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Table of Contents
Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................ List of Tables .................................................................... List of Graphs and Figures .............................................. Foreword ......................................................................... FRAMEWORK I. Introduction ............................................................................................................................... Background ................................................................................................................................. Survey Objectives ....................................................................................................................... Sample and Survey Methodology ............................................................................................ Sample Design ............................................................................................................................ Questionnaires ............................................................................................................................ Training and Fieldwork ................................................................................................................ Data Processing .......................................................................................................................... Sample Coverage and Characteristics of Households and Respondents ........................... Sample Coverage ....................................................................................................................... Characteristics of Households .................................................................................................... Characteristics of Respondents .................................................................................................. Data Quality ............................................................................................................................... Interview ..................................................................................................................................... Data Entry and processing ......................................................................................................... Validation ..................................................................................................................................... Action for data improvement ....................................................................................................... 1 1 2 3 3 3 4 4 6 6 6 7 9 9 9 10 10 III IV VI VII

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RESULTS 5. Infant, Child and Maternal Mortality ........................................................................................ Infant, Child and Maternal Mortality ............................................................................................ Nutrition ..................................................................................................................................... Nutritional Status ........................................................................................................................ Breastfeeding and Complementary Feeding .............................................................................. Consumption of Iodized Salt ....................................................................................................... Vitamin A Supplements ................................................................................................................ Child Health ............................................................................................................................... Oral Rehydration Treatment of Children with Diarrhea ............................................................... Antibiotic Treatment of Children with Suspected Pneumonia ..................................................... Fuel Use ..................................................................................................................................... Immunization ............................................................................................................................... Water and Sanitation ................................................................................................................ Access to Improved Drinking Water ............................................................................................ 11 11 13 13 14 16 17 18 18 19 19 20 21 21

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....................... Type of house ........................................ FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS ......................... Livestock ................................... Gender Parity Index ..................................... 13... HIV/AIDS ......................... Reproductive Health ....................................................................................................... 11.........................................................................................................................................................................9.............................. Remittance ....................................................................................................................... Land holding ....................... Population congestion .......................................................................................... Ownership of house ...................................................................................... Primary and Secondary School Participation ............................................ Adult Literacy ............................................................................ Knowledge of HIV Transmission ......................... Donation and Zakat ........................................................................... Physical assets ................................................... Seasonal migration ................................................................ Birth Registration ......... 36 38 39 ii ... SUMMARY TABLE OF FINDINGS ..................... 12................................................................................... Media and communication ........................................................................................ Socio-economic status of households .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Antenatal Care .............................................................. Child Labour ................................................................................................................................................................................................ Education ..... Assistance at Delivery .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Tables and Maps ................................................................................................................................. List of Contributes ... Child Protection ..................................................................................................................... 23 23 24 25 25 26 27 28 28 28 29 29 30 30 30 30 31 31 31 32 32 32 32 33 10....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

USA Census Enumeration Areas Diphtheria Pertussis Tetanus Expanded Programme on Immunization Federally Administered Tribal Area Global Alliance of Vaccines and Immunization Gender Parity Index Human Immunodeficiency Virus International Conference on Population and Development International Live Birth Definition Iodine Deficiency Disorders Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses Intelligence Quotient Insecticide Treated Net Intrauterine Device Lactation Amenorrhea Method Millennium Development Goals Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Ministry of Health Net Attendance Rate National Centre for Health Statistics Oral Rehydration Therapy Oral Rehydration Situation Parts Per Million Primary Sampling Unit Statistical Package for Social Sciences Sexually Transmitted Infection United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS United Nations Development Programme United Nations Population Fund United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS United Nations Children's Fund Vitamin A Supplement World Fit For Children World Food Programme World Health Organization Table References CD .Reproductive Health iii .HIV/AIDS HH .Nutrition RH .Child Health CM .Acronyms and Abbreviations AIDS BCG CDC CEA DPT EPI FATA GAVI GPI HIV ICPD ILBD IDD IMCI IQ ITN IUD LAM MDG MICS MOH NAR NCHS ORT ORS PPM PSU SPSS STI UNAIDS UNDP UNFPA UNGASS UNICEF VAS WFFC WFP WHO Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Bacillus-Cereus-Guerin (Tuberculosis) Centre for Disease Control and Prevention.Environment NU .Child Protection ED .Household EN .Child Development CH .Child Mortality CP .Education HA .

6: Children's Vitamin A Supplementation Table CH.1a: Vaccination in First Year of life Table CH.5a: Home Management of Diarrhea Table CH.5a: Iodized Salt Consumption Table NU.1: Birth Registration Table CP.7A: Knowledge of Two Danger Signs of Pneumonia Table CH.3: Time to Source of Water Table EN.List of Tables Table HH.5: Assistance During Delivery Table RH.1: Knowledge of Preventing HIV Transmission Table HC.7: Type of Stove Table HC.3: Secondary School Net Enrolment Rate.1: Type of House Table HC.1: Results of household and individual interviews Table HH.5: Use of Sanitary Means of Excreta Disposal Table RH.3: Breastfeeding Table NU.1: Child Mortality Table CM. 6-10 Years Age Table ED.10A: Literacy Rate.2: Household age distribution by sex Table HH.3: Antenatal Care Provider Table RH.2: Initial Breastfeeding Table NU.8: Location of Cooking Place 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 iv . 15+ years Age Table ED.1b: Use of Un-improved Sources of Drinking Water Table EN 1c: Use of Improved Sources of Water for Other Purpose Table EN 1d: Use of Un-improved Sources of Water for Other Purposes Table EN.2A: Middle School Net Enrolment Rate.10B: Adult Literacy Rate. Proportion Dead Table NU.2: Children Ever Born.4: Oral Dehydration Treatment Table CH. 10+ years Age Table ED.1: Vaccination in First Year of Life Table CH.5: Home Management of Diarrhea Table CH.3: Household composition Table HH.6: Maternal Mortality Ratio Table ED1A: Primary School Net Enrolment Rate. 10-12 years Age Table ED.5: Iodized Salt Consumption Table NU.1: Use of Improved Sources of Drinking Water Table EN. 14-16 Years Age Table ED.4: Adequately Fed Infants Table NU.7: Gender Parity Index Table ED.4: Person Collecting Water Table EN. Children Surviving.5: Children's background characteristics Table CM.1: Child Malnourishment Table NU.4: Women's background characteristics Table HH.9: Solid Fuel Use by Type of Stove or Fire Table EN.3w: Infant Feeding Patterns by Age Table NU.10c: Youth Literacy Rate (15-24 year of age) Table CP.8: Solid Fuel Use Table CH.2: Child Labor Table HA.

MICS 2007 Table HC 23: Owned Livestock Last Year Table MN 8: Institutional Deliveries Table TT1: TT Shots Received Table TT1a: TT Shots Coverage Table TT 5: TT Shots Received Table TT6: TT Shots Received Table VA1: Vitamin A Taken Table VA2: Vitamin A Taken by Months Table VA3: Vitamin A Taken by Source Table CA5: Children Aged Below 5 years having Cough Table CA6 Prevalence of Cough (Suspected TB) Table CA10: Medicine Given For Illness Table WS: 10 A: Washing Hands After Using Toilet Table WS: 10B: Washing Hands Before Taking Meal Maps 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110-122 v .Table HC10: Source of Media Table HC11: Land Holding Table HC 14: Person Employed Outside Village Table HC 15A: Ownership of House Table HC 16: Remittances Received By Households Table HC17: Money Received As Donation/Zakat/Support Table HC18: Seasonal Migration Table HC19: Physical Access to School Table HC 19a: Physical Access to School Table HC 20: Availability of Facilities Table HC22: Population by Agency and Age-Group in FATA.

FATA.8: Figure CH-1. 2007 Distribution of childbearing age women by five year age groups. FATA. FATA.1B: Figure EN.3: Figure ED. 2007 Youth literacy. FATA.5: Figure NU.2: Figure ED. FATA.3: 15 16 16 17 18 19 20 21 21 22 23 24 25 26 26 27 27 28 29 30 31 32 vi . 2007 07 07 08 11 14 14 Figure NU.2: Percentage of population by age group and gender. FATA. FATA. Percentage population FATA. 2007 Distribution of time spent by household members retrieving drinking water from the Source FATA. 2007 Infant and under -5 mortality rates. FATA. 2007 Percentage of children with diarrhea in the past 2 weeks.2007 Gender Parity Index Child labor percentage of 5-14 years children. 2007 Distribution of childbearing age women by Agency. FATA. 2007 Percentage of children aged 6-59 months who received a high dose of vitamin A supplement in the last 6 months.1: Figure HA.1: Figure HC. 2007 Primary school Net Enrollment rate. 2007 Remittance received by households.1: Figure NU.5: Figure CP. FATA. FATA.1: Figure HC.4: Figure ED. FATA.2 Figure EN. 2007 Literacy rate of 10 + years population. FATA.3: Figure CM.3: Figure RH.1: Figure EN. 2007 Children under weight by agency. FATA. 2007 Coverage by Antenatal care.1: Figure NU. FATA. FATA.2: Figure HC. FATA.3: Figure RH. 2007 Infant feeding pattern by age: percentage distribution of children aged under 3 years by feeding pattern by age group.1: Figure 3. 2007 Percentage of households consuming adequately iodized salt. 2007 Sources of Media.5: Figure CH. 2007 Vaccination in first year of life. FATA. 2007 Use of improved sources of drinking water.5: Figure ED. FATA. FATA.1: Figure ED. 2007 Primary Gross enrollment rate (GER).4b: Figure NU. FATA.6: Figure CH. 2007 Access to improved sources of drinking water.2: Figure 3. FATA. 2007 Knowledge of 3 preventive methods. percent of households. FATA. 2007 Sources of non-solid fuel. 2007 Percentage of women aged 15-49 years with a birth in the 2 years preceding the survey who breastfed their baby within one hour and within one day of birth. FATA.List of Graphs and figures Figure 3. 2007 Assistance during deliveries. 15-24 years of age.3W: Figure NU. FATA. 2007 Persons living per room (percentage of households). 2007 Percentage of 0-6 month infants exclusively breastfed.

In line with the objectives of FATA Sustainable Development Plan and recognizing the need for an authentic baseline. forms the western border of FATA. Similarly. 40 billion. Kurram. both political as well as financial. most of the socio-economic indicators of FATA have regressed instead of making progress towards betterment of the local populace. Thus it leads to poor visibility and impact of the development interventions. FATA joins the Punjab province. health facilities etc. Mohmand. FATA Secretariat has prepared the FATA Sustainable Development Plan (2006-15) which provides a framework for development interventions in FATA. the cost of living has increased manifold. Undoing this damage will require a long term commitment. resulting in poor service delivery. This issue is more compounded due to the fact that there is also no private investment being made in FATA.The Durand Line. Moreover. The cost of protection of these facilities and public life has also increased manifold due to the on going conflict in the area. there have been frequent incidents of blasting of public infrastructure including electricity pylons. Peshawar and Tank. Even with increased allocation since year 2002. The Plan identifies lack of availability of authentic data for informed decision making as one of the key cross cutting issue in FATA. and South Waziristan-and six smaller zones. Dera Ismail Khan. however. The methodology. With current level of funding by the Federal Government it would take atleast four years to complete the ongoing projects of the FATA ADP. During the same period. scarce economic activities and socio-cultural barriers and law & order situation. Starting with the 1979 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. limited resources coupled with increased procurement rates have further impacted the development and cost of construction in FATA. human resources and machinery. the ongoing conflict in FATA has severely impacted the already limited economic activity as there has been significant increase in the flight of capital and human resource from the conflict ridden pockets of FATA. FATA ADP has throwforward liabilities of more than Rs. Kohat.Foreword he territories that form FATA consist of seven 'political agencies'-Bajaur. Increasingly impoverished and marginalised. The socioeconomic indicators of FATA suggest that it is one of the poorest areas of the country. FATA Secretariat selected the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) methodology to fill the data requirement gaps. called 'Frontier Regions' (FRs) in the districts of Bannu.or US$ 11. To the north and east. Khyber. 2044/or US$ 25. Orakzai. has been used to produce the first ever comprehensive survey on human development at the Agency and Frontier Region (FR) level in FATA – the “FATA Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey”. In the south-east. which separates Pakistan from Afghanistan. Federal Bureau of Statistics. Resultantly. The key reasons of the historical development lag are attributed to resource and capacity constraints. schools. the per capita government funded development investment in FATA (Rs. Another phenomenon is that the ongoing conflict has limited the access of tribesmen to market places in settled districts of NWFP and vice versa. Moreover. It also appears that there is no quick fix of the crises. the last three decades have seen turmoil and instability across the border spill over into FATA. which has been successfully implemented in more than 70 countries in connection with the monitoring of the World Summit Goals for Children.30) stands very low against the national per capita government funded development investment (Rs. Lakki Marwat. meager financial allocations coupled with increased development cost have resulted in huge throwforward liabilities. To effectively respond to the development challenges. the tribal areas are bounded by the North West Frontier Province (NWFP). North Waziristan. Its people have seen few of the benefits of development activities launched in their own area and have failed to share in the progress achieved elsewhere in the country. Therefore the Plan envisages creation of an authentic baseline in different sectors. while on the south lies the province of Balochistan.55). The cost of development and construction is also high mainly due to lack of availability of local material. 905/. FATA Secretariat in partnership with UNICEF. that would address not only the brick and mortar reconstruction but also try to heal the psychological scars which have marked the population. FATA has remained one of the most insular and isolated corners of the country. GoNWFP Bureau of Statistics T vii . It may not be wrong to state that due to the ongoing conflict. they have also become vulnerable to exploitation at the hands of criminal and extremist elements. cut off from the mainstream of Pakistani society. A number of projects were started under successive FATA Annual Development Programmes (ADPs).

recently developed by UNICEF. in terms of data quality. implementation and monitoring of social services for the people in FATA. carried out the survey which is first of its kind in the history of FATA. Pakistan April 2009 viii . Planning and Development Department FATA Secretariat. designed to collect information on the situation of children and women in countries around the world. The Planning and Development Department. On successful completion. on the latest international standard of MICS3. with any MICS survey carried out in Pakistan and international standard surveys. We must ensure these efforts are not in vain. All the tools are based on the models and standards developed by the global MICS project under MICS3. MICS FATA covers 76 indicators vital for development planning in FATA and required by donors and planners.and WFP. The report has been prepared. The results will make a valuable contribution to the end users for effective development planning in FATA and would provide a basis for future surveys of similar nature. NWFP Provincial Bureau of Statistics and WFP. MICS FATA report is comparable. Federal Bureau of Statistics. with inputs from UNICEF. Peshawar. FATA Secretariat is therefore encouraging government officials at FATA Secretariat and Agency/FR level and the academicians to make ample use of the information and analysis provided in the report to improve the planning. FATA Secretariat is pleased to present the report of the FATA MICS 2007-08.

FRAMEWORK .

assessment and planning.” (A World Fit for Children. Accordingly. Introduction A Commitment to Action: National and International Reporting Responsibilities The governments that signed the Millennium Declaration and the World Fit for Children Declaration and Plan of Action also committed themselves to monitoring progress towards the goals and objectives they contained: “We will monitor regularly at the national level and. in close collaboration with Governments. the Millennium Declaration (paragraph 31) calls for periodic reporting on progress: “…We request the General Assembly to review on a regular basis the progress made in implementing the provisions of this Declaration. and ask the Secretary-General to issue periodic reports for consideration by the General Assembly and as a basis for further action. we will strengthen our national statistical capacity to collect. paragraph 60) “…We will conduct periodic reviews at the national and sub-national levels of progress in order to address obstacles more effectively and accelerate actions…” (A World Fit for Children. and support a wide range of childfocused research. relevant funds. at the regional level and assess progress towards the goals and targets of the present Plan of Action at the national. paragraph 61) The Plan of Action (paragraph 61) also calls for the specific involvement of UNICEF in the preparation of periodic progress reports: “… As the world's lead agency for children. as appropriate. where appropriate. and all other relevant actors. including by sex. the United Nations Children's Fund is requested to continue to prepare and disseminate. We will enhance international cooperation to support statistical capacity-building efforts and build community capacity for monitoring. analyse and disaggregate data. information on the progress made in the implementation of the Declaration and the Plan of Action.” 1 .1. age and other relevant factors that may lead to disparities. programmes and the specialized agencies of the United Nations system. regional and global levels.” Similarly.

2 .

and included the following modules: 3 . The survey was funded both by FATA Secretariat and UNICEF. the NWFP provincial Bureau of Statistics. However.1. Members of this group were representatives from line departments. households were randomly selected within each PSU. An Operational Group chaired by the chief survey coordinator-FATA Secretariat was responsible for day-to-day management and logistics of the survey.3.2. Members included representatives from selected line Directorates (Education. A Planning and Coordination Group chaired by the Secretary Planning and Development Department FATA was involved in the preparation of the survey tools and advised the Steering Committee on the survey implementation. Health. Survey Management he survey process was governed by a Steering Committee chaired by the Additional Chief Secretary. 2. In the first stage. FATA. 2) a women's questionnaire administered in each household to all women aged 15-49 years. In the second stage. NWFP provincial Bureau of Statistics and UNICEF. a validation exercise was deemed necessary following review of preliminary data tables and validation and reanalysis of the data set and final report writing was entrusted with WFP's Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping Unit of Pakistan. the Federal Bureau of Statistics. to provide estimates of various indicators on the situation of children. T 2. women and households in general at the FATA. administered to mothers or caretakers of all children under the age of 5 living in the household. an administration and finance officer and an assistant technical coordinator.608 households in rural areas and 168 households in 4 urban locations of Kurram and Khyber agencies. Sample and Survey Methodology 2. The Steering Committee approved all major issues pertaining to the survey such as final questionnaire. Questionnaires Three sets of questionnaires were used in the survey: 1) a household questionnaire which was used to collect information on all household members. the household. and 3) a Children under-5 questionnaire. the Planning and Development Department FATA. the chief survey coordinator-FATA Secretariat. Sample Design The sample for MICS FATA was designed by the Federal Bureau of Statistics. Political Agents of the FATA were called into this forum when and if necessary. A local data management firm was engaged for the data processing. and 12 households were selected from the urban PSUs. The survey was implemented by the FATA Secretariat in partnership with Federal Bureau of Statistics. The Household Questionnaire included the following modules: Household ? listing Education ? Water and sanitation ? Household characteristics ? Child labour ? Maternal ? mortality Consumption of iodized salt ? The Questionnaire for Individual Women was administered to all women aged 15-49 years living in the households.2. 16 households were picked for enumeration. The sample was selected in two stages. It included the technical coordinator. 334 clusters as primary sampling units (PSUs) were systematically selected. Public Works & Services and Local Government & Rural Development). the NWFP provincial Bureau of Statistics and UNICEF. In rural PSUs. Agency /FR level and for urban and rural areas. The survey covered 4. Listing was conducted in the sample PSUs. changes in the data collection methodology and the final report. and the dwelling. the national consultant. The total sample had 317 PSUs in rural and 17 PSUs in urban areas. the technical survey coordinator and a national consultant engaged by UNICEF.

Medical technicians and teachers. In order to ensure quality control. Details and findings of these measurements are provided in the respective sections of the report. An exclusive training was conducted for the enumerators and supervisors of FR Tank and South Waziristan Agency.4. questionnaire content. The questionnaire included the following modules: Birth registration ? Vitamin À ? Breastfeeding ? Treatment ?of illness and care Anthropometric data ? The questionnaires are based on the MICS3 model questionnaire. and measured the weight and height of children aged under 5 years. This situation created a difficult environment for female interviewers. Training and Fieldwork The interviewers have been adequately trained to collect data and ask questions. Data was entered on twenty computers using MS Access software. The gender dimension in particular posed a major challenge to the survey. households were requested to meet at a nearby health facility and bring young children along. The appearance of female enumerators that were not from the communities themselves and carrying out interviews inside the households was viewed with suspicion in many areas and was even refused in some. Procedures and 4 . The data was collected by 12 teams. The fieldwork encountered numerous challenges given the extraordinary political. Eight teams were deployed to Kurram Agency and 4 teams to FR Peshawar. The editor was responsible for data editing prior to data entry and a data entry operator was responsible for entering the corrected data.5. Female family members in the FATA do not normally move within their own communities. The fieldwork was completed during September 2007. economic and security situation prevailing in the FATA. During the first phase. all questionnaires were double entered and internal consistency checks were performed. modifications were made to the wording and translation of the questionnaires. 2. while supervisors and senior supervisors were selected from amongst the staff of the provincial Bureau of Statistics. Three trainings were conducted for 88 participants including enumerators (male-female) supervisors and senior supervisors. in cases when the mother was not listed in the household roster. Data Processing Data processing was not centralized. In Bajour agency. The fieldwork started in April 2007. Based on the results of the pre-test. the editor and data entry operators accompanied the teams to different agencies and Frontier Regions. The English version of the questionnaire was translated into Urdu language and was pre-tested in March 2007. The training was conducted at FR Tank. 1 male) with one supervisor for 2 teams. The enumerators were selected from the health and education directorate FATA and were mostly Lady Health Visitors (LHVs). each team comprised of three interviewers (2 female. the Steering Committee decided to adopt a change in fieldwork approaches in a number of agencies. Afterwards the number of teams was increased to 20. This led to a situation whereby the household members were interviewed by the enumerators in a central location. and mock interviews. a primary female caretaker for the child was identified and interviewed. Instead. Given the prevailing law and order situation. fieldwork teams tested the cooking salt in the households for iodine content. Training included lectures on interviewing techniques.Child Mortality ? Tetanus Toxoid ? Maternal and ? Newborn health HIV/AIDS ?awareness The Questionnaire for Children Under Five was administered to mothers or prime caretakers of children under 5 years of age1 living in the households. the questionnaire was administered to mothers of under-5 children. let alone outside of their communities and are expected to be accompanied by male family members. In addition to the administration of questionnaires. Normally. Copies of the FATA MICS questionnaires are available with FATA Secretariat and on UNICEF Website. 2.

5 . Data was analyzed using version 14 of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software programme and the model syntax and tabulation plans developed by UNICEF for this purpose. and was completed in September 2007. Addawin and data simulation/verification techniques were used in the analysis of various modules to ensure accurate and quality results. Data processing began simultaneously with data collection in April 2007. Q5 (UNICEF). like Anthro (WHO). other software. In addition.standard programs developed under the global MICS3 project and adapted to the MICS FATA questionnaire were used throughout.

Data on different age groups in the population was Table-3. In Khyber 114 100 MICS FATA.203 were men and 14. The population pyramid reflects 31.2: Sex ratio.2. 34 clusters were dropped. "5-9" is not valid as the "5-9" age group population is almost similar to the NWFP population ratio of the same group. i.6% of population for the same age group. The cross-border war. The distribution of survey population by age and sex is given in Graph 3. 499 households were dropped. Sample coverage Total 4776 4745 4296 499 80.797 Interviewed women households. Sample Coverage.1% of the total Orakzai 100 107 population. rather only the male population was 1998 MICS counted. Occupied households including one entire agency.2. A total of 4. like family size and sex ratio also suggest the trend of the population age groups in line with 1998 census results.296 households were Households dropped interviewed. Such variations normally occur due to the comparatively higher death rates of a particular sex in a particular age group 6 . while the MICS survey 2007 estimated it as 108.1 Sampled Population clusters covering 7 agencies and 5 Frontier Regions.276 households in 334 Table 3. These figures indicate that that sex ratio is 109 males per 100 females.1. which are in favour of males.Waziristan 113 decline in population growth during the last 5 years.1. one cluster Interviewed households in Kurram. Average family size in FATA as per the 1998 Census was 8.0 5374 5311 557 88. This left 3. Household response rate After applying the data quality checking and validation Eligible women process.4 he total sample size was 5. The interagency sex ratio varies from the Census data..2% than NWFP for Kurram 105 100 the same age group. The decline is possibly due to N. but falls within the acceptable limits.e. North Waziristan. The recent baseline livelihood survey by World Food Programme in 4 FATA agencies (March 2008) estimated 12. the sex ratio of FATA was recorded as 109 males per 100 females. except for age group "0-4". In order to make a reasonable comparison. where 16.7 rounded to 109. two clusters in Khyber and one cluster in Mohmand agencies. Characteristics of Households Women dropped Women response rate Eligible children under 5 Mother/Caretaker Interviewed Children under5 dropped Child response rate According to the 1998 Population Census. the Agency percentages of all the specified age groups of 5 Bajour 105 114 years interval are quite close to the estimated Mohmand 110 102 figures of MICS FATA. non-response and/or population displacement. According to the NWFP 1998 Census. This shows that the result of MICS 2007 is close to the actual population trend of 1998 census.Waziristan 116 125 security crisis accompanied by decline in income FATA 109 109 sources has resulted in decline of growth. All the age groups by male and female ratio shows a normal trend except for age group 50-54.910 women. Other indicators. which is less by 4.3. Census FATA the evidence from NWFP can be taken as an Ratio Ratio example. Sampled households Due to the security situation. age group "0-4" has 12. militants' movements and S. T 3. Characteristics of Households and Respondents 3. 2007 Census. which is in favour of females.113 people listed in the survey. and age groups 60-64 and 70+.7.5 4171 4095 407 88. similar to the 1998 Census on FATA. The supposition for shifting the "0-4" age group population to the 2nd higher group. while the MICS FATA estimate was 8. 1998 Census Verses not available as it was not calculated for the 1998 MICS FATA.

1: Percentage of population by age group and gender.4 13. 4. Besides providing information on the background characteristics of women and children.7 1.3 3.4 2.0 20.0 7 .4% according to the survey. FATA.2 30-34.3 45-49 3.2 15-19. The population of children aged 0-14 years contributes 43. 9.9 40-44. The NWFP 1998 Census data also shows the same trend where the ratio of age group "20-24" to "40-44" is in favour of females. 2007 70+ 65-69 60-64 55-59 50-54 45-49 40-44 Age Group 35-39 30-34 25-29 20-24 15-19 10-14 5-9 0-4 -20.2 40-44 4.7 10.0 -15.3.8 4.2: Distribution of childbearing age women by fiveyear age groups.9 65-69 0. Table:3.7 30-34 5. 7.0 -5. Characteristics of Respondents Table HH-4 and HH-5 provide information on the background characteristics of female respondents "1549" years of age and of children less than 5 years of age. The population distribution from the survey closely resembles the pattern seen from the 1998 Census of NWFP and also the overall sex ratio of 1998 Census of FATA. 3.3 5-9 16.1 20-24. A decline in the male-female ratio at age group 40-44 and beyond suggests migration of males to other areas in the country or abroad for earnings and many of them do not come back to the area. the tables also aim to show the number of observations in each background category. 5.0 70+ 1.0 Female Male Percentage 3.7 8. Table HH-4 suggests that highest percentage of Graph 3. The second highest age group is "20-24" with 9% of the population of childbearing age women.and migration of male family members to other parts of the country or abroad for employment. The population size steadily diminishes with the growth in the population age.1 16.5 5.0 10.9 3.6 25-29.1 6.9 15-19 11.2 4.1 55-59 2.9 1.0 0. FATA.3 Population by age group 1998 MICS census Age group FATA NWFP 0-4 12. A sharp decline is observed beyond the age group of "15-19".5 20-24 8.0 35-39.9 Total 100 100 Graph 3.9 17.0 10-14 14. 2007 45-49.0 -10.9%) in all age groups. The age groups of "20-24" and "25-29" in 1998 Census of NWFP have the same level of difference as mentioned for the age group "50-54" in the FATA MICS. 11.2 25-29 7.0 15. the age group "15-19" has the highest percentage of such women (11.5 35-39 4. These categories are used in the subsequent tabulations of the report. According to the distribution of childbearing age women.0 5.4 50-54 3. 5.4 1.0 60-64 2.

5% reported that they had given birth.1% and 9.1%.9% respectively. Orakzai and Mohmand agencies with 12. and 89.0 12. 8 .0 6.1%.0 2 5 6 7 8 8 10 10 3.women of childbearing age reside in Bajour Agency (12.9%.0 9. Graph-3.3%). The lowest percentage was recorded in FR Tank.0 15.0 Percentage Table HH5 shows that the FATA population of under5 males was 50. followed by Khyber. Around 96% of this group live in rural areas. FATA. 2007 12 Bajour Khyber 11 12 Orakz ai 10 Mohmand Kurra m South Waziristan FR Bannu FR Kohat FR Peshawa r FR Lakk i FR DI Khan FR Tank 0.3: Distribution of childbearing age women by Agency. while females contributed 49.5% reside in urban areas. Around 5. 11.

4. 2. Data entry and processing 1. Such cases were found in Bajour agency (except one tehsil) and FR Lakki. without explanation. some problems were noticed in the following areas of the survey: Interviews 1. Data Quality T 4. Some of the outliers were found in the datasets. 7.1: Children and women modules interview status Agency/FR Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Interviewed by F2M M2M F2F F2F M2M F2F M2M F2F F2F F2F F2F M2M F2M=female to M2M=male to male F2F=female to female 4.2. For example. Keeping in mind the extraordinary security risk and emergence of various militant groups. After detailed investigation. FR Tank and South Waziristan Agency. with different figures for a number of entries. The verification process was not always consistent. S o m e h o u s e h o l d s w e r e n o t p r o p e r l y interviewed. The datasets from all agencies were found to contain mistakes. There were a number of mistakes in the soft form of data. These issues affected the fieldwork and compelled survey staff to interview the households away from their houses or in a centralized location in parts of a few agencies. Two different sets of data were observed for the same variable. 3. where both the columns were filled simultaneously. has created disturbance and insecurity in FATA. either because the team could not meet with an adult from the household or because the location of the interview was far away from the respondents' residence. There was no proper cleaning of data sets. and the prevailing crisis on the border with Afghanistan. 5. which could be avoided if properly cleaned. 2. FR Lakki. The combination of enumerators (male/female) could not be maintained in certain areas and thus women and infant related modules were not accurate. age group population and sex ratio. increasing the risk of human error. the fieldwork was subject to frequent interruption and restrictions in mobility. 4. Missing data was not properly coded. Table 3. different figures were recorded in modules giving the same results. In order to maintain data quality. 3. Male enumerators interviewed male household members in FR Bannu.1. such as family size. Such mistakes were observed while comparing various modules of the dataset. Mistakes in data were in the range of above 5% in various modules. female enumerators interviewed male members of the selected households in parts of Bajour Agency. economic and power dynamics of the area. questionnaires were sometimes verified by only one person. like BF1_a (breastfed for 1 hr) and BF1_b (breastfed for 1 day).4. On the other hand. In certain cases. Some of the results were not in line with empirical evidence from FATA or NWFP. Labels and values were not defined. he complex political. 9 . a unique governance structure which differs from the rest of the country. the Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping (VAM) unit of the World Food Programme thoroughly examined all aspects of the survey and conducted validation exercises. 6.

especially of infants/children and women in areas where the enumerator was male or the respondent was male. the dataset signaled a reasonable dispersion and showed a close proximity. 499 questionnaires were dropped from the survey. In addition. random checking of questionnaires. and were thus recorded as missing or unknown. review of soft data and usage of advanced data verification software. This could have been avoided. however. It was observed that in some cases. for basic indicators. two agencies and three FRs namely.6. Thirty households were randomly selected and interviewed. validation exercise. Bajour. especially children. number of family members was found to be correct. The women's response rate was 88% with SE Mean of 1. As a result. Details are given in table-HH-1. Poor quality questionnaires that deviated from normal trends or those with obvious mistakes were excluded from the analysis. FR Lakki and FR tank were excluded from the analysis for child and women's modules. Validation In order to check data quality. names of the respondents did not match.3. some of the modules were also reviewed.1. This resulted in an 80% response rate with standard error (SE) Mean of 1. Proper techniques were not used to check the age of the family members. Action for data improvement As a result of the personal observations of the enumerators. while children's response rate was 88% with SE Mean of 0. 10 .4. Data collected during validation was compared with the hard copy as well as with the soft data from the regular survey. FR Bannu. both women and child module results were dropped. South Waziristan. The validation process also identified a few mistakes in the soft form of the data and suggested a thorough screening of the dataset. With the exclusion of such questionnaires.4.8. 4. a validation exercise was undertaken in four agencies and two FRs. with the 1998 census data of FATA and NWFP.

RESULTS .

assuming a particular model of age pattern mortality. more expensive and requires greater attention to training and supervision. child mortality is the probability of dying during the period between the birth and the fifth birthday. but attempts using direct questions. Their levels are one of the basic indicators that characterize the health of a country's population. and their length of exposure to the risk of mortality. The technique converts the data into probabilities of dying by taking into account both the mortality risks to which children are exposed. T Graph-CM. indirect methods were developed.000 live births. The mortality rate for males was higher than that of females in the case of both infants as well as under-5 year children. no comparison for improvement or otherwise. as per the Demographic and Health Survey 2006-07 statistics were 80 for males and 73 for females. Using direct measures of child mortality from birth histories is time consuming. infants and under five mortality rates were calculated based on the indirect estimation techniques using the Coale-Demeny Models. child and maternal mortality is one of the key goals of the Millennium Development Goals and the Plan of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD. infant mortality rate was 79 per 1.1: Infant and under -5 mortality rates. According to the survey results.000 live births . The mortality rates for infants.5. The child mortality rate is the number of deaths among children under five years of age per 1.000 births. The data used in the estimation was the mean number of children born for 0-5 years age group to women of "15-49" years of age and the proportion of children that had survived for the same group of women. Alternatively. 1994). and poor interviewing techniques.000 live births and 116 for under-five children. and 93 for males as well as females in the case of under-five age children per 1.000 live births. while infant mortality rate was 86 per 1. the under-5 mortality rate in FATA was 104 per 1. Indirect methods minimize the pitfalls of memory lapses. Cairo. For the MICS FATA survey. Monitoring progress towards this goal is an important but difficult task. The infant mortality rate is the number of infants who die before their first birthday. The reduction of infant. According to the NWFP MICS 2001. Measuring childhood mortality may seem easy. Child and Maternal Mortality he International Convention on the Rights of the Child states that member states must take adequate measures to reduce infant and child mortality levels. Infant.000 live births. Government of Pakistan 11 . Whereas. can be made. Infant mortality is the probability of dying before the first birthday. per 1. such as "Has anyone in this household died during last year?" gave inaccurate results. There is no empirical evidence of mortality rates in FATA and therefore. in Pakistan. National Institute of Population studies. both infant and under-5 child mortality rates for males are higher in FATA when compared to national levels. inaccurate or misinterpreted definitions. 2007 Female DHS National (2006-07) 93 73 93 80 104 86 80 72 110 95 0 20 40 60 Per 1000 live borths 80 100 120 Male Both Sexes FATA MICS Female Male Under-f ive mortality rate Infant mortality rate 2 Demographic and Health Survey 2006-07. FATA. Hence.

UN agencies and local/district authorities. uncertainty.000 live births. indirect estimation techniques are often used. 3. claim further lives. The method records deaths of respondents' sisters during pregnancy and delivery.Maternal Mortality duration and site). demographic structure and behaviour etc. donor communities. Thus. eclampsia and intractable haemorrhage. prolonged or obstructed labour and the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. conflict. especially eclampsia. National Institute of Population studies. the quality of public health systems. social. The “sisterhood method” was applied in this survey for measuring maternal mortality. Hence.6). The measurement of maternal mortality rates is difficult. and cultural status. child and maternal mortality is therefore a priority for governments.000 live births (2006-07). however. Using this technique helps estimate the probability of maternal mortality. Government of Pakistan 12 .000 live births. MMR of 275 per 100. Sepsis. Infant and maternal mortality is determined by a multitude of causes: poverty. as recommended by WHO and other UN agencies. delivery is defined as a woman's death caused by pregnancy complications (irrespective of occurring during pregnancy or up to 42 days after pregnancy. It is well known that infant mortality is considered to be one of the most sensitive indicators of the level of poverty or socio-economic and human development. child and maternal mortality rates are relatively high in FATA as compared to NWFP or Pakistan. antibiotics and transfusions and to perform caesarean sections and other surgical interventions that prevent deaths from obstructed labour. complications of unsafe absorption. According to the survey results (Table RH. higher than the national level MMR of 276 and NWFP. Even countries with developed statistical systems often underestimate the rates. These complications can occur at any time during pregnancy and child birth without warning and require prompt access to quality obstetric services equipped to provide lifesaving drugs. Addressing infant. the rate of is extracted from the number of women who die due to complications during or postpartum period per 100. infant. economic. It should be used with caution.4 Demographic and Health Survey 2006-07. Thus. because of the high probability of estimation error. The most common fatal complication is post-partum haemorrhage. maternal mortality pregnancy. due to incorrect classification of the causes of death. the maternal mortality rate (MMR) in FATA is 380 female deaths per 100.

and are well cared for. Overall. healthy population. is presented in Table NU. they can reach their growth potential and are considered well nourished. 41. there is a standard distribution of height and weight for children under the age of five. Malnourished children are at high risk of morbidity and mortality. When children consume an adequate diet. while those whose weight for their age is more than 3SD units below the mean are classified as severely underweight. and lowest in Bajour agency (11.3% are underweight and 3.7% for females. Malnutrition during early childhood impacts on mental development and learning ability later in life.6%. The lowest rate was prevailed in Bajour agency (26. The severe underweight rate was recorded to be the highest in Mohmond agency (21. which is recommended for use by UNICEF and WHO. At the lower end of the weight for height distribution of 0-59 month old children.7%) and severely wasted (6.8% in males as compared to 29. Children who were not weighed and measured and those whose measurements are outside a plausible range are excluded from consideration. which exceeds similar indicators in urban areas where 25. The height and weight of malnourished children are lower than the expected average for well-nourished children of the same age.8%). are not exposed to repeated illness. Of children aged 0-59 months.1% of children and severe wasting in 6. Children whose weight for height is more than 2SD units below the mean weight for height of children in the reference population are classified as wasted (hypotrophic). However.3%).8%).2% are underweight and 16.3 % are severely underweight. Malnourishment in a population can.5%). Nutritional status indicators can be expressed in Z-scores.1 reports data from 90 percent of surveyed children. The pattern of malnutrition (Graph-5) shows that both moderate and severe underweight rates vary among agencies. which can be measured also by weight for height. therefore. Nutritional Status he nutritional status of children is a reflection of their overall health. 33. this indicator has not been examined in this survey. Measurement for the weight of infants and young children is a time-tested method in strategies to prevent child hypotrophy. Children whose weight is more than 2SD units below the average weight of children of the same age in the reference population are considered moderately or severely underweight.6.9% respectively). based on anthropometric measurements taken during the survey. more children are underweight (33.5% in females). or Standard Deviation Units (SD).5%. while those whose weight for height is more than 3SD units below the average are considered severely wasted. The most extensive nutritional problem in the FATA among the under five year-old children is underweight or retarded growth. Wasting or thinness is usually the result of a recent illness or acute nutritional deficiency. the severely underweight percentage is 18. The nutritional indicators vary significantly by sex. Weight for age is a measurement of both acute and chronic hypotrophy. In a well-nourished population. The reference population used in this report is the WHO growth reference. be gauged by comparing average height and weight of these children to a reference distribution of children of the same age from a well-nourished. Underweight prevalence in males is significantly higher than females (36. In rural areas. The highest rate of moderate underweight (below -2SD) was recorded in South Waziristan and followed by FR Tank (42. Children whose weight for height is more than 2SD units above the mean weight of children of the same height in the reference population are considered obese.4% severely wasted. the information in Table NU.1. Similarly. which reflects chronic poor nutrition. Wasting occurs in 13. The distribution of children classified into each of these categories. T 13 . significant seasonal shifts may be observed in this indicator in association with fluctuations in food availability or disease prevalence.8% for males as compared to 13. Overfeeding of children on the other hand mostly underlies over-nutrition or fatness. which show how the children surveyed differ from the mean.

2). appropriate and adequate complementary feeding up to the second Kurram year and beyond. Lack of breastfeeding denies the infant an opportunity for early bonding and socialization. Mothers may stop breastfeeding too soon and turn to the use of infant formula or other locally made compounds.1. which can contribute to growth stunting and micronutrient malnutrition. This is why preceding the survey who breastfed their baby within one hour and within one day of birth. FATA. for urban areas it is 1. Graph NU.56. The results should be used with caution keeping in view the SD for each category. The World Fit for Children goal FR Kohat states that children should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months and that FR Peshawar breastfeeding should continue along with Orakzai safe.2. 2007 complementary feeding needs to start from FR DI Khan this age onward to make sure that young children continue to grow properly and stay Mohmand healthy. 6. traditionally. FATA. At the age of six months.62 and for rural 1. SDs for agency-wise indicators are given in table NU-1.7% start within one day (Table NU.6% of mothers start breastfeeding their newborn within one hour and 26.Graph NU-1: Children under weight by agency. only 15. the nutritional Graph NU 2: Percentage of women aged 15-49 years with a birth in the 2 years needs of infants can no longer be satisfied by breastfeeding alone. women do not breastfeed children immediately but rather wait for few hours or even a whole day.55. Khyber The Table-NU-2 and Graph-NU-2 gives details of breastfeeding by mothers during the first one hour and within the first day after birth. Breastfeeding and Complementary Feeding Breastfeeding for the first six months is essential. Bottle feeding is unsafe in households where clean water is not readily available. In FATA. The result of the survey shows that after giving birth. 2007 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% K ur ra m B an nu ha w ar K oh a oh m an K hy B aj D IK ra k FR FR Below 2SD Below 3SD The Standard Deviation (SD) for under-weight children is 1. Urban Rural So ut h W az iri Pe s FR M FR FR O st an 30 35 < 6 months 6-11 months 12-23 months Total 0 5 10 15 20 25 FA TA within one hour within one day 40 45 ou r be r za i n d 14 Ta n ha k t . while for the first few years of a child's life it is an economical and safe way to protect children from infection and provide an ideal source of nutrients.

The highest percentage of women who started breastfeeding infants within one day is recorded in Khyber agency. The occurrence of initial exclusive breastfeeding is lowest in male infants and in urban areas. however.1% of the infants started receiving solid or semi-solid foods in addition to breastfeeding. The table shows exclusive breastfeeding of infants during the first six months of life (separately for 0-3 months and 0-5 months). while other agencies were almost with in the range of 36-40%. Exclusively breastfed refers to infants who received only breast milk and vitamins.4% respectively). 3w Infant feeding pattern by age: Percentage distribution of children aged under 3 years by feeding pattern by age group. This demonstrates that there is substantial room for improvements in infant and young child feeding practices. however. exclusive breastfeeding for 0-3 month children is about 4. except FR Kohat. Continued breastfeeding up to two years and beyond is established among a significant proportion of young children in FATA (Figure NU. 15 . as well as complementary feeding of children 6-9 months and continued breastfeeding of children at 12-15 and 20-23 months of age.6 % less prevalent in urban areas than in rural areas. 46. Figure NU. mineral supplements. After six months of age. breastfeeding status results are based on reports from mothers/ caretakers on children's consumption of food and fluids in the 24 hours prior to the interview. followed by Kurram. Agency/FR wise percentage of exclusive breastfeeding infants (0-6 months) significantly vary. a level much lower than considered optimal. 31.5%). FATA. it is a matter of concern for good child feeding practices. which started declining over the period of time.7%) than urban areas (37.3w). Approximately 38. It was also noticed that exclusive breastfeeding for 0-3 months infants in the poorest group is less prevalent as compared to the richest group.3.6% vs.8% of children below six months of age from the date of interview were exclusively breastfed. Moreover. Mothers/caretaker responses indicate that exclusive breastfeeding during the first three months of life among male infants is less prevalent than among female infants (42.6% in the first month. In Table NU. These agencies are comparatively better for education and health indicators in general. There is no significant difference between male and female infants in terms of exclusive breastfeeding in the same age group. About 87% of infants at 12-15 months of age were continuing to breastfeed in FATA.6% infants of 0-6 months are exclusively breastfed in FATA. The highest percentage of infants of the same age group exclusively breastfed was recorded in Mohmand agency (51. 2006 100 Weaned (no t breastfed) B reastfed and co mplementary fo o ds B reastfed and o ther milk/ fo rmula B reastfed and no n-milk liquids B reastfed and plain water o nly Exclusively breastfed 80 60 Percent 40 20 0 0-1 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 12-13 14-15 16-17 18-19 20-21 22-23 24-25 26-27 28-29 30-31 32-33 34-35 10-11 Age (in months) Percentage of infants exclusively breastfed was 74. or medicine.Only 23. About half of the infants at the age of 4-5 months were exclusively breastfed.5%). This percentage is higher in rural (38.

0 4.0 20 37.7% families consume inadequately iodized salt with below 15 PPM.7 11. Figure NU.3 8.8 FATA Orakzai Kurram FR Peshawar Agencies 5.2. 2007 FR DI Khan 60 50 40 38. and in extreme cases it causes endemic cretinism.5 10 0 37. respectively). 12. Salt was more likely to be adequately iodized in urban than in rural areas (11.8 36.9 3.4 38.8 FR Peshaw ar 38. As Figure NU.8% and 4.2 7.4 Orakzai 39.5 shows.1 6. including the salt used by the food industry. FATA.0 0. The results of on-the-spot tests showed that only 5% households consume adequately iodized salt (15+ PPM).Graph NU. thereby reducing the education performance of the future generation. Iodine deficiency can be prevented by the low-cost strategy of iodizing all the salt for human consumption. This initiative is assisted by UN agencies.8 38.8 Urban 37.7 30 25. Consumption of Iodized Salt Illness caused by iodine deficiency (iodine deficiency disorders or IDD) is a global problem. and for feeding animals.4b: Percentage of 0-6 months infants exclusively breastfed.6 36.0 0 2 4 6 Percent 8 10 12 14 FR Kohat Khyber Mohmand Bajour South Waziristan FR Tank FR DI Khan FR Lakki FR Bannu Table NU.8 7. 16 . The Government of Pakistan has started a programme for the iodization of salt through out the country. FATA. Iodine deficiency during pregnancy can lead to increased miscarriages and stillbirths. the percentage of households using adequately iodized salt was highest in Orakzai agency and almost nil in FR Lakki and FR Bannu. However.3 1. Household salt was tested for iodine during household interviews. A diet low in iodine leads to diminished mental function and intellectual performance.5 shows the results of the household salt samples that were tested with a solution that detects iodine.0 Female Male 51.0 12.9 Khyber 38.5 Mohmand Kurram 6.0 0. It is a matter of great concern that availability of iodized salt is inadequate and salt processors are not bound by the law to ensure iodization of salt.7%.3 3. 2007 Rural Urban 4.5 FR Kohat Rural 38. 5: Percentage of households consuming adequately iodized salt.8 1.

The age pattern of confirmed VAS receipts shows a modest decline after the age of two years. Within the six months prior to the MICS survey. However. In Table NU. 32% received VAS prior to last 6 months. mothers/caretakers of 2. It can cause eye damage and blindness in children with severe or recurrent diarrhea or in those with a high fever from viral diseases such as measles.7% vs.6. FR Kohat has the highest percentage of children who received VAS within the last 6 months.4%) as compared to rural areas (28. the intake of VAS prior to last 6 months was higher in urban (68.7%). and 38. Both these regions are close to Peshawar city and thus have better access and awareness as compared to other agencies and FRs. or otherwise improved dietary habits. Of the total children. while FR Peshawar has the highest percentage of children who got VAS prior to the last 6 months.6%) than in urban areas. 17 . In a population with vitamin A deficiency. Based on international guidelines endorsed by UNICEF and WHO. nearly 32% of their mothers reported that the infant had not received a supplement. 21.3.7% of the 6-59 months old children received VAS. three out of four eligible children under five years old had benefitted from the national vitamin A campaign.5% of children never received it.6 the status of vitamin A supplementation (VAS) of children and post-partum mothers is based on the recollection by mothers/caretakers of the six-month period prior to interview. food fortification. For children aged 6-11 months at the time of the survey. 43. Vitamin A Supplements (VAS) Vitamin A deficiency or shortage impairs the immune system of infants and young children. the Ministry of Health carries out mass distribution of high-dose vitamin A capsules for children aged 6-59 months twice a year.142 who were born in the two years before the interview have provided information about whether they received a high-dose VAS within eight weeks after giving birth. The proportion of children who received a confirmed VAS within the last six months was higher in rural areas (45. Responses about VAS receipts were obtained for 90% of the 6-59 month old children. Nearly. In general. pregnant and lactating women are at a higher health risk. Yet this deficiency can easily be prevented with inexpensive supplements. increasing their chances of dying from common childhood illness.

3 14. Home treatment was more likely in rural areas (12%) than for urban areas (4. the mother was asked a series of questions about what the child had to drink and eat during the episode and whether this was more or less than the normal food and liquids intake by the child.3% had used ORS.3 sh Pe FR Children from urban areas had slightly higher episodes of diarrhea than children in rural areas. 2007 30 25. As the analysis shows.4). The indicators are: Prevalence ? of diarrhea Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) ? Home management of diarrhea ? (ORT or increased fluids) and continued feeding ? In the MICS questionnaire. the World Fit For Children calls for a reduction in the incidence of diarrhea by 25 percent. female children suffer from diarrhea more frequently than male children (19. Use of ORT is higher in rural than urban (71% and 66% respectively) areas. while 30% did not receive any treatment.9%). If so.3%) had episodes of diarrhea in the two weeks preceding the survey (Table CH.4% males vs 17. 11. 451 children (19. Of the children who experienced diarrhea.7 20. The goals are to: 1) reduce by one half. nearly 70% received rehydration therapy (ORT).7.5 21. Most diarrhea related deaths in children are due to dehydration from loss of water and electrolytes from the body in liquid stools. and 2) reduce by two thirds the mortality rate among children under five by 2015 compared to 1990 (Millennium Development Goals). Preventing dehydration and malnutrition by increasing fluid intake and continuing to feed the child are also important strategies for managing diarrhea. mothers (or caretakers) were asked to report whether their child had diarrhea in the two weeks prior to the survey. and lowest in FR DI Khan (9. Incidence of diarrhea was the highest in Kurram agency at 25. Figure-CH. Nearly 58. In addition.9 10 5 0 e e n d O ra kz ai FR Ko ha t Kh yb er IK ha ar an m al Fe m al FA TA M al an rra aw rb m U R ur D 19.4 22 19.1 19.5: Percentage of children with Diarrhea in the past 2 weeks.3% used homemade fluids and 19.4 17. Oral Rehydration Treatment of Children with Diarrhea iarrhea is the second leading cause of death among children under five worldwide. FR M oh D 18 Ku .can prevent many of these deaths.46%.1 19.8%). FATA. Child Health 7. The survey covered 2.7 16. Of these.either through oral rehydration salts (ORS) or a recommended home fluid (RHF) .7% pre-made ORS fluids. deaths due to diarrhea among children under five by 2010 compared to 2000 (A World Fit For Children).5 25 20 Percentage 15 9.1.414 children aged 0-59 months. Management of diarrhea .3% females).

7. Nearly 8. Around 95.3% of cases respectively.1% were taken to an appropriate health provider. 94% of all households use solid fuels for cooking (Table CH-8).6% of females and 87. 2007 respiratory illnesses. pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children. 86. Keeping in mind the nature of FATA society. and whether they received antibiotics during the same period or not and if care was sought outside the home.94. use solid fuel for cooking. Obviously. the group of 24-35 months had more opportunity to get the services of appropriate providers than other age groups. as compared to 57. Antibiotic Treatment of Children with Suspected Pneumonia Globally.6% versus 63%). no Mohmand South Waziristan FR Tank Bajour FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Bannu Orakzai Kurram FR Kohat Khyber -15 5 25 45 65 88 84 83 85 105 98 98 98 98 97 97 97 96 Percentage 19 . The prescription of antibiotics for children under five with suspected pneumonia is one of the most effective ways of fight it. Issues related to knowledge of danger signs of pneumonia are presented in Table CH.1% in rural areas. Table CH. awareness about septum of pneumonia is a serious issue in tribal areas. and to a village health worker in 2. often suffer from rapid or difficult breathing and other symptoms linked to disorders of the respiratory system. its usage is quite common in rural areas. besides having a fever or cough. FATA. Women know very little about septum of many dangerous diseases including pneumonia. About 86. Of these children. cancer and other Richest 94 Middle 94 diseases. 7. Heating and cooking with solid fuels leads to high levels of indoor pollution and is a major cause of health problems that can take the form of acute Figure CH-8: Usage of solid fuel. Education levels are quite low and local expertise is almost non-existent. Children with suspected pneumonia are those who have had an illness with a cough accompanied by rapid or difficult breathing and those whose symptoms were not due to a problem in the chest and a blocked nose. FR DI Khan 100 According to survey data. Owing to easy access and lack of availability of other sources of energy. particularly among Total 94 Fourth 97 children.5% of children aged 0-59 months were reported to have symptoms of pneumonia during the two weeks preceding the survey.2.6 presents the prevalence of suspected pneumonia.1% purchased medicines from the pharmacy.8%. Children with suspected pneumonia. Children with suspected pneumonia were taken to public hospital or health centre in 27.3. Fuel Use Solid fuels (biomass and coal) use is the traditional way to cook and heat. where there are restrictions on the movement of women. The percentage of females taken to an appropriate provider was less than those of males (56. In FATA. The use of a closed stove with Poorest 92 Rural 95 a chimney decreases indoor pollution Urban 57 significantly. Receipt of antibiotics at the age group of 0-11 is the highest among all other age groups for under-five. Children in this age group have learned to communicate with parents and inform them about problems.9% of under-5 children with suspected pneumonia had received an antibiotic. Table CH.2 of males received antibiotics for the treatment of suspected pneumonia. About 28.7A. 59.3% of urban areas. as well as chronic obstructive Second 95 illnesses of the lungs. mothers' knowledge of the danger signs is an important determinant of care-seeking behaviour. There is a huge difference in urban and rural areas regarding the use of solid fuel. The indicators are: Prevalence ? of suspected pneumonia Care seeking ? for suspected pneumonia Antibiotic treatment for suspected pneumonia ? Knowledge ? of the danger signs of pneumonia Survey respondents were asked if they had children who suffered from pneumonia within the past two weeks prior to the survey. Similarly. Unfortunately.5% of rural.7% in urban areas and 86.7 presents the use of antibiotics for the treatment of suspected pneumonia in under-5 years during the two weeks prior to the survey.

according to information from the vaccination records and mothers' recall. and 93% received at least one dose of polio . Similar is the case of FR Kohat and Kurram agencies. Only 14. Khyber was better off in terms of non-solid fuel usage.7% 40% Urban 89. 5. use non-solid sources of fuel at home. where 90% of the BCG cases were confirmed by the mark on the arm. In Pakistan. used by 89. The highest percentage of BCG coverage was recorded in FR Kohat (77%). However. DPT vaccine for the prevention of diphtheria. The most common source of solid fuel is fuel-wood.0% 57. Among agencies. 80% of children aged 12-23 months received a BCG vaccination. a mark on the arm was only seen on 68% of children who reported BCG vaccination during the first year of life. Since the concentration of the pollutants is different when the same fuel is burnt in different stoves or fires. This includes BCG vaccination against tuberculosis. than rural (54. and tetanus. use of close stoves with a chimney minimizes indoor pollution. while open stove or fires without a chimney or hood means that there is no protection from the harmful effects of smoke.5% FATA 42.8% of families in FATA.2% FR Peshawar Urban 87% 20% 0% FR Peshawar 90% FATA 77% 57% 54% 63% Khyber Orakzai Mohmand Kurram The MICS FATA survey.6% Orakzai Mohmand 55. The rest rely on traditional ways to burn fuel. in urban areas.9% 33.large regional differences in solid fuel use exist. with regard to indoor air pollution. 75% received the first dose of DPT. However. Accessibility is a serious issue in FATA. during the child's first year. vaccination against measles and polio. National Institute of Population Studies. Methods used to burn fuel are important. Government of Pakistan 20 . where 90% of households using wood. Urban areas use improved. Figure CH-1: Vaccination in first year of life. non-solid sources of fuel. Common sources include electricity and LPG Gas.6% 20% 0% 71. There is no proper awareness about the dangers of smoke.1% FR Kohat Rural 66% 80% 60% 40% 53% FR Kohat 78% 76.5% of BCG coverage for children in first year of life. Immunization The Pakistan Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Better results were observed in FR Peshawar. Around 42. %age of children with BCG FR DI Khan 100% Rural 80% 60% 54. recorded 57.6%). as per mothers' recall.4. with the technical and financial support of WHO/ UNICEF carries out regular immunization campaigns.5% 46. respectively.7%) areas. pertussis (whooping cough).8% Kurram Khyber 68% Figure CH-2: %age children with BCG have mark on arm FR DI Khan 100% 76. Wealth levels do not play a significant role in the utilization of non-solid fuel.6 Demographic and Health Survey 2006-07. A limited number of households use better method of fuel burning for cooking.1% of households. only 59% and 83% of children received the third dose of DPT and polio. BCG coverage is higher in urban (89. while lowest was in FR DI Khan (33%).9% of the households use protected stoves with a chimney. 7.

A Figure EN-1: Access to improved sources of drinking water.pipe into dwelling.8 In house. protected well water and protected spring water are considered improved drinking water sources. 41. including the tube well. public tap water. 3. The second major source was the outside protected well. 10. FATA. 0.3 In house. 5.5%).pipe into yard.4% vs. 2007 Total Rural Urban FR Kohat Khyber FR Peshawar South Waziristan Kurram Orakzai Bajour FR Tank Mohmand FR DI Khan FR Lakki FR Bannu 0 8. 2. cholera.5% of the population (92. hepatitis-A and schistosomiasis. The situation in FR Lakki. Organic and non-organic materials with harmful effects on human health may also be found in drinking water. However. Sources of drinking water for the population vary significantly by agency and FR (Table EN. water consumption from open sources is one of the reasons for the spread of diseases like trachoma.3 In house protected well.2 7. and public taps.1 38 51 58. FATA.1).9% in urban.5 Protected well.7 21 . and 39. Globally. among the improved sources of water group.8% of the population).2%.3 92. 3. percentage population. available to 8.5 54.9 In house donkey pump. Water and Sanitation 8.8.2%). Agencies with urban populations have a higher percentage of households with this facility. 2007 Bottle water. is a Figure EN 1B: Use of improved sources of drinking water.5 Turbine-tubewell.2 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 13 27. Overall.2 In house.7 41.hand pump. The most common drinking water sources in FATA are water pipelines (used by 16. 4.9% families).3 33.1 Protected spring.2% and 13% respectively.9 40. Piped water. The protected well inside and outside the house. 7.3% in rural areas) had access to improved drinking water sources (Table EN. typhoid. the highest percentage of families. percent of households. borehole/ tube well water. 8.5 39. This facility is more common in rural as compared to urban areas (8. had the facility of an inhouse pipe into their dwelling (10. 0. 2.1). access to drinking water was available to 8.1 Publictap/standpost/hand pump. Access to Improved Drinking Water Sources ccess to safe drinking water is a necessity for good health.1. mostly available in urban areas (51.9 There is no single major improved source of drinking water in FATA. which run into the dwelling or onto the property. 5.3% of households. FR Bannu and FR DI Khan was considerably worse than other parts of FATA.4 77.3 71.

Rarely. including diarrhea and poliomyelitis.6% and 23.4% of households in rural areas fetch water in 30 minutes to one hour.4%. In around 96% of the households. FA TA. used by 12. The highest number of households using surface water for consumption is observed in FR DI Khan (62.5%). the major facility is a flush toilet connected to a septic tank (35. toilets connected with a sewerage system or a septic tank. Improved sanitary-hygienic facilities include toilets with a water flush. 58.4% of households.9% of the households use improved sanitation. Figure EN. Fetching water is a gender specific activity in FATA. while this percentage was only 14. The people of these agencies/FRs are. followed by FR Bannu (49%) and South Waziristan (34. 2007 Water on premises 14% Do not Know 0% Less than 30 minutes 14% More than one hour 25% 30 minutes to one hour 47% The availability of improved sanitation facilities varies among various agencies/ FRs. and adult men (2. In urban areas. Family members spend considerable time in fetching water on a daily basis. A common type of improved sanitation is the pit latrine with flush. FR Kohat has better sanitation facilities.2%). 27. adult women collect water. The majority of households collect water from sources outside their dwelling. 47. Households in urban areas with improved sanitation facilities were 77. The maximum number of families benefitting from the facility is highest in FR Kohat (54.8%). are connected with the improper removal of human excreta and lack of maintenance of proper personal hygiene. where 56. Nearly 85% of families in rural areas collect water from sources outside their house. while 25% spend more than one hour to fetch water.8%). and improved pit latrines with cesspools or common cesspools. The in-house pipe into dwellings is comparatively better in FR Tank. therefore. while in rural areas this share was 26% (Table EN. 22 . A major chunk of the population (72% of households) does not have access to improved sanitation facilities. In urban areas.4%).2% who use surface water. including 16. followed by FR Tank (53. Only 28.4% in rural areas.3: Distribution of time spent by household members retrieving drinking water from the source.5).1% of households use sanitary hygienic facilities.3% respectively). According to survey results.9%). female children fetch water (1.1%. outbreaks of disease. In many countries. followed by Khyber and South Waziristan (31. greatly exposed to the risk of infectious intestinal diseases.7% of the population do not have access to clean drinking water. Khyber and Kurram agencies (32.7%). Collection of water from protected springs is common in South Waziristan. other types of toilets with a flush.common facility in the rural areas of FATA. Around 46.3% of households get water at their premises.4%).3%) and FR Peshawar (50.

Of the A Figure RH-3: Coverage by Antenatal care.0 35. Antenatal care includes prophylaxis.0 25.1 4.8%). 1.. in 18.4%) when compared to rural (23. There were significant differences observed between agencies and Frs.1. a nurse/midwife or Lady Health Visitors (LHVs) provided these services. It is important to adequately organize a system of antenatal care (antenatal monitoring).9 0. Reproductive Health 9.6%).4% of these cases. The analysis shows that the percentage of women with antenatal care in urban areas was considerably higher (55. Training to help women prepare for labour and enhance trust in health personnel (birth attendants) plays an important role. 25. WHO guidelines are specific on the content on antenatal care visits.0 Orakzai FR Kohat 26.0 15.156 women who gave birth to children during the two preceding years were interviewed. in its own turn.0 5.8% received skilled antenatal care/monitoring once or several times during pregnancy.4 1. early screening and treatment of diseases. According to the survey results.0 20. and to ensure necessary assistance for her partner or family to ease the transition to motherhood and fatherhood.4% of cases. 2007 FR DI Khan 40. for the mother and the foetus. malaria and STIs) during pregnancy.1 25.5 FR Peshawar Mohmand 10.0 Kurram 35.0 8. which includes: Blood pressure measurement ? Urine testing ? for bacteriuria and proteinuria Blood testing ? to detect syphilis and severe anemia Weight/height measurement (optional) ? In order to determine the quality of antenatal care. Of these. The highest percentage of women with antenatal care was observed in Khyber agency (45. doctors provided antenatal care services and in 7.9. followed by Mohmand (11.0 1.0 10.0 6. FATA.9 7. Adverse outcomes such as low birth weight can be reduced through a combination of interventions to improve women's nutritional status and prevent infections (e. The lowest percentage of those who received antenatal care services once or several times during pregnancy was in FR DI Khan (10%). to protect maternal health as well as the health of the unborn child. WHO recommends a minimum of four antenatal visits based on a review of the effectiveness of different models of antenatal care.4 8.8 5. Quality health care and testing during the antenatal period allows early stage prevention and detection of the signs and symptoms of diseases or deviations and allows the mother to seek appropriate treatment.6 20.6 8. assists in reducing newborn morbidity and infant mortality. the antenatal period is a time of intrauterine development of the fetus from the time the zygote is formed until birth. The antenatal period presents important opportunities for reaching pregnant women with a number of interventions that may be vital to their health and well being and that of their infants.2%).g. This.0 30.5 Khyber Medical doctor Nurse/midwife/LHV 23 . Antenatal Care ccording to experts.

5% of deliveries took place in government hospitals. This was because of the urban population of the agency and the benefit of easier access to Peshawar city. The basic goals of assistance to women during the birthing process include safe (non-traumatic) deliveries.0 20. In total 27. The analysis revealed that the overwhelming majority of deliveries (72. It is noted that there is a significant difference between rural and urban areas in terms of antenatal care services provided by a doctor (15. FR DI Khan and FR Peshawar (both 8.6%).1%).7% attended government hospitals. The most important is the attention given to the newborn in the early neo-natal period. while in FR DI Khan and Orakzai the percentage of women who received antenatal care was only 1. Urban residents have more awareness and thus the percentage of women that attended hospitals/clinics for delivery accounted for 78.8% respectively (Figure RH.9% vs. 65% of women attended hospitals/clinics. and transport is available to a referral facility for obstetric care in case of emergency. A World Fit For Children goal is to ensure that women have ready and affordable access to skilled attendance at delivery. Figure RH . The highest proportion of women who received antenatal care from a medical doctor were in Khyber (35.0 40.4%). The MICS included a number of questions to assess the proportion of births attended by a skilled attendant. 43.6%) took place at home (Table RH.surveyed women. 47. early diagnosis and treatment of delivery complications.5 and Figure RH-5).3).3% of deliveries were attended in hospitals or clinics. 2007 100. Correspondingly. while the percentage in rural areas was around 22. Most of the population live in remote mountainous areas in hard terrain with poor communication systems. nurse. A skilled attendant includes a doctor.0 Orakzai 60. and who provided assistance at the delivery.0 0. FATA. 9. 1. Over the course of this survey. acquiring the services of a qualified skilled attendant is expensive and beyond the means of poor people. hampering access to health services. Health facilities are far away and some times trained staff are not available. where 55. Beside traditional boundaries.0 Mohmand FR Peshawar FR Kohat Kurram Khyber At own home Government Hospital 24 . the highest proportion of pregnant women who received antenatal care from a nurse/midwife or LHV was observed in Khyber (10.7%. The single most critical intervention for safe motherhood is to ensure a competent health worker with adequate skills is present at every birth. Assistance at Delivery The majority of maternal deaths occur during delivery and the immediate post-partum period. Proper transport is also a serious problem in FATA. In Khyber agency.5: Location of deliveries.5%) and in FR Kohat (26. midwife or auxiliary midwife/LHV.156 women between the ages of 15-49 who gave birth within the past two years were asked where their deliveries took place (at medical institutions or otherwise). early diagnosis and treatment of postpartum complications and effective post-partum care.8% did not obtain any antenatal care services during pregnancy. Nearly 18.2.6%. Agency-wise variation was observed in terms of the availability of health clinics/ hospital facilities during pregnancy. The indicators are the proportion of births with a skilled attendant and proportion of institutional deliveries.4% and 5.8% respectively).0 FR DI Khan 80.

Entries to education in FATA normally starts from primary level and children of age five years and above are entitled to be formally enrolled. which also covers early childhood education irrespective of enrollment.3% for females. and influencing population growth. Hence.5%. The net enrollment rate in urban areas was significantly higher than in rural areas (57. Education is a vital prerequisite for combating poverty. Primary and Secondary School Participation niversal access to basic education and the achievement of primary education by the world's children is one of the most important Millennium Development Goals and A World Fit For Children goal. empowering women. protecting children from hazardous and exploitative labour and sexual exploitation. FAT 2007 A. however. contributing to socio-economic development.6%).8%) followed by FR Peshawar (39. The prevailing security situation over the last few years has retarded the pace of growth in education sector. The highest primary NER for males was recorded in FR Kohat (63. measuring education status.2%). The female primary NER was also highest in FR Kohat (43. Survey results showed the primary net enrolment rate (NER) was 28. Figure ED-1: Primary school Net Enrolment rate. 27. the enrolment rate has been considered a vital indicator. The primary net enrollment rate varies among agencies and FRs. The MICS generally reflects the attendance of children at various levels of education. promoting human rights and democracy. formal education starts at primary level. The indicators for primary and secondary school attendance include: Net primary ? school enrollment rate Gross primary school enrollment rate ? Net secondary school enrollment rate ? Gross secondary school enrollment rate ? Net middle ? school enrollment rate Female to ? male education ratio (GPI) Bearing in mind that FATA has a traditional society.1. followed by Orakzai (11. Education 10.9% and 17. The lowest female primary NER was recorded in FR Bannu (4%).3%). education is not a priority.6%). with low economic development and limited facilities.3% for 6-10 years age of children. Early childhood education is not common in Pakistan.10. FR Bannu FR Lakki FR DI Khan Bajour Mohmand FR Tank Orakzai South Waziristan Kurram FR Peshawar Khyber FR Kohat Rural Urban U 0 10 Net enrolment rate male 20 30 Net enrolment rate female 40 50 60 70 Total net enrolment rate 25 . protecting the environment. followed by Khyber with 54. The net enrolment rate for males was 39.6% vs.

The primary Gross Enrolment Rate (GER) for FATA was recorded as 46.3% (64.8% for males and 26.8% for females). The primary GER for urban areas was 95%, with 100% for males and 90% for females. The primary GER for rural areas was 44.1% (63.1% for males vs. 24.2% for females). The highest GER was recorded in FR Peshawar (83.7%), followed by FR Kohat (71.3%).
Figure-ED-2: Primary Gross Enrollment Rate (GER), FATA, 2007

FR Bannu FR Lakki FR DI Khan Bajour FR Tank South Waziristan Mohmand Orakzai FR Kohat Kurram Khyber FR Peshawar Urban Rural Total
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Male

Female

Total

10.2.

Adult Literacy

One of the World Fit For Children goals is to increase adult literacy. Adult literacy is also a MDG indicator, relating to both men and women. The MICS FATA covered literacy rate related questions for males and females and for various age groups. While analyzing the data, literacy rates for various age groups: 10+ years; 15+ years; and, 15-24 years of young persons were examined.

Figure ED-3: Literacy Rate of 10+ years population, FATA, 2007
70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

kk i

n

d

m Kh yb er FR Ko FR ha Pe t sh aw ar U rb an

i st an

ur al R

nu

k

r

O ra

FR

Literacy rate male

Literacy rate female

So u

th

W az iri

FR

FR

M oh

FR

D

26

Ku rra

Ba n

Ba j

IK

Total

FA TA

Ta n

La

m

kz a

ha

ou

an

The literacy rate for 10+ years of age is given in Table: ED-8. The 10+ literacy rate was found to be 21.4% in FATA. Literacy rate in rural areas was 20%, and 47.3% in urban areas. The overall female literacy rate (10+) was around 7.5%, however, it was 6.7% in rural areas. The overall literacy of 15+ years of age was 22% in FATA. It was 49.2% in urban areas and 20.6% in rural areas. Female literacy of this age group was 6.7% and 35.8% for males. Female literacy of the 15+ age group was only 5.6% in rural areas of FATA. Agencies and FRs are significantly varied in terms of literacy rates. The female literacy rate is below 1% in FR Tank, FR Bannu and FR Lakki. A higher rate of female literacy for 15+-year age group was observed in FR Peshawar (10%), FR Kohat (15.6%), Khyber (10.1%) and Kurram (14.4%). The overall literacy of 15+ years age group is lower in the same areas. Literacy is a good indicator of the potential for local capacity in socio-economic development and technological awareness. Youth literacy (15-24 years of age) is 30.7% in FATA. Youth literacy for rural areas is 29.1% and 61.6% in urban areas. Female youth literacy is 12.4% in FATA. Lowest youth literacy for females is recorded in FR Lakki (11.3%).
Figure ED-4: Youth Literacy, 15-24 years of age, FATA, 2007
Bajour

50
South Waziristan FR Bannu

40
Orakzai

30 20 10

FR DI Khan

Mohmand

0

FR Kohat

Kurram

FR Lakki

Khyber FR Tank

FR Peshawar

Literate

10.3.

Gender Parity Index (GPI)

The Gender Parity Index (GPI) for the primary school Net Enrolment Rate (NER) shows a bleak picture in FATA and respective agencies and FRs. Female enrolment in educational institutions is not promising. In FATA the GPI for primary NER is 0.45. A comparatively better gender balance was observed in FR Peshawar (0.78). The lowest GPI was recorded in FR Bannu (0.22). Access to secondary education is low in FATA for males as well as females. Females are particularly unable to access secondary school. Most secondary schools are far away from the population or the majority of hamlets. Female mobility is restricted in FATA due to cultural limitations. Transport facilities are often not available, while the road network is non-existent or badly constructed. These are the major factors hampering access to secondary education for girls.
Graph ED-05: Gender Parity Index, primary school net enrolment rate, FATA, 2007
Bajour 0.80 South Waziristan 0.70 0.60 0.50 Orakzai 0.30 0.28 0.40 0.30 0.20 0.10 Mohmand 0.28 0.00 0.37 0.22 0.33 0.69 FR Kohat FR DI Khan FR Bannu

0.36 0.61 Kurram 0.43 FR Lakki 0.38

Khyber FR Tank

0.78

FR Peshawar

27

11. Child Protection
11.1. Birth Registration
he International Convention on the Rights of the Child states that every child has the right to have name, nationality and protection of his/her identity. Birth registration is an important means of protection of these rights. Unfortunately, birth registration is not common in FATA.

T
11.2.

According to the survey results, only 1% of the children below 5 years of age have their births registered. The registration process is growing in urban areas with the introduction of proper offices and facilities. Around 5.6% of births were registered in urban areas. On the other hand, 87.3% did not heard of birth registration at all.

Child Labour

Article 32 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child states: "States Parties recognize the right of the child to be protected from economic exploitation and from performing any work that likely to be hazardous or to interfere with the child's education, or to be harmful to the child's health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development." The World Fit For Children mentions nine strategies to combat child labour and the MDGs call for the protection of children against exploitation. In the MICS questionnaire, a number of questions addressed the issue of child labour, that is, those children of 5-14 years of age involved in labour activities. A child is considered to be involved in child labour activities at the moment of the survey if during the week preceding the survey: Ages 5-11: ? They are working for at least one hour of (paid) economic work or 28 hours of domestic work per week. Ages 12-14: ? They are working at least 14 hours of economic work or 28 hours of domestic work per week. This definition differentiates child labour from child work to identify the type of work that should be eliminated. FATA has a conservative society and limited job opportunities. Many parents prefer their children to work at home and/or assist them at work. Some parents raise their children from an early age without taking into account the wishes of the child as well as perspectives of child development in order to support family interests. Over time these children fail to learn how to make decisions on their own. They do not know what kind of rights they have as a child. Parents do not take the safety and health concerns about child labour seriously. They are often ignorant and lack awareness. In accordance with the survey data, 17.1% of all children of 5-14 years of age were child labourers. A gender breakdown of the data shows that 16.4% of male children and 18.1% of female children are child labourers. Among them 5.1% were children working outside their households and only 1.7% of them were paid for the work they performed. Domestic work (28 hours per week) was done by 4.1% of children (3.1% of male children and 5.4% of female children). About 8.7% of children were engaged in the family business (10% males and 7.1% females). The majority of working children reside in rural households (17.2%), working with parental consent in the family business. Only 5.7% of children in urban areas work. At the time of the survey, 14.2% of children aged 5-14 years attended school (Table CP.2).
Paid w ork

Figure CP-1: Child Labour %age of 5-14 years children Bajour

30
South Waziristan

25 20

FR Bannu

Orakzai

15 10 5

FR DI Khan

Mohmand

0

FR Kohat

Kurram

FR Lakki

Khyber FR Tank
Unpaid w ork

FR Peshawar

family business

child labor *

28

A total of 1. Incorrect information reduces the effectiveness of preventive activities and leads to higher infection rates.8%. HIV/AIDS 12. The highest awareness rate was recorded in FR Peshawar as 25.9% of women knew about HIV/AIDS in rural areas. Figure HA-1: Knowledge of 3 preventive methods.9% in rural areas. Knowledge of HIV Transmission The awareness.1.7% women had knowledge of one preventive method. Nearly 6.314 women were interviewed. where at least one preventive method is known to 18.7% of women could do this: 17.4% in urban and 1. while only 9. They were questioned about HIV transmission via sharing needles and whether a healthy-looking person can be infected. knowledge and availability of correct information about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention. Survey results showed that the level of HIV/AIDS awareness among women aged 15-49 varied among agencies and FRS (Table HA. interviewees were asked whether they knew about HIV/AIDS.5% had heard of HIV/AIDS in urban areas. The highest percentage of ignorance was observed in FR DI Khan at 98.5% of urban women compared to 6% in rural areas. FATA. 2007 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 DI a Kh n FR t i m nd nk er ar ha an za ist ma aw R Ta Khyb Kurra ak Ko zir sh oh Or F M Pe Wa FR uth So ta To l FR 29 .12. When women aged 15-49 years were asked to list three preventive methods. In order to identify levels of awareness of HIV/AIDS and its prevention. especially among young people. only 2.6%. A great majority of women (88%) had no knowledge about HIV/AIDS in FATA.1). Women were asked about the two most common misconceptions: that HIV is transmitted by supernatural means or by sharing food. Around 43. how HIV is transmitted and how it is possible to protect themselves. Urban women have higher HIV/AIDS awareness. are major factors in controlling infection rates.

28.13. The percentage of ownership is significantly higher in rural areas (96. 85. This suggests that accommodation is expensive and unaffordable to many families in urban areas.8%) areas. Similarly. FATA. Socio-economic status of households 13.7%. there is no limitation on the occupation of land for house construction in most areas.2% have part of a house or compound. Around 6% have one room to sleep 7-10 persons.4%). 30 . This is higher in urban areas (43. There are no significant differences among agencies. See Table-HC-1 for details. Land is abundant and non productive and. The lowest rate of ownership was observed in Kurram agency (84.1%).8% of households have separate house/compound. 6%). flats/apartments are becoming popular due to scarcity of land.4% of households have one room to sleep 4-6 persons.5% live in rent free accommodation (Table-HC 15A). Many families construct big compounds with separate houses for different relatives. while 2. Agency/FR-wise ownership significantly varies.5%) than rural (27. On average. As a result.1%). 2007 Total Rural Urban South Waziristan Orakzai Mohmand Kurram Khyber FR Tank FR Peshawar FR Lakki FR Kohat FR DI Khan FR Bannu Bajour 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1-3 persons per room 4-6 persons per room 7-10 persons per room 11 persons and above The availability of rooms per population varied significantly among Agency/ FRs. In FATA.1% respectively). 13. 13. Figure HC-1: Persons living per room (% of housholds).1. many family members sleep in one room and/ or keep livestock in the same room.7% in urban areas.3% and 12. finding that nearly 95. therefore. with 2. The highest percentage of separate houses/compound was observed in FR DI Khan (98. Nearly 86. Type of house The majority of families in FATA live in separate houses or part of compounds. Ownership of house Traditionally tribal people own their own homes. This results in a number of diseases. while 11.4% were homeowners. mostly for grandsons. There is no tradition of living in apartments and less than one percent of occupants were observed in flats/apartments in FATA.6%).4% vs. this is more evident in urban areas compared with rural areas (8. even if they have nothing else.6% of households dwelling in flats/apartments.3.2. The MICS survey in FATA confirmed this. Population congestion Many families in poor communities cannot afford to construct adequate rooms within their house. The percentage of the population living in rented houses is around 1.1% have separate house/compound in rural and 79. In urban areas. compared to urban (79. Khyber and FR Peshawar had the higher number of households sleeping 7-10 persons per room (13.

Receipt of in-country remittances is significantly higher in urban areas (53. In the developed world. 31 . Nearly 85% of households own less than 5 acres of land. Figure HC-2: Remittance received by households. Land holding Farming is the major livelihood source in FATA. For example. opinion and change and is used to disseminate gradually develop public opinion. 13.9% (FR Lakki) to 26. Educational awareness programmes are increasingly via radio and TV in Pakistan. while 5.13. 13.5. and the majority of households have small landholdings for subsistence farming.1% of households receive remittances from other parts of Pakistan.4% of households own above 10 acres of land (Table HC-11). Nearly 10% of households receive remittances from abroad. the majority of the inhabitants rely on income from off-farm sources outside the agency or country. The urban population is heavily dependant on remittances from off-farm sectors.9%). The most popular media source are the government radio channels. Media sources in FATA are a mix of old and more modern types. Media and communication is an important information and being broadcast have been seen The media is an important source of awareness. than rural (35.4%). 2007 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 l l r i d n ki u han hat ar ank ber za am an ak j ou tan Tota rba Rura nn U Ba R Ba DI K R Ko FR L shaw FR T Khy Kurr ohm Orak ziris F M F Pe Wa FR FR uth So Remittances received from inside country Remittances received from abroad The data shows a great difference in the receipt of remittances among various agencies/FRs.6.2%). The flow of remittances from abroad to various agencies ranges from 1. the media instrument of political dominancy.1%). Remittances Due to small land holding and uneconomical cultivation. which are listened to by 43.5% of the population. A higher percentage of households in urban areas (15. while the lowest was recorded in FR DI Khan (15.6%) receive remittances from abroad than compared to rural areas (9. People therefore have no other option but to search for alternative sources of income. FATA. The highest percentage of the population receiving remittances from inside Pakistan was observed in FR Lakki (56. which is not feasible for sustainable livelihoods. The second source of income from remittances is the transfer of money from abroad.7%). About 10% own land of 5-10 acres. Around 36.7% (FR Peshawar). awareness programmes for health promotion to be very effective.4.

8%). Seasonal migrations are undertaken partly for livelihood reasons and partly because of seasonal variation and extreme temperatures. 1.3. while the highest is in FR Kohat (14.9%). 1. Besides physical assets. The highest percentage of livestock owners was observed in FR Tank (100%).6%.6%). Television is watched by 13. while the lowest was found in Khyber Agency (74. zakat is an important source of income distribution and support for the poor. Around 6% of households read daily newspapers.1% of the inhabitants listen to it. Security concerns and depleting livelihood sources are mostly the causes of excessive migration. 5% own a computer. 22% refrigerator.3% of families migrated last year. around 70% of households have electricity and 3% have access to gas. shown in Table HC-16. They depend on donations. Uncertainty and lack of opportunities for livelihood interventions are also reasons for migration. Livestock plays a vital role in the coping strategies of households.4.1% (FR Bannu) to 38% (FR Kohat). Livestock holders normally migrate to upper pastures in summer and return in winter. 32 .Figure HC-3: Sources of Media. destitute and orphans. The percentage of FM radio listeners is highest in South Waziristan (33. Seasonal migration Seasonal migration is common in mountainous areas such as FATA. Physical assets Physical assets are an important source of household status and level of resources. Donation and zakat are important social safety nets. 2007 Bajour 90 South Waziristan 80 70 60 Orakzai 50 40 30 20 10 Mohmand 0 FR Kohat FR DI Khan FR Bannu Kurram FR Lakki Khyber FR Tank FM Radio Government Radio FR Peshawar Television Newspaper FM Radio is becoming popular in FATA and around 16. The most vulnerable are widows. followed by FR Peshawar (4. In FATA. Heavy migration took place in South Waziristan (12. 20% washing machine and 57% air cooler.3%). 21% of households have a television. charity and zakat. 18% telephone connection. It ranges from 1. The highest percentage of households to receive donations or zakat is recorded in FR Tank and South Waziristan (5. FATA.1.5%). Around 89% of households keep livestock for milk and sale. 1. These assets significantly vary among agencies.5%). Livestock Livestock is one of the major sources of livelihood in FATA. 64% radio. The survey reveals that 4. 8% air conditioner.2.4 % (FR DI Khan) to 33. The third source of information is the newspaper. The survey reveals that 1.6% of households receive a donation or zakat for meeting routine expenses. Donation and Zakat Many families in poor societies like FATA are highly vulnerable and have no or limited source of income. 1. In Muslim society. The lowest rate of readership is in FR Bannu (0.6% of households in FATA. The range of FM radio listeners varies from 0.1%). as shown in Table HC-13.

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS .

? The maternal mortality rate was 380 per 100. the severely underweight percentage was 18.8% for males as compared to 13. The percentage of exclusively breastfed infants (0-6 months) was higher in rural (38.2 members per family. while the sex ratio was 108.547 children under 5 years of age.7%) and severely wasted (6. The primary objectives of the survey were to provide basic information to assess the situation of children and women in FATA and to provide data needed for monitoring progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).2%. about one third of the infants were breastfed within one day. ? of children under 15 years of age accounted for 43.7% for females.5%).6% of infants at age 0-6 months were exclusively breastfed. It will provide a good basis for resource distribution and planning. while the infant mortality rate was 86 per 1000 live births.9% respectively).1 % of children and severe wasting in 6.1% of the population was 0-4 years.4% of the population. ? predominantly rural area with a small urban population. Similarly.000 live births. Child and Maternal Mortality ? and maternal mortality rates remain relatively high in FATA when compared Infant.7% of the 6-59 months old children received vitamin A 33 .797 households.6%. 41.Findings and Conclusions The Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) is a representative sample survey of households. In rural areas. ? Around 38.7%) than in urban areas (37. Nutrition ? The prevalence of underweight among children aged 0-59 months was 33. Above 96% of interviewed households were located in rural areas. ? The average family size was 8. mostly located in FATA is a Khyber and Kurram agencies. more children were underweight (33.8% in males as compared to 29. The mortality rate for children under five years of age was found to be 104 per 1000 live births. Wasting was ? While nearly 9. women and children in FATA. the infant mortality rate per 1000 live births was 95 for males and 72 for females.3 % were severely underweight because of malnourishment. Similarly. Around 43. 80 for females.8%). It should be noted that both infant and child mortality rates are higher for males than for females. The percentage of households consuming adequately iodized salt was higher in urban (11. child to other parts of the country and especially when compared to the national average.8%) than in rural areas (4. Infant. The under-5 child mortality rate per 1000 live births was 110 for males. ? reported in 13.660 women aged 15-49 years of age and mothers/caretakers of 3. 4.7%).5% in females).7% of mothers started breast-feeding their newborn within one hour of birth. It is worth mentioning here that the MICS FATA is the first report to provide primary data at the household level since the 1998 population census. while 16. Underweight prevalence in males was significantly higher than females (36. ? capsules are freely distributed in FATA by the Department of Health as part of Vitamin A a mass campaign.7 males per 100 females. Interviews were completed with 3. ? Consumption of iodized salt was very low and stands at 5% of households.5%. close to that of NWFP. and other international goals. The highest rate of moderate underweight was recorded in South Waziristan and followed by FR Tank (42. the goals of A World Fit For Children (WFFC). The number while 12.

1% in rural areas. Net Enrolment Rate for boys was 39. This showed that there was no difference between rural and urban areas for female literacy rates.5% (6. however there were large differences in access with 92.2%). ? of the households use hygienic sanitation facilities.9% in urban areas having access compared to only 39. while 7. Child Health ? a leading cause of illness in children under five. 86. 34 in urban areas with the births were registered in in either economic or Just 0.9% of under-5 children with suspected pneumonia had received an antibiotic treatment: 94.1% urban areas had improved sanitation facilities.3%.4% in FATA.6% in rural areas. 77 % of households in Only 28. three out of four eligible children under five years old had benefitted from the national vitamin A campaign. Child Protection ? Child registration is rare in FATA. ? In FATA. Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) was given to 70% of children with diarrhea.3% in rural areas.4% males versus 17.3% of children Diarrhea is had episodes of diarrhea in the two weeks preceding the survey. The registration process is growing introduction of proper offices and facilities. mostly in urban areas (51.supplements (VAS) 6 months prior to the survey. ? literacy of 15+ years of age was 22% in FATA.156 women). Female literacy of 15+ years of age was only 5. where only 1% of the children below 5 years of age are registered at birth. 41. Around 5. The literacy rate in rural areas was found to be 20%. The female literacy of this age group was 6.6% in rural areas.6% were involved domestic work. ? The 10+-literacy rate was 21.2% in urban and The overall 20.45 in The Gender FATA. 27. It was 49.4%) for urban women when compared to rural women (23.4% were assisted by a nurse/midwife or Lady Health Visitor (LHV). 18 % of women were assisted by a doctor.7% compared with 35. There is no single major improved source of drinking water in FATA.9% and 17. Only 10. ? In total.3% of deliveries took place in hospitals or clinics.7% in rural areas).7% in urban areas and 86. Male children had higher episodes of diarrhea than female (19. their labour.9% families). 3.1% were paid for . Education ? school (6-10 years of age) Net Enrolment Rate (NER) was found to be The primary 28.3% for girls. Reproductive Health ? who gave birth within the last two years (1.5% of interviewees had in-house water pipes. while in rural areas only 26% has access to proper sanitation. The percentage of women who got antenatal care was considerably higher (55.8% for males. while 1. There was no difference according to their gender.6% versus 27. In general.8% received Of those antenatal care.5% of the population had access to improved drinking water sources.3% females). Water and Sanitation ? Overall. Nearly 19.3% in urban areas. ? Of all children aged 5-14 years. 25. ? Parity Index (GPI) for the primary school Net Enrolment Rate was 0. NERs in urban areas were significantly higher than in rural areas (57.6% of urban areas.2%).5% worked outside their households. while 47. The female literacy rate (10+ years age) was around 7.

7% of women interviewed had knowledge of one preventive method.9% of women knew about HIV/AIDS in rural areas.6% of households receive donations or zakat for meeting their routine ? expenses.4% in urban and 1. Around 89% of households keep livestock for milk production and sale. Socio-economic status of households On average. while only 9.1% of households and Television is watched by 13. In all. 16.1% versus 79. Awareness ? of at least three preventive methods by women in the age group 15-49 was observed in 2.4% were male and 18.8% of the households interviewed had separate houses/compounds.1% were female. Nearly 1. The majority of households have small landholdings for subsistence farming. The percentage of ownership is ? significantly higher in rural areas compared with urban areas (96. Around 43. Nearly ? 85% of the households own less than 5 acres of land.2% were sharing a house or compound. Around 6% of the ? population had one bedroom for 7-10 people. Nearly 28. Around 36. Around 95. Government radio channels are listened to by 43.6%).8%. where at least one preventive method was known to 18.5% of urban women compared to 6% of rural women. 85. 17. Urban ? women have greater awareness about HIV/AIDS prevention.Out of all ? children of 5-14 years of age.6% of households in FATA. ? 35 . The percentage of listeners of FM radio is highest in South Waziristan (33.4% of the population had one bedroom for 4-6 people.2%).5% of women in urban areas had heard of HIV/AIDS.7% for FATA: 17.4%). FM Radio is ? listened to by 16. Nearly 10% of households receive remittances from abroad.4%). The highest awareness rate was recorded in FR Peshawar as 25. Nearly 6. ? Receipt of remittances from within Pakistan is significantly higher in urban areas (53.9% in rural areas. The highest percentage of lack of knowledge was observed in FR DI Khan at 98. than rural areas (35.1% were child labourers.4% of the occupants owned their own house.6%.5% of the population. ? while 11. HIV/AIDS The large ? majority of households in FATA (88%) had no knowledge about HIV/AIDS.1% of households receive remittances from other parts of the country.

SUMMARY TABLE OF FINDINGS .

8 Percent 5 Institutional deliveries 23.5 Percent 34 Home management of diarrhea 11.2 Percent Continued breastfeeding rate 16 At 12-15 months 27.95 Percent Urine specimen taken 21.4 Percent 18 Frequency of complementary feeding 21.5 Percent 19 Adequately fed infants 32.63 Percent 44 Blood pressure measured 37.SUMMARY TABLE OF FINDINGS Multiple indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) and Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Indicators.7 Percent Maternal mortality 3 16 Maternal mortality ratio 380 Per 100.3 Percent sanitation 13 Water treatment Percent 12 31 Use of improved sanitation facilities 28.2 SD) 13.8 Percent 17 Timely complementary feeding rate 24.8 Percent new born Content of antenatal care health Blood test taken 20.0 Percent 42 Vitamin A supplementation (under -fives) 43.1 Percent Breastfeeding 45 Timely initiation of breastfeeding rate 33.5 Percent Source and 96 Source of supplies (from public sources) Percent cost of supply Antibiotics Percent 97 Cost of supplies (median cost) Percent Antibiotics Percent Public sources Sum Private sources Sum ENVIRONMENT Water and 11 30 Use of improved drinking water sources 41.7 Percent Vitamin A 43 Vitamin A supplementation (post -partum mothers) Percent Low birth 9 Low birth weight infants Percent weight Infants weight at birth Percent CHILD HEALTH Care of illness 33 Use oral dehydration therapy (ORT) 70.3 Percent Received ORT or increased fluids. and continued Percent 35 14.0 Percent At 20-23 months 63.4 Percent 22 Antibiotic treatment of suspected pneumonia Percent Solid fuel use 24 29 Solid Fuels 94.000 Percent Percent CHILD DEVELOPMENT Child 46 development 47 Support for learning Father’s support for learning - 36 .73 Percent 4 17 Skilled attendant at delivery 25.1 Percent 14 Disposal of child’s faeces Percent REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH Contraception 21 19c Contraceptive prevalence Percent and unmet 98 Unmet need for family planning Percent need 99 Demand satisfied for family planning Percent Maternal and 20 Antenatal care 25.95 Percent Weight measured 26. FATA 2007 MICS MDG Topic Indicator Indicator Indicator Value Units Number Number CHILD MORTALITY Child Mortality Per 1 13 Under-five mortality rate 104 thousand Per 2 14 Infant mortality rate 86 thousand NUTRITION Nutrition Status 6 4 Underweight prevalence (below -2 SD) 33.6 feeding 23 Care seeking for suspected pneumonia 5.2 Percent 7 Stunting prevalence (below -2 SD) Percent 8 Wasting prevalence (below.4 Percent Salt iodization 41 Iodized salt consumption 5.1 Percent 15 Exclusive breastfeeding rate 21.

0 Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Ratio Ratio Percent 6 7 7b 9 8 1.9 0.7 6.48 49 50 51 EDUCATION Education 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 61 Literacy 60 CHILD PROTECTION Birth 62 registration Child labour 71 72 73 Child discipline 74 Early marriage and polygyny 67 68 70 69 Support for learning: more than 3 children’s books Support for learning: more than 3 non-children’s books Support for learning materials for play (3 or ore toys) Non adult care Pre-school attendance School readiness Net intake rate in primary education Net primary school attendance rate Net secondary school attendance rate Children reaching grade 5 Transition rate of secondary school Primary completion rate Gender parity index Primary school Secondary school Adult literacy rate Birth registration Child labour Labourer students Student labourers Any psychological/physical punishment Early marriage Marriage before age 15 Marriage before age 18 Young women aged 15 -19 currently married/in union Polygymy Spousal age difference (> 10 years) Women of age 15-19 Women of age 20-24 28.3 - Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent 37 .1 - Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Domestic 100 Attitudes towards domestic violence violence HIV/AIDS. AND ORPHAND AND VULNERABLE CHILDREN HIV/AIDS Comprehensive Knowledge about HIV prevention 82 19b Knowledge and among young people attitudes 89 Knowledge of mother-to-child transmission of HIV 86 Attitude towards people with HIV/AIDS 87 Women who know where to be tested for HIV/AIDS 88 Women who have been tested for HIV Counseling coverage for the prevention of mother-to90 child transmission of HIV Testing coverage for the prevention of mother -to91 child transmission of HIV MICS FATA Knowledge of HIV/AIDS MICS FATA Knowledge of one prevention method MICS Knowledge of 2 prevention methods FATA 92 Age-mixing among sexual partners Sexual 83 19a Condom use with non-regular partners behavior 85 Higher risk sex in the last year Orphan hood 78 Children’s living arrangements 75 Prevalence of orphans Percent 11.45 0.17 22. SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR.3 5.0 17.7 2.

Habibullah Khan Mr.List of Contributees S. Khalid Mehmood Mr. Humera Ali World Food Programme 19 20 Mr.Sarah Ahmad Mirza Dr. Ershad Karim Ms. Zafar Hasan Syed Mazhar Ali Shah Amir Shehbaz Khan Dr. Habib -e-Mustafa Ms. Mohammad Ramzan FBS Islamabad FBS Islamabad Bureau of Statistics NWFP 9 10 Mufti Javed Aziz Mr. Shafaat Sharif Chief Executive Eycon Solutions Islamabad Head of VAM unit WFP Islamabad Pakistan Chief provincial Office Chief PM&E Section M&E Specialist NE Specialist Programme Specialist National Consultant Admn:& Finance Officer PM&E Officer UNICEF Islamabad UNICEF Islamabad UNICEF Islamabad UNICEF Peshawar UNICEF Peshawar UNICEF Peshawar UNICEF Peshawar UNICEF Peshawar Bureau of Statistics NWFP Bureau of Statistics NWFP 38 .No. Jawad Habib Khan Mr. Mohammad Rafique Dr. Name FATA Secretariat 1 2 3 4 5 6 Mr. Drothee Klaus Ms. Sahib Haq Eycon Solutions Mr. Fawad Khan Fazle Manan Designation Additional Chief Secretary Secretary Deputy Secretary/ Chief Survey Coordinator Chief Engineer Director Director Education Deputy Director General Sample Design Section Chief Statistical Officer Sample Design Section Director Technical Coordinator Organization FATA Secretariat Planning & Development FATA Planning & Development FATA Works and Services FATA Directorate of Health FATA Directorate of Education FATA Federal Bureau of statistics 7 8 Mr. Muhammad Farooq UNICEF 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Mr. Abdul Jamil Dr.

TABLES AND MAPS .

Urban Rural Bajour Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai Waziristan Peshawar Kohat Bannu Lakki Tank Khan Total Error Number of households Sampled households 168 4608 528 480 496 504 480 480 288 352 432 320 112 272 4776 Occupied households 168 4577 527 480 496 504 479 478 277 352 422 320 111 267 4745 499 58 84 643 639 65 89 428 425 54 87 471 36 92 574 62 87 445 64 85 499 33 93 343 25 89 471 589 448 502 356 304 294 23 89 92 87 85 92 91 89 92 239 235 19 90 506 506 41 660 656 81 533 529 77 566 560 38 500 496 41 365 346 21 391 387 27 481 469 62 85 352 333 42 83 79 83 72 76 78 87 85 83 89 334 330 33 89 233 229 16 91 416 35 480 66 433 72 401 35 409 34 255 14 321 23 416 65 320 36 100 22 70 122 120 26 77 74 74 8 89 246 39 78 273 273 45 84 175 173 25 85 4296 499 80 5374 5311 557 88 4171 4095 407 88 1. FATA.6 Interviewed households Households dropped 164 9 4132 490 80 5146 5084 546 88 39 Household response rate 92 Number of women Eligible women 228 Interviewed women 227 Women dropped 11 Women response rate 95 Number of children under 5 Eligible children 207 3964 Mother/Caretaker Interviewed Children under5 Child response rate MICS Indicator FATA 204 10 94 3891 397 88 0.Table HH.1: Results of Household and Individual Interviews Results of household and individual interviews Numbers of households.1 1. women and children under 5 by results of the household. and household. women's and under-five's interviews. women's and under-five's response rates.8 . 2007 Urban/Rural Agency FR FR South FR FR FR FR DI Std.

3 54.2: Household age distribution by sex Sex Male Number Percent 12.2 4.2 3.9 9.740 2.167 16.9 0.4 49.403 1.0 49.939 15.641 12.732 1.0 2.7 1.4 844 7.6 0.725 7.235 287 0.2 176 1. FATA 2007 (Un Weighted) 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 40 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70+ Missing/DK <15 15-64 65+ Missing/DK Children aged 0-17 Adults 18+/Missing/DK Total MICS FATA indicator .0 43.031 1.3 3.341 1.132 812 1 15.436 15. by sex.8 4.4 478 4.5 Percent Number 1.4 0.161 0.8 8.6 5.266 16.9 2.0 3.687 17.2 1 6.2 100.0 16.2 14.152 888 745 732 553 557 430 503 169 356 0 7.8 54.2 3.3 1.7 1.953 2.6 340 3.0 50.855 Female Total Percent distribution of the household population by five-year age groups and dependency age groups.5 2.2 2.7 7. and number of children aged 0-17 years.2 1.2 54.382 1.7 0.5 1.232 1.5 4.5 2.0 770 751 280 532 1 13.764 2.702 31.0 7.934 1.0 43.330 4.0 100.480 3.0 49.716 2.9 1.6 100.1 248 2.5 787 5.9 Number 1.4 609 4.0 51.361 11.0 111 3.8 50.549 3.080 8.1 5.0 1 7.1 5.Table HH.4 11.9 14.239 2.051 8.4 682 3.3 11.0 42.532 1.0 17.4 2.6 0.8 0.0 1.636 8.897 525 0 8.214 8.808 5.806 14.2 4.614 Percent 11.

4 2.5 63.8 24.2 82.132 3.296 4.5 9.288 8 499 416 480 433 401 409 255 321 416 320 100 246 3 209 685 1. 2007 Number of households percent Sex of household head Male Female Agency Bajour Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai South Waziristan FR Peshawar FR Kohat FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan Number of household members 1 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10+ Total Residence Urban Rural At least one child aged < 18 At least one child aged < 5 At least one woman aged 15 -49 MICS FATA Indicator Un-weighted 99.3: Household Composition Percent distribution of households by selected characteristics.296 41 .1 4.Table HH.132 3.035 1.1 4.9 27.296 164 4.3 9.168 4.1 9.2 11.515 4.5 5.196 1.294 4.1 27.296 164 4.9 15.288 8 499 416 480 433 401 409 255 321 416 320 100 246 3 209 685 1.196 1.294 4.6 9.5 95.7 0.8 0.515 4.3 5.2 10. FATA.7 7.7 11.168 4.2 100.9 7.035 1.0 3.8 96.

1 9.5 4.171 489 42 .7 9. 2007 Number of women Percent Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Motherhood status Ever gave birth Never gave birth MICS FATA Indicator 12.9 7.4: Women's Background Characteristics Percent distribution of women aged 15-49 years by background characteristics.7 5.5 574 396 228 358 268 305 90 564 450 463 519 445 212 4.1 9.448 4.Table HH.9 12.5 95.448 4.9 11.5 89.5 4.3 8. FATA.171 489 Un-weighted 574 396 228 358 268 305 90 564 450 463 519 445 212 4.5 10.8 6.5 1.

2 19.9 10.1 20.5 10.8 1.1 8.1 13. FATA.2 6.7 5.0 100 weighted 1.353 354 219 692 684 889 709 354 3.4 10.1 50.9 14.5: Children's Background Characteristics Percent distribution of children under five years of age by background characteristics.2 5.547 43 .5 94.741 1.5 7.9 4.806 363 231 148 209 161 275 66 511 380 429 465 309 194 3.806 363 231 148 209 161 275 66 511 380 429 465 309 194 3.0 6.Table HH.741 1.3 25.5 19.5 4.547 unweighted 1.0 10. 2007 Number of under-5 children Percent Sex Female Male Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Child age <6 months 6-11 months 12-17 months 24-35 months 36-47 months 48-59 months <6 months Total MICS indicator 49.7 12.353 354 219 692 684 889 709 354 3.

MDG indicator 14 ** MICS Indicator 1.1: Child Mortality Rate Infant and under-five mortality rate. MDG indicator 13 44 . FATA. 2007 Infant mortality rate* Sex Male Female 95 72 110 80 104 Under-five mortality rate** Total 86 * MICS Indicator 2.Table CM.

02 0.05 0. FATA.07 0.46 30-34 1.37 1.06 0. children surviving and proportion dead by age of women.67 MICS FATA Indicator Mean number of children surviving 0.05 0.77 25-29 1.17 1. 2007 women age Mean number of group children ever born 15-19 0.10 Total 1.82 35-39 2.Table CM.09 0.06 Number of women 141 464 532 408 398 419 525 2887 45 .14 45-49 2. Children Surviving.30 20-24 0.71 2.29 0.31 40-44 2. Proportion Dead Mean number of children ever born.56 Proportion dead 0.03 0.75 1.2: Children Ever Born.97 1.90 1.

8 29.2 17.2 25.7 3.1 16.3 1.19 1.9 6.1 13.6 16.80 1.6 3.9 12.6 16.5 33.1 13.6 16.2 31.66 1.4 13.1 16.7 33.Table NU-1: Child Malnourishment Percentage of children aged 0-59 months who are severely or moderately malnourished.0 11.51 1.34 1.9 6.2 26.3 11.2 32.2 38.9 11.0 16.1 9.1 33.3 13.7 16.53 1.4 6.3 41.2 39.38 1.5 33.9 30.3 15.3 15.54 1.56 1.6 3.69 1.2 21.3 3.36 1.56 46 .3 42.1 Below 3SD 6.3 5.8 13.62 1.3 22.3 6.59 1.58 1.3 3.3 Weight for height Below 2SD*** 13.7 12.6 Children age 0-59 Standard Error 1621 1565 3186 347 234 146 199 259 62 493 366 404 450 226 3186 190 2996 3186 1. FATA.8 31.56 1.58 1.3 11.7 6.6 13. 20007 Weight for age Below 2SD* Sex male female Total Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total *MICS indicator 6 *MDG indicator 4 *** MICS indicator 8 36.8 11.1 13.3 33.1 8.7 15.8 29.1 7.5 17.2 Below 3SD 18.0 5.5 11.55 1.3 11.9 11.4 18.8 6.6 16.3 18.

0 19.2: Initial Breastfeeding Percentage of women aged 15-49 years with a birth in the 2 years preceding the survey who breastfed their baby within one hour of birth and within one day of birth.6 26. 2007 Percentage Percentage who started breastfeeding within one day of birth 18.8 40.3 15.9 26.1 15.8 8.5 17.7 9.1 23.6 21.2 6.5 23.1 28.3 15.8 16.7 Number of women who started breastfeeding within one hour of birth* Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Residence Urban Rural Months since birth < 6 months 6-11 months 12-23 months Total *MICS Indicator 45 13.0 28.8 21.3 28. FATA.4 26.1 32.8 23.2 24.7 with live birth in the two years preceding the survey 149 220 287 526 379 434 466 197 2264 879 793 789 2461 47 .Table NU.9 10.

7 49 54.0 63.1 89.0 80.3: Breastfeeding Children 0-5 Months Children 12-15 Months Children 20-23 Months Percent of Living Children According to Breastfeeding Status at Each Age Group.1 38 5.3 83.4 60.0 33.5 Orakzai 35.3 35.6 63.0 Mohmand 62.2 Richest 50.5 Second 47.0 63 38.1 11.8 63.6 80.1 20.2 80.0 38.0 63 88.0 59 34.0 71.9 109 39.4 66.8 86.3 81.1 33.8 4 47 Female 46.7 21 22 27 9 126 39 34 37 13 28 23 5 9 93.5 Fourth 65.0 60.4 83.7 FR Kohat 7.9 Kurram 40.4 87.0 Number of children Sex 84 115 6 13 31 37 30 48 34 15 184 74 48 41 23 12 198 39.5 90.6 FR DI Khan 16.0 62.3 89.0 52.0 50.9 Middle 41. FATA.3 59 42.4 23 264 34.0 87.6 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 36.0 56.7 FR Peshawar 48.0 76.8 93.1 12 135 96.0 159 39.1 100.2 86.9 17 33.0 Total 44.3 35.0 41.7 72 85.3 35.4 11.2 35.8 49 37.Table NU.3 31.0 Rural 44.4 48 Khyber 45.3 12 39.1 39.0 31.4 Male Agency 42.5 62 32 24 286 39.3 36.6 65.7 100. 2007 Children 0-3 Months Percent exclusively breastfed Percent breastfed*** Number of children Percent exclusively breastfed * Number of children Children 6-9 Months Percent receiving Number breast milk of and children solid/mushy food ** Number of children Percent breastfed *** 25.1 7.0 28 307 50.1 148 159 32 29 23 56 51 56 60 21 286 113 79 57 30 63.3 Residence Urban 40.5 50.4 * MICS indicator 15 ** MICS indicator 17 *** MICS indicator 16 .8 128 22 26 3 9 2 17 5 7 5 5 43 22 11 5 5 25.7 33.

4 4.3 0.0 7.7 5.5 12.6 11.8 2.6 0.9 8.5 2.4 26.4 34.0 0.0 7.8 3.0 0.7 20.6 1.5 3.7 51.0 42.1 0.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 35.7 20.8 36.7 92.9 15.9 0.2 4.9 44.8 16.4 0.1 2.2 35.6 8.8 3.8 2.7 0.7 0.2 0.1 100.7 0.9 74.7 0.0 2.9 1.6 53.4 8.6 6.0 2.3 27.6 6.0 0.3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 76 123 88 75 60 44 143 164 47 36 18 30 210 102 46 43 15 19 1339 MICS FATA Indicator . FATA.0 25.5 13.0 0.9 7. 2007 Infant feeding pattern Breastfed and plain water only Breastfed and nonmilk liquids Breastfed and other milk/ formula Weaned (not breastfed) Total Breastfed and complement ary foods Number of children Age Exclusively breastfed 49 0-1 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10-11 12-13 14-15 16-17 18-19 20-21 22-23 24-25 26-27 28-29 30-31 32-33 34-35 Total 74.0 99.8 0.0 0.7 50.4 7.0 0.0 0.1 10.0 0.0 0.0 0.8 2.4 1.2 0.0 0.0 0.1 36.0 0.8 6.5 0.2 95.0 0.8 18.2 96.0 6.0 0.2 97.0 0.0 21.0 0.6 0.7 3.0 13.Table NU.6 13.0 0.7 21.0 48.0 24.1 9.3 0.3w: Infant Feeding Patterns by age Percent distribution of children aged under 3 years by feeding pattern by age group.6 51.6 11.1 0.1 0.0 0.7 14.9 3.6 5.0 3.2 50.7 54.5 44.0 0.

1 39.3 27.7 28.4 * MICS indicator 18 ** MICS indicator 19 .1 12.2 46.6 25.0 42.6 34.1 37.1 20.0 7. percentage of infants 6-11 months who are breastfed and who ate solid / semi-solid food at least the minimum recommended number of times yesterday and percentage of the infants adequately fed.0 40.0 35.8 8.9 32.0 9.2 34.0 0.0 26.0 16.0 34.5 19.9 11.6 34.0 11. FATA.4 39.5 0.7 25.0 Sex Female Male Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Residence Urban Rural Total 33.3 30.9 42.5 17.2 32.3 28.8 39.Table NU.4 23.3 5.1 21. 2007 0-5 months exclusively breastfed 16.0 0.6 22.2 6-8 months who received breast milk and complementary food at least 2 times in prior 24 hours 9-11 months who received breast milk and complementary food at least 3 times in prior 24 hours 6-11 months who received breast milk and complementary food at least the minimum recommended number of times per day* 0-11 months who were appropriately fed** 30.0 20.9 26.3 25.3 38.0 21.1 40.7 39.4: Adequately Fed Infants Percentage of infants under 6 months of age exclusively breastfed.0 22.8 54.0 23.5 26.0 30.6 5.0 15.4 Number of infants aged 0-11 months 219 247 21 25 65 98 79 88 90 43 423 466 50 39.0 21.5 37.0 20.

0 0.3 0.0 0.0 97.5 16.5 81.1 69.6 84.9 5.0 1.2 1.4 84.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 7.0 1.3 0.4 7.7 5.8 0.0 0.2 81.Table NU 5: Iodized Salt Consumption Percentage of household consuming adequately iodized salt.1 78.4 90.0 0.0 0.9 2. 2007 Iodized salt No Iodine in salt Total less than 15 PPM Above 15 PPM* No salt available not tested Number of households 51 74.2 1. FATA.0 8.0 0.9 0.6 12.6 11.0 0.4 15.2 21.2 0.0 0.0 0.3 80.8 4.6 9.0 7.7 79.8 5.0 13.0 0.3 6.0 0.2 0.7 12.2 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 439 340 207 297 273 237 75 403 353 350 357 364 3695 153 3542 3695 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total *MICS Indicator 41 .0 0.2 0.0 0.8 4.1 93.0 0.7 11.7 12.1 0.5 77.0 0.3 12.4 6.3 10.0 23.3 0.9 13.0 0.3 81.0 0.0 0.1 76.3 3.2 74.7 3.3 13.0 1.

4 20.3 47.0 52.4 Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Number of households 440 347 207 295 278 241 77 413 360 380 365 373 3776 155 3621 3776 52 .4 41.6 66.5 24.1 42.2 50.8 49.7 28.6 75.9 57.4 24.6 32.7 52.5 75.0 47.3 71.0 33.1 47.4 46.4 67.0 66.6 53.7 48.4 34.6 No 68.3 51.Table NU 5a: Iodized Salt Consumption Percentage of household who know about Iodized salt FATA 2007 Do you know Iodized salt Yes* Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total *MICS Indicator 41 31.6 79.9 53.6 58.

5 38.7 29.3 75.8 25.6 10.6 45.5 1063 1079 53 21.5 13.2 1.7 38.4 0.6 36.0 58.7 45.6: Children's Vitamin A Supplementation Percent distribution of children aged 6-59 months by whether they received a high dose Vitamin A supplement in the last 6 months.5 100 100 Number of children aged 6-59 months 41.9 0.0 1.1 1.3 6.1 1.6 44.5 40.1 42.8 43.9 40.8 32.0 0.0 32.9 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 136 197 239 453 330 371 416 171 1971 181 355 84 437 589 496 2142 Sex Female Male Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Residence Urban Rural Age 6-11 months 12-17 months 18-23 months 24-35 months 36-47 months 48-59 months Total * MICS indicator 42 .9 35.7 4.3 13.0 31.4 0.6 31.2 41.8 68.0 2.7 22.9 38.8 48.2 41.Table NU.5 28. 2007 Percent of children who received Vitamin A: Within last 6 months* Total Prior to last 6 months Not sure if received Never received Vitamin A 23.6 3.4 1.8 30.7 0.5 34.7 51.6 40.7 34.6 1.7 23.1 0.0 43.5 43.0 1.8 0.7 1. FATA.5 2.5 15.9 37.4 28.5 51.7 0.3 5.5 31.7 28.0 31.7 34.3 44.0 77.

5 41.4 0.9 76.3 51.7 30.8 10.7 77.1 55.8 1.8 1. 2007 Number of Children BCG* Yes Total FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai FATA Urban Rural Female FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai FATA Urban Rural Male FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai FATA Urban Rural *MICS indicator 25 *MDG indicator 15 33.7 0.1 29.3 41.0 2.4 44.0 55.2 43.9 60.6 69.5 89.1 62.7 0.1 69.8 46.6 54.1 39.9 89.5 29.3 56.1 89.8 57.8 44.2 54.1 76.0 0.4 43.1 44.8 0.7 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 No Do not know Total 148 208 265 500 378 421 456 2376 193 2183 78 85 134 238 199 199 228 1161 86 1075 70 123 131 262 179 222 228 1215 107 1108 0. FATA.7 0.6 0.7 56.1 23.9 22.4 10.2 23.4 28.3 10.7 57.8 1.8 76.2 82.6 42.4 0.8 17.5 47.6 54 .4 0.8 0.4 51.2 41.4 72.1 47.5 57.Table CH 1: Vaccination in first year of Life Proportion of Children aged below 5 years who received BCG.2 23.1 0.8 58.6 1.2 66.1 35.4 42.5 70.7 56.2 71.3 42.8 0.6 27.7 0.5 52.

2 42.3 Residence 15.3 67.8 53.9 34.2 69. 2007 If BCG* yes then mark on arm Agency Total FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai FATA Urban Rural FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Urban Rural Total Male FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Domain Urban Rural Total *MICS indicator 25 Yes 52.9 49.7 78.3 30.6 49 77.5 10.4 Female 51 22.8 30.2 62.1 65.4 91.7 32.2 46.2 22.7 57.7 69.2 67.3 43.9 65.7 87.8 79 88 80 62.2 34.1 34.5 36.4 57. FATA.8 37.7 56.3 42.Table CH.2 26 37.7 84.3 21.3 89.8 74 62.8 32.5 63.5 No 47.8 65.1a:Vaccination in First Year of Life Proportion of children aged below 5 years who received BCG.8 77.3 Residence 12.4 56.2 21 12 20 37.6 8.8 57.7 10.6 43.5 89.5 Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Number of Children 93 203 215 425 320 346 309 1911 186 1725 49 84 98 200 170 158 153 912 84 828 912 44 119 117 225 150 188 156 999 102 897 999 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 55 .6 42.1 50.

8 54.4: Oral Rehydration Treatment Percentage of children aged 0-59 months with diarrhea in the last two weeks and treatment with oral rehydration solution (ORS) or other oral rehydration treatment (ORT).5 FR Peshawar 14.0 8.5 22.4 41.7 36-47 months 13.2 16.2 45.3 79.1 57.3 53.9 19.4 25.7 35.2 2.1 12-17 months 29.3 4.4 Male Agency 17.1 14.4 16.3 23.0 19.3 58.3 FR DI Khan 9.9 10.5 14.0 59.4 22.3 11.4 70.1 67.4 6-11 months 27.3 35.0 12.7 76.6 0.9 30.9 71.5 11.1 58.4 22.5 16.2 67.6 60.1 Age Group <6 months 15. 200 7 Number of children aged 0-59 months Fluid from ORS packet Recommended homemade fluid Pre-packaged ORS fluid No treatment ORT use rate * Number of children aged 0-59 months with diarrhea Had diarrhea in last two weeks Sex 1209 1252 149 220 287 526 379 434 466 197 2264 319 181 355 84 437 589 496 2461 62.9 47.5 69.9 7.7 28.5 56.9 51.3 41.6 5.7 20.9 48-59 months Total 11.9 32.6 20.7 Khyber 21.1 9.1 15.4 28.9 FR Kohat 20.5 58.9 70.8 11.8 70.6 34.1 11.0 35.7 61.4 64.7 57.2 18.6 58.0 15.8 20.0 19.7 21.0 70.4 65.2 61.6 74.0 40.1 29.2 29.5 14.1 44.0 8.3 * MICS Indicator 33 . FATA.5 69.1 19.1 29.8 32.9 12.0 30.4 9.6 29.3 64.2 8.3 78.6 24-35 months 19.7 22.3 7.4 56 Kurram 25.5 Mohmand 16.5 235 216 14 42 36 105 96 68 90 41 410 49 49 106 24 86 82 55 451 Female 19.1 Orakzai Residence Urban Rural 19.Table CH.9 41.5 71.8 77.0 13.9 18-23 months 28.2 22.8 58.

FATA 2007 Drink water/juices during illness very little or not Do not know as usual or little more than usual Number of children aged 0-59 months with diarrhea Had diarrhea in last two weeks 19.62 55.53 24.5 9.6 0.22 3.47 20.41 10.0 19.46 16.49 48.77 50.88 18.76 8.69 19.63 45.3 36.6 37.18 43.1 19.08 4.75 6.03 5.06 14.39 37.83 51.29 22.11 19.61 3.3 29.5 73.57 26.69 21.42 235 216 14 42 36 105 96 68 90 451 41 410 451 57 Sex Male Female Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS indicator 34 .0 0.49 14.13 15.28 47.77 16.7 17.93 41.00 41.43 25.82 29.56 14.59 48.67 23.53 7.38 28.82 11.06 7.8 55.Table CH 5: Home Management of Diarrhea Percentage of children aged 0-59 months with diarrhea n the last two weeks who took increased fluids and continued to feed during the episode.91 7.03 15.70 48.88 37.45 70.93 30.62 30.56 7.03 28.42 2.86 20.23 10.0 23.6 75.

00 10.82 11.88 6.00 8.47 24.21 40.68 3.38 21.78 FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Residence Urban Rural Total 7.50 12.78 10.00 2.24 9.76 9.57 8.23 0.07 3.74 58 50.00 48.69 7.08 1.70 53.70 5.43 8.56 2.82 15.15 2.14 11.91 3.29 18.00 4.70 0.53 3.88 23.68 13.09 9.27 7.69 16.85 50.38 5.67 29.08 1.00 48.78 0.51 22.08 2.00 2.06 3.49 3.05 3. FATA 2007 Quantity of food eaten during illness very little little same as usual More than usual Do not know No food Sex 47.97 18.96 3.09 48.18 3.38 2.56 15.70 MICS indicator 35 .27 40.50 3.00 44.43 8.72 11.90 28.18 9.00 15.28 20.24 23.15 5.Table CH 5a: Home Management of Diarrhea Percentage of children aged 0-59 months with diarrhea n the last two weeks who took increased fluids and continued to feed during the episode.59 58.41 29.14 49.12 32.40 Male Female Agency 10.32 65.00 1.38 0.00 21.76 12.

3 48.6 3.0 27.7 15.9 4.3 20.8 4.7 19.2 1.5 60.3 3.0 5.7 27.5 5.9 5.2 0.8 5.2 15.9 61.5 27.9 50. 2007 Percentage of mother/caretakers of children aged 0-59 months who think that a child should be taken immediately to a health facility if the child: Become s sicker Develops a fever Has fast breathing Has difficulty breathing Has bloo d in stool Is drinking poorly Has other symptoms Is not able to drink or breastfeed Mothers/ caretakers who recognize the two danger signs of pneumonia Number of mothers/ caretakers of children aged 0-59 months 59 56.0 57.5 60.9 25.8 21.8 4.9 5.6 13.9 41.0 8.2 11.8 148 209 275 511 378 428 465 194 2220 2414 Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 10.7 39.5 55.8 5.7 38.9 10.0 19.1 19.3 4.5 3.4 5.1 20.3 19.7 29.3 54.5 10.7 14.6 58.7 4.6 58.7 35.5 23.3 5.7 12.2 2. and percentage of mothers/caretakers who recognize fast and difficult breathing as signs for seeking care immediately.9 0.7 35.2 9.6 14.7 12.4 40.1 19.Table CH.7 5.3 14.8 28.1 11.3 .3 23.7 8.8 6.5 10.8 13.1 11.0 42.8 2.1 18.7 45.7 41.4 5.9 2.2 16.0 2.7 8.8 62. FATA.6 15.6 12.9 0.4 15.7A: Knowledge of the two danger signs of pneumonia Percentage of mothers/caretakers of children aged 0-59 months by knowledge of types of symptoms for taking a child immediately to a health facility.7 13.

7 82.0 1.3 0.4 0.0 0.6 0.4 5.5 0.0 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.0 57.0 FR Tank 2.2 91.5 86.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.7 0.0 0.9 60 Orakzai 4.9 0.0 Khyber 6.2 80.2 97.3 *MICS indicator 24 *MDG indicator 29 .3 0.0 0.4 95.0 0.7 96.0 11.1 54.8 Rural 1.4 0.7 0. 2007 Source of fuel for Cooking GasLPG Coal Grasses Total 1.6 98.3 0.0 27.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 10.0 0.0 0.6 3.0 0.4 0.0 0.0 14.0 0.0 1.6 0.0 0.8 0.3 0.6 FR Lakki 0.7 7.2 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Biogas Kerosene Oil Fire wood Dung cake Strawwheat Solid fuels for cooking * 98.6 8.3 90.3 0.9 0.0 1.2 96.4 1.6 Number of households 441 381 414 361 366 375 241 298 351 284 78 207 155 3642 Electricity Agency Bajour 0.8 1.0 1.4 3.4 99.0 1.6 0.9 86.8: Solid Fuel Use Percent distribution of households according to type of cooking fuel. and percentage of households used solid fuels for cooking.0 5.0 FR Peshawar 1.3 2.4 0.Table CH.0 0.9 9.0 0.4 0.0 1.3 14.5 84.0 0.0 0.3 0.3 94.9 97.1 1.0 0.0 0.0 Mohmand 1.0 1.3 FR Bannu 0.3 0.3 0.4 100.5 0.3 97.1 South Waziristan 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.0 0.9 97.0 0.0 0.1 85.5 1.4 95.0 0.6 98.8 0.6 FR DI Khan Residence Urban 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.8 0.1 2.3 0. FATA.1 Kurram 3.3 0.7 84.3 78.0 0.7 0.3 0.2 98.2 82.3 FR Kohat 1.0 0.0 1.

5 67.6 Agency Bajour Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai South Waziristan FR Peshawar FR Kohat FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan Residence Urban Rural 14.7 19.1 6.1 3.0 3.3 29.9 9.8 34.6 8.4 28.6 7.1 4.8 20.6 1.3 21.7 85.3 10.1 14.1 16.5 12.3 2.9 6.Table CH.0 46.5 25.8 6.1 56.1 7.7 49.1 17.8 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 435 374 343 312 350 370 233 251 340 278 76 207 89 3480 MICS FATA Indicator .1 1.4 3.8 65.9 6.1 2.2 55.1 17.3 67. FATA 2007 Percentage of households using solid fuels for cooking: Closed stove with chimney Total Open stove or fire with chimney or hood Open stove or fire with no chimney or hood DK stove type/missing Number of households using solid fuels for cooking 61 9.8 45.0 14.5 2.6 5.6 7.0 57.7 55.3 52.7 21.6 8.0 73.9: Solid Fuel Use by Type of Stove or Fire Percent of households using solid fuels for cooking by type of stove or fire.7 13.3 49.5 66.2 23.0 15.0 23.

5 5.1 7.9 1.2 41.3 441 351 207 297 283 241 78 413 361 381 366 2.5 0.0 0.6 8.1 6.2 21.8 2.2 1.3 2.6 0.6 3.4 27.1 37.8 58.3 0.1 5.4 8.9 4.6 2.9 5.4 8.4 2.8 4.0 0.8 2.Table EN 1: Use of Improved Sources of Drinking Water Proportion of households using improved sources of drinking water FATA 2007 Improved source of drinking water* Publictap/stand post/hand pump Protecte d well In househand pump In In house house Turbineprotected donkey tube well well pump Protected Bottle spring water Total Number of households In housepipe into dwelling In housepipe into yard 62 0.0 1.5 3.2 2.5 3.7 10.9 2.1 0.5 0.0 0.0 1.7 0.0 0.4 17.4 10.0 0.1 0.5 3.2 8.9 8.4 12.5 9.9 7.8 4.3 2.4 0.0 0.5 374 3793 154 3639 3793 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total 51.8 0.3 1.1 0.1 47.0 1.1 16.1 4.5 0.3 3.3 1.0 3.9 3.6 0.6 4.6 2.2 0.5 0.9 3.7 6.2 0.5 41.9 0.4 2.0 3.0 1.8 3.1 2.1 0.3 8.8 2.3 3.0 0.2 3.5 0.3 1.6 77.6 1.5 3.4 6.3 2.2 10.3 0.5 5.3 1.4 71.3 7.1 5.0 12.7 5.0 1.2 0.3 5.3 2.3 0.1 7.8 4.1 7.6 0.3 92.5 0.7 3.0 0.0 2.3 0.8 3.0 0.3 0.6 5.0 2.7 6.9 39.1 0.9 1.1 27.0 0.4 5.5 3.3 0.9 0.9 4.5 *MICS indicator 11 *MDG indicator 30 .2 52.0 0.2 0.7 0.3 0.3 2.0 5.4 8.1 0.8 17.6 0.5 8.2 5.7 0.4 29.3 5.6 0.6 0.3 8.7 4.3 38.0 0.7 0.4 32.8 0.3 0.5 2.3 2.4 4.6 23.3 9.3 6.2 0.0 2.0 54.8 0.0 18.0 8.0 0.

1 60.0 3.9 52.0 2.0 0.1 22.0 0.0 0.2 16.7 0.0 0.9 7.2 0.2 0.5 0.0 1.9 23.7 441 351 207 297 283 241 78 413 361 381 366 374 3793 154 3639 3793 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS indicator 11 MDG indicator 30 0.0 2.2 3.3 15.5 2.0 0.1 1.5 33.3 2.0 2.8 58.0 0.0 2.2 0.6 2.6 1.3 0.4 22.6 28.0 11.8 33.3 3.9 1.1 34.7 1.9 16.0 2.5 5.3 1.0 45.9 7.0 0.1 0.5 58.3 3.9 0.2 0.4 2.5 0.8 0.5 94.0 2.2 0.9 0.7 7.8 10.4 3.3 4.7 7.8 0.3 0.0 16.6 0.3 0 Un-improved sources of drinking water Cart Unprotected Unprotected Rain Tankerwith well spring water truck Buckets -drum River/strea m/dam/lak e/pond Other (specify) Total Number of households 4.0 3.7 0.8 16.0 0.8 5.0 5.9 0.4 11.5 0.9 0.7 49.8 6.9 0.0 22.6 12.3 3.8 47.7 0.1 63 2.8 33.5 4.1 2.5 7.5 0.0 3.9 34.1 0.3 22.7 0.4 20.0 0.7 62.7 20.2 24.2 0.7 18.4 1.0 0.0 87.0 2.0 6.4 .9 92.2 0.1 34.5 1.0 62.2 0.0 0.Table EN 1b: Use of Un-improved Sources of Drinking Water Proportion of households using Un-improved sources of drinking water FATA 2007 In houseunprotected well 16.3 0.1 63.8 10.5 0.0 0.8 0.0 1.5 0.8 0.5 5.7 62.7 5.7 0.0 0.0 0.4 8.2 7.4 2.2 41.6 72.5 0.6 1.7 0.

0 9.9 5.5 0.0 5.4 0.0 0.0 0.6 9.0 0.3 0.4 4.4 6.5 *MICS indicator 11: *MDG indicator 30 .6 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.7 0.5 5.3 2.0 0.0 0.0 7.3 2.5 10.3 41.3 41.3 0.2 4.6 2.Table EN 1c : Use of Improved Sources of Water for Other Purposes Proportion of households using improved sources of water for other purposes FATA 2007 Improved source of water* for cocking and washing hands Publictap/stand post/hand pump In house donkey pump Protected well Protected Bottle spring water In house protected well In househand pump Turbinetube well Total Number of households In housepipe into dwelling In housepipe into yard 64 0.0 0.7 0.9 9.5 3.6 0.6 3.3 2.0 2.8 0.0 7.0 0.1 0.4 3.4 6.5 57.2 13.9 1.3 0.3 2.0 4.4 8.6 4.5 439 348 207 291 282 241 62 413 361 381 364 374 3763 155 3608 3763 South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total 2.6 3.8 17.1 0.3 0.7 0.9 8.4 51.6 4.0 27.2 0.9 2.0 0.6 5.0 1.0 0.7 7.1 0.4 27.1 54.8 8.7 4.3 40.0 77.3 2.1 0.2 0.4 5.4 4.6 1.9 4.9 0.6 0.4 11.8 10.4 0.3 1.7 38.7 0.0 0.3 6.0 2.0 1.0 7.8 7.5 5.7 0.3 1.5 0.4 3.6 2.4 1.3 0.8 25.4 27.5 3.8 0.7 11.6 3.0 3.4 10.5 0.9 71.0 1.6 1.5 92.6 2.8 21.9 0.6 0.5 0.8 5.5 5.9 8.2 1.3 2.3 0.1 3.2 8.5 33.2 58.0 18.2 1.7 0.7 8.6 1.0 0.3 0.9 3.4 2.8 5.4 0.4 1.5 3.0 1.8 0.8 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai 3.9 0.4 3.8 3.6 2.0 5.5 0.2 2.6 6.1 4.9 39.0 0.0 0.9 2.8 4.7 6.5 3.7 9.2 1.2 0.6 0.4 1.3 3.8 6.1 5.5 11.4 19.4 17.

1 Mohmand 6.5 0.4 21.1 28.0 5.9 0.2 0.0 0.5 7.3 2.Improved Sources of Water for Other Purposes Proportion of households using un-improved sources of water for other purposes FATA 2007 Un-improved source of water for cocking and washing hands Unprotecte d well Unprotecte d spring Rain water Tankertruck Cart with Buckets -drum River/stream/ dam/lake/ pond Other (specify) 0.9 0.3 0.8 0.1 Kurram 1.0 0.9 11.8 15.0 0.3 9.4 0.1 7.6 2.2 0.9 3.8 0.5 Total Number of households In houseunprotected well Agency 14.3 0.0 0.0 2.3 South Waziristan 1.6 1.0 Khyber 4.3 32.1 0.3 7.4 FR Kohat 1.0 22.6 3.1 1.6 0.2 61.4 2.9 0.1 58.0 0.6 32.3 Orakzai 3.9 6.0 16.0 1.9 0.1 48.9 6.7 FR Bannu 1.1 60.3 2.3 2.4 FR DI Khan 1.5 0.0 0.0 17.1 1.4 8.7 4.6 1.8 12.0 72.1 0.5 0.6 23.0 0.9 8.0 2.0 0.4 3.0 0.4 1.0 1.1 11.9 0.8 .7 20.5 66.0 1.2 3.2 2.9 2.1 2.0 5.7 1.3 0.0 2.5 439 348 207 291 282 241 62 413 361 381 364 374 3763 155 3608 3763 Bajour 5.8 41.7 59.9 0.7 58.7 35.5 FR Tank 0.8 10.5 32.0 5.4 0.0 0.6 49.3 1.9 0.7 FR Peshawar 2.3 33.8 7.9 45.2 62.8 22.0 3.5 4.7 58.3 16.7 0.5 1.6 21.1 0.8 87.6 0.5 0.7 65 FR Lakki 0.9 22.0 92.4 1.3 0.Table EN 1d: Use of Un.7 0.0 0.6 5.2 4.8 16.1 0.8 11.1 2.3 2.9 40.5 15.3 20.3 91.0 0.8 Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 0.

0 0.0 0.9 54.7 4.8 12.8 47.0 0.2 48.8 20.0 13.0 0.3 0.6 8.3 22.3 2.4 19.3 19.2 9.5 0.6 15.5 8.2 25.4 45.3 10.5 14.1 27.6 5.3 41.5 31.1 46.4 79.7 42.2 4.0 0.6 0.0 50.6 56.2 17.3 14.3 11.5 42.1 12.1 24.0 0.7 40.3 14.7 15.3 15.7 60.8 8.0 14.5 0.5 18.2 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 66 Agency Urban Khyber Kurram Total Rural Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total MICS FATA Indicato r .4 35.2 21. and mean time to source of drinking water.3 54.0 0.3 42.1 11.8 19.0 0.5 25.5 47.9 12.5 32.6 29.4 44.0 0.2 26.0 1.1 27.4 0.6 2.6 7. 2007 Less than 30 minutes 30 minutes to one hour More than one hour Water on premises Do not Know Total 28.6 12.7 5.Table EN 3: Time to source of water Percentage distribution of households according to time to go to source of drinking water.0 0. get water and return.5 13.0 0. FATA.

87 2.1 0.21 97.1 0.62 95.8 2.5 2.0 0.9 0.87 1.0 0.0 0.5 96.7 0.7 0.5 97.0 0.9 0.6 3.5 6.0 0.0 0.2 5. 2007 Person collecting drinking water Adult man Female child under age 15 Do not know Male child under age 15 Total Number of household Adult Woman 67 76.04 0.9 0.76 1.0 0.Table EN 4: Person collecting water Percent distribution of households according to the person collecting drinking water used in the household.04 1.09 95.41 2.5 0.0 0.5 0.7 0.54 10.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.18 0.0 0.5 0.8 9.5 93.0 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 439 348 207 291 282 241 62 413 361 381 364 374 155 3608 3763 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Rural Urban Total MICS Indicator FATA .0 0.30 10.0 0.2 96.0 0.7 96.0 8.9 0.0 2.00 0.0 0.8 95.5 0.4 96.0 0.0 0.6 2.8 85.4 0.0 0.0 0.7 2.91 2.5 1. FATA.9 98.4 99.2 88.7 0.17 0.0 0.

6 1.5 3.0 0.5 3.3 1.2 5.7 3.4 3.1 0.9 13.1 2.3 37.5 5.7 0.2 12.0 0.1 5.9 12.3 73.4 26.0 0.7 0.1 7.5 66.5 14.0 8.Table EN 5: Use of Sanitary Means of Excreta Disposal Percentage distribution of households population according to type of toilet facility used by the household and the percentage of household population using sanitary means of excreta disposal.7 4.9 4.7 0.9 2.2 4.9 0.3 9.3 70.9 6.7 1.9 28.1 0.1 2.8 14.9 8.6 18.0 0.6 12.0 0.0 5.0 100.9 7.2 2.0 0.1 6.1 12.0 16.6 0.6 2.2 37.2 9.7 0.0 0.3 0.5 38.0 0.0 5.4 0.2 10.3 1.4 23.8 46.9 3.1 17.1 84.5 0.3 25.0 0.4 11.2 4.0 3.8 5.3 4.0 0.9 4.0 0.9 5.0 0.8 2.0 0.3 13.5 4.3 56.5 10.7 3.4 2. 2007 Type of toilet facility used by household Improved sanitation facility* Flush toilet connected to septic tank Pit latrine with flush Open pit Bucket Pit latrine with slab Pit latrine without slab Un improved facility Public toilet Open fields Other Total Flush toilet connected to public sewerage 68 4.7 0.3 1.0 0.7 35.0 5.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.9 10.3 20.4 0.9 0.0 .2 0.3 4.2 67.9 1.5 14.3 0.4 0.0 6.1 0.2 5.0 0.0 0.9 3.0 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Total *MICS indicator 12 *MDG indicator 31 14.2 7.7 3.6 0.3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 0.0 0.4 1.8 3.0 0.0 10.0 12.7 39.1 2.2 1.1 100.9 3.4 0. FATA.5 0.6 16.0 3.0 100.7 4.6 0.0 3.5 1.7 37.2 0.4 54.4 21.2 75.6 7.

7 72. 2007 Number of Person providing antenatal care women age group Medical doctor Total Nurse/ midwife Lady Health Visitor Relative / Friend Any skilled personnel * 1519 2024 2529 Lady Health Worker Traditional Birth Attendant/ Dai No antenatal care received 3034 3539 4044 4549 women who gave birth in the preceding two years Agency 2.4 0.0 55.0 27.1 0.5 35.8 0.0 11.6 100.8 3.9 1.0 4.9 53.0 0.0 8.9 0.0 9.9 2.4 15.7 4.3 Rural 15.8 100.3 Total 18.6 8.5 100.6 10 1 10 5 10 8 0.8 34.1 52.5 4.8 13.8 100.0 1.5 50.0 10.8 3.0 0.0 7 20 37 18 60 37 41 37 17 28 34 58 46 47 60 9 6 16 40 31 27 31 8 4 11 26 18 19 26 6 0 59 10 17 9 22 3 2 12 44 18 50 41 70 87 151 248 172 203 225 FR DI Khan 1.5 0.6 11.8 34.4 1.3 7.5 43.4 Kurram 25.9 0.6 2.6 2.0 4.3 5.8 100.0 1.Table RH.0 35.0 59.0 100.0 0.2 25.0 4.4 2.0 100.9 3.3 Residence 1 50 51 18 232 250 23 267 290 14 146 160 10 102 112 5 118 123 21 149 170 92 1064 1156 Urban 47.6 32.8 FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber 20.6 5.4 23.7 26.3: Antenatal Care Provider Percent distribution of women aged 15-49 who gave birth in the two years preceding the survey by type of personnel providing antenatal care.0 2.9 27.3 30.9 100.2 100.8 1.6 26.0 Orakzai 5.1 Mohmand 6.0 29.0 25.4 * MICS indicator 20 .3 41.3 100.4 5.8 3.7 1.6 2.1 69 4. FATA.8 44.0 45.0 0.0 9.9 6.

9 0.0 100.4 1.0 70 Total Residence 72.9 0.0 0.6 0.2 2.1 0.5 2.0 0.3 0.1 1.1 18.0 4.4 3.9 0.3 0.3 0.0 100.2 2.7 0.5 1.0 100.8 1.6 19.9 0.7 18.0 3.0 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 6.6 1.0 0.0 0.0 92 1064 1156 51 250 290 160 112 123 170 1156 0. 2007 Number of Where Born Person assisting at delivery Others home Total 100.5 0.0 1.3 35-39 68.2 0.0 0.2 14.0 100.2 8.5 1.0 3.5 20.0 0.0 100.0 0.2 Orakzai 89.0 0.8 14.Table RH.9 0.6 4.1 0.0 7.0 100.5 0.0 0.8 0.7 Mohmand 86.0 2.0 100.5 0.0 0.0 1.3 Total 72.1 45-49 73.7 4.0 1.0 100.1 FR Peshawar 78.5 25-29 73.9 Kurram 66.2 3.5 0.0 0.0 2.8 21.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 100.7 0.6 0.5 1.8 9.7 1.0 100.8 2.1 0.7 0.6 .2 17.0 0.6 Urban 21.1 5.0 100.0 100.3 Rural 77.7 0.7 4.5: Assistance during Delivery Proportion of women aged 15-49 with a birth in two years preceding the survey by type of personnel assisting at delivery.0 1.7 4.0 1.4 FR Kohat 82.5 20-24 73.1 0.0 0.2 4.8 4.0 0.0 1.0 100.1 1.7 3.0 0. FATA.0 0.8 17.9 6.9 0.2 Khyber 34.8 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.0 55.0 0.0 0.1 5.6 Age Group 15-19 74.0 4.6 1.8 Total MICS Indicator 4 MDG Indicator 5 72.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 Government Hospital Government clinic/ health center Private hospital Private clinic Private MCH Private Other (specify) At own home women who gave birth in the preceding two years 70 87 151 248 172 203 225 Agency FR DI Khan 95.0 65.5 1.0 100.0 2.1 16.2 1.0 0.0 1.2 3.1 30-34 73.1 5.9 3.6 6.0 1.5 21.0 8.9 18.0 0.6 0.4 2.1 100.6 6.1 0.0 100.8 6.0 40-44 70.0 100.6 3.

01 0. .Table RH.02 0. . 192 27 0. . .8 .02 0. .958 0.53 7. . .01 0. .664 170 19 0.802 211 29 0.18 13.22 11. .43 17. .206 3489 146 9 0. .503 180 13 0. .67 17. .31 11.01 0.00 0.6: Maternal Mortality Ratio Lifetime risk of maternal death and proportion of dead sisters dying of maternal causes.107 1823 0.84 12.71 . 2. .16 8.00 0. .74 14.06 16. . .01 0.343 5382 2559 3091 3305 2820 3375 2137 3917 31898 211 18 0.01 6. 2007 Sisters who reached age 15 (adjusted) Maternal deaths Adjustment factor Sister units of risk exposure Lifetime risk of maternal death Sisters who reached age 15 and who died Percent of dead sisters dying of maternal causes Total fertility rate 10-14 years ago Number of adult household respondents Sisters who reached age 15 Maternal mortality ratio * Respondent age 17035 16939 15692 5088 4655 4121 3133 3523 2167 3917 76270 2613 777 92 332 260 45 304 53 162 27 0.01 0.02 0. FATA. 380 15-19 4044 6435 20-24 2982 6399 71 25-29 2417 5928 30-34 1889 5088 35-39 1690 4655 40-44 1461 4121 45-49 1159 3133 50-54 1338 3523 55-59 839 2167 60+ 1674 3917 Total 19493 45366 * MICS indicator 3 * MDG indicator 16 .9 0. .986 1 .

3 695 623 236 296 357 368 98 777 614 632 645 554 229 5666 5895 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Total * MICS indicator 55 * MDG indicator 6 .8 18.5 42.0 9.3 31.1 50. FATA.2 63.9 115 2907 3022 48.0 37.6 27.7 18.7 25.2 23.5 54.Table ED.5 43.2 28.2 114 2759 2873 355 349 120 166 199 171 65 367 288 296 335 311 11.2 21.0 54.5 41.0 35.6 12.5 39.8 11.8 31.5 57.2 16. 6-10 years age Percentage of children of primary school age (6-10) enrolled in primary school (NER).6 15.8 38.2 19.2 33.8 44.6 29.8 9.8 4.9 40.0 28.1A: Primary School Net Enrolment Rate.0 12.0 17.8 27.5 9.2 41.6 38. 2007 Net enrolment rate male Number of male children Net enrolment rate female Number of female children Total net enrolment rate* Number of children 72 67.3 26.3 340 274 116 130 158 197 33 410 326 336 310 243 22.

5 9.8 1. 2007 Net enrolment rate male Number of male children Net enrolment rate female Number of female children Total net enrolment rate* Number of children 73 9. 10-12 years age Percentage of children of middle school age (10-12) enrolled in middle school (NER).1 19.1 1.5 55 1540 1595 2.4 2.2 0.0 9. FATA.1 5.0 6.1 7.1 14.4 6.1 8.7 11.3 1.6 2.0 2.3 4.4 14.9 74 1331 1405 187 171 74 89 82 114 26 182 149 170 157 194 2.4 5.0 4.7 2.0 2.7 1.9 0.4 4.0 0.Table ED.2 2.8 0.5 144 106 52 85 66 102 21 226 157 173 135 138 4.4 7.5 8.6 11.4 5.4 2.4 5.5 6.02A: Middle School Net Enrolment Rate.6 2.1 5.1 331 277 126 174 148 216 47 408 306 343 292 332 129 2871 3000 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Total * MICS indicator 55 * MDG indicator 6 .4 2.4 0.7 6.

0 2.5 5.4 1.1 1.3 0.7 5.0 4.3 12.9 301 162 97 136 107 192 40 391 334 321 242 277 138 2462 2600 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Total * MICS indicator 55 * MDG indicator 6 .7 1.1 0.9 0.0 4.9 3.3 5.8 1.0 0.4 1. FATA.1 10.0 2.0 145 60 51 67 53 99 22 199 166 178 113 114 4.3 17.4 11.03: Secondary (Metric) School Net Enrolment Rate.9 16. 2007 Net enrolment rate male Number of male children Net enrolment rate female Number of female children Total net enrolment rate Number of children 74 23.9 4. 14-16 years age Percentage of children of secondary (Metric) school age (14-16) enrolled in secondary (Metric) school (NER).0 0.9 4.1 8.9 3.0 0.9 0.4 9.0 6.3 10.4 20.6 3.8 0.3 16.9 74 1193 1267 156 102 46 69 54 93 18 192 168 143 129 163 0.0 0.9 9.0 64 1269 1333 10.0 10.0 3.7 9.Table ED.

8 4 9.3 17.2 16 Gender parity Index (GPI) Primary school NER Secondary school Net enrolment rate female Secondary school Net enrolment rate male Gender parity Index (GPI) Secondary school NER 0.12 0.36 0 0.42 0.2 67 37.6 29.9 4.72 0.30 0.3 26.9 0.8 38.9 0 10.9 16.43 0.5 9.2 63.17 0.4 9.8 1.00 0.2 23.5 43.1 1.37 0 9 2.00 0.07: Gender Parity Index Ratio of girls to boys by Net Enrolment Rate in primary and Secondary (Metric) education.61 0.9 0.3 * MICS indicator 61.91 0.28 0.45 0. MDG indicator 9 .00 0.5 41.4 11.3 10 11.9 23.3 48.40 0.00 0.8 0 0.5 5.9 3.8 18.8 11.46 0.1 50.6 12.2 41.7 0.33 3.1 0 10. 2007 Primary school Net enrolment rate female Primary school Net enrolment rate male 31.4 20.00 0.25 0.17 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat 75 FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Total 17.Table ED.4 1.78 4 0 2 4.19 0.69 3 0.8 9.5 42 35.17 0.9 40 54.38 0.6 15.28 0.7 25.22 0 0.5 39. FATA.00 0.

7 8. 2007 Literacy rate male Number of male Number of female Total Literacy rate female Total number of household member 76 66.7 20.8 16.0 21.4 4.6 16.0 12.6 54.2 3.5 32.7 12.3 35.1 27.7 14.Table ED.1 18.7 11.1 0.6 5.8 517 11086 11603 28.3 20.8 37.3 47.10A: Literacy Rate.4 32.2 0.1 20.4 7.5 1.3 33.5 25.8 7. 10+ years age Percentage of literate population 10+ years. FATA.1 27.5 1131 758 439 783 525 857 199 1418 1151 1177 1114 933 15.9 4.0 15.9 543 9942 10485 1334 984 485 857 598 828 241 1445 1204 1215 1218 1194 4.5 10.4 62.5 31.4 2465 1742 924 1640 1123 1685 440 2863 2355 2392 2332 2127 1060 21028 22088 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Total x MICS indicator 7 x MDG indicator 8 .9 6.1 14.7 25.4 9.5 36.9 54.

4 3.5 7.0 0.2 57. FATA.1 35.6 8.7 10.5 3.0 20.4 34. 2007 Literacy rate male Number of male Literacy rate female Number of female Total literacy rate Total number of household member 77 71. 15+ years age Percentage of literate population 15+ years.6 0.8 37.6 17.5 16.6 34.5 65.5 5.8 419 8841 9260 27.4 4.1 0.2 37.2 13.2 26.6 3.0 10.3 426 7926 8352 1071 752 377 721 485 655 205 1157 973 974 980 910 3.9 12.6 22.4 15.5 29.0 49.10B: Adult Literacy Rate.2 20.0 1979 1370 734 1374 914 1346 369 2261 1890 1861 1885 1629 845 16767 17612 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Total x MICS indicator 60 x MDG indicator 8 .5 32.3 908 618 357 653 429 691 164 1104 917 887 905 719 16.9 28.8 7.7 57.7 27.1 14.6 6.8 21.9 15.5 36.Table ED.3 12.

3 77.3 61.2 47.2 30.9 88.8 52.7 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 676 438 235 476 300 499 99 885 740 737 662 606 6353 336 6017 6353 Sex Male Female Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS Indicator 60 MDG Indicator 8 .6 29.1 11.10C: Youth Literacy Rate (15 -24 year of age) Percentage of literate youth between 15 and 24 years of age FATA.1 16.3 46.0 84.9 83.2 38.8 87.8 38.1 81.Table ED.0 15.1 30.8 67.7 53.8 61.2 12.8 69.9 69.7 75.4 100 100 Literate Total Number 3269 3084 78 38.6 48.0 25.7 23.2 61.0 74.2 32.4 70. 2007 Illiterate 51.3 100 100 100 25.9 18.

0 2.0 0.6 1.6 0.3 0.0 1.2 0.3 0.6 0.2 52.7 5.5 0.5 4.0 1.8 2.0 0.0 0.0 0.9 0.0 0.0 3.5 6.2 0.3 61.2 0.4 3.7 33.6 0.2 6.6 1.0 0.6 45.1 1.2 0.0 3.0 0.0 56.4 68.0 61.5 8.6 0. FATA.0 0.0 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.0 0.5 24.5 3.2 9.3 0.1 0.2 93.0 0.0 6.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 42.5 407 294 171 232 185 291 74 570 430 469 497 6.7 44.0 0.8 1.3 0.3 27.2 0.7 0.5 0.6 58.0 3.0 32.3 0.2 2.5 43.7 45.Table CP 1:Birth Registration Percent distribution of children aged 0-59 months by whether birth is registered and reasons for non registration.0 2.0 86.0 0.0 0.3 70. 2007 Birth is not registered because Number of children aged 0-59 months Cost too much Other Must travel too far Didn’t know child should be registered Late.4 0.0 0.6 2.0 0.0 0.0 27.0 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Total MICS indicator 62 5.0 11.7 0.0 1.4 21.3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 392 233 128 213 160 228 71 457 358 407 435 290 174 3198 3372 0.4 0.4 7.2 0.9 1.3 1. did not want to pay fine Doesn’t know where to register Don't know Total Birth is registered Number of children aged 059 months without birth registration 79 334 200 3754 3954 0.1 13.0 0.5 80.0 8.6 0.1 30.6 33.3 3.3 0.0 0.2 8.0 0.8 30.0 39.0 0.5 27.3 8.0 49.6 12.0 .2 50.0 0.3 0.

9 2.8 7.7 17.8 22.7 1.4 0.8 1.1 16.3 1.2 11.2 2.0 9.0 15.5 0.8 5.6 4.0 15.0 1.9 28.1 Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Residence Urban Rural Age 5-11 years 12-14 years School participation Yes No Total * MICS indicator 71 .2 18.5 0.6 0.4 18.8 4.3 14.5 10.8 5.2 0.6 10.0 4.1 2.1 5.0 3.0 1.6 3.1 6. FATA.0 9.6 1.4 4.0 1.1 80 0.2 7.6 2.8 3.7 11.9 19.1 8.5 2.4 8.2 4.0 17.1 0.2 4.2 16.8 0.6 12.6 2.2 0.4 14.2 0.3 16.4 0.4 0.9 1.9 3.5 6.7 9.4 3.0 0.2 : Child Labor Percentage of children aged 5-14 years who are involved in child labor activities by type of work.4 10.4 2.0 0.5 5.0 4.1 0.9 0.2 21.9 1.6 2.9 8.0 4.6 5.0 17.7 1.0 0.0 0.3 5.7 8.5 25.2 0.5 2.0 1.6 19.2 3. 2007 Working outside household Paid work Unpaid work Household chores for 28+ hours/week Working for family business Total child labor * Sex Male Female 1.4 4.4 0.Table CP.0 9.0 7.8 1.9 16.0 7.0 21.9 3.2 1.

3 0.8 2.8 74.9 2.9 2.6 90.2 87.9 0.4 1.9 0.6 88.2 93. FATA.1 88.9 2.3 .Table HA 1: HIV AIDS Knowledge and Pre vention Proportion of women aged 15-49 having knowledge of HIV AIDS.7 7.3 19.3 2.0 1.0 5.5 1.4 15.6 2.4 4.3 0.3 98.5 1.5 90.6 6.4 1.6 5.3 0.2 75.2 25.0 8.7 17.6 95.7 1.9 7.1 5.0 10.7 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 70 87 151 20 248 172 203 225 138 1314 92 1222 1314 Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA Indicator 56.6 74. 2007 Knowledge about HIV/AIDS prevention Knowledge of 1 prevention method knowledge of 2 prevention methods knowledge of 3 prevention methods Total Number of women No knowledge 81 18.9 2.0 76.0 4.0 2.0 3.3 0.0 6.5 6.0 2.

8 0.0 0.3 78.4 88.7 86.2 81.4 16.3 0.8 2.5 0.2 0.9 0.7 11.1 0.6 10.2 0.0 0.Table HC 1: Type of House Percentage of households by Types of house FATA 2007 Separate house/ compound Apartment/ flat Part of house Part of compound Other Total Agency 82 79.1 2.3 7.0 0.1 79.6 3.8 0.8 0.3 0.8 84.1 2.1 1.9 1.6 95.8 0.6 0.9 0.9 88.0 0.6 84.4 18.2 11.0 0.2 8.2 80.8 4.0 0.9 20.0 0.0 0.0 1.4 0.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 1.6 1.0 0.3 0.5 1.0 0.2 0.3 0.3 11.8 98.4 4.1 85.0 1.6 96.3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator .0 9.5 10.0 13.

5 45.1 3.6 9.4 15.5 8.4 3.6 3.3 100 100 100 0.1 90.6 94.8 86.7 1.4 2.8 81.7 9.0 81.3 32. FATA.1 3.3 83. 2007 Open Fire place Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 1.3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Open Stove Covered stove Total 83 .8 1.2 7.Table HC7: Type of Stove Proportion of households using stove by types.0 1.9 45.5 81.2 5.6 81.4 1.5 3.5 0.8 12.6 20.1 15.2 11.0 97.5 62.7 3.7 15.5 15.0 76.7 14.4 1.0 93.6 2.0 6.0 89.2 91.0 85.

8 29.4 2.8 92. FATA.2 75.7 39.0 1.8 1.5 0.9 2.0 63.2 52.8 7.5 76.0 71.7 79.7 11.4 74.3 46.4 0.Table HC 8: Location of Cooking Place Location of cooking place.0 1.2 21.8 1.5 100 100 100 88.1 83.1 28.0 17.8 21.7 37.9 13.3 75.9 2.3 11.8 5.3 74.4 0.2 22.6 2.5 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 separate kitchen outside of house Total 84 .9 60.2 7.3 2.0 69.9 83.0 0. 2007 With in house Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 61.4 2.2 21.7 26.0 27.

8 0.4 9.1 5.5 25.1 8.Table HC 10: Source of Media Percentage of people using various media sources.7 12.6 51.5 39.2 3.3 28.8 24. 2007 FM Radio Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 9.5 20.2 64.9 13.0 1.4 14.9 22.9 36.5 48.3 35.2 22.9 33.7 46.6 5.4 32.0 10.3 68.7 43.4 15.1 40.3 14.3 85.1 12.3 1.2 2.6 27.1 5.9 43.4 19.2 53.7 3. FATA.6 16.1 6.9 Government Radio Television Newspaper 85 .4 1.5 5.1 21.9 16.7 13.7 33.1 0.2 13.5 5.6 5.5 6.6 12.2 5.9 0.3 0.9 1.2 38.0 43.6 5.6 6.

5 30.0 3.Table HC11: Land Holding Proportion of households having landholding (Acres) by size of farm/land.0 0.8 15.0 1.9 1.0 0.2 15.9 25.9 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1 to < 5 acres 5 to < 10 acres 10 to <15 acres 15 acres and above Total 86 .5 2.5 3.0 2.7 10.8 8.2 32.1 36.4 59.3 2.9 100 100 100 27.9 1.3 10.7 18.5 1.1 65.8 59. 2007 Less than 1acre Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 27.3 3.6 25.3 1.7 11.0 0.3 63.6 33.2 63.1 0.3 2.9 3.0 1.0 19.4 2.1 54.0 1.2 29.5 2.8 68.1 0.0 4.3 2.0 3.3 31.5 7.3 67.4 14.9 11.7 25.1 8.1 18.2 65.5 53.7 46.0 2.6 1.4 35.7 2.6 1.4 3. FATA.9 68.3 5.3 0.1 59.1 2.2 25.3 0.2 59.4 5.2 10.7 2.3 64.4 38.0 3.

Table HC14: Persons Employed Outside Village Proportion of persons employed and their place of employment.4 9.2 40.7 56.7 50.6 47.5 100 100 100 47.8 50.8 25.5 28.7 16.0 35.5 30.5 31.5 6.4 29.5 12.8 50.6 20.8 59.2 40.1 35.9 18.2 74.4 67.6 12.7 16.8 27.4 100 100 100 43.0 24.5 12.3 7.0 41.7 19.1 58.3 10.6 50.3 20.8 24.3 33.6 32.0 50.2 29.4 46.2 49.3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 37.7 8.7 59.5 29.5 70.3 14.8 59.4 49.6 5.4 27.6 24.0 5.4 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 No Total Other village/city Place of employment Other district/agenc y/FR Other province Outside country Total 40.7 32.8 50.3 30.4 42.5 10.1 42.9 57.5 54.1 81.5 42.6 26. FATA.9 41.9 54.8 19.7 4.2 49.0 18.8 23.3 35.7 5.7 20.9 42.9 9.8 6.1 21.3 67.8 26.3 35.3 32.3 48.7 24.5 11.3 MICS FATA Indicator 87 .5 57.4 30.8 18.8 1.6 35. 2007 Persons employed Yes Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total 45.1 10.

4 97.0 0.6 2.5 0.0 97.4 11.9 0.4 0.4 97.2 0.4 0. FATA.3 100.4 10.0 98.0 1.2 0.5 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Rented Government/ subsidized Without rent Total 88 .1 3.8 0.1 1.0 1.0 0.4 16.5 0.0 0.0 84.6 95.0 0.0 1.4 0.2 99.0 0.1 95.0 0.4 0.6 2.3 99.1 1.4 3.5 100 100 100 86.1 98.3 0.7 3.3 0.0 3.3 0.0 0.4 1.7 0. 2007 Own Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 79.4 96.1 1.3 0.5 0.0 0.6 1.5 1.3 2.3 0.Table HC 15 A: Ownership of House Percentage of households who own house.6 99.0 0.4 0.6 2.3 96.2 0.

6 90.9 26.2 5.3 86.Table HC16 : Remittances Received by Households Proportion of households receive remittances from inside the country and abroad.5 16.4 90.2 63.0 89.1 89.1 No 61.4 67.1 No 94.7 53.7 19.9 53.1 42.9 21.1 73.3 80.1 53.8 94.7 90.1 78.5 43.9 Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Number of households 170 74 31 117 152 116 26 178 117 84 102 145 1312 75 1237 1312 Remittances received from abroad Yes 5.4 36.9 Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Number of households 23 34 5 27 5 51 10 20 58 32 48 45 358 21 337 358 89 .1 46.2 8.2 35.2 15.9 60.7 14.9 84.1 39.9 2.5 13. 2007 Remittances received from inside country Yes Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 38.3 45.2 1. FATA.9 10.8 64.8 84.9 46.5 83.6 22.3 28.8 98.1 97.5 86.3 9.9 57.1 15.4 9.8 91.4 77.5 56.6 32.8 36.6 63.7 71.0 10.3 46.7 54.6 9.

2 5.5 97.5 5.8 99.1 99.5 100 99.8 94.4 4.6 95.9 0.6 99.0 0.1 1.5 2.9 98.5 1.5 0.6 1. Money Received As Donation/Zakat/Support Percentage of household who received money as donation/zakat/support.4 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 No Total 90 .5 94.2 0.6 97.4 98. FATA.5 0.7 97.3 2.5 0.5 99.4 100 100 100 0.Table HC 17.5 98. 2007 Yes Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 2.5 99.

3 1.7 98.3 98.1 93.2 2.7 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 No Total 14.6 96.0 94.4 87.2 95.8 97.6 1.8 4.5 96.3 98.5 3.7 1.6 12.3 85.1 10.8 4.2 95.3 97.4 0.9 6.4 98.6 99.9 89.0 5. FATA. 2007 Family members migrated last year Yes Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 2.Table HC18: Seasonal Migration Proportion of households who migrated last year.4 3.7 2.7 100 100 100 91 .

5 32.1 42.8 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Outside village/ward Total 76.8 50.4 33.9 57.Table HC 19: Physical access to School Physical access to school FATA 2007 With in village/ward Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 40.1 56.5 67.0 48.6 79.2 23.7 57.2 41.2 49.1 51.1 66.9 43.6 22.9 48.3 22.7 78.2 50.8 58.4 20.9 33.6 66.8 100 100 100 92 .2 59.3 42.0 51.4 77.8 49.

9 4.7 39.6 8.4 26.9 34.3 0.0 0.9 34.6 17.3 32.0 32.2 3.9 5.5 31.3 37.1 28.0 21.8 51.6 1.0 2. FATA.4 49.5 41.0 11.4 64.3 20.9 4.9 8.3 23.4 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2-5km (0.7 42.1 57.2 36.9 38.2 28.2 23.4 5.9 22.6 4.6 23.8 1.6 11.Table HC 19a: Physical access to School Physical access to school by type of distance.6 13.0 14.8 42.9 23.4 0.5 20.5 31.2 2.3 32. 2007 Distance to School Less than 2 km (1/2hrs) Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 42.8 30.4 32.1 42.5-1hr) Above 5 km (>1hr) Do not know Total 93 .6 2.2 52.8 1.0 56.1 18.0 41.1 7.3 45.5 4.0 26.6 82.

4 95.8 5.4 2.3 1.9 2.9 20.0 4.7 22.1 18.1 18.1 2.8 2.7 0.3 Orakzai South Waziristan Total 69.3 62.0 4.9 87.6 2.6 61.1 27.5 17.6 Domain 15.1 20.5 53.9 1.0 39.8 96.4 39. 2007 Gas Radio TV Telephone Mobile phone Computer Internet AC Fridge/ Freezer Washing Machine Air Cooler Electricity Agency 2.0 1.9 12.1 7.8 1.7 41.7 0.0 9.2 34.1 80.6 1.2 17.6 3.0 Bajour 77.5 1.3 13.9 4.8 22.7 48.1 24.9 4.0 2.9 7.9 63.7 2.6 58.6 55.7 58.7 94 FR Tank 70.1 67.7 Rural 68.6 34.4 61.8 19.6 73.0 74.1 49.5 7.9 5.3 49.7 1.7 MICS FATA indicator .3 17.7 56.0 7.0 9.3 15.3 68.0 7.3 FR DI Khan 72.9 11.4 61.5 55.9 7.7 57.1 2.5 33.2 6.6 7.6 70.6 17.4 Total 69.2 2.6 2.9 85.5 Khyber 99.6 14.7 Mohmand 72.2 29.4 43.4 9.2 8.6 3.3 9.4 6.0 8.3 1.4 3.5 1.5 1.7 55.8 42.8 74.4 45.9 2.7 8.8 16.7 27.7 14.0 1.5 10.0 39.7 18.3 21.9 22.0 FR Kohat 99.9 64.6 3.2 43.9 25.2 10.6 61.5 45.8 69.2 0.7 85.3 Kurram 63.3 76.9 15.5 8.1 86.6 18.9 0.0 17.7 96.3 2.3 FR Bannu 23.1 38.8 4.9 1.8 57.9 57.9 64.4 37.9 11.9 26.4 1.7 FR Lakki 08.1 18.5 7.6 29.3 1.8 28.3 7.3 16.6 6.Table HC 20: Availability of Facilities Percentage of people having facilities by kind.9 3.9 2.3 2.1 5.7 68.1 3.2 28.5 0.6 15.8 0.9 7.0 0.8 10.6 55.1 40. FATA.7 Urban 98.5 19.5 2.7 FR Peshawar 94.

9 1.1 4.8 21.9 3.8 0.1 FR Peshawar 12.1 2.1 2.7 8.9 .9 15.5 4.5 1.6 2.8 3.7 1.5 4.8 14.3 4.7 0.7 0.2 2.7 17.4 12.4 2.7 6.7 7.5 5.5 5.Table HC 22: Population by agency and age-group in FAT A.8 3.5 9.3 2.6 2.3 3.4 5.2 FR Tank 10.1 6.9 16.1 1.7 9.8 14.5 11.0 5.4 2.1 13.8 13.3 4.8 2.3 3.1 95 14.4 11.9 Orakzai South Waziristan 13.7 1.0 17.0 10.1 2.0 5.7 14.3 14.8 4.1 6.7 FR Kohat 10.1 5.9 0.7 3.1 12.4 8.2 5.1 4.0 4.8 4.7 4.9 3.2 1.6 12.4 1.5 2.3 FR Lakki 12.5 13.0 3.2 14.1 2.9 6.4 6.8 2.9 21.5 1.4 11.7 3.5 7.5 4.7 4.6 2.9 1.7 9.1 13.6 13.4 Rural 12.8 0.4 8.4 2.4 15.0 6.9 10.9 0.1 2.2 6.3 3.7 1.4 Kurram 11.4 0.9 2.5 7.9 15.3 2.6 5.4 5. MICS 2007 Age groups 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70+ Total 0-4 5-9 10-14 Agency 14.5 3.8 0.0 7.2 2.1 5.9 0.6 1.5 2.0 5.5 3.1 Total 12.1 MICS FATA indicator 16.0 9.9 4.9 9.8 FR Bannu 11.3 3.1 2.6 3.7 0.4 2.0 1.9 2.6 Residence 3.0 4.8 4.5 12.1 5.0 3.4 17.7 5.8 7.9 2.0 1.2 4.8 4.8 10.9 2.4 2.6 7.2 5.8 12.2 3.2 5.7 11.3 3.5 9.0 16.5 3.5 7.5 10.1 7.3 4.4 6.2 7.5 2.6 8.1 4.2 14.1 Mohmand 12.4 2.9 0.9 4.4 2.0 16.7 5.3 8.8 4.0 1.1 3.8 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Bajour 11.0 2.4 14.7 100 100 100 Urban 13.9 3.1 8.5 5.0 3.9 6.5 11.8 18.4 4.8 Khyber 13.1 4.1 6.7 8.2 4.3 0.3 3.1 3.6 1.4 2.9 5.5 FR DI Khan 11.4 2.3 9.1 11.5 4.7 0.6 7.9 3.2 3.5 13.5 14.8 11.8 2.9 3.1 16.

3 13.0 90.8 92.3 9.0 25.7 100 100 100 95.9 1.1 98.1 78.4 94.3 4.7 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 No Total 96 .9 10.1 89.1 11.9 21. 2007 Yes Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 51.0 74.9 88.6 5.2 7.0 9.9 89. FATA.7 86.9 89.3 49.Table HC 23: Owned Livestock Last Year Proportion of households having livestock last year.1 10.7 90.2 0.1 10.1 5.8 100.9 94.

0 0.6 6.4 4.2 Kurram 64.0 0.2 0.0 0.1 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 70 87 151 21 263 179 205 225 140 1341 FR DI Khan 95.3 16.6 0.3 7.7 Rural 79. 2007 Institutional Delivery Private Governm ent other (specify) Private hospital Private clinic Private MCH Total Others home Government Governm ent Government clinic/he Hospital alth center 0.0 0.2 0.1 14.4 3.0 0.0 0.0 1. FATA.0 1.0 1.9 0.0 0.1 3.3 3.6 7.0 Orakzai 86.0 0.8 1.0 1.0 0.6 1.0 0.2 6.6 0.3 0.0 2.8 100 100 100 92 1249 1341 Urban 25.0 1.0 3.2 6.2 3.1 0.2 Total 76.1 1.0 1.2 1.0 0.5 14.0 0.0 7.2 FR Kohat 84.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 5.8 0.4 Mohmand 89.6 12.0 0.2 Residence 8.2 FR Peshawar 74.0 1.4 1.4 12.8 3.6 0.0 8.0 0.6 1.8 8.0 0.3 0.6 0.2 0.1 24.Table MN8:Institutional Deliveries Proportion of women aged 15-49 having live birth in the preceding 2 years in any institution.6 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.3 0.7 0.0 1.0 0.9 South Waziristan 65.9 9.2 MICS FATA indicator .8 1.1 0.2 3.5 Khyber 37.8 Number of women who have given birth to a child Home Agency 0.4 0.2 7.0 58.7 97 0.7 1.4 3.0 Total 76.1 3.0 0.5 52.3 FR Tank 87.

00 100.67 12.08 31.32 16.00 100.70 5.00 100.46 73.77 18.00 0.00 100.60 2.88 20.27 11.12 12.00 Yes-card not shown No Do not know Total 98 .53 0.59 20.51 1.70 0.00 100.24 1.14 29.65 26.14 100.Table TT1: TT Shots Received Proportion of women having birth to live child during last 2 years and received TT shots.76 20.14 100.00 100.08 8.56 48.74 79.08 0.93 0.33 64.33 18.14 16.62 7.47 43.00 3.00 0.08 33.03 65.00 1.00 100.59 62.44 52.00 100.08 86.85 31.63 14.20 42.00 100. FATA. 2007 TT1-Women give live birth in the past two years FATA 2007 Yes-card shown Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 35.98 16.00 0.56 62.

2 42.2 0.4 100 11.5 FR Tank 0.3 100 13.6 100 15.0 62.0 0.6 11.7 100 100 1.7 10.5 2.7 71.6 100 0.0 100 29.0 100 0.2 21.0 0.1 100 32.3 53.3 0.2 11.6 2.6 12.6 80.3 85.7 1.6 11.4 6.0 100 6.0 38.3 100 100 100 92 1249 1341 Urban 72.1 Kurram 40.Table TT1a : TT Shots Coverage Proportion of women aged 15-49 who received TT coverage during last pregnancy.2 Orakzai 20.7 51.7 14.0 0.0 0.7 13.7 69.5 2.0 Total TT during last pregnancy No Do not know Yes Number of women who have given birth to a child 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 70 87 151 21 263 179 205 225 140 Agency FR DI Khan 88.7 33.2 0.6 0.4 2.0 9.5 79.9 44.9 Mohmand 18.3 10.5 88.7 South Waziristan 27.3 62.3 58.5 15.4 Residence 33.0 MICS FATA Indicator .8 0.6 100 27.8 1.2 Rural 25.6 Total 28.5 74.9 82.0 Khyber 60.9 0.1 28.8 99 26.5 69.0 100 3.4 2. FATA.5 53.7 18.7 67.8 FR Kohat 46. 2007 Last pregnancy TT covering by seen and recall Total Yes-card shown No Yes-card not shown Do not know 8.7 71.3 2.1 56.0 0.2 1.9 FR Peshawar 43.2 6.3 100.

65 1.72 Urban 74.54 20.61 Kurram 38.68 1.86 .58 22.56 0.80 70.39 Orakzai 22.51 Total MICS FATA Indicator 36.18 0.86 Residence 39.34 56.90 0.34 Total 36.72 100 24.49 60.02 FR Peshawar 46.66 62.03 83.61 79.98 4.0 7. 2 007 TT in last pregnancy No Do not know Yes No TT before last pregnancy Do not know Yes Agency 88.08 22.12 Rural 33.00 0.53 0.41 15.87 58.72 FR DI Khan 10.79 Mohmand 19.0 31.87 0.17 FR Kohat 48.85 0.77 76.26 1. FATA.68 0.73 36.28 53.Table TT5: TT Shots Received Proportion of women having birth to live child during last 2 years and received TT shots.02 87.84 1.64 62.69 7.02 78.44 1.27 1.0 1.72 90.77 13.20 66.27 0.61 1.71 65.26 2.20 28.96 1.08 77.26 5.24 76.27 Khyber 61.55 86.68 39.14 51.02 0.

77 8.91 40.25 59.27 MICS FATA Indicator .67 1.46 5.91 3.70 2. 2007 If Yes then No. FATA.51 FR Peshawar 0.00 2 3 4 5 0.00 0.80 Kurram 0.00 Mohmand 0.60 85.96 8.00 Total 0.00 16.80 3.51 2.0 Khyber 0.95 33.0 Total 0.03 30.13 2.36 57.13 2.67 Rural 0.51 31.95 1.41 2.29 62.13 5.Table TT6: TT Shots Received Proportion of women having birth to live child during last 2 years and received TT shots.49 64.00 10.38 69.67 4.60 25.27 Residency 1.89 4.40 3.38 2.67 54.72 57.0 1. of times 1 0.11 59.28 2.00 101 1.16 27.38 4.00 Orakzai 0.81 0.00 0.41 1.80 3.49 20.70 0.45 100 100 100 Urban 1.22 3.00 36.00 FR Kohat 0.45 Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 0 Agency FR DI Khan 0.16 33.36 71.33 2.00 60.75 0.

00 No Do not know Total 102 .65 1.16 75.00 100.00 100.Table VA1: Vitamin A taken Proportion of children aged below 5 years who taken Vitamin-A.58 1.70 23.43 23.11 11.37 74.18 77.33 9.08 75.00 87.58 0.63 23.27 0.67 89.31 100.11 12.12 38. 2007 Vitamin A eaten Yes Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA Indicator 87.00 100.00 100.00 0.35 23.64 20.00 100.18 2.31 100.00 100.05 24.19 77.69 0.65 75.94 2.62 74.58 1.00 100.29 1.50 1.54 22. FATA.19 60.00 100.00 100.

FATA.38 0.0 1.17 0.4 22.0 1.5 Residence 38.00 10.7 1.4 0.1 3.0 0.0 0.3 5.4 25.0 4.2 12.4 2.3 0.5 Total 21.2 0.3 20.31 3.1 2.7 5.5 49.0 5.8 3.0 0.14 31.0 0.4 1.0 0.8 Kurram 8.5 28.1 10.4 0.85 20.0 0.78 3.40 0.7 0.2 3.4 FR Kohat 90.1 0.Table VA2: Vitamin A taken by Months Proportion of children aged below 5 years who have taken Vitamin A by months.2 0.2 0.8 12.3 0.32 1.46 MICS FATA indicator .83 1.8 0.7 3.8 25.71 8.82 3.0 0.32 5.0 1.0 3.0 0.0 9.7 33.6 9.3 0.3 Orakzai 5.6 42.0 0.49 Total 21.6 0.0 0.3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 FR DI Khan 9.3 3.5 Mohmand 21.0 17.7 7.0 14.61 0.34 100 100 100 Urban 1.0 0.7 0.19 0.27 3.0 0.6 30.5 0.5 15.42 3.27 3.66 4.0 0.3 0.8 0.0 2.90 4.3 5.83 Rural 23.0 1.5 0.2 8.1 0.08 0.8 0.0 0.8 0.5 FR Peshawar 0.2 0.49 21.1 16.7 0.3 0.0 8.0 0.01 1.9 3.0 4.4 1.54 Khyber 26.66 1.0 0.88 5.0 0.27 4.8 6.2 7.22 3.0 2.0 0.38 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6 0.0 1.9 14.0 0.41 27.02 3.27 28.31 1.0 12.0 103 5. 2007 When did Vitamin A taken-months 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 4 Month 5 Month 6 Month 7 Month 8 Month 9 Month 10 Month 11 Month 12 Month Total 0 Month Agency 74.

67 97.52 2.92 97.20 98.02 2.50 0.Table VA3: Vitamin A taken by source Proportion of children aged below 5 years who took Vitamin-A by source.00 5.08 0.00 97.96 95.43 1.54 1.81 0.50 2.02 1.22 99.52 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Health centre visited for illness National polio day Total 104 .52 0.72 0.52 100 100 100 0. 2007 Where from the last dose of Vitamin-A taken Health centreroutine Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 1.00 0.96 99. FATA.17 98.30 0.36 0.91 97.53 1.78 0.47 93.21 97.80 0.36 1.50 1.

Table CA5: Children aged below 5 years having Cough
Percentage of children aged 0-59 months with Cough in the last two weeks, FATA, 2007 Cough in past 2 weeks
Yes Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA Indicator 15.51 13.93 14.06 83.96 86.07 85.90 0.53 0.00 0.04 29 294 323 4.93 12.81 19.47 14.96 14.44 13.37 14.13 14.06 95.07 87.19 80.53 85.04 85.29 86.63 85.87 85.90 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.27 0.00 0.00 0.04 7 26 44 73 54 56 63 323 No Do not know Number of children aged 059 months with Cough

105

Table CA 10: Medicine given for Illness
Proportion of children aged below 5 years who got sick and received medication, FATA, 2007
Medicine given for illness Yes Agency FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Peshawar Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA Indicator 100.0 87.1 88.3 0.0 12.9 11.7 100 100 100 40.0 100.0 78.7 90.9 92.3 97.6 86.2 88.3 60.0 0.0 21.3 9.1 7.7 2.4 13.8 11.7 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 No Total

106

Table CA 6: Prevalence of Cough (Suspected TB)
Proportion of population having cough more than three weeks, FATA, 2007
Cough more than three weeks Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total MICS FATA indicator 0.1 0.5 0.5 1452 29661 31113 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.2 0.1 2.7 0.5 0.5 3411 2615 1303 2120 1699 2295 608 4054 3225 3362 3406 3015 31113 Total number of household members

107

Table WS 10 A: Washing Hands after using Toilet

Percentage of person who wash hands after using toilet, FATA, 2007
All members without soap Do not Wash No reply 0.2 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Few members with soap few members without soap 0.0 1.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Do not know Total

All members with soap

108
51.0 13.0 14.5 1.0 4.5 0.6 2.0 1.7 1.2 4.0 3.4 4.1 0.8 2.2 11.4 2.8 4.6 4.1 38.1 65.6 64.5 9.0 11.5 11.4 0.6 4.8 4.6 9.6 5.5 10.7 8.1 8.7

13.3 0.6 6.8 37.2 0.0 25.7 1.3 25.6 27.2 9.7 1.9 12.5 14.5 1.3 0.2 0.3 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.2 1.3 4.7 4.5 16.0 21.3 14.2 18.0 17.1 0.0 0.2 0.2

71.9 76.1 49.3 21.8 85.6 55.9 81.8 55.3 61.2 74.7 75.4 66.1 64.5

12.4 5.1 16.4 32.9 14.4 15.5 3.9 11.0 3.1 6.5 2.5 15.7 11.4

1.8 9.9 14.5 7.7 0.0 1.6 5.2 4.7 1.3 3.9 3.8 5.3 4.6

0.2 6.5 13.0 0.3 0.0 1.2 0.0 3.1 6.9 5.2 16.1 0.0 4.5

6.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.3 0.0 0.3 0.3

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Agency Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat FR Lakki FR Peshawar FR Tank Khyber Kurram Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence Urban Rural Total Age 5-11 years 12-14 years School participation Yes No Total * MICS indicator 71

2 1.3 90.0 0.6 9.6 0.0 0.1 70.5 4.9 12.0 0.0 0.9 65.0 0.7 0.0 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 0.0 8.8 4.9 71.9 3.0 Bajour FR Bannu FR DI Khan FR Kohat 0.0 6.1 3.6 77.0 0.0 0.1 Kurram 20.0 0.0 0.7 4.7 5.0 0.5 5. FATA.8 3.7 19.1 1.7 0.6 1.0 0.0 0.2 FR Tank Khyber 21.0 9.0 7.0 0.0 100 100 100 Urban 44.0 0.0 0.3 0.4 FR Lakki 109 0.4 9.0 0.0 0.9 61.2 13.4 2.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 15.7 8.4 9.8 10.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 54.0 0.0 10.9 9.5 3.1 1.8 FR Peshawar 19.8 98.0 0.0 4.0 10.9 4.0 0.Table WS10 B Washing Hands before Taking Meal Percentage of person who wash hands before taking meal.3 Mohmand Orakzai South Waziristan Total Residence 1.1 11.0 77.0 10.7 11.5 Rural Total MICS FATA I ndicator .8 43.0 79.8 8.5 2.1 1.0 4.3 0.6 4. 2007 All members with soap Do not Wash No reply All members without soap Few members with soap few members without soap Do not know Total Agency 8.3 66.0 0.3 76.5 77.8 2.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 70.0 0.6 5.0 0.0 1.9 19.0 0.0 12.0 0.6 13.0 54.0 0.0 0.0 0.

MICS FATA.Percentage of households selected. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Peshawar FR Kohat 110 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .

2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Peshawar FR Kohat 111 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan . MICS FATA.Underweight children below 5 Years age <2SD.

MICS FATA.Underweight children below 5 Years age <3SD. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber FR Peshawar FR Kohat Kurram Orakzai 112 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .

2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Peshawar FR Kohat 113 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .Percent of households with improved drinking water. MICS FATA.

Percent of HH with Improved Sanitation. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Peshawar FR Kohat 114 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan . MICS FATA.

2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Peshawar FR Kohat 115 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan . MICS FATA.Percent of HH spent above one 1 hr in fetching water.

MICS FATA.Percent of children as child labor. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Peshawar FR Kohat 116 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .

Literacy rate of male 10+ years age. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Kohat 117 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan . MICS FATA.

MICS FATA.Literacy rate of female 10+ years age. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Kohat 118 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .

10+ years age. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Kohat 119 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .Literacy rate of both sexes. MICS FATA.

MICS FATA. 15+ years age.Literacy rate of male. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Kohat 120 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .

15+ years age. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Kohat 121 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .Literacy rate of female. MICS FATA.

MICS FATA. 2007 Bajaur Mohmand Khyber Kurram Orakzai FR Kohat 122 FR Bannu FR Lakki FR Tank FR DI Khan North Waziristan South Waziristan .Literacy rate of both sexes 15+ years age.

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