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UDK

the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Volume 125 Issue 34 kansan.com Thursday, October 18, 2012
Haunted House
takes inspiration
from Poe
Page 4a
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2012 The University Daily Kansan
Windy with increasing
clouds, NW wind at 28 mph.
Seniors, stop by the Grad Fair
today in the bookstore.
Index Don’t
forget
Today’s
Weather
Classifieds 2b
Crossword 8a
Cryptoquips 8a
opinion 5a
sports 1b
sudoku 8a
HI: 63
LO: 28
Withey at Media Day
Page 1B
megan luCas
mlucas@kansan.com
Wonder Fair, a Lawrence art gal-
lery, is putting customers in the
right mood for Halloween through
its exhibit collection, “100 Ghost
Stories.”
Complete with exhibits featuring
masks created by local and non-
local artists, a zine and a haunted
video store, Wonder Fair is cer-
tainly the place to go to get into the
spooky spirit.
The main exhibit is a print
portfolio. Wonder Fair curator
Meredith Moore chose 10 different
artists to create masks that are both
in the gallery and on sale in print.
To qualify, the artists all needed to
be strong graphic designers.
Each mask is different, though
all the artists used the same tem-
plate.
Lizz Hickey, from Brooklyn,
N.Y., made 20 different masks,
each somehow featuring a chick-
en. Rudy Marron, who is from a
Hispanic family, made Day of the
Dead masks with American cul-
tural elements, such as the Chanel
logo.
“The second exhibit is the zine.
The local artists chose the writers,”
Moore said. “The third exhibit is
the haunted video store.”
There is only a few more days
to see the exhibit, as “100 Ghost
Stories” closes on Sunday.
“Students have to run to see
it; it’s your last chance,” Moore
said. “We are really sad to see the
haunted video store go.”
However, students have the
opportunity to attend one last
blowout before “100 Ghost Stories”
closes. On Thursday at 7 p.m.,
Liberty Hall is hosting a film
screening of “Ghoul School,” which
was made in Springfield, Mo.
The film is about students who
break into their school to steal a
test and are haunted by the ex-
principal.
A party will be held at Wonder
Fair after the screening.
“We will be turning off all the
lights and giving out flashlights to
look at the art,” Moore said. “We
also have a DJ, who is the music
score composer for Ghoul School.”
A secret also lies at Wonder
Fair.
“There is a secret to unlock at
the Haunted Video Store,” Moore
said. “If you tell the clerk you want
a video card, you can get a coupon
to use at Liberty Hall any time. We
are also giving away free prints on
Thursday night.”
Wonder Fair is located at 803
1/2 Massachusetts St., above The
Casbah.
— Edited by Madison Schultz
Tere are ofen two activities as-
sociated with the Halloween sea-
son: trick-or-treating and going to
see horror flms.
From the classic “Friday the
13th” series to the newer “Paranor-
mal Activity” flms, horror flms
and Halloween seem to coincide.
Now, thanks to the Wild West Film
Festival, people get to try their own
hand at making horror flms, only
with a bit of a twist.
Te Wild West Film Festival has
been held in Lawrence since Octo-
ber 2005. It pits teams of flmmak-
ers against one another with the
challenge of creating a fve-minute
horror flm in a 48-hour time span.
Te concept is one that may make
potential flmmakers excited.
“I think this is a really cool com-
petition, especially for someone
who is interested in movies and
making movies,” said Edwin Saun-
ders, a freshman from Vero Beach,
Fla. “As someone who fnds them-
selves as a movie enthusiast, I was
excited as soon as I heard about it.”
While this task seems daunting
at frst, even the most inexperi-
enced flmmakers have the ability
to win.
“It doesn’t really matter what lev-
el of flmmaking you’re at or what
kind of equipment you use,” said
Derek Sellens, the event coordina-
tor. “It’s about having a good idea
and a well-executed idea that really
makes it exciting for people. You
never know what kind of flm is go-
ing to win.”
While this competition may
seem scary to some, it is done for
a good cause. Proceeds from the
Wild West Film Festival have gone
to help a number of non-proft or-
ganizations.
“We’ve given over $1,000 to the
Lawrence Women’s Shelter in the
past, as well as $500 to the animal
shelter,” Sellens said. “We’ve also
given to Hollywood Hawks, which
is the KU graduate association
which helps place recent graduate
flm students. It defnitely helps
keep flmmakers coming out of
Kansas.”
Although the competition sign-
up deadline has passed, students
can still attend the screening at Lib-
erty Hall on Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. Tick-
ets are $5 at the door. A DVD of all
the flms can also be purchased for
$10.
— Edited by Madison Schultz
Halloween gallery ends Sunday
ArT
Contributed photo
These printed masks are the focus of one of three exhibits at Wonder Fair’s 100 Ghost Stories. The art museum, which is at 803 1/2 Massachusetts Street, will feature these
spooky exhibits until Sunday.
lAWreNce
Wild West Film Festival hosts
5-minute short-flm contest
bret ivy
bivy@kansan.com
headed for
norman
After almost defeating Oklahoma State last
week, the Jayhawks go for a major upset
against Oklahoma.
illustration by trey Conrad
gaMe DaY
Page 4B
PAGE 2A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, octobER 18, 2012
The UniversiTy
Daily Kansan
Graduating this semester? Stop by
the KU Bookstore in the Kansas Union
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today for their
Fall Grad Fair. They have announce-
ments, rings, caps and gowns, etc.
contact Us
editor@kansan.com
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Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: UDK_News
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student
newspaper of the University of Kansas.
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Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be
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KJHK is the student voice
in radio. Whether it’s rock
‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or
special events, KJHK 90.7
is for you.
KANSAN MEDIA PARtNERS
Check out
KUJH-TV
on Knology
of Kansas
Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what
you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other
news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.
PoliticalFiber exists to help
students understand political
news. High quality, in-depth
reporting coupled with a
superb online interface and
the ability to interact make PoliticalFiber.
com an essential community tool.
Facebook: facebook.com/politicalfber
twitter: PoliticalFiber
NEwS MANAGEMENt
Editor-in-chief
Ian Cummings
Managing editor
Vikaas Shanker
ADVERtISING MANAGEMENt
business manager
Ross Newton
Sales manager
Elise Farrington
NEwS SEctIoN EDItoRS
News editor
Kelsey Cipolla
Associate news editor
Luke Ranker
copy chiefs
Nadia Imafdon
Taylor Lewis
Sarah McCabe
Designers
Ryan Benedick
Emily Grigone
Sarah Jacobs
Katie Kutsko
Trey Conrad
Rhiannon Rosas
opinion editor
Dylan Lysen
Photo editor
Ashleigh Lee
Sports editor
Ryan McCarthy
Associate sports editor
Ethan Padway
Special sections editor
Victoria Pitcher
Entertainment editor
Megan Hinman
weekend editor
Allison Kohn
web editor
Natalie Parker
technical Editor
Tim Shedor
ADVISERS
General manager and news adviser
Malcolm Gibson
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
weather,
Jay?
Plenty of clouds in the sky.
20% chance of
showers early,
otherwise mostly
cloudy, NW wind
at 20 mph.
Friday
It’s warming up!
HI: 62
LO: 38
Partly cloudy with
10%. South wind
at 10 mph.
Mostly sunny.
South wind at
10 mph.
Going to be a sunny day!
HI: 73
LO: 52
HI: 78
LO: 61
Source: Weather.com
What’s the
Saturday
calEndar
Friday, October 19
whAt: Soccer vs. Iowa State
whERE: Jayhawk Soccer Complex
whEN: 3-5 p.m.
AboUt: Watch the Jayhawks match up
against the Cyclones.
whAt: Voter Registration Drive
whERE: Kansas Union
whEN: 3 p.m.
AboUt: Stop by the Union during Tunes
at Noon to register to vote if you haven’t
already.
whAt: Wild West Film Fest
whERE: Liberty Hall, 642 Massachusetts
St.
whEN: All Day
AboUt: Join KU Filmworks for a flm
competition in which teams have 48 hours
to create a horror flm that is no longer that
fve minutes.
Sunday
Sunday, October 21 Thursday, October 18
whAt: Soccer vs. Texas Tech
whERE: Jayhawk Soccer Complex
whEN: 1-3 p.m.
AboUt: Watch the Jayhawks play the Red
Raiders
whAt: Elizabeth Berghout: Carillon Recital
whERE: Campus
whEN: 5-5:45 p.m.
AboUt: Listen to Dr. Berghout play the bells
in the Memorial Campanile.
whAt: Tilly and the Wall
whERE: Jackpot Music Hall
whEN: 9 p.m.
AboUt: The Nebraska-based indie pop band
tours with Nicky Da B.
whAt: Drop-In Draw: Mammal skulls
whERE: Natural History Museum
whEN: 5-7:30 p.m.
AboUt: Get ready for Halloween with morose
sketching. The museum will have mammal
skulls available to draw along with coffee and
cookies.
whAt: Campus Movie Series: Ted
whERE: Kansas Union, Woodruff Auditorium
whEN: 8-10 p.m.
AboUt: Check out Seth MacFarlane’s story of a
grown man trying to coexist with his childhood
friend, a talking teddy bear.
whAt: So Percussion
whERE: Lied Center
whEN: 7:30-9 p.m.
AboUt: Listen to these Brooklyn-based musi-
cians play everything from drums to beer cans.
Saturday, October 20
whAt: NPHC Step Show
whERE: Kansas Union, Woodruff Audito-
rium
whEN: 7:30-8:30 p.m.
AboUt: Members of the National Pan-
Hellenic Council will be performing in SUA’s
second step show.
whAt: Noche Latina
whERE: The Chateau
whEN: 10 p.m.-2 a.m.
AboUt: Students can learn about Hispanic
culture at this event sponsored by the His-
panic American Leadership Organization.
whAt: EMU Theatre Presents Horrorshow VI
whERE: Lawrence Arts Center
whEN: 7:30 p.m.
AboUt: The local theater group is reviving
some of its best Halloween productions
from years past.
POLICE REPORTS
Information based off the Douglas
county Sheriff’s offce booking recap
and KU offce of Public Safety crime
reports.
• A 21-year-old Lawrence man was
arrested Wednesday at 2:27 a.m. in the
600 block of Massachusetts Street on
suspicion of transporting an open con-
tainer and operating under the infuence.
Bond was set at $600.
• An 18-year-old Lawrence woman
was arrested Tuesday at 8:16 p.m. in the
1200 block of Kentucky Street on sus-
picion of operating under the infuence,
failing to report an accident, possessing
of drug paraphernalia and leaving the
scene of accident involving damage to
a vehicle or property. Bond was set at
$800. She was released.
• A 19-year-old male University stu-
dent was arrested in the 1100 block of
Mississippi Street on suspicion of two
counts of domestic battery, criminal
damage to property and kidnapping.
Bond was not set.
• A 54-year-old Lawrence man was
arrested Tuesday at 6:52 p.m. in the
1800 block of Harper Street on suspicion
of driving while intoxicated, third offense
or greater, and driving while intoxicated,
third offense. Bond was not set.
• A 23-year-old Lawrence man was
arrested Tuesday at 4:04 p.m. in the
3000 block of West Sixth Street on sus-
picion of transporting an open container
and operating under the infuence. Bond
was set at $600. He was released.
CAMPUS
The University Daily Kansan is accepting
applications for Spring 2013 editor-
in-chief and business manager. The
positions are responsible overseeing for
the editorial and advertising content of
The University Daily Kansan and Kansan.
com. Experience with The Kansan is not
required but is encouraged.
Applications can be found at employ-
ment.ku.edu. The deadline for applica-
tions has been extended to 11:59 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 31, and the Kansan will
interview applicants in the frst two weeks
of November. Send questions about the
application process to editor@kansan.
com.
— Ian Cummings
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. — Fresh
off an intensely combative
debate, President Barack Obama,
Republican Mitt Romney and their
running mates are taking their
tuned-up fight to the precious few
battleground states where the elec-
tion is up for grabs with just 20
days to go.
In the sprint to Election
Day, Nov. 6, every aspect of the
campaign seems to be taking on a
fresh sense of urgency — the ads,
the fundraising, the grass-roots
mobilizing and the outreach to key
voting blocs, particularly women.
Obama wore a pink breast can-
cer bracelet while campaigning in
Iowa and Romney’s campaign dis-
patched former Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice to introduce vice
presidential nominee Paul Ryan in
Ohio.
Rice and Ryan highlighted the
plight of women in the current
economy, with Ryan reading sta-
tistics from the podium on female
unemployment and poverty rates
under Obama’s leadership. “We
need to get people back to work,”
Ryan said. “We need to get this
economy turned around.”
Romney also quietly began air-
ing a new TV ad suggesting he
believes abortion “should be an
option” in cases of rape, incest
or when the life of the mother is
at stake.
The ad is an appeal to women
voters, who polls show have
favored Obama throughout the
race although Romney has been
making gains among them.
Romney supported abortion
rights as Massachusetts governor
but now says he opposes abortion
with limited exceptions. His cam-
paign didn’t announce the ad, but it
began running on debate night on
stations that reach Virginia, Ohio
and Wisconsin.
Romney traveled with come-
dian Dennis Miller, and singer
Lee Greenwood warmed up his
crowd in southeast Virginia. Vice
President Joe Biden was westward
bound for Colorado and Nevada.
Obama appears to have 237 of
the 270 electoral votes needed for
victory comfortably in hand, and
Romney is confident of 191. That
leaves 110 electoral votes up for
grabs.
Kansan positions open
• A theft was reported in the 1800
block of Naismith Drive Tuesday at 1:05
p.m. after someone broke into a car and
damaged the steering column. Damage
is reported at $1,000. The case is open.
ASSocIAtED PRESS
Women voters warming up to Romney
HEALTH
ASSocIAtED PRESS
Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama spar during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, Tuesday in Hempstead, N.Y.
America’s favorite dietary sup-
plements, multivitamins, mod-
estly lowered the risk for cancer
in healthy male doctors who took
them for more than a decade, the
frst large study to test these pills
has found.
Te result is a surprise because
many studies of individual vitamins
have found they don’t help prevent
chronic diseases and some even
seemed to raise the risk of cancer.
In the new study, multivitamins
cut the chance of developing cancer
by 8 percent. Tat is less efective
than a good diet, exercise and not
smoking, each of which can lower
cancer risk by 20 percent to 30 per-
cent, cancer experts say.
Multivitamins also may have dif-
ferent results in women, younger
men or people less healthy than
those in this study.
“It’s a very mild efect and per-
sonally I’m not sure it’s signifcant
enough to recommend to anyone”
although it is promising, said Dr.
Ernest Hawk, vice president of can-
cer prevention at the University of
Texas MD Anderson Cancer Cen-
ter and formerly of the National
Cancer Institute.
“At least this doesn’t suggest a
harm” as some previous studies on
single vitamins have, he said.
Hawk reviewed the study for the
American Association for Cancer
Research, which is meeting in Ana-
heim, Calif., where the study was to
be presented on Wednesday. It also
was published online in the Journal
of the American Medical Associa-
tion.
About one-third of U.S. adults
and as many as half of those over
50 take multivitamins, yet no gov-
ernment agency recommends their
routine use.
ELECTION
Vitamins lower cancer risk
ASSocIAtED PRESS
ASSocIAtED PRESS
Monthly calendar vitamin packs were used in a long-term study on multivitamins.
Dietary supplements and multivitamins,modestly lowered the risk of developing
cancer in healthy male doctors who took them daily for more than a decade.
PAGE 3A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, octobER 18, 2012
NEwS of thE woRLD
— Associated Presss
RIO DE JANEIRO — Days afer
police stormed one of Rio de Ja-
neiro’s most dangerous shantytowns
to seize back territory long held by
a powerful drug dealing organiza-
tion, city health and welfare work-
ers are working to ease the despair
and devastation lef behind among
hundreds of crack cocaine addicts
suddenly without drugs.
Since Sunday, when more than
2,000 heavily armed ofcers stormed
into the Manguinhos and Jacarezin-
ho complexes, crews working with
police support by Wednesday had
rounded up 231 crack users, and
another 67 who had migrated else-
where looking for the drug.
Te area had been Rio’s biggest
open-air crack market, known as
“cracolandia,” or “crackland,” where
hundreds of users bought the drug,
consumed it and lingered in shacks
and on blankets, picking through
trash for recyclables to sell so they
could buy more.
“Tese people have to be cured
and treated,” Jose Mariano Bel-
trame, who heads security for Rio
state, said during a Tuesday visit to
the area. “Tey’re not coming back
to Jacarezinho and Manguinhos; the
area is now occupied.”
Drug dealers tired of the hassle
posed by the addicts and by incur-
sions of city health and welfare
workers earlier this year banned
crack in Mandela, one of the slums.
Police now have taken over the en-
tire complex housing about 70,000
people as part of a state program
to make Rio safer before the 2014
World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.
In the days afer the occupation,
ofcers were still searching for guns,
drugs and suspects, but other city
services were already making head-
way. Te garbage removal company
ran its own mega-operation, re-
moving 220 tons of trash. City util-
ity workers replaced more than 300
street lights.
Te crew of welfare workers, psy-
chologists and others who provide
help rounded up drug users found in
the streets and took them to shelters.
Adults don’t have to stay; of the 215
adults picked up from the streets be-
tween Sunday and Tuesday, half had
lef the shelters by Tuesday night,
the city health department said.
YANGON, Myanmar — Myan-
mar has signed a deal with a British
aviation enthusiast to allow the ex-
cavation of a World War II treasure:
dozens of Spitfre fghter planes bur-
ied by the British almost 70 years
ago.
Aviation enthusiast David J. Cun-
dall discovered the locations of the
aircraf afer years of searching. Te
planes are believed to be in good
condition, since they were report-
edly packed in crates and hidden by
British forces to keep them out of
the hands of invading Japanese.
Te British Embassy said Wednes-
day that the agreement was reached
afer discussions between President
Tein Sein and British Prime Minis-
ter David Cameron during his visit
to Myanmar earlier this year.
Te excavation of the rare planes
is slated to begin by the end of Oc-
tober.
Te Myanma Ahlin daily report-
ed that the excavation agreement
was signed Tuesday by Director
General of Civil Aviation Tin Naing
Tun, Cundall on behalf of his Brit-
ish company DJC, and Htoo Htoo,
managing director of Cundall’s
Myanmar partner, the Shwe Taung
Paw company.
“It took 16 years for Mr. David
Cundall to locate the planes buried
in crates. We estimate that there are
at least 60 Spitfres buried and they
are in good condition,” Htoo Htoo
Zaw said.
MOGADISHU, Somalia — Te
frst Ugandan soldiers to fy into
Somalia 5 1/2 years ago came un-
der attack as soon as they arrived:
Militants fred mortars at the new
mission’s welcome ceremony.
Today, backed by a sweeping
multinational efort that includes
$338 million in U.S. equipment,
wages and training, the force of
Ugandans, Burundians, Kenyans
and Somalis that was deployed to
take on the country’s Islamic radi-
cals can claim a degree of success
that had initially seemed highly
unlikely.
When the Ugandan spearhead
arrived on March 6, 2007, Somalia
had been in chaos for years, ruled
by warlords and insurgents bent
on creating an Islamic state. AMI-
SOM, the African Union Mission
in Somalia, was the most ambi-
tious response since the failed
1990s U.S. intervention of Black-
Hawk-Down infamy.
Te militants called al-Shabab,
who once controlled nearly all of
Mogadishu, have been gone from
the capital for more than a year,
and last month AMISOM booted
them out of their last urban strong-
hold, the port city of Kismayo.
“I think from a military and
security perspective it has been
a success. Absent AMISOM, al-
Shabab would now be in control of
Mogadishu. We would not be talk-
ing about a new (Somali) national
government with a president from
civil society in charge,” said E.J.
Hogendoorn, a Horn of Africa
expert at the International Crisis
Group, a think tank that tracks
conficts.
But if the specter of Somalia as
al-Qaida’s next Yemen has been
averted, the challenge now is to
achieve a strong central govern-
ment for an estimated 10 million
Somalis. “What is necessary for
the long term in Somalia,” said
Hogendoorn, “is some sort of po-
litical resolution to this confict.”
Offcials give aid to crack addicts
SOUTH AMERICA
ASSocIAtED PRESS
ASSocIAtED PRESS
A welfare worker escorts a young suspected crack user to a waiting van near the
Parque Uniao slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on Wednesday.
AFRICA
Multinational efforts
stop Somali terroists
ASSocIAtED PRESS
ASSocIAtED PRESS
In this Feb. 17, 2011 fle photo, al-Shabab fghters march with their weapons
during military exercises on the outskirts of Mogadishu, Somalia.
ASIA
World War II planes to be dug up in Myanmar
ASSocIAtED PRESS
ASSocIAtED PRESS
In this Sept. 28, 1941 fle photo, Spitfres, subscribed for by the people of Assam,
are now operating with fghter command of the Royal Air Force.
Fun, Trendy, and Prices
to Die For!
PHOTOS BY TRINA BAKER PHOTOGRAPHY AND AMBER TEMPLE PHOTOGRAPHY
809 Massachusetts
Lawrence, KS 66044
(785)331-4449
PAGE 4A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, octobER 18, 2012
Just as mystery and darkness sur-
round his bizarre life and nightmar-
ish literature, Te Chambers of Ed-
gar Allen Poe haunted attraction in
Kansas City, Mo., promises to live
up to its namesake.
Te Chambers is “a literary walk
through Poe’s writing,” according to
Amber Bequeaith, vice president of
Full Moon Productions. Full Moon
also operates Te Beast and Te
Edge of Hell haunted houses, but
Te Chambers is a unique experi-
ence for patrons.
“Poe’s literary work speaks for it-
self, and for fans of his, this is going
into his writings and being able to
experience them in a physical way
instead of just reading,” Bequeaith
said.
Some of Poe’s most famous and
twisted horror tales include “Te
Raven,” “Te Tell-Tale Heart,” “Te
Black Cat” and “Te Fall of the
House of Usher,” and they all fea-
ture themes of terror, obscurity and
imagination, making them ideal
subjects for a haunted journey.
Randy Nguyen, a sophomore
from Wichita and a self-proclaimed
fan of haunted houses, said he has
not been to Te Chambers but
would be interested in going.
“If it’s anything like Te Beast
and Te Edge of Hell, it will prob-
ably be really creative and interest-
ing,” Nguyen said.
An investigation by Discovery
Channel’s Ghost Lab has proven the
location to be buzzing with para-
normal activity. Te Chambers has
also recently been the site of flming
for “Horror Filmed,” a movie cen-
tered around two college students
attempting to prove the existence
of ghosts. Bequeaith said there were
unexplainable events that happened
in the building while shooting the
footage.
What makes this attraction really
stand out, however, is the audience
participation factor and the oppor-
tunity to experience frsthand the
ghostly activity. Visitors learn how
to use paranormal equipment and
actually conduct their own hunt
through Te Chambers that comes
complete with a DVD creation of
personal footage available afer-
ward.
Te construction of Te Cham-
bers is historically and geographi-
cally accurate, too. Te artifacts
used inside the attraction are repli-
cas of the era when Poe lived, and
Bequeaith’s research of Poe in his
hometown of Baltimore provided
the basis for the fourth-foor recre-
ation of his gravesite.
“All of the tombstones are facing
the same direction and all the names
are the same,” Bequeaith said. Tere
is also a recreated church that was
built over the gravesite in Baltimore
that visitors have to crawl under to
get to part of the graveyard.
Te Chambers and its coun-
terpart, the Macabre Cinema, are
nonproft organizations that beneft
the Dream Factory of Kansas City,
a charity for critically ill children.
Bequeaith said most of the audi-
tioned actors and workers for the
Chambers are volunteers for the
Dream Factory.
Single tickets for the haunted at-
traction start at $25. A combo pack
that includes tickets to the Cham-
bers and the Macabre Cinema starts
at $38.
Te Chambers is open this Fri-
day and Saturday, and next Friday
through Halloween. Doors open at
7:30 p.m. on Fridays and 8 p.m. all
other days.
— Edited by Madison Schultz
An old tradition is being revived
at the University through Greek life
on campus.
Te National Pan-Hellenic
Council (NPHC) will be perform-
ing a step show on Saturday in the
Woodruf Auditorium in the Kan-
sas Union.
“When we were asked by NPHC
to help sponsor the step show, we
thought it was a perfect opportu-
nity to help showcase the talent
here at KU,” said Student Union
Activities Cultural Programming
Coordinator Subha Upadhyayula, a
sophomore from Leawood.
Stepping is a form of dance in
which the dancers use their bodies
as percussion instruments to set the
beat. Te step show had been a tra-
dition at the University dating back
to the mid-1990s.
“We haven’t done it in two years,
and so many people remember it,”
said NPHC member Chris Cushin-
berry, a junior from Topeka. “We’re
trying to get it back for KU.”
Tere will be six acts perform-
ing at the show, including Uni-
versity fraternities Phi Beta Sigma
and Kappa Alpha Psi, and sorority
Zeta Phi Beta. Tere are three other
outside acts: the University’s Dance
Unity, the Boys and Girls Club of
Lawrence and the Lawrence High
School step team.
Cushinberry, a member of Phi
Beta Sigma, talked about the his-
torical aspects of the show.
“NPHC’s governance is African-
American greeks here at KU, and
it’s been a tradition that we partici-
pate in step shows,” he said. “It all
goes back to our chapter’s history,
and to keep this tradition going
is an honor. Te preparation and
hype for it will have lots of people
coming.”
Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity mem-
ber Stan Parker, a senior from the
Kansas City area, also expressed
his excitement about the upcoming
performance.
“I want KU to come out and
support us in large numbers and
get exposed to step culture,” Parker
said. “Also, they should have a good
time.”
Zeta Phi Beta member Courtney
Newman, a senior from Leaven-
worth, also talked about the up-
coming performance.
“It’s good to be able to add dif-
ferent things to my life besides aca-
demics,” Newman said. “It’s nice
to take a break and have fun with
something like this.”
Upadhyayula, a frst-time mem-
ber of SUA, expects the extensive
advertising for the event will help
draw people in.
“Tere are calendars and posters
everywhere, and I expect it to be a
blast and a lot of fun,” she said.
Doors will open at 7:15 p.m. for
the 8 p.m. show. Tickets are $7 in
advance, $10 at the door and $5
with a Student Saver Card.
— Edited by Madison Schultz
Poe haunted house lives up to author
Television
Halloween
CaMPUs
DANE VEDDER
dvedderkansan.com
ELLY GRImm
egrimm@kansan.com
EmmA LEGAULt
elegault@kansan.com
step show
to perform
in Union
new season starts
for ‘walking Dead’
While the second season of “Te
Walking Dead” was nothing more
than a post-apocalyptic rendition
of “All My Children,” the third sea-
son’s premiere, “Seed,” snaps you
back into the grim reality of a ragtag
group of survivors in a world where
the dead outnumber the living.
Afer two painstaking seasons
of watching Rick Grimes (Andrew
Lincoln) fght tooth-and-nail to
fnd a suitable shelter for this group,
including his wife, Lori (Sarah
Wayne Callies), and his son, Carl
(Chandler Riggs), the new episode
throttles us into an intense action
sequence in which the survivors
clear a residential home of zombies
without speaking a word. All puns
aside, their methods are perfectly
executed.
Te plot’s new direction is most
likely in response to recent criti-
cism that the previous season was
“treading water” and shying away
from major plot progression.
Season 3 picks up afer an entire
winter has come and gone, and the
weather isn’t the only thing that has
changed. Te premiere shows the
developing survival skills of several
cast members, who before would
cower at the sight of a zombie but
are now spraying more blood,
brains and bullet casings in the frst
two minutes than any episodes be-
fore. Decisions are made with the
fuidity of a military unit, which
helps push the story past the con-
stant struggle of protecting group
members who seemed to dominate
much of the previous confict.
Staying true to producer Glen
Mazzara’s promise of a more heav-
ily plot-driven story, the group of
survivors stumble upon a prison
that, aside from being flled with
hundreds of fesh-craving guards
and prison mates, presents the frst
truly safe shelter they have seen
yet.
“Tey are starting to have more
wins,” Mazzara said in an online
press release. “It’s important for the
group to have wins, so when they
sufer losses it’s that much more
devastating.”
If the frst 19 episodes of “Te
Walking Dead” lef you itching for
more gritty, gunslinging zombie
extermination, the latest in the se-
ries will surely reestablish itself as a
masterpiece in the genre and make
fans fall back in love with the group
of survivors who frst drew them
in.
— Edited by Sarah McCabe
coNtRIbUtED Photo
edgar allen Poe was a Romantic writer best known for his gruesome and macabre
short stories and poems. The Chambers of edgar allen Poe haunted attraction
focuses on Poe’s most horrifying works.
ASSocIAtED PRESS
From left, sarah wayne Callies, Robert Kirkman, andrew lincoln and Danai Gurira attend the premiere of “The walking Dead”
at Universal studios in los angeles on oct. 4. The show premiered its third season on sunday.
At Commerce Bank, we’re working behind the scenes to save you some
time ... and a little money, too. A KU Checking Account helps you:

ü%DQNRQOLQHDQGRQ\RXUSKRQH
ü*HWHPDLODOHUWVWRNHHSWUDFNRI\RXUDFFRXQW
ü8VHDQ\&RPPHUFH$70ZLWKRXWIHHV
Use your KU Card to access your Commerce
account. It’s a whole lot easier than a pop quiz.
Well, maybe just your banking.
We ask, listen and solve.
commercebank.com/kucard / 785.864.5846
© 2012 COMMERCE BANCSHARES, INC.
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to make college easier.”
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PAGE 5A
Text your FFA submissions to
785-289-8351 or
at kansan.com
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TEXT
FREE FOR ALL
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
That awkward moment when your
roommate texts the FFA about your sex
life...
Quarterback controversy is so old. We
should be focused on getting Air Bud
into a KU jersey.
My dear FFA,
One day you should accept just,
Entries in haiku.
Oliver Hall out-drank and out-
drugged every other dorm on campus...
Is it bad that I’m kind of proud right
now?
Just overheard from outside the
men’s bathroom: “On a scale of 1 to 8,
how gay are we right now?”
Why did the University put all those
Halloween decorations up two weeks
early?
Hey FFA, the Pokémon couple are no
longer. He went and broke my heart.
Bring on the tissues and Ben and
Jerry’s...
So...was that moment awkward?
No guy can do me better than a
Perkins cinnamon roll.
We just frat packed the FFA. Deal
with it GDIs.
All stamps are food stamps if you eat
stamps.
Mommmm! I can’t fnd my binder full
of women! Where’d you put it?!
My life is a romantic comedy. It’s just
stuck in the frst 30 minutes of being
awkward and single.
My teacher just compared the Chiefs
to the French, essentially claiming that
both have delusional visions of success.
Finally, someone understands!
Kanye West should interrupt the
presidential debates.
You don’t cheer for the Crimson Tide,
you cheer for the Jayhawks. Get it right.
Totally just saw a guy playing the air
guitar while walking on Wescoe Beach.
I still use the stirring straw thingys
to blow bubbles in my coffee. Is my
freshman showing?
I think I actually like the people from
“Jersey Shore.”
This girl is watching lesbian porn on
her laptop in class... I’m sitting next to
her from now on!
If I fail the human sexuality midterm,
all of my worst fears will be realized.
Halloween is the one day that I get
to pretend to be someone I’m not. So
does that mean I can be Jeff Withey’s
girlfriend?
That brief moment of panic when
you enter through the wrong door in a
Budig class.
LETTER GuidELinEs
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.com.
Write LETTER TO THE EdiTOR in the e-mail
subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s
name, grade and hometown.Find our full let-
ter to the editor policy online at kansan.
com/letters.
HOw TO submiT A LETTER TO THE EdiTOR cOnTAcT us
ian cummings, editor
editor@kansan.com
Vikaas shanker, managing editor
vshanker@kansan.com
dylan Lysen, opinion editor
dlysen@kansan.com
Ross newton, business manager
rnewton@kansan.com
Elise Farrington, sales manager
efarrington@kansan.com
malcolm Gibson, general manager and news
adviser
mgibson@kansan.com
Jon schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EdiTORiAL bOARd
Members of The Kansan Editorial Board are Ian Cummings,
Vikaas Shanker, Dylan Lysen, Ross Newton and Elise
Farrington.
I was born and raised in Kansas,
thus I am a KU, Royals and Chiefs
fan. I am suspicious of anyone who
doesn’t follow the same protocol.
I strongly detest Midwesterners
donning Boston Red Sox or New
York Yankees caps.
Having said that, I can say, with-
out regret, Chiefs fans suck. Not
all Chiefs fans, but many, way too
many, do indeed suck.
Once again, let me express my
allegiance to the Chiefs:
I have split season tickets with
my family for the past 10 years. I
have attended at least four games a
year for the past 16 years.
I have seen bitter losses at Ar-
rowhead. I was there in 1999 when
the Raiders (with nothing to play
for, having been already knocked
out of the playof hunt) beat the
Chiefs (who needed the win to
make the playofs) in the last game
of the season, in 1995 when Lin
Elliot missed three feld goals in a
playof game against the Colts, and
in 2003 when our defense couldn’t
stop Peyton Manning and the
Colts.
Trough the sufering, I am
still a proud fan. And, if we went
another 19 years without a playof
win, I’d still be a fan. Why? It’s who
I am and it’s my mom’s fault.
For some unexplained reason,
Kansas City became a quarter-
back-centered town, despite the
fact that the Chiefs have never
been a pass-frst football team. Tis
quarterback obsession began dur-
ing the Elvis Grbac/Rich Gannon
debacle of ’97. Chiefs fans eventu-
ally ran Grbac out of town much
like they’re doing with Matt Cassel.
Since then, every quarterback has
been on a short leash with fans,
and the backup has almost always
been the most popular guy on the
team.
Criticism is OK, But what I
can’t stand—even more than fair-
weather Chiefs fans, which there
are way too many—is the booing
at Arrowhead. (Forget the cheer-
ing afer Cassel was injured last
week, which was very, very little)
I have never understood why a
fan would boo their own team at
home. Chiefs fans are the worst at
this. Te past couple of seasons,
the standard procedure has been to
boo Cassel afer his frst incomple-
tion and throughout the rest of the
game.
Booing has become more and
more common at Arrowhead
through the years. I don’t under-
stand why “fans” (true fans don’t
boo their own team at home) don’t
see how this is idiotic and counter-
productive.
I understand why Chiefs fans
are upset. Te Pioli regime makes
many fans yearn for the days of
King Carl, a GM that brought
nearly 20 years of success to Kansas
City and who was also run out of
town by idiotic fans. However, the
most important ingredient to any
good sports town is the fans. Mike
Hendricks, a columnist for the
Kansas City Star, recently referred
to our city as “loserville” because of
the poor performance of our sport
teams. “Forbes” magazine ranked
Kansas City as the eighth most
miserable sports city in the U.S.
I take ofense to this. Fans make
the city, not the teams’ perfor-
mances. If we want to be a truly
great sports town then we should
support our teams no matter what.
Cities like Green Bay and Pitts-
burgh have set the example. Packer
fans have sold out every home
game at Lambeau since 1960. Pitts-
burgh has sold out every home
game since 1972. Green Bay has
had their fair share of bad times
in the past 52 years, yet their fans
remain true.
Too bad Kansas City can’t do
the same thing. Instead we boo
our team at home and only sell-
out when we’re winning. What we
need is pride, not pride in our team
but pride in ourselves as fans and
in our city, regardless of our teams’
record.
Scott is a graduate student majoring
in American studies from Overland
Park. Follow him on Twitter
@dscott12.
Te “freshman 15” may no
longer exist because with current
obesity rates, we’re looking at the
“freshman 30” or worse, the “fresh-
man 45.”
According to research from the
College Student Health Survey of
University Students, 31 percent of
college kids are overweight. So
that means if you’re sitting in a
class with 30 students, almost 10 of
your classmates are obese.
College life isn’t the type of life
it was years ago. Our older friends
can’t fnd jobs afer graduation, our
parents are nagging us to do well
in school and every passing week
seems to be a test of our sanity.
Stress and sleep deprivation may
be apart of this journey right now
in life but it also contributes to our
bad food choices.
Imagine the last time you were
up late cramming for an exam or
getting through a day afer fve
hours of sleep. Were you more
likely to embark on a healthy ad-
venture at the salad bar or make
a thoughtless, fried decision for
lunch? Chances are your blood-
shot eyes saw the frst easy, quick
option and grabbed it. Stress
makes us lazy and this laziness
leads to an unhealthy domino ef-
fect.
A day with barely any sleep,
flled with stress and fast food
equates to one, big unhealthy life-
style that so many of us experience
more frequently than we’d like to
admit. Te trick is to spice it up.
Hot dogs, pizza and hamburgers
have long been the traditional col-
lege feasts for years, so this type
of tradition isn’t easily breakable.
Stress also goes hand in hand
with college but what about health
shakes instead of sugary lattes or
salads instead of greasy burgers?
Notice how I am not trying to help
you prevent stress, that was an ear-
lier column of mine this semester,
but show other options to eating
while under the infuence of stress
and little sleep.
Your body will crave a sug-
ary food if you’re sleep deprived,
but stay away from the tempta-
tion. Replace the doughnuts with
scrambled eggs, a banana or celery
sticks with peanut butter. Te last
thing you want to do when you’re
exhausted is put together a meal so
don’t forget grocery stores and the
Underground are just a few of the
places that sell premade healthy
options for quick consumption.
Grab a cofee if that’s in your dai-
ly routine but don’t double up just
because you’re tired. Te cafeine
may temporarily jumpstart your
sluggish day but it will prolong it
too. I sometimes think that 24/7
fast food chains and cofee shops
are working together. Four cofees
later and you fnd yourself at the
drive-thru around 2 a.m. thinking,
“Tey got me again!”
We may not be able to complete-
ly ban the bad stuf out of our lives
because late night study sessions
and days with little sleep afer im-
promptu bar hopping are neces-
sary evils of college. However, we
can change our food choices by
adding a little more of the healthy
stuf or better yet, get more sleep.
Montano is a senior majoring in
journalism from Topeka. Follow him
on Twitter @MikeMontanoME.
Eating healthy depsite the challenges
Keeping the Chief allegiance
LIFESTYLE
thursdAy, octobEr 18, 2012
By David Scott
dscott@kansan.com
By Mike Montano
mmontano@kansan.com
SPORTS
how did you feel about EsPN’s “30
for 30” on Naismith’s original rules of
basketball coming home?
Follow us on Twitter @UDK_Opinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just might publish them.
@raymundo_t19
@udK_opinion So happy those rules didn’t go to
Duke! David and Josh are KU heroes #RockChalk
@vida_ambiciosa
@udK_opinion loved it! Made me think about all the
memories Ive made here as a part of KU athletics. Gonna
miss this place #rockchalktilidie
.
@24whitemamba
@udK_opinion I love 30for30’s but that was the
most boring I’ve ever seen. If it wasn’t about KU I
wouldn’t have sat through the whole thing
@raymundo_t19
@udK_opinion i got goose bumps when they did the
short intro video and was nervous during the auction, and
I know how it turned out
Illustrated by Maddie Lytle
By Marshall Schmidt
SCHMIDT HAPPENS
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment

Odd Future continues its
2012 releases with MellowHype’s
“Numbers.”
MellowHype is a duo consist-
ing of rapper Hodgy Beats and
producer and occasional rapper
Left Brain. Last year MellowHype
re-released one of their previ-
ous mixtapes, “Blackenedwhite,”
which is regarded as the duo’s
best work because of the great
verses, amazing production
and general cohesiveness of the
two, but a lot of fans already
were familiar with the material.
“Numbers” is the first full-length
album MellowHype is releasing.
Left Brain is the star of the
show throughout the album. He
toys with everything from gui-
tar samples to synth melodies.
Throughout the album, Left
Brain’s production tends to over-
shadow Hodgy Beats’ lyrics, and
while Left Brain doesn’t appear
enough as a
rapper, his
c h a r m i n g
goofiness is
usually a great
counter to
Hodgy Beats’
seriousness.
Part of
what made MellowHype’s pre-
vious release, “Blackenedwhite,”
so great was the fiery energy in
Hodgy Beats verses, which he ini-
tially made his name on. Hodgy
is not the best lyricist, but one of
his greatest assets was his ability
to demand attention to his lyrics.
Sadly, this is mostly missing from
the new album. Hodgy sounds
bland and uninspired in tracks
such as “Leflair.” The album also
suffers from repetitive and often
annoying hooks. This is very
noticeable with the beginning
track, “Grill,” in which the duo
uncreatively spell out their name
on the hook.
There are high points to the
album, such as in the tracks
“Astro” and “P2.” Astro features
fellow Odd Future member Frank
Ocean. Hodgy does a solid job on
the track, but Frank Ocean truly
steals the show. On the hook he
sings with conviction. He even
raps on the track near the end,
and he sounds great there, too.
The track “P2” features anoth-
er Odd Future colleague Earl
Sweatshirt. His verse is one of
the best on the entire album.
His flow is immaculate on this
track, and the verse is filled with
slick wordplay as Earl Sweatshirt
reflects on his past and the future
of Odd Future.
“Numbers” is a solid rap album,
but Mellowhype has shown in
the past that its capable of much
more.
— Edited by Sarah McCabe
Girl: You know what’s
disgusting? Pregnancy.
Nine months without
alcohol? Are you kidding
me!?
Professor: Folks, I
am not smart enough to
write trick questions.
Girl: Who is our bas-
ketball coach again? Is
that who Weis is?
Girl: I have such bad senioritis. I can’t
wait to be done already.
Guy: Aren’t you a sophomore?
Professor: Nobody’s like, “Freedom,
take it or leave it.”
Girl: Kim Jong-un begs to differ.
Guy: I’ve never walked this fast in my
life. I feel like I have calf cramps, and
I’ve never had one of those before... Or
maybe I just tore my ACL.
Girl: That’s the only difference be-
tween Minnesot’ns and Kansans. We
know how to bundle.
W
e
s
c
o
e

W
i
t
CATCh OF The WeeK
Andrea Stewart
hOMeTOWN: Smith Center
YeAR: Junior
MAJOR: Journalism and history
INTeReSTeD IN: Men
WhAT IS YOuR FAvORITe
MONTh OF The YeAR?
I love October. It is when the
weather starts to change into the
fall season. I love Halloween and
all of the fall colors.
WhAT IS ONe ThINg NOT
MANY PeOPLe KNOW AbOuT
YOu?
I used to be a cheerleader, not
many people know that.
IS TheRe A quOTe YOu
LIve bY?
I know that he is a fictional
character but I love the one from
Albus Dumbledore “Happiness
can be found, even in the darkest
of times, if one only remembers
to turn on the light.”
WhAT DO YOu vALue MOST
IN A ReLATIONShIP?
Communication and honesty
are really important to me. I
don’t like being lied to. It’s not
anything I want. I don’t think
you can have a healthy relation-
ship unless you communicate
what you want, what you’re
thinking, and how you’re feeling
about everything.
DO YOu hAve A TALeNT?
I’m really good at doodling! I
doodle everything.
WhAT MAKeS YOu AN OuT-
gOINg PeRSON?
I just have this sense of adven-
ture in me. If I haven’t tried
something I have to try it at least
once. I did the Color Run a few
weekends ago. I’ve never done it
before. I just wanted to do it for
the fun of it.
WhAT WOuLD be A CRAzY
ADveNTuRe FOR YOu?
I think back-packing around
Europe would be awesome!
WhAT DO YOu APPReCIATe
MOST AbOuT YOuR LIFe?
I really appreciate my friends.
I know that if I needed some-
thing I can always go to them,
and they’d be willing to help out.
No matter what!
MuSIC
Rap duo release new album
Ryan wRiGht
rwright@kansan.com
final rating
Numbers
FAShION
Check out this fall’s
new footwear styles
callan Reilly
creilly@kansan.com
Shoes: They’re just like the cher-
ry on top of a sundae. Countless
sayings such as, “You can’t judge
a person until you walk a mile in
their shoes,” or “If the shoe fits,”
center around these favorite (and
necessary) accessories. Even the
fairy tale “Cinderella” is centered
on footwear. They can transform
an outfit from good to great, and
this year expect to see a big change
from last year’s trends.
Current shoe styles range from
high tops and wedge sneakers to
booties and pointy heels, and of
course who could forget flats and
loafers? Updated styles are stomp-
ing all over today’s fashionable
streets, and toes couldn’t be hap-
pier.
French fashion designer Isabel
Marant started the wedge sneaker
trend this past year with stars such
as Kate Moss and Sienna Miller
setting foot in her designs (pun
intended). While these fabulous-
ly chunky sneakers turn heads
nationwide, a more subtle version
would be opting for a pair of high
top sneakers, just as senior tex-
tile major Jenny Bengtsson from
Sweden did. These Europeans real-
ly know their stuff.
As for other comfortable foot-
wear, ankle booties and loafers are
other fashion-forward options.
Similar to the ballet flat, a mens-
wear-inspired loafer is a great
go-to for strolling along Jayhawk
Boulevard. Try getting a pair in
grey, a neutral color that goes with
just about everything. There’s noth-
ing better than being stylish and
comfortable at the same time. Am I
right, ladies? Most men just cannot
relate to our fashion woes. But, as
Marilyn Monroe once said, “I don’t
know who invented high heels, but
all women owe him a lot.”
If you’re feeling daring and will-
ing to put comfort aside, a pointed
toe heel is your new best friend for
a night on the town. It’s a smaller
and sleeker heel than the chunky
platform pump and is surprisingly
harder to walk in despite the down-
size in heel height.
Extra credit goes to anyone with
a pop of color or patterns on their
feet. But as always, the most impor-
tant thing is to be confident in your
shoes. With confidence, you can
pull off any style.
— Edited by laken rapier
callan Reilly/Kansan
Senior Swedish exchange student Jenny bengtsson doesn’t let packing lightly
for her semester abroad slow down her fashion forward ways. This textile
major from Sweden sports navy blue Converse high-top sneakers and a casu-
ally cool look for class.
PaGe 6a thURsday, octobeR 18, 2012
PAGE 7A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, OctObER 18, 2012
Movie Review
Contrary to what many flm
geeks will tell you, colorful gangster
dialogue is not the sole province of
Quentin Tarantino.
Don’t get me wrong. Tarantino
is my favorite director, and I think
he’s one of the most consistently
brilliant, genre-bending flmmakers
working today. But there are oth-
ers who have elevated underworld
idiosyncrasies to the point of high
art. One of them is Irish playwright-
turned-flmmaker Martin McDon-
agh, whose new movie “Seven Psy-
chopaths” has been judged by many
critics as “Tarantino-esque.”
Personally, I think that term does
a disservice to both artists. First,
Tarantino is a freewheeling, referen-
tial cyclone of creative nods and in-
fuences, so the adoption of his style
by another writer-director would be
hopelessly derivative and ultimately
pointless. Second, McDonagh’s
movies have a distinct set of themes
and values that make them inher-
ently diferent from Tarantino’s. Te
best example is probably McDon-
agh’s 2008 hitman comedy “In Bru-
ges,” a lapsed-Catholic morality tale
swathed in black comedy.
“Seven Psychopaths” represents a
meta-comic attempt by McDonagh
to make sense of his own creative
process. Its principle character is
Marty (Colin Farrell), an alcoholic
screenwriter who’s struggling to fesh
out his newest script idea, an unre-
pentant saga of violence and may-
hem tentatively titled, you guessed
it, “Seven Psychopaths.” Desperate
for inspiration, he looks to his manic
friend Billy (Sam Rockwell) and his
zen-like partner Hans (Christopher
Walken), two career eccentrics who
make their living kidnapping dogs
and returning them to their wealthy
owners for the reward money.
Tings become complicated afer
Billy and Hans bring home a lethar-
gic Shih Tzu named Bonny, unaware
that she belongs to a local gangster
named Charlie (Woody Harrelson),
a sociopathic dog lover who will stop
at nothing to reclaim his purloined
pooch. All this leads to an increas-
ingly surreal desert showdown, with
occasional interludes explaining the
histories of the seven titular psychos
and priceless cameos from the likes
of Harry Dean Stanton as a venge-
ful Quaker and actor/musician Tom
Waits, whose character owns a rab-
bit bred by the Zodiac killer.
I hesitate to call Farrell’s Marty
the movie’s protagonist, since he’s
ofen relegated to the role of a spec-
tator. Te focus remains largely on
Rockwell and Walken, who manage
to play of each other’s kooky sensi-
bilities perfectly as Marty’s dueling
surrogate muses.
Rockwell, with his herky-jerk
mannerisms and excitable nature,
recalls the lust for puerile, nihilistic
violence that can defne younger
writers and their work. Walken’s
character, on the other hand, is a
sof-spoken pacifst who believes in
redemption and greater meanings.
Seeing the two interact is like watch-
ing McDonagh’s id match wits with
his super-ego.
Walken’s performance alone is
worth the price of admission. It’s
one of his best in years, free from
any trace of self-parody, a reminder
that he’s an actor equally adept at
farce and tragedy. In fact, his fnal
story pitch to Marty is enough to
make “Seven Psychopaths” feel like
both at once.

— Edited by Madison Schultz
LANDON mcDONALD
lmcdonald@kansan.com
LANDON mcDONALD
lmcdonald@kansan.com
ASSOcIAtED PRESS
Colin Farrell, left, Christopher walken, center and Sam Rockwell star in the
comedy”Seven Psychopaths.” The flm opened on oct. 12.
final rating
Creative in ‘Seven Psychopaths’
‘Sinister’ scares up
original horror concept
What’s the scariest thing about
“Sinister”? It’s not a remake, re-
boot or a prequel to the sequel
of “Paranormal Activity 5: How
Katie Got Her Ghoul Back.” It’s an
original horror movie that prizes
psychological dread over torture
porn or cheap jump scares.
Scott Derrickson’s latest flm
masquerades as an observant fam-
ily drama before revealing itself as
a devilishly intriguing haunted
house thriller, one willing to es-
chew the usual pop-out banali-
ties in favor of tightly ratcheted
suspense and a shockingly severe
third-act payof.
“Sinister” is also fully commit-
ted to its R-rating, which it re-
ceived not for gore, language or
sexuality but rather for what the
Motion Picture Association of
America (MPAA) glibly describes
as “disturbing violent images and
some terror.” Why not just say it’s
too frightening for kids and leave
it at that?
Despite its later inventiveness,
the movie’s set-up feels discon-
certingly familiar, especially for
Stephen King fans. Ellison Oswalt
(Ethan Hawke) is a washed up
true-crime author whose last best-
seller hit the shelves nearly a de-
cade ago. Hoping to rekindle the
recognition he feels he deserves,
he decides to move his wife (Juliet
Rylance) and two young children
into an unassuming suburban
home that was once the site of a
bizarre series of murders, includ-
ing the ritualistic hanging of an
entire family from a tree in their
new backyard. Te worst part?
Te splintered branch that held
them is still up there.
Oblivious to the traumatic toll
this news will have on his own
family, Ellison holes up in his of-
fce to write a new book centered
on the massacre and the missing
girl who may have survived it. His
obsession with the case deepens
afer fnding a box of what appear
to be snuf flms in the attic. Tese
diabolically titled “home movies”
contain some of the most unnerv-
ing imagery in “Sinister,” espe-
cially during a scene involving the
improper use of a lawnmower.
It’s always refreshing to see a
horror flm populated by actors
who don’t look as if they’ve wan-
dered of an Abercrombie photo-
shoot. Hawke’s moody, rumpled
performance acknowledges Elli-
son’s self-destructive vanity while
compelling the audience to root
for him anyway.
Former Republican presidential
hopeful Fred Tompson appears
as the surly town sherif who has
plenty of reasons to distrust Elli-
son, while James Ransone defes
regional stereotyping as a chipper
deputy and rabid fan of Ellison’s
earlier work. Veteran actor Vin-
cent D’Onofrio, who apparently
shot his scenes via Skype, even
shows up as a helpful demonology
professor.
Derrickson’s unjustly forgot-
ten “Te Exorcism of Emily Rose”
also depended on a gifed cast
to fnd the humanity in a genre
where characters are ofen treated
like cattle and dispatched with the
same indiferent efciency. Te
“Sinister” script, which Derrick-
son co-wrote with online flm crit-
ic C. Robert Cargill, never makes
that mistake. Tese two clearly
understand one of the oldest rules
in horror: If you really want to
scare us, make us care.

— Edited by laken rapier
final rating
ASSOcIAtED PRESS
Juliet Rylance, left, ethan Hawke, right, and Michael Hall D’Addario star in “Sinister,” a supernatural horror flm directed by
Scott Derrickson. The flm opened on oct. 12.
check out
movie review
podcast
http://bit.ly/WbcttV
ElEctronic
rEviEw
ASSOcIAtED PRESS
AMSTERDAM (AP) — In
Hollywood movies, heists usually
feature criminals who plan meticu-
lously and use high-tech equip-
ment to avoid detection. But the
thieves who snatched seven paint-
ings by Picasso, Matisse and Monet
worth millions from a gallery in
Rotterdam appear to have taken a
less glamorous approach, relying
mostly on speed and brute force.
In other words, the theft from
the Kunsthal exhibition on avant-
garde art was more “smash and
grab” than “Ocean’s 11.”
Dutch police said Wednesday
they had no suspects in the case,
the largest art heist in the country
for more than a decade, though an
appeal to witnesses had produced
more than a dozen tips for investi-
gators to follow up.
As questions arose about security
at the museum, its director, Emily
Ansenk, rejected criticism of the
facility’s safeguards. Speaking at a
news conference Tuesday evening,
she defended Kunsthal’s security
as “state of the art” and noted that
insurance companies had agreed
to insure it.
And yet the thieves got away.
The paintings they took are esti-
mated to be worth roughly $100
million if sold at auction.
Experts said the structure and
location of the museum, which
was designed by renowned Dutch
architect Rem Koolhaas, may have
attracted criminals.
“Speaking as a museum-goer, it’s
fantastic,” museum security expert
Ton Cremers said. “Speaking as a
security expert, it’s a total nightmare.”
The gallery is located along a
large road that leads to a round-
about, less than a mile away, con-
necting highways heading in three
directions. The display space where
the paintings once hung is a large
square area, at ground level, visible
from outside through glass walls.
Though police and the museum
have declined to discuss aspects of
the heist that might help thieves,
the main details of what happened
are clear.
The break-in occurred at around
3 a.m. Tuesday, police say, after
someone triggered an alarm.
Investigators have focused on an
emergency exit behind the build-
ing. The exit connects directly
to the main exhibition hall, with
paintings hung just a few yards
away. Tire tracks can still be seen
in the grass behind the building
leading away from the exit. Police
on Tuesday dusted the exit for fin-
gerprints and took samples of the
tire prints.
The paintings were yanked from
the walls, leaving only white spaces
and broken hanging wires dangling
behind.
Officers were on the scene with-
in five minutes of the alarm being
triggered, according to museum
director Ansenk, but the thieves
were already gone.
Police spokesman Henk van der
Velde said Wednesday that 25 offi-
cers have been assigned to the case,
but the getaway car has not been
found and there are no suspects.
Agents were reviewing videotape
from museum cameras.
It is unknown what will happen
to the paintings if the thieves are
not caught.
ART
‘Smash and grab’ heist raises security concerns
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PAGE 9A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, octobER 18, 2012
OCTOBER 18
Because the stars know things we don’t.
Aries (March 21-April 19)
today is a 7
Check the big picture for the
next few days, and take a leap into
the next adventure. You don’t want
to regret not having followed your
heart. Resist the urge to splurge.

taurus (April 20-May 20)
today is a 5
Too many circumstances threaten to
get in the way, but you fnd inspiration
and rise to the occasion. Balance ide-
alism with realism. Costs may end up
higher than expected.
Gemini (May 21-June 21)
today is a 7
Play well with others, compromise,
and win on many levels. Previous
plans come to fruition. Intuition il-
luminates career matters. Check and
double-check the data. Accept an un-
usual request.
cancer (June 22-July 22)
today is a 6
Focus on work to tie up loose ends.
Your energy may be scattered, so direct
it toward priorities. Plan an outing.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
today is an 8
Romance, games and relaxation
take priority. But continue to build your
reserves and remain fexible. You have
what you need. Dreams reveal a major
change.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
today is an 8
You’re entering a two-day domestic
phase. Put a plan on paper to save
time. You’re getting impatient to start.
Don’t try it alone. A friend can put you
in touch with the perfect partner.
Libra (Sept. 23-oct. 22)
today is a 7
Manage all that’s possible, and
then some, with some help from in-
novations. There’s no time to com-
plain, and it wouldn’t do you any
good anyway. Adapt with grace.
Scorpio (oct. 23-Nov. 21)
today is a 6
Scratch out the things you can’t af-
ford, or that you’re never going to com-
plete. Romance is a defnite possibility
... full speed ahead. Go for what you
want most.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec.21)
today is an 8
You get a head start, thanks to your
focus and determination. Use your
power for good. Give up something you
don’t need and surge forward.
capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
today is a 5
You’re under pressure with deadlines
for the next few days. Big spending is
not the correct answer. Let partners
do the heavy lifting. Stay rested, and
it fows.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
today is a 7
What you’ve learned comes in very
handy during the temporary confusion.
Listen carefully to one who doesn’t say
much. Friends really help over the next
few days.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
today is a 7
Expect more from others and your-
self. It’s not time to be slacking off ...
every moment counts. Change the itin-
erary as needed. Do the job you’ve been
thinking about.
WEEKEND hoRoScoPES
OCTOBER 19
Aries (March 21-April 19)
today is a 7
Keep up the good work. Take
some risks, maybe, but keep it
steady. Your credit rating’s on the
rise. Challenges in romance pay
off later. Hide a treasure.
taurus (April 20-May 20)
today is a 5
Study an ancient source and com-
bine the new. Listen to a bright idea
(from yourself or someone else). Some-
times small is beautiful. Postpone
launches, travel and romance.
Gemini (May 21-June 21)
today is a 7
Be careful so that you don’t dou-
ble-book or forget an important date.
Spend time outdoors to replenish your
energy. It’s not a good idea to stretch
the truth now.
cancer (June 22-July 22)
today is a 6
You have less than you thought, but
that can change with intelligent work.
You have the support of loved ones
(even if it doesn’t always seem so).
Meet with friends later.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
today is an 8
A new trick doesn’t necessarily work,
but it may still be worth trying (results
may surprise). Sell something you’ve
kept hidden. Let a loved one help you
decide.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
today is an 8
Provide plenty of positive reinforce-
ment as it’s needed. Achieve harmony
through meditation. Send a scout to
gather information. Postpone long
journeys for later. Compromise.
Libra (Sept. 23-oct. 22)
today is a 7
Consider all possibilities. Make
sure you have all the facts before
choosing. Working at home increas-
es your effciency. There’s no need to
spend money now; you have what
you need.
Scorpio (oct. 23-Nov. 21)
today is a 6
Don’t tell everything to everybody.
Watch out for mistakes with numbers.
Check for changes in requirements. Ex-
ceptional patience may be required.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec.21)
today is an 8
The glitches in romance will go away.
For now, focus on taking advantage of
your new boost of confdence. Thank the
others who stand by your side.
capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
today is a 5
You can be social, but it’s better to
postpone having company over. Every
experience adds wisdom. Investigate
suspicions and avoid gambling. Opti-
mism is within reach.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
today is a 7
Friends play an important role today,
especially providing assistance in dif-
fcult situations. Listen and be heard.
You have the support of the most im-
portant people.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
today is a 7
Stand up for yourself. The group
helps out, even as it seems that they
may disagree. Give and receive love,
and compromise. Logic wins. A bond
gets renewed.
OCTOBER 20
Aries (March 21-April 19)
today is an 8
Get all your playing done in a
hurry. This weekend presents many
opportunities to get busy. Fol-
low your intuition. Anticipate big
changes in fnancial affairs.
taurus (April 20-May 20)
today is an 8
Great news: Your luck is shifting for
the better. You’ll fnd what you seek. Pay
attention to feelings. Temptations are
abundant ... avoid impulsive spending.
Pay back a debt instead.
Gemini (May 21-June 21)
today is a 7
Practice makes perfect for the next
few days. Your valuable skills notice-
ably increase. Your partner provides in-
sight into a career problem. Take action
on the possibility revealed.
.
cancer (June 22-July 22)
today is an 8
Everybody’s willing to negotiate. Fig-
ure out who needs what you’re offering.
Trading is good. Keep searching and
fnd the prize. Previous commitments
interfere with an outing.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
today is a 7
Focus on making money for a few
days. Get a second or third estimate
before buying. Keeping your word is
easier than you think, and it keeps ev-
erything functional.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
today is a 9
You’re entering a particularly cud-
dly phase ... wear comfortable clothes.
Have faith, and come up with a win-
ning strategy. Beat the deadline. You’ll
soon have time to relax.
Libra (Sept. 23-oct. 22)
today is a 9
This weekend is good for mak-
ing changes at home. Catch up on
the latest news from friends. The
decisions you make now will leave
a big impression. You’re especially
charming and gaining stature.
Scorpio (oct. 23-Nov. 21)
today is an 8
Things will fall into place soon, es-
pecially around fnances. Enjoy a time
of intense learning. Don’t take yourself
too seriously. You can afford a change
for the better.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec.21)
today is a 7
For the next few days, bring in the
money. Use your imagination to in-
crease the odds. Gain new confdence
in public speaking (it’s easier than you
thought). Accept the applause.
capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
today is a 9
You’re lookin’ good and will look
even better tomorrow. Think about your
future needs, and jump into action. A
partner and distant contacts may bring
extra proft.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
today is a 6
Now’s the time to clean up old mess-
es; no more putting them off. Clear
clutter and create room for the new and
exciting. Keep digging for the clue.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
today is an 8
Friends want you to come out and
play, so don’t let them down. Get out-
doors for beauty and introspection.
Simplify matters. Re-evaluate your
position, and write it down.
OCTOBER 21
Aries (March 21-April 19)
today is a 9
Balance work and romance.
Relax with someone instead of go-
ing out, and save money. Defne
success to include where you’re
winning, and use failure to show
what’s missing.
taurus (April 20-May 20)
today is a 9
Choose love you can depend on.
Don’t worry if you make mistakes;
practice builds much-needed skills.
Launch a new project. Improve house-
hold communications. Change your
hairstyle.
Gemini (May 21-June 21)
today is a 7
Others acknowledge your charm.
Your communication skills are getting
better. Write a love letter, and seal it
with a kiss. Don’t be afraid to do the
job over to get it right.
cancer (June 22-July 22)
today is a 9
Listen carefully to one who loves
you. Go for what you believe in. Not
everybody may agree with you, but
you’ll be happier for following your
heart.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
today is an 8
It’s easy to lose track of time when
you’re having fun ... set an alarm so
you won’t forget an important ap-
pointment. A tender moment arises.
Everyone wins.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
today is a 9
Let a partner take the lead. Don’t
waste your old stuff; repurpose it.
There’s money in there to be saved or
given away. Start by fxing leaks.
Libra (Sept. 23-oct. 22)
today is a 9
Relax. You’re surrounded by
love, and you can fgure it out. Let
the girls have their say, and accept
their encouragement. You have more
than expected.
Scorpio (oct. 23-Nov. 21)
today is a 9
You have more money than you
thought. Hone your skills while having
fun. Call a family member, and ask for
what was promised. You draw love to
you.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec.21)
today is an 8
Communication channels are open
and available for you to proft. Good
food and friends make the day even
more enjoyable. Find motivation in
love.
capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
today is a 9
Your focus and determination make
you especially attractive. Everyone
wants to be at your house. Don’t get
so distracted that you forget to invest
in your career.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
today is a 7
All work and no play could make
Jack and Jill very boring. Increase the
fun. Don’t be afraid to roll around or
do headstands. Great ideas are the
result.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
today is a 9
Play with friends and move up a
level. Work your plan, and provide
information. Start by listing what’s
overdue. Others have skills you lack.
Show your appreciation.
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PAGE 10A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, octobER 18, 2012
READERSHIP REWARDS 2012
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ONLY PAPER
the
t for
royalty
For the third time in as many
weeks, Kansas defensive coordina-
tor Dave Campo is looking to slow
down an offense averaging more
than 40 points a game with the
Jayhawks taking on the Oklahoma
Sooners on Saturday.
It’s a tireless job, which head
coach Charlie Weis has admit-
ted is costing the former Dallas
Cowboys defensive coach some
sleep. But when you’re facing a
Heisman-hopeful in senior quar-
terback Landry Jones, a big-play
threat junior wide receiver Kenny
Stills and backup sophomore
quarterback Blake Bell, sleeping
will probably lead to nightmares
anyway.
Fortunately for Campo and
the Jayhawks, the countless hours
at the office have begun to pay
off. What was 2011’s last-ranked
defense in the FBS is now sit-
ting 30 spots higher than where it
ended last season.
“The kids believe in what
we’re doing,” Campo said. “We’re
making progress with discipline
and making sure they know where
they are supposed to be.”
It’s not just that Kansas is mak-
ing tackles and applying pressure.
The Jayhawks have been stumping
some of the nation’s best offenses.
TCU is averaging 35.8 points
against teams not named the
Jayhawks, but when the Horned
Frogs visited Lawrence, Kansas
held them to 20 points.
The same is true for Oklahoma
State. The Cowboys averaged 55.8
points heading into last week’s
game but were held to 20 points
as well.
The only gaffe in Kansas’ game
came at Kansas State, when the
Wildcats exploded for 35 points in
the second half. Northern Illinois
also scored 30 points in its victory
over the Jayhawks.
And yet Campo and his staff are
doing all of this with virtually the
same players that placed 120th in
FBS defenses a season ago.
“We’ve got good players here,”
said defensive backs coach Clint
Bowen. “They just needed to be
pointed in the right direction.”
After months of pointing, yell-
ing, teaching, helping and schem-
ing, Campo finally felt his defense
click last week against Oklahoma
State.
Nevermind that his team was
one of the nation’s best at gaining
turnovers, or that the Jayhawks
— with the exception of K-State
— have been within striking dis-
tance at the end of each game
this season. Campo’s moment of
peace came during a rain-soaked
Saturday when his player came
up with stop after stop.
“I felt calm, really for the first
time, in that game,” Campo said. “I
felt calm that we were getting lined
up where we needed to line up,
and there was not a lot of looking
around and pointing. I look back
at the Northern Illinois game, and
I felt like a chicken with his head
cut off sometimes in that game. I
felt like we were making progress
really for the first time last week.”
Coming from the NFL, Campo
is by no means setting any coach-
ing precedent with the Jayhawks’
continual improvement.
In 2010, the Michigan
Wolverines ranked 110th for total
defense in the FBS. Two years after
Brady Hoke pegged Greg Mattison
after his time with the Baltimore
Ravens. The Wolverines now have
the 10th best defense in college
football.
And even with his background
coaching defense, when Nick
Saban left the Miami Dolphins to
take over Alabama, he brought
with him the Dolphins’ safeties
coach, Kirby Smart, to be his
defensive coordinator.
No matter what team is being
taken over, the first emphasis
is on stopping opponents from
scoring before worrying about
your own offense. Hoke found
Mattison, Saban came with Smart,
and Charlie Weis grabbed Dave
Campo — whether his players
knew who he was or not.
“I didn’t know anything about
coach Campo,” said safety Bradley
McDougald, a native of Ohio.
“When we got him, all of the Texas
players were excited, and I was
kind of lost as to why everyone
was like, ‘We just got the best
coach in the world.’ But it turns
out we did.”
— Edited by Ryan McCarthy
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Volume 125 Issue 34 kansan.com Thursday, October 18, 2012
COMMENTARY
Basketball
future is
promising
By Kory Carpenter
kcarpenter@kansan.com
replacing roBinson
in withey self trusts
sports
Page 4B-5B
Game day preview
tara bryant/Kansan
Kansas coach Bill self answers questions from the media about Kansas’s upcoming season Wednesday at the sprint center for the Big 12 Men’s Basketball Media Day.
B
ill Self didn’t exactly com-
pare this season’s fresh-
man class to the herald-
ed 2005-2006 crop that included
Brandon Rush, Julian Wright and
Mario Chalmers.
However, at Wednesday’s Big 12
Media Day in Kansas City, Mo., Self
mentioned the similarities between
both groups.
“I do think it’s going to be a chal-
lenging year, but not in a bad way,”
Self said. “It was challenging back
when Mario, Julian and Brandon
were all freshmen... but that team
still managed to do pretty well.”
Of course, the situations aren’t
exactly the same.
This Kansas team is better than
the 2005-2006 version. The senior
trio of Elijah Johnson, Jeff Withey
and Travis Releford will help set-
tle in the seven freshmen. Led by
Ben McLemore, Perry Ellis and
Andrew White, this class could
leave Lawrence with a resume as
impressive as the 2005 class.
But what Self did in 2005 laid the
groundwork for the 2008 national
championship, and if everything
goes well, the 2012 freshmen might
have the same impact.
The Jayhawks already have a
head start on the 2005 group. This
year’s squad has legitimate Final
Four and national title aspirations
because of the lack of talent near
the top of college basketball this
season.
Out of this 2012 group,
McLemore is the only real threat to
bolt for the NBA after this season.
If that does indeed happen, it still
leaves plenty of talent returning
to compliment next year’s class,
which might be better and is still
not complete. The players already
committed include the guard duo
of Conner Frankamp (No. 28
prospect according to Rivals) and
Wayne Selden (No. 23), and small
forward Brannen Greene (No. 22).
Self and his staff are looking to
round out that class which ESPN
recently called the second best
recruiting class for 2013.
The Jayhawks are still in the run-
ning for forward and No. 1 overall
recruit Julius Randle as well as for-
ward Aaron Gordon (No. 5), who
visited last weekend for Late Night
in the Phog.
A signed letter of intent from
Randle or Gordon could make the
Jayhawks national title favorites in
2014. Even without those players,
Self is setting himself up perfectly
for a four-year run that will most
certainly lead to another Final Four
appearance and could eventually
make him the first Kansas coach
to win two national titles for the
Jayhawks.
At Big 12 Media Day, Self was
asked about the recent contract
extension he signed which keeps
him at Kansas for another decade.
“There are always provisions in
any contract where, if you don’t
do a good job, they can get rid of
you, so to me the pressure is still
on, and that’s the way it should be,”
Self said. “I probably look at it in
a more relaxed state now, though,
which is probably positive.”
With the fat contract and white-
hot recruiting, I’d be pretty relaxed
as well.
— Edited by Ryan McCarthy
footBall
campo turns defense around
Kansan file photo
Defensive coordinator Dave campo addresses members of the media at the ander-
son family football complex.
blaKe schuster
bschuster@kansan.com
tara bryant/Kansan
senior center Jeff Withey answers questions from reporters about Kansas’ plans
to succeed in the postseason again this year at the Big 12 Men’s Basketball
Media Day Wednesday at the sprint center.
ethan padway
epadway@kansan.com
KANSAS CITY, Mo.— When
Thomas Robinson and Tyshawn
Taylor packed up their lockers for
the final time last April, more than
50 percent of the Kansas men’s
basketball team’s scoring in confer-
ence play walked out the door with
them.
Without Robinson, the burden
of opening Kansas coach Bill Self ’s
inside-out offense with low-post
play falls on the shoulders of senior
center Jeff Withey.
“Jeff naturally isn’t one of those
guys that just looks to score or it
comes easy for him. That’s not the
case,” Self said. “Last year he aver-
aged nine a game and a large part
because he played next to Thomas,
and Thomas would get doubled or
whatever and Jeff would benefit
from that.”
In the offseason, Self placed an
emphasis on Withey developing a
low-post move with his offhand,
which would make him harder to
cover.
In Withey’s first three years
at Kansas, Danny Manning was
always the one working closely
with Withey on his low-post game.
But Manning’s departure to take
the Tulsa head coaching job cre-
ated a hole in the Kansas staff.
Former Self assistant Norm
Roberts returned to the staff to fill
that void.
“I feel like he’s watched a lot of
film from last year, because we’re
doing a lot of the same things from
when coach Manning was here,”
Withey said. “He’s been extremely
good with me.”
Roberts’ previous experience
under Self eased his transition into
his role at Kansas. Before leaving
to take the head coaching job at
St. John’s, Roberts coached in the
same capacity under Self in each of
his previous coaching stops.
In his first go-around on Self ’s
staff, Roberts used many of the
same coaching techniques later
implemented by Manning.
This year’s Kansas offense is
much stronger and deeper on the
perimeter than it is on the inside.
“We’ll probably shoot more jump
shots than we have in any other
time since I’ve been here,” Self said.
“I’m not sure that’s a strength as
much as we should play through
our bigs more, but we don’t have a
natural scorer inside.”
Self said without Robinson
around, a jump to an average
of 12 points or more per game
would show a vast improvement in
Withey’s offensive game because of
how often Withey will see oppo-
nents double-team him down low.
It will also add another ele-
ment to Withey’s expanded role
in the offense, which will see more
plays designed to go through him,
including some plays that aren’t
expected from a seven-footer.
“He can shoot the jumper, which
a lot of people don’t really know,”
said senior forward Kevin Young.
“He can put it on the floor as well
and go by some guys, but at the
same time, he’s going to be able to
draw in double-teams, which will
leave me open to rebound.”
— Edited by Ryan McCarthy
PAGE 2B thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, OCtOBER 18, 2012

?
Q: What former Jayhawk plays
safety for the San Diego Chargers?
A: Darrell Stuckey
— NFL.com
tRIVIA Of thE DAY
!
The frst UFC event (UFC 1) took
place on November of 1993, and
featured an eight man tournament.
— UFC.com
fACt Of thE DAY
“Anderson Silva’s been doing it
since 2005 in the UFC, Georges St.
Pierre’s been doing it forever, Jon
Jones has been on a tear for a year
and a half. Time will tell. At the rate
he’s going, he’s on his way to number
one and possibly going down as one
of the greatest ever, too.”
— UFC president Dana White
QUOtE Of thE DAY
thE MORNING BREW
UFC fght Jones vs. Sonnen rescheduled for spring
By Drew Harms
dharms@kansan.com
This week in athletics
Monday Wednesday
Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
ITA Regionals
All day
Tulsa, Okla.
Women’s Tennis
ITA Regionals
All day
Tulsa, Okla.
KU Tournament
All day
Lawrence
Tulsa (Scrimmage)
All day
Tulsa, Okla.
Iowa State
3 p.m.
Lawrence
Women’s Tennis
Women’s Tennis
Women’s Rowing
Women’s Soccer Men’s Golf
Herb Wimberly Intercollegiate
All Day
Las Cruces, N.M.
Women’s Tennis
ITA Regionals
All Day
Tulsa, Okla.
Iowa State
6:30 PM
Ames, Iowa
Women’s Volleyball
Minnesota
1 p.m.
Lawrence
Oklahoma
6 p.m.
Norman, Okla.
TCU
1 p.m.
Lawrence
ITA Regionals
All day
Tulsa, Okla.
KU Tournament
All day
Lawrence
Tulsa scrimmage
All day
Tulsa, Okla.
Women’s Tennis
Women’s Tennis
Women’s Rowing
Women’s Swimming
Football
Women’s Volleyball
Women’s Soccer
Texas Tech
1:00 PM
Lawrence
Women’s Tennis
KU Tournament
All Day
Lawrence
Women’s Tennis
ITA Regionals
All Day
Tulsa, Okla.
Tuesday
Men’s Golf
Herb Wimberly Intercollegiate
All Day
Las Cruces, N.M.
L
et the trash talking begin. Jon
Jones is set to take on veteran
Chanel Sonnen on April 27. Jones
refused to fight Sonnen with short
notice earlier in September because
Jones believed Sonnen didn’t deserve to
fight for the belt. Jones originally was set
to fight Dan Henderson on Sept. 1 until
Henderson injured his knee. With eight
days before the scheduled fight against
Henderson, UFC president Dana White
asked Jones if he would consider fight-
ing Sonnen because of Henderson’s inju-
ry. Jones declined and agreed to fight
Victor Belfort later in September, when
he won with a fourth-round submission.
The 35-year-old Sonnen holds an over-
all record of 28-12-1. Sonnen’s build is
at 6-foot-1 and 205 pounds. Sonnen is a
two-time national champion wrestler at
the University of Oregon. Sonnen’s last
fight was on July 7 last summer, when he
was knocked out by Anderson Silva in the
second round.
Jones stands at 6-foot-4 and weighs in
at 205 pounds. Jones has a clear height
advantage and wider wingspan than
Sonnen. Jones holds a 17-1 record in the
UFC, with his only defeat being to Matt
Hamill in the Ultimate Fighter final in
2009. At 25 years old, Jones is the young-
est champion in UFC history and cur-
rently holds the belt for the light heavy-
weight title.
Before the April 27 fight, Jones and
Sonnen will participate in the “The
Ultimate Fighter,” in which they will serve
as coaches for fighters contending at 185
pounds.
Chris harris represeNtiNg
KaNsas
On Monday Night Football, the
Denver Broncos beat the San Diego
Chargers 35-24. The Broncos came
back from a 24-0 halftime deficit to
outscore the Chargers 35-0 in the
second half. The offense and Peyton
Manning led this comeback, but they
were not the only reason the Broncos
emerged victorious.
Former Jayhawk cornerback Chris
Harris, who got the start at cornerback
for the second straight week, made the
most of his opportunity. Harris intercept-
ed Chargers quarterback Phillip Rivers
twice, one of which he scored on. Before
Harris’ second interception, Denver was
up 28-24 with about three minutes left in
the fourth quarter, but the Chargers were
moving the ball down the field. This was
until Harris stepped in front of Chargers
receiver Eddie Royal to intercept the pass
and take it 46 yards to the end zone. This
dynamic play by Harris sealed the game
for the Broncos and displayed Harris’
skill set. It also showed his ability to come
through during the biggest stage of a
game.
With the other former Jayhawk cor-
nerback, Aquib Talib, suspended for
four games for violating the NFL’s policy
on performance-enhancing substances,
Harris stepped up and showed his ability
to contribute in the league as well. Harris
is only in his second season in the NFL
but looks to be more of a factor with his
talent at cornerback.
— edited by ryan McCarthy
SWIMMING AND DIvING
Jayhawks to take on Golden
Gophers in upcoming meet
The swimming and diving team looks to im-
prove on last weekend’s victory over Rice as it
takes on Minnesota at Robinson Natatorium this
Saturday at 1:00 p.m.
The meet is one of two competitions located in
Lawrence this semester. This not only gives Kan-
sas fans a chance to cheer on the home team, but
they can also see Kansas compete against Min-
nesota, one of the perennial powers of the sport.
Over the last seven seasons, Minnesota has
been one of the most consistent programs in the
Big Ten Conference by fnishing in the top four
each year. The last fve years have been particu-
larly successful for the Golden Gophers as they
have fnished in the top two spots the last fve
seasons, including a frst place fnish in the 2012
Big Ten Women’s Swimming and Diving Champi-
onships.
The Gophers have also done well in the nation-
al rankings in the recent past, fnishing in the top
15 in the country each season. Minnesota started
off the 2012 season by defeating Michigan and
Iowa State in its frst two meets.
Some Minnesota swimmers to watch out for
are freshmen Lauren votava and Kierra Smith,
who won the 200-yard freestyle, 100-yard breast-
stroke and 200-yard individual medley against
Iowa State. On the diving side, look for junior Mag-
gie Keefer, who won titles in both 1- and 3-meter
diving against Iowa State, to have a big meet.
For Kansas, some swimmers to look out for are
freshmen Haley Molden, Alina vats and Chelsie
Miller, who each made winning debuts for Kansas
in last week’s meet against Rice in the 200-yard
freestyle, 100-yard backstroke and 400-yard in-
dividual medley.
Other upperclassmen to watch in this meet
against Minnesota are seniors Brooke Brull and
Rebecca Swank and junior diver Alyssa Golden,
who have all succeeded in the intrasquad and
Rice meets.
This meet will also serve as Senior Day for the
eight seniors on the Jayhawks team.
— Christopher schaeder

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It’s hard to pinpoint what stood out most
for the Kansas volleyball team in their 3-1
victory against Kansas State Wednesday
night.
Maybe it was junior middle blocker Car-
oline Jarmoc, who earned her frst career
double-double with 11 kills and 11 block
assists to accompany a solo block.
Or it could have been sophomore out-
side hitter Sara McClinton, who notched
19 kills and only one error.
Te again, sophomore outside hitter
Chelsea Albers contributed seven kills,
eight digs and two block
assists in her most ex-
tensive playing time of
the season.
“Someone needed to
be aggressive, so I was
going to go all out, it
didn’t matter what hap-
pened,” Albers said. “My
teammates responded
well to me, kept feeding
me the ball.”
For the frst time in the series’ history,
both teams faced each other as ranked
foes. K-State entered at No. 14, Kansas at
No. 21. Jarmoc, who knew little about the
rivalry before coming to Kansas, realized
this would be one of the best matches in
series history.
“I came into Kansas not really knowing
about the rivalry as much, because from
Canada, you don’t really hear about that,”
Jarmoc said. “But once you get in it, you
get it in, and I just wanted to crush them
today.”
Te Jayhawks led the Wildcats in the
middle of the second set when coach Ray
Bechard decided to take freshman outside
hitter Tiana Dockery out in favor of Albers,
whose playing time has dipped this year
because of injury. Although Albers didn’t
know beforehand that Bechard would use
her in the match, she looked as though she
had been playing all year, earning a kill and
a block assist in her frst two points of the
match.
Te Jayhawks’ defense also played a piv-
otal role in the second set, limiting K-State
to a .025 hitting percentage. Kansas won
the second set 25-15, responding well to a
disappointing 28-26 frst-set loss.
“Te way we lost the frst set could have
created a really down mood or depressed
stage,” Bechard said. “For us to come right
back and really get afer them in the second
set I think was critical.”
Kansas was looking to end a four-match
losing streak to the Wildcats. To do so, the
Jayhawks knew they would need to win the
third set, which would force K-State to play
from behind. However, a 7-0 K-State run
gave them a 14-8 lead and seemingly all the
momentum.
But Kansas whittled away at the Wild-
cats’ lead and eventually tied the third set
at 23.
“You’re not necessarily always control-
ling a set if you’re ahead,” Jarmoc said. “I
don’t think at any point in the third set we
felt it slip away from us.”
Just like the frst set, the third set came
down to who could handle set points bet-
ter. Unlike the frst set, Kansas held their
ground. Te Jayhawks fought of three set
points in the third set, and a K-State ball
handling error gave Kansas a 27-26 lead.
Senior middle blocker Tayler Tolefree and
junior outside hitter Catherine Carmichael
then teamed up for a block to give Kansas
the third set, 28-26.
Teir block was one of 18 on the night for
Kansas, a season high. Te Jayhawks held
K-State to fve blocks, and it was the frst
time in the last four matches Kansas out-
blocked its opponent. Carmichael joined
Jarmoc in setting career-highs in blocking
during the match, as she fnished with sev-
en block assists and one solo block.
“Tird set we made some aggressive
plays to prolong the set at key times,”
Bechard said. “Tolefree was great. We end-
ed the third set with a big block.”
K-State had one fnal run lef in them in
the fourth set, using four straight points to
close Kansas’ lead to 17-16. But the next
two points summed up the match for both
teams. K-State committed one of their 10
service errors on the night, and Jarmoc and
Carmichael followed that up with another
block, giving Kansas a 19-16 lead. Mc-
Clinton ended the match by scoring three
of the Jayhawks’ fnal four points, sending
the sold-out crowd of 1,300 at the Horejsi
Family Athletics Center into a frenzy.
“I love when we have a sold-out crowd,
have all my Jayhawk fans there,” McClinton
said. “Te environment is just incredible.”
Te Jayhawks are now 18-3 overall and
6-1 in Big 12 play. Tey face TCU Saturday
at 1 p.m. in the Horejsi Family Athletics
Center.
— Edited by Sarah McCabe
PAGE 3b thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, octobER 18, 2012
volleyball
Team beats K-State for frst time since 2009
GEoffERY cALVERt
gcalvert@kansan.com
tRAVIS YoUNG/KANSAN
Kansas runs onto the court to celebrate after winning the match against the Kansas State Wildcats. Kansas beat K-State 3-1.
Albers
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Gameday
PreVIeW F
O
O
T
b
a
L
L
( ) (
KaNsas
1-5 (0-3)
OFFeNse
Kansas fans, we offcially have a quarterback controversy. After Michael Cum-
mings led two scoring drives in the Jayhawks’ futile comeback against Oklahoma
State, coach Charlie Weis is splitting time between his redshirt freshman and
Dayne Crist. With three quarterbacks in the mix — Christian Matthews is still
running the “Jayhawk” offense — Weis will have a lot more room to get creative
against a tough Sooners defense.
Starting Lineup
Pos.
QB
HB
FB
WR
WR
TE
RT
RG
C
LG
LT
K
Name
Dayne Crist or Michael Cummings
Tony Pierson
Trent Smiley
Kale Pick
Andrew Turzilli
Mike Ragone
Gavin Howard
Randall Dent
Trevor Marrongelli
Duane Zlatnik
Tanner Hawkinson
Nick Prolago
No.
10, 14
3
85
7
82
84
70
64
69
67
72
16
year
Sr., Fr.
So.
So.
Sr.
So.
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Sr.
Sr.
So.
Pos.
DE
DT
DT
RE
SLB
MLB
WLB
CB
CB
SS
FS
P
Name
Josh Williams
Jordan Tavai
Kevin Young
Toben Opurum
Tunde Bakare
Ben Heeney
Huldon Tharpe
Tyler Patmon
Greg Brown
Dexter Linton
Bradley McDougald
Ron Doherty
No.
95
9
90
35
17
31
34
33
5
23
24
13
year
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Sr.
So.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
deFeNse
If you happen to see what looks like a zombie dragging himself through campus,
don’t panic, it’s most likely a very sleep-deprived Dave Campo. The frst-year Kansas
defensive coordinator has had a tremendous effect on this year’s team — holding
both TCU and Oklahoma State to their lowest point totals of the season. For the third
straight week he’ll be facing one of the nation’s top offenses. Get some rest, coach.
mOmeNTum
Coach Weis’ decision to split time between Crist and Cummings
may prove to be the best option. It was obvious that something
needed to change, but giving Cummings his frst career start on
the road against an Oklahoma team that just beat Texas out of
the rankings wouldn’t have been good for anyone but Sooners fans.
Now both quarterbacks will not just be playing to win, but also to
eliminate the other from claiming the starting role.

aT a GLaNce
If Michael Cummings can per-
form in Norman, Okla., like he did
in Lawrence — and if Tony Pierson
is healthy — Charlie Weis may
be a little giddy come Saturday.
For a coach who constantly firts
with trick plays it would be hard
not to think the options that Crist,
Cummings and Matthews open up
won’t lead to more imaginative
play calling.
cOachING
This one comes down to a tie and
rightfully so. Both Michael Cummings
and Dayne Crist will have all eyes
on them as each tries to claim the
starting quarterback role for the Jay-
hawks. In Crist’s last outing he com-
pleted 10 of 22 passes for 136-yards,
while Cummings completed 5-10 for
75-yards and a touchdown. Both will
need to be better to give the Jayhawks
a shot against the Sooners, but the
Kansas quarterback battle might make
for an equally compelling match.
PLayer TO WaTch
After taking a week-long hiatus to allow
for some healing — and to give other kick-
ers a chance — Ron Doherty is returning to
punting duties for Kansas. Nick Prolago will
still be handling kickoffs and extra points,
but the glaring hole that is kicking feld goals
is still a costly concern for Kansas. With an
offense ranked 109 out of 120 in the FBS, the
Jayhawks can’t be leaving any points on the
feld.
sPecIaL Teams
?
quesTION marKs
?
How will the change in quarterbacks affect the running backs?
Charlie Weis made note at his Tuesday press conference that Kansas was a run-
frst team. Will one quarterback favor that system over another?
And for that matter, can Cummings hold his own against the second-best defense
in the Big 12?
Cummings has only played in situations with little pressure. How will he play now
that he is expected to help Kansas win?
One of the Kansas quarterbacks
emerges from the rest. That could
mean Dayne Crist, Michael Cum-
mings or even Christian Matthews
running the “Jayhawk” formation.
The Jayhawks have done a great job
at limiting opponents’ scoring, now
they just need to put together points
themselves.
PredIcTION 38
by The Numbers
.449
45
Jayhawks all-time winning percent-
age (573-574-58)
Michael Cummings touchdown passes in
high school
50
Tackles each by Ben Heeney and Bradley
McDougald this season
Since defeating South Dakota State in week one,
Kansas has not had much momentum to ride. That
all changed with a couple of touchdowns late against
Oklahoma State. It was the frst time all season the
Jayhawks ended the game on a higher note than their
opponent, and it may be the best thing Kansas has go-
ing right now.
Cummings
Weis
baby jay WILL cheer IF ...
bLaKe schusTer
bschuster@kansan.com
Tara bryaNT/KaNsaN
Junior halfback James Sims rushes to the end zone to score the Jayhawks’ second
touchdown of the fourth quarter against Oklahoma State University at Memorial
Stadium. The touchdown was not enough to bring the Jayhawks a victory in their
20-14 loss against the Cowboys.
Tara bryaNT/KaNsaN
Freshman linebacker Jake Love tackles an Oklahoma State player to prevent a frst
down for the Cowboys in Saturday’s game at Memorial Stadium.
ashLeIGh Lee/KaNsaN
Senior wide receiver Kale Pick during the
Oct. 13 game against Oklahoma State
University at Memorial Stadium.
the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, OctObeR 18, 2012 PAGe 5b the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN
GAmeDAY
PReVIeW F
O
O
t
b
A
L
L
( )
OKLAhOmA
4-1 (2-1) #9
OFFeNSe
After coming in as a backup in the frst three games, running back Damien Williams
has evolved into a starter and has made an impact. Williams ran for a career-high 167
yards against Texas last week. He’s rushed for over 500 yards and six touchdowns this
year. With Williams’ recent rise, expect the Sooners to feed him the ball a lot against Kan-
sas. Fullback Trey Millard may also get in on the action; he’s been active with 23 touches
for 264 yards, which is rare for fullbacks in football nowadays. The offense still revolves
around quarterback Landry Jones. He’s been a little more quiet on the feld than he has
in previous seasons but still gets the job done to help Oklahoma win.
Starting Lineup
Pos.
QB
RB
FB
WR
WR
LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
K
NAme
Landry Jones
Damien Williams
Trey Millard
Kenny Stills
Justin Brown
Taylor McNamara
Lane Johnson
Adam Shead
Gabe Ikard
Bronson Irwin
Daryl Williams
Michael Hunnicutt
No.
12
26
33
4
19
88
69
74
64
68
79
18
Year
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Fr.
Sr.
Fr.
So.
Jr.
Jr.
So.
So.
Pos.
LE
DT
DT
RE
OLB
MLB
CB
CB
CB
FS
SS
P
NAme
David King
Casey Walker
Jamarkus McFarland
Chucka Ndulue
Corey Nelson
Tom Wort
Aaron Colvin
Demontre Hurst
Gabe Lynn
Tony Jefferson
Javon Harris
Tress Way
No.
90
53
97
98
7
21
14
6
9
1
30
36
Year
Sr.
Sr.
Sr.
So.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Sr.
DeFeNSe
Oklahoma’s defense is second in the Big 12 and is one of the best in the nation.
The Sooners are seventh in the nation in frst downs allowed and 14th in total
defense. Defensive backs Tony Jefferson, Javon Harris and Aaron Colvin are the top
tacklers on the team. Oklahoma’s 4-2-5 nickel package has brought them a lot of
good fortune this season. Harris and Colbin co-lead the team in interceptions with
two. Even though the Sooners are unaware of who the starting quarterback is for
Kansas this Saturday, they will still come out with the same mentality and will do
very little to adjust if and when a quarterback change is made.
mOmeNtUm
Stoops has a lot of strengths on his football team each season,
and this year’s team is no exception. Oklahoma’s offense is ranked
ffth in the Big 12 and has been sparked by the rushing game. The
defense stands tall at second in the conference. Stoops and his
staff have also stressed the importance of special teams, which is
currently in the top three in the Big 12 in kickoff return and punt
return average.
At A GLANce
Bob Stoops played defensive back
at Iowa from 1979 to 1982. Seven
years after playing for the Hawkeyes,
Stoops took a job with Kansas State
University as a defensive assistant
under Bill Snyder. He also spent three
seasons at the University of Florida
as a defensive coordinator for Steve
Spurrier’s staff. After he learned from
some of the best in Snyder and Spur-
rier, Stoops took a job as the head
coach of Oklahoma in 1999 and is in
his 14th season with the Sooners.
cOAchING
Backup quarterback Blake Bell
could be one of the most notable
backup quarterbacks in college foot-
ball today. While his fve-of-seven
passes for 74 yards aren’t eye-grab-
bing statistics, his rushing numbers
are doing all the talking. Oklahoma
has a lot of plays for Bell that involve
him in short-yardage situations. He
often helps his team get a frst down,
and other times he takes the ball to the end zone. Nicknamed
the “Belldozer,” Bell leads the team in rushing touchdowns with
seven on the year.
PLAYeR tO WAtch
Kicker Michael Hunnicutt missed two extra point
attempts and one feld goal this season, but he is still
second in the Big 12 among all kickers in scoring with
46 points on the season. Roy Finch and Brennan Clay
have handled the kickoff returns and average 26.6
yards per return. On punt returns, Justin Brown and
Kenny Stills have done a good job trying to give Okla-
homa’s offense good feld position as they average
16.3 yards per punt return.
SPecIAL teAmS
?
qUeStION mARKS
?
Will Oklahoma’s defense be ready for both Kansas quarterbacks?
Kansas coach Charlie Weis said both of his quarterbacks will play this Saturday
against Oklahoma. But Oklahoma won’t know who will start until game time. That
forced the Sooners to spend all week preparing for both quarterbacks. Dayne Crist
and Michael Cummings are different in their own way, giving Oklahoma defensive
coordinator Mike Stoops a lot to prepare for before Saturday’s match.
Oklahoma shuts down Kansas in the
second half. In last year’s meeting, Okla-
homa cruised in the second half against
Kansas, 20-0. The Sooners eventually
went on to win by 30. The Jayhawks have
struggled in the second half this season
until last week against Oklahoma State.
If Kansas carries over its second-half mo-
mentum to Norman and expands it to four
quarters, fans might be in for an exciting
game.
bY the NUmbeRS
143
82
wins for Oklahoma under Stoops
since 1999.
consecutive home sellouts at Gaylord
Family - Oklahoma Memorial Stadium.
59
players under Stoops who have been
drafted in the NFL.
21, OU
Oklahoma is 7-0 all-time when facing Kansas with
Stoops as head coach. The Sooners have always had the
best of the Jayhawks since their frst meeting in the Stoops
era on Sept. 30, 2000. In the seven matchups during the
Stoops era, Kansas has never scored more than 21 points
and have been outscored 259-90.
Bell
Stoops
bAbY jAY WILL WeeP IF ...
FARzIN VOUSOUGhIAN
fvousoughian@kansan.com
ASSOcIAteD PReSS
Oklahoma fullback Trey Millard is grabbed by Texas cornerback Carrington Byndom
during the frst half of the Cotton Bowl Saturday in Dallas.
ASSOcIAteD PReSS
Texas quarterback David Ash fumbles after he was sacked by Oklahoma linebacker
Tom Wort and defensive back Tony Jefferson during the second half of an NCAA
college football game at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas.
ASSOcIAteD PReSS
Texas Tech’s Seth Doege is hit by Oklahoma’s Casey Walker as Chuka Ndulue nears
Doege during a game.
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PAGE 6B thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, octoBER 18, 2012
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After coming off two losses this
past weekend, the Jayhawks hope
to bounce back as they compete in
their final three matches at home.
Kansas fell to 8-6-2 for the year
and 2-4 in conference play after
facing Oklahoma and Texas on
the road. All the Kansas losses this
season have been by only one goal,
which has proved especially frus-
trating for the Jayhawks.
“I think the thing that is most
disappointing right now is that
we’re not getting outplayed. We’re
just not getting results,” Kansas
coach Mark Francis said. “We just
gotta keep playing the way we’re
playing. We’re not very far off.
We just got to get the small pieces
together and get results.”
Junior forward Caroline Kastor
and senior midfielder Whitney
Berry will need to keep creating
opportunities as the Jayhawks host
the Iowa State Cyclones this Friday.
The Cyclones are 10-7 overall and
1-4 against conference opponents.
The Cyclones are an offensively
sound team, scoring 36 goals this
season. Junior forward Jennifer
Dominquez has carried the team
on her shoulders, leading the team
with 13 goals this season. Kansas is
led by Kastor with nine goals, fol-
lowed by freshman forward Ashley
Williams with seven goals.
It will be the job of the Kansas
defense to shut down Dominquez,
who scored two of Iowa State’s
three goals in its most recent vic-
tory against Drake. Kansas hopes
to shake off the scoreless drought
it suffered while on the road, not
finding the back of the net since
early October versus Wake Forest.
“We’ve got players who have the
talent to put the ball away. But
when you’re an attacking player
and you aren’t scoring, it gets in
your head a little bit,” Francis
said. “We just got to maintain
our confidence.”
On Sunday the Jayhawks will
welcome the Red Raiders of Texas
Tech, a team that boasts a record of
12-4 and is currently riding a two-
game winning streak. The Raiders
are 3-2 in conference play and still
have to face TCU before heading
into Jayhawk territory.
Kansas will need to bring
power and precision to the pitch
on Sunday. The Jayhawks have a
loaded arsenal of scoring talent,
with five different players scoring
this season. That talent will need
to break down the brick wall that is
the Texas Tech defense, which has
forced seven shutouts this season.
Kansas has a good chance of
scoring, as four of its offensive
weapons recently received rank-
ings on topdrawersoccer.com ear-
lier this week. On the Top 100
Upperclassmen in NCAA Division
I women’s soccer, Berry was ranked
19th and Kastor 48th. Williams
ranked 27th and Dickerson 48th
on the top 100 first-year players
list.
Kansas’ defense will also have to
stay solid, as the Red Raiders have
scored 30 goals this season. The
Jayhawks have a strong defensive
line capable of clearing the dan-
ger out of their side of the pitch.
Kansas also posts two really strong
goalkeepers between the pipes, Kat
Liebetrau and Kaitlyn Stroud, who
have 73 saves and three shutouts
between them.
The Jayhawks receive their final
two conference matches this week-
end, playing Iowa State at 3 p.m.
on Friday and facing Texas Tech at
1 p.m. on Sunday.
— Edited by Stéphane Roque
thursday, OCtOBEr 18, 2012 PaGE 7B thE uNIVErsIty daILy KaNsaN
Making sure that all your
homework is done, getting out of
the house enough to stay sane and
trying to get enough sleep can be
a tricky thing to do, especially as
a freshman. Add playing tennis at
a Division-1 level to the mix, and
the result is a daunting task.
For Anastajia Trubica, a fresh-
man from Latvia, getting used
to a new country is also in that
equation.
“The first week was difficult
trying to get used to everything,”
Trubica said.
Being able to rely on her team-
mates and the people around her
was helpful during her acclima-
tion to the United States.
The team aspect is new for
Trubica, but you wouldn’t know
that by watching her play. She
and junior Claire Dreyer won
their doubles flight at the Tribe
Invitational in Williamsburg, Va.,
earlier this month.
Trubica and Mariajose Cardona
are the only two freshmen on the
team. Being new to the program,
Trubica is quickly beginning to
see what it’s like to be in the
Jayhawk community with all the
different levels of support, and so
far she is enjoying playing for the
University.
“One of the things I like about it
is the team atmosphere,” Trubica
said.
Having teammates and fans
around cheering for the match-
es is something she really likes
about being at Kansas, and play-
ing in doubles tournaments is a
welcomed opportunity.
In the first tournament
of the season, the Kansas Fall
Invitational, Trubica and Dreyer
made it to the final round of
their doubles flight but lost to fel-
low Jayhawks Cardona and Haley
Fournier.
Trubica will look to con-
tinue her early success as the
Jayhawks host their second KU
Tournament this weekend at the
Jayhawk Tennis Center.
— Edited by Stéphane Roque
tennis soccer
crime
tyLEr CONOVEr
tconover@kansan.com
assOCIatEd PrEss
NICOLE EVaNs
nevans@kansan.com
Latvian Jayhawk adjusts
Jayhawks working hard,
waiting for better results
Armstrong resigns from
charity following fallout
traVIs yOuNG/KaNsaN
Freshman Anastasija trubica returns the ball in Women’s Doubles vs WsU saturday afternoon for the KU tournament.
tyLEr rOstE/KaNsaN
Forward Whitney Berry drives the ball downfeld through two West Virginia
defenders. the Jayhawks lost to the Big 12 newcomers on oct. 5.
AUSTIN, Texas — Lance
Armstrong stepped down as chair-
man of his Livestrong cancer-
fighting charity while Nike and
Anheuser-Busch each said they
were cutting ties with him as fallout
from the doping scandal that has
swirled around the famed cyclist
escalated Wednesday.
Armstrong announced his move
at the charity in an early-morning
statement. Within minutes, Nike
said that it would end its relation-
ship with him “due to the seeming-
ly insurmountable evidence that
Lance Armstrong participated in
doping and misled Nike for more
than a decade.”
Nike said it will continue to sup-
port Livestrong.
Beer-maker Anheuser-Busch
did not give a reason for its action,
which followed hours later. A two-
sentence statement from U.S. mar-
keting vice president Paul Chibe
said simply, “We have decided not
to renew our relationship with
Lance Armstrong when our cur-
rent contract expires at the end of
2012. We will continue to support
the Livestrong Foundation and its
cycling and running events.”
The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency
released a massive report last week
detailing allegations of widespread
doping by Armstrong and his teams
when he won the Tour de France
seven consecutive times from 1999
to 2005.
The document’s purpose was to
show why USADA has banned him
from cycling for life and ordered
14 years of his career results
erased — including those Tour
titles. It contains sworn statements
from 26 witnesses, including 11
former teammates.
Armstrong, who was not paid
a salary as chairman of the Lance
Armstrong Foundation, will
remain on its 15-member board.
His duties leading the board will be
turned over to vice chairman Jeff
Garvey, who was founding chair-
man in 1997.
“This organization, its mission
and its supporters are incredibly
dear to my heart,” Armstrong said
in a statement. “Today therefore, to
spare the foundation any negative
effects as a result of controversy
surrounding my cycling career, I
will conclude my chairmanship.”
Foundation spokeswoman
Katherine McLane said the decision
turns over the foundation’s big-pic-
ture strategic planning to Garvey. He
will also assume some of the pub-
lic appearances and meetings that
Armstrong used to handle.
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HOW MUCH IS ONE
No. 24 Iowa State 4-2 (1-2)
@ oklahoma State 3-2 (1-1)
Iowa State cracked a spot in the top 25 as it tries
to dig itself out of the bottom tier of the confer-
ence. But Oklahoma State vies to have a better
ofensive performance afer a season low of 20
points scored last week against Kansas.
Oklahoma State rushing back Joseph Randle
leads the Big 12 with 614 yards. Regardless of
whom the Cowboys have taking snaps under cen-
ter, Randle will be their key against the Cylcones.
Iowa State will rely more on its defense, which
is ranked fourth against the run and pass in the
Big 12. But its ofense has a lot of holes and has
been mostly quiet this season. If Oklahoma State’s
defense can hold Iowa State like it did to Kansas
for three quarters, you can expect an upset.
Oklahoma State wins, 31-13
No. 17 texaS tech 5-2 (2-1)
@ No. 23 tcu 5-1 (2-1)
Texas Tech is climbing in the rankings afer a
huge win at home against West Virginia. Quarter-
back Seth Doege is coming of the best game of
his career when he lifed his team afer a loss to
Oklahoma.
Doege will encounter a TCU defense led by
cornerback Jason Verrett, who leads the Big 12
with four interceptions. If Doege wants to carry
over his success from last week, he will want to
throw the football to the receivers not covered by
Verrett.
TCU quarterback Trevone Boykin is still getting
used to his starting role, but his game last week
against Baylor gave him the lif he needed to built
some confdence. But like Doege, Boykin will also
be challenged by Texas Tech as it is ranked frst in
the conference against the pass.
But TCU’s secret weapon could come through
on special teams. Punt returner Deante’ Gray has
the highest punt return average in the Big 12. He’s
returned one punt 70 yards for a touchdown and
is on pace to fnish frst in the Big 12. He could be
the diference maker against Texas Tech on Satur-
day.
CU wins, 28-21
Baylor 3-2 (0-2)
@ No. 25 texaS 4-2 (1-2)
Baylor and Texas are eager to get this week’s
matchup underway. Both teams are riding a two-
game losing streak as Baylor is seeking its frst
conference victory of the season.
Baylor quarterback Nick Florence had his
worst outing of the season last week against TCU
when he threw four interceptions. But Florence
can redeem himself against a Texas team that has
struggled lately. Wide receiver Terrance Williams,
who leads the team in all key receiving categories,
will be Florence’s most important weapon on the
road.
Although this game marks the fnal match of a
three-game home stand, Texas lost its two home
games against ranked conference opponents. Te
Longhorns declined defensively in the last two
weeks. Sophomore quarterback David Ash is
dealing with a wrist injury, and his status for Sat-
urday is questionable. If this week’s adjustments in
practice don’t show on Saturday for Texas, Baylor
could pull of an upset and get its frst conference
win of the season.
Baylor wins, 28-24
No. 4 kaNSaS State 6-0 (3-0)
@ No. 13 weSt VIrgINIa 5-1 (2-1)
Many people expected this to be a top fve battle
between two teams that hold a 6-0 overall record
and a 3-0 record in the Big 12. But afer last week’s
setback against Texas Tech, West Virginia sufered
a huge loss. However, don’t count the Mountain-
eers out yet.
Kansas State’s ofense has been predominately
led by quarterback Collin Klein. He has account-
ed for 17 touchdowns this season with 10 of them
coming on the ground. As a dual-threat quarter-
back, Klein can keep West Virginia guessing and
give K-State a lot of momentum on ofense.
However, K-State could be in for a ride. Te
Wildcats have limited all of their opponents to 21
points or less in each game. Tat will change when
they face Mountaineers quarterback Geno Smith.
Smith, still without an interception, has thrown
25 touchdowns this season. With West Virginia at
home, expect K-State to run into trouble when it
tries to hold Smith. K-State has not played a team
as challenging as West Virginia. Coach Bill Snyder
will want to make sure his defense comes out with
its best game of the season. But Smith will play
with a chip on his shoulder afer last week’s loss.
West Virginia wins, 45-35
— edited by ryan mccarthy
PAGE 8B thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, octoBER 18, 2012
FARzIN VoUSoUGhIAN
fvousoughian@kansan.com
football
Iowa State, texas defend rankings in week 8
Keselowski seeks to revive lead at Kansas Speedway
NaScar
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Brad
Keselowski held serve through the
frst half of the Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship, due in part to a
smart strategy with his Penske Rac-
ing team.
It just didn’t work last week.
Keselowski’s lead in the stand-
ings was sliced in half when he
ran out of gas at Charlotte Motor
Speedway 59 laps from the fnish
of a race that was a chess match for
crew chiefs at the drop of the green
fag. He had dominated the race,
but had to settle for a disappointing
11th-place fnish.
Keselowski and crew chief Paul
Wolfe immediately put the mis-
calculation behind them and got
ready for Kansas Speedway, site of
Sunday’s race and Round 6 of the
10-race Chase.
“I know I speak for everyone ...
when I say we can’t wait to get to
Kansas to prove that our fnish at
Charlotte was an anomaly, a blip on
the radar,” Keselowski said.
He goes to Kansas with a slight
advantage over the competition:
Keselowski got two days of track
time on the repaved surface dur-
ing an August tire test. Te track
opened Wednesday to the entire
Sprint Cup Series for a two-day
test, but Keselowski is one of only
eight drivers who has already been
there.
Wolfe, who guided Keselowski
to his frst career Cup win last sea-
son at Kansas, already has an idea
of what to expect.
“We defnitely learned a lot about
the new surface at Kansas when we
did the tire test in August, so we
should be able to roll of the truck
with some decent speed,” Wolfe
said. “It’s going to be a very fast
place, for sure. I don’t think many
people are going to venture outside
the groove, so passing may be dif-
fcult for the frst couple of races.
“Tat means qualifying will be
very important and that’s some-
thing we will work on during the
practice sessions. We’ve shown
speed in our cars throughout the
Chase and I expect that to carry
over to what is, basically, a brand
new racetrack at Kansas.”
Wolfe had been spot-on until
Charlotte, which was certainly an
aberration to the strategy — sprin-
kled with luck — that’s worked
for Keselowski over the past three
months. Very little has backfred —
Keselowski got a win in the Chase
opener at Chicago and again in a
fuel mileage race at Dover. He ar-
rived in Charlotte with a 14-point
lead in the standings over fve-time
NASCAR champion Jimmie John-
son.
Wolfe, for his part, said nothing
will change with the No. 2 team go-
ing forward.
“What got us to this point is be-
ing aggressive with our strategy,”
Wolfe said. “We aren’t going to
change that approach as we run
through the Chase. And 90 percent
of time, it works out for us, and we
get the fnishes we want.”
ASSocIAtED PRESS
Friday, October 26
6 p.m. Homecoming Parade – Jayhawk Blvd.
7 p.m. Homecoming Pep Rally – Adams Alumni Center
(immediately following parade)
Saturday, October 27
9 a.m. Pregame Pancakes – Adams Alumni Center
TBA Football Game - KU vs. University of Texas
www.homecoming.ku.edu
Facebook: KU Homecoming
Twitter: KU_Homecoming
Celebrate 100 Years of KU Homecoming!
October 21-27
back front
Purchase an ofcial “Century Long,
Tradition Strong” T-shirt for only
$10 at these events and online.
For more information, visit www.homecoming.ku.edu
Facebook: KU Homecoming
Twitter: @KU_Homecoming
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TraVIs yOuNG/KaNsaN
Junior defensive specialist Jaime Mathieu gets into position during the frst set against the Kansas State Wildcats Wednesday
night.
TraVIs yOuNG/KaNsaN
Junior defensive specialist Jaime Mathieu laughs during the opening lineup of the match against Kansas State Wednesday
night.
Jayhawks end four-game losing streak to ‘Cats
TraVIs yOuNG/KaNsaN
Sophomore outside hitter Sara McClinton gets a kill during the fourth set of the match against Kansas State. McClinton had
19 kills and 33 total attacks.