Meet the

Vineland
City Council
Candidates
The Grapevine has
begun its effort to educate and inform voters in
the weeks leading up to Election Day,
November 6. Last week, we introduced you to
candidates running for the Vineland District’s
school board. Next week, we will print profiles
of county freeholder and Vineland mayoral can-
didates.
This week, we bring you responses of city
council candidates to our questionnaire. The four
slates and two independent candidates total 18
candidates in all. In the subheads under each
candidate’s name, we’ve listed the slate/slogan
and, in parentheses, the mayoral candidate with
which each council candidate is aligned, if any.
Turn to page 33 to read where the candidates
stand on issues affecting the residents of the
City of Vineland.
Local Haunts
{ BY RYAN DINGER }
As Halloween draws nearer, everyone’s looking
for a good scare. For some, the haunted hayrides,
houses and ghost walks are enough to quench their
thrill thirst. But for the hardcore fear enthusiasts,
sometimes the synthetic scare isn’t enough. Lucky
for them, southern New Jersey is a hotbed of
authentic horror, with supposedly haunted build-
ings all over the region. Here are four such places,
all just a stone’s throw from Vineland.
The Abbott House Bed & Breakfast, Mays Landing, NJ
A short drive up Route 40 takes you to the
Abbott House Bed & Breakfast. The Victorian style
three-story home was constructed in 1865. The clas-
sic design gives the building a haunted house look,
and through the years the legend has grown that
the ghost of a boy named David, who died in the
house, lives on the third floor.
Cliff Melder and his wife, Donna, served as the
Abbott House’s innkeepers for nine years before
selling in 1999 and they’ve heard plenty of experi-
ences with strange activities on the third floor.
Various guests who stayed in a certain bedroom
Experience the Rossi Advantage
We Service
All Makes &
Models
Express Service $24.95oil change.
Applies to most vehicles. Appointments preferred but not necessary. Coupon not valid with any
other offer. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Limit one coupon per person. Other restric-
tions may apply. Void where prohibited. Up to 5 quarts of oil. Some vehicles slightly higher. Does
not include synthetic oils. Cannot be combined with other offers and discounts. Expires 11/25/12
SEE SERVICE ADVISOR FOR DETAILS
1517 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland
www.RossiHonda.com
856-692-1700
We Treat you Better...Period
FREE
Battery Test • Multi-Point Vehicle Inspection with Every Service
Rossi
Sells Tires
Call Service Advisor for Details
VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 37 | OCTOBER 24, 2012
I NSI DE: PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE: PG. 21 • HALLOWEEN FUN • OKTOBERFEST AT LUNA’S • WILDFLOWER VEGAN FARE
C
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4
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T
he American economy and millions of small busi-
nesses have experienced rigorous challenges since
the 2008 downturn. Smart entrepreneurs and
owners have realized that their creativity, determination
and hard work are all vital to keeping their doors open.
American small business is defined as those compa-
nies with fewer than 500 people. Of that group, 80 per-
cent employ less than 10. These “mom and pop” opera-
tions are the backbone of their local communities. In
Cumberland County, thousands of people own, work
for or sell to just these types of business enterprises.
Numerous successful local companies are celebrat-
ing milestone anniversaries this year and in coming
months, including, among many others, Yi’s Karate,
Phoenix Business Systems, and Colonial Bank.
Next to Acme & Blockbuster
Vineland: 691-0290
TWO CONVENIENT
SMILE CENTERS
Across from new Walmart
Bridgeton: 451-8041
Q
u
a
lity Dental C
a
r
e
Today’s Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
WWW.QUALITY-DENTALCARE.COM
Love Your Smile!
FULL BRACES
ONLY $2,995!
When you mention this ad • Expires 11/30/12
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CONNECTI NG YOU TO SOUTH JERSEY. WEEKLY.
Colonial Bank’s headquarters location at Delsea Drive and Sherman
Avenue in Vineland. Colonial Bank’s 100th anniversary celebration
E C R W S S
L o c a l
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Celebrating Milestones
Longevity in business is something to
applaud, especially in these times.
{ BY SHARON HARRIS-ZLOTNICK }
Continued on page 25
Continued on page 10
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{
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MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
MICHELE LOW Advertising Executive
LORI GOUDIE Graphic Designer
TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer
RYAN DINGER Editorial/Sales Assistant
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Ste. 205, Vineland, NJ 08360
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2012. All
rights reserved.
1 Celebrating Milestones
The region’s long time businesses
are a big deal in these tough times.
SHARON HARRIS-ZLOTNICK
1 Meet the Vineland City
Council Candidates
1 Local Haunts
Authentic scares to quench your
scare quotient. RYAN DINGER
3,4,6,
8,17 Faces in the News
12 News in Brief
16 Recipe Corner
Soups and stews are hearty
options for cooler weather.
LISA DINUNZIO
18 Halloween Events
20 DINING: Very Vegan
Wildflower Earthly Vegan Fare in
Millville offers locals healthy food
choices. FRANK GABRIEL
21 Prizeweek Puzzle
22 Entertainment
32 Community Calendar/
Sports
42 REAL ESTATE
43 CLASSIFIEDS
EXCELLENT
QUALITY
not
EXCESSIVE
COST
All Cartridge World ink and
toner cartridges are built to the
highest standards and will save
you money. Buying big name
brands just guarantees you’ll
pay a lot more.
The Award Winning
MUSEUM
STORES
at
WHEATONARTS
say
Thank You!
To Our Customers
CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION WEEK
Oct. 27 to Nov. 4, 2012
10am to 5pm

MYSTERY DISCOUNT
of 20% to 50% off your
entire purchase* in each
store. Receive a FREE Eco
tote bag when you visit. Enjoy
complimentary refreshments
in all museum stores
while you shop.

One lucky customer will
receive a $250 SHOPPING
SPREE at the WheatonArts
Museum Stores. Sign up in
the stores during the week.
The winner will be selected
on Sunday, Nov. 4 at 5pm.
wheatonarts.org
ShopWheatonArts.com

856.825.6800
Millville, NJ 08332
WheatonArts is open Tuesday
thru Sunday, 10am to 5pm
I
Editor’s Letter
The major benefactor of Newcomb Hospital in Vineland, Leverett Newcomb, willed his
estate of approximately $200,000 (big bucks in the 1920s) along with two city blocks of
land upon which the hospital was built, in order to make the city’s first modern medical
center a reality. All he asked in return was that his remains be buried on the grounds,
beneath a beech tree he had planted in honor of the hospital’s first medical director.
The tree was planted in a grassy area surrounded by the
hospital parking lot. Beneath it is a large rock, six feet in
diameter, imported from Newcomb’s home state of
Connecticut. Inscribed upon the stone is Newcomb’s name
and his birth and death dates (Jan. 2, 1839—Sept. 16, 1926).
The stone covers the ground under which is buried an urn
containing Newcomb’s ashes.
In the past two years, the beech tree has succumbed to a
termite infestation and now its dead branches are bare. It’s a
sad ending for this memorial tree that became emblematic of
the hospital and the legacy of its founder.
A few weeks ago, my friend Charles Loyle visited my office to talk about the beech tree
and what it symbolized. Charles, who once served as chairman of the hospital’s board,
explained that the Beech Tree Society was the name given to the hospital’s biggest donors.
Further, the luncheonette near the front entrance of the hospital was called the Beech Tree.
Most significant was the use of a beech tree graphic in Newcomb Medical Center’s logo.
Newcomb Hospital opened in 1924. It merged with South Jersey Healthcare in 1997
and was closed in 2004 after the regional medical center was opened on West Sherman
Avenue in Vineland.
The Newcomb Hospital site was sold to the Danza Group three years ago. The Danza
Group’s plans for the site “are still evolving,” according to Vincent Archetto, a minority
partner in the Danza Group and president of Vineland-based Archetto Construction.
The Danza Group originally
announced plans in 2008 to con-
vert the decommissioned hospital
into a mixed-use facility centered
around a medical school and an
assisted living facility. The medical
school portion of the plan involved
a proposal for University of
Medicine & Dentistry of New
Jersey to open a School of
Osteopathic Medicine here, though
an agreement with UMDNJ was
never finalized. Gov. Chris Christie
signed legislation in August that
breaks up UMDNJ into medical teaching facilities at Rutgers and Rowan universities.
The Danza Group is forging ahead with its plans to construct an assisted living facility
at the hospital site, to be named in honor of the late Sid Brody. Demolition on part of the
old hospital commenced in May of this year to make way for the assisted living facility.
Archetto says none of its plans will affect Leverett Newcomb’s final resting place.
“The plan is to leave the grave site as is and work around it,” he says, adding that,
“The beech tree will have to come out.”
MIKE EPIFANIO
Editor & Publisher
Newcomb’s Resting Place
The remains of the founder of Vineland’s now-closed Newcomb Medical
Center is buried in the hospital parking lot beneath a beech tree that
has died in the past two years. What is to become of the memorial?
Grapevine 1-2 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:09 PM Page 2
Loved One
Remembered
In loving memory of Minister Lauran
Wright-Miles, who passed away on August
23, 2012.
When the Lord calls our loved ones
home, He leaves a gift of memories in
exchange. I’m holding on to sweet
memories of you “Sister,” and I’ll let them
guide me during this time of sadness.
Sadly missed and always loved,
Your Sister, Lois Wright-Suggs
Thursday October 25, 2012 • 6:00 pm
St. Anthony’s Community Center • Tickets 35.00
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Faces in the News
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Newlyweds
On September 27, 2012, Mr. and
Mrs. Jonathan Zeb Phillips were wed on
the dock overlooking Crystal Lake in
Vineland during a small ceremony,
which was attended by family and close
friends.
Bruce Baldwin served as the best
man and Amanda Pederson was the
maid of honor.
The parents of the groom are Zeb
and Terri Phillips of Millville and the
mother of the bride is Samantha Bailey
of Dividing Creek.
After a honeymoon in Ocean City,
NJ, the bridge and groom will reside in
Millville.
Birthday Wishes
Happy fifth birthday to our beautiful
granddaughter, Tristen Marie Serrano,
on October 24. You have brought us
so much joy. You are a blessing to us.
May God continue to bless you.
We love you very much!
Love always,
Mom, Dad, Mama and Papa,
your aunts and uncles
Grapevine 3-11 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:10 PM Page 3
Recycling Coordinator Says "Think Green"
Sharon Flaim, the Recycling
Coordinator for the City of
Vineland, recently addressed
Vineland Service Club Council
members at a meeting. She
discussed the city’s recycling
program and told attendees
that the mission of the City’s
Recycling Program is to "Think
Green" in all decisions it
makes for the community and
workplace. Flaim mentioned
that the City will continue to
strive to keep its designation
as the #1 Recycler in
Cumberland County.
Flaim mentioned, as part of
this "Green Initiative," the City of Vineland will also strive to be a leader in
demonstrating how to create a more sustainable way of living in our community.
"Each day we will reduce waste, reuse whatever we can, recycle as many
materials as possible, take every opportunity to recycle new materials and react
by preserving our precious natural resources," she said.
Flaim also stated the city is dedicated to buying locally whenever possible,
using environmentally friendly cleaning products, and passing on this commit-
ment to Vineland residents, businesses and especially the city’s children through
informational materials, presentations and workshops.
From left: Service Club treasurer B.J. Giercyk, Vineland City Recycling Coordinator
Sharon Flaim and Service Club president Chris Volker.
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Faces in the News
I
SEND US YOUR FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The Grapevine... birthdays, engagements, weddings,
anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to the address listed on p. 2.
Club Youth Take Part In Worldwide Day of Play
A number of members of the Boys & Girls Club of Vineland participated in the
Worldwide Day of Play, which consisted of several competitions including a hula-
hoop contest and a jump rope competition. Worldwide Day of Play is an entire
day devoted to active play. Nickelodeon goes dark for three hours, turning off
programming to encourage kids to get up, get out and go play. Every year,
Worldwide Day of Play is celebrated with more than 5,000 local events in all 50
states and in 20 countries.
Pictured here are Club members taking part in the hula-hoop contest at the Carl Arthur
Center Unit.
Grapevine 3-11 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:10 PM Page 4
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BY SYMBOL, KLAUSSNER, BEST, COLONIAL CRAFT, PLUS MANY MORE!
up to
BRODY’S FURNITURE
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Ruben
Bermudez
John Procopio Terra Dower Edwin Cintron Maritza Gonzalez
The BermudezTeam
Vote Column N
Before You Vote, I Want You To
Know Where I Stand
Moving Forward...Together
For Mayor
For City Council For City Council For City Council For City Council
Paid For By Bermudez For Mayor, Thomas Owoo, Treasurer.
For a ride to the polls,
call 856-507-0022
The Bermudez Team Plan
Hire a professional
Business Administrator
Develop a coordinated
economic development
marketing plan
Appoint a Citizen’s
Budget Committee
• Cultivate regional
economic development
partners
• Launch a Stronger
Safer Neighborhoods
Initiative (SSNI)
Work for new job
training and educational
opportunities
As your full-time mayor, I will be focused every
day on finding practical solutions that protect
taxpayer dollars, enhance economic development
opportunities, and make our neighborhoods
safer and more attractive for new businesses.
Vineland’s Future is in your hands.
On November 6, vote for Real Change.
Local Football Team Remembers Fallen Soldier
During a recent
football game, time
was taken beforehand
to recognize and
commemorate the
MyThankYouCoins
campaign the Junior
Raiders have under-
taken. The American
Fallen Warrior
Memorial Foundation
developed the
MyThankYouCoins
campaign to help
fulfill their second-
ary mission of edu-
cating the youth of
our country about the sacrifices being made for our freedom.
During the presentation, the story of Vinelander Gerald Giordano was told.
Army Staff Sergeant Gerald Giordano Jr. died February 27, 2012, serving dur-
ing operation Enduring Freedom at the age of 47. He was assigned to 1st
Battalion, 35th Armored Regiment based at Fort Bliss, Texas. Giordano died from
a service-related illness in Fort Bliss. He joined the United States Army on April
20, 2006, after fighting for five years to join. At the time he joined, Gerald, or
Jerry, as he was called by family and friends, was the oldest recruit in the U.S.
Army. At his basic training graduation, it was noted that history was being made
with his graduation, as he was 41 years old.
Staff Sergeant Giordano was beloved by his soldiers, admired by his fellow
leaders and respected by his superiors. His soldiers’ welfare and training were
always foremost on his mind. He left his unit better trained as a result of his
leadership and personal touch. The Iron Knights, the name given to his Battalion,
will always remember him. Giordano loved the army and his soldiers and he
proudly gave his life for his country. He always said, whatever happened, he was
doing what God had created him to do and he willingly fulfilled his destiny and
his dream.
Following the presentation, a moment of silence was held in Giordano’s mem-
ory, and then the National Anthem was played.
Giordano’s mother, Pearl, was on hand to help celebrate the memory and pay
tribute to the MyThankYouCoins campaign, which was set up to remember sol-
diers like her son.
Pearl Giordano (center) with the Junior Raiders football team and cheerleading squad.
Boys and Girls Club Holds CareerLaunch Session
Amol Kohli, owner of several Friendly's Family Restaurants in the area, recently spoke
to Boys & Girls Club of Vineland teens during a CareerLaunch session. He focused on
how important it is to be a diligent worker as well as following your dreams - even when
faced with adversity. The program at the Club helps teens explore careers and get ready
for the working world, thanks to support from Bank of America and United Way. Kohli is
shown here (center) with Club teens at its Success Center site.
Faces in the News
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Local Motorcycle Club Gives Back to Area Seniors
On October 4, the
NJ “Jersey Devil”
Chapter of the
Brothers In Blue
Motorcycle Club
helped area seniors in
Cedarville comply with
the Lawrence
Township address
ordinance. Members of
the motorcycle club
helped Lawrence
Township Senior
Center members dig
holes and erect four
foot posts with their
addresses on it. The
posts needed to be
put in the front of their property near the driveway.
Vice President Carl Tozer stated that the Brothers In Blue Motorcycle Club, NJ
“Jersey Devil” Chapter is made up of current and retired Sheriffs and police offi-
cers from Cumberland County. Tozer stated that one of the most important roles
their club is involved with is charitable community events. He stated that they
feel like it’s their obligation to help those in need. He further added that the sen-
iors they usually help don’t have family members that live locally.
“Most of the seniors in that situation must hire unknown people to do the
work for them, which takes money from their fixed incomes. It also could possi-
bly open them up for scams,” Tozer said. “The club can help them feel safe and
save them money in these hard times.”
The NJ “Jersey Devil” chapter of Brothers In Blue MC was formed in March of
2008. The club originated in Chicago, IL, in 2005 by several Chicago police offi-
cers. The club is also open to full-time firefighters and E.M.S. workers.
The NJ chapter donated over $1,000 worth of food to the Lawrence Township
Senior Center in June of this year. The club will be doing other projects to help
the community in the near future.
“Giving back to the community is what we do,” Tozer said.
Brothers In Blue MC members stand next to Mrs. Eleanor Anderson in front of her new
address post that the club erected for her in Lawrence Township. The club assisted sen-
ior citizens from the Lawrence Township Senior Center who needed help to comply with
a new city address ordinance.
4-H Dressage Horse Show Enjoys Success
The 2012 State 4-H Dressage Horse show was a great success for the riders at
Fairway Farms, trainer Karen Killeen. Dressage is the discipline of horse and rider in
obedience and the execution of precise movements in various different level tests. Riders
placed as follows: Gina Picciano - 7th place; Emily Kubrak - 1st and 6th place; Ashley
Jacobs - 2nd and 10th place; Heather Koering - 1st and 9th place.
Faces in the News
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PRIMARY CARE PLUS
Comprehensive family care and wellness planning
that connects your doctor, hospitals and specialists.
Elliott Bainbridge, RN, hadn’t seen a doctor in 10 years.
He felt too good and was too busy working full time,
going to school, and playing golf with his buddies to go to
the doctor. But when his health insurance required him to
get a physical, Elliott went to Primary Care Plus, where a
blood test uncovered a form of kidney cancer that would’ve
been fatal. Now one year after having the tumor removed,
Elliott’s back out on the course, has lost 82 pounds and
kicked his cigarette habit with AtlantiCare’s smoking
cessation program. He credits that initial check-up with
saving his life – giving him a second chance at living a
longer, healthier life story.
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Taking You Well Into The Future
Elliott Bainbridge Voorhees, NJ
In Support of Family
Promise
The Woman's Club of Vineland, a
member of the General Federation of
Women's Clubs, held their October
Business Meeting on October 8. The
speaker was Joy Gross from Family
Promise of Cumberland County. The
Special State Project this year of the
NJ State Federation of Women's Clubs
is Family Promise. Gross explained
that Family Promise is an organization
that helps families get back on their
feet after they have had financial dev-
astation. Several churches, synagoges
and other organizations in Cumberland
County have volunteered their facilities
to house families at night for a week at
a time, three or four times a year. They
still need about three more facilities to
volunteer to be able to be up and run-
ning in Cumberland County. During
the day the families go to work, school
or a day center to help them find work
or work on skills and do other personal
things like laundry and showering.
Family Promise is a non-profit organi-
zation that started in southern New
Jersey and has spread across the
country. There are now more than 160
organizations helping those in need.
People can volunteer to help in many
ways such as making a dinner, helping
with homework, socializing, staying
overnight in a facility, fundraising, find-
ing local housing and driving.
From left: Joy Gross from Family Promise
of Cumberland County and Shirley Burke,
Second VP from the Woman's Club of
Vineland.
Cassidy June Weyman, riding on Indian
Trail Ila, took Grand Champion in the
Western Pleasure Growing and Training
class at the NJ State 4-H Championshop
Horse show on August 26.
Grapevine 3-11 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:10 PM Page 9
complain of a cat disturbing them at night
by jumping up on their bed.
“We never had a cat,” said Donna.
“We’re dog people. The strangest part was
that room was always locked from the
inside when people stayed there. But
guests would say they didn’t get a great
sleep because of the cat.”
“We were never really able to figure
out exactly what that was they were feel-
ing on their bed,” added Cliff.
The ghost of a young boy, perhaps?
“We can’t say either way,” said Cliff.
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D E E T N A R
HAUNTS
Continued from cover
Bogart’s Books, Millville, NJ
Nestled nicely on High Street in
Millville rests Bogart’s Books, a late 19th
century building with a busy history.
Serving as both a business space and a res-
idence, the building has endured hundreds
of inhabitants over the years. According to
legend, some of those residents have never
left, even after death.
“It can get pretty creepy in here at
night,” says manager Katelyn Phillips.
“Not all the time, but sometimes during
closing I’ll get a chill up my spine and a
nervous feeling like I’m being watched.
You can sometimes hear footsteps
upstairs, which is vacant.”
Phillips has never actually seen any-
thing, but customers have.
“Our most famous ghost is a shadow
that lives in the classics section,” said
Phillips. “People will come up to pay and
they’ll say they were startled by a person
in the back. We’ll go back to check on it
and there will be no one else in the store.”
Curious about what exactly the sightings
were, the staff at Bogart’s recently enlisted
the services of spiritual photographer Greg
Geraci, who set up cameras to take pictures
on a timer over night. The results yielded
dozens of photos with inexplicable shapes
and orbs, some resembling people.
“I don’t know how to explain it,” said
Phillips. “You can’t deny what you’re seeing,
and some of these pictures do appear to have
phantom faces or the shapes of people.”
Ye Greate Street, Greenwich, NJ
Greenwich is one of New Jersey’s oldest
towns. Founded in 1675, it served as one of
the first entry point ports to America. It is a
small town and Ye Greate Street, with its
small corner store and quaint feel, reflects
that. But Ye Greate Street is also known for
paranormal activity.
Greg Jones, a lifelong resident of
Greenwich who leads ghost walk tours (info
on p. 18), grewup on Greate Street and has
had his fair share of run-ins with ghosts.
“Strange things happen in Greenwich,”
he said. “There’s been a lot of unexplain-
able deaths and disappearances over the
years. Residents know the stories. With
this town, it is what it is.”
One of the many supernatural photos taken at
Bogart’s, this picture displays the image of a
ghost man wearing a suit and peering through
a glass window in the bookstore. Credit:
Greg Geraci (www.spirits.smugmug.com)
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Your mouth is a mess. It became this way because, well, you just gave up.
You have had a number of unpleasant experiences. They range from being
lectured, almost scolded for the condition of your teeth, to being hurt in the
dental chair. You have untreated problems. They don’t hurt right now and it is
easier to “forget about them” than go through the process once again.
I aminviting you to visit me — To Give It One More Chance.
We’ll talk to you. We’ll listen. There’s nothing you have that I haven’t seen
before. I’ll give you options – no pressure – just an unbelievably pleasant
experience that will likely win back your trust and confidence. So go
ahead, hold me to this!
Give It One More Try.
I’ll bet you’ll leave smiling - and that’s something I’m darn good at.
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The street is lined with a plethora of
haunted houses. There’s the Pumpkin
House, where a young girl died in 1840
and whose spirit still resides upstairs. Just
up the block is the Pirate House, where
Pirate John was chained in the attic and
left for dead by his crew in 1721. You can
still hear his chains rattling at night. A few
strides away is the House of Seven
Suicides, where numerous people have
reportedly taken their lives over the course
of the domicile’s 200-year history.
And that’s just a few.
“Everywhere you turn, there’s a house
with a story,” said Jones. “That’s Greenwich.”
The Hancock House, Hancock’s Bridge, NJ
On the banks of the Alloway Creek, the
Hancock House was built in 1734 and
served as both William Hancock Jr.’s home
and military quarters for soldiers working
the drawbridge during the Revolution. In
1788, it’d be the site of one of the most
gruesome military attacks of the entire war,
when 300 British soldiers stormed the
house, killing and wounding 15 civilians
and militia. It is this act that gives the
Hancock House its paranormal reputation.
The legend goes that the British troops
who participated in the massacre were
condemned to return to the house upon
their death, forever roaming the grounds
as penance.
Alicia Bjornson has worked at the
Hancock House for a number of years and
has witnessed some bizarre activity.
“We often have malfunctions with the
heater—things that can’t be figured out,”
she said. Upon entry to the house, there is
a distinguishable drop in temperature,
even on a warm autumn day.
Bjornson has also encountered
instances where her office had pens or
pamphlets strewn about when she arrived
in the morning. “There’s no one allowed in
here overnight,” she says.
But the most damning evidence of a
ghost’s presence came in a story Bjornson
didn’t witness first-hand.
“We were doing a Civil War encampment,
and one of the women wasn’t feeling well.
So I told her to go into the house and rest,”
said Bjornson. “A fewhours later, she came
out and said she couldn’t believe I let some-
one in there to disturb her while she slept.”
The woman complained to Bjornson
about a man adorned in a revolutionary-era
cloak who spooked her in one of the hall-
ways while she tried to find the bathroom.
“We didn’t have anyone on the grounds
wearing Revolutionary attire. It was a Civil
War encampment,” said Bjornson.
Even stranger, the phantom man came
into the house through a door that can
only be unlocked from the inside.
“Needless to say, that woman didn’t
come back here for about six months,” said
Bjornson, laughing. “No one is sure what
really happened that night.”
Those interested in taking a historic tour
of the Hancock House can contact Alicia
Bjornson for information at 856-935-4373. I
The Pumpkin House (so named because it
once was painted a bright orange) houses the
ghost of young Amy and is one of many haunt-
ed houses on Ye Greate Street in Greenwich.
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Library on Buck Street.
The program will be conducted by
Kathryn Brzozowski, a licensed clinical
social worker who is pursuing her doctoral
degree in social work at the University of
Pennsylvania. Brzozowski also runs a pri-
vate therapy practice in Cherry Hill, spe-
cializing in clients who are experiencing
major life transitions, including illness,
unemployment or divorce.
The information gathered from the pro-
grams will be kept confidential.
Brzozowski expects the data will allow her
to gain new insight into family relation-
ships that have often shifted from “parent
and child” to “parent and caregiver.”
Since space is limited, anyone interest-
ed in participating may register by calling
856-770-4631. To learn more, visit
Brzozowski’s website at www.southjer-
seytherapist.org. Refreshments will be
served during the program.
Tri-Chamber Business Expo
Set for November 1
The County of Cumberland in collabo-
ration with the Bridgeton Area, Greater
Millville and Vineland Chambers of
Commerce have scheduled the annual
Economic Development Breakfast and
Business Expo for Thursday November 1 at
Cumberland County College.
Freeholder Director and Economic
Development Board Liaison Carl Kirstein
said, “This is an excellent networking
opportunity for both business and industry
leaders as well as government officials. It
also allows us to take time out to celebrate
some of the business success stories in our
county. The small business community is
our economic foundation, and this is a
great opportunity to reaffirm the county’s
commitment to the business community.”
Freeholder Liaison Samuel Fiocchi
echoed Kirstein’s remarks and said, “I
want to thank the Chambers of Commerce
for their partnership with the county, as
well as event sponsors Compassionate
Care Hospice and the Cumberland/Salem
Workforce Investment Board. By working
together, we have created a premier event
that has become tradition for our region.”
Business Success Stories will be pre-
sented by Let’s Do Linens and Fat K
Designs, Merighi’s Savoy Inn, and Mitchell
Products. “These are three very different
companies that have a great story to tell,
and I think this is the perfect opportunity
to share some good news about success
here in Cumberland County, especially in
this very difficult economic climate,” said
Freeholder Liaison Tony Surace.
In addition to the Business Success
Stories, the morning will highlight 45-
minute breakout sessions at both 10 and 11
a.m. that will focus on Wellness in the
Workplace, presented by South Jersey
Healthcare ,and Servpro Cumberland
County will discuss Avoid Smoke Damage
this Season, Is your office or home ready?
There will also be a number of vendors
on hand to share their information with
Delsea to Participate in School
Choice Program
Delsea Regional School District will be
participating in the New Jersey
Department of Education School Choice
Program during the 2013-2014 school year.
One of the goals of the NJ Department
of Education is to offer educational choices
to parents so that they can select programs
that best serve their child’s needs. The
Interdistrict Public School Choice Program
is a program designed to increase educa-
tional opportunities for New Jersey stu-
dents and their families by providing stu-
dents with the option of attending a public
school outside their district of residence
without cost to their parents. Under this
School Choice Program, interested New
Jersey school districts can apply to become
choice districts. These are districts that
designate specific open seats into which
they will accept nonresident students at the
expense of the state. Each year, the New
Jersey Department of Education selects the
choice districts from those districts that
have submitted a competitive application.
For more information about the School
Choice Program, contact Dr. Melissa
Williams, Assistant Superintendent by call-
ing 856-694-0100, ext. 214.
Older Adults Needed For
Research Study
Area adults at least 65 years of age and
their adult children are invited to partici-
pate in a research program designed to
improve family communication. Titled
“Bridging the Gap,” the two-hour session
must be attended by both family members,
who will be asked to complete a question-
naire at the beginning of the program and
after the program concludes.
The first session will be held on
Thursday, October 25, from 10 a.m. to
noon at the Vineland Senior Center at
Sixth and Elmer streets. The second ses-
sion will be offered on Friday, October
26, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Millville
News in Brief I
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attendees. This event is free, but registra-
tion is encouraged, so if you plan to attend,
register ASAP. To register or for more
information email info@vinelandcham-
ber.org or call: 856-691-7400.
The event begins with a continental
breakfast at 8 a.m. in the George P. Luciano
Sr. Family Center for Public Service and
Leadership at the Cumberland County
College located at 3322 College Drive,
Vineland, NJ 08360.
This event is presented by Cumberland
County Government and the Bridgeton
Area, Greater Millville and Vineland
Chambers of Commerce, and made possi-
ble through the generous support of the
Cumberland/Salem Workforce Investment
Board and Compassionate Care Hospice.
Keeping Youth Safe from
Medicine Abuse
The Cumberland County Healthy
Communities Coalition (CCHCC) and the
Salem-Cumberland Regional Action
Toward Community Health (SCRATCH)
will hold a community health fair and dis-
cussion on Wednesday, October 24 from
6:30 to 8 p.m. to raise awareness about
prescription and over-the-counter medi-
cine abuse.
The event, held during National
Medicine Abuse Awareness Month, will
take place at Cumberland County College
in the Luciano Conference Center. The
event will bring together parents, families,
educators, law enforcement, healthcare
providers, business leaders and local sub-
stance abuse prevention experts.
Linda Surks, a prevention expert from
NCADD of Middlesex will discuss her son
Jason’s battle with prescription drug
abuse. Her experience as both a mother
and a substance abuse prevention profes-
sional will provide a unique perspective
on medicine abuse.
Hernando Perez, owner of Hernando’s
Hometown Pharmacy in Vineland will
also be on hand to answer questions.
Cumberland and Salem community agen-
cies and businesses will participate in the
health fair.
Learn how to keep children safe from
medicine abuse, and learn what communi-
ty resources are available to families.
Parking is free in lot G. Light refresh-
ments will be served. Bring the whole
family.
If you are interested in attending this
family-oriented event and have any ques-
tions, contact Beth at 856-794-1011, ext.
306, or
bethmayers@southwestcouncil.org. No
pre-registration is required.
The CCHCC and SCRATCH coalitions
include members from throughout the
region. These members work hard to
reduce substance abuse in Cumberland
and Salem Counties. The Coalitions are
always welcoming new members. To get
involved, contact Beth Mayers or Jessica
Ortuso at 856-794-1011, ext. 302 or jessi-
ca@southwestcouncil.org.
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Society Seeks Information
About Vineland Artists
The Vineland Historical and
Antiquarian Society is currently working
with Kate Ogden, associate professor of
art history at Stockton College, to uncover
further information about the Vineland
School of Art that existed in the 19th cen-
tury. The students in Ogden's class on
"Nineteenth Century Art" are researching
and writing about works of art owned by
the Society, and plan to create a catalog of
its paintings, sculpture, prints and other
works.
Some of the most interesting artists
turned up by the students are Beatrice
Braidwood and her father, Thomas
Braidwood, who was principal at the
School of Design for Women in
Philadelphia. In 1870, Braidwood moved
with his family to Vineland where he
founded the Vineland School of Art on
Peach Street. Other notable Vineland
artists include Louis Mounier, a descen-
dant of 18th century French revolutionar-
ies, and Philip Stockbridge Nutt, a painter
and woodcarver.
The Society is interested in learning
more about the work produced by these
and any other Vineland artists, including
works of art owned by local individuals. If
you can provide any information, please
contact Patricia Martinelli, curator, at
856-691-1111 or at
vinelandhistory@gmail.com, or Prof.
Ogden at 609-652-4406 or at
kate.ogden@stockton.edu. All inquiries
will be kept confidential.
Vineland Pacesetters Three
Evenings a Week at D’Ippolito
The City of Vineland Health
Department in collaboration with the
Vineland Public Schools is continuing the
Vineland PaceSetters, a free city walking
program to promote health and well-being
for people 18 years of age and older in the
Vineland area. The walking program
began on October 22 from 6 to 7 pm. and
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continues through May 2, 2013.
Walking is an excellent activity for fun
and fitness. It is an easy and convenient
form of physical activity with myriad
health benefits, said George Sartorio,
Health Officer for the Vineland Health
Department. Walking helps reduce stress,
maintain strong bones and muscles,
increase endurance and stamina, improve
circulation, and control weight. Walking
for at least 30 minutes a day, five or more
days a week will allow older adults to
meet the U.S. Surgeon General’s physical
activity requirement. Today, roughly 100
million Americans are walking. Clearly,
walking is the nation’s preferred activity
for achieving and maintaining good health
and fitness.
The Vineland Health Department is
hopeful that adults in the Vineland area
will agree that walking is a fun form of
physical activity and start walking indoors
at D’Ippolito Elementary School. Walking
will take place on a regular, on-going basis
inside D’Ippolito School on Monday,
Wednesday, and Thursday from 6 to 7
p.m. when school is open.
For more information about the walk-
ing program, contact 856-794-4131 or visit
www.vldhealth.org.
Salem County To Preserve
Open Space in Elmer
More than 100 acres of farmland are
slated for preservation in Salem County,
but thanks to the perseverance of county
and local officials, 17 acres in Elmer will be
set aside as open space, with an eye toward
expanding Elmer Community Park.
The Salem County Board of Chosen
Freeholders have announced an agree-
ment to provide 25 percent of the funding
needed to purchase 17 acres of farmland,
formerly known as the Anthony Estate
Farm. One hundred acres of the Anthony
property is in Upper Pittsgrove, but 17
acres of the land is adjacent to the base-
ball fields that front Harding Highway in
eastern Elmer.
“We were looking at preserving the
entire property as farmland,” said Jack
Cimprich, Mayor of Upper Pittsgrove.
“But when Ben Laury took me out there to
walk the property, he pointed out that the
Elmer parcel could be preserved as open
space and used to expand Elmer
Community Park, providing much needed
space for all our residents.”
Cimprich said Ben Laury, who is the
Deputy Director of the Salem County
Board of Chosen Freeholders, was one of
the strongest supporters of turning the
Elmer part of the property into open
space. “I give Ben the credit,” he said.
“Ben did a good job of promoting and
pushing.”
Elmer City Councilman, Steve Schalick
said that the borough became interested in
the property nearly five years ago when it
came up for sale. “We looked at it then, and
thought it would be a good place to expand
the park.” Schalick, who is also involved
with Little League, said the area needed
more space to serve the local youth.
“Getting that property will be a win for
Elmer,” Schalick said. “It’s near the exist-
ing sport fields, and it’s near other pre-
served areas. Getting this expansion is a
real home run.”
Julie Acton, Freeholder Director, said
that since 2002, two cents of every tax
dollar in Salem County has been directed
into a fund for Open Space and Farmland
Preservation. “Prior to this project, the
only matching funds were for farmland
preservation.” But this time, the county
received funds that will allow Elmer to
pursue the land near its existing park.
For the purchase of the $160,000 prop-
erty: $80,000 will come from Green Acres
program; $40,000 will be provided by the
Open Space and Farmland Preservation
program; and $40,000 will be provided by
Elmer Borough.
“This park expansion gives residents
throughout the area access to a large open
space for athletic fields to promote healthy
activities,” said Ben Laury, Salem County
Freeholder. “We are proud to work with the
all the interested parties in finding a way to
give our neighbors a gift we can all share.”
Women's Hall of Fame Seeks
Nominations
The Cumberland County Women’s Hall
of Fame is accepting nominations for the
2013 inductees. If you know of a woman
you feel is deserving of this honor, go to
www.ccwhof.com for a nomination form.
You can also visit the same website for
additional information about the organi-
zation and its mission.
Joyce Carol Oates to Visit
Cumberland County College
Cumberland County College’s One
Book-One College reading campaign will
be highlighted by a visit from author
Joyce Carol Oates, who will make a per-
sonal appearance on Tuesday, October
30 at 7 p.m. The event is set to take place
in the theatre of the Guaracini Arts
Center, Sherman Avenue and College
Drive. Admission to the event is free and
the public is welcome to attend.
Oates’ book, Faithless: Tales of
Transgression, was chosen by Cumberland
County College as this year’s reading selec-
tion. In this collection of 21 unforgettable
stories, the author explores the mysterious
private lives of men and women with vivid,
unsparing precision and sympathy. Oates
dissects the psyches of ordinary people
and their potential for good and evil with
chilling understatement and lasting power.
Oates is a recipient of the National
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News in Brief
I
Continued from previous page
Nominate Your Hometown Hero Today!
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/hometownheroes
Is it someone who gives of their time and energy to make our community a better
place to live and work? Perhaps they’re a policeman, fireman, teacher, coach,
volunteer, serviceman or woman, public servant, or an everyday hero
who makes personal sacrifices so that others can live better lives.
They don’t do it for the recognition, but we think they should be recognized anyway.
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Check out our website at www.ccaymca.org, follow us on Twitter and like us on
Facebook for up-to-date Y information, specials, Y stories, contests and more!
(856) 691-0030 • Open at 5:00 am
1159 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360
WE ARE COMMUNITY
Music Through the Decades – Y’s 85th Birthday Bash
Help celebrate our 85th Birthday with our “Music Through the Decades”
Costume Party! This party will be held on Friday, October 26th at the Savoy Inn
from 7:00-11:00pm. Tickets are $40.00 per person and include a light dinner,
dancing and fun! Proceeds benet Y programs. Contact the Y for details!
BE A YMCA
MEMBER!
NO CONTRACTS
NO JOINING FEE
FREE Exercise Classes including unlimited Zumba
ActivTrax – FREE Fitness and Nutrition program
YMCA AWAY Program – FREE access to
other Y’s across the state
45% savings with a Family Facility Membership!
Teen Memberships (up to 19 years old) only $22.95
THE SOUP KITCHEN OF
VINELAND AUXILIARY
The Soup Kitchen of Vineland Auxiliary is a non-prot 501 (c) (3): contributions: tax deductible 170 (b) (1) (A) (vi).
COMING TO VINELAND
April 7, 2013 • 3 p.m.
(856) 690-5509 • soupkitchen@verizon.net
Soup Kitchen of Vineland Auxiliary, PO Box 636, Vineland, NJ 08362-0636
An Afternoon to Remember
of Spirituals and Folk Music
At 1st Methodist Church,
700 E. Landis Ave.
Light refreshments will be served.
Free Will Offering.
SCOTT BREINER
Renowned Director, Organist and Pianist
And the 50-member Cape Shore Chorale
Originally scheduled for early July, this concert was
postponed due to the severe storm that devastated
our region. We are excited to announced the resched-
uled concert date and look forward to presenting it
on April 7. Since its inception the Cape Shore Chorale
has been under the direction of Scott J. Breiner, one
of the most respected musicians in South Jersey.
Save the date and don’t miss this musical event!
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e the date and don’t miss this musical ev Save
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- are excited to announced the resched
Book Award and the PEN/Malamud
Award for Excellence in Short Fiction.
The author of some of the most enduring
fiction of our time, Oates is the Roger S.
Berlind Distinguished Professor of the
Humanities at Princeton University and
has been a member of the American
Academy of Arts and Letters since 1978. In
2003 she received the Common Wealth
Award for Distinguished Service in
Literature and The Kenyon Review Award
for Literary Achievement, and in 2006 she
received the Chicago Tribune Lifetime
Achievement Award.
The goal of CCC’s One Book-One
College campaign is to encourage reading
for pleasure, critical thinking, global
awareness and multicultural understand-
ing, and to get the campus and the com-
munity to bond by discussing relevant
themes covered in a single book. A “must
read” on the Cumberland County College
campus, community members are also
urged to read the book.
For more information, call Professor
Sharon Kewish at 856-691-8600, ext. 358.
Mansue Inducted in National
4-H Hall of Fame
Francis Mansue, former County 4-H
Agent and Associate 4-H Extension
Leader, was inducted into the National 4-
H Hall of Fame’s Class of 2012 during a
special ceremony held on October 12 at
the National 4-H Youth Conference
Center in Chevy Chase, Maryland.
“Fran Mansue touched the lives of many
people in New Jersey, from his colleagues
in the 4-H Department to thousands of 4-H
volunteers and members throughout the
state,” said Jeannette Rea-Keywood,
Cumberland County 4-H Agent and chair
of the New Jersey 4-H Communications,
Marketing and Promotion Committee.
The National 4-H Hall of Fame was
created in 2002 as a 4-H Centennial proj-
ect to recognize and celebrate those peo-
ple who have made a significant impact on
4-H and its millions of members over
more than 100 years. Each laureate was
selected for the National 4-H Hall of Fame
because of his or her significant contribu-
tion to 4-H, the nation’s premier youth
development organization that serves over
six million youth nationwide. 4-H pro-
grams in every state, U.S. territory and the
District of Columbia as well as 4-H’s three
national partners… National Association of
Extension 4-H Agents (NAE4-HA);
National 4-H Council and National 4-H
Headquarters at National Institute of Food
and Agriculture (NIFA), USDA, nominate
outstanding individuals for this honor.
Francis Mansue received his BS Degree
in Agriculture from Rutgers University in
1942. After serving in the U.S. Army for
four years, Mansue started his 4-H
Cooperative Extension career in 1946 as
the Passaic County 4-H Agent for six years
and then worked as the 4-H Agent in
Ocean County for 12 years before becoming
the Associate 4-H Extension Leader for the
College of Agriculture & Environmental
Science in 1964. In 1973, he accepted the
role of 4-H Department Chair for Rutgers
Cooperative Extension until he retired five
years later. Fran Mansue completed over 32
years of professional service in the New
Jersey 4-H Youth Development Program.
After his retirement in 1978, Mr. Mansue
continued his 4-H involvement by estab-
lishing the New Jersey 4-H Development
Fund and serving on a part-time basis as
Acting Executive Director. I
Halloween
Costume Party 2012
Saturday,
October 27, 2012
6-11 p.m.
DINNER BUFFET
$21.95
PER PERSON
DJ AND
DANCING
WWW.ALLFORECLUB.COM
BuenaVistaCountryClub
PO Box 307
301 Country Club Lane
Buena, NJ 08310
Autumn Mixed Salad
w/ Witch’s Vinaigrette
Creamy Maggot Risotto
Dracula Style Mixed Vegetables
Stringy String Beans w/Eyes
Pasta w/Blood Red Sauce
Roast Hog w/Gravy
Flounder a’ La Transylvania
Roadkill Roast Beef
DESSERT
Dirt & Worms
Chocolate Cake w/Pumpkin Icing
Kooky Cupcakes
Cash Bar Available
Call for Reservations 856-697-1200
Prices exclude NJ Sales Tax
Grapevine 12-19 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:15 PM Page 15
Relive The Magic Of An Era In Music
T
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Christ the Good Shepherd Parish Presents
“AN EVENING TO REMEMBER”
Complete With An Elegant Dinner Buffet
NOVEMBER 16, 2012
A Grand Setting For Your Wine & Spirits Enjoyment By
ShopRite Wine & Spirits of Vineland
CENTERTON COUNTRY CLUB & EVENT CENTER
Tickets On Sale Now!
$
40 per person
Must be 21 years of age
Permit #13003088
Tickets available at the parish rectory, at St.
Isidore The Farmer Church,1655 Magnolia Rd.
Vineland NJ, 856-691-9077, Frank’s Realty office
in the Landis Shoprite Shopping Center in Vld
856-297-2889, 856-405-1725
100% of the net proceeds goes to CTGS Parish
Reli
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our Win Your Wine & Spirits Enjoyment By
NOVEMBER
Complete With An Eleg
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Christ the Good Shephe
A Grand Setting For Y
ShopRite Wine & S
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arish 100% of the net proceeds goes to CTGS P
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16, 2012
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ENTER C VENT E & LUB
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reetings! As cooler weather rapidly
approaches, many folks look forward
to hearty, healthy, soups and stews.
Here are several that feature autumn veggies
that can be found at most local farmer’s mar-
kets, or your favorite grocery store. Add a side
salad, and a slice of multigrain bread or roll,
and a “warm your insides” dinner is served!
Italian Vegetable Bean Soup
2 tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium onion, diced
4 cups low-sodium, fat free chicken or
vegetable broth
2 cups water
1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes
2 large carrots, sliced into bite-sized pieces
2 stalks celery, sliced into bite-sized pieces
1 medium zucchini, diced
1/2 tsp. dried thyme
Sea salt, to taste
Black pepper, to taste
1 (15.5-ounce) can cannellini beans,
rinsed and drained
4 cups escarole, chopped
Freshly grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
In a small bowl, add the rinsed and drained
beans, set aside. Heat olive oil in a soup pot
over medium-high heat, sauté the garlic and
onion for 30 seconds. Add the chicken broth,
water, and tomatoes, bring to a boil. Reduce
heat to medium, add carrots, celery, zucchini,
thyme, salt and pepper, and cook until vegeta-
bles are fork tender. Gently stir in the cannelli-
ni beans and escarole, cook just until the esca-
role is wilted. Turn off heat, let soup sit for 10
minutes, then serve topped with a sprinkle of
Parmesan cheese, if desired.
Turkey Sausage Stew:
Extra virgin olive oil, for sautéing
1 pound turkey sausage links
1 onion, chopped
1 green bell pepper, chopped
(seeds discarded)
2 garlic cloves, minced
4 cups organic low-sodium beef broth
1 can (14-1/2 oz.) diced tomatoes,
undrained
1 cup apple cider
1 tbs. fresh parsley, minced
1/4 tsp. dried basil
4 oz. multi-grain spiral pasta, uncooked
Sea salt, to taste
Black pepper, to taste
In a stockpot, cook turkey sausage over
medium heat in a little olive oil until thor-
oughly cooked through, and juices run clear
when sausage is pierced. Remove sausage
from pan, slice into bite-size pieces and
place in a bowl, set aside. Add a little more
olive oil to the pan and sauté onion and
pepper until crisp-tender, add garlic and
sauté 20 seconds more. Stir in the broth,
tomatoes, apple cider, parsley, basil, then
add sausage back to the pan. Bring to a boil,
then add pasta, season with sea salt and
black pepper, reduce heat; cover and sim-
mer for 10-15 minutes or until pasta is
cooked. Serve.
Bon appetit! I
Lisa Ann is author of Seasoned With Love,
Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned
With Love II. Send recipes for publication to
lapd1991@aol.com or The Grapevine, 907 N.
Main Rd., Vineland, NJ 08360.
Soups and Stews
Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DINUNZIO }
Warm up your insides, and make a meal of it
with these hearty recipes.
I
Grapevine 12-19 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:15 PM Page 16
Harvest Fest Baking Contest Provides Tons of
Treats, Great Competition
The competition was fierce, but the esteemed judges happily sampled their
way through a table full of delectable entries at the Deerfield Harvest Festival
Dessert Baking Challenge.It took place on Saturday, October 6, with entries
ranging from cupcakes worthy of being in Cupcake Wars, gluten-free Pizzelles,
a decadent buttercream fudge cake and everything in between.
It was a difficult decision for the judges, but after tasting each of the
entries, there was a tie for first place in the cakes category between Margaret
Hemple of Bridgeton with her Pumpkin Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting and
Briana Robinson of Millville with her Briana’s Fall Harvest Carrot Cake. Second
place was awarded to Jennifer Bates of Bridgeton for her Caramel Covered
Apple Cake. Hemple of also took first place in the cookie category, with her
gluten-free Pizzelles. Second place went to Jennifer Bates with her Supreme
Chocolate Chip Dipped Cookies. Linda Hoder of Bridgeton won first place in
the cupcake category with Mocha Cupcakes. Bates won second place with
Chocolate Ganache Covered Peanut Butter Cakes. Contestants submitted
recipes with each entry. The Recreation Committee will be publishing the
recipes in a Harvest Festival Cookbook planned for next fall.
Jennifer Bates, top, with her award-winning Caramel Covered Apple Cake. Margaret
Hemple won two first place awards, one with her Pumpkin Cake with Cream Cheese
Frosting (pictured) and another for her gluten-free Pizzelles.
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OAK CREEK COUPON
SHOP RITE LIQUORS OF VINELAND
Like “ShopRite Liquors, Wine & Spirits” on to receive extra savings and coupons
PRICES VALID
10/18/12 -
10/30/12
Excludes tobacco, sale items and items prohibited
by law. Cannot be combined with any other
offers. Coupon code: 103012, Exp: 10/30/12
OAK CREEK
ALL TYPES • 750 ML
FOR YOUR HALLOWEEN CELEBRATION
HEINEKEN
24 7 oz bottles
$
18
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$
26
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750 mL
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GOOSEBUMP
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750mL
$
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PINNACLE
Pumpkin Pie Vodka
750mL
$
15
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YOU
SAVE
$
3
$
2.99
SAVE
$1
Limit 1 per
customer
SPIRITS COUPON
Excludes tobacco, sale items and items prohibited
by law. Cannot be combined with any other
offers. Coupon code: 103012, Exp: 10/30/12
ANY SPIRITS 750
ML OR MORE
Whiskey, Vodka,
Gin, Tequila, Rum
$
1
OFF
CRAFT BEER COUPON
Excludes tobacco, sale items and items prohibited
by law. Cannot be combined with any other
offers. Coupon code: 103012, Exp: 10/30/12
ANY 6 PACK
From Our Craft
Beer Selection
Limit 1
$
1
OFF
SENIOR COUPON
Excludes tobacco, sale items and items prohibited
by law. Cannot be combined with any other
offers. Coupon code: 103012, Exp: 10/30/12
YOUR PURCHASE
OF $10 OR MORE
With This Coupon
$
1
OFF
(62 AND OLDER)
3666 E. Landis Ave, Vineland, NJ
Located at the ShopRite Shopping
Center, Landis & Lincoln
696-5555
Scary
$+0
6$9,1*6
+DOORZHHQ )HDWXUHV
OP RITTE LIQUORS OF VINNELAND
s e l t tt o b z o 7 4 2
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OAK CREEK COUPON
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sale items and items prohibited ludes tobacco, Exc
TYPES • 750 M LL A
2.99
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BEER COUPON
$
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$1
Limit 1 per
10/30/12 Exp: 103012,
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10/30/12 Exp: 103012, Coupon code: offers.
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SENIOR
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OF $10 OR MORE
ASE H URC P OUR Y
VOTE FOR STEPHEN PLEVINS
INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE
Running for Vineland City Council
ON NOVEMBER 6 VOTE FOR PLEVINS
See What Plevins Has Done For Vineland Already:
• Founder of Broaden Your Horizons, an after
school program which has since become the
Vineland Boys and Girls Club
• Member of the Vineland Planning Board
• Past member of the Vineland Sewage Authority
• Co-Founder of Project Thanksgiving, a
program that provides Thanksgiving meals to
over 750 area families in conjunction with the
Salvation Army
Stephen Plevins was born and raised in Vineland and has called it his home for nearly
50 years. A graduate of Vineland High School, he has made it his life’s work to improve
the community he grew up in. In 1971, he graduated from the University of Maryland
with his Bachelor’s degree in Community Public Relations and Government. He has
done graduate coursework at both the University of Maryland and the University of
Northern Colorado. That’s why he’s your best choice for City Council.
Awarded The
Presented By
R
E
P
.
B
I L
L
H
U
GHES & PRES. GEORGE
H
. W
.
B
U
S
H
ORDERED AND PAID FOR BY PLEVINS FOR COUNCIL, 28 TEMPLE RD., VINELAND, NJ 08360
For establishing the Broaden Your Horizons after-school program
in Vineland - honored by U.S. Rep. William Hughes, President
George H.W. Bush and the New Jersey Legislature
Relax – you have peace of mind
because you had your fireplace
cleaned & serviced by the best.
American Fireplace sells, installs
and services wood & gas fireplaces,
stoves & inserts & gas logs. So
relax and enjoy the warmth & cost
savings of your fireplace or stove.
American Fireplace
Hearth Shop & Chimney Sweep
Member National Chimney Sweep Guild
2535 South Delsea Drive • Vineland, NJ 08360
856.457.5689
Certified Chimney Sweep #6775
Visa, Mastercard & Discover Accepted
NJ Licensed Contractor #13VH01293200
$100 OFF
Purchase & Installation Of Any Wood,
Gas Or Pellet Burning Stove Or Fireplace
Not to be combined with any other offer. Must present
coupon at time of purchase. Expires 12/31/12
Faces in the News
I
SEND US YOUR FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The Grapevine... birthdays, engagements, weddings,
anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to the address listed on p. 2.
Grapevine 12-19 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:16 PM Page 17
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FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS
IN OCTOBER
Halloween Event: Terror in the
Timbers at Parvin. Parvin State Park,
789 Parvin Mill Rd., Pittsgrove. Enjoy a
hayride across a field, then a haunted
walk through the timbers of Parvin and
back to the Committee Headquarters
building. Snacks, beverages and novel-
ties will be sold. 7:30–11 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 28 will be rain date 7:30–10:30
p.m. Cost $10 pp ages 12 years and
older (not recommended for under 10).
Children must be accompanied by an
adult. 358-8616. For children 9 and
under, there is a hayride and corn maze
every Saturday in October 2–5 p.m. $1
for children, $2 for adults.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24
Hammonton Halloween Parade.
Downtown Hammonton. 7 p.m. Floats,
costumes, food and fun. Begins at Egg
Harbor Road and Bellevue Avenue,
travels up Bellevue to Third Street. Rain
date is Thursday, October 25.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26
Annual Halloween Ghost Walking
Tours. Presented by the Cumberland
County
Historical
Society. 8 p.m.
each night.
Rain or shine.
Registration is
required.
Participation is
limited, so reg-
ister early. $5
per person
Meet at the
Warren & Reba Lummis Library,
Ye Greate St., Greenwich. Wear com-
fortable shoes and bring a flashlight.
455-8580 to register.
Family Halloween Party. LLPOA
Community Center, Lake Shore and
Narcissus, Laurel Lakes. 6 p.m. Games,
prizes, costume contest, kitchen open for
light dinners. 825-0319 or
www.LaurelLakeNJ.com
Atlantic City Ballet performs
Dracula the Ballet. Landis Theater, E.
Landis Ave., Vineland. 8 p.m.
Choreographed by Atlantic City Ballet
founder and director Phyllis Papa, this
three-act ballet is based on the classic
Bram Stoker novel that tells the hyp-
notic tale of the notorious
Transylvanian
Count. Set in the
15th century, this
not-to-be-missed
classic will take
you on a super-
natural journey
from London to
Romania. Tickets:
Adults $30 |
Senior $28 | Child $15.
YMCA President's Gala—Costume
and Mascarade Dance Party.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. 7–11 p.m.
Light dinner and dancing. Come dressed
in your best costume from your favorite
decade of music. Tickets $40. 691-0030,
ext. 307.
OCTOBER 26, 27, 31,
NOVEMBER 2 AND 3
Rocky Horror Picture Show. Eagle
Theatre, 208 Vine St., Hammonton.
LIVE Stage Left Productions brings the
mayhem and hilarity of this cult clas-
sic to the stage. $20 general admis-
sion. No outside props. $5 prop bags
at the door. October 26 and 31 and
November 2 at 8 p.m. October 27 and
November 3 at 11:59 p.m. There will
also be a 8 p.m. showing on November
3. Purchase tickets at 609-704-5012 or
www.theeagletheatre.com.
OCTOBER 26, 27, 30 & 31
Monster Martin’s House of Terror
Presents “Hotel Pitman Lives.”
155 Esplanade Ave., Pitman. Free, but a
canned food donation is requested. All
donations will go to South Jersey
Community Impact, Inc. Experience the
terror and celebrate Halloween with
this noble cause! For more info., visit
Monster Martin on Facebook.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27
Make Up Your Own Super Hero
Halloween Party. Bogart’s Bookstore.
210 N. High St., Millville. 6–9 p.m.
Costumes, prizes, music, refreshments
and live performance by Punky O’Dell
and The Mudville Cats.
Vampire Sprint & Costume Party.
Bellview Winery, 150 Atlantic St.,
Landisville. Morning run and afternoon
fun; $5 for party. 697-7172.
Autumn Tales. Magnolia Hill Studios,
1425 Magnolia Rd., Vineland. 1 p.m. All
HALLOWEEN EVENTS
Some are spooky nights of terror, some are ghostly
walks through history, others are just plain fun
costume parties for kids, adults or families. Keep in
mind a child’s age when choosing your Halloween fun.
Grapevine 12-19 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:16 PM Page 18
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ages, boys and girls: Dress up as your
favorite dragon, knight, princess, fairy
or gnome. Do an autumn craft
inspired by the work of Georgia
O’Keefe. Theatrical dance movement
class with the staff. Free but call to
register: 856-692-7262.
Let’s Scare Cancer Halloween
Costume Party. NJ Motorsports Park,
800 Dividing Creek Rd., Millville. 7 p.m.
to midnight. $30 (includes 10 free auc-
tion tickets). Sponsored by Relay for
Life, this fundraiser will include a Beef
and Beer, DJ and dancing, 50/50 and a
Chinese Auction, Cash Bar, Best
Costume contest, door prizes, games.
Tickets must be purchased in advance.
Call 856-691-4908 for tickets or info.
Halloween Story Hour, Crafts and
Parade. Millville Public library, 210
Buck St., Millville. 11 a.m. Free. Wear
your favorite Halloween costume and
join in the Halloween Parade. Prizes for
Most Original, Funny, Beautiful and
Scary. Enjoy a story, make a Halloween
tote bag to carry all your goodies from
trick or treating. 856-825– 7087, ext. 12.
Adult Halloween Party. LLPOA
Community Center, Lake Shore and
Narcissus, Laurel Lakes. 7 p.m. BYOB.
$10 per person—adults only. 825-0319
or www.LaurelLakeNJ.com.
Trick or Treat At Cumberland Mall.
Cumberland Mall, 100 Cumberland
Mall, Vineland. 10 a.m.–Noon, or while
supplies last. Free. Indoor Trick-or-
Treating event for costumed kids.
Children ages 12 and younger are invit-
ed. Participating mall stores will have
sweet treats on hand at stations set up
throughout the mall’s common area.
Halloween Bone Run & Walk.
Cumberland County College, 3322
College Dr., Vineland. 9 a.m. $25 for
those who pre-register, $30 for those
who register day of the event. The com-
petitive 5K run offers more than $2,000
in prize money for race winners and mul-
tiple awards. There will also be food,
music, a costume contest and a health
fair offering complimentary screenings
from 8 to 11 a.m. The 5k run and one-to-
three-mile walk will begin at 9 a.m.
4th Annual Halloween Bash.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant & Lounge.
3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland. 10 p.m.
Free giveaways all night. Plus a costume
contest with a grand prize of $250, a 2nd
place prize of $150 and a 3rd place prize
of $100. 856-765-5977.
Trunk or Treat. Redeemer Lutheran
Church. 2384 E. Landis Ave., Vineland.
1–3 p.m. $2 per trick or treater and $5
per car. Follows a national program for
children to Trick or Treat in a safe envi-
ronment. Kids will go from car to car col-
lecting “treats.” Families are encouraged
to decorate their car trunks with a
Halloween theme. Prizes awarded for the
best themed trunk. Vehicles should be at
Church parking lot by 12:30 to finish
their decorating. All proceeds will help
support the Redeemer Youth Groups.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28
Laugh Til It Hurts Pre-Halloween
Comedy Showcase. Cosmopolitan
Restaurant & Lounge. 3513 S. Delsea
Dr., Vineland. 8:30 - 11 p.m. $20 in
advance and $25 at the door. Feauring
Mr. Marshall, Reggie Conquest, Shawn
Jackson, Stax, Solo and Topp Flight.
Parties of four or more. Call the
Cosmopolitan in advance due to limited
seating at 856-765-5977
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31
Trick or Treat - Meet and Greet.
Steps of Vineland City Hall. 640 West
Wood St., Vineland,. 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Residents will be able to speak with
their Legislators, Mayor, and Council
members about issues or concerns and
the kids will be given treats. Plenty of
candy for everyone.
THROUGH OCTOBER
Night of Terror at Creamy Acres
Farms. 448 Lincoln Mill Rd., Mullica
Hill. 223-1669. www.nightofterror.com.
Tickets sales start at 6 p.m., open
Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights in
October plus Halloween week, Monday
through Saturday. $30 per person for
all six haunted attractions.
Duffield's Farm Market. Greentree
and Chapel Heights Rds., Sewell. 589-
7090. Farmfresh@duffieldsfarm.com.
Pumpkins, corn maze, wagon rides.
Open through Wednesday, October 31.:
Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m,
Weekday Afternoons: 12:30–4:30 p.m.,
Last wagon leaves the booth at 4:30
p.m. Closed Sundays.
Conte Farms. 299 Flyatt Road,
Tabernacle. 609-268-1010.
Contefarms@verizon.net. Pumpkin
patch-pick in the field, pre-picked pro-
duce, snacks and refreshment stand,
restrooms, picnic area. Corn maze and
wagon rides Friday through Sunday 8
a.m.–6 p.m., last wagon leaves at 5 p.m.
Muzzarelli Farms. 3460 Oak Rd.,
Vineland. Educational corn maze, open
to small groups, schools, church youth
groups, scouts, and private parties.
Featuring a pumpkin patch. Tours begin
anytime after 10 a.m. All groups must
pre-register. $8 per person. Call Rita
Muzzarelli at 691-2497 in the afternoon.
Miller’s Haunted Hayride. 625 Route
561, Winslow/ Hammonton. Every
weekend night in October. 7–11 p.m.
$10 Haunted Hayride, $5 Haunted Corn
Maze, $13 both. Free parking. 609-561-
2436. www.millershauntedhayride.com.
Grapevine 12-19 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:16 PM Page 19
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1853 Vine Rd. Vineland
691-4848
Fax: 856-691-2294
marcaccimeats@verizon.net
SPECIALS
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WHOLE BONE IN
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Let us help you with your tailgating party!
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STORE HOURS: MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 7:00AM TO 6:00PM
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Gabriel’s Horn { BY FRANK GABRIEL }
I
Millville’s Village on High has one of the region’s few
eateries committed to the vegan fare and lifestyle.
O
n the far north end of Millville’s
downtown business district sits a
cozy collection of shops set back
on a pleasant grassy knoll called
The Village on High. With names like
Octopus’ Garden and Eklektic Dream, the
miniature buildings possess an English
countryside-type charm.
Fronting those fairytale-style cottages is
Wildflower Earthly Vegan Fare. Owned and
operated by Eric Nyman, whose own story
brings him, nearly by accident, to southern
New Jersey, Wildflower opened in January
of this year.
Initially planned as a takeout only ven-
ture, the little café’s success begat a cozy
seating area for 20 or so to the right of its
tiny, tidy kitchen space. That food prepara-
tion area, domain of chef Melissa Maly,
seems hardly large enough for her to formu-
late the plethora of items available on the
day we visited. But like most talented cooks,
Maly makes use of limited space with spec-
tacular results, including an entire deli case
filled with delectable baked goods.
Nyman, a northern New Jersey native
possessing a degree in Philosophy from
Montclair State, arrived in Millville after tak-
ing a position building a pipe organ locally.
Already himself a vegan, Nyman’s intent in
creating Wildflower was to prove that “You
can eat delicious food without eating animals
or using animal products.”
Maly, a mother of four who had previously
worked as a personal chef, became devoted to
veganismduring her children’s formative years.
Atmosphere here is vibrant, colorful and
cordial with locally sourced artwork adorning
the walls.
Wildflowers’ menu rotates weekly, helping
them build a consistent following, both from
vegan customers and those who simply want
to eat a more balanced diet. Nyman explains,
saying “Young people come for ethical aspects,
older people more for health reasons.”
A schedule of hot evening entrees avail-
able on Friday and Saturday works something
like this: One week a month, sometimes
twice, features Maly’s house-made falafel; a
second week, ‘Crabby Patties’ formed with
tofu, a classic Creole trinity of peppers,
onions and celery, plus scallions, carrots,
freshly made bread crumbs and Old Bay sea-
soning; the third week, a dinner special (this
month’s was polenta with almond sauce); and
finally, a nacho and/or burrito platter.
Other favorite items appearing frequently
on the café’s daily chalkboard bill of fare
include Buffalo tofu plus a tofu cutlet similarly
designed to mirror chicken.
Another of Maly’s proudest efforts are her
wide array of various hummus. Wildly creative,
with flavors like coconut curry, chili black
bean, Kalamata olive and sun dried tomato,
fresh dill or basil and a kale/artichoke blend,
these have become signatures at Wildflower.
But nachos (pictured above) just might be
the singular item Maly seems content to hang
her toque on, proudly asserting, “We call
them ‘Kick-Ass Nachos.’ ” They feature TVP
(textured vegetable protein, an essential, yet
underutilized ingredient every good kitchen
should employ) seasoned with Mexican spices
along with black beans, guacamole, olives and
scallions. Bathed in a secret-recipe queso
sauce, based on nutritional yeast—a product
Maly calls “similar to Brewer’s yeast”—the
result is a creamy, yet dairyfree product.
She’s similarly enthused about adding
more personal pizzas topped with rotating
seasonal ingredients in the near future.
The third leg of Wildflowers’ business
equation is 23-year-old Vineland native Tori
Moratelli. A recent graduate of Stockton
State College with a degree in Theater
Performance, Moratelli became a vegan
“almost a year ago” and sought employment
at Wildflower after sampling their food.
When asked about what to expect in the
coming weeks, Maly declares “Butternut squash
is definitely the star vegetable of the fall.”
Nyman, who personally sources the vast
majority of produce used here, mentions
Vineland’s East Oak Road farm market tri-
umvirate of Santaniello’s, Simone’s and
Muzzarelli’s, along with Lincoln Avenue’s
Pontano’s, as being his preferred purveyors.
Most of Wildflower’s baked goods are
crafted using spelt flour, an ancient cousin of
wheat containing significantly less gluten.
Other oven-based offerings, along with all
soups, are gluten-free. I
Wildflower Earthly Vegan Fare, 501 N. High St.
(Village on High), Millville, 856-265-7955 Open:
Mon. 11 a.m.–3 p.m., Wed. & Thurs. 11 am.–6 p.m.,
Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
(Closed Tuesday)
Very Vegan
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800-582-7640
www.SouthJerseyFCU.com

106 West Landis Avenue - Vineland
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HOW TO ENTER:
$ PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE $
ACROSS:
1. A good equestrian will
check his position before
preparing to take _.
5. The advent of World
War II marked the destruc-
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6. Lawyer advises client
that if it’s a clear-cut claim,
it might be hard to _ it.
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endless to some people.
10. One cent.
12. If a man’s really _, he
can be a menace.
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on a trip.
15. Tear.
16. Proprietor cancels fur-
ther orders with supplier,
claiming any storeowner
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when having her photo
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ter when it’s cut.”
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DOWN:
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to travel club about the _
of remote island chain
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ter is firmly reprimanded
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blow, financially.
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escape.
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lively discussion about that
person.
10. As girl is _ by a
brightly lit window, partner
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silhouette looks.
11. The smallest unit of
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14. Used for ice skating.
18. Vermin.
THIS LIST INCLUDES, AMONG OTHERS,
THE CORRECT WORDS FOR THIS PUZZLE.
ARENA
BAD
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CHEERY
FILED
FINES
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FIXED
GLASS
GRASS
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MAKING
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TAKING
THAT
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WHAT
WINE
PRIZEWEEK 102012
Jackpot increases by $25 each week if
no winning entry is received!
$600
1. Solve the puzzle just as you would in
any crossword puzzle. Choose from each
printed clue the word that best fits the
definition. Write the answers in the blank
space provided in each puzzle until all
spaces have been filled in.
2. There is no limit to the number of times
you may enter, however no facsimiles or
reproductions will be accepted. Only original
newspaper entry forms will be accepted.
3. Anyone is eligible to enter except
employees/directors of South Jersey
Federal Credit Union (SJFCU) and the
Grapevine and their immediate families.
4. A basic prize of $50.00 will be awarded
to the winner(s) of each weekly Prizeweek
Puzzle. In the case of multiple winners, the
prize money will be shared. If no correct
puzzle entries are received, $25.00 will
be added the following week. Winners
agree to permit use of their names and
photos by SJFCU and/or the Grapevine.
5. Entries can be mailed to South Jersey
Federal Credit Union, Attn: Prizeweek
Puzzle, PO Box 5429, Deptford, NJ
08096, or dropped off 24 hours a day, 7
days a week in the vestibule of SJFCU,
106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland. Mailed
entries must be received by SJFCU no later
than 10 am on the Monday following the
Wednesday publication of the Prizeweek
Puzzle. Entries dropped off at the SJFCU
Vineland branch must be received no
later than 8:30 am on the Monday fol-
lowing the Wednesday publication of the
Prizeweek Puzzle. SJFCU assumes no
responsibility for late or lost entries.
6. South Jersey Federal Credit Union
reserves the right to issue additional
instructions in connection with the
Prizeweek Puzzle. All such instructions
are to become part of the official rules.
Visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com for list
of additional rules.
This week’s jackpot
Note contest rules at the top of this page.
Readers can deposit their puzzles 24/7
in the drop-slot located in the vestibule of
South Jersey Federal Credit Union,
106 West Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360.
Note: Use a debit card from any financial institution
to gain access to the vestibule drop box after hours.
Entries must be deposited by 8:30 am on Monday.
Or, completed puzzles can mailed to:
South Jersey Federal Credit Union
Prizeweek Puzzle
PO Box 5429
Deptford, NJ 08096-0429
Mailed entries must be received by 10 am on Monday.
SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S
PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE
The answers to last week’s puzzle
are below. For a detailed explanation
of the answers to last week’s puzzle
and additional rules, visit
www.SouthJerseyFCU.com
Grapevine 20-24 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:24 PM Page 33
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2NWREHUIHVW 2NWREHUIHVW
OCTOBER 23 THROUGH 27
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W.
Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Karaoke
Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-
close, $3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance Party
Fridays 9 p.m.-Close, $3 Coronas. All
Sports Packages: MLB Extra Innings, NBA
League Pass, NHL Center Ice, and NFL
Sunday Ticket. $3 12-oz. Coors Light &
$5 23-oz. Call for RSVP and details.
EVERY TUESDAY
Karaoke. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea
Dr., Vineland. Sing your heart out. 765-5977.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr., Vineland. Latin-inspired dance
party. 765-5977.
Country Dancing. The Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, 1022 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove. 7–11 p.m.
EVERY THURSDAY
Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live Jazz
featuring area's best jazz duos. 6:30–9:30
p.m. No cover. RSVP recommended.
Magician Kevin Bethea. Centerton
Country Club & Event Center, Ten22 Bar &
Grill, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. 6–8 p.m. Magician and slight-of-
hand illusionist.
Jeff Giuliani of Eleven Eleven. Double
Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd.,
Vineland. Live acoustic 7–10 p.m..
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25
Masters of Motown. Levoy Theatre, 126-
130 N. High St., Millville. 2 and 7:30 p.m.
Tributes to both male and female groups
of the Motown era. Tickets $29.50
$26.50, $23.50. www.levoy.net
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27
Bay-Atlantic Symphony. Cumberland County College, Guaracini Fine and
Performing Arts Center, Vineland. 8 p.m. The season opens in monumental fashion
with a program that will feature Ludwig van Beethoven's powerful Ninth Symphony-
-one of the greatest works of the classical music literature. This concert features
the orchestra, two choruses, and four vocal soloists. The gala program will include
Ralph Vaughan Williams’ sublime Serenade to Music and Beethoven’s monumental
Symphony No. 9, Choral. Tickets $25 again this year, thanks to a PNC Arts Alive
grant. Photo credit: Alan Kolc
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MAKE YOUR OWN
Grapevine 20-24 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:24 PM Page 34
OCTOBER 25 THROUGH 27
Nightlife at Ten22. Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, The Patio Bar at
Ten22, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Wed.: Country Night with DJ Bob
Morgan, 7-11 p.m. Lessons and non-stop
dancing (song requests all night) on one
of the largest dance floors in region. $5
admission. Thurs: DJ Tommy B 8 p.m., Fri:
TBA 9 p.m., Sat: DJ Tommy B 9 p.m.
Nightlife at Mori’s. Lou Ferretti's Mori's
on Landis, 830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
690-0300. Thurs.: Adelante 7–11 p.m. Fri.&
Sat.: TBA 8 p.m.
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night,
1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy Hour
Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic drinks.
Wed.–Sat., live entertainment.
Nightlife at Double Eagle. Double Eagle
Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland. Live
music every Friday night. NFL Sunday
Ticket Package Turtlestone Brewing Co. on
draft, along with 16 other imported and
domestic beers. Happy Hour daily 3–6 p.m.
OCTOBER 26, 27, AND 28
Nightlife at The Rail. The Rail, 1252
Harding Hwy, Richland. 697-7245. Fri.:
Eleven Eleven. Sat. Rail-O-Ween.
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Tues.: Bike Nite with
live entertainment. Thurs.: Karaoke. Fri.:
Mike Bryan Band. Sat.: DJ/band. Daily drink
and food specials.
Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar
House Irish Pub. 123 N. High St., Millville,
293-1200. Wed.: Karaoke 9 p.m., Thurs.:
TBA 8 p.m., Fri.: Main Street Band 9 p.m.,
Sat.: Danny Eyer Band 9 p.m.
OCTOBER 26, 27, 31,
NOVEMBER 2 AND 3
Rocky Horror Picture Show. Eagle
Theatre, 208 Vine St., Hammonton.
LIVE Stage Left Productions brings the
mayhem and hilarity of this cult classic
to the stage. $20 GA. No outside props.
$5 prop bags at the door. October 26
and 31 and November 2 at 8 p.m.
October 27 and November 3 at 11:59
p.m. There will also be a 8 p.m. showing
on November 3. Purchase tickets at 609-
704-5012. or www.theeagletheatre.com.
EVERY FRIDAY
Gene Cortopassi. Merighi's Savoy Inn, E.
Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-
8051. 6 p.m. Dinner music.
www.savoyinn.com.
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THE FUN DOESN’T STOP!
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25TH
Halloween Party
Jeff Giuliani from Eleven Eleven,
Holiday Food and Drink Specials,
Costume Contest starts at 7
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27TH
Octoberfest
all day and night with Beer Specials
and Octoberfest Food Specialties
NFL Sunday Ticket
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WED - MON. 11 - 12AM
Continued on next page
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26
RESCHEDULED EVENT
“Amarillo” by Teatro Linea
Sombra. Cumberland County College,
Guaracini Performing Arts Center,
Sherman Ave. and College Dr.,
Vineland. 8 p.m. Haunting modern
dance and dramatic acting pieces tell
the story of a man who vanishes in
the desert, plus those of a modern
day town experiencing a continuing
exodus. Made possible by “Southern
Exposure: Performing Arts of Latin
America.” Tickets $10; $5 for those 55
and older, and under 18. Tickets can
be purchased over the phone with a
credit card by calling 856-692-8499,
or in person during business hours: 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday; and 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Wednesday.
BAY-ATLANTIC SYMPHONY, OKTOBERFEST AT LUNA’S, RAIL-O-WEEN,
YMCA COSTUME DANCE PARTY, AND NIGHTLIFE AROUND THE REGION.
Grapevine 20-24 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:24 PM Page 35
EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony Morris.
The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea Dr,,
Vineland. All of the most popular main-
stream dance music. 765-5977.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26
Gordon Vincent. Bogart’s Bookstore.
210 N. High St., Millville. Free. Live
music, 7–9 p.m.
YMCA President's Gala—Costume and
Masquerade Dance Party. Merighi's
Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd.,
Vineland, 691-8051. 7–11 p.m. Light dinner
and dancing. Come dressed in your best
costume from your favorite decade of
music. Tickets $40. 691-0030, ext. 307.
Comedy Nite Fun Raiser. NJ Motorsports
Park’s Thunderbolt Raceway, 800 Dividing
Creek Rd., Millville. 6–10 p.m. Headliner
Mike Burton and MC Tim Shannon host fun-
nyman Ray DeVito. Originally from Cleveland,
Ohio, and raised in an Italian-Americanized
family, this former Second City performer
is one of the youngest comedians headlin-
ing across the country. Tickets are $35 and
include a buffet dinner. A cash bar will be
available. Reserve a table of 8 and tickets
are only $30 per person. 856-825-2600.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27
Punky O'Dell & the Mudville Cats.
Bogart’s Bookstore. 210 N. High St.,
Millville. Free. Live music and Create
Your Own Super Hero Halloween Party.
6–10 p.m.
Atlantic City Ballet performs
Dracula the Ballet. Landis Theater, E.
Landis Ave., Vineland. 8 p.m.
Choreographed by Atlantic City Ballet
founder and director Phyllis Papa, this
three-act ballet is based on the classic
Bram Stoker novel that tells the hypnotic
tale of the notorious Transylvanian
Count. Set in the 15th century, this not-
to-be-missed classic will take you on a
supernatural journey from London to
Romania. Tickets: Adults $30 | Senior
$28 | Child $15.
Mark Nizer 3D. Levoy Theatre, 126-130
N. High St., Millville. 2 and 7:30 p.m.
Original comedy, world class juggling ,
movement, music and technology,
Abbreviated matinee performance is
intended to suit the age range and atten-
tion span of our Kids Series (2-8 years)
and will run just under an hour. Tickets
$12/$8 for matinee, $19/$14 for full length
evening performance. www.levoy.net.
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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY,
OCTOBER 26, 27 & 28
OcktoberFest Weekend at
Luna's. Merighi's Savoy Inn, E.
Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland,
691-8051. Last chance to hang out at
Luna’s for the season. German and
Oktoberfest draft beers,
bratwurst/German food, and live
entertainment, Oktoberfest girls. No
cover. Fri.: Fish in a Cup 7 p.m. Sat.:
TJ Frye Duo 7 p.m. Sun.: Eagles foot-
ball 1 p.m. www.savoyinn.com/lunas,
www.facebook.com/Savoyinn.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28
Loudon Wainwright III and Dar
Williams. Appel Farm at the Landis,
E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Two
of Appel Farm
concert audience’s
favorite perform-
ers make their
Appel Farm at the
Landis debut in a
spectacular dou-
ble bill. Tickets:
Orchestra $37.50,
Mezzanine $50.
www.landisthe-
ater.com
Grapevine 20-24 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:24 PM Page 36
PHOENIX BUSINESS FORMS After 30
years in the printing industry, Phoenix
Business Forms owner Joanne Buckalew
strongly believes that her four female
employees’ loyalty and customer consistency
have helped her business expand and suc-
ceed. Classified as a women’s minority busi-
ness, Buckalew coordinates with the state for
all sized printing jobs.
In 1992, having come through some tough
circumstances, Buckalew launched her com-
pany and rented space at 633 Elmer Street.
Naming her company “Phoenix,” Buckalew
aimedtoreflect her triumphover somedifficulties.
She rented that property through 1999.
During those years, she hired her four trusted
employees who remain with her today. In
1995, Brenda Carpani became a sales repre-
sentative and helped Buckalew expand
enough to outgrow their space. In 1997, Terry
Giberson came on board as a press person.
While driving on Northeast Boulevard in
Vineland in 1998, Buckalew noticed an avail-
able 5,500-square-foot building. She remem-
bers saying to herself, “Wouldn’t that be
something for me?”
In 2000, Buckalew moved into her dream
building. Newly hired receptionist Monica
Blake’s prior printing experience expedited
the move. Graphic Designer Lori Ferrarie
joined Phoenix Business Forms once
Buckalew had relocated.
Phoenix Business Form services cus-
tomers in Atlantic, Cumberland and Salem
counties. Many have remained steady clients
through the years, and Buckalew praises
organizations like Gerresheimer Glass Inc.
(formerly Kimble Glass), SJ Hospital System,
Garden State Highway Products and Chem
Glass and Eye Associates for their loyalty.
“Using heavier stock papers, current pop-
ular products are full-color pieces. Glossy
coated business cards are big sellers. Laser
has replaced traditional printing, and we are
producing fewer multiple part forms and
checks,” says Buckalew.
Buckalew has diversified due to the indus-
try’s major technological changes. She says,
“We are the total printing and promotional prod-
ucts specialists. Phoenix Business nowoffers
promotional mugs, pens, tee shirts and apparel.”
Depending on the complexity of the job,
orders may be completed within a week. E-
mail and technology have expedited the
change and proofing processes.
YI’S KARATE Master Chuck Vertolli’s
earlier pastime is now his business. As
owner/operator of Yi’s Karate in Vineland, he
teaches martial arts while providing character and
leadershipdevelopment for childrenandadults.
Always athletic, Vertolli began training in
1986. With one employee in 1982, Grandmaster
Ki Yun Yi and Master Dwayne Reed opened the
original site across fromLandis School. Vertolli
acquired the business in 1998.
Originally a part-time endeavor, Vertolli
taught night classes at the Ellison School
gym, guided by Grandmaster Yi and Master
Martin Carson. In June 2008, Vertolli’s mar-
tial arts passion motivated his career change
from a custom home builder.
Opening at his larger current location has
proven profitable, despite the economic
downturn. Today, Vertolli has one fulltime
and two part-time employees.
He says, “The difficult economy has actu-
ally reinforced us. After evaluating our
strengths and weaknesses, our improved pro-
grams offer additional value and benefits. The
expanded program includes a Black Belt Club
and a projected Leadership Club.”
Yi’s Karate adapts, rather than follows, the
current trends of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA).
“The traditional Tang Soo Do, meaning ‘the art
of the knife hand’ or ‘the way of the Chinese
hand,’ helps a person mature by totally integrat-
ing intellect, emotions, body and spirit. This
more relevant curriculummeets our students’
21st century needs. Technology improves opera-
tions, but instruction remains traditional physi-
cal activity, using our hands and feet for self-
defense,” says Vertolli.
Serving as President of the International
Martial Arts Association (IMAA),
Grandmaster Yi continues to guide and
inspire Vertolli. IMAA schools operate in the
U.S., Europe and South America. They regu-
larly travel together for IMAA business with
the European schools.
Yi’s Karate students compete in several
annual tournaments, often winning many tro-
phies and medals. Through the IMAA, the
U.S. Championship is held on odd years and
the World Championship on even years.
COLONIAL BANK FSB originally
opened in 1913 as the Young Men's Building &
Loan on Commerce Street in Bridgeton with
the main purpose of granting home mort-
gages. One hundred years later, Colonial
Bank, FSB is a nine-location community bank
offering comprehensive banking products
and dedicated customer service to residents
of Cumberland and Gloucester counties.
In 1943, the Bank obtained deposit insur-
ance on savings accounts and became The
Young Men's Savings and Loan Association.
During the next three decades the Bank
expanded its products and services and
acquired The Cohanzick Building & Loan and
the Equitable Building & Loan. By 1987 the
Bank had four locations throughout
Cumberland County and ventured into
Gloucester County by purchasing Mantua
Building & Loan and constructing a fifth
branch office in Sewell.
The biggest change for the Young Men's
Savings & Loan Association came in
November 1994, when the Bank changed its
charter from a state regulated Savings & Loan
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Grapevine 25-32 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:26 PM Page 1
Association to a Federal Savings Bank charter,
thus becoming Colonial Bank, FSB.
In 2007, Colonial Bank, FSB moved into its
corporate headquarters in Vineland to
streamline back-office functions and improve
efficiencies to better service the customer.
In addition to the three locations in
Vineland, Colonial Bank, FSB currently oper-
ates branches in Bridgeton, Mantua, Millville,
Upper Deerfield, Sewell and Cedarville.
Colonial Financial Services, Inc. was
organized in March 2010 to serve as the stock
holding company of Colonial Bank, FSB.
Colonial Financial Services, Inc. is a
Maryland-chartered corporation and its com-
mon stock trades on the NASDAQ Global
Market under the symbol “COBK.”
To commemorate its 100th Anniversary in
2013, Colonial Bank, FSBis presenting a year’s
worth of celebrations for its customers and the
entire southern NewJersey community with
events and prizes. Watch for details in January.
100 YEARS OR MORE
BARRETTA PLUMBING, HEATING &
COOLING Barretta first opened their doors in
1883, when John C. Barretta sawan opportunity
to cash in on a young Vineland’s rapid growth.
By the 1920s, the staff had grown from
three employees to 20. After the Great
Depression, however, the business was scaled
down quite a bit. Through the ’50s and ’60s,
there were only a few employees. With the
’70s, came a focus on heating and air-condi-
tioning. With it came another expansion for
Barretta to about 10 employees. The high mark
for employment came in 2007, when Barretta
reached 30 employees for the first time.
The business has always been family-
owned and operated. After over 100 years of
service, it is still going strong, as the fourth
generation of the Barretta family guides it
into the 21st century.
The business has had to change many times
over the years in order to survive for as long as
it has. During the early years, there was a hard-
ware store division of the company. When air-
conditioning was invented, the business began
offering that service. With the recent slow
down in construction projects, Barretta has
adapted by focusing more on residential and
commercial service and installations.
They’ve also tried to keep up with the ever-
changing technological landscape. In 1998, the
entire office was computerized. Employee cell
phones were added in that same year. In more
recent years, the company has instituted new
policies that focus on environmental friendli-
ness within heating and cooling equipment.
There are no secrets to Barretta’s longevity
and success. It can be attributed to a combina-
tion of hard work and a commitment to family
members and customers. Though the last few
years have been more challenging, the com-
pany will continue to adapt and persevere.
CENTURY SAVINGS BANK, www.cen-
turysb.com, is celebrating its 147th anniver-
sary year in 2012 by continuing its history of
growth and giving. Since its beginnings in
1865, Century Savings Bank has grown from a
small building and loan association with just
a few thousand dollars in assets, to a multi-
million dollar, friendly financial force in our
community, boasting a current bottom line of
more than $349 million in assets.
With a location on Landis Avenue and cor-
porate headquarters at Sherman Ave and
Orchard Road, the bank provides easier prox-
imity and seven-day banking to its many cus-
tomers and friends throughout Vineland and
the surrounding area.
Today, Century’s solid financial position
remains well documented, supported by annual
exams of federal regulators and confirmed by
independent rating firms like Bauer Financial,
which for more than 22 years has awarded
Century its top “Five Star” rating; and Siegfried
&Brew(S&B) LLC, who named Century Savings
Bank to its honor roll of U.S. Safest Banks.
Century Savings considers its customers and
associates to be its greatest asset, individuals
who are part of businesses, industry, and organi-
zations that keep the wheels turning in our area.
75-100 YEARS
RIGGINS OIL is a family owned and
operated business located in Vineland that
offers wholesale and retail delivery of gaso-
line, diesel, and heating oil to customers
throughout the region. There are currently
over 30 Riggins service stations in New
Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. The busi-
ness was founded by Loren Riggins, Sr. in
1926 as the South Vineland Feed and Coal
Company. At the time, the company
employed three people. Today, they’ve
expanded both in number of locations and in
staff, as they now employ over 100 people.
The real reason for their success has been an
ability to adapt to a changing marketplace as
new suppliers enter and exit the market, new
regulations are passed, and their capital
needs increase as prices rise. This flexibility
is a testament to their employees’ skills and
ability to adjust to new ways of operating.
When businesses and consumers are facing
economic pressures, they need to be buying
at the lowest possible price. Riggins fulfills
that need for their customers.
RONE FUNERAL SERVICE 2012 marks
the 80th anniversary of the founding of
Vineland’s iconic Rone Funeral Service by C.
Calvin and Mary B. Rone in 1932. The essence of
a family business was established at the outset.
Eighty years later, second and third genera-
tion members of the Rone and Geraci families
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THE CUMBERLAND COUNTY
GUIDANCE CENTER
is a private non-profit organization which provides Southern New Jersey
residents with mental health services. We have outpatient offices in Bridgeton,
Millville and Vineland, provide day programming for adults with a severe and
persistent mental illness and offer outreach and support services to residents in
Cumberland and Salem counties. Additionally we operate the Crisis Hot Line f
or emergency psychiatric evaluations. This year, 2012 is our 50th Anniversary
and we are holding an Awards Dinner on November 29, 2012.
GUIDANCE CENTER MAIN NUMBER: 856-825-6810
To schedule an appointment: 856-825-6810 ext. 261
Crisis Hot Line: 856-455-5555
50th Anniversary information: 856-825-6810 ext. 203
MILESTONES
Continued from previous page
Grapevine 25-32 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:26 PM Page 26
continue to operate the business, devoted to
the same high standards stipulated by Calvin
Rone upon Rone Funeral Service’s 25th
anniversary in 1957: “We realize that the confi-
dence of a community is a sacred trust, and
creates a solemn responsibility. Throughout
our years of service, the Rone Funeral Service
has earned a reputation for sincerity, under-
standing and dignity of purpose with thou-
sands of families. The Rone Funeral Service
recognizes its responsibility to the community,
and, through the competent experience of our
licensed morticians, will always endeavor to
merit the reputation we have earned.”
Current funeral director/ owner James C.
Geraci says, “We have always been guided by
our grandfather’s wisdom, compassion, and
professional standards.”
Faustina Rone-Geraci joined the business
soon after graduating high school, became one
of the youngest women ever licensed in New
Jersey in 1940, and continues to serve as man-
ager. Her brother, C. Victor Rone, worked tire-
lessly in the business and throughout the com-
munity until his sudden and untimely death at
age 52. In 1955, Faustina’s husband, James A.
Geraci, affectionately remembered as “Big
Jim,” brought his own personal touch, comfort-
ing ways, and quiet professional demeanor to
the business. Big Jim passed away in 2007.
Today, owners Faustina Rone Geraci, Jana
Geraci Scarpa and Big Jim’s son, managing
director James C. Geraci, continue the eight-
decade family tradition of service to families
in need, assisted by office manager Lori Rone,
daughter of Vic and Sarah and funeral direc-
tors Nick Chamenko ( 42 year employee) and
Michael DeStefano ( 32 year employee).
MARTINI SHOES, INC. Martini Shoes
was founded by Frank R. Martini in 1920. The
first store was run from the home that he
shared with his wife, Lena, and their three
children George F., Harry J., and Gloria. It
was located on South East Avenue between
Chestnut Avenue and Cherry Street. As the
business grew, Frank moved his store to
Landis Avenue in the Baker House Hotel.
After the Baker House Hotel burned down,
the store was moved to 623 Landis Avenue;
George and Harry joined their father in sell-
ing and repairing leather shoes.
Frank retired in the 1960s, with his sons
working the store until 1985, when George’s
son, Frank S. and wife Lynn took over. The
secret to their longevity, Frank says, is
“knowledge of how to fit shoes, not just sell-
ing shoes.” He calls it “good old fashioned
service,”—Martini’s provision of superior
quality shoes and customer service.
With three generations of the Martini
family continuing the tradition for 92 years;
they have embraced every era on Landis
Avenue. Lynn notes that they have been on all
the boards that been working to bring the
Avenue and Vineland back to the thriving
place it used to be.
NEWFIELD NATIONAL BANK was
originally chartered in 1934 as the First
National Bank in Newfield. In 1990, the
Newfield National Bank became a wholly
owned subsidiary of the holding company
Newfield Bancorp, Inc.
Since its inception, the bank’s main objec-
tive has been to serve the banking needs of
Newfield, as well as Cumberland, Gloucester
and Cape May counties. They continue their
commitment to relationship banking.
Person-to person service has never been
more important than in this current, fast-
paced financial environment.
For Newfield, community banking is to
serve and contribute, not take from the com-
munity. Newfield Bank employees do make a
difference, by becoming involved in the com-
munity, serving on boards and committees,
volunteering, and financially supporting
organizations and events.
Newfield National Bank intends to remain
an independent full service banking institution
whose mission will continue to serve the finan-
cial and credit needs of its entire community.
THE YMCA OF VINELANDof the
Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA began 85
years ago in 1927. The original location was
745 Landis Avenue. It was staffed by volun-
teers at that time. Today, there are more than
150 full- and part-time employees. Not only
has the facility at 1159 East Landis Avenue
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Installed the
original sewer line
on Elmer St. in
• 1901 •
116 years and still going strong
1784 Pine Avenue, Vineland NJ 08360 • Lic# 12089
BARRETTAPLUMBING.COM
856-691-1950
Serving Vineland residents since 1896.
What You Need, When You Need it
RENTALS • SERVICE • SALES • PARTS
Toll Free — 866-692-7510
Equipment For:
Contractors • Homeowners • Industry • Environmental
Vineland 856-692-7510 • Cape May Court House 609-465-7368
Egg Harbor Twp. 609-646-6666 • Sicklerville 856-227-4242
rentalcounrty@comcast.net
rentalcountry.com
Major
Credit Cards
Accepted
Delivery
Available
Gary Galloway, President
Continued on next page
Grapevine 25-32 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:26 PM Page 27
been modernized, but the programs are con-
stantly expanding.
The Y’s commitment and ties to the
community have never wavered. The sup-
port of local citizens is credited with making
the organization strong, vibrant, and
ever-evolving.
In addition to the regular health and fit-
ness offerings, the YMCA provides programs
to help battle obesity, available to children,
families, and individuals in the Y and other
settings. The YMCA attributes its longevity
and success to the support that the communi-
ty gives it in making the area a healthier place
to live.
50-75 YEARS
ACE PLUMBING HEATING AND
ELECTRICAL. The story begins on June 1,
1950 when the doors opened at Ace Plumbing
Supplies in a 3,200-square-foot storefront at
its present location on Delsea Drive. Between
1950 and 1967, Charles Berman worked and
sold product lines including plumbing, heat-
ing, electrical, appliances, cabinets, and even
automotive supplies. It was in 1967 that their
son, Larry, then 13 years old, began his career.
Between 1967 and 1973 Larry worked every
day after school and on weekends, handling
sales, purchasing, and stocking shelves. When
Larry graduated from Vineland High School
in 1973, he was ready to operate Ace on a full-
time basis. What happened after that is a clas-
sic American success story, built on a founda-
tion of hard work and determination. Fast for-
ward to 2012: Ace is comprised of five south-
ern New Jersey locations and nearly 65 dedi-
cated employees who strive to position Ace as
one of the leaders in the industry. Ace services
eight counties with an outside sales force, a
fleet of vehicles that make daily deliveries and
an inside sales staff that boasts an average of
more than 20 years experience. Ace will ship
anywhere, anytime. Ace has fully moved into
its new 50,000-square-foot sales and distribu-
tion center that will allow them to implement
state-of-the-art material handling systems,
improve service and increase inventory levels.
The new Showroom is also open and encom-
passes almost 6,000 square feet and features
the finest and most innovative products avail-
able in the plumbing, heating, and electrical
industry today. Ace recently won first place in
a National Showroom of the Year contest.
Ace enjoyed a successful 2012. The slow-
down in construction and newhome sales were
offset by a strong repair and remodeling trend.
THE ELLISON SCHOOL is a fully
accredited independent school and educates
children from toddlers through grade 8. The
Vineland Elementary School opened its doors
in 1959, in a small building on the corner of
Grape Street and East Avenue with seven stu-
dents in grades 1 through 3. While enrollment
started small, the dreams of the founding
families were big. The school was welcomed
by the community and the student body
almost tripled in its second year with the
addition of a fourth grade. The tiny school
also underwent a name change to honor the
generous support of its first benefactor, Mr.
George M. Ellison.
By the 1964-1965 school year, the 47 stu-
dents enrolled in grades K through 6 had out-
grown the Grape Street building and the
school moved to 740 Wood Street.
In 1968, The Ellison School moved to its
present site at 1017 S. Spring Road. Today, it
operates in a facility equipped with modern
equipment and technology. In 2008, new sci-
ence and computer labs, seven classrooms and
five offices were added. The school has 162
students and in 2010, the original building was
renovated to house preschoolers and toddlers.
During the summer of 2010, the original
building (historic little house) was fully reno-
vated to create new space for preschool and
toddler programs. Ellison recently purchased
a new network server and 60 new computer
workstations.
At Ellison, the most important driver of
growth is a commitment to provide academic
excellence with small class sizes, individual
attention and top-notch teachers.
FOREST GROVE MOTORS is owned
and operated by brothers Louis, Kenneth and
Peter Crescitelli. The business was started by
their father in 1949. By 1975, when the busi-
ness moved to its Main Road location, the
three boys were all working alongside the
elder Crescitelli. Then in 2001, when their
father decided it was time to retire, the three
Crescitelli brothers purchased the business
from him, looking to carry on the Forest
Grove name.
Today, the business specializes in all and
any used parts or cars in the auto market.
They feature a new “After market” depart-
ment, a towing service and recently updated
computer sytem for all inventory.
They attribute their success to their loyal
customer base, and always having the parts to
serve their customers’ needs.
MERIGHI’S SAVOY INNhas been a
hometown dining and banquet tradition for
over 58 years. Ernest and Rose Merighi found-
ed the Inn back in June of 1954. It was a
strong work ethic and a pretty good ravioli
recipe that helped build the Savoy into what it
now is.
Today, Merighi’s Savoy Inn is a landmark
restaurant with several private rooms for par-
ties from 50 to 500 people. Hosting every
type of event possible, the Savoy has catered
thousands of private affairs from wedding
receptions to charity galas, to Sweet 16 parties.
Many current brides and grooms at the
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Carrianne
Lighting &Fan
Specialist
Henry
Design
Specialist
Suzanne
Decorative
Hardware
Specialist
Eric
Plumbing
Specialist
Ask Our Team of Specialists! Celebrating Our 62nd Anniversary!
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3839 At|ant|c Ave., At|ant|c C|ty
609-348-0186
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4 OTHER LOCATI ONS TO SERVE YOU:
MILESTONES
Continued from previous page
Grapevine 25-32 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:26 PM Page 28
Savoy are the children of Savoy brides and
grooms from the 1970s. Tom Merighi, Sr. took
care of the parents when they married in the
1970s and now Tom Merighi, Jr. is taking care
of their children when they get married today.
This past spring saw the opening of Luna’s
Outdoor Bar and Grill, built adjoining the
Savoy Inn’s dining room. Luna’s provides a
laid-back, open air atmosphere with regular
food and drink specials.
UP TO 50 YEARS
CRUSTN’ KRUMBS: Ann and Terry
Cantoni started out in Philadelphia Center
City and moved to Vineland 10 years later
with Upper Crust Bakery. They had a thriving
business for years, but in 1997 Terry was in a
fatal accident. Ann eventually closed the busi-
ness, then reopened, with the help of her two
daughters, Robyn and Tara, and her faithful
baker, Ramon. The business specializes in
wedding cakes and special-order cakes, cook-
ies, breads, pastries, doughnuts, muffins,
scones, and pies.
To keep up with today’s technological pace,
the bakery does a lot of promotion via their
website, email, Facebook and even on phones.
They’ve also started to do more custom cakes,
in keeping up with the trends of today.
ROSSI HONDA was started in 2000 by
Ron Rossi to offer sales and service of new
and used vehicles and parts. At the peak, he
had 100 employees but has since scaled back
some. From 2001 to 2005, the dealership was
expanded and remodeled to fit the newHonda
image program, including a computer upgrade.
“We pride ourselves on doing the right
things for customers,” says Rossi.
APPLIANCES PLUS VIDEOhas been in
business in Vineland now for 29 years. In that
time, the business has witnessed major
changes in what people can expect from their
washers, dryers, televisions and refrigerators.
The Vineland company has also seen the rise
of large chain home-improvement stores and
online retailers that emerged as competitors.
But this also ensured the business set itself
apart, said Sal Venuto, 54, who co-owns the
South Delsea Drive store with his childhood
friend, Rich Curcio, also 54.
Appliances Plus carries more than 53
brands of appliances in a 14,200-square-foot
showroom.
The 10-employee staff also takes special-
ized training and develops an expertise in
products. The appliance store has the distinc-
tion of being in a state Urban Enterprise Zone,
which means it collects only half of the state’s
7 percent sales tax.
In the years before the housing downturn,
new construction put the business in its hey-
day, as work came from builders and con-
sumers upgrading from the traditional appli-
ance packages in new homes.
Through all the changes, the business has
remained a staple in Vineland from when the
two owners bought the original location in
downtown Vineland before moving moving to
a store three times larger in 2003.
CAPITAL BANK OF NEW JERSEY,
Since Capital Bank of New Jersey’s beginning,
its success has been due to the people con-
nected with the institution. It started with
Capital Bank’s 27 Organizers who, in 2005,
saw the need for a new community bank in
Cumberland County – one which would deliv-
er friendly, hometown service, which would
be an active lender to small- and mid-sized
businesses and individuals.
Those 27 Organizers soon multiplied into
hundreds of local stockholders who agreed
that a new bank headquartered in Vineland
was needed and would be successful. And
they’ve been proven right. Following Capital
Bank’s initial capital raise, which was the
biggest community bank initial offering in
South Jersey of all time, the bank has achieved
remarkable growth and results since it opened
for business in April 2007. In 2012 it
announced record profits, and declared its
first-ever cash dividend to its stockholders.
The quality of Capital Bank’s staff has
always been a critical part of its success. David
J. Hanrahan, President and CEO, commented
“As we celebrate our fifth anniversary in 2012
and look back on our achievements, we know
that they are due in large part to the friendly,
hometown staff in our two Vineland branches.”
In Vineland, Capital Bank has branches at
175 South Main Road and on West Landis
Avenue next to the Wal-Mart Supercenter.
Capital Bank also has branches in Woodbury
Heights and Hammonton.
L.A. MALE opened its doors as a full serv-
ice men’s clothing store in Vineland in 1994
after operating in Absecon for ten years. At
that time, owner Larry Leonelli was the bene-
factor of a friendly business climate for high-
end clothing. As years have gone by, that has
changed, but Leonelli has been able to com-
pete continuing to specialize in male formal
wear, but expanding into restaurant uniform
availability for both men and women, as well
as a Speedo swimsuit department for boys and
girls in swim clubs.
Today, L.A. Male is still a family-business,
with Leonelli getting help from his children
during the busy seasons. L.A. Male’s dedica-
tion to a loyal customer base has been a con-
stant through the business’s history.
RENTAL COUNTRY INC. provides
rental equipment to contractors, home own-
ers, landscapers and DIYers. They also sell
power equipment to contractors and land-
scapers, as well as the general public. The
business began in October 1981 by Betty and
Gary Galloway. At the time, it employed about
five or six people, including the Galloways.
Today, Rental Country employs close to 30
people, and has seen great expansion. Along
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22 Landis Ave., Unit Q
Vineland, New Jersey 08360
(856) 691-0741 • Fax (856) 691-4655
E-Mail: ss7057@bellatlantic.net
www.sirspeedy.com/vineland
33
YEARS
1200 Harding Highway (Rt. 40) Newfield, NJ 08344 • 856-697-4444
Mon.-Thurs. 8am-6pm • Fri. 8am-7pm • Sat. 8am-5pm • Sun. 9am-3pm
GAROPPO’S
STONE & GARDEN CENTER AND FEED & PET SUPPLY
FAMILY RUN • EXPERIENCED, FRIENDLY STAFF
One of the largest suppliers of E.P. Henry Hardscaping Products
Offering Care for Your Animals as well as design
ideas for your landscaping and hardscaping needs
www.garoppos.com
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1616 Pennsylvania Avenue • Vineland NJ 08361
Contact Patty A. Lamplugh
856-825-2266
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with their original Vineland location, they
now have facilities in Cape May Court House,
Egg Harbor Township and Sicklerville. They
have also added national brands such as Stihl,
Honda and Wright to their resale inventory.
Through all of their success, they’ve man-
aged to keep the same ideals: Providing quality
rental equipment and excellent customer serv-
ice. Though they have added the sale of nation-
ally-known products, rentals are still at the
core of their business. The Galloways attrib-
ute their success to an ability to adapt to the
times. With technology like computers and
internet they strive to keep up with the ever-
changing landscape of customer demands.
SIR SPEEDY PRINTING AND MAR-
KETING SERVICES specializes in instant
and custom printing and copying, as well as
marketing programs. The Vineland franchise
opened its doors in 1980 as a family-owned
business with just three employees. Sir Speedy
has grown from an instant print shop to a full
digital printing and marketing company.
Along with the Vineland store, they now
own a store in Charlottesville, Virginia. This
expanded their staff from three people to
seven.
Today, their values continue to be good
customer service, great quality and commu-
nity involvement. As other businesses grow,
Sir Speedy’s services will keep pace.
DOMINICK’S PIZZA II is a family-
owned pizzeria and restaurtant that has been
in operation in Vineland since 1989 when
owner, Dominick Connena, wanted to bring a
touch of Southern Italy to the Vineland area.
He later sold the business to the Brunetti
Family, who own and operate it to this day.
Over the years, they’ve kept their quality the
same by keeping the same ingredients, even
as the business expanded to open a second
location. Their goal is to give a family of four
in today’s economy a healthy meal at a rea-
sonable price. They treat their customers like
family and always offer the freshest and best
product available.
SOUTH JERSEY FITNESS CONNEC-
TIONis an accredited Medical Fitness Facility
that helps members of the community achieve
a healthy lifestyle through exercise and educa-
tional programs. Initially opened in 1986, the
Fitness Connection was one of the first hospital
wellness centers in the country. SJHFC has
grown by receiving accreditation by the
Medical Fitness Association in 2009 and again
in 2012 and by starting programs such as PREP
(Physician Referred Exercise Program) and
PIT (Performance Improvement Training),
which enhance the training experience. The
Fitness Connection has seen a recent change
in philosophy, however, by focusing now on
reaching the inactive population.
They continually purchase top of the line
fitness equipment and have made great
strides in becoming technologically progres-
sive with online member management
through programs like IHP (Interactive
Health Partner) and integration with the hos-
pital’s electronic medical record. Their med-
ical integration with the hospital and ability
to network with other departments and share
best practices is a secret to their success.
FOREST GROVE AUTOBODY was first
opened in 1962 by Nick Simione. For 50 years
now, the business has been a fixture in
Vineland. From a humble beginning, Forest
Grove expanded into the next generation,
with Vincent Simione, son of Nick, now man-
aging the business. Forest Grove has also
expanded technologically. They now feature
state-of-the-art body straightening equip-
ment, as well as the most up-to-date spray
booths. Along with the modern equipment,
they’ve also become environmentally con-
scious, as they’ve begun using water-based
paints. As a family-owned business, they
attribute their longevity to good, honest work
and their customer referrals.
CUMBERLAND COUNTY GUIDANCE
CENTER is a community mental health cen-
ter that has been providing a variety of men-
tal health treatment and services to area resi-
dents since it opened in 1962. The center
started with just two full-time employees on
staff. Today, it employs over 200 part-time
and full-time employees.
The center employs all of the finest technol-
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YI’S KARATE OF VINELAND
FALL SESSION MEMBERSHIP
October 30, 2012 thru November 28, 2012
Introductory Membership only $49.00 includes FREE Uniform
(New Students Only Adult & Youth (6yrs. and up) - Tai Chi and Lil’ Dragons Programs excluded)
Enhance Condence • Positive Self-Image
Improved Study Skills • Increased Mental
Focus • Respect for Self and Others
Improved Concentration • Improved
Communication Skills • Personal Self-
Defense • Courtesy through Martial Arts
Learn and Master Success Skills • Non-
violent Conict Resolution • Positive Peer
Group • Problem Solving • Character
development • Goal Setting • Manners
Lincoln Plaza
3722 E. Landis Ave. • Vineland, NJ 08361
856- 405- 0008
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WORLD CLASS CURRICULUM • PROVEN SUCCESS
TODDLERS - PRESCHOOL - KINDERGARTEN - GR. 8
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4 Wheel Alignment and Framework
Body and Fender Repairs • Insurance Work
Expert Refinishing • Air Conditioning
FOREST GROVE
AUTO BODY
Vince Simione
Heavy Duty Endorsement • Lic. #32 • NJ State lic. #01277A
564 Main Rd.,
Vineland, NJ 08360
(856)697-2500/697-2504
FAX 697-3549

93 Years!
&Five Generations our shoes have walked the earth!
ANNIVERSARY SALE ON NOW!
20%OFF ENTIRE STOCK
613 A Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360
856-691-2329 Fax: 856-794-1658
a e YYe 93 ars!
a FFa 856-691-2329
in VVineland, NJ 08360 ve. AAve. andis L 613 A
NT E FF 20%O
A S NNIVERSARY A
our shoe &Five Generations
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x: 856-794-1658 aax: 856-794-1658
neland, NJ 08360
TOCK S TIRE
! OW N N O ALE
es have walked the earth!
ars!
CELEBRATI NG
44 YEARS
anks to all our Customers
Phone: (856) 696-1698
Fax: (856) 691-8693
MRM
MARIO J. RUIZ-MESA
INSURANCE AGENCY LLC
720 E. LANDIS AVENUE,
VINELAND, NJ 08360
MILESTONES
Continued from previous page
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WWW.APPLIANCESPLUSVIDEO.COM
2155 Delsea Dr., Vineland, NJ
692-1544

Fine Men`s Clothing and Formal Wear Specialists
L.A. MALE
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3LaSalle St · Vineland · 856-794-3000
ALLINVENTORYIN THE
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1370 S. Main Road, Vineland
856-690-1200
Dominck’s
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Since 1989
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ogy available to them, including an Electronic
Health Records system, which allows themto
more accurately evaluate their efforts to pro-
vide quality service. They continuously evalu-
ate their programs with the assistance of the
Cumberland County Mental Health Board, the
local National Alliance for the Mentally Ill
chapter, consumers and their employees.
In today’s economic climate, the center’s
funding is affected. However, for 50 years,
they’ve adapted to the needs of the communi-
ty. They will continue to do so.
BERRYMAN’S BRANCH, professionally
managed and maintained by Hometown
America, is a family and pet friendly manufac-
tured housing community that has been in
Vineland since 1970. They offer newand used
homes at an affordable price to enhance the
lifestyle. Keeping the cost of home ownership
affordable, comfortable and clean is their staff’s
chief goal. They also strive to provide a high
level of customer service and attention to detail.
In 2000, they added a total of 309 more
home sites. This helps them to provide choic-
es to people in all walks of life. Whether a
potential home owner needs to downsize or
purchase their first home and anywhere in
between, they provide an option.
MARIO J. RUIZ-MESA INSURANCE
AGENCY, LLC is a personal and commercial
insurance company with personal service.
When you call their office, you talk to a per-
son, not a machine. That’s because, even
though it’s an insurance company, Ruiz-Mesa
is still a small business. It was opened in 1968.
At that time, Ruiz-Mesa was the sole employ-
ee. Today, it is very much the same, as Ruiz-
Mesa employs just one part-time worker. The
business has seen a lot of growth otherwise.
In 1975, they moved to their current location
on Landis Avenue in Vineland, which dou-
bled their office space. At first, Ruiz-Mesa
dealt with a primarily Spanish clientele.
Today, their customer base is about half
Hispanic, half Anglo-Saxon.
Ruiz-Mesa attributes the success of his
business to his personal touch. He always
tries to be fair and honest with his customers,
and provides an intimate relationship,
opposed to the detached service one might
receive from buying insurance online.
DENTAL CARE OF VINELAND
GENERAL AND FAMILY DENTISTRY
opened in 1991, when Dr. Frank Pettisani, Jr.,
wanted to follow in the footsteps of his
father, who founded OraCare and worked in
Vineland for over 40 years. It opened in a
very small office with just seven employees.
But in its 21 years of service, they’ve expand-
ed their Vineland office and increased their
staff to 21. They’ve transitioned into an envi-
ronmentally friendly office by going com-
pletely paperless and continue to stay
informed with the latest in dental technolo-
gy. But the biggest sign of their growth
comes in the opening of four other offices.
The biggest keys to the success they’ve
seen over the years are their commitments to
honesty, sincerity and a genuine concern for
their patients’ overall health.
BOB NOVICK GM CHRYSLER DODGE
JEEP When Bob Novick opened his General
Motors and Chrysler dealership in 1971, 25
dealerships were in the Vineland-Bridgeton-
Millville area. After 41 years of hard work and
dedication to offering a quality product and
good service, the operation remains one of 10
throughout the entire county.
His original staff of 21 has increased to 49
full and part time employees. Two genera-
tions of the Novick family currently oversee
the eight individual auto franchises, which
include Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick, GMC,
Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge and RAM.
Thanks to sustained sales and service
growth since 2010, the Novick family will
expanded its facility last year after more than
60 years in the same location.
PARISH SIGN CO., INC. is a local, family
owned and operated sign manufacturing com-
pany that specializes in all types of custom
signs from small, screen-printed job-site, real
estate or special-event signs to large lighted
pylon signs, channel letters, monument signs
and LED digital displays. The business
opened in 1959 and was purchased by Charles
Parrish in 1986 as a small local sign manufac-
turer. When his son, Craig, graduated from
Widener University in 1988 and joined the
company to run the day-to-day operations, he
began to transform the company into a nation-
al supplier. Craig Parrish, now president of the
company, expects to continue growth through
national internet marketing.
Over the last two decades the sign busi-
ness has evolved dramatically with the evolu-
tion of computers.
Their employees are the main secret to
their success. They provide the business with
dedication and the skills necessary to remain
competitive in this ever-evolving industry.
RICHLAND CARPET AND FLOORING
has been serving the flooring needs of the
community for over 40 years. After working
for the company for 34 years, Phil Brunozzi,
Sr., officially took over ownership of Richland
Carpet &Flooring in October 2010. Phil and
his wife Jeanne Marie Brunozzi, both long-
time residents of Vineland, employ five people
at the same location (Rt. 40 and Fir Ave. in
Richland) where the business was founded by
John and Jean Petrini in 1971. The company
offers a large array of hardwood, laminate,
sheet vinyl, carpet and customarea rugs to fit
any size roomfor both commercial and resi-
dential customers. Richland Carpet &Flooring
offers quality brands such as Shaw, Mohawk,
and Armstrong. Phil and Jeanne Marie are
always on-site to personally help customers.
GAROPPO’S STONE & GARDEN
AND FEED & PET SUPPLY CENTER
Next year will mark 40 years in business for
the Garoppo’s stone yard. The business was
started in 1973 on Tuckahoe Road in Newfield
and moved to its present location on Route
40 in 1996. In 2000, the business expanded
into pet supplies, opening a feed store and
adding more pet supplies each year leading
up to 2010, when they expanded from2,500 to
8,000 sq. ft. This enabled them to stock a wide
variety of pet foods and supplies, as well as a
large selection of wild bird seeds, feeders, etc.
Aside from feed, they also offer fencing, gates
and horse/livestock supplies. On the gardening
side of the business, Garoppo’s offers a wide
variety of fertilizers, weed and pest control,
garden supplies along with loads of gifts ideas
for the family gardener. They carry topsoil,
stone, mulches and EP Henry Pavers and wall
systems. Best of all: Garoppo’s offers delivery
for your purchase. With their knowledgeable
staff of 15, they can make your visit a one-stop
shop, offering a wide variety of products. I
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COMMUNITY CALENDAR

HAPPENINGS
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24
Herniation, Bulge Or Degeneration of
Your Spinal Discs. Ledden Family
Chiropractic Center, 2821 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland. 6 p.m. Complimentary presenta-
tion on how chiropractic care is a natural
way to help improve how you feel. 856-
692-2220 for information or to RSVP.
Community Health Fair & Awareness
Day. Oaks of Weymouth Club House,
11th Ave, Weymouth Twp. 10 a.m.–2 p.m.
Advice for residents, seniors, veterans
and anyone with disability concerns.
Free.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25
Sacred Heart High School Open
House. 15 N. East Ave., Vineland. 6:45
p.m. Open house for 6th, 7th and 8th
grade students, parents and friends.
Reverse Mortgage Program. Millville
Public Library, 210 Buck St., Millville.
10:30 a.m. Genworth Financial will hold
the program, free and open to the public.
Halloween Game Day. Millville Woman's
Club, 300 "E" St., Millville. 12 noon. Card
and game groups, food and fun games.
$15. The club house is located at 300 "E"
Street. RSVP: 856 765 5372.
OCTOBER 26-28, NOVEMBER 2-4
Choose: Where Will You Be When
Reality Strikes? Chestnut Assembly of
God, 2554 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland. 7
p.m. PG-13, parental supervision strongly
suggested. $3 adults, $1 kids 12 and
under. 856-691-1205, ext. 25.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27
Fall Harvest Festival. City of Refuge
Church, 737 W. Walnut Rd., Vineland. 1-3
p.m. Shiloh Baptist Church will host the
free family event. .
Disability Awareness Day in
Cumberland County. Cumberland
County College, Luciano Conference
Center, W. Sherman Ave. and College Dr.,
Vineland. 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Continental break-
fast, lunch and door prizes. Free but RSVP
by Oct. 23 to 856-459-3090.If in need of
transportation, call CATS at least 48 hours
in advance at 856-691-7799.
Women’s Conference. Life on the Vine
Ministries, 427 S. Spring Rd., Vineland.
8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Speaker is Trisha
Roselle. Love offering. 696-3604 or
www.lovechurch.com.
Soup, Bake and Rummage Sale.
Newport United Methodist Church, 340
Methodist Rd., Newport. 10 a.m–2 p.m.
Various homemade soups, chili and baked
goods. “Take-home” red and white clam
chowder and fish chowdere $7 per quart,
all others $6 per quart. Soups include
vegetable beef, navy bean, chicken noodle
and Italian wedding.
OCTOBER 27 AND 28
Boat Races. LLPOA Community Center,
Lake Shore and Narcissus, Laurel Lakes. 8
a.m.–3 p.m. Kitchen open for breakfast
and lunch. www.LaurelLakeNJ.com.
OCTOBER 27, NOVEMBER 3 AND 10
Fall Yard and Bake Sale. St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church, 3rd and Mullberry sts.,
Millville. 8 a.m–1 p.m. Yard sale benefits
Lutheran World Mission Support, the bake
sale supports the Millville Help & Hope
Food Larder. 856-825-3008.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28
Beef Barbeque. North Italy Club, 8th
St., and Virano Ln., Vineland. 12 noon–5
p.m. Two sandwiches with hot or sweet
peppers $8. 856-692-9862.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Health & Information Fair. Abbott’s
Building, 7 Washington St., Bridgeton.
10:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Youth Immunization
and Outreach program at Gateway
Community Action Partnership will hold
the fair. Event is free and open to the pub-
lic and features health, immunization and
nutrition information as well as social
service program information. Give-away
items, balloons, popcorn, cotton candy,
face painting, music and games for chil-
dren. 856-451-5600.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Boogie Nights. The Event Center, Forest
Grove Rd. and Delsea Dr., Vineland. 7 p.m.
Dinner and dancing. 856-696-4380, ext. 106.
Basket & Bag Bingo. Millville Elks Lodge
No. 580, 1815 E. Broad St., Millville. 7 p.m.,
doors open at 6. Don your red, white and
blue as Woodland Country Day School
hosts their ‘Vote America’ Basket & Bag
Bingo Try to win one of the many beautiful
Coach or Vera Bradley Bags, or baskets
made by that famous company in Ohio.
Advance tickets $20 until 10/28, $25 after.
Call Diane at 856-453-8499 ext. 112.
NOVEMBER 2 AND 3
Bake Sale, Soup Sale and Chinese
Auction Fundraiser. Fairton United
Methodist Church, 20 Main St., Fairton. 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Homemade soups, baked
goods, hot dogs and sandwiches. Soups
are $3 for 16-ounce container, $6.00 for
32-ounce container. Call 856-451-4182.
Antique & Collectibles Sale. Women’s
Club of Vineland, 677 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland. Friday 10 a.m–6 p.m., Saturday
10 a.m–4 p.m. Admission free.
Christmas Yard and Food Sale. Malaga
Camp Meeting, 4488 Arbutus Rd.,
Newfield. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Get your holiday
decor. 856-691-3154.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Cumberland County College
Foundation Starlite Gala. 6 p.m.
Social Hour, 7–11 p.m. Dinner and
Dancing. Catering by Feast Your Eyes,
music by the David Christopher
Orchestra, black tie optional, open bar,
silent auction. Tickets $150 pp. For infor-
mation, call 691-8600 ext. 392.
Glasstown Chapter of the National
Federation of the Blind of New Jersey
Meeting. Trinity Episcopal Church, 800
E. Wood St., Vineland. 10 a.m.-12 noon.
RSVP Lydia Keller 856-696-3518.
Oysterfest. Greenview Inn at Eastlyn
Country Club, Vineland. 5:30–9:30 p.m.
Cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, keyboard music
of Irv Mellman. Dinner at 6:45 p.m., cash
bar open through evening. NJ Secretary
of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher, a life-
long resident of Cumberland County, will
speak about the importance of farming in
the Garden State. Tickets $85 pp, full
tables of 10 may be reserved. RSVP by
10/26. Purchase tickets at 856-785-2060
or www.bayshorediscovery.org.
CLOTHING DRIVE
Through November 16, Girl Scout
Troop 54611 is holding its semi-annual
clothing drive in order to make a holi-
day donation to a local shelter. The
troop will wash, separate and bag all
donated clothing after pickup. Call
856-899-9880 to arrange for pickup.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Cumberland County Economic
Development Breakfast & Tri-
Chamber Business Expo.
Cumberland County College / Luciano
Conference Center, Sherman Ave. and
College Dr., Vineland. 8 a.m.–1 p.m.
"The Future - It's Everybody's
Business!" County Economic Status,
Business Success Profiles, Vendor
Displays and Information, Two
Breakout Sessions 10 and 11 a.m.
FREE / Open to the public /
Registration Required at 856-691-7400.
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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
TATCA Breakfast Fundraiser.
Proceeds to fund breakthrough
cancer research. Rosary Hall at
Saint Padre Pio, Dante Ave.,
Vineland. 8 a.m.–12 noon. $8
adults, $4 children. Additional
donations are encouraged. Tickets
available from the church rectory
by calling 856-691-7526 or from
Limpert Brothers at 856-691-1353
or at the door.
Three radio programs on WVLT-
FM 92.1 will be broadcast live
from the event:
• 9–10 a.m.—Jim Sauro’s Straight
Talk
• 10–11 a.m.—Pearl Giordano and
Friends
• 11 a.m.–12 p.m.—Steve DiOrio Show
There will be an informal
fundraising competition between
the shows.
For details, visit TATCA online:
www.theanswertocancerarmy.com
Bus Trips
• The Team Department of the Millville
Woman's Club is sponsoring a bus trip to
The Society Hill Playhouse in Philadelphia
followed by dinner at the Pub. The show
being presented is the comedy Cooking
With The Calamari Sisters on Saturday,
November 3. Leaving the clubhouse, 300
"E" Street at 12 noon. There will be a 2
p.m. show followed by dinner. Tickets are
only $90 and includes all costs. Checks
can be made out to TEAM. Call Sharleen
Johnson at 327 1024 or email gunner750
@comcast.net for tickets or questions.
• Shop the Lancaster Outlets and dine
at Shady Maple Smorgasbord on
Saturday, November 10. Depart SJH
Fitness Connection (rear parking lot) at 8
a.m. Return to SJH Fitness Connection
9 p.m. Tickets: $51 (for bus fare and din-
ner) per person. Itinerary includes Tanger
and Rockvale Outlets. For reservations
and information, contact Jill Higgins (856-
358-8822). Proceeds benefit Girl Scout
Troop #97420.
• The Friends of Vineland Public
Library are offering a bus trip to New York
City on Saturday, November 10. Design
your own itinerary and enjoy the theater,
museums, shopping and diverse restau-
rants in the Big Apple. The cost is $36
and includes transportation and helpful
handouts. Call the library Administration
Department at 794-4244 ext. 4732 for
more information or stop in the library
Monday through Friday from 10-5 to pur-
chase tickets. All proceeds benefit the
Vineland Public Library.
• Ramoth Church (Vineland Nazarene)
is sponsoring a bus trip to Rockvale and
Tanger Outlets in Lancaster, PA, on
Saturday, November 17. Bus leaves
church parking lot at 8 a.m. and returns
at 7 p.m. $40 per person includes trans-
portation, driver gratuity, coffee/water/
doughnuts. Call 358-9124.
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CANDIDATES Continued from cover
About the candidate:
Angela A. Calakos, 52, is a 1978 Vineland
High School graduate. She later attended
Cumberland County College and graduated
from Glassboro State College. She has been
a vivacious and effective teacher for over 25
years in the Vineland Public School district.
Calakos currently teaches eighth grade
Language Arts at Rossi Intermediate
School. She is also an NJEA member and
has had the honor of serving as Vice
President of the local Vineland Education
Association. As Vice President, Calakos
served as the Grievance Chairperson. Along
with that office, she was on the Executive
Council, chairperson of the Instructional
Professional Development committee,
served on many negotiations teams and
mentored numerous first-year teachers. She
is a member of ADK Teacher Sorority as
well as chairperson for the chapter’s high
school scholarship. She has also chaired
numerous fundraisers through her school
for the Cumberland County SPCA.
Calakos and her family are very active in
the Greek Orthodox Church and can be
seen every year helping out at the Greek
Festival. She is the daughter of the late
Anthony Moniodis, a pharmaceutical glass
blower, and Mary, a retired secretary for the
Vineland school district. She and her hus-
band, Byron, have been married for 33
years. They have two children, Mary and
Steven. Mary is a teacher at Rossi School
and is married to Nick Kaskabas of
Vineland. Together they have two beautiful
children, Steven is a fourth grade teacher at
Petway School and has performed his musi-
cal talents all over the area.
Calakos comes from a family of educa-
tors. Her brother, Peter Moniodis, and sis-
ters, Katina Kanakis and Cynthia Doulis,
are all teachers in the Vineland Public
Schools. They have jokingly called teaching
the “family business.” Angela’s roots here in
Vineland are long and have always been the
basis of her devotion to the city. She also
feels the importance of giving back to a
community that has always served her so
well. All of these great experiences have
given Calakos the drive and depth to serve
the City of Vineland and its residents well
as a member of council.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
The pertinent issue facing the Vineland
is communication between City Hall and
our public employees. I would like to see
the Mayor’s office and representatives of
our public employees sit down and con-
verse at least once per month.
Fiscal responsibility for the city of
Vineland by the people elected to run it.
There must be a better checks-and-bal-
ances procedure with the Mayor as lead.
Continued improvement of Landis
Avenue and the Landis Theater. We have so
much local talent here. We need to promote
that. We need to create a better liaison
between Appel Farm and the Mayor’s
office.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
Stated above.
Please provide a closing statement:
Calakos is the third-generation born in
Vineland. Her family and the students she
teaches are her true passions in life. She
believes in working to keep Vineland a
place that many more generations of her
family will be proud to call home as well.
Candidate: Angela Calakos
Slate: Vineland Taxpayers First (Barse)
About the candidate:
Councilwoman Mayra Arroyo is currently
serving her first term. Prior to being elected
to serve on the Vineland City Council in May
2008, she served on the Vineland Board of
Education for seven years (elected in April
2002 and re-elected in 2003 and 2006).
Arroyo was born in Manhattan, NY but
raised in Vineland. She is the eldest of three
daughters of Jose Arroyo and Elsie
Martinez Arroyo, both from Utuado, PR.
She has a daughter, Charissa, 24, who
recently graduated from Rowan University.
Arroyo earned an Associate in Applied
Science degree from Cumberland County
College (CCC) in 1991 and transferred to
Richard Stockton State College, where she
graduated in 1993 with a Bachelor of
Science in Social Work. In 2001, she gradu-
ated from Springfield College with a Master
of Science in Human Services.
Arroyo is currently Assistant Director/
Counselor of the Educational Opportunity
Fund Program at Rowan University.
Previously, she was employed by CCC as an
Academic Advisor/Counselor.
Currently a member of the P.A.L. and
VDID Boards of Directors, Arroyo has
served and volunteered in numerous organi-
zations including the Vineland Puerto Rican
Festival, the Mujeres Latina en Accion,
March of Dimes Community Advisory
Board, Communities Against Tobacco-
Cumberland Coalition, Casa P.R.A.C., Inc.
Board, and CCC Alumni Board.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
Stabilization of taxes, public safety and
economic development, all of them impor-
tant for quality of life.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
I think we all agree that sustainability is
fundamental to building a strong communi-
ty, not only in the physical environment but
also in economic prosperity.
Our current administration is committed
to the retention and creation of new jobs
via programs such as the UEZ and the NJ
Economic Development Authority.
However, during my tenure as council-
woman for the City of Vineland, some of
our efforts have been deeply affected by the
economic depression our city, county, state
and nation have been facing.
With that said, I believe we need to con-
tinue our current efforts and pursue other
types of businesses initiatives to expand our
business portfolio in hopes of keeping our
children close to home after college or
vocational school graduation. We need to
entice businesses by promoting Vineland
Municipal Electric, which is the only
municipal-owned electric utility. Our rates
are 12 to 17 percent lower than our sur-
rounding communities and we continue to
build and expand our solar fields.
I’ve been consistent in voting in favor of
not supporting a tax increase during my
tenure, because I hear people loud and
clear and understand why they do not want
an increase in their taxes. The high unem-
ployment numbers and the number of
home foreclosures have been a factor.
However, maintaining a balance between
budget cuts and taxes without sacrificing
services is also important for the sustain-
ability of our community.
The Romano administration has been
working diligently to look for ways to
reduce tax increase through the reduction
of costs by 10 percent in each department,
volunteer furloughs, attrition and combin-
ing of jobs, minimizing operating costs,
leasing of our visiting nurses department
for four years to South Jersey Hospital, cost
sharing employees with other municipali-
ties and collection of debts owed.
Public safety is a priority for all. We all
want to feel safe in our neighborhoods and
especially assure that our families are safe
in their homes. I am proud that during my
tenure as councilwoman we did not lay off
any Public Safety personnel. We kept our
numbers stable and have reinvented how
we operate by hiring Class II Specials who
are fully trained and certified to perform
duties as officers.
Please provide a closing statement:
If re-elected, I will continue to work dili-
gently on behalf of our constituents to con-
tinue to move Vineland forward. The deci-
sions I have made and will continue to
make will be researched, fair and made
with careful thought. I believe in honesty
and integrity and will continue to serve in
that manner
Thank you for this opportunity to share
with you why I should continue to serve as
Councilwoman for the City of Vineland.
My approach is sincere, no hidden agenda.
Candidate: Mayra Arroyo
Slate: Proven Progress (Romano)
County Clerk Cautions Voters
The Cumberland County Clerk's Office cautions residents that there have been
reports of individuals contacting voters who requested applications for a "Vote By
Mail" ballot from the Clerk's Office, and that these individuals are falsely repre-
senting themselves as employees of the County Clerk's Office. The Cumberland
County Clerk's Office does not have employees contacting voters or going to resi-
dents’ homes or business to collect "Vote By Mail" ballots.
No one from the Cumberland County Clerk's Office will ever visit or call your
home requesting information about your ballot.
"If you are contacted or visited by someone representing themselves as a
member of the Cumberland County Clerk's Office, please ask for their name and
identification, and please call and report any incidents of this nature to the
Clerk's Office by calling 856-453-4862, so they may be included in our investiga-
tion into this serious issue." said Gloria Noto, Cumberland County Clerk.
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About the candidate:
In 1981, I joined the Army National
Guard in the split-entry program. I spent
my junior year summer vacation in Army
Basic Training. In 1982, I graduated from
high school and I transferred to active duty
Air Force, and was trained to work in the
avionics department.
I married my wife Marilyn LaBoy in
1983, and after 29 years, I love her more
than ever. I am proud to say that we have
two boys, one is married and is an attorney
in East Brunswick, and the second is cur-
rently in his last year of college.
Once I left active duty in 1987, I worked
in the private sector for two years. I joined
the Vineland Police Department in March
1990 and remained in the force until March
1998. I also joined the Air National Guard in
November 1990. Once I left the Vineland
Police Department, I joined the Atlantic
County Prosecutor’s Office and remained
there until I retired in 2010. I also retired
from the Air National Guard in 2009. I com-
pleted an associate degree in Criminal
Justice from Cumberland County College
and my bachelor’s degree from Wilmington
University. I graduated with honors from
both institutions.
I believe I am qualified to serve on the
Vineland City Council because I know the
value of working together as a team;
because of my faith, strong family values,
and desire to give back to the community;
and because of my work ethic. There are
core values we go by in the military which
goes like this: Service before self, integrity,
and excellence in all we do.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
One of the biggest issues, if not the biggest
issue, is the growing unemployment rate in
the city of Vineland. In the past four years,
the unemployment rate has climbed to one
of the worst in the history of Vineland. We
are currently around 14 percent, which is sig-
nificantly higher than the federal and state
unemployment rate. What’s worse, we have
been at this rate for nearly two years, with
less than 100 net newjobs having been creat-
ed by the current administration during that
time span. We are also having problems in
the area of job training. We need to find cre-
ative newways to make sure our children are
taught the job skills employers are looking for
in this new 21st century economy. Finally,
we need to improve the way City Hall oper-
ates, begin to address the problem of vacant
buildings and unkempt properties, and the
maintenance of roads throughout the city.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
We must work with businesses already
doing business in the city in order to under-
stand their needs and concerns. We will
review the city’s existing incentive pro-
grams and permitting process and fully use
the assets we have, like the electric utility
and industrial park, to aggressively recruit
new businesses. We will review the current
economic development structure and
implementation process, and pursue new
education and training partnerships. To this
end, I fully support the creation of a four-
year Technical Education High School in
Cumberland County. We will finally begin
to coordinate our economic development
message and properly market the city.
We must also find ways to collaborate
with the educators of Vineland. This collabo-
ration must also include the families of the
students. It is far too easy to just blame the
teachers, but in fact this is a social issue to
which everyone must contribute. We will also
pursue partnerships with programs like the
Youth Build programto help in this endeavor.
We will develop a community pride program
that includes identifying the vacant buildings
and absentee landlords and using code
enforcement where possible. We will also
ensure that roads in the city of Vineland are
properly maintained and that the county is
doing its part on roads under its jurisdiction.
Please provide a closing statement:
We live in a great city, where I have been
fortunate enough to raise my two sons in. I
have great pride and admiration for Vineland.
I know the potential that exists here. We
have a great and diverse community of peo-
ple, eager to see the city succeed. We have
the resources available for the city to succeed,
we just need elected officials with the vision
and new ideas for the city to reach its fullest
potential. I have been proud to serve my com-
munity both in the military and lawenforce-
ment, and I appreciate everything this service
has provided for my family and taught me as
a person. I believe that my sense of pride, my
sense of commitment, and my loyalty to the
citizens of Vineland will make me a good city
councilman and representative of the people.
So I humbly ask the citizens of Vineland for
their votes, and to also consider my running
mates on the Bermudez Team. On November,
6, let’s all Move Forward ... Together.
About the candidate:
Peter Coccaro is 55 years old and has
been married to his wife Sheree for 32
years. They have a son, Peter, who is 26,
and a daughter, Kaelin, 19. They also have
a two-year-old granddaughter, Angelina
Rosalie.
Coccaro retired as a Vineland Police
Officer in 2005. Presently, he is employed
as a security officer with the Vineland
Public Schools at the Vineland High 9-10
Building.
I also hold the position of Vineland
City Council President elected in 2008.
My qualifications to be a city councilman
is as follows—my understanding of city
government, my 25 years of employment
with the city of Vineland has helped me to
understand the workings of our local gov-
ernment. I have had extensive training in
community policing and crime prevention.
I have also received training in various
community orientated subjects. I would
also say that my past four and half years as
a sitting councilman will be important in
continuing my service to the community.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
I believe that the three biggest issues
facing our community are:
1. Continuing to supply a service at a
cost that will not raise taxes.
2. Focus on attracting industry and
businesses to Vineland that will create
jobs.
3. Continue the growth and improve-
ment to the Municipal Electric Utility, and
have that utility maintain the lowest elec-
tric rates in the state.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
Our administration has been saving
cost through attrition by not filling vacant
positions within the city. This saves in
healthcare costs, as well as pension pay-
ments and salaries. We have also been
able to save money through contract nego-
tiations. We have upheld Governor Chris
Christie’s plan by keeping pay raises at the
two percent maximums. We have also
shopped for the best pricing in healthcare
costs, which helps to keep down high
healthcare premiums. Working along with
our department directors we have been
able to supply services to the city with
“Bare Bones” budgeting.
We know we need to attract industry
and business to Vineland, and with the
assistance of second-generation Urban
Enterprise Zone funding and low utility
rates from our electric utility, this should
be an incentive for business and industry
to come to Vineland.
We are also continuing the growth and
improvements to our Municipal Electric
Utility by adding a second gas fire turbine
at the Clayville Switch Sub Station. This
should lead to possible additional rate
decreases and maintaining the lowest
electric rates in the state.
Please provide a closing statement:
The Romano team will continue mov-
ing Vineland forward with the above men-
tioned plans. We will continue with an
open door policy and having the elected
officials reachable to the public. Our past
record speaks for itself with our contin-
ued progress.
Candidate: Peter Coccaro, III
Slate: Proven Progress (Romano)
Candidate: Edwin Cintron
Slate: Moving Forward Together (Bermudez)
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25
"Harvest Night" with Congress-
man LoBiondo. Luna’s Outdoor Bar &
Grille, Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis
Ave. and Union Rd. 5:30 p.m.
Networking, hors d’oevres and cash
bar. Topics of discussion: Healthcare
and Disaster Relief. You must register
by 10/23. Greater Vineland Chamber of
Commerce members $20, non-mem-
bers $30. 856-691-7400.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24
Candidates Forum for County
Freeholder. American Legion, Buck
and Mulberry streets, Millville. 7–9 p.m.
Millville First will host the four candi-
dates running for two open positions.
All have confirmed they will be in
attendance for this forum:
Joe Derella (D), Mary Gruccio (R),
Doug Long (D) and Tom Sheppard (R).
The public is encouraged to attend.
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About the candidate:
Louis F. Cresci, Jr., has resided in Vineland
for over 64 years, and has been a lifelong public
servant to the community he loves so much.
Louis graduated from Sacred Heart Grammar
School, St. Augustine Prep. and Glassboro State
College, and attended Rutgers University for
specialized training in environmental health.
As an experienced public servant, Louis
is currently serving over four years as a
Vineland City Councilman. He is the former
City of Vineland Health Director for more
than 30 years, also serving as the Registrar of
Vital Statistics before retiring in 2007, after
working for the city for 38 years.
Cresci was instrumental in founding the
Vineland Emergency Medical Service and
was an original member of the EMS Advisory
Board. He later served as director of EMS
under the auspices of the Department of
Health. He continues to be an advocate for
the health, safety, and welfare of the Vineland
community serving as council liaison (Board
of Health) to the department.
Cresci also served his community as a
volunteer firefighter for more than 45 years,
having been a captain in Company #1 and
the chief of Company #4.
He and his wife Bonnie have one son,
Robert and two grandchildren. His family
before him were always well known in the
Vineland area for being successful in busi-
ness as well as agriculture.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
The economy seems to be a hot-button
issue that continues to be a problem at the
local, county, state, and national levels of gov-
ernment. Our community is no exception to
the weaknesses that affects everyone. Three
issues that I feel are a priority of the governing
body as it fulfills its fiduciary responsibilities to
the taxpayer is to prioritize the following areas.
1.The commitment to prosperity through
job growth and the fostering of an environment
that supports business and entrepreneurship
while strengthening our neighborhoods along
the way inclusive of our roadways and parks.
2. The commitment to maintaining
police, fire, and EMS, as well as public
health and recreational services needed to
preserve our quality of life
3. The commitment to stable taxes and a
balanced budget while providing quality
service to our residents.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
If I were re-elected to my council seat, I
would continue, as the record stands clear,
to strongly support the continuation of our
investment in the municipal electric utility.
While we stand only partially complete in
our quest for self-sufficiency, we have
already reaped the benefits from an econom-
ic standpoint that are a vital component in
attracting business and industry to our city.
Through budgetary considerations, I will
support enhanced marketing of our commu-
nity through the Office of Economic
Development as it lays out our assets to the
widest range of prospective parties of interest.
I will support grants and initiatives for
new technologies to enhance the capabilities
of all our community services with particu-
lar emphasis in public safety and health.
I have, will, and do continue to support the
utilization of services where possible be fund-
ed on a fee for service basis, thus freeing prop-
erty tax dollars for other important purposes,
such as the maintenance of our roadways.
I have, will, and continue to support shared
services in the areas of bulk purchasing,
shared equipment, joint insurance funds, etc.
I would continue to participate in budget
preparations that are developed with trans-
parency and accountability to the taxpayer.
We must continue to analyze all expendi-
tures and provide a balance between cost
and quality.
It seems imperative to me as the next
administration and governing body take on
their respective roles that a concerted effort
should be made to encourage, support, and
vigorously stand behind our state represen-
tatives to have Trenton rework a new and
compromised version of UEZ that will help
restart an economic engine that will produce
resources for our community.
Please provide a closing statement:
I ran for City Council four years ago with
the intent of broadening my public service
commitment to this community. I did so
with the conviction that I would serve in an
open, transparent, and independent way.
From my perspective I truly upheld those
principles demonstrating my independent
decisions through independent thinking as
my slogan depicts.
I was truly honored and humbled by the
public’s support in the past and I will contin-
ue to be honored to serve in the future com-
bining my community life experience, full
time public service, and administrative
knowledge with new and fresh minds as we
look at the challenges of the present and
future.
Candidate: Louis F. Cresci, Jr.
Independent Thinking Independent Decisions
About the candidate:
My name is Delfin Cuevas, Jr., and I ama
candidate for Vineland City Council.
I ama Vineland native, and a graduate of
Vineland High School.
For a number of years I was a police offi-
cer in Vineland. Presently, I amthe
Commercial Manager of Pep Boys Auto on
Landis Avenue.
I have worked with a number of non-
profit organizations throughout the com-
munity, including my church. I host a radio
programon WMIZ 1270 AM. I have three
children: Delfin Oben, Misael, and Wilson
Samuel.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
1. Fiscal responsibility. The first thing the
newly elected council should do is review
the past budget. That is important because
we must understand the past to improve the
future. I will also ask for a better systemof
checks and balances on any spending. City
department heads should—and will—be
held accountable for their budgets.
2. Economic Growth. Vineland is a city
with roomto grow. We have our own elec-
tric utility, available land and other incen-
tives can be packaged to promote business
and manufacturing growth in our city. I also
agree with my running mates, Doug
Albrecht and Gina Randazzo-Thompson,
that the city should provide additional assis-
tance for newbusinesses including a naviga-
tor assigned to help newbusiness applicants
find their way through the process. In addi-
tion, we always must be aware of the needs
of existing businesses, which often have to
change with the times.
3. Downtown business district. The last
decade has seen many changes on Landis
Avenue. The Landis Theater and the Amish
Marketplace are prime examples of success-
ful changes. Now, we have to sustain and
improve on those successes. We need to
better coordinate downtown events with
the merchants to maximize what the events
bring to the city.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
Stated above.
Please provide a closing statement:
As a former police officer and manager
of a downtown business, I amwell aware of
the necessity of good communications.
Sometimes that means talking and some-
times it means listening. When elected, I
will work with my fellowcouncil members
and the mayor to make Vineland the best
city it can be for all its residents. I will have
an open-door policy for any resident with
an idea or issue that needs the council’s
attention.
Candidate: Delfin Cuevas, Jr.
Slate: For the People, With the People (Albrecht)
TELL ‘EMYOU SAWIT INTHE GRAPEVINE!
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in the greater Vineland market.
(Including Millville, Bridgeton, Upper Deerfield,
Newfield, Franklinville, Richland, Buena, etc.)
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For advertising info, call 856-457-7815
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About the candidate:
I was born and raised in the City of
Vineland and currently own and operate
businesses here—A.R. Fanucci Real Estate
and A.R. Fanucci Insurance Agency.
I am a graduate of St. Augustine Prep
School, and continue to be very involved
with the school, serving as a member of the
Alumni Board of Governors Executive
Committee, Decade Representative, and
member of the Capital Campaign
Committee for campus expansion. In 2005,
I was inducted into the school’s Hall of
Fame and have also received its Cultural
Award.
I attended Cumberland County College
and St. Peter’s University.
For the past six years I have served on
the Vineland Board of Education and used
my experience in business to be an active
contributor to the policy and personnel
and budget committees.
My professional affiliations include the
National Association of Insurance and
Financial Advisors, National Association of
Realtors, and the Cumberland County
Board of Realtors. I am a former member
of the Greater Vineland Chamber of
Commerce.
I have also volunteered my time to serve
as a student career counselor and mentor,
and support local youth athletic teams as a
sponsor and coach.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
1. Ensure the safety of every citizen in
our community by making a commitment
to having the best trained and well-paid
first responders—police, fire and emer-
gency medical personnel. We need more
resources on the front lines, particularly
more police officers on the streets. We also
need to give careful consideration to the
issue of paid vs. volunteer firefighters and
appropriate training, and the best equip-
ment for our emergency medical workers.
Compensation should be equitable, but the
best we can afford.
2. We also need to make a concerted
effort to bring more jobs here and improve
the local economy by exploring every pos-
sible strategy that will attract new busi-
nesses. We have abundant land, our own
electric utility, and access to the huge
Boston/Washington economic corridor
through Rt. 55 into Philadelphia, This is
the largest undeveloped area in the north-
east U.S. We must use this to create a thriv-
ing, robust economy and a city that will be
a stunning success story.
3. A vital issue is the creation of a strong
connection to our Board of Education and
therefore to the teachers, administrators
and support staff in our schools that will
allow local government to provide the
greatest possible assistance and resources
to our children—the future of our city. We
also need to reach out to the managers of
our local businesses and industry so we can
determine the academic qualifications and
other skills they seek in new employees.
We can then share this information with
our educational professionals to our young
people will be able to prepare themselves
need to become valuable, productive mem-
bers of our economy and community.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
Each of these capsule summaries is
multi-faceted and requires some elabora-
tion. But the short version is this:
1. Perform a thorough review of the city
budget and all contracts for first respon-
ders with an eye toward more resources on
the front lines and best possible compensa-
tion.
2. Employ any and all reasonable strate-
gies for improved economic development
and also work diligently to help existing
businesses thrive and grow.
3. Appoint a liaison to the board of edu-
cation to help with a two~way exchange of
information and assistance so municipal
government can truly be a helpful partner
to the school district that is so vital to our
community's growth and accomplishments.
Please provide a closing statement:
I’m seeking office because I wish to
serve the community where I live and
work, and to help our city grow and pros-
per. There is no better way to achieve those
goals than to participate in the government
of our City.
I believe I have the experience, vision
and courage to do what is best for ALL citi-
zens of our community and will work dili-
gently and tirelessly to help create a com-
munity that is safe, prosperous, and a
source of pride for everyone who lives and
works here.
Candidate: Anthony R. Fanucci
Slate: Vineland Taxpayers First (Barse)
About the candidate:
Terra Dower has been a resident of the
city of Vineland for 38 years. She is a moth-
er of a 17-year-old son who attends
Vineland High School, where she is
employed as a School Counselor as well as
an Advisor to the Student Government
Association. Dower has also served as an
Adjunct Professor at the Cumberland
County College for the past 4 ½ years. She
has a keen interest in the development of
the youth in the community.
Dower’s academic achievement includes
a BA in Criminal Justice and a minor in
Social Work from Stockton State College,
as well as an MA in School and Community
Counseling from Wilmington University.
Dower is seeking her first term in city
council and she brings a strong work ethic
and proof that with commitment and
determination an individual from a single
family household can accomplish great
things and be a viable contributing mem-
ber of society.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
The three biggest issues facing my com-
munity are jobs, affordable housing and
education. The unemployment rate in the
city of Vineland is currently 14 percent as
compared to the national rate which is 7.8
percent; so it is clear that the city of
Vineland is in dire need of quality jobs.
Due to the national economic downturn
and the reduction of the median income of
our residents, there has been a sharp
increase in the need for affordable housing.
In regards to education, it has always
been agreed upon that education is key to
improving the quality of life. While our
schools have made great progress in the
improvement in the quality of education,
we must persist and press forward in the
development of new education strategies
and systems to ensure that our youth will
be able to compete in the new economy.
While I recognize that there are many
issues that face our community, these three
issues are the ones I have identified that
are most critical at this time.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
The first thing I would do is to have a
grassroots strategy that involves meeting
with every employer and potential employ-
er in our city to identify and get a clear
understanding of the employment chal-
lenges they face. From there we would, in
collaboration, work to develop and imple-
ment solutions detailed in the Bermudez
Team platform.
To address the affordable housing prob-
lem, I would work in collaboration with
government and public and private enti-
ties such as the housing authority, zoning
committees, redevelopment agency, con-
tractors, builders, community leaders, and
other relevant city officials to identify
locations, possible rehab projects and
funding to find solutions to what I believe
is going to be a major need in the next
three to five years.
In regards to my educational plan, as a
school counselor again I must emphasize
our schools have made great progress in
the improvement of the quality of educa-
tion; however, we can not settle and we
must continue to move forward in the
development of new educational strategies
such a as a four-year Vocational School as
well encourage continued parent-teacher
collaboration efforts to help develop our
young adults to productive contributing
citizens.
Please provide a closing statement:
I remember growing up in the city of
Vineland, viewing my city as a place that
was happy, a place where everyone
seemed to have a decent job and some-
where they could call home. I don’t
remember seeing people losing their
homes due to their inability to have an
adequate income. That was because there
were more opportunities for employment
and the mindset of the people in the com-
munity was for everyone to work together
to accomplish a common goal.
I believe that people in the community
still have that mindset. Call it naïve or
maybe just plain hopeful. Change begins
with a group of like-minded individuals
coming together to create a new path. It is
clearly time for a new path in the city of
Vineland. I am part of that new path; I
represent new ideas and a strong hope for
tomorrow.
The vision I have for the new Vineland
says that every day we must do the simple
disciplines that take us toward change or
repeat the little errors in judgment that
have brought us to today’s problems. We
must choose the new path.
Candidate: Terra Dower
Slate: Moving Forward Together (Bermudez)
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About the candidate:
I have one son, Raymon, a fiancée Luis
Ramos, and my mom, Celia Matos. I
retired from the Vineland Public Schools
after 32 years of service. As a Supervisor
of Instruction, I oversaw No Child Left
Behind with a $2.5 million budget, as well
as other programs for at-risk students. I’ve
worked closely with teachers and parents
in Vineland and understand their con-
cerns with education as well as with the
City of Vineland. I have served on numer-
ous boards and committees in Vineland as
well as the county, including Secretary of
the Board of Directors for Complete Care
Health Network, Secretary of Cumberland
Empowerment Zone, former Chairwoman
of the Board of Trustees for Cumbertland
County College and Committee member
of the Office on Aging. I am president of
Hispanos Pro Educación, a non-profit
organization that provides scholarships
for Vineland High School graduates. I am
a Committee Chair for the Family
Involvement Conference Committee, a
six-state consortium that organizes an
annual conference for school admininsta-
tion, teachers and parents. I served on the
Hispanic Task Force-State of NJ. I feel the
information and understandings gained
from the above qualify me for City
Council.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
CITY: The three biggest issues facing
the city are the economy, unemployment,
and education. These three are closely
intertwined because if we are to entice
businesses to come to the city, we need an
educated, skilled workforce available to
them. In order to provide an educated,
skilled workforce, we need to improve
upon and expand our already good educa-
tional system to respond to the high num-
ber of unemployed residents.
ECONOMY: To encourage companies
to move to Vineland we can offer lower
electric rates, which take a large chunk
out of a company’s budget. More impor-
tantly we must offer them our ability to
train and/or retrain those who are unem-
ployed to provide them with an educated,
skilled workforce to meet their specific
needs.
UNEMPLOYMENT: Some of this is
already happening, we should continue to
partner with our high schools,
Cumberland County College, the County
Vo Tech School and others to expand the
programs offered to our residents to
include the necessary skills and specialties
for companies moving into our area. This
would include training and retraining
those who have been displaced from a for-
mer position. Once the companies build
and are ready to hire employees, our resi-
dents will also be prepared to work.
EDUCATION: More jobs means the
need for better and more extensive educa-
tion pre-K through college and
trade/technical schools. We have the
School Counts Program, which empha-
sizes strong work ethics and possible
scholarships to the County College. We
need to take a stronger lead in this pro-
gram to inform students and parents of its
availability and encourage continued par-
ticipation. Our high school students
attend CCC to take College Credit courses
and the County Vo-Tech to expand their
learning in areas not offered at our high
school; this too should be expanded. With
such a high unemployment rate, it is nec-
essary to retrain residents who worked for
many years in other areas. We must make
them employable again.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
Stated. above
Please provide a closing statement:
I moved to Vineland in 1973 after col-
lege to begin a career as a teacher of
English as a Second Language.
Throughout the years I have been very
active in our schools and community at
large. On daily visits to my mother at
Kidston Towers, I have become aware of
the concerns of seniors and wish to help
them as well; after all, they were there for
us, now we must be there for them.
I have always advocated for honesty
and justice both in the schools and the
community. Having served on a number of
committees and boards, I am aware of the
needs and concerns faced by our diverse
community, but I am also aware of the
outstanding positives such as our desire to
work together for the good of all. My only
promise is to work to the best of my abili-
ty for all City residents, thank you.
Candidate: Maria A. Laboy
Slate: Proven Progress (Romano)
About the candidate:
I was born and raised in Vineland. My
education comes from a New Jersey col-
lege. I was brought up in a retail business
my father owned and operated for most of
my lifetime. My father’s business,
Rodriguez Bros., is well known in our
community. He dedicated his life to help
whoever he could. Whether it was extend-
ing credit for merchandise purchased in
the store, providing a ride to the airport,
borrowing money or extending an invita-
tion to dinner. This is how we were
brought up. This philosophy is my way of
living and my own family’s way of living.
My work experiences are vast, includ-
ing accounting, working as a switchboard
operator, and now as a teacher in
Vineland. I have been dedicated to my
craft for 14 years now. I understand what
it means to change careers to fit the econ-
omy of where I have chosen to live and
raise my family.
I decided to make myself a candidate
for the Vineland City Council because I
want to give something back to this won-
derful city. I will bring a different perspec-
tive, and I hope my participation in gov-
erning Vineland will help move our city
forward. Because I have history and
accomplishments in Vineland, I know I
can make a positive difference.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
Three of the biggest issues facing our
schools are parent education and involve-
ment, vocational school opportunities, and
family health and wellness. One of the
mistaken views I’ve heard is that the city
has nothing to do with the business of our
schools. I believe it is in the best interest
of our city that “City Hall” work together
with the Vineland Board of Education
administrators, supervisors, teachers, par-
ents and most importantly our students.
No one entity should be the sole provider
of all the needs of our city residents and
their children. Together, we need to find
ways to continue educating parents, who
happen to be our taxpayers. There is a
need to help parents help their child.
I believe the vocational school is also a
great resource for the city of Vineland. We
need to provide our citizens with new job
training options in order to acquire the
skills employers are looking for. Turning
the vocational school into its own four-
year high school is critical to our residents
and their future, because their future is
also the city’s future. If we can accomplish
this, we will have more skilled educated
workers with a better chance at acquiring
good-paying jobs, thereby providing for
themselves and their families. The city
benefits, and by marketing this new con-
cept along with the other advantages we
possess like our electric utility, new busi-
nesses will be vying to come to Vineland,
consequently lowering our unacceptable
unemployment rate.
Family health and wellness is a nation-
wide initiative that needs to be addressed
by our city. It is our job to make our resi-
dents aware of the ramifications of poor
eating habits and lack of exercise. I am
interested in promoting walking clubs,
cooking classes, nutrition awareness, free
health screenings, and overall education
on nutrition label information.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
If elected as a city council member, I
will work alongside the other elected
members to come to decisions that are fair
and good for the residents of Vineland.
Only through a sense of unity will we be
able to get things done. I welcome input
from our community members. The solu-
tion to our problems lies within the peo-
ple who live here. I intend to go out and
attend community functions where I will
be accessible to the community so I can
listen to their issues and concerns, and get
feedback from them. I will ask questions,
and keep asking questions until I under-
stand. Then I will bring them back and be
the voice of my community.
Please provide a closing statement:
I ask the citizens of Vineland to consid-
er voting for me on November 6 to repre-
sent them on city council. I promise to
bring a fresh perspective to our city gov-
ernment, both in the way it operates and
by presenting creative new ideas. Just as
I’ve been a hardworking and dedicated
person in my career, I will also extend that
work ethic to city council. Just as I’ve
dedicated myself to your children, I will
dedicate myself to you.
Candidate: Maritza Gonzalez
Slate: Moving Forward Together (Bermudez)
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About the candidate:
My name is Gina Randazzo-Thompson
and I am a Vineland resident. I have over
20 years of IT experience on a variety of
platforms, equipment and technology. I
spent seven years at Harrah’s in Atlantic
City, and two years with Collective Bank,
both in IT positions. Most recently, I spent
more than 10 years as the Network
Administrator and Senior Computer
Operator of the City of Vineland, serving
as Acting Director of Data Processing for a
period of time. I am married to Anthony
Thompson and we have a daughter,
Brittany, who is currently enrolled at
Cumberland County College.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
In my opinion, the three biggest issues
currently facing our city are:
1. The need for better paying jobs;
2. Creating a capital plan for city budg-
eting; and
3. Expanding economic growth.
My teammates Douglas Albrecht and
Delfin Cuevas Jr. and I have discussed
these issues and others at length and
agree that these will be among our top
priorities when elected.
With the jobless rate hanging continu-
ally above eight percent, it is our duty as
public servants to do everything in our
power to bring the jobless rate under con-
trol and help bring jobs to all citizens that
need and want them. Economic growth is
a key factor in successfully achieving this.
Economic growth brings jobs.
Creating a capital plan for the city
budget will be another key factor in con-
trolling costs. This would save tax dollars
for everyone. Paying it forward is what I
call it. Every dollar saved through better
budget planning should bring savings
down the road for taxpayers, myself
included.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
To bring better paying jobs into the
city, we must use a targeted approach. We
want jobs that fit our specifications, not
just jobs that we simply accept for the
sake of getting them. We plan to form a
panel of citizen experts in industry and/or
business to help determine the businesses
we want. Once we have identified our tar-
geted markets, we must focus on those
industries and entice them to come to
Vineland. Share with them what we have
to offer, show them the reasons why they
should come here and provide them a
skilled work force to keep them here.
Economic growth brings jobs.
I think it is important to have a capital
budget plan in place so the city can better
prioritize expenditures. Using common
sense strategies, each department would
then make recommendations for a depart-
mental capital budget. With a plan in
place, we, as a city, will be better prepared
to handle any unanticipated funding more
efficiently.
Please provide a closing statement:
As councilwoman, I pledge to be open
and accessible to all citizens of Vineland.
If you have a question, complaint, prob-
lem, need direction, help, or just want to
compliment a job well done, I will listen
and do all I can to assist. I truly under-
stand that every dollar spent by Vineland
government is a tax dollar and not one
person’s personal piggy bank. I will always
remember this and use it as a foundation
when making decisions regarding the use
of those tax dollars. Together, Team
Albrecht will bring the good management,
good people, good plans and good deci-
sions that Vineland deserves.
Candidate: Gina Randazzo-Thompson
Slate: For the People, With the People (Albrecht)
About the candidate:
I was born and raised in Vineland. I was
president of my sophomore and senior class
(’67) at Vineland High School. Upon gradua-
tion from the University of Maryland, I was
hired as director of recreation of the model
cities area in Prince George’s County, Md.,
then promoted to director of recreation at a
community center in Maryland. I gained
experience in leadership, controlling the mar-
keting, planning and budgeting of a success-
ful recreation program. I was promoted again
to community director of Prince George’s
County, which was voted as the best recre-
ation programfor its size in the country. After
training and experience at the county level,
I became the director of recreation in Bowie,
the second largest city in Maryland, where I
was in constant communication and collabo-
ration with the mayor and city council.
Upon returning to Vineland, I was hired
by the state to work at the Vineland
Residential Center, where I earned a quick
promotion to become a senior counselor and
supervisor of recreation. After four years of
marriage, I became a widower in 2008. I
retired in 2011 after 35 years of government
experience. In addition to my government
positions, I have helped start many programs
to help improve peoples’ lives, such as Project
Thanksgiving and Broaden Your Horizons.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
In our municipality, the three most
important current issues are jobs, money,
and safety of our residents. The unemploy-
ment in Vineland has reached a record high
as there are more people out of work than
there have ever been. Not only does this
hurt our citizens, but it also takes its toll on
our local businesses. This leads to our next
issue, the lack of money in our city. If there
is no money to spend our businesses will
suffer. We must find ways to attract more
people to our town to shop and dine so our
businesses can be more successful. It is a
cycle that can help our town thrive. With
more jobs, there will be more money to
spend, which in turn will create stronger
businesses and more stable well-paying jobs.
The final issue is the safety of our citi-
zens. Our roads must be improved. We must
also put an end to crimes, violence and drug
use. Our children are often brought up in an
environment in which they do not have
good leaders and role models.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
My plan to solve these issues will revolve
around getting more businesses started in
this area to help ease the high unemployment
rate, attract more money to our city by bring-
ing in more companies and visitors, and set-
ting up an organized plan to help improve the
safety and lives of our residents. I believe set-
ting up an entrepreneurial center in Vineland
would be a great way to help train our citi-
zens and guide them on starting a business.
With a proper education, start-up businesses
will have a better chance to thrive and pros-
per, leading to stable jobs for our citizens.
We also must do a better job of recruiting
companies to Vineland. We are in a great
location, with cheap land and electric rates
and many prepared workers coming out of
Cumberland County College and the area
vocational schools. With these favorable char-
acteristics we will be able to attract more busi-
nesses and ultimately more money to our city.
It will be my role to ensure the safety of
Vineland citizens. We have to organize a
system to fix the dangerous potholes in our
roads that are causing accidents. We have an
excellent police department and we must
continue to reduce the crime, violence and
drug problems. We have to become partners
with local youth programs by working with
them, not just funding them. Many children
don’t have two parents or people to look up
to. Mentors (coaches, religious leaders,
teachers) can have an ongoing relationship
with children and help guide them as they
grow. We are losing our greatest resources,
we must inspire our future young leaders to
keep them in Vineland.
Please provide a closing statement:
I feel that with my experience in leader-
ship, public relations, and budget preparation,
I will make an excellent city councilman. I
organized an after-school program entitled
Broaden Your Horizons, which turned into
a national program, The Vineland Boys and
Girls Club. For my work in Vineland, I have
received close to 100 awards, the most pres-
tigious being an Honorable Point of Light
Award given to me by Congressman Bill
Hughes and President George H. Bush for my
work with at-risk youth. Along with my lead-
ership experience in helping improve peo-
ple’s lives, I take pride in being easy to work
with and a transparent leader with an open-
door policy. With strong leadership, comes a
vision. I see Vineland as a successful big town
with a small-town sense of community.
Candidate: Stephen I. Plevins
The Independent Candidate
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About the candidate:
I am 34 years old and have a son named
Arcangel M. Cruz. I attended Vineland
Public Schools and I am a 1996 Vineland
High School graduate. I have an Associate
Degree in Early Childhood Education
from Ashworth University and I am cur-
rently employed by the Cumberland
County Board of Social Services. I am the
Vice President of the Vineland Board of
Education and have served the Board of
education for the past four years.
Experience:
*Ten years experience in the banking
industry
*Eight years experience in government
employment
Dedication and volunteer experience:
*Vice-President of the Vineland Board
of Education
*Chair of Policy and Personnel
Committee of Vineland Board of
Education
*Co-Founder of Hermandad Latina Inc.
*Woman of the Year Award 2009
(Puerto Rican Festival of Vineland, NJ)
*Participated in Dancing with the Stars
of Cumberland County 2009
(Helped raise funds for Cumberland
County Vocational School)
*Member of the Year Award
(Hermandad Latina)
*Former Member of the Puerto Rican
Festival
*Former Member and Executive
Member of the Statewide Puerto Rican
Festival
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
The major economic issue facing the
City of Vineland is the annual tax increase
faced by every resident of the city.
Although these are tough economic times,
local officials should understand that tax
increases present a financial burden to
city residents. This tax burden reduces
economic growth and serves to keep new
businesses from investing in our city.
To address this issue, we need to scru-
tinize the budget on a line by line item
basis. As City Council we need to provide
the proper checks and balances to follow
through with our responsibilities to our
constituents. This will lead to a balanced
budget, tax relief to city residents and
present a lucrative opportunity for new
businesses. When our community pros-
pers, we all prosper.
The lack of communication between
the City of Vineland and other depart-
ments is another issue of concern. There
is currently a major disconnect between
the City and the School district.
Regardless of political affiliation, channels
of communication should always remain
open between the city and other depart-
ments.
Although Municipal Government and
the School District are two separate enti-
ties, it should be understood that we are
working for a common goal—to improve
the City of Vineland. Therefore, we should
always work together in a united front
toward this effort. I bring a unique per-
spective as a sitting School Board Member
along with ideas on how we can once
again work together.
The third issue is the lack of attention
to detail throughout municipal govern-
ment.
We need a road program that will stop
the neglect currently taking place in our
community. We have to resume proper
code enforcement because the city has
many issues in this avenue.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
Stated above
Please provide a closing statement:
In closing, there are many issues that
can be looked into and addressed to help
our city. I have many ideas of what can be
done to help our youth. I have always
been actively involved in my community
and am very fortunate to have known,
early in life, the meaning of sharing and
the pleasure of helping others. I believe
that my community has given me so much
and has helped me grow as a person. It is
my turn to give back. I have the motiva-
tion, strive, desire, and conviction neces-
sary to work at the City level. My experi-
ence makes me the suitable candidate.
Candidate: Diamaris Rios
Slate: Vineland Taxpayers First (Barse)
About the candidate:
I was born and raised in Vineland and
am married with two children. I graduat-
ed from Vineland High School in 1986,
joined the United States Navy as a
Hospital Corpsman for four years, and
spent two of those years attached to a
Marine Battalion. I have a business back-
ground in the Personal and Commercial
insurance industry for over 20 years and
currently teach at Vineland High School. I
have coached high school sports including
football, wrestling, and track; and have
coached in youth leagues such as the
Vineland Basketball Association and
Vineland Soccer. I have a bachelor’s
degree in Business with a concentration in
International Business, and a master’s
degree in Education and Leadership. I am
currently pursuing a PhD. in Higher
Education through Seton Hall University.
I previously served as Vice Chairman and
Treasurer of the Vineland Downtown
Improvement District.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
We must put policies in place that will
spur economic growth in order to ensure
a thriving city that is safer, more afford-
able for families, and is responsive to the
diverse and urgent needs of all of
Vineland residents.
We need to bring back a city govern-
ment where residents are engaged and
eager to participate in the civic process;
have access to good, clear information;
and are able to place confidence in their
public officials.
Finally, the manner in which our elect-
ed officials deal with the problems of
crime, vacant and abandoned properties,
and the city’s infrastructure will be criti-
cal to how Vineland is able to grow in the
future.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
I am excited to be part of a team with
an unwavering commitment to improving
our neighborhoods and to making local
government work for everyone. Vineland
residents are looking for fresh faces, new
ideas, and individuals who are problem-
solvers able to build consensus, work
together, and get things done. During this
campaign, the Bermudez team has out-
lined a “big picture” vision for change
designed to create a welcoming environ-
ment for job creation; return transparent,
accessible, and competent government to
Vineland residents; and create safer, more
connected neighborhoods.
Our plan is built on forging new, inno-
vative partnerships that will make
Vineland stronger than ever and help cre-
ate an environment where businesses can
thrive. It seeks to link educators with
employers in order to provide the job
training opportunities and skills our work-
force needs to succeed. And it protects
taxpayer dollars through complete depart-
ment reviews, eliminating waste and inef-
ficiencies, implementing new green initia-
tives, bringing a new focus to finding
grant opportunities, revamping how pro-
fessional contracts are awarded, and giv-
ing residents a voice in the budget process
through the creation of a Citizens’ Budget
Advisory Committee.
Please provide a closing statement:
It is my pleasure to be running with
Ruben Bermudez and my fellow council
candidates. They are all persons of good
character, with strong ethical and moral
values. It has been refreshing to work
with this group of concerned individuals,
whose only goal is to serve the people of
Vineland. I believe we have put forth a
plan that is both realistic and achievable
in order to earn your vote. I ask you to
consider our ideas for moving Vineland
forward together, and to cast your vote
for the entire Bermudez Team on
November 6.
Candidate: John Procopio
Slate: Moving Forward Together (Bermudez)
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About the candidate:
I was born in Cuba on January 31, 1956.
I came to live in Vineland at the age of 10.
I have lived in Vineland for the past 46
years. I am the owner and operator of
Budget Mufflers & Brakes in Vineland. I
was awarded the Latin Businessman of
the Year Award in 2006. I worked at
Midas International Corp. Philadelphia;
there I was appointed to board of director
in 1992 and awarded for management and
sales achievement. In 1986 I worked for
Speedy Mufflers in Philadelphia where I
was presented with the highest award in
management and sales and also was pre-
sented pride award winner. I previously
worked with Store Communication Inc. in
Miami, Florida as technical manager &
construction supervisor.
Education, Shelton & Associate award-
ed certificate in public relations & man-
agement.
Pennco Tech awarded electronics &
communication diploma.
Attended Vineland High School with a
diploma.
Married to Mari C. Romero, I have five
children—Lynn Romero, Vanessa Romero,
Stephany Romero, Anthony Romero and
Nathaly Romero.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
Three of the biggest issues facing the
city of Vineland are taxes, roads, and pub-
lic works.
Even though we have faced economic
crises, Vineland is still one of strongest
cities in Cumberland County.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
Because of economic crises, I cannot
see an increase in taxes in the city of
Vineland.
By bringing new industries to the city
to increase employment and revenues, by
offering to development the land that sur-
rounds Road 55, and having the lowest
rates in electricity in the state gives
Vineland the edge for development.
That will give us the revenues to
strengthen the police force so we can give
the citizens of Vineland a safe city.
Please provide a closing statement:
I will like to establish a better relation-
ship with the fire department and the vol-
unteer firefighters by naming a volunteer
director.
Candidate: Antonio F. Romero
Slate: Proven Progress (Romano)
About the candidate:
I am a retired educator of over 30 years,
married for 20 years to Josephine Orlando-
Spinelli and have one son Paul A. Spinelli,
who is Assistant Chief Engineer for Sinclair
Broadcasting Group, which owns Baltimore
Fox Television stations.
I am a lifelong resident of Vineland and
did my undergraduate studies at Mount Saint
Mary’s University. I have a Masters Degree
in Administration and Supervision from the
University of Phoenix. I ama former member
of the Vineland Board of Education and was
Finance Chairman for two years, dealing with
a $197 million budget. I negotiated labor con-
tracts for the Board of Education and for the
Atlantic City Teachers Union, successfully
and professionally.
I ran my own painting business for over
20 years successfully until I retired from the
profession. I have officiated collegiate bas-
ketball and coached various youth teams in
the City. I am an officer in the International
Association of Approved Basketball officials,
representing the entire State of New Jersey.
I am also secretary of the local basketball
official’s board, which runs a business deal-
ing with about $250,000 a year, servicing
the entire southern part of the state.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
The three biggest issues in this election
are public safety and making it a point to
staff the police department to its proper
numbers. Safety in our city is a paramount
issue with the crime rate rising around us.
Fixing and up keeping the infrastructure
of our city. This city is not well kept. The
steps of City Hall are a disgrace, roadsides
are filled with debris etc., the roads have
not been maintained and just in general the
appearance of the City needs to be brought
back to something we can be proud of.
Work with local businesses to give them
incentives to upkeep their properties to the
best of their abilities.
Fiscal responsibility is something every
elected official should consider a major
issue. It is time that we make it a point to
oversee contracts and make sure that the
city is getting the best job for the best price.
We need to be more efficient in our deal-
ings with outside contractors and if money
needs to be spent spend it like it is our own
because in reality it is ours and the rest of
the taxpayers of Vineland.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
We need to find the money to get our
police force back to capacity. With wasted
dollars in other areas, I think we can do this.
Crunching budgets and setting priorities is
very important as an elected official and I
think that my past record in negotiating and
running the school board and business budg-
ets have proved I can make those choices
and find the dollars necessary to make this
happen. We need to look into grants that can
help the city with these areas etc. Most
importantly, we need to get everyone on the
same page and moving the city forward.
Keeping the city clean can be done now
without one more dollar spent. As I said,
part of it can be dealing with local residents
and businesses to do their part. Code
enforcement is another way to make this
happen and not just for some but for all.
Roads were done in the prior administra-
tion because they made it a priority to put
money aside and budget portions yearly to
get roads completed on a needs basis.
Once again, it is City Council’s job to
oversee the budget and money issues. We
need people who have been successful both
in the private and public sector to be able to
understand the monetary issues of the city
and prioritize projects as they come to the
council. This is the purview of City Council
to protect taxpayer dollars and still give
them the best quality of life we can.
Please provide a closing statement:
I believe that we must stop the helter
skelter issues that have haunted this council
and mayor. The lawsuits, the illegal con-
tracts and things of this nature that cost the
city wasted tax dollars. I would love to see
the legal fees we are wasting on these type
issues. I think my Team has the ability to
clean the city, pave roads and make
Vineland a destination for better business.
My Team and I have people that are diverse
in background and successful in life. We
have successful businessmen and women
and we have people who have succeeded in
both the public and private sector. We have
people who care about education and our
youth and truly have the City’s best interest
at heart.
It is with great pride that I am running
with teammates that share ideas and have a
give and take and yet are still true to their
convictions.
I hope that you can support me and my
team in the upcoming election.
Candidate: Paul F. Spinelli
Slate: Vineland Taxpayers First (Barse)
School Board Candidate Forum
(recorded 10/22)
Wed., 10/24: 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Thurs., 10/25: 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Fri., 10/26: 10 a.m.
Sat., 10/27: 10 a.m.
Sun., 10/28: 10 a.m.
Mon., 10/29: 10 a.m.
Tues., 10/30: 10 a.m.
Wed., 10/31: 10 a.m.
Thurs., 11/1: 10 a.m.
Fri., 11/2: 10 a.m.
2012 Vineland Mayoral Candidate
Debate Sponsored by The Greater
Vineland Chamber of Commerce and
the Daily Journal.
Sun., 10/28: 9:30 a.m. and 9:30 p.m.
Sun., 11/4: 9:30 p.m.
Tues., 11/6: 12 a.m.
Tues., 11/6: starting at 8p.m.
Election Live: hosted by Jim Quinn
with numerous special guests and
political analysts, election results.
VPS TV BROADCAST
SCHEDULE — ELECTION
COVERAGE
QUINN BROADCASTING
QBC COMCAST CHANNEL 2
— ELECTION COVERAGE
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About the candidate:
I retired from The International Union
of Painters and Allied Trades after 36 years.
I started out as journeyman and worked my
way up through the ranks to land a job as
Assistant to The General President in
Washington DC. Retired just this year, I have
started a newbusiness here in Vineland—
Thompson Economic Strategies LLC.
I served as Cumberland County
Freeholder in 2009 and 2010. I was chair-
man of public works during my tenure as
freeholder and on the Safety and Agriculture
committees. I also served on the county
planning board for nine years as a member
and then freeholder liaison. I served on the
Empowerment Zone board for six years as
member and freeholder liaison. I also served
on the County Vo-tech Foundation Board for
seven years as a member and freeholder liai-
son. I also was liaison for the County
Veterans Commission. I ammarried to my
wife, Debbie, and have four sons.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
Jobs, taxes and safety!
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
When it comes to taxes, I think this is
something that we can attack in several ways.
Efficiency in our departments, preventive
maintenance, and pro-active ideas are key.
We need to continue looking in every
department and comparing with the success-
es other cities have in place. In the past four
years, there has been a positive trend in anti-
status quo practices. I want to continue the
same practices of proactivity vs. reactivity,
meaning-don’t rob Peter to pay Paul but tack-
le an issue with sensible solutions and not
leaving a mess for someone else to clean up.
Example: Four years ago the public works
department was left with worn-out and fail-
ing equipment. The Mayor had to clean that
up. Things were out and you must prepare
for that and sometimes you have to change
methods for your departments to save tax
dollars. Status Quo can cost you double when
things wear out or leave you in serious trou-
ble when emergencies occur. Newinnovative
methods have been implemented as I did in
the county to save tax dollars. No one likes
change, but we did it with newroad patching
equipment and a newsalt brine systemand
saved hundreds of thousands for county tax-
payers by eliminating unnecessary overtime
and a systemthat patches potholes that last
up to seven years instead of patching over
and over. This is just one of many ways to
reduce taxes. This is just one department, we
can look at others in the same way.
Jobs: I amproud to say that Vineland now
is the leading city in solar energy, creating
more jobs by the day. This is a teamof hard-
working idealists we need in tough times. We
can do more with the same perseverance.
For the safety of our residents, it is vitally
important to keep our police and fire depart-
ments supplied with the tools and manpower
they need to keep us all safe and not gamble
with uncertain financial budgeting. The
police department is currently working with
less manpower nowthan in the past, due to
some careless decision making. Yes in tough
times you have to make tough decisions, but
we should have a solid solution where safety
is concerned in our annual budget and not
rely on grants that can be suddenly cancelled.
When Mayor Romano was faced with that in
the toughest times since the great depression,
with no money to hire, the Police Dept. and
the mayor and his teammade some changes
that include not replacing retirees to balance
the budget. The police, to their credit, have
met their challenges well, but we still need to
work toward a long-termsolution to fix it.
I believe they are moving in the right
direction and want to be there to help.
Please provide a closing statement:
Stay the course with the Mayor and coun-
cil on job creation, and continue his and the
council’s vision to promote the changes on
Landis Avenue to attract businesses, work on
more green-energy projects. When a busi-
ness is looking to locate, a trained workforce
can be the deciding factor, we have to keep
our city up to par by engaging to the fullest
our support for the county college and the
county vo-tech. I have four boys and I would
love for themto stay here in Vineland. Jobs
are okay but careers make you stronger as a
community. The college and Vo-tech are
great schools, but a full-blown campaign
fromevery city in Cumberland County will
make a louder noise for businesses to hear.
I will continue to search for things we can
do to ensure our departments are running on
the latest and most efficient and effective pro-
grams available. We must remain open mind-
ed. A good idea is a good idea; I don’t care
where it comes from! If it makes sense, saves
tax dollars, keeps us safer and creates jobs,
why aren’t we doing it already? I plan on put-
ting in the time necessary to go to other cities,
ask questions, take those ideas and ideas that
we all have collectively to growthis city.
Candidate: Nelson Thompson
Slate: Proven Progress (Romano)
About the candidate:
I have owned and operated Bagel
University for over seven years. A Cuban
immigrant living the American dream, I
believe every Vineland family deserves the
opportunity to make a better life for their
family. Born and raised in Cuba to the age
of 10, I ultimately came to Vineland and
graduated Vineland High School in 1970. I
earned, my Bachelor’s degree in Sociology
from Glassboro State College (now
Rowan).
I’ve always felt a tremendous sense of
dedication to this community and have
served many local organizations such as:
President of Vineland Kiwanis Club, past
member of Cumberland County
Improvement Authority Board of
Directors, Past member of YMCA Board of
Directors, currently serving as Vice
President of Cumberland County
Technical Education Center’s Board of
Education.
I deeply believe that investing in our
children is one of the most important pri-
orities, and that investment needs to go
beyond just the classroom. Our city must
be a place that stimulates our youth to
grow and flourish into dynamic young
adults. I have volunteered as Assistant
Mini-Wrestling Coach, Vineland
Basketball Association and CYO coach and
sponsor, East Vineland Little League
Coach and I’m a past member of East
Vineland Little League Board of Directors
to ensure our children have diverse oppor-
tunities for learning and developing.
I am married to Sylvia Villar, am proud
father of three sons; JC Villar, police offi-
cer, Victor Villar, owner of Manny and
Vic’s Pizzeria and MVP, and Eric Villar,
who currently attends Vineland High
School. I am the very proud grandfather
of one granddaughter, Isabella (and one
on the way).
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
During our announcement (Team
Barse) several months ago, I alluded to the
need for additional police in the City of
Vineland. We need to add officers to bring
them up to recommended strength.
We must find a way to repair and
resurface of our city streets, which have
been neglected for far too long.
We must have a master plan to cover
potential catastrophic weather-related
problems, be it snow or wind related.
How do you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
In these times of economic turmoil, it
is imperative that we look to the business
sector for answers. Having spent my com-
plete adult life working in corporate
America, I believe I have the insight need-
ed to address these issues.
Budgeting and planning ahead is the
key, as well as making sure that the con-
tracts that we award are in line with dol-
lars, as well as qualifications. Strategic
planning would also include the signing of
mutual aid agreements with our surround-
ing states to assist at times of distress,
before they re-occur.
Please provide a closing statement:
As a professional, I have over 30 years
of experience in the development and
profitable leadership of large scale, multi-
million dollar business operations. I am a
team builder with strong sales perform-
ances, personnel management, marketing,
advertising, purchasing, and cost reduc-
tion skills. I have the experience and tal-
ent to serve as a Vineland City Council
member who understands the business of
operating a City. Given the chance by the
taxpayers of Vineland, I will do my utmost
to control waste and find new and innova-
tive ways to get our city back on the right
path.
Along with the issues discussed previ-
ously, we must enforce city codes that
keep our city looking good. Perhaps look
into solar panels at traffic lights to provide
a failsafe way of electricity during power
outages as well as a reduced cost measure.
Installed by prevailing wage and union
contractors. Coordinate traffic lights to
speed limits to allow for better traffic flow
and gasoline savings. Start and encourage
a dialogue between the paid and volunteer
fire departments.
Candidate: Carlos Villar
Slate: Vineland Taxpayers First (Barse)
Grapevine 33-44 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:20 PM Page 41
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UNLIMITED POTENTIAL
Fantastic Location In A Quiet Neighborhood
1258 Iris Avenue, Vineland
Family raised, now house is too big.
Large yard on a quiet street. Priced to sell.
Thomas Riggione, Broker-Associate
Coldwell Banker Excel Realty (856) 696-1111
1100 E Landis Avenue Vineland, NJ 08360
E X C E L R E A L T Y
:AN7ED:
Cíeah, MaLure, Respohsíbíe AduíLs Lo Lake íovíhg care oI
our beauLíIuííy renodeíed ahd ííke "New Agaíh" hones.
)OR RE17 oU RE17-7O-O:1 OpLíoh avaííabíe. NEW ACAIN
HOMES has a cohsLahLíy chahgíhg íhvehLory oI hones beíhg Iuííy
rehovaLed ahd prepared Ior saíe/rehL. We are Lakíhg appíícaLíohs
NOW! Caíí or E-Maíí Loday: NewAgaíhHonesOO@gnaíí.con
CONTACT:
7erry HaIIauer
609-665-0033
PhiI BIack
856-297-2349
NEW
AGAIN
HOMES
NEW AGAIN HOMES is proud to offer
º ConpíeLeíy rehovaLed 8&4 BR hones
º Síhgíe-Ianííy hones íh good íocaLíohs
º SLaíhíess SLeeí appííahces,
Hardwood Iíooríhg ahd nuch nore
CURRENTLY AVAIL$%LE:
RENT - $1,2bO nLh, píus 1 ½ nLh
securíLy deposíL. Sec 8 OK.
RENTTOOWN - $bK+ dowh, $1,1OO/nLh.
*RRG MRE KLVWRU\ &UHGLW FKHFN UHTXLUHG
REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
The following transactions of $20,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in
the month of August 2012 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month).
Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives.
BRIDGETON
21 Morris Ave., Shirley Hart Berry
(Exec.) to Mason Realty LLC for
$52,500 on 8/28/12
45 Central Ave., Margaret P Malone-
Haer to Delena C Everland for
$15,000 on 8/29/12
3 Ewing St., Ruth A George (Exec.
by Atty.) to 3 Ewing Street LLC for
$35,000 on 8/29/12
71 Magnolia Ave., Hoover B Chew,
Jr. to Emerson J Ford, Jr. for
$95,000 on 8/30/12
COMMERCIAL TWP
8005 Tamarack Rd., Jersey Coast
Homes LLC to DJO Properties LLC
for $8,500 on 8/24/12
FAIRFIELD TWP
24 Coombs Dr., Henry Mayerfeld to
Mario Garcia for $56,000 on
8/30/12
HOPEWELL TWP
104 Shady Brook Ln., Neil W Lemon
(Ind. Exec.) to Deana L Walsh for
$152,500 on 8/28/12
15-17 Dutch Neck Rd., Marjorie M
Rammel to Kevin D McCormick for
$125,000 on 8/29/12
MAURICE RVR TWP
Meadow St., Woodrow Harry Wilson
(Est. by Exec.) to Randell Hawkins
for $18,000 on 8/30/12
197 Main St., Tracy Edwards to
Robert William Brown, Jr. for
$30,000 on 8/30/12
MILLVILLE
1018 High St., Antonio Lopez to
Lipeng LLC for $155,000 on 8/28/12
97 Bogden Blvd., KMIV Real Estate
LLC to MIV Real Estate LLC for
$450,000 on 8/28/12
307 Henderson Ave., Craig S Carole,
Sr. to Robert S Pierce, Jr. for
$145,000 on 8/31/12
2130 Wheaton Ave., Theresa B
Maggio to Stephen Ray Adkins for
$150,000 on 8/31/12
629 Quail Dr., Fenton Appleby, III to
Kathleen M Epifanio for $244,000
on 8/31/12
UPPER DEERFIELD
172 Northville Rd., Ryan A Schofield
to Stephanie Roberts for $170,000
on 8/29/12
VINELAND
1680 Redwood Dr., Alfred A Gratz,
Jr. to Joseph Sieri for $215,000 on
8/24/12
3468 Venturi Ln., NVR Inc. (DBA) to
Jeffrey Evelyn for $249,966 on
8/24/12
2056 Venezia Ave., NVR Inc. (DBA)
to Daisy Romero for $279,990 on
8/24/12
1350 S W Blvd., Atlantic Realty
1350 S West Boulevard LLC to
Vineland Board of Education for
$1,400,000 on 8/24/12
1740 Sequoia Dr., Irene R Parsons
(by Atty.) to Thomas J Levari for
$90,000 on 8/27/12
5 Sutliff Ave., Cecilia T Ruggieri to
Christopher J Ricci for $156,000 on
8/27/12
5429 Ascher Rd., John C Hotz, Jr.
to Vladimir Polishchuk for $180,000
on 8/27/12
857 Queens Rd., Adele Greenblatt to
Jacqueline Galbiati for $215,000 on
8/27/12
1630 Country Bridge Rd., Andrew
Petrella to Erin Garrison for $76,000
on 8/28/12
3417 Tuttlegrove Rd., Spring Hollow
No. 1 LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA) for
$79,750 on 8/28/12
308 Amanda Ct., Realty Capital
Management III LLC to Folkstone
Properties LLC for $90,000 on
8/29/12
3520 Tuttlegrove Rd. & C., Spring
Hollow No. 1 LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA)
for $159,500 on 8/30/12
4211 Sherman Ave., Luis A Negron,
Sr. to Kurt Upshaw for $170,000 on
8/30/12
528 E Plum St., Cumberland County
Habitat For Humanity Inc. to
Frederick Miller for $150,000 on
8/31/12
Grapevine 33-44 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:20 PM Page 42
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Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.
To order your classified call, 856-457-7815 or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or
visit www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds. See box below for additional ordering information.
Only $10 per ad, per week, up to 20 words; over 20 words,
$0.50 per word. $0.30 for bold—per word/per issue, $3 for a
Border/per issue. Add a photo for $15. Mail Ad & payment or go
online to www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds.
Not responsible for typographical errors. • Once an ad is placed, it cannot be cancelled or changed. The Grapevine does not in any way
imply approval or endorsement. Those interested in goods or services always use good judgment and take appropriate precautions.
Acct. No. ___________________________________Exp. Date________ 3 Digit # on back
of card__________
Signature:__________________________________________
Printed Name:______________________________________
Name ___________________________________
Address__________________________________
City__________________________Zip_________
Phone #: ________________________________
email____________________________________
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Suite 205
Vineland, NJ 08360
www.grapevinenewspaper.com
Mail Ad
Form with
Payment TO:
Classifieds
Call for more information
856-457-7815
1.____________
2.____________ 3.____________ 4.____________ 5.____________
10.____________
15.____________
9.____________
14.____________ 13.____________
7.____________
12.____________
6.____________
11.____________
20.____________ 19.____________ 18.____________ 17.____________
16.____________
25.____________ 24.____________ 23.____________ 22.____________
21.____________
30.____________ 29.____________ 28.____________ 27.____________
26.____________
35.____________ 34.____________ 33.____________ 32.____________
31.____________
40.____________ 39.____________
42.____________
41.____________
44.____________ 43.____________ 45.____________
47.____________
46.____________
49.____________ 48.____________ 50.____________
38.____________ 37.____________
36.____________
8.____________
Check if needed.
Refer to prices above.
JBold
J Border
CLASSIFIEDS
Credit Cards
Accepted:
Having a Yard Sale or Garage Sale?
It’s time to make room in that attic, garage or
basement, and there’s no better way to get the
word out than to advertise your yard sale in
The Grapevine’s Classifieds.
Use the form below, or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Deadline is Friday for the following Wednesday’s paper.
Micro Electric LLC.
Residential repair, addi-
tions, and services.
Bonded and insured.
“no job is too small.”
NJ LIC #14256.
Call 609-501-7777.
Vineland 3-BDRM, 1-BA,
Eat-in-Kitchen, LR, DR,
family-room, sunroom,
mudroom, plus 2 spare-
rooms! Basement w/work-
shop, W/D hookup, 2 stor-
age-rooms. $1050. Call
856-825-7600
Share a Nice Big Modern
House in a Great
Neighborhood. $850. a
month. All utilities includ-
ed. Call 609-213-0832
East Vineland two bed-
room, one bathroom half
house. All tile and hard-
wood, large craft-made
kitchen. Great neighbor-
hood. Very clean. Freshly
painted. $1250/mo,
includes all utilities. Call
856-278-2834
Furnished rooms for rent.
For clean, quiet, drug-free
individuals only. Laurel
Street, Bridgeton.
$495/mo. Includes utili-
ties. One and a half
month’s security.
References required. Call
856-453-8323.
Experienced Stylist want-
ed. Up to 60% commis-
sion. Paid vacation and
bonuses. Call Rose or
Kathy at 856-213-5316.
Protocall Staffing is seek-
ing 100+ people for
Production, Packaging etc.:
• Competitive pay
• Many shifts available
• Must have 2 Valid forms
of ID. Apply in Person M-
TR, 9am-Noon, at 106
Landis Ave, Vineland NJ
or call 856-848-2196
Phone Sales. 10%
Commission. Must have
laptop and cell phone.
Call 609-213-0832
Christian Daycare seeking
P/T caregivers. Located
in Millvile, NJ. Exp.
Preferred. Phone 856-
825-8800.
Start your own business
for only $10. Call: 856-332-
6446 Jasmine Avon ISR
Para Español llamen
Gresenia 856-391-5958.
ANNUAL FALL
YARD/BAKE SALE: St.
Paul’s Lutheran Church
Fellowship Hall. 3rd and
Mulberry St., Millville. Sat.
Oct. 27, Sat. Nov. 3, and
Sat. Nov. 10, 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. Call 825-3008 for
more info.
Cleaning out entire garage
All kinds of tools, shovels,
etc. Call 856-692-0717 for
an appointment.
2006 Ford 500 Limited.
Excellent condition.
28,500 miles. $10,000.
Call 856-696-1693.
Have a bike taking up space
in your home? Please con-
sider donating it. The
Vineland Rotary Club has
partnered with Pedals for
Progress to export bikes to
third-world countries where
they are needed for trans-
portation. Also collecting
treadle and portable sewing
machines. Contact Henry
Hansen at 856-696-0643
for drop-off or pick-up.
FLUTE, PICCOLO, PAN
FLUTE, RECORDER,
FLUTE ENSEMBLE,
Lessons by Renowned
Flutist, BEVERLY PUGH,
(Member, Bay-Atlantic
Symphony). ALL AGES-
ALL LEVELS, REASON-
ABLE RATES & MUSIC
FOR ALL OCCASIONS.
Phone: (Machine) 856-
455-1098. Email:
BevsPanFlutes@aol.com
WANTED! Slightly used
childrens books (donated)
to the Coats for Kids event
at the NJMP, Call Brian
856-364-6011 to arrange
pick up.
Wanted Dead or alive.
Junk or running cars.
Quick removal. Cash
paid. 856-649-2732.
TOT LOT providing quality
child care, ages 0-3,
accepting NJCK & TANF.
Mon-Fri 6:30 am.–7pm.
$140 per week w/meals.
856-641-7407.
All American Plumbing
and Drain Cleaning.
Specialing in all plumb-
ing services and repairs,
all at very reasonable
rates. Serving Vineland
and Millville Just give us
a call! 856-696-3052
REAL Painting:
Reasonable Prices–High
Quality Residential &
Commercial Painting
Interior/Exterior/Custon
Staining–South Jersey
Areas. (302) 444-2396
General House Cleaning.
20 years experience.
Reasonable, honest &
reliable. Call 856-697-
1338. Leave message.
Steelman's Drywall.
Drywall installation and
repairing nailpops, cracks,
water damage, unfinished
drywall. Big or small! Call
Joe for a free estimate at
609-381-3814.
Turk's Pressure Clean.
Property maintenance.
Vinyl and aluminum sid-
ing, concrete, brick, roof
cleaning, gutter clean-
out. Over 25 years in
business, fully insured.
(856) 692-7470.
AJB III Construction.
Licensed and fully insured.
Windows, doors, remodel-
ing, and more. Call us
today at 856-332-7865.
Electrical
Contractor
Pete Construction
Specializing in decks,
roofs and home
remodeling. State
licensed and insured.
Call for a free esti-
mate. 856-507-1456.
Homecare Provider
available: Prefer to
stay in Cumberland
County. No live in, but
daily and/or overnight
available. No driving.
Call 856-691-1133 or
856-581-5127
Help Wanted
Home
Improvement
Home
Improvement
Services
Garage/Yard Sale
Employment
For Rent
For Sale
Do you have a car or boat that is
taking up space in your drive-
way? Are you hoping to sell your
vehicle for some extra cash?
Publicize the sale of your vehicle
by advertising in The Grapevine’s
Classifieds section. Make your
junk someone else’s treasures.
LANDSCAPING & PAVERS
Professional Installations...Over 10 Years
SPECIALIZING IN:
Lawn Maintenance
Landscape Design • Walks,
Driveways • Retaining Walls
Fire Pits • Restoration of Pavers
Call 856-982-7701
or 856-498-7571
lewbowhunter@gmail.com
See our work on

See our w
whu lewbo
or 856-498-7571
Call 8
e Pits • Restor Fir
ays • Retaining Drivew
Landscape Design •
Lawn Maintenance
SPECIALIZING IN:
ork on ur w
unter@gmail.com
56-498-7571
856-982-7701
vers ation of Pa Restor
alls W s • Retaining
alks, W pe Design •
Maintenance
ALIZING IN:
We Buy
Used Vehicles!
See Lenny Campbell See Lenny Campbell
808 N. Pearl St., Bridgeton NJ
(856) 451-0095
Items Wanted
Flute Lessons
Have a business and need more customers?
Need work? Why not get the word out through
The Grapevine’s Classifieds?
Advertize your skills and business in the
Classifieds by calling 856-457-7815.
Mowing, edging, tree
& stump removal,
clean-ups, bush &
tree trimming, mulch,
river-rock, gutter
cleaning, Vineland
area, 856-691-2017
Landscaping
Bikes Wanted
Grapevine 33-44 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:20 PM Page 43
175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234
Our Focus Is You.
All winners have the option of starring in one of our
newspaper ads or on one of our billboards.
Enter to win Capital Bank’s You’re The Star Sweepstakes this fall and you
could also win one of three big prizes fit for a star:
First Place — 42” LCD HDTV
Second Place — A Deluxe Spa Package
Third Place — Dinner for Two
Just stop at your nearest Capital Bank branch to enter. You could be our next
Capital Bank Star!
Vineland Chooses Capital Bank.
Capital Bank is rated 5
Stars by Bauer Financial.
See your bank’s rating at
BauerFinancial.com
You Can Be
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No purchase necessary. Sweepstakes drawing November 1, 2012. Three winners will be chosen from entries at each Capital Bank branch for the three prizes. All winners will have the option to be featured in future Capital Bank advertising
programs. You need not be present at the time of the drawing to win. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Capital Bank employees and their immediate family are not eligible to enter or win
prizes. Rates guaranteed, as a minimum, through 1/1/2013; interest rate may vary thereafter. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY).
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Grapevine 33-44 102412-de:Layout 1 10/22/12 9:20 PM Page 44

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