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October 17, 2012

MIDWEEK

13

shot me

AGENTS, ONE FORMER SPOOK REVEALS
Suspect ‘was called n****r to help him’
A VETERAN cop who branded a young black suspect a “n****r” during the London riots told a court he was trying to “encourage him to be proud of who he was”. PC Alex MacFarlane, 53, said he was attempting to boost Mauro Demetrio’s self-esteem and calm him when recorded using racist language on a mobile phone. In the clip, he tells the suspect, “...you will always be a n****r, yeah?” and “You will always have black skin”. He goes on to say, “Don’t hide behind your colour, yeah” and “Be proud of who you are”. The Met officer (above) is on trial at Southwark Crown Court accused of causing racially aggravated intentional harassment and or distress. He admits using the language but denies the offence, claiming he was appealing to Mr Demetrio, 21, to “consider his lifestyle” and wasn’t being racist. MacFarlane told jurors Mr Demetrio, who had been stopped on suspicion of drinkdriving, had insulted colleagues, referring to them as “white c***s”. The trial continues.

wanted to hear and I drifted away into unconsciousness. after the Five days shooting I was still in intensive care, guarded round-the-clock by seven armed police officers, all wearing body armour. For two years I had pleaded with Northumbria Police and Home Secretary Jack Straw to give me some protection. But they had always refused, saying I was in no danger from the IRA. They even refused to give me any CCTV system to check my house for suspicious strangers. Marty became a target because over a four-year period as an IRA infiltrator he reported to Special Branch with information on the IRA and its planned operations, including key figures, murders, bombings and gun-running. It is estimated that his information saved the lives of 50 men – hence the title of his book. His cover was eventually blown when he provided info about an attack planned on a pub in Bangor, County Down, where British soldiers frequently drank. The RUC intercepted the courier delivering the gun to be used and McGartland was exposed as an MI5 mole. My former friends in Northern Ireland’s Special Branch knew differently from Jack Straw. They knew my life was still under threat even though there was a so-called ceasefire. They knew I was still high on the IRA’s death list. But the Northumbria Police and Home Secretary chose to ignore their advice. If they had listened I would never have been shot because I would have had some protection. I was never cavalier about my security. I always knew they would have another go at me. And I was f***ing determined to make sure they didn’t get me. That Thursday morning – 17 June – I had left my house in Duchess Street, Whitley Bay, on Tyneside, around 8.45am intending to drive my girlfriend to work. As usual, I checked if there were any suspicious

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strangers hanging around the lane behind my house. The lane seemed deserted. I had walked to the garage, opened the up-and-over door and checked for UCBTs – Under Car Booby Traps – but there were none. I carried out this routine every single day because I knew in my heart that the Provos would one day track me down, even though I was living under an assumed name at a secret address. I unlocked the car, sat down in the seat and started the engine when I sensed someone was nearby.

to die

The man was tall and dark and wearing glasses. I think he had a goatee beard. I didn’t recognise him, but I’m sure I will if we ever meet again. After the Good Friday Peace Agreement was signed in 1998, I had high hopes that one day I would be able to lead a normal, ordinary life once again: get a proper job, enjoy my life a little without the constant worry of waiting for the unexpected, the knock at the door, a bullet in the back or a gunman waiting by the garage to kill me. The longer the peace deal was intact, the more my hopes rose. Then Eamonn Collins, a selfconfessed IRA killer who turned against the terrorist movement, was murdered by the Provos. At the time of his shooting I made a statement saying, “Now I feel like I am waiting for someone to come to my house and shoot me”. I tackled Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams during a radio talk show asking him when Sinn Fein/ IRA were going to allow people like me to return in safety to Northern Ireland without fear of reprisal. His answer was evasive. That, too, made me realise that I had to keep my wits about me. I heard in May 1999 that MI5 had warned senior politicians to take extra care over security, for they feared the Provos were intent on launching a new wave of violence. No-one warned me. My Ma told me when she saw my lying in the hospital, “Marty, you can’t go on like this. You’ve got to get away. You know the Provos will never give up trying to kill you, peace or no peace.” I know she’s right; my Ma was always right. Now I must persuade the Home Secretary and Police to listen.

t had been nearly eight years since the Provos had first decided to kill me. Now they had returned for another try. Once again my luck had held.

Getting close to enemy is key to bring them down
IN war it’s important to know your enemy – which is why MI5 gets as close to them as possible. Marty McGartland risked his life by infiltrating the IRA at the peak of the Troubles in Northern Ireland – and still not a day goes by that he doesn’t fear being killed by them. But he’s just one of many secret agents who over the years have been recruited by MI5 to gain the trust of rival organisations to feed back information on their inner workings and strategies. Last year, following the death of grandmother-of-seven Peggy Harmer at 89, it was revealed that she had been one of Britain’s top female spies during World War Two. She was handpicked for Britain’s Security Service due to her beauty and intelligence – the perfect combination for any spy – and was part of the counter espionage unit Double Cross.

READER’S
SAVE a fortune on laundry bills. Give your dirty shirts to Oxfam. They will wash and iron them and you can buy them back for 50p. Jim Cartland, Brighton

Bomber

● Fifty Dead Men Walking by Martin McGartland is published by John Blake Publishing Ltd, RRP £7.99.

It was her job to turn captured Nazi spies into double agents. In the 1930s, MI5 spy Olga Grey succeeded in unmasking a Soviet spy ring in the Woolwich Arsenal, headed by Percy Glading, a Communist Party official who was later brought to justice. More recently, it emerged that a British undercover agent infiltrated al-Qaeda, volunteered to be a suicide bomber and smuggled out the latest version of the deadly underpants bomb. The man, who risked his life to get close to al-Qaeda’s bomb-maker in the Yemen, is of Saudi origin and was recruited by MI5 for the CIA-led operation. With thousands of lives at stake, there are always heroes willing to risk being tortured or executed to help The Security Service bring down the enemy.

A SMALL cafe that serves fry-ups for just £5.95 has been rated higher than all the Michelin-starred diners in the same city. Every customer to have reviewed The Haven in Edinburgh on the Trip Advisor website says they would recommend it. And it scores the highest possible marks for food, service, value and atmosphere. The result means it now ranks higher than posh restaurants Castle Terrace (4), Number One (11), Martin Wishart (13), Kitchin (19) and 21212 (219). All five were awarded a star in the latest edition of the Michelin Red Guide, which marks exceptional food and service. Natalie Kwek, 26, who runs The Haven cafe in the Newhaven area of the city, said: “I can’t believe my cafe is being mentioned in the same breath as these amazing Michelin star restaurants.

City cafe is a real star!

TIP