The Vocab Weekly

Flagrant

Flagrant Some people have a flagrant lifestyle or worse flagrant dressing style, which means both are evident or so shocking that you cannot help, but notice them. It is an adjective. Its first usage dates back to 1400-50 and it is late Middle English word. It has originated from Latin word Flagrant, present participle of flagrare. Pronunciation: fley-gruhnt The dictionary definitions for flagrant are as follows: 1) Something shockingly noticeable 2) Infamous, scandalous/shameful/ shocking Master tip to learn flagrant: Flagrant can be learnt easily by associating it with the word fragrant, as flagrant and fragrant rhyme with each other, the only difference is of ‘r’ and ‘l’. Further, fragrance can also be flagrant (shockingly noticeable) Flagrant can be used in the following ways: 1) His appearance was flagrant. (Adjective) 2) It was a flagrant a flagrant felony. (Adjective) 3) He was flagrantly dressed. ( Adverb) 4) Flagrantness of his behaviour has always led him in trouble. ( Noun)

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The Vocab Weekly

Hoodwink

Hoodwink If only all cars had this ability: to bamboozle and hoodwink even the ‘reaper’ (read symbol of death). If they had, we would have escaped all nasty accidents. Meanings of Hoodwink 1. To deceive or get the better of (someone) by trickery, flattery, or the like; humbug. 2. To perplex; mystify; confound. Pronunciation: hood-wingk

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The Vocab Weekly

Frenzy

Frenzy Frenzy can be confusing, as it can be a state of excitement and eve a state of total derangement of mental state or motions. And it is a noun. Its first usage goes back to 1300-50. Pronunciation: fren-zee The dictionary definitions of frenzy are as follows: 1) As a noun a. A state of mental agitation or excitement 2) As a verb a. To drive someone into frenzy or to make hysterical Master tip to learn frenzy: Frenzy can be learnt easily by associating the word with phrensy, as the two words rhyme. Frenzy is the new usage for phrensy and the meaning for both the words is same. Further, next closest word to frenzy is fury, as fury and frenzy can mean the same thing. Fury can also drive someone in frenzy. Frenzy can be used in the following ways: 1) Multitude was driven into frenzy when thy saw ninety percent discount on jewellery. (Noun) 2) For her acrophobia results in many frenzies during a single month. (Plural) 3) Deadlock in her professional sphere frenzied her beyond repair. (Verb)

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Incongruous

The Vocab Weekly

Incongruous Even if two incompatible people are together it is only a matter of time that they will realise that how incongruous they are to each other, eventually breaking apart. It is an adjective and its first usage dates back to 1611. Pronunciation: in-kong-groo-uhs The dictionary definitions for incongruous are as follows: 1) Something out of place for a situation or a place 2) Incompatible/inharmonious 3) Something not conforming to ideologies etc. 4) Inconsistent within itself Master tip o learn incongruous: Incongruous can be easily learnt by associating it with a mathematical term that still might be haunting some people .i.e. incongruent triangles/angles, meaning not equal to each other. Incongruous can be used in the following ways: 1) He is incongruous to bias of any kind. (Adjective) 2) Incongruity (state of being incongruous) of her behaviour ruined everything. (Noun) 3) Her hysteria was incongruous to the situation. (Adjective)

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Laceration

The Vocab Weekly

Laceration Most self-laceration is more noisy than painful. Mason Cooley. So lets try and understand this quote by first trying to understand the word “laceration”. Pronunciation :las-uh-rey-shuhn Dictionary definitons: 1. to tear (the flesh, etc) jaggedly 2. to hurt or harrow (the feelings, etc) 3 .having edges that are jagged or torn; Master tip to learn the word : The word can be thought of asLASERationi.e the use of LASER and when laser action is performed on our body it is expected to cause some damage like a cut or a wound. This is how laseration can be linked to it’s meaning of being torn or hurt. Usage examples : 1. One of them slipped and fell 20 ' breaking his arm and sustaining facial lacerations. 2. The cause of death, the medical examiner's office said, was a liver laceration caused by blunt trauma to the torso. 3. He dropped the angle grinder onto his ankle causing a severe laceration. 4. I've got multiple lacerations on my head from all the glass ceilings i broke on my way up!

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Mundane

Mundane It is the ordinary things in life that give us pleasure, but perhaps mundane is not the right word to be used for that. Mundane is also ordinary, but has more of a boring ring to it. It is an adjective. Its first usage dates back to 15th century. Pronunciation: muhn-deyn, muhn-deyn The dictionary definitions for mundane are as follows: 1) Something ordinary and unimaginative 2) Something that has characteristic of the world .i.e. practical/having worldly/earthly characteristics Master tip to learn mundane: Mundane can be learnt easily by associating the word with an ordinary day in your life, which can be the easiest association. Further, getting up to go to office everyday is mundane too. Mundane can be used in the following ways: 1) Every Monday is perceived to be a mundane day. (Adjective) 2) Mundaneness of this masquerade made it a damp squib. (Noun) 3) He mundanely enhanced the web page of his company. (Adverb)

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Scoff

Scoff Middle English scof, Scandinavian origin; akin to obsolete Danish skof jest; akin to Old Frisian skof mockery. Pronunciation :skawf, skof Dictionary definitions : 1. To mock at or treat with derision. 2. To show or express derision or scorn. 3. To eat (food) quickly and greedily. 4. An expression of mockery, derision, doubt, or derisive scorn; jeer Master tip to learn the word : Remember those group of “ mean girls “ in school who were always into showoff ( this word somehow sounds like scoff, doesn’t it ? ) . Another thing you’ll remember about them is how everyone in school used to mock them behind their back . So there you have it , remember “scoff” by how you used to mock these “showoff” girls . Usage examples : 1. She scoffed three hamburgers and a large order of fries. 2. If you can't do any better, don't scoff. 3. Their efforts toward a peaceful settlement are not to be scoffed at.

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Work Out Zone
Work Out 1: Match the following words with their respective meanings or synonyms. Word 1 Flagrant 2 Hoodwink 3 Incongruous 4 Laceration 5 Mundane 6 Scoff 7 Frenzy Meaning or Synonym A inconsistent B routine C insanity D gross E tear F hoax G mock

Work Out 2: Did you really understand the word? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Flagrant appearances are pleasing The guys hoodwinked to fool everyone. Exercise and fitness are incongruous things. Lacerating the feelings of others is appreciated. Mundane things excite people. The child started crying after being scoffed at. Festivals send kids into a state of frenzy. yes yes yes yes yes yes yes no no no no no no no

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Answers: Work Out Zone
Work Out 1 1-D, 2-F, 3-A, 4-E, 5-B, 6-G, 7-C Work Out 2 1-no, 2-yes, 3-no, 4-no, 5-no, 6-yes, 7-yes

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