LIBRARY

gham Young
University

'

.i;r-._

1?6533

b

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
GRENFELL

VI

AND HUNT

^

3315

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND
GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
BY

VI

EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES

BERNARD

P.

GRENFELL,

D.Litt.

HON, LITT.D. DUBLIN; HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE PAPYROLOGY PROFESSOR OF FELLOW OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY SCIENCES CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF

AND

ARTHUR

S.

HUNT,

D.Litt.

HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG FELLOW OF QUEEN's COLLEGE LECTURER IN PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND LATE FELLOW OF LINCOLN COLLEGE

WITH

SIX

PLATES

196533
LONDON
SOLD AT
'

*;

'', ,'"',

'.

'

'''

1

'i

'

,*,

THE Offices of the EGYPT

EXPLORATION FUND,

37

'^W^

^^^§5^1.1,

S%/^f},

AND Pierce Building, Copley Square, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., Dryden House, Gerrard St., W. KEGAN BERNARD QUARITCH, ii Grafton St., New Bond St., W. Berlin & CO., 13 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C, and 56 Unter den Linden, ASHER EC, and 29-35 West 32ND Street, New York, U.S.A. AND HENRY FROWDE, Amen Corner,

1908
All rights reserved

OXFORD
HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

PREFACE
Of
the papyri included in this volume, the two long classical texts

containing the Hypsipyle of Euripides (852) and the

on Thucydides II (853) formed part of the large which was made on Jan. 13, 1906, in the circumstances described in the Times of May 24, 1906, and the Archaeological Report of the Egypt Exploration Fund, 1905-6, p. 10. The other literary papyri were chiefly discovered during the same season, but some were found in 1897 01* 1902. The non-literary documents, which largely belong to the third and fourth centuries, come, with a few exceptions, from the
finds of 1897.

new commentary find of literary MSS.

In editing the

new

classical texts

we have
;

for the first time

without the support of the late
previous publications have

Professor

F. Blass, to

whom

been our

owed so much
J.

but for 852 and 853 we have

been fortunate

in

obtaining the generous aid of Professors U. von
B.

Wilamowitz-Mollendorff and
has also contributed

Bury,

who have very
and

materially

furthered the reconstruction of those texts, while Mr. Gilbert

Murray

many most

valuable suggestions

criticisms

upon 852. To these three scholars in particular, and to some others whose occasional assistance is acknowledged in connexion with the
individual papyri,

we

here offer our sincerest thanks.
to

Lastly,

we would
of
the

express our

obligations

the

accomplished

Proof-reader
its

University Press, whose care, in this book as in
small blemishes from our pages.

predecessors, has

removed many The next volume of the Graeco- Roman Branch will be Part VII of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri, to be issued, we hope, in the course of 1 909. We expect to include in it a detailed description of the site and
excavations with a plan, and a rdsumo of the topographical information which the papyri have so far yielded concerning Oxyrhynchus and the

Oxyrhynchite noma.

BERNARD

P.

ARTHUR
Queen's College, Oxford,
September, 1908.

S.

GRENFELL. HUNT.

CONTENTS
page

Preface
List of Plates

.

V
viii

Table of Papyri Note on the Method of Publication and List

..........
of Abbreviations

ix
xiii

TEXTS
I.

IL in.
IV.

Theological Fragments (845-851) New Classical Texts (852-872) Extant Classical Authors (873-884) imlscellaneous literary fragments (885-887)
.

.

19

.

179 198
202

V.

Documents of the Roman and Byzantine Periods (a) Official (888-893) {5) Declarations to Officials (894-897) (<:) Petitions (898-904) {d) Contracts (905-915)

....

.

213 221 243 269
283 288
291

{e)

Taxation (916-919)

(/) Accounts (920-922) (^) Prayers (923-925)
(k) Private

....
.

Correspondence (926-943)

VI.
VII.

Collations of Homeric Fragments (944-956)

315

Miscellaneous Documents (957-1006)

.

317

INDICES
New
Literary Texts
{a)
((5)
:

852 (Euripides, Hypsipyle) 853 (Commentary on Thuc.
Other Literary Texts

.

.

.

.

.

«329
335 340
346 347 34^ 348
357

II)

(f)

II.

Emperors

............
;

III.

Consuls, Eras, and Indictions

IV.

V.
VI.
VII.

Months and Days Personal Names
Geographical
Religion

359

Vlll

CONTENTS
page
Official and Military Titles Weights, Measures, and Coins

.
IX.

360
362

.
XI.
XII.

Taxes General Index of Greek and Latin Words
Index of Passages Discussed
.

,....••
849
recto,
ii-iii

363

363 380

LIST OF PLATES
I.

II.

III.

IV.

848 852 852 853

verso,

850

Fr.

i,

Cols,

Fr. 60, Cols, i-ii

Cols, xvi-xvii

V.
VI.

871 and 884 recto 847 recto and 894

.... .... .... ....
recto,

854, 867

y ai ihe end.

TABLE OF PAPYRI
{An
845.
846.
asterisk denotes texts ivhich are not printed in full)

. D.
Psalms
Ixviii

and Ixx

.

Amos
St.

ii

847.

John's Gospel

ii

(Plate VI)

.

848.

Revelation xvi (Plate 1)

849.

Acts of Peter (Plate Acts of John (Plate

I)

850.
851.

I)

Apocryphal Acts
Euripides, Hypsipyle (Plates II-IIl)

852.
853.

Commentary on Thucydides
Archilochus,

854.

855.
856.

Menander(?)

' ....
(Plate I)
I)
.

II (Plate

857. 858.

Scholia on Aristophanes' Acharnians Epitome of Herodotus Oration against Demosthenes
Poetical Fragments

859-864. 865-870.
871, 872.

Prose Fragments (Plate

.

Latin Fragments (Plate V)

.

873.

Hesiod, Theogonia

874.
875.
876.

ApoUonius Rhodius, Argonautica III
Sophocles, Antigone
Euripides, Hecuba
Euripides,

877.

Hecuba
.

878. 879.

Thucydides II

Thucydides III
Thucydides

.

880.
881.

V

.

.

.

.

Plato, Euthydernus

and Lysis
I

882.
883.

Demosthenes, In Aristogitonem Demosthenes, In Aristocratem
Sallust, Catilina (Plate

884.

V)

885. 886.
887.

Treatise on Divination

Magical Formula
Directions for Wrestling
(.?)

888.

Edict of a Praefect and Petition

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A.

D

889.

Edict of Diocletian and Petition
Letter to a Strategus

890.
891.

Apportionment of Duties
Judicial Sentence

892.
893.

Appointment of a Superintendent of Works
Latin Declaration of Birth (Plate VI)

.... ....
.

to

an Exegetes

894. 895.

.

Return of Village-Accounts
Reports to a Logistes
Declaration to Riparii
Petition to

896. 897.
898.

an Acting-Strategus

899.

Petition of Apollonarion

900.
901.

Petition to a Logistes
Petition to a Public
Petition to a Public

.

Advocate
Advocate

902.
903.

Accusation against a Husband
Petition to a Praeses
.

904.

905. 906. 907. 908.
909.
910.
911.

Marriage Contract

Deed of Divorce Will of Hermogenes
Sale of Acacia-Trees

.

Contract between Eutheniarchs
.

Lease of Land

,

Lease of a House Lease of a Cellar
Lease of Land
.

912.
913.

914.

915.
916.

Acknowledgement of a Debt Receipt for Lead and Tin
.

Tax-Receipt
Taxing- Memorandum

917.

918.
919.

Land-Survey

920.
921.

Advance of Dues on a Freight Account of Food
Inventory of Property

922. 923.
924. 925.

Account of Horses
Petition to a

Pagan Deity
.

.

Gnostic

Charm

Christian Prayer.
Invitation to Dinner
Invitation to a
.

926.
927.

Wedding

828.

Letter of Lucius

TABLE OF PAPYRI

XI

Xll

TABLE OF PAPYRI

NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
method followed in this volume is the same as that in As before, some of the more important new literary texts (852-3, Parts I-V. 855) are printed in a dual form, a literal transcript being accompanied by a reconstruction in modern style. In other cases, and in the fragments of
general

The

extant authors, the originals are reproduced
capital initials in proper

except for division of words, names, expansion of abbreviations, and supplements of

lacunae.

Additions or corrections by the same hand as the body of the text

are in small thin type, those

by a

different

hand
in

in thick type.
'

Non-literary
'

documents, including the magical text

(88)

the

Miscellaneous

section, are

given in modern form with accentuation and punctuation. Abbreviations and symbols are resolved additions and corrections are usually incorporated in the text and their occurrence is recorded in the critical apparatus, where also faults of orthography, &c., are corrected if they seemed likely to give rise to any
;

difficulty.

Iota adscript has been printed

when

so written, otherwise iota sub-

Square brackets [ ] indicate a lacuna, round brackets ( ) the resolution of a symbol or abbreviation, angular brackets ( ) a mistaken omission in the original, braces { } a superfluous letter or letters, double square brackets Dots placed within brackets represent the a deletion in the original. [[ J approximate number of letters lost or deleted dots outside brackets indicate mutilated or otherwise illegible letters. Letters with dots underneath them are Heavy Arabic numerals refer to the texts of the to be considered doubtful. Oxyrhynchus papyri in this volume and Parts I-V, ordinary numerals to lines,
script is

employed.

;

small

Roman

numerals to columns.
in

The
P.

abbreviations used

referring

to

papyrological

publications
viz.
:

are

practically those adopted

in the

Archiv

fiir Papyntsforschmig,

Amh.

=

The Amherst Papyri

(Greek), Vols. I-II,

by

B. P. Grenfell and

A. S. Hunt. Archiv = Archiv fiir Papyrusforschung. B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den K. Museen zu Berlin, Griechische Urkunden. P. Brit. Mus. = Greek Papyri in the British Museum, Vols. I-II, by F. G. Kenyon Vol. Ill, by F. G. Kenyon and H. I. Bell.

;

xiv
C. P.
C.
P.

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
Herm.

= Corpus Papyrorum Hermopolitanorum, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. = Corpus Papyrorum Rained, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. P. R. Cairo = Catalogue of Greek Papyri in the Cairo Museum, by B. P. Grenfell
and A.
S.

Hunt.

P. Fay.

= Fayum Towns

and

their Papyri,

by

B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and

D. G. Hogarth.
P. Flor.

P. Gen.
P.

= Papiri Fiorentini, Vol. by G. Vitelli. = Les Papyrus de Genve, Vol. by J. Nicole. Grenf. = Greek Papyri, Series I, by B. P. Grenfell, and
I, I,

Series

II,

by B.

P.

Grenfell and A. S. Hunt.
P.
P.

Hibeh

= The
=

Leipzig

Griechische

Hibeh Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. Urkundender Papyrussammlung zu Leipzig, Vol.

I,

by

L. Mitteis.
P.

P.

P.

Leyden = Papyri Graeci Musei Antiquarii Lugduni-Batavi, by C. Leemans. Magd. = Papyrus de Magdola, Bull, de Corr. Hell., xxvi. pp. 95-1 28, xxvii. pp. 174-205, by P. Jouguet and G. Lefebvre. Oxy. = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I-V, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S.
Hunt. Par.= Les Papyrus grecs du Musee du Louvre, Notices ct Extraits, t. xviii. 2, by W. Brunet de Presle and E. Egger. Reinach = Papyrus grecs et demotiques, by Th. Reinach, W. Spiegelberg, and
S. de Ricci.

P.

P.

Rev. Laws
P.

P.

Revenue Laws of Ptolemy Philadelphus, by B. P. Grenfell, with an by J. P. Mahaffy. Strassb. = Griechische Papyrus der K. Universitatsbibliothek zu Strassburg im Elsass, Vol. I, Parts 1-2, by F. Preisigke. Tebt. = The Tebtunis Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and and Part II, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and E. J. J. G. Smyly
Introduction
;

=

Goodspeed.
Wilcken, Osi.

=

Griechische Ostraka, by U. Wilcken.

I.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

845.

Psalms
12-5

Ixviii

and Ixx.
Late fourth or
fifth

X 8•2 cm.

century.

written in a large

This fragment from a papyrus book contains parts of Ps. Ixviii and Ixx, and clear cursive hand probably of the period from 350 to 450.
of a large size, the page

The book was
across.

No

lection signs occur

when complete measuring about 23 cm. beyond the diaeresis the usual contractions
;

full. For the two Psalms here represented the chief uncial MSS. are N, B, and R (the Verona Psalter, attributed to the sixth century), but the papyrus does not agree consistently with any of these authorities. It seems to have been rather nearer to than to B, and, as would be expected in an Egyptian text, supports none of the

of Oeos and

are used, but

and

are written in

peculiar readings of R.

Verso

Ixviii.

30-7.

TO

fi[ov

5

? €€ €[] [( € ^ ^^^ [[][€
66[]

\^\

[]

t^nep]

€/ •[
veov

_i[5]eT[ou]aal•'

(
€v

[][

[] ? ? ?

6[s

[
9

[

[

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Recto Ixx. 3-8.

15

[ [€€]^
[€
Y6i/3oy

[^ [
'\ €
[et

[€9

^ [
eXwiS

]?
ev

] €[€] [\ ^ ] [] € € €9
aSiKovuTO?

\9 ? €€]
doubtful whether

€9

€ em

e/c

KoiXias


of this Hne
is

[] ][€]€
the final syllable of
line rather short,

.
but
it

It

is

0 the article before

after ^[eojv with t^c•^ The could be sufficiently lengthened by the insertion of better than o, but is too slight to decide the point, and suits vestige of the letter after some traces of ink later on in this line are also indecisive. ^(e)w]: or perhaps 2. *:[()], which would be a new reading, though the cursive Kvpiov. vas perhaps omitted, as in {^*. Its insertion produces a very 188 has long line, while on the other hand its omission leaves the supplement a little shorter than would be expected. Cf. note on 1. 4. R. 3. Kvpiov R. 4. e[to\v The ( is t^*'•*) t^ R, or the scribe may have transferred the preposition from one verb a repetition from in R. to the other; cf. the omission of « with

.

at

the beginning

The

latter division

would make the

€( €€,
:

[
:

(
: :

:

() €8]
5.

5
:
.

Bi^R.

(
eXnis

{

.

.
12.
13.

epnovTa ev

The

Bh^c•*. SO i<i*R ; nepara SO BS^.aJ^ i^*. length of the lacuna indicates that the papyrus had
:
.

€8((

after

omits.
fXwis in

[:
14.
:

1.

It is

14. K{vpi)e

()€
15eK

( [(€]
.

B^^R. Cf. the omission of SO the cursives 27, 285; unlikely that stood before « as in R. in 1. 12. Bi^R cf. the addition of om.
f\nis
. .

.
of
is

{()

with i^R;
before

.

].
;

R

',

The papyrus

et

16.

{

seems to be Corrected)
;

and the Sahidic version
17.
1.

:
R

.

BR.
Bt^R
;

of

t^c.aR add
after

:

om.

\
:

after

, ..
^.

.

KoiXtas is

«=

agrees with B^ ; R has corrected from v. which is the reading of i^

«

corrected.

18.

adds

{

Ed., Psalt. Acthiop. was orignally Omitted in

)

t^,

but added by the second corrector.

846.

AMOS,
Amos

II

846.

ii.

6•4 X 2•6 cm.

Sixth century.

The upper
lost

portion of a leaf from a papyrus codex, preserving part of the

second chapter of the book of
at the

Amos

in the

Septuagint version.
size of the

Six

lines are

complete page can be and heavy uncial script, round and upright, in brown ink, and resembling the hand of P. Amh. 190, is probably At the ends of the longer lines the writing becomes very of the sixth century. Two kinds of stops, the high and middle, occur, as well as some of the small. The text is fairly correct, and so far as it goes coincides for usual contractions. the most part with that of the Vaticanus, Alexandrinus, and Marchalianus, with which we give a collation. The only variant of interest is in verse 7, where

bottom of the

verso,

and the

estimated at about 26-5

15-5 cm.

The

large

a reading peculiar to a few cursives occurs.

Verso
ev€K€v

\\
€iy

^ ^'

8[ [
ii.

6-8.

Recto

ii.

9-12.

[/
^

€8[
e[^€/cXi

em

5

[\

[]€7 [ [\8 [] [] [
Wp

[\/'

[ []€ €[ [ [
[]€€9
[€]^
€7[
OLVOV

[ [

[

2 []

[] []
ev

[\

[]9 €

[] € []
[] []
[re

25

[]' [] € []^•
[\ Xe]yei ^^
ks

3

15

ev

[€€€]€

[ ][]
[

[
"7.

[[ ^^ ^ ]ۥ
ei9

[ [ €[
6[
7rp[o

[ €] 9 []

v€av[i

ety

€['\

€[
[

019

[[/Lt]j

XeyovTes

[(] ({)
long,

[]{€

:

[€]{()(.
was omitted.
:

The supplement
86,

at the

end of the

line is rather

and perhaps

8.

SO the cursives

153,

198

(Holmes);

,

Swete,

A^Q, &C.
a

\ . €
20,

4

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
AQ
;

23.

[]' [/]4'
:

:

SO

,
is

MSS. There

for at least three letters in the lacuna

;

2 8.

cannot be read. Q* has A stop is probably
:

lost after

{).
Gospel
ii.

847.

St. John's

i6-2Xi4-6cm.
This leaf from a vellum MS. of
to be of decided value.
St.

Fourth century.
is

Plate

VI

(recto).

John's Gospel

sufficiently early in date
is

The

rather large calligraphic script

more

closely

and preserves a dozen verses from chap, ii of the Gospel. Compared with the three principal MSS., the Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, and Alexandrinus (C and D are both defective here), the text is much nearest to that of the Vaticanus, with which it agrees four times against the other two, whereas there is no coincidence with against AB, one with A against ^?B, and only two with i^A against B. Readings unsupported by any of the three are for found in verse 12, and verse 15, where is added before variants for which the new MS. is much the earliest authority.
leaf
is

^ ,
The

and fourth centuries than to the squarer heavier style which subsequently became common for biblical texts and of which 848 and 851 are examples. Especially noticeable are the small and placed high in the line of writing the is also remarkably shallow shallower for instance, than that in 665 (cf P. Oxy. IV, Plate I). We have little hesitation in referring the MS. to the fourth century, and it may well be as old as any of Stops in the middle position are freely used a few the great biblical codices. other dots which occur seem to be accidental. The usual contractions of -narpos and are used, the latter word appearing both as hjs- (1. 9) and Is (1. 30)
related to the sloping oval type of the third
;

;

on the other hand,

is

written out at length

(1.

4).

practically entire,

Recto
avTOv
01


5

^ 9 '

, ^^€ •
ii.

?

,
^J^Aoy

11 -16.

Verso

ii.

16-22.

ety

20 nepiarepas

€mey.
evTevBev-

eis

2

€€

apare

€€

€€

^

ۥ

^ •
Wps

? [ [
[] []
15 vio)v

847.

ST.

JOHN'S GOSPEL,

^^•
€v

eyyuy

, -] [ [\ - [
fiy

€]€

'

^ €- [ ?
€9
[

5

-

[€

[ ]

] []
[]
[•]

ly

etTrei/

-

[ [

[

[\
:
(ts
:

^

35

etf

-

1—2.
3.

4.

5.

in ^. Originally stood after ^5AB,W(estcott)-H(ort), T(extus) R(eceptus). SO M,the cursive 124, &c.; A, T-R. SO t*5B, is presumably accidental. A curved mark above the (so W-H); t^A add after in omitting The MS. agrees with

W-H

:

(so T-R).
6.

€€:
is

^^

omits

€( .
:

.
TO

^

.
9.

{)
eyyvs

eyyuf 5e ^.
:

SO

i<5B,

W-H, T-R

II. ^^ originally read
14.

found before W-H, T-R. ^5 originally had are omitted 16. € and
1 8.
:

(
in t^.
;

;

A
. . .

has

.

(»/)?

'
W-H

T(tjaou)r.

also in

GLX, some
in place

cursives, &c.

;

om.

5^AB,

of the participial construction.

19.
2 1.

avtTp^ylrev•.

:

23. 25. 26.
citations.

The same variation occurs at 1. 33. i^A, T-R. so B, ; ol.i^, T-R. ; so AB, in place of [ev] To read in brackets, T-R; om. B. 32. [ev]: so would leave 1. 3 1 too short. e| the use of figures instead of words is unusual in early uncial MSS., though 33. and elsewhere ; cf. e. g. 2. recto 9 sqq., 846. 20, note. sometimes found in t^B*, W-H. SO A, T-R ; 34.
28.
:

( . ^ / (
SO SO B, SO

, W-H
W-H

^5, T-R.
A, T-R,
mg.,

in text

;

aveaTpeyl^fv

.
:
:

€€

^.

-/(
(?)
:

^, W-H (.
j

Se

is

an error for SO i^AB, W-H;

A, T-R. In

T-R

precedes with some cursives and patristic

.

30.

W-H W-H ^, W-H

[]

:

l

35. fv

is

omitted in
:

t^.

38.

om.

^i.

6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
848.

Revelation
3-1x9 cm.

xvi.
Fifth century.

Plate I (verso).

Fragment of a leaf from a vellum codex, containing a few verses from Rev. xvi. The book was of remarkably small size, for only 11 lines are lost between the last line of the recto and the first of the verso, whence it follows that the inscribed surface would there were only 17 lines in the complete page
;

thus have been about 10 cm. in height. The bold upright uncials are similar in they may be style to those of the Codex Alexandrinus, though rather heavier
;

referred to the fifth century.

The

text agrees, so far as

it

both the high and middle position occur. goes, with that of the Codex Alexandrinus.
Stops
in

Recto

xvi. 17-8.

Verso

xvi. 19-20.

[ 6\
y^yov^v
5

'
^.

;
vaL

^[ ^ •8

eye

- [ ]?
:

ey[e

9 [\9 []
;

,[]
.
if

&C., T(extus) R(eceptus). SO ^^, W(eslcott)-H(ort) vaov, and it is therefore possible uncontracted, would occupy the same space as that [ouparoju should be read here. substituted. is omitted in > and before inadvertently has (so W-H). 4-5. The IMS. agrees with T-R with a number of cursives. after as well as

.

A

.

.

^

.

8.

bovvai

9-12.

, , and
:

are omitted in

h^.

849.

Acts of Peter.

98x9

cm.

Early fourth century.

Plate I (recto).

codex of the Acts of Peter in Greek, the two and 168 respectively. These so-called Gnostic Acts pages being numbered 167 in of Peter, distinct from the so-called Catholic Acts, are partially preserved firstly the Latin Codex Vercellensis of the more than one shape. There is
single leaf from a vellum
' ' ' '

A

849.

ACTS OF PETER
Rome

7
in con-

seventh century, which contains an account of the acts of Peter at

nexion with Simon Magus and of his martyrdom.

Secondly, there are two Greek

MSS.

(of

the ninth to

eleventh

centuries)

containing only the martyrdom

dependent upon
versions.

this recension are the Slavonic, Coptic,

Armenian, and Ethiopic

Thirdly, another Latin version of the martyrdom, ascribed to Bishop
in

Linus and extant

a large number of MSS.,

is

independent of the version

in the Codex Vercellensis, which is shorter and written in much worse Latin. These three texts were edited by Lipsius in Acta Apostoloriim Apocrypha, I. Recently a fragment of a different portion of the Acts pp. 1-33 and 45-103. dealing with an incident during Peter's sojourn at Jerusalem has been published by C. Schmidt from a fourth or fifth century Coptic MS. at Berlin {Die alten The date and Petrusakteu in Tcxte nnd Uniersuchnugeu, Bd. xxiv. Heft i). character of these Acts of Peter, and the history of the text in its different forms have been the subject of much discussion and the discovery of a fragment of what is no doubt the Greek original is a new factor of considerable importance.
;

Our fragment belongs to the portion of the Acts concerned with Simon Magus found only in the Codex Vercellensis, and corresponds to p. 73, 11. 16-37 of
Lipsius' edition.

The

leaf

is

lines of the verso.

third to fourth

is much obliterated in the last five The handwriting is a medium-sized upright uncial of a common century type. Had the material used been papyrus, we should

practically perfect, but the ink

have been more disposed to assign it to the late third than to the fourth century, but since vellum was not commonly used in Egypt until the fourth century, it is safer to attribute the fragment to the period from Diocletian to Constantine. The papyri with which it was found were rather mixed in point of date, ranging from the third century to the fifth. The usual contraction of 0eos and its cases is at the end of a line is sometimes indicated is uncontracted. employed, but

by a stroke above the preceding letter. There are no stops, breathings, or accents, but a coronis is employed to fill up a space at the end of 1. 14. The scribe was
not very careful
in
1.
;

e(eo)u for ^(e)^ occurs
11.

in

1.

8

and
is

9,

while in

1-3

it is

clear that the text

seriously corrupt;

^
in
11.

for
cf.

note

ad

Apart, however, from this difficulty at the beginning, the agreement between the Greek of our fragment and the Latin of the Codex Vercellensis The Greek sometimes tends to be fuller than the is on the whole very close.
loc.

Latin, there being

two instances
and
36.

(cf notes
:

on

11.

6-7 and 19) where the Latin
is

omits words or phrases found in the Greek
cf notes on
11.

at other times the Latin

longer

14, 33,
ie,

.

.

.

Treipaaat,
is

3o-[

is

wrongly
;

rendered confidens in
cf.

but as a rule the Latin

a singularly literal interpretation

e.g. libenter habet for

57

exei in

11.

16-7, and the close resemblance in the

8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

That our fragment represents the Greek text from which the Codex Vercellensis was translated admits of little doubt. For the question of the relation of the two Latin versions and the Greek to the Greek original of the Acts of Peter that conclusion is of cardinal importance. Lipsius had supposed that the Greek original was altogether lost, and that the longer Latin version found in the martyrhim ascribed to Bishop
order of the words throughout.
it went, represented the original more faithfully than the shorter Latin version found in the Codex Vercellensis, while he regarded the Greek text Against this of the as a retranslation from the shorter Latin version.

Linus, so far as

NTKanoiis, ii. pp. 833 sqq.) put forward was part of the original the simpler explanation that the extant Greek Acts of Peter, that the Codex Vercellensis was a translation of it, the longer Latin version being an independent translation made at a later date with numerous The elaborations, and a much less faithful representation of the original. correctness of Zahn's explanation, which has been generally accepted (cf. Harnack, Chron. d. altcJir. Lit., ii. 1, p. 551), is thoroughly vindicated by the new discovery. Though the longer Latin version of that portion of the Acts to which our fragment belongs is not extant (whether the longer Latin version ever contained more than the martyrhim is very doubtful), a comparison of the divergences in the two Latin versions of the martyriiim shows unquestionably that the shorter and not The rejection of the the longer one is the form supported by our fragment. claims of the longer Latin version to be regarded as more authentic than the shorter also removes the principal reason for supposing the Greek text of to be a retranslation from the Latin, and this theory may now the agrees on the whole very be finally abandoned. Since the Greek
complicated hypothesis Zahn {Gesch.
d.

closely with the conclusion of the
in

Codex

Vercellensis,

Zahn

is

clearly right

accepting the former as belonging to the Greek original.
is

Its relation to this

shorter Latin version

very similar to that of our fragment to the corresponding

portion of the

Codex

Vercellensis.

The Greek
it

tends to be rather fuller than

the Latin, which however sometimes instead of abbreviating paraphrases the

Greek

of our fragment can be judged,

The

construction, for instance,
p. 83.

in the

Did the MS. to which our fragment belongs begin at the point where the Codex Vercellensis commences, or did it also comprise an account of earlier doings
of Peter, including perhaps the events at Jerusalem described in C. Schmidt's
fragment, which apparently belongs to the period before Peter

, €9€
at greater length

and generally follows
it is
.

closely.

So
4-5

far as the style

quite in keeping with that of the
.
.

in

11.

finds a parallel

.

34—5

«al

€(0)€9

).

came

to

Rome ?
lii

The two pages

of our fragment, nos. 167 and 168 of the MS., correspond to

849.
lines of Lipsius'

ACTS OF PETER
Codex
Vercellensis.

9

edition of the

The

previous 166 pages

therefore ought to correspond to approximately 996 lines of his edition.

,
Codex
to break

As

a matter of fact the preceding portion of the Codex Vercellensis occupies 908 lines, and Avhen allowance is made for the circumstance that, judging by the
the tendency of the Latin to abbreviate the original
is is less

marked than

usual in our fragment, there

every probability that the beginning of this

MS.

coincided with the beginning of the

Codex
it.

Vercellensis,

and that the acts
is

of Peter at Jerusalem formed no part of
fatal to C.

This conclusion

not necessarily

Schmidt's view that his fragments form part of the same work as the

Acts tended up into distinct sections, if indeed these sections were originally combined. That the Acis of Paul comprised the Acts of mil and Thecla, the forged correspondence with the Corinthians, and the Martyritun Patdi, which were

Vercellensis, for from an early period the various apocryphal

known as distinct documents, has only recently been made clear through C. Schmidt's discovery of the Coptic fragments of the Acts as a whole. Similarly of the Acts of JoJin various sections have been preserved in different
previously
forms, but with considerable lacunae in or between them, in one of which
is

no doubt

to

be placed the new fragment

in

the present volume (850), itself conits

taining the beginning of a distinct section with a sub-title of

own.

But since

the composition of the Acts of Peter is referred by the principal critics to A. D. 160-170 (Zahn), 200-210 (C. Schmidt), 200-220 (Harnack), our fragment was
written
in
little, if

at

all,

later

than a century afterwards
in

;

and the apparent absence

so early a

MS.

of any section corresponding with C. Schmidt's fragment

certainly provides an

argument

favour of G. Ficker,

who
is

{Die Petrnsaktcn^

pp. 6-7, Netitest. ApokrypJioi, ed. E. Hennecke, pp. 383-4)

disposed to regard

that fragment as either not belonging to the Acts of Peter as such, or as later

than the Acts of the Codex Vercellensis, and thinks that these Acts were intended
to follow immediately after the Acts of the Apostles.

On

the other hand the

subscription in the Coptic

MS.

TTpa^t?

certainly provides strong

prima

facie evidence that

belonged to the same work as the Codex Vercellensis, and, as C. Schmidt reminds us, in the stichometry of Nicephorus the Acts of
it

Peter

is

credited with 2750

(i. e.

it

or St. Luke's Gospel), a

Greek

original of the

number which Codex Vercellensis

is

was about the same length as Leviticus too large to be accounted for by the

alone.

On
op. cit.,
ii.

the disputed questions of the date of the composition of the Acts of
'

Peter and their supposed Gnostic or
2.

vulgarchristliche

'

origin

(cf.

Harnack,

new fragment has no direct bearing, but its appearance is useful in tending to clear the ground by a dispersal of the suspicions of having been tampered with which have hitherto attached to the Codex Vercellensis and
pp. 170-2) the

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
the Greek
pilation in
(cf.

Harnack's

later

Texte

und

Unters. Bd. xx. Heft

view that the Acts of Peter are a com3, pp. ico sqq., and C. Schmidt's
is

criticism of this in his Petriisakten).

For, putting aside the question whether

C. Schmidt's Coptic fragment

was

an integral part of the Acts or not, there

now

no longer any reason
or to suppose that
it

to

doubt and the

the substantial fidelity

of the shorter Latin version,

represent, as far as they go, anything else

than the Acts of Pctcy

Sl
[

[

]joa

] ^ ?
Verso.

in their original form.

Recto.

15

5

Kpos eaTiv

.^

9

XeyofTes

^
^^
ci
(5e

u a
'€

€?

2

apavTes

€€

eyeipas
2

?
'
.

5

^s

^ ^ ^ ? ^
nats
v^Kpos

piv

^?

ye

€9

et

anoOavuv

TliTpos


He
is

D—

^
his nostrils to see)

.

.

(the youths having

examined

whether he was indeed really

dead, and seeing that he was in truth a corpse, consoled the old woman saying, " If indeed you wish, mother, and trust in the God of Peter, we will lift him up and carry him thither, While they were thus speaking, in order that Peter may raise him and restore him to you." the praefect looking intently at Peter (said), " Behold, Peter, my servant lies dead, who was a favourite of the king himself, and I did not spare him although I have with me other youths ; but because I desired to try you and the God whom you preach, whether ye are indeed true, I wished him to die." And Peter said, " God is not to be tried or proved,

Agrippa, but when
since

loved and entreated

He

hearkens to those who are worthy.

But

now

."
.

.

Codex

Vercellensis (Lipsius,

Ada

Aposi. Apocr., p. 73).

uidentes iuuenes autem qui uenerunt nares pueri cotisiderarant si uere viortuus esset. auteyn quoniam morluiis est cottsolabantur 7?iairem ipsius diceJites : Si uere credis in deo Petri haec diceiitibus iubenibus iollentes eum perferivius ad Petrum ut cum suscitatis restituat iibi.

849.
praefeclus autem in

ACTS OF PETER
illi

ii

die is, Pelre ? ecce puer tnorluiis iacet pcperci ; titique habebam alios conplures iuuenes ; sed confidens in te et in doviinum tiiiim quern praedicas, si uere certi et ueri estis : ideo huiic uolui mori. Pelrus autem dixit: Non temptatur deus neque exiis)timatur, sed dilectissimus ex animo colendus exaudiet qui digni sunt. Sed quoniam nunc .

for

miucns Petruvi dixit : Quid

quern el imperator libcnier hahet et non

.

.

1-2. Line (something like

quite inappropriate,
. .

to in 11. 2-4, and though in itself the nominative would yield a better . construction than the genitive, a parallel for this kind of genitive absolute is cited from in 1. 2 be right, another part of the Acts of Peter in introd. Nor can for a participle meaning examined is necessary in view of the following clause ei apa tO 1. 2 may be retained, but almost hopeless to emend, might be read and connected in instead of with qui uenerunt (cf. conlinuo surrexerunt four lines previously, and, for this phrase. Acts of John, ed. Bonnet, p. 191. 23 but would remain ray pivm unaccounted for, and it would still be necessary to suppose the omission of has come in by mistake before amov. It seems more probable that from some other passage, presumably occurred where the Latin ha.?, faciens per me a few lines after the passage preserved in our fragment, and perhaps again two lines later where per nieam uocem is found, however, does not suggest itself as an equivalent for any Latin expression on p. 73 of Lipsius' edition, except conlinuo m\. 11 where would be out of place. 2. [ there is a hole which occupies the place where the first letter of this line and of 1. 3 would have come, if these lines began evenly with 11. i and 4-14, and it is therefore possible that a letter is lost before and pa respectively. But this hypothesis

. (€
is

(
'

i

is

not only

far

removed from

the equivalent of the Latin at this point

(
'

pii/aswould be expected), but
is

unintelligible, while the case of

\(

is

obviously

is

in contradiction

'

By

altering

(()
^

(

),

'

^,
1.

]'.

is

not satisfactory in
difficulty in
1.

1.
;

2,

much

3

for

where though the
that apa
is

is

preferable to e. g. of pa is very faint the

[]

or

[\, and

leads to

is

practically certain

(

is

the only alternative),

word meant is shown clearly by 11. 6 and 22. 2 becomes superfluous. We prefer to Hence if [a^ia is read in 1. 3, the at the end of suppose that the hole was there when the leaf was written upon, and that the scribe therefore began 11. 2-3 further to the right than 1. i. apa is rendered by only one word in the
and
the
cf. 1. 2 2 where in rendering apa the Latin is redundant. ; 6-7• For the Latin has matrem ipsius, omitting to translate 8. is a mistake for

Latin, uere

^

g.

.

(p. 100. 16, ed. Lipsius) has haec dicentibus iubenibus praefeclus aute7n in foro, putting autem too late. of in foro, however, makes the passage clearer, since the preceding lines refer to what took place at the house of the old woman. cf. in chs. 55 and 56 of the Marlyrium Petri et Pauli (ed. ] 3. Lipsius, pp. 164. 21, 166. 6), which is supposed to be based on the older Acts of Peter (cf. Harnack, Chron. d. allchr. Lit., ii. 2, p. 177). Quid dicis, Pelre .^ ecce puer mortuus, &c., and we should expect 1 4. The Latin has dixit at the beginning of this line for which there is not room. The doubtful s might ;, be 6, i. e. the termination of ehe, which is, however, insufficient by itself. The leaf is torn

12.

: .
:

1.

eicet:

ad Petruvi

^.
.
Lat.,

.

for this

which is clearer. form cf, ch. 12 of the

^ '
:

The Latin The addition


:

at this point,

and the ink very much
is

obliterated, so that

decipherment

is

impossible.

15.

omitted in the Latin.

12
1 6.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
= mperafor,
and
1 8.

servant,

19. In place of /xer

{() =: dominiwi tuwn quern praedicas. The addition of a participle neipaam is would be an improvement, but is not necessary, mistranslated by the Latin co7ifide7is in, which does not suit the following clause si uere
20—1. such as
cerli,


that
8ia
ei

ye erepovy

Agrippa might have chosen one of

^
:

the point of this

as frequently in the Martyriiim Petri et Pauli. is that the boy chosen to die was the favourite
his other attendants.

the Latin has conphires.

&c.
22.

apa

hand apa
25.

is

26-7,
aniino colendus.

the Latin is redundant, si uere certi el iieri. rendered by one word uere. is omitted in the Latin. this is clearer than the
:

In

11.

2-3 on the other

(5
850.

:

Latin

dilectissimus

ex

Acts of John.
I2-I

X

IO-7 cm.

Fourth century.

Plate I (recto).

The upper portion (apparently) of a leaf from a codex of the Ads of John, containing a mutilated account of two incidents, neither of which occurs in
the extant portions of that work.

The handwriting

is

a good-sized, irregular

and rather inelegant uncial of the fourth century. The ordinary theological are freely employed, as well as occasional breathings. contractions of 0eos, ?;}?, and Kvpios occur. The recto has in one or two lines at the top of the page the sub-title of the section of the Acts. This sub-title is unfortunately incomplete, and no light is thrown upon it by the actual contents of the fragment but the mention of Andronicus supplies a point of contact with the extant portions of the Acts of John, in which that individual is mentioned several times as a of Ephesus who, at first a sceptic, afterwards became one of
;

Stops (middle and low points)

the apostle's chief disciples in that city.
familiar in apocryphal Acts.
at a village near Ephesus,
is

The

following incident
to visit

is

of a type

barred

by a demon

in

The apostle goes and on the way has to cross a bridge, where his passage The the form of a soldier, who threatens violence.
the brethren apparently
;

assumed by the demon recalls a similar story in the Martyrium cf. 1. 26, Matthaci, vhich is not impossibly here copying the Acts of John note. Rebuked by St. John, the demon vanishes, and on reaching his destination the apostle exhorts the brethren to worship and joins with them in prayer The verso (11. 1-19) is concerned with a quite different episode which (11. 22-36). is much more obscure. The scene is a church (cf. 1. 16), and apparently a person called Zeuxis (1. 13) had just tried to hang himself but had been miraculously saved by St. John (11. ^-d), who in 11. 4-13 offers up a thanksgiving of a character Afterwards for which there are numerous parallels in the extant Acts of John.
military aspect

850.

ACTS OF JOHN
concerning
tlie

13
of the

some question seems
(11.

to

arise
(sc.

partaking

Eucharist

13-5),

and the proconsul

of Ephesus) intervenes, perhaps bringing a letter

Whether the from the Emperor (11. 15-8), but the circumstances are obscure. is no external page on the recto precedes that on the verso or vice versa there evidence to show but since the description of the incident on the verso implies a considerable amount of space devoted to the earlier part of the Zeuxis story,
;

prefer to suppose that the verso precedes the recto, for the missing lower half of the recto does not seem to allow sufficient room for the beginning of the Zeuxis story, which is obviously quite unconnected with the incident concerning the demon in the form of a soldier. The verso therefore presumably belongs

we

one section of the Acts of John, and the recto to the beginning of the next. The tendency of the various apocryphal Acts to split up into independent parts has already been noted (cf. p. 9) in regard to the Acts of Peter, and in the Acts of John is especially marked the fullest edition
to the conclusion of
;

(Bonnet, Acta Apost.

Apocr.,

i.

pp.

151-216)

is

made up

of

five

separate

sections derived from different

gaps of uncertain length, omissions. There is no difficulty in finding a place for the new fragment. The references to Andronicus and the proconsul clearly indicate Ephesus as the background. Andronicus is mentioned, obviously for the first time, in c. 31 of the extant Acts, where he appears as an unbeliever, but in c. 37 he has already become a disciple, and the account of his conversion probably occurred in one or more lost chapters which originally intervened between cc. 31 and o,-/^ although these both belong to the continuous section of the Acts (cc. 18-86) found in the Codex Patmensis. Andronicus also occurs in the following section found only in the Codex Vindobonensis (cc. 87-105), so that our fragment must be
inserted at

MSS., and not only separated from each other by but also exhibiting in some places evidence of internal

some point

account of the

residence at Ephesus are ascribed to the apostle in these chapters, the first covering cc. 31-55, at which point St. John leaves for Smyrna and there is a gap in which several chapters are lost. His return to Ephesus is narrated
in

^^

later

c. 31 and before c. 106, where begins the which the work concluded. Two periods of with

than

c' 62, and throughout the rest of the Acts Ephesus remains the scene. Excluding therefore cc. S5-^^ with those lost between cc. $$ and 58, all of which dealt with events away from Ephesus, the most suitable points for the insertion of our fragment are (i) c. 37 before the sentence beginning 01 h\ where there is a change of subject, and a lacuna is in any case probable owing to the inconsistency of c. 37 with c. 31 concerning Andronicus (2) the gap between cc. 86 and 87 (3) the gap between cc. 105 and 106. But though in these three places the lacunae are Evident, there are other points between

,

;

;

14
cc.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
31-55 and 62-86
(cc.

87-105 form one long speech) where the existence of lacunae is possible, so that there is much freedom of choice. If the title in 11. 30 and 21 refers, as is possible, to the separation of Andronicus from his wife
avbpos to in c. 63 (e/< our fragment must have preceded that chapter, and the general resemblance between the situation in 11. 22 sqq. and that in c. 48 (especially

),
of John.

Drusiane, alluded

-

^
by
is

cf. 11. 22-3, note) also suggests that in the version found in the Codex Parisiacus our fragment belongs to the earlier rather than to the later portions of the Acis
;

The composition
depends
[Chron.
largel)^

of the original Acts of

John

is

assigned

all

critics

to the second century, but

how

far

back

in that

century the work

to be placed

upon the disputed question whether it was used by Clement of Alexandria, as has been supposed by Zahn and others, but not by Harnack
d. altchr. Lit.,
ii.

i, p.

542,

ii.

2,

p.

174).

As

is

usual with apocryphal

Acts preserved in comparatively late MSS., there is some uncertainty as to the extent to which the existing portions accurately represent the original or have been subjected to editing. So far as it goes, our fragment, which on account of its antiquity no doubt belongs to the original Acts of John, agrees closely both in its general form and contents with the previously extant portions, and therefore tends to support the view that these have not
of revision
;

cf.

undergone any serious amount which we attained in connexion with the the similar conclusion to

Acts of Peter (pp. 9-10). The use of the first person plural in reference to Leucius, the supposed narrator of the Acts of John, which often occurs in the narrative portions of the Acts dealing with Ephesus, is not found in 11. 22 sqq. where it might perhaps be expected but no importance is to be attached to this circumstance, for e. g. in the story in cc. 48 sqq. the use of the first person is equally Formerly the Acts of John were treated as pronouncedly Gnostic, but absent.
;

this inference has recently

been disputed by C. Schmidt, who
regarding them as
'

is

followed

by
von

Harnack

{pp.

cit.,

ii.

2, p. 173) in

vulgarchristlich, aber

It is unfortuausserordentlich starker modalistischer und doketischer Farbung '. fragment Avhich would be most likely to show nate that the passage in our
its

author's theological point of view, the prayer in

While most of the phrases are, so far as can be judged, of a conventional plete. in 11. y-8 has character, the expression b .]

[\^€

a somewhat Gnostic ring. The beginnings and ends of lines are lost on both pages of the fragment, but it is clear from the fairly certain restorations of the lacunae between II. 22-3,
26-7, 29-30, and 31-2 that the lines on the recto contained about 41 letters, and 1. 27 which projects proves that at least 5 letters are lost at the beginnings

{

11.

5-13,

is

far

from com-

.

.

850.
of the other lines on the recto.

ACTS OF JOHN

15
size of the lacunae

on and 4 letters at the 27 end of 1. 31. The arrangement of the division of lines on the verso is more problematical we suppose the lines to be of the same length as those on the recto and have taken the restorations in 11. 13 and 13 as the basis for calculating the size of the lacunae elsewhere cf. note on 1. 9.
the hypothesis that one letter
is

We

have calculated the
/xeyo? in
1.

lost before

;

;

Verso.
v]iTei3
]

avTov

[
[
/x[

\8
5
. .
.

]

5e

apas

.

[

] [.]
.

.]

€\] [\^
€[€]
ji'oy

]

.

.

.

.]•

.
ae
Se

.

[.

.]?.

eavTOv-

et?

€.
6

€[€ [\}8 €[7
.

[
[

....

....].

]( ] [].

.

.

,^•

€iri

[]

15

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.] []
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[] €.
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[]

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[ [[ [] [ [
6
.

[ [ €^[
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[.

.

.

[

6

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,

.

20

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Recto.

;>>>>>[

[

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?

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

25

?] 7](€ []
nep]aiv€iy

ye^vpav

'\ Tis

]€9.

[] []
ety

3

\\\ [] [] €[] «[ €[ []€ €[ ^ []

€ \€

^^^]

^"[^]

^-7\ ^ ^•
[•

€€ 9 ^^^ •\\^
[

[;]?

a5eX0[ous'

[.

.

.

.

6

[

35

] ] ] ] ]
. . .

ks

eKXeivev

]tow

[

[ [
einev. . . .
.

[]

[

eyevcTO

a[8eX

.

.

.][
.]€[

.

.

' thou who didst compel me to ; (spake) to Zeuxis, " Rise up and lift John turn from his purpose one who was intending to hang himself, who turnest the hearts that ., who are in despair to thyself, who makest known the things that are known to none Jesus, the comforter weepest for the afflicted . ., who raisest the dead ... of the weak, praise thee and worship thee and give thanks to thee for all thy bounty and of the And he (gave) the eucharist to Zeuxis alone, (and the present dispensation and service." The then) offered it to those who wished to receive it, but ... did not dare to do so. " servant of the (coming) into the middle of the church saith to John proconsul
. .

.

.

.

,

.

.

.

We
.

.

.

:

." brought letters from Caesar The separation (?) Andronicus and his wife. ., and wished After a few days had passed, John went forth with several brethren to And as John was on his way to river was flowing. to cross a bridge under which a and standing ., clothed in the fashion of a soldier, approached him, the brethren, a certain before his face said, " John, if thou (advancest) thou shalt straightway engage me in combat."

unnameable one,
' '

.

.

.

;

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

And John

.

.

.

said, "

The Lord

shall

quench thy

threat

and thy Avrath and thy

offence,"

and

behold the other vanished. John then having come to those whom he was visiting and found them gathered together, spake, " Let us rise up, my brethren, and bow our knees before the Lord who has made of none effect the unseen activity of even the great .' (enemy ?)"... he bowed his knees with them
.

.

4.

...
1.

is

(for whom cf. 1. 13) and avaaras, Probably eine is to be supplied before the beginning of the speech, although there is no stop after Zev$]i8i ; cf. however

(]

30, note.
5.
.

( [].
[

before If in 1. 27. After [. .]s is a low stop, as after ae in 1. 7 and (or is not due to dittography, we may restore For similar invocations in the Acis of is quite uncertain. The letter after

[((

]

([€()

(:^\

John see

pp.

187-93 of Bonnet's

edition.

850.
6.

ACTS OF JOHN
1.

17
is lost

both before

here and before rovs in

9 probably had a breathing which

in a lacuna.
Sia if ]vos in 1. 8 is a genitive; or could 7. The line may be completed be read there in place of the doubtful v. at the beginning of the line is extremely doubtful, and it would be 9. The supposed possible to read e. g. s. In that case, if the lines on the verso were 3 or 4 letters shorter than those on the recto (cf. introd. p. 15), we might read here, with 8o\ao]eu in place of in 11. 11-2, omitting both in 1. 12 and the supposed lacuna between and in 11. 6-7. The reduction of the corresponding lacunae elsewhere by 3 or 4 letters would, however, present some difficulty in 11. 13-4, where a verb is necessary; and we prefer to adhere to the length of lines indicated by the recto.

-((\

([
is

(^]> ([^

(\[\'^

is

possible afier
vocative.

10.

in place of ., but less suitable. not satisfactory since the word occurred in the previous
.

line.

;()

is

no doubt
1

1-3. Cf. e.g. Ac/s of John {AJ), p.

p. 188. 2.

which would be expected (cf. AJ, p. 193. 14, &c.), is too long for the 14. lacuna after might be read but then if 67'^][/] in the next line is right (cf. AJ, p. 208. ir) these two sentences do not connect well together. The supposed stop after may be the beginning of a letter, e. g. . The letter at the end of the line is represented by the lower half of a vertical stroke ; [o]i [8e is possible. The supposed apostrophe after is very doubtfuh For 15. Perhaps of Ephesus cf. AJ, p. 167. 28 and 851. 2, note. the 16. suggests a participle like but the following letters constitute a difficulty, the arrangement of the fibres, which are twisted, being not quite certain. Of the supposed the merest vestige remains, but 8e is unsuitable. At the end of• the line the supposed rough 17. ]ov may be read in place of ]. breathing is more to the left than usual, but it is not sadsfactory to regard it as part

(, (.
]

189. 23-4, and 193. 2 sqq., and for

\8\

;

](.

],

[]

of a mark of abbreviation, i. e. ^v. does not occur elsewhere in the apocryphal Acts. 20-1. Prof C. Schmidt well compares the similar sub-titles in the Coptic Ac/a PaiiU. posting-stage ', Avhich is unsuitable here, occurs in AJ, p. 154. 7. Of the compounds secms most likely, and if the words in 1. 22 had been in the genitive it would be easy to connect this heading with the allusion to the separation of Andronicus and his wife Drusiane in AJ, p. 181. 25. The presence of the nominative there renders this explanation more difficult, unless indeed we restore The double dots after jXXayTj are not certain. That refers to the death of St. John is very improbable, for the section of the Ac/s of John dealing Avith that subject is extant, under the sub-title of OX With regard to the reading -^, {AJ, p. 203). the is almost certain, being the only alernative and less suitable might of but course be the beginning of e. g. another proper name. The prominence of Drusiane, however, as well as Andronicus in the Ac/s of John makes -^{ very probable, even if 1. 20 has no connexion with 1. 21 and belongs, as is possible, to the preceding section, not

7

=

'

'
ef
is

] ^
all.

^^.

;

to the sub-title at

than

€\ ()
The
parallel

22—3. Cf.

Af ^.

place-name or equivalent expression passage in the Codex Patmensis is be
possible in
1.

(.

€^
(

175. 24—5 (Codex Parisiacus)

€€•

8ev.

(

ovv

[(€\/

(with a shorter verb
is

23, but a

'
C

^ ^

more
eVt

likely.

i8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

or

might be
2 0.

,
24.

The

lacuna at the end

may be
with a

filled either

by a short epithet

or else by reading

compound

of

.
Cf.

]€. [],

e. g.

Marty Hum Matthaei (Bonnet, Acta

Apost. Apocr.,

... Since the Martyrium Matthaei wzs composed much later than the Acts ofJohn, the coincidence may be due to imitation by the author of the former work, haipoiv would be expected at the beginning of this line, for it is clearly an evil spirit who appears ; but the traces of the last letter are inconsistent with and suggest p, though might

(
iv

(\
ii.

The

doubtful

?

of epp^ev

i, p.

232. 15-6)
iv

8

/](')

be read.
f,

28. so that ei[nev

[•^ might be read
is

at the

end of the

line.

The supposed

might be

but not

inadmissible.

no stop or blank space after eyeveTo, and possibly represents a[vTa>, with next word. Cf. note on 1. 4. is rather more like , but the accusative seems to 33-4• The second letter of be required by the sense, or can be read after pe in place of y. The word no doubt refers to the powers of evil; with fvepya in 1. 34 cf. AJ, p. 187. 24 ivepyeiav 200. For 14 8aipov€s, ifepyeiai, aneiKai. cf. Af, p. 1 92. 24 and Acta Philippi, ed. Bonnet, 40. 7 diivapis. The doubtful r before can be y, and is possible. The word is probably a participle in any case. cannot be read, and the is nearly certain. 35. With regard to the repetition of this word is not very satisfactory, but is inadmissible there also. The next word may be etVej/ [, but r can be read for .

\\:
30.

There

is

for the

€]

[[ ^/ ^^
{)
851.

aapy,

,

[,

Apocryphal Acts.
5-3x18 cm.
Fifth or sixth century.

The following small fragment of a papyrus codex, which clearly contained the Acts of some apostle or saint, we have not succeeded in identifying with any of the Acta Apostoloriim Apocrypha edited by Lipsius and Bonnet. It consists of
round calligraphic and may belong to the fifth, ^eos is contracted as usual, but not nor perhaps Kvpios. The recto begins just after the commencement of a new chapter which is indicated by a paragraphus and by a vertical wavy line in the margin, apparently the bottom of a flourish. If our restoration in 1. i (cf. 1. 5) is correct, a praeleaf,

the lower portion of a
uncial

written with

brown ink

hand which

is

certainly not later than the sixth century

,

in a large

fect

is

apparently giving orders for some one to be exposed to wild beasts.

The

verso contains part of a protest

made

to the praefect, defending

some one (no

doubt the apostle concerned

in these

Acts) from the charge of being a magician.

comes first is quite uncertair^ Some points of connexion with the Acts of Paul and Thecla, in which a similar scene occurs, suggest that the fragment may belong either to a different version of those Acts or to one of the lost sections of the Acts of Paul (cf p. 9), but it does not correspond to any of the new Coptic fragments of that work.
recto or the verso

Whether the

851.

APOCRYPHAL ACTS
Verso.

19

Recto.

^

€€/

9
emeu

[]€
royy

^
[5e
".
is

-^

[

['^^!1/?/?

9

].[....]... ^[.

.

[]^(

€? €
ovtos
6s
is

'
. .

.

said "
.
.

Do

as

you wish

The

praefect said to the chief huntsmen, " Bring to

me

here
"
2.

.

lord praefect, this
:

man

not a magician, but perhaps his god

great

."
.
.

(5

this word does not seem to occur in Lipsius and Bonnet's Ac/a Apost. of Paul and Thecla, ed. Lipsius, p. 257. 4 (cf. 1. 5) is also the word used in those Acts for the Roman governor, while is used in the Acts 0/ Pe/er and in the Acis ofJohn. or possibly , and the next letter seems to be 3. The letter after fw, if not v^ must be a round one, but much narrower than the scribe's ^ or elsewhere. Possibly he began to write and corrected it to but though the supposed may have been crossed through the next letter is not like or corrected into . Or perhaps a proper name is intended, cannot be read. 5-6. Cf. Acis of Paul and Thecla, p. 249. 1-2 6 f>i

Apocr., but

•(

cf.

Ads

%

.

(

,
.

(,

iariv, aipe

. NEW
852.

CLASSICAL TEXTS.
Euripides, Hypsipyle.
Height 37-1 cm.
Late second or early third century.
Plates II
Fr. 60.

and III

(Fr.

i.

ii-iii,

i-ii).

The
841-4
in

following fragments, which

constitute the

most important addition
papyri, belong, like
large group of literary

to the remains of Greek tragedy hitherto

made by Egyptian
the
first

our previous volume and 853

in this, to

and contents of 852 Avere sufficiently definite to announcement of the discovery to identify the play as the Hypsipyle of Euripides, and this identification has subsequently been confirmed by the recognition of at least two coincidences with citations from that drama by ancient authorities.
texts found in 1906.
style

The

enable us at the time of the

first

C 2

20
In

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
common
with the other manuscripts from this
i

find,

the papyrus was

recovered in an extremely mutilated condition.

The most

considerable piece

was the central portion of Fr.

containing parts of two consecutive columns

but the majority of the fragments, originally numbering over 200, were comOn the whole they have hardly fitted together so well paratively small in size.
as might have been expected.

Particularly difficult to deal with in this respect

numbered 6-17 and 30-56, which formed a small group found subsequently at some little distance from the rest, and distinguished by being of a darker colour and badly worm-eaten. Another characteristic shared by 852 with 841-2 and 853 is that the literary text is on the verso of a non-literary document,—;in this instance a money account, of which a description is given
are the pieces

under 985.
to be of

Though

of course very useful for purposes of confirmation, this

document on the

recto,

which follows no regular formula,
of the

is

in too large
;

a hand
of

much

assistance towards the combination of small fragments

moreover
is
;

the recto of a

number

fragments

is

uninscribed.

The account
first

a decidedly early date, and
it

may

be safely placed within the

century

but

was apparently not till a good many years later that the verso came to be used for this copy of the Hypsipyle, which we should judge to be little anterior to A. D. 200. It is written in a sloping uncial hand similar in kind to that of 842 (the new historian), and no doubt of about the same period. ^ is always of the cursive shape, with a tail, and other cursive forms occasionally make their
appearance, particularly at the ends of
in Fr. 60, 59.
lines, e. g. vs of olkovs in Fr. 58. 8,

^

of

and the spacing show considerable variations in different parts of the MS. there is a marked contrast for instance in this respect between Fr. i. ii and Fr. 60. ii (cf. Plates II and III). Hence inequalities occur in the number of lines contained in the columns, which are remarkably tall there was a difference of seven lines between Cols, i and ii of Fr. 60, numbering 62 and ^^ lines respectively Col. ii of Fr. 64 has only 54 lines, while the first seven columns of the play averaged about 60 lines, as is shown by the occurrence in the seventh column of the figure 400, the verse opposite to which this numeral is placed being succeeded by at least 15 lines before the column ended. This marginal numeration of verses by hundreds is not infrequent in papyri cf e. g. 841 (Pindar's Paeans), and note on Fr. 25. There are frequent variations of the point in the column at which the lines were commenced, the object usually being to mark the distinction between iambics and lyrics or strophic divisions within the latter. Accents, breathings, and marks of elision and quantity are fairly frequent throughout, but lectional signs, as might be
size of the letters
; :

The

;

;

expected,

are

rather

commoner
is

in

the lyrical

parts

than

elsewhere.

The

system of accentuation

similar in character to that of 223, 841

and other

85.2.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
it

21

papyri of this period

;

should be noted that for convenience of printing

we

place the circumflex on the second vowel of a diphthong, though in the
it

original

usually covers the two letters.

A line curving upwards

is

occasionally

placed below
tuation,

compound words, as in 841 and the Bacchylides papyrus. Puncwhich is rare, is commonly effected by a high stop, usually placed well
;

above the line ; a low stop occurs in Fr. 68. 7. To what extent these various signs but he evidently wrote some of them are due to the original scribe is uncertain and the majority may well come from his pen. The same writer was also doubtless responsible for the names of the dramatis personac which occasionally appear
in the

margin (cf. 211, 855, &c.), for the stichometrical figures already mentioned, and for the paragraph!, which are employed both to denote changes of speaker and to mark strophic divisions. But it is equally clear that a number of the frequent alterations and additions made in the text are due to another hand, which we have as usual attempted to distinguish by the use of a thicker type it is however often very difficult to feel confidence in assigning the authorship of minor corrections, and doubtful cases have as a rule been credited to the original
;

writer.

Occasionally a variant or an explanatory note
spite of the

is

inserted in the margin.

numerous modifications the text is left in a by no means The satisfactory condition, and in several passages emendation is necessary. fault no doubt sometimes lay with the archetype, but it is impossible to acquit are our copyist of much carelessness. His orthography is very fair et and iota adscript is frequently omitted, and some unusually correctly written, but

But

in

:

mistakes of accentuation occur.
lyrical parts there
is

With regard

to the use of the Doric

in the

little

consistency,

and here we

as a rule follow the spelling

of the papyrus.

several ancient authorities, but none of the versions is Hypsipyle, found to agree very closely with the treatment of Euripides. daughter of Thoas, the son of Dionysus and king of Lemnos, in a massacre of the men of the island by the women concealed and saved her father, whom

The fragments are is now clear, some pyle's story is told by
plot

scattered widely over the play, and though
essential points unfortunately

much

of the

remain

in

doubt.

Hypsi-

The deception was eventually discovered, and Hypsipyle, who had meanwhile become the mother of two sons by Jason on his way to Colchis in quest of the golden fleece, was sold as a slave to Lycurgus, king of Nemea, and put in charge of his infant son. It was with her subsequent adventures at Nemea that the plot of Euripides' drama was conThe following is the account of the scholiast to Clement of Alexandria, cerned. YIoXwdK^L •\ ore oi 105 sqq. p.
she succeeded in the government of Lemnos.
:

ds

'

tottos be ovtos

",

8e

, ^

avj/e-

the outline so far as it goes will be accurate, but it omits entirely the two sons of Hypsipyle who, as we now know, played a part in the plot of Euripides. Apollodorus iii. 6. 4 is slightly less detailed he adds however that the serpent was slain and gives Lycurgus as the name of the king of Nemea. Four separate accounts are prefixed to the scholia on Pindar's Nemea. The first of these brings in Hypsipyle's sons, though with marked divergences from
:

', -,
for

€, ^poeaveao
en

. } ^. '5 ^
22
(1.

') ] ,)
and

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
be

Soavros

6e €V

be 6

Toy Tialba

^eea^v

^^
els

in the last sentence

. '?
eKoKeaev.

"?
If

^. "
avTois
be
toIs

,-

vbpeaaL

be

€9

for "AbpaaTos

be substituted and Evpbv for

Euripides
ev Ne^e'a.

:

aveXelv

/

ev eKetj-o) be

aveevo bev

"^-

be

There was evidently no question of the concealment of Hypsipyle by the queen in Euripides' play, nor any intercourse between the former and the seven chieftains after her recognition by her sons. The brief account of Hyginus c. 74 is very similar to those of Apollodorus and the scholiast on Clement. In only one extant work is the story of Hypsipyle at Nemea treated at length, namely the Thebais of Statius, which might have been expected to reflect the version of Euripides and was largely drawn upon by Hartung in connexion with the Hypsipyle in his Euripides Restitiitus, ii. pp. 430 sqq. Statius, however, whom as Hartung thought esse Euripide tisum atictore manifestiim est^ turns out to have been by no means a safe guide. Apart from minor variations in detail, which need not be emphasized here, there are fundamental discrepancies
in structure.

{).

ev

'^.

^^? ^4\ ^• aae, ~
iralbes

be

eJ|aa

'
irapeKakei

After the death of the child {Theh.

v.

505 sqq.)

army as proceeding with Hypsipyle to the palace of Lycurgus. The procession is met by the king, who proposes to take vengeance for Hypsipyle's negligence, but is restrained by the chieftains. In the confusion which results the sons of Hypsipyle, who had been hospitably received at the
Statius represents the Argive
palace,

go to the assistance of Lycurgus and are so led to discover

their mother's

identity.

Then

follows the institution of the

Nemean games

at the instigation

of Amphiaraus.

As
is

will

be seen,

it

was certainly not from Euripides that Statius
In the fragments of the

derived the ground-plan of this part of his poem.

tragedy Lycurgus

conspicuous by his absence, his place being taken by the
in Statius is

queen Eurydice who

a minor figure, while the only representative of

853.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

23

the Arglve

army is Amphiaraus accompanied by a few attendants, and his appeal on Hypsipyle's behalf is exclusively to right, not might (Fr. 60. 40). First in order stand Let us now turn to the actual remains of the play. the three verses quoted in Aristoph. Frogs 121 1-3 from the prologue (Nauck ... Welcker, Gricch. Trag. ii. pp. 557-H, Fr. 752) os and Hartung, Eiirip. Rest. ii. p. 431, are very positive that the prologue was spoken by Dionysus and have therefore to suppose that the lines cited by Aristophanes were preceded by one or two other verses. This however is on the one hand and on the other with the inconsistent with the use of the third person express testimony of the scholiast, which there is no reason to doubt, that the The opening is strictly parallel to others in passage was the prologues of Euripides, e. g. those of the /ou or the Iphig. in Tatiris, where

-?,

.

.

.

-

'' .
by giving

,

the speaker begins

his or her genealogy.

In the present case accord-

ingly the speaker was tracing descent from Dionysus, and the only persons

who

can here come in question are Hypsipyle herself or one of her two sons Euneos

and Thoas. In the first column of Fr. i of the papyrus, which, as the stichometry indicates, was the third column of the play, the sons in the guise of travellers seeking hospitality for the night appear in colloquy with a woman, whose congratulations to the mother of the strangers would almost suffice to identify her as would be quite appropriate in the Hypsipyle herself; hence the initial

$

mouth of any one of the three persons who are available. If the speaker of Hypsipyle, the arrangement is similar to that of the it is, as we suppose,
Iphigenia in Taiiris.

Hypsipyle recounts her history and circumstances^ and perhaps for the purpose of fetching the child Archemorus then enters the palace, Euneos and Thoas arrive, and after some conversation, in which their identity
;

and mission (they were looking
Statius, Theb. v. 715,

for their

lost

mother: cansa viae genetrix as
p.

says;

cf.
;

Schol.

Nem. quoted on

22) are explained,

knock at the door of the palace Hypsipyle opens it and the dialogue of Fr. i. If on the other hand Euneos or Thoas made the opening speech, Col. i follows. Hypsipyle would not have appeared until the travellers proceeded to knock
at the door.

so well for the

This viev/ is simpler, but possibly too simple it hardly accounts 30 lines of the first two columns, apart from the consideration heroine of the piece is perhaps more suitable as the that the The papyrus breaks off in the middle of the conversation of Hypsipyle with
;

-.

the strangers,

who presumably gained
i.
i.

admittance, in spite of the absence of the

king Lycurgus (Fr.
Euripides
ling,
(cf.

11)

;

in these

Tkeb.

v.

640, 715).
is
1.

of which the conclusion

two details Statius is in agreement with Hypsipyle then sings a monody to her nurspreserved in the first 14 lines of Fr. i. ii. This is
8 to
indicates, to

the song, as the reference in

which allusion

is

made

24
in
cf.

Frogs 1305 sqq.
Phot. Lex.

^?

Fr. 769, takes the

but that
to

^^ '' , ^. , THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Vrti-•

toIs

p. 180. 12

.7{)
likely
;

/

;

:

6

7€

rrjs

Nauck,

word
all

as having occurred in the text of the play,

is

not at

the verse of the papyrus sufficiently accounts for

The parodos of the chorus, consisting of Nemean women friendly Hypsipyle (cf Fr. i. ii. 15 Frs. 20-1. i follows, the 14 choral ode consisting of a strophe and antistrophe (largely composed of glyconic verses), each of which is succeeded by a lyrical response from Hypsipyle. In
Photius' note.

,

[], ),

the strophe (Fr.

i.

ii.

15-40) the chorus asks

if

the captive's thoughts are

still

busy with her island home while such stirring events as the march of the army of Adrastus against Thebes are in progress. Plypsipyle replies (Fr. i. iii. 1-17) that she cares for none of these things her heart is with the ships of the Agonauts. The chorus offers consolation by recalling the adventures of other heroines who had left their homes and suggests that Hypsipyle's prospects are brighter than were theirs (Fr. i. iii. 18-43). Hypsipyle refuses to take comfort, and can only look forward to the release of death (Fr. i. iv. 1-9). She then perceives some strangers approaching (Fr. i, iv. 10-14), and Amphiaraus enters with a small retinue (Fr. i. iv. 15). He addresses Hypsipyle, and asks to be shown the way to running water, which was needed for the purpose of a sacrifice on behalf of the army on crossing the frontier (cf. note on Fr. i. iv. ^^). A long dialogue ensues in which Amphiaraus explains who he is, what was the object of the expedition, and how he himself came to be concerned in it, while Hypsipyle in her turn discloses her identity and antecedents (Fr. 1. iv. S^-v with Frs. ^-q). Finally she consents to comply with Amphiaraus' request (Nauck, Fr, 753 and goes off with him, carrying the child with her. Thus ends the first and the chorus occupied the interval with an ode, to which Frs. 6-9 are likely to belong there is a reference in Fr. 6. to and the description in Frs. 8-9 of the quarrel between Polynices and Tydeus which led up to the expedition of Adrastus would be a very suitable subject at this point. Meanwhile Hypsipyle, perhaps with the motive attributed to her by Statius ne tarda Pelasgis dux foret (iv. 778), had left the child lying unguarded on the ground, to find on her return that he had fallen a victim to a snake cf. the fragmentary description of the accident by Amphiaraus in Fr. 60. 6"] sqq. At this point the course of events becomes obscured, and clearness is reached only at Frs. 20-1, where Hypsipyle is found in conversation with the chorus, fearful of the vengeance of the child's parents and considering means of flight. In what way is the lacuna to be filled ? How was the misadventure made known to the chorus and in the palace ? The usual tragic means in such a case
;

\

), ^'',

b€

;

4,
;

852.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

25

was the report of a messenger, and as a matter of fact in Fr. 18 there are the remains of a few lines which certainly refer to the serpent, and might well come from such a report. The objection to this view is the subsequent occurrence On of a description of the scene by Amphiaraus when pleading with Eurydice. this ground Prof. U. von Wilamowitz-Mollendorfif, to whom with Prof. J. B. Bury and Mr. Gilbert Murray we owe a number of most valuable suggestions and criticisms, would reject the intervention of a messenger, and refer Fr. 18 to the first dialogue between Amphiaraus and Hypsipyle, supposing the serpent to be a well-known object to whose existence Hypsipyle might allude in speaking of the spring. This no doubt is a quite tenable explanation, and the serpent
505 nemoris sacer horror Achaei^ 51 1-2 InacJiio sanctum dixcre Tonanti agricolae, and 579 sqq. On the other hand some description of the disaster seems essential at this point, if only for the enlightenment of the audience; moreover to credit Hypsipyle with so clear a previous
is

actually so treated

by

Statius

;

cf. v.

knowledge of the
be found
in

risk

would considerably increase her culpability
messenger
et

in leaving

her

charge unprotected, while to the parallel from Statius a counterweight
his

may

reference to a

:

Lycwgi

mintiiis implerat lacrimis (v. 638-9).

iam sacrifici stibitiis per tecta Hence, whether a regular mesprefer to regard Fr. 18 as

senger was employed by Euripides or not,
part of a post factum narrative.
:

we should
is

an obvious alternative to a regular But there messenger possibly the narrator was Hypsipyle herself. At the conclusion of the stasimon she may have returned alone from her ill-fated expedition, and to in answer to interrogations from the chorus briefly stated what had occurred the lyrical portion of such a scene we should refer Frs. 10-13 ^^• ^^e scholiast The question would then on Clement quoted above, h\ A hint towards the solution arise, how was the news to reach queen Eurydice ? of this problem is perhaps to be found in the rather mysterious remark of ' apa, to no purpose then Hypsipyle when being led off to death, was my compunction (Fr. 60. 31). These words appear to imply that shame had prevented her from a certain action and we can find no interpretation more suitable than that first suggested by Mr. Murray, that Hypsipyle's feelings of honour led her to abandon the project of flight discussed in Frs. 20-1. If that is right, then she might naturally be supposed to have gone a step
?/
'

(^
^^.

;

5

^

'

;

further,

and voluntarily to have surrendered
1

herself.

Of course

this explanation
;

of Fr. 60. 2
latter

is

quite compatible with the hypothesis of a messenger

but the

expedient becomes rather superfluous, and the awkwardness of a second description of Archemorus' fate would be far slighter if the first had been a more

or less incoherent account by the distracted Hypsipyle, and not a formal report of another independent eyewitness.

26

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Our supposition
of a voluntary surrender seems to
first

harmonize with the

among the dramatis personae. In Fr. 22 the speakers are an unnamed person who appears to be pleading the cause of Hypsipyle, the chorus, and Eurydice. The chorus praise the first
mutilated fragment in which Eurydice
occurs
nobility or generosity {yivv\aC ejAe^^as), and Eurydice follows with If the an angry accusation of using specious words (1. 1 1 ...;). first speaker is Hypsipyle and she had courageously thrown herself upon the queen's mercy, ycwaios would be the natural epithet for the chorus to apply to her, while her scruples and excuses would no less naturally appear to the Frs. 23-31 may for the most part well indignant mother as mere belong to the same scene as Fr. 22 in the case of three of them stichometrical figures show that they come from the central portion of the play (11. 600-800),

speaker's

.\\

[

^.
;

though somewhat widely dispersed. Postponing for the moment the question of what further scenes may have here intervened, we pass on to Fr. 60, where sure ground is again reached. Hypsipyle is now being led off to her doom. She makes a final appeal to Eurydice, acknowledging indeed that she had unwillingly caused the child's death,

made against her b' rib' Kraveiv € by the queen (cf. 11. ^j-6 /uois, and Nauck Fr. 758). It is of no avail, and her position seems hopeless when at the critical moment Amphiaraus suddenly interposes. He had foreseen, he says, Hypsipyle's fate, and comes with the object of preventing it, not by force, but by persuasion. The queen, who here meets Amphiaraus for the first time, conbut indignantly repudiating the charge of malicious negligence
sents to hear him.

?
tell

He

proceeds to

her

(11.

55-1 11)

how he had

induced

Hypsipyle to show the way
Thebes.

to the spring,
it

and describes the accident with the
and concludes with the practical
hers.

deductions which he drew from

concerning the fate of the expedition against

He

offers philosophical consolation,

proposal that the

army should

give her son burial and institute a festival (the

Nemean games)
only the
but that
first

to perpetuate both his
lines are preserved,

name and

Of

Eurydice's reply

few
of

but their tone suggests that she had been

convinced and was prepared to give
it is

way (11. 11 2-7). Another gap here occurs, no very large extent seems to follow from the fact that in Fr. 64. Col. ii Amphiaraus is still found upon the stage. He has now done the further service of bringing about a recognition between Hypsipyle and her sons, and this accomplished he leaves them to mutual explanations in which the adventures of both parties are reviewed, Hypsipyle speaking mainly in lyrical measures and the sons more calmly in iambics. The i6ooth line is marked in the course of this column, and that the end of the play is imminent is also clear from the occurrence in the margin of the column following of the name of the god

852.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
i

27
disappeared,

Dionysus as a speaker. Col. of this fragment has almost entirely scene of anagnorisis, but it must have been largely if not entirely occupied by the are required between Fr. 60. ii and Fr. 64. i and therefore one or more columns development by Amphiaraus of the for Eurydice's decision and exit, and the
preliminaries, whatever they were, to the recognition. to a loss of three columns, to

Stichometrical data point

which probably should be assigned Frs. 61-3 A suitable place can also be found for the (cf. Fr. 61. 4-6, Fr. 62. 3, Fr. 6^. 6). preceding the long act lyrical fragments 57-9 in the choral ode immediately connexion which we have now reconstructed. In these fragments, of which the recalls that of the parodos in the Bacchae, the chorus is evident and the language The topic at this juncture would be especially sings the praises of Dionysus.
invoked to come to the assistance of his descendant concluding scene is fittingly in her extremity, and his actual appearance in the figure 1100 In one of these fragments (57. 15; cf. note ad loc) the •presaged.
appropriate
:

the god

is

to them probably occurs, which though consistent with the position assigned the presence of involves a final act of unusual length, if it be inferred from The longest Frs. 60 and 64 belong to a single act. Amphiaraus (cf. p. 26) that that of the Ion, is under 400 lines, iioho'i in the extant plays of Euripides,

that a short whereas the e^ooos here would reach nearly 600. Hence it is likely the exit of Eurydice choral ode, like e.g. that in Electra 1147-64, divided a real and the recognition of Hypsipyle's sons, though not necessarily effecting Fr. 64 of break in the action. The large lyrical element in the two columns
is

a further reason for reducing the part of the chorus in this section. by means Euripides' plot may thus be followed with sufficient clearness but its earlier stages and its final denouement of the surviving fragments both in It would wrapped in obscurity. there is an intermediate link which remains Hypsipyle's sons who, as has in any case have been not a little singular if were kept been seen, appeared both at the outset and at the end of the play,
;

Secondly, an interval of some entirely out of the action during the rest of it. unaccounted 200 lines between about 11. 900 and 11 00 at present remains quite filled without bringing in the sons in for, and it is difficult to see how this can be point we have some external evidence to take into

some way.

Now

on

this

consideration, primarily that of the epigram in Anth. Pal.

^€, ©^,
h

ijbpos,

EvpvUms

€€

6 yas yevkas,

^' € ^, , € ,. ? . &
yap

iii.

10

:—

ayKca

(?)

h

28

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
the following explanation
beKaTov

To which
fv apxfj

Euneos and Thoas rescued Hypsipyle but in Euripides her was certainly Amphiaraus. There thus appear to be two distinct traditions and it is even possible, as Wilamowitz suggests, to follow these to their source. There was at Athens a class of musicians called Evvelbai who traced their descent from Euneos the son of Hypsipyle cf. e, g. Hesych.
According to
this
;

^
.
.

Evvoos

45 ,
is

prefixed

:

h

6e

bvaiv
oijs

(y^virqaev

beiKvvvTcs
Trjs

//•,

^ ',

avTols
Trap'

Evbs

.

kariv

yivovs

preserver, properly so called,
;

y€Vos
bi,


ytvos

(stc)

'\//•7?]9.

apbo, irpos

tols

Upovpyias

Euneos to Athens, and would accordingly be likely to glorify him by giving him and his brother the credit of saving Hypsipyle. A clear reflection of this form of the legend is to be found in Euripides in Fr. 64. 98, where one of the sons (obviously Euneos) says that Orpheus had taught him the lyre. These considerations provide a clue, as Wilamowitz points out, to the tenour of the speech of Dionysus, whose appearance when the crisis was over would otherwise have remained rather unaccountable the god no doubt directed Euneos to go to Athens ^. It is quite in accordance with this inference to find from C. I. A. Hi. 274 that Dionysus Melpomenos was the object of the family cult of the Euneidae. The other and probably older legend, which represented Hypsipyle as owing her preservation to Amphiaraus, is likely to have been derived from Theban epic tradition. Euripides contrived to combine both versions of the story but what part he assigned to the sons between their arrival at the palace and their recog; ;

, . '^ ,5 ,
,
yivos

67]

;

Photius yevos

yivos

Attic legend therefore brought

nition is a problem which and 437-8, proposing in
(Kbibovai

still

awaits solution.

Hartung, Etirip. Rest.
Iv
rfj

ii.

pp. 431

Arist. Poet.

to read

conjectured

]]), thought that

in place of (Valckenaer had Euneos and Thoas were constituted Hypsi-

'}
c.

14

"EkXrj 6 vios

";

pyle's judges

and condemned her to death, a view supported, as he believed, by an amphora published by Gerhard in 1837, which represents Hypsipyle and Amphiaraus standing before Eurydice, with Euneos and Thoas on the side next Hypsipyle and the two chieftains Parthenopaeus and Capaneus next to Amphiaraus above the two former appears Dionysus, above the other pair Zeus and Nemea. But this evidence is of very doubtful value. In the passage
;

^ He went on to Lemnos afterwards, at any rate according to Homer 467 sqq., where he is represented as sending cargoes of Lemnian wine to the Greek army— a most appropriate gift from a descendant of Dionysus. Cf. Anth. Pal. iii. 10. 5-6 quoted above.

196533
from the Poetics
;

(though otherwise unknown) is retained by the best modern editors and it is now clear that would not really be suitable, for it was not the sons' recognition but the intervention of Amphiaraus that saved Hypsipyle the recognition came afterwards. As for the amphora, the artist's
;

;

852.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

}
it
; ;

29

object seems to have been to include the principal figures associated in the

legend rather than to depict a single scene of

at

any

rate

it

is

evident that

Hypsipyle, her two sons, Eurydice, Amphiaraus, Parthenopaeus, and Capaneus cannot all have been brought on the stage together by Euripides. There is
apparently no road this
papyrus.

way

;

and we have searched vainly

for a clue in the

One

or two mutilated passages indeed in the central group of fragments

may

significant being Frs. 34-5.
?]

which in Wilamowitz^s opinion implies that the speaker was unacquainted with her name. The only characters to whom such ignorance would be natural are Euneos and Thoas and perhaps the latter name is to in 1. 2 of the same fragment may be recognized in Fr. ^^. 7, while 7r]eAas be a reference to their encounter with Hypsipyle in the prologos. But these fragments are too ambiguous to carry much weight, and they hardly bring us any nearer to the answer to the question how the sons were brought into connexion with the main action. If, as we have supposed, Hypsipyle did not carry out her idea of flight, they cannot have assisted her in it although perhaps had befriended that she was thinking in it was of the travellers whom she 20-1. 15), What if I found some one to convey her question to the chorus (Frs.

?

be interpreted as remains of a scene in which the sons appear, the most There Hypsipyle is alluded to by the periphrasis

,

'

me

out of the country

?
'

Possibly there

is

a substratum of truth
culprit.

in

Hartung's
this

theory, and Eurydice in the absence of her husband turned to the two strangers
for advice or

support in her condemnation of the

we

think more likely

Or possibly— and —they may have gone to seek the assistance of Amphiaraus,

although the natural inference from his words in Fr. 60. 37-8 is that his This last suggestion would have the opportune arrival was spontaneous. further advantage of bringing the young men into contact with Amphiaraus, and Indeed it is difficult so give him an opportunity to discover their identity. he can have become aware of their presence at all to perceive how otherwise unless by a very remarkable display of his powers of divination. It will be convenient here to summarize briefly our conception of the

dramatic structure.

Speech of Hypsipyle, describing her history and present circumwhich she retires on some pretext into the palace. Arrival of Euneos and Thoas, who hold an explanatory conversation they then knock and Hypsipyle emerges with the child Archemorus. She inquires their business,
Prologos.
stances, after
;

30
and they
enter.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Hypsipyle
i. i-ii.

left

alone sings to the child.

11.

i-about 200.

Nauck

Fr. 75s, Fr.

14, Fr. 2,

Parodos of Chorus of
iv. 9.

Nemean women.

followed by lyrical response from Hypsipyle.
ist Epeisodion.

About

Strophe and antistrophe, each 11. 200-310. Fr. i. ii. 15converses with Hypsipyle and

Arrival of Amphiaraus,

who

persuades her to conduct him to a stream of water.

They go

out together.

About

11.

310-430.

Fr.

i. iv.

lo-v, Frs. 3-5,

Nauck

Fr. 753.

ist Stasimon. The chorus refer to the quarrel of Polynices and Tydeus at Argos, and their marriage with the daughters of Adrastus. About 11. 430-500.

Fr. 7-9.

2nd Epeisodion. Hypsipyle returns in great grief after the death of Archemorus. She laments his fate, and questioned by the chorus gives some Becoming calmer she considers plans of description of what had occurred. flight, but finally resolves to give herself up to Eurydice (?). About 11. 500-650.
Frs. 10-13,

Nauck

Fr. 754-5, Frs. 20-1.

2nd Stasimon.
3rd
death.

About

Epeisodion,

11. 650-700. Hypsipyle and Eurydice

;

Hypsipyle

is

condemned

to

About

11.

700-850.

Frs. 22-32,

Nauck

Frs. 758, 760.

About 11. 850-900. 4th Epeisodion. Euneos and Thoas take an uncertain part in the action. They were probably confronted with Eurydice, and perhaps subsequently induced either by an appeal from Hypsipyle or by natural generosity to go and seek assistance from Amphiaraus. About 11. 900-1080. Frs. '^'^S4th Stasimon. The chorus sing the praises of Dionysus and call on him for succour. About 11. 1080-1150. Frs. 57-9.
3rd Stasimon. 5th Epeisodion. Hypsipyle is led out to meet her doom. Arrival of Amphiaraus, who persuades Eurydice of Hypsipyle's real innocence. Exit Eurydice.

About

11.

1

150-1350.
11.

Fr. 60.

i-ii.

5th Stasimon.

About

1350-75.

Exodos. Amphiaraus brings about the recognition between Hypsipyle and Euneos and Thoas, and then leaves the mother and sons together. Dionysus, the ancestor of the family, appears ex machina, and sends Euneos to Athens. About 11. 1375-1720. Frs. 61-64, Nauck Frs. 756, 761, 762, Fr. ap. Lydus. With regard to the number of the actors, though the characters in the play are only six, they would require four to represent them if the papyrus is followed in the ascription of Fr. 64. 68-70 to the two sons of Hypsipyle whether they speak simultaneously or one after the other cf note ad loc. If the number is to be reduced to the ordinary three, one of the sons must be a mute.
;

852.
It is clear

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
is

31
(cf.

from internal evidence that Euneos

p. 28), while the

papyrus assigns Fr. i. i. 7 sqq. to Thoas but the former may in one scene, the latter in the other. have been the The Hypsipyle was one of the latest of Euripides' plays, being brought
;

-

the speaker in Fr. 64. loi

out not long before Aristophanes' Frogs, as stated
of that

by the

comedy row
:

oKiyov

hiha\QivT(iiv

KoKQiv^

'7]9
before.

'9,

scholiast

the Frogs was produced in 405 B. c, Euripides having died the year This statement of date is borne out by indications traceable in the character of the lyrical odes (cf. notes on Fr. i. ii. 15 sqq.), as well as by the

,
on
1.

^^t

repeated parodies of the Hypsipyle in the Frogs (cf e.g. notes on Fr.
Fr.
7.

i.

ii.

8-10,

4),

which are more natural

if

the play be supposed to be fresh in the

memory
in the

of Aristophanes' audience.

From

the conjunction of the three names

above-mentioned note of the scholiast it has been inferred by some critics, e. g. Hartung and Meineke, that the Hypsipyle, Phoenissae, and Antiope belonged The remark that they to the same tetralogy; but this is quite uncertain. were fine tragedies probably reflects the popular verdict, which in the case of the Hypsipyle has been endorsed, on the strength of the scanty evidence before them, by modern critics ' drama eximiiim', Valckenaer, Diatr. p. 211, fabula
'

'

:

^

vcmistissima reriim varietate distinctal Hartung,

op. cit.

ii.

p.

411.

We

now

know

that there was not quite so

much

the remains happily brought to light at
epithet
'

Hartung imagined, but Oxyrhynchus sufficiently justify his
varietas as

none of the new fragments reveals Euripides in his sublimest poetic flights, they maintain a high level of excellence, and need not fear comparison with much of his extant work while the fact that the dramatization of this part of the Hypsipyle legend appears to be essentially a Euripidean creation renders the recovery of at any rate the bulk of his plot, with upwards of 300 verses either complete or capable of suitable restoration,
veitusta
'.

If

;

a matter of especial satisfaction.

we have placed them so far what we conceive to have been their original order. The small group, which, as already explained (p. 20), was found separately, and both from the stichometrical numeration and internal evidence appears to represent the
In arranging the fragments of the papyrus
as possible in

the other central portion of the play, has been kept together (Frs. 6-17, 20-56) their position, minor fragments, the contents of which give no sufficient clue to
;

Finally on pp. 80-83 we print the previously known citations from the play, and attempt to assign them their place among the
are placed at the end.

fragments of the papyrus.

32
Fr.
I.

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105
106
(a)

6[.
^[•

7[.]€[.][.]_
•][•'
[

]8^
J\iT

106(b)

-]']i^^[•
'

-^

[

>8[.

[

no

.

[

€/[

]
]€8 ]
.
:±_
.]

Fr. 64.
31 lines lost.

Col.

«
?[

Slow

[

45
[

155

«[
[

150

Fr. 63.
](5i;roi[

Fr. 66.

Fr. 67.

[
5

]€/70

.

[

]^;'

.

]•/»'[

'\[

[

]</€[

]i''oiaero[

\8.8\^

]€[

]0

852.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
*
is

73

\\
(.)
05
St

^pecuy
Se

^^, )('

{.)

( .)
(^.) 07 C^fO

? []€ ? [] [][]
c/i[oA]er'
[

^
;
;

1025

().

F4•
[

•>^<^^

(.)

[
[
.

]?
[][]
]e

ye

^.
1630

[

]

.

]vTos

Fr. 64.

Col.

iii.

31 lines lost.

4
1665
145

A

6{9).
155

o[

[

4
[

4

i675

^

4
[

1670

150

[

[ 4

Fr. 6S.

Fr. 66.

Fr. 67.
]
.

][
elno[
]

?

e/ia[y

iv

.

[

]rov

[>'?»'[

€]
]i/'

[
.

[

lots

€(:[

(?)

]

]
i/c[
]

5

]ro0

)(

Ae[y

74

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

]0[
vo\_

]/«[1[]]€•/[

'\[
]l
.

.

Fr. 68
.

852.
]ai
[

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

75

]

Xey[

e]aTiu

[ ^ ]
].
.[

'[

[

Fr. 68

'.

.

.

.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Fr. 74.
.
.

.

Fr. 75

]}^{

][
]
.
.

]{

Fr. 76.

.

.

][
^f"

8[ ]€{
5
1.

\{

[

][

ji/ex6i

5

]€€

*

]•[

Fr. 77
]

Fr. 78

]•[
\^

5

€ ]
]
.

]
]

]8[
5
\7^'-?[
]

]

Fr. 79•

Fr. 80.

Fr. 81.

Fr. 83.

][.][

852.
Fr. 74.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
Fr. TS'

77

'\

'^
]

[
ft[

Fr. 76.

][

yvva^L

]; ;[
]70€[
]

]..[

[

][
.

]

]€[

y €«
5

]•

]

]•[

Fr. 77•

Fr. 78.

]

]€9
5

]

]

14

Fr.

78
Fr. 86.
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Fr. 87.

Fr. 88.

.

]yvx

'

[

]•.
I

]_^[[]]';^[

Fr. 89.

.

Fr. 90•

Fr. 91.

.

Fr. 92•

]
]
i
.

]4
]77•0/[)€1/[
]
.

]![
]/caTainra[

5

]?
'\iVOV

]

]

Fr. 93.

Fr. 94.

]/[
]'[
]€[

Fr. 97.

.

Fr. 98.
1^

.

[ 4

852.
Fr. 86
.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
Fr. 87.
.
.

79
.

.

Fr. 88.

.

.

.

>
]eii

\[
I'^^x

[

]

]

Fr. 89.

.

]oy

8
Fr. 105.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Fr. 106.
.

Fr.

;.

.

.

Fr. 108.

.

][
Fr.
109.
.

"[
Fr.

]

[

][
Fr. III.
.

]ape

no.
]oi;re[

Fr. 112.

.

]€[
Fr. 113.
]8gv[
]'
[

"[
Fr. II
Fr. 116.

.

[

Fr. 114.

.

][
]
[ 1
[

]|[
]
.
.

/

]

[

.

[

We append here the previously known fragments of the Hypsipyle those of Nauck's Fragmettta Tragicorum, 1889.
752. Aristoph. Frogs 121 1-3 and Schol.

,^
?
kv

;

the

numbers are

ad loc:

The
753.

first

three hnes of the play, spoken by Hypsipyle, or, less probably, one of her
p. 23.

sons; cf introd.

Didymus

in

Macrob. Sat

,
Mor.
p.

5.

18. 12

:

Apyeioiaiv

!4>(€'
The
line is to

Hypsipyle accedes to Amphiaraus' request to show him a spring. placed between Fr. i. v. 35 and Fr. 6.
.

be

754. Plut.

93

D = p.

661 F:

erepop

('

^^
?.
93)

.

.

93>

)fvos

.

66 .

3•

emv

. 66.

This fragment, spoken by Hypsipyle and referring to Archemorus, probably belongs to the lyrical portion of the scene between her and the chorus immediately after the accident

852.
Fr. 105.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
. .

8l
Fr. 108.
. .

][
]
.

...
€7[

Fr. 106.

Fr. 107.

.

.

]

>.[
]7[

]l[

]/fOiy

Yp^

Fr. 109.

.

.

.

Fr.

no.

.

.

.

Fr.

in.

.

.

Fr. 112.

]€[
Fr. IT3.
.
.

][
Fr. 114.
. . .

]lv{

]
.

.

.

.

[

Fr. 115.

.

.

Fr. 116.

.

.

.

][
]

].
]

[
[ [

]

6[
]
]

].

[

[

]

[

]

[

]S-< ]•••[

see introd. p. 25, and note on Fr. 10, in the neighbourhood of Cf. Statius, Tke6. iv. 786 sqq. at puer in gremio vernae, Sec.

755. Aristoph. Frogs 1328 and Schol.
avh. TO

it (cf. Phoen. loio usually supposed to refer to the lair of the and if SO is to be connected with No. 754 and Frs. 10 sqq. however, is a very strange epithet of Svrpov. There is another reading aarpov, which has been taken to mean the sun or the moon ; but this is also unsatisfactory.

(\ , ),
This
is

^
ad
loc.
:

which

it

is

to

be placed.

«-

756. Aristoph. Frogs 1322 and Schol. 1320:

7€'
Spoken by Hypsipyle and probably from and her sons (Fr. 64. i), rather than addressed to
of the play.
757.

aXevas
the

scene of recognition between her

the child

Archemorus

in the early part

=

Fr. 60. 89-96.

758. Stob. Flor. 10. 26

9
:

TO

9

€€
;

Fr. 60. 35-6.

Probably to be attributed to Eurydice, who is accusing Hypsipyle of corruption The line will then come from the vicinity of Frs. 22-32.

cf.

759.

= Fr.

60.

1 1

4-1 8.

82

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
760. Stob. Flor. 20. 31 and 20. 12
:

€^
The
cf.

?

af^/o

€9

speaker here

Fr. 22. 3 Koi No. 758 and Frs.

' 6[
no.

is

in all probability Hypsipylej deprecating the anger of Eurydice ; Hencc this line is likely to come from the same scene as
. .
.

22-32.
16: ovSiu,

761. Stob. F/or.

after

Presumably spoken either by Amphiaraus to Hypsipyle or by Hypsipyle herself her unexpected deliverance, and to be placed somewhere between Fr. 60. 117
Fr.

and

64.

ii.

762. Eust.

ii.

p. 959.

(
43

and Hartung following Zirndorfer to by which the recognition of Euneos and Thoas supposing a reference to some secret which was effected. Wilamowitz would retain was to be preserved by silence ; but the context cannot be recovered.
Valckenaer wished to emend supposes that the reference is to the
763. Aristoph. Frogs 64 and Schol. adloc:
ri
;

( (, ,

^
'
first

The
remark
TO

Avords give
be

no

indication of their context.

Bothe supposed that the
half of the line, ap

scholiast's

,.

eo-r»

referred to the

764. Galenus,

vol. 18, i p.

519:

8,
1.

irpos

('
MSS.,
, . .

kv

? €) 6{)
Musgrave.
2.

Hermann,
p. 2 1

MSS.,

(V

Valckenaer, Diatr.
or afTOs),

4 (the passage being quoted in connexion with

Nauck.
is

The
i.

reference in these lines
their

obscure

Euneos and Thoas on
1-3, note.

arrival

possibly they occurred in the conversation of outside the palace; cf. introd. p. 23, and Fr. i.
;

765. Aristoph. Frogs 1320 and Schol. ad

loc.

Upov

RV,
in the

Other MSS.,

TzetzeS.

referred to This is connected by Welcker {Gr. Trag. ii. p. 559) with the xpvor\ Scholium on Anth. Pal. iii. 10 (introd. p. 28) as the symbol by which Euneos and Thoas established their identity. But the words might well come from a choral ode such as those to which Frs^ 7 and 57-9 belong; ef. also Fr. 64. in.

853.
766. Hesychius
i, p.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

320:

Hesych. gives as synonyms would be a Hkely place for the word
767. Harpocration,
s. v.

Harp, says on

Hdt. vi. 138 Brauronia, who was associated with Lemnian legend through the story told by Athenian women from Brauron. At what point an allusion to them came of the rape of the Hypsipyle is quite obscure.
768.

\

^9 , 85 ], ]. (€
An
ode such as
to occur.
:

8 ,.
so-called
p.

83

that in Frs.

57-9

be ai

These

were

devoted to the cult of Artemis

m

= Fr. = Fr.

I. iv.

15?
7

769. Cf. Fr. 770.

I.

ii.

and

introd. p. 24.

I.

ii.

13?

862. (fab.

inc.)

Bekker, Anecd.

Cf. Fr. 60.

71-2, note.
iv.

Lydus, de mensihus

7. p.

€1

8'

drawn by Wilamowitz to this citation, which is given with the name The two last lines appear in the form d and «'' oi in Floril. Monac. io8 (cf. Schol. Lucian p. 171), oihiv ioTiv would read eeu>v for ^.oG in 1. 3. The hues are W-M so stand in Nauck, Fr. adesp. 169 after Fr. 60. likely to have occurred towards the end of the play,

? ,, ' , .
362
:

72, ed.

Wunsch

)(

\ €, 8\
ov8€v

deovs-

Set

attention was of the poet and play.

Our

^

f,

;

Was it you, Hypsipyle. '... toys to soothe thy mind from lamentation. happy woman your mother, whoe er she Was. young sirs, who knocked at the gates ? Oh What do ye come seeking from these halls ^ .r -ui r cf if it be possible for us to rest desire to be taken within the house, woman, Thoas. should we be any trouble to wherein all we need
Fr
1
i

2-1

1.

We

here a single night. We have with us Thy duties will be undisturbed. these halls ? Hyps. It chances that the house is left without a
:

man

to rule

it

.

.

.

which had been crying, before addressing i-q. Hypsipyle is apparently quieting the child, In 1. 3 some alarm. possibly their appearance was the cause of the child's the strangers)

G

a

84
alteration of

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

which W(ilamowitz)-M(9llendorfF) suggests, seems almost necessary, and The remains of the two preceding verses would be easier than a simple remedy ; give little clue to their sense ; at the end of 1. i the letter before on had a curved base, and may be e, , , or v. ypa[ suggests Nauck Fr. 764. 2 ypanrovs (t iv TV7T0VS, but the difference of termination seems to preclude any identification with that verse In is too bold. was written for ae]roir could not be read, and to suppose that or may be 1. 2 the doubtful and vfavia[i are wrongly placed. 4. The accents of of Jason and Hypsipyle according also 7. Boas: this was the name of the second son to Schol. Find. Nem. Argum.^, Myth. Vai. i. 133, 2. 141, Anth. Pal. iii. 10, and Statins, Theb. vi. 342; Apollod. i. 9. 17 calls him Nebrophonus, Hyginus, c. 17, Deipylus.
is

, .

€) \({)

«

.

is due to Murray. (Murray) suits the scanty traces sufficiently well, and than another passive infinitive such as after the preceding in Soph. 33.
[e']i{TOf

8.

^^/ (\]
The

.
2. I.

\

^.
is

more euphonious
evavXiCeiv

occurs

g.

reading of the latter half of the line
;

satisfactory,

and

<

is

doubtful,

after Set is only fairly

scribe's spacing

[
and two

II.

[8(] [
is

but the might well be substituted [re] hardly fills the lacuna after irregular, and e especially sometimes occupies a good deal of room. ]<[]$• (Bury) suits the papyrus decidedly better than

o]Ik[o\s

(W-M).

[]

,

preceding fragment is evidently very slight, It is indeed just possible that the i. i. 11. lines should be combined into one, reading [a8]eanoros ..., but the vestiges in The purport of the passage clearly Fr. 2. I though scanty are not in favour of . is that Lycurgus the king was away (cf. introd. p. 23), and that in his absence the queen Eurydice was at the head of affairs. 4 sqq. The remains of these verses suggest that the sense of Thoas's remark was ' Then we cannot find quarters here but must seek them elsewhere ? to which Hypsipyle replied, By no means; strangers are always made welcome here.' LI. 4-5 may accordingly

Pr.

Fr. 2. i

The gap between this and the may well be the next line to Fr.

'

be restored
;

'

e. g.

8'

cf.

for the latter line Here.

(\ ' , '
ev

F. 1286

and, for the reply of Hypsipyle in

& .
ap
eV

'

\\ 8

,

'
11.

6-9, Ale. 566-7

,

]\\ 8
Ale.

1040

el

'

The 1-14• Hypsipyle is singing to the child Archemorus; cf. introd. p. 23. Fr. 1. metrical identity between 11. 9-14 here and 11. 11-7 in Col. iii, makes natural the supposition that the preceding verses of these two sets of lyrics were in strophic correspondence, though points as they stand in the papyrus they do not at first sight appear to be so. But, as

.

out to us, a sufficient correspondence can be obtained in 11. 5-8 with very slight manipulation, Between 11. 8 and 9 the verses being glyconics, in which a free responsion is permissible. is marked by the marginal the loss of a verse, answering to iii. 10 in iii. 6, and in the following for {)•, cf. note on 11. 8-10. By Avriting the and transposing the first syllable of in verse omitting the following correspondence is obtained

}

,
v^«^ v^v^

W-M

,

:

"• 5•

[-

-]

'^^j
^^^^

[--]

- (3rd - (3rd —

glyc.)

=

iii.

6.

kj

-

«^


v-<

glyc.)

^^

-

(2nd glyc.) (2nd glyc.)

^^
\j
'u\.j\j

(pherecr.)

—^—

\j\j

'u'u

(3rd glyc.)

wv.^v-< wi^v^»-»

\j

(pherecr.) (2nd glyc.)

852.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

85

it is hazardous to attempt to extend this process to the but it seems Hkely that in Col. iii. 3-5 the scribe's division is at fault, and that the glyconic-pherecralic measure should be restored by writing [^]€/>?5 in ya\avei\as Similarly in Col. ii. 4 the second syllable of aliyav very likely belongs to the following verse ; in 1. 3 there seems to be a more serious dislocation or

Owing

to the imperfect text
;

preceding lines

.

6\

corruption.
3. 4.

\€]:

Perhaps

\,
cf.

/.

but the vestiges are too slight to give any confirmation. A. 1054 but this Is Only one of several ;

possibilities.

this rattle's sound! (. . .) No Lemnian strain as solace for the pressed within the web, Muse, is this which I have to utter, but whatever befits a young child, for his slumber or amusement or meet tending, of this I make my song ' (i. e. I sing for the benefit of my nursling, not to beguile labour at the loom).

8-14. Ifyps. 'Lo

shuttle or for the

comb

8-10. For
introd.
p.

cf.

Aristophanes, Frogs 1305-6, and the other references given in
at

24.

to be a parody on 11. 9-1 1, and here strongly supports in the Aristophanes passage where the Ravennas alone has the reading preferred by recent editors. written in a probably different hand at the end of 1. 8, and the critical signs in front of 11. 8-9 refer to an insertion in the lost upper margin supplying a textual omission which is also indicated by the metre cf. note on 11. 1-14. Cf. also Fr. 64. 57, where occurs in a similar position, and 223, 125, 700. 27. II. for /xeXet, but, as Mr. E. C. Marchant observes, this is suggests unnecessary if be taken as a vocative. Xeyeiv has been altered (perhaps by the first hand) to Murray remarks that these has replaced cf. 1. 26, where variations recall the double readings which are found in the Laurentian MS. in several of Euripides' plays, the Ion, I. ., I. T., and Rhesus, and which perhaps descended from the edition of Aristophanes of Byzantium; cf. Wilamowitz, Heracles, I. pp. 147 sqq., 214 sq. perhaps this is the passage referred to in Bekker, Antiatt. p. 109. 15 (= Nauck 13.
/ieXiVoy

{),

,

Frogs 13 13— 6

was perhaps intended

!

eUifitiXiaatTf

;

()

;
W-M

.

/:

'Yy^nrvXi]. Fr. 77®) vfapos' veos' 14. TUSe: this construction ad sensum of a plural substantive with a singular relative good parallel to the having a collective sense is common from Homer downwards.

present passage
e^eiv,

is

Soph. Ant. 707

yap
Kevot.

,

A

,

aWos,

15-37. Chorus. 'Why art thou, dear one, at the vestibule? Art thou sweeping the palace-entrance or sprinkling water-drops upon the ground in servile wise, or art thou hymning the fifty-oared Argo which is ever on thy lips or the sacred fleece of gold guarded upon oaken branches by a dragon's eye ? Are thy thoughts with sea-girt Lemnos, echoing to the rolling billows of the Aegean, now, when hither up Nemea's meads in brazen panoply fleet Adrastus having passed the plain of Argos is bringing swift war against the He has summoned the might (of Hellas) wiih lyre-built wall, the work of Amphion's hand ? .' divers scutcheons and gilded bows
.
.

15 sqq. As with the lyrics of Hypsipyle (cf. note on ii. 1-14), so too in the two choral iii. 18 sqq., the metre odes, strophic responsion was naturally observed, and ii. 15 sqq. being as before to a large extent glyconic, and the correspondence of a free character. greater licence in the use of the polyschematic glyconic verse, as was remarked by G. Hermann, Flem. dodr. vieir., is a characteristic of Euripides' later period. Hypsipyle's

=

A

86
third song, of

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

general scheme thus
17.
18.
:

re: so again Fr. 64. 77 cf. Homer, 73, Hdt. ii. 175. 19 sqq. Cf. Statius, Thed. v. 615-6 quoiiens tibi Lemnon et Argo sueta loqui
;

.
Sepas. p.

which the conclusion remains
is

at the top of Col. iv, served as

an epode
\vnpau

;

the

a

a

y.

cf.

e.g. J/ec.

363—4
is

aalpeiv re

^
;

€€
i.

The

accent

erroneous

cf.

4, note.

somnum
Hdt.

€€
21.
Cf. Apollod.
2 2.

suadere querela.

7€6!
i.
.

is

9.
.

28.

required by the metre. 29. 8(' oT (Murray) seems preferable to hevpo ('), bringing out more clearly the connexion of thought ; Are you still harping,' the chorus asks, * on the old themes when events of such importance are passing at our doors ? comma-like mark just below the a of seems to be meaningless. is represented only by the second 30. anayei is not a quite satisfactory reading. The of the two uprights, which is drawn so long as to be more like with a space for an or intervening letter after the a ; there would also be room for a narrow letter between y and et.

Hephaest.

!

,

.
16
cf.
'

the usual Attic spelling; -fpos was an Ionic form, and appears in KareaKevaae (^SC. Argus)

:

£.

724~5
is

though unattested

quite a possible word, but
is

74 Gaisf.

!: )
.
. . '

et

longa

and Apollod.

i.

9•

6
ap.

(Simmias

\((

A

But we can find no suitable alternative to airayu, and a of just this shape occurs in the next column in 1. 20 in 1. 21. The verse can be easily reduced to cf. also a third glyconic and brought into harmony with the remains of iii. 15 by reading for Murray suggests []' ayei, with e. g. after Ne/xf^o" in 1. 29 (cf. Or. 181 TjyayeT') and in 1. 3 1 instead of na[pfts. But something of the base of a would be expected to be visible between a and p, and a mixture of dochmiacs (-ou ...) with glyconics does not seem very probable in a choral ode. (W-M) suits the sense, and to a sufficient extent also the metre, though the 31. corresponding line (iii. 34) is catalectic. Part of the tail of the p would indeed be expected
in the make .that letter very long (cf. e. g. next line), and it is not quite clear how far the accent on e of epvpa extends, i. e. the upper extremity of it might belong to a of the line above. 32-3. The wall raised by the lyre of Amphion is of course Thebes. Qi.Phoen. 823-4

; .
\\^
Tt'\.\ta

to be visible, but the scribe does not always

^oppiyyi re

Tag
{

Anth. Pal. V. 223, ix. 371) is due to W-M. It is The occurs in the corresponding verse of the antistrophe (1. 37). supplement at the end of the line aims at reproducing the metre of iii. 37, but is of course highly conjectural ; for npoarjye, /. A. 283-4 cf. Phoen. 11 23-4 ' is Very doubtfully read, but his name can hardly be spared in this line, and the initial is fairly certain. 35. eKoKtae pevc^s, as Wilamowitz suggests, is more apposite than KoXeaoptvi^s since the army was already on the march, and it would be more natural to describe the result than the process of Adrastus' preparations. The scanty vestiges between and are consistent with either or e, though an e must have been written rather small. 36. Apparently being afterwards crossed through, was originally written, the but not the e possibly, however, the second letter is a deleted or y, and the cross-bar of the supposed e represents the stroke of deletion. Above the line is an a, and
34. noticeable that
cf.

=

8:
. .

re Xvpas

.

\(

"
;

(. [][]?

."

"

,

{)

I.

would be a natural word A. 275

.

in this context;

cf.

PL

455-6

iv
(cf.

TOiabe

W-M,

however, WOUld prefer

Atldr.

852.

617

followed the

and it is indeed possible that an overwritten rubbed here. re is in accordance with the rules of ancient grammarians 37. The accentuation of /xe and note ad loc. 1 of Fr 64. ii. I, 841. V. 44 where it is the only other instance of this word is Anth. Pal. xv. 27, 38. 476, &c. in^he sense of having only one foot. Cf. applied to

\\
iii

^
reixn
a,
:

'

iv

for the

papyrus

. ),
is
.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

87

:

(, .
On
.

speeding over the waves in the calm to make fast the cables, 3-17. Bj'ps. '. mast amidships Orpheus him whom the river-maiden Aegina bore, even Peleus and by the measure for the rowers ot Thracian lyre of Asia sounded a dirge of invocation, playing a This, this my soul blade of pine. the long-shafted oars, now a swift stroke, now easying the
. ;

longs to celebrate

let

others

hymn

the toils of the Danai.'
is

3-5. In its present condition this metre cf. note on ii. 1-14.

j r f ^„ note on are changes made on metrical grounds; ct. and 6-7. cf. Apollod. 1. 9. 16; but 1-14. Peleus is introduced here as one of the Argonauts; ii and grandson, not son, ot according to the usual mythology he was the son of Aeacus, The river of course is Asopus. Aegina. OeagrtustUicaccltnis 8-10. Cf. Statins, TM. v. 342 sqq. vox media de puppe venit 1 ne Tk^yov is a certain emendation oi W-M. malo mediis iyitersonat Orpheus remigiis. possibly first written is doubtful termination has been altered in the papyrus, but what was as The combination of Aa.as and actually ^\eyov, with a very small o. it was the frequency of the conjunction epithets of Kt^opts is harsh but excusable on account of Orpheus is enumerated among the 'Asian lyre'; cf. Fr. 64. loi, Cyclops 443> &c. musical art to later mythographers his Argonauts by Pindar, Pyih. iv. 315, and according

^

an obscure passage.

the question of the

\\^

,

'

'

.

.

.

.

,
;

had much
°^

to

do with the success of the expedition.

Cf. Fr. 64. 98.

analogy of the Homeric iv very attractive (ihough that word too lacks classical support) is, however, is a synonym for oars. Timolheus, Persae 10 1-2, where opeiovs

^
II-2
cf.

"'II sqq.

We

rearrange
is

the

division

of the

verses

so

as

to

correspond

j

/ to

.u

that

.

not found elsewhere, but

^^. ...

may

?
6

Cf

/. 7:

II25 sqq.

ff

ibuv ineptness of IMv and the parallelism of

W-M:
ii.

Alexandrian poets but the the earliest examples of this verb are in

8

523, r 205.

perhaps be defended here on the s suggestion to read

W-M

^

oipdov

.
;
,

ct. e.

g.

.

,.

make

the correction practically certain

here;

also

19-21.
'

men have I heard the tale how of old the Tyrian journeyed on the waves to Europa left the city and Phoenician home of her fathers, ^"^ dien yet to a threefold birth of chi sacred Crete, nurse of Zeus and home of the Curetes And another maiden, I hear queenl) lo the land. she left sovranty and happy sway over
18-32. Chorus.

From

wise

maid

;

her fatherland to take the horns of a of Argos! When the god calls this to thy mind
.'
.

qSd

cow and

suffer a gadfly s torment.

.

18 sqq. On the sequence of thought cf. introd. p. 24. ^,,^ muc^ Tvptay 21-2 Cf. Creies, Nauck Fr. 472 hardly be nght, but a less followed by reKvov can and r^. following Bothe omits here. cf. to drastic remedy would be to emend and the alternative readings 22. TheVe does not seem much to choose between in Eunpides, happen to occur with a direct accusative elsewhere does not ..', but

^

,

^..
;

«.

.

«.
^

88

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Whether
21.
Atoyepiropeg epavkoi.

and the idea of departure is sufficiently expressed by added by the first or second hand is doubtful; cf. introd, p. re 23—4. Cf. Bacch. 120—2 Za
collocation
.

.

the interlinear

e

was

.

.

is

a

little

inelegant, but probably

sound

;

is

a

The new

compound.
i. e. Minos, Rhadamanthys, and Sarpedon; 26. rpia-aois cf. Hesiod, Fr. 39 (Schol. //. 292), Apollod. iii. i. i, &c. 27. Both a circumflex and an acute accent have been placed above the the ; former of course is erroneous.
:

the hiatus, but is both a less natural term (cf. Kevrpois ... and less suited to the size of lacuna. The following word as originally written was a vox nihili ; the first of the two deleted letters seems to be rather than a. the supplement is rather longer than would be expected on the analogy 30. \nar^pas of the verses above, but the scribe tends to make the point of commencement of the lines advance slightly towards the left as the column proceeds; cf. 1. 31 where is
29.

[]: [€] would remove
:

however, Aesch. Prom, 596 sqq.

^.

)

32 sqq. In this passage the chorus is with little doubt seeking to offer consolation and encouragement to Hypsipyle, and Wilamowitz suggests that 11. 32-7 may have run somewhat ' [raCy ap Beos els as follows [ervKetjs '1 [ert TOP Trjare/wi jrojr t\ei Cf. Soph. las C. 3^5~^ Bfoiis nore. ^!/, This restoration, which is made only exempli gratia, brilliantly satisfies the requirements of sense and metre, but in the last verse can only with difficulty be reconciled with the papyrus, where the lacuna at the beginning of 11. 35-7 is practically of the same size ; one letter more than in 1. 35 might be conceded in 1. 37 on account of the slope of the column,
:

(,
. . .

appropriate, especially so soon after 1. 27. a word common in Homer and also used by Pindar, is not found elsewhere in tragedy, but that is not a sufficient reason for questioning its genuineness here. (Murray) seems guaranteed by the parallel of Phoen. 248 rar 31.
practically certain.

,

[{]

[x«]pay

is less

[(]
'lovs,

though is not the column was kept straight;

Certain,
cf.

and two

letters

the preceding note.

would be enough for the lacuna if Aeschylus, Prom. 588, calls lo tSs

|

,

|

'

|

'

|

, \>

,
'

\\(\ /^] €
|

€.
[

but hardly three more. In 1. 33 also though just possible is unsatisfactory, since «[t] would not normally fill up the space; moreover a future would be more apposite than a present tense. The letters are quite doubtful ; the may well be ^ or and the possibly or might be read were it not for the difficulty of the apparent vestige of an accent above the place where the y would come ; the accent might, however, belong to the preceding letter. Perhaps is the apodosis of the sentence, and we should read
:

[^[]

]/;

[^%,

This would well Satisfy all the Conditions except that [/cafjis a short supplement for the beginning of 1. 33 ; a^i] would not be open to the objection brought above against «[il The supposed acute accent cannot be a mark of elision or length. In 11. 36-7 it is evident that the scribe's division of the verses was not the
\

, , ['
ii.

'

]

,..

(?)]

same

as in

33-4.
fits

38. yfvea

in with the context as explained in the

preceding note; the god will not

forget his descendant.
iv.

2-9. I/yps.

'
.

.

.

slew.

Death
lyre
?

is

the

meet end of these

of

the

with

tearful

sang a lament for Procris the huntress whom her husband my woes. What wailing, what song, what music lament, though Calliope inspired it, could come up to my

suffering

852.
2.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
who was
iii.

89

The
is

insidious corruption in this line

,
3•

Procris, daughter of Erechtheus,

accidentally killed

Cephalus

€.
This
.

thus told by Apollod.
KpiOeis iv

1 5.

I

ev

\]

btaKKayeiaa

has been inserted by the original scribe ; cf. ii. 8, note. 5. In view of the imperfect context we have left this verse as it stands in the papyrus, * Spa. may be right. though the transposition suggested by * epa n's ... should be read. Or possibly e\axe (sc. Procris)•
line at first omitted

.
895-9
''''^

was detected by Murray.

^(
""
'*^''

The legend of when hunting by her husband
eVl

'
lines

(')
(/)

W-M

'

6.

For the form of
.
.

this verse cf.
;,

/. T.

Phoen. 1498— 150 1
S)

but either of these would involve some alteration in the following line; cf. the next note. oi was Originally written, and then altered to being 7. added in the margin as a variant. The p[ following is presumably the initial letter of -, which could not be conin some form, and possibly was substituted for however, would neither scan nor structed with the variant (?) for construe with any of these readings. without a possessive or similar adjective is obscure, but perhaps admissible in 9. thinks that in 1. 5. in 1. 7 conceals consequence of the proximity of e^a an original but if so the corruption has gone very deep. The chorus now catches sight of the approaching strangers, whose advance is signalized by the usual anapaests, 11. 10-4.
suggests, than

,

[

'"'"
;

The marginal

86 \^
and

''"^ "" V ^«^s
eVt

for the substance of this

and the following
S)

as a variant for

, , (^,
is

perhaps more probably

, ^,

(,

(
as

W-M

,

(\

W-M

' Zeus, Lord of our Nemea's grove, what is the quest of these the Dorian fashion of their dress, whom I see approaching hard by, on their way towards these halls through the lonely grove ? Amphiaraus. distasteful to a man is travel, and the sight of fields deserted or with

iv.

10-42. Chor.

strangers,

marked by

How

is overtaken by some need, unbefriended, with none to which way to turn. E'en upon me has this strait come, but And thee, strange woman, with joy I saw yon house in the mead of Zeus in Nemea's land. whether thou art a slave who watchest over the house, or no servile person, thee will I ask, what man is called the lord of this mansion where the sheep are tended in the land of Phlius ? Hyps. Lycurgus call men the master- of these rich halls, who was chosen from out all Asopia to be the warden of Zeus, the country's god. Amph. I desire to take some running water in our pitchers as a libation to the gods For streams of stagnant water are impure, and they have all offered by us on our journey. been defiled by the army's throng. Byps. Who are ye, and from what land do ye come ? Amph. We are from Mycenae and of Argive race, and on crossing the border into another land we wish to off"er sacrifice for the Danaid army ; for we have set forth against if haply the gods may speed us prospering on our way, woman. the gates of Cadmus Hyps. Why are ye marching, if I may learn this of thee ? Amph. We would restore Polynices, an exile from his fatherland. Hyps. And who art thou who seekest to take the troubles of others Amph. I am the seer Amphiaraus, son of Oecles.'

lonely habitations

when a wayfarer

interpret his want, in doubt

.?

66

.'
II.

:

this

abnormal accent was preferred by some grammarians;

cf.

Fr. 64.

go
12.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
For

TtiKarav. The scribe apparently began 1 1 64 evvoia of &c. ; but the $piritus lenis (due Pap., following the analogy of 13. &c. probably to the following &) is usual in is due to W-M, is quoted from the to 15. The correction of followed by aypovs Hypsipyle in Bekker, Antiatt. p. 93. 26 (Nauck Fr. 768), and
cf.

to write a

:.
1,

Soph. Phil.

in place of the first

. , ^
%,
and the
t
.
. .

in

1 7

produces an awkward tautology.

i8.

was

originally written,

written through the

mark of

elision, the correction

was subsequently converted into and being probably by a different hand an
;

is intolerable, acute accent seems to have been erased over the first o. and some other adjective must be substituted. It also seems likely that the nominative case in this and the next word has been replaced by the accusative, though the latter need not as Murray remarks, would be closer to the text of the papyrus than be wrong, This passage supports Wakefield's cf. Jlec. 8 II in Ion 255. correction is not otherwise attested. 24. The compound is a simple correction oi evpeOeii, which is not a natural word here. 27.

!•,

28.

29-30.

),
31

by and it 754 sqq.
.

instead of and o[8iov] were suggested by Murray, [;][//^' 0. C. 477 is idiomatic (cf. e.g. Soph. The middle by W-M. perhaps the scribe was influenced is indefensible with [x]e'pw/3a whereas Statins describes the country as suffering from a drought, in the previous verse. was water for drink not a libation that Hypsipyle was begged to indicate cf. Thed. iv.
; ;

' ^?
[

€(^^(

,'

.

'priest', as in

T'.

131 Saias

\}8.

was an easy error with

at the

beginning of the next verse.

35. [5]pia
37. vestiges

W-M.
suit

are extremely doubtful ; the appears likely here, but the supposed A combination with Fr. 92, though the papyrus or | better than p. is very similar in appearance, does not seem practicable. in the margin at the end of this line is no doubt a variant like those in Col. iv, 38. and we therefore infer that the verse began with et and some other particle than ^, e. g. renders the general sense sufficiently clear, This opening combined with nms or and the line may be completed in various ways, of which we print an illustration. To suppose that €8[ is the commencement of a line originally omitted and subsequently supplied is inadmissible, for the margin between the columns is not nearly broad enough to contain a verse in a single line, while if the verse were divided into several lines, something of these should be visible below 39. The restoration of the first half of the verse is the suggestion of Bury; but it is quite likely that the letters should be divided ]?

would

.

€]

41.
suitable.

by

,
^v

position of Fr. 3, containing the beginnings of 11. 41-4, is practically assured the appearance of the papyrus and the appropriateness of its contents. 42. Both here and in Fr. 60. 15 the papyrus has the Homeric and Pindaric form

\
The
:

.

[5

W—.

&

[^^"(f)»

[^ [
.
. .

;

WOUld

also

be

In Suppl. 925, the but is preferred by editors of Aeschylus and Euripides. only other passage is Eurip. where the name occurs, LP read cf. e. g. Ion 260-^3 (Kp.) 43. Hypsipyle evidently knew Amphiaraus by name

', * ^! [ [? . The
fK

, \!
...

*

.
;

?.

("•) ^

44•

or

4.

precise position of this fragment

is

uncertain, but there are

two reasons

for

852.
placing
his
it

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
11.

91
after telling

above rather than below

i-ii of Col.

:

(i)

Amphiaraus

Hypsipyle

name would naturally proceed to ask hers before making any further disclosures, dark fibre in especially when he found that his name was familiar to her (cf. 1. 43, note), (2) a
the papyrus in front of the lines

but disappears lower in the column.
horizontal

a loss of
2.

at least

and the number 15 lines between

noticeable in Fr. 4 and also in the upper part of Col. y, is Since the break along the top of Cols, iv and of lines in a column here is about 60 (cf. introd. p. 20), there is
is
iv.

44 and

v. i.

•. or 17 or ^? 3-4, We print a restoration suggested by Bury represented in various other ways.
.

;

the

same sense can of course be

Pr. 1. V. i-ii. Amph. ' My wife persuaded me Hyps. With righteous intent or (guilefully) ? Amph. She received a necklace Hyps. Whence (was it obtained) ? Amph. Famed Cadmus once married Harmonia, Hyps. He was one of those whose nuptials were attended by gods. Amph. To her Aphrodite gave a lovely necklace. Hyps. The gods to children of gods are ever kind. Amph. Now their son was called Polydorus. Hyps. If he was the son of a goddess, and received gods' gifts, 'twas a .' Amph. His son was Labdacus
. .
.
.

.

fit

name.

.

.

and Bury, is clearly subject of this passage, as was perceived by both necklace of Harmonia with which Polynices bribed Eriphyle, the wife of the famous Amphiaraus Amphiaraus, to persuade her husband to join the expedition against Thebes ; arise between sworn that Eriphyle should be the arbiter in any question that might had although he was aware of himself and Adrastus, and so could not reject Eriphyle's request,
I-II.

The

W-M

her duplicity
I.

;

cf.

ApoUod.

iii.

6. 2.

Only the bottoms of
;

the

doubtful

but the vestiges suit
1.

, and

first

two
if
iii.

letters

been the subject of
3

l.

Cf.

ApoUod
e. g.

6. 2

in general had been and not merely had also been specified. mentioned, but it hardly follows that Polynices yfms following d.Phoen. 5 sqq. 5. For the genealogy here

The

line

may be completed
o>os

iBe^aff

^\ ^

remain, and their identity is extremely is right in 1. 2, Eriphyle must^have ennae rhv

\
. . .

UoKweiKovs

probably indicates that the

'
6

in particular

ds 6e Restored by W-M. Cf. Phoen. 822 given according to who gave the necklace and to whom it was Accounts diifer as But that the giver in this line should be to some Harmonia received it from Cadmus. in 1. 8 ; cf. Schol. Phoen. 71 divine is necessary from the emphasis on
.

./ €,
(sc.

8e

Xeyovacv,

.

.

airrfj

8-10.
Pr. 5.

The

restorations were suggested

).

?^ '
«

.^
^
^

(/)
m
^

1.

4

roiSe Aaiov.

.
;

,
by

^

W-M.

closer to 1. 12 of the papyrus suggests that this fragment goes even coincide with 1. 12. It is noticeable that than to 1. 27, and the first line of it may a small hand, obliterated letters on the lower edge of the recto there are two or three half reverse iv-v is blank. But these few letters run in the whereas the recto of the rest of Cols,

The appearance

m

92

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

direction to the other writing on the recto, and their presence is not a valid reason against Which of the speakers placing the fragment in Col. v, which is its most suitable position. is Aniphiaraus and which Hypsipyle is not clearly defined.
5.

The
1 2.

letter after

is

more probably

than

e.

Col.
after
1.

V. 27.

A

If yi(

comparison with the preceding column indicates a gap of 14 lines in 1. 2 8 is yv[vai in the vocative the speaker there must be Amphiaraus,
certain.

but that
29.
p. 20.

is far

from

The

in the left

margin marks the 400th

line of the play; cf. Fr. 25,

and

introd.

regard these fragments as forming part of the stasimon which followed and Amphiaraus. That Frs. 6-7 and 9 belong to a single column is practically assured by a vertical crease in the papyrus, made, as the writing in the case of the two latter shows, after the recto but before the verso was inscribed. This crease has also served as a rough guide to the number of letters lost at the beginnings of lines in Frs. 6 and 7. The position of the three fragments relatively to each other is quite uncertain, and but it is likely on account of the difference of subject they may be arranged in any order The reference to that Fr. 9 was separated by a considerable gap from the other two. also Frs. 7 and 9 in Fr. 6. i affords a slight reason for placing that fragment first Fr. 8, containing the beginnings are alike in colour, while that of Fr. 6 is rather different. same column by the appearof nine lines from [. .]\eu[ to [ is shown to belong to the ance of the papyrus on both recto and verso (the line of junction between two selides accurately corresponds in Frs. 8 and 9), and its place has been determined on internal

Frs. 6-9.

We

the scene between Hypsipyle

[
Suidas
3.

;

;

.

evidence, especially

11.

6-7 and

9.

Fr.

.

the accent
s. v.

^,
I.

^'

is

usually accented, like other

&c.,

as in the papyrus,
is

The supposed
7. 4.

interlinear

to be too acute.

Pr.

8][ W-M.
this

reminiscence of

passage.

8
.
. .

words in was usual napa

,

on

rois

the penultimate, but according to

possibly only a circumflex accent, but the angle seems

in Aristoph.

Frogs 131 2 may well be a

Frs. 8-9. The chorus is here tracing the events which led to the expedition against Thebes. According to the well-known story Polynices of Thebes and Tydeus of Calydon, both fugitives from their homes, arrived simultaneously at Argos and began quarrelling 7r[ep]t in front of the palace of Adrastus about their quarters for the night Adrastus roused by the noise separated the combatants and, believing that they I. 10). represented the lion and the boar which an oracle had foretold as the husbands of his ' ei(o]n-ci[s] [(]€v\$]at), adopted them as sons-in-law daughters (11. 13-5 and undertook to restore them each to his country. Cf. Suppl. 131 sqq., Phoen, 409 sqq.,

{ ,
in
1.

;

ApoUod.
2.

iii.

6. i.

Pleuron was close to Calydon, the capital of Tydeus.

6-15. 'By night in lairs by the court-yard, exchanging frequent defiances, by oarage of iron and by slaughter they made proof with the spear, fugitives as they were, of the spirit of their noble fathers. And king Adrastus lay in his 'couch, having received the behests of .' Phoebus that he should wed his daughters to wild beasts
.

.

(cf.

6-9. The restoration, which proceeds on the assumption that For 1. 6 cf. Phoen. 4 1 5-6 note ad loc), is mainly due to Murray.

12

is
'

correct

(.)

vv^

,

. SOme form, and if ;[ is evidently (.) 5 is masCuline and not feminine it is probable, as Bury remarks, that 1. 6 is a fresh clause and vv]kt6s Se should be restored. At the end of the line either av\a or is possible. In 1. 7 suggests epib' [eptSos ayffvo, which may be right ; but the dative would perhaps be expected rather than the genitive in such a phrase, as e. g. in Aret. p. 71• 30 TO flp]faia (Bury and Murray) In 1. 8 seems certain, though we can find nothing quite parallel. In 1. 9 the letter before ov may be is a somewhat strong expression, since nobody was killed or, for anything the story tells us, even hurt ; but the imperfect serves to soften it. only very slight vestiges remain of the letters after , and the first of them 12. may also be or ; not room for ^[«5], even if .] could be read, but there is that prosaic word could be admitted here, and is an improbable combination. compound adjective . agreeing with would be attractive, but none such is known, nor are there obvious analogies upon which to coin one that would suit the papyrus. Cf. Phoen, 409-11 ?>;' S.o^\.ai 13. €j{o]7ra[s] was suggested by Murray.

'

els

[

8.

852.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
.
.
',

93

in

1.

W-M

^-^
^.

.

^
and

.

.
.

A

\ ^]

.

.

.

.

fvonai.

15• [CM^]«t is somewhat too cramped to be quite satisfactory, but is adopted in default of a better reading is excluded. 16-17. probably refers to some word like 'house' or 'gates' and hence (so Bury; or are alternatives) is a natural restoration. Cf. AL•. 597
;

]/[

! ,
[ (](

\
297

'

!,

. 302

][;

][

Phoetl.

TniXas,

Tr. 10. As explained in introd.
chorus and Hypsipyle after the

p.

25 we regard

this

and the three following fragments

(the relative order of which is quite uncertain) as belonging to a lyrical dialogue between the
latter's return from her disastrous expedition with Amphiaraus. depends upon the correctness of the decipherment in 1. 3 of Fr. 10, where there If the name is, as we believe, is a broken letter of the name of the speaker. The doubtful the view adopted of this fragment seems necessary. may also be a letter (hardly p), but the abbreviation with a round top like ^ or is unsuitable because something of the ought also to be visible. Murray proposed to make Fr. 10 refer to a search for Hypsipyle and Fr. 11. 1-2 represent her cries when captured, while Bury thought that Fr. 10 is a dialogue between the members of the chorus, who caught sight of But the name of Hypsipyle before the struggle with the serpent going on in the distance. 1. 3 would of course be inconsistent with either of these interpretations.

Much

']{),

]{)

2. There is a speck of ink at the edge of the papyrus in front of this line, but the absence of a paragraphus below 1. i is against referring 1. 2 to a different speaker whose name might be given in the margin, as in 1. 3.
3.

Murray.
is

There

is

4.

right,

this line

no paragraphus below cyyur. projected by a letter further

and 7-8. 5. For

aX]tiC€s cf. Here. ^.513 Phoen, 1 747 ^pos Either two or three letters may be lost according as 1. 4 or 11. 7-8 are taken as the standard (cf. note on 1. 4) ; yvva]U€s would be too long. At the end of this line some has been crossed through and or correction has been made ; apparently a letter like y or written above. Whether the next letter, which is rounded like f, , or was also altered cannot be determined ; ctpijKe is unsatisfactory as the remains stand.

.

,

,,

to the left than

^
11.

3

,

94
6.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
If
is

right the y has

was produced; a confusion of and .
the effect of

been corrected, perhaps from cf. Fr. i. iv. 2 and Fr. 64.

or because as
12,

first

written

where there has been

Pr. 13.

I.

The

vestige in the

margin may be part of an obhque dash

Fr. 60. 72, &c.) or represent a letter, e.g.

[{

(cf. Fr.

57. 16,

as in

1.

4 below.

Frs, 14

Frs. 14r-7, These fragments may be connected either with Frs. 6-9 or 10—3. and 15 were found adhering together, face to face, and the worm-eaten edges follow
pattern.

the

same

the position and interpretation of these two pieces cf. introd. p. 25. with the main group of fragments, but are distinguished from them by the dark colour and semi-decayed condition of the papyrus.

Frs. 18-9.

On

They were found
Ft. 18.

I

.

The

letters vh are
(.'*)

I24g— 6
;

as well as the preceding mark like a grave accent has been placed above 3was first written too far to the right, and then reprobably the accent intended for the seems to have been corrected from peated in its proper place. The acute accent on

!

very doubtful

8.

:

^

might be read

;

cf.

/.

T.

a circumflex.

[

is not used elsewhere presumably refers to the hpanav, though 4. Cf. Statins, Theb. v. 51b auraiae crudelis gloria frontis prominet, 572 of a serpent's crest. perque iuhas sianiis capitisque insigne corusci emicat. suggests ; but the passage is very obscure. or eTretat y', as 5. Perhaps eVei The vestige of the letter after fnn is too minute to be recognized. 6. At the left edge of the papyrus opposite this line are two letters, in a smaller or ]. They probably belong to but perhaps not different hand, which may be read as a marginal note on the preceding column (cf. Fr. 64. 50-1) rather than to an entry of the dramatis persona, since the paragraphus shows that a change of speaker does not occur till The commencement of the verse is difficult. The letter after the lacuna the line below. hiahpavat. suggests seems to be either or a, and rather the former than the latter. On the other hand if the words are itself, but the compound hiahpav does not occur. ojSta (Murray) divided '[. .]5ta a satisfactory restoration is not evident ; neither is not suitable. nor seems very likely. or \/r. 7. The first letter of the line had a tall stroke and vas with little doubt either on account of the difficulty suppose the verse to have begun Avith a hypermetrical of filling up a foot with the remaining two letters ; but there is a rather similar problem in

'

W-M

]

7{]

{' ]

\'\

^

We

the next line.

the

8. The vestige supposed to represent the top of the e in kh and the stop at the end of word might together be taken as a diaeresis over the t, [•] hut there would then At the beginning be room only for a very narrow letter, another or o, in the lacuna. of the Une the space is so short that the foot and a half to be supplied there (if "^^ is right) must have consisted mainly of vowels.
9.
e after

Some
is

The insertion has been made over the line, but its nature is very uncertain. on a small fragment which broke away when the papyrus was being flattened,
closer to the p.
is

and should perhaps be put

/(^[]6[5
in
1.

cannot be read.
18 by the appearance of the

Fr. 19. This fragment
papyrus.
Possibly
it

closely connected with Fr.
1

joins

on above 8ia^

of Fr. 18.

Frs. 20, 21.

On the

scene here see introd. p. 24.

The

position of Fr. 20, which con-

852.
tains the beginnings of

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

95

II. 1-4, is probable on internal evidence and confirmed by the correspondence of the fibres of the recto.

1-16. Hyps. 'Dear friends, I stand on the razor's edge, (in danger of) shameful treatment I am full of fear. Chor. Hast thou no word of hope to tell thy friends ? Hyps. Flight if only I had knowledge of these roads Chor. What then hast thou found that spurs thee to boldness ? Hyps. I am fearful of what I shall suffer because of the child's death. Chor. Poor soul, thou hast some acquaintance with such ills Hyps. Yea, I know them, and I will be on my guard. Chor. Where then wilt thou turn ? What city will receive thee ? Hyps. My feet and zeal will decide that. Chor. The land is guarded round about by sentinel-posts. Hyps. You are right let that be but I go. Chor. Consider, for thou hast friends in us to give thee counsel. Hyps. What if I found some one to conduct me forth from this land ? Chor. There is no one who is willing to conduct a slave.'
;
1 I !

:

;

I. Z> ^^ra^ai, suggested by Bury, is suitable in itself but not a very satisfactory reading of the papyrus, as it makes the letters between and rather crowded, while on the other hand there is a slight space between the and the [.1/3 could be read, ; yvvdiKfs occurs in Oresf. 136; 2> however may of course stand alone, and the here is quite doubtful. At the end of the line eVt is only one of many possibilities '^] im cf. Here. F. 630 Homer 1*73 eVt ScC. ; seems preferable to on account of the preceding e^etj/ ; but 3. is the e^et (. usual word, e. g. Fr. 64. 76, Orest. 1255 which could be read, is an obvious restoration, but the line is then 5. aTe[y]S>v difficult to complete ; there is not room for Bury suggests e'\bp[av as toKft, but edpava, though a word used by Euripides as well as Aeschylus and Sophocles, Hence we adopt the restoration proposed by Murray, which is occurs only in lyrics. sufficiently consistent with the papyrus ; something of the lost might have been expected to be visible, but would not necessarily be so. would restore at the end of this line on the analogy oi Androm. 28 6. Ttv evpelv in the present passage seems to have a different but sense. Hypsipyle has just stated in the previous line what her her defence or resource, was to be, namely flight ; and her reply in 1. 7 shows clearly that the present question must be, what induced her to contemplate such a bold step. Our proposed restoration attempts to give this meaning. Whether the alteration of the original reading for which has apparently been substituted, is by the first hand, is doubtful.

[]
'4

;^

'

,

[

^

,

([.

W-M

,

,
1

,

)

.» \ [] ' ^ ()(
So Med. 386 TLS ; and For the conjunction of and Phoen. 1430 and ['][•] W-M; 12-3.
10. II.

8

^

,

Toiabe

iav, but this is not so close to y), on the analogy of El. 379 the papyrus. In 1. 12 has been lightly crossed through with ink of the same colour as that of the overwritten (v. 14-6. The restoration of these lines is largely due to Murray. In 1. 16 [ovbth may be suggested as an alternative supplement.

.

cf.

for the latter cf. Suppl.

;

(..)

]

^

.
Ion

lOg-lO

tIs

€€

We

946-7 (17.) had thought of [eltVa[i'] ew

^ ^
(Tt;

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
we
Pr. 22. The speaker of 11. i-8 is evidently pleading the cause of Hypsipyle, and assign them to Hypsipyle herself for the reasons given in introd. p. 26,
2.
7.

/.

T.
9.

966

may 8\ may{,
The
doubtful
OeXfi.

be . be some part of the verb

or

'

and

for the latter

(W-M)

Bacch. 209

6[\ '
;

for the

former

of.

'

ovbfv

€]\f[|af

Bury

;

][

or

][

can also be read, or possibly
for e8p]aa[as.

][

though the

first letter

is

more
II.

like

than

a.

There would not be room
last line

This was the

of a column.

Prs. 23-36. The relative position of these pieces is mostly indeterminate, though there are grounds in certain cases for connecting two or more of them somewhat closely together; see the notes on the individual fragments. Frs. 23-4. These two fragments are similar in appearance, and may well belong to same dialogue if the speakers are, as we conjecture, Eurydice and Hypsipyle, (A), the questioner, would naturally be the former in both pieces.
the
;

Pr. 23.
to Hypsipyle

3.
;

Perhaps &
cf.

the previous note.

[

(cf.

Hipp. 682),

if

the line

is

spoken by Eurydice

in the margin of Col. ii marks, we suppose, the 600th, not the 700th line, the Pr. 25. not i, 1 100 , numeration being by the letters of the alphabet, not figures thus 1000 not la, and so on ; cf. Fr. 64. 79, 841. II. 25, VI. 7, and P. Brit. Mus. 732. Col. xvi {Journal denotes the 6ooth line of Iliad xiii. The same of Phil. xxvi. No. 51, p. 43), where a is omitted and t alphabetical system, in which 6, is commonly used for the numeration of the books of a work, e.g. Homer and Herodotus. In P. Grenf. II. 11. ii. 4 (Pherecydes), which is in all probability stichometrical is found, the scribe has confused the where a alphabetical and numerical systems or employed the latter.
;

=

*:,

=

=

Prs. 27-9. Fr. 28 was found adhering, face downwards, to the upper right-hand side of and the worm-eaten edges have the same pattern. This indication that the two fragments are to be connected gains some confirmation from the recto, where part of an oblique dash denoting a total occurs on Fr. 27, and on Fr. 28 there is in the right position If so, the the end of a stroke which may be the continuation of the same oblique dash. p6nv or gap between them is unlikely to be large, and [6]/[' e]Sii^[a ]«'^[ would be a suitable combination ; but we have not succeeded in carrying out the That Fr. 29 belongs to the same column as Fr. 27 is made restoration on this basis. probable by the presence of a pair of dark fibres in the left margin of both fragments these fibres are rather closer to the commencement of the lines in Fr. 27 than in Fr. 29, which suggests that the latter preceded, but this inference is not certain. The speaker apparently is Hypsipyle, who is addressing the queen Eurydice (cf. Fr. 27. 2 and 6-7), as in Fr. 22, and perhaps Frs. 27-9 come from the upper part of the column of which Fr. 22 is the bottom; but the writing on them is of a distinctly smaller size than that of Fr. 22, so that in any case it is likely that there was an appreciable interval.
Fr. 27,
.

.

.

[][]

may
and
cf.

Pr. 27. I. Only the bottom of the stichometrical letter in the margin remains, and it be read as e, but e does not suit the supposed situation here cf. the previous note
;

introd. p. 26.
2.

The
I,

accent of

x[cp]w'/3[

does not prove that the termination was the genitive plural

Fr. 6.

note.

852.
3.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

97

is not room for eye at the b^inning of this fine, bat «• voold be jost perhaps not more than a sin^ie letter is lost in the lacona between c and *. A pamgnphus below this or the next line voold probablj be invisible, die popyras heistg much rubbed. 4. A single broad letter would fiD the space before Aim ^>, bat thoe woold be room £ither y or a- coald well be read in place oft before the final bcnna. for e. g.ovorru

Thore
:

possible

2

cf.

c»^. For a possible combinatiom with Fr. Ft. 28. I. : the 1 maybe note above on Frs. 27-9. 3. Oaly part of the r ronains. bat there is enoa^ of ii^ we dunk, to exdnde

'^

^,

s';.

.

Ft. 29. See note on Frs. 27-9.

hor love Fr. 32. The speaker here, evidendy, is again Hypap]^ who is dwdling her dead nai^in|^ probeibly in repodatuon of tbe accnsalions of Fmjdke; cf It is dear firom the recto that the fragment is not from the same colomn Fr. 60. 10. as Fr. 22 or Fr. 27. tul 3. V after a» is fairly certain, bat beyond this the remaios of l^tos are very could be read. and «par or tar is reached ; the t may be part of a suggests w}mr. 4. 7. K}|ii4!uir«{r: Bf^vora is used in Tlreed. 893 crf'the cfaanns «rf^HeloL 9. 6 ]' ayicaXats : cC Fr. 6ol ID ; perhaps iy «ynXMn [pam>„ but die last letter may also
for

di^

W-M
it,

m

be

e. g.
1 1.

,
is

or

».

X

corrected, a^f^arendy from

.

Fr. 33. The speaker and subject of dais fragmant are both problemadcaL dwinL'; naturally suggests BuJ^s, and perhaps diis fragmoot belongs with Fis. 34-5 lo a scene in which the sons of Hyps^yle again ^^ncd; dL introd. pi 29. breathii^ or an I. The supposed grave accent on^ is vary doubtfal; a circamflex interlinear letter, is eqmlly possiUe.

m

The si^gested combinadoa of these two fragments is made probaUe by its But die siqipfied by the recfoi. 5-6, and some confinnalory evideace Tbat situation remains very doubtful, and we abstain fi«m attempts at reconstmdtion. thinks Eurydice is one of the chaiactecs ofmcomed is |Kobable (c£ 1. a aer|gmow[), and that die is confronted by Fnneos and Tboas» but we are not convinced that the periphrasis used in speaHr^ of Hypsipyle in L 5 really involves this ; cf. introd. p. 29, and die notes The nnmbar of letters to be supplied at the beg^mings of the fines is uncertain below. they are estimated on the hypothesis that six are lost in D. 4-6, but though there can hardly
Frs. 34-5.
suitability in U.

W-M

have been

less,

there

may have been mme.

Tbe worm-eaten patton of Fr. 35
[tm

is identical

with that of Frs. 14-5. 3. Bury suggests

Eurydice who had been away from the pabo^ and had now jiet returned. He thinks that the absence of the queen as well as the Kng when Amphiaraus arrived would be an advantage to ±e plot as hdping to excuse HypsipyH who thus could not ask leave to grant his But the data seam scarce^ sufficient to substantiate this view. The vestige before request. only moderately well, and the proposed restoration of the preceding hama is suits a

[^ }» ^* U

wAptSm

if•», snpposiiig the speaker to

be

somewhat overlong.
4.

Perhaps

suggests

?]»

^}^
.

.

.

Bury ; die letter b^ore « (which is almost certain) may be y. [«pw^iJ^A, but ftMynnw sp^^Sns is uot a voj soit^bfe phrase in
Mrniay.

referring to Hypsipyle.

5-6.

rpo4{6s

W-M,

We had propo^d to read f

tc}cm»

. . .

SOmi»^

98

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
W-M

would be expected, and (2) that Hypsipyle was objects to this (i) that but No doubt the dative would be more natural, but the genitive hardly seems a dry-nurse. impossible ; and to the latter objection it may be answered that Hypsipyle Avould not be more than middle-aged (Statius, Theb. v. 466, makes her sons about twenty years old), and mother's functions that her own language rather conveys the impression that she fulfilled all a be read in Fr. 60. 12, and secondly that she was certainly especially if
imagined as a nurse in the fuller sense by Statius; It may also be questioned whether viaterna daham. suggests something like suckling,

,

' {(
I.

: [(^ ^
cf.

TM.

v.

617 libera parvo iam would necessarily imply
beginning of
1.

at the

5.

Frs. 37-56 are too small to give clear indications concerning their metre. They were found at the same time as Frs. 6 sqq. (cf. introd, p. 20), and are therefore grouped here with them.
Fr. 41. Fr. 46.

]
The
This

:

cf.

Fr. 60. 18.

I.

deleted

was

originally unelided.
like a

Fr. 49. 2. above the letter preceding the
Frs.
;

There was a horizontal stroke
first a.

mark of length or a rough breathing

60 cf. introd. p. 27, and note on 1. 17. We have not succeeded in finding a combinathe script, as well as tion between them, but the texture of the papyrus and the character of The praise of Dionysus is the similarities in subject and metre, serve to connect them. main theme, and the metre had a large anapaestic element.
Fr.

57-9 probably belong

to the stasimon preceding the act partially preserved in

Fr. 57.
5.

I.

line is apparently the first of

a column.
the interlinear
cf.
;

The supposed

variant,

Fr.

I.

though such iv. 6-7 and Fr. 73.

stop after dots are
4.

may well be one of two dots inclosing not commonly used in this papyrus

however,

10. Cf. Rhes. 12

13-6. Cf. Bacch. 142 sqq.

'

?
17-

The traces of the stichometrical figure are slight, but that it is such a figure is from the horizontal dashes above and below it, and this granted the only right-hand suitable reading is , i. e. 1 1 00 ; the stroke seems to be too diagonal for the limb of a /x. , , 20 sqq. The commencement of a new strophe or antistrophe is marked by the paragraphus and the projection of the lines to the left; cf. e. g. Fr. i. iii. 18. Who is addressed
evident
,
.

.
is

'

TO

Bpoei.

p^l 8e

neBov,

pa

b'

,

pel be

,
,

,

in

not clear.

22. Cf. /. T.

209

Fr. 58.
2.

Cf. Fr.

3.

Cf. Fr. 57.

8,
1,

in

this word was conjectured by Casaubon in Mnesim. Bi'pp. i. stood and not It is just possible that where the MS. reading is ought certainly to appear. the papyrus, but something of the vertical stroke of a remarks, is a hardly possible compound. as

.

. 7{)•.
I.

avpai: or

57.16 and

. .
lofl

89

re

-

W-M

.

' avvbpov

eh

,

Tro.

064

Fr. 59. The colour of the papyrus suggests that this fragment is to be placed below it does not seem likely that Fr. 58. 12 and Fr. 59. i coincide. rather than above Fr. 58
;

852.
Fr. 60. 5-62. Hyps.
'

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
... So

99

seemest thou to indulge blind rage without staying Art thou silent, and answerest none of my complaints? For of the child's death I am indeed the cause, but of killing him I am not justly accused, my nursling, whom I fed in my arms, and who to my love was as my own child in all save that I bare him not, my great comfort prow of Argo, and the sea's white foam my children, I perish miserably seer, son of Oecles, death is upon me Help me, come, suffer me not to die on a shameful charge ; since for thy sake I am lost Come, for thou knowest my case, and wouldst be received by this woman as the surest witness of my mishap.— Let us go, since I see no friend at hand to save me. Vain then was my
to learn truly the events' course.
! 1 ! ! !

compunction

Amph. Stay, thou who art sending this woman to be slain, queen of the palace; for from thy comeliness to my view I attribute to thee noble birth. Hyps.^ O, by thy knees, Amphiaraus, from the ground I supplicate thee, by thy beard, by Apollo's sacred art, save me, for thou art come at the very moment in my extremity, and
'tis

for thy sake that I perish. I am at the point of death, and in bonds thou seest me at thy knees who then went with the strangers. So thou, a holy man, wilt do a holy deed ; but if thou desertest me thou wilt be a reproach to the Argives, yea, to the Hellene race.

thou who by the altar's sacred flame dost foresee the fortunes of the Danai, tell this woman of the child's disaster, for thou wert by and knowest. She says that of set purpose I killed her son and plotted against her house.

Amph. With knowledge am I come, having suspected the fate which the child's end upon thee and I am here to aid thine evil case, armed not with might, but right. For it were shame to know well how to receive benefits from thee, and having received them, how to do nought in return. First then, stranger lady, show thy face for the discreetness of my eye is much noised abroad among the Hellenes, and it is my nature, lady,
^yould bring
;

;

to restrain myself and to discern qualities. Next listen and relax this hastiness. In all else error needs must be, but error against the life of a man or woman is a foul thing. Euryd. Stranger, native of the neighbouring land by Argos, I have learned of all men

of thy discretion, else hadst thou never stood by and looked upon this face. And thou desirest, I am willing to listen and to instruct thee for thou art not unworthy.
;

now

if

Amph. Lady,

much

I would soften thy bitterness at this poor creature's injury, not so out of regard for her as for justice and I am shamed before Phoebus whose art
;

speak any falsehood. 'Twas I who persuaded this woman to show a spring of water running with a pure stream that therefrom I might take an offering
sacrificial fire
if

I practise

by

I

for the

army

in crossing the

bounds of Argos

.'
. .

4 sqq. Hypsipyle on her
cf.

introd. p. 26.
5.
:

cf.

Nauck
11.

[
is

way

to

death

is

making a

{): '

suggests,

12. Murray's for seems the best remedy for this defective line. The mistake would be a very easy one especially after in (cf. Or. 464 and can be Supported by Cyc/. 142 ov Suggests Cf. for the language here Fr. 32, and for Statins, Thel•. v. 608 sqq. inihi desertae natonim dulcis imago, Archemore, rerum ei patriae solamen ademptae serviiiiqiie decus. is transitive elsewhere in Euripides; cf. Nicander, AJ. 13. 170

. \

' % ^),
Pap., but as a rather larger alteration.

Fr. 31

or So/c[fi and the sentence from the Aeolus

,

6 W-M

€€

is

perhaps interrogative.
superfluous;

remarks,

is

.

last

effort to

move Eurydice

r«XV

(

,

For
which he

W-M

(^

{€)i.

('

'

\( \[
.

a

lOo
14. 16. 19.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
The
dot which
is

that superfluous letter, but

required sense.
20. nyere

[, ()
is

it

was perhaps intended to cancel of placed directly over may be a carelessly written stop.
F. 494.

e]\ee: SO I/erc.
:

cf.

Hipp. g^2

.
'

WOuld nOt yield the

addressed by Hypsipyle to her guards.

21.

On
i.

suggested by
reverenced,'

It see introd. p. 25. the significance of the words Keva ' "might possibly be here used in a passive sense, I Murray that
'

mean that she might as well have but there seems to be no parallel for such a use. was first 22. has been corrected apparendy from e, and probably written. The left margin is broken a\vay close to the beginnings of the lines throughout this column, and the entries of the speakers' names, if they occurred, are lost. 23. iurperres was first writteil, the t being a later insertion though possibly by the original evnpene't. is instrumental and there is no need for an alteration like e'-yw yap scribe, dvai or something of the The Sentence was begun as if eXevBepav
e.

]^

[](

spared, in which case Hypsipyle would
;

been

slain at

once

^

was was

(.
sort,

was
25.

to follow.
.

.

.

iKeris

=

familiarity of the formula

of a verb.

Cf. for this

— '' '
. .
.

which is sometimes used with an entire Z> yepov, appeal e.g. Andr. 572 sqq.
&c.,

,

,
,

'iKerevw,

the abnormal construction being assisted

by the
ellipse

yeveiados

29- Since the second sentence expands the first and does not stand in any sort of Perhaps the particles should be transopposition to it, re is more appropriate than Be. posed, €. The mistaken in has not been crossed out. of is corrected from . 30. 31-2. Some or even all of the corrections may be in another hand; the above 01 in 1. 32 looks as if it had been enlarged after it was first inserted. (Murray) is more likely than 35. 43- Eurydice had veiled herself on the sudden intrusion of a strange man. Cf. the words of the of Hermione in Aftdr. 876 It is also tO be remembered more subtle interpretation of her that Eurydice's husband was absent from the palace. attitude has been proposed by IMurray, who thinks that shame at being surprised by a good man in an act of blind vindictiveness led to an outburst of tears. There is, however, no real hint of this in the Greek, and 11. 51-2 are hardly consistent with it. For the turn of the

8
']

,

napes

[]

[].

,

8'

' ,. ^
^'
A

cf. Heracl. 942 which inverts 44-5• There seems to be no similar instance of this use of yepov, the ordinary construction, e. g. Soph. O. C. 305-6 But the locution may be defended on the analogy of buevai, bepea^, &c., and there is no need to suspect a corruption, of /cm has been corrected; the scribe apparently began to write .

verse

'

.
,

.

restrain,' as in Andr, 956 Amphiaraus apparently means that he regarded qualities, not allowing himself to be distracted by vanities. and is by a later hand. as well as the 47. Perhaps the interlinear

46.

By

'
=
'

, .
8(
is

regulate,'

'

49. Cf. Ale. 301

ovbev

52. Sense
53. 60.

and metre both demand the

,

essential

insertion of aV after

here Pap., but -u is the regular form elsewhere. The circumflex accent on influenced apparently by the prodelision, but the accentuation is not seldom at fault; cf. Fr. i. i. 4, iv. 11. Aesch. Pers. 483.

.

,

curious occurs in

6i.
62.

\\

852.
Murray.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE
place of 'kpyuov is
is

loi

What was

originally written in

obscure

was of breathing but it consists of a single W-M. word as which might bcAvritten , Bury lave. suggests 67. In the initial lacuna ]as in the preceding line. probably followed in which case or : 68. [,
also deleted.

,
([

The mark above

was presumably intended as a rough followed by some such horizontal stroke,
of

?

;

perhaps the

^'^,

W-M

,

.

€[

?

^

a/iei>//[

could be read. 71-2. Bury suggests
Fr.

which is quotcd from Euripides in Anecd, Bekk. The subject 362, and has been referred to this play by Hartung, Eun;p. Rest. ii. p. 436. p. the name of a kind of serpent. Bury compares evidently is of The breathings in 1. 72 are both not quite certain. line of course easily admits 77. We adopt the restoration proposed by Bury; the

Nauck

870

8pa<ovTos

;
',

[5

and

,

in the next verse

,

[16

,

comparmg

of several variations,
80.

nals. 988 opvis ytvoir' av are represented by exiguous vestiges and are all very doubtful. 81. The letters after Above the second of them there is a faint vertical mark which may represent an inserted
'

=

e. g.

or
as
e. g. in

or

omen

LA.

,' €
.
. .

but the sense

IS

evident.

iota

;

that

82.
84.

'[
it is
:

the top of a

or V' or

is

not probable.

or
sc.

apa. Our restorations Murray suggests, seems to be a crasis of in this and the next two lines only attempt to give the sense. 89-96 = Nauck Fr. 757. 1-8. Lines 89-92 and 95 end-96 are quoted by Clement Stobaeus (who gives the Alex. Strom, iv. p. 587, 11. 89-96, by Plutarch, Mor. p. no F,and by Marcus Antoninus 7. 40, and 1. 94 again name of the play), Flor. 108. 11, 11. 94-5 Lines 90-4 are translated by Cicero, Tusc. 3. 25. 59. at II. 6.

85. Probably as 86.

€[,

7() [5

[.

some

equivalent expression.

agreeing with

".
,

^

89.

'

90. Krit. Stud. 91.

.

€Tfpa

We
92.

.,
ii.

'
:

yovv Clem.
:

;

'
ae\

p. 487,
is

There

is conjectured by F. G. Schmidt, Stob. that Cicero has quern non attingit dolor considerable variation in this line in the authorities; Stob. \^%

.
is

clearly right.

.

on the ground

Plutarch

.

.

.

follow Nauck's text. in the papyrus is a slip for
also has

Stob.,

who

93translation reddenda terrae est terra.

[

!
.
.

^

,

Clement

erepa

'

'

:

8'
:

(=

'

?)

for

\ '.
and

as read by Plut.

and Clem.

avToiis

^( ^
. . .

Plut.

Stob., corrected

r by Grotius from Cicero
.

^

^•

s

vayav

for 7. 40. Ant. II. 6, and ' eKuepav Clem. OTeyeiv . 96. oreveiv . . Beivov yap oiBev After this line Plut. and Clem, give another, which Nauck edits as yhp heivov Plut., oi bnvhv oibiv Clem.), and it is quite possible that there On the other hand has been an omission in the papyrus; cf. Fr. i. ii..8 and Fr. 64. 57. ...) (in the form the verse is not added here by Stobaeus, who quotes it simply, without the name of the play, in another place, Flor. 29. 56. as and as the hne is easily Stobaeus' testimony, therefore, tends to corroborate the papyrus,

94-5.

'[

8((

.

.

.

.

. 6

.

.

.

6

spared

97.

we do The

not insert it. letter before the lacuna seems to be

Something
indicated.

like "Apyolvs

iov

rather than
dbs

,

\

^

,

.

e,

i.e. Apyo[vs

r

or Apyoufv.

.

'/1

k(v6v

seemS

I02
99-101. Cf.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

dignus morerere septdcro, and 741 mansuris donandus honoribus infans. 102-3. Cf. the words of the scholiast on Clement quoted in introd. p. 22 eV aura

£, 6.
111. 112.

,
Statius, line
:

Theh.

v,

536-7 ut

inde sacer per saecula Grais genlibus et tanto

and Schol. Pindar, Nem.

The
its

TO

\6 Murray.

may be completed

Murray proposes is also suggested here by Bury. after is naturally interpreted as rj\ of. Fr. i. ii. 19 and 22, where is 113. is obscure. But written in the same way. Nauck Fr. 759, quoted from the Hypsipyle in Orion, Flor. 7. 5, p. 51, 10; 1 1 4-7 1. 114 also appears, without statement of the source, in Flor. Monac. 100. so correctly Flor. Monac; Orion. 114. Wecklein, Rhein. Mus. xxxiii. p. 121 117. ovhi: olbiv Orion, corr. Schneidewin. proposes to read \oyov in place of

\

=

[

.[
e. g.

arg. 4

5 / ,
£
as

Bury

suggests.

^.

and Fr. 64. ; the allusions to Hypsipyle's sons in Fr. 61. 4-6, to Lemnos in Fr. 62. 3, and to Amphiaraus in Fr. 63. 6 suit that position. But though all three give ends of lines they appear to come from different columns. Fr. 63 is distinguished by a se/is rather to the right of the centre and the other two are quite dissimilar, Fr. 61 being light-coloured and well preserved, whereas Fr. 62 is dark and It is likely enough that some of the other pieces among Frs. 65-73 ^^so belong rubbed. to this part of the play, but in the absence of definite indications we do not attempt to assign
the
ii
i
;

Frs. 61-3. These fragments, as columns intervening between Fr. 60.

W-M

suggests,

may be

assigned with probability to

their position.

Fr. 61. Hypsipyle is the speaker in part of this fragment at any rate, perhaps throughout. 6 she is probably expressing her ignorance whether her sons survive or not, and 11. 8 and 12 contain allusions to her servitude. A reference to the strange young men precedes in 1. 4 may well be right in thinking that Hypsipyle is addressing one of the latter, and asking him to obtain her liberty. If so the fragment would be preliminary to their
In
1.
;

W-M

recognition.

[

2.
is

objectionable owing to the neglect of caesura
e'lxoif
:

[

4.
5.

of

divided
for this line.

'

(Murray) seems more difficult. perhaps or possibly cf Fr. 33. 8, where })[ might be is corrected from , probably by a later hand. The words may also be (?) as Murray suggests, which would imply a masculine speaker
;

W—

o[i;]pta

[

:

[]5

:

.[. ][]

[5

15. Apparently not

.

Fr. 62. 2. The above the line seems to have been inserted by the first hand, and was perhaps deleted by the second. in if the reading is right, is remarkable. The is similarly 5. The short scanned e.g. in Aristophanes' Knights 723, 972, but is long elsewhere in tragedy wherever the quantity is determinable. Ion 391, Phoen. 990. in Murray notes the parallel oi Rhes. 494. or Tivos; the fragment may be stichomuthic. 7.

,

^

•.

Fr. 63. The speaker is probably Hypsipyle, who after her rescue by Amphiaraus seems in 11. 5-8 to be asking for further assistance cf. note on 11. 7-8. 3. An acute accent on eanv has been substituted for a barytone ; cf. 841. VI. 88.
;

852.
4.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

[

of was originally omitted. 7—8. V€0)s ^oKij proposes as representing the sense of these two verses ;

W—

[]

however could not be read, though

€^
]

103

[;

would

suit.

between Hypsipyle and her sons ; cf. introd. p. 26. It is tempting Pr. 64. i. The recto is blank save for the tip of an oblique to place Fr. 70 at the top of this column. dash, and in the margin of Fr. 64. i recto there are two incomplete oblique dashes, to one of which the tip in Fr. 70 might well belong. On the other hand the strongly marked fibres of the papyrus do not correspond in the two pieces as they should do, and the combination cannot therefore be regarded as satisfactory. 50-1. These explanatory glosses are in a small hand resembling that of the text, The words though perhaps distinct from it. and nayyatoi/ of course occurred
in the text.

57. in the text

margin below, replacing a deletion (apparently) has been written twice, perhaps through mere inadvertence, or possibly the corrector thought that the word was placed too near the end of the verse, and so rubbed it out and rewrote it further oif.
refers to

()
;

an entry
8.

cf.

Fr. i.

ii.

()

in the (lost)

58-106. Hyps. (the wheel of the god) ... me and my children has run back again along a single road, rolling us now towards terror, now delight ; and at last he has shone
'
.

.

.

forth serene.

Amph. This is the guerdon, lady, that thou receivest from me ; since thou wert zealous towards my entreaty, I in my turn have shown my zeal towards thy sons. God keep thee now, and keep ye this your mother, and fare ye well; while we will go on with our army to Thebes, even as we have set forth to do. The sons of Hyps. Blessings on thee, friend, for thou dost merit them; yea, blessings on thee. Hapless mother, how insatiate of thy Avoes was one among the gods Hyps. Ah, if thou shouldst learn of my banishment, my son, my banishment from sea-washed Lemnos, because I cut not off the grey head of my father Eun. Can they have ordered thee to slay thy father ? Hyps. I am full of terror at those bygone woes. Oh, my son, like Gorgons they slaughtered their husbands in their beds. Eu7i. And thou, how didst thou steal aAvay from death ? Hyps. I reached the resounding shore and the sea-wave where the birds make their lonely nests. Eun. And how camest thou thence, what convoy brought thee hither.'' Hyps. Sailors carried me by ship to Nauplia's haven, the place of travellers' passage, and brought me to servitude here, my son, a sorry merchandise of Danaid maidens. Eun. Alas for thy woes Hyps. Lament not in our good fortune. But how wert thou and thy brother here brought up, and by whose hand. my son ? Tell me, tell thy mother. Eun. The Argo brought me and him to the city of lolcus. Hvps. Yea, the nursling of my breast Eun. But when my father Jason died, mother, Hyps. Alas thou speakest of my afflictions, my son, and bringest the tears to my eyes. Eun. Then Orpheus brought him and me to the land of Thrace. Hyps. What kindness was he doing to thy hapless father ? Tell me, my son. Eun. He taught me the music of the Asian I^tc, and my brother he schooled in Ares' art of arms. Hyps, And by what way went ye over the Aegean to the shore of Lemnos ?
! ! I

!

I04
Eun. Thy
Hyps.
Is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
father

Thoas conveyed

thy two children.

he then safe ? Eun. Yea, by the contrivance of Bacchus.'

or or subject of the sentence is e'/i*' evidently preceded, and the is a regular dochmiac dimeter, and 11. 58-60 equivalent expression, as they stand in the papyrus may also be regarded as resolved dochmiacs, but it is perhaps In either suggests, to regard those verses as iambic on account of better, as iv cf. e.g. Soph. Fr. 787 For the metaphor of case re is best omitted.

58-62.

some

.

.

.

W-M

deov

is a 64. for the meaningless

.

(

8 .

somewhat strong expression, but we can find no more suitable correction rore of the papyrus, and it is well to suppose that Hypsipyle was not

easily persuaded.

it

65. A slightly curved stroke in which we can see no meaning stands above f of TratSe; might be meant for an iota. 66. The line as left by the first hand though grammatically correct will not scan, since it and bring in riji/Se (accented 8(, cf. Fr. i. To omit gives a short final vowel before vi. 11), which was inserted at a diff'erent time and probably by a different hand, is an easy or remedy, but the construction then becomes more difficult, since a transitive has to be supplied out of the passive 69-71. The marginal annotation assigns these lines to both sons, which implies a fourth Perhaps one of them spoke 1. 69, the other 11. 70-1 ; this adds point actor cf. introd. p. 30, Ores/. (cf. however, Soph. E/. 11 63— 4 &s ' to the repeated reminds us of the parallel in Afed. 1271 sqq., where the MSS. 219 The StOp in Or oi hvo iraibes. to 1272 ereposnaii, and to 1277-8 prefix to 1. 1271 instead of before it. 1. 70 should have been placed after which follows in the papyrus might be regarded as an error for y (cf. 72-3. The metre of these two verses is iambic Fr. 60. 12), but is better omitted altogether. monometer, dochmiac monometer, dochmiac dimeter. implies the of 74. The deleted , which was written by the first hand over ipov, though if the words were so understood division ought also to have been is suggested by in order to produce altered to ore. The transposition of a dochmiac dimeter. 75 sqq. Since Euneos is the speaker in 1. loi (cf. introd. p. 28), it is best to regard him as sustaining the whole of this conversation. to proposed by W-M, is probable since one son is 77. The correction addressed throughout this passage; cf. 11. 73, 86, 91, &c. An anapaestic dimeter is here interposed between a dochmiac dim. and a dochmiac monom. For ota re cf. Fr. i. ii. 18. Topyabis in the sense of TopyovfS is quoted in Phot. Lex. TrKOKiovTopyabos• which is explained by cf. Lycophr. 1349"? ]

.

.

(85 ,). ,
;

W-M


'
W-M

,

-8

^,

^,

some
is

Scholl. as

meaning Hera

glossed by Hesychius,
al

ibid. Topyibts'

79•

On

the rnarginal

^, . =
who
{sic) Pap.,

opya.

,

The word

cites

it

(i p.

851) from Sophocles' Daedalus, as
yopyabes' al

Lex.

p.

448

(,

^;

Topyabmv
cf.

80-82. tragedy and
1.

1. i6oo cf Fr. 25, note. but Spvfov though a good word does not occur elsewhere in

W-M's

correction

is

also metrically preferable.

Transposing

to

then get here an iambic dimeter, an anapaestic dimeter, and a dochmiac with irrational penultimate. The papyrus shows both the old Attic (properispome) and the later accentuation of For . cf. a fragment from the Polyidus (Nauck

81

we

636. 5)

.

.

.

opvis.

occurred in the Bellerophon (^dMcVi 301. 2)

852.

EURIPIDES, HYPSIPYLE

105

spond. dip., dactyl, tetrap., 2 dactylo-epitrit. dims., withcatalexisin the second. which produces a dochiniac dimeter, adopt W-M's conjecture ivBabe 87. which Murray suggests evdab' § deleted) (another unintelligible for the more difficult, besides is closer to the papyrus but makes the construction of

84-6

=

We

(

8, .
is

,

being

less satisfactory metrically.

written
ore

owing

to confusion with

89-92. Dactylo-epitrit. dim.

was written
93.

We
:

us and was stayed two infants on that at any rate it is improbable that he could have wished to take two Colchis dangerous expedition moreover there would be a strange hiatus in Euneos' story if he said nothing of going to Thessaly. Euripides apparently imagined Jason as calling again at Lemnos on his return from Colchis (cf. Pindar, Fy/L 4. 251), and on finding Hypsipyle gone—she had in the meantime been banished—his natural course would be to carry his young children
;

dactyl, tetrap., 2 crelic dims, (apparently), Fr. 60. 29, note; the partial correction is by the first hand. the incongruity of which had already struck for ds substitute is emphasized by Dr. Mahaify. According to Ovid, fferoid. 6. 56, Jason further years at Lemnos, but his children were not yet born when he sailed for
for ode
:

. ^^ (),
The
of

more

like

,

and perhaps

((

was

cf.

,

away with him to his own home according to Statius, TM. v. 467, Hypsipyle on going into other sources. exile left them in the charge of a person named Lycaste, Avho is unknown from yaiap to Hypsipyle) d ' 904-6 (Jason Cf. ApoUon. Rhod. W-M evSov ' apaeva on the ground in spite of the foregoing considerations, would retain els however,
;

,
=
cf.

i.

,

that this is required

by Hypsipyle's
e
is

interjection in the next line,

. .
re

The

written through a mark of elision. catalectic dochmiac. Anapaestic monom. (equivalent to dochmiac) 94 are converted from an of The letters 95. Murray, restoring the dochmiac trimeter. for 96-7.
interlinear

+

.

98.

For Orpheus cf. note on Fr. i. iii. 8-10. 99-100 = Resolved dochmiac + iambic trim.

€8:
letter

( . .
102. ''Apes

For

.

.

.

evos

cf.

El. 61

This verse which shows that Euneos is the speaker alludes to the Attic clan ot but the vestige of the The first hand perhaps wrote introd. p. 28. is too slight to show whether it was corrected. after
. .

.

equivalent, as

W-M
Soph.

s

:

6-5

remarks, to
Afli.

aias-aov,

795

. (-5
,
'

5,

coalesces into a single term, being practically
Cf.

FAoen. 307-9

vvas, &C.

The
an

letters

ea,

though broken, are practically certain. Dochmiac trim., the first member 103-4

=

catalectic, the third with

irrational first

believes that which is obviously wrong. 105. The papyrus has 8voiv and secondly because the is a serious corruption, first on account of the form '. But although dual neuters words would naturally mean 'his children' not your children Phoen. 582 i^ ivhs are certainly rare, they do occasionally occur, e. g. /. T. 487 in Xen. Cyr. v. 4. 51 Aristoph. Birds 1464 ^repS, Lysist. 291 bio the and though the expression is not clear, no doubt could arise concerning or intended meaning. It would be easy to complete the line differently, e. g. therefore leave the text as nearly corruption. iKUae but not easy to account for the questionable authenticity. as possible in the form in which it stands, while quite admitting its ; which no doubt might readily produce ol Murray ingeniously proposes but the collocation does not seem quite satisfactory. and, as Murray remarks, is more 106. Ba[*c]x[iov] suits the space better than

there

,

W-M

;
-

,
,

^,

,

^

,

We

' €,

[«][4

io6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
=

)

probable in itself in view of the extremely common use in Euripides of In Statius, T/ieo. v. 283-4, Dionysus in aiding Thoas to escape from Lemnos promises to watch over his fortunes /u lato paire7)i covimitte pro/tindo. Succcdam curis. del yap (cf. Nauck Fr. inc. 864 but 107. Perhaps is excluded by the accent on o. is less hkely. cf. Fr. i. ii. 17 for the circumflex on 109. as INIurray suggests: but the sense of the passage III. Possibly remains too obscure for a restoration. 152. On this appearance of Dionysus and the purport of his speech cf. introd. p. 28.
:

.

\<,

^^

:

;

8],

^Frs. I. iv.

in 1. 9 are doubtless references to the Argive army (cf. in 1. 4 and Fr. 65. 36 and 60. 62), and the speaker is perhaps Amphiaraus, in which case the fragment should probably be placed with Frs. 61-3 in the gap between Frs. 60 and 64.

Pr. 67. The rubbed papyrus
it

is

is

quite likely to be lyrical, but does not

very similar in appearance to the bottom of Fr. seem to join on there directly.
i

i. iii

Frs. 68-9. Fr. 68 cannot be placed in Col.
Fr. 69 belongs there.

of Fr. 64, nor

is

it

at all likely that

Fr. 70. Possibly
not

come from
2.
]i

the
:

same column

or

5.

This may be a

.
this

fragment belongs to the top of Fr. 64.
as Fr. 77.

i ;

cf.

note

ad

loc.

It

does

lyric verse.
lines, this

Fr.

I. V,

Fr. 71. Since the recto contains beginnings of where the recto is blank.

fragment does not belong to

to be definitely

Fr. 72. This piece approximates in condition to Frs. 18-9, but not closely enough grouped with them.

(not Fr. 73. 4. absence of the context it

)
is

is

inserted above the line apparently as a variant on of course impossible to give either the preference.
:

d

:

in the

Fr. 76. 3. The insertion above the line is puzzling the two sigmas are clear, and at a short distance from them is a vestige of what seems to be another letter. Fr. 77.
4.

The

slight vestige of the first letter
if it

would

suit
ii,

.
but

Fr. 79. This fragment looks as
it

belonged to Fr.

i.

we cannot

find a place for

there.

Fr. 86. 3. A vestige on the edge of the papyrus above the top of the Q a breathing or belong to another inserted letter.
Fr. 90.
4.
4.

may

represent

This

is

probably the
c

last line

of a column.
;

Fr. 96.
letter is

The supposed

and

the

has been corrected apparently from was merely crossed out, being followed by a .
slightly

but perhaps the

first

Fr. 97. In the margin
horizontal strokes below
it.

above

1.

i

is

The remains do

with two what appears to be a small not well suit either one of the dramatis
is

personae or a stichometrical figure, though ^

=

1400

Fr. 116. Judged by the manner 'of writing, is more probably part of the text than a marginal dramaiis persona, though the blank space below would suit the latter hypothesis.

[

just possible.

Fr. lie. This
like

is

an accent

is

some

perhaps part of a marginal note; little way above the ^.

cf.

Fr. 64.

i.

50-1.

The

stroke

853.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
853.

II

107

Commentary on Thucydides
Height 20-5 cm.

II.

Late second century.
Plate

IV

(Cols, xvi-xvii).

These considerable portions of a commentary upon the second book of Thucydides belong to the large find of literary papyri which produced 841-4 and 852, and consisted originally of about a hundred fragments of varying sizes, Excluding the small unplaced two-thirds of which have been pieced together. fragments, 19 columns (about 600 lines) are preserved, divided into eight separate sections which we have called A-H, and covering the first 45 chapters of the book, though with large gaps at certain points. Like 842, which was written

commentary

on the verso of a long official document from the Arsinoite nome (918), this is on the back of a series of non-literary documents from that district. A detailed description of these texts is given under 986 here it is
;

necessary to state that the writing proceeds in the opposite direction to that of the scholia, and that at least three originally different papyri have been joined together to form a roll of sufficient length for the literary text. Cols, i-iv of the
recto

(=

Cols,
;

xix-xiv of the verso) belong to a survey-list of confiscated

house property Cols, v-viii of the recto (= Cols, xiii-viii of the verso) are in the same hand and of a similar character, but are concerned with property in land,
the writer, a

comogrammateus of the
start.

village of

Hadrian, making a fresh

Col.

viii

of the recto was cut

Oxyrhyncha in the i6th year of down the middle and

joined to another second-century document, Col. ix (=Col. vii of the verso), containing a return by sitologi which has itself had the beginnings of lines cut
off
;

the line of junction corresponds to the margin between Cols,
Cols,

viii

and

vii

of

the verso.

x-xv of the

recto

(=

Cols, vi-i of the verso) belong to a third

document, a second-century account concerning loans of seed-corn to cultivators
of

Crown

lands.
script of the

commentary is a small and neat informal uncial, with a tendency to lapse into cursive forms, especially in the letters, e and , and presents much similarity to the hand of the Oxyrhynchus scholia on Iliad xxi (221). The circumstance that one of the documents on the recto is dated in A. D. 131-a provides a terminus a quo for the date of the text on the verso, which on

The

palaeographical grounds

is

not likely to be later than A. D. 200.

Probably 842,

852, and 853 were
Iota adscript
is

all

written about the
(e.

same

time,

rarely

g. x.

15, 31, xv. 34)

somewhat later than 221. omitted. There are no stops,
;

and accents, breathings, and elision-marks are used sparingly

but paragraph!

io8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

occur frequently to separate the notes, and the lemmata project into the left margin by the width of one letter, as in the Berlin Didymus papyrus, and are
separated from the notes referring to them

new

quotation the scribe begins a fresh
is

by a short blank space. line. The common angular
lines,
t

With each
sign (some-

times doubled)
diaeresis.

employed

to

fill

up short
is

and
(v.

occasionally have the
15, vii. 28, xv. 4, xvi.
i ]

The concluding word
full
;

of a note
first

four times

abbreviated, even though in the

two cases there was plenty of room

to write
in

the word out in

but of the conventional abbreviations often found
(cf.

com-

mentaries of this period

from 35 to 38 lines, column proceeds. There are a few corrections, all due to the original scribe, who was not a very careful copyist, so that several minor alterations in the text, cf. 22, ii. 19, 28, vii, 24, ix. 13, x. 27, chiefly due to omissions, are necessary
;

856} there is no trace. The columns contain the beginnings of which tend to slope away to the left as the
e.

g.

i.

XV. 4, 38. Of the eight sections into which the papyrus

falls,

A contains Cols,
i

i-iii

in

a very

fair condition,
is

external evidence

and the beginnings of lines of Col. iv. So far as the is the concerned, there is no special indication that Col.

original beginning of the writing

on the verso, but since the first note refers to the opening words of Book II, it is probable that in Col. i we have the actual commencement of the work, and that the roll did not contain our author's commentary on Book I if he wrote one. i. 7-iv. 9 is taken up by a long discussion

of the criticisms directed against Thucydides' method of writing history by Dionysius of Halicarnassus in his extant work -nepX ©ovKvUhov, so that by the end
of Col.
iv

our author has only reached

c.

2. 4.

B, comprising the two well-

and covers cc. 2. 4-8. 2, has no connexion Since the writing on the recto of after which there is a gap. with that on the recto of C, it does not help to decide the width of the lacuna between these two sections, but the internal evidence of the scholia shows that at least one column and probably not more than two are missing between Cols, vi and vii. C, which contains the two damaged columns vii and viii, begins D, containing the upper half of Col. ix, at c. II. 4 and reaches c. 13. 6.
preserved columns

and

vi,

follows immediately after

A

follows

C

without an interval, and
c.

down
14
;

to

1.

18 covers

c.

13. 6-7.

Fr.

i,

how-

ever, apparently refers to

14.

i

and probably belongs
for

to the lower part of
15. i,

Col. ix,

which no doubt covered

all c.

begins at

c.

and though, as

far as the verso is

concerned, there might be a column or two missing between

D

follows and E, the writing on the recto makes it practically certain that Col. immediately after Col. ix. While Col. i of ( = Col. x), which covers cc. 15. i17. I is in moderate preservation. Col. ii (=Col. xi) is represented only by

three small detached fragments.

The exact

position of that containing parts of

853.
11.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES

II

109

1-3
11.

is

of

15-7

obvious from internal evidence, while that containing the beginnings is fixed not only by its suitability to this context, but by the
11.

writing on the recto, and the accuracy of the position assigned to the third

fragment, containing parts of
of Col.
xii is
c.

14-21

(Fr. 2), is
lines

hardly open to question.
lost

The

next section, F, consists of the ends of
xiii,

of Col. xii and three quarters
is

covering

cc.

17. 4-24.

. That

anything
is

between Cols, xi and

most

unlikely, but after Col. xiii there

a long gap, since

G

begins at

34. 5.

In this section

we have

the ends of lines of Col. xiv, then three well(xviii)
(cc.

preserved columns (xv-xvii) and the beginnings of lines of another
ing cc. 34. 5-41.
3.

cover-

35-45) is noted in xiv. 3. After Col. xviii there is another considerable lacuna in which probably 3 or 4 columns are lost, and (Col. xix) has only the ends of 18 lines on a fragment dealing with c. 45. 2, near the conclusion of the funeral oration.

The beginning

of the funeral oration of Pericles

The
narrow
his great

date at which these scholia were composed can be fixed within tolerably

Dionysius of Halicarnassus came to Rome in 30 B.C. and issued work on Roman Archaeology in 7 B.C. {Ant. i. 7. 2), while Q. Aelius Tubero, to whom the treatise on Thucydides was addressed, is probably identical with the consul of 11 B. c, so that our commentary which discusses that treatise
limits.

cannot be earlier than 30 B. C. and is not likely to be earlier than 10 B.C. On the other hand, since the MS. itself is not later than A. D. 200, the composition
of the

and

it

commentary can hardly have taken place likely that it was written soon is more

later than
after the

Hadrian's time,

beginning of the

Christian era.

MSS. and of and are rarely of great value either for the elucidation of the text or for quotations from other writers and in spite of the greater antiquity of our commentary it is but little Our author's interest in Thucydides was superior to them in point of quality. mainly grammatical, and most of the notes are devoted to the explanation of words,
extant scholia on Thucydides, derived from the Byzantine
fairly full,

The

varying dates, are

but do not display

much

learning,

;

phrases, or constructions, with frequent paraphrases of clauses or even whole

sentences which were

difiicult,

especially in the funeral oration.
vi.

Questions of
In exegesis
;

spelling and accentuation are discussed in v. 12-5 and

25-8.

our author displays more intelligence than the extant scholia (e.g. v. 1-3) and though many of his remarks are trivial enough, his opinions on several wellknown and much disputed passages have some importance, as supporting now
one, e.g.

now another
X.

of the

25-30, xiv.

6-1 1, XV.
cf. v.

modern commentators, or suggesting something new 16-24, xvii. 16-9, 23-9, and 31-3. But his
is

authority cannot be ranked high, for in several places his interpretation

certainly

wide of the mark

;

22-9 (two explanations of the

infinitive

(^,

no

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

both of which are unsatisfactory), ix. 4-6 (an impossible explanation of ctt' as equivalent to a-no), xix. 4 sqq. (a hopelessly wrong interpretation of than his exegetical remarks are his critical ...)• Of more interest recorded in xiii. 13-5 was for notes on the text. The variant (vii. 29), which occurred in our already known, but neither
author's text of Thucydides II. 12.
(vii.

; ^
of
c.

(
2,

nor the alternative reading
into the existing

in the
all

note

€€€4•, a reading ignored by our
(xiii.

30) have found their

way

MSS., which
is

author.

Of

real value
felt

have the note on

20-3), which explains the origin of a long

corruption in the text

22. 3.

In the rare cases where the

commentary

deals with historical or
it

geographical rather than with grammatical or textual questions,
disappointing.

is

singularly

The

brief indication of the position of

Phrygia

in xiii. 16 slightly

modifies the current view of the site of that unimportant village, and the note on

the temple of Dionysus at

Limnae

(x.

7-14) might have been of some value

if more complete, but that on the Anthesteria (x. 16-8) merely confirms what was already known to us from other sources, and such annotations as vi. 16-24 and xiii. 25-8 are elementary. Our author, indeed, exhibits a very limited acquaintance with Greek literature. There is not a single quotation from other Greek historians, and apart from the discussion of the criticisms of Dionysius, the .]os (apparently an earlier only prose writer of any kind who is referred to is commentator on Thucydides) mentioned in x. 11. A well-known quotation from Pindar, which in its later proverbial form is also quoted by the extant scholia on Thucydides, occurs in vi. 34-5, and there is a passing allusion to the Erech. .

thens of Euripides in x. 3

;

but the only other writers with

whom

our author

shows familiarity are Homer and Callimachus. The former is quoted by way of illustration not less than ten times (iv. 6, 17, vi. 9-10 (?), 14-5, vii. lo-i, 27-8, ix.

^-^

xiii.

17-9, 20-1, xvii. 18-9, xix. 6-7), the interpretation in the last instance

being singularly perverse, though in accordance with that of the earlier Alexandrian commentators, while the citation in
9-10, note).
ix.

^-6

is

quite inapposite
xvii. 18-9,

(cf.

vi.

The

text

is

uniformly the vulgate except in

where our

author probably relied on his
is

memory and quoted
(x.

inaccurately.

Callimachus

cited twice, the
(x.

first

quotation

7-10, from the Hecale) being partly extant,

the second

mode of treatment between this commentary and the extant scholia it is surprising that the points of actual agreement are so few. The most noteworthy is the Pindar quotation alluded to above (vi. 34-5), but even here the scholia quote the saying as a and in a slightly different form. Elsewhere there are occasional verbal similarities, such as would be expected from any commentators covering the same ground (cf. e. g. notes

37-8) new. In view of the general similarity in

-

853.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
19-20,
xii.

II

iii

on

but amid and there innumerable divergencies no striking coincidences are found anywhere, of the extant is no reason to think that our author is one of the direct sources scholia, while even an indirect influence upon them seems unlikely. The somewhat unfavourable impression which our author makes as a comV. ^^, viii. 7-9, ix. 10, x.

10, xiii. 17, xv. 16, xvi. 19-24)5

mentator on the text of Thucydides is improved when we turn to his discussion As of the views of Dionysius about Thucydides' methods as a historian. himself to greater advantage than as a grammarian, a literary critic he exhibits and his defence of Thucydides is both just and sensible. Dionysius, whose whole treatment of Thucydides though not wanting in learning and acumen 9-20 of his De is marked by a lack of appreciation of his real merits, in cc.
the following chapters

mode of dealing with his subject-matter, 21-55) being concerned with his style. Dionysius' criticisms on the former topic are represented as coming not from himself but from Tildes, i. e. his predecessors, and his objections fall under the three heads
Thticyd. Itidic. censures the historian's
(cc.

and ^^epyaaia (c. 9). Our author replies to the criticisms under the first two heads, briefly summarizing cc. 9-12 in i. 7-33. To Dionysius' on firstly Thucydides' choice of a division accordstrictures with regard to ing to summers and winters in preference to the years of the archons or Olympiads or the geographical arrangement adopted by Herodotus, and secondly on the
of biaipeais,

,

^?

consequent want of connexion and abrupt transitions in his narrative, our author justly retorts that there was no reason why Thucydides should have chosen
to reckon

by archons

or

Olympiads
(ii.

(ii.

of narrating events according to localities
the Peloponnesian war

6 sqq.), and that the Herodotean method was quite inapplicable to a history of

15-27), concluding with an effective argMneiitmn ad hominem against Dionysius (ii. 33-iii. 1), whose own theory of what system of chronology ought to have been followed is shown to be open to the objection con-

system cerning abrupt transitions which he had brought against Thucydides. of dating by the years of the archons or Olympiads which began in the summer would in fact disturb the sequence of the narrative far more than Thucydides'
division of the year into

A

which in describing military operaa passage which is much mutilated, our 7, tions is author deals with the supposed want of connexion in Thucydides' narrative, and shows that this charge is exaggerated. In iii. i8-iv. 9 he contradicts Dionysius'

summer and
In
iii.

winter,

the most natural one.

2-1

criticism directed against the ra£is, that in his account of the origin of the

war

Thucydides ought to have begun by of Athens, instead of postponing this to his description of the commonly alleged causes, the Corcyrean and Potidaean incidents. The point at issue between our author and Dionysius is here more debateable. No doubt a modern historian
it,

describing the true cause of

the rise

112

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

of the Peloponnesian war would in agreement with Dionysius prefer to begin with a sketch of the rise of Athens rather than to introduce this subsequently as

a digression.

I from the point of view of Thucydides' aims arrangement adopted by him is quite defensible. as expressed in his preface, the As our author points out (iii. 22-30), Dionysius was wrong in thinking that Thucydides was under an obligation to give an elaborate account of events preceding the Peloponnesian war. Probably his desire to avoid becoming involved

But looking

at

Book

an undertaking was one of the chief reasons for the postponeFurther, our author's dictum in of the rise of Athens. iii. 30-iv. I about the duty of a historian to relate the obvious before the remoter causes of events is at least as true as Dionysius' opposing aphorism inc. 11 that
in this so serious

ment of the sketch

true causes ought to precede false ones, the fact being that no a priori rule can be laid down on the subject, which has to be settled with regard to expediency.

an annotator, our author must on the points in dispute be credited with a fairer appreciation of Thucydides than his adversary, one

Whatever

his demerits as

of the ablest

critics

of the day.
of the

Can our author be identified with any Thucydides? The answer, is, we think, in
mention
three
of
their

the negative.

known commentators upon The extant scholia
Asclepiades),

sources,

Antyllus,

Asclepius (or

and

Phoebammon.

of the question. to have been a rhetorician rather than a grammarian, are quite uncertain, and might therefore fall within the period (about 10 B. C.-A. D. 140) in which the

Of these Phoebammon, who lived in the fourth century, is out The dates of Antyllus and Asclepius, who is generally thought

author of our commentary wrote

;

but the slightness of the connexion between

it

and the extant scholia (cf. p. no) excludes the likelihood of an identification with Nor is much more to be said in favour of identifying writers utilized in them. our author with any of the other rhetoricians or grammarians who composed
commentaries upon Thucydides
Doberentz,

^^

probably lived in the time of Hadrian, which barely falls within the right period, and to judge by the title his work seems to have consisted of short arguments, not a detailed commentary. Julius Vestinus, who also lived under Hadrian, and
wrote an

,
Dc

Scholiis in Thtic, Halle, 1876.
vTToOicreLS

5 ,€,
;

cf.

E. Schwabe, Leipz. Stud.

iv.

pp. 81 sqq.,
-nepX

Numenius, who wrote

t^s
&C.,

commentator upon Thucydides.
probably
in the first century,
it

}

in

QovKvUhov, was apparently a lexicographer, not a regular The title of Claudius Didymus' work, composed

indicates that

was quite different from our commentary, as were the
or
in

Evagoras of Lindus, also probably

;
the

first

century.

Didymus

^ \4€,
written

/,

by

853.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES

II

113

though a contemporary of Dionysius, is also, we think, out of the question, it is very doubtful whether he wrote on Thucydides (cf. Pauly-Wissowa, Real-encycl. v. p. 460), and his recently discovered commentary on Demosthenes is almost entirely historical, not grammatical, and abounds in quotations, being thus far removed in character from our papyrus. Caecilius Calactinus, who was also coeval with Dionysius, has no stronger claims than Didymus to be identified with our author. He discussed and quoted Thucydides (cf. pp. 57-8 and 193-6 of Ofenloch's edition), and though Dionysius {Ep. ad Cn. Pomp. 3. 20) calls Caecilius the two critics seem to have had controversies (cf. Ofenloch, But Caecilius was primarily a rhetorician, and that he wrote a gramp. xiii). matical commentary on Thucydides is improbable. Sabinus (time of Hadrian), Tiberius, and Heron son of Cotys (dates unknown) wrote upon Thucydides about which nothing further has been recorded, and since our commentary is technically a it is possible that one of these writers is identical with our author but it is more likely that he was some obscure Alexandrian grammarian whose works were not long preserved, and whose name even is lost. Of his influence on later grammarians (apart from the Thucydides scholia already discussed) we have not discovered any clear trace, though cf. x. 36-7,
for

,
;

,
i.

note.
It remains to examine our author's text of Thucydides, in so far as this can be ascertained from the lemmata. The chief MSS. fall into two main families, CG and ABEFM, of which the former is now generally considered to be superior.

As

usual, the text of the

papyrus
xiii.

is
;

of an eclectic character and does not con-

sistently agree with either family

but

it

supports the

ABEFM

group seven

times

(cf.

notes on

6-7,

only four agreements with the other (cf. notes on vii. 37, xiv. 25, xvi. 29, 31). Several new readings occur, of which we append a list.
(i)
i.

7

(c.

I. i) V.

1.

€ €5
for
for for for

(2) V. 5

(c. 2.

4)

(3) V. 21 (c. 4, 2) (4) V. 30 (c. 4. 3)

.

(5) vii. 15

(c.

II. 9) 12. 2)

(6) vii.

29

(c.

(7) ix. 3 (c. 13. 7)

vno for

(8) X. 15

(c.

15. 4)
22. 3)

(9) xiii.

20

(c.

. {^ . ^ . . €€, .()
above the
line for Odpos

13, xiv. 4, xv. 15, xvii. ao, 30, xviii. 24) against

only

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MS.).

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v.

1.

par ivovroiv^ for

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for

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(10) XV.

34

(c.

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bpq,
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114
(11) xvi. 25 (12) xvii.
'3,^

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
(c.
(c.

39. l)

l•a(a for

Statrcojueroi.

40. 3) avToi for 01 avroL

shows that

which confirms a conjecture of Hude, and (9), where the note is an interpolation, are undoubtedly better than the readings of the MSS. On the other hand (7) is certainly wrong and (i),(ii), and (12) may be merely due to mistakes on the part of the copyist of the papyrus (cf. his omission In respect to the other new in ix. 3) and in any case are not likely to be right. readings there is little to choose between them and the MSS., the sense being hardly if at all affected by any of them. As regards the passages in Thucydides

Of these

(5),

which have been suspected of being corrupt, the explanation of supports the conclusions of modern editors, and there is some reason to believe
that the formidable anacoluthon in the
16, note)
;

MSS.

reading at

c. 7.

2 did not occur in

but elsewhere the papyrus, like other Thucyour author's text (cf. vi. dides papyri (cf. 878-880), tends to confirm the ordinary text even where Thus in c. 15. 4 (x. 15) the words alterations have generally been accepted.
rfj

\

Usually regarded as a gloss, are found, and neither Cobet's insertion
c.

of rod in
(x. 31)

15.

4

(x. 7,

note) nor Lipsius' transference of
c. 4.

in c. 16. i

and c. 16. (. 25, On the whole our author's text, though not on a level note) are confirmed. with the first-century fragments of Book IV (16 and 696), and perhaps affected to some extent by errors of the copyist, is a good one, and its early date gives it
nor the proposals to omit words in
2 (v. 21-2, note)

considerable value.

we have received U. von Wilamowitz-Mollendorff and J. B. Bury some suggestions are also due to Dr. C. Hude and Mr. H. Stuart Jones. We give the text and reconstruction in parallel columns, the lemmata being
In the restoration of the very imperfect text of this papyrus,
assistance from

much

Professors

;

distinguished in the latter

by thick

type.

In the notes Schol.

= the

extant scholia

on Thucydides.
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.
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6 [(]

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[6
col.

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853.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
/€[

II

133

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?

35

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Some columns
lost.

\<

6\1^[

.

134

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Col.

xix( = H).

[

]€

[.

.

[

]'[.]6[.
]/^pe/ceo^[.
[

.

[

5

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.

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.

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kv

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.

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][

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.

.

Unplaced Fragments.
{a)

To

Cols. i-vi.
Fr. 3.

Fr. 3.

]xp[

'\8\^

^

'\.8\^

]

7[

853.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
{b)

II

135

To

Cols, viii-xiii.

Fr. 4.

Fr. 5.

Fr. 4.
(?)

]/>[
]/9€7•[
]5eTi;[

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Fr. 7.

.

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]

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.

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s

]

.

Fr.

6.

Fr. 8.

Fr. 6.

Fr.

7.

Fr. 8.

]ero[.

.

136

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
{d)

To

Cols, xiv-xix.
Fr. 14.

Fr. 14 (to col.

XV ?).

Fr. 15.

Fr. 15.

I'^'si

853.
Fr. 24.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
Fr. 25.

II

137

Fr. 24.

Fr 25

138
his subject.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Secondly it must be remembered that it is the duty of every historian to describe accurately first of all the obvious and commonly alleged causes of events, and if he .).' suspects the existence of any more obscure reasons (to add these afterwards
. .

.

of the two extant MSS. of this treatise one Trepi i, 8-9. iv ad this book following upon the has no title, the other has en nep\ Cn. Pomp. -34. The passage of Dionysius here summarized is De Thucyd. lud. ed. Radermacher, pp. 335 sqq. (cc. 9-12). Of Dionysius' three objections, the first, relating to the division into summers and winters (11. 12-15), corresponds to 335. 20-336. 12, the second, concerning the want of connexion (11. 15-20), to 336. 12-338. 3, and the third, O" the first two points concerning the causes of the war (11. 21-33), to 338. 4-343• 4• similar criticisms are also made, but more briefly, in the same author's Ep. ad Cn. Pomp.

;[]

: 8
...
to

\€,

.

and by Theon, Progymn. pp. 184-5 ^"^^P and Doxopater, ad Aphthon. ii. p. 220 rovro yovv
C. 3,

,
2 2.

Oepos

For the correction of

(p.

338)

'';
7-8.


\

.
11.

The

restorations

^? ?)
(or
^]f (cf.
1.

€ '(,
elnelv

^^ 88
nves

,
cf.

nves

\

...,

suggested by

.

W-M,

Dionys.

op. cit. c.

10

and

iyeyovu are due to Bury,

who

in

8-9 suggests

ov k[oiv6s

10. \vTov is very likely

],
as
11.

4).

referring to Herodotus.

Bury suggests
op.
cit.

eV r^i

as

the preceding words.
11. Perhaps
151.

],
|

Bury suggests;

cf.

Dionys.

c.

9

The

construction of

15-7

would supply something would restore 11. 13-5
17,

like ov

The vestiges of writing before [. probably parts of two letters, e. g.
19.

[
is

not certain.
in
apxjf\
1.

at

.], or .
re,

[]

proposed 15; Bury, reading [e"peiv
tovs

... W-M, who

\'[
suit e
:

^]
not

nXa[r]aiica

]
,
is

[8€(] in
in
1.

17,

...
being

however, do not
to

if

or

A

conjunction, i.e. te or

wrongly connected with what follows.
31. raCra: or
i.e.

by Bury.
iii.

,
and

seems

have been omitted through

-

they are

affairs

belonging to the

same

series,

which

preferred

3-5.

refers to the seventh, not the sixth,

our author's than the numerals

Were suggested by W-M and Bury, ttj ' presumably book of Thucydides. That in reckoning the eight books notation followed the letters of the alphabet, as in the books of Homer, rather

€]

[€

The existing division of Thucydides' is unlikely, though cf. iii. 10-5, note. books was already known to Dionysius, who mentions the eighth in op. cit. c. 16, and though there were other ancient divisions of the work into nine or thirteen books, our author no doubt agreed with Dionysius in employing the system which Marcellinus ( Vit.
work
into eight

Thuc. 58), quoting AsclepiuS, calls 5-6. Bury suggests makes it probable that the preceding letter 8. The absence of a diaeresis above It does not seem possible to find was a consonant, e. g. SiiceXjtKa rather than cannot be read, although the for a suitable second adjective ending in is more probable, or some part of supposed is very uncertain. ]poi there seems to be an optative, possibly especially as [ could be read in 1. 7. e\epeva e'ljeTaffti» (Bury) is CTVi/eijpot. In 11. 9-10 something like els]

.

€\ ^.]
[][

[]

. ]. [, ][
7[]. ea[s

.

likely.

853.
10-5.
1.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
11.

II

139

The

restorations in

12-3 are due

to

Bury.

It is

tempting to read

\\

in

, !
iiveT

must then be ignored, for it is not a rough breathing. Since 14, but the stroke above Herodotus' history contained only nine books, <! in this context seems to mean the ninth
letters

book, the notation following the

of the alphabet, while

indicates that

it

had just been mentioned, possibly in 1. 1 2. But the narrative in the ninth book is particularly should expect the ninth book to be called ff (cf. iii. 3-5, note), free from and
so that the suggested explanation author seems to have had in his
the praise of Herodotus in
iv. 4-5. a\va
c. 5. is

not satisfactory.
is

mind

,
in op.
i.

The passage
9 (p. 336)

in Dionysius

cit. c.

oiire

yap

toIs

...

:
;

which our iv oh ai
cf.

also

€[

:

there

is

probably a reference, as Dr.
1.

12. 14) calls the Homerica dtspositio {,. weakest part of one's rhetorical forces in the middle (//. iv.

what Quintilian

(v.

Cornificius,

Rhet.m.

in 1. 13. in 1. 12 and 10-4. Perhaps The Homeric quotation is 15-7. The restorations in 11, 16-7 are by W-M. from 504. 18-31. This note is out of place and should have preceded that in 11. 15-7. In 1. 27 Tivt\s is possible, but the doubtful letter is more like o. and Bury, refers as was perceived by 33-5. The first part of this note on being adduced as a parallel. to the use of the middle for the active,

\
(corr. tO

E. Sandys suggests, to i.e. placing the 297-300); cf. Cic. Orator 50,
6

^^),

J.

10, 18, Quintil.

vii.

10.

]|7;?

"•
is

V. I.

[]€:
WevTo.

supported by Schol. Aeschin.

\

eVi

be

67
5.
:

MSS.

7—8. Cf. Schol.

ieos'

or rjieaav here as elsewhere in MSS., which, however, have the form Cf. the first century (i. e. ^<^av) found in our author's text. place of the more correct with the variant Thucydides papyrus from Oxyrhynchus (16), which in iii. 7 has

.

12. els:

€ .
is

wrongly explained by Schol.
yap

i.

\

29

,' ^
... The

, ^

W-M

\

Correct interpretation given

€€ .
\
iv

by our author
',

? yvv iv

6

Xeyerm
Xeyet.

by Rciske, but wrongly)

'

is

with iota adscript from The object of the note is to distinguish the Attic as a trisyllable, the form found in Homer, &c. the 17-9. This is the only place where Thucydides uses the masculine form of The Clarendonianus and Aeneas Tact. 2 have neuter occurs in Thuc. iii. 23 and viii. 42. vKOTei in the present passage, but the papyrus supports the overwhelming majority of the MSS. The papyrus text agrees Other MSS. 21-2. eK^>vyeiv•. SO Parisinus 1735;
the reading of A, which is preferred ievyev is by many recent editors, but not by Stuart Jones. The construction of Classen connects the words with iepovs, difficult, and has been explained in several w-ays. as an infinitive which is the most satisfactory view, \vhile Poppo constructs them with in order that they might not escape ', and Kriiger regarded the phrase as of purpose expressing the effect ' so that they could not escape ', an explanation which produces Hude, following Herwerden, a tautology with the following words Our author's criticism is not very illuminating. altogether. would omit should be omitted and wore put is redundant (11. 22-6) or else He remarks that either ivyfv in the one case, and by els Since he renders in its place. in the Other, both his interpretations approximate to that of Kriiger rather than means in respect of, in which case our author's first the rival explanations (unless els

;

with most

MSS.

in reading

oi

in place of

'

ieev


'

, 8(( .
ieyev

I40

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

explanation agrees with Classen's), but both seem to rest upon a misapprehension of the or the transference of it to For the omission of construction of the whole sentence. without any conwould have the effect of leaving the place occupied by struction, unless indeed in our author's text a fresh sentence began where the MSS. have in that connected with what precedes. No variant, however, upon passage is known, and it is more likely that our author simply misunderstood the

8(

sentence.
30.
:

papyrus
the note
6

in
cf.

Cramer, Anecd. Par. iii. p. 84. 3 rhv HesychlUS KaXovpfvos ecmv Schol. and the similar explanations in other lexicographers.

33,
vi. 1-2.
e. g.

,
:

MSS.

;

but there

The lacuna
(cf. X.

in

1.

2

is

right,

reading 7r^[

(e. g.

the stroke in the margin against

[, ) \
cf.

Schol.

at the

3

1

)

Or

or

, \\
is
1.

end of 1.

i

may havo

aS

W-]\I SUggCStS,
is

,\. , ,
is
.
,

possibly a reference to the reading of the

With
,

contained another parallel for
|

['

').

If

[

a natural restoration, but this

2 is obscure.

There

The meaning, if any, of not excluded. is in the top margin another stroke /,

which seems
3. It is

to

be accidental.

,
1

(or as conjectured by Bredow and of course doubtful whether Baumeister) occurred in the lemma, which may have ended with tiv(s as Bury suggests, meaning that this use of 6-7. Perhaps was not confined to Attic. To the doubtful the only alternative is t. must belong to 9-10. A note on the dative in place of the genitive after a quotation, which WOuld be expected to be from Homer ; and though neither of the two and in the I/l'ad (n 816 instances of 55 ^^ "? '^°^ ^^ nevertheless may be right in restoring is really at all apposite, and supposing that the latter passage was referred to. Schol. A had noted that the

^^ ?

|

,
A

.)

more relevant illustration would be one in \vhich was used for with the genitive, but it is difficult to see with the dative was used in place of (cf vii. 30) points to whence this is to be obtained without altering
dative there

'

?.
|

W-M

\

(, .,

. ^
,

is

rather long,

and the

a variant upon
1-2.

to7s

more

but the letter following is much than i. 14-5. The Homeric quotation is from 467. unless the line was exceptionally long, but after 1 6. There is not room for might be inserted. It is unfortunate that the text of this passage, in which a well-known The chief MSS. have difficulty occurs, is not quoted in extenso.

(

.?),

though none
Xe'yei

Bury suggests
be
a, e,

likely to

or

. ^^ [
is

[
:
.
.

known.

:

.\.

rols

will not construe.

Poppo and

i. e. to Hude follows Herbst in emending ; (with apparently one late MS.) ; Classen preferred the Stuart Jones read . alteration of vavs to vrjts, while Cobet boldly met the difficulty by reading Bohme). It is impossible to arguc with certainty from our author's paraphrase in 11. 16-20 back to his text of Thucydides at this point ; but seeing that he ignores any grammatical difficulty, it is improbable that such an anacoluthon as Aawoai/xowois

£€ {
.
.

^

eXoptvois vavs

€( ^ ^

whlch

. vavs existed in his text. With regard to the various emendations the parasimply a note phrase does not favour in place of vavs or and with on the dative of the agent Avould be expected. On the other hand Cobet's (or would suit the paraphrase very well, especially as the construction of the sentence would then be quite easy, and no grammatical note would be

%

)

4€ ,

general sense of the passage seems to be (i. e. the reference of W-M) as far as possible, the rule concerning accent a pronoun to another person than the subject of the sentence) often prevents this '. But the here. lacunae make the whole passage obscure. Modern editors accentuate Stob. Flor. 50. 3 ^livSapos 34—5. Cf. Schol.
its

,
necessary.
21.

the corruption.
viii.

Thuc.

^
26.

853.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
difficulty

II
for

141
the

But the great

would

still

remain of accounting
to

origin of

W-M.

25-8. The rules for the accentuation of ovv Herodian, ed. LentZ, i. p. 555 sqq. ore

.

eyeipovat
;

cf.

{

TlivSapos' 2 2^ Schol. ' but this now seems hardly Schroeder (Fr. no, ed. 1908) writes satisfactory in view of the uncertainty of the metre and the agreement of our author with Stobaeus. The precise restoration of the lacuna at the end of 1. 34 is uncertain. 6 is possible, if our author was not aiming at an is hardly long enough, but exact quotation.

, ! , , ( , ^, [
the rules quoted in the notes
'

The

expedition

of Hermocrates

Ionia

is

described in

' ^^
ore Se

and

similar

pronouns are given by
ertpov

exepov

ad he. from the Homeric scholia. The here is enclitic, for although one ought to keep

!'
[;5

.

Xeo.

vii. I.

The

writing on the recto

'

6-910.

The
For

(
is

-

-

1

\

extent of the gap between Cols, vi and vii cannot be determined by the e'| cf. introd. p. 108. ; LI. 1-3 are the end of a note on

\

in C. II. 4•

restorations are
far

due to

W-M.

12-3.

\\
it

}\\
to
is
is

']\)\

cf. iv. 6.

quotation is from from certain; the supposed

The

is

difficult

find anything

([],
just

and there
impossible,
15.

room

for [voiai]

[
].

suitable

for the

']

.
\

539.
is

more

like

or

previous word.

W-M

, but with proposes
]oi,

o]rt

The

article is Certainly

less suitable

than

in the two lacunae, but and might be read in place of

[]

,

wanted before though not
but
it

is

not

satisfactory to
:

make
:

transitive.

MSS., Stuart Jones. ; can be suggests ; but though might belong to e or read in place of v, and the vestige which we regard as the tip of an suits the space better, and the author of the commentary or several other letters does not elsewhere employ the first person plural. With this lengthy note on eV
18.

[}][]

the papyrus confirms the conjecture of possibly ], as

[]([

Hude

W-M

[][]

cf.

the brief remark of Schol.

eV W— and 27-8• The Homeric quotation (identified by

20— .
29.
is

\avTi

^\-^

8

.

was known

previously, the MSS. all having not found elsewhere in Thucydides, and the present is quite defensible. was Suggested by Bury. 34. Other MSS., but cf. Schol. (sic) C, 37.

Thucydides employs the future infinitive after more often than the present, and where the MSS. are divided on the point, in i. 107. 3 and viii. 6. 5, editors prefer the future.
viii. 4.
5•
. .

[.|^ :
:

neither this reading nor

, . ^
\
is

?.

W-M)

from

i.

a variant mentioned in 1. 30, The perfect middle of this verb

127.
i

Hude proposes to The word following
eXavveiv, to

restore the line
is

[

probably some part of

'^/

.

e.

g.

somewhat here and

;

cf.

Thuc.

i.

.

which

11.

4-5

refer.

142
7—9. Cf. Schol.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
($' '
eLeeias
aei

by Bury.
11.
12.

Probably the scribe wrote

six letters.

[] []
and
Perhaps

10

letters.

line rather long.

33-4. Perhaps
ix. 3—6.

\6
lemma

[^
is

[],

.
the

in

I.

8 waS Suggested
for

for

lacuna

is

hardly sufficient

are both too short for the lacuna, which requires 9 or which makes this should be restored in place of

with

6[

36. Kol nepiaiperav has already

been quoted

The MSS. have
in the

The Omission of probably a mere accident, and does not imply that the words were wanting in our author's text, though this seems to have gone astray at this point. The ,.. is is indefensible if which stood there in place of reading cannot be for as our author clearly intended to be connected with in this sense, and the Homeric parallel which he cites, used as equivalent to there has its not uncommon sense 'to the 492), is irrelevant, since
.
.
.

,

,
.

\

(
in

[,
;

1. 35, as Hude suggests. in the lemma in 1. 29.

.

,

.

accompaniment of.
10.

,
The

(

insertion of

[

\

The reading though possible, is less suitable. suggested by Bury. ... depends on is a parenthesis, and 14-6. [kJukXoi» Se referring to Thucydides' words a few lines later than the lemma, and Bury ; waS Suggested by in 1• 14 has been cannot be read. The second s of [. or
cf.

[]:

Schol.

' was
.

!

],

.

.

[]6[

\[ .
:

.

[]

'\^\

W-M

rewritten.
18.

On the one hand the colour and general appearance of the fragment suggest that it belongs to this column, and at the beginning of a line giving a new entry of the landwhen placed where it is survey on the recto of Fr. i will come just underneath at the beginning of another entry which is on the recto of the upper part of Col. ix, while the lines on the recto of the fragment containing the ends of viii. 22-9 (the position of which is fixed) may be the continuation of the lines on the recto of Fr. i, though there is no certain connexion. The chief objection to the position assigned to Fr. i is that on the recto of the upper part of Col. ix there seems to be a junction between two selides, which would be expected to appear also on Fr. i, but does not. have, however, been unable to find any suitable place for the lemma in 1. 23 in 14. i, and if that restoration is accepted, the position commencing except
22-8.

][] The

Hude, Stuart Jones. SO MSS. ; position assigned by us to Fr. i is not certain.

?

We

given to Fr. i must be approximately correct. A difficulty arises in 1. 26 where [•]/[ The is a very unsatisfactory combination of letters, and probably there is some corruption. projects somewhat to the left, but not enough to justify the inference that it belongs to a lemma.

\_

.[

,
7.

X. 2-4. Bury suggests 6. The word following
TO

SO MSS. Hudc, following Cobet. The a blank space after as if the lemma ended there, but probably this is a mistake; cf. x. 25. The remains of 1. 10, as was perceived by and Bury, belong to a quotation from the Hecale of Callimachus (Fr. 66 a ed. Schneider) see Schol. Ar. Frogs
;

scribe has

left

\\ \' \]
ttjs

\ '\\

''^'

may, as Bury remarks, have been

\
()

[

»/].
or

..

216

,

.

W-M
;

]'

:

853.
riyov eopras,
of

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
6

regards the quotation as beginning with fv Se in 1. 8 and containing two complete hexameters, but this view is open to some at the end of 1. 7 implies that 1 1 letters are lost objections. The restoration after whereas elsewhere in this column the corresponding space contains only 5-8 was abbreviated, but letters. This difficulty can be got over by supposing that (which is certain) is sufficient in 1. 9 a similar and more serious obstacle arises ; for will be the conclusion of by itself to fill the lacuna at the end of the line, and since the first hexameter, the first foot of the second hexameter seems to be reduced to ei. which makes excellent sense, but involves a supplement of 12 letters proposes The e of ft[ has been corrected from a straight stroke (probably i) but the in the lacuna. being the only alternative for ei and less satisfactory. Bury reading is practically certain, in 1. 7 on the other hand would restore a shorter name than ?), and regard the Callimachus quotation as beginning with in 1. 9, reading the preceding word as i. e. But that Callimachus' name was mentioned in 1. 7 (cf. x. 37), and that 11. 8-9 belong to the quotation, seem to us more probable. On Eleuther, the eponymous hero of Eleutherae, who is said to have made the first image of Dionysus subsequently brought by Pegasus to the temple eV at Athens, cf. Pauly-Wissowa, Real-encycl. s. vv. Dionysos, Eleuther, Eleuthereus. II -2. Apparently the point of the contrast between this statement and the Callimachus quotation is that according to the latter the temple at Limnae was called after Dionysus as god of marshes in general, while according to the other explanation Limnae was merely With in 1. 11 jo? is the termination of a proper name, e. g. a local name. ; ovi[o\i, being the termination of an adverb or a substantive but it is possible to read ]cus
codd.).

,

and Steph. Byz.

W-M,

restoring

!.
Aiouvaos
in
1.

II
8e

143

\5'

...

(

7,

8[,

?

"[,

W-M

(,

.
e.

[

[

in the genitive with

not satisfactory.
15.
is

reading of the lemma may be a mere error, but Boeckh's view that there were four distinct Dionysiac festivals at Athens, the Greater and Lesser Dionysia, the Anthesteria, and Lenaea, the Anthesteria might be called the ' most ancient instead of the more ancient ', i. e. than the Thucydides' statement that the Anthesteria was a general Ionic festival Greater Dionysia. veatTepa ewre ecm is intended to prove its high antiquity, and cf. Schol. TTj 1/3' so MSS ; most modern editors follow Torstrik in regarding the words as would be expected. The papyrus not iv a gloss. With a mention of the day shows, however, that the interpolation, if it be such, is very early. Our author's note concerning the date of the festival is in accord with the extant evidence on the subject cf. Pauly-Wissowa, Real-encycl. i. p. 2372. AB (corr. A 2nd hand), SO most MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones ; 19-20. tls, ... cf. Schol. With ei'j which Torstrik wished to read, omitting

in itself defensible

:
:

g.

[] .

{'\ would however then have to mean Thucydides, which
MSS. The

]

\8~

is

;

for accepting

'

'

,
note.

\

,

.

][€]:

]

ei?

2
fails

',

.

.

^.

There can hardly be any doubt
;

that the

(

to leave a blank space

cf. x. 7,

The

difficult, and the construction of the dative some recent editors, including Hude, would omit the latter word. That our author's text had is discussed by is clear from 1. 30, and the difficulty of connecting it with him in 11. 25-9, but the nature of his explanation is somewhat obscure. Apparently

as equivalent to in place of he regarded Trj thus approximating to the view of Herbst, who explained the dative as instrumental and this, however, produccs a very redundant con(i. e. T^s supplied ; struction. is rightly restored in 1. 25, the beginning of the note seems If

.

^

[0

€€

€ )
.

, ^ ' ^
lemma ends
at

although the scribe
ol

following words in Thuc. are being extremely with

.

,

144

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
'

mean rfj mark if oi ...,
to
;

air.

Schol. merely remark that

29-30. nected with
cf. xiii.

7,

SO MSS. (v. \. Hude and Stuart JoneS folIow 31. ; after Lipsius in placing following r is almost certain, being the only alternative. [01] does not fill 33• The nav\TO[s] is possible. is not the termination of e. g. up the lacuna, so that

[\['\

note.

( ([ .:
be

[

or a different verb in 1. 25 be connected with bia might be read in place of the doubtful must be abandoned e or
:

goes with with either

oi

',

and

...

IS

a distinct reo.

is

for

...

refers to the position of eVi

TO

(restored

by

W-M)

was Suggested by Bury and Hude. 35-6. and vaos is also stated by Ammonius: vaos 36-7. This distinction between yap vaos 6 The distinction is not alwayS observed ; cf. The quotation from Callimachus (from the Hecalet', cf. x. 7, Liddell and Scott, s.v. note) is new.
|

^ ,
Schol. remark
xi. 14-5.

8.

.,
is

']

,

).
means
'

^.
the

which is to be congrammatical sequence is
'

.

\

The

accent oi ap\yos points, as

W-M

lines as a quotation of the

well-known

oracle,

which occurs

perceived, to the restoration of these e. g. in Schol. Theocr. xiv. 48.

but here and have connexion with the reading [ya]t7/[f, that, since it belongs to the note, not the lemma, there ought to be only one letter lost, but the scribe sometimes begins his lines unevenly (e. g. in ix. 26) and occasionally treats words belonging Possibly, however, he wrote to the note as if they were part of the lemma (e. g. in xvii. 31).

The beginning

of the line

commonly

cited as

changed places.

A

difficulty

arises in

,

[][.
1 6.
1 7.

Perhaps
is

given the barytone accent in order to distinguish
like

].
Classen,

began with something
Stuart Jones suggests.
xii. 2-3.
5.

6

The restorations are due to W-M. may have been added in the lemma after

in the paraphrase indicates that

of the allies at ordinary view ;
6.
7.
]
.

The occurrence of our author explained as referring to the assemblage Sparta not to the conduct of the war, thus agreeing with Herbst against the
cf.

e:

the vestige of the

(Bury)
TO

...). In place of (W— Bury SUggestS Line 14 clearly contains a comparison between and but the reconstruction is There is certainly a letter after uncertain. and the vestige suits better than is nominative plural this may be accounted for by the plural use of If if it ; is dative singular something like is required. (W-M) would have been more satisfactory. but does not fill the lacuna 17. It is tempting to restore oi Possibly Pe]trot [. .] should be read, but the letter following before ?. than is more like

.
12.

.

Stuart Jones suggests cf. Schol.
:

The word before was probably an equivalent of (W-M, who compares Bekker, Anecd. or p. 400.
i.

])(

. \^ ] . ' ] ,, ^, [ ] ,
ad
loc.
first letter

^[
would

it

from

\

\ ^,
.
perhaps
7

The note probably
aS

suit

or

best.

(P 588).

)

'.
$•.

'

[\

]5

'] []

\

IT

and there

is

not

room

for

[].

19. Lines

19-32 are on a detached fragment.

The

writing

on

the recto confirms the

853.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
W-M

II

145

internal evidence of 11. 24-7 that these lines belong to the lower portion of Col. xii, but the extent of the gap, if any, between 11. 1 8 and 1 9 is uncertain. remarks, a form like 'EXeuirlimSe, but though 23. The accent of abe suggests, as than t. the letter before aSe might be v, the letter before that is more like e, o, or does not suit may be t instead of , but 24. The letter before is also too long, so that the size of the initial lacuna, and [trepuhi'iv there is no objection, but the word does is practically certain. To the form The doubtful might be read as a, , or not seem very suitable in this context. 27-9. The restoration of the beginning of the note is due to W-]\I, who further

suggests
fkivaovrai

]

{)

(?) oi
eZ

^.[\\

cf.

Schol.

ine^iaaiv'

^
el

^ [ ) ^^
^.
[
.
but

[]4 ^((\,
ol

does not

suit the vestiges.

€.

belong to a note on being adduced have a stroke The first two letters of as an illustration ; cf. iv. 32-5, through them, but this is to be regarded as accidental, not as implying deletion. after a long 7. A note on the construction of avToU, which depends on bnvbv The reading «'[^'5? is not very satisfactory, for the traces of ink suit o, , or better interval. is the technical phrase required here ; cf. the close parallel in x. 29-30. than e, but MSS. are divided between this reading and (CEG), which accord13. ing to our author (1. 14) was found 'in some copies', and must have been a very early Editors also differ; Hude and Stuart Jones prefer variant. 1 6. Apart from the present passage in Thuc. Phrygia in Attica is only mentioned eW twice, (l) Schol. Arist. Birds 493 epia, (2) Steph. Byz. S. V. eari Bursian {Geogr. i. p. 334) conjecturally placed it in the neighbourhood of Acharnae at the north-east foot of Mount Aegaleus. Since the site of Athmonon is fixed {idicf. p. 343) at the modern village of Marusi, which is 7 kilometres west of Acharnae, the statement of our author that Phrygia belonged to the Athmonian deme does not accord with the position assigned to the village by Bursian, although Athmonon being an important deme may have stretched some way to the west. Our author is likely to be right on the point, in spite of Steph. Byz.'s assertion that Phrygia was between Boeotia and Attica ', which suggests quite a different position. hi The Homeric quotation is from 298. SO Schol. 17. lieipaaioi MSS. (cf. 878. 6 Hepaaioi B), which 20. a term nowhere else applied to a Thessalian tribe, continue and has generally been rejected by critics as an interpolation due to a misspelling of in Arcadia, who are out of place here, while the form Tieipaaioi a confusion with the in accordance Avith Sirabo ix. p. 435, and Steph. Byz. s.v. is generally altered to did not stand after The reading of the lemma proves that in our author's text of Thuc, while his note shows that he knew of Uapaaioi (or Uappaaioi) was originally a marginal That as a variant on netpao-tot, but rightly rejected it. is now clear, variant which found its way into the text, causing the transposition of and the hypothesis of an interpolation is confirmed. As regards the form Utipaaioi the and in view of the fact lemma supports the traditional spelling of the MSS. against seems the alteration to that Steph. Byz. mentions a certain Ueipaaia menas connected with the Our author's explanation oi to us unnecessary. is there somewhat uncertain tioned in 766 is however very doubtful, for the reading and litept'i; besides Ufipijj), and Steph. Byz. distinguishes (there are variants from
the next
(c.

xiii. I. This line, restored by Hude, and the use of the middle in place of the active in

clearly

20. 4),

([(\

^

For

«Ve^-

:

'.

,

,

.

.

\

6

8(€

..
;

^

\ \

'

:

.

.,
:

? .

,}

, ,

L

146
22-3.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
;

Hude

cf.

The restoration of these two Unes 'ApKades, Schol. UapaaioC

was proposed by

€.
Toiis

W-M,

Stuart Jones,

and

does not fill the 29• The restoration of this Hne is far from certain, especially as Perhaps the lemma ended lacuna after av, unless those letters were unusually spread out. belongs to which would then be followed by a blank space, and ol with

\]

. ]5
the note.
4.

[\
in

\

Xiv. 1—2. Part of a note on alu

iv


no doubt

-ye

iv

The
1.

restoration in
title.

1.

2

is

due
eV,

to

W-M, who
is

is

right in regarding

3 as a

That before

evi

the papyrus had

which

omitted by

CG,

is

certain not only

from

the size of the lacuna but from ev ivi in the paraphrase, i. 6. 6-1 1. The proposed restoration of the paraphrase is very doubtful in several respects. suggests, may be Substituted, or possibly Kivbvvo[s yap, as For

not very satisfactory, but there is not room for avhpS>v\ Toioif^Tovs In 1. 7 either or an equivalent is required. may be n-, but neither The doubtful is possible, with another word in place of avhpi. like nor ] can be read. Our author seems to have interpreted being and not as the subject of it Poppo and Classen, as epexegetic of eV omitted), which latter view is supported by Schol. and now advocated by Steup ; cf. Classen's Thucydides, ed. iv. p. 221. suggests (cf. Schol. as 13. Perhaps (Bury). iv pay 15-20. Bury restores these lines yap
with
elvai

^[\ ^[(\ ] \. [/ €1'[
in
1,

7

;

\\

)
[^]
2 2.

^
is

\

W-M

\()[

(
|

[],
CG

rloii

\5.
:

,8^
\
word

W-M

8 ), •,
']
|
|

^, (

6\

above

it,

indicating either a numeral or

25.

^
if

author meant
yap

27—31. Bury suggests
. . .

\.
so
2.
7r[a\\iv,
is

The

letter

(beginning with a vertical stroke) following
cited like
in xix. 5.
;

32-3. Bury is probably right in assigning these lines to a fresh lemma, not to the preceding note, although 11. 30-1 paraphrase words not included in 11. 24-6.

:]\
yap
;

ABEFM.
tiv

It is

of course possible, but less likely,

^
;

has a horizontal line
that our

'

8.\ y^a.

'

XV.

which can hardly be evaded,

as a reference back to

...

in c. 11. 2.
vi

he had one, an adverb.
4.

Hude. After -/ it is difficult to see what other word than can have been meant, but that was certainly not written the letter following irapa is conceivably , but is much more like y or , and is out of the question. 6. so most MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones C (second hand) and superscr. G.
:

[]
'

lost in the

gap between Cols,

may be explained, as W-M suggests, Our author's note on that passage, and vii. The word after eipi;K[f]«/ is probably

:

the papyrus follows the ordinary spelling of the

}

MSS.

7-1 1. In regarding as equivalent to our author is quite correct, but in paraphrasing as for the advantage of he conflicts with modern editors, who practically This all adopt the view that is supported both by the variant for and by several parallels for this use of eV (especially Thuc. viii. 53), and suits the context much better. The interpretation Avhich our author rejects in 11. 7-8 seems to be right in its interpretation of h, but is wrong with regard

=

. .
;

853.
to the

which cannot mean in this context inhabit meaning of in 1. 7 and bioiKUaOai in 1. 10. by the contrast between has the barytone accent to distinguish it from 14. Hude, Stuart Jones ; SO ABEFM 15.
'

,
:

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
',

II

147

as

seems to be impUed

\\

16.

21-2. This explanation of the obscure phrase
Xeyet

tovs

and in accordance with this supposed reference to the Spartan fvyivfuiv kings the phrase has generally been interpreted not because he is sprung from a particular class ', while Classen thinks that the meaning is not because he is supported by a political Our author on the other hand party ', and Herwerden wished to read yevovs for not according to the equal share to which he is entitled as a member of interprets it a democratic state', i.e. honours are distributed not in equal shares but in accordance In 1. 25 Bury suggests |[] (which is possible) followed by a participle with merit. long, but is too or infinitive meaning will be assigned iv COUld be read), and in 1. 26 cf. note on 1. 38. or possibly 33. vno\y\f'iav apparently may be a mere slip of a copyist, rt MSS. 34. hpa T(
'
'

?, ? ,
cf.
'

8:

(/),

.

Schol.

,

/
oiTivts

18.
is

CG.
Schol.

novel.

remark

.
'

'

[]([] ()
:
:

'

occurs in the paraphrase
38. ov\x

his paraphrase is not very accurate at this point.

does ..., and Madvig conjectured not harmonize well with the following words would be appropriate enough. To to which Reiiferscheid read avvno}j/iav in 1. 33 is possible, for though it would produce 13 mostly broad letters in the lacuna as against only 11 in 1. 32, there are 14 letters in the corresponding lacuna in of lines seems to have sloped 1. 34, and in the lower part of this column the beginnings and in away to the left. But it is more probable that our author read ; TTTfiovTes was merely giving the general sense, obtaining his negative from

,
cf.

{]
"

\^^
if

] {^][([

].
in
...
1.

;

(xvi. 2).
:

our author's text had the ordinary reading Thucydides' phrase e's

33,

\/,

] (€

Schol.

'eKtytv

iaph

\([

would suit e. g. , but hardly o, so that of a letter following may be read in place of the doubtful v. improbable, (Bury) is unsuitable, but ]s may well be the end of a participle. h{]\kov\ (Bury) does not suit probably refers to Toi 9-10. [. .] a, , or , the second to be a round letter, t.^.o; or possibly [ the first letter seems to be
xvi.
5•

The vestige

is

^. ^
, '.
;

\(/

'

]-

[£]^[^']9

.

.

.

)

might be read.
19—20.
Tols
di

18. a\pfi: so
21.

frequent in Schol. on cc. 37-9;

.[]
24.
.

is Whether MSS., the verb being 25. text (e. g. inadvertence, or implies a diflferent arrangement of this sentence in our author's an is Uncertain. other MSS. and Dion. Hal. SO CG, Hude, Stuart Jones; 29. other MSS. re: SO BCG, Hude, Stuart Jones 31. suprascr. Gj, ex SO most MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones; 33. corr. f, and Dion. Hal. aUi: so E, Hude, Smart Jones; aei other MSS. ; cf. 1. i8.
.

: 8€ ) (:
[(]
:

\ /
Hude
with
:

E;

other

cf.

Schol.

Tov.hovs:

cf.

Schol. *'

MSS. ' /^. '
cf.
1.

33.

:

similar

remarks (e.g.

cf.

also xvii. 6-9.

(

.

')

"

are

;

^

L 3

148
xvii. 1-2.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

away immediately to practically no doubt,
3.

Fj g. It is disputed whether being omitted (so Poppo and Steup), or is a kind of adverbial dative (so Classen, 3rd ed.) our author's paraphrase in spite of the use of iv is compatible with either view. 16-8. This explanation of as a comparative used in place of the simple adjective agrees with that of the ancient grammarian quoted by Poppo (who practically accepts this view) while Other explanations, e. g. Classen's, attach greater significance to the comparative. 18-9. The quotation is from A slight error has crept in, for the MSS. have 294. €( Te, not atVi which will not scan. With ev it is necessary to supply 20. eu evi CGfg, Hude, Siuart Jones. so ABEF the verb, as is remarked in 1. 23 and evi is no doubt preferable. 21. e]Tepois: SO MSS., Poppo and Stuart Jones; erepa Classen; irepois erepa Hude following Richards, The traditional reading is defended by Poppo on the view that erepoL refers to the poorer classes of Athenians who were too busy to take part in the administration of public affairs, but able to form a judgement on them, and that the persons meant by With erepa or are the richer classes, an interpretation which is rather arbitrary. crf'pois eTepa both halves of the sentence refer to the Athenians in general, the second half emphasizing the same idea as that expressed by the first. Our author does not explain epya precisely who are meant by erepoi, but since he took epya in the sense of he seems to agree with Poppo's view that hepoi refers to the poorer classes. ol Cf. so ABEF, Poppo, Classen CG, Hude, Stuart Jones. 30.
:

.
is

' '\ ,,
:

&\ ,
the
left
:

'7[

and

\[
of

especially as

;
are
it

on a separate fragment, and the margin

but the position assigned to the fragment admits of belongs to the top of a column.
;

and Hude SO the best MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones
SO Bur)'

a predicate of

?

\
;

is

broken

W— .

eV

,

:

;

;

' :
31.

epa

;

1.

35, note.

by mistake included Kpivopev in the lemma. The note explains decide upon proposals invented by others ', implying a contrast with ' originate new ones ourselves Our author's interpretation thus supports Poppo's translation aid mdicamus certe (^ab aliis proposiia) aut excogitamus {nova) recie, against Classen's entweder bringen wir die Sachen zur Entscheidung, oder suchen iiber sie richtige Einsicht zu gewinnen'. Hude. The papyrus (Set AB) MSS., Stuart Jones ; 34. [brf TojSe

The

scribe has
'

Kpivopev as

meaning

'

().
in
1.

'

:

may have had [\
35,

[]:

].

MSS.
is

;

cf

30,

where the MSS. are divided,

may be

right there, but here

distinctly better.

xviii. 12.

may
14.

\[
explain

AB. MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones; 1 9 and the restoration of 1. 22 were suggested by Bury and Stuart Jones, the restoration of 1. 21 by Bury, who proposes in 1. 18 and
:

7]'

The note was doubtless on have occurred here, or, as

es, upon which Schol.
suggests,

18-23.

€]
by

W-M

so most
in

. '
is
. .
.

remark

am oveKs.

1.

24.

€]:
Perhaps

ev, eve.
1.

in

20.

4]

(W—

)

an alternative in
C.
epyois

1.

19.

Schol.

SO most

MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones;

27.

we[piyiveTai, as

W-M proposes.

and Bury.
restorations are mainly due to Bury,

]

was suggested by both him

29-33• These lines paraphrase the sentence of Thucydides following the lemma. in 1. 29, who further proposes

€]

?

The

in

I.

31,

reading
well as

35-7.

was the before the lacuna, and if xix. 1-3. There is a blank space after re and 11. 2-3 end of the line, 1. i probably belongs to a note on are a lemma. It is possible, however, that a couple of letters are lost in the lacuna after That all in which case that word belongs to the lemma and 11. 2-3 to the note. and the same three lines belong to a note is less likely, for 1. i would then be too short objection applies to regarding all three as a lemma, while in addition it would then be necessary to suppose the omission of a whole line

, .
853.

COMMENTARY ON THUCYDIDES
in

II

149
difficult

and

A

The paraphrase does not help in regard to the 1. 32. which many critics have wished to alter. note (restored in part by Bury) to the effect that exei governs

'

as

,
for

;

and must apply

,

4-7•

The Homeric
if

quotation (from A 117) is cited in order to illustrate the use of his comment for our author considered that Thucydides also employed

{

).

points out, that the quotation is intended to however, as in that case our author's remark applies to the converse of Thucydides' use construction Avas i. e. he thought that the in his opinion was for
It is possible,

.

to

,

though in

reality there is

no

justification for interpreting

there as
illustrate

W-M
;

;

, which
Which-

..., which makes

Sense.

ever view we credit him with, our author seems to have completely misunderstood the meaning of the sentence, and the Homeric parallel makes matters worse ; for is not there used for though on this point he is only following the singularly perverse interpretation of that passage by the Alexandrian critics ; cf. Schol.

,

Our
11.

author's lack of
.

7-8
are

the real antecedent of
errors
in

[

\

judgement
. .

in explaining

.
[,
this

A

Thucydides' meaning
that
is

• , ,.
is

made

still

clearer

by

.

is

It is

be supplied with ^s•, for understood, and the words which are truly impossible to acquit him of having committed a series of
to

meaning

his attempt to elucidate

badly constructed, but

not particularly

difficult

sentence.

854.

ArCHILOCHUS,
3-7

'EAeyeta.

X 3-3 cm.

Late second century.
is

)
Bergk
but

The extreme

smallness

of this

fragment

very unfortunate, since the

coincidence of the last four lines with a quotation in Athenaeus proves the

author to have been Archilochus

;

cf.

Athen. 483 d

*).

An

(=:Fr. 4 including these four cited by addition to the aa lines which,
ev 'EAeyeiots
all

?

?'

,
'

Plate

I.

(sc.

...

Athenaeus, are

that survive of the 'EAeyeta, would have been very welcome
is

;

seems to have come from an extensive roll (cf. note on 1. 2), the recto of which was occupied by a cursive document dating probably from about the middle of the second century the seventh year of an emperor (Antoninus ?) is mentioned. The literary text on the verso, written in rather small round uncials, need not be
in its present

mutilated state the fragment

practically worthless.

It

;

I50
referred to a

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
much
later period,

and

may well

fall

within the same century.
significance.

Two

accents occur, besides

some marginal marks of uncertain

]

[
.

[

Seinuoi/

5

€^[ ^ (\
aye
[epvOpov
cy

[

^\^\
2.

[€^
Sta

\

ovSe

is most naturally explained as marking the Sooth line of the 852. The papyrus is broken immediately above the , but a slight vestige is left which we suppose to represent a stroke over the letter. Of the marks below the second horizontal line and the vertical one beneath should perhaps be combined as a critical sign referring to 1. 3, to which they are really opposite ; cf. the dash

The marginal
;

manuscript

of. e. g.

opposite
6.
7.

1.

5.

aye
Ko'CKc^v
:

'.

re

A
ev
:

A, corrected by INfusurus. and editors, but an Aeolic form found in Anacreon

may
9.

be right here.

,

9. 2,

A, eV Mus. But the reading in the papyrus is not satisfactory would be belter than two, and the traces after the second e, if not absolutely inconsistent with v, suggest a round letter like . Moreover the accent is wrong. But we can find no suitable alternative the fourth letter can hardly be o, and therefore does not suit (conj. Bergk) is inadmissible.
v.

([]

one

letter

between

and

!

;

^
855.

;

MeNANDER ?
13

X

16-3 cm.

Third century.

New Attic comedy, though inconsiderable more than usual interest, bringing before us with much vividness a scene to which we think there is no exact parallel in the extant remains of either Greek or Roman comedy. A slave Daus has been detected and caught by an indulgent (1. 13) master. Laches, in some act of villainy connected with an inheritance (1. 18), and Laches proposes to have him burnt alive. Daus is perhaps bound to a stake his fellow-slaves, to whom the victim appeals
This fragment of an unidentified
in size, is of
;

855.

MENANDER?
;

151

and Laches and pile them round him Wilamowitz, to whom we are much indebted in the reconstruction of this text, supposes that the slave had taken refuge at an altar, where however the right of asylum would not protect him from being burnt. At any rate the language plainly implies that it was not his master's object merely to dislodge him from a place of sanctuary. Of course the grim scene was not acted out, and no doubt Daus eventually escaped but that it should be carried so far is a significant indication of the Athenian attitude towards slavery at this period, and the passage may be placed in contrast to some others where a more
vainly for mercy, bring out faggots

himself carries the lighted torch.

;

humane tendency
bovXovs b€

is

displayed,

irXeove^La

of slaves was peculiarly favourable at Athens, and though a master had the

power of punishment he might not
de caede Herodis, p.

'

738

For perhaps the law was stricter in theory on this point than in practice. the burning of slaves Wilamowitz cites the fragment from Euripides' Syleus (Nauck Fr. 687) in which Heracles in a servile position says ... Murray suggests that Laches only wished to frighten Daus, and was playing a big practical joke. That is a quite tenable hypothesis, but perhaps

, ^
e.

g.

Philemon's (KevOipovs
95).

(Kock, Fr.

^

rfj

^
:

It

is

said that the position

legally put

them

to death

;

cf.
. .

Antiphon,

ol

tovs
.

hea-noras
.

.

^^^

,

'

iraTpLovs

but

],

not

much
;

is

gained by

it

so far as the rights of Athenian slaves are concerned.

was to be burned, and seems rather to take it for granted he makes no protest against the illegality or the unheard of barbarity of the act. There is a general similarity between the scene, in the papyrus and that in Aristophanes' Thesmoph. 726 sqq., with the essential difference that Mnesilochus, for whose burning preparations are there made, is a free man. The identity of the play to which the fragment belongs and of its author Wilamowitz would refer it to some other poet than is quite uncertain. Menander on the ground of the occurrence of the article at the end of a verse at But this is not a very 1. 23, to which there is no parallel in the Cairo papyrus. be more than outweighed by a conclusive argument, and it seems to us to remarkable linguistic coincidence between 11. 13-4 and a citation from the

Daus

certainly thought that he

Perinthia

;

cf.

note

ad loc.
of

two columns, the second of which is in fair in medium-sized sloping uncials of the common third-century type. Double dots and paragraphi are employed to denote the alternations of the dialogue, and, as in 211, 852, and the Cairo Menander, the names of the speakers are sometimes inserted, in a more cursive but
There are
remains
text
preservation.

The

is

written

perhaps not different hand.

Stops, mostly a high point (one in the middle

152

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ii.

position occurs at the end of
discrimination,

5),

are freely used, though not always with

and marks of

elision are also frequent

misplaced) and a

mark of long quantity
origfinal scribe.

{=

;

two accents occur (one
All these lection signs

kv).

seem

to be

due to the

Col.

11.

5

Col.

i.

]
15

€\/€:
:
:

po

[

20

Unplaced fragment

^^
[.
.

]^[ •'€€
[ [

\av8aKo\ov6ei\^

[.

.

.]•€€ .]'^€€^ ]€ € ([.])( .]€€7 €\>€€^€€
.]
.

.]'•[. .^.]€(\€€•
auyera
.
: .
.

^^
^^
: :

[

'' €/[.][
pay
[

•)(8(

]/
.

]8'€^€)(

[

]

[

[

€ \()
:

€[.]

.

855.

MENANDER?

153

Col.

()
5

[]
eVeira

'^

]

[] , ^\'\

[ , ^ ,
'

ii.

[,

.

[]

[

[7]*

[
(.)
15

] [
\

[

[
€€
;

,

;

])

;

'' €]^, €,

]€.
;

'

ye

().

' ^^

(.)

., , , . \\[ ],
(.)

€ (.) ,

€^ .
;

Ade,

. \
.

k[v]

.

(.) d

(.)

6

kv6aS

2

[

]
]
]

[

[

. (). ][]. ^ ] €
(.)
H^iv
ixj)
I

€[€]

Tibius (?) ., and do you, Getes, follow me. Tibius and Daus. He is coming out with faggots there is the fuel and the fire. ? Getes, would you then leave me to be burnt, Getes, me your fellow slave, and your preserver What have we against each not desert me now ! Will you disregard me ? Surely you will himself other ? Here comes Pyrrhias, with what a load on his back I am undone Laches
' . . ;
!

is

following with a lighted torch.

154

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Laches. Put the logs quickly all round him. Give an exhibition, Daus, of your cunning by finding some device and escaping me here. Da. J find a device ? La. Yes, Daus for to deceive an easygoing and careless master is mere foolery. Da. Ohl La. But if one feels his brains turning to ashes were you hurt ? Da. Not by you, master. La. This rascal, this rogue, has lately in a cowardly manner (made away) here with
;

the inheritance of

my

dearest

.

.

.'

i. )3( ) is in the same hand as the interlinear dramalis personae in the next In the Cairo Menander papyrus the names of speakers are frequently added in the right-hand margin of the column to which they refer, and that might be the case here, though /3( ) suggests no likely name. Perhaps a name frequent ), e. g. in comedy, may be read, though there would then remain an unexplained mark below the first cf. note on 1. 21. But of course the word may not be a name at all. Col. ii. 2. The supplements were suggested by Wilamowitz. For [<cX»j/itari6]ar cf. Aristoph. Thesmoph. 728 and, for 661. 19. were common names of slaves. In the line cited from Menander's 3• Tt'/Sioi and Thettale as rot (Kock, Fr. 231) Bentley proposed to read ..., but as the second syllable of the name is now shown to be long, the rot is

Col.

column.

(

(),

;

(/6
is

,
[].

superfluous.
4.

quite clearly written,

and there

is

no necessity

to

emend

to

though that might have been expected. 6. [vvv], which makes an apposite contrast to the aorist

The

only objection to
(cf. e. g.

it

is
is

the stop after

accurate
7.

we might read

]

1.

The

,
to

,

8\,

^
be

(
,

is

due to Wilamowitz.

3) this

not a

fatal obstacle.

but as the scribe's pointing is not always If the presence of the stop is to be pressed,

[].
may
but

there does not

8\
in
11.

8. 6

[

g.

The

.'
seem
of

letter

before npos, of which only a very slight vestige remains,

be room for nvp]pias Wilamowitz. Cf. Aristoph. Progs 730

and Schol.

II. Restored

was inserted by Wilamowitz.

after the

In

1.

second 10 after

papyrus

may represent a stop, but it is further Even if 5 and 6 and, since an object for nepieer is desirable, it is better disregarded. the stop were certain, this would not necessarily preclude the suggested supplement ; cf. note on 1. 6.
3-4.
Cf. for the language

had been written. an indistinct spot on the edge of the away from the final letter than is the case e. g.

(!
Menander
15.

\

{nporepov)

^.
(^ 7).
. .

Menander, Perinthia (Kock, Fr. 393) "Otrrw

,
;

'

'

Such a
cf.

Striking similarity

seems to us to point to

,
(. ^

as the author of our fragment

introd.

appears to be an exclamation not otherwise attested.
r]i]

Wilamowitz compares

Euripides, I/erc. Fur. 906
16.

sentence et . is not completed, a wince on the part of the slave of his brains' ashes leading Laches to break off with the question single stop instead of double dots should have been placed between and : the latter word is also wrongly accented. This passage seems to be much the earliest
at the idea

The

A

instance of the use of Hieracos. 2. 18

^

in the sense of

.,

(or

which

cf. e. g.

Demetrius Constantinop.

1 8.

tm
suit the

8ia b(i\iav

:

855.
cf.

MENANDER?
Toiv

Aristoph. Peace 241

(Wilamowitz).

Whether

'
this

i55
and Schol. Rav.
explanation Avould

in

(?) present passage remains uncertain owing to the mutilation of the context. 19 would be consistent with it. papyrus being damaged 19. There may have been two dots, not one, after ]8, the in 1. 20 is attributed to Since the place where the lower dot would be placed. is probably to be Laches, a change of speaker must have intervened in 11. 19-20.
1.

]8

m

€[]

restored rather than
21.

might also represent double dots, but the vestige before With regard to the name of the speaker inserted above the should then be read. and Hne, we read n]i{p]ptai on the strength of 1. 8, but the traces preceding the termination suggest those are extremely slight, and though not inconsistent with ][.^p they do not a name possibly to be recognized in the first column (cf. note adloc), would letters.
Perhaps
]

]. ^,
at

(]8

2[],
The

in

some ways be more
23. 24.
article
last

suitable.

the

end of a verse

is

noticeable;

cf.

introd.

This
letters

line

was

apparently the

of the column.
fix

We

have failed to

the place of this small fragment.

The

suggest

Ti'0[tof.

856.

Scholia on Aristophanes' Achamians.
Fr. (a)
1 1

-9

X

5-9, Fr. (i) 10-2

5-1

cm.

Third century.

two fragments, preserving parts of two successive columns. The long interval between the subjects of the last line of Col. and probable the first remaining line of Col. ii shows that the columns were tall, the They were also proportionately broad, height of the papyrus being over 30 cm. These scholia are contained
in
i

and the compact writing combined with extensive abbreviation enables the scribe On the same scale another column would have to economize greatly in space. in brought him to the end of the play, and the commentary was thus completed series of similar commentaries, It may well have belonged to a three columns.
and
written evidently not to be classed as a collection of school-notes. It is century ; the several in rather small sloping uncials, apparently of the third paragraph! notes are divided off from each other by double dots, accompanied by used as single high dot usually follows the lemmata, but is also occasionally
is

a system an ordinary stop; accents and breathings are sparingly added. The resembles that of the Berlin commentary of Didymus on Demoof abbreviation besides words shortened by the ordinary sthenes and of the and writing a letter above the line, the method of omitting the termination
;

following

'=

,
As

more conventional abbreviations occur y'=
-=

close

in no be seen from the excerpts quoted below, the scholia stand source for the relation to the extant scholia, of which the principal

will

,

'

^ = ?, =

, ]=

:

or

, '= , = , ,=
^
€tVt.

= ^,

156
Acharnians
far
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
the

Codex Ravennas.
;

The papyrus
vv. 392-444,

notes are usually not only

shorter but also less frequent

for instance, are covered in

On the other five lines whereas in Dindorf's edition they occupy four pages. hand words or phrases are sometimes here selected for comment which in the extant scholia are passed over (cf. 11. 9, 29, -3,^, 37, 38, 44, 68), and the notes are occasionally quite full, e. g. those on vv. 614-7 similarly a more precise explana'>

tion than that of the scholia

is

noticeable in

1.

^^.

Verbal agreements occur here
indeed, there be any historical
in

and
is

there, but

they are nowhere striking and scarcely amount to more than

natural in a treatment of the

same

subject.

If,

connexion between the annotations of the papyrus and those represented
mediaeval MSS.,
it is

the

of a very slight and distant character.

In the commentary below Schol. means the extant scholia, which we cite from the edition of Dindorf, with some modification from Rutherford's transcript of the Ravennas.

Fr. {a)

Col.

i.

^
5

]

r\ai^

]oL
]y

...

67

15

* ]]€
:

]? 6€[)

] €]
]

{) (?) ]()
8(e)
:

]

] nepi

108

?

118

€^(

)

120
127
134

:

)(^ {?)
[]
:

140

]
]
](VOtS

160

]{•)

]

e^cv

856.

SCHOLIA ON ARISTOPHANES' 'ACHARNIANS
"[oi

'

157

20

(€)

:

TOUT

158
Fr. {a) Col.
[

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ii.

Yv?i[

[....]
[.]ifaX(
)

{)
OL

a[.

.]

.

[
6[

55

$
5(e)

' KaOas

?

{) {
€is

erepoL

tov[s

€[€€

{)
(
:

{)
ois

6

vovpyiai

€6(5) -^- [ {) {) [ €€€ € €{) [
:


{€9)

€€[ [
(eiai)

()• [ (5)•
Se

?• '('$)• €[('-$)•
Tep[qs

5
[

TTTCpov anei
Xe(yei)

584

589

595) 59^

597
e

598

603 605
614

65

eXeyov

[ $• €€{?) [ (§)
5(e)

{)

€[

ۥ

{)

[5 7[
:

616-7

7



npos

[€

€$•

619?

6^, 647

(/)
eavTOV

€[9

() {) {)[£) {)
[

{)

[

75

{)

^ •

6.
:

5(e)

{•)

652
.

€€

[

654

656-8
[
.

[

[
:

[€\|/5•

€€$•

66$, 668,

Kpea:

(€)

[
yevetoi'

671

The remains
iariv,

of this line suggest Schol. 108

(
eVt

nepaiKov

.

,

.

7.

(.

Cf. Schol. ovTos 6

1&(

au

veos' Sto

(
8e

856.

SCHOLIA ON ARISTOPHANES'

'

ACHARNIANS'
-naiy^Dva

159
is

, .€
:

9. There is nothing in the extant scholia corresponding to is strongly suggested by very uncertain, but ). not plainly eVt Cf. Schol. on y

.

.

11.

Cf.

Schol.

ef]iupos indicate that the

name

is

12.
14.

The

note in Schol. is is glossed in Schol.

end of the note, not of the lemma. 6 Qioyvis TpaymSlag similarly worded
the
;

, ( ( . ( ((. ' .
({
)
;

((

the

The

overwritten letter

is

ovtos be

The

double dotS

1 6.

17-20.
1

The note perhaps relates to The remains of these lines
on 162

in

1.

163

;

but

]\

.

.

.

cannot be read.

give

scholia there are notes

66

...,

language,

might be
or
TV
€1»

eVots referring to

OtS.

21. Cf. Schol.

\
'.

2 2.

2 3-

suitable.

24. Schol. are quite different,
^

25—7• Cf. Schol.
iv
, .

seems strange.
nyav
in

27—8. Cf. Schol. OVTOS 6

connexion with him by Aristophanes in Clouds 348.

a

much
28.

less likely restoration.
:

29•

30-3. Cf. Schol.

(](

seems to be a continuation of the same note, and 1. 33 may also belong to it the latter words may, however, be a gloss Cf. Schol. in the note on in 4 1 8. or go back to on 423 431 in 423 are explained as similarly quoted above
1.

( ,
has

]

. (
.
. .

, ^ , ,^ , € \ € , . () ( ] 2
€€ \ The
ovK
is

8, , , \ 8, \.
i^ji 172 cannot be read in 1. 17
;

(,

no

In the extant 163 about Dicaeopolis and the but coincidcuces do not occur here with their
clear clue to their subjects.

,
1.

after

the

first

letter is certainly

.

]eiOir in

19

but

is

more

likely to

be the termination of a

:

e|

S)V

6

probably a gloss on
,
. .

in

i8o or
.
. .

aTepapoves

:

letter

before

can hardly be
ineibrj

is

, so gloSSed in Schol. avri
dpi.
:

€]

. ^
11.

participle,

in

1

8

1.

Cf. Schol.

(cf.

355, 359, 365-6)

is

ov

un. . .

.
. .

^.
yap

yap

\

(, /»
in
1.

6pye\
iWt

iypa^aTO

,

.

.

€\_

26

.

\ payoOLb

\

ypfv

.

.

.

The WOrd

is

USed

would be

.

MSS.,

which Schol. have

\

.

.

There

is

no comment
. . .

in Schol.

on

this verse

beyond the Victorian gloss

:

...

or according to Gl. Vict,
note.

33-4. Cf. Schol.

the

same

34. Schol. have only a note to the effect that the verse
TelephllS

35• i"p(of)

: (, . , . .
:

,'
32

;

.

.

.

\

...
is

in

1.

34 belongs tO

a parody of a line in Eurip.

'

.

.

.

(€

:

there

is

nothing corresponding to this in Schol.

On

457 Schol.

.
pfVTea,

i6o

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

36. Cf. Schol. olov 37. Cf. Schol.

There was apparently no stop
.
.

yap (17 . a reading in which the papyrus

'

^(
^)
'
the note
is

\(
eiiTeXes.

.

.

.

after bos.

No

(KnopevTea Bentley. 38.

39.

^.
. .

There For
.

40. This line therefore restore

however, 1. 36. occurs in Acharn. 688.
41. Cf. Schol.
.
. .

is the accepted apparently had no relation to Schol. and Athenaeus. in the present passage, Schol. have no explanation of the term 42. ira]poivia but cf. Wasps 1238 evioi 8 cf. Schol. For and 1239 ^e|ets

The
;

reading

,' {) . ,. :
is

supports

R

and other MSS.

note OCCUrS On epnoevnopevrea A,

no corresponding comment in Schol.
cf.

Schol.

:

On

, 8

eWeXe?

'
is

4

is

obscure;
i8o]l€v,

indicates that the reference

to verse 520,

though it is noticeable that there is no stop after is as unsatisfactory here as seems to be corrupt; ri^ac
TO
.

.

.

(
;
17

] ^/.
cf.,

and we

R)

note here on

R

:

/:

43• Cf. Schol. 44• Schol. have 45•
]ai is
;

'.
.

.

.

no remark on
6

8.

probably part of a note on
Schol.
line
cf.

cf.

the only remark
48.

This

appears to be part of a description of the quarrel between the two halves
Schol. 557

'

of the chorus;
6

.,
. . .

8

\

,
is

\

" . ., . 8 ] ' . ,
are explained as
in 554, e. g.

.
.
. .

or

.

.

.

ol

On

6

\

*

and 563

49-52. Perhaps 1. 51 or 1. 52 should be combined with 1. 50, but we have failed to it is not make out any connexion. If 1. 50 is rightly explained as a gloss on 568 in Schol. There is no note on possible to put 1. 51 higher up than 1. 49. the letter above the line seems instead of or 53. The first letter may be
to be

or

.

is

, .,. .
57-8. Schol. are
similar,

54-5. Cf. Schol. TO 55—6. Cf. Schol.

{], \
and

the

58-9.
is

The

note on

in Schol.

. . , .,,., '
;
:

\

On

glosses being,

on
:

6

similar idea, however, to that apparently expressed in

\

ceases.

, ? , .
tO

be found

in

Hesychius

'
is

different

\

59-6.

Schol. have
.

\
:

.

.

,

\

. ,

the gloSS

\

\

...

«is

6-4• What

^ Schol.

is similarly interpreted as Megacles, but here the resemblance follows apparently corresponds to the explanation of the allusion to

856.
Koi

SCHOLIA ON ARISTOPHANES'

'

ACHARNIANS

'

i6i

of S(e)

may

quoted in the next note, but it is quite differently worded. In 1. 62 the supposed be meant for an n, but the abbreviation a here would be more difficult
61 TTore

€()

€\1/

^€, , . . (, , ( ,
74. Cf. Schol. (VTiidev
(V

\
:

is written as a curved stroke above a, as if of In 1. J 2 the first the word was to be abbreviated, and there has been some correction of the ; possibly [ should be read. 73. bin B{e) K.T.X. seems to have been tacked on to the previous note without a new 6 lemma. Schol. have The papyrus Tovff A^. agrees with R in reading

€. ( , (\€ 8. . : . ^. ( (
to explain.

65—7• Cf. Schol.

('€

Xeyeiv

.

,

.

Xeyti

.

according tO another explanation,

re

\

66 of is corrected. 68. The paragraphus above this line indicates a new lemma, and the stop after suggests (though it does not prove) that that name formed part of it hence we refer the There is nothing corresponding in Schol. note to 619.
In
1.

(
.

} :€( ^

,
;

69. Cf. Schol.

:

(\

.

69—72. Schol. 648—9 have

)

iv

.

,

.

:

yap

\ •^,

^
.

(

AaKfbai-

\

'

:

'^
.
.

6

:

.

*
ev

noieiv

ev

might be read after e/cei. 75-7. These lines seem to give a paraphrase of 656-8; 658
.

cf.
.

Schol. 657 ovff

.

78. Cf. Schol.

665

:

. ( : '( .
.
.

.

.

.

.

.

668

78—9• Cf. Schol. on

(.

enl

These two

79. Perhaps after of the following r.

below the last line of the preceding column. a high point was written which has coalesced with the cross-bar
lines project

857.

Epitome of Herodotus.
10-7

X

7-1

cm.

Fourth century.
all

The lower

portion of a leaf from a vellum codex, containing in
historical work.

28

lines,

most of which are incomplete, from a

The

script

is

a medium-

and probably of the fourth century, without lection-marks. The MS. is far from accurate, serious mistakes (probably due to omissions) occurring in 11. 3 and 17. The verso is concerned with the dispatch of Cadmus the Coan by Gelon to watch the struggle between Xerxes and the Greeks, and is nothing but an abstract of Herodotus vii. 163. The
sized upright uncial of the biblical type,

subject of the recto, the refusal of the Argives to join in the defence of Greece,

102

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

148-52 of the same book, though the verbal cc. resemblance to Herodotus is here less marked. In the absence of external evidence to show which side of the leaf came first, we suppose that the order of the narrative in our fragment agreed with Herodotus, and therefore the recto
corresponds to that of
precedes the verso.
is
11.

A

mention

in

1.

2 of the battle of

Thermopylae, which

not described
1-4, note), but

by Herodotus
it is

until cc. 201 sqq., causes
is

some

difficulty

(cf.

clear that this

a forward reference and not part of our

author's description of the engagement.

The

chapters intervening between 152

and 163 are occupied by, first, a digression on Gelon, and secondly his colloquy with the ambassadors who came to ask for help, and the lacuna between the end of the recto and the beginning of the verso no doubt contained a brief account of the unsuccessful embassy cf. note on 11. 15 sqq. Probably our fragment belongs to an epitome of Herodotus as such, rather than to a historical work closely based upon him. This being granted, the first name that suggests itself for the authorship is Theopompus, who began his historical researches by writing an epitome of Herodotus of which only a few isolated words survive. The fragment is
;

too short to enable us to obtain

much

idea of the writer's style, but the occurrence

of at least two examples of hiatus (11. 20 and 21-2), which is very rare in the extant quotations from Theopompus, does not favour the view that he was the author, though his earliest literary efforts may have shown less care in this
respect.

The fragment
preceding ones,
that
is

is

in

two pieces which do not actually join, but the position of
practically certain
;

the smaller one, which contains the last line of each page and parts of the two

made

by the combination
cf.

\]
S[e

in

1.

27,

word being required by the context
Recto.

note on

11.

15 sqq.
Verso.

[.

7\[ [€]9
.]5[
.

5

\] []
[ai\ovs

^
. .

15

[•

[]

/j.€vovT€9

Spas

)([

[]?
]
o]ySevi

[

€€

€~ 6~
2

€[9 € [€

•]

\[]

KavTOS

')(7}

vavs

€8
awe

[
6

[[
€€[€
[ [
. .

[] [ \
.]

zl[eX0ouy

[.

857.

EPITOME OF HERODOTUS
?

163

II[epaas avyy^vei

25 ro[
[
]
.

a[v..].[

9

;[.]7/)[

[

]

[]•<^

^[
]

^•

[

.

€€8[.

.

[.

.]

attacked Thermopylae, the (Lacedaemonians) fought to the number of three These remaining at home provided neither men nor ships, hundred, except the Argives. and allied themselves with neither side on account of their pretended relationship to the Gelon, taking precautions that if the departed. Persians (?)... (The ambassadors) Greeks were defeated he should himself suffer no harm at the hands of the barbarians, sent Cadmus, son of Scythes, a man of Cos, in command of three fifty-oared vessels to Delphi .' (with instructions to offer to the barbarians, if victorious), money, earth, and water
'

.

.

.

.

.

.

may be imperfect or aorist. The subject is in any case the Persians 1-4. After 01 in 1. 3 a word has dropped or Xerxes, but the construction of 11. 1-4 is obscure. and might easily have been omitted through would suit ava out must be connected, not with the words immediately homoioteleuton, but then would suit or preceding, but with something lost before 1. i. very well, but involve a difficulty with regard to the figure, since 300 applies to the Lacedaemonian contingent. The reference to the battle of Thermopylae is in any case somewhat remarkable, since Herodotus first mentions that place in c. 175 and describes
:

](

.

.

{\(8)

{)

()

the battle in cc. 201 sqq., whereas our fragment corresponds to cc. 148-63 ; of. introd. who opposes the Argive 5. The neutrality of Argos is discussed in detail by Herodotus, version of their action (cc. 148-9) to that current elsewhere (cc. 150-1) and then gives If our restoration of 11. 9-12 is on the right his own intentionally confused view (c. 152).

the epitomizer explained the action of the Argives in the light of c. 150 (the letter of Xerxes claiming relationship between the Persians and Argives), thus interpreting correctly the real opinion of Herodotus, who no doubt believed in the medism of the Argives, though
lines,

unwilling to accuse

them openly.
or -»?)
the subject here seems connexion with Herodotus. 8 163
:

^, , ",
if

•, ,
14.

(([{-€
vii.

been unable

to recover the

Ig sqq. Cf. Hdt.
beivov 8e

€0)1/

6

1

7-9•

The
is

, .
\
construction in

( 8

86

" . (8 , 8 ,/ ,
nepl

to

have changed, and we have

'
.

(
nv8pa

xmep-

is

be

eneire

\

8

,\
is

8

.

.

must be omitted or
like 2 2.
en-It
:

room

\

for

].

to be supplied after the vestige of the letter after the lacuna is extremely slight, but there cf. Thuc. vi. 29 with the dative in connexion with For

2428.

[

may

,
.

altered to

.

or,

what

has become confused. Either is perhaps more likely, a word
not

be some part of
is lost

(cf.
1.

Hdt.
;

certain that

any letter Perhaps [ri]

^\
at

the end of
[

24

71[
;

/.

c. is

),
unsatisfactory.
/.

but

it

is

not

may end

1.

27

cf.

Hdt.

c

2

i64

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
858.

Oration against Demosthenes.
Fr. {b)

18x7-7 cm.

Late second or early third century.

Two

fragments of an oration attacking Demosthenes, written on the verso of

a second-century cursive document of which only a few letters from the ends and beginnings of lines are preserved. The exact position of Fr. {a), containing
parts of six lines from the top of a column, in relation to Fr. {b) is not certain, If so but that the two fragments belong to the same column is most likely.
Fr. {a)

must on account of the recto be placed above the

right side of Fr. [b)

and

comes from near the ends of the lines, but there is nothing to indicate how near The script of the oration is a sloping I. I of Fr. (b) is to the top of the column.
uncial bearing a strong resemblance to the hand of 853, with which it may be regarded as contemporary. The ends of lines are lost throughout, and the margin is also broken at the beginnings, being only visible at 1. 29, where seems to be the beginning of a line, though even that is not quite certain in II. 26-36 however, where the restorations hardly admit of doubt, it is clear that
;

the interval betAveen the end of one line and the beginning of the next does not exceed four or five letters. No lection-marks occur except a doubtful accent
in
1.

4,

but there are several corrections (some due to the original scribe, others

in a

1. 13, an unfavourable and another orator, whose comparison is being instituted between Demosthenes identity is uncertain, the point of the contrast being that Demosthenes had never In 1. 25 the subject changes, and the himself taken part in active service. speaker criticizes Demosthenes for his behaviour when the news of the capture this passage is clearly borrowed from the famous of Elatea reached Athens description of that crisis in De Cor. 169 sqq., several of the phrases which
;

second hand), the text being very faulty. Where the fragment first becomes intelligible at

Demosthenes there used being here actually placed in his mouth (11. 25-9). The oration to which the fragment belonged therefore presupposes the existence of the De Corona which was composed after B. c. 330 but on the other hand the general situation implied by our author seems to be the period between the capture of Elatea in 339 and the battle of Chaeronea in September 338, for since Demosthenes took part in that engagement the reproaches addressed to him in 11. 24-5 and 29-30 would be inapplicable at a later date. This incon;

sistency at once gives rise to the suspicion that our fragment belongs to a rhetorical exercise, not to a genuine oration whether of Demades or another

philo-Macedonian orator, and several other considerations combine to leave no room for doubt as to the real character of the composition. The florid, jerky

858.
style^ the

ORATION AGAINST DEMOSTHENES

6

use of

bpos,

a term foreign to Attic oratory, the exaggerated
in

1. 19 as holding a shield in one hand and a psephisma in still more the serious blunder with regard to Attic law which has crept into a passage (11. 34-5) borrowed from the De Corona, are all quite incompatible with a contemporary of Demosthenes, and indicate that the oration is, like 216, a work of the Alexandrian school of rhetoric, and probably not earlier than the Christian era. We are indebted to Prof. U. von Wilamowitz-Mollendorff for several suggestions in the restoration and interpretation of this fragment.

description of

Demosthenes the other, and

Fr. (^)
[
1
.

Fr. {a)
[

\av

[

]''•[
]ei/r[

][
.

[

[

]vs
]

€[
[

[

]Xei/e[
]
.

'"o"""

5

[

.

[.

.14

1°"

""'f

[

].[..]-[

[

]..[...).[..]..,[

"^'"^•f _M
^ ^
.

[....]..
10
[.
.
.

7[.

.]

.

[.'\
.
.

[

[•

15

] € ^ [^ ^ [] [[ [. 9 ?[ [] [€ [^?
[....]
[.
.

^( 9.
6?
ayaO^LS
. .

.]fi^TO_J/[. .]»?[. ](C

.

[

[

.[.•.] €LS

na]pe)(^eiv

-^[^

[tov]tov9

[
e[
.

[€^€]€/7€' avT[os
.

[.

.]

[.

.

.]

2

[]
[]

[]

€[]9

? 9?
8]e
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.
.

[.

.

.

.

.

.

€1

.

.

.

.

.

[.]e

.

.

[e]iy

[]€

? -[ ^[ 9 ^ ?
[]

^[

ety

[€/

?

i66
25

[]

[]€ []/9
TIS

^
5e

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
yap
Siiirv^^ovvTe^

3

€yv ? []{}€€
nepi

€ ?€[? [ ?
Se

?

[
ayopas
*

ray

€€[€

[$ [9

yap

[]?

fikv

35 Aeyeti/
[/3]L'/f[o]y

[.]

[]
40
[.

??
]
yap
][.]

[€][? ? [\?[ ?\
€^[
TOS

[?

eXeyej/

OLK oieaOe

].[..].

]
.]
.

[]? €
]
.

? ?[
[

[]?

€€[€

[' yaa[? €€?
[[]]
.
.

[? paya

?[ €[
.

.[

.

[
*

45

.]fo[.]5e

.

[

12-38. Yet when he exhorted them to come to Thebes, he did not dispatch the rest he Avas the first to go out to fight. Let the same man and himself remain at home, but be both orator and general, and let Demosthenes harangue with a shield in his hands as If Themistocles is the orator I will embark; let Pericles lead an well as a decree. I will follow Tolmides across the Peloponnese, expedition to Samos and I will sail but how can 1 listen to Demosthenes, who has no breastplate, if he marches through it no spear, no sword, not even one inherited from his father? '• Elatea has been captured," he said, " the prytaneis have broken off" their meal the owner of tents have left the marketAlthough place some one is fetching the trumpeter." That was what we heard him say. Demosthenes had never yet heard the sound of a trumpet he was nevertheless terrifying you by these words and this description. The demos was seated on the hill, the boule had not yet deliberated about the crisis, and although the boule had not yet decided that Demosthenes
'

.

.

.

;

;

;

;

858.

ORATION AGAINST DEMOSTHENES
:

167

should speak, when the herald made the proclamation and no one came forward he " Do you not think that a loyal and a careful nevertheless (in violation of?) the laws said " follower of events (is needed) ?

commander who marched to Thebes is obscure; there have been a contemporary of Demosthenes, for 11. 20-3 are quite general. Timotheus, as Wilamowitz remarks, would be a most suitable person to mention in this context, but he did not command at Thebes in b. c. 378, though as he was strategus at the time he may have been credited with having done so by the author of this oration. has been corrected from . of The 14. [tov\tovs: or perhaps [aujrous•, in which case [<\€( must be read in 1. 15. initial lacuna throughout 11. 14-22 would be expected to extend to three letters. 18-21. The restorations are chiefly due to Wilamowitz, who also suggested 7r[€tao/^ai in 1. 25. in 1. 23 and 22-3. For the reference to Tolmides cf. Aeschin. ii. 75 os '4( bia ahtas hu^rfei, which may, aS WilamowitZ points out, .veil be the source of the present passage. The statement is of course a rhetorical
13-4.
identity of this to
is

The
for

no need

him

[\

.

.

.

exaggeration. 24-5. TO

Ti\apa

\
169

Dem.

'

corrected from The dots above Revindicate that the word was to be omitted; cf. 1. 37. were fixed by the betrays ignorance of implication that the speakers at the Attic law on the subject ; cf. introd. as Wilamowitz suggests, is the natural restoration, but there 36, is hardly room for so broad a letter as and it is not even certain that any letter stood
33• 34.
Trept is

,. ( .
The

\( ^.

xxvii. 9.

25—9• Cf. T)e Cor,

31—6. Cf. Z)e Cor,

.
'

^ & (
:

Demosthenes

pev

ayopav i^elpyov
ibid, r^

yepp'

'

(

.

& ,
,

eVopcvea^f,

,€
father

was

a

sword-manufacturer

;

cf.

,

€ (^ 8€
'
8i

\ \

\

(
;

6

[,

between and ap[. 37—42. Cf. De Cor. 171

' ,,
\

'

,
el

of

1.

37 some such

infinitive

as
is

corrected,

and what exactly was written

is required, but very uncertain.

' ' '/ ,

\

,\ \
.
.

,

[{})

At the end has apparently been
.

,

i68

.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
859-864.

Poetical Fragments.

The

following six small pieces in verse, which do not seem to be extant,
latter parts of a

may

be conveniently grouped together.

859 contains the
a column, written in
in the third century.

few hexameter lines from the end of bold and well-formed uncials of the sloping type common

Some

variae lectiones and corrections have been inserted

whom the occasional accents and breathings due a high point, placed slightly above the line, occurs once. There are mentions of Stymphelus and Talaus king of Argos (1. 2) and the very rare word otherwise known only from Hesychius, is found in 1. 5. On the verso are some blots and flourishes. 860, consisting of three fragments from a column of lyrics, is more valuable. The good-sized, upright hand is evidently early in date and probably falls within the first century, or at any rate is not later than the beginning of the second. An insertion in 1. 3 and a variant, enclosed as commonly within two dots, at 1. 5 are due to the original scribe, who seems also to be responsible for the occasional accents and punctuation (a point in the middle position in 1. 7). The subject and
apparently by a second hand, to

may

also be

,
;

;

authorship of the

poem

are

Bacchylides
vai[s, cf.

:

Fr. {a) 3 Ta]XaKapbLos,

Bacch. 16. 116, where

pound otherwise only found in Bacch. 7. 49; Fr. Bacch. 5. 126, 170, 16. 73. With regard to the position

^
alike

obscure
Bacch.

;

the vocabulary
5. 157, 15.
;

cf.

26

€9
is

should be retained
(d)

10
7

€(]{?),

,
;

suggestive of

5 epe/xa comcf.

main fragments, {/?) is probably to be placed below (a) so that the right edges of the papyrus make a more or less straight line, the extent of the gap between {a) 18 and () i being uncertain. This arrangement is indicated by some strongly marked fibres on the verso, which is inscribed with part of an account of some kind, written towards the end of the second century. 861 is a narrow strip containing very scanty remains of two columns of
of the two

iambics, the language pointing to tragedy rather than comedy.

The

squarely

formed upright uncials belong to what is commonly called the biblical type, and may be assigned to the third century. A broad margin was left at the top
of the columns.

862 and 863 are fragments of comedies. 862 belongs to a dialogue mentioning a person called Phidias, a name no doubt frequent in the later Attic comedy (cf Antiphanes ap. Athen. ii. 38*5, Menander Fr. i). The hand, which is probably of the third century, is a better and perhaps rather

example of the style exemplified by 861. Change of speaker by the usual double dots. Two marks of elision are perhaps later
earlier

is

denoted

additions.

859-864

POETICAL FRAGMENTS
is

169
in rather better

863, written in well-formed sloping uncials of the third century, preservation. The verses perhaps belong to a single speaker,

who seems
1.

to be

bewailing his misfortunes

;

but they are too broken for reconstruction.

Two

instances of the rough breathing

and a high point

at the

end of

8

may

well be

by

the original scribe.

from an anthology.

which seem to have been put in at a different time, are markedly larger and Below, in a more regular and probably coarser than those of the two preceding.
distinct hand,
is

'

864, containing the ends of lines from an entire column, comes apparently At the top are five hexameter lines, in which the hloi
figure, written in a semicursive

hand

;

the letters of the last three

lines,

a series of iambic verses

in tragic style, written

continuously like

prose.
is

The column is divided off into three paragraphs, of which the third separated by a broad blank space from the second, while a rather narrower
is

interval

left

between the second and the hexameters.

It is likely that
1.

the

names of the authors stood in these spaces. The followed two lines later by pvbv, unattested word

^,

occurrence in
is

22 of the

noticeable.

The

papyrus probably dates from the third century. we have tentatively marked off by horizontal lines the successive verses in the last paragraph the point of division is sometimes indicated by short intervals left between the words.
;

In the transcription given below

859.

5-5X7-5cm.

].[.].
]rjT€

a. [..].[.].[

[

^]/ ]ۥ
5

ey
.

[
[
. .

]/

] ^^'^' ].

cf.

2. The form Etym. M. p. 746. 10

us
3.

(OS

((

was

the

[ [ ] €€€ ( .' ,
[

napoiOe Si

^v8o[

Be

nep

oy[

is

also found in a citation

from Antimachus

in

\

Tives'

yap

Pausan. 8. 25. 9 8,
city,

,

name

of several mythological personages, as well as of the

lyo
river,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
and mountain
5,

but the vestige of the
:

of
8.

8( =

neXeaKfo occurs in Iliad

.

in Arcadia.
letter after

cf.

Hesychius

The
is

following word is perhaps too slight to give any indication. the ;

in

some form
a derivative

8(,

word

is

X

433.

860.
Fr. (a)

Fr. (a) 9-2

5-1

cm.

TO

10

15

859-864.

POETICAL FRAGMENTS
X 35 cm.
Col.

171

861.

12-6

Col.

i.

,

¥[

4
'

]M-

[]

[
20 Q\

]
]
]es

M•]
W€pa9

]Xiou

])( ]€
]p

]
€/
]iOU
]?

4

3

[

4• JTepay
1
.

ntpai.

£];'

.
862.

3•2

•2

cm.

]
]
.

[. .]€

]

.

€[
.

][.
]y
:

rjoyy

5

]
]
.

Tr]aiSioi'

7'A[j7i']

/
.

6i[ovs
:

0V9

15
[

]€/)'

/ioi
.]

TOVTOvt

W

\
]
.

[.

8

[
,

172
]oKOS

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
€//
TraiSiov
efe[.
!

y

\
10
7.

\
.

|[][.]
]
. .

[.

.]

eji'eyic'

.

[

The

correction

may be due

to the first hand.

863.

6-8

•8

cm.

"
]
.

[

/^^^
.

]

5

]»/

] 9 ? €9
.

9

T01S

ero

[.

.]^OiS

^§poL
]

^•

]

irapeXdLTTOv
.

]

eiy
]
.

?

'\.[.'\[

/ \
e^oLS
[

^
[]

([(] might read.
y.

3-

The

may be e and the next letter had a long tail Hke or ] But the supposed may also be or . napiBfs occurs in the sense of in Anth. Pal. xi. 278 and Chariton
doubtful
: .

ae

5.

2.

Perhaps
12.

[:

or

{
€v

preceded.
01

€[.
864.

15-8

6-8 cm.

]9
]e
]
.

[€]
15
Seioi

eivai

Se

]5

]€

iravTes

{) ?
\

] ]
]?
\


\

\

.

[

]^
\

]

\€€

]

]

/? €€
\

^^ ^
e/c

6\\

2

]

^

' \
*"

859-864.

POETICAL FRAGMENTS
]y
|

Se
j

>•

]vs

-?
^

oXevais
' !

,

/
'

Oeovs eSai

^ /
]a5e?
.

^ €[
.

173

,

.

[

^

'

r

J

[.

.

.

]

]

]>9

\^

.
7.

of

]

10.

The

has been corrected from e. occurs in Jo. Chrysost. t. 2, p. 624 c (ed. Par.). end of the verse may equally well be after eSnt suggests only 'Saiaev
is

cannot be read.
17. If the text

right aXeverai

found

in the tragedians,
is

though

24. ^ in

evSa form a crasis. The epic word occurs in lyric passages. corrected apparently from .

/

.

and

(

:

is

not

865-870.

Prose Fragments.
Plate I (867).

small prose fragments remain unidentified, and except in the good reason for believing them to belong to works which are not extant. The first three seem to be historical, the fourth is perhaps from a commentary, the fifth is philosophical, and the sixth geographical. 865 consists of the beginnings of the last eight lines of a column, written in The fragment belongs to a medium-sized uncial hand of the third century. a description of a war in which Greeks were apparently fighting foreigners, and the leader of one of the armies was the illegitimate son of a person whose name probably ended in -eu? (1. 5), this general being subsequently recalled, perhaps in consequence of an oracle (11. 6-7). 'Tbpovs, presumably the town in Calabria, is mentioned in 1. 3. of that name occurred in Book xxxix A of Theopompus' Philippica (Fr. 210), which Avas concerned with Sicilian history, though whether the was identical with 'Tbpovs in Calabria is not certain. Possibly our fragment too belongs to a lost work dealing with Sicilian history. Apart from the Theopompus passage, there seems to be no mention of in Greek historians before the Roman period. 866 contains a few letters from the first seven lines of a column. The script is a neat uncial of a distinctly early type, and may be ascribed with confidence to
case of

The following six
866 there
is

'?

the

first

century.
is

A

mention of the Carthaginians

in

1.

5 suggests that this
in

fragment also

historical,
I)

867 (Plate

but the context is has six nearly complete lines from the top of a column,
quite uncertain.

174

^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(Part IV, a rather large and handsome square uncial, resembling the hand of provides an exceptionally early Plate V). That papyrus (late second century)

present specimen

and is likely to have been written in the third century. Two kinds of stops (high and middle points) occur. An iota adscript has been inserted in one place by the original scribe. The fragment refers to the capture of Ephesus, and may belong to a historical work. with the dative, which occurs in 1. 4, the only example quoted For
661,
in the lexica is

example of the type of hand to which the great is probably somewhat later than

Biblical codices belong.

The

;

Diod. xx. 39.

868

consists of parts of twelve lines, apparently from the top of a column,

written on the verso, the recto being blank except in one corner where there are

The script is a medium-sized rather irregular uncial, one or two broken letters. the probably of the first century. The nature of the fragment is very obscure 11. 5 and 9, but it is difficult to believe that the second person singular occurs in lines belong to a connected oration or dialogue, and we are disposed to regard and the fragment as a piece of a commentary, the blank spaces after aKoveis in 11. 6 and 9 in that case marking the division between the text and the found in writers of the The rare word cf. 853. scholia (1. 4) is not
;

^

classical period.

869 contains the ends of twenty-two lines from the upper part of a column, hand of probably the latter half of the third century. The subject is clearly of a philosophical character, and perhaps has reference to
written in a sloping uncial
religion.

870

is

part of a leaf from a papyrus codex containing a geographical work.
list

The
in

recto gives a

of tribes in Thrace, Macedonia, and Asia Minor, apparently

two columns, the successive names being numbered.
list

Of the

verso only a few
side of the

letters

a

from the ends of lines are preserved the of names, but the upper portion of the page
;

last
is

seven lines also seem to be

different.

Which

leaf

came

first is

uncertain.

The

script is a good-sized oval uncial of the .sixth or

seventh century.
865.

8x6-3 cm.

866.

6

24 cm.

€7[
5 coy

]
.
.

[ €9 \€ ^
.]'[

[.

5/)[/]9
V109

]\
e
]e

]

?^ ([
[
[

,

[

Se

5

1^]([

€9 €[ 9
6y€r[eT0

865-870.

PROSE FRAGMENTS
]/9€/

175

€9

.[

/
865.
5-

\\\
-evi.
lie
:

The supposed after ( might be . probably the termination of the genitive of a proper name ending in yLyveadai occurs twice in Plutarch. phrase but this WOrd is nOt knOWn. Or 7. Kara may be the end of a line. 866. 2.

(( [
is

3•

([
av[.
.

([,
Plate
I.

867.

8
5-7

X

7-5 cm.
.]
.
.

869.
]

3•8

6• cm.
.

5

[ []€] [.
868.
]e)Lie[.]oi

- €[ '^ •
vtyK^v eni

[

[

^€9
enc

[.

]

[.
a0ay[.

[€][€
5

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4• cm.
[

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.
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]

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[

15

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] 69
.
. .

€[\
avT€S

^ [. €[€
[.
.

[.

.

[

.

]

.

.

]9 [
probably
a,

867. . ] second suggest

»/: the first letter is

, , ,

or

,

y,

,

,

or

.

It is

not certain that a

letter is lost at the

while the vestiges of the end of the line.

176

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
But there may
;

would be rather cramped. 868, I. je/^^"]"' ^s possible, though the have been a blank space before 01 cf. 11. 6 and 9.
2.

oTi 3.

:

the division
is

is less

probable.
if

869.
5.

vestiges after

Some form of may represent

presumably to be restored,

the y

is

right; but the

the angular

mark

for filling

up a

line.

Perhaps

I 4.
I

Possibly

8.

Or

\iva

([. [. .
870.

14-5x5.5 cm.
Recto.
Col.
i.

Verso.

Col.

ii.

]ey

T6..[

9
25

?.
aLV'

yap

30

]
]
]

yeyovaaiv

^([\
7poyopas
15
A]fiKaSes•
]a>ve?•
]

. ]'
]'€?.
]

35

20

]

.

«/

871, 872.

LATIN FRAGMENTS
Latin Fragments.
Plate

177

871, 872.

V (871).

We have not been able to identify the two following fragments in Latin, and print them here in the hope that some of our readers may be more successful.
871, a papyrus, has a considerable palaeographical interest, since part of

a document in Greek cursive on the verso, which

most probably of the fifth On the other hand it is unlikely that the writing on the recto was separated from that on the verso by a very wide interval of time, and consequently that the literary text is to be put earlier than the fourth century, while it may be as late as the commencement of the fifth. It is written in rather heavy rustic capitals, of a less formal and epigraphic type than e. g. those of the Palatine Virgil, though not dissimilar in
is

century, provides a fairly secure terminus ante quern.

formation.

The
5 and

tail
iis

of the
in
1.

is

a conspicuous feature
are divided off

;

/

is

made

rather

tall in

qui in
script

1.

of inscriptions,
in the

which in second person in 1. 3, and the treatise seems to have been of a philosophical character, and not extant, if the references for the rather rare word astutia, which occurs in 1. a, are complete in the new Latin Thesaurus. 872 is a small piece from a vellum leaf of a book, containing on one side the beginnings and on the other the ends of a few lines, written in good-sized and S at the rather ornate uncials which may be referred to the sixth century.
beginning of a
the end of
1.

by dots after the manner as in the Flerculaneum fragments on Actium and in 30, a manuPart I we perhaps dated rather too early. Somebody is addressed
6.

Words

line

is

made

rather tall

;

6 in order to save space.
is

the same letter is combined with a C/" Whether the fragment is to be classed

at as

prose or verse

doubtful.

The
It

scanty remains, so far as they go, would suit
is

hexameters, and the lines
case in Latin prose

differ

considerably in length, but that

not seldom the

MSS.

does not seem to be Virgil

;

but no good word

occurs to provide a clue.
871.
12-3

X
.

12-9 cm.
it
• •

Plate V.

inertia
et

n^agis

.]

quam

virtuf\e

astuti[ae

fnag]is

convenit

qiia[m

sapientia[e
iis
5

me\inineris

autem de

[

me
'

loq[ui
.

no]n

qui

nuineros

[.

tium
iis

suo

[

]cunt
in
-]

sed

qui

in[

partib\tis

quibns

mdhis

ne[

tins

minimu[s quidem quam[

178

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
id
'

qiiod

-

e

.

\

10 [n]egantf^

[pe]rforq[

I.

The

vestiges before

it

suggest

r, /,

or

j

;

would probably also be

suitable, but

no

example of

that letter occurs in the papyrus.

4. The letter at the end of the line if not a can only be m or possibly n, and judging by the preceding and following lines, not more than one or two letters should follow. a\r]iium is the obvious word, and this would involve suos, not suorum (the slight vestiges after suo would be consistent with either r or s) in 1. 5 ; but numeros artium suos, whatever The the mutilated verb in Yuni may be {discunt, dicunt ?), seems an awkward collocation. numbers but parts ', should mean not it use of the plural numeros is noticeable members ', or office ', a sense in which the word is often accompanied by suus. cf. e. g. Cicero, Tusc. 5. 6. 16 nulla ne minima quidem 6-7. nullus ne mtnimt^s quidem At the end of 1. 7 liben^ius aura; but n^c without quidem would also be possible.
'

;

'

'

'

'

:

suggests

itself.

may be m or n, but per/ormare ox per/ormidolosus are improbable, and the absence of a stop between r and/" makes per /orm[ inadmissible.
II. \^pe]rforc^: the final letter

872.

873.

HESIOD, THEOGONIA

179

III.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
873.

Hesiod, Theogonia.
5-9

X

6-7 cm.

Third century.

The beginnings and ends of a few lines from the Theogonia of Hesiod, preserved on a fragment of a leaf from a papyrus book. The character of the handwriting, a rather small and informal round uncial, points to a date not very
late in the third century, in

which the codex form
of elision
is

is
1.

for theological works.

A mark
may

used

in

somewhat uncommon except 999, and in one or two other

places a similar sign

damaged.
of
60^

The columns

of writing were remarkably

have been obhterated, the surface of the papyrus being tall, there being an interval

lines

agrees, so far as

between the corresponding points of the recto and verso. it goes, with that of Rzach.
Verso.

The

text

930

6

[\[? ([^ [^
[5]

yevero //eyas oy re

paiei

{•€\
ol

Kv6i\pua
935 Seivovs
ev

^ €[
Seivos

[

\8(
[\

[]9 [] 6[][ €9
lepop

re

? [9 €9
€09

€€

[

re/ce

[€
995

?? ^]? ^ ^? \ ? ? ]€? [? ?
aej^Aovy
eTrereXAe

Recto.

2

i8o

1000

[9 [? [
\
[

\ [€?

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
e?

reXeaas

[^"
67

€] ]
\\\

^
Rzach.

6ak{\f)\rf\v

€€

naiSa
Se

Alos v]oo^ e^ereXeiTO

]
TCKe]


we

€]9
MSS.

997• ff 1004, dta: or

:

print the reading of the

8e[i]a.

874.

ApolLONIUS Rhodius, Argonautica
6x4-8 cm.

III.

Early third century.

Oxyrhynchus papyri

of Apollonius
(cf.

ductive of valuable readings

690-1), and

Rhodius have been remarkably proit is to be regretted that the re-

mains of the present MS. are not more extensive, since judging by the small fragment which survives it would have been of much importance for critical purposes. Only the ends of nine lines from the bottom of a column are preserved but in this narrow compass occurs an apparent confirmation of a generally accepted emendation of Brunck (1. 26^), besides marginal references to unknown The text is written in a small sloping hand on the variants in two other lines. verso of a second-century list of persons, and probably dates from the end
;

of that century or the earlier part of the third.
accent which
1.

There

is

one instance of an acute
(cf.

may
Our

be by the original
references to the

scribe,

but no clear case of punctuation

268, note).

MSS.

L(aurentianus) and G(uelferbytanus)

are derived from Merkel's edition.

265

[(€ [9
[?

[ ] ? €[
[XeuyaXeTyy

[€ €
60

? ]9 ]9 ^ ]€
]

€][]

€€[^6

eTrereXXer av[tas

874.

[e/f

270

[ ^
8
\epKos
[

APOLLONIUS RHODIUS, ARGONAUTICA

III

i8i

]
]

\ ^ ^^
Kiev
oy

k]i€v

[

19 letters

€v

()
[

( €€[
[

.

G.

L; fXea[^e SO Brunck reading in the papyrus is unfortunately not certain, but at any rate does not agree with that of LG, while on the other hand the broken letters are quite consistent with Brunck's conjecture. enereiXaT MSS. 264. SO L J Ke G. 265. Kev 268. At some little distance from the end of the line there is an ink-spot which perhaps represents a stop (in the middle position). 269. This line is rewritten at the bottom of the column with a note concerning an Whether the ordinary reading of the verse alternative version found in some MSS. No variant is cited by editors beyond the trivial stood in the text is of course uncertain. is written in the usual way with a semi(L) for The abbreviation of circle above o, and cannot be naturally interpreted as the negative ov ; moreover the omission of 1. 269 would necessitate the alteration of the feminine participle and the following ' in 1. 270. There was indeed a considerable variation in that verse (cf. the next note); but there is no need to suppose that it affected the general construction of the passage. in the second line of the adscript are very doubtful ; before The letters preceding there is a short blank space, but not enough to show the papyrus breaks off after
263•
:
,'

The

][]
(\\(
'.

.

.

.

(

€(

.

:

.

()

6

that the note ended here.

[ in the margin at the end of the line seems to be a variant on is almost certainly , not The letter after but no other reading is attested here. and . it is unlikely that another letter has disappeared in the space between Brunck with four late Paris MSS. On the extreme ; SO 271. but edge of the papyrus opposite this line are signs of ink which would suit e. g. or they may be accidental.
270.
; :

,

^^€,
LG

{):
:

.

875.

Sophocles, Antigone.
5.5

X

5.7

cm.

Early second century.

A fragment from
calligraphic
;

from the Antigone. it probably dates from the first half of the second century. different vi^riter seems to have made at least one alteration (1. 243), but the mark

the top of a column, inscribed with the ends of five lines The hand is a good-sized uncial, round and upright, but not

A

of elision in 1. 244 where the variant

is

apparently original.
is

The

antiquity of L's
is

in

1.

242,

commonly

preferred,

the one small item of

any

value to be gleaned from the text.

i82
[to

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

245

[fo'i

[ [ € ^^ [ €]
]?
' Suva yap
tol

?

\

€€

€]'

)(^69
[]9

[[]]/

a7re[i

Ven. 47^ and several Other late MSS., and this was SO LA; 242. apparently also the reading of Didymus; of. Schol. Ajax 1225. seems to be due to a diorthotes ; 243. The correction of the graphical error is whether he or the original scribe was responsible for the alteration of the preceding to more doubtful. The method of the change is different, the being crossed through, while Presumably was first written. are cancelled by dots placed above them. the of has been converted from a . 244.

:

[uaylras

>]

([9

\€

876.

Euripides, Hecuba.
2-9

X

8-4.

Fifth century.

A
good
the

small fragment of a leaf from a papyrus book containing the Hecuba

of Euripides.
size,

The somewhat
;

negligent uncial writing, which
earlier

is

upright and of

seems to belong to the
the ink
is

Byzantine period, and
colour.

may

date from

fifth

century

of the

common brown

were used, but no accent occurs. The paragraphus after 1. in 1. 740 are in blacker ink and seem to be due to a corrector, who is perhaps variant found in Parisinus 2713 (thirteenth responsible also for in 1. 703.

Marks of elision 738 and elision mark

;

A

century) alone of the better

MSS. appears

in

1.

740.

Verso.

700 [^v

Recto.

[ ?~ [ [ ] [ [
Xevpa
]

VLV e^T^i/ey/cje
]

aiai

€>

[

]

€^/9 '
TL

876.

EURIPIDES, HECUBA

[[
'
Ion 77

183

740

{8\

Kpa6ev

X€y[ety

9

o8e

703.

The

division of the verse at aiai

739
740.
altered to

A

^.

presumably

, ^

(Murray with Hermann). The space suits ew^woi; (MSS.) better than is also found in A. and is apparently meaningless. dot above the line between subsequently so the first hand in Cod. Par. 2713, the reading having been KpaOeu of course gives no sense, and as in other MSS., by correctors.

was intended;

cf.

e. g.

m hv

.

877.

Euripides, Hecuba.
X 4-3 cm.

Fr. (a) 1 1-8

Third century.

These two fragments from the upper part of a column also come from the recto a copy of the Hecuba. The text, which is on the verso of the papyrus, and was being blank, is in a slightly sloping uncial hand of the oval type,
probably written
paragraphus.
in

the third century.
1.

No

lectional sign occurs other than the

A

\ [9
€{
€[9

variant at

1272
coy

is

of some small interest.

1.255

[€ €9 9 ?
€[9

yvvaiKos

1260

1265

[] ?[ [9 [€9 [€
[^

^ [^

€?
e/x

[€

[^

?

voTis

e/c

vaos

^[

[

€€

^

i84

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

1

27 1

[] [ []?
[]

12 75 [fa^

1

28

^^^? ^[] [? ? [] \€ [? ] [

^ [ ? [ €€ [
ovSev

[ €)(€

^€?

ya[p

^\

]?
ye

eiXey

[

([9

epei?

[]€ [] []

]

]€€

[?

[]

^[^^

ye

[7r€]\e[ici'i'

€?

MSS., corr. Bothe. 1256. are inconsistent with and suit , and there is space 1272. The vestiges after gives a sense, but would be a doubtful for another letter between this and n. [] Nauck proposed improvement on the MSS. reading exeiv MSS. Seems tO have been Omitted after 1276. but a graphical error is more likely. The line may have been completed by e. g. 1279. y« so L; but the vestige of the first letter is too slight to be decisive against

€8

88

.

.

,

.

the variants

8

and

ae.

878.

ThUCYDIDES

II.

27•46•9

cm.

Late

first

century.

These remains of three consecutive columns, containing portions of chapters 32-4 of the second book of Thucydides, were found not at Oxyrhynchus itself but in a small very shallow mound lying about a mile beyond the site to the north, where some experimental work (without other result) was done one day in January, 1906. The text is written in a round ornamental hand which we should refer to the latter part of the first century. Upright strokes are commonly
finished off with apices,

A

is

of the capital shape,
;

shallow-topped,

X

of the

archaic form.

No
23,

breathings, accents, or stops occur

a short blank space marks

a pause in
sign
it,

1.

paragraphi are sometimes employed, and the ordinary angular

(cf. e. g.

like

a

^ -^^,
853),

which

is

here usually accompanied by a dot above and below
is

used to

fill

up short

lines.

But though early

in

878.

THUCYDIDES

II
;

185

date the

MS.

is

inferior in

however of some

interest

the traditional text.

[^\\ \]
8

quality, having several erroneous readings it is on account of its support, in two doubtful passages, of Our collations in 878-880 are with the text of Hude.

Col.
2 2. 3

i.

\\

5

[ \
\yLOL

15

] [^ ] ] • ^
]
€€€
Col.

[ ]9] [
8]e
[e/f

[?
[Se

>

>

^? €€? ]' [][/ ] €9
>
€]<
[Xeis]
[

.

/
T€S

€\
ey

23-3

€[ €[€9
Tiv€S

Col.

iii.

25.

45 ovT€S

2

[\[^'^

?
25

?
[]
[)(]

€? ^
-^
>

[ ?\
€[

ey

€€

24.

5° *-

? ?

€€

30

[5o^e]i^

(^ [? )(\€

[]

] [ ]€
[\?

^

55

€v
[c]

? ?[[( €[] [
'''^^^

[€? [ [«/ € [? €[?

€[ €€ ?

?
ey

25. 2

at

[

[] €[7€£
60

€€[ [?
ev

[

€[€

ev

?

[] [ ? ?

[?

€?

Me

i86
35

[ ] \ €]
[€

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

4

€€] [€ [
5-

es

[]

65

ev

[ €[ [9 [
^
Se

re ttoXlv

6,

]
1.

CTre^jerro

[apjctj/rey

:

SO

;

The papyrus
B) between

evidently agreed with the

Ilepaaioi

and
is

Stahl.

The

correct reading

probably

.
;

[[^ [^
\^
in inserting a

25. 3

H(ude) with FM.

MSS.

. brackets .

name

following Heringa, Ueipaaioi, omitting after
xiii.

as indicated by the
7.

Ufipaaioi]:

new Thucydides commentary; cf. 853. SO MSS.; cf the previous note.

20, note.
cf.

{,
ix. p.

ACEFM,

.,

Strabo

435 and

Steph. Byz.

10-3. The remains of letters are scanty and the decipherment is doubtful, (?) in 13 and apxovTfs in 1. 14 are on a detached fragment. the initial letter is correctly written in 1. 19. 17. 1. Steph. Byz., H. The interlinear may have been 18. SO MSS.; It is not clear whether the two dots merely enclose the added inserted by the first hand. letter as is often the case, or represent a diaeresis ; the former alternative is more likely.
1.
:

:
.

19.

,.
.

20.

The

32.

\:(•.
[•.
[.

correction

44. 61.
62,
64.

\•.

The paragraphus

\
is

perhaps by a diorthotes.

MSS.,
is

rightly

nO doubt.

:

misplaced

perhaps the scribe took aXka for the conjunction.

eaSpopfj

MSS., more appropriately.
;

so E,

H.
SO

ABFM.
Herwerden, H.

MSS.;
879.

Thucydides
1 2• I

III.

X

8-1

cm.

Third century.

.

Part of one column, with the beginnings of a few lines of the column adjoin-

ing, written in third-century sloping uncials of a

common

type.

preserved, from the fifty-eighth and fifty-ninth chapters of Thucydides,

The portion Book III,
23).

shows a correct

text, supporting a traditional
(1.

but suspected reading

(1.
;

Two

kinds of stop, the high and low
the interlinear insertions in
11.

13),

are used, besides paragraphi

these, like

8

and

11,

may

be by the original

scribe.

[pas

][ ?
[(]

^
i.

Col.

Se

58. 4

5

yvovTes'

€ €€
^
yrf

879.

THUCYDIDES

III

7

'

58.5

[e\v


ei

0[]


[]9
re.

'

Col.

.

tolovtois'
8e

ktcvhtc

[]

re
15

€^\•€ [
ev €v

\\

[])( €€' 2 []€ €€ ^ [] [€]• €€ [ [] [ €€] [] €]€
i'epa

30

[€ €€ € [^€
[ [€
€)(^[
re

[
[

59• ^

re

25

[
5-

]
:

[e7ro^'
35

[

[^
€v

59• 3

6

23.

with an obeFus.

(
so

ABEFGM
:

;

re
;

C, H(ude).
Stahl,

SO

MSS.

€€
X
13-2 cm.
fifth

Herwerden.

.

prints

880.

ThUCYDIDES V.
1

Fr. (3)

8• I

Late second century.
fall

The

following nine fragments from the

book of Thucydides

into

two

groups, which were discovered on different occasions and
parts of the

come from

quite different
40,

MS.

Frs. {a)-{d), containing portions of chapters

32-4 and

were

i88

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

found together, and the remainder, covering chapters 96-105 and part of iii, made their appearance some little distance away ten days afterwards. The rather broad columns are written in a clear and upright semicursive hand, dating

High stops and paraapparently from the later decades of the second century. graph! are used, double dots as usual denoting a change of speaker in the report There are two instances of the rough breathing of the debate at Melos.
a
final
;

;

is

occasionally represented

and | in not of a high class and shows several errors which are absent from tradition in two passages where it supports the better mediaeval MSS. emendations are accepted by Hude, but confirms Kriiger's conjecture
vowel
iota adscript
is

by a horizontal dash over the preceding are commonly but not consistently written.

The

text

;

for

in

c

97,

which Hude does not adopt.
{a).

Fr.

\[
TOi;]s

\^
[ [ [

32,

i

]

1\\.
Fr.

yvv\aiKas

]''\

).

.

[8\[
[yjriXois]

15

€ \6.\^ [ \ ][] [ ^ €[] [9[< [] 9 [? ^p. \^^] €[ € [] \[^ [? []$ [ [9 €[] 2 [ ] [€

][[][ [€5 []• €[][ [ [\9 []9
ovt€S
re]

ev

33• 2

t[€1)(^os

]9

€v

]€ tovs

33• 3

[ret

34•

[]

]
]€/

([.]

€y

^

880.

THUCYDIDES V
rovs

25

\\ ^^ 8/ []€[9 [ € ]9 €[9 [] [ €[€( [] [][]€[9] [ ][\ [€]€[ [\ ^[ [? [ ]9 € € [?
€7
HXjciai oures
[S

[
a[p)(^eiv

189

34- 2

8e[ia]auTe9

ov]Te[9

]

e^ov]Tas

K[vpiovs eivai

Fr.

(.).

30

€09

35

?

[ €[

9 [ €7€ [€9

([

€€€
Bepovs
ov9

ev

4.

[^
Fr. (d)
.

€€

7€€

4
r[

i[

[
Frs.
(.),

[
7[

(/), (^).

45

[^

50

[€[ ^^' € [ ][ [ €€€ ] [][
\
Tives
€S

[€
[€

7][9
\['\[

\[€9
;

96

€€
tovs

97

[pov9

€\€€]

[ € ] [] € [€ €€ [

[€

€€

]

ovtcs

TTJeptye

iQo

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

55

[ [ [
[9

[€
§€1

:

€1/

[
Fr.
(/i)

[
][€€

]^ ^] ]
€€/

€] €[? ^? ][
7r6i^eT[e

€[ .]
]0[]€
f/xeiS"

9^

[n

neidel

6

[

[(]€ [€]
[]

[]
[]
€1»

[/€][]

6

//61S

[ []

€€ []
])(^

( €

(^ em

[\\] ] [
re

[ ][6 ] [ €
[€
ei
:

ovtcs

103. 2

^(^

104

[[]]

[][€]
75

[€\

( • ^
e/c

] €€

[:]

et

[] []

ye
'

.

8

[]

105. 2

880.
85
ey

acL

€€[9]

Se

[rejy

[^
[€]
go

9

^
€v

THUCYDIDES V

191

€€
€8
105. 3
ey

[^
[€]

€[]6^ [

€<

Se

]€8[

][

Fi•.

{

[]€ [
ei

95

[][]

[ ][€
to

€€€€ [^ ^ [[
[]€
em

III. 2

[
ye

(v

3

1-2.

The papyrus seems
between the s of about 34-5 letters.

40

letters

^,
14.

a line is with Dion. Hal.
is

De
so

have differed here from the ordinary text which would give of in 1. 2, whereas the usual length of in 1. i and Perhaps was omitted that there was an agreement tovtovs Thuc. lud, 845. 12, who has n-fpl hi tovs

]?

^

;

less likely.

:

21—2.
33•

long enough without the superfluous Fr. {d). This small piece, containing the first letters of lines, we have failed to identify. Since it was found with Frs. {a)-{c) it would be expected to come from the neighbourhood of cc. 30-40.

: ([
[]•.
: :

MSS.
or

;

irti

H(ude).
HXJetat
:

:
The
in the

'HXeias

MSS.
and the
line is quite

MSS.

.

papyrus

is

clear,

MSS., >c[at so Kriiger ; corr. rather than 50—1. It is likely that the papyrus had but owing to the very doubtful identity of the two broken letters at the end of 1. 50 the is uncertain. and size of the lacuna between (ABEFM) may equally well have SO H. with CG ; but 55. stood in the papyrus. this late form also occurs in C. 63. meCovpevovs (CEFGM). (AB) suits the space better than 1. irpos ov with MSS. 72. The second e of eWeinovri has been corrected probably from an /. and at. would be easy between MSS. The loss of 75.
49. To]v

),

] . : (
'.

(]€
: :

\

.

(

.

][(]! ^!»

80.

MSS.

192
82.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

'.

84.
87.

'*
'.

MSS.
:

1.

With

MSS.

88.

:

SO

MSS. MSS.
;

.,

cf.

Valla and Schol.

881.

Plato, Euthydemns and

Lysis.

•2 X 6•2

cm.

Late second or third century.

small fragment containing on the recto part of a column, and a few from the ends of some lines of the column preceding, from Plato's Eiithydenms. The text, which is written in a small neat uncial hand, round and upright, of about the end of the second century, shows one or two unimportant variants as compared with the three principal MSS., with none of which it
letters
all consistently. Stops (in the middle position), paragraphi, and double dots marking a change of speaker occur. On the verso of this is a portion of a column from the Lysis, written small irregular uncial hand with some admixture of cursive, dating probably in a

A

agrees at

from the first half of the third century. Double dots accompanied by paragraphi mark, as usual, alternations in the dialogue there is also a doubtful instance of a high stop, and one accent. The surface of the papyrus has suffered considerably and decipherment is sometimes difficult. Considering the small size of the fragment variations from the ordinary text are surprisingly frequent they do not seem to be very valuable, though in most cases they are not obviously wrong.
; ;

Recto.
Col.
i.

[ [
5

\ [

TOvSe

:

ap ovv

€] € ]9 \

30

e

[ [8

[9 [
[

[

€i€

]]
\\•

[9 €[
pe
:

302 a
15

ye

\

]

€ ([ £

\ [
Col.

.

302 b

[9

302 c

^ejeo»'.

€)(]

2

pe•

(7[€[
re

[ €
u[pa

:

881.

PLATO, EUTHYDEMUS

AND

yap

25

9
c^VK
5.

€ [9
;

[ ^< [
€€
^[
upa
Zivs
has an

LYSIS

193

[

[?

final syllable

\
;

:

cf.

14.

ye t\ls

22-3.
23. lepa

:
'.

1808, where Burnet. ye Burn, with T, re Tis ye B. SO TW, Burn.; om. B.

, Ven. 189 and Par.
BW,
Upa
:

written above the

\

BTW.
Verso.

[(€]
[6
[60J7

]

ap[
:

208 c

10

€[]

\]^
5

•]

-^^
ye
€0?;
:

[€]^

[] []

^
15

X9\y^'\':\y

°j*

\'\\\

[] \\
:

\\
ye

[]
:

:

eXeu^e

ye

[
.

] [] []]
[]\€
:

[ )(]
[kc^]

[7ro]AX[ou]y

^
eoi
• •

28 d

[

€:[/]
:

]

]

[

is not more satisfactory, for line is uncertain, but to read than the second is of the doubtful letters is in some ways more like more like than . Moreover the division apx\ei is very objectionable in a literary text, while to read apx[ei would make this line longer than any of those that follow, and besides necessitate a supplement of three letters at the beginning of 1. 2, where there is no

at the
first

end of the

though the

known
2.

variant.
ris
:

a8ayy.
seem
to
4.
6.

]

ris

The

scribe omitted the

or 6 MSS., which also read and perhaps also the t

8e (6

in the latter

alone Paris. 181 1) before word ; he does not

have written e8ayos. precedes f]peTep6s ye in the
ye:

MSS.

(omit

.

.

.

Ven. 189),

om. MSS.
:

7.

8e

MSS.

except Vat. 226 which has

in place of

8e.

194
8.
IT.:
:

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
14. ye

between
15.

[. €[(
and
:

.

MSS,
is

the reading

quite uncertain, but

something certainly stood in the papyrus
cf.
1.

For

the insertion of ye

6.

om. MSS.

as hiKev Occurred a few Hues above in 208 b.

It is

superfluous

here after apa.

882.

Demosthenes, In Aristogitonem
9•8

I.

X

cm.

Second century.

fragment from the bottom of a column of a roll containing the first speech of Demosthenes against Aristogiton. It is written in an upright and rather small round hand, not very regular, and probably dating from the second
century.

A

No
10.
is

stops or other lectional signs are found, but slight blank spaces,
left

perhaps corresponding to marginal paragraphi, are
11.

where a pause occurred
the original scribe.

in

7

and

An

interlinear addition in

1.

8

may be by
;

The

fragment
careless.

too small to possess any critical value

the writer was apparently

[\ /€[9]
[r]e

[ai]s

[.]€
5
[I'jo?

eyei/ero

[]9

[-^^
\^p\yov

[ \ •\ [\ [] [ ([ [\
6\
^]
rats

47

>9 Seov

ore]

[\
10

[€]
after
ev
:

[
[t]ls
:

].[€]9

\
e^eis

& 4^

.
8.

inserted here as well as

omission of
9.

(. €() [ 5
1.

SY

add

om. Blass with the other MSS.
It
is

[ev]

om.

AF,
by

Blass.

of course impossible to be sure that ev

was

,

but the similarity of
itself

and

ev will readily

account for the original

«, whereas
1.

would

less easily

drop out.

:

((!

with

MSS.

883.

DEMOSTHENES, IN ARISTOCRATEM
883.

195

Demosthenes, In AHstocratem.
18x4-1 cm.
Third century.

A short fragment containing parts of §§
tocrates.
left

149-50 of the speech against Aris-

The

roll

above them.

was written in narrow columns, a large space (7-5 cm.) being The good-sized, well-formed hand is of the oval type, but the
;

letters are

upright or have only a very slight slope

is

noticeably small.

It

seems to be a rather early example of this style of literary writing, and perhaps stop placed midway in the goes back to the beginning of the third century.

A

and accompanied by a paragraphus marks the end of a section. There are two agreements with minor MSS. against S but judging from the blunders in 11. 1 1-4 the text was not of a high class.
line
;

9 8€
5

ov

€€>[

>7[
€[

\ \
§

149

/^^^


15

.
[']'
:

\
;

150

$[]6[
TTOieiv

[ ^
n[po€L
[

[

ov[Siv

^K€L

79

7[€
3•

[
Other MSS., Blass.
'.

Blols

2

[ \
]\^
)([019

Tepois

5—6.
8.

8€\^

:

SO

The

but reduces the passage to nonsense.

SO V ; y Blass With Other MSS. 1 1 sqq. The ordinary reading here is is comparatively harmless, text of the papyrus has gone badly astray ; npoeiKero for in 1. 17, and the omission before is an awkward repetition of

(

€.

.

]\ISS.

^(

({]
(recto).

€.

884.

SalluST,
15-8

Catilina.
Fifth century.

X

15-4 cm.

Plate

V
is

Latin classics have been conspicuous for their rarity

among

papyri from
of

Egypt, and hence the following fragment of
than ordinary
interest.
It consists of

Sallust's Catilina, ch. vi,

more

a nearly complete leaf from a papyrus
2

196
codex, which

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
may be
is

assigned to the
'

fifth

century.

The

upright and wellg. of the legal

formed hand
fragments

of the

mixed

'

type, the forms of the letters, in which cursive
e.

characteristics predominate, being in general similar to those
in P.

which are no doubt of about the same date. The ink is of the reddish-brown colour common at this period. Dots in three positions as well as the colon (cf. P. Amh. II. 27) are used for purposes of punctuation, pauses being also sometimes marked by blank spaces (11. i, 3, 25) or paragraphi (1. 6). que is written q- the only other abbreviation which occurs is reip• for reipublicae. The scribe was extremely careless and made a number of errors, which have been amended to some extent by himself but more often by some one else.
11. 38,
;

Amh.

text,

Since the colour of the ink in these corrections does not differ from that of the it is not easy to distinguish the hands but the alteration of e. g. propularent
;

to proptlerant in

1.

18 seems clearly to be

by the

original writer, while the inser-

tion of an7iis four lines lower

down

is

not less clearly due to another person.

also occur a few cursive adscripts (11. 5, 6, and 10) which may be independent both of the original scribe and the corrector of annis, &c. if, however, they are to be assigned to one or other of them, the former seems more likely to be responsible than the latter. It may be noted that the cross-stroke of t in

There

;

tempore,

1.

5,

is

brought down to form the base of the following e as

in

the

Italian papyri of the fifth

and sixth

centuries.

In several places small interlinear
;

marks are found of which the significance

The

text as corrected

is

is not clear cf. note on 11. 7, 26-7, 30. good, agreeing in the main with the best MSS., of which

there are a large
interesting reading

number dating from the tenth century onwards. The most
. .

is the occurrence in 11. ^-6 of the sentence ita brevi facta est, which there is otherwise small support. Our collation is based on the edition of R. Dietsch (Leipzig, 1859), ^o"^ whose text the papyrus rarely diverges.

for

Verso.

libermn adq• sohitum• \fuit^
a

hi postquam

vi.

a

in una moenia convenere. dispari genere
dissimili lingil^e^.
tes.

alius alio
est•

more viven

incredibile
a

memoratt^s^

quam

fact

5

tempore tu le cob{erin[t] ita brevi multido diversa t per con m g ^[[^]]^' i^«[[-y]]<i Concordia civitas facta est

:

sed postquam res eorum civibus moribus
agris- aucta• satis prospera satisq• pollens

videbatur : sicuti pleraq- mortalium I^^aben

884.

SALLUST, CATILINA
entia ia

197

io tur- invidia

ex opoletii^tn^ orta est
i

[i\gitur reges. populiq- f\e^iitimi. bell\o tern
taba[nt]

[PlA^Yf
[ri

[pa]iic[i\

ex aniicis auxilio esse [nam cete

metu

peY\c\tilsi

a

peric[u]lis aber\ant

Recto.

propuf^^a^'^e^tt : sociis
a

eat
4
vel aetate

lines lost.

«[[^]]^•

amicis auxilia por[ta

baftt m^tis^isq• [[^w]] dandis
20 dis heneficiis amicitias

quam

accipien

parabant imperium legetiimtm nomen hnperii regium habe
aunis bani' delecti quibus c[oyptis infinmim• inge

6

nmm
bant
25

sapientia validtim eral• reip- consulta
ii

e el cur a similitudine

paires appellabantur'

post
e

tibi

regium

7

imperium quod
t

initio co7tservandae t\i

[b]ertatis c^^d^q-

augenda

reip-

fueral• in stiper

\bi\am dominationem.q• se convertit•
[tato
,^0

immu

m\ore annua imperia• binosq• impera

\tores sibi fecere eo]

mode min[ume

not found in the MSS. Dietsch with P^BT (2nd hand) p^ &c. and with erat for est in a 5-6. ita .facta est this sentence is found in Leid, MS. used by Popma, Vind. i and 2, and cod. Herbipolitanus ; om. Dietsch. tempore, which is inserted above the line, is found only here ; the addition is no improvement, per concordiam as a variant for concordia is also novel the reading is uncertain, the supposed c of Both per concordiam and con looking more like n, and very little remaining of the final m. tempore might be regarded as explanatory glosses rather than textual variants. 7. Above e oi eorum is a mark resembling a small c, which we do not understand. ia over the 10. We suppose that the mistaken opulentum has been twice corrected, termination is clear, but the decipherment of the cursive letters which precede at a higher
I.

/ui/,

which
:

is

crossed through,

is
;

3.

alius

so the majority of
. :

MSS.

ah'i

.

G

;

level is very doubtful.

The

first

of them

is

there

is

really

more ink than

is satisfactorily

probably e, and eniia seems just possible, though might or epo accounted for by nt. ex
,

.

.

.

.

.

be read.
II. temptare or tentare

MSS.

an angular mark

to

which we can attach no meaning.

Just in front of the upright stroke of 3 in bello there is The low stop beneath it is doubtful.

198
13. pey\c]ussi (p^

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
gg^

)

might also be read, but
is

is less

likely ihs^xi pey[c]ulst.

21.

1.

legitimtim.

22. annis (\o]rpus: so 3K; corpus annis

the usual order.

24. ii: ei

MSS., except

g*,

which has

hi.

26-7. Several small interlinear signs of doubtful significance occur here; cf Plate V. there is something rather like an e, and above the middle i of initio are some strokes resembling the letters li a more complicated sign appears over augendae, and an angular mark over e oifuerat. of min[w?ie•, cf. notes on 11. 1 1 and 26-7. 30. There is an angular mark above the

Above quod

;

IV.

MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS
885.

Treatise on Divination.
23-3 X 8'3 cm.

Late second or early third century.

This text, containing one well-preserved column between two others which have almost entirely disappeared, is written in careful and well-formed upright uncials of about the end of the second century. High stops are used, besides paragraph!, while a coronis below a short line at 1. 57 marks the end of a section an accent occurs in 1. 38. The subject of what remains is the interpretation
;

of strokes of lightning

found

in the

when falling upon statues. A parallel to this is to be work of Johannes Lydus, de Ostentis, §§ 47-52, where a section occurs when
various objects, and

(probably derived from Cornelius Labeo, a writer of the second or third century)
giving the prognostications to be deduced
statues, are struck

among them
Possibly

astronomical conditions were also taken into account in the present treatise,

though they do not
only
{itepX

also doubtful.

)
is

by

lightning, according to the position of the sun.

figure in

what remains.

Whether

it

concerned thunderbolts
is

or was of a wider character and included other

It is interesting as in

and wonders which
circumstance
tioned in
11.

an early specimen of the treatises on signs the Byzantine period became so popular. noticeable

A

that there are no traces of Egyptian influence, the gods

men-

According to Lydus indeed (§§ 43, 52), things were not struck by lightning in Egypt, or if ever they were, when the sun was in Pisces, it was a good omen. Thunderstorms do occur at the present day, though rarely.

44-6 being exclusively Greek.

885.

TREATISE ON DIVINATION

199

Col.

i.

15

OiS

yap

25

30

200
'

THE OXYRIJYNCHUS PAPYRI

(If the statue of a poor man be struck by a thunderbolt and do not fall), it will be the beginning of happiness for him; but if the statue when struck l)y the thunderbolt falls down The poor man should therefore entirely, it indicates the destruction of his whole family. purify the statue, and sacrifice to Zeus Wieldcr of Thunder, and Heracles, and Fortune the but the portent Preserver in accordance with his means, and appropriate the former portent of the fallen statue he should expiate and avert by sacrifice to the same gods. If the statues of noble men be struck by a thunderbolt . .'
; .

it

31 sqq. The sense of the protasis of this sentence may be restored tau \() \Kfpavvov avbims
I

meant arc public ornaments, or represent abstract qualities, and the portent has a more general significance than is the case here, where private individuals

.

(( (^) <
In I.ydus,
J)(^

Oskntis, the passage concerning statues

The

Statues there

\

(

/
2

is

apparent from what follows;

«

is

Tois

,

»;||[

as follows (§ 47)

( -^
»\\
,.\.
:

**

?

tlntiXf'i' fl

yhp
ntpi

are concerned,

marginal sign, which stands midway between the two columns, is repeated Its meaning is obscure; it cannot be associated with the paragraphus 87. below 1. 41, since at 1. 87 there is no paragraphus, nor on the other hand is it very likely in the latter place to have some connexion with the conclusion of the section in 1. 57, for 1. 10 is a full line, and there is therefore no reason to suppose that a section ended at that point. The symbol might be taken to represent ap or 8p, but the first letter would be incompletely
41.

The

again before

1.

formed.

88.

Magical Formula.
•3

X

1

2'5

cm.

Third century.

A formula for obtaining an omen, of a type common in
book
;

magical papyri, and

purporting, as often happens with Hermetic writings, to be copied from a sacred

2-4 and Rcitzenstcin, Poimandres, pp. 138 sqq. which are frequently employed in astrology and magic (cf. Boll, Sp/iaera^ pp. 469 sqq., Reitzenstein, op. cit.^ pp. 260 and 288, Oicievlch, A BC-I^/d-ma/cr, P. Brit. Mus. 121. 705 sqq., &c.), play a somewhat
cf.

note on

11.

The

letters of the alphabet,

number being reckoned as 29 instead of 24. any case required owing to the nature of the process described in 11. 19-21, but how the figure 29 was obtained is quite obscure. To give confidence in the efficacy of the spell, the claim is made (11. 7-10) that it was used by Hermes and Isis in the search for the dismembered body of Osiris. The scribe was a very illiterate person, and makes several mistakes. A couple of dashes are placed in the margin below 1. i and against 11. 24-5.
mysterious part
in the formula, their

An

uneven figure was

in

^ .

.
pi

€9

-

886.

MAGICAL FORMULA
15 KOS

20

9 €€9
^ 6 8k T/JOTToy iarlv

Upas

.
kv
<€

-

€9 €{)

kv

.

.
19.
1.
1.

9. olaipfw'

24.

? ? €. ^^ '. ].
S)V

€[\
2

€ ,
TL


kp€ 5e

k-mv^d-

-

"-

^{?)

(/

kv

ttc-

25

€ €€ ^] .
[/]€\
kv 019

-

Pap. Pap.

;

so in L

7.

3.

1.

(€(.
If

14.

1.

The

7• L has been inserted
iiroXtTroT/ijevoi»

:

later.

so in U. 9, II, 18, 22. Pap. 17.
21.
1.

alpf.

19—20.

8vo'

Pap.

20.

Pap.

~ /.

Lady Isis. Copy of a sacred book found in the archives of Hermes. concerned with the 29 letters used by Hermes and Isis when searching for Invoke the sun and all the gods in the deep concerning her brother and husband Osiris. Take 29 leaves of a male palm, those things about which you wish to receive an omen. and inscribe on each of the leaves the names of the gods ; then after a prayer lift them up two by two, and read that which is left at the last, and you will find wherein your omen conssts, and you will obtain an iEuminating answer.'
'

Great

is

the

The method

is

2-4. Prof. F.

in Caial. codd. Astr. Graec. vii. p. 62 ev Upois €V abvTois
6.

nmneral being

) ^
(L
19.

the right-hand part of the second in place of here ; cf. introd. but there is, we think, no doubt about the reading is not very stiit e better than a. the vestiges following : 10. constantly occurs in magical formulae of this character (e. g. satisfactory, and (= eVi/cathe extract from P. Leyden W. quoted in note on 1. 14); but to read here makes the' change to the second person singular in I. 1 3 very diflficult. is the ordinary symbol in magical papyri for 17X10?. 11, The sign following
in
1.

^^ - ^ (^ ':
Cumont
ev

well compares the beginning of a magical

formula

found

r^s Alyinrrov ev

« €{•
15

...

«

might be read

,

lost,

([

[

14 sqq. Cf.
(1.

e.

g. P.

Leyden W.
hei^as

xxiv. 31 sqq.

0$)

etm»
:

(1.

) (/)

Xeyc,

/

ae

,.

eniypcr^ov

biio

bio

for this mixture of distributives

cf. e. g.

Luke

x. i.

887,

Directions for Wrestling
10-6

(?).

X

5-8 cm.

Third century.

the recto of this small fragment are parts of eight lines from the bottom of a column, containing repeated references to different parts of the body and

On

202

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
is

apparently belonging to a treatise of the same class as 466, which
with grips in wrestling.

concerned

and rather large uncial writing is probably third century. On the verso is another text in a similar and possibly of the but the letters are more hastily formed, and the lines are set identical hand much wider apart and also come further down towards the lower edge of the papyrus. The subject here is evidently different, but the remains are too scanty
careful
;

The

to give a definite clue to

its

nature.

Recto.

CTTt

t6\v 5e|[io]i'
]

[
[

\ ]€
]
]
]

eiy

67 67 67 []/

\\

:,[
[

5

]
]

€7

?

[
[

][[ ][]
]

]
]]
€^

Verso.

€[
.

[

[

]€

[

eXe[

]

V.

DOCUMENTS OF THE ROMAN AND
BYZANTINE PERIODS
(a)

OFFICIAL

888.

Edict of a Praefect and Petition.
Fr. (d) 9-2 X 14-9 cm.

Late third or early fourth
century.

Oxyrhynchite nome, with which is here whom was a woman (cf. note on 1. 9), concerning the guardianship of the children of their dead sister. Only the first two or three lines of this document remain and its purport is unknown the interest of the papyrus lies in the fact that prefixed to the mutilated petition is a copy of an edict, dated in the year 387, of the praefect Flavius Valerius
to the exegetes of the

A petition

coupled the Small Oasis, from two persons, one of

;

888.

EDICT OF A PRAEFECT AND PETITION

203
This

Pompeianus, relating to the appointment of guardians
ordinance
{ol

directs

guardians, since absence of the latter led to

much delay in business in which orphans were involved. The question here arises, what magistrates were competent to appoint guardians? According to the lex lulia et Tiiia, passed in
B.C. 31, this right

)
that

for

orphan minors.

magistrates

empowered
all

to

make such appointments

should do so in

cases where orphans were without

was
in

in the provinces vested in the praefects,

enactment continued
it is

force

in

the third century In practice,

expressly

named

(a. d. 247).

and that that shown by 720, where however, the praefect of Egypt
is

is seldom found exercising his power, which was delegated to subordinate officials, and in particular to the who, as in 888, are the persons most commonly invoked in connexion with the guardianship of minors cf. e. g. B. G. U. 1070, in which a woman supplies to the exegetes the name of a man suitable for the

(,

;

From P. Amh. 85 and 86, which are applications addressed to the exegetes for leases of land belonging to orphans, it would appear
guardianship of her children.
that this magistrate was actually responsible to

some extent

for the

proper

management of property

of that class.

Professor Mitteis, to

whom we are indebted

for several points in the interpretation of this papyrus, thinks that the praefect

was principally appealed to when the parties concerned came from different nomes, or when one or other of them happened to be residing outside his own nome, and the local magistrates were consequently unable to act. The latter explanation would well suit P. Tebt. 326, where the applicants who have recourse to the praefect are natives of Antinoopolis domiciled in the Fayum. The exegetae, however, were not the only officials competent in these matters. In 487 the is stated to have assigned a guardian to certain minors, and the

?
is

epistrategus

requested to direct the strategus to give orders that the

According to P. Tebt. 326, where the case is who would actually make the appointment in accordance with the praefect's instructions would be not the exegetes but the strategus cf. P. Cattaoui verso ii. 1 7-9, where the iuridicus proposes to In both these instruct the strategus to make an appointment of guardians. acting merely as the instances no doubt the strategus may be supposed to be temporary delegate of the superior authority but a more general competence to deal with such matters is proved, for Oxyrhynchus at any rate, by 56, where an
should substitute another person.
referred to the praefect, the magistrate
; ;

application

by a woman

for a Kvpios is

addressed to the exegetes because the
26-9, where

deputy-strategus was absent, and 898.

a strategus

orders

the

guardian of a minor to be changed.
the praefecture of Pompeianus,

A
is

who

new date is supplied by this papyrus for shown to have been in office in Oct. 287,
still

while from P.

Amh.

137 he

is

known

to have been

praefect in July 289.

204

[]\[^
019

[^

iv[

15 letters

5

.

[?

?? ] ^ ] ^^[ ? [? '? [] ^? [ ? , {?) ^ [^) ]?
ye

[9
\<
.

^ \ € ?' \ ? ^,
OvaXipios
6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

]9
?

8[\9
(}[]9

'

€€•

ot

[€69 ' [] ? ? [•

[]

)[€6

]9 \^
(eVof?)

[9

TOis

[?.
.
.

[

\\ ^} \{?) ] €? (€}) ? {?)
kv
1

.

6 letters

k]vp

]
]

6[€?).

\6€?
letters

? ]€?

? {?)

(?)

[?

.

^ '
Fap.

?

?

5^

[]

?

.

.

.

.

Fnp,

6.

,.

8.

'
.

Fa.p,

Proclamation of his excellency Flavins Valerius Pompeianus, praefect of Egypt. for whom no guardians have been assigned shall have guardians in accordance for it ; with their age created for them by those competent to make the appointment will thus result that they receive proper attention, whereas at present much business concerning orphans and depending upon their guardians is delayed because the orphans the 3rd year of our lords the The 4th which are unattended by iuiores or curatores. Published in Oxyrhynchus on the August! Diocletianus and Maximianus, Phaophi 27th of the same month Phaophi. To of the Oxyrhynchite nome and the Small Oasis, senator of , exegetes in office and Apollonia, both the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, from children of Origenes and Thaesis, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus. We were given the guardianship of our nephews (or nieces), the children of our dead .' sister daughter of Origenes, of the said city

Orphans

.

.

=

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

888.

EDICT OF A PRAEFECT AND PETITION
may
be
filled e.g. iv

[

3.

The

lacuna

tutores for those
is

enirpOTTovs

the case distinction between tutor and curator is not infrequently lost sight be.' of in provincial documents of this period, but no such confusion would be expected, as Mitteis has pointed out to us, in an official proclamation, and therefore does not mean that emrponovs and are convertible terms. and s of in which there is room 5. There is a hole in the papyrus between for a letter ; the writing surface seems to have been faulty at this point. The supplement of the preceding lacuna is a trifle shorter than it might be.

" ['\ 8(5, 8€ \_5 may The
Mitteis.

\

205

eieias, or ii^Tos

.

.

.

^.

[\-

Tovs

guardians Corresponding to the age of the orphans/ i. e. below the age of puberty (14 years), cura/ores for those under 25 years. here used as a wider term including both tutores and curatores cf. 11. 5-6 where
'

is

synonymous with

' . 8,

;

'

tutores Or curatores as

\,

blank space

five letters between and erovs, but a short before the date. 8. The Small Oasis (Bahriyeh) which was grouped with the (cf. P. Amh. would naturally, for administrative purposes, 137. I be combined with the Oxyrhynchite nome, to the west of which it lies ; cf. 485, where the implication is that persons living in the Oasis were under the jurisdiction of the Oxyrhynchite 6.

There would be room

for

may

well have been

(() .

?)
left

about

[5

strategus.

The petitioners were either brother and sister, or else two sisters in the former which is the more probable, they perhaps also stood in the relation of husband and wife. In any case the passage provides another instance of female guardianship, which has already been attested for peregrini by 495, and for Roman citizens by P. Tebt. 378; cf. Wenger, Zeitschr./. Savtgny-Sti/tung, 28, p. 305^. Various instances in the papyri prove the possibility of a mother acting as guardian to her children (cf. e.g. 898. 5-6), and the guardianship of mothers and grandmothers was eventually admitted by the later Roman law
9.
;

case,

;

but that of

women

not so related to the ward was at no period legalized.

889.

Edict of Diocletian and Petition.
23-5

X

9 '3 cm.

Fourth century.

This narrow strip from a papyrus written in a large cursive hand in very broad lines contains in 11. 1 1 sqq. part of a petition addressed to the boule of, no doubt, Oxyrhynchus, by a man who probably wished to be let off some municipal burden on the score of old age and ill-health. In support of his case he appeals to an imperial decree, of which a copy is prefixed in 11. i-ii. The papyrus
is

thus similar in character to P. Flor.

S^j,

a petition to the praefect claiming

immunity from Aeiroupyiat, which begins by quoting several rescripts of Septimius Severus and Caracalla guaranteeing this immunity to persons over the age of 70. The authors of the present decree are clearly Diocletian and Maximian, and the date of it is apparently the third consulship of the Caesars Constantine and
^

In 495

it

is

the sister of the testator, not, as stated

by Wenger,

his daughter,

who

is

appointed

guardian.

2o6
Galerius, A.D. 300.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
It

was of the nature of an indulgence
(e^/j/coiraeTets,

apparently to persons over the age of 60

of the benefits conferred remains obscure, the only clue being afforded

where there seems to be a reference to quartering persons upon others {e
petition itself
(11.

-).

^
?

{],
by
falls

1.

5)

1.

9),

but the special nature
1.

8,

(?)

and to the practice of
of the date of the within
it

11-2) are too slight to fix the year, but

the 50 years following A.D. 300.

5

10

15

2
6.
1.

corr.

from

.
.

]^ ^ ? ]€ €[ €] . ]. ^ ] €[ [ ]
[
.

]9 ^ )]^
^/]9
]

]s

?^€[ [ ^
Kaiaape[s
[ [

The remains

no doubt

]

[

[

kv

\^^\
]€?

]ois

ei

iXa[

rfj

a

y

:[

.

[

] ] ](
ir\epi

evap^ov

7€[€
[
.

kviavTov

kva\ov

[

]/

II.

!

]
Pap.
1 6.

^
[

.

[

Pap.

1 8.

1-4- Since there are two Augusti bearing the titles Germanicus and Sarmaticus, and two Caesars, while the consuls hold office for the third time and must be Caesars or Augusti is the Only alternative for in 1. ii), the reign of Diocletian and Maximian, and the third consulship of Constantius and Galerius are clearly indicated. A slight difficulty arises in connexion with the title (= Gothicus; cf. for the form P. Leipzig 119. verso ii. 8, where perhaps which was should be read for

[]

]/

),

889.

EDICT OF DIOCLETIAN AND PETITION

adopted by Claudius, Aurelian, and Probus, but seems to be new as an epithet of Diocletian. With regard to the length of the lines, only in 11. i and 13 can the beginnings be restored with any degree of probability. In 1. i Taios oiaX^ptos implies an initial loss of 46 letters, and in 1. 13 [rf, a loss of 52, and since no shorter restorations of these two lines are likely, the initial lacunae may be estimated at not less than 45 letters throughout. How much is lost at the ends of lines is more uncertain. If the names of the Caesars were given in full, as is likely, in 11. 3-4, we must restore i.e. 56 letters, of which 5-10 probably occurred in 1. 3; hence even if is the last of Maximian's titles, there seems to be a loss of from 15 to 20 letters, and the total number of• letters missing between the points at which one line breaks ofF and the next commences can hardly be less than 60 on an average, and may amount to 70 or more. In 1. 3 secms to be an error for the singular, applying to Maximian alone, for if the plural is correct here, must then be read and Diocletian has already been styled in 1. i.

€]05

]

[

,} : :
207

([6\,
8.
Ko[
:

\

or

Ku[i'.

II.
11.
1.

Probably

1-4•
10.

The date by the regnal The date beginning

to the length of the lacuna before full, and it is quite uncertain who these consuls were. 13. Probably [r^ /cat note on 11. 1-4.
15.

Owing

16.

]6:

€[ '.
:

[ ^ ] ( ]
([
\
years

'

{?

\ ) probably occurred
;

cf.

the note
at the

SC.

cf.

1.

9

(]

refers to the following petition

the

[ may names
; *

end of be read for must have been given in

.

\(

'

cf.

0 the like.
(cf.
1.

1

7)

is

also possible.

890.

Letter to a Strategus.
20-2x14.7 cm.
Third century.
at

An
treasury.

incomplete letter from the prytanis of the local

Oxyrhynchus

to the strategus, giving a list of persons

who owed money

to the municipal

imperial government and to be balanced against from the municipal exchequer.

Apparently these sums were to be collected by the agents of the moneys owing to the imperial

5

^^9/? €
AovKios

?

]€[] . [6][€]
7[€]

'

§>u

2o8

[e/y

[.
[

6] [] (^ [^ \
[6€]9
]

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

elal

!/4]7/9

15

\y^^i
[

]9,
8e

.
.

^]'9

[

[

2

letters

]9]
4•

{^?
[.
.

1)

,

.

12.
'

Pap.

8^\>

Pap.

A

Lucius Septimius Aurelius Sarapion also called Apolinarius, and however I am styled, prytanis in office of Oxyrhynchus, to his dearest Aurelius Leonides, strategus, greeting. written list of those from whom are to be exacted the sums which they owe to the city, and which are to be used in payment of moneys payable from the account of the city, is

hereby given you
all

in

m.ost sacred Treasury,

three sons of Sarapion also called
7.

With
or

'

of
is

money

practically equivalent to

,
[.
.

order that there may be no hindrance in collecting the revenues of the They are Aurelius ., Aurelius Apollonius, and Aurelius Domitianus,
.

.

.

.

.,

ex-agoranomus, 400 drachmae
if

the sentence begins as

the object
;

was going

to

be stated
in

but

this is

,

.'
.
.

i.e.

particular

not expressed, so that

sums '

S>v

a.

14. Perhaps

.

.

TpeU in

1.

16. i.e. might be read; but it is likely amounts of the debts were mentioned, not merely the names of the debtors.

{}) :
891.

15.

,

\,

]-,

which case

must be substituted

for

that the actual

Apportionment of Duties to an Exegetes.

•8
A letter

6-7

cm.

a. d.

294.

from the boule of Oxyrhynchus to an exegetes, acquainting him

with the fact that he had been chosen to act in his official capacity during part of the month of Epeiph as superintendent or president in the discharge of certain duties, the nature of which is uncertain (cf. 1. 11, note), the expenses being borne
in

is

common by the whole body of exegetae. The papyrus is written in a small very much damaged in several places.

flowing cursive, and the surface

891.

APPORTIONMENT OF DUTIES TO AN EXEGETES
['JE0'

5

]^ . () ^ ? ^ ^^ ]] (} {) ^.
/~
Trjs

209

{5«f}

)£(7;9)
(

St

.

.

15

' (7€€ , €.
Se elSivai

,
.

(€
[.

)

.]ay

eSo^ev

'€ ? \^,
ae
e^oiy

e/s

^

2nd hand

( €.
. .

€ €{6€),

In the consulship of Valerius Constantius and Valerius Maximianus, the most renowned Caesars. The most high senate of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus through Aurelius Cornelianus prytanis in office, to their dearest .,
*

Ptoleminus also called Sarmates, exegetes, greeting. An exegetes being required for the of Epeiph up to the 17th, it was decided that you should preside, while the expenses should be paid by the whole body of those belonging to the order. This letter is accordingly sent to you, dear friend, for your information. We pray for your health, dear friend.'
. .

1-2. The writing is much obliterated in these lines, but on palaeographical grounds the papyrus can hardly be later than Diocletian's reign, and that the Caesars are Constantius Probably the initial e was written large, causing 1. 2 to and Galerius is, we think, certain. begin much further to the right than 11. i and 3.
5.

The
.

repetition of

reading but
;

\{)

is

very doubtful, and

though not .
7.

' might be
and
.

!,

read for

',

it is not satisfactory to suppose the are the regular epithets of Oxyrhynchus, and the letter before the supposed would suit 1/ or /i but

honorific epithets of Hermopolis (e.g. in P. Brit.

are out of the question here.
.
:

doubtful
is

(())

) Or ) might perhaps be read ; the letter following ( ) has a vertical stroke coming below the line and suggests or p, while above a long horizontal line possibly representing an overwritten or But are unsuitable to the context, and no title of any kind would be expected at

^[

[

Mus. 955),
the
this

.

8{)

and
this

2IO
point, so that

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

it is perhaps safer to regard the word as part of the name of the prytanis, though in that case the abbreviation of it is remarkable. the supposed s is very doubtful, and there may be nothing at all II. [. .]as but between a (for which may be read) and :] a is unsuitable, for the lacuna ought not to contain more than 3 letters at most, and even with [6] a there is no stroke with ras above a to indicate a numeral^ as there is over of tf. Moreover, to supply and suppose that only the period and not the purpose for which the exegetes was required was expressed, is unsatisfactory. We prefer therefore to read [. ,]as in agreement with ras, though would be expected. for there were no doubt this seems to mean the 14. Preisigke, Siddtisches several exegetae, just as there were several gymnasiarchs of. is the word to be supplied with Beamtenwesen, p. 60, and 900. introd. That (cf. C. I. G. 441 1 b. 5) is less likely.
.

:

,

[6

:

,
.

;

892.

Appointment of a Superintendent of Works.
24-2

X

13-8 cm,

A.D. 338.

A letter from the logistes of the nome to a member of the boule at Oxyrhynchus, informing him that he had been appointed by that body to superintend the supply of wood required in building a public bath and a gate. Though written in a formal cursive hand the letter is only a rough draft, which has been subjected to correction, especially towards the end. The words added between the lines are more cursively written than the body of the document, but the hand seems to be the same b€v added in the margin of 1. 1 1 is almost certainly due to the original scribe. On the verso is a list of names preceded by a heading in two lines, the writing being much effaced. Apparently the individuals in question were sent to the Arsinoite nome to meet some charge.
;

5

? ^^ ^
TTJs
e
.

9 ?
,

§[ov\€vttJ
[.
.
. .

kvdpyov

[\ ^. ?? [€
[9

[e/y

[]

€[^€
ipyov

e/y

.

.

.

[

'

[\}

Sia

^

892.

APPOINTMENT OF A SUPERINTENDENT OF WORKS
10

^

? [][ 0] []
ipyov
4-

iviSpov yeviaOui

), .
rrepl

(

211

7€€)(^

}^
[

(is

Xovrphv

.
^•

Pap.

9• •""

Flavius Eusebius, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, to Aurelius Pasion, son of Horion, senator of the said city, his brother, greeting. Know that by the instructions of the most high senate of the city conveyed through the prytanis in office, Aurelius Nepotianus, you have been chosen to (provide) the timber required for the bath, and also for the construction of the north gate of the city and you are hereby instructed, brother, to take charge of the work, and with all speed to get the timber cut and delivered, so that there may be no fraud in connexion with the public bath and the municipal work. In the consulship of Flavius Ursus and Flavius Polemius the most illustrious, Tubi 18.'
'
.

.

.

.

.

.

;

I.

6.
[els

combine very well with [fls or [tls (cf. 6. g. C. P. Herm. 67. 8) avouM be appropriate enough, but are somewhat For a siniilar notification of appointment cf. B. G. U. 362. v. long. would be expected to occur somewhere at the end of this line ; cf. 1. 1 1 7. but fls cannot be read, and though the letter following fh may be r, and the doubtful may be , iU re is also inadmissible. Perhaps the word following fls gave the special name of the bath in question, but if so it differed from the 8fiov (43. versO iii. 24), (43. verSO iv. 24), and
is

'

Flavius Eusebius occurs also in
Cf. C. P.

85 and
. ,

86.

83. 7—8 aipeOevros possible here, but does not

Herm.

.

fls

;

^ (\.\\^ .
\

8[

()5

[

8/

(896. 7 5 cf. 53. 6). 1 1-2. The words from tvebpov to fpyov have lines drawn through or above them, indicating deletion, but fvfbpov at any rate cannot be spared. Apparently the corrector, whether identical or not with the original scribe (cf. introd.), at first cancelled these words, intending to rewrite the sentence entirely, but changed his mind and merely added what was required to restore the sense of the passage.

893.

Judicial Sentence.
1 2 '5

X 34 cm.

Late sixth or seventh century.

The extraordinary grammar of this document makes it difficult to construe, though its general purport is fairly clear. It is a decision or enactment (tvttos cf. note on 1. i) pronounced by three (cf 900. 19, note) of a village concerning some dispute, of which no details are given, between Marcus, another and Marinus. The latter, who was apparently the plaintiff, is declared to have the right of imposing upon Marcus, acting through his daughter Sophia, a formal affidavit (Oflos opKos), in which perjury would have serious consequences and

^^

,
; ;

2

212

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

If Marinus declined to free from further proceedings. an investigation by means of the proposed affidavit he was to be debarred conduct from taking other steps in the matter.

Marcus would then be

The

writing

is

across the fibres of the papyrus.

-\-

^[.^(
[]()

[]
6{)

8

+

[6)
5


8\\
[]

,^

^€ ^ ,
^{)
.

], € ^
{)

^ \^) ^ {) '
€(9)
[]{)
.

[.

\

()

,

,
eivai.

€{6)

\] \

{)

^)

[ ]€
2.

\'\

[/
eaeauai.
.

Pap.
4.
1.

an erasure.
.
,

6.
.
. .

COrr.
'

1.

.

.

.

and ., sentence of the honourable men Pamuthius, official, son of Paniren, of official rank, son of John, and Apollos, of official rank, son of Phoebammon, of the village of Apollo, in respect of Marcus, of official rank, and Marinus, tow-merchant : Marinus has power to make inquiry by means of the divine oath through Sophia, daughter of the said Marcus, of official rank, and after the inquiry by means of the divine oath through the said Sophia Marinus shall have no ground of complaint on any matter of any kind whatsoever. Written on the 29th of the month Pauni, the sixth hour of the day. It is manifest on the other hand that, if the said Marinus refuses to make inquiry by means of the divine oath through the said Sophia, Marinus shall have no ground of complaint on any matter of any kind whatsoever, and Marcus is free of him as though he were declared so

By

the

.
8ia

3•

^*

8(.
,

{) ^^ . € '(
. .

'
*]. 1.

\

.,
.
.

iy

.

i^.

5•

,

.

.

,

1•

^^
.

f'/'"•
.

.

(\

"""^^

g,

, /

are of

OVCr
1.

8.

apparently

.

.

by

sentence.*

893.

JUDICIAL SENTENCE

213

I. For Tvnos in the s§nse of ordinance or decree, found in late Greek, cf. P. Brit. Mus. 45-7 Z**?^^ KpoaeXfvaiv irpos tit. Oeiovs Justin. NoV. KfXtvafis. mUSt be intended (cf. e. g. p. Brit. Mus. 77. 68 but the space between and is so wide that it is difficult to suppose that nothing intervened. may have been Avritten, but not |;[' ]. 7-9. This clause is added as a postscript to provide for the contingency of Marinus refusing to acquiesce in the form of investigation prescribed. Something seems to have been written between and W, and the traces may be read as ; but the expression is

) []
77•

8, [.]
:

3
. .

.

.

.

.

;

very clumsy.

(d)

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
Latin Declaration of Birth.
9-4 X 10-8 cm.
a. d.

894.

194-6.

Plate VI.

Declarations of the birth of children are of frequent occurrence

among

Egyptian papyri, but these have always related to peregrini and until recently there has been no example of such a declaration made by a Roman citizen. Two years ago, however, the omission was supplied by some wax tablets in the Cairo Museum published by S. de Ricci, among which is a certificated copy, taken from an official register, of a declaration of birth made by a Roman in the year
cf Archiv, IV. p. 252). The formula of these p. 483 which are in Latin, falls into four sections (i) Names of seven witnesses. (2) Date {a) by Roman consuls and month, {b) by Emperor and Egyptian months, Alexandriiae) ad Aegyptum, descripttim et recognitum fac\itim'\ ex tabula albi profession\tim libero\n(m nator[um] &c. (3) Date as before, M{arco) Petronio Honorato praef{ecto) Aeg{ypti) professionis liberorum acceptae citra causarum
;

148 {Nouv. Revue Hist., 1906,

tablets,

:

cognitionem tabula

et post alia pag[ind)
.

m,
.

xviii k{alendas) Octobr{es).

(4)

Ti-

b{erius) lulius Dioscorides

.

.

fil{iam)
.

n{atam) luliam
.

Ammonum

ex lulia
:

Ammonario

xiii k{alendas) Septembres.

the declaration was

made

in the

Latin language,

Here three chief points are clear it was made at Alexandria, and

to the praefect of Egypt.

fragment of a tablet in the Bodleian Library has been recognized by Wilcken {Arckiv, IV. p. 267) as part of a similar Latin

A

declaration.

Another instance has now come to light in the following papyrus, which is later in date by some two generations. In the meantime according to the statement of Julius Capitolinus, Vita Marci, 9. 7-9, the formalities of registration had been regulated by Marcus Aurelius, who ordered that declarations of birth should be made within 30 days of the event at Rome to the. praefecti aerarii Saturni, in
the provinces to certain tabularii publici.

We

should therefore be prepared

214

^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

to find in a registration of a date subsequent to this regulation some features distinguishing it from one of the reign of Antoninus. As a matter of fact, however,

Our papyrus shows the same three these distinguishing features do not occur. essential points as the Cairo tablets the declaration was made at Alexandria,
:

and to the

praefect,

and the

certificate is

drawn up

in Latin,

though followed by

the signature of the declaring party in Greek. that vague term may signify, do not appear.

The

tabnL•r^^ publici, whatever

Prof. Mitteis, to

whom we

are

indebted for information on this question of registration, thinks that perhaps only the praefectorial bureau is thereby meant. In any case it seems that the regulations attributed
to

Marcus Aurelius had

practically

no

effect

upon the form

Egypt. of a Roman The scarcity of dated specimens of Latin cursive makes this papyrus palaeoIt is written in a clear and good-sized hand with occasional graphically valuable. Abbreviations and an ordinal figure in 1. 6 (cf. 737) are division of words. a is sometimes supplied with an abortive cross-bar. followed by a single dot.
declaration of birth in

On

the verso are traces of ink which seem to be
is

more than
is

blottings, but the

writing
figures.

too

much

effaced for decipherment

;

it

probably Latin, perhaps

21 letters

^qnno\^.

J\

Imp[eratoris) Cae\sa\ris L{ttcii)

Septimii Severi Pii Perti\nacis Aug{usti) A\rabi\ci Adiabenici

mense

die

.

.

.

A\lexandr{iae)

ad A\egypt\uin,

apud Marciim Ulpiiim Pri\mianum prcief{ectum) Aegypti
17 letters

pro\fessus est filium sibi
hab{it

20
19

natum ^num ex Ulpia Sabina xvi
]


20

? ] €€
.

)

[O'jxyryncAo.

7•

[o]xyrync/ia Pap.

year of the Emperor Caesar Lucius Septimius Severus Pius Pertinax 'In the Augustus Arabicus Adiabenicus, in the month ., at Alexandria on the coast of Egypt, before nus, born has declared a son, named Marcus Ulpius Primianus, praefect of Egypt. (Signed) ., being an inhabitant (?) of Oxyrhynchus. to him and Ulpia Sabina on the i6th I, ., declare that a son has been born to me
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.'

.

.

.

.

I. Probably one line is lost which with the first half of 1. i gave the date by the Roman The year may be the second, third, fourth, or consuls and month, as in the Cairo tablets.
fifth
;

cf.

1.

4,

note.
.
. .

3.

mense

die

.

.

.:

so the Cairo tablets, which also
is

support the supplement ad
in -ianus

A\egypi\um.
4.

M. Ulpius Primianus

the only praefect with a

name ending

who

is

894.

LATIN DECLARATION OF BIRTH

215

and though the list is not certainly complete the three held office during this short period cover it quite sufficiently. There is therefore good ground for identifying the praefect of the papyrus with Primianus, whose name occurs in two inscriptions, C. I, G.. 4863. iv of a.d. 194-5 and C. I. L. III. 51 of Feb. 24, 196, and in B. G. U. 973. 6 (undated). Mantennius Sabinus was still praefect on April 2, 194 {Archiv, II. p. 447, no. 77), and Aemilius Saturninus had entered office before July 197 (B. G. U. 15. ii. i). The limits of Primianus' praefecture are thus from the second to the fifth years of Severus. 4—5. Cf. Vita Gordiani \. 8 apud praefedum aerarii more Romano prof essus filium. The lacuna at the beginning of 1. 5 was filled by the name of the father. 6. "^um is the termination of the son's name, and xvi refers to the day of the month on which the birth occurred, and which was given according to the Roman calendar ; cf. According to the law attributed to Marcus Aurelius (cf. the Cairo tablets, section (4). introd.) the registration had to be made intra tricensimum diem ; it is noticeable that the Cairo tablets are already in accordance with this regulation. 7. \ihah• stands for hahitans referring to the name of the father, it is somewhat out of its place. Perhaps a plural participle was intended, connecting loosely with both parents. [O^xyryncho should then in either case strictly be ^O^xyrynchi, unless [O^cyrynchoirum) (so.
in the sole reign of Severus,

known

praefects

who

,

urbe) be read.

895.

Return of Village-Accounts.
19

X

15-4 cm.

A.D. 305.

A
in

statement rendered to the logistes of the

nome by two comarchs

of

the village of Tampeti, of the village-accounts for two months.
details are lost

through the mutilation of the papyrus.
(cf. e. g.
;

Most of its The report was required
o^-ifi)
1.

consequence of an order of the praefect

P. Tebt.
cf.

for

whose period of office a new date

is

supplied

has been joined to another return of a similar character, of which only the occurs apparently as beginnings of the first eleven lines are preserved a village name.

On
]
.

the verso at right angles to the writing on the recto are the

ends of nine

lines,
.
.

apparently of an account of judicial proceedings.

three lines are:
]

ev/o

ba(r|)aov.

?

5

9

[]•} ^9 ^?
(erovy)

€€9

^9 . ^ ^[
er7r(ev)•
}

)[

^ ][]
;

^

Clodius Culcianus,
8.

note on

The document

*] \
The
Stv
€.

last

[]

2i6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

?
15
[ [

88

[7]€ [
[')]
[....]
]

[ [[
Svo
[^??]?•

[][[€] ]€ re
Sl•

....]. eX/ay
]

eni
.

]
]

8e

] () [
.

€Xi]as

() , ()
ivos

[

[

]

.

.

[

[
"Olaaijv
.

[

^[
[.
. . .

]€[€]
of

€[.

.]

.

[

[

Remains

4 more
10.
1.

lines,

below which the papyrus breaks
15•
1•

a»'ay>t[atlo[j/.

In the consulship of our lords Constantius and Maximianus, most renowned Caesars, To Aurelius Seuthes also called Horion, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite for the fifth time. nome, from Aurelius Sakaon son of Petiris, and Aurelius Psois son of Patabes, both comarchs In reply to your request in the present 21st which the 13th of the village of Tampeti. year, in accordance with the order of his excellency the praefect Clodius Culcianus, for the village-accounts of our village in the two months Pharmouthi and Pachon, we, regarding For the price of this as a necessary duty, present them for your information, as follows of three workmen sent to Babylon 120 drachmae for the papyrus and writing-materials price of papyrus and writing-materials ... of one workman sent to . total . i[. .] drachmae ; together 2[. .jdrachmae . . .'
*

.
.

off.

=

:

.

.

.

;

2.
6.

The numeral e is not very satisfactory, but is confirmed by the date in 1. 6. The years are those of Diocletian and the Caesars Constantius and Maximianus,

the

year of the emperor Maximianus being omitted ; cf. e. g. the date in 71. 4. The present 8. Clodius Culcianus is mentioned as praefect in Feb., a. d. 303, in 71. passage proves him to have been still in office at the end of May, a. d. 305. was written ; the space between and 10. Perhaps is narrow for two letters. 12. Wilcken, who compares B. G. U. 1062. 20 fXiar, however, remains a difficulty, for there is hardly room for here, and ] certainly not in 1. 14. in 1. 13 suggests a more 15. O^upi7x]trai' would barely go into the space, and
.

^
seems

^^/

remote

locality, e. g.

'^.
=
:

^

(\(\

,
18 sqq.;

1 6.

stroke which

(\(,
19.

to be the numeral ; it is followed at a slight interval by a i o. be since the statement of accounts is continued in 17. Probably not

tall

upright

may

\(,
cf.

1.

e. g., is

more

likely.

'[]'

888.

8, note.

896.

REPORTS TO A LOGISTES
896.

217

Reports to a Logistes.
25-1

X34

cm.

A.D. 316.

These two reports addressed to the logistes Valerius Ammonianus belong to the same series as 53, which was sent to the same official and is dated in the same year. The first of them, which is numbered at the top 127, is also closely conIt is an estimate of the probable expense of painting nected with 53 in subject.
certain specified parts of

some public baths which were

in course of repair

;

and

Some new these repairs were also the occasion of the report contained in 53. be necessary. technical terms occur in the description of the work stated to
This
983),
is

followed

by a medical
1.

report, similar to 51-2, 476, B. G.

U. 647, &c.

(cf.

upon an
(cf.

official in

the service of the governor of the province Aegyptus

Herctdia

note on

29).

The

doctors certify that the person in question,
suffering

who

was perhaps suspected of malingering, was
Col.

from a mild attack of fever.

5

.) ?^
/()

^ € ()
i.

\[7

()


15

'? ,
€19

Tjj

^^
)-

9

[] 49
[€]
\'\

^^^
]

[€ ]'£

[ [

[.

] ^' [ ^]
...].[
^°V

]

2i8
20

[
[

[.
25

) )
TTJiy^

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
]

(2nd hand)

{\^')
{)

] €() (€)
Col.

€(9
8(6).

0[][€][

30

[cTTJf

€[
.

[€]8€ [\ [] €[] 6 €[6€' ^]
kv

35

and hand
3rd hand

.
'
.
.

4•


4
26.
;

[]
Pap.

) . ^ [] ^) ^€ . ^^ ' ] . {) ?"
]

.

"^ ^)

[•]

.

[

^ )](^)
fai
Aa[/X7r(/)ay)

[€]€
- [U]

[]

iv6a

^, ey-

[.]

...[•]

[] ![][ ] []
?

[6]€.
Pap.

. ^
28.

[.]

7"^•

5

abpiavav OVer an erasure, probably of

Pap,

31. ey Pap.

33.

\.

^.

8

To Valerius Ammonianus also called Gerontius, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Artemidorus son of Arsinous, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of In reply to the request of your grace for an Oxyrhynchus, a painter by profession. inspection of the places requiring painting in the public bath of the said city now auspiciously under repair at the warm baths of Trajanus Hadrianus, I hereby declare that for of the two cold water conductors, and one vapourthe painting of the parts requiring it bath, and the entrances and exits of the entire colonnade, and four passages round the vapour-bath in the outer colonnade, and the other places there is required for cost of paint painting of the whole work ten thousand thousand denarii of silver, and of the . which I therefore report. The consulship of Caecinius Sabinus and denarii of silver

.

.

.

896.

REPORTS TO A LOGISTES
.
. .

219

(Signed) I, Aurelius Artemidorus, have presented being illiterate.' To Valerius Ammonianus also called Gerontius, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from the Aurelii Heron son of and Didymus son of Dioscorus, both of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, public physicians. were sent by you to-day, Pharmouthi 6, in consequence of a petition delivered to you by Apollonius, officer of Aurelius Anton ius governor of Aegyptus Herculia, to go to the house in the said city and inspect this person, and to make a written report upon the condition in which we found him. Having therefore proceeded thither we saw the man himself lying on a bed seized with a slight fever ; which we accordingly report.' Date and signature of the two physicians.
the report.
'

Vettius Rufinus the most illustrious,
I,

Aurehus ... on wrote
. . .

for him,

We

.

.

.

in A. D. 201,

ad

loc, is

a bath.
creates

8
to

7-8, TpaiavQiv'^bpiavaiv the ' Baths of Hadrian' are also mentioned in 54. 14 vhen too they were undergoing repair. Cf. 53. 5-6

be modified accordingly.
:

: 8,
€' []\
of. is

which

is

evidently identical with the

(

([]€^]•
;

here

the note

II— 13. For

are used in the sense of 282 ivrSn an unknown word of uncertain signification ; is also new, but
P.

Magd.

33. 3

and in later Greek Melanges Nicole,

no

difficulty.

since not only is there no sign of any tail an overwritten would remain unexplained ; the supposed v, however, is more directly above the than elsewhere in the papyrus. for might be read but is not satisfactory perhaps rfy^eov. 29. Aegyptus Jovia, Aegyptus Herculia, and Thebais were the three provinces of Egypt according to the reorganization of Diocletian. It was supposed by Mommsen {Abh. d. Berl. Akad., 1862, p. 500), whose view has been generally followed, that Aegyptus Jovia consisted of the western, Aegyptus Herculia of the eastern, portions of lower Egypt, the latter coinciding with the province afterwards called Augustamnica ; but the intrinsically more probable hypothesis of C. JuUian {Rev. Hist. xix. p. 357) that Aegyptus Jovia was the Delta and Aegyptus Herculia corresponded to the Heptanomis with the Arsinoite nome, is supported, as the editors notice, by a papyrus published by Collinet and Jouguet in Archiv, III. pp. 339 sqq., and receives fresh confirmation from 896. Mommsen's theory, however, might be reconciled with these two documents by transposing Aegyptus Herculia to the west bank. or perhaps the singular being used by mistake for the 31. plural the middle is supported by 51. 10. occurs in the corresponding passage of 983. 33. 34. The mutilated word is probably an adjective qualifying nvpfriois.
for the p, but a

16. It is not possible to read v]wfp

mark

like

,

p.

^» .

>£€]

;

/3[/]/

:

^,

;

897.

Declaration to Riparii.
i6'5xi2-6cm.
a.d. 346.

A
by

declaration on oath addressed to

two

riparii of the

four inhabitants of a village, denying

all

Oxyrhynchite nome knowledge of the whereabouts

of a certain individual

whom

they had been ordered to produce.
904.
3,

On

the

riparii.,
;

who were

police-officers, see

note.

The papyrus

is

nearly complete

the

missing termination probably contained only the signatures.

220

'TwaTiias

5

6

? . ? ^ 9 . ?.
'
"

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

)({)

-

€9

15

] [ '\ , € \
\)\€

[]

[

][] ttjs

dvai

6\\

'

]\[

.
14.
'

of

(

corr.

Pap. from

6.

Pap.

8, i/TTOiSXij^ei^a

Pap.

12.

Pap.

.

In the consulship of our masters Constantius for the fourth time and Constans for the the Augusti. To Flavius Eulogius and Flavius Dionysarius, riparii of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Amois son of Horus, and Aurelius Patapis son of Paesius, and AureHus Sarmates the elder, and Aurelius Papnutius son of Paesius, all from Your grace required us to search out and produce Choous son the village of Ision Zapitou. We therefore declare on the august of Heracleus, supposed to belong to our village. divine oath by our masters the Augusti that Choous is no longer at our village, and that we do not know where he is, and that we have made no false statement, under pain of .' becoming liable to the consequences of the divine oath
third time,
7.

(899.

:

.

.

or

0
(719.

Zayviov.
1 4).

The name of thls

village is

new;

cf. 'laeiof

7),

898.

PETITION TO

AN ACTING-STRATEGUS

221

{c)

PETITIONS

898.

Petition to an Acting-Strategus.
23-3

x8

cm.

A. D.

123.

petition to Hermodorus (cf. 714), basilicogrammateus and acting-strategus, from Didymus, a minor, complaining of fraud on the part of his mother Matrina
in her capacity as his guardian.
It is alleged that

A

Matrina, after various acts of

8 {) {)
the guardianship.

bad faith, had obtained possession of a deed belonging to Didymus and demanded in exchange for it a document absolving her from all claims in connexion with

)^€
f^ov

5

MVTVP
TTos

^ []
Marpeiua

[] •[()
\1
6€[9.
25

[€

]8
.

€[eis

^^ 8
evbs

30

' €€6 €}

15

€ €
2

6\ ([. [€
\\6
€19

^
kv
Trj

\} '\
[.

,^
.
e/y

€, €€
e/c

[€]

^-

()
-

,
.

-.€

eK

35

^

S)v

-kav

&

€^9
.

^€€

^^
[]6.
40

kv

()

^(
Pap.

1

(StcDt

Pap.

20. avveibvM Pap.

21.

222
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

To Hermodorus, basilicogrammateus and deputy-strategus, from Didymus son of My mother Matrina, daughter Dionysius also called Phatres, of the city of Oxyrhynchus. of Heracleus also called Matreus, who is my guardian and by whom I am much injured, has ended by beguiling me and causing me to go to the Oasis, and to draw up with Dioscorus, the husband of her freedwoman and her confidant, a ... of one and a half talents of silver, and to mortgage all my property in the Oasis in return for a deed of release On my return to the Oxyrhynchite nome with Dioscorus she received from Dioscorus. watched for an opportunity of asking me for the deed, and after obtaining possession of it, being conscious of the theft of much of my property, she refuses to acknowledge having it, and demands in return a receipt for her guardianship, thinking by this means to escape This she has done notwithstanding the fact that the consequences of her misdeeds. Philonicus the strategus has decided, in accordance with a report of proceedings, that another person should be appointed as my guardian, distrusting both her and my own Besides this she has failed to supply my allowance for the last three months, using youth. For every means of oppressing me so as to render me incapable of proceeding against her. all these reasons I am obliged to present this petition, and beg that it may be registered, and The seventh year of the Emperor Caesar that you will take whatever steps you think best. Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Pauni 29.'
I. cf. 714. 2, referring to the year before the date of the present papyrus. should be read in place of for 898. 26 shows In the previous line there that Philonicus was the name of the strategus.
:

[(?)

[,

6. 9.
I I

":
.

€7r[irpo]n-of

:

i.e.
[.
:

and to govern the and the next letter is and P. Brit. Mus. II. Possibly aborop is to be read cf. 1. 18 or . either For 18 cf 974. but this needs other support. 361 verso 5 n€p\ i.e. a deed of indemnification, distinguished by the formula 15. cf. e.g. 270, 286. 9 sqq., and P. Tebt. 392. or an equivalent phrase
.

genitive

simply. 18 the deed is called ^eXei would naturally be followed by 22-3. The construction is mixed: ov were absent. instead of which a participial phrase is used as if nph av (7;•)^'7-) is possible, if Philonicus had cf. note on 1. i and 957. 26. For the competence of the resigned or died and was not merely absent temporarily. strategi in the appointment of guardians cf. 888. introd. the allowance of Didymus was probably fixed by his father's will ; cf. e. g. 31. .,. 44. 16 '

// '^
In
1.

888. 9, note. the Small Oasis (Bahriyeh) ; cf. 888. 8, note. a substantive is wanted to be the object of The letters a8o are quite clear, in 1. 12.
cf.
;

[6•.
:

,

;

.

.

.

),

:

:

17

899. Petition of
35-3

Apollonarion.
A.D.

25-3 cm.

2.

copy of a petition from a woman claiming on the score of her sex to be released from the called Apollonarion, responsibility of cultivating various plots of Crov^n land in the Oxyrhynchite nome. That women were legally exempt from the obligation to undertake this

The

recto of this papyrus consists of a

duty was known from B. G. U. 648. 12-4 ds

rjv

{^)

899.
VTib

PETITION OF APOLLONARION

correctness of Wilcken's interpretation of that passage in Osi.

confirmed against the view of Mitteis,
P. Tebt. 327, a petition from a

of an

The

( ^^
petition of

€(
is

^
i.

223
(the

p.

702
;

is

now

Aus d. Griech. Papyrusurk. p. 48) cf. also woman asking to be released from the liabilities
inherited from her father.

ApoUonafion

dated at the end Thoth

i

of the 9th year of

an emperor, who from the reference in 1. 10 to the praefect Aemilius Saturninus must be Septimius Severus it was a very elaborate and composite document, giving apparently the history of her case from the beginning, and quoting both her own
:

previous petitions and various official correspondence in coniiexioh with them.

Since the papyrus contains only the concluding portion of the document, one or

more preceding columns being
dition,
it is

lost,

and what remains
is

is

in far

from perfect constep

difficult to trace fully

the whole complicated narrative, but the general
fairly clear.

outline of Apollonarion's proceedings

Her

first

was

to send

the petition which occupies
liabilities

11.

2-32.

In this she explained the nature of her

in

difficulties into

connexion with the cultivation of Crown land (11. 3-8) and the which she had fallen (11. 8-14), and requested that she, as a woman,

might be released from the obligations and her place taken by men (11. 14-20). In support of her claim she appended an account of a similar application made in court in A.D. 154 by a woman which after the recital of earlier precedents created by two praefects and an epistrategus was decided in the applicant's favour (11. 20-32). The tiame and rank of the official to whom this initial petition was addressed are lost, but 11. 9-10 show that he was not the praefect, and 11. 16-7 that he was above the strategus. The hypothesis that he was the epistrategus can be supported by the possible restoration Kvpios which in in 1. 18; but sirtce this petition seems to be identical with the
j

11.

official

of the dioecetes, probably the latter ^^ and 38 is coupled with an was addressed, his tiame being Flavius Studiosus, as appears from a con-

(

(immeofficial
1.

temporary document oil the verso (cf. p. 225). In answer to Apollonarion the dioecetes wrote a letter, apparently to the acting strategus of the riome, at the same time enclosing a copy of her petition. The text of this letter, as is shown

by

1.

33

€5
11.

Trjs

diately before

2-32

:

(^ ([][

at the

end of

{)
32

,

occurred

1.

may

indicate the

signature of the dioecetes appended to the enclosure.

The

date in

^;^,

Pha-

menoth 6 of the 7th year, applies to this signature, not to Apollonarion's petition, which was probably written a short time previously. Concerning the contents of
the dioecetes'
petition
(11.

both from Apollonarion's reference to it in a later cTreWciAas) and from the terms in which it is spoken of by the acting strategus (11. 37-8) that the dioecetes admitted the justice
letter, it is clear

44-5

224

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
The next
step,

of Apollonarion's claims.

as

appears from

11.

37-8, was for

Apollonarion to write a petition to the acting strategus, Ammonianus, enclosing the letter of the dioecetes and her original petition, and no doubt asking him to
give the necessary instructions to the local
to
officials

of the different villages

This petition to the acting remove her name from the list of cultivators. strategus must have been presented between Phamenoth 6 and Pachon 27 of the 7th year, for on the latter day Ammonianus wrote to the comogrammateis of the villages concerned the letter contained in 11. 36-9, enclosing a copy of Apollonarion's petition to himself, the letter of the dioecetes and the original petition, and ordering an inquiry into the facts to be held and a report to be made. So far the negotiations seem to have proceeded smoothly, but at this point a hitch occurred for in Tubi of the 8th year (i. e. eight months later than Ammonianus* letter to the comogrammateis) Apollonarion addressed a second petition to the dioecetes, of which the conclusion is extant in 11. 40-45, while the lost beginning of it presumably preceded the letter of the dioecetes which occurred immediately before 11. a sqq. In this second petition Apollonarion began by quoting the dioecetes' letter in answer to her first petition, and the first petition itself (11. 2-23), then recounted the action of Ammonianus (11. 33-9), and ended by asking the dioecetes to give stricter instructions to the new strategus (whose name is shown by one of the documents on the verso to be Diophan[es]), so that pressure might be applied to the local village authorities to cany out the previous orders of the dioecetes and to release her. The second petition of Apollonarion to the dioecetes is, we think, the which in 1. 46 is coupled with an and as having been quoted in the papyrus. Hence the texts of both these documents seem to have immediately preceded the beginning of the second The petition. is no doubt a second letter of the dioecetes (to the strategus or Apollonarion) in answer to the second petition: and with it we should connect in 1. 46, interpreting that on the analogy of in 1. 32 as the oflucial signature of the dioecetes appended to the copy of the petition enclosed in his reply but the identity of Aufidius Ammonius, who also appends his signature in 1. 46, remains quite obscure. The nature of the is explained by Col. ii of the verso, which seems to contain an actual copy of it. It was a report, probably supplied by the various comogrammateis, giving the situations and descriptions of Apollonarion's holdings and the names of the previous cultivators. Probably it was sent to the dioecetes by Apollonarion along with her second petition to him, and was also included by him in his reply. That this reply was, like the earlier one, favourable to Apollonarion is clear from the context, especially the words oh ... in 11. 46-7 the date at which it was dispatched is not stated, but though the
;

( (, [€]€
€[][
:

;

.[][5

899.

PETITION OF APOLLONARION
in

225

second petition was written
the year, for on Thoth

Tubi the reply had not taken

effect

by

the end of

46-50) with the usual request that the local officials should be instructed to release her from liabilities. Of this petition to the strategus we take the
(11.

,
whole
us,
I

1

of the 9th year Apollonarion sent off yet another

petition, addressed, as dossier,

we

which by

this

and her own

In this she began by citing the time comprised the second letter of the dioecetes, the second petition with all its enclosures, and concluded
think, to the strategus.

papyrus to be a copy, and, if so, the beginning of this third petition of which the end remains in 11. 46-50 was the actual beginning of the papyrus. brief summary of the arrangement of this very complicated document, as reconstructed

A

by

may

be of assistance.
I

Petition of Apollonarion to the strategus (beginning)

a

second letter of the dioecetes
.lost

3

4
5 6

second petition of Apoll. to the dioecetes (beginning) first letter of the dioecetes
first

petition of Apoll. to the dioecetes

11.
11.

2-32

4
7

second petition of Apoll. to the dioecetes (continued)
letter of

Ammonianus

11.
11. 11.

4
I

second petition of Apoll. to the dioecetes (end)
petition of Apoll. to the strategus (end)

33-5 36-9 40-5 46-50

The

chronological order of the documents

is 6, 5, 7, 4, 3, 2,

On the verso, the surface of which is much damaged, are two incomplete columns belonging to three distinct documents, written in hands which strongly resemble each other, but are perhaps not identical, and are certainly different from the hand of the recto. The upper half of Col. contains parts of 22 lines (the last 8 being almost entirely obliterated) of a document quoting a Among the words decipherable are 1. i ]as 3 ) ),
5

,8

,

i

6

L•]

^Akf^^avbpeiq)
kirl

rfj

irpos

]s ei7r(ey)•

-, g

^? 1[],
y
]

[

,

'

7(

elbcov]

8€[],
rest of Col.
i

. ^
r.

€(

]-

\atov

Tovs tokovs.

So

far as

can be judged, this document, unlike the two

following, has

no bearing on Apollonarion's
Heraclia.

by a copy of a petition similar later by another woman called
a
passage which
is

to that of Apollonarion,
It

of that line and the two next being almost entirely effaced, but in

^) ((^) ()
{).

() *(\) ^)() 8()
legible
:

. .(
case.

The

is

occupied
the rest

made apparently a year
(or

begins

-),
1.

?)

€[]

|

(5)

juot

|

(6)
\

^?

{)' 7€[€]
4 sqq.

is

(y)

[] ()

Q

226

THE OXRYHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ttipX \y\€(t)py{ias)

(7))

€:.{)

Ammonianus in 11. 36-9 Diophanes from Heraclia enclosing a letter of the dioecetes Flavius Studiosus, but these two documents, which continue up to the end of 1. 17, are in a hopeless condition. In 1. 18 sqq. is what appears to be a short imperial decree bearing upon the immunity of women from Aovk^los) and beginning occur in 1. 21, and a date, the words biKaias (hovi) 1. 32 also seems to belong to the decree, but the subject of the two following lines, which are the last of the column and begin much further to the right, is different. Col. ii has only the beginnings of lines, and
this letter of

\\ (
:

kiav[s)
. .

^?

y^y as ov
|

|

.
|

()
cf.

€{€,

(9)

(erovs)

^ ^ [)
(8)
avrfj
.

€() €7{4()
to

.

.

[

]

€.

With

Diophanes

the almost identical letter of

of the recto.

Then

follows a

copy of the petition

(()

(
is
[

,

is
]

() €)
The
6-45)
is

probably not more than about a third of each
first five lines

preserved.

subject of the

uncertain, but the rest of the

column

(11.

occupied

by a document bearing upon Apollonarion's

case, being

we

think a copy of the

€[,
1.

referred to in

1. 46 of the recto (cf. p. 224). It begins (1. 6) Apollonarion is alluded to more than once, and there are numerous

7]{€)

references to lands at various places, including the

6 of the

recto, while lists of persons occur, in

words

7rai^T(es) ovt[€s)

2nd hand

^ []9 [
30
Tfj[s
[

'{
im[

ALovbos mentioned in one case being followed by the

?).

letters

€€[
rrjs

) .-9 [ \€] ?
-- {) a\{)

?
]t

h

{)

!47]';

{)

8t[

.

9 letters

]pvv€y

25

letters

[
5 [•••]*
f^^i-

25 letters

']^
^€1^

.[..]..

[.]/?[

]?[
a)s
.

]

[

25 letters

.

[.

.

]6[]

^[9
es

""^

(apovpas) {apOvpas)

,
.

7r[e/)]i

ie

€ []
{apovpas)

]€/3

(apovpas)

mp\

.

.

.]croy.

^

nepl ^€f e/ceXei)
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35


Ke[

^€[]
25

{apovpas)
letters

[

25 letters

^

L•

[

\\

^ []9
[]
[eiV

^,

899.

PETITION OF APOLLONARION
knu

\
[

c/c

re

7[]
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^ 227

a)(^e86v

[]

^^^
kv

[

[

[

25 letters

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19 letters

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oUeiov
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{]»'

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.

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[••].[

[

25

letters

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letters

15 [....] 6^

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yeviadai

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21 letters
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[

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6

17 letters

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6 letters

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re

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(()'
kj
. . .

letters

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re
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k

^^ ko
y€<»/?yf[ai/

k€l

kevo

^[.
.

K€KpiTCU

[]
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kpav

228
[^]a[i,]

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Koi

[\9
.[.]..

[]9.

[](3[]€/

[][]9
.
.

'^ 9 ^ ?
€in{evy

?
eJTTi

[€]€.

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[] €€?
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anayop[ivov\To?

(erous)

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.

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Kaiaapos

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(Xniev)'
jfj?

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[]
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\[•

^'['"]^/?°^ [yjecopyoi)? etV

[. .]

35

? ?' ? ? ? ? -^? []? ? .
[?)
<^.

€?

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avTiy

€? {). ?

^. [>] . [][.
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€[]

eat]

[€] 6[9
-

[][]

eniaTCiXev

nepl {?)

[]
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40

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^

{). ?
^

[ , ? [] [ ^
[?]

? []

^

{?)

.

. ^

?

?

[[] ^] ^] ?{)[] [? []?
ttj

[]

899.

PETITION OF APOLLONARION

[^]$• yrjs yecupywv,

45

[]€9

[€](.

\\ []
\^]
[

[]

nepl

,
?

avaYp[a](pfj

'^ ' ' [][ [€] ' ..
8€-^.
(erovs)

, ^. .

«o'toi'
1.

229

[]
eooy

dvavBpov

KaOm

[7]6€

[]
in[i[.

^(<).

[]

ois

[]

()

(eTOvs)

.

4-

1.

Pap. Pap.
'

19.

. €|
(
his
.
.

]

[]€. ()
Pap.
35.
8.

[] [.
Pap. Pap.
14.

.
imp
38.

47.

em above the line. 7• Pap. Pap. ; so in 25. added above the line.

37.

\^

highness the dioecetes Flavius Studiosus from Apollonarion also called daughter of Aristander, her mother being Didyma daughter of of ., Oxyrhynchus. ... (I am lessee of) 20 arourae near the metropolis, arourae at Chusis in the pastures of Dionysias, ... no arourae at Ision Panga, 38^ arourae at Seruphis, and arourae at Senekeleu and ... As long as I had the power I cultivated these and (paid) the taxes, but since it has been my fate as the result both of the extra levies ordained by his excellency the praefect Aemilius Saturninus and of other causes ... to have perforce spent nearly all the year on them, not only being hard pressed but also in consequence (having sacrificed) both my household stock, my private ornaments, and and a large quantity of other property worth a considerable amount for quite a small sum I am ., hence reduced to extreme poverty. For which reason, in order that I may not become a wanderer as I have only ... to live on, I present this petition, and entreat you (to pity) my fate, and release me from the cultivation of the aforesaid lands, and to write to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome instructions that the official in each village shall provide for the cultivation being performed by others for men are the persons suitable for undertaking the cultivation, as you yourself, my lord, owing to your innate kindness, Farewell. I have appended ... in order that I may be completely benefited through you. etis daughter The 1 8th year of the deified Aelius Antoninus, Thoth ., in the case of Saturninus, advocate, said, " Ptollion the father of my client was appointed of Ptollion
Aristandra,
.
. .

To

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.,

;

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

:

Crown and public land at the villages of Busiris, Thinteris, and ... in the He died leaving her as his heir, and since the comogrammateis of Heracleopolite nome. these villages are imposing upon her the obligation to cultivate her father's land in defiance of the regulations forbidding this, and it has been decided by praefects and epistrategi from time to time that women are not to be forced to undertake this duty, she too requests, citing these judgements, that she may be released from the cultivation, which pertains only to men." Parmenion said, " Let the judgements upon such cases be read." There were read a decree
(to cultivate)

230

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

of Tiberius Alexander in the 2nd year of Galba, forbidding women to be made cultivators, and a decision of Valerius Eudaemon to the same effect in the 5th year of Antoninus, and another of Minicius Corellianus, epistrategus in the loth year of Antoninus Caesar the lord; whereupon Parmenion said, " In accordance with the judgements which have been read, and other cultivators ought has the right to be released from the cultivation Tathun I, ApoUonarion also called Aristandra, have to be appointed for the land in her stead." So far the copy of the letter Signed, the 7th year, Phamenoth 6. presented this petition. and the petition ; acting in accordance with which the basilicogrammateus of the nome and depuly-strategus Ammonianus wrote instructions to the officials of the villages where the lands are situated as follows Ammonianus, basilicogrammateus and deputy-strategus, to I send you a copy of the the comogrammateus of Chusis and those of the other villages. petition presented to me by ApoUonarion also called Aristandra, to which is joined a letter of his highness the dioecetes, and also a petition concerning the cultivation for which she declared herself not to be liable, in order that you may, in accordance with the judgements Signed, the 7th year, Pachon 27. on the subject, hold an inquiry and report to me. The change in appointment of other cultivators ought accordingly to take place in conformity with your letter, and the rents should be exacted from the former cultivators ; I therefore entreat you, if it please your Fortune, to command that stricter instructions be written to the present strategus of the nome to compel the officials to make the change in accordance with the orders which they have received, and the collectors to exact the dues from the cultivators who claim the land, and not to harass me, a woman without a husband or helper, following your previous instructions in this matter, that I may obtain relief. Presented by me, ApoUonarion also called Aristandra. The 8th year, Tubi i[.]. Farewell.
.

.

.

.

.

.

,

:

in accordance with

me Aufidius Ammonius. Thus far the petition, the list, and the letter which I entreat you to instruct the local officials to make the change in the appointment as claimed by me, and the collectors to exact the dues from the proper The 9th year, Thoth i. Presented by me ApoUonarion also called Aristandra, persons. daughter of Aristander. I, Cornelius son of Pekusis, have been appointed her guardian. The 9th year, Thoth i. s, assistant, have brought the petition. I,
Signed.

Signed by

.

.

.

1, The nature of this much abbreviated marginal note, which is written in a larger band than the body of the text, is quite uncertain. ... cf. introd. p. 225. 2. For the restoration which were special levies at intervals, see P. Tebt. 373. 12, 9. For

a date probably followed. known from B. G.U. 15. ii. i, a letter from him to the His official rank was not strategi of the Heptanomis written on Epeiph 1 7 of the 5th year. there given, but P. M. Meyer's view that he was praefect is now confirmed by the present passage and 916. 10, where he is mentioned as praefect in Pauni of the 6th year; cf. The precise date of this petition of Cantarelli, La serie dei prefetli di Egitto, pp. 63-4. ApoUonarion to the dioecetes is uncertain (cf. introd.) ; it cannot be later than Phamenoth 6 After Saturninus of the 7th year (cf. 1. 32, note), and probably is not many months earlier. the next praefect who is known is Q. Maecius Laetus, who held office in the loth year.
note.

After

,

10. Aemilius Saturninus is

cf. 11. 35-6, where by 17. 42-3, where they are contrasted with the term for a minor official; cf. P. Amh. 107. 15
11.

P. Brit. Mus. 164. something After Possibly the previous is required by the sense. like on the verso were to be reinstated ; cf. 11. 40-4 and the cultivators (ol (p. 226) which contains a list of these persons.

7

\{) €'

, :() , . ^^
are

meant

the

and

The word seems

to be a general

('\ (()

\

. Flor. 57• 54. &C.

899.

;
of

18. inicT[
cf.

introd.

may be The

the name of the applicant is given in 1. 31 as 21. ] where the termination is not -ens. Probably she had two names. eV [: perhaps en, yrju being an accusative of the same kind as e.g. Aeschin. 3. 24 may have occurred. an infinitive such as in the parallel passage fromB. G. U. 648. corresponds to 25. 12-4 quoted on pp. 222-3; cf. Wilcken, Os/. i. p. 427. 27. Parmenion, the presiding judge, cannot have been praefect, for on Thoth i of the i8th year of Antoninus (cf. 1. 20) that office was held by Sempronius Liberalis (B. G. U. 372). Perhaps he was epistrategus of the Heptanomis, but that view is open to the objection that in Choiak of the 20th year the epistrategus was Statilius Maximus, as is shown by 487. i, while B. G. U. 340, an undated petition to him, refers to events in the 12th year, so that Other possibilities are Statilius Maximus may have been already in office in the 1 8th year. or t^ws that Parmenion was 28-30. For Tiberius Alexander and Valerius Eudaemon cf. Cantarelli, op. cit. pp. 33 and 49. Minicius Corellianus, epistrategus of the Heptanomis, occurs also in P. Gen. 31 not which refers to the 9th year of Antoninus. Before In 1. 28 after ytapyta is to be understood, as is shown by the word seems satisfactory. no compound of is the signature of some official and the following date refers to it, 32. which marks the end of ApoUonarion's petition. The signature may have not to been added in the office of the dioecetes upon the receipt of the petition, but since the petition is itself an enclosure in the letter of the dioecetes, we are disposed to regard as the signature of the dioecetes at the conclusion of the copy of the petition which he was forwarding cf. 1. 46 and introd. cf. 1. 46, G. U. 6 1 3. 25 and 36, and introd. 33. erfpov on which can be found in a singular antecedent for 37.
.

,
.

appended by ApoUonarion in 11. 20-32, and 8e has perhaps dropped out. Cannot be read, and the word following erepai does not seem to be any part
:
,

/
^
:

or or SOme part of construction of 11. 18-19 is not clear.

\
;

PETITION OF APOLLONARION

231

€\, €,

but hardly

([-

if right,

refers to the

(

8.85,

8,

?.

!,

6[:.

,,
'

{[][ (8€
:

([][
writer

;

.

:

being probably used, as often, for the singular, the depends, but the plural Cf. the letter of Diophanes well have meant it to be the antecedent of ). ) quoted on p. 225, where the phrase recurs, but with the abbreviation iv cf. e. g. 985 ^v in the sense of including in For

may

{()

would be expected at this point (cf. the letter of or fTfpov 38. means no more than the duplicate', Diophanes quoted on pp. 225-6), and perhaps in 1. 37 is really and the plural If it means the second of two copy.' i. e. correct, these were probably duplicates, not two petitions to Animonianus written at None of the three documents different times, so that the sense would be much the same. ntpl the stated to be enclosed in Ammonianus' letter actually follows in 1. 40 sqq. ytapyias is the Original petition to the dioecetes already quoted in 11. 2-32, and the letter of the dioecetes immediately preceded it, but the petition of ApoUonarion to Ammonianus himself does not seem to have been cited in the papyrus cf. introd. the traces of the figure of the year are very slight, and would 39. {(Tovs) but the date of Ammonianus letter is clearly later than Phamenoih 6 of the as well suit e. g. 7th year (1. 33), the date of the communication from the dioecetes which caused it to be written, and unless the date in 1. 39 is earlier than that in 1. 45 (Tubi of the 8th year) we are
:

.
;

.

'

() (8\)', and .

'

G. U.

1

68, 24

'

{8 ( (\{() [\(]

8({

toIs

'

'

8,

;

\8ou

:

;

232

unable to explain the relation of 11. 40-50 to what precedes, for 11. 40-5 cannot be regarded as an enclosure in the letter of Ammonianus. apparently the previous cultivators were to be made responsible 41. In in the cited on p. 226. for the land leased by Apollonarion ; cf. and in 1. 48 they are 11. 43—4 a different phrase is used was suggested by Wilcken. vaguely called S>v
:


€.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

^}) [ۥ
24-3

\,

900.

Petition to a Logistes.
X 16 cm.
A.D. 322.

same logistes Avho issued the proclamation from a functionary who had been nominated about as an annual superintendent of the express-post, and who here complains of the It is failure of certain donkey- drivers to support him in carrying out his duties. badly put together, in spite of the comparatively high position of the writer. The year of the sixth consulate of Licinius Augustus and the second of Licinius Caesar, in which the papyrus is dated (cf. 42. 8-9), is still disputed. The two most recent discussions are those of Jouguet in Coviptes rendus de Acad, des Inscr. et Belles-Lettres, 1906, pp. 231-6 (cf. Archiv, III. pp. 339-43), and Seeck in Rhein. Mus. 1907, pp. 517 sqq., who uphold A.D. 322, and Viereck
petition to Dioscurides, the

A

the gj^^mnastic display in 42,

in Archiv,

IV. pp. 156-62, who decides for A.D. 323.

Of

prefer the former.

'€[]9

8€\

'
[

^
ih

these alternatives

we

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TOVS

€9 ?,
900.
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kuiovs Sk

\
20

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, ^
tois
1.

PETITION TO A LOGISTES

^
(2nd hand}

233
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[]intSovvai

\

^,
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e^eTeXovv

ayjops {

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[]^
Pap.

3rd hand

3•

from .
17.
\.

viraKovovTus,

/ (^ \'\. ^/
. .

[{)]

^,
.

tovs

/xei/

7[]'.
1 6.

^3• ^

1,

of

COrr.

KovbovKTopias COrV.

18.

COXV.

In the consulship of our masters Licinius Augustus for the sixth time and Licinius for the second time, ... To Valerius Dioscurides also called Julianus, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Dioscorus son of Silvanus, ex-magistrate and senator of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus. Being already the administrator of the impenal patrimonial estates in the tenth pagus of this nome, I have besides been nominated as contractor for the express-post for the year auspiciously approaching. It was accordingly incumbent on those who customarily discharge such services on behalf of the annual nominees to this office, to render obedience to me who have been entrusted with so many public burdens, and to discharge their customary services, for which their expenses are provided. But whereas I learn that these persons are desirous of acting fraudulently in respect of these important and unavoidable functions, some by absenting themselves, and others by deception, and since the period before entering upon this duty has become short, I therefore hasten to present this petition, requesting that the said donkey-drivers, Faustus, Horus, and Chaereas, be compelled to retain and to provide everything for the functions pertaining to the contract which they were wont yearly to fulfil, in obedience to the annual contractors, so that I may with their assistance perform the function entrusted to me, and not be reduced to appeal to the officials upon this matter. (Endorsed) Concerning a case of fraud in the consulship aforesaid, Mesore 6. (Signed) Presented by me, Aurelius Dioscorus.'
'

the

most renowned Caesar

:

are the properties belonging to the imperial patrimonium, which in period were usually called The occurrence of the term pairimonalia in the fourth century is noticeable.
5.

The

Egypt

in

the

Roman

.

234
6.
:

T^tiE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
els
:

/3

^•(

cf.

B. G. U. 906. lO
cf.

(\.
138. 9

KovhoxjKTopiav

S^eos

Oxy. . . 2 1 9, &C., took 6. to refer to the race-course, but, as Wilcken has remarked to us, the cursus velox or express postal service is doubtless meant cf. Cod. Theod. 8. 5. 62 and Preisigke, Klio, VII. p. 269. KovSovKTopia conductoria is novel, and conducioria is apparently not found in the sense

6.

.,

.

Flor. 39• 6

..

In

.

,,
was
tO
vi.

P. Leipzig 40.

iii.

1

7

140. 7

.

;

=

implied here. 12-3. For

have been

in the accusative.
;

satisfactory

pkv 904. 9. has no construction, and should reading is indeed uncertain, and the supposed not very but a participle seems required to balance and d7ri[o](}(r(, but for
cf.

^'\,

The

the case, gives a
.

good
.

.

and the meaning to be that his duties had become short,

.
ovTOi oi

sense appears to
15•

On

^
. .

\^€
sense.
.

It is
I

noticeable that

we SUppose

\'^
eVioty
.
.

had to take up This remedy is somewhat violent, but cf. B. G. U. 893. 1 2-14 o\iyai(?) ^juepat eV where the be very similar, and, for this use of e.g. B. G. U. 18. 14
the interval of time remaining before Dioscorus

^^^

^^^:

the duties of

^

^.

t.

see

Rostowzew, X'hO,
.

16-17. '^^^' «X^*»' is strange, but we can find no other suitable reading, and is supported by the following exeiv . would hardly fill the [€ space at the beginning of 1. 17. avTovs is practically certain in spite of the letters marked doubtful, for though the could equally well be read as , and vs might possibly be «, these alternatives give no word. The final s has been written twice over, once as a flourish below the line, and again in the ordinary position, tviois seems to be a slip for (vtavaiois, a word which has already occurred in the adverbial form in 1. 8 the mistake may have been assisted by eviovs in 1. 13. to7s eViotr is hardly a possible expression. and 19. To'is are apparently general terms for a person in authority, used in much the same way as The titles commonly occur without further definition as e. g. in 894. i, but are also found both in combination with a local name indicating the sphere of influence, e.g. 158. 2 ttjs or with the name of the person to whom the was subordinate, e. g. 131. 14 G. U. 367. 5 and 368. 10 cf. the similar USe of in 896. 28. The earliest instance of a that we have noticed is P. Brit. Mus. II. 214. 22, of the reign of Aurehan.

^.

.

, , ]
p. 253.
;

originally written for iviovs.

be an error for

[](,

,

^

\

(6 ,,.

6( \

2
15

(

[]

,, ]

.

901.

Petition to a Public Advocate.
X
12 cm.
A.D. 336.

of cKbiKos or defensor

official occupying the position though in this case as a deputy. It is a complaint of a woman against a neighbour arising out of a chase after her pigs which had got loose but the details of the story are lost owing to the mutilation of the papyrus. On the verso are a few letters which apparently have no relation to the petition on the recto.
is (cf.

This document like 902

addressed to an
note),

902.

i,

;

901. 'TTrare/ay

PETITION TO A PUBLIC ADVOCATE

[>]
5
6

€€

? ,?
.
.

0\\ [\^

^ []
€...[..

^^ ^ 8 9

235

€[] } ^9 •^ ^^ (

,
'4

[]

\] ]
.
.

.

.

.

[

]
]
.

6€[]

^yoav

€[

15

[]
.

[

15
[

letters
.

^
? €€
[.
.

] []*
.[...]..[.

[....].
[

.] '
]

33 letters
18

]6

[

26

letters
'

20

[

]
]

.

.[

:. ;/[/
.
1,

viruTfias

.

.

.

also in 10, 12, 13•

Pap.
18.

.

1 6.

Pap.
'

1.

most illustrious, (?) Nepotianus and Tettius Facundus the Flavius Julianus, deputy-advocate of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelia In the Allous daughter of Thonius of the village of Taampemou in the fifth pagus. evening time of yesterday our two pigs made a rush into our piece of land, and got into the channel of the water-machine of our children and a certain Pabanus, of the said village. The aforesaid Pabanus happening to be by, and having in his hands a stick, wished to He had not been in the least injured (catch) the pigs and (remove them ?) from the place.
In the consulship of Vibius
6.

, .
Pap.
].
. .

3•

7•

[] ^^.
'•

Pap.

5•

1•

14.

('

Pap.
Fa.p.

.

«'' 8>.
8.
1.

.

.

\.

[] .
9
.

Pachon

To

by the
(I

pigs, but full of

know

not

how ?)

. against them, because they had overrun me, wishing to unless from some madness
.'
. .

.

.

.

I. Cf. for these consuls, whose gentile names are not known from literary sources, With regard to the latter, P. Flor. 96. 6 and 13, where Vitelli reads Oiii [.]ov and TertTiOu. though the traces of the second r in our papyrus are excessively slight, the letter is guaranteed by the comma after the first (see critical note). This mark, which is quite clear, would
.

236

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

not have been inserted if the next letter had been a vowel, and we have no doubt that the supposed t in P. Flor. 96 is a similar sign, which is sometimes so exaggerated that it could Moreover, Tettius has the advantage of being a well-known easily be mistaken for a letter. Roman name. Out [?pv may represent either Virius, as Vitelli suggests, or Vibius. the occurrence of this phrase shows that Wilcken's objections in 3. bioiKovvTi in P. Amh. 72. i are Archiv, II. p. 127 to our supplement hioiK{pvvTi) Its precise significance is not yet proved, but we adhere meanwhile to our groundless. cf. the analogous original explanation that it means a deputy, and not the magistrate proper use of Sunwv in e. g. 727. 5, P. Brit. Mus. 908. 13 and 19. is mentioned in 501. 10, &c. 4. The village of as suggested above, might be for irebimv; but ireSia 8. if not equivalent to in papyri commonly mean the lands of a village, not of a private owner. or ti/ is no doubt an infinitive depending on but not 10 At the beginning of the line there is a vestige of ink in 14. Perhaps front of 01, but if another letter was written this line was begun further to the left than those above it.
.
:

\

{)

;

',

8 ].

([^,

\{

.

902.

Petition to a Public Advocate.

A

petition to a defensor

(?
;

31-5x39 cm.
:

About
1.

A. D.

465.

cf.

note on

i) of

Cynopolis from a

complaining of oppression and wrongful imprisonment by a member of the senate. According to his own statement the petitioner would seem to have but it is likely from his repeated offer been treated with extreme harshness
cultivator,
(11.

9-10, 16-7) to pay any debt which could be established against him, that right
entirely
cf.

was not
papyrus;

on one
1.

side.

A

difficulty arises

regarding the date of the

note on

19.

[
5

\\( []
[]9

]
,

[] [

[€]

^ ] ^^

[]

,^
9

?.

e/c

, ^-

902.
Tfi

,. ? ?
4$

ope^ai

PETITION TO A PUBLIC ADVOCATE
d

237
kv

€kSikol

rah

npo[s]

roh

89,

TToXcaeiu

€ ([]
Trj

€/

€/€€
afj

15

aveOifi^vai re

/x€i/[o]uy,

3rd hand

^
Pap.
1.

[]^

^ , , •^ .
KeXivaat

^

)^ 7€, /3?
e/y

eh TeXeiau

^, ()
anep

TOvaSe

^

?

irpoeinov

eyovTos

yap

€€ €.

(2nd hand)

[(6\
3•

.
16.

lo-aifj

Pap. through.

Some

from .

.€^ . ^
2.

.
Pap.
6.
e

Pap.

of

«

9.

II.

in tois

and
\.

written above

, which

II-2.

\.

netvav.

1 3.

. Second
17. First

letters inserted

above

have been erased.
blotted.

Pap.

1 9.

COrr.
is

crossed
COTT.
corr.

»

* To Flavins Isaac, most learned advocate and defensor of the upper quarter of Cynopolis, from Aurelius Macarius, son of Joseph, of the said city. In the past I was appointed irrigator and cultivator of real property on the estate of Phoebammon, of blessed memory, member of the council. After his death his brother Theodorus entered upon the management of his property, and tyrannously seized eight fine beasts out of my kine ; he also to prison three months ago, in consequence of which sent and had me unjustly carried This he has done in spite of my readiness the remainder of my kine have died of hunger. Therefore, since advocates to pay, if written proof of any debt to him can be produced. have been devised in the cities for the puose of lending assistance to the oppressed and I have been reduced to complete ruin and the extremity of hunger through the aforesaid member of the council I present this petition to your wisdom, begging you to order him to

238

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
;

be summoned, first of all bringing about the restoration to me by his excellency of my kine which he tyrannously seized, in the same good condition in which they then were and for the rest directing that what seems good to your wisdom should be done, and that I be released from my bonds, since I am ready, as aforesaid, to discharge any debt secured in For the perpetrators of injustice are hateful to the laws, most learned lord writing. The year advocate. (Signed) I, Aurelius Macarius, son of Joseph, presented this petition. after the consulship of the most illustrious Flavins Vivianus for the second time, and of the consul whose name is to be declared, Athur 24.'

(),
These

I.

:

cf.

901.

3,

129. 3

6 Strassb. () (1. \([)?), are the defensores civitaiis who from the year a.d. 365 appear as regulariy They constituted authorities in the provincial towns (Cod. Just. i. 55; Cod. Theod. i. 29). were elected by the body of the citizens, the decurions being ineligible, and held office Scholastic! are originally for five years, but after the time of Justinian only for two.
i. 29. 2 among the classes suitable for the appointment. limited jurisdiction in civil cases and in minor criminal matters ; their chief function was, as described in 11. lo-i of the papyrus, to protect citizens from oppression and injustice plebem tantuvi vel decuriones ab omniimproborum insoleniia et tevieriiate tueantur.

«

P. Brit.

Mus.

I.

87. 85

(5()

.

{€), . 4•

{)

tKbUov

G. U. 1094.

^ [ .
ttjs

I

]

expressly

named

in

Cod. Theod.

The

de/efisores

had a

Cod. Theod. i. 29. 7; cf. Cod. Just. i. 55. 4 ut imprimis parentis vicem plebi exhibeas, descriptionibus rusticos urbanosque non paiiaris adfligi, officialium insolentiae, iudicum procacitaii is used. In P. Leipzig 34. 10 of c. a.d. 375 the form occurras, &c. .
.
.

were advocates employed in defending cases and similar legal work, The such as drawing up petitions; cf. Cod. Theod. 8. 10. 2, where they are coupled with scholasticos ultra modum acceptis nee latet officiales, and their avarice is censured: honorariis in defensione causarum omnium et anno?ias et sumptus accipere consuesse. and P. Brit. Mus. III. IO44. 25. cf. 137• 2 2 3. in 126. 1 7, &C. is similar to being doubtful, and the middle voice is not quite satisfactory, the 7.

'.
[]
This date

{)
aS
:

.

.

.

unusual.
13.

that Vivianus had been consul for the second time, whereas his only recorded consulship is that in a. d. 463 (when his partner was Fl. Caecina Basilius, or, according to Marcellinus, Felix), and the lists show no blanks in the years preceding and following that year, to which period without cf. C. I. G. 3467. 3, 42. 9, doubt the papyrus belongs. For the phrase .]€ 99 1. I and 60. 12 rolr , P. Brit. Mus. numerous Other examples are given in Du Cange, s. v. is unusual. Its Occurrence in a date
19.
is

() 8
\

:

(^),

singular, for the order of the

Wilcken suggests. words must imply

*

.

.

.

^

DOS.

Accusation against a Husband.
27-2X2i-6cm.
Fourth century.

This singular document is an elaborate indictment of a husband by his wife, who gives a circumstantial account of the former's violent or insulting behaviour, extending over a considerable period of time. The two, whose names are not
mentioned, seem to have been a young couple, united originally by an

903.

ACCUSATION AGAINST A HUSBAND
;

239

and subsequently by a regular contract (11. 17-8) but in neither condition could they succeed in living on terms of harmony. The present document, which is unaddressed, was presumably a kind of affidavit used in proceedings taken
against the husband
it is written in vulgar Greek, and in an irregular uncial hand, the letters of the first two lines being much enlarged. The occurrence of the word in 1. ^'j is of special interest in connexion with the muchdiscussed Epistle of Psenosiris ; cf. note ad loc. Ori the verso are a few lines of shorthand in two columns.
;

79,

TOVS
Tois

4€€
5
Tot/y

Tlipi

S>v

€[]

^

[]

.
e/y

cVi oXas

SovXovs

[]^4
€[]

[] €, €( []

15

€ €' , ;
€€

[]

7[],

^
6€
;

^
.

, ^, , {}()€{'
Tats
kveKoi TOIS


e/y

^ €€€
fvtffTfvev

((, €€€.
[e/jy

{)

.3

6/€.

2

ray


;

25

^«^«[/ccuy]

y

..
[]

[,]

wepi

^

^^, €^,
\
c/y

() {) € . ()

,

240

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
eh
TO
7rapea)(ev

€?
30

8,

^^
ef


35

^ \
€€
Pap.
22.

. ^ ] , (.
4• 8.
1.

^€9

^ .? . , ?
eve^vpov

. ? ???
^<»>'

kv

,

.
.
added
'

3(

3•

^•

'''"'^

added above the

line.

Pap.

of

COrr.

COrr. of 33. SeCOnd above the line, ai of apai corr. (?)
all

, . (' '^ . /
//era
6

'

(€0?).

^" ^^•
34.

6.

rats

g.

Pap. Pap.

7•

of
1.

I'J.

from

.

26.

37.

Pap. 28. 1. Pap. 35. \. added above the of
.

.

3

1.

line.

by him against me. He shut up his own slaves and and son for seven whole days in his cellars, having insulted his slaves and my slave Zoe and half killed them with blows, and he applied fire to my foster-daughters, having stripped them quite naked, which is contrary to the laws. He also said to the same foster-daughters, " Give up all that is hers," and they said, " She has nothing with us "; and to the slaves when they were being beaten he said, " What did she take from my house ? " and they under torture said, " She has taken nothing of yours, but all your property is safe." Zoilus went to see him because he had shut up his foster-son, and he said to him, " Have you come on account of your foster-son or of such a woman, to He swore in the presence of the bishops and of his own brothers, " Hencetalk about her ? " forward I will not hide all my keys from her (he trusted his slaves but would not trust me) I will stop and not insult her." Whereupon a marriage deed was made, and after this agreement and his oaths, he again hid the keys from me and when I had gone out to the church at " Sambatho he had the outside doors shut on me, saying, " Why did you go to the church ? and using many terms of abuse to my face, and through his nose. There were 100 artabae He of corn due to the State on my account of which he paid nothing, not a single artaba. obtained possession of the books, and shut them up saying, " Pay the price of the hundred and he said to his slaves, " Proartabae " having himself paid nothing, as I stated before Choous his assistant was carried off to prison, and vide helpers, to shut her up also." Euthalamus gave security for him which was insufficient, so I took a little more and gave it When I met him at Antinoopolis having my bathing-bag (?) with my for the said Choous. ornaments, he said to me, " I shall take anything you have with you on account of the To all this his security which you gave to my assistant Choous for his dues to the State." mother will bear witness. He also persisted in vexing my soul about his slave Anilla, both at Antinoopolis and here, saying, " Send away this slave, for she knows how much she has possessed herself of," probably wanting to get me involved, and on this pretext to take away whatever I have myself. But I refused to send her away, and he kept saying, " A month hence I will take a mistress." God knows this is true.'
Concerning
the insults uttered

mine with

my

foster-daughters

and

his agent

;

;

903.
3.

ACCUSATION AGAINST A HUSBAND
cf.

.>[>:

A

who were being brought up by
different
6.

male For the hyperbole
^e.
^

P. Leipzig 47. 10. The here were apparently some girls the complainant, the masculine in bein^g an errar 6 ^ is mentioned in 1. 12.

^

241

18

.

^v^vaeu
9.

4•

^
1.

The

cf. e.g. P. Brit. Mus. instrumental use of the genitive

in

d^omVa.

.

,;;,^ (hterally 'on our side') is practically equivalent to roiav IS a slighting reference to the writer of this indictment.
Td\y\, eipeOJvTas

. ^].

I.

is

113. 12 (d). 11 noticeable.

.,.
131
.

14-5
20.

(both

of

Byzantine period);

,

,.

sense in

G. U. 29. 1-2 the word is used in another
.

,.

^-

For

inav<^ cf
.

uncommon

15. With this oath made in the presence of the bishops cf P. Leipzig 43 where f 6 ^^i a bishop acts as a judge. 16-7. The insertion above the line is a parenthetical explanation of _ an
k\(Is.

Speaking through the nose aggravated the insult cf. naso susbendere, &c. i. 33 balba de nare lociitus has a different meaning. 29. is perhaps better written as two words than one. In either case the article meant seems to be some kind of handbag which was carried by a lady in going to he bath, and would ho d trinkets and similar objects. A connexion with so. ?,' ^ (ct. 265. 3), IS less likely.
2 2.
;

in Fersius

^,

r-

1

^,
r r

34.
35.

as used in P. Tebt. 315. 21 ae the sense of 37• i^ov cf. P. Grenf IL 73. 9. The present passage, which supplies a contemporary parallel, supports our view of that papyrus as against the interpretation of Deissmann {T/ie Epistle of Psenosiris) who wished to make there a proper name.

^

^ (>:

cf.

P. Tebt. 424. 5

is

the Opposite

m

^,
d
Be

,

8.

^^'

,

,

904.

Petition to a Praeses.
31-3

X

88-5 cm.

Fifth century.

A petition
Flavius,

addressed to an

who had consented

unnamed praeses (of the Thebaid) by a certain to act as substitute for Philoxenus in the post of

riparius, a police official

(cf. 1. 3, note). Philoxenus had undertaken to provide Flavius with the requisite staff of helpers and indemnity in case of accident, but
;

had

failed to fulfil his bond and Flavius, who had been subjected to much indignity and even violence in the performance of his duties, now prays that he may be released from them and the original holder made responsible. The

petition

is

cast in a stilted

formal cursive.
1

2

Tfjs

^. ^ 8[]9 € ^
Tlapa

and

rhetorical style

;

the handwriting

is

an exceptionally large,

{).
R

\

rbu

^-

242
3

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ovroy

yap

4

/€ €\ €, €9 ] '
ei

5


6

avvyevrj
7

^ , €€
[]
eis

, ?, ^ ,
eiy

^
9

[€]€09 ?
XeiTovpyiiav

€9

$ 9
,
Tovs

oUeTas re

[]\
\

yeveaOai

€5

/xe

&

^ , €€[] ^
}
€lopyav

ay

e/s

€.

66ev ray

8

ray

9

,
2.

€lopyav,

[
;

€€[], []
Kayoo

5e

[]
\
1.

^^ €
ay

,
1.

e/xe

-

]^

yao[pa €(5 ^
Pap.
SO in
11.

7

and

Pap.

4•

Pap.
1.

iKeaias
'

.

.

.

Pap.

8.

From Flavins. The purity of your righteous judgement will surely pity me, an old man who has suffered a breach of covenant and mockery at the hands of Philoxenus, the devoted
magistrianus.

.& ^. .
y]v
9•

.
,

-{

9.

3.

'[€]/;6
Pap. Pap.
7•

5•

.

.

^•

.
*''°''

Pap.
• • •

He

gave

me

his

word on

oath,

and promised

that

he would surely

fulfil

without any reminding every requirement for the office of riparius, providing for my support both servants and assistants and others whose duty it would be to undertake the guarding of the city ; and not only so, but he promised that if anything extraordinary happened, he would himself make up the loss to those who suffered injury, and also that he would set right everything connected with this office. But all this he has evaded, paying no attention to my unfortunate self, who am daily suspended by ropes and have my body belaboured with blows, and possess no brother, no relative, no son to sympathize with me, so that at last the very breath of my life is in danger. Accordingly I make my entreaties to your highness that I should be released from so grievous an office, and that the original holder should be compelled to finish it either himself or through some other person, as I renounce

904.

PETITION TO A PRAESES

243

it, being unable to endure any longer an office so severe and onerous, in order that having gained my request I may bless the impartial ears of your highness, our most noble lord

praeses.'
2.
is

presumably an adverb from a form occurring in Onesand. would have been more normal with following. the magistria7ii were the agentes in rebus in the service of the magisier officiorum, and were employed as messengers or representatives in the provinces cf. Cod. Theod. 6. 27, Cod. Just. 12. 20 De agentibus in rebus, which devoh'ssimus, i. e. a true servant of the State, was the regular epithet of inagistriani ; cf. e. g. Cod. Just. 12. 21. 7 schola devoiissiinoruni agentum in rebus, C. I. G. 3467. 7—8
Slrateg. i. 37.
:

,

(8(\

that the riparius, who first appears in the fourth century, was primarily 3. a police official appears clearly from 1. 4, where the rrjs is mentioned as the sphere of duties of his assistants, and the other evidence is in accordance with this. In P. Amh. 146 a riparius issues to eirenarchs an order for arrest similar to those sent in earlier times by the strategus (e.g. P. Tebt. 290), decurion (64), or beneficiarius (65). Petitions to riparii concerning cases of assault are extant in P. Cairo 10269 and P. Leipzig 37, and in 897 they are found engaged in the search for offenders. Other references to them are P. Leipzig 49, where a riparius appears as surety for the appearance of a person, P. Leipzig 62. i. 34, where two riparii are found acting with a in the delivery of gold to a occurs in a papyrus C. P. R. 30. 52, whcrc a pitrapios of the sixth century, when the houses of the great nobles play an important part in the administration of the country (cf. 133. 8), and P. Brit. Mus. 653. 17. They were sometimes officials oi (e.g. P. Leipzig 49), sometimes of the nome(P. Leipzig 37 and 897), and are often found acting in pairs, e.g. 897, and P. Cairo 10269. The office, as 904 shows, was a burdensome XeiTovpyia. : this form occurs as early as Aristotle, Metaph. 11. 8. 12; cf. Diod. i. 5. &C. 78, Act. Apost. 17. 15 eya> 8. P. Strassb. 40. 25-8 cf. 136. II

:

[ :
;

=

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: . .

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.

.

.

(^^

[ , .,
.

€[^

(d)

CONTRACTS
Marriage Contract.

905.

20•48

cm.

. D.

170.

A short but interesting
Oxyrhynchite
contracts,
is

contract of marriage between two inhabitants of the

village Psobthis.

The
is

formula, as usual in Oxyrhynchus marriageas in the

of the protocol type, not that of a

Fayum

;

cf.

496.

The dowry brought by
provision
is

the bride
is

briefly described, the obligation of the
in

to maintain his wife adequately

emphasized

husband the stereotyped phraseology, and
in case of

made
clause

for the restoration of the
is

dowry

a separation.

An

where the bridegroom's father appears as a consenting party to the deed and guarantor of the repayment of the dowry and the opening formula is also remarkable cf. 1. i, note.

uncommon

added

at the end,

;

R

%

244
[

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5

68] [ '\€ [^€ \.
5'
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"fipov

{9)

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7.

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from

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. []\

Pap.
.
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.

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and

€ , ^ .
8e

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and of written above added above the line ; 1,
1 4.

]5 ".

from

.
and

which are
6.
1.
1•

.

5•

added above the hne.

Antoninus and Faustina, Augusti. Menodorus son of Horus and Tacallippus of the village of Psobthis has given for partnership of marriage Thatres, his daughter by Thatres, to ApoUonius son of Heracles and Tausorapis. The bride brings to her husband in respect of dowry one mina's weight on the Oxyrhynchite standard of common gold, in kind, according
.
.
.

to valuation,

and in parapherna in clothing two outer veils, one Let the other white. husband and wife therefore live together observing the duties of marriage, and the husband shall supply the wife with necessaries in proportion to his means. If a separation takes place after the birth of children or before it, the husband shall restore all the superdowry at the time of separation, and the dowry in sixty days from the day on which the separation takes place; and Menodorus, the giver of the bride, shall have the right of execution upon the husband and upon all his property. The father of the husband, Heracles son of IMorus and Apollonia, of the said village, being present assents to the
. .

.,

the

905.
marriage, and

MARRIAGE CONTRACT
The
Phamenoth

245

is surety for the payment of the aforesaid dowry. written in duplicate in order that each party may have a copy ;

This contract is valid, being and in answer to the formal
loth year,
18.'

question they have declared to each other their consent.
I.

is a date. There seems to be barely room for even if erovs were written as a symbol ; it is also 20) noticeable that the month is not added (there being a blank space after and the date at the end makes another at the beginning quite superfluous. Moreover, the mention of the empress in a date would be very unusual, though possibly it might have been thought appropriate in a marriage-contract ; cf. the coins in which Faustina is associated with Fecunditas, Fortuna muliebris, Laetitia, &c. These considerations suggest the probability that 1. I contains some unfamiliar formula, e. g, with which might be compared the common in wills. In any case, however, the mention of here appears to fix the year given in 1. 20 as the loth of Marcus Aurelius, for though the phrase in II. 19-20 suggests a later period (cf. note ad loc), the fact that none of the parties to the contract is an Aurelius gives strong support to a date earlier than Caracalla. For Faustina cf. 502. 3-4, where a priest of occurs in the reign of Marcus.

It is
(cf.

very unlikely that this line

(erovs)

t

1.

^],

,),

,}
Se
:

^

'\ .,

"
5. 6.

((\\( 6kyav
is

fore suggest
(kSiSovoc

(!. [€]
and

)?/] €], though
cf.

too long, and the natural subject of thereis the bride. that word does not apparently occur in the papyri ; cf however,

of

in

[).
7.

Grammatik, pp. 167-8.

8.

.

]vov is the

12-3. Cf. 603, where it is similarly provided that the were to be returned on demand, and the within sixty days. The latter term is also that fixed in 497. 6 and P. Gen. 21 {Archiv, III. p. 387); in Roman marriage-contracts thirty days is a commoner limit. At the beginning of 13 the space is rather broad for ^], and perhaps a^Si^a
1.

{) €\€
{
:

4. 3
a

exemplifies

]
to
6.

We

'([)
cf.

irevre.

The
12,

insertion

common phenomenon;
be a new compound;
like

seems

cf.

termination of
cf.

some word

or

e.g.

906.

.

P.

Tebt.

26.

Mayser,

921. 4 and B.G. U. 327. 7

irji)

should be read. 16-8. On the analogy of this passage we would suggest that the signature which in 497. 22-4 follows those of the bridegroom and the bride's father is that of the bridegroom's Similarly in 906. 10 father, who was perhaps made security, as here, for the repayment. Isidorus, who is only a few years younger than the father of the wife, may well be the father of the husband. In P. Leipzig 27, which like 906 is an agreement for divorce, the husband is associated with a person who actually pays over the dowry on his behalf to the wife's father ; but this fourth person is there unlikely to be the husband's father, since not only is no such relationship stated, but the husband was a freedman, who would not be expected to have an assignable father. Mitteis suggests that he was the banker, but that does not seem
at all

\

probable

;

we should
had

prefer to suppose that he
in

was more

intimately concerned in the
as
the

transaction,

and

appeared

the

original

marriage-contract

husband's

guarantor.
19. This is a remarkably early example of the use in Egypt of the stipulatory formula, which only becomes common in the third century. In fact we are unable to refer to another instance from the second century apart from those in which Roman citizens are concerned, is an for in C. [P. R. 22. 35, 'which is cited by Mitteis, Reichsrecht, p. 486^ erroneous reading (Hunt, Goli. Gel. Anz., 1897, p. 462).

€€]/^6[

246

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
906.

Deed of Divorce.
2•6 X 33• I cm.
;

Second or early

third century.

The conclusion of a contract for divorce cf. 266, P. Leipzig 27, C. P. R. I. &c. The document is apparently called an referring to the repayment 23, At the end are the names and descriptions of cf. note on 1. 10. of the dowry

?/,
is

;

the principal parties to the contract, Horion
Plutarche the wife,
a surety for him
;

who

no doubt the

wife's father,

and a third person who
cf.

is

not the husband but

may have been

905. 16-8, note.

.

[ [

45
24

letters

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€€ €
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three

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will

{).
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1.

{) 6{) €{).
of.

.

as for

.

.

and the parapherna fixed

in the said contract,

worth 40 drachmae.

further agree that they neither

claim or proceed against each other on any point connected with the union of Diogenes and Plutarche, or on any other subject whatever up to the present day. Diogenes shall henceforth provide the necessary means for the said sons, who shall live with him until they come of age and henceforth it shall
;

make nor

make any

906.

DEED OF DIVORCE

247

be lawful for Diogenes and Plutarche, either of them, to marry as they choose without incurring liability, any act of aggression against them being invalid. The above-mentioned contract, "and the registration of it through the record-office, and communication of it are acknowledged to be invalid. This receipt is valid. Horion, aged about 57, with no distinguishing mark. Plutarche, aged about 24, with no distinguishing mark. Isidorus, aged about 48, with a scar on his right eyebrow.'
.

.

In marriage-contracts the repayment of the is generally provided for without any stipulation concerning their value, such as commonly occurs in connexion with the In the marriage-contract of Diogenes and Plutarche, however, though and are very uncertain, the value of the seem to have been stated. Cannot be read, nor L• for as. 7. apparently refers to the registration of deeds through the 9. archidicastes in the Library of Hadrian and Nanaeum at Alexandria ; cf. 719, P. Leipzig 10, and, for the latest discussion, P. Strassb. 29 introd. These deeds were, however, in all previously known instances i. e. private notes of hand without the intervention of the agoranomus or other notarial official, whereas the document in the present case was a \. e. the original marriage-contract of Diogenes and Plutarche. The extant marriage-contracts of the Roman period are all notarial (cf P. M. Meyer, JiCho, VI. should have undergone a.t Alexandria is a new pp. 442 sqq.), and that a and surprising phenomenon. The only explanation which we can suggest is that the in question resembled that mentioned in 259. 11 in being i.e. that it was really a (cf P. M. Meyer, op. cit., p. 447), which required to be sent to Alexandria to receive official What is precisely meant by here is also not quite clear, owing to our ignorance of the terms of the and the circumstances of its which occurs in the but is likely to be connected with instructions of the archidicastes quoted in the documents bearing upon the e. g. in the latter example is explained by Mitteis {Hermes, 719. 4, B. G. U. 578. 7. xxxii. p. 647) as the communication of the copy of the petition concerning to the defendant through the strategus ', but this explanation does not very well suit the other cases where the is not preparatory to an action at law as in B. G. U. 578, but is only means the official communication a precautionary step (cf. 719. introd.). Perhaps of the fact of to all Concerned. 10. the reading of the last three letters is uncertain, but an abbreviation of or The repayment of the dowry was the chief point in is not admissible. and P. Brit. Mus. II. 178 is simply that a contract concerning divorce ; the formula of of an cf Lesquier, Rev. de Phil. 1906^ p. 25.

: €> []
€€[]

1—2. Cf. P. Leipz. 27• 20—3 "apoiv be

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ras

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77/7

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907.

Will of Hermogenes.
26*5

X

22-4 cm.

A. D. 276.

The

following will

is

of Julius Africanus.

preserved on the verso of 412, a fragment from the The testator, Aurelius Hermogenes, a president of

the boule at Oxyrhynchus, divides a considerable real estate between his five and his wife. Property of various three sons and two daughters children

248
kinds
of
is first
(11.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
apportioned to the sons, a special bequest being

made

to the eldest

Other property was similarly to be shared by the daughters, the elder of whom was married the dowry bestowed on this elder daughter is confirmed, and provision made for the future marriage-portion of her sister To the wife is given the absolute ownership of some land hypo(11. 1 1-6, 2,4.-^). thecated as security for her dowry. guardian is appointed for the three younger children who were still under age, to act in the case of the sons until
7-1 1).
;

them

A

they attained their majority,
of

in that of the

daughter until her marriage

;

the wife

Hermogenes

is

associated in the guardianship, and a

nephew

is

requested

to give his assistance

when

required.
is

The

chief point of interest in this will, which
(cf.
1.

not the original document but

a copy taken after the original was opened
to Latin formulae.

lies in its adherence According to the express statement of 1. 2 the deed was drawn up in Greek yet it reproduces in a striking manner the phraseology of the will of Gaius Longinus Castor at Berlin (B. G. U. 326 cf. Mommsen, Sitznngshei'. d. Pr. Akad. 1894, p, 47, Scialoja, Bull, delt Inst, di dir. rom. vii, In the recent monograph of p. 2, &c.), which was translated from the Latin. Ardir\g\o-'R.n\z, La sticcessione testainejitaria secondo i papiri gj-eco-egizii^ where the evidence is conveniently collected and fully discussed, it is remarked (pp. 277-9) how little difference the promulgation of the constitutio Antonina made to the testamentary formulae current in Egypt. Latin phrases and forms appear sporadically, but the few previously published Greek wills of the third and following centuries have been cast in the typically Greek shape. In the light of the
; ;

38 and note),

present text this conclusion needs

some
;

modification.

The

preference here

shown

for

Latin forms

may

be traceable

in a greater or less

degree to the high

municipal position of the testator but the influence of Roman law upon the formulae of Egyptian wills was evidently stronger than has hitherto been
suspected.

The papyrus
Tacitus, and
is

is

dated on Pauni

7

(June
in

i) of

the

first

year of the emperor

said to have been

opened

the following

month Epeiph (June 25-

July 34) of the 'same first year'. Aurelian seems to have been killed before March 25, 275, but since Tacitus was not chosen emperor till about September

and his accession could not have been foreseen, it is evident that the date of the papyrus refers to the year 276. Tacitus only reigned six months, his death
probably occurring early

had not yet reached is however not very remarkable, for there were considerable variations in the length of the periods which elapsed before changes in the imperial succession became generally known in Egypt Commodus appears in the date of B. G. U. 515 more than five months after his death. Cf.
in

April

;

that the

news of

it

Oxyrhynchus by Epeiph

:

907.

WILL OF HERMOGENES
8. 17,

249
first

912. 40, note, occurs,

and

P.

Strassburg

where Pauni 14 of the

year of Tacitus

and

Preisigke's discussion in pp. 30 sqq.

The ends
loss
is
i.

of the lines are missing throughout and the exact extent of the

not quite certain.
15, the

Assuming

that

1.

6 corresponded verbally to B. G. U.
11.

326.

number
less
;

of letters to be supplied in

1-16

is

about

'^^,

in

the

and our restorations are made on this hypothesis. In one or two places a slightly longer supplement seems necessary, but not more than can be accounted for by a reasonable variation in the length of the lines and the
remainder a or 3
size of the writing.

5

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28 letters

16

letters

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

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907.
3.

WILL OF HERMOGENES
11.

251
1.

Pap.

7.

|;

Pap.: SO in

11, 14. 12.

Pap.

of

/
4.

Pap.
corr.

:

SO in

16.

6.

from

.

l8.

Pap.

27• TraOVt Pap.

Eudaemon, exegetes, councillor and prytanis of the of Oxyrhynchus, dictated the following will in the Greek language, in accordance with the permission. Aurelius Herminus, Aurelius Horion, Aurelius Heraclides, Aurelia Ptolemais and Aurelia Didyme, my five dearest children by my wife Aurelia Isidora also called Prisca, a matron wearing the stola, shall be my heirs according to the disposition below written, and on the conditions on which each ., all other persons being disinherited ; they shall proceed to my inheritance in accordance with the bequests made to each of them whenever they themselves to be my heirs ; they shall be responsible for giving, doing, and providing all this which is written in this my testament, and I confide this to their honour. To Aurelius Herminus, Aurelius Horion, and Aurelius Heraclides my three sons as aforesaid I bequeath jointly in equal shares on behalf of my inheritance the vineyard belonging to me near the village of (?) Istrus by the upper temple of Isis, and all the corn-land and and utensils and all appurtenances, and all the corn-land belonging to me at Sepho, and in the metropolis my house and all the furniture in it ; and to Herminus alone as his special property all the corn-land belonging to me at Sen jointly with ., and my slave called Philodioscorus. To Aurelia Ptolemais and Aurelia Didyme my aforesaid daughters ... I give and bequeath likewise jointly, and in equal shares on behalf of my inheritance, the vineyard belonging to me at jointly with the said with all the corn-land and the plant, utensils, and all appurtenances. To Didyme alone as her special property I bequeath and I also confirm to Ptolemais by this my will the dowry which I previously gave her, and I leave to her my slave named Eunoea ; my remaining four slaves, Dioscurides and Sabinus and Herm and To Aurelia ., I bequeath to the three sons and one of the daughters, to wit Didyme. Isidora also called Prisca, my wedded wife who has conducted herself becomingly in our married life, I leave as her own property all the corn-land belonging to me at bis jointly with the said which was previously mortgaged by me to her in security ., for the dowry brought to me with her ... I appoint as guardian of my three children aforesaid who are under age, Horion, Heraclides, and Didyme, until the boys attain majority and the girl is married, Aurelius Demetrius son of Dionysotheon, with the concurrence, in all that pertains to the guardianship, of my aforesaid wife Isidora also called Prisca ; and accordingly I do not wish any magistrate or deputy or any other person to intrude himself the piety of my nephew Didymus to assist ., for I further enjoin it upon Demetrius in any way that may be required of him. To my friend Aurelius Dionysammon I bequeath and I wish that there be given him during his lifetime from and the cornland belonging to me at Moa thirty jars of wine at the vintage and artabae of wheat by the tenth measure in the month of Pauni. (I direct that there be provided as dowry) for Didyme ... by her brothers four talents of silver This will was made by me in the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus in the first year of our lord Marcus Claudius Tacitus, Pauni 7. The first year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Claudius Tacitus Pius Felix Augustus, Pauni 7. I, Aurelius Hermogenes also called Eudaemon, have made this will with all the above provisions. Opened in the same first year, Epeiph.'
'

Aurelius

Hermogenes

also called

illustrious

and most

illustrious city

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1.

2.

:
Cf.

cf.

11.

990 and

\ovQm rfj was essential

[|«.

1 4 and 26 below, and P. Leipzig 29. 7 'EXXj/wkois P. Rainer 1702. 13 {Wt'en. Stud. ix. p. 241) According to the older Roman law the use of the Latin language

'^\

.

-

in all legal transactions.

The emperor who

established the right to use

Greek

252

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

is thought to have been Alexander Severus, to whose reign the Rainer papyrus belongs whether the permission applied to other countries besides Egypt is disputed ; cf. ArangioRuiz, op. at., p. 266 sqq. is restored from 1. 16, and was probably followed by some epithet. 3. would not fill the space. cf. G. U. 86o. I, P. Flor. 1 6. I. The s^ola was the mark of 4. [is alpeaei volun/ali, a common term in connexion with wills, rank and dignity,

!
\
[>

:

a verb apparently meaning shares or ' is endowed '. cf. G. For the supplement 326. i. 6, where, as Schubart informs us, the fifth letter is almost certainly i, and therefore something like The construction of the rest of that line remains is probably to be restored. imcertain ; /^[epovi], however, is not necessary (cf. e. g. 11. 7 and 1 2 of our papyrus) and 8]e may be read (cf. P. Leipzig 29. 5 possibly Or is awkward. though the repetition of for which cf the passage of the Leipzig perhaps is part of some phrase with papyrus just quoted, and P. Brit. Mus. L 77. 13-4 (Will of Abraham^)
'
'

]
in

=

.

.

.

[

), []\[
.

cf. G. U. 326. i. 7, and the will pubHshed by de Ricci 4-5• ' ^^ Wessely's Sh(d. z. Palaographie I, p. 6, 1. 24 ; the phrase corresponds to the Latin formula which not The papyrus proves that ceteri omnes exheredes sunio (Gaius 2. 128). Arangio-Ruiz wishes to read before {pp. cit., pp 223, 276), is correct. re 5. B. G. U. 326. i. 7-8 is on this analogy to be read is there replaced by which is now confirmed by Schubart. tm We accordingly read (Schubart) for vnep after which 1.

€, (7

in the corresponding position, the infinitive

of or and it is preceded at an Schubart tells us, can be any letter having a long tail, i. e. i, therefore does not seem interval of three letters by a similar long stroke. and Gradenwitz suggests a connexion with suitable. Dareste proposed
the Berlin papyrus, perhaps depending
verb, e. g.
is hardly convincing. is no doubt to be 6-7. Cf. B. G. U. 326. i. 14-5, where (so Schubart) not Schubart would write in the Berlin text read after as here. [] iv but this absolute USe of €117 re (nOt (. does not greatly commend itself, and the mood might be due to a sin/ in the original Latin. or It therefore seems more satisfactory to have either in the lacuna here. The corresponding Latin formulae are damnas esio dare facere praestare fideique ems commitio; cf. the will of Dasumius C. L L. 1352. 116 and 125, the will of Hadoindus in Brissonius, de Formulis vii, ita ut ubicumque aliquid per hoc

cernere, but this

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,'
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^ [£ \^ , []€[' , ,. , ( , ^^
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which

is

also adopted

from

on an intervening

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,
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mea
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testamentum
7.

meum

dedero legavero dareque iussero id ut detur fiat praestetur fidei tuae heres
appeal
is

committo, &c.
8. Trepi to

.,

is by no means certain. cf. 11. 1 1-2. not quite clear how these words should be constructed or sc. even how some of them should be divided. Perhaps and may refer to SC. is the best interpretation but the first be descriptive of that name cf. combinations like 7)> 'lo'""»'

,
.

Or perhaps
.

[
;

:

.

it

",

;

, "
(8.
in

.

.

;

g.
^

,

(719. I4).

which

is

clearly written,

is

puzzling.

Some

expression corresponding to
1.

We

of that papyrus.

are surprised to see that Arangio-Ruiz, op. cit,, p. 295, repeats the error of writing Evidently k<p' should be read there as well as in 11. 28 and 60.

51

, where 6 [,
SeveKfXtv,
[.7

!
(cVi

907.

WILL OF HERMOGENES

253

in 1. 1 3 is expected. The lacuna at the end of the Hne was presumably occupied with a description of the The names of several Oxyrhynchite villages beginning with Sev are known,

,,
]( ,
if

. !, 2(.
ii.

The

following Koivas

is

indicated

by

1.

12

correct, implies a previous

held property in common, and the end of 1. be given; cf. also 1. 17. 1 1-2. = do lego, as 6. g. in C.

mention of a person with whom Hermogenes 10 seems the most suitable place for the name to
I.

hh(

L. 1352. 125

and

1 7.

The name
. .

to

which top

the

(so 494. 9) (45. 9) or (614, &c.). 18. It was the usual practice in marriage contracts to give the wife a general claim against the husband's property for the repayment of her dowry, but in the present case the security seems to have been limited to a portion of the husband's estate which was formally
17.

end of 1. lo; cf. the previous note. raXavTois 14. Perhaps e[v .: cf. 1. 1 6. The line may be completed e.g. eivooCar;
Perhaps nepl

[

;

cf.

B. G. U. 326.

i.

i8

refers probably occurred at

]3

]

2

\

.

],

mortgaged

for this purpose.

[)
at

be enough.
19.

-

For eV cf. e.g. 266. 9 might be supplied before but three or four

^ ^,

For yiveauai cf. e.g. 496, 12, 651; the age of 14 years is probably here which time a boy passed from the care of a h(/or to that of a curator According to the provisions of some Oxyrhynchus wills (cf, 491, 9, 495. 10) are appointed to act for minors up to the age of 20 or 25 years, but these cases are anterior to the consiitutio Anionina, and considering the strong tendency of Hermogenes
meant,

().

{

^'
letters

(}

(V

would

Roman formulae, it is safer to take here in its technical Roman sense, tutor but not a curator could be appointed by a Roman will. For the phrase cf, G, U, 326. ii, 17 Tjj 18 The analogy of the present passage, in which the tutor is assigned to the daughter as well as the sons, makes it clear that in that much discussed clause also (cf. Arangio-Ruiz, op. cit. pp, 232 sqq,) means tutor.
to use

,

20.

21.

(
.
:

((
:

.

cf,

909. 4
:

\

cf,

e.g. C,

I,

G,

2 22 2,

corresponds to the Latin pro-. But the intervention of a magistrate would according to Roman law be necessary when the sons required a curator; cf. 888. introd, is very doubtful ; 23, the name of Dionysammon's (?) father may be given instead. 25. Possibly ev &pa with before but the reading would not be very satisfactory, and if rightly deciphered, may also be constructed with 26, We suppose that there is a small dash after followed by a short blank space but the papyrus is damaged in this part, and a letter or two may have intervened before the supposed There is not room for ... at the end of this line. Perhaps alone stood here, with the Roman month or a reference to the consuls ; cf, B, G. U. 326. ii,

,.
17

A

[]

and

note,

-

,

.,

8

;

.

,

8],

-2,

28.

...

the

same time

after the

\

,

this entry, Avhich is in the same hand and was evidently written at as the rest of the text, indicates that the whole document is a copy made had taken place. Cf. B. G, U, 326, ii. 21

and

for

in this

couuexion also 715. 19,

. G, U,

^
&c.

592.

ii,

7,

254

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
908.

Contract between Eutheniarchs.
30-6

X

8-5 cm.

a. d.

199,

agreement between Sarapion, who was either himself a eutheniarch at Oxyrhynchus or, more probably, the grandson of a person holding that office (cf. note on 1. 5), and five other eutheniarchs concerning the grinding of wheat for bread to be supplied to the city. The precise terms of the agreement are much obscured by the mutilation of the papyrus the five eutheniarchs were however each to bear the expense of one factory, and Sarapion and his grandfather were
;

An

apparently together
tant,

made

responsible for a sixth, the average daily output of

But the details are comparatively unimporand the value of the document lies mainly in the fresh information supplied regarding the office of gymnasiarch and eutheniarch. The eutheniarchs, who first appear towards the end of the second century, superintended the food supply of the capital towns but they are not very often mentioned and their
each mill being fixed at 20 artabae.
;

official

rank

is

not yet clear
office

(cf.

P. Tebt. 397. 14-5, note).
e. g.

They
;

are sometimes
in the present

found holding another

simultaneously,

that of exegetes

case five eutheniarchs were gymnasiarchs.

We
;

here learn

further that

at

and 11. 18-21 indicate that these six held office for a period of a single month. Hence it would appear that the number for the year was twelve, and that they exercised their functions in alternate months in two sections of six. With regard to the number of the gymnasiarchs, of whom five are mentioned in 11. 6-15, this is the largest figure yet attested for Oxyrhynchus but C. P. Herm. 57 (to which Wilcken called our attention) indicates the coexistence of at least ten gymnasiarchs at Hermopolis, and there may well have been ten or twelve or even more at Oxyrhynchus. At Athens at this period there were monthly as well as yearly gymnasiarchs, and the monthly office was sometimes held by more than one person (Boeckh,
at least six
;

Oxyrhynchus they formed a board of

Staatshauskaltung,

.

^ ^^- 9
I.

548).

6

5

^ 9 ]? ? ^
d>s

^
'

,<\

[6
.

.

.

\-

908.

CONTRACT BETWEEN EUTHENIARCHS

255

10

€ []
9
.

Upas

Upovn-

] ^\€ [^]€ [ ] €€€ ^^[.

15

[€]
[]

\^

[]€
[roy]

[€])( [ ]
2

]
.
.

^^ ?

[]€.
6-

vpos

OS

[ej^^y
[tosI

vbs

'€
%
.

i^os)

€ ' ^*

[.

25

[]€ [

[\

.]

.

.

kp[y]ar|pov

[]5

€[] •[•]••
kv
. .

[]
as

[.]

.[...].
€1/

[pjfXCii/

[.]/€/3(

)

ۥ[][]
irpos

] €ps ' ^ €[ [.

KpiOfj

-

"^"^^[00

[.

[.] .[..]..

.]

.

[.]

.

[.

.

.

[

'/3[€];('[]
...
.

[\\ovas
35

[]€
4

(,

€ps [
e^eii'

[•\ pas
Tpo(f>as
.

.

Ta[s

i^ovTos [ooSevi]

. ^€ ^ €5

€[€. ][] [] €^ [] [ ]irpos

[][-

' 8[]

(os)

n€pTiva[Kos

256

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
TIavvL
45
5'

'9 € . ?[\
(2nd hand)
g.
"iepas
.

€019.
5•
1.

' 'iepoveiKmv

()

€[
Pap.
1 8.
io'as

Pap.
'

19.

1.

[("^.
(J).
.

.

.

Pap,
2 2.
.

12.
.
,

20.

Pap.
. .
.

Pap.

35•

Pap.

(?)

Sarapion also called Horion, son of on, through his paternal grandfather Apion, ex-gymnasiarch of Oxyrhynchus, at present eutheniarch of the said city, to Tiberius Claudius Didymus and however "he is styled, a victor in the games and exempt from taxation, member of the Dionyseum and the sacred club, and to Theon also called Antimachus and Dionysius
Berenicianus,

and Achilles also called Isidorus, ex-exegetes, and Horion also called ex-exegetes, all five gymnasiarchs and eutheniarchs of the said city of Oxyrhynchus, greeting. I have made a compact with you being now eutheniarchs from the (30th of the present month Pauni till the 29th of the following month Epeiph in the
also called
.
.

.'*)

the animals being fed by current 7th year, that one bakery be fitted out by each of you you with grass and barley, on the understanding that they grind daily in each factory as much as 20 artabae of wheat supplying the animals in each factory ... to provide one
. .
. . .
.

by me, and we shall grind at (this) factory an equal and it shall be unlawful for any of us to transgress the aforesaid conditions. This contract, done in six copies in order that each of us may have Date and signature of Sarapion. one, is valid.'
factory, the fodder being provided

amount

daily,

namely 20 artabae

;

I.

Probably
It is
is

Sarapion or to Apion in the former case should have been written. On the whole we prefer the second alternative, though why Sarapion appears in the business at all then becomes obscure, and his action must be supposed to depend upon a private arrangement between himself and his grandfather. 8-10. This Aiovvae'iov is more probably an Oxyrhynchite than an Alexandrian temple; cf. B. G. U. 1073, a notification from the boule of Oxyrhynchus to the record-office of the election of a person to the of a Upa which entitled him to are'Xeta, and 1074, the statement of this individual's claim, which in 1. i cites a rescript of Claudius Gothicus (cf. Wilcken, Arch'v, IV. p. 564 and Viereck, Xh'o, VIII. p. 413) addressed to'is
5.

the order

'Qpei]a)vos or 'Am]mvos. not clear whether irregular, in the latter

( (
171 (Part

refers to

;

nepl

Oxyrhynchus
called
19.

(8)

is

()
:

UpovUais
in

mendoned
cf.
1.

.
II, p.

8,

A

(!

may

in

some way
shows

208), and the impost in 917. 3 apparently have benefited the Aiowa-elov.

'

at

would

44, which be a natural period.

[]

that this contract

was written on Pauni

28.

30 days

'

is not Satisfactory, for though the doubtful e may be 24. [] the vestiges of the next letter do not seem to suit a stroke below the line suggests rather With or p. ;

\(

moreover a diaeresis would be expected over the t. 28. Not 30. There may be a letter at the end of the line
all

(

.

[]
after
e,

,

cannot be read.
v,

plural does not accord at
is

well with

.

e. g.

but a

first

person

The

traces

unsatisfactory,

might be read

in place of

.

do not

suit

e\aev,

and

908.
31. Perhaps
to\\s

would assist 32. Perhaps
is

.

CONTRACT BETWEEN EUTHENIARCHS
The
doubtful
1.

257
.
. .

may be

or

;

avbpas

would be

possible.

[a]\)j^oi/raf in

'[1.

34, but the

especially

33. ep
38.

•\4'\[\

followed by the curved is very doubtful.
is

mark commonly used

. G. U.

817. 17. facsimile shows,

unknown The word

to the lexica but is parallel to
is

P. Amh. 107. also to be recognized in P. Strassb. 29. 46 where, as the

should be read for i^as

, .
'0^)(

is difficult.

in abbreviations to represent

.

,

909.

Sale of Acacia-Trees.
27-5xio-8cm.
a. d.

225.

for

contract for the sale of fourteen acacia-trees on the edge of a vineyard 1200 drachmae, the purchase-money being devoted to the payment of

A

arrears of taxes

5

?88 '^ ' €^€9 ^ €
upon the vineyard.

7

'Avrivois

)(9

^€

15


20

€ €

^€

e/y

€. €[]
e^

[

€€ -€[] , ,
XeveuTa

-

S

258

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\\9 €?
25

vTTep

6

2nd hand

.
Pap.
2 8.
'

Aurelius Ptollion son of Ptollion, of Oxyrhynchus, iuior of the children of Apollonius Didymus, son of Onesas, who are minors, and the mother of the minors, who gives her concurrence, Aurelia Eudaemonis daughter of Antinous also called Hermes, of Antinoopolis, acting without a guardian in accordance with Roman custom by the right of her children, to the Aurelii Serenus son of Aurelius Ammonius, formerly exegetes of Oxyrhynchus, and Serenus son of Serenus, and Theonas styled as having Taarmiusis as his mother, and Soterichus son of Didymus, of the said city, greeting. acknowledge that we have sold to you four in equal shares the fourteen acacia-trees in good condition growing upon the embankment of the newly -planted vineyard belonging to the minors, at the price agreed upon between us of 1200 drachmae of silver, which sum was devoted to the purchase of wheat paid for the dues upon the aforesaid vineyard in the reign of the deified Commodus, on condition that you shall perform the complete uprooting and removal of the aforesaid acacia-trees at your own expense whenever you choose, but of necessity not later than Mesore of the present 4th year, and after the pulling up and removal of the acacia-trees the place shall be set in order in equal shares, half by us and the other half by you the buyers, as hereby agreed, and in answer to the formal question we have given our consent. This sale, of which there are two copies, is valid. The 4th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander Pius Felix Augustus, Tubi 15.' Signature of Aurelius
also called

? 9. . ^ ? [9 ? [? ? ? ? (^ ~ [^ .
[eTovs),

,
///[ajy

€€9

kwdvayKov

^?[] ^\
e^
Se

^

^

6[ 7rpo/c[e£-

? €9
8.

? ^ ?,
(?)
le.

\^\

-

re

-

€€[

35

€^[ €]9

-

[?

Pap.

Pap.

9•

^^

COrr.

flOm

.
27.
1.

4•

21-2.

corr.

from

added above the hne.

30.

"

and

added above the
32.
1.

line.

Pap.

^ .

We

Ptollion.

909.

SALE OF ACACIA-TREES

259

(,,
4.

send an through their mother as where three where the concurrence of the mother in the acts of the guardian of minors is provided for by will. The wood was in vineyards cf. P. Brit. Mus. 214. 13-5 (II. p. 162). 15. For used for boat-building (Hdt. ii. 96), and for various kinds of machinery (P. Brit. Mus. 1177. III. pp. 186-7), 3•"^ gum arable was obtained from it (Hdt. ii. 96). 177-220 ... takes the place of the usual acknowledgement of 20. The clause at the purchase-price by the seller. Apparently the money in question had been paid direct to
Cf. P. Leipzig 9. 6,

and 907.

20,

{)

=

the sellers of the corn.
this word is generally used for 'banking up', and the trees were «Vi 15); but the context shows that it must here be employed in the unusual sense e| is very uncertain ; [. can be read for (, but [5 of digging up or uprooting. ejn-i yields no sense, being inadmissible. suppose the sense of enippiCos, Avhich which is read by editors in apparently does not occur, to be similar to that of

25.

(1.

:
10
;

[

['^

Diosc.

I.

.

.

.

main ones

for the

form

cf.

.
910.

We

,

i.e.

the smaller roots subsidiary to the

Lease of Land.
31-5

X

9 cm.

. D.

197.

A lease
formula.

of 5 arourae of land at Pakerke for four years, following the usual In the first and third years of the lease the land was to be sown with

wheat

at a rent of 6 artabae per aroura, in the

green-stufifs at a rent of

3a drachmae per aroura

;

second and fourth years with Seven cf. e.g. P. Tebt. 377.
first

artabae of seed-corn were lent by the landlord for the

year's crop.

Caracalla

is called in the date formula emperor-designate on Nov. 4, 197, as in inscriptions and coins of that year his tribimicia potestas began in the following January, and already by May, 19H, he was placed on an equality with his father (C. I. L. viii. 2465) cf. 976, which was written 2% days later than 910, Caracalla being still emperor-designate, and 916, \vhere he appears as full emperor in Pauni (May 26June 24 A.D. 198).
; ;

[ivpOyy^up

[]?
[

^\? \]
]^
\€,

5

[€] [€.]
\^?

/^
\

^
^^ ^
S a

^lepaKLCuvos
rfjs

-

kv

[^]9
{€T€i)]

[

evearcoTi


ds

]€
{^)

? eroy

(^Vet)

26

[
[iifj]9

15

. ] ^^ [ [€)(^] [ €] ^? [^ ]? [ ]? , ???? [] 2 [? ]?
[pau
Se]

[9

6]

\ ?f|,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Se

(£€)

(erci)

^?
kv

eroy

7[]/3€'

Ci'y

yrjs

€tov9

[€]?

[] ? [] ?
€])(^,
25

eo[s]

[ [] [ ].
€?

^ [] ,
[]?
[]

?

'?
kav

[? €]?,
[?

\? []€)(^€[] ]€[?] ? ^? [] [\ ? []' [.],
^[],

[k]<^

35

[€]€?
[]?

40

€ €€? ^, ' , [] '/ , ^ ^ []?. ^^ ? ?
€0?

?

^
5e

,?
?
6€€vkov
kK

-

?

€[]

re

k[]

[]

?? ^?
kva

?,

ۥ

{^?) -

45

?
\
pois

910.

LEASE OF LAND

.

^
8h kv

261

pevov
TecSy

(2nd hand)

yrjv

[]
kv

-

^-

['\
e|,
[T]rjs

,

55

.
[9
'Up.

? '4
'iay(ov

^^

-

'49

'\[6].

[] []
1 4.

€[6-

26.

([\ \5
.
'

Pap.
37•

before

^.

over an erasure.

18. iVas

Pap.

Pap.

Pap.

Hieracion son of Hieracion, of Oxyrhynchus, ex-agoranomus of the said city, has Teos son of Sarapammon, his mother being ... as, inhabiting the village of Pakerke in the eastern toparchy, for four years dating from the present 6th year, the 5 arourae which he owns at Pakerke, on condition that in the present 6th year and in the 8th year Teos shall sow them with wheat at the annual rent of 6 artabae of wheat per aroura, and in the following 7th and 9th years he shall cuUivate them with green-stuifs at the annual rent likewise of 32 drachmae per aroura. The lessee acknowledges that he has on the spot received and had measured to him from the landlord as a loan for seed on account of the land, for the present year only, 7 artabae of wheat, of which he shall be compelled to repay an equal amount to the lessor together with the rent in kind in the month Pauni of the said present year, by the same measure as that by which he received it, guaranteed completely against all risks, the taxes upon the land being payable by the landlord, who shall further retain the ownership of the produce undl he recovers his annual dues. If after the coming year (which heaven forbid !) any part be unirrigated, an allowance shall be made to the lessee, who when the lease is guaranteed shall pay the rent in kind and money annually in the month of Pauni, the wheat at the threshing-floor of Pakerke, new, pure, unadulterated, unmixed with barley, and sifted, according to the 4-choenix receiving measure of the landlord, the measuring being done by his agents ; and he shall have the right of execution upon both the lessee and all his property, and the said lessee shall deliver the land in the last year with all the rushes cut, and free from rushes and dirt of all kinds. This lease is valid.' Date and signature of the lessee.
leased to
30.

[]/)

Tovs

:

for the distinction

of.

P. Tebt, 377. 23—7, note.

202

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
911.

Lease of a House.
ii'iX7-2cm.

as

it

This contract for the lease of part of a house at Oxyrhynchus follows so far goes the ordinary formula (cf. e. g. 502) the chief point of interest in it is
;

or subscriber to act on the mention of a special appointment of a behalf of the lessee, whose sight was affected ; cf. note on 11. 6 sqq. The papyrus was written in the third century in the 13th year of an emperor who must

^
^^-

A. D.

233 or 265.

be Severus Alexander or Gallienus.

? []€9 ^
5

? €9 ? ? 6€[ ^??€ [
Oeoyivovs

[Z]'jul\os

apyjL^paTivaas

[] []% [] € €? . €? ?
Svo

^?? ?
(?)
ev
[eJTr'
]
.

^ ?
A
8,

15

[

? [] ? [? [
.

[ ? ?
'

[ ".
II.

[.]

2.

[^] Pap.
14•

6.

/€' Pap.

1.

^'.

Pap.
'

Pap.

Aurelius Demetrius also called Zoilus, ex-chief priest, exegetes and councillor of Oxyrhynchus, has leased to Aurelius Theogenes son of Theogenes, of the said city, who has weak sight, and is acting with the subscriber who has been appointed for him in accordance with the memoranda of the office of the strategus, namely Aurelius Dionysius also called Ammonius, for a period of two years from Thoth i of the present 13th year, of his property at the said city of Oxyrhynchus in the quarter of the Square of Thoeris, a half share of a house and yard, beneath which is a cellar, and court, and all the appurtenances, .' being held by me in common with
.
.

by the strategus seems to be quite novel, and somewhat new Hght. This term is frequently used in contracts to designate the person who signs on behalf of an illiterate party to an agreement, but per se has no other concern with the business in hand; there is no reason to suppose that

6-8.

An

shows the

!
*

911.

LEASE OF A HOUSE

263

appointment of a
in a

subscribers of this kind required any official recognition. A man with defective would naturally need in his business transactions the services of such a but the latter would not be expected to have the prominence here accorded him, or to be specially appointed by the strategus. On the other hand if the physical disabilities of Theogenes had been such as to debar him from acting on his own account, his representative should have been termed or not The position of this officially constituted appears to lie somewhere between that of the curator mente capti and the normal subscriber

ordinary
sight

'

'

,,

.
/?

,

'.

912.

Lease of a Cellar.
26-8 X 7-9 cm.
A.D. 235.

5

eVa

15

.^
eroi/y

^^ - ?8 9 ?? €9 ? ?? ) ^ 8? ?€ €€ 9 , -^ , -^
;

lease of an underground chamber in a house together with the space above the exhedra, at an annual rental of 60 drachmae cf. 502, the phraseology of which is closely similar, and B. G. U. 253. The date in 1. 40 appears to show that the death of Alexander Severus and the accession of Maximinus occurred some days earlier in the year 20^^ than has been generally supposed cf. the note
;

A

ad loc.

?

?
?

8os

25

?

kav

?

kn

kviavTov

kav

?, 8'

a

{'4tovs)

3

[ka]v

^9

\{)
?
evov

e^ei

(

& ^? ?, ??

(€?)

kvoi-

Toy

8^ ^? ?
kvoi-

e^iSpas

35

8k

6

^-

. ?
?,

k€pe?

?
-

-

204

?,8€ 2
kv

? ?
9
enl

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

kvoi-

[^€{)

€9.
.
'

8t


32•

^ 4•

Se

-

[^ \€ \.
]

€ (]
lPa.p.

.

(2nd hand)

fVtavToVa.'p.
l•^^'

[<] Pap.

Pap•

8
34•

^.

21.

((

.......
24• h

[6-

.

^,

Pap.

Aurelia Besous, daughter of Sarapion and Sarapias, of Oxyrhynchus, acting with Theon also called Asclepiades, has leased to Aurelius Patus son of Panouris, from Mermertha, for one year from Thoth i of the coming 2nd year out of the house which she herself holds on lease from Aurelius Isidorus son of Chaeremon in the South Quay quarter, the cellar within it and the space above the hall at the rent of 60 drachmae of silver for the When the lease is guaranteed the lessee shall use the parts leased to him throughout year. the period without hindrance, and shall pay the rent in two instalments in the year, half the sum at intervals of 6 months, without any delay. And at the end of the period he shall deliver the parts leased to him as aforesaid free from filth and dirt of every kind, in the condition in which he receives them, with the existing doors and keys, or shall forfeit a sum equivalent to what he fails to deliver, and for arrears of rent one and a half times the original amount, the lessor having the right of execution upon both his person and all his This lease is valid, and in answer to the formal question he gave his consent. property. The ist year of the Emperor Caesar Gaius Julius Verus Maximinus Pius Felix Augustus, Phamenoth i.' Signature of Aurelia Besous.

Aurelius

/ ^
4.
. .

:

the precise legal significance of this phrase, which

several papyri of the period subsequent to the constiiutio Antonina, is is quite clear from e. g. C. P. R. That it is not equivalent to
.
:

:;

Strassb. 29. and a direct opposition between in his most recent discussion of the subject, Go//. gel. Anz. 1907, p. 293, proposes to find an explanation in the distinction between Reichsrecht and Volksrecht ; where the former no longer rethe latter retained him in the form of a cf. P. Leipzig 28. 4 quired a is Sometimes USed as a synonym for cf. P. Leipzig 3. i. 2 and 29. 3, 20.
cf.

,

Leipzig

29),

where there

is

.
:

somewhat obscure.
I. 9.

2

4•

8

S^d . Wenger,

(

is

found in

a this is a remarkable date, since Alexander Severus is supposed to have 40. been killed about Feb. 10, and that the accession of Maximinus should have been known If a here is correct, the at Oxyrhynchus so soon after as Feb. 25 is incredible. death of Alexander must be put back somewhat earlier; a date from about Jan. 10-20 is On the other hand some days of January in this year the latest that would be expected. must be allowed to Alexander in order to account for coins on which is marked the 14th year of his tribunicia poiesias, which would date from Jan. i. The problem is further complicated by a papyrus from the Heracleopolite nome translated by Wessely in Fiihrer Pap. Erz. Rainer No. 249, which is dated in Pharmouthi of the 14th year of Alexander that is to say, the writer of that document continued to reckon the year by Alexander at least 30 days after another writer, at a place further south, had adopted the new reckoning
:

]

\\

4 (.

(

af]u

912.

LEASE OF A CELLAR

265

by Maximinus. The discrepancy, however, is less striking than that between B. G, U. 784 which is dated by Pertinax on April 2, 193, and B. G. U. 515 which is still dated by Commodus on June 2 of the same year, both documents coming from the Fay urn. It seems that the scribes were not very prompt in adapting themselves to the altered conditions, and that force of habit sometimes led careless persons to go on using a superseded formula; cf, 907. introd. With regard to the reading, the numeral a might perhaps be e, but that makes hardly any diiference. It is a little surprising that there is nothing to be seen of the abbreviation of for the papyrus is broken only slightly above the line of the letters. [Se^aaroO] might well be read, but Thoth i of a first year is an impossible date, since according to There is no doubt the Egyptian reckoning Thoth i always began a new regnal year. either about the number of the year in 1. 37, which is also guaranteed by 1. 8, or that '\. a might possibly be explained as was written at the same time as the rest of the date, an inadvertence of the scribe caused by a reminiscence of 1. 8 ; but this cannot be regarded

^2({\
41.

^

as a satisfactory hypothesis.

may

of course have been abbreviated.

913.

Lease of Land.
31-7

X

23-5 cm.

A. D.

442.

lease of 9 acres of land for apparently three years (cf. note on 1. 8), at the rent of half the produce, the landlord being responsible for taxes and the tenants

A

providing seed.

\^€?
[

5

[\6\ ? [] []
[.

? ? ?? ? .? ] ? ^? ? [6]
EvSo^iov

]]
evvea

[]

.

{)

[]9

{)9

O^vpvyyj.Ta>v

[?

^? ? ? ?^ ? €€??? \\
.]€[.
. .

k^

[ ]? [€
'4?]

15

[€]€ [] € ? [ ]? [€ ]? []€?, ? ? ? [€] '[
?]
k(f>

? ',
kav
81

]?

? ^? &
\

??
Tfj

&

'^^

?

266

20

25

?^? [[] ] . ^ {] ^? ^. ? ]
THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
avvnep\6eT\(u^,

€[•]

€€9

??

npcs

c^

\\[) ^€() []€. \€\ ^]
[]

kv

(2nd hand)

[]

€()

[](

e^

/xepo[y]

[
23.

[

][)6
^

.
.

?

^?
mov Pap.
I9.

{9)

(ist hand)

' emu
of

//

.

On
3.

\(••
21.
1.
'

8\
Pap.

the verso vestiges of an endorsement.

over an erasure. 8. "ivhiKTiovos Pap.

'.
. . .

1.

(€< .
5.
.

corr.

from

0.

17. ai/U7rep[^er]toi Pap.

!*j.

Pap.

In the consulship of Flavins Eudoxius and Flavius Dioscorus the most illustrious, daughter of of Daniel, of excellent memory, president of the council i8. To in the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, from Aurelius Harmiusius son of from the village of Ptochis in the said Padidymus and Aurelia Taor daughter of Castor, nome. We desire of our own free will to lease upon our mutual security from the present year until the sowing of the 13th indiction, out of the land belonging to you in the fields of our village, 9 arourae of corn-land or thereabouts, on condition that we sow them with any crops we please on the basis of half shares in the resulting produce, the terms being that we shall pay to you the landlord in place of rent the half of the produce in good faith, and that we the lessees in return for the labour bestowed on the cultivation and the seed sown by us in the land shall keep the other half, with no delay, the taxes upon the land being due from you the landlord ; and it shall be obligatory upon us on our mutual security to pay the half of the produce at the proper season with no delay, and to perform the banking up of the land. This lease, of which there are two copies, is valid, and in answer to the Signatures of the lessees written for them by formal question we have given our assent.' Flavius Sarapion.

Phaophi

.

.

4.

cf. Mitteis, C. P. R. I. pp. 61-2. means president of the decurtottes is awkward and raises doubts whether the fragment containing these letters 6. the hand, however, though not certainly and ]pa in 1. 5 is after aU rightly placed here

[^ {) ^
:

cf.

67.

2,

C. P. R.

I.

19. 1, P. Leipzig 37. 3.
;

The

tide probably

][

;

identical, is very similar,

the fibres of the papyrus correspond rather well,

and the verso,

which contains vestiges of an endorsement

in the right position, is also suitable.

A

title

913.

LEASE OF LAND

267

"!

The name suggests nothing likely. would be apposite, but 6, and possibly this may be read here as the patronymic of Castor, being omitted, though in the case of the other persons concerned grandfathers' names are not added, and there would barely be room for [Ev], erovs cf. G. U. 586. lO irpos 8. For but a difficulty would then arise concerning the aTTopas.is suggested by e. g. P. Tebt. 378. 9 number of the indiction, which should in that case be the nth, not the 13th, and ea>r has the further advantage of defining the term of the lease. iav. The rent of one half the produce was II. There is not room in the lacuna for cf. 103, 277, 729. fairly common in the Oxyrhynchite nome cf. e. g. P. Leipzig 28. 21. (or 14. For ij[eTa as Wilcken suggests, is more probably for 20. The corrupt word
referring to

][

occurs in 70.

]

.

.]

;

?

than e.g. for veovpythv or Pfwpav (cf Theophrast. C. veov). and Photius

,

\]

]) []€
;

PL

3.

,
13.

3

v^ovpyov re elvai

914.

Acknowledgement of a Debt.
i7-iXii-6cm.
a.d. 486.
in

A promissory note for the payment of two solidi of gold, due
of a purchase of dye.

consequence

The goods had

already been delivered to the purchaser,
to

who
later.

in the present

document undertakes

pay the money

for

them two months

[

5

{) €€ ? [^^ ? ? []€ ^ ^ ^ 9 [] [ ]€ . ^{) [ €] , [] ^ [ ] )(
4- To]is

ttjs

^

8{^).
Kvpias

'ApeovTOS

[/3€])€«/

)(()

.{) .

^6

15

[] ^, [ []
eroi/y

[] [€]

[7]

[•^6]

^]
kv

€€

Tfj

268

[
On
20 yf

[€]€

\8\ \[\

the verso

. ' €6
.
1 4•

/^)

€€ ] .^([ . ?
TOvSe
k[cu\

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Pap.

2.

Pap.

8() ['\
Pap.
1 5.

3•

^•

Pap.

.

^[ ^.
vtos

Pap.

5•

20. viov Pap.

' The year after the consulship of Flavius Theodoric the most illustrious, Mecheir 5, the 9th indiction. Aurelius Apphous son of Hareous and Cyria, coming from the city of Oxyrhynchus, to Aurelius Serenus son of Daniel, of the said city, greeting. I acknowledge that I owe as a debt to you, of the price of various dyes which I have bought from you and removed in accordance M'ith the agreement between us, two solidi of gold, total 2 solidi of gold ; and the two solidi of gold I will of necessity repay to you free of all risk in the month Pharmouthi of the current 162nd the 131st year and the present 9th indiction with no delay, and you shall have the right of execution upon me and all my property, which is mortgaged for the repayment of this debt, as security and lawful pledge. This bond, which is written in duplicate, is valid, and in answer to the formal question I have given my consent. (Endorsed) Deed of Apphous son of Hareotes, of the illustrious city of

=

Oxyrhynchus.'

an inconsistency in the statements of date, for the year after the consulship a. d. 485, whereas the dates by the indiction in 1. 2 and by the Oxyrhynchite eras in 1. 13 combine to fix the year as 486. The letters ]is are broken, but satisfactory enough, and ]/3 cannot be read ; there would indeed be room for one or two more letters in the lacuna, but with a chrism and an enlarged initial letter the space would be sufficiently accounted for. The scribe therefore seems to have made a mistake ; cf. 133 and 140, in which the eighth year after the consulship of Basilius appears where the ninth would be expected. in the endorsement on the back the father's name is given as 'Apfarov. 3. 'ApfovTos cf. e.g. P. Strassb. 40. 13. 9. For 10. The supplement is a trifle long for the lacuna. 13. On the Oxyrhynchite eras cf. 125. introd. 17-8. Cf. 136. 41 and P. Amh. 151. 19.
I.
is

There

of Theodoric was

[]
:

915.

Receipt for Lead and Tin.
6x30-4 cm.
A.D. 572.

by a lead-worker for repairing the pipes up with four similar receipts issued to the same lead-worker, which are described in 1000-1003. The writing is in each case across the fibres. 915 alone is dated by the two Oxyrhynchite eras.
receipt for lead

A

and

tin supplied

of a bath.

The papyrus was found

rolled

) {) {)
-\-8{) 8{)

915.

RECEIPT FOR LEAD AND TIN

{)
. .

269
Ci'y

\{)

lv8{iktlovo?)

(and hand)

(ist

hand)

(crovs)

() 9 {6). {^) '[^.
(),
2.
1.
.

{) () {) {) {) {)
()
\{) 9,
{6).
]
:

()

.
'

1.

SO in

1.

3•

Provided by Apollos, lead-worker, for Georgius, servant, for soldering the pipes of the bath in the suburb on Phaophi 20 of the 6th indiction, twelve pounds of lead and three pounds of tin, total 12 lbs. lead and 3 lbs. tin only. Total 12 lbs. lead and 3 lbs. tin only. The 249th which the 218th year, Phaophi 20, 6th indiction.'

=

(e)

TAXATION
Tax-Receipt.
16-3

9ie.

X

19-4 cm.

A. D.

198.

payments on account of a tax of which the name and the precise nature is still a matter of uncertainty. This impost is known from two other published texts, B. G. U. S7'^• 5 and to, and P. Tebt. 500, in both instances occurring along with the and other imposts on land. Wilcken {Ost. I. p. 174^) interprets it as meaning oyhor}. The present text shows that it was calculated upon the aroura, and the mention of the praefect's instructions concerning it suggests that it was a special levy rather than a regular tax. The sums paid are rather high, amounting to 640 drachmae within two months (11. ia-9), but it is not clear whether the individual Caracalla to whom the receipt is issued was the tax-collector or the tax-payer. appears as full emperor in Pauni of the 6th year (May 25-June 24 of A.D. 198)
for a series of
rjj

A receipt

is

abbreviated as

or

77+

cf.

810. introd.

" €5 €[9 ^ (^) '[
9

;

^€7[

270

5

[/]

15

2nd hand

() (^) () (^) . {) {€) {) 6{) {<). } , () () €{). / 2 () [) [][][] [)
Trj

[]9 [] .{9) {€) ^^) ^) ]€€)(^ [] [] \^\ [\ \6^ ^) 8['\, () [^) \\ {) (^) €{€).

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[

8

[]6()

Kf\(e)v-

6

.

L^

6

€€'[],

^
TTJ
1 7•

tj"*"

.

\'[][]€{)

"^

,

[

^/

.

1.

'?.
'

3-

of

/)» written through an .
of

and

first c

of

«

6,

\.

corr,

.
20.

1 1,

oy

of

corr.

of

corr.

The sixth year of Lucius Septimius SeA'erus Pius Pertinax Augustus Arabicus Adiabenicus Parthicus Maximus and of the emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Paid to Pasion and his associates, pubhc bankers of the Oxyrhynchite Augustus, Pauni. nome, on account of the tax of | (?) ordered to be paid upon the aroura in accordance with the edict of his excellency the praefect Aemilius Saturninus, by Tiberius Claudius Geminus also called Gaiion(?) two hundred drachmae, total 200 dr. Signed by me, Pasion, public
banker,'
9.
1

Records of other instalments

follow.
cf.

On

the praefecture of Aemilius Saturninus

899.

10, note.

1-2.
t

The name

occurs in P. Brit. Mus.

II.

258. 130-1, &c., and the repetition

of the
for

here was perhaps a clerical error. The initial letter is uncertain, and might be meant or possibly e, and e could also be read in place of a. In any case a second name seems here more likely than e. g. (for vnep) for though the interchange of 01 and V is common enough, to postulate it in a doubtful passage is not very satisfactory. There would too only just be room for the abbreviation of and ey in the lacuna.

[()

\\},

917.

TAXING-MEMORANDUM
Taxing-Memorandum.
5

271

917.

X

9-8 cm.

Late second or early third century.

A

memorandum

extracted from the day-book of a collector of money-taxes,

summarizing payments under various heads. Of the imposts mentioned two, The tax of | (1. 2) is not often the (1. 2) and (1. 3), are familiar. occurs in P. Brit. Mus. III. 1171. 72 met with in Roman times, but a apparently in P. Tebt. 343. 69, where we suplevied upon and a posed that it was connected with the Ptolemaic tax of ^ of the produce for upon vineyards and gardens, in spite of the fact that the is known to have been sometimes calculated in Roman times upon the acreage

'

of land.
latter is

That the
found
in

here too means the

653, where several of the taxes mentioned in 917 occur

-

is

very likely, especially as the
;

the

name

be a mere survival and not necessarily imply that the tax was actually ^ of the produce. The tax va( is known ) ) (1. 2) from 653, where we resolved the abbreviations doubtfully as
however,

(,
is

may

{)
factory,
is

on the whole more probable than and is more likely than

(€)
)
(1.

a somewhat tautologous expression more naturally be abbreviated

-{

)

hiov{

3),

we connect with

{ {)
;

{[). {) {) {) () () ^,
;

{ ()
impost,

but

is

unsatis-

though

or

however, would
abbreviated
it

).

The remaining
in

653, and regard

as levied

nominally for a libation to Dionysus cf. as a tax in P. Tebt. 347. 2. There may well be a connexion between this tax and the at Oxyrhynchus, which perhaps benefited by the proceeds cf. 908. 8-10, note.
; ;

Two
in

other similar

memoranda by the same

981-2.

One
dr. i

of these has only the beginnings of lines

complete, mentions besides k-napo{vpLov) a tax called

which 47

:^ () {€),
;

tax-collector are described

the other, which

is

for

ob. 2 chal. are paid,
II. 11 71. 73,

by
dr. are

itself
it, i

appears as an impost

in P. Brit.

entered for

400

dr. for

€() '() -{4)
for

Mus.

where 7^
in
1.

paid for

in P. Brit.

Mus.

III. 1157.

and 400 drachmae are it, 600 dr. in 1. 113, and

152.

The editors

suggest that the charges for

measuring areas, but remark that the amounts paid are high upon the areas measured, not on behalf of the measuring. That the impost yefojuerpias means land-tax, not a tax for measuring, was maintained by Wilcken (Osi. I. pp. 173-6), but the evidence subsequently discovered does not support that view cf. P. Tebt. I. p. 39. There is, howpossibly the impost was levied
;

were

ever,

somewhat

less

difficulty in referring

the term

than

an area measured, and we are disposed to regard the

^
to

272
as a tax

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
upon pigeon-houses levied according them called
9,

there was a tax upon
P. Tebt. 84.

note), but this

and the may have taken and 981 are written (982 is dated in the
reign of Septimius Severus than to that of

.

is

not

known
its

^
to
place.
?)

to their size.
(i.e.

In Ptolemaic times

| of the profits

;

of.

have survived into

Roman

times,

The

4th year, in which 917
refers to the

31'd year),

more probably

Marcus Aurelius, Elagabalus, or Severus

Alexander.

[()
y
5

€((€9)

{\)

{5) {]
,

€{) ()
{ppayjLcu)

{ ^)
kvvea
corr.

y^

(^)

(erouy)

/
:

(€).
€.

(^) {), {8^) {}) () (€) ^) () 6{) ,
<,

€€{9) S {)

.
Talao.

6\{) from

2.

.
at

the tax of

'From the day-book of Apion, ^ and freight by water for

collector of

money-taxes

the present 4th year 22 dr.

3 chalci, for a libation to Dionysus (?) 8 dr. 4 ob. i chal. 139 dr. 6 ob. Total one hundred and thirty-nine dr. 6 obols.
3.

For naubion and 109 dr. Total 139 dr. 50b. Paid The 4th year, Pauni 5.'

i

ob., for land-tax

is

-

confirmed by 653

first letter might possibly be e, but is a more suitable reading and cf introd. 4. The sum actually paid is i obol in excess of what was due ; similarly in 981 the exceeds the previous total by nearly 2 obols.

{8)

the
;

918.

Land-Survey.
Second century.

Height 21-2 cm.

verso of this long papyrus contains the text of the new Greek historian and a short description of the document on the recto was given in Part V, (842), This is a very elaborate survey-register of Crown land at a village in pp. iio-i. the south-west of the Arsinoite noma near Ibion Argaei, which is mentioned
e. g. in V. 17.

The

The

plots leased to separate cultivators are arranged in

numbers which they occur in the present list, beginning with the ist and ending, so for as the papyrus goes, with the 12th the other set of numbers refers to some more extensive register, of which the here
of varying sizes which have a double system of numbering.
refers to the order in

One
;

set of

^^ €5

918.

LAND-SURVEY
list

273

described formed a part.

In only two cases are the figures of the second set

preserved, the ist and 2nd a0payi6es of the present

corresponding to the

17th and

1

8th of the other

16 between the two sets must be distinguished the use
plots
;

and it is not unlikely that there was a difference of From these numbered of numbers throughout.
;

of the

term
is

cf.

ii.

The normal scheme
a particular
its

number on both systems,

<

16, note.

^

-^^^

in

918 to denote the individual
First

of the survey

as follows.

comes a description of

as a whole,

its

geographical relation to the preceding
the rents yielded by
it,

^,

its size,

and

its

adjacent areas.

Where

as the result of flooding or other cause in former years (ranging from the

1 3th of an unnamed emperor) the rents were no longer paid or had which had been reduced, or the land had changed its category (e. g. become pasture land), information is added on these points, there being several closes with The general account of each references to earlier surveys.

3rd to the

/^
name

the words &v

of the individual plots into which

{
is

)

(cf.

ii.

i^, note), referring to
it

the following description
entries

was subdivided.

These more detailed
first

give the geographical position ot each plot defined as in the later ones as
cultivator, the size

and the addition made Where the land was not paying to the rent as the result of a reassessment. the normal rent or had undergone changes, the details already summarized

^^
e. g.

),
(in

the

entry the arourae are
of the lessee or

the

and rent of the

plot, the adjacent areas,

in the general

account of the
in Col. xi.

are repeated in reference to the particular

cultivators,

The papyrus
the historical
prising Cols,

divided into four sections separated
Cols, xi-xxi,
is

by

gaps, and as the

writing on the recto and verso runs in opposite directions, D, the last section of

work containing
i-viii.
is

is

the

first

of the land-survey,
a different

com-

Col.

i,

which

much

mutilated,

is in

hand from

the rest, and

columns.

ends

{) '
starts,

apparently the concluding part of a summary of the succeeding vbaros (cf. Cols, ix-xv), and It is concerned chiefly with land iroaeia. In Col. ii vbaros [apovpai) x/z/ctj/i't '/3'^'.

'

begins the detailed the survey

list

of

^.

Lines i-3 indicate the point from which

and 11. $-y apparently define the position of certain arourae, The aaf in number, which stand in some obscure relationship to the ist occupies 11. 8-13, and the details concerning general description of that

the two sets of cultivators of the 93^ arourae comprised in In iii. 3 begins the general description of the 2nd

^

(v. 15-21) io| arourae, the details following in iii. ii-v. 14. The 3rd situated in a hollow which seems to have been formerly contained only 2 arourae

,?
it
fill

$.
ii.

i-iii.

2.

which contained

dry but was now flooded, and as no rent or cultivators were assigned to

it

only

274

^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
The account
it

the general description was required.
is

of the 4th
(8,

incomplete, but the
is

number
It

of the arourae in

including

5
^-^

(vi.

1-8)

aroura for

a canal)

preserved.
2,

was divided among three

sets of cultivators

who owned

respectively 4^q,

what
It

is

clearly

and i^f arourae. vi. 19-vii. i contains the description of the 5th though the number is for some reason omitted.

comprised 5 3^2 arourae, but only 4 3^^ are accounted for in vii. 2-1 1 so that either 5-3^2 is an error for 4-3*2 o^ an entry has been left out. vii. 13-18 gives the description of the 6th which contained s^Te arourae, and the details concerning the several plots followed in Col. viii, of which only a few letters from
,

5, ^,

the beginnings of lines are preserved, section

D breaking

off at this point.

the land in question, with the exception of that in the 2nd

had been The rents up to this point range with one exception from in good condition. 6i artabae per aroura down to 4||, this being the commonest rate cf. P. Brit. Mus. II. 267, where the rents of Crown land near Lake Moeris range from 7 to 2| artabae per aroura, 4|-3 art. being the most frequent. The exception occurs in the description of the 6th where the 303^ arourae pay at the rate of ',''^', i. e. 4-^q -^q or 49^6 art., a fraction which could not be
;

^,

So

far

{ ^)
it

,|
^^

,

expressed without departing from the ordinary series of fractions of the artaba h T2-i &c. In every instance an addition to the rents had been recently made
of amounts ranging from
-^^ to i artaba, and in one case (iii. 1-2) the rent had been twice raised. The case is different when we turn to the later columns of the survey on the recto of sections C, B, and A. These are chiefly concerned with land which had been flooded, and was therefore unproductive except where

had been reclaimed for pastures. A, containing the ends of lines of Col. xiii, which is incomplete, and Col. xv, of which the ends of lines are lost, deals with the nth and 12th but to which C (parts of 12 lines from Col. ix) and (containing a portion of Col. x. Col. xi, which is fairly well preserved, and a few letters from the beginnings of lines of Col. xii) refer is not indicated, and the relative order of these three sections would be quite doubtful apart from the text on the verso. If we are right in regarding A as the first section of the historical work (cf. Part V, pp. 114-5), it is the last of the survey, and C and must belong to the intervening between the 6th and nth; but it remains uncertain whether C comes between D and or between and cf. Part V, pp. 1 13-4. Col. ix, so far as can be judged from its scanty
Col. xiv,
;

^

A

;

remains, deals with land similar to that described in Col.
(cf. xi.

xi,

various

Nothing can be made of Col. x, but Col. xi. 1-9 gives 5) being mentioned. the conclusion of a general description of a new which had been flooded,

$,

^
Owing
to

the entries concerning the individual holdings following in

11.

10 sqq.

the loss of the beginning and the uncertainty of the construction of the various

918.
relative clauses

LAND-SURVEY
:

275

which are piled one upon another the details are not

various categories of land

'

vharos are distinguishable

()

in

any rate to be exacted, 3>v €(77). () in 11. 3 and 13 land of which the rent had been reduced and which subsequently had been converted into pasture land, (3) in 21 land kv eiroxfj, a category frequently mentioned also in Cols, xiii-xiv, and apparently implying land upon which the collection of the rents (in xi. 21 4 artabae to the aroura) had been suspended indefinitely cf. P. Tebt. ^^6. 13-5 and 337. 2, notes. Col. xii, as we have said, is represented only by a few letters, and Col. xiii, with which section begins, has only ends of lines. Both this column and Col. xiv give part of a detailed list of entries referring to what must be the nth since the account of begins at the top of Col. xv. the 1 2th Of the five entries in Col. xiii two are concerned with land L• ^/, two with land in another category, the arourae
rent continued for a time at
1.
;

[
1.

clear,

but

2 that

on which

^,

being called

€[),

a term which occurs in P. Tebt.
Tebt. 325
in

II.

325• 5
it

',

cf.

note

ad loc.

The

land had presumably been placed in this class because

flooded, but to judge
cultivated,

by
L•

P.

€{4)
is

had been

though at only a nominal

concerning lands placed
but

€}

rent.

Col. xiv contains five

the 8th year.

i| artabae to the aroura are mentioned (the latter b'eing exceptionally low,
cf.

p. 274),

if

our interpretation of

rents paid before the land went out of cultivation.

which occupies 11. 1-12. Lines 3-1 1 summarize in a manner similar to xi. 1-5 the changes which had taken place in the character of the land since the 4th year as the result of various but owing to the loss of the ends no connected sense is obtainable. The seems to have consisted largely of which had been converted into at different periods, and, since 3o|| arourae are mentioned in 1. 6, to have been more extensive than usual. Lines 13-21 give the first three entries concerning individual holdings. In one of these the land had become vbaros in the 12th year, but the remark is added (Irei) showing that it had been re[] claimed in the year in which the survey was written. Since no years later than the 1 2th are mentioned elsewhere in the papyrus, the iveard? hos is likely to have been very soon after the 12th, and may even be the 13th. The handwriting proves that the survey belongs to the second century, and most probably to the reign of Antoninus or Majrcus Aurelius. We print Cols. ii. i-iii. 16, v. 15-21, xi and xiii, which afford good specimens of the whole. The parts omitted mainly consist of repetitions of the same formulae or are too much damaged to be intelligible.
description of the lath

,

(

was capable of being more entries Rents at the rate of 4^ and

correct these represent only the
Col.

xv begins with a

€4€,

€{5)

:€{) €[]

'

[,

Two

other land-surveys of the

Roman
2

period exhibit a classification of land

276

339 and P. Bruxell. i (Mayence and de Ricci, P. Fay. 339 is a mere fragment, but the accounts of the nth and 12th are for the most part preserved the text of the entry concerning the lath is quoted in our publication, that of

by numbered Music Beige,

^,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
P. Fay.

1904, pp. loi sqq.).

the

nth

follows the

its size, rent,

cultivator,

than

in 918,

same formula. The geographical situation of each and surroundings are given but the areas are much smaller being only i and i-| arourae in the two cases, and the term
; ;

^

;

seems to be used to denote a plot of ground belonging to a single lessee rather than a group of such plots cf. ii. 16, note. On the other hand in the Brussels papyrus, which though reputed to come from Dimeh is on account of the proper names more likely to have been discovered at Hermopolis and to refer to land in the Hermopolite, not the Arsinoite, nome, the are much larger than those in 918, one of them containing over 635 arourae. as well as is included in them, and the land-tax upon the former is added to receipts from rents of the latter, whereas in 918 private land, though frequently mentioned among the ydroves, is not included in the survey. The Brussels survey, of which the extant portions cover the 6th to the loth is moreover on a much less elaborate scale than 918, and does not enter into any details concerning

, ^

/^

^€,

individual cultivators of

Crown

land.

Col.

ii.

2nd hand

[

[€] 6[ ]{) 7[ ]{) ' {)
[

]ovy

(9) ^^
kv
]
>

]

]

e|

[///

[

5

*\6\,
[^?
[a]

][5 \{) ^ ' '[]€9 (6\ () ]^{ {9) () )] [ {) {) \ ) {
6{).
y[i(Tov€s)]

{) ^^) ' [{)]
67
\

T^/f-

6{)

[

T^fjs

[

,]

[(9)
e[

{fjv)

o86(s).
)

€{)

]

.

iV€iX{
?)

6\'

{€) 6{)

,'
SlS'

()

-^'

(')

{)

()

[

^tV, /^

«'

7{€€).

a\vv8p(ps),

€{) ^€[]

{) {9)

[1

JJaTvvtos

918.

LAND-SURVEY

".{^)

(9) \6(€)
15

20

' ^ {)(€?) ( ) ' [^) [ ? / {) () ^, {) {)( ) ^. 6[) [) ^^ (/) () /€9 "() (€9) {) ( ?) ' () [) [) {), () '
€6)^(),

{)

277

{<)
?,

{)

[

)•

6()

[•••]• ^ys
€^

[.

.

.

.

()

€']^<^.

{9) {)
^6(€)

^),

(), {$)
"[(9)

)(€9
coi^

',

/() '
e^

.5'
ah

a(ya)

,

(')
kv

.', /^

(9)

/i(epoy)

{)
"(9)
5•

() () {€) €€5 ()
/oeouy,

(?).

€5 €() )(^[](€) ^^)
^^),
COrr.

{)
of
[.
.

iTaTWi[o(s)

of

5

) () ][() ) [) { {€6) {), [ ]{) {) {) { ) ()
[ 6{)
. .

\5 5 [].
{^€) L

{,
COrr.

^
[

6. Final

from .

Col.

iii.

] () (
L•.
]

'.

67

6{)

[

.],

{6)

' ()

''']

{9) €{) {9) ' [{) {)
{€€).

', ^/

278

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

" \{) /? Jovv [ €]€9, 9 ] ? [) {) , €[. () () {) [ [ 6{€) ]€9 [€•€9 [{) ( ,'' [{) [9
€{'
[€()]
.

(/9) v6t{ov)

{)
]

TcK[i^ayis

€]{€) €&

(rjv) 686(9),

/wu( )

Trjs

€^

€{€)

15

{ , {)
? {?)
1.

kiri

S)u
.

)•

B€Via[.

?

]

"/{)

{)

.

.

{) {
7

€{€)

more

)
Col. V.
lines.

[{) ]€{ €)[(), \ {),
]

{€?) 6{)

\[[$)

['{)
L•'

.

lines.

15

20

{) ?[) ^. ,, ? ? {)
6{?)
kv
rj

(), {) 9 ^) ' {), . {5) {) () () {€9) [) {€) ' () () /() '?
14

6{)

5

? ?

^? (?) {), {$) [) [?\
kv
21.
e

{

€^()
17.

'().

(^)

COVT.

[

] '

?

Col. xi.

[€(€)
S)v

{)]
[
.

''^er[.

''
(
")

[ '

]{?)

{),

.

.]€'

[€]6{)

€{),

[ۥ](6)

(eret)

918.

LAND-SURVEY

279
&u
U<p6{pta)

5 ^

' 8{) [{)] { [^{, uea9] {) ? [€{ ..^..) . ^ {,) 5> [ {) ^ ^' {) {) 6{)
{9)]
{dpovpai)
(€T€l)

7,{^)

^',

8

a{uh)

S8' ,

S>u

daiv

e/c

(eVet)

alycaXov] auap[.Tpn]a.cos

^

q[L\8

[
^'^

]

yiijov^i)

^{^)]
. .

^8{),
ijn{eLpos)
)

{^)
<)
^6{.)

8ca,pvi

^'

{,
^
tc
)'

(^.)

[,
^

.

.]y(
'

{,

€{)
8cS>{pvi)
S)V

kn[i]

? {) {^
{).
y proves)
•]/(

/3.(.,)

6(^) 6{) ^

[] ^6 [.]6{^.)
[r]fi,

[
^^^

[]
i&povpa.)

6{^)

{)
[.

\{) [^]9 ^[.]?"^) {^)
at

^{^)

{ ^^ ,
8{c^)
[]

[]{
. .

{)
['

t

[^]

,
kv

(

&
.

.1[

kK]

€[6{)] yevo{v)

{) {€) ' <{),
55(.), &.
alsftaXod

.
)'

^'

8 {hei)

[€6^(6
[yc(TOve,)

]' 8{
'^\

{{
(^T.i)

^l8'

/

6{)
,

[]{,
8ih,

]{) 8^ \ {9) [] 7{) {^) {) { ]\^^ {)
daay((oy6s),

{9) [ €][]{^) /€'[] 8{) []

[{] {)^{^^

•€$ [. {€).

-

...]•,

ye[py{v)

[yt{TOve,)]

6{)

20

[]

^6{€)

{) {9)
8],

kv

[p]a{ys),

[pa{y9). {' 'yo]p(e9 ^) [][9 '{€)

) [ {)
[8.

.

\

€(/)

28

" (
{)
.
i
[
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

{hovs)]

'
i6.

{
xiii.

ey
)]

.

yeft)[/)(y

[]{€)

{)

[

]•[•]•••
kv kno^fj

1.

(

of

[
1.

corr.

from
xiii.

The
and

fractions after

' have a horizontal stroke above them;

similarly in

lo and

[

ay letters 28
.

[

[ [\{)
{€T€i)

{ '
letters

Col.
.

]''i'' Sm
e]i/

a(ua

knoyji reray//(ei/ai)
y^yoivkvai).

{?)
]

35 letters

) ] 9 (),
yiijov^i)

(
,

'

5

[

23 letters 29 29 29
J}

]6(^)
]
]

{)
6{)

yL•'

{)

[

yL[TOV€s) v6t{ov)

[
[

»

„ „

[28
[

[
26
[

]
yi(Tov€s)]

]

{^)
v6t{ov)

\{)

(€/)
yfj

alyi{aXins),

24

]

28 letters
»
,,

[27
15

[,
[

26

], [) €
y]i(Toves)
letters]

]

{ha)

€{^) {)

(/3?) 20

23
[

letters
},

]•[•••
]

23

/^

() {€).
y(:yo{yevai).

''^'^'',
kv

&/
kiro\{fj)

[
[

.

(€€)

' ()
]

€y(7;^')
yt{Tov€s)

[9)
.
rjiT€ipos

€(€

\{)
)

2.

Probably not
:

\{),

for there

is

hardly

room

for a

proper name, even

if

an

was

the abbreviation 4. ) occurs frequently in this survey, always following the description of one of the yeiroves, but is nowhere written out. It is clearly different from ava which occurs in a corresponding position, e. g. in v. 18, and is, we think, contrasted with it, meaning ' beyond ' as opposed to between ' ; cf v. 17, where ) must mean that the boundary between the lands of Ibion and the village with which
'

& ()

likely to bear one.

({

6{

{.) '()

918.

LAND-SURVEY

281

yeir«p of the 3rd concerned lay beyond the canal which was the south abbreviated required sense, and would have been probably .(6.) would hardly give the G U. 571. 9-io. where In certain and ,.' {^ (or 5. or o) is practically )

18

is

^^.
.

%{ Wilcken
{tv)

,, 8{6 ^{ >,).
reads
^^^ .^^^
11.

6 /<{) (.5) (
is

{Spovpa) a
),

;,(.) .,

?,,

yi{rov.s)

{) 8{ .,, \,
propose eff (.)
opor,
.
.

AVe

described in

the total of the arourae ^j^^ ^f these figures, which seem to give as is found elsewhee uncertain, for they have a line above them such 3-7, numerals referring to of fractions, e.g. xi. 10, but not above in the papyrus above a series sqq. is very obscure, but regarded as The relationship of 11. 3-7 to 11. 1-2 and 8 arourae
fractions the figures are still more difficult, the restoration of the missing figure : 8

[

position of the entry at the beginning of the

(\ Zll
^^
(1.

^)
iar{c)
)

_

is

certain,

r.^^ the not only from ,,^
vi,

fj

^

is

perhaps

[{

list

(cf.

iii.

4) but from Col.

occurs in

connexion with the south

for eV .lX{v^vr,):

<

meaning

of the 4th '^fP-T^' to cover with slime is quoted by
is

..

where «

eV«\(w^'•"?) and ^.^\{^) are unsatisfactory, Hesychius. cf. iii. 5Upovpai), not with the preceding words ^ here and is more probable than 12.

to

be connected with

.
tion
ist,

)

.{)
to
TeKvavis
)

;

U

seems

be meant.

(V. 21),

was known

^) 8
?
,.'.,)

€(,.)

m
.

,

1.

24, since

w

.

neither this canal nor For &. [ro .ara< ) previously.
:

1 . n j that called

which is used e.g. perhaps stands for Cf. P. Tebt. 343. 5 and 88, where sense of kJ' Lpa.

«.(
'

.,

cf. iii.

m

a«o()

The abbrevia10 xi. 9. ^^e Anst. ^^^• 2. 1°• 7 "^ in a survey-list apparently

^^ ,
*
'
,

^, \
^
-

.,,.

(v.

nr 17), or

means nondescript 16. Ippa

',' unclassified.'

.pa{y

but the plot described in back to the plot described in corresponds to , Similarly in iii; 15 a,(«rov) f, '^--' and 19, where y«Vo.ei of the next plot described ; cf. also xi. 16 ^f^'l the This, the ordinary use of apay.,, which occurs holding. each case to the preceding holdings to express the separate SroughoSr918 in describing the y.Vov« of the individual numbers, use to denote the larger areas which had parcefs, must be distinguished from its

^{)
in the

adjoining the 2nd or any other ..,(...) refers 1. 21, where 18 sqq.; cf. 11. the ist 11. 14-7. both plots being comprised m

means not

{

the

.()^

.

j.

*i,„

..

.( () m

.^^

and contained

occurs in the description of a numbered irrdvco or not to an individual holding. to another numbered i{avova) cf. P. Tebt. 84. 91 and note, 18. For
iii.

{ ?,
several

.^8..

narrower sense.

Where

^^^•f/;, ;;!; ^.^ Uff' as a whole, it reters

In cf. P. Tebt. 86. 32. avh For the occurrence of an angular sign before wavy line. V. I it takes the shape of a is written out. cf. u. 8, where e ,. j r. .i, -.i, r^ is supplied by the arithmetic The missing figure of the arourae assessed at si artabae given in 111. 1 7-v. the 2nd details concerning I -1- 9i), and confirmed by the loi The rate at which the 9I arourae occur. i4!%h;ce two^mentions of | aroira at that rate &c. ^ ivf'rp assessed (4.^ artabae) is restored from 1. 13, entry m Col. iv. of the proper names are derived froin an
3.

():

=

^^

.

,

.

''"%TrThe Restorations
where
i

^\^«^ i"^P^°^^^^^^^^ aroura belonging to these three persons is described. which ought to be Graecono likelihood of a connexion between this name, but there is Egyptian, and Benjamin. a lacuna, this spelling is is for the most part lost in of V. 17. Though the which occurs in Col. vii. confirmed by

{) . .

.

..[».

282
21.

€{)
I.

is

since the canals called
xi.

Superfluous and should be omitted, or perhaps altered to are obviously identical. (1. ly) and

-

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

,
line

In the fractions of the aroura after

^

read, but the two following letters are irreconcilable with would not fill the lacuna. (/), but the sign for

perhaps

{[(),
The

sc. eV

punctuation of these lines is not clear, and to what figure hv in each case The land leased in the 3rd year' (1. 2) corresponds to that described in 11. 12-3, the 1 aroura in 1. 4 to that in 1. 18, and the 6| arourae in 1. 5 to the 6| arourae The i8f arourae in 1. 3 would be expected to correspond to the figure in 1. 13, in 1. 15. but the vestiges following [apovpaC) there suit , not t. since there is no before is probably , not the number of the 9. elsewhere. stroke above it such as occurs with the numbers of the II. clearly refers to the land described in 11. 12-7; the following word is and to read not [/5()] is unsatisfactory, for the individual holdings comdo not themselves have numbers; cf. ii. 16, note. prised in the numbered IMoreover after ..[..] is a horizontal line indicating , or merely a mark of abbreviation, elsewhere in the papyrus. but not occurring in the abbreviation of 21. It is not clear whether ey means 5^ (arourae) or is an abbreviated word. ^ is not a common fraction of the aroura, but occurs in Rev. Laws Ix. 23. It is not possible to read for f and connect the fractions with the preceding .
2-5.
refers is uncertain.
'

^

can be we should expect J^ ^; The following a may be for

.

At

the

end of the

[.

is

',

cf. xiii.

17.

{•)

^),
17

({()

?

?,

D19.

APVANCE OF DUES ON A FREIGHT.
i4'5XiO'3cm.
a. d.

182?

Memorandum of an advance of 160 drachmae to a ship's captain for customsdues to be paid at Memphis on a cargo of olives and honey. The 22nd year in which the document is dated probably refers to the reign of Commodus.

{€
KaWia
5

TlavvL

€ 6()

'[) 6{) ^)
(:[]€()
kXatai
c|

€(})

{ {) €
?)

Xapaniimvos;).

c/y

KXavSia

€{)
S>v

-

\6yo{v)
{BpayjiaC)

10

6()
4.

6[)

^{) [)
|.
.

^,

of ffJ{3.fv{<v) corr. from

919.
*

ADVANCE OF DUES ON A FREIGHT

283

Pauni 27, on account of the holding (?) of Julius Sarapion. Paid to Memphis upon his freight of 90 Prosopite measures of olives carried from the Arsinoite nome, and 7 jars and 20 boxes of honey for Claudia Isidora solely, 160 drachmae, of which he shall render an account. Let him render an account to Sarapion of 160 drachmae.'
year,
Calleas, pilot, for the taxes of
2.

The 22nd

\{)

is

where a Sarapion
Sarapion here. 3-4. The

not quite satisfactory, but is apparently mentioned

\{)) or

is

unlikely

owing

to

1.

11,

whom

it

is

natural to identify with the Julius
in

\ '!

are analogous to the duty called

Fayum

customs-receipts, e.g. P. Fay. 69, 72, &c. ; cf. P. Brit. Mus. III. 1107 and Preisigke's recent discussion of this tax in P. Strassb. i. p. 50. In P. Hibeh 1 10. 24, of the third century b. c, was paid at Memphis upon a freight of corn. only a small sum for
to be a measure deriving its name from the Prosopite Mus. III. 11 70. verso 79, &c.) from Oxyrhynchus. might also be read in agreement with (cf. e. g. 116. 1 1 {{;)), in which case the measure is not specified but apart from that small difficulty it is unlikely that olives from the Prosopite nome in the Delta would be taken to Memphis via the Fayum. The figure at the end of the line is doubtful; it is more like cj than t, but does not greatly resemble either. A figure of some kind however seems essential. 8. cf. P. Par. 10. 22 The word is supposed to be a diminutive of which according to Hesychius
5.

We

suppose

nome,

{8)

like

the

/)7(;) ^{,
Brit.

-

;

:,
(')
:

II.

the letters are

damaged but

..
=

fairly secure.

(/)

ACCOUNTS
Account of Food.
i3'9Xi3'8 cm.
Late second ok early third
century.

20.

A
them.

short

list
is

of various articles, largely comestibles, with the prices paid for

money account of which parts of two columns remain, the beginnings and ends of lines respectively being lost. The items in the second column are dated in Phamenoth and Pharmouthi of the a I St year of an emperor whom from the handwriting we should suppose to be Antoninus or Commodus the document on the verso, which is in a different
This
written on the verso of another
;

hand,

is

unlikely to be very

much

later.

€9 () {
5

a

?)

{) {8\) () [^)
{^)

(),
^•,

(),
,

{,

284
eXeaL

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

{) €{) []
is

6(/)

() , [^) (^) , {/09) {) () ()
",

[

(-^)

(^) [), () ,
,

[

.
SO in
1.

J'a.p.

3•

First

of

12.
cf.

8 8 €) , {)
1.
:

Anth. Pal.

ix.

503

yoxiv

iv

and

have been commonly rejected
Bapt. Pius, &c.,

elg

?( : , . ,8 , .
;

corn.

6.

1.

'.

8.

1,

^()
eivai

fv

6e'iav

jrf

"yeiOver

Toup,

Stadtmiiller), but are

now

confirmed by the papyrus.

(cf. Geop. Erasm., 44 gcnuina VOX nondum reperta is apparently another form
'

.

of

2.

{):
For

the fruit of the zizyphus or jujube-tree ; cf. e. g. Pliny, the abbreviation consists of a or perhaps
to the right of
is

above and somewhat
3.

Alexandrian
4.
is

name

a (new) diminutive o( of the fish
cf.

P. Strassb. 40. 48
is

not clear.
5.
:

the

word
or

ostrich, but ostriches can hardly have been purchased for 8 drachmae. Perhaps this was a part payment; cf. 1. 12, where 12 drachmae are paid as earnest money for In P. Leipzig 97. xxviii. 18 and 20, xxix. 19 and 2 1 occur entries of an artaba cf. Vi'/a MS. are probably sweetmeats, so called from their shape g. S. Simeonis Sali
8.

unknown. means an

\

., {). . .
:

. ^.

15. 14. § 47.

with a small f written
a,

it.

which, according to Athen. 309
, .

was an

e'^

euovs

.

;

what exactly

is

meant

\

;

921.

Inventory of Property.
34•3

4•4 cm.
;

Third century.

cf. 109, 741, P. Tebt. 406, P. Gen. on the verso of a lengthy third-century account, of which the beginnings of lines are lost throughout, mostly concerning measurements of buildings, &c., and mentioning different kinds of (or oi] and anXdi uriyJ^Hs) yjiQL•^ \1\ e. g. eirt ro] '. the form are not otherwise attested •7?7(€?) for Mention is made of occurs in Heron, De Mensuris, p. 314.

A

list

of various articles, chiefly of dress
list is

80, &c.

The

€6 7()

^
:

<^'

{)

^,

€9

|

-), ,

;

921.

INVENTORY OF PROPERTY

,.
is

^{€),
Th

an entVy concerning

^ 7€8
.

yov,vapUv

'.,

].^,

^,
.

285

and

-.

followed
.

by the signature

[^]

At Ae bottom
^apas

part of a date, and
-naph

.]

i^:eba.

epea

y,

i5

y, «,
«,
S,

^oU^ia

5

^ ^
XevKhv

XevKhv

«,

86 2
^

^ {) , ({) { ?.
,
kp^a KaXXk{ov)
«^

€{) ',
{^)
kv

^

Kaivhu

«,

,
,
y,

,
«,

{}>) ,

>

^'^^«^ ^'
7rvp{t]yL<TKco

, ,

25

«,

{).
8.

.()

12. stroke above it. inserted later: the final letter has a above the line. of 24. written through i6.

.

«

^^
.

1.

^

coverings i outer cloak, 3 woollen pillows belonging to Calleas, 1,•. shirts i i.ntl.. woollen ditto, belonging to Thaesis, ?1 dle'l smS face-cloth, x' face-cloth bathingstripes, 4 worn shirts, 3 shawls i shaded Torn X Lrcross-b;nd!2 cambrics with Cynopolite cambric, worn, an Aphrodite, 2 cups; Lg"?), Tthick cambHc,'2 worn pillows, pepper. and in the casket some spoons, some
'Articles

wraps, deposited with Arsinoe:-3 woollen

.

.

(

white veil, 2

LsleZe^ones

, ,
3.

4.

6.

.\\: .^X^a
.

.K.ava is

perhaps a geographical adjective; ^h; cf usually spelled
;

'^°Y'^°''7'''
IS

; possibly to be connected with ^°^^;^;;^^^ &C. , DUl mere scciiio ^^
.,,

^

^.?:
^ ^^
i2.
1.

first letter

may be

i.p. 124. 327• 7, C. F. cf the collateral forms other trace of the spelling with an

. G. U

.

as a nroper
^i

.^.....
iZapL•'.
cf.

name on

II:

the analogy of is a new compound, cf. C. p. R. I. 2X. 19

{!) m ..

..

occurs

m P.

[eV«}ip^cov

-n r-^« «« . Gen. 80. 4. and 27. 9 vraXX.oXovyXo.[o.

'"'^"—:
'''''

Arrian, Peripl

Mar. Ruhr.

p.

13/--

«>

explained to be

apparently novel; the word person going to the bath like carried by a

1rVavap.ov

is

?

may mean
in

a towel or perhaps a bag
29.

903.

286
24.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
seems
lo

be the word intended, though there

is

and

.

The

surface of the papyrus
is

was

faulty here,

and

this

something between the p may have disconcerted
i. p.

the writer. 26. nlnepas
TVtTifpoyapov.

apparently a form of nenf pis:

cf.

Alex. Trail,

67 mntpoyapov for

922.

Account of Horses.
31-1

X

21-7 cm.

Late sixth or early seventh
century.

This document contains particulars concerning a number of horses and other how they had been disposed of, changes effected by sale and purchase, and losses through decease. The use to which these animals were put is not stated, but (cf. 900. 6, note), some of them may well have been employed in the

,

or perhaps the

bos

5

(145. a).

The

^^

popularity of horse-racing at this

period seems to have led to the introduction of foreign breeds and variation of qualities; one of the horses here enumerated came from Constantinople (1. 15),

and several unknown technical terms or epithets occur. The sheet of papyrus is so made up that the recto of a strip added along one side coincides with the verso of the remainder, and on this surface, which is thus mostly verso, the account is written. On the back at a distance from each other are two semi-effaced and illegible lines in which we can discover no connexion with the main document.

+ Ta

8vo

",^^

"

18 eh
els

5

{) {) 6
{\ eov

{9) 6{)
6{)
eh
eSo&irj)

kSoSirj)

10

€ \

KevTivov

epaev
eavov

.. .. ^. .
{6).
eh
eS66(r])

eh

eh

3€€

(6).

e8aev

opaev

ev

Xeyo/xero;/ ilAejS

epaev
e^e

.

6evo{s).

15 TO

[{)] €[ ^ 7€[]€ {1)
T]fjS

VE

2

2nd hand
25

\

^ ? {) . { {) " {) ? ^. ^{)
932.

ACCOUNT OF HORSES

? ?.
€€
€/3'

287

€6{)

.

[]

€€{).

'

.

6{€)

24.

.

Pap.

voIrovPap. Pap.
stroke.
1.

inserted.
'

.
:

5. «P*"iVV«(o.) Pap. ; so in 1. 6. Pap.; SO in 11. 14, 1 6, and 20. the last 5 letters of ovpe«r?^r there is a horizontal i?• so in 11. 10, 13. Pap. 21 1. 20. 1. d..'^a.o.. 19. i-V^opovPap. and of in both cases corr. from , and final

-^^ Pap.

7.

«..(?). Above
;

so in

11.

2-6, 15.

8.

.

,

^.0.

26.

1.

(,
2 5.

. .

The horse from Ophis horses from Asclou were delivered to the groom. The horse of the magistrate was delivered to the same was horse from the The horse from Spania was delivered to the same stable. The stable The small white horse was delivered to stable. Arsinoite nome was delivered to the same for the bay horse of the upper stable I gave Patricius(?) and the small ... the ffioom. I sold the ... and the small horse which died. for I gave the white mare and the I sold the horse called Pleb for 3 so idi, the small black one which is in the stable. bought from Constantinople for 3 solidi, whi?h the revered Philoxenus has. I sold the horse from Heracleopolis and the ass which the revered Philoxenus has. I sold the two asses (?) of the magistrate The solidi, which were paid to the same. from Oureeiebt for 5f f.^ The mare which died belonged to dead. and that of the water-carrier and its mate are for 8| so idi, and another from Menas the official. Three asses were bought from Ophis Karaneots is dead. The other she-ass of the said Pallosis for 3 solidi. The she-ass of the small one I sold, and and that belonging to the people from Lucii and the

The two

delivered to the upper stable.

.

.

.

Karaneots

received 4 solidi for them.'
I.

a

-

on the analogy of
^^^^
^Q

"^^,

2navias (which occurred in 190), &c., should be

bg a proper name rather than a title. The paragraphus ends the sentence (cf. 1. i), so that Patricms does not refer after 1. 6 indicates that may Perhaps the name of a horse is meant; cf. 1. 13 and note, to the groom. The r might be read as . cf. the late form y.paWa. possibly mean' aged '; . cf. Hesych. For which is no easier. or
9.

P^a^^"^^^^^,;^^^^

-: .

,

«(.)

<).

^ :

.

288
II. KtvTivos is
13.

nected

wkh p/edei'us

late writers,

.
A
Sarapis,

in this context more probably signifies asses or mules than oxen (cf. P. Amh. 17, aSSeS In P. Amh. 150. 23-4 146. 3 in a contract concerning a are likely to be meant; cf. 140. 22 was not used of horses. According to Sophocles' Lex. a.nd are attested in docs not Seem to occur elsewhere, but 19.

^

^
(cf.
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
:

an unknown word.
cf.
1.

140.
7

in

and note)

).

). () {) €{)
22
?

Is

con-

was perhaps intended.
not likely to

(

6(

.
cf.
1.

24-5.

mean

natives of Karanis in the

Fayum, though

5

There may well have been a

village called

nearer to Oxyrhynchus.

(^)
923.

PRAYERS
20-1

Petition to a Pagan Deity.
X
8-4 cm.

Late second or early third
century.

petition addressed to the deity of

some Oxyrhynchite temple, perhaps

apparently with a view to prevent the departure of a certain person

and to cause him to sacrifice at the Oxyrhynchite Sarapeum instead but owing to the incompleteness of the first six lines, where the construction is uncertain, the precise object of the prayer is
to Alexandria for purposes of sacrifice,
;

obscure

;

cf.

1.

6,

note.

Similar petitions or questions addressed to Graeco-

Egyptian

deities are extant in P.

Fay. 137-8, B. G. U. 239-30, Wessely, Script,

Gr. Spec. no. 26, and P. Brit. Mus.

d
it is

The papyrus

is

broken at the top, but

{Archiv, IV. p. 559); cf. also 925. not certain that any lines are missing.

[

]

.

eya\[
.

[

]

.

.

.

[.]c

.

.

[....].
5
[

]€
. .

[.

.]

(
-

^€ 9
[.
e/y
.

.

.

[.

.

€,
10

eh

/-^
dyvoiav

€7€

923.

PETITION TO A PAGAN DEITY
erepov

^.
kv

, ,

289

kv

-^]]
[

. Perhaps fy\<. Line i
Kvpioi

or

T.

)
The
Unless

15 86s.

•\,

for which cf. e.g. P. Fay, 137 beginning ^eSt here may be the beginning of the petition, but (cf. P. Fay. 138. i is unsuitable ; the traces of the letter before the supposed t rather suggest

/^ \
r,

^()()

2.

letter before ae
is

3. 4.

Possibly

[].
[(\,

may be t, v, or v. nominative, the following

letter

must be

which

is

possible.

5. ]i€cs seems to be the termination of a future verb, though this does not yield a satisfactory construction, or can be read in place of «. 6. Possibly in which case in 1. 12 is the object, not the subject, of But it seems hardly likely that the petition should be merely concerned with the place where a calf was to be sacrificed, and the question whether a person was to make a journey was frequently asked of an oracle; cf. P. Fay. 137-8 and P. Tebt. 284. 2 sqq., and for a Christian parallel 925. We prefer therefore to suppose that .]v is a personal [.
i^

(

.

.

.

name

or description.
KareviyKai
;

8.

lesS

probably

KaTtveyKT).

924.

Gnostic Charm.
9

X

7-6

cm.

Fourth century.

charm for warding off fever, similar to B. G. U. 956 (edited with a commentary by Wilcken in Archiv, I. pp. 430-7) and P. Tebt. 275, but Christian instead of pagan cf. B. G. U. 954-5. The Deity is not addressed under any
;

A

particular

name
shown

at the beginning, but the essentially Gnostic character of the at the

charm
title

is

Abrasax, a

common
'JT

•]

[

^ 9 9 Gnostic

end by the mystical symbols and the occurrence of the

name

of the

Supreme Being.

'Apias

5

.9
€9

|()

/} €[
€[€]9
[7r]/oa[|-

290

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

{€)

\}
15

€€[.
{()

^

, 5
]

-

{)
V

oy

——

{)
>

On

the verso

'{).
.

.

.

:
'

2.

1.

.

.

.

^. (€ .
of
1 6.
1.

from

.

3~4•

1•

'"^

wKTfpivrjs.

ayiov.

Verily guard and protect Aria from ague by day and quotidian ague and ague by All this thou wilt graciously do in accordance with thy night and slight fever and ... will first and with her faith, since she is a servant of the living God, and in order that thy

name may be
1. 2.

glorified for ever.'
cf.

:

. G. U.
is

229. 3 and 230. 3 Contrasted with pvarepivos
is


(1.

{st'c).

4),

with
in

e. g.

;

cf.

p. Tebt. 275. 21, &c. 6. Above the r of Xetttov

what looks
nai

like

The

line

cannot have proceeded
(e. g. in

€\,

a

, but
for

in contracts relating to the purchase of slaves,
ifpai

any case seems to be superfluous. is coupled with Upa though who are guaranteed to be
will

95. 19), the term does not signify a disease, as

shortly be demonstrated

by

Prof. Kubler.

lines correctly,

very doubtful, for the writer elsewhere divides words between two while of the supposed might be t, , or only the slightest vestige remains. OCCUrs 10— II. Cf. B.G.U. 954• 8 Daniel (Theodot.) 6. 20, The use of .the vowels is very are written larger than the rest. 15-7• "^ and common in magical formulae, but it is curious that here they are six, not seven in number, € being omitted, unless indeed it was written to the left of or , where the edge of the papyrus is damaged.
7-8. [7][^]|"
is

and the supposed

,

',

8\

(

925.

CHRISTIAN PRAYER
Christian Prayer.
5.6

291

925.

X 9-6 cm.

Fifth or sixth century.

oracle of This prayer is a Christian counterpart of the pagan petitions to the asks whether it was the divine will that he which 923 is a specimen. The writer attend him. Preshould make a certain journey and whether success would church, just as the similar pagan sumably this prayer was to be deposited in some It is written in documents were left in the temples cf. P. Fay. 137. introd.
;

a clear cursive of the fifth or sixth century.

+'0
6

\9 89 7{) {) () {) {)
^(€0)9

6

6

?

{){)9

ety

{)
'

.

]

^^
^.

yivoiTO,

our Lord and Saviour almighty, holy, true, and merciful. Creator, Father of that^ I go to Chiout, and reveal to me thy truth, whether it be thy will Amen. it whether I shall find thee aiding me and gracious. So be ;

God

Jesus Christ,

rt^
the letters.

is

the

commontymbol

for

,

equivalents of gg being the sum of the numerical

(k)

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
92.
Invitation to Dinner.
2.9x4-9 cm.
Third century.

of the formal This and the following papyrus (927) are further examples examples from published invitations to feasts of which we have previously which 524, 747) and the Fayum (P. Fay. 132), but Oxyrhynchus (110-1, The occasion collections. curiously enough have not yet appeared in other
of the of the person in whose party in the present case was the his admission to the privileged class who i. e. name the invitation was issued, Cbcy. II. pp. 217 sqq. were wholly or in part exempt from the poll-tax cf. P. about 13 years, since on reaching was The normal age of candidates for

(
;

^^
U
2

292

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
;

14 they became liable to the tax the formality thus heralded the attainment of puberty and the entry upon the duties of a citizen. This invitation is peculiar in having upon the back what seems to be an address, which former instances have
lacked
;

the address, however,
it is

is

in

a different

hand and doubtfully deciphered,

and possibly

not really connected with the note on the recto.

KaXei
eis
kiri-

iv

rrj

-

5 eoTif

On

the verso

2nd hand

^ .

6.
1.

(]0

a>p{as) \.\

(?).

'

Heratheon

invites

you

to dine with him,

on the occasion of
through which a

his examination, at his

honse to-morrow, the 5th,
5.

at the 9th hour.'
/j

The

abbreviation of &pas consists of an

is

drawn.

927.

Invitation to a Wedding.
3-2

X

6-2

cm.

Third century.
feast in celebration

A

formal invitation to a wedding,
is

by which no doubt a
926. introd., and
111,

and P. Fay. 13a, which are also invitations to wedding feasts. The writing is on the verso of a strip cut from two documents which have been gummed together one of these apparently mentioned the emperor Alexander Severus, so that the invitation may be referred to the middle or latter part of the third century.
to

of the wedding

be understood

;

cf.

747,

;

"
.

U9
eoTiv
(upas

.
*

1.

(.
to a

2-3•

1.

iarip: cf. e. g.

2. 4-5.

Eros

invites

you

wedding to-morrow the 29th

at the

9th hour.'

928.

LETTER OF LUCIUS
Letter of Lucius.
10-2

293

928.

X

7-3

cm.

Second or

third century.

In
*

this kindly letter written
',

by Lucius

to Apolinarius,
girl
is

brother

the latter
is

is

warned of a plot against a

who is addressed as who had lost her pro-

tector,

and

asked to befriend her.

The

writing

across the fibres of the

papyrus.

^\9
TdtSi

5 ineSpevovTe?, Si

}^ 7]9
iav
^[s]

V€p6v

^, • ^
yaipeLv.

root

TJ}

0€

(

kav

8->

-

'^\\.

4•

1•

Qai^i'

else.

14.

. ^
15

(

. • /( 6[]€.
ae

^.
Pap.

On

the verso

5•

1•

e0«ip«vowef.

7.

g.

of

\\Titten

over Something

Pap.

' Lucius to Apolinarius his brother, greeting. Since now that Zopyrus is dead there are persons making designs upon Thais daughter of Amphithales, and you once had a conversation with me on this subject, I therefore inform you, in order that if you think fit you may act before she is entrapped for the son (?) of Sebastinus has no mother either. If you are making pickled fish for yourself send me a jar too. Greet the children from me
;

and

Isidorion.

I

pray for your health.

(Addressed)

To

Apolinarius.'

use of the article with the proper names in II. 3-4 is imusual, but neither 3. nor TJ} can be read for 1^ Tattt. though the sentence then seems irrelevant. 9. It is difficult to avoid reading 6 before Without 6, the subject of is Thais.

{}^

The

,

294

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
929.

Letter OF Nicanor.
34.5

X 9•8 cm.

Late second or third century.
clothing,

which the on the verso of the papyrus, the recto containing the latter parts of lines of a column of early second-century accounts, of which the upper portion has been erased to receive Three sections remain, each following the same the address of the letter.

The

subject of this letter

is

the loss of

writer wished his correspondent to assist

some articles of him in recovering.

It is

formula,

e. g.

(the last) (i)

'

^,
No.

{€.
3,
1.

^

:\ ^ (a)

(4)

]

(^,/ T^h (5) ] (6) The preceding sections are similarly headed
]

aju,e(

]

{) 6 (^) ,
(3)

]wf(
]

)

""

respectively, with
3,

and

{)

(

/

and

{)
('?)
;

]y v-nep e

followed by different figures in the next line
)

there

is

a y before

and

(

in

)

for

/3(

)

;

appears

in the

same

position in both cases.

The
of

verso had already been once used, and has been cleaned to

make way

for Nicanor's epistle.

Commodus

(a. d. 180),

^

The

document began with a date of the 21st year but beyond this only a few isolated letters are legible.
original
yfj

5

€€9.


IV

10 kv

,
\

? ?
On
25
3.
1.

[] €-

y^aipciv.

15''"?'

'8,
XevKfj^

2

€ ^, ,
e^ S>v

^ € .
knl
'4^,

e/y

irpoKei-

Sio

epia,

^ € , (. €


]9,
1 2.
1.

d

epeis

kv

cvrji

kpay
the recto

•()
5.
1.

2nd hand
2.

7r{apa) NeiKavopof.

xaipeiPap.
11.

[-».

.

above

13-4•

, \
tis
. . .

929.
'

LETTER OF NICANOR

295

Nicanor to Ninnarus his brother, greeting. Knowing your goodness to all, I ask you do me this one service. Please demand from Tithois the sailor a garment consisting of a brown tunic, inside which was a linen cloth, a worn towel, and some wool. All these were inside the brown tunic, and it was sealed with white clay, and with it send back to me all the other garments, making the total number six, to the Oxyrhynchite nome whence

now

to

I

obtained

all

the aforesaid articles.

some one

else's possession.

(Addressed)

To
:

I write therefore to you, brother, to see if they are in I pray for your health. Please tell me at once about this. Ninnarus steward of Apion, strategus (?), from Nicanor.'

5. €v TovTo

or perhaps iv

(), but there

in this letter.
8.

for

fv8a
seems

is

9. eV

to

apparently novel. 'nut-brown'; be for
is

12.

ۥ.

Kvavofibovs. this

,
15

is

no other case of the confusion of

and

cf.

Theophr. de Sensu 78
use of
in
1.

317. 19—20
i*j.

more

regular.
19. e^

!,
'
S)V

form
.
.

€[]/

.

.

the converse of the

continuing the construction of

25.

()
930.

makes a bad concord with
is

very doubtful.

: .
common
X
9'2 cm.

(or

jj,

e.g. P. Tebt.

7,

would have been

Letter to Ptolemaeus from

his

Mother.
third century.
,

just left him,

mother to her son, whose teacher and who was now in the charge of his with evident anxiety urges him to find another teacher.
interesting letter from a

An

() 05.
The
iXiytv
Se

Second or

had

writer

[

[]€
[a\u

]^ f'V

o'f*''

A'*'*

15

)(

S)v

e-

€)?.

Oev
5
rfjs

?
kiriyvov'

eirev-

. 78^€,,

20

•€.

<

-

,

Aioyivovs KaraTreirXevK€vai


8'

yap

Si

.

€ []

.€
at

-

7€

-

25

\

.

^^ €9

296
nepl

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Trj9

?

kmyvSivaL

avayeiva)-

^.ySv

In the left-hand margin
]
. .

.

e^^[.

.]...[...]

'

[.]

On

the verso
30
]

4•
*

1.

,

.
It

... do not hesitate to write to

me

about anything which you require.

grieved

me

to learn from the daughter of our teacher Diogenes that he had sailed, for I had no anxiety about him, knowing that he intended to look after you to the best of his ability. I took

care to send and ask about your health and learn what you are reading ; he said that it was the sixth book and testified at length concerning your attendant. So my son, I urge both you and your attendant to take care that you go to a suitable teacher. Many salutations are sent to you by your sisters and Theonis' children, whom the evil eye shall not harm,

and by

all

our friends by name.

Salute your esteemed attendant

Eros

.

.

.

(Addressed)

.

.

to her son Ptolemaeus.'
3.

ivTevdfv,
is

'therefore',

more probably

whether meaning 'forthwith' (e.g. P. Tebt. 378. 11 ivTevdev be or to be connected with than with the preceding
is

sentence.
15.

information,
figures;
cf.

rather than the seventh book, the
23.

805,
not

notes on 852. Fr. 25, and 853. iii. 3-5. cf. e.g. P. Fay. 126. 10 TO 2 8. There is a blank space after which indicates that this is the name of the not the imperative of to be constructed with what follows in the margin. 29. If the letters «pp are right they no doubt belong to but the or succeeding vestiges present difficulties. The letter next after the lacuna may be or a, but neither nor suits, the plural is unlikely, and there is

:
ro

The

subject of TKfyev

the

no doubt

refers to

Homer, and is therefore likely to denote the sixth Homeric books being commonly numbered by letters not

]
",

)

his daughter could hardly

have given

this

.

[]5
for

room

^^^.
931.

6[]^()

([)

€{)

,

Letter of Theopompus to a Strategus.
22-9XiO'2cm.
Second century.

Chicago.

A
that in

respectful letter to a strategus of the

note) from a friend,
1.

8 the praefect

was written before the
of the formula
noticeable
;

cf.

237.

( ,
is

upper Sebennyte nome (cf. 1. 15, accompanying the present of an ounce of purple. The fact
called

not

indicates that the letter

close of the second century,
. .

.

which

is

and the early occurrence is here combined with

(,
1.

vi.

^^, note.

The papyrus was briefly

described in Part

163.

931.

LETTER OF THEOPOMPUS TO A STRATEGUS
€070/705

297

7[(\ €.
8

rm

m

^
,

^. eh

€, 9,^]
yap

eVe/i-

[]
So-

^
,
KvpiXXr]
i€.

.

€,

€{).

On
15

the verso

8.

^ . €
{)
above the
line.

6.

1.

^.
As you ;;;^«^'
J;^^^^^^^^
is

«Theopompus

to his

most esteemed Sarapion greeting.

Cyri'la

the upper (Addressed) To Sarapion. strategus of Phaophi 15. from his friend Theopompus. toparchy of the Sebennyte nome,

'^GoodV•

8.

The

to be a youthful daughter ^th the preceding that 11. 8-9 are dosely connected

ArMv, IV the ^. v-ho receives presents than of Sarapion, espeaally as53?) yap of the praefect
at
(of.

.

p^

"-™ IMy
1.

in

8 suggests

^^^^^^^^^

^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^
the three ..p.«.

iurisdi?;io7ZnhfS;:itrn:rha7tt ^trXi^or

That the

S^r^hTu-r^anrhr=,^^^^^^^^^^ &ogr.
rtpSve Aw«X»,
was already known from
Ptol.

,v. 5.

=1 and .3-

298

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
932.

Letter of Thais.
9•6

X 12 cm.

Late second century.
instructions

A letter from a woman to a relative or friend, giving him various
about the payment of dues and
transparent.

other matters relating to agriculture.

The

sen-

tences are loosely constructed and the

meaning

in

consequence not always

€ ?
)
ro

8 ^.
\\.
€].
epi

^
e|

•?
kv
rfj

h

yoaph

^. .
,
' Pap.
;

' ^ .
Sh

-

-

)(-

kav

{\)

^.
7•

.
Pap.
*

.

.

.

Pap.

2.

9•

'^

^•

so in

11.

3, 7> 3•^^ 8.

*"

^•

^•

""^

the measuring.

own Tigrius, greeting. I wrote to Apolinarius to come to Petne for Apolinarius will tell you how the deposits and public dues stand the name will be that which he will tell you himself. If you come, take out six artabae of vegetableseed, sealing it in the sacks in order that they may be ready, and if you can go up to find out the ass, do so. Sarapodora and Sabinus salute you. Do not sell the young pigs without me. Good-bye.
Thais
to her
:

It appears from 88. 4 and elsewhere that is indeclinable. Apparently 4-5. The construction and punctuation of these two lines are not clear. a verb is to be understood with and ... is the predicate of After the of above a hole in the papyrus there is a mark which might be taken for the top of a «r, but to suppose that was written e. g. for {fl)s does not seem likely, and the mark in question is more probably accidental, or denotes a pause. The * name was presumably that of the person to whom the measuring specially related.

3.

,

.
'

933.

LETTER OF DIOGENES
Letter of Diogenes.
Width
9• 2

299

933.

A
a

letter to

Apolinarius, a

little girl

to the care of his correspondent.

Xaipois, Kvpii

6

9 [][]^? \\
Aioyivovs

,.
[][ ]
about 3

who probably was

Apolinarius' daughter and had been

^
2
Sk

cm.

Late second century,
friend,

from a

chiefly concerning

commended

[(] yei-

€ ^ ^ina-

.

[9 €]9
]/[.
.

ne[pl

][9
.

,
Tfj
et

ydvou

[.

.

.

€7[]/,
«5

lines lost

\^ €
[

15

In the left-hand margin

3

who

good Apolinarius, from your friend Diogenes. Having met with a man you I greet you most kindly, praying to all the gods for your preservation. With regard to the little girl, I was there until she sailed, I came to the great festival. and everything was provided for her so that when you come back you will bear me witness. Have no more anxiety about your household than you would if you were present. I sent Salute the letter to the little girl and made the night-strategus sleep on guard at the house. my friend Plutogenes. I pray for your health, sir. If it is no trouble to you inquire of
*

Greeting,

' ? , . .
?
Trjs

.
.

€-

ky^va-

\\

-[] ,
[]()
y6pa€v
Pap.

^-

?

Itkav\T'\oykvr]V

({), €.

.

[^]

€ ^e

6\.
/3
. .

On

the verso

{) Aoyevos
1.

(
2^.

)

1

8.

(<\\]'

my

is

going

to

300

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
if

Antinous whether he bought the cloak for your child, and legate, from Diogenes, linen-merchant.' To Apolinarius,
.
.

not,

buy

it.

(Addressed)

.

I.

For

the
I.

optative

in

place

of

the

more

usual

infinitive

cf.

e.g.

52.

i,

P. Tebt. 417.
8.

The size of the gap below this line is estimated by the apparent length of the lacunae 29-30, which are written along the left-hand margin. occurs e. g. in Pausan. 2. 11. 5 13. The late aorist is avrfj is to be understood with iyeva^qv, and 14-5. Apparently sollicitous,' has been but possibly an adjective meaning careful ', for accidentally omitted after occur at Hermopolis, e.g. P. Leipzig 39. 3, 40. iii. 16 (late fourth 24. century) and were probably established in other large provincial towns of Egypt, as they were cf. the wKTfpivbs in those of Asia Minor (Hirschfeld, Sitzungsber. Berl.Akad. 1891, p. 868) of Alexandria. Their existence at Oxyrhynchus, however, cannot be inferred
in
11.

'
:

.

;

:.

'

'

}

;

from the present passage, since
is

described as a the

munus

The oflSce it is uncertain where the letter was written. personale in Dig. 50. 4. 18. 12. It is somewhat surprising to find himself mounting guard over a particular house, especially as it seems

from 1. 33 that the writer Diogenes was a person in a private station ; his correspondent, however, was a man of some importance. the transposition of and is common in this word ; cf. P. Fay. 347, 30. 2 Ep. Tim. 4. 13 are close to the name while 31. The letters /3 ), which is written smaller, is separated by a wide space both from j3ou[A(evr.v)] and iToktas) is a possible reading, but too doubtful to insert in the text. For cf. 33. iii. 'AXe^avbpemv, B. G. U. 932. 2 II an error for

}^ :
is

(\.
.

.

unlikely.
cf.

33.

C.

I.

G.

3582.

2

as a proper

name, but the word

is,

^ ^ ] ^: .
. .

, ([
[6]

-!. {

^{(

I

we

think,

more probably a

title

Boeckh regards both there and

in our papyrus.

934.

Letter of Aurelius Stephanus.
14

X

i4'3 cm.

Third century.

A

letter

matters.

5

?? .€ ? ^
8€
k^iovTOi

concerning purchases of yokes and manure, and other domestic

€? 'AXe^avSpLav

^? ^, (
€v

e/y

Xfj

?

?€ € ^
et?

{)(9) ,

?

Trj

-

934.

LETTER OF AURELI US STEPHANUS

(?) .

. ^'
)^
«?

5

( ..
.

8€9

€€

^^ €^ (?) {^) ? () . -

301

€ {.).

-

On

()
5•

the verso

{) \{)
Second
of

.
;

.
.
As
I

from

'

Aurelius Stephanus to Aurelius Chaeremon, his brother, greeting.

was

setting

forth for Alexandria I paid to the rope- weaver Petobastis in the presence of Heracleus as

the price of yokes 60 drachmae, and as the price of manure at Chusis in the presence of Kopreus 40 drachmae, and to Kale for Kopreus the 48 drachmae which I had with me. Do not fail therefore to throw the manure on the land. I agreed to pay 100 drachmae for you will therefore give him the remaining 25 artabae, in the presence of Kopreus Do not fail to go there, both to help my wife until I return, and for the 12 drachmae. Salute all our friends. sake of the irrigation. I found Aethiopas and it is well with him. I pray for your health. (Addressed) To Aurelius Chaeremon from Aurelius Stephanus.'
5.
:

oxen which drew

it?)

apparently in connexion with a water-wheel (the yokes of the occur in P. Flor. 16. 26.

eV 'in a heap,' referring to <]. (V Xvatt: for the village of this name cf. 899. 6. in the present case consisted of sifted nitrous the KOnpos is less likely, even if the earth {sebakh), which Wilcken {Archiv, II. pp. 308-12) supposes to have been used in cf. G. U. 839. i. Roman times, as now, for purposes of fertilization. For the name or e. g. 10. An infinitive is omitted after 12. For in the sense of going to a place cf. 930. 20-1

,
A
various

937.

rfj

, ,
3•5

«,

and

. G. U.

824. 14

. .]
.

935.

Letter of Serenus.
8-8 cm.

Third century.

letter

from a

man

to his brother, chiefly concerned with the health of

members of the
tviro

family.
list

On

the recto, perhaps in the same hand, are-

remains of

columns of a

of persons,

being either in the nominative or dative case, followed in

by amounts

in artabae.

One

entry

is

€ {) {
many
of

them women, the names some instances at any rate

{)

[,

302
another

"

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[,

while towards the end of Col.
gen.) also occur.

6{$)
names

[€] {,
and

with a note below the next entry

{)
iiiv

ii

is

the heading
(hovs)

The document appears

(
eiJ^[€-

[;]7()
'
.[.

The
to be

a taxing-list of some kind.

5

. , 6€ ,?
enl

from
a.

[^^]

[]
20
6)9

[

lO

[] []
€€[

[]€,

[€
aei

[1

Seavovv
25

^^
n[e]pi

? , €

[]9

'

€[^ €€
pais
?)
.

ray iv Tais

{•

^ ^.

line.

6[]'€?

15

^[5 \'^ ( []5
\\^
t\tj
.

\\.

vyia\y
5[e

navfas

[] €9.
*I[ep]aKiaiva

[]
of

[][6,

[
ig.
I.

[]{)
30
TravoiKU.

(^)
24.

17.

above the

line.

,

21.

above the

of

Btavovv corr.
'

Serenus to Diogenes his brother, greeting. With the assistance of heaven our sister has taken a turn for the better, and our brother Harpocration is safe and well for our ancestral gods continually assist us, granting us health and safety. I intended to come up myself on the [.'^th, since Sarapion's friends said that he was ill. I write to you therefore to ask you to write to me at once (?) about him by any messenger you may have. The transport of the bundles will be performed immediately by my father he has already taken away those in the i[ ] arourae. Many salutations to my sweetest brother Harpocration, Theanous, Theon, Diogenes, and Heliodorus. Many salutations to you all from Hieraciaena and her daughter Tsenesis. I pray for the health of you and all the household.'
;
:

.

cf. P. Tebt. 414. 10 eav St. John 4. 52 cf e.g. P. Amh. 150. 25 iv ayyaXais {sic), P. Flor. and an Oxyrhynchus ostracon published in Arch. Report, 1904-5, p. 16

5•

19.

:
the

:

,
. .

.

.

(. ^
1 7.

I3,

^

21.

At

end of the

line figures apparently follow the

symbol

for apovpai.

936.

LETTER OF PAUSANIAS
936.

303

Letter of Pausanias.
6•7 X
14-9 cm.

Third century.
it

This
is

letter

is

noticeable for several unusual words which

contains.

It
left,

that to the written in a fairly regular sloping uncial hand in two columns, The writer the ends of lines remain, following that to the right. of which only but anticipated that he would not finish his letter in a single column,

apparently

leaving a broad margin curiously began on the right-hand side of the sheet, The writing of the left column, which was no doubt in front of his first column. graphical peculiarity considerably narrower than the other, is of a reduced size. as well as above the figures in 11. 6, 11, &c. is a horizontal dash placed below

5

?^

^.
kXaiov

.^

A

Col.

i.

J

'

^.
<

Svs

15

€€
e|

^ .
Trj

. )

ivpov.

2

^^ ' () ^ ^ €

,\

Xeyet

304

25

[\ ? . [\ €€?
]

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
tveiyyov
Svo

{} .
ypa-

e^ovTU

-

]9
€/6

,.
[

]
]
.

]€

3
]

] ^ 8.
]y
.

]

\
-

45

[

yap
k\6uv

ei

35

^ -8]
]

] €€ \
]
.

7€kv ey-

[
5

\ ]
] ]

]

iVTTiVKOl

8'

irev-

II.

€]6 €

eif-

KOVS

]

epeov

[.

][]9
]

40

]
.
Pap.
COrr.
2.

top
Pap.
(?).

8.
1.

of
has.
*

from

19.

corr.

from .

'
3•

vyiaimPap.

2.

Pap. soinl. 14• 6. 12. of /xeXmi/a COrr. from . Pap. corr. of
;

;
. .
.

Pausanias to his father Julius Alexander, greeting. Before all else I pray for your Receive health, and I perform the act of worship on your behalf to the gods of the country. from Syrus a basket of 80 eggs and a jug with 3 choinices of mustard and half a chous of raphanus oil and a jug with half a chous of honey and the dagger. Frorn Agathemerus receive a honeycomb and a pot of 10 cakes and 3 honey-sweet garlands; give these to my Receive from the bearer of the letter a basket containing sister and salute her warmly. The cobbler says 40 eggs (?) and a Canopic basket with 4 pairs of loaves and 6 pairs of *' The that he will not give up either the money or the cloak without Justus, for he says I went to cloak has not yet been redeemed, and I have entirely failed to find Philoxenus ". the mother of Ammonius, and she says " I have no food now, and the petitions have not five years old, and Bring me two hides, a wrap, and a small crate yet been got ready ". some (?) shoes. Send me now an open-work covering (?) having a
or a bird-cage; cf. the Hebrew to be a form of occurs in P. Tebt. 413. 14, where it was mistakenly regarded as a form of Both here and in 1. 15 For after at the end of the line cf. 11. 8 and 15. if that were the word meant, should of not , and the second letter is apparently
6.

keliiv.

.

kKoviop

seems

,

.

.

.

.'

.

.

,

936.

LETTER OF PAUSANIAS

305

course be followed by a dative ; in 1. 8 the reading is doubtful on account of a correction and the imperfect state of the papyrus. II. has been altered to the having been converted to an a, but the stroke representing the final being left untouched. This is more likely than that (\(\)1Ti{o)v a should be read, for numerals in this letter have a stroke below as well as above, and
the original
16.
is

,
'
i^
is

,
is
'

more unaccountable
is
ei

known

;

the doubtful

20.

=
:

24• ai\iipo\ov

in altering to

()\{/)
is

perhaps
a single stroke
25.
articles
;

*(),3, which we were therefore wrong on the analogy of 741. 13-4. The end of this line is puzzling a separate word The final letter is possibly e. g. v, but only
cf.

,
may
be
;

if a figure was intended. presumably a compound of and
17,

but this
'

entirely

p. Tebt. 4x3. 10

=

visible

For

irevTafTias cf.

but the meaning

26.

The
Not

adjective
ajrepeoC.
:

39. 42.
48.

]/

or

Perhaps

, .
is

s is

unlikely.

.

{)

not less difficult. ; cf 893. 6 okov TO

, ,

but no such word

is

;

P. Fay.

347 Terparias, which occurs in a list of miscellaneous obscure in either case. is used of animals in Sext. Pyrrh. Hypoi. i. 14'. 50 re here seems to be a garment of some sort. but

],

937.

Letter of Demarchus.
21x9-1 cm.
'fhird century.

The
is

following letter to a

woman named Taor

chiefly concerned with a stone bowl, about the safety of

anxious.
articles

^ ]
6.

The usual request for various articles and announcement of other on their way to the addressee form the conclusion.
rrj

^.
'iypa^-

15

€€,

5

'€9.
y^povqv

7€

10

^
,

^
eav
tfjs

e/y

€irapay-

[] \\
20

-, ^
[[/3]]

from her brother Demarchus which the writer was

,
Sia

,

€[9] €€,


CV

[]/)•\|/

aSeXTrj

?


25

.

€9
ef tivos


(iXrf-

{^ -

kv

()

Ta\<T\oiTdv.

\'\€

-

Thp

3o6
In the
left

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
margin, at right angles

On
30

8.

ig.

8 []. ^, ^ ' .

the verso
ie|e

^/

. (.
kXaiov

{)

{)
2.

}

{)
.
10.

of Pap. 4• Pap.; similarly in

corr.

from

5•

^•

and

similarly in

1.

1.

14.

of

[] corr.

from

f.

25.

of

Pap. corr. from p.

17.

of

from

.

17.

29.

1.

Taor, very many greetings. I would have you know that you wrote to me about what Agathinus did to me. Well, if I live and come to my native And for the present I bid you, my dear sister, go to the street land I will have my revenge. of the theatre and find out about the stone bowl in the boat and warn them all there, Philocyrus and Zosimus, to keep a watch on it, lest Agathinus should determine to take the bowl. Write me a reply through the man from Antinoopolis about whom I sent to you, and write the list there, that you have received so and so. If the man from Antinoopolis wants anything provide him vith it, and come with him to meet Tasoitas. Send your cloak and the jar of pickled fish and two cotylae of good oil. I pray for your health. You will receive three bags from the man from Antinoopolis who is the bearer of this letter. (Addressed) Deliver to my sister Taor from Demarchus.'
'

Demarchus

to his sister

13.
for
is

The papyrus has
ev

.

less likely.

18.

For
is

\[\
not
is

But there

much room
in
1.

' ^ \( ,
cf.

fv of which the easiest correction seems to be to write might perhaps mean engraved with a relief of a boat ', but this
*

,

\

Bekker, Anecd. Ox.
for the [],
;

I.

p.

268

cVtI

not used in

10

and the is of the cursive form like a , which is the other letters, however, are clear. The writer began the
:

^.
.
.

.

\

same word
22.

in the line above. analogous to this is simpler than to take as an indirect interrogative, on being redundant. 26. cf. P. Fay. lOI. recto ii. 9 the usual form is 27. yapovs yapoi or yapop, but yapos occurs in Geopon. 20. 46 ed. Basil,, and Et. Mag. ((.
after
Ti

[]/
:

:

.

\

.

.

.

yp

938.
Chicago.

Letter of Demetrius.
8-9
17.8 cm.

Late third or fourth century.

A
writing

letter

fodder for the oxen.
is

from a son to his father, reproaching him for his failure to send The papyrus was briefly described in Part L 161. The

across the fibres.

TTJs

/€ ,
938.

LETTER OF DEMETRIUS
)(atpeiv.

307

€8]

^,

eveSpevaas ras

5

? ]?.

^

?

yfjs

Tjj

yap

^ .
Spas

. ^ ^^ ?
\\

^povois
is

^

aapydvas

.

-

7•

f Jrey

Pap.

Demetrius to Heraclides his father, greeting. It was an unfitting act of yours to oxen at Senao, and not to dispatch it, although you had long ago been instructed to send twelve baskets of hay thither, with the result that the oxen are in danger of destruction. Since the oxen are thus in a sorry state, and the land in consequence is not being irrigated, I hasten to write to you now once more and beg you instantly to get the baskets properly laden and send them off; for you seem to be mocking my industry. I pray for your long health.'
intercept the fodder for the
3.

/, which

is

presumably a

village of the

Oxyrhynchite noma,

not mentioned

elsewhere.

939.

Letter TO Flavian US,
25-3

X

17-6 cm.
letter,

Fourth century.

An

affectionately

worded Christian
is

apparently from a dependent to

his master, concerning the illness of his mistress.

The

style,

which shows the

influence of the

New

Testament,

more polished than

that of the average letter

of the period, and the document ranks high as a specimen of epistolary
position.

com-

A

strip containing the

beginnings of lines
.

is

missing in the upper
is

portion, but

the sense

is

always clear though the restoration

sometimes

quite conjectural.

[]
kv

5

[ €6] [€ ] 6],

[]09 [

]

ttjs

.

3

[

\dpiTas

-

3o8

8^ \ \9 \]
[Xoyowrajy
Tois

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
on
ivivevaev

kyhero

kv

yap

avrfj

[€/€/.]

,
(

€9 ,
es

[\

?

ras

[]
15

djvovsi]

anoSi^ei

[e/co/iiVo).]

[] []
€Tepa

[) ]9

[][]' [ € ypaa '€
yap
€1

2

6€
25

^
,

^ , ^ . , €6 ,' . € ,
\
yap
kv
kv

nepl

€€
^€

airrijs

]

,

6

ttJ

yp^|r
5e

yap

aveKTOTepov

€\€
^^.

^^

[].
3
On
the verso

[]

,
^)
<^,


\
25.

€€)^6€-

.
€,

,

*J.

!

.
14•

Pap.

Pap.

19•

~iva

Pap.

22. vtos Pap.

inserted later.
'

((

To my

now even more

lord Flavianus from Demetrius, greeting. As on many other occasions so plainly than ever has the regard of the Lord God for you been revealed to

us all by the recovery of my mistress from the sickness which overtook her, and may it be granted us to continue for ever to acknowledge our thanks to Him because He was gracious to us and inclined His ear to our prayers by preserving for us our mistress ; for i©

939.

LETTER TO FLAVIANUS

309

her the hopes of all of us rest. Please pardon me, my lord, and receive me kindly, though I unwillingly caused you so much anxiety by writing to you the messages which you received. I wrote the first letter when she was in much pain, and I was beside myself in anxiety that you should come to us by every possible means in your power, for this was what duty demanded ; but as she seems to have taken a turn for the better I am anxious that you should receive another letter by Euphrosynus, in order that I may make you more cheerful. By your own safety, my lord, which is my first interest, if my son Athanasius had not then been ailing, I should have sent him to you with Plutarchus when she was overcome by the sickness. But now I know not what more I am to write concerning her, for her condition seems, as I have said, to be more tolerable, as she has sat up, but she nevertheless remains rather ill. comfort her by hourly expecting your arrival. I pray my lord, to the Master of all for your continued health. Pharmouthi 6. (Addressed) To Flavianus from Demetrius.'

We

is II. tvvovs: or perhaps which has already occurred in 1. 7. a Sophoclean phrase, Aj. 1009, Tr. 763. 28 sqq. ... is in darker ink, and at first sight appears to have been added by a different hand ; but presents a similar appearance, whereas the rest of the sentence voi . which must have been written at the same time, is just like the preceding lines. It is therefore improbable that any distinction of hand should be made.
. .

(,

^?

84

,

(8(-

940.

Letter to a Clerk.
io«7

X 30 cm.
g. 941-3,

Fifth century.

A letter containing
writing, as
is

instructions to a
e.

concerning the vintage.
is

The

usual with Byzantine letters,

across the fibres of the

papyrus.

86
5
kv

€$?
kney^iv
.
.

rioas kv

ras pvaeis

?. ^ ,
^

rfjs

TiXivraias

€9

eooy

?
€€€? [()] '^
kyyvs
.

^? ^

Thv

On

the verso
imSo(f)

2.

" Pap.

.

., .

8k

3IO
*

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
It is

wine should remain as it is for some time until the not seem to press hardly upon the others who have not Therefore, as stated above, please to delay the account-taking until you learn the capacity of the other holdings, and in the meantime write to me, and Send for Phoebammon the steward, and keep him at thus I shall see what is to be done. hand together with you. (Addressed) Deliver to the most admirable Joseph, clerk, from (?)

my

desire that the flow of the

holding is ready, that yet gathered the grapes.
last

we may

Charmoson
1.

(?).'

is given by He suggests that 1906, pp. 1082 sqq. its or ev, comparing the representation of the the letters correspond to the Hebrew Hebrew tetragrammaton by the Greek mm. It may perhaps be regarded as some slight support for this view that the order of the letters occasionally follows that of the Hebrew, but the question remains unsettled. (cf. Arch. Report for 1906-7, p. 10 ad fin.) in the sense of to resolve' or 'determine' is common in Byzantine Greek, 2. e.g. Concil. Chalced. 639 e by Sophoclcs according to Antiatt. 108. 9, and was used for 6. oZv is Apophthegm. Patrum 80 a (Migne, vol. xlv) quoted by Jannaris, Hist. Gr. Gram. § 666 as an instance of the same use, while Sophocles, Lexicon, p. 427, translates this once in a while, occasionally '. In the papyrus, however, the means together ', una, and the sense may well be context clearly indicates that of the same in Apophthegm. 80 a, emphasizing the but does not really account sufficiently 8. Possibly or may be the name of the place of which for all the traces, and the word ending in

A

careful discussion of various explanations of the mystic formula

/

Smirnoflf in Berl. Phil.

Wochensch., Aug.

i8,

=

;

'

'

()

,- .
'

(7 \(.
. .

.

{)

Joseph was

vorapios.

941.

Letter to John.

3•33•4
monastery of
St. Justus a piece of

cm.

Sixth century.

In this letter the writer entreats his friend to help him in obtaining from the

+

'8 €74
^

?,
ds

ground to be used

for

brickmaking.

NivvoySo^
Xeyei

'

68
npbs
vibv

iav

•[]/^

€\

S

V

[\€

(

irpos

.

,
§ikos

^ ,

\\\

eyyi^S

^ ,.
\
1.

.

'^
{$)
1.

941.

LETTER TO JOHN
Xeyei^

kav

OiXtis

.
core ie
3•

^
ir(apa)

^
+

311

kvOLKlOV^

Sia

2.

Pap.
6.

Pap.

Pap.

^
;

[}
7•

68,
7•

so in

fyV^s Va.p.

^[
10.
to,'

\•\ 6[ €]€
]ivov.

.
4•

corrected.

vlovVap. Pap.

* Since the brickmaker says that the place of the son of Ninnous (?) is full of sherds and not adapted for brickmaking, and as he says that if you will trouble to go to the son of the steward of the monastery of St. Justus he will provide you with a small space, either opposite the martyr's shrine, or on the left of it, or on the right, vouchsafe me the favour of going to him and speaking to him now. It is likely that he will grant you this favour, for it is close by. Say to him this " If you wish, we will pay you rent, only grant me the favour and God be with you (?) Inform me immediately by Phoebammon of his answer. (Addressed) Deliver to John Tell him that we only Avant a little and not much.
:
'*'

from

.

.

.'

I. The meaning of this with a dash through it, which is not uncommon at the top but of letters of this period, is obscure. It is written like the abbreviation of without a following name is meaningless. Possibly, however, the custom of commencing Bt'iva, e. g. 904, led scribes to write even when there was no real intention of

,

{)

adding the name.
3.

replaces e.g. Cyrill. Scythop. or fourth century)

,

=

'

to take the trouble
Vi'fa

of going

S. Sabae

,
4.

B. G. U. 830. 25 where the active form

The form

,
'

^,
is

nva

where «ap 10 (third which we translated wrongly, and found in a letter of the first century.
as
is

shown by

.

instances

Cf. 123.

evidently

(«),

a later period with an accusative, and is used in modern Greek. the meaning being that the proposed change 7. The subject of eanv is perhaps is the subject, and that of locality would be slight this seems more likely than that is metaphorical, the favour is nothing out of the way.' de this very elliptical phrase appears to mean, I pray that God may 8. bless you (if you do as I ask)'; cf. 155. 4-5 wish long life and happiness to your magnificence.'

employed in a local sense, is remarkable. It occurs at vtpbv e. g. Th. Prodromus 3. 285-6 (twelfth century)

,

;

:

^

'

-

'

942.
Chicago.

Letter of Timotheus.
7

X 30 cm.

Sixth or seventh century.

where he had received he had resumed his journey a letter from the addressee in consequence without delay though very unwillingly. Both the writer and the person addressed
a

A letter from

man who had
;

just arrived at Nilopolis,

of this

312

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
;

bear abbreviated titles (apparently ordinarins and exceptor respectively) which are notes. The papyrus was somewhat obscure but seem to be military cf. 11.

-,

briefly described in Part

I.

162.

'\-KaTh. Tijv

?

^^
Trjs

,€
5

€ (^ €€

^
the verso

^ , .? ^ 7€€. ^
aTroXvfravTes

^ €9 € [6^)
€^
d
nepl

{69)

On

+ €()

€6())

7()()

{)
4•
'

() €{) () €() [) () 6{)
7•
1•

. .
^
5*

Pap.

QfoboTov.

reached Nilopolis on the 13th about the 6th hour, and after we had released the was delivered to us from your brotherly excellency about the 8th hour ; and God knows whether we had not released the animals, and whether we had any more to unloose. Accordingly before three hours were passed, as soon as we could leave the city we leave it, being obliged by the help of God to arrive. We were much displeased with your brotherly excellency for not explaining to us any of the consequences. (Addressed) Deliver to the lord my most excellent, most illustrious, and most beloved brother Petronius, exceptor, from Timotheus, ordinarius of Theodotus.'

We

animals a

letter

1.

2.

& :
*

3.

obtained if have returned
6.

: 6()
'.
:

about noon. probably donkeys rather than horses; cf. 922. 17, note. or perhaps for cf. in 1. 7. A better sense would be could be read, in which case would mean could
:

:


cf.

'

({()
The
army
as
;

cf.

the

supplies.

excepiores

mentioned in 43. recto ii. 26, an account of military were a kind of clerks, and those in 43 were clearly connected
too held

(((€)

{), ().
with the
7.

probably Petronius

a

military

position
Brit.

;

cf.

the next note.
I.

Wilcken remarks,
:

is

also possible;

P.

Mus.

113

meaning

we have not found another instance of this uncertain, but as ordinarius was used for a centurion the term may well apply to some minor military officer.
is

6()

title

in a papyrus,
to

and equated

,
(7).

14

and the

943.

LETTER OF VICTOR
Letter of Victor.
17-4

313

p43.

X 34 cm.
i,

Sixth century.

A request to a chartularius
in order that

(cf.

128.

&c.) that he would send three persons

a decision might be arrived at on the question which of them was

responsible for the dues

5

€ .
eh

+

^]

^
.

upon a bath.

+

€V€K€v

,
6 k^

^ )
{€)
.

Seprjvov

€6€5

^\

^€9

()
€ ^^

} Kvpios

[]

e<io[s

.]€iy

On

the verso

(
3•

+ €())

() {)-\• {) () •\from .
4• First

€[.] +

,'
of
7.

{),

.
. .

(€)

(

).

of

corr.

above the

line in a different

hand.

over an erasure. Pap.

6.

' May your true brotherliness vouchsafe to cause the most illustrious Menas and Serenus the most illustrious banker, and Menas the agent to come to arbitration with respect to the bath, and let not the official leave them until the one of them who owes the rent of For Serenus the most illustrious banker the bath agrees with the noble house to pay it. through the persuasion of his wife chased the most discreet Colluthus out of the bath, and having done what he was persuaded to do will not depart. As the Lord lives I do not (Addressed) To the leave the three, but they pay the rent of the bath until the deputy most illustrious and honourable lord, by the grace of God my brother George, secretary,
. . .

from

Victor,
2.

by the grace of God
:

.'
.

.

cf.

P. Brit.

'.

and Gloss.

Basil,

«'

Mus.

III.

1032. 10, a letter of about the same period as
eWoXtui,

this,

314

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
:

though and when SO probably rather than 4. For cf. 126. 4, note. written small, as here, are at this period often indistinguishable. But the connexion is not very clear. sc, Tov 6. (?).

apparently not found in literary sources, occurs also G. U. 303• 28 ., In 156 we translated the word as ., and 693• 2, all of the Byzantine period. The land-agent ', i. e. the deputy of the owner, which on analogy should be the meaning. ytovxovPTfs of Byzantine papyri are commonly people of importance, e. g. Flavius Apion at Oxyrhynchus (133. 4-5, &c.), whose representative would be an influential person. In the
8.

^ .:
7.
^17
'

,
8.

;

is

frequent in the

LXX
is

;

cf.

e.g. Judges

19 C»

Kvpios

.

.

,

The term

avnyfovxo:,

which

in 153. 3

eVS(o|a))

., 156. 5

{\^
classed

.

-^)
v,

indices of the B. G. U.

The
and
this
rJKHv

may

preceding word seems to be an infinitive, but there is not space for A break occurs in the papyrus after the supposed and are not suitable. have been followed by another narrow letter.

(

is

among

the officials.
eX^fii»,

and

VI.

COLLATIONS OF HOMERIC FRAGMENTS
(The
collations are with text of Ludwich.)

{a) Iliad.

944.

elisionfew letters from the ends of ii. 43^-444, with x6•^ cm. uncials. marks. Third century, written in sloping oval on of the top of a leaf from a book, containing 945. 13-5 X 6-5 cm. Fragment and on the verso the beginnings of 753-772, ends of ii. 722-741
6-1

A

the recto the elision-marks. with occasional breathings, accents, and 734 corr. to at by a second hand.

]]^€
5-7

^;.

724 Final
Fifth

e

of

century,

written in heavy sloping uncials.

946

X

5-3

cm.

'}me]ans re

[,.

A

few

letters

from the middles of n. 861-867. 864 Late second or third century, written in broad,

slightly sloping uncials.

947

948

from the X 2.9 cm. A few letters from the beginnings of iv. 443-452, in a small century, written bottom of a column, with elision-marks. Third regular uncial hand. and neat but not very Two fragments containing the ends of x. 233-243 4-3 cm.
7-5

Fr. {a) 8.9

and occasional breathings, and 250-255, with stops (middle and low points) Third century, written in a good-sized accents, and marks of quantity.
semi-uncial hand.

the ends of x. 437-452, trom the 949. 13x4-6 cm. A few letters rom near aya'fios bottom of a column, with occasional accents (449 ^«)• 44^

[? (; ^.
Fr. (b)

MSS.). 451 square upnght uncials Late second or third century, written in

'

V

;

,

Kpareph^

^^

similar to those of

950

869 (Plate I). Two fragments, the 23.8 X 5-7 cm.

first

r * containing a few letters
1

the second the ends of 359-402 from near the beginnings of xi. 322-329. occasional breathings, accents, and elision(a whole column), with stops, and added by a second hand 37^ marks. 366 eorir. 368 oXeaaai. which is crossed through. 375 arciXKC. 381 above

Third

,

]^.

^

:

century, written in sloping oval uncials.

3i6
951.
Fr.
(<5)

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
8

X 6 cm.

Part of a leaf from a book, containing on the verso

portions of XX. 425-437 and on the recto portions of 470-482, with elision-

473 The letter before ovs is not or but seems to be a, i. e. irapja Fourth century, written in heavy sloping uncials. 5•3 cm. Parts of xxiv. 74-90 from the top of a column, with high 952. stops and occasional accents. 78 re omitted. Third century, written in
marks.
or

].

•7

sloping oval uncials.
ib)

Odyssey.

953.

cm. Four fragments from three distinct columns of from the bottom ot a column, contains a few letters from 97-100, Fr. {b), from the top of a column, parts of 197-204, Fr. {c) a few letters from 222-224, and Fr. {d), from the bottom of a column, parts of 248-261, with high stops, and occasional breathings, accents, and elisionFr. {d) 11
11 -9

a

MS.

of

iv.

Fr. (a),

iXoevv (the reading 251 252 for €. Second century, written in a round 254 upright uncial hand of good size and handsome appearance. 954. 2-6 X 9'3 cm. Fragment of a leaf from a vellum book, containing on the verso the beginnings of xiv. 299-303 and on the recto the ends of 328-332, with frequent accents. Fourth or fifth century, the verso being written in lighter and more sloping uncials than the recto. 955. 7 X 2•8 cm. Fragment of a leaf from a book, containing on the verso a few letters from xvii. 601-606 and on the recto parts of xviii. 27-40, with high stops and frequent accents. 34 Third century, written in upright uncials, those on the recto being much smaller than those on the

marks.

249

of Aristarchus

€.
?).

.

€].

verso.

956.

9-6

X

14-2

cm.

Ends of

xxiii.

the tops of two columns.

317

320 omitted.

345

'

omitted.

309-326 and beginnings of 342-356, from (or 318 Second or third century, written in heavy

4.

].

square, nearly upright uncials of

medium

size.

VII.
These

MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS
be
classified as follows

may

(we

call attention to

the fact that the

texts of 957-8, 962-7, 969-72, 974, 977-8, 980-1, 987-95, and

997 are given

nearly or quite in

full).

Writing Exercise 966 verso. Magical papyrus 959.
Orders to
officials

965, 969.

962
Reports to

recto, 970.

officials

983, 989.

Declarations on oath 972, 976.
Petition 991.

Lease 975.
Wills 968, 990.

Loan 988 recto. Deed of surety 996.
Miscellaneous contracts 977, 980 recto.

Receipts 964, 995, 1000-3.

Taxation 960, 966
Census-List 984.

recto, 979,

981-2, 997.

Land-Survey 984, 986, 988 verso. Accounts 962 verso, 971, 978, 980 verso, 985-6, 998-9. Orders for payment 973-4, 992-4. Private Correspondence 963, 967.
Titles or

957-8, 987.

Demotic papyrus 961. Arabic papyri and paper 1004-6.
957.
a

text
J ot

,{) {)
S'S

X

i3'4

cm.

A

strip of leather,

once glued to a papyrus, perhaps
official
<j•

and containing a much abbreviated
(cf.

is (l)

898. a6)

(9)

bLa\oy{r]s ?)
ly,

(hovs) (a) 'Abptavox) 6s

e(n-(i)

irpos

{?) '.{)
note, of
;

which the
db(&v)
(3)

below which in the right-hand corner is ainj( ) enclosed apparently between rounded brackets. The symbol after dh{5iv) is obscure it resembles
the sign for
or a cursive
:

ai,

the following letters

ot

being raised slightly

above the

line

perhaps

() . . D.

122-3.

Complete.

4

lines.

3i8
958.
2

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
X
8-4 cm.

A

strip

of vellum, perhaps used like 957 as a
]

inscribed with
(a. d. 8o).

two

lines (i)
is.

TTpaK{

)

nothing
refers to

959.

7-2

X 13 cm. X
9*5

The
is

$

(2)

.
]

It is

{hovs)

lost

complete above and below the writing, and perhaps TTpaK( at the beginnings of lines. ), if correct, probably can equally well be read. derivative, but or a ) 8 incomplete lines containing magical symbols, interspersed
strip

{

with occasional Greek

letters.

960.

S-^J

cm.

Memorandum

About the third century. of a payment of corn by two

persons, the

^^
the

text being

-'. 770€? known Oxyrhynchite village
5
lines.

()

Qeavovs

^? ?
6 vios
(cf.

e. g.

seems to be identical with Third century. 991).

Complete.

961. IO-2XI2-4 cm. Demotic papyrus containing the first 15 lines of a document. First or second century. of sheep, 962. ii'5x6.i cm. On the recto the first 18 lines of an addressed to the strategus (cf. 245-6) probably in the reign of Claudius or
Nero, the writing being
{eTovs)

much

obliterated.

On
is

the verso a
(hovs)

concerning various contracts, of which the text
NepMi;o(s)

after the reign of

963.

thanking her for sending a
QeapovTL
ttj

^,
is

964.

^[ , . . ,€ / ^ , ^ ? €€ . € ^ ,$
oi/cias.

()

{), ()
Complete.

?"

biaipicnv

? ,
in or

memorandum
{^tovs)

Probably written

soon

Nero.

8 lines.

16 X

97 cm.

The upper

part of a letter from a
('stool').
ae,

b
.
.

^.

woman to her mother, The text of 11. i-ii is
eiri

^-^ ^?
137 X
i6'3

, ] €,

)

anovbfj

rjOovs TTOieis,

cm.

14 lines. Receipt for the rent of a camel-shed, of which the text
.

Second or

third century.

[
-

6

"
<.

€7'

^.bov \^1](

bu\[o]s

()

ev

(€4€5
cm.
(cf.

iveaTotTos

^.
p. 8) to

bpaas

(^)
263.

[]

965.
of

•22•

Signature of Aurelius Theon.

. D.

, ,^
?
ttj

€5 ^,; ev

Complete.

12

lines.

An
P.

order to the collectors of corn-dues at the village
deal gently with a certain individual.

Hibeh

The
[

text

is

K€pe\[.
].

[\ ]
Cf.

MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS
[.....

. Brit. Mus. . 379> • Reinach
Written across the
fibres.

. ]€[] ^
319

'?

^'j,

45.

Third century.

and Fayiim Toivns, Ostr. Incomplete. 4 or 5 lines.
text
is

966.

i27xio-5cm.
list

On

the recto 7 lines of an

() () , ()
giving a

of payments from different villages.

'b'b'y

the verso are two lines in rude uncials, no doubt a writing-exercise, of which

the text

967.

" (€
is

Lines I-II

(
968.
is

^,^ . ( 9
ey

/.,

{) (
elbfis

(
letter

official

account, apparently-

The
[.

'J^'j''b'.

( ^^^ ?"
iambic
line) e.
sister.

Third century.

On

€( ahiKTov

- (corr.)

(a corrupt

15*1

X

9-2

cm.

The upper

part

of a

from a

man

to his

ivOabe vepl
ets
.

.
]
18

be

els Tohs

.

.

Address

the verso.
lines

Second century.

^ ]
Didyme, and her

lines.

39*9 X 13-4 cm.

Ends of

of the will of a

woman

called

leaving her property to her sons

by her former husband present husband Sarapion, and making provision for her
called

the end are the signatures of the testatrix and witnesses, one of
Cf.

reign of Trajan or Hadrian.

.
64-5.

.

At

whom
in the

489-95.

upon the verso. 969. 8•8 X 12-4 cm.
lar e. g. to

An order to an peobos to summon an
The
Trepi

970.
of

8•

^.
text
is
Trjs

8'7

cm.

Beginning of an

by an

inhabitant of Antinoopolis.

€9()
^Iob€b€(4vo)
IleAa.

identical

with

€(€ €() . . ^,
bia
TTpds raty
?)
[.

? -^)

^
45
lines,

Written across the

including 3 lines of an endorsement

^Ap(b.

Early second century.


The
1

fibres,

probably

accused person, simi-

, (-

Complete. 3 lines. addressed to the comogrammateus
text
is

((')
is (cf.

Nepoutavciov

^
^perhaps
Cantarelli,

vice-praefect in A.D.

La

[€)
Aoyo(s)

serie dei prefetti, p.
is

66\ unless wpos

^ €{4),

215-6

a new

title,

be read.
has

unsuitable.

Early third century.

2 lines.

This

been glued to another, of which the beginnings of 8 lines are preserved, and and at right angles which on the verso has 971. 14-7 X 7 cm. Account of expenditure on irrigation, of which the text is

{5)

() ()

.
,

() {)
{)
Mex^clp)

,

()

bpa{ybv)
,

kv

^). () [)^)
]

e,

320

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.{) (^) 6() -,

() . . {) () , ()
/3()
342•
lines.

^,

<7-,

19)
ot

try,/

{) {) . {$) €{) €( ^{) {\) .
iTapay{ovai)
kvoLKLOv
(cf. ?)

Tebt. {bv6oot), /

..

Late

first

or early Second century.

Complete.

10

972.

14-9x10 cm.
ofiice, similar
e]ls [to

Conclusion of an oath taken by an

official

upon entering

to 82, a fi-agment of an oath

(V

]h€vl

[]

[][

] .
by

a strategus.
irovs

[]€

The
he

^
text
is

€4 (& €[
(1.

[]9
323•
8.5

. D.
973.
1 1

^^

)
lines.

.

Tatos

77]/30Ketrat.

€^; ? (^)
Ti/3epeiiOS

evboKOVvTa.

(2nd hand)

^
hbs

6[]

'Iou[A]io[s]

?

'[]

,
perhaps

;/() ()
and Verus
a

€€ () (^} ^^) )
2-1
1 7,

10 cm.

notice to sitologi, similar to 516, 619-32, and P. Leipzig

authorizing

them

to

pay 24^ artabae of wheat, beginning
(or

974.

.
.

... The
in P.
(a. d.

are clearly identical with the

Leipzig 116.
is

2.

After the date, the 9th year of Aurelius

168-9),

the signature of a certain

Nearly complete. 12 lines. 4'5X9•! cm. An order for the payment of 3 artabae of wheat.
is

text

()

, {)

, {)

,
e

{)

.
The

i-nep

. (?)

{).

Third century. Complete. 4 lines. 975. 1 9-8 y•^ cm. Signature to a lease of 2J arourae, in which the lessee agrees to pay rent at the rate of 5^ artabae per aroura and acknowledges a loan of 28 drachmae to be repaid rfj (e)ju,i) Tpv[y]rj, apart from other debts to the lessor. Written in the and year of an emperor who is probably Domitian or Trajan. 20 lines. cm. Conclusion of a declaration on oath, containing the date 976. 1 1-7 X

[) {) * {) ^[] [ ] []
()
•8
<i

bavLo

^ob€b€vov

and the signatures of declaration, and of a collector of corn-dues as
910.
introd.),

{)
14
lines.

.

.

.

.

(

)

()

^ ,( {) {) )
(i. e.

Nov.

{\) .
26,
;

Ileprt-

D. 197

>

cf.

who makes

the

cf.

496. 16, note.

977.

18-7

7*2

cm.

Conclusion of a document relating to a payment of 800

MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS
drachmae
for the <^opos of

321
?),

an

(the collection of a tax

only the date and signatures.

Lines 4-19 (hovs)
.

^ , ,
6

bpa{s)

A. D. 253.

978.

{^) {){) ^ '{€45) ^^) :(9) '? {5)? {) {) () ), ?), ?
()

^? {€) '
6

({)

{)
containing

/ {bpaal)

,

7/)'(€).

(2nd

hand)

/

,

followed

by a

21 lines.

4-6

X

7'5 cm.
(1.

Beginning of a

list

(sic)

,

Third century. 6 lines. 979. 7*4 4-2 cm. Fragment of an account of payments in artabae from the Second or third century. 6'€€(€), and villages of
.

[.

,
?)

asbpaas
exegetes.

similar signature

by an

of articles of furniture.
(1.

The

text

is

[\,

^-, ,
cm.

^{).

6 lines, the ends of which are

lost.

980.

14-9

X

7-8
(?),

On

the recto parts of 14 lines from a

contracts

century.

}(
981.
9

? ? () ^ () €{ (({ (?) () (^ /? '7(?)(^), {) {) €{€) () {) {) '-() €{ () {€() ()
On
houses, of which the text
is

the last 8 lines referring to a purchase of land. Early third the verso is a short list of payments for the purchase of
iv
TriVrei

', "Apeios

'•77[?]
?)

?

list

of abstracts of

?

,

)

'.

(1.

?).

Third century.

Complete.
9-5

7 lines.

cm.
is

Extract from the

of

Apion

similar to 917

and 982.

The

text

'E^

i{€pLbo

{^)

Trepi-

(?)

(/3?)

,

...

Complete. 6 lines. Fragment of a similar memorandum of Apion, written 6-5 X 6-5 cm. 982. Cf. 917. introd. 4 lines. in the 3rd year, the ends of lines being lost. Report, similar to 896. ii, addressed to Valerius Ammo983. 24-5 X 1 8-7 cm. of whom the second is named nianus, logistes, by two The papyrus received by a certain concerning the injuries
Cf. 917. introd.

Late second or early third century.

pobo,
is

^,
lines.

?.

numbered 106

in

53 and 896.
316).

introd.

the series of which 53 is no. 105 and 896 nos. 127-8 cf. Dated in the consulship of Sabinus and Rufinus (a. d.
;

Incomplete.

16

984. Height 18 cm. of Pindar (841).

The

On

verso of this mutilated papyrus contains the Paeans the recto of sections A-C is a census-list of persons
e. g.

with their ages, parentage, abode, &c.,

Yiav^ovii^i)

€(€^€?)

-

322

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(
/(,9)

€4{) €'{)
€b{^])
(irovs)

{ha>v)

{$) {) {)
€,

{) ^{9) 7{€?) {) {) 4€ [) ( -{9) ". (?) ;;{() () 4[9 {5) () 4^ {) ( {$) {),'{6) {) {) '? {$) h []{5) {) {() 7[];5 ( €{) pa€ob{pov) {^) a€ob{pov) {) ( '{) [€]

^.
(hovs)

({ {4){$) { {)
ev

Up&i "Apms
(hciv)

,

({4) ()
,

ye/)6(tos)

-,
rjs

{ {)
kv

{€)
iv

{) {
(Iret)

[.].

Other entries of interest are ()
'AypeVio(s)
e]£

(h&v)

{
()
11
{

Tepeiros

9,

^ , , ?, , ? {5 , ^. , ^
(3)

'Upai

{)

phrase which recurs in another fragment The following rare names occur kv .). 7rpo^eyo(? ?)
(a
. . .

Xe^ez^eCs,

{) ^^, $, ,
^/39,
^evTOvs,

[]
Upo{v)
?),
is
;

,

.

.

Tepexa(

)

(fem.),

^^
(fem.);

(fem.),

(fem.), "^avris, Teaiv/^is (fem.),
(fem.),

(fem.),

;5
714.

;?,

(fem.),

(fem.),

{9),
(fem.),

4[]

(fem.),

€$,

(fem.),

7'()
(cf.

(fem.),

/35

(fem.),

The

locality
cf.

apparently

Oxyrhynchus, the

[77]7(?)

being mentioned

]75.
On

Written

after the reign of Titus,

probably

the recto of section

D

in a different

hand

Part V.

a few lines from a land-survey, mentioning various precedes some of the personal names.

{5)

,

in that of
p. 13)

Domitian.

are parts of

a

=

€)
:

985.

Height 37-1 cm.

The

verso of this papyrus contains the fragments of

Euripides' Hypsipyle (852).

On

the recto

is

a private account of receipts

and expenditure written in the second half of the first century in a large Only one column has complete lines, e. g. 11. 6 sqq. [t]a. cursive hand. (eTOVs) ds {bpaal) {bpa) '^? {$)

)
.

{^) ^^'
()
h
.
. .
.

{€ {) {5) () {) €{) $ €{) €{) . {) € {€) {) {) () {) 6[]
e

<

{bpav)

{bpaal) . (an Oxyrhynchite village
(so in

. () €€() {bpaai) , L •{)

•() ;

€'7^())
epy(aTai?)

(sic) toIs ovois els

&

()

{:)

another fragment)

{) €()
;

cf.

491. 3)

/3() ;

at

(1.

0)

MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS

(/)
\()
986.

(), (^6) {) -{) 1((
',

ctti

' (), ()

another fragment a series of figures

(€'!) () ;8 ().
(cf.
;

( €(4)
?) is
;

^rj(i'os)

2)€;8(5)

() () '?

323

summed up / els

() {) ()
.
r;.

-

In

899. ^y, note) iv

(cTOVi)

Height 20-5 cm. The verso of this papyrus contains the commentary on Thucydides (853). On the recto are three distinct documents which have been joined together to form a roll of sufficient length cf. p. 107. The first of these, which is on the recto of Cols, xix-xiv of the commentary, is part of a list of house-property apparently in the hands of probably at the Arsinoite village of Oxyrhyncha, in the i6th year of Hadrian (see below). Col. i (on the recto of section H) is a mere fragment and Col. ii has only ends of lines but Col. iii is well preserved, and contains the

,
]

[ 66^0 8(€)
]
.

following three entries

taobos

€ €;6 .
[7/?]

] . {) €€4{) "? ; ], [), 5 '•€() ? [] , () [4] ] (b{) (?) ^ []()^€[], ^ [] ? ?
(11.

4-25)
?/?

t/xiVei (sic)

( ^^
''^^

//epos \f/eL\ov
) [.
.

.]

e$

(sic) oiKtas

avXfjs

'^?.

'

([

le (erei)

7rept[ye]yoye(rai)

.

^ [ \
. .

'{) [
[.

{bpaas)

yiroves

...

^

ey

.[...]

{)
(\.

'FbLvos

b' /u[epoL's]

[](),
is

irepiyevap^evov)

entries
TOTTos

,

CTTi

entry mentions

following begins

the same hand as Cols, i-iv and

[] - )4 {) €{). ^) ; , . , €€
[](

(), [?]
complete
. ;

)/65 [,]

() .^€
,
7/)05

In the margin against the beginning of each of these
Col. iv
is less
11.

'
(€)
land)
at
]y

4-7

[6]

' :{)

[.
[1]^

.]

(or

[]

b€v

The next

) €{4))

(erei) eTreXeiio-ei

is

and that which is in , on the recto of Col. xiii of the comIn Col.

[];

" {€){)] () {€)
ibav
1

mentary, begins a return of irpoaobiKa Oxyrhyncha supplied by the comogrammateus.

31-2).

- {^)
bi'

followed

[
by a

€b

(i.

e.

confiscated

Lines 1-5

)(^{)
2

[

eis

[^^] €abov{v)
'Abpavo

]>

[]

survey-list of holdings with rents, yeiroves,

; "
[ €{)
(. D.

324
&c., which
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
continued
in

the fragmentary Cols, vi-viii.

Col.

viii

has been

cut

down
vii

the middle and joined to another document in a different hand

(Col. ix), the line of junction corresponding to the

margin between Cols,

viii

and

of the verso.

This

8
of the

\[])
account of
Col. xi
is

() 7[() () €',
but
is

/xepi?,

to an official y probably the basilicogrammateus, and mentions
is

a return by

•{'$)

[apovpai)

?]

()

[.

.

.

]-

too

much damaged
of the of
i

to be intelligible.

Cols, x-xv, corresponding

to

Cols, vi-i

commentary, belong to
artaba per aroura to

an

seed-corn

issued at

the rate

various cultivators of
detail.
is

Crown

land, the rent of the holdings being described in

well preserved, but the others are

'{) \ {) () {) {) ^' () '. () () ()'' )/()(9) ',() () () , () ^''', () () () () () () () () , () () () ()^? '^{()() () () €(() {()} '<'^'\ « \() €^6/(?) () b' ^ }? ?;() () () ' () () , ()() ' () ' () ''' () ()
the
;

The formula
3)V

same throughout
Aeios

e.g. xi.

b'L•f',

, {) () () b
more
7-15
iLh' ,

or less broken.

y^'il'Lt^-'^'b',

,

'.'.'

b'i{ ,

by'

t'e'o'e'

h'b''

tf',

.

rT€i'e[o]v^(pi9)

()
'•'
/^(^-

i-'eo'e

31-6

-Wi'b',

ee'
,

cO'e'

yij'iV'^'^',

&()

bb'

)^

()
7*7

.()

.()

b'r|(^'k'\

9 -' ' '.
cf.

The

fractions ^^,

^,

-^^,

-^^,

and

of an

artaba are

unusual;

18.

introd.

and

P. Tebt. 341.

987.

X 9"4 cm.

A

piece of vellum with the

name

enclosed in an ornamental border, and below in different ink

988.

concerning a loan of corn, the
Col.
ii.

? ^,^ ( €,
or sixth century.

15 X

8•4 cm.
I-IO

On

the recto

is

the conclusion of two copies of a

first

copy having

lost the

^

Flawi

aboXa

\

erov?

be

bs
?)

(a. D. 224).

ductive land, of which the text

'

... Dated in the 4th year of On the verso is a memorandum
is

'}(€
)

Severus Alexander, Athur 30 concerning the sale of unpro-

4 ^,
].

"

in uncials

.

Fifth

beginnings of

lines.

'

rois

?

ci?

bov

4
(is

via

^? .?)? ((

( € () €(€)
)

(^)
,
ye^r(oj;(s)

{) {, ^,

MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS
?)

?
kTipa

989.

24 X

apparently to some

them.
kv

990.

' /?
9-5

or fourth century.

^ € . ' ] / ^, .. (. ] [. ^ ^, . € ?,/ . } ', ^
'[]
10-8

;() []; ^, {) [] 7:{€) []7:(5) ()
325
, ydT{ov€s) Third century, soon of persons and
after A.D. 234.
. .

5 , ,
^.
kv
TOis vl[ois]
L•

cm.

A list
is
.

at different villages, sent

official

with a view to the exaction of a contribution from

The

text

h

[:]

kpyaoTrlpiov]

Evayyikov

",
h

[€?.] h

1\

h

h [/]] €/)6

05

iv

L•

h

tovtovs

Incomplete, the beginning being
will of a

lost.

^^
X 25-3 cm.

Beginning of a

&pi{avTOs)
robe

)5

991.

^. {) '? ' € ? ^/ ' 9
?....]
followed by parts of two

€[] . :{) [4 (
k

woman.

The

[]7]5
text

[

? - [] ? )
€.
26

4.

Late third

lines.
is

text

L•

]

t^s

]

%{$) ^[.
.

.,

more lines. For the formula
(?)

cf.

907. A. D. 331. 8

lines.

8.3x11 cm.

called

^?
6•

Beginning of a petition

addressed to a police

official

The

is

992.

' ^. {) 5\
{sic,

^]
43•
cm.

(cf.

.

Cairo 10690)
...

.^

apa^vos

not

7())

. D.
-)

8-6

cm.

Order for the

payment

of a jar of wine.
(1.

(sic)

€V

. ('?)
fibres.

(1.

^ (}) )
is

34• 9 1^"^^.^ The text is

/3.

993.

Order issued by wine to a plasterer on the occasion of a of
'o-g

()(?)

followed by

( {}) . 7() } { (5)
X
7-3

. D.

Written across the

Complete.
feast.

6

lines.

a church for the

payment of two
text

jars

The

+

?)

7()

TTjs

() (7;a)

' {),

>

flourishes.

Sixth century.
KoV(es)

Complete.

994. 30-5x8 cm. The text is

+[] ' ^) ')
()

^

Order

for the

payment of
KaTh.

5 lines. 12 artabae of corn to a

pas

, ()

/{) (€') ()

'€{€.

^varrjs

{)

?
monk.

326

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

{).
995.
text

(eVoDs) po<7

.

.

{5)
4

.+
lines.

. D.

499•

-^ difficulty arises,

as often, in the figure of the indiction,

which should be the 8th not the
for a solidus

Written across the

fibres.

Complete.

31x11 cm.
is

. ,
996.
17-1

^, +

apeTrjs inrep

Meao/)T)

Complete.

4

X 29-4 cm.

the estate belonging to the heirs, the formula being practically identical with

€[
vlos

^4 ^
...
(cf P.

Flavius Apion that two other

{,
{) []€()
?).

An

illiterate receipt

and three

€{).
eya, yi{yiTai)
te

.

9th.

The

Ivh^iKTiovos)

o.pxfj,

/'()
fibres, in

(

= coniia})
fifth

[{)\
century.

rrjs

Written across the
yewpyot

the

lines.

that of 135, beginning
ejvepyeroD

^$ ,

? []
viraTeias

Deed whereby two

become surety

to the heirs of

lvb{tKTiovos)

€() ^) \\ ? ^ ?^
/)[/(]
/37/s
(.
D. 5^4)•
. .

? '\
Amh. ,

Nearly complete, only the last few lines, which corresponded to 135. 38-31, being missing. Title on the verso. ;ji lines. 997. 15-1 X 9-2 cm. An account relating to various Oxyrhynchite villages, perhaps a list of fines for arrears of taxes. The text is [? ''7] ( = ?)

^ ?
.

Praous and Georgius, would remain on
5ea7r[o|rou

erovs
.

,

.

^

,

the verso in a different hand
Practically complete.

?
126.
[rjois

20

:()
, Te^eet

'{$)). [(]
, Ta^Treirei ,
[.,]

998.

32 X 45 cm.

Account of allowances

chite villages, beginning

{) {), {) ^ 5. , ,
[]
-.

5'

{) () ^<
sixth century.

^ , ,' ,, , ', , , , {)
The
Other payments are

? ( ,,,,
11 lines.
(?)

{)
t,

$
[rjois

'
'

^ ({)
i<j•,

,

and on

. Fourth

century.

['](5)

^^) {9) {) {5) {) {)
to inhabitants of various
tt/s

Oxyrhyn-

b'{ov)

,

made

to

{^) 5,

Ilayyou-

Aabov,

The

total

is

given in a second column,

'i{avbpas)

Practically complete.

()
lines.

24

. Late The papyrus was briefly

{)

described as 191.

999.

Account of receipts and expenditure on one of the Lines 1-5 of FJavius Apion the younger (cf. 138. 5)•
34 X 37.3 cm.

;6(7^()

;
bi

{•€) i5t(as) one of which is One nearly complete Title on the verso. occur. ?) and The lines in all. column, probably followed by another which is lost. 33 papyrus was briefly described as 196. of tin, provided by 1000. 6'S X 26-8 cm. Receipt similar to 915 for 4 (1. ds l•ip{v) Apollos, Cf. 915. introd. Written across the fibres, about A. D. 572.
Nearly complete. 3 lines. similar receipt for 6 1001. 8-3 X 31.3 cm. = Apollos ) (? provided by III. II77. 395 (cf. P. Brit. Mus. Written across the be'I{o)

[] ' {) {) {) {){) ^^ (6') { . {) , {, 4^ ^) €{) ^, €{).
&{) ^{)
D. olo-j).
. .

^ 7€{€) [ ' { [{)] {

MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS

327

;^
{)

estates

rijs

ivbiiKTbvos)

5
(hovs)
'

65]{)
(.

'{)
ve

77oXei.

() hraveia) L•a{v) €[]{)
aAX(ois)

€{€)

{\)

(]

()

o{rsy

7()

Aroos

()

(]

.,

followed by similar entries,

The names

A

^{ , ?) €{) .
fibres,

of tin and 4 of lead
castrensi)

ds

6{)^
573.

[]€[][]
A. D.

about

1002.

Nearly complete. 3 lines. similar receipt 5-8 X 31-5 cm. provided by Apollos eis ohiias) ds TTJs

{)
3 lines.

about A. D. 573. Incomplete. 3 lines. of lead and 4 of tin similar receipt for 8 1003. 6-5 X 30-3 cm. provided by Apollos ds complete, 2;;€9. Written across the fibres, about A. D. 573. Nearly

^
A A
cm.

for 8

bp{v)

v{os)

{4)

of lead and

^7[.

Written across

{
the

some
)

tin

fibres,

bp{v)

{) -

1004.

Arabic papyrus containing on the recto 34 lines, complete letter (?) of of which the ends are missing, and on the verso a century. Seventh or eighth 9 lines in a large hand. recto 8 complete 1005. 18.9x33-1 cm. Arabic papyrus containing on the verso the last 10 lines on the lines with part of one line at right angles, and Seventh or another document with part of one line at right angles. of
34-3

XI 7-3 cm.

eighth century.

1006.

15-6

X

7-7

A

complete Arabic document of 13

lines,

written

on

paper

in the

mediaeval period.

INDICES
I.

NEW LITERARY

TEXTS.

(a)

852 (Euripides, Hypsipyle).
in thick type refer to fragments)

{Numbers
dya^oy 60.
1.
i.

1 1 5;

69.

5•

';7
V.

1•

7, iv. I

20-1. i6;

1.

iv.

35.

33

;

60.

63.

60. 2o;
98.
ayKokt)

64. 68, 86, 93,
5,

II, 48.

60.
32. 9; 60. 10.
1.

3•
iv.

ayyos 60. 33, 61. aypias 60. 5"•

! /
7[

8.
1.

,

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OTHER LITERARY TEXTS.

{Numbers

885. 59. ayfti/851.3; 856. 29; 858 aye 854. 6. 8.
aya^o'i

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22.
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864.

850. 7• 858 855. ,

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858 b. 27. ayopeCeiv 858 b. ig
854. 8. 849. 25. ay0i'tfea^ai 856. 48

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858^. 14; 864. 4 867. 5• 850. 23, 35; 869. 8. 864. 1 8. 850. 2 0. °' 856. 58; 855. 4, 6 863. 4• 857. 3• di'aytyi'waKeii' 886. 21. 850. 5• di/ayicaartKor 869. 5• 863.
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857. 6, 22; 860 . 8, 885. 58; 886. g. 851. 8; 869. 2; 887. verso 5•

6;

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850. 5• 850. 4, 9

TEXTS.
886. 850. 2 1
verso 4•
6.
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341

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12; 885.32,39•
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3.

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885.

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868.

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850. 3• 854. 8; 856. 5°; 869.
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856. 2. 856. 8 (.?). 857. 20, 2 6. 856. 3• 849. 856. 70. 870. 32. 886. 2. 863. 4• 869. 2. 859. 6. 849. 7; 23 850. 858 3. 4114; 851. ;

6

;

864. (.?). 855. II, 3• 870. 33• 855. 9• SetKWi'at 856. 49• duv 856. 54• Semm;/ 858 3. 26. 854. 4• 857. 2 4• Sextos 887. recto ,

8

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855. 14, 856. 2.

6.

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1 9,

3.

865. . 855. 9• 856. 66. drroTrpoXetVeti' 859. 3 (?)• 885. 53•

864.

32, 34• 26.
6.

23, 29,

880 . .
850.
II.
3•

/30886.
869.

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7

849. 9• 855. 3• 855. 9• 885. 38. 849. 2, 6, 2 2.

870.

23.

870

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857. 4• apiCTrepcJr 887. recto 2, 5• 864. 2, 4; 868. 6.

^
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870. 5• 886. 15855. 7•
851.
2.

885. 31

858 b.

19•

arci/ifetv

849. 13; 850. 15• 857. 9• 849. 2, 9> ^^ 850. , 26, 27, 32, 35; 856. 851. 7 ; 855. g 32, 47, 50, 64, 74 ; 857. 19; 858 3. 15, 30; 869.

>
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854. 8; 855. 1 4, 22 856. 3, 74; 857. 5; 858 3. 25, 29, 39; 860. 6; 867. 5; 870. 6; 887. verso . >€ 849. 8; 855. 8; 858 3. 24; 861. 5; 862. 8. 857. 5• 885. 39• 856. 6. 855. 3, 4• 850. 2 4• y^ 857. 28. 850. 3° 865. 6 870. II. 966. 850. 8.

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849. , 21 ; 854. 6; 856. 73; 857.9; 858 3. 22 886. 7• 868. 7• 850. 3• 865. 5• 855. 12. 863. 6. 857. 7•

858

3. 2 3,

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850. 2 2. 856. 24• 856. 68. 856. 75• 856. 2 7 868. 864. 3• 857. 9• 849. 25.
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858

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24•

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850. 850. 33> 849. 6.

7•

850. 17 ; 868. 3• 856. 39• 885. 47• 854. 9• 886. 9•
861.
8.

35•

850. 12.

342
iav

INDICES

885. 34, 58• 850. 6 858. 70, 72 886. 857. 5 (''
;

8.

tyf ipeiv

'

849. 849. I, 15; 850. 5 854. 4 ; 855. 4, 851. 3 6, 12, 13; 861. 5; 862. 15; 863. 2, 5; 868. 5• fovos 870. 3• 850. 27 ei 849. 2, 6, 22 855. 15• 885. 36, 42) 52, 58. efrai 849. 5> 22 ; 851. 6, 7 856. 2, 855. 5. 14, 23 43, 62; 858 <5. 1 8, 29 862.8, 15; 864. 2; 869. 5; 885. 32; 886. 5; 966. 851. , 2. eiVftv 850. 32
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864. 7• 855. 17; 863. 855. 12. 856. 78• evvofiv 850. 6. 6| 856. 75•

f'xdv
8. 9,

849.
19
;

17,

856.

9,

19; 855. 7, 18 ; 858(5.
15-

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19,
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28; 860

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858

3.

21.

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855. 4• 856. 55 {) 850. 2 2. 855. 2.
66, 67.

850. 4, 13. 885. 44. CfiT-eli/ 886. 8. ^«/5'(?) 851. 37

;

;

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887. verso 3• ioiKevai 856. 40. €7ret 849. 28. 855. 4; 864. 19. 886. 1 8. e7rt'850. 12; 856.58; 857. 5, 22; 867. 2 ; 869. 4; 887. recto i etsaep., verso
886. 1 6. fni8eiKin!vai 855. II.

/
869.

5.

865.
I,
1

4•
5•

851.

849.

6.

855. 5• 886. II.

ij/iiii

61?
fi'i

966

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;

850. 7, 27 856. 857. 24; 858 <J.
17,

25, 12,

55
14,

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849. 9

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854. 8

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855.

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20.

857. 4• 868. 3• 885. 45•

858

5. 8.

866. 6; 869. 16, 2(.?); 887. recto 2. ctaayeij/ 856. 3°• iira 856. 63, 68, 77. 856. 36; 858^. 27; 864. 1 6. 860 a. 8; 889. io(?); 886. 16. €Kfl 849. 10; 856. 74. fKeWev 867. 3.
21
;

inUvai

(
861.
epepvos

850.

1 4•

859. 6. 864.

6
;

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867.

2.

860 .

5•

886. 850. 1 8. 850. 7• epyov 859. 8.

.
^•

849. 7• 849. 21

886.

13.

858 . 2.
^60 849. 8, 2 1, 25; 850. 36; 851. 7; 862. 13; 869. 863. 3; 864. 9; 885. 56; 886. 2, 17. 857. 2. 870. 28. 856. II.

.

;

850. 30.
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860 .

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856. 5 8. 886. 4, 7• epvOpos 854. 8.

856. 63.

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885. 52. 856. 41. 850. 1 6.

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850.

860 .
4•

28; 858 /J. 2 862. 1 1
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858(5.

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8.

850. 854. 6.

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858 858

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b.

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849.

I

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858 .

2 0.

854. 9; 855. 856. 44; 864. 6; 886. 3, II, 850. 34•

10,
I
;

22

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870.

16, 23.

( (. ( ":
.
erepos

869. 859.

858

^.

43•

886. 21. 849. 18; 856. 53•
885. 33• 857. 1 6.
(5.

870. 3°• 855. 7• 868. 2. 864. 24^;«/ 885. 44> 55•

evvovs

858

37•
J

858
855. 12
;

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24-

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850. 3 1

886.

3, 22.

870. 12. 850. 1 1 850. 1 3.
867.
4-

;

849. 14; 850. $0. 886. 2. 850. 856. 55» 67. 849. 886. , 7-

;.

/.

NEW LITERARY

TEXTS
865.
5•

343

//

850. 27. 850. 3;

1

6, 2 2, 25,

;

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KOeti/

27, 28, 31.

(8
KotVot

857. 21. 854. 7855. 20. 887. verso
858(5.
1 5,

7.

32.

856. 55. 866. 4• 850. 8. 849. 18.

864. 9• 862. 7• 855. 4• 864. 2 . Kpeas 856. 79• KpoTciv 864. 2 2. 864. 26. 2 2. 855. 850. 29, 33; 851. 886. . 854. 6. 856. 3• 857. 2 2.

886.
;

23.

?6
p^r
pjjr^jp

857. 849. 34; 869. 2. 850. 7•

7;

858(5.

858

(5.

13•
7
;

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,

849.

859.
9•

6.

860
5•

(5.

(9(;

81

858 ^.12. JKaXerc 861. 9•

;^;/ 866.
5

885. 59

93^•
5•

^ €
13,

850. 6; 855. 864. 15; 865. 7; 869.
;

8

/ /^
4

856. 73• 849. 12. 856. 56, 65. 850. 14 856. 58 862.17; 886.1,4; 887.
;
;

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856. 57• 850. 13. 864. . 864. 2 2. 870. 31 856. 21.

855.

3•
6; 856.

'854.

7;

857.7-

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859. 855. 4•
7•

19.

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recto 6, verso

2.

858^.

25•

856. 37• 855. 849. 6 ; 850. 1 7 856. 35- 44, 66, 70, 7^;

.
7•

849. 9• 849. 4) 5• 850. 9• 864. 4• 854. 9•
857. 865.
7•

885. 35• 856. 77• Karapyeiv 850. 34• 849. 2. 849. 5• Kepavvios 885. 44• Kepaui/o's 885. 37) ^.

858^.

31) 35) 36•

869.
851.

^ ^ / '/
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7•,

6. 9• 2 9-

^' 864.

858 b. 35• 858
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€ ^;
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870. 865. 7•

/ ^ \
6.

5•

869.

II.

858

3.

36.

850. 12; 862. 6; 863. -- 849. 28.
856.

.
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858

^

864.

3.

24•

858

>.

12.

35•

863. II.
858(5.

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850. 8. 856.
2 7-

7•

7•

856.

856.

6. 860 .

^

854.

9•

858

37•

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7;

858(5.

5•

^ /

;

886. 13886. 2 2. 855. 2. 855. 1 8. 850. 33) 35• 864. 2 . 855. 1 6. 864. 21.
856. 65• 864. 23• 856. 2 8. 850. 8. 856. 5^•

850.
2.

856. 72• 851. 33)

850. 12. 854. 8. 862. 12.
28, 69, 75• 850. 22.

856. 23,

858 3. 40; 886.
verso

887. 869. 7•

;

854

849. . pcO^oi 864. 19• 855. 13, 17; 856. 62, 71, 74; 858(5. 14; 869. 6; 885. 49•

!

^^ /
857.

885. 4°• 885. 34• 863. 7• 862. 8. 886. 1 8.
862.
5•

6.

860 b.
;

7 (0•

/858(5. 6; 860 3.
864. 864.

.

(

850. 1 6. 849. 19 850.

5•

.

2

.
13-

858 .

2 8.

858

(5.

344
849. 850.
4• 2 9(5.

INDICES
863. 7• 859. 4• 856. 2 9856. 42859. 773? 850. 12 858 3, 41 860 . 14; 864. 4, 5, 19; 869. 17; 888. 966.
;

860
o^vis

4•

?

"

856. 59• 850. 24, 3^ 849. 856. 36, 58, 75; 858 3. 886. 7> 860 . 9 24

6

/;

;

;

;

13. 23•

> 2
;

886. 9• 855. 8; 856. 62. ore 856. 70. ort 849. 4; 856. 56; 868. 2; 869. 21. (reflexive) 859. 4• oir, 849. 17, 24; 850. 855. 5; 851. 6; 15; 858 3. 14, 24, 36; 862. 18; 863. 4; 868. 9; 16; 869.5,11869. 6, 14/c

858 3. 25• 860 . g. 858 3. 20.

, \((

855. 7870. 17. 864. 8. 850. 2 5• 856. 41850. 24• 869. 8. 862. 7849. 12. 863. 9-

858

3.

33, 34-

6[

870. 856. 26.

2 4-

855.
3.

£849.
24
ouSetV
;

25;854. 8; 858
36.

3.

863. 4• 857. 8; 858

>(
oure

885.

4•
858
;

€ ''/ (
860
a.

858

3.

23.

849. 24• 849. 21. 859. 8
3-

(-)
3.

;

858

2 2.

'/
74

3.

3•
5

854. 5 857. 6, 7• 849. II, 22; 851. 5 856. 29, 49, 73; 857-5;

857• 20. 885. 42. 864. 7• 868. 7857850. 2 4•
861.
4-

2 2.


;^ 860
856. 71. 856.

855. 3• 856. 62. 869. 1 6. 850. 23, 25, ^\, 33; 851. 2; 855. 7, 6; 856. 34, 76; 857. 857. . 867• 4•

.

855..

7•

870. 4• 850. 20. 850. II. 885. 4^. 885• 49•

856. 71856. 67.

856.

858

.
3^
;

4,

<^•

I4j
6.

16,

23,

] !
?
57
;

,

29>

869.
6.

862.3,
4(?),

849. II
77•
1

;

856.

^
( ( (
»
863.

858

3.

4, 43; 857. 7; 33; 886. 5, 2.
3.

858 858

3.

26.

3.

7•

858

21.

861.

6.

850.

27.

862. 4, 849. 5•

9•

856. '^1. 855. 6. nepiTiOevai 855. Uepaai 857. II. 864. 21. 849. 8, 1 3, 14) 24• 885. 5•

3•
3. 8.
;

.

/^^
855.

856. 63

866.

2.

3-

858
5•

3.

21.
2 3-

/
peiv

855. 2. 855. 8, 21. 856. 9• 854. 723.

(

!

856. 43• 870. 9• 855. II ; 856 59• 855. . 850. 8; 856. 30, 32,

850.

858 3.

850. 3°• 857. 4 862. 4(•'')• 885. 36, 6 1.
;

^^

856. 33850. 24. 856. 34-

858

3.

24.

858
851.

3.

39•

84i9. 2 'j;

850.
863.

.
9-

8583.1338.

,
858
3.

858
33•

3.

856. 12. 856. 6; 863. 5; 866.

42

;

/ios

858 3. 3°. 858 3. 28. 858 3. 21.
856. 36. 870. 34850. 29•

.
39•

858 3. 858 3,

858 3.
863.
5•

1 6,

1 3-

'
^,,

/.

NEW LITERARY

!,858

854. 6. 885. 40. 885. 5, 54• 856. 40• 855. 8.

.

>. 2'^.

?7 864.
arparjjyoi

^^ -' 860

856. 29. 856. 2 2. 857. 21. 855. 1 6. arefay/Ltoy 850. 2. 864. 7• 887. recto
b. 8.

( ;^;;
8.
Tpe'is

8

855. 3. 856. 40• rtVeti/ 868. 5• rty 850. 26; 855. 12, 15; 856.2,37; 858(5. 29, 38; 864. 5. 856. 65.

\

TEXTS

345
855. 2, 1 8, 2 2. fvty882. 867. . 856. 2 7 887. verso 3• 849. 2 0. 855. 8. 869. 9• 855. 5• 886. 14. 854. 7• 855. 8. 854. 2. 855. 15 864. . 870. 2 5854. 9• 856. 50• 856. 36 886. 5, 7• 864. 1 6.

869. 14. 850. 5•

' [ /
[
?!'

;
;

858

5. 2 2.

7•

856. 57• 865. 3•

858

<5.

1 8.

^ »?
850.
7,

864. 1 6. 868. 857. 23. 857. 3• 856, 43• 886. 5• 854. 8. 885. 46.

.

;

7 /
.

;

'[ 858 .

.

850. 859.
849.
II,

20.
3•

2,

21

;

II, 12,

29; 855.

, 6;

^
/

866. 22. 857. 8. 849. 5• 854. 6. 850. 32. 855. 5•

'

865. 3• 857. 28 867. 865. 5
;

864. 25.

860 .

4•

858

(5.

3°•

€ /^
^
Tf
Te;;^!/;?

860 .

9•

850. 20. 856. 33• 885. 4^.

860 7.

869. I. i7re> 850. 856. 69. ; vnepidflv 857. 4• 867. 6. 850. 24; 855.2; 856. 27,32; 857.19; 865.3; 885. 37, 6. 886. 2 . 862. II. 865. 5•

855. 19 ; 856. 76. 856. 69. 850. 28 856. 32 (?). 864. Xpeor 856. 35•

.
;

xpj?

885.41.
857. 27. 886. 24856. 24.
858(5.

(€
/at

9•

3•

856. 2 4• 856. 12.

859. 2. 886. 4• 856. 64.
851.
7•

€ ^
7•;( 855.
28.

.
2 2.

864. 2. 849. 24; 850. 27; 856.6, 6, 54,65, 73,74•

€ '//?
/xof

855.

3•

851.

3•

850.

870.

855. 12, 1 3. 886. 24.

^

864. 25. 887. verso 856. 55• 849. 17• 862. 7-

864. 9• 887. recto

3•
; ;

6.

854. 5 856. 41, 54 5 859. 7• = 855. 21 (?).
(relative)

851.

858 .

44•

() Latin
astutia 871. 2.

(871-2).
is

e 871. 9•

871.

4, 6, 9•

autem 871.

3• 2,

ego 871.
in 871. 5•

4•

loqui 871. 4•

convenire 871.

de 871.

3.

inertia 871.

.

magis 871. , 2. meminisse 871. 3•

346
minimus 871.
.

INDICES
7.

pars 871. 6. perforare 871. 11

(?).

sic 872. 8. suus 871. 5.

quidem 871. 6-7. ne negare 871. 10.
. .

quam

871.

i,

2,

8

(?).

ter

non 871.

qui 871. 4,

872.

9.

5, 6, 9.

4.

tunc 872. 16.
virtus 871.
i.

nullus 871. 6.

sapientia 871. 3.
4.

numerus 871.

sed 871.

5.

II.

EMPERORS.

Claudius.

962.

Nero.

^

962.

Galea.
899. 28.
Titus,
Tiros

984.

Tiros

958.

Hadrian.

AiroKp,

Antoninus

(6

. '.
957.
Pius.

Tpaiavos

898. 40

j

986.

899. 3*^• 899. 2 .

'Avrvlvos 899. 29.

Marcus Aurelius and Verus.

Marcus Aurelius.

Commodus.

^ '
(6

:

2aroi

973.

2faoi
909.
2 3•

905.

.

Kopobos 988.

Septimius Severus.

Imp. Caes. Lucius Septimius Severus Pius Pertinax Aug. Arabicus Adiabenicus 894. I. AvroKp, 2(nripios 2(ovrjpos 899. inlrod.
Septimius Severus and Caracalla.
Aovklos ^enripios

. .. .

anobfbeiypevos AvroKp, 910. 43

, .^. .
/3,
>

(

976.

Severus Alexander.

Maximinus.

Gallus and Volusianus.

Gallienus.

Tacitus.

Diocletian and

. . .2( ^ . , . . .' . 8. . . , . ^; ( , . . ^. . . ,.( 86 {. , . .. .. .. , .. [. [. .] . . . \. . .
111.

CONSULS, ERAS,

AND INDICTIONS
.. 916.
.

347

/3.
4•

^.•/''•

908.

988.

^
977.

2(. 909. 34

>

972

J

'.

(.

912. 37•

\

(-

MeyiaT.

864.

(.

907.

2'J.

907.

2 0.

(cf.

Index

III).

^
\
Maurice.
Consuls.

\

888.

6.

['.

,.

.

Miy

\

889.

.

(of Diocletian

and the Caesars Constantius and Maximian) 895.

6.

\

6

\
12.

996.

897.

III.

CONSULS, ERAS,

AND

INDICTIONS.
(294) 891. . (300) 889. II. ' (305) 895. .
(3 1 6)

' ' []'

\

2
\
•'

983.

'

'^ \
\

. . ..

y

. .

896.

1 9,

35

i

(322) 900. . (33^) 990. (33^) 901. .

348
imaTflas

vnareias

xmaTe'ias

902.

19.

, . ^' . .. ( €8
INDICES
(33^) 892.

3•

'

\

y'

'

(34 1) 991• (346) 897• • (44-2) 913. . (aboUt 4^5)

\

fTovs

(486) 914. (584) 996.

.

Eras of Oxyrhynchus.
eTos

„ „

| { -

Pap. 413) 992. (486) 914. 13;

(499) 994. (572) 915. 4•

(66-7) 999.

Indictions.

2nd (6th

cent.)

993.

3rd (584) 996. 5th (616-7) 999. 6th (572) 915. 2, 14. 9th (486) 914. 2, 14; (499 13th (444-5) 913. 8.

;

1.

8th)

994; Mesore

11,

}{

cent.)

995.

IV.

MONTHS AND DAYS.

2(! (Thoth) 958
flbol eiSci

(€
(a)

Months.
(Pachon) 962. 985.
;

(

() Days.
899. 889.
introd.

.

a 972.

967.

*[.]7
12.

{
'AyaGfivoi

V.

PERSONAL NAMES.
xi.

village- elder,

son of Heron 918.

984. 924. 1 8. 936. 937. 5, 1 7-

.

of Aristion 964. ap^as SOn of Caccilius 990. 'AyaBos father of Anchorimphis 918. iii.i 2. son of Anchorimphis and father of Benia[.]is 918.
iii.

^, ,

alsO Called Ag., daughter

ii.

'{

! !
^!
,
)

V.

PERSONAL NAMES

son of Hoius 918. xi. 20. son of Onnophris (i) 918.

ii.

11,

18, 23, xi.

990.

At^ioTrSr

€85,
936.
I.

, , , '
901.
4.
*

'
.
934.
1 4.

20; (2) 986. 929. introd, son of Demetiius 939. 22. daughter of Agathodaemon

"

, ',
'Aneh,

349

.
987.

governor of Aegyptus

Herculia 896. 29.

.

972.
also

899. 10 father of Tharion 984.
praefect
*A.

;

916. 9.

'lovXios

father of Pausanias
28.

. praefect 899. . daughter of Thonius
of

' / ' ' / ,
'

Called

.,
;

senator 977.

923.

2

;

967.
of

collector

money-taxes

917.

981; 982.
eutheniarch 908. 3» 45• public physician, son of Herodotus
strategus(?) 929. 25.
*A.

son of Patunis 918. ii. 15. soH of Sokonopis 918. ii. 14. son of Pastoous and father Petesuchus 986. 895. introd.

.

also Called Gerontius,

' ',
"-

logistes

'^ ', ,
911. 9.

896. i, 23, 34, 36; 983. 936. 2 1 989. son of Ammonius 986. son of Rhodion and father of Ammonius 986. ex-exegetes 908. 8.
;

.

also Called

Am.

'8

'
908.

son of Horus 897. 4• daughter of Amyntas 918. 5. 918. 6.

.

. 899. 4^•

928. 4• 973. son of Anoup 996.

/ , ' ' / ' / ' ',
983. 890.
14.

999.
16; 932.
2, 3.

928.

also called

,^ .,
I,

prytanis 890.

.

933.

, 3•

(6

984.
also called Aristandi a daughter
et saep.

of Aristander 899. 2

905. l7; 984.
daughter of Origenes 888. 10. daughter of Sarapion 918. v. 18.

929.
also

introd.

;

969.
973.
son
of

assistant of sitologi

called
3.

Didymus

Onesas 909.

son of Gaius 969. son of Heracles 905. 3. father of HeracHdes 918. ii. 19. 896. 2 8. son of Panephremmis 918. iii. 8. SOU of Sarapion

.

father of Aurelius

Anoup 996.

, ' ',
',

903. 32. deacon (?) 993. father of Anesius 996. son of Anesius 996. daughter of Phrateus 984. son of Sarapas 976. also called Ant., gymnasiarch

, ,
20,
'Apet'a

leadworker 915. i 1000-3. SOU of Phoebammon 893. son of Epimachus 999. son of Hareous 914.
;

2.

.

3,

.

968. 924. 2, 19.

"Apetos vegetable-seller

10.

933. 29. also called

"

Hermes 909.

5.

899.
?)

introd.

.

6

(vice-

praefect

970.

, 8
20.

980.

father of Aurelius

Apphous 914.

3,

(6

984. ApoUonarion

also

called

Ar.,

daughter of Aristander 899. 2 et saep. of ApoUonarion also father
called Aristandra

899.

2.

350

INDICES
father of Aurelius

,:

'Apiaravbpos son of

Zenon 988. Theon
also called

also called

896.
20.

2,

8
20.
i,

painter, SOU of Arsinous

,
913.

Eudaemon 964.

SOU of DionySOtheon 907.

Eudaemon
9.

surnamed An, son of Aristion 964.
father of

also Called ZoiluS, exegetCS

Taames 918.

iii.

.

911.

I.

son

of Padidymus

public

physlcian,

son of

5, 21.

Dioscorus 896. 24, 37.

son of Patron 986. 984. 935. 6.

907. 23.
also

called called

Ammonius
Aphrodisius,

911. 9.
also

,
/,
896.
2.

^:
912.

921.

I.

father

of

Aurelius

Artemidorus
son
of

.
2, 20.

gymnasiarch 977. 977.
senator,

painter,

SOU of SilvanUS

Arsinous 896.
4.

900.
also Called Ascl.

4, 31.

'Ar^pty

'Arp^i

984. 984. 935. introd.
father of

Horus 935. introd. daughter ofAgathodaemon990. daughter of Thonius 901. 4.
daughter of Sarapion 912.
i,

40.

daughter of Aurelius Hermogenes also called Eudaemon 907. 3 e/ saep. daughter of Antinous also
called

16, 21.

Hermogenes
3,

8 €

' ^
exegetes 907.
19•

SOU of Sarapion 890. 1 4. SOU of Aurelius Hermo-

genes also called

Eudaemon 907.
also
27.

3, 7, 10.

called

Eudacmon,

SOU of Aurelius Hermogenes also called Eudaemon 907. 3, 7,

public physician 896. 24, 37. son of Theogcncs 911. 4.
also

also called Asclepiades 912. 4.

called

Eudaemon

sur-

named

Hermes 909.

5.

Qeavois daughter of

Didymus 960.
907.
4,

also Called Prisca

daughter

of

Aurelius

also called

Eudaemon 907of

II; 14.

,
892.

^

Aristion, son of Aristion 964.

909. I. 964.
SOU of Chaeremon 912. prytanis 891. 6. StrategUS 890. 4•

.
also

called Apolinarius, prytanis

daughter
991.

Sarapion
5,

890. . SOU of Joseph 902. 2, prytanis 892. 6.

.

1 8.

daughter of Castor 913.
ex-exegetes 909. 8. SOU of HorUS 897. 4. SOU of Anesius 996.
6

22.
priest elect

also called Zeuxianus, chief-

970.
senator,

SOU

of

Horion

2.

(vice-praefect

?]

970.
governor of Aegyptus Herculia 896. 29. SOU of Sarapion 890. 14. son of Hareous 914. 3. son of Padidymus 913.
5, 21.

SOU of Paesius 897. 5SOU of Paesis 897. 4. SOU of Panouris 912. 6. 970. SOU of PtolUon 909.

I,

comarch,

son

of

Petirls

895.

4.

, :, ! ( , '
Avpi]\ios

V.

PERSONAL NAMES
president of the council 913.
2.

351

also called Apeis, senator
also called

977.

937.

I,

31.

Theon 960.
5•

980.

2apas 921. introd.
elder

897•

son of Aurclius

Ammonius

909.

8.

son of Daniel 914. 5. son of Serenus 909. 10, also called Horion, logistes

895.

3.

8,
908.
Beria[.]ts

934. I, 7• SOn of DidymUS 909. 12. 934. I, 7• comarch, son of Patabes 895. 4. son of Aurelius Hermogenes also called Eudaemon 907. 3, 7, 19.

, , ,
, , ,
908.
976.

daughter of Andromachus 973. father of Athanasius 939. 2, 33. SOU of Heraclides 938. i. SOn of DionySOtheOD

.

907. 20, 22.

.
i.

also

Called

ZoiluS,

exegetes 911.

899.

3

;

968.

.

daughter

of Aurclius

Hermogenes
3 e/ saep.

also called

Eudaemon 907.

907. 22; 960.
father of Aurelius Soterichus

909.

12.

son of Dionysius also called Phatreus
3.

899.

46.
also
called

898.

also Called Did., SOU of
3.

Aphr., gymnasiarch 977. goddess 921. 22.
also
12.

Demeas 909.

.
6.

public physician, son of

Called Isidorus,

gymnasiarch

Dioscorus 896. 24, 37.

/ €,

995.
father of Sarapion

985. son of Anchorimphis 918.
also called Ber,,

iii.

11.

gymnasi-

arch 908. 13.

,

Bjjffoif,

.
9.

943.
6

"

912.

I,

40.

,
911. 9.

.
I,

gymnasiarch
25.

906.

4, 5' 1

'>

^35.
7•

930.

linen-merchant 933.

. 907. 23. . riparius 897.
;

,

32.

3•

971

974.

987.

assistant of collector of corn-dues

€ ,
(?),

.

993.

father of Apollonius

969.

gymnasiarch 908. xi. father of Herodes 988.

972. 972.
also Called

Gai. 916. 11.

.

alsO called
also

Gaion
Called

(,

916. II.

(
990.

, ,
' '
986.

also

called
3.

Phatreus,

father

of

Didymus 898.

father of Ptolemaeus 910. 56.

.
.
father

also Called

AmmoniuS

also called Aphrodisius,

gymnasiarch 977.
of Aurelius

Gerontius, logistes 896.

,

23.

Demetrius

915.

I.

907. 20.

,'

castrensis (?) 1001. chartularius 943. 9•

god 917.

3.

son of John 996.

.

,

son of Dius 986. father of Onnophris 918. ii. 19 ; 986. son of Onnophris and father of Dius son of Onnophris and father of Hera-

SOn of Caecilius

father of Aurelius Serenus 914. 5.

cleus 986.

352
Aws son of Onnophris and oueris 986. 898. 10, 14, 1 7-

INDICES
father of Pene-

father of Aristander

988.

, , 8! , ,
25•

father of Aurelius

Didymus 896.

father of

Psenamounis 989.

. 977. . senator, son ,
907. 15
oioKepios
3.

,

'

father of
12.

Heron 986.

903. 5. 903.

banker's assistant 916. 18.
also
i.

Called

Zo.,

exegetes 911.

of Silvanus

900.

4.

elprjvrjs

991.

.

also Called Julianus,
introd.

logistes

900.

strategus

899.

.

of Sarapion 890.

14.

992.

'
" "

968. 967.
923.
3•

'[ 907.

, ,

father of
15-

Apphous 999.

' , (
3> 17. 19•

' ' '

928. 937.
(?)

3.
1

5

;

974.

926. 'J. 935. 2 . 926. I. 890. 17; 985. daughter of Theon 899. introd. son of ApoUonius 918. V. 19. father of Demetrius 938. i. SOn of AureliuS Hermogenes also called Eudaemon 907.

.

father of Heracleodorus

984.

wineseller 985.
also Called

. alsO Called EudacmOn,
and acting

Herm. 909.

5•

exegetes 907. , 27. basilicogrammateus
strategus

EioyyiXof smith 989.
also called

, ' , ,,
927.
I.

898.

i.

930.

2 8.

.

daughter of AntinOUS
3.

Hermes 909.

son of Lycus 984.
alsO Called Eud.,

, .. ,. , ,
named
903. 27.

son of Heracleodorus and father of Hierax 984. 934. 5 984. father of Choous 897. 8. son of Dius and father of Muslhas 986. son of Hierax 984. also called Matreas 898. 5. SOU of Pencoucris 986. son of Pcncoueris and father of Heracles 986. father of Ptolemaeus 984. son of Heracleus 986. son of Morus and father of ApoUonius 905. 4, 17. son of Ptolemacus 984.
;

exegetes 907. 1,27.

father

of

Apion public physician

Eud. SUrson of Aristion 964. praefect 899. 29.
alsO Called riparius
logistes

983.

897.
892.

3•

907.

.

.

sitologUS

939.

(?)

973.

" " " " "
xi.

988.

son of Diouysius 988. comogrammateus 986. father of Heron 918. ii. 19. son of Heron and father of Patunis 918. ii. 12, 18, 24. son of Nestnephis and father of Patunis 918. iii. 12. village-elder, father of A[.]apes 918.
12.

alsO

called

Zeux.,

chief-priest elect

970.

son of

Xenon 986.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES
896.

",

"Up.

public physician

! 5

24, 37•

888. lo; 921. 12; 935. introd. daughter of Panesneus 984. 932. I. daughter of Amphithales 928. 4.
984.
son of Aischuras 984. daughter of Menodorus 905. 3. daughter of Pesouris 918. ii. 12,

, , ''
10.

353

. 964. . also

Called Prisca

907.

4, 16, 21.

,^ ,
928. 906.

.

919.

7••

.

1 4.

.

son of Chaeremon 912.
also
called
Is.,

gym-

22, 24. Oeavovs 935. 24,
Qeavois,

. daughter of Didymus 960.

Qeapovs 963.
father of Theogenes 911. 4. SOU of Theogenes 911. 4. father of Aurelius Theogenes 911. GioyeViji, SOU of TheOgeneS 911. 942. 7. 902. 5.

€ € /
,
908.

(€ (5

nasiarch 908. 12. son of Panephremmis 918. ii. 19. 941. 995. ; father of Georgius 996. fsLiher of Paniren 893. 2. father of Aurelius Macarius 902. 2, 18. notary 940. 7.
father of

4. 4.

Agathodaemon 990.

.

, /
also
10.

931. I, 1 6. Qeav 899. introd.; 935. 24.
called Antimachus,

935. introd. 934. 7. 921. 8. pilot 919.

gymnasiarch

. also Called Asclepiades 912. 4. . also called Eudaemon sur964.

<.

' •,
KepfA[,

913.

5, 2 2.

968.

[ ]
3.

965.

€),

named

Aristion, son of Aristion

.

909.

II.

930. 24-

'! 989.
936. 2 7• ex-agoranomus, son of Hieracion
910.
I. i.

^,

,
, ,
,

father of Hieracion 910. son of Heracleodorus 984. father of Heracleus 984. 924. 15; 925. 4. 992.

,^ ,(
908.
6.

,/ /
Gaion(?) 916. 11.

919.

. .
II.

7•

also

called

gymnasiarch

piaefect 895. 8.

934. 934. 7,

6.

,

. epistrategus 899. . prytanis 891. 6.
pracfect

30•

son of Pekusis 899. 49•

980.

.

895.

8.

alsO called

Jul., logistes

900.

3.

€|/$
,
936.
1

.

acting defensor 901.

3.
i.

,

914. 3• 931. II.

.
.

strategus

928.

father of Pausanias
2, 1
1

936.

€[

919.
8.

^

890.
965.

4•

(?).

also Called
i.

972.

Apolinarius, prytanis 890.

monk 994.

. 941. 3• . defensor

902. .

984. son of Horus and father of Eudaemon 984. father of Orseutes 984.

Aa

354

,
l8.

INDICES

.

SOn of Joseph 902.

2,

893.
naveaveis
cration

I.

freedman,

father

of

Petarpoiii.

992. Map'ivos tow-merchant 893. 4, 5, 8. Marcus Ulpius Primianus praefect 894. 4. 893. 2, 4• also Called Mat. 898. 6. Marpe'iva daughter of Heracleus also called Matreas 898. 5. 943. I. 922. 21. 943. 2. SOU of HorUS 905. 2, 1 5. MiriKios KopeXXioros epistrategus 899. 30. Moveli 983. SOU of Heracleus 986. father of Heracles 905. 17.

984.
father of Apollonius 918.
8.

,

^ , /
NiWapof
Ntrj/oCs

€ 8
929.
941.
father

, 1( ,
,

father of Ision 918.

ii.

19.

son of John 893.

I.

father of Aurelius Patutis 912. 6.

. SOU of Paesius 897. 6.

984.

. also Called Zeuxianus, chief6, 12, 15.

priest elect

970. 899. 2 7, 3 .

naCTiW public banker 916. smith 989.

.

senator, SOn of

€'^( father of Heron 918.
I,

. prytanis

892.
iii.

6.

12.

26.

929. 1,25.
I (?).

of
3.
7.
ii.

Apollonius

also

called

Didymus 909.
918.
father of

, / , ?

892.

2.

father of Ammonas 986. SOU of Aurelius Psois 805. 5. SOU of PaesiuS 897•

.

4.

984. {) 922.

7.

father of Harmiusis
father of

986.
ii.

Ameous 918.

15.

son of Heron 918. ii. 11, 19, 23, iii. 12. SOU of PanOUris 912. 6. collector of corn-dues 976. SOU of Julius Alexander 936. i.

.

8 ,
Onnophris 984.
896.
i,

Dius 986. SOU of Dius and father of Anchorimphis 918. ii. 11, 18, 23, xi. 20; 986. son of Horus 918. iii. 7. SOU of Orscutcs 984. SOU of Lycophron and father of
also Called Gerontius, also
Called

984.
(?)

992.
xiii.

918.

13.

father of

((
e'ip

899. 49•

989.

logistes

23; 983.
JulianUS,

logistes

900.

3.

son of Dius 986. father of Heracleus 986. lifi/foCpts son of Heracleus 986. ileaoCpty father of Theabesis 918.ii.i2, 22,24. son of Panesneus 984. SOU of Phaulas 986.

praefeCt

.

899.

29.

pracfeCt

888.

I.

father of Sisuphis

984.

/
5, 22.

984.
8, p.

(

985.
4.

SOU of Ammonas 986. son of Aurelius Sakaon 895.

ropemaker 934. 984.

4.

901.

989.
father of Aurelius

Harmiusis 913.
6.

father of Aurelius Papnoutius

897. father of Aurelius Patapis 897. 5.

, ,

exceptor 942. 6. horse 922. 13.

906.

4, 7,

.

933.

2 7•

986.
Taios

.

'

U.praefect 888.1.

972.

^ ,
907.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES

9.
4>

984.
also Called Prisca

, ,
891.
916.

355
921. introd.
elder

6,

21.

, //
.

935. introd. Primianus, Marcus Ulpius P. praefect 894.

? , ,
\( \(
970.

4.

930.

30.

basilicogrammateus 986. son of Dionysius 910. 56. son of Hcracleus and father of Heracles 984. son of Hieraciaena

.

. daughter of Hermogcnes
Eudaemon 907.
called
3,

also called

n,

14.

also

Sarmates,

exegetes

, '
891.
I,

8.

' , ' ( ^
8.
9.

.

897.

5•

also Called Sann.,exegetes

984.

899.

21.

.

praefeCt

899.

J

928. 999.

.

/75

daughter of Heracleus 984. daughter of Panesneus 984. daughter of Panesneus 984.

899.

21.

father of Aurelius Ptollion
AvpfjXios

909.

i,

.

37.

son of Ptollion 909.

,
, , ,
895. 984.

984. 984. 984.
daughter of Lycus 984.

)(€(€

984.

,
890.

also

called Apolinarius, prytanis

.

37•

935. I. banker 943.

,

5•

father of

Ammonius 986.

father of Serenus

909. 10.

: €€7 2
907. 15 989.
;

Sabina, Ulpia S. 894. 6.

son of Serenus 909. 10. . SOU of Aurelius
8.

Ammo-

932. 9

nius 909.

994.

. SOU of Daniel 914. 5. . also called Horion, logistes
3.

father of

Teos 910.

3, 48.

father of Anteis 976.

father of Aurelius Dioscorus

900.

4.

912. 2. daughter of Herodes 988. 890. I ; 912. 2; 918. V. 18; 935.
14,

SOU of Ophieus and father of Sisuphis
pastophorus, son of Sisuphis 984. father of Ameous 918. ii. 14. daughter of Marcus 893. 4, 5, 8.

23

991. son of Belleos 985.
;

968;

ex-agoranomus, father of Apollonius

, , ,
908.

and Domittianus 890.
I,

15.

also called Horion, son

of ... on
i,

44. strategus of Sebennytus 931.

15.

. . .
932.
g.

also

Called

Apeis,

senator 977.
also called

Theon 960.

.
890.
i.

also

called Apolinarius, prytanis

, ,
991.
. .

. 934. , 7• out'oy,O.dioecetes 899.
936.
5-

,

999.
introd., 2.

984.

. SOn of Didymus909.

12.

daughter of Harmieus 918. iii. 8. . daughter of Sarapion

SOU of Horion 913. 24.
996.

984. 909.
.

12.

also Called Agathoclia, daughter of

Aristion 964.

974.

899. 3• 905. 2.

Aa

2

356

INDICES
84.

{ : !
,
937.

, 3•

. daughter of Castor 913. 5.
999.

22.

99.
?)

984.
daughter of Onnophris 918. 937. 26.
ii.

'! !
dioecetes

actmg defensor 901. 3• defensor 902. I. OiaXtpios praefeCt 888. SOn of Horion 913. 24.
991.

I.

899.
893.

introd., 2.

6.

941.

8.
2.

father of Apollos

TarrayoCf 984.

05.

4•

•)3

' / :
91.
II.
liypiQi

(!'\8
932.
I.

984. 984. 984. Tfoiyjris 984. Tfpew 984. ) 984. 984. son of Sarapammon 910. 3. 4^• . 972. praefect 899. 28.

(
92•
Xaipeas

comes 994.
ex-councillor 902. 4•

940. 995.

5•

(

6

(.?).

(
6.

900.

1 5.

,
(?)

son of Anchorimphis 918.
strategus 970.

xi.

20.

father of Aurelius Isidorus 912. 10.

,

934.

I,

7•

Xf(V(s 984.

also called

Gaion

gymnasiarch 908.

6.

929.

7•

ordinarius 942.

7•

(
/ /
* * * *
908.
895.

924. 15; 925. 4• 903. 20, 28, 3• son of Heracleus 897.

8, 13.

^-^
Ulpius,

984.

935. 28.

984. son of Dloscorus 989. 'iTfVTOvs 984. 984. *<5 984.
963.

Ulpia Sabina 894.

Marcus U. Primianus praefect 894. 4.

, : !
\((

!

888. 906.

, .

12

:

918.

.

3•

^ !
\(

father of Petesorphiomis 986. son of Petesorphiomis 98.

father of Aurelius Pasion 892. 2.

also called Berenicianus, gymnasiarch
13.

984.
also Called Phat., father of

Didymus 898. 4. 900. 15; 985.
907•
II.

937. 15.

strategus

898. 26

!

922. 14,

6

;

957.
2.

;

93. 2.

magistrianus 904.

. ' , . , ^
3•

father of Flavius Sarapion 913. 24.

also called Hor., logistes

son of Aurelius Her mo-

genes also called

3, 17, 19. also Called Hor., son of ... on

Eudaemon 907.

908. I, 44. 900. 15.
father of

984. 939. , 32. 904. .
riparius

897. 897. 3• logistes 892. .
riparius

3•

Anchorimphis 918. xi. 21. Amois 897. 4. son of Auctus 935. introd. father of Lycus 984. father of Menodorus 905. 2. father of Onnophris 918. iii. 7.
father of Aurelius

VI.

GEOGRAPHICAL
GEOGRAPHICAL.

357

VI.

Aegyptus 894. 888. I

'(8(889.

/
;

{a)

Countries, Nomes, Cities, Toparchies.
898. 9
13.

3, 4.

"
19-

UiKpa'O. 888. 8;

895

899. introd. 896. 29.
lo; 899. introd

923.

934. 3; 998. Alexandria 894. 4. 'AvTivofvs 937. 20, 23, 29.

"
AvTivois

909.

-^
;

6.

AuTivoewv

' ,-.
896. 3• 907.
2

() ()

970. 903.

33 933. 32 919. 6 J 922. 5•
29,

(?)

^!/

895. 888. 8 ; 892. 896. , 23 ; 898. 899. introd,, 5, 16; 900. 3; 3; 805. 6; 916. 7; 923. 13; 929. 8; 991. 889. 13 ; 890. 4 891. 4 5 896. 3, 25; 899. 3; 900. 5; 807. , 809. 9; 811. 3; 813. 26; 908. 4» J 4; 914. 4, 20; 990; 999. 888. 7» 8, 1 1 898. 4 912. 3• 909. ; 910. ; 911. ; Oxyrhynchus (? Oxyrhynchorum urbs) 894.
;

()
7

3

;

.

6

;

;

;

2

5

990.

() ()

899. 23. 922. 1 7896. 29.

,
7•

; ,
= =

3. 5• () 921. 21.902. KuzOTToXtray (),

.

/
919.

922.
4•

5•

986.

'/ ^
919.
991.

'\

900. 6. f . 901. 5• 986. Nilopolis 942. Cynopolis 902. 2. Oxyrhynchus 889. 14, 15 892. 3? 4. 9 ; 896. 9, 30 ; 899. 6 ; 904. 4 ; 808. 6 909. 13; 810. 3; 811. 5; 814. 6; 962. 902. 895. 5•

.

/Liepis

=

;

;

.

919.
7•

5•

(rroXts)
;

899. 42
991.

942. 900. 6 913. 6
.

;

;

, (
7(0(
©eayeiOVP

931.

5•

(8, Arsin.) 986.
J

(Oxyrh.) 910.

5•

931.

.

^
^°^'

(?)

(b)

Villages;

^ / "
Evrv;^taSo9

^, .
998.

.

Oxyrhynchite.

989.

/7
.

999. 893.

2.

922.

,* '.
998. 989.

.

897.

6.

989.

EiayyeXetov

998.
96.

tno'iK,

/3(/ 998.

358

IN^^

*\ 997.

!

(c)

QW.

13•

964.

8 /
Deme
915.
8.

VII.

RELIGION
of Oxyrhynchus.
984.
912. II.
Kpjprtdof

359

{d)

Tribe and
Nepoutoi/fto?

(Antinoite).
970.

Tevtapxeios

', ^ ;^7 .

(^)

Miscellaneous (Buildings,

! (
(
,
3•
918.

896. 7• 988. 896. 8. Cf. 892. 899. introd., 6.
(Arsinoite)

,, ',
.
892.
2.

&c.).
II.

.

941. 4•

899.

introd. 6.

908.

8.

(Arsinoite) 986.

'ifTfioj/,

!

(5
.
903.

986.

(Arsinoite) 918.

.

3j

3)

"-

?;

17, 21.

€8. 988.
7•

(Arsinoite)

.

896. 907. 8.

/
(^
TfKmi/tf
6, 13;

915.

2.

892.
),

8.

aa)\)7f Xi-yopez/os
1 4•

.

1002.

923.

988.

1 9)

21.

•)/
17, 21.

!

(Arsinoite) 918.

.

$, 13,


V.

896.

7•

(Arsinoite) 918.

VII.

RELIGION.
() Pagan.

", (6

':
',
'upov

(a)

Gods.

(6

984. 984.

^eoi

/

917. 3
;

(?)•

933. 7

835.

3>

;

836.

5-

921. 2 2.

!
908.

() Temples.
8.

984.

Up."

984.
(•)

€/
Priests.

984.
923.
9•

°"'^^''^'^''^ 911. 2.

984.

apxuptCs 970.

360

INDICES
(d) Miscellaneous.
top.

,
it pa

933•
9•

3•

923.

'

908.

9•
(?)

7•

917.

3•

908.

(2)

Christian.
Titles.

() Divine

8( (
((6
29-

903. 37

(6

^
;

924. 17939.

';;
4•

8(.
;

939.

/cuptof

941. 8

942.

3, 4

;

939. 4• 925.

^«"^ C®"

943. g. 924. II.

.
()

924. 5 925. 4 943. 7• ^ijTvp 924. 15. 924. 15• 924. 1 6. 924. 5•
;

925.

4-

Ecclesiastical Titles.

huLKovoi

993(?).

994.
941.
(f)
4•

903. 5•

(, 5,

,

Miscellaneous.

.
ayios

993.
(^(9

€\. 993.
. 941.
4•

(=

940.

)

941.

4•

;

925. 7• 995.

VIII.

OFFICIAL
2.

AND MILITARY
See

890. l6; 910.
907.
2 I

.
,
(.
D.

TITLES.
5

(€ ^
(.

ap^as 900. 4

;

990.
2.

908. 1 5 977. 908. 3•

.
.
,
37•

969.
911.

970. 907. 21

;

922.

( ,

, 88 \ . €8.
{)
123) 898.

.

D.

199) 899. 34> 3^•

.-( , (
3,

9•

2) 899. introd.,

8(.
i^)

\ -(.
;

(. D.

902. 902. I.

, 8.
;

901.

3•

«,
2

D.

131-2) 986. 976. Cf. Index XI. 888. 8 ; 892. 2 900. 4 907. 911. 3; 977; 984. . 891. 5 892. 5•
;

;

;

,.
Cf.

.

891.

908. 3, 14 J 909. 9• 907. I 911. 9j
;

977. 888. 8.
;

942. 6

(?).

\
(. D.
33 1) 990.

( .(( • '
(a. D.

ۥ . ((
.

VIII.

OFFICIALS

AND MILITARY

TITLES

361
QQ9.

899. 25. 146-7) 899. 30.
991.
5, 1 6.
I p.

KoptWiavos

942. 7. 896. 28.

908. 908.

€/$•

902. 899.
See
ij>^v,

904. 899. 28. OvaXfpms (. D. (. D. 1 4 1— 2) 899. 2g. Ulpius Piimianus (?), praefectus Aegypti 894. 4.

See 899. 25;

(. . )
igS) 816.

-

praefectus. j^*.*v-.v.^iv»o.

. (.
12.
7,
"
.

902.

{.

35> 42, 47•

'

900.

5•

899.

.

(.

D.

, (.

.

D.

20)

AvpfjXios

(}

identical with Alp. 'Avtivoos, vice-praefect
A. D.

in

215-6) 970.
6

888. . (. D. 3^5) 895. (unnamed) 931. 8

,

896.

2.

(5
;

( !!.(
(. D. 287)

^ ^
.
965; 976.
907.
;

889

°

""" 899. 43, 48;
;

917.

981-2.

.

958

(?).

Q33.

3•
918.
2.

.

3, 12.

943.

984.
913.
4•

.
;

.

890. 3

891. 7

'.
892.
5•

889.

1

3

;

7•

967.

(.

D.

3 '6)

,
(.?)

'
.

897.

3

5

904.
986.

3•

973

;

896. 26; 983.

\

911. 8.

1001.
5•

. ()
;

123) 898. 26
third cent.)

994. 895.

.
See

957.

. ' ^
899.
986.
305) 895.
3•

introd., 24,

3^

>

970;
(.

'

\

D.

, ^
VII. (2)

repoiTios

(.
3•

D.

316) 896.

\

2,

23;

983.

(second cent.) 931. 15•

€ (( . , .
(third cent.)
5.

899. introd. 929. 25. cent.) 970.

[] "(?)
(late

.
(.
D.

200) second or
d.

(.

Unnamed 899.
(3)

,
.
5•
2,
;

(early third

890.

17, 42.

See

.
1

322) 900. 892. .

(.

D.

(. D. 33^)

902.
943.

.
7•

904.

2.

922. 21 ; 943. 3• 893. ; 900.19; 980. 893. 2, 3, 4•

6
Cf.

,
1

6.

. 916.

. 916.
7•

3,

999.

Cf.

Index

III.

899. 5°; 916. 8.
931. 6

940.

933. 24.
(J)

933. 25.

929.

2 5•

Index

(^).

943. 995.

9•

362

INDICES
IX.

WEIGHTS, MEASURES,
{a)

AND
2,

COINS.

Weights and Measures.
915.
3;

-^

935. 19.
6, 7,

1000-1002.
/LI.

apovpa 899.

16; 907. 8, 9, ii, 13, 18 24; 910. 7, 10, 12, 50; 913. 10, 20 (?) 935. 21 (?) 916. 8 ; 918. introd. ei saep.
;

986; 988.
903. 22, 23, 24; 907. 24; 908. 28, 35; 910. 10, i8, 52, 55; 918. introd. et saep.; 920. i ; 932. 5; 934. 10; 960;

, ,
910.
34•

21.

SC.

= 3^

artaba" (?)

920.

8 /
2.

994; 999.

966; 974; 979; 986; 994; 998-9. 986. fractions: ^986. ^QSQ. JL 918. introd. 986. ^^ 986. ^^ 918.
Unusual
introd.
biKOTvkov

905.

5•

]

907. 24•

/.

910.

.

^

931.
leoTT^s

4•

;

/
(tvyos

^ ^86.

|^

918. introd.

937. 27. 992-3.

^

921. 23•
921. introd.

936. 15, 16.
936.
7, 9.

,
?
II
;

SC.

£//907

24; 919. 8;

999. 928. 961. introd.
*,

994

;

12; 937. 27. (?) 995.

: €.
(?)

(

;

980.
5•

.

-Toy)

921. introd.

,

(80!,

919.

938.

3> 6.

905.

5•

936. 40.

See

936.

.
';
;

7•

(^)

Coins.
922.
Bpfias

896. 15, ?; 909. 19; 912. 14•

898. 12; 907. 25;

/;/«/ 914.

14,

.

9,

6, 8, 22, 23, 26. 995; 999.
;

998.
;

3; 916. 12

896. 15, 7• 890. 6(?); 895. 13, 1 5, 6; 906. 909. 2; 910. 13, 53; 12. 14;

917.

4, 5

920. 3

971

;

981

985.

/ ^».

;

917.

2, 3, 45

5

5

918.

920.

ei saep.;

934.

6, 7, 9>

,

,
;

917•

4•

8\

964; 977; 980-1; 985-6. 920. , 5> 6 ; 971; 981.
917.
.2.

€\

,

Kepariov

998.

. 905.

? :
5•

898. 12; 907. 25• 917. 3 > 985. 985.

936.

7•
;

917. 3

981.
;

^)
914.

995

(?).

9,

995. 905.

,
5•

koijoC

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
X.

363

TAXES.
931.
7-

,
932.
,,),

981—2.
(?)

997.
S^

. 903.
4•

(

5

^^.

23

;

913. l^

»?.
5

See jj\ 986.
981.

«/; 917.

2.

917. 3

>

981.

899.

9•

(
,,+

965
916.
3•
7)

;

976

;

986.
917.
3•

(=

,5ySO»7 ?)

7>

2

.
899.

(?)

919.

919.
9•

3•

909.

2 2.
2.

»

917.

(?)

917.

2.

'

899.

4°•

Cf.

Index XI.

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS.
&8o\os 910.

933. 29.

930. 23. 899. 44910.
aytof
2 7•

^^^
;
;

33 ; 988. 935. 9• 904. 5• 942. 5•

);

988. 924. 16; 925.

988.
941. 4> 993.

935. 923. 9• ayopafciv 922. II, 22

?

:
8\
aes

3^109 904. 6. 918.
918.

.

..

4•

890.

6

J

933. 29, 30• 910. 2.

: ;
: '

962. 967.
; ;

939. 12. 1 2 ; 930. 23 931. 1 ; 935. 4 937. 2, 9, 3; 94; 967. 888. II. 942. 2, 5• 892. 3, 12 902. 5 ©03. 1 5 ; 904. 934. 6; 907. 25 928. 2 929. 2, 942. 6 943. 9 995. 2 ; 935. 2, 6, 23 943. . 898. 7 ; 901. II 902. (6>( 902. 7Siucof 902. 17.

3.

986. 892. 6; 906. 7; 909. 27; 913. II, 28, 3°, 35• 903. 907. 4• atVciv 898. 18, 23. alavios 996.
911. 14
;

,

.

912. 20.

5«/^ 909.

17, 24, 28.
22
;

910.

914.

.
4.
2.

;

;

;

;

2

;

);

;

;

;

904. 904. 9•

9•

931.

9•
,*

;

.

899. introd. 988. 899. 30, 33,46; 916.9; 899. introd.

5«5

3^4

INDICES
910. 33
912.
1
;

.
aKvpos
iii.

988.

918. introd.,

xi. 5, 14•

-

906.

8, 9.

9•

939. 12. 925. 5•

(€
8, 23
;

899. 44* 898. 21.
907. 7• 939. 5• 902. II. 939. 4•
916.
8.

^^ ^/ ;
908.
925.
13.

26, 34•
2.
7,

913.

918.

.

15, 20,

906. 3; 909. 9• 899. 895. 13, 3^; 902. 15; 903. 28; 904. 4, 5; 906• 51 913. 6; 918. . 17, iii. , 2, 15; 921. 13; 922. 23, 25; 929. 15; 939. 3; 940. 3, 4;

,

€ ^
^^
;

984; 988; 999.

/ /
(€

929. 21 ; 963. 929. introd.
;

(

/ ' 5
988.

918. xi. 4, 1 6) 8• 910. 32 988. 903. 3; 904. 7; 905. 13; 907. 24; 910. 19; 939. 23; 975. 934. 9) 12. 930. 8. 933. 20, (q(9) 925. 7-

898. 37• 939. 25. 906. 8. 903. 36. 907. 2 2. 893. 1 898. 907. 2. 5 avievai 902. 1 6. annus 894. . avoiKohopav 986. 907. 21.
;

;

899. 8, 26

;

905.

943.
QQ'J
.

8.

19.

/7« 907.

8; 909.

5•

909. 23. 985.
967.
;

/
dmr

899. introd., 892. 9• 900. 13. 899. 43•
4.

33•

941.

971; 985.
971. 918. . 912. 21

//

911. 13; 912. II

964; 984.
;

/^
902. 989.

.

;

964. 896. 25 898. 15; 932. 8; 935. 13•

895. 5

;

921. 17.
;

888. 5 909. 936. 24. 899. 2 6, 895.

25,
2 7,

29
3^

;

913. 20.

.

930. 4• 898. 36 899.
>
',

II.

, '
^

907. 8 922. 940. 3• 893. .
; ;

913. 17, 19; 914. 2, 8; 31.

4•

;

900. 1 8. 899. introd. 899. 4^• ai'afijreii' 897. 9• 939. 25. 899. introd;, 37 902. 7 985. 986. 985. 891. 13 900. II 929. introd.; 936. 43; 971; 985; 999.
amyKij

/^ ///!/


^^

;

;

1

;

899. 13; 912. 30. 898. 37; 899. 26, 47; 900. 14; 902. 13 913. 24; 989. 899. 24, 2 8. 890. 7; 929. 7; 939. 17899. 4°, 43> 4^• 905. II, 3, 4• 893. 899. 6, 26, ^. 903. 12, 2 8. 900. 12 904. 9• 908. 23 ; 936. 22. 939. 4 ; 943. g. 898. 984. anevTevufV 903. 16, 17. 898. 15, 8. 903. 19, 20 925. 5; 936. 20 943. 3;

;

;

;

;

;

.^;
964.

:
46
;

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
936.
QlS.'u.^^el saep.\
1 6.

365

986; 988.

((.

985. 900. 1 3.
921. introd.

906.

5.

970

J

984.
910.

907. 21 900. 4; 990. ill. II, xi. 10 967. 969. 995.
;

^
;

922. 3, 9• 918. .

,

14,

,^,

984.

8(8((
;

911. 2.

!
' 14, 22.

976. 8(8. apxitptvs 970. 939. II. 902. 14 905. 12; 910. 3°» 55; 912. 19; 813. 23; 914. 2; 937. 31 ; 942. 2; 988. 922. 20, 21, 24. 904. 5 918. introd.; 929. 17.

,

,

{)
8.

^' ^^
;^7 \
QTiXijr

970. 903. 21. 906. 984. ;
911.
6.

930. 22, 26; 932. 9; 933.

5,

;

921. . 907. 941. •

26; 934.15; 935.22,26; 936.13,47; 963. 904. 2. 977. 938. 7-

5•

908.
8.

&(
;

.
;

936.

»!/ 942.
901.

903.
2,

6.

904.
965.
911. 15;

4•

3

986.

5•
8,

900. 939. 24• 902. 6, 895.

,

926. 4
1

1 4,

5•
15
J

13,

938.

3;

7) 939.

977.

998. 904.

8.

.

anoTiVfiv 912. 29•

!
913.

899. introd. 898. 23; 906. 964. See Index 896. 15, ?; 898. 12; 907. 25; 909. 19; 912. 14. 896. 12. 902. 14; 995. 909. 17; 929. 7•

.

;

888. 907. 19; ©09. 2, 4, 6; 984. 932. 5• 939. 1 6. 939. 28. 943. 3) 6, 7• 899. "XPt 898. 18; 906. 6; 940. 2; 943. 4•

^

927. 3• 910. 14. 918. V. 20. c

;
.

|

933. 15921.
29.
.

1 8.

^aXamof 892. 9; 896.
.

9•

.
.

903.

/3/[
|3//

apuTTtpos 941. 5•
3•

. « .
apKeiv

903. 27. 906. 7• See Index IX («). 920. 12. ?!/ 907. 15. 9• 909. 25, 29• See Index IX (a), 936. 22, 23, 25; 941» upTOKoireiop 908. 23•

6.

( ,. . . /
914.
7•
/Sapetv

935. introd. 934. 9•

939. 23. 903.

.
899. 22; 918.
7>

iii.

6, 9,

4>•
8.

986. See Index VI
6,'_8.
;

•; ^.

,

23,

/3(4/ 914.

.

986; 988(?). and /3.

936.

907. 14*; 910. 29 929. introd.

912. 15.

366

INDICES
89. 27 93. 22.
900. 4•
28.
;

899.

introd., 33> 31> 38,

46;

916. 12, 15; 918. introd., xi. 1^ 22, xiii. 3> 18; 925. 7; 932. 2;
14,

2, 4, 13,

2

933.
;

;

939.
937.
3•

7

;

974 981 986 990
;

;

5

/StKof

93.

994-5; 998-9.

905. II• /377 904. 5904. 4902. 1 1 907. 22. 973 /3;?^? 903. 26, 31 902. 6, 4•
,*

;

;

976.
;

/Sopptjf

( .
23
;

'
988.
907.
2 1,

918.

.

6
8.

/ ^.

;

986

892.

900. 12; 901.
;

, 13;

907. 3 ; 935. 943. . 996. 976. 939. 4 998. 976. 938. 6.
;

2 2.

913. 7
;

;? 891. 5

925. 5• See Index VIII.
5•

:

892. 907. , 14,

26,

27; 990.

901.

5•

.
7/

921. introd.

898. 15; 907.2; 908. 38; 910. 58; 913.25; 937.3©; 939. 8; 942. 2; 963; 990. See Index VIII.
914.
1 8,

20.

^(
yeiTCuv

905. , 12, 1 5, 903- 7• 905. 4, 9, 17 ; 90• 8

,

7

J

^07. 20.
927.
2.

;

(^) .
918. 913.

.) 937.
( «=

27.
.'')

1001.
;

5 ^^
;

•^•

;

986

988.

1 1

985.

;(

999. 1000.
35; 913.
12, 18.
7•

yfovxos 910. 16, 24,

» (
85

922.

984. 899. 899.

. ,
!
918.

895. 12, 1 4• 893. 6; 896. 21 ; 898. g ; 899. introd., 40, 41 ; 905. 18; 908. 38 909. 34; 910.57; 913.21, 25; 914. 19; 916. 9 ; 929. 20; 930. 2 ; 932. 2 ; 935. 16, 17; 936. 29; 937. 3' 21; 938.6; 939. 12, 24 940. 5; 967 ; 990. 988.
; ;

. 4,

.

8,

4•
902. 3
918.

introd., 16, 18, 24, 26, 28, 31,

32, 38 ; 913. 15. yewpyor 899. introd., 32, 44

984. 903. 7• 899. introd., 25, 28, 44 ; 907. 3» 16, 20; 934. 12; 935. introd., 943. 5; 984; 992. 899. introd. 909. 26. 899. 40; 905. 10; 906. 6; 913. 19;

,

See Index VIII. See Index VIII.

>

;

ii.

II, 23,iii. 7, 14, xi. 7, 18, 21 ; 974; 899. 44 ; 910. i7, 20, 23, 40, 49 ;

999.
913.

16, 17, 23; 938. 5; 999. 899. 22 918. ii. 10, 23, iii. 6, 9, 14, xi. 986; 988 (.?). 7, xiii. 10; 929. 14. 899. introd., 22. SC. 986. 889. 1 8. 904. 2. 889. 892. II ; 894. 8; 895. 6; 896. 29,32; 898. 2; 899. 8, 40; 900. 8, 19; 901. 7; 903. 17; 904.4, 5»* 905. 11,14; 906. g; 907. 2 5(?); 910. 27, 36; 912. 32; 914. 9, 5; 915. 3;
;

8( 8
Sell/

\(

-

-

936. 31• Bemvflv 926. 2.
910. 4 1
;

988.

8(

896.

6,

;
;

899. 5,
5•

4;

907. 22.

-

/^ 902.
»;?
30.

(! 906. ;
1

997(.').

941.

6.

.^

902. 7• 942. 6 943. 9 939. 4• Cf. Index II. 937. 29.

;

/.
998
;

1001.

939•

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
964.
910.

367

^
hr,

8. .
;

899. 14; 902. I3(?); 907. 16. 893. 7. 896. 9 899. introd., 38, 39 902. 19; 906. 8; 941.8; 972; 984; 986. 925. 3. 903. 22, 2*J 988. 8. 903. 31 910. 2 3 913. 1 7 932. ^. 896. 8. 899. 4. introd., 22. 900. 9• ^W. 8. 896. 26; 983. 892.
;
;
',

5•
45•

899. 2 , 920. . 904. 2. 899. introd.
18.

;

905. 9

;

909. 8

;

914.

;

II.

.

918.

V.

20.

. ..

;

916.

7•

/3?
.

!
/

<;(6^

;^

\€
7;^€'

906. 9• 896. 15, 7• 935. 7• di(a) 913. 900. 3• 890. 916. 6. 890. 9• 898. 2 899. 34» 3^• 895. introd. 996. 896. 3 . 907. 6. 962. 943. 3• 906. 6.

26.

;
;

' ( ^
19.
11,

.
929.

937. 27. 2; 935.

1 6.

901. 3• See Index VIII.

1000

988. 905. 18

/.
;
;

1002-3.
See Index

IX

{a).

909.34) 913.

2;

914.

;

978. 940. 3 943. 5• 918. . 3 et saep. 988. 891. 12; 898. 39 899.41; 902. 15; 937. 17; 938. 7; 939. 17, 24; 940. 3• 928. 7• 924. 3•
; ; 5

912.

2

;

917.
5,

4•
1 6,

• / ^;

993(?).

898.
(.'').

3^•

957

904.

2.

. eaf

903.
15
;

2,

924. See Index IX 936. 38.

.

9.

25,

32, 34;

907.

{b).

933. 21. 977. 898. 25; 902. 17895. introd., 7• 888. 918. introd., xi. 2 ; 973. 918. V. 1 5•
;

';^'
923.

900. 7 ; 911. 3• 929. 8, 15. 899. 8 ; 905. 930. 898. 25, 34; 899. 31 ; 939. 15; 942. 4• 9; 932. 8 904. 7•
; ;

;

940. 904.

4•

7>

939. 8. 899. 2 8. 899. 22.
918. . 4• 937. 7• 907. 2 . 938. 4• 914. 7•
/m 891.

988.

897. 5• 15; 899. introd., 371 903. 8, 904. 3; 907. 6, IX, 23 23, 24, 25, 30 915. 919. 922. e/ saep. 923. 15; 931. 6; 934. 935. 936. 1 2, 1 7 ; 937. 30 ; 943. 5 974 ; 985. 899. II.
;

,

; ;

;

;

( ( ( ^ .
eyyvaa^at
cyyvf
12,

6.

\
913. 24.

889. 7•

896. 902. ; 905. 1 7 ; 972. 972. 940. 6 ; 941. 7. 906. 3• 903. 2, 12, 20, 23, 898. 9• 900. 9j 1 8. 892. 7•

3

,

17.

2 6.

emu

;

899. 35

913. 26. 901. 6

6,

22,

.

;

3> 9)

;

913. g
7> 8
J

;

918.

.

986.

368

INDICES
900.
"

'

fl^ivai

7, lo; 909. 7. 891. 16; 892. 4; 895. 21; 897. 14; 903. 34, 37;

11; 896. 910• 57;

913.25; 929.3,22; 930.9; 942.3; 963; 967. fiSot 889. 10; 899. introd.
(Ibos
fiKos

905. 6; 937. 22
941.
6.

;

957.

(
fiTTip
€tf.

942. 3. 991.
^iac

940.
(?).

6.

( '
£
e/cei

(laaydv

985

fiffaycuyof

918.

xi. I7•

900. 7; 910. 26; 912. 8. 896. 13 986. pa^ii QQO. 12; 914. 14. 899. 17 ; 904. 6 ; 907. 4, 5 22, 20, 29; 939. 27. fKartpos 905. 19 906. 7 ; 908. 38.

(
(
««.

;

€ / ( ( . ^ « ( €(
896.
II.

€€€ 896.

921. introd, 919. 4; 939.
5
;

1

2.

897.

7•

890. II. 899. 13; 918. xi. 899. 9• (, 888. 889. 13 890. 3 891.
;
;

.
8.
cV.

7

;

892.

(?) SC.

918.

.
2.

5•
9>
^

2

899. 4• 899. 12; 907.
943.
4•

,
;

;

908.

€(> 918.

;

€\ (8(
(7
eKetPos

ii.

18, xi. 20.

903. 34, 36. 939. 27. eic5t6oVm 905. 2, 15. 937. 7. 901. 3. See Index VIII.

( ( ^ !
ei/iicei/

900. 19• 898. 1 7 892. II.
;

;

900. 12

938.

evdvat 912. 12.

902. 12 943. 3• 903. 2 7, 31 ; 914. 896. 32.
967.
;

900, 7 (?)• 800. 889. 16, 17 810. 40 912. mot 800. 13, 7('*)• eviaravai 895. 6; 906. 5; 908. 21
eVtavTOf
; ;

(
17.
;

8.
7•

;

909.

905
;

5

(?).

28 ; 910. 6, 8, 17, 21 911. 11 ; 913. 7 ; 914. 13; 917. 2; 918. introd.; 964;
;

934. 12

937.
;

t5, 21

938.

3.

981; 988.

«»
eKT»;.

899. 23 923 12. 993. 892. 988. 996. 913. 938. 3• e/creXiiv 900. 1 6 972.

6( ((

.
;

'
.

6.

See Index

899. 4• iicTiaif 905. 17; 914. fitTOs 904. 3, 5• f fvyf IV 898. 25.

(
eXat'a

17.

910.
;

9, 20, 30,

49

i

918.

introd., xi.

2, 3> 13•

919. 5 920. 6. iXatov 936. 8; 937. 27; 918. xi. 3, 1 3.

( ( 6| /

' (
(((
ivTuvda

'

(voUiov 912. 13,

9>

31

941.

7

;

964; 971

;

986.
986. 899. 44•
;
'y

897. 972. 903, 33 999. 930. 3• 900, 9; 969.

((0!

904. 907.

, 3•

3•

912. 21.

904. 8. 908. 38.
3;

912.

971.

988. e'Aeiii/ 904. 2. 904. 7• 939. 9. 837. 7 j 972.

(\((

eV e/iavroj

839.

1

4.

906. 7 908. 36• 942. 4• e'lerafeti/ 899, introd. 957. 899. 39• See Index VIII. See Index VIII, 889, 9. 888. i6(?).

(: (.

(.

^
(:

;

XL
i'l^f

GENERAL LNDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
;

910. 11 ; 918. 934. 3• 942. 6 (?). c|oSoy 896. 13; 986. 893. 3 ; 904. 7, 903. 2 . 896. 14•

(
e

( '

908. 21

xi.

6; 967.

eniPiveiv
encvoeiv

(

369

.

(';

('

,

999. 899. 1 8. eop'•'? 933. 13; 993. tnayyeXXeiv 904. 3•
eoiKeuai

eVayo^ei/at

enaKoXovOfiv

eVam-yKd fiti/

907. 20. 909. 4, 37• 899. 42 900.
; ;

.
;

See Index IV.

( ' !/
67«\/^
21,

990. 909. 25. 889. 2 . eTrtCTKeua^ftf 896. 7•
;

986. 939. 9• 902. 939. 21

.

(?)

1 5.

913. l8; 914. II.

€7

enavajKos

909. 27 910. 1 8. inavakvfiv 942. 3. 933. 7• 903. 14, 20 912. 13; 918. xi. 16, 19 985. 986.

infyyeXav 938. 7•
cVei

( .

ii.

;

inapovpiov 917. 3

981. See Index VIII.
,"

899.

9,

23

;

902. 10
;

;

923. 9

;

928. 3

;

935. 14.

( €
€( €\[

€€ 900.

////
;

^
€(

938. 5. 903. 34 ; 941. 2. 902. 5• 986. 901. 1 3 906. 4• 905. 19 909. 32 ; 912. 36 ; 913. 21 ; 914. 9; 964. eWxeif 903. 16; 940. 4• 899. 24• 1002. 930. 4> 4> 932. 8. tniy 899. 49* 896. 2, 28, ^6, 38; 895. ; 898. 36 ; 899. 5, 32, 45. 49 900. 14, 21 902. 13, 8; 907. 14; 921. introd. ; 942. 6. 940. 7; 941. 10 895. 6; 896. 5; 904. 3• 963. 964.
tmiyeiv

900. 14
1 1

€((

;

;

;

€! €(
-^
epioi/

; 970; 986. 903. 5• 889. 8. 899. intiod. (?). 899. 8. 891.17; 892.4,12; 896. 26; 899. introd., 34, 38, 42, 44, 47 938. 3 967. 896. 5• 899. introd., 33) 37) 46• 931. 6; 933. 23; 936. 14. See Index VIII. 899. 4• 900. 9• 907. 21. 938. 6. 897. 7 985 (en-tTt^oiirt). 907. 20. in 898. 24. eViVpoffos888.5; 898.6,28; 907. 1 8; 909.2. See Indices II and III. 899. 5^• 906. 6. 905. 936. 5• 989 996-7.

918. introd.

' .
€8(

;

;

( (.

5

(

;

;

991.

)} 918.

902.

17.

introd., xi. 21, xiii. 2, 17.

923. II. 908. 27, 29, 3^, 34 989. 895. 12, 14; 971; 985. fpyov 892. 9, 12 896. 16. epe'iv 929. 22; 932. 3 940. 3. Cf. Xeynv.
J
; I

;

/

;

^ (

epeovs 921. 2, 8.

epUiiOs 921. introd.

921.

1 4.

939.
9•
;

1 8.

899.
2

926.

966.

929. II. 903. 13, 14; 932. 5; 936. 34; 937. 6, 25; 967. 978. 901. 5• 902. II 910. 4°• erepof 898. 28; 899. 19, 32, 3^, 40: 905. 8; 907. 21; 909. 31; 918. xiii. 14; 923. 11; 939. 18; 936; 938; 996.
;

Bb

370

INDICES
7,

( 898.

32

;

899. 38

;

900. 6

;

911.

;

907. 23;

924. II

;

937. 5;

943. 7

939.3• 902.

9) 1 6.

(^ ({
tvBoKelv

,

905. 17; 908. 46; 972. 942. 6.

899. 9• fiepytrelv 899. 2 , 45• €vfpyi-n)s 996. Cf. Index II. 902. Igev^eW 935. 19. fill's 941. 8. 908. 1 9• See Index VIII. 939. 1 9. 943. 6. tvpfvrjs 899. 3 925. 7.

(
{Cfj

Kvpios).

.

(i.e.

Ilmd
;

vi)

930. 15.

891.

893.

( . (( (!
((( %9 7 ((
;

6. 896. 6, 896. 4• CoJor 902. 6, 8, 15; 922. 942. 2, 3.
893.
21
;
;

,

4, 5, 8.

17,

19,

22,

23;

( ?
exeii'

;

918.

xi.

5,

924. 7. 15; 925. 6; 934. 14;

!
;

( ^ € ( €
6;

936. 20. 907. 22. 996. Cf. Index II. 896. 7 ; 900. 7• 904. 9. 891. 8; 928. 15; 929. 24; 931. 12 933. 6, 28; 934. 935. 29; 936. 3, 5°; 937. 28; 938. 9; 939. 3• 939. 8. 928. 5. ('/.) 924. 2. 981-2. 917.

8

( . '
,

903. 13 904. 8 906. 8 907. 7 925. 6; 941. 4, 912. 29; 913.
;

;

;

;

5; 972.

)7y€ta^at

(.

924. . 895. 899. 29. See Index VIII.

.

See Index VIII.

;

6

933-5• 963. rJKfiv 933. 13• 985. 888. 3; 898. 30 ; 906. 7; 907. ig893. 7; 900. 13; 901. 5; 903. 41 904. 6; 905. 13; 906. 5•

8 5

941. 963.

5-

;

?
lyrtKo

908.
912. 32.

26, 35•

912. 27.

898. 13, 37 900. 902. 9, 6; 903. 9.29» 3, 35; 905. 19; 907. 8, g, 10, 12, 17, 23; 908. 39; 910. 15, 54; 912. 9;
901.
9>

906. 8. 896. 3°• 891. 6; 895.
12
;

;
;

.
^Vot

909.

3°,

32;

911.

913. 13, 1 6, 19, 23; 913. II. 936. 7, 9•

14; 912. 986. «'

2;

See Index
23.
ii.

IX

(^).

939.

TJnfipos

918. 936.
5.

I,

10, 23,

iii.

7, 14, xi. 7.

I 7•

.

913. 16;

;

II, 12,

. 6, 8, iii. 15, . 2, 922. 14, 6; 928. 8, 929.19; 930.3; 934.8; 935.
918.

2

888.

?

936. 15, 22, 26, 35; 938. 5; 939. 10, 21, 25, 26; 940. 6; 942. 3; 964; 990; 995. 891. II 899. 33> 4^ 907. 19; 910. 25; 934. 13; 936. 13; 940. 4', 943. 8; 964; 965; 985.
15, 17;
; ;

^^
^etos•

940. 963.

7•

937. II.

893. 4, 5, 8 ; 897. 12, 16. 996. (9€«' 893. 7 ; 898. 22 ; 903. 35; 931. 3; 937. 3 941. 7, 9 943. 6. 5e\7?/Lia 924. 8.
(so. o/3Kos)
5fi(5raros
; ;

filius

894.

5.

ifoy.

932. 4. See Index VII.

936. 1 5, 934.

1 6.

5•

896. 8. 907. 1 6, 19. 5A/^6ti/ 898. 33 ; 903. 33.

XI.
^I'V'tf

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
939. 13. 902. 9• 896. 12.
901. 9• 910. 40• 910. 4'•

371

899. 44; 902. 15; 909. 32. 898. 2 0.
921. introd., 14. 899. 25; 913. ig.

^
(
tSios

988. 905. 3
;

893. 4

;

913.

3.

5.

22

;

930. 5; 984; 990.
923. 23• 903. 2; 912.
923.
7•

28.

935. 15 938. 5• 918. . 4 ; 926. 927. ; 902. 6; 913. 14; 988. 6; 934. 14; 967. 921. introd. 921. introd.
;

;

989. 929.

913. 15•
habitare 894.
tarpos
7.

896. 26; 983. 898. 11; 932.
918.
)

/;
;

964.
918.

.

8

(?).

936. 5•

8{
if/30?,

.
9•

2 2,

.

974; 999.
3, 9> ^^• 1> ^•

('wrist') 910. 25.
('fruit') 913. 12, 13, 19. 23•

986. 908.
12.

908.

9•

«/ 918. .
tXews

890.

(6/ 984.
15•

»/ 918. . 8
905.
7
;

904. 939.

7• 7•

^ ( •( (
929.

()
898.
913.

9> ^3•

915. 2,3; 1000-3.
9•

1001 (?).

*:^e^v

1 5.

903.

4•

911. 15

;

912. 12.

(?).

921.

5•

895. 899.455 928. 7; 903. 26; 904.9; 924. 929. 21 ; 932. 2, 3, 1, 8; 937. 939. 19 ; 940. 2 967. Cf. Index III. 913. 8; 993-6. 922. I ef saep. (?) 936. 24. 922. I, 6. 922. 8, 13. ?5 907. 7j 12; 908. 35» 909. 14, 30; 910. 18. 903. 34• 906. 2 (?) 909. 32•

tm 891.

6; 892-9;
;

; ;

(

910.

4•

904.

6.

)

918.

.

13,

,.
3^

9•
;

889. 7;

89.

939. 5;

;

942.

.

,

;

KOyKfXXof

994; 999.
;

(
icaTOtKt/cof

( €
;


KadvjKetf

910. 32, 41

(
19.
^

912. 25; 988. 904. 2. 963. 899. 25. 930. 6. 930. 12 939. 16. 924. 3• 888. 2; 898. 29; 902. 3; 939.
;

907. 7, 12, 14, 7> 23; 985. 907. 5• 906. 9• 989. Karai/a-yKafetv 904. 8. 940. 4; 941.5; 943. . 988. 930. 7 ; 933. 5• 903. 35• 892. 8. 965. 969. 923. 8. 899. intfod. 898. 37•

^»/

918.

.

1

6, V. 1 8,

.

1 6,

7•
902.
13;

904.

2.

Bb

.
3

984. KeXeuetv 889. 5; 899. 9, 41 916. 7 970. 895. 7• 922. II. See Index IX ().

;

372
KepKapiov{= 921.

INDICES
)
8, 20.
;

978.

8(
KivBvvos
KXe/y

899. introd. 888• II. 888. 2, 3, 5•
971.

988.

.
Kvpieveiv

919.
II•

3•

936.

903.
910. 24•

»
2

21.

907• 7•
('

guardian
6.

')

888.

;

899.

49

KifSufeueij;

938.

4•

909.

903.

910. 22; 914. 11. 16, 18; 912. 28. 907• 5; ^, 12, 20.

Kvptos ('valid')

/cXjypoj/o/jos

899. 23; 907.4,6; 986; 999.

918.

.

2 4,

.

1 8,

,

xi•

16;

919.

2(?); 971;

984; 988.

\{

)

/'(=
fcoti/o's

980. 896. 33•

936. 6, 4• 918. . 21, V. 1 6. 933. 25. 891. 14; 905. 5, 12; 907. 17; 911•

})
.
4•
5

905. 18; 906• 10; 908. 37; 909• 33; 910. 42; 912. 35; 913. 20; 914. 18; 964. (title) 895. introd. ; 899. introd., 18 ; 902. 18; 904. 10; 922. 14, 16; 923. 7; 925. 3; 931. 3, 10; 933. i, 28; 937. 9; 939. I, 5, 9, 20, 28; 943. 7; Cf. Index II. 995. 998 1001.
;

;

16.

999.

907.

12.

^

905. 986. 994.
13, 14

<5/

€ 8 8
995

,

910. 26; 919. 6; 931. 5; 936. 963. 915. .
921.
6, 1 6.
(?).

5,

^

.
; ;

897. 6, 9,14; 899. introd., 17,35,36; 901.8; 905.4,17; 913.
;
;

895. 895. 5, 9

5•

918. xi. 3, 13 9 Index VI (). 895. 8.

986

;

989

;

991.

Cf.

See Index VIII.

935.

5•
6, 1 6.

.
29.

903. 14. 898. 14; 903. 37; 922. 26; 22. 937. iS 936. 42 Cf. 942. 6; 943. I, 2, 5, 9. Index III and Index VI s. v.

{),

900. 993.

912. 25.

934. 6, 988. KocTKiveveiv 910. 33 903. 29•

.

942. 2, 5• 966. 935. introd. 932. 6.
;
;

^.
,
37•

899. 2; 909. 888. 6. 903. 24, 26.

.

891. 5; 892.
"^

g.

.

931.

II.

fp.

'^• vy^l•^^"

899. introd., 931. 8 967. 6
;

.

895. introd. 899. introd., 903. I, 8, 9, 10, 13, 20, 21, 25, 30, 36; 907. 16; 918. ii. 13, iii. 6, 14, V. 17,21; 922. 13; 930. 15; 932. 5; 935. 15; 936. 17, 18, 21; 941. 2, 3, 6, 7, 9; 1002.
21, 27, 30;

1000. 888.

970. 908. 25 988. KpiWij/ 898. 27; 899. 25, 26, 27, 29, 39• Kpvnreiv 903. 16, 18. 903. 34 904. 6• /cr^/ua 898. 14; 909. 16; 999 1003. 908. 25, 20, 3°; 938. 2, 4, 5• 889. 9•
;
j"

900. 1 4. 904. 3, 5, 929.

.

8, p.

924. 5905. 8; 921.
14-

5,

920. 4• 7; 922.
;

6,

;

929.

;

^?

929. introd. 936. 3• 978.

;

985

999.

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
902. 12. V. 2o; 937. () 902. g.
918.
921. 9.
13.

"
\ivovs

929.

.

902. I, 1 8. XoytoTT^s 802. 13, 15. 940. 4. See Index VIII. Xo'yos 890. 9 893. 6, 8 895. 8 ; 896. 10; 804. 3; 805. 5; 914. 17; 916. 7, 964; 17, 20; 919. 2, 9, 11; 920. 12; 971; 985; 994; 899. XotTTos 804. 7; 907. 15 918. xi. 12 921. introd. 934. 11. 892. II ; 915. 2; 943. 3, 4, 6, 8 1002. \•)(< 992. Xveti/ 907. 28. 930. 4936. 19•
Xoytof
; ; ; ;

/ 7.
\6

915. 2, 3 ; 1000-3. 918. . 7 et saep.\ 986; 988.

^ /
(:
peAXeii/
/[iiV GUI'

373

984. 890. 7; 930. 972.

;

935.

1 2.

899.

8.
; ;

/:t€Veii/

,

903. 33) 36 940. 2 964. 940. 2, 4 986. 905. 19; 911. 14; 913. 13, 6, 23; 918. . 22, iii. 9, xi• 8, 16, xiii.
;

19,
7
;

;

8 ? ' ( (
;

984-6

999. 918.

.

3)

^'•

5> ^•

936. 37• 934. 3• 899. 4^) 43' 47•

899. 3^. 906. 9• 888. II ; 899. 899. 4•
8.

23.

914.

\\ \

:
/zeyas

? '

969. 902. 13 940. 6. 895. 935. 8. 904. 6.
;

8

;

916. 7 932. 3

',

918.

.

12, 24, xiu. 5•

;

988.

1001. 904. 902. 4•

909.

2 2.

2.

1000.
939.
2

.
937- 12; 940. 930. 6; 933.
4•

939.

3•

8:
; ;

941. 903.
4• 9•

984. 900. II 903. 31

8.

907.

4•

937. 20.
921.
7•

904.
923.

920. 8;
;

;

.
833.

2

988

996

;

1002.

and

'

(€!, '.
)
/Lie'Xay

{

See Index VIII. () 918. . 4 ^^ ^^^•

988.

.'
;

984;

(\

See Index VIII. 922. 12. 930. II, 8; 939. 2. 919. 8 936. 9. 936. 936. II.
;

.

<^

910. 35• 907. 24; 910. 21, 34; 986; 988. Cf. Index IX (). 806. 5; 908. 27; 909. 27. 901. II. 893. 6; 895. 9; 898. 32; 902. 8; 910. 2, 31 914. 903. 6 908. 2, 12; 916. 14; 958; 962; 964; 967; 985 988. Cf. Index IV. 803. 32 ; 898. 5 899. 2 888. 909. 4, n, 38 ; 910. 905. 2, 3, 4« 17 3; 912. 2; 914. 3; 924. 15; 928. 10; 936. 21, 47; 963; 984; 886. 807• 9• 885. 985. 801. 7 922. 6, 7, 2, 903. 28; 921. 26; 931. 8; 933. 4, 22. 902. 7• 911. 910. , 14, 28, 39, 4^ 22; 913. 7, 912. , 6, 17, 23, 41 918. xi. 2, II, 12, xiii. 18; 977. 913. 910. 29, 42; 912. g, 16, 35
;

2

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

,

;

;

,
5

;

20; 964. 986.

374

INDICES
905• 6. 895. introd. 902. 4 913•
;

8
/
: /
;

^
'
-?

3•

896. 32 ; 899. 41 933. 23898. 24•

i

904.

7•

915. 2,3,• 1001-3. 1000-3. 915. ;

'.

OQ^ 984

3 4

;

994. 905. 19 ; 908. 39• 899. 15, 26; 907. 919. 7 ; 993-5,
941.
8, 9-

;

910.

1

7
;

;

915.

899.

1 1

904.

1001. 896. 1 6, 936. 39•
921. 25•

17-

nasci 894. 5. 917. 2.

/
roeii/
vo/i»;

917.

2.

929. 8. pfot 910. 32 988. 909. 1 6. yi7 939. 20•
;

. .
990. 899.
15•
vo/ioi
ro/xof

introd.,

6

;

918. introd.,
{b).

xi.

5,

See Index IX See Index 902. 17 903. 7.
;

IX

(3).

899• 12. 904. 4• 911. 907. 896. 3°'? 903. 12; 926. 3,' 933. 26; 932; 14; 912. 12 980; 984; 988; 1002. 929. 25; 941. ^ 993. 933. 19; 943. 4• 9S5. oti/os 907• 24; 985; 992-3. 893. 6, 9 904. 8. 930. . 899. 13; 941. 4, 9• 893. 6, 9; 896. 2, 6; 903. 4.5; 918. xi. 6 936. 19 (' 29; 986. 924. 8. o/i(Xe(f 928. 5• 916. 14. 7. 20 935. 889. 21. introd.; 995. onrr i ^ »^ 897• II 903. 15; 972 897. II 898. 2 2 90. :iUj a\Jtr. 13, 33; 910. 13; 912.36; 913. 21; 914. """ 996. 6, 19; 939. 6 964; ""'^ 895. 1 6.

;

)

;

\-

;
'.

:

;

),
;

'
^

;
/\
;

;

•.

.

.

;

/

899. 30, 42; 900. 6; 913. 6; 991. Cf. Index VI (a). 939. 2 0. 939. 6, 23. 940. 7• yoTor 918. ii. I e/saep.; 986; 988. 924. 4. 933. 24. 899• 41 906. 6, 7; 908. i8; 929. 5; 937. 8; 938. 6; 939. 3, 23. 908. 5 988.
; ;

' /
. 8

931. 7• 921. 23.

936. 910. 892. 7•

.
7, 17. 20. (3).

9•

^
972.

922. 20. 939. 26. 900. 5• 922. 24, 25• 890. 17 903. 23 907. 1 1, 5; 924. 12; 930. 26; 932-4; 936-4^• 932. 8 985. 900. 7• 909. 26. 936• 6, 8 (?), 15980• 899. introd., 17, 39, 42, 47; 935. 16; 938. 6• 896. 32. 942. 7 999. 902. II. 986. 893. 4, 5. 8; 897• 1 2, 6; 903• 8;
; ; ;
;

896.

12, 14.

8{) 916.
918.
ii.

914. 4

;

996.

.17 901.

6.

See Index IX
7.

13»

"•

6j V. 20.

888. 4• 888. 2, 5•

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
13;
3•
2.

375

(
ore

898.

899.8; 902.17; 903. 34

913. lo; 939. 12.

904.
;

941.

((

912. 27.

942. 4 943. 6. 903. 8 etsaep.; 924. lo 930. 9 936. 17, 19, 21; 937. 22; 939. 7; 941. 3,
; ;

((
(€

910. 34• 910. 1 5.

939. 902.

20.
7>

7,9•
/X17

903.

1

6.

931. 4.

/
^/
oyj/is

906. oil/ 899. 8, 40; 901. 15; 903. 10; 930. 18; 934.9; 937.5,8; 938.5; 942.3. 902. 3 986. 986. 888. 3• 940. 5 941. 7 ; 998-9. 890. 8; 899. 48; 904. 4', 910• 25; 914. 6; 942. 4; 943. 4• 906. 896. 2 8.
; ;

.

€ /
{

918.

.

14

;

943.

2.

3•

;('6^ 901.
998.

937.

1 6.

892. 905. 7? 12 904. 4•

.

9•

;

906.

3•

888.5; 905.

6;
4, 1,

913.

13; 933. 2 1 ; 934. 7rap€iO;^Xeti' 965.

;
;

25; 914. 972.

.

911. 6.
;

', y

898. 31 ' 991.

974; 994.

/ 941.

.
;

900. 6

901.
;

5•

/
/?

(5

930. 1 7, 9> 2 7• 928. 13 930. 24 ; 933. 29. 901. 8 ; 915. . 893. 7 903. 8.
;

999.

935.

3•
7•

907. 21. 895. 21 ; 900. 17 903. 27, 28 904. 4; 907. 6; 908. 3> 33 J 913. 12, 18; 937.24; 941.4,6,7,8; 972; 992-4. 897. ) 899. iiitrod. 997. 904. 6. 903. 5• 5? 897. 6 898. 33, 35 899. introd., 20 ; 900. 16 ; 903. , 8, 6, 32 904. 3, 907. 5, 6, g, 10, 11, 13, 5 ; 905. 12, 18, 20, 28 908. 46 ; 910. 22, 38, 42, 56 ; 911. 16; 912. 26,35; 913.11, 24; 914. II, 16; 924. 12; 929. 4, 12, 15, 20; 930. 25 933. 7, 16 ; 934. 15 935. 26 936. 3 937. 14 939. 6, 9, 15, 29 942.

,

.

;

6

,
;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

'^' 988.

899. 13; 903.
925.
2, 3•

6;

964; 988.

( € ^€
7ra/jaSt6oi/at

.

904. 942. 5•

(

908. 2, 45• 908. 36. 930. 21
957. 937.
1

984. 988. 899. 21, 24; 905. 908. 2 924. 15; 925. 3; 935. 2; 936. 2; 937. 900. 5•

6

;

;

.

;

934. 12

;

937.

.

8,

4•

935. 937. 7• 921. 9• 913. 9•

.

wapayeiv 901.

8

;

971.

934. 13; 942.4•

910. 2 8. 910. 39) 912. 23, 29.

896. 3• 899. itltrod. 907. 7• 942. 5•

( €. (.
21, 26;

902. 1 2. 943. 5, 6, (?) 922. 9• ire/iTrcti' 928. 12 930. 12
;

;

931.

4.

26

;

937.

938. 4• 936. 25• See Index See

.

IX

[i).

( € '
^.
8.
TrXai/a»/

€ €
376

INDICES
994.
918. introd.

(€5

921. 2. nepiyiyveaOai 913. 12, 921.

.

1 3,

23

;

986.

/'
13,

899. 14
981.

J

902. 12.

921. introd. 981.

See Index 921. 2 0.

IX

().

909.

14»

S^

922.

,

5>

898. 29; 903. 907. 7; 913. 14 893. •
921. introd.

.
924. g; 980.

5

/,

^ ' /
/
;

See noXvs. 903. 6 904. 6. 929. introd. 902. 6; 904, 3, 5;
;

.
3•
",

936. II. 898. 8. 920. 3) 937. II.

7,

.
^-^S• 7•

,

//^ 986.
937. 904.

941. 3• 941. 2.

^
profiteri
/jotl

! . 5 ^ ^
^.
928.
;

928. 6. 938. 5• 934. 14 967. 888. 4 ; 893. 6, 9
;

;

902.

3,

5

;

938.

2

899. 17, 900. 5•

35» 42, 47•

940. 5• See Index VIII. 5|£5 905. 14 ; 910. 36 ; 912. 33• 909. 33; 988. 895. introd. ; 902. 15 924. 7 925. 7•
;

(•'')

907. 7•
933. 3• 897. 5; 918.
2.

.

984(?);
3, 12.

986; 996

8.

915.

({})

935. 21. 899. introd. 908. 37 907. II
;

;

913. 22.

898. 894. 5•

35•

891. 12.

^
;

890.

(
;

924. 1 6. 7 898. 8; 899. 1 7, 888. 3; 892. 34, 39> 43> 47> 48; 901. 6; 903. 7, 9; 904. 4 907. 6, 8, 26, 27 909. 26, 30 913. 15, 928. 7, 8, 1 1 929. 6 933. 941. 23 936. 4, 31 937. 4 938. 2, 7 943. 6 963 967 971 990. 3 980. 8, 892.3,9; 895.15; 896. 904. 4', 902. 2, 9, 3°; 899. 6; 908. 6; 909. 13 910. 3 911. 5 914. 6; 942.4; 960; 962. Cf. Index VI (). 902. 4, 12. 903. 37• 892. II. 889. 6.• 888. 4; 898. 7, 21 899. 13; 903. 21 930. 6, 22; 935. 22, 26; 936. 938. 8 941. 9• 939. 24. 899. 13; 900. 9; 939. 3•

;

907. 4• 896. 37, 39 899. 905. 8; 907. 1 8, 28; 908. 910. 56 912. 24, 22, 24
;
;

6 4

;

;
;

900. 2; 909.
913. 24
;

918.

. 9,

2i,iii. 5, 9, ^i•

5,'•

^7

5

929.

;

2

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

:

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

5 ;

€ ( ^
,

(€

19; 972; 977; 988. 943. 2. 928. 8. 901. 9; 902. 2, 939. 25. 903. 3 999. 899. 7• 984.
913.
4•

6;

903. 25

;

,8
896.

928. 4• 907. 5• 930. 1 1. 888. 3 ; 899. 936. 4, 48 986.
SC.

introd., 26, 38, 48•

(•'')•

937.

2.

ij 1 7, 918. 912. 3• 903. 6; 904. 7

.

)

986.
2,

15•

;

907.

8.

931.

4-

8,

32, 34, 37> 38•

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
;

^
=

?.

:
: / :
^
pis

909. 2 . 903. 2 1 904. 8. 889. 5• 898. 22; 899. 44 918. xi. 984. 888. 7,' 889. . 907. 1 8. 903. 3• 932. 7• 907. 1 3 910. 1 6. See Index VIII. 902. 13; 924. 9• 939. 13. 904. 8. 902. 13 (?)• 892. 9930. 12; 933. 29* 903. 6.

.

5

!
.
3.

. / » 60

899. introd. 16,19; 974; 977; 992. 899. 32, 39)46; 921. introd. 980.
896. 21.
7•

^
;

377
1

916.

3,

920. 2; 936.

921. 15, I9j 21. 907. 8 etsaep.; 913. 10; 965.

973; 986. 903. 22; 936. 22; 994; 998-9.
918.

.

7•

985. 1001.
921. 15.

940.

5•

921. 24.

924. 6. 896. 33• 907. 24; 908. 27; 909.

941. 3• 941. 5. 936. 23.
(?)

936.
6.

1

6.

2;

910.

g,

(?)

921.

10, 18,

3>

51» 55)' 918. iL 9 ^^ ^«^.;

905.

7•

966; 974; 986; 988.
922. 8. 922. 6 ; 932. 902. 13(0; 939. 15. 932. 4; 939. 24.

8

921. 4• 910. 9 J 913. II. 910. 6, 54 913. 917. 3• 913. 8. 918. . 8, 5.
>

6.

.

939. 17.
936.
8.

899. 21. 897. 3

;

904.

5?

.( ;
931.

903. 22. 920. 13986. 940. 2.
932. II. 891. 8; 928. 15; 929. 24; 933. 28; 934. 6; 935. 29; 937. 28; 938. 8; 939. 28.
931.
1

/
,

939. 8; 963. 929. 3• 963.
922.
2, 3, 4) 5> 8,

12.

905. 5• 936. 40. 902. 7.
936.
2.

3

>

936.

5;

921. II, 12. 932. 6. 937. 29.

920. 5• 938. 3> 6. 936. 20. 928. II. 897. II.
919.
8.
;

. // ;
eVoC

893.
4•
9•

3•

907.

931.

See Index VIII. oTpaTj;yoy. See Index VIII. 920. 8, 12.
921.
3.

903. 30. 904. 6. 939. 905. 1 8 906. 2, 8. 907. 9, 3• 906. 9,' 907. 2; 911. 7; 988;

.

;

990.

942. 5

985.

935.

3> 8.

378
888. 3; 904.
4.

INDICES
899.
9,

i6;

902. 8;

' ^ ,
'''

905. 8. 906. ^', 907. 1 7904. 4• 903. 2$ 904. 7• 985. 909. 8; 913. 24; 934.
]

.

,
'
/7

' !/
TeiVeiK

//.

See Index 936. 24•

IX

{b).

890. 3• 928.
918.

.
2.

2, 1 7-

940.

914. 4• 921. introd.
;

^'

^ / /»
', ?
\//^
918.

900. 13 985 898. 20. 907. 1 6. 929. 12. 896. 34) 899. 899. 21, 994. 903. 3•
912.

;

988.

.
4•

929. 23. ev 906. 5• Tewoi/ 888. 1 ; 905. II 907. 2, 7; 930. 8; 986. reXeli/ 899. 9• 909. 1 8. 902. II 940. 2. 928. 3 84. reXevr»; 902. 4•
; ;

892.
3,

9•

19; 909.

€\(7
67-/

.
919.
Tews 940.

;

3•

910. 34• See Index
2.

IX

(6).

908. 9• 893. 6, 9• 943. 4• 940- 2.

/|»
8;

900. 12; 939. II. 985. 943. 9• 895. 12, 14; 896.15; 903.24; 909.
912.

. 7•

3;
;

914. 71

934.5,6; 971;

^€€'

896. 6. 904. 5• 989. 924. . 908. 1 8. 905. 6. 909. 2 1. 920. 9> H• 929. 13; 932.
918. introd. 936. 5•

980; 985

988.

,

930. 27; 931. 2. 937. 2 2. 940. 900. 7 902. 903. 4• 904. 8, 9. TotoCroi 899. 27
; ; ;

3•

6.

/ ;^ ;(
935.

e/ iai/».

899. introd. 903. 24; 957. 910. 5 986. 896. 6, II, 14; 899.
j

912. 13,

8,
5•

25,

4, 09. 29; 28; 931. 15; 941. 2,

899. II. 904. 6. 934. 4• 902. .
7•

4; 973; 986; 999.

940. 939. 2 2.
916,
Xeyo/xei/os

7,

13. "6;

943.

2, 5-

?!/

/
.

915.

.

.

^»;(
15-

)

1002. 904. 6; 907. 889. ; 939. 21, 20. 903. II. 925. 3• 904. 7 ; 933. 8 935.

935. 5; 939. 1 7. 899. 5; 908. 24. 967.
921. 13,
r/)07roy

8

6, 2,

21

;

929.

.

936. 7• 902. 6, 14; 939. 15• 908. 33 938. 2.
;

;

1

2

;

939.

20.

iKiavos

921.

3•

891.

5•

903. 968. 940. 3• 907. 24

3, 6, 8, 12,

3.

;

975.

XI.
Tvyxaveiv

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
888.
4,

379

5; 899. 14

;

904. 9;

902.

9•
1 8, 1 9•

933. 4. 978.

7

893. I, 9. 902. 6, 899. 41.

1 4•

/?

936. 966. 967.

933. 30•

903. 5, 17. 903. I. iy«a 930. 13; 935. 1 vytaiveiv 935. 8; 936. 901• 7•

?
/?

902. 3 928. 6. 925. 4• 905. 5; 936. 23. 905. 5, 3> 8; 907. 1 8. 889. 21 ; 907. 14; 935.
;

2.

1.
3..

937. 12,

1

8.

889. 5
925.
2.

85 ?
805
971.

890.5; 891.

9,

?. ^9; 907. 23;

902. 3 922. 19'

/), ^'

931. 17 ; 933. 3, 27; 942. 6; 963. 918. .

.

918. introd. •/ ja^/i. vlos 893. 12; 894. 8; 902. 2; 903. 4; 904. 7 ; 909. 8 ; 913. 5,21; 914. 3, 5, 20; 924. 15; 930. 30; 935. introd.; 939. 22; 941. 2, 3; 984; 989;

922.
917.

9j 2.

21.

996.
virayopfveiv

;
;

899. 4°
943.
4,

7

;

910. 12, 977.
;

3,

;

913. 13

;

904.
924.
3, 4, 5•

g.

!
5.
Index
VTTT/peTeii'

() .
II
;

907. 2. 900. 9j 7• 899. 8 905. 1 6 910. 7, 37 911• 912. 34; 913. g; 914. 15; 933. 17 986.
;
;

990. 902. 5; 907. 25; 923. 940. 6 984 998.
; ;

.
908.
1 7

931. 6

;

933. 25.
;

905. 9

924.
;

.
892. 3
;

See Index

III.

999.
"

Cf.

890. 6
;

;

891. 9

;

III.

909.13; 928.2; 929.2; 931.2; 932.
934. 2 935. 2 936. 2 ; 937. 2 ; ; 938. 939.2; 963-4; 987; 973-4.
;

97.

6.
1 6.

:

889.

!
?
//^

996 ; 999. 929. 5• 899. 50; 916. 1 8. 897. 8 ; 900. 6, 899. introd.
911. 6.
2 5-

8.

/ .
;^
4•

;

933.

.

989. 1003.
17.

;^936.

See Index

IX
;

(3).

^^; 914.

936.

941. 5• xopty 939. 6 ; 941. 6

963.

8.

/
8.

898. 35

J

'

922. 21.
914.
1 6.

899. 14; 934. 13. 895. 12, 14•

(59 988.

902. 904.

8.
5•

911. 8.

898. 27• 904. 3• 899. 19, 35 > 907. 898. 1 3•
ZoTfpos 936. 45•

(
901.

.

943.

(
2.

9•

934.

995. XfipoTovelv 888.

918. introd.

988. 918. V. 1 6. X^ev 901. 5• 929. 9, 3•

904.

2.

38
910. II, 52.

INDICES
940.

;

995.

:
^

905. 5; 914.
896. 5•

g,

;

995.

Xo'ipos

932. 901. 5,
918.

. ,
.
;

'

898. 32

;

.

12, 13908. 28.

908. 25 938. 3• ('mound') 985. 899. 25; 900. 2, 6,

909. 15; 985. 900. 8, 890. 8; 909. 2 1. 907. 8, 13; 985; 998. 898. 31 909. 6; 932.

.
;

;

988.

8;

930. 3;

/^ 986.
903. 33• 896. II.

972. Xpe'os 914. 17. 902. 9
Xpz/'Cei.'

5

914.

7•

896. 9 ; 937. 23. 890. 3 908. 964; 977. 900. 7•
>

/^
7
;

914. 8.
6. 7
;

909.

6,

II

»/

936. 893.

17
1 6,

(

901. 5
;

;

938. 6

926. 5 ; 927. 4 935. 939. 27 942. , ;
; ;

912.

6. 1 6, 9> ^

2, 4-

907.

3

J

911.

889.

937. 2 76; 907. 23; 909. 23; 911. 10 912. 8, 22; 936. 52; 937. 6; 938. .

6

910. 891. 12
7
;

1 2.
;

904.

8;

893. 3; 896. 29; 897. 8; 908. 2 2 910. 8 923. 4', 930. 933. 17; 934. 8; 939. 5•
; ;

XII.

INDEX OF PASSAGES DISCUSSED.
(a)

Authors.

XII.

INDEX OF PASSAGES DISCUSSED

381

{b)

Papyri, Inscriptions, &c.

Plate

I

im^
IN
-.
"»•
••

5

fc

5 3

V<-

"^f-

^

w> ^ C h >

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4,-;

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-

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;'

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t.

^
No. 849
r^c/o

(

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^b:Oj.i*'r-l

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k^
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No. 850

ri'c/o

Plate

II

A-'-

f»n r-

,,,,_^>V5riT>«6>J/74

u

f
No. 852.
Fr.
I,

Cols,

ii-iii

^t"

Plate

III

(r

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'J,

^>

->

^^^/^^^^^'^

I
No. 852.
Fr. 60, Cols, i-ii

Plate IV

-• \<^

i
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vHlfH
iVj^i^-ri^•^/*...,

vffCf^
^-<i<--

^^^ 2

e^tj'h V iiHNii» tM-n^Yi'tH ^

M^

,

m

«AM

.i/r^i

?AJ+< vi-T'i/W-

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^i^.^t.MiAMlu.»4

V.
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No. 853.

Cols, xvi-xvii

,C*N3«t?Iiii',

•NiV.

ji^-

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No. 871

*-1j5^-

1-. iiv'..
iiJi? •S'^*

=

77;

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-

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.

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.

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Plate VI

-•""^

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No. 894

-^_^i

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No. 847 ycdo

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND
GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH.
'THE EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND,
in

which has conducted Archaeological research

Egypt

since

1882, in 1897 started a special department, called the Graeco-Roman

Branchy for

the

discovery

and

publication of remains

of

classical

antiquity

and

early

Christianity in Egypt.

The Graeco-Roman Branch
Dr. Hunt.

issues

annual volumes, each of ahottt 250 quarto pages, with

facsimile plates of the more important papyri, under the editorship of Prof.

Grenfell and

A
life

subscription

of One Guinea
to the

to

the

Graeco-Roman Branch

entitles subscribers to the
-£,2^^

annual volume, and also
membership.

annual Archaeological Report.

A

donation of

constitutes

may be sent to the Honorary Treasurers—for England, Mr. H. A. Grueber, British Museum ; andfor America, Mr. E. R. Warren, Pierce Building,
Subscriptions

Copley Square, Boston.

PUBLICATIONS OF THE EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND.

MEMOIRS OF THE FUND.
I.

THE STORE CITY OF PITHOM AND THE ROUTE OF THE EXODUS.
For 1883-4.
Edition^

By Edouard Naville.

Thirteen Plates and Plans.

{^Fourth

and Revised

25^•.

II.

TANIS,

Part I. For 1884-5. and two Plans. {Second Edition.^

By W. M. Flinders
255.

Petrie.

Eighteen Plates

III.

NAUKRATIS,

Part

I.

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