS

Corrupt.

171-83. 'This is the favourable time for chief-priests. It produces many sacred gods and kings and gives long life to each. It causes a king to bestow many and cities also to bestow favours favours even upon his former adversaries and upon It causes it makes men behave well and aim at virtue especially with regard to the god. from the other kings who give him great support, as has been said in the king connexion with another season ..."
scribes of
. , .

.

.

1.

This section 175 may be

^>
1

{)()^6
6eov is

obscured by the frequent omissions of words or letters. ta6m in would then be expected rather than (cf. 1. 177), though

80. ToC

(
is

more probably general than
:

the particular deity presiding over

this period.

195. recipes in

11.

190-6

cf. 1. 191. For the insertion of these medical the termination of cf. the descriptions of the decans quoted in note on 1. 200.

466.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS
&a[s

137

195-6. Probably

('
I

.

igS. Cf. note on 1. 24. A blank space is left between and 200. .]vaa[.]e[.]7) Mr. Smyly suggests (^][.]([.], comparing the descriptions of the decans in the sign Pisces as given in a MS. of Hermes Trismegistus De Jl/ensiius ad Asclepium (Pitra, Analccla sacra el classica, v. 2. 279), a passage which corresponds in a remarkable degree with the descriptions of the decans in Pisces found in the papyrus

[.

(

.
«?

.

:

, (( (. ( 5 ^^^ (, (( € (€ ' , . ( , 8^ € ^ ( , ., € ,
:

SfKavos

iv

9\

\

ev

( ^ .
8^
\

f

dt

\

•€\

Kvpievfi hi

(

\

St

(V

}

iv Bi

cVi

€71

...

((5^

8(.

((

cVt

...

The name of the second decan in Pisces according to the papyrus is very likely connected with the name of the first decan according to Hermes, while the description bears great resemblance to that of the third. Similarly the name of the first decan of the papyrus cf. note on 1. 105) may well be connected with the second

{()•,
list.

in

Hermes'

222-9. 'This deity causes long old age, until a man be bent by old age; he produces hunchbacks or makes men bent by sickness, he causes dwarfs to be born and monstrosities shaped like a beetle, and persons with no eyes and like a beast and dumb and deaf and toothless ..."

466.

Directions for Wrestling.
'3'5

X

•8•3 cm.

Second century.
giving directions for

This papyrus

consi.sts of

a series of short sections

performing certain bodily gestures, and in each case ending with the verb As Mr. Smyly suggests, the purpose of these directions no doubt relates to the dififerent grips in wrestling. That instructions in the palaestra were given in
this

.

way
in
1.

is

and Anth.

Pal. xii. 206.

shown by two curious passages, Lucian, Asintis 9-10 (pp. 576-8) avros in 11. 25 and 30-1 means your opponent,' and
'

19 probably refers to the hand.
ascribe to the second century,
is

The papyrus, which we should
in a

written

good-sized uncial hand with a tendency to link the letters together by short
Parts of three columns are preserved, of which

horizontal strokes.
first

we

print the

two, keeping the punctuation of the original.

138
Col.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
i.

?•
V

Col.

iof

• --{
Se^iay

(•
eis

/
.

e/c

€-

Trj

vXe^ov

(.•^•

[•
irXevpoD

])

[€]5

.

6£/•
TrXe^Of
.


ۥ

at

• [(' avaveve

^ •
€[\eh
. . . .

Trj

€-

-

15

\
7•
30.
?

.
and
26.
IQ.

\ [ [.
. .

of fieffov COrr. from

\(

Pap.

22.

Pap.

foa\o^,

cf

11.

6

467.

Alcuemistic Fragment.
12-3

8•

cm.
in

About

. D.

100.

The

subject of this fragment

is

some process

which

silver

seems to have

been the principal element, but the treatment described is obscure. The text is in a round uncial hand of the end of the first or early part of the second century, and the fragment comes no doubt from some treatise of a scientific or pseudo-scientific character.

[]

,\

8-

[.

.

.

.]

!

[]

468.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS
[.
.

]
.]
.

Tois

.1

](
]
]
.

€ ]\ ][
.]as y
?

.1

^
after
if it

.

[.

.

15

[
[.
.
.

\
€'</'€

139

kv

.]ovf

[....]. f
[

] {\) - ^ [)
('[\,
Perhaps
or
\ovs•.

]

[

j?'""?
. .
.

^^- •

2 [
[

.]

,

[.

.

.]?

t,

,
49.

II. i"V[y€

division of the
1 6.

word the ,

]

but the context is difficult. but there seems to be no reason for the genitive plural. (with [ical] (• in 1. 14) or is precluded by the ?
:

.
be

was added

later.

[\

..... []
].[...

might have been expected.

468.

Medical Fragment.
9•6

X

8-7 cm.

Early third century.

written in a well-formed square uncial

This fragment contains the upper part of a column of a medical treatise, hand of medium size, probably in the first

half of the third century.

The

subject under discussion

is

and treatment of which are writers on medicine.
)[.]'

also described in various passages of the ancient

,

the

symptoms

( ()

(•
'"'"''

(<
10 VOS (Is

[ .
^'
)

) ([\[

^

(

(<{([-

[

140

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[S(]
[

[

][ ]
iii

'[
[

i[ii

.

Cf.

Galen, nep\

Swaptvois

;,
the form

.

The word
is
i.

Gr. xxiv. p. 141); o-io. Cf. Athen.

the

^2 d

commoner form. '

^
8•5

(Kuhn, Med. Gr. xiv. p. 571) is found in Arctacus, X/jov.

.

hi
ii

(Kiihn,

!

Med.

469.

Grammatical Rules.
1•5
cm.

Early third century.

This papyrus, which contained on the recto official correspondence (in which occurs) written in a fine almost uncial hand of the second

century, had been cut

down

so as to form a long narrow strip before the verso

was used for writing a series of grammatical rules in several columns. Of these one column is completely preserved, and there are the beginnings of lines of the The rules, next, written in an irregular semi-uncial hand of the third century. which are of an elementary character, deal, so far as the fragment goes, with
the conjugation of the contracted (or, as they are called, 'perispome') verbs.

5

.

, '- Sia rfjs ai

Si,

yeXay ye-

AloXels

yeXees
Se

/Soey Xeyoi'-

res.

$ev-

10

[[]
,
eyeXay tyeXa.

470.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS

[ (
17

141

S\

TOP

15

,
Griech.

('[] []//
enl SivSia,

\)

. Over
6.
1.

\

Of is

.

a horizontal stroke ; so 1. 3 », &c. 8. Kara over an erasure.

1-2.

^-'^ Pap.
«
of
f-yfXas

;

so in

1.

16.
y.

ii.

corr.

from

13.
'

of

corr.

(The second conjugation of circumflex verbs in the present tense forms the second person by the diphthong , the being adscribed but not pronounced together (with the a), as -yfXaif yiKat. The Aeolians however pronounce it yeXmr and /Suait. In the imperfect the first person is formed by and the second and third by a, as iyiXav
and
third)

fytXas €yi\a.

The

third conjugation of circumflex verbs in the present tense forms the

third person

«

by the diphthong

oi,

as

(? ).'
Dial.
i.

second and

5-6. Cf. Joannes
010J»

!

Gr. (Meister,

fVi Sivripov

ytXais

'!,
16

\

p.

176)
tv

^

hixniput
Tals

«

StaXfKTOic

470.

Mathematical Treatise.
ig cm.

Third century.

A leaf, of which the top is lost, from a papyrus book written in double columns on a page, and containing apparently descriptions of astronomical instruments. The writing is a medium-sized semi-uncial of the third century. The high stop is found, and a comma-shaped sign is used occasionally for filling up short lines. For the interpretation of this papyrus we are indebted to Mr. J. G. Smyly. Lines 1-3 1 are the end of a description of a of which instrument
Eustathius [ad Od.
p.

( :((

iv

' ((.
be

"
re

abp

1397) says
ovroii*

/cat

)

' (( € '
on
dpeiv

,
»

(Vptaiv

(
;

' (( \( (\\(
the technical phraseology

The

details are rather obscure

and the

difficulties of

.

142
are increased

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
by
the inaccuracies of the papyrus, which throughout contains

frequent errors especially with regard to numbers.

These have
is

strokes, either

horizontal or slanting, over them, but no distinction

maintained between
occurs in
1.

ordinary numerals and fractions.

A
is

mention of a
(cf.

24,

which

probably refers to the books of Hermes

note

ad

loc),

perhaps the authority

upon which the present

Lines 31 to the end are concerned with the construction of a lapokoyiov or time-piece, shaped something like a flower-pot. The figure, which in 1. 35 appears to be a frustum of a right cone, of which a is called a
vertical
parallel,

central

,
11.

treatise

based.

section

is

a quadrilateral,
inclined at

having two sides horizontal and
In the
is

and the other two

equal angles to the horizon.

present case the length of the upper line

lower line or base

(-)

24

is

12,

performed
(a) divide

in

38-46 are

(i)

and the vertical depth is 18. The operations add together the lengths of the top and base,
3, result x, (4)

,
cf.
1.

that of the parallel

by

2, (3)

multiply by

find -, (5) find -, (6) multiply

34
(1.

4

by lost

,

result

f
11.

(for

the nature of the last process

between

46 and 47 probably contained a statement that

horizontal lines were

from each other,

drawn across the original figure at distances of i there would be 19 such lines and 18 figures of the same kind
is

as the original (since the height of the figure

18

the lines will form an arithmetical progression, each line being |

than the preceding,

i.e.

they diminish

hoLpov

? ). ?
45, note).
lines
if

The

a series of

The

lengths of
shorter

48).

These quadrilateral

figures are all subjected to the

same process

as the original, but the writer

displays considerable ingenuity in varying his expressions.

Probably the vessel

with water, and time was calculated by the nearly uniform descent of the surface caused by the water running through a small hole in the centre

was

filled

of the base.
Recto. Col.
i.

Col.

ii.

[ <
/
5

[

[

II letters

]piS[.
.

yap

[.

['

.

.]

8

navns

\[ -

}^<[

e

.

.

.

[.

.
,
. . .

25

Trjs

[.

Siontp

€'[.

.

.

470.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS

143
.

,
lOf

\,

1^

(

/CT

,

7(€ ,
'

o'lkos,

,kv
Is

,

7
30 as
rey.

^
,
Tovs

Oeav

[.

.

€'[«' 7re/3[.
.

«»\

[[

[i]s

TTJs

35

15

avvoSov.

20

,.
eweiStj
rj

! (\
'
Pap.
17•

Se

, [ , [,
! [\
[-

[

[-

(-

-

4

[ ][ €-[ () ,
<^,

[5

,
45

(,
fni

'
horn
^

[),

II.


.

((
....
yei-

,

S§.
of

COTT.

43•

/^»
ii.

corr.

Verso.

Col.

i.

Col.

[.

.]
.]

en,[.

.

.

[.

.

ic[a]ra

[(]
50

[^ •]•[•

•]

f•^»

[]9
[viT^ai

. ^^.].<.

[
70

[' [
,]

y

ye/VfJrat ^€,

km

[
55

,

[]

[]( ,

] {)
,

yd-

'
75

(( '
.

',
,

'

•]',

\\ (',
[y

Kay

,

,

',

,

,
^y, Tb

,
,
y
yti-

knl

{/}

{)'
5t

,

y

'',

144

TH^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[] ',
[
5]e

\Sev\Tepov,

ie

8'

yuvtrai

'.

-

6

65

[]\ [][]€^ [ ]' €( ' {-], , [] {) [, ° {) ,
,

Sfvrepa

€ '' '^' 8 \
ydverai

-

ros
,

- \]
,

,
, .

y

,

{)
{«}

'

leS' ,

[Trjs]

<^,
85
'/

',
'^
l•^'

eni y]

{) '.
«0««'

{),

[y

f]y>

^^ ^'

']C^' '

^""^

[y€i']»'€T[at]

k^

',

'
te/3'.

[a^e]X[e
.

i]<^' ,
.

[.

.

.]

TTJ

(][]'

]'
E's
at

tc|<5-

{),

ypa-

If be read for f in 1. 4 3-5• The numbers are very unintelligible as they stand. for in 1. 5, there may be some reference to the sixty dark nights and the sixty of Cleobulus (Diog. Laert. i. 90), Cf. the bright days in the space of two months.

and

|

'

iv Tols

« (.
=

there seems to have been a series of summations of consecutive 5- Kvvbs numbers, of which a specimen is given in the following lines: 15 + 16 + 17 + etc. + 30 360. In the Codex Cizensis of Nicomachus Gerasenus is a series of kuvOs. of which the first is headed Given any number of consecutive figures starting with cipeiv 6 is generally assigned to Diogenes Cynicus (/). This problem unity to find their sum.' Perhaps arithmetical progressions went by this name. Avhich is called Phoror, which is the 9-15. 'up to the place in the making up the number of days from house of Horus, and extends for 30 complete The real period from conjunction to conjunction is about conjunction to conjunction.' Without knowing more about the construction and use of the 29^ days. The reason assigned in 1. 17 means. difiBcult to say what it is in 11. 18-20 is that on the day of conjunction the moon reflects no light from the sun. which Egyptian Per-Hor 'house of Horus.' •£2pou oocoi is a translation of the reference is very likely to the books of Hermes; cf. Clem. Alex. 24.
:

'
(

'\ *' ,
SvoKulScKa,
8e

\(

,

' ,
/

(^

,

'

,

((
ae\

Sirom.

( !.,
!•.
4
vi.

=

&

(-

(\

,

^^
<

Tf

Xf'ipa

\

! , .

The mention

470.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS

145

of the sun and moon affords a noteworthy and of the iipoKayiov and the point of contact with the papyrus. apparently another division of the like in 1. 11. 25. 31-46. 'The calculation of the construction of time-pieces is thus given. Make with an upper line of 24 a base of 12 and a depth of 18 a of the base the result will be 36 to the 12 If we add the 24 of this •| of this is 18, multiplying, on account of the round surface, by 3 we obtain 54; is 18, is -I 13I; 18 multiplied by 13^^ makes 243.' The last process consists of the multiplication of the 2/jy. 45. 1. jroifl 117 (VI ly

((

:

,

,

. ;
-|-

{)

two preceding

figures

(- and -) though
>

it

is

incorrectly performed here as in the corre-

for

first sponding passages of the various (1. 57) 23| 420^*2, 17^ which the papyrus has 300^2 (cf• note ac/ loc); in the second (11. 64-5) 23x17!:= 396!, for which the papyrus has in 1. 315^^ j^, but cf. 1. 66, where the total 396A is reached ; in the third the product is lost; in the fourth (1. 71) 6| 2if (as is expressly indicated i5| by the papyrus) makes 3523*2, for which the text has 5xV ; in the fifth (11. 77-8) 21 3iOj32, for which 33o|, for which the text has 37o|,• in the sixth (11. 83-4) 20-|x 15;^ has 300 J^• the text The whole process may be explained in this way. Half of Let AB and CD be two successive AB + CD is the length of EF drawn halfway between the two lines. This is multiplied by 3 if the writer took the ratio of the circumference (1. 43) of a circle to its diameter to be 3 instead of , the result will be the circumference of the circle described on EF as diameter. This is divided by 3 (i.e. by ), giving "

-.

In the

=

6

=

:

.^
then
multiplied

=

5

the diameter again.

The

diameter
(in

is

by a quarter of the circumference

modern language
If

zr

X
4

=

nr^,

where r

is

the radius), giving the area of the circle.

now

the writer

the specious but incorrect assumption that the volume of the frustum of the cone was equal to that of the cylinder of equal height contained between the planes AB and standing on the circle described on EF as diameter, then since the distance between AB is i 8uktv\os he would have regarded his result as the volume expressed in cubic and The error arising from this assumption is comparatively small in the present case.

made

.
CD
A of
one see

CD

If the instrument in question were a water-clock, a knowledge of this volume would be of great importance. the meaning of this number, \\'hich corresponds to the revised 46. totals in 11. 66, 73, 79 and 85 after a certain deduction has been made from the totals obtained previously (cf. 1. 45, note), is obscure. in length; twice this number is 48, 48-57. 'The first line is therefore 24

!2
is

:

subtract

|, the

remainder

this is

23I,

and ^

is

makes 71, is 47^, half of this is 23I, this multiplied by 3 On the relation of this figure to the original 175, total 420J5.'

introd.

abbreviated.

written out, but the word may have been not room for process of doubling the upper side and then subtracting § is equivalent to adding together the lengths of the two opposite sides ; cf. 11. 38-40. 54. The reading of the first two letters is very doubtful, but the sense is made certain as the arithby a comparison with the parallel passages in 11. 75 and 81. <Vi
50.

There

The

/

»,

h

146

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

metic in the parallel passages (cf. 1. 45, note) shows, is a mistake for eVc y, i.e. multiplicaThis abnormal use of an arithmetical term is immediately followed by another, tion by 3. SevTtpov instead of for §, and the occurrence of these irregularities is traceable to the incorrect verbal interpretation of the figures and |3. The method of expressing f in is also unusual. 1. 56 (l+iV) 1. ''. cf. 1. 45, note. The confusion of and is easy and the space left 57. between and points to an omission. 58-66. 'The second figure consists of 23^ twice this makes 46§, subtract •| for the contraction, the remainder is 46, i is 23, 3 times this is 69, J of this is 23,

//

!

:

,

by 23 makes 396f, subtract -^, the remainder is 396^.' J The process up to 64 is the same as in the previous figure. The numbers in 11. 64-7 are clearly very corrupt, but if ly in 1. 64 be corrected to the result becomes intelligible. but after ; 17^X23 gives 396^, i.e. (\:^, which has been corrupted to ne
is

lyi, this multiplied

1.

{) W

subtracting the last fraction the total in

is 62. [tjJs] means that •| is subtracted because each both shorter than the one preceding and larger than the one following by § 69. About eight lines are lost at the top of the column, which may be restored ' :'0, ", yivfTai /3', y y
:

"^]-

1.

(id is

nearly correct

;

cf.

1.

45, note.

tins

8/
1.

yivcToi

'',

(

,

/3,

,

the text has in
is

70-1. The figures, as usual, are very corrupt; ?,?>'^2< instead of which 1. 71 The correct figure seems to have been transferred to 5^^. Though the final 70 and there to have been corrupted into the meaningless not certain, cannot be read, even if it made sense. The figures 4j^ in I. 73
;

^

,

! .
the
result
is

, ' ,= 62§

.,

. ,

«

are a continuation of the original error 5^3^ for 3523^ cf. note on 1. 45. which 73. At this point the writer becomes more concise; f means the fifth 21I is in length. The usual operations are performed correctly as far as 1. 77. In 1. 78 is an error for and 37o| should be 33o|; cf note on 1. 45. The number at the end of 1. 79 should probably be 329^2^. 80-1. 'The sixth is 2o| which become 4of when the § has This is a short way of saying that when all the operations up been subtracted.'

,
fVi

,

()

(),

to

the subtraction of the

| have been performed,
is

4o| (20§X2
.

=41!;
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4ii-|
82.

=

next

'^ ^.
line.

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40|). superfluous cVi before

obviously due to the occurrence of

m

L the

84.

2oi

=

85.
87.

The
If

seventh

3iOj^^ for which the text has either 310I or 300^^; cf. 1. 45, note. followed by is 20 long, if is a corruption of
for

Or

is

an error

.

471.

OFFICIAL

147

V.

SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS
{a)

OFFICIAL.

471.

Speech of an Advocate.
30-5

X

46-5 cm.

Second century.

written in a semi-uncial hand and elaborately punctuated work, contains part of a speech of an advocate directed against a person whose name is apparently Maximus. The precise point at issue is not clear. There are accusations concerning money-lending, and some question connected with the holding of the office of gymnasiarch arises, but the greater
like a literary

This long papyrus,

part of the speech consists of an outspoken denunciation of the relations of Maximus to a certain boy. That Maximus was or had been a very high official
is shown by several passages cf. the references in 1. 54 to the regal state assumed by him, in 11. 66-72 to the crowd of clients, in 11. 95-7 to petitions made to him and his power to confiscate property, and in 11. 124-30 to his journeys throughout Egypt. These allusions suit no one so well as the praefect himself, and the view that Maximus had been praefect of Egypt is supported by 1. 22, where e[7r]apxecay is the most probable reading. On this hypothesis the Kvpioi whose is appealed to by witnesses in 1. 65 and before whom this speech was delivered, was more probably the reigning emperor (cf 1. 32, where Kiipioy means the emperor) than the praefect in office. Whether however this speech was really delivered or is a composition in the style for instance of 33
;

I. pp. 29 sqq.) may be doubted. It is difficult to imagine the circumstances under which such violent accusations would actually be made,

(cf Bauer, Arc/iiv,

and unfortunately the identity of Maximus

is far from clear. The only second century praefect known to have borne that name is Vibius Maximus (a.d. 103-7), but the papyrus probably belongs to the age of Hadrian or the Antonines.

Out of

six

columns the

first

(not printed) has only the ends of a few lines,
lines,

while the sixth has lost the ends of

and the second and

fifth

are disfigured

by considerable lacunae. Two kinds of stops, the high and low point, are employed and one or two accents and breathings occur. The papyrus has been subjected to much revision, additions to or recastings of the main text being appended at the bottom of Cols, ii-v by a different hand. The position at L 2

148

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
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OFFICIAL
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perhaps indicates that the adscript

bottom of the column was to be inserted at this point. But from internal evidence is referred the adscript would seem more appropriate to 11. 21-32, where the There is also a v-shaped mark opposite to. 7. will add a fact, my lord, which will, I expect, excite your wonder and 2— no. He condemned people to pay interest for a period disbelief until we read the documents. What docs he say ? at which in some cases they had not yet even received the loan. Owing to your absence you were ignorant of the letters written to you about this These letters will still better and more clearly exhibit Maximus' exactness and care in this For the last memorandum confirms (the question of) his slave (?) and his love matter. for the youth. Up to the 19th year of the Emperor Berenicianus will be gymna^iarch and in the 29th Anicetus will hold that office. What reason had you for (suppressing ?) Will you say that you were deceived or that you took bribes ? It is best to all this ? acknowledge only the lesser fault. But we assert not that you took a reward but that )OU gave one. For why did a boy of 1 7 years dine with you every day ? Each of these witnesses whenever he was invited to join the banquet (it was not easy when once you had assumed regal state to obtain such favours from you) saw the boy at the party, both with his father and alone, and each saw the shameless look and shameless goings Why did he greet him every day ? They bear evidence to and fro of the lovers. swearing by your Fortune, my lord, that while they were waiting to salute him and gathered at the door they saw the boy coming out of the bed-chainber alone, showing signs For when once accustomed to his shame this handsome of his intercourse with him. and rich )Outh gave himself airs and became so impudent that he sported with and clasped the hands of Eutychus the chamberlain in the presence of every one and laughed long and freely in the middle of the clients. He was not stu[iid, and even showed off to Why then did not you with your modesty the borrowers what he had been doing. and extreme austerity stop him ? If a poor man wearing cheap clothes asks you a favour, jou order his property and that of his wife and friends to be confiscated, and the man who took his seat at the theatre without wearing white garments you delivered to death, and handsome youth you kept all day in the praetorium and whereas a still beardless you did not send him any longer to the schools and the exercises proper for the young Did not a boy of 17 years accompany travel about the whole of Egypt with the youth. Why then was he by your side both at in the public court ? you to the judgement-seat Memphis and at Pelusium and wherever you were ? .
1.
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would be

o,

but

it

is

difficult to

escape from

\(>,

vhich however yields no sense.

472.

Sl'EECII
30-5

OF AN ADVOCATE.
X
35-5 cm.

About

a.d. 130.

advocate.

This papyrus contains the concluding part of a speech in defence by an The first column, which consists only of ends of hnes, is not printed,

152

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

The orator's client was a woman Hermione, against whom various charges of attempted poisoning, and fraud in connexion with a supposed mortgage, had been brought by a man whose name does not appear here, but was Sarapion, if, as is almost certain, 486 is concerned with the same dispute. An epistrategus is mentioned in the first column, and it is probable that the proceedings took place about A.D. 130 before Claudius Ouintianus at the trial mentioned in 486. 8 and 36, from which passages we learn that the epistrategus referred the case to the praefect. The handwriting of the papyrus is very like that of the Petition of Dionysia (237), written in the reign of Commodus, and this copy of the speech may have been made some years after it was delivered.
the second and third are practically complete.
called

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154

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
55

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14.
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22.

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very cursively written.

For it was from his house that he came out saying that he had been poisoned, and when he came out of Hermione's house he neither told any one that he noticed anything nor had the least suspicion, but it was from the house of himself and his son He had indeed and future heir that he came forth saying that he had been poisoned. reasons for administering poison to himself which many others have had in preferring for he was ruined by creditors and at his wit's end but if any one really plotted death to life Why he brought the accusation is now against him, his son is the most likely person. He may indeed have had other troubles during the period of his stewardship, but clear. the case shows that he was jealous of her without her knowledge and called himself her husband, but since she did not vouchsafe him this title, he suffered like a lover and did not wish her to oudive him. If they say that the slave Smaragdus has disappeared being himself accused of having stolen the mortgage he only asserts that a mortgage
' ;
:

was made in order which neither ever

might be stolen for it is impossible for that to have been stolen existed at all nor could exist, nor can a mortgage have been drawn up, since neither the buyer knew how to write nor the present defendant Hermione, nor does a stranger when another woman is registered as mortgagee himself issue a deed of From So from whom could he say that he had received the mortgage ? mortgage. whichever quarter he did so, it was invalid. And if a slave has run away, this is no argument against his master. Moreover the division also helps to show that there never was any mortgage. For persons who are registered as mortgagees have only their name inserted in deeds and do not claim the property which has been registered in mortgage, but the buyer has clearly claimed the property and been in enjoyment of it ever since she bought it, while he since he sold it has no longer been enjoying it, but administering the
that
it
;

If they say that a joint properly of the mother as a steward and attacking my clients. agreement was made between the daughter and Hermione for 150 jars, to be produced, (Dionysia) bought, we assert that all this has nothing to do from these vineyards which she For if the daughter did make an agreement with the mother, this with the plaintiff. does not afford them an excuse for calumnies. That however did not happen at the same period, but nearly a whole year afterwards, and the provision of 1 50 jars is nothing Again, if there as security for 4 talents, for they are the interest upon only i talent. had been security given to the supposed seller, would the daughter have pledged herself another deed when she was liable to be deprived of the property whenever to the State by

Aphro

Hermione had three children, facts about the provision are as follows Dionysia entreated her mother not to leave her with only what Dionysia had already been used up, but to give her something since she Avas dependent upon only a single resource, whereupon Hermione pays her i| talents. But Dionysia, in order that her mother may not in her lifetime be deprived of that sum, pays instead of interest every year this provision, and this very statement is contained in the mutual agreement.'
he chose
.

?

The

:

.

.

,

.

.

.

473.
9.

upon

) (((,
:

OFFICIAL
this

in the translation
so.

we have connected

with

10. npovnias

Hermione;

Hermione is the last person mentioned by name, but seeing that she was 11. old enough to be the mother of tliree cliikiren, it is perhaps more probable that the person of 1. 18 cf. 1. 31 and 486. 4. meant is Dionysia, who is the for the point at issue in connexion with this supposed document cf. 486. 15. 4-8 and 22-4. Dionysia claimed to have bought a vineyard from the accuser's father, while the plaintiff asserted that it had been only mortgaged to her, and accused Smaragdus, the slave of Dionysia or Hermione, with having stolen the bond of mortgage. Perhaps has been introduced from 1. 27. the context requires 25. means Hermione, as distinguished from 'the daughter' (Dionysia); 28. T^s
; :

.
cf.

Heimione. means the period when the accuser was acting as

,

155
but
it

may be dependent
of

1.

28.

in

•.

-.

.

cf.

I.

30.
36.

These four talents seem to have been the sum which, according to the accuser, Dionysia had borrowed from Hermione and advanced to him upon the security of the vineyard, and the 150 jars of wine were according to him interest upon the money borrowed by Dionysia. To this the orator replies that the 1 50 jars were paid by Dionysia to Hermione as interest upon a talent and a half given her by Hermione.

473.

Decree

Honour of a Gymnasiarch.
21'4

X

29-6 fW.

A.D.

138-160.

A resolution,
and three
nings of
tributions
shields.

dated

in

the reign of Antoninus Pius, of the magistrates and

people of Oxyrhynchus, together with the resident Roman and Alexandrian citizens, to honour a gymnasiarch by setting up a statue, a full-length portrait,
lines,

the

Owing to the loss of from 30-40 letters at the beginname of this individual is not known. The enumeration
'

of his public services mentions his
to

unstinted provision of unguents,' his condisplays
(cf 519),

the fund
'

for

theatrical
'
;

and

his

restoration

of the baths and

greater thermae

cf P.

Amh.

70, a letter of the magistrates

of Hermopolis concerning the expenses incurred

Though

writing a large and
errors.

have committed several
1

^
[eSo^e

2

9

[u\uvov

' ( ] )(](• ']
«'] /

by gymnasiarchs. handsome semi-uncial hand, the scribe seems

to

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156
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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
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(

corr.
cf.

from

t.

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corr.

from

or vice versa.

B. G. U. 362. v. 1-2. such honorific adjectives are not elsewhere applied to century, when it had a municipal constitution like other
2.

For

the supplement

here

is

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3.

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in

an inscription

honour of a
.
.

third century
in P.

Hell. Sited. 1901, p. 284.

.

Amh.
were

Oxyrhynchus are mentioned

from the

The beginning

For

of this line seems to be corrupt. in conjunction with and

(11.

in 54. 14, but

cf.

B. G. U. 362, X.

6.

474.

Circular to Officials.

34•6 8•5
This papyrus contains copies of three
Plautius
strategi
Italus, to

fw. letters written
first

A.D.

184?

by a high
is

functionary,

various

ofificials.

The

1-8)

addressed to the

and basilico-grammateis of several nomes, which were apparently enumerated in 11. 8-9, and directs their attention to the following letter (11. 10-30) from himself to the strategus of the Tanite nome, reprimanding him and the basilico-grammateus for peculations. This is succeeded (11. 31-41) by another letter to the same set of ofificials as those addressed in the first, forbidding in more general and peremptory terms the practice of diverting the imperial
revenues to the
third letter
is
'

salaries

'

of the principal revenue-officers of the nomes.
first

The

complete, but a large portion of the

owing to the staining of the papyrus. The

circulars

two is hopelessly illegible were issued on December 16

474.
in

OFFICIAL

157

the 25th year of an

or Caracalla, since

unnamed emperor, who must however be Commodus none of the others reigned so long. The handwriting, which
is

suggests the second century rather than the third,

in

favour of the earlier date.

emperor was was the praefect in A.D. 184, but this is not very likely, since Longaeus Rufus was praefect in May 185 (237. vi. 15, cf. P. Amh. 107), and Veturius Macrinus in July 181 (De Ricci, Proc. Soc. Bibl. Arch. 1903, p. 67) and perhaps in May 183 (B. G. U. 847). December 16, 216,' falls in the praefecture of Valerius Datus (De Ricci, I.e. p. 100). It is more probable that Plautius Italus was or perhaps Ihios Aoyoy. Since his
Plautius Italus held
possible that he
is

What position Commodus, it

not certain.

If the reigning

is

letters are

addressed to

officials

of

nomes
it

in the

Delta as

well as

of,

pre-

sumably, the
epistrategus.

Oxyrhj'nchite

nome,

is

hardly possible

that

he

was an

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sense of this sentence, which stands between two imperatives, is very iKttvos in 1. 22 and in 1. 24 refer presumably to the basilico-grammateus, obscure. After in 1. 22 three or four letters may be lost, who is also the subject of ov&kv seems to be a parenthetical remark. The unauthorized payment to the basilico-grammateus in 1. 26 is further explained by 11. 35 sqq., since 1. 38 probably

20-7.

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frOm

.

back to the second letter. 31-41. '(Copy) of another (letter). Plautius Italus to the strategi and basilicogrammateis of the hereinafter-mentioned nomes, greeting. On examining the accounts of the money revenue I discovered that certain of the strategi and basilico-grammateis had paid themselves salaries for some period on their own responsibility, in defiance rather than obedience to the proclamations. Thereupon I sent them a suitable admonition, and I now make this second order applying to all that the imperial moneys are not to be touched without leave.' KvpiaKos on which see P. Meyer in \. 6. the revenue of the 41. =:^ fiscus as Festschr. zu 0. Hirschfeld p. 139. His view that is true in most instances, but a notable exception occurs in P. Catt. opposed to tSioi V. 17 (cf Archiv, III. i), where the bona vacantia of a soldier who had died without heirs are appropriated by the idiologus Julianus «is
refers

{)

475.

OFFICIAL

159

475.

Report of an Accident.
28-7

X9

cm.

A letter from
who had been

the strategus Hierax to one of his

of a report sent him
killed

by a certain Leonides with regard to the death of a slave, by falling from an upper story while watching an entera public physician

,
,

A.D. 182.

tainment given by dancing-girls.
the dead body in

company with

Sia>

'Sfprivm

), \8[] [\
(2nd hand)

^-The
;

strategus orders the
cf.

51-2 and 476.

^

enclosing a copy

to view

[] [)
.

5

! [\

.
1st

hand.

10 (erouy)

[]

^ve-

([]{).
(h

3rd hand.

{)
15

. "
(
{()

•\^[']

[
kv
Trj

][] () \[^]
Se-

[

.

(([

-

[-

20

...[.]

[\

l6o
25

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

€((
kav
S6^r]

€([]€.
'iva

3 ^]

.

41.

^

yd-

[^
mpl

els

SevenTO,

[]
(eVowr)

35

(.

[\.
6.

.

COrr.

from

Tor.

Hierax, strategus of the Oxyrliynchite nome, to Claudius Serenus, assistant. A copy of the application which has been presented to me by Leonides also called Serenus is herewith sent to you. Take a public physician and view the dead body referred to, and having delivered it over for burial make a report in writing. Signed by me. The 23rd year of Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus Caesar the lord, Athur 7. To Hierax, strategus, from Leonides also called Serenus, whose mother is stated as Tauris, of Senepta. At a late hour of yesterday the 6th, while a festival was taking place at Senepta and the castanet-players were giving their customary performance at the house of Plution my son-in-law his slave Epaphroditus, aged about 8 years, wishing to lean out from the bed-chamber (.'') of the said house and see the castanet-players, fell and was killed. I therefore present this application and ask you, if it please you, to appoint one of your assistants to come to Senepta in order that the body of Epaphroditus may receive proper laying out and burial.' Date and signature of Leonides.
' . . . ,

8.

22.

means

or perhaps ivypai^ovs. here clearly indicates a the same as i. e. a bed-chamber.
:

(! ?: ^,

room on an upper

floor,

and probably

476.

Report of Mummifiers.
9•8

X

6-3 cm.

Second century.

report addressed to the strategus by two who had been commissioned to examine the cause of a death which had taken place. Cf. 51, a similar report by a public physician, and the preceding papyrus.

A

'

6
(ercof)

()

477.

DECLARATIONS

() ,
Sia,

emSfiy

)
5
V109

-

{) 7{) {€-

"Amos

) ;

l6i

,)?
'

-() {)
II.

15

[ [! ]] 8(. ] [ [
XfejCuy

nepi

.....
ttj

of

corr.

from

.

Phocion, strategus, from Thonis son of Florus and Ptolema, aged about and from Thonis son of Petaus and Taoues, 35 years, having a scar upon his left aged about 62, with no distinguishing mark, both of Oxyrhynchus, mummifiers. To-day we were commissioned by you through your assistant lieracleus to inspect the dead body of Apis son of Pausis, of the said city, and to report the circumstances of the case. We therefore inspected the said body at his house

\5,

.

.

.

18.

The papyrus probably

continued

(V[;

cf.

51.

12 sqq.

()
477.

DECLARATIONS

().
A.D. 132-3.

Registration of an Ephebus.
15-7

X

11-3

<^'"•

This interesting papyrus

Serenus, exegetes and holder of a variety of
officials,

an application addressed to Marcus Claudius titles, and to other Alexandrian from Ammonius, a citizen of Alexandria, who wished his son to be
is

registered

among

the ephcbi of the following year.

and

enrolment

of

received into their tribe and deme, and attained their legal majority, though

(

took place at the

age of

At Athens the iH, when they were

they did not obtain full civic rights until the age of 2 J. At Alexandria that admission it appears from a Tebtunis papyrus of the reign of Trajan
to

the ranks of the

was possible

at

a

much

earlier age,

when the

i62

assumption of legal rights would be out of the question. We also learn from were registered in numbered the same document that the

5

10

. '^ € €-^\6 ? [] ] '[]()€ ! []. - []! !
THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(.

\8\\

yevopivm

/1[]^>'

apyiyiwpyZ

tepei

[]

aWois

[]

[]

eT[o]s

ei[y]

rot)?

'4[]

€6[]
15
TOiS

20

25

2nd hand.

[ ^][] [ (] [ '] [
^€[ ' ]
[
. .
.

[] []9

[]

)

[(\)(^

'

\\
eivai

.]

6

letters

]

](

9

]

[]
[

-

Is

Tods
).

]cB7r(

'() [()

[

]

Marcus Claudius Serenus, neocorus of the great god Sarapis, ex-chiliarch, late praefect of the first cohort of the Damascenes, chief of the cultivators, priest and exegetes, and to the Caesarii and the other prytaneis, from Ammonius son of Theon son of
'

Sarapion, of the Althaean deme of the Propapposebastian tribe, who became an ephebus the 5th year of Domitian. I wish to enroll among those becoming ephebi in the coming i8th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus my son Nilammon
in

'

478.

DECLARATIONS

()

163

my late sister Thaubarion, citizen, and therefore request you to instruct the officers concerned, on receipt of my declaration on oath that the foregoing statements are true, my case on my (proving the descent) of my aforesaid son Nilammon, and to (communicate with) the cosmetes and gymnasiarch to enroll him among the ephebi
by
to write to the proper officials to deal with
. . .

3. 4.

-/(

( ! \^
. . . :

cf. G. U, 73• 2—3. &C. a novel and, in this context, unexpected title ; but the reading seems
;

.

clear.

Cf. 513. ii, note.
:

if these are officials the title is apparently not otherwise known. 5. Kaiaapeiocs Caesarian tribe (? at Alexandria) occurs in 373, but if members of one particular tribe were being addressed, the Propapposebastian (1. 7) would be expected, though cf. 513. i, note. 7-8. On the tribes and demes of Egyptian jriiXds see Kenyon, Archiv. II. 70 sqq. ', who clearly shows by the aid of a British Museum papyrus that these doubled epithets connected by refer respectively to the tribe and deme of the person to whom they are applied. (cf. 497. 20) is known as the name of an Alexandrian from an inscription published by Jouguet in Bull. Corr. Hell. xx. 398. Cf. 513.

r,

note.

478.
name
of a

A

ig— 20. Perhaps hiiiA?pvTi or some such phrase. \^ 22 sqq. The cosmetes and the gymnasiarch are no doubt the officials at Oxyrhynchus. The wish of the petitioner was that after the completion of the formalities at Alexandria the local magistrates should be communicated with, and the status of the boy thus
.

.

.•^.\

established.

Selection of Boys
26

(k-nUpiaii).

X

6-1 cm.

A.D. 132.

\€,
An
The
question of

application addressed, as usual at

Oxyrhynchus in such cases, to the by Dionysous, a freedwoman, requesting that her son, who had

reached the age of 13, might be placed on the list of privileged persons who paid a poll-tax of only 12 drachmae, and stating the grounds of the claim.
evidence of this papyrus was utilized by us in a discussion of the whole in P. Oxy. II. pp. 217 sqq., to which the reader is referred.

Since the publication of that volume the subject has been treated at length

(

by

P. Meyer {^Hccrwcsen dcr Ptolcmder nnd Romer, pp. 109 sqq.), who however had not the Oxyrhynchus documents before him, and could only refer to them in an appendix {op. cit. pp. 2 19 sqq.), and by Wessely [Sitzungsb. dcr Akad.

der Wisscnsch. in Wicn, Bd. CXLII.

ix),

who
own

gives an elaborate recapitulation of

the evidence in the light of the Oxyrhynchus papyri.
are on the whole in agreement with our
'

The

results of the latter

— more
i) is to

so indeed than he himself,
is

The

mutilated

deme

at

Antinoc on p. 7a (V.

be restored Xtvt\apxuo•!, as

shown by

third century

Oxyrhynchus papyrus.

%

i64

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
position, appears to realize.
'

owing to some misunderstanding of our
general sense of
stration,
is
'

That the

examination,'

decision,' requires

no special demon-

and the term of course is, as we remarked (P. Oxy. II. p. 220), a relative But in connexion with the poll-tax tnUpLais and its cognates acquired a technical signification, being used of the process by which persons of a certain status were partially or vholly relieved of liability to that impost. P. Meyer however goes much too far in asserting that implies total exemption from the poll-tax, a view which he somewhat perversely tries to maintain {. cit. p. 231) in the face of our statement of the evidence derived from the present text. It is abundantly clear from II. 9-10 and 31 below, that persons who enjoyed the privilege of paying less than the regular amount of the tax went through a process of as those and were just as much who were entirely exempt.
one.

(
el

,

{)
TTJs

(

amXiv-

6epa{s)
5

/€
10

(() [](^) '
7rep(T)

/. ,
kni-

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e^

IItOWiSos
15

((6)
-

(erei)

() '
yeyovevai

|<| ; ()
eh

20

{)

-

478.

DECLARATIONS
{(tovs)

25

30

35

, ,() (^) , ,
ASpiapoD
t)V

()

165

/cat

€-

tou

oS

) (€)
Si

() 7(€)
65{)

{)

(){)

(€)€

()
4

() .

.[
[
6[.
Second

45

yjia

2nd hand
50

( (^[
'

. [
from .
17. ly in

![ ([ -• (
[((-

.
corr.

of

from
(?).

&.
44.
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corr.

hand

.

2.

(^.(((!) corr.

\\

rewritten.

14. '-

23• ly corr.

from

by the second

i66
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
To
Hadrion and

Zoi'lus, keepers of the archives, from Dionysous freedwoman of Dionysia daughter of Dionysius also called Chresimus son of Dionysius, of Oxyrhynchus, with her guardian Eudaemon son of Menoetes, of the same city. In accordance with the orders concerning the selection of boys 13 years of age when their parents on both sides are inhabitants of the metropolis rated at 12 drachmae, I declare that my son Ptollis son of Phaon son of Ptollis registered in the quarter of the Square of Thoeris (interlinear note "the Kmelemus (?) quarter, as he says") has reached the age of 13 years in the past i6th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord, and that his father Phaon son of Ptollis son of Phaon, his mother being Athena, was an inhabitant of the metropolis rated at 12 drachmae as shown by a uniform poll-tax list of the 13th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord at the said quarter, and is now dead, and that the father of my aforesaid patroness Dionysia (interlinear note " he does not agree "), Dionysius also called Chresimus son

of Dionysius, of the same city, was similarly rated at 12 drachmae by the selection of the ^th year of the deified Trajan in the Lycians' Camp quarter, and died at an advanced age and I swear by the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus that the foregoing statement is correct. The 17th 3'ear of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Tubi 13. I, Dionysous, freedwoman of Dionysia daughter of Dion3'sius also called Chresimus, have presented the declaration and sworn the oath. I, Eudaemon son of Menoetes, have been appointed her guardian and wrote for her as she was illiterate.'
;

10-2. It is noticeable that the further qualification specified in the parallel passage of 258, e(7r)7-a(?) [cJtt; fVi is here Omitted. But not improbably the interlinear notes on 11. 15 and 28 have some reference to such a restriction. 15. The adscript added below this line by a different hand is a note by an oflScial remarking some inconsistency between this statement of the in which Ptollis lived and his own assertions. The question had an important bearing on the consideration of the claims for exemption, for it appears from 258. 9 that a certain permanence of residence was required; cf. the previous note. A similar interlinear insertion occurs in 1. 28 in connexion with the evidence on the mother's side. 22. the meaning of this is obscure. So far as the present passage goes might here have its ordinary sense of ' corresponding,' the meaning being that the poll-tax list of the year referred to corresponded with the statement in the text that the father of Ptollis was a But this interpretation is not satisfactory in another case of the use of the phrase in B. G. U. 618. 13 «<(?) fifV anSpfs for SO no doubt the passage should be read on the analogy of the present papyrus which occurs in a list of individuals who were responsible for work on the embankments. The term is also applied to persons, when it perhaps has a technical signification P. Brit. e. g. B. G. U. 560. 20 Mus. 259. 190-1 inl TO (the preceding list being specially concerned with the poll-tax) ai'[S(pe£)] ;^[. .] a (fTti) , P. Brit. MuS. 260. 1 4 2— 3 ;([.

,

'

- ::


,

&:.

6{) •)/()
((^
[.

a Vienna papyrus described by Wessely in his Siudien z. Palaeogr. imd Papyruskunde, I. pp. 9-11. Wilcken (Ost. I. pp. 253-5), who quotes Cod. Theodos. xi. 24. 6. § 3 qui vicis quibus adscripti sunt dereliclts et qui hornologi more gentilicio nuncupaniur ad alios seu vicos seu dominos iransierunt, supposes that were a particular class of cultivators but though that explanation would suit B. G. U. 560. 20 it clearly cannot be brought into harmony with the passages in which o/toXoyos is connected with There is more to be said for Wessely's view, who supposes the to be domiciled strangers subjected to the poll-tax, and refers in support of his theory to
?)

(07)

?)

()
.
.]

) /(«)
:

!

(

,

.

iv o^oX(oyott)

(((), and

\

ev

() (

in

.

;

479.

DECLARATIONS

()

6

This explanation would well accord the extract from the Cod. Theodos. given above. with P. Brit. Mus. 260. 142-3 and the Vienna papyrus, in which Jews are concerned. here, in which But how is it to be applied to the in all these passages has been suggested to us A better interpretation of figure ? would translate it assessed at the same rate,' i. e. in the present case at by Mr. Smyly, who This explanation would account for the variations in the use of the term, 12 drachmae. the meaning of which is relative to the context in each instance. 26sqq. This passage combines with B. G. U. 324 to show that slaves were placed on the same footing with regard to liability to the poll-tax as their masters; and we here learn that liberated slaves at least could even transmit their privileges to their children. 28. For the insertion above the line see note on 1. 15. above the age of 60, when men ceased to be liable to the i. e. 35. fV The word appears to be not otherwise known. poll-tax.

-:
'

(((

:

479.

Cen-sus-Return.
20-5

X 6-9

C7n.

a.d. 157.

An unaddressed notice from a woman, Demetrous, expressing the wish that her grandson should for the future be registered at her own house. The year the document in which this papyrus is dated was not a regular census-year
;

was therefore supplementary of a previous return, and necessitated by the change of residence on the part of the boy in question, who was now living with his grandmother instead of his parents.

('Anepw5 TOS.

1

5

?
20

avaypae-

.[
{iTWf)

[]9
.

Sio

e-

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inrdpyovTOs

2nd hand.

{9)
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09

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Sv-

2$

':{

([. ([4] [6 ].
«7. . .

]

e.

ifcaroy

{)

[

i68
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
From Demetrous

daughter of Amois son of Philoxenus, with her guardian her son I wish that Horus, the son of my aforesaid son Amois and Heraclous daughter of Harbaithus, who in the present 20th year of Antoninus Caesar the lord is 8 years of age, should henceforth be registered at the house of which I own part in the quarter of the Square of Thoeris. I therefore duly present this memorandum.' Date, and signatures of Demetrous and Amois written for them by Hermon.

Amois son of Aperos.

480.

Census-Retukn.

•56•3
The concluding
written
in

cm.

portion of a census-return

[

A.D.

132,

but

following the
;

formula of the early

)

a.d. 132.

on oath,
century

first

Oxyrhynchus census-returns
and abode
house.
is

cf.

255.

The

description of the writer's family

lost

;

the property described consisted only of an uninhabited

[']
TTpOT^epof)

[]{')

[{)]
els

5

() ^).
dWovs
[ojuieiy

] ^) {<)
67'

[]

'<{)
15

(() {) {() 'AXe^avS{pia) {) {€) €€{€') {()
{(')

) ^{() {)
(

88{€/)

()

8\^\

-

•/[)

^

{(.) (() 8.
{erovs)

-

tvovos

.

481.

DECLARATIONS

()
7•

169

and hand.

20
eniStSwKa,

.corr.

2.

from

.

"--

( register) in the Myrobalanus quarter a house and fixtures which previously belonged to my said father in common with Cleon son of Dionysius and others, in which no one is registered or lives ; and I swear by the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus that I have honestly and truly presented the above return, and that neither stranger nor Roman nor Alexandrian nor Egyptian nor freedman nor any one else dwells or is registered in it except the aforesaid, or may I be liable to the penalties of the oath. The 17th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Athur 29, I, Chaeremon son of Chaeremon, have presented the return and sworn the oath.'
'

3. 9.

If

f vyt{ovs)

[{)

is right,
:

seems

to have

been omitted,

cf.

P.

Amh.

68. 33.

481.

Property-Return.

155x9
of house-property similar to P.
It is

<"'''•

A.D. 99.

This and the following papyrus are examples of the periodical returns

Oxy.

72,

247-50

;

cf.

P.

Oxy.

II.

pp. 177-9.

noteworthy that 482 is dated in A.D. 109, or just ten years later than the present document and there is thus evidence for a series of four general registrations of real property separated by periods of approximately ten years, namely those in A.D. 80, 90, 99, 109, while another occurred in A.D. 129 cf. 584.
;

[]['

5

[] [] ( [• , 6 [(
yov

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([] (
(
\

]
4(

[ ] ([]([
Tjj

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]> [, [-

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2

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.

(2nd hand?)

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10 eiffoSwv
€is

^68'

corr.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
25
(erovs)

15

[ \[( ([6]\
[^
8. at

^^-

,[ ] ' )
.
Second

€6[9

'{>')

from

f.

15.

((([]5

corr.

from

.

2-29• I hereby register in accordance with the decree the half-share belonging to at the present date at the metropolis in the quarter of the Square of Sarapis ... of a house and yard and other fixtures and entrances and exits, which share has devolved upon me from my father Heras son of Heras and Tnepheros, of the same city, who died before the registration of the 9th year of Domitian, leaving me his only son and heir.' Date and signature of Heras written for him by Amoitas.
'

me

6-7.
is

The

scribe apparently thought that the letters

sufficiently

clear,

very probably unusual in reference to a
. .
.

the implication is that the property had been registered TTJs 1 5-7. Domitian (a.d. 90) in the name of the son; and we may also infer no general registration had intervened between that occasion and the date of this Cf. on the latter point 248. 32, where there is a similar mention of the papyrus. though the conclusion that no general registration of the year 63-4 in a return of a.d. 80 had occurred between those two dates is in that case more doubtful.
:

, .(•^

at the
I.

end of

1.

and so rewrote them
is

in the 9th year of that

!
in

6 were not

in the

margin of

7.

The word

before
is

hardly possible, and that formula

moreover

;

482.

Property-Return.
23-5

X

6'7 ««.

A
returns

return of property, probably addressed to the

years later than the preceding papyrus.

made probably

636 and 637, which are similar the same year, and 481 introd. On the verso in

a different hand is a list of persons with their respective and mothers' names, headed ?).

^\
puf

-

^{
25

Cf.

5,
Te-

A.D. 109.

written ten

fathers', grandfathers',

-

Tos
5

er

)

/
»

482.

DECLARATIONS

() ((kv
Trj

2'ei'e/ie-

Xev

(30

?

(
15

oUias

20

^ ',avXfji

ueou

Nfpova

-

35

f??>

^'

8
kv

-

-

40

•\
:

(ts

pe

. ()
.

.( ^(
V
'f'"'

-(
avrf]

()

45

( register), apart from what I have previously registered and sold, now at the present time the third share which belongs to me at the village of Senemuleu of two shares out of four shares out of five shares of a joint house and the court adjoining it on the south side and other fixtures and entrances and exits and appurtenances, situatcii in a cavalry soldier's quarters, which share has devolved upon me with other property from my late father Diogenes son of Ptolemaeus son of Ptolemaeus, his mother being Tekosis daughter of Harthoonis, of the said city, in accordance with the will which he drew up in his lifetime through the record-ofiice at the said city in the month Tubi of the first year of the deified Nerva, which will was unchanged at his death. And I swear by the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus that I have given no false information.'
'

Date.
2.

the point of this
;

is
cf.

that

when land was about

to

be alienated, notice

237. viii. 37, note. 6-9. This passage is a good illustration of the minute subdivision of house and land property, the fraction of the whole house owned by the writer being only -^g. the is mentioned (on 18. cV cf. 506. 24, where a inmKos distinction between and see P. Tebt. I. p. 45), and 604. 9, where «V roO These instances show occurs. irrTTi/toC followed probably by some word like

had

to be given to the

483 and

:

:

172

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
in the

that the old military organization of
still

Fayum
cf.

survived to
5.

some extent

in the

Roman

period;

(cf. P. Tebt. I. pp. 545 sqq.) P. Meyer, Heerwesen, p. 106 and

note on 483.

483.

Application for Leave to Mortgage.
24-3

X

10-7

a7i.

A.D. 108.

An

application, addressed

to the

by a

certain

Achillas, of

a similar character to B. G. U. 184 and 379 and P. Brit. Mus. 299 and 300; cf. P. Oxy. II. p. 180, where part of this papyrus is quoted. There is however
this

difference

between those documents and 483, that

in

them the applicant

wished to part with his land, while here he apparently wished only to mortgage it; cf. 1. II of the Florence papyrus published by Vitelli, Athene e Ro7na iv.
73 sqq., and 588. 483 is also noticeable for containing at the end a letter from the to the agoranomi authorizing the drawing up of the contract
required.

12

15

[e]7r[i]

^ >[] ([\] {] [] 8[,
tf

[] [] [ ] ][] \^ [\.[ [8 \'\ [\[ [([] [ []
18 letters

]

To[

12

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Trj]s
.

.

.]t/

.

[
]
.

]•[•]•• ^'^
iepicoi

'^"^

.

Albs

"Hpas

Trepl

\
[

.

.

.

[.

.

.]•«

Vestiges of 5 hnes.
ejooy

€;[[7]7

/['7]»'[]

Kataapeiov

7[]

8)(^

[]?

^

[[

[

[]

TOis TTJS

20

,

reXetcocrai

[6]

•[ ^[<

€[ €[

483.

DECLARATIONS

25

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Sarapion, keeper of the public records, from Achillas. Wishing to mortgage through his ... priest of Zeus, Hera and the (6 arourae) of catoecic land which I own near the village of ... in the eastern toparchy in the holding of Zenodorus (on condition that the repayment is made) by the 5th intercalary day of the month Caesareus of the 22nd year of Trajanus Caesar the lord, at the interest of i drachma for each mina per month dating from ne.xt month, Pharmoutlii, which I will pay off" at the conclusion of each twelvemonth, I present this application in order that you may instruct the agoranomi of 0.xyrhynchus, who are also recorders, to execute the deed in the proper way. And I swear by the deified August! and by the Fortune of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus and my ancestral gods that the aforesaid arourae are my own property and free from all liability either public or private up to the present day. The nth year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus, Phamenoth <//« Augus/us. I, Achillas son of Didymus, have presented the application and sworn the oath. Sarapion, joint keeper of the records with Theon, to the agoranomi of the metropolis, greeting. Achillas has the 6 arourae on the register. Execute the deed therefore, as
to)
.
. .

(To

,

,

.

.

.

is fitting.'

Date.

very likely these deities are in a Graecized form the Isis, and Thofe'ris (e.g. 46. 8). Sarapis and Zeus were often identified (cf. Milne, yb«r«. /-. Slud. 1901, p. 277), and Isis might well be identified with Hera, whose worship is rarely mentioned in Egypt (Milne, I.e. p. 289). ThoCris was perhaps identified with Athena; cf. 679.
3.
iipt'wt
.
.

[

.:

triad

commonly worshipped

at

Oxyrhynchus, Sarapis,

;

174

cf. 47. 1 8. Our contention (P. Oxy. I. p. 102) that the 5. persons who gave their names to were the original grantees has recently been disputed by P. Meyer {^Heerwesen, p. 107), who wishes to make them the owners immediately preceding the actual ones. This view that e.g. U toC Mfi/omou (45. lo) means no more than ras is not only very unlikely in itself and ignores the preposition which indicates that the was larger than the area in question, but it altogether fails to account for the following facts (i) the uniformly Greek character of the names, (2) the absence of women, (3) the frequent insertion of nationalities (e. g. 270. IJ, Jou 265. 40; cf 506. 24 e. g. that of Drimacus (250, 265, 344). (4) the common occurrence of the same On the other hand all these facts point to the Ptolemaic origin of the persons who give their names to which, seeing that the Ptolemaic organization of catoecic land
.
.

[^
t'/c

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
.

[\:

^
(cf.

still

survived to
30.

, }•.
some
i.

,

^,

extent
2.

482.

1 8,

note),
1.

is

in

no way

surprising.

probably the 29th,• cf

the

same day, and 289.

On

37, which was most likely written see P. Oxy. II. p. 284.

on

(c)

PETITIONS.

484.

Petition to the Strategus.
17x4-3
<^»'•

A-D. 138.

to the strategus by Pausiris, who had been accused of fraud Didymus, requesting that a copy of the present libellus should be served upon the son of the accuser in order to compel his attendance at

A petition sent
certain

by a

the next sitting of the praefect's court (conventus).
the

The papyrus follows nearly and P. Brit. Mus. 358, on the juristic aspects of which documents see Mitteis, Hermes, xxx. p. 572, and Wenger, Rechtssame formula
as B. G. U. 226

historische Papyriissiiidien, pp. ic6 sqq.

The
is

praefect mentioned

is

Avidius Heliodorus, whose tenure of

office

thus carried back to January 138, a circumstance which necessitates a reconsideration of the date generally assigned to the praefecture of Valerius Eudaemon
cf.

note on

1.

22.
is

In the upper margin

an insertion by a different hand, perhaps a number.

.

f)[.]

[)
20

-'
kav 6

*

484.

PETITIONS
AviStoi

5

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175

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COTT.

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Apolinarius, strategus, from Pausiris son of Petsiris, from the village of Sephtha, Nemera. Since Didymus son of Amois has delivered to me an accusation charging me with defrauding his son Didymus in connexion with some wheat, I request
living
at

that a
that

copy of this memorandum be served upon his aforesaid son Didymus in order he may have a written notice and appear wherever his highness the praeiect Avidius Heliodorus holds his auspicious court for the nome or administers justice, and that he may
trial

attend until the

takes place so that the facts

may

be proved.
3.
I,

The 22nd

year of the

Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Mecheir have presented this memorandum.'
22.

Pausiris son of Petsiris,

earliest mention of Avidius Heliodorus as praefect has hitherto been in 139 (cf. de Ricci, Froc. Soc. Bill. Arch, x.xiv. p. 64), and the previous year cf. P. Oxy. II. pp. 17.3-4)1 has generally been assigned to Valerius Eudaemon (40. i who was praefect about the end of Hadrian's reign or early in that of Antoninus. 484 now shows that Avidius Heliodorus was already praefect on Jan. 28, 138, and it is no longer possible to suppose that the date in 237. viii. 7 (Jtov^ , i. e. Feb. 14, 138) refers, as we suggested, to the proclamation of Eudaemon. This being t Beov so, it becomes practically certain that the date in 237. viii. 1 8 does, as is indicated by the arrangement in the papyrus, refer to the proclamation This conclusion produces of Eudaemon, who was therefore praefect on July 18, a.d. 142. a conflict between 237. viii. 18 and B. G. U. 113. 9, where if the editor's reading is correct Avidius Heliodorus is still praefect in the 6th year Pachon 21 (May 16, a.d. 143). be substituted But the reading of the crucial figure in B. G. U. 113. 9 is doubtful, and if for 5• the whole difficulty is removed and Valerius Eudaemon takes his place between Avidius Heliodorus (a.d. 138-141) and Valerius Proculus (a.d. 145-7), being no doubt

The

March

a.d.

;

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176
identical with the

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Eudaemon who tried the Rom. viii. pp. 155 sqq.;
case recorded in P. Cattaoui iii. i6-iv [Bull. of. our revised text in Archiv, III. i), on the

deir Inst, di diriilo

3rd intercalary day of the 5th year of Antoninus.

485.

Notification to the Strategus.
30-5

X

12 cm.

A.D. 178.

Copy

of the fact that he

of a notification addressed to the strategus by Serenus, a freedman, had brought before the archidicastes a claim for the recovery

of a debt, and that that official had authorized the strategus to forward this a proceeding equivalent claim, of which a copy is added, to the alleged debtor

to a

summons

to appear for the trial of the case.

Appended

at the foot are the

authorization of the strategus that the claim should be duly forwarded as desired, and a corresponding acknowledgement of receipt on the part of the defendant.

Similar documents are B. G. U. 578 and 614, the legal aspects of which have been discussed by Mitteis [Hermes, xxxii. pp. 644 sqq.), and Gradenwitz {Einfiihrmig in die Papyrushiude, pp. 35 sqq.), and especially 888, the text of which admits of several improvements (see the notes below). The dispute in the present instance was concerned with a loan of 900 drachmae on the security of a female slave from Serenus to Sarapias, a woman living at Psobthis which we learn from this papyrus was the name of the metropolis of the Small Oasis
(Bahriyeh).

{)
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Cf 592.

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485.

PETITIONS

177

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3rd hand

18
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SapamaSt
.
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

-

.

[

v[rrep

5

[]
In the
left
11.

{) [€ -() ? [,
1.

and opposite

^ [) ()
'I^RV^

margin opposite 10-15

6 are three strokes (apparently not

letters),

[{(]
55

(
Tap.

22.

1.

e7ri8ou(>'at)

.{)€-'
28.

())

0^()
the second
55.

apparently corrected.
iVpijf

29.

added above the

line.

Pap.

To Theon, strategus, from Serenus, freedman of Apollonianus son of Sarapion, of OxyAppended is a copy of the official response received by me from tlie record office. Antoninus also called Pudens, priest and archidicastes, to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, greeting. Let a copy of the petition which has been presented be served as follows. Good-bye. The 19th year of the Aurelii Antoninus and Commodus the lords Augusti, Phaophi 7. Signed by me, Sarapion. I, Hephaesdon also called Sarapion, wrote (on his behalf). To Antoninus also called Pudens, priest, archidicastes and superintendent of the chrematistae and other courts, from Serenus, freedman of Apollonianus son of Sarapion, of Oxyrhynchus. I lent in accordance with a public deed, written in the record office at the said Oxyrhynchus in the past i8th year on the nth of the month Sebastus, to Sarapias daughter of Podon son of Horus, her mother being Thaesis, of Psobthis, the metropolis of the Small Oasis, the capital sum of 900 drachmae of silver with interest at the rate of a drachma on each mina monthly, the capital to be repaid on the 30th of the month Caesareus in the same past i8th year, with the proviso that if she did not repay the money on the appointed day, instead of the capital sum and any interest that was not paid I and my assigns were guaranteed the possession and ownership of her slave Sarapias, then aged about 25 years, with the various conditions contained in the loan and the provisions therein written for my security concerning the flight or death of the slave. The appointed term having elapsed and the repayment not having been made, I request you to give instructions for a letter to be written to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome to present a copy of this petition to Sarapias, if she is still living, and if not, then to her heirs being of age,
'

rhynchus.

485.

PETITIONS

179

and if they are minors, to their lawful guardians, whose names will be ascertained on the spot, in order that they may be informed and may make repayment to me or else that I shall take the proper proceedings to which 1 am entitled for entry upon possession, as is right. The igih year of the Aurelii Antoninus and Commodus the lords Augusti, Phaophi. The strategus ordered that a copy should be served in the proper manner upon Sarapias.' Date. (Signed) I, Sarapias, daughter of Podon, received

may know

'

a copy of this petition.' Date. I, Musaeus also called Pausirion, son of ., am registered as her guardian having been (appointed) by the strategus, and wrote for her as she was
' .
.

illiterate.

in G. U. 578 and 614 the formula used is oJ here it may be noted that in B. G. U. In connexion with is headed indicating the 614 the copy of the petition to the office where it was originally drawn up. In the present case the reply of the to the petitioner seems to have been issued through the same medium. 7. The letter of the archidicastes is in B. G. U. 578 signed, as here, by two persons •whose titles are not given ; cf. B. G. U. 888. 4, where the corresponding signatory is the

8\!

3.

oJ

. !
I,

Syrion, assistant, served the petition

npon Sarapias, as

aforesaid.'

(' ...

:

.

\{)

«
Date.

[](1[,

ayopas.

28.
29.

is the actual copy made in accordance with this request, as is shown by the fact that the docket of the strategus (11. 34-5) is in the same hand as the body of the text, as well as by the frequent abbreviations (cf.
:

! {)
:

SO

doubt

. G. U.

888.

1 8.

the present papyius

especially

(' ' (" ({!)
6(\(',
for
eVi

B. G. U. 888. 21. in 1. 13
33•
f ]/i/3ii8eiaf

[] S\fa S\'Jj][ea\ we (' ^]\• . (((),
1.

i).

31. «VI

is similarly tO be read after should suggest ] . or toC In 1. 8 of the same papyrus (cf. Or G. U. 86. 12, &C.), and in 1. 26
:
.

Etym. M.

34-5-

(' "
p.

:

cf.

B. G. U. lOI. 15—6
fls

334. 35

((\(

G.

.

578•

the

corresponding

'Apai(i'oiVou)

['Hp]aAtXiiSf)u

[].
far as
1.

(8(\
The
is

(8((, \• (, 6 (!)] ^. /() [) (^()
i^eivai

8c

wvi

^
formula
is

(()
and

.

in

Sia

. [
/ii/Se

the

{]!
44-7.

document as
is

perhaps
Kupios

[]
41

present passage is more compressed, probably because a copy of the original; cf note 1. 29. The word after but the reading is very suggests and

(^,

doubtful.

here associated with Sarapias is different from the person who This circumstance acted in that capacity when the loan was contracted ; cf 11. 52 sqq. was assigned explains the statement in 11. 46-7 that the second For the competence of the strategus in the appointment of guardians cf 56. 13-5, and For the Geneva jiapyrus discussed by Erman in Zcitschr. d. Sav. Slift. xv. 241 sqq. some reason whether from death or other cause the original guardian of Sarapias was not available, and a new one therefore became necessary.

The

.

i8o

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
486.
Petitions to the Epistrategus and Praefect.
34-5

X

26-7 cm.

A.D. 131.

This petition to the epistrategus, enclosing a petition to the praefect with Dionysia and Sarapion is concerned with the same subject as 472. had had a dispute concerning the ownership of some land which Dionysia claimed to have bought from Sarapion's father, while Sarapion asserted that she held it only on mortgage, combining his claim with a charge of poisoning against The matter came before the epistrategus Claudius Dionysia's mother, Hermione.
his answer,

Quintianus,

who

referred

it

to the praefect and ordered the rival suitors to

proceed to Alexandria.

Dionysia

complied with his instructions, but not
in vain,

Sarapion
replied

;

and

after waiting

some time

she petitioned the praefect Flavius
(11.

Titianus to give her permission to return

home

18-36).

To

this the praefect

back to the epistrategus, who by this time was Julius Varianus (11. 37-8). Accordingly Dionysia wrote to him re-stating her case, and enclosing her previous petition and the answer to it and reiterated her request for leave to return to Oxyrhynchus and for the case to be decided there. On the verso in a small cursive hand is the rough draft of another petition of Dionysia on the same subject, but too much obliterated for continuous

by

referring her

;

decipherment.

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486.

PETITIONS

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

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Julius Varianus, epistrategus of the Heptanomis and Arsinoite noma, from Dionysia daughter of Chaeremon, her mother being Hermione daughter of Chaeremon, A dispute arose between me inhabitants of the metropolis of the Oxyrhynchite nome. and one Sarapion son of Mnesitheus, who with regard to a vineyard and some corn-land which I bought from his father as long ago as the nth year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord, having paid to his father himself and to a creditor of his the price agreed upon and having received the regular official contract of the sale, declared that I held this land on mortgage. Claudius Quintianus who was then epistrategus heard the case and referred it to his
'

Thereupon I attended at the praefect's court, and when my highness the praefect. opponent paid no attention and failed to appear I presented his highness the praefect with a petition, of which I have appended a copy, narrating in full the state of the affair and he sent me on to you, my lord, to have the case tried. Since my opponent even now is absent and the time for sowing is imminent and the repair of what has been swept away by the river requires my presence, I beg you, if it please you, to permit me to sail
back and have the case decided by you on the spot, that I may obtain redress. Farewell. The copy of the petition which I presented to his highness the praefect is as follows To his highness the praefect Titus Flavius Titianus from Dionysia daughter of A certain Chaeremon, her mother being Hermione, inhabitants of Oxyrhynchus. Sarapion son of Mnesitheus, of the said city, charged my mother Hermione before Claudius Quintianus, late epistrategus of the Heptanomis, with poisoning, and at the same time invented a claim with regard to certain property of which he said he was defrauded, but which I, Dionysia, bought in accordance with official contracts, having paid the price of it to his father when he was alive and to creditors of his said father who held the land in question on mortgage and he asserted that it had been registered in security. The epistrategus referred the whole case to your beneficence, and it happened that my mother died before the trial, while I thereupon in consequence of the letter of the epistrategus ordering me and Sarapion to sail down to Alexandria presented myself here, Since therefore news but Sarapion has paid no attention to the instruction to sail down. has reached me while staying here that all my property has been lost through the excessive rise of the most sacred Nile, both buildings, lands, and dykes, I entreat you, my lord praefect, in the continued absence of my opponent, to permit me to sail back in order that I may obtain justice (there) and that I may not in addition to the loss of my property Farewell. The i6th year of Hadrianus also perish of hunger, that I may obtain redress.
:

;

Caesar, Phaophi 12.

(Endorsed)

If this

is

true, petition the epistrategus, delivering (to

him a copy of

this).'

7.

&^
;

registry office

may

('^ &[

cf. 99. 2. 37-8. These two lines which contain the answer of the praefect to the petition be restored on the analogy of e. g. P. Tebt. I. 43. 44 el

\
487.

487.
i.e.

PETITIONS
drawn up

183
in the presence of officials at the

\

the contract

[,

]:

-^

Petition
12

tjhe Epistrategus.

•5 cm.

A.D. 156.

petition, written in very bad Greek, to the epistrategus from Nicias, wished to be relieved of the duty of acting as guardian to two minors.

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(Is

who

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184
I.
1.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.
.
,

12.

1.

Seofiai Kvpte
.

TrpoaevKaipeiv
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Pap.

from Nicias son of Harpalus, of me guardian of two minors, sons of Dionysius son of Dorion, aged about 25 years, who neither on their father's nor on their mother's side had any other persons who from ties of kinship could undertake Since I am weighed down by my official duties and have the business of guardianship. incurred debts, I request you, my lord, if it please your fortune, to instruct the strategus to compel the scribe of the city to appoint some one else in my place to act as guardian to
his highness
Statilius

Maximus,

epistrategus,

Oxyrhynchus.

The

scribe of the city, Serenus, appointed

the minors,

in order that I

may

be able

to

attend to

the cultivation of

my

property

and be enabled to pay the debts to which I have become liable in connexion with office, and that you may not make me an outcast from my property and home, so
I

my
that

20th year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, the i8th of the month Hadrianus. I, Nicias son of Harpalus, presented this petition.'
obtain
redress.

may

Farewell.

The

I. Statilius Maximus is also addressed in B. G. U. 340, which document was written probably some years later than the 12 th year mentioned in 5, since 487 is dated in the 20th year of Antoninus. that persons aged twenty-five should be still minors is rather remarkable, 5. but cf. 491, where the testator provides that his sons should have a guardian until the age of twenty and should be unable to alienate their inheritance before the age of twenty-five
1.
:

(491. 6, note), and 495. lo. 18-9. The writer has confused two constructions

and

€)

.

.

.

(.

-

(yf I/O/if)

488.

Petition to the Epistrategus.
26-5

X

15-5 cm.

Late second or third century.

petition from a woman whose home was in the Apollonopolite nome and who had bought some land in the Antaeopolite nome. The scribe of the local komogrammateus, the official specially concerned with the land-survey, had entered her purchase in the survey-lists at more than an aroura in excess of the correct amount, and the petitioner appealed to the epistrategus to set matters right. On the verso in a diiTerent hand is a message, probably written in the office of the epistrategus and apparently directed to a local official of the Antaeopolite nome, which calls attention to the petitioner's claim. The petition the beginnings of has been gummed on to another document on each side
;

A

a few lines of the right-hand one are preserved.

488.

PETITIONS

185

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On
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4
4th hand

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3• Second from a. 43.

corr.

from

.

4•

32. First
'

of

; corr.

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Pap.,

corr.

To his highness the epistrategus Julius Julianus, from Senphibis daughter of Thortaeus, with her guardian who is her son Psais the elder, son of Lemos, from the I bought, village of Ibion Nemna of the lower toparchy of the ApoUonopolite nome. my lord, a long time ago from Apollonius and Didymus, both sons of Origenes, of Lycopolis, 5^^ arourae of corn-land in the holding called the Diagraphe in the lands of the But a certain Artemidorus, scribe of the village of Krikis in the Antaeopolite nome. komogrammateus of Krikis, somehow registered me as having more land than I actually possess by one whole aroura and more in each year, and in consequence inflicts much loss upon me. I am therefore compelled, since the man oppresses me and I am in danger of abandoning the (land ?), to take refuge with you, the lord and helper of all, and I beg you, if it please you, to order the strategus of the nome to see that the correct registration is made of my land in accordance with the securities which I possess, and not to let me be falsely registered by the komogrammateus, for last year also he made other false I, Senphibis entries in his register concerning me besides this, that I may obtain relief. daughter of Thortaeus with my guardian Psais the elder, son of Lamos {sic), have presented
this pedtion.

(Deliver) into the hands of

(

)

of the

komogrammateus with making a
.'
. .

She accuses the scribe of the Antaeopolite nome. false entry and requests the correct entry to be

made

,

16. After Trapiypailrev the scribe began to write a word commencing without, however, erasing the initial 1;. but changed it to

17. 22. Neither

37. 43.

The name of an The relation of
;

,\
:

(

,

either

or

cf.

68. 24, P. nor
official

\

Amh.

79. 32, &c.
after ctt xc'ipas.

and spacing. would be expected, but nothing is lost
suits the vestiges

this line to the

preceding
written
'

is

is what looks like o, as if the scribe had but perhaps may be

first

^^: (({){)

".

not

clear.

Above
doubtful

the

The
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8(!

if

no one

objects

should be read.

489.

WILLS

187

{d)

WILLS.
Dionysius.
a.d. 117.

489.

Will of
35-5

X

24-2 cm.

Will of Dionysius son of Harpocration.
wife Diogenis an apartment rent-free in

bequeaths to his a house belonging to him, together with
testator

The

the furniture of the whole house and his slaves. the whole property
is

After the death of Diogenis

his mother's lifetime

to inherit during whatever was not expressly reserved for her, though this The papyrus is dated in the reign of Trajan, and the is not definitely stated. number of the year, which is lost, can be fixed by the occurrence of the title

vested in their son,

who presumably was

Parthicus, which
27,

was assumed by that emperor

in

his 20th

year.

On Aug.

when the papyrus was
;

written, Trajan had, as a matter of fact, been dead

about three weeks.

the fibres of the papyrus

and witnesses were attached to the outside of the preserved cf. P. Tebt. I. 104 introd.
;

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This and the following wills, except 494, are written across The seals of the testator cf. 583, 634, and 646-52.
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Pap. Tap.

24. Final

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«VoiKiOu.

15.

of

/Jayff COrr,

29.

of

The 20th year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Optimus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus Parthicus, the 4th intercalary day, dies Aiigitsliis, of the month Caesareus, at This is the will, made in the the city of Oxyrhynchus in the Thcbaid, for good fortune. street, by me, Dionysius son of Harpocration son of Sarapion, my mother being Esorsois, So long as I survive I am to have of Oxyrhynchus, being sane and in my right mind. power over my own property, to use it and make any arrangements or other disposiBut after my death I concede to my tions concerning it in any manner I choose. wife Diogenis daughter of Ptolemaeus, of the same city, for her lifetime the right to dwell

I

go
use free of rent

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

any one abode which she herself may choose in the stone house and She shall also have belonging to me in the North Quay quarter with exit and entrance. the use for her lifetime of the effects and furniture left by me in the said abode and in the house and the service of and the profits from my female slave Ilarous and her children who are to be fed and clothed by the said Diogenis. After her death all my property shall belong solely to our children, which children shall not have the power to alienate what is inherited by them from me except only to their several families nor shall any one be permitted under any circumstances to proceed against my wife Diogenis concerning any of the provisions of the will, and the person Avho does so shall forfeit a fine of looo drachmae and to the Treasury an equal sum. This will is valid.' There follow (i) the signature of the testator giving a nearly verbal recapitulation of the substance of the will, and written for him by Heracles son of Apion, (2) the signatures of six
in
;

witnesses
(3) the

who add as usual particulars as to their ages, personal descriptions and seals, docket of the record office at Oxyrhynchus, and (4) on the verso the title of

the

will.

I.

(-{)
and
is
it

(^^)

in 481. 22

29, written in the

6th intercalary day
31.

From 634

.

:

it

may be

2nd year of
is

noted that the same day is not called this reign. In 380 (reign of Titus) the
lost before

'-

appears that nothing

/'])>'€.

490.

Will of Tastraton.
Height 16-5 cm.
a.d. 124.

Will of a

woman named

Tastraton,

who bequeaths

her property, consisting

chiefly of a share of a house, to the son of a freedman.

In the event of his

dying childless and
testatrix.

intestate, the

property was to revert to the family of the

The right-hand part of the papyrus is missing, but the amount lost at the ends of lines can be approximately determined, and though the lacunae are The supplement in large they are mostly capable of satisfactory restoration. 1. 16 is practically certain, and on this basis the number of letters lost at the ends of 11. a-7, where the hand is much smaller, is about sixty-five, the tear
down
1

the papyrus being, as far as

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2

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27 letters

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1.

19, in a nearly straight vertical line.

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17.

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2.

of nempws over an erasure.
2 2. (ViSos

9th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Choiach 5, This is the will made in the at the city of Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid, for good fortune. street by me, Tastraton daughter of Psenosiris son of Atreus, my mother being Penuris, of Oxyrhynchus, while sane and in my right mind, with my guardian my cousin . So long as I survive his mother being Taamois daughter of Zoilus, of the same city. I am to have power over my own property, to make any further provisions or new
. .

The

dispositions and to revoke this will. But if I die with this will unaltered I leave on account of his affection towards me to Dionysius son of Panechotes, freedman of Petosiris ... his mother being Ammonous, of the same city, who is now a minor, if he live, and if not to his family, the share belonging to me jointly with my father Psenosiris son of toparchy, of a house and court Atreus and Spokis in the village of Kriethuris in the If Dionysius with entrances and exits, and all else that I leave in any manner whatsoever. happen to die childless and intestate the property devolving upon him from me shall be sent to my nearest relations ; but to no one else do I leave any of my property. This There follow the signatures (i) of the testatrix and her guardian, written will is valid.' for them by a third party, (2) of the usual six witnesses with details of their ages, distinguishing marks, and seals.
.

.

.

.

.

.

3.

5. TTpot 6.

For the supplement at the end of the line [/3, or some other quarter. The supplement is taken from 105. 6.

cf.

492.

4.

491.

WILLS

193

491.

Will of Eudaemon.
22-7

X 39

cm.

A.D. 126.

Will of
three sons.

Eudaemon son

of Thonasuchis bequeathing his property to his

Two

of the sons,

who were

at the date of the will not yet
(of.

20
6),

years old, are placed under tutelage until they attained that age

note on

1.

and are also prohibited from disposing in any way of their inheritance before
reaching 25 years.

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added above the

line,

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corr.

of

' The loth year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, the 5th intercalary day of the month Caesareus, at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid, for good fortune. This is the will made in the street by Eudaemon son of Thonasuchis son of Thonis, his mother being Thaesis, of Oxyrhjnchus, shrine-bearer of the most great goddess

and of Isis and the other gods of the temple at the village Mouchinor, being sane and in his right mind. So long as I survive I am to have power over my own property, to make any further provisions or new dispositions I choose and to revoke this But if I die with this will unaltered I leave my will, and any such provisions shall be valid. sons Thonis and Horus and Eudaemon, all three sons of Ta daughter of Harpafisis also called Horus, each of them, if he lives, and if not, his children, as co-equal heirs of all the buildings, estates and slaves that I may leave, but Thonis alone of all whatever that he chooses on condition that the said Thonis pays any debts which may be proved against me and gives to his brothers Horus and Eudaemon, if they have at the time of my death completed 20 years, one year after my death, and if they are not so old, then to each of them when he has completed the 20 years, 500 drachmae, making for both of them together 1000 drachmae; and it shall not be lawful for the said Horus and Eudaemon nor for any one of tliem to sell, mortgage or otherwise dispose of what will come to them from me until each of tiiem has completed 25 years. And if I die before the said Horus and Eudaemon have completed 20 years, their brother Thonis called Horus son of Thonis shall be and their maternal grandfather Harpaesis also If any of the three sons guardians of each of them until he completes 20 years. happen to die childless his share shall belong to his surviving brothers equally beyond this no one at all shall have power to disobey these provisions and any person so doing
Thofe'ris
. . .
. . .

.

.

.

;

a

J

96

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
and
to

shall forfeit to the party abiding
silver

the Treasury

less

remain

valid.

details of their

by them the damages and a fine of 1000 drachmae of an equal sum, and the foregoing provisions shall none the Signatures of Eudaemon and six witnesses with is valid.' ages, distinguishing marks, and seals, and docket of the record office at
This
will

Oxyrhynchus.

would be expected after (cf. 46. 8-9, &c.), and 2apani[&us might is then no room for and 9. But though Horus and Eudaemon were to enter on 11. 7 possession of their inheritance on reaching 20 years they were not to alienate any part There is, however, a discrepancy here between the of it until 5 years more had elapsed. body of the will and the signature, where it is stated (1. 16) that the brothers were to remain under tutelage till the age of 25. This difficulty might be evaded by supposing that Bt rare refers back to in 1. 14, but that is certainly not the natural
2.

2apafri8us

indeed be read, but there
6.
c'lKoai
eVi)
:

.

cf.

interpretation.

(nevre) should be read throughout. Possibly therefore 20 is the age when the period of tutelage terminated in another case (495. 10), but in 487. 5 we find a guardian being appointed for youths of 25.

([

492.

Will of Thatres.
23•8
38-5 fw.
A.D. 130.

In this will Thatres daughter of
brothers,

Ammonius
is

leaves as her heirs

two

half-

whose

relationship, if any, to herself,
is

not stated.

The

father of one

of the brothers

expressly excluded from a house which formed the principal

item in the property.
1

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Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Mecheir 28, Thebaid, for good fortune. This is the will made in the street by Thatres daughter of Ammonius son of Sarapion, her mother being Tsenthotoumis, from Ision Tryphonis in the lower toparchy, now living at Oxyrhynchus, being sane and in her right mind, with her guardian the son of Thatres' cousin Heraclous daughter of Sarapion son of Sarapion, her mother being Tauseiris also called Sarapous, Horion also called Theon, son of Sarapion son of ... from Ibion Ammonii in the same lower toparchy. So long as I survive I am to have power over my own property, to make any further provisions or new dispositions 1 choose and to revoke this will, and any such provisions shall be valid. But if I die with this will unaltered and no further provisions made I leave on account of their affection towards me Ptollion son of Theon son of Ptollion, his mother being Isareus daughter of Theon, and his brother on the mother's side Theon
14th year of the
in the

'The

Oxyrhynchus

,

493.

WILLS

199

son of Theon son of Tlieon also called Apollonius son of Theon, both of Oxyrhynchus, if not, their children, as joint and equal heirs of the house, court, yard if they live, and and fixtures belonging to me at Oxyrhynchus in the Knight's Camp quarter, and any slaves which I may leave and all other property of any kind whatever; and it shall nowise be lawful for my said heirs to receive into my house aforesaid the father of the second Theon, namely Theon son of Theon also called Apollonius son of Theon, his mother being Helene, for the whole of his life under any pretext, nor for any one else to disobey any of my dispositions, and the person attempting to set aside aught of them
while not disturbing their validity, forfeit a fine of 1000 drachmae and to the and I Treasury an equal sum and none the less (shall these provisions hold good) Signatures of Thatres written for her by her leave none of my property to any one else.' record office. guardian Horion, and of six witnesses in the usual style, and docket of the
shall,
;

3. 9.

The The

mutilated

name

vestiges before
ellipse of

10.

For the

', «^^
is

not

as

would be expected from
cf.

1.

i6.

do not

suit

frt.

due

to the writer's recollection that

20.

The name

after

(\(([!]

504. 32. It may here be partly this same clause had already preceded in the line above. may be . is perhaps all one word; the doubtful

493.

Will of Pasion and Berenice.
1

1•3

X

25-9 cm.

Early second century.

The following will is peculiar in being a joint deed by a husband and wife, who both have property to dispose of. The beginning is lost, but the remaining
clauses suffice to

of the other, with

show that the survivor of the two was constituted the heir power to divide the whole property among the four children
but the wife
is,

of the marriage

;

in

the event of her outliving her husband,
if

expressly authorized to retain the ownership

she chose to do so.

The papyrus

was probably written

in

the reign of Trajan or Hadrian.

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from

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buildings, the survivor of us,

shall have the ownership of the estates and right of domicile in the if he pleases, having the power to sell all or any of the slaves belonging to himself or to the one of us who first dies, and with the purchase money to defray the expenses of the funeral and burial of the body and pay the debts of the deceased, and the survivor of us shall similarly be permitted to devise to the children that have been born to us, Sarapas and Apollonius and Diogenes and the last two being minors, the estates, unsold slaves and other effects belonging to himself or to the one who first dies in such manner as the survivor thinks fit and with any division he chooses, but the wife Berenice if she survives shall if she will have the undisturbed ownership, and no one at all shall be permitted to set aside aught of these provisions or to do anything opposed to them, but the aggression shall be invalid and the person attempting to disobey them in any respect or making aggression upon the survivor of us shall forfeit for each aggression the damages and a fine of 2000 drachmae of silver and to the Treasury an equal sum, the foregoing provisions at the same time remaining valid. This will is valid. The witnesses are Lochus son of Lochus son of Sarapion, Sarapion son of Sarapion son of Pasion, Plution son of Cratinus son of Demetrius, Eudaemon also called Amois, son of Amois son of Sarapion, Apollon son of Diogenes son of Theon, Diophantus son of Diophantus son of Aulius, all six of the said city, in the said street.' Signature of Pasion the testator.
' .

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B. G. U. 183. 24, 326.
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494.

but this

only one of several

possibilities.

494.

Will of

Acu.^il.\us.
A.D. 156.

39 X 23-2 cm,

This long papyrus, which

is

in

an excellent state of preservation, gives
will.
'

a copy of an elaborate and more than usually interesting
Acusilaus, after conferring freedom

The
in

testator,

upon

five

of his slaves,

consequence
is

of their goodwill and affection,' leaves his son Dius heir to his property, subject
to a life-interest reserved for Aristous, the wife of Acusilaus.

The document
;

not the original

will,

but an

official

copy made

at a later date

cf

1.

25, note.

A noticeable
is

palaeographical peculiarity

in this

papyrus

is

the sigma, which

of a square shape, consisting of two horizontal strokes joined by an upright
slight

one with a

inward curve to the

right.

!02

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'Copy. In the 19th year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, the 30lh of the month Germaniceus, at O.xyrhynchus in the Thebaid for good fortune. This is the will made in the street by me, Acusilaus son of Dius son of Dionysius also called Acusilaus and of Dionysia daughter of Theon, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, being sane and in my right mind. So long as I survive I am to have power over my own property, to make any further provisions and alterations I please and to revoke this will, and any such provisions shall be valid. But if I die with this will unchanged, I set free under sanction of Zeus, Earth and Sun, for their goodwill and affection tOAvards me, my slaves Psenamounis also called Ammonius and Hermas and Apollonous also called Demetria and her daughter Diogenis and Diogenis, another female slave of mine. I bequeath to my wife and cousin Aristous also called Apollonarion, daughter of Heraclides son of Dionysius also called Acusilaus and of Herais daughter of Alexandrus, being well-disposed and showing entire faithfulness towards me, all that I may leave in the way of furniture, effects, objects of gold, clothing, ornaments, wheat, pulse, I leave produce, and all my household stock, and my debts, recorded and unrecorded. my son Dius by my aforesaid wife Aristous also called Apollonarion, if he lives, and if not, his children, heir to all the property that I leave and to my other slaves and the offspring but my said wife Aristous that may hereafter be born to the female slaves aforesaid also called Apollonarion shall have during her lifetime, after the taxes are paid, the use of and all the revenues from the whole property, together with the service of and
; ;

494.
profits

WILLS

205

who are to receive their freedom after my death. My said son Dius every month at Oxyrhynchus for his sustenance and other wheat by the measure used for payment and 60 drachmae expenses two artabae of and for clothing 200 drachmae yearly. !My said wife Aristous also called Apollonarion shall have the right to sell and mortgage on her own authority anything she chooses of what I leave to my son Dius in property and slaves and to use for her personal requirements the money accruing from the sale or mortgage. My said wife Aristous also called Apollonarion shall pay all the debts that may be proved against me; and and after her death my son Dius, shall give to my slaves and freedmen for my wife, a feast which they shall celebrate at my tomb on my birthday every year 100 drachmae of silver to be spent. Anything that I append to the official copy of the will, whether cancelling or supplementing or making bequests to other persons or with any other purpose shall also be valid as if contained in the actual will beyond this no one shall have power to disobey it, and anybody who does so shall forfeit to the party abiding by it the damages and a fine of 2 talents of silver and to the Treasury an equal sum, This will is valid. I, Acusilaus the above provisions remaining none the less valid. son of Dius the aforesaid, have made this will, the whole of which with all the above I am 48 years of age and have a scar on my right foot, provisions is in my own writing. and my seal is an image of Thonis. I, Didymus son of Onnophris also called Chaeremon Oxyrhynchus, one of the witnesses to the above will, recognized my son of Herodes, of own seal which is a figure of Hermes and sealed with the said seal.' There follow similar
from
tliose

of them

wife shall supply to

my

.

.

.

;

signatures of three other witnesses,

whose

seals represented respectively Sarapis, Apollo,

and Heracles.

5-6.

:

cf.

48.

6,

4.

8

;

another instance of the manumission of

a slave by

will is B.

G. U. 326.

could not be read as xp[f\oi, even if this were otherwise 21. The word after suitable. xt^'p^U would be possible, though not very satisfactory. TO are mentioned in 34. ii. 6, where the keeper of the 25. ' Nanaeum is ordered not to give them without authorization from the Library of

(:

^

(

17.

'

Hadrian

:

[(

€\\^\

«. . . There the appear tO be copies of the deeds deposited in the archives; and in the present passage (cf also 495. 15) the word has the same meaning, as is indicated by the contrast drawn between and the actual It is indeed most probable that this papyrus was the for it is stated to be a copy and yet is signed by witnesses, who state itself an that they had recognized the seals which they had affixed to the original document. must then suppose that testators were permitted to use such official copies of their wills
ti

'

(\\ ^

]€

(

official

^ ( .\(
We
;

(^,

;.

purpose of adding codicils without being put to the trouble of withdrawing and This however was of course sometimes done ; cf. 106-7, cancelling the original deeds. which refer to the absolute revocation of wills. fV The iV TTj or »; would be expected but was certainly not written. 27. phrase recurs in 495. 16, but in a mutilated form. cf. Hdt. i. 1 14-5. /ios: the mythical guard of the Canopic branch of the Nile 31. Probably in 634 refers to him. which is this is an early example of the form 38. 473. 2 is in fact the only other not found in common use before the third century. instance in this volume.
for the

^

.

:

2o6
44.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\(,

if correct,

presumably
; '

refers to the publication of the contents of the

will after the testator's

death

copy was made.

Perhaps

]€,
495.

but the note

may merely

record the date at which the present

deposited,' should be read.

Will cf

Petosorapis.
A.D. 181-9.

9*7X34^'"•

This
a
its

will

is

much

mutilated, but possesses an interest as a specimen from

somewhat

later period

than that to which the preceding group belongs

;

and

general tenour remains fairly clear. The testator Petosorapis leaves as his and appoints his sister heir in the first instance his son Epinicus, a minor
;

Apollonous to administer the estate, and take charge of Epinicus until he reached It may be inferred that the mother of the boy was the age of 20 years. certain part of the property either dead or had separated from her husband. is appropriated to Apollonous herself, who was to pay the testator's debts and the stipulation is made that she should not be asked to render an account

A

;

of her trusteeship.

A
]

minor legacy was apparently made

to a

nephew of

Petosorapis.
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2o8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

ie)

CONTRACTS.
Marriage Contract.
21
X

496.

75-5 cm.

A.D. 127•

A contract of marriage between Sarapion son of Eudaemon and Thais daughter of Sarapion, written on the recto of 34, the important edict of Flavius The ends of the lines, which are of extreme Titianus concerning archives. length, are lost throughout the papyrus, which has also suffered considerably
from decay and discolouration but the lacunae can almost always be restored by the aid of 265, 497, and the Fayum contracts at Vienna and Berlin, and the The result is a practically complete specimen of an sense is seldom in doubt. Oxyrhynchus marriage contract of this period the provisions have a general
; ;

resemblance to those of documents of the same class from the Fayum, but there
are

marked

differences of formula.

The

chief clauses are:

(i) specification

of {a) the

dowry

of Thais, comprising various articles of jewelry and dress

and

1800 drachmae provided by her father, and a female slave presented by her grandmother (11. 2-6), [b) the property brought into the common stock by
Sarapion
(11.

7-8)

;

(2) conditions of divorce
(11.

of the decease of either party

10-16).

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Cf. also

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496.

CONTRACTS

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15.
1.

year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Pharmouthi 24, in the Thebaid, for good fortune, on the day of Julia Augusta, in the Sarapion son of Sarapion son of Sarapion son of Sarapion, his mother being Thais daughter of Sarapion, of Oxyrhynchus, has given in marriage his daughter Thais whose mother is ... to Sarapion son of Eudaemon son of Theon, his mother being Heras daughter of and Didous, who has received from Sarapion, the father and giver of the bride, a pair of weighing 3 minae 14^ quarters, a brooch of 8 quarters, a ... of 6 quarters, a chain with 3 green ... of stone, the gold weighing [.]^ quarters, making altogether on the standard of Oxyrhynchus 5 minae . quarters, also 2 dresses, 2 girdles, one red the other rose-coloured, a . and a mantle, together worth 560 silver
at

The nth

Oxyrhynchus

street.

.

.

.

.

.

496.
drachmae, and i860
silver

CONTRACTS
total

211

drachmae, the

of silver of the Imperial coinage. of Sarapion and Heraclous, of the same city, with her guardian who is another son of hers and the full brother of the giver of the bride, Sarapion son of Sarapion, acknowledges in the same street that she has given away Thais in marriage, and she confers upon the said Thais (the possession of the slave) Callityche and her future offspring, the services of and the profits from her to be shared by the husband with the bride so long as they live together ; and it shall not be lawful for the husband to the slave without his wife's consent nor anything that is brought to him by his wife, nor to sell or mortgage or otherwise dispose of his property namely a house, yard and court and its fixtures and his slaves Sarapous and Nicarous and the children of Nicarous, Sarapous and Cerdon and Epicharmus, and the future offspring of them or others, or any additional property which he may acquire, without the consent of the bride. Let both live blamelessly together, and the husband shall supply the bride with necessaries in proportion to his means ; but if any difference arises between them and the bride wishes to separate from her husband, as soon as the separation takes place the bride shall withdraw the slave Callityche and the children that may be born to her, and the husband shall repay to the giver of the bride if he sur\'ives, and if not, to the bride herself, the 4 100 drachmae of the dowry within days from the day on which they are demanded or forfeit this amount increased by one half , And if the bride is at the time of separation in a state of pregnancy the husband shall give her on account of the birth 60 drachmae more. When they come together may they enjoy health ; but if either husband or wife should chance to die, the husband shall have power over his own property to make any further provisions he pleases and to divide but if he makes no further provisions the property shall after it among whom he will . his death belong to their children. If the husband dies first the bride shall have and she or her nearest relation on the one part and whoever shall be appointed by the husband on the other part shall together be guardians, the children being brought up with their mother until they come of age. If the husband appoints no guardian for the one part of the guardianship the bride or her nearest of kin shall act alone, and no one shall be permitted to deprive her of the guardianship nor any part of it. If the bride dies first without their having any children or when those that have been born have died childless, the 4100 drachmae of silver in 60 days the husband shall repay the dowry namely . and shall send to the said relations of the bride all the rest of her property. Similarly husband dies first without their having any children or when those that have been if the and withdraw the slave Callityche and the born have died childless, the bride shall children that may be born to her, and until she has recovered them she shall have control over the whole property, and with regard to all the provisions the choice shall rest with
. . . . . . .
;

value of the whole dowry being 4100 drachmae Besides this the grandmother of the bride, Thais daughter

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

the bride to have either if she prefers the aforesaid gold ornaments included in the dowry at the same weight or their equivalent value, and the bride and her agents shall have the right of execution upon both the husband and upon all his property in accordance with
their

scribe,

agreement with each other. The certifier of both parties of the same city, in the same street.'

is

Diogenes son of Hierax,

I.

[
loc.

note

ad
3.

]

,[(]{

:

cf.

604 and 284.

2 1

.[\(
. .

if

^(^,

3.\\

Apparently not
:

[5][^8/,
jfKapovi
4-

The

fiiyos. The mutilated word after «^]< is possibly but the vestiges do not suggest this. fie ffiiyor . .Vour cf. C. P. R. 24. 5—6 ;([. whole dowry of Thais came to 4100 drachmae (II. 9 and 14), of which 560

».

2

212
are accounted for
for

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
by the articles of dress and 1800 were paid by the value of the jewelry. Since a
in

money, leaving 1680 to contained 16 {9. verso 16), the items in 1. 3 make 4 in the 13 + the number of of gold is converted into 288 silver drachmae in C. P. R. 12, and A at the same rate 1680 drachmae would represent 5^ If the figure lost in 1. 3 before was (no higher figure is possible), the total weight of the jewelry was The difference is due to variation either in the rate of exchange or in the
be accounted

8.
5^
weights.
6.

] .
7.

«

.
491.
;

(Se) 8ov\eiav

:

in the translation

we have supposed

that the genitives
a)

.
...
9.

depend on a word like Kvpdav word on which they depend (cf 489.
in the lacuna before
:

lost at
8), in

husband by the

([(
12.

bride, e.g. in

(6
in
1.

the end of 1.• 5, but which case a relative {as or

»

\\](
the

may be

must be supplied

6.
is

the

a

first

word commonly used of property brought to the century fragment of a marriage-contract
g.
8.

For the supplement at the end of the line cf. e. For the supplement at the end cf 497. 16. 10. Some such word as is required before

13.

sc. for the recovery of the dowry; cf. 497. 18. 15. Cf for the supplement C. P. R. 22. 23, 27. 19. 16. cf a Vienna papyms cited by Hartel, Gr. Pap. Erz, Raitter, p. 66 iv Tjj and G. U. 58 1. 13 (3• deed of surety) Aovklos Aoyyos The 3. person was a witness of his or her identity.

-

: :
[

cf.

497.

1 1.

...
:

:

cf.
1.

265. 29.

cf

15.

Or

\(

may

be read; cf C. P. R. 27. 18.

-'^

.

^,

.

.

.

€.

497.

Marriage-Contract.
II-5X 14-1 cm.
Early second century.

Contract of marriage between
lines across the fibres of the papyrus,

Theon and Ammonous,
probably

written in very long

in the reign of

Trajan or Hadrian,

Though a mere fragment
lines

of the whole contract, the sense and construction

are intelligible throughout, for the missing portions at the beginnings of the

can be largely restored from the other Oxyrhynchus marriage-contracts

of this period (265 and 496), and the Ptolemaic marriage- contracts from the Fayum (P. Tebt. 104 and Arckiv, I. p. 484). At the end are the signatures of
the bridegroom and the bride's father, and of a third person

been concerned
parties
is

in receiving the

who seems to have dowry, but whose relation to the contracting

obscure.

][ \( ( ^
497.

CONTRACTS

213

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. .

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214
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OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
avrfjs Se

18

19

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,
.


.

eav

(2nd hand)

]

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(4th hand)

23
24 [tols

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the verso
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hand)

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7—8. After

20.
2 2.

/:)-€[]
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'AXOatfuf.

{) {) . }
23. !

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the papyrus probably proceeded
:

[

spelled

477. ^—S, note. in 261. 6 where the deme name
cf.

!

.

.

is A^veior.

498.

Contract with Stone-Cutters.
17-8

X

8-7 cm.

Second century.

by which two stone-cutters agree to supply the stone required house at Oxyrhynchus at different prices according to the size and nature of the stones. Food was to be provided for them while they were engaged upon the work, and wages were guaranteed to them if their services were required by the builders, but the ornamentation of the stone is excluded from their duties. The stone was to be brought from the northern quarry,' which is still a noticeable feature a little way to the north of the site on the edge
contract
for building a
'

A

of the desert.
stone-cutting.

The papyrus

supplies several

new

technical terms connected with

5

. ?'' . '
498.

CONTRACTS

215

Tavpios

'

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?

15

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35

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

40

45

] [(] [ €] ]5
eva

^
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<^]

Tis

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Sk Sevrepas

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[

]][9]

eripois

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19 letters

]

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2

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et'y

[
€[.
26.

.

[

67])(77.
26 letters

e.Tov[i

.
Pap.

.

2.

of

COrr.

from

.

Copy. To Antonia Asclepias also called Cyria, through her guardian Apollonius, from Asclas son of Alexandrus and Apollonius son of Amois, his mother being Tauris, both of Oxyrhynchus. We undertake to cut the squared building-stones transportable by camel (?) from the northern quarry required for the house of you, Antonia, in the quarter of Pammenes' Garden, the rate of wages for the stone-cutting being for the outer squared camel stones at 4 drachmae for 16, for the inner ones at 4 drachmae for 30, at 3 drachmae for 100 squared camel stones, and for oblong corner-stones at 8 drachmae for 16 outer squared camel stones and at 8 drachmae for 30 inner squared camel stones, and for chipped squared camel stones at 4 drachmae for 50 and for chipped oblong squared camel corner-stones at 8 drachmae for 50. All the aforesaid Each of us shall stones we will cut, but no ornamentation shall be required of us. If the builders have need receive for each day that he works both a loaf and relish. services in stone-cutting, we or one of us will provide them, each of us receiving of our as wages for each day's services 4 drachmae, and likewise each of us on each day a loaf and relish. Until the 22nd of the present month Epeiph you have the right to transfer to others this contract for cutting the aforesaid squared camel stones from the northern
'

quarry

.

.

The point of it seems to be that the stones were 8. the adjective is new. not to be too heavy for a camel to transport them. 16. these stones being the cheapest were presumably the smallest, and may have been used for inserting in vacant spaces between the larger ones.
: :

[
.'

23.

('((\

:

much

apparently corresponding to dearer than the

,
the stones
11.

499.
under

CONTRACTS
this

217

heading are divided into two The 12—5, and 11. 26-8 to 11. 18-23. but cheaper than the others.

:\(

classes,

11.

24-5
were

499.

Lease of Land.
305 X
6-5 cm.

Lease of 10^ arourae of land at the village of Senepta for one year, at the The crop, which in the preceding year had rent of 36 drachmae per aroura. been corn, was to be grass, of which part was to be employed for grazing, part was to be cut for hay. Other leases in the present volume are 500-2, 590, 593,
639, and 640.

"

5

farbs


15

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Se.

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ray

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45

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
On
the verso

'\\{)

{() h
5.
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}.

.

f

of

(
I.

COrr.

from

a.

Tryphon son of Aristandrus and Sarapion son of Herodes, inhabitants of Oxyrhynchus, have leased to ApoUonius son of Horus, of the village of Senepta, Persian of the Epigone, for the present 6th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord from their property at the said village in the holding of Dion the loi arourae upon which corn has been grown, of which the adjacent areas are on the east the land of Didymus, on the south that of the aforesaid lessors, on the north the same, on the west the land of Seuthes son of Potamon, which land is to be cultivated with grass for cutting and grazing at a rent for each aroura, without a survey being made, of 36 drachmae of silver, guaranteed against all risks, the taxes upon the land being paid by the lessor, who shall be the owner of the crop until
'

he recovers the rent. If this lease is guaranteed, the lessee shall pay the rent in the month Pauni of the said year and shall forfeit any arrears increased by one half, and the lessor shall have the right of execution upon the said ApoUonius and upon all his property Date and signature of Sarapion. as if in accordance with a legal decision.'
10.
1

15. introd.

if it

the point of this clause IS that lo^ arourae were 17. accepted as the accurate amount of the land, and there was to be no fresh survey which, brought out a different figure, might affect the rent to be paid.
:

8( ((!

(^
:

cf.

Wilcken, Archiv,

p. 158, P.

Amh.

91. 22, note, and P. Tebt.

500.

Lease of Domain Land.
26x9'7
cm.
A.D. 130.

An application addressed to
of persons
ofifering

the strategus of the Athribite

who wished

to lease jointly, for one year probably,

noma by a number some domain land,
Cf. 279, a similar

a higher rent than that paid by the former lessees.
I.

application addressed to the basilico-grammateus, C. P. R.
640, and P. Brit. Mus. 350.

32, 239, B. G.

U.

The papyrus
at the top

has been
13.

gummed on

to a series

of documents, and

is

numbered

and hand

[]" [7]
[(]()
[••••]

5

€[

'[ ([ ] [
.

.je-

]

[]['

500.
•]7[

CONTRACTS
]?«^[
lines.

.

219

[•

Vestiges of three
10

[12

letters

]ov[

a[. Cj)vSai<a[v\
.

{apovpas)
15

{) []([^) () () {\) () [/ () ()
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te

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\\

(eroir)

25

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hand

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30

35

[ [
[/if
4•
1.

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6]
20 letters
14•

( €[\] ( [
wepi
/cat]
]
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! -^ ?
€.

^ ] (
27.
1.
. .

32•
1•

[]5.

(
.

Pap.

((.
.

"^.

Hierax, strategus of the Athribite nome, from Horus son of Psenobasthis and Nekpheros son of Thaisous and (We wish to lease) 20-J arourae and the rest of public land near Tetaphou at 2 artabae of wheat for each aroura, and for the addition upon the whole land 5 artabae of wheat, and near Psenarsifesis in the eastern part of the Thostian district i aroura of public land at 3 artabae of wheat, which rent we will
'
. .

220

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

measure upon our mutual security into the public granary from the new crop of the said 15th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord. The 15th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Phaophi 5. We, Horus son of Psenomoithas and Nekpheros son of Thaisous, of the village of Sinekthoieku in the eastern part of the Thostian district, have leased the aforesaid 20^ arourae of public land near Tetaphou at 2 artabae of wheat and for the addition upon the whole land 5 artabae of wheat, and near Psenarsiesis I aroura likewise of public land at 3 artabae of wheat, and we will measure ..."

expressing a particular class of Jews. There is room for one or two more letters in the lacuna before but the writer frequently leaves spaces between words. In 1. 12 the termination of suggests a place-name. yiji in Ost. I. p. 646 Wilcken adopts the explanation of 'public land' 13. proposed by Viereck (Hermes, xxx. p. 119) that it means land belonging to the commune (' Gemeindeland) as opposed to 'domain land'; but in Archiv, I. p. 157 he speaks of P. Brit. Mus. 335, which is an application for a sub-lease of yrj, as if that papyrus referred to yrj were the same as Domanialland,' i. e. as if There is, we think, no doubt that the first theory is incorrect. The use of in papyri in connexion with Xoyor, and where it corresponds in the first case to Or in the other two to (cf. Osi. I. p. 645) and renders such a contrast between and as is required by Viereck's theory very improbable. When we hear of land belonging to a Gemeinde,' as e. g. in P. Gen. 16, C. P. R. 39 and but land These instances or 41, it is never called all belong to the third or fourth century, and it is not at all likely that there were enough Gemeinden ' previously to account for the frequent mention of before the reign of Septimius Severus. It is far more probable that in the phrase has the same meaning as in the phrase (cf. P. Brit. Mus. 256 (e) 1-2 eh Upav and, that included without however superseding the older term in the manner in which the Roman Superseded the of the Ptolemies. The evidence on which attempts have been made to draw a real distinction between and is extremely slender. In B. G. U. 560. 21 and are coupled together, but there in the sense of the Crown lands of the Ptolemaic kings makes a better contrast with estates acquired by the Emperors from private persons than in the sense of ' Gemeindeland ; and it is quite uncertain that the mentioned two lines later is intended to be distinguished from the previously mentioned G. U. 188. if is right (which 23, where the editors read extremely doubtful ; is sc. for the is preferable), would rather tend to show that coincided with than that it was something different. In B. G. U. 285 where arourae are distinguished from arourae it is not certain that land at the same village is meant, nor is it at all clear that is there feminine, as would seem to be the view of the maker of the index to B. G. U. Under these circumstances we abandon the view expressed in P. Fay. Towns 88 introd., since there is no reason for departing from the natural meaning of at this period or for regarding as anything but a general term for land belonging to the State, i. e. the imperial domains ^
n[.

][/ seems

1

1-2.

The

genitives in these lines probably refer to the previous lessees
to be the termination of a

;

of.

279.

8.

compound word

([\>,

'\.&(.)

-

:

! !,:, , ( ^ \^ ( ) ^
'

6
'

.

8 !. ,

'

,

\

?)

'

. {) ^) {), () {), ,
7
zti

.

{), ;°<"

'

comes

Cf. also the recent discussion of in Festschr. to the same conclusion as that expressed here.

0. Hirschfeld, p. 140, by P. Meyer,

who

501.
14.

CONTRACTS
Amh.
85. 21

221
and

({0](
:

:

for this

word

in the sense of 'higher bid' cf. P.

Wenger, Archiv,

II. p.

both here and in 1. 27 is somewhat different from the 1 6. form of that letter employed elsewhere in the papyrus. In the present passage but in 1. 27 neither of these forms is could equally well be read, or possibly
possible.

61. the supposed

,
is

'

or

-.

26.

The

termination of the village-name

very cursively written, and might be

-

501.

Lease of Land,
29-6

X

7-2 cm.

A. D.

187.

A

brief description

of this lease of a half share of five arourae in the

Oxyrhynchite nome from Heraclides and Sarapion, acting through their guardian but since the formula presents Hermes, to Harmiusis was given in Part I. some novel features both with regard to arrears of rent from the preceding lease and the use of the word (cf. 516-8), we give the text here in full. The papyrus is in the Bodleian Library, MS. Gr. class, c. 47 (P).
;

^
6

5

$
Toy

10

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

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lines lost.

,

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and hand
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from from pi.

.

1

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line.

'

502.
'

CONTRACTS

223

Heraclides also called Diogenes and Sarapion also called Diogenes, both sons of Diogenes and ex-gymnasiarchs of Oxyrhynchus, and however they are styled, through their guardian Hermes, have leased to Harmiusis son of Heras and Taphibis, from Tischinakitoou, for four years dating from the present 27th year out of their property at Taampemou in the holding of Philonicus and Charas a half share of five arourae and the vacant spaces, owned by them in common with Demetria daughter of Antimachus with respect to the other half, to be sown and cultivated in each year the half with wheat and the other half with green stuffs, at the fixed rent for the said half share in each year of the four years' period of 8 artabae of wheat on deposit and 40 drachmae. And the lessee acknowledges that he owes to the landlords arrears upon the said land for the past year 3 artabae of wheat, which he will pay as a deposit in the present year together
with the deposit of the rent, guaranteed completely against all risks. If in the succeeding years any of the land becomes unirrigated, an allowance shall be made to the lessee, the landlords being responsible for the annual taxes upon the land and retaining the ownership of the produce until they have recovered their yearly dues
i.e. and «paKos chiefly; cf. P. Tebt. I. pp. 563-4. i.e. the corn was to be deposited in the State granary to the credit of 516. introd. 34-41. Cf. the parallel passage in 101. 26-34, which is somewhat more detailed. The meaning is that the lessees actually paid the to the State, but a corresponding deduction was made from the rent. ui/[ in 1. 37 is perhaps in which case is a mistake for 'Mois. (cf. 101. 31) cannot be read.

16.

18. fV
;

: •.
cf.

.

.

.

the lessor

[»(

{\,

«

502.

Lease of a House.
25-5 X 6-7 cm.
A. D.

164.

at a rent of 9.C0

its appurtenances at Oxyrhynchus for eighteen months drachmae per annum, the tenant being bound to deliver up the buildings in good repair at the end of the lease, and the landlord being responsible for the police-tax and brick-tax (cf. 1. 43, note).

Lease of a house and

(
5

'
'

^

^

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JJroXepa

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86 &

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224
viavTov €va
10

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

kv

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42.
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corr.

Pap.; so in

from . 1. 41, and

1.

45

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Pap. 22-3. at

13.
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with

37.

'Dionysia daughter of Chaeremon with her guardian her son Apion also called Dionysius son of Diogenes, priest of Faustina Augusta, both of O.xyrhynchus, has leased to Ptolema daughter of Theon, of Antinoe, through lulas son of Didymus, by adoption son of Demetrius also called Apollonius, of Oxyrhynchus, for one year and six months dating from the ist of the current month Phamenoth of the present 4 th year of the lords and Emperors Antoninus and Verus the house which she owns, and which previously belonged to her second cousin Chaeremon, of Antinoe", at Oxyrhynchus in the Temgenouthis quarter, with the court and two yards in one of which is a well, and the portico which adjoins the house and the other fixtures and the entrance and exit, at a rent for the If the lease is guaranteed the lessee premises leased of 200 silver drachmae a year. shall pay the lessor at the conclusion of each period of six months the proportionate amount of the rent, 100 drachmae, and shall together with her assigns have the use of the premises leased to her as aforesaid for the appointed time without hindrance, and thereafter shall deliver them up free from filth and with the doors and keys received by her of all the premises, and the reel of the aforesaid well provided with a new rope, and the two existing

503.

CONTRACTS

225

stone presses with the water-pitchers and trough, or shall forfeit the value of anything which she fails to deliver and any arrears of rent increased by one half, and the lessor shall have the right of execution upon the lessee and upon ail her property, the lessor being

and brick-making tax. This lease is valid. The 4th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus and the Emperor Caesar Lucius Aurelius Verus Augustus, Phamenoth 5. I, Apion also called Dionysius, have been
liable for the police-tax

my mother's guardian, and have leased together with the above-mentioned premises the chambers in the court. The same date.'
registered as
37. ihpiav written.

Km

:

the genitives

depend loosely upon

the form for the police-tax is also found 43. written out in P. Cairo 10429 (Goodspeed, l/in'v. of Chicago Decennial Publicalions, V. No. 10), where it is coupled with (cf 574) is clearly also a tax, and probably the payments some Theban ostraca of the second century ) in

(Wilcken, Ost. I. p. 280) are to be identified with it. It was very likely a payment in lieu of providing so many bricks to the government and may well be a variant lor the tax, on which see P. Tebt. I. p. 337. The fact that in one of the ostraca the tax is calculated upon the aroura would be in keeping with such a view. In the Fayfim the manufacture of bricks seems to have been a government monopoly cf. P. Fay. Towns 36. introd.

-. {

:

^
the
first,

,

as

if

(

had been

((
An

;

503.

Division of Property.
9-5

X

24 cm,

A. D.

118.

agreement

for

the division of a house and court at the village

of

Kerkethuris between four persons, of
received f of the property, his

the paternal aunt of the three,

to the several parts, apparently on the east side of the court.

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Epimachus son of Harsiesis, two cousins Epimachus and Petosiris each |, and Sepsarion, \. A free space was to be left as an

whom

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504.

CONTRACTS

227

504.

Sale of Catoecic Land.
33-2

X

13-5 cm.

Early second century

a. d.

Contract for the sale of 6| arourae of catoecic land in the Oxyrhynchite for 1000 drachmae, the seller being Aphroditous, a freedwoman, acting with her husband Adrastus as and the buyer being Flavius Apion. The

nome

adoptive mother of the
differs

,

seller,

Thaisous,

of ownership over the land, appends her consent.

who seems to have had some rights The formula of the papyrus
6).

from the Arsinoite and is dated in the third year of an emperor who was probably Trajan or Hadrian, and is written in a small cursive hand with several mistakes of spelling and grammar. Cf. 633.
in similar contracts
I.
i

somewhat from that found

Heracleopolite nomes (e.g. C. P. R.

and

The

contract

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CONTRACTS

229

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The 3rd year of the Emperor Caesar ... at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid. Aphroditous also called Demarous, freedwoman of Epicrates son of Epicrates son of Heraclides, of Oxyrhynchus, by adoption daughter of Epicrates and of his wife Thaisous also called Thaesis daughter of Heraclides, with her guardian her husband Adrastus son of and Eudaemonis, of Philonicus in the nome, agrees with Flavius Apion however he is styled, in the street, that she has ceded to him ... the 6| arourae of catoecic land which
'
.

.

.

.

.

.

near Psobthis in the eastern toparchy in the additional holding of Ptoleof which land the adjacent areas are slated in the documents dealing with the previous ownerships, and that she delivers to FLivius Apion, his children, and assigns the 6§ arourae which are ceded, together with the other ., by a valid deed for ever in accordance with the returns and orders concerning ihom, in lieu of the sum received by Ajihrodiious herself from Flavius Apion for the cession, namely 1000 drachmae of Imperial silver coin, in full, and that the contracting party Ai)hroditous also called Demarous will not violate this contract or any part of it under any circumstances, but will deliver all the 6| arourae ceded to Flavius Apion and to his assigns for from all public imposts and all other taxes from all time with every guarantee free previous limes up to the 5th intercalary day of the month Cacsareus of the past 2nd year including the 2nd year, because the produce of the present year belongs to Flavius Apion who shall be responsible for the public imposts from Thoth of the present year. If the contracting party violates any of these provisions, her action shall be invalid and she shall in addition forfeit to Flavius Apion or his assigns for each aggression both the

belong

to her

maeus son of Theodotus son of ...

,

.

.

230
amount of

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

the damage and a fine of 1000 drachmae of silver and to the State the like sum, and nevertheless the contract shall be valid. The aforesaid adoptive mother of Aphroditous also called Demarous, Thaisous also called Thaesis daughter of Heraclides son of 013'mpus, her mother being Heraclea, of the metropolis of the Heracleopolite nome, with her guardian Heraclides son of Epicrates brother on the mother's side of her above-mentioned and deceased husband and father of Aphroditous also called Demarous, Epicrates also called Apion, gives her consent to all the aforesaid provisions and conceded the land upon these terms. This agreement is valid.' Signatures of Aphroditous written by her guardian Adrastus, and of Thaisous written by her guardian Heraclides, and a list of the persons concerned in the contract with their ages and distinguishing marks.
7.
:

name was found by
after

a funerary inscription concerning an inhabitant of a village bearing this should very likely be restored us at Hibeh in 1902.
the termination of

[.
9•

(
I.

may be
at
this

C. P. R.
12.

is

.
obscure,
13.

\((^(\ \{]€ •^ []!
I.

period

cf.

482. 18, note.

II

:

the technical

in cannot be read after cf. C. P. R. I. 1 8 7. 6
:

ytiTvias

in some form suggests itself, in which case word but But though the construction of 11. 13-6 is difficult (ras refers must under any circumstances be read in 1. 15), it is probable that to Aphroditous, meaning having delivered and that U7rap[ is a mistake for cf. 492. for the omission of 32. 57• The abbreviated word which follows the age in each case (cf 633) is very The last letter is certainly t not p. cursively written, and might be read tmyi or anoyi.
.
. :

[.

refers to the land.

^ ,
1.

meaning of
44.

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The
ds

^
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referring to Flavius Apion.
11.

sense of

[

For 9-10 corresponds to
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this variant

for the usual

and 4• where the editor wrOngly reads

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505.

Sale of a Courtyard.
II X 47 cm.

Second century.

Contract for the sale of 50 square cubits or ^^q aroura (nearly 14 square metres) of a court attached to a house at Oxyrhynchus from Ophelas, acting as the representative of Artemidorus, to Eudaemonis, the price being 500 drachmae
of
silver.

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505.
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CONTRACTS

231
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Pap.

Ophelas also called Besas son of Sarapas and ApoUonous, of O.xyrhyndius, appointed as a representative by Artemidorus son of Anienneus son of Artcnias, his motiier being Thakoris daughter of Amenneus, also of Oxyrhynchus, by the terms of a deed of representation drawn up through the registry-office at Oxyrhynchus in tiic present month,

'

232

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

of which a copy is appended, to Eudaemonis also called Plutarche stated as the daughter of Sinthonis daughter of Pelcusis, and her mother Sinthonis daughter of Pekusis and Teenkegous, both of Tanais, jointly, each with her guardian, in the case of Eudaemonis also called Plutarche, Ammonius also called Dionysius son of Ammonius and Harasis, of Oxyrhynchus, and in that of Sinthonis, her full brother Pachnubis, greeting. I acknowledge that I have sold to you of the paternal house and yard and adjoining court which belong to the aforesaid Artemidorus, whom I represent, at the said city in the quarter of Pammenes' Garden, of the said court in the eastern portion of it 50 square cubits extending from north to south as far as the end of the whole court and from east to west as far as the said 50 square cubits reach. The adjacent areas of the portion of the court sold to you by me, by survey 50 cubits, are, on the south the land of Diogenes and others, on the north that of Sarapion stated as the son of Thaisous, on the east that of Lucius Herennius Crispus and others, on the west the remaining walls of the said court. The sum mutually agreed upon between us as the price of the said land sold to you by me, by survey 50 square cubits, namely 500 drachmae of Imperial silver coin, I have received on the spot from you from hand to hand in full
.
. .

506.

Loan of Money on Security.
{a) 16

X

17-7

C7n.,

{b) 10-7

14-2 cm.

a. d.

143.

Contract for the loan of 1000 drachinae for two years and nine months at 6 per cent, per annum, from Sarapion to two sisters called Thatres and Teteorion, and their mother Demas, upon a mortgage of i|| arourae of land

The document being a copy of the original deed the For other examples of loans upon security cf. 507, P. Brit. Mus. 311, and the Florence papyrus cited on p. 172, The papyrus is in two pieces of which the exact relation to each other is uncertain, besides a small
belonging to the
sisters.

signatures are omitted.

detached scrap.

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Pap. 46. First 45, vvfpiriaovTos Pap. 56. after Kvpia above the line.
.

,

506.

CONTRACTS

235

'Copy. The 7th year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aehus Hadrianus Anioninus Sarapion Augustus Pius, the of the month Hadrianus, at O.xyrhynchus in the Thebaid. son of Herodes son of Exacon, of O.xyrhynchus, his mother being Caecilia Polla, has lent to Thatres and Teteorion, both daughters of Apollonius son of ... and to their mother Demas daughter of Apollonius son of Panechotes, her mother being Philotera, all three Persians from the village of Pela, each with her guardian, of Thatres her husband Peteuris son of Ammonas son of Sagathes, his mother being Panechotis, of Oxyrhynchus, of Teteorion her maternal uncle Panechotes son of Apollonius and Philotera, of the aforesaid Pela, and of Demas her paternal uncle Hatres son of Panechotes son of Apollonius, of the said Pela, in the street, a sum of 1000 drachmae of Imperial silver coin, to which nothing has been added, at the interest of 3 obols for each mina per month dating from the present month Hadrianus. The borrowers shall pay to the lender the interest at the conclusion of each twelvemonth, the lender having security for everything for which they do not produce his written receipt, and the principal on the 30th of the month Caesareus of the 9th year of Antoninus Caesar the lord together with the interest for the remaining 9 months without any delay. If they fail, Thatres and Teteorion concede that the borrower and his assigns in place of the principal and of all interest which he may not receive shall from the time when the payment falls due have the possession and ownership for ever out of the land owned by them in equal shares near the said Pela in the cavalry-soldier's holding of Diodes and Ptolemaeus, Persian, namely the third part of what was previously a vineyard but is now dry vine-land, in the most northerly portion of the said third part iff arourae with all their contents, of which the adjacent areas are, on the south the land and Thatres the aforesaid, daughter of Apollonius, on the north of Stephanas and (the borrowers) and the land of Stephanus, on the west on the east a canal are compelled to deliver this land to the lender or his assigns guaranteed for all time against all risks with every guarantee and free from obligation to cultivate Crown land or Imperial estates and from all kinds of imposts and all Slate requisitions and taxes dating from previous times up to the period of Sarapion's ownership. And until the borrowers repay to the lender the principal and the interest, Thatres and Teteorion have no right to sell this land or mortgage it or dispose of it in any other way or register any one as owning it, while the lender has the right at the expiration of the term of the loan, if he fails to recover it, to assume the ownership of this land in place of both the principal and whatever interest at 6 per cent, he may fail to recover and interest for overtime at the equal rate of 6 per cent., and to make an execution upon the borrowers who are security to each other for payment and upon whichever of them he chooses and upon all the aforesaid land and upon the rest of their property as if in accordance with a legal decision, the lender having the right whenever he chooses to register his mortgage at the property record, . .
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

;

and the said lender shall incur no loss in his right of execution for the other office sums which Thatres and Teteorion owe him in respect of another loan drawn up through the said registry-office in the present month Hadrianus for which their mother is security upon the mortgage of the aforesaid 14^ arourae of wheat-bearing land, namely a principal sum of I talent 600 drachmae and interest, but all the provisions of that deed are valid.
.

.

. ,

This contract
24.

is

valid.'
cf.

37.

(]{] [\{]
in a similar context.

rai

!
is

found

We

[]

notes on 482.
:

1

8 and 483.

5.

cf. P. Ami). 95. 4, where y^r there suggested cither yjjt or ycapytat as the

word

supplied, and Wilcken {Archiv, II. p. 132), comparing C. P. R. 6. 16 where ync is The present passage shows however that, though decided in favour of the first alternative. refers to yrjt, ytwpyiai when not expressed is to be understood ; cf. 577 and 633.

alone to be found,

236
42.
similarly

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
For the restoration of the lacuna be restored SKKat
is

44• Kvpiemiv

rather short for the lacuna, which admits of one or two

[\.

cf.

491.

8.

P. Brit.

Mus. 311. 13-4 should

more

letters;

but

cf.

270. 30, &c. 54• Probably

\ {\<( or \( '«].
507.

Loan of Money upon Security.
19-7

8•7

cm.

A. D.

169.

An acknowledgement, addressed to Diogenes, a gymnasiarch of Oxyrhynchus,
by Harmiusis, of the loan of 360 drachmae at 13 per cent, interest per annum. The money was employed in the purchase of hay, upon which the creditor was by the terms of the contract given a mortgage cf. 506. In the left-hand margin are some notes in a different hand, which seem to have no connexion
;

with the loan and are not reproduced.

On

the verso

is

[^[$

5

^ [
[
Aioyiuu
rfjs

a draft of a contract (509).

ivapycu yvpva-

O^v[pvyyxuv

^.

TroXecoy

vi-

k^

^ [, .
8^[

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[9

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507.

CONTRACTS
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237

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COrr.

Pap.

Harmiusis ... to Diogenes son of Sarapion, ex-agoranomus, gymnasiarch in office Oxyrhynchus, priest of Fortune, greeting. I aci;no\vledge tliat I liave received from you the sum of 260 drachmae of silver to which nothing has been added, at the interest of And I will I drachma upon a mina for each month from the current month Pharniouthi. repay the principal with the interest on Phamenoth 30 of the coming loth year of Aurelius Antoninus Caesar the lord without delay, or if I fail I will forfeit the .amount increased by one half together with interest for the overtime at the same rate of i drachma a month for each mina, for which you are to have the right of execution upon both myself and The aforesaid 260 drachmae I have employed in buying up hay which all my property. is to be stored in the camel-shed of Similis at Oxyrhynchus which I have on lease, and it shall not be lawful for me to remove or sell or pledge this hay until I repay you the And if any accident should happen principal and interest, because it is mortgaged to you. to the said hay no damage shall accrue to you, because the sum and the interest are
at

238

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

guaranteed against all risks. This bond, of which there are two copies, is valid wherever produced. The 9th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus Sarmaticus Medicus Parthicus Maximus, Pharmouthi ..."
9.

aif \ovh(V

13. t5 TpiaKOSt: loans

506. 17.
26.

: :
cf.

cf. 269. 5, 506. 12. were usually repayable on the

last

day of the month

533. 22 and B. G. U. 393, a lease of a

.

;

cf.

269.

5,

508.

Security for a Debt.
13-3

X

II-I fW.

A. D.

102.

A contract between Stephanus and Heraclas, by wfhich the former apparently
accepts liability for the repayment of two loans from Heraclas to Rufus and Diodes, but the papyrus breaks off before the details of the transaction are

made

clear.

"Etovs

Nipova
[/iJTjfos

5

[[.]]

\
15

[]

^ , (^ ^? {) ? (, ,' []
,
kv
rfjs

'

>05

yeyovevai

'

Trjs

avTrjs

(V

-

Saveca

/

kv

Tjj

)

{sTOVs)

Kataap[o\s

[/c]Xeoi

\[\

^)

'-

-

-

20

', ^
509.
(^
;

CONTRACTS
Se

239

25

([ , •\ [[]], .
']
1.

8 []^
3• ^
e

[,
«[^«-

fTovs

()
2.

Pap.
20. ai of

SO in

15.

by 2nd hand.

9.

ayvia Pap.

from

.

coTT.

from

by 2nd hand. 12. Pap. by 2nd hand.

4•

^!

Pap.
t

8.

an

14. First

of

corr.

' The 5th year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus, the Slephanus also called 30th of the month Caesareus, at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid. Amois, son of Sosibius son of Apollophanes, his mother being Ptollarous daughter of acknowledges to Heraclas son of Heraclas Chaeremon, inhabitants of O.xyrhynchus, son of Harthonis, his mother being Demetrous, also of O.xyrhynchus, in the street, that he, Stephanus, the contracting party, has become security for two loans which Heraclas lent from his own money through the record-office at the said city, the first being in the month of Mecheir of the 2nd year of Trajanus Caesar the lord to Rufus son of Diodes son of Diodes, his mother being Didyme daughter of Rufion, for 450 silver drachmae bearing interest secured upon a mortgage of the real property of Rufus stated in the loan, the second being in Tubi of the following 3rd year to Rufus' full brother Diodes for 416 more silver drachmae upon a mortgage of his real property stated in the loan, which loans are in Heraclas' possession, and Heraclas has the right ..."

509.

Modification of an Agreement.
19-7

X

8• 7

cm.

Late second century.

This draft-agreement,
given,
is

in

which the names of the principal parties are not

a modification of a previous contract by which the writer had appointed

a representative to collect a debt

owed

to

him

at

Alexandria.

The debt having
his representative
cf.

been paid

in the

meantime, the writer now limits the duty of
it.

to issuing a receipt for

For contracts appointing representatives
is

4,

©7,

and 281.

The document

written on the verso of 507.

240

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Tis TLVL )(aipu[v.]

5

[] [\]
{]
wpos
15

\ [) 76€

! £{) ^^
H

] ,
kv
e//e

\^ []^^[\\] •)^

[\

rfj

hearwarj

^-

5 []

.

6\[•
t]ois

,-'
(ro[v

^^
&

)(7[]

20
Pap.

[], ([
1.

4.

12.

]. .

13. Final

corr.

from

f,

to

, greeting.
who

To-day
is

I

record-office here as
called Polydeuces,

my

representative
at

appointed you by a public deed drawn up through the to collect from Gaius Memmius Cornutus also

Alexandria, my share of the sums owed by him to my said father's heir, his nephew Heraclides also called Amoitas, but it happens that I have been I acknowledge that the contract of representation has been made paid the debt in full. with you for the sok purpose of your issuing a receipt to the officials without receiving anything, and for cancelling the mortgage, because I have, as aforesaid, already received the money as stated in the autograph receipts which I have issued, and I make no claim on any matter whatever.'
7-9.
difficult

to

Apparently the father of the
half of

The relationship of the different persons mentioned in this contract is rather make out, especially owing to the omission of the names of the principals. man who speaks in the first person had bequeathed certain

sums owing to himself at his death to his nephew Heraclides with the stipulation that in 1. 8 refers to the father (of ns), them was to be paid to his son. whose name would be given in the actual contract. airoO in 1. 9 also refers to the father.

510.

RECEIPTS

241

(/)
510.

RECEIPTS.
Loan.
A. D.

Repayment of
14-5

X 3-5 c»'

loi.

Acknowledgement by Artemidoriis of the sum of 472 drachmae, being the repayment of a loan to Dionysius and his wife, together with the interest and
other expenses connected with the transaction.

.

.

.

[

2o letters

]v[

•}<)
kv 5

.[]9
eSaveicrev

10 letters
[.
.

ttjj

.]<

.

[.

aySpoi

9 ^,
.
kv
e^fjs

.
rfj
«/$•

^.]

€01-

?
(Tfpas oUias irtpas

)(^[]

ttj

[]€
15

2

( ,
6

? (^ $ ! ( )(. ([] €\'^[] ?

,

^ €

}

[] ?
R

(Is

&

? -

242

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
25

[(€
[

kvKaXeiv
ois

8 ]€
]
• •

[[]] rots

" -'

23 letters

^[•]9'{

[•

5•

corr.

Second from .
of

oi

corr.
^

from
1.

or

.
1

7• 8.

3•

^^

22. First

COrr.

from

^^' corr. from . . 23.

/

*" corn from Second of

re.

.
corr.

of

from

f.

for

/ii)Te.

from Psobthis in the eastern . her mother being Tausiris daughter of , toparchy, with her guardian her said husband Dionysius, acknowledges the receipt from them (the agreement being made in the street) of the capital sum of 472 silver drachmae of the Imperial coinage, lent by him to them in accordance with a contract of loan executed through the record-office in the same city of Oxyrhynchus in the month Caesareus of the 3rd year of Trajanus Caesar the lord, and to be repaid on the 5th intercalary day of the following 4th year, on the security of property of Dionysius in the aforesaid Psobthis consisting of a half-share of some open plots of land and shares of a house that has fallen in and a half-share of a second house and its fixtures and shares of another house and court and open plots and the house and yard and other fixtures formerly belonging Artemidorus accordingly in release of the to Claudius Theon at the said Psobthis. mortgage has forthwith handed over to the other parties to the agreement the binding contract of loan and the tax-receipts to be cancelled, and acknowledges the further receipt from them of the interest upon the capital sum and the taxes which have been demanded from him, and that neither Artemidorus himself nor any other person on his behalf either .' makes or will make any claim or will proceed against the other parties to the agreement .
' . . . . . .

3. 7.

6(

19.

of contracts of loan
12, &C.).

.

For the omission of cf. 239.
:

after
9,

cf.

533. 17.
(sc.

note.
:

baveiov

This use of

.6\
is

is

cf. 266. 1 4 ^]s derived from the

(€(
cf.

common

)( (
formula
at the
(cf.

end 269.

20. TfXav: the tax

on mortgages

meant;

511. 4-5, note.

511.

Acknowledgement of Loan.
13-3 y.1 cm.
A. D.

103.

A

receipt for

latter to

16 drachmae lent by Didymus to Harmiusis to enable the pay the amount of the tax upon a mortgage. The loan was only

a temporary accommodation, to be returned immediately. the fibres of the papyrus.

The

writing

is

across

^[]

)
5

! ^8[
511.
?]

RECEIPTS

243

-^.

Xvwbu reXoy

>'(])
(erovs)
e^,

€7

/

()

«,

/

^.
(erofs•)

) ^ ,
2.

15

( [
-.
line. 4•
'•

of

II.

of

above the above the

'.
of

5• " of

line.

15.

over an erasure.

()

above the

line.

Harmiusis also called Heraclas to Didymus son of Sarapion, keeper of a public greeting. I have received from you the remainder of the tax upon a mortgage of the 3rd year of Trajanus Caesar the lord, namely 16 drachmae of silver, total The 16 drachmae, which I will repay to you when I arrive on the spot without delay. 7th year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus, Thoth 6.'
'

the papyrus is rubbed and the reading somewhat does not seem to occur elsewhere it is a likely enough The present word. On the of the Ptolemaic period cf. P. Tebt. I. 6. 29, note. in Roman times was a monopoly of the passage supports the view that the supply of government; cf. P. Grenf. II. 41 and Pay. Toivns, pp. 149 sqq. The amount of the tax upon mortgages, cf. 348, 510. 20. 4-5. TeXof is shown by 243 to have been which is also known by the more general term 2 per cent., payable by the mortgagee. {erovs) the receipt being dated in the 7th year, Harmiusis' payment was four 6. years in arrear. This seems a remarkably long period, but the figure before (trovs), though rubbed, is certainly and not 5•.

2-3.

uncertain, but though

8{

?)

:

«

{)!:
:

(-/,

244

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

512.

Payment for Fodder.
II-5X 10-3
cvi.

. D.

173.

exegetes, that he had bought green-stuff produced

acknowledgement to Apion, an ex-gymnasiarch, from Dorion, an exby Apion for ijao drachmae. Of this sum 600 drachmae were paid to Apion, and the rest was to be paid to the agents of the heirs of Aurelius Antiochus, who were no doubt Apion's landlords and thus received approximately | the value of the crop.

An

5 evTos

{) ^ , {) ^. ^
as h

--

'?

kv

€[]

10

,.
.

{) () ,
(eTovs)

e^

ras Se

()
els
t.

-

Kaapos

4-

of

corr.

from

'Dorion, ex-exegetes and however he is styled, to Apion also called Dionysius, I have bought from you the greenex-gymnasiarch and however he is styled, greeting. stuffs of the land which you have on lease within the surrounding-dyke called that of for 1720 drachmae; of which sum I have paid you 600 drachmae and Sampsouchinus will pay the remaining 11 20 drachmae to the agents of the heirs of Aurelius Antiochus in accordance with the terms of your lease, and I will deliver to you the receipt for them. The 13th year of Aurelius Antoninus Caesar the lord, Phamenoth 12.'

513.

RECEIPTS

245'

513.

Receipt for Sale of Confiscated Propertv.
34-2

X

II-7 -;.

A.D. 184.

acknowledgement from Diogenes to Serenus of the receipt of 705 drachmae 3 obols 3 chalci. This sum had been paid by Diogenes to the State in A.D. 181 as the price (including extra payments) of some confiscated houseproperty, which had been sold to him by the strategus at an auction. Two years later however a much higher bid for the property, amounting to three times that of Diogenes, was made by Serenus, to whom it was assigned by the dioecetes, the arrangement of the strategus being thus overridden. In the present document Diogenes acknowledges that he has been repaid by Serenus the sum which he had expended on the purchase. The papyrus throws some interesting light upon the methods of the government in dealing with confiscated property, and incidentally provides important information with regard to the banks at this period cf. notes on II. 7 and 37.
;

An

[€$
nicoi/os

[<[
6

6

KcC\i

^\]5

7€£
5

]( /
] ]

[[^[aipetu.

15 [fp]

\\
[\

^ ] '] ^ ^ 6[ [ ^[ ^€5 [^] , [ [] []9 ? ([5
7
Sapa]rrimiO9
[.]
.

6[]

/€

.

[.]/

[6]

[''^

(

eTOfy

[fip]aX(/iay)

kvvta

([-

(

((^)

{)

T[pis]

o/3oX(oi)y)

[](4{),

-

246

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\\
so

[\ \'\
[]9
[<\

^
ray
rbf
[.]?

[']

^
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rph,

()

25

[] []

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[

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eiV

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45

50

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[
6

[, ] ]^ [ ], ^ [

[]

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()


-[ €[]( []

[[(5]]

[^\

513.

RECEIPTS

[

55

[!] [/ ]\
kcu

[(]
]

(and hand)

AXOauvs

\\

avr]<S

kvKaXSi

[ovSeyhs
[<Tiy]

[]
60
[

'[ [<] ' []
[]
fv8o[Ka>

[]

65

] [ 6]](. [] ][. [] ({
e]vSoKS)

, .
8 .[
]

^
Tpeh
iav tis

? ^[]
(4th hand)
.

247

nepi

Sapa-

(3rd hand) ^eprjuo^

[

6

\^[

(5th hand)

]

.

_/

?)

[

7-

1.

28.

{
'

from .

\5, (5

14• ovs
COrr.

ntpiKXtovs COrr.

from

.

29•

1.

. 8.
from

9•

f

4^• "

(
COTT.
. . .
,

from

.

COrr.

Diogenes also called Dionysius, son of Sarapion son of Hermias, of the Phylaxithaand Althaean dome, to Seren\is son of Philiscus son of Sarapion, his mother Whereas I was assigned by Nemesianus, tlien being Helene, of Oxyrhynchus, greeting. strategus of tiie nome, in the 22nd year of Aurelius Commodus Antoninus Caesar the lord month Hadrianus from the unsold property of the Treasury a house, yard, and in the
lassian tribe

court with the fixtures, situated in the quarter of the Lycians' Camp, previously owned by Sarapion, late , at 600 drachmae according to the valuation and the extra payments, and whereas I was registered by the basilico-grammateus of the nome, Pericles, as owing
. .

.

sum together with the additional payments, making 637 drachmae 3 obols, and likewise 22nd year 39 drachmae 3^ obols 3 chalci, and as interest for the 23rd year 28 drachmae 2^ obols, making a total of 68 drachmae 3 chalci for interest, and whereas I paid into the public bank for the price of the house in all 637 drachmae 3 obols and likewise for the interest debited to me the sum of 68 drachmae 3 chalci, the receipts for which payments with the signature of me, Diogenes also called Dionysius, I have delivered to you, Serenus, because you have made a higher bid for the aforesaid house and have raised the price to 1800 drachmae, and the property has been made ex-strategus, over to you by a letter of his highness the dioecetes, Venlidius Rufinus in the present 24th year on IMecheir 30 for the 1800 drachmae and extra payments, and the basilico-grammateus has debited you in accordance with the supplementary note which he has issued, after reckoning the 600 drachmae paid by me, with the remaining 1 acknowledge that in accordance with and the additional pajTnents 1 200 drachmae a communication of Epimachus who farms the bank at the Serapeum at Oxyrhynchus I have received from you the sums which I paid as aforesaid, for the price and the
this

for interest for the

:

additional

payments 637 drachmae 3 obols and

for interest

68 drachmae 3

chalci,

making

248

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

a total of 705 drachmae 3 obols 3 chalci, and that I neither have nor will have any claim against you with regard to this or any other matter whatever up to the present day, and if any action is brought against you or your assigns with regard to this, I will My father Sarapion son of Hermias son of Hermias, take the responsibility upon myself. of the Sosicosmian tribe and Aithaean deme, being present consents to the aforesaid. This The 24th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Commodus receipt is valid. Antoninus Augustus Pius Armeniacus Medicus Parthicus Sarmaticus Germanicus Maximus ... I, Diogenes also called Dionysius, son of Sarapion, of the Phylaxithalassian tribe and Aithaean deme, have received from Serenus the aforesaid total of 705 drachmae 3 obols 3 chalci in full, and I have no claim against him with regard to this or any other matter whatever, as aforesaid, and if any action is brought against him or his in connexion with I, Serenus son of Philiscus son of this, I will take the responsibility upon myself. Sarapion, my mother being Helene, consent to the aforesaid provisions and have received I, Sarapion son of Hermias son of Hermias, the receipts with your signature as aforesaid. of the Sosicosmian tribe and Aithaean deme, consent to all the aforesaid porvisions. .' Epeiph 4, executed
.

.

.
I.

[]|4][«
:

xaji

['AXia^cur

:

cf.

1.

that

the father of Diogenes belonged to a different tribe

52 and 477. 7-8, note. cf. 1. 48 ;

Since the Phylaxithalassian was in all probability an Alexandrian tribe (cf. Kenyon, Archiv, II. p. 78) it is most likely that the Sosicosmian was also Alexandrian. the present passage serves to explain B. G. U. 18, a papyrus 7. cmparav ttjs there which caused Wilcken some difficulty cf. Ost. I. pp. 505-6. The eV here, co7tfiscated land and houses, and the commission appointed by the were no doubt, as basilico-grammateus was limited to the assessment G. U. 4 ; cf. 1. 1 1, here) of this particular kind of property and has no reference to a valuation of private property in general. The was a kind of reserve price serving as a basis for higher offers; cf. the distinction drawn in 500. 13-4 between the regular rent of
;

2]
It is

curious
6

(\6 .
[](['}

cf.
is

and

the iwldepa or increase. II. The vestiges of the
12.

hesitate to introduce that rare

14.
State,

We

mentioned

to the

600 drachmae of the 600 drachmae.
:

'
For
explained the

in

in P. Brit.

^
and

first word would suit and curious title here, especially as

connexion with the purchase of confiscated property cf P. Amh. 97.
there as referring to the or yearly payment to the Mus. 164. But it would also be possible to refer the which are added on here in 11. 14 sqq. to the original The here amount to 6^ per cent, on the

,

([
;

477.

4.

But we

quite obscure.

!.
.

though Diogenes bought the property in Hadrianus (Choiak) of the 1 6. year, he seems not to have paid the purchase price until towards the middle of 23rd year. Hence the necessity for interest. the this passage which clearly indicates that the 37. bank at the Serapeum was farmed out by the government throws quite a new light upon From Rev. Laws Ixxiii sqq. the relation of the State to the banks in the Roman period. were it was known that under the Ptolemies the banks other than the the government; cf. Wilcken, Osi. I. p. 635. But in the absence of any farmed out by indications in the Roman period that the banks called by names of individuals were anything but private banks, it has generally been supposed that the bank-monopoly enjoyed by the Ptolemaic government had been abolished (cf. op. cit. p. 647). But it is clear that in the case of this bank at any rate the privilege of administering it had to

22nd

.

.

('!

:

!^

514

RECEIPTS
it

249

(
later

be bought from the government
than 513,
issues the

who

('
if

and of the bank
;

noticeable that in 91. 8 sqq., written four years at the Serapeum are mentioned, and the Epimachus
is

(91. ii)

is

probably identical with the Epimachus here.

commonly found in connexion with {op. cit. p. 599), the two papyri point to the same conclusion, and raise the problem how far the banks which are simply called by the name of an individual were really private. The bank at the Serapeum
are

is

mentioned in previous reigns (cf. 98. and more probably they were either the
If this be granted, the
to a large extent,

persons

who

under the names of different persons, or the of it than the owners. elsewhere give their names to banks may well be
8,

^
264.

Since

7)

(

not wholly, in the same position, and the condition of the banking business in the Roman period would not difler very much from that in the Ptolemaic. One change however can be traced; the plays a less important role in Roman times than the had done previously, for most private transactions were in the Roman period conducted through the (cf 305), whereas under the Ptolemies the existence of banks other than is only known from the Revenue Papyrus. A tax called ?) occurs in 574, being perhaps a charge for the maintenance of the official banks.

{(/

(- (
likely a

514.

Receipt for Salary.
6-4x12 cm.
A.D. 190-1.

A
The

receipt for an

of 400 drachmae, addressed to two collectors of the

corn-revenues by an
writer has
is

unnamed person who was very
so

he undertakes the registration

(?)
and
5Ojj(/5toy)
utpfiXuvT^ccv)

<^,
;

since
515.

of the account-books

cf.

made

many

erasures

interlinear additions that the con-

struction

in

parts obscure.

The papyrus was

written in the 31st year of

Commodus.
1

2

3
4

^{) {) '{9) {() ^^^ '{$) (\ '
[^
o(^iuf)]]

{)
(1)

{)
,
?)

wept Sivapv

)(^({).

5 [[^y

{) {
Stvapv »/()]]
2.

Si€\{$uyTus)

{(;)

vnep
Ijt^ros

\{) ^
?)

•?

{) () ^ (. {)^ ,
,

vir{(p)

tv

{)
,

{
^

7(/)

,,
?)

[[/ /]]
«c

below

which

is

crossed through.

3.

Pap.

250
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
To
Nilus, stated as the son of SofeVis,

and his colleague in the collection of the cornrevenues due at Talao and in the district near Sinaru for the produce of the past 30th year, greeting. I have received from you as my salary 400 drachmae, I being responsible for the registration of the books.'
2.

It is

that

it

governs

not clear with what ((') is to be connected. The analogy of 1. 5 suggests but from its position after o<ji(Ckovt(u>v) it would seem to refer to

,

yfvri\jiaTos\
5.

with a Stroke over

it

may be

either

() {).
or

515.

Receipt for Taxing-Lists.
II-7

X

14-6 cm.

A. D.

A

receipt issued

by the keepers of the public

to the sitologi of certain districts in the nome, stating that they

in the records various account-books of these officials. Cf. P. Amh. 69, a statement by sitologi that they had registered is used as here) their account-books with certain officials appointed to take them to Alexandria.

8\ {) 8{•) {) {6') (\6) { .{) {) . ({ )( {\) (()
6{)
'HpaK\{(i8rj)
)

( ()
record-office at
)

134.

Oxyrhynchus

had registered

6{(>)

€{/>)
Sia

6{>)

rfj

5

{) {) '{)
)

ASpiavov

]{) {) {) .{) {«) \{) ^{ ) {) {) [) {) {) [)
[iTOVs)

avSpa

{),

[]

knl

Meyeip,

€(')

(2nd hand)

(^() (().
. . .

'

Philiscus

sitologi of the

and Herodes, keepers of the public records, to Chaeremon and Papontos, Monimus district, and Heraclides, sitologus of the Sink district, and

;

516.
. .

RECEIPTS

251

Dionysius, ex-sitologus of the . district, greeting. There has been registered with us through the scribe Apollonius on Phamenoth 30 of the i8th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord the detailed list for each sitologus-district of the supplementary payments of wheat-produce for the 17th year, and by Chaeremon and Papontos for the Monimus district and by Heraclides for the Sink district the monthly summary for Mecheir,
.
. .

and by Chaeremon and Papontos only for the Monimus district both the monthly summary for Phamenoth and the secondary detailed list of receipts. Signed by me, Theon, scribe.'
2. no doubt identical with ) T6n{u>v) ) in 517. 6. Mf/i( the second letter is more like v, but the above the line is fairly certain, ) being just like the second of MonV(ou). 3. Apollonius was probably the scribe of the silologi, since the scribe of the
:

7(

/(

:

«, who appends
7.

his signature at the end,
:

this word, which is the phrase occurs in Fayum tax-receipts (cf. P. Fay. Towns 53. 2-3, note), and to indicate a second ta.x-list giving the details of the individual payments, as contrasted with the which only gave the totals.
\iryov whicli

eaK6yn{'')

Theon. new, would seem to be connected with
is

called

19
is

516.

Order for Payment
18-3 X9-I cm.

in

Kind.
A. D. 160.

Authorization addressed to the sitologi by Dionysius, a victor

in

the games

and

late exegetes, for the

payment

to

Apion of a quantity

of wheat.

32
88.

are a series of similar notices to the sitologi, another specimen of which

(cf. 533. 4) appear to be, so far, peculiar to Oxyrhynchus These and clearly indicate that the sitologi, besides receiving dues to the government,

undertook the storage of grain

for private individuals, the public granaries thus

presenting the closest analogy to the public banks.

orders on the sitologi are found in the receipts issued

The correlatives of these by them stating that
clearly

a certain payment had been made, e.g 517-8.

Those two documents are

concerned with private transactions, notwithstanding the opening formula

[,}

^-

and they show that caution must be exercised in the explanation of other sitologus receipts from the FayCim and elsewhere, which need not refer to payments to the government of rent or taxes in the absence Cf. also 501. 18, 24, 26, and 533. 24. of an express statement to that effect.
els
;

(6{')
Sia

')
UpoviK[a>v)

'(')

252
5

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\(9)
)(€.

Toir{a.p-)^ias)

(€) 6{)
()
.
kvvia,

SiaareiXare
kv

(€

(()
[\
'Aniwvos
Ke

8((6>)

AvTCuViivov

/
and hand

{) () . ^) -.
': '
:

{) {$)

)((oLviKes)

()

'Dionysius son of Faustus also called Amphion, a victor in the games and sometime exegetes of Oxyrhynchus, through Horion, scribe, to the sitologi of the district of Kerkeurosis in the middle toparchy, greeting. Supply to Apion son of Apion of the wheat belonging to me from the produce of the past 23rd year of Antoninus Caesar the lord which you have on deposit 25^ artabae 9 choenices, total 2e,i art. 9 choen. The 24th year of Antoninus Caesar the lord, Athur 21. (Signed) Presented by me, Apion son of Apion.'
2. a or victor in one of the great games had special privileges ; 59. 12-3, where a claims exemption from the duty of attending the praefect's court at Alexandria, and P. Brit. Mus. 348. 6
:

1(()

cf.

5•

(({(!)

cf.

625, where the name

is

'.
written out.

517.

Receipt for Payment in Kind.
10-5

X

5-6 cm.

a. d.

130.

Copy of a receipt issued by a sitologus and others stating that 30 artabae of wheat had been transferred from the account of Papontos to that of Sarapion. As explained in the introduction to the preceding text, both this papyrus and 518, which is similar in contents, have every appearance of referring to transactions between private individuals and they are to be regarded as certificates from the sitologi corresponding to orders for payment such as 516.
;

Cf. 612-7.

[)

), 8\{) ^{) ()
els

(erei ?)

{)

.

518.

RECEIPTS
{erovs)

253

5

() €>{) (6) [
6{')
[]!

'flpos
15 Tas

[\ 1{) () [) €() {) [) , 1€{) {) €[) () [9)
/
((,
UtoWus

! ^) " -

)

() () y^ [) {)

\.
Ae.

2

{() {) {)

,
. . .

/

{) {) .

' Psobthis, paid in the granary, from the produce and sitologus of Sink Sarapion son of Herodes 35 artabae of wheat, total

Measured into the public 14th year from Senepta, 30 artabae. of the 14th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord through Theon Horus and Ptollas, lessees of Heraclides son of Antias, to out of the deposit of Papontos son of Dorotheus, cultivator, 35 art. of wheat. (Signed) I, Horus, through Stephanus, I, Ptollas, through clerk, have certified the 35 artabae of wheat, total 35 art. of wheat. Diomus, clerk, have certified the 35 artabae of wheat, total 35 art. of wheat.'
these two lines have any connexion with what follows is uncertain. have been written by the same hand as the rest of the text, but this fact does not establish any essential relationship since the handwriting of the signatures in 11. 14-20 shows the receipt to be only a copy.

1-2.

Whether
to

They appear

6.

(

)

:

SC.

;

cf.

515.

2.

518.

Receipt for Payment

in

Kind.

•78•9•«.
Receipt
for

. D.

179-180.

credit of Sarapion

a payment through the sitologi of 4 artabae of wheat to the cf. introd. to the preceding papyrus.
;

254

({) {)
^\\
y/
Sia

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
is

8{) () ('($) [] 8€[6)
'{ 6{) {) [)^{( {6) (€)
T[o]7r(ap\ias)
)

5

()
Tas

{ ()
()
?)

(6) \()
[.]
6.

(and hand)

.
after

[)

corr.

Measured into the public granary from the produce in wheat of the past 19th year of the Aurelii Antoninus and Commodus, Caesars and lords, through the sitologi of the district of Epi ... in the western toparchy to Sarapion son of Charisius a deposit of 4 artabae, total 4 art. of wheat. (Signed) I, Diogenes, sitologus, have certified the
'

4 artabae of wheat.'
6.
A(oy(e'j/i;s)
:

or perhaps

.
{g)

ACCOUNTS.

519.

Account of Public Games.
X
6 cm.,
(b) ii-i

(a) 8-9

6-6 cm.

Second century.

fragments, apparently in the same hand, though the writing is a little one case than in the other, from accounts of receipts and expenditure in connexion with the public games at Oxyrhynchus. {a) gives a list of payments on Mecheir 23 for a theatrical entertainm.ent, including the high sums of 496 drachmae to an actor, and 448 drachmae to a Homeric rhapsodist, besides payments for music and dancing. The other fragment {b) contains the end of a list of receipts which amounted to 500 drachmae i obol in all, the exegetes and cosmetes contributing 95 drachmae i obol. There follows (11. 4-13) a list of payments in connexion with a religious procession which amounted to 124 drachmae 96 obols, the silver and copper being, as often, added up separately,, and then (11. 14-6) another list of payments to gymnastic performers.
larger in

Two

(),

(a)

•'
• ^

L
'

Mex(ei»

_

/

'

,

,

> (/) , € {8) [8) [][ [6]} [{8)]
fCjT,

}
.

520.

ACCOUNTS

255

[.]

{b)
.

[.

.

.

/
L

() \{) (
)

<[)

], ({'']) , (/) ('), ().
,
<^,
«•,

{
15

iepoSov(\ois)

]
/
[.

€/95()

() () [) [) {), 6() () {) ()
,
,

,

2

.]

[.

() ) () {)) () .] '{{)
()
L
.

6()

•,

•-

(

)

.

[.

.

[

[.

.]

.

ft nvKTTf

{

)

/[

. L
14.
1

(cf.

11.

10 and 19)
:

is

the sign for subtraction.

Though

8.

was perhaps meant. is written above the line, probably from a Graecized form ofpalma.

520.

Account of a Sale.
22-4

X

17 cm.

Report of a sale of articles from a miscellaneous store
longing
is

— or lately belonging— to a man called Chares.
and that the

rendered to three overseers

()

(/)

. D.

143.

be-

The

fact that the report

result of the sale

was paid

;

256
over to them renders

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

it extremely probable that the goods had for some reason in been confiscated by the government, and sold by auction. For The account this connexion cf. B. G. U. 49. 5 was originally glued on the left side to another document, now lost.

1st

hand
(?)

,

2nd hand

() (). ({{)
{)
[
.

() ({).
[.
.

(
[

5

^

8{) [(^) , \(:{) [(/) <{) 8{) [{8,) , ^'). )[]5 '\\\
SepaTOS
JI

9 [)
(
3-

(eVoir)

f
[.
.

([]

15

'^ {) )^ () {)

[

[]>( (){) [8^ 68^ {) {) {^ ()

^ ^ [)
({) 8(')
8{)
(:{)
[

^

)

)(0)(

)

.

.

(

)

[{^)
[

,
[

?)

[

[

20

fs-fi'Uxo.).

/{){66,?),
25

3rd hand

([). (^) (.{).
Aiovvaios

{)

({) {) (^)

\{') (^) /({) (-)

[

( {)
,
;

(

?),

?).

()
. . .

!

corr.

from

(?).

Report of the emporium ... of Chares, to Ammonion, 27 th, Chares' emporium. Hephaestas and Lycarion, overseers, in the 6th year of Antoninus Caesar the lord,
'

The
.

Epeiph

.

Nicus, 2

double jars of pickled

fish

2

drachmae

Didymus, 6 ropes

; ;

521.
Ptolemaeus
i

ACCOUNTS
i

257
'

double jar of pickled
.

fish
.
.

drachma (marginal note
. . .

2

obols too

little ')

Ammonas
;

Seras 2 double jars of lulas 3 mattresses ; son of Gaius, of Kerken another Sarapion 3 loads pickled fish 2 drachmae ; Sarapion 2 artabae of meal Parodus 2 minae of wrought iron . drachmae ditto 2 minae of wrought iron of ... Isidorus 6 couch-legs .; ditto 4 staters of purple drachmae; Arius 24 mats . .; ...; Hartosis 12 ropes .. drachmae ; Morus 8 plaited fishbaskets i drachma i obol Isipoutas 2 double jars of pickled fish 2 drachmae ; Ilerodes 50 wicks i drachma 3 obols ; making 34 drachmae 3 obols '), which sum total 34 drachmae i obol (marginal note Certified was paid over to Ammonion, Hephaestas and Lycarion, overseers. (Signed)
; .
. .

;

.

;

.

.

.

.

.

'

by me, Claudius Dionysius.'
2.

The

6.

7(>')

wine.
this

The may also

mutilated word at the end of the line is not Xfyu/ieV.u. cf. 141. 5 (of the Byzantine period), where the &m\uiu is a measure of is found in Wilcken, Ost. II. 11 66. 4-5, and or form
:

The

be meant here. apparently gives the name of the place 9. ) Possibly word after ) does not seem to be

«'

^\(
cf.

.(({

(

at

which

Ammonas

lived.

from the following
13.

{):

an unknown word, but

,
letters.

(').

Hesych.

'•

^

should not be separated
4 eVi

521.

List of Objects.
1

7-5

5•8•

Second century.

of interest on account of some rare words. and Harpocrates are mentioned, and the list cf. the mention of (?) perhaps refers to the property of some temple This supposition is strengthened by the contents of a fragmentary in 1. 10. account on the verso in which occurs a payment of 800 drachmae (cf. B. G. U. I. 9, Kfpova and another amount ytvfaiw{v) To the left of the list on the recto are a few letters of the ends of 393. X. 9,&c.).

Part of a

list

of articles, which

is

Statuettes or shrines of

Isis, Osiris,

;

({)
lines of

1

(

^

(({')

(

an account

in a different

hand.

Xr^yoy
'Ifft5o[y]

5

?[
'OadpiS[o's
[

-^-[

8\\
1

[

^^-

5

''?

5[ [[ ^
[(>
.

(

.

.

.

^S

\[
[

[

;

258

^vXivov

Ke

( \\
Se

( ۥ^
kv
{

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
2o

^^

8{(?)
?)
[

[ {
[

[

.
6.

/
1.

yaXa/CT[o]^[

Pap.

is a new compound. seems rather an incongruous item, but we can find no alternative. L. Dindorf remarks occurs in Suidas, but the meaning was unknown. corrupium videri . (ap. Stephanus i. voc.) nisi potius nomen est proprium factum a potest ex The present passage disposes of this criticism by showing conclusively means a vessel or instrument of some kind, in this case made of iron, and that Mr. Smyly is no doubt right in identifying it with the Latin batillum or batillus, ' shovel '

II. 25 artabae 13.

of.

the mention of 'tongs' (rapiciW) in
18.
is

22.
in
1.

24.

. [

?

.

.

14.
it

for vhpuov.
is

probably a compound word meaning a receptacle for milk;

recurs

522.

Account of Corn-Transport.
30-8

X

18 cm.

Second century.
to his superior, of expenses
river,

An

account, probably rendered

by an

official

connected with the dispatch of several boat-loads of corn by
to Alexandria.

no doubt

The papyrus

is

written in a large cursive hand, resembling that

of 520.

() (^) ' (^) () (') [) [^] [) . €() () () (<) (€
5

!

(
(()

••/3.

) () (^) (}) (^) {) €() ({(.) €{) ()• €[) "^) {) {) (\€6{() (^) { ).
(')

^40«5(€)

20

{)(){) {) {) () (() ' . ^[) () () () , () () €{) €() €{) (]) () (). () () () 6() () () « ( ). () () () ( ( (). 7(() '«() () 6() (() (() () () () ()) {()() () (()() ^,() ()() ({) / () / « () ($) () (), () () ( ). {) (() ()€ () () () (() ? () () - ( ). (^) () () 3 () () (). () [07]()
6\{) [() (4) 6\{) (05)
y
[8\)
y/

{) () ) (), \{^)
522.

ACCOUNTS

259

{6)

'^)
.

',

15

j;]]

.

tois

?)

?)

[Te/i]]

.

€.

25

\6y(ov)

.

€7(

)

[.

.

.](

)

[

corn from 5• from (?).

.

1 7-

*

of

'S"

corr.

20.

corr.

from

;.

26.

e

of

()« corr.

'Account: for the vessel of Triadelphus 3400 artabae of wheat at 21 drachmae (per 100) 712 dr. To the same at 4 drachmae per 1000 12 dr. Carriage of 171 artabae of wheat transported the drying- place at 4 dr. per 100 6 dr. Price of a jar (of wine) sent to the assistants and soldier 8 dr. i obol. To the elders of Ophis for the wages of 1 1 workmen employed in lading 6 dr. 2 obols. To Aphunchis, guard of the granary, as his salary since Tubi 18 dr. more. Total of expenditure 762 dr. 3 obols, of which
. .
.

For the vessel of Ilorion son of Ammonius 1500 artabae and (381 dr. i^ obols). of Pausiris son of Apollonius 500 artabae, total 2000 artabae, at 21 dr. Payment to Horion, pilot, the sum given, 8 dr. Price of a jar sent (per 100) 420 dr.

^

is

for the vessel

S 2

26
to the assistants
1

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

and the soldier 8 dr. i obol. Price of 2 more jars sent to the sailors Price of vegetables for the same, without bread, 4 obols. To the elders 6 dr. 2 obols. of Ophis for the wages of 7 workmen employed in lading 4 dr. To i workman assisting
beyond (?) the ^ artaba and embarking (?) corn for 3A days 5 dr. Total of expenditure 466 dr., of which •| is (233 dr.). Sum of the whole expenditure 1228 dr. 3 obols, of which A is 614 dr. 2 obols. To Dioscoras 3 obols, for which he shall render an account. Price of 2 jars expended upon us alone from Phamenoth 27 to Pharmouthi 15 16 dr. together with the price of oil for the same period 8 dr. 4 obols.' 2 obols. Expense of
I.

of an The payments in 11. 2 and 14, which are at the rate of slightly more than I obol per artaba, seem to be the charge for transport to the vessel's destination, probably Alexandria. Why in the first case there was an extra payment (1. 3) of 4 drachmae per 1000 is obscure. The calculation of the 712 and 12 dr. is not quite accurate. The
correct figures would be 714
4.
:

.
(
The

.

.

.

Triadelphus, like Horion son of

Ammonius and

Pausiris,

was probably the owner

and

i3|•.
it

if this

word

is

not corrupt,

would seem

to

be a technical term connected

with the
6.

(])
.()
</)(?)
:

fuller's trade.
:

for soldiers

II. 15.

figure after hv
:

()
is

accompanying

the corn-vessels as tVin-Xooi
filled in
;

has not been
' '

cf.

this

if

correct

(masculine) should be read.
1.

means a payment to a Perhaps Horion the pilot is probably different from the Horion

.
11.

cf.

276.

9.

23-5.

{)
in

12.
18.

21.
it

closely with received by the workman.'

{) {) {()>{),
cf.

498. 31, &c.
very obscure.

and against making

The order is mean in it
'

in favour of constructing

addition to the

-J

artaba

{/i)

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE.
523.

Invitation to Dinner.

55 X

8-4 cm.

Second century.

An
is

invitation to dinner, similar to 110.

As

usual, the

name of

the guest

not given.

!i4rrwric(y)
e/s

\(.
.

SapairiSos ev tois

£

copas

) ^/)
\€(.)

8{)

'Antonius son of Ptolemaeus invites you to dine with him at the table of the lord Sarapis in the house of Claudius Sarapion on the i6th at 9 o'clock.'
2.
els

...

:

cf.

110.

2,

525.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
Invitation to a
3-5

261

524.

Wedding Feast.
Second century.
;

X

6-4 cm.
cf.

An
Towns

invitation to dinner in celebration of a marriage

Ill

and

P. Fay.

133.

ae Atoy[v&\io[s Sfinvrj.
els

tovs
ei>

eavTov

(

ttj

,

! [ {)
[.
;

a[vpLov,

' Dionysius invites you to dine with him on the occasion of the marriage of his children at the house of Ischyrion to-morrow, the 30th, at 9 (?) o'clocl;.'

4.

wpat

[6

;

the usual hour (about 3 p.m.)

cf.

523.

4,

&c.

525.
14-6

Letter.
X
10-7 cm.

Early second century.

The following letter, though complete, lacks both the customary greeting commencement and address, and the names of the recipient and sender The latter complains of the trouble he was having therefore do not appear.
at the
in

going by river past the Antaeopolite nome, and instructs his correspondent

to

make

a certain payment.

^

(.

5

. /
[]
\<[] ([]

Sirj

[] ^? . ([] ^"
8ovs

8-8
Si

'(

[-

[6]

iv

202
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
;

The voyage past the Antaeopohte noma is most troublesome every day I am burdened on account of it and I am extremely worn out with the matter. If a gratuity must be given to the brother of the mother of Achillas' sons, please get some lotus (?) for him from Sarapion at my expense. Remember the night-festival of Isis at the
Serapeum.'
7.

[']>'
An

:

cf.

in the rent.

additional

610 and 101. 19, where in a lease 12 drachmae payment of some kind is there meant, but
'

are

ance of the word is not clear. In 653 which suggests that the charge for a libation Rev. Laws xxxvi. 19, where the i.e.

devoted fi[i] ifiji/] [?), though, as 101 shows, its application became extended. 10. There would perhaps be room for t^s in the lacuna before
is

,

,
'

the precise signific-

is coupled with and was primarily imposed upon vine-land

,
an item

(of.

.

ku[1]

[\-

526.

Letter of Cyrillus.
1

6-2

X

1

1-9 cm.

Second century.

evidently a person of

badly written and obscurely worded, and the writer was little culture. It contains a brief apology for a departure occasioned by the desire to recover a loan.

This

letter

is

Xafpois KaXoKaipe,

€.
5

,
g.
1.

-€ ns €-

-]'

.
el

[

6p-

['-

^.
1.

\[]
'

"
[a]n6(Sos)

the verso

€[€.

.
:

.

1.

\€)€.

12.

. .
satisfy

Greeting, Calocaerus I, Cyrillus, address you. I was not so unfeeling as to leave you without reason; for though a man gets his interest in Tubi tenfold, he still does not recover his capital. I am going up with the dancer ; even if he were not going I should not have broken my word. Farewell. (Addressed) Deliver to Calocaerus.'

the

5-8. The meaning is that no amount of repayment of the capital sum.
9.

interest will

a

man who

desires

]^•..€,

519.

()

6.

;

528.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
527.

263

Letter of Hatres.
8-2

X

13-9 cm.

Second or

early third century.

A

short letter from Hatres to his brother Heras, telling
if

fetch a certain fuller

he required the

Arpfjs

,
5
itrrlv

€i

(^

^peiav

.

',
On
the verso
10 an6S{os)

{ ], €
["Hljoart.

?^
latter's services.

him

to send

and

.
ev

((, !

-

()' -

€{) (() ().
.
of
corr.

3.

1.

ToC

of the

line

a round bracket.

^.

from

ov.

6.

After

at the

end

' Hatres to Heras his brother, greeting. In accordance with your instructions concerning Serenus the fuller who is working with Phileas, if you have need of him send a servant for him to-day, the 19th. Do not neglect this, as- I am keeping him. I pray for your health and prosperity. (Addressed) Deliver to Heras.'

6. The round bracket at the end of this line (cf critical note) appears to indicate which is superfluous a wish on the part of the writer to cancel the first fVt I yap but he should have been more explicit.
. . .

,

528.

Letter of Serenus.
18 X 12-8 cm.

Second century.
is

This curious and amusing
writer wished to return.

letter,

written in very bad Greek,

from Serenus

to his sister (and probably wife) Isidora,

who had gone away,

but

whom

the

264

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Sepfjvoi

§
5

, \
rfj

vei(y)

8[.[rfj

aSeX-

1T0VTOS

••(')


10

'

^[[ ]. {\(
7rXaarr[a

a>s

'

15

'

)^
20

{) €,
eSoO

, ?' ( .
€.
avTTJ

() (
{}
Se

Se

). (

vvktos

'

ore

,
Ke

eVe/t-

rfj

rfj

pera

{\

' ( [( €[. \}5
6

Se

- (€
e[t]i

eXeye Se

TOVS

€7£

25

epyji

. Sov .

epXJ? [etVe
[

On

the verso

. ; , / ., . .
1.

68
and
1.

()
12.
1.

^.
8.
1.

,

1.

((.
'

{)[. \(
2.
1.
. . . . .
.

g.

1.

6.

1.

cf.

11.

1

9

24.

\oyoi

.

1.

25•

1.

..

4•

1•

2 2.

.

.

.

.

15.

.
.
.

.

, !, ,
1.

II.
1 3.
1 o.
1.

^.

.

8.

24. f of

f Sou

COrr.

fiom

20.

1,

Serenus to his beloved

sister Isidora,

many

greetings.

Before

all else I

pray for your

health,

Thoeris

and every day and evening I perform the act of veneration on your behalf to who loves you. I assure you that ever since you left me I have been in mourning,

529.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

265

Since we bathed together on Phaophi 12, weeping by night and lamenting by day. You sent me letters which would have I never bathed nor anointed myself until Athur 12. shaken a stone, so much did your words move me. Instantly I answered you and gave the letter sealed (to the messenger) on the 12th, together with letters for you (?). Apart from your saying and writing " Colobus has made me a prostitute," he (Colobus) said to me, " Your wife sent me a message saying He himself (Serenus) has sold the chain and himself put me in the boat.' " You say this to prevent my being believed any longer with Whether you regard to my embarkation (?). See how many times I have sent to you (Addressed) Deliver to Isidora from Serenus.' are coming or not, let me know.
'
1

23.
in

The

seems

to refer to

11.

21-2, but the point of the allusion

is

obscure

both cases.

529.

Letter to Athenarous.
12-2

X

8•2 cm.

Second century.

A
fruit.

letter to

The

writer,

position,

for

oil and seems to have occupied some official he mentions that he was about to accompany the praefect to

a

woman

called Athenarous,
is

announcing the dispatch of

whose name

lost,

Coptos.

.([ [\ )(
\
€5
the verso
20

«/'
Sia K[ejpSvo.

1

KOTvXas S

5 5

-

On

](9
]

e/y

.65 (( ..... -^
etV

5

)(|').
6.
1.

',

Please receive through Cerdon for Dionysius First of all I pray for your health. 4 cotylae of unguent and a basket of dessert containing 100 figs, 100 nuts, and half
'

266

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

a chous of oil, of which you will give 4 cotylae to the said Dionysius and keep 2 cotylae for yourself Gieet your mother and Matris and her children and all who love you. I am going to Coptos with the praefect. (Addressed) To the house of Pausanias, ex-clerk of the city, for Athenarous daughter of Cerdon.'

530.

Letter of Dionysius.
19-8

X

12-2

c7?i.

Second century.
chiefly

A
money
sight;

letter

from Dionysius to

his

mother Tetheus,

concerned with

matters.

The

writer states that he has paid certain taxes, while

others for which his mother was being troubled had been omitted

some by an over-

devoted to the redemption of

and he announces the dispatch of 113 drachmae, 108 of which were to be his wardrobe from the pawnbroker. The letter is written in a well-formed uncial hand with occasional lapses into cursive. An example of formed with three distinct strokes occurs in 1. 13.

wept

)/}
5


[$:]
S)v
yjra.

[\
ypa<peis
7r[€]pt

[\ )([€.
][] \[ ][][]9 5[6]' , [
['
Se]

ere

6e
ei

10

15

[ , € [ ^ . ^ (, €[]
\

. [] []
.

.JuiSe

.

[.].

tv[.

.

.].

\^6[
[]

6[

(})]

[-

€[

€^

eis

. []'
el

eis

[\ (.•.

20

25

] ,\ . ., , , ,,
530.
(V

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

267

].

()

Se

vepi

([] ?

waiSta


left
1.

[

'€/[]
irepi

[[

[]:.
In the

^).
«t

hand margin,
ovv

30 €/3<

On

the verso
TeOevTi

.
8.

( .
at right angles
of
ei

, {)
tovs
tovs
corr.

[]'

,

?
.
11.

ei

.
17.

1.

. (.
2.
'

1 4.

Pap.; SO

20 and 31.

Tetheus his mother, greeting. I have received all the letters concerning and with regard to the wheat which the collectors have demanded from you it is admitted (?), but I had forgotten to make any order for payment I have however paid in full the naubion and other taxes. Do not be concerned that the matter about which I wrote to Tlieon has not been carried out and that I have so long been Please receive from Chaeremon engaged with Pausirion's business to no purpose the bearer of this letter 1 1 2 drachmae of silver of which you will give to my friend Sarapion son of Apei loo drachmae and redeem my clothes, with 8 drachmae on account If 1 had had of interest, and keep 4 drachmae for yourself for the expenses of the festival. more 1 would have forwarded a further sum 1 have borrowed to send even this. So pay him the money and get my clothes back safe, and put them in a secure place. Do not be anxious about us, for there is nothing the matter with us and we are at harmony with each Theonas salutes }ou. Salute the boys Apion and his brother Hermatois, Dionutas, other. Heras and his household, those with Nice and tlie little Thaisous, all those with Leonlas the proud and his household, those with Taamois, and Thermoutharion. GoodThe 20th of the month Caesareus. (P.S.) Send me word about this immediately bye. after the festival, whether you received the money and whether you recovered my clothes. (Addressed) To my mother Tetheus.' Salute Dionutas and Theon.
Dionysius
to

which you

write,

;

.

.

.

;

.

.

.

,

4.

/[]
oi

in

which there
10.
14.

rather than

Perhaps

.
:

it is

difficult to

is

not

room
For

for

more than four

see what other supplement can be found for the lacuna, o! is probably the subject letters
;

ofiuXoyot in

connexion with the poll-tax cf note on 478. 22.

ojiSi

/i[o]i.

Cf

114, another letter illustrating the

pawnbroking trade

at

Oxyrhynchus.

268

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

531.

Letter of Cornelius.
2•5 X
1

1-7 cm.

Second century.

A

letter

from a father to his son, giving him good advice, and announcing

the dispatch of clothes and money.

5

, €^ . . (
8\
ae
ev
VI

navTes

oi kv

^^ « ^ . []),
kav
ev
ttj

-

•^(\

e^eis.

6[]

15

(
ecos

20

!€

^^ ,
5e

, . ,
[](
<^,

-

Vf^as,

?
25

. ,

^
-^

(^) (^) , (^) .

"^

5

^- {)
.

532.
TTipi
S>v

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

OiXfii

.
[]

On
30

the verso

4•

of
line.

corr.

Second of from .
30. tepoKi Pap.

COrr.
1

from

t.

8.

of

,. \() . . . :
.
1.

269

6.

1.

12.

above the

line.

20.

above the

'Cornelius to his sweetest son, Hierax, greeting. All our household warmly salutes you and all those with you. Regarding the man about whom you write to me so often, claim nothing until I come to you auspiciously in company with Vestinus and the donkeys. For if the gods will I shall arrive quickly after Mecheir is over, since at present I have Take care not to offend any of the persons at home, and give urgent affairs on hand. your undivided attention to your books, devoting yourself to learning, and then they Receive by Onnophris the white robes which are to be worn with will bring you profit. I shall the purple cloaks, the others you should wear with the myrtle-coloured (?) ones. send you by Anoubas both the money and the monthly supplies and the other pair of scarlet cloaks. You won me over by the dainties, and I will send you the price of these too by Anoubas ; until however Anoubas arrives, you must pay for the provisions of For the yourself and your household out of your own money, until I send you some. month of Tubi there is for yourself what you like, for Phronimus 16 drachmae, for Abascantus and his companions and Myron 9 drachmae, for Secundus 1 2 drachmae. Send Phronimus to Asclepiades in my name, and let him obtain from him an answer Let me know what you want. Good-bye, to the letter which I wrote to him, and send it. my son. Tubi 16. (Addressed) To my son Hierax from his father Cornelius.'
15.

as an epithet of a
18.

Of the known punctuation and meaning of this line are a little difficult. that of amuse seems to be the most suitable and we refer it must making it depend on If is connected with refer to the cloaks, and the sentence means that these were in exchange for the 19. For pevToiyt as the first word of a sentence cf. P. Amh. 135. 11, w'here a comma should be placed after

meanings of
to the

,
:

seems

to

The

^^

in C. P.

be intended, but R. I. 27. 8, and
'

may

('mulberry-coloured ') occurs be the word meant here.

'

.

/
cm.

.

''.

532.

Letter of Heraclides.
21-5x10
Second century.

A

letter

from

Heraclides to
letter
is

20 drachmae.

The

Hatres, reproaching him for not sending on the verso of the papyrus, the rec/o containing

parts of nineteen lines from a taxing-account.

;

270

89 ()
eSei

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
aw6So9

5

•^ ()
/3[<9

[]/36'.

\

1

5

TO?s

ras,

10

5,
Xioy

^^ ras

[[/'^H

,

elSm

-

-^
[

ovy
{

3-

(

of

cSci

corn from
\.

the

line.

20.

Heraclides to his dearest Hatres, greeting. You ought without my writing to you me by Saetas the 20 drachmae, for you know that I paid them here to my partners ; but you have waited all this time without paying me. Be sure therefore to give this sum at once to the bearer of this letter, that you may save me too from trouble. Mind that you do not fail and thereby cause me to come to you and dispute with you about it for indeed I found you at Paomis the other day and wanted to welcome you ; but you would not stay, being oppressed by an evil conscience.'
'

.
(vOicuS
t.

^^ € - .
,
which
of
is

-^ovy
'^"'

^. ?
]^
edpof

irpa^rjs

npos

iXOety

.

kv

rare

-

)(6ow above

ae above

22.

.

crossed through.

15.

of

from .

to have sent

533,

Letter of Apion.
26

-

X

2 7'5 cm.

Late second or early third century.

letter from a father to his son and another person, giving them directions on various matters of business.

A

yaipuv.

Trjs

\]

.
5[]

-^ ^-

,
,

533.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
npc[s]

5

,

[B\]

[€]

&[ ] ' [](
/ij)

() .
xp[€t]ai/

.

rbu

((
(.
Se

.

(

),

euflecDj

]
271
kv

[.]0[.]»;

^

[[\[\ ,[] ^
yt(upyS)V

^ , '
Traph

k[v

. ]€
kav

[]?

[]6''
(
.[.

Tof

]

? ^ ^tovs

[.
.
[.
.

.

.

]!
.[...] yap

{)

yvvaiKi

. ^)

avrfj
.

oi-

.]•[.]

K01S

\]([\ []
[]

^.

jo[.]Te

.]

[]

.

[]

!
avve-

15

yep

{\(
(is

, []
yfoapyov Trjs

.(
kav
t}jv

20

k
puas.

pa(yov) ko(|v) ypaeav

(

( ^ () [) . ^( () ((
ay
e.

-

kK

oyov
(is

kv

5

^.

272

\ ^]
ty e[au 25

[]^}
Sepfjvov
To[v]s

8 8]. ) .
kv
eis

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.,

{')
Tas

€[]€

'[] 86 -('^

'[]

] ^.
.

{) {'iv€Ka

.
above the
22.

.
^^
i/ie[t]i'

tovs vlovs

On
30
3-

the verso

. '.
/
.

'
21.

T1JS

line.

above the

line.

w of

Pap. 6. corn from m.

above the

line.

aw

(

28.

corr,

' Apion to his son Apion and his dearest Horion, many greetings. Before all else pray for your health and for that of your children and wives. All that I wrote in the other letter, in order that I may not repeat it, consider that I wrote also to Horion. I have sent you by Eutyches of Ision Tryphonis 3 orders for payment, two for the cultivators of Maximus, the third for Diogenes son of Issue them at once before Phaophi that they may not be later than the due time. Others were sent to Panechotes the lawyer; get these from him and pay him 64 drachmae. Sell the grass-seed and ask whether he wants the man from Tampitei. Let my revenues which are paid through the cultivators either be placed on deposit at the store-house or be kept in safety in the possession of the cultivators, in order that if the gods will, we may, if they are neglected, have no complications with our adversary, or the cultivators must bear the risk. Do not lease the house of ... to any one except to a woman who intends to live in it, for it is (wrong) to expose such a house to youths, that we may not be caused vexation and annoyance. Tell Zoilus the cultivator from Sento that in accordance with the agreements he must look after the money. Tell the twins also to be careful about the small change, and likewise tell ApoUonius and Dionysius if you can send to Paberke in the eastern toparchy to Pausiris the donkey-driver, that, as they arranged, they are to pay me the jars of wine and must keep their pledge. Get from Harthonis the priest the 20 artabae of wheat, and from Zoilus the cultivator from Sento the 5 artabae of wheat which he borrowed from me. Look out at the office of the strategus a letter of the dioecetes written in the month of Thoth about the substitution of other names for mine in drawing lots for the post of collector. Tell Serenus at the camel-shed that he is to take care of the money. Tell Hermias, scribe of the collectors of money-taxes at Ision Panga, that he is to issue an order for the wheat which he owes me or for the amount which he approves. Let Heraclides

I

.

.

.

.

.

533.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

273

Tell Dionysius son of son of Hermaiscus pay the 6 artabae of wheat on deposit. Epimachus, ex-chief-priest, that I petitioned the dioecetes about the revenue in order that a reduction might be made in the fine of Sarapion son of Phanias. Salute Statia my daughter and Heraclides and Apion, my sons. Salute little Serenus and Copreus and all I pray for your our household individually. Amarantus and Zmaragdus salute you. health. (Addressed) Deliver to my son Apion and Horion.'

((.
3.
4.

Koi

secnis

5.

For an example of a BfXii; above ) (

14.

[!]:
be new.

.

seems
510.

to

17.
3.

IIa[^e']pKi)

/
:

this

what looks more like a rough breathing than any letter. use of the word in the metaphorica' sense of the Latin stomachus
is
:

»
to
SC.

be a compressed way of saying Xeyw
see

\

51.

)

cf.

101. 4-5,

and

for the

Omission of

VI.

COLLATIONS OF HOMERIC FRAGMENTS
//. i-xii.

(The collations of

and the Odyssey are with the text of Ludwich, those
xiii-xxiv with that of

of

//.

La Roche.)

534. 12-9 X 1 8-8 cm. Bottom of a column containing parts of i. 1-15, with stops Third century, written in good-sized and occasional accents. 15 sloping uncials. The first column, as often, was a short one. 535. 1 1 -5 X 5-2 cm. Fragment, containing about ]o letters in a line, of i. 43-59, with stops, accents and breathings. 57 e of Tjyepj^ev above erased. Third
century, written in good-sized irregular uncials.

.
[a)

Iliad.

few letters from near the ends of i. 127-147 from the '5•53•3 cm. bottom of a column, with accents, &c., written on the verso of a second or Third century, in medium-sized sloping uncials. third century account. 537• 9x8-9 cm. Ends of i. 215-220 and beginnings of i. 250-266 (omitting Second or third century, written 265), with elision-marks and paragraphi.

536•

A

in irregular uncials.

538.

^ .
uncials.

part of a leaf from a book containing on the verso 273-297 and on the recto the ends of 318-342, with numerous stops, accents, breathings, elision-marks and a paragraphus. 273 inserted over the line by a second hand. 274 7[[€]]€5€. 277 (apparently). (so probably in 1. 319 \[. 294 322 of above erased. of [?)). 327 328 329 Final added by a second hand. Third century, written in small upright
10-7

X 10 cm.

Upper
i.

the beginnings of

^?

1(•

539.

5-2

X 37 cm.
lines.

Parts of

i.

middles of

Second century, written

575-58^, having from 2 to 10 letters from the in good-sized round uncials. On

the verso parts of 8 lines of a scientific literary work of
[.

some

kind.

7 ]a

Late second or third century. 540. 11-9x16 cm. On the recto parts of a second or third century account and of an obliterated document. On the verso from the top of a column ii. 672-683, 672-9 being practically complete, with numerous accents, &c. added above the line by a second hand. 673 672 and 673 Net/jeus. 672

VI.

COLLATIONS OF HOMERIC FRAGMENTS
^eitrvpov.
TpT)x[[€]]ti''

275
680

[](.
be.

676

683

(((.

677

s

of

'75[[]] added above
Third century, written

the

line.

[

in large uncials of

the oval type.

541.

8-1 X 6-7 cm. Beginnings of ii. 859-873, with accents, &c. 858 Third century, written in medium-sized sloping uncials. 542. 23-8 X 8 cm. Part of a leaf from a book containing on the rccio the beginnings of iii. 371-393 (389 being lost) and on the verso the ends of 394of aye^^at above 418 (413-4 being lost), with accents, &c. 378 404

([].

'.

e.

406 KeXevOovs.

Third century, written

in

medium-sized rather irregular

uncials.

543.

Fragment containing a few letters from the ends of iii. 3619 X2-5 cm. of tvpvv above 364 377, on the verso of a second century document. erased. Late second or third century, erased. above 374 of

Aob\

written in a semi-uncial hand.

544.

few letters from the ends of iv. 182-198, with occasional 196-7 omitted. a second hand. 195 Third century, written in medium-sized sloping uncials. few letters from the beginnings of iv. 478-490, with occa545. 9x4-2 cm.
9-4

X 3-1 cm.
186

accents.

]!^ by
A

A

]'.

and elision-marks, written on the 2'erso of a second century erased. fxe a correction. of fv above 485 After Second or third century, ?). 487 opposite this line in the margin
sional breathings

document.

483

{

written in good-sized upright uncials.

546.

5•68•4 cm.

list.

On the recfo beginning of an early second century taxingOn the verso a few letters from the ends of vii. 237-244 and beginnings

of 264-273 from the tops of two columns, with stops. erased. 268 y above above 239 Cfi-v of

547. 1 1-6 X 21-8 cm. Ends of vii. 324-336 and beginnings of 357-363 from the bottoms of two columns, with accents, &c. 330 be above the line. 333 Second or third century, written in mediumcorr. to '. 359 sized round uncials. 548. 167 X 88 cm. Part of a leaf from a book (numbered on the reeio and on the verso t) containing on the ree/o the earlier parts of ix. 235-268 and on the verso the latter parts of 269-301, with numerous accents, &c. 236
353 ^^0(. erased. 256 e of

(. (.
".
36

272

[9.

237 of bfVTtpov.

8]9.
269
in a semi-

Second century, written

uncial hand.

.

245

«

of

(

»

corr.

246 First

of

iraveo.

264 First

corn from 254 above the line. 259 of a-nvpovs added above the
a

. «'

above

erased,
e

ev.

249

255

of xe above

corrected to
s

line,

of

?

e

(^' .
corr.

at

276
a68
eptTei/x[oio.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
274
of 27° Second 276 ^e 277 adscript added above the line. 288

.

.

]
d

above the line. 286 [[]].
corr.

372

«^[[^.

of avaebvov

290

t

of

above the
7j.

line. corr. of 291 e of 393 Second added later. 296 -nokypprives. 297 Second 1 of Third century, written in medium-sized irregular uncials.

]')
40

\.

and added corr. from
corr.
erji

549.

9-3

X IO-8 cm.

The middle
line.

parts

a column, with a few breathings, &c.

added above the
third century, written in

45 medium-sized round upright

€.

of xi. 39-52

from the bottom of

/]€€.
^

.

41 Second

of

Late second or

uncials.

550.

Fr. (d) 17-8
xi.

10-3 cm.

Two

fragments containing a few letters from the
earlier parts of

ends of
pa TOT

505-516 and 521-547 and the
(a
line

603, with stops and occasional accents, &c.

new

reading).

564

[€€.

535

a]vbpis for

555-567 and 572^6^ ws 5^3 f^^ev with added

.

above the
(a

new

reading).

a critical

for between e and by a second hand. 595 6o2 In the margin opposite this 600 sign ~-. Second century, written in small neat round uncials.

(.

(

be line

On

some second or third century cursive writing. 551• 24-5 X 25-8 cm. Parts of two columns, of which the first is much mutilated and the second nearly complete, containing xiv. 237-253 and 256-283, with
the verso traces of
occasional
stops.

259 [[S]]/x))retpa MSS.). 267

.

(.
232
is

247 249 254 mentioned by Eustathius, but not found
271

.

269 omitted.

of above the line. 276 274 (?) of eovTfs above the line. 275 of being added by om. r'. corr. 282 278 a second hand (?) above erased. Second century, written in a medium(I) being employed and sized formal round uncial, the archaic form of being formed by three distinct strokes. few letters from the ends of xvii. 80-94, with stops. 552. 7-7 X 2-8 cm. Second century, written in medium-sized round upright uncials. 553. 14-1 X 2-5 cm. Fragment of a leaf from a book containing a few letters on the recio from the middles of xix. 97-117 and on the verso from the middles of 133-151, from the tops of two columns, with accents, &c. Third century, written in medium-sized sloping 1 34 'is omitted.

[€ $

,

.

(-.

-ae.

.€[.

in the

A

4]€.

uncials.

554.
in

8•36•

cm.

with stops and occasional accents, &c.

Beginnings of xix. 251—259 from the bottom of a column, 251 xeip[i. Third century, written

medium-sized oval uncials.

555.

3-2x4 cm.

Parts of xix. 417-421, with accents, &c.

418

s

of

']^'

yi.

COLLATIONS OF HOMERIC FRAGMENTS

277
century,

of added above the line. 419 above the line. Third written in medium-sized rather irregular uncials. 556. 8-6 X3-1 cm. A few letters from xx. 241-250 from the top of a with occasional stops, &c. Final of added above the line. or third century, written in a careful upright hand of the oval

]

column,

Second
type of

uncials (cf 26).

557.

6-6

X

6-2 cm.

the verso, the
uncials.

recto

Beginnings of xxi. 372-382, with accents, &c., written on being blank. Third century, written in good-sized

558.

13-5 X 12-6 cm.

A

few letters from the ends of xxii. 115-134 and from

the beginnings of 143-160, from the tops of two columns, with numerous
accents,

([(.
559.

118 of irroXis corr. 121 was apparently omitted. 150 TTp[ii'. Late second or third century, written in medium1^6 sized round upright uncials. On the verso part of a third century letter &c.

beginning

Latter portions of xxii. 1-18 and beginnings of 40-57, with numerous accents, &c., from the tops of two columns. Second century,

•8 2•6
5•88•6

[1
cm.

€[(.

written in small neat round uncials.

560.

cm.

A

few

letters

from the ends of

xxiii.

Third century, written in medium-sized sloping uncials. 561. 10 X 6-2 cm. On the reeio beginnings of 3 lines in third century cursive. On the verso a few letters of xxiv. 282 and 286 and the beginnings of 318-331 from the top of a column, with numerous accents, &c. Late third
or early fourth century, written in round upright uncials.

of 834-847, with occasional accents, &c. (a new reading) roi ' 847

\[]

(.

836

of

775-785 and most corr. from .

{d)

Odyssey.
i.

562.

12-2

X

7

cm.

Latter portions of

131-145, with occasional accents, &c.,
in sloping uncials of

from the top of a column.
oval type.

Third century, written

the

Ends of i. 432-444, with occasional accents, &c., from the 8-7 X4-3 cm. bottom of a" column. At the end part of the title Second or early third century, written in small round uncials resembling 405. 564. 9-7 X 4-2 cm. Beginnings of ii. 315-327, with numerous accents and marks of quantity, &c. Second or third centurj', written in medium-sized
563.

][].

irregular uncials.

565.

8-3 X 6-7

cm.

Earlier portions of

iv.

292-302, with numerous accents, &c.,

278

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

from the top of a column. 292 ot [. 297 century, written in large narrow uncials of the oval type. 566• 15-3 X 4-5 cm. A few letters from the middles of
occasional accents, &c., from the top of a column.
in

.
iv.

Second or

third

iv. 685-708, with Third century, written

567•

medium-sized uncials of the oval type. few letters from the ends of X 2-7 cm. Third century, written in medium-sized &c.
6-9

A

sloping

757-765, with accents, uncials of the
1-20, with
title

oval type.

568•

14-3

X

8-1

accents, &c., from the top of a column.

of the

roll

uncials of the oval type.

?
cm.
207
a€^€[t.

A
|

few letters from the beginnings of

xi.

In the left-hand margin the
in

.

Third century, written
8 lines of

medium-sized sloping
in

569-

8-2

X

12-2 cm.

century cursive.
accents, &c.

On the recto parts of On the verso parts

an account

(?)

second

(] .

195-208, with occasional Second century, written in a small semiof
xi.

uncial hand.

570.

1

1-4

XI 1-8 cm.
65

Parts of xiv. 50-72, 52-6 being nearly complete, the

rest

having

lost the earlier portions,

with occasional accents, &c.
in

eekfis.

Second century, written

54 medium-sized round upright

uncials.

571.

7-ix5'i cm• A few letters from xvi. 1-8, with numerous accents, &c., from the top of a column, i '[[]][?. Late first or second century, written in good-sized round upright uncials. 572• 28-9 X 12-2 cm. Parts of two columns containing a few letters from the ends of xviii. 1-35, and the earlier portions of 56-93, with considerable lacunae numerous accents, &c. 2 adscript of inserted by a second

]\$
t

;

hand.

66

(.

Similarly in ^6

yS

[

.

58

(.

65

,[.] [
12 letters
]

AvyCvoos.

(so apparently, not Ai{tiioos)

€Vf[vnTev.

hand of the oval type. 573. 15x78 cm. On the recfo part of a document in third century cursive. On the verso beginnings of xix. 452-471, with accents, &c., from the bottom of a column. 456 Third century, written in 465
century, written in a small neat uncial

[7.

small sloping uncials of the oval type.

.

Third

VII.

DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY

DOCUMENTS
574

() ^^^?
/3,

3-9X T3-2 cm. mentioning
te

.>

/ '()(,;)
(iTovy)
. . . ,

2apa77aros

see note on 602. 43• connected with For a tax for the maintenance of the rpaxeCircKoV is also new, and is perhaps P. Fay. Towns cf. For official bank; cf. 513. 37, note. nearly complete and for the pig-tax 288. Second century. 53 introd., of extract from a narrative of the preservation On the verso an lines

[. () ' () '^'),
by
ris

^ '
e

On

the recto part of a

list

of

(,.)

£(.)

()

ta

«

[() () /3
{,,v<L•^o\ov)
?)

(Terpti/JoAoi;),

(Irovs)

>,7][

(6/3-)

{)<^^\), vpo<h{Lapa,va)

here

/,

-'
^<\>\{^) (/3)
/3.

payments

for taxes, &c.,

/3()
.
.

/
eh

((5/3

),

.

wk7,s

(3/3').

eo^
(1.

Eurypylus

^dvov

'
1
]

Patroclus

(cf.

(,

hi

^;$
as L•
,/.

>
ei'arat.

,>

)^.', ^^ ^
//.

xi.

575 sqq)•

The

text

is

(1.

^^

rijs

7(9,
m

-)

575.

Acknowledgement addressed by Hatres son of Kouphateus, Sarapion, stating that son of Prometheus and a third person to "Dionys(ius) lentils rent for 3 arourac 2 artabae of wheat, 2 of they owed him as a year's and i of barley for seed (?), and 2 of barley, in addition to i artaba of wheat Dated in the fourteenth year concluding with the signature of Hatres. no). Written in very corrupt Greek upon the of Trajan, Phaophi (a.D. Practically complete. 19 hnes verso, the recio containing only the title.
-2

column. beginning, probably from a previous a semi-uncial hand. 5 lines.

to be supplied at the Second century, written
is

X

7-8

cm.

in all.

576

the tenth year of Trajan, x8.6 cm. On the rec/o a lease dated in a letter from Diogenes incomplete and much obliterated. On the verso parts, the address being Demctrous, nearly complete but obliterated in to
cjo-i

,

r

written on the ree/o.

577.

17-6 X 7-6 cm.

Early second century. 33 lines in Contract for the sale of § of a

all.

^

of a house

28
in the quarter

The formula
TToXd
T7JS

[] ^[]
le,

5
lost.

[6( [] , [] /, ^5 () [) ] [] [)
follows the Ptolemaic style
fir'
.

[$
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
by Sarapion
(of.
. .

to Synistor

and

99)
.

:

— Date

;

k[v

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

ev

ttj

].

Signatures of the buyers.

3. .

.

ras

Zoilus.
.
. .

(V

...

The 300
;

5
;

silver

cf. drachmae are converted into copper at the usual ratio of 450 i Dated in the second year of P. Oxy. II. p. 187 and P. Tebt. I. p. 600. Hadrian, Tubi (a.d. 118). Nearly complete. ^5 lines. 578. 13-1 X 9-2 cm. Beginnings of 15 lines from an account of judicial and /xos proceedings mentioning Second century. Beginning of a document addressed to Apolinarius, 579. 4-8 •7 cm. strategus (cf. 484. 2), and Hierax, basilico-grammateus, by Teos and Thonis,

[09

?
ovTas

[7).
3, note).

-

(6>)
The

Tro'A(ews)

Written about A.D. 138. 6 lines. 580. 4-2 X 16-5 cm. Parts of two columns containing

,[
fvnopov

?

(cf.

483.

official

returns giving the

names
being

of persons eligible for holding various offices, the opening sentence

becv
second
.
.

•][] / 4{)
first

has

.

.

.

ei's

(corr.

from

) ,.

[eTriTiib]eiov

.

;

the

.

rois

(i.e.

the persons addressed) ds

tovs

...

Second century.

II lines in

all.

581.

147 X 63 cm. Conclusion of a notification addressed to the agoranomi of Oxyrhynchus by (Caecilius) Clemens (cf. 241), asking them to register a sale of which the value was 10 talents 3000 drachmae. Cf. 241-2. Dated in the second year of Imp. Caes. Nerva Trajanus Aug. Germ., sixth intercalary day of Caesareus (Aug. 39 A.D. 99). 17 lines. Letter from Demetrius to his brother Heraclides, 582. 10-6 X 14-6 cm.

'' (
beginning
Kfvai
TTj

TlfTcripios

ev

century.

Incomplete.

14

[] ().
lines.

ds bapav Address the

, ,/3
verso.

Second

583.

X 19-8 cm. Will of a woman leaving her property in the first instance husband Plution, and in the second to his two sons who had been adopted by herself, with a legacy of 100 drachmae to his daughter. Cf.
13-6

to her

VII.

DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS
489-93.

281

Dated

in

the fourth year of Hadrian (A.D. 119-20).

the ends of h'nes and most of the signatures being
across the fibres.

584.

the redo an of property at Pela addressed to Ptolemaeus (cf. 75. i) and Tryphon, by a woman in accordance with a decree of the praefect Flavius Titianus. Written about A.D. 129 cf 75 and 481. introd. Incomplete, the end being
1

1-6

X 79 cm.

On

Theon

also called

-

Incomplete,

lost.

18 lines.

Written

\\9,

;

and the ink much obliterated in parts. 18 lines. On the z'erso a similar addressed to the same by Harthonis, concerning house-property at Oxyrhynchus. Written about A.D. 129. Nearly comlost
plete.

\€
/^•.

22

lines.

585.

Conclusion of a horoscope, the date being lost except the hour of the day (the ninth). The sun and Mercury were in Aquarius, Saturn in Scorpio, Jupiter in Pisces, Mars in Sagittarius, Venus in Aries,
12-6 X

93 cm.

the

586•

66•

moon

in Capricorn,

Nemesion

sixteenth year of Imp. Caes. Nerva Trajanus Aug. Germ. Dae. (a.d.
Practically complete.

«? , '
cm.
Receipt for a month's
9
lines.

Second century.

9 lines.

addressed to Socrates by written in rude uncials. Dated in the
12-3).

587•

8•88•3 cm. On the recio beginnings of the last J2 lines On the verso ends of 14 lines of another letter, and on a narrow to this 22 lines of a third letter (beginning ".()
nearly complete but having lost the end.
24-5

588.

X

1

1-5

cm.

Two

Second century. documents glued together, of which the

of an application to the

mortgage 2 arourae, which are declared upon oath to be free from all encumbrances (cf. 483. 18 sqq.). Dated in the eleventh year of Trajan, Phamenoth (a.d. Incomplete. 37 lines. The second document consists of the begin108).
nings of 30 lines of a contract for the land, similar to 504. On the verso

,
letter,
is

of a letter.
strip joined

),
part

first is

()

a.

for leave

to

alienate or

of 2 arourae of catoecic

589•

6-2X11 cm.
Ttapa

Beginning of a

written in a good-sized uncial hand of

the second century.

The
.
.

text
(a

590.

.
16-3

']
cm.

fbav
.

new

title)

xaiptu:
verso.
7 lines.

(fas

Address on the

X

7-5

lessees.

The

land was

Conclusion of a lease with most of the signatures of the leased for three years at the annual rent of

36 drachmae, 3 artabae of wheat and 6 of barley, and ^ artaba of barley for Dated in the sixteenth year of Trajan, Athur (a.d. 11a).
27
lines.

282

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Full name of Hermias son of Spartas. 4-5 X IO-5 cm. Complete. 3 lines.

59L
592.

()

5-ixai.5cm.
Upei

from Herais, referring to a dispute with Marcus Antonius for a sum of money. Above the petition is bb[oL•ov the last line, ... of an official letter (probably to the strategus) covering the petition, which thus formed part of a series of documents arranged as in 485 cf. especially 11. 5 sqq. Dated in the seventh year of Hadrian (a.d. 132-3). ^° lines. On the verso 6 incomplete lines from a list of names. 593. i5'i ^ ^'5 ^'^• Lease of 2 arourae at from Thrasyllous to Sarapion for four years and four inundations at an annual rent of 8 artabae of wheat and 33 drachmae, the land to be cultivated with any crop (cf 101. Title on the verso. Written in the thirteenth year of Aurelius Anto13). ninus (a.d. 173-3). Incomplete, the end being lost. 39 lines. 594. 7•3 X 15-3 cm. Conclusion of a petition mentioning the praefect Sempronius Liberalis Dated in the twenty-second year (of Antoninus),
Asclepiades about an
,

,/
\ {)
{).

Second century.

Beginning of a petition to Sarapion,

[

rrj

]\

-

;

^( ^
$
receipts

Tubi (a.d. 159). 6 incomplete lines. 595. S'2) X 1 1-6 cm. Beginning of a monthly return of

by
596•

the sitologi

($)

{).

Written

in the nineteenth

()
in

year of Antoninus (a.d. 156). 4 lines. 63 X 13-9 cm. Horoscopes of two persons.
thirteenth year of Antoninus

and Venus were
Aries,

Mars

in Sagittarius,

second year of Antoninus
Pisces, the

moon

Venus
597.
12-8

in

Taurus.

x6 cm.
]

the Arsinoite nome, from a

&

[

(()/3)

Second century. 10 lines, of which the beginnings are lost. Beginning of a letter, which was left unfinished, from 598. 9-4 X 14-3 cm. Andronicus to his father Statilius Phanias. Second century, written in
irregular uncials.

().

()/
€ts
[
]
[

, - [] , []{) ([) [4)
[]
]

in Capricorn, the

^

The
e

first
;

was born

in the

els

vvktos

the sun. Mercury

moon

in Pisces,

Saturn and Jupiter in
the
the sun being in

in Libra.
eis

The second was born

a

in

Gemini, Saturn and Mercury in Aquarius, Mars and

Written about A.D. 150. Nearly complete. 17 lines. Letter to Macer, strategus of the division of Heraclides in
continuing

';,

()

[

?

[-

] .

(»)

?]

[

,]/

'^ ()

5

lines.

VII.

DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS
5-1

283

599•

X 13-4 cm.

KaroirirTjt
btaarjs

.).
A
(1.

short letter written across the fibres

:

bfv

Xi'ye iTfpi
first

Late

or second century.

Complete.

3 lines.

600-

23-2 X 14-5.

P. Cairo 10004.

On

the recto parts of two columns giving

measurements of land and buildings. Early second century. Incomplete Dated in the and much effaced. On the verso a similar document. sixteenth year of Hadrian (a.D. 132). Complete. 18 lines, partly obliterated. 601. 177 X 11-8. P. Cairo 10005. Letter addressed to the agoranomi of Oxyrhynchus by an official (cf 106-7), stating that Harpocras had received back from the public archives the will which he had made four years before. Dated in the nineteenth year of Trajan, Epeiph (a.D. 117). Nearly complete, but broken at the top. 13 lines. 602. 22-8 X 13-9. P, Cairo looio. Letter from Dionysius to Heraclides, abo?, stating that he would procure a boat was and inviting him to come and stay until the boat found. Address on the verso. Second century. Complete. 1 1 lines. 603. 18.5 X 1 8-5 cm. Marriage-contract, in which the husband (who speaks in and the first person) acknowledges the receipt of the dowry and

^
(;),
century.

()

promises not to alienate his house-property without his wife's consent (cf. were to be repaid 496. 7-8). In the event of a divorce the

,
first

an extra allowance if the Written in a semi-uncial hand in the sole Incomplete, the earlier portions reign of IVTarcus Aurelius (A.D. 169-176). of lines being lost throughout, besides other lacunae. 39 lines. 604. 81 X 13-7 cm. Parts of 13 lines from the beginning of a marriageEarly second contract, written (across the fibres) «Vi
in sixty days, \vith

immediately and the dowry
(cf.

wife was eywos

496. 10).

^.

605. 17x98 cm.
signatures.

Part of the conclusion
first

of a

marriage-contract with the
21 incomplete lines.

606.

Late Height 3-5 cm.

or early second century.

Parts of 8 lines from a marriage-contract, written across
title.

the fibres.

On

the verso parts of 2 lines of the

Late

or early

second century.

607•

16-8x9 cm.
hand

Parts of II lines from the conclusion of a marriage-contract,

another column having probably preceded.
uncial
in the fourteenth

Written

in

a good-sized round
(i.e.

year of an emperor, probably Trajan

A.D. IIO-l).

608• on the
parts.

23•8 cm.
verso.

Letter from Horion to his sister Taiioukon (?) Address Second century. Nearly complete, but much obliterated in

25

lines.

284

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

609.

7(;) ()
6 X
'j•'^

cm.

An

order

610).

610.

Second century. Complete. 4 lines. 4-6 X 7.4 cm. Another order for payment
Tiapa
?

(
for

payment

:

"

'^ ()
in the
pi/3,

isapa

',

la>{vos)
?

{)
;

(sc.

biaareiXov

cf.

[
611.

]{) (^) ()
biaaTei\o(v).

same hand
be

&[)
4

as

609

Second century.

15-1

X

6-7

cm.

An

official order,

written in very bad Greek.

bi^ai
^

[[€7-]]

Second century. Complete. 13 lines. 612. 9-3x13• I cm. Receipt issued by the sitologi of the eastern toparchy TOttoiv for 15I artabae of wheat paid by ) Ptolemais cf. 89, 90, 287 and 517-8. Dated in the reign of Trajan, who

}.

[) €
(1.

Complete.

lines.

,
:

The

(\\]

text

is

)

{€)

{) [)
The

{
()
. D.

;

has the
being

title

Dacicus
7 lines.

(a. D.

103-117).

Incomplete, the beginnings of lines

lost.

613•

of Diogas, with the

() [) ()
6
lines.

6-4x13 cm.

Receipt for
(erous)

i

artaba of wheat paid out from the deposit

'
614.

(2nd hand)

'^ ()(?). , '() (^) (([] bv
is

signature of the recipient.

Mofi/x^ov)

-(^)

Cf. 516.

/
[eTovs)

text

AotTr(oi')

{) {) ()
Cominb

.

Wi'itten about

55•

plete.

7•8 cm. Receipt for 30 artabae of wheat paid out by sitologi to Asclepiades from the deposit of Heraclides. The text is

•9

'[) ' (){) () {).
()
6e//(aroj)

()
cm. 5
of the

€{) () ()
.
toparchy.

'A^br|

()
() .
in

(•(7)')

>baov ()
D. 179-80.

, /

Written

.'
Complete.

[^ ^)
by the
Nearly

13 lines.

615.

7•36
sitologi

Receipt, similar to 614, for 65 artabae paid out
eastern

Written

in

A. D.

179-80.

complete.

lines.

616.

119X113

cm.

Receipt, similar to 614, for various amounts of wheat,
8 choenices in
all,

making 7^ artabae

paid out

by

sitologi to

Ammonius,

with the signatures of two persons not previously mentioned (sitologi ?) authorizing the payment {beov). Written about A.D. 163. Incomplete.
14
lines.

Written on the

ve?'so,

the recio being blank.

VII.

617.

)
14-8

DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS
X 74 cm.
7

285

({) '().
lines.

Receipt for 6\ artabae of wheat paid (6i€^r(aXjj) th Cf 517-8. Written in D. 134-5.

.

Complete.

618. 619.

84x5

cm.

Similar receipt for 38 artabae.

Written
8 lines.

in

A. D.

179-80.

Incomplete, having lost the beginnings of lines.

{)
15
to

30 X

]

73 cm.

Authorization, similar to 516, addressed to the sitologi
for

by Sarapion,
Cf.

the

payment

of various

different persons.
lines.

516. introd.

Written about A. D. 147.
addressed
the
to

amounts of wheat to Complete.
the
sitologi

620.

98 X

7-9

cm.
(?)

Similar

authorization

by Dionysius
6

for

payment of i3| artabae

Epimachus through Demetrius
signature

also called

{().
latter's

{)

Theon, concluding with the

6;6()
by Dionysia
to the sitologi

Dated

in the eleventh
lines.

year of Antoninus, Thoth (a.D. 147).

Practically complete.

621.

8-4

X I03 cm.
(sc.

)

30

Similar authorization issued
for the

payment of

3 artabae.

Written across the

fibres in A. D. 163-4.

Nearly complete.
in
all.

12 lines.

622.
for

14-4

X

7-4 cm.

Similar authorization issued by Dionysius and ApoUonius
(a.D. 161).

the
IO-6

payment of 60 artabae
7-6

M. Aurelius and Verus, Athur
623.

Dated in the second year of Nearly complete. 19 lines.

[]5,

X

for

cm. Similar authorization issued by Dorion, 6 payments to Amois and Thoteous. Written about A.D. 146.

624.

Nearly complete. 14 lines. Similar authorization issued by Isidora for the payment 10-7 X 5-5 cm. of II artabae 8 choenices to Herais. Dated in the twelfth year of Antoninus, Thoth (a.D. 14^)• Nearly complete. 15 lines, 625. 9-1 X 11-7 cm. Similar authorization issued by Theon,

'[\(,
626.
8

to the sitologi

TOTiapxCas

for the
in the
lines.

payment of 3I artabae
of Hadrian, Phaophi
(a.

to Hephaestion.

Dated
10

twenty-second year

d

137).

Complete.
(cf

X

7-6

cm.

Similar authorization issued

of the eastern toparchy
to Zoilus.

4()

by Heraclides to the sitologi 621) for the payment of 5 artabae

Nearly complete. 11 lines. 627. 10 X 8-1 cm. Similar authorization issued by Alexandrus for the payment of 50 artabae. Dated in the twelfth year of Antoninus, Phaophi (a.D. 148).
Written
in

A.D. 166-7.

Practically complete.

9 lines.

628.

94 X
for the

ii-i

cm.

Similar authorization issued
of 33 artabae to Andronicus.

payment

by Diogenes and Chaeremon Dated in the twenty-second

286

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
year of Antoninus, sixth intercalary day of Mesore (Aug. 29, A. D. 159). Practically complete. 7 lines.

629.

13-2 X 7-7

cm.
i|-

Similar
all.

authorization

issued

by Idomeneus
18 lines.

for

the

payment of

(. D.
630.
I
J

159-60).

xi3'3 cm.
(sc.

A. D. 161.

)
cm.
8 lines.

artabae in

Dated

in

the twenty-third year of Antoninus

Written across the

fibres.

Incomplete.

Similar authorization addressed to the sitologi

0$
payment

by Achilleus

for

various payments.
lines.

Written about

Practically complete.

13

631.

ii-8x57 cm.

Similar authorization addressed to the sitologi of the

middle toparchy KepKevpiov
of 30 artabae to Theon.

by Alexandrus
Dated
12
lines.

for the

in the twenty-second year of Antoninus,

Thoth
632.

(a. d. 158).

Complete.
for the

()
the
1 1-7

8•6•2

Similar authorization addressed to the sitologi

(

by Chaeremon

payment of

2 artabae to Apollonia.
159).

Dated
Nearly

in

twenty-third year

of Antoninus, Phaophi (a. d.

complete.

633.

(/)

X IO-8 cm.

of i§| arourae (ij
ex

land at

drachmae

to Demetrous,

(
Cf.

Fragment from the conclusion of a contract
^^2

roC

of the signatures.

Upas Tivbs cf. 506. 37> note. Early second century. 25 lines. 634. 23-8 X 30-4 cm. Will of Aunchis daughter of Isas. The testatrix bequeaths her house-property, &c., to her husband Abascantus, giving to Tycharous, the slave of Diogenes, for her lifetime the right to live in the
ov]aiaKTJs
;

[

who was under age, through her father, 504. The land was to be delivered free

'

for the sale

tVi being the half of 2| | |) of catoecic
for

90°

silver

(

with most

house and probably a sum of money. If Tycharous was freed within a year from the death of the testatrix, Abascantus had to give her 500 drachmae more. If she was freed after that date or not freed at all, other provisions were made. There follow (i) the signatures of Aunchis

and the usual
(cf.

six witnesses, the seal of the sixth witness being

and

title

;

cf.

494. 31, note), (2) the docket of the (3) the date 489. Dated in the eleventh year of Hadrian, Neos Sebastos

,
lost,

(a. d. 126).

Written across the fibres. 635. 14-5 X 14-5 cm. Parts of 28 lines of a petition by Ammonius and others, beginning
lacunae.

... date in the Marcus Aurelius and Commodus (probably the date of the

(
30

Incomplete, the latter halves of lines being
lines.

.

.

.

\

, }( ](
]

besides other

joint reign of

petition itself)

VII.
is

DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS
in

.
11.

mentioned

in

11.

1% sqq. to
... It
is

clear from these indications that Sanctus entered office
later

\.
8-9.

287

A copy of

the previous petition referred to follows
hi'

?)

at

some period

than March 38 A. D. 177, when

it

is

known from

B. G. U. 525 that T. Pactumeius

death of M. Aurelius
the Flavius Priscus

znr alien Geschichte I. pp. 477-8. 636. 105 X 8.8 cm. Supplementary return of property addressed to Sarapion by Ptollis cf. 72 and 481. The formula is and Sarapiades,
; .
.

(sc.

the writer's wife)

of Trajan are mentioned, and the return was probably

,( '
in

Magnus was
1

praefect,

but prior to the

March

A. D.

80.

(?)

mentioned

in B. G.

U.

His successor was very likely 1 2 cf. P. Meyer, Bcitriige
;

.

ot/ctaj

.

.

.

€([] (
The
first

.

.

.

havdov.

and sixth years_
in A. D.

made
lost.

cf 481, introd. and 483. 32.

Incomplete, the end being

637.
. .

12x7-5 cm.
ovTOiS
.

^,
.
. .

Return of property, similar to 481. ds
[^

24 The formula

(

Trept
is

/
Athur

109

;

lines.
is

dwoypa-

The

twelfth year of Trajan

mentioned and the return

was probably made
lost.

in A. D. 109.

Incomplete, the beginning and end being

21

lines.

638.

II-2X77 cm.

best preserved portion relating to the terms
inherited

Conclusion of a declaration apparently similar to 75, the upon which the property was

([ ]
;

cf.

75. 29 sqq.

( ^
in
.
.

77];'

.

.

.

[(]4>
sv
[er]

("

...
30
lines,

Dated

the sixteenth year of Trajan,

^
erei

.

.

.

much
(1.

obliterated.

639.

19-8x11 cm.

Lease of an
.

')
.
.

e^•o^I•peos
at

Psobthis in the middle toparchy

!
tijs

].
112).

(a. D.

by

Sarapion and Exacon and their mother Caecilia Polla (cf. 506. 3-4) to Horus, a Persian of the Epigone, for three years from Tubi of the seventh year of Trajan, the annual rent being 160 drachmae, paid half in Athur and half in Written in the seventh year of Trajan Choiak, and 3 artabae
(a. D.

640.

' ^ {) /! (
.

103-4).

Incomplete.

J2-I

xii-6 cm.

40 lines. Conclusion of a lease of land, ending
virip

(

bi

( -[]
(
tros

eis

) ('•)

&9

TtivTf

hi

baavs

,'

288

fifth

(
26-1

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ear

[\(( ('
(A. D.

year of Hadrian

lao-i).

,
23

^

...

Dated

the

h'nes.
(cf.

641.

X

7-6

cm.

Notice from Dio^nysius]
(?)

cerning the cession

of 5 arourae of catoecic land ;

346) to the agoranomi concf. 47-8. Dated in the

Neos Sebastos (a. d. 100). Incomplete, being in two fragments of which the first has only the beginnings of lines. 25 lines in all. 642. 207 X 14-3 cm. Conclusion of a letter from Anoubion son of Julius, to a high official, ending
fourth year of Trajan,

^ ," ,
paaes

7)

evvoias

aperrji

Second century, written in a large semi-uncial hand. 12 lines. Upper portions of two columns of an account of pay643. 9-3 X 14-8 cm. ments for various purposes, the silver drachmae and copper obols being kept distinct, (or w ?) occurs. Second century. 13 lines

, ,.
Tfjs

! [] ,

tovs

(/)
24

ij

in

all.

644.

23-2

X 197 cm.

Letter from Dionysas to his sister Nice, asking her to
&c., written in rude uncials.

send him a letter Incomplete. century.

{),
lines.

Second

645is

Fr. [a)

124

9-6

cm.
the
his

Two

fragments, containing the latter portions of
to the writer's sister, the second, which
reference
to

lines of

two

letters,

first (8 lines)

much

longer,

to

brother Enthesmus with

farming

operations, &c.

646. 22x18 cm. Will of Plution son of Ischyrion, written in the reign of Hadrian (a. D. 117-138). The testator bequeaths his house-property, &c., to his sons, of whom one was another in equal portions, except
. .

.]s

bov [767]7

9, , ^
h

aabp^

yfpbiaKov
.
,

.

and there are other legacies to his wife Sarapous and to the nurse of his children. At the end are the signatures of the testator and six witnesses, two of whose seals are and respectively, docket and Written across the fibres. Incomplete, having lost the title cf. 489-495. beginnings and ends of lines. 33 lines. 647. 15-2 X 84 cm. Beginnings of lines of the will of a woman, dated in the

,
.

.

.

^]

'{}

;

eighth year of an emperor.

Early second century.

18

lines,

the writing

being across the

fibres.

648. 28 X 8.6 cm. Fragment of the will of Sarapion, written in the reign of Parts of Hadrian (a. D. 117-138). The village (?) of is mentioned.
43
lines,

^

written across the fibres.
15-1

649.

26-2

X

cm.

Latter portions of lines of the will of Heracles son of

VII.

DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS

289

Sarapas, leaving his property to his two sons Sarapas and Petosarapis who have to make a payment to Zoilus. The seal of one of the witnesses is Early second century. 37 lines, written across the fibres. 650. 77 X 3•6 cm. Parts of 1 1 lines from the beginning of a will of a woman,

^.
12

written in a small semi-uncial

hand across the

fibres in the late first or early

second century.
651.

X

13-2 cm.

Beginnings of 13 lines of the

will of

Amois, dated

in the

eleventh year of Hadrian (a. D. 136-7).

his children, a guardian being appointed for them,

cf. note on Written across the fibres. 652. 7x12-5 cm. Ends of 13 lines from the will of a woman, written across the fibres. Early second century. 653. Height 33-7 cm. Two fragments of a long roll, the first (a) containing
(i. e.
;

reached
491.
6).

vos

^
4^

The

testator leaves his property to
if

minors, until they

twenty-five years probably

two columns of a list of payments for vav[\ov?) and (cf. 525. 7, note), by various persons for different years ranging from the twenty-first (of Antoninus) to the third of Marcus Aurelius

{?),
of another

'(^)

•{), ((),
sells in

and Verus

(a. D. 162-3).

lines.

Fr. (i) contains the

ends of 16 lines
a different

column of the same
trial

taxing-list,

and on another

hand an account of a

held before the praefect L. Volusius Maecianus.

The

]. [] ' [ [ ( [] ' - ]. €[ ' [] , []
(} []
1.

surface of this selis is much damaged and much of the writing of the upper portion has been obliterated. The dispute arose in connexion with a mortgage upon the property of Voltimus which had been seized by the creditor, Sempronius Orestinus. The advocates Isidorus and Crcpinus (1. Crispinus ?) appear for Orestinus and Voltimus respectively, and a previous trial before the chiliarch Honoratus is mentioned. Lines 1-2 'E[^j

.[]
.]
.

[(erovs)

.

Kai[(rapo]s

.

[.

.

.]

ei'e[.

.]....[..

\']
14

viraKovcravTOS,
. .
.

,[[]
"

[ev ?]

'Opearivov

[]

Lines 9-10
vnep

.

.

[\](? ....

«

(veabe

occurs.
€t77ev

'
.
.

.[

, '."
]
.

Ttepl

(

[ \(]

"
]

7[]''

(

baviov

[ ([(]
1

Lines i8sqq.
8

.

.

.

letters

]('[
]
.

\(
.]

.

.

.

6

baveioV
"
[•

fiireV

•]"?

[

&(((
tlvai,

baveiov

[

([\(]

[] []

\((.

290

€..((
"

. ] / ." ' [] -, -', ^ [], 5[ ." ( .
THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
'

[

(.'
]7/
.

MaiKLavo[s

\. [."
efre
ju.7;re

^bos

(\
"

"

[baviov

]€

«!)•

tokovs

Kenap

MaiKiaroy

(Inev

"

(vebeas.

etre

(€,

?)^
[\](
ttvai

6

6

XeyovTOS

eirat

![,]
eav

b(

K(pbei

KttL

orrep

bapr|[e
Ttts

.

.]

;[]

TLves be

"

(

24
bSis,"

letters
"

[b,]av
trial

(( ."
02;

etwev "

KeyovTos
diKa[to]i5^er."

(iiTfv'

The remains

took place before the end of the reign of Antoninus Pius, and the praefecture of L. Volusius Maecianus, which has been the subject of much dispute (cf. P. Meyer, Hermes xxxiii.
of the date
p.

show that the

362 and Stein, Oesterr. Jahreshefte

ii,

Beiblatt Col. 107

and

ibid,

iii,

Col. 222), therefore

of Postumus (B.
(cf.

began before G. U. 388) in

May
A. D.

A. D. 161.

161

The supposed praefecture may now be finally dismissed

is

p.

Meyer in Beitrdge zicr alien Geschichie I. p. 478), but some doubt thrown upon the date assigned by De Ricci {Proc. Soc. Bibl. Arch. 1902 65) and P. Meyer (1. c.) to the praefecture of T. Furius Victorinus, since
P.

the praefecture of L. Volusius Maecianus
Syriacus.

may occupy the whole period between the praefectures of M. Sempronius Liberalis and M. Annius
29
lines.

;

INDICES

!
3 413. 68.

I.

NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS.
iMeros

468.

12.

464. 53•

'Aiijra

409.

22.
;

413. 184. 410. 75•
iixowrfi

412. 28.

/
«ycii/

409. 27; 413. 135; 441. 17 ; 464. g, 23, 58; 465. 206. 465. I08. iiyai^aKTelv 418. 1 9.

411. 44, 65 417. 37. 411. 46, 73, 88, II4;

409. 106.
4X8. 17. 410. (Doric Perf. 414. g, 35 >
;

(9 467.
ZeXos
i-r

415. I. 413. 2o6
4
6.
(?).

(?);

421.

4.

409.
439.

9,

25, 63.

404. 7• 468. 3. ayyeXXftu 405. 42
dyyeioK

(?).

413.

100,
17.
8.

169,

179.

aye
ayXaifi

409.
426.

421. 14•
1

dyopa 409. 48; 418. 18. dypa^^aros 465. 117.
&ypios

: ^
aipfiv
;

409.
3.

17.

413. 72, 73, 148, 178, 204. ( Ke 410. 3. 418. 30. niyiO;^o? 421. 9. 465. 25. 414. 2 1. (uVifi..- 416. 17. AiAi'u 412. 6o.

:) : :
u/coieii'

435.

2.

413. 50, 54 2 29409. 23 ; 410. 8
4cl3. 123.
5•

413. 146.

dypof 413. 118;
dya>»'

420.

8.

415.
)

(409.

ayu)i'(

413. 213 viarg. I04 415.
;

3.

404. 42. aii/oXoyos 465. 161. Ai'oXeir 469. 5. 408. 54 (?).
413. 49, 151, 152, 224,

; 8(
aSetv

aSdv 465. 30, 32. 422. 10.

: ( /« : : (
403.
uXyiira'f

(

413. 6. 413. 185. 412. 64.

8. •:/3) 411. 15
422.
5•

465. 1 95• 465. 408. 25, 68

;

425.

2.

el saep.

413. 12 6.

406. 17405. 25; 409. 9°;
I,

443.

.
443. g. 531 430. 2; 442.
:

«409.
II.
SStKos
att

413. 98

410. 24.

:
12.
<]/(ijpios

225 466. 13. 408. 23; 422. 5. 409. 9 1. 410. 77. 410. 7' 414. 7•
!

410.

12,

3;

412. 46,
;

-or

409. 45; 414•
22.

19•

413. 413. 45> 221

5•

;

418.

403.

ud'SfiK

412. 37. 413. 72 465. 21, 27. 421. 7•
;

411. 49•

417. 24. 407. 5~7•

>€'

49 413. 125, 99~20 437. 464. 6, 2; 465. 170, 82, 93• 412. 51 420. 2 464 6; 465. 75• (iXoyicTTot 413. 1 19. 464. 59• 416. II, 22 423. 427. 2.

:
1

;

;

;

-

;

;

4:03. 28;
4•

416.

1

6.

dduraror 423. 3-

464. 55•
2

407.

;

292

INDICES
414. 37•
7.

'
407.

412. 17

423. 426. 13;

.

421.

5•
6'J.

408.

' !
22;
01/75./

415.

14;
;

115, 179) 203

465. 37> 468. 4•

'

408. 64; 418. 24,
426. 17•
413.

26, 32;

419. 4 (")• 403. 4• 412. 2 2. 413. 12 8.
411. II

20.

411. 30, 411. 89. 413. 39 ; 574.

4.

>413. 123;

;

417. 3^• 412. 42.

avriSiKot 4,65. 104, 175•
ai/rtKpvf

465. 24, 26.
413. 43• 413. 17. 412. 50• 413. 3•

.

436.11.

'/'
aj/tiyeii'

423. 12. 423. II.
413. 94• 413. 88, 415. 2.

/ ^

410. 3• 427. 4•

vay(v
dra-y/iaiof

443.

,
1

1 6.

nvahfxeaeai 416.

( '

/ ^^
177•

9.

413. 43• 413. 43. 27• 409. 62; 413. 158,

/ (
423.

413. 153; 470. 34• 431. 2. 410. 2, 46; 411. 32. 411. 8; 412. 47• 408. 56; 412. 17.
9•
1

465. 74•

409. 53• 404. 5• 464. 27.
413. 49) 224.

413. 12 2, 413.

42; 574.
;

465. 28.

40

417.

412. 57•

3_; 465. 33413. 33• Q7rar413. 98; 432. 13.

(413. 6(?).
'Apyfios 411.

{() 408.
4•

65.

408. 58.
'Apyos 426. 12.

466. 2g. 415. 3•
411. 90. 411. 9• 466. 3^•

-/ ({

«1/01408. 37; 419. 6; 428. 413. 1 5 1. ) 413. 57•

412. 31 averos 413. 89.

/ ^ /
45•

/
aneCKeiv
afffXaweii/
5•

((

409. 97•
413. 53•
94•
1 6.

409.

439. 12. 467. 5•

421.

443. 21. 422. 6. 413. 1 63;
412. 34•

420.

"7 464.

56. aperij 436. 8 (?).
9-

;/ 409.

f OS

413. 421.

8. 6.

(?)

409. ^6. avariWeLV 465. 20. avaTiuevai 408. 6. 420.
.

409. 5•

413.
15,
;

85•

411. 75•

465.

6,
413.

6.
24•

!

435. 1 8. 414. 409. 86 411. 419. 13; 39; 415. 420. 427. 430. ; 432. 4; 441. 15; 465.
;

2

;

;

;

;

^ /
78';(
470.33•

/ (/
5•
/at

413. 88. 432. 1 6.
24.

(7-/3«/ 466.

€ /

464.

4^'}

470.

14,

20, 32, 51, 86.

465.

1

63.

465. 36• 403. 2 3410.

.
;

'(
;

438. 5
?)

413. 170, 171. 412. 20. ;

437. 12. 432. 8 marg.

413. 157

415. 21

411. 96.

413. 50. 413. 127; 148, 158. 413. 1 66.

465.

403. 23

;

409.

433. 13. 410. 93 (0• 427. 5• 409. 49; 412. 6; 413. 192, 219; 414. ,

)
apaf

.
apoTOS

408. 56. 429.

.
1

413.

17.

,

^!/

429. 4 409.

;
(?).

417. 25.
1

412. 24.
40,
56, 224.

465. 43• 465. 1 49• 465. 47•

417. 34• 413. 103.

;(
57)

416. introd. 412. 59•

409. 55.

62

442. 13,
apxetov 412. 59•

2

1.

413.

82;

465. 25.

1

/.

NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS

293
53.

410. 4

;

465. 23.

408. 32.

"
&(

465.

(i/JXtTfKTomF 412. 67.

'((;!•

422. 3• 442. 2 4

-\(
e/

(?).

/ '
412. 54•
Stikvos

-!
;

416. 7• 410. 97• 441. ig•

464. 58. 464. 48.

409. 02,
413.
1

1 05•

€ (
0apijs
jSaatXf/a

464. 39418. 26; 465. 177• 465. 1 6,

yeVot

413.

'8;
'^4,

465.

(^)

9•
yepas 416.

,
159,
1

112.

413.

68,

408. 3°; 413. 58

/3 413. 6.
418. 15467.

saep.; 418. 10; 465. 69. 173, 174, 177. 181.

413.
8.

1

8,

28;

(
151,

77•

407. 2. 465. 223. 403. 1 1 409. II, 03
III, 114,

;

404. 4 1
413.

;

6,

;

6,

8,
66,
;

131. 138, 173, 178,

76.

408.

31.

^7fia

(
Bias

>'>)

464. 46.
421. 15.

410. 17. 413. 89, 9'•

464. 47• 464. 39aroKos 465. 53• 418. 13, 20.

409. 8. 409. 32.

drupfijs

!
' ! ^
69.
jSnSiffiK
j3<;ior

-

409. 3• 408. 6.

^;!/ 413.
152,

.8.
2 4.

412. 66.

&
1

417. 4°; 179; 414. 38 418. II, 13; 427. 465. 40, 154 467. 2, 5; 470. 9 '/ •5'"*• 412. 53 418. 2 7 438. 12. 425. 4• 465. 65. 408. 67.

;

;

>

;

427. 3; 465. 67,

22,

413. 177

;

414.

7•

464. 415.

3•

.
410.
1
1

55•
465. 29. 413. 125; 464. 42.

406.
414. 21.

5*

411. 98•
7-

<iiToa;(fSiafeii'

413. 93• 413. 1 9• 416. 3•

3

408. 26. 409. 48, 94 469;

425. 9. 465. 114,

'8

;

470.

6.

470.
412.

2

1

f/

•/!.

/3
3•
412.

, ;
;^/)'

2 6.

{{)?) 465.
464. 54'lovXtos

105. 411. 5°; 413. 184.

,

((
421.
ya'ia

409. 86. 470. 9• 403. 2 2.

)5

412. 4°. 419. 3(?)

8
413.
8.

(( 3409.88;
1

407. 3! 411. 112; 413. 24•
412. 37, 42.

109,

-

49, 68.

410. 5
413.

;

418. 24.
1

408. 37•
1

8.

465. 103. 413.133175; 415. 5. 6, 17; 438.
76.

465. 203. 413. 196, 199! 418. 433. 2; 465. 421.

-^ 466.

8,

;

;

146, 152,
1 6.

53•

464. 12,
;

17, 51

412. 3".

408. 38

425. 426.

.

422.
(?)•

4.

4

SeSievai

470. 35 409. 99(?)•

( saep.
438.15-

**•

'7•

437. 5
412.
1 5, 1 8.

SfiKcwiu 413. 126
Sfii-

;

^ai'i/fii/

409. 46. 470. 37•
412. 29. 413. I, 69;

433. 14. 435. 9•

4. 24,
3•

409. 91
yfAiv 413.

;

173,
4- 6,

429. 7• 181; 425.
II.

('must') 409. 14; 410. 21; 413. 44, 48. 181; 416. 18. S(w (' bind ') 411. 74 ; 418.
31•

28.

5; 469.

'

406. 15

(?)•

ycvf
yiViffis

4.

5•
13•

413. 88, 89; 428. 413. 96.

403.

12.

yfvvav

464. 32. 418. 465. ^.

5( « 6((

8f;|.t

414. 60 (.'). 413. 44, 2 20. 416. 5.

409, 98.

1

;

294

((( 411.
8(\! 408.

119.
69.

hevhpov 413. 124.

465. 164; 466.

4,

8,

6416.
fieWoiTO
fifCpo

^
devTfpoi
6.7

21.

^
414.
1

•^

INDICES
1 6.

410. 413.

6.

(
;

et'ee'rai

403. 404.

9•

403. 5• 409. 409. 42
8.

.
411.

410.
52

;

12

(?).
;

€' 421.

39; 429.

15; 409. 65; 8; 411. 46; 412. 413. 185; 415. ;
6.
7• 6.

413. 106. 413. 187. 413. 97. 98, 100.
;

409. 22 409. 12

410. II, 25. 443. 5415. 1 6.

£
«

465. 199; 469. 14; 470. 56, 58-

9>

409. 3•
410. 27, 417. 33•

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410. 6 86 413. 3.38,158, 173.207;
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411. 55•

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409. 52 415. 5• 412. 25; 413. 66, 90,

114,

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464. 53
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8.

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NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS
19.

295
;
;

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116;

47.

464. 'J. 464. 54. 428. 7•
33 412. 436. 5• 465. 63.
;

413. 180. (nifUfta 410. 15. fViftxif 410. 1 1 1 415.
eV<S<Soraf

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2.

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3444•

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fViKpiVft»

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cvTfpov
f'vTp(nfii>

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6.

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((( . . 8

fV«^ 412. 55 (?). 464. 1 8. 418. 25.
412. 52. 410.
1 1

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411. 8 1.

411. 33

J

469.

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404.

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412. 55•

465. 41• 404. 7•
417. 29
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fViop/cof

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;

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58.

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2,

418. 15•
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145• 411. 255•

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426. 7403. 8. 413. 97. 103;
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413. 142. 412. 16. 412. 46. 412. 2 2. 413. 223. 416. 7• 411. 86. 413. 37•
411.
2

( (
14•

433. 32 464. 19 465. ilrtpos 68, 154; 466. 16. 424. 9. 409. ^i. 52 -7/411. 62, 118; 413. 177; 411. 422. 6. 413. 4> 42, 17°• 442. 413. 9^, 172 50 (?). evSfti' 464. 60. (vepytaia 443. 2.
;

403. 21. 435. 3• (i^if 430. 4• fCKatpos 413. 160
fifpyeTeiv

;

438.

.

413. 4• 414. 5•

408. 57-

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412. 50• €paf 413. 107.

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/iif^f

413. 106. 417. 20, 36.

409. 66.
412. 24.
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418.
2
;

409. 104. 409. 51 411• 02. 413. 118 420. 5 (•
;

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574. 412. 39•

412. 5^

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408. 67•
'51•
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222.
;

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413. 'Eppdat 423.

47

465. 70• 433. 27•
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24, 69.

'€/ 413.
411.
411.
1

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465.

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fVi, cVi

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6,
; ;

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403. 7• 466. 28. 409. 66

'! 439. 7• '.' 467.
;

464. 55. 57
19,

465.

410.

'! 416.

(?).

6, 8,
112, 163,

6-3,

4•
12.

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203, 227;

418. 27.

409.
64
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418. 2g.
411.

465.
;

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Ipns

413. 12 8, 140.

cViyiyvuffKitv

413.

60

574.

(Ttpos

409. 92 416. 10. 409. 82; 413. 125;
;

467. 6; 470. 6, 30; 574. It. 433. 33 "'"^ marg. 433. 35• .. 467. 4•

'
'

1

296
ia^eot

INDICES
403. 36
; ;

Zfvs 412. 24
25, 31

fvi'403. 29; 404. 16; 413.

(
8.

;

42.

15.
6,

413.
19,

88; 465.105,
2 7-

59

418. 5, 421. 9, II.
59.

408.
419.

9; 464. 93; 465. 30, 35, 38.
411. 13.

12;

(
(

!
3, 34•

470.

^ ^ ^/
,

413. 94. 413.

417. 21. 413. 227 ; 420. 9• 413. 9• ieios 414. 20. 404. 6; 413. 5 1 III, 113, 37> 49> 68, 179, 209, 211 ; 433

/ 6 *9

07•
14.

422. 6; 464.

465. 20, 1)0. 418. 5•

404. 6; 405. 26 406. 2 407. 409 26, 96; 413. 45. 129, 35 416 221 137) 9°>
; ;

" !
! '

412. 1 8. 413. 1 8. ixeVis 417. 27. 'IvSlkO! 413. 215. 413. 90.
*

! !

405. 24

;

407.

5•

412. 69.
417. 23•

436. 418. 8

.
;

436.

9•

408.

39•
5,

416. 19; 421.

'^

9>
"7

;

409. 8. 403. 12; 413.

59• 410. 72. 411. 86 413.
;

409.

96

;

414.

!

413. 127. 410. 19, 76. 414. 3•

464. 8 (?) Seas 413. 43. 465. 43• 48, 218; 417. 28, 31• 442. 2 7• eepaneifLV 465. 38.

8; 418. 5; 433.

6, 8, 26; 421

;

(,

'iiKcKTpa

420.

7) 12.

^

|(?)

437. 7• 426. II.

409.
;

("?)

45; 412. 464. 14

! " !
:
^rot

!

fpov

465. 107, 201. 422. 403. II 409. 98; 419. 14; 465.193; 468. 5; 470. 14. 9•

.

{!
26
;

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412. 65.

468. 7• 468. 6.

418. 27. 418. 32. 413. 1 46 6(?). 426. 2 3(?).
411. 95•

;

464.

! , ^ ! ! '
416. 2 1 (?). 417. 2 2.
23.

5;
5•

;( 410.

403. 15; 436.
198-9.

465.

470. 2 2. 467. 17404. 1 8. 465.

9•

;

419. 6. 418. 2. 413. 20. xaiTOS 432. 1 1 (.''). Kainep 418. 2

<^..
ratpo'y

.

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413. 413.

53•
1

56;
5•

467.

g

;

470. 45

!

et saep.

423.

0! 433.
4',

413. 184. 408. 14; 465. 62, 203• 428. 8 ; 465. 109. 413. 38•
22

403.

8,

24, 3'

;

465.

marg.
g.

418. 26, 31. 408. 25; 418. 422. 9-

413. 1 62; 429. 413. 35•

408. 48• 409. 84.
407. 2. 468. g. 408. 3•

574.
413. 91
;

433.
;

;
1

465.
6.

50.

! !

410. 7 413.
196.
;

465.
148,

6,

! !
;

! .
2

!

113. 145. 156, 171. 183, 204. 409. 52, 65, 67; 411. 102 413. 209; 464. 8, 465. 21. ;
27,

28, 41. 66,

79.

;

424. 7• 404. 21 411. 78,85; 413. 1 62; 428. 3; 433. 465.
;

6.
;

172,

413. 437. 422. 5; 465. 42.

6
;

9•

Uvai

408.

44•

409. 1 9• 409. 47•
413. 98 430. 410. 64.
3.

(
iepav i(pO!

'!

Upopaaev!
465.

465. 120,

1

72.

413. 90.

3•
22

! (

(?)412. 34• 412. 66 414. 17 413. 465. 32. 8; 433.
;

416. 67.

7

;

179, 196•

413. 94• 413. 45.

.

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467. 20
412.
5•

(?).

465. 223, 225• 465. 2 2 6.

.

412.

6.

421. 12.

1

;

/.

NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS
412.

297

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412. 2g.

6.
59•
4•

\a\e'iv

,

Kapia 412. 62.

;^ 411. 3•

//) 408.

413.

413.

!
>7

420.

1

5•

f£off//tK(!s

>ca7-a8iifiif(ii/

' / } ) ! / €(
(iaToXfiVf
11/

403. 7• 419. 9• 422. 5•
;

433. 29. 412. 30. 410. 78.
;

403. 3; 406. 17; 413. 31, 67, 102. 409. 28 marg.,gi, 415. 16; 99; 413. 172 417. 24; 444. i4(?);
;

408. 31
467.

464. 54

KaroXeyfiK 416. 4•

413. 182
1

414. 13.

411. 02.

403.

9•

411. 55• 4,09. 39•

416.
2
3.

4•

! ! !
K^arnto'f
Kparfii/

6, 8,

.

(?)•

465. 35. 403.

6.
I

409.

5.
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409. 47• 409. 29.
465.
12.

413. 132

413. 105. 409. 103.

/

408. 40 408. 30.
418.

;

415. g. 418. 32.

403.
;

. ,

23, 25

;

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413.

470. 32.
413. 95• 413. 102. 412. 5•

407. 6 464. 1 6. 465. go, 191• itpiVei)/ 409. 65; 411. 31•

ig, 22

50,

409. 13, 56,61; 410.
;

21, 25,
10, 73.
;

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422. 465.

!
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411. 86.

412. 103, III ; 411. Ill 413. 26, 58, 66, 14, 21 92, 100, 122, 128, 129,
134)

465. 165.

40>
8,

141.
;

8,

408.

38.

414.
13,

51

416.
;

, 2;

184

7•
1
1

413. 92.

46. 03.
(?).

413.

465.

8

KpOTTfii/

411. 34• 411. 33• (eaToiKfii/ 411. 58.
Kfipeiv

413. 152• 413. 150.

KeXcvdv 411. 35; 413.

,

465. 230. 413. 29; 465. 114. 465. 72. KTtivdv 419. 3• 465. 2 2 7• 426. 4• 403. 2 465.
.

8.

413.

.

! ( (
470.

425. 7;

464. 15; 465. 469. 6; 183, 200

,

24, 28.

AfiVfii/

412. 19.
3•

(! 410.
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412. 40.

465. 102.

111,117; 417-30; 426. 3. (tfi/of 408. 29 (««of); 409. 5; 413. 118. 464. 1 8, 42. Kfpavvivai 432. 7• KtpKvpaios 435. I.

412. 54• 412. 40. KvvTjyiov 413. 197•

465. 151• 155(ci'piof 404. I 407. 5 413. 182, 183; 465. 14, 60.
Kupifwij»
; ;

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412.

7.

408. 45;
42.

45.

17;

466. 17.

408.

\(

443. 19 433. 27. KtVmios 465. 230.
412. 38.

(?)•

;
1 1

468.

.
2 2.
KOivij

!
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KvpTOs

413. 7, 42, 188, 204, 213. 465. 224. 413. 1 1 8.

I

,

1 1 7,

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465.
1

470. 5• 465. 1 9.
412.

8,

196.

!

4•
9•

426.

408.
8.

34•

413.

1

1

409. 89. 408. 6 1,
;

464.

5,

6o(?); 470.

5.

465. 36. 403. 15. 32 409. 64, 410.79; 465.15,33• 84; 409. 88 413. 175 419. 12; 465. 148; 470.
;

;

Ktiiiov

'
413.

409.

30.

53'/""/'•

409. I03. 413. 150 465. 2 28.
;

KoiviiXoyuv

45.

\ayxavetv

408. 50
411.

;

!

(5 409.

410. <•/ ;£^.
412.

4•
9•

413. 59
99,

;

(8!
429.
117.
XoKTifffi/

5.

(
Xoi'fii•

413. 53•
58.

408.

^!-

413. 56. 413. 30) 189.

409.
;

53•

Io8,

409. 96

413.

26.

63.

413. 65.

465. 68. 413. 38(?).

INDICES

()

424. II (?). 444. 5, 1 6.
413.
1

24.
9-

403.

/413.

422. 3. 41 .'413. 149; 442. 2 (.?) 465. 183. 4U.
;

\;

^
26,

(\\( 418.
30
(?).

€!(

4:65. 7

1

;

466. 25
;

6

466

6

539. 466. II.

/xernraeii/

431. 6, 7413. 1 68.

// 443. 2 423. /)
;

/
"5•
150.

'

408. 42. 422. 7

2.

{?).

411. 26.

413. 52,

191

;

465.

' \

15; 413. 178. 413. 145, 158,

1

7,

172, 176•

418. 3413. 43•

€( (((
/ifTpoi/

'!
/Teii/jn

428. 4 574. 408. 12 marg.
;

409. 82, 466. 1 3. 428. 6 ; 470. 420. 3464. 45> 6. 467. 9 (•

ly.

!
raCi

lOfii/

408.

60.

465. 225. 426. 5 433.
; ;

.
78.

pcTpios 415. 14.

416. 20.

MavTivni 411. 40. 418. 28.

464. 45•

467. 13• ^f'xpi 412. 62 ; 416. 3• ^^' 410. 8, 7; 464.
20.

425. I. 418. 13. Nf^^ 465. 13.
V€apia!

!

440. 2 (.?). 408. 26 411.

,

^
/37,
4:13.

-

!,
412.
154,
77,

411. 53•
7.
;

409. 464. 409. 94 413.
;

58.

,

M^fif 409. 85; 438. 18. 422. 416. 6.

.

!
veo!

409. 49; 413. 144,
vcKpa

433. 32.

412. 42. 414. 4.

pfoVijt

"-

55•
112, 114.

{) 408.
('

465. 1 9, 64. 408. 48; 465. 2 2. 410. 8, 28, 67,

410. 65. 65 month ') 465. 105. 411. 22 ; 465. 13,
;

vfieiv

464. 38. 464. 19.
11. 14.

€(\-(4! 42X.
xv

200.

411. 12.

417. 21.

"2,

123.

/icyar

8
'

^ ( (
^' 413.
465.
/if If

60 ; 410. 47 ; 411. 13, 20; 412. 40; 413. 190; 465. 22.'; 470. 29. 442. 5• 412. 4 1 ; 470. 28.
15,

409.

465. 77• ^17^1^(418. 8, 12

;

421 14

(
12.

96.
II.

!
/905
3•

467.11.
410. 73• 410. 23.

409. 102,
410.
2
.

6.

^' 470.
465.

426.
4.

pfXeiv

409.
1

20.

408. 66. /leOvXiij- 407. 4 413. 47, 99. 136; 419. 4; 420. 13. 404. 1 4 410. 94
; ;

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96.

95•

413. 48, 119,

87•

469.

5•

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.

2,

03
.

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408. 36 ; 409. 412. 38 ; 436. 6.
II.
;

viv

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423. 13; 425. 425. 4. 411. 8 ; 438. yoetv 464. 6, 50. fo/ioi 428. 6.
421.
9.

/
409.
133.

Mituv

!

464.

418. 28. 465. 34, 35.
g.

NiKiaf 411. 106.

4.

"; 434.
403.

15.

434.
9,

13.

467.

410. 97

413.

86.

433. 28 marg. 420. 8. 409. 28 marg.; 443.
(.'').

27 ; 407. 4 ; 58; 413. 107] 121, 146, 159, 179; 443. 10. 409. 5o; 413.
18,

^

433. i9(?). 465. 228.
412. 62.

444. 15 409. 98.
4.65. 228.

^fvla 411. 61.

426. 19.
:

413. 59•
1 8.

467. 12, 403. 466. 17.

409. 57. 62 419. 8; 442.
2.

410. 27

;

28.

/xoVoi-

4•

411. 6;

413. 184,

^&! !
/413.

Imn 420.

3, 8.

408.

30.

226;

468.

409. 99. 468. 8. 1 86; 433.

1

6.

1

;

/.

NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS

299

'Ohv^atii

409.
I.

(> 418.
oleaBai

93.
^

410. 9,84.

409.

5,

87

;

411.

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oioi

409. 6o. 404. 2 470.
;

1 2.

/
;
411.
opta'i'ot

8; 433. 8; 441. 464. 14, 49(0. 55• 465. 1 07. 408. 52.

25;
Trat^j"""

413. 49•

opfyeaem 411. 21. 413. 132,

oiVo/ifXt

413. 161, 172. 413. 5°, 52, 69, 54•
;

420. 6, 465. 15, 6.
413. 99•
1

,

4•
13.

o/oKei

465. 104. •10 403. 2. oiof 408. 62 410. 47. 55, 115; 469.
4, II, 16.

6.
5•

430.
3•

!
;

413. -°, '''5: 416. 4; 417. 22, 33 418. 5, 30 419. 7 429. ; 431. 8; 468. .
;

408. 63. 409. 37, 46, 83
;

113.

:

, ,2

409. 44•
412.

6.
43•

408.

opxeiaiini

408. 63. 409. 38; 416. 430. 7. 410. I 9•
413. 67.

'
oTf

418.

413. 93 413. 48.

'>

465. 30.
;

413. 92, 102. 413. 147, 1 86; 430. 6; 464. 26, 27; 465.
117, 23°
;

467.

1

1.

2

2;

409. 56, 59> 93 412. 39: 439. 13; 464. 44•
oOTtep

442.

6.

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413. 53•

OKiffiif

409.
411.

59,

^4

;

410.
1

8

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6(
0/10105

'!
413.
1

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34•

426. 2 I {?). 403. 30; 413. 208. 434. II, 1 6. 470. 35. 464. 23.

79;

412.

6 (5r<t)

421. 4. 413. 05. 421. 3. navOfiov 412. 65. >')77•$(?) 413. 73•

5'.?,

413. 185.

0 413.
oi^fif

409. 87, 408. 40 443.
;

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(?).

4•

198.
3•

409. 105. 409. 105409. 45; 412.
2 20.
;

/ 413.
6;

(' , '
97•
20
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411. 30.

INDICES
412. 37•

408.

411.

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(4( 470.
()5 440.
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466. 19, 22.
7•

413.

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417. 34•
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409. 34, 49•
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151, 157, 58, 104, 436. 178, 209; 427. 2

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;
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464. 20 428. 4•

470.

413.

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426. 4• 418, 20 (?). 413. 207 444. 17
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413. 120. 413. 51, 54, 66,

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465. 37•

403. 7; 408. 409. 102 410.
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197, 198•

33•
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411.
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411, 97

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73, 112, 113, 137,193-4;

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413. 2 2. 412. 3°•

403. 30. 443.
12,

417. 20 418. 2(?); 4^33. :^^ and marg.; 442. 14; 465, 33, 38,
;

nfplipyos 412. 45•

66,

411. 68. w(pio8os 409. 106.

78, 114, 117, 122, 149, 153, 157, 172, 174, 178, 180, 184, 204, 223-5, 229 ; 470. 36, 45, 46.

418. 12, 27,30,3'• 412. 1 5 ; 413. 27, 422. (?) 413. 55• «'409. 28, 64, 84; 413. 125, 159; 419. 8; 421, 12; 465. 1 75• 409, 89 ; 413. 156. 413. 59•
411, 2 6,

413.

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414. 1 1 412. 52.

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;

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NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS
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465. 112.
412. 42.

411. 76.
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467. 3• 470. 20.

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introd.;
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465. 67. 464. 38. 465. 436. 7•
411. 63. 411. 32. 6 1.

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413.

409.

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marg.,

156;
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430.

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574. 465. 102. 413. 1 8.

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413.

7

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470,

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302

INDICES
465. 32.
2 0.

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417.

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413.

74•

574,

413. 154*

469. 3• 465. 68.
7-

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;

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411. 42.

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412.

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411.

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468. 468. g.

413. 69.

6;

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470. 62.
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;

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416. 10. 413. 105•

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;

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NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS
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464. 3

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409. 95• 426. 1 6. 469. 1 6. 465. III, 202. 467. 1 6. 420. 465. 192. 465. 39• 465. 43• 420. 9 426. 6 470.

.
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413. 104; 416.

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407.

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414.

436.

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467.

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304

INDICES

.
Vespasian.
Bios Oiie(rnaaiav6s 521. introd,

EMPERORS.

DOMITIAN.
/iiriacof

477. 9

;

4S1.

1 6.

Nerva.

Trajan.

Hadrian.

Antoninus
494.

Marcus Aurelius and Verus.

Marcus Aurelius.

Marcus Aurelius and Commodus.

. ,.£ !! .. . .. . .. . . . .. ' // . .. ., . \ .. . ... ' .. ,., . . . ' .
;

Sfos Nf/jouas

482. 34

521. introd.

Nf'pouas Tpaiavos

489.
j

,

32,

34•

Tpaiavos

2.
;

Tepp.

482. 37) 42

J

433. 22, 28, 35
I
;

SU•

12

;

686; 612.
Tpaiavos

Nepouas

/of
1

2e^.

483.

4

481. IQj 26 ; 508. 508. 15; 510. 8 ; 511. 6.

581.

477. II
;

490.

1

;

491.

,

27

;

'ASpiams

492. 496. 478. 8, 24
;

;

478. 36, 39)" 480. 8, 17; 484. 29 499. 35 500. 22 503. . 486. 5 499. 6 500. 20 ; 515. 4 517. 4•
;
,"

5

;

,'

;

;

486. ^6.

Pius.

(.

473.

;

479. 19
613
;

;

487. 20

;

;

506.

'.

.

479. 15

5

506.

8;

516. 9. 13; 520. 5

;

653.

502.

4•

',

\

502. 46.

502.

12.

2e/3.
j

507. 39•

507. 15

512. II.

(.

\

\ '

485. 37•

518.

2

;

614.

(.

485.

6, 34•

AvTiuwcos

485. 43•

.

;

IV.
COMMODUS.

PERSONAL NAMES
,(,
2e/3.

305

. . ! ! ! ., .. , . .! ! . .' !
2f(3.

2. (.

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Me'yiffTos BpcravfiKOs

501. 48.

!!!.
513. 49•
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Ewf/3. 475. 3 1

495. . 475.
)

.

513. 6.

6(\

483.

2

1

.

!

471. 32•

III.

MONTHS AND
{a)

DAYS.

Months.

Egyptian.

'2! 485.

.

14-

(
Mfxf.'p

/ ,! '!
Tfppav'iKeio!

634
;

;

641.

487. 21

506.

2,

13,

53! 513.

7•

(

,,

494.

2.

-,
;

Kniaapfiot 473.

485.
481. 22, 29; 489.

8

;
,

481.21,28; 483. 13;
;

;

489.
491.

491.
27

,

27

;

504. 25
;

606.17; 508.3; 510.

();

530.28; 581.
510.
9•

,

32. 35•

^

;

504. 25

?-581; 628.
ib)

,

Days.
;

(uncertain) 604. (Pharmouthi 24) 496. (Phamenoth 29 ?) 483. 30; (Caesareus 4th intercalary day) 489.

i,

32, 35.

! '!
'

IV.

PERSONAL NAMES.

531. 23 634. 'Ayaffivo! son of Tlieon 492.

-^!

'

611.

504. 48, 58.

^ !
478. 21.

Cf.

478. I Index VI

(u).

daughter of Cerdon 529. 1 9. also Called Dionysius 494. 3,

8.

3o6

*, /' €€
631.

' ^ '!
son of Dius 494.

INDICES
30.
;

3,

Attis

489. 24

;

494. 8

;

498. 3

627

;

586. 533. 28. 505. . 'Afifi/ffvs son of Artemas 505. . 489. 25. SOU of Gaius 520. 9. son of Sagathes 506. 7. 616 635. /ios 505. 4 522. 1 2 also Called Dionysius, son of Am-

\,

! / !
! ! !
saep.

son of Pausis 476. 13. 492. 16, 18; 489. 2; 490. 20 533. i. 516. 10, 14; 530. 24 son of Apion 516. 10, 14; 533. i, 30; 533. 27. also called Dionysius, ex-gymnasiarch
; ;

612.

2.

! /0 ! /£ ! ! !
;

;

;

monius 505.

3.

also Called Psenaniounis

494.

6.

son of Sarapion 492.

2, 10.

also Called

Theodorus 614.

son of Thcon 477. 6. son of Heraclides 439. 25. 520. 3, 24.

490.

p.

daughter of Chaeremon 497. 3
also called Dionysius 489. 27.
; ;
;

(t

! !

484. 8 498. 4 613 ; 623 651. son of Aperos 479. 4, 11, 24. also called Eudaemon, son of Amois 493. 14. son of Philoxenus 479. 2, 23. son of Sarapion 493. 1 4.
also called Stephanus, son of Apollo5.
9.

! !
'AvTiai

phanes 508.

! / ? /
489.
/tos

! ,
604._ 37, 39.
20.

also called Dionysius, priest,
2,

son of

Diogenes 502.

50. also called Epicrates, son of Epicrates

589.
Heracles, son of Apion

also called

.

504.

1

4

/ saep.
;

son of Zoilus 492. i8.
strategus 484. 2

579.

494. 37. son of Diogenes 493.

14. also called Aristous, daughter

of Heraclides 494. 8 ei saep. 632. SOU of Sarapion 485. 2, 11. 489. 21 ; 490. ig; 492. 21; 498. 2; 506. 4, 9, 28; 522. 13; 533. 16 ; 609; 611; 622. son of Amois 498. 4. son of Asclepiades 492. 21. son of Claudius Demetrius 574.
also called

Demetrius 502.

7.

! !
«
485.
'AoviSios

also called Heraclides 509.

son of Troi'lus 481. 24. also called Faustus 516. 2.

son son son son

of Horus 499. 3, 31, 47. of Origenes 488. 8. of Panechotes 506. 5.

of Pasion 493.

6.

-!. !, ' '!
'-)4, 9.

Statilius Phanias 598. 471. 39. 531. i6, 19, 20. son of Julius, ex-scribe 642. 517. 8. 501. 12. 512. 9• also Called Cyria 498.

628. son of

also Called

Theon, son of Theon

492.

6, 8, 12.

505.

I.

also called Demetria 494. 6.

daughter of Petosorapis 495.

7,

, 9•

! !
14.

508.

6.

also called Pudens, archidicastes

»>/,

!
'AjTfi

592. MdpKos son of Ptolemaeus 523.
.

. }!
praefect

Apeioi

484. 21.

530. 14. 479. 4, 24.

! ! ! !

505. 4479. 13. 520. 16. 482. 25; 508. 8 priest 533. 19.

;

584.

499.

I.

also Called Apollonarion, daughter of Heraclides 494. 8 e/ saep. son of Artemidorus 490. i6.

!
491.
"ApjraXof

IV.

PERSONAL NAMES

!. !.
487.

507. I. also called Heracles 511. i. son of Heras 501. 6. also called Horus, son of Thonis
3,

!

307

also called Ophelas, son of Sarapas 605. I. son of Diogenes 487. 21.

4, 10, 16.

rntos

620.

9.

22; 492.

19.

rotor KivUTos,

raios

492. 20. Kopvoiros also Called Polydeuccs

! ((!
called

.

See Index VI (<?). son of Sarapion 489.
of Epimachus

3, 13, 33,

509. 4. 494. 6.
also
e/

! €/ ! ! !
35•
10.

son

503.

2,

8,

Aphroditous 504.
5,

3

saep.

505. I. 490. i6;

daughter of Apollonius 506.

10.

497. 22;

510.
i, 5.

18,

(18!
13•

23•

son of Amenneus 505.

scribe of komogrammateus

488.

'\8 ';8;

504. II, 44. 620. 1 9son of Alexandrus 498.

3.

494. 35

;

531. 25.

,
'Arpevs
AiiXiur

']8! \3,

son of Apollonius 492. 21. son of Asclepiades 494. 40. also Called Eudaemon 614. son of Eudaemon 494, 34.
MtipKos 592. son of Pausirion 494. 41. also called Cyiia

!. .
622.
9•

503. 2. 497. 20. daughter of Antimachus 501. 12. also Called Apollonous 494. 7. 582. also Called Apollonius 502. 7. 574. also Called Theon 620. Ai7^i;7-/)oif 493. 13; 508. 9; 676; 633. daughter of Amois 479. i, 23. 496. 2. daughter of Ruphion 608. 16. 483. 31 491. i8; 499. 12; 602. 6 520. 7. AiSvpos agoranomus, son of Didymus 494.

! , ! !
;

.

;

37•

498. I, 9. 490. 2,
;

5, 8.

527. I 532. i. son of Kouphateus 575. son of Panechotes 506. 10. ASyxtt daughter of Isas 634.

493.
. . .

AiprfKios

!
14.

512.
called

child of

3
BfXii)
.

also

Hermione 472. 41. Demarous 504.

3

ei saep.

526. 6. son of Didymus 483. 30, 33. 497. 2 630.
;

.

.

633.

5.

13fpev 493.

;

8, 16.

son of Origcnes 488. 8. SOU of Sarapion 511. 2 ; 610. son of Amois 613. 601. 3; 502. 3; 505. 7; 676; 628; 634. Aioyttnjs son of Apollonius 489. 21. son of Beleg 633. 5. »'>»; also called Dionysius.son of Sarapion 513. I, 24, 52. ^(fyeV}tgynlnasiach, son of Sarapion 507. 3. Aioye'injs also called Heraclides, ex-gymnasiarch, son of Diogenes 501. 2. son of Pasion 493. 7. also Called Phalanx, son of Harpalus

! ;

son son son son

of Amois 484.
of

7.

Didymus 484.

10, 14.

of Enthesmus 494. 37.
of Onnophris also called Chaere32.

mon 494.

BfpfviKiavas 471. 32.

! ! !
492.
2

.

.

.

19.

491. 20.

son of Ptolemaeus 482. 22.

: ! €!
3o8
Aioyevls

INDICES

also callecf Sarapion,ex-gymnasiarch, son of Diogenes 501. 3. scribe, son of Hierax 496. 16.

AtoyeVijf sitologus

518.

6.

son of Theon 493. 14.

494.

'J.

; !
42.

daughter of Apollonous also called Demetria 494. 7. Atoyfi/is daughter of Ptolemaeus 489. 5 e/
Aioyevis
saep.

506. 24; 508. i6. son of Diodes 508. 15
scribe 517. 17.

;

508.

22.

!

! !

'! '!

530. 25, 3 1. son of Acusilaus 494. 12, 16, 23. son of Dionysius also called Acusilaus 494. 3, 30. 522. 20. son of Aulius 493. 14. son of Diophantus 493. 14. 499. g. 487. 6 623.
;

ex-exegetes 512. 517. II.

i.

Atowaas 644.
621.

^! ^!
I.

daughter of Chaeremon 472. 41,
42, 46; 486. 2, 19, 23; 502.

daughter of Dionysius 478.

4,

28,

daughter of Theon 494. 3. 478. 5, 30 ; 480. 4 ; 503. 4 ; 510. 524. i; 529. 3, 9; 530. i; 3, II 533. 16; 602; 613; 617; 620; 622. also called Acusilaus 494. 3, 8. Atoviaios also called Ammonius, son of Ammonius 505. 3.
;

^
512.

also called

Sambous 489.

29.

also called

Amoinomerius 489. 27. also called Apion, ex-gymnasiarch
also called Apion,
3,

! ((, : : ! [! ') ! ! '! !, ! . ! !
2.

priest,

son of

Diogenes 502.
533. 24.

50.

SOn of Epimachus
of

also

called

Chresimus, son

Dionysius 478.
pion 513.
i,

4, 29, 42.

also called Diogenes,
24, 52.

son of Sara-

son of Dorion 487. 6. son of Epimachus 503. 3 ei saep. 641. son of Harpocration 489. 3

e/

saep.

..., SOU
516.
i.

of FaUStUS also

called

Amphion

! ' ! ' " '
'!
saep.
;

! ^!

!!! !
',!
495.
2.
;

< ! '! !

492. 8 513. 3, 6 . 494. 38 645. 634. 506. 3• son of Herodes 639. 475. 21, 29. also Called Apion, son of Epicrates 504. 3 f/ saep. son of Heraclides 504. 4, 37, 54. 533. 25 ; 620. banker 513. 37.
;

;

614.
el saep.

son of Dionysius 503. 2 SOU of Harsiesis 503. 2

ei saep.

'!! . !

son of Petosorapis 495. 4, 7, 8. son of Nicarous 496. 7. Epevvto!, 505. 8. 533. 24. 494. 6. son of Theon 503. 5• 530. 25. 501. 6, 52. Cf Index VI (a). 495. 5 513. 48, 62. son of Hermias 513. , 47, 62. scribe of 533. 22. son of Spartas 591. daughter of Chaeremon 472. 2

el

486. 2, 19, 21. 489. 23. 479. 27. 489. 3, 33, 35. EiSai^ow't 504. 7.

520. 2 . son of Panechotes 490. son of Prometheus 575.
sitologus 515.
2.

4, 8, 10.

478.

3,

41.

/

!

also called Plutarche

505.

2, 3.

485. 53.
son of Asclepiades 494. 35. also called Asclepiades 614. son of Eudaemon 491. 4 i/ saep.

.

/,
Zfuf.

IV.

PERSONAL NAMES
'Hp5s 481. 23

309
;

son of Menoites 478. 7, 45. SOn of ThonaSUChis 491. 2 c/ •/>. son of Theon 496. 2. 533. 4. chamberlain 471. 84. See Index VI 483. 5533.
2 8.
((?).

527.
'Hpas

2,

496. 2 (woman) 10; 530. 27.
;

501. 6
20.

;

f'anvfvos
494. 32;

KifUTOf

(?)

492.
517.

;
! ! !
£

490. 3;

533. 14, 19;

577;

626;

°HX(of
'Hpais

,!
489. 25
3.
; ;

649. son of Apion 492. 1 8. 478. I. son of Theon 491. 19.

! !

' ! !
490.

'! '!

'Upas son of Heras 481. 12, 22.

499.
515.

2,

37;

lo;

520. 22.
I.

son of Esacon 506. 3. 625. also Called Sarapion 435. 520. 3, 24.
;

8.

485. 15 491. 2, 28. also called Thaisous, daughter Heraclides 504. 5 t/ saep.
2 1.

of

.

praefect

484.

2i.

494.

6.

483.

: ; \( ! /
»() \(! '\(
siarch,

624. daughter of Alexandrus 494. 8. also called Harmiusis 511. i. son of Harthonis 508. 8. son of Heraclas 508. 8, 12, 26. 'HpaicXfia 504. 34. of strategus 476. II. 'HpaxXcidvc 489. 29 504. 4 532. i 582; 626. also called Amoitas 509. 9. son of Antias 517. 7. son of Apion 533. 27.

592

\(!

(! 4
625; 631.

daughter of Sarapion 496. 2, 5. 500. 4, 26; 505. 8; 530. 26. also called Thaesis, daughter of Heraclides 504. 5 e/ sacp. daughter of Amenneus 505. i. 503. 3, 4. daughter of Ammonius 492. i e/ saep. daughter of ApoUonius 506. 4 e/ saep.
.

1 4-

also called

Ammonius

614.

({

;

;

;

504. II, 44. 530. 28. 490. 21 ; 491. 19 ; 492. 5, 6, 8, 23 ; 493. 14; 494. 3; 496. 2; 497. 4 c/ sa,p.; 502. 5; 503. 5; 530. 7, 31;
son of Agathinus 492. 22. also called ApoUonius, son of Theon

also called Diogenes, e.x-gymna-

pa\fi

\€!

!
20.

!

son of Diogenes 501. i. son of Dionysius also called Acusilaus 494. 8. son of Epicrates 504. 37, 53, 61. son of Hermaiscus 533. 24. son of Isidorus 614. son of Oljmpus 504. 5, 33, 51. son of Ptolcmaeus 489. 25. scribe of strategus 602.
sitologus 515. 2, 5.

'

492.

6, 8, 12, 15.

,!
492.

483. 32. also called Demetrius 620.
also called
3, 16.

Horion, son of Sarapion
510.
1

.

6.

also called Ptolcmaeus,

584.

son of Ptoliion 492. 5, ii. son of Sarapion 477. 6.
scribe 515. 8. sitologus 517. 6.

489. 30 ; 494. 43. also called Apion, son of Apion
son of Sarapas 649.

489.

strategus

485.

i

496.

5.

son of Theon 492. 5, 12, 14. son of Theon, also called ApoUonius

daughter of Harbaithus 479. 13. daughter of Sarapion 492. 3.

492.

6, 8, 12, 15.

son of Zoilus 491. 19.

.

3IO

INDICES
/as

' \
BopToiot

.

530.

24.

See Index VI (a). son of Komoapis 491. 22.
3,

488.

34.

623. 593. son of Thonis 491. 2, 12. eSwf 491. 2, 10; 494. 31. 579. eiaws son of Eudaemon 491. 4 «/ saep. Florus 476. 2. son of 491. 23. /if son of Pamm eSwf son of Petaus 476. 4.
.

, &
477.

510.

1 6.

.

epistrategus 486.

8,

20.

exegetes
3•

&C.

(. , ()
.

523.

.

.

^ ,
(/35
20.
i.

'iSofifMis
'Ifpo

629. 485. 55. 496. 1 6.
basilico-grammateus 579. son of Cornelius 531. i, 30.

of StrategUS 475. I. Kkiav son of Dionysius 480. 4. 581. 528. 1 8. 491. 2 2. 533. 27. 531. , 30• also Called Polydeuces 509. 4. 575. son of Demetrius 493. 13. (1. ?) 653.

.

,' ,
526.
2.

.

.

505.

8.

epistrategus

486.

8,

'le'pai

strategus

500.
17.

2.

,'
'IXapoCt

489. 8, 520. 10.

also called Antonia Asclepias

498.

.

'louXat

son of Didymus 502.

6.

'louAios 'IodX. epistrategus

488.

KCpof son of Cyrus 491. i8. KCpor son of Didymus 491. 1 8.

642.

488. Oiapmvot epistrategus 486.
epistrategus
scribe 653.

.
.

'lovKiOS

OvoKripos 653.
5, ii.

" '!
5.

',
Kiraj (?)

*7?

: : $

daughter of Theon 492. 634. 528. I, 26 624. 520. 1 7 614. 653. 520. 2 1 See Index VI {a). 524. 3 646. nXairrios 474. 1,31.
; ;

, 2( .
or

(8
AovKios

530. 27.

/

488.

4, 35.

also called Serenus

475.

3, 14,

35.

praefect

594.

505. 8. praefeCt 653. son of Lochus 493. 1 2. son of Sarapion 493. 13. 520. 4 24son of Hermogenes 489. 23.

Mayi/os, Tiros
Mat(ciai/<5f,

.
;

. pracfect 635. . praefeCt 663.
597.
4.

506. 4

;

639.

471. 1 43• son of Alexandrus 489. 24.
5. 9'

496.

5•

, ,2(
Mdicfp strategus

|5
7•

533.

(praefect?) 471. 15, 142. epistrategus 487.

.

I.

592.
exegeteS &C. 477.

.

;! !

526. 1,14. 529. 2, 9• son of Nicarous 496.

',

529. 13.

.
4.

also called Poly-

deuces 509.
MeiOiVijr

492. 20.
574. 620. 25-

478. 7, 45. 486. 4, 20.
also called Pausirion

486. 44.

IV.

PERSONAL NAMES
son of Pekusis 605. 4. son of Callistratus 489. 24. 558.
2, 3-

MSipos

520. 6. son of Ammonius 477. 15, NfiXapoCs 492. 18. NflXof 486. 32 519. 10. NfiXos son of Soeris 514. i. son of Thaisous 600. 4, 25.
;

^€€

NUavbpos 633.

( '£(
620. 20.
;

631. 24.

21.

strategus 513. 4.

586.

! !
NiKi'at

;

NiicupoCs

496. 7. 630. 2 5 644. son of Harpalus 487. 504. 34.

3, 21.

'OvopaTot,

2(! .
also

631. 12.

Herodes 494. 32.
'Optirnvns,
'Op.

Tarantinus 663.

!
5, 6.

chiliarch 653.

! ( « ! ! '! ; '
^,

3"

((! 606.

Uepvat son of Besas 491. 20. basilico-grammateus 513. 14. nrraCf 476. 5. neTfCptr son of Ammonas 606. 7.

490.

9.

son of Dionysius 603. 3 e/ saep. -tt son of Epinicus 495. 2. son of Heracles 649. son of Petosorapis 496. 2. 484. 4, 32 682. 474. 1,31.
;

also called

Eudaemonis 505.

2, 3.

called

Chaeremon, son

of

son of Semproniiis

! «; ! ' ! !
. . .

' !, ,
Ovaptavos,

621.

OifvriSws

'? ''.
.
1

475. 19; 683. son of Besis 489. 21. son of Cratinus 493. 13. son of Ischyrion 646. son of Horus 485. 15, 41. noXuSfvKTjr also called Gaius Cornutus 509. 5. 689.

epistrategUS 486.

I.

dioecetes 613. 29.

,'! "
485.
4, 9.

Memmius

631. 6.

!,

. .

653.
praefect 663. praefect 636.

!,
506.

491. 23.

490.
son

4 8. son of ApoUonius

,

g, 10.

of

Dionysius
27.
6.

also

called

Amoinomerius 489.
633.

«;^

606. 8. son of Dositheus 617.
sitologUS 615.
I, 5, 7.

1

1.

620. 15. 493. 13, 15. son of Sarapion 493.

! 6/ ( ! 3
\(!
IlToXf/iait

678. 675. 476. 3. daughter of Theon 502. 5• 482. 23; 489. 525! 593. 24; 520. 8; 523.

!
612.

499.

1 4•

also Called P., archidicastes

.

!
;

.

50.

of Canopus 699. son of Ptolemaeus 482.

2 2.

son of Theodotus 604. 11, 43. also Called Theon,j3i/3Xio0uXai 584.
daughter of Chaeremon 508.
8, 17. 6.

517.

1

5.

Hava'ipts

/jir

scribe of the city 62. 18. 633. 17. son of Apollonius 522. 13. son of Petsiris 484. 3, 32.

,

636. son of Phaon 478. 13, 14, 20. 492. 5, II. son of Theon 492. 5, 11. 606. 4 ; 639.

.

494.
476.

630. i). 4 t also Called Musaeus 486. 45.
;

',
'Povipoi

I3.

'

oitvTi&in! P. dioecetes 513. 29.

508.

1

6.

son of Diodes 608. 15, 20, 22.

praefect 635. Sa^rar 532. 4.
2a;u0oCs also called

! 312

INDICES
506.
7•

2 '
;

, 2
3°•,

son of Heracles 649. son of Pasion 493. 6. 636. 485. 23 494. 2. ^apamas daughter of Podon 485. 14 f/ saep. See Index VI (a). 477. 7 485. 2, 7, II 489. 3, 13, 33>35; 490. 19; 492.2,3,10; 493. 13, 14; 496. 2, 5; 507. 3; 511. 2; 513. 2, 10, 59; 520. 12, 13; 525. 8; 575; 577; 593; 610; 648. son of Apion (?) 492. 3, 16. son of ApoUonius 609. son of Artemidorus 497. 22. archidicastes 592. 483. 32 636. son of Charisius 518. 5. also called Diogenes, ex-gymnasiarch, son of Diogenes 501. 2. son of Eudaemon 496. 2. also called Hephaestion 485. 8. son of Hermias 513. i, 47, 61. son of Herodes 499. 2, 37 ; 506. 517. 9 639. 3 2. 523. 3. son of Mnesitheus 486. 4, 20, 29,
'S.apaitis
;

^ ,

Dionysia 489. 29.

611.
I
;

505.

574; 649.

^.

, ^ , ^ :
saep.
2770X15

2€ 520.

,
(!
(.?)

Sevnavbs vopiKos 578. daughter of Thortaeus 488. 3, 34.

.
II.

589.

485. 2, II ; 527. 2 ; 528. 530. 13 533. 22, 27; 558.
;

, 26;
2.

2.

of StrategUS475.

also called Leonides 475. 3, 14, 35. Mdpfcos 2. exegetes &c. 477. I.

Sfprjvos scribe

;

;

;

! ^ ! !|
514. I. 591.

son of Philiscus 513. 2 ei saep. of the city 487. 4. son of Potamon 499. 14. daughter of Epimachus 503. 4 507. 27. daughter of Pekusis 505. 472. 1 4.

ei

2, 3, 4.

490.

6.

daughter of Apion 533. 26. epistrategus 487.

i.

598. 506. 27, 30.
also called

Amois son of Sosibius

;

SOH son son son

of Pasion 493. I3, 15. of Phanias 533. 26. of Pherekphis 492. 23. of Sarapion 492. 3 ; 493. 13

! /
Tccus

!!
577.

508.

5, II.

scribe 517. 14.

of strategus 485. 49.
5.

586.

son of ApoUophancs 508.

530. 27.
daughter of Zoilus 490.
(?)

3.

608.
2 ei

;

476. 6. daughter of Psenosiris 490.
;

!
(\!

496.

2, 5.

strategus 474. 4. son of Thaisous 505.

7.

!!
2{/
531. 24.

646. 7 daughter of Nicarous 496. 7. also called Tausiris 492. 3. 491. 2 .
;

496.

! '!
saep.

saep.

TaCpis 475. 15

498.

5.

Tavaipis 510.

2.

also Called Sarapous

492.

3.

501.

7.

praefect 594.
chiliarch 653.

€< £€
584.

TffCKeyoCf (?) 505. 3. TeifCs 530. I, 32.

daughter of Harthonis 482. 24. daughter of ApoUonius 506. 4

'Op€<TTlvos

son

of

Sempronius

^/!

Tarantinus 653.
TapatTiVOS 653.

TiTiavos, TiTos

!
579.

e/

.

praefect

486. i8

;

! !
Tiros

V.
Mayvos praefect 635.
praefect

GEOGRAPHICAL
631. 23,

313

2.
.

486. 18; 584.

strategus 476.

! !
492.

481. 13. TptdSfX^of 522. I.

584.
1.

son of Aristandrus 599. 481. 24.

492. 2. 634. 491. 19 507.
;

4:80. 2; 486. 2, 19; 497. 508. 7 530. 1 1 628 ; 502. , 15 632. son of Chaeremon 480. 20. of also called Onnophris son
; ; ; ;

,

Herodes 494.
5•

son of Diogenes also called Phalanx
19. also called

!

32. sitologUS 515.

I, 5, 6.

Xnpof 501. 10.

520.

I,

3.

Xapia-ios

518.

5.

Diogenes son of Harpalus

^ !
?

492. 19. 533. 20.

.

598.
516.
.

also called

Amphion

(!{) ',

' ' ! !
,

478. 21. son of PtoUis 478. 13, 20. 492. 23. scribe 653. 527. 4• 593.

( ^(
son

also Called Dionysius

478.

4, 29,

43.

of Lamos

or

also called

Lemos 488. 4, 35. Ammonius 494. 6.

.


Diony59.

500. 500.

3•

25.
2, 5, 8.

son of Atreus 490.
9.

488.

515.

.

522. 15; 582; 608. son of Ammonius 522. 12. son of Apion 533. i, 3, 30.
of Sarapion

also called Philoxenus, son of

sius 613.

son of Sarapion 513. 501.

.

2,

'
Diony1

scribe 616. 4. also called Theon, son

492. 3, 16. 479. 12
517.
8,
;

;

485. I5

;

491. 25

;

499. 4;

479.

2.

also called Philiscus, son of

sius 613.

587; 639. 14 son of Eudaemon 491. 4 c/ saep. also called Harpaesis, son of Thonis

606.
Tlrof

6, g.

Uplapos

.

578.
Ttnai/cis

491. 5, 10, 16. son of Psenobasthis or Psenomoithas

praefect

486.

8

;

684.
476.
2.

(\

500.

3, 25.

also called
I.

Besas, son of Sarapas

505.

V.

GEOGRAPHICAL.
'.\\8<
609.
473.

() Countries, Nomes, Toparciiies, Cities.
600. 480.
AlyuTTTot
2.
I 2.
;

\(8(
635.

5•

2

;

480.
3^
>

1

2.

471. 124

488.

13)

525.

.

;;

! ! (
314
'AvTivoevi
'AvTivois

INDICES

502. 15. 502. 6.

!
496.3; ;

602. 485. 1 6.
475.
;

488.
I
;

6.

485.
2
;

5,

28

;

486.

48.

3

597.

]

.

500.

1 1

474. 477.
"EXXijk

g.

4•

500.

12.

48. ,

21.

\(!
/35 489.
495. 4; 577.
;

494. 38. ; 4:16. 477. 26; 478. 6; 481. 485. 3, n, 13. 55 i 486. 19 487. 3 ; 489. 2 ei saep. 490 , 2; 491. I, 2, 26, 28; 492. I et saep.; 494. 2 i/ iffi^. ; 495. I, 2; 496. i, 2; 498. 5 ; 499. 2 501. 4 502. 5, 8, 15 503. i, 4; 504. 2; 505. 1, 4; 506. 2, 3, 8; 507. 5, 27; 608. 4, 7; 510. 7; 513. 3,
473.
"J ; ;
; ;

!
;

/ifpi'f

597. 504. 34•
491.
;
;

38

;

516. 3

577

;

584

;

601.

Hapanoviov 653.
2
;

!0 '
599.
653. 529. 1 6.

49.

503.

492. 494. 2 506. 2 ; 508. ;
; ;

02.

'
HepoTjs

506. 24.
6.

.

!

tniyovrjs

499. 5j

639.

Tlepaitn]

506.

471. 130.
2

, (\
488.
9•

478. 33

513. 9•

,

/iaios

473.

;

480. 12; 697.
4.
; ;

VOfiu's

614 620. 483. 5; 604. II, 43)' 610. 3 533. 17; 612 ; 615
;

474. 613

'
fif/jt's

471. 129.

626.
19! 483. 33) 485.

597.

481.

5>

6;

486. 3; 504. 34• 485. 1 6. 486. 32 474. 2, 4
)

NelXot

519.

.
;

;

484. 23

486.

,

21

;

613.

5>

3•

!
££»7;(

!

2 7 (Athribite

nome).

(

^)

500.

1

6,

492.

2, 3•

618. 4• 516. 5; 631; 639.

596; 625; 630;

!


4•

485. 5•

(

{>)
)

Villages and

! !
"

518.

4•

630.
614.

42.
Nf/ira

3•

! ( !
eiroUia.
KfpKfiOpis

492.

2

;

533.

503. 6. ) 520.

9•

488. 5 (ApoUonopolite nome).
533. 23.

!

631. 516. 5

j

625.
12,

or

488.
5•

15 (Antaeopolite

nome).

490.

V.

GEOGRAPHICAL
;

(
((

)

;^(' 41.
484.

{()
3•

515.

2.

515.

2, 5. 7

!

613

633.

/ '.
619
;

3^5

514.

2, 5-

(.?)

500. 26 (Athribite nome). 620.
621; 626. 637. 612.
;

(^) 593.
7•
6,

6.

Ta^Trerci

533.

580.
632. 1 8. 495. 5; 506.

, , 23
;

€ ;^(
Taraif

501. 514. 2, 5

;

533. 8

;

;

584.

595
ScixficXfu
2fi/ejrra

;

631.

/ ,
2(

482. 5475. 15, I 7; 28 499. 4 533. 14, 19; 632.

/ 3
•!

505. 3. 500. 13, 29 (Athribite nome).
601.
7 7•

;

517.

2.

'
522.

504.

(Heracleopolite

nome

?).

648. 500. 32 (Athribite nome). 510. 2, 482. introd.; 504. 43 639. 16; 517. I

5

1

J

;

484.
)

5•
2,

515.

6; 517. 6.

7,

19.

(c)

($

488.

!

.\
1 1.

.

\

506. 24499.

9•

483.

5•

(</)

/

KpijTriSos

489.

6, 15•

' '' / .^ '
(/
633.

504.

II, 44•

!
.
'>

593.

501.

478. 33
2.

613.

9•

478. 15! 479. 9) 574.
. . .

MvpojSoXafov
IlnppiVoDt

480.

481.

6.

'' ^^
574.

498.
502.
1

10;

506.5; 574;

677.

492.
1

7

12.

)((?) 478.

6.

(((!
(f)

6.

Buildings, &c.

)3>>(

473.

4•

Bove(o'

644. 473.
5•

»
Vlouat'iov

471. 144-

''^
513. 38
;

612.

5-

525.

10.

3i6

INDICES
(/) Tribes
497.
2 2.

!
Cf.

and Demes.

'AXemeis 497. 21.

Koi 'AX^aieijf

625.

(?)

477.

5•

! ^
'/
497. 2.
491.
6f6s
2.

6

\
623.
513.

477.

7

;

513. 48, 62.

,

S^•

VI.
(a)

RELIGION.

Gods and Heroes.

/,'.
483.
3,

491. i8, 25; 492. 24; 579; 649.
note.

489. 2.

')5
521. 3
;

494. 37.

489. 27; 490.
646.

6;

492.

2

;

?

!

483. 24; 491. 2; 519. 11; 531. 7 ; 533. 10. Cf. Index II. 478. 15; 479. 491• 2; 528. 6;

574; 579?
494. 31.
Cf.

^ 494.

6.

525.
(

490. 22; 491. 2; 492. Cf. 483. 3, note.

.
;
486. 32.
;

.

6;

521. 2;

/
Zeur

=
;
;

?)

634.
22
;

NeUoi 519.
494. 34.
521.

10.
5, 6.

Cf.

489. 24

483. 3

494. 6

°£ 494.

"

'
ifpeut

6.

483.

3•

.
;

492.

646.

2apims 477. 2 481. 6 491. 23 492. 19, 494. 37. Cf. 483. 3 and 491. 2, 23
;

;

;

notes.

489.

25.

SeAijKos

491. 20.
;

489. 3°; 494.

43•

491. 19

507.

5.

apxiepareiaas 533. 25.

477. 4; 533. 19. Up. 485. 4, 9 592. iep. Aios Kai'Hpas
;

483.

3-

(,

!!
(5)

Priests.

:
...

(\
5-

477.

.

VfaK,

507.

.

.

.

Stas
2.

€!

602.

3•

491.

(f)

Miscellaneous.
yfv,
ifpoj»

ycceVia

6eov

ifpo (sc.

!

621. introd
621. introd.

491.

516.
tepoT€KTwv

)

633. 519. 13, 14.

></'(>

^ "
3.
2.

579.
g.

626.

VII.

OFFICIAL

AND MILITARY

TITLES

317

VII.

OFFICIAL
32;

AND MILITARY

!
601
;

483.
641. 514.
I.

I9,

494. 38; 577; 507. 4.

471. 45•
apxiyfiapyot

.
4> 9•

477.
471.
D.

4•

(.

1 46. 12 2— 3) 592.

lepevs

\

. !
(.
D.
1

(!
\(\!
177)
D.

!!
520.
635.
1 7•

TITLES.
(a.d. 156)

(late

2nd or 3rd
4,

487. . cent.) 488.

.

^4•

^'"^'^^

471. 30, 36.

Uptvs

\

7 8)

485.

((! (. !
529.

/) 473.

2

;

592.

\6!
579.

ypapparivs 474.

, 8,

32, 35
(c.

i

(om.

ypappuTfis) 613. 33•

. D. 38)
584;

(.
478.
2
;

181) 513. 14. 483. 32 515. ;
D.
;

! ';, ! / !
588; 636.
614. 471. 34 516.
4) 14)

!
653.

((\ ; ;! !! ; ; /;
6

;

(. D. 31) 486. 9> 10, II, 17) 8, 33; 584. (. D. 38) 484. 2 1. (. D. 59) 594.

.

; ;
!
39•
(c.

-•

A.D.

160)

635.

]

Mayvo;

(c.

. D.
?)

Aiyu;rrou

(.

1

77-8)
507.

635.

(praefect

471. 15, 142.
4•

8

J

496-

13)'

615.

3>

j

653.

yp.

8; See

522.

g.

yp.

642.

yp.

!, )/; . 475.

5•

488.

14, 39•

4, 13) 529. 19. 602. 533. 23. 501. 4 512. 3• 471. 34, 37 )

.


!

7•

487.

»;^;;

<(;

477. 5• 477.
22
;

2.

507.

4•

! ((! :! ! . ! ! /' ( !, ; ;
511. 3•
';/'• ''n'-f>"f

)5

509.

14.

«8(!),

533. 20, 25-

. ?
475.
7•

5•

(2ncl CCnt.)

(a.d. 184) 513. 29.

Cf.

474.

!! '
*''^•

471. 84.

477.

519.
14,

8.

^3

)

488.
483.
20.

^>

()

533. 6

;

578.
4•

578.

introd.

516. 512.

3•

.

AiyimTov,

477. 4; 519. See

477.

3•

: ! ;
597.
4,

530.

'"•

533.

23

;

((!
6;

522. 592. 477. 5•
515.

7.

9•

589*

(c.

. D.

1

30)

486.

8,

20, 27,

29, 37

(.

D.

472. introd. 131) 486. .
)

cf.

2-

! ; !
; ;

, 2 516. 5 517. 595; 613-5; 619-21;
513.

6

;

518.
;

625D.

630-2.
513. 4

^.

(.

8)

474.

,

31, 34! 487. 13; 488.

3i8

(a. D.

26; 533.20; 602. 130) 500. 2.

(&0!
597.
I.

. 'Oyov,

,2
I,

138)484.2; 579.

178) 485. (a. D. 182) 475. 5> 29. 35. 47• (2nd cent.) 476. i. 13. (a. D. 184?) 474. 4.
D.

,°,,^' !
INDICES

. \(8
'AjroXci/dpior

522.

6,

I

6.

MaKcp (2nd cent.)

{•!

(.

D.

475. 2, 28; 476. 12; 485. 49; 522. 6, i6; 627. 5.
653.
(Cf;(t/J;(IJtf
;

e€W(A.

.

;(;([0

477.

2.

485.

592.

VIII.

WEIGHTS, MEASURES, AND COINS.
(a)

Weights and Measures.
;

Spovpa 483. 25, 33 ; 10, 17, 39, 44;

488. 10, 17, 27 499. 500. 14, 17, 28; 501. 13; 504. 12, 15, 23, 46; 506. 26, 55. 494. i8; 500. 13, 15, 30, 32, 34; 501.18,23; 516.10,12; 511. 2 el saep.; 518. 5, 6; 520. 12; 521. 11 522. 2 et saep.; 533. 19, 20, 24; 613-4; 640.
;

( '
{
6, 9,
)

494.
Cf. ().

17.

.

612.

/a

520. 14, 15496. 3•

503. 17; 505.

.

7•

.
3•

505.

520.
Kepapiov

6, 8, II, 2 1.

496.
520.
1 8.

Cf. {).

472. 31, 35; 522.
4, 9,

6,

16, 17,

27;

533. 18.

529. 407.

.
(/;)

496.

3•

.
Coins.
533. 23; 597. 33 19, 27; 485. 6; 491. ; 494. 2, 25, 29; 496. 13; 42; 502. 23; 504. 31, 47;
17,
7,

516. II, 12.

529.

7•

474. 474.
;

493. II 498. 8, 606. 55; 507.
7
;

35; 508.
;

17, 23; 511.

9; 506. II, 55; 507. 8, 23; 608. 17, 23; 510. 5; 511. 7, 8; 512. 6, 7; 513. 1 2 / saep. ; 514. 4 519. 3 ^" saep. ; 620. 6 «/ saep.; 622. 2 f/ iac/. ; 630. 12, 15, 17; 531. 23, 24; 532. 5; 633. 7; 574;
;

514. 4

;

530. 12
;

531.

1

6

;

496.

4>

577. 504.

Cpy.

8

577

;

582

;

597

;

609
;

;

610

;

638
;

;

483. 15

485. 17

642. 507.
;

,
,

605. 9; 506. II

510.

4•

9•

407. 9; 485. 6; 489. 2; 491. 7, 492. 9; 493. 494. 8, 25; 495. 17 496. 4. 9) >. ^3 487. 6, 8, 23; 498. 13 i/i<?iA 499. 18,43; 501. 19; 502. 23, 28; 504. 19, 3. 47; 505.
II, 14;
;

7|3£' 513.
Kfppariop

17,
1

8;
8;

519.8; 574; 697.

633.

6.

;

;

;

483. 15; 485.
20.
Cf. {).

506.

2;

507.

.
513.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
619.
;

i8

;

10; 520.

20,

23;

•^
50.

522. 6

(7

•/•.

574; 582; 597.

(\ «

319

522.

(5 50.
;

1 8,

3;

574.

12, 45•

513. 15, 17, 21, 41, 42. 55! 520.

574.
Cf.

582.

().

\
IX.

22, 23 marg.
3°,'

522. 11, 24.

530. 582.

531.

2;
3,

533. 15, 22; 577;

472. 36, 52; 474. 19; 494. 29; 55; 5VV•

513. 17, 19, 23, 42, 55! 574.

494. 9

;

496.

5•

dij/ioVia

TAXES.

653. 533. 23

;

597.

]
595.
iiicij

502. 44•
513.

"^^
1

4, 3^,

!

674. 574.

590.
574.
;

8(\
tiSos

574.

494. 4; 499. 21; 501. 31 24, 28; 506. 38.
506. 37 577 653.
; ;

504.

514.

.
506. 38.

610; 653.
504. 23
Tf'Xor
rpa7r(ffiTiK(5i' ?)
;

633.

tnapovpiou

511. 4.

imSexaTov

{/

609

;

610.

513. 12, 32.

'
! !

«««( ?)

(^! ^
478. 23.
6.

530.

(gen.

?)

.

1

40.

?)

663.

!! !
574.

574.

511. 4•
23,
26.

643. (?) 522.

1

5•

. \>

499. 6,

580. 602. 43•

'

,

514

.

. GENERAL
474. 37•
501. 28.
;

INDEX OF GREEK WORDS.
aytwcor 471.

491. 490. 484. 23 489. 2 496. 681. 495. 494. 2 492. 6; 642. 42. 4, 9 1 493. 9 496. 3, (V'" 490. 4
; ;
;
;

'

8.
28.

489.

471. 9•
4^72.

;

;

;

8,

20, 27, 3';

486.

4,

23;

;

;

15; 663.

''

512.

3•

471.

2

7•

607.

4•

320

INDICES
482.
3
I.

-/!.

See Index VII,

44.

.

8\8!

8(

492. 9 493. 9• met 503. 20; 506. 23.
;

(
€.

506. 4^• 489. 3 490. 3 491. 3 492. 3 493. 15 494. 3 495. 2 496. , 5, ; 503. 5 504. 8 506. 1 1 508. g ; 510. 577. 4; 530. 21. 477. -1 3 495. 7, 4; 528. . 495. 8 (?) 509. 8. 491. 6, 9, 492. 5> 496. 5; 503. 12; 504, 37' 54; 505.4; 506. 508.22; 525.5; 527. ; 530.25; 638. 3;
;

;

;

,"

;

,"

;

6

;

;

;

;

471. 132, 136; 472. 6, 19; 474. 12, 3; 477.5; 480.5,13; 482. 2; 485. 24; 487. 14; 490. 6, 7, 491. 492. 7, 9> 1°, 3; 493. 8; 494. 17, 2 26; 495. 7, 6; 496. 7, 4; 497. 4; 501. 15; 504. 15, 24; 505. 7, 8; 506.48,52; 508.23; 510.23; 513.44. 530.6; 531. 15, 56; 522. 17 J 533. 5 582 633 642 653. 471.149; 496. 7; 497. 2; 506. 42;

,

;

;

,

,

;

7

;

;

;

;

,

;

;

2

;

490.
otfi.

6,

.

See

aMpioc481. 8; 491-7, 13; 496.;; 502. 17; 505. 5; 510. 16; 513. 8. alpe'iv 489. 4, 6 491. 5 493. 8 494. 19 496. II, 15; 497. 20; 502. 28; 503. 18; 506. 47. 49; 653• 472. 3• 497. 4• 471. 78 497. 4• 471. 41 472. 5, 5• 646. 499. 19; 501. 26; 507. 36• 473. 6. 512. g; 513. 482. 28; 504. 33; 637. ^ 486. 6.
; ; ; ;

? ' ( ((!
7•£

532. 15487. 526.

8.
4•
;

496. 3 528. 471. 141 482. 506. 1 8.
;

2

20.
;

491. 6;

501. 25;

! '/
/

! !
8.
; ;

;

;

496. 8. 482. 35• /£/<' 486. 4; 506. 25. 486. 3• See Index V (</). 478. 488. 9 476. 7 492. 6 496. 2, 497. 13 7 501. 3 502. 4 503. 3, 7. 15 5 3; 506. 4• 526. 9, °•
;

471. 1 1. 527. 7• 473. 4

;

;

6

;
;

;

491.

;

;

;

;

498. 505.

522. 21.

6

486. 32.

;

471.

3•
;

493. 504. 29. 494. 4 495. 3• 490. 3 492. 4 510. 20. 502. ^. 472. 13. SXetppa 473. 3• 528. II. 480. 9• 477. 17; 478. 37• 472. 37• <)?67>'<; 500. 1 8. 506. 46• 489. 8; 493. 6; 496. 6, 8, 11,13.14,16; ^^. ^et saep.; 503.2, 505. 8; 530. 23. 21
;
; !

! ;
/ )%
;

639. 472. 21 491. 3

;

// 8((

513. 27. 471. 5•
20.
;

488.

478. 14

479. 5

;

532. 574.

.
8;
512.

;

!
II
;

513. 47. 59• 486. II ; 501. 24; 510. 513. 25; 532. 1 1.

473. 8. 474. 36; 495.
471. 6 ,
8.

3•

6,

497.

'£'
6.

{)
7•

471. 99•

\\(

522. 27. 522. II, 23, 24• 471. 66 532. 8, 21. 486. 1 2 ; 496. 1 4 532. $ 533.
; ; ;

495. 13; 519.

;

,

''

486. 1 5, 34• 486. II, 17-

avbpmi 473.

.

'!
; ;

493. 9 495. 3• avfiri/cptroi 597. 486. t'lvev 474. 40 496. 6. avfvpfTos 472. 14. avfyjnos 490. 2, 12; 492. 2, 16; 494. 8; 503. 2. 472. 12 j 497. 4 504. 6, 35 506. 7 510. 3. 488. 20 531. 5, lo. 471. 95 avievai 471. 86 503. 18; 633. 10.
;

/

!
(( 613-4
;

.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
480.
;

.

;

'
;

(
;

321
2
;

5,

14

481.
1

482.

;

606. 42

637.
;

4,80.

481.

7,

24; 483. 33

5

577; 584.
471. 471.
8.

34
;

37•
;
;
;

;

;

;

;

;

;

519. 2

I

498. 1 6. 528. 1 4• 474. 5 484. 1 6 485. 4, 6, 29, 486. II, 17 494. i 498. i 505. 42 2 506. I 635. avriSiKot 486. 10, 13, 34; 533. II 653. 492. 20, 21, 23.
;

8(

;

;

;

;

;

;

SvTiKpvs 471. 81.

!
653.
491. 494.

487. 17 486. 37 19, 22 491. 6, 14 494. 22 495. 9 496. 9, 13; 497. 6, 15; 499. 25; 601. 41", 602. 25; 506. 13, 39; 507. 1 2, 30; 528. 511. 9 519. 526. 14 527. 533. 24, 3°; 26 530. 19 532. 9, 638; 663. 472. 21. 493. 5 506. 22 485. 27, 32 610. 9• 486. 28. 495. 2 653.
;
;

485.

;

;

;

;

3

;

;

;

;

;

472.

2 5, 26.

497. 3• 653. 506.
642. 472. 47
II, 12,

21, 43, 44

;

530. 20, 31

>'

531. 26.
511. II.

620.

aVoXiiVfiv

;

489.
7,

502. 39• 473. 7; 474. 14dlioii- 471. 52, 151; 472. 12;

^

7,

16

;

490.
9
5

6,

10;

4, 5, 9,

13; 492.

13; 493. 17, 19;
5- 6,

475. 26;

477.15; 484.12; 485.28; 486.15;
488. 24,
aTrayyiXXfiv

\\

20;

495.

497.

41•

486.
3•

3•
487.
;

!]/ 496. 9;

526.

6,

6;
5, 7,

509. 3;

510.
4•

«
22
;

)7
•)/?}
;

630. 4• 474. 2 2
514.
I.

497.

8

;

514.

(
II,

(\(

486. 32. 509. 15. 663. 472. 8. 496. 9, 5• 530. 1 8,
471.

522.

. ,

12,

3,

3'•

496.

9•

497. 5• 471. 22; 496. 8, 471. 77• Snas 471. 82 497. 17 506. 48 ; 642. 478. 3, 41 480. 13; 485. 2, II 490. 4. 9 494. 23 504. 3, 39• 496. 2 504. 17, 4^ 505. 9 509. 17; 510. 4; 513. 38, 53; 577.
; ; ;
;

;

471. 1 38. 501. 6; 640.

476. 27. 507. 25.

;

496. 9 ; 497. 489. 12 491. II 6; 499. 28; 502. 38 640.
;

;

;

;

;

;

475. 8. 653.

!
471.

483. 5 499. 1 1 500. 1 6, 27 503. 9-, 13, '7 504.11,43; 505. 6, 8; 506. 29; 510. 3; 533. 7•
;
; ; ;

!
(

489. 8, 17 494. 15 496. 513. 49• 509. 13 512. 493. 7 513. 7•
;
;

;

;

6.

;

(5 509. 26; , ' € 628.

4•

472.

8.
; ;

613. 44) 57• ur 628. 9•

'

ipyvpiKOs
7•

apyipiov.

606. 26.

474. 17. 33 533. 23 See Index VIII (b). 642.

597.

! ! <
. . ! /

322

INDICES
23•

486. 5, 597. 529. 6.

^'
28; 490. ^, 23; 504. 6.
2
1,
;

47.

4

;

489. 2,

13; 491. 23; 492.
519. 17.

485. 33•

See Index VIII (a). See Index VIII (). opros49S. 32, 39; 522. i8. 471. I. 471. 145 473. 2 ; 592.
;

'
473.
;

509.
1

3.

^. ;

472.

7-

-)'£705• 477.

4•

See Index VII. apxifpareveiv 533. 25. 476. 6 ; 489. 30 492. 24

( !
58, 59•

;

504. 57.

. -.
7•

473. 4• 525. 3• 506. 37 577 633. See Index VII. 507. 29 622. 4504. 23 606. 36. 0f/3aio£v 499. 25; 501. 34; 502. 24; 604. 47 577 640. 504. 23 506. 36. 471. 127; 486. 475. 3, 26 635.
;
;

.
;

(30

;

;

.
;

;

514. 4

;

531. II

611.

506. 50. See Index VII.
19.

/3, 488.
3;

II

;

493.

1 1

;

494. 28; 604.

507. 34-

471.
1

6.
;

532.

4.

471. 63, 87 ; 529. II ; 630. 23, 24, 31, 531. 3; 533. 26, 27, 28. 471. 67.

473. 8. 477. 4• 491. 23.
471. 89.
4:85. 20;
;

^.
; ;

('
;

488. 28; 592.
493.
1

2 1 533. 9• 513. 37• UTfKiOs 490. 6, 491.

530.

6.

;

,

482. 13; 490. 6, 492. 496. 7 502. 17 55 503. 6, 17 5, 6, 7, 8; 510. 15; 513. 8. 524. 3• 577. 505. 9; 510. 8; 532. 6.
;

; ;

488. 33• 488. 24 614. 498. 8, 45• 469. 6, 15; 499. 13; 503.8; 606. 506. 2 8. 6, 7 2 2; 477.9; 479.5; 490. 494. 492. 4 493. 3> 9 3 ; 491. 3 497. 5> 4; 495. 2, 14, 6; 496. 8, 506. 59 532. 2. 7 497. 24. 490. 12.
; ;

;

;

;

496.

13,
7,
;

4•
iS!

593.

505.

/
'
;

521. 22, 24.

475. 1 9. 496. 2 / 497. 20. 524. 2.
II
;

/.
504.
1 2
;

eVt

airo

496.

3,

4» 513. 42, 54
;

j

«'499.

506.

7

;

506. 27.

622. 24. 472. 39

494. 25 485. 30," 487. 5, 493. 7; 497. 12; 646. 497. 4• 473. 3•
;

4;

495. 5• 490.

471. 88. 471. 85.

5,

9
'>

ye«a 489. II, 19; 490. 5• yeWoK 490. 18; 492. 19.

494.

24.

494.

5•
(?)

^a(9/L<df

8

511. 3•

521. introd. yeVv/ja 493. 18 ; 494.10; 600. 19 ; 514. 515. 5 ; 516. 8 ; 617. 4 ; 518. 1 ; 3

491.

8,

15; 507. 30•

613-4. 487.

7

;

490.

7>

II

;

497.

,

6.

521. 13574.

501. 31•

646.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS

323
;

€(! 49.
;

1 7,

4 1.
;

487. 15; 506. 37
517. 12 533. 499. 2 1 501. 30.
;

4, 8,

,

577; 633.
II, 15,
6.
1

9.

//

494.
TV 633.

506. 37
'3»

;

577
34•

;

633.

600
506. 37
)'

471. 9• ; 495. 12 506. 3 et saep. 508. 12; 510. 6. 471. 7, 62 (?); 486. 24; 506. 52; 508. II, 19, 26 510. 6, 19; 636; 663. 472. 7 486. 6, 24 653.
;
;

;

;

7>

S*-•"

'f/'"

604.
633.

12, 45-

77
29

493. 5, 20 1 6 640.
;

;

494.

1 7

;

522. 29

;

530.

heiKvivai

471. 75•
;

471. 7^;

472.

15,

1

6,

17,

(
! (
!

478- 9; 484 3. 3; 28; 486. 28; 486. 8; 487. 1 1, 1 8 488. 28, 42; 493. 6; 494. 495. 4 12 496. g, 497 2, 13, 501. 28 505. 2 506 4 498. 8, 42 508. 511. 513. 8, 45 53; 58; 515. 2; 529. 8; 633. 6; 692 642; 653. 528. 6.

474.29; 477.

,
;

;

,

;

;

;

;

-6 ,

;

;

626. 5; 532. 3• 474. 475. 30 488. 26, 41 496. 8. 472. 46; 487. 2. buTivflv 471. 50; 523. 1 524. . 526. 7•
if'iv
;

"

2 1,

6(
491.

38;

&(
Se^iof

;

;

489.

22, 25, 27 20, 21,
;

;

490.

12, 17, 18;

17,

9•

24; 492.
1 8.

6,

20, 21, 22;

494. 31
hepdv 653.
hiapios

533.

531.

.
^^ saep.

494. 34
627.
3•

521. 12.

SiUTfpos 471.

( 8(
;

580.

496. 5• 494. 33
498.
1 6.

^^ saep.

478. II. 489. 20, 2 2, 25; 490.
; ;

17•

471. 4 472. 8, 38 26; 485. 48 ; 489. 2 1

478. 48 481. 490. 14; 492.
;

;
.
;

(!. ;

17; 604. 5°. 56; 506. 528. 17• See Index VII. 471. 472. 8,
;

6;
56;

609. 19;

474. 3;
;

477.18; 478.46; 479.27; 481.25; 485. 8, 13, 28, 47 489. 2; 490. 14

'
494.

' .
;

492. 17; 494. 25; 496. 15; 497. 24; 504. 5, 55 607. 37 530. 2, 7 531. 532. 4 ; 533. 3• 2. 5, 27
;
;

;

637. 473. 8. 471. 39 501. 4 512. 471. 29, 35 473. 3• See Index VII. 493. 1 8. 471. 98 489. 5> II, 493.
> > ! ;

3•

<( ';((
15;
5,

^(

574. 472. 2 2. 102; 474. 39• 609-11. 471. 75 476. 6 478. 12 ; 485. 19, 31 486.25; 492.8; 604. 13; 508. 19, 25; 528. 25; 531. 28; 697. 474. 20. 473. 2. 609. 14• ?;. 472. 39 489.12; 491. II 492. 493. 2; 494. 29; 495. 17: 500. 19; 504. 31 513. 2; 517. 3 518. 617 640. () 494. 14; 499. 501. 31; 504. 24, 28 506. 38. (?) 611. 3• 500. 13, 1 6, 29, 34• ^W• 'OTpo'r XtPyoi 475. 5• ^. 483. 26. 515. . 486. 12; 486. 609. 2. 7, 23
;
;

;

;
2

,'

,"

;

;

;

.

;

.

.

;

533.

5•

513. 19, 34, 39; 580. 6.
II
;

488.

582.

472.

1 1.

496.
2 7•

11, 13•

7, II,

, 6,
;

!

8,

^^,^;
<<«
a

471.

ig,

21,
12.

23;

504.

40, 49; 528. 20 yipit 620. 12.

;

633.

\€ ;

497.

19-

476. 486. 1 2. 482. 34 489-96 saep. 503. 5• 496. 496. 12; 497. 3• 484. 24• 473. 6. 533. 3•
;

6

;

y

1

324

/ ^ ^ ^
533.
hiaTUveiv

INDICES
;
; ;

516. 6 517. 530. 5 9, 23; 610-1; 613-4; 616-7. 485. 20; 496. 5; 487. 8.

471. 6 1. 484. 8

;

533.

4•
;

(
494.

492. g 493. 6 503. 9~2; 505. 472. 48.
;

;

495.
6.

1 6,

1

8.

. '
eyyaia
eyyofoi

13; 493. 23; 496.

4,

7, 9,

19; 494. 6, 15; 574.
12.

7,

2, 3• 6,

490.
25.

485.

See Index VIII (). 4,83. 1^; 485. 17; 507.
8.

,
15,

19.

496.
;

2

/
€(>
SiSorai

489. 3 ; 490. 2 491. 495. 2. 495. 1 1 638. 486. 3• 494. 6; 497. 8. 496. 8 497. 5•
;

2

;

492.

2

;

;

;
6.
e'yyus

472. 9, 6, 22; 487. 528. 12 531. 13. 472. 7. 478. 12, 22, 483. 17 ; 506. 15• 475. 2 2.

9>

6;

;

471. 43•

471.

1

3.

472. 20, 51, 53; 485.5; 491. 6, 14; 494. 22 496. 5, 10 522. 15, 26 525. 6, 7; 528. 15; 529. 8; 530. 13; 533.
;

;

;

! ^
614.

7, 18; 580; 653. 533. 15.

582; 592; 599; 640;

€/485. 25;
494. 496.

508. 20, 25. 504. 14• 484, 1 8.

486.26; 494.27; 495.
475.
8.
7, 1 1
j

.
12,

494. 24. 475. 1 6 478. 1 7 485. 14, 19, 27; 504. 26; 514. 3; 516. 8; 518.
;

3•

490.

;

;

486. 1 6, 36. biKaiohoTUv 484. 25. 578. 471. 115; 466. 35; 636. 653.

497. 10, 16. 472. 35• ('yxaXe'iv 472. 19; 486. 22; 503. 21; 509. 20; 510. 24 513. 43, 56•

€€
653.

;

488.

2 2.

653. ') 486. 28; 497. 19; 499-33; 506.49• 577. 479. 6; 483. 34; 510. 7• 474. 13; 487. 503. 19• 513. 8 642. 513. 29 533. 20, 25.

472. g. 506. 5°. 496. 603. i'yXdpelv 472. 29.

;
;

?486.
589.
e(9eVti/

5,

33; 491.5,13; 493.2,7,17;

! ' 5

;

;

;

/

«'

483. 1 6. 520. 6, 8, II, 21. 507. 37• 646. 506. 29. 472. 38, 40 473. 2 475. 27 486. 487. 12 488. 25 493. 8. 15 533. 24. 474, 25. 439. 8, 17 494. 15 496. 6.
; ;

€?

;

;

;

;

( ( (

475. 9• 472. 14. 472. 474. 6 478. 47 ; 481. 25 485. 32, 33> 48; 488. 489. 2; 490. 14; 492. 17; 504.50,56; 532. 5• 506. 37 577 633. 6IS, ets 529. 1 8.
471. 77

€€'

8
;

;

;

;

5

;

;

515.

8.

;

;

491. 5• 6oCXos471. 8; 472. 14, 2; 475. 2; 485. 26; 489. 8, 17; 491. 13; 492. 7, 23,

477. II 507. 14; 640. 477. 24. 503. 19. 481. 482.15; 489.7,15; 490. 6; 502. 2; 503. 1 6, 1 8. eiTf 528. 24 653. 471. 52; 483. 15, ?; 485. 7; 496. 489. II, 19; 491. 5; 493. 497. 13; 498. 31, 36, 38,39; 499. 6;

,

;

;
;

;

;

.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS

325

(
;

602. 27; 503. 16, 19, 20; 604. 30; 606. 6, 12, 13, 15; 607. 10, II, 19; 528. 4. 515. 4 525. 2 «dxfpor 491. 7, 8, 9, 14, 15; 492. 6; 503. 20; 605. 3. 496. 13.
;

(\ 646.
cViciSf

(! 5•

489.

471. 54• 9, 17; 494. 13

;

495.

6, 7, 9,

( «

609. 14, 496. 2, 5; 497. 21 494. 25; 495. 15496. 3> 5. 9; 497. 5• fKUvos 472. . 639. «VXoyij 496. 15; 497. 19• 497. 4•
«8i8<5rai
;

18.

509. 3 653. 486. 30. 31 472. 34. 54; 491. 6; 502. 8, 22. enof 471. 7 474. 34• 476. 9 479. 14; 486. 3• 481. 4; 483. 27; 499. 5; 501. g, 25; 502. II 504. 27, 28 505. 2 506. 13, 513. 30, 45; 640. 53; 509. 'tfoiK^tv 638. 489. 6, 14 493. 3• 101-489. 6, 14; 493. 8; 502. 2, 28,
;
;

;

(
;

:

;

;

;

;

'!
39•

?/ 480.
fVTOKos

1

5

;

653.
8.

{' !
(!

476.
evTfWeiv 527.
2.

6( «

508.

18.

473. 3• 533. 6 472. 43• 646.
;

fWo'r 512. 5•
J

636.

eVruyxuvfiv

493. 10 506. 47• e'icTOt 492. 22. «KTOTf 486. 9, 28, 493. 5. 2.
eWiWix 492. 9

;

494. 28

;

607.

17•

(( (\(

471. 97;

*8.

37!

533. 25;

( \ / ! ((
( ( ( £€'
iV, iV

! (
(•^5/

653.

507. 34•
531.
1

8.

502. 27• e^avey\noi 502. 14.
471. 42. 471. 83.
II,
;

501. 25. 522. 29; 529.

el7npf^os
471. 45•

.

639.

495. 8. i'^flrai 489. 10, 7, 14; 493. 6

506. 5°•

494. 5• 494. 1 6.
33•

(afa 485.

}(1(

(
tvavTi

653. 505. 6, 9, 522. 8, 20. 528. 23. 491. II 44. 28.

;

19; 491. 7. 15: 492. 494. 19; 495. 16; 496. 503. 18 506. 497. 3 498. 42 6, 13 508. 26. 41, 49; 507. 28 528. . 472. 682 653. See Index VII. See Index VII. 4^5 474. 28; 483. 16; 601. 28; 510. 10. f'^iiVm 471. 73 472. 2. 486. 1 2. (|o8«iff<.< 474. 26; 631. 21.

. .
;

;

;

;

;

;

(\((

;

(
6
;

;

471.

1

48.

494.

I

7.
7,

494. 21. 474. 2 . 504. 25.
623.
3•

481. lo; 482. 15; 489.

15;
4
:

4.
493.

495. 5• erapxof 607. 4• ivhtiKvivui 494. 9• Moptvtia 4^9. 17; 494. (vtbptinv 484. iWvni 506. 27.

»

.

; 45.
582.

?| 480.
6.

',

502. 2. 490. 3 491. 3> 39; 494. 4. 27; 495. 506. 43•
;

"

)

492.

2,

9; 496.

;

« ((

All. 81.
1

4?)

(dative

522.
8.

4•

498.
12.
;

498.

613.

2

5

;

633.

2

5

;

476. 17

530.

17, 3°•

326
inayeiv,
oral/

€-(
;

••(

491. 14•

.
;

INDICES
See Index III
(a).

487. 1 3. inavayKos 506. 35. 495. 8 502. 54
inapovpiov 653.

(
3,
;

(\\(
504. 17.
20.

474.
;

39

!

475. 4

5

483.

8;

506. 39.

?.
eVfi

471. 2 2. See Index VII.
;

«
«rcii/nt

473. 2 527. 6, 7

484.
;

7

;

486.

13,

31

;

513. 4

;

531.
14.

9.

cWi-yfti'

486.
495.

471. 21.
4.

«

eiTtt^tpos

531.

9.

'
«rocaXfii/

(^

489. II, 12; 493. lo; 510. 24. 471. 128; 513. 12, 32. eirexftr' 474. 25; 488. 43. eVi TO aiV<i 496. 3, 4 513. 42, 54 ; 522. 24. 472. 8. 499. 5 639. 478. 45; 479. 2; 485. 45; 490. 1 2 492. 1 6 ; 502. 5 1 504. 49)55• fViScilii 471. 90• fniSeKarov 609 610.

\€(

;

;

;

;

483. 34 490. 3; 491. 3, 4 492. 494. 4, 5 495. 3 496. 11. 4, 5 fVirijSfiof 472. 8 580. 580. See Index VII. 492. g 493. 489. 12; 491. 504. 31. 11; 494. 28; 495. 17 cViTpfVfti' 474. 40; 476. 10; 486. 15, 34• 487. 5, 9) 15^ 496. 12, 13. cViVpoTTos 485. 31; 491. g, 16; 495. 14; 496. 12 497. 13 498. 2 501. 6. encrvyxaveiv 474. 33. eVi0epeii/ 472. 9 506.6; 507. 38; 516. 14;
fWeXfii/
;
; ; ;

( (!. (' '/ (.
28; 528.

471. II
12,

474. 3; 486. 29; 513. 6; 530.2; 531.27; 533.
;

530. II 532. 1 1. See Index VII. 486. ^.
471. 17•

;

(
613.
fVoi'/ciov

('

;
;

;

;

;

;

;

;

498.

6.
,'

(•( 492.

imhihovai 473. 4

€ ( 6(> (
€5
((\

475. 26, 35 478. 43 479. 16, 24; 480. 10, 21; 481. 23; 483. 18, 31; 484. 33; 485. 29; 486. 17; 487. 5, 22; 483. 36.
;
J

498. 48.
;

472. 13 493. 500. 14, 3'• 475. 6.

3, 6, 8, 1 1.

499. 492. 20; 586. 488. 2 1. 478. 9. 3 ' 597. 496. "J.
J

.

471.

14; 473. 5; 485. g; 486.

€(\€ (!
14; 592.

(
.

496. 4•
6.

531.

7•
II.

( '. ((
522.
7, fp-yoK

(' (^ (!

)!
531.
9.

510. 19.
g.

486. 33; 593; 633.

471. 49, 128. 471- 02.

498. 32

9
;

;

520.
2 1.

14,

5•

473. 5 489. 19 ; 490. 7, ; 491. 8; 497. 13; 528. 24, 25; 531. 20; 532. 17. (pa>s 471. 1 9• 523. I ; 524. . 472. 3. eVi^s 471. 471. 53•

,

n

{(! 480.

499.

1

(! (!
^'?•
imoKOTTeiv

489.

8,

6;

493. 17; 494. g

;

495.

(

589. 589.
533. 20.

42.

II,

585. 498. 14, 20. erepos 472. 38 481. 9 482. 13 488. 32 ; 489. 10, 19 492. 8, 14; 494. 12 etsaep.; 495. 4, 16; 496. 5 (?), 12; 498. 42; 501. 13; 502. 18, 20; 506. 52; 508. 20; 510.13,14,17; 520.13; 533.3,6; 633; 639. 471. 109; 472. 22; 486. 5; 488. 1; 493. 1 8. hoi passim.
;
; ;
;

,

.

;

.
*v

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
497. 3
;

327

527.

9.

cifliW 530. 30; 532. 12; 533. 5. 471. 79, log. fvvouv 494. 9.

(

tv&oKUp

49.
48.

8

;

503. 5

;

513. 48^

! €
^'

642.
531. 8.
; ; ;

6o, 63.

fiepyrrfii'

486.

16,

36; 487. 19.

27.

/)5
«CiOia

473. 7 ; 495. 13 496. 1 2 497. 13 651. 471. 50, 63, III 476. 481. 5; 483. 27; 496. c,, 13; 497. 6, 16; 498. 32. 37. 39. 47; 609. 522. 22, 30; 625. 3 528. 4, 9•
;

;

;

;

471. 1 4 1. iixfXijt 471. 96. cUTu;(fi(i 526. 13.

{

tvnopns

494. 6 642. 580. 472. 33. 532. 19.
;

4; ^^.
;

496.9; 497. 507. 17; 640.
;

, 6; 499. 29;
; ;

502.

See Index VIII (d). 491. 1 1 492. 10 494. 29 504. 32. 17 493. 4; 494. 2 1, 25; 495. 15.
471. 107 471. 3•
;

496.

527. 9

;

528. 3

;

529.

i

;

533.

2,

472.

{
;

477. 9477. 12, 25, 26. f0o8os 493. 10, II ; 504. 30. 476. 12, 17. fXftv 472. 3, 5, 15, 21 483. 33; 484. 17 485. 42 486. 8, 37; 487. 8; 488. 27, 28; 489. 5, 6, 7, 13, 15, 16; 491. 3 492. 4, 12 494. 14 495. 2, 4, 9 496. 498. 34; 501. 3, 10, II, 15; 497. 21 26; 508. 21; 511. 3; 512. 4; 513. 60; 514. 2, 3, 5 516. 7 527. 4 529. 6 531. 9, 12; 533. 8, 10, 14 582 611. 603. I I, 12. 471. 4; 496. 12, 15; 499. 23; 501. 506. 39; 522. 28; 531. 6, 20, 22 33
;

! (

494. 24. 474. 4 I

(
.

7

',

485.

25.

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

, . ( !
(!

See Index VI (). 475. 24. 471. 6. 506. 9, 3• 528. 7; 531. 7, 23. 28; 533. 653. 501. 8, 24, 26, 40 516. 7 617. 518. 5; 633. 24; 613-4; 617; 640. See Index II and VI {a). 473. 5. 492. 23 502. 7 604. 4, 33. 4°, 53• 473. 4•
; ; ; I

; ;

;

;

;

;

494.

13-

,

;

;

622.
471.

().

8.
;

;

472. 30, 33. 39 497. 2 1 604. 4,
;

4

494.

-]

;

496.

2

;

;

633. 26.

699.
ffCyor

521.
3

1 9.

496.

;

631.

1

7.

(~
;

502. 33•
471. 72.

<!
{()

472. II. 472. 7, 52 490. 5 491. 5 494. 12; 495. 4 497.
;

;

.

;

492. 6

1&

513. 45. 57492. 9, 15 404.
;

1

5

;

38.

^<>( 631. 3509. 17-

' .

496.

4•

471. 66;

528. 8. 636. See Index VII.

; 8 ' '
;

475. 5. 494. 31 509. 1 8. 483. 2 5 487. 489. 4 490. 3 491. 3; 492. 4; 493. 4. 494. 4 <?^ s(7i/>. 495. 2, 15 601. 37 608. 12.
;

;

8

;

;

;

,

521.

.

;

;

483. 628. 2 4.

27.

519.
2.

3.

'

4•
{>).

I'f^fi'f.

See Index VI

516. 491. 3•

328
upas 486. 32.
UpoT(KTa>v

INDICES
Upa
(sc. yri)

633.

579.
14,

489. 9, I 7471. 96; 494. 9; 496. 4; 530.
;

^ (
,
526.

475. ^1.
)

471. 5 612.

j

653.

20, 31

531. 13.
1 8.

494.

! !
! ( (
528.

484. 27; 485. 32; 486. i6, 34, 36; 487. 19; 488. 33; 528. 22; 533. 3, 6, 10, 14, 18, 26; 653. 482. i8; 504. 9; 506. 29.
519. 12. 593. 489. 12; 491. 5) 1°. n. 13' 17! ^^2. 10; 493. 12; 494. 29; 495. 17; 496. 505. 3 ; 506. 23, 15 ; 503. 7 ; 504. 31
;

! !
II
;

474. 34* 490. 4, 7> 8 491. 12 492. 494. 7; 497. 493.

6

;

;

;

!
5,

4-

637.

KaTa\oy€7ov

485. 3• 504.
;

.
482. 19
;

481. 525.

486. 30

;

637.

4•

45; 507. 646. 633.

19•
1 6.

TO

)/ 475.

4.

KaSanep 497. 19; 499. 33

506. 48• A8S. 26; 502. 32; 504. 24; 506. 36; 577; 640. 4^1. 8; 479. 483. 2, 34! 485. 34, 37 ; 486. 75

( ^
KaTexciv

486. 29, 3°• 486. 3• 507. 24• 494. 20. 496. 7 497. 2 478. 49 515. 3•
J
!

;

506. 42.

8

;

614. 472. 39• 527. 6, 7 KaTTjyopos 472. 32. 471. 92.

4•

:

,'

532. 23.

KaTOLKiKOs

471.
2 1.

6.

487. 14
;

;

496. 12; 497.

13,
8,

4;
14;

489. II 491. 492. 493. 9; 494. 27 495. 6. 496. 6; 497. ig;

;

\ yap

527.

2

;

533. 17.

483. 6; 504. 12, 45• (?) 482. introd. 483. 26; 506. 49• 488. 6 492. 2, 3KeXfueij/ 471. 100; 474. 6, 478. 9> 486. 29; 487. 2; 488. 25; 653. 495. 8 602. 55• Kepapiov 472. 3) 35; 522. 6, 16, 17, 27;
;

6

;

;

488. ^.
5•

; ! ;05 ! !
Ka\f'iv

473.

502. 36. 488. 40 532.22.
;

488.

29, 3^•

! ^

533. 18. 653. 533.

1 6.

621. 21. 472. 12 474. 24.
;

525.

7•

498.

7

^ Ja<^.
;

(\
485.
;

17,

8,
44,
5,

12, 17, 21,

4,

608. 24
475.

610.

22
5•

21 ; 497. 23 506. 56; 507. 9> 2, 30 516. 6 526. 7•
; J
;

;

498.

1

8, 2 2, 20.

607. 2 6 533. 492. 17, 2 2.
621. 14.

2 2.

604.

2 6.

!
',

7

;

493.
21.

519. 15.

KivBvvevciv

488. 499. 2; 601. 27; 607.

32,

3^)

633. II.

(crop)

499. 23
;

;

501- 32•

(wrist) 476. 4 492. 16. 472. 2 7 ; 653. 529. 7• 487. Karayiyvfaeai 480. 6 484. 5 492. 472. 9, 24, 25.

.

;

2.

528. 3• 528. 8. kXei's 502. 34• 472. 15, 1 6. 472. 4 509. 7• 485. 29 491. 4, 481. 492. 5, 8, 1 1 494. 1 1 ; 495. 4 512.

!

,'

8
;

;

;

2

;

;

8.

!
\

.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
; ;
;

329

483. 6; 488. ii 499. 9 501. 11 506. 24; 533. ii 593; 633. 503. 8, 14, 19. 520. 7 523. 2 646. 472. 29, 56; 497. 4. «oivrj 474. 39. Koti'uc 492. 6, 12. 490. 5, 9. 480. 3 482.
; ;
;

499.34; 501.47; 502. 45; 504. 38; 506. 56 507.36; 513 49. 50^.
;

1

6.

;

;

^
leo/iifiiK

532. . 471. 73• 471. 84. 614. 653.

\(
496. 15
;

.
{/
5 Cf. Inde.x

513.

4.

520. 20.
471. 94. 519.
;

,
2

II.
;

482.

483. 4
().

V

499. g

;

589

;

597.

See Index VII.

503.
471.

.
43• 47

24

;

474. 14 501. 34
;

10, II, 31

. !
/
;

497. 17 499. 526. 8 529. 2 530. 3, 531. 12 533. 7.
; ;
;
;

7,

;

;

35;
631.
Xa^eia

498.
2
;

31,

36;

477. 6; 486. 7, 509. 15; 526. 5;
;

499. 5• 502. 32. 494.

6 653. 530. 5•

.
4•

See Index VII.

498. ^.
1 8.

493.

Cf.

62.

.
^
>'

498. 6, II, 43• Xa|fuftv 498. 29. 498. 34• 478. 23. 498. 8, 45•
522.
Xe'yfiv
1

8.

503. 20. 485. 2 2 506. 2 2. 484. 2 1 486. 9, II, 17) 488. 513. 29. «piVciv 471. 154; 486. 13. 15; 653. 471. 135 484. 27 653. 4^. 127; 485. 592.
; ;
;

646. 486. 2 5

487.

;

>

(
Kv/xoKos
Kvpttijuv
;

;
;

(
29.

472. 2, 5, 14, 20, 29; 478. 16, 28; 486. 7 488. 1 1 500. 1 1 512. 5 528. 19,22; 633.14,15,22,24; 682; 599; 653. ~\(( 497. 15. 475. 8. 487. II.
; ; ; ;

((

475. 7> 24.
;

XiUKo'f

) 522. 29. 471. 531. 13. ;

472. 31

486.

4,

25; 506. 25.

(gen.) 491. 19•

522.
;

.

602. 36. 526. 4•

498. 7 el saep. 486. 22 493.

2,

g

;

506. 22,
;

3, 26; 485. 46, 52 488. 3, 35 490. 2, 13; 492.2,17; 496.5; 502.2,52; 503. 504. 6, 25, 49, 55 605. 3 506. 7 4 510. 3. (' lord ') 471. 2 ei sacp. 486. 13, 33 487. 12 488. 7, 23 48. 4 ; 523. 2 528. 9 642. Cf. Inde.x II. KUpiot (' valid ') 489. 13; 490. 7; 491. 4, II, 12 492. 4, 10 493.1-'; 494-5,
;

474. 41• 496. 15; 499. 22 501. 32 20; 506. 44. ('guardian ') 478. 7, 46 479.
;
;

;

503.

'

-^

489. 7, 15 502. 37• 496. 3 498. 7 <•/ satp. 528. 12. 486. 35• 407. 499. 14 603. 9 (^ saep.; 605. 6, 8; 506. 30; 618. 4• 599.
;
; ;

.

;

533. 9• 533. 20.

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

26, 29,

30; 495.

3, 16, 17,

18

;

498. 48;

486. 2 2. 474. 17, 34 485. 13 496. 515. 521. 622. , 20 625. g 526. 1 1 528. 13, 17, 22 630. 15. 473. 7: 491. 14; 500. 5; 505. 8; 506. 511. 4 512. 7; 613. 35 13-4; 653. /(( 528. 10.
;
;

;
;

,
;

;

;

;

;

;

8

;

;

;

;

330

INDICES
496. 472.

\ 33
fii'yas

. .

^
/
; ;

510. 7• 530. 4• 521. 2 . 525. 8.

636. 503. 6. 485. 21.
17,

€7- 500.
640. 494.

34; 501.35; 517.3; 518.

( ! !
493.
477.
2

474. 37• 496. 5• 582. 489. 2 2 f/ ifli•;!!. 490. 15 ^^ ^d^P• 491. 18 f/ jfli/. 492. 18 -/ jaf/i. ; 494.
;
'>

1 7 612. juixpi484. 26; 491. 16; 495. 10; 497. 13; 498. 40, 41 504. 25; 505.6; 506. 39; 513. 44; 528. IX.
;

;

;

f/ saep.

471. 64.
12.
8.

480. 14; 487. 488. 43; 489. II 491. 492. 5. 493. 9; 494. 27, 29; 495. 3. 6, 17; 496. 12; 497. 13; 499. 17,4°; 503. 2; 504. 19, 21, 32 509. 5, ig. 20; 513.

,;
;

,

;
;

,

43, 44; 531. 5, 9
firjieVo)

;

538. 12

599.

(Jm .) 530.
;

471.

6.

473. 5• 491. 2

;

646.

^'- 473.
/iftpn/ctoi/

(

5•

,
/
;

528. 23. 491. 2 1, 24472. 37•
471. 126.

V

(")
;

"

471. 66.

471. 20, 80, 109, 125•

530. 8. 472. 4, 39

!
((

488. 39• 472. 5• 485. 20 491. 1 1 ; 492. 495. 17," 506. 20. 472. 2 2.
;

^.

6

;

533.

1 2.

owr

;

494. 29

531.

9•

(: 473. 5

!
4
;

489. 491. 5; 496. 19 493. 8 574. 479. 8 481. 8 482. 6, 7, 9. 13; 490. 5> 9; 491. 17; 496. 13; 601. II, 17; 503. 6 e/ saep.; 504. 21; 505. 6; 506. 24, 26; 509. 6; 510. 12, 13, 14; 577; 636.
;

,

'

1 1.

;

;

;

,

;

471. 87

;

491. 25
6, 7
;

;

516.

;

595

;

625

;

('(
630.

512.
4•

;

489. 4

520. 24 532. 6. 490. 3 491. 3 492.
;
;

;

! (( -'
494.
513. 33•

474. 23

J

484. 13

;

485.

6,

49;

'
504.

485. 36•
471. 53
i

477.
7•

,'

506. 20 513. 46. 496. 13; 497. 9;
;

! !
;

35-

!
'! 519.

('month') 481. 21, 28 482. 32; 483. 16; 485. 14, 18, 44, 51; 487. 21; 494. 2, 17; 498. 42; 499. 27; 502. 9. 10; 504. 25; 505. 2; 506. 2, 13, 17, 18, 53; 507. 10, II, 20; 508. 3, 14, 21; 510. 9; 513. 7; 530. 29; 533. 21. Cf. Index III (a). 531. 8, 22 515. 6, 7 J 595. 490. I 3. 472. 28, 33, 46, 53; 475. 15; 476. 3, 5; 478. 2i; 479. 12, 26; 481. 13; 482. 24 483. i 485. 15, 54; 486. 2, 487. 8 489. 3, 29, 33, 36 19, 21, 27 490. 2, 4, 5, 9, 21; 491. 4, 9, 16, 28; 492. 2, 3, 5, 8, II, 18 494. 3, 8; 495. 496. 2, 5 497. 13, 20 498. 4 ; 2, 4, 5 503. 2, 3, 4 504. 6, 501. 7 502. 52 505. i, 2, 3. 4, 8 506. 4, 33. 34. 53 5, 8, 9, 54; 508. 6, 8, 16; 510. 2; 513. 514. I 525. 5 529. 1 2 530. 3, 60 I, 32; 638. 495. 12. 481. 5, 19; 483. 33; 485. i6.; 486. 3; 504. 34. 478. II, 2 2. 485. i6 530. 26; 533. 27 582.
13, 15,
;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

515.

3.

498. 43• 487. 1 8. 653.

/

525. 471. 47

g.
;

498.

II,

499. ,

22, 25,

37; 522. 7, 9• 3° 500. 27 501.
> ;

.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
I

331

! ! .
I,

20, 24,

36; 502.
;

el saep.\

533. 12

;

472.
ii/Xa/iai.

19-

640.

499. 15; 501. 14.
;

499. 24, 34
517.
7.

45; 507. 26; 512.

4,

501. 35, 47 ; 502. 24, lo; 640.

\C\ivoi 521. 6, 8

646.

521. 612.

6.

,

See Inde.x VIII. 496. 3. 485. 13 489. 31 491. 26 492. 25 505. 2 506. 53 508. 13 510. 8 634. 483. 20. 471. 45. 59. 74; 472. 24, 36, 47. 5°; 481. 17; 489. 8, 491. 5, 503. 19; 509. 13; 496. 12; 497. 13; 515. 7; 522. 27; 531. II 653.
; ;

;

'
oiKfii/
:

'.

See Index VIII
471.
3•

(6).

;

;

;

;

;

480. 14; 533.

12.

,,
531.

;

,

;

519. 5-

(^)
.
6.

1 5.

621. 4.
(gen.?)

40.

530.

'(>'?)
»';;

472. , 2; 476. 19, 23; 476. 8; 479. 8; 480.2; 481.8; 482. 489. 492. , 8, 13, 7, 8, 15, 6; 490. 6, 497. 4 14 496. 6 498. 9 502. 6, 19; 503.6,17; 505.5; 510. 2, 13, 14, 6; 513. 8, 2, 26; 531. 533. II, 13; 636; 638. 498. 7• 498. 34• 489. 4• 4,12. 28; 504. 3• oiVufffSof 491. 5, 13; 493. 3, 17. 19• 489. 6, 8, 15, 497. 4; 531. 3•

;

;

;

;

;

;

6

;

653. 643. 522. 7. 622. 15.

533.
oXi'yof

1

8.

488.

19•

uWiivai

MaWus 471. 114.
vfiipdf

533. 1 3. 475. 6 476. 502. g.
;

13.

(! .
i/0/intdt

wof 500. 19. 477.
; ;

;

507.
2

5•
;

496. 15. 472. 7• 502. 37• 471. 124 473. 8 486. 26 488. ?; 492. 8, 15; 493. 4; 494.30; 496.8; 496. 4 500. 15, 3' 503. 9, 2, 13, 505. 6. 17, 472. 3. 519. 4•
;

;

;

8

;

;

,

;

489. 3 490. 494. 2 495. 2. 472. 23.
;

491.

2

;

492.

2

;

471. 76.

!
viv

II

;

653. 533. 6 578. 485. 30, 34 653. 496. 4; 504. 8; 510. 4
;

505. 9;

506.

651.

474.
5. 13-

2,

4

;

484. 23
;

;

486.

,2

;

513.

478. 35. 44; 480. 7. 2' 482. 37 483. 21, 31 638. 505. 4 508. 2 2. 642. 478. 31 493. 5 498. 38; 503. 13; 513. 6, 22; 533. 6; 597. 471. 4^ 496. 5! 503. 2, 6; 504. 3, 2, 29 505. 4 607. 6 508. 509. 1 1 510. 19, 25; 513. 36. 5,
;
;

;

;

;

!

;

;

;

;

;

;

6, 7

482. 12 499. 1 2 503. 505. ; 506. 27. 525. 9• 479. 6; 482.3; 486. 13,34; 494. 13
;
; ;

,

472.

2 9, 5^.
;

504.

7.

637. 22; 530. 4• 492. . 2 504. 37•
21. 38, 41
;

'

642
490. 5
528.
; ;

472. 34533.
531. 12.

7•

506. 596.

25.

472. 24; 481.

II

;

482.

2;

485.

332
31;

INDICES
491. 8; 495. 11, 13; 508. 10; 531. 26 ; 533. 21, 28 ; 613. ;
471.
1

513. 22
mroi

ovos 531. 7•

(
-

3

1

; !
;

6

506. 49472. 40. 484. 2 . 474. 5; 475. 5, 29; 483. 8; 484. 487. 15 488. 532. 13. 17 471. 57. 59. 74; 473. 3; 527. 6; 531. 9; 532. 15; 653.
; ;

5

;

490.

1 6.
1

' . €
'!

471. 1 1 7• 519. 7; 530. 24. 471. 5°, 5^. 74, 128 ; 472. 41, 45• 530. 1 8 653.
;

'! '--'

;^^ 507•

[?)

496.
519.

4•
1

8.

3'^•

477. 17; 478. 44; 480. 526. 9• 519. 6
;

6, 2 2.

491. 5 ; 492. 7• 520. . 491. 9, 1 6. 491. II 492. 9 28; 526. 12. 533. 1 3.
;

;

493.

;

494.

.)/
/cts

471. 52.

490. 6; 492. 7. 3• 494. 25 495. 9, 15; 497. 4 532. 2. 505. 9 508. 25 653. 494. 486. 4; 489. 7, 15; 495. 12; 524.
;

;

;

.

;

484. 1 8. 474. 37• 484. 1 9 486. 531. 6. 488. 6, 29, 32 513. 3, 22, 33• 488. 26, 40, 42.
;
; ;

527. 5• 4 491. 8. oTf 528. 9. oiheis 472. 3 ; 474. 23 480. 5 490. 7 492. 9, 10 496. 13; 498.29; 506.12; 507. 9. 33; 513. 55, 57; 530. 22. 491. 9471. 112; 472. 25. 27. 476. 4 489. 20 ei saep. 490. 1 1 et saep.; 491. 17 et saep.; 492. 16 / <7.
;

;

;

'
;

;

;

;

;

494. 31

;

504.

6,
;

6 1,

,)
(\(

471. 97•
;

!
! -.

506. 37 577 633. 472. g. 478. 28 528. 13; 637. 474. 15 491. 6, 14 494. 501. 33 506. 52 ; 509. 6, 9
; ;
;

;

481. 2

;

' /'' ! / ' ;(!
;
;

22
1 1

;

495.
514.

;

6(\ 494. ;
;

2; 533. 23

599

;

653.

495. 6. 492. 8, 22; 504. 487. 17 533. 2 6. 489. 26.
;

6.

525. 2. 693.
531.
1 8.

:

474. 24. 475. 6; 528. 5• 514. 3 522. 9
;

;

531.

2

1

;

586.

519. 20.

492. 8, 14; 501. 29; 533. 26. 107; 473.3; 475.7; 502. 38; 513. 28. 502. 9• 533. 9• 486. 33• 530. 1 8. 653. 475. 23. 475. 5; 502. 33; 504. ; 507. 7; 533. 1 8. 525. . 486. 1 4. 504. 1 9, 29. 603. 504. 8, 15, 2 2, 42. 504. 1 8, 46. 495. 1 6. 482. 3 ; 486. 13, 34 503. 5 ; 513. 47; 653. 473. 2. 492. 9• 472. 49 ; 504. 2 2 506. 35 577. 472. 25. 473. 6. 486. 1 5. 471. 5°, 63, III, 133. ^^3^ 472. 2, 486. 31 ; 488. 32 474. 39 483. 26 489. 9.12, 8; 490. 6, 491. 23; 6, 14; 492. 4, 7. ^4, 5; 494.9, 13, 495. 5 496. 4. 4. 5. 14, 22, 31 497. 8, 19; 498. 29; 499. 2, 33;

4.

4

;

;

;

;

;

;

;,

;

6

;

.
;

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
;
; ;

! (^ ;
; ;

501. 27, 46 602. 34, 43 503. 3, 4, 6 504. 16, 23, 25, 32, 48 506. 27, 36, 37, 507.22; 513.63; 528.3; 529. 38,48; I, 15; 530. 2, 6, 27; 531. 3, 4; 533. 28 ; 577 640 642. 471. 58, ii8; 478. 20, 28; 480. 3; 481. 12; 482. 21; 486. 5, 6, 24, 25; 487. 7; 490. 5, 10; 492. 8, 14; 496. 2 497. 15 503. 3 504. 36, 54 506. 10; 509. 8; 513. 47; 531. 30; 637.
;
; ; ;

« !
19
;

333
504.

520. 20.
411. 103;

473. 4;
513. 55
;

505. 9
491.

;

6, 7, 8, g,

509. 494. 24. 502. 44 574. TrXoiaptfiioi/ 602. 22; 602.
!

.

497. 530. 6 505. 15
;

2,3;
;

577.

6.

'528.
(?)
jrotei./

491.

2.

519. 14. 471- 79•

wnrptKOr

505. 5

;

577.

478.

2 7•

€ ((
nfSiov

483. 24. 488. 12. 474. 37.

522. 6, 1 6, 6, 1 1 ; 17; 527.4; 528. II, 19, 24 ; 530. 19, 531. 6, 19, 22, 24, 27 533. 6, ; 30 21 582; 589. 471. 95• 528. 9• jTivflor 528. 8. nipas 503. 9, 10, 12, 13, 18 505. 6. 495. II 504. 27. 474. 24. mpie'ivai 482. 29; 485. 29 486. 24 489. 490. 3; 4:1• 3. 1°.' 4, 5. 7j 14. 16; 492. 4 493. 8 494. 3 495. 2, 7, 496. 9; 497. 15ntpUxeiu 485. 24, 26 506. 56. 471. 133) '3^•

A98. 23, 26. 471. 112; 490.

!

;

;

('( ((

;

;

472. 28; 474. 20; 483. 12; 486. 32; 489. 13 490.8; 491. 12 492.10; 493. 10, 15; 494. 24, 30; 495. 10, 14; 510. 17; 506. 46; 509. 12 497. 5. 7 530. 21 ; 514. 5 525. 7 528. 5, 18 532. 14, 16; 637; 653. <!473. 9; 476.14; 478. 8, 30 481. 486. 487. 4. '3 14; 482. 26, 31 489. 5 elsaep.; 490. 3 el saep.; 491. 18 el saep.; 492. 19 el saep.; 493. 15; 494. 496. 5, 16 505. i, 41 ; 495. 4 el saep. or 508. 9; 529. 19. 2, 5; See Index V (a). 531. 4. 471. 86 472. 6 473. 3, 6 488. 7 ; 582; 653.
;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

2

;

;

\

!
{ !

.
4•

;

'/
;

;

;

;

;

;

€ (( ^
irtprnXoKr)

;

;

;

6

;

;

•! !

485. 3• 528. 1 8. 520. 1 8.
631.
1

528. 24.
15•

471.

4:71.

124.
10.

533. 475. 496.

^.
5•

512.

irtpovibiov

3•

488. 31.
491. 17. Cf. Index VIII (a). 472. 2 7, 3^; 482. 2 505. 4 628. 20 653. viitTfiv 475. 25. jrtffTiuftf 528. 33. 472. 1$ f/ saep. 48. 7, 26 494. g 506. 15 508. 11. 603. 17. 528. 2 633. . 473. 6; 488. 6; 530. 17; 653. 520. 7, '9' 20.
;
; )


!
;

-€
; ; ;

486. 1 4 589. 489. 21 491. 486. 472. 1 1
;

2

;

;

2

494. 31 525.
;

;

4

;

520. 1 7• 653.

512.
"].

8,

530.

471. 533.

.
2 1.
',

«>'471.

;

({(!
VII.

(

;

'
506.

530. 4 533. 2 3 597. 499. 29; 502. 496. 6; 497. ; 506. 46, 5' 507. 20 640. 40 494. 21. 92 472. 32 527. 9 532. 15. 472. 45 > 488. 4, 35• Cf. Index

8

;

!

;

;

;

677.
25.
(?)

504. 17-

1

; ;

;

334
480. 15 493. 499. 12; 504. 32, 35 580.
;

INDICES

,

477. 21

;

(^

478. 37; 494. 638.

2

;

,

479. II 13, 3°!

5

'
TrpOTcpoi;

'
20
;

472. 5. 485. 2 , 473. 3.

(( ((
TrpOTCpos

488.

23.
;

475. 8

476. 15.

513. 37•

493. 4, 5, 7, ^. 480. 3 495.5; 502.13; 510.15;
;

2'J.

(
!

488. 2 8 533. 15, 2 2. 472. 28. jT/joVota 472. 10; 495. 14. npos, (adv.) 488. 18. 520. 2. 506. 1 2 507. 9• npoaayopeveiv 474. 4° 526. 2.
;

!

483. 25; 485. 5°; 489. 1 2, ly; 492. 15; 494. 29, 31, 33. 36; 495. 12, 15; 496. 15; 497. 24; 498. 44; 499. 38, 45; 500. 28; 502. 30. 35; 503. 16, 19; 504. 48 506. 9, 28, 47> 54 507. 23 509. 17; 510. II 513. 36, 39; 49; 54; 57, 6, 6 1, 63; 640.
490.
II
;

77. 8;

491.

€ !
522.
29
;

513. 10.

496. II, 13, 494. 44•
514.
5.

14•

;

;

;

472.

7.

^
TrpurawKOf

640. 592, 477. 5•
2 2. 8.

519.

495.

533.

7•

484.
;

2;

494.

,

17

;

500.

13,

5,

504

13.

17, 3°, 31,

516. 8

05

,

2,

23; 515. 5; et saep. 517. 4 el saep. 518. 530. 3; 533. 19, 20, 23; 4;
; ;

33; 501.

5, 8,

613-4; 640. •€>' 491. 8,15; 493. 3 494. 1 9 496. 7; 497. 2; 505. 7, 8; 506. 41; 507.
;

;

;

510.

2

.

636. 504. 29.

'
pis
j

533. 7 ; 577. 471. 33-

478.

1

6.

8(

npooyiyvfaem 521. 15. 513. 34• 513. 13, 14, 3^, 4°

( (
((

574.
5.

494. 20; 495, 15. 482. II ; 502. 1 8 505.
;

, (( .
496.
4.

471. 54. 653. 491. 25.

485. 6

;

642.

530. 29 527. 9•

;

531. 28
'V*/*•

;

^/'"f

533. 29.

611.

487. 6.
1
.

531.

aaXeidv 472. 50 ; 528, 519. 1 6.

472.

!
( '! !
25
;

474. 35•
1 3.

3•

471. 113•

504. 12, 45484. 20; 486. 9
531.

.

;

530.

9•

528. 5• 494. 14; 533. 8, 25. 499. 28; 502. 39
531. 5.

^^
4•

496.

471. 12.

504. 33• 475. 9 485. 8 501. 52; 515. 8; 517. 14, 18; 518. 6; 520.
;
j ;

520. 1 3. 478. 27

614.
.'

>

40.

527. 5• 520. 14, 15521. 13,

481. 3

;

637.

4•

590.
471.
2.

54
;

;

486. 4; 488. 514. 595.
;

;

493.

7;

506.

498.

33; 39•

515.
6.

4•

472. 6

496.

aiToKoyos.

See Index VII.

. GENERAL
«489.
aneipa

INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
.

522.

2 2. 8,
1

;
42.

493. 17; 494.9; 495.6,

« !
OTTfipciv

()
471.
;

477.

3•

501. 14. 525. "J. 653.
3•

: /3
;.

587. 482. 1 8 496. 520. 1 8 582. 472. 53• 520.
;
;

! '
'
3
1

!

335

496.

6. 4.

496.

533. 1 5. 505. 1,5! 509. 2 653. 4:77. 485. 28,36; 533. 17.
;

;

4:96. 4, 15! 513. 507. 24.

1

1.

.

505. 2; 609. 12. 494. 34 </ f'?^/. 528. 1 6 611. 489. 20 / saep. 490. 12 / saep. 491. 1 8 saep. 492. 1 9 el saep. 494.
; ; ;
;
;

;

/ jac/.
529. 5• 502. 36.

533.
513.

1 4.

4>

3°•

See Index VII. 522. 6, 1 6. 520. 2 2.

^
oTifiiTflv

487. 9• 506. 56 510. 6, 20. 483. 17; 502. 20; 506. 4• 482. 1 6. 474. 28; 489. 5> 13; *8. 6; 497. 19; 503. 504. 38; 506. ig.
;

6

;

See Index VIII (). ra/ifiov 533. 9• 520. 6, 8, II, 21. 494. 24.

532. I 7. 529. 6. 472. 33• 486. 28 490. 6 507. 339, 472. 23. 533. 2. oT/ixjSioOj' 496. 9. 471. 75; 510.

: !,
TCKvov

.

471. 150; 473. 8; 475. 7, 29; 476. 12, 17; 491. 5, 13; 492. -j, 13; 493. 4, 7; 494. 6, 12, 16, 20, 30; 496. 7•

493.

5.

; \\(
582;

;

;

491.

;

479.

(\ 530.
;

531. 8. 489. 8; 491. 5! 492. 6; 493. 6; 494. 12; 495. 4; 496. 1 1, 1 2, 13, 14; 497. 8, 9, 12, 13, 5. ?) 524. 2; 529. 13; 531. 28; 633. 2.

,

8.

2

513. 24,

6

;

611.

597. 486. 35• 532. 23. 489. 5 496. 6 503. 1 4. 527. 3• auKitSoKfiv 504. 32, 52.

(

« ((

/ € /'
/;-

' ;

499. 37•

471. 82. 471. 1 3 2. 513. 20 574. 510. 13. 471. 03. 515. 4. 471. 57• 471. 44; 49•
;

(\( 475. 25; 478. 482. 36; 490. , 17; 492. 495. 3;
27,
4,

(
TeXfior
TfXfioCv

485. 30. 483. 20 504. 24
471.
1

;

510.

7.

;

506. 38.
25,
6.

6.

5

;

34; 481. 491. 496.

; , , 6;
13,

4. 8,

;

486. 6; 505. 8

;

497. II. 530. 23; 577.

;

;

497.

4•

(\ !
>473.

<
( ((
501.
;

489. 5, 9. 8; 490. 8; 491. 6, 493. 7, 12; 492. II 494. 15, 23; 496. II. re'Xor. See Index IX. 496. 3•
;

((

14; 497. II, 15,

,

6.

6

;

.

606. 27. 646. 522. 1 8, 574. 503. 3• 533. 1 8. 482. 29 604. 41.
;

7•

;

336
;

INDICES
496. 5;
533.
I,

486. 6, 24; 493. 4; 505. 8 513. 2o, 40; 522. 6, 16, 17, 18, 27, 29; 531. 19; 577.
roivvv 471. 44. TotovTos 471. 55,

502. 2;
27, 30•

525. 6;

531.

,

30;

^'
;

152; 472. 40; 533.

13.

505.
;

8.

TOKOS 471. 5, 23, 102,

103; 472. 37, 54; 483. 14 485. 17, 22 506. 12, 14, 19, 21, 44, 56; 507. 9, 13, 19, 31, 35; 510. 22 513. 16, 18, 22 ; 526. 7 ; 530. 15
; ;

;

( 653.

483. 5; 504. II, 44.

Cf.

Index

!
5
;

505. 7) 9, 1°• 485. 31 486. i6; 488.6; 501. 14; 502. 34; 503. 9, 10, 12, 13, 18; 510.
;

(\(>

! ^
VII.

599. 653. 482. 4 479. 7 481. 3 483. 4 485. 23; 486. 22, 35; 490. 5; 491. 4; 492. 4, 6; 494. 5, 1 2, 20; 495. 3, 5; 496. 6; 497. 19; 499. 7, 3^; 501. 9. 46 502. 13, 42 503. 5; 504. 43) 505.4; 506.23,48; 507. 2; 510. 653. 507. ^. 493. 10.
; ; ;
;

,

;

12, 15

;

511. 10
;

;

515.

2, 3, 5, 6, 7
;

;

516.

518. 4 471. 532. 9.

595
102

;

612-4
(?)
;

619
7
;

;

491.

620. 530. g

^
653.

€5

471. 93• 513. 25.

;

TOTc

[(
^.
;

485. 23; 491. 16; 532. 529. 5513. 38.
?)

19.

: !
489.
;

574.

9,

7•
;

507. 13 471. II 5•

513.

3•

478. 1 7. 506. 12, 45• See Index VIII {). 489. 5 490.6; 492.7,13; 503. 504. 21. 21 502. 35• Tvyxaveiv 475. 3° 509. 635. ; 582. 471. 65 483. 24 487. 1 2 489. 2 490. 491. 492. 494. 2 495. 496. . 491. 19; 507. 6.
;
;

,

(' ! ^

486. 32. 530. 2 8. 506. 19; 507. vnepTrmTeiv 506. 45• 486. 8,26. 507. 1 8.
522. 21.

1

6.

478.
474.

35;
2,

485.

49•

Cf.

Index

32; 580.

513. 24, 6 1.

486. 2 6. 486. 25; 494. 21 8, 24; 509.16; 510.
;

;

, 8 54
;

506.

;

508.
;

511. 5

•7
5,

!
497.
9•

485. 6 505. 2. 479. 17 483. 8; 484. 15; 485. 592. 42, 49; 504. 471. 1 6 653.
;

;

;

611.
3.

;

;

;

472.

;

;

;

;

inocTTfWeiv

488. 17• 486. 2 2. 474. 5 486.

496. 497. II. vyiaivfiv 528. 3 529. 2 480. 9 530. 20.
iyfia

{

vSpeiov

; ()
; ;

2

1 1 ; 635. ; 491. 8, 15; 494. 19 ; 506. 41 ; 507. 29. ;

49.

7)'

;

;

533.

2.

521.

1 8.

498. 35• 498. 34, 37• 488, 9•
iayivos 531.
7.

iSpla

502. 37• 574. 472. 4, 8 477. 14, 21 478. 13; 479. 4, II, 12; 481. 8; 484. 11,14; 487. 13," 492. 3, 6; 5; 488. 4; 491. 4, 494. 12, 6, 20, 23; 495. 5, 7> ^, ^°
;

,

''

484. 28;
531, 14.

491. 6;

494. 22;

495.

>

;

^

.
471.
8, 44,

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
48; 472.
2,

i6, 31.

472. 26.

48.

2 1.

!
<ji)fpyi7

472. I, 5• 472. 6. 528. 19 530. 3°. 486. 26. 530. 22. 497. 4• 49. 4, 9) 13' '5) 487•
;

<
xei> 471.

337

84; 488. 37; 495. 15; 606.9;

631. 9•

((!
5.
7•

477. 1 7. 607. 37• 506. 25. 477• 2. 653. 496. 3 601.
;

6

;

612.

4•

516. 11,
'^, 17.

1,2.
;

8,

21.

472. 48

;

474. 26.

497.
533.

4•

4•
1 7.

/
12.

521.

528. 6

532. 2 0. 529. 14
;

;

653.

531. II.

633. 7. 629. 7• xpda 473. 3 (?) 487. 1 4; 633. 8. 493. 5• Xpios 491. 6 487. 1 1 653.
;

!
,

494. 6; 496. 8 497. 472. 35. 40. 55 ; 473. 3.

8.

499. 15; 607.

25, 28, 33•

530. 13; 532. 2; 533. 699. 471. 104; 492. 21.

587; 589.

;)€ 4.8Q.

(
512.

;

7

;

498. 33

;

537.

;

;

15.

490.

4

,"

482. 6

;

494. 6

;

495.

473. "J. 503. 6, 14; 639.
531. 14,

!
473.

4,

4•
;

475. 14 ; 477. 19 485. 54; 495. 5; 501. 5; 604. 8; 606. 2, 7;

, 3;
7,

513. 65{?)
24
;

;

514.
;

;

516.

6.

472.
23
;

483. 20
2.

485.

4

12

;

486.

509.
;

5•

'
;

'/ ]

522. 4• 23, 26; 514. 2; 580. 50S. 14; 520. 13; 653(?). 580. 502. 1 8, 35• 489. 3 480. 2 491. 2 492. 494. 2 495. 2. 474. 27; 533. 15; 642; 653. 680. 602. 43*

499. 6,

^ !
;

;

;

;

2

;

') 530. 19 {' 533. 19• (' use ') 471. 150; 474. 38; 486. 489. 4 502. 29 653. 33 489. 6, 7, 14, 494. 14. ; 480. 2 481. 9 482. 1 4 492. 496. 7; 602. 20 ; 610. 14. 7; 7;
;

^65. borrow
;

592.

;

6

;

;

;

;

513.

9•

642. 629. 4•

(
;

489. 492.

474.
;

2,

33

607. 6 ; 4 613. 3 514.
;

483. 33 486. 5 605. 609. 511. 3 612. 2
;
; ; ;

;

2,3; 515.
;

2

;

526.
;

)\.6

^,

628. 2 530. 633. I 689. 646. 630. 30 ; 631. 682.
;

531. 2

527. 532. 2
;

;

474. 36 488. 7 490. 3; 491. 3; 494. 4, 495. 2 499. 4, 9. 15 604. 1 6, 45; 502. 31, 56; 603. 20 25; 506. 22, 23, 39, 43. 45! 680• 9'> 632. 9 638. 494. () 496. 3, 5•
471. 6
;

472. 34

4, 6, 7,

.

;

;

;

6;

;

5

;

;

;

;

;

521.

2, 4, 8.

2

;

633.

5,

22;

677

;

Xopt'ivQ)

621. 1 1, 1 7, 471. 5^
;

1
;

8.

Cf. Index VIII (b). 494. 26; 495. 6;

610. 475. 25

611.

486. 33• 407. 10. 663. 482. 48. 6, 1 4 492. 9 493. 12; 496.8; 497.3; 506. 19; 607. 6; 522. 628. 1 7 ; 632. 3 693. ; 497. 9•
; ; ;

8

;

338

INDICES
482. 41. 520. 1 6.

: !

(8 ^
^'

501. 14 ; 510. 522. 4•

2,

15.

! £

5

486.

7

;

513. 37.

523. 4

;

524. 4
;

;

528. 14

;

.
;

585 596. 496. 4•

471.

8,
;

89,

488.

7•

499. 15

501. 14

135; 472. 20 486. 3°; 529. 3 582. ;
;

oxford:

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PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

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For 1^92-3.

By Percy
By

E. Newberry.

Thirty-four

Plates (two coloured \

25^.

IV.

For 1893-4. Part II. With Appendix by G. W. Fraser.
Part III.

F. Ll. Griffith and Percy E. Twenty-lhree Plates (two coloured 25^.
.

V.
VI.
VII.

BENI HASAN,

For 1894-5.

By

F. Ll. Griffith.
Plates,
jjx.

(Hieroglyphs,

and manufacture, &c., of Flint Knives.)

Ten coloured

HIEROGLYPHS
BENI HASAN,

FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF THE EGYPT
For 1895-6.

EXPLOK.VTION FUND.
Part IV.

By

F. Ll.

Griffith.

Nine coloured

Plates.

25*.

For 1897-8.

By

F. Ll. Griffith.

(Illustrating
i}s.

beasts and birds, arts, crafts, &c.)

Twenty-seven Plates (twenty-one coloured).

VHI.

THE MASTABA OF PTAHIIETEP AND AKHETHETEP AT SAQQAREH,
Part
I.

For 1896-7.

By N. DE G. Davies and

F. Ll..

Griffith.
255.

(Including over 400

facsimiles of the hieroglyphs.)

Thirty Plates (two coloured).

IX.

THE MASTABA OF PTAHHETEP AND AKHETHETEP .\T S.\QQAREH,
Part

.

For 189S-

9.

IJy

N. DE G. Davies and F. Ll. Griffith.

Thirty-five Plates.

25».

X.
XI.
XII.

THE ROCK
Davies.

TO!\IBS

OF SHEIKH
sji.

SAID.

For

1

899-1 900.
Part

By N. de G. By

Thirty-five Plates,

THE ROCK TOMBS OF DEIR EL GEBRAWI,
N. de G. Davies.

L
II.

For 1900-1.
For 1901-2.

Twenly-Feven Plates (two coloured).

25J.

THE ROCK TOMBS OF DEIR EL
N. DE G. Davies.

GEBR.\WI,
2£i.

Part

By

Thiily Plates (two coloured).

;

GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH.
I.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
S.

PAPYRI,
PAPYRI,

Part
255.

I.

For 1897-8.

By

B. P.

Grenfell
Grenfell

Hunt.
Hunt.
S.

Eight Collotype Plates. Eight Collotype Plates.

II.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
S.

Part

II.

For 1898-9.

By

B. P.

25^-.

III.

FAYUM TOWNS AND THEIR
Grenfell, A.

PAPYRI.

For 1899-1900.

By

B. P.

Hunt, and D. G. Hogarth. Eighteen Plates. 25^. Double Volume for 1900-1 and 1901-2. By IV. THE TEBTUNIS PAPYRI. Nine Collotype Plates. B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and J. G. S.myly. V. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part III. For 1902-3. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. Six Collotype Plates. 25J-.
VI.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
S.

PAPYRI,

Part IV.

For 1903-4.

By

B. P.

Grenfell

Hunt.

{In Preparation^

ANNUAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL REPORTS.
(.Yearly

Summaries by F. G. Kenyon, W. E. Crum, and the Officers of the Society, with Maps.) Edited by F. Ll. Griffith.

THE
For „ „ „

SEASON'S WORK.
G. 1892-3. 1893-4. 1894-5. 1895-6. 1896-7.

For
dd.

1

890-1.

By

Ed. Naville, Percy E. Newberry, and

W. Fraser.
2i.

is.

dd.

2i. 6d.

y. 6d.
3i.
2S.

6d.

„ 1897-8. „
,, ,,
,,

2i.

6d.

Containing Report (with Plans) of D. G. I.'ogarth's Excavations in Alexandria. With Illustrated Article on the Transport of Obelislfs by Ed. Naville. With Articles on Oxyrhynchus and its Papyri by B. P. Grenfell, and a Thucydides Papyrus from Oxyrhynchus by A. S. Hunt. With Illustrated Article on Excavations at Hierakonpolis by W. M. FLINDERS

Petrie.
1898-9.
2i. 6d.

\\ith Article on

the Position

of

Lake Moeris by

B. P.

Grenfell and

A.
1899-1900. 1900-1. 1901-2.
6d. 2i. 6d. 2i. 6d.
IS.

S.

Hunt.

SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS.
IH20Y:
and A.
'

Sayings of

Our

Lord,' from an Early

Greek Papyrus.

By B.

P.

Grenfell
3J. 6<f.

S.

Hunt.

2s.

(with Collotypes) and 6d. nett.

ATLAS OF ANCIENT EGYPT. With Letterpress and Index. (^Second Edition) GUIDE TO TEMPLE OF DEIR EL BAHARI. With Plan. (^d. COPTIC OSTRACA. By W. E. Crum. loi. nett.

6

Slides from

Fund Photographs
S,-

may

be obtained

through Messrs. Niwlon
C.

Co., 3 Fleet Street,

B.C.

and Prints from Mr. R.

Murray, 37 Dartmouth Park

Hill,

N.W.

Offices of the
37

Egypt Exploration Fund:

GREAT RUSSELL STREET, LONDON, W.C, and 8 BEACON STREET, BOSTON, MASS., U.S.A.
Agents :

KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & Co., PATERNOSTER HOUSE, CHARING CROSS ROAD, W.C. BERNARD QUARITCH, 15 PICCADILLY, W. ASHER & Co., 13 BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN, W.C. HENRY FROWDE, AMEN CORNER, EC.

3 1197 22884 0085

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