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Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 57
SCIENTISTS CHARGED
WORLD PAGE 35
MARKET WAITS
FOR ELECTION
BUSINESS PAGE 10
ENERGY DRINK
TIED TO DEATHS
HEALTH PAGE 21
SEVEN EXPERTS CONVICTED FOR NOT WARNING OF QUAKE RISK
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO In a postseason
full of twists and turns, the San
Francisco Giants are headed back to the
World Series after a big comeback
against the defending champs.
Hunter Pence got the Giants going
with a weird double, Matt Cain pitched
his second clincher of October and San
Francisco closed out Game 7 of the NL
championship series in a driving rain-
storm, routing the
St. Louis
Cardinals 9-0
Monday night.
San Francisco
won its record-
tying sixth elimi-
nation game of the
postseason, com-
pleting a lopsided
rally from a 3-1
decit.
The Giants, who won it all in 2010,
will host Justin Verlander, Miguel
Cabrera and the Detroit Tigers in Game
1 on Wednesday night.
Verlander is set to pitch Wednesdays
opener. Giants manager Bruce Bochy
insisted before Mondays game he had
not planned any further in advance.
Series MVP Marco Scutaro produced
his sixth multihit game of the series and
matched an LCS record with 14 hits and
Pablo Sandoval drove in a run for his
Oh yes they did!
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
While Community Gatepath serves the
needs of people living with developmen-
tal disabilities and the people who care
for them here in San Mateo County, it
also created an online resource called
AbilityPath that connects resources to
tens of thousands of parents of children
with special needs across the entire
United States.
The website offers practical tips and
AbilityPath an online resource
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Monica Garcia has had lots and lots
and lots of jobs.
She has worked at Safeway,
Starbucks, CVS Pharmacy, Holiday Inn,
Red Roof Inn, Burger King, Ross Dress
for Less, Mills-Peninsula Health
Services and Menlo College among oth-
ers.
At 39 years old, the San Carlos resi-
dent is still looking for the right job and
is willing to train herself for it.
Born with a developmental disability,
Garcia maintains a dream of becoming
more independent, to one day perhaps
live on her own, pay the bills and maybe
even have a boyfriend.
For now, though, she lives in a group
home in San Carlos with seven other
people who also have developmental
disabilities.
Garcia considers herself to be the
most independent person living in the
house but also understands she has a lot
of goals to achieve before she can maybe
live on her own one day.
For now, though, she considers her
roommates to be her extended family.
The Woodside High School graduate
never met her father, he died in a motor-
cycle accident, and her mother now lives
in Oregon. She was essentially raised by
her grandparents, who she only sees on
the holidays, and has a half-brother who
is a tattoo artist.
Garcia, in fact, is one of the few peo-
ple you will ever meet with a develop-
mental disability who has a tattoo its
a sunower on her arm courtesy of her
Home life, work and
goals for the future
Giants on to World Series with 9-0 win over Cards
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Monica Garcia, 39, depends on SamTrans to get back and forth from job training
services in Burlingame to the group home she lives at in San Carlos.
This is the second of a three-part series on
living life with a developmental disability as
October is Disabilities Awareness Month.Part
I focused on early intervention. Part II will
focus on living in group homes and the
challenges in nding work. Part III will
highlight a woman with Down Syndrome
who leads an independent life.
REUTERS
Marco Scutaro celebrates in the rain with his MVP trophy after
being named most valuable player after his team defeated
the St. Louis Cardinals during Game 7.
REUTERS
Barack Obama and Mitt Romney during last nights nal
presidential debate in Boca Raton, Fla.
Final debate
By David Espo and Kasie Hunt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOCA RATON, Fla. President Barack Obama sharply
challenged Mitt Romney on foreign policy in their nal cam-
paign debate Monday night, accusing him of wrong and reck-
less leadership that is all over the map. The Republican cool-
ly responded, Attacking me is not an agenda for dealing with
a dangerous world.
With just 15 days remaining in an impossibly close race for
the White House, Romney took the offensive, too. When
Obama said the U.S. and its allies have imposed crippling
College district may reject TV bids
Station losing money, bids prove problematic
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Plans to sell KCSM-TV may have hit a roadblock as the San
Mateo County Community College District staff is suggesting
the board reject all bids Wednesday.
After struggling for years to eliminate the $1 million operat-
ing decit for KCSM-TV, the San Mateo County Community
See MONICA, Page 25 See ONLINE, Page 26
See GIANTS, Page 14
See KCSM-TV, Page 8
See DEBATE, Page 26
Obama and Romney
find little to agree on
See page 11
Inside
World Series: Cabrera,
Tigers vs Posey, Giants
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Parodist Weird Al
Yankovic is 53.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1942
During World War II, Britain launched
a major offensive against Axis forces at
El Alamein in Egypt, resulting in an
Allied victory.
Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly
strong, have governed my life: the longing for
love, the search for knowledge and unbearable
pity for the suffering of mankind.
Bertrand Russell, English philosopher (1872-1970)
Movie director
Sam Raimi is 53.
CNN medical
reporter Dr. Sanjay
Gupta is 43
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
Muslim pilgrims circle the Kaaba and pray at the Grand mosque during the annual haj pilgrimage in the holy city of Mecca.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Scattered show-
ers. Highs in the lower 60s. South winds 5
to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy. A slight
chance of showers in the evening...Then a
chance of showers after midnight. Lows in
the lower 50s. South winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday: A chance of showers in the
morning...Then showers likely in the afternoon. Highs in the
lower 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
The article County looks at banning plastic bags in the
Monday, Oct. 22 edition of the Daily Journal had incorrect
information. The Board of Supervisors meeting is Oct. 23.
Correction
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.04 Big Ben
in rst place; No.07 Eureka in second place; and
No. 01 Gold Rush in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:48.07.
(Answers tomorrow)
TROLL TREND WEIGHT VALLEY
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: He was bummed after failing to clear the
hurdle, but he would GET OVER IT
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MOVNE
PATDO
BBOWEC
CANREP
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

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n

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Print your
answer here:
7 4 8
14 34 36 48 53 42
Mega number
Oct. 19 Mega Millions
9 10 15 26 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 0 0 4
Daily Four
8 3 2
Daily three evening
In 1862, King Otto of Greece was deposed in a revolt.
In 1915, tens of thousands of women marched in New York
City, demanding the right to vote.
In 1932, comedian Fred Allen began his rst regular radio
show for CBS, The Linit Bath Club Revue.
In 1935, mobster Dutch Schultz, 34, was shot and mortally
wounded with three other men during a gangland hit at the
Palace Chophouse in Newark, N.J. (Schultz died the following
day.)
In 1954, West Germany was invited to join the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization, which it did the following year.
In 1956, a student-sparked revolt against Hungarys
Communist rule began; as the revolution spread, Soviet forces
started entering the country, and the uprising was put down
within weeks.
In 1972, the musical Pippin opened on Broadway.
In 1980, the resignation of Soviet Premier Alexei N. Kosygin
was announced.
In 1983, 241 U.S. service members, most of them Marines,
were killed in a suicide truck-bombing at Beirut International
Airport in Lebanon; a near-simultaneous attack on French
forces killed 58 paratroopers.
In 1987, the U.S. Senate rejected, 58-42, the Supreme Court
nomination of Robert H. Bork.
In 1992, Japanese Emperor Akihito began a visit to China, the
rst by a Japanese monarch.
In 1995, a jury in Houston convicted Yolanda Saldivar of mur-
dering Tejano singing star Selena. (Saldivar is serving a life
prison sentence.)
Ten years ago: Gunmen seized a crowded Moscow theater,
taking hundreds hostage and threatening to kill their captives
unless the Russian army pulled out of Chechnya.
Baseball Hall of Famer and former U.S. Senator Jim Bunning,
R-Ky., is 81. Movie director Philip Kaufman is 76. Soccer great
Pele (pay-lay) is 72. Rhythm-and-blues singer Barbara Ann
Hawkins (The Dixie Cups) is 69. ABC News investigative
reporter Brian Ross is 64. Actor Michael Rupert is 61. Movie
director Ang Lee is 58. Jazz singer Dianne Reeves is 56. Country
singer Dwight Yoakam is 56. Community activist Martin Luther
King III is 55. Rock musician Robert Trujillo (Metallica) is 48.
Christian/jazz singer David Thomas (Take 6) is 46. Rock musi-
cian Brian Nevin (Big Head Todd and the Monsters) is 46.
Country singer-musician Junior Bryant is 44.
Flavor Flav to fight
domestic abuse charges
LAS VEGAS Flavor Flav intends to
ght criminal charges and seek reconcil-
iation with his long-
time ancee after an
argument led to his
arrest last week, the
entertainers lawyer
said Monday.
The 53-year-old
former rap, hip-hop
and reality TV star,
whose legal name is
William Jonathan
Drayton Jr., didnt appear in person dur-
ing a hearing before Las Vegas Justice of
the Peace Melissa Saragosa.
Draytons attorney Tony Abbatangelo
told the Associated Press his client plans
to plead not guilty to allegations that he
pushed his girlfriend of eight years to the
oor and wielded two knives as he
chased and threatened the womans 17-
year-old son during an argument
Wednesday at their home in Las Vegas.
Drayton is charged with felony assault
and misdemeanor domestic battery. He
could face up to six years in prison if
convicted of the assault charge and six
months in jail on the domestic battery
charge.
Theyve been together a long time,
and they want to work this out,
Abbatangelo said. We want whats best
for the family.
Elizabeth Trujillo, 39, told police her
earring was ripped out during the inci-
dent that she said stemmed from an argu-
ment over indelity. The teen wasnt
injured.
Lohan wont face charges
in alleged NYC car scrape
NEW YORK Lindsay Lohan wont
face criminal charges after being accused
of clipping a man with her car outside a
nightclub, one of a string of troubles the
actress has encountered behind the wheel
and elsewhere in recent months.
The Mean Girls
and Freaky Friday
star had been due to
make her rst court
appearance in the
case Tuesday, but the
Manhattan district
attorneys ofce said
Monday there is now
no court date sched-
uled at any point.
Prosecutors wouldnt elaborate on
their decision not to move forward on the
allegations about the Sept. 21 episode,
which was captured on surveillance
video. Lohans spokesman had called the
claims false.
Swift gladly bears
tabloid glare for success
NASHVILLE, Tenn. On Taylor
Swifts new album, Red, theres a song
where the 22-year-
old superstar sings
about a ctional one:
a famous singer who
spends years under
the glare of the spot-
light, then ditches her
uncomfortable fame
for a life of solitude.
It sounds like Swift
might be mapping
out her eventual exit
plan on The Lucky One, which depicts
the troubling side of celebrity: tabloids,
paparazzi, living life in a bubble. Its cer-
tainly a scenario the multimillion-selling
Swift can relate to: Shes become a xture
in the gossip pages, especially with her
penchant for famous boyfriends, including
her latest, Conor Kennedy of the storied
political clan.
But if Lucky One has a plotline that
Swift would eventually like to live out, for
now, its just a daydream: Swift has come
to embrace her larger-than-life status
and all the headaches that come with it.
Theres a lot of trade-offs. Theres the
microscope thats always on you. The
camera ashes, the fear that something
you say will be taken the wrong way and
youll let your fans down. Theres the fear
that youll be walking down the street
and your skirt will blow up and youll be
in the news for three months, says
Swift, sitting at her dining room table in
her apartment in Nashville, dressed in a
playful black shirt decorated with dogs
and an appropriate red skirt.
20 22 26 27 43 16
Mega number
Oct. 20 Super Lotto Plus
Flavor Flav
Lindsay Lohan
Taylor Swift
3
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds & Silver
BURLINGAME
Fraud. A women reported two people
attempted to add their names to her bank
account on the 1100 block of Broadway
before 1:57 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 17.
Harassment. A parent threatened a student
on the 1700 block of Quesada Way before
12:15 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 17.
Suspicious circumstances. A man was
arrested for domestic violence on the 1100
block of Trousdale Drive before 3:56 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 16.
Burglary. An office was broken into and a
computer was stolen on the 500 block of
Airport Boulevard before 11:07 a.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 16.
Theft. Someone reported the theft of motor-
cycle helmets on the 1500 block of Carol
Avenue before 9:04 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16.
Belmont
Disturbance. A person on a train yelled at
train employees on El Camino Real before
12:44 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 21.
Reckless driver. A person was seen speeding
on Old County Road and Sterling View
Avenue before 9:10 p.m. on Saturday, Oct.
20.
Public works. A sewer was backed up on
Coronet Boulevard before 1:45 p.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 20.
Police reports
Bless you
A neighbor mistook her neighbors
sneeze as a scream on the 2500 block of
Poppy Drive in Burlingame before 8:56
p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 17.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Crystal Springs Uplands School ofcials will
face the Belmont City Council again tonight
and possibly learn whether plans to build a
middle school in the hills will be approved.
The Hillsborough-based private school wants
the city to amend its general plan; change the
zoning on the Davis Drive property from ofce
use for a school use; approve the developments
concept; sign off on a development deal that
guarantees $250,000 in annual payments; and
sign off on the environmental review of the
project.
The school has also offered the city a one-
time $1 million payment. The school is a non-
prot and exempt from paying property taxes.
While the Belmont Chamber of Commerce
fully supports the project, it did not pass muster
with the Belmont Planning Commission, which
only approved the mitigated negative declara-
tion before forwarding the project to the coun-
cil for nal approval.
Leading up to tonights vote, opponents and
proponents of the school have tried hard to
sway the councils opinion on the project.
The school even paid for a poll, conducted by
Godbe Research, that showed more than 60
percent support for the project.
The council has been inundated with corre-
spondence on the project, both negative and
positive. It has received petitions in support and
against the project and dozens of emails.
So far, only Councilwoman Coralin
Feierbach has indicated how she will vote,
which is no.
The other four council members, Mayor
Dave Warden, Vice Mayor Christine Wozniak
and councilmen David Braunstein and Warren
Lieberman, however, have given little insight
on what their votes will be.
Lieberman told the Daily Journal last week
he suspects the council to either reject the plan
outright or seek to negotiate more with the pri-
vate school.
Yesterday, Warden said he will allow for any
speakers who have not gotten the chance to
weigh in on the school to give their opinion.
CSUS ofcials will also have another shot to
sell its proposal to the council, Warden said.
The school wants to purchase a vacant ofce
building on 6-8 and 10 Davis Drive, demolish
it and build a new school campus with a turfed
athletic eld and one day a pool. CSUS has
offered use of its eld to youth sports groups in
the city during summer and on some weekends
the rest of the year.
Along with its payments to the city, it has
also offered to pay for any trafc mitigation the
project might create, since Davis Drive con-
nects with busy Ralston Avenue. CSUS has
proposed to start the school day at a different
time than the adjacent Ralston Middle School
to keep trafc to a minimum.
Although the Planning Commission rejected
most of the actions the school seeks for expan-
sion, the deal the council will consider voting
on tonight has been changed considerably from
the one on which the Planning Commission
voted, including upping annual payments from
about $75,000 to $250,000.
In public meetings, opponents of the school
said it was trying to buy its way into
Belmont.
The Chamber of Commerce contends the
school will bring new business to the city and
increase sales tax revenue. Foes of the project,
however, said increased trafc will be too
unbearable.
Crystal Springs Uplands is a private school
which currently has a 10-acre suburban campus
in Hillsborough serving 350 students in sixth
through 12th grades. The school is hoping to
expand by opening a middle school serving up
to 240 students in sixth through eighth grades
on Davis Drive.
The Belmont City Council meets 7:30 p.m.,
tonight, Oct. 23, City Hall, 1 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
CSUS faces council tonight
Two who died in Half
Moon Bay crash identified
Two men who were killed in a car accident
on Highway 1 near Pescadero on Saturday
morning have been identied by the San
Mateo County coroners ofce as Soledad res-
idents Jose Tejeda, 22, and Gabino Mata, 21.
The crash was reported on Highway 1 north
of Pescadero Creek Road at about 8:35 a.m.
Saturday but apparently occurred hours earli-
er around midnight, CHP Ofcer Art Montiel
said.
A Toyota traveling south on the highway
left the road for unknown reasons, went down
an embankment and came to rest on its roof,
Montiel said.
Two passengers died in the crash, according
to the CHP.
The driver of the Toyota was taken to
Stanford Hospital with major injuries,
Montiel said.
The collision prompted the closure of
Highway 1 between Pescadero Creek Road
and Highway 84 for more than two hours.
The crash remains under investigation but it
does not appear that alcohol or drugs played a
role, Montiel said.
Anyone who has information about the
accident is asked to call CHP Ofcer Bingham
at (650) 369-6261.
Local brief
4
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Laura Ann Hickok
Laura Ann Hickok died on her birthday,
Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012 at the young age of
29. Laura grew up in Redwood City and grad-
uated from Sequoia High School in 2001.
She leaves behind her parents, Bill and
Darlene, brothers Billy and Daniel, sisters
Angela and Tracy as well as her dog Rusty and
the countless relatives and friends whose lives
have been touched by Laura.
Laura had an infectious laugh and was full
of life. Her heart was so open and full of love
for anyone who crossed her path always
caring and wanting to help. She was always
laughing and smiling, full of energy, mischief
and adventure and was probably the rst girl
to enroll in mechanics shop in high school.
She is gone too soon, but she is now at
peace and, of course, dancing and singing
with Elvis! R.I.P. Laura, we love you and will
forever miss you.
A Celebration of Life will be held at the
Highlands Community Club, 1665 Fernside
St., Redwood City on Sunday, Oct. 28 from 10
a.m.-1 p.m. for relatives and friends.
James Lee Nunn
James Lee Nunn died Oct. 16, 2012 at Palo
Alto Veterans Hospital.
He was born in Houston, Texas, son of late
parents Christine Lena Nunn and Jessie Nunn.
He was the oldest of seven children.
He leaves his wife Mable B. Nunn whom he
married in 1942, and his only living sister
Minnie Mae Counts of El Grove, Calif., three
children Betty J. Joubert of Richmond,
Josephine A. Moore-Woods of Daly City and
Jimmie Lee Nunn of Vallejo. Grandchildren
Gregory S. Moore, Ayanna Moore, Ann L.
Russell and lot of great-grandchildren, nieces
and nephews.
He was a hard ghting soldier in the Church
of Christ, since 1958. He would quote
Matthew 16:18 and his favorite scripture was
Romans 16:16.
Quiet hours are 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Thursday,
Oct. 25 and homecoming
starts promptly at 11:30
a.m., held at Crippen &
Flynn Carlmont Chapel,
1111 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Burial
will be at Skylawn
Memorial Park. Friends
may sign the guestbook at
www.crippenynn.com.
Donata Maria Fontanone
Donata Maria Fontanone died Oct. 20, 2012
peacefully at home in San Bruno with family
at her bedside.
She was 93.
She was born April 15,
1919 in San Vito dei
Normanni, Italy. She was
the wife of Noris
Fontanone, who prede-
ceased her in 2007. She is
survived by her children
Rita Davi, Robert Visini
and Donna Panebianco;
her siblings Rosa, Teresa, Corrado and Maria,
all of Italy; 12 grandchildren, 12 great-grand-
children and one just-born great-great-grand-
child.
Family and friends may visit after 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 24 and are welcome to attend
the 7 p.m. vigil service at Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El Camino
Real in Millbrae. The funeral mass will be cel-
ebrated 11 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 at St.
Timothy Catholic Church, 1515 Dolan Ave.,
San Mateo. Private interment will follow at
Cypress lawn Memorial Park in Colma.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints
obituaries of approximately 200 words or less
with a photo one time on the date of the fami-
lys choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituaries
CITY
GOVERNMENT
The San Mateo
P l a n n i n g
Commission will
conduct a study ses-
sion tonight regard-
ing the California
Water Services adopted 2010 Urban
Water Management Plan for the Mid-
Peninsula District and the 20 x 2020
Water Conservation Plan. After the
study session, the commission will also
hold a public hearing on phase 1 of the
Draper University plan for Third Avenue
in downtown. The private school wants to
occupy the old Benjamin Franklin Hotel,
the Collective Antiques building across the
street and the old Wachovia bank property
on Fourth Avenue. The study session starts
at 5:30 p.m. and the regular meeting fol-
lows at 7:30 p.m., tonight, City Hall, 330
W. 20th Ave., San Mateo.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO San Franciscos
plans to revitalize its blighted mid-Market
neighborhood are getting another boost.
Mayor Ed Lee announced on Monday that
the technology rm Square has signed a lease
and expects to relocate there in 2013.
The company, which makes a credit card
reader for smart phones and other devices,
currently has an ofce elsewhere in the city.
The ve-block mid-Market area has been
plagued by drugs, muggings and boarded-up
storefronts.
City ofcials have made its revitalization a
major goal and approved a tax break for com-
panies there last year. The decision was aimed
at keeping Twitter from leaving the city.
The company has since relocated to the
mid-Market area.
Tech firm moving to S.F.s
mid-Market neighborhood
5
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros,
Broadway Grill and Original Nicks Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE EIGHTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick em Contest
Week EIGHT
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 10/26/12
Indianapolis Tennessee
San Diego Cleveland
Washington Pittsburgh
Miami NY Jets
Seattle Detroit
Jacksonville Green Bay
Carolina Chicago
Atlanta Philadelphia
New England St. Louis
Oakland Kansas City
NY Giants Dallas
New Orleans Denver
San Francisco Arizona
TIEBREAKER: San Francisco @ Arizona __________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If theres a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certicates to Redwood
General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill and Original Nicks. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pickem Contest
is free to play. Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our ofce by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
NAME ____________________________________
AGE _____________________________________
CITY _____________________________________
PHONE ___________________________________
Mail or drop o by 10/26/12 to:
Pigskin Pickem, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
County ready for flu season
As u season arrives, San Mateo County
health ofcials are urging everyone 6 months
and older to be inoculated and are promoting
community clinics as one option to receive the
shot.
The u vaccine is our best defense against
the u, said Dr. Scott Morrow, San Mateo
County health ofcer, in a prepared statement.
Flu vaccine is safe and can prevent u-related
illness and even death.
Flu season in California generally begins in
October and peaks in late December through
March. The timing and spread of the disease is
unpredictable and it takes about two weeks to
gain protection after receiving a u vaccination.
For this reason, health ofcials urge getting
vaccinated as early in the season as possible.
This seasons vaccine protests against three
strains of u. The virus mutates from year to
year, which is why its important for people to
get vaccinated every year, Morrow said.
Flu vaccine is available through health care
providers and at retail stores and pharmacies.
For people who do not have a health care
provider, the countys Health System and part-
ner organizations are now offering vaccine at
clinics throughout the County. No appointment
is necessary for these clinics and no identica-
tion is required. Visit www.smchealth.org/u
for more information or call 573-3927.
Womans body found
on San Gregorio Beach
Sheriffs deputies and ofcials from the San
Mateo County Coroners Ofce are trying to
identify the remains of a woman discovered
washed onto shore at San Gregorio Beach south
of Half Moon Bay Sunday afternoon.
At approximately 12:33 p.m., a couple walk-
ing on the beach came upon the body of a
woman just out of the surf line and called
police. She was wearing jeans and a red top and
had pink braces. There were no obvious signs
of trauma or cause of death, according to the
San Mateo County Sheriffs Ofce.
The Sheriffs Ofce and Coroners Ofce is
working to identify her and notify her family.
Millbrae Education
Foundation races to a fast start
The Millbrae Education Foundation, which
raised $260,000 last year, is already ahead of its
fundraising benchmark this year.
Thanks to its two donation days last week, the
foundation raised more than $144,000, includ-
ing a $21,000 community challenge grant, from
the Millbrae community. Karen Bettucchi, MEF
president, reported that this is 44 percent more
than was raised by the same event last year.
Our goal this year is to raise $400,000,
Bettucchi said. This will allow us to continue
to fund the two new technology positions which
our donations funded this year, in addition to
more teachers for our schools ... with $400,000
we could fund ve new teachers.
Bettucchi credited the hard work of the many
volunteers who worked on donation days to
speak directly to parents and collect donations
at the ve schools.
Our MEF board members, parents, teachers,
principals, school administrators and Millbrae
School District Trustees all participated, and
that made a big difference, Bettucchi said.
For more information, or to donate to the
MEF, visit
http://www.MillbraeEducationFoundation.org.
S.F. police investigating
three weekend homicides
San Francisco police are investigating three
homicides over the weekend and a fourth death
described as suspicious.
Police say in the rst homicide, a 19-year-old
San Francisco man, identied as Jose Escobar,
died after being shot around 2:45 a.m. Saturday
in the citys Mission District.
Then around 11 p.m., a 30-year-old man was
found stabbed to death in the citys Mission
District. His name has not been released.
A few hours later, police called to a report of
a disturbance around 2 a.m. Sunday found a
woman stabbed to death. Her name has not
been release and her age has not been estab-
lished.
Also on Sunday, a 62-year-old man was
found inside a room in the citys Tenderloin
District. Police have not classied the death as
a homicide, but are describing it as suspicious.
Local briefs
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Millbrae will have a budget gap without an
annual re assessment passed in 2004 and
extended in 2009, according to a ve-year
nancial forecast to be shared with the City
Council tonight.
The ve-year forecast simply shares infor-
mation with the council about upcoming pos-
sible nancial issues. As it stands, the city
could have a gap in funding starting in the
2014-15 year when it no longer receives
money from the re assessment tax, according
to a report prepared by Finance Director
LaRae Brown.
[T]he ve-year forecast demonstrates sig-
nicant structural challenges are facing the
city in the very near future. Unless the econo-
my performs considerably better than project-
ed, new revenue sources are implemented or
total expenditures are lowered, the city will
need to further reduce day-to-day service lev-
els in order to ensure long-term scal health
and vitality, Brown wrote.
Losing revenue from the re tax has one of
the largest possible impacts.
Millbrae voters originally passed the $144
yearly fee for re services on single-family
homes in 2004 as one solution to address the
citys budget crisis, which began in 2001. It
was extended in 2009. The levy brings in
about $1.44 million annually, which means a
four-year cumulative loss of about $5.76 mil-
lion, Brown wrote.
Among the other scal challenges, the fore-
cast predicts an increase in the pension obli-
gation payments, an increase in the California
Public Employees Retirement System contri-
bution rates, only $50,000 for capital projects,
and not meeting the citys 15 percent reserve
policy, Brown wrote.
Annually, the projected budget gap would
range from $1.4 million in 2014-15 to $2.05
million in 2017-18 if no changes are made,
Brown wrote.
The council meets 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23 at
City Hall, 621 Magnolia Ave., Millbrae.
Millbrae budget gap forecasted
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Prosecutors hope Chancy Smiths last stroll
will be back to prison for stealing televisions
from several county stores but two years ago
they say the man with 17 prior strike convic-
tions took a different sort of walk.
Chauncey Smith, 31, is accused of taking tel-
evisions from a Millbrae Walgreens at which he
left his identication behind and from Kohls
where he allegedly pushed the purloined appli-
ance from the department store in a baby stroller.
On Monday, Smith, of San Pablo, opted
against beginning jury trial and pleaded no con-
test to three counts of felony theft and admitted
having a prior strike in return for a maximum of
six years prison when sentenced Nov. 19.
Smith could have faced 25 years to life if con-
victed as a third striker. Instead, District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said serial thief Smith
is doing life on the installment plan.
Smiths recent alleged run of thefts began
Sept. 23, 2010 when a customer at a Millbrae
Walgreens saw a man grab a television and walk
out without paying. An ofcer stopped the man
but he ran away, leaving his identication
behind. The ID belonged to Smith.
On Nov. 26, prosecutors say Smith pushed an
empty baby stroller inside the Redwood City
Kohls store and was able to walk out with a a
$300 television inside. The next day, Smith
returned to the same store and took another tel-
evision but was captured on store security cam-
eras. Review of the tape also turned up footage
of the previous days theft.
Smith remains in custody on $150,000 bail.
Serial thief takes deal for
stealing TV in baby stroller
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
An 18-year-old food service worker at a
Redwood City assisted living home will learn
Wednesday if hell stand trial on charges he
stole more than $400 worth of jewelry from
one resident and at least ve other thefts.
Luis Hermelindo Cebrero, of unincorporat-
ed San Mateo County, has pleaded not guilty
to the felony charges of burglary, receiving
stolen property and elder abuse.
Cebrero had worked at the Woodside
Terrace Senior Living Complex for six
months, during which time several unsolved
thefts were reported, according to the District
Attorneys Ofce. On Oct. 8, another employ-
ee reported nding approximately $425 worth
of jewelry hidden in a food
tray Cebrero had removed
from a room and contacted
Redwood City police. He
allegedly admitted taking
the goods and committed
ve other thefts prior to his
18th birthday in
September.
Police reported nding
several items of jewelry
stolen from other facility residents inside
Cebreros apartment
On Oct. 24, he will have a preliminary hear-
ing to determine if sufcient evidence exists
for trial. Meanwhile, he remains in custody in
lieu of $100,000 bail.
Food worker charged with
theft at senior living home
Luis Cebrero
6
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
T
he Board of Directors of the
Friends of the San Carlos
Library met on July 23 and
voted to donate $10,000 to support the
work of the San Carlos-based Healthy
Cities Tutoring program.
Healthy Cities Tutoring provides ele-
mentary and middle school children with
one-on-one tutoring and mentoring from
community volunteers. The program
began in 1997 and provided tutoring to
159 students during the 2011-12 school
year.
Training for possible tutors will be held
from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. or 6:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24 White
Oaks School, 1901 White Oak Way, San
Carlos, in the Multi-Use Room. No RSVP
is required.
For more information about Healthy
Cities Tutoring, including how to become
a tutor or donate, visit www.healthycities-
tutoring.org or contact Director Donna
Becht at 508-7327. To nd out more
about the Friends of the San Carlos
Library visit www.scfol.org.
***
San Mateo Middle College High
School, an alternative education program
for juniors and seniors in the San Mateo
Union High School District, is accepting
applications for Spring 2013. The dead-
line is Oct. 25.
Students and parents interested in the
program can contact the Middle College
ofce. Applications are available online or
in the SMUSHD counseling ofces and
career centers.
Middle College, located at College of
San Mateo, includes 60 students who
take a combination of high school and col-
lege classes. These classes are intended to
help the student meet high school gradua-
tion requirements and college general
education requirements.
The students, who prefer not to attend a
traditional high school campus, demon-
strate the potential maturity to cope with
the freedom of the college environment.
Current MCHS graduates are attending
University of San Francisco, University
of California at Los Angeles, University
of California at Berkeley, San Jose
State, University of California at Davis
and College of San Mateo.
Students are recommended for admis-
sion by parents, teachers, guidance coun-
selors and administrators. Other applica-
tion procedures include student testing for
reading and writing, an information meet-
ing with parents and interviews with stu-
dents and parents.
For more information contact Principal
Greg Quigley at 574-6101 or middlecol-
lege@smuhsd.org or visit www.collegeof-
sanmateo.edu/middlecollege.
***
The San Mateo Union High School
District is planning its annual College
and Career Fair Program from 6:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 at
Hillsdale High School, 3115 Del Monte
St., San Mateo. The evening includes:
more than 100 colleges and universities
available to talk with students and parents;
large group presentations explaining the
California State University, the
University of California and the
California Independent University sys-
tems; workshop called The Community
College Connection; a college and EOPS
presentation in Spanish; workshops on
nancial aid and loan programs for col-
lege; special programs information such
as career and technical occupational,
EOPS, SMUHSDs Middle College pro-
gram for high school students, the
SMUHSD programs in career and techni-
cal education, accredited career training
schools as well as apprenticeship and
trade organizations.
The free event is an opportunity for stu-
dents and parents to collect information
on application procedures, special pro-
grams, major requirements, expenses,
social and cultural activities and housing.
For more information visit
www.smuhsd.org.
***
Imagine a street where people and pup-
pets live in harmony and teach each other
important lessons. Only, this street is
located in a dicey part of town, and the
lessons these puppets teach are more hard-
hitting and hilarious than learning your
ABCs. You can journey there when the
award-winning San Mateo High School
Performing Arts Company presents the
hit musical Avenue Q (School Edition)
Oct. 26 through Oct. 28
Avenue Q features Joshua Glasson
as Princeton, McKenna Koledo as
Kate, a monster looking for love, Alex
Rosenberg as Rod, a Republican
investment banker with a secret. Larry
Rice will provide vocal and musical
direction.
Performances will be 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26
through Oct. 28 with an additional 2 p.m.
performance on Saturday and Sunday.
Performances will be held at the Bayside
Performing Arts Center, 2025 Kehoe
Ave., San Mateo. Tickets are $15 and $10
for students and seniors. For more infor-
mation and to purchase tickets visit
www.smhsdrama.org or call 558-2375.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Californias first storm of
season drops 2 feet of snow
By Tracie Cone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRESNO Fall looked a lot like winter across Northern
California on Monday as the rst major storm of the season
spawned at least one tornado, brought out snow plows on
Interstate 80 and showered the rest of the parched region with
much-needed rain.
The tornado touched down 40 miles north of Sacramento.
Only minor damage was reported when it hit at 3:15 p.m. near
Yuba City.
There were several other reports of funnel clouds north of
Sacramento, but no others touched down, said National
Weather Service meteorologist Eric Kurth.
Forecasters were calling for up to 2 feet of snow at the high-
est elevations in the northern Sierra Nevada, a good sign for a
state dependent on winter snow accumulation for its water
supply.
It looks like Mother Nature threw us our rst snowball,
said Rochelle Jenkins of Caltrans, which was enforcing chain
controls above 4,300 feet on I-80, the states main highway
from San Francisco to Reno, Nev.
There were reports of downed power lines and trees across
the northern half of the state.
HENRY CHIU
San Mateo High School students McKenna Koledo and Joshua Glasson rehearse
for Avenue Qpresented at Bayside Performing Arts Center Oct.26 through Oct.28.
For tickets and more information visit www.smhsdrama.org.
LOCAL/NATION 7
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Timing
BELT
Special
$199 +up
30K/60K/90K
Service
Mon-Fri 8am-5pm
Sat: 9am-1pm
(650) 342-6342
635 South Claremont St. San Mateo, CA 94402
By Jeff Burbank
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Family members of those killed in
the September 2010 gas explosion
in San Bruno gathered with elected
officials Monday to call for the
ouster of California Public Utilities
Commission President Michael
Peevey.
At a news conference that includ-
ed San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane and
Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-San
Mateo, Rene Morales, whose 20-
year-old daughter Jessica was killed
in the explosion, blamed Peevey for
urging the CPUC to suspend public
hearings in favor of closed-door
proceedings to determine fines
against PG&E.
We are asking Gov. Brown to
replace Michael Peevey with some-
one who can do a better job and rep-
resent all California residents,
Morales said. Our children were
ripped from us and no one should
experience that.
San Bruno resident Kathy
DeRenzi, who lived on Claremont
Drive near the blast and who is lead-
ing a petition drive for Peeveys
removal, complained that the CPUC
is now just an extension of PG&E.
We need new leadership. We
hope Gov. Brown will call us and
make a change as soon as possible,
said DeRenzi, who so far has gath-
ered 231 signatures.
President Peevey brokered a
backroom deal without the partici-
pation of the aggrieved parties,
Ruane said.
PG&E could face fines of
between $200 million and $2.5 bil-
lion for the Sept. 9, 2010 explosion,
which killed eight people and trig-
gered a fire that destroyed 38
homes.
The CPUC, which regulates the
states utility providers, is consider-
ing how much to ne PG&E for
potential violations such as poor
record keeping, operating a gas
pipeline in a populated area without
the correct safety margins and the
failure of the San Bruno pipeline
itself.
On Oct. 5, the CPUC requested
that good faith hearings on possible
fines levied against PG&E take
place behind closed doors with a
mediator talking with seven parties
involved in deciding how much to
ne PG&E. An administrative law
court ruled in the CPUCs favor on
Oct. 11.
Former U.S. Sen. George
Mitchell has been selected to serve
as the mediator. The parties to the
mediation include the city of San
Francisco, the CPUCs Consumer
Protection and Safety Division, the
city of San Bruno, PG&E, the
states Division of Ratepayer
Advocates, Southwest Gas Corp.
and The Utility Reform Network
consumer advocacy group.
Andrew Kotch, spokesman for the
CPUC, said the Consumer
Protection and Safety Division
obtained the judges ruling to sus-
pend public hearings until Nov. 1 to
give the parties a chance to recom-
mend a ne amount in mediation.
Mediations are generally not pub-
lic, but between the parties, Kotch
said. All of the parties are allowed
to speak and put their two cents in.
Mitchell, as mediator, will formu-
late his recommendations based on
the discussions and place them in a
document that will later become
public because it has to be voted on
during a public hearing by the
CPUC, Kotch said.
The commissioner is the nal
judge and jury, he said.
PG&E spokeswoman Brittany
Chord declined to comment on the
details of the mediation.
We have supported negotiations
towards a universal settlement and
we will continue to support these
negotiations as a party in the media-
tion, Chord said.
We have confidence that the
PUC will faithfully discharge their
duties to zealously guard the public
interest and get to the bottom of any
injustice raised by the San Bruno
pipeline explosion, said Gareth
Lacy, a spokesperson from the gov-
ernors ofce.
San Bruno survivors want
CPUC president replaced
We are asking Gov. Brown to replace Michael
Peevey with someone who can do a better job and
represent all California residents. ... Our children were
ripped from us and no one should experience that.
Rene Morales
By Brian Bakst
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PAUL, Minn. Larry King,
the celebrated talk show host accus-
tomed to A-list interview guests, has
agreed to moderate a debate featur-
ing a squad of minor-party presiden-
tial candidates.
The former CNN giant will guide
Tuesdays debate in Chicago, which
will be broadcast on the Internet.
The candidates taking part are the
Libertarian Partys Gary Johnson,
the Green Partys Jill Stein, the
Constitution Partys Virgil Goode
and the Justice Partys Rocky
Anderson.
King told the Associated Press
that its clear none of them will win,
but he said they all deserve a voice
in the presidential race. Democrats
and Republicans are keeping tabs on
Johnson and Goode, two ex-
Republicans who could be factors in
key battleground states.
They have a story to tell. Its a
valid story, King said. Its a two-
party system, but not a two-party
system by law.
King left CNN in 2010 and now
hosts a show on Ora.TV, an on-
demand Internet channel.
The debate was organized by the
Free and Equal Elections
Foundation, which has criticized
the debates between Democratic
President Barack Obama and
Republican challenger Mitt
Romney for excluding third-party
candidates and coming off as too
programmed.
Organizers say at-home viewers
will be encouraged to submit real-
time questions on the social media
like Twitter, where theyll get
Kings attention with the
AskEmThisLarry hashtag.
King set to moderate
minor-party debate
Gary Johnson, Jill Stein
Virgil Goode, Rocky Anderson
Larry King will moderate a debate featuring a squad of third-party
presidential candidates tonight.
By Stephen Ohlemacher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama isnt talking about it
and neither is Mitt Romney. But
come January, 163 million workers
can expect to feel the pinch of a big
tax increase regardless of who wins
the election.
A temporary reduction in Social
Security payroll taxes is due to
expire at the end of the year and
hardly anyone in Washington is
pushing to extend it. Neither Obama
nor Romney has proposed an exten-
sion, and it probably wouldnt get
through Congress anyway, with
lawmakers in both parties down on
the idea.
Even Republicans who have
sworn off tax increases have little
appetite to prevent one that will cost
a typical worker about $1,000 a
year, and two-earner family with
six-figure incomes as much as
$4,500.
Why are so many politicians sour
on continuing the payroll tax break?
Republicans question whether
reducing the tax two years ago has
done much to stimulate the sluggish
economy. Politicians from both par-
ties say they are concerned that it
threatens the independent revenue
stream that funds Social Security.
Psst, taxes go up in 2013 for 163 million workers
LOCAL/NATION 8
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
College District decided to sell the station late
last year. Six bids were received by Feb. 14.
Negotiations with the two responsive highest
bidders have yet to be successful. As a result,
district staff is requesting the board reject all
bids a proposal that goes before the board
during its regular meeting Wednesday.
Board President Dave Mandelkern said, if
approved, the rejection of bids would not
change the situation. The district cannot
afford to support the program. However, it
also wants to make the best decision for the
public, he said.
Chancellor Ron Galatolo explained
Wednesdays conversation is simply about the
current bids. If the board moves to reject all
bids, Galatolo will likely ask that a study ses-
sion be scheduled to discuss how to proceed.
The move to sell the station came after near-
ly two years of struggling to cut the programs
$1 million operating decit. Of the six bids
received, the district moved forward with
negotiations with FM Media TV, Inc. and San
Mateo County TV Corporation. Each
answered clarifying questions and started
conversations with the district for the best and
nal offer, according to a staff report prepared
by Jan Roecks, interim dean of business,
workforce and athletics at Caada College.
However, the district was unable to reach
agreements with either party.
FM Media TV, Inc. has not been able to
demonstrate funding as promised. San Mateo
Community TV Corporation has not been able
to demonstrate to our satisfaction that it could
meet the FCCs requirement of local represen-
tation, or at least that it could do so within a
reasonable time, Roecks wrote.
KCSM-TV began operating in 1964 at its
current location at the College of San Mateo.
The non-commercial station broadcasts a vari-
ety of programs including television courses,
the numbers for which have dropped in recent
years in favor of online classes. Broadcasting,
as a program, was on hiatus for a couple of
years but returned more than a year ago with
all new digital gear.
The challenge for elected ofcials has been
the budget strain. In recent years, millions in
cuts have been made. Programs with low
enrollment were put on hiatus or discontinued
and the board adopted a core values focus.
As a result, programs not addressing the basic
needs of students need to be self-funded, per
the districts direction. KCSM-TV is one of
the programs which fell into this category.
A potential sale would include the station,
its lease to Sutro Tower and the transmitter as
well as equipment. Selling the television sta-
tion, however, would not impact KCSM FM
the district radio station which will contin-
ue to operate as JAZZ 91.1, according to the
district. When requesting proposals, the dis-
trict specied that bidders must be either a
nonprot corporation or another type of eligi-
ble entity permitted to operate a noncommer-
cial television station.
The district meets 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct.
24 at the District Ofce, 3401 CSM Drive, San
Mateo.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
KCSM-TV
By Dirk Lammers and Kristi Eaton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. Russell Means
spent a lifetime as a modern American Indian
warrior. He railed against broken treaties,
fought for the return of stolen land and even
took up arms against the federal government.
A onetime leader of the American Indian
Movement, he called national attention to the
plight of impoverished tribes and often
lamented the waning of Indian culture. After
leaving the movement in the 1980s, the hand-
some, braided activist was still a cultural pres-
ence, appearing in several movies.
Means, who died Monday from throat can-
cer at age 72, helped lead the 1973 uprising at
Wounded Knee a bloody confrontation that
raised Americas awareness about the strug-
gles of Indians and gave rise to a wider protest
movement that lasted for the rest of the
decade.
Before AIM, there were few national advo-
cates for American Indians. Means was one of
the first to emerge. He
sought to restore Indians
pride in their culture and to
challenge a government
that had paid little atten-
tion to tribes in genera-
tions. He was also one of
the first to urge sports
teams to do away with
Indian names and mascots.
No one except
Hollywood stars and very rich Texans wore
Indian jewelry, Means said, recalling the
early days of the movement. And there were
dozens, if not hundreds, of athletic teams that
in essence were insulting us, from grade
schools to college. Thats all changed.
AIM was founded in the late 1960s to
demand that the government honor its treaties
with American Indian tribes. The movement
eventually faded away, Means said, as Native
Americans became more self-aware and self-
determined.
There were plenty of American Indian
activists before AIM, but it became the radi-
cal media gorilla, said Paul DeMain, editor of
News from Indian Country, a national newspa-
per focused on tribal affairs.
If someone needed help, you called on the
American Indian Movement, and they showed
up and caused all kind of ruckus and looked
beautiful on a 20-second clip on TV that
night, DeMain said.
Means and AIM co-founder Dennis Banks
were charged in 1974 for their role in the
Wounded Knee uprising in which hundreds of
protesters occupied the town on the site of the
1890 Indian massacre. Protesters and federal
authorities were locked in a standoff for 71
days and frequently exchanged gunre. Before
it was over, two tribal members were killed
and a federal agent seriously wounded.
After a trial that lasted several months, a
judge threw out the charges on grounds of
government misconduct.
Other protests led by Means included an
American Indian prayer vigil on top of Mount
Rushmore and the seizure of a replica of the
Mayower on Thanksgiving Day in Plymouth,
Mass.
But Means constant quest for the spotlight
raised doubts about his motives. Critics who
included many fellow tribe members said his
main interest was building his own notoriety.
Means said his most important accomplish-
ment was the proposal for the Republic of
Lakotah, a plan to carve out a sovereign Indian
nation inside the United States. He took the
idea all the way to the United Nations, even
though it was ignored by tribal governments
closer to home, including his own Oglala
Sioux leaders, with whom he often clashed.
For decades, Means was dogged by ques-
tions about whether the group promoted vio-
lence, especially the 1975 slaying of a woman
in the tribe and the gun battles with federal
agents at Wounded Knee.
Authorities believe three AIM members shot
and killed Annie Mae Aquash on the Pine
Ridge reservation on the orders of someone in
AIMs leadership because they suspected she
was an FBI informant.
Longtime Indian activist Russell Means dies at 72
Russell Means
OPINION 9
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Los Angeles Times
S
peaking to a group of U.S. business
leaders recently, U.S. Defense
Secretary Leon E. Panetta issued a
dire warning that foreign hackers are becom-
ing increasingly sophisticated and that their
online attacks on transportation systems,
banks and other vital facilities are escalating.
The worst-case scenario, he said, is a cyber
Pearl Harbor perpetrated by state-sponsored
hackers or terrorists that would cause physi-
cal destruction and loss of life, paralyze and
shock the nation and create a profound new
sense of vulnerability.
Panetta wasnt lobbying for more defense
spending or expanded powers to respond to
threats. Instead, he was trying to break a vex-
ing logjam in Congress over legislation to
beef up cyber security in the private sector.
In particular, business groups have resisted a
Senate proposal that would give the private
operators of critical infrastructure water
plants, electrical grids and the like an
incentive to meet new cyber-security goals.
That measure, S 3414, was blocked in
August by a Republican libuster after the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce declared its
unstinting opposition.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-
Nev., has pledged to take up the cyber-securi-
ty bill again in November, after the election,
and lawmakers should enact a bill along the
lines of S 3414. Failing that, President
Barack Obama should issue an executive
order to promote voluntary cyber-security
standards and information-sharing within the
limits of current law. Thats not the ideal
approach, but its a start.
No on Measure A
Editor,
The recession is hitting all counties hard;
this is not the time to further burden San
Mateo County taxpayers with an unneces-
sary and regressive new sales tax that will
inevitably fund an unnecessary new jail.
The sales tax ballot language obscures the
main purpose of the added revenue. The
Nov. 6 ballot statement uses buzz-word
promises of more child support, fire protec-
tion, neighborhood health clinics and well
down the list, maintaining adequate jail
staffing.
The Board of Supervisors has already
approved plans to build a jail that it does
not have money for, and initial construction
costs will account for more than half of the
countys $60 million budget increase this
year. The new unneeded jail will cost more
than $155 million (without overruns) to
build and nearly $40 million a year to oper-
ate and cover new construction debt (non-
voter approved).
The Board of Supervisors should cancel
the new jail. Incarceration costs upward of
$200 per day per prisoner. For nonviolent,
non sexual offenders many well managed
county jails use no-bail releases, supervised
probation and inexpensive electronic home
monitoring. All would greatly reduce over-
crowding in our existing jail.
Virtually all county inmates are released
back into our community. For maximum
community safety, it is far better that we
spend scarce dollars on rehabilitation pro-
grams and not on the construction and high
operating cost of an unneeded new jail.
In reality, this new sales tax is just an
unneeded jail tax. Vote no on Measure A.
Tom Huening
San Mateo
The letter writer is the former county con-
troller and a former member of the San
Mateo County Board of Supervisors.
Against sales tax increase
Editor,
Measure A proponents tell us: The super-
visors have done all that they can; they have
trimmed and cut and sliced right down to
the bone; there is nothing left to cut. Yet,
according to the latest data available, 11.4
percent of adult arrests were released no
complaint was filed with the prosecutor. A
quarter of felony court cases get dismissed
or result in an acquittal. The jail is bloated
with prisoners awaiting trial. These are but
a few of the system-wide inefficiencies set
forth in Crime and Case Processing Rates:
San Mateo and Statewide. You can access
full report at:
http://cushmansite.com/sm_crime_proc.pdf
. The county wants to build a new jail that
we cannot afford to build or operate. We
already have enough jail beds to lockup
serious offenders. Any new beds will be at
the margin. We are prioritizing our justice
system at the expense of other vital servic-
es. Public safety is important, but Measure
A fails to distinguish between what is
important and what is urgent.
Connect the dots. Will this money actual-
ly be directed to the services that are
described on the ballot? Or, will a dispro-
portionate amount of the money be divert-
ed to other justice system functions, for
example, to staff a new jail? Your vote will
boil down to a matter of trust trust that
the majority of current and future members
of our Board of Supervisors will direct the
revenue to preserve our most vital and
needy county services.
Bob Cushman
Foster City
Yes on Measure B
Editor,
San Mateo County, with a population of
more than 700,000, is currently the only
county in California that elects supervisors
countywide. This means a candidate must
appeal to all residents instead of the rough-
ly 140,000 who live in a particular district.
Currently, it costs about $400,000 to suc-
cessfully run for a seat countywide versus
the roughly $80,000 it would cost to run in
a district.
So, only candidates who are already
wealthy, or powerful or well-known have a
chance of winning. This is why there has
not been an incumbent unseated on the San
Mateo County Board of Supervisors in
more than 30 years. It is also why there
have been very few traditional minorities
elected.
San Mateo County is currently being
sued to stop its at-large elections and the
county is spending tax dollars to preserve
the status quo. Lets bring San Mateo
County into the 21st century and in line
with all other 57 counties in the state. A
yes vote on Measure B is not only the right
thing to do, but it will also stop the county
from spending money it does not have to
defend an antiquated system in court a
fight that will likely be unsuccessful and
definitely expensive.
Kaia Eakin
Redwood City
Yes on Proposition 35
Editor,
Wow, simply amazing. Californians are
being asked to approve a substantial
increase in fines for human trafficking vio-
lations and further agree to use those fines
to help the victims of modern-day slavery.
The truly amazing part of this proposition
is that opposition comes from some anti-
trafficking advocates. The problem is that
some advocates are concerned that their
particular agenda may not benefit from
Proposition 35. Is that a reason to speak
against it? No. Human trafficking is the
most critical civil rights issue facing the
world today. Abolition was the right thing
to do in the 1800s and it is the right thing
to do today because serving the needs of
human trafficking victims, regardless of the
advocates agendas, serves us all.
Ray Fowler
Redwood City
Cyber-security
Other voices
Artfully asked
I
f art is in the eye of the beholder, what
does that mean for those whose creative
vision is a little less than 20/20?
Last month, the San Carlos City Council
signed off on a public art installation for the
upcoming Palo
Alto Medical
Foundation cam-
pus on Industrial
Road in San
Carlos. The work
is a series of
carved granite
gates by artist
Larry Kirkland
inspired by the
Chinese tradition
of moon gates that
beckon visitors
into beautiful gar-
dens. The keyhole shape represents the way
patients search for answers from doctors.
Cool enough, but the more attention-grab-
bing component is a plan for granite slabs
embedded in the ground and engraved with
questions that we all ask ourselves, accord-
ing to the ofcial staff report.
Assumedly these queries take a cue from
Nietzsche and Descartes and Kant and other
members of the Deep Thoughts crew. Who
am I? What am I doing? How do I nd
peace?
In a presentation to the council before its
approval, Kirkland showed photos of other
commissioned works hed created elsewhere
with similar engravings. What is your fear?
asked one block, adorned with an ostrich
whose head was stuck in the ground. What
is my joy? and What is my story? read
others.
But frankly these cant be the most popular
bits of self examination.
The question I ask the most is, Where are
my keys? A close second is, Why is there
so much trafc?
Sandwich or soup today? Should I sleep
another ve minutes? Can I get away with
not washing my hair today? Do these pants
make me look fat? Why is this person still
talking to me? Why does my dog insist on
misbehaving? Will the presidential election
campaign ever end? Bangs or no? Do I really
need dessert? Did I turn off the iron? How
many sheep does it take to fall asleep?
Should I wait for the iPhone 5? Can I nd
this cheaper online? How many two-letter
words begin with the letter Q?
Chances are, none of these warrant eternal
inscription and odds are even better Ill never
be asked for formal input on anything best
described as artsy.
During one trip to the Museum of Modern
Art in San Francisco, a former companion
and I stood with a thick crowd staring at a
blur of angry brown and red scrawls across a
canvas. He nally broke the silence by lean-
ing forward slightly most likely to read
the corner identication card in hopes of
knowing what he was supposed to be seeing
and announcing just above a stage whis-
per, I am thinking root canal. Denitely root
canal. Before I could elbow him into
silence, others murmured agreement. In place
of actual information, they accepted the lead-
ership of a viewer who, if memory serves,
probably had one too many Bloody Marys
prior to the mornings artistic eld trip
Or maybe his interpretation was appropri-
ate and I had no out-of-the-box vision. One
persons genius is anothers equivalent of a
kindergarten drawing t for the refrigerator
door. Maybe there is nothing wrong with
favoring a watercolor simply because it relies
heavy on the color orange or thinking that
some metal sculpture could easily be
misidentied as a large-scale can opener.
In any case, perhaps the granite slabs
planned for the PAMF project can address
the most common question raised by art
What the heck is that?
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat
runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think of
this column? Send a letter to the editor: let-
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,345.89 +0.02% 10-Yr Bond 1.798 +1.70%
Nasdaq3,016.96 +0.38% Oil (per barrel) 88.260002
S&P 500 1,433.82 +0.04% Gold 1,730.40
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The stock market is
waiting for the presidential election as
much as anyone.
The U.S. stock market struggled for
direction Monday. Stocks waffled
between small gains and losses, but by
mid-afternoon it seemed they would n-
ish solidly lower. The Dow Jones indus-
trial average fell as much as 108 points
before rallying in the late afternoon to
nish two points higher. There wasnt
any obvious catalyst for the turnaround,
other than general indecision on the part
of investors.
Earnings reports from toymaker
Hasbro, clothing maker VF Corp.,
regional bank SunTrust and other com-
panies were underwhelming. The over-
hang of the presidential election in two
weeks didnt help either. Investors are
wary of making big moves before they
know whos going to be the next presi-
dent.
They need to know the playing eld
before they get out there and play, said
Jeff Savage, regional chief investment
ofcer for Wells Fargo Private Bank in
Portland, Oregon.
David Katz, principal and senior port-
folio strategist at WeiserMazars Wealth
Advisors in New York, said it matters
more that the election is wrapped up
than who is elected.
One could say the markets will rally
stronger if the Republican candidate
becomes president, Katz said. But one
way or another, the markets will have
direction, and the markets like direc-
tion.
The Dow Jones industrial average
ended virtually at. It inched up 2.38
points, or 0.02 percent, to close at
13,345.89.
The Standard & Poors 500 index was
also little changed, edging up 0.62 point
to 1,433.81. The Nasdaq composite
index rose 11.34 to 3,016.96.
Besides the election, an economic
report due Friday also has the markets in
a holding pattern. Thats when the gov-
ernment is supposed to report how much
the U.S. economy grew in the third quar-
ter. But already, company reports are sig-
naling that consumers, who drive the
bulk of economic growth, are far from
healed.
Hasbro, the toymaker behind brands
like My Little Pony and Transformers,
said that sales for boys products and
preschool toys weakened.
Market waits for election
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Monday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Peabody Energy Corp., up $3.06 at $28.95
The coal miner said that its third-quarter prot
fell 84 percent, but its results still topped Wall
Street expectations.
LDK Solar Co. Ltd., up 15 cents at 86 cents
The Chinese solar equipment maker is selling a
20 percent stake in the company to Hen Rui Xin
Energy for around $23 million.
Advance Auto Parts Inc., down $2.28 at $66.15
The auto part retailer said its third-quarter
earnings per share will fall more than 14 percent
when it posts results next month.
Avista Corp., down 92 cents at $25.54
The utility predicted that third-quarter prot
will drop 46 percent from a year ago. The
company also cut its outlook for the year.
Nasdaq
Ancestry.com Inc., up $2.26 at $31.44
The genealogy website agreed to be bought
by a group led by private equity rm Permira
Funds in a deal worth about $1.6 billion.
OpenTable Inc., up $2.77 at $46.36
Reuters reported that executives at Yahoo Inc.,
the search company,have discussed acquiring
the online restaurant reservations company.
Avid Technology Inc., down $1.48 at $6.69
The maker of equipment and software for
recording music and video predicted a wider
loss and drop in revenue for the third quarter.
Carmike Cinemas Inc., up 66 cents at $13.22
A Caris & Co. analyst upgraded shares of the
movie theater chain saying that recent
acquisitions will help boost the company.
Big movers
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Yahoo CEO
Marissa Mayer turned in an encouraging
report card covering her rst few months
running the troubled Internet company.
The third-quarter results announced
Monday werent astounding, but they
were better than analysts anticipated.
Most importantly, Yahoos net revenue
crept up from the previous year for the
third consecutive year. That reinforced
the belief that things are nally getting
better at Yahoo after ve years of nan-
cial malaise, especially with the hard-
driving, well-respected Mayer at the
helm.
Mayer, 37, underscored her determi-
nation to turn around Yahoo by returning
to work just a few weeks after having her
rst baby. Mayers son was born on
Sept. 30, the nal day of the third quar-
ter.
Mondays review of the results provid-
ed Mayer with her rst opportunity to
publicly share her vision for Yahoo Inc.
The company, which is based in
Sunnyvale, Calif., lured Mayer away
from rival Google Inc. in mid-July.
Without providing specics, Mayer
said that she plans to ensure that Yahoos
services become a daily habit for its
700 million users. Toward that end, she
wants to improve Yahoos search engine
and email service and indicated that the
home page of the companys website
will get a makeover. She also pledged to
pour more resources into developing
services for smartphones and tablet
computers. Bolstering Yahoos product
line-up through acquisitions is also on
her agenda, she said, although she
emphasized that most of the deals she
has in mind would target relatively small
startups willing to sell for less than $100
million.
Our products will change how people
learn, share and communicate, Mayer
said. We will inspire, innovate and
entertain.
Investors applauded the strides made
during the third quarter. Yahoo shares
gained 75 cents, or nearly 5 percent, to
$16.52 in extended trading. If the shares
hit that price in Tuesdays regular ses-
sion, it will be the highest level that the
stock has reached since Mayers arrival.
Yahoo earned $3.2 billion, or $2.64
per share, during the three months that
ended in September. Most of that prot
stemmed from a one-time gain of $2.8
billion that Yahoo pocketed by selling
half its stake in Alibaba Group, one of
Chinas most successful Internet compa-
nies. Yahoo earned $293 million, or 23
cents per share, at the same time last
year.
Yahoo CEO starts reign with encouraging 3Q report
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Netixs third-
quarter results will give investors a sense
of how well the video subscription serv-
ice is faring against tougher competition
at the same time its paying for an
expansion beyond the U.S.
Subscriber growth is almost always
the most important part of Netflixs
quarterly updates. It probably wont any
different when the numbers for the July-
through-September period come out
after the stock market closes Tuesday.
The quarter covers a traditionally slow
period for Netflix because summers
longer daylight hours and vacations
make it tougher to get people to pay
extra to watch movies and old television
series. Netix executives also expected
the telecast of the Summer Olympics
during late July and early August to dis-
courage households from buying anoth-
er entertainment package during that
two-week period.
Despite those challenges, Netix pre-
dicted it would gain 1 million to 1.8 mil-
lion more subscribers to its main line of
business streaming video to televi-
sions and other devices with high-speed
Internet connections. Based on those
projections, Netix should have ended
September with 24.9 million 25.7 mil-
lion U.S. subscribers to its $8-per-month
streaming service.
The company expected to lose
600,000 to 900,000 subscribers to its
DVD-by-mail rental service, which has
been steadily declining since Netflix
began charging a separate fee for that
option last year.
The third-quarter growth will proba-
bly determine whether Netix needs to
revise its goal of adding 7 million
streaming subscribers in the U.S. this
year. Several analysts suspect Netix
will have to lower its target. Sterne Agee
analyst Arvind Bhatia thinks Netixs
stock will plunge if the full-year goal for
subscriber growth is revised below 6
million.
Caterpillar sees weak
economy as it cuts outlook
MINNEAPOLIS Caterpillar says
the worlds economy is weaker than it
thought, and it doesnt expect growth to
pick up until the second half of next
year.
The company on Monday cut its 2012
revenue and prot guidance, and took a
very cautious view toward its perform-
ance in 2013.
Caterpillar makes the yellow-painted
excavators, heavy tractors, and other
construction equipment often seen on
road-building projects. Its the worlds
largest maker of construction and min-
ing equipment, and also makes engines.
Its results are watched closely for signs
of where the broader economy is head-
ed.
Where its headed right now is for
some weak growth, based on what
Caterpillar was saying on Monday.
Smaller iPad expected
Tuesday, but at what price?
NEW YORK Those who follow
Apple believe they have gured out most
of the particulars of a smaller iPad
expected to be revealed on Tuesday. One
big question remains, though: What will
it cost?
Apple hasnt said anything about the
device, but the veil of secrecy it throws
over unreleased products has been a see-
through affair this year. Most of the
details of the iPhone 5 were known well
in advance of its launch a month ago.
In the case of the iPad Mini (the real
name is not known), tech bloggers and
analysts expect a device with a screen
measuring 7.85 inches on the diagonal,
making it about half the size of the regu-
lar iPad.
Netflixs subscriber growth holds key to 3Q report
Business briefs
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1
6
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Sequoia High School volleyball team
came into the 2012 season knowing they
would compete for the Peninsula Athletic
League Ocean Division title. And a large part
of that condence revolves around one player,
and one player alone the divisions reign-
ing Most Valuable Player, Mikayla Wilkes.
And so far, that premonition has proven
valid.
Shes been a solid player from the begin-
ning, said Sequoia head coach Jane Slater.
She just came in ready to play. I couldnt say
much about how her game has evolved as
much as shes been consistently very strong
from day one.
And with the division schedule heading into
the home stretch, Wilkes play has the
Cherokees one game out of the leagues top
spot, playing catch up with Woodside High
School.
I think everyone pretty much appreciates
her game, Slater said. I dont think she looks
like your classic volleyball player, shes not
that tall, but she doesnt get the immediate
attention that other taller players might get.
Once shes in the game, shes as competitive
as anyone out there. We play a lot of games
and I dont think any player has dominated
her.
In fact, dominant best denes Wilkes
play in two wins last week. In order to keep
pace, the Cherokees took out previously
unbeaten South San Francisco High School in
a ve-set thriller. Then, Sequoia dominated
Capuchino High School 3-0.
For her efforts, Wilkes is the Daily Journal
Athlete of the Week.
If we would have lost that game, that
would have been the end for us, Slater said of
Sequoias win over South City. We wouldnt
have a chance. We played them tough at South
City and came out there frustrated and know-
ing regardless of the standings that we wanted
to come back and beat them.
Aside from Wilkes 22 kills and 27 digs, it
was No. 21s emotional leadership that shined
in that big win.
That was one of the things we wanted to
turn around, Slater said of the teams con-
dence. And she was just ultra pumped up for
the game. And shes not a really emotional
person. She just wanted to win. Shes a leader.
Shes a captain and she wants that ball every
time.
In the game against Capuchino, despite only
playing in two of the three games, Wilkes still
led the team in kills and digs.
Shes a really smart player, Wilkes said.
She reads the other teams defense really
well. Shes all over our court. Shes smart and
shes fast, shes deceptively fast and she has
great reexes. She gets to balls you dont
think shes going to get to.
Slater said Wilkes stands out just as much
on defense.
She understands the game so well, Slater
said. She sees the court, both offensively and
defensively, remarkably well. Shes there
before the ball is there. Im still surprised to
see, and Ive watched her play for four years,
some of the balls she gets to. She also just
remains calm. She makes mistakes just like
everyone else makes mistakes but she doesnt
let it bother her and she comes back on the
next play. Thats one of the things that makes
her such a good player.
At 8-2, the Cherokees are very much in
contention for the division title. And Wilkes
play has her at the forefront of another Player
of the Year award.
I dont even think she thinks about that,
Slater said. Shes a very humble player. She
just goes out there and plays her hardest every
day. You dont hear her brag or say anything
about what a good player she is. I dont think
that even comes through her head.
Wilkes Sequoias heart and soul
Mills sight
not to see
T
urns out the Daily Journals Game
of the Week between San Mateo
and Mills was a dud Friday night as
the Bearcats dominated in a 35-3 win.
The most exciting part of the night was
nothing that happened during the game but
during halftime. A pair of boys wearing
nothing but masks, thong underwear and
shoes went streaking across the empty
eld as Mills announced its homecoming
court.
The pair were run-
ning with a ag,
which I couldnt make
out, with one of the
guys rotating his
upper body and giving
the San Mateo stands
a double gun salute.
But as the duo neared
the west end zone, out
of the shadows came
Mills campus
resource ofce a
member of the
Millbrae Police
Department. He came ying onto the eld,
hoping to intercept the streaking students,
who eventually saw him out of the corner of
their eyes and found another gear.
One of the streakers hit the perimeter fence
and ipped over it in a heartbeat, while the
other did his best to avoid the ofcer. He,
too, eventually got over the fence and both
disappeared into the darkness. The ofcer
made his way through a gate and followed
the pair into the night.
I dont know if he ever caught them.
San Mateo coach Jeff Scheller said he
heard the crowds roar rise and briey saw
what was going on.
For a minute there, I thought I was at Half
Moon Bay, Scheller said. Half Moon Bay is
famous (infamous? notorious?) for have
streakers on the eld during homecoming
games.
***
Following Capuchinos 40-30 win over
Hillsdale Friday afternoon, I asked Hillsdale
coach Mike Parodi if he was aware of any of
the Knights passing records. He said he had
no idea, but I think its safe to say quarter-
back Cole Carrithers entered the Hillsdale
record book. Carrithers had a monster per-
formance. His 55 attempts has to be a record
Ive been covering the Peninsula Athletic
League since 2001 and I dont think Ive
seen any PAL quarterback throw the ball that
many times. Carrithers completed 25 of those
attempts and threw for a mind-boggling 417
yards.
It was Carrithers nal pass of the game,
on the nal play of the game, that put him
over the 400-yard mark. With seconds
remaining on the clock, Carrithers hooked up
with Justin Kelly for a 36-yard score.
Brandon Butcher was Carrithers favorite
target Friday as he caught 15 passes for 193
yards.
***
It was a successful weekend for a pair of
San Mateo County boxers. Mighty Melissa
McMorrow (8-3-3), ghting out of B Street
Boxing in San Mateo, recorded her rst stop-
page, earning a ninth-round technical knock-
out of Yahaira Martinez to defend her
WBA/WBO/WIBF yweight title Friday
night in Kissimmee, Fla.
San Bruno native Joe The Punisher
Gumina (4-1) won his bout Saturday night at
Thunder Valley Casino with a unanimous
decision over Payton Boyea in a cruiser-
weight matchup. Its the third time Gumina
has beaten Boyea.
***
The Burlingame High School Alumni
Association presents the 2012 Burlingame
Athletic Hall of Fame class Nov. 10 before
the annual Little Big Game against San
Mateo. There will be a presentation brunch
during which the class will be presented. The
cost is $15 and includes a continental break-
fast and a ticket to the Little Big Game.
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Sequoias Mikayla Wilkes attempts a kill in last weeks 3-2 win over South San Francisco High
School.Wilkes, the reigning Ocean Division MVP, had 22 kills and 27 digs in that match.
Big week for M-As Andrew
See LOUNGE, Page 15
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
At this time last week, the Menlo-Atherton
girls tennis team was a half-game behind
Carlmont High School in the standings. But
after two wins, the Bears are back on top.
And a lot of that credit has to go to
Samantha Andrew, who came up with two
huge wins against two of the top three teams
in the Peninsula Athletic League Bay
Division.
On Tuesday against the Scots, the Bears
mixed up their lineup and Andrew moved to
the No. 1 singles spot. It was there that she
took care of Cori Sidell 6-2, 6-3.
I was really nervous because shes such a
good player and Ive never beaten her before,
Andrew said after the match. And I just went
out and gured I had nothing to lose. I just
wanted to play well for my team. I didnt get
tight and I kept swinging through the ball
most of the match.
Andrew followed that performance with a
No. 2 singles victory over Lauren Sinatra of
Burlingame High School 7-6 (8), 6-4.
MAX PARKER, MENLO SCHOOL
Strolling along the sideline a couple of
weeks ago, Parker of Menlo School was grab-
bing a drink of water after a long kickoff
return for a touchdown and, after a bit of chit
chat, said he was aiming for the national
record in that category.
Apparently, he wasnt playing around.
Parker returned his fth kickoff return for
touchdown last Friday against the Kings
Academy. Already, Parker has tied Michael
Justin of Hollywood (ve in 1988) for the
fourth-most in a season. The state mark is held
by Sylmar High Schools Joe Dickson, who
had eight in 2003.
Oh, and Parker added six catches for 96
yards and a touchdown in a 57-23 win.
MORE KNIGHTS
Actually, it was another stellar afternoon for
the Menlo High School offense. Junior Jack
Heneghan returns to the Honor Roll after
completing 12 of 15 passes for 230 yards and
four touchdowns and running for another.
Senior Matt Bradley completed ve of six
passes for 70 yards and neither quarterback
threw an interception.
And speaking of Knights, Menlo girls golf
evened their West Bay Athletic League season
record at 4-4 with a win over Notre Dame San
Jose 238 to 285 at Palo Alto Municipal par 37
front nine. Jessie Rong was medalist with a 2-
over-par 39, +2.
TANNER PICCOLOTII, TERRA NOVA
The scoreboard was terribly unkind to the
Burlingame Panthers in their 49-0 loss to the
Terra Nova. And no one was meaner than
Terra Nova running back Tanner Piccolotii
who ran for 230 yards on only 17 carries. He
also scored three touchdowns including one of
75 yards.
Terra Nova actually took it to the Panthers
on the ground and through the air. Kren Spain
had an unreal day at the quarterback position.
He threw for 225 and two touchdowns on 17
of 20 passing. Six of those passes went to
Dominic Ortisi for 105 yards.
HONOR ROLL REGULARS
A little update on a couple of players that fre-
quent the Honor Roll. Justin Ewing of
Capuchino had another huge game. No. 40 ran
for 363 yards and four touchdowns on 38 carries
See ROLL, Page 15
SPORTS 12
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Stanford coach Tara
VanDerveer tries to avoid preseason predic-
tions. She wants to focus on getting her team
ready for playing into April.
Its irrelevant to me, the Hall of Fame
coach said during the Pac-12 media day
Monday. We plan to pick up where we left
off.
Stanford, which has reached the Final Four
in each of the past ve seasons, is an over-
whelming favorite to repeat as Pac-12 cham-
pion, receiving the maximum of 11 rst-place
votes in a poll of conference coaches.
California, which returns nearly everybody
from a team that advanced to the second
round of the NCAA tournament last season,
got the other rst-place vote and came in sec-
ond.
I expected us to be picked second, Cal
coach Lindsay Gottlieb said. Obviously,
Stanford is such a worthy champion. They are
champions until someone dethrones them.
The Cardinal has won or shared the last 12
conference titles and owns a 78-game winning
streak against conference teams.
UCLA was chosen third, followed by
Southern California, Arizona State, Oregon
State, Utah, Washington, Colorado,
Washington State, Oregon and Arizona.
The Cardinal, who will have both of their
exhibition games televised by Pac-12
Networks, also bring a 79-game home win-
ning streak into the season.
It wasnt that long ago we had six teams in
the NCAA tournament, Arizona State coach
Charli Turner Thorne said. I hope this year
we can get four or five teams selected.
Lindsay did a fabulous job last year and Cal is
in position to have a great year nationally. But
they have to do that.
The introduction of the Pac-12 Networks
this year has coaches excited about the
prospects of broadcasting their games to the
rest of the nation. Other than Stanford, most
say the rest of the country doesnt know how
competitive teams are in the conference.
I had to wrap my head around the fact that
in the Pac-12 no game was going to be easy,
Utah redshirt junior Taryn Wicijowski said of
the Utes rst year in the Pac-12. There can
never be a game you can take off mentally.
You have to be prepared for every game
because the physical play against high caliber
players was great.
SPORTS 13
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA After a pair of games in
the span of five days, a Monday night
matchup was a welcome sight on the schedule
for the San Francisco 49ers.
With 10 days between the 49ers 13-6 win
against Seattle and a trip to Arizona, coach
Jim Harbaugh has the opportunity to give his
team some much-needed
rest. The 49ers had the
weekend off and, after a
light practice Monday,
wont practice again until
Thursday as preparation
for the Cardinals ramps
up.
I spent every waking
and asleep moment with
my wife and kids,
Harbaugh said.
Wonderful weekend, every minute of it was
with them.
Despite the arduous task of playing a
Thursday night game following a Sunday
game, San Francisco can still be considered a
generally healthy team.
I believe it will be, especially as the week
goes on, Harbaugh said. A lot of our guys
came in and lifted and got treatment (over the
weekend).
Running back Frank Gore, who left
Thursdays game with bruised ribs, was on the
eld Monday as the team practiced in shells
and helmets.
He said it was good to move around a little
bit and doesnt expect the injury to hinder his
play moving forward.
(Running backs coach Tom) Rathman just
wanted to be smart (against Seattle), said
Gore, who lamented he could have remained
in the game. We have other backs who can
play the game pretty well. He didnt want it to
get any worse.
With two days off, Gores attention will still
be on football.
Its basically like a mini bye week, he
said. We appreciate it a whole lot. We get our
bodies back. Watch a little lm and chill out,
relax.
Gore has missed at least one game due to
injury in all but one (2006) of his rst seven
seasons in the NFL coming into this season.
Harbaugh said there was no plan to limit
Gores touches in order to preserve him for
later in the season.
With 601 yards on 103 carries through
seven games, Gore is on pace for 1,373 yards,
which would rank as the second-best total of
his career.
His 5.8 yards per carry is the best average of
his career, outpacing his 5.4-yard clip in 2006,
when he rushed for a career-high 1,695 yards.
Hes doing a great job, Harbaugh said.
Been very productive when he has had the
ball in his hands.
Wide receiver Mario Manningham sat out
the game against Seattle due to a shoulder
injury sustained in the game against the New
York Giants, but he is also expected to play
against Arizona. Manninghams injury
occurred on the rst play against the Giants,
but he stayed in for the rest of the game.
49ers recovering after
two games in five days
Jim Harbaugh
Stanford womens basketball picked to win Pac-12
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA Oakland Raiders coach
Dennis Allen likes the production his team is
getting out of the no-huddle offense.
The Raiders scored two touchdowns and a
field goal running the no-huddle against
Jacksonville on Sunday, when they overcame
a 14-point decit in the third quarter and went
on to beat the Jaguars in
overtime 26-23.
It was the second game
this season in which quar-
terback Carson Palmer has
engineered a fourth-quar-
ter comeback. Both times
he did it while running the
no-huddle.
The question for Allen
is: How much is too much?
Offensive coordinator
Greg Knapp continues to be criticized for his
play-calling. The running game is barely
showing signs of life. Pass protection for
Palmer has been shaky at best.
It worked for us against Pittsburgh and it
worked for us yesterday but its one of those
things where you dont want to hang your hat
on a no-huddle offense, running back Darren
McFadden said Monday. We know were
going to have to use it when we can. When we
go out there and use it, were running it pretty
good.
Yet Allen isnt ready to commit to the no-
huddle full-time.
While Palmer has looked comfortable call-
ing his own plays at the line of scrimmage
something he did earlier in his career in
Cincinnati the Raiders plan to use the no-
huddle only as a part of their offensive pack-
age and not a regular thing.
Its something that, on a week-to-week
basis, we try to determine how much well use
it, Allen said. Obviously, we were not exe-
cuting in the rst half on offense. It was the
worst half of football weve played offensive-
ly. But we knew we needed to do something to
try to change some things up and the no-hud-
dle worked good for us.
Oaklands offense sputtered throughout the
rst half against Jacksonville and managed
only two Sebastian Janikowski eld goals
before halftime.
After a three-and out on the Raiders open-
ing possession in the third quarter, the deci-
sion was made to go to the no-huddle and
Oakland scored on three of its next ve drives
to force overtime.
Palmer completed only 56.5 percent of his
passes against the Jaguars but was 9 of 13 for
118 yards while running the no-huddle.
Afterward, Palmer talked about the value of
the no-huddle for Oaklands sluggish offense.
We tired (the Jaguars) out a little bit, espe-
cially in their secondary, Palmer said. It got
them tired, kept things off balance and it was
a great halftime adjustment by coach Knapp.
Palmer also used the no-huddle during a
comeback win against Pittsburgh on Sept. 23.
One of the biggest plays in that game came
when the Raiders quarterback checked out of
the original call and made a small tweak that
resulted in McFaddens 64-yard touchdown
run.
Its worked well in some situations and in
others it hasnt worked well, Allen said. Its
kind of a feel on how the game is going. In the
game (Sunday) ... it seemed to increase our
focus offensively and we executed better
offensively.
Raiders getting production
out of the no-huddle offense
Dennis Allen
SPORTS 14
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
fth straight game.
After falling behind 3-1 in the series at Busch
Stadium, the Giants outscored the wild-card
Cardinals 20-1 over the nal three games
behind stellar starting pitching from Barry Zito,
Ryan Vogelsong and Cain.
They also beneted from some strange
bounces.
On Pences double that highlighted a ve-run
third, his bat broke at the label on impact, then
the broken barrel hit the ball twice more. That
put a rolling, slicing spin on the ball and caused
it to change directions leaving shortstop Pete
Kozma little chance to make the play. Kozma
broke to his right, guring thats where the ball
would go, but it instead curved to left-center.
Injured closer Brian Wilson, with that out-of-
control bushy black beard, danced in the dugout
and fans in the sellout crowd of 43,056 kept
twirling their orange rally towels even through
rain in the late innings a downright down-
pour when Sergio Romo retired Matt Holliday
on a popup to Scutaro to end it.
Romo embraced catcher Buster Posey as re-
works went off over McCovey Cove beyond
right eld.
The NL West champion Giants won their rst
postseason clincher at home since the 2002
NLCS, also against the Cardinals.
These 2012 Giants have a couple of pretty
talented castoffs of their own not so different
from that winning combination of 2010
castoffs and mists as Bochy referred to his
bunch with Scutaro right there at the top of
the list this time around.
Acquired July 27 from the division rival
Colorado Rockies, Scutaro hit .500 (14 for 28)
with four RBIs in the NLCS. The 36-year-old
journeyman inelder, playing in his second
postseason and rst since 2006 with Oakland,
became the rst player in major league history
with six multihit games in an LCS.
Now, hes headed to his rst World Series.
The Giants have All-Star game MVP Melky
Cabrera to thank for helping his teammates
secure home-eld advantage in the postseason
while Cain was the winning pitcher the
National Leagues 8-0 victory in July. Cabrera
was suspended 50 games Aug. 15 for a positive
testosterone test, then wasnt added to the roster
by the Giants after his suspension ended.
After rain fell on the Cardinals during batting
practice, the skies turned blue and the weather
cooperated. Anxious players on both sides hung
over the dugout rails as the game began.
Cain joined St. Louis Chris Carpenter as the
only pitchers with victories in two winner-take-
all games in the same postseason. Carpenter,
who lost Games 2 and 6 in this series, did it last
year.
Cain also pitched the Giants Game 5 division
series clincher at Cincinnati, when San
Francisco became the rst team in major league
history to come back from an 0-2 decit in a
ve-game series by winning three consecutive
road games.
He delivered on an even bigger stage Monday
as San Francisco saved its season once again.
The Giants won their 20th NL pennant and
reached their 19th World Series.
Cain walked off the mound to a standing ova-
tion when Jeremy Affeldt entered with two outs
in the sixth. Affeldt then got Daniel Descalso to
pop out with two runners on.
Yadier Molina had four hits but got little help
from the rest of the Cardinals, who went 1 for
21 with runners in scoring position over their
nal three games.
Cain added an RBI single to his cause and got
some sparkling defense behind him.
The play of the game went to shortstop
Brandon Crawford, who made a leaping catch
of Kyle Lohses liner to end the second inning
with runners on second and third that would
have been a run-scoring hit.
In the third, Scutaro, the second baseman,
made a tough stop on a short hop by Carlos
Beltran, and left elder Gregor Blanco ran
down a hard-hit ball by Allen Craig in left-
center to end the inning.
Cains second-inning single made San
Francisco the rst team in major league post-
season history to have a starting pitcher drive
in a run in three straight games.
Brandon Belt hit a solo homer in the eighth
for his rst clout of the postseason.
It took production from everybody, even the
pitchers, for these scrappy Giants to rally
back from the brink one more time.
Cain certainly did his part to keep the staff
rolling.
The 16-game winner, who didnt surrender
an earned run during his teams title run two
years ago, reached 46 pitches through two
innings but settled in nicely the rest of the
way to avenge a loss to Lohse in Game 3.
Cain even got to repay Holliday for his hard
slide into Scutaro at second base in Game 2
here a week earlier. Cain plunked Holliday in
the upper left arm leading off the sixth, draw-
ing cheers from the crowd.
The right-hander escaped trouble in the sec-
ond with runners on second and third when
Crawford made his catch.
Holliday returned to the lineup after missing
Game 6 a night earlier with tightness in his
lower back. He received loud boos when he
stepped in to hit in the rst from a fan base still
angry about his slide that injured Scutaros hip.
Beltran is still left 0-fer the World Series,
winless in three Game 7s during his 15-year
career. And to think just last fall he was on the
other side with the Giants as they missed the
playoffs a year after winning the clubs rst
World Series since moving West in 1958.
Continued from page 1
GIANTS
Scutaro wins NLCS MVP
REUTERS
Marco Scutaro singles in the seventh inning to tie the NLCS record for most hits in a single series
with 14. Scutaro hit .500 in the NLCS.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Marco Scutaro
looked up through the pouring rain, caught
Matt Hollidays popup for the nal out and
punched his ticket to the World Series for the
rst time at age 36.
In an NL championship series that saw
Scutaro absorb a hard and admitted late slide
from Holliday that strained the second base-
mans left hip, what a tting ending.
Scutaro tied the NLCS record with 14 hits to
earn MVP honors, capping off his remarkable
run with three singles and a walk in San
Franciscos 9-0 victory over the St. Louis
Cardinals on Monday night in the decisive
Game 7.
Scutaro batted .500 with two walks, scored
six runs and drove in four. Hideki Matsui
(2004 Yankees), Albert Pujols (2004
Cardinals) and Kevin Youkilis (2007 Red Sox)
also had 14 hits in an LCS. And Scutaros 10-
game hitting streak ties Cody Ross and Alvin
Dark for the longest in Giants postseason his-
tory.
Starting Wednesday night in San Francisco,
hell have a chance to break that mark when
the Giants host the Detroit Tigers in Game 1 of
the World Series.
The Giants acquired the Venezuelan native
in July at the trade deadline. It turned out to be
one of baseballs best moves, and easily one of
its most overlooked.
While the rival Dodgers spending spree
made headlines from coast-to-coast, the
Giants took on just $2.1 million of Scutaros
salary from Colorado in exchange for minor
leaguer Charlie Culberson.
All Scutaro has done since is make oppo-
nents pay and he earned a $75,000 bonus
for winning NLCS MVP honors in the
process.
He had a major impact even before October,
batting .339 after the All-Star break to power
the Giants playoff push. Scutaro has delivered
in the biggest moments in the postseason, and
in many ways, has become the 2012 version of
Ross.
The Giants plucked Ross off waivers in
August two years ago and watched him cap-
ture MVP honors in the NLCS against
Philadelphia and help lead them to the rst
World Series title since moving from New
York in 1958. And just like in 2010, general
manager Brian Sabeans move made the
biggest noise at the most key time.
Scutaro was hurt on Hollidays slide in the
rst inning of Game 2. Scutaro got even a few
innings later with his own big blow that
helped the Giants even the series and end an 0-
3 home slide in the postseason when he sin-
gled home two runs in San Franciscos four-
run fourth inning.
Another run scored on the bases-loaded hit
when Holliday misplayed the bouncing ball in
left eld. Scutaro left after the fth of that 7-1
win because of his damaged left hip on a play
Giants manager Bruce Bochy felt was illegal.
Scutaro never missed a game, and he never
stopped played all-out, either.
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 4 3 0 .571 217 163
Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 117
N.Y. Jets 3 4 0 .429 159 170
Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 171 227
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 6 1 0 .857 216 128
Indianapolis 3 3 0 .500 117 158
Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 149 238
Jacksonville 1 5 0 .167 88 164
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 5 2 0 .714 174 161
Pittsburgh 3 3 0 .500 140 132
Cincinnati 3 4 0 .429 166 187
Cleveland 1 6 0 .143 147 180
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 3 3 0 .500 170 138
San Diego 3 3 0 .500 148 137
Oakland 2 4 0 .333 113 171
Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104 183
ThursdaysGame
San Francisco 13, Seattle 6
SundaysGames
Minnesota 21, Arizona 14
Green Bay 30, St. Louis 20
Houston 43, Baltimore 13
N.Y. Giants 27,Washington 23
Dallas 19, Carolina 14
New Orleans 35,Tampa Bay 28
Indianapolis 17, Cleveland 13
Tennessee 35, Buffalo 34
Oakland 26, Jacksonville 23, OT
New England 29, N.Y. Jets 26, OT
Pittsburgh 24, Cincinnati 17
Open:Atlanta,Denver,Kansas City,Miami,Philadel-
phia, San Diego
MondaysGame
Chicago 13, Detroit 7
Thursday, Oct. 25
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 5:20 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 5 2 0 .714 205 137
Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125
Dallas 3 3 0 .500 113 133
Washington 3 4 0 .429 201 200
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113
New Orleans 2 4 0 .333 176 182
Tampa Bay 2 4 0 .333 148 136
Carolina 1 5 0 .167 106 144
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 5 1 0 .833 162 78
Minnesota 5 2 0 .714 167 131
Green Bay 4 3 0 .571 184 155
Detroit 2 4 0 .333 133 150
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 5 2 0 .714 165 100
Arizona 4 3 0 .571 124 118
Seattle 4 3 0 .571 116 106
St. Louis 3 4 0 .429 130 141
ThursdaysGame
San Francisco 13, Seattle 6
SundaysGames
Minnesota 21, Arizona 14
Green Bay 30, St. Louis 20
Houston 43, Baltimore 13
N.Y. Giants 27,Washington 23
Dallas 19, Carolina 14
New Orleans 35,Tampa Bay 28
Indianapolis 17, Cleveland 13
Tennessee 35, Buffalo 34
Oakland 26, Jacksonville 23, OT
New England 29, N.Y. Jets 26, OT
Pittsburgh 24, Cincinnati 17
Open:Atlanta,Denver,Kansas City,Miami,Philadel-
phia, San Diego
MondaysGame
Chicago 13, Detroit 7
Thursday, Oct. 25
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 5:20 p.m.
TUESDAY
GIRLSTENNIS
Notre Dame-Belmont at Mitty, Notre Dame-SJ at
Menlo School,Pinewood at Crystal Springs,Sacred
Heart Prep at Harker, 3:30 p.m.; Aragon at Mills,
Menlo-Atherton at Carlmont, Woodside at San
Mateo, Burlingame at Hillsdale, Westmoor at Se-
quoia, Oceana vs. El Camino at South City, South
City at Half Moon Bay,Terra Nova at Capuchino, 4
p.m.
GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Terra Nova at Menlo-Atherton, Carlmont at Hills-
dale, Mills at San Mateo, Burlingame at Aragon,
Capuchino at El Camino, South City at Sequoia,
Half Moon Bay at Jefferson, Woodside at West-
moor,5:15 p.m.; Sacred Heart Prep at Priory,Menlo
School at NotreDame-SJ,ICAat Mercy-Burlingame,
Kings Academy at Crystal Springs,5:45 p.m.; Notre
Dame-Belmont at St. Ignatius, 6:30 p.m.
GIRLSWATERPOLO
Woodside vs. San Mateo at Hillsdale, Mercy-
BurlingameatTerraNova,3p.m.;Millsat Half Moon
Bay, 4 p.m.; Menlo School at Hillsdale, 4:15 p.m.
BOYSWATERPOLO
Sequoia at Terra Nova,4:15 p.m.;Mills at Half Moon
Bay, 5:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
BOYSWATERPOLO
Woodsideat Burlingame,MenloSchool at Aragon,
Carlmont at Menlo-Atherton, 5:15 p.m.; Sacred
Heart Prep at Serra, 5:30 p.m.
GIRLSWATERPOLO
Castilleja at Burlingame, Sequoia at Aragon, Carl-
mont at Menlo-Atherton, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY
GIRLSTENNIS
Valley Christian at Notre Dame-Belmont, Kings
Academy at Mercy-Burlingame, Menlo School at
Crystal Springs, Pinewood at Sacred Heart Prep,
3:30 p.m.; Woodside at Carlmont, Burlingame at
Menlo-Atherton, Aragon at San Mateo.
WHATS ON TAP
Most Hits, LeagueChampionshipSeries
Player,Team,Yr. H PA
Marco Scutaro, SF, 2012 14 30
Kevin Youkilis, Bos, 2007 14 33
Hideki Matsui, NYY, 2004 14 36
Albert Pujols, StL, 2004 14 32
Javy Lopez, Atl, 1996 13 28
Will Clark, SF, 1989 13 22
David Freese, StL, 2011 12 25
David Ortiz, Bos, 2004 12 35
Mark Lemke, Atl, 1996 12 31
Jay Bell, Pit, 1991 12 30
Tim Raines, CWS, 1993 12 29
Devon White,Tor, 1993 12 28
NLCS HITS
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
DETROITTIGERSNamed Scott Bream director
of pro scouting.
MINNESOTATWINSNamedTomBrunanskyhit-
ting coach,Bobby Cuellar bullpen coach and Terry
Steinbach bench coach and catching instructor.
Announced Scott Ullger will coach rst base in ad-
dition to outeld instruction and Joe Vavra will
coach third base in addition to ineld instruction.
SEATTLEMARINERSNamed Dave Hansen hit-
ting coach.
TORONTOBLUEJAYSClaimed C Bobby Wilson
off waivers from the L.A. Angels.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIESNamed Mark Wiley di-
rector of pitching operations.
TRANSACTIONS
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
End
Regular
Season
Playoffs
TBA
vs.Miami
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/9
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
@Rams
10 a.m.
FOX
12/2
vs.Bears
5:00p.m.
ESPN
11/19
@Saints
1:20p.m.
FOX
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/11
Bye
vs.Broncos
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
12/6
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
vs.Browns
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/2
vs.Tampa
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/4
@Ravens
10a.m.
CBS
11/11
vs.Saints
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/18
@Bengals
10a.m.
CBS
11/25
vs.Detroit
5:07p.m.
Oct. 24
vs.Detroit
5:07p.m.
Oct. 25
@Detroit
5:07p.m.
Oct. 27
@Detroit
5:07p.m.
Oct. 28
@Detroit
5:07p.m.
if necessary
Oct. 29
in the Mustangs 40-30 win.
Ewings rst touch of the game was
good for an 82-yard touchdown run
a sign of things to come.
Serras Eric Redwood had a typi-
cal day at the ofce for the Padres.
After going into halftime tied 7-7
against Sacred Heart Cathedral, No.
2 took over. He rushed for 150 yards
on 22 carries and a touchdown.
Over in Daly City, the reigning
Daily Journal Athlete of the Week
Anthony Skruratov ran for touch-
downs of 3 and 8 yards, and he
added a 44-yard TD reception in a
romp of the Indians. His teammates,
Keven Cuhna, added three touch-
downs of his own (3, 3 and 8 yards).
Sequoias Mike Taylor defined
the dual-threat quarterback. In a 32-
7 win over Woodside, Taylor n-
ished the night with 144 yards pass-
ing and 124 rushing. As a team,
Sequoia gained 464 yards.
SAN MATEO DEFENSE
Last season, the Bearcats had the
worst statistical defense in the PAL.
This season, theyre 3-0 in the Lake
Division so far because theyve
turned that around.
San Mateo forced ve Vikings
turnovers, including three intercep-
tions, and held them to just four rst
downs two in each half in a
dominating win over Mills.
The Bearcats recorded three sacks
and held Mills to just 101 yards of
total offense.
Sione Hafoka had a huge game
for San Mateo. Those three sacks
were his. He also forced and recov-
ered a fumble.
BRIEFLY
Alex Lay of Carlmont volleyball
had nine service aces in two match-
es last week. Lay is only a fresh-
man. ... Ellie Shannon of Sacred
Heart Prep volleyball racked up 37
kills and 8 blocks in two matches. ...
Ian Santos of El Camino football
three two touchdowns passes and
ran for another in El Caminos win
over Carlmont. ... At the
North/South water polo tournament,
Will Runkel of Sacred Heart Prep
continued his superb play in the
cage. He had 35 saves in a fth
place finish for the Gators. ...
Runkels teammate Zach Churukian
scored a hat trick and assisted on
three more goals in a win against
Serra.
SPORTS 15
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Continued from page 12
ROLL
Money for reservations can be
sent to the Burlingame High
School Association at 1 Mangini
Way, Burlingame, CA 94010 or
call Michael McQueen at 650-591-
3194.
This years Hall of Fame class
includes: coach Elmer Schaake,
Bob Hamilton (1950 graduate),
Rusty Knudsen (1974), Christine
Bibbes Brock (1977), Dan Rosaia
(1982), Charissa Cramer
Shaughnessy (1991), Brian Carson
(1992), Melissa Mizel (1994), Dan
Uharriet (1994) and Haley Woods
(2002).
***
I have come to the realization
that my daughter will probably
never be an elite athlete. She just
doesnt seem that into sports. At
least traditional athletics. She has
balked at water polo as well as soc-
cer and doesnt seem to have in any
interest in softball or basketball.
Which is ne. But my hopes of
an athletic kid have not been com-
pletely dashed. Sunday, she had her
rst 4H meeting for the sport of
archery. It was nothing her mother
or I pushed her to do and she has
no idea about The Hunger
Games. But as long as she wants
to try it, well give her our full sup-
port. Besides, archery is an
Olympic sport. Maybe she turns
out to be a phenom. Only time will
tell.
She is also raising a guinea pig
for 4H as well.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by
email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com or
by phone: 344-5200 ext. 117. He can
also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 12
LOUNGE
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Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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GENEVA Seven lines of blanks. From
1999 to 2005. There will be no Tour de France
winner in the record book for those years.
Once the toast of the Champs-Elysees,
Lance Armstrong was formally stripped of his
seven Tour titles Monday and banned for life
for doping.
As far as the Tour is con-
cerned, his victories never
happened. He was never
on the top step of the podi-
um. The winners yellow
jersey was never on his
back.
The decision by the
International Cycling
Union marked an end to
the saga that brought down
the most decorated rider in Tour history and
exposed widespread cheating in the sport.
Lance Armstrong has no place in cycling,
and he deserves to be forgotten in cycling,
said Pat McQuaid, president of the governing
body. Make no mistake, its a catastrophe for
him, and he has to face up to that.
Its also devastating for Tour de France
organizers, who have to carve seven gaping
holes from the honor roll of the sports biggest
event and airbrush Armstrongs image from a
sun-baked podium on the Champs-Elysees.
No more rides through Paris for the grim-
faced cancer survivor bearing the American
ag. No champagne. From the sports per-
spective, its all gone.
We wish that there is no winner for this
period, Tour director Christian Prudhomme
said Monday in Paris. For us, very clearly,
the titles should remain blank. Effectively, we
wish for these years to remain without win-
ners.
Armstrongs ercely defended reputation as
a clean athlete was shattered by the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency two weeks ago, when it
detailed evidence of drug use and trafcking
by his Tour-winning teams. USADA released
its report to show why it ordered Armstrong
banned from competition back in August.
Mondays judgment by the UCI was just the
necessary next legal step to formalize the loss
of his titles and expel him from the sport.
ICU comes down on Armstrong
Lance
Armstrong
Ill have to learn a lot about them real
soon, to be honest, Giants manager Bruce
Bochy said.
I know what a great club they are. And we
know all about the guy were going to be fac-
ing opening day and their whole staff, he
said. They swept the Yankees, that tells you
how good they are.
Verlander will throw the rst pitch for the
Tigers. Bochy said he hasnt looked that far in
advance.
Its certainly a unique pairing. Both fran-
chises have been around for well over a cen-
tury and are stacked with Hall of Famers
Willie Mays, Ty Cobb, Carl Hubbell, Al
Kaline and many more yet theyve never
faced each other in the postseason.
Not too much recent history, either. The
clubs have played only 12 games since inter-
league action began in 1995, most recently
last year at Comerica Park. That series was
notable because the Tigers fired pitching
coach Rick Knapp following the nal game, a
day after Barry Zito and the Giants trounced
Max Scherzer in a 15-3 romp.
From Day One of spring training, were
getting ready for this, Giants center elder
Angel Pagan said. Were going to be ready.
Were going to just keep playing baseball like
we do.
Much has changed since then.
Prince Fielder arrived in Detroit this year
after a season-ending injury to Victor
Martinez, and teamed with Cabrera as a most
formidable tandem in the middle of the line-
up.
Melky Cabrera joined the Giants and won
MVP honors at the All-Star game. But he was
suspended 50 games by Major League
Baseball a month later for a positive testos-
terone test, and isnt on the postseason roster.
The Giants bolstered their ineld by trading
for scrappy Marco Scutaro in late July, and he
became the MVP of the NL championship
series. They fortied their outeld a few days
later by getting Pence from Philadelphia.
Earlier this year, Pences bad-hop grounder
broke a bone below Cabreras eye and caused
a bloody gash that needed eight stitches to
close. Cabrera recovered ne, and will be the
rst Triple Crown winner to play in the World
Series since Carl Yastrzemski and Boston lost
in 1967.
Theres been a lot of shuffling in the
bullpens this year.
Closer Brian Wilson helped San Francisco
win the 2010 World Series, but is out this sea-
son because of an elbow injury. The bearded
reliever became a loud cheerleader in the
dugout as the Giants overcame a 2-0 decit
against Cincinnati in the best-of-ve division
series, then rallied from a 3-1 hole to beat the
Cardinals in the NLCS.
San Francisco closed out the Cards 9-0 on
Monday night, getting the nal out in a driv-
ing rainstorm at AT&T Park.
The Tigers, back in the World Series for the
rst time since 2006 and trying to win their
rst crown since Sparky Andersons gang in
1984, relied on excitable closer Jose Valverde
until the playoffs. But when he struggled
against the Athletics and Yankees, Leyland
looked for other options.
Leyland has certainly had time to prepare
for this matchup not that its a good thing.
The Tigers will have had ve days off since
dismantling the Yankees, and the 67-year-old
manager has done more than gure out how to
use ALCS MVP Delmon Young when theres
no designated hitter at in San Francisco.
The Tigers also had nearly a week off
before starting the 2006 World Series, and the
team from the Rust Belt looked rusty. Detroit
pitchers made ve errors in a ve-game wipe-
out by the Cardinals.
A troubling trend, perhaps: Three previous
times one LCS ended in a sweep while the
other went seven games, and each time the
team that played Game 7 easily won the
World Series.
Then again, the Tigers have Verlander total-
ly rested for the opener.
The reigning AL MVP and Cy Young
Award winner is dominating this postseason,
going 3-0 with a 0.74 ERA, striking out 25 in
24 1-3 innings. Hardly the form he ashed in
the All-Star game, when he couldnt control
his 100 mph heat and Sandovals triple high-
lighted a ve-run rst inning.
Cain wound up with the win, the NL
romped and earned home-eld advantage in
the World Series.
Zito is likely to pitch Game 1 for Bochys
bunch. Left off the postseason roster in 2010
his poor pitching didnt t with the Giants
self-described group of mists he has
resurrected his career this year and made a
key start in the NLCS.
Not so sure is what will become of Tim
Lincecum. A star on the title team two years
ago, the shaggy-haired two-time Cy Young
winner struggled this season. Bumped from
the playoff rotation, he excelled in the bullpen
and earned a start, but was shaky in Game 4
against St. Louis.
Continued from page 11
SERIES
HEALTH 21
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By David Dishneau
and Matthew Perrone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HAGERSTOWN, Md. The
highly caffeinated Monster Energy
Drink has been cited in ve deaths
and one non-fatal heart attack,
according to reports that the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration is
investigating.
The reports claim that people had
adverse reactions after they con-
sumed Monster Energy Drink,
which comes in 24-ounce cans and
contains 240 milligrams of caffeine,
or seven times the amount of the
caffeine in a 12-ounce cola.
Although the FDA is investigat-
ing the allegations, which date back
to 2004, the agency said the reports
dont necessarily prove that the
drinks caused the deaths or injuries.
As with any reports of a death or
injury the agency receives, we take
them very seriously and investigate
diligently, Shelly Burgess, a FDA
spokeswoman, said in a statement.
News of the FDAs investigation
follows a ling last week of a wrong-
ful death suit in Riverside, Calif., by
the parents of a 14-year-old girl who
died after drinking two, 24-ounce
Monster Energy Drinks in 24 hours.
An autopsy concluded that she died
of cardiac arrhythmia due to caffeine
toxicity and the medical examiner
also found that she had an inherited
disorder that can weaken blood ves-
sels. But the childs parents claim
Monster failed to warn about the
risks of drinking its products.
Monster Beverage Corp., which
touts on its website that the
Monster Energy Drink is a killer
energy brew and the meanest
energy supplement on the planet,
puts labels on cans that state that
the drinks are not recommended for
children and people who are sensi-
tive to caffeine. The company,
based in Corona, Calif., did not
immediately respond to calls seek-
ing comment on Monday, but said
last week that it is unaware of any
fatality anywhere that has been
caused by its drinks.
Monster is among a growing
group of energy drinks on the mar-
ket. Energy drinks are a tiny part of
the carbonated soft drink market,
representing about 3 percent of
sales volume, according to a recent
report by industry tracker Beverage
Digest. But at a time when soda
consumption is declining, energy
drinks are becoming more popular:
Last year, sales volume for energy
drinks rose by nearly 17 percent.
FDA: Five reported deaths with Monster drink link
Monster Energy Drink comes in 24-ounce cans and contains 240 milligrams
of caffeine, or seven times the amount of the caffeine in a 12-ounce cola.
HEALTH
22
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pediatricians offer first report on organic foods
By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO Parents who want to reduce their kids
exposure to pesticides may seek out organic fruit and veg-
etables, but they arent necessarily safer or more nutritious
than conventional foods, the nations leading pediatricians
group says in its first advice on organics.
Science hasnt proven that eating pesticide-free food
makes people any healthier, the American Academy of
Pediatrics said.
Theoretically there could be negative effects, especially
in young children with growing brains, but rigorous scien-
tific evidence is lacking, said Dr. Janet Silverstein, a co-
author of the academys new report and a pediatric endocri-
nologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville.
We just cant say for certain that organics is better with-
out long-term controlled studies, she said.
The report was published online Monday in Pediatrics
and echoes a Stanford University study released last month.
That research concluded that while eating organic fruit and
vegetables can reduce pesticide exposure, the amount meas-
ured in conventionally grown produce was within safety
limits.
Since organic foods tend to be costlier, a good strategy
for penny-pinching parents concerned about pesticides is to
buy only organic versions of foods with the most pesticide
residue including apples, peaches, strawberries and cel-
ery, Silverstein said.
But the pediatricians group says higher prices on organic
foods might lead some parents to buy fewer fruit and veg-
etables not a good strategy since both have health bene-
fits including reducing risks for obesity, heart disease and
some cancers.
Parents should aim to provide their families a diet rich in
fruit and vegetables, whether organic or not, along with
plenty of whole grains and low-fat or fat-free dairy prod-
ucts, the report says.
A good strategy for penny-pinching parents concerned about pesticides is to buy only organic versions of foods with the
most pesticide residue including apples, peaches, strawberries and celery.
HEALTH 23
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO Cheerleading isnt just
jumping and waving pompoms it has
become as athletic and potentially as danger-
ous as a sport and should be designated one
to improve safety, the nations leading group
of pediatricians says.
The number of cheerleaders injured each
year has climbed dramatically in the last two
decades. Common stunts that pose risks
include tossing and ipping cheerleaders in
the air and creating human pyramids that
reach 15 feet high or more.
In a new policy statement released online
Monday in the journal Pediatrics, the
American Academy of Pediatrics says school
sports associations should designate cheer-
leading as a sport, and make it subject to
safety rules and better supervision. That
would include on-site athletic trainers, limits
on practice time and better qualied coaches,
the academy says.
Just like other athletes, cheerleaders should
be required to do conditioning exercises and
undergo physical exams before joining the
squad, the new policy says.
Not everyone is fully aware of how cheer-
leading has evolved over the last couple of
decades. It used to be just standing on the
sidelines and doing cheers and maybe a few
jumps, said Dr. Cynthia LaBella, a sports
medicine specialist at Chicagos Lurie
Childrens Hospital and an author of the new
policy.
But she said cheerleading often results in
injuries that include severe sprains, broken
arms and legs, neck injuries and concussions.
Last year, there were almost 37,000 emer-
gency room visits for cheerleading injuries
among girls aged 6 to 22, according to data
from the Consumer Product Safety
Commission. Thats more than four times
higher than in 1980, when cheerleading was
tamer.
While there are still traditional cheerlead-
ing squads that support schools athletic
teams, some schools and private clubs have
separate cheerleading teams that compete
against other teams.
Kali Wald of Elburn, Ill., suffered a serious
concussion last year during an acrobatic rou-
tine with her high schools competitive team;
teammates tossed her in the air but she land-
ed wrong twice, rst on her upper back and
neck, then on her head. She blacked out for
several minutes.
Her father, Dave Wald, said her coaches
didnt realize she was seriously injured and
never called an ambulance. She still has
short-term memory loss and cant attend
school full-time because of dizziness,
headaches and other concussion symptoms.
Kali, 18, said she believes that cheerlead-
ing should be considered a sport and made
safer.
Her father agreed and said there needs to be
better awareness about the rigors of cheer-
leading and the potential risks.
Injuries have increased as cheerleading has
become more popular. Data suggest there are
more than 3 million cheerleaders nationwide
aged 6 and older, mostly girls. That includes
about 400,000 in high school, according to
data cited in the new policy.
While the overall injury rate in high school
cheerleading is lower than in other girls
sports, including gymnastics, soccer and eld
hockey, the rate of catastrophic injuries like
skull fractures and paralyzing spine injuries
is higher, the academy noted.
Kasey Bronstein, 14, and her sister Kori,
17, of Mahwah, N.J., both tore a knee tendon
while cheerleading for a private competitive
team run by their parents. They twisted their
knees doing acrobatic moves while standing
on the raised-up hands of their teammates.
They had knee surgery last November, fol-
lowed by extensive physical therapy, and
have returned to cheerleading.
Both said it should be considered a sport
but they also think its already pretty safe.
Theyre kind of making it too safe, taking
out skills that are very exciting to do, Kori
said. That includes a double ip stunt no
longer allowed on her team.
Some schools and state high school sports
associations already consider cheerleading a
sport and require the kind of safety oversight
that the academy is recommending. But many
do not, said Jim Lord, executive director of
the American Association of Cheerleading
Coaches & Administrators. Some dont con-
sider it a sport because not all cheerleading
squads are involved in their own competi-
tions, he said.
Lord said the academys policy mirrors
many of his groups safety recommendations
for high schools and colleges.
That includes limiting the height of human
pyramids in high school cheerleading to just
two people. The academy also says routines
that include pyramids, tumbling or tosses
should not be performed on hard surfaces.
Lisa Kluchorosky, a sports medicine spe-
cialist who works with the academy and the
National Athletic Trainers Association, said
the new policy will help erase misconcep-
tions that cheerleading is not very athletic.
Doctors: Cheerleading needs safety rules
Last year, there were almost 37,000 emergency room visits for cheerleading injuries among
girls aged 6 to 22, according to data from the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
24
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/WORLD 25
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Trenton Daniel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CARACOL, Haiti Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton encouraged foreign-
ers to invest in Haiti as she and her husband
Bill led a star-studded delegation gathered
Monday to inaugurate a new industrial park at
the center of U.S. efforts to help the country
rebuild after the 2010 earthquake.
Actors Sean Penn and Ben Stiller, fashion
designer Donna Karan and British business
magnate Richard Branson were among the
luminaries at the opening of the new Caracol
Industrial Park, which is projected to create
thousands of jobs more than 100 miles from
the quake-ravaged capital of Port-au-Prince.
Hillary Rodham Clinton told a roomful of
investors gathered for a luncheon that she had
made Haiti a priority when she became
Secretary of State.
We had learned that supporting long-
term prosperity in Haiti meant more than
providing aid, she said. It required
investments in infrastructure and the econ-
omy that would help the Haitian people
achieve their own dreams.
So we shifted our assistance to invest-
ments to address some of the biggest chal-
lenges facing this country: creating jobs and
sustainable economic growth, she added.
Earlier Monday, thousands of Haitians lined
the roadway to wave at her motorcade as it
wound its way from the airport. Hillary
Rodham Clinton and other U.S. ofcials,
including Labor Secretary Hilda Solis and
Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from
Vermont, toured a housing development for
industrial park workers supported by the U.S.
Agency for International Development.
The Secretary of State noted there were
three presidents gathered in one room to cele-
brate the opening: her husband, former
American President Bill Clinton, current
Haitian President Michel Martelly and his
predecessor Rene Preval.
Bill Clinton, now a U.N. special envoy for
Haiti, arrived in Caracol separately from his
wife.
The Clintons and their allies hope that the
$300 million industrial facility will transform
the northern part of this impoverished country
by providing thousands of desperately needed
jobs.
But some Haitians say the industrial park
does little more than replicate failed efforts
from the past and will benet outsiders more
than Haitians. They also worry it will harm
some of the few pieces of undamaged envi-
ronment that still exist in Haiti.
Its really all-in on this project, and theres
a high bar to deliver, said Laurent Dubois, a
historian who teaches at Duke University and
is author of Haiti: The Aftershocks of
History. It really needs to deliver in a big
way so that people will think, yeah, this was
the right thing to do.
The stakes are high in large part because the
Clintons have been so heavily involved.
The Caracol project was in the works before
the earthquake but it became a top priority for
the Obama administration soon after the dis-
aster. Hillary Rodham Clintons chief of staff,
Cheryl Mills, has made almost monthly visits
to the site on Haitis northern coast.
Bill Clinton also took an interest. He attend-
ed the projects groundbreaking a year ago
with Martelly.
The $124 million put in by the U.S. makes
the park Washingtons biggest single invest-
ment in the aftermath of the quake and it is
certain to shape the legacy of the Clintons,
who last visited Haiti together in 1975 on a
wedding gift following their honeymoon in
Mexico.
Mondays trip is Hillary Rodham Clintons
third to Haiti since the earthquake, and there
have been more than a dozen visits by her
husband, who was co-chairman of an earth-
quake recovery panel before its mandate
ended a year ago.
The industrial park to be inaugurated by the
Clintons was built on a 617-acre (250-
hectare) site meant to decentralize Haitis
economy away from the crowded capital of
Port-au-Prince and help develop the long-neg-
lected countryside.
The anchor tenant is South Korean apparel
giant Sae-A Trading Co. Ltd, which begun
production in May. It has agreed to create
20,000 permanent jobs within six years and
also build 5,000 houses. Backers say the
entire park has the potential to generate up to
65,000 jobs in all.
Clintons land in Haiti to showcase industrial park
brother.
With few family members living nearby,
Garcia sees her roommates as part of her fam-
ily now although she doesnt want to be too
motherly toward them. Some of her room-
mates are not as communicative as she is and
she looks out for them, always encouraging
them if they feel bullied or depressed. The
group home she lives in is managed by Parca,
a nonprot agency that offers housing and
other services for those who have disabilities.
Parca helps people with developmental dis-
abilities live independent lives.
The right job
While her home needs are taken care of, she
still needs help and direction in nding the
right job.
One of Garcias recent jobs was doing some
landscape work alongside some of her house-
mates. She got the job through Community
Gatepath, which offers job coaching, training
and placement for adults with developmental
disabilities.
She does not like working outdoors, howev-
er, because she is highly allergic to bees.
She wants to nd another job to train for at
Gatepath, where she rst started receiving
services in 1991. The nonprot has a learning
and employment campus on Rollins Road in
Burlingame where dozens of people with
developmental and other disabilities get job
training.
One of the things she has learned over the
years is that sometimes she does not behave
appropriately while at work.
She is a hugger.
I try to be professional, to get to work on
time and to show appropriate behavior. Ive
learned too that your boss is not your friend,
Garcia said.
She tries not to be too friendly but just cant
help herself sometimes.
I try not to be too clingy or attached, she
said. I can be annoying. Ill be honest with
you, Ive been red from a lot of jobs.
She does not have a cellphone because,
when she did, she talked on it too much with
her boyfriend and the bill climbed too high.
She does have a savings account but needs to
learn to manage her money better. She has
decided not to take another boyfriend until she
has a permanent job.
What the permanent job will be, she does
not know.
And while she has not always been
enthused about some of her many jobs, she
certainly has no problem getting up out of bed
to travel to one.
A typical day
In the group home, lights are out at 9 p.m.
on weekdays. Most in the home are up by 4:30
a.m.
Garcia makes her own breakfast and packs
a lunch and then heads out to catch an early-
morning SamTrans bus to wherever her work
might be.
It is still dark most days when she leaves her
home.
At night, cooking duties are handled by
Parca staff but the housemates have a set of
chores to do such as the dishes, bathroom duty
and laundry.
The home has four bedrooms. Each bed-
room has two women or two men. The women
have their own bathrooms and so do the men.
Parca staff members also take turns residing at
the house.
Lately, Garcia has been taking SamTrans
to the training center in Burlingame to learn
more skills.
The training center run by Community
Gatepath offers mock work stations, cus-
tomer service training, administrative skills
for entry-level office jobs, retail training and
more.
Staff conducts mock interviews and teach-
es computer classes.
Community Gatepath also contracts with
Oakland-based Numi Tea for some produc-
tion work that gives clients the real-life
experience of having a job.
One of Garcias roommates, Pedro, has
been doing some of this work recently.
Accomplishments
While Gatepath works to help Garcia have
a more independent life through job training
and coaching, she also finds time to recreate
and participate in the Special Olympics.
Garcia is a champion powerlifter who also
loves soccer. Her bedroom, which she shares
with a woman named Marki, is filled with
trophies and medals of her accomplish-
ments.
Socially, however, Garcia said she, likes
to do my own thing.
She volunteers at least twice a week at a
church in Burlingame where she helps serve
food to seniors or those in need.
Soon, she will have a goal-setting session
with Community Gatepath staff and her
social worker.
Some of her near-term goals are to eat
healthier and take some child-care classes.
She would also like to learn how to navigate
SamTrans better. She is a good reader but
sometimes the bus schedules can be hard to
understand, she said.
She still hasnt learned how to navigate
Caltrain, however, and wants to give it a try.
She mostly lives in the present and does not
look too far in the future.
Im still young. I have lots of time to gure
out what I want to do, Garcia said.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
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Developmental disabilities are a group of
conditions due to an impairment in
physical, learning, language or behavior
areas. About one in six children in the
United States has one or more
developmental disabilities or other
developmental delays, according to the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Developmental disabilities include:
Attention-decit/hyperactivity disorder;
Autism spectrum disorders;
Cerebral Palsy;
Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders;
Fragile X syndrome;
Hearing loss;
Intellectual disability;
Kernicterus;
Muscular dystrophy;
Tourette syndrome;
Vision impairment; and
Down syndrome.
What does it mean?
DATEBOOK 26
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY OCT. 23
POLST: What You Need to Know.
10:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Burlingame
Recreation Center, 850 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. Katie Eisman,
gerontologist and MA, will give a
lecture as part of the Free Health and
Wellness Lecture Series for Active
Adults and Seniors. For ages 55 and
older. Free. For more information call
558-7300.
Muscular Dystrophy Associations
Pacifica Lockup. Nicks Restaurant,
100 Rockaway Beach Ave., Pacifica.
MDA thanks Pacica Leaders, who will
be locked up for having big hearts at
the Muscular Dystrophy Associations
Pacica Lockup. Pacic Business and
Community Leaders will go behind
bars for good. They must raise bail
donations up to $2,400 to be freed,
which will help fund MDAs services,
including clinic visits and summer
camps, to Bay Area children and
families with neuromuscular diseases.
For more information or to participate
call (415) 673-7500.
Peninsula Volunteers Tuesday Tea
Lecture Series: California Ballot
Propositions (31-40). 1:30 p.m. to
2:30 p.m. Little House Activity Center.
800 Middle Road, Menlo Park.
Discussion of Californias ballot
propositions for the upcoming
election. Free for members, $3 for non-
members. For more information and
to make reservations call 326-2025
ext. 222.
Storybook Reading/Meet and
Greet. 3:30 p.m. Macys Center Court,
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st
Ave., San Mateo. Children are invited
to join KQED and Disney On Ice
presents 100 Years of Magic at
Hillsdale Shopping Center for a
storybook reading and visit from the
stars of the show. Free. For more
information call 345-8222 or visit
hillsdale.com.
Street Fighter Trivia Challenge. 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library,1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Team up with
four friends to answer questions and
win prizes. ages 13-19. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org
Make Your Own Body Care
Products. 6 p.m. to 7:30 pm. New Leaf
Community Markets, 150 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. Join Nichole
Garibaldi for a fun hands-on
workshop to learn how to make your
own body care products from all
natural ingredients that you can nd
at New Leaf. Preregistration required.
$10. For more information contact
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Tango, Night Club Two Step and
West Coast Swing. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. For
Beginners Only Tango 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Beginning West Coast Swing 7:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. Night Club Two Step 8
p.m. to 9 p.m. Intermediate West Coast
Swing 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. West
Cpast Swing Practice Session 9:30
p.m.to 10 p.m. $16 per class. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24
2-20-20 Acupuncture Event. 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m.Three Lotus Wellness Center,
Suite C, 328 N. San Mateo Drive, San
Mateo. Treat yourself to a relaxing 20
minute session of acupuncture. Free.
For more information visit
www.threelotusdragon.com.
Korean War Medals Awarded at SIR
Luncheon. Noon. Elks Lodge, 229 W.
20th Ave., San Mateo. Consul General
Lee of the Republic of Korea will
honor local Sons in Retirement
veterans of the Korean War with the
Ambassador for Peace Medal. No
host bar will also be available.
Reservation deadline Oct. 17. $20 for
lunch. If you are a Korean War Veteran
that served between 1950 and 1955
and wish to attend, please call the
reservation line at 573-1560.
Salsa and Argentine Tango. 1:30
p.m. to 4 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G,
Foster City. $16 per class. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Free ChocolateTaster and Wellness
Symposium. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Hilton Garden Inn, 2000 Bridgepointe
Circle, San Mateo. Taste 10 different
delicious Belgian chocolate products.
For more information contact
Wanda@choc4you.com.
Movie Bully. 7 p.m. Century 20
Theatres downtown, 825 Middleeld
Road, Redwood City. Documentary.
Opportunity to meet Bully producer
Lee Hirsch and meet Alex Libby, the
young man with Aspergers syndrome
featured in the film. Presented by
Community Gatepath. $20. To
purchase tickets visit
www.gatepath.com/possibilities.
College of San Mateo Political
Science professor Frank Damon
speaks at Burlingame Library. 7 p.m.
Lane Room, Burlingame Public
Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Damon will present a
lecture and discussion about the
presidential debates. Free. For more
information call 558-7444, ext. 2.
How the French Invented Love. 7
p.m. Town and Country Village, 855 El
Camino Real, Palo Alto. Marilyn Yalom
explores How the French Invented
Love with a journey through
centuries of French literature,
paintings, songs and cinema in her
quest to better understand the
unique qualities of the French love
experience. Free. For more
information call 321-0600.
Tia Carroll at Club Fox. 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. Must be
over 21. $5 at the door. For more
information visit
www.rwcbluesjam.com.
Salsa and Argentine Tango. 7:30
p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G,
Foster City. Beginning Argentine
Tango 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Salsa 8
p.m. to 9 p.m. Intermediate Argentine
Tango 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Practica
9:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. $16 per class.
For more information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
THURSDAY, OCT. 25
Healthy Eating with Ease. 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. City of San Mateo Senior
Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Guest chef Berlin Lillard II,
of 4ork N Road Catering, will provide
a nutrition presentation, a cooking
demonstration and a delicious lunch.
Free. For more information and to pre-
register by Oct. 11 call 522-7490.
San Mateo Rose Society meeting.
11 a.m. San Mateo Garden Center,
Rose Room, 605 Parkside Way, San
Mateo. Free. Slide show and talk by
Filoli docent. For more information
call 342-4956.
Pamela Cox-Otto Lectures on
Generational Communication. 11
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Skyline College,
Building 6, Room 6202, 3300 College
Drive, San Bruno. Free. For more
information call 738-4346.
Halloween Craft for Kids: Decorate
a Trick-or-Treat Bag. 3:30 p.m.
Belmont Library,1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Materials will be
provided. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org
Inuence Dementia Behaviors and
Outcomes. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Silverado Senior LivingLibrary, 1301
Ralston Ave., Belmont. For more
information call 654-9700.
K1 Speed South San Franciscos
Grand Opening Celebration. 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. K1 Speed, 160 Beacon St.
South San Francisco. Enjoy live
entertainment and exhilarating
racing. For more information call 741-
0215.
San Mateo Union High School
District Presents: College and
Career Fair 2012. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Hillsdale High School, 3115 Del
Monte St., San Mateo. Representatives
from UC, CSU and other colleges and
universities throughout the country
will be present. Free. For more
information visit
www.hhs.schoolloop.com.
Quickstep, Bachata and Salsa. 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
International Standard Level II
Quickstep 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bachata 7
p.m. to 8 p.m. International Standard
Level I Quickstep 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Salsa
8 p.m. to 9 p.m. $16 per class. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
FRIDAY, OCT. 26
Elections Division Opens and
Processes Vote by Mail Ballots. 8:30
a.m. Elections Ofce, 40 Tower Road,
San Mateo. The public is invited to
observe the process of opening and
processing returned Vote by Mail
ballots for the Nov. 6 election. Free.
For more information call 312-5222.
The Power of Possibilities
Recognition Event. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Sofitel San Francisco Bay, 223 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City. There
will be keynote presentations by Lee
Hirsch and Alex Libby of the
documentary Bully. For more
information and to purchase tickets
visit gatepath.com/possibilities.
Free Wine and Beer Tasting. 4p.m.
to 6 p.m. New Leaf Community
Markets, 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Free Friday happy hours.
Different selection each week. Must
be 21 or older. Free. For more
information email
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Artists Reception and Silent
Auction. 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Caldwell
Gallery, Hall of Justice, 400 County
Center, Redwood City. This event will
feature local artists with disabilities
and is co-sponsored by the San Mateo
County Board of Supervisors and the
Commission on Disabilities. $10. For
more information call 573-2700.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
information on ways to maximize the
main areas of development for children.
It also provides tips on mealtimes to vac-
cines to help establish routines for the
day-to-day needs of a child with a devel-
opmental disability.
AbilityPath has also produced two
groundbreaking reports on obesity and
bullying in the special needs community.
Finding Balance: Obesity and
Children with Special Needs presents
not only the extent and causes of the
problem, but also offers practical solu-
tions for families and others caring for
these children.
AbilityPath released Walk a Miles in
Their Shoes last year that raises aware-
ness that bullying of children with spe-
cial needs is one of the highest of any
other subgroup.
To learn more visit
www.abilitypath.org.
Continued from page 1
ONLINE
sanctions on Iran to halt nuclear
weapons development, the Republican
challenger responded that the U.S.
should have done more. He declared
repeatedly, Were four years closer to a
nuclear Iran.
Though their third and last face-to-
face debate was focused on foreign
affairs, both men reprised their cam-
paign-long disagreements over the U.S.
economy the top issue by far in opin-
ion polls as well as energy, education
and other domestic issues.
The two men did nd accord on more
than one occasion when it came to for-
eign policy.
Each stressed unequivocal support for
Israel when asked about a U.S. response
if the Jewish state were attacked by Iran.
If Israel is attacked, we have their
back, said Romney moments after
Obama vowed, I will stand with Israel
if Israel is attacked.
Both also said they oppose direct U.S.
military involvement in the efforts to
topple Syrian President Bashir Assad.
The debate produced none of the n-
ger-pointing and little of the interrupting
that marked the presidential rivals
debate last week, when Obama needed a
comeback after a listless performance in
their rst meeting on Oct. 3.
The nal debate behind them, both
men are embarking on a home-stretch
whirlwind of campaigning. The presi-
dent is slated to speak in six states dur-
ing a two-day trip that begins
Wednesday and includes a night aboard
Air force One as it ies from Las Vegas
to Tampa. Romney intends to visit two
or three states a day.
Already four million ballots have been
cast in early voting in more than two
dozen states.
Obama appears on course to win states
and the District of Columbia that
account for 237 of the 270 electoral
votes needed for victory. The same is
true for Romney in states with 191 elec-
toral votes. The battlegrounds account
for the remaining 110 electoral votes:
Florida (29), North Carolina (15),
Virginia (13), New Hampshire (4), Iowa
(6), Colorado (9), Nevada (6), Ohio (18)
and Wisconsin (10).
On Monday night, Obama said more
than once that Romney had been all
over the map with his positions. And
not necessarily putting new distance
between the two men. In fact, Romney
offered rare praise for the administra-
tions war efforts in Afghanistan.
The former Massachusetts governor
said the 2010 surge of 33,000 U.S.
troops was a success and asserted that
efforts to train Afghan security forces
are on track to enable the U.S. and its
allies to put the Afghans fully in charge
of security by the end of 2014. He said
that U.S. forces should complete their
withdrawal on that schedule; previously
he has criticized the setting of a specic
withdrawal date.
When it came to Iran, Romney
stressed that war is a last option to pre-
vent Tehran from developing a nuclear
weapon, softening the hawkish tone that
had been a hallmark of his campaign.
And Romney barely addressed the
simmering dispute over the administra-
tions handling of the attack on the U.S.
Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, that
killed the U.S. ambassador and three
other Americans.
But the debate was hardly all sweet-
ness and light.
On the Middle East, Romney said that
despite early hopes, the ouster of despot-
ic regimes in Egypt, Libya and else-
where over the past year has resulted in
a rising tide of chaos. He said the pres-
ident has failed to come up with a coher-
ent policy to grapple with change sweep-
ing the region, and he added ominously
that an al-Qaida-like group has taken
over northern Mali.
Anticipating one of Obamas most fre-
quent campaign assertions, Romney said
of the man seated nearby, I congratulate
him on taking out Osama bin Laden and
taking on the leadership of al-Qaida. But
we cant kill our way out of this mess. ...
We must have a comprehensive and
robust strategy.
More than a half hour later, Obama
returned to the subject, saying that
Romney had once said it wasnt worth
moving heaven and earth to catch one
man, a reference to the mastermind
behind the 9/11 terror attacks.
You said we should ask Pakistan for
permission, Obama said. And if we
had asked Pakistan permission, we
would not have gotten him. And it was
worth moving heaven and earth to get
him.
The president said he had ended the
war in Iraq, was on a path to end the U.S.
combat role in Afghanistan and has
vowed to bring justice to the Benghazi
attackers.
He also jabbed at Romneys having
said during the campaign that Russia is
the United States No. 1 geopolitical foe.
Governor, when it comes to our for-
eign policy you seem to want the poli-
cies of the 1980s, just like you want to
import the social policies of the 1950s
and the economic policies in the 1920s,
Obama said.
Obama took a mocking tone after
Romney, criticizing the administrations
Pentagon budget, said disapprovingly
the U.S. Navy has fewer ships than at
any time since the end of World War I.
I think Governor Romney maybe
hasnt spent enough time looking at how
our military works. You mentioned the
Navy, for example, that we have fewer
ships than we did in 1916. Well,
Governor, we also have fewer horses and
bayonets because the nature of our mili-
tary has changed. We have these things
called aircraft carriers where planes land
on them.
The televised debate brought no cessa-
tion to other campaigning.
Obamas campaign launched a televi-
sion ad in Florida that said the president
ended the war in Iraq and has a plan to
do the same in Afghanistan, accusing
Romney of opposing him on both. It was
not clear how often the ad would air,
given the falls overall focus on the
economy.
Vice President Joe Biden, campaign-
ing in Canton, Ohio, emphasized differ-
ences between the two candidates on the
war in Afghanistan.
We will leave Afghanistan in 2014,
period. They say it depends, he said.
Ladies and gentlemen, like everything
with them, it depends. It depends on
what day you nd these guys.
Romneys running mate, Wisconsin
Rep. Paul Ryan, was in Colorado. We
are in the midst of deciding the kind of
country were going to be, the kind of
people were going to be, for a genera-
tion, he said.
Whatever the outcome of the nal
face-to-face confrontation, the debates
have left an imprint on the race. Romney
was widely judged the winner of the rst
debate over a listless president on Oct. 3,
and he has risen in polls in the days
since. Obama was much more energetic
in the second.
Monday night marked the third time in
less than a week that the president and
his challenger shared a stage, following
the feisty 90-minute town-hall-style
meeting last Tuesday on Long Island and
a white-tie charity dinner two night later
where gracious compliments owed and
barbs dipped in humor ew.
Continued from page 1
DEBATE
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2012
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Be mindful of all those
little incidental expenditures when socializing with
friends who are in better shape fnancially than you
are. Trying to keep up could put you down.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Have faith in those to
whom you delegate some important assignments. If
you insist upon looking over their shoulders and ana-
lyzing their every move, youll hurt their performance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be a bit skeptical
of some insider information regardless of its source,
because it could easily be overrated. Dont take
everything that is told to you as the gospel truth.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Treating others
in a generous fashion is a commendable attribute,
but dont be stupid about it, either. Just because
someone has his or her hand out it doesnt mean
they deserve anything.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Dont try to achieve
an objective in a piecemeal fashion. In order to be
successful, youll need to coordinate your efforts so
that you dont trip over your own feet.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Usually youre not such
a gullible person that you believe everything you hear,
yet today, if youre not careful, you could be used as a
conduit for some damaging misinformation.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Even if you believe you
have some excellent fnancial advice to offer another,
keep it to yourself. Should the person misuse what
you say and suffer a loss, youll be blamed.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Dont get upset if it be-
comes impossible to sway a supposedly key person
to your view in a controversial matter. Youll end up
counting your blessings in the long run.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Instead of looking for
shortcuts, it behooves you to operate along con-
ventional lines. Easy ways out wont enhance your
effectiveness --theyll only detract from it.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Expenditures that
require a large cash outlay arent likely to cause
you any kind of problem. Strangely, however, when
dealing with the nickel- and-dime stuff, you could get
into trouble.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Should you run into some-
one with whom you recently exchanged hot words,
tread lightly. Youll need to treat this encounter
delicately, because it is not fully resolved as yet.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you insist upon playing
favorites, someone is going to get hurt. Applying
double standards when dealing with friends could
cause you to end up looking bad.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
10-23-12
MONDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Herbal soother
4 Novak and Basinger
8 Horned animal
12 Cotton Belt st.
13 Actor -- Epps
14 Move inch by inch
15 Indian potentate
17 Whistle time
18 Follow
19 Broken-off glaciers
20 Blank space
22 -- Rheingold
23 Secret message
26 -- St. Laurent
28 Pillbox or bowler
31 Tech caller
32 Cohort of Boris and Bela
33 Galleon cargo
34 Pixie
35 Fall mo.
36 Coal deposit
37 Finish a j
38 Patch locale
39 Likelihood
40 Conditions
41 Morning moisture
43 Rodeo mount
46 Eagles home
50 Castaways refuge
51 Fine silver
54 Maintain
55 Smell -- --
56 Burrow
57 Catch sight of
58 Bulfnch specialty
59 Pigpen
DOwN
1 Not exciting
2 Vitality
3 Long sighs
4 China neighbor
5 -- -- Little Teapot
6 Army VIP
7 Mexican Mrs.
8 Chromosome units
9 Dumpster output
10 In a tizzy
11 Wallet stuffers
16 Boring tool
19 -- -relief
21 Towers
22 Flawed, as a can
23 Fed a line
24 Nobel Prize city
25 Adroit
27 Sotto --
28 Tended the garden
29 Dry as dust
30 Lots and lots
36 What I is
38 Col. Sanders chain
40 Sluggish
42 One-moon planet
43 Dressmakers cut
44 Party-throwers plea
45 Fridge stick
47 Disencumbers
48 No future -- --
49 Like custard
51 Cheers bar owner
52 Hear a case
53 Snack
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 27
THE DAILY JOURNAL
28
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNAs
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimers or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
TENNIS LESSONS
Top 50 Mens Open Player
Call 650-518-1987
Email info@adsoncraigslist.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
FT/PT Live-In caregiver on the Penin-
sula and in the South Bay. Valid driv-
ers license and car a must.Must have
exp. and refs. Call 415-683-3171 or
visit www.sageeldercare.com.
CLEANING SERVICE needs workers to
clean houses and apartments. Experi-
enced, $11.00 per hour, viknat@sbcglo-
bal.net, (650)773-4516
FRANKLIN TEMPLETON Investments
seeks Mgr.-Investment Risk Mgr. in San
Mateo, CA. Dvlp. sophisticated risk
models & measuring techniques, & pro-
vide insight to maximize risk adjusted re-
turns. Ref. # 854MDE & send res. to:
Attn: C. Ailey, 100 Fountain Pkwy, St.
Petersburg, FL 33716.
110 Employment
GARAGE DOOR
INSTALLER/
SERVICE TECHNICIAN
Experienced Garage Door
Installer/Service Technician needed.
Installation and repair of residential
wood and steel garage doors, garage
opener installation and repair. Must
be motivated, hard working, professio-
nal, customer service oriented and a
team player. Company truck provided.
Apply at 1457 El Camino Real, Bel-
mont, email resume to:
econodoormaster@yahoo.com
or fax (650)594-1549
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSEKEEPERS
NEEDED
Part-time on the Peninsula.
Must drive & have 2+ yrs
private home experience.
$22-$25 per hour
415-567-0956
www.tandcr.com
OFFICE MANAGER/
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
Part Time
Emerging technology company
located at San Carlos Airport de-
signs and assembles aerial cam-
era systems. Responsible for
administrative and accounting
activities including AR/AP. Pro-
vide executive support for CEO.
Supervise 1 clerical employee.
Reports to CFO. Flexible work
schedule of 15-20 hours per
week. Requires minimum of 5-
10 years relevant experience
and software proficiency includ-
ing Quickbooks and MS Office.
Please email resume to:
jobs@skyimd.com
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TEACHER AIDE - Special Education
Daily and long-term assignments availa-
ble working with pre-school through high
school age special needs students in
schools throughout San Mateo County.
6.5 hr. work days M-F. $16.17/hr. To ap-
ply call The Personnel Department at
San Mateo County Office of Education at
650-802-5366.
YOURE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call
(650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY
RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252289
The following person is doing business
as: Aquavie Skin Care, 951 Old County
Road, Suite 3, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Business Calcium, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 09/01/2012.
/s/ David Schulhof /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/12, 10/09/12, 10/16/12, 10/23/12).
29 Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 516407
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ramesh Kumar
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ramesh Kumar filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
a.Present name: Fnu Garima
a.Proposed name: Garima Kumar
b.Present name: Fnu Divyashish
b.Proposed name: Divyashish Kumar
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
16, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/26/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/18/2012
(Published, 10/02/12, 10/09/12,
10/16/12, 10/23/12)
CASE# CIV 517212
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Rachna Mittal on behalf of Shreeya
Gupta, Rohan Gupta, minors
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Rachna Mittal on behalf of
Shreeya Gupta, Rohan Gupta, minors
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a) Present name: Shreeya Gupta
Proposed name: Shreeya Mittal Gupta
b) Present name: Rohan Gupta
Proposed name: Rohan Mittal Gupta
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
20, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/09/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/09/2012
(Published, 10/16/12, 10/23/12,
10/30/12, 11/06/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252442
The following person is doing business
as: JK Marketing, 1821 Monterey Drive,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Justin Kim,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Justin Kim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/12, 10/09/12, 10/16/12, 10/23/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252384
The following person is doing business
as: Crucial Investigative Services, 10 De-
sabla Road, #507, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Arthur Laughton, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Arthur Laughton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/12, 10/09/12, 10/16/12, 10/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252562
The following person is doing business
as: Bundy Opticians, 201 S. San Mateo
Drive, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: An-
drew G. Bundy, 620 Sandy Hook Ct.,
Foster City, CA 94404. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Andrew G. Bundy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/12, 10/09/12, 10/16/12, 10/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252314
The following person is doing business
as: Daly City Coolmart & Locksmith,
7399 Mission St., DALY CITY, CA 94014
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Gavriel Taub, 3177 Scott Way N,
Napa, CA 94558. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Gavriel Taub /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/12, 10/16/12, 10/23/12, 10/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252616
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Tony Addys Building Services,
Inc., 2)Tony Addys Pressure Wash,
3)Addy Clean, 1951 OFarrell St., #115,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Tony Ad-
dys Building Services, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Anthony G. Addy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/12, 10/16/12, 10/23/12, 10/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252752
The following person is doing business
as: Wilson Appraisal Company, 809 Lau-
rel St #6815, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Jeff WIlson, 3 Plymouth Ave.,
San Carlos, CA 94070. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Jeff WIlson/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/12, 10/23/12, 10/30/12, 11/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252703
The following person is doing business
as: Lyrical Foods, 1140 OBrien Dr., Ste.
B, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Lyrical
Foods, INC., DE. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Jeff WIlson/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/12, 10/23/12, 10/30/12, 11/06/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252821
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: J & A International Company,
3875 Carter Dr., #103, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Kwok
Hong Chung, same address, and Louis
Shum, 3732 Palos Verdes Way, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Kwok Hong Chung/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252847
The following person is doing business
as: Golden Gate Limo, 1031 Cherry
Ave., Apt. 69, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Rafael Alves Oliveira, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Rafael Alves Oliveira /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/23/12, 10/30/12, 11/06/12, 11/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252818
The following person is doing business
as: Great Circle Outfitters, 380 Coggins
Rd., LA HONDA, CA 94020 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Shannan Marie Catinella, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Shannan M. Catinella /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/23/12, 10/30/12, 11/06/12, 11/13/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, playgoer August pro-
gram, featuring Gloria Stuart, George
Sanders, Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20.,
San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
298 Collectibles
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE - Special Issue,
Off to the Moon, featuring Armstrong,
Aldrin, and Collins, and a special article
by Charles Lindburgh, $25., San Mateo,
(650)341-8342
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 (650)787-8600
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box, SOLD!
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection, SOLD!
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, SOLD!
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, collectible su-
perstars, Gretzki, Messier, more, OK
sold separately, SOLD!
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, SOLD!
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POKEMON CARDS - 1000, excellent
condition, SOLD!
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures, SOLD!
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)375-8044
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's, SOLD!
300 Toys
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 SOLD!
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH & LOVE SEAT- Floral Design.
Great Condition, $350.00, (650)266-8025
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINET TABLE walnut with chrome legs.
36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50, San
Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
304 Furniture
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)857-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
AS NEW Bar-B-Q electric outdoor/in-
door, easy clean, no scrubbing./brushing,
as new, $15., 650-595-3933
AUTO WINE OPENER - mint condition,
one-touch, rechargeable, adapter, foil
cutter, built-in light, easy open, great gift,
$12.00, SOLD!
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER- Gevalia Connaissuar
ten cup. white, filters included, makes
great coffee, $9., 650-595-3933
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
30
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Athenian with
harsh laws
6 Sink-cleaning
brand
10 Greenish-blue
14 Put ones feet up
15 Olympics sled
16 Expressions of
disapproval
17 57-Across best-
seller made into a
1971 film, with
The
20 Golf club now
made of metal
21 Line on a graph
22 Move crab-style
23 Heredity unit
25 Lake formed by
the Aswan Dam
26 57-Across best-
seller made into a
1993 film
31 Japanese cartoon
art
32 Exposes
33 Shortest mo.
36 Despicable
37 57-Across best-
seller made into a
1995 film
39 Tear go-with
40 Chopper
41 Head of the
manor
42 Windy City airport
43 57-Across best-
seller made into a
1997 film
46 Across the sea
49 Accessories for a
Just Married
sign
50 Plumbing woes
51 Not real
53 Refs call
57 Doctor-turned-
novelist born
10/23/1942
60 Concept
61 Turn sharply
62 Stunned
63 It may be
standardized
64 Dont get excited
65 Sports page
figures
DOWN
1 Deadlock
2 Gambling mecca
near Carson City
3 Fashions Gucci
4 Bridge, e.g.
5 Tic-tac-toe dud
6 Former Soviet
premier Kosygin
7 Dench of Iris
8 Jumpin Jack
Flash, its __ ...:
Rolling Stones
lyric
9 Symbolic
signatures
10 Vulnerable
11 Campus
courtyards
12 Practical
13 Ed of Lou Grant
18 Controls, as a
helm
19 Nicholas and
Peter
24 Houston-to-Miami
dir.
25 Bosnia
peacekeeping gp.
26 Mud in a cup
27 Operating system
on many Internet
servers
28 Agitate
29 Time-share unit
30 Flat-nosed dog
33 Dread
34 Banjoist Scruggs
35 Reared
37 Not just for males
38 Basketballs
Magic, on
scoreboards
39 Question of
identity
41 Tibetan capital
42 MYOB part
43 Astaire/Rogers
musical
44 Flee, mouse-style
45 Curbside call
46 Ticket word
47 Bouquet tosser
48 Reduces to small
pieces, as
potatoes
51 __ circus
52 Hard-to-hit
pitchers
54 Chichn __:
Mayan ruins
55 Champagne
brand
56 Finishes
58 Holiday lead-in
59 DJs assortment
By Steven J. St. John
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
10/23/12
10/23/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
306 Housewares
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., 650-375-8044
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
LORUS WATCH- date, sweep second
hand, new battery, stainless steel adjust-
able band, perfect, $19., 650-595-3933
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw $80
(650)521-3542
BANDSAW CRAFTMENS - hardly used
$80. obo, SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1 BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, $35., (650)521-3542
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)857-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
308 Tools
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRILL PRESS -Craftmens, works great
$85., obo, SOLD!
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
RYOBI TRIM ROUTER - with butt tem-
plate, $40., (650)521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, SOLD!
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
310 Misc. For Sale
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLANKET- Double bed size, dusty rose,
satin bindings, warm, like new, washa-
ble. $8., 650-375-8044
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, SOLD!
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HALLOWEEN DECORATIONS Pump-
kins, Lights, Large spiders, ect. all for
$20 D.C. SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, work great for small of-
fice/room, extra speakers, 4 1/2 in. high,
includes cords. $8.00, SOLD!
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
METAL COWBOY STATUE - $50.,
(650)589-8348
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEADER shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color with floral motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
mane, tail, ears, eyes, perfect condition
for child/grandchild, $39., 650-595-3933
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
310 Misc. For Sale
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOMTOM GPS- every U.S./Canadian
address, car/home chargers, manual,
in factory carton, $59., 650-595-3933
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, $15., 650-375-8044
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
(650)348-6428
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
(650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2 SAN Francisco Giants Jackets 1 is
made by (Starter) LG/XLG excellent con-
dition $99 for both (650)571-5790
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY SHIRTS - pearl snaps, pock-
ets, XL/XXL, perfect $15 each, cowboy
boots, 9D, black, $45., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME "Little miss
Muffet" outfit with blonde braided wig
never warn Fredrick of Hollywood $35
D.C. SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME 1950's Poodle
skirt Black & Pink from Fredrick of Holly-
wood $35 D.C. SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME Tony Martin
size 40 warn only once from Selix $25
D.C SOLD!
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 SOLD!
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13- 3/8 x 1 3/8, excellent condition,
$30.all, San Bruno, (650)588-1946
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHING EQUPMENT 3 rods with reels,
2 Tackle boxes full fo supplies, SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
31 Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole $45
(650)521-3542
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20 rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
WEED WHACKER-STIHL FS45 curved
bar, never used, $65.,obo, SOLD!
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
FORD 97 Arrowstar Van XLT - 130K
miles, $3500. obo, (650)851-0878
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV 91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims, SOLD!
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, $20.,
San Bruno, (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance Clean
Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
32
Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Landscaping
EXOTIC GARDENS
Sod Lawns, Sprinklers,
Planting, Lighting, Mason
Work, Retaining Walls,
Drainage
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 461-0326
Lic#933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Attorneys
TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING
Top Attorney With Masters
In Tax Law Offers Reduced
Fees For New October Clients.
(650)342-3777
Ira Harris Zelnigher, Esq.
(Ira Harris)
1840 Gateway Dr., Ste. 200
San Mateo
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Business Services
PUT YOUR
BUSINESS INFO
ON THE
INTERNET
FREE
Link the phone number
in your classified ad
directly to online details
about your business
ZypPages.com
Barbara@ZypPages.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
33 Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA
HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
MANUFACTURED
HOME COMMUNITY
For Ages 55+
Canada Cove,
Half Moon Bay
(650) 726-5503
www.theaccenthome.com
Walk to the Beach
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
34 Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Choosing a Mills-Peninsula doctor means youre choosing a doctor
committed to providing care tailored to your specific needs. You will
have access to some of the most respected specialists and a new
state-of-the-art hospital right here in our community. You also will
enjoy the confidence that comes from knowing your health care
providers are part of Sutter Health, Northern Californias premier
not-for-profit network of care.
Visit TheDoctorForYou.com/MPHS
or call 800-4-SUTTER today
Our doctors treat you
like youre 1 in a million.
Not 1 of millions.
Make sure you choose a health plan that gives you
access to Mills-Peninsula network doctors.
35 Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD
By Annalisa Camilli
and Frances DEmilio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAQUILA, Italy In a verdict that
sent shock waves through the scientic
community, an Italian court convicted
seven experts of manslaughter on
Monday for failing to adequately warn
residents of the risk before an earth-
quake struck central Italy in 2009,
killing more than 300 people.
The defendants, all prominent scien-
tists or geological and disaster experts,
were sentenced to six years in prison.
Earthquake experts worldwide decried
the trial as ridiculous, contending there
was no way of knowing that a urry of
tremors would lead to a deadly quake.
Its a sad day for science, said seis-
mologist Susan Hough, of the U.S.
Geological Survey in Pasadena, Calif.
Its unsettling.
That fellow seismic experts in Italy
were singled out in the case hits you in
the gut, she said.
In Italy, convictions arent denitive
until after at least one appeal, so it was
unlikely any of the defendants would
face jail immediately.
Italian ofcials and experts have been
prosecuted for quake-triggered damage
in the past, including a 2002 school col-
lapse in southern Italy that killed 27 chil-
dren and a teacher. But that case cen-
tered on allegations of shoddy construc-
tion in quake-prone areas.
Among those convicted Monday were
some of Italys best known and most
internationally respected seismologists
and geological experts, including Enzo
Boschi, former head of the National
Institute of Geophysics and
Volcanology.
I am dejected, desperate, Boschi
said. I thought I would have been
acquitted. I still dont understand what I
was convicted of.
The trial began in September 2011 in
this Apennine town, whose devastated
historic center is still largely deserted.
Seven experts convicted for
not warning of earthquake risk
Syrian violence spills into Jordan, Lebanon
BEIRUT A Jordanian soldier was killed in clashes with
armed militants trying to cross the border into Syria on
Monday and sectarian clashes overnight in Lebanon left four
dead as Syrias civil war spilled into neighboring countries.
Jordanian Information Minister Sameeh Maaytah said the
soldier was the rst member of the countrys military to be
killed in violence related to Syrias civil war. He died in clash-
es with militants trying to illegally enter Syria to join rebels
ghting President Bashar Assads regime. Maaytah did not say
whether the militants were Jordanians or foreign ghters try-
ing to jump into the fray in the neighboring country.
A statement by the Jordanian military said the soldier was
killed in a shootout with a group of eight suspected militants
armed with pistols and machineguns. Jordanian troops
detained the suspected gunmen and authorities are questioning
them, the statement said.
In Washington, State Department spokesman Mark Toner
blamed Syria, saying the onus for this kind of violence rests
squarely on the Assad regime.
A number of foreign Islamists have been ghting in Syria
alongside the rebels. Jordans banned Sala movement
which promotes an ultraconservative brand of Islam has
sent several ghters to Syria in past months and Jordanian bor-
der patrols have caught some of them recently.
Qatari visit hands Hamas major victory
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip When the ruler of Qatar arrives
in the Gaza Strip on Tuesday, he will hand the Palestinian ter-
ritorys Hamas rulers their biggest diplomatic victory since
taking power ve years ago.
The rst head of state to visit Hamas-controlled Gaza, the
emir will deliver more than $250 million in aid, a move that
will deepen the Islamic militant groups control of Gaza and
which reects the rising inuence of the Muslim Brotherhood
across the region.
The Brotherhood now governs Egypt, and Islamic parties
have made gains elsewhere in the region since last years pop-
ular revolts that became known as the Arab Spring. Qatar has
been a key ally of the movement, which includes the
Palestinian offshoot Hamas.
Around the world
REUTES FILE PHOTO
An Italian court convicted six scientists and a government ofcial of manslaughter
on Monday and sentenced them to six years in prison for failing to give adequate
warning of a deadly earthquake which destroyed the central city of LAquila and
killed more than 300 people in 2009.
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The White House
says it is prepared to talk one-on-one
with Iran to nd a diplomatic settlement
to the impasse over Tehrans reported
pursuit of nuclear weapons, but theres
no agreement now to meet.
National Security Council spokesman
Tommy Vietor said Saturday that
President Barack Obama has made clear
that he will prevent Iran from getting a
nuclear weapon and will do whatevers
necessary to block that from happening.
Vietor said Iran must come in line with
its obligations, or else faced increased
pressure.
The onus is on the Iranians to do so,
otherwise they will continue to face crip-
pling sanctions and increased pressure,
Vietor said in a statement. He noted that
efforts to get Iran back to the table with
the ve permanent members of the U.N.
Security Council and Germany the
so-called P5+1 continue.
Iran has been a recurring issue in the
presidential election campaign and
Vietors statement was released shortly
after The New York Times reported
Saturday that the U.S. and Iran have
agreed in principle for the rst time to
negotiations. The paper said Iran has
insisted the talks wait until after the Nov.
6 election.
Vietor, however, denied that any such
agreement had been reached.
Its not true that the United States and
Iran have agreed to one-on-one talks or
any meeting after the American elec-
tions, he said. We continue to work
with the P5+1 on a diplomatic solution
and have said from the outset that we
that we would be prepared to meet bilat-
erally.
Obama has said hell prevent Iran
from acquiring nuclear weapons. He
hopes sanctions alongside negotiations
can get Iran to halt uranium enrichment.
But the strategy, which began during
President George W. Bushs administra-
tion, hasnt worked yet. Obama holds
out the threat of military action as a last
resort.
White House prepared to meet one-on-one with Iran
36 Tuesday Oct. 23, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL