www.smdailyjournal.

com
TERRORIST ATTACK
NATION PAGE 7
STOCKS STABILIZE
AFTER SELL-OFF
BUSINESS PAGE 10
GARDEN TO-DO
LIST FOR FALL
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Mateo County
district attorney’s request
that a judge set an execu-
tion date for a man con-
victed in the torture mur-
der of a young graduate
student 27 years
ago was delayed yesterday until after
the Nov. 6 election in which
California voters will decide if the
death penalty will stand.
Judge Craig Parson was scheduled
Friday to hear prosecutors and
Robert Green Fairbank’s state-
appointed defender argue whether a
date should be set now even though
executions have essentially been on
hold for years while the courts wran-
gle with the question of cruel and
unusual punishment.
A court has ruled the state’s previ-
ous use of a three-drug cocktail could
not continue and a judge in a different
case also declined to set an execution
date for a Death Row inmate despite
that prosecutor maintaining a single
drug would bypass the concern.
A similar argument was anticipat-
ed by prosecutor Joe Cannon on
behalf of the San Mateo County
District Attorney’s Office. On
Tuesday, however, the defense asked
to push back the hearing and Cannon
did not oppose the request.
The hearing was reset for Nov. 16
at which time the question may be
moot.
California voters are faced with
Proposition 34 which would prohibit
the death penalty and commute the
sentences of all California’s current
Death Row inmates to life without
the possibility of parole. San Mateo
County District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe is a very public opponent
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane thinks the
California Public Utilities Commission
President Michael Peevey could use some
R&R — either resignation or removal.
On Tuesday, the City Council unanimously
passed a resolution asking for such a move.
The vote came a day after a news conference
was held in San Bruno with Ruane,
Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, and
Rene Morales, whose 20-year-old daughter
Jessica was killed in the Sept. 9, 2010 explo-
sion. Under Peevey’s leadership, the CPUC
suspended public hearings in favor of closed-
San Bruno council: Remove CPUC president
City officials take issue with mediation decisions
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After planning to build a new private middle
school in Belmont the past 18 months and
being voted down by the City Council
Tuesday night, Crystal Springs Uplands
School officials are still on a mission to
expand out of its Hillsborough campus and
will meet next week to discuss the school’s
“next steps.”
Head of School Amy Richards sent out a let-
ter to CSUS supporters yesterday that said the
council “vote was a setback, not a defeat.”
CSUS plans ‘next steps’
After Belmont vote, private school considers options
Locals take part
in World Series
Boys and Girls Club sends
two to help with first pitch
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When the ball is walked out to the
mound of Game 2 of the World
Series tonight,
two familiar
faces from South
San Francisco
will be doing the
legwork — liter-
ally.
Through a
p a r t n e r s h i p
between the
Boys and Girls
Clubs of
America and
Major League
Baseball, club
m e m b e r
Clarissa Fong
and Unit
Director Isaac
Davalos will
walk the ball out
to the mound
then stay for the game.
Susan Dolan, executive director of
the Boys and Girls Clubs of North
San Mateo County, said they got a
head’s up a couple weeks ago that
there might be an opportunity to
send two representatives to a World
Series game. Other Bay Area clubs
are also participating on different
nights.
Choosing Davalos, unit director
of the Boys and Girls Club’s
Clarissa Fong
Isaac Davalos
See CSUS, Page 20 See CPUC, Page 20
See DELAY, Page 16
Death penalty request delayed until after election
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 59
Panda-monium!
Sandoval’s three HRs lead Giants to 8-3 rompin opener
By Ben Walker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — With three mighty
swings, Pablo Sandoval put the San
Francisco Giants ahead in this World Series
and put himself in a class with Mr. October.
Sandoval hit three home runs and joined
Reggie Jackson, Babe Ruth and Albert
Pujols as the only sluggers to do it in the
Series, and the Giants jolted Justin Verlander
the Detroit Tigers 8-3 on Wednesday night in
Game 1.
A rollicking AT&T Park crowd — a sea of black
and orange outfits — roared as Sandoval connected in
his first three at-bats. Popular in the Bay Area as the
Kung Fu Panda for his roly-poly shape, he went 4 for 4
and drove in four runs. A Giant panda for sure.
Verlander, the reigning Cy Young winner so dominant
in this postseason, looked uncomfortable from the get-
go and constantly pawed at the mound.
The final score raised a nagging question for manag-
er Jim Leyland and his favored Tigers: Did too much
rest after a playoff sweep of the Yankees mean too
much rust?
Tagged by Sandoval for a solo shot in the first inning,
Verlander could only mouth ‘Wow!’ after the Giants star
See PITCH, Page 16
See GIANTS, Page 16
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor Adam
Goldberg is 42.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
In a dramatic confrontation before the
U.N. Security Council, U.S.
Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson II
demanded that Soviet Ambassador
Valerian Zorin confirm or deny the exis-
tence of Soviet-built missile bases in
Cuba; when Zorin declined to respond,
Stevenson said he was prepared to wait
“until hell freezes over” for an answer.
“You can tell the size of a man by
the size of the thing that makes him mad.”
— Adlai E. Stevenson II, American statesman (1900-1965)
Actress Nancy
Cartwright is 55.
Pop singer Katy
Perry is 28.
In other news ...
Birthdays
LANCE HUNTLEY
Peninsula Ballet Theatre is presenting ‘Dracula: A Ballet to Die For’beginning Oct. 26 and running through Oct. 28 at the Fox
Theatre in Redwood City.Set to haunting music,with sumptuous sets and costumes,exciting drama and dancing.This chilling
blockbuster ‘is something to sink your teeth into.’For tickets call (650) 369-7770 or buy tickets online at PeninsulaBallet.org.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid
60s. Northeast winds 10 to 15 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly clear. Lows
in the upper 40s. North winds 10 to 20
mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
North winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night: Partly cloudy. Lows around 50. Northwest
winds 10 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 60s.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.
Sunday through Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
upper 60s. Lows in the lower 50s.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Highs in
the mid 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.03 Hot Shot
in first place; No.04 Big Ben in second place;and
No. 10 Solid Gold in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:47.74.
(Answers tomorrow)
EDGED FANCY PLACID GENTRY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The submarine needed a —
DEEP CLEANING
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RHILW
SUMYT
TOBCAL
SCAABU
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
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b
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k

h
t
t
p
:
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f
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Answer
here:
8 3 8
1 17 42 46 55 1
Mega number
Oct. 23 Mega Millions
6 8 9 30 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 0 4 7
Daily Four
1 3 5
Daily three evening
In 1760, Britain’s King George III succeeded his late grandfa-
ther, George II.
In 1812, the frigate USS United States, commanded by
Stephen Decatur, captured the British vessel HMS Macedonian
during the War of 1812.
In 1854, the “Charge of the Light Brigade” took place during
the Crimean War as an English brigade of more than 600 men
charged the Russian army, suffering heavy losses.
In 1912, the song “My Melancholy Baby” by Ernie Burnett
and George Norton was first published under the title
“Melancholy.” Country comedian Minnie Pearl was born Sarah
Ophelia Colley in Centerville, Tenn.
In 1929, former Interior Secretary Albert B. Fall was convict-
ed in Washington, D.C., of accepting a $100,000 bribe from oil
tycoon Edward L. Doheny. (Fall was sentenced to a year in
prison and fined $100,000; he ended up serving nine months.)
In 1939, the play “The Time of Your Life,” by William
Saroyan, opened in New York.
In 1945, Taiwan became independent of Japanese colonial
rule.
In 1957, mob boss Albert Anastasia of “Murder Inc.” notoriety
was shot to death by masked gunmen in a barber shop inside
the Park Sheraton Hotel in New York.
In 1962, American author John Steinbeck was named winner
of the Nobel Prize in literature.
In 1971, the U.N. General Assembly voted to admit mainland
China and expel Taiwan.
Former American League President and Baseball Hall of Famer
Lee MacPhail is 95. Former American League president Dr. Bobby
Brown is 88. Singer-actress Barbara Cook is 85. Actress Jeanne
Cooper is 84. Actress Marion Ross is 84. Country singer Jeanne
Black is 75. Basketball Hall of Famer Bobby Knight is 72. Author
Anne Tyler is 71. Rock singer Jon Anderson (Yes) is 68. Political
strategist James Carville is 68. Singer Taffy Danoff (Starland Vocal
Band) is 68. Rock musician Glenn Tipton (Judas Priest) is 65.
Actor Brian Kerwin is 63. Actor Mark L. Taylor is 62. Movie direc-
tor Julian Schnabel is 61. Rock musician Matthias Jabs is 56.
Country singer Mark Miller (Sawyer Brown) is 54.
School bus, truck
crash — without drivers
BEAVER FALLS, Pa. — Police don’t
plan to cite the drivers of a truck and
school bus which crashed in western
Pennsylvania.
But only because neither vehicle had a
driver when they wrecked.
Police in Patterson Township tell the
Beaver County Times the incident hap-
pened just before 10 a.m. Tuesday when
the parked bus began to roll down a hill.
Police aren’t sure why that happened,
because the driver had engaged the park-
ing brake.
The bus rear-ended a parked truck,
which also began rolling down the hill
alongside the bus, until the truck flipped
onto its side. The bus continued on,
shearing off one utility pole and hitting
another before rolling to a stop a few
feet from the porch of a home.
Nobody was hurt.
Patterson Township is about 30 miles
northwest of Pittsburgh.
Report: Inmate steals
money walking out of jail
SANTA FE, N.M. — A New Mexico
inmate on his way out of jail was quick-
ly thrown back in after authorities say he
stole another inmate’s cash then treated
himself to a hearty lunch.
The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office
told KOAT-TV that 20-year-old Frank
Rodriguez-Tapia swiped $80 in cash
while a guard’s back was turned as
Rodriguez-Tapia was walking out of jail.
The money belonged to another inmate
who was just coming into the Santa Fe
jail and going through booking.
Police say Rodriguez-Tapia was sup-
posed to report immediately to the elec-
tronic monitoring office, but bought
lunch at Blake’s Lotaburger. He later
admitted to the theft, turned over the
remaining $67 and was sent back to jail.
Rodriguez-Tapia is now facing new
larceny charges.
It was unclear if he had an attorney.
Swift, Minaj to perform
at American Music Awards
LOS ANGELES — It’ll be a little bit
country and a little bit rock ‘n’ roll
onstage at next month’s American Music
Awards.
Organizers announced Wednesday
that Taylor Swift, Nicki Minaj and
Linkin Park will perform at the 40th
annual ceremony on Nov. 18.
All are also up for awards.
Minaj is the night’s leading nominee,
along with Rihanna, with four bids each.
Swift is nominated for favorite female
country artist and Linkin Park is in the
running for alternative artist.
Fans can pick the winners by voting
online.
Christina Aguilera will also perform at
the ceremony at the Nokia Theatre in
Los Angeles, where it will be broadcast
live on ABC.
Bobby Brown arrested
in Los Angeles; DUI suspicion
LOS ANGELES — Bobby Brown
has been arrested on suspicion of drunk-
en driving for the second time this year.
Los Angeles police spokeswoman
Venus Hall says the singer’s car was
stopped in the Topanga area at around 1
a.m. Wednesday.
Police say he was booked on suspicion
of driving under the influence at the Van
Nuys jail but was later released.
A representative for Brown could not
immediately be contacted.
The 43-year-old pleaded no contest to
DUI earlier this year following a March
arrest in Los Angeles. Under a plea
agreement, Brown checked himself into
a rehabilitation center in August.
Brown’s first album in 14 years came
out this summer.
Cruise files $50M suit
against magazine publisher
LOS ANGELES — An attorney for
Tom Cruise said he filed a $50 million
defamation lawsuit Wednesday against
the publishers of Life & Style magazine
for articles that said the actor has aban-
doned his 6-year-old daughter, Suri.
Cruise’s attorney, Bert Fields said to
falsely claim the actor deserted his
daughter is a “vicious lie.”
“Tom is a caring father who dearly
loves Suri. She’s a vital part of his life
and always will be,” Fields said.
20 26 36 41 42 16
Mega number
Oct. 24 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
SAN MATEO
Theft. A backpack containing school equip-
ment was stolen from the first block of West
Third Avenue before 4:13 p.m. on Thursday,
Oct. 18.
Fraud. A stolen credit card was used on the
1700 block of Kelly Street before 9:36 a.m. on
Thursday, Oct. 18.
Suspicious circumstances. A man reported a
person vandalized his car and threw a rock at
him on the 300 block of Ramona Street before
8:06 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 18.
Accident. A vehicle and a pedestrian were
involved in an accident on Indian Avenue and
North Humboldt Street before 8:04 a.m. on
Tuesday, Oct. 16.
Vandalism. Graffiti was found on Monte
Diablo Avenue and North Railroad before 6:29
p.m. on Monday, Oct. 15.
REDWOOD CITY
Disturbance. A woman talking on a cellphone
while driving almost hit a person on El
Camino Real and Old County Road before
4:39 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20.
Burglary. A radio was stolen from a vehicle
on East Oakwood Boulevard before 8:46 a.m.
on Saturday, Oct. 20.
Disturbance. A man tampered with restaurant
furniture on Main Street before 4:56 p.m. on
Friday, Oct. 19.
Police reports
They start so young
Underage drinking occurred at a party
with a bounce house on Lincoln Avenue
in Redwood City before 10:47 p.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 20.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Foster City attorney previously disci-
plined for misconduct is facing disbarment for
reportedly misappropriating thousands of dol-
lars from her son while representing him in
several civil matters.
Elizabeth M. Barnson Karnazes was found
culpable of 10 of 17 charged counts of profes-
sional misconduct connected to representation
of her son, according to the California Bar
Association’s recommendation she be prohib-
ited from practicing law.
Karnazes, who was admitted to the state Bar
in 1985, represented her now-25 year-old son
in several lawsuits that ended with financial
settlements.
The Bar found Karnazes failed to keep
records of her son’s money, endorsed his
checks without consent, used his trust account
for her personal use and failed to maintain his
money. The account should have held more
than $157,000 for her son but instead the bal-
ance fell below $10,000 and she refused to
give him any of his own funds for more than
two years. Karnazes also tried having herself
appointed as her son’s conservator while still
acting as his attorney which the Bar court
found breached her duty to remain uninflu-
enced by her own financial interests.
Even after the Bar launched an investiga-
tion, Karnazes remained her son’s attorney
and proposed she give him $63,000 of his
funds in return for his not cooperating with
the prosecution.
In recommending Karnazes be removed, the
Bar court cited the multiple acts of miscon-
duct which “significantly” harmed her son by
denying him the opportunity to pick his own
doctors and pay outstanding medical bills.
The Bar also considered Karnazes’ prior
discipline in March 2010 for being convicted
of trespassing. In the same consolidated case,
the Bar found Karnazes not culpable of mis-
conduct for failing to stop practicing law
when her mental condition made it unreason-
ably difficult.
Three years previous she had allegedly
taken several items without paying from the
Sears department store in San Mateo while
dressed in a furry red Santa Claus cap and
snow boots. Authorities placed her on a men-
tal hold after apprehending her because she
threatened to kill herself and said she could
lose her law license.
The following month, she was accused of
taking a $19.97 printer ink cartridge from
Radio Shack in Foster City and colliding with
another vehicle while driving away.
Karnazes pleaded not guilty by reason of
insanity in both cases but was found sane and
ultimately pleaded no contest to misdemeanor
trespassing.
Karnazes is also in the midst of a legal bat-
tle with the city of Foster City over her home
which the city declared a public nuisance
because of the alleged amount of debris and
clutter. The two parties settled the case in
October 2008 and Karnazes agreed to bring
her home into compliance but, according to
court documents, failed to follow up with
inspections and fixes. The city fire chief
reported Karnazes created a fire hazard with
items filling all major rooms of the house and
garage with some piles more than 10 feet
high.
Barring any appeals by Karnazes, the dis-
barment will be effective once approved by
the California Supreme Court, according to
Bar Acting Communications Director Laura
Ernde.
Meanwhile, she remains inactive.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Foster City attorney facingdisbarment
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Authorities are continuing their efforts to
identify a girl whose body was found washed
ashore at San Gregorio State Beach in San
Mateo County on Sunday afternoon.
The body is that of a white female believed
to be between 12 and 16 years old. She was 5
feet 4 inches tall and weighed about 108
pounds. She had brown or black hair, Deputy
Coroner Roger Fielding said.
She had no obvious marks or tattoos but she
had full braces on her teeth, with red or pink
rubber bands, Fielding said.
She was found wearing tan or faded Hurley
brand jeans, a red cotton T-shirt, a black or
brown cloth belt and black boots.
On her wrist she was wearing a red and sil-
ver Timex watch with a black band, Fielding
said.
The body was found by a couple walking
along the beach about a half-mile south of the
San Gregorio State Beach entrance around
12:30 p.m. Sunday, San Mateo County sher-
iff’s spokeswoman Rebecca Rosenblatt said.
Coroner Robert Foucrault said his office is
in contact with law enforcement agencies in
the Bay Area and elsewhere to see if the girl
can be matched up to any missing-persons
cases.
“It’s a case that’s getting a lot of our atten-
tion,” he said.
Identity of girl whose body washed ashore remains mystery
4
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Phillis Louise Flinn
Phillis Louise Flinn, born Sept. 29,
1921, died Oct. 13, 2012.
She was the mother of Terry Flinn
(Polly) of San Mateo and Kent Flinn
(Beverly) of San Bruno; grandmother
of Chad Flinn, Vanessa Scudder (Jeff)
and Natalie Flinn; great-grandmother
of Claire and Jack Scudder; sister of
Jean Betzer and Rose Marie Jarvis;
sister-in-law Elaine Cronin; and
many nephews and nieces, Phillis
was preceded in death by her husband
George, daughter Darleen and broth-
ers Colin and Gordon Chadband.
Phillis was born and raised in
Orcutt (Santa Barbara County).
Phillis graduated from Santa Maria
High School and moved to San
Francisco where she graduated from
nurses training at Franklin Hospital.
Phillis’ nursing career included both
surgery units at Mills Hospital in San
Mateo and Peninsula Hospital in
Burlingame, as well as 27 years at
Peninsula Memorial Blood Bank in
Burlingame.
Phillis and George moved to
Millbrae in 1947
and to Menlo
Park in 1977.
Phillis was dedi-
cated to her fami-
ly as well as an
extended family
of many dear
friends. She was
an active volun-
teer at Little House, Meals on
Wheels, Peninsula Volunteers and St.
Denis parish.
Friends are invited to attend a
funeral mass 2:30 p.m. Monday, Oct.
29 at Saint Denis Catholic Church,
2250 Avy Ave., Menlo Park. A recep-
tion will follow at the parish hall.
Private interment will be at Holy
Cross Cemetery, Colma. In lieu of
flowers, her family suggests contribu-
tions to a mental health advocacy
organization she was dedicated to:
National Alliance on Mental Illness,
San Mateo County, 1650 Borel Place,
Suite 130, San Mateo, 94402.
Obituary South City police awarded
more than $100K in grants
Two grants totaling more than
$104,000 were recently awarded to
South San Francisco police —
money which will be used for spe-
cial traffic enforcement and crash
prevention.
The California Office of Traffic
Safety awarded the department a
$70,000 grant for a yearlong pro-
gram aimed at preventing deaths
and injuries on roads through spe-
cial enforcement and public aware-
ness efforts, according to a press
release from the South San
Francisco Police Department. The
department also received a
$34,100 grant from the University
of California at Berkeley Safe
Transportation Research and
Education Center for the operation
of three sobriety checkpoints in the
coming year.
“This marks the fifth year of our
partnership with the Office of
Traffic Safety and the National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration,” Police Chief
Mike Massoni wrote in the press
release. “During this partnership
we have arrested and removed 64
intoxicated and impaired drivers
from our streets. We have also
made 31 criminal arrests and 18
warrant arrests.”
Additionally, more than 400
drivers who were unlicensed or
driving with a suspended license
were issued traffic citations, he
wrote.
Man arrested for robbing
Redwood City bank
A 24-year-old man was arrested
for robbing a bank on Woodside
Road in Redwood City Monday
morning, police reported.
At approximately 11:05 a.m.,
officers responded to the BBVA
Compass Bank at 660 Woodside
Road on the report of a robbery.
Police report a man entered the
bank, vaulted the counter and
demanded money from the bank
employees. He also threatened to
shoot employees if they did not
comply, according to police.
He then opened a cash drawer,
took cash and fled on foot north on
Oxford Street. He was seen run-
ning into an apartment complex on
the 1500 block of Oxford Street
and police eventually found him
hiding in an apartment complex in
the 1500 block of Hudson Street,
according to police.
The man, Kendrick Roby, a tran-
sient, was taken into custody with-
out incident and the stolen money
was recovered, according to
police.
Anyone with information regard-
ing this robbery or this suspect is
asked to call Detective Ed Feeney
at 780-7129 or Detective Dave
Stahler at 780-7620.
Local briefs
5
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Draper University officials are fine-tuning
their proposal to occupy three buildings in
downtown San Mateo after facing the
Planning Commission Tuesday night.
The commission sent the university back
to the drawing board to come up with more
detailed plans for the project, especially for
the Collective Antiques building on Third
Avenue.
The entrepreneurial school held its first
session this past summer with 45 students
and plans to start up again this January with
about 150.
The university, founded by venture capi-
talist Tim Draper, currently occupies the old
Benjamin Franklin Hotel downtown and
wants to expand to the Collective Antiques
building across the street and the old
Wachovia bank building on Fourth Avenue
for a retail store and administrative offices.
“They are not quite sure what the plan is
for the Collective Antiques building. It is a
work in progress and we asked them to put
more work and thought into the plan,”
Planning Commissioner Kelly Moran told
the Daily Journal yesterday.
In general, though, the commission is in
support of the project, she said.
“We really want to see this project be suc-
cessful,” Moran said.
The commission gave university officials
direction on a number of items including
parking for visitors, bicycle parking, signs
and even paint colors.
Draper plans to keep the pool in the back
of the hotel and will need to fence it since it
shares a courtyard that is partly owned by
the city.
The main questions, however, were cen-
tered around the plans for the Collective
Antiques building, including how the space
will be partitioned and used.
“We challenged them to be more creative,”
Moran said.
Draper bought the Collective Antiques
building earlier this year from the Musich
family and won the Benjamin Franklin Hotel
in a Dutch auction in 2011 for about $6 mil-
lion. He already owned the old Wachovia
Bank property before setting his sights on
opening a school.
If all goes according to plan, the universi-
ty will be housed at the hotel at 36-44 E.
Third Ave., the Collective Antiques building
at 51-65 E. Third Ave., and the old Wachovia
bank building at 37 E. Fourth Ave.
The school plans to have four 10-week
sessions that coordinate with the Stanford
University quarterly system.
It expects to board about 150 students,
aged 21 to 24, at the hotel with a condition
that the students leave their cars at home.
At the end of the session, students will
have the opportunity to pitch for funding
from Silicon Valley venture capitalists.
Draper is the founder of the venture capi-
tal firm Draper Fisher Jurvetson and funded
Hotmail, Skype and Baidu in their infancies.
Draper University officials will have to
come back to the Planning Commission
before the City Council takes final action on
the proposal.
“We are going to keep working with city
planners to improve certain aspects of the
proposal,” Carol Lo, the university’s chief
operating officer, said.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 106.
Draper University fine-tunes proposal
San Mateo Planning Commission makes suggestions for downtown proposal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Cynthia Simms, who took helm of the San
Mateo-Foster City Elementary School
District last year, will be around through the
2014-15 school year, according to a three-
year contract approved by the board last
week.
Approved Thursday night, the contract term
runs from July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2015.
It calls for Simms to work throughout the
entire calendar year for a base salary of
$200,000. She will also receive $2,500 in
annual stipends in recognition for her mas-
ter’s and doctorate degrees.
The agreement also give Simms access to
medical insurance, term life insurance and up
to $10,000 as reimbursement of relocation
costs. Simms is allotted a maximum of 24
days of vacation annually, $200 per month for
expenses related to the job, a $400 monthly
auto allowance and up to $2,500 for annual
memberships offering professional develop-
ment opportunities.
In 2010, Simms retired from Walnut Valley
Unified School District — a district serving
about 14,000 students in kindergarten through
high school located in Southern California. In
December 2010, she was
given the opportunity to
hold a short-term superin-
tendent position in Los
Gatos. As a result, Simms
realized she wasn’t ready
to retire. Simms was the
interim superintendent of
Los Gatos Union School
District when offered the
position with San Mateo-
Foster City. She joined the district after the
retirement of Pendery Clark, who was with
the district for 10 years.
Simms holds a number of degrees including
her bachelor’s in elementary education from
Bethany College in West Virginia, a master’s
degree in special education from the
University of Virginia and a master’s in pub-
lic administration and a doctorate in school
administration both from the University of
Denver. Her career in education began as a
first grade teacher. Simms previously served
as superintendent for the Placerville Union
School District for six years, Steamboat
Springs School District in Colorado for nine
years, Mercer Island School District Outside
of Seattle and then Walnut Valley.
San Mateo-Foster City Superintendent
Cynthia Simms inks three-year contract
Cynthia Simms
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Draper University,founded by venture capitalist Tim Draper,currently occupies the old Benjamin
Franklin Hotel downtown and wants to expand to the Collective Antiques building across
the street and the old Wachovia bank building on Fourth Avenue in San Mateo.
advertisment
6
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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October27th
Ex-Goldman exec given
two years for inside trades
NEW YORK — A former Goldman Sachs
and Procter & Gamble Co. board member was
sentenced to two years in prison Wednesday,
culminating a spectacular fall from grace for a
man whose good deeds worldwide brought
him leniency after he was convicted of feed-
ing inside information about board dealings to
a billionaire hedge fund owner who was his
friend.
Rajat Gupta, 63, of Westport, Conn.,
learned his fate from U.S. District Court
Judge Jed Rakoff, who defended the length of
the prison term he levied, blasting federal sen-
tencing guidelines that he said called for
Gupta to serve at least 6 1/2 years behind bars.
He also ordered him to pay a $5 million fine.
Citing information he received under seal,
Rakoff said Gupta’s crimes may have
occurred because Gupta may have “longed to
escape the straightjacket of overwhelming
responsibility, and had begun to loosen his
self-restraint in ways that clouded his judg-
ment.”
Oregon scientists make
embryos with two women, one man
NEW YORK — Scientists in Oregon have
created embryos with genes from one man
and two women, using a provocative tech-
nique that could someday be used to prevent
babies from inheriting certain rare incurable
diseases.
The researchers at Oregon Health &
Sciences University said they are not using the
embryos to produce children, and it is not
clear when or even if this technique will be
put to use. But it has already stirred a debate
over its risks and ethics in Britain, where sci-
entists did similar work a few years ago.
Around the nation
By Gene Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — An Algerian man whose sen-
tence for plotting to blow up the Los Angeles
airport around the turn of the new millennium
was thrown out for being too lenient was
ordered Wednesday to spend 37 years in
prison.
Ahmed Ressam, who had trained with al-
Qaida in Afghanistan, was arrested in
December 1999 when a customs agent noticed
that he appeared suspicious as he drove off a
ferry from Canada onto Washington’s
Olympic Peninsula. A resulting search turned
up a trunk full of explosives.
Ressam’s capture, after a brief foot chase,
prompted fears of a terrorist attack and the
cancellation of Seattle’s New Year’s Eve fire-
works.
U.S. District Judge John C. Coughenour
had twice ordered him to serve 22-year terms,
but both times the sentences were rejected on
appeal.
This time, Ressam’s
attorneys conceded that he
should face at least three
decades to satisfy the
appeals courts, but no
more than 34 years.
The Justice Department,
which previously sought
sentences of 35 years and
of life in prison, recom-
mended a life sentence
again because of the mass murder Ressam
intended to inflict. In those pre-Sept. 11 days,
it was “a virtually unimaginable horror,”
Assistant U.S. Attorney Helen Brunner told
the court.
“If Mr. Ressam had succeeded,” she said, “it
is likely hundreds if not thousands of innocent
lives would have been lost.”
Brunner also argued that Ressam continues
to pose a threat, as evidenced by his recanta-
tion of prior cooperation, which forced the
government to dismiss charges against two
coconspirators.
Ressam’s lawyer, Thomas Hillier, dis-
agreed, pointing to a letter Ressam sent the
judge this week in which he wrote: “I am
against killing innocent people of any gender,
color or religion. I apologize for my actions.”
Ressam, who made a similar statement to
the court in 2003, did not speak at the hearing
Wednesday.
Prosecutors and defense attorneys said they
would review the ruling, and neither indicated
whether they would appeal. U.S. Attorney
Jenny Durkan said that regardless of whether
she agreed with the judge, the case represent-
ed a victory for the rule of law.
“We afforded a man who sought to do us the
greatest harm the full due process of the law,”
she said.
Coughenour read his lengthy sentencing
order from the bench, noting that of the 4,000
to 5,000 sentences he had handed down in his
31-year career, Ressam’s case was the only
one he could remember in which the 9th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals deemed him too
lenient.
Terrorist sentenced in millennium plot
Ahmed Ressam
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The official voting
record makes it appear that state lawmakers
were eager to wade into the politically sensitive
debate about whether certain people listed as
child abusers when they were minors should be
given a second chance.
The official recorded vote in the California
Assembly shows that 64 of the 80 lawmakers
voted “yes” on AB1707, which would allow
people listed on a central child abuse registry as
minors to eventually have their name removed.
In fact, the legislation actually passed by just
a single vote in August, with more than one-
third of Assembly members opting not to cast a
vote when the bill was debated. Instead, they
added their names after the issue had been
decided.
AB1707 provides a case study of vote
changing in the Assembly. It attracted 36 vote
additions and three after-the-fact vote reversals
on both Assembly floor votes, more changes
than almost any other piece of legislation this
year.
Democrats appear to have been reluctant to
endorse the bill until they were sure of its pas-
sage, while Republicans appear to have been
wary of incurring anger from the law enforce-
ment community.
“Tough-on-crime posturing always makes
issues like this tough to put out there,” said the
bill’s author, Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-
San Francisco.
A yearlong analysis by the Associated Press
found that lawmakers in the Assembly took
advantage of the practice more than 5,000
times during the nine-month session that ended
in August. Many of the bills that attracted the
most changes this year dealt with politically
divisive topics such as taxes, health care and
crime.
The social welfare groups that supported
Ammiano’s AB1707 said the bill would level
the playing field for foster children, who often
end up on the state’s child abuse registry for
fistfights or even “playing doctor” when they
are young because their caretakers have a legal
obligation to report all incidents, no matter how
trivial.
Child abuse bill provides vote-switch case study
NATION/WORLD 7
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By David Espo and Ben Feller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAVENPORT, Iowa — President
Barack Obama is confidently pre-
dicting speedy second-term agree-
ment with Republicans to reduce
federal deficits and overhaul immi-
gration laws, commenting before
setting out Wednesday on a 40-hour
campaign marathon through battle-
ground states that could decide
whether he’ll get the chance.
Republican Mitt Romney looked to
the Midwest for a breakthrough in a
close race shadowed by a weak
economy.
Romney declared, “We’re going to
get this economy cooking again,”
addressing a boisterous crowd in
Reno, Nev., before flying back east-
ward to tend to his prospects in Ohio
and Iowa. Romney urged audience
members to consider their personal
circumstances, and he said the out-
come of the Nov. 6 election “will
make a difference for the nation, will
make a difference for the families of
the nation and will make a difference
for your family, individually and
specifically.”
With 13 days until Election Day,
opinion polls depicted a close race
nationally. Romney’s campaign
claims momentum as well as the
lead in Florida and North Carolina,
two battleground states with a com-
bined 44 of the 270 electoral votes
needed to win. Obama’s aides insist
the president is ahead or tied with his
rival in both of those states and in the
other seven decisive battlegrounds.
Not even Obama, in an interview
with radio host Tom Joyner, predict-
ed that fellow Democrats would win
control of the House from
Republicans, who are looking to
renew a majority they won two years
ago in a landslide triggered by the
Tea Party.
The Democrats and Republicans
are struggling uncertainly for control
of the Senate. And for the second
time, a hard-fought Senate campaign
was jolted by a dispute over abor-
tion, in this case a statement by
Republican Richard Mourdock of
Indiana that when a woman becomes
pregnant by rape, “that’s something
God intended” and there should be
no abortion allowed.
Romney said he disagreed with
the remarks. However, unlike an ear-
lier abortion-related controversy
involving Rep. Todd Akin of
Missouri, Romney did not disavow
his support for Mourdock, who is
locked in a close race with Rep. Joe
Donnelly, his Democratic opponent.
The president’s major focus was
his coast-to-coast-and-back again
tour.
“We’re going to pull an all-
nighter. No sleep,” the president said
shortly after Air Force One touched
down in Iowa, first stop of a swing
that included Colorado, California,
Nevada, Ohio, Virginia and Florida,
with a quick stop in Illinois to cast
an early ballot, before he returns to
the White House on Thursday
evening.
On his second stop of the long day,
Obama told a crowd of about 16,000
people at Denver’s City Park that he
was “fired up” — though tempera-
tures dropped near 50 degrees.
President talks second term;
Romney zeroes in on economy
By Larry Margasak
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Two hours
after the U.S. Consulate came under
attack in Benghazi, Libya, the White
House was told that a militant group
was claiming responsibility for the
violence that killed the U.S. ambassa-
dor and three other Americans.
A State Department email sent to
intelligence officials and the White
House situation room said the
Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia
claimed responsibility on Facebook
and Twitter, and also called for an
attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli.
The document may fuel
Republican efforts to show that the
White House knew it was a terrorist
attack, even as the U.S. ambassador
to the United Nations was saying —
five days afterward — that it
appeared to be a protest gone awry.
The Obama administration’s
account of the Benghazi events has
become a campaign issue, with
Republican challenger Mitt Romney
and GOP lawmakers accusing the
White House of misleading
Americans about the nature of the
attack. But militant groups often sur-
face after such attacks claiming
responsibility and it’s difficult to
immediately verify such claims.
The Associated Press and other
news organizations obtained the
unclassified email and two related
emails from government officials
who requested anonymity because
they were not authorized to speak
about them publicly.
The House and Senate committees
that oversee intelligence received a
raft of documents from the Office of
Director of National Intelligence on
Monday, two congressional aides
said. Congressional staffers combing
through the documents have found a
kaleidoscope of sometimes conflict-
ing intelligence, backing up much of
what intelligence officials explained
over the past several weeks.
But members of both committees
are still complaining that the original
briefing they were given just after the
Tuesday, Sept. 11 attack, differed
markedly from the explanation the
CIA director David Petraeus gave
them by the end of that week. In that
first briefing, just 12 hours after con-
sulate was burned down, the intelli-
gence committees received a report
that it was a military style assault, but
just days later, Petraeus stressed that
militants had infiltrated a mob, a U.S.
official said.
White House told of
Libyan attack claim
By Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LORDSTOWN, Ohio —
President Barack Obama’s decision
to help America’s automakers could
end up being what helps drive him
back into the White House.
Some 850,000 jobs in this critical
battleground state are tied to autos
and Obama’s campaign constantly
reminds voters they’d be jobless if
not for the decision to inject taxpay-
er dollars into General Motors and
Chrysler. However, the move has
not translated into automatic sup-
port for the president, even in areas
that depend on the industry.
Republican Mitt Romney also is
pitching these voters hard with his
message that Obama hasn’t bal-
anced Washington’s checkbook the
same way voters must.
One in eight jobs in Ohio can be
linked to the auto industry —
whether it’s working on a factory
floor or selling groceries to plant
workers. The presidential race’s out-
come could boil down to whether
voters interpret Obama’s move as
saving Detroit or bailing it out. But
like other flashpoints in this rough
campaign, there is little middle
ground between the versions of
events and what it means for voters’
neighbors.
Auto bailout could be key
to Obama victory in Ohio
Locked in a stubbornly tight race,President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney are demonstrating the
urgency of the campaign’s final stretch, with the incumbent alone set to cover 5,300 miles in the busiest single
day of his re-election bid.
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Josef Federman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Hamas mili-
tants in the Gaza Strip fired dozens
of rockets and mortar shells into
southern Israel on Wednesday in the
heaviest bombardment on the area
in months, drawing ominous Israeli
threats of retaliation and dangers of
escalation.
The violence came a day after a
landmark visit to Gaza by the emir
of Qatar. Israeli officials suggested
the visit, the first by a head of state
to the Hamas-ruled territory,
emboldened the militant group.
The rocket fire began shortly after
the emir left Gaza late Tuesday and
continued through the night. Israeli
officials said more than 80 projec-
tiles were fired, and Hamas claimed
responsibility for many of the
attacks.
Israel responded with a series of
airstrikes on rocket launchers,
killing two Palestinian militants,
according to Gaza medical officials.
Two other Palestinians were killed
Tuesday.
Three Thai laborers working on
an Israeli farm were wounded, two
seriously, when a rocket hit a chick-
en coop. Other rockets badly dam-
aged five houses and broke car win-
dows. Schools in the area were
closed.
Many people spent the day
indoors, while others stayed in close
proximity to the makeshift cement
shelters found in the streets of
southern Israeli towns. In one farm-
ing community, shrapnel covered
trees and a children’s playhouse in a
backyard.
“Sometimes it feels like a scene
out of the movie ‘Platoon,’ some-
thing out of the Vietnam war. We
can stay at home and just hear the
noise of the war,” said Tamara
Cohen, a resident of the border
community of Ein Habesor whose
children, ages 9 and 5, spent the
night in a fortified “safe room” in
their home.
A video issued by Hamas’ mili-
tary wing showed six rockets peel-
ing off in rapid succession, then
later, from what appears to be a dif-
ferent location, eight rockets shoot
off, leaving plumes of black smoke
behind them.
Hamas said the video was made
earlier in the day, though it provided
no proof.
Gazans firerockets at Israel
By Felicia Fonseca
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL
PARK, Ariz. — Google and its
street-view cameras already have
taken users to narrow cobblestone
alleys in Spain using a tricycle,
inside the Smithsonian with a push
cart and to British Columbia’s snow-
covered slopes by snowmobile.
The search giant now has brought
its all-seeing eyes — mounted for the
first time on a backpack — down
into the Grand Canyon, showcasing
the attraction’s most popular hiking
trails on the South Rim and other
walkways.
It’s the latest evolution in mapping
technology for the Mountain View,
Calif., company, which has used a
rosette of cameras to photograph
thousands of cities and towns in
dozens of countries for its Street
View feature. With a click of the
mouse, Internet users are transported
virtually for a 360-degree view of
locales they may have read about
only in tourist books and seen in flat,
2-D images.
“Any of these sort of iconic, cultur-
al, historical locations that are not
accessible by road is where we want
to go,” said Ryan Falor, product man-
ager at Google. Google announced
the trekker earlier this year but made
its first official collection of data this
week at the Grand Canyon.
The backpacks aren’t ready for
volunteer use, but Google has said it
wants to deploy them at national
forests, to the narrow streets of
Venice, Mount Everest and to
ancient ruins and castles.
Google cameras map popular Grand Canyon trails
REUTES
Trails of smoke are seen after the launch of rockets from the northern Gaza strip towards Israel.
Foreign fighters worry —
and boost — Syrian rebels
ALEPPO, Syria — The presence
of foreign Islamic militants battling
Syria’s regime is raising concerns
over the possible injection of al-
Qaida’s influence into the country’s
civil war.
Syria’s rebels share some of those
misgivings. But they also see in the
foreign extremists a welcome boost:
experienced, disciplined fighters
whose battlefield valor against the
better-armed troops of President
Bashar Assad is legendary.
Nothing typifies the dilemma more
than Jabhat al-Nusra, a shadowy
group with an al-Qaida-style ideolo-
gy whose fighters come from Libya,
Tunisia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iraq,
the Balkans and elsewhere. Many are
veterans of previous wars who came
to Syria for what they consider a new
“jihad” against Assad.
The group has become notorious
for numerous suicide bombings dur-
ing the 19-month-old conflict target-
ing regime and military facilities.
Hurricane Sandy pounds
Jamaica, then aims at Cuba
KINGSTON, Jamaica —
Hurricane Sandy’s howling winds
and pelting rains lashed precarious
shantytowns, stranded travelers and
downed power lines Wednesday as it
roared across Jamaica on a course
that would take it on to Cuba and
then possibly threaten Florida and
the Bahamas.
Sandy’s death toll was at least two.
An elderly man was killed in
Jamaica when he was crushed by a
boulder that rolled onto his clap-
board house, police reported. Earlier
Wednesday, a woman in Haiti was
swept away by a rushing river she
was trying to cross.
In some southern towns on
Jamaica, a few crocodiles were
caught in rushing floodwaters that
carried them out of their homes in
mangrove thickets, showing up in
districts where electricity was
knocked out, local residents report-
ed.
Around the world
OPINION 9
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By David Lewis and Ron Fong
T
he recent passage of a model bag
ban by the San Mateo County Board
of Supervisors could be a boon for
the Bay without harming businesses. To pro-
tect the Bay from trash and level the playing
field for businesses from San Jose to San
Francisco, all cities in San Mateo County
should adopt this simple, effective ordi-
nance.
The ordinance bans single-use plastic bags
at all retail stores, except restaurants, and
requires businesses to charge customers a
minimum of 10 cents for each paper bag.
The California Grocers Association supports
this regional approach that creates consisten-
cy for businesses and consumers while bene-
fiting the environment. Bans combined with
store charges are also a powerful incentive to
nudge consumers to bring their own reusable
bags. According to the association, stores
located in cities that require bag charges
report that up to 90 percent of customers
bring their own, a clear win for the environ-
ment.
The impact of plastic bag pollution on our
rivers, bays and oceans is well documented.
Plastic never biodegrades in a marine envi-
ronment, and it smothers wetlands and
chokes wildlife. Even if
people are conscientious
about not littering, light-
weight bags blow out of
uncovered garbage cans,
down storm drains and
into our waterways.
Californians use 19 billion
plastic bags annually, and
at least 1 million end up
in San Francisco Bay.
Eliminating this pervasive
litter doesn’t just benefit
the environment; it saves
cities from spending
money to unclog storm
drains and clean streets
and creeks. Regulating
bags will help everyone’s
bottom line.
San Mateo County
partnered with more than
20 cities, including six in neighboring Santa
Clara County, and conducted a full environ-
mental impact report to develop this model
ordinance. The results speak for themselves
in this week’s unanimous vote by the San
Mateo County Board of Supervisors to
approve the recommendation. Now it’s time
for cities to move forward and adopt a uni-
form approach throughout the county.
A healthy San Francisco Bay is essential
to our quality of life and our economy. As
more cities ban plastic bags, and encourage
consumer adoption of reusable bags region-
wide, it will make a huge difference for the
Bay and wildlife, while reducing consumer
confusion.
Thanks to the leadership of San Francisco,
San Jose and other cities, half the Bay Area
population now lives in communities where
bans on single-use plastic bags are in force
or imminent. All cities in San Mateo and
Santa Clara counties should join them, and
make the whole Peninsula plastic bag-free.
David Lewis is executive director of Save The
Bay, the San Francisco Bay Area’s oldest and
largest organization working to protect and
restore the Bay. Ron Fong is president and
CEO of the California Grocers Association, a
nonprofit, statewide trade association repre-
senting the food industry since 1898.
Giants as role models
Editor,
Congratulations to the San Francisco
Giants! On the brink of elimination for many
games, they defeated the Reds, and the
Cards. The Giants winning the National
League Championship was the result of
many factors that each of us can apply to our
own lives: hard work, perseverance, team-
work, communication (Pence’s motivational
pep talks before do or die games) and coach-
ing. Think about it and apply it to your own
life, career and marriage or relationships. Go
Giants!
Steve Duncan
Burlingame
High school football coverage
Editor,
There is nothing more enjoyable for me
than to go to a high school football game on
a beautiful fall day.
Last Friday afternoon (Oct. 12), I attended
the Aragon Dons vs. Half Moon Bay game at
Aragon.
The following day I love to read the Daily
Journal account of the game. In my opinion,
your paper’s coverage of local high school
sports is simply the best.
The headline “Passing game leads Aragon
to victory” by Nathan Mollat — I was read-
ing the article about the game when the six
or seven paragraphs really got my attention.
Coach Steve Sell said he is fighting himself
in trying to identify what kind of team he
has. “We have some unique players,” Sell
said in the Oct. 13 edition of the Daily
Journal. Sell said, “I fight the internal battle
of sticking to our core offense (the run game)
or shaping the offense around the athletes we
have.”
The answer for me is: A great coach
always makes the adjustment to the talent he
has, a great parent has to adjust to each child.
A great teacher has to adjust their lesson plan
according to the abilities of the students, etc.,
etc., etc.
The sports world is made up of cliches. I
would like to close with a few cliches of my
own: intelligence is adaptability; humility is
teachability; my way or the highway does not
work.
This year the Aragon Dons have more tal-
ent than the Sera Padres.
Mike Moloney
Foster City
The Wisconsin lesson
Editor,
I think Sue Lempert is drawing the wrong
impression about Wisconsin to inform her
position on Proposition 32. In her column,
“How I plan to vote and why” in the Oct. 22
edition of the Daily Journal, she writes:
“Proposition 32 — Political Contributions:
NO. This is another union busting initiative
put on by special interests who are trying to
achieve Wisconsin skullduggery in
California.”
I don’t think Proposition 32 will prevent
the free association of people who want to
form union-related political committees to
promote activist agendas. Proposition 32 is
about preventing unions from stealing from
paychecks to promote political agendas con-
trary to the wishes of the workers. Those tel-
evision ads are asinine misdirection and if
she wants to draw a lesson about Wisconsin
political skullduggery, she should try the one
in which Wisconsin thugs attack Republicans
for posting yard signs. Now that’s a skull-
duggery impression.
Sue should also explain how it isn’t a con-
flict of interest for public officials to negoti-
ate contracts with government worker unions
while receiving political contributions from
the same unions. Actually, I would say it’s
fraudulent, but what would I know? I’m just
one of those ignorant Tea Party types who
couldn’t possibly understand how the good
deeds done with tax dollars and union dues
always outweigh the bad, no matter how
absurdly awful those bad deeds are. After all,
our political betters and union leaders always
know what’s best to do with any spare
change or paychecks we might happen to
have.
John Owen
San Mateo
All San Mateo cities should adopt county bag ban
A royal mess
D
isney’s pretty, pretty princesses are
fairytale girls who live in fairytale
worlds.
The Earth’s pretty, pretty princesses
(because, really, what female doesn’t think of
herself as one?) are real girls who live in the
real world. And in this real world, nobody is
ever happy.
Case in point is
Princess Sofia, the
latest Disney
offering just in
time for the holi-
day marketing sea-
son and reportedly
its first Latina
princess. But after
tweeters and pun-
dits and the gener-
ally cranky con-
demned the
auburn-haired,
blue-eyed character as not “Hispanic
enough” the company backpedaled on the
Latina angle by saying that all of its cre-
ations come from “fantasy lands that may
reflect elements of various cultures and eth-
nicities.” Sofia’s mom it seems is from the
fictitious faraway land of Galdiz which is
inspired by Spain. A producer further
described the girl as “a mixed-heritage
princess.”
Yep, her dad hails from a similarly
enchanted kingdom inspired by Scandinavia.
With her lighter complexion and eyes, Sofia
must have received more paternal genes.
Or did she?
Who is to say that those of Latin heritage
must always be brown eyed, brown skinned
and brown or black haired? Some viewers
who’ve been waiting for a more traditionally
Hispanic role model may be peeved Sofia
doesn’t look like them but the growing num-
ber of mixed-race individuals should be
equally insulted Sofia isn’t considered good
enough to represent.
Of course, all little girls want to see them-
selves reflected in their princesses and dolls.
This explains why all my Barbies ended up
with quasi-mullets in a sad attempt to give
them bangs like mine. Little did I know then
what I really needed was a strong pro-bang
contingent with a social media account to
shame Mattel.
Admittedly, all Disney princesses have a
certain look regardless of its foray beyond
the old-fashioned blonde tresses of Rapunzel
and Sleeping Beauty. Mulan, Jasmine, Tiana
and Pocahontas still bear the large, doe-
shaped eyes, button nose and radiant smile of
their predecessors. Even if Sofia got a tan,
chances are she wouldn’t stray too far from
the tried and true Disney ideal.
But this isn’t Mickey Rooney playing an
Asian caricature in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”
or even Robert Downey Jr. playing an
Australian playing a Black man in “Tropic of
Thunder.”
Sofia apparently isn’t trying to be anything
other than who she is. If that is Latina, great.
If that is a melting pot of ethnicities, even
better. Unless the authorities in Galdiz take a
page from the Arizona playbook and ask for
identification and papers, Sofia shouldn’t
have to justify her heritage to anybody.
As one character in the movie “Mean
Girls” explains after another questions why a
girl from Africa is not black — You can’t just
go around asking people why they’re white.
Someday, perhaps, Disney and other ani-
mators will give us princess who better
reflect the world. Maybe these new royals
will have a face only Prince Charles can
love; the company can’t get much more real-
istic than that.
But until then, leave Sofia be. Regardless
of whether the character is actually meant to
be Latina, those who think there’s only one
appropriate way of appearing “Hispanic
enough” are the people who really live in a
fairytale world.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat”
runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think of
this column? Send a letter to the editor: let-
ters@smdailyjournal.com.
Guest
perspective
David Lewis
Ron Fong
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,077.34 -0.19% 10-Yr Bond 1.775 +0.62%
Nasdaq2,981.70 -0.29% Oil (per barrel) 88.30
S&P 500 1,408.75 -0.31% Gold 1,710.20
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The steep losses
stopped Wednesday as the stock market
turned calm, a day after one of its biggest
sell-offs of the year. Indexes ended with
slight losses after the Federal Reserve said
the U.S. economy still needs support.
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed down 25.19 points at 13,077.34, a
day after one of its worst drops this year.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
4.36 points to close at 1,408.75 while the
Nasdaq composite index fell 8.76 points
to 2,981.70.
“Today we’re assessing the damage,”
said Mark Luschini, chief investment
strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott.
“Everybody just got clobbered yesterday.”
Lower corporate revenue and expecta-
tions for the rest of the year drove the Dow
down 243 points Tuesday, its third-biggest
drop this year. DuPont, 3M, UPS and
Xerox all reported lower sales than a year
ago.
“It seemed out of the blue, but what we
were seeing was stock prices adjusting to
corporate profitability,” Luschini said.
The market flitted between small gains
and losses for much of the day. Indexes
started to fade after 2 p.m., after the Fed
repeated its assessment that the U.S. eco-
nomic recovery remains modest at best.
At the end of its latest two-day meeting,
the Fed said the economy is still expand-
ing at just a “moderate pace” and that it
needs time to see whether a new bond-
buying effort launched in September will
spur economic growth and new hiring.
Third-quarter earnings reports have
mainly disappointed investors. The Dow
has risen just one day in the last five, a
gain of two points on Monday. It lost 205
on Friday following poor results from
Microsoft, General Electric and
McDonald’s.
The latest batch of earnings reports was-
n’t as dire, and there was the occasional
piece of encouraging news.
Facebook had its best day since its stock
market debut in May. The company said
late Tuesday that 14 percent of its adver-
tising revenue came from mobile devices,
allaying some investor concerns.
The social network’s stock soared $3.73
to $23.23, a jump of 19 percent. Facebook
has swung widely since its IPO at $38,
and has traded as low as $17.55.
AT&T, which is part of the Dow aver-
age, said it added the fewest wireless cus-
tomers since 2003, far behind Verizon
Wireless. AT&T’s results still managed to
beat the estimates of financial analysts.
AT&T slid 29 cents to $34.71.
Stocks stabilize after sell-off
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Corning Inc., down $1.26 at $12.15
The glass and ceramics maker said that it will
likely cut costs, including job eliminations, to
support profit in a weakening economy.
Lorillard Inc., down $4.08 at $111.70
The maker of Newport and Kent cigarettes said
its third-quarter net income rose 6 percent,but
its results missed analysts’ expectations.
Norfolk Southern Corp., down $4.92 at $61.09
The railroad said that a weak economy
contributed to a 27 percent drop in profits as it
hauled less coal and other merchandise.
Tempur Pedic International Inc., down $6.21 at
$25.66
The maker of mattresses and pillows posted
disappointing results for its third quarter.It also
slashed its outlook for the year.
Fortune Brands Home & Security Inc., up $2.23
at $29.20
The maker of Moen faucets and Master locks
posted sharply higher third-quarter net income,
thanks to an improving housing market.
Nasdaq
Netflix Inc., down $8.10 at $60.12
The online video and DVD subscription service
cut its outlook for how many U.S. streaming
subscribers it would add this year.
Panera Bread Co., up $8.09 at $168.43
The bakery-cafe chain reported that its third-
quarter net income rose 27 percent on strong
demand for its soups and sandwiches.
iRobot Corp., down $4.32 at $18.32
The maker of the Roomba vacuum cleaner said
that its third-quarter profit rose,but it said it will
lose money in the fourth quarter.
Big movers
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The latest federal law-
suit over alleged mortgage fraud paints an
unflattering picture of a doomed lender:
Executives at Countrywide Financial
urged workers to churn out loans, accept-
ed fudged applications and tried to hide
ballooning defaults.
The suit, filed Wednesday by the top
federal prosecutor in Manhattan, also
underscored how Bank of America’s pur-
chase of Countrywide in July 2008, just
before the financial crisis, backfired
severely. The prosecutor, Preet Bharara,
said he was seeking more than $1 billion,
but the suit could ultimately recover
much more in damages.
“This lawsuit should send another
clear message that reckless lending prac-
tices will not be tolerated,” Bharara said
in a statement. He described
Countrywide’s practices as “spectacular-
ly brazen in scope.”
He also charged that Bank of America
has resisted buying back soured mort-
gages from Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, which bought loans from
Countrywide.
Bank of America spokesman Lawrence
Grayson said the bank “has stepped up and
acted responsibly to resolve legacy mort-
gage matters.” He called the allegation that
the bank has failed to buy back loans “sim-
ply false.”
“At some point,” Grayson said, “Bank of
America can’t be expected to compensate
every entity that claims losses that actually
were caused by the economic downturn.”
Countrywide was a giant in mortgage
lending, but was also known for approving
exotic, even risky, loans. By 2007, as the
market for subprime mortgages collapsed,
Countrywide was anxious for revenue.
The lawsuit alleged that the company
loosened its standards for making loans
while telling Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, which were buying loans from
Countrywide, that standards were getting
tighter.
U.S. suit alleges ‘brazen’ fraud at Countrywide
Facebook shares post biggest single-day gain
NEW YORK — Facebook’s stock gained the most in a sin-
gle day Wednesday since it began trading in May, a sign that
the social media company’s complicated relationship with
Wall Street may be getting brighter.
It’s been a rough five months since the social network’s
initial public stock offering, and it’s too early to tell whether
investors’ optimism is here to stay. But on Wednesday they
latched on to clear signs of growth in the company’s third-
quarter earnings report. Several analysts upgraded the stock.
Besides posting quarterly results that inched past Wall
Street’s expectations, Facebook on Tuesday also gave details
for the first time on how much money it made from mobile
ads. This has been a concern since before its IPO. Although
the majority of 1 billion people who use Facebook each
month now access it using a mobile device, the 8-year-old
company was created in the age of desktop computers, for
Web pages. Facebook now calls itself a “mobile-first” com-
pany, but it only started showing mobile ads earlier this year.
Zynga posts 3Q loss, shares jump after-hours
NEW YORK — Battered shares of Zynga Inc. soared in
after-hours trading Wednesday after the social gaming com-
pany posted stronger-than-expected revenue for the third
quarter and said it will enter the gambling business.
The past few months have been tough for the company
known for games such as “FarmVille” and “Words With
Friends.” Interest in many of its Facebook games has waned,
and Zynga has had trouble making money from mobile
games. It laid off workers for the first time on Tuesday to cut
costs, and on Wednesday posted an outlook for the year that
fell short of analysts’ forecast.
As it had earlier warned, Zynga booked a loss in the July-
September quarter due largely to a charge marking down the
value of mobile game company OMGPop, which it acquired
in March for $183 million.
The company lost $52.7 million, or 7 cents per share.
That’s down from earnings of $12.5 million — break-even
on a per-share basis — from a year earlier, when it was still
privately held.
Business briefs
<< Players balk at arbitrator choice in bounty scandal, page 12
• Olympic wrestling legend dies, page 13
Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012
A QUARTERBACK’S WISH: RAIDERS’ QB CARSON PALMER WANTS MORE BALANCE ON OFFENSE >>> PAGE 12
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Fans Third Avenue Sports Bar and Grill inSanMateo celebrate the second of PabloSandoval’s three home runs during the Giants’8-3 win over
Detroit in Game 1 of the World Series.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In the 1980s and early ’90s, there was an
NBC sitcom called “Cheers,” a Boston bar run
by a former Red Sox pitcher “Where every-
body knows your name.”
The bartenders at Third Avenue Sports Bar
and Grill may not know everybody’s name,
but when San Francisco Giants playoffs
games come around, everyone is family.
“It’s great camaraderie (at the bar),” said
Sara Puliatch, a bartender/waitress at Third
Avenue Sports Bar and Grill. “Everyone (is)
having a good time.”
Puliatch said the bar has been very busy
since the playoffs began, adding that last
Thursday was especially busy with the
Giants-St. Louis Cardinals game as well as
the San Francisco 49ers-Seattle Seahawks
football game. Bay Area sports talk radio sta-
tion 95.7 The Game was also in attendance.
“The bar was three-people deep,” Puliatch
said.
All the seats in the establishment were all
but filled 20 minutes before the first pitch of
Game 1 of the World Series between the
Giants and the Detroit Tigers and the place
was standing-room only by the time the
national anthem was sung.
It didn’t take long for the place to become a
party. When Detroit’s Delmon Young ground-
ed into a fielder’s choice to end the top of the
first, the patrons gave a big round of applause.
It was nothing compared, however, to the
eruption that happened in the bottom of the
first when San Francisco’s Pablo Sandoval hit
the first of his three home runs on the night,
tying a World Series record.
San Mateo’s Mark Osier, a New York trans-
plant who grew up a Mets fan but who has
now adopted the Giants, said he has been at
Third Avenue a few times during the postsea-
son.
“I think I was here for three of them. I live
a couple blocks away so it’s a convenient way
to watch sports,” Osier said.
He said he would be just as satisfied watch-
ing the game at home with a few friends, but
the atmosphere of the bar during the World
Series trumps anything that can happen at
home.
“It’s a good atmosphere,” Osier said. “I can
have 30, 40 people cheering along with me.”
Since the Giants played so well, recording a
8-3 win over Detroit, the crowd stayed hyped
all game long. When Marco Scutaro was
thrown out at first on a close play moments
before Sandoval’s first home run, the crowd
released a collective groan.
It was soon replaced by an eruption of noise
and the slapping of high-fives as fans cele-
brated the Giants taking a 1-0 lead on a
Sandoval blast to right-center field. It would
be a recurring theme throughout the night as
Sandoval hit a pair of home runs off Detroit
ace Justin Verlander and added a third against
reliever Al Alburquerque.
“That first [homer] was a game changer,”
Osier said. “(It proved) Verlander is human.”
Let the good times roll
C
.J. Easter had it made. The former
three-sport standout at San Mateo
High was a recruited walk-on to
play football at Stanford University where
he eventually earned a degree in engineer-
ing. He had a job working for a technology
company and everything was good.
But Easter wanted more. In 2009, after
graduating from Stanford, he began what
would eventually evolve into Performance
Science Training
Institute (PSTI), an
athletic training
regime for kids and
adults.
“We ran our first
summer camp in
2009. At first, it was
just a side job. I also
worked 9 to 5,” Easter
said. “I was training
from 6 to 9 in the
morning, then work-
ing 9 to 5 and training
again after work. I
was having much more fun coaching peo-
ple.”
Since that first summer camp teaching
speed training to kids, Easter and PSTI has
grown to offer boot camp-style training ses-
sions in Burlingame, Foster City, Palo Alto,
Redwood City and San Carlos, as well as
semi-private training in Menlo Park.
Saturday, Easter and PSTI will be giving
back as it will sponsor the first annual
“Burpees for Boobies” breast cancer
fundraiser at Gunn High School in Palo Alto
Saturday. Easter said he was inspired to
raise money for breast cancer after one of
his clients was back training just six weeks
after a double mastectomy. Easter said the
doctor credited her swift recovery to not
only her positive attitude but also the way
she threw herself into her workouts.
“She calls herself a breast cancer
‘surthriver’ because she’s doesn’t want to
just survive but thrive,” Easter said. “She’s
the inspiration (for Burpees for Boobies).
She was a client (before being diagnosed)
Giving back
See LOUNGE, Page 14
See FANS, Page 14
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Golden State Warriors
coach Mark Jackson jokes that his family’s
financial future depends on it. General man-
ager Bob Myers turns to inspirational quotes
not to dwell on it, and fans and reporters
always question it.
For all the moves made
and money spent, Golden
State’s entire season is
resting on two surgically
repaired ankles recovering
— and staying at — full
strength through a gruel-
ing 82-game schedule.
Stephen Curry and
Andrew Bogut, a dazzling
guard-center combo if healthy, also form a
duo that has struggled to stay on the court
before it ever came together — and still hasn’t
really come together yet. Bogut didn’t play
during the preseason, and Curry sat out the
last two exhibitions after he sprained his right
ankle again.
Warriors’ hopes
rest on health
of Curry, Bogut
See WARRIORS, Page 13
Stephen Curry
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Barry Zito is playing
his part in this World Series, all right.
After years of being labeled baseball’s most
overpaid pitcher, Zito took the ball
Wednesday night and thoroughly outshined
reigning AL MVP and Cy Young Award win-
ner Justin Verlander to lead the San Francisco
Giants to an 8-3 victory over the Detroit
Tigers that sent the orange-crazed home fans
into a Zito-fueled frenzy.
Three home runs from Pablo Sandoval only
helped Zito’s cause in Game 1.
The left-hander watched
his teammates clinch the
World Series title two
years ago in Texas, never
playing a part on the field
that postseason. That was
all the motivation he need-
ed to revive his career in
his early 30s.
Now, he has the Giants
one win closer to another
championship after a dazzling World Series
debut. The left-hander has just about earned
his $126 million contract in a sensational span
of six days. A hefty chunk of it, anyway.
Last Friday night at Busch Stadium, Zito
pitched a season-saving 5-0 victory against St.
Louis and sent the Giants home trailing the
defending champion Cardinals 3-2 — and
they rallied again to reach a second World
Series in three years.
For anyone who doubted Zito could deliver
on the big October stage, while facing the
daunting task of dueling with Verlander, he
didn’t flinch once. And when two-time NL Cy
Young Award winner Tim Lincecum came out
of the bullpen to replace him in the sixth, Zito
ran off to a roaring standing ovation and
Zito shines in World Series debut
Barry Zito
See ZITO, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — As prolific as he’s been in his
career, Oakland’s Carson Palmer is on an
unparalleled pace for him.
Palmer is on track to join 2002 NFL MVP
Rich Gannon as the only quarterbacks in fran-
chise history to eclipse the 4,600-yard mark in
a single season. Gannon passed for 4,689 yards
during the ‘02 season when he led Oakland to
its first Super Bowl appearance in nearly two
decades.
That would be quite an accomplishment for
Palmer considering the Raiders receiving corps
has been banged up since training camp.
Oakland has also had issues with pass protec-
tion and the running game, making it easier for
defenses to concentrate on Palmer.
It’s also something he’d
almost rather not see hap-
pen.
“Yeah, because we want
to run the football,” Palmer
said Wednesday. “That’s
what we talk about, that’s
what we work on. The bet-
ter you run the football,
those yards might go up
and the pass attempts go
down.”
Palmer said the Raiders would be better off
being more balanced offensively.
That’s not happened so far. Not even close.
Oakland has been held to 120 yards rushing
or fewer in five of the first six games of the sea-
son. Much has been made about the zone
blocking schemes implemented by offensive
coordinator Greg Knapp but the Raiders also
added a handful of the gap-blocking plays that
running back Darren McFadden had success
running in 2011. The results continue to be
mostly disappointing.
Even though Palmer has thrown for 1,732
yards — 11th in the NFL — and has his high-
est passer rating (86.0) since 2007, the numbers
haven’t translated into many wins.
The Raiders (2-4) are coming off a 26-23
overtime victory against lowly Jacksonville, a
game in which Oakland’s offense was dreadful
before Palmer led four scoring drives after half-
time.
It was the second time this season Palmer,
32, rallied the Raiders after they trailed heading
into the fourth quarter.
That’s one of the reasons Oakland coach
Dennis Allen isn’t making too big a deal about
Palmer’s passing numbers.
“I want to win, whatever it takes to win foot-
ball games,” Allen said. “If it’s throwing it 50
times a game, we’ll do that. If it’s running it 50
times a game, we’ll do that. Whatever the game
dictates for us to have a chance at winning the
football game, that’s what we’re going to do.”
Overall, the Raiders rank ninth in passing
and 31st in rushing heading into Sunday’s
game in Kansas City.
A more balanced attack would improve
Oakland’s passing game even if it meant fewer
throws by Palmer.
“I don’t have a crystal ball, but the more you
run the football the more defenses have to
focus on it,” Palmer said. “That’s when you get
your opportunity to really throw the ball down
the field on the nakeds and the keepers and
those long play-actions.”
Palmer wants Raiders to be more balanced
Carson Palmer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The players’ union and the four players sus-
pended in the Saints’ bounties case filed motions
Wednesday to have former NFL Commissioner
Paul Tagliabue removed from hearing their
appeals.
They asked in U.S. District Court in New
Orleans that Tagliabue recuse himself because of
a conflict of interest, and also asked for a neutral
arbitrator to be appointed by the court.
The NFL said it would oppose Tagliabue step-
ping aside.
Commissioner Roger Goodell removed him-
self from hearing this set of appeals and appoint-
ed his predecessor last week. But the players and
their union contend Tagliabue should be disqual-
ified because of his employment by a law firm
that has handled bounty-related matters for the
league and represented Goodell in Saints line-
backer Jonathan Vilma’s defamation lawsuit
against him.
The hearings are scheduled for next Tuesday,
subject to any court rulings.
The players association has concerns about
“ethical and legal” issues involving Tagliabue
hearing appeals by Vilma and defensive end Will
Smith, Browns linebacker Scott Fujita and free-
agent defensive end Anthony Hargrove.
Fujita, meanwhile, will be placed on injured
reserve later this week by Cleveland and will miss
the rest of the season. His suspension originally
was three games, then was reduced to one by
Goodell after a first set of player appeals.
Vilma was suspended for the entire season, but
played last Sunday while the appeals process is in
motion. Smith has a four-game suspension and
Hargrove got eight games, subsequently reduced
to seven. But he was cut in preseason by Green
Bay and does not have a team.
The union also contends that such “pay-for
programs” existed when Tagliabue was commis-
sioner, with his knowledge.
“We have advised the union that we believe
there is no basis on which former Commissioner
Tagliabue should recuse himself and we will
oppose any request that he do so,” NFL
spokesman Greg Aiello said in an email. “The
appointment is consistent with the CBA and past
practice, and there is no question that
Commissioner Tagliabue is fully qualified to hear
these appeals.”
Last week, the NFL and the union discussed
the possibility that Tagliabue would step in if
Goodell recused himself from hearing the
appeals, and the union also suggested “several
outsiders” who could be used in place of Goodell.
After Tagliabue was chosen by Goodell, Vilma
said:
“I think it’s a good first step for Paul to be the
neutral arbitrator. We expect that he is going to do
things in a neutral capacity, which would be to
allow us to cross-examine some of the witnesses,
allow us to see more of the evidence — if there is
more evidence — and be able to have a fair hear-
ing.”
Players oppose Tagliabue
hearing bounty appeals
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
There are no playoff predications from
Jackson heading into his second year. No
scintillating sound bites from the former
broadcaster and point guard, either. Just the
promise that if the franchise’s futility doesn’t
turn around soon, aggressive owners Joe
Lacob and Peter Guber could make more
changes next summer.
“I don’t care who I’m coaching, the pres-
sure’s always going to be to win and do the
job,” Jackson said. “Certainly we have a bet-
ter basketball team and I think there’s added
pressure across the board. I don’t run from it,
I embrace it.”
Myers, the former sports agent promoted
from assistant general manager at the end of
last season, said the roster he helped assemble
is “good on paper.”
The true test of the season, though, will not
be looks.
It will be durability.
Curry, one of the NBA’s best shooters when
healthy, missed 40 of 66 games last season
and has had repeated problems with the ankle
throughout his career. The former Davidson
star had arthroscopic surgery in April and had
surgery to repair a tendon in the ankle in the
summer of 2011.
The fourth-year point guard is eligible for
an extension with the team until Oct. 30 — the
night before the season opener at Phoenix —
or he will become a free agent next summer.
Myers has said the team plans to pick up
Curry’s extension by the deadline, though that
was before Curry sprained his ankle again in
Golden State’s 101-97 preseason win at
Portland last Friday night.
The Warriors also said Bogut is on schedule
and has not had any setbacks on his surgically
repaired left ankle, which he fractured on Jan.
25 while with Milwaukee and missed the rest
of the season. He came to Golden State in a
trade for guard Monta Ellis, among others.
Bogut had hoped to return for the season
opener, but the team has not set any deadline,
and even if the 7-footer from Australia played
it likely won’t be for extended minutes.
“It is frustrating and it does play on me a lit-
tle bit. But at the same time, I look back at the
injuries that I’ve had and that could happen to
anybody,” said Bogut, the 2005 No. 1 overall
pick. “I can’t control landing on somebody’s
foot, and I can’t control coming off the rim.”
The Bogut-Curry combo, if healthy, has
solid support around it.
Power forward David Lee, who has aver-
aged close to a double-double most of his
career, will start along second-year shooting
guard Klay Thompson and either Brandon
Rush or seventh overall pick Harrison Barnes
of North Carolina at small forward. Golden
State is deeper than in recent years, too, with
Jarrett Jack, Carl Landry and Richard
Jefferson complementing rookies Draymond
Green and Festus Ezeli, who both impressed
enough during the preseason to be considered
rotation players.
Jackson has had more time to prepare this
season than last, when the labor lockout elim-
inated most of the offseason and training
camp and limited practices during the
crammed 66-game schedule. Injuries also
decimated the roster, which has been quickly
reconstructed under Myers, and that has all
involved more optimistic than anything after
going 23-43 last season.
“There’s a lot of excitement in here,” said
Curry, who expects to start opening night.
“The roster is deeper and we have a little bit
more experience than we did last year.
Hopefully we can get the season off on the
right foot.”
The fear is still health.
Myers often flips to his phone for inspira-
tional quotes to keep him focused and moti-
vated. He admits he thinks about his stars’
sturdiness “often,” then thinks backs to one of
his favorite phrases by writer Ralph Waldo
Emerson that starts: “Don’t waste life in
doubts and fears.”
Jackson always has tried to concentrate
more on the players who are healthy than the
ones who aren’t. But looking at his roster, he
also knows Curry and Bogut are the key to
Golden State’s success — and perhaps his
own future.
Jackson said the reason he made the bold
playoff prediction when he was hired last year
was to “change the culture” of a losing fran-
chise that, despite only making the playoffs
once since 1994, is consistently among the
NBA’s top-10 in attendance and whose fans
are among the most vocal in the sports satu-
rated Bay Area. He said the team’s mindset
has changed and there is no need for words
anymore.
“Ultimately it comes to a point where,
enough of the talking,” Jackson said. “Go out
and do it.”
Continued from page 11
WARRIORS
offered a quick tip of his cap before disap-
pearing into the dugout.
During his 2012 transformation back to reli-
able starter, the 33-year-old Zito never wanted
the focus to be on him or how he’s accom-
plished this remarkable comeback but rather
what he could add to make the Giants a win-
ner and playoff contender again. And, possi-
bly, win another World Series ring along the
way.
Nobody is questioning Zito’s talents now.
His line of one run on six hits, three strikeouts
and a walk in 5 2-3 innings was hardly spec-
tacular — but it rarely is. Zito is doing just
what manager Bruce Bochy asks of him: giv-
ing the Giants a chance to win.
Zito even added an RBI single in the fourth,
following up his bunt base hit in Friday’s win,
as Giants starting pitchers drove in a run for
the fourth straight game.
This is the ultimate win for Zito, years in
the making. Not that he will say it quite that
way. That’s not how he operates.
When Zito was told he wasn’t going to be
on the postseason roster in 2010, in one of
manager Bruce Bochy’s toughest conversa-
tions with a player, the pitcher immediately
went to work. He threw a bullpen session, he
kept himself ready if needed — but never got
the chance. It hurt to the core, even if he never
said it.
He tried different deliveries and pitching
motions, he added a cutter to his repertoire to
give him four solid pitches to keep hitters
guessing.
In front of a sellout crowd at AT&T Park on
this night, he pitched first to chants of “Barry!
Barry!” and later to hollers of “Zito! Zito!”
Who could have seen this memorable World
Series moment coming for Zito, only two
years after all the boos, from every direction,
in his home ballpark?
The Giants have won Zito’s last 14 starts,
and he hasn’t lost since Aug. 2 against the
Mets. Zito went 15-8 this season for his most
victories since joining the Giants
“They score runs for him,” general manager
Brian Sabean said, “in very odd ways.”
With the Giants, Zito has never been the
dominant pitcher he had been across the bay
as a member of Oakland’s Big Three with Tim
Hudson and Mark Mulder. Fans quickly gave
up hope of Zito turning things around when he
went 43-61 over his first five seasons with the
Giants.
In a strange turn of roles, it was Lincecum
— who pitched the Game 5 World Series
clincher against the Rangers in 2010 — who
came in for Zito. Lincecum credits the veter-
an lefty for showing him how to better handle
the struggles, like this season when The Freak
fell into a long funk.
Lincecum came through, too. He pitched 2
1-3 scoreless innings of relief with five strike-
outs.
Lincecum’s outing marked the first time one
Cy Young Award winner relieved another in
the World Series since Baltimore’s Jim Palmer
came in for Mike Flanagan in 1983 against the
Philadelphia Phillies, according to STATS
LLC.
Zito and Lincecum certainly will share a
hug or a handshake after this one.
“He’s a lot tougher than people think and
he’s got a lot of pride and respect for the
game,” Sabean said of Zito. “He really want-
ed to be out there.”
Continued from page 11
ZITO
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. — Jeff Blatnick, who
overcame cancer to win a gold medal in Greco-
Roman wrestling at the 1984 Summer Olympics
and went on to a career as a sports commentator
and motivational speaker, died Wednesday in New
York state at age 55.
Officials at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, N.Y.,
said he died there of heart failure.
Blatnick was a high school state champion in
suburban Albany in the mid-1970s and was a two-
time Division II National champion and three-
time Division II All-American at Springfield
College in Massachusetts.
He qualified for the U.S. Olympic team and was
a member of the 1980 squad that didn’t compete
because the U.S. boycotted that year’s games in
Moscow.
In 1982, he was diagnosed with Hodgkin lym-
phoma. He was treated and the disease went into
remission before he won the gold as a super
heavyweight in Los Angeles in 1984.
Blatnick was also a three-time Greco-Roman
national champion and won eight Greco-Roman
All-American awards, two World Cup medals and
two Freestyle All-American honors.
USA Wrestling National Greco-Roman Coach
Steve Fraser also won a gold medal at the 1984
games as a teammate of Blatnick. Fraser and
Blatnick were the first two U.S. Greco-Roman
wrestlers to ever win gold medals.
“I am devastated that Jeff Blatnick, who was a
great Greco-Roman champion, has passed away,”
Fraser said. “I am stunned by it.”
Fraser talked to Blatnick a few weeks ago about
working to promote Greco-Roman wrestling.
“I am heartbroken,” he said. “He has done so
much for the sport as an athlete, an announcer, a
leader and a spokesman.”
Jeff Blatnick, 1984 gold medal wrestler, dies
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
While Osier may be new to the Giants’
bandwagon, Gabe Garcia is a lifelong Giants
fan. In fact, Garcia has developed a ritual this
postseason, along with his friends Mike and
Basima, that encompasses a few watering
holes around the Peninsula. He said he starts
his pre-game routine at Bucky’s in San Mateo
before heading over to Third Avenue for a few
drinks and some food.
But he doesn’t spend the entire game at
Third Avenue. After four innings, he excuses
himself and heads to Newall’s Lounge in San
Bruno to finish up the game.
“I have a pretty good track record (doing
this),” Garcia said.
Garcia was pretty positive the Giants had a
chance to get to Verlander in Game 1, consid-
ering the Tigers were coming off nearly a
week of not playing meaningful games.
“Any sport, you get too much time off, any-
thing can happen,” Garcia said. “Zito’s record
against the [American League]? I like it.”
As the game moved along, it’s surprising
how so many people become baseball experts.
Whether discussing Verlander’s pitch count, a
surprising visit to the mound by the Detroit
pitching coach or a gentleman in his late 40s
or early 50s telling a young couple about the
vagaries of the splitter and the circle change-
up, everyone had an opinion on something.
The Giants, meanwhile, kept making plays.
Another huge roar rose from the crowd when
San Francisco left fielder Gregor Blanco made
a sliding catch of a Miguel Cabrera dying fly
ball. When Scutaro had yet another base hit to
drive in a run in the bottom of the third, the
crowd went wild again, with chants of “MVP!
MVP!” rising from the gathering.
When Sandoval hit his second home run off
Verlander, the place went absolutely nuts.
“Not the same as watching with a few
friends in the apartment, is it?” Osier cried
amid the din.
The icing on the cake was a Barry Zito RBI
single in the bottom of the fourth inning,
which gave the Giants a 4-0 lead, the crowd
quickly erupted with a chant of “Zito! Zito!
Zito!” And when he was lifted for a reliever
with two outs in the top of the sixth innings,
the “Zito” chants started anew.
Sandoval’s third homer of the game in the
bottom of the fifth had everyone in amaze-
ment, but it didn’t quiet the crowd as more
high-fives and celebration ensued.
The Giants tacked on two more runs in the
bottom of the seventh to give them an 8-1 lead
and everyone was already looking toward
Game 2.
While happy with the win, there was one
voice of reason among the noise, Third
Avenue owner John Chin.
“I don’t like it when they run up the score,”
Chin said, intimating he’d rather have the
Giants save some of those runs for Game 2.
For most of the fans, however, Game 1 of
the 2012 World Series was a time of celebra-
tion. They’ll fret over Game 2 tonight.
Continued from page 11
FANS
and was one of our original clients. … When
she came back (from her surgery), she wasn’t
just going through the motions. I decided to
work out with her and she was pushing me. …
That just shows her fight and her attitude.”
“Burpees for Boobies” consists of a two-
mile run along with various checkpoints in
which runners will then do a series of burpees
— also known as up-downs or squat thrusts.
By the end of the course, participants will
have run two miles and done 100 burpees. In
addition, PSTI is offering an opportunity to
“Beat up a Trainer.” For $25, participants can
“train” one of the PSTI trainers for a minute
— making them do any set of exercises the
donor chooses. For $100, donors can train the
trainer for five minutes.
Easter said he is hoping to raise $2,000 and
is halfway to his goal. He expects as more
people sign up, the money raised will increase
as well. “Burpees for Boobies” is scheduled to
begin at 9 a.m. and costs $40, all of which
goes to the American Cancer Society.
Participants will get a “Burpees for Boobies”
T-shirt and a chance to win $100. People can
sign up at www.thepsti.com/burpees-for-boo-
bies. People can also sign up on the day of the
event at Gunn High, where Easter is also
assistant coach for the Titans’ football team.
“I knew I would be starting my own compa-
ny because I always envisioned it, but I envi-
sioned it more in technology. I just enjoy
coaching, whether it’s coaching athletes (or)
coaching adults to lose weight. And I don’t
have to sit at desk,” Easter said. “It just start-
ed as summer camp. … After I started work-
ing with the kids, the parents started knocking
on the door, ‘What can you do for me?’
“We, as a company, try to do some kind of
fundraiser quarterly. … Breast cancer is defi-
nitely a major concern. This (Burpees for
Boobies) is the first of, hopefully, many (can-
cer fundraisers).”
For more information about the training
regimes offered by PSTI, go to
www.thepsti.com.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
By Ira Podell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — NHL Commissioner Gary
Bettman says it looks as if a full-82 game
schedule “is not going to be a reality,” as the
lockout nears its seventh week.
Speaking at a news conference Wednesday
announcing the New York Islanders’ move
from Nassau Coliseum to Brooklyn’s
Barclays Center in 2015, Bettman seemed
resigned to looking at a shortened season with
the NHL and the players’ association still at
odds after months of negotiations.
Bettman stated, in making the NHL’s most
recent offer, that a deal needed to be in place
by Thursday for the season to begin Nov. 2
and allow for each team to play a full 82-game
slate. With no negotiations scheduled, reach-
ing a deal in one day appears very unlikely.
“The fact of the matter is there are just
sometimes that you need to take time off
because it’s clear that you can’t do anything to
move the process forward,” Bettman said.
“We’re at one of those points right now
because we gave our very best offer. That
offer, for better or for worse, was contingent
on playing an 82-game season. So I think
things actually in some respects may get more
difficult.”
The players’ association reached out to the
NHL on Tuesday night in an attempt to set up
a face-to-face bargaining session Wednesday,
but the league declined. The NHL’s position is
if the union isn’t willing to talk about the
league’s offer that is on the table and isn’t pre-
pared to make a new proposal of its own riff-
ing off that offer, there is no reason to talk.
“There seems to be no interest in making
any sort of deal along the lines of what we
have expressed a desire and a need for,”
Bettman said. “Sometimes in collective bar-
gaining you have to take a deep breath before
you can move forward.”
NHL commissioner says full season ’not going to be reality’
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ELITE Volleyball Club
Reach your potential with our girls volleyball program
*Check our web site for more information
Pre Tryout Clinic
Sunday, October 28
5 pm to 8 pm
Tryouts November 3
8 am to 4 pm*
Youth Program
ages 7 and up
Register:
www.elitevolleyballclub.net
brian@elitevolleyballclub.net
888-616-6349
Peninsula
Jewish
Community
Center (PJCC)
THURSDAY
GIRLS’TENNIS
Valley Christian at Notre Dame-Belmont, King’s
Academy at Mercy-Burlingame, Menlo School at
Crystal Springs, Pinewood at Sacred Heart Prep,
3:30 p.m.
PAL teamtournament
Finals
No. 3 Aragon at No. 1 Menlo-Atherton, 3:30 p.m.
GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL
Burlingame vs. Mills at Peninsula High, San Mateo
at Carlmont, Hillsdale at Terra Nova, Menlo-Ather-
ton at Aragon, Westmoor at Half Moon Bay,
Jefferson at South City, Sequoia at Capuchino, El
Camino at Woodside, 5:15 p.m.; Notre Dame-SJ at
Sacred Heart Prep, Menlo School at Mercy-SF, 5:45
p.m.; Sacred Heart Cathedral at Notre Dame-Bel-
mont, 6:30 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
End
Regular
Season
Playoffs
TBA
vs.Miami
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/9
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
@Rams
10 a.m.
FOX
12/2
vs.Bears
5:00p.m.
ESPN
11/19
@Saints
1:20p.m.
FOX
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/11
Bye
vs.Broncos
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
12/6
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
vs.Browns
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/2
vs.Tampa
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/4
@Ravens
10a.m.
CBS
11/11
vs.Saints
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/18
@Bengals
10a.m.
CBS
11/25
vs.Detroit
5:07p.m.
FOX
Oct. 25
@Detroit
5:07p.m.
FOX
Oct. 27
@Detroit
5:07p.m.
FOX
Oct. 28
@Detroit
5:07p.m.
if necessary
Oct. 29
vs. Detroit
5:07p.m.
if necessary
Oct. 31
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 4 3 0 .571 217 163
Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 117
N.Y. Jets 3 4 0 .429 159 170
Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 171 227
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 6 1 0 .857 216 128
Indianapolis 3 3 0 .500 117 158
Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 149 238
Jacksonville 1 5 0 .167 88 164
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 5 2 0 .714 174 161
Pittsburgh 3 3 0 .500 140 132
Cincinnati 3 4 0 .429 166 187
Cleveland 1 6 0 .143 147 180
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 3 3 0 .500 170 138
San Diego 3 3 0 .500 148 137
Oakland 2 4 0 .333 113 171
Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104 183
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 5 2 0 .714 205 137
Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125
Dallas 3 3 0 .500 113 133
Washington 3 4 0 .429 201 200
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113
New Orleans 2 4 0 .333 176 182
Tampa Bay 2 4 0 .333 148 136
Carolina 1 5 0 .167 106 144
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71
Minnesota 5 2 0 .714 167 131
Green Bay 4 3 0 .571 184 155
Detroit 2 3 0 .400 126 137
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 5 2 0 .714 165 100
Arizona 4 3 0 .571 124 118
Seattle 4 3 0 .571 116 106
St. Louis 3 4 0 .429 130 141
Thursday’sGame
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 28
Jacksonville at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Carolina at Chicago, 10 a.m.
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Seattle at Detroit, 10 a.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
New England vs. St. Louis at London, 10 a.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 1:25 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
BOYS’WATERPOLO
MenloSchool 20, Woodside4
MenloSchool 7580—20
Woodside2200— 4
Menlo goal scorers — Rosales 5; Xi 4; Katsis 3;
Carlisle, Avery 2; Wilson; d’Alencon, Rozenfeld, Ho.
Menlo goaltender saves — Lazar 11; Witte 4.
Records — Menlo School 3-1 PAL Bay, 12-10 over-
all.
GIRLS’WATERPOLO
St. Francis 6, SacredHeart Prep3
SacredHeart Prep0210— 3
St. Francis 1041— 6
SHP goal scorers — Stuewe 2; McCracken. SHP
goaltender saves — Moran 12.Records — Sacred
Heart Prep 5-1 WCAL, 15-5 overall.
Castilleja13, Sequoia7
Castilleja5503—13
Sequoia3112— 7
Goal scorers: S — Kervick 3; E. Payton 2; Chatelain,
S. Peyton. C — Molano 4; Flamen 3; Yu 2; Chung,
Kramer. Records — Sequoia 1-4 PAL Bay, 6-5 over-
all.
GIRLS’ GOLF
WBALchampionships
At Poplar CreekG.C., par 71
Castilleja 430; Harker 464; Sacred Heart Prep 490;
Menlo School 502.
Top10:1) Lin(Harker) 73;2)Wiss(Mercy-SJ);3) Beers
(Pinewood) 77; Huang (Harker) 79; T5) Sales
(Castilleja),Rong(Menlo) 80;7)Wilkerson(Castilleja)
81;T8) Park (Crystal Springs),Mitchell (Castilleja) 84;
10) Broderick (Menlo) 86.
GIRLS’TENNIS
Aragon4, Burlingame3
SINGLES— Ishikawa(A) d.Harrigan6-0,6-3;L.SIna-
tra (B) d. Kim 6-1, 6-0; N. Somers (B) d. Kuo 7-5, 6-3;
S. Sinatra (B) d. de Sauvage 6-2, 6-2. DOUBLES —
Ma-SUn (A) d. Murphy-Hu 6-1, 6-3; Wong-Oka (A)
d. Patel-Lange 6-1, 6-4; Ngirchmat-Nasser (A) d. M.
Somers-Kotmel 6-1, 5-7, 6-1.
COLLEGE
WOMEN’SWATERPOLO
CSM10, Cabrillo4
CSM3331— 10
Cabrillo2020— 4
CSM goal scorers — Staben 5; Oto,Zaldivar 2; Car-
ranza. CSM goaltender saves — Kekuewa 14.
Records — CSM 5-2 Coast Conference, 16-6 over-
all.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
NFL
BALTIMORERAVENS—ReleasedCBJordanMabin
from the practice squad. Signed LB Sergio Kindle
to the practice squad.
CAROLINAPANTHERS—Placed LB Jon Beason on
injured reserve. Claimed CB James Dockery off
waivers from Cleveland and LB Doug Hogue off
waivers from Detroit.
DALLAS COWBOYS—Placed LB Sean Lee and P
ChrisJonesoninjuredreserve.SignedLBErnieSims.
Released WR Raymond Radway from the practice
squad.
DETROITLIONS—Placed WR Nate Burleson on in-
jured reserve and DB Lionel Smith on the practice
squad/injuredlist.SignedWRBrianRobiskie.Signed
WR Kendrick Adams to the practice squad.
GREENBAYPACKERS—Signed G Justin Cheadle
and RB DuJuan Harris to the practice squad.Placed
WR Diondre Borel on the practice squad/injured
list.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Signed LB Monte
Williams to the practice squad.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Released DE Ryan
Davis. Signed RB Keith Toston.
MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed FB Dominique Jones
to the practice squad.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Released T Steve Val-
los. Signed G Matt Tennant.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Released LB Joe Hol-
land from the practice squad.
TENNESSEE TITANS—Signed LB Xavier Adibi.
Placed LB Zac Diles on injured reserve.Released WR
Vidal Hazelton from the practice squad.
NBA
CHICAGO BULLS—Waived G Ryan Allen and G
Marko Jaric.
MILWAUKEE BUCKS—Exercised their third-year
option on F Tobias Harris and fourth-year options
on F Larry Sanders and F Ekpe Udoh.
PHOENIX SUNS—Waived F Ike Diogu and F/C
Solomon Jones.
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
KANSASCITYROYALS—Named Jack Maloof hit-
ting coach and Andre David assistant hitting coach.
MINNESOTATWINS—AssignedRHPJeff Manship,
RHP Luis Perdomo, RHP Esmerling Vasquez, RHP
Kyle Waldrop, RHP P.J. Walters and OF Matt Carson
outright off the 40-man roster.Reinstated RHP Carl
Pavano and RHP Scott Baker from the 60-day DL.
SEATTLEMARINERS—Declined their 2013 option
onCMiguel Olivo.ReleasedINFMunenori Kawasaki.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Designated RHP Tyson
Brummett for assignment.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS—Claimed RHP Carlos Gutierrez
off waivers from Minnesota.Designated C Anthony
Recker for assignment.
PHILADELPHIAPHILLIES—Assigned SS Michael
Martinez outright to Lehigh Valley (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Activated SS Ryan Jack-
son, RHP Jake Westbrook, RHP Victor Marte, LHP
Sam Freeman, LHP Jaime Garcia, C Steven Hill, 1B
Lance Berkman and C Bryan Anderson. Recalled
RHP Eduardo Sanchez,RHP Maikel Cleto,RHP Bran-
donDickson,LHPBarret Browning,RHPAdamReifer
and 1B Matt Adams from Memphis (PCL).
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — The
new-look Penn State Nittany Lions are
getting quite adept at proving skeptics
wrong.
Most of them stuck it out this sum-
mer after the NCAA announced sanc-
tions so severe, some college football
observers opined the program was bet-
ter off with the so-called “death penal-
ty.” About 10 players transferred
before preseason practice. Then, an 0-
2 start had even the die-hard fans won-
dering if a feared post-sanctions dry
spell had arrived early in Happy
Valley.
Not even close.
Penn State football is making head-
lines again —for what’s happening on
the field. A five-game winning streak
sparked by a fun, unpredictable
offense and trademark Linebacker U.
defense has propelled the Nittany
Lions (5-2, 3-0 Big Ten) into the
Leaders Division title race headed into
the Saturday evening tilt against
unbeaten No. 9 Ohio State (8-0, 4-0).
Both schools might be ineligible for
the overall Big Ten championship
because of sanctions, so Saturday
night’s game has extra juice as a virtu-
al midseason bowl game in Happy
Valley.
“These are the kinds of games you
dream of playing ... but we also feel
that we worked to get here,” running
back and senior leader Michael
Zordich said. “We’ve earned this spot.”
Perhaps no other team in the history
of college football has had to endure
the kind of adversity that has swirled
around the Nittany Lions the past year.
Surging Penn
State proving
skeptics wrong
16
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS/LOCAL
Paradise Valley site, was easy.
“We picked the obvious staff person; the
one who wears Giants gear every day,” said
Dolan.
Davalos was really hoping the Giants would
make the World Series.
“I was cheering like every fan but deep
down I knew there was something else I was
cheering for. A chance for me to experience a
once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. When Scutaro
caught that ball, not only did their dreams
come true, mine did too,” Davalos said in a
press release.
Fong was also a standout. Fong, a 16-year-
old junior at South San Francisco High
School, was really happy to be chosen to par-
ticipate. She’s also a bit nervous to be in front
of such a large crowd. It’s also her first trip to
the World Series.
She started volunteering over the summer
after her brother spent time helping at a differ-
ent location. Fong was a counselor in training
at the summer camp and was hired this fall as
a teen staff person. While she’s hired to help
about eight hours a week, Dolan said Fong
often spends far more hours volunteering her
time. When not helping at the Boys and Girls
Club, Fong plays softball and a variety of
musical instruments.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
PITCH
of the measure, and in fact a co-chair of the
coalition fighting the change, but said that
stance has no connection to his office’s push for
a Fairbank’s execution date.
“It seems logical that people would think that
but it’s not true. It’s just time to keep this case
moving and follow through on the jury’s ver-
dict,” Wagstaffe said.
Fairbank, now 58, was sentenced to death for
the Dec. 12, 1985 attempted sexual assault and
murder of San Francisco resident Wendy
Cheek, a graduate student. Cheek’s partially
burned body was found near Hillsborough off
Highway 280. Cheek had been stabbed repeat-
edly with a barbecue fork, knife and screwdriv-
er before being set on fire. Two days into his
1989 trial, Fairbank, already a convicted felon,
pleaded no contest.
Wagstaffe said Fairbank’s legal options to
stave off the imposed punishment have run out.
Regardless of whether his office prevailed in the
request for a date, Wagstaffe said he is obligat-
ed to keep the case on track because his case no
longer merits further appeal.
The last San Mateo County resident sen-
tenced to death was Alberto Alvarez for the
2006 murder of East Palo Alto police Officer
Richard May.
The last San Mateo County inmate executed
was Donald Beardslee in January 2005 for the
1981 double murder of Patty Geddling and
Stacey Benjamin
Continued from page 1
DELAY
launched a two-run drive in the third. Sandoval
reprised his power show from this year’s All-
Star game, when his bases-loaded triple high-
lighted a five-run first inning against Verlander.
And if there was any doubt that Verlander
was shaky, the best sign came in the fourth.
That’s when pitcher Barry Zito, a career .099
hitter, sliced an RBI single with two outs off the
current AL MVP for a 6-0 lead.
The festive crowd stood and applauded when
it was announced that Verlander was being
pulled for a pinch hitter in the fifth. Sandoval
gave them another reason to get up moments
later when he hit a solo homer off reliever Al
Alburquerque in the fifth, answering the cheers
by waving his batting helmet in a curtain call.
Pujols homered three times last year, Jackson
accomplished the feat in 1977 and Ruth did it
in 1926 and again in 1928.
For good measure, Sandoval lined a single
his last time up.
From start to finish, it was basically a perfect
game by the Giants. Coming off a Game 7 win
over St. Louis on Monday night, they looked
totally fresh.
Zito shut out the Tigers until Triple Crown
winner Miguel Cabrera hit an RBI single in the
sixth, and Tim Lincecum came out of the
bullpen to prevent further damage.
NL championship series MVP Marco
Scutaro hit RBI singles after doubles by Angel
Pagan. NL batting champion Buster Posey con-
tributed two hits and left fielder Gregor Blanco
made diving catches to rob Cabrera and Prince
Fielder.
Game 2 is Thursday night, with Doug Fister
starting for the Tigers against Madison
Bumgarner.
The Tigers seemed out of sync in their first
game following a five-game layoff. That was an
issue in 2006, too, when Verlander and his
teammates had nearly a week off before getting
wiped out by the Cardinals.
ALCS MVP Delmon Young failed to run
after a tapper in front of the plate that the
Giants turned into a double play. The Giants,
meanwhile, kept getting good bounces, with
Pagan hitting a double that hopped off the
third-base bag.
Pitching in San Francisco for the first time
since 2008, Verlander scuffed at the rubber
while warming up for the first inning, pulled off
his glove after badly overthrowing a curve and
kept taking deep breaths. He hardly resembled
the guy who was 3-0 with an 0.74 ERA in three
playoff starts this year.
Ever since two poor outings in the 2006
Series against St. Louis — punctuated by two
throwing errors — Verlander has worked hard
to harness his emotions and 100 mph in the
early going.
Verlander was trying to settle in when
Sandoval tagged him, pouncing on an 0-2 fast-
ball and lining it into the front row over the
center-field wall. Quite a start for the team that
finished last in the majors in home runs.
Get this: It was the first three-homer game at
the stadium originally known as Pac Bell Park
since the very first one, when Kevin Elster did
it for the Dodgers in 2000. Nope, not even
home run king Barry Bonds had done this.
It was certainly a moment of retribution of
Sandoval. He was benched during the 2010
World Series, his production and confidence
down, his weight up. In the stands on this night,
fans wearing furry panda hats celebrated with
him.
Verlander got into trouble again the third,
and pitching coach Jeff Jones strolled to the
mound when the count went to 2-0 on
Sandoval. Verlander stared at Jones and shook
his head. On the next pitch, Verlander could do
little but watch the ball sail into the front row in
left.
To some, this looked somewhat similar to the
2010 Series opener. That day, the Giants beat
up the supposedly unhittable Cliff Lee on their
way to a five-game romp over Texas.
This how got it bad for the Tigers: Former
closer Jose Valverde made his first appearance
in 11 days. Leyland still isn’t what he’ll get
from the struggling reliever.
Lincecum, meanwhile, retired seven straight
batters and struck out five of them. The two-
time Cy Young winner has embraced his new
role in the bullpen.
Jhonny Peralta hit a two-run homer for the
Tigers in the ninth off mop-up reliever George
Kontos.
NOTES: Tampa Bay’s Desmond Jennings
was the only other player this year to homer
twice in a game off Verlander. ... Willie Mays
and fellow Giants Hall of Famers Willie
McCovey, Orlando Cepeda and Gaylord Perry
took part in the first-ball ceremony. ... Tigers
great Al Kaline, now a team executive, watched
Detroit take batting practice from behind the
cage. ... The Game 1 winner has won eight of
the last nine championships. ... Cabrera and
Posey marked the first set of batting champs to
face each other in the World Series since 1954
when it was Mays of the New York Giants and
Bobby Avila of Cleveland. When Cabrera
walked on a close full-count pitch, he playfully
patted the Giants’ All-Star catcher on his way
to first base.
Continued from page 1
GIANTS
REUTES
Giants center fielder Angel Pagan, right, celebrates with teammates Brandon Crawford, left,
and Hunter Pence after they defeated the Detroit Tigers in Game 1 of the MLB World Series.
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
I used to think spring was the
busiest time of year in the garden,
but after reviewing my list of fall
chores I am not so sure any more.
I prefer a well-kept garden, opt-
ing to keep up with work as it needs
doing rather than letting it pile up
for one big assault. Experienced
gardeners know that gardening is
all about timing. I try to think about
what my garden will look like one
or two months into the future: what
the weather will be like, how I want
the garden to look and what will be
growing, blooming or dying back at
that time.
This strategy helps me keep up
with gardening chores and keeps
my rather large garden from
becoming overwhelming.
Now that the growing season has
pretty much come to a close, I am
thinking ahead to winter and to next
spring. Completing work now with
the future of the garden in mind
will make less work for me when
those seasons arrive.
Here is a sampling of chores that
may help you plan in your own gar-
den.
• Cut yellowing perennials back
to the crown so they have time to
establish basal growth prior to win-
ter. This practice is beneficial to
many garden perennials, and makes
spring clean up much easier.
• Take soil samples from your
vegetable garden and send off to
your local county agricultural agent
for testing. Prepping your soil now
for deficiencies will pay dividends
in next season’s bounty.
• Place netting over ponds and
water features to keep out blowing
leaves. This will not only save you
time during future cleaning, it will
also keep pumps and filters work-
ing as they should.
• Order spring bulbs while there
is still time to plant them, and plant
them as soon as they arrive.
Planting bulbs prior to cutting back
annuals and perennials allows you
to place them in spots where they
will be the most visible — rather
than guessing. If you have already
cut things back before your bulbs
arrive, place markers in the ground
where you have space for bulbs to
grow.
• Check gutters to make sure
they are clean. It is surprising how
much gunk builds up in gutters and
how quickly. Cleaning them now
while the weather is mild is much
better than cleaning them later
when the weather takes a turn for
the worse.
• Divide and transplant perenni-
als that have grown too big or too
crowded. Cut back the plants before
dividing to make the task easier. Let
your friends know your plans ahead
of time and you will have a waiting
list of willing takers for extra plants
you don’t have room for. Good gar-
dening friends will happily recipro-
cate with extras of their own!
• Top dress garden beds with fin-
ished compost. Conditioning soil in
the fall is easier once beds are cut
back and clear. Adding compost in
the fall allows time for the compost
to work into the soil prior to plant-
ing next spring.
• Begin new compost piles with
fall cleanup refuse.
• Collect and save seed from
favorite plants and vegetables. I
save the seeds from my heirloom
tomatoes every fall by collecting
them from tomatoes that ripen
faster than I can eat them;
inevitably, my heirlooms ripen all
at once!
• Sew seeds for biennials such as
foxgloves. Once they are large
enough, transplant them directly
into the garden. Planting many
biennials in the fall will yield better
results than planting in spring.
A garden to-do list for fall
Planting bulbs, such as the tulips pictured here, is a fall task that you will appreciate having done come spring.
18
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
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• Gifts • Interior Design
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
One of the most enduring of
Halloween icons, candy corn is now
over 130 years old.
Back in the early 1900s, when the lit-
tle striped treat was one of a variety of
fondant novelties crafted into shapes
like turnips, chestnuts and leaves, work-
men had to run buckets of hot, sugary
slurry back and forth across molds to
make it. Today, companies like Jelly
Belly and Brach’s produce over 35 mil-
lion pounds of candy corn — most of it
around Halloween.
“One of the reasons candy corn has
remained so popular is that it’s a ‘limit-
ed edition.’ This is really the only time
of year you can easily get it, and that
limited availability makes it attractive,”
says Susan Whiteside, spokeswoman
for the National Confectioner’s
Association.
Candy corn has become not only a
staple of the trick-or-treat bowl, but an
inspiration for seasonal decor.
Whether you’re setting a festive scene
or just indulging a nostalgic affection,
there are lots of ways to use candy corn.
You can even make some yourself —
both edible and non-edible versions.
Candy corn kernels have more visu-
al impact en masse than individually.
An array of clear lidded jars filled to
the brim looks wonderful. Dump a bag
or two in the bottom of a hurricane or
large vase; add a pillar candle,
Halloween ornament, or twisty
branches painted black or gold and
you’ve got a great centerpiece.
Woman’s Day magazine suggests hot-
gluing kernels to Styrofoam balls for
colorful bowl fillers. (www.womans-
day.com)
Candy corn topiaries can be made by
studding foam or
paper cones,
adding stems,
and placing in
pots. Wreaths
made of
rows of
candy, hung
with a black
r i b b o n ,
look strik-
ing.
A n d
while you’ve
got the glue out,
consider adding a
few candy corns to
twigs to create candy “blossoms.” Or, if
you’re patient, try stringing kernels into
a garland for the mantel or door frame.
Making faux candy corn is easy, with
a few craft materials in the signature
colors of orange, yellow and white.
Wool retailer Lion Brand provides free
online patterns to crochet stuffed toys
and little carry bags.
(www.lionbrand.com )
Get out the paint pots and paint the
top and base of orange traffic cones for
clever Halloween-night driveway mark-
ers. Better Homes & Gardens’ website
offers instructions to make a door deco-
ration by cutting a foam cone in half
lengthwise, painting it and adding dried
fall plant material. Spray paint gourds
and pumpkins for more entryway decor.
(www.bhg.com)
Ready-made decor with the candy
corn motif is easy to find; look for string
lights (www.lightsforalloccasions.com),
votive holders (www.pier1.com), throw
pillows (www.way-
fair.com) and fab-
ric. (www.bug-
fabric.com)
Finally, if
you’re up for
making your
own treats,
F o o d
Ne t wo r k
star Alton
Brown has
a recipe
o n l i n e .
(www.foodnetwork.com) Evoke the
idea of candy corn by creating tricolor
gelatin or sherbet parfaits, and topping
pretzels or cupcakes with tinted icing.
Nabisco is selling a limited run of
Oreos with candy-corn-colored filling.
(www.target.com)
Jamie Lothridge, a middle-school
teacher and avid baker in Toledo, Ohio,
who blogs about her passion at
www.mybakingaddiction.com, has
already repurposed the Oreos by turning
them into truffles.
“As a recipe developer, new ingredi-
ents get my creativity flowing. I’ve long
been a candy corn fanatic, and autumn
is my favorite season, so making a
recipe with all my favorite things is kind
of a dream come true,” she says.
Getting creative with candy corn
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cut flower gardens are attractive options
for those who don’t like removing the best
blooms from their borders and beds for
indoor display.
The bouquets also open new avenues for
creativity along with becoming something
personal to share. And perhaps best: The
cuttings can grow into a profitable sideline.
“Ours is a hobby gone berserk,” said Gail
Burr, who with her husband, Steve, operates
Everlastings and Time Country Gardens in
the Finger Lakes region of central New
York.
“We always had an interest in gardening
so when we retired, we started selling our
bouquets and arrangements,” she said. “The
Canandaigua (N.Y.) Farmers Market is our
primary venue, although we also sell for
weddings.”
The price of a Burr garden bouquet runs
$8 and climbs to around $25 for something
larger, like a hospital spray.
“In my mind, flowers that bring beauty
into the home should be affordable.” Burr
said. “Typical florist prices are precipitous
for many.”
The roots of cutting gardens go back to
the Victorian era or to wealthy landowners
who grew flowers for the manor house, said
Debra Prinzing, author of “The 50 Mile
Bouquet” (St. Lynn’s Press, 2012).
“That’s what we think of as cutting gar-
dens,” she said. “One row of sunflowers, one
of snapdragons, one row of zinnias. Now,
though, we’re looking at adding cutting
ingredients to natural gardens. There’s
enough variety there that you wouldn’t have
a bare spot.”
Which blooms are best for bouquets? The
choices are vast, and include annuals, peren-
nials, bulbs, fruit, vegetables and flowering
woody stems. Think lilacs, zinnias, peonies,
mums, hydrangeas and sunflowers. Don’t
forget roses, dahlias, cattails, succulents,
kale, grasses and lilies.
Many people have begun planting peren-
nials in their cutting gardens with new
genetics that produce tougher plants, more
blooms and longer flowering times, said
Anthony Tesselaar, president and co-
founder of Tesselaar Plants, in Silvan,
Australia.
“Once cut, these newer plants come back
with even more flowers that grace the gar-
den,” Tesselaar said.
Some suggestions for prolonging the
beauty of cut botanicals:
• Cut the flowers when they’re dew fresh in
the morning rather than wilted from the after-
noon sun.
• Use sharp shears to prevent crushing the
stems, which reduces the flow of water to the
blooms.
• Use a commercial floral preservative to
acidify the container water. Homemade for-
mulas include table sugar and bleach.
“Adding some lemonade also extends the life
of the water,” Tesselaar said.
Growing a cutting garden is one thing.
Knowing how to create a stunning display
with the cut flowers is quite another. Here are
some tips:
• Use a dominant flower or flowers. Many
designers prefer working with uneven num-
bers, Prinzing said.
• Insert a vertical feature, such as a flower-
ing branch or some ornamental grass.
• Drape the arrangement with “spillers”
(vines, foliage, fruit) that soften its look.
Cut flower gardens boost the longstanding
tradition of garden-to-garden sharing,
Prinzing said.
“I have a friend who saves inexpensive
glass vases,” she said. “When someone
leaves her house, they always leave with a
bouquet of roses from her house.”
Cutting gardens can yield beauty inside and out
Many people have begun planting perennials in their cutting gardens with new genetics that
produce tougher plants, more blooms and longer flowering time.
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DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, OCT. 25
SanMateoRoseSociety meeting.11
a.m. San Mateo Garden Center, Rose
Room, 605 Parkside Way, San Mateo.
Free. Slide show and talk by Filoli
docent. For more information call 342-
4956.
Pamela Cox-Otto Lectures on
Generational Communication. 11
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Skyline College,
Building 6, Room 6202, 3300 College
Drive, San Bruno. Free. For more
information call 738-4346.
Halloween Craft for Kids: Decorate
a Trick-or-Treat Bag. 3:30 p.m.
Belmont Library,1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Materials will be
provided. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org
Influence Dementia Behaviors and
Outcomes. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Silverado Senior Living — Library,
1301 Ralston Ave., Belmont. For more
information call 654-9700.
K1 Speed South San Francisco’s
Grand Opening Celebration. 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. K1 Speed, 160 Beacon St.
South San Francisco. Enjoy live
entertainment and exhilarating racing.
For more information call 741-0215.
San Mateo Union High School
District Presents: College and
Career Fair 2012. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Hillsdale High School, 3115 Del
Monte St., San Mateo. Representatives
from UC, CSU and other colleges and
universities throughout the country
will be present. Free. For more
information visit
www.hhs.schoolloop.com.
Quickstep, Bachata and Salsa. 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
International Standard Level II
Quickstep 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bachata 7
p.m. to 8 p.m. International Standard
Level I Quickstep 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Salsa
8 p.m. to 9 p.m. $16 per class. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
FRIDAY, OCT. 26
Elections Division Opens and
Processes Vote by Mail Ballots. 8:30
a.m. Elections Office, 40 Tower Road,
San Mateo. The public is invited to
observe the process of opening and
processing returned Vote by Mail
ballots for the Nov. 6 election. Free. For
more information call 312-5222.
The Power of Possibilities
Recognition Event. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Sofitel San Francisco Bay, 223 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City. There
will be keynote presentations by Lee
Hirsch and Alex Libby of the
documentary Bully. For more
information and to purchase tickets
visit gatepath.com/possibilities.
Free Wine and Beer Tasting. 4p.m. to
6 p.m. New Leaf Community Markets,
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Free Friday happy hours. Different
selection each week. Must be 21 or
older. Free. For more information email
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Artists’ Reception and Silent
Auction. 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Caldwell
Gallery, Hall of Justice, 400 County
Center, Redwood City. This event will
feature local artists with disabilities
and is co-sponsored by the San Mateo
County Board of Supervisors and the
Commission on Disabilities. $10. For
more information call 573-2700.
Slither and Squeak Halloween
Event. 6 pm. to 8 p.m. CuriOdyssey,
1651 Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Discover the science behind the
spooky things you see at Halloween.
Kids are encouraged to wear costumes
to participate in science experiments
and science-inspired trick-or-treating.
Food will be available for purchase
from local food trucks. $12 for adults,
$10 for kids ages 2 through 17, $18 for
non-members and free for children
under 2. For more information call 342-
7755.
McKinley Elementary Harvest
Festival. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The corner
of El Camino and Oak Grove, San
Mateo. Games, music, food and a
haunted mansion. Free. For more
information visit
www.mckinleyharvestfestival.com.
‘Cabaret.’ 7 p.m. Little Theatre at
Hillsdale High School, 3115 Del Monte
St., San Mateo. Director Allison Gamlen
and musical director Kevin Gallagher
are leading the Hillsdale High School
cast in sharing this tumultuous story in
the newly renovated Hillsdale Little
Theater. Adults $15. Students and
seniors $10. To purchase tickets visit
http://hillsdalehigh.com/drama.
Waltz and Hustle Rhythm Dance
Party. 7 p.m. to midnight. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City
Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. For
Beginners Only Waltz I Class, 7 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Hustle Lesson and Rhythm
Dance Party, 8 p.m. Rhythm Dance
Party, 9 p.m. $10 for class, $5 for
dance party. For more information
visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Presents:‘HayFever.’7:30 p.m. NDNU
Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The NDNU Theatre Department
presents Noel Coward’s play, ‘Hay
Fever.’ $10. For more information call
508-3456.
‘Deathtrap.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets available 60 minutes prior to
curtain at Hillbarn Theatre. Adults and
seniors $34. Students ages 17 and
under with current student ID should
call 349-6411 for pricing. To purchase
tickets and for more information visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
Peninsula Ballet Theater Presents:
Dracula A Ballet to Die For. 8 p.m.
Fox Theatre, 2223 Broadway, Redwood
City.This ballet is set to haunting music
and will feature sumptuous sets and
costumes as well as exciting drama
and dancing. $35 seniors, $40 adults.
For more information call 369-7770 or
visit www.peninsulaballet.org to buy
tickets.
SATURDAY, OCT. 27
Museum Docents Training. 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Learn how to lead and assist
hands-on school programs on
different themes of local history. Free.
For more information call 299-0104
ext. 231.
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled eggs,
pancakes, bacon, ham or sausage and
French toast will be served. There will
also be juice, coffee or tea. $8. $5 for
children under 10. For more
information call 583-1740.
Burpeesfor Boobies. 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Gunn High School, 780 Arastradero
Road, Palo Alto. Run two miles and
complete 100 burpies along the way.
Winner gets $100 cash prize. $40
suggested entry fee. All proceeds go to
the American Cancer Society. For more
information visit thepsti.com/burpees-
for-boobies.
Electronic recycling, paper
shredding, clothing drive. 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Beresford Park, 2720 Alameda
de las Pulgas. There will be electronic
recycling and document shredding as
well as a clothing drive. Free. For more
information visit
tinyurl.com/smrecycle.
Fall San Bruno Mountain Native
Plant Sale. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mission
Blue Nursery, 3435 Bayshore Blvd.,
Brisbane. Help celebrate San Bruno
Mountain and native plants. For more
information call (415) 467-6631.
Alzheimer Association: Circle of
Care Education Conference. 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, 1221
Chess Drive, Foster City. Opportunity
for families caring for loved ones with
Alzheimer’s or dementia to learn more
about the disease, common
challenges and hope for the future.
$40. To register visit
conference.kintera.org/COC2012. For
more information call 962-8111.
Preschool Family 29th Annual Fun
Day. 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 4120
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Raffle, train
rides, carnival games, magic shows, live
music, food and bake sale, used book
sale and much more. Free admission.
For more information call 856-0833.
23rd Annual Burlingame High
School Play-A-Thon. 9:30 a.m. to 4
p.m. Burlingame Train Station, 200
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Enjoy
continuous musical entertainment as
the Burlingame High School bands
and choirs perform all day. Watch the
parades down Burlingame Avenue at
11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Enjoy homemade
goods and purchase raffle tickets to
win prizes donated by music families
and local merchants. Free. For more
information email
batesmeow@gmail.com.
Halloween Event and Helicopter
PumpkinDrop.10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Hiller
Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Road,
San Carlos. Creepy Crafts. Games and
prizes. Join the fun. Come in costume.
Helicopter pumpkin drop at noon.
Event included with museum
admission. Adult $12, Seniors and kids
$8, under age 4 free. For more
information call 654-0200.
St. Matthew’s Catholic Grammar
School Class of 1962 Celebrates 50
Years Since Graduation. 10:30 a.m.
910 S. El Camino Real, San Mateo.There
will be a tour of the campus at 10:30
a.m. and a luncheon at the Poplar
Creek Golf Course at noon. For more
information visit
www.stmatthewcath.org.
San Bruno’s Second Annual Trick or
TreatingUpandDown‘TheAvenue.’
11 a.m. Costume judging starts at
noon at 445 San Mateo Ave. Trick-or-
treat the south end of San Mateo Ave.
with participating merchants.
Participating merchants will have an
orange pumpkin on their door or in
their window. For more information
call 228-4698.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
In the letter, she thanked Belmont
residents “who have worked tirelessly
on our behalf.”
CSUS officials first stood in front of
the City Council in April 2011 with a
preliminary design review for the Davis
Drive project that the council “enthusi-
astically” supported, according to
school officials. The initial endorse-
ment of the project by the council sent
the school down a lengthy and expen-
sive process to design a new middle
school, according to school officials.
“In the end, the council voted 3-2
against a general plan amendment
which would have allowed for the nec-
essary rezoning of the property we
hoped to develop. We are, understand-
ably, disappointed in this result,”
Richards wrote in the letter.
At Tuesday night’s meeting, much
discussion was centered on why the
opinions of some of the councilmem-
bers changed over the course of the past
18 months.
Councilman Warren Lieberman said
at the meeting he was “caught off
guard” by some of the councilmembers
who had never indicated that amending
the general plan to allow for a school
use on the property was a “problem.”
At the meeting, Lieberman was pre-
pared to discuss in detail the develop-
ment deal CSUS offered to the city that
guaranteed $250,000 in annual pay-
ments; a one-time $1 million payment;
and use of its turfed athletic field.
Lieberman even went through the
minutes of the April 12, 2011 meeting
with CSUS to see if he “missed any-
thing” as far as his colleagues’ opinions
were on the project.
At that meeting, Councilwoman
Coralin Feierbach, who was then the
mayor, said “I think it’s fine. Welcome.
Please do it. I really like the idea. I like
everything about it. I like that your
school is coming to Belmont. I really
approve.”
Tuesday night, however, Feierbach
said she changed her mind on the proj-
ect after CSUS started a publicity cam-
paign by mailing out fliers in late
August and for “wicked” comments
made on an online message board.
But some Belmont residents said
Feierbach had started to speak nega-
tively on the project before CSUS start-
ed its public relations campaign.
Also Tuesday night, Mayor Dave
Warden said during the meeting “I have
tried to want to vote ‘yes’ for this proj-
ect” before he voted “no” with
Feierbach and Vice Mayor Christine
Wozniak. Lieberman and Councilman
David Braunstein voted to amend the
general plan.
He said the council’s vote was a land-
use decision that has “no right answer.
My vote is my opinion.”
At the April 12, 2011 meeting, how-
ever, Warden said “I think it’s a great
plan. I like it a lot. I think if you can
make it work now in Hillsborough, you
can make it work on Davis Drive.”
He did at that meeting, however,
express concerns about increased traf-
fic.
Opponents of the project cited
increased traffic and noise as a reason
to vote down the project.
Wakefield Drive resident Joe
Brennan was initially the most vocal
opponent of the project during the
Planning Commission process who
started gathering support from neigh-
bors to oppose it in letters and petitions
sent to the City Council. He cited
increased traffic, noise and the loss of
heritage oak trees as reasons to vote
down the project.
The Planning Commission voted
against changing the zoning for the prop-
erty, which houses an office park current-
ly, before it sent the project to council for
final approval.
Early on, Tahoe Drive resident
Michael Dell’Aguila was a vocal oppo-
nent of the project based on increased
traffic.
“Getting out on a normal day is hard
enough,” he said about the traffic that
already exists in the morning at Ralston
Middle School.
He has mixed feelings on Tuesday
night’s council vote, however.
“I’m kind of happy and kind of disap-
pointed. It did have some positives,” he
said about the CSUS proposal.
Brennan, in an email he sent to the
Daily Journal yesterday, wrote: “I feel
both CSUS and Belmont lost: CSUS lost
a dream, and Belmont lost an excellent
school. But, Belmont defended itself
against a misguided choice of a location
by CSUS that had serious short-term and
long-term consequences, both from qual-
ity-of-life and financial standpoints.”
CSUS wanted to purchase an office
building on 6-8 and 10 Davis Drive that
it currently leases, demolish it and build
a new school campus with a turfed ath-
letic field and one day a pool. CSUS
had offered use of its field to youth
sports groups in the city during summer
and on some weekends the rest of the
year, since Belmont youth have a lack
of suitable playing fields.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
CSUS
door proceedings to determine fines
against Pacific Gas and Electric. The
CPUC did not respond to a request for
comment.
“There was a process in place and it
was totally violated by Mr. Peevey,” said
Ruane.
There are two issues, he said. First, the
decision to have conversations behind
closed doors. Second, the CPUC’s deci-
sion to select former U.S. senator
George Mitchell to serve as the media-
tor. While Ruane had nothing negative to
say about Mitchell, the process by which
he was selected is in question.
“It’s not right what happened. We’re
all very upset,” he said.
Holding the meetings behind closed
doors is a practice that led to dangerous
conditions that caused the fatal Sept. 9,
2010 explosion in San Bruno, Ruane
said. Sharing the information and safety
concerns, the resolution argued, is nec-
essary. As things are currently set up,
Ruane said Peevey is brokering a back-
room deal without the participation of
those affected by the event.
PG&E could face fines of between
$200 million and $2.5 billion for the
2010 explosion, which killed eight peo-
ple and caused a fire that destroyed 38
homes. The CPUC, which regulates the
state’s utility providers, is considering
how much to fine PG&E for potential
violations such as poor record keeping,
operating a gas pipeline in a populated
area without the correct safety margins
and the failure of the San Bruno pipeline
itself.
On Oct. 5, the CPUC requested that
good faith hearings on possible fines
levied against PG&E take place behind
closed doors with a mediator talking
with seven parties involved in deciding
how much to fine PG&E. An administra-
tive law court ruled in the CPUC’s favor
on Oct. 11. Mitchell was tapped to act as
a mediator. Letters were sent to
Mitchell’s office from the city this week
asking him to step down, said Ruane.
The parties to the mediation include the
city of San Francisco, the CPUC’s
Consumer Protection and Safety
Division, the city of San Bruno, PG&E,
the state’s Division of Ratepayer
Advocates, Southwest Gas Corp. and
The Utility Reform Network consumer
advocacy group.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
CPUC
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Don’t feel obligated to
attend a social function just to keep up appearances.
If you don’t like the event and/or some of the people
who’ll be there, give your regrets.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Time is too pre-
cious to squander on just anything or anybody. Share it
with those you truly like and enjoy doing things with.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- It could turn out to
be a huge learning experience when you get involved
in a stimulating discussion with someone whose
views diametrically oppose yours.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- This can be an ex-
tremely favorable day in terms of fnancial gain, but
not necessarily from investments or joint ventures.
You’ll play your own game for a big payoff.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Friends will have little
doubt as to where you stand, and you’ll be respected
for your candor, even when your position opposes
that of the majority.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- An old obligation that
has been owed you for quite a while is collectable
at this point in time. Approach the debtor in such a
manner that he or she will get the message without
resenting it.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- You’re likely to be ap-
proached to chair a committee within a certain group
or club in which you’re involved. It may be a tough
job, but it will have interesting side benefts.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Several of your goals
are achievable, but not necessarily in the way you
envision. If you discover you can’t get past the ob-
stacles blocking your path, you’ll go around them.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- The old adage “Experi-
ence is the best teacher” will be true in your case.
When you discover you could once again repeat a
mistake that cost you some bitter moments, you’ll
circumvent it.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Someone who considers
you to be an easy mark is in for a rude awakening.
When push comes to shove, you’ll be extremely
resourceful.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Even though you’ll be
negotiating from a position of strength, you’ll still be
fair in your dealings. You’ll go out of your way to make
sure that both you and the other guy come out well.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Service you render will
be given both willingly and expertly. However, no one
should expect a “freebie,” because you value your
work and the remuneration you deserve for it.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
10-25-12
wEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Big bankroll
4 Rod’s partner
8 Field mouse
12 Refnery shipment
13 Longest arm bone
14 Europe-Asia range
15 Meadow bird
17 Teacup edges
18 Western bar
19 Jalopies
21 Woeful cry
23 Old Norse poem
24 Gripping device
27 Driver with a handle
29 Small untruth
30 Be a doctor
32 Give off, as rays
36 Reclines
38 Low voice
40 Luau strummer
41 Telegraph
43 Thesaurus name
45 Ski town
47 Lox seller
49 Hazards
51 Gavel
55 Nonsense!
56 Fork and knife
58 Thespian’s quest
59 Fan dancer Sally --
60 Hamm of soccer
61 Iowa town
62 Rover’s pal
63 Disallow
DOwN
1 Stir-fry pans
2 Diva’s tune
3 Secluded hollow
4 Ninth reindeer
5 Ms. Verdugo
6 WSW opposite
7 “Tomb Raider” heroine
8 Not a picky eater
9 Sky hunter
10 Expire, as a policy
11 Windy City trains
16 Crumbly soil
20 Suffx for forfeit
22 Reached the summit
24 BC Lions’ org.
25 Twice XXVI
26 Civil War prez
28 Diner sandwich
31 Corn order
33 Tankard
34 Mamie’s man
35 Lunar New Year
37 Rustles
39 Epcot neighbor
42 Sort
44 Fixes a squeak
45 Indy 500 sound
46 Walkway
48 Change text
50 Catch a wave
52 An arm or a leg
53 He directed Marlon
54 1917 abdicator
55 Half a bikini
57 Mai -- (rum drink)
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
GARAGE DOOR
INSTALLER/
SERVICE TECHNICIAN
Experienced Garage Door Installer/Service
Technician needed. Installation and repair of
residential wood and steel garage doors, garage
opener installation and repair. Must be motivat-
ed, hard working, professional, customer service
oriented and a team player. Company truck pro-
vided. Apply at 1457 El Camino Real, Belmont,
email resume to:
econodoormaster@yahoo.com
or fax (650)594-1549
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNA’s
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimer’s or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
TENNIS LESSONS
Top 50 Mens Open Player
Call 650-518-1987
Email info@adsoncraigslist.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
FT/PT Live-In caregiver on the Penin-
sula and in the South Bay. Valid driv-
er’s license and car a must.Must have
exp. and refs. Call 415-683-3171 or
visit www.sageeldercare.com.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSEKEEPERS
NEEDED
Part-time on the Peninsula.
Must drive & have 2+ yrs
private home experience.
$22-$25 per hour
415-567-0956
www.tandcr.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TEACHER AIDE - Special Education
Daily and long-term assignments availa-
ble working with pre-school through high
school age special needs students in
schools throughout San Mateo County.
6.5 hr. work days M-F. $16.17/hr. To ap-
ply call The Personnel Department at
San Mateo County Office of Education at
650-802-5366.
110 Employment
YOU’RE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252679
The following person is doing business
as: Lynn Lefevre Welding Inc., 2511 Isa-
belle Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lynn Lefevre Welding Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ Louise Lefevre /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 516561
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Gunel ONISKO
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Gunel ONISKO filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Gunel ONISKO
Proposed name: Maria-Raffaella Ales-
sandra ONISKO
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
14, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/26/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/25/2012
(Published, 10/11/12, 10/18/12,
10/25/12, 11/01/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252535
The following person is doing business
as: Happy Noodles, 153 S. B Street,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Minghui
Jiang, 2532 San Carlos Ave., San Car-
los, CA 94070. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Minghui Jiang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252319
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Internet Marketing Unlimited, 2)
City Junk Removale, 1000 National Ave.,
#240, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Win-
ston Arver, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Winston Arver /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252336
The following person is doing business
as: Forever Forward Social Club, 1618
S. El Camino Real SAN MATEO, CA,
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Mark Matthews, Po Box
370333, Montara, CA 94037. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Mark Matthews /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252586
The following person is doing business
as: West Face Financial and Insurance
Services, LLC, 990 Industrial Rd., Ste
112, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Pace-
line, LLC, CA. The business is conducted
by a Limited Liablity Company. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Beatrice Schultz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252585
The following person is doing business
as: West Face College Planning, 990 In-
dustrial Rd., Ste 112, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Beatrice Schultz, 237 Shore-
bird, Circle, Redwood City, CA 94065.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
10/02/2012
/s/ Beatrice Schultz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252539
The following person is doing business
as: Philly’s Cheese Steak Shop, 729 Cal-
ifornia Dr., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ju Star, INC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 09/26/2012.
/s/ Chun Ju Lin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252594
The following person is doing business
as: Global X, 1740 El Camino Real,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mar-
jorie Isaac, 439 Gateway Dr. #93, Pacific
CA 94044. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Marjorie Isaac /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/12, 10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252625
The following person is doing business
as: Summers at Your Service, 361 Half
Moon Ln., Unit 107, DALY CITY, CA,
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: D-Etta Estella Summers,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ D-Etta Estella Summers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252647
The following person is doing business
as: JB Tile & Stone, INC., 509 Howland
St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is here-
by registered by the following owner: JB
Tile & Stone, INC., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2008.
/s/ Connie J. Brown /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252331
The following person is doing business
as: I Squared Consulting, LLC., 1518 La-
go St., #107, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
I Squared Consulting, LLC., CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 06/30/2012.
/s/ Maryam K. Headd /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 9/17/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252577
The following person is doing business
as: One Medical Group, 329 Primrose
Rd., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
One Medical Group, INC. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Michael Sarmiento /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/2/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/12, 10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12).
23 Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252792
The following person is doing business
as: Mighty Mike’s Handyman Service,
716 1st Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Michael D. Lillis, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Michael D. Lillis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252595
The following person is doing business
as: 1)GITS, 2)GITS Information Technol-
ogy Service, 1107 18th Ave., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Gita Kumari
Chandra, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Anuresh Chandra /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252681
The following person is doing business
as: Speak Well and Sell, 533 Airport
Blvd., Ste 400, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Michael Neuendorff, 394 In-
nisfree Dr., Daly City, CA 94015. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on October 1,
2012
/s/ Michael Neuendorff /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/12, 10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252802
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Geotours and Travel, 2750 Me-
lendy Drive, #7, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Frank Cromosini & Donna
Rhoan, same address. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Frank Cromosini /
/s/ Donna Rhoan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/1/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252742
The following person is doing business
as: Dymaxicon, 502 Barbados Lane,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Hillary
Johnson, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Hillary Johnson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252479
The following person is doing business
as: Jye Lih Enterprises Co., 454 Hillcrest
Road, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Chang
Meng Chen Yen, aka Margaret Yen,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Chang Meng Chen Yen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252433
The following person is doing business
as: Perla’s Gourmet, 2864 Hosmer
Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Perla Prieto, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Perla Prieto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252606
The following person is doing business
as: G & B Automotive, 113 Camaritas
Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: J. Gerardo Ramirez, same
address, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/2/2012.
/s/ J. Gerardo Ramirez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252844
The following person is doing business
as: Sirius Illumination, 2007 Woodsude
Rd. Apt. 9, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cynthia Magg, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
10/11/2012
/s/ Cynthia Magg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/18/12).
SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ506905
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Corene C. Piccolotti aka
Corene C. Martinez aka Corene Fran-
chechini, an individual; and DOES 1
through 100, inclusive
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): Persolve, LLC, a limited liability
company, dba, Account Resolution Asso-
ciates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
203 Public Notices
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, #194748
Edit Alexandryan, #249323
PerSolve, LLC dba Account Resolution
Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
Chatsworth, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) July 8, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 18, 25, and November 1, 8,
2012.
SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ507170
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Wanda Ogilvie aka Wanda
R. Harness aka Ruth W. Harness, an in-
dividual; and DOES 1 through 100, in-
clusive
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): Persolve, LLC, a limited liability
company, dba, Account Resolution Asso-
ciates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
203 Public Notices
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, #194748
Edit Alexandryan, #249323
PerSolve, LLC dba Account Resolution
Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
Chatsworth, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) July 21, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 18, 25, and November 1, 8,
2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
SOLD!
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, playgoer August pro-
gram, featuring Gloria Stuart, George
Sanders, Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20.,
San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE - Special Issue,
“Off to the Moon”, featuring Armstrong,
Aldrin, and Collins, and a special article
by Charles Lindburgh, $25., San Mateo,
(650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 (650)787-8600
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
298 Collectibles
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection, SOLD!
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, SOLD!
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, collectible su-
perstars, Gretzki, Messier, more, OK
sold separately, SOLD!
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, SOLD!
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures, SOLD!
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6” diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)375-8044
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's, SOLD!
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
24
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 The grand
concert one has
47 strings
5 Teen hangout
9 __ poll
14 French
possessive
15 Chills and fever
16 “The Voice” judge
Green
17 Holdup device?
18 Party person
19 Communications
device
20 Question cads in
their cups?
23 Response to “Are
you serious?”
24 Gardner of old
films
25 Wow
28 Burden beasts of
burden?
32 Western
landscape feature
36 Vessel
designation
37 Weigh station
visitors
38 New Testament
book
39 Variable-yield
investment option
42 Passed-down
tales
43 CBS newswoman
O’Donnell
45 Summer baby
46 Termini
47 Stumble over
plumbing gunk?
51 Brahms’s A?
52 View from
Marseille
53 To-do
58 Proper sort ... or a
cry upon solving
each of this
puzzle’s theme
answers?
62 Canceled a
reservation,
maybe
64 Waikiki’s
whereabouts
65 Yankee great,
familiarly, with
“The”
66 Window box
bloom
67 “Exodus” novelist
68 US Open stadium
69 Post with carvings
70 Passé demo item
71 Scholarship factor
DOWN
1 “Satisfied now?”
2 “__ friend
unbosoms freely
...”: Penn
3 Innkeeper’s
offerings
4 Longstocking of
kiddie lit
5 Hawaiian for “very
strong”
6 All atwitter
7 Thick with
vegetation
8 Super-harmful
9 Serious argument
components
10 Colorful duck
11 North Pacific
sockeye
12 Woodcutter Baba
13 Seek favor with
21 Feasts on
22 Garden outcast
26 Strange and then
some
27 Pluralizers
29 Society honoree
30 Waggish
31 Ubangi tributary
32 Minister’s
quarters
33 Culprit in some
food recalls
34 Severe
35 “Without delay!”
40 “The Matrix”
hero
41 Spot for one in
disfavor
44 Rebus puzzle
staple
48 Outlaw Kelly
49 Shriek
50 Brillo alternative
54 “You’ve got to be
kidding”
55 Grace
56 Nourishment for
un bebé
57 Put in a request
59 Department of
northern France
60 Lipinski with a
gold medal
61 Beat
62 Well-put
63 Confucian path
By Elizabeth A. Long
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
10/25/12
10/25/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
302 Antiques
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 SOLD!
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
304 Furniture
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH & LOVE SEAT- Floral Design.
Great Condition, $350.00, (650)266-8025
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINET TABLE walnut with chrome legs.
36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50, San
Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
304 Furniture
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)857-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
AS NEW Bar-B-Q electric outdoor/in-
door, easy clean, no scrubbing./brushing,
as new, $15., 650-595-3933
AUTO WINE OPENER - mint condition,
one-touch, rechargeable, adapter, foil
cutter, built-in light, easy open, great gift,
$12.00, SOLD!
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER- Gevalia Connaissuar
ten cup. white, filters included, makes
great coffee, $9., 650-595-3933
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., 650-375-8044
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
LORUS WATCH- date, sweep second
hand, new battery, stainless steel adjust-
able band, perfect, $19., 650-595-3933
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw $80
(650)521-3542
BANDSAW CRAFTMENS - hardly used
$80. obo, SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1” BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, $35., (650)521-3542
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)857-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRILL PRESS -Craftmens, works great
$85., obo, SOLD!
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
RYOBI TRIM ROUTER - with butt tem-
plate, $40., (650)521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, SOLD!
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLANKET- Double bed size, dusty rose,
satin bindings, warm, like new, washa-
ble. $8., 650-375-8044
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, SOLD!
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HALLOWEEN DECORATIONS Pump-
kins, Lights, Large spiders, ect. all for
$20 D.C. SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, work great for small of-
fice/room, extra speakers, 4 1/2 in. high,
includes cords. $8.00, SOLD!
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
METAL COWBOY STATUE - $50.,
(650)589-8348
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEADER shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color, $25., (650)873-8167
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
mane, tail, ears, eyes, perfect condition
for child/grandchild, $39., 650-595-3933
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOMTOM GPS- every U.S./Canadian
address, car/home chargers, manual,
in factory carton, $59., 650-595-3933
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, $15., 650-375-8044
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
(650)348-6428
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
(650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
25 Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
2 SAN Francisco Giants Jackets 1 is
made by (Starter) LG/XLG excellent con-
dition $99 for both (650)571-5790
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY SHIRTS - pearl snaps, pock-
ets, XL/XXL, perfect $15 each, cowboy
boots, 9D, black, $45., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME "Little miss
Muffet" outfit with blonde braided wig
never warn Fredrick of Hollywood $35
D.C. SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME 1950's Poodle
skirt Black & Pink from Fredrick of Holly-
wood $35 D.C. SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME Tony Martin
size 40 warn only once from Selix $25
D.C SOLD!
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 SOLD!
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, excellent condition,
$30.all, San Bruno, (650)588-1946
317 Building Materials
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHING EQUPMENT 3 rods with reels,
2 Tackle boxes full fo supplies, SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole $45
(650)521-3542
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Saturday,
October 27
Between
9:00 & 2:00
1132 Cortez Ave.,
Burlingame
Antique Dining
Chairs, Collectible
Dolls, China, and
Much More!
322 Garage Sales
HUGE
YARD
SALE
SAN MATEO
426 Costa Rica Ave.
(between W. Poplar
& Clark Dr.)
Friday &
Saturday
Oct. 26 & 27
10 am - 3 pm
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20” rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
WEED WHACKER-STIHL FS45 curved
bar, never used, $65.,obo, SOLD!
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
FORD ‘97 Arrowstar Van XLT - 130K
miles, $3500. obo, (650)851-0878
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims, SOLD!
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, $20.,
San Bruno, (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Cleaning Concrete Construction Construction Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
26
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance • Clean
Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Landscaping
EXOTIC GARDENS
Sod Lawns, Sprinklers,
Planting, Lighting, Mason
Work, Retaining Walls,
Drainage
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 461-0326
Lic#933572
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Attorneys
TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING
Top Attorney With Masters
In Tax Law Offers Reduced
Fees For New October Clients.
(650)342-3777
Ira Harris Zelnigher, Esq.
(”Ira Harris”)
1840 Gateway Dr., Ste. 200
San Mateo
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
27 Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Business Services
PUT YOUR
BUSINESS INFO
ON THE
INTERNET
FREE
Link the phone number
in your classified ad
directly to online details
about your business
ZypPages.com
Barbara@ZypPages.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
MANUFACTURED
HOME COMMUNITY
For Ages 55+
Canada Cove,
Half Moon Bay
(650) 726-5503
www.theaccenthome.com
Walk to the Beach
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday • Oct. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 10/31/12
WEBUY
$â0
OFF ANY
$â0
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