Android: The World's Most Popular...

Table of Contents
Android: The World's Most Popular... Table of Contents

Table of Contents

I. Android: Background and Basics
Introduction

II. A History of Android
The Beginning

The Bargain year

Shifting to the High-End

III. Establishing a Place in the Market
Legal Problems

Why Android Dominated

What does it all mean?

IV. Extras
A Few Interesting Tidbits

References

Further Reading

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Android: Background and Basics

I.

Android: Background
and Basics

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Android: Background and Basics

Introduction

Android is now the world’s most popular mobile operating system. That wasn’t always the
case, however. When the platform first came out, it was ill-equipped to combat the threat
of the iPhone. Growing from a humble beginning, Android’s popularity around the world
has exploded.

According to Google, Android sees 350,000 devices activated every single day. the
platform also accounts for nearly 60% of all first-time smartphone purchases, and holds
47% of the entire market. But that statistic is a bit out of date. Andy Rubin, head honcho
on the Android project, claims that Android sees 700,000 activations daily, with over 250
million Android devices in use around the world. That’s an incredible statistic.

The amazing thing is that Android’s growth doesn’t seem to be abating. If anything,
Android is growing faster than ever. Google has managed to halt the unstoppable
behemoth that is Apple—a company that demolished every established player in the field.
Now Android and iOS have split the playing field.

Android has thrived in a world that has seen Microsoft, Blackberry, Palm, and Nokia fail.
And RIM is on the verge of defeat, after managing to hold on thanks to its incredible BBM
system. Android has proven to be the only viable threat to Apple, and Apple the only
threat to Google. It’s no wonder that the two are locked in constant legal battles.

Now Android is entering a new era. Google is pushing Android as a generic solution to any
platform that needs a lightweight operating system, positioning it to replace low-end
Linux devices. We have seen Android put into cars, into televisions, and even into
refrigerators.

But perhaps the most interesting use of Android comes from Google itself, who is using
the platform in its Project Glass. Project Glass is one of the most ambitious initiatives of
this decade, an attempt to truly implement a wearable computing system. We still know
very little about the project, but it could prove to be as disruptive as the original iPhone
was. In fact, it might prove to be even more disruptive, if Google gets the implements it
properly.

Purpose

This is an ebook about Android, where it came from, and why it has risen to a position of
prominence among smartphone operating systems. I’ll look at the history of the platform
from its first tentative steps, to the modern day, where Android devices are constantly on

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Android: Background and Basics

the cutting edge of technology. I’ll cover the implications of a world dominated by a freely
distributed platform, and delve into the issues raised by it. There is much to cover, but I
will try my best to be brief.

Who am I, and why am I qualified to write this?

I am a technology blogger. I have followed Android’s ascent to the throne, seen its
occasional missteps, and heard all the criticisms. I have used custom roms, run alternate
launchers, and have replaced my homescreen.

I love Android for its customizability and its flexibility, both of which are unmatched on
any other platform. I have run into the platform’s limits and tried to push past them. I
have even developed for the platform. So stick with me as we take this journey into the
heart and mind of a platform that rejuvenated the open source movement.

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Android: The World's Most Popular... A History of Android

II.

A History of Android

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Android: The World's Most Popular... A History of Android

The Beginning

The Various versions of Android:

1. 1.0 (released September 23, 2008)

2. 1.1 (released February 9, 2009)

3. 1.5 Cupcake (released April 30, 2009)

4. 1.6 Donut (released September 15, 2009)

5. 2.0/2.1 Eclair (released October 26, 2009 for 2.0; January 12, 2010 for 2.1)

6. 2.2 Froyo (released May 20, 2010)

7. 2.3 Gingerbread (released December 6, 2010)

8. 3.0 Honeycomb (released February 22, 2011)

9. 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich (released October 19, 2011)

10. Jelly Bean (not yet released)

2008 saw the release of the first Android device to the public. The device was quirky and
did little to convince technology pundits of Android’s viability, especially with several other
major platforms from established players being released shortly thereafter. The
unassuming phone wasn’t exactly an incredible device. Some would even call it a pretty
pathetic phone. Android, at this point, wasn’t all that smart. There was no virtual
keyboard support, no cut and paste, no paid apps, no video playback, and no multi touch.
This was the beginning. But Android is older than that. In fact, the platform got its start
years earlier, way back in 2003 by a company called Android, Inc.

Android was founded by Andy Rubin, a cellphone innovator who had previously co-
founded Danger, Inc. Danger had developed the immensely popular SideKick line of
phones, which proved to be very popular among tech-savvy twenty-somethings. Their
great keyboards and incredible chat performance made them great devices to keep in
touch with friends, and the social revolution was just getting started.

Android ran in stealth mode for 22 months, and no one was quite sure what the
company’s project was. At this point the operating system we know today was only a
rumor. Insiders assumed that Rubin was developing a new smartphone operating system,

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but only because Rubin kept talking about how the current options weren’t all that smart.

Then, in 2005, Google quietly bought Android, Inc. in the middle of a purchasing spree.
Google was rich, and decided that it was going to buy lots of small startups. Most of these
didn’t pan out. In the midst of these flame-outs, however, was Android. The platform was
still a gem in the rough, and I wouldn’t be surprised if the purchase was more about the
talent on the project than the product itself.

Regardless, the project didn’t seem to have much progress for several years. At this point
the Blackberry still dominated the smartphone playing field. It is no surprise that early
leaked shots show that Android at this point looked quite a bit like a Blackberry crossed
with a SideKick. That’s not a bad idea, but it is nothing like what the operating system
would eventually end up becoming. Even these early screenshots show the pull-down
notification pane, however, which was a fundamental part of the Android design
philosophy.

2007 saw the release of the iPhone, a device that completely disrupted the smartphone
industry. The iPhone was a device that many other companies thought impossible:
touchscreens just weren’t supposed to be accurate enough to replace actual keyboards.
RIM, for example, apparently held an all-hands meeting on the day of the announcement
of the iPhone.

According to a trusted poster on the site ShackNews, RIM’s experts claimed that "it
couldn't do what they were demonstrating without an insanely power hungry processor, it
must have terrible battery life, etc." Interesting, considering that RIM had long been a
leader in cutting-edge hardware.

The iPhone was very real, however, and Google realized it had a unique advantage in the
smartphone wars. In its staple was a forward-thinking mobile operating system waiting
for a chance to shine. Google quickly changed the direction of Android’s development,
even as the company deeply integrated itself with the iPhone.

At this point, everyone—even Apple—had forgotten that Google had bought Android.
Steve Jobs even said in his 2007 Macworld keynote, in which he introduced the iPhone:
“Today we're going to show you a software breakthrough. Software that's 5-years ahead
of what's on any other phone."

But Android wasn’t that far behind. Google managed to fully pivot its Android
development from being Blackberry-esque to mimicking the iPhone in roughly a year.
The iPhone was announced January 9th, 2007 and released June 29th, 2007. The first
Android device was released October 22nd, 2008, a mere 15 months after the iPhone hit
the market.

Then, in 2008, the HTC G1 (HTC Dream) was released. The phone was incredibly limited,
quite slow, and had many, many questionable design decisions. it marked a tepid start for

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Android. But it was a start.

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Android: The World's Most Popular... A History of Android

The Bargain year

The G1 was not a high end phone, and the phones that followed it weren’t either. Android
was a bargain basement operating system for bargain basement phones, one that no
sane person would choose over iPhone. Steve Jobs seemed to be right: no company could
offer a platform that could compete with the iPhone, Google included. Google, however,
believed in its platform. And it had more than enough talent and money to make it better.

Android underwent rapid development. First Android version 1.1 was pushed out, proving
that Android could be updated “over the air.” Over the air updates were an impressive
feat—one that no other smartphone had managed. It is no coincidence that Rubin’s
Sidekick also happened to use over the air updates for its HipTop operating system. The
changes in 1.1 were fairly minor, with the update focusing mostly on bug fixes. The
platform’s first big change came with the next version of Android, Version 1.5. This
version, also known as Cupcake, was released on April 30th, 2009.

Cupcake was the first version of Android to use the dessert naming scheme, and it
showed just how fast Google planned on innovating its platform. Most of the changes
weren’t readily obvious to most users, but the operating system underwent a serious
graphical overhaul. Solid hues were replaced with light translucence, text alignment was
changed, drop shadows were added, etc. But the biggest changes came in the newly
added features.

Version 1.5 is the update that ushered in the virtual keyboard, copy and paste, and the
ability to capture and play back video. You know, elements that are now fundamental to
any smartphone. 1.5 also saw the release of the SDK for making widgets, which finally
allowed third parties to code for the home screen.

Google also did something that still no other smartphone platform has done: it coded in
the hooks for replacement keyboards. Android is the only platform where Swype, SlideIt,
ThumbKey, etc can exist, because it is the only platform which allows apps to tie into the
keyboard APIs.

Next came Android version 1.6, Donut. Released September 15th, 2009, Donut didn’t
change nearly as much as when the platform went from 1.1 to 1.5, but it was still a
remarkable update. Version 1.6 introduced a slew of new features that would eventually
grow to characterize the Android platform. The biggest, without a doubt, was resolution
independence.

It’s hard to think that, prior to Donut, all Android devices were stuck at the same

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resolution. The platform couldn’t handle screens of different sizes without all the content
failing to render properly. Donut changed all that. It opened the door to high resolution
phones like the ones we see today. Suddenly, hardware makers could have screens
running at resolutions beyond 320×480, which seems laughable today. This is Donut’s
lasting impact on Android.

But Donut also featured many other noticeable changes. It was the first version of
Android to have a quick search box, where the search widget did more than search the
web. Donut let you type in the name of an app into the search widget to find it, or type in
the name of a contact, or search for a movie on your system. This concept is known to
most as “universal search,” and it is an incredibly powerful platform enhancement that
would eventually go on to power the voice commands the platform would introduce.

Donut also features a redesigned version of the Android Market, one with an increased
focus on curated apps. The idea was to bring focus on the great, worthwhile apps that
everyone wants while making junk apps—which were a problem on Android even back
then—more obscure.

The camera interface was also updated, though it was still reviled and OEMs still mostly
replaced it with their own software. The change did, however, remarkably reduce shutter
lag.

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Shifting to the High-End

Version 2.0 of Android, named Eclair, was a big update. It is the version that finally saw
Android migrate to a leading carrier, though it would still be quite a while before AT&T got
an Android phone worth caring about. Version 2.0 promised a lot and launched on one of
the most successful phones of all time, Verizon’s Motorola Droid.

The Motorola Droid was the very antithesis of the iPhone. While the iPhone was sleek and
svelte, the Droid was bulky, big and powerful. The iPhone eschewed the physical
keyboard, and was proud of that fact. The Droid embraced the keyboard, including a
decent slide out QWERTY one. The hardware was done with a severe aesthetic meant to
make the device look industrial, and the advertisements saw Android targeting, for the
first time, overcompensating males.

The Droid’s screen was large for the time, at 3.7 inches. Before the Droid, most
smartphones averaged a 3.3-3.5 inch screen. It also had nearly double the resolution of
any other phone on the market, featuring an 854 x 480 screen.

The Droid’s camera featured a 5 Mp sensor with a dual LED flash, which compared to the
iPhone 3GS’s 3 Mp camera and no flash. It produced significantly better pictures than the
iPhone could manage, thanks to its superior sensor.

The Droid was the first high-end android device, though it would hardly be the last. It is a
phone that is remembered to this day, and not only for its aggressive commercials.

Eclair marked a complete shift for Android.

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Via Flickr

Eclair saw the first version of Google Maps Navigation. This was a big, big thing. GPS
devices at this time were still quite expensive, but they were a necessity. There were
some versions of mobile mapping software for smartphones, and TomTom and Garmin
were making a pretty penny off of the sales of it. Then came Maps Navigation, a
completely free alternative that shipped with the phone.

GPS manufacturers were terrified by Google Maps Navigation, and for good reason. This
was the beginning of the end for the industry, and other industries began to wonder when
Google was going to destroy them, too.

Google Maps Navigation had many features that only came on the most advanced GPS
devices of the time. It featured a slick 3D view complete with the ability to layer satellite
photography on top, voice guidance (including street names, something that many other
devices could only dream of), and live traffic information. Navigation companies had
been using traffic subscriptions as their cash cow, and now it was suddenly a free feature
on a phone.

This version of Google Maps Navigation still had some pretty glaring flaws that made
standalone options better, and many navigation companies grabbed on to that fact. But
the last refuge of a dying industry is in it’s competition is “immature.”

Eclair also included support for multiple accounts: for example, a work Gmail address and

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a personal Gmail address. Eclair also allowed for third party app inclusion, making it
possible for Facebook and others to integrate deeply with the platform.

Android version 2.0 also introduced the Quick Contact bar, something now integral to the
Android experience. It works like this: anytime you saw a picture of a contact on your
phone, no matter the app, you press and hold on it. Up would pop the Quick Contact bar
with a call, text or email button, letting you send them a message quickly. Google even
included the necessary APIs to let third parties hook into the Quick Contact bar, so that
other apps could display things on it, too. This is an idea that has been heavily refined in
more recent versions of Android, but Eclair introduced the core of it.

Eclair was also the first version of Android to introduce pervasive multi touch. Android
technically supported multi touch before Eclair, but gestures had never been
implemented thanks to Apple’s patents. No company wanted to be the very first to test
whether Apple’s patents were valid, so the implementation of multi touch kept getting
pushed back.

Fortunately for Google, however, Palm developed a gesture-driven operating system,
WebOS, that would infringe if it was possible to. And Palm proved to be clear of Apple’s
multi touch patents. With WebOS proving the waters clear, the stage was set for Google
to implement pervasive gesture support. Eclair didn’t feature pinch-to-zoom in the
browser or maps app, but most every other gesture we know was brought in then.

Google also overhauled the browser, drastically improving performance. This was the first
version of Android that aimed to be able to display the desktop version of a site in
addition to the mobile version, finally allowing smartphone users to browse the whole
web. Users wanted a device that could access the entire internet, and Google decided to
give it to them.

Google also went the audacious route and implemented HTML5. At this point HTML5 was
something that got a lot of hype but little development, so this was a major move. Google
even included support for HTML5 video in fullscreen.

Version 2.1 didn’t get its own version name. Google decided that it was still Eclair,
considering it a patch. It was the version that introduced Live Wallpapers, something that
sets Android apart to this day.

This is also the first version of Android to feature speech-to-text, the ability to recognize
what you say for doing searches. Voice actions weren’t there yet, but the groundwork
was being laid.

Actually, Google had been working on the groundwork for a long time. Google had
needed a corpus of recordings to train its computers on, so the company had released
several completely free voice-driven services to do just that. GOOG-411, for example,
was a completely free, voice-driven 411 service. When it was released, most people

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didn’t understand why Google had done so. But it was about the long game and getting
voice recognition capability. Now, thanks to Google’s massive library of samples, Google’s
voice recognition technology is comparable to most commercial voice recognition
technologies that run locally.

There were also a number of smaller changes issued in with version 2.1, such as a
revamped lock screen. But mostly these were small platform changes and performance
improvements.

There was one other notable thing about Android version 2.1: it launched on a rather
interesting device. Google’s hardware partners usually took Android and changed how
the entire platform looked. This was one of the selling points of Android to
manufacturers, that it allowed them to make Android their own. But it also meant that
Google’s work often was overshadowed by mediocre design decisions. To counter that,
Google partnered with HTC to release the Nexus One, a phone that changed how Android
phones were made.

The Nexus One was dubbed a “super phone,”and it wasn’t a bad name. The Nexus One
was slim, featured a faster processor than other phones–the Droid and iPhone 3GS both
featured a 600 Mhz processor, while the Nexus One had a 1 Ghz processor, a gorgeously
advanced screen, and featured luxurious hardware design. Best of all, it ran Android in its
pure form. The phone was far ahead of its time, and many still consider it to be the best
Android phone ever released. Unfortunately, it didn’t sell well. Google’s decision to sell it
through its own online store proved to be disastrous.

Android versions 2.0 and 2.1 marked the turning point for Android. The platform had
been growing at a reasonable rate, slowly gaining market share. But with the release of
the Droid and Eclair, Android adoption exploded. The Droid marketed itself as the only
real competitor to the iPhone, and it was on a different network. All those users wanting
an iPhone suddenly decided that Android was close enough. The Android adoption rate
nearly doubled overnight.

The next version of Android, Froyo, proved to be the most popular yet. Released on May
20th, 2010, its biggest change wasn’t obviously noticeable to most users. Froyo saw the
implementation of a Just In Time compiler, something that completely changed how
Android ran. A JIT compiler meant that code could be compiled only when it needed to
be, rather than at the start of the app. It meant that the various pieces Android and the
apps that ran on it would load faster and run faster.

That JIT compiler drastically improved performance on the device. It made it possible to
run huge, complicated apps on Android at the same time that it made the operating
system far more smooth. Again, this wasn’t an obvious change. Most users just noticed
how much better Froyo seemed to perform compared to Eclair. But this was a move to
make Android a truly robust operating system, and it showed in Froyo’s long dominance.

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Froyo introduced numerous other changes that made Android more friendly to use. First,
Google replaced the generic 3-panel home screen layout that had been on Android since
day one. Now it was a 5-panel arrangement, letting you cram in more widgets and links.
Next, the drag-up dock that was a staple of early Android—meant to make accessing
your apps quicker—was replaced by several soft buttons that linked to your app drawer,
your phone, and the browser.

This was a major change that completely altered how people used the phone. 2.2 also
introduced voice dialing, showcasing just how far Google’s voice recognition technology
had come. Google also made some changes to the apps to demonstrate the new-found
graphical power of Android, implementing a 3D picture browser that tilted the images
whenever you got to the edge of the screen, and the operating system began to include
complex animations for the first time.

2.2 also had some compelling features that went mostly unnoticed, thanks to meddling
from carriers. Android came with wifi tethering capabilities built in, for example. You
could turn your phone into a wireless hotspot with the pressing of a few buttons.
Unfortunately, most carriers were offering this as a service. And google doesn’t have the
clout of Apple, who once famously got away with sending a note to the major music
publishers informing them that song sample lengths were now 90 seconds long instead of
30 seconds, and thank you so very much for letting us save your industry. 2.2 also
introduced better copy and paste support, establishing the draggable selection tool that is
now so common.

Froyo marked a major change for Android. Google finally began to take Android seriously
for enterprise consumers, and it showed in the general stability and security of 2.2. To
help this, Google implemented Exchange server support for email.

This version remained the most popular version of Android for a long, long time. Even
now you will occasionally see a budget phone released running the platform. It is the first
version of Android that could truly be said to match what the iPhone could do and quite
possibly exceed it.

Gingerbread, Android version 2.3, was the first version of Android where Google began
trying to unify its appearance. Previously, Android had felt like a hodgepodge of different
graphical styles, with black menus, white dropdowns, various shades of grey, green and
black.

Gingerbread chose to focus on the platform’s look rather than just on features. This
version had gorgeous animations, a fast browser, featured a change from light gradients
to nearly black ones, and a shift from translucent textures for the sake of translucency to
stark, flat textures.

Feature-wise, Gingerbread was a fairly minor update. Beyond some performance

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Feature-wise, Gingerbread was a fairly minor update. Beyond some performance
improvements, not much new was added, beyond support for front-facing cameras, a
battery monitoring tool, and copy and paste improvements. But it marked a tonal shift in
the image of the operating system.

After Gingerbread came Honeycomb, an odd tablet-only operating system that marked
the future direction of the operating system. Gingerbread featured soft buttons in
addition to a soft keyboard–Honeycomb slates lacked a single button on the top of the
device, leaving it all instead to the screen. Honeycomb was a bit of an odd operating
system, and was plagued by performance bugs, an ecosystem that wasn’t fully
compatible with Gingerbread. Very few people managed to use it, simply because it got
almost no market traction. But the shifted focus onto resizable widgets, the move to blue
rather than green accents, and the disappearance of physical buttons all marked the shift
towards a clean slate approach to design.

Finally, we come to Ice Cream Sandwich, the most recent version of Android. Ice Cream
Sandwich is the most drastic change to the platform yet. Ice Cream Sandwich feels like
an entirely new operating system compared to its predecessors.

With a completely unified look, revamped multitasking, revamp to the Android notification
Tray to support swipe-away notifications, pervasive support for NFC including file sharing
through Android Beam, face unlock, resizable widgets like in Honeycomb, and unified
platform for both tablets and smartphones. Ice Cream Sandwich is a beautiful operating
system that is, in my opinion, far better than any other on the market right now.

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III.

Establishing a Place in
the Market

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Legal Problems

Android has also seen its share of problems. The platform’s success has made it the
target of legal attack after legal attack: Apple is stuck in a seemingly never-ending war
with Samsung; Steve Jobs declared “thermonuclear war” on the platform; Microsoft
makes money on most Android devices sold, simply because it has the legal muscle to
threaten Android OEM’s into paying their fees. Samsung has even seen some of its
Android devices blocked from sale in several countries.

And then there’s Google’s legal problems with Oracle.

Java, the operating system that Android was written in, was created by a company called
Sun. Sun was a fairly laid back company—one that strove to get Java adopted as widely
as possible. Google decided to adopt it as the basis for their operating system. Google
even got several key employees from Sun to come to Google to work on Android.

Then, Oracle bought Sun. Oracle isn’t nearly as laid back with its code. The company
accused Google of stealing code that now belonged to them—something that is a
possibility thanks to the corporate culture that Sun had. Oracle refuses to leave Google
alone until reparations are made.

The case will be a watershed moment for IP. At stake is the very concept of copyrighting
code. If Oracle doesn’t manage to score a win, there is at least one prior case where
code wasn’t covered. That is a big, big thing. But then, that’s why the two companies are
fighting over it.

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Why Android Dominated

Android’s dominance is dependent on four things:

Carriers can Customize it

Developers can Port it to new platforms

Small hardware manufacturers can use it royalty-free

The competitors didn't understand the new market

Android’s success is dependent not only on Google’s dedication to the platform, but also
to how they positioned the platform. When Andy Rubin decided to make Android, he
made a bold decision: to make it open source. Android, at its core, is openly available to
all who want to work with it. This has had far more of an impact than most were
expecting.

First, it meant that hardware vendors could delve deep into the code and implement new
features, new looks, and new launchers. The open nature of Android meant that
hardware vendors could make the platform into whatever they wanted. That made it very
appealing to vendors looking to differentiate themselves in a very dense field.

Another major reason that Android’s open source nature caused it to succeed is because
it could be ported to any platform. Android has exploded in China thanks in part to the
popularity of the Rockchip, a small, low power System-on-a-Chip developed in China. It
isn’t supported by default by Android, but it has been ported. This is a common practice.
Nvidia even created a custom store for games specially designed for its Tegra platform.

Also, because the platform is open, you can develop any piece of hardware you want for
it. Android is immensely scalable. It works on a wide range of hardware, from the slow to
the cutting-edge. This means that there are hundreds of phones out there running the
platform, and other, more obscure uses. This has let Android dominate by the sheer fact
that there are so many Android phones out there.

Of course, some of the credit must go to Android itself. Android has become a forward-
thinking operating system unlike any other. Its competitors have largely failed because
they didn't understand what people want from a smartphone. Palm had a compelling
operating system, but saddled it with poor hardware. RIM has excellent keyboards, but
doesn't seem to understand what a smartphone is. Microsoft has been far too slow with
updating its Windows Phone 7 platform, the replacement to the dead Windows Mobile

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platform. Nokia has abandoned Meego because they couldn't finish it, choosing to go with
Windows Phone 7 instead. Android, on the other hand, is owned by a company that
understands the internet. Using its immense skill, Google has kept Android an operating
system that does exactly what users want it to do.

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What does it all mean?

Android is so popular because it is the most flexible platform. Hardware manufacturers
love it because they can make it their own and port it to platforms that they want.
Amazon is a good example of this.

Amazon took Android version 2.2 and created their own distribution out of it, powering
their Kindle Fire with it. They also have their own store, which is popular not only on the
Kindle Fire, but also on stock Android.

Users also love Android for its flexibility, but mostly for the ability to customize the
operating system itself. Replacement home screens are incredibly popular on Android,
and users frequently replace the lock screen with their other options. You really can do
what you want with the platform.

And Android shows no sign of slowing down. Google has shown a commitment to the
platform, using it as the basis for its drivable cars, its TV push, and even Google Glass, an
attempt to make a wearable computer. Google has also been teasing Android Jelly Bean.
We know nothing about Jelly Bean yet, but Google has continually released innovation
after innovation to its platform. I doubt that Jelly Bean will be any different.

Android's growth isn't going to slow down. In China and India, Android is immensely
popular. And both markets are seeing explosive growth, as both ascend from a
developing nation into a fully-functioning member of the global elite. China, in particular,
is seeing an enormous level of adoption of smartphones.

In the future, we will spend more and more time on our phones. Statistics have shown
that smartphones are driving internet adoption more than PCs at this point. And Android
is perfectly positioned to capture more of the market than anyone. Google's got a wild
ride ready for us, so get ready.

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Extras
Android: The World's Most Popular... Extras

IV.

Extras

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Extras
Android: The World's Most Popular... Extras

A Few Interesting Tidbits

Via: FromKeith on Flicker

Android development started in 2003, while iPhone development started in 2005

The Nexus line of phones is an homage to the Nexus line of robots in Blade Runner, a
film by Ridley Scott. The film was based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric
Sheep? by Phillip K. Dick

Google’s lawn is dotted with various over-sized replica of desserts

Google has another operating system, Chrome OS, which the company claims doesn’t
compete with Android

Android can track your face with a front-facing camera, allowing for perspective-
based fake 3D

Google’s Play Store is far less profitable than Apple’s

It is also less profitable than Amazon’s, despite Amazon’s running on Android and
being smaller

Google can remotely uninstall apps from your phone

WebOS designer Matias Duarte now heads up Android’s look

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Extras

Android Powers Google’s home automation initiative

the Motorola Droid had an extra 51 pixels in height compared to other phones of its
era

According to some statistics, Android developers make only a fraction of what iOS
developers. Android users love free and freemium!

Google paid just $50 million for Android, quite possibly the deal of the century

Android has over 12 million lines of code

The first game on Android was a clone of Snake

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Extras

References

https://www.npd.com/wps/portal/npd/us/news/pressreleases/pr_120206

http://techcrunch.com/2011/12/22/android-700000/

http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/aug2005/tc20050817_0949_tc024.htm

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/10/12/27/rim_thought_apple_was_lying_about_original_iphone_in_2007.html

http://www.engadget.com/2007/01/09/live-from-macworld-2007-steve-jobs-keynote/

http://www.geek.com/articles/apple/itunes-to-introduce-90-second-song-previews-
2010113/

http://www.slashgear.com/steve-jobs-pledged-thermonuclear-war-on-grand-theft-
android-21189861/

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Extras

Further Reading

A comparison of the iPhone, the iPhone 3GS, the Motorola Droid, and the HTC Nexus
One:

http://www.theverge.com/products/compare/59/37/71/76

A visual history of Android, complete with animated GIFs showing the differences
between the different versions:

http://www.theverge.com/2011/12/7/2585779/android-history

What Android looked like before it took after the iPhone and implemented a
touchscreen:

http://www.technobuffalo.com/companies/google/android/android-before-and-after-the-
iphone/attachment/screen-shot-2011-10-27-at-16-26-12-1/

Android’s design guidelines, put online to encourage app makers to make gorgeous
apps. Gives you an idea of what Google thinks apps should look like:

http://developer.android.com/design/style/index.html

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Android: The World's Most Popular... About The Author
Android: The World's Most Popular... About The Author

About The Author

Jack Westerfil
Jack Westerfil is an experienced author and researcher, and a member of
the Hyperink publishing team.

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Android: The World's Most Popular... About The Author
Android: The World's Most Popular... About The Author

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Other Awesome Books

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Android: The World's Most Popular... Other Awesome Books

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