CANNON RIDGE CODE OF DEVELOPMENT

MARSHALL, FAUQUIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA
June 22, 2011
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I: Overview
Organization of the Code of Development Description of the Project Process 4 5 6

PART II: Plan Requirements
Conceptual Layout Plan Land Use & Block Plan Streets, Streetscape and Utilities Open Space Phasing Plan Further Requirements for Key Sites 8 9-10 11-15 16-18 19 20-21

PART III: Building and Lot Requirements
Lot Types & Lot Regulating Plan Lot Layout Diagrams and Standards 23 24-28

Part IV: Appendices
A. Architectural Styles B. Building Materials C. Landscaping 30-47 48-50 51-53

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Part I

Overview

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Organization of the Code of Development
The Cannon Ridge Code of Development guides the design, development and construction for the entire Cannon Ridge neighborhood with the goal of fulfilling the vision described in this Overview. The Code of Development is divided into four (4) parts: Overview, Plan Requirements, Building and Lot Requirements and Appendices. Part I of the Code of Development, the Overview, includes a general description of Cannon Ridge, as well as the rules outlining how the regulatory process will work for the project. Part II of the Code of Development, the Plan Requirements, establishes the specific land uses allowed within Cannon Ridge. It also establishes the rules for creating the fabric of the new Cannon Ridge neighborhood, including the system of blocks, lots, streets, utilities and open spaces that collectively define and create the structure of the neighborhood. The Land Use subsection of Part II includes requirements for special uses that are of particular importance to the success of the overall plan because of their specific characteristics. Part II of the Code of Development also establishes standards for the creation of lots. The rules regulating the development of streets, trails and utility systems are also contained in the Plan Requirements section of the Code of Development. Detailed guidelines for elements such as the streetscape and lighting are also included in this section. The system of open spaces for Cannon Ridge is set forth in the Plan Requirements section, creating the open space network that defines and interlinks the individual streets and blocks of the Cannon Ridge neighborhood. The Lot Regulating component of the Plan Requirements section sets out the layout of lots for Cannon Ridge, guaranteeing variety throughout the neighborhood and within each block. Lastly, a Phasing Plan is set forth in Part II, establishing rules and regulations that ensure that Cannon Ridge is developed in a balanced and coherent fashion. Part III of the Code of Development, the Building and Lot Requirements section, establishes detailed guidelines for house layouts on the lots and their corresponding accessory structures. The rules for positioning houses on individual lots are created in Part III, including specific setback requirements. The Building Design subsection provisions create the rules for building height, as well as architectural styles and other critical design elements. Part IV includes three Appendices that address architectural styles, building materials and landscaping.

OVERVIEW

Cannon Ridge Locational Plan

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Description of the Project
Cannon Ridge is a development that organizes the design of homes, public spaces and environmental areas in a manner that complements and respects the traditional time-honored planning models of Marshall and Fauquier County. Cannon Ridge embraces Traditional Neighborhood Design (TND) in a way that exemplifies the goals and objectives of the Planned Residential Development zoning district. Cannon Ridge is designed as a small, eclectic neighborhood that features the very best aspects of neotraditional planning with an appreciation for the qualities that best represent Fauquier County. The community reflects the aesthetic form and warmth of older, established residential areas of Marshall. Cannon Ridge comprises a combination of residential blocks, small pocket parks and internal open spaces served by a system of interconnected streets, sidewalks and trails. Cannon Ridge is envisioned and designed as a walkable community. The residences will be varied in architecture, size, character and type and will be located within walking distance of the shops and services provided along Marshall’s existing Main Street. Each block will have a mix of lot sizes, yards, building heights and architectural styles that reflects the Marshall community’s planning goals and objectives. Cannon Ridge consists of one-hundred ninetynine (199) residential lots. The overall density at Cannon Ridge is 3.47 dwelling units per acre. Cannon Ridge contains a traditional, substantially rectilinear pattern of blocks and interconnecting streets and alleys that are oriented to the pedestrian rather than the automobile. Generally, streets are narrow, minimizing pavement and impervious surface. Parking is provided on both sides of public streets creating a streetscape consistent with the character of Marshall. Single-family houses have garage access via alleys where possible, with front loaded units minimized to the greatest extent possible (not more than 50 percent). Where residential units are front loaded with driveway access to the public street, the architectural standards require the garage to be set back from the front of the house or be located in the rear of the lot, ensuring that the garages are not a prominent feature of the streetscape. Street trees are required on both sides of public streets at 30 foot intervals. In addition, the same species must be located on both sides of each street, although a different complimentary species is allowed at intersections. Located throughout Cannon Ridge are various public spaces including large parks, pocket parks and other open spaces. These are interconnected by sidewalks and trails and are easily accessible to the public. These spaces contain a mixture of passive and active recreation uses. Natural and environmentally sensitive areas such as wetlands have been preserved and protected. The key open space areas and their amenities are further defined in Part II. Cannon Ridge requires a variety of lot sizes, shapes, setbacks and widths. Additionally, variety in architectural style is also required, as is variation in building heights. Houses will be between 1 and 2.5 stories in height (measured from the floor elevation of the lowest floor of occupiable space at the front façade). Houses are required to greet the public domain with varying front setbacks of 10 to 25 feet from the lot line to the house (which may include porches). Specific architectural standards and lot layout diagrams for each housing type are located in Part III the Code of Development, guaranteeing that Cannon Ridge will be a traditional neighborhood development that contains the variety inherent in neo-traditional towns and communities.

OVERVIEW

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OVERVIEW
Process
Submission of a Code of Development Site Plan Submission of Building/Zoning Permits for Individual Houses or Other Structures The County’s process under the PRD zoning for the submission of a Code of Development Site Plan shall be followed, including the submission of additional information as necessary to determine compliance with this Code of Development. The submission of a Code of Development Site Plan must be approved prior to any grading or construction on the Cannon Ridge property, whether related to infrastructure or building development, and prior to the creation of any building lots within Cannon Ridge. A Code of Development Site Plan shall be submitted for administrative approval by the Zoning Administrator, with input from the Community Architect (defined below). A Code of Development Site Plan may include any combination of grading, infrastructure, lots or buildings and any portion of the development, provided it is consistent with the approved Phasing Plan contained in this Code of Development. Community Architect The role and purpose of the Community Architect is to advise the Zoning Administrator on matters of design compliance with this Code of Development. This Code of Development will be administered by the Zoning Administrator, taking into account (but not necessarily being bound by) the advice of the Community Architect. The Community Architect will be retained by the County and paid by the County from fees charged to the developer/applicant. Submission of Final Plats The County’s established process for Final Plats shall be followed, with approval by the County’s designated Subdivision Agent (as defined in the Fauquier County Subdivision Ordinance). Submission of Land Disturbing Permits The County’s established process for Land Disturbing Permits with regard to site plans, infrastructure plans and construction plans also shall be followed subsequent to the approval of a Code of Development Site Plan. The County’s established process for Building/Zoning Permits shall be followed, except that:
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Every structure, including sheds less than 150 square feet and fences shall require a zoning permit; and A review by the Community Architect for compliance with the Code of Development shall occur, requiring submission of architectural elevations and other details sufficient to determine compliance with the Code of Development, including compliance with the stylistic standards and variations set forth in Appendix A and in the Lot Regulating Matrix. The Community Architect’s review shall occur within the framework of the existing zoning review for Zoning/Building Permits. Compliance with the Code of Development shall be required for issuance of a Zoning or Building Permit by the Zoning Administrator.

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Deviations From the Code of Development The developer/applicant shall comply with the provisions of this Code of Development, provided that the Zoning Administrator shall have the authority and discretion to approve certain deviations from the requirements within the parameters specifically set forth in this Code. Deviations beyond those authorized by the language of this Code or the Proffer Statement shall be considered an amendment to the Cannon Ridge rezoning and shall require a rezoning and/or proffer amendment application, as determined by the County. Appeals An appeal of any Zoning Administrator decision related to the interpretation of this Code of Development shall be made to the Board of Supervisors, following the established procedures for appeals of proffer interpretations.

Deviations In Process:
Should Fauquier County amend the approval process or the approval authority for any of the items outlined in this Code of Development, Cannon Ridge shall be required to follow that amended process.

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Part II

Plan Requirements

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Land Use
CONCEPTUAL LAYOUT PLAN

Lot Variety:
This Conceptual Layout Plan is a general representation of the lot layout within Cannon Ridge. The exact lot sizes, lot widths and the variety of lots shall be set forth in the Code of Development Site Plan and shall be subject to the requirements contained in this Code of Development; provided that no more than 199 residential lots shall be constructed in Cannon Ridge. A variety of residential lot sizes is required along each block as set forth in this Code of Development. See also the Lot Regulating Plan on page 23 of this Code of Development.

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Land Use & Block Plan
Accessory Uses

Permitted Uses
Principle Uses Permitted

The following accessory uses shall be allowed within Cannon Ridge in conjunction with and incidental to, and on the same lot as the principal use, provided that all other requirements of this Code of Development are also met: A. Single family detached dwellings 1. Child’s playhouse not to exceed 100 sq. ft. in area, and play equipment. B. Single family attached dwellings (see development alternatives for blocks 12 and 15 on page 27) 2. Dog houses, pens and other similar structures for the housing of commonly accepted household pets, but not including kennels. Secondary Uses Permitted 3. Gardening. 4. Parking spaces. A. Park and playgrounds 5. Statues, arbors, trellises, barbecue stoves, flagpoles, fences, walls and B. Electric, gas, water, sewer, and communication facilities, including transformers, hedges. Maximum height for fences is 3.5 feet forward of the front fapipes, meters, pump stations and related facilities for distribution of local services. C. Accessory uses and structures including home occupations, storage buildings and efficade of the house and 6 feet to the rear of the front façade of the house. ciency apartments. Fences located between the building and the street shall be a minimum D. Temporary buildings, the uses of which are incidental to construction during developof 50% open. ment being conducted on the same or adjoining tract or section which shall be re6. Garages, storage structures, gazebos and similar structures. moved upon completion or abandonment of such construction. 7. Swimming pools. 8. Private outdoor recreation uses. 9. Yard sales, maximum of 2 per year, 2 days each, with sale items being used household goods owned by the residents. General Use Limitations 10. Day care services from a residence for no more than five children 1. Unless otherwise specified under a specific provision of this Code of Develop(excluding children living on premises). ment, all uses shall conform to the following use limitations and performance 11. Renting of not more than two rooms to not more than two persons for standards of the Fauquier County Zoning Ordinance: periods no shorter than one month. a. Section 2-502: Limitations on the Occupancy of a Dwelling Unit 12. Home Occupations allowed pursuant to the limitations set forth in b. Section 2-508: Limitations on Junk and Inoperable Vehicles Sections 6-300 and 6-304 of the Zoning Ordinance. c. Section 2-510: Sales from Vehicles 13. Accessory dwelling units (defined in the Zoning Ordinance as efficiency d. Section 2-512: Limitations on Keeping of Animals apartments) shall only be allowed on single family detached lots of e. Section 2-600: Common Open Space and Common Improvement Facilities 7,500 square feet or greater and further subject to the following f. Article 5: Administrative Permits, Special Permits and Special Exceptions limitations: g. Article 9: Performance Standards a. Maximum unit size is 600 sq. ft. h. Article 11: Telecommunications Ordinance b. Unit must be located in an accessory garage structure above or below the actual garage. c. No more than 20 such units are allowed in the entire development.
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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Block Plan

The number of units and lot sizes may vary but must be included on the Code of Development Site Plan. However in no event shall the total number of residential lots exceed 199 units.

Variations from the Lot Regulating Matrix may be approved by the Zoning Administrator upon recommendation of the Community Architect if desirable to better achieve the goals and objectives of the Code of Development. 10

PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Streets, Streetscape & Utilities
Street Regulating Plan
General Requirements
Streets All streets except alleys shall be public streets. All public streets and alleys shall be designed in a manner consistent with the typical sections shown on the subsequent pages. On-Street Parking On-street parking will be provided along one side of every oneway street and both sides of every other street, as depicted on the typical sections and as approved by the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) and the County. Utilities and Easements All underground utilities shall be located as set forth in this section, and attendant utility boxes or other installations shall be screened as set forth page 13. Public sewer and water lines shall be within the public rightof-way where possible based on standard engineering practices. Streetscape Streetscape elements including street trees, sidewalks, crosswalks and street lights shall be provided as set forth in detail in this section.

Deviations From Typical Sections:
Variations in the typical sections may permitted during final design, provided that the street widths do not increase in size. Any variation in the typical sections shall be subject to County approval prior to submission of the Code of Development Site Plan .

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Streets, Streetscape & Utilities Typical Sections

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Streets, Streetscape & Utilities
Utilities and Easements Utilities and Utility Easements All utilities and utility easements will be located in a manner that supports the goal of creating traditional character within Cannon Ridge. All existing and new utility lines shall be placed underground. Utilities will either be located within the public right-ofway section as shown in the drawing to the right, or to the rear of buildings within alleys and parking areas. Utility lines/easements will only be allowed to be placed within front yards to the extent such placement does not interfere with required landscaping or other required elements of the plan. To the extent achievable, shared easements and easements of reduced width will be utilized as allowed by various utilities. Transformers and Similar Utility Structures Transformers and other utility structures shall be located to the rear of lots to the maximum extent practible. Transformers or other utility structures located in the front of lots shall be substantially screened from view of the street with landscaping and a fence or a combination of both. Fire Hydrants Placement of fire hydrants shall occur at locations that minimize disruption to on-street parking (such as street corners) subject to Fire and Rescue approval and in conformance with Fire and Rescue standards. The Streetscape of Cannon Ridge The streets within Cannon Ridge are designed to reflect the traditional neighborhood character of the development, as well as their carrying capacity. The goal is to provide narrow, traffic-calmed streets with on-street parallel parking in keeping with traditional forms of development. Every street is lined with sidewalks and canopy trees, helping to create an environment that accommodates cars, but also welcomes pedestrians to walk through the neighborhood. Streetscape features shall include pedestrian scale street lights. Standards for lighting are found on the following page. Street Tree Requirements 1. Every street will have street trees planted on both sides of the street. 2. Street trees shall generally be located every 30 feet within the right-of-way between the sidewalk and street pavement. Where larger street trees are utilized, spacing may be increased to 40-45 feet as appropriate at the discretion of the Zoning Administrator. Spacing and location also may be adjusted in special areas at the discretion of the Zoning Administrator in order to create unique effects or to accommodate utility crossings, but precedence is given to street trees over utility placement, and utilities will be carefully located so as not to interfere with the placement of street trees. 3. Street trees shall be selected from those listed in the table titled Appropriate Street Trees at Cannon Ridge in Appendix C. The list highlights specific cultivars of tree types specifically recommended for street tree use in Virginia by VDOT and the Virginia Tech Department of Forestry. 4. Street trees shall be planted in a manner that helps to create special character and identity for individual streets. This shall be accomplished by using the same tree type along both sides of the street, and varying that type from street to street.

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Streets, Streetscape & Utilities
Sidewalks 1. Sidewalks shall be provided on both sides of every street where permitted by VDOT. 2. Sidewalks shall be constructed with brick, special pavers or a combination of both, or at the discretion of the Zoning Administrator, sections of concrete if edged and/or punctuated with brick or special pavers. 3. Minimum sidewalk width shall be five (5) feet. Pedestrian Street Lights 1. Lights shall be provided along every street with a sidewalk. 2. Lights shall be a maximum of 10 feet in height . 3. Lights shall be spaced no more than 150 feet apart, and shall be placed on certain street corners. 4. Lights shall be shielded to prevent undue illumination of the night sky. 5. Fixtures and poles shall have a dark finish and be generally of a traditional design, consistent in character and quality to the ANTIQUE Street Lamps ™ Post Top Series illustrated herein:

Mail Boxes Mail boxes shall be provided in a wall or porch-mounted accessible location next to the home’s front door if allowed by the Post Office. If postal regulations prevent this type of mail delivery, then individual freestanding mailboxes shall be allowed, with a requirement for dark finishes for the mailboxes and posts. No separate newspaper delivery boxes shall be allowed. Grouped mailboxes shall be allowed for lots that do not front on a street and such mailboxes shall be in dark finishes.

Materials and Colors:
The material and color of all streetscape items shall be approved by the Zoning Administrator prior to construction. All materials are required to conform to Appendix B of the Code of Development.

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Streets, Streetscape & Utilities
Roundabouts A roundabout may be located at the crossroads of Anderson Avenue and Cannon Ridge Avenue, as well as at the intersection of Artillery Avenue and John Murphy Street. Any roundabout must be shown and included in the Code of Development Site Plan filed for Cannon Ridge. Roundabouts shall be designed to minimize asphalt, concrete and other impervious surfaces where feasible. If excess impervious surface is required, it shall be treated with stamped concrete or special pavers. The circle at the center of the roundabout shall include a mixture of shrubs and flowering trees, provided that sight distance requirements are satisfied. Deviations From Streets, Streetscapes and Utilities:
Deviations are allowed as set forth within the requirements themselves. In addition, the following deviations are allowed. Streets, including Street Sections, and On-Street Parking The Zoning Administrator may approve deviations from the street sections as necessary to meet VDOT requirements, provided such variations do not eliminate on-street parking. Utilities & Easements: The illustration of utility locations is intended to be conceptual in nature. The Zoning Administrator may approve deviations to utility locations, provided that all utilities remain in the ROW, sidewalk, or rear of buildings. Streetscape and Special Streetscape Areas and Elements The Zoning Administrator may approve deviations from these requirements upon a finding that the change is necessary in a limited location to facilitate a unique environmental or topographical condition or upon a determination that the alternative proposed contributes to the pedestrian character of the development.

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Open Space Plan
Open Space Tabulation
Land Area Acres Square Feet Open Space Acres Square Feet Percent of Land Area 57.34 2,497,730 24.06 1,048,053.6 41.99%

Open Space Areas
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Cannon Ridge Entrance Feature Bayonet Square John Randolf Kerrick Park at Stephenson’s Hill Cannon Ridge Park Resource Protection Area Stone Wall Artillery Park Playground 0.52 0.17 7.90 13.37 1.52 0.20 0.25 0.13

Ownership, Management and Access to Open Space Within Cannon Ridge
Cannon Ridge includes a system of open spaces placed throughout the development linked by sidewalks and trails. The spaces are strategically designed to provide green relief to the hardscape created by streets and sidewalks and also to provide both active and passive opportunities for recreation. All of the open spaces located within the development will be owned and maintained by the Homeowners’ Association (HOA). Responsibility for the management and maintenance of all spaces is to be shared by all property owners within Cannon Ridge through the HOA. All open spaces located within the development shall be open for use by the general public, although the HOA for Cannon Ridge may establish rules for the open spaces. 16

PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Open Space
Entrance Feature—0.52 Acres This pocket park will serve as the entrance feature to the development. It will consist of a wet pond for stormwater management purposes that will be ringed with benches for seating. The pond is designed to hold water at all times, with the water aerated and otherwise treated so that the pond is an attractive entrance feature to the development. Any fencing determined to be necessary relative to the pond shall be done in a manner to enhance the character of the park. Fencing should consist of wrought iron or a three board fence. Bayonet Square—0.17 Acres This small square is located at the end of John Puryear Place creating the terminating vista of this street. This square serves as the frontage for several lots that do not front on a public street. The streetscape of the adjoining streets, including sidewalks, street trees and street lights will be continued along the edge of the square. A sidewalk wraps around the edge of the square providing pedestrian access to the lots fronting on the square. Additionally, sidewalks will traverse the square, which shall include a water feature, statue or pergola providing the focal point in the middle. Additionally benches will be provided in the park for residents’ enjoyment. Artillery Park—0.25 Acres This small open space terminates the vista from Artillery Avenue. It will be a landscaped park with benches. It will also include a dense vegetative screen at its western edge to conceal the alley behind it. John Kerrick Park at Stephenson’s Hill —7.90 Acres This large park is the location of historic Stephenson’s Hill. This park will have minimal disturbance with natural trails meandering throughout. The natural features of this site shall be preserved, with additional indigenous trees, shrubs and groundcover provided to compliment existing features and to help create shady locations for planned amenities. At the top of the hill adjacent to the intersection of Cannon Ridge Avenue and John Murphy Street, a scenic overlook will be constructed that will be accessed by the trail network. The scenic overlook will contain a low masonry wall to provide visitors the same vantage point used by the confederate soldiers during the Civil War. This park will be maintained under the ownership of the HOA. This park will also contain a large tree screen along its westerly edge as shown on the landscaping plan in Appendix C. Stone Wall—0.20 Acres This linear area is the location of an existing historic stone wall. This small open space area is connected to the development by a series of trails and sidewalks. A trail will be built in this area and the existing stone wall will be restored. Playground—0.13 Acres A play structure and benches will be constructed on this lot. This lot will be surrounded by a wrought iron fence with gated openings along the public streets providing easy access for residents. Some representative pictures of the playgrounds amenities are shown below.

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Open Space
Cannon Ridge Park—13.37 Acres This large natural open space provides a buffer to Interstate 66. This park will be left in its natural state with no improvements planned, except for a large stormwater management pond that will serve as an amenity. This pond will be wet year round with the water aerated and otherwise treated so that the ponds are attractive features of the park and overall development. Lastly this park wraps around the edge of the community providing a buffer to adjoining properties and to buffer the development from Interstate 66. A large County trail is also shown within this park adjacent to Interstate 66. This trail will include a 10 foot wide asphalt walkway with 5 foot grass shoulders. The trail location shown is a general location of the planned trail. The final design of the trail shall be completed with the first Code of Development Site Plan which includes any lots in Phase 3, as shown on the phasing plan. A forested buffer area of a minimum of 50 feet in width shall be provided to create a dense visual screen in Cannon Ridge Park on the rear of the lots visible from Interstate 66. Specifically the buffer shall screen the rear of lots 111 – 119 and 121 – 132, and extend beyond to screen the sides of lots 118 and 119, as well as the fronts of lots 103 and 104 as shown on Sheet 3 of the Concept Development Plan. The forested buffer shall be designed to complement the existing landscape which will remain, and shall be designed to appear natural. New plantings of evergreen and deciduous trees should be species which are native to the region. The forested buffer shall consist of a continuous evergreen screen with a minimum of 15 evergreen trees, plus 4 canopy trees, 6 understory trees, and 20 shrubs for every 100 linear feet of buffer. There shall be a minimum of 3 different plant species provided within the whole of the forested buffer area for each of the plant types. In addition to the forested buffer described, an additional 24 evergreen trees, 10 canopy trees, 14 understory trees, and 96 shrubs shall be planted in the area between the forested buffer area and the southern property boundary. These plantings shall be of similar species to the ones located in the forested buffer area, and occur in random groupings within the area to appear as if they have occurred naturally. Given the time required for trees to attain maturity, existing stands of trees and hedgerows should be incorporated whenever possible. Where existing trees, or trees being relocated from on site, are being utilized, the new planting requirements may be reduced at the discretion of the Zoning Administrator. The planting of new material shall occur within 90 days of the completion of the basic grading work for the first phase of development or such subsequent deadline as may be determined by the Zoning Administrator. The developer and subsequently the homeowner’s association shall have an ongoing obligation to replace any dead or dying trees that cause gaps in the buffer from time to time as necessary to maintain a visual screen from Interstate 66 to the extent required by the Fauquier County Zoning Administrator. Resource Protection Areas—1.52 Acres This open space is designed to protect the existing wetlands that traverse it. This open space area will include a natural trail that links Artillery Avenue, Cannon Ridge Avenue and Captain Richards Court. A small play structure will be located along Captain Richards Avenue, outside of the wetlands providing an active recreation area for the surrounding residents. This active recreation play area will be fenced. Furniture Benches and trash cans are critical elements of a neighborhood park landscape and they will be provided at strategic locations, providing a place to rest as people walk from the development to Main Street. The planned open spaces will contain benches or other seating opportunities, as well as trash receptacles. Benches and trash receptacles shall be fabricated of wood and/or dark metal and shall be generally consistent in quality and character to those illustrated herein. Alternate materials may be authorized by the Zoning Administrator where used in a special fashion at a particular location to create a unique feature or place, such as the example shown herein. Deviations from the Requirements For Open Spaces
The Zoning Administrator may approve deviations from the requirements set forth in these descriptions for each open space upon a finding that deviations do not change the overall character, quality or purpose of the open space but rather enhance these elements.

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Phasing Plan
Phasing Requirements Cannon Ridge shall be developed in five (5) phases. Each phase is specifically delineated on the Phasing Plan. No phase has more than 40 Lots. No more than 40 occupancy permits shall be issued in any calendar year. All street and utility improvements, including sewer, water and stormwater management facilities shall be constructed as necessary to support individual houses. The County, in consultation with WSA and VDOT, shall determine the extent of streets and utilities necessary to be shown on each Code of Development Site Plan submission in order to determine that such facilities will be designed correctly. All open spaces shall be constructed in conjunction with or prior to the construction of the first adjoining house. Where the open space does not directly adjoin any house, the open space shall be constructed in conjunction with or prior to the construction of any houses across an alley or across a street.

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Further Requirements for Key Sites
Bayonet Square This square is a predominant visual focal point of the community. Bayonet Square is located at the terminus of Bayonet Street along Anderson Avenue. A sidewalk will line the perimeter of the square, with sidewalks traversing the park creating a central location within the square. Within the center of the square either a water feature, pergola, statue or large specimen tree will be located. Trees will be lined around the periphery of the square . Houses will vary in architectural type and will have varying front, side and rear setbacks. All houses will have direct access to the park via sidewalks. The square will contain lighting consistent with the standards outlined on page 14 as well. John Randolph Kerrick Park at Stephenson’s Hill Scenic Overlook This key feature will be located near the top of John Kerrick Park at Stephenson’s Hill at the visual terminus of Cannon Ridge Avenue (approaching from the east) as shown on the diagram below. This overlook provides scenic views of the entire town of Marshall. From this location, the Baptist Church on Winchester Street as well as a majority of the town can be seen. Trails will provide access to the overlook. The overlook will include a low fieldstone wall between 3 and 4 feet in height in the shape of a semi-circle. The overlook will be constructed with either brick or decorative pavers. Benches will be provided within the overlook for the enjoyment of all the community’s residents who utilize the park.

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PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Further Requirements for Key Sites
Linear Open Space and Old Stone Wall This key feature provides the restoration of an historical stone wall that bisects the development. The stone wall will be restored and a pea gravel or mulch trail will be provided along it linking John Randolph Kerrick Park at Stephenson’s Hill and Cannon Ridge Park to the resource protection area. The trail will be provided along the wall bisecting many of the blocks and providing safe and easy access to many of the open space areas with the community. Height Limitation Area Around John Randolph Kerrick Park at Stephenson’s Hill The lots that front on John Randolph Kerrick Park at Stephenson’s Hill, being lots 26, 27, 28, 29, 45 through 50, 135 through 142 and lot 133 (as number on sheet 3 of the Concept Development Plan) shall have a maximum height of 2 stories or 25 feet. These lots should also include unique architectural elements such as turret’s, veranda’s, wrap-around porches, or any other unique architectural feature meeting the criteria on page 23 and Appendix A of this document. These lots are permitted to exceed the maximum front setback of 25 feet to create a special architectural element surrounding the park.

Deviations From Key Sites Descriptions:
The Zoning Administrator may approve deviations from these descriptions in a manner that does not change the central purpose of the key use or its general size and intensity upon a determination that the change does not detract from the overall character and quality of development and does not diminish the pedestrian oriented nature of the development. No deviation in location and no deviation which eliminates a use may be approved by the Zoning Administrator.

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Part III

Building & Lot Requirements

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Building & Lot Requirements
Lot Types & Lot Regulating Plan
Lot Types
The Cannon Ridge Lot Regulating Plan contains a wide array of lot sizes to accommodate a variety of house and unit types. The variation in lot sizes is vital to the creation of traditional neighborhood design at Cannon Ridge. Cannon Ridge divides the lot types into three (3) categories. These are:
x x x

Lot Regulating Plan

Village Lot Neighborhood Lot Estate Lot

The Village Lots are the smaller single-family detached lots, with the Neighborhood and Estate Lots larger in size. The Village Lots will vary between 45 and 54 feet in width. The Village Lots in Bayonet Square may be narrower. Neighborhood Lots range between 55 and 62 feet in width. Lastly, the large Estate Lots in Cannon Ridge will have widths greater than 62 feet. The width of each lot shall be measured at the front setback from the street. All blocks as defined on Page 10 of this Code and as found in the Concept Development Plan are required to have a significant variation of lot type, architectural styles, and setbacks (both front and side) all as approved by the Zoning Administrator with advice from the Community Architect, and with a minimum of 50% of the units rear loaded with garages located along private alleys. Corner lots with generous front and side yards are important to the character of the development because they are highly visible and serve as key features within the community. Corner lots should include unique architectural features that help distinguish them from other lots creating focal vistas at the development’s most visible location’s. Corner lots should include items like wrap-around porches, turrets, columns, balconies, or other unique items that make these lots stand out.

Deviations from the Lot Regulating Plan
The Lot Regulating Plan provides an example of the amount, lot size and pattern of variation that the Lot Regulating Matrix on Page 10 requires. The Lot
Regulating Plan will be finalized with the submission of the Code of Development Site Plan.

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Building & Lot Requirements
Lot Layout Diagrams & Standards
Lot Layout Standards Front Build-to-Line and Setbacks: The structure of the building shall start within the front setback range. This includes porches. In no instance shall any portion of the house be located closer than 10 feet from the front property line. No encroachments shall be allowed for projections of the main structure into the side and rear setback areas. Accessory Structures: All Accessory structures shall be located on the rear half of the lot. Accessory structures no larger than 150 square feet and one-story in height may be located within the side and rear setback areas for a lot. Larger or taller accessory structures shall meet all setbacks. Garages: All garages shall be sized for no more than 2 cars, with a maximum width of 24 feet. Front loaded garages shall be set back a minimum of 14 feet behind the front wall of the house, with side loaded garages set back a minimum of 8 feet from the front wall of the house (either the main mass, front addition, or front porch). Front loading driveways shall not exceed 10 feet in width up to where the driveway meets the vertical plane of the front wall or porch of the house. Curb-cuts: Designated Front-Load lots may have a driveway curb-cut onto the street fronting the lot not more than 10 feet in width. Designated Rear-Load lots may have curb-cuts only from the rear alley. No alley curb-cut shall exceed 20’ in width without the approval of the Zoning Administrator. Curb-cuts and driveways shall be designed to emphasize and facilitate the continuation of the sidewalk across the apron. Mechanical, Electrical and Utility Equipment: All mechanical and electrical equipment, including utility boxes of all kinds, shall be located rear of the front of the main building façade and shall be completely screened from view from the street. Lot Layout Variety: Each block face shall incorporate a variety of front setbacks and side setbacks for the main structure. In addition, variation in the architectural styles is required as defined in the chart on page 10. Lastly, a variation in building heights is also required along each block. The intent of these requirements is to create significant variation along each block so as to recreate the house-to-house variation historically present in small towns like Marshall.

NOT TO SCALE

24

Building & Lot Requirements
Lot Layout Diagrams & Standards Single-Family Detached: Front Loaded

NOT TO SCALE

NOT TO SCALE

25

Building & Lot Requirements
Lot Layout Diagrams & Standards Single Family Detached: Rear Loaded

NOT TO SCALE

NOT TO SCALE

26

Building & Lot Requirements
Lot Layout Diagrams and Standards Blocks 12 & 15 (Single-Family Attached)

In blocks 12 & 15 single-family attached units are permitted subject to the following standards:
x x

No more than three units in a row or connected together. Single-Family attached units must be adjacent to single-family attached units on both sides, unless located on a corner. If located on a corner they must be bordered by a single-family lot on one (1) side. Single-Family attached units shall be rear loaded and cannot be front loaded. No more than eight (8) single-family attached units per block or a total of sixteen (16) for the entire development. If single-family attached lots are utilized, they shall be shown on the Code of Development Site Plan. Minimum lot size: Minimum lot widths: End Lot: Interior Lot: Minimum Front Setback: 1,800 square feet. 33 feet 20 feet 10 feet

x

x

x

x x

x x

Minimum side yard setback: End Unit: 7 feet Interior Unit: 0 feet

NOT TO SCALE

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Building & Lot Requirements
Building Design Standards
Architectural Style: Each dwelling shall be designed to adhere to an historical architectural style found in Fauquier County or the broader Virginia Piedmont, adhering to the principles established for that style, to include massing, height, roof-lines, windows, doors, porches and trim details, as set forth in detail in Appendix A, Architectural Styles. Accessory structures shall utilize an architectural style similar to the main dwelling. Front Entry: The main door into the house shall face the primary street and shall be articulated with a porch, portico, awning, lintel, or other architectural feature that makes it easily identifiable as a point of entry. Where a lot fronts on a park rather than a street, the front entry shall face the park. At least 40% of all single family homes shall have front porches. At least 50% of corner lots shall have side porches (or wrap-around front and side porches). Building Height: May range between 1 and 2.5 stories for single family detached, and 1 to 2 stories for accessory structures, provided further that no accessory structure shall exceed the height of the main structure. Houses fronting on John Randolph Kerrick Park at Stephenson’s Hill shall not exceed 2 stories in height or 25 feet as defined on page 21. Building Materials: Building materials shall be limited to those listed under the Table of Building Material Requirements in Appendix B. Consistent Design: Each home shall be designed so that every face of the building is consistent with the selected style, with similar siding materials or veneers utilized on every building face, and similar window size and placement and door and trim elements on all building elevations. This does not preclude the use of different materials on a building projection or foundation, or a change of materials at a chimney or other projection, where historically such a change in materials might be found. Projecting Eaves: No single family home shall have a roof overhang of less than 12” (not including gutters) beyond the plane of the wall, except where the building designer can demonstrate that the building adheres to a particular style that does not include eaves. Architectural Variety: A variety of architectural massing and styles shall be provided along individual block faces within Cannon Ridge to include: Deviations from the Lot Layout and Building Design Standards
Lot Layout Standards: No deviations permitted, except for lot layout variety, see below. Building Design Standards: Architectural Style Deviations may be approved as set forth in Appendix A. Building Design Standards: Building Materials Deviations may be approved as set forth in Appendix B. Building Design Standards: Consistent Design, Projecting Eaves The Zoning Administrator may approve deviations from the Consistent Design and Projecting Eaves standards where he/she determines that the deviation is consistent with the principles of the architectural style to which the building adheres. Lot Layout and Building Design Standards: Variety The Zoning Administrator may approve deviations from both the Lot Layout Variety standard and the Architectural Variety standard in select locations where uniformity is proposed to create a special character or identity for a place in a manner that does not detract from the overall goal of creating a pedestrian oriented community that is traditional in character.

x x x x x

A variety of architectural styles (Appendix A). A variety of heights (in stories) to include at least one 1 to 1 1/2 story home on each block face. A variety of roof configurations, including dormers on some of the homes. A variety of building massing, to include fronts with articulated bays or windows, porches, and shorter side additions to 2 or 2 1/2 story homes. A variety of building materials.

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Part IV

Appendices

29

Architectural Styles
This Code of Development requires that every house be designed to adhere to an historical architectural style found in Fauquier County or the broader Virginia Piedmont in order to create a sense of place for Cannon Ridge with a scale and character that is sympathetic to the regional context. The range of architectural styles allowed includes: Federal, Colonial Revival, Bungalow and American Foursquare. Other historical styles documented to be found repeatedly in Fauquier County or the greater Piedmont may also be included at the discretion of the Zoning Administrator taking into account the advice of the Community Architect. Contemporary housing design will only be allowed on a limited basis, with no more than one such house allowed on any block and only then if it is determined by the County that the design complements rather than conflicts with surrounding buildings and does not undermine the broader principle of creating a community with a character reflective of a traditional Piedmont neighborhood. Examples of acceptable contemporary variation are included at the end of this Appendix A. All houses will generally adhere to the principles established for that style to include massing, height, roof-line, windows, doors, porches and trim details. These principles are grounded in historic precedent. Contemporary interpretations of building elements, such as windows, shall be allowed provided the overall form and massing are consistent with the chosen style, and the house retains an overall architectural character derived from that style. At the time of application for a building and/or zoning permit, the Community Architect shall review architectural elevations and other details sufficient to determine compliance with the Code of Development, including compliance with the stylistic and materials standards and variations set forth in this Appendix and in Appendix B. The Community Architect review shall be required prior to issuance of a zoning permit by the Zoning Administrator.

Appendix A

All sketches, details and dimensions are for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to be exact representations. Alternative designs and details are permitted, provided they adhere to the general characteristics for the particular architectural style identified for the building, and are approved by the Zoning Administrator, taking into account the advice of the Community Architect.

30

APPENDIX A
Federal

FEDERAL
Federal architecture is formal and balanced in design, with classically inspired detailing. Federal Style buildings generally are relatively plain and rectangular, oriented with sidegables, with their ridge lines parallel to the street. Windows aligned horizontally and vertically, are double-hung, with multi-pane sashes. In Federal Style buildings, cornices typically have a modest projection, and the principal ornamentation of the façade is lavished on the door surround, which often features pilasters, full classical entablature, and transom window. Federal houses were most typically built in brick in this area, although some frame examples can also be found. Key Defining Features of the Federal Home:
x x x x

FEDERAL
General Standards: Massing: Rectangular or block form oriented with the long side facing the street. Façade is symmetrical, with three and five bays most common. Chimney placement is usually at either end of the main block of the house. Shifting the chimneys out from the center towards the end walls permitted greater flexibility for interior room configurations. In some high-style houses it is not unusual to see a pair of chimneys at either end of the house.

Formal symmetry, with three and five bay facades most common. Gable roof-line, with center or end chimneys. Central entrance on five-bay facades, but off center on three-bay facades. Modillion entrances with rectangular transoms or elliptical fanlight above doors; with or without sidelights. Double hung windows, usually with 6 to 9 panels per sash, narrow muntins; windows never paired. Modest cornice detailing.

x

Roof: Typically a low pitched side gabled or shallow hipped roof. Dormers not typical, but sometimes found, particularly in larger formal homes. Sometimes parapet walls on gable end.

x

31

APPENDIX A
Federal
Windows: Windows, aligned vertically and horizontally, are double-hung, and were originally glazed with six-over-six panes. Many windows are simply flush with the wall without any decorative lintel, or when present, lintels are simple, usually constructed with a keystone or a segmental arch. Flatjack arch design elements, including swags, garlands, urns and geometric patterns. Double-hung windows have six panes per sash. In three story houses, window openings may get smaller as they go up the façade. For example, the first floor windows might be large paned six-over-six sashes and the top floor might be a three-over-three sash. This stylistic treatment was used to enhance the perception of a building’s height. Several types of ornamental window forms were used as decorative elements in Federal houses including semi-circular windows; Palladian windows; and three-sectioned windows. The windows were originally all shuttered with solid shutters on the first floor and louvers on upper stories. Shutters should be sized and mounted to appear functional.

7’8”

5’6” to 6’2”

5’6” to 6’2”

3’0”

2’ 4”

3’ 0”

2’ 4”

2’ 2”

3’ 0”

2’ 2”

32

5’0”

10”

APPENDIX A
Federal
Porches: Federal homes rarely have full porches. The door is often accentuated with simple pilasters and a broken triangular pediment. In some houses, the entry pediment is carried forward to create an entrance portico. The portico may be rectangular or elliptical and is often supported by groupings of slender, Doric columns. Porch Types

House Porch
Portico Full Three-Fifths

Doors: Doors are typically multi-paneled. The front door is usually centered on the primary façade with a semi-circular or elliptical fanlight window above it, or flanked by sidelights that typically have lead tracery.
12 12 6 1’ 3” 8

1’ 8”

6’ 8”

8’6”

4’0”

1’6”

3’0”

1’6”

2’0” 33

3’0”

2’0”

6’ 8”

3’0”

6’ 8”

1’ 8”

APPENDIX A
Federal

34

APPENDIX A
Colonial Revival

COLONIAL REVIVAL
The Colonial Revival style encompasses a number of architectural traditions, such as English, Dutch, and Spanish colonial influences that were combined during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to create buildings that celebrated Colonial America. Thus Cape Code cottages, gambrel roofed houses, large formal Georgians, Federal townhouses, columned southern mansions, in a wide variety of one, two and two and a half story houses can fall under the Colonial Revival heading, so long as entrances, cornices and windows are outfitted with classical details. Key Defining Features of the Colonial Revival Home:
x x x x
GABLE ROOF

Small to large scaled, simple massing. Symmetrical façade with orderly relationship between windows, doors and building mass. Classical details on doors, windows, rooflines and corners. Prominent front entry; door with decorative pediment supported by pilasters or portico supported by classical columns. Multi-pane windows.
Dormers with Windows

x

Arched Portico with Classical Columns

Soldier Course

Prominent Front Entry

Multi-Pane Windows

COLONIAL REVIVAL COTTAGE
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APPENDIX A
Colonial Revival
General Standards: Massing: The Colonial Revival house is rectangular in form and one to 2.5 stories in height with a sidegabled roof. The façade will feature either three or five bays with a centered door and symmetrically balanced windows. Chimneys are often located at the gable end of the houses. Projections to Colonial Revival houses should be designed as secondary elements that respect the overall massing and scale of the main body of the house. A projection should never be larger or wider than the main mass of the residence. Windows: Colonial Revival windows are symmetrically placed, and frequently occur in pairs. Doublehung windows feature six-over-six, eight-over-eight, nine-over-nine, or twelve-over-twelve window sashes. Multi-pane upper sashes may also occur over a single-light lower sash. The muntins on Colonial Revival windows are typically a thicker (7/8” wide) traditional profile. Brick dwellings typically have a 2 inch brickmold and a soldier course at the head of the window while dwellings with siding have 6 inch flat trim. Some brick homes will feature a jack arch over windows instead of a soldier course. Shutters are typically louvered or paneled, and should be sized and mounted to appear functional.

5’10” to 6’2”

5’10” to 6’2”

3’0”

3’0”

3’0”

Roof: The Colonial Revival house typically has a side-gabled roof ranging in pitch from 7:12 to 12:12. Sometimes a front gabled or hipped roof is used with the same range of pitches. If dormers are incorporated into the roof, they are always gabled and aligned vertically with the windows and central doors. Additions to the main mass of the building should have a low pitched roof that is subordinate to the primary roof line.

Twelve over Twelve Double Hung Window w/ Louvered Shutters

Six over One Double Hung Window w/ Louvered Shutters

Six over Six Double Hung Window w/ Panel Shutters w/ Jack Arch

Eaves. The Colonial Revival typically has an 18 inch boxed eave. Dentilled, modillioned, or bracketed cornices and other classical details are commonly found on roof eaves and gable ends. 12
7 to 10

8” 10”

1’ to 1’6”

36

5’10” to 6’2”

APPENDIX A
Colonial Revival
Porches: The Colonial Revival includes entry porticos, full width front porches and wrap around porches in key areas. Porticos consist of classical columns (10 to 12 inches wide and 9 to 10 feet tall), either smooth or fluted that supported an arch or an entablature over the front entry. Porticos can also be flattened against the house with a broken, segmental or triangular pediment or entablature supported by pilasters (flattened columns). If a railing is included, it is typically wrought iron or wooden square baluster spaced no more than 4 inches on center.
3 to 4 : 12 Pitch Arched Portico Soldier Course Panel Door 6’8” 6’8” 6’8” 1’5” 3’0” 1’5”

Doors: Triangular, segmental and broken pediments over pilasters as well as fanlight and sidelights often flank a six-panel door, which is centered on the façade. When a pediment and pilasters are not used, brick dwellings have a 2 inch brickmold and a soldier course at the head of the door while dwellings with siding have 6 inch straight trim.

12 1’6” 1’5” 3’0” 1’5” 6-8

Columns

3’0”

Porch Types

Portico Arched Portico Triangular Pediment Entabulature Segmental Pediment 37 Entabulature Portico

Full

Three-Fifths

APPENDIX A
Colonial Revival

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APPENDIX A
Bungalow

BUNGALOW
One of the chief principles of Bungalow design was the importance of light and openness. The harmony between dwelling and nature takes the form of wide open porches, wood structural members and generous windows. The Bungalow’s roots in the Arts and Crafts movement accounts for the prevalence of windows as character defining features; as a result, Bungalows may feature an assortment of glass and casement windows, as well as double-hung windows. Key Defining Features of the Bungalow:
x x x x

One-and-a-half story; simple horizontal lines. Low pitched projecting roof rafters and triangular knee braces and a gabled or shed dormer. Prominent low, broad front porch supported by square masonry pedestals with straight or tapered wood posts; occasionally solid brick or stucco supports are found. Multi-paned windows and door glazing in a variety of geometric shapes.

General Standards: Massing: A bungalow is a one or one-and-one-half story home, square or rectangular in plan with a gabled roof and prominent front porch. Projections to the main mass can be sensitively located to the rear of the building or as smaller side wings, and are typically a single story in height. Projections should never be larger or wider than the main mass of the house.

BUNGALOW

39

APPENDIX A
Bungalow
Doors: Bungalows feature a variety of doors that reflect both the Craftsman and Prairie styles. In most cases, wood panel doors with upper glazing are flanked by sidelights and a transom. Glazing is always divided by thick wood muntins into geographic motifs. Brick dwellings typically have a 2 inch brick mold and a soldier course at the head of the door while dwellings with siding have 6 inch straight trim.

1’ 6”

6’ 8”

1’

3’0” - 3’4”

1’

3’0” - 3’4”

6’ 8”

FEATURE WINDOW

FOUR OVER ONE

ONE OVER ONE

Windows: A variety of multi-light double hung and casement windows occur on bungalows, with three-over-one, four-over-one and five-over-one double hung windows are the most common window configurations. Sometimes casement windows that feature small panes divided into various patterns are used. Brick dwellings typically have a 2 inch brickmold and a soldier course at the head of the window while dwellings with siding have 6 inch straight trim. Shutters were not used on the Bungalow.
5’ 10” 5’ 10” 3’ 0” 40

6”

3’ 0”

6”

APPENDIX A
Bungalow
Roof: The Bungalow has a side or front gabled roof, with wide eaves. The pitch of the main roof typically ranges from 6:12 to 8:12 and dominates the bungalows horizontal silhouette. A large single dormer with a gabled or shed roof typically is located on the main roof. An exterior end chimney usually projects through the eaves. The porch roof is slightly shallower with a 3:12 to 5:12 pitch. This shape sometimes varies with two intersecting low-pitched front gables or a hipped or pyramidal roof. Projections should have low-pitched roofs that are subordinate to the primary roof line. Porches: Bungalows typically have full-width front porches supported by a variety of porch supports that are unique to the Craftsman tradition. It is common to find massive brick pedestals with thick tapered wood columns; occasionally the columns will be paired on top of the pier. These piers and columns can also be constructed of brick, stone, concrete or a combination of materials, including stucco. Brick knee-walls capped with concrete coping usually span between the piers. Other variations will feature wood railings with 2 inch square balusters closely spaced together or a panel of shingles. Bungalow porches are typically accessed by concrete steps that match the foundation that sometimes feature flanking brick and concrete sidewalks.

Side Gabled Roof with Gabled Dormer Brick Pier & Stucco Post & Porch Entabulature with Brick Knee Wall Capped with Concrete

Eaves. Triangular knee braces and deep overhanging eaves with exposed beam and rafter tails are Bungalow hallmarks. The predominate type of eave in the Bungalow style is the open eave with exposed rafters tails; eaves are almost never boxed or enclosed.

Brick Piers with Concrete Capping & Single Panel Railing

12 6-8

8”

18” - 24”

Brick Pedestal & Stucco Post with Brick Knee Wall Exposed Rafter Tail and Knee Braces
41

Exposed Rafter Tail

APPENDIX A
Bungalow

42

APPENDIX A
American Foursquare

AMERICAN FOURSQUARE
The American Four-Square began appearing on American Streets around the turn of the twentieth century. This new style promised affordable, utilitarian housing for middle-class families trying to gain the most from a modest lot. Simplistic and practical, American Foursquares are a common housing type in Fauquier County. Key Defining Features:
x x x x

General Standards: Massing: The American Foursquare is characterized by its simple box-like form and low-hipped roof, rather than its style. The standard American Foursquare truly is square in form often measuring 28’ x 28’; 29’ x 29’ or 30’ x 30’. The American Foursquare is always two-stories tall. A window and door composition on the front façade typically consists of two windows (sometimes paired) and a centered or off-centered door on the first floor, two windows (sometimes paired) on the second floor and a centered dormer in the roof. The American Foursquare typically has an exterior end chimney projecting through the eaves. Projections to the basic square mass should be designed as secondary elements or wings that are compatible with the overall massing and scale of the main square mass. A projection should never be larger or wider than the main mass. The most appropriate location for extending the main mass is to the rear of the property to minimize visibility from the street.

Cubical-shaped, two-story house, square in plan and elevation. Hipped or pyramidal hipped roof with hipped, gabled or pedimented dormers on one or more sides of main roof. Deep, full-width or wrap-around porch, one story in height, with significant structural components. Centered front entrance with equal groupings of windows on either side of both stories or off-centered entrance with symmetrical upper story windows. Craftsman or Colonial Revival influence present on doors, windows, porches and eaves.

x

43

APPENDIX A
American Foursquare
Roof: The American Foursquare roof is either hipped or pyramidal hipped with a hipped, gabled or pedimented dormer on one more sides with a pitch ranging from 6:12 to 8:12. The roof is typically accented with a wide eave. Porches: A full-length, one story front porch is a widespread element of the American Foursquare. The porch often extends to one side as either a wrap around porch or as a porte-cochere for parking vehicles. American Foursquare porches are typically accessed by concrete steps that match the foundation with flanking square brick posts. Because most American Foursquares are brick, most porch supports are 12 inch square brick posts of full height. Brick knee-walls capped with concrete coping usually span between the brick posts. Other variations will feature a brick pier with tapered wood posts (10 to 12 inches wide) and wood railings with 2 inch square balusters.

Pyramidal Roof

Hipped Roof

Brick Piers with Knee Wall Capped with Concrete Coping

Tapered Post on Brick Pedestal with Wood Railings

Brick Piers with Wood Railings

Doors: The American Foursquare door is similar to other front doors of the 1920s with rectangular shaped glass and raised wood panels. Sidelights and a transom often accent the front door while allowing more light into the living area. The design of the sidelights and transom will often match that of the door. Brick dwellings typically have a 2 inch brickmold and a soldier course at the head of the door while dwellings with siding have 6 inch straight trim.
2’ 5”

Gabled Dormer

Hipped Dormer

6’ 8”

3’ 0” - 3’ 4”

2’ 44

3’ 0” - 3’ 4”

2’

6’ 8”

APPENDIX A
American Foursquare
Windows: Paired, double-hung wood windows with four-over-one sashes typify the American Foursquare. Other common window sash types include a one-over-one or a six-over-one double-hung window. Sometimes decorative six or eight-over-one windows were used. A Brick dwellings typically have a 2 inch brickmold and a soldier course at the head of the window while dwellings with siding have 6 inch square trim. Shutters were rarely used on the American Foursquare. Window placement reflects the American Foursquare floor plan. For example, sets of double or triple windows, and in some instances a bay window, on a side elevation will denote the first floor living room/dining room or a second floor master bedroom. A small window between floors will light the staircase, while a small second floor window located between larger windows indicates a bathroom or closet.

FOUR OVER ONE

ONE OVER ONE

SIX OVER ONE

EIGHT OVER ONE

5’ 10”

2’

3’ 0”

2’

3’ 0”

5’ 10”

3’ 0”

5’ 10”

6”

3’ 0”

6”

Stylistic Influences: The modest American foursquare design lent itself to changing architectural tastes effortlessly and inexpensively. Typical influences include the Colonial Revival or Craftsman styles:
x x

Colonial Revival: Pedimented gable over a porch entry; Classical columns; Cornice with dentils or modillions; Dormer with a Palladian-style window. Craftsman Influence: Low-pitched roof; Tapered posts.; Wide eaves with exposed rafter tails or knee braces; Large gabled or shed dormers with exposed rafter tails and braces.

45

APPENDIX A
American Foursquare

46

Contemporary Variations

APPENDIX A

CONTEMPORARY VARIATIONS
These representative architect–designed homes exemplify innovative energy-efficient designs sensitive to both the natural and built context. In Cannon Ridge, the builder may elect to build 10% of new styles derived from both local architectural cues and energy efficiency and low impact development principals that determine massing, roofing, solar orientation, wind-power, materials, and building placement on the lot.
Kaplan Thompson Architects uses traditional, simple forms with thoughtfully placed windows and overhangs to take advantage of the views and to create a livable, open and modest plan. The home is constructed with double-thick walls, triple glazed windows, solar tubes on the roof and a well-insulated, radiant slab, including innovative detailing throughout.

Phil–Maraham Architects “created a house with as little environmental impact as possible while maintaining a high level of design and detail.” The building takes cues from the local rural context expressed in the simple forms of barns and farmhouses. The building maximizes energy efficiency by its orientation and simple massing. It is an insulated passive solar house with an open plan that allows southern daylight to enter all living spaces. This Burr and MacCullum pre-fabricated design derives its inspiration from a mill complex. This design represents how exciting new cost-effective forms and styles can be fostered with a broad interpretation of compatibility and of what defines historical precedent.

These Fauquier County industrial, agricultural, and institutional historic building forms (below), as almost entirely functionally designed, are evidence of modern architectural elements already present in the vernacular landscape. Modern and efficient materials and methods of new construction can easily reflect these types of local forms in new styles, rendered compatible by scale, materials, and project layout. Burr and MacCullum’s design derives its inspiration from the nearby Shaker community in New England. This layout resembles the New England farmhouse layout with outbuildings all close to the main house, but this house is an altogether new arrangement of those forms and the types of window openings typically found on the original farmhouses.

Christina Brown, architect, completes work that represents a contemporary interpretation of local vernacular design. This building reflect an interest (and respect) for its context and place, but it also stands as a example of a building in its own place and time. The windows are energy efficient single pane or double panes.. The building includes roof overhangs and the strategic placement of windows to maximize solar energy.
Permission to use these photos in a pattern book insert from these architectural firms was granted to Fauquier County Planning Staff, May and June, 2011.

47

APPENDIX B

Building Materials

Deviations from the Building Material Requirements
The Zoning Administrator may approve deviations from the Building Materials set forth in this section, taking into account the advice of the Community Architect upon a finding that deviations do not change the overall character, quality and purpose of Cannon Ridge but rather enhance the Community. Deviations are also allowed for new technology that duplicates the quality and purpose of the building material requirements if approved by the Zoning Administrator. Deviations from these from these standards shall be outlined in any Code of Development Site Plan.

48

APPENDIX B
Building Materials
Building Walls shall be limited to the following materials: Roofs: x x x Primary roof masses shall be architectural grade fiberglass shingles, slate, wood, cedar and faux slate materials, metal roofs, including standing seam. Secondary roof masses may be clad in galvanized steel, copper, anodized or ESP aluminum. Oversized hip and valley caps are prohibited. Gutters, down spouts, rain chains, when used, shall be made of galvanized steel, copper and anodized or ESP aluminum. Down spouts shall be placed at the corner of the building least visible from nearby streets or integrated into the façade to hide them. Splash blocks shall be made of concrete, brick or gravel. No through roof penetrations for mechanical or electrical devices may be visible from the street, unless painted to match roof color.

x x
x

Wood siding, including Board and Batten (and cedar shingles, where architecturally appropriate for style). Fiber cement siding (such as Hardie-Plank). Stucco (two or three coat over metal lathe on wood or masonry backing). The use of exterior polystyrene sheet board is not allowed. Stucco homes must have the stucco return back to window casing (brick mould is acceptable) unless substantial trim is applied as deemed appropriate by the Zoning Administrator. The window must appear inset into the thickened wall and not flush or proud of the stucco unless in a bay condition. Brick Natural or cultured stone. Concrete masonry units shall not be considered acceptable for exposed applications. Vinyl siding, limited to Premium Grade, and subject to approval of an installed sample by the Zoning Administrator taking into account the advice of the Community Architect. Premium Grade is defined as beaded vinyl siding with no less than a 6.5” exposed lap. It is also defined as having a nominal wall thickness of 0.004”. All right angle corner joints at trim pieces shall be mitered at equal angles, in similar fashion to wood joints. Joints at the base of rakes shall be made similar to the direction of wood joints. “Stair-Step” joint patterns are not permitted.

x

x
x x

Windows: x x x x Wood, aluminum clad wood, or vinyl clad. True divided light or simulated divided light (SDL) sash with muntin profile as appropriate for particular architectural style. The window sash shall be located interior to the centerline of the wall. Window sills shall have a minimum 2” sill horn. Window sills in masonry construction shall project a minimum of 1 inch from the face of the building. Shutters, when used, must be sized to match the openings. Shutter designs shall be in accordance with specific architectural typologies.

Retaining Walls shall have an exterior veneer limited to the following materials: x x x Natural Stone Brick Segmental retaining wall systems may be acceptable provided that they are designed and constructed to appear natural. Samples of material and the design must be reviewed by the Community Architect and approved by the Zoning Administrator.

49

APPENDIX B
Building Materials
Doors: x x x Painted or stained wood, fiberglass or steel with raised panel profiles. Transoms and sidelights shall have true divided lights or simulated divided lights with authentic muntins and mullions. Garage doors shall be wood or aluminum and shall be painted or stained. Non-alley garage doors on front loaded lots or corner lots shall be a maximum of 10’ in width. Lots with alley loaded garages may have larger doors.

Porches, Decks and Balconies x x x x x x Trim x Exterior architectural trim shall be suitable for retaining a painted finish. Stone or cast stone trim details may be used. Porch railings shall be made of wood or composite materials; while porch floors may be wood, composite wood, or masonry; and posts and columns may be wood, masonry, or fiberglass. Glass or screened enclosures are not permitted at frontages. Porch ceilings may be enclosed with painted or stained wood. Exposed joists shall be painted or stained. Stoops shall be made of wood, brick, stone, or concrete. If concrete, a stoop shall have brick, stone or stucco side walls. Metal elements shall be natural colored galvanized steel, anodized or ESP aluminum, marine-grade aluminum, copper, cast iron, or wrought iron. All corner trim shall be 3.5” min. in width and rest on top of the foundation masonry or the water table.

x

Chimneys: Chimneys shall be finished with stucco, stone or brick and shall match the foundation material of the main house. Fences and Garden Walls: Fences shall be made of wood or pressure treated wood and may have brick, stone, or stucco piers. Fences may also be made of wrought iron. Pickets, poles, and boards shall be made of wood, pressure treated wood, cast iron, or wrought iron and painted and stained. Driveways, aprons and parking pads: Driveways and parking pads may be of brick, pavers (to include open pavers), or broom finished concrete. Aprons shall match sidewalk materials. Grass or gravel strips are recommended to break up the monolithic appearance of a driveway. Driveways constructed of any material (including concrete) shall allow the public sidewalk to run continuously without disruption across the apron area. Colors: x x x Building wall shall be one color per material used. Paints for masonry applications shall have a flat finish. All exterior wood siding shall be painted or stained. Trim (balcony and porch posts, rails, window trim, rafter tails etc.) shall be painted to compliment the main color of the building. An accent color, for items such as the front door, balusters, trim, and shutters, may be used subject to Zoning Administrator approval. Garden walls and fences shall be in a range of colors approved for their respective materials and similar to the main house. All house facades visible from Interstate 66 shall be earth tone in color, such as green, tan, brown or gray.

x

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APPENDIX C

Landscaping Requirements
Deviations from the General Landscaping Requirements The Zoning Administrator may approved deviations from the Landscaping Requirements and Plant List set forth in this section upon a finding that deviations do not change the overall character, quality and purpose of the landscaping but rather enhance these elements. Deviations from these standards shall be outlined in any Code of Development Site Plan.

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APPENDIX C
Landscaping
General Standards All plants shall conform to the American Standard for Nursery Stock as published by the American Association of Nurseryman. All landscape materials shall conform with the following minimum size or height (at date of planting) standards: 1. 2. 3. 4. Deciduous Shade Trees and Street Trees Ornamental and Understory Trees Coniferous Trees Evergreen and Deciduous Shrubs 2.5” caliper 6’ height 6’ height 18” spread or height Medium to Large Street Trees Acer rubrum Acer saccharum Betula nigra Fraxinus pennsylvanica Fraxinus americana Ginko biloba Platanus acerifolia Quercus phellos Quercus palustris Tilia cordata Ulmus parvifolia Zelkova serrata Small to Medium Street Trees Cercidiphyllum japonicum Pistacia chinensis Acer buergerianum Koelreutaria panniculata Quercus accutissima Flowering/Ornamental Street Trees Aesculus x carnea Aesculus parvifolia Amelanchier canadensis Cercis canadensis Cercis chinensis Cornus florida Cornus kousa Chionanthus virginicus Halesia tetraptera Lagerstromia indica Prunus yedoensis Prunus serrulata Other Large Trees Permitted Betula nigra Cedrus deodora Celtis occidentalis Platanus occidentalis Liriodendron tulipifera Magnolia grandiflora Juniperus virginiana River Birch (Multi-Trunk) Deodar Cedar Common Hackberry Sycamore Tulip Poplar Southern Magnolia Red Cedar Red Horse Chestnut Bottlebrush Buckeye Serviceberry Eastern Redbud Chinese Redbud Flowering Dogwood Korean Dogwood White Fringetree Carolina Silverbell Crape Myrtle Yoshino Cherry Kwanzan Cherry Katsuratree Chinese Pistache (Male Only) Trident Maple Golden Raintree Sawtooth Oak Red Maple Sugar Maple River Birch (Single Trunk) Green Ash White Ash Ginko (Male Only) ondon Planetree Willow Oak Pin Oak Little leaf linden Lacebark Elm Zelkova

Species of trees, shrubs, grasses and other vegetation shall be representative of indigenous species of existing plant communities in the Piedmont Region. Tree Preservation The preservation of existing trees is important and shall be a fundamental part of any Landscape Plan. The purpose is the preservation of structurally sound, healthy and functional trees and forested areas. Site development shall occur in a manner that limits the extent of land disturbance to the minimum area needed to construct the proposed use. Tree preservation standards shall also minimize the retention of high-risk tree conditions that have the potential to cause personal injury or property damage. The intent of Cannon Ridge is to preserve all trees not necessary for construction of infrastructure associated with the development. Clear cutting of trees in the open space is prohibited and shall be limited to those areas needed for construction of stormwater management facilities and trails and other amenities shown on this plan. For specific preservation of vegetation adjacent to Interstate 66 refer to the proffer statement. For specific preservation of specimen trees see proffer statement. Street Tree Requirements x Street trees are required to be planted along all existing and proposed public streets within Cannon Ridge at an interval of 1 tree per 30 linear feet of right-of-way as shown on the Landscape Plan. x Street trees are required to be planted on both sides of public streets in an even row either adjacent to the right-of-way or in the right-of-way. If street trees are planted within the right-of-way approval from the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) must be secured. If street trees are located outside of the public right-of-way they shall be protected through either an open space or easement agreement and shall be maintained by the homeowner’s association. x Variations in spacing shall be permitted for infrastructure improvements such as, utility lines/easements and driveways, but precedence shall be given to street trees. x Street trees shall be medium to large deciduous trees as found in the species list. x Street trees along each street shall be the same species along each side of the street. The type of tree species may change at intersections along the street. Tree species cannot change mid-block of a street. x A list of recommended street trees is provided to the right. Alley Landscaping Trees and other landscaping shall be planted within or adjacent to all residential alley easements in order to improve the character of the alleys. The amount of landscaping provided will, at a minimum, be equivalent to 1 shade tree plus 1 flowering tree or shrub per lot, but the landscaping does not have to be evenly allocated on each lot; it may be clustered at locations where space is available. Front Yard Landscaping In recognition of the value that landscaping adds to the character of a community, a variety of additional landscaping shall be provided within lots between the front of the house and the sidewalk. The character of this landscaping will vary, depending on the space available, but will predominately be comprised of flowering shrubs, and annual and perennial planters and beds. Shade trees and ornamental trees will also be provided at select locations where space allows. The goal is to create a rich and varied landscape.

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Additional Landscaping Areas
The “Additional Landscaping Areas” shown on the exhibit to the left are required to have additional landscaping to soften and/or buffer the viewshed as it relates to the houses. The purpose of these areas is to mitigate the potential adverse visual affect these areas can have. These areas shall be planted in a way to minimize the view from the street and sidewalk to the backyard of the house with a combination of trees and shrubs, both deciduous and evergreen. The amount and type of screening shall be determined by the Zoning Administrator in consultation with the Community Architect during the Code of Development Site Plan in which these areas are located. If the development is designed in a single phase then the additional landscaping requirements shall be determined at that time. This requirement is in excess of the “Reforestation Buffer” contained in the proffer statement and shall not be construed to meet that requirement unless officially determined to do so by the Zoning Administrator.

APPENDIX C

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