www.smdailyjournal.

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Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 53
SEEKING TRUCE
WORLD PAGE 16
CARDS BEAT
GIANTS 3-1
SPORTS PAGE 11
PERFECT TIME TO
SEED NEW LAWN
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 19
UN SYRIA ENVOY CALLS FOR CEASE-FIRE DURING
A MAJOR MUSLIM HOLIDAY
BRENDAN BARTHOLOMEW/DAILY JOURNAL
A group of Pacifica residents want the city to find alternative plans to Caltrans’Calera Parkway Project,which would
expand Highway 1 from four to six lanes from Sharp Park through Rockaway Beach.
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Lawmakers, consumer advocates and local officials want California
regulators to rescind their appointment of former Sen.George Mitchell to
oversee settlement talks in the 2010 San Bruno pipeline explosion.
By Garance Burke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A group of city officials, con-
sumer advocates and a state law-
maker on Wednesday attacked
California regulators’ decision to
hire former U.S. Sen. George
Mitchell to oversee private settle-
ment talks over a deadly pipeline
explosion, calling the process an
unfair backroom deal.
The California Public Utilities
Commission announced Monday
that Mitchell had been appointed to
help energy regulators and Pacific
Gas & Electric Co. reach a settle-
ment over how much the utility
should pay in connection with the
Officials fight
Sen. Mitchell
appointment
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Supporters say a $199 annual par-
cel tax for five years would provide
much-needed funds for San Bruno
schools while others think the dis-
trict should live within its means
and regain trust before asking the
public for money.
Measure G, a five-year $199
annual parcel tax, will raise an esti-
mated $2 million if two-thirds of
San Bruno voters support it. Parents
rallying behind the measure say the
San Bruno voters to
decide on school tax
Proponents say it will help education while
opponents say district hasn’t earned trust
Former senator hired to oversee PG&E
settlement for San Bruno explosion,fire
By Brendan Bartholomew
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Pacifica residents have launched
an organization to oppose the city’s
plan to widen Highway 1. Pacificans
for Highway 1 Alternatives, or
“PH1A” for short, wants the city to
consider various alternatives to
Caltrans’ Calera Parkway Project,
which would expand Highway 1
from four to six lanes from Sharp
Park through Rockaway Beach.
The $52 million Caltrans project
would add one additional lane in
both directions to a 1.3-mile section
of Highway 1 stretching from south
of Fassler Avenue to north of Reina
Del Mar Avenue. The Pacifica City
Council voted in late June to nomi-
nate the project for Measure A fund-
ing and to include a landscaped
median in the design. Measure A is
a countywide half-cent sales tax that
pays for transportation projects.
If the project moves forward, it
will be the result of more than 20
years worth of citizen complaints
about bumper-to-bumper rush hour
traffic.
The PH1A organization claims
Caltrans is pushing the project
despite local opposition and main-
tains Caltrans has not adequately
investigated alternatives. However,
Caltrans spokeswoman Gidget
Navarro said the agency has been
working closely with the city of
Pacifica and the San Mateo County
Transportation Authority, the organ-
ization that allocates Measure A
money.
That cooperation is described in
the project’s DEIR/EA (Draft
Environmental Impact
Report/Environmental Assessment),
said Navarro, which was developed
to be consistent with all applicable
requirements, including full analys
Residents: Don’t widen Highway 1
Pacifica grapples with ways to ease congestion on city’s main route
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Pacifica police discovered a dead
man in the front yard of a residence
on Dell Road early Wednesday
morning and are considering the
death suspicious as a suspect has
been taken into custody.
San Mateo County Coroner
Robert Foucrault told the Daily
Journal the deceased is Keith
Coffey, 25, a Pacifica resident.
Foucrault said the case will be
investigated as a homicide.
Coffey was fatally beaten, accord-
Man found dead in Pacifica yard
MICHELLE MORALES
Pacifica police are investigating the suspicious death of a man whose body
was found in the front yard of a Dell Road home.
See MITCHELL, Page 18
See TAX, Page 20
See PH1A, Page 20
See COFFEY, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Jean-Claude
Van Damme is 52.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
James D. Watson, Francis Crick and
Maurice Wilkins were honored with the
Nobel Prize for Medicine and
Physiology for determining the double-
helix molecular structure of DNA.
“Slow down and enjoy life.
It’s not only the scenery you
miss by going too fast — you also miss
the sense of where you are going and why.”
— Eddie Cantor, American comedian-singer (1892-1964)
Rock-and-roll
performer Chuck
Berry is 86.
Actor Zac Efron is
25.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A Nepalese youth plays on a swing during Dashain, Hinduism’s biggest religious festival, in Kathmandu.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the lower to
mid 70s. East winds 5 to 10
mph...Becoming south in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the upper 50s.
South winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the upper 60s. South winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. West
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the 60s.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.
Sunday and Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the lower
60s. Lows in the lower 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.04 Big Ben
in first place; No. 06 Whirl Win in second place;
and No.12 Lucky Charms in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:41.55.
(Answers tomorrow)
ARROW TEMPT USEFUL NINETY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: His comments about the wine were —
IN “POUR” TASTE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
YODOZ
ULPEM
TRIBTE
SLUVIA
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
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Print answer here:
1 8 2
13 37 40 46 52 29
Mega number
Oct. 16 Mega Millions
6 11 13 20 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 8 0 3
Daily Four
3 4 4
Daily three evening
In 1685, King Louis XIV signed the Edict of Fontainebleau,
revoking the Edict of Nantes that had established legal tolera-
tion of France’s Protestant population, the Huguenots.
In 1812, during the War of 1812, the British ship HMS Frolic
was captured off the Virginia coast by the crew of the USS
Wasp, which was in turn captured by the HMS Poictiers.
In 1867, the United States took formal possession of Alaska
from Russia.
In 1892, the first long-distance telephone line between New
York and Chicago was officially opened (it could only handle
one call at a time).
In 1912, black boxer Jack Johnson was arrested in Chicago,
accused of violating the Mann Act because of his relationship
with his white girlfriend, Lucille Cameron. (The case collapsed
when Cameron refused to cooperate, but Johnson was later re-
arrested and convicted on the testimony of a former mistress,
Belle Schreiber.)
In 1922, the British Broadcasting Co., Ltd. (later the British
Broadcasting Corp.) was founded.
In 1931, inventor Thomas Alva Edison died in West Orange,
N.J., at age 84.
In 1944, Soviet troops invaded Czechoslovakia during World
War II.
In 1961, the movie musical “West Side Story,” starring Natalie
Wood and Richard Beymer, premiered in New York, the film’s
setting.
In 1969, the federal government banned artificial sweeteners
known as cyclamates because of evidence they caused cancer
in laboratory rats.
Sportscaster Keith Jackson is 84. Actress Dawn Wells is 74.
College and Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Mike Ditka is 73.
Singer-musician Russ Giguere is 69. Actor Joe Morton is 65.
Actress Pam Dawber is 62. Author Terry McMillan is 61. Writer-
producer Chuck Lorre is 60. Gospel singer Vickie Winans is 59.
International Tennis Hall of Famer Martina Navratilova is 56.
Boxer Thomas Hearns is 54. Actress Erin Moran is 52. Jazz
musician Wynton Marsalis is 51. Actor Vincent Spano is 50.
Rock musician Tim Cross is 46. Tennis player Michael Stich
(shteek) is 44. Singer Nonchalant is 39. Actress Joy Bryant is 38.
Man sells McJordan
barbecue sauce for $10,000
BISMARCK, N.D. — A man who
used to own McDonald’s restaurants in
North Dakota is about $10,000 richer
after selling a 20-year-old container of
McJordan barbecue sauce to a buyer in
Chicago.
The sauce was used on McJordan
Burgers, named for basketball icon
Michael Jordan. The promotional item
was sold in limited markets for a short
time in the 1990s, when Jordan led the
Chicago Bulls to six NBA champi-
onships.
Mort Bank, of Bismarck, saved the gal-
lon jug of sauce after selling his
McDonald’s restaurants in Bismarck-
Mandan and Minot in 1996.
“It was in my basement and I would
look at it occasionally,” he told The
Bismarck Tribune. “I thought it would be
worth something someday.”
Bank advertised the sauce on eBay,
saying: “A once in a lifetime chance to
own the rarest of rare Michael Jordan and
McDonald’s collectible!” It sold for
$9,995 Monday night to a buyer from
Chicago whom Bank has not identified.
Bank told the Chicago Tribune that the
buyer was not Jordan himself. Jordan
opened a steakhouse in Chicago last year.
“I’m sure he’s a Bulls or Michael
Jordan fan, and hopefully he’s not going
to put it on his ribs or his burger,” Bank
told KXMB-TV of the buyer. “But it’s up
to him; he can do whatever he wants with
it.”
Bank said he has at least three storage
units full of McDonald’s memorabilia
and other collector’s items that he has
been selling on eBay for three years. He
has sold items to buyers as far away as
China, Japan, Brazil and Europe, though
never for as much money as the sauce
garnered.
“I’m pretty ecstatic,” he told the
Bismarck Tribune. “You never know
what is going to be a hot item.”
Brothers wait years to
claim $5M lottery prize
SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Two brothers
from central New York have claimed a $5
million lottery prize for a scratch-off tick-
et they bought at their parents’ Syracuse
store six years ago, state officials said.
Andy Ashkar, 34, of Camillus, and
Nayel Ashkar, 36, of Cicero, came for-
ward March 1, just 11 days before the top
prize in the “$500,000,000
Extravaganza” scratch-off game would
have expired, New York Lottery said.
Andy Ashkar said he bought the ticket
at his parents’ convenience store in
Syracuse in 2006 and decided to share the
winnings with his brother, officials said.
The agency said the younger brother
said he waited so long to claim his prize
because he was concerned the windfall
could “negatively influence” his life if he
didn’t plan properly before being pub-
licly introduced as the winner. Andy
Ashkar also told lottery officials that he
also didn’t want the windfall to influence
his engagement and subsequent marriage.
Calls to phone numbers listed for the
Ashkar brothers went unanswered
Wednesday morning.
Nayel Ashkar’s wife, Sara, told The
Post-Standard of Syracuse on Tuesday
that news of the winnings was spreading
fast, with family and friends calling to
express their surprise and excitement.
“It’s crazy,” she said. “Hard to believe.
It’s still sinking in.”
The brothers’ mother, Wasa Ashkar,
said her husband, Neyef, sold the win-
ning ticket to Andy at the couple’s Green
Ale Market, but she couldn’t remember
exactly when. She said she and her hus-
band were Palestinians from Jerusalem
who immigrated to the United States
nearly 40 years ago and have owned the
store for 12 years.
“I’m happy. Of course I’m happy,” she
told the Associated Press over the phone
before ending the conversation because
she was busy with customers Wednesday
morning.
Lottery spokeswoman Carolyn
Hapeman said the brothers claimed their
prize at the agency’s Schenectady head-
quarters on March 1. Unlike winning
tickets for games such as Lotto and Mega
Million that expire in a year, tickets for
scratch-off games expire a year after a
game is retired. The Extravaganza game
was retired on March 12, 2011, Hapeman
said.
4 19 25 40 42 3
Mega number
Oct. 17 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Petty theft. A wallet was stolen from an
unlocked vehicle on Jones Court before 8:05
a.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 16.
Traffic hazard. A man chasing a loose
Chihuahua was running in and out of traffic on
Middlefield and Woodside roads before 2:24
p.m. on Monday, Oct. 15.
Disturbance. People were seen throwing
rocks at an apartment building on Roosevelt
Avenue before 10:02 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 14.
Disturbance. A man was seen swinging a
chain during a fight between three males on
Main Street before 1:43 p.m. on Sunday, Oct.
14.
Robbery. A person was assaulted from behind
and had their cellphone stolen at a bar on
Broadway before 12:20 a.m. on Sunday, Oct.
14.
False imprisonment. A woman reported
being held against her will on Arguello Street
before 6:37 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12.
SAN BRUNO
Hit and run. A white construction truck
reportedly hit a gray Mazda in the parking lot
of Lunardi’s Supermarket on the 2800 block of
San Bruno Avenue before 11:22 a.m. Tuesday,
Oct.9.
Burglary. Someone reported their home was
broken into through a window on the 400
block of Mastick Avenue before 9:17 a.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 9.
Police reports
Catching a nap
A commercial fishing captain ran his ves-
sel aground after falling asleep at Rossie
Cove in Princeton before 5:45 a.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 13.
By Ashley Hansen
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Dream it, build it, fly it — it’s a belief by
which all X-Plane homebuilders live and an
idea shared by longtime pilot Dave Morss
who will be speaking about his experience as
an X-Pilot at the Hiller Aviation Museum in
San Carlos Oct. 20.
Morss is recognized as one of aviation’s top
test pilots and holds a variety of certificates.
Morss — whose interest piqued when his
brother began flying — owns Myriad
Research, which he began in 1984 as a way of
helping other homebuilders with their proj-
ects.
“He was 12 years older than I was so when
he was learning to fly I was probably 6 or 7
years old and I remember seeing how focused
it made him,” Morss said. “[He was] doing his
flight planning and it just impressed me seeing
that it was maybe something that I could do.”
“It started out with local homebuilders.”
Morss said of his company. “I was young and
full of [energy] and somebody would ask me
to fly their homebuilt and tell them what I
thought of it. I did that for a few people and
made some recommendations and they said
‘well how could you tell it needed that’ and I
said ‘well it was obvious’ and after doing a
few of these and flying other people’s air-
planes I found I could analyze things that air-
planes needed very easily that other people
didn’t have the ability [to analyze].”
The world of homebuilt aircraft — official-
ly known in the United States as Experimental
Amateur-Built Aircraft — has existed as long
as powered flight, dating back to the Wright
brothers, who were the first homebuilders
since they never relied on a factory to con-
struct their airplanes, according to the
Experimental Aircraft Association.
“Six Bay Area residents will ask me to help
in a year [but] I actually fly airplanes all over
the world so that’s actually just a small part of
what I do,” Morss said. “But in the Bay Area,
usually what I would do is look at the project,
make adjustments and then when the time gets
closer to licensing it I help them do that or I
license it myself. I also then can help them
decide if they can do the test flying or if they
want me to do it. If they want to do it I can
help them design a program and mentor them
through the process.”
Morss will be speaking about his years
working with homebuilt planes at Hiller
Aviation Museum Oct. 20.
“I’ll talk about a lot of different aspects of
X-Plane flying but what I was going to try to
focus on was the electric airplane because
they’re something that’s real new and just
turning on and setting the standards of what
electric airplanes are going to be doing in the
future.”
Morss’ presentation begins at 11 a.m. and
the event is included with admission to the
museum.
For more information on Dave Morss visit
davemorss.com. For more information on the
Hiller Aviation Museum visit www.hiller.org.
X-Pilot lifts dreamto flight
Dave Morss will be speaking about his
experience as an X-Pilot at the Hiller Aviation
Museum in San Carlos Oct. 20.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A woman who claimed she injured her
ankle while working as a custodian for the
Sequoia Union High School District but was
later videotaped tossing her crutches, slipping
on a pair of high heels and engaging in inti-
mate acts in a public park pleaded no contest
yesterday to worker’s compensation fraud.
Modupe Adunni Martin, 29, changed her
plea to avoid trial on 10 counts of insurance
fraud charged after a doctor contacted by
prosecutors concluded that she could not have
engaged in any of the activities if she was
actually injured. She faced approximately
seven years in prison if convicted by a jury but
instead faces up to a year in jail when sen-
tenced Dec. 13.
The settlement is “reasonable” for a theft
case under realignment, said Deputy District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Martin, who was originally scheduled for
trial Monday, was originally charged with a
count for each time she allegedly misrepre-
sented herself to two different doctors
between February and August 2009. Martin,
of Hayward, told her employer she injured
herself on the job and could not walk. She
used crutches to attend doctor appointments
but arose suspicion. Investigators following
her to one appointment taped her entering and
leaving the office on crutches but throwing
them in the back seat of her car and driving to
a nearby gas station where she changed from
flat shoes to heels, Wagstaffe said.
Footage also reportedly showed Martin
walking to a Lathrop park without the crutch-
es and engaging in sexual activity with her
boyfriend.
She remains free from custody on a $40,000
bail bond.
School custodian admits faking ankle injury
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
A single-engine plane that was found
wrecked on a coastal bluff Tuesday after it
departed from Half Moon Bay on Monday
morning was registered to a Florida man,
authorities said.
The single-engine Aeropro CZ A240
crashed near Seal Cove shortly after depart-
ing from the Half Moon Bay Airport for
Marana Regional Airport near Tucson,
Ariz., around 5:50 a.m. Monday, Federal
Aviation Administration spokesman Ian
Gregor said.
The plane is registered to Andrew Hayden,
of Punta Gorda, Fla.
A San Mateo County Coroner’s Office
employee said Wednesday she could not yet
confirm the pilot’s identity.
The pilot’s wife said he intended to make a
fuel stop in Apple Valley, Calif., and she
reported the aircraft missing when it did not
show up on schedule at Marana, according to
Gregor.
After a search effort led by the U.S. Coast
Guard and aided by the Civil Air Patrol and
the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office, a
ground-based search crew found the wreck-
age around noon Tuesday, about 400 yards
west of the Half Moon Bay Airport, Gregor
said.
FAA investigators were at the scene
Tuesday, and National Transportation Safety
Board investigators were expected to arrive
yesterday.
It typically takes the NTSB several months
to determine a cause for these types of acci-
dents, Gregor said.
San Mateo County sheriff’s spokeswoman
Rebecca Rosenblatt said the pilot’s name is
expected to be released Thursday, after
authorities contact his family in Florida.
Rosenblatt said the pilot was alone in the
plane.
Plane found wrecked near Half Moon
Bay registered to man from Florida
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Pacifica man who worked as a security
guard for Electronic Arts was sentenced yes-
terday to nine years prison for sexually
assaulting a woman on the company’s clean-
ing crew three separate times.
Raymond Nygard, 31, pleaded no contest in
July to two charges of forcible oral copulation
and one charge of forcible rape. On
Wednesday, he received a nine-year term after
the victim addressed the court and his securi-
ty guard license was confiscated.
Nygard assaulted the woman on Jan. 9, Jan.
23 and Feb. 6, 2011 when she cleaned
Electronic Arts on Sundays and threatened to
have her fired or deported if she did not comply.
During the last incident, Nygard picked up
the victim, took her into another room and
then assaulted her, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
He was originally charged with kidnapping
as a result, leaving him facing life in prison
before settling his case on the sexual assault
counts.
Nygard had been free on a $75,000 bail
bond but was remanded into custody after
sentencing.
EA guard sentenced for raping cleaner
4
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Joseph M. Santo
Joseph M. Santo, born Dec. 11, 1931, died
Oct. 13, 2012 peacefully after a brave battle
with lung cancer.
Joe was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., son of
Salvatore and Elvira Santo, one of 17 children.
He left home at 16 to follow his passion —
horses — getting work at the stables in
Prospect Park. He went on to become a stee-
plechase jockey, exercise rider, trainer and
jockey’s agent. In the afternoons, he worked as
a pari-mutual clerk, always hoping to “run it
up.”
He was married to Dona Kirkpatrick Santo
for more than 49 years. He will be missed by
his children, Debra Santo Dudley, Susan Santo
(Kevin) Underwood and Matthew Santo. He
leaves three granddaughters and five great-
grandchildren, his siblings, Rudy (Florence)
Santo, Lorraine Santo (Pat) Cotroneo, sister-in-
law Victoria Santo and many nieces and
nephews.
“Truly one of a kind, he was everyone’s
friend, always had a twinkle in his eye and a
grin on his face, was never too busy to lend a
hand. He always said ‘God loves me’ and
everyone left behind does too.”
A memorial service will be held 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 20 at Sneider and Sullivan and
O’Connell’s Funeral Home, 977 S. El Camino
Real, San Mateo.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may
be made to Vitas Hospice of California or the
National Center for Equine Facilitated Therapy
in Woodside.
Nina Stucki Sheridan
Nina Stucki Sheridan died Oct. 2, 2012 at her
home of 35 years in San Carlos.
She was born on March 23, 1953 in Paso
Robles. Nina is survived by her dearest friend
and caregiver Tony Ponce. She was the sister of
Paula Anderson, Sharon Norwood, Annette
Chase, Leah Slagel, Richard and David Stucki.
She was aunt to numerous nieces and nephews.
Nina loved enjoying life to the fullest and
traveling. A graveside service will be held at
Alta Mesa Memorial Park at 695 Arastradero
Road in Palo Alto 2:30 p.m. Oct. 19. A memo-
rial reception will follow the burial at Stanford
Park Hotel, 100 El Camino Read in Menlo Park
at 5 p.m. Funeral arrangements made through
Crippen & Flynn — Woodside Chapel.
In lieu of flowers, family would like dona-
tions made to Pathways Hospice Foundation
(408) 730-1200; Pathways Home & Hospice,
585 N. Mary Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085.
Casual attire requested.
Obituaries
STATE
GOVERNMENT
• Gov. Jerry
Brown appointed Bill
Nack, business man-
ager at the Building
and Construction
Trades Council of
San Mateo County, to the Cow Palace board
of directors. State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San
Francisco/San Mateo, recommend Nack for
appointment to the board whose formal name
is the 1a District Agricultural Association,
Grand National Rodeo.
Nack has been the business manager at the
San Mateo County Trades Council since 1999
and served on the Housing Leadership
Council of San Mateo County from 2002 to
2012, San Mateo Community College
District Bond Oversight Committee from
2002 to 2010, San Mateo County Fair
Board from 2005 to 2007 and the San
Francisco Bay Conservation and
Development Commission from 2001 to
2005.
COUNTY GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors will hold a public hearing to con-
sider certifying a final program environmental
impact report analyzing adoption of a reusable
bag ordinance by the county and 18 cities. If
adopted, the ordinance will be effective in the
unincorporated areas beginning April 22. The
Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 23 in Board Chambers, 400 County
Government Center, Redwood City.
By Bernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
As the hulls of his 72-foot catamaran dug
into the waves on San Francisco Bay and the
boat began to tumble stern over bow,
America’s Cup champion Jimmy Spithill of
Oracle Racing thought only about his mates
and how they’d come out of the scary crash.
Spithill had capsized a 45-foot version of
the fast catamaran before, but the 72-footer
that flipped Tuesday is more powerful and
carries a bigger crew.
“You’re a lot higher in the air,” Spithill told
the Associated Press by phone on
Wednesday. “You’re 70 feet in the air. My
biggest concern is there are a lot more of
your teammates on board. And really, until
you know everyone is accounted for and safe,
that’s probably the worst part of the experi-
ence.
“There were some cuts
and bruises, but it was
pretty amazing everyone
was able to walk away
from it,” Spithill said.
“There were no significant
injuries. It’s very, very for-
tunate to get through that
and to get the boat back in
one piece. Things could
have been a lot worse con-
sidering the conditions last night.”
The boat, being tested for the 34th
America’s Cup next year, carried 11 crew-
men, a designer and two extra sailors. All
were wearing crash helmets and life vests.
“The last thing I heard before we went
over, and it became evident we were going to
go over, was Jimmy yelling out, ‘Make sure
you have an eye on your mates,’ said Jono
MacBeth, a grinder.
America’s Cup champ worried
about mates after boat capsizes
Jimmy Spithill
5
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
6
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The former bookkeeper for a San
Mateo bakery was sentenced yester-
day to two years in jail for pocketing
nearly $400,000 of the company’s
dough to buy gift cards and cover
hefty debts.
Gabriela Figueroa Verdusco, 31,
faced up to three years and eight
months in prison after pleading no
contest to embezzlement and com-
mercial burglary. At the time, she
was told the amount of restitution
she is able to scrape together by that
time would likely play a role in the
final sentence. The amount repaid
was not released but on Wednesday
Verdusco received a term of two
years custody followed by one year
and eight months supervision. The
split sentence is a new option under
state prison realignment.
Verdusco was originally charged
with 14 counts of embezzlement
and second-degree burglary after the
president of Pastry Smart hired an
accountant to audit the records and
found the bookkeeper had taken
$387,631.03 between May 2008 and
April 2011. Verdusco allegedly stole
the money by making false entries
in the books that showed payments
to legitimate vendors but actually
cut the checks to herself. The money
was reportedly spent on high-end
gift cards and payments on exten-
sive financial debt.
Pastry Smart, on South Amphlett
Boulevard, specializes in organic
par-baked and frozen pastries, bread
and confectionery products, accord-
ing to its website.
Verdusco has been free from cus-
tody on her own recognizance.
Former pastry bookkeeper
sentenced for taking dough
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Environmental Protection
Agency awarded $6.5 million in
grants for Bay Area water preserva-
tion including $75,000 to improve fish
passage in San Francisquito Creek.
The grant, in partnership with the
San Mateo County Resource
Conservation District, will remove a
barrier and redesign the creek channel
to reopen access to 40 miles of
upstream spawning habitat for steel-
head.
The improvements are one of 10
projects receiving grants in amounts
ranging from $75,000 to $1.5 million
throughout the San Francisco Bay
watershed.
“San Francisco Bay is a magnifi-
cent treasure that supports more than
500 species of wildlife, including 128
threatened or endangered species,
and the economies of Bay shoreline
communities,” said Jared
Blumenfeld, EPA’s regional adminis-
trator for the Pacific Southwest, in a
prepared statement.
The other projects funded include
restoring wetlands at creek mouths,
including San Francisquito; reducing
sediment loads into the Napa River;
improving water quality and wetlands
at Sonoma Creek Marsh; restoring
creek channel and tidal marsh to the
Crissy Field wetlands; preparation of
Sears Point for tidal marsh restora-
tion; studying mercury in the South
Bay salt ponds; reducing packaging
at fast-food establishments; reducing
household use of toxic pesticides; and
restoring Alameda Creek.
Flavor Flav arrested in
Las Vegas domestic case
LAS VEGAS — Entertainer
Flavor Flav threw his fiancee to the
floor twice and grabbed two knives
as he chased and threatened to kill
her 17-year-old son during an argu-
ment Wednesday at their home in
Las Vegas, a police report states.
The former rapper, hip-hop and
reality TV star, whose legal name is
William Jonathan Drayton Jr., cut his
finger with one of the knives before
police arrived and arrested him about
3:30 a.m., according to the report.
Drayton, 53, was being held on
$23,000 bail at the Clark County jail
pending an initial court appearance
Thursday on a felony charge of
assault with a deadly weapon and a
misdemeanor count of battery-
domestic violence.
EPA funds local creek improvement
By Elliot Spagat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Home foreclosure
activity in California fell to a new
five-year low in the third quarter as
rising prices eased pressure on home-
owners and lenders, a research firm
said Wednesday.
There were 49,026 default notices
on residential properties from July
through September, down 31.2 per-
cent from 71,275 the same period last
year and down 63.8 percent from
135,431 in the first quarter of 2009,
DataQuick said.
It marked California’s lowest num-
ber of default notices since there
were 46,760 in the first quarter of
2007.
The numbers further eased concern
about a flood of distressed sales to
slow or even reverse the housing
market’s recovery. On the flip side,
the dearth of foreclosures has meant
slimmer pickings for buyers seeking
to take advantage of low interest
rates and an improving economy.
“There’s been speculation for
years that the next wave (of foreclo-
sures) is just around the corner, and it
just hasn’t happened,” said Lance
Martin, a Coldwell Banker broker in
Southern California’s Inland Empire.
The median price for new and
existing houses and condominiums
in California reached $287,000 last
month, up 15.3 percent from
$249,000 a year earlier and its high-
est since August 2008, according to
San Diego-based DataQuick.
California foreclosure
notices at five-year low
A research firm says home foreclosure activity in California fell to a new
five-year low in the third quarter amid rising sale prices.
Around the nation
NATION 7
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By David Espo
and Ken Thomas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOUNT VERNON, Iowa — One day
after their contentious, finger-pointing
debate, President Barack Obama and
Republican Mitt Romney vied aggressively
for the support of women voters Wednesday,
as they and their running mates charged
across nearly a half-dozen battleground states
in the close race for the White House with 20
days to run.
Not even Republicans disputed that
Obama’s debate performance was much
stronger than the listless showing two weeks
earlier that helped spark a rise in the polls for
Romney. The two rivals meet one more time,
next Monday in Florida.
The first post-debate polls were divided,
some saying Romney won, others finding
Obama did. At least some of the voters who
asked the questions in the town-hall style
encounter remained uncommitted. “If Gov.
Romney could actually provide the jobs, that
would be a good thing because we really
need them,” said Nina Gonzalez, a 2008
Obama voter, neatly summarizing the uncer-
tainty confronting voters in a slow-growth,
high-unemployment economy.
Obama wore a pink wristband to show sup-
port for Breast Cancer Awareness Month as
he campaigned in Iowa and then Ohio, and
reminded his audience that the first legisla-
tion he signed after becoming president made
it easier for women to take pay grievances to
court.
Romney took no position on that bill when
it passed Congress, and his campaign says he
would not seek its repeal. But Obama chided
him, saying, “That shouldn’t be a complicat-
ed question. Equal pay for equal work.”
He also jabbed at Romney’s remark during
Tuesday night’s debate that as Massachusetts
governor, he received “whole binders full of
women” after saying he wanted to appoint
more of them to his administration. “We
don’t have to collect a bunch of binders to
find qualified, talented women,” he said.
“I’ve got two daughters and I don’t want
them paid less for the same job as a man,”
Obama said at an appearance in Athens,
Ohio, later Wednesday.
Obama spoke to a crowd of about 14,000
students and supporters at Ohio University,
imploring them to vote early. “I want your
vote. I am not too proud to beg. I want you to
vote,” he said.
Romney’s campaign launched a new televi-
sion commercial that seemed designed to
take the edge ever so slightly off his opposi-
tion to abortion — another example of his
October move toward the middle — while
urging women voters to keep pocketbook
issues uppermost in their minds when they
cast their ballots.
“In fact he thinks abortion should be an
option in cases of rape, incest or to save a
mother’s life,” says a woman in the new ad.
Pivoting quickly to economic matters, she
adds, “But I’m more concerned about the
debt our children will be left with. I voted for
President Obama last time, but we just can’t
afford four more years.”
That dovetailed with Romney’s personal
pitch to an audience in Chesapeake, Va.
“This president has failed American’s
women. They’ve suffered in terms of getting
jobs,” he declared, saying that 3.6 million
more of them are in poverty now than when
Obama took office.
Obama, Romney seek support from women after debate
President Barack Obama on Wednesday ridiculed challenger Mitt Romney’s debate description
of receiving ‘binders full of women,’ while the GOP nominee said the incumbent’s policies
have failed female voters.
NATION 8
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Tom Hays and Collen Long
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — A Bangladeshi
man who came to the United States
to wage jihad was arrested in an
elaborate FBI sting on Wednesday
after attempting to blow up a fake
car bomb outside the Federal
Reserve building in Manhattan,
authorities said.
Before trying to carry out the
alleged terrorism plot, Quazi
Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis
went to a warehouse to help assem-
ble a 1,000-pound bomb using inert
material, according to a criminal
complaint. He also asked an under-
cover agent to videotape him say-
ing, “We will not stop until we
attain victory or martyrdom,” the
complaint said.
Agents grabbed the 21-year-old
Nafis — armed with a cellphone he
believed was rigged as a detonator
— after he made several attempts to
blow up the bomb inside a vehicle
parked next to the Federal Reserve,
the complaint said.
Authorities emphasized that the
plot never posed an actual risk.
However, they claimed the case
demonstrated the value of using
sting operations to neutralize young
extremists eager to harm
Americans.
“Attempting to destroy a land-
mark building and kill or maim
untold numbers of innocent
bystanders is about as serious as the
imagination can conjure,” said
Mary Galligan, acting head of the
FBI’s New York office. “The defen-
dant faces appropriately severe con-
sequences.”
Nafis appeared in federal court in
Brooklyn to face charges of
attempting to use a weapon of mass
destruction and attempting to pro-
vide material support to al-Qaida.
Wearing a brown T-shirt and black
jeans, he was ordered held without
bail and did not enter a plea. His
defense attorney had no comment
outside court.
The defendant had sought assur-
ances from an undercover agent
posing as an al-Qaida contact that
the terrorist group would support
the operation.
Man held in plot to blow up Federal Reserve
By Pete Yost
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Violent
crimes unexpectedly jumped 18 per-
cent last year, the first rise in nearly
20 years, and property crimes rose
for first time in a decade. But aca-
demic experts said the new govern-
ment data fall short of signaling a
reversal of the long decline in crime.
The U.S. Bureau of Justice
Statistics reported Wednesday that
the increase in the number of violent
crimes was the result of an upward
swing in simple assaults, which rose
22 percent, from 4 million in 2010
to 5 million last year. The incidence
of rape, sexual assault and robbery
remained largely unchanged, as did
serious violent crime involving
weapons or injury.
Property crimes were up 11 per-
cent in 2011, from 15.4 million in
2010 to 17 million, according to the
bureau’s annual national crime vic-
timization survey. Household bur-
glaries rose 14 percent, from 3.2
million to 3.6 million. The number
of thefts jumped by 10 percent, from
11.6 million to 12.8 million.
The statistics bureau said the per-
centage increases last year were so
large primarily because the 2011
crime totals were compared to his-
torically low levels of crime in
2010. Violent crime has fallen by 65
percent since 1993, from 16.8 mil-
lion to 5.8 million last year.
Report: Violent crimes rose 18 percent in 2011
REUTERS
A courtroom sketch shows Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis,
second right, being arraigned in the United States District Court of the
Eastern District of New York .
Meningitis outbreak
deaths rise to 19
NEW YORK — Four more peo-
ple have died in the national menin-
gitis outbreak, bringing the death
toll to 19, health officials said
Wednesday.
The deaths are among the 247
people in 15 states sickened in the
outbreak. They all received shots of
an apparently contaminated steroid
medication made by a
Massachusetts specialty pharmacy.
Most of the patients contracted a
rare fungal form of meningitis, after
getting the shots for back pain over
the past few months. Two developed
infections from joint injections.
Of the latest deaths, two were in
Tennessee and one each was report-
ed in Florida and in Virginia, the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention reported Wednesday.
That brings deaths to eight in
Tennessee; three in Florida and
Michigan, two in Indiana and
Virginia, and one in Maryland.
Around the nation
OPINION 9
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Farewell to Bean Street Coffee
Editor,
I was sad to learn that Bean Street
Coffee is closing on Oct. 21. This
locally-owned coffee shop has been a
fixture on B Street in downtown San
Mateo for over 10 years. It’s always
been a friendly, welcoming place to
have a cup of coffee, meet friends or
see the work of local artists.
Sadly, the owners haven’t been able
to renew their lease or find a compara-
ble lease at a decent rate downtown, so
they’re closing up shop.
It’s too bad to see another locally-
owned shop go out of business. Unlike
the big chains, Bean Street felt like a
family affair without any of the usual
corporate cookie-cutter nonsense. It
also had great free Wi-Fi.
Perhaps San Mateo needs to take a
look at its business development poli-
cies to ensure a vibrant future for
locally-owned businesses like this one
was.
Dylan Tweney
San Mateo
Who’s entitled?
Editor,
In response to the line “besides
insulting half of the country, Romney
adds insult to injury by speaking at a
$50,000 a plate fundraiser where the
audience includes some of the most
entitled people in America” (Sue
Lempert’s column “Who’s entitled?” in
the Oct. 8 edition of the Daily
Journal), here’s a fact from ABC News
Minneapolis and Chicago, June 1,
2012: Obama attends $50,000 per per-
son fundraiser.
Dear Ms. Lempert, you insult con-
servatives, but liberals insult the other
half of America with no mention.
Claren Herbert
Hillsborough
Hike sales tax:
Measure A and others
Editor,
These tax proponents, Measure A and
others on the ballots, are out of their
minds. Government is here to provide
basic and essential services and should
set their base expense line accordingly.
It does not include supplying golden
handrails in public toilets. And have
you ever thought how much of that
money is going to disappear in salaries
and benefits, no matter what the law
says and how it is written? You remem-
ber the deficits we have? We must flush
this from the taxation and budget sys-
tem through austerity measures and
reduction of expenses. I would not trust
the politicians with my 15-year-old
rusted bike. Would you?
Harry Roussard
Foster City
Romney’s mistake
Editor,
I just read Sue Lempert’s column
“Who’s entitled?” in the Oct. 8 edition
of the Daily Journal and she has really
given a very good reason for not voting
for Mitt Romney. As she says, Romney
really did insult half the country by his
statement that “47 percent of
Americans feel entitled.” Who does he
think will vote for him when he belit-
tles almost half the American citizens?
An old statement comes to mind:
“There’s many a slip twixt the cup and
the lip.” And he did it!
Julia M. Bath
San Carlos
Train noise
Editor,
Who would spend top dollars to live
in an apartment next to railroad tracks,
especially with the increased number of
trains planned plus adding on the new
route of the future high-speed rail?
(“Neighbors balk at San Carlos’ Transit
Village review” in the Oct. 16 edition
of the Daily Journal).
I remember visiting folks living next
to an “El” train in New York City. One
couldn’t hear our conversation when a
train passed. It not only roared, but also
shook the building. At that time when I
lived one block away from the elevated
“A” train in Manhattan, I slept soundly
only after moving away to a much qui-
eter street.
Even now the night trains a half-
dozen blocks away can be heard at my
home here in San Carlos.
Living next to the tracks would
become unbearable during the day,
later becoming a nightmare. Wearing
Bose earphones 24/7 would not be a
solution.
Recent meetings over the proposed
Transit Village project seem to be more
concerned with increased noise that
could be generated by the project itself.
I have not yet heard concerns voiced
over the issue of noise duress that
would be generated by existing and
future trains themselves upon all the
new residents of this proposal now
under consideration.
Jerry Emanuel
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
— Chicago Sun-Times
T
he Oct. 16 debate was
President Barack Obama’s to
win.
Or lose.
After a performance in the first
debate that was universally panned,
there were just two possible outcomes
for Obama: further damage to his cam-
paign or the beginning of a recovery.
It was a reset for Obama.
The president came out strong, with a
powerful and detailed vision for the
future. He spoke clearly and forcefully
to a room full of 82 undecided voters in
New York and the nation.
From the start, Obama was in com-
mand, putting Gov. Mitt Romney on the
defensive, calling out Romney’s mis-
characterizations of the governor’s
long-standing policies and revealing the
hollowness of Romney’s tax plan.
Unlike in the first debate, Obama
refused to let Romney’s shifting state-
ments about his tax plan, about coal,
about the federal government’s rescue
of the auto industry stand unchallenged.
Two weeks ago, we urged voters to
look past style and focus on substance
in these presidential debates. That was
before the first debate when Obama
won on substance but Romney clearly
won the debate. We now see the power
of style.
Romney emerged the winner because
he appeared to embody the qualities
you want in a president — decisive-
ness, energy and toughness. He exuded
confidence, telling voters he’s the guy
to follow.
In contrast, Obama was listless and
didn’t fight back, reinforcing a nagging
fear that he’s letting the Republicans in
Congress bully him and that he lacks a
plan for the next four years.
On Oct. 16, Obama turned that
around.
It wasn’t exactly a do-over but it was
certainly a restart.
The second presidential debate
Bean Street Coffee
I
will miss my coffee. Come Monday, Bean Street Coffee
in downtown San Mateo will shut its doors indefinitely,
ending more than a decade of outstanding joe and even
better camaraderie. As anyone who’s had the pleasure of a
visit knows, the independent coffee shop on B Street was part
coffee purveyor, part snarky Algonquin round table, part warm
Cheers bar atmosphere and part everything in between.
I don’t remember really meeting
owners Ken and Riyad Khoury so
much as feeling like I always knew
them and noticing they seemed to
know everybody else, too. The
small back coffee bar at the back of
the narrow shop was the domain of
the regulars and the servers who
didn’t even need ask what they
wanted to order. Here is where I
often kick-started my morning —
or sometimes, other parts of the
day — with a strong dose of
Organic Joe Black and culled pub-
lic feedback on whatever nonsense
filled this column space that week. There I had the best zuc-
chini bread ever (thanks Bob!) and began an ongoing Words
With Friends battle of wits (You can’t always win, Michael!).
I received advice on keeping bruises at bay from one cus-
tomer, picked apart Giants games with another and always
looked forward to October when rows of pumpkin bars join
the other sweet treats for sale.
Here dogs like sweet Mollie offered her ears up for a
scratch or my own rascally puppies learned the joys of a
madeleine courtesy of Ken. Animals and kids were always
welcome, despite the ever-present comic strip proclaiming that
unaccompanied minors would be given an espresso and a
puppy.
The cartoon on the register is far from the only bit of color
in the shop. The long wall always showcased local artwork
and boasted framed articles about the business, particularly its
unique offering of kopi lowak. For those who don’t know
about the pricey brew, kopi lowak is made from beans previ-
ously digested by catlike creatures. Not my personal favorite,
although there might be a bit of cachet in saying one’s tried it,
but certainly something you can’t get at any of the chain cof-
fee shops.
But caffeine aside, there are several other things I and every
other Bean Street junkie won’t be able to get with our venti or
grande whatever elsewhere. Has Starbucks ever hosted a wed-
ding for two faithful patrons? Did Pete’s ever throw after-
hours gatherings for patrons, complete with homemade good-
ies and revelry? How many Blue Bottle or Philz employees
visit former customers after age and fading mental acuity
make it impossible for them to show up?
Once as I sat on a barstool, a woman came in to visit the
spot where her daughter first met her then-fiancee and was
greeted with a hug and wishes by Ken. This came just a week
after the shop hosted a wedding. Another time, a customer —
actually, make that friend as they all eventually become —
came in with an old espresso maker. Ken offered to contact
somebody who would whip it back into order. Sometimes cus-
tomers showed up before the store even opened in the morn-
ing.
Bean Street is just is that kind of place.
Last November, the coffee shop was abuzz with its mention
in the “missed connections” section of Craigslist — “You are
the gray-haired man in Bean Street Coffee most mornings.
You ride your bike to and from. Just thought you should know
you’re incredibly sexy!”
In a space where everybody seems to know everybody,
news and amateur sleuthing traveled quick that somebody in
the proverbial family had a secret admirer.
Like I said, Bean Street was — and for at least the next few
days until Sunday, is — a special place whose absence will be
sorely missed. As the story goes, texted around the faithful
coffee klatch, its lease is not being renewed and while it had
hoped to eventually move into the vacant space next door,
those negotiations fell through.
The question now is where to go. Ken also owns the Castro
Coffee Company in San Francisco but that’s a bit of a hike for
a midday pick-me-up.
Since the Daily Journal’s move from B Street to offices sev-
eral blocks away, my visits have become more sporadic
frankly but that doesn’t mean I won’t feel like a cheater if I go
anywhere else now.
I’ve tried before, out of convenience and desperation, but
have twice been caught as I snuck by Bean Street with a tell-
tale cup in hand. “You went to Starbucks!” came the knowing
cry from inside the shop, as my cheeks burned with guilt. You
never want to tangle with the source of one’s addiction.
With Bean Street absent, I may frankly slip back to my less-
faithful ways. But mark my words, a chain can have my busi-
ness but it will never have my heart!
So as Bean Street prepares to steam its last froth and top off
its last espresso, a humble thank you doesn’t feel adequate.
I will miss my coffee but more significantly I will miss
everything — and everyone — that came with it.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every Tuesday
and Thursday. She can be reached by email: michelle@smdai-
lyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do
you think of this column? Send a letter to the editor:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
Other voices
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those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,557.00 +0.04% 10-Yr Bond 1.81 +5.29%
Nasdaq3,104.12 +0.10% Oil (per barrel) 91.989998
S&P 500 1,460.91 +0.41% Gold 1,751.40 By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — A surprisingly strong
housing report helped push the stock
market mostly higher Wednesday, while
weak earnings reports from Intel and
IBM weighed on the Dow Jones indus-
trial average.
Even though the two tech giants disap-
pointed, overall earnings results have
come in much better than some investors
had feared, said Dan Veru, chief invest-
ment officer at Palisade Capital
Management in Fort Lee, N.J.
“Everyone is breathing a sigh of relief
that things aren’t all that bad,” Veru said.
“That’s what you see happening now.”
The Dow edged up 5.22 points to close
at 13,557, barely managing its fourth
straight day of gains. The broader
Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained
5.99 points to 1,460.91.
Better results from Mattel, Goldman
Sachs, and Johnson & Johnson shot the
stock market higher Tuesday. For the
week, the Dow is up 1.7 percent and the
S&P 500 is up 2.3 percent.
Heading into this earnings season,
FedEx, Caterpillar and other global
heavyweights had warned investors that
China’s slowing economy and Europe’s
ongoing debt crisis would weigh on
quarterly profits.
Analysts still expect that third-quarter
earnings for companies in the S&P 500
will shrink for the first time since 2009.
IBM reported sales late Tuesday that
missed Wall Street’s expectations. On a
call with analysts, IBM’s chief financial
officer said the company faced “more
challenging” market conditions in
September, the final month of the quar-
ter, as cautious customers and a weaken-
ing euro undercut its results. IBM’s
stock sank $10.37 to $200.63.
Without IBM’s drop, the Dow would
have been 79 points higher. Stocks with
higher prices carry more weight in the
average of 30 large companies. Every
move of $1 in any Dow stock is equiva-
lent to moving the Dow average 7.68
points.
Intel warned that sales of personal
computers will likely remain weak dur-
ing the holiday season this year. The
chip-maker cut its revenue estimates for
the year-end quarter when it reported
results late Tuesday. Intel’s stock fell 56
cents to $21.79.
The Commerce Department said
Wednesday that builders broke ground
on building new single-family houses
and apartments at the fastest pace since
July 2008.
Market edges up
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily
Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange and
Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Quest Diagnostics Inc., down $3.62 at $59.75
Third-quarter earnings slipped 5 percent as
restructuring costs and a drop in clinical testing
revenue hurt the medical laboratory’s
performance.
Dean Foods Co., up $1.92 at $16.96
The food maker has filed with regulators for an
initial public offering of its WhiteWave Foods unit.
St. Jude Medical Inc., down $2.09 at $40.85
CEO Dan Starks said during an earnings conference
call that the medical device maker could get a letter
from the FDA related to its manufacturing facilities
in California.
PulteGroup Inc., up 88 cents at $17.44
The homebuilder’s shares hit an all-time high
following a report from the Commerce
Department showing a surprisingly large surge in
construction starts.
NASDAQ
International Business Machines Corp., down
$10.37 at $200.63
The technology company reported disappointing
third-quarter revenue and suggested demand in
key markets may be slowing.
Intel Corp., down 56 cents at $21.79
The chipmaker said the usual bounce in sales due
to the holiday season is likely to be cut in half this
year due to a weak global economy.
Cree Inc., up $2.73 at $28.92
The maker of light-emitting diode products
reported a profit increase last quarter, breaking a
four-quarter stretch of year-over-year profit losses.
Apollo Group Inc., down $6.09 at $21.40
Fourth-quarter net income tumbled 60 percent,
hurt by higher costs and declining enrollment at
the University of Phoenix. Apollo will close 115
locations.
Big movers
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — EBay’s third-quarter
net income grew 22 percent, helped by
higher revenue at its PayPal payments
service and the marketplaces business
that includes eBay.com.
The results were roughly within expec-
tations, with revenue a little light and
earnings a tad higher than what Wall
Street analysts had predicted. EBay Inc.
also raised its full-year guidance slightly.
The online commerce company said
Wednesday that it earned $597 million,
or 45 cents per share, in the July-
September period. That’s up from $491
million, or 37 cents per share, a year ear-
lier.
Revenue grew 15 percent to $3.4 bil-
lion from $2.97 billion.
Adjusted earnings were 55 cents per
share in the latest quarter, slightly ahead
of Wall Street’s expectations.
Analysts surveyed by FactSet were
expecting earnings of 54 cents per share
on revenue of $3.41 billion.
“We had a great third quarter across
our company, with Marketplaces and
PayPal accelerating customer growth,”
CEO John Donahoe said in a statement.
“Mobile continues to be a game changer
for us, and we continue to be a clear
leader in mobile commerce and pay-
ments.”
EBay is working to take advantage of
the increasing number of people who use
their smartphones to shop and pay for
things.
EBay posts higher 3Q earnings, revenue
Google opens window into secretive data centers
SAN FRANCISCO — Google is opening a virtual window
into the secretive data centers where an intricate maze of
computers process Internet search requests, show YouTube
video clips and distribute email for millions of people.
The unprecedented peek is being provided through a new
website unveiled Wednesday. The site features photos from
inside some of the eight data centers that Google Inc. already
has running in the U.S., Finland and Belgium. Google is also
building data centers in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and
Chile.
Virtual tours of a North Carolina data center also will be
available through Google’s “Street View” service, which is
usually used to view photos of neighborhoods around the
world.
The photographic access to Google’s data centers coincides
with the publication of a Wired magazine article about how
the company builds and operates them. The article is written
by Steven Levy, a journalist who won Google’s trust while
writing “In The Plex,” a book published last year about the
company’s philosophy and evolution.
DreamWorks Animation
SKG founders donate $90M
LOS ANGELES — The founders of the studio behind
“Shrek,” “Madagascar” and “Kung Fu Panda” are donating
$90 million to a Hollywood charity that offers support to sen-
iors and health services for members of the entertainment
industry.
Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen,
whose last names represent the “SKG” in DreamWorks
Animation SKG Inc., said Tuesday they are donating $30
million each to the Motion Picture and Television Fund.
The fund kicked off a campaign in February to raise $350
million over three years.
Other notable donors include actor Kirk Douglas and his
wife Anne, who pledged $20 million, and Rupert Murdoch’s
News Corp., which pledged $20 million.
Business briefs
<< Armstrong’s world crumbling, page 13
• NHL, players encouraged by progress, page 13
Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012
YANKEES STAY ALIVE: GAME 4 OF THE ALCS IS RAINED OUT WITH DETROIT HOLDING A 3-0 SERIES LEAD >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Serra has a good boys’ water polo team. It
really does. The Padres managed to score nine
times against a Sacred Heart Prep team that
came into the match allowing an average of
5.8 goals a match.
Sacred Heart Prep, however, has a great
water polo team and it was all on display in a
17-9 win over the host Padres Wednesday
evening.
“They’re better. They’re just better,” said
Serra coach Bob Greene of the Gators. “I
thought we played well. This was one of our
better games against these guys in a while.
“I think [the Gators] are the best team in
Northern California.”
Sacred Heart Prep (5-0 WCAL) wasted lit-
tle time in jumping out to a 2-0 lead less than
two minutes into the match as the Gators
scored six times on seven shots in the first
quarter and the last shot shouldn’t even really
count considering it was a shot by the goal-
tender as time expired in the first period.
They barely cooled off in the second period,
scoring four time on eight shots. In fact,
Sacred Heart Prep rarely missed, as far as
water polo goes. Any time one has to figure
out a shooting percentage for a water polo
team, that team is on fire.
The Gators definitely were as their 16 goals
came on 29 shots, which is good for a shoot-
ing percentage of 55 percent.
“It was a very good shooting night and they
have a very good goalkeeper,” said Sacred
Heart Prep coach Brian Kreutzkamp. “Lately
we’ve been shooting ourselves in the foot,
Sacred Heart Prep too much for Serra
REUTERS
Giants starter Matt Cain gave up three runs on six hits — including a two-run homer to Matt
Carpenter —in 6 2/3 innings of work in taking the loss in Game 3 of the NLCS.
By Jim Salter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS — The San Francisco Giants
had every opportunity to grab control of the
NL championship series Wednesday.
The NL West champions had nine hits and
five walks but stranded 11 runners during a 3-
1 loss to St. Louis that gave the Cardinals a 2-
1 lead in the best-of-seven series.
The Cardinals were as opportunistic as the
Giants were wasteful in a game delayed 3 1/2
hours by rain. St. Louis scored its three runs
on six hits and left only five runners on base
in beating San Francisco ace Matt Cain.
Cardinals starter Kyle Lohse was unusually
wild, walking a season-high five (one inten-
tionally) and allowing seven hits while throw-
ing 108 pitches over 5 2-3 innings. But he got
the outs he needed as San Francisco went 0
for 7 with runners in scoring position, its lone
run coming on Pablo Sandoval’s third-inning
groundout. By contrast, St. Louis was 2 for 4
with runners in scoring position.
Inning after inning, the Giants had opportu-
nities. Six times they put at least two hitters
on base in an inning.
“We had our chances,” manager Bruce
Bochy said. “We left too many on base.”
Angel Pagan singled leading off the third
and Marco Scutaro followed with a double.
But after Sandoval’s RBI grounder and an
intentional walk to Buster Posey, Hunter
Pence hit into a double play.
The Giants had runners on second and third
with two outs in the fourth, but Pagan flied out
to center. Pagan failed to come through again
with two on and two outs in the sixth, ground-
ing into a forceout.
Sandoval one-hopped the left-field wall
with one out in the seventh, but Matt
Holliday’s strong throw held him to a single.
That was a big play because Posey followed
with a single. But reliever Mitchell Boggs
came in to strike out Pence swinging and
Brandon Belt looking.
Pence was perhaps the biggest rally-stopper
for the Giants’ offense, stranding six runners.
“I’m the goat tonight. I just didn’t get the
job done,” he said.
Giants’ offense sputters
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Last October, the San
Francisco 49ers were all alone in first place and
already on their way to winning the NFC West
title in commanding fashion in coach Jim
Harbaugh’s first season.
That’s hardly the case this year as they prepare
for their division opener at home Thursday night
against the Seattle Seahawks: There’s a three-
way tie at the top among 4-
2 teams Arizona, San
Francisco and Seattle.
“Everybody in our divi-
sion got better,” 49ers run-
ning back Frank Gore said.
“That’s OK, we’re all right
with that. We like it like
that. We like it tough. We’re
tough enough to handle it.”
After riding high for two weeks after consec-
utive blowout victories against the New York
Jets and Buffalo Bills, the 49ers had little time to
figure out all that went wrong in a 26-3 loss
Sunday to the reigning Super Bowl champion
Giants at Candlestick Park.
“You’ve just got to go,” Harbaugh said.
“You’ve got to go right away.”
Seattle fullback Michael Robinson describes
it this way: “Go get in a car accident and then try
to play two days later. That’s how it feels.”
These teams — the last two division winners
— faced off in Weeks 1 and 16 last year, with the
49ers eliminating the Seahawks from postseason
contention with a 19-17 road win on Dec. 24.
That was the 49ers’ first win in Seattle since
2008.
And Harbaugh certainly has had his way
against Seattle coach Pete Carroll of late, win-
ning the last four meetings dating back to that
surprising 55-21 rout by No. 25 Stanford against
Seahawks visit 49ers in key NFC West matchup
T
wo local fighters — “Mighty”
Melissa McMorrow and Joe “The
Punisher” Gumina — will both be
back in the ring this weekend. McMorrow (7-3-
3) will take on Puerto Rico’s Yahaira Martinez
(7-3, 4 KOs) Friday night at the Kissimmee,
Fla. Civic Center, while Gumina (3-1, 2 KOs)
will face San Francisco’s Payton Boyea (0-2)
Saturday night at Thunder Valley Casino Resort
outside of Sacramento.
This is McMorrow’s first fight since captur-
ing the WBA and WBO world flyweight title in
May when she went to Germany and earned a
majority decision over Susi Kentikian, her first
professional loss after 29 straight wins. Two of
the judges had
McMorrow ahead 96-
94, while the third had
the fight even at 95-95.
Martinez won her
first five fights, but has
lost three of her last
five, including a unani-
mous decision loss to
Carina Moreno.
While McMorrow is
at the top of her game,
Martinez could show
some considerable ring
rust considering this is
her first fight in four years. Her loss to Moreno
came in August 2008.
Eddie Croft, McMorrow trainer/manager and
owner of B Street Boxing in San Mateo, said
this fight came about in the last few weeks after
a couple fits and starts getting McMorrow back
in the ring. She was originally supposed to have
a rematch with Kentikian, but that fell through.
Once he secured a spot on this card in Florida,
he scrambled to get an opponent. He couldn’t
reach an agreement with another potential
opponent before he finally secured Martinez as
McMorrow’s first title defense.
The promoter with which Croft and
McMorrow have been working asked if
McMorrow was ready to go on such short
notice.
Back in
the ring
See LOUNGE, Page 14
See 49ERS, Page 15
Frank Gore
“They’re better.They’re just better. … I think
[the Gators] are the best team in Northern California.”
— Bob Greene, Serra coach on the SHP water polo team
See POLO, Page 14
See GIANTS, Page 15
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Linebacker Aaron Curry has
returned to practice with the Oakland Raiders
for the first time since May after dealing with
nagging knee problems in recent months.
Curry began the season on the physically
unable to perform list and was unable to prac-
tice for the first six weeks. He made his first
appearance on the field with his team on
Wednesday, starting a three-week window for
Oakland to decide whether to activate him,
release him or place him on season-ending
injured reserve.
Curry is working at all three linebacker spots
for now after playing mostly on the weakside
last season in his first year with the Raiders.
“He looked good,” coach
Dennis Allen said. “He
moved around well. I think
the key is to see how he
responds tomorrow and
we’ll continue to monitor
him as we go through the
week.”
Curry last practiced with
the team at OTAs in mid-
May. He was shut down
later in the offseason program and wasn’t
ready at the start of training camp. Curry told
CSN California during training camp that he
underwent stem-cell treatments on both knees
using bone marrow from his hips this summer.
Curry, the fourth overall pick by Seattle in
2009, was acquired by Oakland in a midseason
trade last year for a seventh-round pick in 2012
and a conditional fifth-rounder in 2013. He
played in 11 games, starting nine, for the
Raiders and had 32 solo tackles, three passes
defensed and two fumble recoveries.
He was expected to start at weakside line-
backer but was never healthy enough to prac-
tice. Now the Raiders aren’t sure where he will
be used if he is activated.
“We’ll cross that bridge when we come to
it,” Allen said. “That’s not a decision that we
have to make right now. I think right now the
biggest thing is to see where he’s at physically,
see how he responds to a couple of days of
practice, how the knee responds to it. And then
we’ll make that decision when we need to.”
The Raiders have been shuffling things at
linebacker. Middle linebacker Rolando
McClain, who had usually been on the field all
game, was taken out of the nickel package in
last week’s 23-20 loss to Atlanta.
McClain, the eighth overall pick in 2010,
played only 31 percent of the snaps against the
Falcons. Rookie Miles Burris played 55 defen-
sive snaps, taking McClain’s spot when the
Raiders went to two linebackers.
“He responded well, and he actually, he
played well,” Allen said. “He had his most pro-
ductive play on a per-play basis in that football
game. I think when we went back and looked
and saw how many plays that Rolando was
playing, it had a factor in his conditioning. We
felt like him not playing quite as many plays
would help him to play better and be more
effective, and I think it had that effect in this
game.”
LB Curry returns to practice for Raiders
Aaron Curry
By Larry Lage
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — One win from the World
Series. Rainy or not, the Detroit Tigers will have
to wait.
Game 4 of the AL championship series
between the Tigers and New York Yankees was
postponed because of a stormy forecast
Wednesday night — although Comerica Park
was still dry when the decision was made.
“They kept saying it was going to come and it
never came,” Tigers pitcher Max Scherzer said.
“So go figure.”
About an hour later, however, heavy rain
started to fall, soaking the tarp that was placed
on the infield before the postponement.
With the Tigers seeking a sweep in the best-
of-seven series, Game 4 was rescheduled for
Thursday at 4:07 p.m. New York will send ace
CC Sabathia to the mound against Scherzer. The
Tigers will have lefty Phil Coke, who saved
Games 2 and 3, available after a day of rest.
Game 5, if necessary, would be Friday in
Detroit.
Under the original schedule, there was a good
chance Sabathia would pitch a potential Game 7
on three days’ rest if the Yankees rallied in the
series. Now, he might be limited to one start —
and New York might need to win four games in
four days to advance.
“You cannot think about Game 7 when you
need to win a game,” New York second base-
man Robinson Cano said.
Yankees center fielder Curtis Granderson,
benched along with third baseman Alex
Rodriguez by manager Joe Girardi on
Wednesday before the game was called, said the
unplanned night off might actually help him and
his slumping team.
“It’s definitely not going to hurt by any
means,” Granderson said. “We haven’t played
well to this point. Who knows? Change is
always a good thing.”
The first pitch Wednesday night was slated
for 8:07 p.m. But shortly before the scheduled
start, the crowd was informed of a delay. A radar
forecast for the Detroit area was eventually
posted on the scoreboard video screen, as if to
explain to fans why there was no baseball
despite what was still pleasant weather at the
ballpark.
The postponement was announced after a
delay of about 70 minutes. A misty rain finally
began about 15 minutes after the postponement
was announced and steady rain followed short-
ly thereafter.
The Tigers are no strangers to rain in the play-
offs. Last year, ace Justin Verlander had two
starts cut short by bad weather — although both
were on the road.
“A lot of people were pretty upset that
Verlander didn’t get to finish his start,” Detroit
catcher Alex Avila said. “So, I think people
would be pretty upset if they didn’t get to see
Scherzer and Sabathia finish their starts as well.
Major League Baseball is trying to protect not
only the pitchers, but also play a clean game
without having to stop and stuff like that.”
After Game 1 of the 2011 ALCS at Texas was
delayed twice for a total of 1 hour, 50 minutes,
Game 2 was called off well before the sched-
uled first pitch because of a forecast calling for
more wet weather. Then, it didn’t rain that night.
Only rain can stop Tigers
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — NHL labor negotiations
will resume Thursday after the players’ union
reviewed management’s proposal and saw it
as only a small step forward to ending the
monthlong lockout.
The NHL made the proposal Tuesday in
what it said was an attempt to preserve a full
82-game schedule. The league publicly
released the plan Wednesday.
NHL players’ union head Donald Fehr met
with players to formulate the union’s
response. In a letter to players and agents, he
said the management plan would cost his
members more than $1.6 billion over six
years.
“Simply put, the owners’ new proposal,
while not quite as Draconian as their previous
proposals, still represents enormous reduc-
tions in player salaries and individual con-
tracting rights,” Fehr said in the letter, accord-
ing to a report by TSN. “As you will see, at the
5 percent industry growth rate the owners pre-
dict, the salary reduction over six years
exceeds $1.6 billion. What do the owners
offer in return?”
The lockout began Sept. 16 and last week
the league canceled regular-season games
through Oct. 24. NHL Commissioner Gary
Bettman, in announcing the new proposal,
called it “a fair offer for a long-term deal” and
“one that we hope gets a positive reaction.”
“We’re studying it and we’re trying to get
ready to give a response tomorrow,” said
union lawyer Steve Fehr, brother of the union
leader.
In the midst of their third lockout since
1994, owners gave the union what the league
called a “proposal to save 82-game season.”
The NHL said it hoped a deal would be
reached by Oct 25 and the season would start
by Nov. 2, three weeks behind schedule.
“We do not yet know whether this proposal
is a serious attempt to negotiate an agreement,
or just another step down the road,” Donald
Fehr wrote. “The next several days will be, in
large part, an effort to discover the answer to
that question.”
NHL spokesman Frank Brown said the
league was not responding to Fehr’s letter.
The NHL released details of its offer for a
six-year deal with a mutual option for a sev-
enth. The plan includes a 50-50 split in hock-
ey related revenue
The NHL proposed in July to cut the per-
centage of hockey related revenue from 57
percent to 43 percent, then increased its offer
in September to about 47 percent.
Winnipeg Jets forward Olli Jokinen called
the plan a “starting point,” according to The
Canadian Press.
Management included a provision to ensure
players receive all money promised in existing
contracts, but the union is concerned with
what management termed the “make-whole
provision.” If the players’ share falls short of
their $1.883 billion in 2011-12, up to $149
million in the first year of a new deal and up
to $62 million in the second would be repaid
to players as deferred compensation.
However, the union believes that money
would be counted against the players’ share in
later years.
Union views NHL plan
as small step forward
By Jim Vertuno
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUSTIN, Texas — Already an outcast in
cycling after a massive doping report, Lance
Armstrong absorbed hits much closer to home
Wednesday: to his wallet and his heart.
Armstrong was dumped by Nike, Anheuser-
Busch and other sponsors, and he gave up the
top spot at Livestrong, his beloved cancer-fight-
ing charity, a week after an anti-doping agency
released evidence of drug
use by the seven-time Tour
de France winner.
Armstrong stepped down
as chairman of Livestrong
in an attempt to minimize
the damage caused by the
U.S. Anti-Doping Agency’s
report. USADA banned
Armstrong from the sport
for life and has ordered that
his Tour titles be stripped,
which could come before
the end of the month.
“This organization, its mission and its sup-
porters are incredibly dear to my heart,” the can-
cer survivor said in a statement. “Today there-
fore, to spare the foundation any negative effects
as a result of controversy surrounding my
cycling career, I will conclude my chairman-
ship.”
Minutes later, Nike dropped its personal spon-
sorship contract with him and issued a blistering
statement that the company had been duped by
his denials over the years.
“Due to the seemingly insurmountable evi-
dence that Lance Armstrong participated in dop-
ing and misled Nike for more than a decade, it is
with great sadness that we have terminated our
contract with him. Nike does not condone the
use of illegal performance enhancing drugs in
any manner,” the company said.
In 2001, the apparel company produced an
anti-doping commercial, narrated by Armstrong,
addressing allegations that he had used perform-
ance-enhancing drugs by mocking the question,
“What am I on?” and answering that he trained
on his bicycle “six hours a day.”
Brewing giant Anheuser-Busch followed
Nike’s lead, saying: “We have decided not to
renew our relationship with Lance Armstrong
when our current contract expires at the end of
2012.”
Soon after, other sponsors also cut ties with
him. Among them were Trek bicycles and
Honey Stinger, a maker of foods and gels for
athletes.
“We are in the process of removing Lance
Armstrong’s image and endorsement from our
product packaging,” a Honey Stinger spokesman
said. An image of Armstrong’s signature that
was on the site’s front page earlier in the day
appeared to be gone late Wednesday.
The FRS Co., which makes energy, diet and
health drinks, said Armstrong had resigned from
its board.
If there was a silver lining in the day for
Armstrong, it was that his major sponsors said
they will continue to support the charity, which
started as the Lance Armstrong Foundation 15
years ago.
Another longtime sponsor, sportswear maker
Oakley, said it is withholding a decision until the
International Cycling Union — the governing
body for cycling — decides if it will fight
USADA’s sanctions against Armstrong. UCI has
until Oct. 31 to appeal USADA’s sanctions
against Armstrong to the world Court of
Arbitration for Sport. If not, the penalties will
stand.
Armstrong, who Forbes has estimated is
worth about $125 million, was not paid a salary
as Livestrong chairman and will remain on the
charity’s 15-member board. The duties of lead-
ing the board will be turned over to vice chair-
man Jeff Garvey, who was founding chairman in
1997.
Garvey will be responsible for big-picture
strategic planning and will assume some of the
public appearances and meetings that Armstrong
used to handle.
At the entrance to the Livestrong headquarters
in Austin, autographed framed yellow jerseys
from each tour win are mounted on a wall near
the entrance. Armstrong had a conference call
with employees on Wednesday to explain his
decision.
Armstrong out as
Livestrong head,
loses big sponsors
Lance
Armstrong
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
“I said, ‘She was ready yesterday,’” Croft said from Charlotte,
N.C., where the McMorrow team was waiting for a connecting
flight to Florida. “They came back to me … and said,
‘[Martinez] is a southpaw. Does that bother you?’ I can’t really
be worried about if she’s a southpaw. [McMorrow] is a world
champion. She has to be able to beat a southpaw and she has to
be able to beat a girl who hasn’t fought in four years.”
Croft said there is a chance, assuming McMorrow wins, she
could face Simona Galsai, an Italian left-handed fighter who is
the current WBC flyweight champion.
“I figure this (fight against Martinez) is good practice,” Croft
said. “I tell [my fighters] they have to always be ready. The good
thing about [McMorrow] is she’s always ready.”
The Gumina-Boyea light heavyweight fight will be the third
time these two have met and the second time this year. Gumina,
a San Bruno native, has beaten Boyea twice — once as amateurs
and again in August when Gumina won a relatively easy unani-
mous decision.
Boyea told John J. Raspanti of DoghouseBoxing.com he
believes he hurt Gumina in the August bout, to which Gumina
responded: “If he believes he hurt me, boxing might not be for
him. … I’ve never been hurt in a boxing match in my entire
life.”
***
It appears Lance Armstrong is having a Tiger Woods-like fall
from grace and unlike Woods, there doesn’t appear to be a para-
chute to slow his descent.
After the World Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong of
his Tour de France title after a mountain of evidence suggested
Armstrong was not as clean as he claimed, the dominoes have
started to fall. Wednesday, Armstrong announced he was step-
ping down as Livestrong chairman, the organization he started to
fund the fight against cancer. Minutes later, Nike said it was end-
ing its relationship with him and Anheuser-Busch has also fol-
lowed suit. Radio Shack, another longtime sponsor, also said its
contract with Armstrong had lapsed and there was not a plan to
renew it.
While Woods seems to have rebounded from his public-rela-
tions disaster — he is still earns millions of dollars in endorse-
ments — Armstrong could be in much worse shape. Woods at
least had his golf game on which to fall back, but Armstrong is
currently a disgraced, retired athlete.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email: nathan@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone: 344-5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed
on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
missing shots, missing the cage.”
Despite falling quickly behind 2-0, Serra (2-3) did not cave
in. In fact, the Padres came right back to cut the Gators’ lead
in half, 2-1, scoring 12 seconds after the Gators’ second goal.
But Sacred Heart Prep just has too much firepower. The Gators
connected on three man-advantages in the first period as they
built a 6-3 lead after the opening seven minutes.
Serra, however, kept it close. A rebound goal from Robert
O’Leary closed the Padres’ deficit to 6-4 early in the second.
The Gators pushed the lead back to three on a Zach Churukian
5-meter penalty shot, one of two he converted in the match.
Again Serra cut the lead to two, 7-5, when Zach Zamecki
snuck a goal past Sacred Heart Prep goalkeeper Will Runkel.
Matt Blais also skipped one past Runkel late in the second
period, but that was sandwiched around Gator goals from Bret
Hinrichs and Harrison Enright to give the Gators a 10-6 lead at
halftime.
“[Serra] came out firing. Any time you play Serra, they’re
not going to back down,” Kreutzkamp said. “We started out
shaky (defensively). But we only gave up three goals in the
second half.”
In the second half, both defenses did a better job as Serra
limited the Gators to just seven goals. The Sacred Heart Prep
defense was even better, holding the Padres to just three goals.
Sacred Heart Prep did an especially good job of limiting
Serra’s offense in the hole set. Nearly every time the Padres
dumped the ball down to Anthony Buljan in the set, he was
swarmed by two and three Gator defenders.
“That defense, you want the shots to come from up top,”
Greene said of the Gators defense.
Said Kreutzkamp: “We want to force them to take low per-
centage perimeter shots.”
Despite what looks like a lopsided loss, Greene was pleased
with the way his team played. Not only did the Padres manage
to score nine goals against the Gators, they got those goals
from eight different players.
“On a scale of 1 to 10, I’d give [us] an eight,” Greene said.
“I’m excited to score nine quality goals against them. Any
good things you can do against SHP, you can do against any-
body.”
Continued from page 11
POLO
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Sacred Heart Prep’s Zach Churukian scores on a 5-meter
penalty shot during the Gators’ 17-9 win over Serra.
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
End
Regular
Season
Playoffs
TBA
vs.Seattle
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
10/18
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
@Rams
10 a.m.
FOX
12/2
vs.Bears
5:00p.m.
ESPN
11/19
@Saints
1:20p.m.
FOX
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/11
Bye
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/21
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
vs.Browns
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/14
vs.Tampa
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/4
@Ravens
10a.m.
CBS
11/11
vs.Saints
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/18
@Bengals
10a.m.
CBS
11/25
@St.Louis
1p.m.
Oct. 17
@St.Louis
5p.m.
Oct. 18
@St.Louis
5p.m.
if necessary
Oct. 19
vs.St.Louis
1:30p.m.
if necessary
Oct. 21
vs.St.Louis
5p.m.
if necessary
Oct. 22
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 133 141
New England 3 3 0 .500 188 137
Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 117
Buffalo 3 3 0 .500 137 192
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 5 1 0 .833 173 115
Indianapolis 2 3 0 .400 100 145
Tennessee 2 4 0 .333 114 204
Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 138
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 5 1 0 .833 161 118
Cincinnati 3 3 0 .500 149 163
Pittsburgh 2 3 0 .400 116 115
Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 134 163
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 3 3 0 .500 170 138
San Diego 3 3 0 .500 148 137
Oakland 1 4 0 .200 87 148
Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104 183
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 178 114
Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125
Washington 3 3 0 .500 178 173
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 94 119
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113
Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 120 101
Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125
New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71
Minnesota 4 2 0 .667 146 117
Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 154 135
Detroit 2 3 0 .400 126 137
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 4 2 0 .667 110 97
San Francisco 4 2 0 .667 152 94
Seattle 4 2 0 .667 110 93
St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 110 111
Thursday’sGame
Seattle at San Francisco, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Arizona at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Green Bay at St. Louis, 10 a.m.
Baltimore at Houston, 10 a.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
Dallas at Carolina, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
Carroll’s 11th-ranked Southern
California team in 2009.
The Cardinal even attempted a 2-
point conversion with the game way
out of reach — prompting Carroll’s
infamous “What’s your deal?” when
the coaching rivals met afterward at
midfield.
Any ill will seems long gone for
these two.
Carroll believes his Seahawks
should be undefeated.
“Because of our lack of effective-
ness last year, we stepped up and went
about it differently this year,” Carroll
said. “Last year by our assessment
there were six games that we could’ve
won and we didn’t win any of them.
This year we have been in five and
won three.”
While San Francisco escaped with a
narrow win at Seattle in December,
the 49ers can find plenty of motivation
from that game 10 months later.
Tight end Delanie Walker broke his
jaw in two places when he took a knee
to the face from Seahawks linebacker
Leroy Hill in the first quarter and did-
n’t return until the NFC championship
game.
NFC rushing leader Marshawn
Lynch ran for 107 yards as San
Francisco’s defense had its streak of
not allowing a 100-yard rusher end at
36 games, going back to Green Bay’s
Ryan Grant in Week 11 of the 2009
season. Lynch’s 4-yard touchdown
run in the fourth quarter also was the
first TD rushing allowed by San
Francisco all season.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
“He’s got to put this behind him like
us, and be set tomorrow,” Bochy said.
Cain was mostly solid but lost for the
second time this postseason. Jon Jay
looped a two-out single in the third and
Matt Carpenter — playing only
because Carlos Beltran was removed
with a left knee strain — hit a 421-foot
homer over the right-field bullpen.
Before that, Carpenter was 4 for 4 in his
career against Cain, all four of the regu-
lar-season hits for singles.
“You know, really there’s no explana-
tion,” Carpenter said.
The Cardinals managed just one run-
ner after Carpenter’s homer until the
seventh, when David Freese doubled
with one out and Daniel Descalso was
intentionally walked. Pete Kozma sin-
gled to load the bases and Shane
Robinson — inserted in a double-
switch in the top half of the inning —
grounded to second, scoring Freese just
before a rain delay of 3 hours, 28 min-
utes.
Jason Motte got six straight outs for a
two-inning save — the first of his career
— after the stoppage.
The Cardinals snapped the Giants’
five-game road winning streak in the
postseason, three of them this year.
Game 4 is in St. Louis on Thursday
night, with Adam Wainwright pitching
for the Cardinals. Tim Lincecum will
start for the Giants.
It was the third game delayed by rain
this postseason and a fourth, Game 4 of
the Yankees-Tigers ALCS, was post-
poned later Wednesday night. Two
games between the Yankees and
Orioles in Baltimore began late because
of inclement weather.
The Giants entered 70-22 when scor-
ing first, including the postseason.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
BOYS’WATERPOLO
MenloSchool 16, Aragon3
Menlo6802— 16
Aragon1020—3
Menlo goal scorers — Katsis 7; Avery,d’Alencon 2;
Walker, Xi, Hammarskjold, Rosales, Carlisle. Menlo
goaltender saves — Lazar 8; Wilson 3; Witte 2.
Records — Menlo School 2-1 PAL Bay, 9-8 overall.
SacredHeart Prep17, Serra9
SHP6443— 17
Serra3312—9
Goal scorers: SHP — Enright, Holloway 4; Chu-
rukian,B.Hinrichs 3; Conner 2; Jollymour.SERRA —
Buljan 2; Mirt, Bradley, Yee, O’Leary, Zamecki, Blais,
Kmak. Goaltender saves: SHP — Runkel 12; Olujic
8. Records — Sacred Heart Prep 5-0 WCAL, 16-3
overall; Serra 2-3.
GIRLS’WATERPOLO
SacredHeart Prep18, NotreDame-Belmont 2
NotreDame0101— 2
SHP5535— 18
SHP goal scorers — McCracken, Stuewe 4; Bocci,
Rakow 2; Bigley, Flessel, Harper, Koshy, Mohrman,
Willard.SHP goaltender saves — Pursley 3; Moran
2. Records — Sacred Heart Prep 5-0 WCAL, 13-4
overall.
MenloSchool 12, Half MoonBay7
Half MoonBay0214—7
MenloSchool 4421— 12
Goal scorers: HMB — Chee, White 2; Clark, Kemp,
Beche.MS — Flower 4; Dunn 3; Huneke 2; El-Hage,
M. Meyer, Miller. Goaltender saves: SHP — Mont-
gomery 11. Records — Menlo School 8-2 PAL
Ocean, 9-4 overall.
GIRLS’ GOLF
Castilleja216, SacredHeart Prep230
At PaloAltoHill G&CC, par 35
SHP — Koenig,Ellison 41; Dake 46; Ulam 48; Flynn
54; Fishback 55.
C — Sales 39; Debs 40; Wilkerson 44; Zales 46;
Mitchell 47; Choi 52.
Records — Sacred Heart Prep 6-4 WBAL, 7-6 over-
all; Castilleja 9-0, 10-0.
GIRLS’TENNIS
Burlingame4, Carlmont 3
SINGLES — Sidell (C) d.Harrigan 6-4,6-3; L.SInatra
(B) d.V. Dvorak 6-4, 6-4; N. Somers (B) d.T. Dvorak 4-
6, 6-3, 7-5; Won (C) d. S. Sinatra 6-3, 6-1. DOUBLES
— Murphy-Hu (B) d. Darafshi-Burgueno 6-3, 1-6,
6-3; Farmer-Sobey (C) d. Patel-Lange 6-2, 6-1; M.
Somers-Kotmel (B) d. Chen-Gabovich 6-3, 4-6, 6-3.
Records — Burlingame 9-3 PAL Bay, 11-5 overall.
SanMateo6, Woodside1
SINGLES — Speigel (SM) d.Charda 6-1,6-1;Pantuso
(SM) d. Herrefort 6-0, 6-7(8), (11-9); Pritz (W) d.
Yushiba 7-5,6-4; Gore (SM) d.Kitaura 6-1,6-0.DOU-
BLES — Bindal-Hai-de (SM) d.Bedel-Houghton 6-1,
4-6, (10-5); Halpern-Popluck (SM) d. Phan-McDow-
ell 6-3,6-2;Chan-Londa(SM) d.Pandosa-mcMoahon
6-1, 6-1.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
16
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Group: Libya militias ‘executed’ Gadhafi loyalists
CAIRO — Libyan rebels appear to have “summarily exe-
cuted” scores of fighters loyal to Moammar Gadhafi, and
probably the dictator himself, when they overran his home-
town a year ago, a human rights group said Wednesday.
The report by Human Rights Watch on alleged rebel abuses
that followed the October 2011 capture of the city of Sirte in
the final major battle of the eight-month civil war is one of the
most detailed descriptions of what the group says were war
crimes committed by the militias that toppled Gadhafi, and
which still play a major role in Libyan politics today.
The 50-page report, titled “Death of a Dictator: Bloody
Vengeance in Sirte,” details the last hours of Gadhafi’s life on
Oct. 20, 2011, when he tried to flee the besieged city. The
longtime leader’s convoy was struck by NATO aircraft as it
tried to escape and the survivors were attacked by militias
from the city of Misrata, who captured and disarmed the dic-
tator and his entourage.
Misrata was subjected to a brutal weeks-long siege by
Gadhafi’s forces that killed hundreds of residents, and fighters
from the city became among the regime’s most implacable
foes. HRW says it seems the Misratans took revenge against
their prisoners in Sirte.
“The evidence suggests that opposition militias summarily
executed at least 66 captured members of Gadhafi’s convoy in
Sirte,” said Peter Bouckaert, emergencies director at Human
Rights Watch.
Israel counted Gaza
calorie needs during blockade
JERUSALEM — Israeli authorities blockading the Gaza
Strip in 2008 went so far as to calculate how many calories
would be needed to avert a humanitarian disaster in the
impoverished Palestinian territory, according to a newly
declassified military document.
The military said Wednesday the guidelines were never
implemented. However critics rejected the claim, saying the
document was new evidence that Israel used food as a pres-
sure tactic to try to force Gaza’s Hamas rulers from power —
a strategy that ultimately failed.
Israel maintained a strict blockade over Gaza from 2007-
2010. During that time, Israel limited food supplies entering
Gaza and maintained a baffling list of items that were banned
or permitted as part of a broader effort to topple the violently
anti-Israel Hamas by squeezing the economy.
In the January 2008 document, Israel determined how to
ensure that Gazans eat 2,279 calories of food each day, a fig-
ure in line with World Health Organization guidelines.
Around the world
By Ben Hubbard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — The international envoy
to the Syrian conflict on Wednesday
called on President Bashar Assad’s
regime to take the lead in implementing
a cease-fire during a major Muslim holi-
day later this month.
Lakhdar Brahimi said rebel represen-
tatives have assured him they will also
observe the truce if the government takes
the first step.
“The Syrian people are burying hun-
dreds of people each day, so if they bury
fewer people during the days of the hol-
iday, this could be the start of Syria’s
return from the dangerous situation that
it ... is continuing to slip toward,” he told
reporters in Beirut.
Brahimi’s push to get Assad and rebels
seeking to topple him to stop fighting for
the four-day Eid al-Adha feast set to
begin Oct. 26 reflects how little progress
international diplomacy has made in
halting 19 months of deadly violence in
Syria. Activists say more than 33,000
people have been killed.
Unlike his predecessor as joint U.N.-
Arab League envoy, Kofi Annan,
Brahimi has said he has no grand plan to
end Syria’s civil war. Instead, he pre-
sented the truce as a “microscopic” step
that would alleviate Syrian sorrow tem-
porarily and provide the basis for a
longer truce.
Even a short-term cease-fire faced
hurdles. Both sides in the past have ver-
bally signed on to cease-fires only to
then blatantly disregard them. And
before Brahimi spoke, Syria’s govern-
ment dismissed the plan, saying the
rebels lack a unified leadership to sign
the truce.
“There is the state, represented by the
government and the army on one front,
but who is on the other front?” asked an
editorial in the Al-Thawra daily.
The scores of rebel units fighting a
brutal civil war against the regime have
no single leader, and many don’t com-
municate with each other.
U.N. Syria envoy calls on
government to start truce
REUTERS
A man runs past a damaged bus at the front line between the Free Syrian Army and
the pro-government forces, in the city of Aleppo.
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
America’s favorite dietary supple-
ments, multivitamins, modestly lowered
the risk for cancer in healthy male doc-
tors who took them for more than a
decade, the first large study to test these
pills has found.
The result is a surprise because many
studies of individual vitamins have
found they don’t help prevent chronic
diseases and some even seemed to raise
the risk of cancer.
In the new study, multivitamins cut
the chance of developing cancer by 8
percent. That is less effective than a
good diet, exercise and not smoking,
each of which can lower cancer risk by
20 percent to 30 percent, cancer experts
say.
Multivitamins also may have different
results in women, younger men or peo-
ple less healthy than those in this study.
“It’s a very mild effect and personally
I’m not sure it’s significant enough to
recommend to anyone” although it is
promising, said Dr. Ernest Hawk, vice
president of cancer prevention at the
University of Texas MD Anderson
Cancer Center and formerly of the
National Cancer Institute.
“At least this doesn’t suggest a harm”
as some previous studies on single vita-
mins have, he said.
Hawk reviewed the study for the
American Association for Cancer
Research, which is meeting in Anaheim
where the study was to be presented on
Wednesday. It also was published online
in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.
Study: Multivitamins may lower cancer risk in men
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ellen Gibson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Car seat, diapers, changing table, crib,
stroller, blankets, onesies: A new baby is
a bundle of joy that also costs a bundle of
cash.
Nursery decor is one area where new
parents can save some money by creating
their own design elements.
Opting for DIY doesn’t mean missing
out on the fun of browsing stores and cat-
alogs: Often a splurge item — such as a
$400 Jonathan Adler giraffe lamp — can
serve as inspiration for a cheaper, hand-
made version, says Pam Ginocchio, co-
founder of baby design site Project
Nursery.
Handmade decorations also lend the
baby’s room a unique personality, she
says, and give parents a project to work
on together before baby arrives.
Here, Ginocchio, her business partner,
Melisa Fluhr, and a few other DIY design
bloggers share their favorite projects for
baby’s room. Whether you’re creating a
cozy nest at home or seeking ideas for a
shower gift, these crafts can add warmth
and style to a little one’s space.
DECOUPAGE TREE
(From Pam Ginocchio and Melisa
Fluhr, ProjectNursery.com)
Wall trees have become a popular trend
in nursery dicor; try this project in lieu of
a pricey vinyl decal.
Materials:
scrapbook paper (any size), about 20
sheets for a 6-foot tree
Mod Podge matte finish
scissors
2-inch-wide paintbrush or foam craft
brush
paper bowl or plate
ladder or step stool
Step 1: Take fabric swatches from your
baby’s bedding to a crafts or paper store,
and grab a mix of printed, solid and glit-
tered papers in the same color family.
Step 2: Start building the tree at the part
of the trunk where the limbs begin to
branch off. Cut or tear the paper (imper-
fect edges give a vintage feel), making
each branch the thickness and length you
want. Apply the Mod Podge to the back
of each piece with the paintbrush or craft
brush, and press the scrap against the
wall. With this glue, the piece will be
moveable at first if you don’t like your
initial placement.
Step 3: Let it grow! As the limbs reach
out and up, tear the paper thinner, just like
on a real tree. Create the tree trunk with
various-size scraps of paper using a col-
lage technique. For a cute addition, hang
the baby’s name off a low branch that
reaches out across the crib.
Step 4: Stack some of the leftover paper
and cut out simple leaves. Cluster them
along the branches. You can adorn the
tree with birds, butterflies or even rhine-
stones.
NO-SEW BUNTING FLAGS
(From Ginocchio and Fluhr,
ProjectNursery.com)
Materials:
printed papers or fabrics
ruler
colorful ribbon or pom-pom fabric trim
hot glue gun
scissors
Step 1: At a crafts or scrapbooking
store, pick out a variety of printed papers
or fabric remnants.
Step 2: Using a ruler, draw an 8-inch
line on the back of a piece of paper or fab-
ric. This will be the distance from the
point of your triangle to the base. Turn the
ruler perpendicular to one end of the line
and make a “T” by drawing a line 6 inch-
es long. Use the ruler to connect the top
edges of the “T” to the point, making a
triangle. Cut out this first pennant and use
DIY nursery chic: Five drool-worthy projects
Nursery decor is one area where new parents can save some
money by creating their own design elements.
See NURSERY, Page 18
18
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
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it as a template for the rest.
Step 3: Line up your different-patterned flags
in the order you want. Lay them side by side so
they are pointing down and almost touching.
Apply hot glue in a line across the top edge of
each triangle and affix the ribbon or trim over-
top. (Optional: Add iron-on letters to the flags
to spell out baby’s name.) Once the glue dries,
hang the bunting flags like a banner or in a
zigzag pattern.
CLEAN AND COLORFUL
DRESSER DRAWERS
(From Sherry and John Petersik,
YoungHouseLove.com)
You can get a similar effect from contact
paper, which comes in a wide variety of colors
and patterns. But you can make your own if
you’re looking for a different look.
Materials:
Foam craft brushes
Mod Podge matte finish
Six sheets of patterned, heavy-duty wrapping
paper (or swatches of colorful wallpaper or fab-
ric)
Step 1: Wipe the insides of the drawers with
a moist rag. If they’re musty, wipe them with
mineral spirits or Murphy’s Oil Soap and let
them air dry in the sun.
Step 2: After selecting six sheets of wrapping
paper (or however many drawers you have), cut
the sheets down to the size of the drawers. If all
the drawers are the same size, use the first rec-
tangle as a template.
Step 3: Apply a thin, even coat of Mod Podge
adhesive to the bottom of the first drawer. Mod
Podge is 100 percent water-based, so it won’t
stink up baby’s clothes.
Step 4: Glue the cut-to-size paper rectangle
to the bottom of the drawer by pressing it along
the center and out towards the corners to elim-
inate bubbles or wrinkling. Repeat steps 3 and
4 for all drawers.
Step 5: Give the drawers four hours to dry,
then apply a thin top coat of Mod Podge over
the paper to protect against wear and tear. Let
everything dry overnight and you’re left with
fresh, durably lined drawers that provide a little
dose of happy every time they’re opened.
FABRIC MIRROR
(From Carrie McBride,
ApartmentTherapy.com)
Materials:
fabric scraps
fabric stiffener
craft store mirror
cardboard
string
super glue
Step 1: When you design a space for a little
one, chances are you’ll end up with leftover
fabric. This project is a great way to use up
those scraps. Lay the fabric on pieces of alu-
minum foil. Brush fabric stiffener onto the
material and smooth out bubbles or wrinkles.
Let dry completely, then peel off the foil.
Step 2: Sketch a lion or other animal onto a
piece of paper and cut it out. Trace the shapes
onto the back of the stiffened fabric. Cut out
fabric shapes. The fabric stiffener will prevent
the edges from unraveling.
Step 3: Cut a small scrap of cardboard small-
er than the mirror. Punch two holes and tie a
string through them. Glue the cardboard onto
the back of the mirror. This will allow you to
hang the fabric mirror when it’s finished.
Step 4: Cut a large circle inside the lion’s
mane (or the face of your animal). Line up the
mirror in the hole and glue it to the back of the
fabric so the edges are hidden. Let everything
dry completely, then hang.
PRETTY AS A PICTURE FRAME MOBILE
(From McBride, ApartmentTherapy.com)
Materials:
8 mini frames (available at craft stores; check
the bridal section)
one larger frame
about 3 yards of ribbon, divided into four
uneven sections
decorative paper
photos or art reduced to fit small frames
4 screw eyes
fishing line or thin wire
glue stick
paint
polyurethane
Step 1: Paint the frames to make them color-
ful. Some may need a light sanding first. Add a
coat of polyurethane after the paint is dry.
Step 2: If any of your frames has a support
arm on the back to prop it up, pull it off. You
want the back of the mini frame to be com-
pletely smooth.
Step 3: Put your photos or artwork in the
small frames. (You could use abstract art, pho-
tos of vintage trucks or pictures of baby’s
cousins, for instance.)
Step 4: To connect two small frames verti-
cally, run the ribbon behind the artwork but
inside the frame back. Cut a piece of decorative
paper the same size as each frame back and,
with a glue stick, paste it on.
Step 5: Remove the glass and backing from
the large frame. Hang the four pairs of small
frames from the large frame by twisting four
screw eyes into the back of the large frame and
then tying a ribbon to each screw eye.
Step 6: Tie a length of fishing line or thin
wire to each screw eye, then tie all four pieces
together so the mobile hangs evenly. Knot the
end for attaching to a ceiling hook.
Continued from page 17
NURSERY
San Bruno blast.
Eight people died and 38 homes were
destroyed in the gas-fueled inferno that tore
through the bedroom community of San
Bruno on Sept 9, 2010 after one of PG&E’s
pipelines ruptured.
Attorneys from the cities of San Bruno and
San Francisco, as well as the commission’s
own consumer advocacy branch, known as the
Division of Ratepayer Advocates, said they
were not consulted about Mitchell’s appoint-
ment until days after the commission decided
to hire him as a mediator and told PG&E
about the decision.
The commission did not immediately
respond to questions about how or when the
agency hired Mitchell, and the former sena-
tor’s law firm did not immediately return calls
and emails seeking comment.
Commissioner Mike Florio said in an inter-
view he felt the move to inform PG&E first
had not been well thought out.
“I think we handled this rather poorly.
Announcing it before people were brought
into it was not a good idea,” Florio said.
Over the past two years, the company has
faced grueling public hearings over potential
malfeasance leading up to the blast.
One proceeding, chaired by Florio along
with commission President Michael Peevey,
was intended to determine the level of fines
PG&E would face. But a commission judge
suspended the hearings last week to instead
hold a fresh round of talks between PG&E
and other parties.
Peevey said holding closed-door negotia-
tions could lead to a quicker settlement.
Consumer groups said they feared that mov-
ing from a public process to private talks
chaired by Mitchell would favor PG&E and
help the company whittle down possible fines
that could reach hundreds of millions of dol-
lars.
“Why not finish the hearings?” said Karen
Paull, a lawyer for the Division of Ratepayer
Advocates. “Instead, we are being treated like
mushrooms ... Feed them manure and keep
them in the dark.”
In a letter filed Wednesday, the organiza-
tions said they don’t question the talents of
Mitchell — who brokered the 1998 Northern
Ireland treaty and spent two years as President
Obama’s special Middle East envoy — but are
concerned that he and his law firm, DLA
Piper, previously have represented public util-
ities.
PG&E declined to comment on the group’s
concerns but earlier this week praised the
news of Mitchell’s hiring.
“We are committed to resolving this as
quickly and fairly as possible for all parties,”
said PG&E spokesman Todd Burke. “We’ve
supported negotiations that lead to a universal
settlement.”
Any decision on fines brokered by Mitchell
ultimately will be considered by the full five-
member commission.
Continued from page 1
MITCHELL
Baby shower hosts get creative
If you’re throwing a baby shower for a rela-
tive or friend, creating a suitably festive
atmosphere is part of the fun.
Some people go all out by hiring an event
planner, while others go more simply, taking
the do-it-yourself route.
Whether you’re nurturing an elaborate party
plan or just want a little inspiration to get start-
ed, the Internet opens the nursery door to a
wide range of ideas from baby shower experts.
Here are a few with their favorites:
Maureen Anders and Adria Ruff, who run
the Anders/Ruff event planning company in
Charlotte, N.C., recently went with a color
scheme of aqua, mint, lemon and lime for a
gender-neutral shower. Mint and orange, gray
and yellow, and aqua and coral are also on
trend, Anders says, and even black and yellow
— for a “baby to bee” theme.
“‘Gender reveal’ showers are really popu-
lar,” she says. The guests don’t know if it’s a
boy or a girl till the mom-to-be cuts the cake
and reveals a pink or blue interior. Even the
future mom can be in on the surprise; party
planners can have the ob-gyn contact the cake
baker with the information.
Book showers are another hot trend: Guests
bring a children’s book to help build the new
baby’s library. Party planners A Good Affair,
in Newport Beach, Calif., created a “Peter
Rabbit” and “Pat the Bunny” theme at one
recent baby shower, in Anaheim, Calif., with
vintage rabbit books as dicor.
On the pregnancy website The Bump,
Allison Micarelli-Sokoloff suggests a
“Goodnight, Moon” theme, with dark blue and
white polka dots and hanging silver foil stars.
Blue lemonade with star shaped fruit, a round
cake with dark blue icing and white dots, and
starry sugar cookies as favors round out the
party elements. For an activity, she suggests
gathering each of the poem’s items: mittens, a
toy house, etc. and having each guest list them
in the order they appear in the story.
For their gender-neutral party, Anders/Ruff
used colorful yet inexpensive yarn to make
decorative pompoms, gift ties, even flowers.
They dipped marshmallows in colored choco-
late and candy pearls to make table displays,
and served tinted macarons and paper-cone
popcorn.
Suburban brief
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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The arrival of fall brings not only cooler
temperatures but also more rain. The combi-
nation of warm days and cool nights with
adequate moisture in the ground creates
ideal growing conditions for many types of
perennial seed, most notably grass seed.
September through October is the perfect
time to seed a new lawn or to overseed an
existing one. The main advantage to seeding
a lawn now is that many aggressive, warm-
loving weeds are slow to germinate at this
time of year. Cooler temperatures and
decreasing daylight favor the germination of
grass seed over many types of weed seed,
giving your grass a chance to establish itself
before faster growing weeds can overtake it.
Grass seeded in the late spring, by con-
trast, often shows good initial germination
but will face stiff competition from weeds as
summer continues. Fast growing, heat-lov-
ing weeds steal available moisture and nutri-
ents from slower growing grass. The results
are usually a disappointment.
Whether you are installing a large lawn or
a small patch of green grass in an urban
space, the same rules apply.
The best way to begin a new lawn is to
start with bare ground so you can assess
your grade. If you are working in a large
area, you may want to hire professional help
to remove existing vegetation or bring in
soil.
Start by making sure you have a slope to
your grade. Grass loves moisture but does
not like standing water. Remember that
when it rains, if the grade is perfectly flat,
water will not be able to run off. This is
especially true in areas adjacent to a house
or other structure.
It is best to have the grade slope away
from a structure. The slope only needs to be
a differential of a few inches to drain water.
Start with a reference point, such as one spot
on the foundation of your house, and work
the grade away from that point.
If you have brought in fresh soil to cover
the area, you must remove both large and
small stones before you add your seed. I use
an iron rake for this job, but many profes-
sionals prefer to use large aluminum rakes
especially designed for preparing new seed
beds.
Carefully rake the soil and remove as
many stones as you can. You will be sur-
prised how many there are, even in screened
loam. Be mindful of your grade. Once you
have the area raked smooth, there should be
a perceptible change to the grade and you
should be able to see where excess water
will flow.
You are now ready for seed. Grass seed is
surprisingly expensive, but try not to skimp.
I usually apply more than the recommended
amount, preferring to achieve a thick lawn
sooner rather than later and leaving no room
for weeds later on.
Small patches of new lawn can be seeded
using your hand to scatter the seed, but this
method takes some practice. You want to
ensure even distribution of the seed, and
grass seed is surprisingly light. It tends not
to spread out when cast from your hand.
You may want to invest in a seed distribu-
tor from your local DIY store. This simple
hand-cranked device will distribute the seed
evenly and is a real time saver if you are
seeding a large area.
I often use the seed distributor for one
application and then go over the area a sec-
ond time distributing seed by hand to ensure
thick coverage of seed. Again, don’t skimp
on the seed.
After the seed is down you may want to
apply a thin layer of straw over the top to
keep moisture in until the seed germinates,
and to protect the seed from hungry birds.
Note: Do not spread hay rather than straw!
Hay contains unwanted seed.
The straw is optional. I usually rake it up
once the grass has germinated and grown a
few inches, but you can leave it and let
decompose into the soil over time. Be care-
ful not to apply the straw too thickly or it
will inhibit germination.
Keep the newly seeded lawn moist by
watering daily. Seed should germinate with-
in five to 10 days, depending on conditions.
After the seed has germinated, remember
to keep it moist but not soaking wet. One 20
to 30 minute watering with a sprinkler each
day should suffice.
Once the seed has grown to several inches,
you can start cutting it. Next spring, your
new lawn should be thick enough so you
don’t see any bare ground.
Fall is perfect time to seed a new lawn
Seeding grass in the fall gives the new plants an opportunity to thrive without competition
from heat-loving weeds.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, OCT. 18
AARP San Mateo Chapter Meeting.
Noon. Beresford Recreation Center,
2720 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo.Those who would like to attend
should bring non-perishable items for
the Samaritan House. There will be a
speaker from AARP on health care. For
more information call 345-5001.
Filoli Presentation: Russian Hill: An
Early Arts & Crafts Community. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Reception, book sale and
signing will follow presentation. $25
members. $30 non-members. To
purchase tickets call 364-8300 ext. 508
or visit www.filoli.org.
October Book Sale at the
Burlingame Library. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Burlingame Library, Lane Community
Room (enter from Bellevue Avenue),
480 Primrose Road, Burlingame. Find
great deals on used books. $5
admission. For more information call
558-7499.
Wellness Lecture on Genetically
Engineered Foods/GMOs. 6 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Manu Hipkinswill give a
lecture on the basics of genetically
engineered foods, GMOs, safety
concerns and tools for avoiding them.
Free. For more information contact
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Zoppe: AnItalian Family Circus.6:30
p.m. Circus Tent, 1044 Middlefield
Road, Downtown Redwood City.Youth
$10 to $13. Adults $15 to $18. Front
row seats $5 extra. For more
information call 780-7586 or visit
redwoodcity.org/events/zoppe.html.
Sofia University: Extending the
Vision. 7 p.m. Sofia University
(formerly Institute of Transpersonal
Psychology), 1069 E. Meadow Circle,
Palo Alto. Join founders, Robert Frager
and James Fadiman, as they discuss
the transition from the school’s rich
past as Institute of Transpersonal
Psychology (ITP) to Sofia University.
Free. For more information visit
www.nealkinginauguration.com.
‘Gluten Free Canteen’s Book of
Nosh.’ 7 p.m. Town and Country
Village, 855 El Camino Real, Palo Alto.
Join local author Lisa Stader-Horel and
her husband Tim Horel as they talk
about and bring treats from their new
kosher and gluten free cookbook. Free.
For more information call 321-0600.
Jeff Risberg presents MOAH lecture
series: Inventing the ModernWorld:
Design and Technology in the
1930s. 7 p.m. Museum of American
Heritage Lecture Series, 351 Homer
Ave., Palo Alto. Jeff Risberg shows how
design emerged as an important
element of our world during the
1930s, and how technology and
design interacted to create vehicles,
buildings and event household
appliances that still influence our
visual world today. Free for MOAH
members. $10 for non-members. For
more information call 321-1004.
Foxtrot, Bachata and Salsa. 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
International Standard Level II Foxtrot
7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bachata 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
International Standard Level I Foxtrot
8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Salsa 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.
$16 per class. For more information
visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Notre Dame de Namur University
presents‘ShowGirls.’ 7:30 p.m.Taube
Center, NDNU Campus, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. The Department of
Music and Vocal Arts presents,
‘ShowGirls,’ a showcase of the music
and lyrics by the heroines of Broadway
and film. The all-female cast will
perform songs from the 1920s to the
1970s. $25 general, $15
students/seniors. To purchase tickets
visit BrownPaperTickets.com or call
(800) 838-3006.
FRIDAY, OCT. 19
VarietyShow and Lunch. 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Tickets at the front desk of the San
Bruno Senior Center. For more
information call 616-7150.
La Marienne’s Vintage Costume
JewelryTrunk Show. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
The Ritz-Carlton Hotel, 1 Miramontes
Point Road, Half Moon Bay. Free. For
more information call 712-7090.
St. Paul Nursery School’sHalloween
Fun Faire. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. St. Paul’s
Nursery School, 405 El Camino Real,
Burlingame.There will be games, crafts
and a train ride as well as a silent
auction for parents. Costumes are
encouraged, but masks should not be
worn. Free. For more information call
344-5409.
Meditation and Teachings of Lama
Pema. 11:30 a.m. Sofia University
(formerly Institute of Transpersonal
Psychology), 1069 E. Meadow Circle,
Palo Alto. Lama Pema was the first
Tibetan ever to have received the
distinguished ‘Ellis Island Medal of
Honor’ award by the National Ethical
Coalition of Organizations in May, 2009
for his humanitarian work around the
world. Free. For more information
email kristen.sato@sofia.edu.
Home Boutique. Noon to 7 p.m. 1930
Stockbridge Ave., Redwood City.
Discover unique gifts and home decor
from local artisans. Free. For more
information call 309-2064.
Sofia University Presidential
Inauguration Ceremony and
Reception. 2 p.m. Sofia University
(formerly Institute of Transpersonal
Psychology), 1069 E. Meadow Circle,
Palo Alto. Celebrate the inauguration
of Sofia University’s first president,
Neal King, Ph.D. For more information
email kristen.sato@sofia.edu.
FreeWine and Beer Tasting. 4p.m. to
6 p.m. New Leaf Community Markets,
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Free Friday happy hours. Different
selection each week. Must be 21 or
older. Free. For more information email
patti@bondmarcom.com.
October Book Sale at the
Burlingame Library. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Burlingame Library, Lane Community
Room (enter from Bellevue Avenue),
480 Primrose Road, Burlingame. Find
great deals on used books. Free. For
more information call 558-7499.
Zoppe: An Italian Family Circus. 4
p.m. show and 7 p.m. show. Circus Tent,
1044 Middlefield Rd., Downtown
Redwood City. Youth $10 to $13.
Adults $15 to $18. Front row seats $5
extra. For more information call 780-
7586 or visit
redwoodcity.org/events/zoppe.html.
Bullying: ACulture of Silence. 5 p.m.
East Palo Alto Library, 2415 University
Ave., East Palo Alto. This program in
part of a San Mateo County anti-
bullying initiative. Free. For more
information call 321-7712.
Peninsula Symphony Presents:
Transformers – ‘The Titan.’
Reception 6:30 p.m., pre-concert
lecture at 7 p.m. and concert begins
at 8 p.m. Bayside Performing Arts
Center, 2025 Kehoe Ave. San Mateo.
$40 General Admission, $35 Senior,
$20 Youth/Student. For more
information call 941-5291 or visit
peninsulasymphony.org.
Hot Salsa Night. 7 p.m. Hillsdale High
School Cafeteria, Hillsdale High School,
3115 Del Monte St., San Mateo. The
event will include performances by
the Jazz Ensemble and Chamber
Orchestra, a Latin themed dinner, Salsa
dancing lesson and salsa tasting
competition. $20 for adults and $15
for students, $20 at the door. For more
information email
dqdrummer64@yahoo.com.
Operation Christmas Child
Countdown. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The
Crossing Community Church, 1315
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Run
by Samaritan’s Purse, Operation
Christmas Child Countdown delivers
shoeboxes packed with gifts to
children in need. Free. For more
information call (415) 816-5420.
Norwegian Heritage Night. 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. Highland Community Club,
1665 Fernside St., Redwood City. Come
enjoy a soup supper and Norwegian
desserts, cooking demonstrations,
crafts and more. Sons of Norway invite
the public to celebrate Norwegian
heritage. For more information call
851-1463.
Tango, Argentine Tango and
Milonga. 7 p.m. to midnight. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd.,
Suite G, Foster City. For Beginners Only
Tango Class 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tango
Lesson and Milonga with Live Music
8 p.m. Milonga with Live Music 9 p.m.
$20 for Tango Class and $18 for
Milonga with Live Music. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Notre Dame de Namur University
presents‘ShowGirls.’7:30 p.m.Taube
Center, NDNU Campus, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. The Department of
Music and Vocal Arts presents,
‘ShowGirls,’ a showcase of the music
and lyrics by the heroines of Broadway
and film. The all-female cast will
perform songs from the 1920s to the
1970s. $25 general, $15
students/seniors. To purchase tickets
visit BrownPaperTickets.com or call
(800) 838-3006.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Presents:‘HayFever.’7:30 p.m. NDNU
Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The NDNU Theatre Department
presents Noel Coward’s play, ‘Hay
Fever’. $10. For more information call
508-3456.
‘Deathtrap’ Opening Night. 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Foster City. Tickets available 60
minutes prior to curtain at Hillbarn
Theatre. Adults and seniors $34.
Students ages 17 and under with
current student ID should call 349-
6411 for pricing. To purchase tickets
and for more information visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
according to the San Mateo County
District Attorney’s Office.
A nearby resident phoned police at
about 5 a.m. to report a disturbance at
the residence and when police arrived
they found an unconcious man laying in
the front yard. Fire and medical person-
nel arrived on the scene and confirmed
the man was dead.
Officers cordoned off the area and an
investigation into the cause of death is
under way, according to Pacifica police.
The suspect is a 24-year-old Pacifica
man. Police have not released his identi-
ty.
Anyone with information on the inci-
dent should call Pacifica police at (650)
738-7314
Continued from page 1
COFFEY
money is necessary to deal with long-
term cuts from the state and to, hopeful-
ly, avoid school closure. Opponents of
the measure, however, argue the district
has been deficit spending for years and
does not have a track record of commu-
nication that can be trusted.
For many years, the district turned to
deficit spending or one-time funds to
cover its budget. Last year, the Board of
Trustees directed staff to create a bal-
anced budget, which meant making cuts.
The impact to the district, like all school
districts in California, will be worse if
Proposition 30, Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax
initiative slated to fund education, isn’t
passed next month. As a result, the dis-
trict considered closing one to two
schools in the spring. Parents, at the
meeting, pleaded for the board to keep
the schools open and give other options
a chance before closing a school.
Measure G gained many of its support-
ers as a result of that situation.
“The fact is we need the money,” said
district volunteer Teri Vo, Yes on
Measure G San Bruno campaign direc-
tor. “We have the opportunity to deter-
mine San Bruno’s quality of life.”
Under the ballot language, the parcel
funds could be used to retain teachers,
improve student achievement, fund spe-
cial education, reduce combination
classes, offset reductions and to modern-
ize curriculum.
Parent Scott Curtner, a San Bruno
childhood education advocate, explained
the tax will help the district. Exactly how
it will be used if passed, however, will
depend on the outcome of the state
measure and possible cuts. If both meas-
ures fail, Curtner said the district could
have up to 20 fewer days of school and
need to consider closing one or more
schools.
Chuck Zelnik, a former trustee with
the district who opposes the measure,
pointed to a lack of trust as a main rea-
son to not support Measure G. The dis-
trict and board, he said, have deficit
spent for years, do not work construc-
tively together and avoiding making
tough decisions — like closing a school
— which could have helped the financial
situation.
“My biggest point is there is a lack of
leadership and responsibility,” he said.
Zelnik would like to see the district be
more transparent with its finances and
consider closing schools to chip away at
the financial problems before approach-
ing the community for cash. Also, he
questions what the measure would really
raise. It’s estimated to bring in about $2
million if passed. However, it’s difficult
to say exactly how much the measure
would bring in. An exact amount would
depend on how many seniors and low-
income residents are given exemptions,
he said.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
TAX
sis of the suggested alternatives.
Hal Bohner, a semi-retired attorney
who describes himself as PH1A’s unoffi-
cial spokesman, said his group has writ-
ten to Caltrans asking the agency to put
the project on hold and meet with PH1A
to discuss alternatives, such as timing
traffic lights, staggering school start
times, improving public transportation,
encouraging carpooling, expanding
school bus services or even replacing the
center divide with a movable cone flex
lane.
Caltrans’ own documents reveal the
agency has considered some alterna-
tives, such as timing and coordinating
traffic lights, which would cost $300,000
and “yield significant benefit,” Bohner
said.
When the City Council voted on the
project in June, Councilwoman Mary
Ann Nihart explained that the most
important factor driving that decision
was not commute times, but the possibil-
ity that emergency vehicles might be
delayed by Highway 1’s congestion and
lack of adequate shoulders.
Bohner scoffs at this assertion.
“Mary Ann (Nihart) says Caltrans
doesn’t do highway shoulders? Well,
why not? This is another example of
Caltrans doing what it wants to do,” he
said. “If the safety problem is so bad,
why haven’t they asked Caltrans to
implement alternatives that can be done
sooner? Why don’t they run emergency
vehicles through the quarry? I’ve done
the research, and I haven’t found one
incident of an emergency vehicle not
being able to get through. Let’s see the
records.”
North County Fire Authority
spokesman Matt Lucett said he is not
aware of Highway 1 congestion causing
the failure of any emergency vehicles to
meet 911 response time requirements,
but can see the advantage to widening
the road.
“We definitely would agree it’s a good
thing. Any time we might be able to
improve traffic flow would be beneficial,
whether we’re responding to an incident
on the freeway or using that freeway as a
corridor to get to an incident,” Lucett
said.
Although Nihart is in favor of moving
the project forward, she is not unsympa-
thetic to PH1A’s concerns.
“We’re trying to work out several dif-
ferent issues regarding the highway, and
what’s best for Pacifica is somewhere in
between,” she said. “There are 14 differ-
ent alternatives out there and they all
need to be reviewed. I don’t think six
lanes is appropriate or what’s going to
happen, but I also don’t think Caltrans is
going to build a road through the quar-
ry.”
The rock quarry at Rockaway Beach is
adjacent to Highway 1, and Nihart said
proposals to run an emergency road
through the quarry are likely to be
stymied because it is privately owned.
When Nihart and her fellow coun-
cilmembers addressed the issue in June,
they expressed misgivings about being
told by Caltrans that Pacifica would have
to choose a preferred design before the
project’s Environmental Impact Report
could be finalized.
PH1A chairman Pete Shoemaker voic-
es similar frustration with a process that
he describes as “murky,” and points out
that many of the proposed alternatives
would have relatively low costs, lower
environmental impact and would
improve traffic flow regardless of
whether the highway widening eventual-
ly did happen.
Despite PH1A’s criticism of Caltrans
and the Calera Parkway Project,
Shoemaker avoids painting the issue in
extremes.
“The project is going to take a long
time and something of that magnitude
that’s going to effect the city needs to be
done with a lot of thought and consider-
ation. ... The position of our group is
we’re not calling anybody stupid,” he
said. “We’re saying we’ve got to have a
good conversation — we’ve got to know
what’s going on. It’s a common sense
business principle; let’s sit down and be
reasonable about this.”
Continued from page 1
PH1A
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If your credibility with
others could be fragile at present, it wouldn’t be wise
to tell any fsh stories. You need to have the trophies
to back up your tales.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You are the type of
person who seldom counts his or her chickens
before they’re hatched. However, for some reason,
you might bank heavily on something more wishful
than real.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Watch out for
someone with ulterior motives who could try to
manipulate you with fattery. If someone says that
you’re one of the greatest people alive, enjoy, but be
on guard.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Someone for whom
you’ve gone out of your way several times might not
be in a mood to reciprocate when needed. Chalk it up
to experience.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If a social gather-
ing that you’re invited to is likely to include several
people you dislike, don’t punish yourself by not going
and missing out on the fun; be prepared to turn the
other cheek.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Instead of taking bows
for something you’ve yet to accomplish, tell it like it
is. It could cause you embarrassment down the line if
the work in question should go unfnished.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Usually, you like to
play things spontaneously, and you do quite well, but
unless you plan every step of the way today, you’re
likely to trip over your own feet.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Before getting yourself
involved in a joint endeavor, think carefully about the
costs and responsibilities that you’d be taking on. If
things are not equally distributed, it won’t work out.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t underestimate
your adversaries, especially if you’re involved in
negotiating a critical matter. That edge you think you
have may only exist in your head.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- The truth will out
itself and put you in a very embarrassing position
if you fudge the facts and pretend that you’ve done
something that you promised to do but have yet to
complete. Tell it like it is.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If you are tempted to cater
to your whims in order to achieve instant gratifcation,
chances are you might engage yourself in something
extremely extravagant and fnancially unwise.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Be careful not to do
anything that could jeopardize a relationship with
some key allies. Your projects and prospects need
the goodwill and support of these people.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
10-18-12
wEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Treacherous one
6 Fortune’s partner
10 Relish tray items
12 Pranksters
14 Envoy
15 Polar bear domain
16 Carbon-14 job
18 Zoom on runners
19 Say decidedly
21 Kitty’s reminder
23 Vocalist -- Sumac
24 Skip stones
26 Dinner checks
29 Lean against
31 Attorney’s deg.
33 Lost traction
35 Big name in soccer
36 -- -tzu (“Tao” author)
37 Mammoth
38 AAA suggestions
40 Refusals
42 Codgers’ queries
43 Open to debate
45 Harbor town
47 Subside
50 Trouser length
52 Jauntily
54 Puts up
58 Like T-shirts
59 Rue the day
60 Tuxedo button
61 Every morning
DOwN
1 Encyclopedia bk.
2 Percent ending
3 Bacon on the hoof
4 Skirt the issue
5 Make slow
6 Overlooked
7 Canine registry
8 N.Y. baseballers
9 Viking name
11 Arm the alarm
12 Maureen O’Sullivan role
13 Lab course
17 Artifcial teeth
19 Fossil resin
20 Bank feature
22 Do the laundry
23 Bark or yelp
25 Once and for --
27 More gloomy
28 Vision
30 Bristle with
32 Scare word
34 -- Moines
39 Got dirty
41 Went easy on
44 Black gem
46 Alpha opposite
47 Perfume label word
48 Dumpsters
49 Liverpool chap
51 Always, to Byron
53 Terre Haute coll.
55 Dernier --
56 Util. bill
57 Messy place
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Thursday • Oct. 18 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNA’s
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimer’s or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
TENNIS LESSONS
Top 50 Mens Open Player
Call 650-518-1987
Email info@adsoncraigslist.com
110 Employment
BARBER WANTED for busy shop in
Belmont. Call (650)679-1207.
CAREGIVER -
FT/PT Live-In caregiver on the Penin-
sula and in the South Bay. Valid driv-
er’s license and car a must.Must have
exp. and refs. Call 415-683-3171 or
visit www.sageeldercare.com.
CLEANING SERVICE needs workers to
clean houses and apartments. Experi-
enced, $11.00 per hour, viknat@sbcglo-
bal.net, (650)773-4516
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
GARAGE DOOR
INSTALLER/
SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
Experienced Garage Door
Installer/Service Technician needed.
Installation and repair of residential
wood and steel garage doors, garage
opener installation and repair. Must
be motivated, hard working, professio-
nal, customer service oriented and a
team player. Company truck provided.
Apply at 1457 El Camino Real, Bel-
mont, email resume to:
econodoormaster@yahoo.com
or fax (650)594-1549
110 Employment
JEWELRY SALES
FUN! No Nights! Benefits & 401K!
(650)367-6500 FX:(650)367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
OFFICE MANAGER/
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
Part Time
Emerging technology company
located at San Carlos Airport de-
signs and assembles aerial cam-
era systems. Responsible for
administrative and accounting
activities including AR/AP. Pro-
vide executive support for CEO.
Supervise 1 clerical employee.
Reports to CFO. Flexible work
schedule of 15-20 hours per
week. Requires minimum of 5-
10 years relevant experience
and software proficiency includ-
ing Quickbooks and MS Office.
Please email resume to:
jobs@skyimd.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
YOU’RE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 516561
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Gunel ONISKO
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Gunel ONISKO filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Gunel ONISKO
Proposed name: Maria-Raffaella Ales-
sandra ONISKO
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
14, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/26/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/25/2012
(Published, 10/11/12, 10/18/12,
10/25/12, 11/01/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252497
The following person is doing business
as: FX Playground, 525 S. Delaware St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jong Won
Pak, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Jong Won Pak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12).
23 Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252535
The following person is doing business
as: Happy Noodles, 153 S. B Street,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Minghui
Jiang, 2532 San Carlos Ave., San Car-
los, CA 94070. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Minghui Jiang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252319
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Internet Marketing Unlimited, 2)
City Junk Removale, 1000 National Ave.,
#240, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Win-
ston Arver, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Winston Arver /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252336
The following person is doing business
as: Forever Forward Social Club, 1618
S. El Camino Real SAN MATEO, CA,
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Mark Matthews, Po Box
370333, Montara, CA 94037. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Mark Matthews /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252586
The following person is doing business
as: West Face Financial and Insurance
Services, LLC, 990 Industrial Rd., Ste
112, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Pace-
line, LLC, CA. The business is conducted
by a Limited Liablity Company. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Beatrice Schultz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252585
The following person is doing business
as: West Face College Planning, 990 In-
dustrial Rd., Ste 112, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Beatrice Schultz, 237 Shore-
bird, Circle, Redwood City, CA 94065.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
10/02/2012
/s/ Beatrice Schultz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252594
The following person is doing business
as: Global X, 1740 El Camino Real,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mar-
jorie Isaac, 439 Gateway Dr. #93, Pacific
CA 94044. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Marjorie Isaac /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252679
The following person is doing business
as: Lynn Lefevre Welding Inc., 2511 Isa-
belle Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lynn Lefevre Welding Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ Louise Lefevre /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252625
The following person is doing business
as: Summers at Your Service, 361 Half
Moon Ln., Unit 107, DALY CITY, CA,
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: D-Etta Estella Summers,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ D-Etta Estella Summers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252539
The following person is doing business
as: Philly’s Cheese Steak Shop, 729 Cal-
ifornia Dr., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ju Star, INC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 09/26/2012.
/s/ Chun Ju Lin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252647
The following person is doing business
as: JB Tile & Stone, INC., 509 Howland
St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is here-
by registered by the following owner: JB
Tile & Stone, INC., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2008.
/s/ Connie J. Brown /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252331
The following person is doing business
as: I Squared Consulting, LLC., 1518 La-
go St., #107, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
I Squared Consulting, LLC., CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 06/30/2012.
/s/ Maryam K. Headd /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 9/17/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252577
The following person is doing business
as: One Medical Group, 329 Primrose
Rd., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
One Medical Group, INC. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Michael Sarmiento /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/2/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252792
The following person is doing business
as: Mighty Mike’s Handyman Service,
716 1st Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Michael D. Lillis, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Michael D. Lillis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252595
The following person is doing business
as: 1)GITS, 2)GITS Information Technol-
ogy Service, 1107 18th Ave., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Gita Kumari
Chandra, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Anuresh Chandra /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252681
The following person is doing business
as: Speak Well and Sell, 533 Airport
Blvd., Ste 400, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Michael Neuendorff, 394 In-
nisfree Dr., Daly City, CA 94015. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on October 1,
2012
/s/ Michael Neuendorff /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 233508
The following persons have abandoned
the use of the fictitious business name:
Optometric Center for Family Vision and
Vision Therapy, 1234 Cherry St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070. The fictitious busi-
ness name referred to above was filed in
County on 6/8/09. The business was
conducted by: Kristina Stasko, 72 Pine
ave., San Carlos, CA 94070 and Carole
L. Hong, 351 Booth Bay Ave., Foster
City, CA 94404.
/s/ Kristina Stasko /
/s/ Carole L Hong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 09/19/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/27/12,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12).
SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ506905
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Corene C. Piccolotti aka
Corene C. Martinez aka Corene Fran-
chechini, an individual; and DOES 1
through 100, inclusive
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): Persolve, LLC, a limited liability
company, dba, Account Resolution Asso-
ciates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
203 Public Notices
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, #194748
Edit Alexandryan, #249323
PerSolve, LLC dba Account Resolution
Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
Chatsworth, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) July 8, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 18, 25, and November 1, 8,
2012.
SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ507170
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Wanda Ogilvie aka Wanda
R. Harness aka Ruth W. Harness, an in-
dividual; and DOES 1 through 100, in-
clusive
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): Persolve, LLC, a limited liability
company, dba, Account Resolution Asso-
ciates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
203 Public Notices
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, #194748
Edit Alexandryan, #249323
PerSolve, LLC dba Account Resolution
Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
Chatsworth, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) July 21, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 18, 25, and November 1, 8,
2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
296 Appliances
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 (650)787-8600
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box $80 OBO (650)589-
8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection $50 OBO (650)589-8348
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, SOLD!
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, collectible su-
perstars, Gretzki, Messier, more, OK
sold separately, $100 obo, (650)578-
9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POKEMON CARDS - 1000, excellent
condition, SOLD!
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
ROCK MEMORABILIA Rolling Stones
Tour Guide, From ‘70s. $50 obo
(650)589-8348
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures, SOLD!
24
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Browns’ org.
4 Twine material
9 Come-ons
14 SS supplement,
for some
15 Golfer who was
#1 when she
retired in 2010
16 Missouri’s __
Mountains
17 TUMS target
18 Congregational
divide
20 Modern address
starter
22 Spirited mount
23 Do a hatchet job
24 “Inside the NBA”
analyst Barkley,
familiarly
28 Burning rubber
sound
30 Decorous
34 Green hole
35 Wings it, musically
39 Heavenly bear
40 Fix-it guide
44 Like many eBay
items
45 Tuscany city
46 Hum attachment?
47 Fable messages
50 Manually
52 Woolly garment
56 He voiced Elmer
59 Sweethearts
maker
60 Leap in a tutu
63 Office purchase,
and in a way,
what can be seen
in this puzzle’s
sequence of
circles
67 Fish lacking pelvic
fins
68 Aptly named bug
spray
69 New product div.
70 Holiday tuber
71 Surrogate
72 Out of port
73 “Strange Magic”
rock gp.
DOWN
1 Soon to happen
2 Its name usually
has only two or
three letters
3 Da Vinci
masterpiece, with
“The”
4 Humanities maj.
5 Einstein’s “I”
6 Complaint about
a library volume?
7 Primary artery
8 One working on a
punch, perhaps
9 Dump truck
adjunct
10 Israeli arms
expert __ Gal
11 Diaper woe
12 Gardner who
invented cases
13 Depict unfairly
19 Common menu
option
21 À la mode
serving
25 Sitarist Shankar
26 Woodwind instr.
27 Franklin’s genre
28 Rugby tussle
29 Mexican cheese
31 Magnum, for one
32 Krupp Works city
33 Did Ebert’s job
36 Roast hosts, for
short
37 Part of PBK
38 Understand
41 First family
member?
42 “Mad Money”
channel
43 Put on the
canvas
48 Desolate
49 Poet Silverstein
51 Pilgrimage to
Mecca
53 Ghana’s capital
54 Apple messaging
tool
55 Horses with
interspersed
colored and white
hairs
56 Amt. you
don’t expect
to pay
57 Wide-mouthed
pourer
58 Slimming choice,
briefly
61 Marsh duck
62 Sailor’s patron
64 Plague
65 Ending with
fluor-
66 Nutritional stat
By Rich Mausser
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
10/18/12
10/18/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
298 Collectibles
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6” diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)375-8044
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces $50 (650)589-8348
TONKA BULL Dozer from the 50's or
60's $50 obo (650)589-8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 SOLD!
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
304 Furniture
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINET TABLE walnut with chrome legs.
36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50, San
Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)857-1045
304 Furniture
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
AS NEW Bar-B-Q electric outdoor/in-
door, easy clean, no scrubbing./brushing,
as new, $15., 650-595-3933
AUTO WINE OPENER - mint condition,
one-touch, rechargeable, adapter, foil
cutter, built-in light, easy open, great gift,
$12.00, (650)578-9208
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER- Gevalia Connaissuar
ten cup. white, filters included, makes
great coffee, $9., 650-595-3933
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., 650-375-8044
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
LORUS WATCH- date, sweep second
hand, new battery, stainless steel adjust-
able band, perfect, $19., 650-595-3933
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw $80
(650)521-3542
BANDSAW CRAFTMENS - hardly used
$80. obo, SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1” BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, $35., (650)521-3542
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)857-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRILL PRESS -Craftmens, works great
$85., obo, SOLD!
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
RYOBI TRIM ROUTER - with butt tem-
plate, $40., (650)521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, SOLD!
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLANKET- Double bed size, dusty rose,
satin bindings, warm, like new, washa-
ble. $8., 650-375-8044
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HALLOWEEN DECORATIONS Pump-
kins, Lights, Large spiders, ect. all for
$20 D.C. SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, work great for small of-
fice/room, extra speakers, 4 1/2 in. high,
includes cords. $8.00, (650)578-9208
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEADER shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color with floral motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
mane, tail, ears, eyes, perfect condition
for child/grandchild, $39., 650-595-3933
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOMTOM GPS- every U.S./Canadian
address, car/home chargers, manual,
in factory carton, $59., 650-595-3933
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, $15., 650-375-8044
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
25 Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
(650)348-6428
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
(650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2 SAN Francisco Giants Jackets 1 is
made by (Starter) LG/XLG excellent con-
dition $99 for both (650)571-5790
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY SHIRTS - pearl snaps, pock-
ets, XL/XXL, perfect $15 each, cowboy
boots, 9D, black, $45., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME "Little miss
Muffet" outfit with blonde braided wig
never warn Fredrick of Hollywood $35
D.C. SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME 1950's Poodle
skirt Black & Pink from Fredrick of Holly-
wood $35 D.C. SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME Tony Martin
size 40 warn only once from Selix $25
D.C SOLD!
316 Clothes
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 SOLD!
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, excellent condition,
$30.all, San Bruno, (650)588-1946
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHING EQUPMENT 3 rods with reels,
2 Tackle boxes full fo supplies, $100 all,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole $45
(650)521-3542
318 Sports Equipment
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
BURLINGAME
ESTATE SALE
Friday, Oct. 19,
Saturday, Oct. 20
&
Sunday, Oct. 21
Lots of Antiques,
Collectibles,
Over 1500 Books,
Kitchenware,
Fine art, Sterling,
Appliances and
much more!
1521 Cabrillo Ave,
94010
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20” rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
WEED WHACKER-STIHL FS45 curved
bar, never used, $65.,obo,
(650)345-7352
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
FORD ‘97 Arrowstar Van XLT - 130K
miles, $3500. obo, (650)851-0878
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims, SOLD!
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, $20.,
San Bruno, (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry Contractors Cleaning Concrete Construction Construction
26
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance • Clean
Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Landscaping
EXOTIC GARDENS
Sod Lawns, Sprinklers,
Planting, Lighting, Mason
Work, Retaining Walls,
Drainage
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Sewer trenchless
Pipe replacement
Replace sewer line without
ruining your yard
(650) 461-0326
Lic#933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING
Top Attorney With Masters
In Tax Law Offers Reduced
Fees For New October Clients.
(650)342-3777
Ira Harris Zelnigher, Esq.
(”Ira Harris”)
1840 Gateway Dr., Ste. 200
San Mateo
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Bookkeeping
TAX PREPARATION
Bookkeeping
“No Job Too Small”
Lorentz Wigby, CPA
(650)579-2692
Larry@wigby-CPA.com
27 Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Business Services
PUT YOUR
BUSINESS INFO
ON THE
INTERNET
FREE
Link the phone number
in your classified ad
directly to online details
about your business
ZypPages.com
Barbara@ZypPages.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
CELEBRATE
OCTOBER FEST
October 8 Through 21st
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
Marriage & Family Therapist
Behavior, Chronic Pain or
Illness, Trauma & PTSD, Family,
Couples, Teens, and Veterans
Welcome!
(650)380-4459
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Health & Medical
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
MANUFACTURED
HOME COMMUNITY
For Ages 55+
Canada Cove,
Half Moon Bay
(650) 726-5503
www.theaccenthome.com
Walk to the Beach
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday • Oct. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
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Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 10/31/12
WEBUY
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