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THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART IX
HUNT

3315

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND


GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
BY

IX

EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES

ARTHUR
HON. PH.D. KOKNIGSBERG
;

S.

HUNT,
;

D.Litt.
;

HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN HON. lUR.D. GRAZ HON. LL.D. ATHENS LECTURER IN PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES MEMBER OF THE ROYAL DANISH ACADEMY OF SCIENCES AND LETTERS

WITH

SIX

PLATES

LONDON
SOLD AT

37 Great Russell St., W.C. AND 527 Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. KEG AN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., 68-74 Carter Lane, E.C. BERNARD QUARITCH, 11 Grafton St., New Bond St., W. ASHER & CO., 14 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C, and 56 Unter den Linden, Berlin and HENRY FROWDE, Amen Corner, E.C., and 39-35 West 3aND Street, New York, U.S.A.

The Offices

of the

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND,

1913
All rights reserved

.
OXFORD
HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

PREFACE
the rather late appearance of this vokime the nature of its It contents will perhaps in some degree be accepted as an excuse. includes two texts of more than usual importance and interest, the

For

new fragments

of Sophocles and the Life of Etiripidcs by Satyrus. In the reconstruction and elucidation of these I have again been most fortunate in obtaining the invaluable aid of Professor U. von
I am also under considerable obligations, Wilamowitz-M Ollendorff. more particularly with regard to the Sophoclean fragments, to Professor The proof-sheets of the non-literary documents were Gilbert Murray. seen by Professor U. Wilcken, whom I have to thank for some very

useful

Occasional contributions kindly comments and suggestions. acknowledged elsewhere. made by other scholars are A small edition of the fragments of the Iclmeutae and Eurypylus is in preparation, and will be issued by the Clarendon Press in the

course of a few weeks.

ARTHUR
Queen's College, Oxford,

S.

HUNT.

May, 191 2.

CONTENTS
PAGE

Preface

List of Plates

....
.

V
viii

Table of Papyri Note on the Method of Publication and List of Abbreviations

ix

xi

TEXTS
I.

.
in.
IV.

Theological Fragments (-1173) New Classical Texts (1174-1176) Extant Classical Authors (1177-1184) Documents of the Roman and Early Byzantine Periods
{a) Official

30 182

(1185-1193)
213

(1194-1200) {>) Declarations to Officials

{
(e)

Petitions

(1201-1204)

228
.

(d) Contracts

(1205-1209)

239 254
257

Accounts (1210-1212)
Private Correspondence, &c. (1213-1223)

(/)

INDICES
I.

New

Literary Texts (a) 1174, 1175 (Sophocles, Ichneuiae and Eurypylus


:

269
277 283

)
\c)
II.

1176 (Satyrus, Life of Euripides) Citations in 1176

Emperors
Consuls
. .

283
284

III.

IV.

V.
VI.
VII.

Months and Days Personal Names


Geographical
Religion

286
.

286 289
291

Vlll

CONTENTS
PAGE
Official and Military Titles
291

VIII.

IX.
X.

Weights, Measures, Coins

XI.
XII.

Taxes General Index of Greek and Latin Words


Passages discussed

.......
.....
1178, 1170
.

293

304

LIST OF PLATES
I.

nee, 1171
1174 1175 Fr.

recto,

II.

Cols, iv-v
5, Cols,

III.

i-ii

at the end.
80, 91,

IV

V.
VI.

1175 Frs. 3, 6, 79, 1176 Fr. 39, Cols,

94

1200

....

xvii-xxiii

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A.D.

liee.

Genesis xvi

1167.

Genesis xxxi

1168. 1169.

Joshua iv-v
St.

Matthew's Gospel

vi

1170.
1171.

St.
St.

Matthew's Gospel x-xi


James's Epistle
of
ii-iii

1172. 1173. 1174.

The Shepherd
Philo

Hermas
.

Sophocles, Ichneutae
Sophocles, Etirypylus

1175.
1176. 1177.

Satyrus, Li/e of Euripides

Euripides, Phoenissae Euripides, Orestes

1178.

1179.

ApoUonius Rhodius
Thucydides

ii

1180.
1181.

Xenophon, Anabasis
Demosthenes,

vii

1182. 1183.

De Falsa Legaiiom
.

Isocrates, Trapeziticus

1184.
1185. 1186. 1187.

Pseudo-Hippocrates
Edict of a Praeses

Letter of a Praefect, &c.

Proclamation of a Strategus
Official

1188.

Correspondence
.

1189.

Letter of a Strategus

1190.
1191.

Letter of a Strategus
Official

Correspondence
for

1192.
1193.

Order

Payment

Order from a Speculator


Arrears of

1194. 1195. 1196.

Annona

Promise of Attendance in Court


Declaration of a Tax-collector

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A. D.

1107.

Declaration of a Shipper
Notification of

1198.
1199.

Death

Notification of Purchase

1200.
1201.

Registration of a

Deed
Ephebus

Succession to an Inheritance
Petition concerning an

1202.
1203.

Claim of Creditors
Petition to a Strategus

1204.

1205.
1206.
1207.

Manumission
Adoption
Public
.

infe?-

aviicos

Lease of a Camel-stable

1208.

Acknowledgement of
.

a Contract of Sale

1209.
1210.

Sale of a Slave
Poll-tax Register

1211.

Articles for a Sacrifice List of Vegetables

1212.
1213.

Question

to the

Oracle

1214.
1215.

Invitation to a Birthday-feast

Letter of Sinthonis Letter of Sarapas Letter of


Letter of

1216.
1217.

1218.

Eudaemonis Didymus

1219.

Letter of Aristandrus

1220.
1221.

Letter of a Bailiff
Letter of Isidorus

1222. 1223.

Letter to Demetrius

Letter of Hermias

NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND


LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
method followed in this volume is the same as that in The new literary texts are printed in a dual form, a literal Parts I-VIII. In the transcript being accompanied by a reconstruction in modern style.

The

general

fragments of extant authors, the originals are reproduced except for division of words, capital initials in proper names, expansion of abbreviations, and

supplements of lacunae.

Additions or corrections by the same hand as the

body of the text


type.

by a different hand in thick documents are given in modern form with accentuaadditions Abbreviations and symbols are resolved tion and punctuation. are usually incorporated in the text, their occurrence being and corrections recorded in the critical apparatus, where also faults of orthography, &c., are Iota adscript has corrected if they seemed likely to give rise to any difficulty. Square written, otherwise iota subscript is employed. been printed when so brackets ( ) the resolution of a symbol or brackets ] indicate a lacuna, round
are in small thin type, those

Non-literary

abbreviation, angular brackets < ) a mistaken omission in the original, braces a superfluous letter or letters, double square brackets [[J a deletion in the { } Dots placed within brackets represent the approximate number of original.
letters lost or deleted;
illegible
letters.

Letters with

dots outside brackets indicate mutilated or otherwise dots underneath them are to be considered
to the texts of the

doubtful.
in this

Heavy Arabic numerals refer


in Parts

Oxyrhynchus papyri
lines,

volume and

I-VIII, ordinary numerals to

small

Roman
are

numerals to columns.

The
P.

abbreviations

used

in

referring

to

papyrological

publications
viz.
:

practically those adopted in the

Archiv fur Papyrusforschung,

Amh. = The Amherst

Papyri (Greek), Vols. I-II, by B. P. Grenfell and

A. S. Hunt. Archiv = Archiv fiir Papyrusforschung. B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den K. Museen zu Berlin, Griechische Urkunden. P. Brit. Mus. = Greek Papyri in the British Museum, Vols. I-II, by F. G. Kenyon Vol. IV, by H. I. Bell. Vol. Ill, by F. G. Kenyon and H. I. Bell C. P. Herm. = Corpus Papyrorum Hermopolitanorum, Vol. I, by C. Wessely.
;

xil

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. P. Cairo Cat. = Catalogue des Antiquites egyptiennes du Musee du Caire, Papyrus grecs d'epoque byzantine (two parts), by J. Maspero, P. Class. Phil. = Classical Philology, I. 2, Papyri edited by E. J. Goodspeed. P. Fay. = Fayum Towns and their Papyri, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and
C. P. R.

D. G. Hogarth.
P. Flor. P. Gen.

=
=

Papiri Fiorentini, Vol.

I,

by G.
I,

Vitelli

Vol.

, by D. Comparetti.
and Series

Les Papyrus de Geneve, Vol.

by

J.

Nicole.
I,

P. Giessen

=
P.

Griechische Papyri zu Giessen, Vol.

by E. Kornemann, O. Eger,

and
P. Grenf.

M. Meyer.
I,

Greek Papyri, Series Grenfell and A. S. Hunt.


Griechische

by B.

P. Grenfell,

by

B. P.

P.

Hamburg =

Urkunden der Hamburger

Stadtbibliothek, Part

i,

P.

P.

by P. M. Meyer. Hibeh = The Hibeh Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. Leipzig = Griech. Urkunden der Papyrussammlung zu Leipzig, Vol.
L. Mitteis.

I,

by

P.

P.

P.

= The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I-VI, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt Parts VH-VHI, by A. S. Hunt. Par. = Les Papyrus grecs du Musee du Louvre, Notices et Extraits, t. xviii. 2, by W. Brunet de Presle and E. Egger. Petrie = The Flinders Petrie Papyri, Parts I-II, by J. P. Mahaffy Part HI, by
Oxy.
; ;

P. P.

P.
P.

Mahaffy and J. G. Smyly. = Papyrus grecs et demotiques, by Theodore Reinach. Reinach Rylands = Catalogue of the Greek Papyri in the Rylands Library, Manchester, Vol. I, by A. S. Hunt. S. L = Papiri della Societa italiana. Vol. I, by G. Vitelli and others. Strassb. = Griech. Papyrus der K. Universitatsbibliothek zu Strassburg im
J. P.

Elsass, Vol.
P. Tebt.
J.

I, by F. Preisigke. The Tebtunis Papyri, Part and Part by G. Smyly


;

I,

by

B. P. Grenfell,

A.

S.

Hunt, and
J.

B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and E.

Goodspeed. P. Thead. = Papyrus de Th^adelphie, by P. Jouguet. Wilcken, Ost. = Griechische Ostraka, by U. Wilcken.

I.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
nee.
Genesis
X
4-7

xvi.

Fr. (c) 13-5

cm.

Third century.

Plate

I.

Remains of one column from a roll of Genesis in the LXX version. The early example of the large and upright calligraphic handwriting is apparently an
so-called Biblical uncials,

eei, 867, 1179, P.


especially for the

and Rylands 16.

may

well

fall

within the third century

cf.

e. g.

papyrus of

this date is textually valuable,


is

book of Genesis, where the Vaticanus

defective.

Several

an agreement in 1. 20 with MSS. of Philo, two interesting readings occur, coincidences with a group of cursives against other older evidence (11. 3, 24), and

two peculiar variants

medial point, followed, sometimes at any punctuation and a rough rate, by a short blank space, is used for purposes of These signs are apparently due to the original writer. is once added. breathing
(11.

14, 16).

pay noOey

]8 [ .
[^a

xvi. 8

7]'
5
t

][
rj

5e

[t

line lost.

10

[ [ 9] [
[yeXos

Kv

] ] 9
r\r}v

]([
ica[i

pay

]$[]
6

9 [
[

unev

10

(?)]

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


15

\\(

][]
]^'
]
/]

76[ ^[

ayyeXos

[ [
\
[

i7r[ei/

1 1

] ]69
Os

^[9

][]
25

]9

] ]9

] [
[

K[s

earai

[
[

xei/)]ey

8e: so the cursives fir (Holmes 53, 56, 129); DM, &c. The supposed stop 3 preceding is very uncertain, and may be a vestige of another letter. 7-8. Line 8 is shorter than would be expected, even when allowance is made, on the analogy of 11. 12 and 18, for a blank space after the stop. But the y at the end of 1. 7, though broken, is highly probable. but some addition is necessary to fill the lacuna; 14. There is no authority for came in here from 1. 20. perhaps

16.

20. 21.

[][] seems
to
:

Chrysostom.
24-5.

have been omitted after as in mor (Holmes 72, 82, 129) Syr. is omitted in some MSS. of Philo. SO some MSS. of Philo ; mov other authoriiies.
e{eo)s after Y\{ypio)s, as in
fir, is

^
1167.

Or

MSS.

The

addition of

indicated by the spacing.

Genesis xxxi.
10

cm.

Fourth century.

This fragment of a leaf from a papyrus book is less ancient than but be of some value. It is written in medium-sized sloping uncials which may be roughly assigned to the fourth century. There is a loss of five lines between the end of the recto and the beginning of the verso, so that
still

sufficiently early to

the number of lines on a page was about 2a, and the leaf was nearly square in shape. comma-like mark divides two mutes in 1. a at the end of a line

i;

1167.
is

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

sometimes written as a horizontal stroke over the preceding vowel. The chief characteristic of the text is a tendency to agree with combinations of against the Codex Alexandrinus an exception occurs in 1. 20.

DEM

Recto.

[
[ae

iSev

ds

[
5

][9

] ^^
e[t7r]i

Se

15

[? ?] ?[ [^ ]
eiwev 5e

] []
[ [
$9]

]] [] [
[]

[] []
[]

[]

[ ^
01S

][

]
K<m6\v
[S]evpo

42

43

][]()[]9
opas]

]) )

[\ (

[][ ]
[]
ovOets

tols TKvois

[ [

( ^ [
et

44
eis

Se

[
[]
45

9 [

^6

[ [] 2 [
[]

Tvpei

25

? ?? [[] [ ] [ [] [ ? [ ] [] [ ^] [? ? [ [
(5e

Verso.

48

[][]

49

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


erepos
ycoaet
ety

[]
30 yayo
[/3]7

9 $ [
^
)[]
/

[]

[
i ei

5
52

yi''[at]fay

[ ^[/ [(
eav re

//

/;

[
SO

[
/
in

irpo[s

/i77(5e

/3[;'/

em

^
,
Other

,.
Philo.

53

g4

4-5 The blurred and broken letters are here difficult to identify, but the indications favour the supposition that was omitted after ai uvyarfpes, 01 and as in EM, various cursives and versions, and Philo. omits 01 before and before 6. V of was apparently repeated by mistake ; cf. 1. 30, where there is an inadvertent omission, and note on 11. 26-7. After adds with in place of otra; but these
variants are less suitable to the space.
7.

[][

910.
12.

which Stands

8(
:

EM

.
A

MSS.

{dvyaTfpes A),

om.

after

was doubtless omitted

Z)8ilEM, &c.
13.

than

tSe

Unless was divided (A) om. E.


;

^
TO

in the papyrus, with

(\,

{DM)

seems rather better adapted to the space

15.

fis

18.

\:
:

()

is

also admissible.

20. 23.

is

After

24.

uhov

26-7. marginal reading


30.
1.

: ( 6[ (((
om.
?j
:

() doeS not SUit. omitted in Z^siiEM, &c. so and a number of cursives reads instead of

^^^

so

A,

( ,
;

{ihov), iibev
;

(intv

AM.

so Z>i'EM

A. was perhaps written by a dittography for does not help. For reads

(( ,

cf.

1.

6.

M's

\%.

1168.

Joshua
7 3

-.
Fourth century.

6-5 cm.

fragment from the bottom of a vellum leaf inscribed with v^ell-formed upright uncials of a medium size, and probably of the fourth century, is shallow and high in the line, as in 847. high stop is twice added in a blacker ink than that used by the original writer. Eleven lines are lost at the top of

the recto, and the height of the leaf

may

be estimated at about 15-5 cm.

1168.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

two agreements with

character of the text can hardJy be gauged from so small a sample, but against are noticeable, and the support against both of a variant found in a few cursives.

The

[Ks

[] []'
. . . :

[ [

][ \'^[ ]
Verso.
ecwy

Recto.

iv.

23

[ ]([
[

] [8
(

[] [] []
2-4.

\.
;

24

ej/

?15

(() [( , 8[
8.

[ [
8[
.
vi.

[ [

eunpo

[
in

F* OmitS

and haS

place of

13.

SO Several cursives SO
:

4~5 ^'''[

8[

.
;

BAF.

SO

1169.

St.

Matthew's Gospel
8x14-1 cm.

Fifth or sixth century.

leaf, of which the upper worm-eaten and decayed. Two columns of about 27 lines each were contained on the page, and the original dimensions of the leaf may be estimated roughly at 25 3o cm. No clear traces of ruling are discernible. The hand is an upright uncial, rather large and
is

This

a fragment from the outer part of a vellum


off,

portion seems to have been cut

while the lower

is

carefully finished, with strongly


It is of

marked contrasts of light and heavy strokes. the same type as 848, and the fragment reproduced in Schubart's Pap.

Gr. Berol. 44 a, and must belong to approximately the same period. text is divided up into paragraphs or verses, a new line with an enlarged
letter

The
initial

commencing each paragraph, much

after the

manner

of, e. g.,

the

Codex

Alexandrinus.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Verso.
Col.
i.

Col.

ii.

y[ap
[

vi.

[o]

[/

[]
Se

]
^
]

vi.

"fpo

ovV

OvT<ii[^

[]9
f?'

[ro

15

7/)

?7"^'^

[][] \]
Recto.
Col.
i.

eX

Col.

ii.

20

[ \ ^ [] [?
Krf[9

wei

vi.

13

pv

30
14

25

[7]

\
\[
vi^\r\ai
;

[ [
{).
it is

vi.

^ [
[

7[
IS

7.

that the

The vestige suiis and is inconsistent wath a round letter MSS. did not agree with BS* in adding {() before

thus most probable

13.
I p.

( ].
1.
:

1169.
is

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

for

-.
of the end of
1.

23.

om. D*L,
28 and
1.

28-9.

The decipherment

29

is

very uncertain.

1170.

St.

Matthew's Gospel
22.9

x-xi.
Fifth century.

x9

cm.

The following leaf from a papyrus book is complete at the top and bottom, but broken at the sides; the surface is also very much damaged, and partly
owing to this cause, partly also to the brown shade of the ink used, decipherment is in places extremely difficult and uncertain. Nothing of much importance seems to be involved, for the text is not distinguished by accuracy. It is,
however, probably the oldest authority for the reading
otherwise unrecorded variant
in x.

32

and an

may be

noted

in

1.

7.

The

rather widely spaced

lines are written in a good-sized upright uncial

hand, which is less heavy and than that of 1169. An unusual characteristic is the avoidance of the ordinary theological contractions.

probably rather

earlier

Recto.

evnpoaOev

\t(uv

[ \ } ]( [ [] [
.

[]>

[]

^[
?''"
^^
v
otl

(\^
\

32

15

[<]

[ [ \ [ [] [ [ [
i]pr)yr)v

[ [ [
ra)[t'

33

34

[\]

7r]arpoy

35

[yanpa

[ ^]

^6
37

e/ze

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


iios

[7]
2

(:
[

[?
[

39

\9

][

e/ze

4
Se

25

[] 3 [
[
[as]
35
[cf

45

[] 4 [ [][[] ] [][]([ [] ] ] [] [

[ ][\][][ ? ][ [
Tats]

[ ][] [\[ [^
]

] [ [ [] [ ][]
ev]a

[ [

[] ]/ { [ ] []9

Verso.

41

]^(

os

42

Aeyoo

]7[]

e[ye]i/e[r]o

eTeXeacv

XI.

[]

eKeiOev

[
;

[
]\ISS.
;

ev

[eTepov

3
4

[
[ere
ev

[
BCK.

A]e

2.

SO
:

DL
SO

most
&c.

3.

ovpams

DEFGL,

rotr ovpa,ois

Cf.

1.

6.

is

for -rat.

1170.
5.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
for
is
;

There

is

no room
SO

possibly he wrote
6.
7

ovpa^vois

.
:

9
made some
error

or
tois

-,
is

and the

scribe evidently
;

the order of

Bt^D

t^CDEGKL
ow
D.

.
in

CEFGKL.
text.

The

insertion of

before

apparently peculiar to the present

at the

end of

this line is

placed after
.

and verse 38 conclusion of verse 37 os are omitted. The former of these omissions, which the repetition of homoeoteleuton of made easy, occurs also in B*D, and the latter in M. on 11. 25-7. 18. The vestiges at the end of the line are very faint, but seem to suit better than b[e (D). '\\1/ is Omitted in D. 257.
17.
, . .
.

10.

viov

The

t<.

and the
Cf. note

28. 29.

'.

(
.
:

rather

).

38.
43

[][. (;) D.
fc^*.

45

omits

.
1 1

D.

1171.

St. James's
5

Epistle

ii-iii.

4-3 cm.

Late third century.

Plate I (recto).

A
cursive

strip

hand which
used

from a leaf of a papyrus book, neatly written in an upright semiis more likely to belong to the latter half of the third

century than to the


infrequently
Kvpios,

are written out.

commencement
is

of the fourth. the


final

The comma-shaped
way, but

sign not

placed

after

consonant of non-Greek names.

and

Oeos are contracted in the usual

and

If,

as

is

probable, the lacuna at the bottom of the recto was

contained in six

lines, the height of the leaf was about 16 cm. were of some length, and since the point of division is quite uncertain I have not made a conjectural restoration of the gaps but only completed imperfect words. The fracture along the right-hand side of the recto, except at 11. I and 20, is practically straight. So far as can be judged the text was a good one, being generally in agreement with that of the Vaticanus but there is one coincidence with C (1. 34) and one with L (1. 9) against the other more important in 1. 15. MSS., besides a probable divergence from

The

lines

Recto.

Plate

I.
ii.

]$ [9
0eXe[iy
K\^ve

19

20

mans

x[o>pLS

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


5

]' [[/ 9
]

21

Tois epyoiy

]
]''

[ ][
]

/3Xe[7reiy

22

[
23

15

/)]
]

] ^[
yap
TTi/y

[] [ ^[\ \ \8
t[ovs

^i
[ej/c

^py^v

24

70)[9

25

veKpov

\
[

26

ympis

epycoj/

iii.

7[//

Verso.

]
]

[
[ [

ifa[i]

25

)[ ] [ [9 8\
]

[//$ ] ] [ ^[ ]^ 9 []9
] [
]

av^^ei

019

[/]

yei/jeffecoy

[
[ [

]?

]//

1171.
35

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
8e y\(daa[av

(5;'][]
]

40

[ ^ [ \ ^ \
[
[

ir
8

roi{y

from an early period, e.g. P. Grenf,


:
',

the interchange of CTand is not uncommon ly P. Tebt. 35. 4, 16 14 cmartvafv 8e B^A, &c. SO L (-f) 9 II. Considerations of space make it unlikely that roivw was added after opare
2.
is

o7r]ou
:

a misspelling of

ii.

fus,

as in

KL.
15.

Without

,
:

which follows
;

short;

omits yap. 17 fpycop; so B^5

21.
2 2,

\(
so B^5
;

is

also the Order of BiiC

( ^
;

in

fc^ACKL, the lacuna would be abnormally

ACKL.

.
;

24.

26.

27. 31. 34
36.

/ ]
eyka
(ca[t is

ACKL.
BAC^

SO

omitted by S*.

kql

The

8(
,

initial

a of

equally well belong to a of BC ; l*iAK have


38.

():

KL.

[,
:

((
C
is

AL.

tiC^KL.

Bt^A, &C. represented only by a small vestige which might but the spacing clearly shows that the papyrus followed the order
SO

8.

..

1172.

The Shepherd of Hermas.


19-2
1

2-9

cm.

Fourth century.

Pastor, both in Greek and Coptic, have Egypt, and their comparative frequency clearly Those in indicates the popularity of the book in the early Christian church. Greek include 404, P. Amh. 190, P. Berl. 5513 and 6789 {Berl. Klassikertexte, vi. pp. 13-30), and a vellum fragment at Hamburg {Siizungsb. d. Berl. Akad., cf. 5 recto, where Mand. xi. 9 is quoted. phil-hist. KL, 1909, pp. 1077 sqq.) To this list has now to be added the present fragment, a nearly complete leaf from a papyrus book, the two pages, which are numbered 70 and 71 respectively, containing the greater part of Sim. ii. The script is a medium-sized sloping

Several fragments of the

Hermae

recently been obtained from

12
semi-cursive which
I

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


should assign to the fourth century,
is
;

and the angular loop of the


doubtful accent occurs in

often considerably exaggerated.

O^os 1. 2 there is no clear instance of punctuation. A few corrections are abbreviated in the usual way, but not and have been made, and some at least of them are probably due to a dififerent though practically contemporary hand, which is perhaps also responsible for the numeration of the pages. The Greek text of this part of the Hermae Pastor is dependent upon the contains only an earlier portion. fourteenth-century Codex Athous, since From 1. 23, however, of the papyrus onward, P. Berl. 5513 is also available for comparison. The latter comes from a roll which is most probably of the third century and no doubt somewhat older than 1172. There is, however, a striking uniformity in the testimony of the two papyri, and they are usually in agreement as against the Athous, such discrepancies as they show (11. 29, ^fi^ 39) This unanimity is most marked in the order of being comparatively slight.

has a waved

tail,

somewhat

words, and
credible.

it

is

likely that these early witnesses are here generally the

more
4, 6,

Of the other

variants the

most noteworthy are those

in

11.

(disposing of an old crux), lo-ii, 17, 18, 25, 26, and 47.

The collation given below is based on the 1877 edition of Gebhardt and Harnack, whose symbols are reproduced ca = Codex Athous, L^ = the old Latin (Vulgate), L^ = the Latin Palatine version. A = Aethiopic, C = Coptic.
:

Recto.

5 Se

10

8 [ ]\ [ \ [][] ] [] [] \[ ^ [] [] [] ^ -^ [][ ] [] 6[] [] ( [[


Se
[is

jiqi

['\(

] ]
[]
6[6
.

]
\ei
.

e\i

SeovTa

1173.
VTCV

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
ev

13

^L

[]
/ [ev]Tiv^[LS

\
15

9
Tvyyavei

[] []

] ^]

^^
8
ev

ipyov]

(]^
25

^ ] [ ]9

Verso.
.

^ ^ [ ^^
vnep

-^ (^
^

^^ \\ [
ev

][] (

[]

8'[

ev

^ [[ [
^VTiv^L[s

(
7

[.]

]]ya

[]^ []

^
[ [

Scktov

3
peiv

[\[]
6[]/

( [] [] [] ^
[]
['\
fai

[
0e
[

35

[^]
[""If/?

^ ^^ [ ] []
^^
[]

4 [\

[ ][ ] [] [

[]

^ (

^pv

^ []
,[

[]

[]
[

[
[

)(

14

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

45 [fjapiOi

[7]
[\(
]

[ [\\9 [] '?
ej/oyof
ls
TL

? [ [ 8\
[
be
full

ey

ye

for

in the lacuna,

which
;
.

4
is
:

ca.

There

already of
et

length.

L
to

has

terra, but supports the

order of the papyrus by reading exiguum


4 XPvlMfl'O 5-6. omitting

nugacem.

7[(] .

so

LL A
.

ca.
.

6.

avTOv'.
:

)
nor

SO ca

LL A
is

Seem

have read

ca.

ca

LL
be

this

tautology inappropriate.

6-7.
8.
.
.

( :
would

A. Since an advantage,
:

\\

ca again inverts the order.


;

is

yap,

and

repeated immediately below, an avoidance of in the sense of remote is not

.\

ca.

LL

Omit

.
.

ca,

emended by Tischendorf
suits the papyrus,

But neither

vestiges of the letter or letters


satisfactory since the long tail
at all

to cf. apud dommum (om. L^ A). where the termination is apparently The intervening between and are very slight, but is not of a should have left some trace, and this word would not

account for the corruption of ca. i. e. which is a just possible reading, would be better from the latter point of view, but the abbreviation is unlikely, especially with in 1. 31, nor does the adjective seem appropriate in itself. this is no doubt the original of ca's 9. for which various conjectures
:

{),

Geb.-Harn. with HoUenberg, avanvij Hilgenfeld, Harnack). is accurately translated by A {innixus fuerit) L^ (om. L^) has reficietur {reficiiur Dressel) pauper a diviie, which is rather far from the Greek, and are attested,
;

have been made

()
.

{
.

but not apparently the subjunctive. 910. em


:

.
:

eVt

ca.

-. []66 (() .
ca.
.
.

cf.

L^ credet uUque dives quoniam

ca, confisus
:

13. 14.
15
.

ev
.
.

][]
a.

\
:

ca.

ca

LL

Om.

rrj

.
ca.

si operatur

'y

before the lacuna are also consistent with a, but shorten the supplement, if possible. Perhaps the supposed tail of the of

The remains
interlinear
:

it is

desirable to
in the line

above

is

an

16. 17.

be ca.
.

The
.

{)

of was corrected from o. ca has which Geb.-Harn. retain

(,

[,

Of ),

with

1172.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
is

no evident
vn(p
:

sense.
TVf pi

Tischendorfs reading

tvxapurrei ed, pr.

gralias
1

agit

8.
r\

For vntp cf. ca. Deo pro eo qui tribuii. 6Tt om. ca.
:

{) A orabit pauper pro divite ad dominum gratias agens, U


confirmed by the papyrus;

(
;

15

(^ 6 ( 22-3. [ fne]
20. 21.
:

TTfJ^or evrfv^t\s
ca.
cf.

17

evr.

.
at the

ca.

L'^

A
ca.

oratiotie

supplement than would be expected


a high stop.
23. 25. TO
is

and

ca. P. Bed. is defective, but reads tq at 1. 38, noticeable that in the present passage a reduction of two letters would give a line The rare neuter would be more likely to corresponding better in length to those adjacent.
:

: !

end of

(
1.

ca.

22.

dot after

however is a shorter ]|t might be taken for

SO P. Berl.

it

be converted to the masculine than vice versa.


in

ca. P. Berl. is again defective, but one or two more letters 26. the lacuna would be an advantage, and here too the principle of difficilior lectio potior
:

\('\{)

may be
27.

applied.

The deletion presumably included the mutilated letter following of epyov; what was originally written is not apparent. The supposed y of /xcya is more like a . awiei ed. pr. is confirmed The word is not 28. Tischendorfs reading is the form in P. Berl., preserved in P. Berl. ca ; but the here is imperfect, might be read. and

(
;

29. 7rt: els ca, P. Berl. SO P. Berl. 30. biaKovLav 301. Tot[yl ovv
'.

32.

33
34. 35.

: ^ !
: :

L'^

biaK,
;

SO P. Berl.

toIs

Ca.

ovv ca.

36.
37.

38.

39 so p. Berl.; 43 suits the papyrus better than


:

([]. :

SO P. Berl. and cf. L^ cum ; iav ca, etiamsi A. SO P. Berl. ; . ca. TO SO P. Berl. ; om. ca. ca. SO P. Berl. ; (cf. 1. 6) ; The papyrus apparently agreed with ca in reading ovv L" also Omit P. Berl., ca. This is also the order in P. Berl. ; ca has . . .
:
:

'
.

:
yap

(()[^\.
SO

.
25.

P. Berl.

(.

Berl.;

ca.
Berl., ca.

Cf.

1.

ca, rightly corrected

(ca), the fracture at the

(P. Berl.) by Hilgenfeld. ends of 11. 42-4 being practically

](

vertical.

44.

46-7.

.:

SO P. Berl. ca

aliquid ministrare. aliquid boni operari, original reading.

have the singular. poterit only after om. ca. Cf. ; cf. L^ being a variant for is presumably a slip for tg ay,, ; It is not clear what is the bona opera agere, C
;

A L* C

SO P. Berl., with

</77

48. This line may be regarded as either an explicit or an iiicipit, though at the bottom of a column the former is more natural. In either case the papyrus differs from the It is to ordinary arrangement, according to which the foregoing Similituda is the second. be noticed that the hypothesis that in P. Berl. the usual order was observed implies, as the editors have remarked, a very tall column, and the suggestion may now be made that Sim. ii was there directly followed by Sim. iv. The other number, if it be a number, which

i6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

may refer to some such larger division into sections as is stands in front of There are traces of ink in front of the apparently also indicated by P. Amh. 1 90 {k). (quite doubtful) ^, but whether another figure preceded is not clear.

1173.

PhilO.
17-5x15 cm.
Third century.

Fol. 7.

of which remains here follow was a large volume, numerous works of Philo. The surviving fragments are shown by comprising the numeration of the pages to be curiously scattered, and as many as four extant

The papyrus codex

De

books are represented, Sacraruni Leguni Alleg. i, Quod Deteritis Potiori hisid.^ Moreover, some treatise or treatises Ebrietate, and De Mercede Meretricis. no longer extant were also included, for there is one nearly entire leaf which is doubtless novel, besides some smaller pieces at present remaining unidentified. These are reserved for a future volume, and I now print only such fragments as
have been able to find of the four books mentioned above. The leaves were nearly square in shape, each page containing 24-5 rather long lines. The gatherings were of six sheets at least, as is shown by one sheet
1

of which the pages are respectively numbered 192, 193 (not published) and 214, 215 (Fol. 5). Down the middle of the inside sheet of the quire a narrow strip of vellum was

gummed

in

order to protect the papyrus against the binding string

both vellum and string

still

adhere to the margin between Fols. 2 and

3.

That

more
of

writers

surprising.

them

is

than one should be employed upon so long a MS. is not Apparently three hands are to be distinguished. The most formal that of Fols. 2-3, a sloping somewhat negligently formed uncial of

medium size. Fols. i and 5-7 are in a sloping semi-cursive hand, while Fol. 9 is written in a less flowing round and upright script. All these hands are of third-century type, and the codex may be regarded as of approximately the same antiquity as the Paris papyrus the impossible date assigned
rather less than
;

to the latter

by Scheil {Mem. de la Mission Arch. Frang. au Caire, ix. 2) has questioned by Wilcken (ap. Cohn-Wendland, i. p. xlii) and Kenyon been rightly In several respects these two early books show [Palaeography, p. 145).
similarities
:

the size of the leaf; the informal character of the hands (only one of

those in the Paris

MS. can be

described as

une belle onciale ')

and the occasional


the signs of
elision,

insertion of breathings

and accents.

In 1173 these proceed from the diorthotes

who has throughout made

occasional alterations, and to

whom

pagination, and to a large extent, at least, the punctuation

by means of a high

dot should also be assigned,

^eos

is

regularly contracted in the usual manner,

1178.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
;

and

v{lo)s is

written in Fol. 5 recto 35

in Christian literature occurs

7 verso 30).

(
;

if

but none of the other compendia

5 recto 14,

^,

common

5 recto 23, ovpavos

Apart from obvious


vigilance
(cf.

errors, several of

which have escaped the corrector's


3, 7

e.g. 3 recto 9, 5 verso 8-9,


is

6 recto

recto 10, 31, verso


differ,

6),

the

text of the papyrus

fairly correct,
cf.

and where the MSS.


recto 3, 5, 24.
2,

commonly
verso 4).

supports the better reading


editorial

e. g.

In a few places small


;

emendations are confirmed (5 recto


i

recto 30, 32

cf.

Other readings peculiar to the papyrus, some of which


others are doubtless wrong, occur at
7 recto
3, 4, 13, 34, verso 6, 7, 13,
*

may be
recto
7,

right, while

recto 14, 5 verso

3, 19,

and apparently. 9 verso

2, lo-ii, 35, recto 4, 11, 13, 16.

The
to

qualification

apparently

'

is

necessary, because

my

collation of Fol. 9 has

depend upon the meagre information of Mangey, since the treatise De Mercede Meretricis is not* yet included in Cohn-Wendland's critical edition, which is On the whole the papyrus leaves the available for the preceding fragments. satisfactory impression that the text of Philo as reconstituted by modern
criticism
is

substantially sound.

Legum
(Cohn-Wendland,
Fol.

Alleg.
i.

i.

75,

Mangey,

i.

54.)

T7y[y]

[ 7[ [9 )^ [ (>[] ^^ [] [[ 9 7[ ] ' \[]


o[a

verso.

^T]i\

Cf

'
eviai

iiSevai

SevSpa

Se

re

evepYia[i

57
[

* []'
[]

eiaiv

'

'

^^ ^ ^
^'^
C

i8

15

c^et

' [ ' ^
\\[\

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

] [ 2 [ 9 ]

[]

[
[

)(^

] [
^

[ [

yap

o[8os

np[a^is
[ev

5^

] []
ety

Fol.

recto.

[]
5

^? [ ][]' 9] ] [] \^ ' 9
omp
eis

[ /]

59

[] ' 9
[]

[]

Tives

[] [

[]
[]
15

20

^ - [ ] [5] ^^ ] ^ [ [] [ ] [] ( [ ] [ ] ]9 []
re

[ []

[[eji

[9

ye

[
[

1173.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
MSS.

rg

MAPUFL.
UFL.

: (: ^
1

verso

I.
:

2.

yvaoToi

3 5

UL.

?
ye

UFL.
;

8.

of

;(apaKr;jp[t]iet

has been altered

MSS., but

perhaps the copyist began to write a is omitted in the Armenian.


1.

p.

APU.
:

11.
1 2.

4.

15,
17.
19.

Armenian
21.

somewhat

^] , [
The
first
t

UF
eiaiv is written
:

of

om.

here and in over a .

13.

which

omit, clearly stood in the papyrus.

UFL
ai

have
before
irp[a^eif,

as before. as in the

is

The

omitted in L. size of the lacuna points to the omission of


;

(so

Turnebus and Cohn)


is

al

UFL,

MAP.
and the preceding supplement
is

of

only moderately satisfactory,

short.

1
3.
4.

recto
itrrt
:

5.
7.

g,

14.

15.
17.

, ( . 8 (: . \ (<.
I.
:

Mangey
[1;

\
'.

is

omitted by

UFL.
in the

om. U.

reads
:

and there might be room for (excerpta Neapol.) Arm.

lacuna here.

UFLN.

\]:
'.

avTOvs

MSS.

(.

UFL.

Arm.

Quod

Det, Potiori Insid. Soleat.

(Cohn-Wendland,

i.

270,

Mangey,

i.

aoi.)

FoL

a recto.

][] [ ? <] [ ] [
]

2,

20
5

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[^
[pinouirai

CKeivois

?
:

]]
S

ne

line lost.

'

--'

Fol 3 recto.

[Se

]70
ev

[]
[re

[] ?

[''c]p[oi]$'

Xoyo[[i;y]]

Tepa

[]
[]

[[ [
[[.]]

[ ^[
c/ic

[ )( [ [ [] [ ]
eav Se

5 [[ [
Si

^?
eav
Se

54

[][

'
[
[

[ [][
[]

[ [][

Fol. 3 verso.

[ [ ][][][ ] [][ [ ]$] [


]

][] [ ^ ] [ ]
[
[

56

[
[

10

[ ^] [
1173.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

21

IS

[ [
[ie
is

[
[eiv

^]

c{v]i/

iKav(io[s]

SoKovvTas

yap

] ]

]'
S ^]9

^^ ][]
[

]5 \^ \
s

Tepov

[]

[]

eyco

MSS.
2 recto .
4.

= UFHL.
The
supposed to have

UF.
and (so HL) to shorten the supplement. represented only by a tiny vestige.
:

write

been inserted

3 recto
9.
1.

13.

1314.

\(
5.
:

Markland's conjecture

is

not confirmed.
.

with the

MSS.

3 verso
6.

[^[

12.

: (( ((
3.

UF.
or

with UF.

HL.

SO

UF

14.

The supplement
assumed
;

is

slightly shorter
is

anoKptivfTai is

but there

HL,, Cohn. ^ than would be expected, even when the spelling give ov for no variant except that

HL

De
(Cohn-Wendland,
ii.

Ebrietate.

171, aia,

Mangey,

i.

358, 390.)

[\
[oy

'^\\
[ei]?

[8]

^^

Fol. 5 verso.

[5 ]

X^oyos
e|

[]
5

ai'[a]y/C77[y]

^ ([] [
re

yv

Se

avvayjras []
e[i/

evipyaaaT[o

[ [ y ][

ave

ev

onore

[]

yo[p]

22
10
/joec

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRt

^ [6
8l

15 [[^

9
20

[ ][0 [] [][]9' [^ ^^ [] [9
[][]
^

[] 7[];

[]
5

[] []

[] [ ] [
[?

\? ? [] [] [] ^
[
peo]v(Tiv

? [? [? ^ ] [ ] [ ^ [ [ ( ^ ^ ] ^ ?
eyei/ero

/]]

7[ ? ][ []( [[] [
^[]
eiaoSov

^^^ [ [
? [][

[
[\
[][]

][

?]]

vnepopios Tray

eKe[i]vo?

7[7
[] []

eivai

Fol. 5 recto.

1 2

[]

[]

^?

[?
[

15

[] [] [ []
'

? [] ^(^?
[]

? []
1

[]

Tive?

CTe]/oouy

^?

[]
[]? [][

[ay t,vat

[5

35

[/

] [\ [? ] [ ][]9 [] [\ [ \\\ ^^ [ [] [ ^
1173.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

23

]^]8[

]]

aiei

] ][
e[ia]a[7ra]v
eis

"[]'[

][]

/];6/[

yap

\<]

[7]}

Fol. 6 recto.

]'
]

[^^

\]'

]
]

Fol. 6 verso.

[(
[

[[]]

Fol. 7 recto.

[]
5

319

[] ^^

24

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

?\]9 ? [] []
yap
ovtol navres

)([9]

[ [] ^. ( [])
5e

^^ []
evvov

220

.[....

15

/ [][]9

8[]9 [][]
o[v]SL9
oi]s

yei/oy

[9 []9

[]

[] ][] [] 9 [] )([] 9 []][]9 [] [] ] [ [][]


Se

[] [9]
e[ri

[l]

ye

^ [] ^^^
5e
yei/o/xe

22 1

(\\

[]

civ

[] ^
[]

Fol. 7 verso.

[\

[]

0[]5

^ [ ] []
[]
[]

-
['

^ '

ev

222

[] [] []
[5]

[[]]/?

[]

^ '\[

[][ ]

223

15

^'\\\^ \^\ 0^[4]_ [] [] [] "? []? ?? []

'[] )(
1173.
fiV

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

?5

a[X]^^ofs [o]v8v

[]
are

^ \^

[/\

^ [][][
[[]]

Kepavviovs

,?

^
?
'[]7;[]
1.
:

? ? []
? \
MSS.

^[]

= GUFH.

5 verso
6.

8.
9

\\\.
for
:

^. G.
for

om. MSS.

.
16.
1

rightly
is

3 There
as conjectured

hardly seems to be

(.
MSS.

with

MSS.

).
or

by Wendland, and probably the papyrus agreed with F in omitting was originally written is not clear. The letters 14-15. Why ^? ?]5e

'

room

in the lacuna for

dots placed above them.

.,
have

The supplement
:

at the

end of the

line is slightly

longer than would be expected.

18.
19.
7ret

F. Om. L.
:

ineibap

MSS.
anaidevaiap
:

Damasc. Sacra FaraL); ovbep oy8evi MSS. U. GD, Wendland, lo-ii. The reading of the papyrus was evidently longer than the ordinary text, is rightly restored, Something additional If which is yovp
8. ovdepi:

[ 8
[]
6.
:

5 recto G.

2.

[]
SO

SO

Tumebus, Wendland

UFH,

so

Wendland with Richter


*.

om. MSS.

G.
SO

preceded. 1214.
23.

20. ovp

24.

[]\\
F.

. : ]
:

D (lo. FH
;

[ ]<
.
suits the
;

(8

om.

om.

F.

(Wendland)
SO

space better than

GUH, Wendland

FL.

be an irregular

(] \\

(GUH)
would

division.

26

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


25.
.

.[
u(io)r
:
.

fi

MSS.

but

fi

vios is the

order in the

LXX (Deut. xxi.

18).

U omits

recto

3.

1.

with the

MSS.
MSS.)
is

verso
7 recto

3.
2.

The
SO

deletion of Sf (om.
'.

probably due to the corrector.

3 fvrpfnfis:

The

corrector's
4.
5.
: :

om. MSS.
G.
SO
:

(
GF
;

.
a Trinity College

Mangey and Wendland from


is

MS.;

(vnptntis others.

novel.

6.

.
1 1

was written
20.

( . /
, Wendland
top
;
:

so

U,

GUF.

HL.

1.

^*

F.

At the end of the

line

is

doubtful.

was

originally misspelled, but

what

12. earl

om. MSS. The papyrus confirms Wendland's


:

21.
22.

[]. \5\
:

1.

voi

24. OKpuTovs
vulg.
:

in the

the papyrus gives the correct spelling (Turnebus); MSS., Tas apvaTfis TurnebuS, Wendland.

.
:

insertion of

Be,

which the MSS, omit,

after

with the

MSS.
MSS.
omits ras
oiv.
.
. .

U, Wendland, papyrus has been altered apparently from MSS. The Spelling pexpi is also found in G

7
3-

verso
v
:

I.

om.
:

After

4.

has the appearance of having been crossed through.


;

was conjectured by Benzelius, Wendland MSS., Mangey. The stroke above apparently here does duty for a circumflex accent a somewhat similar stroke is employed in the Coptos papyrus of Philo, according to Scheil, p. iv. Turnebus, Wendland. GUF, 5.

(
is

repeats

.
t.
;

GFH,

^e'xpts others.

.
:

., .
in the

6.
7

f]
:

]\ISS.

a sHp for

8.

11. 12.

L. for dot at the end of the line is probably accidental. were strangely cramped; was written, the letters 19. If omitted. 20-21. For the alteration of the word-division cf. Fol. 9 recto 17.
. .
.

^. {] '
:

0([1

. .

MSS., as

.
LXX.
oibi

.\
F,
F,
'.

MSS. (om.

1415 1516.

G).

perhaps

was

21.

((
,
.

22.

^
SO

UH,
HL*
;

G.

GUFL^

Wendland with Mangey.

om. U.

1173.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
De Mercede
(Mangey,
Meretricis.
ii.

27

268.)

yra

[.

[]
. .

[ [\\? 69 [] ]
[e^

[?
[?

15

' ]? [?] \ [(? ?? ? [?] ? ?. [?] ]? ? ? [? ?] ? ? [? [? ]? ? ? ]? [


otl

[]? \\
\?
a8iayoii\yo?

[? 2 [?
[r;To]y

? ? ?? ? ? ? ?] [? ? ?] \ [?? ?
\[?
ei/roy

? ? '^ ? ^ -^?
\(^

[]

Fol. 9 verso.

^ ? ?
]?

[7?]

<

als

/9

[]

e^ety

0[]

a//[[e]]i/croy

ap]yaXeo?'

])/?

aviepo?

???
Fol. 9 recto.

06][[_']]

[]?
yo?

?? [? ?
0?
[])(?

? ?[ ?
[?

.[....

28
5

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI'


'
'

^'^)(^/
15

? ? ^ [ ([ ? ' [ 9
9
VvS[otos

7[ 8 [][9 [][9 /?
[9

Sl^ovovs

voy

? ? [^
[9 [5 [9]
[)(5

^^^^ ^^? [9 /^ '^09

[][9
2
e0e[Xe)(0/ooy

[ ^^
The page-numbers
.
.
."

?
Mangey
others.
for

^^

9 verso.
imperfect. 12.
are
.

of this leaf are not preserved, the upper margin being with

SO

Vat

the beginning of
doubtful.
e.

been some correction of Besides adding above the line, the


1.

2 there has

,
,'

Others.
its

At
have

but

nature and reason

second

hand

seems

to

retouched the
3.

, was apparently written by the


o]vv
:

first

hand.

6.
7.

e|etf

9.

[^
:

so

Mangey with om. fcrt] Mangey with no v. 1.


;
:

20.

9 recto

() and
3
is

.
I.

Mangey. For another substitution of

The

vestige of a letter before the lacuna is indecisive

of

has been altered, perhaps from


the ordinary text has

found in
4.

MSS.
in
11.

After

words occur below


8. evevb[oTos
'.

14-15 with the variant

letter following a

SO vulgo ; avivfvhoTos suggest rather than y.

Mangey

! ^, 8,. \
between

an original

cf.

recto 14.

8
which

. The corrector's spelling

8(,

vnepBtTiKOs,

for

with

M.

In

the remains of the

1173.
10.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
;

29
or

The

first

of pahiovpyos has been corrected


the. line act,

apparently

was

originally

written.

which is absent in M, is required to fill the space. as originally written, is the ordinary reading; corrector's anipevos is not mentioned as a variant by Mangey. At the end of
11.

(: (
12.
is

(,
!.
12.

The

om. vulgo.
V.
1.

The word
The
letters

has already occurred in

found as a
1.

in Dion. Hal. Ant.

Rom.

iv.

29

14-15. Cf. note on


1.

16,

note on
17.

(,

on in have undergone some correction. om. vulgo, the word having occurred above (Mangey, p. 268. 42); cf.
4.
1,

v.

(((
1.

9.

vulg.

which

is

the usual form.

30

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

II.

NEW
1174.

CLASSICAL TEXTS.
Sophocles, Ichneutae,
Height 18-3 cm.
Late

second

century.

Plate II (Cols. iv-v).

That Satyric Drama should be represented by but a single play, and that too by the youngest of the three great tragedians, has often been deplored. A specimen by Aeschylus, commonly reckoned the greatest exponent of the art (Diog. Laert. ii. 133, Pausan. ii. 13. 5), or of Pratinas, might have been a more welcome gift, but in presenting us with the considerable remains here published of the Ichietitae of Sophocles, fortune does something to remove a reproach
and to
fill

one of the

many gaps

in

the history of Greek dramatic art.

The
fragments

greater part of this papyrus was obtained in 1907, but

made

their

appearance close by

in the previous winter,

some minor when the main

That text is apparently a sister-MS. to the present, portion of 1175 was found. and the work of the same scribe and it is quite likely that some of the smaller pieces placed there belong to 1174, while, on the other hand, among the miscellaneous fragments assigned to the Ichneutae there may be a few stragglers
;

from

1175.

The

difficulty of distinguishing

is

further increased

by the

fact that

the finds to which 1174 and 1175 belong include a


written in a closely similar
if

number

of prose fragments

not identical handwriting.


It is a fine

This hand

is

seen at

its

best in 1174.

specimen of the

common
It

oval type, slightly inclined, and executed with

much

firmness and precision.

may,

think, be assigned with probability to the closing decades of the second

century, a date suggested as well

by the character of the

uncial script as

by

the occasional cursive marginalia.

The

columns, which contain from 36-7


right, so that the last line of a

lines,

tend to lean over a

little

towards the

column

left of the first by Choral odes are distinguished from iambics by indentation, as in the Hypsipyle papyrus (852), where too, as here, the parts of an iambic verse which is divided between two or more speakers are written below one another in separate lines

generally projects to the

the space of two or three letters.

Paragraphi and diaereses were inserted by the original cf. 1177). and to him are also due the stichometrical figures, which mark ofif the Stops, which are usually in the form of lines by hundreds (cf. e. g. 841, 852). a high dot, though points in the medial and low position occur, accents, breathings, marks of elision and long or short quantity, all of which are fairly frequent, and other occasional symbols, including a low-placed comma to separate words
(viii.

15 sqq.

scribe,

'

1174.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

31

(viii. 19; cf. e.g. 1082), the coronis marking the beginning and end of the first surmounted by an iota sometimes inserted as a nota chorus (iii. 4, 19), and the

bene in the

left

margin, are largely, at any rate, subsequent additions, often easily

distinguishable

by the darker colour

of the ink

and they

may

be attributed

who has not only corrected the text but inserted a number of Some of these he kindly refers to their source, the authority various readings. most frequently named being Theon, a grammarian who flourished in the
to the revisor

A few references are Augustan period and was probably cited in 841. ii. made to Apy and Ap, of which the former probably, and perhaps the latter also, with a vertical means Aristophanes (cf. 841), and to a name appearing as stroke through the middle, possibly Nicanor (cf. note on iv. 33). Explanatory notes are rare there is one of some length apparently in Frs. 23 (), {h), while a bare gloss occurs at iii. 6. The dramatis personae 2x0, specified here and there a single stage direction is put in the body of the text at v. 2. The accentual
'i,'].
;

system, which
1082), calls for

is

similar to that of other papyri of the period

(e. g.

841, 852,

no detailed notice.
in

papyrus was recovered have fortunately fitted together in a very satisfactory way, producing large remains of seventeen columns from the beginning of the play. Of these the first fifteen are the remaining two, which certainly successive, as is shown by the stichometry

The numerous fragments

which

this

are very scantily represented, perhaps follow immediately, and at

any

rate are

not separated by more than a slight interval


a point the course of the action
is

cf.
;

the note on Col. xvi.

Up

to

and the story of the Ichneutae turns out to be something very different from what it was conjectured to be by Welcker, to whom the title suggested the wanderings of Europa {Nachtrag^ pp. 311-12). Yet one of the three extant fragments, had its reference been perceived, would have given the clue: the fragment which describes the abnormal
thus clear

growth of the youthful Hermes and occurs in the papyrus at xi. 12-13, establishIt ing beyond question the identity, already sufficiently evident, of the drama. of Apollo's cattle and his is the myth of the infant god's exploits, his theft The scene is laid on Mt. Cyllene invention of the lyre, that provides the plot. in Arcadia (ii. 4), and the characters are Apollo, Silenus and the Satyric chorus, the nymph Cyllene, and doubtless Hermes himself, though the papyrus breaks In the Apollo announces the loss of the cattle, off before he appears. for which he has vainly sought in the northern districts of Hellas, and offers Silenus then comes forward, with the: rewards for their discovery (i-ii. 11). Satyrs in attendance, proffering his services, and Apollo promises them their The Chorus sing a short ode freedom,' as well as gold, for success (ii. i2-iii. 4).
(iii.

5-19) and then, urged by Silenus, start out on the quest

they are the

32
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


'

Trackers

from

whom
i.

the play was named.

Confused traces of the cattle are

soon found
yrjs,

(iv. 15--V. 19),

leading towards the entrance to a cave-dwelling

alarmed by strange sounds, the notes of the newly-invented lyre upon which Hermes was playing Silenus upbraids them roundly for their cowardice, and within (v. 20-vi. 6). promises them the encouragement of his presence (vi. 7-viii. 11) they take heart and sing a lively little stasimon, which is unfortunately much damaged.
Philostrat.

Imag.

26).

But

at this point the seekers are

the terrifying sound is heard, and they are with difficulty restrained from decamping by Silenus, who at last himself beats loudly at the cave's mouth The nymph Cyllene emerges, and after remonstrating against their (ix. 2-4). behaviour (ix. 6-27), and warning them of the necessity for secrecy, unseemly
explains that she
tells
is

Then again

the nurse of the child lately born to Zeus and Maia, and

them

of his astonishing growth (xi. 8-13)

and of the lyre which he had


(xi.

made from

the shell of a tortoise and


'

some cowhide
;

14-xiii.

4).

This

and they express their suspicion that the hide was obtained from the cows of Apollo (xiii. 5-13). Cyllene indignantly repels this accusation, and is still stoutly maintaining the innocence of Hermes Here there is a lacuna of the next column, if it was the at the end of Col. xv. next, all that remains is a marginal variant containing the words cows' dung', and in Col. xvii, represented by the beginnings of the last sixteen lines, Apollo, summoned by Silenus and the Satyrs, reappears upon the scene, and apparently accepts their evidence as entitling them to the promised reward (xvii. 18-19). In the gap between xv. 22 and xvii. 5, therefore, the proofs were reinforced and Cyllene's discomfiture completed. What happened next is a matter of conpresumably the sequel was in the main that of the Homeric Hymn jecture Hermes was confronted with Apollo, and appeased him with the gift of the lyre. This denouement may not have occupied more than another two or three hundred lines ; if the Cyclops is an average specimen, the length of Satyr-plays was conprovides the

Trackers with another clue


'

'

siderably less than that of tragedies.


It is

perhaps somewhat surprising that the name of Sophocles has not previously
list
(c.

figured in the
Liberalis,

of authors
;

known

to have treated this ancient myth.

Antoninus

cf. Ovid, Met. ii. 676 sqq.) relates the incident of the 23 informer Battus, quotes as sources the 'Erepotou/xeWz; a of Nicander, the MeyciAat

who

of Hesiod, the

of Didymarchus, the
of Apollonius Rhodius.

and the

'?
is

of Antigonus,
to have

Alcaeus
;

also

known
vii.

dealt with the story in a

hymn

to
is

Hermes

(Fr. 5

cf.

Pausan.
2),

20. 4).

Of
is

the later authorities the chief

Apollodorus

(iii.

10.

whose version
theft of the

analogous to that of the Homeric


particular,

Hymn, though

differing in certain details.

In

he inverts the order of the

Hymn

in

making the

cows

1174.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

33

precede the invention of the lyre.

Whether Apollodorus used any source other

than the Hymn is a question on which opinion has been divided. Some scholars have maintained that his discrepancies came out of his own head (cf. Gemoll, 191-a). So much, at any rate, is now clear, that in Die Homerischen regard to the sequence of the two events he was anticipated by Sophocles, who

,^').
Hermes

likewise represented
It

as utilizing the cattle for the production of the lyre.

;
With
TTOTc

does not necessarily follow that Sophocles originated this conception, or that he was responsible for the introduction of the nymph Cyllene, although the earliest authority for her in this connexion has hitherto been Philostephanus
(Schol. Pindar, 01.
cf.

vi.

144

. kv

r<3 Trepl

Festus ap. Paul. Diaconus,

Be

'
it

.
s.

\/,
v.

sc.

Verb. Signif.,

Cyllenius

alii

quod

a Cyllene sit nympha edticatus). attributed two innovations at

To the

poet himself, however,

may reasonably be

which are bound up with his dramatic treatment of it, the discovery of the thief by means of the Satyrs, and the transference of the hiding-place of the cattle from the neighbourhood of the
least in the story,

Triphylian Pylos to Mt. Cyllene, a

course dictated
is

by the

unity of place.

reference to the invention of the lyre,

of interest to note that this

subject had a peculiar attraction for Sophocles as an expert on the instrument.

We are

told in the

to account

'

anonymous Bios by appearing in the Thamyras


oOev
kv
it

]
is

in the present play too

{ )
(l^^t

that he turned his accomplishment

highly probable that, as Wilamowitz suggests, the

)
h
5^^^
)

and

dramatist took an active though unseen part


the strains which terrified the Satyrs,
of Satyric

by producing behind
<^^
>v/}-.
lirfn

the scenes

^ j^<^

Apart, however, from the musical interests of the poet, for the purposes drama the theme was well chosen. There was a strong element of comedy in the thievish and lying propensities of the infant god, which, according to the Homeric Hymn, provoked Zeus himself to great laughter and we may surmise that it was in the later scenes, when the mischievous

was confronted with the indignant Apollo, that the humour of the was chiefly developed. So far as the papyrus extends there is nothing so amusing as the scene in the Cyclops where Silenus acts as cup-bearer to Polyphemus. The imitation by the Satyrs of dogs upon the scent no doubt lent itself to fun of a rather boisterous kind, though there is throughout much not that Sophocles' Satyric less coarseness than in the drama of Euripides plays were always above reproach in this respect. Small comic touches are also noticeable here and there, such as the comparison of the Chorus starting on the search to colonists setting out for new lands (iv. 17), or the invitation which seems to be addressed by Silenus to the spectators to give information (iv. 5).
child

piece

34

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

But there is a general air of light-heartedness and good humour which in the certain amount of popularity complete piece must have been very attractive. and as Wilamowitz points out, is argued by the existence of the present copy In the there is some reason to suppose that Euripides was moved to emulation. Antiope of Pacuvius an enigmatical description of the tortoise, similar to that

in Col. xii,

note on

whom
94
;

the

precede that of the Frogs of Aristophanes in

'
De

was given by the lyre-player Amphion (Cic. de Divin. ii. 133 cf. It is most probable that this feature was derived from Euripides, Pacuvius in the Antiope seems to have followed closely (Cic. De Inv. i.
;

xii. 2).

Fin.

i.

4).

If that were so, a terminus ante quern for the appearance of

is

provided, since the production of Euripides' Antiope did not long


B. c.

405 (Schol. Frogs

53).

But

in

any case our play may on account of its metrical

reasonably be placed considerably earlier than


strictness (see below).

this, if

only

Upon
drama

the

much

discussed question of the garb of the Chorus in Satyric


;

Reisch, Festschrift Gomperz, (cf. Wernicke, Hermes, xxxii. pp. 290 sqq. pp. 451 sqq.) the fragments throw no new light of importance, but confirm the indications of the Cyclops. As there (II. 13, 42, 100, 369) the Satyrs, who are (vi. 9, 15, ix. 6 cf. Cycl. 624), are the sons of Silenus addressed as drip^s and
;

(vi. 15, vii.

5, viii.

13, ix.

13),

from^which

it

is

reasonable to infer identity of

nature.

The upholders

of the goat-type can hardly claim as a proof of their

view the does not though it at all on

simile of the goat in xiv. 16, for that has a quasi-proverbial cast, and imply that the person to whom it was applied was habited as a goat, might gain point if he were. Certainly, if the goat-form was employed the Attic stage, it would be expected in a play the scene of which is laid in the mountain-haunts of Pan. In the matter of language the Ichneutae falls fairly into line with conclusions previously formulated concerning the Satyric drama, which occupied an intermediate position between tragedy and comedy. The diction is predominantly tragic, but there is some slight admission of the words and phrases of common

parlance

v. 7 voX

(cf.

Cycl. ^^^^ 558, 586), v. 9

,
iv. 7
.

vi.

13
Cycl.

are

instances, the speaker in each case being Silenus or the Satyrs.

and
572
v.

20V

,
V

Exclamations
(cf.

interjections are frequent, as in

503

),
12
.

comedy, e.g.
Cycl.

iii.

iii.

, iv.
a

2, viii.

25, xvii. 9

'
.

eta,

22 ibov 5

,
(cf.

no,

vii.

,a

(cf.

49

\1/,
is

i^y a a

Cycl. 464).
I

leaning towards popular speech


fX'iOS
ev

homely figures and comparisons, v. 16-17


vi.

810

nalb^s &S

(^,

xiv. 16 as rpayos
in

] ?.'?
? ns kv
. .

also to be discerned in certain

The

,
a), xvii.

^ ns

^,

23 diminutive forms

which are rather frequent

the Cyclops are not here in evidence.

On

the whole

1174.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

35

the Silenus and Satyrs of Sophocles show more restraint in language as well
as in sentiment than those of Euripides.

This observation can be extended also to the metre, and the common doctrine concerning the Satyric trimeter must be applied to Sophocles with some reserve. Resolution is indeed commoner than in the tragedies. Statistics collected by A. Mancini, // dramma satirico, pp. 83 sqq., show for the fragments
of Sophoclean Satyric

lU

dramas a proportion of about i resolution in 6 lines. In the Ichneutae the proportion is somewhat lower, about i in 8 but this is more than twice as frequent as in the tragedies, where the ratio is about 1:17. Of the
;

tribrachs

all

the instances are in the third


25) foot,

(i.

12, v. 14, ix. 6, xiii. 14,


all

20

(?))

or

the fourth

(iv. 18, v. 7, vii. 9, ix.

and the dactyls

in the third (v. 9,

The position of the tribrachs must, 15, 18, ai, 32, vi. 22, ix. 26, x. 19, xiv. 17). however, be to some extent accidental, since in the Fragments they are found in v. '17 elsewhere. An anapaest in the first foot occurs not improbably in i. 15 the papyrus gives an anapaest in the fourth foot, but the passage is suspect
;

on other grounds, and the metrical severity which marks the rest of the play is strongly in favour of emendation. There is no instance of double resolution In Fr. 305, to within a verse, nor can a case be cited from the Fragments. of IkaTo^ was probably long. The iambics of the which Mancini refers, the It has been pointed out (e. g. by Cyclops show very much greater freedom. this freedom is chiefly apparent in Hermann, Elemejita doctr. metr. p. 1 25) that
the lines spoken
less clear
;

'

by

Silenus or the Satyrs.

In the Ichneutae the distinction

is

the tribrachs are fairly evenly divided, but Silenus or the Satyrs are Besides the trimeters there is the responsible for all but two of the dactyls. curious novelty of a dialogue of about 30 lines in iambic tetrameters
xiii. 4).
(xii.

2-

The

lyrical

parts are,

like

those

of the

Cyclops,

somewhat

slight,

and

probably this reduction


places a short strophe
X. 1-8
is

in scale

was a usual
xiv.
is

feature of Satyric drama.

In two
;

separated from the antistrophe

by passages
io-i2.
xiii.
is

in

dialogue

xi.

20-7,
free.

xiii.

5-11

20-6;

cf.

xvii.

$- =

The

other

strophes are

A
vii.

large use

made

of cretics (x. 1-8,

5-1 1,

xvii. 5-7).
;

In the parodos
matics, with

(iii.

5-19) a considerable dochmiac element


of cretics.

remarkable

the

longest stasimon,

T2-viii. 12 consists largely of anapaests

and proceleus-

some admixture

In the reconstruction of this and the two following papyri I am under deep obligation to Professor U. von Wilamowitz-Mollendorff, who saw copies at an early stage, and both then and since has rendered generous assistance. I am
also not a little indebted to Professor Gilbert Murray,
useful suggestions

and have received some

on the Sophoclean texts from Mr. A.

Pearson.

36

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Col.
i.

]i/ayyeXci)[.]poro[
. ,

.]

.[
.

[ .]'[
.

, [
.]/[
.

.]

lO

,
.
.

.]aiT05'e/)y[

]7
.

.]^'^7
0
.

.'^ovvweLwep[.

.]
]
'.

] ]79 ]
]78

"[^' ] ]\

]/'/6[

[ [ [

15

.]8' .]^' .]7{


.]'\6[.][.][.
]ria[
]
.

][
30
]ireiTa[

[
]8['
[

.][

][
].[..][
].[

].-[

Col.

][
]^[

[ [

]^[

]([
]v'^^i^y[-h

'

1174.

NEIV CLASSICAL TEXTS

37

[ {) [
[

Oeois

.][

.][

15

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][

][

1174.

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CLASSICAL TEXTS-

63

Col. xvi.

Col. xvii.

(-Xo.)

'
[

0VT09

[ [
A[oiia
(?)

(^.)

(.)

[
[.]uv
.

5e[

[])[

'6{)

() ] () (5).
n-JeXi'eois
.

4]^
^
**

]vos.

[
'

9 [
[

20

(**.)

7'' 6y[

Unplaced Fragments.
Probably from the bottom of Cols,
Fr.
I. i-iii.

Fr.

2.

Fr.

3.

Fr. 4.

Fr.

5.

(^)

4
5[

].[
joi/

>[

()

o[

][

].[
]o[

64
Fr. 6.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

1174.
Fr. 6.

NEW
7

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr.
8.

65
Fr. 10.

Fr.

Fr.

9.

[.]

][

Probably from Col.


Fr. II,

ix.

Fr. 12.

Fr. 13.

Fr. 14.

'\vtlk[

]aro[

][
.

Fr. 15.

Fr. 16.

Fr. 17.

Fr.

li

]o[

66

][.]

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


.

1174

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

][.]

68

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Of
the three previously ia-13,
xii.

above

(xi.

of.

notes

known fragments of the Ichneutae, two have occurred ad loc.) the third is:
;

293.

Pollux

X.

34
bLaTopevcrai ae beirai

corrupt passage, on which

To

this

play

may

cf. Lobeck, Phrynichus^ p. 178. now be referred with W(ilamowitz)-M (Ollendorff)

932.

Athen.
is

ix, p.

409

The word

given as an epithet of

Eustath.,

Musurus,

^
W-M

Hermes
Dindorf.

^.

A,

1-3. For the supplement of 1. i cf. 11. ro and 14 involves an accompanying which will naturally precede. This line is probably the first of the play. Line 1 4 of Col. iv, which is marked as the looth verse, is indeed not more than the 94th from this point, and possibly a foregoing column, of which the upper part was occupied e.g. by a hypothesis or a list of characters, has been lost ; but the numeration of lines in papyri is not always exact, and if iv. 20, 22, &c., are counted as whole lines, the figure 200 atviii. 13 is but one in excess, with i. i as the starting-point. Apollo's name ought then to occur in 1. 3. ear may have stood in 1. 4, but the 4-5. Something like [oetj^joi' restoration depends upon that of the next verse. Murray suggests [et ye, but the initial supplement is too long. 6. vev]a (W-M) is somewhat long for the space, and perhaps a more recondite periphrasis was employed, e. g. which has also proposed. Three classes of the
i.
;

ueois,

'

8]

(\[

(],
is

cattle are apparently distinguished, (i) the full-grown

cows, (2) their calves, (3) the immature

heifers

Murray's
'

veoyva

thus less suitable.

7-16. They have all disappeared, and in vain I track them, wandering in secret far from the cattle's manger, hidden by some artifice. For I would not have thought that any one either of the gods or of the mortal creatures of a day would have dared so far as to do this deed. On learning it distraught with fear I set forth and search, with full proclamation to gods and men, so that none may be ignorant. For I follow frantic in pursuit. And I have visited in haste the peoples of the whole host of Thrace, but no one

-8. The
suggests that

where there was some difference of reading, neither the circumflex accent nor the diaeresis on t is quite certain ; but is clearly indicated by the marginal [. above
In
1.

8,

is

possibly
13.

deleted

by means of dots placed above and beneath

14. Either rdSe or

given at
15.

be the passage referred to in Bekker, Anecd. (Nauck, Fr. 899). Murray suggests [6]^'. 16-17. and ov]ns W-M. Another method of treating the passage is to take as the genitive of a more general term or as a participle, e. g. and to put
this to

367. 32

[ . ? \\ . [] '
may
refer to a ditch

restoration of

1.

and

in 1. 8 are due to surrounding Apollo's byre (e.g.

]
it.

[]

[\:

as a variant for

e.g.

\'\,
may

as both

W-M

and Murray suggest,

[ '
.'
.
.

W-M

Murray
vv]v.

vnepOe

8[

of

was
is

be right; a similar choice between singular and plural

iii.

25 and

v. 9.

W-M,

supposing

[]^,

1174.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

69
.
.

.7][

in

1.
1.

19.

Something
]tov

like

[]

ris

follow in

17.

in the

margin may

[avrhidXe (Murray) or would then [. well be again, with something other than

]^

[\5

preceding as a variant.

18-23. That these two small fragments belong to Col. i is clearly indicated both by their appearance and contents, but their relation to each other and to the rest of the column is not definitely fixed. The worm-eaten edges of both show the same pattern, according to which should be in the same line as e]neiTa [Se. But the worming is not an infallible guide, since the papyrus may not have been folded quite straight and if is right in 1. 23, it is desirable to lengthen the interval between this and the foregoing ej/reira [5e. This being granted, a further comparison of the worm-marks in Col. iii suggests that there is no loss between 11. 17 and 18 ; the adscript of which a few letters remain In the left margin of Col. ii will then be opposite 1. 22, and the loss below 1. 23 will extend to four verses, in which no doubt Attica was mentioned. At ii. i the Peloponnese is reached ([). In 11. 21-2 supplements suggested by are printed exempli gratia.

^(]

In 1. 5 he WOUld emend es tO et (e. g. ei ' \), but this is hardly justifiable in a passage so mutilated, especially when is suits the context, and the corruption of el would be inexplicable. To substitute ff for ' would be less objectionable the J^ in the margin (which suggests
e. g.
re).
;

[[
ii

W-M

8[ ) \
or

W-M, who points out that the words 3-5 '?''" ^"d give a complete sense, which only requires some ornamental amplification
. . .

^{{

nerpais

8]

\]
(11.

4-5,

again) shows that there was

some

[()

variant here.

any shepherd or husbandman or charcoal-burner is by, or one of announce to them one and all, whosoever captures the thief of Apollo's kine, his forthwith is the reward lying ready. Phoebus, I heard thy voice raised in loud proclamation, and apprised of the Silenus. matter with the haste that an old man can command, wishing to become thy favoured benefactor, Phoebus Apollo, I set out on this quest, if haply I may hunt down this thing
6-17.
'

Therefore

if

the

nymph-born race

of hill-roving satyrs, I

for thee.'

"
filled

occurs in Stcph. Byz. continued without alteration


aypafrrjp

() !. . ],
6-10.
7

in

The supplements are largely due to W-M, whose restoration of from Soph. Fr. 964 is especially attractive Hesych., Tovs Phot. Zex. 247. 17). is an unattested form, and the is perhaps better omitted, though there is some evidence for
1.

{ ^
]
to
is
is

^
is

[\\)
=
;

s.v.

In

1.

by

[6

[,

10, if [ra

Supplied, the verse

may

be

but the lacuna


is

more

satisfactorily

and the

alteration of the following

no

violent remedy.

12.

is

a rather longer supplement than

expected; perhaps an epithet of

stood here.

16.

The

alteration of

'

to Tfj8\

which

is

proposed by

W-M,

is

unnecessary in view
is

of
cf.

iii.

21.
17.

That the

iii.

22

a puzzling passage. If 1. 18 is rightly reconstructed, Silenus means be proclaimed, like that of a victor in the games. This, hovv-ever, is not convincing, nor can I regard Murray's [] ayye, eV [aii\it']ata[t as more satisfactory. It is not certain at the end of 1. 18 that was not followed by some other letter ; and the first of the two gammas is not quite clear and may possibly be or , but [] yap ye[pa]? will hardly improve matters. In 1. 19 7r[ may be >[ ; the diflSculty of obtaining a conjunction makes preferable to [. [
1

8-2 1. This

(.

aorist of

should be formed with a short vowel

remarkable;

is

that he wishes his success to

\ [) '\

\\

\\\,

70

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


' ;

is intelligible but not its not is probably to be read ; the loss of a In 1. 20 erroneous insertion some adjectival expression, meaning sharp-sighted ', seems indicated, before e can hardly be but the remains of the end of the verse are not readily adaptable, avoided, and above the line, between this and the supposed a, there is a slight vestige of ink may as well be as a. In which might represent a circumflex accent. The letter after 1. 2 1 the elision mark is uncertain, but it appears to stand rather too high in the line for the I would get my sharp-eyed sons to help, top of a p, and an optative here is not unsuitable if you will perform your promises.' 22. The vestige in front of [.] is hardly sufficient to give a clue to the verb something or is wanted, but like is improbable, in iambics is a Sophoclean use. 23. The letters tc^ are on a small fragment which no doubt belongs to one of the first three columns, and must on account of the paragraphi come from the bottom of Col. ii ; its location in this line is, however, quite conjectural. If it is rightly placed, Fr. i will follow below, though whether in 24-5 or 25-6 cannot be determined. 26. The papyrus is broken close beneath this line, but it was most probably the last of the column, since it ranges with iii. 27, and the dialogue works out right on the supposition of the loss of a line at the top of Col. iii.
'
:

in

iii. 3. Murray suggests some form. Silenus could not

[,
'
cf. vi.

easily anticipate

4.
I

Restored by
'

W-M;
a

26-vii.

i.

is perhaps more likely to be what the additional boon was to be. From whom Silenus and the Satyrs were to

but

be

'

freed

is

obscure.

of this short choral ode was partially, and perhaps to a large extent, dochmiac dimeter, and dochmii occur also in 11. 15-16, while the remains of many of the preceding verses are compatible with the same measure. This dochmiac element, which is rarely employed in songs of the entire chorus Soph. 138497 is another example may be regarded as expressing the eagerness and excitement of the 5 sqq.
;

The metre
1.

dochmiac

19

is

Satyrs.
'5. It is not clear whether a dot after aye is the vestige of a letter or a low stop. cross-bar of the e has been lengthened by the second hand. 6. as remarks, is indicated by the marginal note. 8. Cf. AristOph. Av. 274 ovtos 12. Cf. note on x. i.

The

[,

W-M

3.

That
is

14.

or a kindred word stood in the text may be inferred from the adscript. a remarkable form, which is, however, credited to Cratinus (Fr. 100,

Kock).
15. Murray suggests that emws is for (', (cf. ii. 12), but alterations are undesirable with so doubtful a context. The purpose of the paragraphus below this line is obscure. 16-19. The slight remains of the letter before suggest the base of e or and are preceded by a diagonal stroke consistent with a, , , u, or [, though imperfect, is almost certain. would suit. It is, however, difficult to obtain [] or [. .]as a suitable connexion with what follows, which I leave as it stands in the papyrus, though 1. 1

[]

[]

is

open to some suspicion, Oes was apparently originally written, the final being corrected to by the second hand, which completed the verse. If is right, this is the ' earliest instance of the word. Taken by themselves 11. 1 7-19 may be construed Therewith
:

let the

god end our toils, who has displayed clear samples of his gold,* i. e. their life would be eased by the attainment of the reward. It appears from this that the gold was actually exhibited on the stage, can come from either avUvai or aveiv the latter, giving
friendly
;

another dochmius,

is

perhaps preferable.

1174
'

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

71

20-6. Sil. ye gods, Fortune and the deity who guidest steps straight, grant me success in the quest whereon I am now to speed forth to track down the plunder, booty, If any man has seen or spoil of Phoebus from whom the stolen kine have been ravished. heard tidings of them, he would both earn my gratitude by telling it, and join in benefitting king Phoebus.'
20.

{){])
Here
the letters,

there
if

is

some

variation in the abbreviations taken to represent this

is on above. In vi. 8 and ix. 6 the a level Avith ap, and has an t drawn through its middle this might well stand for passing At vi. 5 ap only is written, the if he were known as a Sophoclean commentator. could be meant, as we supposed in the Pindar through the o, by which e. g. But the annotator may have allowed himself a certain papyrus (cf. 841. ii. 61 note). and I have therefore and Se for amount of inconsistency, just as he writes avoided a multiplication of the names. not 25. , was apparently written, but the latter is probably to be read with

name.

rightly read, are ap with

^{.){),

(,

W-M,
dative

(
1.

as well as

26. I substitute to a reminiscence of


cf.

/^
for

which does not occur elsewhere and may be due for immediately above. For the 15 aided by the recurrence of

.,
((
;

Eurip. H. F. 1252 'Moreover the informer shall be substantially rewarded' seems to have been the are sufficiently consistent the very slight traces before sense of this verse and the next and Murray suggest. with Xo[yo]u ff which both
27.

.
The

W-M

is

iv. 2-6, The Chorus apparently make an appeal for informers to come forward, and this Does any one profess knowledge or are all ignorant ? Then we taken up by Silenus
'
:

must act

for ourselves

' ;

e. g.

ns

[ov8eis

abivai

;]

eaiKev

Trpos epy'

8f~iv.

Cf. Eurip. /. T. 1072.

7.

:
The
e.

cf. vii.

10, 1175. 91. 4.


l

aspiration

is

stated to be Attic

by the Venetus
fell

Scholiast
9.

on Homer

Herodian, ed. Lentz i. p. 495. acute accent on eav is doubled, probably because the

262

cf.

first

accent

too close

to the

10.

W-M's

8inovs for

SmXovs

is

plausible, but as usual I hesitate to accept

emendations

in a very defective passage.


13.

estimated.

can hardly be In the present state of the text the merits of the variant The paragraphus below this line seems to be due to the second hand.
'
!

them

We seem to have 14-V. 12. Half-Chor. A god, a god, a god, a god. Let be, let be hold ; do not Half-Chor. These are the tracks of the kine. A god is leading our colony. Half-Chor. Hush What ? Half-Chor. What are we to do, friend ? Were we performing our task aright How say those on this side ? Half-Chor. They say yes, for these marks of themselves give clear proof. Half-Chor. See, see, here again is the very print of the hoofs This is the exact measurement. Half-Chor. Look well Half-Chor. Come quickly and ... if any one's ear catches the noise of the kine.
;
. . . !
.?

A
Half-Chor.
I

noise.

do not yet hear


!

their voice clearly, yet here are the very

footmarks and

the track of those kine plain to view,

direction

By Zeus, the footprints are reversed They look in the opposite Half-Chor. Let be What is this ? What is the manner of their arrangement again ; see here
!
^.
!

72

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

The

front has been changed to the rear, or again they are entangled in opposite directions. strange confusion possessed the driver.'

14 sqq. As the paragraphi indicate, the Chorus is here divided into two or more Hnes in the papyrus seems to be sometimes at fault. In one place (1. 18) a paragraphus has been cancelled, but probably wrongly, by the second I have adopted the arrangement suggested by W-M, with the slight difference that hand. he would recognize a third section of the Chorus at I. 26. A still further multiplication of are not absolutely necessary. parts is quite possible, but smaller divisions than
sections, but the distribution of the

14. [ra
15.

W-M.
vestiges of the letter before
p,

The

which seems

to

have been partially rewritten,

The imperative of a verb in -Tew or -yew is but a r is not impossible. apparently required ; it would not be satisfactory to suppose that erei was written for en. 17. The first three letters of the line were supplied by the corrector, and the sign in the dash the margin no doubt has some reference to the original defect (cf. 1175, Fr. 3. 7) which appears following the was presumably inserted to fill up a blank space. unavoidable, may be explained as a comic touch. 18. Here again the initial letters proceed from the second hand, but in this case something was previously washed out. The authority apparently quoted in the margin for which was suggested by W-M, seems probable, the V. 1. ert was not have not previously occurred ; the compound can be avoided, as though compounds of
rather suggest

.
:

[],

[^(,

Murray remarks, by writing [''] 19. With punctuation after


extracted from this line. stroke like that of t or v, and

rjvopev.

[\

, as suggested by Murray, a sufficiently good sense can be


;

is followed by part of a vertical is hardly to be avoided has apparently been written by the second hand through the

base of the next


23.

letter.

seems preferable to av t6', cf. 1. 25. In the marginal note iniaipov, if that cf. be meant, may be taken to signify * devious course The abbreviated name consists of a with a long I through the Avould give no sense. Of these the former is the more cross-stroke, and so may begin with either Ni or \v. likely combination, e. g. Nicander or Nicanor, though neither of these grammarians is
'

known

to have

commented upon Sophocles.

25.

26.

does not

[]/[][]// Or perhaps [e]if/xi[joia'y]/ii[e]iOj', as PcarsoH suggests. which looks right, is doubtful What was originally written in place of The absence of a reference after seem to have been a dittography of

may

traces of ink
is

imply that was in the archetype. After the lacuna are perhaps accidental. above and beyond 27. This should be the last line of the column, but since the margin
certainty.

, .

()
some

there

is

possible

is

broken

off there

no

greater clearness.

repeated as an adscript perhaps for the sake of and the e may be due to the second hand. 2. is a stage-direction ; the context indicates that notes on the lyre are meant. e. g. is not impossible, is very doubtful the may also be or ; 3. is due to W-M. was doubtless written with two gammas, as in viii. 26 Schol., X. 18, &c. ; cf. the note on viii. 25-7. were converted apparently from 01 or . I take ['7 4. The letters av of would place a stop after as the subject of and as epexegetic ;
V. I.

8 ! []
The
airros e/Sati/e.

correction in the text

is

was
:

originally written,

[]?

and make
7 sqq. Cf.

the direct object of

H. Herm. 77-8

. ,

W-M

omvOfv,

'

(,

1174.
8.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

av

were ignored and

so the papyrus, apparently implying punctuation after ' adopted, a stop should be placed after
eiaide

73
If the accent

instead of at the

end of

1.

7.

mark above the first e of which would, however, be incorrectly placed.


indistinct
9,
:

An

might be taken

for a

grave accent,

the deictic form, so frequent in comedy, has hitherto been regarded as alien

from the
II.

tragic writers;

For

[{'\
Si7.
'

cf.

introd. p. 34.
cf. is

13-15. The construction


K(K\ip[fvos\
av,

the

mark

Possibly is an adverb and there Avould then be only a comma after epexegetic to ; of interrogation being transferred to yrj.

Xenophon, Cyn. 5. 6. somewhat doubtful.

[<](
is

you have found, what, I say ? It is strange to your method ? I do not understand. You lie fallen like a hedgehog in a copse, or stooping like an ape you vent your spleen. What is this ? Where in the world, in what sort of place, did you learn it ? Tell me, for I am ignorant of these vays.
13-vi.
6.

What then is

this art that

hunt thus prone on the ground.

What

Hu! Hu! Hu Hu Why do you make this cry Whom do you fear ? Whom do you see What terror Why do you keep raving There was a harsh sound hard by do you do you behold desire to learn what was ? Why are ye silent, ye who were erst so loud
C/ior.
!

Si'I.

it

C/ior.
Si7.

Nay, be
is it

silent

What

there that

you keep turning from


I

C/ior. Listen
St7.

now
hear no man's voice
?

How

C/ior.
St7.

can I listen when Be persuaded by me.

we

You will never help my pursuit. Ckor. Listen again awhile to this thing, a noise such as no mortal ever heard, whereby are here dumb-struck and confounded.'

which Stands in the papyrus, might perhaps, as suggests, here 17. and have the sense of But there is no other flatum emittis ; cf. appears to be sound, trace of such a use, and the anapaest is very objectionable. It is easy to restore though the was originally omitted there is no authority for metrical regularity by the omission of the preposition ; but the sense is unsatisfactory, since is hardly to be attributed to the simple verb, and the reading of the meaning of the papyrus remains unexplained. I have been tempted to suppose that the original text had and which might easily produce cf. Hesych. /ei But the evidence for this verb is too doubtful to justify its but only /au/e de mieux. I therefore print Pearson, to whom vha insertion. suggests some erotic term, proposes for is no doubt right in substituting which may easily have been 1 8. brought in from the next line. 20. Cf. vii. 12 and Aristoph. Piuf. 895 Avhere t v, repeated six times, is used to imitate the sound made by a person smelling a feast. 21-5. The restorations are made exempli gratia. Those in 11. 21 and 25 were proposed nV ayvoih ;), those in 11. 23-4 by Murray (who compares with 1. 21 Soph. El. 1475 is here to be interpreted as a harsh, grating sound is indicated by by W-M. That the context; cf. Galen, Gloss. Hippocr. (Kuhn xix, p. in), who says that the word may

(5,

W-M

,
t/iet/)tt[s],

.9 ,, (, .5,
W-M

,
;

:
but a

/3

signify either
to

rijs

fair

sense

is

(V would emend or obtainable without alteration, as above, or by writing

W-M

74

[;^
by

The first e of e^eiptis was probably deleted hand it has a dot over it besides being crossed through. The marginal oi for 2) is no improvement in 1. 24. was Suggested by 26. cf. Soph. 0. T. 480. The restoration ot" the first half of the line is facilitated by the crasis adopted in the text the supplement adopted is of course only one of several possibilities.
Tis

^\

the second

[\
;

! ';

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

8.
W-M

.:\
4.
5.

but can certainly not be got into the indeed strained to the utmost by the modification printed 01, or a single letter would be more satisfactory. The accented letter after is probably either t or a, and the vestige succeeding is not inconsistent with would also be suitable. eV \_^' y or y would be consistent with the palaeographical conditions, but is not otherwise A small vestige before as suits e. g. or , hardly . convincing. hix[a cannot be read.
vi. 3.

Murray here proposed


is

{\

&[,

lacuna, which

although this (KnkayivTfs, as read by Aristophanes,

(,(,
For

cf. xiv.

23.

if

that

was the verb of the text, use of seems otherwise


is

appropriate than the marginal be post-classical. The compound also preferable to the simple verb.
is

less

to

7-vii. II. Sil. 'Why, pray, are you afraid and fearful of a noise, unclean bodies fashioned of wax, vilest of beasts, who see a terror in each shade and are alarmed at everything, who render slack, heedless, illiberal service, mere bodies, all talk and lust, professing faithfulness, but if ever it is called for, flying from performance. Yet your father, ye vilest of beasts, is one by whose youthful prowess many trophies have been set up at the homes of his brides, Avho was not wont to turn in flight nor be subdued nor to cower at the noises of hill-fed herds, but did deeds of strength. And their lustre is now disfigured by you at some new cheating noise of shepherds, which you fear like children before seeing its source, abandoning the hope of golden wealth which Phoebus told of and secured, and the freedom which he promised both to you and me ; this you neglect, and sleep. If you do not pursue and track down the kine and their driver to their hiding-place, you shall make a noise in lamentation for your very cowardice. Chor. Father, be present with me and yourself be my guide, that you may know well if there be any cowardice ; for you yourself shall learn, if you are present, that your words are nought. Sil. I will myself be present and urge you on by my voice, sounding the whistle that speeds on the hounds. Come, take your stand at the cross-ways, and I will stay on the scene of action and direct you.'
7. The punctuation apparently indicated by the papyrus is quite defensible (cf. e. g. Aristoph. Acharn. 345 but less natural than that adopted. It can hardly be doubted that a stop was intended, though the dot is not quite in the proper position, being too far from the and close to the vertical stroke of 8. Aristophanes' reading is again preferable to that of the text. The masculine ovt[s is some9. V was written by the second hand over an original what awkward with but oW[a which Pearson would prefer, is not adapted to the lacuna, which barely accommodates three narrow letters. 16 sqq. Cf. Eurip. CycL 2-9. i. e. the caves of the nymphs ; 17. oiKois cf. Homer, Ji. Aphrod. 262 (Pearson). 18. is probably sound ; SeiXoCj/ is rare and, so far as known, post-

,
:

],

classical.

20.

[]/ []'
:

'!

in the active sense,

or perhaps which gives a better

[/]', and this

is

preferred

antithesis than

^,

by Pearson.
cf.

For

('(

e.g. Soph.

Ani. 262, 384.

'

1174.
21.
is

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

75

clearly right.

Neither vnoppvnaivtiv nor nnoppvnaivtiv occurs elsewhere.

22.

to that o{ 2324.

vii.
cf.

Soph. FL'/. 43 your ways '.


5.

attested.
7.

which is doubtless right, appears unintelligent. on eh, but cf. Soph. Track. 339x00 /i(?) suggests the easy emendation which confirms the testimony of the papyrus, while this in turn may be TijvS' For the rough in Track. 339 is intransitive. cited in support of the view that W-Mrefers to Arcadius 199 (Herodian i. 546, Lentz) breathing on 12 sqq. The rhythm of this song, which is unfortunately defective nearly throughout, is largely anapaestic, the anapaests being often resolved into proceleusmatics ; cf. Aristoph. Av. 327 sqq. and the Hyporcheme of Pratinas (Fr. i, Bergk). Cretics are also used, while
variant
10.

(
The
is

. '
(coXa/f[t] is
;

[ W-M.
2.

[]
cf.
is

an unexpected epithet, the meaning of which perhaps here approximates Moeris, p. 113
is

".
a,

apparently found only here.


is

eVt

another novel form, which here seems to mean 'pursue'; returning from the error of It could hardly signify
'

used by Plato, Pol. 269

c,

270

but

is

not elsewhere

[,

W-]M

;,

'

,.
6.

1.

15

for

apparently Glyconic. here is apparently used like or is a novel compound, but 13. the form cf. the variant Kpiye for KpUe in
12. 15.

'

Pst
is

used by Aelian, N. A.
470,

19

Hom.

and the commentators

thereon.

The second
is

of

has been rewritten.

have you'; cf. 1. 17. has been altered by the second hand from e in both instances. 18. The marginal reading is the more attractive; bevrepai was probably due to the in 1. 15. influence of 1 9. bpUKis is an unknown form, which, however, in consideration of the adjacent ypams compares it is rather hazardous to emend to bpaKels (Pind. Nem. vii. 3, Fr. 123. 2); An acute accent may have disappeared above the a. ypams is described by AopKis.
16. exei

the second person of the passive:

W-M

Hesychius as ddos opveov. 22. The narrowness of the lacuna indicates that the letter lost before the iO]/tt[o]i/ is not impossible. probably o, but the word was apparently not ;
26.

final

was

[:
The
Not

or

8i[.

viii. 2.
8.

is cancelled by a stroke above the line; cf. x. 6 and 843. 142-3, &c. confusion between and t is common; the former here seems likely to

be correct.
9.

n.

'' W-M would prefer \


:

the letter after

was probably

or

.
Do you
not

13-24. Ckor. 'Father, why are you silent? hear the sound, or are you deaf ?
St'I.

Did we speak the truth?

Be

silent

what

is it ?

Ckor. I shall not stay.


Sti. Stay, if

you can.
;

Ckor. I cannot

but do you search and track them


.

down

as

you

please,

and enrich

yourself by getting the kine and the gold

76
Sil.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


But
I will

we know

clearly

and were restored by W-M. If is right, for which 13-14. would rather be expected, may have an ironical sense, You don't mean that we spoke sometimes practically loses its negative force cf. Stallbaum's note on But the truth ? With the form of 1. 14 cf. e. g. Eurip. J^kes. 565-6 Plato, Lj's. 208 c.
ovK
' '

'
the

by no means allow you to leave what is within this dwelling here.'

me

or to withdraw from this task, before

Kevos

Since 11. 13-14 ^^^ apparently 18-21 must be assigned to the Chorus, the verse contained in 11. 15-17 should be distributed into three parts instead of four as in the and the former papyrus, is therefore to be combined either with (Ti\ycL\ or oh
alternative
is

,,

more

natural.

W-M

^,

prefers

ai\y5i\.

A
16
TL

by Pearson.

quite different

e/xoi en Starpi'iSen/] is Suggested So sudden a volte face on the part of both Silenus and Satyrs might be exempli gratia. comic, but it is hardly natural moreover this theory also involves a departure from the original, Avhere changes of speaker appear to be indicated by the paragraphi below 11. 24 (25) and ix. i. Those paragraphi are not easily interpreted as marking the distinction between cf. 1. 12, where there is no paragraphus. iambics and lyrics hvva. For this the 17-18. It is clear from the marginal note that 1. 18 ended annotator wished to substitute ?/ ^eXeiy, and there would be something to be said for his which he apparently did not feel of the preference were it not for the awkwardness points out that this may be removed to the advantage of the repetition of ukXtii. hvva in 1. 17 is well suited to the reply of sense by simply transposing the two verbs, el If ^eXets and hvva are retained as they stood in the papyrus, the Chorus Stay, if you wish (to share in the ueXeis is perhaps best regarded as an unfinished sentence unless, indeed, the tone was ironical. Stay, if you please would be too polite, reward)
;
;

the latter where the restoration

and in some respects not unattractive view of this passage is taken would keep the arrangement given by the papyrus in 11. 15-19, assigning d ^eXei? and 23 sqq. to the Chorus, 17 18 and 19-22 to Silenus; then becomes the person anxious to leave the scene, and would do so at 1. 22,

He

][]

[]

:^][

W-M

'

'

'

'

19.

W-M.

20 sqq. Since the ends of these lines are on a different fragment, their length cannot be Some standard of measurement is, however, provided by 1. 18, determined very accurately. where the supplement is certain, though it is of course not certain at what distance the marginal note was begun from the conclusion of the line. Assuming an interval of average and ]e, extent, I estimate that there would be about thirteen letters in 1. 20 between and the loss in the lines below has been calculated on that basis. The letter after is hardly to be avoided; etocan certainly not be read. 21. that after may be or v. the lacuna is probably e or 22-4. The restorations of com^se only aim at giving the apparent sense. In 1. 24 is unknown, but would be a not unnatural poetical variation of which I have adapted to the requirements of Murray proposed /[/'] fj[S' of [8 being inadmissible. The letter in question, if not e, should be the papyrus, the or possibly . 25-7. The Chorus make an ineffective summons to the occupant of the cave. but the was restored by W-M, who in the marginal note above proposes narrow space and the flourished form of the t are both against a and in favour of -eis. stood in the text. according to the ordinary orthography, I write Possibly remarks, the doubled which is found here and at x. 18, xi. 15, xii. 3, although as xiii. 4 was preferred by Herodian ; cf. Cronert, Mem. Gr. Hercul. p. 69.

^.

4
][

[];

W-M

1174.
ix. 2-18. Sil.
'

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

77

with

many

He will not appear to them ; but I by making a noise upon the ground leaps and kicks will quickly compel him to hear though he be very deaf. Cylleyie. Beasts, why came ye rushing with many shouts to this green wooded hill,

abode of animals ? What is this device, what this change from the tasks wherewith you erst pleased your lord, who clad in fawn-skin and bearing the light thyrsus was ever wont to raise before you the cry evoe in the god's train along with the nymphs his offspring and the But now I understand not the matter, whither the gusts of new frenzy throng of his sons ? I heard a cry befitting hunters who have come near to the For it is a riddle whirl you. brood of an animal in their lair, and at the same time . .'
!
.

2.

use

of.

e.g. Soph. O. C.
like

3. 5

Ani. 710
6.

For the redundant

;^'.

,
emts

,,
after
fj:

^^^
742

could hardly be taken as instrumental.


f< Se

For the demonstrative

.
vii. 9, is

in
is
vi.

(.
and the correction
is

the third person

evidently required,

easy

cf.

Soph.

Kei TLs

and

13 above.

The marginal

e.g. Soph. 0. C. 1350 would have the effect of balancing the possibly even but does not seem very probable
cf.

'

Xayovs.

variant

epithets,
is

8=.

1 76 vpeiv, not waS apparently the Strabo C 719 is novel. may be explained as a dativus commodi. it reading of the papyrus and evffaXewfare used by Ap. Rhod. ii. 618, iv. 193. The corrector's 12. For the middle form eumfer' cf Eurip. Bacch. 67 for a second person plural which is unintelligible, looks as if he had taken referred. The active. It was presumably to this word that the marginal note alteration of the termination involved the transference of the accent, and that on a was cancelled by means of the dots on either side of it, as in 841. vi. 88, ix. 17, 1082. i.

^
p.

is

Strange,

10 II.

Cf. Eurip. Fr.

and

W-M's
752

correction

.,, ^
;

a mistake for

is

an evident

simplification.

bopais

Bacch.

,
first

((

{)

iii.

7 (5). 13.
1 4.

[]
The

The emendation
:

of

the space seems almost too narrow for


apposite.
variant, with

'

to

is

due to

W-M.

and would

better suit ve[o]v,


after

which
is less

however
15.

is less

Theon's

which of course there would be no stop

attractive.

16.

written,

has been converted from c, and in 1. 18 also first of though there the alteration is less obvious and may be due

was probably

to the original

scribe.

After 18-23. Though the wording of this passage is elusive, its purport is evident. mentioning the sounds of hunteis on the trail (11. 15-17) the nymph says that she has also heard accusations of some theft (11. 18-19), proclamations (11. 20-1), and finally knocks and eTeive[T, if correct, is iterative, In 11. 18-19 av kicks on the door (11. 22-3). to refer is more suitable, and there seems to be nothing for might be read, but the as Murray suggests, is which is unsatisfactory, while to emend to to except ]nai is not possible. ereiVt[T' too precarious. The letter before at (or as ?) may well be , i. e. ; is more probably third person singular passive than second person plural active, or fTeive[v ti[s, ereiv^v t]is being of course excluded on metrical could be restored, with the division to be grounds there is not room for fTftvo[vr e]ts. It remains to find some word Hke however, is the subject of fTLve[r or the object of eTeive[v and to go with is hardly long enough, even if Sophocles were likely to have used the too long, while
.
.
.

[],

[,

[[

.]

'

78

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

A vestige of ink above the lacuna might neuter form, which occurs only once in Homer. indeed be the remains of a diaeresis on t, but it suggests rather a circumflex accent or an
inserted
20.
letter.
]
.

(vai at

the

end of the

line

is

doubtless a perfect infinitive,


cf.

j/ceVat

or
in

this

form

is

now

admitted as Attic beside

\V-M's note

Sitzungsher. Preuss. Akad. 1907, p. 872. 22. I adopt Murray's which is perhaps not inconsistent with the remains, though

convincing. depending on is an alternative. 24-7. The sense seems to be But for some other evidence I should have supposed (or, " In other circumstances I should suppose ") from such a conflict of sounds that you were mad'. Given the probable in 1. 26, f^r^v, as Murray suggests, is attractive; but I cannot reconcile the remains with and ['];[' is another possibility, e. g.

not at

all

, ['/

\.>

'

[];[']

tiv

is inadmissible before but might serve. In 1. 24 if that is right (the s is extremely doubtful), may be followed by or et, and the letter after can be a. but though the supposed of ttout may 27. I should like to read well be for is not possible. A fair sense, however, is obtainable with tn noelr, (or 7), What will you do next to an innocent nymph ?
*

!,
'

%> , '[, though

8 4\ \
civ

and

cfipevcov

could hardly both be read,

'[]

Deep-girded nymph, stay this wrath, for indeed no strife of hostile Chor. approaches thee, nor methinks would any unfriendly or vain words from us touch Do not thou be forward in reviling me, but graciously disclose this thing, who is it who thee. here below the ground uttered in such wondrous wise an awesome sound. Cyll. This is now a gentler mood than before, and seeking thus will you more easily learn than by deeds of strength and attempts upon a hapless nymph. For it pleases me not Come, reveal and tell to me calmly what is the thus to stir up shrill strife of words. thing that ye chiefly need. Chor. Queen of this region, mighty Cyllene, I will tell thee afterwards for what I came. But tell us of this voice vhich resounds and what mortal expresses himself therewith. Cyll. You must know this clearly, that, if you reveal these words of mine, a penalty is For in the seats of the gods the deed is concealed in order that in store for yourselves. no tidings of the story may reach Hera. For Zeus came to the hidden dwelling of the and in a lonely cave he begat a son, whom I nurse in my arms for daughter of Atlas his mother's strength is shaken by illness. And I staying by the cradle prepare an infant's nurture, food and drink and rest, night and day. But he grows daily to a more than natural stature, so that I am seized by wonder and fear. For though he has been born not yet six days his limbs press on to the maturity of boyhood, and this shoot springs upward and tarries not. Such is the boy who is stored within and he is still concealed by the command of his father. And the voice of which you ask, ringing out by an unseen instrument, and at which you \vere much amazed, he himself devised in a single day out of an upturned box ; such is the vessel brimful of delight which he fashioned out a dead beast and makes resound
X. i-xi. 19.
conflict
.

below.'
is no doubt in strophic correspondence with xi. 20-xii. i, where same and so far as preserv^ed they are metrically equivalent, xii. i, the one complete verse, coinciding with x. 8. The measure is predominantly cretic, with an iambic monometer (11. 1,2, 4, 6) or dimeter (1. 3) at the beginning of some of the lines ; the

X. 1-8. This short ode of lines


is

the

number

the

last line

20-6.
of
1.

ends with a brachycatalectic trochaic tetrapody (ithyphallic) ; cf. xiii. 5-13, xiv. at the ends of 11. 1-4 were suggested by Murray ; the restoration 6 and partially of 1. 7 is due to W-M.

The supplements

1.

cf.
iii.

xi.

12 . 3 inconsistencies unaltered. was a later insertion, 2. of


contrast Avith

'

, ,
2

1174.

NEW CLASSICAL . 12 and

TEXTS
5
xiv.

/, 6
xii.
i

yrjpvv, xiii.
.
.
.

[,

, [/
'
2

79

forms which stand in 26 leave these


with

i.

e.

the original text

combined
viii.

is

quite intelligible.
6.

which

of

has been cancelled in the same way as in

by a horizontal stroke

over the

letters.

8. This line, which was originally omitted, has been inserted by the corrector in the (' see above ') was added at the end of 1. upper margin. Probably the note 7. 9-13. The restorations printed of the ends of these lines are substantially Murray's. paov av, suggesting that In 1. 10 he proposed was a mistake for But this is unnecessary if be regarded as the participle and the singular substituted

'
genitives,
is

([
is

for the plural

while

prefer
^'

which are equivalent to


to

in 1. II and in 1. 13 are new WOrds. which the sign in the left margin is probably intended to draw attention, W-IM suggests and this would be an easy correction ; but since is attested both by the Etym. Magnum and Hesychius, it is hardly necessary, and itself though would be is uscd by Aeschylus. The recurrence in this play of

).

/[]'

to paov as softening the construction of the following with the dative (as e.g. Eurip. Cyc/. 273-4

For the former,

^^
1.

[)],

.,

or
in

its

derivatives

rather curious

rightly restored in the latter passage,


1.

cf.,

besides

5 above,

xiii. 5.

If

would seem

to

12
14.

is

very uncertain, but perhaps preferable

[](
is

[ W-M
W-M

to, e. g., ov]

[.

have the sense of

-.

[]

and Murray.

questionable whether the speaker here and in the following dialogue is Silenus or the Chorus. would prefer the former, chiefly on account of xiv. 15-17, where see the note; but xii. 2-3 and xiii. 14-16 distinctly point the other way. To give those lines to Silenus is practically to make him here Coryphaeus. It may also be noticed that in ix. 9-13 Silenus (if he is meant by is apparently spoken of as if he were not present and a comic effect would be produced if, after his valiant protestations, when Cyllene actually emerged he beat a temporary retreat and left the Satyrs to cope with the situation. Pearson would get rid of Silenus rather sooner; cf. the note on viii. 15.
16. It

;)

probably sound; Theon's v. 1. looks like an attempted improvement. here appears to have the metaphorical sense acquired by &c., but I have found no other instance of such a use of the verb. 25-7. The general sense is evident, but its precise expression is beyond recovery. In 1. 25 the initial is quite doubtful and may be which was suggested by ; and 7 of W-M, may also be . At the end of 1. 26 Murray proposes and the verse might then be completed e. g. \8"
18. 19.

The

8[](
text
is

^,

xi. 2-3. Restored


5.

[/36] (W-M)

in the case of such a prodigy.


six days.
6.
is

article \n J.
7.

\
A

seem not to occur; is well-adapted to the space has the analogy of e^evrpeniCeiv, which is used by Euripides in 75. 8. 6 ', wliich is the obvious supplement, is admissible on the supposition that the e was unelided ; otherwise the space would not be filled. stop may have disappeared at the end of the line. 9.
and, as

H. S. xxiii. Compounds of

, \\ - ^.
by

W-M.

Cf.

Homer,

is

the natural correlation of

and need not occasion surprise would be preferable for a more ordinary infant of
as a cradle
cf.

.. Herm.

^,

6-9.

On

the usc of the

W-M remarks,

^^

Miss Harrison's

pp. 294 sqq.

\\<

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

The latter, however, does not lo-ii. and [-)^ Were restored by W-M. produce a very satisfactory line, since ^aihos, which has to be constructed with what follows, would depend, like or Se/inj, would is awkward, and some supplement on which have decided advantages. But it seems difficult to obtain this without altering for odovs as probable; /x/[o]r, for I cannot regard Murray's suggestion By the marginal note a variant neither is Pearson's (cf. Eur. Ion 354) convincing. is presumably implied ; but there is no reason for preferring this to what stands in the text. 12-13. Soph. Fr. 294, preserved in Athen. ii. p. 62 f. and without the name of the play in Eustath. //. p. 899. 17, in both places with the reading en a conjecture now confirmed by the for which Meineke proposed papyrus. Of the variants and the former seems preferable. which Murray suggests, gives a good sense, though the supposed s is 14. It is necessary to write [, not [*, in order to account a little too far apart from the o. (Pearson) does not suit the remains. for the accent, which is clear. 15-19. The restoration of this first account of the lyre is very problematical. W-M's supplement in 1. 18 and S[oi^ei]at the end of 1. 19 look probable ; and a relatival construction For the rest in 1. 15, as desired by Murray, seems well suited to the run of the sentence. At the beginning of 1. 15 the supposed tail of 1 only aim at an indication of the sense. or the might be taken for an acute accent on the a below, but this is less likely, and In 1. 16 is practically certain. is followed by an upright stroke suiting , , , , The word beginning with \_ in 1. 17 is rather puzzling; neither or . (Murray), nor \6-5 is convincing, any more than a\yyos in 1. 19. A word must be added concerning the arrangement of the latter part of this column. The beginnings of 11. 15-26 are on a detached fragment, and since the papyrus is broken immediately below the e of (?), there is the bare possibility that there was another line below this ]e[, in which case the beginnings of 11. 15-26 would have to be moved a line and so on. An additional verse in the lower down, corresponding with ]s much compressed account of the lyre might be thought no disadvantage, and the close conOn the other hand the top junction of and in 11. 20-1 would also be obviated. but would protrude above it, and I am satisfied of the column would not be level with Col. that the arrangement adopted is correct. 22. The supposed high stop may be the top of an inserted i. 24. ]ov is perhaps the end of the line.

,
-

([
\'\((
.

\\

[] =

.,

[8]!,

[\]](

^, \\

[.
cf.
1.

^,

7[

26.

[(c

], W-M;
Cj'H.

18.
faithless;
faithful

xii. 2-16.

'Be not now

are the words of a goddess which

greet your ear.


C/ior.

How

CyN.
Chor.
Cyll.

Chor.
Cyll.

Chor.
Cyll.

Chor.
Cyll.

Chor.
Cyll.

can I believe that the voice of what is dead sounds so loudly ? BeHeve, for the beast received a voice by death, but in life was speechless. What was his shape ? Long, or curved, or short ? Short like a pipkin, curved, with a dappled skin. Is he to be compared to a cat or to a panther Something between, for he is round and short-legged. Does he not resemble a lizard or a crab ? No, he is not like that either find some other guise. Well, is his shape that of a horned beetle of Etna ? Now you have nearly guessed what the animal most resembles. Tell us what is the part that sounds, the inside or the outside. It is ... of .. skin, akin to a shell.
.?

1174.
Chor.
Cyll.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
to
tell.

8i

By what name do you call it ? Supply it if thou hast ought further The boy calls the beast a tortoise, and the part that sounds, a lyre.'

2 sqq. This use of iambic tetrameters in dialogue is unique in Attic drama. The neglect of diaeresis between the two halves of the verse is a noticeable feature. Murray observes that the same metre is possibly to be recognized in Soph. Fr. 672. With the enigmatical description of the tortoise cf. the griphus of Pacuvius, ap. Cic, De Divin. ii. 133
:

Quadrupes tardigrada,
Eviscerata, inanima,

agrestis, humilis, aspera,

Capite brevi, cervice anguina, aspectu truci, cum animali sono.


nep iovaav. is obvioUSly an supplied by the marginal note. How this continued is suggested by Mr. Allen, is plausible, but the form is unknown;

See introd.
4.

p. 34. Cf. Nicand. Alex. 561

error for

uncertain;
vf[

, [8,

which is which

rightly
is

8
'

%6

may

also be read.

6. There is not much to choose between and the v. 1. the former occurs only here, is cited from the Ichneuiae by Photius and Suidas (Soph. Fr. 295), the reference perhaps being to the present passage, although their interpretations of the word are inapposite here. 7. aUXovpos was known to be a Sophoclean form from the Berlin MS. of Photius lately
;

edited

by Reitzenstein, Anfang Lex. Phot. use of for as, which here does not admit of the same easy remedy as in ii. 12, is very remarkable, = is common in Epic poetry and also occurs in the lyrics of Aeschylus and in Soph. Aj. 841, a passage generally regarded as spurious. Of = /, the only examples adduced are Aristoph. Ach. 762 (Doric) and Aesch. S. c. Th. 637.

The

? ,
(,

9.

W-M's
cos

substitution

of the

nom.

for

the

datives after as
cf. e. g.

is

plainly

does not apparently actually occur, but


cf.

the use of

&,
Pax
is is

&C.
II. AtTvatos:

73
14.

derived.
cited

seems to be a compound of pivos formed in the same way as which by Hesychius, although a compound of this kind would not be expected to have three terminations, was written by the copyist, but over the e there is a clear dot which was presumably intended to cancel it; optivrj would be a suitable epithet of the tortoise itself (cf. e. g. Lf. Herm. 33 opeai but hardly of its 42 shell in this context, and a reference to the shell is expected from the question in.l. 13. At the end of the verse neither the text nor the marginal variant is intelligible ; the former, as remarks, looks like a mixture of and, with it and appears probable that Herm. 32-3 was the original reading; cf. If the Other hand the verse be supposed to refer to the whole animal and not only the shell, and will make the better antithesis.

AtVi

/'

Soph. Fr. 165

ovSi and AristOph. with the scholia thcreon, whence the Sophoclean fragment

necessary. with

\%

W-M

) ,
.

],

();

15. n\[e]ov

' [][',
this point.

1 6.

or possibly

[]/.

xfXvv Murray.

H. Herm. 47 sqq., Lucian, Deor. Dialog. 7. 4. probably refers to the cow's hide; cf. xiii. 21-4 and xiv. 24. For the next word which suggests, is possible. Where the stichomythia stops is uncertain; it may extend a few lines beyond
18. sqq. Cf. the description of the lyre in

W-M
is

19.

Kkayyc^iiv

used by Soph. Fr. 874. 4 of birds.

'

82
24.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

6<\.

({
Too

might Well be
of the
is

[,

for

little

preserved to

show whether

which the corrector wished to substitute there was a deletion.

this is an assuagement of pain and refreshment to him . And Cyll. he delights in the mad joy and in singing an accompaniment of song for he is alone, and Thus did the boy design a voice for a dead exalted by the cunning device of the lyre.

xiii. 1-16.

'

Vvpogf

Chor. A loud voice goes forth over the land, and through its tones culls clear images of the scene (.?). But the point to which step by step I bring the matter is, know that the But deity, whoever he is, who invented this, he and none other is the thief, lady, for sure. be not enraged nor wrathful at this.
Cyll.

Chor. Chor.
I.

not otherwise attested. 2-3, The nymph does not seem to have taken much pleasure in Hermes' musical Homer makes the audience more appreciative H. Herm. 60 ap^mSkovs re yepaipe efforts. For thoUgh there tOO (54, 420) the lyre

Sophocles (Fr. 439);

Do

Whom do you What delusion possesses you By Zeus, lady, I would not vex thee.
.?

revile for theft

you

call the

son of Zeus a robber


is

.?

as a

synonym of
is

attributed

by Hesychius

to the

Palamedes of

of the line
3.

Anecd. 361. 2
4. Cf.

:^ - .
cf. ibid.

W-M's

, :
cf.

54-5
is

Oeos

'

\6

afibfv e|

better than tnos, of which I

Soph. Fr. 826

8'

At the end had thought. (Schol. Theocr. i. 56), and Bekk. The substantive is found only here.

8\{ (8! .

H. Herm. 38

Be eavtjs, TOre Kev

5-7. Lines 5-1 1 evidently correspond to xiv. 20-6, as x. 1-8 did to xi. 20-xii. i, and is a vox nihili, and In 1. 5 the metrical scheme is of the same character as before. suggests a comparison of xiv. 20 indicates that a syllable is missing. of which I adopt the latter partly because there is already evidence Murray for that compound (x. 13), partly because it would perhaps lend itself rather more readily further defect is disclosed at the beginning of 1. 6, where the papyrus to the corruption. which was accordingly gives a spondee instead of a cretic. The mark of length on

6^,

W-M

^,

is thus suspect, and becomes further discredited through W-M's constructed with elKOves, which appears to relate to this very apt reference to Hesych. which removes the asyndeton and might rather I have therefore inserted ' passage. easily have dropped out before But though metrical regularity may be restored without difficulty, 11. 6-7 remain not is used by Aeschylus, Suppl. 73 does not occur, but a little obscure, The SOng TO which the ScholiaSt explains yoebva ' plucks local images ' might be interpreted as meaning that the scenery was depicted by the song ; if Hermes was singing as well as playing, this mode of description is perhaps not

'

^
It is

. ,

,
is

incredible.

hardly to the point to cite P. Hibeh 13. 31-2 for the Satyrs who are hearing music for be f$fiv Or possibly eaveie^ is the first time could not be credited with perceptions of this kind. intransitive and repeats the idea of KaToixvel, fantasies flit over the scene like a bird or bee

[]

[] ,

,
'

( . []
' '

([(]

from flower to flower. In any case the active form, and not Theon's variant i^avfiea, is shown by xiv. 23 to be correct. Line 6 originally protruded slightly beyond 11. 7 sqq. and the irregularity has been removed by the corrector, who washed out and converted the to , interiineating another p.

Why

the scribe wrote the line thus

not clear,

The

simplest explanation perhaps

is

that

1174.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

83

he inadvertently ranged it with instead ot with and then observing the mistake put the rest of the ode in its right position. The objection to this is that the first hand is not elsewhere responsible for the dramatis personae. Owing to a hole in the papyrus at this point both the hand and the reading are uncertain. 8. V of ovnfp has been enclosed, by the second hand no doubt, between two dots, but a long syllable is demanded by the metre. It is perhaps unnecessary to emend to olirep ; cf. Kiihner-Gerth, i. p. 545. 9-10. The construction is changed, the sentence having begun as if

()

^^,

was

to follow.

12-13. Line 13 is unsatisfactory both metrically and because is expected. One easy method of correction is to insert between and Se, which produces an iambic dimeter + a cretic (cf. x. 3) followed by an ithyphallicum. however prefers to emend cVot he to /xijSc, regarding 11. 12-13 ^ot as forming part of the strophe but as a catalectic iambic tetrameter closing the foregoing tetrametric series. The question is not decided by the antistrophe in Col. xiv, since the papyrus is defective after the line corresponding to 1. 11. (not -;5) is noticeable ; cf. the v. 1. in Xen. Cyr. ii. 2. 5. the slight remains of the letter before etpa are quite consistent 15. Restored by with a. . TO For cf. Ammon. p. 146 Xeiv, in xiv. 4 reverts to the same points out that tidiav image. 16. Cf. xiv. 7. suggests as an alternative [6 e/c Aios 8e ]', which, however, is hardly long enough to fill the space. In the spelling the papyrus repeats a common

8
cf.

W-M

\(W-M W-M
;

.
19.

(
similar

W-M

error;

1084.
K\o[irjj

3, note.

17.

here perhaps has a concrete sense

ex (om. by Eurip. I/ei. 1675 enel LG, add. 1., Herwerden). If so, something like \ov y might be restored. 20-4. The first 20 lines of Col. xiv are occupied by a speech of Cyllene, but

8 \]
is

to that given

to

the plural

point this

commenced
1.

extends beyond

'\
is

at

what

uncertain.
(?)

[* '

There

no
(?)

clear evidence that the stichomythia in 1. 20 may be attributed to either the

Chorus or Cyllene, according as the sentence is supposed to have been positive or negative. Lines 21-4 apparently relate to the cowhide as evidence of the theft, and if the hide had been referred to in Col. xii (cf. note on xii. 18), all these lines might perhaps belong to the Chorus ; but in any case Cyllene's long speech is not likely to have begun more than a line or two before xiv. i. is very doubtful; what has been taken to represent the top of In I. 24 the supposed it may be e. g. part of an acute accent.
supposes the meaning of these lines to have been I now see that xiv. 1-3. was wrong in supposing that I was being made the object of just a harmless jest '. This however is uncertain, for an admission of error is not necessarily implied by the context, and the sense may be more simply I see that you are merely amusing yourselves at my expense that is all very well, but don't include the boy '.
'

W-M

'

For the future with tranquillity so far as regards me, if it gives you pleasure or and make your heart glad as you will. But mock not at the boy, who is of a surety the son of Zeus, bringing a novel tale against a new-born child. For he If inherits not from his father a thievish nature, nor does theft prevail in his mother's stock. then there is a theft, seek the thief in a man who is needy and poor ; but in the boy's house Look at his birth, fasten the crime wherever it is due, but on him it is not is no hunger. meet to fasten it. Nay, you are ever a child ; for though you are a young man with beard
4-26.
'

you think

to gain, laugh

84

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Cease courting pleasure with your bald pate. full-grown you revel as a goat in the thistles. Will not the utterer of foolish jests anon be caused by the gods to weep ? So I think. C?ior. Turn and twist with thy tales, find what polished legend thou wilt ; for of this thou wilt not persuade me, that he who wrought this hide-fastened thing stole the skin from Draw me not away from this path.' other kine than those of Loxias.
4-10. A restoration exempli gratia of 11. 5-10 has been made by W-M, and I have added a provisional completion of 1. 4. The supplements in 11. 7 and 9 were also proposed independently by Murray. In 1. 4 evhiav the jest may is the opposite of run a free course if it is confined to Cyllene. In 1. 8 I have substituted ]' for W-M's which is tOO long vith 12. is unintelligible, and plausibly emends this to i.e. n-fii'.v, according to the Attic spelling. With the corrector's ' for a good sense is thus obtained his rough breathing instead of a smooth was perhaps a mere slip. Pearson suggests as an [oKj/]et, which is rather less forcible. alternative rovht b\ ol Cf. Philostr.

]/,
Iviag.
i.

.
6

(5

W-M

^,

. j7*ci cf. Aristoph. P/uL 919 eh For fJKei Ttjs before is written over an almost effaced . is an easy correction of fia-i the shows signs of alteration. For 15. would substitute which is certainly more consistent with the tenor of the sentence as well as with 1. 1 7. veos could have come in as a gloss on ttius ; that some difiiculty was felt about it might possibly be inferred from the erratic punctuation. But a young Satyr may very well be and baldness, though no doubt a characteristic of the Papposilenus (cf. Eurip. Cj'cl. 227), is in Satyrs not necessarily a sign of age ; it will suffice to refer to the well-known Brygos vase (Brit. Mus. Miss Harrison, to whom I am indebted 65). for some information on this point, writes Practically the young Sat}Ts are as often bald as haired'. Cf. also Eurip. Cycl. 434. I have therefore considered it safer to leave the text as it stands, more particularly since this is consistent with what appears to be the more natural attribution of xii, 3 sqq. and xiii. 15 sqq. ; cf. the note on x. 16. Whether the short horizontal stroke at the end of this line has any significance is doubtful.
. . :

26 ovTt nevia 13-14. Restored by W-M.

, ,

(\) /(),

W-M

,
764

'

16. Cf. Soph. Fr.


in

8(5

of Theophrastus and elsewhere. 18-19. This is a difficult couplet. The last seven letters of 1. 18 were inserted by the corrector, who probably washed out some previous writing, though no legible trace of it remains. The latter part of 1. 19 as originally written makes no sense, nor does the interlinear r improve matters ; a suitable construction is, however, supplied by the marginal adscript. But the passage is still hardly satisfactory, though not impossible, since the result of an action is sometimes expressed as a purpose and as might thus be interpreted as practically meaning and then I shall laugh '. The metathesis adopted of and is, however, a very gentle remedy additional clearness might perhaps be obtained by the insertion of after would emend to ds Ofois, suggesting at the end of 1. 1 9. 21. was the reading of the first hand the corrector has written ft over the and turned the into r, deleting the original s both by a dot above and crossing the letter through, well-groomed,' i. e. elaborate, is a new adjective, as is also below.

MSS.

.
;

The

inferior Spelling

is

found

.
'

W-M

'

at the

The correct reading is again given in the margin. An additional syllable required beginning of line to restore correspondence with xiii. 8 is easily obtained by writing (so and Murray),
23.

W-M

25.

{)]VdW-M.

1174.

NEIV CLASSICAL TEXTS

85

XV. 1-6. This small detached fragment is apparently stichomythic and is suitably placed in the upper part of Col. xv. Perhaps 11. 6 and 7 should be combined. In 1. 2 the vestige from the bottom of a letter before a suits a , but is very indecisive. The restorations in 11. 3-6 attempt to indicate the purport of the passage. 15. The scanty remains suggest iro[v\ rather than /3? might well be read, but would then be expected rather than and the top, which is all that remains, of the doubtful letter is perhaps not inconsistent with an a ; but the form /Soas is also questionable. In front of this line there are some inkmarks which may be read as e. g. a with a dot above, but their meaning is quite dubious.

[.

18. The alteration of 6 8' to oy, which is proposed by both and Murray, is an ' is a correction by the second hand from improvement, ig. There is no reason for preferring the v. 1. to W-M's emendation of ToG to produces a normal attributive genitive. Parallels to here are however not altogether wanting, e. g. Hdt. i. 2 Thuc. ii. 85 (W-M) is one of several possible supplements, e. g. i[^ayoi nore. 2. 21. After completing this line, for the form of which cf. Soph. Anh'g. 573 ayav ye XvneU Koi was glad to find that the same supplement had occurred to both and Murray. 22. Perhaps [](1 o-e, as Murray suggests. The letter following is either or , and the next possibly . Between v[ and there would only be room for a narrow letter,

^(\

W-M

. ,
.

W-M

e. g.

(]{

is

xvi. The position of the fragment containing the remains of Cols, xvi and xvii unfortunately a matter of doubt. After some hesitation I have rejected the hypothesis, to which I was at one time inclined, that Cols, xv and xvi should be combined. What chiefly

suggested that view was the coincidence that ]vos in the third line of the scholium is on a level has been altered to and hence a marginal variant iyeKr|vos on an ; original iye\r]ivov would be very natural. The further possibility then presented itself that the mutilated first word in xv. 16 might beee^o$, to which 1. 1 of the scholium would refer. To this, however, there are grave palaeographical objections, for even if the exiguous traces were consistent with ], as I think they are not, the space between these letters and is too narrow for as ordinarily written. That would stand slightly below 1. 16 is a minor matter. When to these external considerations are added (i) the wide difference which would have to be supposed between the variant and the text, if referred to 1. 16, and (2) the difficulty urged by W-M, that more than the 10- 11 lines which would intervene between xv. 22 and xvii. 5 seem to be needed to bring about the discomfiture of the nymph, who is still stoutly maintaining her position at the end of Col. xv and might be expected to make a speech of some length before her disappearance, the case for the combination of Cols, xv and xvi cannot seriously be defended. Whether more than a single column of text intervened between Col. xv and Col. xvii is indeterminable ; but it is well to make the gap as slight as possible, and quite legitimate to suppose that Cols, xv
with XV. 18, where

]^

and

xvi were consecutive.

xvii. 1-4. Enough of the margin above 1. 5 is preserved to show that the four preceding lines were indented like 11. 8-9. 5-7. So far as they go these Hues correspond metrically with 10-12. Their rhythm is like that of x. i sqq. and xiii. 5 sqq. In 1. 5 some vestiges of ink above the letters deleted after the second lov are regarded as representing a paragraphus, but they might be remains of letters inserted above the line. The mark following the interlinear in 1. 6 might be taken for t, but a dot is expected on

86

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


and

here would be difficult. A short oblique stroke between both sides of the r, and the next letter (which may be y) is possibly meant for a high stop. 13. [rt] vvv [ is improbable. 19-20. Some inkmarks in the margin here are very likely accidental.

Prs. 1-10. These small pieces accompanied the earlier columns of the papyrus and are to come from the lower portions by their worm-eaten appearance ; they are likely to belong for the most part to Cols. i-ii.

shown

referred to
in
1.

Pr. 1 being part of a dialogue must be from the bottom of Col. 11. 24-5 or 25-6, if the small fragment containing the letters tc^

ii,

and

is

to be

is

rightly placed

23.

first

Fr. 2. This fragment cannot, of in ii. 20.

I think,

be placed so that the

in

1.

forms part of the

Prs. 11-18. Col. ix rather than Col. fragments.

is

probably the source of these small decayed

Pr. 21. If yui{ is the vocative yui{<"> as its position near the end of the line suggests, fragment may well belong to Col. xv, more especially if it is the top of a column. The stop after e in 1. 2 is doubtful, and might be part of a which need not be the end of the
this
line.

Pr. 22. Col. xvii

is

rather suggested

by the appearance of the fragment.


by the which

Prs. 23 (a) and {b). These two fragments are brought into connexion scholium in the upper margin, but there is no direct junction.
Prs. 2-7. I am unable to find a likely place for either of these pieces, both of are from the top of a column, in Col. iii.

in Cols. i-xv.

Prs. 34-5. These fragments do not appear to belong to any of the choral parts In Fr. 35. 3 is possible, but it is improbable that the fragment

^^

came from

the bottom of Col. xi.

\
Fr. 5

1175.

Sophocles, Eurypylus.

42325

cm.

Late second century. Plates III-IV (Frs. 3, 5, 6. 79,


80, 91, 94).

These fragments of a tragedy, as explained in the introduction to 1174, come from a MS. which -wzs apparently designed to be uniform vv^ith that papyrus. The height of the columns is the same, the hand though varying sometimes in size is identical, accents, &c, have been inserted in the same manner, and the same corrector has added variants similar in character to those in 1174. That the two dramas were included in a single roll is however unlikely, since this would involve a roll of abnormal length, if the tragedy was of ordinary compass. The columns of Fr. 5 contain one or two lines more than is usual in 1174, but this is due to a reduction in the size of the script. The ink also in those columns

1175.
is

NEW
in

CLASSICAL TEXTS

87

blacker

than generally

the Ichnetitae papyrus, but in other fragments,

e. g.

it is of the same reddish-brown colour as there. thus a prima facie probability that the tragedian is Sophocles and The style is internal evidence raises the probability to a practical certainty. be mistaken, and to clinch the argument a coincidence occurs at Fr. 5. hardly to

Frs. 4, 6, 9-40,

There

is

i.

9 with an extant Sophoclean fragment.

But that fragment

is

not referred to

any particular play, and to determine this is not quite so easy. Its subject however is evident it was concerned with the Trojan War and related the death of Eurypylus at the hands of Neoptolemus. This event is reported by a messenger
:

in Fr. 5,

cf. 6), who laments and his account is addressed to a woman (ii. 11 her loss and blames herself for the occurrence. She must therefore be Eurypylus' mother Astyoche, sister of Priam and wife of Telephus, who had been induced by the gift of the golden vine to allow her son to go from Mysia to the assiscf. v. 520, Quintus Smyrn. vi. 135 sqq. tance of the Trojans (Schol. Homer

Untersuch. p. 15a). Of the known titles of plays by Sophocles, Wilamowitz, several, e.g. the Phrygians, which vaguely imply a Trojan though there are theme, only one is at all suggestive of this particular story, the Mysians. So But one of the far as the papyrus goes, a Mysian Chorus is quite possible. that the scene of that play was laid extant fragments of the (377) indicates

the papyrus the scene, as would rather be expected, appears to be Troy (see below). To suppose that the queen accompanied her son thither would fall in with the tradition which represents her as taken into captivity with
in

Mysia, whereas

in

at the end of the war (Tzetzes, Lye. 931. 1075). has to be found, the most obvious is the name of the hero whose death was such a prominent incident. Moreover, there is already some slight independent evidence for the attribution of an Eurypylus to

the other daughters of


If,

Laomedon

however, a new

title

Sophocles.

play so called

is

mentioned by Aristotle, Poetics,


(cf.

p.

i459
;

b,

and author was Sophocles was put forward by T. Tyra guarded suggestion that the (Soph. whitt, Arist. Poet. p. 191, on the strength of Plutarch, De cohib. ira, c. 10 dealt with the combat of Eurypylus Fr. 768), which proved that a play of his and Neoptolemus cf. the note below on Fr. 5. i. 9-10. But this shrewd guess (the reference to which I owe to Wilamowitz) rested on rather slender foundations,

among others based upon the

Little Iliad

Schol. Eurip. Tro. 822)

and has received scant attention Nauck passes it unnoticed. Nevertheless it seems to have hit the truth ; at any rate the Eurypylus is a most suitable title adopted. for the fragments before us, and this accordingly is provisionally The papyrus is in a deplorable condition, which is the more unfortunate because the remains indicate a play of much originality and interest. Of one
;

peculiar feature there

is

no doubt, the division of the messenger's report into

88
two and
parts, divided
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


by a short
interlude in which Astyoche expresses her grief,
5.
ii.

answered

in brief lyric

passages by the Chorus (Fr.

3-20).

Fr. 6 with

little doubt followed on the conclusion of the messenger's speech, and seems to be part of a longer and more elaborate commos between the Chorus and the bereaved queen. In Frs. 7 and 8 references may be recognized to arrangements for the burial of Eurypylus (Fr. 7. 3-7, Fr. 8. ii. 8), and those pieces with Fr. 9,

which

may

well belong to the

a succeeding scene.

same context (11. 5, 7), are suitably assigned to few fragments on the other hand may be supposed to

>

precede Fr. 5, though their position is more hypothetical. In Frs. i and 3 there is a rapid dialogue, and Wilamowitz suggests that the speakers are Eurypylus and engaging in the altercation which was the usual Neoptolemus (cf. Fr. i. 8

,)^

antecedent of the heroic duel (cf Quintus Smyrn.

viii.

138

sqq.).

This,

if

correct,

would seem to involve another singularity of structure, for Eurypylus and Neoptolemus could hardly meet except on the battlefield, whereas Astyoche It is, however, quite uncertain that would naturally be kept in the city. Neoptolemus was introduced here. The reference to Scyros can easily have been made by some other person, and Fr. 3 is capable of a quite different interpretaFr. 2 is doubtfully grouped with Frs. i and 3. tion cf the note on 11. 4-6.
;

perhaps concerned with the preliminaries of the contest (11. lo-ii). fails to carry us. In the Tabula Iliaca the representation of the death of Eurypylus is preceded by a scene in which two men
Fr.

is

Further back the papyrus

stand before an altar.

Wilamowitz has conjectured


in

{Tsyllos,

p. 48*)

that the

hero
this

is

there promising deliverance to the Trojans, and something of the sort

may be
is

supposed to have occurred

the earlier part of Sophocles'

drama

but

only guesswork.

In the arrangement of the remaining fragments, whose contents provide no


real clue to their order, the

main principle has been

their appearance.
in

Frs. 9-40,

with Frs.

4, 6,

and

7,

are distinguished

by a comparative smallness
;

the size ol

the letters and the light colour of the ink are akin to that group.
the most part
off

Frs. 76-7,

which were found separately,


8,

In Frs. 41-75 and 78, as in Frs. 1-3 and

the

hand

tends to be larger and the ink blacker.


for

A
seen

further increase in size,


in Frs.
;

accompanied

by a brown
all

ink,

is

marked

by

the uprightness of the writing

79-107, Frs. 91 sqq. being Fr. 64 should perhaps be put in


is

the latter class.

That

these belong to the Eurypylus

by no means

certain

or even probable.

Some

of them, as stated in the introduction to 1174, In

may

come from
piece, apart
start with

the Ichneutae, others from another source.

from those already considered,


;

is

Fr. 91.

1.

The only substantial 4 some one is told to


?) is

speed on some errand

subsequently a lady of rank (Astyoche

addressed by the Chorus, and an allusion made to the departure of a stranger.

1175.

NEW
is

CLASSICAL TEXTS
in

89
the distance

Further on
(11.

Agamemnon

mentioned, apparently as waiting

and Wilamowitz suggests that he was expecting the stranger, now recognized to have been a spy. The situation might thus have been something
22-3)
;

like that of the Rhesus, and there is no difficulty in attributing such a scene to the present play, for which the story of the death of Eurypylus by itself perhaps

hardly provided sufficient material. On the other hand, since the connexion of the scene with that story is not clear, and the evidence of the script is indecisive, the attribution of Fr. 91 and the associated smaller pieces to the Eurypylus must be made with a certain reserve. Fr. 95, which contains some colourless reflections

on the

instability of fortune, gives

no

assistance.

In addition to the lection-signs noted in connexion with 1174, a curved ligature connecting parts of words is twice used (Fr, 5. ii. 3, iii. 11 cf. e.g. 841,
;

862, 1082).

This

is

the

complement of the

diastole,
iii,

employed

to separate

words, which occurs

in several places (Fr. 3. 4, Fr. 5.

10, 11, Fr. 6. 13).


final syllable

An

oxytone word is sometimes given an acute accent on the of a grave on the penultimate (Fr. 5. ii, 24, iii. 11 cf, 1082.
;

instead

Fr. 3.

ii,

2).

90
Fr.
1.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr.
2.

/I

][
6[
noiaSe[
]riroi;roT[
]
[

]6^

]^[

[ [ [
6[[/
.

].

Fr. 3.

^<?[
15

6[

/)

[ 8 '[
,[
$^[
.

Plate IV.

[.][
.

[.

.][.]<

Fr. 4

][ [

][
5
]^'y0't^)^[

]/[

1175.
Fr.
1.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr.
2.

91

10

92

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


]///[

'\

\\
]eXXi)u[

]7/)[

Fr. 5.

Plate III.
Col.
i.

] ]
]

]f4
\ia^^\r]ii\

]/07'
]<'[

^^ ]/8

20

]
]
.

])(
]01/

][. ](

]^ ]'

.]

^,[

1175.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

93

94

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

] ]
]8'
~][.]

25

]
'

]4)

Col.

.
.

Plate III.

~^

[ [
.]

\[. .]
[.
[

]/[.
]

.]

8[

[.]8[.]

88[.] 8' 8'

76'
.

\)

'

'

[.

][.] .]'

][
. . .

[.][

^[7

.]

15

8\. 88'

([

[.][.

[.][.] .]
"7

/[.] [.][.][.]
[.][.][.]\\[.]'

1175.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

95

25

"^^ ]< ']\ ] *


]ovs

]'[][]

VOVS

'. ()
(?)
5

Col.

Plate III.
[

[\]

(.)

]9 (.) [\ {)7[]' [.] .[][5


]

[
'

/[
en[
in'

][.
'iSe

6[(
>

(.)

()

76

.] '-'>'!>
.

[.

,
]
;

.
.

.]

egeOfs.

(.) (.)
(4(.) 15

(.)
(/4.)

^^., '
,

[].
e/croy
['.

TTpoaunas,

- ($)

(.) (.)
no
("^.)
inel
is

, } . [
\^
;

kv

eKeipev,

Ttpos

[]
;

;([]'9

[]/

Apyeioi

([]

^] []\ [],

[\ [][]

im)^a^\{^LV ,

g6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


25

[.][
[.

\.]6^.
.

,]ndv[.]

[.

.]

.]8[
[

]{
[

]
][.
]
.

][

.]

[.

.]^.][

Col.

iii.

24

letters

]
][[

[
[

a6

.,

25
26

,.

]^[

,.

][

[
[
[

24
22
])[

]^[
]/,7)"

[.

[.

^. [.]
[.]8,([.
.

.],[
]

.]*:.[

^[

][.]

];/)^[

.'^[.]'

}/[. .]/\[.]'
7[.

.]7[.]0

15

[. .][.]

[.][. [.
.

.][. .]
.]

\[. '7\^.]\[.

.]'
.]
.]'

^^
[.

25

^^^"[. [. '\[ .][


.

[.
[.

.]

.]/[

][

.][. '^[.".

.].[..

1175.
6

NEW
\6\6^,

CLASSICAL TEXTS
6

97

25

[\]
S

[]9

[[/ ][6[ ]6[^


Sk

[\

[.]

[.

.]oy

[][][

[? 8 ]?,
re

]vos.

]1

Col.

iii.

24 letters

98

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Fr. 5.

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.

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Plate IV.

Fr.

7.

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1175.

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99

kaya\.

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(.)

eneiaev

(.)

,[ [ [
Fr.
6.

Plate IV.

Fr. 7-

Karaf^

[]

epiat.

7\,\

(.)

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[.][
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(.)
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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr. 8.

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i.

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1175.

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Fr.
8.

lOI

Col.

i.

]oi;?

Col.

ii.

^ava'
]
.

(.)

Tos-

lO
]

Fr. 9.

I02
Fr. 12.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr. 13.

Col.

i.

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Fr. 14.

Fr. 15.

Fr. 16.

Fr. 17.

][

1175.

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Fr. 13.

103

Fr. 12.

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i.

]y[

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.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

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1175.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

105

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]
.

Fr. 22.

Fr. 23.

Fr. 24.

Fr. 25.

io6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr. 39.
Fr. 40.

Fr. 41.

Fr. 42.

][

1175.

NEW
Fr. 40.

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr. 41. Fr. 42.

107

Fr. 39.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr. 50.

Fr.51.

Fr. 52.

[ [
5

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.[

Fr. 53-

Fr. 54.

Fr. 55

Fr. 56.

1175.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr. 51.
Fr. 52.

109

Fr. 50.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr. 65.

Fr. 66.

Fr. 67.

Fr. 68.

][

1175.
Fr. 65.

NEW
Fr. 66.

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr, 67. Fr. 68.

Ill

]ov

112

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr. 79.

Plate IV.

Fr. 80.

Plate IV.

Fr. 81.

][
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^
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Fr. 82.

Fr. 83.

][
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]

][
.

]>

Fr. 84.

Fr. 85.

Fr. 86.

]?

lirs.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr. 80.

113
Fr. 81.

Fr. 79

Plate IV.

Plate IV.

114
Fr. 87.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr. 88. Fr. 89.

Fr.

9a

1175.
Fr. 87.

NEW
Fr. 88.

CLASSICAL TEXTS

115

]/)

7[

10

15

20

6
25

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

'\^[
5
]

][

[ -[
Fr. 96.

Fr. 94.

Plate IV.

Fr. 95

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Fr. 97.

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Fr. 9 .

Fr. 99

Fr. 100.

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1175.
25

NEW
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.

CLASSICAL TEXTS

-7

][ ]
[,

]8[

[
Fr. g6.

t[

Fr. 94

Plate IV.

Fr. 95

[.

. ([
(>\
6

]ov[
.

^[ / -[ ]? ^ ]^[
]

ivpov

au

]^[

Fr. 97.

Fr. 98.

ii8
Fr. 105.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Fr. 106.
Fr. 107.

[
.
.

]a

][
.

]o^

w
]^^[
]*'"4

]4]?[
]j/ye[

^^^
.

][

'][

Fr. 1. On the arrangement and supposed contents of fragments cf. introd. p. 88.
6.

this

and the three following small

'.

or

ei[p]y.

The
viii.

above them;
or

cf.

1174.

2, x. 6.

following letters are cancelled by a horizontal stroke drawn very slight vestige of the letter after suggests

.
II.

and the succeeding lines are on a detached fragment, which most probably part of this column, though whether it is rightly placed as above is A paragraphus may be lost below the beginning of the line. uncertain. There are some small traces of ink in the margin opposite this line. 1 8.
14.
is

The remains in The letters],

the margin belong to a note referring to the previous column.

Fr. 2. I have had some inclination to assign this fragment to 1174 on account partly appearance and partly of the variant in 1. 4, for which cf. 1174. v. 9. Line 2 would be doubtful even if is not decisive, since were certain, which it is not Above the (or in 1. 4 is a dot which may represent another interpossible. is linear letter, but this cannot be brought into connexion with the overwritten t, from which it is separated by the high stop.
of
its

\
.

,
]ia

Fr. 3. 4-6. suggests that the reference is to the rapacity which did not respect sacrificial offerings; cf Aesch. Suppl. 751-2 Murray, understanding the fragment differently, suggests as aXeyovTfs ovbev, Babrius 78. cipia-ros erra6]et a restoration of 11. 36 (.) 7[ (.?) S) "Apfos The remains are really too slight to give any clear clue to the situation. 7. The sign in the margin is like that at 1174. iv. 17, a line in which an insertion was made by the corrector. 8. Ti may of course be indefinite.
. .

\_

8\;

^ '^ .
?

W-M

, !
.
.

[\ [(.The
10.

Fr. 5. i
9-10.

8.

may be constructed with ., if right, should be read. coincidence with Soph. Fr. 768 was perceived by W-M.

][
or

[]'.

preserved in Plutarch,

"

('
'

was emended by Badham to re. Other conjectures were proposed by W. Headlam, C/ass. Rev. xvii, p. 288, who maintained that with Badham's restoration the meaning must be not, as usually taken, They burst without vamit or reviling into the ring of armed men but they dealt unvaunting, unreviling blows upon their enemies' round brazen
' '

,,(
Oe
cohib. ira, 10, p.

.;

but perhaps

458 e
(s

>\,
6

The fragment

is

1175.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr. 106,

119
Fr. 107.

Fr. 105.

].[
]a ]a
.
.

]y

[
]khv[
.
.
. .

]va[
]ai/xe[

to[l\o[

][
]ua

]vye[

shields
It
is

in the ordinary way. quotation to some extent, since does not immediately precede the simplest course is to transfer the ; words to the next verse, although its conclusion is difficult, , though the base is lost, is practically certain and can hardly be e ; for the next letter is most suitable, but e or At the end is possible, hardly . seems the only likely word, though the a may There is an undeniable high dot after the v. be . in the middle voice appears to be novel. The passive occurs in Lycophr. 15.
'.

W-M

however would understand

now

clear that Plutarch manipulated the

412
20.
iv

{)
ii.
I.

, ( {)
iv

could also be read, but


Fr. 5.
ii.

cf.

Fr. 13.

i.

7.

In a fragment of another text

occurs;

cf.

11, note.

in the

24 sqq. The reference is to the spear of Achilles, which had healed Telephus and hands of Neoptolemus slew Telephus' son cf. Fr. 6. ro-12. 28. Perhaps Ktivovs.
;

now

accent and mark of elision, as well as Since the e is enclosed between two hence might well dots this should be a variant and not merely explanatory of the elision and KaOelXe be the article, i. e. a choice would lie between KaBeDC 6 But . then becomes inevitable, and though this would not be out of place in the context (cf. Fr. 6. 12 the slight vestige after does not suggest . The substitution of e for before vp would be natural in the aorist of evpiaKtiv, which however is hardly and this has been provisionally to be worked in. proposes The vestige following is adopted, though the genesis of the corruption remains obscure. not inconsistent with a but is more suitable to a v, and I have been tempted to suppose that the name stood here, but that hypothesis has led to no satisfactory result. is thickened 3 sqq. The paragraphus below this line is not clear, but the base of the and this may be supposed to be due to the partial coincidence of the paragraphus. If this is correct, a paragraphus is missing below 1. 6, since 11. 7-8 obviously belong to the Chorus. Moreover, since yap oZv can hardly be separated from the following words, it becomes necessary to suppose a change of speaker within the line, against the usual practice of this scribe (cf. 1174. viii. 15-17). Presumably double dots were used, but an accompanying would make a similar division in 1. 3, but this paragraphus would be expected.
line are puzzling.

The remains of this

The

the interlineated letters, were inserted by the corrector.

)[.) W-M

[]6,

is

.[ ]
not essential.
4.
',

W-M

i.

e.

Telephus.
is

The word
;

at the

end of the

line

was perhaps

\)

or

5.

i'Se

a dochmius

cf.

1.

8.

2
6.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Cf. the note

on

1.

3.

of course refers to
;

it is certainly curious that the corrector the papyrus is possibly due to scaling of the ink of i{ai\ may be v. should not have observed the error, catalectic iambic trimeter, like 11. 10 and 18, but I have 7. This verse seems to be a may be or , and ty may be e. g. The letter after not found a satisfactory restoration. in the margin refers, is preceded either by y or p. 7 hiaiveis, to which ['' would also be appropriate. (not suggests 2)' \v or S) cf. Aesch. Ag. remarks, is perhaps equivalent to Ib'mv, as 8. But (^peVey and tangible objects like Soph. Tr. 690 1008 here means are in rather different categories, and Murray's suggestion that with a reference to the golden vine, is not unattractive. covetous ',
;

in

1.

3.

The

apparent y of

] ,,
. .

W-M

W-M

[]

{))

.
;

'

Fortune, evil Fortune, that has shorn me. 9-23. {Astyoche) Chorus. Thou speakest face to face, for misfortune stands not aloof in dragging thee headlong.
'

{As.) Justice will pull me down. {Chor!) Yea, justice. \As.) Then soonest best.

{Chor.) Alas, what shall we say, what shall we speak ? {As.) Who will not with justice smite my head ? \chor.) Fortune has shorn thee, but Fortune judges thee not. {As.) Have the Argives departed adding to the woe violence and mockery of the very

corpse 1 j {Messenger.) They went not so far as insult, since the bodies of them which had .' but a little apart fought together in combat lay
'i

9. Cf. e. g.

Homer ^ g1

, 8{,
this is

II.

Avas originally Avritten, but the

perhaps by the second hand, though

Eurip. /. 7. 203 was afterwards washed out and substituted, uncertain the was then enclosed between dots
;

88 .

restored over the line on the authority of another copy, as recorded in the margin. preserved and is not to be read here, since the stroke above the line is completely fu The lost letter was therefore a figure, and I restore on the cannot be the cross-bar of a r. analogy of the fragment referred to in the note on i. 20. the substitution of the nominative for the dative is evidently necessary, if the 13.

and

({)

nom.

is

retained in the preceding line.


ij

might be regarded as the future of 18. used by Hdt. i. 97, is not found in Attic, nor does

the phrase has a proverbial cast. but the contracted form, though take an accusative of the person. (Herpossibly the same verb rather than prefers to postulate a present werden) is to be recognized in the inscription from Eleusis published in
14.
(sc.
is

an explanatory note;

W-M
1900,

p.

79

produces a weak repetition of as interpret ency with 11. 12-13. The Chorus may no doubt be supposed this change seems overabrupt. fx[o]vTfs is used like 19-20.
458. 9
restoration.
/xe

-KoioivTai

\. , .. ' . [] ,^,
;

(,

to

change

as well as an inconsistits opinion, but

&c., e.g.

Nauck, Fr. Adesp.

(W-M)

is

hard but seems to be the most likely

22-3. Eurypylus is represented as having fallen close to one or more of his own victims. Nireus (Quint. Smyrn. vi. 372, Dictys iv. 17, Hyginus 113), Machaon (Pausan. iii. 26. 7, Quint. Smyrn. vi. 408, Hyg. 113), Peneleos (Pausan. ix. 5. 15, Quint. Smyrn. vii. 104 sqq.,

: .

1175.
Dictys
iv.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

121

been

17) and others (Quint. Smyrn. vi. 615-6, viii. 111-13) are named as having by him. 7;', which might be derived seems almost inevitable, for an adjective 24. h\o from the supposed form (cf. note on 1. 18), is not likely here, nor, I think, is []7 may perhaps mean that Eurypylus ('wounds') which Pearson suggests. was so little disfigured that death appeared more of a semblance than a reality, in contrast to his adversary, who was, e. g., though that verb could hardly be got into the space. W? might be read instead of tos, but would be still more difficult. At the end of the line ]os can well be ]m. 26-8. Restored exempli gratia by VV-M. The in 1. 26, though unconvincing,
slain

/
1.

,
\\
:

is

sufficiently suitable
iii. 6.

in

28

-y

could be read in place of

.
visible.

An

iota adscript inserted after

would no longer be

10-25. 'Such was the murmur of many mournful lips, and much fine hnen and many And Priam Istrian women were cast upon the man, useless offerings to the dead. clinging to his wounded side, though not his father, speaking a father's words, wept for the kinsman of his children, the boy, the youth, the aged man, calling upon him not as Mysian " Alas, my child, I have betrayed thee, in nor the son of Telephus but as of his own seed whom I had the last great hope of safety for the Phrygians. Thou wert a short-lived guest, but wilt leave a memory lasting many years with the remnant spared by Ares, who hast given us sorrow such as Memnon or Sarpedon never gave, albeit they were mighty

webs of

warriors and

.".'

10. \vypo\v
opvis)

(W-M)

is

better adapted to the space than

would

also be suitable.

(cf.

An/. 424

11.

The

no doubt implies a
to
;

[]8
a'l

transference of the accent from the second to the first syllable of parallel desire to interpret the word as the genitive plural of

8
,
.
.

but
to

"larpos;

and according

is assured by []\. Hesychius the name of the


;

is

artificers

attested by Steph. Byz. s. v. was transferred to the product


Tivft.

'loTpiavidfs'

similarly

are described as

W-INI considers this verse to have been interpolated from some other source, perhaps through a misunderstanding of the genitive avbpos, which however can be concf. e. g. Eurip. Cjci. 5 1 structed correctly enough with ; eppinrov. The anacoluthon in bidovTfs is undoubtedly Bacch. 1097 xeppASas iXeyero awkAvard, but not more violent than in Soph. Afii. 259-60; cf. Hdt. viii. 74 iv o'l pev ... I therefore 01 ., Aesch. P. V, 202 ov8(v allow the line to stand provisionally, though it must be regarded with suspicion.
13.

([\

(
15.

The

occurs in An/. 550. punctuation of the original evidently needs amendment.

have been a really is Strange, since Eurypylus cannot be supposed to may possibly here be taken to imply But the text seems to be sound and merely a stage beyond that of the veavias. Murray and Pearson suppose the meaning to be that Eurypylus combined the qualities of different ages, being to Priam a son, a counsellor, This may be right, but is open and a warrior, and compare e. g. Pindar, Nem. iii. 72-3. in antithesis to yepovra and veav[ia]v should indicate a quality to the objection that corresponding to youth rather than to birth, childishness not sonship. the means of salvation existing in our hopes ', comes practically 21. to mean our hope of salvation '. Were restored by W-M, who further proposed 8[opos and 22-3. would be the most A however is inadmissible after ]ois ; (cf. Aesch. Ag. 517).
17. yepovra

old

man.

^ [],
[(

[7]

'

'

[((]5

122

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


is

>\(\\
25-6.

suitable letter, but

Avould prefer

in Fr. 12. 11.

Dots were placed over the deleted letters or was presumably written. 27. following hardly enough remains and the r is also crossed through. Of the doubtful to show whether this also was cancelled or not. Of the two small fragments {a) and {b), which were with Fr. 5, the second is likely to
belong to Col.
iii.

(
W-M

The

[
a

is also possible, and or somewhat long supplement

I
;

suggest

"[':

to

[,

perhaps

on the analogy of bopos. was written. Pearson


occurs again

of.

Soph. Fr. 534.

restorations are largely due to

W-M.

The Sophoclean

thinks it unlikely that Astyoche took part in these lyrics but the coronis Fr. 6. below 11. 6 and 9 point to changes of speaker rather than strophic divisions in a choral ode and 11. 3-6 and 10-12 are eminently appropriate in the mouth of Astyoche. The reversed coronis below 1. 9 was inserted or rewritten by the second hand. restoring npia]fii8as ; a reference to Midas here is I. is no doubt right in
;

W-M

unlikely.
5. 6.
;

i.

c.

by the
is

gift

of the golden vine.


5.

i[pyo]v

W-M.
idea

7-9.
12.

The

perhaps similar to that of Fr.


Cf. Fr. 7. 4.

iii.

22-3

if

so the Chorus

is

trying

to administer comfort.

[(, which was

restored by

W-M,

refers to the healing properties of Achilles'

spear,

now

the instrument of death.

^
The

Fr. 7. 6. is a new compound, and an adjective The marginal note occurring only as a substantive. allusion seems to be to the tomb of Eurypylus.
10. Possibly

is

also novel,

no doubt

refers to

\ ^.

or

\,
There
e. g.

Fr. 8.

ii.

6.

is

a small dot between


.

and

but a stop here seems unlikely.

Fr. 9.
9.

I.

e. g.

\yva\^ OX ]-)/'[][
I

Somewhat
6.

to the right of the

there

is

a vestige of ink which probably represents

another insertion,

mark

of elision.

Fr. 10. Fr.


11.

\\({) W-M.
e. g.

H.

[][ [][.
or

Fr. 12.
Fr. 14.
linear letter.

Some
4.

at least of these lines are lyrics.

The

acute accent

is

uncertain and

may

be a smooth breathing or an inter-

Frs. 35-40 are much wormeaten. The combination of Frs. ^6 and 37 probable. In Fr. 40. i the supposed top of a letter after may be a high stop possibly ends the line.
Fr. 47.
7.

<\
;

is

not

in

1.

4.

cf.

1.

6,

where however the reading


is

is

somewhat

doubtful.
said

The rough
I.

breathing on
1.

probable but not certain.

The same may be

of the accent on

in

9.
is

Fr. 48.

There
is

a short blank space before

but this

junction, which

clearly visible below, of

two

selides, of

is no doubt due which the upper one has

to the
at this

point disappeared.

1175.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
i.

is

Fr. 50. This fragment appears not to belong to the same column as Fr. not to be read in 1. 5.

.[

123

Fr. 57.
note.

3.

speck of ink to the

left

of the line

may be

the remains of a marginal

Fr. 58.

was preceded by a
7.

straight stroke,
is

e. g.

/]/.

Fr. 69.

The supposed

stop

doubtful.

Frs. 76-7. These two fragments, which were found together, may well belong to the Fr. 77 is probably the bottom of the column, and Fr. 76 perhaps goes immediately above it.

same column.
Fr. 82.

3.
2.

The supposed
For
Ni(
) cf.

vestige of a letter after


iv.

may be

a medial stop.

Fr. 84.
Fr. 85.

1174.

23, note.

6.

after

has apparently been crossed through.

the subject of this fragment cf. Introd. p. 88. supposing the time to be night ; cf. Fr. 98. 3. Lines suggests ov\to<: 1-7 look like the beginnings of iambic verses, but if so they were not ranged evenly with 11. 21-2, and the trochaics must be supposed to have projected by the space of four or five letters into the left margin. 4. For the rough breathing on da cf note on 1174. iv. 7. 8. W-I\I thinks that the Chorus was here divided into two parts, and would give 1. 10 This may be correct, but the indications are as restored by him to the second division.

Fr. 91.
3.

On

W-IM

[,

inconclusive.
12.
for a,

The
the
6

and
18.
20.
22.

'[]
form
?)
:

lacuna

at the

end of the
is

line is too

suits the metre, wiiich is a

narrow for ov, but there is perhaps room combination of cretics and trochaics, better than
aub]pos

[];
an

XayeVir
is

moreover

unattested.

was restored by

W-M.
no word
;

{]
of
23.

W-M.
For
Fr. 6

Sophron

e'-yw

[ (]
...

'.
A
in
1.

at the end of the line may be . seems hardly possible, which might be said of a corpse exposed to the sun. Or

,
5,

unsatisfactory, but

, which would be the


t

easiest reading, gives

Fr. 94. 2-5.

is or In 1. 7 either ]i ' is hardly suitable. strange in either case, the only analogous instances cited from however Damoxenus Fr. 2. 67 the Attic poets being Eurip. Ion 943

possible, but the

form

seems

unlikely.
3.

^ ]^/ '[ ,
cf Hesych.
/ueVft,

- ,
lines
is

boKei,

, (' ,
by

restoration of these

suggested exempli gratia

evpoV

yivoif

however,
is

, \ \ (^ [ ^ (]1
et

W-]M
yap

Fr. 105.

To[i\i:^ is

indicated by the narrow space.

124

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


1176.

Satyvjjs, Life of Eitripides.


Fr.

39 42 X 75-5 cm.

Second century.

Plate

(Fr. 39, Cols, xvii-xxiii).

The

identity of this

work

is

fortunately determined

by

the

title

preserved in

the last column of Fr. 39, from which we learn that the roll contained the sixth book of the Lives of Satyrus, and that the book dealt with the three great
'
'

tragedians.

Euripides as the youngest of the three naturally came last


all

him, so far as can be judged, relate


survived.

the fragments of the

roll

and to which have


;

These fragments fall into two main groups. Frs. 37-9, which form the nucleus of the whole, are closely associated, Fr. 38 perhaps joining Fr. 39 immediately, and
Fr. Q,'] preceding at not more than a short interval Frs. 40-57 are some scraps which accompanied these larger pieces. Nos. 1-36, on the other hand, are miscellaneous fragments which were found sporadically some time before the main group made its appearance. Since Fr. 39 contains the end of the roll, Frs. 1-36 will naturally precede. Frs. 1-8 are put together as apparently all concerned with the style of Euripides. In Fr. 8. ii. 9 sqq. this subject is dismissed and the writer passes on to consider his character, which is also the subject of Fr. 9 and perhaps of Frs. lo-ii also. The arrangement of the rest is for the most part arbitrary Frs. ^'^-6 are more akin in external appearance to Frs. 37-8 than the preceding pieces, the colour of which is generally lighter. The MS. appears to date from the middle or latter part of the second century. It is in a small upright hand of the informal type shown also in 221, 853, the Herodas papyrus, and especially 666, which has other points of resemblance to 1176 (see below) all these probably belong to about the same period. There is some tendency to cursive forms, e. g. in the letters e and . A curious feature is the frequent doubling of strokes, which may be partly due to the use of an inferior pen. The common angular sign is often added at the end of short lines, while in longer ones the final letter is sometimes interlineated. Stops in three positions (low rarely) are used besides paragraph!, and there are two or three accents (Fr. 2. i. 14, Fr. '^9,. 21, Fr. 39. xv. 37) and a doubtful rough breathing (Fr. 33. i. 21). All these signs, as well as the few corrections which occur, are to be credited to the original writer there is nowhere any indication of a second hand. This absence of revision is regrettable, since the text is clearly erratic. In two places suspicious blanks occur (Fr. 39. x. 34, xi. 6-7),
;

i.

while serious corruption


,

is

shown

in

some quotations which

are already extant

(see especially Fr. 39. xi.

20 sqq.).
is

No

doubt these mistakes are often older

than the papyrus, but

it

impossible to acquit of carelessness a writer

who

'

1176.

NEW
title

CLASSICAL TEXTS
39.
xxiii.
a).

125

does not even

spell

the

correctly (Fr.

Such aberrations

'

greatly increase the difficulty of reconstructing defective passages.

The columns
across,

are extremely narrow, measuring no

more than about 3 cm.


be
accurately
;

and are
is

set

very close together.

Their

height cannot

ascertained, since their ends are missing throughout the larger fragments
fact Fr. 20

in
i

the only bottom of a column remaining.

Apparently the

loss is

considerable.

The

best indication of

its

extent

is

given at Fr. 39. Cols,

xxi,
|

where the story of the killing of Euripides by the dogs of Archelaus is begun in the former column and continued in the latter. This story is also told in the extant and on the reasonable Vivos EvptTTibov, the source being almost certainly Satyrus original was not more compressed than that assumption that the narrative of the of the excerptor, some twenty lines at least would be required between xx. 35 and xxi. i. An absence of cohesion between other columns bears out this
;

conclusion,

which
title

is

confirmed by a consideration of a quite different kind.

is written in a separate column, it seems usually to cf. e. g. 843 have been placed somewhere about the centre of the papyrus (Part V, Plate VI), and the Berlin Hierocles papyrus (Schubart, Das Buck bei den Griechen, p. 90). The colophon in Fr. 39. xxiii is opposite 11. 26-33 of

When

the

of a work

Col. xxii,

from which

fact I

should suppose that the amount lost


preserved.

in Fr. 39.

iv-xxii

would then have been on is not much less than what is a scale similar to that of 666, where the columns, as here, are very narrow and closely packed and extend to about fifty-seven lines. The scripts of that papyrus and of 1176, as remarked above, also show a strong resemblance. Concerning the author little is known. He is described as a Peripatetic (e. g. Athen. xii. p. 541 c), and lived not later than the reign of Ptolemy Philometor (B. c. 181-146), .since his Lives were epitomized by Heraclides Lembus {F. H. G. It may iii. p. 69), Avho is stated by Suidas to have lived under that monarch. be noted as a curious coincidence that Heraclides, whom Suidas calls probably resided in the city from whose ruins the present papyrus was obtained. Besides the Lives, which were Satyrus' best-known work, a book Jlept of which a single fragment is preserved (Athen. iv. p. 168 e), is with probability credited to him. Wilamowitz {Hermes xxxiv. pp. 633-4) has shown reason for referring him to the third century B. c. rather than the second, and would identify him with the writer of the treatise on the Alexandrian demes
This
roll

]$,

,
';

of ii. p. 94), which is apparently a product of the reign This date for the biographer is accepted by Leo {Griech.-Rom. Biogr.'^. 118), and there is nothing in the new fragments at all inconsistent with it. nickIf it is correct, he is to be distinguished from the (Ptol. Hephaest. ap. Westermann, Mythogr. named
Philopator.

(Theophil. ad Antolyc.

126
Gr.
p.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


191) as well as from the Satyrus sent on a

embassy to Rome by the whose identification with the composer of the Lives was proposed by C. Miiller {F. H. G. iii. p. 159). An authority on precious stones, who is thrice referred to by Pliny {N. H. xxvii. 11, 24-5), and was very likely, though not certainly, a poet, does not need to be taken into consideration. But the Satyrus who collected ancient myths (Dion. might very well be our Hal. A. R. i. 68 . b tovs apxaiovs Miiller suggested (op. cii.,p. 164), it was in the work author; and possibly, as 288 216 and thus referred to that the view which the scholia on Homer Aphrodite was stated. attribute to Satyrus concerning the girdle of
citizens of

Rhodes

in the

year 172 (Livy

xlii. 14),

'

'

But whatever the other writings of Satyrus may have been, the biographies, which are repeatedly cited by Athenaeus and Diogenes Laertius, were the work These biographies are commonly to which he chiefly owed his reputation. the more formal title is given by the papyrus, alluded to as oi They included monarchs (Dionysius the Younger, Philip), statesmen and generals
;

(Alcibiades), orators (Demosthenes), philosophers (the seven sages, Pythagoras,

Empedocles, Zeno of Elea, Anaxagoras, Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Anaxarchus, Stilpo), and poets (Sophocles, and, as we now know, Aeschylus and Euripides). division into books was proved by references to the fourth book, which dealt with philosophers though these may well have occupied more books than one. The sixth book, as the papyrus shows, treated of poets, and further books Most of the extant citations, which have been collected, perhaps followed. though not quite exhaustively, by Miiller (F. H. G. iii. pp. 160 sqq. cf. Wilamowitz, op. cit., p. 633^, Leo, op. cit., pp. 120 sqq.), are quite short, but two considerable verbal excerpts are given by Athenaeus (Sat. Frs. i and 3), and indicated

a writer with considerable pretensions to literary style. While confirming this impression, the papyrus reveals an unexpected and surprising fact the life of Euripides is in the form of a dialogue. The fact is indubitable, although the
:

copyist has failed to bring


interlocutors

it out by distinguishing clearly the parts of the by means of the double dots which are commonly employed in

works of a dramatic cast. There are at least three speakers, of whom two, Diodorus (Fr. 39. iii. 19, xv. 13), and Eucleia, a woman (Fr. 39. xiv. 31), are named. These latter persons play a subordinate part the name assigned to the chief speaker, into whose mouth the main narrative is put, is not mentioned. Presumably the present Life is a fair sample of the others, and the inference is to be drawn that they had a similar shape. The method is a singular one to apply to biography. It emphasizes at the outset the nature of Satyrus' work, which, like that of other biographers of the Peripatetic school, was essentially popular in its aim, and endeavoured to supply interesting information in an attractive shape.
;

1176.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

127

Another formal feature, which is not less characteristic of the writer's school (cf. Wilamowitz, /. c, p. 6^^, Leo, /. c, pp. 104 sqq.), is the wealth of quotations, both from Euripides and elsewhere. It is easy to understand why in the next generation, with the growth of a more strictly scientific spirit, the biographies of Satyrus were reduced by Heraclides to an epitome they were much too diffuse for a handy book of reference. Their style is smooth and pleasant, and care is shown in a general avoidance of hiatus, though the rule is by no means consistently observed. Very likely the apparent exceptions are less the fault of the
:

author than of his transcribers, but drastic measures would be required to eliminate some of them (e.g. Fr. 39. xiv. 30-1), and the safer course is to allow

them to

stand.

The account
main events of
(Frs. 1-8, Fr. 39.

given of Euripides was evidently comprehensive.


life,

Besides the

his

his style

and position
8.
ii.

in

the development of tragic art


'^'j.

vii),

his character (Fr.

20 sqq., Frs. 9-10, Fr.


i.

i),

his

philosophical, religious, political,


Fr. 39. i-vi),

and

ethical opinions (Fr, 37.

and

his views

about
is

women

22 sqq., Fr. 38, (Fr. 39. x-xiii) are discussed at confor

siderable length.

There

little

semblance of original research,


felt

which

a successor of Philochorus could hardly have

much

need.

The

story of the

cave at Salamis, reported

in Fr. 39. ix.


20).

sqq., is expressly attributed to Philo-

chorus by Gellius {N. A. xv.

fondness for anecdote, which Satyrus shares with his kind, and which was a product of the prevaiHng interest in individual

character and personal traits and details, does not necessarily imply an uncritical

turn of mind.
*

The

tales are
like
;

commonly prefaced with

as

is

said

',

and the

in

29-32), while in another


(cf. is

it is

the warning 'as they relate one place a more exact reference is given (Fr. 39. xx. not improbable that some scepticism was expressed
',

the note on Fr. 39. xii. 1-16). A fanciful interpretation of a lyric passage propounded with proper reserve (Fr. 39. xviii. 7-20). Diog. Laert. vi. 80 (Sat. Fr. 17) shows our author disputing the authenticity of the work bearing If there were any such critical consideration of the the name of Diogenes. plays attributed to Euripides, this must have been given in the lost earlier
portion of the treatise.

In the anonymous
to Satyrus, but he
is

life

of Sophocles which

is

extant there are three allusions


(cf.

not mentioned in the similar account of Euripides

Schwartz, Schol. Eurip. pp. 1-7), although this cites Eratosthenes, Philochorus, and Hermippus. Nevertheless it now seems plain that Satyrus too was among
the sources of the

anonymous compilation, the language of which


;

is

sometimes
21 sqq.,

very close to that of the papyrus


XX. 1-15, xxi.
the notes
I sqq.,

cf.

Fr. 39. ix.

sqq., x.

23 sqq.,

xii.

with the parallel passages of the FeVos Evpi^ibov quoted in


in the

ad

loc.

These related passages, however, do not stand

sequence

28

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

of their apparent source, and the want of cohesion conspicuous in the Vivos

becomes still further evident. But not only is authority now assignable for several statements about the poet which were previously anonymous and their antiquity definitely ascertained; Thus the papyrus also makes some contributions of its own to the material. Cleon (Fr. 39. x. 15-20, we are told that Euripides was prosecuted for impiety by and note), that his retirement from Athens was partly due to irritation with certain poets, whose names are given (Fr. 39. xv. 26 sqq.), and that he composed the exordium of the Persae for Timotheus (Fr. 39. xxii. 27-30). There are moreover some substantial additions to the Fragments of his poetry, as well as a few improvements in the text of others already extant.
Fr. I.

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Fr. 8. ii. 1-27. '. in emulation of the beauties of Ion developed and perfected [tragedy] so as to leave no room for improvement to his successors. Such were the man's artistic qualities. Hence Aristophanes wishes to measure his tongue "By which such fine expressions were expunged ". And he was almost as great of soul also as in his poetry.
.

For he contended,
1-3.

as

we have

said

.'
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Restored by W-M. The subject of course is Euripides cf. Fr. 39. vii. 20-2. 17-19. This citation is novel and the reading is rather doubtful. which was proposed by W-M, seems certain, but his X[e7r]ra is more questionable, since the initial vestige suggests a round letter like or The top of , however, as of and , is sometimes turned over, and a slight exaggeration of this feature might produce the curve found in the papyrus. 20 sqq. There is some resemblance between this passage and Fr. 37. i. 15 sqq. cf. the conjunction of with in Tev. 2. But the two fragments cannot be brought into close connexion.
;

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suits in 1. 30, and the absence of a genitive is against In 11. 27-8 ev might be read, but the next word is then a difficulty ; is followed by an upright stroke consistent with e. g. or /, or perhaps or , but not with or Reconstruction of the latter part of this column is the more conjectural on account of the fact that ] vev with the beginnings of the succeeding lines, and the final letters ]a, ]u, &c., are respectively contained on two detached fragments whose position here, though, I think, probable, is not free from doubt.

25 sqq.

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Evpim]8rj

seems

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Fr. 9. This fragment, the restoration of which character of Euripides ; cf. reV. 5 and SuidaS rju proposes [oidev.

might be read, but the restoration In all probability ended the line. In 1. 14 he would see an allusion to the poet's large library (Athen. i. 3 a, Aristoph. Frogs would be a supplement of the right length, though rather precarious 943> 1409) and in so obscure a context ; is an easy alternative. The supposed stop in 1. 4 is

Fr. 10. i. Murray suggests that in 1. 9 is the frequent attacks of Euripides upon Apollo. is not readily carried through on this hypothesis.

]
in

{)\]

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is

largely due to

W-M,
11.

relates to the

In

10 II Murray

and

that the reference

is

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[]

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]
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1.
;

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.[.

Fr. 13. Restored by

W-M.
is

1.

may

well be

],

i.

e.

another adjective parallel

Fr. le,

i.

2.

[]

not supported by what follows.

Ft. 17. This fragment rather resembles in appearance Fr. 18, and possibly contains the tops of those two columns ; but the fibres of the verso do not confirm the combination.

In

1.

Fr. 18. i. 2-5. may be and 5


Fr. 26. Fr.
4.
is

[] ]
be
before

3 seems inevitable, but the rest of the sentence or ]kuou is unlikely.

is difficult.

The mark

may

well be a stop instead of part of a letter.

29

probably not to be joined on above Fr. 19.


It is

Fr. 32.

not certain that this fragment belongs to 1176.

172

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


\\_ ^

or would be possible; cf. note on Fr. 10. i. Fr. 33. i. 5. ii\v. .]a) bwcS^ros 14-17. Perhaps [. [. .]>; (or [. What has been regarded as the horizontal stroke of 21. ov is a doubtful reading. a rough breathing might be taken for a small r over the , but an abbreviation of ovrms, is unlikely, and the curved stroke above, which suggests only though it would suit a circumflex accent (cf. Fr. 39, xvi. 37), would be unexplained. At the same time the supposed has apparently been rough breathing must be admitted to be clumsily formed. The
.
.

\\^

\]

\(,

altered or rewritten.

Fr. 37. i. The number of lines lost at the top of this and the following columns can be estimated fairly accurately by means of the worm-holes which persist in Frs. 38 and 39. 20-1. If the reconstruction is correct the dot at the end of 1. 20 is accidental or erroneous. The -y in 1. 21 may equally well be r. 22 sqq. Cf. Viv. 2 )
3

(,
The
ii.

Se
eVt

influence of

8
,

^(

^,
is

Suidas

be

18

i.
;

( ((

Anaxagoras on Euripides

traced in the following columns;


25, Anal.

, .
cf. iii.

17.

For modern discussions of this subject see Wilamowitz, Her. Parmentier, Euripide et Anaxagore.

Eur. 163

sqq.,

letters

19-28 = Eurip. Fr. 593, from the Piriihous. Line 19 is difficult. The last two but that word can only be restored on seem to be which strongly suggest and moreover, there is barely room for r between the assumption of a deep corruption o. in 1. 20. Perhaps then the quotation began at Clem. Alex., 21. so Hesych., Eustath., Schol. Apoll. Rhod.

Euseb., Schol. Eurip. Or.

:
=

7-8. 9-14. Eurip. Fr. 912. MSS. of Clem. Alex., from


iii.

and
18-20.

. 8\

](^]/,, which W-M suggests,


in
1.

is

not very suitable.

11 confirms Bergk's conjecture for


is

whom

alone the passage was known.


clearly inexact.

Clement has
is

given by the
elr

Satyrus'
nepi\obois

and

were restored by

W-M

the latter

somewhat long.

26-9

Eurip. Tro. 886.

Fr. 38. i. A loss of two columns between this and the preceding fragment is made probable by the Avorm-holes cf. the notes on Fr. 37.1 and Fr. 39. iv. 11-16. The quotation in 11. 16 sqq. expressing a belief in divine power is in opposition as to the Anaxagorean tenets exemplified in the foregoing citations, and therefore proposed by W-M, may well be right in 1. 16. But the restoration here depends upon that suggests r^i/ [Aujy?/ of 11. 13-14, which at present remain a problem. might easily be corrupted but this can certainly not be read, is clear, and though to the dative in 11. 14-15 suits very well. The last letter of 1. 13 is probably there may be one or two letters, or e or is much less Hkely. Between this and or perhaps v. e.g. , e., a. In 1. 14 the letter before had a vertical stroke, e.g. Heracles may have been brought in, as remarks, as one of Euripides' exponents of a pure religion; cf. H. F. 1345-6. 16-30. This fragment is cited by Clement, Strom, v. p. 732 (Eurip. Fr. 913)
;

[^^,

,
:

W-M

'/'^',

\\

'
but this

} ;' ( ,
is

now shown

to be wrong,

) '
be

W-M

88

re

/cat

waS

altered

by Cobet

tO

(sO Nauck),
tIs is

'

nV having preceded.

What

followed

uncertain.

1176.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

173
:

^^^^'^ " ^"'^^ ^ ^ "' ^' ^' ^' ^"^ "^"^^^ (560 nor f;i^po'^eof will do [arluo'^fos '^i^ which Murray suggests, might be read, but, as remarks, an adverb of cimmrison seems needed, and something like ris ' hb' SOeos would be expected. This however was certainly not written, and to restore it in opposition to the papyrus is somewhat arbitrary although the mfenonty of the text is exemplified in the next line, where (an r r unknown form) appears to have stood for \

^^^^

W-M

Clement. The discrepancy is curious. confirmed against Nauck's conjecture 2>j which was restored by W-M, is a variant for Clement's MS>.; ; ci. note on 11. 20-3. is perhaps the more apposite epithet. 29. The ink after the second lacuna may represent an angular sign
. .
.

20-3.
23.

[,

[(]
is

ueou

8.

voel

(drupa
filling

up

remains of this column are occupied by a lyric citation, the partial coincidence r u^v'^^^ of which with Eurip. Fr. 960 was perceived by W-M. Lines 6-14 are not clear and there IS possibly some defect in the text. In 11. 8-14 the meaning may be 'Let the man who works and who is known to be the friend of the good &v) be my friend , but, if so, it is obscurely expressed. Lines 12-14 give an Anacreontic called ver^e which perhaps terminates a strophe.

(, ^ {[

are, have you acquired great wealth for nought why produce virtue by means of riches ? What though you possessed Etna's mount or the marble of Paros wrought in gold in your ancestral halls ? Not then, unless you are LgoodJ of heart [are you deserving of honour], but you sit unblessed in the

14 sqq. 'Why, mortals as you

think

you

to

(". were presumably the


was something like jTore, was apparently
sa,me context with
iii.
; .
.

fully. W which had already restored in Plutarch before I read it in 11 14-; is obviously the original of the corrupt Of the variants and the former is perhaps the superior, but either may stand. In 1. 19 the MSS. of Plutarch have which was Corrected by Jannotius to KaTipyaaaadai ; the future as in the papyrus, seems preferable. In 1. 21 rev not rov is clear; after A'lrvas suggests the insertion of re, which may be right. The words eV eV^Ao?? Si

^,

( (, ,
...

wealth.

^4-29. Cf. Plut. Deaud. poel. 14, p. 36 C

ovbiv

'

aperav

now

clear that Plutarch has greatly

W-M

,
rare,

(,

eVei

iv

compressed the quotation, which Satyrus gives more

( '' '
8e

midst of
'

(Fr. 959),

<6

iy^

"

'

latter part of the

written.

.
iambic

Perhaps Plutarch's preceding quotation (Fr. 959) is from the recalls II. lo-i i, and corresponds metrically
. .

([ ,
;

apodosis to

, ' [' ^
(so
in
1.

(Fr 960)

It is

/^^

W-M
29,
8e'

Nauck

for

^,')
tots

eWe], v

.
i.

e.

the sense

not

lines, which are not elsewhere extant, are here quoted in theme of the foregoing column, the vain pursuit of wealth Lines 8-9 were restored by the purpose of the oblique dash prefixed to 1. is

8 sqq.

Some

further illustration of the

W-M

not clear. 12-15. Watching waves as high as heaven' is the sense, ^ (jrreek, but the verb has apparently not occurred previously.
'

is

found

in late

17.

a substantive to accompany the participle in cf. Fr. 39. v. 12 sqq., vi. 1-15, notes.

[(], [] W-M.
is

The asyndeton
1.

of I. 15 and the difficulty of obtaining 17 indicate that the verses are not continuous

18-19.

an unexpected epithet of

"?,

but I do not see

how

it

can be

174
avoided.
for

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


The
Ister is naturally

coupled with the Bosporus,

ovrt

would be an easy mistake

of this column with Fr. 39. i is made with some hesitation. Two with theparagraphus, 1. 20 of the stop after (2) the fact that if Fr. 38 is placed thus, certain worm-holes in Col. ii will come at the right On the other hand a high dot at the distance from the corresponding pattern in Fr. 39. ii. end of 1. 23 is unexplained ; but this is not a fatal objection since similar superfluous dots
iv.

The combination
its

points are in

favour, (i) the coincidence in

occur elsewhere, e.g. after


restoring this
that difficulty
19. If

bo

in Fr.

39.

vii.

16; cf Fr, 37.

i.

20.

The

difiiculty

of

column satisfactorily is no argument against the proposed combination, because is not produced by the remains of Fr. 39. i. must have been written above the line. is right, the

fv

'
20. 23. 26.

' '()([]',
x[.loi' is

For

[],

very doubtful;

a paragraphus.

.
as

W-M remarks,

could well be read. which was restored by W-M, cf Fr. 39. ii. 17 and rev. 2 SuidaS The supposed cross-bar of in 1. 27 might be taken for

is

preferable to he

\6[\.

,?

\(\,
;

()

27 sqq. There is no apparent connexion between this and the preceding sentence, some corruption is therefore to in 1. 34 lacks a subject and [aiji-oi/ is undefined suggests, probably The passage of the Dana'e here referred to is, as be suspected. Socrates might be supposed to have excepted Fr. 324 or to have excepted this passage in a general approval of Euripides' doctrine about wealth But no Euripides from his condemnation of poets, though disapproving of this passage. such sense can be extracted without the assumption of a considerable dislocation in

([]

,
ii.
."
.

'.

W-M
;

the text.

Fr. 39.

dost thou fear ? will be Socratic


seen.

in the following way '{A) When this is done in secret, whom 7-27. '. Such a conception of the gods {B) The gods, who see more than men." for in truth what is invisible to mortals is to the immortal gods easily Moreover, the hatred of tyranny and the [condemnation of] democracies and
.
.

oligarchies
7.

[t

'[

] W-M.

W-M

8(
iii.
'
.

of 8-14. These lines are not elsewhere extant, has been rewritten. which, 15. A conjunction seems a desirable addition and will also obviate the hiatus, cf Introd. p. 127. however, is repeated immediately afterwards in ; is attractive (cf Col. iii), but not altogether 24-7. The restoration proposed by in 1. 24 is consistent with , there is barely satisfactory, since, though the vestige before The also in 1. 25 is questionable. An infinitive such as room in front of it for

is

to

be Supplied

after 6\iy\tov.

none of the citizens above a proper level, nor make no admission to honours. For the greatest disease in Nevertheless, Diodorus, cona State is a worthless orator promoted beyond his worth. cerning the general imprudence and negligence (?) of the Athenians

him

tyrant,

and especially and to give bad


.

to raise
citizens

1-2. [']7[0].'
5.

[;^]

W-M.
is

Restored by 15-17.

^/'
]1

W-M.

a redundancy,
o]pa

and
as

word

as well as in substituting npoayopevos for

23-5. Perhaps

a/neX[etas.

[,

.
W-M

.'

seems

right in rejecting the latter

W-M

suggests

but the traces at the end

1176.
of

NEIV CLASSICAL TEXTS


a,

175
is

]\[
1.

23 though slight do not suggest cannot be read.


'
.
.

and the preceding space

barely sufficient.

not in this wise, but we are not also guilty of baseness when we put full somebody whatever he says, speaking not what is base but having recourse to what is weak, and then each one accuses the assembly of which he was a member. (Z?/.) The comic poets, it seems, have said much both with severity and like statesmen. (A) Yes, of course. Euripides again admirably incites the youths to valour and courage, " Gain glory in the urging Spartan efforts upon them and emboldening the people thus .".' time to come by performing every day a labour
iv. 1-38.
.

trust in

1-15. The purport of this quotation from a comic poet, which is not extant, is apparently to excuse the Demos, which allows itself to be guided by demagogues ; we are weak, he says, but not base. in 1. 5 is due to W-M, who would prefer ... oj to ' *. In 11. 8-9 he suggests Xe''y[oi'r](o)f oi> be (or his words are specious and we allow ourselves to be deceived.' however, can certainly not be read, though perhaps should be restored. The letter after a (which could be or must be either or /* ; it is not unlikely that the scribe wrote diaeresis should perhaps be recognized on the of 33 sqq. The citation is new. but it does not appear to occur elsewhere in this papyrus. W-M. For the conjunction of ttovos and evKkeia cf. e.g. Eurip. Fr. 474 38.

,
yap,

\\ ][, >\,
?.

(\),

[]/
a>s
.

\eyovaiv, evKXeias
]fff tf
:

V.

1 1

or

e. g.

. ].

12-27. "
are
:

The

flute-girls smile at

you

at the street corners.


liberty.

you mean the men who


it

you regard
1

wings of not as property but as power."


clip the

If a

You ask who the as/yno?nt man gains wealth, Pamphilus,

These lines from a comic poet are also unknown. They seem disjointed, but very likely due to a desire on Satyrus' part for brevity; cf. vi. 1-15 note, viii. 17 sqq. W-M, to whom is due the restoration of 11. 14 and 24-6, suggests that note, xii. 1-16. the idea running through them may be that the astynofni, by regulating the tariff, placed rich and poor on a certain equality with regard to 19-20. is difficult; The the first letter though imperfect is apparently , not /. vocative of a feminine name does not seem probable, and a corruption may be suspected, cf. Callim. perhaps caused by the compression of the citation. ;
2 sqq.

that

is

8(5.

Epigr. 46. 8
2\.

28. y could be read in place of 29.


vi.
:

/[] )
.

Keipfv

looks probable, but the

[(\[] W-M
o.

is
t

rather cramped.

and

in place of

possibly
.

^.

come

and most bitter against the father who begat them. For men who have 4-29. ' " Small to the passion for rule over others are most hostile to their closest friends. So one would say, doubtless, auguring ill of the children are sweeter to an aged father."
.

For such persons are eager to carry out their father to majority now badly brought up. burial with all speed, and to dispose of his property.'

As

which appear not no evident connexion with the I have suggested, might easily
1-15.
verses,
in Col. V, they
2.

The

If f

and

are right,

presumably are from Euripides himself, are again unknown. form a consecutive passage 11. 12-15, ^^ ^^Y rate, have must be corrupt ; In 1. 7 which preceding lines. have a very similar appearance. on account of the narrow the intervening letter should be
to

space

but

may be

y, e. g. ya[p.

176

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


15-16. According to the copyist the quotation ended him than to place the stop after av and make
at

follow
Tii

may mean one


19-20. 28-9.
[vv\v

] \^ W.W-M
.

of the characters in the play. there is barely . ;


.

[] ,
room
for

and

it

seems

safer to

refer to Euripides himself.

[].

the husband] against the wife, and the father against the son, and the servant [. against the master ; or in the reversals of fortune, violations of virgins, substitutions of For these are the things which children, recognitions by means of rings and necklaces. comprise the New Comedy, and were brought to perfection by Euripides, Homer being the
'
.

.
.
.

starting-point in this
rightly

and

in
for

the
this

gives
.".'

him

credit

in

colloquial arrangement of verses (?). the passage, " So says Euripides,

And Philemon who alone can

speak

Why the of 11. 2 and 3 has 1-6. The restoration is substantially due to W-M. a horizontal stroke drawn above it is obscure ; cf. the note on Fr. i. 3. 23-6. W-INI objects to Homer being brought in here, and suspects a corruption of stands in the papyrus. The principle of .; but I have no doubt that e. g. oTi at any rate is to be found in Homer as well as an approximation to dramatic But possibly there is some omission dialogue, if that is what is meant by towards the end of the sentence .), for instance, suggests itself. Se 28 sqq. The admiration of Philemon for Euripides is referred to in TeV. 6
.

^
oi

. ((
.
.

nep\

dne'iv

(,

avSpes,
I

Tives,

18
partly to

restoration of which
viii.
1 1,

owe

W-M,

'. \
'

el

rais

The

Citation in

^
11.

'

326, the

is

not elsewhere extant.

rather than

seems to be the appropriate word,


first

might be read
Lines 30-3,
is

in place of pi.
1

7 sqq.

which were restored by


ovtos

\
the

( ((
The
quotation

is

from the
are

oration against Aristogiton 40.

W-M,
in

an abbreviation of the ordinary


;

(,
:

end of
ix.
3.

1.

21.
]\fiov
'

That
or

1.

29

is

not certain.

text,

which

yap
;

ISiayras,

hv
is

high Stop

possibly to be recognized at

jSetoi/.

4-32. He was the owner of a large cave there with the mouth towards the sea, and here he passed the day by himself engaged in constant thought or writing, despising everything that was not great and elevated, Aristophanes at least says, as though summoned " As are his characters, so is the man." But once when as a witness for this very purpose .' witnessing a comedy he is said
:
.

(isi Se iv 5 XV. 20, citeS PhilochorUS > Aulus Gellius, as the authority for this statement: Philochoriis referi in insula Salamine speluncam esse taetram et horridam, quani nos vidimus, in qua Euripides tragoedias scriptitarit. for are found from the third century b. c; 7. Analogies for the spelling cf. Mayser, Grain, d. griech. Papyri, p. no. 19. The stop is uncertain. 25-8. The quotation, which is apparently in trochaic metre, is not otherwise known. tivbpa For the sentiment yap well compares Arisioph. Thesm. 14950

4 sqq. Cf.

. (

2. .

..

W-

lire.
bei

NEW
roiis

CLASSICAL TEXTS

177

^.

In

1.

25

Seems tO have been Written

for oia,

31

X[eyf Tat
'

WM.

X. Every one disliked him, the men because of his unsociableness, the women because And he incurred great danger from both sexes, for he vi^as of Ihe censures in his poems. prosecuted by Cleon the demagogue in the action for impiety mentioned above, while the women combined against him at the Thesmophoria and collected in a body at the place where he happened to be resting. But notwithstanding their anger they spared the man,
partly because of their admiration for his poetical gifts

of Euripides cf. Fr. 9 and note. On the 15-22. This prosecution by Cleon, which the extant accounts of Euripides do not A charge mention, was perhaps referred to in the columns lost between Frs. 37 and 38. was involved in the property-suit which is mentioned by Aristotle, H/iei. iii. 15. 8 oi

3-5.

( (\(
(p.

1416 a 28)

the accusation

was made more than once.


Tiv. 5 ai Se yvvaiKiS
ai yvvalKfs

8 !,
'

.'
.
.

'Yytatvovra iv
Se

rrj

23 sqq. Cf.

, , '

bieTeXti,

erretTO 8e

&'

(
:

cf xi. 6-7. blank space, in which there is no sign of writing, precedes cf xviii. 14. 35. For the crasis might be read, as Tas] two letters hardly fill the space, and 37. (cf the note on 11. 23 sqq.); but I can find no suitable word to precede in the if so, followed in the next line. 38. There may be a high stop after
34

((.

tovs

ipfiv.

,( (
'.

(
tv

But

it

is

quite Credible that


(Is

eVoiet ty

, or

ev

8e

pev

(\
;

(Fr. 499)

[^
]
The

'[]?
].
is

[.

39. xi.

or possibly

occupied by a long quotation from the Melanippe Desmolis are also found in the Florilegium recently published in Berl Klassikeriexte, V. ii. p. 123 sqq. with some slight variations partly perhaps due to Satyrus 6 (cf note on The Melanippe was no doubt quoted in the papyrus, as in himself. ipfiv. 11. 23 sqq.), in illustration of the poet's supposed promise 1-4. The supplements suggested are derived from the Berlin papyrus, where the two

This column

of Euripides.

lines

]; []'.
wanting. 7-8.

verses which precede that ending

\1]

(11.

7-8) conclude

api{o]upivai

and

6-7. There

is

indicating an omission, though in x. 34,

a blank space at the end of 1. 6 and at the beginning of 1. 7, perhaps where a similar blank occurs, nothing seems to be
P. Berl., the editors suggesting

]^

(, which
(3[

is

now

partially confirmed.

mistakes in the following lines do not inspire confidence.

can now be informs me that was apparently the object of the verb. 11-12 = Eurip. Fr. 492. 6-7 (Athen. p. 613 d). the word is lost in P. Berl. Athen., which is less attractive oye P. Berl., which will neither scan nor 16-19. ] ^Pwk yvvao ' suggests that the original may have been construe. though the the papyrus however perhaps gives the verse as Satyrus wrote it,
lo-ii.
]
.
, .

] P.

Berl., but

W-M
;

recognized.

Something

like

6[]

W-M

8'

178
20,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


'
eis

deovs P. Berl.

given by P. Berl. The before may be a survival of the termination of but [n]s would hardly fill the space. 33-8. The restorations in 11. 33-5 are derived from P. Berl., which continues yeVos nopevei rols This, however, is not reconcileable with the clear of 1. 36, and apparently the text of the papyrus was again erratic, in 1. 37 may be e or o.
is

8
2.

21.

25-6. 3C-1.

was written twice by mistake. and P. Berl.

'

is

correct;

[.

evidently a corruption for

.
;

, ,,
.

.]

'

P. Berl.,

restored by the editors

[^]

'.

But

which

is

xii.

1-16

Aristoph. Thesm. 374-5, 335-7.

the interlocutor in connexion with the story of the women's attack suggests, as the actual source of the story. as

These passages Avere evidently cited by upon Euripides, perhaps,

W-M

Aristoph.

the papyrus

13-14.

MSS.
between

of Aristoph.,

had some other name, e. g. being added by Scaliger.

There

is

not

room

for MjjSois

and

r.

16-35. 'You have clearly comprehended my meaning and absolved me from developHe was embittered against the sex for this reason. He had, it seems, in his home ing it. a young man born in the house named Cephisophon and he detected his wife in misconduct with this person.'
21 Sqq. Cf.
34 the space.

.
.
.

[][1[/
'
.

is

.
!

ras

'

warranted by

Tev. 6 (cf. the

previous note), though

. .
[]

hardly

fills

xiii. 1-38. bearing the outrage [calmly], as is related, directed the woman to live with the young man. When he was asked " What is the meaning of this ? ", he said " In order that my wife may not be his, but his mine, for that is just, if I wish ". And he continued to oppose the whole sex in his poetry. Quite absurdly For why is it more reasonable to blame women because of a seduced woman than men because of the man who seduced her ? As Socrates said, the same vices and virtues are to be found in both.'

{.)

I. Some adverb such as or preceded. 9-1 1. Restored by W-]\I. It seems necessary to assume some error in 11. 9-10. is very questionable, and {^) should perhaps be inserted, or mi 23. This use of substituted, without an accusative is only found in Lucian in the phrase {Twi. Dial. Deor. 20. 7, 22. i, Dial. Mori. 20. 3). 24 sqq. Cf. Berl. Klassikerlexie, V. ii. p. 126 -^^ft []['^ and, for 3 1 Sqq., PlatO, Rep. p. 455. 34-5. W-lM's emendations are clearly right. 40. The letter before can be .

,
is
'

,
\

xiv.
6.

4.

V is

very doubtful and there

possible

{[]

is

perhaps room for another

letter, e. g.

];;[^].

?).

that she was drugging Hystaspes with love potions. So she sent for the 8~35 woman, but when on her approach she saw her stature and beauty, " Welcome, woman,"

" I see that the accusations were false. For you have the drugs in your face and your eyes ". {A) Capital, best of women, and rightly named Eucleia, since you remember such

she said

traits

of character

.'
. .

1176.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

179

8 sqq. This story about Hystaspes seems to be new. is corrected. 17. t of


21.

[]/3 W-M.
' .
.

XV. .so long they prevailed over their adversaries; for in my view this is to be reckoned the victory of the women. The men so far as depended upon themselves were
worsted.

{A) Perhaps, Diodorus.


Euripides.

But

let this

be the defence of the

women and

let

us return to
at

and partly in anger his frequent association with Acestor and Dorilaus and Morsimus and Melanthius {pi.) By Zeus, whom do you say ? Were they poets ? {A) Yes, poets, who
in vexation at the malice of his fellow-citizens
.'
.
.

He partly

1-12. Owing to the loss of the context 216. Cf. Vev. 3 iireKeivTo be ol
MaKeSoviav anrjpe, 5

'

31-4 Morsimus and Melanthius are ridiculed by Aristophanes, who alludes also to Dorilaus is Acestor in Vesp. 1221 and Aves 31; cf, the scholia on those passages. whose doubtless identical with the tragedian mentioned by Aristophanes in the name is given as Dorillus or Doryllus in Etym. Magn. p. 283. 45 and Hesych. s.v

;
,
you
say.
19.

this

passage remains obscure.


Siaavpovres.

'

cis

cf.

Aristoph. Fr. 367 Kock.

35-9. Restored by

W-M.

quotation from a comedian, apparently giving a receipt for a dish of xvi. 1-17. poetry : ' Take some of Sophocles and Aeschylus, but put in a whole Euripides,' i. e. you It is clear from the sequel that Euripides will want the whole in order to extract a flavour. was being depreciated. Lines 6-10 ought to be restored. In 1. 10 the first letter is perhaps eaff is hardly suitable ; a, can be , , , , or or , and that before is possible, though unconvincing.

[](&

[]

The verses have the appearance of being by one of his competitors, as 17-31. {A) But here too the comedian's attack on Euripides is mischievous. In the follow.' ing winter
'
. .

[] W-M.
'

30-1. If the words are rightly restored, they are of interest as showing that Satyrus was seems to have dropped out in 1. 30, as acquainted with the dates of the plays mentioned,
in
ii.

15.
.
.

whatever part of the body it has taken for its habitation, in the hands, the xvii. " inwards, or by the eyes," added mockingly to this, " where the dog as she sleeps puts her nose ". These then, as I said, in their expression of views sought popular favour. He however, after putting in, so to speak, an obstructive plea, renounced Athens. (Dt.) What was the plea {A) It was entered in the following choral ode " Wings of gold ", &c.'
.
.?

the fragment are

The first two lines of 403. 3-4 (Stob. Flor. 38. 8) from the Ino. At the apa which has been variously emended. beginning of the third line Stob. gives cannot be right, ot/cet, and gives some support to The papyrus confirms since an interrogative is required. 7-13. The poet who added the line in the Doric dialect is unidentified. The play is unknown, Eurip. Fr. 911, from Clem. Alex. S/rom. iv. p. 642. 30 sqq.
1-7
:

= Eurip. Fr.
ris

,
2

8.

i8o
but
11.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


21-5 show
that
it

was among the


;

latest

works of Euripides, presumably one of the

Orestes group.
ipoevra L. so rightly Grotius 34. TTT^poiv^a is bracketed by Nauck, whose suspicions prove to be ill-founded. 36. ' : r' L. The insertion of ds with Clement {is L, els Bergk) is desirable 37.
:

on

metrical grounds.

37-9. alOepa Goniperz's quotation continued


xviii.
{Bi.)
*
. .

aepOds L,
apeeis.

The
;

which has been mistakenly emended; Nauck adopts The true correction is now given by the papyrus.
cf. xviii.

7-8.

began the songs. Or do you not know that it is this that he says ? then ? {A) In saying "to mingle my flight with Zeus" he metaphorically designates the monarch and also magnifies the man's power. (JDi.) What you say seems to me to be more subtle than true. (A) Take it as you like. Anyhow, he migrated and spent his old age in Macedonia, .' being held in much honour by the sovereign ; and in particular the story is told that
.

How

and Murray have both contributed, though there is some awkwardness in making the speaker assume a knowledge of Euripides' meaning, however, is better adapted to the space than which suggests as an alternative. In 1. 4 or could be read in place of a, in 1. 5. for and Clement, omitting 7-8. W-M. For an analogous interchange of / and for cf. vi. 7. 13. seems demanded by the sense a slight thickening of the cross-bar of the e, 1 8. which rather suggests that a followed, may be deceptive. 21. anep is very awkward, and W-M's emendation is an evident improvement. 25. Kanyr^paae conveys a somewhat false impression, since Euripides was over seventy when he went to Macedonia, and only survived there about a year and a half. The date of his death is given by the Parian chronicle as 407-406, and this is confirmed by Aristophanes'
3-6.

The

suggested restoration, to which


sense,

gives a fairly

good

8\,

W-M

W-M

{)

.
;

([

Frogs.
2 7 sqq. Cf. Suid.

yvtvos

'^ ' \ \
. .

., .

not badly said; for the appreciation of the people at Athens afterwards learnt from Macedonians and Sicilians the genius The story at least is that at the time of Nicias' expedition against Sicily, when of the poet. numbers of Athenians were captured, many of them owed their release to the poems of Euripides, any, that is, who remembered some of his verses and taught them to the sons of those who had taken them captive so great was the admiration of the whole of Sicily for .' Euripides. Moreover by Archelaus he was
is is

'That xix. not worth mention,

{)

who only

2.

paragraphus

II Sqq. This story


yap,

,
his

34-5 Restored by

5' :
may be
is

lost

also told

below this line. by Plutarch, Ntc. 29

^ktos

\ \ opvs,

W-M.
is

in

1.

35

is

very doubtful

.
;

yovv

rois

the remains suggest rather a

XX.

'

"...

mouth

and extremely malodorous."

" Hush, boy," he interrupted,

1176.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

i8i

" what mouth has there been such or could be sweeter than that from which proceed songs " and words like his ? {Di.) He resembled the man who ... to the poet, as you have admirably said in {A) Well, these were the events of Euripides' life. The death he met was very violent and peculiar, according to the version of the oldest Macedonian story-tellers.
. . .

(Dt.)

What

is

their

account

?
.'
.

\A) There
115.
uwovTOs,
4'

must be defective; perhaps the original was eV (. error being due to a lipography. The supposed iota adscript is rather long or p,
text
.
.

9 The

[
.
W-M.
'
.

is

in

Macedonia
5
'

(,' ,
Cf. FeV.

rtvos anaiBevTorepov

yXvKVTfpov

W-M.

.'

?
whence

^(

23. d of

was corrected from


Tev. 4 iv
Tjj

34-6. Cf.
here by

The
.

vestiges at the beginning of the next line hardly suggest

eV

[
iv

) and may
.
. .

the

be

[.

is

restored

xxi. and he begged them off. Some time afterwards Euripides happened to be alone by himself in a grove at a distance from the city, while Archelaus went out to the When they were outside the gates the huntsmen loosed the hounds and sent them chase. on in front, while they themselves were left behind. The dogs fell in with Euripides unprotected and killed him, the huntsmen arriving on the scene later. Hence they say the proverb is still in use among the Macedonians " Justice even for a dog ".'
.

\ (. ^/. . , \,
I

sqq. Cf. Tev. 4, the language of which


avToiis

is

very close to that of Satyrus,

,\

&>s

(
\

, \ ,
^

nore

'

'.

35-7 After
fKyuvav

When Timotheus was unpopular in Hellas because of his innovations in music and was so exceedingly depressed that he had determined to make away with
'

. .
the
.

The

shoAvn by the last sentence quoted in the previous note. the clause perhaps proceeded ... or

general sense

is

]['/

], , )[

himself, Euripides alone taking a contrary view ridiculed the spectators and, perceiving the

quality of

composed
despised
I
.

Timotheus in his art, consoled him with most encouraging Avords, and even proem of the Persae and Timotheus owing to his victory soon ceased to be
;

.'

sqq. This anecdote about Euripides

and Timotheus

sit

ger. r.p. 23, p. ^795 d

is
ttj

narrated by Plutarch,

'
,

supposed meeting might have occurred at the court of Archelaus, which Timotheus also said to have visited (Plutarch, De Alex. fori. ii. i, p. 334 b).
5.
is

An

sem

The
is

Plutarch's

word

(cf.

the preceding note) but the reading

is

not

particularly satisfactory.
suitS.

The

letter

after

may

well be

but neither
is

nor
very

27-9. This Statement that the proem of the Persae was written by Euripides

i82

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

surprising. The lime of its composition is not precisely fixed, but fell somewhere between the years 412 and 395 (cf. von Wilamowitz, Timoiheos, pp. 56-61), and though there are reasons for putting the date nearer the lower than the upper limit, the statement of Satyrus
is

not chronologically impossible.

The poem

itself

shows

that

at

the time

Of the detractors had not yet been silenced {Persae 219 sqq.). eXevOepias is known (from Plutarch, Philopoem. 11, p. 362)

on\y the

to and the supplements in 11. 33-5 were proposed by 30-5. The alteration of In 1. 33 the doubtful may be e. g. e or , and the initial letter, of which only the top of a tall vertical stroke remains, can be instead of

'.
first

of writing
line

W-M.

connexion between this fragment, which contains a lyrical citation, and Pr. 40. In 1. 3 the t of is suggested by the similar blackening of the verso. which with avi[p]a)v in 1. 5 was suggested by W-jNI, is questionable, but the general sense at any if right, will mean after the manner of ; rate is probably not misrepresented, which wishes to substitute, cannot be read. The stop in 1. 8 most likely marks the
Fr. 37

W-M

[],

'

end of the quotation.


Ft. 41. This fragment, in which there seems to be another quotation, from Frs. 37 or 38 but there are no decided indications of its position.
;

may

well

come

Frs. 48-57. These small pieces were associated with the larger fragments, Frs. 48-9 with Frs. 37-8, Frs. 50-4 with Fr. 39. i-xi, Frs. 55-7 with Fr. 39. xv-xxiii. The discolouration of Frs. 49, 51, and 55-7 indicates that they come from near the ends of the columns.

III.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS


1177.

Euripides, Phoenissae.
1

12

cm.

Early

first

century.

The copy of the Phoenissae of which this fragment gives the bottoms of two columns was written on the verso of the papyrus in a somewhat crabbed and irregular upright hand which is clearly quite early in date. On the recto is some cursive writing apparently of the first century B. C, and above this for the sake of support strips of other documents have been pasted, one of which is dated in the reign of Augustus. This evidence combines with that of its own script to place the literary text of the verso somewhere near the commencement of the Christian era. When verses were divided between speakers, the several parts were written in separate lines, as in 1174. Lyrical verses seem to have been distinguished by slight indentation. A high stop apparently occurs at the end

1177.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

183
gives

of
it

The copyist was not very accurate, but the age of the papyrus 1. 12. some weight, and readings of interest occur in 11. i, 5, 11, and 30.

[ovTOS
[os

[
5

^^ ^ [] [^ ?
Col.
i,

yepate

[]

XevKou

/?e/3[ioy

[Karravevs
[Keii/os

[]\ ^ ] [
[
)(p]vaeou

] ]
]

AeXiov

175

[>

[?
OS

[ ]9 ] [
re

180

15

]
]9 ]
Col.

^
[]
.
220

[ [9
2

? [[ ?
[
-,
the traditional reading

225

MSS. Editors generally follow Valckenaer in []^6': 7 ) is as likely which is supposed to have come in here from 1. 123. But omitting and the papyrus may well give the true text. to be the interpolated word as
3 (^73) 5 (i75)
1

'

Wecklein with Nauck.

. :

with MSS. 1. ). 6 (176). xp^vaeov II (i8o). The lacuna is of the same length as in the next line, and is satisfactorily filled without the addition of errra which the MSS. read after (khvos and which was ejected

: ]\,

is

supported by the papyrus; ^aovs Badham,

{.

i84

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

to Antigone by Valckenaer. The papyrus, however, agrees with tradition in giving a needless alteration suggested by Geel and adopted by and not to the

Murray.
1

6 (220).

1.

]/[.
:

20 (226).

so Wecklein with

some

later

MSS.

AaBELG.

1178.

Euripides,
Fr. (a)
1 1

Orestes.

-8

8-9.

Early

first

century

b. c.

Plate

I.

Remains of two columns written in an upright somewhat informal hand which The must go back at least to the earlier decades of the first century B.C. originally consisted of 24 lines each, but these are fairly widely spaced, so columns No lection signs occur that the height of the roll was not less than some 20 cm. beyond the paragraphi, which are used to indicate alternations in the dialogue.
Verses divided between speakers were put into a single line and not split up, as in the point of division was probably marked in the usual 1177, into two or more
;

way by double

dots.

Two
1.

small illegible fragments remain unidentified.

For so early a copy, the text can hardly be called a good one.
obvious blunder
11.-1347 sqq. is
in

There

is

an
of

1345, besides other probable errors.


cf.

The arrangement

noteworthy;

note on

1.

1348.

[
[8
13 '5 [orei^et

[ [ [[a>s

\\

yap

^]]
Col.
i.

ey

1320

1325

] [ ^^9] [ ] [ ] ]
[

]
] 88\ ^
]

fipd\yoi9

Kopas

\oas

TIS

1178.
[rt

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

]
]9
.
ev

185

1335

[ [
Col.

]
)(

[9

[ \ 7[ 9 9 [\ [ ^
]

[] ^
[]
9

134

1345

?[[ [
8
[e?

[^
ey[cu
[e/ie

\
8

[^^ 9 [9

^<

ye

[])(

[Ti]vas

9 -^

[0
1350

[9

1356

or

,
1315

1360

^ [] [
[]
rj

[][[
[ev
/ze[y

\5:
]

not Weckleitl's ingenious

1320

thing

like

85 may
8^:
(?)

: :

y]a/)

\
its

MSS.

The

the

MSS. have have preceded


way
fv8o6]([v,

and afterwards made


1324. 1335.
others, edd.
ev

. ^, ,
dative
into the text.

shows

that

the papyrus read eama-ovaa

which is quite satisfactory. Somewhich was perhaps originally a gloss on

Hartung's
:

which Wecklein accepts, is also possible. Originally a and perhaps A,


i.e.

?
first

1342. t of (IS was converted from a straight stroke, unelided. wrote

probably the scribe at

i86

1345. 1. SO MSS. except F, which has 1346. of but if a paragraphus had been 1348. The papyrus is broken below the written it should be partially visible. In this text therefore were assigned to the speaker of 11. 1349-52, in agreement with Lachmann, who gave to
:

.
: .

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Electra.

so Ea, &c., Wecklein; AL, Murray. MSS. ELG). In this hand a r may be easily mistaken for . 1359. TTov 1360. ras: so the MSS. except A, which has corrected from ?, ras being restored by A^. Wecklein.

1350.

\[:
.

(
15

[,

1179.

Apollonius Rhodius
8-4

ii.

cm.

Early third century.


'

Plate

I.

This small fragment

offers

another example of the

biblical

'

type of uncials

upon papyrus. The hand closely resembles those of 664 and P. Rylands 16, and may be assigned with some confidence to the earlier decades of the third century, if not to the end of the second cf. also 1166, which represents a somewhat later stage of the same style. Accents, breathings, and marks of elision and quantity appear to be a subsequent addition, but the punctuation in 11. 3 and 4 is probably
;

original.

The

[
05

] ]] [ [^ ' ^ ?
[ [^
[avTos
Se

text so far as

it

goes agrees with that of Wellauer.

en

y]e

avepa
8'

[
[
104. Brunck's

^]] | ](] [ ] [] /
i'ovTOS

^? ][

is

not supported.

1180.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS


1180.
1

187

Thucydides
7-3

v.

8'4 cm.

Third century.

This fragment contains the lower portion of a column with slight remains of the two adjacent columns, written in sloping uncials of the third century. The
shortness and horizontal position of the third stroke of the
are noticeable.

A A
is

rather deep margin, of about 5| cm., was left at the bottom of the columns. coronis at 1. ^^ probably marks the end of a chapter. The papyrus shows
-nplv

the antiquity of the reading

^ in 61.

but the text

is

not very correct and

of comparatively small interest.


Col.

i.

(Opposite

11.

9-T3.)

[
5

[? [
re

[^-

] ] ^]
!^]

]8
[]

V.

6o. 3

[]/[]$'
[to]vs

Trpos

[9[9 ^
6[
6[1

[ 8[5
Col.

6 1,

avrovs

15

Toiy

[][ []9
ikiyov

8^[
\\

[ [
[9

v re

/[]?
at

arev

[9 [

i88

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

20 vvv ev
vaL

^ ^
\

iravT^S

7?

^ (
\
[

^
>

25

[
[]

Col.

(Opposite

11.

ai-6.)

30

[9

[ 9 [ [
\
MavTivua

62. 2

Tiv9

AaKeSai

63.

aveyco

35 [<^(>'- ^

11.
12.

:
1.

77 [t]

the

first

syllable of

14. 15.

[/][
is

16. Toi[s:

,. ' .
so
:

MSS.

1.

en yap with the MSS.


ot

H(ude) with Haase and Kriiger. has dropped out owing

to the similarity of

MSS.

Stahl's conjecture

is

not confirmed.

om. MSS.

19. yevoiiy^To:

yevoiVTo

^ISS.

28.
ft

and
TO

MSS. But in a papyrus of this type the distinction between not likely to have been carefully observed.
;

IneXfinoiro

om.

MSS.

30-6. The relation of Col. i to Col. ii indicates that the remains of Col. iii are to be looked for at about the end of Chap. 62, a conclusion which is confirmed by the marginal coronis below 1. 33. A slight obstacle, however, occurs at 1. 31 where the division io\v[Tfs is irregular. The might well be , but that letter cannot be worked in here, and the arrangement adopted seems to be the most probable that can be suggested.

1181.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS


1181.

189

Xenophon, Anabasis
8-9

vii.

6'9

cm.

Early third century.

A
careful

small fragment containing a few lines from the Anabasis, written in upright uncials of medium size and dating perhaps from the earlier

Two short dashes inclined to each other at decades of the third century. but the slight angle appear to be used as a mark of punctuation in 1. 2 a broken, and the interpretation suggested is therefore uncertain. papyrus is
;

[]
ft

8e

'
^?
[

vii.

>

[
[

. The
3.
5.

Leg. (KaWiepfi.

[]
MSS.
is
:

< aiKaXXupeL ovSe

8ie

supplement

is

raiher longer than would be expected.

SO the better

([]

edd.

the reading of the better

MSS.

^
is

dett.

1182.

Demosthenes, De Falsa
27x22-6 cm.

Legatione.

Second century.

the copyist of 1093, the Contra Boeotum, are also to be referred the four His hand is well-preserved columns following from the De Falsa Legatione.

To

here somewhat less inclined to cursive, but its identity is evident. The two MSS., however, were not quite uniform, for, though the columns of 1182 are of the same breadth as those in 1093, the latter are shorter, notwithstanding the
greater height of the papyrus.

The

elaborate punctuation of 1093

however

On the other repeated, and here too may be to some extent a later addition. that the corrections are by the same person in both papyri. hand it is not clear The marginal insertion in 1093. xii. 17, at any rate, shows no resemblance to the Perhaps more than one revisor should interlineations, e. g., at 1182. 122, 127. complementary symbol at the end of short lines be distinguished in 1093. The
is

more angular here than

in

the latter papyrus.

190

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Textually the characteristics of 1182 are similar to those of 1093
:

agree-

ments with S preponderate, but the opposite scale


peculiar readings of

is

not

left

empty.

No
by

moment

occur

three valueless variants are contributed

the corrector.
Col.

Col.

i.

.
>

^
^5

53

35

9.
ray Tou9
res Ttv9

Tas

[[]]

\ []
[]

.
^^

[ [ ^[ [
[
[

45

15

[]' '
[9]
1

[]

([9]

[]

[]'

20

ye
vaiovs

[]^^

25

'

55

1182.
Tot's

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS


vaL

>

191

30

Toi[s

]' []
[ol]

eis

[e]i/

[fjey

^ [] [
Col.

65

ye
uai

55

? 7
[] []/
75
i^rji^

9
iv.
ei

[] /
? ?

[ []
iii.

105

[ ? ([?
[?]

Col.

?
115
Vp

85

[ [ ^[ [[ ?
[?[ \
[
Kei?

? ? [?
[
-

ia[vTov?

go

? ??

nepiov

20

?
>

[ ??
[>

[\ [

[[ajjuroy

[
[

125

^^^

57
[

192
XovTas
95

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

?
ovvi ^
eit

"^X""

navras
Tovs

[]

oia

Tovs \pouovs>
..
^
,

130

Seivop eaTLv

TOVTO TOLvvv
100

56

[] -^ ?
vueis
t

[
ov9 yeii'[e

[\[

>

135

? '

.
ev

.
19.

tnayyeXiav. SO S^ (?)

L
is

corr. (?)

FQO

Bl(ass)

The erroneous
it.

crossed through besides

having a dot placed

and Butch(er) with S corr. above and

apparently also beneath


22.
S.

23. Bl. brackets


:

^.
; ;

SL, Bl. Butch. A, Butch. in the margin at the top of this column 35. The purpose of the SA. The first SO FYO, Bl. Butch. 43.
anr^yyuCKe SO vulg. 27. aTnjyyeiXei* avTo^s: SO SL, Bl. 30.
:

is
t

not clear.
later

seems to be a

insertion.

of has been corrected, but was most probably the original reading. corrector perhaps substituted and then changed his mind and restored the v.

The
is

found

e.

g. in

O.

was converted by the first hand from 54. The final which has 56. eyyovois is the Spelling of SL, and so Bl. and Butch, above the line is not otherwise attested.
623.
64. 80.
:

(\\
:

been added

',

SLY,
SO S^A, Bl. Butch.
; ;

oSroi

.L
in

Vulg. Bl. Butch.

Vulg.

SO SL^A, Bl. Butch.

vulg.

102.

The papyrus

agrees with the

MSS.

reading

[] which
SQ.

Bl.

and Butch,

bracket, with Weil.

115 ea\yTovs: avTovs MSS. SO most 117. 122. The interlinear variant
:

[There
is

MSS. and

i.

e. ', is
is

edd. ; novel.

(:
MSS.
which
like

123. ovTos, the corrected reading,

that of the

127.

no support

for e^et after

of an explanatory character. high and a low stop have apparently both been written; 134. punctuation expected; cf. e.g. 1. 43.

in

1.

56

is

an addition
is

the latter

the

1183

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS


1183.

193

ISOCRATES, Trapeziticus.

276 25

cm.

Late

first

century.

Three columns written in a hand similar in scale and type to that of 844 earlier stage of development. vii), but showing a somewhat As I should refer this example of the round upright style to the first century. in 844, the final letters of a line are sometimes much reduced in size in order to keep the column even, and with the same object the common angular sign is added when lines would otherwise be short. A pause in the sense is marked by a slight blank space, which may or may not be accompanied by a marginal
(Part V, Plate

paragraphus.

A doubtful

stop occurs in

1.

67.

The text is interesting on account of the strong support given to the eleventhcentury Codex Vaticanus () against the older Urbinas (). Slight variations
from both these authorities are noticeable based on the edition of Drerup.
Col.
i.

in

11.

41, 4a,

and

70.

My

collation

is

Col.

ii.

']^

44

30

[^ []
[7]

[]

^
([]

[\

eyi]i/6T0

\^^

[]
35

[]

^
>

[^] ? ^

e/ctro

7r]a^

[ 8]
[? [ []
[
5e

15

[ >] ^ [ [ ]([ ^ 9 ]
[

]
>

[] [\ [
[e]i/

[] [

[]? [\] [
re
7r[a]

[ ][ 9] ((
[olfM"
>

46

'^"

K01S

\eiv

45

45

8[

Si

4 lines

lost

^(

.194

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


[)(/
ore]

[Mevi^ivov
25

[] [ ]
[]

[ 7] [?]
e^apvos

5
>

<5e

8^^
[]
>

tcs
ets

yjej/e

55

[]
6

> >
[iv

[] ([
[] [(]
[]'
e^^iv

[]

65 []/;[/

[ [ ^^ [ ^ \
[
v

[ [
[
[6

Col.

iii.

)
75

[ [ \ ^
[

)(^[

47

[[ [] ^ [] [] [ ][ 1[
yap

^ [

48

85

['\

[ [
vett.,

Unplaced fragment

]..>[

4-

](

SO

/no

eyivi& D(rerup) With edd.

(ykviff

Bl(ass).

5~6.

given as a variant on by the last corrector of . SO 7. ; , D. BI. 9. In view of the decided tendency of the papyrus to agree with and eKfiTO in 1. 12 ; re and Kdrai . so 15. , D. 1. ; 28. SO D. 1. with 1. with MSS. 33 41. eniKokeiv ey/caXfti MSS. 42. MSS. om. D, Bl. with . 47 fat: SO
is
:

\
:

1183.
. . .

f)^iv

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS '4 '


IK.

195
D. 1. with

write

here

]'\ [
: \;
'.

\^(
:

\^'\
:

49. 60.

^^[]6/

623.
67.

MSS.
so D. with
:

;
;

e/cajrepos

SO

. .
;

V, Bl.

D.

Bl. with

doubt attaches to the supposed stop

ink between this and the following

The vestiges after commend itself.


67-8. ev^ab
70.
:

73. 75. 83.

84.
87.

85. emxeipei
ft
:

(( . : [ ^
:

since there is a slight trace of but to read or [ with no stop is still less satisfactory. would perhaps best suit , but there is no variant, and does not
after

^,
.

SO .

ivBabe

D.

Bl. with

D.
i.

Bl. with

1.

Cf.

852.

iv.

so D. Bl. with so D. with


:

iv

; \

15.

om.

.
pr., Bl.

pr.

SO

D.

Bl.

om.

The unplaced fragment, if the angular sign but the reading is far from secure.

is right,

must come from the end

of a line

1184.

Pseudo-Hippocrates.
32-2

225 cm.

Early

first

century.

One complete column,


clear cursive hand, which
is

inscribed on the verso of 1210 in a rather large and

probably of the reign of Tiberius,

if

not of Augustus,

and could not be placed later than the middle of the first century. A document with which this papyrus was found is dated A. D. 24-5. 1184 is thus much the oldest MS. authority for these Pseudo-Hippocratean letters, being considerably earlier than the two Berlin papyri published by Kalbfleisch in Berliner Klassikertexte^

III. pp.

5-9.

And

it

possesses several unique features.

As

originally

written, Ep. 3 (11. i-io) was shortened at the end, the ordinary termination being appended as an adscript. Ep. 4 (11. 11-16) appears in a double shape, a greatly

compressed version of the longer form, and the shorter form which is found in P. Berlin 7094 has a group of mediaeval MSS. and is here added in the margin
;

196

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Between Ep. 4 and Ep. 5 three editorial lines (11. 17-19) not occur elsewhere. Of Ep. 5, of which in P. Berlin 7094 are inserted which do the shorter form follows the longer, the shorter form, with some peculiar
only the shorter form.
variations,

Lastly, whereas in both the Berlin papyri is alone given (11. 20-7). immediately followed by Ep. 11, in 1184 there succeeds (11. 28-33) a letter to Gorgias which apparently occurs nowhere else but has coincidences of phraseology with Ep. 6, which is addressed to Demetrius. The papyrus illustrates afresh the instability of the tradition regarding these letters.

Ep. 5

is

The hand

of the alterations

and additions

is

probably not to be distinguished

from that of the body of the text, and is at any rate contemporary. collation given below, Littre's edition has been used.

For the

/
5

/xeyay

^^ ^^
ety

09

8
apyvpov
(
J

^9 ^
Sos

eav

TIS

aWvs

^ 9 ^
j^ayaOos

^
e/ze

($
/cXe

fT^el]

\'^

] ]
]

oeiSope
V09

(^y^^os

\([$

[]9
"!;

?^
9^
ear

5e]]

/9<[]

{((
(

15

.1

^)

1184
7/7
ey

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

197

25

: , . .
2.

^^ ^ ^ :
3
re

SO

^
ey

Ilep

,
and
1.

;
:

CDHIKb

Yaravei Others, Littre,

21 below.

4.

so so

CDHJrb
;

om. vulg.
kKcos

is

others, Littrd.

Kkeos

(Littr^)

..

..,
Others.

.
P. Berl.

Berl., aS originally

1184,

(cXeof

5-6.
is 7.

is

omitted

in the

also the spelling of


eav
: :

CD, and
e? or eis others.

of

MSS.and Ko
; ;

CFGHIJKb
others.

have xpvaiou.

and
Others, Littre.

so

CHb

SO
;

with av for eav

8.

g.

The

interlinear insertion brings the papyrus into

except that into the lacuna after so 10. The sentence


:
'.

{) .
The
SO

CDHIJKb.
has been
left

out after

ovv is unattested.

agreement with the ordinary

text,

could hardly be got

Others, Littre.

yap
latter has,

,. . ' ' { , . ( ( . , . : ., ^
;

in P. Berl. 7094. 11.

^^^'.
:

12.

-^-:

however,

P. Berl.

SO

which 1184 omits with


Others.

is

Omitted, aS

P. Berl. 7094,

om.

Others.

anoyovtu

MSS.

vyiaiviv

Om. MSS.

13-16.

The

ordinary form of the longer version


apyvpiov

is

HJKb)
yap

The marginal adscript coincides with the shorter form of the letter, except for the ovv P. Berl. 70941 The absence of the words ) after before and placing iva before P. Berl. in omitting papyrus agrees with for For P. Berl. and for in reading and with

' .

lav

,
?

gives

Other

MSS.
:

omit,

substituting

20.

Om. MSS.

22.

Berl.

794

others.

198
ws

'

has eyw
ort
:

24.

Berl. 7094)
:

,
:

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


niOSt

MSS.,

for

and

omits on

CDGHIJK.
:

.{
,*

SO

\> \(\\ . and


(1.

SO most

MSS.

(/)
; :

.,,
\//^,
'''"
ii

P. Berl. 7094.

Berl. 6934

,.
ii

b also

is

defective,

.
and

the Berlin papyri

others.

'/ ()
245
'*''"
:

fnavpeadai: SO

26.
except
with

Traveiv

which has
eovTas:

27

SO

in omitting

28-33.

The

text

. ..
:

, : ^^ '
.
.

Others and P. Berl. 6934. MSS., including P. Berl. 7094. P. Berl. 6934 ;

(Littre)

cf

. Berl. 7^94

(
8.

and 6934.
Others

(. ).
MSS.
(with

Other MSS., P. Berl. 6934. The papyrus agrees which other MSS. and P. Berl. add after of Ep. 6, the phraseology of which is reflected in 11. 32-3 is:

In

1.

32 read

((,

.
(8

Berl.

6934)

(.

IV.

DOCUMENTS OF THE ROMAN AND EARLY BYZANTINE PERIODS


{a)

OFFICIAL.
etc. About
a.d. 200.

1185.

Letter of a Praefect,
9'9

14-9 cm.

Though
his hand,
its

the writer of this papyrus was merely amusing himself or practising


contents are of

some

interest.
:

On
the

the recto sentences have been


of a petition from
;

copied out from four distinct documents

(i)

commencement

Ammonion

to the praefect

or part of one,
to the offices

Magnius Felix Crescentillianus (11. i, 2,4) (a) a letter, from the same praefect to the strategi of the Heptanomia relating of gymnasiarch and agoranomus (II. 3, 5-8) (3) a proverbial
;

saying

(11.

10-12)
13).

(4)

the opening formula of a letter from


is

Ammonion

to

Diogenis

(1.

On

the verso

a partial copy of another letter from Felix to the


referring to their failure to

strategi of the

Heptanomia and Arsinoite nome,

pay

the proceeds of the eight-drachma tax, which had been made over to him, and ordering the centurions in the nomes to go to Alexandria in order to celebrate the Emperor's festival '.
'

1185.

OFFICIAL

199

(1.

bears no date, but apparently belongs to a period of joint rule and since it was accompanied by a document of the reign of Septimius Severus, it is most probably to be referred to the time of his association with
21),

The papyrus

Caracalla, a date Avhich suits the handwriting.

In the
is is

list

of praefects most of

those years are already accounted

for,

but there

a blank between 197 and 201,

and to

this

Magnius Felix

Crescentillianus,

who

not otherwise known,

may

be

which occurs here for the first time, is evidently the same as that which in 916 and one or two other texts is represented by the abbreviation \]\ or tj'^. 916 shows that it was levied upon land per aroura, and that the praefect Aemilius Saturninus, who may have been the immediate predecessor of Felix, had issued instructions regarding it possibly his interest was of a similar direct kind. What the centurions had to do
conveniently referred.
of

The tax

of eight drachmae, the

name

with this

is

not clear.

Military officers are not ordinarily associated with the

collection of taxes, but the special circumstances of this impost


their co-operation desirable
(cf.

Wilcken, Ost.
Recto.

[[Mayi/io?]]

67/3

/109
5

9 ?. [] . , ^, ,
?
.

? ^ ^.
ttjs aiTfj,

i.

may have

rendered

621).

k(f>iaLS

TOLS

01/

15

, '.
\

7[]^

? Verso.

^,
\

? .'

200

20

^
ovSeu anoSeiSore
el

^ 6)^ ()^ ^, ^ \[]} ^

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

^
kv
ewrtV,

(.\\-

^[\

kv

kv

Tfj

^.
e

Se

.
31,
1.
'
'

(-.
. .

Second

of

ye,

oy

inserted above the line.

12.

1.

Bldov.

13.

1.

Atoywr.

To Magnius
.'

Felix Crescentillianus, praefect of Egypt, supplication from

Ammonion

also called

Magnius Felix to the strategi of the Heptanomia, greeting. I have assigned to the most high epistrategi the appeals concerning the offices of gymnasiarch and agoranomus, and an edict has been published concerning this in the most illustrious city of Alexandria.' A little boy must eat bread, nibble besides some salt, and not touch the sauce but
'

if

he asks for wine, give him your knuckles.'


' '

Greeting, lady Diogenis, I, Ammonion, address you.' Magnius Felix to the strategi of the Heptanomia and the Arsinoite nome, greeting. I would have you know that the most divine sovereigns granted to me the money from the so-called eight-drachma tax, and you have not yet up to the present made any payment. If then the centurions are in your districts for long, let them attend with speed at the most illustrious city of the Alexandrians and celebrate the festival of the sovereign. Otherwise, .' if any one disobeys this my order
. .

and was perhaps the actual writer cf. 1. 13. 5-6. The meaning apparently is that the decision in certain cases concerning the offices in question had been delegated by the praefect to the epistrategi.
;

1-8. Lines 3 8 (from

/]). .
.

and 5-8 as far as were first written the letters of 11. 1-2, 4, Ammonion 3, though by the same hand, are larger and heavier.
;

^/

repeats the conclusion of 1. 12. 10-12. The third of these iambic lines is known as a proverb from Suidas and the paroemiographi. Diogenianus and Zenobius give it in the form hv olvov but Suidas, s. V. rightly has KovhvKovs, as in the papyrus cf. Schol. Aristoph.
8.

(/[]5

Pax

but looks more


with

8, ,
123, Plutarch,
like
6' olvov

An

,
in
1.

Vl'rius

doceri potest, 2 (439 d)


IVul.

Aristoph.
12.

than anything

else.

the first letter is possibly , 981-3 In 1. Metre is easily restored by writing {)6

},

for

T,

Sei

was no doubt the word intended; cf. e. g. 526. 2. 13, 17-20. For this appropriation of the proceeds of a ta.x to the praefect cf. the &c. as rightly explained by Martin, Episiraieges, pp. 137 sqq. 29. The festival was perhaps the customary celebration of the emperor's birthday. Since the date was known and was still some little time distant, a celebration in honour of the accession of Caracalla, who became full emperor between Nov. . d. 197 and May . D. 198 (cf. 910 introd.) is less likely to be meant, though it would fit in well enough with the supposed date of this papyrus.
31.

(
On
slaves,
is

1185.

OFFICIAL

201

-[^.

1186.

Edict of a Praeses.
14-4

68 cm.

Fourth century.

The
account.

recto of this papyrus contains parts of sixteen lines of a late third-century

the verso, written in a clear semi-cursive hand probably of the


is

first

half of the fourth century,

part of an edict of Aurelius Herodes, praeses of the


(l/xayres) in

Thebais, directed against the use of the whip

the punishment of free


;

men.
law,

For
it

he says, this

is

permitted, though to be deprecated

but for

the free

illegal.

In their case the proper instrument, according to

Roman

was the

fusiis, as

opposed to the

flagellmii,

and even

this

came

to be re-

garded as out of place for persons of superior


iiibetur, 19.

station.

Cf. Dig. xlviii. 19. 10 ex

quibus causis liber fiistibus caediiiir, ex his sevvus flagellis caedi et domino reddi 28
11011

et quideni tenuiores

omnes fiistibus caedi soleni, sed hi dunitaxat qui libcri sunt homines: honestiores vero fustibus non subiciuntur, idque
;

principalibus rescriptis specialiter exprimitur

Mommsen,

Strafrecht, pp. 983 sqq.

Aeyer

[.]
5

? 6[] []
\9
[

^, ^,
\
4

\~

,
ey

eXeu^epoi/y 5e

( [']

;^^ letters

'"^

2.

7.
'

!
Pap.

Pap.

(( Pap.
. .

6.

'(

Pap.

Subjection to Edict of Aurelius Herodes, most honourable praeses of the Theba'id. servile ., is even for those of the punishment of scourging, called in the native speech

202
estate lamentable

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


is
. .

an outrage

though not entirely forbidden ; but for free men to be submitted to such .' contrary to the laws and an injustice and between the and 2-3. The first letter of 1. 3 may be y, r, or possibly there is a space and a small hole in the papyrus, but there is no trace of ink and it is not certain naturally suggests that the preceding word is Egyptian, that any letter is lost. If but Mr. Griffith, whom I have consulted, does not recognize it. is reconcileable might stand for le/kah'um Avith a Latin term, legalium is a less likely epithet. Mitteis suggests a connexion with the late word ligaria \ cf. Du Cange s.v. In

P. Leipzig 40. iii. 20 the scourge used for a slave is called buneura. The reference of the words eXevOepovs in the next line there is obscure ; cf. the note on p. 132.

1187.

Proclamation of a Strategus.
21-5

7'2

cm.

A.D. 254.

notice issued

by the strategus Aurelius Posidonius summoning the

in-

habitants of those quarters of the city upon which devolved the liturgies for the

meet for the nomination of a phylarch. This functionary, v^ho is had duties similar to those of the amphodogrammateus, and cf. 1119, and the fourth-century is perhaps the same official under a different title Wilcken, ChrestomatJiie, p. 67. His business was to Leipzig papyrus cited by submit the names of persons suitable for the various public offices. Hence it was of much importance to those liable that the man entrusted with that power should be honest and impartial and this, it is interesting to find, was recognized to the

coming year

to

rarely mentioned,

extent of giving them the right of election.


short lines of an account.

?{?)? ^^)

On

the verso there are parts of six

[]

kv

?.
(?)

\ ?

kvardv-

? {).

6[
iav

^KeXeu-

6[]

25

[]
2![]

15

,,
\\^
12.
*

1187.

OFFICIAL
<^.

203

of

blotted.

13

Pap.

the inhabitants of the quarters about to serve in the

Notice is given to Aurelius Posidonius, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome. coming year to assemble to-day at the accustomed place and to name whomever they choose as phylarch, being a person of means and suited for the post, in accordance with the orders of those who constituted the appointed office (?), in order that when the time comes he may be able to perform the duty honestly and faithfully. The first year of the Emperors and Caesars Publius Signed by me.

From

Licinius Valerianus and Publius Licinius Valerianus Gallienus Pii Felices Augusti, Pauni 26.'
I

sqq. This
7.
i.

B. G. U.
6,

18.

For the
is

8
is

the usual formula in notices promulgated by the strategus;


in this to

cf.

e.g.

9.

seems

papyrus

doubtful.

insertion of

The
. . .

13-15.

connexion cf. 1119. 6, note. have been the word intended, but what precisely stands in the was originally written and then amended by the Perhaps sense at any rate is evident. is commonly applied to is an obscure phrase,

is similarly used, e. g. kind or money, nvpos, &c., and 1124. 5, P. Fay. 39, 17. But here can hardly be the salary of the phylarch, who was probably unpaid. In 34. i. 2 the word is employed of ofiicials, [toIs Hence I suggest that cf. P. Leipzig 28. 7, P. Flor. 71. 722 the appointed office of phylarch, a sense which combines well with is It does not seem likely that could mean the persons constituting the whole

amounts

in

, 4,

(\
year 254

'

'

..

. \.
(^A. D. 13.

body of those

liable to XfiTovpyiai.

21 sqq. This date confirms the view taken of 1119. 5 and 30, where Mesore of the The dating of that papyrus is clearly abnormal. is still attributed to the Galli.

1188.

Official Correspondence.
32-6

X 26 cm.

This correspondence relates to a proposed sale of some persea-wood and acacia-wood which had no private owner and so belonged to the i6tos
with the application of the purchaser, Didymus, to the idiologus Quintus Attius Fronto (11. 18-26; cf. 721), who forwarded it to the basilicogrammateus of the nome with instructions to verify details and value the

.
;

The

series of letters begins

wood
the

(II.

14-17).

The correspondence then descended


(11.
(II.

in the usual

way from

the basilicogrammateus to the topogrammateus

comogrammateus

2-6),

upon

whom
; :

7-13) and from the latter to devolved the business of supplying


cf.

the information required

by

the idiologus

e.

g.

P.

Amh.

68.

Acacia-trees
cf.

occur in a similar connexion in 1112


C. P.

a dead persea was the subject of 53

Herm.

7. ii.

28,

iii.

7.

204

kv
4

knl

(9)
cis

ipo{v)
eTTi^efi?)

)([)
6
1

(^), () [{?)] () {9), {$) 8\ ^ {, ? ()[)


i8iov

^) ^^ {)[) .8 [) ^) [) 8[^) 8[) \ ^ {) ^) {) 8? ^) \8 ' [09) [] 8


[.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.]

knl

.
k\<^Sol)

yaipuv.

yp^aa^s:)

(.h

^HpaKXeiS[ov)

kv

UpSoL

kpa>v

kn

^
Tleevvo)

k{\jrevo9) '

eiaiv

6()

(9) {).
{){) '
iTereupeijs}

2nd hand.

8()

{)

11

{) {), () ^ {) 6() {) k {6) ^ ^ \{) ^) {), ^^)


et

^^) {) {). ^[){) 6 [^) [)


kK

(){')

(7}{)

(eVouy)

^.

()[) {) {)
(^)
8.
kwi

ka{\kvv)

ety

kk(ye)

()

12

13

14

^) (). {^) []. {) ^^). ^^) {) () '{)


{()
.
(/)) .
Tfj

{) {) {) ^
{)
ycyovvia

^{) 6{)

{6), {^).
'.

15

{) {). () ,
1188.

OFFICIAL

205

^)
L

7^<?

{\)
17
1

TTyooy

{),
err
e/c

{) ^) \{^$) ^ (), {^)


/ ivpoi

.
kv

{),

6{/)

els

()
6()

19

)) ()

().

2
2

eh

{), (9) [] k[pakvov) {) (^)


Trjs

6()

6() {^)

[)

^) {) {) '(()
.
kv
kv

22

23

24

^
;^
hand,

25

26

27

{) , ^[] () ,/^ {) [) , {) () {) {) \ \ () (), () () [6] () k(a) {) [){) () () [). {). {). () {)


IleivvQ)
kv

{) {) ^) {) ()
[']

[] {) () ,
iep5>v

k[pakvov)
kv

^ "
'4,

[)
UpS>i kv

kv

{)

kv

[]

Te(pov)

kav

28 29

e/y

k-

{) {}[}.
4.

. (){) {){).
{)
.
1.

{^)

/.
A
copy
is

'

Kerkeura, three branches. Sarapion to Peteuris, comogrammateus of Kerkeura, greeting.

appended

of the

Dioscurides, basilicogrammateus. Go therefore to the objects specified as concerning Didymus son of Heracleides, namely a branch of a live persea-tree at the Tlioereuni of Osorphnas, and two dry branches of a living persea-tree in

document

sent to

me by

2o6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


tomb
of the sacred animals,
in

and see whether they are dry accordance with the tariff, add the true value with a signed declaration and report clearly, making it your aim that nothing be concealed or done by favour, knowing that you will be held accountable in any inquiry concerning facts that remain unknown. The 42nd year of Caesar, Mecheir 24. 'Dioscurides to Sarapion, topogrammateus of the middle toparchy, and to Peteuris, comogrammateus of Kerkeura, and Dionysius, comogrammateus of Peenno, greeting. A copy is appended of the document delivered to us from the person below written in accordance In furtherance with the instructions of Quintus Attius Fronto, controller of the privy purse. of the object stated go to the branches and acacia-trees indicated and see whether they are dry and ought to be appropriated by the privy purse in accordance with the tariff, add the true value with a signed declaration and report clearly, making it your aim that nothing be concealed or done by favour, knowing that you will be held to account for facts that remain unknown. The 42nd year of Caesar, Mecheir 9. The 42nd year of Caesar, Signed by me, Dioscurides. 'For the privy purse. Mecheir 9. To the basilicogrammateus of the Oxyrhynchite noma. Appended is a copy of the memorandum presented to me from Didymus son of Heraclides, with the endorsement made below it. Go then to the logs therein stated and see if they are dry and have no owner and ought to be appropriated by the privy purse in accordance with the tariff, and after learning their condition and adding the true value furnish a report, making it your aim The 42nd year of that nothing be concealed, knowing that you will be held accountable. Caesar, Mecheir 9. To Quintus Attius Fronto from Didymus son of Heraclides. I wish to purchase in the Oxyrhynchite nome from the privy purse some dried logs which have no owner and ought to be appropriated by the privy purse in accordance with the tariff, namely at the village of Kerkeura in the middle toparchy in the Thoereum of Osorphnas a single branch of a small persea-tree, dried and worth six drachmae, and in the temple of Harpebekis on the tomb of the sacred animals two dried branches of a living persea-tree worth two drachmae, and at the village of Peenno in the same toparchy in the temple of Ammon a dried branch of a living persea-tree worth two drachmae, and near the same village in the holding of Melanthius in the cutting made in the great dyke two fallen acacia-trees worth eight nor to drachmae, total value 18 drachmae, and I will give no trouble with regard to anything else at all, if it seems good to you to give instructions to the secretaries that on my paying as the price the aforesaid 18 drachmae of silver I may receive the proper
the temple of Harpebekis at the

and ought

to

be appropriated by the privy purse

'

'

authorization.
'

spection.
'
'

Let a letter be written to the basilicogrammateus for an 42 nd year of Caesar, Mecheir 9. Read by me. The 42nd year of Caesar, Mecheir 9. To the comogrammateus. Inspect and report. The 42nd year of Caesar, Mecheir
the secretaries.

To

in-

The

I.

The number

of

are counted.
3.

^
1.

24.'

in this

marginal note

parallel

document was no doubt sent


(1.

the other village concerned

^, ^:
For the Uphv
5. 70.

{{)) MuS.
:

22).

cf.

and C. P. Herm.
8vo

P. Brit.

2 1 4. 1 3

(Harpebekis
in

Horus

. ,
is

three because only those at Kerkeura to the comogrammateus of Peenno,

7.

ii.

17

28

nff{a']pv

the

hawk)
is

cf.

the

mentioned

in
(cf.

P. Tebt.

Osorphnas,

whom

Wilcken, Grundziige, pp. 105-6), is cf. e.g. P. Tebt. 4.


.

a deified animal apparently new.


5. 78.

probably to be recognized

1188.
:

OFFICIAL

207

'idios Xoyos is mentioned in the edict of Ti. lulius Alexander, Or. Gr. Inscr. 669. 44; cf. P. Tebt. 287. 5 note, B. G. U. II 18. 45, Wilcken, Grtmdzuge, p. 210. cf. P. Amh. 68. 10 the lacuna at the beginning of that line 5. For should be filled on the analogy of the present passage 8] preceded by a verb such as npoaaveveyKere or At the end of the line I am unable to read any abbreviation of \oyov ; the suspended is fairly clear, and the preceding letter can well be . cf. P. Par. 64. 29 toU 6e (not 9

the

of the

C.I.G. 4957

= Dittenberger,

{)
:

8{

ig. As Wilcken remarks, may be restored on this analogy in 721. 3. Seppius Rufus, the idiologus there concerned, was no doubt the successor of Fronto. 25-6. Cf. the conclusion of 835 quoted in the note on 731. 14-15. 27-8. These lines contain the endorsement of the idiologus. The day of the month must apparently be , not e, and if this is correct, Fronto must have been at Oxyrhynchus or in the immediate neighbourhood.

{) 8
rovs

,,

^ .

18

]^^

{)

8\ .

29.

The

identity of the date with that in


;

the topogrammateus
written

the hand, however,

is

1. 6 indicates that this line emanated from not the same as in 11. 1-6, which were probably

by

his secretary.

1189.

Letter of a Strategus.
16.6x13-1 cm.

About
lost,

A. D.

117.

This

letter,

of which the conclusion

is

from the strategus of the

neighbouring Heracleopolite

nome

to Apollonius, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite


'

nome,

property which belonged to the Jews cannot be later than about the beginning of the second century, and since an Apollonius is known from 74 and 97 to have held the oflfice of strategus in a. d. 116 it is highly probable that the papyrus
relates to a

or schedule of

'.

The

large upright handwriting

belongs to the period of the great Jewish outbreak which occurred


year,

in the

previous

and was not ended until after the accession of Hadrian. Confiscations would be the natural consequence, and it was doubtless with some of the property of the text was concerned. For the papyri referring thus forfeited that the
to these disturbances cf Wilcken, Grundziige, pp. 64-5. The document was the forty-fourth of a series made up into a roll in the bureau

of the strategus.

mentioning

/9] l^!'^pa^
^\^

Of the one adjoining


(?)

it

fragment from the commencement of another likely belongs to this.

2nd hand

on the and

^ 7[, ?
left

the ends of a few lines remain

letter

and a detached from Aquilius Polion most

2o8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

')(^[]
5

\
nepl
ois

15

9 \\ 87ev

^ ?[
^aipeiv.

Svo

eypayjra

Se

[]8

Se

eh

[9
On
the verso

Aquilius Polion, strategus of the Heracleopolite nome, to his dearest Apollonius, Kindly receive two letters which I have strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, greeting. written, one to you and one to Sabinus, strategus of the Cynopolite nome, about a list of property which belonged to the Jews, with the list itself, and keep the letter coming to you (Addressed) To Apollonius, strategus of and forward the other to the Cynopolite nome
'
.

'

{) [.
.
.

44-

the Oxyrhynchite nome.'

1190.

Letter of a Strategus.
26.7

XI4-5 cm.

A.D. 347.

from the strategus to two praepositi of a pagus informing them that the commander-in-chief had ordered the recruits to proceed to Babylon and
letter

directing the praepositi to assist in carrying out the order.

add a

[9 [ ] {) [ ]9 {?) [ ]
list

of the recruits, but this

It

was intended to

was not completed.

Cf.

1022, 1103.

[
e

yaipeiv.

1190.
Toiis

OFFICIAL

7]^/ [ , ], ] 7ip(uva\^
e/s

[9
e^[
[

7[6
and hand
15

7[, ?

][] []

'
.

3rd hand

20

[] ? {) ?
^p]/?[<^o'^]?f
<^^
*

]] . .
]

.
)([]

209

enl

[]

[f^1xoy"'j

()
.

'-

Si'

[?]

{)
.

of the Oxyrhynchite nome, to his brothers Flavius and Flavius ., strategus His highness my lord the most Aurelius Theon, praepositi of the fifth pagus, greeting. timus has ordered the recruits to be dispatched to Babylon. honourable dux Flavius
. .
.

produce the recruits for which care therefore, my brothers, that the officials of the they are severally responsible as hereinafter declared and assemble them at the city and prepare for their dispatch, in order that there may be no hindrance. I pray for your health,

Take

brother.'

I.

3.
Toti
7. 8.

For

]: ]
is

Date.

cf.

1057.
11.

2,

note; Wilcken, Grundzuge, p. 77.

The

vestige above the line suits the top of a 14. were abbreviated. too long, even if supplement is rather short as compared with those in the adjacent lines.
cf.

and

and

Perhaps ([, as in 1. to. An alternative in 10-12. The restoration suggested is of course very uncertain. only (or 11. II 12 would be e.g. np6s 6 []7' then it becomes difficult to complete the sentence satisfactorily, unless this be supposed to have extended into another line which was begun further to the right than those preceding in 1. I cf. 1. 17. is somewhat long for the lacuna. 13-14. The signatory forgot that he was addressing two persons. was 20. This line appears to lack sense. It is not certain that the word or abbreviated at the fourth letter, but the remains are not easily reconciled with There is a wide margin (5^ cm.) below the line.

[\

^ \) ,

().

2IO

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


1191.

Official Correspondence.
Breadth 12-8 cm.
a. d.

280.

Lines i-io are a copy of a letter sent This document consists of two parts. by Aurelius Ammonius to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome conveying to him an order of the praefect Hadrianius Salhistius that all acts emanating

from the senate with regard to the appointment of various local administrators
(em^eXTjrat) should bear the signature of the secretary {aKpeijSas).
this
is

Appended

to

a letter from the strategus to the secretaiy directing his attention to the
its

foregoing document, with a repetition of

Hadrianius Sallustius
Aurelius
is

is

new name
title

Ammonius, who

also

unknown.

AvpYjXlos

^ ^8 ^^
is

given the

provisions.
list

to be added to the

of praefects.

and was perhaps epistrategus,

[].

\'\^

[]9

[]9 []

'^^[

TOis

ev-

k(f)

[8]
<7

[]7,

. () \\
[
*'4o]y
"^^^

15

[] ' () [) [] [] ^^, ,
H
-

^ ][]^ [ )( ,
[/37]?

' ^^ ae

\6 ^.
^.] -] (^-

^0]^vpvy)(iTOV

[a\vTLypa(f>ov

, ^
[]

fj

1191.

OFFICIAL

211

[\\
( []6

3rd hand
[

](

[ ^[ [
Pap.

^.

]
]

(and hand) {e/)}

^{).

.
'

^[
Hathur

7.

1.

[\\(,

Aurelius Ammonius to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, greeting. In accordance with the orders of his highness my lord the most honourable praefect Hadrianius Sallustius concerning the election of administrators, on every occasion when instructions are issued concerning them do not neglect to take the subscription signifying concurrence of the secretary, in accordance with the orders concerning this. I pray for your lasting
health.
'

The

sixth year,

11.

Aurelius Olympius, ex-hypomnematographus, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, to . copy is sent to you of the letter which we have received ., secretary, greeting. from his excellency Aurelius Ammonius concerning the election of administrators in accordance with the order of his highness my lord the most honourable praefect Hadrianius Sallustius, directing the office of the strategus, on every occasion when instructions are issued by the most high senate concerning the administrators, not to neglect to take your subscription signifying concurrence, as ordered, so that you may be informed and keep the order in view. I pray for your health. The sixth year of our lord Marcus .' Aurelius Probus Augustus
.

6.
7.
ii.

emartWo

A A

i.e. by the as explained in appears in connexion with the


:

1.

19.
in

59.

9.

Cf.

P.

Leipzig 40.

12, &c.
1 2.

break occurs below

this line,

but the gap

is

evidently slight.

1192.

Order for Payment.


7-5

X 68 cm.

a.d. 280.
lentils

An
to

order from a financial secretary to a local agent for a payment of

two

collectors of annona.
;

part of their remuneration

The payment was probably due to cf. the note on The writing 4.
1.

the collectors as
in this

and the

following papyrus

is

] ^

across the fibres of the recto.

{9)
2

^[.]

6{)

212
5

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

['\
greeting.

()

<7

.
e^
4.

,^
Secorr.

yiivovTaC)

(.) \\ {).
p.

<rZ.,

y.

of

from

'Chaeremon, secretary for the public records, to Isidorus, Measure out to Apollonius and Herminus, collectors of period of six months on behalf of Ammonion six and a half artabae I pray for your health. measure, total 6^ art., and take a receipt. lord Probus Augustus, Choiak 3.'
2.

agent at Episemou, annona, for the fourth

The

of lentils by the tenth sixth year of our

For

;5
is

cf. e. g.

village

mentioned 4. The mention of the issued by the


official.

personally in consideration of their services.


5.

9.

: [

The 1134. 8, 1147. 17, and Gelzer, Byzant. Verw. p. 87. in 136. i6, 1031. 8. in conjunction with the fact that the order was
indicates that the

In that case
iv.

payment was made to the collectors Ammonion would be another

for the fern,


is

form

cf.

B. G. U. 14.

24, 977. 2, P. Flor. 171. 6.

more probable than

][(.

1193.

Order from a Speculator.


Height 7 cm. Fourth century.

An
a guard.

order addressed to a village police-officer to supply a donkey and

TI{apa)

[])(0[5)]

().
'

.\\\^. ^^
eVa

[^]

[]

ivos
[

(and hand)

From

the speculator to the chief of police of the village of

Taampemou. Immediately

on

receiving

my

letter

supply one donkey together with one guard to the sentinel

whom

I have sent.

,
I.

For

2.

[?]

P. Flor. 155.

2, &c., and and perhaps [][8]

([\ ;
cf.

Signed by me.'

{speculatoris)

cf. 1214. 2, 1223. 21, P. Flor. 71. 652, &c. which occurs in another (unpublished) order of this period, (sc. Avould be an easier reading than is wrong, though it well suits the remains.

).

1194.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

213

{)

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS.
1194.

Arrears of Annona.
15-8

28-9 cm.

Third

cent, (about a. d. 265).

This papyrus contains a mutilated report of arrears of military supplies


(annona) which had been ordered for the use of troops accompanying the praefect Claudius Firmus but had not been fully delivered.

The

chief point of interest here

is

the identity of the praefect.

A [C]l(audius)
is

Valerius Firmus was in office in A. D. 246-7, but his praenomen

only

known

from 720.
([Iu]l(ius)

, and

even

if it

is

there rightly restored, which

is

not quite certain

is another possibility), usage requires that, where brevity was desired, and not the second of the two prior names should be omitted. Moreover, that usage is followed in the case of this particular man in P. Amh. 72. 10 and 81. 5, as well as in an unpublished Oxyrhynchus text, where he is called simply Valerius Firmus. An identification with the praefect of A. D. 346-7 is therefore unsatisfactory, and I prefer to suppose that Claudius Firmus was the praefect plerique Graeconim alteram tradwit, mentioned by Vopiscus, Firmus, 3 igfiari eo ipso tempore tres fuisse Firmos^ quorum unus praefectus Aegypti, alter dux limitis Africani idemqtie proconsule, tertius iste Zenobiae amicus ac socius. Eo ipso tempore means the period of the Palmyrene war in the reign of Aurelian an unpublished Berlin papyrus (P. 1463), the knowledge of which I owe to Wilcken's kindness, fortunately fixes the date of Firmus' tenure more precisely. The document, a fragmentary petition, is dated in the twelfth year of Gallienus (a.D. 264-5), and in 1. 5 a reference occurs to [(]. Our praefect is accordingly to be placed between Aurelius Theodotus (a.D. 262: P. Strassb. 5) and Juvenius Genialis (A.D. 266-7). Whether he was after all, in spite of Vopiscus, the same person as the alleged usurper, as maintained by P. Meyer {Hermes xxxiii. pp. 268 sqq.) and Homo {Aurelien, p. 113, n. 2), is a further question which need not here be considered. It is curious, however, that in the inscription upon which the former relied (N^routsos, Inscr. dAlexaiidrie,

the

first

'

'

]
. .

48) the

name

coincides with that of the present document.

erased name)

Meyer took

the

Roman
iii.

rule.
cf.

word But as against

"(
La

The

text

, km

to refer to the role of Firmus as deliverer from

.
is
.

(an

this Stein

has observed (Pauly-Wissowa, Real-Enc.

2720;

Serie dei Prefetti, p. 75) that the title corresponds to clarissimus corrector^ and points rather to a period
Cantarelli,

214

-//^

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

subsequent to the reforms of Diocletian. sufficient to overcome that argument.

mere coincidence of names


(1.

The
1.

troops had apparently gone in a southerly direction


;

from 7 Wilcken makes the plausible suggestion that the Blemyes were Coptos), and giving trouble. It may be noted in this connexion that the usurper Firmus is stated to have been in league with that people (Vopiscus, Firmus, 3 idem et cum
avohov

but

cf.

P. Leipzig

6'^.

, ^^
is

not

ets

but the case for the identification of the Blemyis societatem maximam tenuit) pracfect and the usurper is hardly to be strengthened by this consideration.
;

'^ ^
Col.
i.

8-

\^

,.
nepi
S6^iv,

kv

\ [[] [] () ]

,
^<, [?)

[
['
09
Si

15

{) {)\{) [ ' 6[ ^{) {) ()


TTOut
S>v
[
[

(
{4)
S>v
.

Col.
[

()(

U7r[e]/)

1194.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

25

()
[

215

i,

the left-hand margin of Col.


]y

at right angles kvTo^


.]vi
[

30

On

the verso, along the edge opposite the


]

]
[.jofcra
1.

[.

left

margin of Col.

6.

Pap.

10. vnep

Pap.; so in

20.

15.

Pap,

so

I.

25

y.

28.

Pap.

Lines 1-13. 'Oxyrhynchite


arrears devolving

nome

in

answer to the requisition for a report of the

upon the superintendents of the annona on account of the soldiers who have gone up with the most illustrious praefect Claudius Firmus, the amounts ascertained are declared below, and the proper measures for their collection can, if it be approved, be communicated to the strategus. The amounts are as folloAvs Bread, imposed for a journey of four days, 136 artabae of which there were
:

distributed through the superintendents

artabae

remainder

.'
. .

The annona
the troops.

at this period cf 1115, Wilcken, Grundzuge, pp. 361-2. 3-4. For the of the present text was no doubt a special levy occasioned by the passage of

(cf. 1. 15) to y (cf. 1. 25) because 136 is divisible by 4. For the supplement cf 1. 17. The here appears as carried out directly by the eVt/tiXj^rat, and not through intermediary hiahorai; cf 43 recto, iv. 8-9, 15. But hiahihovai cf. P. Leipzig 58. 9-14 and note ad loc. is not always strictly used the abbreviation here and in 1. 16 is tXX, with a diagonal stroke after 15. *()() would be the natural expansion, but there seems to the second . Of this, be no other authority for whereas is a common epithet of the and Wilcken suggests that the compendium is a misrepresentation of l^, the

11. I prefer

12.

doubled
23.

indicating the plural, after the Latin method.

'{)

The

ie(m)s
:

was apparently valued

at

20 drachmae.

28. /3o(f)tou

SC. Kpf (OS.

2i6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


1195.

Promise of Attendance in Court.

2 X 14

cm.

A. D.

135.

on oath to appear on the following day before a judge by the praefect to try a case, the nature of which is not stated. The person makjng the declaration was an inhabitant of Hermopolis his opponent, whose patronymics only are given, was presumably an Oxyrhynchite. Cf. 260,
declaration

delegated

B. G. U. 891, P. Leipzig 52, 53, pp. 61 sqq., Gradenwitz, ArcJiiv

Hamburg
ii.

4,

Wenger, Rechtshist. Papyrusstudien,

pp. 573 sqq.


SodeuTL

\((
[]9
['\
5

?.
[M]e7r]poy

^[, \ .
eiKas

[] ^
corr.

9 9

^]

[]9

^
.

(ero^y)

[]
[
.

]9,

kvvaKa\C\8iKaTri.

8.

from

1 2.

Second

of

ei'mKa[i]Sicarj;

added above the

line.

'

To Apollonius, the judge appointed by his highness the


also
called

Anubion, son swear by the Emperor Caesar Trajanus to-morrow, being the twentieth day of the against Hermaeus son of Apollonides consequences of the oath.' Date.
I,

Hermaeus

praefect Petronius Mamertinus. of Hermaeus, inhabitant of Hermopolis Magna, Hadrianus Augustus that I will speak before you present month Mecheir, in explanation of my case son of ... ; otherwise let me be liable to the

I. If the date in 1. 10 is rightly read, this papyrus was written two days after B. G. U, which has hitherto provided the latest point (11 Feb. a. d. 135) for the praefecture of Petronius Mamertinus. 8. For cf e.g. 260. 15, P. Hamburg 4. 10, 9. The grandfather's name was possibly but the traces of letters are hardly

19,

identifiable.

10. For which suits the remains, cf 1. 12, where the word was originally so spelled, though a u has apparently been added above the line.

([],

1196.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
Declaration of a Tax-collector.
13-7

217

1196.

9-8 cm.

A. D.

211-12.

corn-dues
it is

This declaration upon oath by a person nominated to serve as a collector of is a parallel text to 81, and fortunately in better preservation, though
not quite complete.

itself

TOS

ioy

9 ^
15

(). ^ ?^? ^ ^-9 ()


daSodus
e/y

Cf. also 82.

9
-^

-^

e/creXe-

On

{) {) {) {) {). , {) '()
the verso

'

...[... ]
\.

Anubion, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome. I, Ptollas son of Ision and Stephanous, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, having been presented along with others by the

'

2.

iVtwrof

Pap.

TToXi

Pap.

12.

amphodogrammateus of the same city now in office for the collection of corn-receipts at the metropolis from the produce of the current 20th year in the district of Pakerke in the eastern toparchy, do swear by the fortune of the lord Emperor Marcus Aurelius Severus

2i8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Antoninus Pius Augustus that I will take up at the proper time the said office and will discharge it, appearing whenever I may be required and presenting myself at the regular .' Endorsement on the verso. monthly statements, so as to incur blame in no respect
5. This analogy makes it certain that and Mr. Bell informs me that he can read [])

8
. .

is

to be restored in 81. 7,
;

cf.

1119.

6,

. G. U.

1062. 9-10. 8. k: or perhaps is meant. 12-14. Cf. e.g. 1187. 17-20, P. Flor. 1617. Cf B. G. U. 1062, 1617 '*

2.

i.

9-10, &c., Thead. 50. 12 sqq.

;{)
P. Tebt. 339. not quite clear
17.
;

[]

Examples of such monthly reports are could be read as -at?, and in The termination of the masculine however (sc. Xoyots) is more likely.
proceeded 20 and 82. 7-1
:

[].
cf.

& \(\\\ ?^^

[rjou
e. g.
is

frequent,

The
cf.

text probably

.
X

(
rois

too the

1.

20.

496.

16, note,

97,

Amh.

139 23,

4 5

^-G. U. 1032.

11.

1197.

Declaration of a Shipper.
23*2

cm.

A. D.

211.

A
Archiv

declaration on oath addressed to the strategus

by a boat-owner promising
vessels for the
i.

to supply a boat for the transport of corn.


transport-service, on
iii.

pp. 220 sqq., was not always adequate

^?^. {) ?
which
cf.

That the supply of


is

Wilcken, Grundziige,

pp. 378-9,

Rostowzew,

shown by

C. P.

Herm.

6.

[]
rfjs

TlroKi^as

^ -()
16

Sie-

, . \
e^

69

ev

1197.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
[.
.

219

.]
.
.

8\

h[.

.]

[.]

^apa-

20

3 y[pay^a TOS

[ / [
{Tov9)

[] ^[]( [9] []8[.] [] []9 ^[\ ?\\ 6[]. \ [.


IlepTtvaKos
.
.

\\.[]6[ [

[..]... Of

(2nd hand) T[']T9V^

\^\

eiSo-

'27.

1.

[].

Sarapion also called Phanias, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome. I, Tithoes son of Sarapion and Ptolema, of Phacusae, com-lader (?) of the said Phacusae, swear by the fortune of Severus and Antoninus the lords Augusti that I will provide the small boat belonging to me of 150 artabas' burden for the lading (?) of the government corn whenever the boats collected in accordance with the orders of lading arrive, so as to incur blame Date, sailor Sarapion son of ... of Phacusae.' This bond is valid. And in no respect. and signature of Tithoes written for him by Sarapion.
*

2.

that
4.

Bif'paais,

For is apparently a new word. a person who deals with ds ; which OCCUrS in 1. 11, cf. P. Tebt. 328. 3-4 doubt either to be read or restored in P. Thead. 26. 14 (a receipt issued by is could mean sifted com prepared cf. 27. 1 9) ; in 1. 11, where for embarkation, but 'sifting' seems a not very apposite sense for Perhaps the word merely implies pouring lading would be more suitable to the context. the corn into the hold of the vessel. In Plutarch, Non posse suaviter vivi 4 (p. 1088 e) signifies a strainer, but that meaning will clearly not fit P. Thead. 26 and 27.

,
^;:,

if

that

is

the

word meant,

was abbreviated.

,
is

very cursively written.

It is

not clear

().
is

'

'

vew
than

lo.

ayolvTos).

or

is

known

fi-om the lexicographers,

who

describe

it

as

or

a-y(<oy^s)

(^5)

more probably

to be read in P.

Amh.

13. Cf. p.

Amh.
p.

{Chrestomathie,

391),

138. 10, where Mitteis is doubtless right in reading \\ [i8 lettersjou Brit. Mus. 256. 9-10

\($

<

138. 5

220

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


Herm.
6.

^,
Tovs

C. P.

11-12 as restored by Wilcken, Chrestomathie, p. 522 Was [13 letters '] S)v KeXeveiv

i-n^a o]i

Mitteis has aptly cited

522

\oyos

17-20. The purport of this additional sentence was broadly to fix the identity of the In 1. i8 is not improbably a verb, but whether Sarapion is the object or the in 1. 17 is apparently not subject is uncertain. The word preceding would be a possible reading, but is not at all convincing.

8,
.

^'^

[^

xlix.

6.

litteras dimissorias sive


is

//[/3][' aposiolos. In

\
150.

&c., a

somewhat

different sense

required.

^^^

, [^
A. D.

1198.

Notification of Death.
26-2

7-2

cm.

A notice addressed to the comogrammateus by an inhabitant of the Oxyrhynchite village Teis


cf. ^. g.

1200. 14) of the death of his father and his paternal uncle 79, 262, 1030. The present document is peculiar in mentioning that these
(of.
;

had been too late to be included comogrammateus relating to that year and the notice was delayed till the last day of Tubi. In P. Brit. Mus. a8i a decease is similarly reported the year after it had taken place, but there is no analogous
deaths, which

had occurred

in the previous year,

in the periodical return of the

explanatory statement.

^ {) 9? '
'AvTeiTOS

,
'

TaneTrje-

'AvTehos

9 9 ^
0oy

coy.

"^
25
eivai

\
5

e/y

aSeX-

^oy

) .
6

][] [\
eVe-

eVoyy

86//era

, Sia

eVi

2nd hand

^^-

35

'

^^-

1198.

16. vs oi TovTQVi corr.

26.

1.

29.

1.

.
from
8,

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
v.

21. Final

corr.

from
'.

(?).

24.

1.

and

COrr.

from

221

Sarapas, comogrammateus, from Anteis son of Ammonius son of Anteis, his mother being Tapeeis, of the village of Teis. My father Ammonas son of Anteis son of Heracleus, his mother being Tanetbeus, and his full brother Anteis, who were past age, had no trade, and were registered in the said village of Teis, died in the past twelfth year of Antoninus Caesar the lord after the presentation of the accounts. I therefore request that they be registered in the list of dead persons through the public accounts presented by you, and I swear by the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius that the above declaration is true and that I have made no false statement, otherwise let me be liable to the consequences of the oath.' Date and signature of Anteis written for him by Theon son of Ammonius.
'

2.

in
cf.

1.

5 the

name
note,

is

given as

g.

vnepeTeU:

{6) ),
14-15. Cf.
11.

and B. G. U. 1140. 22 ro (}). 19-20, p. Brit. MuS. 259. 92 7['(({() i[Si] (eVei) 1(\ G. 62. 17-18. 95, <^^., and . g. 514. 4, Fay. 35 9,
1030.

.
cm.

1199.

Notification of Purchase.
12-4

A
ship.

notice,

addressed to the

a house, with a request for the proper

or

The document is memorandum asking

not in the form of the usual


for a

^,
5

Third century.

^^,
It is
;

of the purchase

of

official

recognition of the change of owner-

but

is

to be

made.

thus akin to P. Tebt.

U. 243, P. Gen. 44, Class. Phil. 2, Hamb. 16 but there is a certain According to the usual view of that group of documents, which all distinction. come from the Fayum, the reason for the substitution of what may be called the TTapa6i(ns-iorm for an Avas the fact that the previous owner had not cf. Eger, Ag. Grundbiichwesen, pp. 131 sqq., Mitteis, Grundziige, made an pp. 103 sqq. That explanation will not apply to the present case, since in 11. 24-5 it is distinctly stated that the vendor had declared her ownership in an Why the Trapa^eais-form was nevertheless adopted by the purchaser remains obscure the lost conclusion of the papyrus perhaps gave the solution.
318, B. G.

] ^) []{) '?
[

^
]

[6($)

[()() <]

T]fJ9

-[-

222

{9)
(89

iv(rra>{a\Ti

9 9 8( . ^?86/ ^) ^ (erei)

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

9 ? )(()
rfjs

[)

^ ?yeyovviav
e-

?^
'AXe^avSpeia^

ktr

avTrj

kv
f)u

)(^,

[]
25

Pap.

above the
20. 24.
1.

. * ( . . . .
[][
13
s
.

^
of
a.
1.

() )( ^ () ^^ [, []
'

[
COrr.

[][
[

[]

[.

.]

1.

so in

1.

corr.

from

line.

15.

.(
from

Final

of

and

from

.
7

6.

*
of

added above the


8.
1. 1.
.
.

line.

Pap.
f

Final

Pap.

g.

Second
ig.

of

17.

of

COrr.

21.
\.

COrr.

1.

'\

1.

25- e[y\yfO''

^^

',

([],

( ,
corr.
1.

added from rj,

2 2.

illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, and his asso., ex-gymnasiarch of the most keepers of the archives, from Aurelia Julia Harpocratiaena daughter of Theon also called Asclepiades surnamed ZoVlus, her mother being Tatreiphis, of the most illusI have bought in accortrious city of Oxyrhynchus, acting in virtue of her children. dance with an autograph deed of sale made in the present seventh year, Hathur 2, from Aurelia Theonis daughter of Theon also called Zoilus, ex-exegetes of the most illustrious city of Alexandria and however he was styled, likewise acting in virtue of her children, her mother being Ptolema, of the same city, the house belonging to her by right of inheritance and formerly the property of her said father Theon son of Zoilus, situated in the same city in the quarter of the South Square with frontage (?) and cellar beneath and all
'
.

ciate,

1199.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
;

223

appurtenances as contained in the autograph deed of sale which having been deposed by me through the local record-office in the month Hathur of the same seventh year, I bring before you a single copy with the subscription of the tax-farmer and present this memorandum in order that the proper entry may be made and I declare that the said .' Theonis registered the aforesaid property
to
;
.

I.

but a
is

title

possible, but
7.

[),
1208.

cf. P. Brit. Mus. 262. I oiKta(s) is for TpLaTeya{<TT(}v) Gen. 8 355 3 f^^pyov word is presumably derived from but what exactly it means is not clear. sc. 19 sqq. See the introduction to 1208, and for

17

(^ (),, , .
cf.
1.

This was perhaps the first line of the address of that kind evidently stood here. ]
6.
:

\{])
;

yv\y.[vaaiapxr]aavTi) is very uncertain,

\\\\ \

[ ;?
The
cf.

SC.

For

which

[][]

}(\(),

2,

note.
:

23. napaee[ai\v

7\\
1200.

. ),
266.
;
:

instance of the word, although sense of deposit ; cf. 1039. 7, note.

could well be read, but there is apparently no analogous occurs in place of the more usual in the

Registration of a Deed.
34-3Xi6-icm.
a. d.

Plate VI.

This long and u^ell-preserved papyrus, which vi^as found rolled up in a cloth, an application to the archidicastes asking him to communicate to the recordoffice of Oxyrhynchus the publication at Alexandria of a deed of sale a copy of the latter and of the request for publication is enclosed. The component parts
is

of the document
(i)

may
11.

be placed

in their chronological order as follows


(11.

vendor
(a)

(,
Copy

of the agreement of sale


40-3).

14-40) with the signature of the

Application to the archidicastes for the publication


for the

(^/?) of

this

agreement (11. 9-13, 44-53). (3) Further application to the archidicastes


publication to the record-office at
(4)
(1.

communication of the

Endorsement

5-8, S3~5) of the archidicastes ordering the proper steps to be taken


(11.

Oxyrhynchus

56).

(5) Endorsement prefixed by an official in the bureau of the archidicastes, forwarding the document to the proper quarter (11. 1-4). (6) Signature of the applicant, appended at a later time (11. 57-61; cf.

note

ad

loc).

this process of publication of private agreements cf. P. Oxy. IV. 192-3, Mitteis, Grundziige, pp. 82-7, and for analogous documents see pp. especially 719, P. Leipzig 10, B. G. U. 578. The present example is differentiated from that group by the secondary application for communication to the local
;

On

cf.

P. S.

I.

74. 1-9, with

which

11.

^^-^ agree very

closely.

10

^ {^\ ) 9 ? . ?. } 9-? ^ . 9.
()
(6/).

{
224
6 TTpos

^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

85

^{)
La.
.

Upey?

('
a
. .

{) 8{{) '^^^)
{6.).
.

UavvL
a
.

Tfj

Upd

apyjiBLKaaTrj

9
iepei

ttj

Trjs

15

Kevai
^

,
25

alpfj

^ ^
re

^ . ^) ^/ ^ []
ei'y

ev

[^][]-

[]

, {) {) () ,
-

.^-

kav

,
[]

--

[]
[],

35

?^ ,. ?
1200.
iripas

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

225

kvTevOev

(^?

\ /)

uels

(5).
41

*^
"^fi

. ' ,
.

'

^Apeco-

\
kv

45

55

and
and

^^ . "
evKa

,.
'
\

()
}

ly

-,

'
{")

kv

{). () ()

{) ()
.,,^,.,^. (')
Pap.
12, l6.
1.
'

(^).
,

) the verso
and (?) ^'

32.

() () 8
5
lepei

Pap.

so in
later
1.

1.

9.

COIT.

by a

hand from
1.

Pap.; SO in Vap.

57.

35-

].

]. 78.
8.
v.

38.

:
;

so in
.
.

1.

13.

11.

Pap.
1.

1.

Second
1.

cf.

II.

23.

Pap.

SO in

11.

46, 47.

41.

.
\.

of

15.

226

44.
54

1.

Pap.

.( ("^
or
46.
4^

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


. . .

(cf.

1.

8).

42, 47. 49
*'''*^''

1.

vnep Pap.
.

SO in
.
.

COrr.
. .
.

from

Pap.
"*

Pap.

53

Pap.

55

^.
A

^.

1.

60.

'

Aurelius

Didymus

also called Sarapion, priest

archives in the Hermopolite


that has
'

been made to me. of the bureau To Aurelius Didymus also called Sarapion, priest, archidicastes, and superintendent of Appended is a copy of the the chrematistae and other courts, from Aurelia Isidora. publication which has been effected. To Aurelius Didymus also called Sarapion, priest, archidicastes, and superintendent of the chrematistae and other courts, from Aurelia Isidora styled the daughter of Aristos. Appended is a copy of the bond issued to me in duplicate with the subscription
.

and archidicastes, to the keepers of the copy is appended of the communication The 13th year of Gallienus Augustus, Pauni 1 1. The official

nome, greeting.

'

beneath

it.

'Aurelius Morus son of Hareotes and Minous, of the village of Teis in the Oxyrhynchite nome, to Aurelia Isidora styled daughter of Aristos, of the said village of Teis, greeting. I acknowledge that I have sold and ceded to you from henceforth for ever the share falling to my father Hareotes of a free space in the middle part of the village, whereof the boundaries are, on the south the property of Ammonas son of Politas, on the north that of Cronius also called Nepotianus, senator, on the east that of Achilles also called

Antoninus, on the west that of Cornelius son of Artemidorus, at the price mutually agreed upon, namely one hundred and twenty drachmae of silver of the Imperial coinage, total 120 dr. of silver, which I received from you forthwith from hand to hand in full. Therefore from henceforth you shall own and possess with your descendants and successors the aforesaid free space and shall have power to sell it to others and manage and dispose of it as you choose Avithout hindrance and no one shall in any wise proceed against you, and I will further guarantee the property always against all claims with every guarantee and free from persons' property-returns and the cultivation of royal or domain land and from every And I have delivered this bond obligation or debt or lien of every kind, public or private. to you in duplicate with my subscription, and you shall make it public through the bureau whenever you choose without requiring any further consent or concurrence from me, because I now agree to the future publication, and to your question whether this is done The thirteenth year of the Emperor Caesar rightly and fairly I have given my assent. Publius Licinius Gallienus Germanicus Maximus Pius Felix Augustus, Choiak 4. I, AureUus ]\Iorus son of Hareotes, have sold the free space falling to me and have received the price as aforesaid. I, Aurelius Apollonius, wrote for him, as he was illiterate. And whereas I desire that a single copy of the duplicate bond shall be publicly registered, I give to the city the prescribed 1 2 drachmae and the ad valorem tax, and request that on receiving it from the person sent by me, Aurelius Apollonius, with his attestation that the subscription is the writer's autograph, you register it together Avith this memorandum at the Library of Hadrian, and a copy at the Library of the Nanaeum, in order that my rights in virtue of it may be assured as by a public deed, owing to the assent to the publication. The 13th year of Gallienus Augustus, Pauni. ' And whereas I desire that this should be communicated to the keepers of, the property
'

Oxyrhynchite nome, I request that on receiving the publication with the proper subscription you will give orders for a letter to be written for their information. Let the proper steps be taken. The 13th year of our lord Gallienus Augustus, Pauni 9. I, Aurelius Isidora daughter of Aristos, have presented this memorandum and it has
registers of the
'
'

1;

1200.
been registered.
(Endorsed)
'

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
3rd year which

227
Theon
also

The

= the

ist year,

Pachon
was

30.

I,

Aurelius

called Harpalus, son of Demetrius, wrote for her, as she

illiterate.

Communication of publication, forAurelia

Isidora.'

1-4. These four lines inserted at the top of the application in the bureau of the archidicastes are in an extremely cursive hand (see Plate VI) and there are several words
in them which I cannot read with certainty even with the help of a parallel document (unpublished) of the following year, where there is a similar but still worse written endorseis assured, but what immediately precedes and follows is very ment. In 1. I is suggested Upfvs by similar communications from the archidicastes to doubtful. Upevs however is unsatisfactory; the initial letter strategi, e.g. 485. 4, B. G. U. 578. 7. might perhaps be read, if it were otherwise suitable. might well be e. g. y, and is equally unlikely, since that title is not elsewhere applied to the seems demanded by If xa{ipetv) is right in 1. 2, a preceding mention of the is a difficulty, since is probable here in the parallel text; but 11. 53-4, and was written by an inadvertPresumably is of course expected. T^ In 1. 40 is is clearly impossible. ence, npos TTJ f7nynfXei(g) tS)v cf. P. Leipzig confirmed by the unpublished text, which has here 8iq{\oy^) ;

!
10.
ii.

{)

323

oi

, {)'', [^, : 8 .
that

may be read with some confidence at the end of this line, analogy The letters might possibly be but there is nothing in front of it in the least like buypa^ev. especially is an unconvincing reading. but intended for eVi Trjs 8^aoy For 8ia\oyr} cf. e.g. 34. ii. 5 oi

On

{$:)
bioKoyfj

() ?'

^ . '
()

8iypa{yj^ev)

^)

{5)

{).

8()

18.

and Mitteis, Grundziige, pp. 85, 125. similar marginal entry occurs in the parallel text referred to in the previous note,

and there the


37.

of ?) is fairly clear. 30-2. Cf. 577, 719. 23-5.


SO
28.

(7]

1040. 33, where

1209.

40.

44.

cf.

1.

35, 51.
58.

where

Since the month is Pachon (1. 59), this signature must of the document, where the latest date is Pauni 1 The writer was unpractised, and the figures, which are in each case above the sign (1. 3). might well be read in place of a, but how could a are not very clear, for be explained ? The third and fourth years cannot be those of Maximian and Diocletian for should be in the reverse order; (2) an interval of 22 years two reasons: (i) y and

:
The

The marginal
is

entry apparently notes the fact that the vendor was illiterate. both here and in obviously a clerical error for is written for
is

SC.

.
is

not to be inserted;

cf.

e.g. 1208. 29,

1.

53

date here

strange.

be at least a year subsequent to the

rest

(),

refer to a period of joint rule

between the signature and the other dates is too long. Neither could by Claudius and Vaballathus in a. d. 270-, since not only is there no evidence that the latter was recognized during the lifetime of Claudius,^ but in P. Strassb. 8. 1-2 Aurelian is already found associated with Vaballathus in Pharmouthi of a and suppose that the third and I therefore adopt the reading (erous) y that year. last year of Claudius which coincided with the first of Aurelian is meant (a. d. 271), y Vaballathus being ignored. No doubt the more usual expression for this would be

() \ ()

\ {)

{()

1 P. Grenf. ii. 70 is no doubt to be referred to the reign of Diocletian and Maximian, as was pointed out P. Meyer in Hermes, xxxiii. p. 269 ; Meyer's correction has been overlooked by both Preisigke, P. Strassb. i. 34, and F. Hohmann, Chronologie der Papyrtisurkunden, pp. 18 and 55.

by

Q2

228

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


a,

)
63.

in the case of such

as e.g. in Wilcken, Osl. ii. 109. 2-3 an ill-written subscription.

but that objection

is

hardly to be pressed

Below

there are a few small illegible marks.

(c)

PETITIONS.

1201.

Succession to an Inheritance.
Fr. 2

i8-4Xi2-4cm.

a.d. 258.

An

application to the praefect Mussius Aemilianus from a

man whose

father

bonorum His request was couched in Latin, with a signature appended in possessionis). Greek (cf. 720, 1114) this is followed by an endorsement of the praefect granting

had died

intestate, asking for the right of succession to the estate {agnitio

the petition
into Greek.

(1.

11),

and a

translation, in a very cursive hand, of the Latin text


is

The

central part of the papyrus


;

decayed, and most of the Latin

original has disappeared

but the loss

is

of small consequence, since a precisely

Oxyrhynchus, at Giessen has recently been published with a valuable commentary by O. Eger in Z. Sav. xxxii. pp. 378 sqq., and by means of this the portion here missing is easily restored cf. note on 1. 4. In the Giessen papyrus, on the other hand, the Greek translation, which in 1201 is well preserved, has been badly mutilated. The two documents thus supply each other's deficiencies in the happiest manner.
similar document, also from
;

Aemilianus was already known to have held the office of praefect in A. D. 257 as in from Euseb. Hist. Eccl. vii. 11. 9, where he is called hd-nuiv His name in the Latin of 1. i he is styhd prae/ec/its Aegypti simply. 1. 14 here; Mussius is novel the praenomen is added by another papyrus not yet published,
;

Lucius.

This was the

man who
he
is

a few years later revolted against Gallienus.

On

a coin of that period, attributed to


p.

him by

Poole, Catalogue of coins of Alex.

299

(cf.

introd. p. xxxiv),

given the

initials

M. L

Mussio Aemiliano

v{iro) p{erfectissimo) praef{ecto) Aeg{yptt)

ab Aurelio Heiidaemone.
rogo domine des inihi b{onoruifi) p{pssessionein)
\Catilli\i

Vqriqni pair is mei

and hand

^ ^^

)^ -

10

?. \
{erovs)

15

, ,() , \\)(6
KOTOS

^ ] ,. \ {) 0 .. \\
:

?. / '
1201.

PETITIONS

229

aSia6iTov tT(eypa-

69

(3rd hand) ex edicto

legi.

6\(),{?) eh.

eKeivov

\]]

TTJjOJo

'
. .

{^)
. .
,

6() , {6)
Pap.
12.

4.
'

Pap.

6,

vnep

'iboros

' (=

)
ely.

added above the

line.

Eudaemon.
'

Mussius Aemilianus the most illustrious, praefect of Egypt, from Aurelius I beg you, my lord, to grant me possession of the property of my father .' Catillius Varianus I, Aurelius Eudaemon son of CatiUius, have presented this petition asking for the succession to the inheritance of my father, namely the property inherited in turn by him, having died intestate. I, Aurelius Theon son of Harpalus, wrote for him as he was The sixth year, Thoth 27. (Endorsed) In accordance with the edict; read by illiterate. me. Sheet 4, volume i.' To Mussius Aemilianus the most illustrious, deputyTranslation of the Latin. I beg you, my lord, to grant me the succession to the praefect, from Aurelius Eudaemon. property formerly belonging to my father Catillius Varianus who has died intestate, in accordance with that portion of the edict which grants succession to the lawful heirs. Dated the 8th day before the calends of October, in the consulship of Tuscus and Bassus. The sixth year, Thoth 27. In accordance with the edict; read by me. Sheet 4, volume i.'
'

To

1.

The

letters

On

the other
2.

p have no dots either after or, as in the Giessen papyrus, above them. hand dots are placed after />r<7^/" and Aeg.
:

Heudaemofiem for the erroneous aspiration cf. e. g. 32. 9 omo. There are \Caiilli~\i seems hardly enough for the space, but Variant is probable. some slight illegible traces of the two following lines, which with the rest of the Latin can be restored with security from the Greek by the aid of the Giessen papyrus and 1114. 1 thus intestati defuncii ex ea parte edicti quae legitiniis heredibus b{pnorum) p{ossessiOnem) da/, datum a{nte) d{iem) viii kal{endas) Oct{pbres) Tusco et Basso co{n)s{ulibus). Instead of quae daturum te polliceris. The mistake oiquae for dat the Giessen papyrus has qua[e]
4.
:

230

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

qua may now be explained as due to a change of construction, the writer having quae dat in his mind and then substituting daturum ie polliceris without altering the quae. Amh. 72. 9-10 6. Cf. the GieSSen papyrus 1. lO axr<i> and G. U. 1 40. 21-7

12 of the Giessen papyrus Eger restores do b{pnoruni) p{ossessionem)'\ before ex edicto, but probably those two words stood by themselves, as here, recognovi there is written just like a , both in this line and 1. 22, The r of takes the place of legi. The reference no doubt is, as Eger explains (/. c, but is demanded by analogy.
II. In
1.

^
13.
18.

[\)(\]

88,

,\\, 8'
.
. .

8<, ,

/xe[p]ouf

Kpfyivyo.

,
point.

8\ ^^ \
rots
irpos

{6^

p. 381), to It is

the liber libellorum rescriptorum of the praefect. hardly certain that the three Latin words are in the same hand as what follows,

but there seems to be no further change probably distinguished by Eger.

\.(
Cf. the

in the note on 1. 6, and Eger, /. c, p. 382. It is not clear whether II ex edicto : legi. 21-2. eK I. should be written. was intended to be abbreviated or not perhaps

passage of E.G. U. 140 quoted

'
:

beyond

this

Too many hands

are

is

the correct equivalent o{ perfectissitnus.

{)

1202.

Petition concerning an Ephebus.


26-1

11-3 cm.

A.D. 217.

This document

is

an interesting supplement to the existing evidence about


pp. 139 sqq.,

the enrolment of ephebi, a subject which has recently been discussed at length

and Jouguet, La vie municipale, pp. 150 from the father of a youth complaining that his son's name had been qualified to become an ephebus, omitted from the list which was annually prepared by the amphodogrammateus, and begging that the error might be rectified. The list in question is stated to have been regularly prepared shortly before the time of the contest of the ephebi, established at Oxyrhynchus by Septimius Severus and Caracalla (11. 5 sqq.). This reference is explained by 705, which contains a copy of the Imperial rescript

by Wilcken, Grundziige,
sqq.
It
is

a petition to the deputy-epistrategus

sanctioning an
are set out in

endowment
11.

17 sqq.

reached the age of fourteen, and having been admitted through the
the privileged

body

of

become one a
Wilcken,
/.

further

, .
for the

purposes of the
already a

festival.

The boy's qualifications


gymnasium, having
to

He was

member

of the

\<
;

o\ Ik

But he was not yet an ephebus


(cf.

to

probably by the praefect

P. Flor. 57. 73,

was required, a preliminary to which was apparently the list of the amphodogrammateus. The fact that the epistrategus is addressed in the present petition does not imply that the was conducted by that
c, p. 142),
official.

The

date of the papyrus

is

approximately fixed by the mention

in

11.

19

1202.

PETITIONS
still

231

and 21 of the 25th year, which was perhaps


of the word hiaras.

current, in spite of the absence

Caracalla did not attain to a 36th year, and the petition

can be

seems to have been written before the accession of Macrinus. At any rate it Aurelius Severus, the acting epistrategus, was little later than A. D. 317, not previously known.

\\
5

^ ' ? [^
[7]

[]

69

'

[5]/39

[\
TOS
.

[7]9
15
67'

}, ]
'4
['\
ev Trj

-?
'

^ ^ ^ 9

^?.

[/ce]i/

20 6ivTa

[']9
Trj

25

and hand

'/

.
5

^ ^-} ^ ,] ' ^ .. -

^
'4^
nap'
"Puip.

^napei-

(eVei)

eniKpci-

Ke (erei)

Pap.

COrr.

II.

COTT,

232
14.

for fa/.
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


.

Pap.

16. viov

Pap.; so in

1.

23.

21.

of

com

from

a.

25.

1.

Iva

To his highness Aurelius Severus, deputy-epistrategus, from Aurelius Ptolemaeus son It is of Sempronius son of Lucius, his mother being Thaesis, of the city of Oxyrhynchus. the custom since we gained by the gift of our lords Severus and the great Antoninus the contest of the ephebi that those who are for the time being amphodogrammateis of the city should, as the contest of each year approaches, submit and publish a list of those about to become ephebi, in order that each one may assume the status of ephebus at the proper Since then the present amphodogrammateus of the city, Aurelius Sarapion, in the season. list recently published by him of those who are auspiciously about to become ephebi, has,
perhaps in ignorance, passed over my son who is also an incipient ephebus and on the roll of our gymnasium, and who reached the age of 14 years in the 25th year, and was passed in accordance with his age and parentage into the list of the members of the gymnasium in the same 25th year, I perforce have recourse to you, requesting that my son too may be entered in the list of the ephebi in the same way as his companions, that so I may obtain
relief.
'

Farewell.
I,

Aurelius Ptolemaeus, presented the petition.'

3.

likely

than

[].

or perhaps

,^.

prizes for the contest

really that of Aurelius Horion, who gave a large sum to provide the emperors merely sanctioned his endovment. 8-9. In A.D. 323 the date of the contest was Jan. 19 ; cf. 42. 2, 10. was no doubt due to the influence of the preceding infinitives. II. in Censorinus, De die nat. 5, Eustath. the word is spelled 17.
7.

The

was
;

Od. 1768. 56.


1 8.

19-21. Fourteen was apparently the usual age for admission to the ranks of the ephebi; Wilcken, /. c, p. 141, Jouguet, I.e., pp. 150 sqq. The anomaly of P. Tebt. 316 (which of course was found at Tebtunis and not, as stated by Wilcken, Chrestomathie, p. 173, is still at Oxyrhynchus), where boys of three and seven years are described as unexplained. cf. 257, where the importance of the yevos is For an inUpiais etr TOW e/c
cf.

^: :
\
is

Cf. P. Brit.
cf.

Mus. I166. 4

e.g. 891. 15.

,
cm.

At the end of the

line

{]

seems more

GieSSen 54. 6

8.

^^,

well illustrated.
25.

written as

if

or

Iva

and not an

infinitival

construction had preceded.

1203.

Claim of Creditors.

6 X 12-2
Though
the

Late

first

century.

commencement of

this petition is lost, the

transaction involved are sufificiently clear.

main details of the According to the petitioners' stateafter obtaining a loan

ment (the first person plural is used throughout), Leonides upon mortgage had surreptitiously alienated the security

to a third party

and

made a

claim against his creditors for a debt which he asserted v^as due to him

from their father. notice of the claim had been served upon them through Apion, the son of Leonides, who seems to have been himself absent, and the

1203.
collection of the debt put into the

PETITIONS

hands of the

cordingly request that copies of their counter-claim

in order that no further proceedings would naturally fall to the strategus to take the steps required, and probably he was the person to whom the petition was sent, since there is no mention of written instructions,' which would be expected cf. 68. 29-31, P. Brit. Mus. 908. 29-30. if the addressee were the stating that notice had been given to the At the foot is a signature of an assistant

be communicated to Apion and to the

should be taken pending a legal decision.

,
It
',

. (

233

The
;

petitioners ac-

cf.

68. 11) should

as desired.

6[]

6[]^
nepl
TOVTOLS

8^. ? ^
Ka]6fjKoy
.

kv 'AXe^auSpeta

[]9

avTos

69
kno-

10

15

. \^^^ ^^
)(
ev

, ^

20

,^ ,
^
6

/iere-

25

234
pi

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

)^ ?. ? ^. ?. ^? [
'iyofiev

^eviKcov

? 8\

,
-

5e

(2nd hand)

[][(?)
?

{)

][]{()) []

8.

1.

^:

cf.

II.

a vertical stroke, which


.

is

21, 23, 2. 23 Above the left-hand limb of ?; of not in the right position for an inserted iota adscript.
. . .

eiS?

there

is

' but also ventured wrongfully [without our knowledge ?] to alienate [not only] Alexandria the security to Philostratus son of Zoilus, to whom with your just concurrence we presented through you a notification concerning his improper purchase. In addition to this the said Leonides, heedless of the reckoning that would follow, provided himself with a memorandum from the bureau to the collector of external debts here on the plea of other sums being due to him from our father, whereas on the contrary he was our debtor, as stated above, and served upon us a copy of this through his son Apion on the fourteenth of the present month Epeiph. Wherefore we perforce come forward with the request that this memorandum should be duly placed on record, and that a copy of it be served through an attendant both upon Apion on his father's account and upon the collector of external debts, in order that Apion may know that everything that has been done by his father Leonides to our hurt is invalid and that our claim holds good against Leonides on all the counts that we have against him, and that the collector of external debts may take no step against us in consequence of the aforesaid memorandum before the trial of the case. For we maintain and shall maintain all our subsisting rights. (Endorsed) I, Theon son of Onnophris, assistant, have duly presented a copy of the above memorandum to the collector of external debts.'
.
.
.

at

3.
a, e,

,
6.

or
1

8(6

Mus.

a term applied to notifications of various kinds; cf. e.g. P. Brit. in 1. lo is described as a is often called of. Mitteis, Grundzuge, p. 124. ; 9-10. Cf. e.g. 485. 3, B. G. U. 1038. 9, P. Leipzig 120. 3, Mitteis, Grundzuge,
is

231. 25.

'
Perhaps

[-

the letter before the lacuna

had a rounded base

suiting e.g.

The document which

pp. 159 sqq.


ir. For the in the Roman period cf. 286. 15, 712. 1, 8, 825, B. G. U. It is remarkable 970. 26, 1038. 13, P. Leipzig 120. i, IMitteis, Grundzuge, pp. 30,159 sqq. that here too the person suing for the debt >vas apparently living outside the Oxyrhynchite nome (11. 4, 15-16, 20-1), but whether the functions of the were limited to such cases, as suggested in P. Tebt. I. p. 56, P. Oxy. II. p. 279, IV. p. 178, is very doubtful. There is no indication of distinction of residence in P. Leipzig 1 20 (11. 5-6 ttjs rather implies the contrary).

()

()

1203.
19.
iv
:

PETITIONS
69

235
sqq., Grundziige,
^
,

cf.

Mitteis, Leipz. Sitz.-Ber. 19 10, pp.

PP 33-4
;

)(.
is

29-31. Cf, e. g. 282. 18-21, 286. 22-4, and Strassb. 74. 17-18, where no doubt yap I do not see in the facsimile the justification for the spelling should be read in place of
32-4. Cf. 485. 49-50, P. Brit. Mus. 908. 39-40, Flor. 56. 22-3. to be restored than

more probably

.
20-4

In 485. 50

1204.

Petition to a Strategus.
X
27-2 cm.
A. D.

299.

The

following very interesting petition represents a stage in

some legal proceed-

consequence of his nomination for the office In order to of decemprimus, from which, he maintains, his rank exempted him. release himself from municipal burdens, as is expressly stated in 1. 13, Plutarchus
ings taken

by Aurelius Plutarchus

in

had obtained from the Emperors the rank of Kpanaros, i. e. vir egregius. Sometime afterwards, while absent on a special mission in the Small Oasis, he had been nominated to the office in question. He at once instituted proceedings of
appeal through his father
(cf.

Dig.

1.

5. i

qui exciisatione aliqua utuntur

necesse habent appellare), and had also applied to the rationalis

($),

the chief

of the general department of finance, before whose tribunal he appeared.


rationalis reserved judgement, ordering

The

documentary evidence to be produced and notice to be given to the official responsible for the appointment. Plutarchus accordingly now forwards a copy of the official report of this preliminary bearing to the strategus, with the request that the necessary notification should be made.

That senatorial rank brought release from local mwiera is well known (cf. Dig. It was not however clear that this privilege was enjoyed by those whose dignity was merely honorary cf. Mommsen, Rom. Staatsrecht, iii. p. 473* bei einer Person bloss senatorischen Standes, die ausserhalb Rom wohnt, kann
1.

I.

22-3).

'

allerdings die Frage aufgeworfen werden,


ist'.

ob

sie

nicht als incola leistungspflichtig

It is therefore surprising

senatorial claiming exemption, for the egregiattis


in

(cf. Hirschfeld, Sitz.-Ber. Bcrl. Akad. 1901, pp. 584 sqq.) doubt the term was not unfrequently employed where would be expected (cf. Magie, De Rom. iuris vocahilis sollem. p. 31) but if Plutarchus had really acquired senatorial rank the fact would surely have been expressed on the present occasion with more precision. Nevertheless he asserts and though his advocate speaks with that the nomination was absolutely illegal greater caution (1. 21 ?), the rationalis makes no objection on this

the equestrian order

No

to find a provincial of a rank lower than the


1.

(,

15)

was but a degree

point.

The

object of the latter's examination

is

rather to establish the relative

236

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


;

1.

dates of Plutarchus' attainment of rank and his nomination to office cf. Dig. 6. 6. 7 si ante qtiis ad imtnera inunicipalia vocaius sit quam negotiari inciperet,
vel

anteqnam

in collegium

adsnmeretnr quod imnmnitatem pariat,


to the
7-8.
list

coinpellatur

ad honor em gercndnm. The papyrus makes an addition


Aelius Publius,

.^ . ^ ?
[\
who
is

of praefects in the person of

mentioned

in

11.

TTJs

^ ^
?
eis

'4

{)

eivai

kv

'

,
^. ^
6
Trj
/xe

Tfj

^ , ^ .' }
kv

^,
*

()

^,
kv

15

25

, " ^ , ?? 6 ^ ^^, \ . ' ^. , ' . ' ^ ^, ^, /) ^. .


kv

,.
9
Si,

1204.
Oeia

PETITIONS

237

iwivevaei^

8,
eira

8iTe\eaev
rrj

? ?^ ^
8

rd^ei,

kariv

e/y

hit[iev)

Hn{ev)'

ev

()

ii

[][
;

[
10.

[]
;

] ]. '
ein{ev) ein^ev)

[].
]
.

^-

[.

.]

[
;

13.

21.

' .
I.
.

[]^ Pap.

SO in 1. 12. 4 ^^^ Pap. Pap. SO in 1. 24. II, /xepoy ... Pap. 1 7. Pap. 22. erepa/ Pap. SO 1. 23 Pap. 26. o( 24. iva Pap.

'

In the consulships of our lords the Emperors Diocletianus Augustus for the seventh and Maximianus Augustus for the sixth time. To Aurelius Zenogenes, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Plutarchus also called Atactius, excellency, and however Having been nominated wrongfully and in contravention of all law for the I am styled. decemprimate by Aurelius Demetrianus, decemprimus of the western toparchy, I brought an action of appeal through my father Aurelius Sarapammon also called Dionysius, and
*

//, ? :
g.

Pap.

so in

1.

25.

smaller

6^61

above the

line.

Pap.

20.

1.

25

(/.
f.

Pap.
23.

COrr.

from

Pap.

238
however he
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


styled,

because I was at the time in the Small Oasis for the discharge of the accordance with the order of my lord the most honourable praefect of Egypt Aelius Publius and having taken the proper steps for the appeal I had recourse to my lord the most honourable catholicus Pomponius Domnus, and applied to him in Whereas then his highness ordered me a memorandum setting these facts before him. by a judgement to give notice to the aforesaid person, the essential part of the proceedings and the judgement being as follows 'In the consulship of our lords Diocletianus Augustus for the seventh time and Maximianus Augustus for the sixth time, August 19, at Alexandria, in court. Plutarchus, excellency, having been summoned, Isidorus said, " His excellency Plutarchus who has presented himself before your eminence, endeavouring to find for himself a release from municipal offices, some time ago besought the divine fortune of our masters the Augusti and Caesars to grant him the rank of excellency, and their divine fortune consented and granted Now he has continued in obedience to your lordship's department it, and he now enjoys it. and also to the orders of you magnates. Lately when he was in the Small Oasis, where he had been sent by my lord your colleague Publius the most honourable praefect to discharge the soldiers, a certain Demetrianus, an Oxyrhynchite of the same city, made a design upon him and ventured to nominate him for the decemprimate, ignoring his acquisition of After other a superior r^nk, which presumably releases him from municipal offices". evidence Domnus the most honourable catholicus said, " Read the day of his appointment ". I was away in the Oasis; I came back when I knew". Plutarchus said, " Pauni 30. Domnus the most honourable catholicus said, " Let the document containing the appointment be produced, and let him also show the following correspondence, as I ordered; and that he may be heard in a more regular way, let him give notice to the person who nominated (.?) him for the decemprimate". Gregorius said, "Give orders for the issue of Domnus the most honourable catholicus said, " They shall be issued ". the minutes ".
soldiers stationed there, in
;
:

I,

Olympius, official notary, issued the minutes. Wherefore I beg, if it seem good to you,
'

4.
5.

This nomination of one


:

\[

P.

almost certainly to be read, and may now be restored with security where ovhe had already been suggested by Wilcken, Gnmdzuge, p. 353^. and Plutarchus commenced proceedings through his father because the period during which an appeal was allowed was limited cf. the passage already cited in P. Amh. 82, which proceeds napaXeXvOevat, Dig. 1. 5 I ?'" tempora praefinita in ras
sc.
)

cf.

Amh.

82. 9-10,

8]

or dine eiusmodi appeUaiionum per agendo non servaverint, merito praescripiione repelluniiir. which is apparently a Graecism of expungere, cf. 1. 1 9 6. a term technically used of the discharge of soldiers, e.g. Plautus, Ct/rc. 4. 4. 29 ??iiks

((.

^^,
;
. .
.

\\

1117. 3, where

?
which
3,
xii.

.'
.

by another

is

noticeable.
is

({)\[

(8]

expuncio in manipulo, Dig. xlix. 16. 15 ex causa desertionis notatus ac restitutus kmporis quod No doubt the same word was meant in B. G. U. 435. in desertione fuerit iinpendiis expungiiur. (saec. II-III). 14 lo-ii. Perhaps something has been omitted cf the critical note.

(
12.
i.

=z secreiario, for

38.

I,
e. g.

C. Just.

i.

48. 3,

iii.

form^

Hesych.
:

aeKperop

<.
i.

15-

e.

Constantius and Galerius.


is

16. ev 24.

SC.

The misuse

of the optative

,
24.

cf.

e.g.

P.

Thead.
or
vii.

13.

in secret{ario), L.t\^z\^
is

19. 5.
ZT/j/. ccl.

the usual

Greek

Euseb.

30

be aMTTTep oi

noticeable in an official

document of

this period.

1204.
25. The letters construction. Some

PETITIONS
clear, suggest
is

239

or

commentariensis \ cf. P. Flor. 71. 758, 794, P.S.I. 97. 6. i. e. the minutes or memoranda of the proceedings, which the petitioner was thus enabled to quote. Cf. P. Leipzig 38. i. 17-18, and Cairo Cat. 67131. 28-30, KeXevaov is to be supplied in 1. 28. where something like Further on 27. At this point the petitioner resumes, and a[ may be ([|. might be read (cf. e. g. P. Flor. 56. 20), but does not combine well with the other remains.
26.
:

[]

eXa/x,

which are

word

like

might be adopted.

The

nothing which suits the sense and expected, and possibly this has been miscopied slight vestige of the letter after is indecisive.

)[

(d)

CONTRACTS.
amicos.
a.d. 291.
Fr.
I

1205.

Manumission tnUr
14

16-9 cm.

The

solitary

specimen hitherto known of a manumission inter amicos was

published in 1904 by S. de Ricci from a tablet in the Amherst collection {Proc. reprinted by Girard, Textes de droit rom? Soc. Bibl. Arch. xxvi. pp. 145 sqq.
;

p. 849, Mitteis, Chrest. p.

405

cf.

Grimdz.
is

p. 272).

That document was


is

in Latin,

with Greek signatures.

The

following second example, which


in

of greater

Greek throughout, but here too Latin was apparently the original language cf the note on 1. i. An additional feature Unfortunately of interest is that several of the persons concerned were Jews.
length, of this form of nianumission
;

there

is

a large gap at the beginnings of the lines, extending, as


letters

1.

15 shows, to
in

some 40
detail,

throughout.

Nevertheless, though there


clear.

is

some obscurity
either a
;

the general sense

is sufificiently

The manumittors were


perhaps two

man

and

his half-sister, acting with a curator, or

half-sisters

and the

persons freed were a middle-aged female with her two young children, one of whom was named Jacob. The ransom was paid by the Jewish synagogue,

presumably that of Oxyrhynchus, and reached the large sum of 14 talents To ransom Jewish slaves from Gentile ownership was regarded as of silver. duty incumbent upon the community, if their own relatives were unable to a perform it (this is recognized by the Talmud, e. g. Baba Bathra, fol. 8 ad fin., a reference which I owe to Dr. Cowley; cf. S. Krauss, Tahnndische Archaol. ii. pp. 98-9) and it seems probable that the action of the synagogue in the present But there is some case is to be connected with that religious obligation. uncertainty as to the nationality of the manumittors cf the note on 1. 8.
;

[
[

27 letters

'O^vpvyyeiTCuv

fj

-][9 ] ;

]\(6[]9.

240

15

] [^ -] ? ?? ][][ \' [ ? ] , ? ? \, [ ? ? ] [] ? [ ? ^ ?] , ? [ ? ? ]? [? [ [ ] - ] [\
[pUTopos

[^ []

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


23
letters
]os
Ttjs

- ([] []6? [\ ? { [] () {() [] ? [) ^33


letters
]

22

letters

1? letters

?,

]?
?

[^?

24

letters

3 2 letters

[?

?,

? -

6 letters

']

?,

{][]?

[.

[]].

Vestiges of two lines of signature.

Fragments of signature

and hand
20

[6 ]
.

[?
.

[.]

]
]

[
. .

1205.

PETITIONS
(3rd hand)

241
Avpfi\\Los

6[\\'/[^
[\

6\5 /[6].

[
[ [

/]?.

25

1.

.
5

].
Pap.
:

][
.

[
UTTcp

]
]

[]
.

[.

.]vroy
,

[.

[[ .]
]

]s

][ [
14.
9

[ '{

[]/3

Pap.

12.

Pap.

Pap.

is unsuitable account of the autograph signatures, and indicated by Latinisms in the Greek; cf. 11. 13-14. Apparently the deed was bilingual, as e. g. 1201; there is a fair margin above this line and the edge of the papyrus is

\ , !.
is

]6[66]?

straight, but
3.

perhaps the Latin text preceded in a separate column. cf. 888. 3, note, B. G. U. 705. 3, Mitteis, Grundzuge, p. 250. 4. -napaho^ov may be either a proper name, as in B. G. U. 362. xiv. 10, or a title signifying aXe'inrov athletic prowess; cf e.g. P. Brit, Mus. II78. 54 ^6 For cf. e.g. 1044. 23 &c., and Meyer's note on P. Hamburg 21. 3.
5

*
ot

"
its

Oxyrhynchus cf. 335 (a. d. 83) which not only mentions but shows that one of the quarters of the city was called Fragments in Aramaic have occurred among the Oxyrhynchus papyri. their town 8. This reference to the 'Qmrat is rather puzzling. Since they had a must have been a considerable place, but its identity is not evident. Besides the Egyptian
7.

For the Jewish colony

^{\>() 6{()

.
it

'.

cf.

1.

19
at

\'\

inhabitants could be called


district

(Heliopolis), which naturally could not be described as belonging to Palestine, even if there was according to Cheyne in Black's Encycl.

name in S. Palestine, but the supposed biblical Possibly the Benjamite Ono, to which references occur in post-exilic literature (i Chron. viii. 12, Ezraii. 33, Neh. vi. 2), is meant. Another question vhich is not quite easily answered is, of what woman was this 'QveiTciv the father ? If of the the manumitting family Avas Jewish, But her of Oxyrhynchus father would more naturally be supposed to be the yevopivos named in 1. 3. Moreover, if the manumittors were Jews, the part played by the synagogue is not readily explained, for that body does not merely witness and confirm the transaction,
BibL Col. 3500 a
rest

bearing the same

allusions to

upon conjecture.

,
It is
is

as e.g. in the manumissions from

Eux, ii. 52-3

G. 21141, Latyschev, Inscr. Ponti cf. KrauSS, Festschrifl Harkavy, p. 65), but pays the purchase money. This action would be more intelligible if the objection to that view, however, is the owners were Gentiles and the slave a Jewess

TT\i

is

(?
;

Panticapaeum (C.

I.

that the latter


is

described in 1. 4 as a somewhat arbitrary assumption.


is
:

restored
12.

difficulty.

^],
xeipos

,
R

as

in

1.

3,

to regard this description as inaccurate in 1. 8 is to be of course not certain that an alternative ; but this does not affect the

and

The supplement
like

some phrase

quite conjectural.

or

ex

\.

In the line below, the gap

may be

filled

by

242
13. 14.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


=
The day
tablets
1.

actum;
of the

cf. e. g. the Amherst tablets 1. 12, 1114. 38, &c. month according to the Roman calendar preceded

em';

cf.

the

Amherst

13.

18 sqq. The arrangement adopted of these three detached pieces is suggested as well by the handwriting and spacing of the lines as by the satisfactory restorations obtainable in 11. 19 and 21-2. Some small unplaced scraps are not printed. was perhaps the name of the 24. 25-8. The letters ] and those immediately below them seem to be in a different hand from those opposite on the left. If that is so, some of the signatures must have been Avritten in separate columns. cannot be read in 1. 26.

6[

i2oe.
23-5

Adoption.
X
15-6 cm.

A.D. 335.

by a

Like manumission inter amicos (1205), adoption has hitherto been represented single text, P. Leipzig 28, first published by Mitteis in Archiv iii. pp. 173 sqq. and lately reprinted by him in Clirestomathie^ p. 406. second example is there-

fore very

welcome.

It is

some

fifty

years older than the Leipzig .specimen and

rather simpler though essentially similar in form.

husband and

wife,

Heracles

and

Isarion, agree to the adoption of their two-year-old son

by Horion, who

promises that the boy shall be his heir. Apparently there was no affinity between the contracting parties, nor is there any obvious reason for the adoption as in the Leipzig text, where an uncle adopts his fatherless nephew. Another small point
of contrast is the absence here of stipulations about proper food and clothing, which are replaced by the negative guarantee that the boy should not be repudiated or reduced to a state of servitude. These however are minor details the important feature from the juristic standpoint is that the transaction is regarded as a purely private affair, the forms prescribed at this period by Roman law, the sanction of an imperial rescript and the intervention of the praefect {C. Just. viii. 47. 2), being in complete abeyance, and that the participators are not concerned with any constitution oi p atria potestas (although, as 1208. 6 shows, that was not quite a dead letter in the provinces), but simply with the upbringing and eventual testamentary succession of the adopted child cf. Mitteis, Grimdziige,
; ;

pp 274-5

[] ' '[^)( [)
^^

[] []6
'^[
6v]

[^]

). {)

[]

* ['? [] ? )? . 6\ 9 8
1206.

CONTRACTS

243

]9 []9
^

{ 6 rje
|

vibv

^
Svo

eh

^ 9^, , ,

^iaT

15

2nd hand
21

[] []
[]

, [] [^ [][ , [ ](). [ . []
(^

e/y

([]

[]

^ ^(.
^[
SiaSo)(fjs

[] ^] [ ]9

[\

8-

[]
[]

e/y

^\_\

e^

[]
[

[ ], ' ] [

7{)

{)

veio-

e/[y

e/c

[]()
^'"

{)
6,

4.

1.

.
11.
'

14, 16. erasure.

'; (;
cf.
1.

10.
\.

13.
1

6.

\.

. (.
11.

13.

7
11.

^
e

*5

so in
.

1.
. .

SO in

13, 15. 1 4. First


t

Pap. ; so in 8. f apparently rewritten over an


COrr.

20.

of

of

from

15.

\,

rewritten.

In the consulship of Julius Constantius, patrician, brother of our lord Constantinus Augustus and Rufius Albinus the most illustrious. Aurelius Heracles son of Harasis, whose home is in the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, and his wife Aurelia Isarion daughter of Agathon of the said city, and Aurelius Horion son of Horion of the said We agree, Heracles and his wife Isarion on the one part, that we city, mutual greetings. have given away to you, Horion, for adoption our son Palermouthis, aged about two years, and I Horion on the other part, that I have him as my own son so that the rights proceeding from succession to my inheritance shall be maintained for him, and it shall not be lawful for me to disavow him or to reduce him to slavery, because he is well born and the son of well born and free parents, and in the same way it shall not be lawful for us, Heracleus and his wife Isarion, to remove the boy from you, Horion, because we have once for all given him to you for adoption, nor shall it hereafter be lawful for any one to transgress the terms herein This deed of adoption, written, because we have consented and agreed on these conditions. done in duplicate so that each party may have a copy, is valid, and in answer to each other's question we have given our assent, in the consulship aforesaid, Pharmouthi
.

244
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

I, Aurelius Horion, have received the boy for adoption and will register him as my own son so that the rights from succession as my heir shall be maintained for him as aforesaid, ., wrote for him, as he and in answer to the question I have given my assent. I, Aurelius
.

was

illiterate.'

3.

iavWouv

6. eKSeSwKeVnt it seems not unlikely that the same word should be read in P. Leipzig 28. where Mitteis gives Cf. after [}]', which however is doubtfully read. 8. There is no room for ['?] 18 P. Leipzig 28. 11 12
:

(( .
TO

is

an unusual phrase;

cf,

P. Brit.

Mus. 904. 23-4

iTra[vf\]ee'iu

ds

13,

12.

. :

[]8..
is

[] ^

,
6.

expected from

11.

and

1207.

Lease of a Camel-Stable.
7*2

X 9-3 cm.

A.

D.I 75-6?
for

Part" of a lease for five years of premises

which had been used

keeping

camels, and were

now

to be turned into a fowl-house.

The rent was 300 drachmae

tion to the lessors' sei-vants of 8

per annum, with yearly extras of 4 cocks, 8 hens, and 100 eggs, besides a donadrachmae for a libation '. The reign of which
'

the seventeenth year

is

referred to in

1.

2,

may

be that of Marcus Aurelius.

7'

, , ,^^ . ^ ? 9 ^-^^^^"^^^

^,
\

^ -\ ^ ,^ )(9
)^]'
ety
7r[6]Xe[ius]

nii/T

^
a
^'S"

(erovs)

e^oy-

kav

09

)(
tos

reXetoui/

[9]

15

^.

kv

? ^?

5e

^-

1207.
nap

CONTRACTS
[.]
.

245

au[r]op

viqh
. . .

[]

[(.['][9

2.
'

Pap.
. .

First

( TTevTafTuiv COrr.

from

f.

14.

Pap.

have leased to .,] of the city of Oxyrhynchus, for a period of five years from of the coming 1 7th year the camel-stall which they have in the quarter of the Hermaeum together with all its appurtenances, for a fowl-house, excluding any parts needed for an oil-press that may be chosen by Epimachus, the rent for the rest of the premises for the term of five years being 300 drachmae annually, with an additional payment likewise annually of 4 cocks in perfect condition, 8 laying hens in perfect condition, 100 eggs, and On the lease being guaranteed, the lessee shall 8 drachmae for the slaves for a libation. pay to the lessors the additional payments whenever they wish and the rent at the two fixed The lessee with his sons or [other agents] dates of Phamenoth and Mesore vith no delay. .' shall then utilize the premises leased to him
[.
.

Thoth

6.

Epimachus was one of the

Berger, Strafklauseln, p. 156^, Meyer, P. Hamburg, p. 18), or rent proper. are special or separate payments as distinguished from the ^6po^ The word is similarly used of a special bequest in 646 a earai P. Leipzig 3. and of distinct or special documents in B. G. U. 12. 18 81 enrjveyKa (cf. Wilcken, Archiv iv. p. 459). ii. 12 iv in B. G. U. 1067 ; Four oKeKTopes reXeioi are similarly part of the rent of a In a Rylands lease of land one cock is stipulated for. cf. ibid. 269. 4, 8. coupled in P. Strassb. 56. 67-9 with probably the 9.
8.

',
like

lessors.

(cf.

' , ,
.07
.
.

'.

and not, as supposed by Preisigke, 730. 1315 Hamburg 94 33' " S. 109 7lav ^[][] is not satisfactory though perhaps 1 6.
refers to fowls

to pigeons

10. Cf.

,
;

cf.

P. GiessenSi. 6. Archiv V. . 253,


is

just possible; but

very

uncertain.

1208.

Public Acknowledgement of a Contract of Sale.


23-2

37-3 cm.

This long and interesting document contains an affirmation


1.

[^,

A.D. 291.

drawn up before tKe representative of the agoranomus (cf. note on 1. 2), of the validity of a private contract of sale and cession dating from the previous year. The property sold and ceded by the contract, a copy of which is given (11. 6-28), was f of an aroura of arable land, with a share in appliances for irrigating, for which the large sum of i talent 3,000 drachmae was paid. Another example ? What is the significance of this process of
3o),

(,9

of
is

it is

95, a re-aflfirmation of a contract for the sale of a slave, but that papyrus
It

unfortunately incomplete.
allusion
is

has occurred in the present volume in 1199. 19,

and a similar

to be recognized, according to Eger's obviously right

246

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


botas

() []4 $
to which

restoration {Ag. Grtmdbiichwesen, p. 95), in B. G.

was thus applied were alike

private
in

cheirographa.

By

the

a notarial document, and so elevated into a

process would thus appear to be a form of publication.

however, the purchaser of the land,


presented to the keeper of the
registration at the
in close association (cf. e. g.

and the
1199,

But

in

1. 2), and the possibility remains that the registration were parts or stages of the same process. According to preceded the application to the for any case we here seem to obtain a proof which has hitherto been

] .
'

^ .
U. 619. 14-16

. The
in this, that

[]
all

four contracts

they were

the cheirographon was embodied

who makes
But the

the

^? ^?,
and

The

According to 1208. 5, had already


were

a copy of the original contract for

lacking that

^?

^.
;

or public registration of cheirographa could be effected

elsewhere than at the archives of Alexandria.


publication

Some

indications of this local

have indeed already occurred

see P. Leipzig 31
ii.

(Oxyrhynchus),
is

Amh.
in

98 (Hermopolis), and especially Grenf.

7o(Kusis), which

closely similar

form to the present document and can now be better understood cf. ibid. 71. 25-6. But the evidence of those documents was not sufficiently explicit to convince Mitteis, who in Grundsiige, p. 86, adheres to the view that the publication of cheirographa bei den landlichen nicht vollzogen werden konnte
'.

The

clear statement of

1.

5 renders that view no longer tenable.


libraries,

word here of the Alexandrian is carried out on the spot.

and the

boLs provided

There
for in
11.

is

"

/ [] )[] [\ . [] []
AvTOKpaTopo[s!\
<7

^ \[\ []
()
[]
{)

no 24-5

[a]ciVTiKoD

[]

[]

[]

[] [ ] [] . '
[]

[.

.]

^
[]

[6\

^ 6 [] ? ,?
[ 86
[
7
1208.

CONTRACTS
[],

247

]\ [ ]

ei[y]

[]\
[8

'

{9)

O[^v\pvyyiT5)v

^[] [\{)

' {) [ ]
?
[]

(]9

()

[]

{\6 []

.
e/y

[ ] []

[']

['\

[6]

{) [] [] [] []
67
/'['^(?)

^
(erci)
.

[]
[]

[\ [] \ []6
[\

re kpol

[]

[] ]
.,

12

[]
[
}>
6[]

[] []
6[]

{()

, [ '
\\

[]

[] ()

\\, \]^

,
[]

[]
[]
[]-

[]6[]
.

{)
,

13

]' []
[6],
[/xjepei

[] []

[]
[]

[]

.]

*{
eav

[] [] [ ]6, ,
[.
.

[]

14

[,
[]

iv]

[],

[] -

248
15

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[]

7
'[\
6^

8, [9 ]1

[][]

\)(\

^ .

[] []
re

? ^ ^[\, [?] [] [,

[]

[\,

?
dai

[(6]],

[]

19

[
[]

2
21

] ' [ ] [] ^ [ [] ] ,
[]
[]
kav
a'lprj,

[]

Kvpievew

[\

[]

] []

re

[]

[]\ ] \]
[

[^'\[

22

[ ] [] [ ] {^)

23

,
iv[a]i

] [\ [ [\ []
]

....]. [.]

(erofy)

[]
e

[ ] {^)
elvai
A77[^ecuy

[]

i'e^r[eur]oy

{) {\
[6\
(erovy)

(erofy)

24

[]

] [] [,] [^
[]

ei'ear[<Sro]y

[]\ [] -

, [][\ ^

{aiprj

kav

25

26

[ 78 8[], () {)
1208.

CONTRACTS

27

[ ]

28

^ ^^ [] {) . [] []
rfj

i[Tep]a9

[]

kohr|

nepl Se

Slcc

[] [\ .

[]
\]

Trj

^}

^ [] ^ [] [] , [] .,
249
Sia
cvSoKc'iv

{).

[]

Trj

29

2nd hand 30

31

3rd hand 32

Pap.; so in 1. 10. Pap. 9. 13. \. II. I amXiXoinev. Pap.; SO in 1. 27. 18.


e

{^
5.
'

^ * \ \]. (
.
.
. .

\ [] [] {). {)6{), {) [] {) {) ' [\ ([] []

.
;

kv

.
[]{).

Pap.

2.

$[]
11.

Pap.
17, 25.

SO in
7

11.

4, 6.

4-

Pap.

Pap.

6.

Pap.; so in

(\: Pap.

"iTopovTOS

Pap.
. . .

for

(frovs)

Pap. SO in 11. 1 5, 18. Pap. 22. 19. enauay Pap. 29. COrr. from or. of 2^.
;

10.

[\ Pap.
Fap.
23.
1.

8.

8((

^!

Pap.

Diocletianus and seventh year of the Emperor Caesar Gains Aurelius Valerius Caesar Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Germanici the sixth year of the Emperor of Maximi Pii Felices Augusti, Xandicus-Mecheir, in the illustrious and most illustrious city Aurelius Agathinus also called Origenes, farmer of the tax payable to Oxyrhynchus, before Aurelia Thermouthion surnamed Tanechotis, daughter of the agoranomi and recorders. yet and Tanechotis, of the village of Pakerke in the eastern toparchy, being not Nepheros son of Dionysius, of the said village, of age and acting through her father Aurelius Nepheros autograph acknowledges, in the street, that she hereby deposes at her own valuation to the with her by Aurelius Thonius son of Thorns, of the deed of sale formerly agreed to in the past year on the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, and drawn up of which she, the acknowledging party, presented a single nth of the month Epeiph,

The

250

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

authentic copy to the keeper of the record office to be deposited in the local archives, of which the following is a copy. Aurelius Thonius son of Thonis and Artemidora. of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, with his father, who has him under power according to Roman law, as co-guarantor, namely Aurelius Thonius son of Serenus and Isarous, of the said city, to Aurelia Thermouthion surnamed Tanechotis, daughter of Nepheros and Tanechotis, of the village of Pakerke in the eastern toparchy, being not yet of age and acting through her father Aurelius Nepheros son of Dionysius, of the said village, greeting. I acknoAvledge
'

I have sold and ceded to you from henceforth for ever my property by right of inheritance and formerly belonging to my aforesaid mother Aurelia Artemidora daughter of Pausiris and Iseis, of the said city, who died leaving me and my brothers, namely my full brother Aurelius Demetrius and my half-brothers on my mother's side, Aurelius

that

Diogenes, Aurelius Isidorus, and Aurelius Iseis, her three children by Hermias, the five of us, her sons and heirs, which was hers by right of inheritance, having formerly belonged to her father Aurelius Pausiris son of Dionysius and Artemidora, of the said city, in accordance Avith the will left by him in the second year of Claudius which was the first year of Aurelian, the of the month Tubi, and opened after his death, and had been bought by the father of Pausiris, Aurelius Herammon son of Pausanias also called Eutychus, his mother being Hermione, of the said city, in accordance with an autograph sale and cession drawn up in the 12th year of Gallienus, Pachon 23, at the village of Pakerke in the eastern toparchy, in the holding of . with that of Epanthes, the fifth part of four arable arourae of private land, that is f of an aroura, forming part of a parcel of 8 arourae held jointly with Horion son of Acrono themselves formed part of a total of 28 arourae, or thereabouts, ., which containing irrigators and a machine fitted with all wood-work and iron-work, together with the proportionate share of the irrigators and machine, the boundaries being on the south a road and on the other three sides a canal, at the price and cession-value agreed upon between us for the fifth part of the aforesaid four arourae of private land and irrigators and machine, namely 9,000 drachmae of the Imperial silver coinage, that is one talent 3,000 drachmae of silver, which I have forthwith received from you through your said father from hand to hand in full, and for which the land is bestowed upon you as a present and gift unchangeable and irrevocable, and to your question whether I have counted the money in full with the concurrence and assistance of my father I have given my assent. You shall therefore possess and own with your descendants and successors the fifth part sold and ceded to you by me as aforesaid of the four arable arourae of private land and the share of the irrigators and machine, and shall have power to use and dispose of it as you choose, no right of proceeding against it or any part of it in any wise being left to me nor to any one else on my behalf, and I will of necessity deliver it to you guaranteed perpetually against all claims with every guarantee, free from cultivation of royal or domain land and from every impost and debt and lien public and private, and from municipal . and every other impost and from construction and ... of dykes and from public dues and requisitions and contributions paid for other purposes of every kind up to and including the present 6th and 5th year, because from the coming 7th and 6th year the proceeds of this property are yours who are purchasing it and having it ceded to you, and who are to be responsible for the public dues and all requisitions from the end of the present 6th and 5th year. And every one who in any manner proceeds against or claims this property, whether the whole or a part of it, I will of necessity and at once repel at my own cost, as if in consequence of a legal
. .
.

This sale and cession, of which three copies are made, is valid, and you whenever you choose make it public without requiring any further approval from me, because I now approve the eventual publication, and to your question made through your father whether this is rightly and fairly done we have given our assent.' Date
decision.
shall

1208.
and signatures of the
office.

CONTRACTS
and of Agathinus, the
official

251
of the record

parties to the contract

\[ ' (,
. .

was "sipiyL^, 2. The second name of Agathinus, as is shown by his signature in 1. 32, was written. which was here misspelled in some way perhaps cf. 1209. 5 and, for the farmers of the yopavoov, &c., 2 2-3 TO fVKVKkiov 44. 6-7 Wilcken, Os/. . 053 It is now seen that these tax-farmers could as a tax is found in P. Brit. Mus. 856. 17.
;
.
:

the present document is drawn up, like discharge the notarial functions of the agoranomus at Oxyrhynchus, ev ayvia, and is signed by the others made em In what circumstances the agoranomus was with the characteristic replaced in this manner is obscure. It is noteworthy in this connexion that in Heracleopolite contracts of the third century the regular phrase is St'
;

.
',

(") (/)

,
-^

{)

(
;

^,
4.

'
3.
5.

\[] [];}
:

SC.

cf.

533.
85. 7

7>

nOte.

cf.
:

275.
cf.

8, Mitteis,

Grundzuge,

p. 251.

here too a

(.

analogy of the two was in view, though it is not directly named. (rows) II, where 7(;) cf. Amh. 98.
Leipzig
21.

..

e. g.

The

. ,
latter

\(5

and 1200. 45

'"^ '^^

passages suggests that


follows the abstract of

the cheirographon.

For
:

or some similar P. R. 149 6, P. Leipzig 4. 6, 5. ii. 2. B. G. U. 937. 6, in manu, commonly used of the status of married women, but also of TTJ sua manu dimitterent, Cod. Just. vii. 40. i. 2 children e.g. Itisi. i. 12. 6 filios suosvelfilias Mitteis perhaps goes rather fuerint liberati. manu paterna postquam filiis familias

too

must imply a

1200. 47. In the present passage accompanying document.


cf. e. g.

6.

cf.

C
.

too far in asserting {Grundzuge, p. 275) that the patria potestas was to the provincial a matter of no importance. is given as the genitive. but in 1. 6 cf. 1. 28 ; 7. 10. Is(e)is is apparently masculine also in P. Brit. Mus. 188. 46.
:

Romanized

11.

(eret)

there

must be some error


;

here, for

Alexandrian coins

show

that Claudius reached a third year

read for
13,

the copyist

inaccuracies.

, , [ ] ,^ ' .[]' [; .
.
.

[' ]

For
I.

[rj]
.

{)
makes
:

Presumably y should be P. Strassb. 7. 21. a mistake in figures in 1. 23 also, not to mention other \v6[fi]ar] cf. e.g. P. Leipzig 10, ii. 12-13.
cf.
. . .

the

same mistake occurs

in

1124. 21-4.

14. Cf. P. S.

77.

14-16

cf. P. Brit. Mus. 11 64. {h) For be room here for does not seem 17, 25, where the same word is meant, and e. g. Artemid. 2. 53 cf. e.g. C. P. R. 24. 8 is apparently for 16-17. P. Grenf. ii. 70. 7-8. and for the combination but the adjective is doubtfully read, and the 21. Perhaps is coupled with may be a . letter preceding The following substantive was probably not in G. U. 59 1 6. cf. P. Tebt. 373. 12, note. For ; here means revenues, as in P. Tebt. 88. 15, &c., 22. 8 or cf. P. Giessen 51. 18-19 (^^so from Oxyrhynchus), where should be restored on the present analogy, and e.g. 504. 26-7, P. Leipzig 6. 12-13. SO probably P. Giessen 51. 21 rather than 24. In 95. 35 a negative is to be supplied before 24-5. Cf. e.g. 1200. 34-7.

to

[\(.
.

\ .
\ \

there

[]'

\ [(],

, .

^2
tha,n

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

found in 1. 3 by Wilcken, Archiv iii. p. 124. The formula eKros of that papyrus and in others from the Great Oasis seems to be the local phrase corresponding to the Oxyrhynchite iv ayviq. and 99. 12. Bry's error in 32. Cf. P. Grenf. ii. 70. 24 supposing this use of to be confined to the Ptolemaic period {La venie dans les papyrus, p. 87) has already been pointed out by Mitteis, Grundziige, p. 61'.
rightly read

^ [{)
28-9.

TO

or

[{'').

() {)
:

is

Cf. P. Grenf.

ii.

very doubtful, but seems 70. 19

[^,
more

suitable

&S

[],

1209.

Sale of a Slave.
21-5

12-7 cm.

A. D.

251-3.

price of 2,000

young female slave and her infant son at the drachmae; cf, 94-5, 263, B. G. U. 193, &c., Mitteis, Griindzuge, The deed was drawn up, like 1208, before an pp. 192-4. on whom see the note on 1208. 2. As a small point of palaeographical interest it may be noted that in two places (1. 6 1. 15 the writer of this papyrus abbreviates words
contract for the sale of a

-,
method
is

{$),

^{))
cf.

without any suspension of letters or other indication of abbreviation.

not therefore confined to the early Ptolemaic period, as supposed


p. xl;

Wilcken, Grundziige^

^Etovs

] [] [ ][\6 \^] \\
.

[)(\ [7] []9 [(?)] [] 9


Trjs

[iv

^])(^

[,

] 6 []
[.
.
.
.

^ ? ^ ^
Hapds

^ ' .
Mitteis, Chrestomathie, p. 10 1.

This

by

[9)

()

15

[] 9 [\ [] [] () []
.]/

'

? {^)

(erei)

), -

ev

Tepea

()

\() {)

[6] ? 2
[0]ei/

25

2nd hand

^ []] \ / ^ ^ [] ] [^ [ \ [ ^ [ .] \ [ ]
1209.
[.'
.

.]

8\

[]9

[]

{) [\8
[]

CONTRACTS

^?, ^.
\

253

TepeUTOS
Se

\8\,]

{)6(

77;9

()-

[(

kv

]
.

aurfj,]

ncpi 5e

yeye-

[ (). [ {)
.
Pap. Pap.
.
. .

] ^[]'[
1 6.

[ ^]/
in
11.

,
24.
1.

...
for

19

"iVpfasl

8.

Pap.

Pap.; SO

17, 22.

year of the Emperors and Caesars Gains Vibius Trebonianus Gallus and The Gains Vibius Aphinius Gallus Veldumianus Volusianns Pii Felices Augusti, Daisins at the city of Oxyrhynchus, before Aurelius Antipater also called Pharmouthi Aurelius Asclepiades also called Dionysius, farmer of the tax payable to the agoranomi. Saras, son of Sarapion and Lucilla also called Demetria, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, aged about 32, with no distinguishing mark, has purchased from Aurelius Serenus also called Sarapion, son of Agathinus and Taposiris, of the said city, aged about 34, with no distinguishing mark, in the street, the female slave belonging to him named Tereus, aged about ., who was 21, fair, with a scar on her ., together with her male nursling child named purchased by him in accordance with a deed made through the said office of the agoranomi in the 4th year of the Philippi in the month Phamenoth from the mother of the present purchaser Aurelia Lucilla also called Demetria, daughter of Euporus son of Diogenes, her mother being Tauris also called Philumene, of the said city, and was born in her house, which slave together with the nursling the purchaser has forthwith received from the vendor just as they are and unrenounceable, free from epilepsy and external claims, Tereus having been examined and the price mutually agreed upon for the said slave and as set forth in the former deed the nursling, 2,000 drachmae of silver of the Imperial coinage, has been received by the vendor Aurelius Sarapion also called Serenus from the purchaser Aurelius Asclepiades also The vendor sells and guarantees the said slave with the called Saras from hand to hand.
<
,
. . .

nursling [on the liability of

all

that stands in (?)] his

name, as

aforesaid, in the

same

street.

254
and

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


fairly

to the purchaser's question whether this has been rightly and Signatures. given his assent/
3.

done

the

vendor has

The day

v, for which cf. e. g. B. G. U. 9 occurs in B. G. U. 629. 14, 1058. 12. i^j. The spelling cf. B. G. U. 887. 5, 937. 11. SO e.g. P. Leipzig 4. 19, 5. ii. 8 19. in this context seems now established by P. Strassb. 79 The sense of vianus inieciio for (cf. Kiibler in Z. Sav. xxxii. pp. 366 sqq.), which contains the passage (1. 7)

15.

13. 8 vyir]V

\\ ',
.

of the month, as frequently happens, has not been filled in.


is

a justifiable restoration in spite of the final


vi,
1

Ep. Hcbr.

(or

887. 5-6, 17.


27.

. \^ ^]!
For

(:
Tois

.
cf.

Some

definition of the liability of the

of this

line, e. g. iv

iV]

29-30. Cf.

e. g.

attractive, as Mitteis

Mus. 251. 8-10, Leipzig 4. 31 has remarked (1. c. p. 368^), in P. Strassb. 79.
p.
Brit.
;

.
(e)

iav 8e ris

-,

(Mitteis)

P. Brit.

Mus. 251.

G. U. Leipzig 4. 15. seems to have stood at the beginning


/xei/oy
;

cf.

[\> .
is

7,

a similar restoration
9.

ACCOUNTS.
Poll-tax Register.
325

1210.

22*5 cm.

Late

first

or early

first

century b.c. century a.d.

This text

is

written on the recto of 1184 in a large semi- uncial hand which

can hardly be later than the reign of Tiberius and is more likely to belong to There are remains of two columns, but those of the first are that of Augustus.
confined to the ends of a few scattered lines and are not worth reproducing.

The second

is

entire

and

is

concerned with the poll-tax

in the

Oxyrhynchite and

other nomes.

At

the top of the column are two lines which gave the total of

persons paying the tax in the Oxyrhynchite and Cynopolite nomes, or rather, which were intended to give them, for the figures here and elsewhere, except in document never having been completed. Below this 1. 12, are omitted, the are two other sections, one reporting the numbers of persons chosen by their parents to support them in their old age, in the same two districts the other specifying various officials in the Tentyrite, Cynopolite, and Oxyrhynchite nomes and in the (Small ?) Oasis, who were exempted on account of their oflScial duties. Presumably these two sections stand in close connexion with the one immediately preceding them, and imply that fecial treatment with regard to poll-tax was accorded to persons on whom devolved the maintenance of aged parents or who
;

served the state in certain


selected the son

official capacities.

It further

appears that the parents

who was

to support

them

what

further conditions were imposed,


is

and whether the son enjoyed complete or only partial immunity, there

no

1210.

ACCOUNTS
is

255
stated to be

evidence to show.
'

With regard

to the officials, the privilege

customary
iii.

'.

Possibly these immunities, of which there seem to be no traces at


(cf.

a later period, were a legacy from the Ptolemaic regime


Petrie
p. 174, B.

P. Tebt.

i.

p.

447,

G. U. 1198.

ii.

7 sqq.).

Col.

i.

XovvTii

^ ' ' ^^
Col.
ii.

re-

avS{ps)

f/y

yovicov

Siv

e^

9? , 9
8(9)
1

? ^?
[]

Tois

[]/[///]9
1.

II.
'

paying poll-tax in the Oxyrhynchite nome In the Cynopolite nome Men chosen by the parents from their sons to support them Oxyrhynchite nome In the Cynopolite nome Total of these Those usually absolved because of service rendered by them to the The basilicogrammateus of the Tentyrite nome, In the Cynopolite nome, ditto r,
. .

Men

""

of

from

.
in

old

age, in

the

state

Topogrammateis and comogrammateis

2s6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


. In the Oxyrhynchite nome In the CynopoHte nome Comogrammateus of the Oasis by [the Oxyrhynchite nome]

should be associated in this Hst with the II. It is rather strange that the Ox}Thynchite and CynopoHte nomes, which were so much further to the north.
1

6.

Twt

sc, probably,

^ .
8'9

.'
.

1211.

Articles for a Sacrifice.


X
6^ cm.

Second century.

A short

list

for the celebration of a sacrifice

of objects which had been or were to be supplied to the strategus Evidence for the to the most sacred Nile '.
'

cult of the Nile-god at Oxyrhynchus has already been supplied by 519. lo there is recorded cf. the NeiAaia a payment of 2o drachmae to the of Jupiter Capitolinus at Arsinoe (B. G. U. 362. xv. 11) celebrated at the temple

()

and, on Nile-worship in general, Lumbroso, VEgitto, pp. 1-8. The participation of the strategus in the celebration is a point worth noting cf. Otto, Priester tmd
;

Tempel,

ii.

p. 79.

)
5

tt/jos

-,
if,

^
eXeor,
362.
vii.

NeiXou Tlawi

'{)
,

<^/

-,

, (9) ,
^,

, .
1.

.
'

f\aiov,

!:
2.

i calf, the. Strategus, articles for the sacrifice of the most sacred Nile on Pauni 30 of sweet wine, 16 wafers, 16 garlands, 16 cones, 16 cakes, 16 green palm-branches, 16 reeds likewise, oil, honey, milk, eft'ery spice except frankincense.'
:

2 jars

':
/3otV:

6.

8.

8 .'. .
[etjs

SO e.g. 486. 32. cf. 1144. Il, B. G. U. 362.

i.

\\

8oi.

17 18

cf

G.

13, P. Tebt. 295. ii, note,

and the

in

519. 18.

1212.

ACCOUNTS

257

1212.

List of Vegetables.
7'5Xi7-rcin.

Second century.

The
the text

village of Pela
is
:

{) 9
row of
verso.
crosses,

following short account of vegetables supplied to the archephodus of the is written on the verso of an order for arrest in two lines, of which

/)[]

' ^ 4 4> \
e.g. 969).
is

\()
line there is
is

(cf.

Below the second


fibres, as

a long
of the

and the writing

across the

also that

[]5
5

9
8iap{at.)
Si(Tp{at)

[^]

{) {^)
/ 8.

^ Siap{ai) ,
,

{) ,

'For the archephodus of Pela through Diogas, guard, of Sento: 19 bundles of asparagus, 2 bundles of lettuce, 2 bundles of turnips, i bundle of radishes, total 24.'
4-6. papyrus.

!
Opidai
is

occurs in 736. 36, and (cf. 1. 6) the usual spelling, e.g. P. Tebt. 112. 11.

is

mentioned

in

1.

5 of that

(/)

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE,
1213.

etc.

Question to the Oracle.


2-7

5-7

cm.

Second century.

question addressed to the oracle of Zeus-Helios-Sarapis by a man in doubt about marriage. Cf. 1148-9, and for another example on the same subject, Wessely, Script. Gr. Spec. 26, re-edited by Wilcken, Chrestomathie, p. 150. The
writing
is

across the fibres.

\
[]

'ifjAi'oo

//eyaXo)
Oe-

258

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


[?.]
[et]

a^Loi

Mivav8pos

[)]

On

the verso

.
5f is

.
of

.
corr.

'

granted

To Zeus Helios, great Sarapis, and me to marry? Answer me tliis.'


than

4. he\hoTai rather

26. 2-3.
5.

the associated gods.

Menandrus

asks,

is

it

probably to be restored in Wessely, Script. Gr. Spec.

cf.

1149.

9, note.

1214.

Invitation to a Birthday-feast.
8-6

9-6 cm.

Fifth century.

This formal invitation has an interest as being considerably later in date than those previously published, which are all of the Roman age cf. e. g. 110-11, 524,
;

747, 926-7, Wilcken, GrundrJlge, p. 419. formula, beginning with an address like a

[ ^ [] ^
The
letter.

present example shows a different

[]

({().

yeveOXiov

^-

Trj

{)
'

.
2.
1.

.
three
letters

ic^

festival of
1.

my my

Deign to gladden the birthday lord Macarius from Gennadius, speculaior. son Gennadius by dining with us on the i6th at 7 o'clock.'
would be room
:

[.7()
There
2.

for

two or
2 1.

of an

abbreviated

title

after

cf.

1193,

I,

1223.

1215.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
1215.

259

Letter of Sinthonis.
12-5x13 cm.
Second or
third century.

An

illiterate letter written in

, ^ .
'

^? ^
.

a rather large uncultivated hand.

.
ety

k\6a)V irpos

}^
.

yap

()().

On

the verso

.
5
1.
'

1.

enfi.

6.

1.

(.

? .
.

"ZlvOOvls.

2.

of

8,

1.

ae.

. (^).
1.

COrr.

1.

{^()

(.

"''

Sinihonis to her brother Tereus, greeting. Please arranged, but if not, do not go to the house of Satyrus, for into trouble. Good-bye. Tubi 15. Sarapion greets you.

come to me until matters we hear that he is going to

are

get

(Addressed) Deliver to Tereus

from Sinthonis.'

1216.

Letter of Sarapas.
i8'5X9'8cm.
Second or
third century.

letter to a sister,

who

is

seems to have been lately married.

Sapands

^
TOis

^ ^.
rebuked
for

having neglected to write.


is

She

As

in 1215, the spelling

erratic.

ttJ

09

nepl

,
S ?

26

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Tos
?

irepl

iviav-

9
;]

^,

KOU

. , [
Xeiav
a^eioi

irepl

.
iviavTOp.

1.

\fiav

above the
19.

^. 9. [ ; ; . .. .
,^
6e
20

kv

^
1.

,
ovje[?.]
V
1.
1.

yap

?. [][
23.
3
'

On

the verso

}.
Se
.

9. e of

so in

^7^

/xt

8.

1.

fmaroXrjs.
1 3.

COrr.

from
1.

n.

10.

ToSe

e//e.

line.
1.

15.

1 6.

ovTa[s.]
'

Xff

of

^ COrr.

2 2.

1.

(. []^[.
II.
1.
1.

cVt
.
.

of

1.

Sarapas to his sister Diogenis, greeting. I pray always to all the gods for you, and you know from close experience my good-will even though I do not write to you ; but you have never thought proper to send me greetings in a letter. A year to-day 1 have been away from you and all the time you have not thought proper to give me tidings about Have you produced us yourself or your brother Horion, how he is for I love him greatly. For I pray that you may agree in this, as you entirely deserve. Tell me a male child ? now about anything here that you want, for with the help of the gods I am hastening to set (Addressed) To my sister I pray for your health. I greet you all. out to you.
;

Diogenis.'

was perhaps meant. which seems of of the interlineated letters is obscure. in 1. 10. cannot be read as or vice versa, inevitable, has been corrected from is not might be read, but is meaningless ; II. ami is dubious,
5.

will give

a sense, but does not occur, and

9-10.

The purpose

possible.
13.

Horion was probably the husband of Diogenis.

1217.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
Letter of Eudaemonis.
8-5

261

1217.

1-6

cm.

Third century.
writing
is

short formal letter of greeting.

The

across the fibres of the

papyrus.

[] .
5

, )^
ev

NeiXav

. .

IO-7

[
cr[e,

^).

On

the verso
10

{) [9.

Eudaemonis to my lord Ptolemaeus, greeting. I am again writing you this my letter, sending you salutations, and secondly praying to all the gods that you may receive them in health and prosperity along with all our friends. I salute Pallas and Nila and all our friends. I pray for your health. (Addressed) To Ptolemaeus from Eudaemonis.'
'

first

1218.

Letter of Didymus.
X

cm.

Third century.

A
tions

letter to a father from his son who reminds him of some farming operaand gives him domestic news. The writing is across the fibres.

)(
5

^^01'

is

) 9 ,, .
^aipeiv.
yeoii-

?,

(^).

OLKias

k-

202

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

aiav

01/

[]

[]
On
the verso
15

\\ {)
1.

^ . --'^

.
8.
1.

^
13.

^.
1

...[..]..[
eav.

4
'

8.2,

[]7^.
Do
not neglect the things

Didymus

to his father

Chaeremon, very many

greetings.

be done for the land-holder, as you desired, for I know your goodness and reasonableness. My mother Thaesis went, I think, to There is nothing unpleasant at your house. Antinoopolis for a funeral. Tell me freely about anything which you want and I will do it gladly. Give many salutations to my dearest PhuUon and his children, whom the evil eye shall not harm, and his wife and those whom we love severally. All your relatives and your children salute you. I pray for you health.'
to
7.
fls

'AvTLvoov:

cf.

9.

cioKvos is

15.

()

the usual form.


is

P. Tebt. 416. 6, 417. 26. For the active

cf 1158. 18, note, P. Leipzig in. 18. expected, but the traces are really too slight for recognition.

1219.

Letter of Aristandrus.
24-1

12-5 cm.

Third century.

from Aristandrus, of Oxyrhynchus, to his son Apion, basiliconome, recommending to the latter's good offices a person who is described as our son but was not actually so related to the cf. P. Giessen iii. p. 53 ^. writer, since it is clear that the real father was dead
letter

grammateus

of the Letopolite

?^
'
'

yaipeiv.

e/y

Net-

'4

^'4

1319.
8\

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
pi

263

9.
,
eiT
1

yap

[]
[]
kav

Si'

'[]
eiTe

15

On

the verso
20

, , \\ . {) {) {) {) {)
kav

)( ^6 ,
[]

8\\

vnep-

(2nd hand)

()(^).

Arislandrus 10 his son Apion, greeting. Tlieon our son is coming to you on his way on account of a pressing incompleted negotiation of which you have I think that he wrote to you about it while perhaps been aware long since from his father he was still alive. Indeed you love him both for his own sake and for his father's memory. But I know that this letter of mine also will be of much help to him, if he wants anything either with Apion the basilicogrammateus of the Prosopite nome or with any one else, if you will ask them and not delay to write to them. I pray for your perpetual health and prosperity, my son. (Addressed) To my son Apion, basilicogrammateus of the Letopolite
'

to the city of Nikias

nome, from Aristandrus of Oxyrhynchus.'


4.

The mention
NfiKiov here

inl.

14 of the

that

means

nome
1

(1.

5.

(:
8[]
:

6.

20) to Nikiu in the Prosopite nome. cf. 238. introd., P. Fay. 116. 12, &c. or the first letter appears to be either

/ ,,

is,

as

Wilcken remarks, a

sufiBcient indication

the capital of that


5

nome;

of.

e.g. Ptol.

iv. 5.

. G. U. 939-

49

Theon

travelled through the Letopolite

([]

is

unsuitable.

1220.

Letter of a
217 X
8-7

Bailiff.
Third century.

cm.

from a steward or agent enclosing some accounts and giving other In the left-hand margin there are information, and asking for various supplies. some indications of a previous column, which perhaps contained the accounts
letter

264
referred to
sides,
;

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI


and the verso
it

also
is

is

inscribed with 2a lines, incomplete

a ruder hand than that of the recto, though Most of the entries it corresponds well enough with the description in 11. 3-5. ets or h refer to payments made to
of an account, but
in

{^^})
letter.

who

received a uniform
11.

wage

of 2 drachmae.

^^
A
ijXovs

on both

curious reference to

a hippopotamus occurs in

ao sqq. of the

' ()[]9 , ,

9
'
.
viy

[]
e/y

[]6 ^.
]

^
20

ds

dSrjs.

tpya
;

{)
ttjs

. ^,
eiva

, ^ ,,
yap
nepl

y^vrj

eypayjres

25
k-

^.
2.

yap

,
3
line.

, .,
1 *"'

kav

.
2 2.

1.

1.

my lord Theon from Hebdomus (?), greeting. I send for your information in some Would you be pleased, sir, to send me some money for notes the journal of expenditure. With regard to the the business of harvesting going on here and the other business ? collection of the wine about which you wrote to me, I see nothing bad in my. behaviour ; for You will send the boat is being prepared in order that I may transfer the wine of Silenus. me the nails for emptying (?) and a jar of gum for the tools of the machines ; this will be The hippopotamus has destroyed nothing, for if of use to prevent their perishing of neglect. About the fields, if you come, D. V., you there is any superfluity, I watch over the place. The accounts will will learn their condition. I pray, sir, for your health and prosperity.
'

. 9 . . ' . .
.

dva -

ev q>s

. ^
5
1 6. 1.

6yv

[^
1

"]85

of

[] above the
3
2 0.
1.

12.

1.

Pap.

"''"
1.

21.

t rt.

25

ae.

show

the details as contained in the


1 6.

What

only here.
21.

! !

memorandum.'
denotes
is

as applied to
to be a

obscure.

The

adjective

occurs

seems

combination of the alternative forms tnnos

{)

and

-.
persistance at

1220.
I

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
;

265
possibly
its

am not aware of other references to the animal in Greek papyri Oxyrhynchus is to be connected with the local cult of Thoeris.
is

28-30. of
letters.

The papyrus

damaged

in front of these lines, but there

is

apparently no loss

1221.

Letter of Isidorus.
12-4

7-6

cm.

Late third or early


fourth century.

This letter, in which Demetrianus is informed where the corn-dues of the western toparchy were being paid, perhaps belongs to the category of official rather than private correspondence. Both the writer and the recipient were probably public functionaries of some kind.

^9 ^(aipuv.
ttjs

kv

,
7/)

. []

ovu

.
X
is

\p6vois

my lord and brother Demetrianus from Isidorus, greeting. The deliveries of the western toparchy are being measured in at Paraetonium by the cultivators there according Do not therefore worry Zoilas about this. I pray for your lasting health.' to custom.
'

45.

npos

SC.

!.

For

cf.

653.

1222.

Letter to Demetrius.
6.3

25-8 cm.

Fourth century.

The

writer of this letter asks his son to send a colt and


it.

some medicines

with which to treat

The

writing

across the fibres of the papyrus.

266

'i'iva

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

'^

eiW

^
.
'

^
aXas
4

yaipiiv.

(^) (^) ^{)


Sbs
SoSe

'^,

eni

nepl

{)

}
'^^.

^^-'

Pap.

,
26-9

.
.

ovtipos {?)

('4(

Isidorus to his son Demetrius, greeting.

Give your brother Ammonianus the colt to

be brought to
basil-seed, in

Posidonius to you need. I pray for your lasting health.'


3.
:

ammonia, both the pounded and the unpounded, and the order that I may doctor him away here, for I have been asked by my father and send to me about anything stay for the collection during these five days
the salt of
;

me and

sc.

rather than
e. g.

cf, e. g.

p. Flor. 222. 10 sqq.

em

is

of

course for

eVet,

the yap being redundant, as

in 1215. 5.

1223.

Letter of Hermias.
X
9-3 cm.

Late fourth century.

The

chief point of interest in this letter, which


is

was written by a man

in

financial difficulties,

the ratio given in

11.

31 sqq. between the current values of

the gold solid us and the


half of the
fourth

of drachmae or denarii.
is

date in the second

century

suggested by the handwriting, and the great


it

depreciation of the
close
;

makes
loc.

probable that the century was nearing

its

cf.

the note

6\

^
eiTrep

.},
kav

ad

'1\

25

. , , , .
yap

\-

{)

1223.

4.
15 avTos 6

).
kv

'

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

opa

npbs \Lpoy

)9,

.^
,

, ]
iav
16.

30

5[[/]]
oXoKOTTivos

' ?.

267

^)9
35

kv

Trj

OLKOS

noWois

..
yap.
kp-

{)6

)(

?,
Pap.

On

the verso

/[,
II.

29.

Pap.
'

Pap. ) Pap.
lord

34

Pap. 20. Pap.

Pap.

24

28.

8\

finds the boat of the landlord with


there,
sent.

and brother Horion from Hermias. I am surprised if my messenger you if, however, owing to some carelessness he finds it make haste to send the sailor to the city at once with the attendant whom I have See that you do not neglect this. If it is cahn weather and he cannot bring back
;

my

the boat to-day, let the sailor himself return in order to make a bond, for I am being worried If you neglect it, our house is likely, owing to the absence of the landnot a little. lord, to be brought to a critical pass through the tiresome Ammonius the specula/or and If you have any silver coins with you or sohdi, send me them the praefect's assistant. quickly, for I owe on account of so many obligations and I am no longer trusted, unless Send and tell your people to hand over to me the remainder of the wine I behave fairly. and one and a half units of the general account. The solidus now stands at 2,020 myriads it has come down. Do not neglect to send the boat or the sailor to-day. I pray for your lasting health, brother. (Addressed) To my lord and brother Horion from Hermias.'
;

1 2 sqq. A sense may be obtained by taking as the interrogative particle, Do you pretend that the boat cannot be brought in fair weather like this ? But probably Wilcken is right in supposing that here represents et, although this mistake is avoided in 11. 3 and 22. 22. Being coupled with a speculator (cf. 1193. , &c.) this is perhaps more likely to be a person in the service of a military praefect than an ofiicial of the cf. e. g. C. I. G. 1329 25. 2'j. For cf. e. g. P. Fay. 124. 9, 21, B. G. U. 970. 24.
'
'

is obscure. very low value of the shown by this passage points to a late date in the fourth century. Other fourth-century equations cited by Wessely, AUersindiz. im Philogelos, pp. 32-3, are 62, 72, and myriads to the solidus; but a papyrus which he attributes to the fourth or fifth century (p. 46) gives a and 1133. 8-9 shows that in the year 396 a.d. 600 myriads were considerably less than four solidi, and in the light of the present passage it is more probable that they were really less than one. implies that the value of the had lately been relatively higher.

30.

85 {(
:

8{

('

('.

TTjs

31-3.

The

no

Cf. P. GieSSen 47

{) {)
(^?)
.

^),

289

to

(sc. apyvpiQv}^ vvv

^({)

INDICES
I.

NEW LITERARY

TEXTS.

(a) 1174,

1175 (SoPHOCLES, Ichneutae and Eurypylus).

{Roman figures

refer to the cohimns of\VJ^\ Fr.

= fragments of 1114:
;

numbers

in thick type refer to fragments of 1175.)


S
viii.

;
ayyeXo?

7.

a a

vii.

12.

viii.

13

xiii.

18, 19

.
.
i.

5
7
I

(?).

XV. 5.
X. II.

viii.

4.
(?)
;

/ (
.

1 6.

94.
5.
4

8.
ii.

ayycXXfti/

.9
aye
8.

4.

1 1 (?).

ii.

l8(?).

a-yetJ/ iv.

17.
iii.

.g

4 ; vi. 20 ; vii, 10; viii. 10, 18, 22 ; ix. 2 ; x. 6, 14; xii. 10, II ; xiv. 3,
V.

.
5.

avbpfia

iv. 7.

''

5.
i.

14J
22.
6.
ii.

IX. 1 4.

^yX"^ 5.

'
iii.
ii.

15; l.ii(?); 3.9, (.?); 5, ii. 14, iii. 19 ; 47. 8 57. i; 74. 3; 91. 4; 94. 2.
;

(
/ftj; iii.

vi.

16.
;

17

iv.

18

(?).

vi.
ii.

II.

28.

ai/ev

5.

i.

II.

V. V.

.
;

VI.

II.
;

91. II.
10.

II

5.
xiii.

ii.

23.

OS xii.

10;
ii. ii.

10;

xiv.

&
oifi

5.

ii.

2 2.

24; 8.

6.

'six.
i.

(
2
;

xiv.

15

5.

iii.

12

41.

91. 12, 22.


9. 4 (?). II, 12.
3.

24.

xiii.

91. 20
iv.

(?).

25 Schol.
5.

amos

47.

24. atVc xiv. 15. ix. 10.


Xll.

lO.

7. 9.

xiii. 2.
iii.

.
iv.

3.
ill.
;

2 7 (?).

xiii. 3.

xii.

24

(?).

!
^^;
vi.

91. 14
xii.

II.
iii.

5.

25

(?)

xiv. 12,
xiii.

3.

.
vi.
i.

I.

. 5 ix. 12 ; 5. iii. 14. ap i. 9, 10; ii. 21 (?); iii. 25; xiii. 17; ix. 18, 24; X. 4 XV. 20 ; 8. ii. 8; 91. 21; =reau ii. 17 ; iii. 94. 4.
;

13

12.
1 1

6.

viii.

vii.

vui. 8.

2o(?);
\.

Xi.

II.

15;
avayfiv

vii.

7.

15(0
II. lO.
;

vil. 1 7

5.

8
6
;

V. 27 25 ; XV. 4. 99. 2.

vi. I, 4,

ix.

VI. 8,

^
xiv.
IV.

.
25

2.
;

5.
1

iii.

ii. 23. 3 SChol.

7
7. 4

.
V.

15;

13

vi.

25.

marg. 20
{?).
\.

ix. 27
Vll. 2.

^,

iii.

26; 91.

2 2.

xiv. 21.

270

INDICES
5.
5.
ii.

"!

20.
(?).

;?
.
2

xi.

13.

xiii.

11
;

Fr.

21.

5.

iii.
iii.

23
19.

91. 2.

3.

5.

14

and
;

marg.
iii.

\( .
iSoij

vi.

.
xi.

ix. 17.

8
iu.

12

91. 12.
2

iii.

xin.

5.

ii.

13.
;

9, 18.

schol.
;

ix.

7
i.

20.

dOKveiv 2. 2.

vi.

5 schol., 8 schol.
. .

ix

V.

12.

5.

7 schol.

6 schol.

22. 19.
3

,
8fi\ia

* ?
V.
,

12. g.

vi.

xiv. I.
VI. I 7.

/3
3
;

.
;

.
.

3. 4, 6.
1 1 (?)
;

i.

iv.

16

V.

5;

.
21
;

3. 8.
1.

91.

1 6.

viii.

, 20;
XV. 15, 12, 15
i.
;
-

xni.

X. 25

91. 2 2.

,6
.
.

8,

,
.

13

vi.

j'

xiii.

6(?).

.
vii.

.
.

8.
8.

xiv.
I
;

.
xi.
i.

24;

20;

xvi.
i.

Fr. 20.

Seh

8(
iv.

vi.

18

V.

vi. 7.
vi.

.
1.

vi.

18
;

8.

18

vi.

13

Fr. 26.

v.

12.

xii. 5, 6.

XU. 8.

15
2.

.
; ;

3.
vi.

8( .
6
;

7. 8.

.
ix.

8.

5.

7 schol.

I,

10, 14

x.

avTts ix.
iv.

8(?), 20.
21,

19; 23.
4. 4.

?? .
(.
1.

1 8.

9 4
oeiTf

4, 5>

25; V. 4; 7>8; viii. 18; .


23,
;

19,
3,
iii.

2,
;

22

8 '). .
1

26.

.
49.
II.

V. 1.;

13

xiii.

yap

i.

15
ix.

iv.

21

v.

19
12,

vii.

3. 3

17

1-5;

20, 27,

7;
xi.

19

4,

15; X. 2, 10 ; xn.
;

25;
8
xv.
7
; ;

2,

4,

.
xi.

II.

xiu.

3
1.

xiv.
;
;

15,
2
;

22
5.

8. 8
)7 iv. 7
iv.

vi.

23

5.

II.
(?)
;

ISi?)'
;

.
2 2.

9(?)

/
^?}

. .
5.

14 schol., 10
I
;

3.

8\\
8iaiveiv 5.

xin. 6.
i.

5.

(?).

ix.

81.

xi.

20.
1.

.
.
6.

47. 7 ; 48. 3 91. 3 ; 97. 2.

\
5.

.
1 1
1

23.
XV.

dtaKomi/

vi.
iii.

12. 3 V.

2 6 V.

.
5.

25; 91. 14 i. 24; 80. 2.

ye viu. 4 ; xi. 1 7 5. i. 4.
yetTwai^ ix.

(>*) J

23.

xiii.

. .
3
j"

ii.
;

2.
(1.

xi.

.
19; 91.
3

yeXai/ xiv. 1 9

?),

91. 24-

.
5.

yeoo xiv.
5.
xiv.

1 8.

5.

.
iii.

20.
;

93. 4; 98.
V. 2 2.

yei/os

13

2. I.

.
;

17.

3
/

xiv. 21.

6. 2.
iu.

..

viu.

18 schol.

.
5.

//
.
41.

y^pvy

.
ui.
vi.

5.

17.

8 / 8 8 ( '
iii.

1.

X. 1 9.

5.

iii.

13

5.

ii.

18.

5.

ii.

12, 13, 17, 18.

iv.

lO; 5.

U. 3.

vi.

3 (?). 91. 23.


19,

iv.

v. 15, 18.

5.
ix. I

.
;

20 xiv. 24 (?).
;

5.

X. 8.

xiv. 12.
(?).

12

xii. i.

xi.
5.

19
II
;

l6; 76.

ix.

xui.

24

vii,

7; XU. 12.
ix. 1

xiv. 25. 5.
.
.

7-

. 2.
xiv. 26.

.
1

13;
8.

X. 4.

i.
.

9.

II, 19 ; 6. 10. 80. 5. vi. 18 (v. 1. SetXow).


1 9.

12. 5

vii.

; ;

/.

NEW LITERARY
6,

TEXTS
schol.
vii.
;

271
vi.

8.

ii.

6
2
I

(?).

iii.

17, 22 schol.; viii. 9, 15, 18; ix. 5, 15 schol.;

schol.,
;

9
ix.

dpav

i.

II (?);
I.
iv.

iv.

18;

91.

X.

xi.

14

xii.

4,
;

5, 8.

15, 22 schol. 15 schol.; x. 7, 13,


II,

23;

6(?); 94. ii. 16;


.

7. 13.
viii. 1

^ ^?
18
V.l.

{
26.
(?).

Pap.),

14 schol. xiii. i6(?); xiv. 7(?), 11, 15, 23 schol; XV. 5, 18 ; xvi. I schol. ; Fr. 20. 5. i. 20 schol., ii. 11 3
10, II, 13,
I,

xi.

xii.
;

10,

7 schol.
xvi.
I

xiv. 8,

14 schol.; xiii. 23 schol.


5.
i.
;

schol.;
ii.

20
8.

schol.,
ii.

II schol., 17 13. i. 6 schol.


1 1.

ii.

4,
ii.

schol.
9.

13.

i.

6 schol.

91.

evaprios V.

5.
xi.

13
(Inelv vi.
eiTrep
ii.

ipapyf)S V. 5.

25
21.

XV. 6

91. 21.

83.
i.

4.

efy xi.

16.
i9(.'')

3. 5 (?).
xiii.

1 3.

12.

8; 91.
I.

II.

10; vi, 18 ; ix. xi. II ; xiv. 4. (laaKowiw. 3 ; viii. 14


etsv. 8,
fluitvai viii. 1 1,

ei/^ev

ix. 5.

ii.

fppenf IP xii. 1 5 (?). ipTOs xii. 13.

, (

viii.

24(?); xv. 18.


5.

epi viii, I.

vi.

ii.

2.

ix. 7

eai/ iv.
eai/ iv.

V. 2.
;

Cf.
;

.
9.

elaopav v. 8, 21
eiT ii.
K,

vi.

12, 23.

9, 5,
;

14

V.

79.
12.

X. 21

xi. 17,
ii.

26;
;

xiv.
7.

((
i^aipnv
iv. 1

xiii.

3.
ix,

3,

(?),

eyyovos ix. 13.


f-yyuf ix. 1-7
J

eyxos 5.

18, 26; 5.

26

85.

5,

iii.

15.

xii.

iyKaXeiu XV,

1 8.

21,

xiv. 2.
i.

K(ipos iv,

20.

eyXdipos xiii. 6.

'

i.

ii.

i8 22
12,

iii.

25;
;

'/.

^
5.
ii,

iv.

21.
8.
;

v'l.

24,

ii.

16
5.

X. 9

xiii.

11.

(.
e^ca xii.

i^fXavveiv XV, 2 2.
vi.

20.

Kfivos V. 5

xiii. 2.
iii.

xi, 7 (?).

1 9.

V.
e|t;^i/evti' vii.

xii.
viii.

I O,

iii.

2 2.

2;
viii.

19.

vi.

2,

7;
7,

vii.

I,

5,
ix.

8, II.

vi. 8.

xi.
(?).
;

12,

14;
5, 6,
xiii.

viii.

(.i);

x.

21;

xi. 3,

9;

13

(1.

19, 22,
6, 9, 1 2

26
;

/>; ?) ; xiv. 4, XV. 21 ; 5. ii. ;


8.
ii.

\( \).
iv.

25

23,

i.

12

vi.

5 (v.

1.

13,
3, 4
xiii. 7.

.
(v.
1,

ioiKepai iv, 6, 1 5,

(
eVei 5.
(\)aivtv).

10. 5

14. 4 ; 94. cSpa X. 23.


eV 5.
?
iii.
ii.

2.

15.

15,
viii.

24;
5,

17;

15; XV.
(2a iv. 7

13; vii. 2, 21; xii. 20; 94. 7. t


vi.

x.

'
i/at

(
ii.

ix. 5.
;

. '
eKTeXe'iv

21.

iXm

eKTOs xi. 10.


5,
ii,

entyxaiveiv 5.
ii.

ii.

21.
iii.

10.

8, 2 2,

28.

xi,

10
4,
vi,

eirelyeip

iii.

i6
26,
I,

xvii, 19,

eXevOepmais
,
.

87,
15.

IrrciTa

5.

iii,

21,

vii.

10
;

91. 4.

viii.
;

9, II

24 94. 7

x.
(.?).

20

xiii.

xii. 5.

eiKa^etf xii. 7.
i.

( (
ii.

i.

xi. 19.

( (
fneintp
i.

21

91. 4.

eiTfUeip, enetKws xi. 8.

12.

i.

20, 23; 98. 2(?).


i.

(
vi.

1 6,

vii.

26
1 1

viii. 5.

viii.
;

V. 8,
ii.

im
3
(.?)
;

16

5.

ii.

6.
1 1

2 2, 23.
vi.
vii, 1
;

fnuvai
7
;

iii.

viii.

20;

xi.
7.
ii,

8 schol., 2 2 schol.
II,

3;
eV
i.

9,

24;

iii.

25;

iv.

xiv. 2 ; 5. ii. 17 85. 8 schol., 22 schol. ;


iii.

tniievpTos xii. 5.

fniatvfip

2 schol., 3 schol., 16,


vi.

3 schol.,

13 schol.

iv.
iv.

25

V. 9, 19,
;

24 schol.;
14
;

schol.,

5 schol.

vi. 9,

vii.

3 schol.; 13 schol. ; v, 16,

11,

ii.

12.

i.

21

ii.

16.

iv.

23.

iv.

23
ii.

V.

1.

18,

24

5.

12,

272

INDICES
xii.

5 (
enos
vii.

2; 5.
23.

iii.

15.

xii. 4.
viii.

19

ix.

12 marg.

xiv. 23.
vi.

:
2
;

xiii.

7.

12. 6

15.

91. 20.

94.
4.

epyoui. 11;
6.

14;
ii.

vii.

11;

iii.

.23;3.8;.6(?);54.3.
epScij/

24
;

iv.

5
;

V.

7 7

;
;

viii.

80.

14
iv.

ix.

24

xii, 5,

xiv.

3, 6.
V, 1 7

8.
;

9.

epeideiv xi.

II
12.
2.

xii,

20.

5, 25.

{.

Pap.).

tpevva
'E/j/x^f

iv.

87.

epxeaBai
4,
ipo)

vii.
;

16
ii.

X.
;

I^

vi.
iv.

18; viii. 8 ; 5. 16 xi, II,


;

ix.
ii.

II
25, 27.

19.
5.
i.

16 ...
5
;

5.

21
ii.

81. 3.

8
TJKdv

XV. 16, 21.


;

xi.
ii.

18
;

xiv. 17.

X. 2 (?);

1. 2.

3. II,
9,

eV
f

ii.

5.

i.

21.
iii.

xi. 8,

10

(v.

1.

15.
5.

I.

)
;

xiv.

14;
;

/
/)5
temi

.
5..
V.

2.

5>

5
;

iv. 2 2.

5.

19.
7. 5

7.

(
en

iii.

20, 27

(?).

fjpds

X.

18; 5.
7,

i.

iii.

26(?);
xi,

iii. iii.

viii,

11.

5.

ii.

I.
i.
;

erepos

5.

lO
i.
1. ;

(^(),
6 schol.
viii.

12. II.

20
ix.

schol.
iv.

13.
V.
iii,

"Upa

18
5.
ii.

21

27

8,

!
deos
i,

xi.

10

V.

1,

16,

X. 24.
X,
1

"
'^
.

20.

.
106.

24.
2.

V. 23

4.

tiO vii. 6.

fTolpos
eros 5.
ev
vii.

24.

.
ii.

5.

iii.

22.
8.
ii,

eaWeiv
8.

xiv.
xi. 1

6.
(?),

larai/m 5,

.
1
.

5.
iv.

iii.

fvSeiv vii. I.

ix,
ieti xi.

15;
;

xi. 9.

...

41,
;

6.

evdia xiv. 4.
eiepye-nji
evil/
.

xii. 2.
;

ii.

15;

xi. 4.

20,

ie'Xeii'ii.

16
10,
;

viii.

18
iii.

xiv. 21,

.
;
;

Fr. 31. 3. ix. 12.


.

14
ix.

17
X,

iv.

iii.

6 schol.
i.

,
;

4.

14, 17
xiv.

12;
2,

23(?);
iv.

(ivaios IX. 17.

18; 49.
7. 5

viii.

25
4

xvii.

evwf 91. 18.

( (
.

ix. II.

eOTTWS X. 6.

^ 4( (
.

:
;

xi, 14,

98.

.
i.

8,
i,

5.

. .

ii.

24; xiv. 21

94.

3.

21.

ix.

.
.
vi.

7. 3.
.

8 schol., 22 schol,
;

10.

2.
1 6.

iii.

13 schol.

iv.

2 schol.,
v.
;

xiii. 2 2.

tat
ii.

23. II.

fat

yap
7

viii,

i,

.
vii.

vii.

.
15; V. 16, 23 ;
12,
viii,

3 schol,, 13 schol. ; schol. ; vi. 5 schol.


;

24
vii.

ovr 5.

6.

8.

rXeti^

i.

133
;

iv,

22, 26

12; ix. 9 (e'dff Pap,); x, 15; xi.9; xii. 4, 15; xiv, 4; XV. 17 5, ii. 20, jii. 20 91. 21. iv. 26,
; ;

22 schol. ix. 15 schol. schol.; xiii. 7 14 schol. ; xiv. 23 schol. xvi, I schol. ; 5. i. 20
xii.

^
vi.

/ii.

vi,

25.

Kavekfieepos
viii.

II.
12,
/covKeVi xi. 12,

19;
XV.

Act5|oppevtXei xi.

mix.

5,

schol,
vi.

2l(?).
;

V. 4.
iii,

9 4

ix. 6, 1 7
xiii. 4.

xi.

18;

AfatVep 5.

25.

xii.

v. 16.
ii.

X.

2. 3 ; 5. ii. 19 ; 77. 3 ; KaKwsXV, 91. 17; 94.4.


4.
raXeti/
iii.

8.

8.

Zevs V. 7
I (?),

X.
;

25

xiv. 7
;

xv.

19

7. 2

47.

7.

X. 2 2,

: (

5.

i,

5 SChol,

vi. 9,

xi, 2 2.

xii.

16

xiii.

16

5,

vi.

15.
xi. 1 3.

18
viii,

(?),

3.
1 1

xi.

26

(?)

xii. 3,

xii.

/.

NEW
i.

i.

8.
ii.

5.

17
;

10. 4

98.

: /
Kpe
.

LITERARY TEXTS
IX. 4.

273
7.

\.
2.
/xafcpo's

xiv.

10; 92.
2 schol.
2.
ii.

5.

iii.

22
;

27. 2
6.
xii.

(?).

xii. 9.
viii.

79.
.

iv.
ii.

24

V.

xi. 7, 8.

/cpoKi

viii.

((>
\().
118 f

Karaivelu vi. 26.


ix.

15

(v.

1.

19;
vi. 8.
i.

X.

15;

12;

Kpvirreiv X.

23 ; 8. X. 25 (?).
ii.

8.

91. 9.
2
V. 5, 1 5,

Kreavov xii. 1 7.
xii. 6.
vii,

18,

5.

23

xiv. I.

6.

ix. 3
V.
1.

ix.
iii.

15

24.
2 2.

itaTot;^mi/ xiii. 5.
xi.

!
16;
vi.

V.

17.
V. 12.

6.

i.

9.

19; 5.
xiv. 6.

i.

ii.
ii.

.
;

16.

(
^;
4.

ix.

ig.
ii.

.
3.

7 (?V

4.

iCctiOs.

See
ii.
ii.

((,
9, 18.
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1 7.

? .
1

i. 13. VU. 1 3.

Kui'ij'ycTeii' i.

15

V.

12.
6.
iii.

8.

xi.

(?)

Ktiptiv 5.

ix. 1 6.
vii.
viii.

21.
viii.

II, i8;
ii.

9.

2.

17; 5.

23,
II.

iii.

14.

14.

94.

5.

(5
KeXfvpa
Kivelv

ix. 1 6.
xii.

Ktpbaivfiv xiv. 5
V.
i.

Xayexijs 91. 12.


i.

23.
ix. 21. ii. 13; 13 21 4. 10 ; 81. 5 (?).
; ;

^
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ix. 5,

/)>
.
sciiol.

91. 7.
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24.
;

17,
viii.

20
3.

5.

ii.

24,

iii.

8 and
13.
V. 24.

15; 10
5.
i.

iii.

ix,

ix. 4, 2 2.

16, 17 20.
5.
i.

xi. 6.

\
kXoUiv
iii.

1.

8.

7.

xi. 1 7 (?).
xii.

vi.

21.

xii. 8.

19.
;

Xa^oos 7. 6.

ix. 8.
iii.
;

vii.

4
14.

xiv.

19;

5.

ii.
;

16.
iii.

12

21; xi. 22

3;

vii.

7,
;

iv.

25.
vii.

xiv.
(.?) ;

19
ii.

{(
;

xiii.

18, 19 Pap.); 5. i.
;

iv.

15;
xiii.

viii.

2,

10,
xii.

21, 22(?); X.
2
j

5,

24;
26
fie
;

xiii.

20

xiv. 24.

26,

16

15. 4

40. 6;

12

xiv.

91.

xiv. 9,
ix. 23.
itXtViti

87.
18.

3.

17.

oi

XV. 6; 3. 9.

v.

14;

vi.

... XV.
ix.

2.

14,

Xet'a iii.

22.
5.

?
;

xiii.

13

(e/ioi

Pap.)

Xctosxiv. 17.
1.

15

iii.

23

(?).

xiu. 10.

xi. I.
xiii.

.
?'
4
;

7.9.
i.

14;
1 4.
iv.

vi. I.

4.

19;
I.

17;

ix. 5. xi. 6.

xiv. 10.
vi.

I.

/ /
iii.

kKuuv

88.
(?).
ii.

3
;

xiv. 10.
;

7
;

KviJKos xiv.

16.
1

viii.

iii. 2 7 (.?) X. 13, 21,

iv. 1

xi.

17

xiii. 4.

xii.

xi. 5

7, 8; 1. 94. 6.

24 ; xiv. 18; 92. i2(?);

;/7
18.

xi. 1 5.
viii.
ii.

II
1 6.
iii.

viii.

27;

xvii.

| ^

7. 6.

^oyx;

12.

Ko(ifo( 5. ii. 2 2.
vi.

Ao^i'asxiv.

25

xvii.

(?),

10.

vi.

2 2.

V. 1 6.
(?).

5.

23.
7
;

xii.

23

Kovia 4. 6 (?).

3. 4

} ;

xiv. 20.

6.

ii.

25.
I.

/
17

.
iv.
;

23 schol.
77.
;

xi. 2 V.

1.

xiii.

2.

24
;

3. 6.

xii.

16

xiii. 3.

schol.

vi.

5 schol., 12

;; ;

274
xiii.

INDICES
2
i.
;

5.

i.

20 schol.
ii.

viii.

ix.

6,

8;
xi.

x.
;

2, 7,

13.

6 schol.
6.

22.

.
1.

20.

14. 2.

/
mi

5.
viii.

iii.

18

12.

13

^
68
oiotot

24 xiii. 7. 12 ; xiv. 12, 14, 26 91. 6. 47. 6 84. 8 9 xiv. 26 ; 84. 2.


10,
16,
; ;
;

20;

.
viii.

.
,
9
(?)
;
;

1 4.

24; 24(?);

.
.
19
;
,'

12, 22; 15,


vi.
;

?;
18
;
;

xiii.

9
i.

xiv. 14.
V. 3,

11. 6.

viii.

14, 16, 18, 22


;

ix. 2

i.

9.

.
20.

12

xi.

xiii.

10

xiv. 2. xiv. 1 8.

oi/cos vi.

17,
iii.

xiv. 12, 14, 18,

22

xvii.

5.

vii.

10.
2.

V. 7 ; 5. ii. 13. veavias 5. 111. 17

5.

ii.

7 ; 5. ii. 10, 18, 21, iii. 15, 22; 7. ii(.?); 48. 3; 5. ii. 57. I ; 91. 10.

oios vi. 5
iv.
iii.

17
10.

7.
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01)

XV. 6

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ix.

10.
2, 13.

,3.9.
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vfKpos 5.

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i.

I 2

vi.

3
;

91. 21.
vi.

ix. I.

4
;

{})

19
10.

viii.

23

reos ix.

14;
iv.
;

xiv. 8, 15.

vi.
.

2 2.

/
vi.

5. 5.
i.

iii.

1 6.

X. 3
ovSeiy

xii. 9,

23.

vi.
iii.

6
13.

vii.

xiv. 3

23 schol.;
;

18

ix. 16, 18, 23.


xiii. 5.

5.
^

schol.

84. 2 schol.
viH. 5.

94.
14.
18.
xi. 12.
i.

3.

ni. 2 2
IX.

oi/fi6iXen/ xiii.
vi. 3.

20.

ix.

10. 5 (?). 27 (?); xi.


iii.

onr) vii.

viii.

4.

ix. 12.

/;

5.

9.
;

ix,

13
vi.

x. I, 12.

;
;

V.
IV.

.
i.

(
ow
iv.
i.

12

3. 7

5.

ii.

6.

X. 17
xiii.

(1.

.^).

6. 9.
5.
vii.
i.

23.
9

1 4.

1 7.
11.

5.
8.
;

.
.

20.
5.

20.
8.

I.

yii/ vi.

14 2, 12; XV. 16 3; 47 5
21
;

ix.

x. 9

xii.

viii.

oirc

10
ii.

X.

iii.

18,

7. 5

10.

viii. 7

24

077
opy
.

iii

24
;

xi.

98.

3.

^91. . oesfor
.

24

xiv. 23.

.
9
xvii.

25;
ix.9
ix.
I,

v.

17; 18 ;

iii.

3;
;

iv.
viii.

16,

vii. I
;

18

22,

24
4
;

X. 9,

vi. 5.

53.
5.
1.

5
1 6.

10

xiv.

18; 22, 23 ;
2.
1 9.

xiii.

xvii.

|W83.
5.

3; 91. 13.
iii.

22.

opciw's

.
8.
ii.

(?)

xiii. 3.

.
op^toy

,
3
J

7;

2.

94.
iv.

V. p.
i.

Schol.,

22
iv.

iwm

Fr. 24. 3.
7. 7

VI.

schol.;

iii.

13 schol.;

, ^, TO.
,
17,

.
13
;

5.
2

10.

.
,
14

^\//- .
ix. 7

13.

(?)

3 schol., 12, 13 schol.; V. 24 schol.; vi. 5


2 schol.,

schol.
1

vii.
;

2 2 schol.
xii. 1

ix.

1 3.

7. 12.

5 schol.

4 schol.
5.
;

(demonstr.).

be

.
3

ix.
ii.

. ^8
iii.
;

.
vi.

14;
10
;

iii.

21 12

16, 21, 23, 25,


xii.
;

25(?); 26; ix.


;

xiii. 4,

14
ii.

xiv.

23 schol.
i.

(
, ,
iii.

Of); 5.

10.

^
25

24,

9,
1

xiii.
;

.
6
;

xvi.

schol.;
1 1

schol.,

schol.

^20 13. i.

24.

* Pap.)

6 schol.
ix.

(relat.).

vi. 6.

24. II, 14;


;

/7
ii.
;

13.

IV. 8.

i.

II, 14, 16,

5.

iii.

22
8,

iii.

iv.

21

v. 4,

13;

vii.

15,

18,

24;

24 21 ;

42.

2.

7. 4.
ix. 6.

. 8.

20.

xiv. 3.

NEW LITERARY
51. 3ii.

TEXTS
xiii. 6.

275

vi. vi.

14;

xii.

2.

20;
21;

23;
xi. 2,

ix.

13
xiii.

{novs Pap.);
20j
xii.

11, 13,

i6(?);
XV. 2, 18,

xiv.

1 7.

xiii.

15?

TrXciytos viii.
xiii.

12.

4;
5.

xiv.
iii.
ii.

15;

19;

TrXeiW

17; 6. II.
10.
5.
i.

/ 5
iv.

12,

ii.

2 2.

23.
V. 7
i.

5.

17

ix.
1 3.

23.
xiii.

^ \
.

xii.

14 (?). 15; XV. 16. viii. 21 ; xii. 8.


.
.

vi.

. 14. . (?). 5. . 5j
23.
24.
5.
iii.

6. 3

xii.
iii. ii.

21.

V.

5.

14.
I (?).

20.

5.

8 /
irapv iv.
vi.
.

i.

20;
17.

21.

n-apa/3aiWiv

vii.
iii.

21
19.

79.

\
2.

7. 8.
vi.

V.

1.

91.

8.

7. 13.
1 9 24. XV. 21.

viii.

(?).

vi.

(
i.

,
;

8.
5

II

V.
ii.

15
19.
7

xiv. 9,

14

5.

i.

14,

5.

xiv. 13.

vi. 2 2.

ix.

14.

vii.

II.

xiv.

(.'').

^
2 2.
V.

.
ix.

.
.

8.

2.

27;

,
ix. 9

5.

.
19
j

.
.

V.

ix.
.

25.
viii.

5.

iii.

25(?).
xii.

lO.
I.

6.
;

!
ii.

xiii.

ii.

vi.

.
\.
iii.

14.
9; 12.

14;

vii.

5,

7,

8.

46.
3,
7

2.

V. 5

iii.

18;
ix.

18;
xi.

xii.

.
21.
;

15;
2.

iii.

25.

5.

iii.

23.

5
1.

1.
vi.

23. 3
ii.

(?).

16;
5.
iii.
;

7;

16;

^
ii.

7 (?)
vi,

10
;

10, 11, 22, 26,

7.
iii.

1 1

:
viii.

i6
;

15;
;

vii.

29 //

9. 8
vii.

98. 4. 12; Fr. 23. (a) 4.


1 3.

13

xi.

xiv.

9;

5.

xiv.

4,

iii.

15. 12.
iii.

iii.

5.

1 5

XV.
I

20.
;

.
xv. 19.
iv.

(?); xiv. 17
4.
ii. ii.
;

94. 16 ; 10; 5.
i.

vi. 9,

2, 8 (?)

24; 6. 4; 10. 98. 2.


Tret'^e-

i.

8
/$
V.

XV. 3, 17

iii.

i8;
xii. 7.

viii.

ix.

^
-/

^^ .
5.
i.

18

6, 14

15

49.

in.

3 schol.
i.

/'?

5.

vi.

5 schol. 20.

24
6.

91. 19.

V. 3

xiv.
vi.

xiii. 8.

6.
;

X.

22

xii.

I.

ni.
xii; 3

13
17
;

iv.

19
;

vi.

xii. 1 5.

6.
vii.

wore

22;

22;

x.

19;

ix. 3.

xiii. 9.

elI'l'Xiv. 12
.
.

^
]

xiv.
vi. 2

22; 6.5.
;

xi. 5.

xii.
i^

3, 4.

Pap.),

V.
vi.

15. 3. i8 ; xv. 15.

89.
iii.

2.

13

xiv. 25.

xvi. I.

iii.

6, 1

ix. 1

(1.

),
;

^ ^
.
5.
5.
6.
iii.
. .
.

in.

15

ix.

16.

i.

g,

iii.

9.

iv. 8.

xiv. 24.

5. iu. 12.
iii.

V. I.

5.

25
iii.

(?);
1 3.

9. 5.

22.
V.

V. 2.

iv. 9.

9,

V.

1.

.
iii.

ix. 4.

9. 7
V. 1 7
i.

6(?), 15; xiii. 8. iii. 21.

24

5 marg.
20.
II.

47.
v.

4 6.

xiii.

1 1

16.

ix.

16;

xiv. 14

xiii,

; ; ;

276
iv. 2 1
viii.
;

INDICES
xiv. 7

23(?);
1

.
J

20.

/
9.
viii.

xi.
vi.

12.

xii. 3,

10
;

5.

iii.

10;
(?).

8, 12.

68.

I
i.

iv.

6.

3. 7

;'' iv.

21
V.

V.

6.12
5.
iii.

(?).

07
7,

81. 4 II.
;

X.
iv.

6.

21.

18 16; xiii.
v. 1.

(
5.

105. 3

Pap.);

X.

17;

24;

13,

(?).
ii.

15.
iii.

20 marg.
11.

Toy/ia V. 9 V.

1.

5. Tore
ii.

21.

iv. 1 8.

18.

5.

iii.

48.

2.

Tpayos xiv. 16.


;

91. ip
xiv.
vi. 9
1 1

;(
5.
i.

viii.

8; ix. 2
i.

92.

5.

28.
;

5.

14 schol.

94.

6.

"SiKvpos 1.

'

8.
xi. 6.

. 4
14,

'
((

^
ii.

xi. 2 (?).

14.
1.

xi. 13, V.

,
;

25(?).
5.
i.

5j " 6> 26; v. 4; vii. I viii. 19,20; ix. 11; xiv. 20 xvii. 6 X. 4 (?) 5. ii. 26; 10. 7.

22;

'
.

viii. 4.

91.

xi. 3j
vii.

.
6
;

13

V. 1.

4>

11. 1
ii.

1 (?).

25

(ye
;

Pap.),

5.

9. 3.

V. 9,

1 5,

18

(1.

),
2. 3.

15

Tfiveiv ix. 19.

19; vii. 15; xii. 10; ... 5. iii. 6. ix. 17; xi. 6.
xii.
.
.

((

5.

i.

16.

TCKvov

iii.

4
;

5.

ii.

5,

iii.

16,

V.

1.

ii.

18.

20.
24.
TtKtiv
i.

1.

13.
1 5,

V.

4
vii.

5.

iii.

.
25

vii.

iv.

3.

xiii.

23.

^'
ix. 8.
i.

ill.

21,

5.

ii.

23.

xiv. 6.

94.

5, 8.

;
5

iii.

20.

i.

16.
ix.

7. I.

xii. 7.

5
Tixi/^i.

xiii.

10.

xiv. 20.
ix. I 4.
ii.

\(
26,

9;

V.

13;
;

V.

20.

.
21,
;

12.

2. 2

5.
6.
2.

schol.,
V.
I
;

ix. 6.

12, 15, 23
vii. 8,

iii.

8;
3,
;

v.

iii.
;

13;
xii.

II

viii.

18;

10. 4

18 40.

10; 7. 7

15;

vi.

25

vii.

ix.

10, 26
i.

20, 22.

xiv. 14 5(?); 5. ii. 7 schol., iii. 20; 11. 5; 84. 2 V. 1.; 86. 2; 91.
2
;

xiii.

12,
1.

>;5
Tt'f iii.

91. 23.
7.
7.

2.
;

15; XV. 21;

.
iv.

1 1 (?).

vi.

16, 21
vii.

91. 16.

1 3.

18
15,

(v.

1.

), 19
18, 21,
vii.

vii.

^23.
xii. 1 4.

V.

9, 13,

i7,

HI.

13.

22, 24, 15, 18;

26;
viii.

vi.

7;

13,
IV.

vi.

21.

5 \Kflv
ii.

6. II.
2 2.
V. 1 1 (?).
vii.

iii.

13;

ix. 7, 13,
J

22(?);

''

91. 17. 14. 5


iii.

1 7.

88. 5 (?). iii. 26 (?

Pap.).

15; ix, 6,8; X. 19; xii. 13, 17; XV. 17 2. 4 xiii. 14 3. 7, 8; 5. ii. 16, 17 50. 4. ii. 9; iii. 24; iv. 5, 17; viii. V. 16 vi. 4 ; vii. 6; 22; ix.5; xii. 5, 10, 15; xiv. 5, 11; xiii. 2, 5, 15; XV. 20; 3. 9; 66. 2.
3, 13,
; ; ; ;

II.

xi.

17.

xiv. 1 9.
vii.

,
*
).

I'j.

4 (wro

^
/
/t
.

5.

iii.

12.

.
vi.

21

xi.
ix.

(.
2.

1.

.).
xiv.
1 7.

13
;

ii.

II.

Toi

iii.
.

8
. .

vii. 9.
iii.

Toio
4

v. 7 ; xv. 3. Fr. 28. 2.

iv.

5
1.
.

xvii.

5.

ii.

16.

5.

23.
11. 6.
6.

5.

iv.

15;

xi.

13,

i8;

79.

6.

xii. I.

iii.

/.

NEIV LITERARY TEXTS


</)<Bveti/

277
iu.

:. .
vii.

xi.

22

ix. 3, 9, 11.

. 8;
;

.
;

13,

6(?).

vi.

14

5.

i.

18.

vi.

ix. 2

1 6.

.
26
;

12
;

5 (?) ; xi. 23.

6.

22;
18
;

91.
ui.

93.
;

4
ii.

19

via.

3. 2.
V.

15;
iii.

.
;
;

.
4.

.
;

ix. 18.

20

Fr. 23. (a) 2.


vi.

14.

2.
iv.
1 1

"

91. 17
1

27; 3.

(?);

7.

' .
xiii.

2.

.
;

(fv

),
(v.
1.

24.

6
ix.

).
1.

12.

9.
xi. 2.

;^'09

1. 3

;^ .

iv.

26.

v.

5. . 9

\// Fr. 32. 2. . 21 ;

;^
vi. 7,

80.

6.

23.
vi.

/3 .
i.

vi.

15

iii.

. 17, 8;
4
i. ;

25

( .
xi. 9.
iii.

\(
xiii.

;^aptf ix. 9

^^
yjr

vii.

12.
4.

vii.

xiv. 19.

26;

25.

Xei/iafetv xi.

4;
xi.
1

vi.

6, 7, 19, 22.

5
i.

Pap.); i3;Fr. 27.1.


;

xet'pix. II
xiv.
ix.
iii.

3; 5.

17.

S>

v.

24;
8,
;

vi.

15;
3. 5
2.
;

XV.
5.

17;

6.

xvii.

xiv. 6

5.

ii.

8.

7 (?) ; 91. 13. 5. iii. 21.


^uy)

6 (v. 1. \S>pos). 5 marg. ; x. i marg.

6.

12

10; 49.
vii.
;

. 9;
iv.

18.
V.

18.

5 marg.

14
12
;

ix.

25

. 9
vi.
*5

iu. 8.

. ?,
.

vi.

18.
7,

X, 15.

91.

xiv. 9.

.
xiv.

II.
.

ii.

2o; xiv. 18. 17; vi. 4;


23
iv.
iv.
;

.
ix.

14;

21

48.
8.

47.
1
1

9.
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1.

3 V.

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1 6,

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19.

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).
()

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;^/3^a5at).

9. 6.
xpoj/os vi.

(
;

5.

.
;

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6
20,
(?).

23
xiv.

.
;

7> 9>

II

16

14,

ui.

19, 27.

xiv.

19
;

81. 2.

6.

iii.

21

xiv.

(\(

ix.

5
6.

xi.

')

5.

ii.

21.

iii.

13

1176 (SatyruS,

?/^ of Euripides)
fragments)

{Numbers
39.
iu.

23.

37. i. 17 ; 38. U. II. 39. X. 37.


aytiv

'
8.

in thick type refer to


39.

.
.

7.

39. xix. II,

.
4-

;^^^
xvi.

1. 2.
vi.

39.

39.
8.

vi.

20, VU. 21, XviU.

28.
ii.

28.

...

.
14.
i.

6.

13. 3 39. xiu.


aei

I.

39.
.
. .

ix.

38. iv. 9(?) 2 2. 39. 8, XXUi. Atrr? 38. . 2. 1 8. 39. 39. XV. 3 aKouctr 22. 8. 37. iU. 14

\ ^
39.
iv. 2,

31,32
37.

{ .
20.

Pap.),
iu. 2 I

37.

i.

/*

39. xvi. 14, 16. 39. Xxi. 7 39. iv. 19, 3^, XV. 21,

5 2.

26, xvui. 13 13. (?).

(
VII.

Pap.).

18.

2.

5. 7

/at

39. . 21. 39. xvn. 24. 39. xix. 3. 39. iii. 22,
39.
X. 27.

^v.

.
.

39. vi. 16. 39. xiu. 37


1

21.

i.

39. XviU. 20. 39. iv. 25. 38. 8


39.
iii.

16; 39.

13. 3 (?) ; 38. ui. 1 6, 15, iv. 6,

io(?),

,
14;

xiii.

24, XX. 10.

39.

12.
2.

xix. 16.

20, ix. 28,

xiii.

39. XXUi.

xvui. 13 (!

37. . 24

278
^Ava^ayopeioi 37. iu. I?

INDICES
39. 1 4. 39. ix. 7 39. xix. 20. 8. ii. 4 ; 39.

. ?
xiii.

29,
xvi.

vii.

28,

ix.
xiii.

22, X.

2,

39.
39.
xiv.

vii.

5.

25, xii. 25,

36, xiv.

7,

13, XX.

12, 23,
;

4,

30,
;

XV.

10, xvi.
5.

35, 18,

xviii. 1

40. 4 39. ii.


xiii.

?
\(

21, xviii. 6, xix.

19,

38.
.

i.

12

39.

V.

30, xxi. 18, 25.

II, xviii. 31, xxii. 27.


. .

39. vi. 9. 39. XV. 27.


11.
i.

33.

i.

9.

3.

1 3,

xiii.

4,

7
8.
X.

41. 5.

39.
ii.

iii.

1 5, X. 1 7. vii.
vii.

13. 6; 39.

16.

xiv. 13.

, / ? ? ?
^

39.

16.

^
32(?).

39. Xvi. 1 9. 39. iv. 36. 39, iii. 17. 39. xiii. 39, xix. 5. 39. ii. 20. 39. iv. 9 (?). 39. iv. 36, ix. 16, xix,
39. xvii, 23. 39. X. I.

?
/3
. .

19.

ii.

2.
i.

17
7,

39.

38.

8.

4,

xiii.

13, 14, 26, 29, xiv.

40. 3
.

(?).

?
ydp

? ( ?
8.
i.

32. 39.

34, xix. 21, XX. 1 1, xxii. 3. 39. xiv. 21.

vii. 8.

39. xxiii. 2. 39. ii, 12. 38. iii. 8 (?), 20. 39. xiii. 17. 38. ii. 15.
ii.

^
vii.

39.

XXii. II.

39. ix. 15. 39. X. 13. 39. xix. 33 atToKiiiteiv 39. Xxi. 1 8 38, iv. 28. 39, XXi,
5

18.

38.
(?).
iii.

ii.

5; 3; 22. 9; 35. 3; 7, iv. 19; 39. ii. 19,


i.

26;

10.

( .).

12,

iv.

22,

vi. 7,

23,

16, X. 16,
3, xxi.

xiii.

16, 24, xiv.


10,

' ^
8.
ii.

37. iii. 1 8. 39.xvii. 21.


iii.

37.

22.
1 4-

39. XX.

3, 22, XV. 5,

21, xix.

39. xiii. 19. 39. xxi. 24. 39. xix. 26. 39. iii. 9. 39. xxii. 23. 39. ix. II. 39. XUi. 1 5. 39. X. 2 , xxi. 35.
12,

35
13
;

39. xiv. 20. 39. xiii. 33


41.
6.

ye 10.
vi.

i.

40. 6; 44. i. 37. iii. 21; 39.

40.5(?).
39,
iii.

17, vii. 25(?), xiii. 23,

1 9,

XV.

1 3.

39.
8,
ix,

1 5.

32, xiv. 28, xvi. 24, xvii. 20, xix. 6, XX. II.

I3J

39.

yf\av 9. 6.
yeXot'w?

20.

39.

vi.

7.

)7 39.

39. xix. 355 xxi


24.

39. xiii. 23, 39. X. 14, xii. 23, 39. XX. 30.
vi.
1 3.

xxii.

39. . 1 9. 39. iii. 3. 8 (?) 1 38. 39. V, 1 6. 39. 34 39. xvi. 23. OTipaCfiv 39. ix. ^.

' -

21.

?
iav 2.

39. 42,

xiv. 31.
2,

41.

2.

39.

2.

32,
18.

25, xix. 17^ XX. 9, 10, xxi. 12. 8. ii. I5


V.
iv.

39.

/;/?

ix.

39. XV. 32. 38. ii. 6 ; 39. ii, 9. 38, ii, 6. 39. vii. 35. 39. . 20 (?). 39. Xviii. 29.
1. 8.

yoi)v39.

23,

ix.

20, xix. 12.


ix.

6; 39.
vii.

14.

2,

i.

39.

I, X. 6,
I,

23,

xii.

?
,
38.
eyw 10,
1
ii.

39. vi. 39. . 5 39. XX. 27.


xi.

5.

39.

31

('

,).
22
;

xiii.

28, xiv.

19, xv.
^

39.
aClfti 8.
ii.

V. 1 5

8,17.
37.
i.

..
38.
xii.
i.

3 (?) 39. iv. 1 9. 39. ix. 5 6. 8 ; 8. ii. 6, 16; 13. 4(?); 1. i. 5; 38. i. 13 (?) iv 33 ; 39. iv. 15,

39.
xxi.

25

39. XX.

12,

33> XV.
xii.

1 1,

8, xxii. 10,

39. vii. 13. 38. iv. 30. 39. vii. 14.

i.

4; 39.

19,

xiii.

14, XV. 4

20; 39.

ix. 16.

/.

NEW LITERARY
xvi.

(hai 16.
iv.

i.

23; 38.

ii.

3; 37. i. 18, iii. 13; 39. ii. 15,


vii.

17.

?
8, 31.

TEXTS
vii.

279
8.
ii.

39.

^TjXoCi'

I (?).

39. XX. 22.


fTvavayeiv

15, V. 17, 24, 23, ix. 28, xii. 24,

16,

39. XV.

1 7.

40.
iv.

4.

xiii.

37,

xiv. 20, xvi. 18, xviii. 5 (?), XX. 34, xxi. 33, xxii. 20.
ovTi

eW 39. xiii. 7 37.


i.

22; 39.

11,

39. XV. 37.


39.
vii.

xvi. I.

6, ix.

18,

xiii.

29,

39.

ii.

19, xiv. 30.

t7ieti/39.xvi.2 2,xvii.i5,xx.6.
(Is

8.

iii.

10; 39.

vi. 8, ix. 8,

39. xiii. 9. eneaOai 39. Xvi. 30 (?). eVi 37. i. 16, 19; 39. ix. 22,

xviii. 3,
fiye'ia-eai

XX. 10.

X. II.

5
fK 16.

elaiivai
i.

39. xiv. 15.


I.

embOKvdv 39.
8.

39. iv. 13, 14. 39. X. 13. 39. xviii. 22. fKUvos 39. XV. 21, xvii. 19.
Kcivos 2.
i.

II.
iv,

14, xxi. 10.


ii.

X. 29, XV. II, 19, 28, xix.

38. i. 2 2. 39. vi. 14, XX. II. ^^oslO. i. 10; 11. i. 4; 39.
^

xiv. 33.

Xvi. 27.

rJKfiv

9. 8.

14.

39.

39.

12.

8. U. 1 9.

"
ix.

39. vi. 29. 39. v. 21. 39. iii. 13. 2. i. 13; 39. xxii. 2. eXXoyt/Ltos 38. iv, 20 (Xoy.

({

4 ^
.
.

(' ?

39. Xxi. 26. 39. X. 24. 39. Xxi. 20. 39. XV. 24.
;

(5 39.

xxii. 19.

iv. iv.

14.

9. 9

39. XX. 14.


21.

tpyovSl.

i.

!
( 6(
22.

pa 39.

37.

39. V. 25 (?). 39. xviii. 19. 38. i. II.


18.
i.

3.

epftj/39. xix. I, XX. 17.

39. XV. 12.


iii.

39. XXi.
8.
iii.

8.

38.

38.

ii.

25

40.

3.

Pap.).

39. xvi. 13. eynof 38. ii. 13 ; 39. xiii. 12. 39. xviii. 10. ev 34. i. 3 ; 37. iii. 19; 38. ii. 25, iv. 30 39. iv: 33,

i7(?); 39.x. II. 39. vi. 8. en 39. xxi. 29. (v 39. iv. 24, xiv. 28.
evayayos 2.
i.

39. ix. 9. 38. iv. 25.

39.
38. 39.
ii.

ix.

29.
1 5.
;

^ear^y 39. XXU.


iii.

('^
xiii.

4. U. 2 2.

16

39.

xviii.

39-

fVKKeia 39. iv. 34. EijKkeia 39. xiv. 3 1

14, 17.

9, 30, xi. 20, 36(?), xiv. 22, xvii. 26, xviii. 26, xx. 19,

10, X.

21,

19. ii. I. evXoywTepos 39. xiu. 24.


.

xxi.

6,
3.

32,

xxii.

3,

20

40.
ivavrios

:
23,
20,

39.
8.

xi.
iii.

1 8.

6 (?)

39.

iv.

vii.

ivaXios 38.

iii.

14.

xvi.

22, 32, viii. 11, xv. II, 29, xix. 21,

39. vii. 4. 39. X. 20. ^ereoi 39. XV. 6. 39. xxi. 14. ^j/j/To's 39. ii. 19. 39. iv. 3 1. 38. iii. 1 5.

^
8.

39. XV. 3. 39. V. 27, xvi. 24. 39. vii. 31, viii. 13. 39. iii. II.
xviii.

32,

XX.

24,

xxi.

4,

23,

( !
eveivai

39.

27.

38. ii. 7 (f"") 38. iv. 35. 39. xviii. I. 39. xii. 20. e'iieVat 39. XXi. II. i\opylC(iv 39. x. 33 (?). 39. V. 26. 39. xxi. 13. ioiKfvai 39. iv. 18, xii.

(
^

((
40.
25,

xxii. 13, xxiii. 6.

/
tStos

39.

xii.

]).

(1.

Ev-

39. xiv. 15. 6.13; 37.i. 7

39.

xii.

39. xiii. 38. 39. XX. 5 39. iv. 26. exeti/ 10. i. 13; 38. ii. 26; 39. ix. 8, xi. 8, xiii. 13,
xiv. 26, 35, xvii. 13, XX. i;
4.
i.

" "

^/;

33, XX. 28. 19. ii 4. 16. i. 2.


xiii.

(/ 39.

II.

38. iii. 1 9. 39. XV. 13.


ii.

I (?).

... exfip 42.


4.

3.

ecuXor 2.

39.
xvii. 21,

xiii. 33, xvi. 21, XX, 16.

Z(vs 39. XV. 35.

39.

xvii. II.

28

,
.

39. Xvi. 24. 39. iv. II. 39. 11. 5


4'
xiii.

<<-

(
33.

INDICES
39.
ii.

vii.
1 8,

27.
8.

8.

8. ii. 8 )7 2. i. 1 1 38. ii. 29 ; 39.


;

18.

i.

9;
ix.

iii.

9,

3.
1. g.

39.

32

1. .

39.

iii.

14

38. iv. 20 (1. 39. XX. 29.


1.
;

,
;

16,

xiii.

II, xvi. 16.

39.
?).

iU. 6.
iii.

39. vi. 19, xix. . 39. ix. 24. 38. . II 39. 17.

.
8.
vi.

.
;

3. i. 4 5. 6 4 22 39. xxii. 23. 39. xviii. 31.


i.
;

14;

8.

.
i.

2 (?).

33.

II

39.

39. xxi. 15. 18. i. 9.

'
23
M>"?M'7

39.

2 (?).

39. xvii. 20. cat 39. iii. 19.

39.

ii.

39. Xvi. 14.

39.

24.

39.

xiv. 34.

17,

vii,

6, ix. 12, xv. 4, 7, xxii. 6.

XX.

2, xxi.

(8

39. xiu.
.

2,

XVUl.

14.

I.

jcarayeXai/

^'^
12,
viii.

/ . (
14.
KitiOf.

39. XXU. 1 6. 39. xviii. 25. 39. XXU. 32. 39. XVii. 28. Karexeir 39. xix. 23. 10. i. 7 ; 39.

39. xix.
xxi. 32.

8,

XX. 32,

32.
.
.

39. Xviii. 26. 38. iii. I 7. 39. iv. 24, xviii. 27, xx.
iv.

/iovof

22. 3. 39. XViii. 12. 38. iv. 32 ; 39.


.

vii.

35,

39. xxi. 20. 39. xiii. 5.

See
39.

39. 39. iii. 21. 39. xviii. I 7. Kparftv 39. XV. 2. 39. xiv. 28. 39. iv. 33, ix. 4 (?). KVpeiv 39. vi. II.

39.

xii.

28.

. 1 2. . 1 6.

39. iv. 5. 39. vi. 21. 39. vii. 28. 38. ii. 14. 39. XV. I 39. xiii. 20. /LieyaXfioy 39. ix. 1 7. 8. ii. 21 39. X.
.

'
26.
. .

'
12.

xxii. 13.

8.

ii.

29.

'
.
39.
1 8.

39. xxi. 23. 39. XV. 33. 39. 38. 39. XXU. 4 39. XX. 3

1 5.

^39.
39.
iii.

(/
iv.

38. iii. 39. xiii. 39. xi. 12.


11.
i.

.
7

ii.

12.

28.

39.

39. xiv.

8
KvuivQQ.

/^
28,
xiii.

39.

1 6.

20.

xvii. 1 2, xxi. 22, 34.

39. xxi. II. 39. iv, 1 7. 39. vii. 1 9, ix. 30. 39. Xvi. 25.
ii.

39. XV. 34. 39. XX. 13. 39. XVii, 2. 38. iv. 19 ; 39. iv. 23,
ix.

v.

39. xiii. 23. 39. xxii. 31 viVjj/ia 39. XV. 7 39. xix. 13. 38. iii. 9 (?) 12 ; 39.

V.

23.

26, X.
XV.
5,

3,

16, 36,

40.
39.
vi.

2.

4,
2,

xix.

XX.
ii.

9, 15, 22, 22, xxii. 15.

19

(?),

xxi. 29.

39.

8.
iv.

ovv 8. 14.

9; 39. xvii.
1 3.

ij,

TO.

30. 39. xvi. 16. 1

39.

39.
39.
ix.
ii.

8. .

ii.

II.
xviii.
iv.

14.

35>

38.

28.
6

38.
Xeytiv 17.
ii.

iii.

21
i.

39.
16,
ii.

8.

6.
(?).

, ,
2,

(demonstr.).

xvi. 7, xix. 28.


I iv.
;

40. 9
8,

8 39. .
08 39.
ii.

,
27.

2 8, xi. 20, xix.

38.
6,

14; 39.

20,

V.

22(?),vii. 36,ix. 27, 3i(?), xii. 18, xiii. 34, xv. 37,
xviii. 9, 19, xix. 5, 11,

39. xiv. II. 39. Xviii. 9. 38. iv. 21 ; 39.

xxi. I. 26.
7, xvi. 12, xvii.

xx.

34, xxi. 29.

XdVe' 8

'

xviii.

23.

39. xxi. 28. 39. ix. 25.


xxii. 24.

otof re

39.

39.
8.

iii.

4.

ii.

8,

39.

1 6.

5.

39. xii. 27. 39. ii. 27 (?).

/.

NEW LITERARY
xiv. 25.

TEXTS

281
.

"
Of 8.
iv.

89. xiii. i8, xvi. 10. 37. Hi. 1 5. 39. vii. 23. 39. XX. 15 39. xii. 28, XV. 36. 39. xvii. I. 39. Xvii. lO. 39. xvi. 15. 39. iv. 29, xviii. 8.
9.
ii.

o^Xof 38.

iv.

24.

/
vi.

1.

i.

6.

38.
28,
8.

iv.
viii.
ii.

34

39.

iii.

7,

14, ix. 26.

38. ii. 22. 39. vii. II. 39. vi. 14, xx. 7. 39. iv. 22, XV. 19,
39. V. 24. 22. 4.
.

24(?); 39.
1 7, XV.

x.

xvi.

25.

*J.
i.

17; 33.
vii.

21

39.

10.

i.

5
iv.

39. 39.
.
. .

10,

xiii.

22, xix. 22.


iv.

37, 38,

xix. 6, XX. 21.


xvii. 25, XX. 7.

18.

i.

7
vi.

39.

II.

39.

iii.

13, xxi. 6.

14,
xii.

20,

35, X. 21,

30,

5 (?). XX. II.


oo-of

17, XV. 39(?), xviii. Of ye 39. xix. 6, II, xvi. 9, xix.

39. XV.

23

^
16,
xviii.

38.

23

(?)

39.
8,

iv.

xii.

25,

xvi.

xviii.

29, xxii. 2.

39. Xxi. I. 39. iv, 26. 39. Xxii. 25.


39.
xii.

39. xvii. 17. 39. iv. 20. 39. XV. 2 6. /ctf 39. XV. 30.
1.

18.

i.

2 (?), 6 (?)
i.

39. xvii. 15, xviii. 21 Pap. oartf 38. ii. 8 8. ii. 3i(?); 34. i. 3; 39. iv. 5(?), xiv. 14, xix.

1 8.

22. 6(?); 38. ii. 16,


iv.
jjix.

33.
iv.

4 (?);

1. 6.

().

39.

.
39.

15, xvii. 17,


15.

27 38

(),

(?);

39.

21.
x. 28,

38. 21
2.

ii.

9;

(TTfp eVrti/ Pap.).


i.

12.
rt,

Ta^of 39.
xviii. 4,

vi.

23.

napioff

39.
OX),

33.
;

33.

i.

23
iii.

37.
;

38.
I,
iv.

i.

20,

16

i. 19; 39. iv.

5 ; 39. 38. ii. 2 2. 39. iii. 10. 39. XXi. 3I.


9. II.
iv.

vii.

9.

38. ii. 10. 39. iv. 3. 39. iv. 9, viii. 17. 38. ii. 8 39. iv. 38. 37. iii. 23; 39. ix. 32. 39. vii. 33.
;

39.
x. 2, xiv.

17

{.
i.

8, 22, V. 22,

xviii.

3, xix.

38.
29

33

39.

Pap.).

XX. 5; 40.6.
1.
iii.

39.
Pap.);

oibe 38.

20
39.
7,

{
xii.

39.
oiv 8. 14,

iv. 2, xi.
ii.

16, 19, xix. 4.


xxi.

xviii,

30, xvii. ' 21.

38. ii. 1 6, 26. Trar;;/) 39. vi. 5, 1 5, 26, vii. 38. ii. 27. 39. Xxii. 3 1. 38. ii. 23.
7rei/;;f

2.

39. XXi. I 7. 38. i. 20. 8. ii. 27; 38.


39.
X. 21.

14

37. iii. 24. 39. xxii. 29.


2.
i.
i.

39. xviii. 24. 37. iu. 25. o^f 39. xi. 10. 39. V. 2 2. 9. 7, 9 38. iii. 20 Pap. ofJrot 38. ii. 28. o^Tof 38. iii. 22 39. ii. 9, iv.

I, vii. 15,

29,
xii.

34

(.),
xiii.

ix. 10,

23,

23, 30,

10, 12, 15, XV. 6, 14, xvii.

9, 13, 26, xviii. 4, 34(?), XX. 16, 23. 39. iv. 32, vii. 34

' (
.
37.
vi.

((
iii.

39. 38. 38.


20.

V.
iii.

28.

iv.

39. iii. 16. 9 31 ; 39. ii. 17,


;

15 38.

8.
iv.
vii.

ii. 30 ; 22; 39.

11.
iii.

37.

iii.

6.

37. iii. 20. 39. vii. 7 39. V. 10 (?). 39. xxii. 28.
2 2.
i.

iii.

(
xii.

10, iv. 25,

I, 3,

5,

20,

29,

xiii.

35, xvi. XX. 20.

XV.

10, 18, xiv. 7, 12, xvii. 16,

39.

V.

14.

8.

(?).

/^
18.
TrX^^of

17.

39.

iv. 7.

38.
i.

iv.

31.

38.

8.

39.
(?), iv.

(ovTot Pap.), xviii.

34

(?),

xix. 30. of^iKftv 41. 7

39. ii. 25 39. XV. 14.

32.

' ;

39. . 2 1, XV. 39. Xvii. 7 39. 12. 39. iv. 4 39. xiv. 23. 39. xvii. 34 39. V. 1 9 (?) 39. xxi. 14.

2 2.

282
39,
V.

INDICES
IQ.
.
.

Tfiviiv

19.
ii.

ii.

3.
vii.

33.
34,
1

i.

21

39.
xiii.

vi.

15,

(
39.
8.
pis

iv.

2i,xviii. i6,xx. 33.

reXeiovv 8.

4.

ix.

21,

ii.

1 8.

1. 3.

39. iii. 14. 39. xvii. 13.


39. XXUi. I. 39. XU. 1 6. 39. ix. 18.

!
4.
TiKTeiv
Tt/io(9eos

13, xiv.

39. XX. 25.

3;

7. 3 (?); 8.
I.

ii.

8, xviii, 5, xxi. 30.

T-eW 39. XV.

39. xix. 7 39. xvii. 22. 39. vi. 4.


39. xxii.
iii.

i,

18, 34(?).
i.

37.
xiii.

23

38.
ii.

16,

ii.

14, 20; 39.

10, V. 17,

'
39,

^
^
.
.

39. xiv. 27. 39. xiv. 8. 39. iii. 8. 39. X. 34. 39. xiii. I {iveyKOiv). 39. X. 2 . 39. xiii. 26, 29. 39. XV. 25.
2.
i.

39. xix. 14, 31. 39. xix. 9. 39. Xvi. 23. 39. 38. 39. XXi. 1 6, 36. 39. vi. 12. 39. xiv. 24.

10, 24, XV.


ii.

36
iv.

(?).

ns 38.
16,
Totos

21

39.
vi.

{),

^/' 39.
38.
vi,

16.
vii.

30.
12,

V. 2 5

(),
ix.

16, ix. 14,

ii.

xiii.

24, xix. 25, xxi. 7.


27.

10,

39.

ToiovTos
vi.

8. ii. II ; 39. ii. 15, 24, xiv. 32, XX. 8, 12.

8.

iii.

5(?);

39.
TOTf 38.
rpeZs

38.

i.

27.

^/

xvi. 6, xxiii. 5.

/
/

39. ix. 6. 39. vi. 2 2. 3d. xvii. 29.


I.

39. X. 30. ii. 28.


iii.

39, xiv. 9. 39. . II. 38. . 29. 39. xiii, 19 37. i. 26.
.

39.

30.

37.

20.

(
16.
i.

41.

39. vii. 25, xix. 25. 39. XX. I, 8. 39. xix. 1 3. 39. V. 13, xiv. 2 2.
39. xxii. 29.

38. iii. 1 4. 39. v. 13 (?). 39. ii. 8, iv. 2. 39. X. 32, XX. 28.
xxi. 4.
Tupavveiv

39.
iii.

xiv. 1 8.

39. xvii. 19. 12 ; 39.

38.
24.

Xeip 22. 7

39.
vii.

iii.

6.

39. xvi. 31 39. xxu. 10. ; 39. XVU. g. 37. iu. II.
2.
i.

awe'xeii'

39. Xviii. 7 8; 38. iii. 26. 39. xviii. 13. 39. vii. 1 7. 39. XV. 15
39. XV. 29.

39.
vrrep 7.

3, xix. 27.
vi.

6.
ui.

(
39.

39.
;

27, XX. 23.


i.

^/38.
;

18.
5.
ii.

22. 5

iii.

/ /
.

39. xiii. 8. 39. vii. 26. 39. xix. 19.


8.
ii.

2 2.

(
xxii. 6.

8.

39. xx.

2,

33.

i.

39.

xviii. 1 5.

39.

X. 15, xix.

35

?
\j/eyeiv
v//-vSijf

II 39. 39. iv. 39. xi. 26 (1. 39. iv. 35) xxi 38. . 24 38. iii. 18.

.
;

v.

26.

).
2.

(?).

39.

31-

7;38..26; 39..35
39.

.
3

/^
. .

6. 1 5

Taneivovv 37.
re

1. .
i.

21.

39. vi. 24. 38. ii. 1 1, 18, 23, iii. 10 39. vi. 25, vii. 13, xviii.
30, XX. 13, 30,xxii. 23,30.

^
\//'>?(5

39. iv. 28. 39. vii. 10. 39. viii. II. 39. XX. 4

39.

(?).

39, xiu. 27. 39. xiv. 19. 39. X. 8. 38. 8. ii. 21


;

i.

21

l6.

39,

iv.

38.

39. . 1 6. 39. xix. 29. 39. xiv. 2, 39. iv. 33


i.

.
28.

S)

38.
8.
iv.

iu.

19
23

39.
38.

xiv. 28, xv.

13, XX. 6.

iv.

28

39.

39. xix. 10, xxi.


37.
18.

2,

18,

xii.

8,

xviu.

24, xiu. 2, xiv. 22, XX. 29, xxi.

13.

39.

xviii. 18.

33, xxu. 24. 39. xxu. 9. 8. ii. 5


;

/.

NEW LITERARY
{c)

TEXTS

283

Citations in

7.

Aristophanes Thesm. 335-7 39. xii. 8-15. 374-5 39. xii 1-7. Incert. 8. 17-19; 39. ix. 25-8.
:

Demosthenes
c.
:

i. 40 39. viii. 17-33 Euripides Ino (Fr. 403. 3-4) 39. xvii. 1-6 Melanippe Desm.{Berl. Klass.N .\\.^,\2'^.
\

Arisiog.

Pirithous (Fr. 593) 37. ii. 19-28. Troades 886 37. iii. 26-9. Incert. 2. i sqq.; 37. iii. 9-14 (Fr. 912); 38. i. 16-30 (Fr. 913), ii. (Fr. 960, &c.), iii. 8-21 ; 39. ii. 8-14, iv. 33-9, vi. 1-15, xvii. 30-9 (Fr. 911), xviii. 7-8
(Fr. 911); 40; 41. Philemon, Incert. 39. vii. 32-6.

Fr. 492. 6-7)

39.

xi.
)

Adesp. 39. iv. 1-15, xvii. 10-13.

v.

12-30, xvi

1-16

II.

EMPERORS.

Augustus.
1188. 6
ei saep.

Hadrian.

Antoninus.

^AvTCuvivos

Septimius Severus and Caracalla.

Caracalla.

.. . . .
\ \
1209.

AtXios

86 86
1 3.

(.

1195.

5, II.

2e/3.

1198.

1,

28.

1198.

Kaiaapfs

2(05

. ("
1197. 21.

6/3.

1197. 5 1202. 6.

2(
12.

.
\
1209.

2(. 1196.

Philippi.

Callus and Volusianus.

? (-

284
Valerian and Gallienus.

INDICES

('!
Gallienus.

. ..

KaiVapey

OvaXfptavos
21.

AikIvvios OvaKtpiavos

\\6

,. 1187.

Aiklvvios

Meyiar.

,,

1200. 56.
1 2.

..

2t. 1200. 38.

,.
Claudius.

1200. 51 1200. 3 1208.


;

1208.

II.

AURELIAN.

1208.
Probus.

II.

Diocletian and

Diocletian and
01

. . ( .. , ,
beanorai

: .

2f/3.

1191. 25

112.

8.

. e. ,". .
\
/3.

2(. 1205. 14 2(. 1204, 1


1204.

'>

1208.

I.

)3

Constantius and Galerius.

.
!

1208.

20.

Constantine

.
1206.

1185.

^( '
8(6
2{
1185. 29.

(, 1200.
1209.
22.

22

1208.

6;

(. D.

06)

1200. 58.

III.

CONSULS.
1

\
eVi

(a.D.

eVt

1204.

'

.
.

258) 1201. 20. (a.D. 29 ) 1205.

4.

,. (a.D.

299)
1 1.

2(.

(a.D.

299) 1204.

! ' .' !
IV.
SavTiKOs

///.

CONSULS

(. D. 335) 120.

.
.

285

\
\

(. D, 347) 1190 5

MONTHS AND DAYS.


(a)

Months.

1209. 3 1208. 2.

'
8

1201.

.
12.

SfTrre/i^pios

1204.

1196.

8
7

() Days.
1201. 20,

8
\\Q5.
4,

1204.

12.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES.
I3
3.
i.
;

,
'!

! "
I,

" ,
1208. 2, 32. 1206. 4.

of Auielius Serenus also called f. Sarapion 1209. 8. also called Origenes

' ,
s.

1192.

5.

also called

Anubion,

s.

of

Hermaeus 1195.

Strategus 1196.

ofAmmonius

or

Ammonas

1198.

praefect 1191. 4, 18. praefect 1204. 8, 18.

praefeCt

1201.

13

Mussius Aemilianus 1201. . ... f. of Horion 1208. 13. strategus of the Heracleopolite nome 1189. introd., 2.

god 1188.

2 2.

' ', '


14.

Called S. of Anteis 1198. 5. 1198. 2, 32. S. of PolitaS 1200. 1 9. S. of IsidorUS 1222. I. f. and s. of Anteis 1198. 1198. 5. Called

-' ''
28.
2,

, ,
2,

32.

/Tfif s.

of Anteis 1198. 9.

s.

or

Ammonas and
4.

of Heracleus and f. of Ammonius Anteis 1198. 3, 6. also called Dionysius

1209.

also called Achilleus

. also

1200.

21.

called

Theon 1208.

basilocogrammateus of the Letopolite


s.

nome,

of Aristandrus 1219.

i,

20.

32.

epistrategUS (?) 1191.


s.

ex-exegetes,

of Sarapas 1196. 20.

speculator 1223. 2 1

,
/tos

basilocogrammateus of the Prosopite nome 1219. 14. s. of Leonides 1203. 16, 21, 22.
1212. introd. f. of Hermaeus 1195.
9.

. 1200.
.

4^ 4^

1196.

/
286
f

INDICES
strategus 1189. 3, 17. tax-collector 1192. 3.
27.

also called

Horion 1208.
4,

30.
1 9,

decaprotUS 1204.

of Aurelius Heracles 1206. 3. f. of AurcHus Morus 1200. 14, 18,


f.

40.

1208.
of Apion 1219.
II,
1

I,

21.

"! ",
6, 9.

1200.
f.

6, 57.

dicastes
9.

8
9.
I.

s.

of

Aurclius

Thonis

also called Sarapion, archii, 5, 9.


s.

1200.

of Aurelius

Theon 1201.
alsO called

of

Hermias 1208.
7) 12, 2

10.

.,

S.

of

/ ,
s.

Demetrius 1200. 49. god 1188. 3, 21.

Aurelius
d.

of ThcOll

, ",
s.

, ,
*8,
30
18.

also called Asclepiades 1199. 4.

'
&

1205.
S.

.
5j

of CatiUius 1201.
2.
2.

Heudaemon 1201.
StratCgUS
S.

1204.

1208.

II.

of Harasis 1206. 3, 6, 12. s. of Pausanias also called


11.

d. of Pausiris

1208.

Eutychus 1208.
1186.

pracses

of the

Thebaid

f.

of Cornelius

1200.

21.

also called SaraS,

of Sarapion 1209.

6, 25, 31.

Of 1205. 2 2. Qeav also called

Harpalus,

s.

of

also called

., surnamed
also called

Zoilus 1199. 5.

.,

of Aurelius

Sarapammon
3.

also

called

Dionysius 1204.

Ko'tiTOf

. also called Horion 1208. idiologUS 1188. .


.
of Pausiris 1208.

8,

SUmamed
Nepheros 1208.
1199.
3, 7, 30.

,
d.

9.

d.

of

Demetrius 1200. 59. Qeav s. of Harpalus 1201. 9. praepositus pagi WQO 2. of Aurelius Thonis or s. Thonius 1208. 4, 6, 26. s. of Serenus and f. of Aurelius Thonius and Aurelius Demetrius 1208. 4, 6, 7, 28. senator 1205. 8, 12, 25. S. of HermiaS 1208. lO. s. of Hareotes 1200. 14, 40. s. of Dionysius 1208. 3, 8.
.

{)

also called Asclepiades 1199. 4. d. of Agathon 1206. 4, 6, 13. of Hermias 1208. 10.

^
4.

'
9.

d.

of

Theon

also called Zoilus

'
3.

StrategUS 1191. II.

S.

of DionysiuS 1208.

9, 10.
S.

of

Theon
Aurelius
sius

also called Atactius,

of

'-.

1204.
16.

^
2,

1200.

7, II, 1 5, 57, 62.

1202.

also called Demetria, d. of


7, 13.
3' 7

Euporus also called Diogenes 1209. 1205. 21 1206. 23.


32.

1209.

'

' '
;

also Called Origenes

1208.
1,

also Called DionysiuS, f. of Plutarchus also called Atactius 1204. 5.

epistrategus
also

(?)

1191.

14.
13

called

Dionysius
28.

,
(
s.

Sarapammon
s.

also called Diony-

of Aurelius Ptolcmaeus
I.

StrategUS 1187.
s.

of Sempronius 1202.

amphodogrammateus 1202.
deputy-epistrategus 1202.
also called Sarapion,
8, 24, 32. ei saep.
s.

.
of

also Called

Theon 1208.

1200. 42, 46.


also called Saras,
6, 25,
s.

Agathinus 1209.
of
also called

of Horion 1206. 5

Sarapion 1209.

31.

Antoninus 1200. 21.

/
Tfvvahios
Catillius

V.
s.

PERSONAL NAMES
4.
2.

287

Speculator,

of Gennadius speculator 1214. f. of Gennadius 1214.


2

1204.
s.

.
f.

of Varianus and
4.

of Aurelius

Eudaemon 1201.

^-,
7,13

also called D., d.

of Euporus also called Diogenes 1209.

05,

1221.

2.

.
of Aurelius

decaprotUS 1204.

, ,
1208.

4,

19, 27.
f.

Theon

also

called

, , , ,
14lius

1208.

12.
I,

1217.

. .

S.

of CatiUiuS 1201.
2.

5>

Aurelius

Heudaemon 1201.
Diogenes 1209.
(?).

also called

13.

1205. 24

also called
1 2.

.,

f.

of Aure-

Herammon 1208.
I.

Zeus

god 1213.
1221.
g.

.
also

StratCgUS

1204.

2.

Harpalus 1200. 60.

.
9.
s.

S.

of AureliuS Thonis
I.

Called

Asclepiades,

sur-

named

Z. 1199. 5. also called Z., ex-exegetes of

Alexandria 1199. 10, 16. f. of Philostratus 1203.

5.

of Isidorus 1222.

/ 8
f.

.
1200.
of

also
i,

called

Sarapion,

archidicastes
s.
s.

"HXtos
5, 9.
i.

Chaeremon 1218.

'

;?,
Aioyevis

, ,
1209.
tius

of Heraclides 1188. guard 1212. 2.

3,

14, 19.

1208. also called D. 1209. 1 3.


S.

of Heraclas

XO.

, . ',
god 1203.
f.

I.

1194.
of

2 6.

Didymus 1188.

3,

14, 19.

See

f.

of Antcis 1198.

6.

s.

of Harasis
6.

and

1185. I3; 1216.


4.
f.
f.

I,

23.

also called D.

,
1195.
1195.

',
',
d.

Petermouthis 1206.

3,

Called

f.

of

1206.

12.

of Aurelius Nepheros 1208. of Aurelius Pausiris 1208. 10.

3, 8.

called

Eutychus 1208.
I.

also Called D.,

" ' /

, 8 ,
23, 26.
3.
s.
f.

of Aurelius Plutarchus also called Atac-

1204.

5.
7.

comogrammateus 1188.

1205. 8, 12, 2, basilicogrammateus 1188.2,7,13 . cathoUcUS 1204. g, 2 2,

,
1186.
s.

. .
.

S.

of Pausanias also
11.

praeses of the Thebaid

1202. 4

1218.

6.

sumamed
3, 7,
I.

Tanechotis,

of Nepheros 1208.

eewv 1219. 3; 1220.


of
also
called
4.

1220. 2. 1207. 6.

also called

Anubion,

s.

of

Hermaeus

of Apollonides 1195. 9. of Hermacus also called Anubion

3.

, , , , ,

Zoilusll99.
assistant,

'
s.

30.

Ammonius 1198.

34. Asclepiades,

sumamed

of Onnophris 1203. 3 1
alsO Called

T. 1208.

28.

. 1205. 2 2. . praepositus pagi 1190. 2. . also Called Harpalus, .


9.

s.

of

Demetrius 1200. 59. s. of Harpalus 1201.


f.

tax-collector 1192. 3.

1223.
f.

2,

38.

of Aurelius Diogenes and Aurelius Isidorus 1208. 10.

1212. introd. 1212. introd. s. also called Zo'ilus, ex-exegetes of Alexandria 1199. 10, 16.
of

Theon of Theon

288

,
26.

INDICES

.
1199.

d.

of

Theon

also called

Zo'ilus

Oavios,

Qwvis

of Serenus and f. of Aurelius Thonius and Aurelius Demetrius


(or
s.

)
57.

9, 24.
S.

,
40.

S.

of Hareotes 1200.

1 4,

of Thonis 1208.

4, 6,

1208.

4, 6, 7,

26, 28.

,: ,
(/3 1205.
Theon

,
13
'laels

.
. senator
*. d. of

d.

of

also called Asclepiades 1199. 4.

1205.

8, 12, 25. 4, 6,

Agathon 1206.

' ',
1, 8,

, ,
NetAos

1217. 8. god 1211.

3.

also called

N.,

senator

1200. 20.

s.

of Diouysius 1208. 3,

30

a commentariis 1204. 26. StrategUS 1191. II.

f. {.

ofTheon,

assistant

of Catillius 1201.

1 6.

1203. 31. Varianus

, ,
?,
trius
f.

1208. 1208. 9.
AvpjjX.

*i. s.

(?)

.
1204.
s.

of Hermias 1208. 10. 1200. 7) Hj ^5 57> ^^'

1221. 3. s. of Hermias 1208. 10. of Posldonius and f. of Deme1

?
1201.

4.

1217.

7.
(?).
1

1205. 4 1205. 4,
s.

9.

and Ammonianus 1222.


1192. of Ptollas 1196.
2.

of Aurelius Heracles 1206. 7. also called Eutychus, f. of Aurelius

i.

' ,
s. s.

2,

19.

',
9,

Herammon 1208.

12.
S.

of Varianus and
5, 16.

f.

of Aurelius

Eudaemon 1201.

Catillius

1201.
8,
1

4.

praefect 1194. 5. idiologus 1188.

8.

of Artemidorus

1200.

21.

praefeCt

1185.

I,

3, 14.

, ,
lo.
s.

of DionysiuS 1208.
2, 7.
I.

comogrammateus 1188.

praefect 1195.

. also

Called AtaCtius,

of Aurelius Sarapammon also called Dionysius 1204. 3, 13, 14, 22. f. of Ammonas 1200. 19. S. of Aurelius Ptolc-

maeus 1202.
26.

16.

also called Nepotianus, senator

1200.

, []
I, 3.

20.

f.

of ApioU 1203.
also called

8, 21, 25.

. also called Demetria, d.


f.

of
13.

Euporus

Diogenes 1209. of Sempronius 1202. 3

7,

5
sius

05
I. i.

praefect 1185.

14

1214.

. praefeCt 1196.
4

I.

1213. 3, 6. 1212. introd.

1200.

Ai'/uXtaroi

praefect 1201. 13

Mus-

Aemilianus 1201.

, ^,
1189.
7

,
f.

, . ' ,
/,
f.

catholicUS 1204. 9, 2 2, 23,

.
4
;

StrategUS 1187.
4.

1.

of IsidorUS 1222.

. praefect 1204.
1199.

8, 18.

1217.

.
.

3.

S. of Scmpronius and of Aurelius Polydeuces 1202. 3, 27. praktor, s. of Ision 1196. 2, 19. StrategUS of the Heracleopolite noma 1189. introd., 2.

StrategUS of the Cynopolite

nome
1

praefect 1191. 4,

8.

S. also called

Dionysius,

VI.
f.

GEOGRAPHICAL

of Aurelius Plutarchus also called Atac-

, ,
pion,

2 ,
s.

25 2

tius

1204.

5.

^
TepfCs

289

2apanas 1216. I. f, of Ammonius 1196. 20.

1198. 3. 1209. 9 1199. 6.

TaOpty also called

Philumene 1209.

14.

comogrammateus 1198. god 1213. I,

i.

1209.
s.

15, 20.

1197. 1 8, 29; 1215. 7. f. of Aurelius Asclepiades also called


6.

1215. , of Sarapion 1197.

3,

27.

Saras 1209.

also

Called

S.,

archidicastes

1200.

i,

5, 9.

amphodogrammatCUS
also called Sara-

1202. 13.
s.

of Agathinus 1209. 8, 24, 32. of Chaeremon 1190. 19. also called Phanias, strategus 1197. i f. of Tithoes 1197. 3, 27.
s.

topogrammateus 1188.

2, 7.

also

called

S.,

epvo

of Sarapion 1209. 6, 25, 31. 1215. 5 s. of Lucius and f, of Aurelius


3.

,
18.

, ,. ,
Varianus
f.

of Catillius 1201.
also
called

4.

P.,

StrategUS

1197.

I.

^^,

praefect

1185.

I, 3,
S.

14.

of Zoi'lus 1203.
also Called P.

5.

1209.

1 4.

praefect 1194. 5.

pagi 1190. 2. 1190. 5 StrategUS 1190. . 1218. KotiTOs "Arrtoy idiologUS 1188.
.

praeposi'/tis

8,

(,
,

Ptolemaeus 1202.
I.

depUty-epistratCgUS
s.

1202.

f.

.
f.

also called Sarapion,


8, 24, 32.
7.

of

Agathinus 1209.

of Didymus 1218. I, 15. of Sarapion 1190. 19. secretary 1192. i.


f.

of Aurelius Thonis 1208.


1 5.

1220.

^,
1208.
2, 32.

also

called

^ /,
1201.

1215. I, 10. 1196. 2.


7.
3, 7-

TawT/Sevs 1198.

1208.

surnamed .,
3,
7.

d.

of Nepheros 1208,

, ,

1216. 13; 1223.


S.

38.
13

of

Acrono

1208.

also called

Horion
^^ ^<^^

1208. 30
f.

S.

of Horion 1206. 5
5.

of Aurelius Horion 1206.

VI.
(a)

GEOGRAPHICAL.

Countries, Nomes, Cities, Toparchies.


1204.
7.

1185.
I.

AegyptUS
17

'. '(8(
'AXf^avdpfia

1203.4; 1204.
1 1.

12.

1185. 8; 1199.
7

()
1190.
6.

1185.

1185.

2 8.

1185.

(() 1218.

3)

5
1200 .

(<')

290

INDICES
1195.
4

'

5 ()
1186.
2.
;

|. .

1205.

1206.
;

1189.

^!/
Trayos,

1208.

2, 4, 6.

1196. 3

'lovbaios

//
1210.

1189. 9 1205. 1194. 15, 6.


(iOjttos)1189.

,
.

1209. 4) 7 1205. 3
1190.
3

1202. 4

1207.

..

. 1205.
;

8.

'
;

8,14; 1210. 3,12,15


;

[)
1204.

1189. introd.
6. 6,
1 8,

1219. 20.

1196.

"

1204. 23;

1 6.

1219. 4 1188. 19 1200. 15? 54 1185. 3, 5


;

()
See

,. ' '
1206.
9, 4,

1221. 5 ^}'" Alexandria 1200. 45^ 1196. 4; 1199. 14, rhynchus 1190. 11 16; 1202. 8, 13; 1204. 20; 1205. 3;

5; 1208.
9

7,

9>

">

2;

1209.
'E/j/Lioi,

I4J 1223.

Cf. 'AXe^ni'^peW,

[)
6.

1219. 14

1201. 12.

1208.

".

^
'/ 1212.

1187. 2; 1188. 14, 19) 1194. 1191. , 1189. 4, 17 1190. 1197. 2; 1200. 15, 53; 1196. 1204. 2; 1210. 2, 6, 14. 1204. 20 ; 1219. 2 1. 1199. , 6.
;
;

[)
;

".

,
12.

1205.

8.

[)
7, 20, 8.

1210. 1 1208. 1196. 8 1204. 51 1221. 5


.

*'^'?

1188.

22.

)? 1205.
1212.
3

[) Villages.
1192.
2.

1188.

2, 7,

2.
T^ts

1198.

1193. 2, 4; 11; 1200.14, 16.


3) 5 2

1196. 8, 19 1L88. 7, 2 2.
introd.,

1208.

3> 7.

12.

1197.

.
(c)

aoba.

1207.

/^

(d)

1208.

13[e)

Miscellaneous.
1200. 49

1200. 49
1188. 24.

. /

1199.

1188. 23

VII.

RELIGION

291

VII.

RELIGION.
{a)

"nXtof.

"" ! '!
1188. 2 2. 1188. 3, 21.
Zf

Gods.

1213.

See

Zevf.

(d)
ojjpeioi'

Temples,

'')/:/

1188. 3, 20. 1188. 22.

Ifptvs

.
(c)

<

, * , ,
121.
4,

24.

^eot

19; 1217. 1213.

5
2. 2.

(
I.

1220.

1211.

1188.

35 20.

Zevr 'HXtos /xeyar

1213.

drc.
'

Upov

1188.

3,

21.
7

1206.

Priests.

See Index VIII.

(
1188.

(d)

Miscellaneous.
Up5)V

1185. 29.
4) 21.

1188.

4,

21.

1211.

VIII.
1185.
5

OFFICIAL

AND MILITARY

TITLES.
.
3, 8.

1199. 3; 1200.

(, .
\
ieptiis

! ,
14.

85

1209. 1 1209. 5 1208. 2.

.
8,

. \
3

\,

1200. 54 1200. 20

..
1192.

1205.

1191.

1196. 5> 1202. 1192. 3 1212. introd., 1193. 2


;

\ .,

^.

D.

206) 1200.

} ((\(<

/? ..
if

'.

.\

1200. 5) 9 1209. 5 1208. 2.


J

"''"

yro

1199.

2 1.

1188. 14 2^ 1210. II. (. D. 1 3) 1188. 2. (Letopolite nome, 3rd cent.) 1219. , 2. (Prosopite nome, 3rd cent.) 1219.

1208.

(
1197.
5-

,
],

, ((

1199. 1185. 5 1188. 25,

.
2'J.

See

1204. 4? 2 , 25. 1204. 4 Tjj . 1200. 4


4

(.

D.

347) 1190.

1185. 23. 1196. 20.


3

1205.

^'

1199.

292

. (
1223.
iepoij

INDICES
2 2.

. . -, -,
See
^

(.

,.

\ . 1208.
5

2.

1208.

1190. 5

1191.

5)

*"'/*

^^

1194.

1204.
See

2 6.

3. 12, 17.

See 1185. 6

praefectus.

^.
1190.
if

1189. introd.

AvpfjKios

2eovtipos

8iad\opvos

(.

D.

217) 1202.
(eV.
?

V10S 6

. .
(.
D.

See

(,

KevTtWiavos {c

(. D. 258) 1201. 12. MuSSiuS Aemilianus vir perfectissimus praefectus 6 Aegypti 1201. I. KXavhos (about . D. 265) 1194. 5.

135) 1195.

(
.
6

. . D. 28)

1191.

, 4

. 1190. 5 1196. 5 . 1203. II, 22, 27, S^


9
2.

""

. D. 20)

1185.

3'

1196. 1192.

4
1211.
3,

Alpi\iavos

1191. 7 1193. 1191. 21.

1214.

1223.

2.

1185.

3,

^4',

1191.
{c.

;
D.

(.

, ( . ' ' ,
1204.

8.
D.

280)1191.3 7

-'^'?

8.
(4th

(.

^
D.
I.

.
.

1197.

299) 1204.

8.

Cf.

280) 1191. 1 1. (. D. 299) 1204. 2. 347) 1190. . (c. A.D. 117) 1189.
(a.D.

cent.) 1186.

1189.
^^

,
8.

^
.
;

(. D. (. D. 211-12)1196. . (. D. 254) 1187. .

1194. 8; 1x7) 1189.

(, . ,
.

-(a.D.
intiod., 2.

2)

(^c.

. D.

II 7)

1189. introd.

1194. 6
saep.

1204.

1188. 4

..
D. 1 3)

7,

(.

1188.

8.

1190.

6, 9, 20.

(.

D.

299) 1204. 9, 22, 23, 26. 1204. 2 6.


1 6.

11(90.

,. -

1188.

1210. 13III.

See Index
2

1203.

32.

llQl, II.

1195.

.
1188.
2,

7)

^9

1198.

1210. 13,

6.

1204.

1 7

(^6

.) 1199.

21.

.,
1133. 4' 1193. 3 ; 1212. 1187.

See

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS


IX.

293

WEIGHTS, MEASURES, COINS.


{a)

Weights and Measures.


1211. 5
1
;

1208.

13, 15
;

8,
1 1

//37

1192. 6

1194.

26-8. 1197. ;

1220. 17.

beKUTOv 1192. 5

1212. 4-7

leVriji

1194. 18, 19.

.
1

1194. 15, i6,

(6)

Coins.
1220.
7-

1188. 26; 1200. 23; 1185. 1205. 9. 3> 23> 26; 1208. 27. (--) 1223. 23. 1200. 22 1208. 6; 1209. 22.
;

1223. 32.

1200. 22; 1208. i6; 1209.


1223.
2 3; 32.

22.

bpaxp^ 1188. 21-4, 26

45; 1207. 1209. 23.


23.

7.

1194. 23; 1200. 11; 1208. 16, 27;


;

1205. 9

1208.

6, 27.

.
1208.
2
;

TAXES.
1210.
2.

1209.
4

( ^!
eiSos

1192. 4

>

1194.

1208.

2.

1208.

21, 23

685
21.

1185. 9

1200. 32 1208. 20, 1208. 2 1, 23. 1208. 2 2.


;

1196.

f''

1196.
45

6.

1200.

XI.
ab 1201.
2.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS.


1218. II.

, ( (1188.

(
eV 1206.
ayopaffii/

1202. 5
5)

II. II)
5
2
;

, ( 03
22.
5

(V

1200. 4 marg. 1208. 4, 29

1205.

22, 27.
9, 27.

6;

1202.

1185.

? 8(

1197.

,'

1209.

1208. 1203. 7

1209.

1202. 7) 9 1205. 3 1216. 2, 23. 118 8 1204. 1190. 3. 7, 1216. 1208. 9', 1215. 1206. 1223. , 37- 3^ 1222. 1221.
;
;

1
1

8
2

;
;

^ '
294
abiadiTos
ofi

INDICES

190.
9
;

1188. 15, ip. 1201. 8, 17. 1203. 24. 1186. 8 1200. 17; 1216. 3. 1186. 3.
;

// . ;(^
1194. 1218.
9
;

1208.
; ;

14, 15.
;

1187.

oKoveiv 1204i.

^ \( ,
1185, 12 1188.

1200. 28, 34 1207. 5 1201. 6.

1208.

19, 24.

24.
8.

1202.
II.

20.

1186.

1191.
5

2,

8;

1208.

24; 1215.

/
21
;

1203. 24 1222. 2. 1207.

8.

en 1188. 5 1 1198. 24. 1200. 22; 1206.5, 8; 1208. 15;


21.
6,

1209.

1196. 4; 1200. 1220. 9


II.

1208.

14,

9>

?1185.

1194:.

4; 1196. 4; 1214. 5; 1223. 1223. 1 2, 33 1218. 3> 17 1220. 20 ; 1223. 7


;

8.
1187.
6.

1208. 7 1222. 2.
See Index
Cf.
2.

Index VI (.
2 3, 2 4

.
22
5
;

1203. 3) 311188. 2, 9) 15 1191. 22; 1200. 1203. 15, 2, 33 1208. 5, 29 2, 7, 12 ig 1196. 12; 1202. 12. 1207. 4 1204. 1 4 1 6. 1188. 5, 1188. 21-4 1216. 7 1200. 45j54; 1202. 23; ; 1203. 18 1213. 3 1216. 7,10; 1222. 3 1204. 1 6, 21. 1186. 6. 1194. 7 1222. 4 1192. 3 )/)^ 1204. 3 1204. 21. 1204. 23 1223. 5 1206. 1 4 1208. 8. 1185. 3 1204. 23 (^;^). 1208. 21. 1215. 4 1218. 7 24, 4^; 1208. 1 6, 27; 1209.231196. 8 ; 1200. 20 1208. 3> 7. 1 2. 1188. 25. 24; 1206. 21.
;
.

198. 6
;

'

1200.

',

1199.
(1.

1200. ^.

1199.
'/ 1185, 12,

1188. 15. 1188. 2 8 1201. 1219. 1202. 2 2


; ;

3;

1185. 22; 1207. 1209. 2 1215. 9 ;


;

1204. 22.

),
1217.
6.

8,

1.208. II.

^//7 9 ,
12^3.
1198.

6.

1209.

1188.

4>

> 6, ^

1200.

45

220.
1220.

4
3

'
35

!/

1220.
1210.

.
7, 6.

1 9.

1205.
1185.

1206.

3
1204.
1

1193. 4

1223.

3> 24,

1209. 9 1208. 7 1223. 13. 1220. introd. 1208. 1 5. 1200. 28.


2, 8.

1197. 1187.

3 4

1194. 4 1186. 7 ; 1200. 3; 1210. 1186. 5 1192. 4 ; 1194. 4

' .
1215.

1223.

1204i.

II.

1208. 24. 1208. 1206.


4

1 6.

See Index

IX

(3).

XI.
pcTij

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS


;

295

1204. 14. 1205. 6, 12 1208. 17. appfviKOs 1209. 16; 1216. 14. See Index IX {a). dpTos 1185. 10; 1194. 10. See Index VIII. See Index VIII.

. .
7,
;

.(
1211.
1 1.

, (
yeW
y^

1202.

20.
;

1218. 3
3

1223.
;

5,

20.

yepy' 1200.
1221.

1208.

20.
20.

{)
31
;

1200. 1208. 13, 1 5) 1208. 2.

1208.
y^

1 8.

1200.

1209.

8, g.

\( ^'

1218. g. 1215. 6 21 1217. 4. 7; 1218. 13. 1212. 4.

1216.

1200.

12, 33, 44.


;

1199. 21 1198. 1222. 2.

1208.

1209.

1206. 4 1208.
1185.
6.

1210. 5 1188. 14, 24 1191. II ; 1192. 6 1196. 6; 1199. 8, 23: 1200. 37. 44 1205. 3' 9> 1208. 4, 1 1, 2; 1209. 1 1, 28 1210. 8 1220. 7yy!/cen' 1185. 1194. 6; 1204. 23. 1220. 1 6. 1206. 8, 2 1. 1188. 4; 6, 20. 1196. 20.
;
; J ;
;

>

5
yoi/evs

1212.

6.
;

(9 1200. 23;
1216. 15

1208.

1209. 7

1206. 12 yow 1204. 17


43^ 28, 31

1210.

1220. 20.

1208.
a'xpt

2 4

^ .
3.

1215.

1211.

8.

1185. 21, 29. 1200. 3 1 1208. 20. See Index VIII. ^e/Smos 1200. 29; 1208. 20. 1207. II ; 1208. 27 1209. 26. 1200. 3 ; 1208. 20. jSi^Xioi/ 1204. 23.
J

.
/
1185.

1192. 7 ; 1193. 3; 1198. 35 1200. 1206. 17, 24; 1208. 1201. ; 1217. 3; 1219. 1 2. 1188. 2 7 1189. 6 1197. 30 1198. 1201. 9 25, 34; 1200. 42, 48, 55,
,*

6;

/SXeVetr

,.
1200. 49

1206. 17,24; 1208.24,28,30; 1216.6; 1217. 4; 1219. 8, 6; 1220. See Index VIII. 1189. 9, II ; 1202. 14, 24. 1199. .

1185.

1202. 1 8. 1206. 4, 6, 13.

1202.

2 1.

See Index VIII.

1208.

24

,.
1209.

1220. 1 1 1194. 28. 1202. 2 5-

dare 1201. 3 1185. 2.

bona 1201. 3. 1200. 20.


1188. 19
1 6.

1207. 3 ; 1200. 44, 53 See Index VIII.


!

,.
1204.

1194. g 1199. 23 1204. 1203. 7 1204. 3 1204. 14 1218. 4; 1219. 1 6. See Index VIII.
;

24.

9.

1212. 4-7

/^
ye

1211.

.
4
4

1193.

1204. 15
2.

1206.
;

1213.

1185. 30

1200. 19; 1208. 4


1214. 1196. 7

1188. 3, 15 1190. (?); 1196. 13 ; 1199. 15, 24; 1208. 9 1216. 8; 1218. 9; 1223. 2 8. 1190. , 20 1200. 32, 1208. 1210. 9 2. ;/5 1208. 21, 23.
;

.
;

5 .

296

INDICES
.
1208. 24. ev 1192. 1198. ;

8 / '
44
Stoyeti-

1200.
20.

1197. 12.

See Index IX {b). 1187. i6 1194. 8; 1223. 14. 1218. 5


;

1200. 34 1200. 7>


27.
6.

8 marg., 36, 51

1202.
5

54? 62

1208. 25,
1217.

1188. 20, 1188. 2 6.

(
.

1202.

1194. 17. 1201. 7; 1206. 9, 22. <(95 1188. 6; 1220. 25 (9);?; 1208. II. 1201. 6, ,

(
(
e'inep

1205. 4 1208. 1199. 25. 1202. 8. 1206. 1 5. 1200. 3


;

4,

;^?;

1204. 7 1200. 4
1189.
1186.

/-

/ / /
/!/

"
1204.

5
;

1200. 46.
1190. 4
;

ego 1201. 3 VxPffC"" 1207. 5 edictum 1201. 11. e^oi 1202. 5; 1221. 7 ei^W1191. 22 1197.30; 1198. 35; 1200. 1203. 22; 1206. 43> 55) 6; 1201. 24; 1208. 28, 3; 1216. 5; 1218. 4', 1219. II ; 1220. 5 1200. 32 1208. 20, 2.
;

1191.

3j

17

>

1195.

7
1

7 ^/

/.

1204.
1223.
Kaff ev

<?^

saep.

1203. 6. 1188. 2 4
1185.
7j

1201.

1 8,

2 1.

1204. 1 6. 1204. 1 8. 1204. II. 1198. 20.


8,

'
eU,
eii,
ei'y

1220. 39

1208.

1185.

12

1200. 44; 1201. 5, 19

( )
=
5 ;

eiTo
eiVe
;
;

1195. 1213. 4, 5;

1222. . 1201. 14. 1197. 4 1197. II. 1198. 12 1208. 5 1202. 2 0. 1199. 7, 13 Jf5; 1200. 50; 1203. 1208. 8, 30 ; 1205. 6, II ; 1206.
;

'

1196. 17 ; 1197. 15. 1196. 3. 1187. 5 1207. 2 1208. 2 2.


; ;

1204.

17.

1219. 14, 15. 1191. 5, i8; 1202.

9, 11.

1206.

1 7

1185. 23. 1195. 8.

1200. 25 1208. 1 7. 1200. 33; 1204. 25, 26; 1206.


;

6, 14.

1221.

6.
;

eWi/os 1201. 17

1204.

6.

1204.

6.

2 4.

1198. 15; 1200. 24.

1200. 1200. 1208.

27.
12, 33> 15;

44
7
;

1206. 7
1220.
5-

1194. 8 1218. dominus 1201. 3

? .

1206. II. 1205. 4; 1209. 15, 7 22, 26, 31; 1202. introd. 1186. 4 See Index VIII.

1204. 5, 8. 1203. 8. 1199. 1208. 1208. ^. 1223. II. 1204. ig. 1204. 6. 1207. 8, 13. fKreXetv 1196. 14 eKTOs 1209. 19; 1216. 9 1220. 1 6.

// (( '!

eXaiov 1211.

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS


5
.
.
.

297

ikaiovpyuov 1207.

\(

1205.
5

2 7

eXnOepos 1186. 6; 1206. 12.


fXevOepovv

1205.

Keveps 1205.

I,
;

lO.
4.

1206. 21 1208. 1208. 23. 1196. 1$. evayxos 1202. 1 4. ivavTioi 1203. 13. eVeivai 1218. 5. ei/e/ca 1200. 5 1 ; 1219. 5. ivdabe 1203. 10.
iviavTOs

iyyvLv

1200. 37; 1206. 8, 23; 1208. 27-9 ; 1209. 29. 1205. 9 et^eI/ 1194. 14, 24; 1200. 8, 41. 1188. 6; 1204. 2 1. 1188. 14; 1198. 32; 1199. 22; 1201. 5; 1202. 9, 27.
17, 25,

'

1218.

1194:. 2)

1196.

5
3> 7

1199. 5

1208.

eviaravai

( ' ; '
cVtos

1216. 8. 1187. 17; 1195. 7, 8; 1196. 7; 1199. 9; 1203. 17; 1208. 22, 23.

1204. 24. 1207. 6, 13. 1221. 9 ; 1223. 17. 1195. 1198. 26. 1202. 23. 1199. 20, imeiidev 1200. 36 1208. 25.
;

'.
1194.

\yv 1210.

1208. 21, 23. 1202. 9 1200. 54


4

1200.

6, g.

See Indcx VIII.

1208. 2 2. 1204. 1 6.

ivTvyxaveiv

ex 1201.

(
1190.

''

1194. 29.

1204. 9 1203. 1203.


4.

1212. introd.

II.
g. 4

,
8.

1188. 4; 29. 1188. 27. 1220. 1 3. 1219. 6. 1188. 2, 8, 25; 1191.

6,

19, 22;

1192.

e^eimt 1206.

, (', (.
;

1208.

14

pyv'l85.
5
See Index VIII.
24.

1189. 6; 1191. 14; 1216. 8. See Index VIII. 1185. 1200. 27. 1187. II. 1188. 5) 1 6.

pyo.
^
;

II.
5

13,

1204.

1216.

.
6,

en-et

1190. 4> 1200. 26; 1205. 1208. 19. 1222. 31185. 29. enayeiv 1190. 8.

1199. 22; 1200. 57; 1208. 1186. 3. 1220. 7. 'dpyov 1218. 3 1220. 8, g. 1195. 6. 1201. 12.
;

1215. 2. 1201. 5
1185.

(!

! '.
23

1208. l*J. 1208. 19, 24. 1223. 2 2. See Index VIII. 1209. 1 9. 1202. 12; 1204. 10.
1

(,
eVei

1188. 25; 1200. 27, 35 1203. 12; 1204. 22; 1208. 25; 1219. 15. 1200. 29; 1204. 14; 1219. 6. 1202. 20 1208. 3, 7 '''"' *''<'f 1207. 7, 8.
J
;

/3

1215. 5

1189.
vyv

II

1217.
5

6.

1222. 31204.
1217.

ay( 1203.
1206.

8.

II.
2 7

yvoviv 1223.
3, 9>

1188.

^5

1200. 28

1208.

/ 1200.

1228.

12.

36, 51

1208.

25, 27, 28.

298

INDICES
1191.
6.

(^ (
ei

^
(

/ <^

20

1200. 35

1208.

25.

(1202.

1203. 9 1187. II. 1204. 1188. ^,


5*;

12.

.
;

1219. 8; 1220. 27. 1190. 13 1191. 9. 24; 1192. 7; 1216. 3, 6, 22; 1217. 5> 9; 1218. 14; 1219. 17; 1220.26: 1221.13; 1222-5; 1223. 36.
1211. 4

See Index VIII. 1200. 32; 1208. 13, 1 8, 20. ifptvs. See Index VII (c). Upov. See Index VII [b). 1188. 4, 21 1190. i6 1211. 2. 1209. 19.

.
;

1199.

8,

1200. 48

1208.

4,

'

1189. 1186. 2.
1191. 2 2
;

1 3.

1185.

6.

24

^
eiuf

1186.
;

1206. 3 1202. 12. 1202. 5 1202. 7, 24. 1220. 2 2. 1208. 19-

1200. 55 1203. 1220. 5, 13, 19; 1222. 1220. 2


;

1204.

2, 3.

lVosll88. 25.
22
:

TO
2
1
;

200.
1219.
6.

49

1202.

1204.

1200. 2 6 1203. 1204. 1 1 1205. 1 1 1206. 3, 19, 26 8, 8; 1207. 2; 1208. 6, 19; 1210. 5;
8
;

1191. 23
;

1216. 13, 1218. 5; 1223. 23.

.
,\

1208. 24. 1200. 30 1208. 20. 1188. 20 1200. 55> 56 See Index VIII.
;
;

1203.

1219. 13; 1222.

1208. 22,

28.

1223. 3 1218. 4 yap 1219. 1216. 6.

6.

1202. 23.

*^

1202.
1188. 5 (myovelv 1188. 4, 21, 23. 1188. 4) 21. 1188. 3
? 1216.

7,

1 1

1204.

/^

1215.

6.
9

1211.

1201. 1185.
1215.
2.

2;
;

1204.
;

12.

1186. 3

1204.

13.

1200. 37; 1208.

25,

29; 1209. 28;

^ (, !. ^220. ,( ^);
1 6.

,
6;
<96

14; 1220. 5; 1223. 1 2. 1195. 1198. 26; 1200. 35; 1208. 24; 1223. 23, 35; See Index VIII. 1218. 8, 12.

1194.

15,

2;

1220. 4 1202.
1223.
;

^aff

1204. 22; 1205. 1222. 4

6.

'
IV

1207. 3 1220. 8. 1223. 33 1199. 7. 1223. 5, 7 1208 9 1200. 35; 1203.


1213.
5

1208. 4
3

1215.

1185. 21 1204. 14, 1 6. BeXeiv 1185. 17; 1216. 19

1204.

8.

See Index VII 1222. 3 1188. 4, 21.


1185.
1
.

(a).

1198. 9 1198. 14 1189. 3


;

1200. 58
20.
8, 21,

1203. 9

'^ {)
1199.
1211.

1212.

5-

187. ,

1200. 32

1208.

.
^

12; 1191.2,
1

23; 1204.

24, 25-

1191.

6.

See Index

IX

{a).

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS


1220.
7-

299

1208.
.

232.

8 1218.
. .

(?)

1220. introd.
7.
I

1186.
1211.
2 1
1
;
.

1216. 13ei saep.

1188.
.

t^Iy

^?
Ko/ites

^
;
29.
fcvptos (title)

1199. 2 0. 1201. 7 1201. 6 1206. , 2 2. 1199. 14) 1208. 8, 1201. 19 1208. 1188. 23; 1208. 13. 1223. 9
;
;

1204. 5 1221. 5 Xoyoill88. II, 17 1198. 15^ 20; 1203. 21, 1192. . 26; 1220. 28. . See Index VIII. 1194. 3 1194. 19; 1207. 6. vev 1208. II.

1200.

. (

/^

'

1208. 3
2 2.

1201. II,

1204.

20.

1190. 16. 1189. 1 2. 1185. 8, 12. 1205. 3 /iparetv 1200. 25; 1208. 7 1204. 1 5 1185. 6; 1189. introd.; 1191. 15, 19; 1195. 2; 1202. i ; 1204. 3, 13. Kpe'aff 1194. 24. 1203. 29

1203. 3 1220. 24, 28. 1204. 1188. 24; 1195. 4', 1213. 1204. 171204. 21.

/LteXXeti/

1200.
1195. . 1197.

6,

.
1211.

1191. 3j

6.
10,

1187. 4; 1202. 1223. 19.

15; 1215. 6;

1209. 5 1202. 1717; 1197. 15


;

peVfii;

200.
II, III.

.
25; 1208. 17. 3, 17; 120

1191.


1200.
1211.

1185. 3 1206. 16 (adj.) 1197. 17


;

1208.

24,

1200,
1205.
5

1200. 50; 1203. 25; 1206. 9) 22. 1206. 17; 1200. 19; 1204. 1208. 14, 15, 8, 19, 24, 26-8. 1200. 1 8. 1188. 7, 20. 1194. 2; 1203. 6, 14, 19, 32; 1204. 15, 1 6. 1200. 25 1203. 6 1204. 21 1208. 8.
;

^6.

1198. 4 1193. 2 1188. 20, 22, 23 14, 6, 19; 1208. 3, 4, 7,8, 1 2. See Index VIII.
;
;
.

5 5

1186.

//3^188.

1210. 2. legere 1201. 1 1187. 5 1187. 20


.

,
6,

1185.
II
;

1192. 7 26; 1191. 7, 1199. 27; 1190. 1 5, 1201. 13; 1205. 2, 3>
;

7>

1188. 8; 1220. 131219. 5 1192. 3 ; 1221. 8. 1221. 41192. 5 meu^ 1201. 4 1203. 29. /Lie'xpt 1185. 23, 24 ; 1196. 17 1188. 5, ", ;

1197.

1206.

2,

3; 1208.

2, 4, 6.

1200. 28, 29; 1203. 27; 1205. ; "f 1205. 11. 1208. 9 1198. 26. 1195. 7; 1199 2; 1203. 7; 1208. 5, II ; 1209. 12.

^^

1220.
1196.

.
6.

1204.

14, 21.

(particle)

1186. 5 1196. 17 1196. 2 1197. 4


;

1198.

3,

1199.

300
6,

INDICES
13; 1200. II, 14,
3, 6, 7, 9, II,
6.

15,

1208.

12

57; 1202. 4; 1209. 6, 9, 12,

, : ^;
lO^rjjf

14; 1218.

1208. 171223. 23, 32 1208. 13, 14, 24. St'

1196.

6.

^7;/7) 1208. 14, 15' . 1216. 5 Mtic/ja 1185.

8;

7?/; 1219.

// 1223. 3
1208.
5

. / ^
.

1207. 12, 15, 6. 1207. II.

"

1220. 8.

1204.

6,

8.

'
;

1219. 19 1196. 1197. 6, 28; 1198. 2 1, 33 1198. 8 ; 1208. 9 1194. 2 1. 1199. 12; 1207. 8;

1211.

9.

See Index VIII.


;

1199. 21 1188.
4

1200. 44; 1206.

1202. 24. 1200. 1 6, 38 1205. 2 1 1206. 6, 8, 23; 1208. 3, 5, 8, 17, 25, 27-9; 1209. 291208. 29. 1205. 2 1208. 9
; ; ;

1216.

1 6.
; ;

2.

1211.

1223. 32.

1188. 8 1192. 4 1218. 12. 1187. 9 1204. 1193. 3


;

1209.
4:

1 5,

1 6,

27

2.

1223. 9. 1 5. 35 1197. 17 1219. 8. 1201. 1 8. See Index IX {b).


;

-^

1200. 34
2 6.

1208.

24.

1196. 15; 1197. 13; 1207.


II.

1188.

5/1223.

,^. . , ^
;

1204. 4 1208. 6. See Index VI (). Ko/xos. iepa 1209. 19 1200. 19 1208. 14. viv 1200. 17, 24; 1204. 16; 1208. 8 1216. 17 1217. 3; 1223. 32. wvi 1196. 4; 1202. 12.
;

(
,

op^ay 1200. 37; 1208. 25, 29; 1209. 28.

1200.

^'
, ,
o8e

See Index VIII. See Index IX (). 1188. 19, 21, 23. 1188. 4. 15, 22.

1208. 4

1197. 28; 1198, 27, 33 1204. 20. 1207. 4 1207. 9 be 1189. 7 1208. 23. 1208. 14 761200. 34; 1208. 6, 19, 24; 1209. 1195. 6 1218. 8 1222. 51208. 2 1. 1204. 23.

1195.

45

8
,
U85.
II, 20.

17

|188.

15,

9
1203. 3

.
;

1219. 1 1. 1215. 5 17 1218. 5; 1220. 1185. 22 1188. 25


;
;

'

1200. 48; 1216. 10. 1208. 4 1203. 17 1204. 27.


1218. 3 1199. 17 1218.
;

1208.
1185.
oiv

3, 7 2 2 ; 1223. 26.

1209. 5
1185. 23 1188. 3, 15 1202. 12; 1204. iav 10; 1207. 15; 1219. 13; 1221. 8.
; ;

6.

1205.

1209. 5
;
;

1203. 27 1208. 19. 1188. 5> II 1223. 1 8. 1185. 12; 1194 14; 1211. 4', 1220. 14 1223. 3
;

1185. 19. 1223. 1 6.

1188. 25 1200. 3 1 ; 1208. 20. o/Ve 1186. 7 1188. 25 1206. 10. 1198. 8, 1185. 7, 23, 31 1190. 6; 1199. 8; 1200. 33. 37, 53; 1203. 1204.9; 1205. 19; 1206. 8, 8, 15 15, 6; 1207. 3; 1208. 19, 22, 23, 2
;
;

5,

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS


;

301
;

, 6(

28, 29; 1209. 18, 28; 1210. 8; 1213. 1220. 5; 1216. 15; 1217. 3; 1219. 11 18; 1221. 10; 1222. 4. ovTMs 1186. 3 ; 1204. 1 1. 1188. 4, 15, ip ; 1203. 12. 1200. 32 ; 1208. 20.

( ,

1204.
1185. II.

2 0.

1190. 3 1207 1218. 1 1, 14 1185. 1206. 1220. 12. 1219. 6. 1214. 3 1186. 6.

1194. 31; 1220. 6, 15; 1222. 5 1223. 28. 1207. 7 perfectissimus 1201. . 1219. 7 1220. 2 2. 1199. 9; 1220. 29. 1223. 1 8. 1188. 24. Tvepaea 1188. 3, 2 2, 23. 1188. 21.

13,

2.

( ( ^
, /
6

1200.
1

6,

41

1208.

8, 26.

1223.. 2 0.
8.

1187.
1211.
6.

1220.
7

29.

1223.

)^6/ 1187.

1208. 2 2. 1206. 1 5
;

/
1220.
23-

24. 3 1204. 1185. 20 1197. 14 1219. 3


,'

1205. 4 1199. 23.

1206. 20
1191.
7)

1209.

ly.

20.

7;^)7(

1222. 4 1204. 1223. 8. 1208. 24. 1200. I'J 1208. 8, 1 8, 2 2, 20. 1208. 12, 24. 1208. 1 5, 2^. 1188. 2 . 1207. 4 1193. ^ 1200. 29; 1204. 24; 1208. 2; 1210. 9; 1223. 29. 1202. 15. 1197. 8; 1204. 13 1199. 8; 1200. 29-32; 1203. 23, 20, 3; 1204. 3 ; 1205. 6 1207. 4 1208. 1216. 3, n, 14, 2, 21, 23; 1211. 17,22; 1217. 5, 7, 8; 1218. 13. 1198. 5; 1199. 15; 1200. 8; 1201. 1203. 13, 2, 23 1204. 5 1205. 7, 8 ; 1208. 3, 6, 8, 6, 17, 25, 30 1218. 1219. 7, 1222. 4. pater 1201. 41206. . 1205. 6. 1204. 13.

^ , ..
1203.
g.

1200. 24 ; 1208. 6. 1197. 9) 14; 1223-4, 1 3) 34 1189. II 1194. 6; 1204. 5, S; 1208. 1215. 2 1218. g. See Index VI (<?). 1204. 1 4, 21 1208. 2 1. 1185. 24; 1191. g; 1219. 12; 1221. 1 2 ; 1222. 6 ; 1223. 1218. 3 7 1219. 4
;

possessio 1201. 3

1215. 3 praefectus 1201.

1190. 3 1190. 1 6.

See Index VIII. 1199. 8, 19; 1208. 4, 12, 24, 28. 1203. 24; 1205. 13 1208. 25, 29; 1215. 6. 1209. 6, 1 8, 24 Pap.), 3 1201. 2; 1204. 1 2.

{
; ;

1216.

6.

1203. 1 8. 1207. 4 1200. 12. 1188. 20; 1197. 28; 1199 25; 1200. 26, 42 1203. 14, 28, 32; 1204. 1208. 27 ; 1205. 21 ; 1206. 19, 23 15, 8, 36 ; 1209. 27. 1199. 1 7

,
1206.

1192. 2. 1199. 23
9,

1200. 5

1202,

7>

21.

302
npoaayopeveiv 1185.
1

INDICES
3
(?).

8 8 (
6;

1188.

5? II>

29. 25.

7(9

1202. I . 1200. 35; 1208.

1194. 29. 1223. 2 . 1196. 13; 1202. 1203. 13 1204. 7

. (
.

See Index VIII.

1211. 6.

1200. 48
2

1208.

1185.

1 1.

1204. 7 npoaraaaeiv 11Q0. 5 1202. 2 2. 1208. 1 6. 1208. 2 2.


1188.
1

'
.
.

1208. 2 8. 1208. 6.

1218. II. 1223.

.
1

1206. 1188. 1220.

6.

24.
1 9

1191. 2 7

1200.

2,

761209. 20.
1208.
1204.
g,

1200. 53 iSmarg., 63. nporepov 1199. 1 5


;

/^/^ 87
;

1201.
4

10.
7
',

1185.
1 8.

1202.

,
8;

14

1208.

1200. 22; 1208. 15; 1209. 21. 1205. 7 1208. 7


1214.
4. 6.

1206.

200. .
1222.
1216. 131212. rogare 1201.

1217. 4 1197. 12.

1188. 9 1187. 6. 1187. 8. 1187. 14 1213. 2. 1188. 24.

1210. 1188. II.

27; 1208.

1209.

25.

1200. 55

, (
7 3
;
;

1190. 1 3 j 1191. g, 23; 1192. 7; 1215. 8 {epp. omitted); 1216. 22 ; 1217. 9 1218. 14 1219. 17 1220. 26 1221. 11 1222. 5 li223. 35.
; ; ; ;

:118. ,

1204. 1188.

12.
g.

1216. g
;

/'

.
1204.

1187. 20 1220. 3 1208. 4 1196. 6; 1208.


1191.
14,
7

1223. 14, 34 1188. 1193. 4


;

{1198.

13,

8.

7; 1218. 13; 1223. 29. See Index VIII.


2. 2 '.

1222.
1216.

^^/ .

//
;

^^

,.
1211.
6.

1207. 1190. 7 1218. 4


1188.

1223.

8.

5>

>

6.

^/

See Index VIII.

1202. 1 8. See Index IX {), 1198. 8; 1204. 17. eV 1185. 26; 1223. 24. re 1186. 8 1200. 29, 30; 1203. 20 1205. II 1206. 6, 12; 1208. 20. re/ciOi/ 1199. 7, 13 1219. 18. J TeXe'iv 1208. 21 1210. i. 1207. g. 1200. 2, 7. 12, ly, 1201.8, 17 1208. 9. 1208. II. 1200. 451202. 1 9. 1188. 26 1200. 22, 42 ; 1208. 15, 27 ; 1209. 32. 1200. 45 1208. 4 1190. 6, 9) 2 . 7-tr 1204. 19; 1206. 15; 1219. 13, 15 1220. 21 1223. 7, 22. 1186. 7 1209. 1 8. 1207. 9 1203. 3 1204. 2. 1201. II, 2 2.
rtiy^a

. ,

1206.

1 6.

;^
;

>

.
XI.

.
(
?

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS


0tAfri'
;

303

See Index VI {a). See Index VIII. 1185. 25 1187. 8 1196. g 18,26, 41 ; 1207. 4, 6; 1208. 5. 1223. 2 .
; ;

1222, 2. 1216. 14; 1219.

1200.

1205. 5 1223.

1189. 5; 1218.
21.

1205. 5 1222. 2. 1208. 24. 1200. 29; 1208. 19, 23. 1220. iutrod. 1186. 5 ; 1196. 1 2 ; 1197. 8 ; 1204. 14,16.

.
5
;

1191. 23. 1193. 4

See Index VIII.


1187.

1185.
;

1186. 7 iyiaiveiv 1217. 5 1187. 1 8.

. 7

1208. 14, 5) !, 27. 1206. 8, 14, 1 6, 2. 1202. 6, 23; 1203. 6; 1206. 7. 9) 1210. 5; 1207. 6; 1208. 21 1219. 2, 3, 2; 1222. . 1213. 4
;

3, 13) 6; 1188. 2, 7; 1189. 1190. 3 1191. 2 1192. 2 ; 1200. 2, 1216. 6; 1206. 6; 1208. 8; 1215. 1217. 2 1218. 2 1219. 2 1220. 2 2 1221. 3; 1222. . 1208. 17. 1188. 5? II xetpdf 1200. 24; 1208. 16; 1209.
;

;
J

1196. 1 6. 1197. 9 1199. 1189. 1201. 16; 1208. 8; 1209. 10.

(
25.

;^ 1208.
5,

6.
5

6;

1188. 1223. 6.
1191.
5,

1 1

1196.

19

1197.

6;

1204.
;

22, 24.

1211. 8.

14;

^ 4
1200.

1206. 19 Cf. Index See Index III. 1203. 29. 1198. 9.


1219.
1 6.

III.

1196. 14; 1210. g 1216. 18; 1219. 13; 1222. 5. 1223. 2 5 XpriCeiv 1218. 8. 1199. ", 12; 1200. 4, II, 15; 1204. 3, 6; 1208. 32. 1188. 2, 9) 1200. 5 1209.

1204. 1 7. 1203. 2 , 32. 1188. 8 1200. 47>


;

54
;

.
,
20.

1188.

1191.

6,

20

1199.

2 1

12, 34, 47 xmobeiKvviLv 1194. 6.

1220. introd. 1203. 5 1200. 2, 8, 13 1223. 29.

See Index VIII. 1207. 15; 1208. 9 1207. 4 1199. 1 8 XpoVof 1187. 17; 1191.9; 1196.13; 1200. 1222. 1208. 8 1221. 1207. 17 6; 1223.37 1208. 21. 1220. 23.

^^
;

1211. II.

'
1203.
vir

1186. 4, 7 1188. 14

, 8,
.

1199. 22; 1200. 48; 28, 33; 1204. 9, 25, 26.


;

1200.

8, 26, 41.

U(

1191.

1188.

2, g,

15
2 2,

1209. 6,

1 7,

20.

1201.

1214. 1188. 1192. 5

2 5

1220.

II.

1222. 3. 1222. 3 1188. 19 1199. 8 12. 29. 1209. 1208. 2 1209. 5 1207. 1214. 7. 1193. 2 1206. 12. 1194. 2, 1219. 12.

, .
;
;

1208.

1 1,

22

3^4

INDICES

XII.

INDEX OF PASSAGES DISCUSSED.


a)

Al

Aristot. Poet. p.

Aristoph. Thesm, 337, 374 1459 b

Etym. Magn.
Fr.

p. 283.
.

45

Eurip. Fr. 403

492 Fr. 911 Fr. 912. Fr. 913.


.

Fr. 959,

960

Hesych.

s.v.

hnpvaK\6

Liv. xlii. 14

Plate

i^
.

^
.1

'
>^

'-

^ |j.j

t^

0,

^ r

^-^

fi?^''?f^-

-^ *f^>; ,3/1:

^vS -^.^

tatt.

%?

Plate

II

-MSE;

'is-

Plate

III

< ^^

:^

-^
7'

-^

^ * ^ " ><>

7 A-t:'^
J

u.

*-

<.

'm^

:5

?-^-.

>^

3
^ Hz
9

<

"7

Plate IV

00

f 7

C >^J.

i'^-^Ck^
*i'

J.M

or

^5 r^,^i ^>^
ri
^
r*

^'^^'--^ mV<;
.
*

Plate

ft ^^
^'z

ri 111'
7.P >
*^"

Plate VI ;-

s.

*Cy;^

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No. I20O

>

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND

^
in

GRAECO-ROMAN

BRANCH.

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND,


Egypt
since
the

which has conducted Archaeological research

1882, in 1897 started a special department, called the Graeco-Roman

Branch, for

discovery

and

publication

of remains of

classical

antiquity

and

early

Christianity in Egypt.

The Graeco-Roman Branch

issues

annual volumes, each of about

50 quarto pages, with

facsimile plates of the more important papyri, under the editorship of Or.

Hunt.
annual

A
volume,

subscription of One Guinea to the

Graeco-Roman Branch

entitles subscribers to the

and

also to the

annual Archaeological Report.

donatio7i

25

constitutes life
J.
I.

membership.

Subscriptions

may

be sent to the
St.,

Grafton Milne, 37 Great

Russell

for England, Mr. Honorary Treasurers London, W.C. ; and for America, Mr. Chester

Campbell, 527 Tremoni Temple, Boston, Mass.

PUBLICATIONS OF THE EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND.

MEMOIRS OF THE FUND.


I.

THE STORE CITY OF PITHOM AND THE ROUTE OF THE EXODUS.


For 1883-4.
Edition.')

By Edouard Naville.

Thirteen Plates and Plans.

{Fourth and Revised

25^.

II.

TANIS,

For 1884-5. Part I. and two Plans. {Second Edition.')


Part
I.

By W. M. Flinders
25^.

Petrie.

Eighteen Plates

III.

NAUKRATIS,

For

Chapters by Cecil Smith, Ernest A, and Plans. {Second Edition.') 255.

1885-6. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. With Gardner, and Barclay V. Head. Forty-four Plates

IV.

GOSHEN AND THE SHRINE OF SAFT-EL-HENNEH.


By Edouard Naville.
Eleven Plates and Plans.
{Second Edition^
255.
'

For

1886-7.

V.

TANIS, Part II including TELL DEFENNEH (The Biblical Tahpanhes ') and TELL NEBESHEH. For 1887-8. By W. M. Flinders Petrie, F. Ll. Griffith,
;

and A.

S.

Murray.

Fifty-one Plates and Plans.


II.

25^.

VI.
VII.

NAUKRATIS,
Griffith.

Part

For 1888-9.
25J.

By Ernest

A.

Gardner and

F. Ll.

Twenty-four Plates and Plans.

THE CITY OF ONIAS AND THE MOUND OF THE


Extra Antiquities of Tell-el-Yahudiyeh. F. Ll. Griffith. Twenty-six Plates and Plans.

JEW.
Plates

The
and

An

Volume.
255.

By Edouard Naville and


Fifty-four

VIII.

BUBASTIS.
Plans.
25J.

For

1889-90.

By Edouard Naville.

IX.

TWO HIEROGLYPHIC
Containing

PAPYRI FROM TANIS. An Exira Volume. THE SIGN PAPYRUS (a Syllabary). By F. Ll. Griffith. THE
(an Almanac). {Out ofprint.)

GEOGRAPHICAL PAPYRUS
X.
XI.

By W. M. Flinders Petrie.
II

With 890-1.

Remarks by Heinrich Brugsch.

THE FESTIVAL HALL OF OSORKON


By Edouard Naville.
Plates.

(BUBASTIS).

For

Thirty-nine Plates.

255.

AHNAS EL MEDINEH.
And
Griffith.

For

189 1-2.

By Edouard Naville.
By
J. J.

Eighteen
F. Ll.

THE TOMB OF PAHERI AT EL KAB.


Plates.
25^.

Tylor and

Ten

XII.
XIII.

DEIR EL BAHARI,
Fifteen Plates and Plans.

Introductory.
255.

For
1893-4.
Royal

1892-3.

By Edouard

Naville.
Plates Plates

DEIR EL BAHARI,
I-XXIV

Part Part

I.

For

By Edouard Naville.
folio.

(three coloured) with Description.


II.

30J.

XIV.

DEIR EL BAHARI,

XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.

( DESHASHEH.
XXV-LV
other Plates.

For 1894-5.
Royal

By Edouard Naville.
30J.

coloured) with Description.

folio.

For 1895-6.
Part III.

By W. M. Flinders
For 1896-7.
Royal
lOi.)

Petrie.

Photogravure and
Plates

255.

DEIR EL BAHARI,
LVI-LXXXVI

By Edouard Naville.
folio.
30J.

(two coloured) with Description.

DENDEREH.
255.

For 1897-8.

By W. M. Flinders
Forty Plates.

Petrie.

Thirty-eight Plates.

(Extra Plates of Inscriptions.

ROYAL TOMBS OF THE FIRST DYNASTY.


Flinders Petrie.
Sixty-eight Plates.
25^.

For 1898-9.

By W. M.

XIX.

DEIR EL BAHARI,
Plates

Part

IV.

For

899-1 900.

By Edouard Naville.
Royal
folio.

LXXXVII-CXVIII

(two coloured) with Description.

305.

XX. DIOSPOLIS PARVA.


Forty-nine Plates.

Ati

Extra

Volume.

By W. M. Flinders Petrie.
Part
II.

{Out ofprint ^

XXI.

THE ROYAL TOMBS OF THE EARLIEST DYNASTIES,


1900-1.

For

By W.M. Flinders Petrie. Sixty-three Plates. 25J. (Thirty-five extra Plates, lOi.) XXII. ABYDOS, PartL For 1901-2. By W. M. F. Petrie. Eighty-one Plates. 25^.

XXIII.

EL AMRAH AND ABYDOS. An


A. C.

Extra Volume.
25J.

By D. Randall-MacIver,

Mace, and

F. Ll.

Griffith.

Sixty Plates.

XXIV. ABYDOS,

Part

II.

For 1902-3.

XXV. ABYDOS,

Part III.

An Extra

Volume.

By W. M. F. Petrie. Sixty-four Plates. 25^. By C. T. Currelly, E. R. Ayrton,


25J,

and A. E. P. Weigall, &c.

Sixty-one Plates.

XXVI. EHNASYA. For 1903-4. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. Forty-three Plates. 25^. (ROMAN EHNASYA. Thirty-two extra Plates. loj.) XXVII. DEIR EL BAHARI, Part V. For 1904-5. By Edguard Naville. Plates
CXIX-CL
XXVIII.
with Description.

Royal

folio.

30^.

THE ELEVENTH DYNASTY TEMPLE AT DEIR EL BAHARI,


For 1905-6.

Part

I.

By Edouard Naville and H. R, Hall.


Part VI.

Thirty-one Plates.

25^.

XXIX. DEIR EL BAHARI,


CLI-CLXXIV

For 1906-7.

By Edouard Naville.
folio.

Plates

(one coloured) with Description.

Royal

30J.

XXX.

THE ELEVENTH DYNASTY


For 1907-8.

TEINIPLE

AT DEIR EL BAHARI,
25^.

Part

By Edouard Naville.

Twenty-four Plates.

XXXI. PRE-DYNASTIC
XXXII.
For 1909-10.

CEMETERY AT EL MAHASNA. For 1908-9. By . R. Ayrton and W. L. S. Loat. THE ELEVENTH DYNASTY TEMPLE AT DEIR EL BAHARI, Part III.
25^.

By Edouard Naville and H.

R.

Hall.

(^In

preparation.)

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
Edited by F. Ll. Griffith.
I.

BENI HASAN, BENI HASAN,

For 1 890-1. By Percy E. Newberry. Part I. by G. W. Eraser. Forty-nine Plates (four coloured). {Out ofprint.)
Part

With Plans

II.

For 189 1-2. By Percy E. Newberry. With Appendix,

Plans, and Measurements by G.

W. Eraser.

Thirty-seven Plates (two coloured).

25J.

in.
IV.

EL BERSHEH,

Part

L
2 5 J.

For 1892-3.

By Percy
By

E. Newberry.

Thirty-four

Plates (two coloured).

EL BERSHEH,
BENI HASAN,

Part II. For 1893-4. Newberry,, With Appendix by G. W. Eraser.

F. Ll. Griffith and Percy E. Twenty-three Plates (two coloured). 25J.

V.
VI.
VII.

Part III.

For 1894-5.

By

F. Ll. Griffith.
Plates.
25J.

(Hieroglyphs,

and manufacture, &c., of Flint Knives.)

Ten coloured

HIEROGLYPHS FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF THE EGYPT


EXPLORATION FUND.
For 1895-6.

By F.Ll. Griffith. Nine coloured

Plates.

25^.

BENI HASAN,
beasts

Part IV.

For 1896-7.

By

F. Ll. Griffith.

(Illustrating
25J.

and

birds, arts, crafts, &c.)

Twenty-seven Plates (twenty-one coloured).

VIII.

THE
THE

MASTABA
MASTABA
Part
255.

OF

PTAHHETEP

AND AKHETHETEP
F. Ll.

AT
Thirty-

SAQQAREH,
IX.

Part I. For 1897-8. one Plates (three coloured). 25^.

By N. DE G. Davies and

Griffith.

SAQQAREH,
five Plates.

OF

PTAHHETEP
SAID.

AND AKHETHETEP
For 1899-1900.
Part
2,$.
I.

AT
Thirty-

For 1898-9.

By N. de G. Davies and F.Ll. Griffith.

X.

THE ROCK TOMBS OF SHEIKH


Davies.
Thirty-five Plates.
2 55.

By N. de G.
1

XL THE ROCK TOMBS OF DEIR EL GEBRAWI,

For

900-1.

By

.
XIV.

N. de G. Davies.

Twenty-seven Plates (two coloured).

DEIR EL GEBRAWI,
Plates (two coloured).

Part IL

For 1901-2.
Part

By N. de G.

Davies.

Thirty

255.

Xm. THE ROCK TOMBS OF EL AMARNA,


Davies.
Forty-one Plates.
25^.

L For 1902-3. ByN. deG.

EL AMARNA, Part II. For 1903-4. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-seven Plates. 25J. XV. EL AMARNA, Part IIL Fori904-5. By N. de G. Davies. Forty Plates. 25J. XVI. EL AMARNA, Part IV. For 1 905-6. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-five Plates. 25J. XVII. EL AMARNA, Part V. For 1906-7. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-four Plates. 25J. XVIIL EL AMARNA, Part VI. For 1907-8. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-four Plates. 25J. By J. W. Crowfoot, and MEROITIC XIX. THE ISLAND OF MERGE.
INSCRIPTIONS,
Part
I.

For 1908-9.

By
II.

F. Ll.

Griffith.

Thirty-five Plates.

25J.

XX.

MEROITIC INSCRIPTIONS,
Forty-eight Plates.

Part

For 1909-10.

By

F. Ll. Griffith.

{In preparation.)

GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH.
I.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
S.

PAPYRI,
PAPYRI,

Part
Part
25^.

I.

For 1897-8.
For 1898-9.

By By

B. P.
B. P.
P.

Grenfell
Grenfell
Grenfell,

Hunt.

Eight Collotype Plates. Eight Collotype Plates. G.

{Out ofprint.)
II.

II.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
S.

Hunt.

III.

FAYtJM
A.
S.

TOWNS AND THEIR


Hogarth.
J.

PAPYRI.

For 1899-1900. By B.
255.

Hunt, and D.
S.

Eighteen Plates.

IV.

THE TEBTUNIS
Grenfell, A.
and A.
S.

PAPYRI.

Double Volume
G. Smyly.

for

900-1 and

901-2.
sale.)

By

B. P.

Hunt, and

Nine Collotype Plates.

{Not for

V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
Hunt.

PAPYRI,
PAPYRI,
Part
I.

Part III.
255.

For 1902-3. For 1903-4.


for
45^.

By

B. P. B. P.

Grenfell

Six Collotype Plates.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
B. P.
S.

Part IV.
255.

By

Grenfell

Hunt.

Eight Collotype Plates.

THE HIBEH
and A.
S.

PAPYRI,
A.
S.

Double Volume
Plates.

1904-5 and 1905-6.

By

Grenfell and
Hunt.
Hunt.

Hunt.

Ten Collotype
Part V.
255.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS THE OXYRHYNCHUS


and A.
S.

PAPYRI,
PAPYRI, PAPYRI, PAPYRI, PAPYRI,

For 1906-7. For 1907-8.


For 1908-9.

By By

B. P.

Grenfell

Seven Collotype Plates.


Six Collotype Plates.

IX.

Part VI.
25^.

B. P.

Grenfell
S.

X.
XI.
XII.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
Six Collotype Plates.
25J.

Part VII. Part VIII. Part IX.

By By By

A.

Hunt.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
Seven Collotype Plates.
Six Collotype Plates.
2 5 J.

For 1909-10.

A. S. Hunt.
S.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
255-.

For 1910-11.

A.

Hunt.

ANNUAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL REPORTS.


(Yearly Summaries by F. G.

Kenyon, W.

E.

Crum, and

the Officers of the Society, vi^th Maps.)

Edited by F. Ll. Griffith.

THE
,

SEASON'S WORK.

For 1890-1.

By Edouard Naville, Percy E Newberry, and"

G. W. Fraser. 2s. ed. For 1892-3 and 1893-4. 2s. 6d. each. 1894-5. is.6d. Containing Report of D. G. Hogarth's Excavations in Alexandria. With Illustrated Article on the Transport of Obelisks by Edouard Naville. 1895-6. y. I, With Articles on Oxyrhynchus and its Papyri by B, P. Grenfell, and a Thucydides 2s.()d. 1896-7. ,, Papyrus from Oxyrhynchus by A. S. Hunt. With Illustrated Article on Excavations at Hierakonpolis by W. M. F. Petrie. 2s. 6d. 1897-8. 1898-9. 2s.6d. With Article on the Position of Lake Moeris by B. P. Grenfell and A. S.Hunt. 1899-1900. 2s. 6d. With Article on Knossos in its Egyptian Relations by A. J. Evans. ,,

And

eleven successive years,

2s.

6d. each.

SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS.
'
:

Sayings of Our Lord,' from an Early Greek Papyrus.


2s.

By

B. P.

Grenfell

and A.

S.

Hunt.

(with Collotypes) and 6d. net.

NEW

SAYINGS OF JESUS AND FRAGMENT OF A LOST GOSPEL.


Grenfell and
is. net.

By
S.

B. P.

A. S.

Hunt.

is. net.

FRAGMENT OF AN UNCANONICAL GOSPEL.


Hunt.

By

B. P.

Grenfell and A.

ATLAS OF ANCIENT EGYPT. With Letterpress and GUIDE TO THE TEMPLE OF DEIR EL BAHARL COPTIC OSTRACA. By W. E. Crum. 10s. 6d. net.
Slides

Index.

With Plan.

{Ou/ 0/ pnn/.) (Ota 0/ pnni.)


Street ,

from Fund Pkotograp/ts may be obtained through Messrs. Newton 6^ Co., 3 Fleet and Prints from Mr. R. C. Murray, 37 Dartmouth Park Hill, N.W.
Offices of the
37

E.C,

Egypt Exploration Fund:


MASS., U.S.A.

GREAT RUSSELL STREET, LONDON, W.C, and

527

TREMONT TEMPLE, BOSTON,


Agents :

BERNARD QUARITCH, 11 GRAFTON STREET, NEW BOND STREET, W. KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & Co., 68-74 CARTER LANE, E.C. ASHER & Co., 14 BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN, W.C, and 56 UNTER DEN LINDEN, BERLIN. HENRY FROWDE, AMEN CORNER, E.G., and 29-35 WEST 32ND STREET, NEW YORK.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY

3 1197 22884 0143