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Ulep v CA G.R. No.

125254 October 11, 2005 NATURE: Petition for Review under Rule 45 seeking the reversal and setting aside of the decision of the Court of Appeals. FACTS: 1. Valentin Ulep sold the one-half (1/2) eastern portion of Lot 840, comprising an area of 1,635 square meters, to respondent Maxima Rodico, while the remaining one-half (1/2) western portion with the same area, to his son Atinedoro Ulep married to Beatriz Ulep, and to his other daughter Valentina Ulep. 2. On June 1971, Atinedoro Ulep, his wife Beatriz and sister Valentina Ulep sold the one-half (1/2) portion of the area sold to them by their father to their brother Samuel Ulep and the latters wife, Susana Repogia-Ulep. The sale was registered in the Office of Registry of Pangasinan on February 1973. 3. Later, an area of 507.5 square meters of the western portion of Lot 840 was sold by the spouses Atinedoro Ulep and Beatriz Ulep to respondent Warlito Paringit and the latters spouse Encarnacion Gante 4. All the foregoing transactions were done and effected without an actual ground partition or formal subdivision of Lot 840 5. In June 1977, respondent Iglesia ni Cristo (INC) begun constructing its chapel on Lot 840. In the process, INC encroached portions thereof allegedly pertaining to petitioners and blocked their pathways 6. This prompted Samuel Ulep and sister Rosita Ulep to make inquiries with the Office of the Register of Deeds of Pangasinan. They discovered from the records of said office that a deed of sale bearing date December 21, 1954, was purportedly executed by their brother Atinedoro Ulep his, wife Beatriz and their sister Valentina Ulep in favor of INC over a portion of 620 square meters, more or less, of Lot 840 7. They also discovered that on July 9, 1975, an affidavit of subdivision was executed by respondents INC, Maxima Rodico and the spouses Warlito Paringit and Encarnation Gante, on the basis of which affidavit Lot 840 was subdivided into four lots. 8. The petitioners filed a complaint for Quieting of Title, Reconveyance and Declaration of Nullity of Title and Subdivision Plan with Damages against respondents INC, Maxima Rodico and the spouses Warlito Paringit and

Encarnacion Gante. They allege that they and the respondents are co-owners of Lot 840. 9. The spouses Atinedoro Ulep and Beatriz Ulep and their sister Valentina Ulep denied having executed a deed of sale in favor of INC over a portion of 620 square meters of Lot 840, claiming that their signatures appearing on the deed were forged. They claimed that at the most, they sold to INC only 100 square meters and not 620 square meters. Samuel and Valentina Ulep also averred that lot was subdivided without their knowledge and consent. 10. INC asserted that it purchased from the spouses Atinedoro Ulep and Beatriz Ulep and their sister Valentina Ulep the portion containing 620 square meters of Lot 840 on December 21, 1954, as evidenced by a deed of sale duly registered with the Registry of Deeds of Pangasinan. 11. The trial court renders judgment in favor of the petitioners, ordering INC to vacate and surrender 520 square meters of the land in favor of the Spouses Samuel Ulep. Upon appeal, the Court of Appeals reversed the decision ISSUE: Who has a better right over the 620 square meters of landthe spouses Samuel Ulep or INC? HELD: The INC has a better right over the 620 square meters. As the Court sees it, the present controversy is a classic case of double sale. On December 21, 1954, Atinedoro Ulep, his wife Beatriz Ulep and sister Valentina Ulep sold the disputed area (620 square-meter) of Lot 840 to INC. Subsequently, on January 18, 1971, a second sale was executed by the same vendors in favor of spouses Samuel Ulep and Susana Ulep. The Court is, therefore, called upon to determine which of the two groups of buyers has a better right to the area in question. x x x The law provides that a double sale of immovable transfers ownership to (1) the first registrant in good faith; (2) then, the first possessor in good faith; and (3) finally, the buyer who in good faith presents the oldest title. Jurisprudence teaches that the governing principle is primus tempore, potior jure (first in time, stronger in right). Knowledge gained by the first buyer of the second sale cannot defeat the first buyers rights except where the second buyer registers in good faith the second sale ahead of the first, as provided by the aforequoted provision of the Civil Code. Such knowledge of the first buyer does not bar him from availing of his rights under the law, among them to register first his purchase as against the second buyer. In converso, knowledge gained by the second buyer of the first sale defeats his rights even if he is first to register the second sale, since such

knowledge taints his prior registration with bad faith. This is the price exacted by the same provision of the Civil Code for the second buyer to be able to displace the first buyer; before the second buyer can obtain priority over the first, he must show that he acted in good faith throughout (i.e. ignorance of the first sale and of the first buyers rights) from the time of acquisition until the title is transferred to him by registration, or, failing registration, by delivery of possession Per records, the sale of the disputed 620 square-meter portion of Lot 840 to respondent INC was made on December 21, 1954 and registered with the Registry of Deeds of Pangasinan on January 5, 1955. In fact, INC was issued a title over the same portion on September 23, 1975. On the other hand, the conveyance to the spouses Samuel Ulep and Susana Repogia-Ulep happened on January 18, 1971 and the spouses registered their document of conveyance only on February 22, 1973 Clearly, not only was respondent INC the first buyer of the disputed area. It was also the first to register the sale in its favor long before petitioners Samuels and Susanas intrusion as second buyers. Although Samuel and Susana thereafter registered the sale made to them, they did so only after 18 years from the time INC caused the registration of its own document of sale In the instant case, the registration made by respondent INC of its deed of sale more than satisfies this requirement. The same thing cannot be said of petitioners Samuel Ulep and Susana Ulep. Said petitioners, by their own admission, were aware that there existed an agreement between INC and vendors Atinedoro Ulep, his wife Beatriz and sister Valentina Ulep involving a portion of 100 square meters of Lot 840. Knowledge of such transaction should have put the spouses Samuel Ulep and Susana Ulep upon such inquiry or investigation as might be necessary to acquaint them with the possible defects in the title of their vendors. Petitioners insist that the conveyance of only 100 square meters to INC was in fact evidenced by a deed of sale notarized by a certain Atty. Benjamin Fernandez.[19] However, they sorely failed to produce in court the said alleged deed of sale. They could have, at the very least, presented Atty. Fernandez to prove the existence of that deed, but they did not. The only plausible conclusion is that no such deed exists. On the other hand, to bolster its claim of ownership, respondent INC presented the December 21, 1954 deed of sale executed in its favor by the spouses Atinedoro and Beatriz Ulep and Valentina Ulep over a portion of 620 square meters of Lot 840. To be sure, INCs deed of sale was duly notarized by Atty. Bernabe Salcedo Calimlim