Phone Bank House Party - Host Packet

Thank you for planning a phone bank house party in support of Amendment 64! The end of marijuana
prohibition isn't going to come without a fight, and that fight can't be won without people like you and actions
like phone bank house parties. Now that you have scheduled your phone bank house party with our friends
at Just Say Now, this packet contains the information you will need to successfully host a phone bank house
party.

Step-by-step guide to hosting a house party
Step 1: Invite Friends, Family and Fellow Supporters
ż Ìnvite people you know.Think about friends, family, colleagues and neighbors who are excited about
or interested in Amendment 64. Ìnvite at least 15 people, knowing that at least half will probably not be
able to attend. Reach out to your larger community.
ż Encourage all of your attendees to RSVP and invite their friends.
ż Send an email to all of your attendees a couple days before the event and then again on the day of the
event. Encourage everyone to bring their cell phone and a charger so everyone can participate.

Step 2: Get your materials in order
There are several materials you'll want to be prepared with before you begin your house party. They are all
included in this packet.
ż Sign-in sheets. This is the form that you will want to have all your attendees use to sign in. After your
phone bank is complete, please return this sheet via email.
ż Phone bank scripts. Even if all the callers at your party are bringing laptops, it's a good idea to have
call scripts on hand just in case. Also, some people may choose to access the phone bank via smart
phone, and those people will need to have a phone bank script available.
ż Flyers. Have some flyers available for those callers who are less familiar with Amendment 64.
ż Camera. Don't forget to take pictures and share them with us after the event.

Step 3: Welcome and Training
ż Welcome your guests and introduce them to others at your house party. Make sure every attendee
signs in on your sign-in sheet.
ż Once people are settled, you'll want to go over the basics of phone banking. Walk through the script,
the materials, and the call lists or online phone bank.
ż Give your guests some time to review the call script and ask questions. You might want to break off into
pairs and practice a few "mock" calls, just so everyone has a chance to get comfortable.

Step 4: Making the Call
ż Now you should be ready to start calling! Make sure that everyone has enough space and all necessary
materials: phone, call sheets, and a call script.
ż Occasionally check-in with your phone bankers to see if they need any water or have any questions.
Remember, this a social movement. Your efforts will be ensuring that people in your community know
that there is a real grassroots effort for change underway, and hopefully they will want to become a part
of it as well.
ż Have fun!

Step 5: Wrap Up
ż Once everyone has finished up, be sure to set aside some time for reflection. Take some time to share
stories. Talk about some of the more notable call experiences you had and what you learned. Not
everyone will have a notable experience to share, but it is important to laugh and learn together. Doing
so ends the night on a fun note and instills a sense of purpose and connection within the group.
ż Scan and email your sign-in sheets.
ż Share unique stories and experiences with the campaign! What kind of event did you hold?
What worked best? Share your ideas for future phone bank party hosts. Send your photos
toinfo@regulatemarijuana.org.
ż Send individual thank you emails to all of your guests and invite them to your next phone bank event!

Phone Bank Tips
Ɣ Practice the script a few times before you make your first call
Ɣ Speak slowly and clearly
Ɣ Don't hesitate to repeat back responses to the voter to ensure accuracy
Ɣ Ìf you're unsure how to answer a voter's question, politely refer them to regulatemarijuana.org
Ɣ Use a headset or headphones
Ɣ Make sure you have a comfortable place to sit
Ɣ Make sure you have enough space to have a phone conversation without disturbing or being disturbed
by other callers.
Ɣ Take breaks so you don't wear yourself out!
Ɣ Set goals and have friendly competition with your fellow callers -- contact justsaynow@firedoglake.com
if you would like to set up a "team" in our online phone bank
Phone Bank Script
Hi, may I speak with ______?
[Yes] ÷ My name is {YOUR NAME}, and Ì'm volunteering today for Colorado's Campaign to
Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol. Ìn this November's election you will be voting on Amendment
64, which is a statewide initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol.
[No] -- My name is {YOUR NAME}, and Ì'm a volunteer with the Campaign to Regulate
Marijuana Like Alcohol. Ì am just hoping for two minutes of your time.
Are you a registered voter in CoIorado?
[No] ÷ Ok, thank you for your time. (End conversation.)
[Yes] -- Great! Ìn this November's election you will be voting on Amendment 64, which is
a statewide initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol.
Have you heard about Amendment 64?
[Yes]: Great. So you know that it would make possession of marijuana legal for adults; would
regulate and tax the sale of marijuana, generating millions of dollars for public schools; and
would leave existing laws against driving under the influence of marijuana in place.
[No]: OK. Well, if Amendment 64 is adopted, it will establish a system in which marijuana is
regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol; it will allow for the cultivation, processing, and sale of
industrial hemp and make the private use, possession, and limited home-growing of marijuana
legal for adults who are 21 years of age and older;
The first $40 million of revenue raised annually will be directed to the Public School Capital
Construction Fund.
The initiative does not change existing laws regarding driving under the influence of marijuana
and it allows employers to maintain all of their current employment and drug-testing policies.
The initiative also does not change existing medical marijuana laws for patients, caregivers, or
medical marijuana businesses.
So, at this point, wouId you say that you pIan to vote for the initiative, against the initiative or you aren't
sure?
[Plans to vote for A64] - Great! Will you be voting by mail or in person this year?
[Ìf by mail] ÷ Have you sent your ballot in yet? Ìf you haven't mailed your ballot yet, you
should consider dropping it off. Ìt has to be received by 7 p.m. on November 6th.
[Ìf they have already voted] ÷ Great, thanks for being an active citizen who votes!
[Ìf in person] Ìf you don't know your polling location, you can visit
www.justvotecolorado.org to search for your precinct.
[Plan to vote against] - Well, Ì am sorry to hear that, but Ì hope that you will consider that
marijuana prohibition has completely failed to make our communities and families safer. More
than 500,000 adults in Colorado use marijuana each year, and it doesn't make sense to punish
them while we enrich gangs and cartels. For more information, you can visit
regulatemarijuana.org. Thanks so much for your time. (End conversation)
[Aren't sure/Don't say] -- OK. That's understandable. Marijuana has really been given a bad
name over the years. Ì hope that you will consider that marijuana prohibition has completely
failed to make our communities and families safer. More than 500,000 adults in Colorado use
marijuana each year, and it doesn't make sense to punish them while we enrich gangs and
cartels. Ìf we regulate marijuana like alcohol, we can reduce teen access and use, take the sale
of marijuana out of the hands of criminals, and provide the state with much-needed tax revenue.
Ìf you are interested in additional information, you can visit regulatemarijuana.org. Thanks so
much for your time. (End conversation)
VoicemaiI
Hi! This is {YOUR NAME}, a volunteer with Yes on 64. This November you will vote on
Amendment 64, a statewide initiative to tax and regulate marijuana similarly to alcohol.
Marijuana prohibition has failed to make our families and communities safer. Ìnstead, we can
take marijuana off the street and put it behind a counter where it will generate millions of dollars
in tax revenue and allow us to redirect our law enforcement resources toward serious crimes.
Please vote yes on Amendment 64. For more information, please visit RegulateMarijuana.org.
Return this sheet by scanning it and e-mailing it to info@regulatemarijuana.org or by mailing it to: CRMLA, P.O. Box 40332, Denver, CO 80204
Name: Phone:
E-mail: ZIP:

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Distribute literature
Make phone calls
Share info on-line

Distribute literature
Make phone calls
Share info on-line

Distribute literature
Make phone calls
Share info on-line

Distribute literature
Make phone calls
Share info on-line

Distribute literature
Make phone calls
Share info on-line

Distribute literature
Make phone calls
Share info on-line

Distribute literature
Make phone calls
Share info on-line
Conv:

Hand:



Eighty years ago, Colorado voters concerned about the health and safety of their
families and communities approved a ballot initiative to repeal alcohol prohibition. This
November, they will vote on Amendment 64, a measure to end the equally harmful and
ineffective policy of marijuana prohibition.

In summary, the initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol, Amendment 64:

• makes the private use, possession, and limited home-growing of marijuana legal for adults
21 years of age and older;

• establishes a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol; and

• allows for the cultivation, processing, and distribution of industrial hemp.

The initiative creates legal marijuana retail stores and affiliated facilities regulated by the Department of Revenue.
It allows localities to ban or limit these stores and facilities through their elected representative bodies or via
referred or citizen-initiated ballot measures.

In addition to sales tax, the general assembly will be required to enact an excise tax of up to 15 percent on the
wholesale sale of non-medical marijuana. The first $40 million of revenue raised annually will be directed to the
Public School Capital Construction Assistance Fund.

The initiative does not change existing laws regarding driving under the influence of marijuana, and it allows
employers to maintain all of their current employment and drug-testing policies. The initiative also does not
change existing medical marijuana laws for patients, caregivers, or medical marijuana businesses, and it exempts
medical marijuana from the new excise tax.

Passage of Amendment 64 will:

• redirect law enforcement resources away from the enforcement of marijuana prohibition and toward violent
and otherwise harmful crimes;

• reduce youth access to marijuana and replace the underground market with a system in which marijuana is
regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol; and

• bolster Colorado’s economy with significant new tax revenue and job creation – the Colorado Center on
Law and Policy found that passage of Amendment 64 could produce more than $120 million annually in
new revenue and savings within the first five years.

• stop the arrest and prosecution of adults who are simply choosing to use a substance that is objectively less
harmful than alcohol to the consumer and to the broader community.

Amendment 64 has received the official support of:

The Colorado Democratic Party; the NAACP Colorado Montana Wyoming State Conference; the Office of the
Colorado State Public Defender; the United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 7; the ACLU of
Colorado; the Colorado Criminal Defense Bar; the Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition; former
Congressman Tom Tancredo; State Rep. Jonathan Singer; State Senator Shawn Mitchell; Denver City
Councilman Chris Nevitt and Lakewood City Council President Karen Kellen, among other local elected officials;
more than 300 Colorado physicians; more than 130 college professors; former Colorado police officers,
prosecutors, and judges; and the Aurora Sentinel, the Boulder Weekly, and the Aspen Times; among others.

Learn more about Amendment 64 and join the campaign at RegulateMarijuana.org.

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