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THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART X
GE ENFELL AND HUNT

33(S

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND
GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART X
EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES
BY

BERNARD

P.

GRENFELL,

D.Litt.

HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN; HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG; HON. lUR.D. GRAZ FELLOW OF queen's COLLEGE, OXFORD; FELLOW OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY CORRESPONDING MEMBER OP THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

AND

ARTHUR
; ;

S.
;

HUNT,

D.Litt.

HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN HON. lUK.D. GRAZ; HON. LL.D. ATHENS AND GLASGOW PROFESSOR OF PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE FELLOW OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES MEMBER OF THE ROYAL DANISH ACADEMY OF SCIENCES AND LETTERS

WITH

SIX

PLATES

LONDON
SOLD AT

The Offices of the EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND,
AND
527

Tremont Temple, Boston,

37 Great Mass., U.S.A.

Russell
E.C.

St.,

W.C.

KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., 68-74 Carter Lane, BERNARD QUARITCH, ii Grafton St., New Bond St., W.
ASHER &
C. F.
;

CO., 14 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C, and 56 Unter den Linden, Berlin CLAY, Fetter Lane, E.C, and 100 Princes Street, Edinburgh and HUMPHREY MILFORD Amen Corner, E.C, and 29-35 West 32ND Street, New York, U.S.A.

1914
All
risihts

reserved

YOUN'G UNlVERSiTC
LIBRARi'

PROVO. UTAH

OXFORD
HORACE HART PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

PREFACE
Of
the

new

literary pieces here published, 1231

and 1233-5 pro-

ceed from the second of the large literary finds of 1906, with some small additions from the work of the next season. The remainder, with the extant and non-literary papyri, were for the most part found
in

1903-4.
It is a great

pleasure to be able to restore to the title-page of this
friend

volume the name of the
last five years

and colleague whose absence during the

has been so much regretted.
in
in the editing of

The

earlier portion of the

book was already
he has shared

shape when Dr. Grenfell came back to Oxford, but
the non-literary texts, besides helping

materially in the revision of the whole.

In future

we hope

to return to

the old division of labour, and so

by degrees

to reduce the arrears in

the publications of the Graeco- Roman Branch.

To

Professor U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff

I

am

under fresh

most generous assistance in connexion with the new classical texts, 1231-41. Professor U. Wilcken has repeated his kind service of reading the non-literary documents in proof and affording the benefit of his criticism and Professor L. Mitteis, as on many previous occasions, has given valuable advice on some points of Graeco-Roman law. To these scholars, as to one or two others from whom occasional welcome contributions have been received, belong the hearty thanks of both the editors of this volume and its readers.
obligations for
;

ARTHUR
Queen's College, Oxford,
Jan.;

S.

HUNT.

1914.

CONTENTS
Preface
List of Plates

Table of Papyri Note on the Method of Publication and List of Abbreviations

.............. ............
. .

PAGE
v
viii

ix
xiii

TEXTS
I.

IL
IIL
IV.

New

Theological Fragments (1224-1230) Classical Texts (1231-1242)
1X9
:

Extant Classical Authors (1243-1251) Documents of the Roman and Byzantine Periods (a) Official (1252-1257) (i) Declarations to Officials (1258-1269) (c) Petitions (1270-1272) {d) Contracts (1273-1282) (e) Taxation (1283-1285) (/) Accounts and Lists (1286-1290)
.

162
178

200
207 227

.

236 243 256

(g) Private Correspondence (1291-1300) () Miscellaneous Minor Documents (1301-1350)

INDICES
I.

New

Literary Texts: (a) 1231-4 (Sappho and Alcaeus) {&) Other Texts

.......
.

265

273

II.

Emperors
Consuls, Eras, Indictions

280

IIL
IV.

.282
283
283

V.
VI.
VII.

Months and Days Personal Names
Geographical
Religion
.

291 293

viii

CONTENTS
PAGE
Official and Military Titles

VIII.

IX.

Weights, Measures, Coins

X.
XI.
XII.

Taxes General Index of Greek and Latin Words
Index of Passages discussed

............. .....
LIST OF PLATES
Fr.
recto, Fr. 2 verso,

294 295 296
297 311

I.

1224
1231

I

1232

Fr. i. Cols,

ii-iii

II.

Frs. i, 10,

56
ii,

III.

IV.

1233 1234

Fr.

i.

Col.

Frs.

2,8
-

at the end.

Fr. 2

V.
VI.

1225, 1238, 1249, 1271

1250

Cols,

i-ii

TABLE OF PAPYRI
{A)i asterisk denotes texts not printed in full)
A.D.

1224.
1225. 1226.

Uncanonical Gospel
Leviticus xvi

Psalms

vii, viii

.

1227.

St.

Matthew's Gospel

xii

1228.

St.

John's Gospel xv, xvi

1229. 1230.
1231.

St.

James's Epistle
v, vi
i
.

i

Revelation

Sappho, Book

.

1232.
1233.

Sappho, Book
Alcaeus
Alcaeus

ii

1234.
1235.

Arguments of Menandei's Plays Menander, Epiirepoiites Menander, Colax 1237. 1238-40. Fragments of Comedies
1236.
1241.

Chrestomathy Greeks and Jews before Trajan ApoUonius Rhodius, Argonautica

1242.
1243. 1244.

Herodotus

i i

1245.
1246.

Thucydides
Thucydides

vii
viii
.

1247.

Thucydides

1248.
1249.

Plato, Politicus

.

Babrius, Fables

.

1250.
1251.

Achilles Tatius, Cliiophon

Cicero, In Verrem II.

ii

and Leucippe and Pro Caelio

i

1252.
1253.

OfBcial Correspondence and Declaration
Military Requisitions

....

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A. D.

1254.
1255. 1256.

Publication of an Appointment
Affidavit of

.

Comarchs

.

List of Priests

under age

1257.

Statement concerning a Decaprotus

1258.
1259.

Promise of Attendance
Declaration of a Shipper
Declaration of a Shipper
Declaration concerning Commissariat

1260.
1261.

1262.
1263.

Receipt of Seed-corn

.

Announcement concerning
Notification of Inviolability
Affidavit of Priestly

Practice of

Trade

1264.
1265. 1266. 1267.

Rank

.

Examination

for

Membership

of the

Gy

Registration of a Child Registration of a
List of Property

1268.

House
.

after
.

Purchase
.
.

1269.
1270.
1271.

Notification through the Archidicastes
Petition to the Praefect

1272.
1273.

Complaint of Theft
Marriage-contract

.

.

.

.

1274.
1275. 1276.
1277.

Appointment of a Representative

Engagement of Musicians
Sale of House-property

.

Sale of a Triclinium

.

1278. 1279.

Division of Usufruct of a Pigeon-house

Lease of State Land

.

1280.
1281.

Partnership in a Lease

1282.
1283. 1284.
1285.

Loan Repayment of a Loan
Revenue-return
Receipt for

....
Sales
.

Tax on

List of Village

Payments

.

1286.

Account of Receipt and Expenditure
Survey-list

1287.

1288.
1289.

Private Account
Private

Account

1290.
1291.

List of Articles

Letter of Zois

1292.

Letter of
Letter of

1293.

Hermogenes Theon

.... .... .... ....
.

TABLE OF PAPYRI
1294.

TABLE OF PAPYRI

NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
method followed in this volume is the same as that in new literary texts, 1224 and 1231-4 are printed in a dual form, a literal transcript being accompanied by a reconstruction in modern style 1242 is given in modern form only. In the others, and in the fragments of
general
Parts I-IX.

The

Of

the

;

extant authors, the originals are reproduced except for division of words, capital
initials in proper names, expansion of abbreviations, and supplements of lacunae. Additions or corrections by the same hand as the body of the text are in small

thin type, those

by a

different

hand

in thick type.

Non-literary documents are

given in modern form with accentuation and punctuation.

Abbreviations and

symbols are resolved

;

additions and corrections are usually incorporated in the

text, their occurrence being recorded in the critical apparatus,

where also
rise

faults

of orthography, &c., are corrected
difficulty.

if

they seemed likely to give

to

any

Iota
is

adscript

subscript

employed.

has been printed when so written, otherwise iota Square brackets [ ] indicate a lacuna, round brackets ( )

the resolution of a symbol or abbreviation, angular brackets ( ) a mistaken omission in the original, braces { } a superfluous letter or letters, double square
brackets
[[ ]]

a deletion in the original.

Dots placed within brackets represent
;

the approximate

number of letters

lost or deleted

dots outside brackets indicate

mutilated or otherwise illegible
to be considered doubtful.

letters.

Letters with dots underneath them are
refer to the texts of the

Heavy Arabic numerals
volume and
in

Oxyrhynchus papyri
lines,

in this

Parts I-IX, ordinary numerals to

small

Roman

numerals to columns.
used in
referring
to

The
P.

abbreviations

papyrological

publications
viz.
:

are

practically those adopted in the

Archiv fiir Papyrtisforschung,

Amh. = The Amherst
A.
S.

Papyri (Greek), Vols. I-II, by B. P. Grenfell and

Hunt.

Archiv = Archiv fiir apyrusforschung. B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den K. Museen zu Berlin, Griechische Urkunden. P. Brit. Mus. = Greek Papyri in the British Museum, Vols. I-II, by F. G. Kenyon Vol. Ill, by F. G. Kenyon and H. I. Bell Vol. IV, by H. I. Bell. C. P. Herm. = Corpus Papyrorum Hermopolitanorum, Vol. I, by C. Wessely.
;

;

xiv
C. P. R.

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

=

Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Vol.

I,

by

C. Wessely.
Caire,

P. Cairo Cat.

=

Catalogue des Antiquites ^gyptiennes du Musee du

Papyrus grecs d'epoque byzantine, Vols. I-II, by J. Maspero. P. Cairo Preis. = Griechische Urkunden des Aeg. Museums zu
F. Preisigke.
P.

Kairo,

by

= Fayiim Towns and their Papyri, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and D. G. Hogarth. Vol. by D. Comparetti. P. Flor. = Papiri Fiorentini, Vol. I, by G. Vitelli P. Gen. = Les Papyrus de Geneve, Vol. I, by J. Nicole. P. Giessen = Griechische Papyri zu Giessen, Vol. I, by E. Kornemann, O. Eger,
Fay.
;

,

and P. M. Meyer. Goodsp. = Greek Papyri from the Cairo Museum, by E. J. Goodspeed (University of Chicago Decennial Publications). by B. P. P. Grenf = Greek Papyri, Series I, by B. P. Grenfell, and Series Grenfell and A. S. Hunt.
P.

,

P.

Hamburg =

P.

P.

P.

P.

P.

P.

P.
P.

P. P.

P.

Griechische Urkunden der Hamburger Stadtbibliothek, Parts i-a, by P. M. Meyer. Hibeh = The Hibeh Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. Leipzig = Griechische Urkunden der Papyrussammlung zu Leipzig, Vol. I, by L. Mitteis. Munich = Veroffentlichungen aus der Papyrussammlung zu Miinchen, Part i, by A. Heisenberg and L. Wenger. Oxy. = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I-VI, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt Parts VH-IX, by A. S. Hunt. Par. — Les Papyrus grecs du Musee du Louvre, Notices et Extraits, t. xviii. 3, by W. Brunet de Presle and E. Egger. Petrie = The Flinders Petrie Papyri, Parts I-II, by J. P. Mahaffy Part III, by J. P. Mahaffy and J. G. Smyly. Reinach = Papyrus grecs et demotiques, by Theodore Reinach. Rylands = Catalogue of the Greek Papyri in the Rylands Library, Manchester, Vol. I, by A. S. Hunt Vol. II in the press. S. I. = Papiri della Societa italiana. Vols. I-II, by G. Vitelli and others. Strassb. = Griech. Papyrus der K. Universitatsbibliothek zu Strassburg im .Elsass, Vol. I, by F. Preisigke. Tebt. - The Tebtunis Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and and Part II, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and E. J. J. G. Smyly
;

;

;

;

Goodspeed. P. Thead. = Papyrus de Theadelphie, by P. Jouguet. P. Tor. = Papyri Graeci Regii Taurinensis Musei Aegyptii, by A. Peyron. Wilcken, Ost. — Griechische Ostraka, by U. Wilcken.

;

I.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
1224.

.

UNCANONICAL GOSPEL.
Fr. 2

6-3

X

13-1 cm.

Fourth century.
(Fr.
I

Plate I

recto, Fr. 2 verso).

These small but highly
written with
care
in

interesting fragments

from a papyrus book are
size.

an upright uncial hand of medium
is

The

contrast
at

between dark and light strokes

well marked,

and the frequent thickening
;

the tops of letters gives a somewhat ornate effect

cf.

1229.

varies in size,

being sometimes quite small, sometimes on the same scale as the other letters generally also is inconsistent, the internal part being either angular or curved
;

has a long
the
line.

tail,

whereas

is

shorter and sometimes does not descend at

all

below

Hands

of this type are

commonly

assigned to the fourth century, and
attributed,

to that period the present

example may also be
is

have been written early
is

in the century rather than late,

not out of the question.

abbreviated

,

though it is likely to and a third century date as in 1079, a papyrus of

about the same age. at the end of a line sometimes appears as a horizontal an angular sign to fill up a short line is once stroke over the preceding vowel used. Both fragments are from the tops of leaves, and the columns or pages were numbered, in one place (a verso i) certainly, in another (3 recto ii) probably, In Fr. i recto and 2 recto i, on the in the formal script of the text below. other hand, the figures are more negligently written, but since an intermittent numeration would be inconvenient, they are likely, nevertheless, to have
;

proceeded from the pen of the original scribe.

whether

two columns on recto and verso, and the question arises be regarded as a single leaf with double columns, or as two Since Col. i of the verso is numbered leaves with a single column to the page. 174 and Col. i of the recto [i]76, it is clear that verso i, ii, recto i were consecuFr.
2 contains
this is to

tive

;

but
i,

if

the fragment consists of two leaves, recto
i,

ii

immediately preceded

verso

instead of following recto

as

it

would

if

a single leaf with double

columns be supposed. The latter hypothesis is supported by the narrow space between the columns and the absence of a strongly marked crease down the

2
middle of
it.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

But the space is not narrower than in P. Rylands 38, a certain leaf, though no doubt the book to which that belonged was not nearly so bulky as the one under consideration moreover, there is a crease, though not a deep one, in this space, and the fold is in the right direction, i. e. it would make the verso lie uppermost in the quire. Several other considerations
instance of a double
;

support the theory of the double leaf as against the double column,

(i)

Single

papyrus books in Egypt. (2) In a book composed of leaves with double columns, the second column on every page should have an even number but here the number of the second column would be odd. (3) Col. i of the recto stands higher by nearly a line than Col. ii. Contiguous columns were not, indeed, always kept parallel, but an inequality would be more liable to occur if the columns did not stand side by side on the

columns were apparently customary

in

;

same page.
that Col.
that the
ii

The
recto
is

balance of probability, therefore, inclines to the supposition
the page preceding Col.
i

verso.
it

If this be correct,

it is

likely

column was of no great height, and
I,

may

be estimated at about twenty
preserved that no recon-

lines at most.

In Fr.
struction
is is

numbered on the

recto 139, so

little is

practicable.

On

the recto the words
is

{

show

that the

probably to be drawn from the which is the only complete word on the verso. second person plural Between this leaf and Fr. a there was a wide interval, the next pagination number
Saviour
speaking, and a similar inference

?,

preserved being 174, at the top of Fr. 2 verso i. If, as we have supposed, this page was preceded by Col. ii of the recto, the number to be restored there is
i[73].

The

subject of that

column

is

again not clear.

Seemingly

it

describes

an appearance

in a vision of Jesus,

who speaks words

of comfort or exhortation,

but the occasion and the person addressed remain in doubt.
to which the passage relates
is

That the incident

the walking on the sea (Matt. xiv. 35 sqq.,
is

Mark

yi.

48 sqq.) seems unlikely, and the reference
Call of Peter contained in

perhaps to something not

reported in the Canonical Gospels.

Dr. Bartlet, after suggesting that the lines

expand the account of the
tion of a supplementary

Luke

v.

i-io by a descrip-

commission given

in a nocturnal vision,

now

inclines to

the view that they relate to a vision of consolation and encouragement following
Peter's Fall,

Either of these explanations,

if

adopted, would have an important
(a verso

bearing on the problem of the identity of the work to which the fragment belongs
;

see below, pp. 4-5.
is

The next column

i)

is

not more extensive,

but enough

preserved to indicate that questions were being addressed to

Christ concerning the nature of His mission and teaching.

Apart from the

phrase 'new doctrine
parallels in the

',

however

(cf

Mark

i.

37),

the language finds no evident

pages of the Evangelists.

1

;

1224.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
more
familiar

3
is

In the two following columns firmer and
Fr. a verso
ii

ground

reached.

describes in language similar to that of the Synoptists,

though

more

concisely, the offence taken

by the

scribes, Pharisees,

and

priests at seeing

Jesus consorting with sinners, with His answer, which appears to have been in the form given it by St. Luke. Col. i of the recto contains two recorded Sayings

'

put

in

a novel relation.
'

The
;

injunction to pray for enemies found in
'

and Luke is followed by the sentence For he that is not against us Matt.) and this line of thought is carried on, if the restorayou (so Luke tion is correct, by an otherwise unrecorded Saying that the man who to-day is
' :
'

Matthew you is with

The mention of the adversary in the to-morrow be near at hand. development of the same idea. How are these fragments to be classified ? Are they part of an uncanonical Gospel covering much the same ground as the Synoptic Gospels, or do they come from a collection of Sayings of Jesus like that of which portions have been previously recovered (l, 654, possibly also, as some think, 655 and the Vienna fragment from the Fayum) ? The latter hypothesis may be supported by more than one argument. In the first place it is to be remarked that, in these mutilated remains of six columns, Jesus is always either actually speaking or about to speak. Moreover, the discourse here attributed to Him shows the same admixture of novel and familiar elements as the two Oxyrhynchus fragments of collected Sayings (1,654) and the so-called fragment of an uncanonical Gospel (655) which has been referred by some critics to tl^e same collection. Again, in each of those three papyri there were certain special points of contact with St. Luke's Gospel in 1224 specific Lucan affinities may again be observed (i verso ii. 5-6, a recto i. 3). But there is at any rate one notable divergence from 1 and 654: the formula 'Jesus saith', which there introduced the various Sayings, is here absent. Instead of this, in Fr. a verso ii. 4-5 the words addressed to the murmuring scribes and Pharisees are preceded by [eluev (or just as in the parallel passages of the Synoptists. There is thus good reason for declining to refer 1225 to the same collection as 1 and 654. Possibly other collections differently put together were in circulation but the alternative view, that our fragments belong to an uncanonical Gospel, is the more natural. In such scanty remains as these the absence of pure narration is an extremely precarious argument and it may be held that the introductions to the Lord's words in Fr. 3 verso are more in the manner of a connected narrative than a collection of Sayings as such. There is indeed the analogy of 654. ^%-6, where a series of questions from the disciples are quoted but nowhere else in that papyrus or in 1 was the context of a Saying given, and the occurrence here of two or, including Fr. a recto ii, even three instances within so small a compass
afar off will
' '

next

line suggests a further

?
; ;

),

;

a

4

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Stress will perhaps be laid. on the

thus affords a distinct point of contrast.

brevity of the introduction to the reply to the scribes and Pharisees in Fr. a

verso

compared with the corresponding accounts of the Evangelists. some extent upon the restoration, and would be less striking if, for example, the alternative supplement suggested in the note ad loc. were adopted. Moreover, the conciseness here is counterbalanced by the fullness
ii,

as

This, however, depends to

of the preceding column.

It is also significant

that in Fr. 2 verso

i,

ii,

recto

i,

which were certainly consecutive, a natural sequence of events is traceable, substantially that of St. Luke, to whom, as already remarked, the fragments

show
to

linguistic relationship.
i,

The

questions put concerning the
(cf.

new

doctrine in

Fr. 2 verso

as

might be expected, precede

Mark

i.

27),

and

may be supposed

have arisen out of the claim to forgive sins as recorded in Luke v. lysqq. ii is parallel to Luke v. 27 sqq., while recto i embodies some of the teaching of the Sermon on the Mount, reported in Luke vi. The inference will follow that these columns stood comparatively early in the Gospel, which therefore, on account of the high pagination numbers, must have been preceded by some
Col.

other work.
questionable.

Whether

Fr. i belongs to the

same work

as Fr. 2 thus

becomes

For the

identification of this Gospel,

if it

be rightly regarded as such, decisive

indications appear to be lacking.

A

search
;

among

the extant non-canonical
think of the Gospel
in the case

Sayings has failed to disclose points of contact
or against any particular sect recognizable.

nor are traces of bias in favour of
of

It is natural to

according to the Egyptians
tion,

;

but beyond some a priori probability
little

a document circulating in Egypt,

can be urged

in

support of this identifica-

commonly attributed to that Gospel are Perhaps 1224 belongs to the same work as 655, which, though probably distinct from the Gospel according to the Egyptians, had some affinity 'to it. In their relation to the Synoptic Gospels there is a general similarity between 655 and 1224 both exhibit a free handling of Synoptic material, and a tendency towards abridgement. The fact that the two papyri are derived from the same site lends the hypothesis of a common source a certain
and the
distinctive characteristics

not here in evidence.

;

plausibility.

A more definite suggestion

is

made by Dr.

Bartlet,

who

is

inclined

to refer Fr. 3 to the Gospel of Peter.

This view rests upon the interpretation

mentioned above of Fr. 2 recto ii as concerned in some way with that disciple. In the eponymous Gospel an amplification of any incident relating to him would be likely enough, and since the Gospel was written in the first person, the use of
in
1.

I

is

very appropriate.
i,

If

it

refers

to the Call, this

column should
arising

precede verso

an arrangement already found probable on palaeographical
difficulty

grounds

;

but the

pointed out in that connexion

(p. 3),

from

1224.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
space,

5

the narrowness of the inter-columnar

becomes accentuated, since the
pages would be needed.
If,

Akhmim

fragment shows that the Gospel of Peter was a work of considerable

compass, for the completion of which

many more

To

evade the obstacle by the assumption that our Gospel was not finished volume, but extended into a second, is not altogether satisfactory.
other hand, recto
ii

in a single

on the

be connected with Peter's Fall, this column will follow recto i, and the double-column formation of the pages must be assumed. This, as remarked above, is on external evidence less satisfactory; but a more serious
difficulty is the resulting necessity of
all

supposing the omission

in this

Gospel of

the matter found in the Canonical Gospels between the
i)

Sermon on the Mount

(Fr. 3 recto

and the Fall of Peter.

Dr. Bartlet holds this to be possible on
it

a theory of the Gospel of Peter making

highly selective in the narrative of

events preceding the Passion, in which interest was centred.
ever,

Such a view, howidentification with

needs further substantiation.
is

Another objection to any
it

the Gospel of Peter

that in the extant fragment of

the

name Jesus

is

not

used, being replaced

by
will

Kvpios.

Until further discoveries throw fresh light
in a conclusion of

upon the problem,
tion liquet.

it

probably be necessary to acquiesce

Fr.

I

recto.

Plate

I.

Fr. I verso.

[

[•

.]
.....
Col.
i.

^vTievnavTi

€[.
[
[.

.]

.

[

.]«[.

Fr. 2 verso.

Plate

[

[
[

]€€ ]([.]'€
poS

])(^[. .]
].[...

[

5

[

]

[. €[.
Col.
ii.

.]
5

.
>([. ([. .][
]

.

.

,

.

.

.

...

[.

[

[

[

[.....
[

.'\_

^
Col.
i.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Fr. 2 recto.
Col.
ii.

--

€€[.
^.][.
[.][
5

/?[
.
.

'\(<
]
.

[

5

[

"[ ^^
'\ivev(uv\.
.

.

.

[. .][.

[

8\.
.

[
.] .

.

.

[

Fr.

recto.

Plate

I.

Fr.

verso.
[
[.
. . .

]'

ev

\
[

"^.
]€[

-

[.

.[
is
ii.

Whether the
of deciding.

recto of this leaf preceded the verso or vice versa there

is

no sure means
In
1.

The

subject of what remains of both pages

also quite uncertain.

2 of

the recto the doubtful

may be

,

or perhaps

i.

.
[\
5
6

[ [() 6\ [];
\k'\v
[ [

Fr. 2 recto.

Col.

Sovs

€[

73•
'
.
.
.

overcame me.

And
. .

For

it is

not thou

who

.

Jesus stood by in a vision and said, .' but he who gave (?) .
.

Why art thou

cast

down ?

The

question of the position of this page has been discussed in the introduction.

1224.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
('( 6

Unfortunately its contents are also obscure. The only passage where the word is found in the Gospels is Matt. xvii. 9 op. in reference to the Transfiguration ; and it is remarkable, as Prof. Swete has pointed out, that occurs in the description of the same event in Luke ix. 32 fif Tlerpos oi The subject of the present passage, however, appears to be quite different. That the nominative to be supplied before /if is vitvos is not unlikely (cf. Matt. xxvi. 43 yap ol but there are of course many other possibilities, e. g. or In 1. 2 can hardly be interpreted otherwise than as the termination of a participle, though the genitive causes difficulty, since is the natural subject of the sentence. This type of construction is, however, to be found in classical Greek as well as in the the genitive may even be a clerical error and not attributable to the author. For ; \i\v Xe'yei cf. Acts ix. 10 ; [e]v op., though there is not too much room for the e, suits the remains better than opaparos (Acts xviii. 9). ^^[/]^ is very doubtful; the shape of the letter following the is more like that of than of 0, which both when written large or small is nearly circular. Moreover an is very intractable here; the « would inevitably have to be connected with the preceding letters, whereas a question context ; cf. e.g. Matt. viii. 26 KaWeyei airo'is . . fits in much better with the SeiXoi cVt6, is that there is no visible trace of the cross-bar, The objection to ; although the surface of the papyrus in the middle of the letter is not appreciably worn, is not altogether satisfactory on account is less suitable. At the beginning of 1. 4 of the comparative shortness of the tail ; but or is still more objectionable. If is right, an emphatic seems more probable than -[o]v, and a convenient antithesis is obtained by reading 6 fV[! . cf. for this collocation e. g. Luke vii. 44 in\ woSas . ; eSwKar. On the supposition that the passage described Peter's restoration from the remorse of his denial Dr. Bartlet suggests oi yap iv\i.Tayr)v, e. g., may be restored on the view of the passage as concerned with the Call of Peter; cf. introd. pp. 2, 4.

\

-

),

4(

.

\
. .

^

;.

'

yo
.

[]

.

.

\
Col.

\

\!
I.

.;

Fr. 3 verso.

poS

[ [^,
[/ifjOf.

]77€

\^•,

(55]'

5

[;
.

][]
174.

[]
i.

Plate

-

\\

'

.

.

.

thou didst say
?

.

.,

making no answer.

What

What

is

the

dost preach

new doctrine Answer and

that they say thou teachest, or
.

then hast thou forbidden ? vhat the new baptism that thou

.

.'

the wording of this passage is open to doubt, its purport may be recovered points clearly to •[)/] in the preceding line, and, given with probability, cf. Acts ; ];^;' becomes obvious on the analogy of Mark i. 27 ri ianv

Though

; \\
"[

'

8
xvii.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

may naturally and the next two letters, 19 Tt'swhich is The interrogative be assumed to be the first syllable of the verb in the line almost inevitable, fits in admirably with these supplements, and ^ij implies following in 1. 5, is also quite in keeping, above, which suggests Other details of the restoration an infinitival construction ; hence of a verb, is In 1. i n- of wes, which is doubtless the termination are more questionable. than practically certain, and (l]nes is better suited to the present participle ^17 (toTcXiJjrts, although the use of the form -emas in such close proximity constitutes e. g. something of a stumbling-block. The letter preceding emas is doubtfully identified as a . What remains is a vertical stroke with a small tip to the right of its top. In other examples of in this papyrus the cross-stroke does not project beyond the uprights, but a slight The top of or , inaccuracy in this respect may easily have occurred here and there. is therefore which are the alternatives, turn, if at all, to the left, not to the right, or the commoner signification forbid preferable, whether the primary meaning declare gives a good sense amLm'iv is, however, not found in the Gospels. be adopted, and but the lacunae are perhaps rather easier In 1. 4 ]a may well be e. g. be restored. The vestige in the or to fill if some neuter substantive like assistance, except that it indicates a somewhat tall letter, such middle of the line is of httle cf. Mark i. 4, &c., For as usually is, but an or t, e. g., is also possible. and, for the likelihood of questions concerning a 'new baptism', John iv. 1-2
;

]]

'

^.
.

.

.

[(.

!

[], [(![] [(!

,

]! ] ],
nXeiovas

]]
' '

'

[,

;

space.

€( ' ! . ][-] \
Trotei

would Scarcely be too long

, ! ^;
(caiVoiye

for the

available

Fr. 2 verso.

Se
iepeis

5

[] []
Se

[[. '{) [^
.

[
175•
priests

[ [ ([( -

Col.

ii.

Plate
I.

^peiav

[

'The

scribes

and Pharisees and

seeing

reclined in the midst of sinners. And Jesus hearing not a physician, [but they that are sick].'

him had indignation because he them said. They that are whole need

\

where the same verb

!

There

is

much
/cat

similarity

between

iSoWir
'lijaoCs

^
.

.

.

'! ^ " (
this
Toli

is

used, but only the Pharisees are mentioned as objectors

( (,

passage and the Synoptists, e.g.
,

Mark

,;

\

.

.


ii.

15-17

('

cf.

Matt.

IX,

10—12

1224.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

which apparently stood in Upcls cf. Luke xx. i, where the MSS. are divided For the papyrus, in place between Uput and the more usual apxifpfis. The vestige in 1. 7 may well be the top of the of The restoration adopted of 11. 5-7, producing a striking coincidence with the language of St. Luke, is likely to be correct, especially as both Matthew and Mark here use but the passage will admit of a quite different without amplification the simple

and Luke

v.

29-31, who has

.

!.
(

,
;

9

and

vyiaivovTfs,

treatment,
the term

e. g.

to the scribes

[ •^\\ and

emev the frequent application of o'l Pharisees in the Gospels would serve to justify its
:

[
]
.

.

occurrence in this context.
Fr. 2 recto.

Col.

i.

[ \\ .
\t5)v

'\>
]^)^

] []€ \

\
5
[


\

, .
6
1

yap

ev

.81[
.
.

76.

'

.

.

.

and pray

for

to-day

1—2. Cf. Matt.

Luke

vi.

cf. appears in Didache i. 3 Oidascalia v. 15 «'" similarly Mark ix. 40 2-3. Cf. Luke ix. 50 °^ y°P ; But in these two passages the Saying stands in quite another context, with for its occasion being the attempt of the disciples to prevent a man who was not a follower of Jesus from casting out devils in His name. 4 sqq. The restoration of 11. 4-5 is highly conjectural and rests upon no authority, Pray for your enemies, for they may but it appears to carry on well the line of thought be in truth friends, or if they are not now, they may soon become such.' An analogous sentiment was early current in the Greek world, and is attributed by Aristotle, JiM.
.
.

( :•( ,. . , ((
is

afar off shall

your enemies for he that is not against you is with you. .' to-morrow be near you, and in ... of the adversary
;
.

V.

44

27—8

V(p\

.

(/

^.
,
.

' The ,(. . ^" « '
'
:

actual combination
.

/, ((, (((8-

\

^
.

He

that

tods

(;

\(, .
p.
•yciit

; (
In
1.

1389 b23, to Bias, and . 1395 ^ 25

cf. Diog. Laert. i. 87, who also attributes the maxim to Bias, Soph. ^z'. 679-82, we are ut ex inimico cogiiet fieri posse amicum Seneca, 95. 63 cum mone?}ms aliqiiem Somewhat similarly the Greek proverb indebted for these references to Prof. J. S. Reid.
. .
:

,

,

»

5

\1

is

reflected in

-^

654. 18-20. may be preferred to

\/ •/.]

as a clearer expression

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
of the real meaning, though a more general form would well accord with the proverbial in 1. 6 is possibly character of the Saying. The supposed vestige of a letter preceding e. g., the end of the cross-bar of the , and in any case is too slight to build upon ; would be suitable. The recorded precept about agreeing with the adversary quickly In 1. 7 the letters may be divided (Matt. V. 25, Luke xii. 58) would hardly suit this context. eVt-]!j/ iv or ]ii'ev the third V may equally well be .

],

;

1225.

Leviticus
iO'2X5-5cm.

xvi.

Fourth century.

Plate V.

A
similar

small fragment written in heavy sloping uncials of a type generally
to

those of the

Oxyrhynchus Callimachus

(1011)

though at a

less

advanced stage of development. It may be assigned to the first half of the fourth century. Apart from the hand, a comparatively early period is suggested by the fact that the MS. was in the form of a roll, not a codex, the verso of the fragment being blank. The ink is of the brown shade which became common in
the early Byzantine age.

darker colour, and
front of the
first

Some stops in the middle position show a somewhat may have been added subsequently. There is no margin in
lines,
11. 4-5 and 7, and it is uncertain that these were the though the text can be conveniently arranged on that

letters of

beginnings of the
supposition.

]' []

\

e]^eiXaaeTai•
i'epecov.

5

[ ](• [
[] [/

(\ [' [^
nepi

xvi.

33

] ]
7rep]t
5.

, <\ ([€

[€ \
\
[
om.
evtav

34
.

]][6€
so

:

FGN;

.

1

1226.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
.1226.

ii

Psalms
10-5

vii,

viii.

X 6•8 cm.

Late third or early fourth
century.

The upper

corner of a leaf from a papyrus book of early date, belonging

perhaps more probably to the third century than the fourth. It is written in round upright uncials of medium size, and showing some tendency towards
cursive forms,
e. g.

the occasional linking of

to the following letter.

Some
its

marginal flourishes mark the commencement of a Psalm on the recto, and

number seems
^eoy

to have been written

and Kvpws occur.
8.

A

above the title. The usual contractions of second hand seems to have inserted an iota adscript at
It is of

verso

The

text

is

written stichometrically, the initial letters of each

being slightly enlarged.

some

interest as providing early attestation of inferior authority.

one or two readings which have hitherto rested on

[icy

Kpwei Xaoi/y

[€\()
5
['^"'

[

\ [ 8']
]

Verso,

[€ [

[
[

KaTevOwets

\ [] ] 8\ ]
[]€

vii.

g

[

[] ( [
tovs evjOeis

\,
]

1

1

2

_

/
KS

Recto.
[

V


5

[
a)[s

ev

\

vnep

;

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(
(veKev

^ [^ [
)\

[
;

[-^

e/c

Verso
2.

:
f/ioi

.
:

3.
7.

/je so and many cursives. ; so the cursives 27, iii marg., 156, 202, 269, 283, 284. so Bi^A ; f/ie R.
: :

B^R

e(eo)v

TOD
is

Bt^A

R.

a narrow crack in the papyrus between been inserted here as well as at the end of the line. II. Considerations of space make it probable that
8.

There

and

, and

iota adscript

may have

stood before

,

as in

^•» and

numerous

cursives.
I.

Recto

The

vestige of a vertical stroke

is

consistent with

;

but a figure in this

position might refer to the stood in the margin.

page instead of the Psalm, the number of which could have

2. In Bt^AR &c. is preceded by «r reXor omitted in 151, 173. 9. fveKfv: so 181, Cyril!. Alex, vi, p. 400; tv«a others.

,

but these words are

1227.

St.

Matthew's Gospel
6

xii.

X

1

1•8

cm.

Fifth century.

Fragment of a leaf of a papyrus codex, written in rather large upright uncials in which dark and light strokes are strongly contrasted. The hand
bears a general resemblance to that of the Ascension of Isaiah (P.
it

Amh.

i)

appears to point to a date in the

fifth

century.

The

ink

is

of the brown shade

stop in the high position occurs once, and there one doubtful instance of a rough breathing. An agreement with D and a corrector of is noticeable in 1. 5 of the verso, and an unrecorded variant
characteristic of the period.
is

A

in

recto

1.

4,

and apparently also

1.

6.

Verso.

\\€

xu. 24

1227.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
[etwoi']

13

[]
5

('

8[]
.8>

c^Tos

\ €[\€ \
ev

[Be

[] [][€ [ ]•([](7[ [ €[] []>
[]

Se

[

25

[]

TToXty

[] ([9
[]
ei

^[
Recto.

[][ ]([€
26

]
]
Se

.]

.

.

[

OS

]

([
os

]
€[]77;

[

31 32

] [] [] []] .[ \ ] [][] [ [] ]][ ] [[ ]8[
ev]

ev

]


&C.
;

33

Verso
5.

3•

«"
:

[BejeXfe^ouX

SO

^. . CDEGKM
;

most MSS. CEGKLM &c. add so ; instead of D, which also has SO mOSt MSS. ; ffcrai, and this may have stood in the papyrus. ei et D. That a slightly curved horizontal stroke above the next II. represents a rough breathing is uncertain.
SO iii^O

18:

€8!

(\

BN.

. [\ ([!
[]
:

:

{)!.

:

(
is

letter

Recto 2. Of so D ; from the papyrus. om. MSS. 4.
: :

eav

most MSS.

Cf.

1.

4,

where

fav

is

apparently universal apart

5-6.

The

reading of the papyrus, here

very doubtful.

MSS. have

^

(

14

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
followed by either
ovre ev
is
oiii-e

£ () )
01"

€v

(EFGLM

&C.).

of the recorded variants
clear.

To
for

long

tv is too the space and the vestiges do not suggest «/. Possibly something other than written, but it was not Traces of ink above was perhaps indicate

reconcilable with the following letters, a little further suppose an omission of does not solve the difficulty, since [our]

[\
ovre

(Bt^CD)
is

ovre €v

(
none on being

possible, but then

a correction.

.
ii)

[]

1228.

St. John's
Fr. 2 (Col.

Gospel

xv, xvi. Late third century.
roll

18-5x5 cm.

Fragments from two consecutive columns from a
of St. John.

containing the Gospel

The

text, written in

the verso, the recto of both fragments being blank

an upright informal hand of medium size, is on but no doubt in other parts
;

similarity

There is a general between the script of this papyrus and that of the second Logia fragment, 654, also on a verso in 1228, however, the writing is somewhat heavier and approximating nearer to cursive. It is likely to date from about the end of and occur, the third century. The usual abbreviations of
the roll included sheets which had previously been inscribed.
;

5, -,

but no punctuation-marks or other signs apart from the diaeresis. In both fragments the lines have lost their beginnings and ends throughout, and since

!
xv. 25

they were of some length

it is

impossible to fix the points of division.

Like the
(208),

early fragments of this Gospel previously obtained from

Oxyrhynchus

1228 shows a good and interesting text, though, as often, its affinities are not strongly marked, and it does not agree at all consistently with any one of the Coincidences with the Codex Sinaiticus are frequent, but chief authorities.
divergences are noticeable at
ii.

4,

9-10, 27, 29.
Col.

5

.[ ' [ ]8[
]

\< ([5
i.

oray

26

Wps

[

]

Wps €Knopevf[Tat

ej/iOf

«7
xvi.

€]

]( [

[

2

;

1228.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
Col.
ii.

15

]] vo\vcvfl ((]
5
*'^''
l•'-]^^

•/\

avos

eis

^\€ \\( \ )( [][
[

ov\8eii

]

[ ]
aipu
eav
]

[ «\
Se
5Xef\|f€a)[y
[

\[ €[

xvi. 21

22

23

ea>[s]

[

24

[

3 lines lost

15
6]'

[a]y[a]yyf^<»

[wy/ti'

'[/]6 /''
7;[

6]) €[7;]( []'
]

/ca]t

['\\\
]
]

^tXet]

\
[

)\
[

25 26

o]ri

/[6
ey[cu

27

:

e^?jXio]i'

] []
t5e
ou]5e/Lit[al•']

^^[^

"^]

[ [
rt"]."

28

[

29

[€€

25

]'[]

\< []€/€[/
auTOty
]

€[/
iJ7[y]

•]€/[5;]
e]iS

[/cat

[

€\\\

[
[

3^

]

/([]

e/i[e

i.

. The
;

follows
2. 4.

(€5.
so

papyrus followed the same order as

Bi^DGL;

in

AEHIKM

&c.

ev

()()
The
is

BS
:

6-7. but there
ii.

3.

5«[; \! D.
i^

no recorded

ordinary text gives a somewhat shorter supplement than might be expected variant, and the spacing in the papyrus is not very regular.

!
;

8e

ADIL.
D.

4,

1

i6
5. vuv y\fv
:

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
€€€
7.
8.

9.

]

((
SO
:

SO
:

so

«oADL. B«*C NACD»L apei BD*.
;
;
:

(
(av)

BN (^
ti*.

*) C*DLM

;

>7;'

AC.

€av

:

so

A

;

»

9-10. The papyrus agreed with which precedes in BtiC*L.
15. Either

BCDL, on AC'D

a;»

in

D', placing

ti,

or

«

Others.

cv

before

^,

[][](
;

(BN (-) DC*KLM) 0

[aHn]y.

(C«<>"EGH)

is

possible.

16. The vestiges of the letters are doubtfully identified, but appear to suit the usual (v order rather better than that of ti omits SO ^<AC' ft BC*L. 20.

:
[
:

.

D

2 7.

-;(-)[]: SO

BC

;

I.
;

28.

29. Ko[i]

[€

SO the best SO
:

MSS.
;

ACD

^

t^ADL. km vw CD'.

.( .

.

.

.

!.

BNC*L.

1229.

St. James's Epistle
I2-I

i.

X

11-2 cm.

Fourth century.
it

This papyrus

leaf,

as the pagination
it

on each side of

shows, was the

second of the book to which

belonged, the text commencing on the second

while page i was either blank or, more probably, Nine or ten lines are lost at the bottom of the verso, and the height of the leaf when complete would have been approximately 19 cm., When found the if the lower margin was of about the same width as the upper. leaf was folded up, like a document, at right angles to the lines of the text. These are written in good-sized broad uncials, rather coarse and irregular in formation, though hooks and thickenings at the ends of strokes show an attempt

page of the preceding
contained only the

leaf,

title.

at ornament.

The

fourth centuiy

is

the date suggested.
final

No

abbreviations occur
;

except the strokes over a vowel for a
in full.

A

medial point

is

found once.

Textually there

the occurrence of the
verse 17.

ungrammatical

-at the

end of a

line

Tiarpos is written

is little

to notice
also
in

beyond

found

BN

in

Verso.

€!'[[]]

\.

<
7;£0 cvf
5

Trape
1

Xevaerai aveTeiXev

^

1229.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

17

(
T<os

evwpeneia

ev

OS

?
Recto.
7

1

3

yeuo

15

\(
5

<
tois

€77;[]'[]

15

1

6

1

7

?
15
ei?

VI

?? €
[
eivai

(

e

1

8

[?
.

]
The
division

Verso
abnormal.

II.

:

so

BNCKL

;

of the

word

after

is

16. After

((\

(C)KL add

Kvpios.

C

i8

Recto

.

11. 12.

!
::
4. €vi:

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
is

for
;

-.
J

SO most

MSS.
;

eanv

MSS.
SO

BN*

/
l^.

N^ACKL,

edd.

1230.

Revelation
4-1x7 cm.

v, vi.

Early fourth century.

medium-sized sloping informal hand, approximating to cursive, and dating probably from the earlier part of the fourth century. The lines, which were of considerable length, have lost both beginnings and ends, and their distribution cannot now be recovered. The use
leaf of a book, written in a

Fragment of a

of the numeral
likely that

as

it

and Tpds in v. 6 and vi. 6 were similarly shortened. So far goes, the text shows a tendency to agree with that of the Codex Sinaiticus.
Recto.

(

for

is

in

accordance with the character of the

MS.

;

it is

i\Soy

]!/
5

] '
]?
]

''

jdav]ei8'

[]
ev

[

eiSov ey

[

^ ([.
e/c

\
aneana
.

v.

5

6

[

5

] €[ ] [
[
eXeov
]

[ ][
Verso.

] ([/

fi[e^tay

7

8

]
]

vi.

5

6

[

OTe

7

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THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
;

19

Recto
5•
6.

2.

so

«»
:

NA

:

so Bti ; so Bt^A

.

.

;

P.

f

so
.

om. A. BS is a mere slip of the pen and probably the second [ (A) was intended. A slight vestige following the second
;
:

^
suits a

()

.

or has

7.

:

so

;

,

«.
two forms

some

cursives, &c.

5.

is

a confusion of the

and

;

the

MSS.

give the

6.

:

so

i>i

A

;

om. B.

20

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

II.

NEW
1231.
Fr.

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Sappho, Book
I
i.

i7-7xi3-2cm.

Second century.

Plate II

(Frs. I, lo, 56).

The
would
if

authorship of these fragments in Sapphic metre and Aeolic dialect

in

any case have been evident, and

it is

placed beyond question by two,

not three, coincidences with fragments expressly cited from Sappho ; cf. The title of the roll is preserved in Fr. ^6, Fr. I. i. 15-16, Fr. 16. 2-3, 11-12. but this, curiously enough, does not mention the name of the writer, giving only
the number of the book and of the verses contained in
is
it.

That
p. 874.

it is

called
in

Book

i

in

agreement with the statements of grammarians that the pieces
all

Sapphics

were

included in that book
it,

;

cf.

Bergk, Poet. Lyr.

iii,

The number of

verses comprised in

was 1330, i.e. 330 stanzas. Very likely the other eight books, or some of them, were shorter than this, but even so Sappho's entire works may well have extended to something like 9,000 verses.
learn,

we now

Substantial additions to

the exiguous surviving remnants of this large

output have lately been forthcoming from Egypt, where evidently the lyric poets

were
less

still

popular in the

Roman
1232.

period

;

and further welcome contributions are

now made by 1231 and

The

gain from the former, however, proves to be

than had been hoped. Except in Fr. i, which has been built up from some twenty small pieces, the fragments have not fitted together at all well, and it is hardly to be anticipated that further efforts in this direction will produce a very diiferent result. Still, five and a half consecutive and nearly complete stanzas of a poem of Sappho is a gift not to be despised and for vocabulary and dialect even small and disconnected scraps have their importance. The two columns of Fr. I include remains of four poems, of which the first, as a reference to Doricha (Rhodopis) shows, was addressed, like 7, to Sappho's brother Charaxus. This is
;

followed
writer's

I

by what is no doubt the greater part of a graceful piece expressing the deep longing for an apparently absent friend, Anactoria, whose name was already known as that of one of the intimates of the poetess cf. note on Fr. I. i. 27-8. In the next column stood a poem of five stanzas addressed to Hera, part of which by a strange coincidence has recently appeared in P. S. I. Of the succeeding verses not enough remains to 133, also from Oxyrhynchus. indicate their theme. On what principle these poems were grouped within the
;

1231.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

21
It is
0, -n,

book
(if

is

not evident

;

apparently the principle was not similarity of subject.

noticeable that three consecutive pieces begin respectively with the letters
av represents an original w), which suggests that possibly there
;

was a rough

but the juxtaposition of these initial letters may be mere accident. Among the smaller fragments, Nos. 13, 14, 15, and 56 are again concerned with members of Sappho's circle, another of whom, Gongyla, is named in Fr. 15. Fr. 56 was composed in honour of a wedding.
alphabetical arrangement

The MS.
size
;

is

written in an informal upright hand, of rather less than
effect this script recalls that of the

medium

Herondas papyrus, and it should be referred, like the latter, to the second century. Stops in two positions are used and as usual in lyrics, accents, breathings, marks of long and short quantity, and signs of elision have been added here and there. In some of these additions the ink differs from that of the text, and to a certain extent at least they may be attributed to a second hand from which have also come occasional Strophes are divided off by paragraphi, and an corrections and marginalia. elaborate coronis marks the end of each poem. The accentuation of the papyrus
in style

and

;

conformity with the barytone system traditionally associated with Aeolic, In this and other points the orthography of the in 7. originals has been adhered to so far as possible, both here and in 1232-4, even at
is

in

and also exemplified

the cost of consistency.

After all it may well be that the authors themselves were not invariably consistent cf. Wilamowitz, Sappho imd Simonides, pp. 91 sqq. The views of Wilamowitz concerning the textual tradition of the Lesbian poets are substantially confirmed by the new discoveries, to the restoration and
;

elucidation of which he has,

by a

fortunate combination of circumstances, himself

so largely contributed.

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1231.
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38

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
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Fr. 51.

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Fr. 51.

39

Fr. 50.

[•

40
Pr.
1. i.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

».

1-6. These lines are on a detached fragment, the position of which is hardly by a strongly marked fibre on the verso, partly by similarities is not The length of the lacuna before at the point of juncture on the recto. in 1. 23. a serious difficulty, the space being no greater than that before or t. 2. The first letter is apparently either 9-10. Restored by W(ilamowitz)-M(ollendorff). II. Doricha, whose name was recognized here by W-M, is not mentioned in the Her reappearance here gives fresh substance to the lines of previously extant fragments.
certain, but is suggested partly

[]

PosidippuS

de

\

^

^

^^
We

1 3-34• ' Some say that the fairest thing on the black earth is a host of horsemen, others of foot, others of ships ; but I say that is fairest which is the object of one's desire. And it is quite easy to make this plain to all ; for Helen observing well the beauty of men judged the best to be that one who destroyed the whole glory of Troy, nor bethought [Verily the herself at all of child or parents dear, but through love Cypris led her astray. And I now have wills of mortals are easily bent when they are moved by vain thoughts.] called to mind Anactoria, far away, whose gracious step and radiant glance I would rather know well see than the chariots of the Lydians and the charge of accoutred knights.

that this cannot

But the gen. cf. Sapph. I. lo, and Fr. 9. 6 below, 1233. Fr. 1. ii. 17. 14. yav is a gen. plural in or dat. would be expected rather than the accus., and possibly (cf. e. g. Ale. 18. 2) and agreement with an error for yas or ya.
is followed by is very uncertain. At the end of 1. 18 or possibly and next to this is a rather high stroke turning over ; The termination may be or perhaps in 1. 30. to the left, which would suit cf. ; either or ei[a]a. Near the beginning of the next line an interlineated a, , or is more probable than a grave accent ; and below this are vestiges of what seem to have been round letters. The reading adopted gives a fair sense and suits the remains sufiSciently well, if the apart from the left shoulder of the in be supposed to have scaled off;

.
!y<o
.
.

come

to pass

among men

.

.

.'

15—16. 18-19.

.

=

Sapph. 13.

The

reading here

a rounded

letter, f, o,

[]

£[],

dubious form, has led to no satisfactory restoration. The omission of one of the lambdas of KoWos is a not unlikely error. before yap has been retouched or corrected. 23. rrapayaye seems to be the right word, and ya is possible, though not suggested by the very small vestiges remaining from the tops of the letters. Fr. 35 is not to be assigned to this stanza ; cf. the note there. 25-6. These two lines apparently contained a general reflection on the weakness of

human
it

nature.

27-8. W-M's reconstruction of these two verses has been provisionally adopted, though cannot be considered very satisfactory. The supposition of a corruption in a mutilated word is generally objectionable ; moreover the of aneotaas, though not impossible, is really more like p, i. e. ] napfoia-as, not ] aneoiaas, is the more natural reading. But it seems diflBcult to adapt this to the preceding remains and the apparent sense. If, as would rather be must precede gathered from the gist of the whole poem, Anactoria was absent, or oi. In 1. 27 and there might also be room in the lacuna for another letter, e.g. For ]vfpva is suitable, but is equally possible ; of the e there is hardly anything left. the marginal v. 1. cf. the spelling in the Berlin fragment {Klassikeriexte, V. ii. 13. 2. 8 and 10). At the beginning of the line might well is far from certain, and be substituted.

(\

was restored by

W-M.

^

-

^,

€&,

:

1231.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

.

the same person is doubtless meant. The mark of length above the may of eparov appears to have been corrected. 29. cf. P. S. I. 123. 5, where iparav has been written as due to confusion with be a variant above according to the not infrequent use with verbs implying preference. 31. ' is for
;

) ^ .
The name
rfi
. .

is

given by

Maximus

Tvpivva

.

Tyrius,

De am.
S.V.

In Suidas,

2,
.
.

Socr.

S,ti

yap she appears aS

/

41

;,

For the comparison

was suggested by W-M. a in the termination is written through an e. 32. 33-4. Restored by W-M, who as a completion of the stanza proposes, exempli gratia, For the neglected diagamma cf. Fr. 2. 7, and for which conflicts with yeveadai in 7. 6. the accent on yheaOai 1233. Fr. 8. 4 and ovKa\eovTfs in 1232. is written also in ii. 22, 1232. Fr. i. ii. 11 avopovae, but A mark of short quantity seems to Fr. I. iii. 2 and 5 ; cf. 1234. Fr. 2. ii. 7-8, Fr. 4. 9. have been substituted for a mark of length above the first of

.-

cf.

Sapph.

.
"Hpa,
TOL

85

.

.

niri

cyi)

([],

^ .

{)

ii. i-ii. These lines correspond with the fragment, also from Oxyrhynchus, recently published in P. S. I. 123, where rather more of the verses is preserved than here in 1231; The following tentative their extent is shown by the brackets in the reconstruction above. of 11. 2-1 1 is printed by Vitelli ad loc. restoration by

W-M

• ^^ \€5'
€\(!
\

\*

Ovaivas IpcpoevTa

This seems to express successfully the general sense, but some modification is at any rate required in 11. lo-ii, where a verb is essential in order to complete the sentence before (W-M) or viv Se in 1. 12; peyiaTov might be replaced by e. g. (cf. 1174. attributed to Nt( 1. Opposite this line in P. S. I. 123 the variant ) There can be little doubt that this annotation iv. 23, note), is entered in the left margin. referred to the preceding column, in accordance with the usual practice of scribes at this period. But since the relative lengths of the columns of P. S. I. 123 and 1231 is indeterminable, the line concerned cannot be identified in Col. i of 1231. has been corrected from a. 2. The is written above 4. In P. S. I. 123 the unmetrical v. 1. cf. von Wilamowitz, Textgesch. der Lyriker, p. 5 r\ 8. [(]' so 7. 2 10. '[, not [, is indicated by P. S. I. 123, where marks of short quantity have been added above both vowels. 20-1. Perhaps "H|pa, as suggests. W-M. For av instead of the AeolicoV cf. i. 33-4, note. 22.

^, * (,^ ^ .
yap "Apevos epyov
piyifTTov
. .
.

^,

.

^

'

:

;

W-M

similarities in the

Frs. 2-8. These small pieces have been placed together here on account of certain appearance of their versos and that of the first column of Fr. i but the resemblance may be misleading.
;

42
Pr. 2.
7.
8.

]

2.
:

or

^
e]v.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
:

the

is

likely to

be the

final letter

of the
e.

line.

Cf. Fr. 9. 20,

12. Either

€[

and
or

(

for the neglect of the
[

digamma

g.

Sapph. 19.

3.

or

-r)[s.

Pr. 4. Pr. 9.
5.
1 6.

Pr. 10.
3.

an unknown form, which may perhaps be connected with Hesychius' There is a dot above the second o, but this is presumably accidental, since the omission of the would dislocate the metre. 12. It is probable that Alc. Q) 63 Suaov is to be recognized here.

: ',
6.

The supposed
There seems
[

grave accent

may

be part of an interlineated

letter like

or

.

4.

to have
likely

.

of Alc. 82 seems more

been a marginal note opposite this line. and Johannes Gram. Compend. iii. i than [, but neither is satisfactory.

/

.

.

2.

]'

[:

or

](' '\[( (= .), as W-M Suggests.

=

^.

is

Pr. 11. 2. An ink-mark above the vestige of the correction or variant rather than an accent.
Fr. 12. 5. 6. Perhaps

]
[at S]e

first

letter

suggests an interlinear

is

an obscure form.

(W-M)
lines.

;

but this

will involve

equally short supplements in the

preceding and following

Pr. 13. This fragment is evidently addressed to some of Sappho's companions. The length of the lacuna at the beginnings of the lines has been estimated on the basis of 1. 6 ; with a longer supplement there the others would need to be proportionately lengthened.
mil

'

2 sqq.

Cf. £er/. Klassikeriexte,

.

«[ W—.
[]€'

V.

ii.

13. 2. (2)

lo-ii

[

eoprcus 8e 5-7• Restored by W-M, who further proposes and \. This is attractive, but is unsatisfactory owing to the straightness of the stroke following which has the appearance of the top of an 1. If ]€ is adopted in 1. 5, a longer verb than must follow.

,

7[

[] <5 \ <![
X[a]fleat

\

]

[

^

Pr. 14. A fragment apparently concerned with one of Sappho's friends, who is compared to Helen. In estimating the length of the initial lacunae in 11. 3 sqq. the supplement in 1. 5 has been taken as the standard. is very uncertain ; the two last letters might well be Xy, but these make an I.
intractable combination.
:

a[e or the comparison with Helen then being attributed to others. 3. For the spelUng for cf 1233. Fr. 2. ii. 5, 1234. Fr. 2. ii. 10. 5-7. The supplements at the beginnings of the lines were suggested by W-M. That in 1. 7, however, is rather shorter than is expected, and or might be read instead of . The accent on in this verse was possibly intended for a circumflex. For the elision before cf 1232. Fr. i. ii. 8, note. 8. is noticeable, since the accentuation of such forms has been doubtful ; cf. Fr. 17. 6 1233. Fr. 22. 3 1234. Fr. 2. i. 6 10. The marginal entry looks like a v. 1., but the reading is uncertain.
4.

(

6[,

^[ [>

'[]

.

.

.

\,

,

'.\.

Pr. 15. Part of a poem addressed, as was recognized by Colophon, who is known from the notice in Suidas as one of the is named also in Berl. Klassikertexte, V. ii. 13. 2. (4) 4.
II.

W-M,

to Gongyla of of Sappho, and

2-8.

'

Take your milk-white

robe, Gongyla,

and come

(?).

Love again

flits

about

1231.
;

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
thrilled you.

43
;

your fair form for the sight even of the dress this reproach against you.'

And

I rejoice

for

Cypris has

2. An imperative such as is expected after but is not easily obtained, being certain. At the end of the line the name of some article of dress is wanted, and if rightly read, suggests or an allied form, but this seems to have been a masculine garment. The doubtful might well be v.

the V before

,
:

3.

[]7•/' W—

6.

('

;

cf.

on

this

analogy

.
is

\\\,

5{

7-8. Restored by

Fr. 16. 2-4, The

(
the text.

Since the passage
at the

'

W-M.

-^

should replace the vulg.

-^

in

Sapph.

2. 6.

partial coincidence of

11.

2-3 with Sapph.

was recognized by
Si/Cte,

W-M, who

1 2 ottivos yap ei suggested the restoration adopted in

,

(<, the omission of

quoted (Etym. Magn. 449. 34) in illustration of the form or whatever the latter word was, would be natural enough.
;

1. 3 is indeed slightly longer than would be expected from a comparison of 1. 12, where the reading is practically certain but fourteen letters instead of twelve do not constitute a serious difficulty in a script of this irregular character. was corrected from . 9. € of II-I2 Sapph. 15 from Apollon. De pron. 324 b. ApoUonius, who has %yav, writes Bergk thinks as in the papyrus (cf also Fr. 23. i), both here and in Ale. 72.

The supplement

beginning of

(

=

more

correct, but nevertheless prints

'

in the latter place.

The supposed stop may be the vestige of a letter, e. g. e. 15. What has been taken for the tip of an c is possibly a circumflex accent. Fr. 18. 3. ly\mas W-M. The acute accent on might perhaps be taken for
13.
is

a

mark

of length, but an alternative accentuation

more probable.

Pr. 19.
Fr. 21.

2.

Perhaps
Perhaps

2.

['.
(or

[']oi[r]

or

\j\oi[s\

\\.

Pr. 23. I. mark of elision has very likely disappeared after accent on f indicates the division e)x' ., as in Fr. 16. 11. Pr. 32. This fragment appears to be
written in stanzas; but

A

would be expected
A.
iii.

]
is

\

;

at

any

rate the

.

])

in the

is difficult,

to

31 &c., P.

S. I.

123. 12.

be partially visible. Pr. 33 also
is i.

same hand as the rest, and also to be and in the next line any letter following For the marginal crosses in Col. ii cf. e. g. 841.
is

doubtfully included here.

Fr. 35. A junction of two selides which cannot therefore be assigned to Fr. Pr. 37.
I.

apparently to be recognized in this fragment,
i.

23 sqq.

The
letter.

separated from the

by a

slight interval,

and perhaps a stop

followed the latter

rest

;

Prs. 50-5. These pieces are put together as having been found rather apart from the but combinations with them are of course not to be excluded on that account. Ft. 52. This fragment possibly joins on above
1.

i

of Fr. 51.
too short for

Ft. 56. Conclusion of an epithalamium. I. The doubtful might be , but the stroke following
4.

6.

7.

€. -€\ :,
Cf Theocr. xviii. 54-5
:

W-M.

fSScT

«

might also be read.
or

/

is

€!
Brit.

,

.

Se

sc. fTaipois,

some

equivalent.

II. Similar stichometrical figures are

found e.g. in P.

Mus. 128, 732, and some

of the Herculaneum papyri.

44

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Sappho, Book
1

1232.
Fr.

ii.

13-3

X 29-6 cm.

Third century.
(Fr.
I,

Plate I
ii-iii).

Cols,

roll, written in rapidly formed and dating probably from the first half of the third century. Stops (in the high position), accents, and other signs have been inserted with some frequency, as usual in lyrics. How far they are to be credited some of them may well have been to the original scribe is not easily determined added subsequently, especially if, as is quite possible, a second hand is to be

Parts of three columns from the end of a

sloping uncials of

medium

size,

;

recognized in the marginal adscript at Fr.

i.

ii.

3.

Sappho is given by the subscription at the end of Fr. i. iii, and is further confirmed by the coincidence of ii. 10 with a citation from the second book by Athenaeus moreover, it was already known from Hephaest. p. 42 that that book consisted of pieces in the so-called Sapphic pentameter of fourteen
attribution to
;

The

Fr.

I.

Col.

i.

]

](
]
.

'[aWayLTOxfiikai

]•.)(
]

]•
] ] ]

1232.
syllables
(cf.

NEW
is

CLASSICAL TEXTS
the metre of the present fragments.

45

Sappho 32-7)^ which

They

two poems. Of the first, composed for some nightly festival The rest of no more than a few words from the conclusion remains. Col. i is blank, with slight vestiges of ink in one spot at the edge of the papyrus. The natural explanation, that 11. 1-9 were succeeded by some shorter verses in a different metre, is excluded by the statement of Hephaestion just referred to, unless the papyrus be supposed to have contained not a single book, but extracts from several cf. note on iii. 8. It may be suggested as an alternative that a title stood here in Col. i and it happens that a portion of such a title, having the
consist of remains of
(cf.
i.

8-9),

;

words
Cols,

[7)
in

;

|

]€[;, was
is

actually found, with other literary fragments, in
is

company with
ii-iii,

1232.

which
will

Andromache,
other source.

be assigned to this position. the marriage of Hector and then have been added as an afterthought, perhaps from some
Possibly that fragment
to

preserved part of a

poem on

We

are indebted to Mr. E. Lobel for several

good suggestions on the text of

this papyrus.

Fr.

I.

Col.

i.

]€ yap
]
]
.

]

(ftpivas

e

KaTLa8ave\i\

dyiT

,

yap

, .

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Col.
ii.

Plate

I.

.

[
.

22 letters
[

7\6[.]
.o[.

/'88[.'\
5

[.] €('€}[.].€•
.

[.][.

.]

.

10

•\[. [. .].\[, .]6• .]((• [, .][.
.

15

''.€[.][. €[.][ .](
.

,
. .

€\.[^]< .•)(€\
•],[.
. .

€-[. .]•
.][.

.]
.]•
.


]eXe[.
.

]«<•
.

.]

[.]€[.]•[.]'€)([.
.

.

7[.

.]([.]•[.][
.

[.

.

.]

^^ ^[
.

20 [.

.

.

.

'][

Fr. a.

]([ ][

]'^
]ve8«T
.
.

]8[
[

1232.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
ii.

47

Col.

Plate

I.

^ "
{

.

[

32

letters

\6[] [ [.]

]€€[.
.

.

.]

[][.

.]

is

5

" ' [ ] ^!. [ [] ' , [] .
)


]«',
.

Tas

7"'

/€[\
kvl

[•]5

.

lapas

[]'(')

'

[iXtjy/iara

[]/,

]

[][]

15

? ,[][] []' [. 5
*

wy ('•

'

avopovae

5,

\€

'

€vpv-)([opo\v

,[\

kv\i'^aivi

0([]
0[

\

S'

'7[]
[. 20 [.
. .

'

[']£
.]
.

{a)i[e\iot•
.

/€)[]

[
['

- w —

.

.

€]|ayo[i'

Fr.

2.

]€
]

'\

"^ ([ ]
]»1'

ayvov

\ [€€
.

S"

]((

[

.

[

48
Fr.
1.

f

[

/:£€[.][.]€•5[.]£7€'€€/)[

(88\.'\ۥ)([
5

=

, \\
Col.
iii.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Plate
I.

]^[•]?

[•]"[

^-

•]

^«<•]

L

c

\(\
of

[.]'•

i.

3•

yop

:

or

yai.

6.

Dots above and below the
oyiT
:

^
ii.

were apparently intended
ii, 17 Syi,

letter.

8.

of.

for the spelling
ii,

1233.

Fr. i.

20

(Hoffmann, Gr. Dial,
9.

pp. 384-5).

,

to cancel the

and e.g.

/, S^t

On

the blank space below this line see introd. p. 45.

The mark of short 'iSaios ; cf Sappho 44 Alc. 9. I &c. Below this line there has been an omission quantity above the initial letter is mistaken. of one or more verses, which were supplied in the space at the top of the column, as No doubt the oblique dash to the left of the line also refers indicated by the marginal
ii. 3. "iSaos

=

, ,

.

to the omission;

cf.

852. Fr.

i.

ii.

8.

[]€

4. Restoration here is rendered difficult by the uncertainty of sense and construction. will hardly do. For the letter before av, , , , or looks likely, but what is -av ? ' icKios. would boldly emend to would be suitable, besides y.

W-M

Hector and his comrades are bringing from sacred Thebes and Placia's 5-18. '" everflowing streams fair bright-eyed Andromache on their ships over the salt sea, with many golden bracelets and purple robes and treasure of goodly broideries withal, and Thus he said ; and in haste his dear father started up, countless silver cups and ivory." and the tidings went forth in the spacious city. Straightway the sons of Ilium yoked mules to the swift cars and all the company of the women and slender-footed maidens mounted And the men yoked horses thereon, while the daughters of Priam took their seat apart. to the chariots, even all the youths.'
11.
. . .

6.

.

.

.

:

cf.

Schol.

A

On

396
eKoKeaev.

.

.

.

KTiVas

6\

le'pas, v. 1.
i.

25,

1234. Fr.
I'apor is

while

has hitherto been regarded as the old Aeolic form (cf. 1233. Fr. 2. occurring only in later inscriptions (so too Theocr. xxviii. 7), If Upas is the original spelling here. the Doric spelling, though also Boeotian.
:

i.

9), I'epot

1232.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
iii.

49

Fr.

I.

Col.

Plate

I.

[

M.]a.J.M. ..Me[..]..6a4].[

[]
[

navTes S
5

(<)
'

" ' \[.
['

]i

'

€]€5[]'

npoyeviaTipa[i,

.
'
;

avSp[e]i

evXvpav,

.
it
ii,

would substantiate the view that
P• 313•

ipos is

a contraction of

of.

Hoffmann, Gr. Dial.

,
W—

,. []
.

very doubtful, and unsatisfactory as involving an assumption of an error in the papyrus, but nothing else suiting the conditions suggests itself. A letter marked as long must be either a, t, or ; and this is followed by two dots above the line looking like the top of a or a diaeresis. This combination points decidedly to being ; and a horizontal stroke preceding may well be part of the top of a y, , or alternatives. There would, however, be room for a letter, if wanted, between this supposed further objection to []'(>') here is the questionable propriety and the preceding a. of this epithet in relation to a town or district. was restored by cf. Hesych. 8. is an ; interesting instance of a crasis with a word beginning with a digamma, and is to be ranked with the elisions in Berl. Klassikerkxte, V. ii. 12. 2. 21 13. 2. (2) 8 cf. Wilamowitz, Sappho und Simonides, pp. 94-5. ; 9. For [(!]/, which was suggested by E. Lobel, cf. Hesych. and Homer 441 *'" tnaaae. The main objection to it is the acute accent on av, which, if is read, is incorrect unless an enclitic followed ; but a5 ['] is too weak, condemns aZ as otiose and considers that an adjective defining the material should precede The position of the stroke above the line indicates that the scribe wrote and the spelling of in the following line was probably similar, though there would be room there for another vowel ; cf. Sapph. 44 8e (?). , . . cf. Sapph. 67, identified here by W-M. In Athen. xi. 460 d, where the passage is cited by Athenaeus from the second book of Sappho, the
:

[\()

the reading

is

,—

A

[]

W-M

W

'

,• "

.

:

' fragment appears as which has hitherto resisted emendation, comes from 1. 8. There is however the difficulty that the accus. would be expected rather than the nominative, in continuation of the construction with in 1. 5. But that is some way off, and the nominative is not unintelligible. There is no possibility of getting in another verb, unless the restoration of 1. 9 is quite wrong. &', 12. the accus. is defensible on the analogy of e.g. Soph. Pht'L 141 but it seems likely that, as thinks, the word has come in by error from the line above.

^ ,
W-M

, ':: (,

50

,/ ^ ^. [
14. 16.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
attested in
ii,

was already Hoffmann, Gr, Dial, For the single in

Eiym. Magn. 452. 37;

cf.

1233. Fr.

2.

ii.

13
14

p.

420.
cf.

W—, who

e.g. Berl. Klassikeriexte,
5uy[a]rpfff[i

Suggests as an alternative

!.
V.
ii.

13.

2.

(2)

Fr. 2. This fragment from the bottom of a column 6eoi[s seems inevitable In 1. i a dative in in 1. 5 then have preceded; cf. e. g. Sappho 11. yivaiKCS TrpoyevitTrepm of iii. 3.
Col.
ii.

iii,

2.

would be precarious in this uncertain context to
3-6.
'

:
I.

[(
;

-

is

in

no doubt to be assigned to agreement with ieOi[r must

is

the natural antecedent of the

The

doubtful

sc. TO ttC/j?

may be any other long letter such as The supposed is more like , but
emend

And

the elder

women all

\ \.
or
v.

this gives

no word.

It

to

in a sweet paean, calling

uttered cries of joy, and all the men raised their voices on the Far-darter of the tuneful lyre, and sang of Hector and

Andromache, peers of

the gods.'

3 The reading of the text £]'8[]' accords better with the other imperfects than the superscribed variant -^av. of seems to have been drawn through 4. The mark of length above the

a

diaeresis.

6. as a 3rd person plur. imperf. lacks analogy in Aeolic, but seems a possible form (from In Doric the vowel was usually shortened before -v for but a long vowel in this position occurs in Crete. At the end of the line either or may be restored. might be an , but a following would be expected to be partially 8. The doubtful visible. That the number of the book was added is not very likely ; and hence the possibility remains that the roll contained a selection from Sappho's works and that a poem in different metre preceded the Marriage of Andromache.

.

'

^

,

€€[

1233.
Fr.
I

AlcaEUS.
9-4

X

17-3 cm.

Second century.
Plate III (Frs.
i. ii. 2, 8).

The

identification of these pieces, apart
is

from other

clear indications of their

guaranteed by the coincidence of Fr. 32. 2-3 with already extant verses of Alcaeus. Like 1231, which belongs to the same find, they are much
authorship,

broken up, and

efforts at
i,
2,

combination have only been moderately successful.
4, at

Nevertheless, Frs.

and

any

rate,

provide substantial additions to the
i

remains of the poet.
Col.

The two columns

of Fr.

are apparently in the

same
In

metre, the Sapphic pentameter of fourteen syllables exemplified in 1232.
ii

they are divided off by paragraph! into couplets
.

;

cf.

Frs.

9-10 and Berl.

Klassikeriexte,

ii.

12.

i.

Col.

ii.

At

1.

8 a

new poem
v. 95,

begins, addre.ssed to

Melanippus, the friend to whom, according to Hdt.

Alcaeus wrote the poem

;

1233.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
;

51

cf. Ale. 32. That poem, however, the opening lines of which, apparently, have been preserved in a corrupt state in Strabo xiii. 600, cannot be identical with the one here, in which Alcaeus

describing his flight from a battle with the Athenians

remembering the Perhaps, as Wilamowitz suggests. Ale. 93, which refers to Tantalus and seems to be in the same metre, belongs to this context. Fr. a.
fate of Sisyphus.

admonishes

his friend to resign himself to the prospect of death,

Col.

ii

contains four Sapphic stanzas, admitting of satisfactory restoration, in
is

which a contrast
referred to in the

drawn between Helen and
few lines of Fr.
3,

Thetis.

The

latter

is

again

first

apparently Asclepiads.

followed

of a poem Sapphics addressed to the Dioscuri cf Fr. 1 2. 5-8, also Sapphic, where Aphrodite is invoked. Other metres are exemplified in Frs. 8, 32 (Asclepiads), II (cf. 13 and 17), and 32. There is therefore very considerable variety in these fragments, both of form and content. Little is known concerning the arrangeof
in
;

mouth

by two incomplete Sapphic stanzas describing a resort some river. Fr. 4 preserves twelve lines from the beginning

These are of maidens at the

ment of the works of Alcaeus beyond the fact that they were distributed into at with some regard to their subject-matter. Thus Book i contained hymns to the gods (Ale. i, &c.), and Frs. 4 and 13 might well have been referred to this category, which, however, will clearly not suit, e. g., Frs. i and 33. It is a natural assumption that the present fragments are from a single book but, if so,
least ten books,
;

the principle of the grouping

is

here not easy to follow.

The papyrus

is

written in graceful upright uncials of

medium

size, to

be

assigned most probably to the second century.

The hand

is

very similar to that

cf.

of one of the Alcaeus fragments at Berlin (Schubart, Pap. Gr. BeroL, Plate 39^) also 1082j the Cercidas papyrus, sometimes has the shape of Y, some-

times, though less

commonly, of V.

As

usual, strophic divisions are

marked
small

by

paragraphi, while a
in

new poem

is

distinguished

by a

coronis.

Some
to

corrections

the text have been introduced

by a second hand,

which

apparently the accents, marks of elision and of long or short quantity, and other
signs are also due.

In the punctuation, for which both high and medial dots are In Fr.
but this too, to some extent at least, is 4 a short oblique dash is used instead

used,

it

is

more

difficult to distinguish,

likely to

be secondary.

4.

of a dot.

52

1233.
Fr.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Col.
i.

53

I.

]
"[
5

«-[.

.

.]

[

/[
€Xicrcro/i[
.

\ \8
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tip'

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]
.

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.

.

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Col.

.

Plate III.

6\ ' [
5*

5

.\
)
10
o-^eaff

yap

[ [
k[

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SivvdtVT

^! '
;

€[.

,
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(\ !'
]
.

[

\

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^

AloXiSais

\€ €[. [
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54

5\[
15
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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[.'\\\\8.[
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[.

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.
.

20

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.]€\^ .]€[ ]€[
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i.

.\]8[

Fr.

2.

Plate III.

8 or 9 lines lost

-

]
25
]

-

y
]

'.

."[
]

]^
]eo»'[
]

'\vipav[

8 lines lost
]cr5ai[

•\^ [
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ii. >

Plate III.

5

>

^ (-^^ ^' '
ovTedvTavaiaKiSy

(^^
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[.]][ '^^\[
.

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eaSeviavTov

8 []
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[ €, [ . []€ .
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\ph

55

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[9
\_

KpoviSaii

wpicre

[ [

Fr.

2.

56

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
15

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8 ^• ^
,

20

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5

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'E[Xei'a

57

\
20
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'ivviK

yXaivav

[6]'

[

e[

'<\

&Se
.]

[

[....:..

[

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Fr. 3-

14

5

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1. i. With the exception of the*two final letters of 1. 5 this column is contained on a detached fragment, but its position is rendered almost certain by the correspondence of the fibres of the papyrus. or is possible. 3. Either have been corrected and what was intended is uncertain 14. The letters after

.

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perhaps
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was
8-17.

originally written.
.

'. . How can you suppose that, when you have crossed Acheron's whirling stream, you will thereafter see the pure light of the sun ? Come, seek not after high things. For king Sisyphus son of Aeolus, most cunning of men, thought to escape death ; yet for all his wit he was stricken by fate and twice passed over the whirling stream of Acheron, and the mighty son of Cronus set for him a heavy task below the black earth.'

8-9. A new poem begins at 1. 8 ; the first letters may be divided in various ways, of which Tt 3>v c'[ is perhaps the best, though 2)v for oiv lacks authority in Aeolic. For Melanippus cf. introd. p. 50. In 1. 9 there is some error, as the metre shows; the defect may be cured by the transposition of SiwatvT, but the apparent recurrence of this The epithet in 1. 15 is somewhat suspicious, and there may be a deeper corruption. At the end of 1. 9 the doubtful y may be , general sense, however, is evident.
hardly
I

-

.
1 6.

10. dialect;

iotas have been deleted.
cf.

The restoration is for the most part due to W-M. The iota adscript in aeXtwi must be erroneous cf. Fr. 2. ii. 10 and Fr. 4. 3, where is here first attested for the Lesbian The Doric form

,

;

ov,

&c.

1233.

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CLASSICAL TEXTS

67

\\<
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Fr. 33.

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1232. Fr.

8, note.

12,

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14.

[ ., []€>
v.

SO 1 6 KpoviSats, 20 cf. e.g. Theognis 702 sqq. oj Tf f'^ Schol. Find. OL i. 97, Eustath. 1701. 50. may he regarded as analogous in Sapph. ii ; a fern, participle is Unlikely in this context. could be read At the end of the line or

!.

'( \8(!

«'

instead of

These remains are on a detached fragment which is conjecturally placed i. 2 2-8. here on the strength of a junction between two selides. In 1. 24 the mark of length on a is
Ft. 2.
doubtful.
ii. 1-16. Through thee, it is said, there sprang from evil deeds a bitter end for Priam and his sons, and thou didst consume with fire sacred Ilium. Unlike to thee was the fair maiden whom the son of Aeacus, inviting all the blessed ones to the marriage of his desire, took from the halls of Nereus and led home to the house of Chiron. And the chaste love of noble Peleus and the goodliest of the daughters of Nereus loosed her maiden girdle, and in the space of a year she bore a son, mightiest of demigods, happy driver of chestnut
'

steeds
I

;

but the Phrygians perished for Helen, they and their

city.'

e. g. 11. 6-7, 14-15, can be completed with practical certainty ; of the others a restoration exempli gratia has been made by W-M. sc. Helen. Cf. Horace, Odes iii. 3. 20 et mulier peregrinavertit in puherem. 3.
is

sqq.

Of these

verses, of

which the general sense

evident, some,

^.

68
4.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
For the
diplS in the
5, &c.,

in prose texts, 1241. v.

margin here and 1248. 115.

at

1.

12

cf. e. g.

659.

1 7,

841. IV. 35, &c., and,

5. For the spelling reavTav cf. 1231. Fr. 14. 4, note. 9-10. In the restoration adopted it is assumed that a dot above the 1 of was a mark of deletion supplementing the stroke through the letter. But this dot might also be ' regarded as a stop, which would require some such supplements as 8' In any case the nom. is demanded by the following genitives. (?). There is not room for and perhaps was written. seems to have been altered from f. For ai'/iiScanicf. 1232. Fr. i. ii. 14, note 13. -y of 17. The paragraphus below this line and the apparent unsuitableness of the words as the opening of a poem suggest that there is some dislocation here. It would be easy to suppose that the verse is out of its true position, having perhaps come in from the margin of an earlier copy; but this is an insuflScient remedy, since 1. 18 also makes an unsatisfactory commencement of a new poem. disyllable would be rather expected before 18. but the is quite certain and there can be little doubt that was the first word ; the metre of 1. 20 may be the same. At the end of the line above the doubtful e there is a vestige which would suit a grave accent, but is too small to be clearly identified. 20. is perhaps a proper name, p, the top of which has been rewritten by the corrector, is preceded by part of a vertical stroke which would well suit The curved stroke below the line shows that the letters are to be combined in a single word ; cf. e.g. 852. Fr. i. ii. 22, 1082. Fr. i. ii. 18. For m'fi«[r cf. the Homeric forms The has been converted from a . SSe seems a more likely division than [. .]u rmSe. 21.

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4-7.
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to Thetis,

The supplements suggested by W-M proceed on the who appeals to Zeus to vindicate Achilles.

supposition that

In

1.

4 ep might

be read instead of

A

.
is

new poem

marked by the change of both metre and
to the sea, the second the

subject.

The

first

stanza describes
thither.

a river flowing out

maidens who resorted

10. The last five letters have been written over something else which has been washed out. may be regarded as another form of or as an adjective derived from that substantive. 12. Perhaps [evda] At the end of the line wf is followed by the tip of a vertical stroke which would be consistent with , , ir, , p. would not be out of place, and though this would the sentence might continue . not account for the apparent stop in 1. 14, which rather implies a preceding participle, or

else

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?
.

better than anything

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Fr. 4. 1-12. 'Come, mighty sons of Zeus and Leda, leave flashing Olympus and appear Castor and Polydeuces, ye who come over the broad earth and all the sea ., on your swift steeds, and lightly save men from chill death, leaping on the tops of the wellbenched ships, shining afar and bringing light to the black ship in the stress
.
.

of night.'
1.

This

line,

of the poem.
2.

W-M

of which the opening words were restored by he refers to Arcadius, p. 67. prefers to or

For

'^[]

]]

W-M,

was no doubt the

first

\].

1233.
3.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

69

been substituted for the dative by the deletion of the iotas adscript, suggests (cf. Berl. Klasdkeriexte, V. ii. 12. 2. 19 hardly fills the lacuna, besides leaving the correction unexplained. 5 sqq. For the Dioscuri as preservers from peril by sea cf. e. g. the Homeric Hymn xxxiii. 6 sqq., Eurip. Helen. 1495 sqq., Lucian, Deonim Dial. 26. 2 Set vavras fVi Lines 9-12 might even be supposed to contain a reference, unparalleled at this early period, to the phenomenon known as St. Elmo's fire. Cf. the fragment of a romance in Hermathena, xi, pp. 322 sqq., II. SS"? hi /<] rr\s Kepalas f'r eiT \\ey]ovTes, Lucian, NdVlg. 9
genitive has
10.

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Castori id numen adsignant, eosque in viari deos invocant. Kfpaia, &c., in these passages rather suggest some form of eVeji/Tef, the original in 1. lo, e.g. omission of being due to the preceding But the uncertainty as to the nature of the insertion makes any restoration very doubtful. The corrector's variant is perhaps preferable to 7.
et

-

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Frs. 5-7. These three fragments are placed here on account of a similarity in the condition of the papyrus to Fr. 4. But the metre shows that Frs. 5 and" 7, at any rate, come from a different poem, even if they belong to the same column.

Fr.

.

5.

7.

The

The
2.

doubtful could be or has a slightly inclined stroke through
letter.

.

it,

the scribe apparently having begun

to write

some other

Pr. 6.
4.

The supposed

Fr. 8. Fragment of a

60

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7.

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9.

[ '] W—. .
o.
'

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acute accent

Not Mf\]avmno[.

may

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;

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letter further

away

{v[i. .'.)

poem

in greater Asclepiads

cf.

Ale. 37, 39, &c.,

and Hephaest

ۥ7,

=

The second

c

has been corrected by the second hand

Not a

hair

is lost

but by the will of Zeus

'

must be the sense, a remarkable early
fill

parallel to Matt. x. 30.

II.

\-/\,
1.

which

W-M

suggests,

would not

the lacuna

if

[

^

is

right in

9.

Fr.
as Fr.
I.

9.
ii,

owing

This fragment from the top of a column can hardly belong to the same column to the different texture of the papyrus. Line 7 might be Ale. 85.

Fr. 10.

Two

dark
i.

fibres
ii

column

as either Fr.

or Fr. 9.

?|
is

4.

i| ava : or perhaps apparently occurs.

;

on the verso prove

that this fragment is not from the same Lines 2-9 form a single short poem. cf. £erL• Klassikertexie, V. ii. 12. 2. 8, where the compound

exiled

Fr. 11. 10. There may be a reference here to Alcaeus' brother Antimenidas, from Mitylene went to Babylonia; cf. Ale. 33. of low dot after the probably unintentional.

who when

A

; ;

12.

\(
A

or

Hesiod, Th. 936

<\6(, as W-M

'
some
V.
ii.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
similar

probably to be supplied before metre is the same as e.g. Sapph. 76-8, suggests, might well be restored.
is

word

\\(;

cf.

KpvoevTi.

If the

^
e.g.
Cf.

(\

Pr. 12. fragment in Sapphic metre. Lines 5-8 are evidently an invocation to W-M. In 1. 7 Aphrodite, and possibly a new poem begins here rf^tvos and (or
;

!
Inl. 5
to

might be restored, as in Sapph.

9.

Ft. 13. The metre is perhaps that of Fr. 11, but the colour of the papyrus is diflferent. supposes ]wSi8?;o[s to be a proper name formed hke (1234. Fr. 6. 10),

W-M

(Ale. 94).

/

\

)

6[' cannot be read in
Fr. 16.
3.

Frs. 14-15 are apparently in Sapphics.
1.

The former

is

from the top of a column

4.

W-M

suggests
12.
2.

yp(a
19,

Berl. Klassikertexie,

from a form where

^
is

=

:, .

not otherwise found.

Fr. 17 does not join on either to Fr. 11 or Fr. 13. Ft. 18.
5.
2.

The

last letter is

probably
ot

,

not c

'.

Fr. 20.
*

Spots of ink above

may

represent a circumflex accent, which would point

Fr. 23. This fragment might well belong to the same column as Fr.
Fr. 24.
2.

12.
to delete

A

thin diagonal stroke through the

c

was probably intended

that superfluous letter.

Ft. 29. That

this

scrap belongs to

1233

not certain.
separately from the rest,
Frs.

Frs. 30-4.
different

These fragments were found

30-1

on

occasions, Frs.

32-4, which are rather darker in colour than the other pieces,

together.

Fr. 32. 2-3 Ale. 42. The were the beginning of a new poem.
4.
7.
cf.

:
Perhaps

=

Alc. 2

[k]^j'[ok],

as
is

W-M
is

,

tail

of a coronis opposite

1.

3 indicates that these verses

2 !.

suggests.

Fr. 33.

The metre

again Sapphic.
hardly to be combined with Fr. 33. 6-7.

Fr. 34. This fragment

1234.
Fr. 2

AlCAEUS.
14-3

X

27-3 cm.

,

Second century.
(Fr. 2).

Plate

IV
be

The

following fragments are written in a fine upright script which

may

assigned with

much
I,

probability to the latter half of the second century.

It is

a specimen of the oval type of uncials,
cf.

much resembling 665

(Part IV, Plate i)
is in

also 7 (Part

Plate

a),

which, though the letters are more sloping,

very

1234.
similar style.

NEW
is

CLASSICAL TEXTS
further supported

71
cursive marginalia,
;

The

date suggested

by the

which are perhaps more likely to

fall
is

within the second century than the third

the hand in which these are written

much
is

like that of the

annotator in 841, the
the responsibility
in part to

Paeans of Pindar.

Whether the author of the
lectional aids,

scholia was also the diorthotes
is

who

has occasionally corrected the text

not clear, neither

for the accents

and other
;

which seem at any rate

be

subsequent additions

they are of the same character.as in 1231-3, but include an

example of the diastole in Fr. 3. i. 6. The bottoms of six columns are preserved, the order of which is not definitely fixed except in the case of the two columns of Fr. 2 but it seems probable that the columns were consecutive, and the arrangement adopted is suggested by the appearance of the papyrus, which deteriorates in condition as the later columns are reached. The relative position of Frs. 4 and 6 is quite uncertain. That the author is Alcaeus is at once evident from the style and the personal allusions, and is implied by the scholium on Fr. a. i. 14-15, in which
;

name of the poet is expressly mentioned. much more homogeneous than 1233, having for
the
bearing,

and so coming into the category of Fr. i contains remains some opponent as a shameless one and a cunning fox who hoped to escape detection and referring to an understanding with the Lydians, who had offered a sum of 3,000 staters to assist the party of Alcaeus to enter the sacred city Whether the cunning fox is Pittacus is not evident; he, however, is certainly the subject of the poem of which the conclusion is preserved in the first column of Fr. 3. This was written during the ascendancy of Pittacus, no doubt during the exile of the poet, who hopes that the fortunes of war may yet be reversed and peace thereby restored to the state. Allusion is made to the aristocratic marriage of Pittacus and to discreditable
of four Sapphic stanzas, describing
' ' ' '

.
',
'

In subject these fragments are

the most part an obvious political

'

'

'.

'

relations with the tyrant Myrsilus.

The

piece

is

written in stanzas of four verses
(cf.

of which the second and fourth are regular lesser Asclepiads

Ale.

'3,'^,

while in

choriambus is replaced \iy^—^-^ a variation described by Hephaestion, p. 34, under the name of and w illustrated by Ale. 62 in the three remaining instances of the third verse w This is followed by the two only appears, but that may well be accidental.
the
first

and third the

first

{]' 6/3/

;

opening

lines of

a favourite of Alcaeus a more or
of the sort

an Alcaic poem addressed, according to the marginal note, to it is the only one represented in the papyrus where
;

not apparent, but of course something have been developed in the sequel. At any rate personal antipathies are prominent again in the next column, which is in the same metre and dwells, in rather obscure terms, upon the ignoble birth of a man who had
less direct political reference is

may

easily

72
risen to

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
high station.
s. v.,

Probably the person meant is Pittacus, whose Thracian i. 74) would lend itself to a diatribe of this kind. Fr. 3, again in Alcaics, is closely similar to extant fragments of Alcaeus (18-19) in which the imagery of a ship in stress on a stormy sea is applied to civil discord. The poet's concluding invitation to a friend to drown care in the wine-cup is analogous to Ale. 35, and illustrates afresh his tendency to combine festivities
origin (Suidas

Diog. Laert.

Fr.

I.

Fr. 2, margin.

r

1

.

[.

.

.lef.

.1

.

.

1234.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

73

and the close connexion of the Stasiotica and the Scolia. Frs. 4-6, two preceding cokimns are in Alcaic stanzas, are in an inferior state of preservation, though enough remains to show that they too had a controversial and political character. A tantalizing allusion to an event which happened
with
politics,

which

like the

in

the poet'g childhood occurs in Fr.

6.

7-8.

Fr.

1.

Fr.

2,

margin.

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KvXivSerai•

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Fr. 4.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
]070'[.10
.,

.

pa

Jpeo-y

avayKa

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[--iiyWyE
]

.[....]...[

.
2

1.

in the next line. followed by airof W-M. []', as he further suggests, is tempting for the next word, is elided in Homer but the admissibility of the elision is open to question 551. being the form both attested by Grammarians is noticeable, The spelling and found in inscriptions ; cf. Hoffmann, Gr. Dial, ii, pp. 486-7. In the marginal note nor \apov aiais an impossible combination, but neither opposite these lines

(Alcaeus) 8-9.

seems admissible.
Fr. 2.
.

^ [; ?]
3-4- For

'\\
here and [ZtC

7[

]€ '8[
in

1.

7 cf. Berl. KlassiJtertexte,

V.

ii.

12. i. Col.

i

;

;

]

i.

2. TObe is

a

common

v.

1.

for rade or vice versa

cf. e. g.

1231. Fr.

2. 12.

For

the elision before the digamma cf. 1232. Fr. i. ii. 10, note. ei the first e is unusually close to the preceding and seems to have been inserted 3. Qf ( The very slight vestiges of this are consistent with after the next letter had been written.
:

i,

to aei. Beyond this and it is thus natural to suppose that there was an alteration of there are tips of two strokes at the top and bottom of the line which would suit a , i. e. acocii, but this would leave the construction very obscure. is an occurs in a Mytilenean inscription C. I. G. 2189. 4. which is commonly spelled unknown form explained by as equivalent to

:
city

=

W-M

:,

;

cf.

1084.
'

ii.

3,

note.

6-13. But let him in the pride of his marriage with the lineage of Atreus devour the even as he did with Myrsilus, until Ares be pleased to restore success to us ; then would we forget this wrath, and will rest from this soul-consuming pain and strife with kindred which some one of the Olympian gods has stirred up among us, bringing the people to ruin, but giving to Pittacus the meed of glory.'

()
6.

Kijvos
;

:

sc.
cf.

nttieXiSat, which however the scholium, in the second line of which he suggests airoyoi/oi Sc has apparently (or a) after seems irreconcilable with the remains ; the supposed been altered from a . Penthilus, from whom the Penthilids traced their descent, was the fweiSrjTrep oSaa son of Orestes ; cf. Diog. Laert. i. 81 (vyevearipa yap

,

Pittacus.

(!

is

a

new

gaudere, &c.

at the

verb akin apparently to the Homeric from end of the line is restored by

W-M

ToC
8.

!

^,
is

a VOX

nihili,

of which Is

^( ,

and

Fr. 6.
is

= emr (W-M)

€6\!.
cf.

,

a simple correction;

Sapph. 24,

.

1234.

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. .
.

79
.

otjs

.

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..[......]...[
.

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knivSavov,

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.[.^;^[

Theocr. xxix. 20.
acute and a
ix. 12.

In the following word a circumflex accent has been substituted for an

quantity, which have been enclosed between dots, as e.g. in 1174. the end of the line fVl looks probable, but this would not account for the traces nor give a really satisfactory sense ; to bring about a change, Ares must not merely incite the oligarchs to arms, but give them the victory. Hence suggests iVireup^fof from

mark of short

At

^

an unattested form
.

(^ =
may be
is

as fmrvyxavei,

'

to turn us to success

10.

indicate that Alcaeus

regarded as future or but the preceding lines ; dwelling on the eventual results of success rather than making an

=

^

W-M

',

appeal for peace.

The

Scanned as in Pindar, Pylh. ii. 28, iii. 24. is found on a Lesbian coin in Mionnet, Suppl. vi, p. 64, no. 82. power of Pittacus rested on popular support, as Alcaeus himself says (37)
12. aiarav for afarav is 13.

The

spelling

<55

\> {,

?)

inaivemes

aoXKteS'

The first verse of the new poem was originally omitted, and has been supplied by a corrector who enclosed in brackets the line originally written and repeated it in its
14-15•

There is some appearance of letters proper position, tacitly emending to having been washed out where this verse stands. The marginal note explains that the person addressed was an of Alcaeus, and seeks to elucidate the phrase fV Lines 3—3 are apparently a paraphrase, e. g. (or -ov) [€/, but is hardly to be read unless abbreviated would be possible if a tall stroke just before the lacuna may be regarded as belonging to the line above. In 1. 3 the stroke before «i is like that used in the abbreviation of di. in 1. 5 may be

.

'

word,
to

[ !
ii.

-.
3—4.
if

right,

and must be regarded as a

cf. Theocr. I. 5 1• a formation Stated by the Grammarians be shared by Aeolic with Doric, though not occurring in the previously existing remains of the Lesbian poets, is used in Sapph. 53. is unexpected here and perhaps wrongly read for the doubtful 5. might be V. For the following word suggests which would suit the space the first supposed may be at. The marginal note is too much mutilated to be of material

!

^

^ \( ,
[][/
^

]
;

[

^
;

.

.

.

Were restored by

W-M.

dialectical variation of the Attic

!
The

].

latter

for

;

W-M

[6],

;

assistance.

8
Ale.

,)
(-,
12.

cf. Fr. 2. i. 9 The doubled in is analogous to which should perhaps be written cf. 1232. Fr. i. ii. 6 The object of the verbs in these two lines is obscure. ()[]/(/) (?). cf. Fr. 4. 9 and 12 ?/<€ occurs in Alcman 72, but the iterative g. form is alien both to Aeolic and Doric ; cf. Kiihner-Blass, i. 2, p. 81. For the spelling reavras cf. 1231. Fr. 14. 4, note, and for 10. sc. Fr. 3. 8 f5l', Alc. 147 (vyyv, HofFmann, Gr. Dial. ii. Inscr. 121. 5

7-8. For
18.
I

^ (
:

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.
.

;
cf.

():
&C,
:

.

-/
'

was the reading of the

first

hand.

Fr. 3. 3-10. Stricken by a thunderous wave she avows the desire to fight no more against the rainstorm and the fierce tempest, but to strike a hidden reef and be wrecked. Such are the seas whereon she is tossed ; but I would forget this, my friend, and find pleasure with you and [keep company ?] with Bacchus.'
3-7. The restorarion is mainly due to ship the state is no doubt described, as in
eV

(()
5.

tfcaiOty

'
is
:

:

subject
8.

For

read instead.

so Alc. 35. 3 At the end of the line 10. supplied, but the letters are very uncertain ; [ is an alternative.
.

11. 12.

: .
Perhaps
:

\e\ae<uv

^ \,^^^' ^ ,
W-M.
Alc.

Under

;//
cf.

€£

18-19;
.
.

the figure of the distressed Heraclid. AHeg. Horn. 5

.

ras yap

,

yap 6

8(6 €
f^

The personification SO Sapph. 66. cf. the previous note. ;
e. g.

is

assisted

by the

fact

that the

real

0

the note

as in Anacr. 36. on Fr. 2. ii.

.
and
9,

10.

[

is

very uncertain and

[

might be

\^,

e.g.,

maybe

SC. vaiv.

\>'\
Cf.

;

the lines, however, are too

much

mutilated for satisfactory

restoration. 13.

\\\^}
The

1233. Fr.
iv

5. 7.

But the form

is

unknown.

Fr. 4. 1-2.

letters

ve

immediately below are on a separate fragment

rather doubtfully placed here. cf. 1. 12 and Fr. 9.

2.

ii.

note.

of

1.

ro-i I. 10 may be
12.

W-M suggests e. g.
yi,

[aiei]

and

\]

or

preceded by a narrow

^
\

.

The
(.

doubtful

in the latter part

letter after

14.
15.

W-M. Restored by W-M.
:

the

first

is

most uncertain, and the second could
Fr.
4,

be

v.

Fr. 5. This little piece probably belongs to beginnings of 11. 6-8 but there is no evident junction.
;

coming perhaps from the

Fr. 6.

much
and
5.

The right-hand margin opposite and above 11. 1-4 is filled with a long and mutilated note or notes of which only a few letters can be distinguished here

there.

waS 7-8. E. g. Ti tSiv In 1. 7 """^ In apparently originally written, the alteration being probably due to the second hand.
. .
.

\6! W-M. [' m

\'

'

\.

""

1234.
the marginal

NEW
the

CLASSICAL TEXTS
may
perhaps be a
Fr.
11.

8i
relic

note

opposite,

suspended

above.
10.

(\\ =

nei'fliXeto[s

from
SO.

11-13. nebiTij\am above in the note on Fr.
last line.

W-M
2.

;

i.

13.

. \^\
Or
;

of another line

Cf. note
Zeui.
is

2.

i.

6.
cf.

For
to

12-13

Alc.

37

quoted

be restored

at the

end of the

1235.

Arguments of Menander's
25 X 7•5 cm.

Plays.
Early second century.

Remains of three consecutive columns, written in a rather large informal hand which appears to be not later than the first half of the second century.
Stops and other signs are rarely used
point
(1.

there

is

one not very clear instance of a high
space,
of the

method of indicating a pause was a short blank sometimes accompanied by a marginal paragraphus. An angular mark
105), but the usual
is

usual shape

once added at the end of a short
is

line

(1.

62), while conversely the

final letter of

longer ones

occasionally suspended.

column very little is left, no more than a few letters from the ends of the lines, but the two columns succeeding are in fair preservation. These are for the most part occupied with an account of the plot of Menander's 'lepeia, that of the commencing towards the end of Col. iii. The title of the piece is here followed by its opening words, the quotation being marked, as often happens,
the
first

Of

by

left margin. This is succeeded by a short and circumstances of the production of the play (II. 105-13), then comes the story of the drama, and finally, apparently, a brief appreciation of its qualities (cf. 11. 95-103). Such presumably was the scheme throughout and on the analogy of Col. iii, the position in Col. i of the title of the 'Upeia and of the heading of its can be fixed with some security at points where blanks in the papyrus indicate unusually short lines

the projection of the lines into the

historical note concerning the date

;

single play thus occupied about two columns, and if all 13-14, 21)• Menander's comedies, which numbered over one hundred, were treated on the same scale, the work was an extensive one, and must have occupied two rolls at
(11.

A

least

the presence of a strengthening strip of papyrus on the back of Col. iii may perhaps be interpreted as an indication of a lengthy roll. Since the follows the 'lepeia, the arrangement of the plays was presumably alphabetic, as
;

"

suggested by Korte

in

the case of the plays of Cratinus, to whose Dionysalexandrus
'Upeia,

in 663, containing the

argument of the play, is assigned the number 8. The and described in the upper portion of Col. i, may accordingly be supposed to be the but the very slight remains in the papyrus afford no confirmation of this hypothesis.

comedy preceding the

,
G

82

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Concerning the plot of the 'le'piio practically nothing was previously known, the short passage on religious superstition upon which Meineke based some inferences being of a general character, and giving no real clue to the structure.

The play was

largely concerned with the favourite subject of the discovery of
first

a relationship, but the loss of practically the whole of the obscures the earlier development.

twelve lines of the

An

elderly

man, who seems to have
;

the cause of formerly been the husband of the priestess, had lost his son his wife's separation from him and the manner of the son's disappearance remain
in doubt.

Reference

is

made

in

1.

36 to the burial of something, but the bearing

of this incident

up as their and the real

upon the plot is also problematical. The son had been brought own by some neighbours with a younger boy, their genuine child,

father discovers his whereabouts through the ingenuity of a slave,

who

gained the confidence of the priestess by pretending to be possessed ; but mistaking the identity of the two young men he at first claimed the junior, and the
latter misled his reputed brother by declaring that the old man was mad and was recognizing a lost son in every youth whom he met. Accordingly the brother who was the true son rejects his father's advances when offered to himself. Here lacunae occur in the papyrus, and the immediate sequel is uncertain but eventually the misunderstandings were cleared away and the comedy closes in the usual happy fashion, the reinstated son marrying his foster-sister, the younger brother marrying the daughter of the priestess, and the old man apparently No names are mentioned, being paired off anew with the priestess herself. and whether '?;, which occurs on an extant fragment, belongs to the priestess or to one of the other women in the piece, is not clear. only the first few lines remain, showing that it Of the plot of the was concerned with two poor residents of Imbros who were close friends and
;

and married two sisters. The title of the piece is thus quite sufficiently which Kock has accounted for without any reference to the proverb connected with it (iii, p. 71). But though we' learn little of the story, some interesting information is gained concerning the date and production of the This was one of Menander's later works, probably the 71st, 73rd, 76th, or piece. 79th (11. 106-7), but possibly the 74th or 75th it is said to have been written in the archonship of Nicocles, i.e. 302-301 B.C., and intended to appear at the
partners,

;,

;

Dionysia (of that year), but to have been obstructed by the Tyranny of Lachares.

These statements appear
Lachares
is

to be

mutually conflicting, for the domination
to the spring of 395 B.C. 238, Beloch

of

now commonly brought down

strength of an inscription indicating a political change in that year (C.
299, Wilamowitz, Aiitigonos {Phil.-Untersiich.
iv), p.
iii.

on the I. A. ii.

a,

pp. 197-8,

Ferguson, Hellenistic Athens, pp. 132-3)

;

and the name Nicocles, as Wilamowitz

1235.
suggests,

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

83

be supposed to be a mistake for Nicias, the archon of 296-295 B.C. Textual corruptions have to be recognized in one or two other places in the
It should, however, be noticed that the 296-295 is not entirely free from objection. Menander died in 392-291, probably in the latter part of the year, and the total number of his plays is stated as from 105 (ApoUodorus) to 109 (Gellius, N.A. xvii. 4. 4; Suidas and others make it 108). The Imbrians was at most the 79th, and therefore during the last four and a half years of his life the poet must be credited with at least twenty-six plays, nearly six a year. His first piece was brought out in 321, so that his average down to 395 was only three
;

may

papyrus

cf notes on

attribution of the

"
11.

48-9,58-63, 66.
to the year

a year.
assigned,

So

far

e. g.,

by Clinton

then as the question of literary output goes, the earlier date to the Lachares incident, 299 B. c, would have been

more

suitable, giving

an even average throughout Menander's productive period,
Col.
i.

j

]a

jetj»

]/)
]^€t
5

if

20

]

]

- 8
]

]

]
]
10

]e

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];
25

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1?

]€
1

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]
.
.

lepeia
15

]

]ope

]
Col.
[

.

][
]€7
.

]\
[

[

[

]/

Tj

S iep[eia

]
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2

84
35

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. .

.

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€> ^
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,'

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.^eovv
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iepei]as
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[5€]$•

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€€]€^;e^'
45
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.

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upeiav

depaneias

€7€
aev .

$

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55

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65

1235.
70

75

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85

e

yepovTOS

[

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Col.

iii.

[
.

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[

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95

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86

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\\

_(\] [

05

^ ( 8[

em
yfrev

[

epyacriav

)^

[

[.

.

.

.

\iypa
.

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[eiy

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iig

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7;['
8e

1

20

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1235.
there

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

87

was a difference in personal appearance, addresses the younger of his neighbour's sons as his own. The youth discerning his mistake intimidates his brother in advance by saying that the old man was mad and was declaring every young man to be his son. Accordingly when the old man subsequently learned the truth and addressed the elder as At the same time ... the old man having his son the latter sends him away as being mad. recovered his son marries the priestess, and the son receives the daughter of his fosterparents and the younger and true son of the neighbours receives the daughter of the Such priestess whom he had loved, and the marriages of all three pairs are celebrated The play is one of the best and are the incidents of the plot. " My good man, .". The Imbrians, commencing " For how long a time, Demeas, I
. . . . .
. . .

This he wrote in the archonship of Nicocles, being his 7[.]th play, and issued but it did not take place on account of the tyrant it for production at the Dionysia; Lachares. The play was subsequently acted by the Athenian Callippus. The plot is as follows Two poor men who were friends lived in close association at Imbros and married twin sisters and sharing all their possessions too they worked industriously both on land
I
.

.

."

:

;

and sea

.'
. .

fragment containing the central portions of these lines at no point joins main piece, but its position, which is commended by the suitability of the restorations resulting in 11. 37-40, is confirmed by the external evidence of both recto and

32-42.

A

directly

on

to the

verso.

(cf. 1. 43) could hardly be got into the space. 39. of 11. 59 and 76, and is the servant 45. The oiKETTjs is doubtless identical with the of the old man, whom he assists in the discovery of the lost son. Se seems to be necessary, as well as W-M's 48-9. The transposition

\\

to nenva-^evos. emendation of 58-63. Here again the papyrus text is unsatisfactory. The subject of this sentence or an equivalent expression has dropped must be the old man, and probably causes difficulty and is well emended by to SiaWavTeiv, out. In 1. 60 also subject, e. g. airois, is still desirable. The meaning will then be though the addition of a that the two young men differed in appearance, one of them not taking after the rest of the

^^
is

:

family.

66.
72.

((
The

clearly to be corrected with

W-M

to

75.

\(\,

in the termination

was corrected from
looks obvious, but a
is

^
a.
?)

W-M

;

cf.

11.

73-4.

as

W-M proposes,

hardly to be read.

What
is

remains of the first letter is a horizontal stroke which suggests only a sometimes projects slightly to the left of the upright, upper stroke of nowhere else in the papyrus so long as it would be here.
77.
vestige of the letter after

,

for

though the

this

projection
v.

points to

or

(/^/

or possibly

78-85. The fragment containing the middles of the lines, like that at the top of the preceding column, is detached, but its position here, though not so securely fixed, is nevertheless probable. Some dark fibres on the verso serve as a guide to its relative place in the column, and satisfactory supplements in 11. 84-5 are thus obtainable. At the end of the latter line ya/ifi is an inference from 1. 92. yeiTovav rather than is required to 87-9. Restored substantially by W-M.
fill

remarks, hardly sounds like prose and SiSovTmv would fit into a tetrameter ; but the latter parts of the lines do not readily lend In 1. 93 «i may be and the is possibly a themselves to restoration. 95-7• W-M's restoration is convincing.
.
.

the lacuna. 93-4. fpas

((,

(
.

as W-M

^^

.

83
98. Possibly

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

but a , though possible, is hardly so suitable as ». was followed by some rounded letter; does not occur, but could be substituted for [;1 would be Still less satisfactory. 104. The insertion of the omitted a of Aijfiea may be due to the originai scribe. The following letter, if not , must be
veav

\ \6,

102.

iv

[]

io6.

109-10. Restored by undergone some correction.
IT
2.

\, \, (^ . W-M.
The
scribe apparently

or frajn/v are best Suited to the space. of is not very satisfactory, but has perhaps

<^
suit

118.
Fr.
3.

\

began

to write

in this line.

W-M.
11.

This fragment does not well

75-6

;

that

it

belongs to 1235

is

not

absolutely certain.

1236.

Menander,

Epitrepontes.

9x15-6 cm.

Fourth century.

A useful
TTOvres
is

addition to the extensive fragments already extant of the

^-

made by

the following fragment, part of a vellum leaf inscribed in

well-formed sloping uncials of

medium

size.

Though

smaller in scale this script

shows a general similarity to those of 1011 and 1225, and is likely to be of The MS. is thus not far removed in age from approximately the same period. the Cairo papyrus, the comparatively late date of which M. Lefebvre now Accents, breathings, and marks of elision are added here and there, recognizes. some by the original scribe, others by a second hand which employed a blacker ink and has also made textual corrections. Stops in two positions, high and medial, occur, and double dots mark changes of speaker, but by a natural extension this symbol has also been sometimes used as a quotation mark to distinguish words put by the speaker into his own or another person's mouth, Presumably marginal paragraphi were also employed, e. g. recto 8, verso 7. but they are no longer discernible where they are expected on the damaged The recto of the leaf was ruled both horizontally and surface of the verso. vertically with a hard point. Parts of twenty-two lines are preserved on each page, the breadth of which is consistent with the supposition that about an equal number has disappeared The lines on the recto a supposition probable for reasons to be stated below. correspond with Epitrep. 459-80 (Korte, ed. 2), and make three small contributions to the text, the correct completion of 1. 465 and probably of 1. 464, and the confirmation of a reading concerning which there was a division of opinion in
1.

476.

The
is

contents of the verso are of

more importance,
;

for these, with

an

exception to be referred to presently, are novel
the leaf

but unfortunately this side of

badly damaged, and decipherment

is

in places difificult

and uncertain.

1236.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
MS.
at a distance of

89
about twenty lines
is

Considerable lacunae occur in the Cairo

both before and
lacunae
11.

after the

passage found here on the recto, and either of these

is

therefore available for the
is

new

lines of the verso

;

but

it

8-9 that Charisius

there the speaker, and there can be

little

clear from doubt that

Prof. Korte is right in supposing that we here have the conclusion of the monologue which begins at 1. 487. At first sight, indeed, the double dots in 1. 7 suggest a conversation in which Smicrines was taking and the vocative part, but that is inconsistent with the context, and the dots are easily explained on the analogy of recto 8 as marking a speech within a speech. At 1. 10 the slave Onesimus, who in fear of his master's violent mood had left the scene at 1. 486, reappears, and on being observed by Charisius, who suspects him of eavesdropping, engages in a dialogue which is carried on through the remainder of the page and to which P. Cairo Fr. U (11. 501^"^, 510^"^) in all probability

also belongs.

But the contribution of 1236
does not end here.
hitherto

to the reconstruction of this portion of the play
] i

Further progress becomes possible through the recognition
/3\ part of a double leaf

of the coincidence between verso 12 sqq. with P. Cairo Fr.
attribution rested

wrongly assigned to the (Korte, ed. 2, p. 93). That] in the on the supposed occurrence of the name margin, but this must be a misreading, which can be corrected only by the aid of the original. If, then, Korte is right, as seems likely, in supposing P. Cairo Fr. must have been to have been the third sheet of a quire (ed. a, p. xviii), the fourth, and Fr. Q, which, if part of the fourth sheet, belonged to its first leaf (Korte, /. c), must be the bottom of ^~^. Q^ contains remains of 9 lines, /3^
I

{)

j

coincides with the twelfth of remains of 18 lines and, since the first verse of total of 38 lines for this first 1236 verso, 11 more lines at least preceded /3' i. page of the fourth sheet is thus arrived at, which is the largest number of lines found on a page in the Cairo papyrus. This total might be slightly reduced by
;

^

A

a combination

between the

last lines

of

^

and the

first

of Q^,

e. g.,

as

Korte

proposes,
(?)[:

]',

[
The abruptness
but, as

be]

.
syllable

[ ][5.
who
name
according to the current
in
1.

of the intervention of Habrotonon,

reconstruction takes up the dialogue at this point, would however be a difficulty,

Wilamowitz remarks, the
is

restoration of her
its last

510

is

highly conis

jectural, since all that remains
justified

and of

this the first

hardly

alone.

by the facsimile. More probably the dialogue is carried on with Onesimus In any case it is clear from the foregoing figures that 1236. verso i follows
if

very closely,

not immediately, after Epitrcp. 501.

On the

supposition that there

go
was no
interval, the

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
number
of lines to the page in 1236 works out at 43.
usefully supplement each other, while

The

lower part of the verso and
xxix),

^

on

- a choral

song, the occurrence of which hereabouts had been already suggested by Korte

marked, and the proof of the division of the Epitreponies into five acts This indication of a choral ode is a deciding factor in fixing the position of Fr. U, for since there is no extra space between any of the lines on the recto, it follows that these— if they belong to the same leaf as ^'- must stood, or all either all precede the eleventh line of -, where the direction
(p.
is

is

thus obtained.

follow

it.

The
;

latter alternative is inconsistent

with the apparently close relation
of the dialogue of

of 0^ and Q^.

U^ therefore probably forms part
the appearance of Chaerestratus

Onesimus

with Charisius

may

naturally be placed in the

No convincing combination next scene, and Q^ will accordingly follow ^. however has at present been obtained either of 1236. verso 16-21 (= /3' 5-10) with U^ or of /3^ with U'. A further examination of the papyrus might be
helpful.

Recto.

\8 [' £
5

€€ 9 ^ ([( ( ' '
Xeyoa
tis e[iKaaeiev

4^0 yeyoroy

yap

[evSov

Se Trjs

[€

] \](\$
^^
S'

cey

^'^

XP^l•'•

Se

10 avEKpaye

. _'[]
a)[y]

/ieXeoy

15 [eycu

[]] [\'[9 [^ \\ [(^ (] [
ev8ov-

-^ '€
av8pis

'

[€]'-

pe.v

465

emetv
Aeyeiy

;

'

[]•

ipyd\v

[€

] ( ]

]? -

(

(

irepas

47°

475

1236.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

91

20

[ [€. [ [
[ [ [

XoiSopeiT

] /
,

^€]€
€^ \)

•€[5
Seei
[

480

Verso.

28 letters

.

j."

]

«''}.

5

[

[..]...
\ip\co

(

])^ :

[]
[]
ro

\€

^
]e

]^^

5e

Se

A'Jf]]

[]

[]
]
'

15

2

^ (, \] [ ['
' €6

. .

- [ ('[:]
:

«
]€.[:
.

€([
e
]

'
. .

1

/]
[

[
. .

..[....].

..
\_

:

[.

][

[(\>

:

.

e[

[

.

.]

.

.

.

[

[ [ ^
.
.

•[
.

.]_'

:

.

[

...].[

Recto. 3• «[ttno-fifi' of the letter after ns well suits
:

[(]€( .
«.

Cairo, the letters doubtfully read.

The vestige

here

92
6.
T!fpi

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
exclude most of the proposed restorations
the line, like
after
p,
\\r.

sufficient to

somewhat below

the Cairo papyrus a
is

\ []()[)/5 ^ ^ ,,,
:
.

[

P. Cairo.

The

vestiges in 1236, though slight, are
;

they indicate

letters

descending

Croiset's

is

not impossible.

f[ P. Cairo, completed by Wilamowitz [iis there Above the deleted 7. foiK an oblique mark, the purpose of which is not evident. 8. The corrections are due to the second hand, which also rewrote the accent probably altering it from a circumflex. 9. The accents on olovs are probable, though not very distinct. 10. the reading of P. Cairo, for which Headlam and van Leeuwen proposed
i

.

is

thus suitable, and in

,
.

to substitute 11. T€
1 2
;

'

((,

:

is

confirmed.
rightly.

Se P. Cairo,

probably

Apparently

was

originally written

and has been

altered

by the second hand
t ;

to yvvaix'.
it

A

mark

precisely similar to the elision sign also stands above

possibly
is

is

a miswritten accent.
18.

Van Leeuwen's

.

happily confirmed. doubtfully Jensen.

suggestion •)/'[. .]>;? (or -v)

[][4]!,
[.

.] (or

accepted with hesitation by Korte, for and for s) Lefebvre,

Verso.

2.

!\
6.

5.

W-M remarks that
If [..]..
.

must be an error
;

.: . .
forar' is
for

Epitrep. 477. in 1. 4 suggests

an adverb, as seems to be the case (not For rt Sf compares

]

rather than

W-M

[\((', apparently),
Homer
360

].

epiBos

7. [(] W-jM and Korte. is very 9-10. Either ouv or is possible. The final V in uncertain and perhaps non-existent, but is a rather more suitable reading than and moreover the accented is then correct. The commencement of the next line is very doubtful, but seems more likely to refer to the appearance of Onesimus on the scene which was suggested than to stand in connexion with the preceding sentence, and [r]i by W-M, suits the remains sufficiently well. 10-12. Korte thinks that these verses belong to Charisius, the double dots after only standing for marking the close of his imaginary address to Smicrines, and This may be so, but the more natural interpretation of the passage as here written is to give to Onesimus, and the words are moreover in thorough accord with the close of his preceding speech, 11. 484-6 iari if it were The absence of double dots after certain, would be in favour of Korte's view, but it is quite possible that they were written and have disappeared (a hole in the vellum would have removed the upper one at any rate), although the r and the following of are rather close together. if right, refers to the illegible name at the end of the line, but the reading In 1. IT is very doubtful, and the first letter may be . The is followed by a vestige which could belong to a u or another , but is perhaps due to the penetration of ink from the recto. c may possibly be a single was apparently preceded either by e or After letter, , and it is not clear that the supposed following was the final letter of the line.

,

,

.

(.

( ((

,
this

.

.

.

(-

.

, (.,

.

.

[,

.

,

.

a correction by the second hand from . of the Cairo papyrus (Korte, ed. 2, p. 93) is Fr. and the beginnings of 11. 17-22 are restored from that source. In that fragment paragraphi occur below the verses corresponding to 11. 13, 16, 18, 19,

The second

of

in

1.

10

is

12 sqq.

From

line

onwards

^

available for comparison,
20,
21, 22.

1236.

NEW
A

CLASSICAL TEXTS

93
is

Tovs Ofovt which, however, 13. M, who further proposed lepotrvXos: unsatisfactory, partly because the termination is apparently -Xe, not -\os, partly because
insufficiently

\

W—

.,

negative is unnecessary with following, and the space. though extremely uncertain, is a possible reading. The traces of writing after Btovs may be attributed to penetration from the recto. the lower dot having disappeared in a hole; but or possibly 14.
there
is

no paragraphus

fills

'

(,

[]

:

in

\

(.,

the letter before the supposed looks more like 15. The remains are very puzzling Since in the next line clearly belongs to Charisius, a than anything else. there should be a paragraphus in /3' below earm, if 11. 14 and 15 both belong to Onesimus; cf. the preceding note. A paragraphus below earai is rather suggested by the Cairo facsimile (Plate xlvi), but this may be deceptive.
:

(
7-7

1237.

MeNANDER,
X
9-5 cm.

Colax.

Third century.

That the following fragments belong to the Coiax of Menander is established by the coincidence of the first two verses of Fr. i with 11. sz-^ of 409. Below 1. ^^ in that papyrus there is a coronis, and a short line of about twelve letters follows, after which the dialogue is continued. It was supposed both by ourselves and subsequent editors that no more than the conclusion of the defective verse had dropped out; but the viewof Wilamowitz that there was a more considerable lacuna is now confirmed, for in 1237 sixteen lines succeed the two already extant verses without any further coincidence with 409. Of the height of the column in 1237 there is no indication, and perhaps the passage inveighing against flatterers,
which
in

the previously published text follows
i,

1.

53, stood in the present papyrus
11.

at the foot of Fr.

Col. i; the introduction at
its

a parasite, suggests that he was

occasion

;

but the lacuna in 409
is

been of

still

greater extent.

This name Gnatho
is

16-17 of Gnatho, evidently may have unexpected, for though in the
is

Euuiic/ms of Terence, a play based on the Colax, the parasitus Colax

called

shown by an extant fragment (Kock 293, Unless, Korte a; cf. Plut. Oe aditl. 13), this role was filled by Struthias. therefore, Gnatho be regarded as a nickname of Struthias, more than one parasite figured in the Colax; perhaps, as suggested by Wilamowitz, Struthias was the dependant of Bias, Gnatho of Phidias. It is noticeable that the two names are connected by Lucian, Ftigit. 19 ] Another addition made by this papyrus to the dramatis personae is Aaos (Fr. i. i. 16, ii. 3), who is presumably to be identified The as the elderly slave with whom Phidias carries on the dialogue of 409. ii.
Gnatho, in Menander's play, as

-

^.
i.

^

alluded to in Fr.

ii.

2

is

the speaker of 409.

iii.

78 sqq.

The hand

of the papyrus

is

a rather small sloping semi-cursive, dating

:

94

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

probably from the third century.
a stop, and
the usual
alternations in the dialogue, the

A single
in

dot

in the

high position

is

used as

double dots

combination with

paragraph! denote

name

of the individual speaker being sometimes
sign of elision occur once each.

added above the

line.

A mark of quantity and a

All these adjuncts are to be credited to the original scribe.

«repcoaje•

]
tl
]
.

Fr.
i.

1.

Col.

SiSaaKeis


:

TaStKetv
]/€
:

]
]

(

]

[
Col.

.

:

[

Aaos

:

.

[

(Keivov fxiv

\vrjv

^ ]]
]

(-fj-e-

€[/
Seov
:

]

.

]>

x^r[•

•]

15

]
:]

:
:

^
:

]otye

[

][

Fr.

2.

Fr. 3-

Fr. 4•

]

^«."«
:

] ]

[ [

]•«

]

5

]

.


]
.
'

[
1

1237.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

95
Fr. 6.
. .

(
[

...
.

Fr. 5.

[

]

[ ...
.

]([
•.
.

409. 53' '^^ letters Fr. . i. 2. being which in the facsimile looks uncertain, is clear in the of doubtfully read, is unsuitable, and the present passage, however, seems to have been original ; in eiV would give a sense (cf. 409. 51-2 XuaiTfXei[f] fiiTft EK written, ;

^) ^,
is

[€
its

TJjf]

6.

Or

1 3. .] might also be read. 7-8. The fragment containing the beginnings of these two lines was detached, and ii. exact distance from 11. 1-4 is not certain. 9. The marginal entry is probably the name of one of the speakers ; the initial letter

€. ([
;

but

more

''
likely to
yeLTo[v.

8€

be a mistake for

le

!

(

than vice versa.

is

perhaps
Fr.
2.

.
6.

Apparently not

Frs. 5-6.

a short

That these fragments belong to 1237 is hardly certain. and the preceding letter. blank space between the supposed

In Fr. 5 there

is

1238-40.

Fragments of Comedies.

Three minor pieces from unidentified comedies, the two former in the style of the New Comedy, the last belonging to an older age, may be conveniently grouped together. 1238 is a fragment containing the beginnings of a few lines from the top of a column, written in round upright uncials of rather above the medium size, and evidently of an early date in the Roman period they may be assigned to about Changes of speaker within a line are denoted by the middle of the first century. blank spaces within which the usual double dots are inserted, marginal paragraph! and for the sake of greater clearness the names of the being also employed speakers have been added in small cursive letters, probably by a different and somewhat later hand, either in the margin or above the line. One of these names, Theron, is known as that of a parasite in a play of Menander from Aelian, jV. a. ix. 7, and though this coincidence is of course insufficient to determine the
;
;

Menandrean origin for the present fragment is likely enough. Another of the dramatis personae was Malthace, a well-established name in comedy, and the initial letter of a third was apparently (1. 9). 1239. This is the right-hand portion of a short column of twenty-one lines (cf. note on 1. 31), written in medium-sized sloping oval uncials of a common third-century type, is sometimes practically indistinguishable from . High
authorship, a

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
and medial stops are used, the former occasionally taking the shape of a short oblique dash a colon at the end of 1. 14 indicates, as usual, a change of speaker. Rubbing and discoloration have in places effaced or obscured the text, but the
;

general

drift

of the

fragment, in spite of

its

mutilation,

is

tolerably clear.
:

upon the advantages of independence detachment is necessary for happiness if a man laughs with friends he must also weep with them, and his life becomes exposed to constant change. This theme is then dismissed, and preparations follow for some festal occasion (1. 13). Here too the suggestion is natural that Menander was the author, but its confirmation
Lines
i

sqq. are a sententious discourse
;

is still

to be found.

1240 consists of four fragments written in a small informal upright script dating probably from the first half of the second century. Names of speakers have been inserted in the margin in a sloping cursive, apparently by a different hand to which writer the occasional accents and marks of elision in the text are due is questionable. Frs. 1-3 contain beginnings of lines, and it is quite likely that Fr. i and Fr. 3 should be joined, in which case there would be a loss of about nine lines between 1. 5 and 1. 11, and Fr. a may partially fill this gap. The indentation of some of the lines, which indicates variety in metre (cf. also Fr. 4, from the end of a line), as well as the participation of the Chorus in the dialogue (1. 11), point clearly to a comedian of the older school, and both Wilamowitz and Korte have suggested that should be read in 1. i and the fragments referred to the Denies of Eupolis, of which some substantial pieces have lately made their appearance in Cairo (cf. Korte, Hermes, xlvii. This is an attractive hypothesis, but unfortunately the initial pp. 276 sqq.). in 1. I seems indubitable. It is not credible that the name was intentionally disguised by Eupolis, especially as the new fragments have shown that Myronides figured in the play as a dead, and not a living person (cf. Korte, op. cit., p. 303). is a mere blunder Possibly the is well attested, and but the name Ylvp(uvihf]s occurs in Lucian, V. H. i. 20. The proposed identification thus remains highly conjectural. The other character mentioned, an (11. 9, 15), gives no assistance towards a solution of the problem.
;

'(?])

;

\5

1238.

10-3

X

7-3

cm.

First century.

Plate V.

[
erepa
:

"

((['
:

[

([

:

1238.
5

?

[ [( [•
NEW
(09

CLASSICAL TEXTS

97

€[\
[
]

[.

.

.

.]

([]€ [
[:

[.][

[.

.

.

.]•/

][
is

34-

Or The

[. fourth letter of the speaker's
is is

name

most probably

,

not

a.

Since the next

line is attributed to the
6.
7.

{70
The

same person, 1. 4 was Suggested by W-M.
doubtful
;

thrice divided.

stop

if it is right,

1239.

]•
]

] ]
.

et

5

\
15
]

[\\ ]•
]
.
"[

5• ]€[]•
ety
.
. .

( ^^9 <
6•5

the next

word may be

e. g.

[](

or

iJiy]ei

.

cm.
ey(i

Third century.

-Tis

]

]iXj;i'£

.

J'[i']«'

<\ ]?

[

TIS

] []9
[•

]/??•••

•]

0fpe'

][
]?
]y•

..[...]
.

]..[
20

]


]

ye

[.

.

.

.].

.

[

98
2.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
The
superfluous

was enclosed by dots on each
eVjiXiji/ioi

side (that

on the

right lost),

and

a third
9.

was placed above.
If the letters are rightly read,
;

indicated
13.
16.

be completed, as proposed by Korte, n-atSes, vOv. itself, but though the papyrus is much damaged it has entirely disappeared. On the other hand some is difBcult to suppose that the tail of a which would suit sufficiently well, is not very satisfactory here. case of e. g. 21. Below this line there is an interval of i^ cm. before the papyrus breaks off. If this was a complete column, it was abnormally short in comparison with its breadth, though an analogy may be found in P. Rylands 1 6, which, however, was a MS. of a much more sumptuous kind. But possibly 1. 2 1 was the conclusion of an act, or even of the whole

The

(\
line

in

some form,

as Korte remarks, seems

is

possible.

/[7]

may

naturally suggests

!,

;,

play.

1240.

Fr.

r

15-8

6-5 cm.

Second century.

Fr.

I.

[5]
5

dp

^' [
[

\
.

[

[]

[

Fr.

2.

\\ '^
]««5

.(3\_

Fr.

.

] «[
[

Fr. 3.

Xo(pos)


[

0[
.
.

ig

](3)

[

[

.

[

;

1240.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr. 4.

99

]

]•
]

]

2.

A

circumflex has been substituted

for

an acute

accent

over

;

cf.

1174.

ix.

12, note.
II.

The marginal
there
is

of the
1 5.

\[> W-M

Xo(pof) can hardly be doubted, though rather above and to the left a short vertical stroke which remains unexplained. the a is followed by a vertical stroke which is sufficiently consistent
;

with a

K.

1241.

ChRESTOMATHY.
22 X43-6 cm.

Second century.

Of
ones,
last
is

the six consecutive columns remaining of this papyrus the four central

though damaged in parts, are in a state approaching completeness; the broken vertically, while of the first only the ends of a few lines are The script is a careful uncial, round and upright, rather similar preserved. to that of the British Museum Hyperides (fragments in Kenyon's Palaeography, Plate xvi), though more regular and ornamental and probably somewhat later it may be referred to the first half of the second century. in date Other hands of much the same character are 220, P. Berl. 6845 '^P- Schubart, Pap. Graec. The few corrections which occur are due to the original scribe. Berol. 19 c. Punctuation is effected by a high point, accompanied by marginal paragraph! at the close of a section the paragraphus is replaced by a coronis. There is some variation in the length of the lines, and short ones have been sometimes, but by no means always, filled up with the usual angular mark. Diaeresis is frequent with an initial t or d a rough breathing apparently occurs in vi. 10. A diple is placed in the margin opposite a line at v. 5, 24, vi. 25 (cf. 1233. Fr. 2. ii. 4, note, P. Rylands 55. 33, note), and double dots, one above the other, occur in a similar position at v. 4 (cf. 16, where the two dots are divided by a horizontal stroke). The work here partially preserved is a treatise containing historical and mythological information collected in summaries and lists. In Col. i there were short catalogues of famous sculptors, statuaries, painters (11. 1-5 cf. notes), and grammarians Col. ii opens with an account of the Alexandrian librarians, and then at 1. 21 warfare is abruptly introduced, and this subject is continued through the remainder of the fragment, ii. 21-iv. 10 recounting the persons, mostly
;
;

;

;

2

loo

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
first

mythological, supposed to have been
while from
iv.

responsible for various acts of war,

lo onwards the inventors of different weapons are specified. The earlier part of the fragment recalls the Ptolemaic papyrus published by Diels under the title of Latercidi Alexandrini {Abh. Berlin Akad. 1904), and the second portion is closely analogous to the excerpts from the catalogues
of inventors
the

Greek and Latin authors of cf. Clement of Alexandria, Pliny, and Hyginus A rather marked similarity to M. Kremmer, De Catalogis Heurematiim.

embedded

in the writings of certain

Imperial period,

e. g.

;

a passage in Servius

is is

noticeable at

vi.

19-35

;

see the note adloc.

Though

the

name

which this treatise is to be referred it is a characteristic product of the Alexandrian erudition which is thus clear Its age is fixed within exercised itself in antiquarian research and tabulation. well-defined limits, on the one hand by the historical allusions in Col. ii, on the other by the date of the papyrus it must have been put together, if not towards
of the compiler
;

unknown, the

class to

;

the close of the Ptolemaic period, under one of the earlier Emperors.

The section dealing with warfare and weapons is, as might be expected, of no great importance, though it includes some mythological and historical details which are not without interest, besides occasional citations of older authorities Hellanicus (v. 3), Philochorus (v. 6), and perhaps Aristotle (iii. 3) are named. But the most valuable part of the papyrus is the list of Alexandrian librarians in Col. ii, which at last determines the order of the holders of the office under the earlier Ptolemies, and supplies fresh evidence for the much-discussed chronology of Apollonius Rhodius. With him the list begins, the name of Zenodotus having of course preceded towards the end of Col. i. Apollonius, who is said to in 1. 5 must be a clerical error for have been the tutor of Euergetes I was succeeded by Eratosthenes, and Aristophanes of Byzantium, Apolloand Aristarchus followed. After the death of Philometor nius
;

), (',

(
'

occurred the dispersal of the Alexandrian scholars by Euergetes II (Athen. 184 c), and it is highly significant that the next name is that of a military officer,

Cydas € room for doubt that
sufficiently evident.

,
it

who

is

otherwise unknown.
i.

His mention leaves no
e.

was a

definite official position,

the chief librarianship,
if

of which the successive occupants are here enumerated,

this

was not already
;

Who

the successor of Cydas was

is

not expressly stated

we

are next told that under the 9th

Zenodotus, Diodes, and ApoUodorus
turns to another topic.

Ptolemy the grammarians Ammonius, flourished ', and the compiler thereupon
in

While placing Apollonius Rhodius

the position indicated

by

his relations

to Callimachus and Theocritus, the papyrus explains the mistake in the tradition

which brings him down a generation or so

later.

Suidas describes him as

1241.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

loi

a contemporary of Eratosthenes
at the Alexandrian Hbrary,

and Timarchus, and the successor of the former and similarly the second Life of Apollonius (Westermann, Biogr. 50) records a tradition that he eventually returned from Rhodes to Alexandria and became librarian then. These statements may now be traced to the subsequent appointment of a second Apollonius, dloypa^os, and a confusion of this person with his more famous predecessor not improbably also
underlies the hesitating report of Tzetzes, p. 200. 14

one Apollonius were counted, Aristarchus would be the fourth from Zenodotus, if two, the fifth. Apollonius •Rhodius, therefore, must have been of nearly the same age as his reputed master
f

Zvboos,

be

b

^

(cf.

p. 307. 8) TTporfpos be

:

if

- .)

Callimachus (cf. ii. a-3, Gercke, Rhcin. Museum, xliv. 352-3). That he was a learned grammarian as well as a poet was already ascertained. He may have become the teacher of Euergetes about 370 B. c, not earlier, since the marriage of Philadelphus and Arsinoe I did not occur before about 385 B. c. His retirement to Rhodes may then be placed, with Knaack (Pauly-Wissowa, RealEncycl), about 360. But here we are confronted with a difficulty. It might naturally have been supposed that Callimachus filled the post vacated by his discomfited rival, whereas the papyrus asserts that the next holder of the librarianship was Eratosthenes, who according to Suidas owed his appointment to Euergetes, and in 260 B. c. was not more than about fifteen years old bh the statement of Strabo (i. 15) that he was a pupil of Zeno of Citium would indeed imply a greater age. Wilamowitz suggests that the office remained in abeyance during the lifetime of Apollonius, but this can hardly be considered

{(

;

a satisfactory explanation.
of Zenodotus, who,
ture to Rhodes,
if
if,

There was no interregnum after the retirement he was succeeded by Apollonius before the latter's deparas Suidas says, he survived to be the teacher of Aristophanes
office
is

and

of Byzantium, withdrew from his
possible that after
all

many

years before his death.

Is

it

the tradition

correct which represents Apollonius as

having returned to Alexandria and become librarian comparatively late in life ? If Zenodotus and Callimachus both died early in the reign of Euergetes,
librarianship for

Apollonius might then have been recalled by his former pupil and have held the some years immediately before Eratosthenes. It would then be

unnecessary to assume that Zenodotus retired long before his decease, and the unexplained interval between Apollonius and Eratosthenes would disappear.

Perhaps

this

may

prove to be the easiest solution.
Col.
i.

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1-4. Restored

Praxiteles,
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5-

by W-M; cf. Diels, LalercuU Alex. vii. 3-9, where Pheidias, and Scopas are grouped together as and Myron, Lysippus, Polyand Phyromachus follow as and Cf. Laterculi Alex. I.e., where the come next before the

.

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Pliny, iV. JI.

vii.

205, Quintil.

xii.

lo. 3.

,

position

Httle doubt that this fragment belongs to Col. i, but its exact hardly certain. The place assigned to it is suggested chiefly by a dark fibre passing below 1. 14 and continued in the margin of Col. ii.

14-17. There can be
is

1-20. ' . ii. Apollonius son of Silleus, of Alexandria, called the Rhodian, the disciple of Callimachus ; he was also the teacher of the third king. He was succeeded by Eratosthenes, after whom came Aristophanes son of Apelles of Byzantium, then Apollonius of Alexandria the so-called Classifier, and after him Aristarchus son of Aristarchus, of
. .

io8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Alexandria, but originally of Samothrace ; he became also the teacher of the children of Philometor. He was followed by Cydas, of the spearmen ; and under the ninth king there
flourished
I.

Ammonius, Zenodotus, Diodes, and Apollodorus

the grammarians.'

of the father of ApoUonius is given both as 'S.iWds and'lXXtis; cf. Vii. i and 2 (Westermann, Biogr. 50, Keil Schol. ApoU. Rhod. p. 532). Suidas, like the papyrus, gives only SiXXtir. (so Suidas), Vii. 2 cf. Vu. I 2-3. iv and introd., p. lOI. i.e. Euergetes I. is an obvious mistake for 5. 8. is doubtless an interpolation, since Aristarchus recurs with a full

The name

[] :
'.\(&,
is

description in

11. 11-15. 9—10. Cf. Etym. Magn. 295. 52 €() Tois ei'Sfati/ eVeVft/xfi/, Schol. Pindar, Pyth.

15.

'

€,

, ! , . ^ - ^) ^ ,
o^(os)
ii.

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((
S.

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ineiSt)

ev

init.

an error
. .

either for

or

;

cf.

Athen.

71b

eL•

:

yiyove 8e

.

eVi

'

and oUldaS,

V,

(sc.

(naiSevaev,

is

palaeographically the easier correction.
likely

will better suit the plural

for

it

is

enough, as Busch,

bibliothecariis Alex., p.

53, has argued, that

Aristarchus taught Philometor as well as his brother Euergetes. have not found another instance of the use of 1 6.

We

as a military technical
II, if

term in Egypt. 17-18.

is

expected

;

moreover Euergetes

he

is

here meant,

is

usually called the seventh or eighth Ptolemy.

', [8] . '(&(.
1 9.
:

Or poSsibly

to

whom

the author of ten books TIep'i Schrader would assign also other works mentioned by Suidas,
If Zi)io[8oto£j
is

[8\
.

s. v.

W-M), or Z. of Alexandria, may be supposed to be meant, if indeed these two grammarians are to be distinguished; cf. Susemihl, A/ex. Litt.-Gesch. ii, pp. i4-i5> i92-3> 711• 103, Schol. BT onX this may be the grammarian cited in Schol. A on mentioned in Artemid. Onei'r. iv. 70 is 208, Schol. 132, 457 whether the same person is doubtful. There would not be room for 20. Apollodorus of Athens was, like Ammonius (1. i8), a disciple of Aristarchus.
(so
;

:

rightly restored, either Z. of Mallus,

[('.

2i-iii. 14. 'The first man to establish a camp is said to have been Asias, after whom Asia is supposed to be called ; while Apis son of Phoroneus is said to have led forth an army, arming his followers with clubs and hides. Intestine war was first begun, it is said, by Agenor, who collected some shepherds together, and, attacking Pelasgus drove him out. A Hellenic city was first sacked by Amphitryon with Cephalus of Athens, (their foes) being Taphians of Cephallenia ; Aristotle however states that this first happened at Pellene, and some say that not only was Pellene enslaved by Cleisthenes when he marched against it with the Sicyonians, but that the captive wives and daughters were reduced to prostitution. The .' first to restore the slain under a truce is said to have been Heracles . .

22—4. Cf. Hdt.
apparently novel.

In 1. 24 the stop is not certain. 24-7. According to ApoUod. ii. i. i Apis was a against by Thelxion and Telchin. The second f of ffayayftc seems to have been corrected from
signs of alteration.

, ^ (\ ,
iv,

45

( '.

etn
is

The

attribution of the

first

oTpaTOvfbov to Aslas

who was

conspired
also

i,

and the

shows

1241.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

109

/ifvaf. 30-1. 1. Agenor and Pelasgus were brothers according to Schol. Eurip. Orest 920 and Hellanicus ap. Eustath. Their conflict is apparently not elsewhere 75.

recorded.
the expedition of Amphitryon and Cephalus against the Taphians cf. The construction of the sentence is harsh, and probably Strabo 456, &c. something has dropped out. At the end of 1. 35 cannot be read, and the remains suggest "lai rather than moreover there would hardly be room for ^vai\. We have ; therefore supposed that there was an incomplete line at the bottom of the column ; cf. iv. 2, where a similar blank occurs. This view may be supported by two considerations, (i) the awkwardness of ovs «hoc which must refer back to and (2) the fact that ii. 35 ranges with iii. 35, not iii. 36. Perhaps something like{oL•rl' Se tovs stood in the original. which is doubtless right, was recognized by W-M. iii. 2. The name of the authority cited unfortunately remains doubtful. name beginning with Ari- is probable, but the letter before the lacuna may also be , , , or possibly another p. is a probable restoration (cf e. g. and are unsuitable. Clem. Alex. S/rom. i. 16. 77, Schol. Pindar, Pytk. ii. 127, Pliny, N. JT. vii. 195, 197, &c.), especially as Aristotle wrote a treatise on the constitution of Pellene. 3-8. Cf Zenob. i. 57 in the version of MS. Bodleianus 207 where had rightly emended to UeWavaioi {Hermes,
33-iii. 2.
ii.

For

ApoUod.

4. 7,

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xliv.

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W-M,
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.,

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was restored by W-M. comparing Plutarch, Tes. 29 Sn

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22-iv. 9. 'The first to recover the slain in war was Theseus in the affair with the Thebans, when he received and buried the bodies of the Seven who had marched against Thebes and remained unburied. The first to shed kindred blood is said to have been Aetolus, who killed Apis son of lo when competing against him at the games celebrated by Cepheus in honour of Azan but some say that the original shedder of kindred blood was A trial for murder of kindred was held by Ixion, who killed his father-in-law Eioneus. Phoroneus son of Inachus, who constituted a single court. It is said that the first murder of brothers took place at Thebes when Ismenus and Caantus the sons of Oceanus fought on account of their sister Melia.'
;

22—8. Cf. Plutarch,
KaSpeta
iii.

ApoUod.

The arrangement of the beginning of the sentence is doubtful, can certainly not be read at the end of 1. 23, nor is Keipevom satisfactor}', the fourth letter after vcKpo[vs also suggests itself, but this again is, to . being apparently not . say the least, unconvincing, and the verb in 1. 22 was at any rate not yap . 28—34. Cf. Pausan. v. I. 8

- , ' / ) €^ ' / (. ^
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))
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29

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6

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yeveauat

eKeivas.

5[

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.

of the person who instituted the games is not given 19. is plausible, though that personage does in these passages ; W-M's restoration of not seem to have occurred elsewhere in connexion with the story of Azan. That Apis is described in 1. 31 as the son of lo is no doubt to be traced to the Greek identification of the Egyptian Apis with Epaphus (cf Hdt. ii. 153). e.g. Pherecydes ap. Schol. ApoUon. Rhod. iii. 62, Pindar, Pyth. 34. Ti«s ii. 31-2.
Schol. Pindar, 01.
iii.

,

.

viii.

4. 5

^'^*

^^

The name

*
.

(,

[])5

:

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

In 11. 3-4 a satisfactory sense is iv. 3-9. The restoration is laigely due to W-M. obtained by the supplements adopted, though possibly the blank in the previous line points ci. Pausan. ii. 15. 5, For Phoroneus as cf. ii. 35 and note ad loc. to some dislocation where he is represented as having been the arbiter in a dispute between Poseidon and Hera. Here he seems to figure as the founder of the Argive tribunal for homicide. is a corruption of stood in the papyrus. 7. It seems clear that for whom cf. Pausan. x. 9. 5. According to the Theban story there given, Caanthus or was slain Avhen seeking to recover his sister Melia from Apollo ; the version of the papyrus apparently eliminated the god and represented Caanthus and Ismenus as having engaged in
;

,

:

a fratricidal combat.

lo-v. 35. ' Weapons of war according to some were constructed by Ares, according to and the first person to others by the Cyclopes in the cave in Euboea called Teuchion employ armour, it is said, was Briareos, while previously men protected their bodies with Others say that weapons were first made skins ; some, however, state that Ares was the first.
;

", ^ ^.
12-18. Cf. Schol.

Thrace by Enyalius son of Zeus, who was bound by Aloeus and his sons and rescued by Apollo, who killed them. According to others weapons of bronze were first made and worn by the Curetes in Euboea, who equipped their followers and [attacked] Cymindis queen of [the Chalcideans ?]. Others again say that the Egyptians made offensive armour and protected themselves with skins and also wove garments and constructed sails and Hellanicus says that Saneunos king of Scythia first constructed sheets and so navigated. weapons of iron, while Philochorus states that arms were first made in the time of Cecrops and consisted of a spear and a covering fashioned of the skin of wild beasts, but afterwards when oxen came to be sacrificed the inhabitants of Attica made shields of ox-hide. Shields but according to the account of are said to have been first brought by Danaus to Argos some Acrisius first constructed them at Argos when he fought against his brother Proetus, while according to others it was not Acrisius but Proetus who constructed shields at Argos, and these of wood ; others state that a bronze shield was first made by Pyrrhis (?) son of Thermaeus, a Cretan living in the island of Ophiussa, and that it was he who taught the Handles for shields, and other implements, are said to have Eteocretes the war-dance. been introduced by the Carians some, however, narrate that whereas formerly men had hung their shields on their shoulders, the Argives first supplied them with loops and bars and put them on the left arm.'
in
;

;

A

Homer,

439

,

(sc.

Eustath. 8 1 7

Istrus, then, is presumably our author's source for this In connexion with the reference of the Cyclopes statement about the Euboean Cyclopes. Euboea figures as the notes that in Hesych. s. v. and Briareos to Euboea daughter of Briareos. Briareos is included among the Cyclopes in Schol. Theocr. i. 65. The latter frequently appear as metal-workers in association with Hephaestus in ancient works of art ; cf. also e. g. Pliny, tV. If. vii. 197 aerariain fahricam alii Chalybas alii Cydopas {monslrasse pulattt) fabricaviferream invenere Cyclopes, ApoUod. i. 2. i, Tatian, Ad Gr. probably was first I. seems to have been altered as well as the X of

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written.

that the story of the imprisonment of Ares by the 19-25. The suggestion of Aloadae was in this passage transferred to Enyalius was confirmed by a subsequent decipherment of the latter half of 1. 22; the correctness of this reading, in spite of the Since Enyalius is here in accordance mth scantiness of the remains, can hardly be doubted.

W-M

1241.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

iii

the later mythology differentiated from Ares, it is curious that he is still described as the son of Zeus elsewhere he appears as the son of Ares or of Cronus (Schol. Aristoph. Peace tv is in accordance with the apparently 456, Eustath. 944. 55, Hesych. s. v.).
;

[;]
;

Thracian origin of the myth of the Aloadae cf. Eustath. 673. 50, where a Thracian In 1. 23 the obvious Enyalius is said to have been killed by Ares. hardly fills the space, and some other verb may have been used. 26-32. For the Euboean Curetes as the first to employ bronze armour cf. Steph. Byz.,

,
S.

V.

.'8!,

'

>)£,

Strabo 472 Servius, Aen. ix.

which was recognized in 1. 31 by W-M, is apparently a According to Diodor. iv. a word probably derived from the same root. was also called Byz. s. V. XaXWf, Zenob. vi. 50, &c., and according to Homer, S 291 cf. Schol. ( Though the general sense of the clear, the wording of 11. 29-32, which are in parts almost effaced, remains

The name

TLayJ^T],

! ,
(

^\

5e
i<eivovi

4

(sc. tovs

.)

•^ scuta

aerea gesiare Curetes privii invenerwii.

(. ,

\

'

!
=
ad
es

ivfbiaavTo

something
is

like tovs

:.
.

not impossible, the supposed difficult to reconcile the vestiges with did not follow letters, e. g. yap 33~5• Cf• Hdt, iv. 180

,

'>;'.

\!. 6
cf.

,

. ^,
'?)

being perhaps part of a but in 1. 31 it is and in 1. 29 it is not certain that one or two

, ; \(
;
.
.
.

variant of
72, Steph.
loc.

is

passage is doubtful; expected.

fustibus qiios vacant phalangas; might be read instead of the

vii. 200 proelium Afri contra Aegyptios primi fecere Hygin. 274. 29. is not very satisfactory; , and the succeeding letters are quite doubtful. In 1. 35 is a rather long supplement for the lacuna. 36-v. 2. Line 36 was restored by W-M. Cf. Clem. Alex. Strom, i. xvi. 76 re {sic) Pliny, JV, vii. 1 96 Aegyptii textilia, Martian. Cap. ii. 158 Isis in Aegypto lini usum monstravit, and for the Egyptian origin of sails, Hygin. 277. 37 velificia prima invenit Isis, Cassiod. Var. v. 7 hoc velum Isis rati prima suspendit. v. 2-5. Since bronze arms have already been dealt with and Scythian is a familiar epithet of iron (e. g. Aesch. Theb. 817) W-M's is attractive, though the space is somewhat narrow, however (cf. e. g. Pliny, N. H. vii. 197 acs conflare et temperare Aristoteles Lydum Scytham monstrasse), would be no improvement in this respect. Saneunos

According

to Pliny, JV.

^\
2((!
in
1.

(

\ ,
.

.

^,

\
.

4 is otherwise unknown. 12-13. Cf. the note on iv. 33-5. 15—22. Cf. Apollod. ii. 2. I vii. 200), Schol. Eurip. Or. 965 (so Pliny, /^

.

22-8. Uvppiv is presumably a misspelling of but the patronymic is novel and also the connexion with Ophiussa, which will be the island in the neighbourhood of Crete mentioned by Pliny, IV. H. iv. 61. According to Nicol. Damasc. ap. Stob. Flor. xliv. 41, Pyrrichus was a native of Cydonia. For his invention of the war-dance see e.g. Ephorus ap. Strabo 480

(
i.

'Apydoi.

?)

'

49sqq.

Others derived the
171
. .

from Pyrrhus, e.g. Etym. Magn. 699.
ovTot
.

, ^ ^ , , (
.

eipov

8e oTiiv

(of P.

and A.)

Schol. Pindar, Pyth.

Z)e salt. 9.

28—36. Cf. Hdt.
Schol.

fl

(sC.

Kupes)

o'l

A

Homer,

193.

In

1.

29

[]

^'
ii.

I27, Eustath. 771. i, Lucian,

'

aviv

nepiKeipcvoi,

is

not very satisfactory,

some

specific device

112
corresponding with
the
is fairly

being rather expected moreover, there is barely room for the The first letter was, however, certainly either t or , and In I. 31 is wanted before Trporepov. The last few lines of this column are disfigured by extraneous marks which have made in 1. 32 look like vi. 3—4. Cf. Clem. Alex. Strom, i. 16. 75 ie (sO
;

'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
.

three letters in the lacuna.

secure, the only possible alternative being

.

W-M for
5-6.

"^ (W—) (. 6[(
;

!
8

'

4

with Samothrace. Samnite Itanus ; cf Athen. 273 f. In 1. 6 of [ is written over an o. 7. a[a\myyas is the obvious restoration (cf. Aesch. £um. 568, Diod. v. 40, Athen. 184 a, Pausan. ii. 21. 3, Schol. Homer, 2 219, Clem. Alex. Strom, i. 16. 74, &c.), though this invention comes in somewhat awkwardly at the present point. In 1. 10 the rough breathing can hardly be evaded an overwritten e is inadmissible. is apparently not otherwise attested. II. He cannot be identified with 'ApSaXos is son of Hephaestus, the discoverer of the flute, in whose name, as remarks, the
.

looks probable, but it remains to find in other sources a connexion According to Clem. Alex. 1. c. the evpeos was the invention of the

;
Cf

W-M

certainly short.

18-19.

Hdt. 75) Dion. Hal. restored here.
narratur.

") .

Clem. Alex. Strom,

. R.

'
ii.

i.

16.

75
is

tVi

70.

wanted

(,
in

Eurip. Ale, 49^
1.

!, ,/(?
evpov

19-25. Cf. Servius, Aen. ix. 503 Lycaon Areas gladium longiore lamina produxisse Peleus primus machaeram diciiur invenisse. harpen, id est curvum gladium in The similarity of this passage to the falcis, a Perseo invenlam multi dixerunt. and papyrus suggests a common source. For cf Hesych. of Perseus, with which he is commonly represented, cf. Pherecyd. 26 and for the Apollod. ii. 4. 2, who says that it was given him by Hermes. is right there was a reference here to the legend of Narcissus, who 26. If according to the account of Conon c. 24 sent a sword to the disdained lover Ameinias. The letters though imperfect, are very probable, and the slight vestige of the final letter suits

modum

[

^
X
53-9 cm.
'

23 below and so cannot be

. ^^ ,

,

V sufficiently well.

1242.

Greeks and Jews before Trajan.
15-8

Early third century.

This interesting and instructive text, describing an audience by the Emperor Trajan of rival Greek and Jewish emissaries from Alexandria, is another fragment literature, of which several of the Alexandrian anti-Semitic and nationalist
'

specimens have already made their appearance.
d. phil.-hist.

Those published prior to 1909 have been conveniently put together and studied anew by Wilcken in Abhmtdl.
Kl.
is

d. k.

Sachs. Gesellsch. d. Wissensch. xxvii. 33

;

a recent addition

is

probably to be referred to the same class. To one member of the extant group 1242 stands in an especially close relation. In P. Par. 68 + Brit. Mus. I (i, p. 229), of whose contents B. G. U. 341 is a second recension (Wilcken, op. cit., pp. 807-32), a chief part is played by a certain Paulus, and another speaker
1089, which
is

Theon

;

these two

names recur

in

1242, and Paulus

is

described as the

1243.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

113

Nevertheless P. Par. 68, &c., professional advocate on the Alexandrian side. and the present papyrus cannot refer to the same occasion. In the former, as the references to the Dacian war (i. 13), to the praefect Lupus (i. 5, iv. 3), and to hostilities in Egypt (wo'Xe/ioy, ii. ^-6) and a Jewish 'king' (i. 5-6) show, the date must be subsequent to the great Jewish outbreak which began in Egypt and Cyrene in A. D. 115. In his first discussion in Hermes, xxvii. 464 sqq., Wilcken supposed that the proceedings in question took place before Trajan at Antioch but subsequently he adopted the more probable view shortly before his death of T. Reinach that the Emperor concerned was Hadrian. In 1242, on the other
;

hand, not only

is

the

Emperor expressly named as Trajan, but the scene

is

Rome,

to which city Trajan did not return after his departure to the east in A.D. 114.

The

proceedings here

described are therefore prior to that event, and thus

necessarily prior also to those of P. Par. 68, &c.

That the personnel of these two

Alexandrian missions was to some extent identical is no cause for surprise, if they were dispatched within the space of a few years. If in the meantime there had been a change of Emperor, there would perhaps have been the less
reason for an entire change of envoys.
originated
11.

In what circumstances the present mission
however, from the Emperor's language
in

is

unknown

;

it

is

clear,

35-7 that hostility to the Jews at Alexandria had assumed an active form. Parts of four consecutive columns remain, the first three in good preservation so far as they go j but the tops of the columns are lost throughout, and the

number
of Col.

of lines thus missing cannot be determined.
it

This loss

is

the more

unfortunate because

is

clear from the broad blank space (7

cm.) in front

i that that column was the first of the roll, and its opening sentences would have been of particular interest. As it now stands, the papyrus commences with an account of the members of the Alexandrian mission, the names

of eleven persons remaining, including two gymnasiarchs, a gymnasiarch-elect,

and a distinguished ex -official, besides Paulus, who had volunteered his services as advocate for the party. The Jewish mission, which was appointed as
a counterweight to that of their
rivals,

consisted of seven persons
its

only

a number perhaps selected on account of

mystical associations.
it is

parties then set out, each carrying with them,

surprising to read,

'

The two their own

gods

and they arrived at Rome at the beginning place was appointed for the audience, and meanwhile, we are told, of spring. the Empress Plotina displayed an active sympathy with the Jewish cause, and under her influence Trajan adopted at the outset an anti-Alexandrian attitude. The next column reports an exciting dialogue between the Emperor and Herma'iscus, a man of high birth (11. 44-5), whose name does not occur among those of the Alexandrian envoys preserved in Col. i but presumably preceded.
'

(i.

17-18

;

cf.

the note

ad

loc.)

;

A

I

114

"^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
; ;

He boldly accuses the Emperor of Jewish bias sweat is seen to break out on the image of Sarapis carried by the Alexandrians and for a time panic and conHere the papyrus fails; from the scanty remains of the next fusion reign. column little can be extracted beyond a mention of the Emperor Claudius, where Alexandrian mission of which it is natural to see a reference to the earlier a partial account is preserved in B. G. U. 51 1 and P. Cairo 10448 (Wilcken, op. cit.,
pp. 800-6).
this class is in this latest

which has come to be recognized in documents of example especially evident. In the account of the preliminaries to the hearing, the formal phrases which must have stood in the original account of the proceedings are entirely dropped; details concerning place, time, and the council in attendance upon the Emperor disappear, and from a bare statement that a place was fixed the writer proceeds at once to a picturesque 1242 here differs widely from B. G. U. description of the entry of the envoys.

The

literary character

511, where the protocol-form

is

maintained
i.

;

nevertheless the third person
first.

is still

used and not, as
of Col.

in P. Par. 68.

8-10, the

Similarly in the pro-Jewish
at the

activity attributed to the
iii,

Empress and the introduction of the portent
is

end

the hand of the artistic redactor

unmistakable, as well as the party

which he wrote. It may, however, still be maintained that, as Wilcken holds, though manipulated for political purposes, the basis of this literature was the authentic ofificial records. The text was written on the verso of the papyrus in an upright, semi-cursive Some corrections have hand, probably near the beginning of the third century. been introduced by the copyist into his work, but inaccuracies and corruptions at the end of the line remain. A high stop is occasionally employed. sometimes takes the form of a horizontal stroke above the preceding vowel. A comma-like mark is inserted between two gutturals in 1. 35. On the recto are parts of three columns, numbered 34-6, in second-century cursive, containing copies of contracts of lease a date in the reign of Antoninus is mentioned in
bias with
;

Col.

I.

Col.

i.

.

[

22
21

letters

][.][.

.]

.

i\

»

\-°
Jtoj/]i/fftos

^\
5

]«.[,..

"^,

6[7/]7

y6i'[o]/i€roy

'lov\k{\os SaXovioi,

,

[

V-

b

iv

!, \\88 ,, ,^ '!,
1242.

,' . ! !
NEW
'lovXios

CLASSICAL TEXTS

115

15

5

,, , ,!!! ',
'AXe^aveOvovs
8e

^.

'Ovias,

!
1.

which
Pap.

.
at the
is

5•

beginning of the line may be accidental. lo. ijnep Pap. ; so in 1. i6. crossed through. 12. Pap. ; SO in 1. l8. 13. X of 16. Pap., perhaps unintentionally ; but

[] !

! ! ! !,
Pap.

!'6.

!
»9
Pap.
]
.

8.
ai

high point after
written above
f,

of
ii.
corr.

Pap.

;

so passim.
ii.

14.

cf. e. g.

B. G. U. 511.

!
i.

Col.

ii.

[

20

[

! 6[
[

25

30

! ' !] •\'\ ! []9 . ' , ! []
].[...].
o[.]_t[.]_i' ,

]

]r[
. .

[

[.

.]

[] '. [
ei]y

([],

[\ ! !
[.
.

n-

...].[...
.

.][.

.][

[

[]

TiKoi^!]

!

!

[]!

!.
2

!,

(-

ii6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Xovrat

35

' '] [] \$\

[]

[]'
'lovSaioii

,
x^aipeif,
;

6

Sk

-d^eioi

\-

of one deleted. Pap. 35.


25.

above

o,

£ added above the line. which is crossed through. Second e of Pap.

^
28.

of

corr.

Pap.

30.

written above

32. ai-ow = aureus, as often. '[(!;] Pap. 37.
1.

^.

, and between
33.
\.

. •
from
e.

of

written

Pap.

and

Pap. 32. a letter or part

34.

Col.

iii.

[

[

]ov
[.
.

'IovS[ai

40

.

.]

fieX([T]as

45

50

55

41.

1.

space.
52.

iSe

,!) , " € ' . 5• /. ' '? , [],' - [ [ / . . !
et7r[€i'
[

4 ', ,
yiva.
01S

[]5 ^.
dnev
;

]

.

[

][
[

.

(inev

;

-

5

'

Tpaiavbs

€ty

] []! (!
Pap.

[\

eis

-

1

Pap.
55•

;

SO in
47.

Pap.
. .

45. yev"• Pap.

.

/^

(:•

1.

47•

Pap.

43• After 48.

a short blank

1.

0

Pap.

1243.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Col.
iv.

117

[•

•][

[
7-[

\\

6
vaL

.

[

[ i

Sea[

•[
65
Te(s[

([

70

.

[.]

^[

.

Xeyei

75

/
/3

''>^
KXavSios
[

[
[
.

>[685

(?)

yap

[.

.

.]r[

6€5
oVrey
[

[.

.

.]e[

73. 74.
1.

71. Before

seems which

to
is

a blank space. have been crossed through.

\
I.
. .

.

was

originally written, but the
e

77.

of

oi-Ter

written above

o,

crossed through.

Fragments.
.

3.

.

.

.

].[

'

ii8
11.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
3-18.
.

'. [? Dion]ysius, who had held several procuratorships, Salvius, Julius Timagenes, Pastor, gymnasiarch, Julius Phanias, Philoxenus, gymnasiarch-elect, Theon, Athenodorus, Paulus, a Tyrian by birth, voluntary advocate On learning this the Jews also selected envoys on behalf of their for the Alexandrians. own race, their nominees being Simon, Glaucon, Theudes, Onias, Colon, Jacob, and Sopater, by birth of Antioch, advocate for the Jews. Thereupon they started from the city, .' . each party taking their own gods, the Alexandrians [a bust of Sarapis, the Jews '. 11. 22-37. and at the end of the winter they landed at Rome. The Emperor learned that envoys of the Jews and Alexandrians had arrived, and appointed a place for and Plotina approached the senators so that they might appear hearing them both The Jews were the first to enter and greeted against the Alexandrians and assist the Jews. the Emperor Trajan, who greeted them very affably in his turn, having been already won over by Plotina. The Alexandrian envoys next entered and greeted the Emperor, who did
.

Salvius,

Sotion, gymnasiarch,

.

.

.

;

not return their salute, but said " Do you give me greeting like men deserving to receive ." Begone and one, when you are guilty of such outrages to the Jews " presumably] you are studying how to die, being so contemptuous of 11. 40-55. Hermaiscus said, " We are distressed that your council death as to answer me insolently." chamber has been filled with godless Jews." The Emperor said, " See, I tell you a second time, Hermaiscus, you are answering me insolently in reliance upon your birth." Hermaiscus Explain to me." The said, "What insolent answer am I making, mightiest Emperor.' Emperor said, " Because you describe my council as dominated by Jews." Hermaiscus " So the name of the Jews is irksome to you ? You ought then to turn round and help your own While Hermaiscus said this, sweat suddenly people, and not to defend the godless Jews." broke out on the bust of Sarapis which the envoys carried, and Trajan seeing it marvelled ; and presently there were tumults in Rome and many shouts were raised, and all fled to the .' high parts of the hills .
.' .

.

'

.

.

.

;

.

<Tvvi]yopos probably Paulus occupied the same position on the 9-10. occasion described in P. Par. 68, rather than that of the leader of the mission, as supposed by Wilcken, op. cii., p. 815. 16-18. This statement that the Jews as well as the Alexandrians took with them 'their own gods ' is extraordinary. The sentence must obviously have continued 'AXelavSpeis 8e . It would have been very interesting to know what divine symbol accompanied the Jewish envoys. That of the Alexandrians, as appears later (1. 51), was a bust of Sarapis. is 21-2. The remains would suit axirovs rather better than and the preceding
. . . : . . .

'

[

.

.

also very doubtful.

seems to be wanted and 24-6. Some emendation is necessary here. In 1. 24 need not occupy more space be squeezed in, since is a narrow letter and ei and alone it is unlikely that was written. The is represented by a slight e and In 11. 25—6 . vestige which has been taken to belong to the tail. may be restored ; or perhaps, as Wilcken suggests, re is for ^, i. e. 17, with would give a less could be retained. To read cfri which the preliminary arrangements would naturally not rest with the envoys. satisfactory sense

may

than

< [ [; : ] .
just
; ;

\\
.

,
in

\'\

.

.

[ (\ [£]|

Cf. B.
in

G. U. 511.

i.

17

eif aCJpioj'

26.

The

.
11.

interest of Plotina in the affair, attested here

and

that of Agrippina

on the occasion of the embassy
for
-oi.

to

Claudius;

cf.

31-2, has its analogue B. G. U. 511. ii. 7-8
;

;»'?)[] is

e.xpected after

cf.

1.

II,

where B. G. U.,

has

been written

attended Claudius according to

1.

c.

1242.
40.

NEW
cf.

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Phaedo 67 e
oi

/6€[]

TO

Oaviiv

:

PlatO,

!(
119

53-5- Cf. 33. iii. 8-14, where the condemnation of Appianus is represented as the occasion of a tumult, though there is not the same rhetorical exaggeration as here. 71. That the name begins a new sentence is indicated by the preceding blank space ; it is however possible that this blank is due to the scaling of the ink. is suggested by 1. g, but the absence there of KXauStos makes it very doubtful whether the same person is meant. there is a short space in which a slight trace of ink is 73. Between Xeyfi and discernible, and perhaps Xeyeis should be read.

'[8!

Fragments. These two unplaced fragments are narrow
letters.

strips

containing incomplete

III.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
1243.

Apollonius Rhodius, Argonmitica
1

iii.

1-6

X

7-5

cm.

Second century.

from the bottom of a column are written in an informal A-B (P. Oxy. V, Plates i-ii), and no doubt of about the same period it is likely to fall well within the second century. Stops in the high position are used, and accents, breathings, and marks of elision have been freely inserted, apparently by a diorthotes who has made corrections in 1. io6a, and whose ink in comparison with that of the text is of a rather

These few

lines

uncial script very similar to that of 841
;

stronger black.

An

otherwise unrecorded variant occurs in
is

1.

1058.
;

As

in 841, the literary text

contains the ends of a few lines

the recto on the verso of the papyrus apparently from a second-century survey-list.

1055

[/''
[ai

o<^io^

8v^<^\pr]v
iroX]ea.[s

io6o

[] []9 [] []
Xdav
[Kap)(^aX\eai

Kev

[a]0e[y

Kvves

'

\£• [ [
veioio
Trej/at

[a\vTOS ene[i\Yeo

Kcoas es

[
o[i

en

oXeKotev

'

([

I20

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\\
[
[ct)y

e|

\]'

MSS., Et. Mag. 493• ^• The rough breathing and 1058. accent on the two omegas are probable, but not quite certain. is joined to the preceding >; by a diagonal stroke, which is not of 1059. It is hardly likely that was first written. easily accounted for. 1060. There is a spot of ink, perhaps accidental, at the top of a hole in the papyrus between and y of roto y. 1061. vEiaeo is also the spelling of Laur. Guelf. 1062. ofeai/SEi» was deleted so Laur. Vatt., Merkel ; 3 Vrat. Pariss., u Guelf. vulg.

](•.

.[!

' '
for
c

\ \\

koH^v^ev

[ ^^([
vetaeo

'

napos

[€

:

by the corrector who substituted

in

€\.

1244.
Fr.
I

Herodotus
i6-6x 13 cm.

i.

Early second century.

fragment from the top of a column, with the ends and beginnings of a few lines from the columns immediately adjoining it, is written
following
in

The

irregular upright uncials of

medium

size

which appear to date from the

earlier part of the

second century.
right.

A

formed, hand

is

seen for example in

somewhat similar, though much better 220 (P. Oxy. II, Plate vi). The columns
Diacritical signs are scarce
1.
;

have a pronounced slope to the
apparently occurs in the same
of words, but
(1.

the diaeresis

takes the form of a horizontal stroke in
line.
;

31,

The

medial position text displays a tendency to omission

and a stop

in the

3),

Hude from 18 is supported and a commonly accepted emendation of Schaefer also finds confirmation
is

otherwise good

a reading adopted by

(1•

31)•

On
century.

the verso are

some incomplete
is

written in round informal uncials which are also likely to

The
are

subject

not clear

;

from the ends of two columns fall within the second the names ]Kaviavos, and
lines

(?)

mentioned, and the Latin word

,

occurs

'

twice

in

the plural.

[os
5

] [ (] ( ]
i.

Col.

[

[

TO ipov TO tv
Toicri

\\(
Oe

Col.

ii.

105

irep

eiXov ms Se eiXov

[

^]

^
ev

€[/5][]
t[o]vs

Aaavpiovs

1244.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
TJjy

[5

]€ \ <]] [^

[/ ]
es

tovs

[^]
20
e

Se

[vapeas

[ ^]

[]9
Teaaepa
TeXevTai

tovs Ka\e]ovai

[]
1

[]

(lev

06

^ []
Se

e[Tea\

Skv

^
[

pe(o [7r]a<[s]

iyeveTo
25

[]

\\\\
€v

€[]€

\[
\]"/\
[

[]_ ([€]

\[
ove[i

3

[] [\•
t[co]v

Se
5[e

[]

[ ([
35

Col.

iii.

Unplaced fragment.

[
a\iiTi\i\ov

eov

40

'\[
3.
6.

\[ \€[
«]?'.[«"'
;

:

so 18. II and Longinus, Hude; MSS. seems to have been omitted after
is

the lacuna
line,

is

of the same size as that
dis-

in the following line.
8.

The papyrus

appeared.
2 7.

»

preserved at the end of this
after [/)>;][]<.

but the ink has entirely
that

was apparently omitted

The remains of

word

are not

122
securely identified, but

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[>; sufficiently fills 1. 27, and Cf. 1. 6. 28, while []/ does not. 31. Schaefer's correction of the MSS. reading
36-40.

of

1.

The

position of this fragment in the

;
column
i.

[] suits the vestiges at the beginning
is is

confirmed.
uncertain,

and therefore the

restoration

is

not carried beyond the completion of imperfect words.

1245.

ThUCYDIDES
25-3

X

22-6 cm.

Fourth century.

A

fragment from a papyrus

roll,

well written in medium-sized upright

This style is now known to go uncials of the square so-called Biblical type. back to the beginning of the third century, if not to the end of the second (cf. 661, P. Rylands 16 ^), but the present papyrus is probably not to be reckoned among the earliest examples, partly on account of the formation of some of the letters, partly of the colour of the ink, which is of the brown colour common in the Byzantine age. 1245 is therefore more likely to belong to the fourth century than to the latter part of the third. The ends of lines are not kept very even,

and the angular mark which
not here employed.

is

elsewhere often used to disguise irregularity

is

Some

corrections have been introduced

by a second hand,

to which the occasional high stops are apparently also due.

few variations from the Textually the papyrus is of no special interest. MSS. occur, both by way of addition (11. 7, 12) and omission (11. 49, Some agreements with C and CG are noticeable 84), but they are unimportant. The scribe was weak in orthography, being particularly in 11. 100, no, and 123. liable to the confusion of at and e, and these errors have sometimes been passed

A

mediaeval

over by the corrector,

stands side

by

side with rr, for which
is

been substituted obtrudes where it

(1.

113).

Iota adscript

usually written,

has once and sometimes

is

not wanted.

[
[to 5

]] [
Col.
i.

uvat

139. 4

^[v]i'ea[e]o)S

['< (]$ [ \ [ \

(]'

35

[] ( ][] []' /
Col.
ii.

[€]•
T[as

[\

[](

[])/3»?[[]]£

[\

€ []

8iayo[i\as

'

It is not, of course, the graphie,\\, pp. 131-2verso the dated letter of Heroninus.

These two papyri have been strangely confused by Gardthansen in the new edition of his PalaeoOxyrhynchns papyrus, but P. Rylands 16, which has on the

[]€ ] [5
1245.
\^povov

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

123

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[ [ ]
[$

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4
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[
15

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[novs

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ev

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

8

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\\
aavT[e]s•

([]
"J.
:

7[ \\[€
re

[ [[ ( [
'''^^

? [[ ([
([
e[v

141.

4•

3

ea\Tiv

enena

12. It is clear
I'ud.

om. MSS. from the
is

920. 14 in inserting
26.

The supplement

,
:

size of the

lacuna that the papyrus agreed with Dion. Hal. Thuc.

which the MSS. omit.

rather longer than what a comparison of the preceding
v.

and
to

- '/ \
49. 56. 60.
78.

following lines indicates, and ^ot was perhaps omitted. was Corrected by the first hand from 36. £ of is due to the corrector.

€ «[
\(:
:

The

alteration of

[\
little.

MSS.
Xoyois

SO SO Hude

ABDEFG
;

.
;

-y.

.

MSS.

MSS. of waS altered from e. C, Hude. But the spelling of the papyrus counts for

1.

yiyvcaBai.

81.

the termination untouched. 84. 87.

Richards the common interchange of
100.

,(
:

of €1 has been corrected by the second hand from . 8g. t of cTTi was lengthened by the second hand. av whence so MSS., though AEF have 93.
e

. :
1.

1245.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
It is

125
for
e,

curious that the corrector, while substituting

has

left

8

.
MSS.
e
fills

-^,

Madvig conjectured

But the future form is easily explicable as originating and m, of which this papyrus offers several examples.

-

in

(CG)

the lacuna better than as

(ABEF).

no.
123.

:

so

CG

;

om. ABEF.

The papyrus
;

evidently agreed with

by

ABEFG

cf.
it.

Syrianus

,

C in omitting airoU which is added after eVn» Lex. Vindob. «Viv aliTots. Hude omits auTois, Stuart

Jones retains

1246.

ThUCYDIDES
9-6

vii.

X

7

cm.

Early second century.

This small fragment from the seventh book of Thucydides is w^ritten in the hand of 844, the long papyrus of Isocrate.s, Panegyricus. The round upright uncials are of the same size and formation, the column is of the same width, and the diminution of the letters at the end of longer lines, which was a feature of 844, also reappears here. There is indeed this point of difference, that in 1246 stops in the high position only occur but it cannot be inferred from so small a specimen that this was the only stop used, and, moreover, the punctuation of 844 was
;

probably not entirely

original.

The fragment

is

not sufficiently extensive to show the quality of the text

but an agreement with
Col.
i.

BH

against older

MSS.

is

noticeable in
Col.
ii.

1.

9

;

cf.

1247.

\^ \

*:[£

Treves

38.

]70

€[6)'
2

5

ovSev
res
\K\ov

-^•
[

Kias

[]
10

[](
[avTo]vs

[)(] .[

]
em])(_ei

[

ye

126

15

[et

{[
[pjjaet»']

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[

[pap-)(ovS!]

[] •[] ] (([ [ \5 ] [(€
Tovs re

ras

[i']avs

Tts

[ere

g.

[\
ii.

)

:

so

,

Stuart Jones

;

om. Hude with other MSS.
is

Col.

Since the height of the column
letter.

unknown, it is impossible

to guess the position

of this solitary

1247.

ThUCYDIDES
Height 23-4 cm.

viii.

Second century.

The

upright uncial hand of this papyrus shows so close a resemblance to

Meliambi of Cercidas, that the conclusion can hardly be avoided that the two MSS. were written by the same scribe. The only noticeable difference is that tends to be broader than in 1082, and that the regularly has a rounded loop, whereas there both the rounded and angular forms were used. These distinctions, however, are insufficient to counterbalance the numerous strongly marked similarities, among which the long fine shaft of and V, the low-looped , and the small bent head of Stops are prominent. in two positions, high and medial, are found, and are apparently due to the original scribe, but since two other hands have made marginal insertions, their
that of 1082, containing the
origin
is

hardly certain.
text,

Of the

which
is cf.
11.

is

accurately written and of good quality, the most

interesting feature

a distinct. tendency to agree with B, the Vatican
i-a, 18,31.

MS.

of the

eleventh century;
of
es

before

«

Westermann's commonly accepted addition
(1.

in 10.

3

is

confirmed

40).

In three places slight divergences

from the traditional order of words occur (11. 29-30, 32, 54), one of them recorded by a second hand as a variant at the bottom of a column. Another marginal
variant has been inserted at
obliterated.
1.

42, but

the original reading

is

unfortunately

'

///€]_/?

8ia(pep6\^evas

^ [ ['
v[ow
ras

Col.

i.

8. 3

em
4

yap

1247.

]
vavs

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
[eK

5 vovs eiro]iovvTo

]

\(
ttJoXi;

8e eioj^ej/

10

][]
ot]

[ [
e^fiv

[ [ [ [^
km
Col.
ii.

127

aSv

ovSev

?
g.
1

Suko

Se

[6
tov[s]

15

]• 8€] ] ]] • ]€ ](^ !] !
\€]
(V

]
]
ey]

9•

3

SuTpi

e

10.

1

e

[]

25

] (]
at

ivOvs

€5

]

[]>

es

avTo]is

30

7][]_/

5•

>

[] \ []
es

5

€[

[

] ]
e-)^o]vTiS

] [ [

ei

a[pyov

[

[]

[]-

][]

^
e

128
35

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

avTOVs

ras

vavs ev

\\<
varepov
es

ewra

3

6[]/
40

[] [] [](5 [\,[•
[]7[

[][]
. .
.


eiri

.]

«ls

^

\\$;'\

8e

[\\9

45

TTjOOS•

^•
^

\\
irJoXu

[5

€[]
Col.
iii.

[€ €7
50

[ [
[<

[

vavs

1 1.

2

opcuVTes ev

[ ^[
55

(
enevo
eSo

eneiTa Se

^[f

[(
yjre

[
[
:

€CuS

9

Since both the beginnings and ends of the lines are lost, the point of division between the lines is only conjectural. 1. TOP SO other MSS., Hude, Stuart Jones. ; 2. In view of the tendency of the papyrus to agree with it seems likely that (Stuart Jones with B) stood here rather than (other MSS., Hude). cm. other MSS., Hude. 18. at SO SO C (-); ABGM. 23.

-.

(

[

:

;

]

]-

:

1247.
24.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

Kiyxpeav B.

28. The size of the lacuna appears to be in favour of supposing that the papyrus agreed with the MSS. in reading not MSS. Probably the marks (added by 29-30. \\\\> a corrector?) above 1. 29 have some reference to the order of the words ( is used to denote transposition in mediaeval MSS. cf Hermes, ii, p. 248), but their purport is not entirely

\

:

, '^.
;

129

clear.

31.

-^:
;

SO

and

schol.

later hand has recorded 32. The original text agrees with that of the MSS. a different order at the foot of the column, calling attention to the variant by the word

{),
ii.

Hude, Stuart Jones;

en-ijyov

ACEFGM.
this adscript

A

in

the margin

following that at

is here confirmed. 40. Westermann's insertion of cV before imperfectly preserved, but may be regarded as practically certain.

this Stood in the papyrus seems doubtful, would suggest a more important difference than merely eir for es. Perhaps es was written, as conjectured by K. O. Miiller. It is indeed just possible that this is really the reading in the margin, but the second letter is more like t than . The hand of the adscript is different from that of the variant entered at the foot of the column. 54. If the initial letters of this and the preceding lines have been rightly identified, avTois preceded instead of following it as in the MSS.
es Tieipaioti 42. since the marginal adscript «t

cf.
1.

e. g.

852.
iii.

i.

8,

note.

For the sign preceding

() and
are

42 cf 16.

3,

&c.

The

letters

MSS., but whether

«/

(^

1248.

Plato, Politkus.
32-4

X

25-8 cm.

Late second century.

This papyrus, which was found with 1241, is written in rather small and neat, though not particularly regular, round uncials, which may date from the middle or latter part of the second century. Alternations in the dialogue are generally marked, as usual, by double dots, but these were for the most part, at any rate, a subsequent addition, the original scribe having been content with marginal paragraphi and short blank spaces in the line. The double dots may well be due to the corrector who has occasionally made small modifications in the text, and it is likely that the other stops, which are found in three positions, though apparently without any definite distinction of meaning, proceeded from the same source. This corrector objected to the practice of the first hand of representing at the end of a line by a dash over the preceding vowel, and has in several places inserted the V. The tall columns (25 5 cm.) lean over considerably to the right. Owing partly, perhaps, to the great height of the roll it was found necessary to support it by sticking patches on the verso, and fragments of other literary papyri have been utilized for this purpose. Some of these are of sufficient extent to be of value, and will be dealt with in a later volume.

I30

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Textually the papyrus
is

undistinguished

;

some small points of

interest

are found in

11.

7, 39,

53, 63, 68.

Col.

i.

\\ \_\
[/i]coi'Q)[i/]

[\••
S[f]'
:

epiov

[/\
5

eoi/cer
; : :

280 e

eyoya


.•
:

Col.

.

eivai
>

55
:

6[]

7[]

[

ye

[
;

TfXeov

[\ [] ?
:

)
ev

>

^
6
28 1

[\5
(
Se

TIS

(
:

( (
(•
(
eav

epeav

65

15 ye Tcov

ye
:

28

d

;

ۥ
20
cay

^aivovTos re

(

^
:

(

:

>

KaXeiv

25

>
:

ye

75

et

re

(
28
b

:

;

€[•^
30
:

(

8

:

;

1248.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
ol

131

irorepa

8
35
e[<''^]'?''"9[s]

^
o)S
:

^]


>

2
-aii

[]

[] > [
T[ai'Tay]
Xe]^o//6i'

\
ye

85

(

vapayevo

[]
:

90
40
yevea-ems

45

[]€
Se


:

>

€ •[ (
([(
:

( []•
wep[i

([]

(.

\
[yeve
;

>

95

[
\) wtpi

ye

50 ovpyovs

(
[
veiv
[:


[[]]

€py[]e^'

8

^
:

281

100

:

105

\ [\ [
2 lines lost.

Col.

.
130

[\
ev

[] []
\
^
[

€. [](>

.\
Ttve
[

\ ^
:

[€\


135 2

""
Teyva

\\[ \\ [
[]
[
:

;

132

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

['
1 1

ye 140

5

>

/;[* Iv

[«ai

20

670//€/[[]
[:

125

f"'

[[€ [ ? [? [( [
nept
fCTTl

[ [5 ((

[

145

^ • > (
[]
ۥ
re
ev

epioii

282

c

•^
{\

yepaiv

([]

[(]

;

8e

^

[ ( [
Svotv
:

282 b

150

7r[coy

:

[\ ['\
Col.
iv.

[[;?]]
ev

[ ][
55

[][ ( [
arepeov

282 e

1

6

[ [[
eivai
:

[\[]

^ [€ [!
:

[]

[[<

[

8e

ye

[]

1

65 7rXe^[e£

5-

7.

[r](.
1.

The double dots om. MSS.
:

are wrongly placed after yap instead of ow.

8.

XtKty^fvav.

represents the usual Egyptian spelling ; BT. 34. Ti of Tim was corrected from v. the reading of BT, has been superscribed over that of Ven. 8, 39. Vind. 31, and originally Ven. 184, Whether the insertion is due to the first or second hand is uncertain. 5T. The superfluous lightly crossed out, and a dot was also placed above it. was
30.

53. 63.

66,
68.

( (!
The

,. ,
1248.
reading of the
:

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

.

133

first

hand,

ets

:

:

\(! MSS.
BT
;

,

Bumet,

(Is

,

(

is

that of the
Others.

MSS.

;

of.

1.

99.

so

Ven. 189, Vind. 31, Burnet.

99. avvaiTias I GO. 1.
;

,
:

avvaiTiovs

MSS.

;

cf.

1.

53-

lower of the double dots has disappeared both before and after 115. For the diple opposite this line cf. 1241. v. 5, note. Its meaning here is uncertain. The MSS. read (- Stephanus), and perhaps the marginal sign has some reference to the dubious reading. Whether the papyrus had the nominative or accusative cannot be determined. Or possibly there was an error at the end of this line, e. g. wav\T av makes a rather short supplement. ;
I02.
.
.

The

[].

.

|

123. ee:

MSS.
;

of \vas a later insertion, perhaps by the second hand. five letters would make the line of normal length. 133. Ti may have been omitted 136. or poSSibly )[])[/, omitting
127.

[] [{):

140. 151.
1.

1.

! was

.

.

apparently intended to be cancelled by dots placed above the letters

;

cf.

51.

Om.

MSS.

1249.

Babrius, Fables.
9-5

X

'/•s

cm.

Second century.
its

Plate V.

This small fragment

is

of considerable importance for

bearing both upon
It is

the date of Babrius and the history of the text of the Fables.

a piece from
easily be
is

the top of a column, neatly written in rather small round uncials, which can

hardly be put later than the end of the second century, and
appreciably earlier.

may

A

hand of the same type
;

in the present

volume

seen in

1241

;

cf.

211, 220, recto

412, written about A. D. 250,

shows a posterior stage
the close of the second

of development, as also, probably, does 656.

But

if

century

is

on a

liberal estimate the

downward

limit for 1249, the poet himself,

whom

Crusius would place near the beginning of the third century (PaulyWissowa, Real-Encycl. ii. 2658 cf. id. De Babr. aet.), must have lived well within the second, if he does not go back to the first. This period, i.e. about A. D. 100, was adopted on metrical grounds by Christ, Gr. Litt. 1905, p. 651. Babrius has, indeed, often been referred to the Hellenistic age, but a second-century papyrus does not, of course, substantiate that improbable view. With regard to the text two points are of especial interest. That the alphabetical order of the Fables
;

134
which
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

found both in the Codex Athous (A) and the paraphrases of Babrius is unbe original was recognized, although its antiquity is attested by P. Amh. 36, where a similar arrangement appears. In 1249, on the other hand, nothing of the sort is to be found. The four fables here partially preserved are xliii, ex, cxviii, Secondly, while the and XXV, beginning respectively with the letters E, M,
likely to

,.

to ex and cxviii are, naturally, here absent, the prose epimythia attached in metrical epimythium of xliii stood in the papyrus, which thus carries back the

A

beyond the Assendelft tablets (third cent.) and some of these epimythia may now have to be reconsidered. Compared in detail with A, the papyrus shows verbal variations in ex. 4 and cxviii. 8, and omits cxviii. 5, a line on which
tradition of
P.
its

class a

stage

Amh.

26.

The

question of the genuineness of

suspicion

had already fastened.

of each fable is marked by a paragraphus and the first letter of mark of elision in 1. 5 the next projects slightly to the left of the column. is the only diacritical sign occurring.

The end

A

^^
em(v
5

oSeveiv
Tt

eapos

[]

/[ ([9

[ ^[[ (
eutoO at

xliii.

19

kwos

tis

ex.
iroiei

Se KepKOv

^[

cxviii.

«[aJXjj/i/

([((
o\ikos

ev

?
15

«[

Se Tovrovs

€[€
\•/\

[ [] [5 (
[6\

[ ^
€['

4
6

8

€€[

yap

(

.

. The
was
first

Assendelft tablets

4.

^

() agree

with the papyrus in having the epimythium, which

deleted
:

by Lachmann. so A ; c^fis Nauck.

5.
2.

109
7. fapoi
:

A. which was rejected by 9. The papyrus omits 1. 5 Gitlbauer (lemere, Crusius thinks) and transposed, with emendations, after I. 6 by Seidler and Bergk. 10. f\-n\yaai, if right, is for an example of the not uncommon interchange of and here. The is probable, though is not excluded, but the is very uncertain. 12. aiupovs A.
TJpos

(,
:

1249.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
MSS.
Schol. Aesch,,
«S".

135
Schol. Theocr,
ras oipas.

-^

For the accus. With aalvetv C. Theb. 704 Kvvw)

!,
Clitophon

cf.

[,

13.

1.

,

:

1250.

Achilles Tatius,
24-4

Leucippe

ii.

X

22-5 cm.

Early fourth century.

Plate VI.
i-ii).

(Cols.

Of
Tatius
;

the extant Greek romance-writers only Chariton has hitherto been

i). We have now to add Achilles and the following fragment containing three consecutive and nearly complete columns of the Clitophon and Leucippe, besides making valuable

represented in the papyri (1019, P. Fay.

contributions to the text, supplies, like the Chariton papyri, important evidence

Rohde {Griech. Roman, p. 472) on the strength of supposed imitations of Musaeus placed Achilles Tatius in the middle of the fifth century, while W. Schmid (Pauly-Wissowa, Real-Encycl. i. 245) brings him down Such estimates are no longer tenable, for the present papyrus is to the sixth.
for the date of the author.

certainly anterior to the fifth century.

It is

written in round upright uncials of

medium

size,

and of a style which

is

seen at a glance not to be that of the later

Byzantine age.

Some resemblance may be
was written not
this, in

observed between

this

hand and
is

that of 412, which

later

than about A. D. 350.
first

1250, however,

no doubt not so early as
century
is

but an attribution to the
respect of the

half of the fourth

not likely to err

downward

limit.

The composition
and Achilles
later

of the romance cannot then be put

much

after the year a.d. 300,

need not be supposed to have
Heliodorus,
op.
cit.,

lived

more than a generation or two
is

than

who

is

assigned

to the latter part of the third century (Rohde,
1.

pp. 465-6, Schmid,

difficulty in the

writer

was also

no longer any chronological rejects, that the romanceof which some the author of the astronomical work
c.)
;

and there

statement of Suidas, which

Rohde

extracts are preserved.

As was to be expected from a witness standing so close to the author, the papyrus shows a number of small discrepancies from the mediaeval MSS., and in Two conjectures are corroborated several places is manifestly superior to them. no (11. 35, 1 30), and unsolved difiiculties are removed in 11. 44, 58, and ic8
;

doubt

in other instances of

disagreement the papyrus

is

not seldom right, though

136
as
1.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
I, e. g.,

warns
(cf. 11.

at the outset,

it

is

by no means impeccable.

On

the other

hand,
is

in

other passages which have been regarded as corrupt the traditional text

reproduced

methods of Hercher meet with no support.

40-1, 48, 54, 63-4, 76, 92, lai), and in particular the drastic But the most striking feature in the

is the entirely different order of Chs. 2 and 3. 1-2, which are here inserted between Chs. 8 and 9. Some slight changes in the transitional phrases are made, so that the passage as it stands runs quite smoothly. But the last section of Ch. 3 would not join on to the end of Ch. i, and there must have been a larger modification at this point. The abruptness of that section had already been observed by Jacobs, who suggested that something had fallen out. These remarkable divergences of the papyrus from the current version seem capable of two explanations. Either there were two redactions of the romance, a view which was suggested long ago by Salmasius, but was vigorously contested by Jacobs (pp. xliii sqq.) or possibly a leaf in the archetype from which the mediaeval MSS. were derived was copied in a wrong position, and the dislocation has been concealed by subsequent patching. The omission in some MSS. of the words at the beginning in Others of Kuipbs of Ch. a might be taken to point in that direction.
;

new text

.

.

.

?,
;

.

.

.

With regard
Punctuation
1.

to palaeographical details, there

is

little
1.

that calls for notice.

is

rare

a paragraphus

is

inserted
filled

below

7,

and a high point

in

100.

Short lines have been sometimes

with the ordinary angular sign,

and

V at the

to the right,

end of a line here and there takes the form of a horizontal stroke and about on a level with the top, of the preceding vowel.

Col.

i.

Plate VI.
7• 7

5
5

^
€(((
Se
e

aiorepov

Se

(V

<

9 ^

i8ovTei

8.

~
eyeyo

1250.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
veiv

15

TOS
cey

[^
20

( 8
Se

( (^
?
yap
Se

137

"
8. 2

onep

[]'

[] []
[]

^
(

[]
25

[]

[\
[] ['] []9
[eJcTTrepay

?
[]
(Se

8.

3

3 []

[] [] " [] ((
[]
\6\
[icai]

?

?

2.

35

[ \]
?
[] \^\

40

^^ [ ?? ?
€t

€7ret

2.

2

\\

Col."ii.

Plate

.
?

[\?
VOS

[
eK

138

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
45 XiVKov

tovtovs
eivai

~
T[o]y

Se

avTOis

5

eivai


55

[]

(€

^
>
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2.

3

eivai

[] []
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em

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Se

[]

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[] ([€~

rpecfiei

Se

avTois

6

[
[

(?)

2.

^

\
wpoTeivL
Se
oivos

[
6eov

65 Se

{,
[Xey]ei
[^e]ve

ev
evpes

[6
e^ei

? [8 [
[
p[eov

a[^)(^eve

70 eKeivo

ev
Se

ei

Ka\j.'\

peivai evpa^'f[
75

)( ev
Se

nvei

aev

[\
[ets

\ \

a[aave

8
at

(


2.

5

\ € e~

8[ e

1250. 80

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
neXou

[

[ [ ][
ayet

139
2.

[9

6

Oeos

\]€

[

85

(

90

[ [€ \ ^
otvos
eis

5

[ (~ [ [
Col.
iii.

8]e

[

[?

Se

[fKeivm

3• ^

95

![ -[
?
Se

((
tpyov

Seinvov eTV)([ev

SiVTepov vfXov

€ (

£e

((?

[[[ €
([€
Se
IV

^\

[\ [

Xeiov
3• ^

[][^
[(
eav

105 "

[ €[
Kevoi

[€
9• ^

5e

^[

[ ([ [

I40

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
(L

[\( €'[

11,5

/ (! €
\

^ ^
oopeyev
[vos Se

('[5
5e

20

[ '€]€
[
Se

j(etX]oy

€[[
€'[][€

[ ?
(-^
afier fanv.

[

['

9• 2

[] [ ]'
]
eiSev

(]veneivoi'

[ ([
[( [

.
3•

^', :
1.

aypiavqs: SO
8.

,v:

12. 13.

(:

so

MSS. MSS. aypiocv MSS.; /cdt- H. om. MSS.
;
:

H(ercher).

so Cod. Flor.
]\ISS.

;

Mon. Angl.

15. OS'• 16.
18.

(:
o{

',
€K
J/
:

•{/) MSS.

22.
24.

26,
28.

30. 0K[5]f 32.

33• 35.

! [(
("
:
yap
.

-! was
,

5

MSS., which add
corrected.

(^
ex

brackets

.

.

,

y'S.vKv.

.

:

'
;

:

:

SO

MSS. MSS.

'!

MSS.

omitting with Cobet.
,

.
2.
i

I\ISS.

6e

'€€/\ €€8

Be

Kaipos

MSS.
of the ordinary
text.

" yap

«-.
:

:

the papyrus here reverts to Ch.

the papyrus confirms Jacobs's transposition, which is adopted by H. 40-1. At the end of the line the so Mon. Angl., nore Flor. and others, H. papyrus seems to have agreed with the reading of Mon. Angl. Mediol. The choice lies between and oTt, and ore was actually conjectured by Jacobs. But

[] appears
attested,
it

[]

.

to suit

the remains slighdy the better,

7.
:

has the stronger claim,

and, since that reading is already Flor., omitting following Cobet rejects

.

43. Bi(3A[i]at

so 44. XfioK cKKevKov : (K

which

applied to vina by Pliny, the probably 45. 1. 48. SO MSS.
is
:
,"

: /
;

!
:

so MSS. inserts which was desiderated by MSS. MSS. For e/iXeuicor as an epithet of o'l/of
;

. ,
H.

Jacobs. cf. the Latin exalbidus,

1.22. came in from 1. 52. with Jacobs.
i\'.

xxiii.

It

may be

noticed that Jacobs's other

suggestion that
since
49. awTotff 50. Tiva

{>)()

1250.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
might have arisen from
in a non-theological
is

141

51—2.
52.
54-

^ ;
: . . .

uould not occur
avToii

MS.
J

put out of court by the papyrus, of this dale.
1.

\,(
:

MSS.
:

.. .

MSS. MSS.
;

cf.

62.

MSS.
:

reads
57• 58.

€€

and
:
:

ejects

^]

^'
SoKei

SO Flor.
. .
.

Mon. Angj.
SokcIv.

.

.

.

Vat. Mediol.

Thuan.

the

MSS. MSS. have

one seems to have thought of
60. apneXivov

,

which

is

clearly a corruption

;

it is

singular that
Flor.

no

before.
;

would be room
62. 63.
TTOi/ifKa

(Mediol.) Jacobs strangel)' preferred which is not in the MSS., at the end of which Flor. inserts before ewaivei has been misplaced.

64. noTos

68-9.
76.

: /:

for

,
.

There

this

line.

Possibly the

:

SO

MSS. MSS. npomvei
;

with Cobet.

77- r)b\ovqi 80.

go. 92.

!
ff
:
:
:

\€

determined.
93.

\£\((
7€])
99. loi. 102.
94. upov

€^. ^^
:

cf. Flor.,
. .

in

which
:

7[«

:

SO
:

MSS.

. MSS.
MSS.
;

;


SO

6s is written
;

MSS.

above om. H. Cobet, H.
omitS

.

:

'.

^SS.

so Flor. Vat.

This

line is

whether the papyrus had es or «s in somewhat short even with the

96. ufXou

((([
:
:

^v MSS. 103. 104. oLvov olvov MSS. 106. so Mon. Angl.

? ]•. (.
;
: :

Mon. Angl., MSS. MSS. om. MSS. MSS. SO Mon. Angl., SO Flor. Mon. Angl.;
:

SO Flor.

(^, ,
11.

75 and 86 cannot be

7ro\vTf\evTfpov Others.

:

Up.

;

Flor. Mediol. Vat.

:

Kpepaaevoi Mediol. Vat.
fill

Thuan. Thuan.

MSS., but

this

does not sufficiently

the line.

107. 108. 109.

,
€(,
TTOTov
:

;

Flor. Vat. Mediol.,

H.

At

-;

^: TeMSS. om. MSS. om. MSS.

'

Praeposiiionem excidisse suspicen's' ^a.cohs.

instead of

the papyrus goes on to Ch. 9 of the ordinary text. which makes the line a little long.

no. in.

-2.
112.

2aTvpos
at the

for Ti before

have

11 6.

117. 120.
1

, ! (^
([]
end of
1.
:

^€\!

: £
'.

MSS., adding
Se

.

' ^

MSS. MSS.
;

! ((

Possibly ena was read

after

.

Cf.

11.

32-3.

omitting

20-1.

]^
The

:

€. MSS.

:

Boden's conjecture, which MSS. have
:

(,
MSS.

in. MSS.

cf.

^

;

there

would perhaps be room

a few lines lower, where

adopts,

is

but

this

confirmed, does not suit the

^

Mon. Angl.

MSS.

papyrus,

142
in
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

TO

was written in which is clear before eneivov. Since the finite verb As an alternative to the supplement adopted t required after the participle. may be suggested. 121. SO MSS. ; with Cobet.

(\

124.

\:
\
be
tibeV.

((\

/[][ €

1.

117, Si
|

«.

ius he elSep

MSS.

1251.

Cicero, In Verron
Pro
Caelio Fol.
i

II.

ii

AND Pro
22-4 cm.

Caelio.
Fifth century.

28-7

These fragments evidently belonged to the same MS. as 1097 part of a leaf from a papyrus book containing the end of the De Imperio Cn. Pompei and the beginning of the In Verrem II. i. The new pieces are fortunately both more A small fragment from the commenceextensive and of greater intrinsic value. ment of the Second Verrine is comparatively insignificant, but there are also considerable remains of two consecutive leaves from the Pro Caelio, a speech which is to the textual critic of unusual interest. For this oration the prime extant authority is a Paris MS. of the ninth century (P), from which are derived, perhaps with a few additions from other sources, three others of the twelfth or = the consensus of these). Numerous variants thirteenth centuries (e, g, h from another early MS., now lost, which was in the Cluny monastery, have been preserved, as Clark has recently shown {Anecd. Oxofi., Classical Series x, and the preface to his Oxford edition of the speech), in Parisinus 14749 (), and some extracts made by Bartolomaeus de Montepolitiano from the Cluny MS. have also survived (B). Thirdly, there are fragments of two palimpsests, at Milan (A) and Turin (T), which appear to have stood in close relation to the Cluny text (cf. Clark, Anecd. Oxon. x, introd. p. 29). We have thus two main streams of tradition, one represented by a Caroline MS. of early date, the other by a witness which was in all probability pre-Carolingian (Clark, ii/». «V., p. 17), and at any rate nearly allied to the old palimpsests, which go back to the fourth and fifth centuries. What is the relation between these and the papyrus ? A priori this might have been expected to show a strong affinity with arid
;

the palimpsests, but this expectation

is

realized only with considerable limitations.

As

is

so often seen in papyri of extant Greek authors, the text of 1251 proves to

be of a remarkably mixed character.
against
et copiose
tit

Of

the certain agreements with
1.
']

(or
P),
1.
1.

B)

and
1.

its

congeners, the more striking are
1.

probem (probabam

2

(om. P),

^o^facis

.

.

.

argtiis (om. P),

1.

' praeceps (praecipiti
1.

P),

107

(om. P),

140

libet (liquet P),

{labore fiendi P),

1.

1. 147 quoniani (quandam P), 1. 166 labor offendit On the other hand notable coincidences 171 nihilne {nihil P). 1.

with

against

occur in

28 ne {tarn ne ),

{paratos

),

1.

94 disce

{dissice

),

1.

117 aliqtta (alia

40 sed {verimi ), 1. ^y parasti 1. 120 dicendi {verba-

),

1251.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
1. !.

143

rum ),

prudentiae

146 iam {hoc ), 1. 154 quae vestra prudentia est {qiiae vestrae si 212 erat {fuit ), 219 ilia (alia ), 1. 229 ), 1. 167 hie (om. ), non (om. ). In 1. 22 the reading of P, habeat, is written above habet, the reading of . With regard to T, three readings hitherto peculiar to that MS. are found,
1.

1. 234 locisque {locisve), 1. 238 L. Luc{c)ei testimonium L. Luccei), but these are compensated by divergences in II. 97, 105, 112, In a few places, too, variants hitherto dependent on one or more of the 337. and the members of the group) are later authorities (the second hand of reproduced, 1. 25 de praevaricd^tione (e), 1. 75 acta (), 1. 8o tuis (^), 1. 99 In effregit (^), 1. 137 rei (eg), 1. 158 disputo (%), 1, 2oi L. Luc{c)ei (^). 1.

128 putaverunt {putabunt),

(test.

which have been emended by modern critics The readings peculiar to the papyrus Apart from the more obvious errors, of which there are singularly unimportant. is a fair sprinkling (cf. 11. 19, 23, 29, 35, 40, 47, 86, 103, 108, 144, 165, 172), they consist mainly of variations in the order of words (11. 18, 23, 26, 54, 85, 86-7, 95, 97, 97-8, 221-2) and omissions (11. 35, 47, 48, 74, 75, 94, 100, no, 134, 161 (?), 210). There remain 1. 15 ertiant (evertant), 1. 38 voluit (potuit, the MSS. reading, is
several others, traditional lections

reappear;

cf.

11.

3, 4, 38, 78, 83, 99, 209.

superscribed), 41 virtute (prudentia),

1.

51 mallet {malit),
(dide),
1.

nequaquam
1.

velis

(nequiquam velim),

1.

94 decede

1. 90 ac (atque), 1. 92 96 cessisse (decessissc),
1.

97 ista maledicta (tarn maledica),

1.

165 etiam (om. MSS.),
in
1.

205 in

(ob

, ad
by
its

P%), none of which carry conviction, though etiam
consideration.

165 might be worth

To sum up

these results, the text of the papyrus
;

is
is

not distinguished
it

accuracy, being especially prone to omission

neither

at all remarkable for

valuable readings
heterogeneousness.

unknown from other

sources.

Its salient characteristic is its

While sharing not seldom the excellences of , it has side by side with these a number of distinctive readings, some good, others bad, and occasionally carries back to the fifth century the tradition of still later authorities.

The high

antiquity of the bulk of the variants

is

the chief lesson of the papyrus.

A description of the script of this MS. has already been given in the introduction to 1097,

and

it is

closed

by the new fragments.
;

now only necessary to add a few palaeographical details disThe height of the leaf was there estimated at about

29 cm. and this is approximately the measurement of Fol. i, though the margins remaining at the top and bottom are probably not of the full depth, and the leaf may originally have been well over 30 cm. in height. Its breadth is rather
greater than was supposed in the case of 1097, being about 23 cm., while the column of writing has a width of about 1 7 cm. There is a considerable variation
in the length of the lines,

extent also at the beginnings

which are irregular not only at the ends but to some on the verso of Fol. i the column leans over
;

144

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
to the
left,

whereas on the recto there was apparently a strong The scribe was at surprisingly little pains about an even appearance, and would commence one line a couple of letters in front

markedly

tendency

in

the opposite direction.

of its predecessor. Owing to these irregularities, the point of division between two lines, when beginning and end are both missing, is often very uncertain. Another characteristic of the writer was a tendency to write a and ii above the line e.g. 11. 40, 42, 47, 64, 75, 78, 81, 160, 172, and 1097. 60 an instance which in the light of 1251 can now be understood. This suspension of a and ii is found in Latin cursive from the fourth century onwards, and was thence adopted by the A few abbreviations not already exemplified by 1097 national Latin hands. are found, the most noticeable being im for tanicn, tb for tibi, and ig- for igitur. It may be remarked that the spelling -es, not -is, is regularly used in the accusative This and other minor orthographical plural of /-stems of the third declension. details like adqite, inmensa are not, as a rule, noticed in the appended collation, for which the Oxford edition has been used, supplemented occasionally by that

;

'

'

of Baiter-Halm.

hi Verrem IL
Recto.
r{e\i frumentariae CaAtaginc deleta
\

ii.

Verso.

\

§3

pof'uerit
\ ]

q\jii

§12
fyum

\

propngnatore[s\^>
appareret
]

qiio^ victoria p'^^ R\>
co^nloca\ret

Ti

provinc\iani
]

>n\i\nd(ri

Compared with
Carthagine.

Peterson's

text,

the

only

variant

is

the

spelling

Car\tagine

for

Pro
Fol.
\iio ilia silves\tris a?iie [es]t
1.

Caelio.

Recto.

{\nsiituta qiia??! hiimanitas adq> leges si quideni
§

h

inodo noniina de
\fertint inter] se sodales scd eti[avi

26
tit

covnnemorant sodalitatem

in accusattdo

ne quis id
[forte 7iescid<t timere videatnr [scd haec o?nitto] a\d ilia quae

me

>nagis

move§ 27

rnnt re
[spondeo delici\arum obiiirgatio
^

fnit longa

e]t

ea t\enior plusq> disputationi^

hdbuit qudSm

1351.
S

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
{atte\jiti[zis
]

145

[ati'ocitatis]

quo etiani audita e
gravissime

[P.

Clodms amiais ni^us

<\ji\m se

\veheiit\enf^ss\imeq> iactaret et oiiin\ia {\nflamma{itis ageret tristissiniis vifbis

voce

[maxt\jna tametsi probem

ems eloquentiam tqmen
f^
q[ii\tem

\iion

pertimescebam aliquot\

enim in causis
\euvi\

[

viderani frusira litiganteSjii
[pre]cario si lice\t

Balbe [respondeo priimi\m

\si

fas] est defendi a
sttmpserit qui

me

etim q[ui nullum con^viviuvi i\nierit qui ung\ienta

10

[Baias vi\derit

equid' multos e[t vidi in hac civit\ate et [audivi] np[n
[

modo
§ a8

q^ui priinoribus labris

\gusta\s sent genus hoc vita[e et extremis ui] dicif^iir digiti]s ai\tigisseni se\dqui

totam adu
\lesce\ntiam voluptatib• d\edissent emersiss^ aliqu\a7ido etse

ad bonam f\rugem
omni^nn huic
quae
si it\a

ut dicitur rece\pis
[segravesq>] homines [atq>i]nlust{res fuisse\datiir en{im concessit
aliqui
\ludtis aetat{\ et ip\s\a ita[turd\prof{u7idii adule\scentiae cu\piditates

erumpunt nt
15

[nullius

vitam lab]ef[acte]nt [nullitts] dovium eruant [faciles
Solent

et tolerabiles hd\beri

[sed iu\

mihi vid\ebare ex communi infarn\iq iuventutis ali[qnam invidiam
§

Caelio ve[\le con

29

flare itaq> p[mne ilhtd silentium quo\d e orationi tr\ibutum tuae fuit ob
catc\sam

eam

quod
reo

uno proposit\o

de multorum vitiis co]gitabamtis [facile est accusare

htxurie]m dies iam

me
20

confociat si [qu^ae \dici in
cor]rtiptelis [de]

eam

senten\tiam pos^tcnt coner expromere de

\adi{l\ter[iis'\

d[e p\oter\yitate de s^umpiib'
[. .]

inmensa

o\ratio est ut tibi

reum

nemineni] sed vitia
\prop\o7ias res

tm ipsa

et copiose

et

graviter accusari pote\st sed vestrae

sapiefttiae iud> est

\abduci ab reo nee] quo[s ac]uleos habet severitas grav[itasq> vestra

cum

eos

accusator erexerit
[in

rem

in vitia in] mpr[e]s in tempore in honiinem et in re[um emittere

cum

is

suo crimine sed

mul
it[aq>

[torum vitio
it a

sit in

quo]ddam odium iniustum vocatus

ego severitati tuae
§

ut opor

30

L

146
35
{tct

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
responder^
veii\i\am
\g>

audeo erat enini

meum

de praevaricd\tione adulescentiae

petere non inqiiam

aude^

perfugiis utor aetatis concessa [o]mn[il>us

i]t([ra

d]imiUo tant^im
[peto

ut si qua e invidia coi}i\niunis hoc tempore aeris alieni peiulantiae

libidimmi
[tutis

iu{ve7t\

quani video ee
vitia

magn]am ne
Ji\aec

tmic aliena peccata ne aetatis ac temporitm

\noceant aiq> ego idem qui

postulo quae in criminib• quae in hunc proprie

feruntur
30

[diligentissime respondeani
quib•
[adq•

rec]uso sunt

autem duo crimina

aiiri et

veneni in

una

\Clodiae daretur dicitur

eadem persona versatur a\urum sumptum a Clodia venenum quesitum quod omnia sti\nt ialia Ti crimina sed maledicta iurgii
petulantis

{magis quani publicae quaestionis a\iulter inptidicus sequester convicium c non
accusatio

{nullum e enim fimdamentum ho]ru7n criminum nul\l]ae sedes voces sunt
contumeliosae
35

\temere

ab

irato

accusatore

emis]so

horum

duorum

criminum

video
§ 31

fofitem
\video auctorem video

certum nome]n

et cap\ii\t

auro opus fuit sumpsit a Clodia

sumpsit sine
[teste

habuit quamdiu voluit

maximum

vi^eo signum ctiiusdam egregiae
I

familiari
[tatis

necare eandem voluit quaesivit] venenum sollicitavit quos ^'^^^I^iit

paravit
[locum constituit attulit magmivi ru]rsus odium video ctcm crudelissimo discidio
exstisse

40

\res c

omnis in hac causa nobis iud> cu\m Clodia vmlieri non solum
etiam nota de q^*a

nobili sed

[ego nihil

dicam

nisi depellendi crimin]is causa sed intellegis pro tua praestanti

virtute
[Cn.

Domiti cum hac
dicit si

sola

rem

ee ii^bis

quae

si

Jj]] se

aurum

Caelio

§ 32 commodasse

venen^^m
ee

[ab hoc sibi

paratum

non ar\^i{\t petulanter facinms
post[u]lat

si

matrcm familiam

secus

quam
sa7icti\tc^^s\

[matronarum
crimen

nominamus

sin ista muliere remota nee

1251.
45
till[icin'\

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
illis

147

nee opes

ad opp{u]guaiid{u]m Caelium
tit

reUnqmin\t\tir g{uid e ali]tid

quod nos patroni
facer e debeainus nisi
vehementiiis
nisi inter^edYrent inimicitiae ctim isiis mulieris viro

eos qui insectantnr repellaimi{s qu\gd g[iddcin faceyeni

fra[trem volui dicere
et

s\emper hie er\rd\ n^hic
[again inodice nee long\i\ti^ \prog\rediar qttam

mea fid[es

causa ipsa coget

nee enim mtdicbres i]ni
[micitias

mihi gerendas puta]vipraesertim cum ea q[uam onmes sejnper amicam
cuiusqiiam inim{icci\m putavertmt- se\d tamen ex ipsa quaeram
tiirtim

omnitwt]
50

potius

quam
prius
illo

me

secu]m

severe et gravitcr et prisce age[re] mallet

an remiss\e

et leniter et

§ 33 urbane sin

austero more ac\

modo

aliqiiis

mihi ab

inferis excitandus est ex ba{rbatis

illis

non hae barbula

qua

ista delceta

\tur sed ilia horrida qud\ni in statuis antiquis adq[> imaginibus

videmus qui

obiurget mulierem
[et

qui pro

me

loquatur ne

i)iih]i

forte ista suscenseat [exsistat igitur ex hae
[capiet qui

ipsa familia aliqtds
S5

[ae

potissimum Caecus

ille\

minim[u\m ettim dolorem
fb

istam non

videbit qui profeeto si
[exstiterit sic aget

ac sic l]oqueiu[r ni\ulier quid

eu[m Caelio quid cum homine

adulescejitido

[quid

cum

alieno cur aut i\am [familia\ris huie fuis[ti ut aurtim

commodares
Ti

aut tam ini
[mica ut venenuni timeres no\n pd\treni tuuni\ videra[s

patruum

avum

proavum atavum audieras
[consules fuisse

h deniq> mod]o

te [Q.

Mete\lli

matJ^monium

tenuisse sciebas
§

clarissimi ac
60

34

[fortissimi viri patriae]q> ama[ni]issimi qui sim[td ac pedem limine extiderat

omnes prope
[cives virttde

gloria digni\tate superabat cum [ex amplissimo genere infamiliam

Claris

[sintam nupsisses cur

tib]i

Caelius

tam coniunctus

[fidt cognatus affinis viri tui

familiaris nihil

[eorum quid igitur fidt nisi] quaedam temeritas

«[i libido

nonne

te si

nostrae

imagines viriles h com
[movebant ne progenies qiddem] me'^ Qui^itta
laudis in
ilia

C]laudi[a

aenmlam domestic ae

L 2

148
65

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
{gloria vtuliebri esse admo\nebat [non vir\go[{\ll\a Vestalis Claudia quae patrem

complexa \triumphantem ab inimico ir]
vitia
\ii21s

pl•

de [airru detrain passa h est cur

te

frater na

po
et avita] et usq> \a nobis

qnam bona paterna

cum

in viris turn in feminis

repetita moverjcnt ideone ego pacem

\Pyrrhi diremi uttu
addiixi

amorum

tu'\rpissiin{or2iin cotidie foederafcrires idea

aquain

[ut ea tu inceste uterere ide\o

via[m munivi ut earn tu alienis viris comitata
§

celebrares sed

35

Verso.
70

\quid ego iud>

itagravem personam indjixi ut verear ne se idem Ap]pius repente co\nvertat et Caelium [incipiat accusare ilia sua gravitate censoria sed videro hoc p]osterius adq> ita
iud[>

ut vel severissimis

d[iscept]ato[ribus

M-

Caeli vitain

me prob]atur{um

ee\

cp[nfida]m pi vero vtulier

i[am enijn ipse tecum
Jiulla pc{r]sona [introducia loqiior si

ea qu]ae facis qjiac d[icis] qtiae insimilas

quae moliris qu\ae arguis

probare co[gitas rationem tantae fam\pj]iariiatis tantac consuetudinis reddas
a[dq> exponas
75

necesse es\t accusatores
f?

quidem

l\ibidities

ad\ii\lt\eri\a

Bai'^s

acta convivia

[

cgmf^ssationes

cantus s[y]mp[honia\s nay[igia
dicere quae [tu

iactaii\t

idemq> significant nihil se

t\f

invita

quoniam
iudicitiinq> voluis-

mente nescio qua effrenata adq[> pra\eceps inf\orum deferri
t[i\

au[t diluas oportet
neq-> [crimiiti]

aVt falsa esse doc{eas aut nihil]
ee fateare s[in

tuo [neq> tcstimonio c\redendHm
§ 3*5

urbanius
80

me

[agere

autem mavis si^

a^am

tec\uiii

re\movebo illu]m senem

durum

ac

paene agrestem
ex his igitur
qui
te

tu[is

sumam

aliquem ac potissimti\m min[imum fratrem] qui est
propter] 'nescio

[in is]to

gene[re urbanissimus

amat plu[rimum qui
nd\cturnos qtiosdam ina

q'"am [credo timidi]tat[em

e]t

nes metus [tec]u[m seniper pusio
loqui quid
tic

cum

m]aiore sorore cubif^avit eu]m[putato tecum

1351.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

149

multn\aris soror quid insanis quid clci\more exorsa ve}\bis parvam facts viciiitim
adulesce\iitulum aspexisti candor huius
t\e

rem magnam

et proceritas v\oltus oculiq> peptc-

lerunt saepius videre
85

voluisii [ficisti

numquam

i?i

isdeni hortis] vis nmlier n{obilis ilium filium

fainilias patre parco et

tenaci h\abere tuis copiis devincium iipotes] calciat r\esp\uit
f[?

\ptitat

tua dd\nq

tanti confer alio

tc hab\es hortos

ad Tiberim

ac diligenter] eo loco parasti quo omnis ncbe\]i\tus

\jiatandi causa vetiit

hinc

li\cet condicio7ies cotidie

legas cur] huic qui te spernit molesta e\s redeo

nunc ad
-J\icissim

te Caeli

ac viihi auctoritatem patrid\in scveritatemq-> suscipio sed

patrevi potissiintini
90
s[ii]7n[am

\

§ 37

quem

inihi

Caecilianumne aliquem] vehevientem ac durtim nunc en\im demuni animus ardet
infelix
sceleste ferrei
stiii\f\ i\s\ti

\nunc metim cor cuvmlattir ira aut i\llum
p[atres egone quid dicam

[quid velim quae tu omnia tuis foed]is facis ut

nequaquam

velis vix fe[re}tdi

\
95

diceret talis pater ciir
in i\st\am v\icinitatem iner]eiriciain contulisti cur inlecebris [cognitis
refugisti cur

alienam
ac disce per

ullam inulier[e]m

n[os]ti decede

me

si egebis fb dolebit \mihi sat est

,

qui aetatis quod reliqu
est oblectem

meae huic seni

[[a]]

tristi

ac derecto responderet C[aelius se
§
i[a]ctti[r]a

nulla cupiditate inductum

38

de via ^^^ci^ssise quid signi mdli sumptus nulla

nu[lla verstira at

fuit fama quoins
quisq> istam potest efftigere in ista maledicta civitat[e vicinum
eitts

midieris

male audisse
miraris cuius

frater

gervianus sermones iniquorum \effugere non potuit

lent

vero et dementi

patri cuius modi ilk est fores effregit restituentur di[scidit vestem resarcietur filii causa est
100

expcditissima quid enim esset in quo se facile defe[nderet nihil

iam

in istam

muliercm

dico sed si esset

aliqua dissimilis istius quae se omnib' pervo[l]garet \quae haberet palam decre-

tum semper aliquem
cuius in hortos doinum Baias hire suo libidines

omn\ium co\miH\earent quae

etiam aleret

150

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
adulescentes et parsimonia patnim sui^s sti\mp(^b• suste\nt\arct si vidua libere

proterva petu
lanter dives effuse libidinosa meretricio
si qnis
105

more

v\ivere\t

ad\idterum ego putarem
tu\a discip^f^ia sic tu
§

hanc
dicet
aliqtiis

paido liberius salutasset
instiUiis adidescentes

haec

ig.

c

39

ob hanc causain fb hunc puerum parens covimendavit

\et tr\qdi\dit\ n\t

in

amore

adq> in voluptatihis
adulescentiavi

suam

collocaret et ut han\c\ tu vitdytn d\dq\> hd\e[c studia de-

fenderes ego si quis
iud> hoc robore

respueret

animi adq> omnes

hq.ec indole virtutis

adi^

con\tiii\e\iitiac

fuit ut

vobiptates ovinemq> suae vitae

cursum in labore corporis
ii

«[</]?[>

in

animi

contentione conficeret

no quern

quies
nisi

remissio
esset

h aequalium studia

ludi

co7ivii{{\q [delectarent

quod

cum

Iqude et

cum

aignitate coniunctum htuic

mea sententia d{\yi\n\is quibusdam

bonis instnictum

adq> ornatum p{uto ex

hoc']

genere illosfuisse arbitror Camillo[s\ Fab[ricios

Curios omnesq> eos qui

hae ex minim\is tantd\fe{cer]tmt
in morib' nostris

verum haec genera viriu[ium non solum
§

40

sed vix iam in

li\bris

reperiuntiiy chartae quoq> quae illam \pristinam sever i-

tatem continebant
115

[obsoleverti]n[i neq>

sohim apud nos qui h\anc sectam ration\emq> vitae re magis

quam

verbis secuti

[sumtis sed etiaui aptid Graecos docti]ssimos homines quib' [cum facere 7ion

possent loqui tam.en et
[scribere honcste et magnifice licebat] aliq[ii\a

quaedam [mutatis Graeciae tempo-

ribus praecepta ex
[stiterunt itaq> alii voluptatis causa o\mn\i\a sapieiites fac[e]re d[ixei'unt neq> ab

hac orationis
\ittrpitudi7te

§ 41

eruditi homines

refugeruii\t

alii

cum

voUtptate

d[ignitatem

conitmgen
120

[dam putaverunt ut res maxime
coniungerent
[illud

inter

se

r\epugnantes dicendi fq[cultate
labore qui probaberu\iit prope soli

unum
iam

derectum

iter

ad laudem cu\m

in scholis

[sunt relicti nmlia

enim nobis blandime\nta natura

if^sa g]enuit [quib• sopita

virtus coniveret

1251.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
ilia insistere

151
ant

[interdnm multas vias adtilescenti\ae liibricas \ostendi\t q[uib•
ingredi
[sine casti aliquo

ac prolapsione vix p\ossei jmdi[arum

r-erii\ni

[iucundissimariwt

varieta
125

\tein

dedit qua oh

modo haec aetas sed etiam ia\m
si

corr\oborata\ cap\eretiir

quam
§ 43
tillo

rem

quern
odore

[forte inveneritis qtii aspernetus ocul\is pulchritu\di}i\fm \reruni

h

tactu
[fi

sapore capiatur excludat aurib' omii\em suavitat\e\m hn\ic homini egofortasse
et pauci

[deos propitios pleriq>

autem

iratos pu\taverunt

ergo [haec deseria via et

inctdta
[adq> interclusa

aetati sit
130
[lesceiitia

iam frondib• et vir\gtdtis rer^n\qttatur detur aliqui ludiis adu omnia voluptatib' de\ne[g\en[iur liberior se\rnper [superet vera
derecta

ilia et

[ratio vincat aliqzia?ido ctipiditas voluptasq> r]ation[em dtim

modo

ilia in

hoc

genere
[praescriptio moderatioq> teneatur parcat iuve]nius [pudicitiae suae ne spoliet

alie?iam
[ne effundat patrimonhim

nefaenore trucidetur\ ne

i7t[currat in alterius

domum

adq>

[familiam ne probrum
insidiis scelere

castis

labem integris infani^am b[onis inferat ne intersit

Fol. 2.
135

Verso.

[careat postremo
aetatis
[adq>

cti\nt

par[uerit vohiptatib' de\derit [aliquid temporis

ad ludum
ad

ad

i\nanes

[Jiasce\

adidesc\e\n[tiae cupiditates

r\e'iJ^cet se

aliquando

cur\qrn rei do
[mest]icae rei forensis rei p>
abiecisse
ttt

eq qii[ae ratione antea h perspexerat saiiet\ate

[expe]riendo contempsisse vide[at\tr a[c multi et iiostra et patruni

maiorumq>
§

memoria

iud>

su]mmi ho

43

\min\es et clar[i]ssimi cives fue[rii\nt

quorum [cum

adulescentiae] ciif^ditci\tes

[def\rvissent
140

iam aetate exti[terunt ex quib• neniinem mi\ki lib[et] nominare i^s\met vobiscum recordamini nolo e[nim cuiusquam forties adq> inh{^tri]s
e[xi\miae virtutes firmata
vir[i]

ne

152

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[min\imum qd erratum cum maxi[ma laude
vellern vi^Hti

coniiingere\

quod

si

facere

a [m]e sjimmi adq> ornatissim[i
liber
\td\^

viri praedicarentur

quo\rum pd^tim

ii\imia

in adulescentia partim p[rofusa luxuries] mag\itit\udo a[eris alieni stt\mptib'
libi

145

[difi^s

nominarentur quae m[tdtis postea viriui\ibus obiecta adulesceniid\e qui
vellet

e[xc]usa(ione defcnde\ret\ at ver[o in

M•

Caelio dicd\m enivi i\am confidentiti^
§

de studiis
e[iu\s \h''pne{stis]

44

quo7iiam \aude\g qu{aedam fretti\s vestra s{apientia libere

confiterY nidla
\luxuries reperietur n\ulli \sump]ttt[s fmllu\m aes alienum [nulla conviviorum ac

lttstro\rum
\libido

quod qd> vitium ventris
sed etiam d\uget

et gurgitis n\

mode

ti

minS^dt aetas hominib'

150

\amores autem et deliciae quae vocanf^ir quae fyirmiore auimo praeditis
diut\ius

[molestae

Ti

solent ee

mature enim

et ceVfriter de[florescunt

numquam kunc
antea
§

oc\:u

[patum impeditumq> tetmerunt

aud]isti[s

c]um pro

se [diceret audistis

cum

a]ccu

45

[saret defendendi haec causa
cop\iani

]

gloriandi loquor [geims orationis facidtatem
perspexistis adq> in

\sententiarum adq> verborum q]uae vestra pruden\tia
eo
155

e]s[t

solu]m
v\ide[b]atis

[ingenium elucere eius
tainen
[suis virib•

quod saepe etiam

si in[dusiria

aliiur valet

ip^i\m

sed i?ierat nisi]

me

\p\ropter be7iivolentiam f\orte fallebat ratio et

bonis artib•]
[instituta et cur\a et [v]igiliis elaborata

atqui

sci[tote iud>

eas cupid\i-

tates

[quae obiciunttir Caelio d\dq> {ha'^c studia de quib' disputo

facile in \eo\d\em

h]omine
[ee

posse fieri enim cupidate

po\tes «[i d\ninms libidini deditus ainore dei^^derio

160

[saepe

nimia copia inopia] et[ia]m h nu[mq]uam inpeditus hoc quidquid
nos facim^^s
et]ia[m c]ogita[nd]o possit stistinere

est

quod

[non

modo agendo verum causam

an vos aliam
§

46

1251.
[esse

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
i]n

153
tanta
voluptate

nllam putatis cur
dic\e\ndi

[iani]is p[rae])nif[s]

eloquentiae

[iania laude tanta gratia ian]to honor e tarn sint paitci semper q> fuerint qui
in hoc

[labore

versentiir
delectationis

obtere]n[dae

su]ni

omnes

voltiptates

reliqitenda

stndia

165

\hidti.s

ioeus

convivium

s\fr\ino es\t paene

etiam familiar um descrendiis- qua re
ingenia

in hoc

\£enere labor offendi\t h\ovii\nes a sl[ud]ioq> [d]eterret non quo aut
def[i\fian[i^

[aut doctrina piieril\i[s

an

h\ic s\i\ se [is]ti vita[e d'^disset cpits[nlarem\

homi§

nem ad [modum adulescens
st[rictus

47

i]n [iudict\um vo[ca\visse[t\ hie si lab[o]r[cm fugeret] si o[b]-

[yoluptatib- teneretur in ha]e
citias in
lyo

a[c\ie

eo[ti}flie

v[er\saretur

q[ppeteret ini\m[i-

[indicium vocaret subirei pe\r\i\eulu[vi\ eapit[is] ipse insp[ectante p>

R>

tot

iam

menses aut
[de salute

aut de gloria dimiYaret [nih]iln[e i]g- ilia vic[initas redolet nihilnc hominuvi [fama nihil Baiae deniq> ipsae loqiiu]nt[ur] illae \ve\ro loq'"a[ntur solum verum
etiam
[personant hue unius mtdieri\s lih[id\inem
solitudinem
[ac tenebras adq>
\ee\

prolapsa[m nt ea
q[uaerat sed in

modo
ttirpis-

haec flagii{\orii[m' i]ntegu[m]enta
c[ld\rissima

simis
175

[rebus

frequentissima
si quis

cele]br[i]i[a]te

et

l[uce

laetetur

verum § 4°
est

[est

qui
ille

etiam
qui

meretrieiis

am]pr[ib•

i]nter[dic]tum

iu[ventuti putet

[dem valde severus negare h p\os[suvi\ sed
licen
[tia

a[bh'\prrei

[modo ab

huitts saeeidi

vertim etiam a

maiorum

cu\ns[ueiuYiti[e a\dq> eon[cessis

quando enim hoe
ttt

factum
non
180
lice

e

[quando reprehensum quando
hie ego
relin

permissicm q]uan[do] deniq> [fuit

quod licet
in

[ret

iam rem definiam vudierem n]tdlam [nominabo tantum
mtpta mtdier

medio

[quam

si

quae

domum suam pate\feeerit pin[nium

cjcpiditati

palamq>

§

49

154
[sesc

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
in

meretricia

vita

conlocarit

viront\m

aliettiyssiiuontni

conviviis

uii in
\stituerit si hoc
si deniq>
[ita

in iLrbc si in hortis si in Ba\iarn\in ilia celebritate faciat

sese

gerat

incessii

solum sed ornatn

adq>

c\oviii'\atn

h flagrantta
navigatione

oculorum
iS5

[libertate

scrmomim sed etiam complexu

osc\ulatio[ne

actis

convi
[viis

ut

solum viereirix sed etiam protervd\ in\eretrix procaxq> vidcatur cum
hac
si

[qtii

adulescens forte fuerit

utrum

hie tibi

L• H\e\fenni adulter an amator

expugnare
\pudicitiam an explere libidinem voluisse v\id\cat2ir

Fol.
\s7int

2.

Recto.

enim criviina tma

i]n

mu\liere

summoriim
eiusdem

fa\cing[rttm

auri quod
§ 51

sump turn
200
[a

Clodia

dicitur

et

veneni\

qif^od

Clodiae]

neca[ii\dae

[c\au^a

parasse Cae
[[i]unt

[criniinantur

aurum

s\uin\psit

tit dicitis]

quu[d L•] Lucci servis da\ret]

pe\r quos Ale

xandrinu[s Dio qui turn apiid Luceium habitabat] ne\caret]urinagnum crim[en
vel in
legat\is insidid\ndis [vel in servis

ad hospite\vi \do\mini n[ec]andnin
t\u

solli\c\iiandis

p\lenum

see

le[ris co]nsili[um]

plenu[m audaciae quo qd
[

crimine primum illud r^quiY\o\
§

dixeritne Clodiae
205

5*

qu[a]m in rem
eodcin se

aurum

[stimeret

an
tune

dixcr\it si

dixit ctir dedit si dixit

C07iscientiae scelcrc devinx[it

aurum

ex]

armario tuo proviere ansa

es

tu

Venerem
ceteror\nm

illani spolia[re or]ttamenti[s spoliatricem

cum

scires

quantum ad

/acinus

aunim

h\oc quaerere\pir q[d ne\cein {legati

ad L• Lucei
mens

s\anctissimi hominis

adq> integerrimi
labeni ^celeris sempite\r7ii huic fqc\inori tanto tud\
liberalis conscia tua

domus
210

popidar\is minis tr a tua d\eniq> /ios[piialis ilia Ve]nus ad[iutri]x ee deb\iiit
vidit hoc Balbus
§

]

53

1251.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

cel\atam ee Clodiam dixit] adq> ita
l\udoru\in

€\

155

adi\llam

\ati\nlisse se

qd p{r]nai[um
vis

a[urum quaerere
m[2dia
dicis

si iani fd\miliaris era[i Clodiae

quain

tii\

c\J'

cum de
Ti

libidi\ne e{\iis tain

dixit

pro\fecto

quo

v[ellet

atirum

si

tarn

familiar\is

er\at

d\edit ita si

verum
e

tibi Caeliii\s dixit \o

ivnnoderata mtdier sciens

t\u ajirttm

q\dfaci
215
nSjis

dedisti si
crimijii

misus dicere\

dedi\sti

quid ego nunc argumentis huic
[dicere

[quae sunt innumerabilia re]sistam

possum

mores

M•

Caeli longis-

sime
\a

tanti

sceleris

atrocitate

ee

di\siunctos

mitiime ee

c\redendum

hoviini

tarn in

[genioso

tamq> prudenti h v\enisse in mentem rem

\t\a7i\ti

sceleris ignotis

alie
\iiisq>

servis

Ti

ee credendd\m' possiun etiavi ilia et c[e]te[r\gru\in

patronorum

et

mea
aao

con

[suetudine ab accusatore] perquirere ubi sit congressus

cum servi[s Lucei

Caelius

qui ei
fu\erit aditus] si per se

qua temeritate

si per alitim per [quern

possum ovines
conscius

suspi

cio[nu\m [la\tebras peragrare dicendo h causa h

t\ocii\s

h [facidtas

h perfi
ciendi

occultandi maleficii spes
reperietur

ratio ulla

v[estigiujn

maximifacinoris

sed haec quae sunt oratoris propria quae [mihi
propter
325

propter ingenium

meum
§

sed

54

hanc exercitationem ustimq> a me

dicend[i\

fructum [aliquem ferre

potuissent

cum

ipso elaborataproferri viderentur bre[vitatis causa relinquo

omnia

habeo enim iud> quern vos socium vestrae re[ligionis iurisq> iurajidi facile patiamini L- Luceiipn sanctissimum grqv[issim\iim [qui tanium facinus in

\

famam
\iri\

adq>
audisset [i\n[la\tum [\ Cqel[io ne]q[> neglexisset neq>
«,.

fortunas suas neq>
tulisset

an
adq> doctrina

230

[ilk vir i\ll\a huvi\anitate p[raeditji\s illi[s studiis ariit

illius

ipsius

[periciilum quern propter] haec ip[sa s\tttdia [diligebat neglcgere potuisset et

quod

156

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
2 lines lost.

234

\neglegeret

quod

in agris] locisq> p{ublicis
3 lines lost.

237

\ipsms iurati religione\m auc\tor\itqt\eviq> percipite adq>
testi
[tnojiii

oiimia

diligenter
§

55

verba cog7ioscitc recitd\ L[• L]i(cei testim[oniiem
3 lines lost.

quid expectatis

{amplius an aliquani vocem] putati\s ip]sam p[ro se

\exinimica ex infavii ex c\nideli ex facin[erosa ex libidinosa domo domus autem
ilia qtiae tern

345

\ptata ee scelere isto nefdfi\o\ dic\itur ai letters [ ] [

Fragments.
I.

Recto.

3.

Recto.

3.

Verso.

\nestis\
]~[

]_««[
]

]a«[
]?';«[

ho\

]

? \unt

[
.

^V'^
.\
]«[
]«.4

d

3.

Recto.

3.

Verso.

4.

Recto.

4.

Verso.

]..[
\im\

]/."[

]..'['
]
.

\•
]"[
];-«[

]«[
]
.

e{
.

\m\

ck[

]i7

...

\.U.{
\-et.\
]•."•[

...
]«[
]/
.

[

....
3.

[

videaiur

The
omiflo 2.
4.
7.

so videanlur Abram, C{lark). a supposed to belong to ad may well be assigned to oviiltam, the reading of
:

;

;

e\l

ea

:

so
:

;

e/ eo

Kayser, e/iam C.

has alienior for

lenior.

9.

probem so 2; probabam other MSS., C. That the papyrus agreed with Seg in reading

inierii is uncertain,

but the shortness

1251.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
is

157
hS,
re-

of the letter after coTi^ivium
minierit P.

in

favour of i as against r

;

renuerit C. with

qui in horiis fuerit, which
evidently omitted as in
1 2.

.

is

added by Donatus before qui unguenla sumpserit, was
better than d\edidisseni {K5ctn%. 3, C.).

(i[edissent

(^&) suits the size of the lacuna much
:

bonam f\ugem frtigem bonani MSS.
15. ertcant:

everiani
:

MSS.
MSS.
But possibly
reo

18. proposif\0 reo

reo proposilo

The 19. confociat is a curious corruption oi deficiat. in the subjunctive as against the deficiet of to support
30. ipsa 21.
"

.

was omitted altogether. papyrus may, however, be taken

added by 2

after vHia \ista C.)
is

seems

to

have been omitted, as in

.
and the

The

abbreviation of lamen

uncertain, the stroke above being lost

m

especially not clear.
et copiose:

so 2 ; om. iud{ices) est: the traditional order
22. habet, as originally written,
is

-.

is

confirmed;

est iudices

Halm.

the reading of 2, habeat

;

an a has apparently

been added above the

line in darker ink. In the accepted text emiitere precedes iii hominem. 23. tempore: 1. tempora. 24. That the papyrus agreed with 2 in inserting ego and reading ita ut oportet [ut is of course uncertain. oportet ita That 5oe {prev.\deprecationemg• deprecari vacationemY , 25. de praevaricc^tione

)

:

C

the papyrus had depraevaricari for deprecari is less likely. 26. 7i{pji) perfugiis perfugiis non Yni, perfugiis nihil 2, C. tarn 2, iamen Wrampelmeyer, C. 28. In omitting tamen the papyrus agrees with
:

;

29. quae in criminib{us)
talia

:

1.

quitt criminib(iis).

32. ut (2) may well have been omitted, as in PttS. so 2 ; alia other MSS. C, ilia Ernesti. petulantis the final letter, if it was written, has almost entirely disappeared
: :

;

perhaps

it

was omitted. 34. There

was the reading of the (2, C.) not nulla papyrus, for though the e is indistinct, nulla does not fill the space. The ordinary reading is ab irato accusa35. The text was apparently corrupt here. This, however, is much too long for iore (arbitratu accusatoris ^•) nullo audore emissae. the lacuna, and the homoeoteleuton may easily have caused the loss of nulla auctore ; and Possibly an attempt at construction was made by the ]ji) is clear where '^ae is expected.
is
little

doubt that nullae

()

omission of ab. 35-6. fonteni [video auctorem

auctorem video fontem C. with 2. so ; 38. The alteration of voluit to potuit was apparently made by the original scribe. C. adopts Bahrens's servos, voluit being unattested elsewhere. potuit is the reading of
:

,
1.

potionem for quos potuit. 39. The reading of
C. restores clam attulit. Jirf 40. \. muliere.
41. virtute
lineated
is
:

completely
exstitisse.
is

fills

the lacuna

;

2 has quam before locum, whence

also

found in
final

;

wri<»2 C. with 2

and Quintilian.
an
inter-

prudentiaWSS. 43. Whether a mark above the
:

m

oi familiam

is

rightly interpreted as

45. Caelium

very doubtful ; familias MSS. Caelium 2, C. so apparently the papyrus, with ; 46. qu]od q[uidem: or perhaps q]uod [q{ui)d{em),\vilh a space after repellamu[s. mihi, which the MSS. add after intercedere?it, is omitted. 47. istis is a slip for istius.

.

48.

mea

:

me mea MSS.

158

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

muliehris umquam is the ordinary reading, but this seems to be too much for the lacuna, and some omission is likely, the space at the beginning of the next line being sufficiently It is fairly certain that inihi did not precede filled by the words in their usual order.
inimiciiias as in 2.

49. cum ea 51. viallet:
54.

:

om.
is

Quintilian.

gui (2) after e/, but the papyrus may have agreed with in omitting it. hla fork MSS. /brie is/a huius 2B, om. Severianus, C. 57. hide: so 58. Considerations of space make it likely that the papyrus was here in agreement with 2B have non proavum non ataviim non ; non proav. non abavum non aiav. C. The line is abnormally long even with the omission of etiarn, which is the only 67. word that can well be spared. It is thus pretty clear that the papyrus had no longer verb than vioverunt, which has been suspected. arguis so '^k?•^''• {quae before moliris om. b'', quae insiviulas om. ''); 73. facis om. V''-; facis quae dicis quae in sororem iuam moliris quae argum.entaY\l•. Halm's conarguis as a pannus intolerabilis ' constructed by homines Itali out demnation olfacis was not happy. of the reading of 74. The papyrus omits laniae coniunctionis which the MSS. read before reddas. libidines amores MSS. If quidem was abbreviated qd, amores may have 75. i\ibidi7!es

There
:

MSS. room for

.

;

.

.

.

:

'

'

.

.

.

'

:

preceded
acta

libidines.
:

so

;

actas P, C.

At the end
interlineated.

of the line

some

alternative for or correction of comissationes

was apparently

77. prd^ceps so 78. aut 80. his igitur
:

82.
telligible

Above

praecipiti others, C. ; ac C, with Halm. so PVS ; om. tuis P', oi cii^i there the supposed
:

and may be due
: ;

83. cla\more: so 85. vis so P', C.

; / ;.
so 2
:

C,
is

istis tuis

Madvig.
is

m

a

mark

rather like an a, but this

unin-

to accident.

clamorem Ribbeck, C.

visa

mulier n\obilis
86. calciat:
\.

:

nobilis mulier

MSS.
which has
calcilai.

cakilrat;

cf.

P',

The remains

in the line are doubtfully identified, but the omission of repellit esse dona is the order of probable,

.

() after respuil

of letters further on appears

86-7.

alio] te: te alio

MSS.
For the spelling
iube\)t\tus ci.
1.

87. parasti: so
probaberii\nt.

P; praeparasli irh, paraios 2B, C.

121

90. ac

91.
uncertain.
92. 93. 94.

atque MSS. The line is sufficiently
:

and was removed by Spengel
:

;

without egone, which is repeated by but that egone was omitted in the papyrus
filled

is

before quidvelim of course wholly

nequaquam velis nequiquam velim MSS. a&waw, which 2 omits, apparently stood in the papyrus. decede dide MSS. (dede P'', dideae g, dii deae e).
: :

disce dissice 2 Puteanus, C. so per me per me licebit P, per me licet others, per me iibi licet Francken, C. The termination of dolebit is doubtful, the b especially being questionable.
;
:

The

1251.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

159
At the end

following lacuna is well filled without Francken's addition fton mihi after dokbii. of the line the division of reliqutim is curious, but there is no known variant. 95. sent trisH ac derecto iristi ac derecto seni MSS.
:

96.

1.

ce'ssisse

:

decessisse

MSS.
. . .

in /am); quisque esi quiT. 97. guisqiue): so C. with BPVe (P^ omits Ji? nulla palest effugere praeserliyn effugere polesl 2B, effugere potesl other MSS. ; effugere potest, praeseriim C, effugere possit Halm.
:

ista maledicta

tarn maledica MSS. ; maledka is obviously right. 97—8. male audisse] miraris mir art's male audisse MSS. patre Schwartz, C. 99. pairi: so
:
:

;

effregit: so

PVS; etfregit P•, ecfregit Miiller, C. \oo. facile: non/acile ^S)?i.; cf. 1. 210. sustentaret seems to have been the reading of the papyrus, not 103. 1. parsimoniattt.
which C. adopts from 2. so most MSS. and Quintilian; est igitur T. 105. igiitur) e{st) 106. t{i)b{i) htinc puer urn parens: parens tibi hunc puerum
: ;

sustineret,

om. 107. lit: so T2, C. The first two letters seem to have been altered from [z]«, and it is io8. haec: 1. hac. has in hac ; but the scribe may merely have begun to write indole too noticeable that
soon.
ai/y[(ai)]

.

.

o.d

from adq. T, atque Halm, ac
:

109. suae vitae

At the end suits the remains better than conviv\{\iS^n (TB, C). no. conviv\pf. of the line there is evidently not room for the ordinary reading nihil in vita expetendum

()

so

2B

;

vitae suae others, C.

,

C.

The similarity of deleciaret putaret was presumably omitted. putaret nisi &c., and nihil nihil and putaret nisi would make this loss easy. 112. Fabricios precedes_/«/wi in T. oi quoq{ue) has apparently been altered from e. 114. 117. aliq\u\a: so PttS ; alia T2g^, C. 120. dicendi: verboriim 2. 122-3. The papyrus may of course have had the vulgate rea.dmg et interdum-, om.
.

.

.

et 2,

C. 128. pu]taverunt
134.

:

so

T;

WhetheT /amiliam

(2,

In but

the latter part of the line ne quern vi terreat, ne inter sit insidiis is the
this

putabunt others, C. C.) ox famam stood in the papyrus cannot be determined. reading of the MSS.,
.

omitted.

overloads the line considerably, and it seems clear that one of the two clauses was . terreat is the more likely to have The recurrence of -at ne suggests that ne dropped out ; cf note on 1. no. 1 36. The vestiges at the end of the line do not suggest the letters do, but no variant is known, and the termination in the next line agrees with the ordinary reading.
.

137. rei: so eg ; reiqueV ,(Z. in omitting f/ which C. inserts 138. The papyrus with little doubt agreed with The omission of quidem after multi with the same group is also with 2 before experiendo. highly probable, for although this might have been abbreviated to two letters, the supplement
in

the

latter

half of

the

line

is

already
is

so

long

that

any unnecessary addition

is

objectionable.

139. 140. extiterunt is also the spelling of P. The reading is practically assured, for though liquet P, necesse est so 2, C. the upper part of the b is lost, q is inadmissible, since the tail should be visible.
lib\ei\
: ;

The

variant of 2, deseruissent,

unsuitable.

.

i6o
144.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1. su\mpius. 145. ohiecta (2) not obteda (C. with other

MSS.) was most probably the reading of

the

papyrus.
so most MSS., C. ; hoc 2. 146. T^avi so 2, C. quandam 147. quoniam (om. 2, C.) stood 150. It is quite possible that hae which is found before deliciae in in the papyrus. or /\irmo ingenio, with 2. f\irviiore ammo 153. loqiior so 2, C. ; eloquor 154. quae vestra prudentia est is the usual reading; 2 has quae vestrae si prudentiae, whence C. conjectures quae vestra est prudentia. 157. atqui: so 2, C. ; atque The oS. K\omine has 158. disputo is the accepted reading; dispuiavil,, disputato P\ apparently been corrected.
:

:

;

.

:

:

. .

letters are expected in the lacuna, it appears probable that the scribe omitted in dicendo quoquo modo facimus, the recurring ya«>»ai giving rise to the error. This will imply that the archetype of the papyrus agreed with 2 in reading modo facimus non which other MSS. omit. 162. The supposed of i^n is not very satisfactory. etiam is omitted by the 165. est paene is also the order of 2 ; paene est others and C.

159. \. po\test 161. Since not
.

.

.

cupiditate.

more than about twenty

MSS.

\.

familiar ium.
: ,

eg, homiries

so2, C. ; labore fiendi Jiomines V labor confitendi homines offendi'\l h\omi\nes a labore studioque discendi \-•]•. om. 2, against the other MSS. and Arusianus. 167. K^c se so apparently the papyrus; sese MSS. But [zj]/?'is not a very satisfactory reading, for though the / is probable, the base of the next letter is abnormally curved for an i.
166. labor
: :

d^fdisset

so MSS. ; dedidisset C. with Arusianus. hac in 2, C. 169. in ha\c so P) stood in the papyrus. 170. It is uncertain that iam (so 2 omit /[[.J] The i is joined to the / by a diagonal 171. nih'\iln[e: so 2, C. ; nihil (twice)
: :

;

;

, .

stroke which

is

presumably accidental.
:

172. loqua\titur 1. loquentur with the MSS. 178-9. The reading of the papyrus here remains very doubtful.

with that of initial lacuna of

,

Possibly

it

coincided

as according to the arrangement adopted ; but thirty-four letters in the 1. 179 are rather more than would be expected, and it seems not unlikely

lh2Xfac\titatmn est was written, with 2, and one of the quando clauses omitted. merelrix (om. . 186. The agreement of the papyrus with "^^- in adding sed etiam

)
is

.

.

after

non

solum, meretrix

seems probable,

m

in this line

to belong to

cum

further on, but the supplements at the beginnings of

might indeed be supposed 11. 187-8 would then

become considerably

shorter than they ought to be, the id of videatur being clear. om. 2P^ For the 201. The papyrus seems to have had Z. hdoxt Lucei as and other MSS., cf. 11. 228, 238. spelling of the name with one c, which is found also in so 2B but the decipherment is extremely uncertain and insidia\ntes 203. insidia\ndis

'^;

:

;

possible.

204. re[qui]r[o]

:

so 2, C.

;

if

the second r

is

rightly identified the space

would be too

narrow

for

requiram
'

().
.
.

Possibly turn may have si non is omitted. 205. i'"- ob 2, ad PV. In P' quam ob stood in the papyrus before sumeret, as in ; turn iret ^'. had the corrupt ceterum found in Pb. 207. It is quite possible that the papyrus
.

1251.

208. Lucei: the space

209. sempite\rni: 210. debtcit lion debuii
:

;
is

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
against the reading of
ii»2/?'/ir«izw

i6i

Lucullian.

C. with Pantagathus.

MSS.

Without non the sentence could be taken as interroga-

tive

;

MSS. except 2, which hzs/uil. 212-13. The number of letters in the initial lacuna of 1. 213 is rather smaller than is expected and the ei of ei\us are by no means plain it appears, however, on the whole more satisfactory to adhere to the ordinary text than to make libidine end 1. 212 and read }i\idus
;

but cf. 1. 100. 212. era[l: so C. with

iam midia,
219.
ilia
:

&c., in

1.

213.
stop after credenda\pi
fills

The supposed
;

is

doubtful.

,

the lacuna, and therefore fz' probably preceded y«[in'/, But the s otsi is unsatisfactory, the remains looking like the base of a round letter such as c or e. 221-2. suspicio[nu]m [la]kbras lalebr as suspicionum MSS. 226. elaborata: so C. with 2; laborata -•. 2 2 8. Luceiwn 2 omits L. The letters Lu have apparently been written over
:

alia 2, C. so 2.zo-\. fu\erit aditus\v^€^ instead of following it, as in 2.

.

:

something

else.

following words in the ordinary text are sandissimum hominem ei gravissimum tesiem, but this is not to be reconciled with the papyrus. Apparently there has been some omission, but that gravyissim^im is rightly read is extremely doubtful. 229. 7i{on') om. 2. which is added by C. before Caelio with 2P^g, seems to have been omitted in the papyrus. 231. The supplement at the end of the line is of full length without illis which is read before ariibus in T2 om.
:

The

.,

;

234.

locisqiiie)

:

so

T;

.

locisve others,
is
:

237, percipite adqiiii), which 238. Z[. L\ucei teslim\onium

C. omitted in T,
is

so

(Luccei), C.

supplement after these words is shorter than siderable blank space before quid.

required to fill the line. tesiimonium L. Liiccei ; The expected, and probably there was a conis

.

is problematical. 244. The addition oi e(ss)e (T; om. iure [ might well be 245. The remains of this line are too uncertain to be built upon, read, but the preceding vestiges are not easily reconciled with 7wbis, those of the first letter suggesting e ; iur\e iura[ndo, however, is unsatisfactory on account of the distance of the e from the i. d\vinct\a (which would presumably imply the omission of dignitatis, with

)

)

does not appear to be suitable,
Ft.
I
.

still

less r]ecitatu[r.

This fragment, which
i

is

from the top of a

leaf,

cannot be placed in the

first

line

either of Fol.

recto or Fol. 2 recto.

i62

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

IV.

DOCUMENTS OF THE ROMAN AND
BYZANTINE PERIODS
{a)

OFFICIAL.

1252.

Official Correspondence and Declaration.
27-1

X

29-2 cm.

A.D.

288-95.

Both the
official

recto

and the verso of

this

papyrus are occupied with copies of
first

documents.
letter,

On

the recto are three columns, of which the
Fl. Valerius

contains

Pompeianus, to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, reiterating some order, but a considerable lacuna at the beginnings of the lines leaves the precise purport obscure. This is followed by a formal declaration made by three municipal functionaries to the
a short

probably from the praefect

had experienced no extortion from Phileas, a former official declaration was made in consequence of an order of the praefect Valerius Pompeianus, and supplies the latest date at present known for his praefecture, which is now brought down to September 15, A.D. 289. Of the third column, written in a larger hand, only the beginnings _^of some lines from the lower portion remain, and a mention of the eleventh year of Diocletian
strategus that they
of Alexandria.

The

(a.d. 294-5)

is

the only noticeable point.

The

verso, in a

hand perhaps
In Col.
i

identical with that of Col.

iii

of the recto,

is

of

the remains of some short letters (one dated a,d. 289) addressed apparently to the senate of Oxyrhynchus by some high official, per-

more importance.

haps the praefect, are too slight to be of value.
is

The second column,
copy of a
petition

however,

nearly complete, and provides

some

interesting information concerning the

office of

eutheniarch at this period.

It contains a

from the
the

prytanis to an
filling

unnamed
post.

praefect recounting the difficulties that had occurred in

up the

Of

the three eutheniarchs annually required

(1.

13),

order of gymnasiarchs, on

whom

the nomination appears to have devolved, had

designated only two,
involved.

who had been
is

hardly persuaded to undertake the burden

Efforts to provide for the duties during the remainder of the year

having

failed,

the praefect

asked to intervene and to send instructions to the
eutheniarch
cf.

strategus.

On

the office and

functions of the municipal

Wilcken,

Grundz., pp. 366-8, Jouguet, Vie municipale, pp. 324-7.

His chief concern, no

1252.

OFFICIAL

163

doubt, was the bread-supply

;

cf.

1252. verso 15, 908, P. Tebt. 397. 14-15.

considerable personal obligations were involved was to be inferred from

P. Tebt. 397, and is clear from the tenor of the present text. The office seems to have had but a short histoiy. First mentioned in the latter half of the second

century,
revived,
this

it

fell

into

abeyance during the course of the
municipal
written.
4.

we now

learn, along with the

document was

apparently P. Leipzig

along with the other civic

Blank spaces are commonly left at the end of sentences in this document, but the writer is unsystematic and the blanks are not confined to places where
there
is

,
]

the year before dated mention of an eutheniarch is 9 of A.D. 393, and the title presumably disappeared, early in the Byzantine period.

The

latest

,
third,
]«»/

That 908 and

and had only been

a pause in the sense.

[ \5 ) - \^ .
Col.
.

Recto.
i.

16 letters

.

[.]€5

]•€
].'
]
.

[] \[ ] [
ols

eav

•§

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[^

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07<05 Trpo\s
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Col.
15

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() '{)()

2

i64

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

O^vpvyyiTS)v
25
kv

HXevadei

&

re?

, , ^, (() () €(
ei

35

'
40

45

? , (\ (( [\ ' . $ . . (•{) . ' [)
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ei

{) €€, (-

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/3€

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()

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COrr.

Pap.; so

in

1.

8.

17.

1.

.
:

'(\(.
Vxp.

20.

t

of

COrr.

24.

• of
29.

26. 39. yaiov Pap.

28. wo/nfflToJI^aiOU Pap.

• .
\. cl

37•

i'"'

Pap.
sc.

1.

line

being a heading like
2.
ii,

For the praefect Valerius Pompeianus
p. 13.
e. g.

serie dei prefetii,
7.

.

The
ii.

.
sentence
'

(',
11.

The preceding word 16-19.
cf.

is

apparently a place-name, the whole
27,

1.

888, P. Amh. 137,

Cantarelli,

Zo

may be

negative, Tea

-]?.
late

Col.

Statement of proofs with regard to Theon, Heraclides, and Thonius,

1252.

OFFICIAL

165

overseers of the fort at Elensais (?), concerning the fact that nothing was extorted from them by Phileas, in accordance with the order of the praefect. To Aurelius Heraclides, exegetes of Alexandria, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Thonius and Aurelius Heraclides, both exegetae, and Aurelius Theon, chiefall three councillors of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, formerly overseers of the fort at Elensais. Whereas to-day, the i8th, you summoned us, and in your memoranda read a letter of our most illustrious praefect Valerius Pompeianus in which he gave orders that if we had suffered extortion from Phileas, ex-magistrate of Alexandria, we were to come with the proofs, but if not, we were to remain at home, and we forthwith declared in your memoranda that we had not suffered any extortion from Phileas, but you desired us to state this fact also in writing, we again affirm our former declaration, that nothing has been extorted from us by him, and we request that The 6th year of the Emperor Caesar these facts should be made known to his highness. Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus and the 5th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Germanici Maximi Pii Felices Augusti, Thoth 18.' Signatures of Thonius, Heraclides, and Theon.

priest,

8.

of the column is inserted at the top. What follows is in a hand not certainly different from that of Col. i, though no doubt it was written on a different occasion. but the 16. seems to suit the sense and construction better than abbreviation is written practically in the same way as in 1. 18, and n(epi) may be

15 sqq.

[]The number
(')

cannot be read.

(),

meant.
17.
is

'Hf']l;:

cf.

1.

25.

A

local

was apparently named; a reference
1.

to Sais

hardly to be obtained. 26-7. iVl
;

:
: . .

cf.

cf.
.

Wilcken, Philolog. 53,
for this
.

36.
Sfiff^ae,

.

.

Acts

XXvii.

10

.

32, 1157.
p.

17.

The word
e. g.

is

here equivalent
v.

103.

mixed construction cf

237.

8

/

to

.

.

.

Verso.
Col.
i.

5

- •
Tjj

. '^] . ]
] ]
.

ov

rfj

noXei

ejj'jji'oxel•'

]

](os.

]•

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{erovs)

e

{()

.

i66

THE OXYRHYNCHU.S PAPYRI
TTJ

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)(^aipeii/.

Se

.^/
Pap.

.

Pap.

II.

of

01

corr.

from .

1 2.

[
[,]
15

Col.

ii.

20 TTapeXGcuv

^ .( [
Se
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, [€^
(?)

Kvpie,

, ^ [\^\ [\
[
[

'[€]
eetv
els

Siii

e^roa

es.
25

peov
Ttves

30

35

^ [^ , €• 6 ^ €^ . €€€ [ ,\ .
Trj

anoSei-

^ /
.

...

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.

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.
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e eeves

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1252.

OFFICIAL

ras

}

[9]
(once) Pap.

24•

Second

added above the
1.

line.

26.
'iXftKpiveiav

35•

Pap.; so in

36.

38.

Pap.

[ \) .
167
.

[

34.

\.

£\!
different.

2-4. These lines so far as they should then be restored in
12.

go might well be supposed
1.

to refer to

Col.

ii.

5

;

but the subject of

11.

9-1 2

is

apparently

A date

probably followed below

this line.

The whole food-supply, my lord praefect, ought to be 13-38. 'From the prytanis. forthcoming for the citizens, but especially the provision of bread. You have now in the propitiously revived for us the civic office of eutheniarch and agoranomus, past year which had long been in abeyance. I myself, my lord praefect, having been recently appointed by your propitious right hand to the prytany at Oxyrhynchus readily came forward to assume this crown of oflSce and have had no other care, undertaking (?) the expenses imposed upon me for the management of the public baths and other municipal charges and the continual service of the senate in the appointment of magistrates. Now the order of gymnasiarchs has so far designated only two eutheniarchs of the three annually required, namely Heracleus son of Plutarchus and Sarapammon son of . ., who came forward at the behest of the senate and at first declined the office but afterwards were persuaded and assumed it, and partially supplied the needs of the post which ought to be entirely contributed to the city by lot ; for trouble of collective a period of four months is allotted to each, in order to avoid the Thereupon I urged Ammonius son of PtoUarion, responsibility throughout each period. gymnasiarch in office, from whom, it was ascertained, a month more of his superintendence of provision was due, to discharge this in the meantime in order that they might make a recovery and easily discharge the remainder of their office without reproach. But since these persons when called upon to supply the city with food during the rest of their term of office persist in their refusal, I am obliged to have recourse to your probity, begging you to .' [order] them through the strategus to .
.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

For the municipal agoranomus in connexion with the markets cf. C. P. Herm. 102, Jouguet, Vie municipale, pp. 327 sqq., and for the association of this office with that of eutheniarch, B. G. U. 578. 9 y^va^iva Trjs The present passage might seem to lend colour to the hypothesis of a regular conjunction of the and but the latter could certainly be combined with other offices cf. Wilcken, Grundz. p. 366. 18-19. The appointment of the prytanis was thus at least confirmed by the praefect. For cf e.g. P. Amh. 135. 10, B. G. U. 731. ii. 5, C. P. R. 20. i. 7, ii. 7. 21-3. As president of the the prytanis was largely concerned with financial business; cf. e.g. E.G. U. 362. xv. 2-8, C. P. Herm. 66, 67, 74, &c. the first two of the relate to the public baths, and for the connexion of the prytanis latter group as well as 82 with these cf. especially 1104. 16-17 05 Koi might be read before but a suitable \\ reading of the preceding letters has not suggested itself. In 1. 23 a verb such as inovpyav
17.

^ ^^^ (,
16.
:

.

cf.

1.

20, 1117. 5) note, P.

Rylands 77. 34—5

(,

-^

\

(.

;

\\!

.

>/[]

^ ^,
;

i68

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

has apparently to be supplied with to offices, the nominations of the C. P. Herm. 97.

Wilcken, Grundz. p. 200. 1202. 1 8 P. Rylands 77 it appears that in the second century nominations to the various of the offices concerned, acting perhaps as delegates civic offices vi^ere proposed by the That in the present instance the designation to the post of for the Koivov the of gymnasiarchs may have been due to the fact that eutheniarch proceeds from had become obsolete. the eutheniarchy had only just been revived and that its Possibly during the period of abeyance the duties of the office had in some measure devolved

(), From

24.

, .
!
cf.

^

;

for the active part
ii.

e.g. B. G. U. 8.

5,

362.

taken by the prytanis in v. 13, C. P. R. 20. i. 12,
(SC.

'
'.

cf.

891.

4— 1$

"^^^

kolvov

upon the gymnasiarchs. 25. At the end of the second century, as shown by 908, there were at Oxyrhynchus at least six eutheniarchs, and more probably twelve, exercising their functions in alternate months in two sections of six. The reduction of the number to three may have been made when the office was revived. the /3ovXij and ffpirawir as its representative were responsible T^s 27. Sore for the appointment; cf. C. P. Herm. 7. i. 6 e? where 1. (? cf. 1. cf. 1. 32 For (. 6 ehrifv') (?) is to be restored. C. . Harm. 7• i- 2, where 30-2. The meaning apparently is that sole responsibility for four months was less

}!'

(^^

\
official

^ [^ \:
:

:

,

:; , /^)' ; . ^,
8(4\
;

\

reverse might have been expected.

onerous than collective responsibility through the year from a financial point of view the e. g., may be supplied. At the end of 1. 31 32. The asyndeton is awkward, and the writer had perhaps rather lost the thread, at the end of the line suits the space better than Ammonius may have held office in the previous year, when, according 33.

1[€\,

/

^^.

to

I.

1

6,

the eutheniarchy

was

reinstituted.

1253.

Military Requisitions.
25-5

X

26•9 cm.

Fourth century.

whose name is lost, giving which had been made at Oxyrhynchus by some It Is not suggested that these requisitions, which were mainly military officers. though not entirely (cf. 1. 12) in money, were irregular or illegitimate the writer merely says that the report was presented for information but perhaps this mode of statement was considered the more prudent.
report presented to a praefect
particulars of certain requisitions
;
'

An

',

[

[]
]y

[\ [/ ']> 88
[

]

]

ku

.
Tois

fueKev

5

r.

.

.]^[

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[6]
10

.[..]..

.[..

8[ $ \
[]
.
.

( -•
1353.

OFFICIAL

]/

tovs re

re

169

evsKev

.

Sia

[\]
[ ]

€($)
evsKev

^(
? {){)
kyeveTo

15

2

rfjs

€,

! {) •
S)v

,{) , ! ' )
,

[$:)

€{€)

,

^),

€9
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..
of
Kfi/TTji/aptoDi
;

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$
;
].
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{ {) [) {)

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.
8.

[£) { Bepiov
\.

5•

COrr.

and
I.

Kci'

( .
COrr.

from

rewritten.
1 9.

(.
Pap.

.
II.

l6.

1.

eyeVrro for ev(K(v

21.

{-).
1.

cf.

-

Pap. 19. ydiavos Pap.

[']. ^•

14.

20.

.

Pap.

'

To

.

.

.,

the

most

illustrious praefect of

Egypt.

It

should be

made known

that the

members of the bodyguard and of
. .

the cohorts herein following have stayed in the city of and have assembled the public magistrates next to yourOxyrhynchus on account of the self in rank and property-owners and received from them on account of travelling expenses and Therius, centurions, who came for the adaeratio the amounts herein written, namely son of . ., paid to them through Sarapion and the contribution 50 solidi of gold and 2
.

:

.

.

.

(?),

.

Eudaemon, formerly banker

Sozon, rug-merchant ; corn and barley for the days from the 7th to the nth, 80 solidi of gold, of which the collector (?) was Isidorus, assistant of the praepositus of the 7th pagus Aquilinus, member of the bodyguard, colleague of the aforesaid Tauriscus, 50 solidi of gold, of which the collector was Gaianus, assistant of the praepositus of the 5th pagus. The account of what was provided by each, the praepositi and the others, is with Triadelphus the chief assistant of the
;

Zoilus, adjutant, 20 rugs of 6 cubits, supplied to him through Tauriscus, member of the bodyguard, who came for the collection of
;

170
strategus.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
We
give this information in order that nothing

may

escape your highness,

my

lord praefect.'
I.

The
For

4.

\<.

cf. e.g. 1252. verso 13. source of the report was perhaps given here Kopnavovs =z co{ho)rlianos, though that form does cf. 1134. 3, note.
;

not occur in Latin. 5. The lacunae

[
8.

KevTvpiav is used;

in

cf. Maspero, Organisation milit. de Egypte Byz. Grundz. p. 406 need some modification. here cf 1322 its relation to the 9. For
;

€]
:

may be filled e. g. eJi[ous cf e.g. Wessely, Die Pariser Papyri,

^[]'

.
\
:

^.
. IVIunich
(iii,

p. 53,
8.

App. 392. 1-2

In

41»

45

9•

°5

^*-•'

'^^

form

p. ro6'.

Wilcken's remarks
is

15.

and
1 6.

is

headed

though much hv (iyivcTo) (cf 1. 19) the sense of the word has recently been thrown upon it by the equation with capitidarius resulting from (cf. Jouguet's note pp. 132-3, Wilcken, Griindz. p. 410), has notyet been made fully clear. The capitula \vere groups of proprietors responsible for supplying recruits, and the capilularii were their temporary representatives who received their contributions and conducted their business. But in the present passage there is clearly no question of the support and P. Leipzig of recruits any more than in B. G. U. 367. 22 Apparently the scope of the term was extended, and it was 89. 2 /(£[]$•
light

^!
:

'! (\^).
cf. e.

g. P. Brit.

Mus. 1293.

2

pp. 238-9), \vhere an account of

(-: ^!,

{adaeraiid)

not

clear.

?

P.

Thead. 22-3

'/.
:

()(£)

%,

The explanation applied to other official receivers or collectors of contributions and levies. exactores capitationis given long ago by Gothofredus in connexion with Cod. Theod. ii. 24. 6 cefaliotis, irenarchis, logografis chomalum et ceteris liiurgis is probably after all not far from the truth. cf e. g. 123. 14. 1 7. /()^(/)
24. This line perhaps gave the date.

1254.

Publication of an Appointment.
26'7X9-2cm.
A. D.

260.

letter from two comarchs to the strategus of the Cynopolite nome, nominating a person for the duty of carrying to Alexandria a sample (5ety^a) Prefixed to this, in a space left for of the corn collected for the Government.

A

the purpose

by

the writers of the letter,
;

is

a notice

by

the strategus certifying the
iii,

publication of the appointment

cf.

P. Flor. 2,

Wilcken, Archiv

p. 530.

That samples of the public corn-dues were subjected to official well known from e. g. 708 cf. Wilcken's remarks on that papyrus
;

scrutiny was
in

Chrestom.

pp. 508-9.

It

now appears

that in the third century at

were separately delivered at Alexandria by persons specially appointed for the duty, whose title may now be restored in P. Strassb. 31. 6 (third century more probably than second) At what period this practice was introduced is unknown. In the third century

[]'

/

any

r^te such samples

.

.

.

5().

1254.
B.C., as is

OFFICIAL
and
98. 17, sealed

171

shown by

P.

Hibeh

39. 15

samples accompanied the

cargoes of corn.

[.4]_77_[]?

86<
5
eis

€ .' (5 '/
(eVoir)

' ,
SoOiyros

, [

[
i^fjs

[6

\
.

[ () 7{)•
!1€^[]'-

][(

€?

2nd hand
15

^^ ^
Ua.

.

-

(irovs).

20 e/y
eis

-

25

'
{!)

() '{) {) (^^)
['\
.

Tavptos

'

.

172
3rd hand

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

€'[]
kniSeSwKa^ev.

{)
9.

€(•)
from
01.

()
ISoTOS•

[]

-

'-^[(9

after

for

.
.

corr.

17.

^^! Pap.

26. fy

Pap.

29•

1•

From Aurelius Hierax also called Didymus, strategus of the Cynopolite nome. memorandum handed lo me by the comarchs of the village of ruthis, presenting the person named below for the conveyance of samples of the Avheat belonging to the State which is being conveyed to the most illustrious Alexandria, is publicly exhibited, in order that every one may know and the person nominated may enter on his duties. The ist year of our lords Macrianus and Quietus Pii Felices Augusti, Choiak i. To Aurelius Hierax also called Didymus, strategus of the Cynopolite nome, from Aurelius Silvanus son of Panetbauis and Aurelius Menches son of Theon, both comarchs of the village of ruthis for the present ist year. For the conveyance of samples of the wheat belonging to the State which is being conveyed to the most illustrious Alexandria we present the undermentioned person, being a man of means and suitable, at our own risk Aurelius Petrus, whose mother is Tauris, aged about 30, having property worth 500 drachmae.' Date and signatures of Silvanus and Menches.
'

A

copy of the

.

:

I

.

The papyrus
i
:

is

broken above
18.

the formula 1187.
3.
.

sqq., note.
cf.
1.

\([!

Oxyrhynchite name, and the 1. 18 may be t, not v.
5.

nome

^

this line, but

probably nothing has been

lost.

Cf. for

is a possible reading, but this is only here concerned is the Cynopolite. The

known
last

letter

as an of

P. Giessen 15. 3 editors as plan '
'

'[]
no doubt
:

:

to the evidence for
TO

8(7

suits

of com put together by Wilcken, 1. c, perhaps to be added. The interpretation of the the following sentence, but this has no necessary connexion
is

Mus. 256 recto (a) 17 (ii, p. 99). 2 7. evidence concerning the property-qualification of various offices conveniently collected by Meyer in the introd. to P. Giessen 58. He seems right in holding that irapos in this connexion signifies property, rather than income (Wilcken, Grundz.
Cf. further P. Brit.

with what precedes.

7{)

()

is

p• 342).

34. There is an appreciable blank space below this line, which was apparently not followed by a signature of an like those in P. Flor. 3. 37 sqq., &c.

1255.

Affidavit of Comarchs.
i6-6xio-6cm.
a. d.

292.

guarantee on oath, addressed by two comarchs of the village of Ision Panga to the strategus of the nome, that they would allow no produce to be

A

removed from the village threshing-floors until the claims of the decaproti for dues to the State had been fully satisfied. The priority of the representatives of

1

1255.
the

.

OFFICIAL

173

Government
e.

in

the appropriation of the harvest was well attested for the Ptole-

27. 53-64, and a similar procedure had been inferred Rostowzew, Archiv iii, pp. 313-14, Wilcken, Grundz. pp. 315-16), but its clearest evidence is found in the present text, which is to be regarded as an undertaking to comply with a recognized requirement. An employment of analogous methods in the Byzantine age may be seen in 1107.^

maic period,

g.

by P. Tebt.
(cf.

for

Roman

times

[\]] (() {\)
"

,
{erovs)

[)
'^
{)

Xaipia

() ^)

Oecavos

-

5

/-

TOS

().
roTs

9
c^xpts

kv

aXcoviais

T€S

15

^
irpos
TOVS,
els

€(

, ^
ecoy

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20

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{)
.
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1
.

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-

€-

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of

.

. €
4.
1.

25 .[..].[.'...].[

"ay'v"

(^!
is

CQTI.

from

.

8.

1.

Pap.
^

Pap.

In

1.

of that papyrus

(')[]!

probably to be read.

174
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

To Claudius Dioscurides also called Chaereas, ex-strategus of the Diopolite nome, nome, from Aurelius Papontos son of Theon and Aurelius Horas son of Archelaus, both comarchs of the village of Ision Panga for the present 8th which = the 7th year. Having been enjoined by you to keep in safety the crops at the threshing-floors in our lands until the decaproti have received payment in full of the public taxes from each person, we accordingly agree, swearing by the fortune of our lords Diocletian and Maximian Augusti, to be on the watch and to permit no one to touch the produce until each person has paid to the local decaproti the amount due from him, the measurement being made so that no complaint may ensue otherwise may we be liable to
strategus of the Oxyrhynchite
;

the penalties attaching to the oath. and Maximian Augusti, Pauni 19.'
2.

The

8th which

is

also the 7th year of our lords Diocletian

much name

is doubtfully read, but seems to have been written in title following later in the line. If same way as the is right, the or nome must follow, and either looks possible. is Cramped and very uncertain; 18. a participle, however, is necessary unless there was a dislocation in the construction.

The

the

of a

^\([

^^) ^) {) {) {) -{)
to the signature,

25.

The remains presumably belong

but they are too slight for

recognition.

1256.

List of Priests under age.
21-5

X 9-5 cm.
village

A. D.

282.

A

list,

presented

by two comarchs of the Cynopolite
;

Laura to the

keepers of the public archives of the nome, of persons of priestly descent

were not of
priests

full

age

cf.

Wessely, Kar. wid Sokn. Nes.

p.

Upioiv is cited from an unpublished Rainer papyrus.^ were regularly recruited from the younger members of their families, as is clearly seen e. g. in B. G. U. 258. 10 sqq., where additions to the local priesthood
for a given year

who 6% where ypa^^]\ The ranks of the

are stated cf Otto, Priester tmd Tempel, pp. 35, an, 314-16. In the present list only two persons are included, one male and one They were attached to temples of Anubis, Leto, and other gods, with female.
;

i,

which was associated a shrine of Augustus character of Egyptian cults at this period.

— a good illustration of the composite

^ [] [^
[.]
.

f

.

.

.

[

[.]

6[] [\[
]

.

.

j/Q)

.

[.

.

.

'

On

.

64

lcmo^s']

this is a different

Upiav is quoted from the same document (R. 73), but whether passage or another version of the same may be doubted.

'

;

5
[v]os

[\6€
[7/3]{}
[ ]

^
Upa>v
kv

1256.

OFFICIAL

175

^-[
[

€'

[',

{erovs),

'•

hpi(u[v

[''

[]
[l]epevs

[]
[|
15

'8

20

2nd hand

25

On

of

Itpeaiv

SO in

. ! [^ [] [\( — ! ^!.
the verso

\] , (), .] [\ . {\ [\ [] . []( [] \{) [] ^^ {) {)
vaos
[.

(erouy)

! .
'Ap^ems
6eSiv

iepeia

Aavpas

€6(().

Aavpas]

2.

1.

/3[(]<. ([]/ /3[(]^.
COrr.

^J.

and
1.

J

.

„f of

COrr.

6. f

Pap. rap.

COrr. corr.
.-

irom from
_-

.
15.

from

K.

..

1

rj .ij.._-_

1.

Pap.

10.

13.

Pap.

1.

18.

17. Upcia

Pap

(

7•

g^

First ~~^^

Pap.

son of Sarapion, both keepers of the public records of the upper nome, from Aurelius Paterniouthis son of Saprion and AureHus Kalaumis son of Petenouphis, both comarchs of Laura with other villages. List of priests' Aurelius Haruotes son of children under age in the present 7th year, as follows Hermanubis son of Harbeus, priest of the temples of the first rank of Anubis, Leto, and the associated most great gods, to whom has also been consecrated a shrine of the divine tris daughter of Thalres, priestess Augustus Caesar, at Laura in the Cynopolite nome The 7th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Probus of the same temples.
' .
.

To

.

and

.

.

.

division of the Cynopolite

:

;

.

.

176

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Gothicus Maximus, Parthicus Maximus, Germanicus Maximus, Pius Felix Augustus, Phamenoth 2 1. We, Aurelius Patermouthis and Aurelius Kalaiimis, comarchs of Laura, have presented this list. I, Aurelius Antonius, wrote on their behalf, as they were illiterate.'
6.
"7.

haipas

of villages for
8.

is (wrongly?) spelled 26 ; in 11. 16 and 24 Aavpa Only is specified. The association administrative purposes was common; cf. 1281. 15, P. Hamburg 7. 2, note. Upiav cf. the unpublished papyrus in Wessely, Kar. und Sokn. Nes.

( [>»

:

in

1.

23 the
:

name

cf.

1.

.

:

are called below on p. 174 above. Since these and (11. 12, 17) the distinction which Otto, Priester und Tempel, vihs iepcm? and iepeis proposed to make between the phrases (so P. 327 Brit. Mus. 338. 12-13 (ii, p. 68), Wessely, op. ciL, p. 63) cannot be maintained. 10. The first half of the line is filled up by two dashes separated by an ; it is unlikely
p. 64, cited

in

the foot-note
ie'pem

respectively iepevs

^

ii.

^^

that the latter stands here for oZras.

remarkable that here the father only is mentioned, while in the case of the 7 her mother alone is named, which suggests that priestly descent was required on the father's side for priests and on the mother's for priestesses; cf. 1265. 17-18, and Otto, Priesier und Tempel, i, pp. 219-20. cf. B. G. U. 1004. i. 4 The doubtful might be read as . 12. 7)0: cf. G. U. 1095. 7, where there is a doubtful mention of a iepov Aijroif (so the index). A local cult of Leto in the Pathyrite noma is perhaps to be inferred from
11. It is
1.

priestess in

1

'5

:

.

!.

the mention of the vrjaos A7)toC(s) in P. Grenf. ii. 15. Col. ii. 5. 14-15. On the cult of Augustus in Egypt cf. Blumenthal, Archiv v, pp. 318 sqq. are common epithets of temples (cf. Otto, both and Priester tend Tempel, i, p. 18, ii, pp. 310-11), but this seems to be the first instance of their
:

:

combination.
16.

''()
1257.

is

irregular in form,

and above
i.

to the left of the
;

something

has been written which might be read as been intended.

€ or ?,

e.

but KurawoXeiVou must have

Statement concerning a Decaprotus.
17-6

X

23-3 cm.

Third century.

The purpose of this unaddressed document is not quite clear. It is a statement drawn up by a person named Maximus (1. i6) concerning the accounts of an Oxyrhynchite decaprotus. A payment of 500 artabae had been made to the latter after the proper time for receiving it had passed, but it had been duly added Four years afterwards, when a superior official to the account by his assistant. was at Oxyrhynchus, the question of this late payment was reopened, apparently
as a precedent for further supplementary additions to the accounts
11.
;

cf.

note on

This statement, which seems to have been made out for some official occasion rather than as a draft for a petition, is written across the fibres of the papyrus in a semi-cursive hand dating from the latter part, probably, of the third century. The fifth year mentioned as current in 1. 14 might well be that of
16-19.

1257.

OFFICIAL
lines of a letter

177

Probus.
in

On

the verso are two mutilated columns of accounts in two hands, and
first

the reverse direction the

Maximus

• (.- ^
,

-

two

from Maximus (no doubt the

of the recto) to his father Horion.

,
eh
eis

!

•\\

5
Trj

{)

[]
15
.
. . .

() \[.]

.

, \\ '[
[]'

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,
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[,
.

[]

^
5•
1•

()

Trj

[] {]
.

^^

4.

.

'! . (
1—2.
1.
1.

.

.

^'-

:

of.

125.

.

.

.

.

cVe'ffTfiXfj/.
1•

1 9.

[. ! !! . !. .
.
Pap,
'J.

['
\.

-

1.

g,

\.

' On the nomination of Epimachus to the oflSce of decaprotus in the western toparchy of the Oxyrhynchite nome, as he was past his prime, Thonius the stepfather of Epimachus administered the business of the office. After the time for the delivery of corn had passed Theon also called Plutarchus, ex-hypomnematographus and now strategus of the Tanite nome, directed Demetrius his agent to measure out 500 artabae to the account of public dues in the first year of this most happy reign to Thonius and his assistant Dionysius, who was also present. On delivery by Demetrius of this amount the assistant followed the natural course and added it by way of supplement to the accounts of the oflBce, that is, to the ledger of the amounts received and to the individual list lodged in the archives through the monthly summary presented by the decaprotus for

178

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Epeiph in the first year. But when his excellency Ammonius, collector of public corn-dues, was [present] in the city of Oxyrhynchus in Phaophi of the present fifth year, the aforesaid decaprotus Epimachus producing myself, Maximus, and representing that Theon owed the 500 artabae asked that the further amounts in his hands should be added through the memoranda drawn up by the strategus of the nome in the presence of his excellency Ammonius, because they had been measured out to him to the account of his office of
decaprotus.'
2.

by
1.

should have been conducted somewhat curious that the business of a who would presumably have been his elder. irf[i']raii[o]ai[as is awkward, but the reference in and 6-7. The separation of 16 demands a previous mention of them, and the ends of these two lines are the only
It is

his

,

\

^|

available places.

(erow) a trovs:
follows the figure
is

cf.

11.

13-14.

In dates of

this

(cf.

e.g. 1252. recto 40), but to write the

period a superfluous year-sign often word out in this position

unusual.

here Seems to designate the current accounts kept by the decaprotus as 10. opposed to the more formal records presented for preservation in the archives cf. P. Brit. where Wilcken, Chrestom. p. 321 has already Mus. 255. 1 1 (ii, p. 117) npoKTopeifiv as supposed a reference to bookkeeping. The sense of list also appears in was explained In P. Tebt. 121. 49 applied to inventories of temple-property. made to a but the meaning as a payment on the analogy of 18S

^() (^\.
cf.

there

is

uncertain.
:

12.

[ ] ^),

JV^S, p. 1 1
1 3•

occurs in the 14-15.

12, P. Thead. 20. 8. required to be constructed with -opfvo[v\ is perhaps just possible at the beginning of TTcXei. and to govern rrj would give 1. 15; ... vTo[s] is certainly unsuitable. At the end of that line a good sense, but a shorter supplement is wanted. fJiomv is unconvincing. however should have is somewhat obscure, 16-19. The phraseology here the same sense as in 1. 9, and as the passage stands it can hardly be interpreted otherwise than as meaning that Epimachus wished the strategus and the eVfi/cTijy to authorize further

compound

A

participle in the genitive

/^ ^, ^, ^ ,"
(,
i.
;
' '

P. Tebt. 34O.

and

.

5-9 Rainer
this

^({)

.

.

,

[]
\.

1

45 cited by Wessely, Kar. und Sokn.
seems
to

8)

:

title

be a novel one.

e.g.

1053.

is

[]

will then mean not that the 500 artabae were supplements to his accounts, as still due from Theon, but that they had been due when strictly the accounts were closed. But that further additions should be made after an interval of four years is certainly cf. 1252. recto 26, note. surprising. For

\\\

()

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS.
1258.

Promise of Attendance.
13-9

8•4

cm.

A. D.

45.

A
in

declaration on oath that the writer would appear before the strategus in
is

connexion with a reckoning of receipts from taxation. The document form to 260, 1195, B. G.U. 891. recto, P. Leipzig 52-3, Hamburg

analogous

4.

1258.

[

5

[ ]]' [ []
\iv
ei'jj,]

. \ [!] [ ]\\ .
'4]
9•
1.

^ [\ [] [ [^ [\ ^ ]!
[noXiws

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

\ ]86 \ 8\ 68.
Yjaios

179

SeKOVvSwi

avrov

KXavSiof

[] [^7]'£)

rfjs

'/

.

[\9

tepoD

-

.
(cf.
e. g.

Hippodrome quarter, to Secundus, swear by Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus Imperator that I will appear before the strategus Apollonius at the next reckoning of taxes unprotected by any temple, altar, sacred enclosure, or any place of sanctuary or shelter in any form. If I observe the oath may it be well with me, but if I swear falsely, the reverse. The sixth year of Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus
' . .

.

son of

.

.

esis,

...

of Oxyrhynchus in the
quarter.
I

collector of taxes of the

same

Imperator, the ninth of the month Neus Sebastus.'
2.

abbreviated.

G. U. 72. 2-3 and for the combination with 3. where was apparently intended, p. Rylands 141. 6. Cf. note on 1. 12. suits the size of the lacuna better than 7. is Supported by 1. 3 but hardly fills the lacuna, in which there is room 8. cf. e. g. 785, P. Hibeh 93. 3-5. For «[] iepoO for six letters. and exclude i, or ir better than 12. the vestiges of the letter before suit and . is long for the lacuna, for which six letters are sufficient, and eVjarou would give rise to difficulties concerning the name of the strategus in 1. 7, since Dorion occupied that office in Phaophi of the 9th year (255. i), and Tiberius Claudius Pasion in the loth Pasion must have been twice strategus, as he is known from 283. 28 to have been (393). in office on Mesore 1 5 of the 5th year.
:

], ! []/ [] ]
There
is
:

barely
cf. 1. 8,

room

for

yep8iW

285.

,
4,

288.

2),

unless

^

.

()

was

['].

.

€)]7

8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1259.

Declaration of a Shipper.
i9-8xii-9cm.
a.d. 211-12.

This and the two following papyri (1260-1) relate to the corn-supply, 1259 and 1260 both containing formal acknowledgements by shippers of the receipt of Similar documents of the Roman and early corn for transport to Alexandria.

Byzantine periods are P.
256), Flor. 75,
peculiarities

Amh.

138, Brit. Mus. 256 («) and 301

(ii,

pp. 99

Goodsp.

14, Cairo Preis.

34

;

cf also 1197.

1259, however, has

and some
it is

of phraseology, and the conclusion of the document, where

unfortunately mutilated, cannot yet be restored with security.
pp. 320 sqq.

of the corn-transport see Wilcken, Grundz. pp. 369-70, 376 sqq., Rostowzew,
ArcJiiv
iii,

{) .8<
[]

^
S.

On

the subject

5 09

() [),
Neas
6^

tols

- [] \([]-

-

15

^ [\ \ {) }
[) ^
(€[ ]
T[fj
, .
.

\] ]
et'y

(erot/j)

.]€ {) \{) ()
'

20

\\ [ \\
.[

[

^ [
.

,

€[,
[

]

20

letters
(Is

^et-

25

6[ . [] [
'»[]77
1

[ [
1259.

^\8]<[
toIs Se
p€Ta,y[yiKaiv
8.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
6 letters

i8i

\

{erovi

?)

[]

[]

Pap.

Oxyrhynchite nome, from Posidonius also called Triadelphus, master of 8 boats carrying 40,000 artabae in the administration of Neapolis. I have received and had measured out to me by Dioscorus son of Onnophris and Didymus son of Pausiris, sitologi of the Psobthis district in the lower toparchy, the amount ordered me by you and Horion also called Apion, basilicogrammateus of the said nome, in accordance with the message of his excellency the procurator of Neapolis from the public granaries of the said village at the river Tomis of wheat from the produce of the past 1 9th year of our lords the Emperors Antoninus and GetaPii Augusti, unadulterated, with no admixture of earth or barley, untrodden and sifted, including a percentage of i^ artabae, thousand eight hundred and forty artabae, total [.]840 art., by the public measure and according which I will carry to Alexandria and deliver to the to the prescribed measurement This receipt is officials of the administration safely, free of all risk and damage by ship valid•, there being three copies of it, of which I have issued two to you, the strategus, and one to the sitologi.' Date.
'

Didymus, strategus of the

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.,

.

.

.

2.

Is this shipowner identical with the Triadelphus in

522.

i ?

The

dates of the two
is

papyri are suitable enough.
3.

right in reading

^- {^, .
Nf'af
:

cf.

708. 1 3, where Wilcken (Chrestom. pp. 508-9) Neas G. U. 8. ii. 29—30

!

Wilcken, Griindz.

8(!
ad
8.

4.

{^):

p.

369.

,

no doubt

Wilcken compares the obscure sentence in P. Giessen 11. 17-18 «XXas of which he now prefers his Original explanation, cited

>

,

loc, to that

suggested in Chrestom. p. 523. Cf. B. G. U. 1091. 1-2, where the same Horion appears as deputy-strategus in the

2ist year.
10. 6^

/ioC (so This passage throws light upon P. Leipzig 22. 10 eV [A]i/3[ii]ri; [2]7-£ comparing another unpublished papyrus), tv []|3[]7-); cannot be right something Possibly, however, the initial 2 should stand and is wanted. like « fif be read in the present place. The date is practically certain, since the association of Caracalla and 13. Cf. 11. 27-9. According to 1196 see also the note on 1. 8 above. Geta ended in the 20th year should be read there in 1. 8 instead of . Anubion was strategus in that year, but probably 5. Seems to be a novel qualification in this context. 1

<!

:

cf.

1197. 13, note, P. Tebt. 486, C. P. Herm.

6. 13.

12.

Mitteis,

/3

(2)/

6
ToC

;

16.

A
P.

^ :
;

the purpose of these percentages

occurs also in 522. 21, a passage which

Tebt. 486

([7]()

{) () {)
',

may now

is unexplained. be better understood, and (so rather than

())

i82
K,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
(jTupoC)

p. 257, 6th cent.) crvv required from silologi

meant. Cf. P. Brit. Mus. 1015. 2 (iii, Tebt. 470. In 708 percentages are on account of detected impurities in the corn-freights, but the extras are presumably of a different kind. in the present passage 19-20. There was perhaps a reference here to the receipt of expenses cf. e. g. 1260.

I

',

which shows that \

(,
art.
(iii,

per cent,

is

and

P.

1

5-1 7

;

but

21.

For the supplement
els

[

;

.

.

.

is

a difiiculty.

or

(P.

Amh.

eU (P. Brit. Mus. 256. (a) 15 (ii, cf. 1260. 12. 138. 14) are not so well adapted to the space, but
p.

:] [\!, ([][]
Kivdvvco,
1.

(P. Flor. 75. 17) would be suitable. 23-4. Cf. P. Brit. Mus. 948. 8

220)

3°!• 12—14 (, 256) Mitteis, Berichte d. SUchs. Gesellsch.

\

^
d. is

napaSaaei

23 the letters '[ are very doubtfully identified, and longer supplement, but the exiguous vestiges do not suit 25-6. Cf. 1260. 17-19. The supplement in 1. 25 but seems guaranteed by the analogy of 1260 possibly
;

In Wissetisch. 19 10, pp. 270 sqq. there would be room for a somewhat

[5

.

/
p.

99))

fh

longer than would be expected,

was abbreviated.

1260.

Declaration of a Shipper.
23

X

9-7

cm.

A. D.

286.
for

An

acknowledgement similar to 1259 of the receipt of a cargo of corn
;

transport to Alexandria

cf.

{5)
5

[) .

'
eis

^' '
(

the introduction to that papyrus.

{9) {^) ?
{) \\
07{)
oe, ety

\\
ols

)[) ,
eav

^[)
veas
ai

([]9 () (^(

(

-

15
//€

€70[]

,
20

[]

.. )()() 1260.
8e

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

183

/^,
(eTovs)

^

()

(5)
and hand 25

\[] [\\
).

[\
€()

'[] ([) ())
!
[()'\

30

. \\
from

-7• 7

[ €][{€)

{).
.
1.

12.

27.

.
of

COri".

from

.

.

1/(

Pap.

1

8.

Pap.

' Aurelius Philippus also called Horion, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Anicetus son of Olbanus, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, belonging to the heirs of Tiro, of 350 artabae burden. I have received and embarked upon the aforesaid boat in accordance with the instructions of Ulpius Cyrillus, the most eminent catholicus, from Aurelius Demetrianus and however he is styled, decaprotus of part of the middle toparchy, 75 artabae of new, pure, and sifted barley, belonging to the village of Heracleum, which I will transport to the most illustrious Alexandria and deliver to whomsoever I am ordered to deliver it, and I will produce the certificate of the delivery, because I have been paid all the expenses. This receipt is valid, there being three copies of it, of which I have issued two to you, the strategus, and one to the decaprotus, and in answer to the formal question I have given my consent.' Date and signature of Anicetus written for him by Aurelius Silvanus.

pilot of a Hellenic boat

3.

5.

Goodsp. 14. 3. 12. cf. 989 and 1285. 100. 14-15. P. Flor. 75. 18-20 is rather more
:

15-16.

\ ' ( /
may be
so
:

for'Op/SaKoC
P.

e. g.

The

are

\

28.

:

SO e.g. P. Flor. 21. 14 ciVewyKoC/jev,

^.
=
Urbani.
explicit
J

[rijr

]£!
1 4.

ds

'

of.

P. Goodsp.

9— 10.

more

/[]/

precisely defined in P. Flor. 75. 21-2 cf. P. Goodsp. 1 4. 7 J

\(?\

\\\

Hamburg

44. 7 eneveyKS).

i84

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1261.

Declaration concerning Commissariat.
26-3

X

19-5 cm.

A. D.

325.

Acknowledgement on oath from
in

a senator of

Oxyrhynchus

to a centurion

the service of the catholicus that he had received a quantity of produce

for transport
official visit,

and

delivery.

The consignment was
ii,

destined partly for a coming
;

partly for troops stationed at Babylon
pp. 88-9.

cf.

1115, Wilcken, Grundz.

pp. 358-9, 361-2, P. Giessen
'^'^^

^frL"']

.([^
.

[]
ra|[e]cuy

Trap

5

.[..]..
[]€

10

() [) '(, ^^,
els
31.

^( , () - ,^ • . {)
[] [€]€
^^.
line.

{) ^(•) ?(€) {) {) , () () {){) () ( () [(]
,
eh
kv


Trjs
8.
1.

[]{6)

.

.
ro.
1.

above the
'

.
1.

els

.

.

.

\,
.
.

^'''.

g,

added

year after the third consulship of our masters Crispus and Constantinus, the most To Flavius Sarapion, centurion on the staff of the most eminent catholicus, from Aurelius Heracles son of Coelacius, senator of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, superintendent of . I swear the holy divine oath by our masters the Emperor and Caesars that I have received from the produce of the 12th indiction 24,235 pounds, for the coming visit 10,000 pounds, and for provisioning the most noble soldiers quartered at Bab3'lon under Severianus, praepositus, 14,235 pounds, and the expenses, to carry down and make the distribution of them in full whenever I am ordered, and I will produce the receipts for the delivery, without giving any cause for complaint;
illustrious Caesars.

The

1261.
otherwise

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

may

I

be

liable to the penalties of the divine oath.

Tubi

18.'
3. 5.

Cf. B.

G. U. 21.

iii.

10

of the

There seems to be line nor do the faint
as
e. g.

insufficient

vestiges suggest that word.
iii.

was

given,

in 43. recto

might also be used, as e.g. 1115. 10 was perhaps that of the catholicus himself, as . The expected
1259. 33
9.
(iii.

. ( (: .
room
for
1 1
:

185

The

aforesaid consulship,

(cf. e. g.

1194. 3-4) at the beginning Perhaps the name of the produce
geographical qualification
in P. Brit.

^.(!([\. A

Mus.

cf. 1260. For Km has perhaps fallen 1 7. here was apparently to be carried out by the the note ad loc. lO-II. cf e. g. 1115. 9 Sqq.

^

P• 240)•

out before KaTfV((y)Kiu. himself, as in 114. 12

The
;

cf.

1262.

Receipt of Seed-corn.
10-4

X

6-2 cm.

A. D.

197.

acknowledgement, addressed to the strategus and basilicogrammateus through two local commissioners, of a loan of seed-corn; cf. 1031, P. Flor. ai (Arsinoite nome), which are applications for loans addressed directly to such commissioners, and P. Hamburg 19, a similar application to the basilicogrammateus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, in which no commission is mentioned. In practice, no doubt, the mode of address in these applications varied at the caprice of the writer, and it is not to be inferred from P. Hamburg 19 that the commission was not sitting. The form of the present document was perhaps
technically the

An

more

correct

;

cf.

1024, where a grant of seed

is

authorized by

the strategus and basilicogrammateus.

1262 is substantially analogous to the common Arsinoite receipts (e.g. B. G. U. 104, 05, &c.), but follows a different formula. The reign, of which the sixth year was current, was probably that of Septimius Severus, as is indicated by a document on the verso, a short receipt for rent in four lines, of which the text is

/() .

fis

fvoiKwv


this,

(1.

)

"
(sc.

'/

fTovs)

Below

^, ,

-?
2apar.iahos

written in the reverse direction, the

name

has been washed out.

5

[] {) {) '§{) () (€) {) ^{) [](') [$) {) {) -\:{)
NeiX(a>
?)

5[]

{)

[.]

.

.

_?;(

)

knl

i86

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

{<)
q
{erovs)
TTjeojs

TTapaSocrems
els

15

{) ' - Trjs

{) 8(])
{.\).
/eia

Teifiay[ivovs)

'
'^

[)

() '6{)
viocnitpov)

[)
riyy

(•]

Taei>(f>aT{peiovs)

([$) {)
ei>eaT{a)Tos)

yevrj{jiaTos)
e/y

[].'
els
rjf

{(tovs)
a{vTr]v)

ye-

mpyS) \epi

Trjeiv

13.
'

COIT.

Lucretius Nilus, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, and Serenus, basilicogrammateus of the said nome, through Epimachus son of Sarapion, ex-gymnasiarch, and Demetrius ex-exegetes, appointed to receive and deliver seed employed for the . also called Pha ., sowing of the present 6th year, from ApoUonius the younger, son of Timagenes also called his mother being Didyme also called Tsenphatres, of Teis in the toparchy of Didymus, Thmoisepho. I have received and had measured out to me from you as a loan of seed from the produce of the past 5th year for the sowing of the present 6th year, for the land which
.

To

I cultivate in the area of the said

^
A
83. II,

Teis

.'
. .

4 sqq. In

ex-chief-priest,

1031 the two commissioners, who are both the other agoranomus, are described as

€€5 \)

T07T\ap\Lasj

J

^. :
senators,
cf.

one being also an

im

P.

21. 2—4.

1263.

Announcement concerning Practice of a Trade.
9-4

X

6-1

cm.

notification addressed to the city-scribe of

proposed to begin practising the trade of a is probably a variant of papyri of the later Roman and Byzantine periods

(

,
;

A. D.

128-9.

Oxyrhynchus that the
e/jyarrjs in

writer

the current year.

a word occurring in several
1053.
3,

cf.

1288. 13, B. G. U.
bis,

14.11. I9,iii. 3, &c., 295. 8, II, 818. 5, P. Flor. 157. 3, 373.

i3,Reinach 52

P. S.

I.

appear as labourers employed in the construction or where the As a re'xj;?) this calling was repair of embankments and canals, and similar work.

1263.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

187
in

presumablj' subject to the or tax on trades, and it was probably the interests of that impost that the present declaration was required.

\{)
5

[) [')
[[6
aneXev-

^ \.
'

15

Sib

•\ 88[ [.
Trj
Ti^jiyr).

^ 8
eVoi;[y]

^-

[?

(erovs)]

•[

Diogenes also called Hermaeus, ex-exegetes, scribe of the city, from Dioscorus, freedman of Sarapion son of Sarapion son of Dio inhabitant of Oxyrhynchus in the ., quarter of Hermaeus. I wish to begin from the present thirteenth year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord to practise the trade of a river-worker ; accordingly I present this application
.
.

as above.'

Date.

1264.

Notification of Inviolability.
32-6

X

8-5 cm.

This singular document
the formal entry

()

is

an application to the

in their registers of a right of inviolability

( {)
A. D.

272.

for

attaching to the writer, as recently recognized

by the

dioecetes

;

a copy of the

memorandum
of the claim.
is

of the dioecetes was at the same time forwarded

in substantiation

frequently coupled in inscriptions with immunity from taxation as
conferred
in

a personal privilege

return

for

services

to

the

State (cf e.g.

Dittenberger, Or. gr. inscr. 66, 150. 15), and the same combination occurs in P. Brit. Mus. 345 (ii, p. 113), where two pastophori are described as
TTJs

•}

natural to infer a sileniio that the applicant was not a
order,

.

In the present instance

it is

and the ground of his privilege is presumably to be found in the strange term dvaibeia in 1. 18. It seems likely that, as both Wilcken and Mitteis have
suggested, the word meant
established
is

by the Lex

hilia et

,

member

of

any

priestly

and that the reference is to the ins liberortmi Papia Poppaea. is not indeed known to

have been included among the privileges conferred by that enactment, but

i88

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
its

information regarding

provisions
it

is

incomplete.

What

exactly this

'

implied

is

uncertain

;

perhaps

secured the person of a debtor as against private
it

creditors, or perhaps, as Mitteis thinks,

carried immunitj' from certain public

was wide enough to be efficacious in both these directions. That immunity from taxation was recognized through the registers of the was already known from B. G. U. 1073 (a. d. 275, also from Oxyrhynchus), and it is interesting to find similar treatment accorded to the parallel privilege of Preisigke will perhaps welcome this as fresh evidence that the registers were not a Grundbuch (cf. his recent discussion in Klio xii, If, however, meant immunity from pp. 402 sqq., especially pp. 418-19). distraint, an entry of such a privilege would not be out of place upon the registers
functions
;

possibly

it

.
]

of the

immunity

ownership of property, such a right might naturally appear

[
5

[] '' {) €€ )?. {)
^{€')
€7

[ ]{^)
is

to be connected rather with liturgies, since these were based

(

'

'

as these are

commonly understood

;

or, again, if

the

upon

in a property-register.

]

[.)
Trjs

(-) [] {) [](^)

'

0^•)(^[

€'-^[

-

(
kv

-

>
2

'
€••€'[.]

, '' {)

-

-

^

;

1264.
Koi

(eTouy)

' 6[8]
.
.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

^^
5-

189

25

'{)
rj.

.
corr.

COrr.

from
\.

from

and
18.

1.15.
'

[] ([. (!
4•
1.

Pap.

c6rr.

;

.
Pap.

Fap.
corr.

6.

First

of

|;(/;(«('
Pap.
;

12.
(.'').

>£/

so in

{?).

23.

27. ; COrr,

illustrious city of

also called Apollonius, ex-gymnasiarch of the illustrious and most Oxyrhynchus, and his associate, both keepers of the archives, from Julius Theon also called Zoilus, son of Gaius Julius Alexander, of the illustrious and most illustrious I submit to you in duplicate the copy of the memorandum drawn up in city of Oxyrhynchus. consequence of my petition to his excellency Andromachus, ex-dioecetes, concerning the inviolability legally belonging to me and present this memorandum in order that the proper entry may be made against my name through the registers in your keeping, so that all may know the rights belonging to me in virtue of the number of my children and I swear the oath customary with Romans that I have not made a false statement. The 2nd year of the Emperor Caesar Lucius Domitius Aurelianus Pius Felix Augustus and the 5th year of Julius Aurelius Septimius Vaballathus Athenodorus, most illustrious king, consul, Emperor, general of the Romans, Phamenoth 8.'

Aurelius

.

.

;

Some civic title is to be restored in the lacuna and seems to 1. i (see the critical note, and cf. e. g. 1199. x). This seems to be the latest extant mention of the dioecetes as a central authority cf. Wilcken, Grundz. p. 157. the catholicus had already been instituted by this time 12-15. Cf. the notification of aTfXfia in B. G. U. 1073. 15-19 Iv elbrfre
2.

suit the correction in
8.

()

;

CK

XeToi

.
fivaideias is

eniareX-

1 8.

clearly written,

except for the fact that the top of the

has been

retouched.
9, P. Strassb. 8, B.
of.

20 sqq. Other papyri dated in the joint reign of Aurelian and Vaballathus are C. P. R. G. U. 946. The last alone gives Vaballathus the title as here
loc.

Wilcken' s note ad

,

1265.

Affidavit of Priestly Rank.
23.5

X 8-6 cm.

A. D.

336.

Declaration on oath to the logistes

by

a priest of Zeus, Hera, and other gods,

and bearer from his father.
pp. 203 sqq.

(?;?)
As
is

of the divine images, that his priestly rank

was derived
office in the
i,

well
in

known, the priesthood was a hereditary
earlier

Graeco-Roman period as

times;

cf.

Otto, Priester

und Tempel,

igo

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Mera

8€

SeairoTov

5

,

{).
[]1

'
{])
0^{vpvyyiTOv)

? '^ (, ^• ( (]
(€[

( \\()\'\ -

,

15

20

{^ \€ \ . '
\'\{)

!iepims

25

and hand

[]

,{)
?

.

,
8.

Pap.
2'].
1.

2.

7)/ Pap.

£{?)
26.
1.

25. iVareias Pap.
'

.
. .

.

^

15.

Pap.
a>s

.

20.

1.

TVy}^avovTOS.

The year after the consulship of Julius Constantius, patrician, brother of our master Constantinus Augustus, and Rufius Albinus, the most illustrious. To Flavius Paranius also called Macrobius, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Thonius son of Demetrius, of the same city, priest of the temple of Zeus, Hera, and the associated most

;

1265.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
I

191

great gods, celebrant of the divine images

me

and their advancing victory. Your grace enjoined Accordingly I acknowledge, obtained the aforesaid rank. our masters the Emperor and the Caesars, that I received swearing the holy, divine oath by the said rank in succession to my aforesaid father Demetrius, who was himself one of the said priests and celebrants of the divine images, and that I have made no false statement, In the consulate aforesaid, under penalty of the consequences of the divine oath. Phamenoth 30. I, Aurelius Thonius, have sworn the divine oath, as aforesaid.'
to state in writing

whence

8.

Cf.

the editors of Dikaiomala,
p.
:

p. 64, Otto, Priester

II.

e.g. 1142. 9, note, Mayser, Grammaiik^ pp. 163-4. Wilcken suggests 13. [][;]7;5 is not Very satisfactory.
vestiges less well,

17-18. It is noticeable that the writer makes no reference to his mother; cf. note on 1256. II. 21-2. The words as they stand are just intelligible, but probably the writer intended

! . ( .
3, v^fhere p.
cf. e.

483.

\\

is

probably to be restored, as here, after "Hpar

121, rightly rejected
I.

[
vli.

g. B.

G. U.

19-20, 362.

17, &c., Wessely,

.

Kar.

tind Sohi. Nes.

und Tempel,
for

i,

is

pp. 10, 95. For the

common

omission of y between vowels

cf.

[/17;, but this

suits the

and hardly gives

the required sense.

1266.

Examination

()
is lost,

for Membership of the Gymnasium.

25-2

8•9

cm.

This

is

an application by a father for the

to the latter's admission to the
199, 200, 1202, P.

Rylands loi.

gymnasium cf. Wilcken, Grunds. pp. 140-3, The document is of precisely the same kind as
;

;

A.D. 98.

of his son as a preliminary

257, and being better preserved at the end

The
the

the strategus and basilicogrammateus as the
of ephebi in the provincial towns
qualification as ephebi, however, a further
(cf Wilcken, op.
cit.,

'

is

a useful supplement to that papyrus.
primarily responsible for

beginning, as in 257,

but presumably the application was addressed to
officials

p.

142, 1202. introd.), and 1266

metropoleis, as at Alexandria, the praefect here intervened

[..].[..]...[.]...

/ €
(?

[.

€[€\

!
•[\ -

cf 257. 13-15, 1266. 1-2.

For

full

process of daKpiais was

necessary

now shows
;

that in the local
1.

cf the note on

25.

{(€)

5

-

6

-

192

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

8( ? \\()\^
oy r\v

nepiaiv

early

[][

15

,
Se tv
(eVet)
eiT

'
Se

....

] ,

[

-

T\rj

5

(eroi;?)

-

epoov

eo(eVet),

86

20

6

vapa6evos

ene-

25

^
evoevo
S)v

eTei

ev ra^ei

HavXeivov

€-

30

Xeaov
e-^eva6ai, tivai

,€
]

[e

[

35

''"'

/^?^^

][a]eas ^
{s\


2nd hand 4°

•^[,] .
Nepoa

(eroi/y)

!

Seaov

TeppaviKov Uavvi

.

. () 6€

,

1266.
15. viov Pap.
18.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
COrr.

193
Pap.
;

from

o.

31.

so in

1.

38.

selected at the selection which took place under] . basilicogrammateus, and the other proper officials in the 7th year of the deified Vespasian in accordance with the proofs adduced in his lifetime by my aforesaid father Dionysius also called Amois, son of Psammis son of Ballarus, who was a guard of the palaestra, that his father Psammis son of Ballarus was in the list made in the 34th year of the deified Caesar of those ... in the gymnasium ; and I myself ever since I came up for selection was included in all the lists of the gymnasium ; and I declare that Thermouthion the mother of my son was married to me in the 2nd year of Domitian by an autograph contract which was also made public through the record-office in the following 3rd year, while her father Plution son of Plutarchus, registered at the South Square quarter, was in the same fifth year of the deified Vespasian placed by Sutorius Sosibius, then strategus, and Nicander, then basilicogrammateus, and the other proper officials in the class of persons selected by Quintius (?) Paulinus ; and I swear by the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus that I have made no false statement, and that Plution is the son of myself and Thermouthion by birth and not by adoption nor is he supposititious, and that I have not availed myself of credentials belonging to others or identity of names ; otherwise may I be liable to the consequences of the oath. The ist year
'

[.

.

.

I

declare that I

was

.

.

late strategus

and Pamphilus,

late

I, Psammis of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus, Pauni 16. son of Dionysius also called Amois, have presented the memorandum and sworn

the oath.'

!
1

comparison of the dates in 11. 4 and 1 7 indicates that the reference is to the of the applicant, not, as in 257. 12 sqq., to that of his father. 11-12. oi cK is commonly used absolutely, but here seems to have been combined with a participle.
I sqq.

A

7—1 9. Cf. 906. 8—9

'

we had suggested in Hypoihek und Hypallagma,
that, as
a.

preferred by Mitteis, Grundz.Tpp. 86, 126, must accordingly of private contracts see Mitteis, op. ci/., pp. 82-7, be definitely discarded. On the Preisigke, op. a'/., pp. 296 sqq., 1200. introd., 1273. introd., Jors, Z. Sav. xxxiv, pp. 107 sqq.

^.
23.

,
;
:

Sc

a passage now cleared up by the present parallel, which indicates the note ad loc. (so too Preisigke, Girowesen, p. 299, Schwarz, really i. e. in question was p. 88), the

^^

[]

^\( :

The explanation

,

remarks on pp. 14 1-2 concerning marriage-contracts now require modification. The 5th year has not occurred in what remains of the text, but was perhaps mentioned in connexion with the of the applicant's father in the lines which originally preceded 11. r sqq. cf. 257. 12 sqq. and note. 25. Paulinus is known from Josephus, Bell. Jud. vii. 10. 4 to have succeeded
Jors's

Lupus (died a. d. 73) in the praefecture, but this is his first occurrence in He has been identified with the Valerius Paulinus mentioned by Tacitus, Hisi. iii. Prosopograph. Imp. Rom. iii, p. 373, Cantarelli, La serie del prefetii, i, p. 35), but the 43 nomen is at any rate not Valerius ; it looks rather like a corruption of Quintius. the first three letters are indistinct, but on the whole are more like im than here, if is, however, expected on the analogy of P. Flor. 57. 73, and rightly read, may be due to the carelessness of the scribe. hence be restored in 257. 13-14. 26-7. and must 32-6. Cf. 257. 40-3, which should now be read ctva\i ' ipoi
Ti.
Julius

papyri.
(cf.

.

7(€

2[/3

\( ' \

>\\

\'^

\\ ^

]^ \
(?)

^ €,
\

.

! ]»
14.
Cf.

194

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
\.
may
previously read before is preferable to s, or if the /xi^Scvi on the analogy of B. G. U. 1032. be substituted for &' aXKorpiais also P. Tebt. 316. ii. 9—10 in ]. 35 is conjectural (cf. e.g. P. Tebt. 293. 19), but suits the remains; anap])(ais
;

\\(!

^^ \(/
cm.

&(

('^

^,

cannot be read.

1267.

Registration of a Child.
24-5

X

7-7

A.D. 209. for the registration of

A

request to an

a boy aged three

is to be referred to the which several examples from the Fayum have been published cf. P. Fay. 28, Tebt. 299, Gen. 33, B. G. U. 28, iio-ii, and Wilcken, Grundz. pp. 195-6. There are, however, considerable differences in formula, the most obvious being the concurrence of the owner of the house, where the boy was to be registered, with the boy's father in presenting the application. Possibly, no doubt, in the Fayum examples the parents happened to be owners and not tenants. That the present notification occurred some years after the child's birth is no unusual circumstance. The papyrus offers a still older mention of the tribal organization of the provincial metropoleis than 1030. On the verso is an extract from an official survey-list (1287).

amphodogrammateus of the city years and five months. The document
birth, of
;

category of the notifications of

5

?[] ? [\.
Svptcuvi

<:{]()

SapamaSos

)

/c[a]i

[]\

(

ttjs

^!.

)(ovTos

)

-

Kias
1

5

-5',

;

(^)
{eTOs)

1267.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

195

•{)

/{)

tTWv

nevTe.

20

^ ^
[']

-

eyfreCaO^ai).

25 {(Tovs)

^(.

30

1.
'

[]
Syrion,

^ ^
Pap.
;

[]5 2(
.
Pap.
SO in
1.

14.

15•

UiOi'

19.

Va.^,

from ApoUonarion daughter of Harpalus and Sarapias, of Oxyrhynchus, with her guardian Charmus son of Pausiras and ., and from Zoilus son of Zoilus son of Apollonius, his mother being Claudia daughter Theon, of the said city. We wish that now for the first time and henceforth Zoilus' of legitimate son Horion, his mother being Heras daughter of Apollonius, a payer of twelve drachmae and member of the gymnasium, aged in the present 17th year three years and five months, should be registered in the share of a house owned by me, ApoUonarion, in the Broad Street quarter. We accordingly present this memorandum as is fitting, and swear by the fortune of our lords the Emperors Severus and Antoninus and Geta Caesar Augusti that we have made no false statement.' Date.
of the 3rd tribe,
. .

To

amphodogrammateus

1-2. Cf. 1030. 2, introd., 1116. 20, which gives the equation o{ and Wilcken, Grundz. pp. 42-3, 348-9. 10. cf. the phrase in registrations of property, e. g. P. Tebt. 323. 7, where we interpreted it as meaning that the new owner was making a return for the first time of his acquisition. Mitteis thinks {Grundz. p. loi) that the sense must be that the person making the return was appearing for the first time as a property-owner Eger, Aeg. Grundbiichwesen, pp. 12 1-2, leaves the question open. The analogy of the present passage is distinctly in favour of our original explanation. 13. In 733. 3 )[7-/)()] n\aT(eias) is probably to be read. in preference to 1 7. The gist of the document appears to commend the meaning being that Horion was qualified by descent for eventual classification as a Cf. e. g. P. Amh. 75. 35, where the latter phrase is applied to a boy of three years.
:

!

,

(«;^),

- ^.

()

;

196

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1268.

Registration of a House after Purchase.
16-9

X

I2-I

cm.

Third century.

This document belongs to the class of property-returns following upon purchase, of which examples have been published from the Fayiim (e. g. P. Tebt.
323),
(P.

Hermopolis

Strassb. 34)

pp. 99-101.

Mus. 945 (iii, p. 120), Leipzig 3. ii), and Antinoe Eger, Aeg. Grundbuchwesen, pp. 1 20-3, Mitteis, Grundz. 1268 has some peculiarities which give it an interest in spite of its
(e.

g. P. Brit.

;

cf.

extensive mutilation.

A noticeable feature
title
;

is

the array of documentary evidence

adduced Antinoe
is

in

support of the purchaser's

in the parallels

from Hermopolis and
it is

this is less prominent, while in those

from the

Fayum
is

not directly

referred to.

An

analogous papyrus from Oxyrhynchus

but is an application for irapaeecrLs, an expedient not in the form of an supposed to have been adopted when the previous owner had not made an 1199, as cf. Eger, op. cit., pp. 131 sqq., Mitteis, op. cit., pp. 103 sqq.
;

?)
yet
it

1199, which, however,

was pointed out

by a
an
it

1268 now brings the correlative contrary evidence apparently states in 11. 14-15 that the vendors was conMitteis plausibly suggests that the present ditioned by the production of evidence that the vendors' title depended on But it Can hardly be said that the conditions (11. 1 3, 1 7). are yet fully understood. and underlying the alternatives of

is

boL

.,
itself

in the introd.

ad

loc,

conflicts with the
in

current explanation

positive statement that the

property

question had been declared in
;

by the vendor.

an

The document
Alexander.

belongs to the
1.

first

half,

probably, of the third century
refer

the sixth year mentioned in

2nd hand

[

[^
[

{
26
KaTCt

5

may

well

to the

reign

of Severus

21 letters

as]

((). () {(^)
'HpUTos

2 1 letters

5

[

['

-]
letters
]

]>

'Hparos

'AvTivoems.

19 letters

! ]
Ilero-

'

^
(erei)

€TToXecoy

1268.
[r^y

[
[ [ [

8$
noXecos
1

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
Oeai

{5)
rij]

!/][]

!
197

'
TaatvTL
1

fat

8 letters

{)
€7

}

[_

9 letters

24
2^

letters
.'

t^oSois

]^
ttj

^]

\68

[

29 letters

15

[
[

\ [
[

27

,.

]

.

.

[.

] []
/€]//[€]_''

86]•[]

21 letters

]

[•]

,€ , (68
SiaXoyrjs

Se

][]5
S)v

2

[ \
I.

28 letters

/[]_'

"29 letters
corr.

]

[

]

'"®''

]

/f['?i']i

,
rpels

[\
\

]i^

''[•]

^

3.

Cf e.g. 713. I. The Oxyrhynchite
.
. .

cf. 579, 1117. 2-3. But the fact that a person tjj was at the same time an 9. Cf. 1208. 6, note. owner of property shows that the patria polestas was not strictly interpreted in Egypt. is a somewhat doubtful restoration, but seems suitable enough in this 13. context on the use of the term cf. Mitteis, Grundz. p. 63. On the iroXeai), which appears in connexion with the of contracts, cf. Mitteis, op. cit., pp. 84-5,
:

4—5. 6-7.

[ :

14-0 of TOW

from

-.

1

8.

tVois

Pap.

) \\( .
The

is
:

mentioned also
e.g.
1.

in

cf.

1 7,

Mitteis,

270. 22, 1052. 5. Grundz. pp. 65-7.

]/[]

;

Preisigke, Gi'rowesen, p. 297. are not yet clear. Mitteis's

relations of the officials
84',

^

{

remark (pp.

to the KardKoyeiov rfj 125') that apparently the latter only was

8\

ig8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
seems
to

concerned with the preparation of
present passage.

20•2
ofifice.

([](.

\][ . -(]\(].
A

14—16. Similarly 119 9. 24—5 "["]' The next words should now be restored, on the analogy ofl. 16, e[iv]ai S[e Something like may be supplied in the lacuna before
[a]n-oyfypa(^i[ai]

^

need modification

in the light of the

1269.

List of Property. X

•2

cm.

Early second century.

list

addressed to the exegetes (of Oxyrhynchus) of some property belong-

ing to two minors whose father was dead.

The

list

had been drawn up by

the uncle of the minors on the order of the previous exegetes and was

mitted to his successor in the
functions of the exegetae
323),
;

A

supervision of minors was one of the

cf.

P.

Amh.

85, 86, B. G.

and

for a

near parallel to the present papyrus B. G. U. 388.
eKeyov '^Apov

T{.vk% TTpos

6
list
(ii,

(\
different
is
1.

-'

[.][]
their late

had been pawned by
p. 245)•

owner

.
(sc.
;

U. 1070 (= Mitteis, Chrestom. ii. 22-4 etVeXSoiires

various

Several of the articles in the

)

now sub-

[\[,]
193. verso

cf.

e.g. 114, P. Brit.

Mus.

Three

The upper part From cursive.
left

hands are apparently to be distinguished in the document. upright semi-uncials which change in 1. 20 to a smaller 4 onwards dots or short dashes have been placed in the
in
lines.

margin close to most of the

€< ,

^

iepe?

^ ,
-

(and hand)

5

TOS

^ ^. ^ {)
''''1
Se
tepei

1269.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

199

,
15

20

• ,
KOVS,

€8/^?
{}

^
erepos

O^vpvyymv

^.

€\
(3rd hand)
irpos

25 XfioLS

,
]
.

,)

IaaTo(s)

[]}, []
[

3

'

[

,
35
[

,
]^
4•
[
1.

, ] [] ,
•\[\

-k-

[\

Iji^pivov

[] % \
24.

,
1.

,\\,
8.

3•

; of

; corr.
30.

over something expunged.
29.
1.

^^pov.

« . .
33.

over something expunged. or Xiavaprj. 1. 28.
36.
1.

1.

.
Or

irpos

added above the Hne.

,

ig.

icraT-o(f)

from Theonas son of Isidorus and Appended is a copy of the list which I presented to SoSris of the city of Oxyrhynchus. Sarapion, your predecessor as exegetes, of the articles left to my nephew and niece, being minors, Sarapas and Sarapous, by their deceased father, who was my full brother, Isas. To Sarapion, priest and exegetes in office, from Theonas son of Isidorus and Soerous of the city of Oxyrhynchus. Being asked by you for a list of the furniture and other articles left to my nephew and niece, being minors, Sarapas and Sarapous, by their deceased father who was my full brother Isas, I declare that they are as follows a coffer
'

To

Ptolemaeus, priest and exegetes in

office,

:

200

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

supplied with a false key, another out of use, a box of bronze, a plate or dish pledged by Isas during his lifetime to Panares for twenty drachmae of silver, another box likewise pledged for ten drachmae to the same Panares, a flask of tin pledged to the same person for four drachmae, a coloured pledged to me for a further sum of twelve drachmae, a tunic pledged to Tnephersois for eight drachmae, and a half share in three weavers' looms which belonged to his father, a pig sold by me, Theon, after the death of my brother Isas .' for forty drachmae, a large chest of bronze, one cup of tin and one of silver, a pillow .
. . . . . .

14.

22. occurs in a line of Plato Com. (Kock 77) apparently in the sense of a false key ; that this is the meaning here is not clear. 23. kKus does not seem to occur elsewhere in this sense.

^
:

in

1.

3 she

was

called

34. Bloivos: in
note.

11.

2

and 13

.
{c)

?

.

;

cf.

1.

34, note,

and 1291.

introd.

The same

irregularity occurs in

119;

cf.

1.

14,

PETITIONS.
6•5
cm.
of

1270,

Notification through the Archidicastes.
32
A. D. 159.

A notice addressed

to the strategus

by the purchaser

some land

that he

had brought the terms of his contract to the cognizance of the archidicastes, who had authorized the strategus to communicate this fact to the seller or her representatives. Documents of this class, of which other examples are 485, B. G. U. and were commonly employed to bring formal 578, &c., are known as notice of claims for breaches of agreement cf. Mitteis, Grundz. pp. 122 sqq., who has well characterized the proceeding as Mahnverfahren '. The peculiarity of 1270 is that no claim or complaint is specified the object of the communication is apparently stated to be merely that the seller might be aware of the validity of the contract (11. 52-3). This is yet more vague than 286, an analogous invocation of the archidicastes in which the claim is still hypothetical
;
'

,
,

;

,

is

(11.

17-20).

the present case, too, some negligence in the fulfilment of the terms of the contract

was anticipated, and the purchaser had recourse to this as a precautionary measure. Mitteis suggests that the seller had died, and that her heirs had to be notified before being called upon to carry out the terms of the agreement cf. Cod. Theod. ii. 27. i. In 1. 50 the possibility of her decease
;

/
:
.

?

.

.

Perhaps

in

is

indeed mentioned, but only

in

a stereotyped phrase

(cf.

e. g.

485. 29, and

contrast B. G. U. 888. 20), which does not imply that the writer believed death to have taken place.
It

may

be remarked that
is

in the application to

the archidicastes an abstract
it.

of the contract

given, not a complete copy of

This

is

very likely due,

1270.
as suggested
is

PETITIONS

not parallel

a notarial
upon.

-,
;

Of

differentiated from

?
by
cf.

Mitteis in connexion with B. G. U. 888 (Grtindz. p. 134^

1266. 17-19, note), to the fact that the contract in question was

not a
there
is

requiring

here

no word, and

^
;

201
:

906

before

it

could be acted
is

the document

thus

719,

and cannot be explained as an announcement of the
cf.

fact of publication to the other party to the contract

5

'() ^. [[5 ,\ '[ .^ €. [)
[)8[
woXems.
tepevi
[

1276. 19, note.

KiXep

[ )([ €< [^9 ^([.

Tevs

15

5}

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20
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.

Kaiaapos

[

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202
30

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

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A

of Oxyrhynchus. Phocion, strategus, from Ptolemaeus son of Herodes and ., copy of the communication which I have obtained from the record-office is as follows

1270.

PETITIONS

203

" Celer, priest and archidicastes, to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, greeting. Let a copy of the application presented to me be served, as below. Good-bye. The 22nd year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, the ... of the month Hadrianus. Signed by me, written by me, Sarapion ., scribe of the record'" To Celer son of the ex-hypomnematographus office. ex-strategus of the city, ., priest, archidicastes, and superintendent of the chrematistae and other tribunals, from Ptolemaeus son of Herodes and . ., of Oxyrhynchus. By the terms of the contract made daughter of Diogenes and Sinthoonis with her guardian her son by me with Ammon Diogenes son of Theon, of the said city, in the present 22nd year, she acknowledged that she had ceded to me the sixth part of an arura, or thereabouts, whether more or less, of catoecic corn-bearing arable land, of rectangular shape, belonging to her in the area of the village ... in the holding of Polycleidas, and formerly the property of . daughter of Diogenes, the whole one arura being held jointly with . and another, and being adjoined on the south, north, east, and west by and that she had received from me ., forthwith from hand to hand in full the hundred and six drachmae of the Imperial silver coinage agreed upon between us as the price of the sixth part of an arura, as aforesaid, and that she would guarantee the land with every guarantee as free from the liability of cultivating royal or domain land and every impost and from construction and ... of dykes and also from all public taxes incident in the past down to the end of and including the 2 ist year of Antoninus Caesar the lord, because the proceeds henceforth belong to me, Ptolemaeus, with the conditions included in the contract concerning the previous cultivation. I beg you to give orders that instructions should be sent to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome to serve a copy of this application upon Ammon . if alive, or if not, upon her full heirs whose names will be disclosed on the spot, as is fitting, in order that they may know that the contract with all its provisions is valid.'" (Endorsed) Let the proper steps be taken. The 22nd year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, the ... of the month Hadrianus." In these circumstances I request that a copy should be served on Ammon fitting.' Date. ., as is
.
. . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.,

.

.

,
I.
1 8.

Phocion has occurred in 476, which may now be dated more precisely. 10-12. For the double signatures cf e.g. 485. 8, 719. 6. ey[pa^a is possible but the Order would be unnatural and a patron}'mic is more probable, with

understood. 12—14.
Cf.

\(
1.

58

;

either

28.

Very

([/
29—30.
46. 48.

€€,

likely np6s

^
or

?

after

.:
;

cf.

727. 2—3, B.G. U. 888. 5—6.
possible.

is

€[(

top

if right,

must be

the

. genitives . ?) or a descriptive phrase or at any rate the latter of them, look like an error for accusatives. -6 where the mutilated ....]. [.] ias 39. Cf 1208. 21 word before is doubdess the same as i[. here ; it is not, apparently, The supplement is a shortened form of 504. 25-6, 1208. 22. 45.
.

([
.
.

but

e

may

be the

initial

name of a person and The ?).
.

[^•'\ [

,
29,
1.

-

of a proper name. either a patronymic

-\,
^,

.
.

£]8
is

Cf

emSoivm,

to be read.

would

53. For £' off also be suitable.

not to be connected with the preceding sentence 54. but is the endorsement of the archidicastes, to be taken with the following date ; cf 286. 28. In 485. 34 and B.G. U. 578. 22 a full stop should similarly be placed before ass
as

,,
:

for the

supplement e.g. 286. 12, 485. 24. cf. e.g. B. G. U. 578. 20, 888. 20, and 485.

where

not

which

is

quite conjectural here, cf

46 note.

o5 cav

1200. 56 shows,

is

204

56-8. 485. 35-7
ak\}S>

1. 35 the Supposed mark of abbreviation is no doubt a stroke over the day of the month ; after this there would be room In 1. 56 which, however, may well have been omitted. more than room) for (but not here, if [/c]at is right in the line below, nothing more than the figures of the date are wanted and the rest of the line was presumably blank. after

^ ,
\
An
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
may now be
yei/£V6[ai

]7.

read on

this

analogy

[0

.]

.

[>?]

T[o]yVov ovtos

At the end of

,

1271.

Petition to the Praefect.
13-1

X

8

cm.
(cf.

A.D. 246.

Plate V.

application to the praefect Valerius Firmus

720.

i,

1194. introd.) from

a

woman who was

a citizen of Side for a permit to leave the country via Pharos.
official

An
but
this

extremely cursive

endorsement

in

Latin remains partly undeciphered,

not likely to have contained more than a formal authorization.

With

interesting illustration of the vigilance exercised

by
f$ov

the Government on

the frontiers of

Egypt and the
. .
.

strictness with
ii.

which ingress and egress were
loi

.
C.
I.

€( ?
^AKe^avbpfCai

controlled Wilcken aptly compares Strabo

'

; 'Ae^avbpq

This Ptolemaic

addressed to the commandant at Pharos, corresponding to the authorization For the latter official cf. issued by the Roman praefect to the procurator Phari.
L.
vi.

,
.. I

ovbe ye

^»,

mentioned by Strabo was no doubt a permit

,

(vehexero

en

) ^'
avev

^poaos

"6^%% proc.

Pari Alexandriae ad Aegyptum.

5

,, ,
pot;

S {85).

€ []
.

2nd hand Valerms Firnms
Asclepiade
diniitti
.

.
Wos.

• .

... si
.\.
.

s

d
.

.

.

10

CO

.

.

tis

d

.

••/'>[•

dqtiim xvii k\al{endas)
Present}

A [Ibino co{ji)s{ulibus)

1271.
'

PETITIONS

205

To

lord, to sail out

Valerius Firmus, praefect of Egypt, from Aurelia Maeciana of Side. I wish, my by way of Pharos ; I therefore beg you to write to the procurator of Pharos
to leave, as
is

to allow
8.

me

usual.

Pachon

i.

Farewell.'

Latin endorsement.

Asclepiadae is expected, but the letter after d is not in the least like a and probably Asdepiade was meant. At the end of the line neither Phari nor Pari seems to suit ; iussi looks more possible, and sal(uiem) would then be almost inevitable for the intervening word. 9. Some form oi dimittere ns.tax2\\y suggests itself, and perhaps dimiiti or dimittimus was
fifth letter is much more like a or r than /; cf. however the / oi datum (?) The first letter might be b. Wilcken, who has contributed to the decipherment 1. 12. of these lines, proposes dimittite de F\aro (better P\haro), but for this there is strictly a stroke too much. 10. One of the two letters after co is apparently m. 12-13. datum accords with the following figures, and Presenilis sufficiently suitable in the next line ; the remains of the letter before the lacuna apparently exclude e\_t A Ihino.

meant, though the
in

1272.

Complaint of Theft.
13-9

X 9-6 cm.

A. D. 144.

This document belongs to a well-known type, which has been discussed at length by Mitteis, Leipz. Sitz.-Ber. pp. 6'^ sqq. and Grmidz. pp. 0,'^ sqq. Owing to the mutilation of the beginning it is uncertain whether the petition

was addressed to the strategus
officer of police.

or, as

frequently happens, to a centurion or lesser
1.

The suggestion

in

19 of a personal inspection perhaps points

rather to the latter.

[
[.
.

5

[

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.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
\yep'\8iov
8ic(,

TTJs

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.

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20
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1.

{)
.

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(2nd hand)

.

. from Diemous daughter of Colluthus, of the city of Oxyrhynchus], with her said city. ... I shut up the door of my house and ., of the of the terrace, and on my return I found that a box which I had in the terrace the door had been unfastened and that there had been abstracted from it two gold bracelets of the weight of four minae, a gold figure of Bes, and two large silver bracelets, and that the door of the terrace had been lifted. As I have some suspicion against my neighbours Heras son of Kalathus, weaver, and those working with him, because my house is easy of access from the house of Heras, I present this petition and request that, if you think fit, you should come for a personal inspection, and that Heras and his associates, whose names he will himself give, should be brought before you and the proper inquiry made, in order that I may be able Date and signature of Diemous written for with your assistance to discover my property.' her by Sarapion. '
.
.

[

guardian Sarapion son of

2-3.
5.

remains of a letter or two shortly before the supposed are insufficient to confirm the supplement suggested. see P. Munich 11. 20, 27, notes, and cf. 9. 33, 12. 6. For the signification of 16, 22, P. Brit. Mus. 210. 19 {/otirn. Phil, xxii, p. 272), 978. 10 (iii, p. 233), 1023. 19
slight
(iii,

Very

p. 268), Flor. 5. 9.

10.

Silver

B.

G.U.

387.

16. cf. P. Fay. no. 9, where the same (Wilcken, ap. Preisigke, Berichtigungslisie, i, p. 131).
:

[ (
ii.

is

derived from

26.

and bronze images of Bes are mentioned
9, II.

in a

list

of temple furniture in
is

compound

to be recognized

1273.

CONTRACTS

207

{d)

CONTRACTS.
Marriage-contract.
34-1

1273.

X

15-5 cm.

A. D.

260.

between the bridegroom and the mother of the bride, in protocol form like 496, which is more elaborate, and 905, which is shorter, than 1273, The document is of interest as representing a later age than the bulk of
the marriage-contracts of the

A marriage-contract

Roman

period hitherto published, which, with the

exception of the fragmentary C. P. R. 21 of A. D. 230, belong to the first two But though the date in the present case is the middle of the third centuries.
century, and the contracting parties are all Aurelii, the various clauses, apart The from the usual stipulatory formula, adhere closely to the Greek type. specification of the dowry, which consisted, as usual, partly of jewellery, partly of
clothing, contains several rare words.
It is

for future publication

remarkable that the contract includes the stereotyped clause providing From this one 11. 37'~4)•
its

of two conclusions appears to follow, each of which conflicts with prevailing views.

( ,
objective style

Either this document in spite of

ment, or notarial contracts could go through the same process of formal publication Of these alternatives the former is much the more probable. as

A certain instance of a contract of marriage drawn up in the form of an
and afterwards published has occurred
loc.)
;

€.

was a privately-drawn agree-

in 1266.

i6sqq. (see the note ad

'
ttj

specification of locality,

and there are certain formal features in 1273 the absence of any opening and the position of the date at the end (contrast e. g. If this view is 496) which, though indecisive, are not without significance. correct, an objective form is a less trustworthy criterion of a notarial contract than has been supposed (cf Mitteis, Grtmdz, pp. 61-3).

],

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1373.

CONTRACTS

^
(•

209

.

(2nd hand)

(

}

(
Apa-ivoos

(ord hand)

,

€-

7)
12.

Pap.

^,

8. f of Pap. ; SO in

COrr.

from

11.

8,

29.

. 5•

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i"i

Pap.

51•

of

((

else

€7\£](
of

for -Bcis.

44. Third

t

corr.

from

o.

II. 1. Pap. Ttjs Pap. 20. . Pap. 36. 29. rij Pap. Pap. 5°• "^u'lijr 49.
9-

^

and

corr.

52.

corr.

from

.

' For good fortune. Aurelia Thaesis daughter of Eudaemon and Herais, of Oxyrhynchus, acting with Aurelius Theon also called Nepotianus and however he is styled, has given her daughter Aurelia Tausiris in marriage to the husband Aurelius Arsinous son of Tryphon and Demetria, of the said city, to whom the said giver contributes as the dowry of her said daughter the bride in common gold on the Oxyrhynchite standard a necklace of the kind called maniaces, having a stone and weighing apart from the stone 13 quarters, a brooch (?) with 5 stones set in gold, weighing apart from the stones 4 quarters, a pair of ear-rings with 10 pearls weighing apart from the pearls 3 quarters, a small ring weighing ^ quarter, and in clothing at a valuation a silvery striped Dalmatian veil worth 260 drachmae, a white, single, tasselled, striped frock worth 1 60 drachmae, a turquoise-coloured Dalmatian veil worth 100 drachmae, another white Dalmatian veil with a purple border worth 100 drachmae, making the total of the whole dowry i mina 4^ quarters of common gold, and for the valuation of the clothing 620 drachmae, a sum total to which no addition has been made ; and questioned concerning the aforesaid dowry by the giver of the bride Aurelia Thaesis, the bridegroom Aurelius Arsinous agreed that he had received the full number at the aforesaid weight and valuation. Let husband and wife therefore live blamelessly together, observing the duties of marriage, and the husband shall supply his wife with all necessaries in proportion to his means ; but if which heaven forbid in consequence of an estrangement a separation of the parties takes place, the husband shall restore to the giver of the bride, if she be living, or if not, to the bride, the aforesaid dowry in full within 60 days from the day on which a demand for restoration is made, the gold objects in accordance with the amount of the weight in each case, while, in respect of the clothes at

2IO

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

a valuation, the bride's representatives shall have the choice of keeping them at the valuation be then made and receiving the balance in silver, or receiving the aforesaid valuation, the If at the time of responsibility for the wear and loss of all these resting with the husband. the separation the bride should be pregnant, the husband shall give her on account of the expenses of the birth 40 drachmae ; and in connexion with the demand of the aforesaid dowry the bride's representatives shall have the right of execution upon both the husband and all his property. This contract is valid, being written in duplicate so that each party may have one copy, and whenever they or one of them chooses, he shall make it public through the bureau, without requiring the concurrence of the other side or any further consent, because both sides now agree to the future publication, and to each other's questions whether this is done rightly and fairly they have given their assent. The 7th year of the Emperors and Caesars Publius Licinius Valerianus and Publius Licinius Valerianus Gallienus Germanici Maximi Pii Felices and Publius Licinius Cornelius Saloninus Valerianus, the most noble Caesar, Augusti, Mecheir 2. (Signed) I, Aureha Thaesis, have given my daughter in marriage to the above mentioned Arsinoiis and have made over to him the aforesaid dowry I, Aurelius as aforesaid, and in answer to the formal question have declared my consent. Theon also called Nepotianus, was associated with her and wrote on her behalf, as she is which heaven illiterate. I, Aurelius Arsinoiis, have received the aforesaid dowry, and if forbid a separation take place, I will restore it as aforesaid, and in answer to the formal question I have declared my consent.'
to

2.

virtue of the ius h'berorum dispense with a xipios (e. g.

taken by a
6-7. 912.
6, 8.

where

though the very
10, wcti/af 12.
for
:

'
(ca[i

( !;
1.

:

after the introduction

[].
faint vestiges
cf.
:

cf.

912. 4, note, and Mitteis, Grundz. cf. 496, 3, where 1.
:

seems to be a new word.
P. Par. 10.
cf.

.
13.

(!
t-\i

occurs as an epithet of gold in Tzetzes,
. .
.

P. Tcbt. 406, 14

.

With the form

pp.

167-8.
24.
for
is

,, ^ p.

of the constUutio Anionina 1277. 2), but his place
252.
for

women
is

could in not infrequently

(.[ ([,
might be restored also
y, irivas
t.

and
3,

Possibly

it

in

496.

cannot be said to suggest

9—10

'

it.

114. 5

where the
i.

,
For

as
its

we

Suggested,
cf.

is

628.
6,

use here

e.g.

I'J

.

.

.

cf.

e.g. vayaiQv in 912.

and Mayser, Grammatik,

£];7«'[]
also

(cf.

read and
point, 25-

906. 4-5, B. G. U. 1045. unsuitable. In 905. 10 there

and 46. 8 has For the restorations cf

,

18, C. P. R. 27.
is

1 2) is hardly to be a lacuna before xop;;yeiVM at this

1.

496.

()
omitted.

29. 1 5 fxAoy^s-

(\

Tovs is

!

52.

perhaps a mistake for

(\

,

iav

should be read. is 60 drachmae. 33-4. In 496. 10 the corresponding payment for 44. The full name of Saloninus, the youngel• son of Gallienus, here occurs for the first time in a papyrus, and the restoration proposed by P. M. Meyer in P. Giessen 50. 34 is In P. Brit. Mus. 211 confirmed. A similar date is found in P. Rylands no. 21-4. oiaKepiavov are (ii, p. 266), if the year has been rightly read, the names

'

due

to the following

(')

—UnleSS

mp\

there tOO

; ()

cf.

however
nepl
.

.

.

1274.

CONTRACTS

211

1274.

Appointment of a Representative.
1

6-3

X

14-4 cm.

Third century.

\5 ,
A contract

whereby Aurelia Aristous, widow of a basilicogrammateus of the appoints a representative to go to Alexandria in order to
property of her late
of
heir,

register before the procurator nsiaais the value of the

husband on behalf of the Oxyrhynchus (1. 13, note).
which the description

who was
1.

a minor, though a gymnasiarch

15 begins an enumeration of various debts chargeable to the estate in connexion with Aristous's dowry and other claims of
is imperfectly preserved. The ordinary formalities concerning the registration of inheritances in the third century are illustrated by (i) P. Arnh. 72 (a.d. 346), a return addressed to the deputy-strategus of the

In

Hermopolite nome by a woman, announcing that the property of her uncle, who had died intestate, devolved upon her and was worth 3 talents, and stating that she had sent the i. e. aguitio bmiorum possessionis (cf. 1201, Mitteis, Grundz. p. 247) to the praefect (2) P. Rylands 109 (A.D. 235), a declaration addressed to the strategus of the same nome by two minors through their guardian, that property inherited under their father's will was worth about 10 talents (3) 1114 (a.d. 237), a Latin professio (called an a-noypa^-i] in 1. 34) with a Greek affidavit by a man stating that his wife had died intestate, and that the inheritance, which passed to their two daughters, was worth 200,000 sesterces and exempt from the succession duty of 5 per cent. 1114 was drawn up before an official belonging to a. p-ocuraiio, of which the description is lost, but which seemed to be that of the procurator vicesimae. It is possible, however, in the

?,

;

()

;

light of 1274. 10 that the office in question

was that of the procurator usiacus, administered the patrimonium, and ranked immediately below the idiologus (cf. Wilcken, Grundz. p. 158).
a high financial
official

who

5

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!

Pap.

Aurelia Aristous daughter of Aurelius Herodes son of Apion, ex-gymnasiarch, senator of the city of Oxyrhynchus, with the guardian given to me in accordance with Roman custom, Marcus Aurelius Nicocles son of Zoi'lus, ex-gymnasiarch of the said city, to Aurelius Heraclides also called Lucius, son of Lucius, and however you are styled, greeting. In consequence of the lamentable news announced to me concerning the death of my blessed husband Achillion also called Apollonius, son of ApoUonius, while at his post of basilicogrammateus of the territory of the Alexandrians, I agree that I have by this bond appointed you to go down to Alexandria and register with his excellency the procurator usiacus in my name on behalf of the son of myself and my said husband, and his heir, Aurelius Dionysius also called Apollonius, gymnasiarch of the said city, who is still subject to the Laetorian And out of law, all his (Achillion's) property, valued at two hundred thousand sesterces. this estate I declare that my husband owes me from the dowry which was brought to him upon my marriage with him consisting of gold ornaments and clothing and other objects valued
at
»

two
5. 8.

talents

The

cogrammateus.

^,
:

and 3000 drachmae of
cf.

silver
.

.

.

1114. 24

.

.

being administered as a distinct nome, naturally had a

.
.'

basili-

e.g. 977, P. Grenf. ii. 71. 5, 9. technical terms for the appointment of representatives
(cf.

B.G.U. 1093.
;

and

. G. . 6.

13.

Cf. B.

G. U. 378. 21—2
i.

yap

6.

The

lex Laetoria or Plaetoria, which

[

are the 7) or cf Mitteis, Grundz. p. 261.

(

firrbs

was passed before 190

b.

c,

protected persons under the age of twenty-five from fraud, and the phrase cVris toC is equivalent to For other instances of minors as gymnasiarchs cf. 54, C.P. R. 8. 9, B. G. U. 324. I, and Milne, Ca/al. of Greek Inscriptions in the Cairo Museum, no. 9314
14.

200,000 sesterces, as is most drachmae, i. e. 33 talents 2,000
20. Either
in
11.

::
6

. "!
cf.

1114.

!
1274.
likely,

CONTRACTS

213

((( () .
read.

21-2, which may be a repetition of that in 1. 18, perhaps make the three talents odd of 11. 23-4, but the last few lines of the document are so much mutilated that the relation to each other of the different amounts remains quite uncertain.

]'

15 eamque heredilatem esse dticend^i^pm. If this means it should be equivalent to 50,000 denarii or 200,000

or

(]»
dr.

may be

This sum added to that mentioned

1276.

Engagement of Musicians.

between five of Souls, a village in the lower toparchy of the Oxyrhynchite noma (cf. note on 1. 35), and the manager of a company of musicians whose services are engaged for a five days' festival. Similar agreements concerning village entertainments are P. Brit. Mus. 331 (ii. p. 154), Gen. 73, cf. also 475, 519, 731, and 1025. Flor. 74, Grenf. ii. 67
;

A contract

16-7

X

10-4 cm.

Third century.

['0]//''

5

[) '[\] {\ \'\ [
\
irepl

\\^ [] ][] () [\5 '[\(
T[a\vaeipios

[
(ist
/3

(2nd hand) Av\pr\kLoi 'Ov-

hand)

[

'[\ -

, XovecuS,

]

[],

]crii

{\\

'
15

€{) ^

{()

-

-

;

214

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\<
20 o^ovs
iv6s,

eVoy

Konpivi
\yo\v ap(p)aj3cui'[os•]

\[] [] []
25

39 .
eiV
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.
.

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ivTfveev.
'

1.

!.

.

'^!
26.

Pap.

Pap.

20.

1.

25• o[^\vpvyxeiTovVa.Y>.

^^ Pap.
Tha'isous,

The Aurelii Onnophris son of Ammonius and
. .

Aphunchis son of Heraclas and

Hermogenes son of Dionysius and Heraclous, ... sis son of Philotas and Aristous, son of Ammonius, all five presidents of the village of Souis, and Copreus son of and Sarapammon, chief of a company of flute-players and musicians, mutually acknowledge that on the one hand Onnophris and his associates have engaged Copreus with his company
Tausiris,
.

for the inhabitants of the aforesaid village for five festal days beginning on the Phamenoth of the present 2nd year at the daily pay of one hundred and forty drachmae, forty pairs of loaves, and eight cotylae of raphanus-oil, and for the whole five and on the other hand Copreus forthwith days one jar of wine and one jar of vinegar

to

perform

tenth of

;

acknowledges

Onnophris and that he has received as earnest-money twenty-drachmae. his associates shall receive Copreus and his company from the Oxyrhynchite nome with ten .' . asses, and shall transport them to the aforesaid village
7.

[]7
but
cf.
tlie

on oath by an inhabitant of Psobthis

^
In

.

:

cf.

299. 4

[]7;

Nc/jipwi»

and 239.

6 sqq., a declaration
. . .

Gen. 73' where a dancer makes an agreement with mentioned, and in the similar contract to perform a seems to be equivalent to Grenf ii. 67 the title ^yoipemi irwahov P. was the president of the village In the note on 299. 4 it was suggested that the
at Philadelphia, a KoWrjyiov is

7[]() 5.
;

Xoyeiav yeyovlvat

.

\\
five

;?.

((,
hypothesis

occurrence here of

(sc.

were the 122. 6—8 TOtf

could be read, in which case the reign of Caracalla would be meant is preferable on palaeographical grounds. for a five days' engagement with their 16-20. In P. Flor. 74 two and 2 drachmae pairs of loaves, 2 receive 136 drachmae, 30 presents a difficulty, for Souis was not outside the OxyToO 25. The writer perhaps meant of it (1285. 139). rhynchite nome but in the the metropolis, which is likely to have been the head-quarters of Copreus ; cf P. Brit. Mus. 233 (ii, p. 154) and P. Grenf. ii. 67, where in the corresponding clauses concerning the apparently refer, as remarked by Wilcken, and transport of the performers

.

{)

^, ((
payos)
:

P.

Hamburg

35.

2—4

but the

8([]. former was wider \ [(^(.
the

\

acting together disposes of that

Meyer SUppOSeS
is

,
.
.

that

these

term, as

clear

from P. Rylands

but a later date in the third century

'[](

Ckresl. pp. 574-5, to Arsinoe.

^

,

.

1276.

CONTRACTS

215

27.

Sale of House-property.
31-9

X

19-4 cm.

A. D.

249.

A

contract for the sale of half a house to the owner of the other half for
in

700 drachmae, with the signatures of the vendors written formula closely resembles that of 1200. 15-43.

rude uncials.

The

'HpaiSos

5

. (^
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owe

2i6
15 Koi

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(
eiSovs

,, 20 TfDOev

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Sia

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;

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so in 1.2.
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2.
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\.

Pap.

15.

.

.

.

25.

1.

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28.

(

^^.

22.

typaijra

inserted above the line.

/

Fa.p.

Pap.
1.

33.

Aioyevovs.

1376.
'

CONTRACTS
Nice,

217

Aurelius

Agathodaemon son of Geminus and

and Aurelia Meithous daughter of

Apion and Herai's, both of Oxyrhynchus, Meithous acting without a guardian in accordance with Roman custom by right of her children, to Aurelius Serenus also called Sarapion, son of Agathinus and Taposirias, of the said city, greeting. agree that we have sold to you from the present time henceforth for ever the half share of an old house and all appurtenances thereof owned by us in equal portions at the said city of Oxyrhynchus The in the Myrobalanus quarter, jointly with you in respect of the remaining half share. adjacent areas of the whole are on the south a blind street, on the north the house of Theonis

We

daughter of Horus, on the east the house of Diogenis daughter of Diogenes and others, on the west a public street. The sum agreed upon between us for the price of the said half share of the house with the appurtenances, seven hundred drachmae of Imperial silver coin, we have forthwith received from you in equal portions from hand to hand in full, so that henceforward you and your descendants and successors shall possess and own the half share of the house sold to you by us as aforesaid and use and dispose of it in whatever vi^ay you choose ; and we will guarantee to you the half share completely against all claims by every guarantee, free from persons' property-returns and the cultivation of royal or patrimonial land and from every impost or debt or lien of any kind and all other liabilities whatsoever. This sale, written in duplicate, is valid, and you shall make it public through the bureau whenever you choose, without requiring a notification or any further concurrence on our part, because we now agree to the publication to be made by you, and in answer to your question whether this is rightly and fairly done we have given our assent. The 6th year of the Emperors and Caesars Marci Julii Philippi Carpici Maximi Germanici Maximi Pii Felices Augusti, Pauni.' Signatures of the vendors.
19.
i. 6. notification through the archidicastes and strategus, as exemplified SaV. XXXiv, of. B. G. U. 983. 10 [. ., JorS, Schwarz, Hypothek und Hypallagma, p. 86'.
:

[]8

in

719

;

^[]! [\

[€][])

.

.

p. 154,

1277.

Sale of a Triclinium.
25x8-5 cm.
A.D. 255.
(cf.

A contract for the purchase of a
On
year.

triclinium or dining-couch

note on

1.

7)

with coverings and four cushions for 500 drachmae.
the verso are two short and

much

effaced documents, the former of

which
fifth

contains a judgement of the praefect Basileus dated Mesore 25 of the

Since Mussius Aemilianus

is

known from 1201

to

have been

still

in office

in September A.D. 258, the fifth year is probably that of the Philippi, i. e. A.D. 248, and Basileus may be identified with the Aurelius Basileus who was praefect But, if so, he must be credited with a second period in A.D. 244-5 (P. Flor. 4). of office, since Claudius Valerius Firmus certainly held the praefecture in A.D. 246-7. Or possibly he is a distinct person, and the fifth year refers to the reign of Aurelian (A.D. 275) or Probus (a.d. 280).

Sapcorias Apeiov

^

2i8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

)^
^aipeiv.

5

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( , .
£^£'[]'

)?

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.

.

/

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2
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[] []7 [\ [\ []
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25

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from
'

.

Pap.
14.
1.

Aurelia Sarapias daughter of Arius, citizen, acting without a guardian by right of her Roman custom, to Aurelius Theon son of Ammonius also called Aphunchis, of Oxyrhynchus, greeting. I acknowledge that I have sold to you a three-sided . linen cushions of the same couch with linen coverings embroidered throughout, and four
children according to
.

.
4•

s.
15•

Trjs

Apos flpvs pos

1.

COrr.
COIT.

.
from a

ISias.

12.

of

COrr.

(?).

.

quality for the price of five

hundred drachmae, total 500 dr., which I thereupon received. This contract of sale of which there is a single copy, free from mistake, is valid, and I will guarantee the sale and have been asked the formal question, as aforesaid. The 2nd year of the Emperors and Caesars Publius Licinius Valerianus and Publius Licinius Valerianus Gallienus Germanici Maximi and Publius Licinius Cornelius Valerianus the most illustrious Caesar

1277.

CONTRACTS

219

Augusti, Mesore 16. (Signed) I, Aurelia Sarapias, have sold the couch and cushions and received the 500 dr. for the price and will guarantee the sale, and have been asked the formal question, as aforesaid. I, Aurelius Origenes, wrote on behalf of my mother, who is
illiterate.'

7.
1 1

The

15. 17), but here since rather the couch.

leased in P. Brit. Mus. 871 (iii, p. 269) is clearlj' a room (cf. B. G. U. no details are given concerning locality the word seems to mean

to or from to e 15. The figure of the year has been corrected, but whether from The Caesar mentioned in 11. 19-20 is the elder son of Gallienus, as in not quite certain. C. P. R. 176 of the 2nd year; cf. 1273. 44 (probably of the 7th year), where the younger son, Saloninus, is found, and P. Giessen 50. 34, note. Since the change took place in the 5th year and 1277 was written in Mesore, the presumption is in favour of the 2nd rather than the 5th year.
is

1278.

Division of Usufruct of a Pigeon-house.
22-6

X

10-4 cm.

A.D. 214.

agreement between four persons, two of whom were minors, acting together, for dividing the revenues of a pigeon-house for four years, the two minors being given between them the usufruct of two years, which were not consecutive, and the two other parties that of a single year each. Contracts for the
division of property occur with

An

some frequency

in the papyri, but not for the

division of usufruct.

The

napirCas referred to in B.

have been analogous.
'

[][]
6
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5

10

[\ ['] []€[] \\ ([]) [\'€ [^ [] ? ?, ' ,

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G. U. 985. 11

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15

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
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36
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On

the verso remains of

Marcus Aurelius Andronicus also called Mithres, and however he is styled, and Aurelia Dionysias also called Chaeremonis through her husband Aurelius Ammonius, gymnasiarch-elect, senator of Oxyrhynchus, and Didyme also called ApoUonia and Letodoris also called Dionysotheonis, both minors, through their mother Ptolema daughter of Dionysotheon, ex-gymnasiarch of the said city of Oxyrhynchus, herself acting through Epicrates son of Didymus, mutually acknowledge that they have divided among themselves the usufruct of the excellent productive pigeon-house owned by them in equal shares in the farmstead of their vineyard called Perkops for a further period of four years from Thoth i of the present 23rd year, and the minors have had allotted to them the usufruct of two years, namely, the present 23rd and the 25th year, Aurelia Dionysias also called Chaeremonis that of the coming 24th year, and Aurelius Andronicus also called Mithres similarly that of the dung is to go annually to their aforesaid vineyard, the 26th year, and each party
'
. .

.

an endorsement.
2

.

Second

e

of

^

COn.

.

;

1278.

CONTRACTS

221

is to deliver to the other the said pigeon-house on the ist of the intercalary days in productive condition, none of the parties having the right to molest another during This agreement, done in triplicate in order that each party may have a copy, is valid. The 23rd year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Parthicus Maximus Britannicus Maximus Germanicus Maximus Pius Augustus, the loth of the month Hadrianus. (Signed) I, Aurelius Ammonius, and however I am styled, consent .' to this joint agreement as aforesaid.

and each party

his aforesaid period.

.

.

For the guardianship of children under age by their mother cf. e. g. 898, Mitteis, Grundz. p. 253. The mother, who though the daughter of a gymnasiarch was apparently
7.

a peregrina, herself acts through a eyxjaXfii/. 19. Perhaps

[

Kvpios,

1.

9.

1279.

Lease of State Land.
23

X

8-1

cm.

A. D.

139.

A

request for the lease of three arurae of unproductive land, which had

formerly been cleruchic but

now belonged

to the Government, addressed like

C. P. R. 239 and P. Brit. Mus. 1227 (iii, p. 143) to the strategus. The rent fixed is very low, only four drachmae for three arurae cf P. Tebt. 325, where the rent of two arurae is one drachma.

[>/
5 TTOXecoy.

2[\

-^
?
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Kopajos

/-


10

5

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Tovii

15

re

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ywpis

222

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
VLOV

20

TOS

€ ^ (^ .^,, €€£'
Tas
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5

5e

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els

y

3

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1.

.

(2nd hand)

2.

1.

influence of the preceding name.

:
1st

hand
cf.

{)
9.

[

29.

Possibly Kopayos was written, but -tos

Pap.

17.

£5• Pap.

may be due

to the

29. Tail of

of
'

rewritten.

To

Petronius Dionysius, strategus, from Ophelas also called Corax, freedman of Apia

also called Dionysia, daughter of Dionysius, of

Oxyrhynchus. I consent to lease from the State for five years from the present third year of Antoninus Caesar the lord three arurae of unproducdve land in the area of Senao in the holdings of Heraclides and Heraclides, of

which the adjacent areas are on the south a field, on the north and east a pubhc dyke, on the west the land of Didymion son of Demetrius, on condition that I may sow and plant the land with any crop which I choose except wheat, woad, and coriander (?), and shall have the pastures and secondary pastures at the annual rent for the pastures of four drachmae in If any part becomes unall, which sum I will pay annually in the month of Caesareus. watered, an allowance shall be made to me, and at the end of the five years' period I shall The 3rd year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius not be forced to take the lease. Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, Hathur 11. I, Ophelas also called Corax, presented Written by Hermes, nomographus.' this application.
for five Trevre 6. eV cf. P. Tebt. 374. 5, Rylands 99, a proposal to lease In other leases years at a higher rate than in the preceding five years, and land. 30. 13. of State land shorter periods occur, e. g. two years in B. G. U. 831, one year in C. P. R. 239 and P. Brit. Mus. 1227. 3. is the spelling, in B. G. U. 1017. so 729. 31 ; in 101. 12 and 593 17. The meaning of the word, which seems only to have been found 1 1 the initial letter is lost.
:

£

4(

:

.

in papyri

from Oxyrhynchus,

is

uncertain.

31.

vooy{ov)

:

cf.

Mitteis,

Grundz.

p. 56', P.

Hamburg

4. 15, note,

Rylands 88. 26.

1280.

CONTRACTS

223

1280.

Partnership in a Lease.
25•!

X

16 cm.

Fourth century.

agreement on oath between two citizens of Oxyrhynchus whereby one of them undertakes to share part of a camel-stable leased by the former, and to make an annual payment towards the rent.

An

The

writing

? ' {)
is

across the fibres of the verso, the recto being blank.

{,)
irSXeais

5

? ]
\
672

6

2nd hand

6

?\ ?{) [ .[ ?, ( ?? ? [ €
TOS

8{)

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+

7[(?

[(?) {6).

? [6€.
€[?.
. .

20
6.

€(!.
'

1.

/le.

7.

before

17. eyycypa/i/ifi/a Pap.

(

.

COrr.

from

TO.

1.

(.

8.

1.

.

13.

1.

to Aurelius

Pamea son of Peter, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, Ammonianus son of Euporion, of the said city, greeting. I acknowledge that I have of my own free will covenanted with you to share with you in the arbour of the camelshed, which you, Ammonianus, have leased, from the past month Pachon at the beginning
Aurelius

on account of rent one thousand myriads of drachmae, total 1000 myriads of silver, which I will deliver yearly with no delay. This agreement, of which a single copy is made, is valid, and in answer to the formal question
of the twelfth indiction, and to pay you yearly
silver

224
have given

1^
my
assent.

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
I,

(Signed)

Aurelius

Pamea son

the agreement

and consent

to all therein written, as aforesaid.
is illiterate.

of Peter, the aforesaid, have made I, Aurelius Pagochis son of Ptol
.'
.

PtoUion, wrote for him, as he
9.

Drawn up by me,
new

.

apxfi
ii.

:

Other instances of a

indiction year beginning in

Pachon are 140,

P. Grenf.

87, Brit.

Mus. 1007

c

(iii,

p. 264).

1281.

Loan.
cm.
a.d. 21.

8•6 13-3

This papyrus contains a copy of the signature to a contract of loan, with the last three lines of the contract itself, which was of a rather complicated nature. The debtor, a weaver, acknowledges that he had borrowed 300 drachmae, the
value of 100 linen cloths of special quality, the repayment being conditional on an account, to be rendered apparently by the creditor (a Jew?), upon which

another sum of 50 drachmae depended cf. the commentary. The transaction was perhaps really a purchase with deferred payment, and the loan would then be of a fictive character cf e. g. 1320, P. Par. 8.
;

[
5

\>

5{) ()' [ [,, , . '. () \ [). [)
e/c

{').

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;

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'

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e/c

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15

{€)
6.
1.

e,

) ({.
{?).

;

cf.

1.

5•

.

1.

as

if

Joseph [having the right of execution] upon Harpaesis and upon This contract is valid. in consequence of a legal decision.
'
.

.

.

all his

property,

1281.
Copy.
.

CONTRACTS

225

Harpaesis son of Panrumis, linen-weaver, have borrowed the price of the sum of 300 drachmae of silver, and will repay it as aforesaid, on condition that when Joseph receives it he shall first render an account of it in order that ... the agreed 50 drachmae of silver. I, Heracleus son of Horus, wrote for him, as he is illiterate. Copy. The 8th year of Tiberius Caesar Augustus Tubi 5, executed by Achilles son of Proetus, scribe of the village of Sinaru and other villages.'
I,

100

.

.

cloths of Sinaru, the capital

()
13.

was the lender. 8-9, which indicate that an unknown word the letters are mostly fairly clear. would be some one associated with the debtor Harpaesis. It seems more likely, however, that and mean the money, in which case was the creditor. To whom the account was to be rendered is not apparent. The letters immediately following "wa are obscure ; since an accusative follows, should be active, not passive. Possibly is meant, a superfluous stroke being written after the in the next line, though as in is hardly the verb expected, 'w' is an unsatisfactory alternative.
I.
:

[ /
6.

cf. 11.
is

9-10. If

refers to

,

/
;

-

For

( ()
An
five

The repetition of the word before the date is curious. 14-15. Cf. 320, 1208. 32, note, 1282. 46. Swapv is no doubt to be read in 56. 10.
cf.

•{)

1256.

7,

note.

1282.

Repayment of a Loan.
24-2

X

9-8 cm.

A. D. 83.

acknowledgement by a woman of the return of a loan made by her
years previously.

late

husband

.

.

o\{

)

(

2nd hand "Erovs

1st

hand
5

(2nd hand)

TOS TTJs
rfjs

€{5}

^. !5).

»

h

,! ^ ,
(€ 05
ev

^Trjs

5(

Kaiaapos

iav-

}

Tpos

€,

-

at/Spbs

navTes

-

XiCBS,

Q

226
15 piov

^
Trjs

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

TOVTCUV TOKovs

6

re-

-

avSpoi

2

25

30 imep

{] ' ' , 8 8 ! [,
ety

(^, ?
\\
[€\
fTei

yiyovviav

^

'-

6

6€

fVKaXeiv

35

^

[ , (
ois

7€[]

(\uvai inep

]

/*

^'^

Tiveiv

€Tois

-

'
40
Oev

ToTs

eis

45 iVIoii

[][] [,

[]5. \^
[]
ray
Ji/oy

'

() () '?,
(ist

hand) eTovs

{6) )(^().

Emperor Caesar Domitianus Augustus, the i8th of the in the Thebaid. Thnas daughter of Petosarapis, her mother being Heras daughter of Heraclides, with her guardian Avho is her nephew
' . .
.

The

third year of the

month Neus

Sebastus, at

Oxyrhynchus

1282.

CONTRACTS

227

Thompachrates son of Paapis, his mother being Tekosis daughter of Petosorapis, acknowledges to Amois son of Apollonius son of Syrus, his mother being Tekosis, and to his wife Tekosis daughter of Thonis son of Petosorapis, her mother being Eseneus, with her husband Amois as guardian, all inhabitants of Oxyrhynchus, the contract being drawn up in the street, that she has received from them the capital sum of four hundred drachmae of Imperial silver money with the requisite interest upon it, which sum was lent to them by the former husband, now deceased, of Thnas, Papontos son of Amois son of Theon, in his lifetime in accordance with a contract drawn up through the record-office at Oxyrhynchus in the eleventh year of the deified Vespasianus in the month Neus Sebastus, the right of execution for the debt having, as claimed by Thnas, descended with other property of Papontos to her in accordance with the disposition made by Papontos in his lifetime, and that neither Thnas nor any one on her behalf makes or will make any claim or will proceed against the recipients of this acknowledgement or their agents on any point whatever up to the present day, and that she has forthwith restored to them the contract of loan crossed out to invalidate it; otherwise not only shall any future claim be invalid, but Thnas or the person proceeding on her behalf shall in addition pay to the aforesaid persons or their agents for every claim the damages and a fine of a hundred drachmae of silver, and to the State an equal amount, and this contract shall be none the less valid. The third year of the Emperor Caesar Domitianus Augustus, the eighteenth of the month Neus Sebastus, executed by . .,
agoranomus.'

In the I. This endorsement seems to be the same as those in 47. i and 276. r. former passage we supposed the first word to be an abbreviation of but that would not be in place in the present context, and moreover the letter before can hardly Cf. 98. i, where there is a rather different be a. suggests or some derivative. abbreviation at the head of a similar acknowledgement of repayment, and P. Cairo Preis. 43. i, where the editor reads 8cS[.]( ) here, however, does not commend itself, and the reading in the Cairo papyrus remains questionable. That the hand of 1. i is the same as that which wrote the date in 1. 4 and the date &c. in 11. 42 sqq. is likely but uncertain. cf. e. g. 492. 9, 493. 6. i. e. a testamentary disposition; 27. or the active 46. Cf. note on 1281. 14-15. Either the passive form may have been written.

\

,

.

(/)

;

\(!)
. .
.

:

.

.

.

£{)

({)

(e)

TAXATION.
Revenue-return.
i7-9X7-2cm.
a. d.

1283.

219.

This example of the monthly statements of receipts submitted by taxcollectors to the strategi follows the formula found in B. G. U. 653-3, which are approximately of the same date as 1283, but come from a diiiferent locality cf.
;

1046, which
different

is

the conclusion of a similar document.

imposts on land, and the

Q2

,
The

taxes concerned are

on which see the

228

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
date of the papyrus

commentary; most of them have already occurred

The

{) \. )\{) {
rimvi
5

is

in association in 917, 981.
i2.

discussed in the note on

1.

{•/•)()
)

^)
Ueevvai

() {6)

( {) - () •{)
)

15

20

{) [) {) [$) [) [) {) {)[€){) () (€ () •)({) () {^) {) {)() [], (), (^)
{() \
,
em

[]• , ^) \[() {) {)
'4<

{<). [<) (5)8\[]) ()

[](
\\
'

[eTovs)

(eroiiy)

{)

^

knapoivpiov)

,

,

[]{)
[]\{
[..].[
[

25

[(erouy)

] [ ^^
) .]

'[.\][.

{) [)]
]^••
]pfT•

{) -

[

) {)

cmovS(fjs)

,

'^,

[

[(5
. . .

^]
7•

Aurelius Harpocration, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Pat and his associates, collectors of money taxes of the metropolis for the son of Eutych
. .
.

'

Pap.

1283.

TAXATION

229

middle toparchy in the district of Peenno. The classified list of payments for the month of Pauni of the present 2 nd year of Marcus Aurehus Antoninus Caesar the lord is as follows. Receipts of the present 2nd year: for acreage-tax and tax of i 600 drachmae; and paid into the public bank by Septimius Chaeremon for acreage-tax 143 dr. ^ obol 2 chalci, for the eight-drachma libation of Dionysus 8 dr. 4 ob. i chal., for the cubit-measure of pigeon-houses 17 dr. 5 ob., by Aurelius Achilleus for acreage-tax 198 dr. 5^ ob., for the eight-drachma libation of Dionysus 8 dr. 4 ob. i chal. by Aurel and Ta for .' acreage-tax 116 dr. Date.
;
. . . . .

.

.

.

and irpa of are followed by the curved stroke which commonly 3-4. represents a (so e. g. in 1. 5 1. 6 but here is rather a mere symbol of abbreviation; cf. e.g. P. Tebt. 351. i, note. 4—6. Cf. 1196. 5~9 ^'^ TrpaKTopeiav cf. e.g. 1046. 13, For G. U. 652. t, 653. I, P. Tebt. 363. I. 12. For the regnal year here there is a choice between j8 and (in 1. 8 the figure is wholly uncertain), and with the latter the Emperor would be Caracalla (a.d. 212) instead of

{),

()),
.

.

8(;)

.

.

.

!

Elagabalus, who is usually styled , however, is preferable as a reading, and since the papyrus is clearly posterior to the Constitutio Antonina, which was only promulgated in a.d. 212 (month unknown), the year 219 is a more likely date; moreover 1259 shows that the strategus of a. d. 211-12 was Didymus. these are to be regarded as two taxes, the 13. being well known as a distinct tax ; cf. 917. 2-3, where the $' and are mentioned separately, P. Tebt.

2/3'.

Hawara 303• 12-13 {Archiv inTo\oyovpAvov, 343. iv. 69 ^^2) note on P. Brit. Mus. 195. 10 reprinted ap. Rylands 192 {b). The is discussed at length in the commentary upon the latter papyrus. 17. Cf. 11. 20-1 and 917. 3, where our reading is now confirmed, coupled with and 653, where the and is no doubt the same. On the tax much light has been thrown by 916, which showed that it was calculated on the arura, and 1185, where its name is given without abbreviation, and the fact is revealed that the proceeds were, at any rate temporarily, assigned to the praefect by order of the Emperors ; cf. P. Rylands 216. 128 note, where the evidence is considered in more detail. What is the relation of this impost to the Both here and in 11. 20-1 a single sum is recorded under the two names, and it is the same in both cases, 8 dr. 4 ob. On the analogy of 1. 13 the supposition would be easy that the connecting particle r ch. had been omitted and that the and were distinct. This explanation, however, seems to be precluded by 917. 3, where an identical sum is entered under the heading of alone. This can hardly be regarded as a mere coincidence and suggests most strongly that the two names designated a single tax. The appropriation of the to the praefect is not a serious diflSculty, since the diversion of revenues from religious to secular purposes would not necessarily involve a change of nomenclature; cf. e.g. P. Rylands 213. 354, where a is classed under not That passage also provides an analogy for the devotion of a tax to a particular cult, a practice of which the is another example. But inferences concerning the original destination of the impost are not necessarily to be drawn from its name. Further light on this subject may be expected from the Theadelphia papyrus described by Schubart in Amil. Ber. aus d. K. Kunstsammlungen, Nov. 1913, Col. 57, which brings in the Arsinoite nome. evidence for the 18. cf. 981, where this tax occurs, as here, in conjunction with 917. introd., Preisigke, Sammelbuch, 1091. 25. On the analogy of 1046. 13, B. G. U. 652. 16-17, 653. 15 this line should give the
,

4{) {6) &
:

!
'.

^ ? ! 4

,.

{^!) .{)

,

,() {()

:

230
total of the items,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

if, as can hardly be doubted, the date followed in 11. 26 sqq. (cf B. G. U. 652. The amounts as far as 1. 23 add up to 1093 dr. i^ob., which subtracted from i]426 dr. leave 332 dr. 4J ob. as the amount expected at the end of 1. 24. Instead of [? this, however, there is a clear followed by something illegible. The restoration of 1. 25 consequently remains in doubt.

181 653. 16).

1284.

Receipt for Tax on Sales.
21

X

IO-3 cm.
for

A. D. 250.

A
cent.

receipt issued

mortgages, &c., due in consequence of the acquisition of part of a house. The rate of the on sales in the Roman period is known to have been 10 per
collected), and it is 5^ ob. was paid on a value of ^\^^$ dr. 5I ob. These 73 dr. 5I ob. certainly included an unspecified amount for an extra charge sometimes found in association with taxes cf. e.g. P. Tebt. 347. 1-2, where 2 dr. are paid as on 18 dr., and note ad loc, 1283. 17, note, P. S. I. 109. 7. But the amount of this a-novhn would not be expected to be more than a relatively small item, and unless in the present case it be supposed to have been almost as much as the main payment, the conclusion
(cf.
is

99 and

(
-,
still

by a public bank

payment of the kyKmkiov or tax on

sales,

P. Tebt. 350. introd.,

where evidence

therefore surprising to find that here as

much

as 73 dr.

--

;

is

natural that in the

course of the third century the rate of the

rose considerably.

apparently

In P. Brit. Mus. 933 (iii, p. 69) of A.D. 211 the old rate is to be recognized ; cf. note on 1. 16 below. It is, however,

(

uncertain that the transaction referred to in 1284 was technically a sale, and if some other form of transfer was in question, that might account for the higher
rate of the tax
;

see
is

1.

la, note.

The papyrus
and Hostilianus.

^Etovs

5

[] ] ]]
[Epevviov
[

dated, like C. P. R. 37, in the joint reign of Decius, Herennius,

/[]

[]
[e/y

[]

8{€) {( {( [{) '() [] {()

[•] [']
.

\\)(

[i/ioy

] ]

{)
h

]

6(()

';

1284.

TAXATION

[) ] '
[S
[
]

[ {() ? 6{() \ ^)]
rrj

15

]{) \ () (€) {) [] ^) 8(_^)
[[)

' {)
iSto-

TTJs

?[) {) {) ' {()
{^)
[.]

a{vTfj)

^
kn

^/ 8{)

7(€)

\ [)

231

[\

]
3.
1.

[
2
.

2nd hand

], {^) []{) {) €{)
y{ivovTai)

^ {) 8 {) {)
^.

() '{^') ()

[] •)(()
Pap.
;

yiivovTai)

(^)

^.
2.

{€).
i.

yal'ou

9•

so in 1. ^'^'

(^!) .
e.
'

an abbreviation was originally intended.
1 8.

^.

3••

12.

^

[ ) [),
.

8{)

Pap. 6. 1. . . of eavrov has a horizontal stroke above
15.
1.

(\.

I'j.

1.

()
it,

^^

The 2nd

year of the

Emperor and Caesar Gains Messius Quintus Trajanus Decius

Pius Felix and Quintus Herennius Etruscus Messius Decius and Gains Valens Hostilianus Messius Quintus the most august Caesars, Augusti, Choiak 19. Paid to Aurelius Apollonius and his associate, both senators of the city of Oxyrhynchus, public bankers, to the account of the tax on sales by Tiberius Claudius Diogenes son of Tiberius Claudius Diogenes, ex-cosmetes, ex-president of the games, senator of the city of Oxyrhynchus, on account of the half share of an old house and all its appurtenances belonging to him in the said city of Oxyrhynchus in the North Quay quarter, which was [purchased?] from his foster-child's mother Aurelia Ammonia daughter of . . and Techosous, of the said city of Oxyrhynchus, in
.

accordance with a privately drawn contract made in the said month Choiak by an irrevocable transfer, on the valuation which he has made of the said half share of the house, namely 3[.]5 drachmae 5^ obols, in payment for libation-money and the tax on sales seventy-three drachmae five and a half obols, total 73 dr. 5^ ob. (Signed) I, Aurelius Apollonius, exgymnasiarch, senator, public banker, have certified the seventy-three drachmae five and
half obols, total 73 dr. 5 J ob.'

. [\(
7.
g.

5.

should be restored after
cf. e. g.

in C. P.

R. 37. 18.
(iii,

For the supplement
:

P. Brit.
to

Mus. 933. 9
first

p.

this

seems

be the

occurrence of

!
69)
fis

6

toC fVKvK\{iov)

as a municipal

232
title

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
in tlie provincial towns.
;

is found in association At Alexandria the office of with that of gymnasiarch cf. Dittenberger, Or. Gr. Inscr. 713 (= Archiv ii, p. 567). T)yopaa\6r) naturally suggests 12. The verb to be supplied here remains in doubt. itself, and this, as 1208. 1 7 shows, would be consistent with the phrase in 11. 14-15. But the mentioned in 1. 15 then seems strange, since the basis of the Possibly, therefore, the property tax on a sale would normally be the purchase-money. was ceded by deed of gift like those in P. Grenf. ii. 68, 71, where the phrase (cf. P. Grenf ii. 68. 3, &c., and 1208. 16 recurs. The verb might then be e.g. though rather than be expected to follow; is too

-^

(!

\\

For the on a gift cf. P. Tebt. 351, where 4 dr. only are paid on account of a house of unspecified value. an extra charge with a payment for 16. Though not described as occurs in 99. 19 (Naber's attempt to explain this away in Archiv i, p. 314 is futile), and probably in P. Brit. Mus. 933, where 40 dr. i ob. are paid on 300 dr. ; cf. P. Tebt. 347. 2,
long.

),
in a

- ,1285.
33'3
is list

('\

/ !
€\
Brit.

where

-?

banking account 2 dr. are entered on account of on another sum. an additional payment in leases or elsewhere cf. e.g. 101. 19, 730. 13, P. Mus. 948. 12 (iii, p. 220), and as a tax, 1283. 17, note.
as

•]

For

List of Village Payments.
X 3•5 cm.
its

Third century.

The

value of this papyrus

centred in

geographical information.

It

contains a long

of villages, classified under the six toparchies of the nome,
levied

with amounts in
first

money

upon them.
is

The account
is

is in

two

sections, the

ending with Col.

ii,

which

very short and

separated from the next

column by a broad blank space. The names in Col. i, so far as they are preand in Col. ii coincide, with one or two exceptions, which may be partly due to accident, with those at the end of the second section, 11. 92 sqq. and the corresponding sums in the two sections though often varying slightly are approximate throughout. There can thus be little doubt that practically the same list of names was written out twice and the similarity in ratio of the amounts prompts the inference that the account refers to two periods of the same impost. Unfortunately the nature of this impost and the basis of the assessment remain obscure if the word ri^ijs is rightly identified at the top of Col. iii, an adaeratio of some kind is indicated. With this uncertainty the amounts, which as between
served,
;
;

;

the villages vary considerably, are not a trustworthy index to the relative size or

wealth of the individual

localities.

Neither would

it

be very safe to assume

because only six names are mentioned in the toparchy of Thmoisepho, while in the others the number ranges from twelve to twenty-three, that that toparchy

was much the smallest and least important. For the list is far from exhaustive, and many names of Oxyrhynchite villages known from other sources do not figure in it. On the other hand, the following are here mentioned for the

1285.
first

',
On

time

:

[.],

''KvreUuis
1.

(?),

(but see note on

(
1

102),
),

^, [\(, , ', -, ».
. .

TAXATION

,

233

[.](?),
and

Ntypou,

(?).
11.

It is noticeable that

occur in three toparchies

(.

94, 115, 133,
i

.

/3

11.

104, 123, 141).

the verso, opposite Col.

of the recto, are the ends of lines of a wellofficial letter

written document, probably a draft or copy of an

or petition.

Col.

25

[
234

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

1285.

TAXATION

105

"5

236

83. In 1052 the form
102.

being should be restored, may be meant. understood between the two names in 1. 5 an adjective 114. Cf. 1. 21, whence the termination of the village-name is obtained. 129. Cf. 280. 8, 290. 6 in the lower toparchy is known 133. In 1. 40 a different name was written, but from e. g. 239. 4. may be a mark of abbreviation. 135. The doubtful

105. Perhaps \'\((/) (966), but the absence of the in 102. 8. III. Cf. (? 2evra 113. Cf. 97, and 734. 3, where

: / )
()
;

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
IlfTf/iioucfmy is

used.

in Preisigke,

Sammelbuch, 1989.^

may be

identical.

final r is curious.

.

{\:) {\)
Hibeh

/

137.

(or

-)

is

written out in P.
is

(491.

3,

985

;

cf.

1127. 7

)
17-5

53. 19, 21, 22, 92. 8

and 132.

perhaps

distinct.

(/)
1286.

ACCOUNTS AND
X
12-6 cm.

LISTS.

Account of Receipt and Expenditure.
A. D.

253.

Conclusion of an account relating to corn and pitch. As in P. S. I. 83/ which also comes from Oxyrhynchus and offers other similarities to this papyrus, the account has a formal signature at the end, and the person presenting it seems to have occupied an official or semi-official position perhaps he was a The text is much abbreviated and in consequence ovaias (cf. e. g. P. Flor. 77). sometimes obscure. It is noticeable that the artaba in use was one of 40 choenices The document bears an interesting date see 1. 4 and cf. 1044. introd., 1145. 18. in the reign of Aemilianus, which only lasted about three months. On the verso is a mutilated account of wine headed
;
;

(cf.
I

Preisigke, Saimnelbitch,

jar

,
. .
.

[€
.]

?]

(erei)

{)

945• 5> 973•

*°)

^/^,) qa.

5 '
[eoL•ov?] The payments
include
. . .

an amount which

is lost 'lepaxt

-/

and another ail•po\.

() [) [) {)
[.

yiivovrai

?)

[

/-,

^88" ^(oiVi/cey) -,

6{) {) [\{-)(€

?)

[]

'

With regard

presumably
[7fo]uxif.' is

=

]\{)

to the text of that
(cf.

papyms,
while

({
in
1.

12S6.

4),

S

probable.

{)
)

in

1.

3 must be or a.va\{aipaTos)

({).
is

In

1.

4

]{
In
1.

)

meiint.

5

5

() {)
(eroi/y)
jS

[ { [ ') \\ [\ ^ TiS'

1286.

{) {) (-)• [) (() ({€^€) [) , () ' {) , () \{)
^{oLviKes)

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
olS'

237

,/

,

e|

)

le,

at

?)

i,

e/y

(

)

€^7j(

)

yi^oiviKes)

.

6[).

?)

(&))

\'\\

[\

.

(2nd hand)

\.'\
2.
3.

a charge for as it is sometimes more exactly termed, is not seldom met with in accounts of corn (cf. e.g. P. Amh. 69. lo-ii, Fay. 86, B. G. U. 835, perhaps also 988. 12), and since this was a payment or peT-(a0opSr) seems a suitable expansion of for transport ), which recurs in 1. 6. The restoration [i'] suits the following figures, 6-^ art. (cf the next note) being in fact more than the tenth part of 64! art. Moreover [i] is in exact accordance with on 15 art., i. e. i^ art., are charged for 1. 6, where, if the reading adopted is correct, lo transport. That the same percentage should be expressed in 1. 3 by and in I. 6 For by is, however, rather strange. on corn-dues cf. e. g. B. G. U. 552 A. i. 9, P. Tebt. 363. 12, Leipzig 84. ii. 7, and 1259. 16, note. 4. Since yof art. 4 choen. are given as the sum of the two preceding items, 64•!• art. 6 choen. and 6^ art. 8 choen., it follows that the artaba contained 40 choen. and here is 5. In P. S. I. 83. 1, 4, 10 the editor gives iiv perhaps an error for cf. 1. 8. ; ) m is puzzling ; the obvious secms hardly suitable. ) might be read in 1. 6 instead of ), if it gave sense. were read here, the passage would be all-important in the 7. If els interpretation of the document ; but the abbreviation may be expanded in other ways, e. g.
.
.
.

() {)
; 1.

i' Pap.

so in

6 ?•?'.

5•
[']

^^11^'

^•

:

8
6.

pV^

Pap.

8.

,
~
f{

Pap.

([((()

^

()

{{)

((
{^
t(^I')

({){)^{ ({
{),

,

{) (')

{)

(^)

e has a horizontal stroke above it like the preceding is the most 13. Since the reign of Aemilianus terminated about September, or suitable month, and is also better adapted to the space than

8.

{() €
.
is

Or (/) SC. apparently a number, though

.

(.
is

1287.

Survey-list.
X
7-7 cm.

24-5

Early third century.
(cf.

This extract from an

official survey-list

preserved in the public archives

B. G. U. 861, 870) has been hastily copied on the back of 1267.

Two

entries

have been extracted, both concerned with Diogenes who

described as a

238
or charioteer.
illegibility in in
in

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Owing
partly to their highly abbreviated character, partly to
is

the writing, there

some obscurity
2)

in

the details.

The 14th year

which the survey was made whose reign 1267 is dated.

(1.

was probably that of Septimius Severus,

"{ {:)
^)
.

e/c

8{5)
Sevinira)•

{)
{erovs)
?)

e/f

6() ,
e

5

,
. . . .

€7()(6••€(»)

'HpUTos

10

15

20

{$) ",\ [\^ [.]'.
Turning ment to
. .
.

() [}{) ) {) ^) {9) '{) &) ) 6{) {) {){) {) () { {) () €^

{€) () {)[7]<{6 {) {)
Aioykvovi

6{)
'

imidpyiiv)

avXirju).

in

'^{)

O^ivpvyywv) n6\{ews)

?)

Sapaw{lavo5)

?)

'4'\({)
{

'

.[.].'.'.
).

'Extract from the public archives from a field-survey of the 14th year, column 50, Senepta: to the north, the house and court of Diogenes son of Heras, charioteer, by prepayPublius (?), formerly the property of Ptolemaeus son of Papontos, in accordance with a memorandum of the aforesaid Diogenes of the city of Oxyrhynchus, who declared Turning to the east, the ruined house that the aforesaid house and court belonged to him.

of Tazoilas daughter of Aphunchis in
charioteer, of the city of Oxyrhynchus,

accordance with a

memorandum

of Diogenes,

declared that there belonged to him a quarter share which was formerly the property of his son Sarapion and before him of Teutheis,

who

1287.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
the

239
son of

and another quarter share which was formerly .' Horus
. .

property of Nechthenibis

( ()
(48
17.

1—3. Cf.
?)
.

e. g.
.

({()
:

!

.

B. G. U. 870. 1—4 fV (probably the year)
.

.

.

! (^) \(^!^
cf.

:

e.g. p. Leipzig 40.
?

iii.

7

€€! (^ \,€\{]) ^, «.
e|

and

for

P. Flor. 46. I

ai

20.

or o(ir^r)

1288.

Private Account.
25-9Xi6-6cm.
Fourth century.

An
hand

account rendered by an agent to his mistress,
(cf. 11.

who was

absent in

Alexandria

17, 29, 34), of

expenditure for the household and estate.

The

{) () ()
r)L•,

and the account was probably put together times. This papyrus was found rolled up with another short account The text is written in a different hand (1344).
varies a

good

deal,

at different
in six lines,

(^)
^j

{.)

ty,
;

'[]
for

P. Thead. 29. 26, &c., 34. 45.

() 8,
a

[.

.]\(

() []9• () ()

here in place of

^
le

(",

cf. e. g.

^

apyvpionv rl f

'""' "''^

^"''

els

8'
e/y

{) ({) {) -^ {) . () () {{)
''
'

f^^^i{avSpeiav)

Ai(Tpas) y/,

',

8[]
[]

5

eh
els

eh

eayev

vn(ep)

15

^)
(5)

5 5 5
els

6
Novvas

^^

eh

.

(.)
(«.) "

ovcou

5

napovTos

(.) (.) (.) (.)
«;{?} ^vi")

,

(

(5) ,
,

,
, .
(.) ,

eh

vaa{os}
wpoevrjve^a

in(ep)

\^^

e[ov

]

()>{)• () , ' () ',
(.) , (.) (.) ,

()()

,

240
rrj

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
yiovyov

[\\
[[['
.

{()

[] ]
.

\\^) []()
[.]€
.

\

ets

A\e^[avSptLav)

TaniXwTOS

(

(.)
)]]

;,

'

(.) (.) . (.) ^

,

2

1

TawiXovTOS

{)
26
ets

[\
(})
ytvapi\y\qs

>^[]'
Mcopos

.\\'\€

ya>v

'
eis

(.

?)

^.

\{^)
e
6.
1.

(.) , (.) (.) . (.) .

,

30
[[e/s

'
'' Pap.
Pap.
COrr.
?
1.
1.

^
.

[]
[•]
. •

(\.) a

(
7.
1•

?)

'.

\(.\<

yeppi-

4.

8.

€(' Pap.
margin),
'

14.

17.

is

Pap.

. . ^ '/ .. ' '
[.]

(.)
(?).

.
ctittWou Pap.
;

12.
1.
.

1.

^'' Pap.
24.
1.

13.

' ipo)

so in

1.
.

20.
. .

;([(]

-.

26.

.

.

2g.

($) f Pap.

34 (upper

36.

Pap.

Account of money received by In payment for purchases

me

:

15 talents and
6 artabae.

In payment similarly to the bakeries In payment for the donkeys In payment for a sea-vessel, for charges In payment for tow Paid to Palladias for service Price of two bundles when you were here

8
6

tal.
tal.

and 3 art. and 10 art.

9
1

tal.

2 tal.

taL

2 tal.

Expended by me

annona The nurse of Palladias had for expenses I opened the wine-store and took out To Morus for expenses of the river-workmen For alum
for

I tal.

of

silver.

5 1 jars of wine. 4 tal.

20

tal.

2,200
dr.

dr.

Price of a bundle to Anchisas

I talent.

Price of Nonna's shoes (?) To you the owner I sent to Alexandria

1,200
8
tal.

For pledges
For
interest of

two months

.

.

.

,

for adaeraiio

180 tal. 10 tal.

1288.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
250 tal. 60 tal. 49 tal.
17
_

241

Phamenoth

2,

to

Morus

the servant for expenses through Apia daughter of Tapilous

Price of uncoined silver on account of Apia For the bakers for six months For a short cloak and tunic

tal.
tal.

Morus had sent Morus Necessity arising,
Phainenoth
2,

64
to the village and he received from the sitologi

tal. of silver. Since you went away I have bought 5 pounds of tow at the price for each pound of I tal. 2,000 dr.

46

of silver.

amounting to 1 50 tal. of silver. (Added at the top) And when you went to Alexandria you supplied me with 3^ pounds of unspun tow. There was sold i jar of wine of the supplies at 2 tal. 2,000 dr., and if lb. of tow were bought.'
In payment for ...
I

gave the current cash

(?)

and

the

.

.

.

on

security

and in the next two lines apparently stands for where wine is also included in the account. On the other hand apyvp'iov, though generally omitted, is added occasionally; cf. 11. 11, 28, 30, 33. (cf. 11. 34, 36), for which cf. 1130. is both here and in 1. 29 written for 7. 12, note, and P. Giessen 103. 11, note. cf. C. g. 1230. 1 4. 9.
3.

rather than

/ ( ^:
In

spite of the title in
;

I.

i

ap here
12,

cf.

1.

cf. 1263. introd. 741. 8 (•^{) , 1158. 8, note. may be accidental. 19. Some traces of ink after (raX.) occur in the middle of the fourth century in P. Amh. 139 and 140, and are 27. mentioned in a papyrus dated by Vitelli as late as the fifth or sixth century (P. Flor. 78). 30. In a Rainer papyrus cited by Wessely, Etn Altersindiziiim im Philogelos, p. 42, 4 talents a pound are paid for which, however, does not occur and is a rather perhaps 32. seems to be short oblique stroke passing through the tails of each far-fetched epithet. might be read as meaningless ; the second is intelligible, though the form does not appear as an attribute of 34. should to occur elsewhere. There is no sign of abbreviation, so that perhaps

13.
16.

[]
:

:

cf.

=

».

A

(,

.

()

be read.

1289.

Private Account.
8•6 X
II

A

list

of articles with their prices, which are reckoned apparently in myriads

of drachmae.

5

• € '
{)
e

cm.

Fifth century.

[8€ , ^
?)
fJ^iyp•)

'^-)

c"'

R

242

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

8()

'^•) ")
•{^•)

,
*"'>

(
On
the verso
15
4•
1.

[

]

'^•)
1^{.)

€'[\
P-(yp•)

,
""")

'^•) '^•
aa-e,


{.)
0•
1•

{.)

{.)

,
(}>.)

.
12.
1.

;
.
. .

cf.

1.

7•

;

.
SO in
1.

3.

.

'Account of Harpocration 4 ladles 470 myriads, 3 curved knives 120 myr., 5 pairs of scissors 250 myr., two large pairs of scissors 150 myr., i knife 30 myr., 2[.] necklets (?) 450 myr., 24 cups 1,200 myr., total 3,120 myr. From the old account 450 myr., a I have left 1,205 ™yr-> 13 large cups 1,054 myr. ; on account of these he has 3,520 myr.
:

1,860 myr.'

this

figures.
4.

commonly means a necklace or bracelet (cf. e. g. 1273. 7), but since 20 8. or more are here concerned and the price as compared with the other items is not particularly high, the word may have a sense like that attested by Phavorinus is apparently unknown. cf. 922. 1 1, where the word occurs For g. as an epithet of a horse ; KfiTijTfojC is a less suitable reading.

{ (
3.

{):

a form Occurring in Schol. Aristoph. Ach. 244. with a horizontal stroke above it. Of seems to be the most probable resolution, in spite of the largeness of the resulting
the abbreviation consists of an
is

=

,
?

/:
:

formed from an abnormal form

;
the
.

cf.

1.

7.

6

(>\\

.

14.

SC.

1290.

List of Articles.
14-2

X

8-5 cm.

Fifth century.

A short
obscure.

list

of utensils and other

2

articles,

names of

several of which are

[.

.

a,

1290.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
a,

243

Tvyaviov
5

a,

a,

^
.
2. 3.
4. Tvyavtov is for

a,

,
, ,
)

through is apparently unknown in Greek as well as Latin. was the 6. is perhaps derived from According to Hesychius name of a plant, but that would be out of place in this context. A misspelling of is more probable ; cf. 1. 10, note, and 1. 4. a. 7. pulvinus is apparently the word meant ; cf. P. Gen. 80. 13 again unknown. 8. is a diminutive of situla, a bucket. 9. 10. ayiov is not very satisfactory, since there is no obvious substantive for ), of which \p(yaovv) is the natural expansion. Perhaps, then, is for ; cf. e. g. 1289. 4, where
5.

may have come

.,
The
cf.

ayiov /3(

.
€([.
c.

remains Unexplained. diminutive form
1160.
3, note.

The
is

next word was perhaps e\e\ov for

cited

from Eubulus in Athen.

p.

169

a threshing-instrument.

•/.

Possibly the form in Hesych.

,.

:

arpoyuKa

is

written for

.

^

(

{g)

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE.
1291.

Letter of
4-8

Zois.
A. D. 30.

X

8-2

cm.

short letter from Zeis to her brother Ischyrion, who is probably identical with the Ischyras in 1292, another letter found at the same time cf. e. g. 119, where the writer calls himself Theon in 1. i and Theonas in 1. 18, and 1269.
;

A

14 and 34, notes.
Z(uis
yaipeiv.
ou5[ei']y

^

/€
R

irepl

,
2

5

244
5

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

'
8e

y^ai

8 ,,
eyfllcssj
Slit,

ewe/i-

-

ekprjs

eh

\(^-

10 Speaiv) dneXOew,

(erouy)

. (). {
COrr.

Niov

kav

On

the verso
1

.
e.

Kaiaapos

^(() .
1.

3•
'

of

from

5.

fl.

9.

1.

!.

Ischyrion her brother, greeting. No one has brought me a letter about the bread, but if you send a letter by Colluthus, an artaba will come to you immediately. If you wish to depart for Alexandria, Apollos son of Theon is going to-morrow. Good-bye. The 17th year of Tiberius Caesar Augustus, the 29th of the month Neus Sebastus.
Zo'is to

(Addressed)
5.
is

To

Ischyrion.'
likely to

more

be meant

for

ei,

as often, than 3.

1292.

Letter of Hermogenes.
ii-5X7-3cm.
About
a. d. 30.

jars,

short letter from Hermogenes to his brother, asking for two hundred and stating that he had sent some money and was prepared to supplywood for the transport of a water-wheel. The papyrus was found with 1291, which is dated in A.D. 30, and is probably addressed to the same correspondent.

A

[\5
5

. « - (^) , & {)
ras

[\,
)(aipuv.

.

1292.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
Soyvai

245

10

.

() .
eScuKa

eav Se Xpiau ]]{5)

15

, €€
the verso

Svo

'

[
ave-

[]

....

[.]

'

(().

On

.
of bovvm corr. from
1

9•
'

(?).

Hermogenes to Ischyras his brother, greeting. Please put on board for me two hundred empty jars, as I asked you before. You have the 16 drachmae of silver by Saras, and I have given Hermas 1 2 drachmae to give you. If you specially require tvsO pieces of wood to bring down to me the wheel of the machine, they shall be brought up to you by For the rest, good-bye. (Addressed) To my dearest Ischyras.'
.

.

1293.

Letter of Theon.
23-9X9-2cm.
A. D.

117-38.

from a son to his mother concerning the dispatch of oil and other articles. The reigning emperor whose name has been lost in 1. 37 vi^as most probably Hadrian.

A letter

[\(.
'[']
vi.iv

.

rfj

.

5

SapaTos

kav

\

Sapas,

.

,( .
{')
?)

•() .
-

-

246

ay
7€
ig

)
20

) .

.

, /
^
Sia
et

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ka)(fiKaTe•

&yap

eveKa
tis

(,
Sapai

aWovs
els

.(
eii

,
€.
Tas

"
eav

({)

ep[i]Sia,
S[v]o,

25

30

[( [ €.
(?)]
[

e^vat.

[

[

^apUTOs]
]

[ [

eV.

[

[

35

[
[
[
[

]{).

40

] ([) () '\( () [() '\ [)
]
'\
]

6] ()
.

}

]

{}{
®(

).

\€
]
• •

.

)

)

ev

]

.

At

right angles along the left-hand

() §€ [ ,
)

On

the verso
ety
.

[

[]

. {) / .
margin

.

ris

2^ letters

(')

^

1293.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
or
1•

U.
38.
1.

!.
1.

bihovm,

and
4"•

.
for

247
14.
1.

{1:).
^2.

12.

1.

for

.
.

((.

of

COrr. for

mother Philumene, greeting. Before all else I pray for your health and Receive from Saras son of Marcus four and a half metretae of fine aphrodisiac oil and having done so let me know. If I do not get letters from him about the amount of the oil which he brings to you, I do not intend to send it (?). You ought to have given him a letter, because it is not Saras but another stranger whose word I have to take that you have received it ; so in future write, for I have had no letter about the first four and a half metretae. I do this not on our account but on that of the camel-men, lest one of them should want to leave part behind and not bring it. Saras says to me, " Let the other five metretae about which you write wait for the other load," and if I cannot find a carrier, I shall do so. I sent my brother Apollonius some wool to be dyed, since I want two quarters (?) and they have not been prompt in bringing it (?) because the days are I wrote to him Receive from Saras son of Marcus two sealed baskets ., one for you, and one for Plutarche my Receive in addition from Apollonius Good-bye.' Date, postscripts, and address on the verso.
'

Theon

to his

that of

my

father.
;

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

5.

8{)
for

:

cf.
?

11.

33, 39.

The meaning of the word

here

is

obscure

;

was

it

used

like the

Latin venusius

10. It
is

seems more probable that an infinitive has dropped out after than that and that the preceding is a repetition of the termination of

A verb

{).

in place of

is

hardly to be obtained.
error here.

stands for or ar seems has apparently been altered, but Sn cannot be read. to be the simplest remedy. The 13. It is noticeable that the oil was sent to the Apollinopolite nome (1. 43) overland and not by water. The nome referred to is doubtless the ApoUinopolites Parvus
1 1.

There must be another

To

suppose that

(Heptacomiae). 24-5.
the latter with

e'p[i]8ia

should take a genitive, but to place a comma before gives no sense. should perhaps be read

€()
i.

;

the reraprov

and construct was

a liquid measure {quariart'us).
33. Perhaps
43.

()\8.

(cf P. Giessen 51.

25)

is

unsuitable.

Cf. the

note on

1.

13.

1294.

Letter to Didyme.
19-6

X

18-9 cm.

Late second or early
third century.

A letter in a rather large cursive hand
sister,

from a
5,

man whose name
1.

is

lost to his

announcing the dispatch of various

articles.

Pauses in the sense are
8,

indicated
1.

by blank spaces
in
1.

after

in

1.

apov in

)

in

I.

13,

14,

and

16.

[, ]
[
]

^

-

in

[

]

Kvptai yaipeiv.

^^

248

5

[kav

[?
.

, ^) • ^^^. , . ], €
[
]«/

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
kv

Svo

[

]

.

\\

kv

vyeiai

ety

k^

ev

]

[

.
On

15

ko -

.
Pap.
15.

yap

' •
6.

( [](
[(]1

]].

xpeia rj{v},

'\,

, [], . . [)
kv

'

(

(

-

[]{)

the verso

4•

/

{.
First

of

COrr.

from

(?).

.

Pap.

12.

Pap.
'
.

The

vertical stroke of

in

rewritten.

to the lady Didyme his sister, greeting. Receive from the slave of the strategus . . and a box, and from chest containing two parchment quaternions and a cloak Didymus the sailor a bread-basket containing 4 glass flasks in sound condition, and a good knives ; of these take one for yourself. And from Carpus strap tied to the basket, and 3 son of Cleon receive the key of the bread-basket. If you cannot open the basket yourself, Take for it opens with difficulty, give it to the key-maker, and he will open it for you . Do not lose heart about the rent, for you will care of the things in the box lest they rot.

a

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Tell me through the sailor about get it once for all. received them, and if you require anything, let me know.
Sarapas.
3.

all

these things, whether

you have

I salute Tausiris

my daughter and

may be
a

in the sense of qua4. Possibly \ipayivo\v ; cf. e. g. 123. 30, 39. ternion occurs in Martyrium Petri Alex. p. 212. at the end of the line may be either for or a compound word. arevo is to be emended is obscure owing to the lacuna. 5. How ] Xaywoe is fem. also in 6. The form i-yios is cited in Stephanas from a glossary.
.

.

Good-bye,

sister.

.

.

.

20th.
5, It

(Addressed)

To

and

connected with

.

(11,

12) are, as 1. 12 shows, receptacles of some kind and is strange that a should be contained in

^ ($(

Didyme.'

B. G. U. 1095. 19.

1295.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
1295.

249

Letter of
14-8

Tasois.
Second or early
century.
third

X

1

1-5

cm.

A

letter

from a

woman

complaining that her correspondent Dionysius
in

was attempting to alienate her son, who apparently was threatening to remove the boy from Dionysius' influence.

his charge,

and

. \
5

Aio[v]vaio3L

[.])'

()
eyo)

7]

[]/
6

(8
Seo

\_\
[v]nep

,,- [] . ((
kav 8\
sVei
fis

,]

e[i']y

(^) (^) .
.

eKTos

f[T\vac,

.
15

el

,(5( \ . (
[
(

'AXe^avSpi-

7[5
.

20

[]

.
10.
1.

(-

.
15.
s

On

the verso
^[io]i'i'[(7i']cui

4-

v'iov

Pap.
17.
1.

COrr.
'

..

of

. !
this

written above

and

of

Taso'is to her

taking away

my

son, but

most esteemed Dionysius, greeting. if you intend to blame him in

See, I have not imitated

way,

I shall

you by send Ptolemaeus

.

250

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

and take him away. When his father died, I paid on his behalf 1,300 drachmae and expended on clothes for him 60 drachmae. I therefore beg that you will not persuade him to desert me, or I shall take him away and put him in pledge at Alexandria. So please send me a payment for two months through the bearer of this letter and the cloak, and let me know how much money you have given to him and whether you have received the cloak. Send the veil to your brother. Good-bye. (Addressed) To Dionysius from
Tasois.'
12. What exactly the writer intended by this threat is not clear. Perhaps she contemplated a loan on the security of her son's services, which might be engaged in lieu either of the principal or the interest of the debt ; cf e. g. Wessely, Fuhrer P. E. R. No. 433, P. Flor.

44, Tebt. 384, Lewald,

Zur Personalexehdion,

pp. i4sqq.

1296.

Letter of Dius.
1 5•

8

X

I

cm

Third century.

A letter from a son to his father, assuring him that his studies were proceeding satisfactorily. Cf. the good advice given by a father to his son in
531. 9-12.

Avpy]Kio^

^
^.
toTs

'flpeiai-

5

(' ,,, ^, [] .
OeoTs.

Ttjv

15

€[)
',

^ , , ^),( , .
6

)

?.

1296.
20

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

251

^, (.
the verso
an6S(ps)

5.

1.

through.

.

On

(>)
6.

Pap.
17.
1.

l6. viov Pap.

:

8.
;

of
1.

\
18.

viov.

above

, which
I

iS

crOSSed
1.

SO in

yaia Pap.

20.

(.

Aurehus Dius to Aurelius Horion

my

sweetest father,

many

greetings.

perform the

mother Tamiea and my sister Tnepherous and my sister Philous, I salute my brother and my brother Patermouthis and my sister Thermouthis, I salute my brother Heracl KoUouchis, I salute my father Melanus and my mother Timpesouris and her son. Gaia salute you all. I pray for your health, salutes you all, my father Horion and Thermouthis father. (Addressed) Deliver to Aurelius Horion from his son Dius.'

Do not be anxious, father, act of veneration for you every day before the gods of this place. about my studies ; I am industrious and take relaxation all will be well with me. I salute
:

my

.

.

.

^

&c., at 15. This papyrus provides a good illustration of the loose use of period; besides Horion, who was no doubt his real father (cf. 1. 21), the writer refers to two other men as 'father' (11. 15, 18), and he speaks of two women as 'mother' The true relationship of all the (11. 8, 15); cf. e.g. 1300. 8, P. Giessen I. iii, p. 53'. ' brothers and sisters mentioned may also be questioned.
this
' ' '

,,

1297.

Letter of Sarmates.
24

X 9-3 cm.
are remarkable.

Fourth century.

A letter announcing the
be
sent.

dispatch of various articles and asking for others to

The

spelling and

grammar

iSia>

,
5

ifpfoi/yU?]]

[]

Kehai,

,
,
.
£€[]'
ev,

.

, ), ,
(-

. "
,
elop-

kav

)

eis

"IXitos

€-

252

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
15

)$ ,
e/c€t,

Sev{po)

-

tveyKe | r }

tovs

-.
On
the verso
Trj

[6)
.
.
1.
'

.
.

Pap.

3•

1•

II.

1.

.
'ipiios.

4• •
1

oi™.

8.

,.
5•
^•

1•

-.

of

corr.

from

a.

Sarmates to his own Dioscorus. I sent you by Ammon the priest a marium of oil, which is meant for you to burn, and by my brother Theodoras four baskets, which are for you to burn, and a ... of oil for you to uncover and eat, and a spatkium of wine for you to drink at the festival, and by His one basket for you to burn. If Theodorus reaches you there, come here with him and bring the milk cakes when you come and the not the ., papyrus. I pray for your health. (Addressed) Deliver to my mother and father from
. .

Sarmates.'
3.

. []<"
8.

eivapiov

barely

room

(fopind). 10.

For the Analogous forms

cf. P. Giessen 103. 8, 22, Wilcken, Chrest. 297. 6, note. 14. 18. ^iXiyvov is another obscure word. might be read instead of -oi» oi, but the has previous letters then become very difficult, especially as there can be little doubt that been altered from not vice versa. 19-20. is followed by some unintelligible writing, which is unlike shorthand and suggests rather a cipher. The characters are, in 1. 20 F, L, d, o, I, Latin cursive s, a sign resembling that for 4 obols, o, Latin cursive c with long oblique head, cursive s, and the 4-obol sign again, Cf. 90. 6-7. , and in 1. 21

:

is an apparently otherwise unattested diminutive of appears to imply that the Cf. 11. 12-13. contained oil. must be a vessel or measure of some kind. If the f is right, there for a preceding , or the word might possibly be derived from

.

infin.

in the personal endings of the aorist are

»

cf.

e.g. P. Tor.

i.

5.

27

,

is

. G. U.

250. 8 eneveyKai.

common.

^
,

,

.
X
is

1298.

Letter of Ammon.
ii-i

II-5 cm.

Fourth century.

An

incomplete letter from a
in

man

to his friend, complaining of the treatment

which he had received sympathy or assistance.
being blank.

a transaction concerning some wine, and inviting
writing
across the fibres of the verso, the recto

The

1298.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

253

TOS
5

" ( ^.
Secnrorr)

-

Spa-

.

€. € \€

^ ' ^
,

6

15

^ ()
^)

",

,
,
. .

-

.

.

.

.

On

the verso

..
2.
1.
'

9•

1•

".
4• -

] ] ". (.
6.
1.

17.

1.

]. (oye
?

7•

"""

Pap. Pap.

8.

1,

greeting.

incomparable master, the consolation of his friends, Gonatas from Ammon, Before all else I pray to the Lord God for the prosperity of yourself and those dearest to you. I have been keeping myself quite alone beyond the point of safety, and all the vain talk of the world besets me. For I have only you to witness how Gunthus laid hands on me when Castor son of Damostratus, superintendent of wine Gunthus sent me a receipt for 66 spaihta of wine ; for'Troilus 36, for me 22, for Dius 8, and when I came to the Oxyrhynchite nome he charged me for each spathium 7 talents, which you being the intermediary in this (Addressed) To my lord and brother Gonatas from Ammon.'

my

.

.

.

11-13.

The

conjunctival clause

&c., cf. e. g. the

For the doubling of the in is left incomplete. hexameter fragment edited by Goodspeed in Chicago Lit. Pap.,

where
1 8.

Philogelos, p. 35, a

is especially common before . In papyri of the middle of the fourth century cited by Wessely, Altersindizium im of wine is priced at 20 and 25 talents.

254

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1299.

Letter of Psais and Syra.
24-5

X

1

8-1

cm.

Fourth century.

A

letter to a

son from his parents, giving news of their health and of their

preparations for his arrival.

5

. \ ^ , ' . ' [\ (. , {\ \^ ) '€ . -,
{)
'
Wdeii
Xvpq.
pelv

eTovs

Sas

{)€ ()

yivrfTai,

^
€(),
.
5•
1•
1.

()€6
61-

'[.]

'

eVoy S[e]

ecos

'•

[] [€] \\
,

oli

[]
![.

,^

15

TOis

Tois

,() .
[]

, ,, . ,-

2
On

.
.

the verso

.
.

6($)

.

pa

.

,

{) Svpa
•".
6.

.

Pap. 3• 1• "' iyialveiv. of rewritten. 7. of ;)((' inserted above the line
;

(

(
'

COrr.

from

)

Pap.

1.

. !. . 2 ^^
.
\.

, (^
;
g.
1.

.

,
.

.

II.

1.

so in

11.

12, 13.

21.

1.

yovea>v.

To my

lord

I

pray to the Lord

and son Ision from Psais and Syra, many greetings. Before all else God for your health and prosperity Thonis your brother sends you
;

1299.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

255

Next, since the new year we have been very ill, but we give thanks to recovered ; and up to the present time we have not sacrificed the pigs. We are expecting you to come. You know that on your account we have not salted any fish, but we have made the pickle yearly, and, if possible, I will prepare it for your coming. of knives and the pepper. Your brothers Horion and Do as I told you about the Herai'scus salute you, An ... and her children salute you, Tachosis and her husband salute you, Triadelphus and his wife and children salute you. I salute Kamokos and his household, I salute Hepsates and his wife with their children, I salute Hatres, Pseke, and all our friends by name. I pray for your long-continued health. Hathur 10. (Addressed) from his parents Syra and Psai's.' Deliver to Ision

many salutations. God that we have

.

.

.

1. 6 But only the bottom of the supposed and there may have been some correction.

7.

(

.

.

.

:

cf.

is apparently novel, but cf. e. g. 9-10. does not connect at all well with what precedes and is better taken as an independent sentence, the main verb being unexpressed, but easily understood, is obscure ; would not suit this context. The preceding [(] is required to balance nepi mnepadiov. The latter diminutive form does not seem to occur elsewhere.

8.

!.

. ,
1300.

of

is

preserved

Letter of Peter.
9-9X3I-I cm.
Fifih century.

from a son to his mother asking that various articles might be sent to him, and making other requests. The words in 1. a in 11. 8-10 were written in a different and xpovois (so.
letter

A badly spelled

hand, no doubt by the sender himself, before the vacant spaces originally
these lines were filled in
for a veil

(
Tfj

)

{)

left in

by the insertion of the

reference to Theon, and the request

and hood.

() {()

)
xat(peiv).

/}
,

(^^
rfj

vios

!

kv

eOKepiav evpmv

(\
5

()

].
.

,

', ,
{)

,

'Hpaeiv

256

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

,On
the verso

.( . . .
768()
2.

.))
^
1.

%

els

.5 .
COrr.
1.

ae

,

-

?
3•

[\
e'iva

\5>

\
1.

of

COrr.

from

,

of

added above the

line.

^.

from

.
of
1.


.

T1J
.
.

corr.

.

1.

(sO in

6)
9.

]

SO in

8.

7.

The

loop of
.

( . , eSpov Sta
4•
'•
;
.

in

rewritten
1.
.

so in
.

8.

1.

.

.

ayopauai.

\(
1.

9

.
'"'
6.

I.
, .

.

II.

1. ri;.

my most esteemed and virtuous mother, the lady Maria, from your son Peter in Lord God, greeting. I have found a good opportunity by this letter to greet you many times with my brother Theon and my sister the lady Plusia and my sweetest brethren Herai's, Nonna, Omaia, and Phoebammon, by name. Be pleased, my lady mother, to send and the rings. Do not neglect to send them to me by Athanasius. Many greetings me the many greetings to to my lord brother Athanasius the valet of Abel and also of Dorotheus my mother Cyrillous. I pray for your long health. Be pleased, my lady mother, to buy me a thick veil for the winter, and to get the Oasis hood from Peter son of Esour, that
'

the

.

.

.

;

I

may wear
4.

it

when
is

I

come.

(Addressed) Deliver to

my

dearest Maria from your son

Peter.'

found in Eustath.

5. 6.

814. 27
8.
9.

. :
is
is

Unknown.

may

p. 886. 36 and other late writers. corruption of SKvpav seems hardly likely. be merely due to the writer's erratic orthography, but cf.

A

cf 1296. 15, note. probably a syncopated form of

KovKovKoveiv.

, €
e. g.

B. G. U.

cucuUa

;

cf

for

{h)

MISCELLANEOUS MINOR DOCUMENTS.
X 5-8 cm.

1301.
pite

7-8

Fragment

of an application to the strategus of the Proso-

nome from
text
is

the comarchs of a village.

The document
[.

is

numbered

a\

and was glued on the

The

'^
left

side to another, of which the end of a line remains.
.
.

.
]

-{)

.

.

|

-

MISCELLANEOUS MINOR DOCUMENTS

\(
roiis

.

[.

.

.


.

.

[.

.

.

.

[

1302.

8 X 5-6 cm.

and remains of one more line. Late third or early fourth century. Three lines containing the words
kj"

|
I

rf]

[[)
• •

257

\

rovbe
. .
.
|

[.

.

.
|

{

corr.)
1 7,

\

ey/SoXe'as (cf. P.

Rylands

90.

note)

(^.:){$)
referred to

1303.

by a weaver
from
£ (?)
;

]
4*7
.

«?

,

"- -{])
Complete.

perhaps a

title.

may

well be that of Septimius Severus (a.d. ao8).

X 5'7 cm.

Beginning of a declaration on oath addressed to

1304.

Fragment of an application for payment from two brothers (whose status does not appear), of Oxyrhynchus. Lines 4-7
5*5 X 9*8

&(

and for the form of the document e. g. 55, C. P. Herm. 67. Reign of Marcus Aurelius (?). Beginning and end lost. 9 lines. 1305. (>y-S'S cm. Fragment of an account of a meeting, with acclamations Lines 5-9 similar to those in 41 cf. C. P. Herm. 7. i. 9, Archiv iii, p. 541.
pp. 359-60,
.

((
1.

() .).
cm.

,[]
Ends of

of the Oxyrhynchite
(?)
]

nome

through the agency of
8 lines.

About A.D.

336.

[ '
The
(cf.

reign

1265.

5),

(

corr.

e/c

«?

[\.
.

virip

Cf. Wilcken,

Grundz.

[€ ((5
. .
.

€€
. .

.

,] , . ] ^ $ ,
;

'2€/€
.

[•

|

]

.€,
.]

.

.

.

AioaKope

[.

.

.

[.

.

.

.

.

|

baaos

|

.

.

ev

[

.

.

Late third century. Parts of 10 lines. 1306. 8-5 X 5-8 cm. Application similar to 1109, &c., sent Sarap for the of his son. Lines 3-10
.
. .

irepl

(]
6

[8) ] 6[]
the a3rd year
of
is

(] :() ,() €(') [[((] [()[ ([()
in
.

eis

(

[() [
by Aurelius

ew'

]b{ov)
]

]

15 letters

{(),

irpb[s]

[]
.

eTi>ai]

(€-

f[ivai

.

.

The

father's

name Aurelius

suggests that

that of Caracalla (a.D. 314-15), though palaeographically that

1307.

()
lines.

[fTOVs]

Third centuiy.

] . {
(a.D. 183-3)

Commodus

would be suitable enough.

Parts of 13 lines.
official

7-2x15 cm. Four lines, unaddressed, containing an to some petition. The text is

()

response

{-) ,

.

[

(cf. e. g.

. G. U. 583 and P. Thead. 19. ai-3).
letters

[](

,

Complete but for the slight In the right-hand bottom corner 3 or 4
strip of

loss at the beginnings of the
?),

(

written in the

reverse direction, from the beginning of a line, probably the last of a

document

from which the

papyrus was
S

cut.

258

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
7-5

1308.

X 8-6 cm.
els

Memorandum

((){() []
century.

3,388 dr. for two months on account of
virep

1309.
(to

'?;. Late second or early third Four lines, written across the fibres. 8• X 8-1 cm. End of a document recording a supplementary payment the State) of 1,925 dr., Dated (eTovs) f Aovdov
Practically complete.

. () ()
of

payment (by a

tax-collector) of 3 tal.

The

text

is

(eVovs)

[]

, >
98)
;

[] '[]

/3;

.

cf.

1310.
the

910. introd., P. Tebt. 397. 2. Incomplete. 12 lines. 6-2 X 6-g cm. Memorandum or ticket of clothing
:

1273. 12)
fibres.

1311.

use of an anchorite

fibres.

1312.

1313.

, () -^ (. ' 5"8

.
An
he

aTro6e6eiy[/xei'oi)

AvTOKpaTopo]s

Third century.

Complete.

3 lines, written across

;
(?)

[

(Feb. 5iA.D.

]
(cf.

X 8 cm.

Memorandum The (?).

of a payment or contribution of
text
is

Els

ikaiov
?)

'Aviavos

{)!{)
is

oil for

the
(cf.

(cf.

1151. 50, note).

Fifth century.

Complete.

3 lines, written across the

7*2x8 cm.
I -I

obscure
of

memorandum: To
lines

Fifth century.

Complete.
t^s

3 lines, written across the fibres.

X
]

II cm.

Ends

two
is

mentioning a praefect Heracleus.
|

The
roiis
|.

text

is

...]..

Third century.

Heracleus

unknown, unless perhaps he

to be identified

with Septimius Heraclitus (a.d. 215); but the fragment a later date in the third century.

may

well be of

1314.

7x9

cm.

Ends

of 8 lines (written across the fibres), containing the words

quadringento\s octoginta sex tantum,

,

repeated 8 times, apparently as
;

a writing exercise. the

The hand

is

a clear cursive

zt

is

sometimes written as
(?).

a curve linked to the next
left

letter.

Fourth or

fifth

century

Broken to

and along the bottom.

On

the verso the words \omol

in large upright letters.

1315. 12-3 X 14-5 cm. The Latin alphabet first in capitals, then in minuscule, with Greek equivalents over some of the letters. F and / both have
written above them,
/i

(=

capital

and minuscule)

is

represented

by .

G

is

represented as

,^ as
]
.

(corrected to y?).

Written across the

fibres.

Fifth

or sixth century.
large rude cursive

Incomplete, the ends of lines being
asii intenaiirosa
[.

1316.

6x12-9

*^i"•

Beginning of a contract drawn up

Iv

son of Sarapion renounced claims against Theon and Zoilus, sons of Theon

,

lost.

On

the verso in

in

which Diogenes

[
1317.
in

MISCELLANEOUS MINOR DOCUMENTS
. .
.

Dated .). Germanicus Imperator,
.
.

()€; -()
in the
first

6[
yd
.

259

^}'
(day not

€[(1 hf
filled in
:

year of Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus
A.D. 57).

Incomplete.

7 lines.

5-1x8 cm.
in

Beginnings of the

6 lines of a copy of a contract of loan
.
. .

protocol form, the lender being Sarapion son of

and Heraclous.

Dated

the loth year of the [Emperor] Caesar Domitianus [Augustus
2[.]

Germanicus],

of Soterius (A.D. 91).

Conclusion of a contract for the loan of 5,000 odd 1318. i4'5 X 6-4 cm. drachmae, having the formula vTiip and the singular date (eTovs) la (erous) (trovs)

]
.

€[,

avbpeLo[o

KaCcrapos]

borrower's signature (written for him)
Diocletian did not abdicate

^ [,
.
. .
.

}(\ ([( [
which
is
.]

]

[

.

followed

ev

[]- {)

.[

by the

There appears to be a mistake
till

in

the

number of the

year, since

the 13th year of Galerius, and there was

a difference of 13 between the

latter's

regnal years and those of Maximinus,

who
1319.

is

thus necessarily excluded in the

of a third.

' ()
of which are lost.
3*7

nth

year.

13 lines, the ends

X

15-3 cm.

Strip from the top of a contract containing the date

be^o

()
[Aiyoiio•]-

(A.D. 403)•

3 lines, with

some

vestiges

1320.

The first 9 lines of an acknowledgement of a debt 7-3 X 13-1 cm. incurred in consequence of a purchase of wine, the price of which was not
paid, or not fully paid (fictitious loan;
is
[

text

[

1321.

7'42

^[
cm.

/?' {$)] ()) .[ ', [ ] [][ ^0] 5
cf.

^
— Tubi

Mitteis,

:

[(?)

Av^o]s

^ .
?]
. .

Grimdz.

p. 117).

(?)...

. D. 497•

Receipt for rent of the months Pachon

8th year and

Thoth

of the 9th year of Tiberius Claudius Caesar

Augustus Germanicus Imperator (formula .). . D. 48-9- Nearly complete. 5 lines. The text Receipt for 94 dipla of wine. 1322. 16 4*7 cm.

€{) ^ (). (()

«'»

? €- .
— Mesore

$ (
rijs]

The

of the

-

^'

'

(eTOVs)

$(
1253.
g,

is

(^)
I.

(cf.

P. S.

89. 2)

S 2

26
ivb{iKTiovos).

1323.

ii-gxy-y cm.

Theophilus, vetch-seller

(t corn from o)). Sixth Nearly complete. 17 short lines. Receipt from Leucadius to Paulus, and 1324. 11x9 cm. Miapis for i ceramion of wine. Dated in the 17th which = the i6th which = the 9th year (of Diocletian and Maximian, Constantius and Galerius), Mesore (A.D. 301). Practically complete. 8 lines, written apparently on the verso, the recto being blank. 1325. 15•! X 7-7 cm. Receipt for payments of wine. The text is MaprvpLos

4 14th indiction

{-3 /?; \
(iirep

( ,()
. D. 413•
Complete.
Receipt

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

()
11 lines. issued
:

()
P. Brit.
i

op

{).

by Martyrius,
Mus. 1445.
7,

(;?)
note
;

to

(

cf.

in

1037.

should be read), for
v-nb

6()

solidus as rent for his shop in the

century.

{$),

. Fifth century. Complete. , 8 lines. Endorsement on the verso in a different hand. 1326. io-6x6-5cm. Receipt for payment of wine. The text is

(() ()(^ ()
€ •([)
century.
to P.

Ps-P•)

()

() ,

'

( •{}
(1.

-)

(5)"
zivTe,
lines.

\

'

'.{)
ITaXeoCros

Complete.

10

1327.

4•6 X ^-^ cm.
Hierax,
land.
51•
8),

Another
for

receipt similar to the preceding from Philoxenus
MtyaK{r]s)
Ylapop{iov)
(cf.

of the

217 dipla

(

{) () .

IvbiKrlovos

'

Fifth or six-th

a subsequent payment of 2 dipla.
II lines.

Fifth or sixth century.

Nearly complete.

,
v-nep

154.

12,

and

1328.

months' (rent
(1.

bodevTa
(1.

1329.
1

? () . ] ]^ .
16x9-7 cm.
?).

Receipt for an unspecified amount paid on account of two

The

text

is

-!)

y.

hvo

bevTipas
(1.

(1.

vbsi

IvbLKriovos

26 X 10 cm.

Late fourth or fifth century. Complete. 8 lines. Receipt for 3 solidi on account of dues of barley

,

{) < () []
r^s Kvpas els

2th indiction.

The

text

is

Tlerpos

().

for the

(erous?) ivbiKTiovos

(^) ivbiK(Tiovos), (2nd hand) [] 4[]. - (Irons) ( (eroDs) . (2nd hand) YltTpos (09) {). . . 399• Practically complete.
verso a

/

,

(

v-ntp

^\

{) ()
(ist

hand)

(eTOVs)

10

lines.

On

the

much

effaced endorsement.

MISCELLANEOUS MINOR DOCUMENTS
1330.
5'3

X 15-8 cm.
is

An

illiterate receipt

for i solidus
(1.

The

text

kXl{os ?)

(1.

, ){$) 5
(1.

({). -)
VTiip

.) os
(1.

on account of dues.

yi(i'erai)

(^.) ,
(1.

virep

avvTaiKias

^),
rrjs
:

),
.

(1.

)(1.

261

oibiKTLOvos

.
(1.

boOevra
Ivb.).

fifth

century.

Complete.

6 lines, written across the fibres.
similar receipt
.
.

1331.

7*4

X 7• cm.
(.

Fragment of a
(1.

Xeias)

?)
(1.

(.
?),

:= capitation
(1.

dues)

(.)
(1.

century.

)8() () ;
.]

Late fourth

v^nip avvrepias
(1.

()

[.

.

.

7 lines.

1332.

7'5><4'4 cm.

Receipt for 15I artabae of corn.
hfKaTtevTe
(1.

"A/SfXe

[
;

The

text

is

.)],

teZ.

Fifth century

"
Fifth
(?).

Practically complete.

3 lines, written in a large coarse hand. the recto parts of la lines from the bottom

1333.

for a

third century.

, ,
13-3 X 6-7 cm.

On

apparently, an account of

names.

payment of 600

Late second century. dr. on account of

() On
.

of,

what remains consists largely of personal the verso an order from a gymnasiarch

{) ()
bos

[X]oy((i))

(erous) e

. (
lines.

The
as

text

is

(/3)

?-

b[a)(]s
Late second or early

[]7] .
of
(?

Practically complete.

4

1334.

7'6x9-3 cm.
in

Beginnings of 4
of the 93rd which

lines,

written across the fibres, from an
(?)
1.

order issued by

for a

payment

to

Abraham.
i.

Dated
1335.
(1.

Thoth

=

the 64th year

94th and 63rd,

e.

A. D. 416).

4"9

X i5"4 cm.
(1.

Order

for a

payment of meat
rois

'\uiavvr\s "Siipfjvos
-ei,

or roC

. o(vos)
the
writer

-)

{<).
Kpeu)S

e lvbiK{Tiovos)•

Kpims
fibres.

Lpas p{as)

() {5).
e^
/x(oi»as).

for a comes.

{)

The

text

is

AtoyeVr/y

{(tovs)

. D.

482.

Complete.

4

lines, written across

1336.

5-8

X 9-9 cm.

vpbes.
century.

The

Order from John to Philoxenus for a payment of 60 was perhaps the same person as in 1335. Fifth
lines.

1337.

8-1

{(()

Complete. 3 X 9-5 cm. Order
eX
. .

for a
.

payment

of 10 myriads.

(Is
.

\

The

text

is

+Nowos
Fifth

{by)vapiu)v)

century.

1338.

. (2nd hand ?) + NoVios Complete. 4 lines, written across the fibres. Order for a delivery of dried cheese 5'7 X I4'9•

{pbes)

€]().
(?).

pbas b(Ka, /
The
text
is

202

Poll. vi.
ta.

48

.]]

Fifth century.
8

,^• ) » {)() ^. ^ {) () ^
(1.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
-})
(sc.

(1.

:

cf.

be

eXeyov) XCrpas evbeKa,
(1.

Xi(rpat)

.

(1.

ovhv)
4

Tpw),

Complete.

lines,

written across the fibres.
is

1339.

X

8-1

cm.

Account of expenses. The text

Els

-^^

'!(()'{)

(.) ,
i/f,

(.)

,

,
(.)

.
1.

(.)
is

/cy (is

^flpas

Third century.
uncertain.

9 lines.

(•)( (.) Whether the account was continued
Two
a (erovs)
aTTovbrj[s)

,

(.) ,

, €]
(1.

-)

(.)

below

9

1340.

6-4Xi2-5cm.
(cf.

On

the recto fragment of an account.

complete containing the entries
naT^ais
lists

. G. U.

two more
1341.

lines.

1039. 4) (.) -, below which there are slight remains of On the verso remains of two narrow columns, apparently

)
is

lines are

(.)

,

of names.

First century.

()[ ()
,
written
;

10x8

cm.
?)

Account.

The

,

{){)
however,

()

{){) , ()

text

(erous).

()

without any sign of abbreviation,
possibly,
is

occurs

masculine

{bracai-ins),

not the feminine form found in P. Giessen 90.

&
p/ce.

,

()

y.

For
cf.

[){),
is

P. Flor. 143. 9,

(){) "
which
is

meant.

Fourth century. Complete. 6 lines. 1342. 8-7 X 10-2 cm. End of an account of payments from various Oxyrhynchite villages.

Ka)p(r)s)

1343.

+

s () [], , .), {)
/3»}(3),

The

text

is

(5•)

(}$)
On

()

, {s)
Fifth century.
.

^?

[.

.,]

(y]s)

?
hi{a)
it.

where presumably

6.

()
,
is

Qfoba>pov

7 lines.

30-5

IO-8 cm.

the recto a short account, of which the text
vfa,

(1.

,

[.][.] ( ), ) each entry having an oblique dash after
the verso an endorsement along the fibres
,

{
;

.

and across the fibres an account which seem to have been intentionally obliterated, vTi{ep) was one of the items. Sixth century. 1344. I3"4X 9-2 cm. Account found rolled up with 1288 for text see introd. Fourth century. Nearly complete. 6 lines. to that papyrus. 1345. 6-5 X 10-4 cm. Fragment from the end of a letter, the last few lines of which are nearly complete. Lines 6—10
inserted above the line) to
in

() {
II

complete.

7 lines.

On

+[]-

Nearly

lines,

5 & ({. ,
[].
written across the fibres.

.

.

.

(€

be

ttj

.

[]£6

(1.

-)

NeiAaros

(. ()
10
lines,

Late second or

third century.

MISCELLANEOUS MINOR DOCUMENTS
1346.
(1.

4'6 X 8'5 cm.
!/

-0)

,
okas
ii.

Fragment of a

'

letter.

The

\peiav
(1.

/,

-),

,

text

is

h

r?} (?)]

-(1.

263

^,

-fs)

of garment, apparently
(1.

.)
II

--

1347.

i4"3 cm.

Wilcken, Osi.

. G. . 485. ,

1334. 3 C. P. Herm. 39. 4)

with part of another at right angles in the left-hand margin.

1348.

above the

1349.

Addressed on the verso Fourth century. Practically complete. 15 lines. 1350. 6-5 X 20 cm. Letter, of which the text is-^

' €), ? ^, . ' [] . ^ ' ? [] (), . ". .[.]
5*6x7 cm.
Beginning of a
letter.

[7)

^ ,,([\ , ,' ' '
• .

unknown) (1. Second century (?). 8 lines. Fragment of a letter concerning some

[](

apabpa (a kind
yeyove).

'

rpis

P. Flor. 64. 2a

[\
is

({) {^),
('
.
.

5
land.
.

^
(cf.

Lines 2-6

Pap.)

(?)]

.

.

.

Third century.

8 lines,

The

text

(

rewritten

line)

(1.

[.

Late third century.

8 lines.

20*2X7-8cm.

Letter of Sarapion.

The

text

is

r^s

bodvai

bia

?)?.

(

corr.)

?;

verso -^

()

Tois

{). Written \{os)

[]

Toiis iv

(1.

--)
.

across the fibres.

Addressed on the

Fifth or sixth century.

Nearly complete.

3 lines in

all.

INDICES
I.

NEW LITERARY

TEXTS.

(a)

1231-4 (Sappho and Alcaeus).

{Figures

iti

thick type refer to papyri, those in Italic type to fragments,

Roman

figures to columns

;

schol.

=

sckolitim.)

&
oyi/a

1233. 10.
1231. 18.

34.

1232.
2.

1.

ii.

7

;

1233.

1233. 15. 2. ii. 8. ayadas 1231. 10. 10.
ayyeXof 1232. 1.
ii.

&<{
ii.

3.

Oyil232.

yo 1232. .
ayov 1232. i.

i.

H,
ii.

17.
ii.

ayire

5. 4.

ayv

1232. i. i. 8. 1234. ^. i. 12.
.2. ii.

€[ ]/ '.\

1231. J5. 7. 1233. 5. 14.

1

«V"o 1233.
.2.

7.

1231. i. ii. 14. 1233. .2.3. 3.

ayvov 1232.

2.

ayv[

«

1231. 50. 4. 1231. 56. a'fiVes 1231. J4. 6.

« ' £

1232. 1. 1231.

i.

9.
ii.

1.

I.

4.

-

1231. JO. 12.

1233. J. ii. 10. aijraif 1231. i). 9. 1232. J. ii. 9. 1233. 1. ii. 18 1233. 10. 6. al 1234. ' K( 1234. J. 9. 5. 12. 1233. .2. ii. 5. 1233. IL 15. Pap.). 1232. J. ii. 18 ai>i(iiOti 1232. J. ii. 14. (?) 1232. J. ii. 6. 1233. J. ii. 12. aipfiv, 1233. 3. ii. 7. ]ai'c'Xo[ 1231. 25. 4. 1234. 6. 5. 1232. J. i. 5. oKpas, 1233. 11. 1 3. 1233. 4. g. 1234. 2. ii. 4.
;

,
1234.
aV

1234. 2. 1231. 16. . 4• 1233. 5. 6. 1234. J. 6. 1234. .2. i. 14-15 schol. 1231. 1. i. 23, 12. 2, 50. 6, 55. 6; 1232. J. i. 8; 1233. 1. ii. 11, 14, 17; 1234. 4. 16. 1232. J. ii. 4. 1233. 5.2. s. 1233. J. ii. 18. 1232. J. ii. 7. 1234. J. 12. 1232. 1. ii. 15 ; 1233. 1. ii. 8.

[
1.

»

1231.
J.
i.

\.

I

.

d/ij3p]or

/?

6. 5.
i.

apapvypa 1231.
apepa 1232. J.

9.

30. dpc>a 1234.

.2. ii.

3.

1233.

iff. 4.
;

1231. J. ii. 16 1233. 2. 1231. JO. 7. 1231. 15. 4•

ii.

15.

{.

avayKa 1234.
OV
k'

6/

^

.

'.\

!
1231.

1234. 2.
J.

i.
i.

9.

34.

Cf.

oV.

45[

6. 6.

1231. J.
1.

ii.

2 2.

1234.
1232.
J.
ii.

.
i.

AvaKToplas 1231. J.

27.
ii.

J.

aveyos 1233.

20.
.

1234. 5. ii. 1233. 50. 5.

7

1231. J. i. 19; avbpi 1231. J. ii. 26. civ-

/

7,

iii.

6.

.

266
Spes 4.

INDICES
1232.
S. 8. 1.
ii.

17,

iii.

4; 1234. 3.
1.
ii.

II.

1203.
1231. 1. 1231. 1. 1231. J/.
i.

13.

ii. 11, SvSpeai

1234.

5.

1 1

^ '
1233.

34
i.

1233. 4. 19; 1233.
;

7.

'6.

/3a5u

ii^.

[

i.

7,

53. 2.

'^ \
iil/]rioi/

1232. J. ii. 19. 1232. J. ii. 11.

1231. 11. 1231. 5. 3. /3[ 1233. 1231. ^. 6. 1231. J. i. 29. 1233. 1. . 12.
5•
.2.
i.

.

.

12.

1231.

1.

/[^
dTTOyofoi

1231. Ji. 9. 1231. J-i. 3. 1231. 1. ii. 10.
J.
ii.

/,! 1234.
8.

4.

1231. J5. II. 1231.

1234.
J.
i.

.2.

[«5 1232. 5.
1233.

1232.

3 marg.
2.

1234.
1233.
5.
1

5.

.

29.

S. 5.
i.

3.

yai/

1231. 1.

i.

14.

ySs 1231. 9. 6.

aneoiaas 1231. 1.

28

(f).

([

1234. 3. i. 1234. C. 8 schol.
1231.
1.
ii.

6 schol.
8.

1232.

J.

ii.

6.

1233. 3. ii. 6. y til/OS 1231. 9. 2. yap 1231. J. i. i8, 25, .2. 7, 13. 5, J5. 5, 7, 50. I, 5; 1232. J. i. 3, 9; 1233. 1. ii. 6, 12, 8. 7; 1234. .2. i. 14-15 schol.,
ya/iOK
ii.

"kpevs 1234.

/ >£ /
Sr Ke
i.

1233. 1. i. 7• 1233. .3. ii. 15. 1232. .2. 5.
1231. 15. g. 1231. 1. ii. 4. 1233. 4. 11.
ii.

8, 6. 7.

1231.

1.

I 34.

apyvpa 1232. J.

10.
8.

.2. i.

"™ ]>
6.

1233. 5. 1231. . i. 20. 1232. . ii. 1 7. 1234. 5. i. 8 {Ois K€ Pap.). 1233. S. II. 1232. 1. ii. 4. 1233. IJ. II. 1233. -i. I. 1234. 4. II.
1231.
9.

!

1234. 3. i. 6. 1233. ^. ii. 1 3. ycpavoia-iii 1233. .2. ii. 1 8. 1233. 16. 3. yfipas 1231. 10. 6 ; 1233. 1233. 8. 8.
yevvaTai

([
i;

ii.

II.

€ []
33•

8. 3.

^

1231.

1.

[\]
''

1234,

1. 12.

14.
J.
ii.

1231.
'Arpfit

4.

'ATpeiSav

1234.

.2.

1231. 15. 3• 1231. 1. ii. 24. 1231. 15. 2. 1234. 3. . 12 (cOir. to yavw 1231. 16. 6. yot/Vj 1233. 5. 6. yula 1233. 15. 3• yvvaiKfS 1232. 1. iii. 3. yvv[aiK 1233. 1^. 9. ii. 15.

).
1232.
1.

1234. 3.
1.
li.

i.

6 schol.
16.

232.
avVixa

3[ 1233. 33.
1231. 1. I 23. 1233. il. 19.
]8eu/cir

9(.'),
i.

/
6fOpo
Sij

2.

«!
i.

1234. 3. 1232. 1.

12.
13.
7.
affrai/

1234. i". i. 12. 1234. .2. i. 7.
1231. 9. 17. 1233. 5. 5. 1233. 10. 2.
i.

ii.

1231. 15.

5,

avTu 1233. 17. 4{?).

1233.
5.

.2.

ii.

16.

1234.

.2.

SevTfpov 1231. 1.

12.
;

1233. JO. 4, 8. 1232. 1. ii. 4. 1233. J.S. 7. 1233. J. ii. 9, 15.

'

1231. 1. ii. 2, 15. 7 oijCre 1231. 15. 3.

1234. 3.

ii.

10.

1234. 3. 1233.
1.

i.

13.

|•. 1233.

£/
5•

1234.

1.

9-

5-2. 5.

.

g,

.

/.

NEJV LITERARY TEXTS
1232. 3. ii. 5. 1233. 3. i. 3. 1234. 3.

1233.

1.

ii.

I4{?).

1234. 1. 8. hiaKwp 1231. 10. 8. &(&(.. 1233. . i. 13. 1231. J5. 3. 1231. 31233. 3. ii. 9Soceii', €;[ 1231. 55. 2. 1234. 3. ii. II. 1234. 4. II. Sims 1234. 5. i. 10. &vvafa 1234. . g. iSimvTO 1231.

' £[ (,
>[
ii.

267

1

4.

(

/ -

.

1231. 23. 1 1232. 3. ii. 8. ]£>/ 1233. 8. 2. >' 1233. S. 9. f/i^6i/ai 1231. 3. i. 15, ii. 20. 1234. 5. i. 1 4. 'V« 1234. 4. 9, !/ 1233. 3. ii. 14. eOi/T€f 1234. 2. 12.
12.
11,

J.

ii.

9.

1231. 1233. 1231.
?yep/)e

.

i. 33. 15. J. i. II.

i.

1233. 17.

3.

?

cyf'pfl'jri

1231. 5e. 6.

^
>
9.

1233.
i,

.
1.

1 2.

1234. 5. i. II. evl231. 3. i. 31, .2. 3, 35. 3; 1233. 4. 1234. 5. 7. cVi 1232. 3. ii. 7. 14. 2 evfpyoiac 1234. 6. 9 schol. 1234. .2. ii. 5. iv'iavTov 1233. 5. ii. 12. ero«a 1233. .2. ii. 17. 1231. (vvinovTfs 1231. 3. i. 10.
;

(-

3.

1231. 1. i. 15, 15. 6, 59. (' 1233. 1233. S. 3. 1231. J5. 3 1233. 1. ii. 4

51.
8.

(

23. ewopoi/ 1233. 34.
ii.

I. I 2.

.
;

ii.

!
fwre

(

;

1234.

3. 11.

e^ayot/

1234. 1232.

.2. i.

3.

ii.

20.
5.
I

1234. 3.
1231.
otSa
.3.

i.

8.

1231. 10. i2;

e^fpjfvyopevos

1233.
2.

O.

1233. JJ. 17.
.25. 2.
ii.

1231. 30.
fVt;

tiots 1234. 2.
fi'Sf'i/ai,

5 schol.
6.

1234.
7.

^

1231.

.
i.

i.

1234. 2.-i. 14-15 schol. 1234. 2. ii. 7. €V€lK7;[ 1231. 9. 14.
cVft'Si)

33(?),
eoiKores

la[ec\1231. 14.

.
2.

£7[«'
fVi

1231.

3. 3.

i.

9.
;

;[

1233. 1232. 3. 1232.

.
.2.

i.

10. 11.

1232.

ii.

1234. 5.

12.

dt 1231. J. i. 12; 1233. 10. 7, 33. 15(f); ff 1232. .2. 1234. S.i. 12, 14-15 schol. 3 ; 1233. 3. ii. 6,9, 12; 1234. 5. 1 1.

(

1231. 34. 3. 1231. 34. 5. eV (e^) 1231. 3. ii. i

€[£ «[
fVtyapia

',
;

1231. 3. i. 14, 4. 6 1234. 2.

( ^ "

(

1232. 3. ii. 6 .2. ii. 3, 7, 30. 4; 1234. .2. i. 9, ii. 1232. 3. ii. 5; 1234. 1. 3. 1233. 3. i. 8. cxye-yoi'roi' 1234. .2. ii. lO.
;

;

1233.
12.

(,

1233. 3. ii. 11. 1234. 2. 1. 6 schol.
eVfXa^fro 1234. ^.
6. 8.
.2. i.
i.

(
3.

4 1234. 2. i. 1 10; 1232. 3.ii. 7 \. 14 and schol., ii. 1232. 3. li. 14.
iii.

3.
;

9.

1233.

3.

1231. 2. 8.
ii.

6.

1234. imrevxeas 1234.

^ '

1231. 38. 5. 1231. 3. il. 6. 1232. 3. iii. 6. 1231. 3. ii. 5. 1233. .2. ii. 14. (v. 1. -») 1232. 3. iii. 3. 'EXiVa 1231. 3. i. 19. 'EXe'ra 1231. 14. 5; 1233. -2. ii. 15 (?). 1234. 3. ii. 11.

"

( » /
1231.
f'ppa
cpoi/

8.

1231.

24.

cpai-m 1231. 3.

i.

16.

1234. .2. i. 14-15 schol. eparov 1231. 3. i. 29. epya 1231. 9. 20. cpyoi/ 1231. 12. 2.
.2.

epyl'

8.

1234. 2. i. 1234. 5. 6.

14.

1231. 14. 1231. 3. i. 12

4.
;

1234.
;

1233.

4. 6.

1232. 3. ii. 10. 1232. 3. ii. 8.

1231. 3. i. 1 2 1233. 5. II. eparos 1231. 14. I.

\

?

5.

11.

1233. ^.
2.

ii.

19.

1232. 3. ii. 2, 1 1234. 3. lo.

fXitrc

268

?
i.
iVi

1231.
II.

\\
9. 4.

INDICES
1233. 11. 14
ii.

1234. 2.

12.

[
;

1234. 1231.

5.4• 1234.

^
' /
')!/

e. 7.

]€

1233. J5.

3.

1233. 4. 9• 1232. 3. . 1 6. 1234. .2. . 1233. 12. 1233. 4. 3-

.

.

6^ 1231. 51. 3.

//
fupe[

1233.

4. 9.
J.
i.

1231. 3. 3• 1231. 3. . II.
3.
;

fi<V]a/i7rToi'

1231.
J.

25.
5.

eiXipav 1232. i.

iii.
i.

lapat

1232.

(€! 1231.

.
3.

6. 3. 9•

1234. 6. 3. 1233. 4. 5. 1232. . . 12. fiVe 1233. 8. 3. 1232. 1. ii. 13. 1234. 3. i. 5. 1234. 3. i. 14-15 schol. 1234. 3. ii. 10. ?;>' 1233. 1. ii. 16. 1231. 50. 8. 1233. 3. ii. 19. 1234. .2. i. 6 1231. 3. 4.

( €£
fpav

17.

1234.

J.

1 3.

. 4, 30. 7
';(/ 1232.
iV]roas

1234.
iii.

^

1233. .5. i. 26, 1233. 33.

.

3.

4•

1231. 18.

"iSaof

€]<

-

^ ?

"iXtoK

schol.

" 1232. ^
IWots((/>fl]i/jut

1232. 3. ii. 3. 1231. 3. i. 30. 1231. 35. 6. ueXoi 1232. 5. I. UiTev[ 1233. 9. 8.
3.
ii.
;

'^'

1231. 56.

g.

13.
.3.
ii.

1232. 2. 3 1233. iV[fpO€tra 1231. 3. ii. II. 1234. 5. 5.
1231. 56. 1231. 3. i.
5.
1 3.
ii.

4.

faicpvofi'TOi

1233. 1. ii. 10. 1233. 4. 8. faXai'ai/ 1233. 3. 10.
fdiSais

[
&€

1231. 50. 1231. 55. 6.
2, S.

3.

[ [|<];^/
1231.
1.
ii.

1232. 1233.

3.

17.
3.

'
32.

1233.

4.

6.

6. 2.

1231.
4. 2.

i.

1233.

ZeC 1234. 1

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iri231. J.
i.

1233. 4.

7 (?). 10.

10.

Ai'os

«,
3.

1232.

3.

ii.

10.

.
iii.

1

8.

1232.
31.
3.
;

(
3. 3.
ii.

.
8.

.
1231.

'
3.
i.

1233.
''"V"
i.

3°•

1231.

3.

31•

1231.

3.

.

20.

1232.

,

1233. 4. 2. 1231. 10. 6, 34.
1231. 1.
ii.

1233. 17.

.

9.

;
8.

6.

Kawo/ioj/

1233. 14.

1234. 3.

5Vep 1231. 56. 8.
3I.

II.

30.
3.

\
12.

1231. 2. i. 14««•'» 1233. 1233. 11. 14. 1233. 1231. 35. , 50.

«^

.

)«71231.

;

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[ / ;[ /
\ \

7.

.

1231. JS.

7•

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277

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INDICES
1241. V. 9• 1241. V. 34> 35• 1241. vi. 24. 1241. vi. 25. 1242. 42. 1237. 1. . 4•

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Pap.).

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1240. 5•
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1242. 23, 54• 1242.
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1242.

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TEXTS
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279
6, 15, 35, iv. 20, 27, v.

2.
34; 1242. 25

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1241.

1241. iii. I. 1239. 13. 1239. 17, 18; 1241.
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23, 8, 21.

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i.

9; 1241.

28
II.

INDICES

EMPERORS.

Augustus.
6eui Scbr

2(!

1256. 1266. II.

1

4.

Tiberius.

Claudius.

!. !

1281. 13

Nero.

Vespasian.

DOMITIAN.

Trajan.

Hadrian.

Antoninus.

1279. 26.

../ .. .. .. . . ..' - /// 1266.
4,

€!
1266.

. .
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2e/3.

Ftp/i.

! .
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1258.

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1316.

24) 1282. 23.

2c^.

1282.

2,

43•

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1317•

Nf'pouas

2f/3. Tep/j.

1266. 30, 37•

Tpatavor 'ASpiavos
Kvpios

(,

123.

36.

'Adpiavos

1263. II.

2.

1270.

8,

54» 59

'

1272. 23

;

1270. 44

j

1279.

8.

Septimius Severus and Caracalla.

8((!

Septimius Severus, Caracalla, and Geta.
Aovkios

Caracalla and Geta.

! . ! .: !. . ! ! . . ? ! !' .' . . .^
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1309.

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2(!

Scovrjpos

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1267. 25-

\

1267. 21.

1259.

2'J.

1259. 3•

//.

EMPERORS

281

Caracalla.

-.
Philippi.

..
2e/3.

AvptjKios Sfovrjpos

.
1283.
8.

Mcy. Bperam.

Mc'y. Tepp. Me'y.

1278. 31.

Elagabalus.
MapKos AiprjKios

Decius.

Aemilianus.

Valerian and Gallienus.

Macrianus and Quietus.

AURELIAN AND VaBALLATHUS.

Probus.

2, 1256.

Diocletian and
Ova\epios

, . . .. . . ^' ' . ,. (. , ! . ! , " / ., , ! , '! ! : '!! ! . ! ! . ., ! : (, , ,. :!! , ., . ! ,! ^! . ,! ! ! . ! ! .! 2( , . . .
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Me'y. Euae/Seis

!.
.
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6 Kvptos

60.

1276. 22.

Kuij/70S

Upatavhs

'Epevvios

2.

1284.

AlpiKtavos

2/3.

(,

OvaKfpiavhs

Mey.

OvaXepiavos 6

1277.

5•

!
1286.
II,

Ova\epiai/os

AiKivvios OidKepiavhs

Mey,

Ovak^ptavos 6

eiri-

1273. 42.

'loiivios

Titos

'loui/ios

;^. (.

1254. 28.

'.

20.

',

! / ! !
Aovkios
Map/cos
Me'y.

MaKpiavos

;^. 2e0. 1254.
5e/3.

\

SeTrri/iioE

'/!» 1264. 20.

Mey. Vepp, Me'y.

Oie'poy
2ej3.

'.

1260.

3•

Ova\epios

OvaKcpios

Me'y.

2e/3.

1252. reCtO 39• 1252. rCCtO 12

;

1255. 12, 22.

282

Galerius.

[.)

CONSTANTINE.

Theodosius.

Anastasius.

/. ,{
.
.
1257.
III.

! ! !'! . ? .
VaKipios Oia\epios

INDICES
2f3.
6 avSpdOTaros

.

(erot

1318.

beanOTat

'

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Avyovaros 1265• . Kataapes 1261. 5

\

1265.

;

.
1261.

.

1319.

Ai/y.

1320.

7•

CONSULS, ERAS, INDICTIONS.

Consuls.

' /
'

(

Praesenti Albino co(n)s(ulibus) (246) 1271. 13.

(325) 1261.

.

.

! !
£ £
ETos

(403) 1319.

Trjs

!
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£
1261. 12
J

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(33^) 1265.

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(49?) 1320.

1265. 25.

Eras of Oxyrhynchus.
?•
(\

€ (399) 1329.
(413) 1322.

cjy

|

(1. c\8

,

i.

6.

416) 1334.

eTOS

(482) 1335.

Indictions.

3rd 5th 6th 9th

(5th or 6th cent.)

1326

;

1327.

(482) 1335. (497) 1320. (5th cent.) 1331.

nth
cent.)

(late 4th or 5th cent.) 1328. i2th (323-4)1261.6; (399)1329; (4th cent.

)

1280. g;

(late 4th or

5th

1330; (413)1322.

13th (399) 1329. 14th (6th cent.) 1323.

IV.

MONTHS AND DAYS
MONTHS AND DAYS.
(a)

283

IV.

'!
34•

Months.
Nf'oi

€!

(Choiak)
1318.

1270.

10,

56

;

1278.

205
45
;_

3. 24.

(Mesore) 1279. 22

;

1304; 1316.

] €!
rrjs

(Hathur) 1258. 14; 1281. 1291. 14.
^

1280.

g.

(Pauni) 1317.

inayopfvai

^(€

() Days.
k[al(endas)
.

1278. 26 ; 1316. 1318.

1271. 12.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES.
6

"
'Ayia

f.

of

Abram 1332.

'AjSfXos

1307. s. of Abele 1332. 1334.

! ! '!
1277.
4.

f.

of Aurelius

Theon

Sarapion 1276. 4. 1244. introd.

'\€!,
1264.
5.

!! ^! !!
1276. I, 25, 28. 1349. 1288. 15.

Ayaflos

,!
1300.
6, 7.

f.

of Aurelius Serenus also called

..

S.

of GeillinUS

'[.]! 1349.

!
12.

goddess 1268. 7. 1253. 17. f. of Jul. Theon

.

1326.

'[.
3,8.

',
1278.

!! !, !
1275. 6
35•
; ^

!, ! .
.
4,

1297. 2; 1298. 3 2• . of Diogenes 1270. 18, 49 ^• d. of TechoSOUS 1284.
. .

S.

of Euporion 1280.

! !! !, "! ! ,
1278.

! ! \. !, ! !, ! ! . !
'A/ifiwwos tax-collector

gymnasiarch, verso 32.
s.

s.

of Ptollarion 1252.

!
'!,
'[.
.

1257. 13, 18. of Apollonius 1282. 9, 13. of Psammis S.

1266. 6, 40s. of Theon and f. of Papontosl282. 20. ex-dioecetes 1264. 9.

,

ly.

presbyter 1311.

.

pilot,

son of Olbanus

1260. 3, 25. god 1256.
1325.

12.

. 1256.

24.

.] 1299. 12.

1350.

1311.

\.

d.

of Dionysius

1339.

.

'

1268.
d.

7,

5•

gymnasiarch-ekct

. of Aur. Onnophris 1275. 2. f. of Aurelius Silvanus 1260. 30.

,

of Dionysius 1279. 3• of Tapilous 1288. 8, 2, 22. {. of Aurelia Mei'thous 1276. , 24. f. of Aur. Herodes 1274. i.
6 8.

.

.

basilicogrammateus

1259.

.

284

INDICES
d.

/,
1278.
5.

of Harpalus 1267.

.

3, 12.

.

d.

of Ptolema

,
arch,
s.

d. of

Philon 1344. 1293. 23, 32.
f.

of Achillion also called Apollo7.

nius 1274.

Aip.
Aip.

. banker 1284. .
os
i.

of Achillion also called Apollonius

:
6

!
I,

d.

of Aur. Petosiris 1268. 8. of Aurelia Thaesis 1273. 3.
S.

of

Gcminus 1276.

25, 28.

3.8.

5, 19.

gymnasi-

,
1278.

S.

of Euporion 1280.

gymnasiarch-elect 1278.

..

4,

,

17.

1274.

12.

!, (5 /.
/iof,
s.
f.

/ /
f.

Aip

. keeper

pilot, S.

of Olbanus 1260.

of

3,

25•
_

the archives 1264. nius 1274.
f.

.

S.

of ApoUo-

.;
Aipto

7.

'.\[. .][.

"Apeios

! , ! " ^ , !, , ' :'
of

of Haras 1267. i6. s. of Timagenes 1262. lo. f. of Phanias 1330. (?) strategus 1258. 7. of Syrus and f.of Amois 1282. 9. /iof f. of Zoilus 1267. 8. 1331.
Kf^Tcpof

1256. 24. banker 1284. 5, 19• .] 1283. 2 2. StrategUS 1283. . S. of Tryphon 1273. 4, 21,
priest,
S.

47. 50•

of Hermanubis

1256. 10.
S.

of HeraclaS,

1275.

3.

Theon 121.

ii.

1283. 9•
ii.

of

Hermanubis 1256.

Aiplo

deCaprotUS 1260.
6
s.

of Aurelia Sarapias 1277. i. d. of Aur. Herodes

.

Aipo
arch,

\

g.

gymnasi-

of Achillion also called Apollonius

1274.

I.

1274.
6.

12.

]sis 1275. m. of Aur. [ s. of Panrumis 1281. i, 4.

StrategUS of the Piosopite

nome 1301.

f.

of Apollonarion 1267.

3.

Aipo

1289.
s.

2.

Aip. 'A. strategus

1283.

I

Aio
4, 21,

I,

21.

Aip.'A.

of

Tryphon 1273.
s.

47. 50•

Aipo
1275.

Aip. 'A. priest,

of

Hermanubis
4.

1256.

10.
f.

Aipo
Aipo
20.

of Aur. Horus 1255. Asclepiades 1271. 8. 1252. versO 4.

21, 44.

1299.

17.

Aipo
1274.
1261.
2,

.

Aipa

of TechoSOUS 1284. 12. d. of Aur. Herodes 1274. i.

IZ^S.

16.

^, ^ ( '
S.

s.

of

Aur.

1296.

of

S.

Theon 1276. 27. of JOSeph 1320. S. of DionysiuS

4.

exegetes 1252. recto 16,
StrategUS 1252. recto 2,

S.

of LuciuS

4.

Senator,

s.

of Coelacius
s.

4.

.

of

Eudacmon and m.

of

ex-gymnasiarch,

of Apion

Aipa

Aurelia Tausiris 1273. i, 20, 45. 1271. 2. d. of Apion 1276. I, 2, 24. d. of AriuS 1277. 1,2 2.

.
1268.
7, 10,

of Dionysius

,
Aipo
45•

1274.

I.
s.

of

Aphunchis 1277.

^€
3.

Ammonius

also called

chief-priest

1273. 2, 48. 1252. recto 16, 22,

15•

^ !{). !] :( . !! , , !
s.

recto 17, 21, 43. Qavios priest,
6, 26.

/
6,

V.

PERSONAL NAMES

285

Qeaycw/r exegetes 1252.

of Demetrius 1265.
StrategUS of the
14.

Cynopolite

nome 1254.

i,
s.

, , ,
1338. 1330.
6

.

{.

of Aur.
S.

Theon

1277. 1275.

4•

.

of HeraclaS

AiprjKios

comarch,
1

of Petenouphis

1256.

23
[.

(,

3.

{.

of Tazoilas 1287.

.

7• 1283. 9•
s.

12S6.

3.

village-scribe,

.

.

.

comarch 1301.

S. of Pepirius 1320. comarch, s. of Theon 1254.

7.

31. 33•
s.

arch,

MapKOs of Zoilus 1274.
10, 23.
S.

.
S.

ex-gymnasiof Ammonius

^
€5
Feppavia

and

f.

ofProetusl281. 15. S. Of Apollonius of Aur. Dionysius 1274. 7.

\

f.

of

Psammis 1266.
10.

7,

10.

praefect 1277. introd.

3.

god 1272.

1275.

1255. 1256. 1283.

€ {
S.

,
I,

1296.

of Ptollion 1280. 1 8. of Peter 1280. I, 15. comarch, s. of Theon

17. assistant of the praepositus 1253. 19.

'8
,
2,

f.

of Julius

Theon

1264.
f.

5.

3.

comarch,
s.

s.

of Saprion
)

5, 23.

1339. of Aur. Agathodaemon 1276. 1349.
21.
13.

i,

29.

^'
3.
s.

)

tax-collector,

of Eut(ych

f.

of Aurelia Taseus 1268.

5. 8, 14•

2[
1276.
3.

of Tauris 1254. 25. S. of DiogeneS 1276. 32.
S.

1306.
of AgathinUS

'
1254. 16.

S.

of Ammonius 1260. 29. comarch, S. of Panetbauis of

,^
1262. 41294.

1298. 1298.

f. of CaStor 1298. 12. m. of Aur. Arsinous 1273. 4. . decaprotUS 1260. 9. f. of Aur. Thonius 1265. 6, 18. f. of Didymion 1279. 14. 1257. 5, 9.

S.

' ^
[ [

6
S.

^
i.

Theon 1307.
1260.

.

of Aur. Saiapias 1277. 26. f. of Aur. Dius 126. I, 21. comarch, s. of Archelaus 1255.
]os 6

4;

the archives 1264.

](
]

1275.
[

5.

1275.

6.

, ,
\
S.

keeper of
S.

of PhilotaS

of Ammonius

, ,

m. of ApolloniuS the younger 1262. 12. s. of Demeirius 1279. 14. 1294. 5.

'
[.]

.

.

)(

)

ex-CXegetCS

,

1 9.

. of Ptolema 1278. .

\

.
9.

StrategUS of
14.
6.

the Cynopolite
f.

nome 1254.
s.

i,

of Epicrates 1278.
I.

sitologus,

of Pausiris 1259.

StrategUS 1259.

.
d.

f.

of ApolIoniuS

the younger 1262. 11.

comarch 1301.
[

of Colluthus 1272. 25.

1268. 3. s. of Hesychius 1303.

1279. 25.
{.

of Ammon

.

.

.

1270.

19.

286
AioyiVijs
f.

INDICES
of Aur.

Sarapammon 1276.

33.

.oyvs charioteer, s.ofHerasl287.5,ii,i8.

! ' ! €;
Aioyivris
f.

•/! comes 1335.
Aioye'rTjs

, ,
f.

..
6
pricst,

s.

of Joseph 1320.

.

city-SCribe

S.

of Harbes and

f.

1263. . of Aur.

of Diogenis 1276.

9.

city-scribe

1263.

I.

Haruotes 1256. 1292. 9.

ii.

s. of Sarapion 1316. Aioycfiyr s. of Theon 1270. 20. eX-COSmeteS, Aioye'i'ijs•,* Tt^cptos

.

f.

', , .
1292.

of

Panus 1328.
I.

of Tiberius Claudius

Diogenes 1284.

8.

1275.

4.

,
)

S.

of DionysluS

Aioyevqs,

,
1279.
arch,

S. of TiberiuS Claudius Diogenes 1284. 7. d. of Diogenes 1276. 8. d. of DionysiuS 1279. 3. 1278. 2, 6. Aip. 1295. , 22 1305. S. of Psammis and f. of Psammis 1266. 6, 40. Aioviatos f. of Apia also called Dionysia

.

'Eae«Ct m. of Tekosis 1282. 12. f. of Peter 1300. 10.

1348.
f.

.

.

, ,
',

!
,

f.

;

(

f.

of Aurclia Thaesis 1273. i. of Sarapion 1253. ii. of Aur. Ammonianus 1280.

3.

1334.
)
f.

of Aur. Pat(
1 6.

1283.

3.

1299.

4.

Avp.
12.

s.

gymnasi6 of Achillion also called Apollonius
strategus 1301. of Aur. Hermogenes 1275. 4. of Aurelia Sinthonis also called
7.

Firmus, Valerius F. praefect 1271.

7.

1274.

ZcM god 1265.

8.

Avp.
f.
f.

.

adjutant 1253. 12. s. of Apollonius and

f.

of Zoilus

o^'vofle'cgymnasiarch,f.ofPtolemal278.8. . . of Ptolema 1278. 6. god 1283. 1 7, 21. 1298. 5• 1296. , 2 1. S. of Aur. 1321. 1297. S. of Theon 1276. 27. freedman of Sarapion 1263. 3. silologus, s. of Onnophris 1259. 5.

,
, , ,
[
1255.
f.

Apia 1268.

•, Uepvo .
1257.

8.

StrategUS 1279.

,
7.

1267.

7.

1342.

.
f.

S.

of GaiuS JuliuS

I.

Alexander 1264.

s. s.

.. ..
.

;

"

'
14•
Zcuif

Aur. Nicocles 1274. 4. of of Theon 1316. of Zoilus and f. of Horion 1267.
I.

.

5.

1291.

.
1347.

1305.

keeper of the archives 1268. goddess 1265. 8. 'Hpaif 1300. 4. m. of Aurelia Meithous 1276. 2. of Aur. Eudaemon 1273. i.

2.

.

1299.

II.

.
5•

StrategUS

," . 7!•;9 '/
1262.
3.

\(,

of Sarapion 1263.

1350. 1300. 7•
S. of Didymus 1278. 9• decaprotus 1257. , 2, 15. ex-gymnasiarch, s. of Sarapion

, , )!
f.

of Aur. Aphunchis 1275. 3. Aip. S. of LuciuS

.

1274.

4.

1270.
Aip.

.

10.

exegctes 1252. recto 16,
2,

21, 44.

..
f.

StrategUS 1252. rectO

20.

s.

of Heras 1282. 6. of Horus 1281. 11,

1330.

m. of Aur. Hermogenes 1275. 5. m. of Sarapion 1317. ) 1296. 13. d. of Apollonius 1267. 16. 'Upas s. of Calathus 1272. 14, 17, 20. 'Upas f. of Diogenes 1287. 5. 'HpSsd.ofHeraclidesandin.ofThnasl2S2.5. 'Upas f. of Heras 1268. 3. 'Hpas s. of Heras 1268. 3. 'HpSis d. of Hera[ 1306. 'Hpc{ f. of Heras 1306. Aip. ex-gymnasiarch, s. of Apion and f. of Aurelia Aristous 1274. i. f. of Ptolemaeus 1270. 2, 17. Pap.) 1303.

!: , !
s.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES
eimv

287

of Plutarchus 1252. verso 26.

HpaiiKeios

1328.
senator,
s.

praefect 1313.
Aip.

.

of Coelacius

1261.

4.

\{

!
'

5 ^ ,
eucts

,. , !,
/as

s. of Theon 1316. s. of Isidorus 1269. 2, 13, 34 d. of Horus 1276. 8. d. of Petosorapis 1282. 5, 19, 25, 29.

().

.

goddess 1268.
7.

7.

s.

of Paapis 1282.
s.

. exegetes 1252. rectory, 21,43• Aip. . priest, of Demetrius 1265.
4.
f.

6, 26.

1299.
s.

of Petosorapis and
II.

of Tekosis

1282.

1286. introd.
Aip.

)),

^!

{ ,

.

,
f.

.

Cynopolite nome 1254. 1297. 12.
Taios

.
6

.

d.

of

Eudaemon and m.
3.

of

' ! '
/

Aurelia Tausiris 1273. i, 20, 45. m. of Aur. Onnophris 1275. m. of [. .Jtris 1256. 17.

Oeayhnjs, Avp.

. 1252.
5, 14.

rectO

1 7,

21, 43-

1297. 1323.

centurion 1253. 8. of Plution 1266. 16, 33•

.

1296.

12, 19.

eeW1262. introd.; 1293. ; 1300. f. of Amois 1282. 20.

3; 1348.

1252. recto 1 6, 22,45. Aip. . 6 1273. 2, 48. f. of Aur. Dioscorus 1276. 28. eeW f. of Aur. Menches 1254. 17. GeW f. of Aur. Papontos 1255. 3. {. of Aur. Silvanus 1307. f. of Claudia 1267. 9. f. of Diogenes 1270. 20. S. of Gaius Julius Alexander 1264. 4. strategus of the Tanite nome 1257. 4, 16. f. of Theon and Zoilus 1316.
Ge<»i',Aup.e.chief-priest

, ,
( €

f.

of ApoUos 1291. 11. Aip. s. of Ammonius also called

.

Aphunchis 1277.

^!

3.

,

\

!
.

;

, ; (^^) '! ) ! : !, () ! ,. ,!! !: ,!
'lovKios

also called Zoilus 1264. 5.

'
;

!
4.

1327.
strategus of the
i,

14.

f.

of Julius
S.

Theon
Julius

'

of G.

Alexander 1264.

.

1311.

of Sarapas and Sarapous 1269. lo,

i9> 24, 35;
f.

1253.
2,

1 6.

s.

of Theonas 1269. of Psais 1299. 1,21.

13.

1292.

I,

17.
1 5.

(=

1325

;

1335-6

1291. I, 1341. ;

'

f.

1281. g. of Aur. Epiphanius 1320.
of Heras 1272. 14. s. of Petenouphis 1256.
23.

f.

Aip. K.

6,

1299. 15. 1294. 8. 1293. 38. Aip. . 1286. 1 3. S. of Damostratus 1298.
(1.

1 1.

KaivTios

?)

praefect 1266. 2 5.
8.

Ke'Xfp archidicastes
d.

1270.

5. 12.

of

Theon and m. of Zoilus 1267.

Xaipea! strategus

1255.

I.

ex-COSmeteS, f. of Tiberius Claudius Diogenes 1284. 8. S. of Tiberius Claudius Diogenes 1284. 7.

.

.

288

INDICES
1294.
f.

! ^
KoiXd/cios

9-

of Aur. Heracles 1261. 1291. 6.
f.

4.

of

\(y.

1296. 14.

,
.
8.

Diemous 1272.
f.

26.

of Psatrcs

123.

41.

Konpfas 1333. Ko?rpeurs. of Sarapammonl275. 8, II, 21, 24.

',

.
monk 1338.
1300.

1279.

2, 2^.

KipiXKos,

catholicus 1260. 7•

of Horus 1287. 22. basilicogrammateus 1266. 27. m. of Aur. Agathodaemon 1276. i. ex-gymnasiarch, of Zoilus 1274. 3. 1288. i6; 1300. 4. NoWos 1337.
S.

; ^,

« , .^ ((

,
3. 25•

1345.

NeiXoi 1337.

.

StrategUS 1262.

.
2,

. 1273.

48.

/

..
f.

S.

[!'\,

8
.

..

1274.
S.

1 3•

of PepiriuS 1320.

1322. AevKaSws 1324.
.

AevKavTos

(1.

1278. 6. goddess 1256. 12.

AovKios,

.
4.
f.

1274.

!
?)

f.

of PhiloxenuS 1338.
d.

Aovvofvis

of Ptolema

,. , \(
(=
1300.
I,

.)
4•

of Aur. Anicetus 1260.

1275.

,

.

S.

Of

AmmOnius

23.

f.

7;/
7.

of Dioscorus 1259. 5. 1329. praefect 1252. recto
praefect 1271.
catholicus
I.

2,

6

.

S.

of LuciuS
called

of Aur.
5.

Heraclides

also

, !,
:
I,

Lucius 1274.

AovKpfjTios NeiXos strategus

1262.
2.

i.

Hapavios 6 logistes 1265. 5; 1303. 1257. 1 6. m. of Peter 1300. 2, 11. m. of Aur. Sinthonis also called Apia 1268. 7. AvSpaviKos 6 1278.
17•

.

. 1271.

.

,. ^
f.

'

28.

Valerius
7.

Firmus 1271.

1260.

of Thompachrates 1282. 8. S. of Ptollion 1280. 1 8.
'

.

1348.
8, II.

,.
s.

1326.

1288.

!
,

'

:

Zoilus 1274. 3. f. of Saras 1293. 5, 30. MapTvpios 1328. MapTvpios 1323. comarch, s. of Meyx^f,

/

AiptjKios

ex-g}'innasiarch,

s.

of

5 .
.

Theon 1254.
I, 2, 24.

17. 31. 33• MfiSoCt,

.

d.

of Apion 1276.

McXavos 1296. 15.

', ,

1322. 1324.

.
3,
20,

\ . 1278.
2,
20.

17.

, ,.. ( , {?)
1255.
3.
f.

/, . .
1265. 5
;

of Peter 1280. 1,15. basilicogrammateus 1266. 2. 1269. 24, 27. {. of Aur. Silvanus 1254. 1 6. of Hermias 1328. f. of Harpaesis 1281. 4. S. of Amoi'S 1282. I9, 25, 27. comarch, s. of Theon
S.

.

of Ptolcmaeus 1287.

8.

.

logisteS

1303. IlaTfppoifts 1296. II. comarch, 1256. 5, 23.
),

1283.

3.

. of Saprion . tax-collector, of Eut{ych . praefect 1266. 25.
S.

s.

)

1324.

1288.

1328.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES

-'
Ufrnpios

f.
f.

of Charmus 1267. of Didymus 1259.
2 9.

6. 6.

1270.

(£5
f.

iieToiriptr,

of Aur. Lamasas 1320. f. of Aur. Kalaumis 1256. 6. Avp. s. of Taseus and

.

f.

of
8.

, ,.!
.
1276.
3•

d.

of Arius and m. of
i,

Aur. Origenes 1277.
;

22.

1244. introd. 1256. 2; 1272. 2, 26; 1287. 20; 1349. . S. of AgathinuS

\

Aurelia Taseus 1268. 5, 8, 14. f. of ThnasandTekosisl282.5, f. of Thonis 1282. II. nirpos 1341. Tlerpos, Aip. s. of Tauris 1254. 25. Uerpos f. of Aur. Pamea 1280. i, 13. neVpos (l) 1322 (2) 1329. s. of Esour 1300. 10. Xlerpot s. of Maria 1300. 2, 12.

banker,

8.

of

Eudaemon 1253.

1 1.

. of Diogenes 1316. of Dio[ and f. of Sarapion s.
1263.
4.
f.

!
f.
f.

.

of Epimachus 1262.

3.

;

lierpavios Aioinimos strategUS

?,
Tanite

(;
s.

1279.
4.

I.

Pap.) 1300.
6 4.

,
: 2
2•[,
s.

excgetes 1269. 4, 12. s. of Heraclous 1317. s. of Sarapion 1263. 4. scribc of the record-office 1270. . centurion 1261. 3. d. of Isas 1269. 8, 17.

1 1.

1293. 31.

.

Avp.

.
8.

1306.
5,

StrategUS of the

noma 1257.

,
2,

of Heracleus 1252. verso 26. of Plution 1266. 21. of Plutarchus and f. of Theimou-

thion 1266. 20. s. of Psammis 1266. 33. 1270. 23. oiaKepios praefect 1252. recto

} !

1292.
of

Marcus 1293.
I,

2/)) 1297.
1258.

12, 19, 30.

23.

2.

praepositus 1261. 8.

1283.

1 5.

.

28.

1287.

£ !
.
. .

!

7.

8(\! 1259.

2.

1341.

. of Achilles 1281. 14. d. of Dionysotheon and m. of Didyme and Letodoris 1278. 7. 1295. 5 1342. gymnasiarch 1333. s. of Herodes 1270. 2, 16, 46. s. of Papontos 1287. 8.
;

f.

of Ammonius 1252. verso 32. of Aur. Pagochis 1280. iB.
f.

,
f.

1280.

20.

of Aur. Patermouthis 1256. 5. 1252. verSO 26. 2. S. of DiogeneS 1276. 32. f. of CopreUS 1275. 8.

.

28.

1294. 17.
of IsaS 1269. 7, 1 7. 1262. introd. 1268. 19. m. of Apollonarion 1267.
;

,. , ! , !, ! ! . , [
f.

^! , (! . !,
1335. fpvos, Aip.

1321.

S. of AgathinUS 1276. 3• basilicogrammateus 1262. 2. 2. S. of Ammonius 1260. 29. 2. comarch, s. of Panetbauis 1254. 16, 31, 32. Avp. 2. s. of Theon 1307. m. of Ammon[ 1270. 19. . d. of Dionysius

\

\

1268. 7, 10, 15• 2oipis m. of Theonas 1269. See
StrategUS

3,

14

{).
i.

126

6. 26.

m. of Ision 1299. i, 21. amphodogrammateus 1267.
of Apollonius 1282. 9.
2. StrategUS

1253. 13-

1266. 26.

'

4.

m. of Aurelia Taseus 1268. 8. d. of Aphunchis 1287. 1 6. m. (?) of Aur. Dius 1296. 9. til. of Apia 1288. 1 8, 21. 1286. 2.

.

290

INDICES

, (

m. of Aur. Serenus also called Sarapion 1276. 4. . d. of Aur. Petosiris 1268. 8. m. of Aur. Petosiris 1268. 6. 1295. I, 22. TaOpif m. of Aur. Peter 1254. 26. 1253. I4, 1 7• 1294. 1 6. . d. of Aurelia Thaesis

! '! ',
1273.

!, . . '/
//;
f.

\
,
43•

StrategUS 1260.

.

1336. S. of Leucantus 1338.

1326—7.

1293. 1296.

.

!,

3.

!
II.

«5

m. of Aur. Aphunchis 1275. 4. 1299. 13m. of Amois 1282. 10. d. of Petosorapis and m. of Thompachrates 1282. 8. d. of Thonis 1282. 1 1 Tcvflftr 1287. 2 1. m. of Aurelia Ammonia 1284. 13.
Tt/3i'pior

!
Xaipcar,
2,

of ApoUonia 1344. sis 1275. 5. f. of Aur OiaXepios praefect 1271. 1. Valerius Firmus 1271. 7.

.

logistes

1265. 5; 1303.

1300.

StrategUS 1270.

! !
/£)
1296. 1 6, 1260. 5. Tw0€poCr 1296. 1269. 31. 1299. 14.

ex-COSmetes, f. of Tiberius Claudius Diogenes 1284. 8.
Aioyei/Tjt
S.

!,
1255.

of

TiberiuS

Claudius Diogenes 1284. 7. f. of ApoUonius 1262.

/'
1259.
{.

TpmSfXi^of

8(\!,
2.

?
15.
S.
),

.

1253. 21.

^ !^ ! .
I.

6.

; ;
4.

centurion 1261.

3•

\.
1 5.

StrategUS

.

1278.

.

1283.

S.

of Pausiras 1267.

5•

. of Ision 1299. , 2. S. of Ballarus and f. of Dionysius also called Amois 1266. 7, 9. s. of Dionysius also called Amois and f. of Plution 1266. 40. of ColluthusoOeyof^eI/os^293. 40. YeKij 1299. 17.
'QKeavoc

.

ship-master

1305.
Aip.

of Aur. Arsinoiis 1273.

4•

'Q,piyhn)s,

.

s.

of Aurelia Sarapias 1277.

^!,

1298.

26.

.

m. of ApoUoniuS

1262. 12.

, /
'
[.]
. .

Valerius Firmus, praefect 1271.
IraTpijs

7.

flpiW 1296. 19; 1299. 11. basilicogrammateusl259. 8. Aip. 'a. comarch, s. of Archelaus 1255. 4.

of ColluthuS

.

Xeyo/ifi/of

1293. 41. s. of ApoUonius 1330.
.

j/8(

-!

, ,
^apos

',

Aip.
I.

.

StrategUS
i,

1260.
s.

Aip.

.

ex-exegetes

1262.

4•

ex-magistrate recto 18, 30, 34.

of Alexandria

1252.

' ! (\!
f. f.
f.

f. of Aur. Dius 1296. of Zoilus 1267. 15. of Heracleus 1281. 11. of Nechthenibis 1287. 23. of Theonis 1276. 8.

.

22.

1279.

2, 29•

291
VI.
(a)

GEOGRAPHICAL.

Countries, Nomes, Cities, Toparchies.
;

'\(8
'

A?y«7iT09

\(5(

1313. 1253. 2 1271. i 1252. recto 20, 30; 1274. 9; 1291. 9; 1295. 12. 1288. 17, 34; 1254. 6, 22; 1260. 1 31271. 3• 1274. 8.
;

.

™^ »;
'

>»;5 .
'AvTivofvs

1268.

4•

(i/o/ndr)

123.

43•

! '/
'
9
; ;

1300.

1273. 7• 1253. 3 ) 1257.14; 1274. 1278. 5. 9 1284. 6, 9, 3• ? 2 1252. reCtO 23 |. 1260. 4; 1261. 4; 1264. 2, 6 1280. . 1320. 1263. 6 1267. 4 1258. 1268. 6 1269. 3, 14 1270. 3, 17 1273. 1276. 2, 6 1277. 5; 1279. 4; 1282. 2 4, 13, 22; 1287. II, 19•
;

.
; ;

;

..
;

;

;

J

;

;

;

1261.

7•

(vo/ios)

1255.
5•

2.

nSkis

!,=
e

);>(5 1260.

/ /

1302.
4•

1282.

1262. 13; 1285. 122.
(fopos)
1

! \ !
'ASatov

(\. ),
1259.
;

1254.
6

(/.),

,

15; 1256.

4

'264.
3
;

/
,
85.

"ay. 1253. 1 6. Alexandria 1270. 14- • = Oxyrhynchus 1252. verso 2, 30, 36 1263. 2 1265. 7; 1267. 9; 1272. 3; 1273. 5; 1274. 4, 13; 1276. 4; 1280. 4; 1284. nay. 1253. 19.
; ;

10; 1346

{)
(?).

1301.

19; 1268.9; 1274.3; 1276.

1277.
1271.

3.

\05

1306. 1283.
3,

4•

2!

2.

(! 1252. verso
1261. 3
;

.
7
;

(i/opos)

1257.
;

2, 5,
;

18

;

1259.

1301

1307

1320.

1252. recto 3, 20, verso 1260. 2 1259. 7 1255. 2 1257. 1265. 5 1270. 6, 48 1275. 1262. 25; 1283. 2; 1298. 7; 1303; 1320.
;

{)

;

;

1259. 1285. 1285. 9».
1271.

1257. 51285. 1285. 11262. 13 1285. 122. 6; 1285. 129. <55 1257. 1283. 5 *''^ 1260. 7°;

/
;

;
>'

;

;

;

3•

(6)

Villages and
I.

Oxyrkjinckite.

1285. 86.

4.]« 1285.

58. 'AvTcus 1285. 68.

'

f-noUia.

'£(?) 1252. recto

'(

1285. 17, HO. 1285. 64. 1322.

1285. 46, 39•

^( :)
1285. 55•

17, 25.

1285. 72• 1260. 12; 1285. 9,

.
1

!(

1285.
14^•

23.

.) 1285. 48,

11

292

\{
[.]
KfpKfiOpii

INDICES

1285. 104• 1285. 52• [ 1285. 96.

.)

IlfTffioCwt
IleTEDoCpit

(

1285. 98. 1285. 39) ^S^'lo-fioi- Uayya 1255. 5 1285. 56'laeiov 1285. 45; 1 3^• 1285.
',

1285. 83. 1285. 119. 1285. 107. 1285. 5• [.] 1285. III. 1285. 85. nou[.]em 1285. 105.
.

.

8.

1285. 70.

KcpKe^oCwi 1285. 66.
Kcpfcevfja

[.]

! ;
AevKiov
.

1285. 1 6. 1286. 23. 1285. 124 1342; 1347 1285. io6. 1285. 135;

2 !

1285. 59•

(?).

1285. 82. 1285. 77• 1285. 92•
.

^ // !
yieKavdiov

1285. 21, 1327. 1285. 102. 1285. 54• 1285. 02. 1285. 79• 1285. 44) 37• 1342.
Uapopiov

4•

Xaiprjpovos 1285. 93• 1285. 95• 1285. 103. 1279. 9; 1285. 78. SfveKcXfi 1285. 80. 2evenra 1285. 120 1287. 3• 1285. 73• 2«) 1285. log. 2evipit 1285. 63. 1285. 7• 1285. 136. 1285. 125. 1285. 65. SiDopi 1281. 15; 1285. 134; 1339.

^!
2« 26 ('
2oCii

;

2/-


»
Tavats

pviTiKos

1281. 6. 1275. 7; 1285. 4?) 401268. 3 1285. 75•
5

'

Ne/ic'pa

1285. 1 2. 1285. 6 1. 1285. 57• Ni'ypoi; 1285. 53• 1285.

^ !
!

.
1342.

|«285.
TfpCitf

1285. 88. 1285. 20, 1285. 1 30. 1285. 1285. 24, 1285. 99•

3•
7•
26;

3•

1 8.

1285.

6. 132.

!( )
XOo-is

1285. 87• 1262. 13, 19; 1285. ) 1285. 129.

1342.

1285. 9°•

1285. 76. 1285. 89• 1285. 27 TJavevet 1285. 74• 1285. 12 2. €£») 1283. 6.

^

;

{?)

1312.

^
[

^{ (1285.

1285. 67•

.) 1259.
•.)

)
7

1285. 94• 1285. 33•

1285.

2 2, II 5•

9•
.

1285. 8 1.

]

[.

1285. 40.

Vi.

GEOGRAPHICAL
3.

293

Aaipa (Cynopolite) 1256. . 1252. recto i.
.

' '&6
'HpaiiKeibov

[

Miscellaneous.
.

7,

16, 24, 26.
.

7(

)

(Apollinopolite) 1293. 43.
3, 18.

(Cynopolite) 1254.

KpijiriSos

1284.
7-

.
;

{c)

OF OXYRHYNCHUS.
1266. 2 2. 1267. ?. 1268. II.

1263.

/

1258, 2. 1276. 6

1306.

1279.

.
(e)

(/)

^. «'8
|

1270. 23.

Miscellaneous.

/,

1252. verSO
[\f

2 2.

//?] . 1286. introd.
VII.

-,

.

\(( 1278.

(village ?) 1312.

RELIGION.
() Pagan,
() Gods.

! !
!
iepov

1256. 12. 1272.

^
.
8.
;

1268.

'].

"
€0!,

1265.

8.

«!/,
1265.

1283.
8.

7

21.

(\ 1296. 5• 1256. 13; 1265. 8 Index II. Qoripis, . 1268. 7• 1256. 12

\

.

. ^
apxiepeis

(a)

Temphs,

dfc.

1258.

1256. 12.
'ifffloK.

See Index VI (3). 1258. 8. 1256. 18
[oils

vaos

Upa

(3) Priests.

1252. rectO 2 2. Upfia 1256. 7. 1297. iepds 1256. 8, 12; 1265. 7, 20, 21 . I, 12. t. evapxos f^'jyjT'Jf 1269. 3.
;

! : !
vaos
Te'fierar

(

See Index VI
9•

1258.

:
pey.

. 1265.
1256.

"Hpas
8.

{6).

4•

1270.

5i I 2.

"
(

(5)

Christian.

1311.

1311.

1299. 6. 1300. 2.

. 1298.

4

;

1299. 4

J

' ^
Xfty

1265.

9

21

(.

8!
;

. . .).
1268.
7•

-

1311.
1311.

1338.

)
;

1289.

1300.

;

1328

1343.

294

INDICES
VIII.

;, (!

! ! ^/ ^, . !/
verso 17.

OFFICIAL

.

1282. 46. 1284. 9. 1267. . 1252. recto 3• verso 28, 361 37• 1252. recto

,

KtXep

Upeiis

\ 6.
)

1270.

5-

ytvopevos

iepevs

! , ) ! '
1252.
(a.D. 159)

AND MILITARY

TITLES.
1252. verSO
8.

.

2 2.

(a.D. 272) 1264.

(SC.

1253.

5•

(mpekfia
^A.D.

159/

apxtepevs

1270. 12. 1252. reCtO

(.

2 2.

1253. 21. 1252. verso 23.

!.
27.
(a.D. 197)

1274.

8.

Cf.

^^85\^.. 72—3/1266.
(a.D.

«

2-2)
S.

1262. 2. 1259. 8.

of ApoUoniuS

,
\
1263.

1274. 71264. 3 1268. 2. 1256. 2. 1257. 8, 9 1322 ; 1329 1342. 1253. 1 6, 19. 1252. recto 23 1261. 4; 1268. 1274. 2 1278. 5 1284. 6, 9, 9• 1252. verso 6, 9, 23, 27.
cent.)
; ;
;

*
6 fv
17 J

74-5)1266.

2.

- ,.
. .
.

, .
1257.

289) 1252. recto 20. See 1253. 2, 23.

,, .
;

1261. 3• 1301. 1262. 5 1263. 2. 1252. rectO 2 2, 44 1269. 51269. , .) 12.

.

(. . \
;

(a.D.

...

3•

'.
1261.
4.

1298. 12. cjrijti. 1252. reCtO 17, 24•

1302.

{..

. .

6

.? .

1259. 1274.

(3ra

..
2
;

1271. 4• 1252. versO 24. 1252. verSO 29, 33•

1252.
verso 17.

;

;

.
1270.
II.

See

.

.

2
;
,"

(.?)
25.
cent.) 1313.
(a.D.

1252. reCtO 1 9. 1252. verSO 14, 18

'
,

;

(a.D.

1305. 72-3) 1266.

,
;

246) 1271.

1281.
2.

..
2,

(Valerius Firmus)
(a.D.

..
7•

(3rd

248?)

15.

introd.

1262. 4

;

1264.

1274.

1278. 8; 1284.
4 ; 1333. verso 24.

19.

yv/ii'aaiap;(oyl252. verso 33;

1274. 13; 1278. 1252.

,

1252. recto

,

1257. 1255.
19-

,
9•

3)

,
;

. .. Kf)s
6

. .,

(

87;
(a.D.
;

(a.D. 288-9)

A.D. 289) 27.

Cf.

.

1277.

1261.

3•
"J.

286) 1260.

19.

'7

1257. 12, 15
6,

1260.

1284,

9.

1253. , 1253. 1 6, 19 1335. 1253. 12. 1253. 4• 1284. 8.

1330.

VIII.

OFFICIAL
7,

AND MILfxARY
24
;

TITLES

295

1301.

^,

! !
eVi

336) 1265. 5

?
3•

1254.

3,

i8; 1255. 5; 1256.

1255.
(a.d.
6
;

1.

45)

(a.D.

1303.
Nenr

^! 8! , 8,
1266.
8.

, ' ,
1279.

3•

(
4•

(Oxyrhynchite nome)['An-oXXm]i'ios 1258. 7• (a.D. 72—3) 1266. 26. (a.D. 1 39) 1279. I.

(a.D.

1259.

2.

159)1270. 197)1262. I.
I,

&{.. 211-12)1259.

I.

26.
I.

1283.
(a.D.
aipeSeprfS
6.
'

(8
20.
(a.D.
cent.)

1262.

1257.

5•

1261. 8.

nayov 1253.
"?•

1

6,

€( . ?
(a.D.

286) 1260.

288-9) 1252. recto

,
I,

'{
(before A.D. 292)

(2
1

(a.D.

(a.D.

6

18.

4•

9)

2,

A.D. 289)

Xatpeaff

!
1258. 1254.

19, 21. apyvpiKOiv

1283.
7•

1275.

! ,
nome)

--, !, . .
(SC.

(

1252. verso 19. 1252. verso 1 3• 1253. 4, 14, 1 7•

,
.

292)

1255.

(Prosopite nome) early 4th (Late 3rd
I.

1301.
iv

6 (Tanite nome) (3rd cent.) 1257.

BiOKcipevoi
8.

1261.

6,

1323
1328.

(?).

/ €)
1288. 27.
6.

1253.

6.

1259. 6

;

.

aipfocWes eVi

.
1253.
1

1262.
(?).

1252. versO 24. 1261. 3• 1283. 4• 1. 1284.

.

9•

1331

See 1252. verso 38; 1253. 22; 1257. 18; 1270. 6, 48; 1294. 3; 1307. (Alexandria) Kt'Xfp (Cynopolite (before a.d. 159) 1270. 14.
6

1328

;

1339.
(Alexandria)
4•

1270.

13•

. \(

(Oxyrhynchus) 1257.
1252. verso 10.

, 4•

(Diopolite

(. D. nome)

&
2
;

6)
1270.
1 5•

IX.

WEIGHTS, MEASURES, COINS.
{a)

Weights and Measures.

6,
4,

1270. 20, 28, 33 ; 1279. II. 1257. 6, i6 1259. 4, 17, 18 1260. 1286. 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 ; 1288. 3, II, 27
; ;

;; 35;
12,

»

5; 1291. 8; 1332.

1322

;

1325-7.
1253. 12.

-

1275. 1 9, 20 1324. 1275. 1 8. 1343.
6, 7,

;

1286. introd.

;

1288.

1261.

9

;

1288.

29, 30,

34, 3^

>

1335; 1338.
1297. 3• 1293. 6,' 20.

/«/3' 1259.

1

6.

l8.

296

INDICES
1255. i6
;

1257.

8.

/i.

^/

1259.

1286. 8. 1272. 1341
1344.
1272.
;

:

129.
1273.
6.

;

1298. 14, 8.
28.

21,

.

|;((

1273.

;

1273.

7•
1273. 8, 9) II, 1293. 2 5 (?)

(?).

7•

1273.

8, g, 10.

«
((5)

128.

3, 4, 7•

Coins.

apyipiov

1262. introd. 1269. 24, 35 ; 1273. 13, 4> 5. 6, 8, 34 ; 1274. 8, 20, 24 1275. 6, 22 1 1, 24; 1279. 1276. 26, 31 1277. 1281. 7, 1282. 4°; 1283. 13 20 etsaep.; 1284. 16, 17, 18, 20, 21; 1285. passim; 1288. 14, 3°> 35 1292. 8, 1295. 8, 9; 1308-9; 1318; 1333; 1339; 1345. fiwjSoXot 1285. 17.
;

&
;

1269. 24, 37 1273. 31 1274. 18, 1276. 31 1280. II, 12 1281. 7, 10 1282. 40; 1288. 11, 28, 30, 32, 33 1292. 8 ; 1308 1318; 1337. apy. 1270. 34 > 1282. 1 4• opy1288. . 1276.
',

;

20, 24;
;

;

;

;

; ;

.

.

1344. 1274. 1254.

1337.

2

4•
;

26, 28, 30, 31,

7(\

!

, 2( . ( ^.
1329; 1330.
1285.
1283.
1 8,

1289. passim. . 1337. ;. 1280. II, 12; 1336-7.

-

1270. 34 1282. 4• 1276. . 1253. 9, -^5, ^" ; 1323

.

J

9, 26, 31.

.
;

nevre

1284.

17.

20

1284.

1 6,

8,

2

;

;

; ,

;

1285. 23, 30, 32•

\<

>

;

!

1274. 8, 21 ; 1285. 69, 84 ; 1288. 3 et saep.; 1298. 18 ; 1308 ; 1344. 1283. 17, 21 ; 1285. 1 1, 6.

\28. 6,

20

;

1284.

6, 8, 2.

1295. 17. 1283. 6, 17, 21. 1253. 9> '5) 1329; 1330.

1323:

.
1288.
apyvpiKa

,

35•

TAXES. €5276.

1283.

4•

((
Sij.

. :. !
1308.
See

£//1255.
(?)

. ; (((
1258.
3, 8.

1254^. 7, 20.

).
1270.

1257. 3• 1257. 6.

(SC.

')

4•

«; €'! (,

\

1286. 6. 1283. 3• 1253. 8 iirapoiipiov 1283. 1 3, 1347.
tis

, ((€ ) (
1

6.

.

\

1259.

1 6.

!
(?)

(sc.

;

1288.

1

9

;

1344.

1 6,

19, 23.

i.

1261.

7•

1261.

7•

BeKOTOV

1286.
7•

3•

1253. 1333.

7•

1284.

1

!! ^, !
.
XI.

, ,

.
! (.
1331.
6.

TAXES
1253. g
;

1322.

1257•

1283. 17, 20.

1284. 1 6 1340. 1283. 17, 20. 1330. .
;

:

1283. 1283. 1 8.

.

1

8.

((
;

! :
1331.

297

.

1288. 6 (?). 1270. 40.

1255.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS.

)£ !

-

!

1279. 23. 1259. 15. 1273. I. ayyfiov 1290. 6 (? (ayiov Pap.), Pap.); 1343. ayeivl272. I9; 1279. 25. 1284. 12 (?) 1288. 29, 36 1300. 8; 1346. 1252. verSO 17. 1282. 46. 1268. 1 6. 1282. 14; 1316. 1259. 4> 1260. 5• 1293. 21. 1284. . 1294. 1, 17; 1296. g, 10, 12 1300. 4; 1349. 1269. 7, 17; 1282. 7• 1300. 4• 1269. 1292. 35; 1291. 2; 1293. 23, 38; 1295. 19; 1296. 1 1, 1299. 4, 13, 14; 1297. 5; 1298. 20 1 1330. ; 1300. 3, 7 1259. 15• 1259. 15«' 1276. 5. 1252. verso 31• 1268. II. 1294:. 8 1295. 1 1. 1262. 6; 1273. 38; 1276. 8; 1279.
;

!

! ?

;

^ (
7
((!
6;

;

,,
;

;

;

;

1308; 1331. 1273. 29. 1269. 15. 1273. 2 8. 1319 ; 1320. 1259. 23.

€ ! !

! !

! ! ! !

1290. 6. 1257. 9• 1266. 5• 1259. 151282. 36. 1282. 35• 1270. 32; 1273. 22, 41 ; 1275. ; 1276. 1278. . 1252. verso 21; 1256. 7, 26; 1266. 3, 29; 1269. 20; 1270. 16, 30; 1274. 17; 1276. 9, 17; 1282. 24, 29; 1288. 4; 1292. 15; 1293. 12, 20, 21; 1316. 1266. 351255. 8. 1303 1350. 1300. 6 1349. 1252. verso 35 ; 1273. 23. 1296. 5• 1297. 171278. II, 24. 1322 ; 1324-7. 1286. introd.
(1.

?)
;

!

;

;

12S'7
;

.

.
;

1258. 3 1263. ^ 1266. 2 2 1267. 13; 1268. II 1276. 6; 1284. (?) 1343. 1252. recto 21; 1254. 18; 1255. 5; 1256. 2, 7; 1264. 3; 1274. 11; 1276. 2 ; 1278. 7 1284. 6. 1252. reCtO 27. 1252. verso 37• 1288. 20. 1266. 21 1267. II.
;

.
;

;

;

1252. verso 20. 1254. g ; 1282. 33

;

1295. 15.

1297. 91252. verso 34•

2g8

INDICES
1252. verSO 28.

\( ((
Sv&peios,

1286. 4

;

1288. 8
;

;

1295.
;

8.
;

53; 1280. 12; 1281. 7; 1296. 1297. 22 1299. 21 ; 1300. 11.
;

21;

1252. veiso 21

1260. 17

1261. 9

1288. II, 20. avavfwais 1252. verso

^. '!
1295.

.

1 6.

((

1275. 25. 1286. 9•

I3.

^. (
'
avTiKiyetv

1284. 15. «>'a0f'pfii/1286. introd.
1 8.

1272. 5• 1269. 1 6. 1271. 5• 1255. 6.

;

1292.

14.

1296.

7•

1318.
23.

1295. 4, 6. 1288. 17 1298. 13 1259. 1274. 9•

.
J

;

;

1300.

5, 6.

''«272.

1345.

1311.

1273. 4; 1274. 6, 2, 15; 1276. 1278. 3; 1282. 2, 19; 1299. 3• rar' 1257. II.

6;

1273. 2 2. 1259. 25
1331.

1260.

17;

1298. 14;

1288. 34• 1343. 1288. 35• ufoiyeii' 1288. 12; 1294. II. 1264. II; 1268. 14,

,

^ ^
! (-

,

8;

1270.

4,1; 1281. 4, 131252. verso 1280. 13•

37•

(
^

((! fpaa

1256. 4; 1285. 5• 1252. recto 37; verso 38 1270. 57 J 1271. 4; 1272. 18. 1265. 14, 191253. 14 1273. 35• 1273. 25, 33 5^• 1252. recto 6. 1263. 3 1279. 3• 1270. 39• 1291. ajiiVKTalos 1274. 5• 1270. 35; 1276. 1 1, 25, 30; 1277. 12, 24; 1282. 14. 1270. 31 1276. 8; 1279. 2; 1285. 85; 1287. 15. 1277. 13 1280. 14. 1282. 31• 1268. 4 15 1274. 1276. 1 8. 1252. VerSO 24. OTToSfSfiyfieVos 1309. 1278. 4• 65(!252. recto 16,31, verso 23; 1266. g. 1288. 29. 1339. 1252. verso 30)34. 35 1273. 26,
;

;

;

1297. 4, 7) '3• 1273. 8. apyeVTiMos 1273. 12. 1310. 1269. 2 2. 1283. 4• See Index IX (b). 1272. II. 1258. 7,' 1273. 28 1283. . 1261. 1270. 36 1273. 2. See Index IX (<?). 1275. 2 2. See Index IX (a). 1288. 4• 1288. 23• apTos 1252. verso 15 1291. 4• 1275. 17 1252. 1252. VerSO 23.

! .
. .
,
17,

;

;

;

.

.
recto 30.

;

;

;

^

;

\

.

!
.
;

1252. recto 10, verso 28, 361 37• See Index VIII. apxupds 1252. recto 22. 1253. 21. 1288. 2 2. 1252. verso 19 (?). 1294. 1296. 8, II, 13, 14.

€ ^
8

6
4>

;

1299.

> 2,
;

13,

5. ?•

1277. 1298. 1264. II.

.

.

'

1258. g. 1266. 35• 1255. 7 1298. 1280. 5• 1237. 9> 4•
;

7•

avpiov 1291. 12.

!
XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1275.
g.

299

,

1270. 38; 1276.

1

6.
",

!
VIII.
25.

! §. '
!
ya/tili/

^:/

,. •
;

1252. verso 27. 1270. 35; 127. 1 1. avTOs, cVi 1273. 1 6. 1272. 1 9• 1256. 8; 1269. 6, 6; 1278. 1288. 34 1293. 1346. 1293. 5. 33 39• 1346. 1345. 1255. g 1346.
;

8
;

7,

4•

;

1334 (?).
7-

|36 1257.

-

and

1270. 38; 1276. 1 6. See Index

-!.

1272. 8 1293. 22, 41, 42 1320. 1293. 24. 1276. 15^f^atow 1270. 36; 1276. 26, 31 1277. 13,
:

: . ( ! ! !
. .

1270. 2. 1270. 3^ 1276. 1 6. Cf. yiyi/fffflai 1252. reclo 17, 24, 38; 1253. 11, 16, 19; 1255. 2,18; 1257.4, 17; 1264. 1266. 2, 13, 28 1270. 12, 13, 7, 8, 14 58; 1272. 22; 1273. 26, 28, 41. 52; 1276. 20, 21; 1279. 23; 1280. 12; 1282. 18, 21; 1284. 14, 18, 21 1285. 49, 69, 81, 121, 128, 142; 1286. I, 3; 1288. 26 1289. 11 1291. 8 1298. 9
;
;
;

!. -

;

;

;

;

1305 1307 1320 1322 1325-6 1329 1330 1333 1346.
1299. 9
;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

1252. veiso 33 1296. 2 1300. 4 yvaiTTdv 1346. 1267. 5•
; .

>

;

1348. 1350.

!

;

! !
!
II.
yevvatO!,

1270. 37; 1276. 151287. . See Index VIII. 1282. 4. 1272. 2 2. ^oijfleii- 1348. See Index VIII. 1270. 1276. 8; 1279. 1284. 1287. 5• 1263. 8; 1267. 1271. 3• /SouXfVTjyi. See Index VIII. 1252. verso 6, 9, 23, 27. 1341. 1258. 8.

^.

3;

2

;

;

1280. 51286. intiod. 1253. 20. 1333. yovei! 1299. 21 1306. 1252. recto 27; 1254. 34; 1256. 1261. II 1273. 25; 1260. 7, 15. 31 50; 1274. 9; 1276. 28, 34; 1277. 27; 1280. 19; 1281. 12; 1300. 3; 1349. 1274. 8. See Index VIII. 1256. 25; 1260. 17,3°; 33; 1270. 48 1271. 4 1273. 37, 49 1276. 8, 28, 33; 1277. 13, 27; 1278. 29; 1280. 14; 1281. 1293. 14, 2, 27. 8; 1266. 15; 1269. 5, 5•
;

, .
;1279.

;

;

.

£254.

. !.
;

;

)

125.

,
;

12.

1266. 16 1273. 6et saep. 1274. 16. /iof 1273. 4, 23, 46. 1299. 8. «'-1270. 30 1272. 1276. 8; 1279.
; ;
;

See Index VIII. See Index VIII. 1267. 7• 12, 1273. 24 1282.

12.
;

4

.
;

4

;

;273. ^/

II.

1259. 12; 1261.6; 1262. 6.
1261. 8.

•6

1288. 17; 1329; 1339. 1269. 32• 1272. 15. 1308. yewpyc'iv 1262. 1 8. 1270. 37 ; 1276. l6.
yeouxos
yepSioKOf
yepSior

1281. 5; 1282. 17. 1262. 1 6 1282. 34• 1288. 13. 1273. 34 1252. verSO 23. dare 1271. 12. 1254. 5, 20. Sell/ 1257. 1252. verso 17; 1295. 10. 29; 1264. 14; 1272. 21; 1273. 24;
; ;

1293.10,12.
('

bind

')

1294.

'
7•

«

1304:.

;

300

INDICES
ip. 1257. I, 3, See Index VIII. . (?) 1286. 3.
T.27S. 12, 14,
1 5.

!. !
bUarov,

,

&(\]5

Sf^ia 1252. verso 19.

€;
Seiipo


. :

1292. 9 1293. 11 1294. 11 1295. 8, 17; 1328; 1330; 1333; 1349. 1259. 13; 1262. 17 1268. 5; 1270. 42 1306.
;
; ; ;

;

1288. 9, 15. 1252. verso

14;

1298.

I.

Cf.

!,

>;26. 8
1308.
32•

^ ^ . ! . ! . /
;

Index II. 1287. 15. 1345. 1264. 17. 1252. recto 36 1265. 12 1268. 14 1270. 51; 1274. 15; 1287. 12, 19; 1293. 7 1294. 15, 16; 1295. 16. 1257. II. 1304. fV .)/:/ 1254. 8. ^,/' 1258. 3. 8. .). 1259. II. 1287. . ). 1252. verso 1256. 3• "?• ;, 1257. 6. ?;, 2 2. ;, ;. 1259. 1 8. ;. -nvpos 1254. 7, 20. ;;. "?• ""''"OS 1257. 13/iV"? 1276. 9• 1255. 1270. 4°• ^1• "^-' 1284. 6, 1283. 14. ;, 1279. 13. ;. 19• 1273. 38; 1276. 8. 1273. 4° 1276. 20. See Index IX (). 1279. 21 ; 1283. 14; 1284. 5)
; ;
;

'^

1271. 6. 1264. 8; 1273. 23; 1307. 1276. 3> 24 ; 1277. 3. 1281. 2.

(
1273.

1288. 19; 1295.

14.

dimittere 1271. 9.

;

.

! !

1263.

>322;
1259.
«/1272.

15; 1267. 19; 1276. 2. 1253. 5 ; 1257. 2. 1252. verso 22. 1264. 8. 1325-7. 26; 1260. 8; 1264. 1 2 37; 1276. 8.
1 8.

;

;

',

1274. 4• 1294. 3, 9• 1298. See Index IX (i). 1273. 24. 1272. 2 2 1294. See Index IX (3). 1294. 1267. 1 7 1306.

.
;

.

.

;

eai/1293. 19, 2
12.

2.

1284. 17;
1261.

1288.

3>

4j

5.

6>

7.

cawoO 1273. 3; 1278. 10; 1282. 6; 1284.

.
7•

1265. 1278.

.

£€5

1261.

8.

^
((
1261.

1349. 1268. 131252. recto 18, 29. 1252. recto 33• 1252. recto 27
3•

(/ ££282.
6(
;

1260.

8


-

1283. 6. 1264. 1 5• 1282. 27. 1348. 1273. 2 5. 1286. 3. 1265. 33• 1253. II, 13; 1254. 2, 23; 1273. 1274. 3; 1281. g ; 1288. 10, 32; 33;

1268. 6. 1258. 'J. 1253. 7 1254. 3 1280. ?. 1252. recto 34; 1265. 12. 28; 1316. ) 1343. 1284. 7. e'yKuos 1273. 33• 1254. e%os 1264. 19. 1271. 5 1274. 3 1276. 3 1277. 3. elSemi 1254. 9. 34; 1256. 25; 1260. 31; 1273. 50; 1276. 28, 33 1277• 28 1280. 1347-8. 19 1281. 12 1299. 7 ciSos- 1276. 16. 1252. verso 38. 1294. 4• 1254. 3• eiVieVai 1278. 7.
; ;

€((

.

!

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

€ /

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
eVreCfe 1273.
;

301

«ftVoSos

1268. 1 2. 1252. verso 30 1253.20; 1255. lo, 15; 1273. 28; 1278. 19, 24, 30; 1282. 39; 1288. 30; 1296. 4; 1298. 18. eKOTfpos 1273. 37 ; 1278. 25.

40; 1275. 20; 1276. 19;
28.


:

1277. II.

eVoil274. 13; 1278.

( !
cm
ixeivos

1261.

3.
;

1259. i6

1286.

6.

!
(!
?)
CKTiveiv

1301. 1276. 12. «SiSdwi 1260. 18 ; 1273. 1268. 1 3. cVSOTif 1273. 5, 20, 26.

,

45.

£
cKTOf

1297. 1 5. 1265. 20. 1287. I. 1280. 4.

fWXeii/ 1271. 3.

1283. 13. 1282. 36. 1258. 8 1295. 11. e\aiov 1293. 9 1297. 4, 8 1311. 1275. 1293. 5• ^^• 1270. 2•]. 1298. 7• 1260. 6 1292. 3• €fi/xeXeia 1265. 12. 1270. 4• 1258. 6. 1278. 13, 26. evavTios 1258. II. fvaperos 1300. 2. 1269. , 12.
;

^ ('
(!
fveica

;

;

.

-(
1

8.

;

1264. 71273. 1288. 23 1328. 1253. 12. f\apyvps \259. 8; 1288. 19; 1344. 1349. 1272. 2 1 See Index VIII. See Index VIII. 1272. 8. 1253. 3 1254. 4f^oSoy 1268. 12. 1278. 27. 1275. 14; 1297. 1 1. e'ffayciK. See Index IV (). enaipetp 1272. 12. 1255. 19. 1286. 5• eVapoipiov 1283. 3, 16, 19) 23• See Index VIII. eVei 1252. recto 26, 34; 1295. 11. eVeiS^ 1293. 24; 1346; 1349. 1257. 1 3.

^ ^
.

.

;

(-^. (-.

.

;

( (
1276.

1299. 5. 1282. 29, 37. 1260. 19; 1273.
2 1, 27,

20,

41, 48, 53!

32; 1277. 14, 25.

€273.

( '
6.
ivBaSe

3•
ewKfi'

1293. 16, 17.

1253.

(^

4)

8)

14,

1288. 13, 33 1295. 12. 1296. 5• 1280. II, 3• iviavTOs 1252. verso 16. cVfffxas 1254. 19 1255. 5; 1256. 9; 1257.14; 1262.8, 8; 1263.9; 1267. 17; 1270. 21 ; 1275. 15; 1278.14, 5; 1279. 7 ; 1282. 32 1283. 8, 2. ivoiKiov 1262. introd. 1280. 10; 1294. 13 > 1321; 1323. tvoxos 1255. 20; 1261. 11 1265. 23 1266.

,
(
.

(
eVifi/reiy

1278. 27. 1347. 1279. 5• 1253. 3• 1261. 7• 1252. recto 44 1254. 32 ; 1256. 24; 1257. 13; 1263. 15; 1264. 12; 1266. 41; 1267. 19; 1269.4; 1272.17, 26; 1279. 30; 1286. 14; 1350.
;

,"

;

;

( (
12.
iViopKfli'

1313. 1252. verso 21.

;

;

36.

1280. 6. 1266. 22, 25. 1306. 1252. verso 7• 1270. 15. eVt/ifXr/T^s 1252. recto 17, 24; 1261. 4; 1298.
1279. 19. 1258. II.

1273.

3, 4•
;

cWaytor

1323

1326.
10.

evTfXhfiv

1299.

302

€€ (' £(

(

€! ((€
ipi&iov

1293. 24. 1253. 8, 14; 1297. 17; 1299. 7, 9' 1345. 1300. 1292. 6. ia-eUcv 1297. 1273. 15, erepos 1252. recto I ; 1269. 22 39; 1276. 19; 1281. 15. erqaims 1252. versO 2. ?1269. 3o; 1270. 40; 1274. 13; 1278. 13; 1282. 36. 1299. 9. i'ros 1299. 5. CTOS, fV 1299. 8. eS 1258. 1 1 1292. 3. eiSoKf'iv 1273. 40 1276. 20 1278. 36. 1273. 39. eifieW(al252. verSO 14; 1261. 7 {(^). 1291. 5. 1252. verso 24. 1252. verso 29, 33. 1252. verSO 1 7. 1300. 3. iipapas 1252. verso 35. evvmieia (1. ?) 1264. 1 8. fiopKtiv 1258. 10. [evvatbua Pap.) 1264. 1 8. 1254. 24•

('. . (( ;

1287. 2. 1252. recto 8, verso 36 1257. 5 1304. 1252. recto 10, verso4; 1291. 4, y; 1293.8, 16. 1295. 15. 1302. 1254. 24. 1255. 4• 1255. 6; 1265. 1 1. 1295. 5• 1282. 40. 1255. 14. 1252. verso 38. tnirpoTTos. See Index VIII. See Index II. €m(p(puv 1260. 1 5 1261. 1 1 1264. 1 2 1266. 5; 1268. 18; 1318. 1282. 33. 1274. 7. 1278. I . Cf. Index VI (3). 1255. 1 5.
iVio-rfAXeip
;

!
1259.

INDICES

;

7

;

«293. ( (! (!

(! (!

.
?
;

;

;

;

2 2; 1300. 3; 1312. 1252. verso 19; 1257. 7. Cf. II. 1252. verso 15. 1272, 1 6. 1299. 5• 1297. 21; 1293. 3; 1296. 20 1298. 4 1299. 3, 21 1345; 1349. 1255. 14. 1253. 7• 1282. 36, 39• 1252. verso 21 1253. 6 1254. 9> 27 1255.7; 1262. introd. 1265. 19; 1272. 13; 1273. 7) 8, 10, 21, 30, 37> 51 1275. 1278. 1279. 8; 1288. 2, 1 1, 21 25; 1289. 14, 15; 1292. 7. "; 1293. 1309; 1318; 13, 6, 42; 1298. 1321-2; 1325-6; 1329; 1333; 1346. 1349. ?1253. 15; 1255. 5; 1299. 1304; 1350.

(( (

Index

'/ '
(
;

;

;

;

;

;

!

;

;

;

(

;

;

feCyorl273. 10; 1275. 17. 1252. verso 25.

'

1263.

1 3.

1289.

3.

().

;

€!

(! (!
;

(!

;

! . ! (
fJKfiv

.
ijw'oxof

1252. recto 19. See Index VIII. 1252. recto 30. 1273. 27; 1275. 13; 1296. 5. 1275. 1 5. 1259. 1 6. See Index IX (3).

1293.

26;

1298. II. 1287. 6, 1 8. 1282. 42.
1288. 1347. 1348.
6.

! .

6£KeLv

1261. 5, 12 ; 1265. 15, 22, 24, 27. 1252. recto 35; 1291.9; 1293. 18,
;

,

«

€8

!

42

1300.

5, 8, 9•

-'

(

Index VII {a) , {b). See Index 1266. 341333. 1289. II. 1268. 8 1273. 3> 6, 46 1278. 1294. 6; 1344. 1299. 7.
;

,

;

7

;

;

XI.
6<ipa

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
5, 6, 1 2.

303

tSt'a

'

t6(o;

1272.

aafv 1274.
;

1269.

2 7•
6.
;

1277. 10.

12.
;

1

7

1284.

1 3.

1274. 21. 1291. 7 1295. 3. Upeia 1256. 17. iepftJf. See Index VII (a) 3. I'fpdv. See Index VII {a) 2. 1294. "j. 12, i8, 29; 1274. 17; 1294. 4; 1295. 9, 16, 18. 1272. 1254. 8 1270. 52 tea 1253. 22 22; 1281. 10; 1292. 12; 1294. 12; 1300. 10. See Index III. 1279. 17. 7; 1268. 14, i8; 1270. 49; 1276. 5, 12; 1278. II ; 1282. 41. 1252. verso 34 (?); 1281. lo. 1269. 32.

/)3«' \(7(

£266.

: 273.

4(
;^ -

.
(
;
87
Kaipos

;

;

;

^
!
'

1254.

€€€252.

(« 1269. 32.
1281.
2.
;

. &
6\

1260. II 1276. 15; 1277. 3• 1266. 3, 29; 1267. 2; 1270. 1282. 6. 54; 1281. (?). See Index VIII. 1328.
1281.
8.

5.

1254. 5. 21 1260. 1 2 ; 1293. 26. 1268. 5> 7• 1257. II. 1297. 4• 1269. 6 1286. 7• 19; 1268. 5) '7; 1270. 4, 11 ; 1273. 38; 1276. 1 8. 1282. 20. 1262. g, 17. 1260. 2 8 1261. g. 1274. 9• 1270. 2 5• 1276. 7• 1259. 6; 1285. 129. 1269. 21 ; 1287. 17 1297. 4, 1, 3• recto 9 ; 1259. 19; 1260. 14; 1261. 10; 1306. 1253. 8. KCVTIVOS 1289. 9• 1292. 4• Kepapiov 1275. 19, 20; 1286. introd. 1288. 12, 35; 1324. 1269. 37• 1273. 19; 1281. 7; 1282. 1 6. 1253. 1 6, 19 1330.
;

;

;

( «
>/>

;

;

1331.

1299. 9• 1252. verso

24.

1257. 3• 1252. verso 21. 1290. 2. 1259. 24. 1346. 1318. kalendae 1271. 12 KaXflv 1273. 7-

: -

(?).

1273. 15•

( ;

!

1293. 6 1294. 1276. 21 1295. 13 1300. 7• 1293. 7• 1280. 7• 1287. 4) 5• 1278. 5• 1255. 7• 1269. ^6.
;

7•
;

;

1296.

«

1273. 41

8.

,

1269. 21. 1310. Kivhvvos 1254. 25. 1269. 36• 1269. 3• 1272. 9) II• 1294. 9• 1294. II. 1269. 23. 1260. 5; 1270. 5°; 1274. 1 2. 1252. verso 30; 1270. 24 1279. 11. 1278. 14. Koivo'r 1273. 6, 17; 1278. 36. 1253. 5• 1276. 7• or)ya 1253. 7• 1287. 3 ; 1307. 1335. 1281. 8; 1293. 4, 7. 1°. 29, 32; 1294. 9. 15; 1295. 1 8. 1278. 23• 1253. 12.
;

( '

:

304
KOpnavos 1253.
KoaKiveveiv
4.
;

INDICES
1%59. 15 1274. I 7. 1284. 8. 1298. 8. 1275. 1 8. 1300. g.
1260.
II.

120.

3.

1343. 1276. 12. 1264. 8; 1257. 13, 19 1259. 1274. 1335. 1260. 27; 1329; 1344.

.

;

,

1273. 4• 1278. II, 24 1286. introd. 1288. 5• 1253. 6. 1289. 13. 1260. 4• 1349. 1343. 1300. 5, 8 1329. KvpifidV 1276. 12. guardian') 1267. 5; 1270. 19; 1272. 2; 1274. 2; 1276. 2, 24; 1277. 2; 1282. 6, 12. 1253. 23 1271. icipiof (title) 1252. verso 18 1299. 1,4; 1300. 2, 6; 3; 1298. 4, 20 1294. 2 1300. 2 1329 1330. 1349. Cf. Index II and ('valid') 1259. 25; 1260. 17; 1270. 53; 1273. 37; 1276. 17; 1277. 12; 1278. 29; 1280. 13; 1281. 3; 1282. 42 1318. See Index VIII. 1265. 9, 21. )1254. 3, i8; 1255. 5; 1259.12; 1260. 12; 1268. 3; 1270. 23; 1275. 7, 13, 26; 1281. 15; 1288. 27; 1301; 1320; 1342; 1347.
;

!

1300. 5• 1270. 1 6.


('

,
;

1257.

;

;

;

!

;

.

;

;

.
;

£ ,& ' »
(7
1311.

125S. 22. 1253. 2 2. 1339. Xcyii/1278. 12; 1293. 19, 41; 1348. Xetronpyfii» 1275. 12. 1298. 8. XeuKo'f 1273. 13, 16; 1346. 1257. 31269. 271283. 12. 1273. 7, 8, 91281. 6. 1277. 7, 9• 1303. 1280. 4• See Index IX (). 1270. 31 1276. g 1279. 13; 1285. 70. 1329. See Index VIII. 1253. 7; 1256. 3; 1257. 6, 19; 1262. introd. ; 1273. 34 1275. 21 1281. 9; 1284. 7; 1286. introd., 8; 1288. 1289. 2, 12, 14; 1320; 1326-7; 1329; 1330; 1340. 1286. 8. 1252. verso 22, 33; 1253. 21; 1268. 10; 1276. 7; 1289.15; 1293. 14; 1314. . 1252. VCrSO 22. 1273. 34• 1290. 8. 1299.

. !^
1319.

'(8(,

!.

See Index

VI

{a).

4<

€ !

»

/ / .

.

;

;

;

,
;

i

;

.

1335. 1296. 6. 1320. 1274. 6. 1252. verso 15; 1292. 11. 1273. 7 1289. 8. 1297. 3•
;

!

1294. 6. 1269. 23.
12'73.

1293. 8; 1349.

31; 1286. 5; 1288. 27; 1294. 14; 1300. g; 1345;
.

1253. 2; 1264.

2;

€€

1265.

4',

1298. 1295. 19; 1310. 1299. 1289. 4> 7• 1252. recto 38. 1269. 36; 1272. II

. .

J

1289.

6,

13;

i

1

.

XI.
1350. Index

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
MeytoTot 1256. 13;
II.

305

1265.

9.

Cf.

(>24.
(\\( 1293.

12.

^

.

! 4 /
(85
(\('

1261. 1 1 1255. 1 9. fifwiK 1252. recto 32. 1252. verso 29; 1260. 10; 1267. 13; 1269. 32 ; 1276. 6, 10, 14, 25, 26, 29, 30; 1278. 19,24,27,30; 1284, 10, 16; 1287. 22, 24 ; 1293. 18.

1272. 1273. 17. Hi/ij/ii; 1320. 1282. 22. 1338. 1260. 19; 1273. 13, 37.' 1278. 30. 1252. verso 25; 1298. 6, 9; 1322; 1329; 1330.

;

.
15•
«'05

1341

(?).

1275. g. See Index

IX

().

1298. 19. 1260. 1283. 5 1270. 48.
;

;

1285. 98.

-/
€((

-

1276. ig. 1252. recto 26. 12'7. 1 3. 1273. 39• 1269. 8, 1282. ; 1252. verso 34 ; 1320. 1286. 3) 6. 1257. 1 9 ; 1304. 1255. 1 8 ; 1257. 6.

1256. 14• 1259. 2. 1288. 3• 1269. 24

;

1286. introd.

;

1294.

6,

8

1

8.

1255.

1269. 1293.

196, 20.

. .
.
roror
5,

1257. 8; 1259. 8. 1270. 41 ; 1282. 31 1299. 6; 1347. 1252. verso 33; 1257. 14; 1267. 18; 1268. 5 1270. 56 ; 1278. 34 1279. 22; 1280. 9; 1282. 3, 44; 1283. 7; 1284. 14; 1286. introd. 1291. 14 1304; 1328. 12; 1308.
; ;

6;

1260. 10; 1299. 5; 1343. 1265. 1343. 1279. 1 8. 1348. See Index IX (). See Index IX (). 1279. 3• 1264:. 1268. 9•

.

;

14.

.
1267. 11
;

1274.

;

See Index VI (), 1299. 5• 1276. 8; 1279. 12.
recto 8, verso 15
;

;/1252.
12.

1276.

;

;

25
;

wvi 1257. 4• 1244. introd.

.

1254..

! !
!
/^

1263. 22. 26 1262. 1266. 15; 1267. ; 1268. 7, 8; 1269. 2 ; 1270. 4, 6, 8 ; 1273. , 4; 1275. 2, 3, 5; 1276. , 4; 1277. 27 ; 1278. 7 ; 1282. 5, 8, ; 1284. 12, 13; 1293. 1296. 8, 15; 1297. 22; 1300. 2, 5. 8; 1306; 1384; 1349. 1306. 1283. 4• 1292. 13. 1273. 1 ; 1350.
;

2

iiXfyvov (?)
ieVor

7

;

,

.
^

1297. 18. 1293. 12. 1344. 1279. 15. 1292. 12.

See Index 1306.

IX

().

1288. 20. oiVal267. 13; 1268. 11
1276.
9. 13.
6, 10, 14, 25,

;

29

;

1272. 6, 16, 17; 1284. 16 ; 1287.

6!\215.

1295. 3• 15; 1288. 1279. 5 ; 1280. 1279. 20. 1286. .

7•
;

9,
7•

5•

;

1276. 4• 1299. 15 1360. 1288. 12, 1275. 19; 1286. introd.; 1288. 12,

1

! /
3o6

INDICES
1288. 34 1295. 71293- II (.') 1299. 6, 7, 8 1348. oiSeTfpos 1278. 28. 1270. 38; 1274. 1276. 6. 1295. 5• 1253. 7• 1252. verso 33; 1274. 15; 1304; 1320. o^eAij 1276. 171257. 1 6. 1279- 17-

35; 127. 10; 1298. 13. 14; 1320; 1322; 1324; 1326; 1340; 1344.
1326.

\Z83. I 7, 20. 1294. 13. 1272. lo; 1273. 8, 9, 10.

)!
21.

1300. 5. 1299. 31298. 5• 5! 1270. 28, 3°; 1273. ly; 1276. 8; 1277. 8 1293. 3 1347. 1255. II 1258. 4; 1261. 5; 1264. 1267. 8; 1265. 5, 26; 1266.

\\(

oXoiapop

^

(
;

!
£7-1

oTf

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

,4

;

1270. 21,53; 1280. 4, 6. 1289. II 1325. 1266. 3^• 3.^124. 1270-51 1274. 1 1 1288. 22; 1299. 8; 1300. 5;1301(?); 1329; 1350. 1257. 1272. 21. 1252. verso 3. oKof 1275. 25; 1288. 5• o|of 1275. 20. omji-iica 1273. 37; 1276. 18. oTTorc 1282. 20, 27. 1261. 1278. 2 71347. 1293. 4• 1323. 1323. 1270- 2 0. 1273. 41 1276. 2. 1255. 21 1261. 5, ^; 1264. 1265. 15, 19, 27; 1266. 37, 42• Spveov 1339opot 1252- verso 1 1. 1252- recto 36; 1260- 12; 1273.37; 1276- 14. 18; 1280. 12; 1298. 18 1252- recto 26, verso 26. 1276. ?•
;

. ^
;

1269. g, 1268. 17 1286. 6 1288. 4 1306 1338. ooyfv 1255. II 1260. 2; 1265. 5; 1270. 21 1273. 20,41,48,54; 1274. 1276. 4, 2, 27, 3^ 8; 1275. , ; 1277. 6; 1278. 1280-4; 1281. 5; 1282. 30 ; 1316 1320.
; ; ;
;


;

. ^
77»

125.

14.

2

;

;

;

21),

37•

6

8 ^
1298.

!

See Index VI (a). 1335. 1276. 6 1284. 1 1289. 1 2. 1266. 8. 1252. recto 35 1293. 41. 1272. 8 1294. 6, 7, 9, ^°•
; ; ; ;

1318. 1276.
6.

1 7.

;

;

;

apfs

;

' ! : ^
6(

.

/ ((

($

(

1272. [8; 1298. 6; 1346. 1279. 23• 1257. 9; 1259. 22; 1260. 13, 28 1278. 251257- 3; 1260- 15; 1261. 1262. 7• 13461264. 14. 1265. 13. 1252. verso 28. 1269. 22. 1259. 4 1260. 6, 25 1261. 22. 6; 1262. 14; 1275. 1262. 6. 1259. 5; 1260. 26; 1257. 6; 1262. 14.
;

;

,

;

1298-

2'

;

;

; €/

^

1257- 9> ^1 1268. 1252. rectO .

.

1270.

22

;

1314

(?).

napebpos 1286. introd.

1257. 8, 1 8. 1252. verso 2 0, 27 1280. 8. 125. 20 1276. 15; 1280;
;

;

1328; 1330; 1335; 1337-81257- 2. 1254. 8 1258. 9, Ttdit 1252. verso 14, 29 10; 1259. 21; 1260.16; 1264. 17; 1273. 1266. 14 1268. 12 1270. 37, ;
; ; ; ;

4

;

XI.
19,

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
24,
15, 16,
; ; ;

307

32; 1274. 14; 1276. 7, 1279. 20 1280. 1 7 ; 1281. 2 1 7 13; 1284. II ; 1294. 14; 1296.

17,

1282. 18;
(?);

1298.3,8; 1299.3, 18; 1305; 1307 1349; 1350.

! ^
;

! !

1268. 6. 1252. rectO 33. 1265. i8; 1266. 6, 9, 20; 1269. 9, 18; 1293. 4; 1295. 7; 1296. 2, 6, 15, 18, 20; 1297. 22. 1340. 1266. 2. 1269. 33• 1257. 2. 1299. 6.

1300.

9•

^ .
(4 (!

7«>288.

1287- 2. TTfSioi/ 1255. 8. 1252. verso 28 1293. 13. 20; 1291. 5; 1293. 23, 29, 1295. 6, 13, 19• 42 1279. 24. See Index IX {b). 1266. 8 1269. 24 1270. 1282. 21, 27; 1288. g 1301. 1270. 47• 1278. 12.
;

;

;

;

;

€(>1218.

12,

25; 1283.

8.

/ ( !
6,

1273. 7• 1273. g. 1272• 6, 1 2. 1283. 1 8. mVa 1273. 1297. II.

!
22
;

.

1299.

.
;

1269. 33

;

1276.5,

2,

ig

;

1277.

;

1288. 35-

£/1265.

1286. 8. 1255. II 1261. 1270. ^6 1273. 21, 27 1276. 2; 1331. 1252. recto 9 1255. 9 1260. 16 1331. 1259. 3 1260. 4. 7 1288. 6.

;

;

;

;

;

'
/( ! !

! ( ^

;

>

13• 1252. verso 16, 21; 1257.9; 1261. 9 1270. 18 ; 1284. 15 ; 1292. 3 ; 1293. 17 ; 1295. 13 1296. 4 ; 1299. 8 ; 1345;
;

1252. verso 22. 1252. verso 17; 1296. 2 1299. 2, 4, 20 1300. 3, 6, 8, 9 1350. 1270. 27. 1254. 27. 1295. 17. 1293. g. 1288. 31259. 12, 20 (?) 1263. 14. 1269. 361252. recto 4 (?)• 1348. 1257. 5• See Index VIII. 1283. 4 1258. 3• 1273. 35 1282. 24. 1276. 1 7 1277. 12 1286. 5• 1311 {?); 1322. 1292. 6. 1265. II. 1287. 7 (?)• 1266. 5 1282. 38 1287. 1270. 47• 1252. verso 1 6. 1274. 17. 1275. 8. 1253. 17; 1254. 8; 1260. 7, 26, 29; 1261. 12; 1263. 6; 1265. 13, 27; 1268. 6; 1273. 19, 2, 27, 35> 47 48, 51. 53; 1275. 13, 20; 1276. 13, 27, 32; 1277. 14, 26; 1278. 23, 28; 1280. 15, 17; 1281. 8; 1287. 13• /)€'«/ 1257. 15; 1265. 17. 1273. 6. 1254. 2. 1257. 5• 1300. 3, 6) 9 1350. 1266. 13; 1269.20; 1306. 1273. 19. 1273. 39 1276. 9• 1299. 7• 1252. recto 4 1257. 17. 1277• 9> ^3• 1296. 4•
;

! ! !
5,

;

;

!

;

((!

!. ! !

;

;

;

;

(

€(

;

;

.

;

;

;

12ST

.

II.

.

1349.
1277. 8. See Index VI
(a).

(123.

) 1286. 51252. recto 19• 1252. rectO 4, 29. 1275. 7• 5, 47; 1274.

6.

;

3o8
1263. 9 1322. 1262. recto 35. 1273. 46.
;

INDICES

6\ 1288.
1268.
19;
8, 20,

/

1 6.

(
1288.
.

128.
;

8(?).
;

TtpOTcpov

1270. 24 1281. 9 1287. 2 2. 1265. 1252. verso 32.

,

21, 22.

/ !

! !
;

!

! {

1297. 8. 1252. verSO 19• 1252. verso 1 3• 1263. 4> '7• 1256. 15. 1293. 151253. 6. 1263. 8 1267. ro 1345. 1254. 7, 21 1259. 2, 1279. 1304. 1276. 3. 1298.

(
12.

1252. verso 27. 1252. recto 33> 3^

;

1282. 25

4

! ' !. !
;

1297. 1298.14, 8. 1279. 1 5 1347. 1262. 7, 5• 1340. 1283. 7, 20; 1284. 1270. 2 . 1273. 6, 2 1, 2 8. 1252. verSO 16, 20. 1288. 2 4•
;

;

6

;

1341.

1331

(?).
'>

;

;

8

;

7

.

1275. 1 8. 1276. 8, 9.

^ !
^(3•

1257. 5 1266. , 27. See Index VIII. 1261. 8. 1289. 4• 1277. 7•

! ,
(?)

1326-7. -() 1252. versO 371252. recto 11, verso 12; 1270. 8; 1291. 12; 1292. 16; 1293. 35; 1294. 17; ac (or /iSy) 1295. 2 1 1296. 20 1299. 19; 1300. 8; 1349. 1297. 2 1 1345•

( (
.

((
1284.
;

!

;

;

1290.

.

(?) 1281. 6. 1261. 5; 1265.

;
II

4•

1252. recto 37•

((120.
;

1328; 1330;

1335; 1337.
1262. recto 25
13.
8.

1345.

( '^7 // ! ! (

! !
/ !
.
('6

1288. 4• 1266. 1273. 1282. 21, 34, 42; 1284. 1256. 4• 1268. 4> 7• 1294. 14, 6. 1273. 2 2. 1309.

8

;

37;
14-

1281. 3;

1323

(?).
;

1270. 3^

1276. 9; 1280.

6;

1329; 1331.
5. g, 12, 24.

1304. 1253. 5• 1257. 12. 1252. recto 45, 46• 1276. 9• 1252. verso 23. 1273. 2, 49• 1256. 13 1265. 8. 1270. 47• 1270. 42 1330-1.
; ;

1280.

5.
.

7«294.

1294.
1312.

1273. 12, 8, 22, 29, 3°) 3^ 1274. 8, 19; 1284. 15.

/
)

1289. 9' 1288. 7, 29, 34> 1290. 9•

3^•

1263. 15. aiToKoyoi. See Index VIII. 1257. 4, 3; 1332; 1344. 1258. (TKcCof 1269. 5, 20.

>293.

1288. 3• 1328. 1293. 411293. 30, 39• 3, 39; 1297.

6, 1 2.

.

1252. verso 24. See Index IX {b).

tantum 1314.

XI.
Ta|is

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN IVORDS
1261. 3

! ?/
7•
TiXcIf

(( € 12,.

1266. 24. 1263. 12. 1253. 13.
;

;
{iytos

309

iyiaivdv

12.

8.

1262. verso 30• 3, 24; 1277. 2; 1299.

1 2,

14,

1347. TfXeioCi/ 1268. 17. 1255. 1270. 4; 1288. 6. 1295. 7• TcXfuTTJ 1269. 34 1274. 6. 1258. 9• 1273. 8, 9 II, 7• 1293. 25 (?). TerpaSfppa 1294. 4• 1252. verso 31 31• See Index IX {). 1263. 14. 1252. verso 25. Tijpcii/ 1298. 7• TiiffW 1286. 16; 1282. 26; 1295. 12. 1253. 6; 1276. 26, 3°; 1277. 24 1281. 5 1286. 50 1286. 5 1288. 22; 1304; 1320; 1339. 1274. 1 4. 1296. 1300. 2 1337. 1252. verso 18. TOKOS 1282. 17 1288. 19. 1252. recto 6. 1307. See Index VI (). ToVor 1255. 17; 1258. 9; 1259. 7; 1283.

!
;7
;

;
;

fpvos

.
! //
<!
Torf

,

,

;

;

;

;

;

.
-'

;

1294. 6. \2QZ. 3; 1299. 31294. 6. lyiats 1269. 23. 05 1256. 8; 1266. 15; 1267. i5; 1270. 1287. 20 20 1293. 40 1296. 4 1296. 16, 21 1299. 1300. 2, 1306. 1288. 34; 1291. H. 1274. 1 4. 1252. verso 14 1267. 11 1270. 22 1273. 36 ; 1274. 22 1276. 5 1281. 2 1287. 12, 19. vm'ivai 1264. 10, 17. 1288. 8. 1328 1339. 1266. 34• 1264. 23 1269. 21. 1252. verso 18. 1270. 8. UTToXoyfii/ 1298. 17. vn6\oyos 1279. 9• 1262. verso 35 3^• 1262. recto 26, 32; 1267. 17; 1263. 16; 1264. 9. 13; 1267. 19; 1270. 7; 1287. 10, 18; 1302. 1257. 4! 1270. 3• 1343. 1272. 3• 1274. 15. 1269. 23, 25, 27, 29, 31 1293. 24. iorepoi' 1252. verso 28.
; ;
; ;

;

,2

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

( !
! ! ' ((
( ^ £
(popeiv

;

;

•/«;)/5

( !
'

^ ' '
(292.

6; 1288. 12. 1273. 31• 1283. 4• 1263. II

(05 1262. recto 37•
;

1300.

9•

1284.

6, 19.

1290.

5•

1277.

7> 23•

1306. 1259. 25; (y) 1260. 17; 1278.

29.

1273. 32. 1262. verso 36. 1284. 12. 1288. 1 1.
13.

1274. 6. (piptiv 1252. verso 3; 1291. 3; 1293. 19; 1297. 16; 1347. 1273. 6, 17, 19. 27, 35. 47, 5• 1252. recto 32 1293. 25• 1305. -omi' 1296. 7• 1298. 1292. 7; 1298. 6;
;

«| 1293. 34
.

1300.

II.

(?)•

TVy^aveiv 1266. 20.

1290. 4• 1276. 8. 1255. 13; 1273.

1300. 10. 1279. 9• 1290. 7• 1307.

3IO

INDICES
1252. verso 20. 1252. recto 18, 25. 1252. verso 10. 1273. 23. 1267. 2. 1266. 33•
1252. recto 3. verso , 6, 9 1274. 5 1276. 4 1277. 6 1293. 2 1291. 2 1292. 2 1295. 2 1296. 3 1298. 3
;

(
6
; ;

1320.

;

;

;

4
2
2

;

;

;

\
;
;

:

;

;

1270. 1280. 1294. 1299.

: !
1268. 1277.
2
2

;

1252. recto 45; 46; 1260. 9; 1273. 3 1274. 5 1276. 2 1278. 2, 35 1281. 15 ; 1282. 46. 1270. 4• 1270. 5;
;

;

;

;

128.2;

1300. 1295.

2

;

1320-1

;

1348-9.

17.

(

;(£;

1269. 22, 36. Cf Index IX {b). 1296. 6. 1297. 1 8. 1294. 5, 2. 1294. 3• 1300. 9• 1270. 36; 1276. 12. eh «', 1268. 9• Xetpas 1339. 1259. 3) 2 2. 1257. 1252. recto 16 (?). xeipoTovetv 1252. verso 18. 1288. 32. (1. 1347. 1282. 341269. 3° (k'™!/). 1273. 13, 17 («i^fflwof) 1310. 1288. 24. 1289. 1300. 1328 1343. 1286. 3, 4, 7• 33; 1299. 7X<!i'Spot 1338. 1252. verso 29, 31 36; 1273. 24• 1252. verso 15. 1292. 1 1 1294. 1337; 1346.

! {
)

1274. 26. 1263. 12; 1266. 36; 1276. 14. 1318. 1276.7,10; 1284. 1 1. 1252. verso 17, 36; 1276. 5; 1278. 13, 20, 29; 1299. 20; 1300. 10. 1273. 28. 1273. 6. See Index IX (b). 1272. 9. 1 1 1274. •].

.
.
2,

^

^

! »
^!
-''

.

1279. 3• 1252. recto 3 1 A\f 1262. 8 1278. 23. 1273. 8, 9> 1276. 1279. 1282. 35•
)'

1290. 1270. 39

.
;

;

'

6

;
;

^
;

1274.

8.

24; 1277. 2;

;

(65?)
j

'/ 8(
»

1289. 5, 6. 1264. 20 1266. 32. 1339. 1280. 7• 1345.

;

;

;

/)269.

;

6

;

(

1320. 1339. 1252. recto 36, 45> 46 1254. 27 1257. 6; 1260. g 1265. 27; 1267. 20; 1270. 52, 54; 1273. 3, 16; 1274. 5; 1276. 13, 14; 27, 31; 1277. 14, 26; 1278. 2, 35, 37; 1280. 17; 1292. 5; 1293. 13 1348. 1255. 7 1279. 1293. 13.
;

;

;

;

4

;

3"
XII.

INDEX OF PASSAGES DISCUSSED.
{a)

Achilles,

!

Alcaeus i8. i 32 42 63 93 Biogr. Gr. 50 (Westermann) Cod. Theod. ii. 24. 6 Hesych. s. v.
. •

!

Authors.


,
.

S. V, S, V.

'
Q U

Menander, Epiirep. 503-4 510
Fr. Fr.
.

.

Plate

I

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No. 1250, Cols,

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