COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions

Course descriptions are arranged in alphabetical order by subject code (prefix). Developmental classes are numbered less than 100 and serve as prerequisites for courses in mathematics and English. Developmental courses in mathematics, reading and writing need to be completed before you finish 30 credit hours. Placement in these courses is based on your ACT and COMPASS test scores. They are self-support courses and charged at that tuition rate. Freshmen and sophomores may take courses numbered 100 and 200 providing that the necessary prerequisites have been completed. Courses numbered 300 and 400 are normally junior and senior level but might be taken by sophomores if the necessary prerequisites have been met. Courses numbered 500 and 600 are entrylevel graduate courses offered in conjunction with the undergraduate-level course. Undergraduate students who wish to enroll for the course at the 500 or 600 level must secure permission from the Graduate School. Courses numbered 700 are open to graduate students only. Pre-requisites: Some classes have pre-requisites which must be met before enrolling in the class. This can consist of passing grades in specific courses, minimum scores on placement exams, a specified class level or admission to a particular program. It has been determined by the disciplines that these pre-requisites are necessary to prepare the student for enrollment. Pre-requisites are listed in the course description for each class. Credits are semester hours. Asterisk (*) indicates that the course is not offered every year.

ACCOUNTING (ACCT) ACCT 210. Principles of Accounting I. A study of fundamental accounting principles and procedures such as journalizing, posting, preparation of financial statements, and other selected topics. Accounting is emphasized as a service activity designed to provide the information about economic entities that is necessary for making sound decisions. Prerequisite: Sophomore or above standing. 3 credits ACCT 211. Principles of Accounting II. A continuation of ACCT 210 with emphasis on partnership and corporate structures, management decision-making, cost control, and other selected topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 210. 3 credits ACCT 291. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits ACCT 292. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits ACCT 294. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. 1-12 credits ACCT 310. Intermediate Accounting I. Involves the intensive study of financial accounting standards, both in theory and practice, as they relate to the preparation and analysis of financial statements. Accounting problems and their impact on the financial statement are addressed in regard to current assets, fixed assets, intangible assets, liabilities, and other selected topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. 3 credits

ACCT 311. Intermediate Accounting II. Provides an intensive study of accounting standards, both in theory and practice, as they relate to the preparation and analysis of financial statements. Accounting problems and their impact on the financial statements are addressed in regard to liabilities, investments, stockholders’ equity, leases, pensions, tax allocation and other selected topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 310. 3 credits ACCT 320. Cost Accounting. The study of principles and techniques for accumulating, reporting, and analyzing cost information for decision-making and external reporting. The use of cost accounting systems for planning and controlling cost responsibility centers is emphasized. Consideration is given to the appropriate use of various cost accounting methods such as activity-based costing, target costing, and just-in-time management techniques in service and manufacturing industries. 3 credits ACCT 360. Accounting Systems. Provides an understanding of the patterns of flow of accounting information in business, principles of internal control, and the use of computers in current and future accounting systems. Topics include concepts of accounting information systems, flowcharting and analysis of manual and computerized transaction cycles, decision support systems, electronic commerce, management reporting systems, control and audit of complex computerized information systems, and the development of accounting information systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. 3 credits ACCT 406/506. Accounting for Entrepreneurs. Accounting concepts and practices for entrepreneurs/small business owners. Emphasis given to the use of accounting tools to solve small business problems. 3 credits ACCT 421. International Accounting. Provides a discussion of the comparative accounting practices and problems in international environments. The course is designed to explore the concepts, principles, and practices underlying comparative international accounting systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 211 and senior standing. 3 credits ACCT 430. Income Tax Accounting. Involves the study of federal income tax law as it affects individuals, as well as other selected topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. 3 credits
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
ACCT 431. Advanced Income Tax. A study of Federal Income Tax Law as it applies to partnerships, S corporations, C Corporations, as well as other selected topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 430. 3 credits ACCT 440. Accounting Theory. Provides a study of current accounting theory and its applications. The course reviews theoretical aspects of accounting by means of problems, directed reading, and study of the various sources of accounting theory. Prerequisite: ACCT 311. 3 credits ACCT 450. Auditing. Studies both theory and practice. Topics include audit planning, internal control, audit procedures, audit reports and opinions, materiality, audit risk, evidential matter, as required by generally accepted auditing standards (GAAS), professional ethics, legal responsibilities, and other selected topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 311. 3 credits ACCT 451. Internal Auditing. An introductory course in the study of internal auditing. This course is designed to provide an in-depth exploration of the concepts, principles, and skills underlying the practice of internal auditing. Prerequisite: ACCT 311, ACCT 360 and ACCT 450. 3 credits ACCT 460. Managerial Accounting. Addresses the accounting information needs of management for planning, controlling, and decision-making purposes. The course integrates management accounting with other functional areas of business. Importance is placed on the use of technology to improve performance and quality in a highly competitive, global marketplace. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. 3 credits ACCT 470. Non-Profit Accounting. Involves the study of fund accounting, including reports, records, and special problems encountered by nonprofit entities and the generally accepted accounting principles related to them. Nonprofit entities include municipalities and state governments, universities, hospitals, and voluntary health and welfare organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. 3 credits ACCT 480. Advanced Accounting. Studies special accounting problems relating to the preparation of combined and consolidated financial statements, partnership accounting, and foreign exchange transactions and translations. Prerequisite: ACCT 311. 3 credits ACCT 490. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. 3 credits ACCT 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Independent study or research in the ara of accounting. Prerequisite: approval of department coordinator. 1-4 credits ACCT 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits ACCT 493. Workshop. Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range, but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may be lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity. 1-4 credits ACCT 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Specifically designed to provide practical training under the supervision of certified public accountant(s) coordinated by the accounting faculty. Accounting internships are graded S/U. Prerequisite: senior status plus application to and approval by the accounting department. 1-12 credits AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES (AIS) AIS 422. Issues in Contemporary Indian Life. An analysis of current American Indian life including inquiry into government policies, economics, and social adjustment to non-Indian society, and cultural changes as these relate to Indian citizens on and off the reservation. 3 credits ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH) ANTH 210. Cultural Anthropology. Introduces the nature of human culture as an adaptive ecological and evolutionary system, emphasizing basic anthropological concepts, principles, and problems. Draws data from both traditional and industrial cultures to cover such concepts as values and beliefs, social organization, economic and political order, science, technology, and aesthetic expression. 3 credits* ANTH 322. Cultures of the Plains Indians. Patterns of life and thought of the Plains Indians with emphasis on the Sioux and their neighbors. Includes social organizations, activities, arts, customs and religious beliefs. Prerequisite: ANTH 210 or consent of the instructor. 3 credits* ANTH 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issued in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with signifigant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits. ART (ART) ART 111. Drawing I. Introduces various drawing concepts, media, and processes developing perceptual and technical skills related to accurate observing and drawing. Meets six hours each week. Required of all art majors and minors. 3 credits ART 112. Drawing II. Emphasizes the continuing development of essential drawing skills and perceptual abilities as drawing concepts, compositional complexity, and creativity gain importance. Meets six hours each week. Prerequisite: ART 111. 3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ART 121. Design I 2D. Emphasizes the organization of visual elements and principles while exploring creative thought processes through art theory, concepts, materials, and techniques. Meets six hours each week. Required of all art majors and minors. 3 credits ART 122. Design II Color. Introduction to color theory as it applies to basic 2D and 3D design principles. Meets six hours each week. Prerequisites: ART 121. 3 credits ART 123. Design III. Three Dimensional Design. 3-D visual problems solved through the organization of design elements, utilizing three dimensional design language revealed through its history, theory, aesthetics and materials. 3 credits ART 211. Drawing III-Figurative. Figurative drawing studied, emphasizing the development of individual ideas and approaches to various drawing media, including the use of multimedia. Prerequisite: ART 111. 3 credits* ART 231. Painting. Initial approach to painting, employing history, materials, techniques and processes in various media as students work with concepts, objects or models. Meets six hours each week. Prerequisite: ART 111. 3 credits ART 241. Sculpture I. Introduces the development of sculptural concepts and objects through history, techniques and processes using basic three-dimensional materials, including clay, plaster, stone, metals, wood and synthetic media. Meets six hours each week. 3 credits ART 251. Ceramics I. Introduces ceramic art through its history and basic methods of forming, decorating, glazing, and firing pottery forms, including glaze chemistry and kiln construction. Meets six hours each week. 3 credits ART 281. Printmaking I. Introduces the history and techniques of relief and intaglio processes, lithography (section 1) and screen printing (section 2) as primary means of expression. Meets six hours each week. 3 credits* ART 294. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Under the supervision of an art faculty advisor, an apprenticeship is served with a local commercial art business firm. May be taken only during the final year of the program with permission of the department coordinator. 3 credits ART 331. Painting II. Emphasizes painting based on complex combinations of concepts, materials, techniques and processes using objects, models, and individual creativity. Meets six hours each week. Prerequisites: ART 231. 3 credits ART 341. Sculpture II. Continues Sculpture I as students explore individuals concepts through various techniques and materials. Meets six hours each week. Prerequisite: ART 241. 3 credits ART 342. Sculpture III. Continues Sculpture II as students further explore individual concepts through various techniques and materials. Prerequisite: ART 341. 3 credits ART 351. Ceramics II. Continues Ceramics I as students explore clay through individually creative application of concepts, techniques and glazing and firing methods. Meets six hours each week. Prerequisite: ART 251. 3 credits ART 360. Professionalism in Art. A course on career and interview skills to include portfolio development, exhibition preparation, the art world and markets, ethics in the art world, legal considerations for the artist, graduate art programs, and other professional preparations. Meets six hours per week. 3 credits ART 371. Mixed Media. Mixed Media is an introductory studio course that integrates traditional and non-traditional art mediums to create conceptually based art. Through the cross-utilization of mediums and techniques such as fibers, painting, sculpture, and collage, students will create projects that combine content, form and materials. Meets six hours each week. 3 credits* ART 381. Printmaking II. Continues Printmaking I as students further individualize their application of printing processes and media. Prerequisite: ART 281. Meets six hours each week. 3 credits* ART 430. Watercolor. Generates creative experiences in developing and evaluating visual ideas expressed in watercolor through discussion and utilization of master artists’ watercolor approaches and techniques. Meets six hours each week. Freshman or sophomore year. 3 credits* ART 431. Painting III. Continues Painting II emphasizing concepts in art history, art criticism, and issues in contemporary art as students are encouraged to use selfdirected and experimental approaches in developing subject matter and content. Meets six hours a week. Prerequisite: ART 331. 3 credits ART 470. Creative Photography Techniques. Instruction in camera and darkroom techniques. Photography field trips, lab sessions and critiques. Experimental photography. No prerequisites. 3 credits ART 488. Senior Thesis. A capstone course required of all seniors as part of the senior exit review process. In collaboration with their Academic Advisor and/or major faculty, students will identify and propose topics directly related to their fine arts experiences in studio and art history classes, in preparation for their senior exhibition. 2 credits ART 489. Senior Exhibition. A capstone course required of all seniors as part of the senior exit review process. In collaboration with their Academic Advisor and/or major art faculty, students will create and produce a professional quality art exhibition directly related to their studio and art history work in Visual Fine Art. 1 credit ART 492/592. Topics. Advanced work in any studio area. Course may be repeated. 3 credits ART 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. 1-16 credits ART 791. Individual Graduate Problems. Further study in individual problems in art or art education. 1-3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
ART DESIGN (ARTD) ARTD 231. Graphic Design. A beginning level advertising design class. Emphasis is on advertising design principles, layout stages and formats, typography, working with art and color, technical methods of commercial reproduction. The course is structured around studio projects and lectures. Six hours each week. Prerequisite: ART 121 3 credits ARTD 240. Computer Design—Page Layout. An introductory digital studio course focusing on the fundamentals of desktop design. Industry standard applications for digital page layout, typography and graphics will be explored, including the basics of scanning, basic electronic pre-press, printing and networking. Emphasis upon creating projects oriented for print and digital publishing. 3 credits ARTD 241. 2D Motion Graphics. This is an introductory course in time-based and interactive 2D graphics with an emphasis upon moving images using typography and 2D graphics and images. Students will learn basic key-frame animation, digital compositing and visual effects using interactive media ñ animation, video and sound. Prerequisite: ARTD 231. 3 credits ARTD 292. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issued in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with signifigant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits. ARTD 331. Advertising Design. An advanced advertising design course emphasizing newspaper, magazine and television advertising. The course is structured around studio projects, lectures and business tours. Meets six hours each week. Prerequisite: ARTD 231. 3 credits ARTD 333. Web Page Design. An introductory course in web page design, with an emphasis upon effective visual design, organization and structure, graphics authoring and user interface. Graphics Industry standard applications and hardware will be used. Prerequisite: ARTD 231 3 credits ARTD 334 Digital Imaging. An introductory course in the basics of editing and compositing raster graphics. Students
*indicates course is not offered every year

will explore graphic tools and techniques of computer-imaging applications for manipulating digital images. The principles of digital photography, digita cameras, and output for print and web imaging will be covered. Prerequisite: ARTD 231 3 credits ARTD 335. Digital Illustration. Computer graphics and illustration students produce professional quality illustrations for a variety of art and publication markets as they master advanced techniques in electronic imaging using computer illustration software: Prerequisite: ARTD 231 3 credits ARTD 337. Interactive Design. An introductory course in digital multimedia design, with an emphasis upon authoring, organization and structure. Graphics, text, sound and video will be utilized to create digital presentations. Graphics Industry standard applications and hardware will be used. Prerequisite: ARTD 231 3 credits ARTD 338. Digital Video Design. An introductory course in the use of digital video cameras and digital editing software. Students will learn the basics of digital video design or personal applications. Related topics will include digital video use in broadcasting, multimedia and the Internet. Prerequisite: ARTD 231 3 credits ARTD 435. 3-D Animation. A digital studio course which explores electronic media applications, animation, video/ computer interface presentation software and basic video production techniques. Focus upon creating electronic presentation projects utilizing sound, graphics, text, animation and video. Prerequisite: ARTD 231 3 credits ARTD 488. Senior Thesis. A capstone course required of all seniors as part of the senior exit review process. In collaboration with their Academic Advisor and/or major art faculty students will identify and propose topics directly related to their design studies in Advertising Design or Multi-Media Graphic Design, in preparation for their senior portfolio. 2 credits ARTD 489. Senior Portfolio. A capstone course required of all seniors as part of the senior exit review process. In collaboration with their Academic Advisor and/or major art faculty, students will create and produce a professional quality design portfolio directly related to their design studies in Advertising Design or Multi-Media Graphic Design. 1 credit

ARTD 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits ART EDUCATION (ARTE) ARTE 310. K-8 Art Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 art; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 art; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 art; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Six hours each week. Required for elementary and K-12 teachers. 2 credits ARTE 414. K-12 Art Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-12 art; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-12 art; the ability to assess student learning in K-12 art; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Meets three hours each week. Required for secondary teaching majors only. 3 credits* ARTE 491. Special Projects in Art Education. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Independent study in Art Education. 1-3 credits ARTE 798. Thesis or Project Paper. Thesis is six semester hours and may be taken in one or two semesters of three hours each. Project paper is three hours, one semester only. 6 or 3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ART HISTORY (ARTH) ARTH 100. Art Appreciation. Explores the nature of art in various aesthetic, formal, and psychological dimensions, involving analysis of art objects for understanding, enjoyment, and life enhancement. 3 credits ARTH 211. History of World Art I. Art and architecture in the historical and contextual development of the role of visual arts, including crafts, drawing painting, sculpture and architecture, in the historical and cultural development of world civilization from prehistory through the 14th century. 3 credits ARTH 212. History of World Art II. Art and architecture in the historical and contextual development of the role of visual arts, including crafts, drawing painting, sculpture and architecture, in the historical and cultural development of world civilization from Renaissance through the 20th century. 3 credits ARTH 250. Art, Religions and Values. A course in comparative religion and values using art as the primary vehicle of investigation. Western, Eastern, and Tribal religions will be studied. A global perspective of values will be explored through a wide variety of faiths and their visual expressions. 3 credits ARTH 311. History of World Art III. A survey of art from around the world between the Renaissance period (c. 1400) and the end of the 18th century. Included in this course will be a consideration of art and new forms of religious, social and political thinking in the Western World, Middle East, Asia, Americas, and Africa. 3 credits ARTH 312. History of World Art IV. A survey of art from around the world between 1800 and the present. Included in this course will be a consideration of art and life in the modern world. 3 credits ARTH 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Research in any art history field. 1-9 credits* ARTH 712. Art in the Modern World. A directed studies program in modern art from the French Revolution to the present. Contributions of Old Masters, contemporary artists, contemporary architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts are studied in terms of their effect on today’s world. 1-3 credits* ATHLETIC TRAINING (AT) AT 164. Introduction to Athletic Training. A basic introductory course designed to acquaint students interested in athletic training with all aspects of the profession. 2 credits BUSINESS (BADM) BADM 101. Survey of Business. This course is an introduction to the basic business disciplines and the organization and management of the American Enterprise System. It also introduces students to the necessary college level skills of critical thinking, effective communication and cooperative and effective learning. 3 credits BADM 120. Mathematics for Business. A review of mathematical skills with emphasis on solving business problems. 3 credits BADM 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits BADM 220. Business Statistics. This course introduces students to basic statistical methods, topics, with computer applications, include: descriptive statistics, probability, distributions, sampling, estimation and index numbers with emphasis on applications in business and economics. Prerequisite: MATH 102. 3 credits BADM 244. Business Communications. Study and practical application of the principles and psychology of effective writing. The course will include hands-on experience in a variety of relevant communication formats and technologies. Major emphasis will be on written communications. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits BADM 251. Consumer Credit and Collections. The role of credit and collection agencies within the broad financial community and persuasive methods of obtaining repayment on delinquent accounts and default loans. 2 credits BADM 252. Commercial Credit and Collections. Practical aspects of State and Federal consumer and commercial credit management and bankruptcy proceedings, Federal and State Creditor’s Rights and Fair Debt Collection Practices and international credit and collections transactions. 2 credits BADM 280. Personal Finance. This course is a survey of individual investment opportunities, topics include common and preferred stocks and corporate bonds, auto, life and health insurance, home ownership, and wills and estate planning. 3 credits BADM 284. Career Planning. Making a more effective transition from college life to a career in the private, public or non-profit sectors. Placement procedures including interviewing and preparation of placement files, resumes and correspondence will be addressed. Grade assigned S/U. 1 credit BADM 291. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits BADM 292. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. Independent study or research in the area of business and business education. Prerequisite: approval of department doordinator. 1-3 credits. BADM 293. Workshop. Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range, but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may be lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity. 1-3 credits.
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
BADM 294. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Business internships are graded S/U. 1-12 credits BADM 310. Business Finance. Business finance is an overview of financial theory including the time of value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure theory, dividend policies, asset pricing, risk and return, the efficient markets hypothesis, bond and stock valuation, business performance evaluation and other financial topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. 3 credits BADM 312. Introduction to Banking. This course provides the students with background in the context, structure and operation of banks as profit-making enterprises; deposit products and services, opening accounts; check processing and other payment systems; specialized services such as investments, insurance, cash management and global banking; Fiduciary role of banks in protecting customer information, assets, deterring crime; developing fee-based services; electronic payments systems such as debit cards, Check 21, and the Internet; and customer service, cross-selling and referrals, and building customer relationships. 3 credits BADM 334. Small Business Management. This course applies business policies and procedures to the small business environment. As such, it is designed for students contemplating management or ownership of a small business. Topics include the nature of the entrepreneur, financing and ownership options, marketing, government regulations, taxation, inventory control and other relevant business functions. Prerequisite: BADM 360. 3 credits BADM 336. Entrepreneurship I. This course is an introduction to the concepts, terminology, and process of new venture creation, operation and growth, as well as the introduction of entrepreneurial management practices into existing businesses New ventures include public and nonprofit institutions, as well as for profit businesses. This course will assist in the identification of entrepreneurial management opportunities and strategies and the role of personal factors (including creativity). Legal, ethical, and social reponsibilities are emphasized. 3 credits BADM 342. Introduction to Trust Management . This course presents an overview of the trust department in a commercial bank, including it fit with operations, service provision and delivery. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of accumulating, preserving, and disposing of an estate. The course also provides an introduction to the trust industry, including the products and services associated with a trust institution, and management of products and services. Prerequisite: BADM 411, BADM 417. 3 credits BADM 350. Legal Environment of Business. This is a study of legal topics as they apply to the business environment. Topics include an introduction to the law, the U.S. court system, legal process, government regulation, and criminal, tort, and contract issues. 3 credits BADM 351. Business Law. The course involves a thorough study of the law of contract, sales, product liability, agency, corporations and other selected topics. Prerequisite: BADM 350. 3 credits BADM 353. Bank Regulation and Compliance. This course focuses on the regulatory environment for banks and financial institutions, with particular emphasis on compliance and reporting requirements for the community commercial banker. Prerequisite: BADM 350. 3 credits BADM 360. Organization and Management. This course is a study of management, including the planning, directing, controlling and coordinating of the various activities involved in operating a business enterprise. 3 credits BADM 362. Supervisory Management. Basic techniques: the role of the supervisor, understanding human behavior, developing good human relations. Effective communication, planning and organizing work, decision making and discipline. For supervisors and potential supervisors. 3 credits BADM 370. Marketing. This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and practices of modern marketing. Topics include marketing, and its linkages to business, consumer behavior, marketing research, strategy and planning, product and pricing decisions, distribution and promotion decisions, marketing management, and evaluation and control aspects for both consumer and industrial goods. 3 credits BADM 372. Advertising. This course is a survey of advertising principles including advertising terminology, communication processes, advertising agencies, media, and ad copy and layout elements. Prerequisite: BADM 370. 3 credits BADM 391. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits BADM 392. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. Independent study or research in the area of business and business education. Prerequisite: approval of department coordinator. 1-3 credits. BADM 402. Bank Safety and Soundness. The annual “Safety and Soundness” examination is the most comprehensive regulatory examination to which every federally insured financial institution is subject. Examiners intnsely review six subjects with the acronym “CAMELS”Capital adequancy, Asset quality, Management, Earnings, Liquidity and Sensitivity to market risks. Each category is graded. An overall grade is also assigned- and the operational flexibility of the bank and perhaps the longevity of the bank senior management are on the line. This course explores each of the six categories and how the bank examiners perform ther assessments. It also demonstrates the potential tradeoffs that bank management must wrestle with between CAMELS categories’ grades. 3 credits BADM 403. Marketing Communications. This course is designed for students who are interested in stakeholder communications, including: public relations, media relations, and promotions. Students will examine the use of promotional

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
vehicles to communicate to existing and potential stakeholders in support of corporate marketing plans and objectives. Students will gain experience with the tools used in developing promotional and public relations campaigns, improving customer satisfaction, ethical issues management, and crisis management. Prerequisite: BADM 370. 3 credits BADM 404. Not-For-Profit Marketing. This course reflects the increasing importance of marketing in the not-for-profit sector. It discusses marketing needs and approaches in the sector and the value of it services. This course will also encourage students to consider how concepts of marketing are developed and used in a range of not-for-profit organizations, including: charities, the public sector, and other political, religious and social agencies. Coursework emphasizes the skills and techniques used to develop innovative marketing plans that promote interest in the products, services and people that comprise these organizations. Prerequisite: BADM 370. 3 credits BADM 406/506 Accounting for Entrepreneurs. Accounting concepts and practices for entrepreneurs/small business owners. Emphasis given to the use of accounting tools to solve small business problems. 3 credits BADM 410. Asset and Liability Management. Presents the processes of acquiring and investing bank funds to maximize return and economic value of equity, while controlling for financial risks. Emphasizes the importance of balancing the maximization of profitability/shareholder wealth with credit, liquidity, and market risks. Prerequisite: ACCT 211, BADM 310. 3 credits BADM 411/511. Investments. This course is a thorough study of the equity market including fundamental valuation techniques, asset allocation, the efficient markets hypothesis and its implications, portfolio theory, risk and return, the primary and secondary market mechanisms, security market indicators, and international investing. An overview of the bond market including bond valuation, duration, and bond portfolio management, and an introduction to options, futures, and forward contracts are provided. The vital roles of computer technology and electronic trading are also explored. Prerequisite: BADM 310. 3 credits BADM 413. Advanced Corporate Finance. This course utilizes a combination of cases and theory in studying the investment, financing and dividend decisions of the firm. The emphasis is on long-term debt and equity financing as well as managing financial risk. Prerequisite: BADM 310. 3 credits BADM 418. Financial Futures and Options. This course is a study of futures, options, and related derivative security markets, theoretical analysis and practical issues and concerns are examined. Prerequisite: BADM 310. 3 credits BADM 422. Modern Banking Crises in America. From “wildcat” banking to the establishment of the Federal Reserve system; from the consistent economic growth and development to the disaster of the Great Depression; from the introduction of federal deposit insurance to the failure of thousands of insured financial institutions in the 1980’s and 1990’s- this course investigates the history of banking and banking regulation in the United States, with particular emphasis on recent history. A strong light will shine upon triumphs and tragedies, heroes and villains, regulatory achievements and regulatory blunders, economic growth and monetary policy mismanagement. The result: a color and facinating review of economic and banking history that will demonstrate the fragile and incendiary balnace between money, banking, bank regulation and monetary policy. 3 credits BADM 424. Operations Research. This course looks at quantitative tools and methods used in the decision making process of business organizations. Linear programming, decision making under uncertainty, simulation, inventory models and queuing models will be studied. Prerequisite: BADM 220. 3 credits BADM 431. Risk Analysis and Insurance. This course is a study of the management of non-speculative risks and the management devices available for dealing with them. Emphasis is placed on insurance as a tool for managing risks by individuals and businesses. 3 credits BADM 433. Real Estate. This course is a study of real property interests including brokerage, law, financing, investments, appraisal, property development, property management and marketing. 3 credits BADM 434. Consumer Lending and Credit Cards. This course will exposed the student to the risk / return profiles of different types of consumer loans, consumer credit scoring, and the management of credit cards as an active asset of a commercial bank. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. 3 credits BADM 438. Entrepreneurship II. This course focuses on the process of screening an opportunity, drafting a personal entrepreneurial strategy, and understanding the business plan writing process. Building the entrepreneurial team and the acquisition and management of financial resources are emphasized along with the venture growth, harvest strategies, and valuation. 3 credits BADM 439. Quality Management. Philosophy and methods for continuously improving performance at every level in an organization will be studied. It is designed specifically to improve customer service by improving the quality of products and/or services and increase productivity. 3 credits BADM 440. International Financial Management. A study of the financial management of an international firm involved in multi-currency transactions. The financial manager in this environment must be aware of the causes and consequences to the international firm operating in the uncertain international atmosphere. Prerequisites: BADM 310. 3 credits BADM 446. Community Banking Issues. Community banks play a large role in the growth and economic development of local communities. This course investigates the role of banks and financial institutions in a community, as well as strategies and best practices for banks and other financial institutions that enable them and their communities to grow and prosper despite intense and increased competition. 3 credits BADM 449. Commercial and Ag Lending. This course will focus on the loan transaction process and the impact of commercial and mortgage lending on the institution’s asset quality. Course content will discuss collateral, covenants, pricing, documentation, borrower monitoring, and credit analysis. Loan portfolio acquisition, maintenance, and management will also be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: ACCT 211, BADM 310. 3 credits BADM 450. Business Leadership. This course examines the relevant management and behavioral science concepts,
*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
techniques, and research essential to an understanding of leadership. The major theories of leadership are reviewed. Students develop and improve upon their own leadership capabilities through familiarity with the current literature, experiential exercises, and applied research. Prerequisite: BADM 360. 3 credits BADM 451 Organizational Development. This course explores and illustrates the basic approaches to organizational development. Both transactional and transformational approaches to organizational development are presented in the context of real-world management situations. Prerequisite: BADM 360. 3 credits BADM 454. Lending and Credit Risk Management. The course begins with a review of analytical underwriting principles illustrated via case studies. It proceeds to the evaluation of credit risk, principally from a probabilities, portfolio point of view, in which regulatory standards for asset quality and capital adequacy are introduced. It concludes with consideration of credit risk management techniques, including the assessment of asset concentrations, diversification, securitization and the use of credit derivatives. 3 credits BADM 457. Business Ethics. This course is a study of the ethical implications of managerial decisions. Topics covered include the responsibility of the organization to the individual and society, the role of the individual within the organization, and ethical systems for American business. The course provides an examination and assessment of current American business practices. 3 credits BADM 458. International Business Law. This course is a study of the legal framework in which international business is conducted. Competing national laws and court systems are examined with respect to international business transactions and the resolution of international business disputes. International commercial law, trade law, trade organizations, and coalitions are examined. Ethical, cultural, and diversity issues are explored. Prerequisite: BADM 350. 3 credits BADM 459 Direct Marketing. This course examines the use of direct marketing techniques as an increasingly important distribution function. The pros and cons of direct marketing as well as the mechanics of direct marketing efforts are presented to students. Prerequiisite: BADM 370. 3 credits
*indicates course is not offered every year

BADM 460/560. Human Resource Management. This course provides a survey of managerial practices with respect to the management of the human resource function and an introduction to the topic of human resource management as an occupational choice. Major areas of inquiry include recruitment and selection, training and development, compensation and benefits administration and work force integration and maintenance. Prerequisite: BADM 360. 3 credits BADM 463. Women in Management. This course explores the organizational changes that have occurred in the business environment over the past five decades in response to increasingly larger numbers of women entering the workplace, and the implications of these changes for managers. As an “overview” course, we will explore a range of topics, including: the historical factors driving the changes; workplace diversity issues related to leadership, teamwork, and communication; social change issues related to the challenge of balancing work and family; and career paths in the future. Prerequisite: BADM 360. 3 credits BADM 464/564. Organizational Behavior. This course is a study of individuals and groups. Traditional organization theory and concepts are presented and study is given to motivation, group dynamics, and methods of coordination, change, and adaptation within an organization. Prerequisite: BADM 360. 3 credits BADM 467. Labor-Management Relations. This course is a survey of the historical, current, and emergent patterns in local, state, and federal labor organizations relating to collective bargaining. Topics include an analysis of the rights and obligations of both management and unions as influenced by legislation, administrative decisions, and court cases. Student exercises in collective bargaining negotiations, and contract agreements, nationally and globally, will be tracked and discussed. A collective bargaining agreement will be negotiated as a student exercise. Prerequisite: BADM 360. 3 credits BADM 468. International Management. A study of the management required in an internationally oriented firm with emphasis on policy formulating and planning. Also emphasized are relationships between business, cultural and political factors. Prerequisites: BADM 360. 3 credits

BADM 469. Project Management. Projects are becoming a major tool for reaching the strategic goals of the organization. This course is designed for individuals who will be required to manage a variety of projects. A project is a complex, nonroutine, one-time effort limited by time, budget, resources, and performance specifications designed to meet customer needs. At the end of this course students will gain experience in mastering the tools, concepts, and techniques of project management. Prerequisite: BADM/ECON 220; BADM 360. 3 credits BADM 471. Marketing Management. This course is a study of the field of marketing and the influences that affect marketing strategy. The focus is on the methods that marketing managers use to develop and evaluate marketing mix decisions. Prerequisites: BADM 370. 3 credits BADM 473. Retail Management. This course is a study of competitive structure, trade area analysis, site selection, merchandise planning and control, pricing, buying, credit policy and research. Managerial problems concerning the planning and operation of retail facilities are emphasized. Prerequisite: BADM 370. 3 credits BADM 474. Personal Selling. This course is a study of the skills needed to develop and manage long-term relationships with customers and suppliers. Emphasis is placed on relationship selling, presentation, prospecting, handling objectives and closing techniques with consideration given to differences in the global marketplace. Prerequisite: BADM 370. 3 credits BADM 475. Consumer Behavior. This course is a study of the various factors that influence consumers in their decisions relative to buying, using and disposing of goods, services and ideas. The course examines concepts and theories from the behavioral sciences and analyzes their application in developing marketing strategies. Prerequisite: BADM 370. 3 credits BADM 476/576. Marketing Research. This course provides an in-depth study of the primary methodologies of marketing research. Emphasis is placed on collecting, analyzing, interpreting and presenting information for the purpose of reducing uncertainty surrounding marketing and management decisions. Prerequisite: BADM 370 and BADM 220. 3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BADM 478. International Marketing. This course is a study of the application of marketing principles and concepts in diverse cultural, economic, political, legal, and technological international environments. Prerequisite: BADM 370. 3 credits BADM 482. Business Policy and Strategy. This course is designed to develop an understanding of strategy formulation, implementation, and evaluation. It involves integrating all functional areas of business, analyzing the environment in which the firm operates, and choosing strategies that enable the firm to meet its objectives. Prerequisite: BADM 310, BADM 350, BADM 360, BADM 370 and senior standing. 3 credits BADM 486/586. Readings in Business Problems. Independent study or research in the area of business and business education. Prerequisite: approval of department coordinator. 1-3 credits BADM 489. Business Plan Writing and Competition. Student will write a business plan and present it to a panel of faculty and business community members. The top three business plans will move on to a statewide competition. 1 credit BADM 491. Independent Study/Readings. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits BADM 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits. BADM 493/593. Workshop. Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range, but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may be lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity. 1-3 credits BADM 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. 1-12 credits BADM 591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-3 credits BADM 605. Foundations of Finance. Topics included are mathematics of finance, liquidity management, capital budgeting, liability management and value creation. 3 credits BADM 620. Quantitative Procedures for Business. This is an accelerated course in applications of mathematics and statistics to business and economics. Topic coverage includes: 1) equations and their graphs; 2) matrices and their operations; 3) differential calculus, in particular, first and second derivatives of single and multi-variable functions; 4) descriptive statistics, 5) probability; 6) distributions; 7) hypothesis testing; 8) linear regression analysis; 9) time series analysis; and 10) the modeling of business and economic problems. Computer applications are included. 3 credits BADM 708. International Finance. Balance of payment analysis, international equilibrium and the mechanism of adjustment, international money markets and monetary standards, capital movements and the objectives of international monetary movement and corporate finance. 3 credits BADM 715. International Trade. Theoretical analysis, historical survey and current problems of international trade; an examination of international economic policies and institutions especially as they relate to national political and economic objectives; trade barriers and controls. 3 credits BUSINESS EDUCATION (BED) BED 480. 7-12 Business Education Methods. Students develop an understand of the tools of inquiry of business; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to business; the ability to assess student learning in business; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits BED 791. Readings in Business Education. Selected readings in the areas of shorthand, typewriting, bookkeeping, office practice, office machines, basic business and data processing. 1-3 credits BED 798. Thesis or Project Paper. Thesis is six semester hours and may be taken in one semester or in two semesters of three hours each. Project paper is three hours, one semester only. 3 or 6 credits BIOLOGY (BIOL) BIOL 101/101L. Biology Survey I. Study of the nature, diversity, and classification of life; ecology; cells and cell cycles, mendelian and modern genetics evolution and evolution theory. Intended for those not majoring in Biology. Lecture, two hours; lab or small group discussion, two hours per week. 3 credits (This course does not serve as a prerequisite for upper division courses in biology.) (BIOL 151-151L and 153-153L is the prerequisite for all upper level biology courses unless otherwise indicated.) BIOL 151/151L. General Biology I. The introductory course for those majoring in Biology and Microbiology. Presents the concepts of cell biology, evolution, heredity, molecular genetics and ecology. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week. 4 credits BIOL 153/153L. General Biology II. A continuation of BIOL 151, the introductory course for those majoring in Biology and Microbiology. Presents the concepts of animal and plant structure and function, energetics, and reproduction. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 151-151L. 4 credits
*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
BIOL 211. Environmental Biology. Historic and current ecological principles and human impact on the environment. Alternative modes of action are sought and discussed for South Dakota and the world. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 recommended. 3 credits BIOL 221/221L. Human Anatomy. Structures of various systems in the human body are presented as a structural basis for physiology. Lecture-laboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 151. 4 credits BIOL 291. Special Problems. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. In depth exploration of topics in biology selected to complement current course offerings. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 1-4 credits BIOL 301/301L. Plant Systematics. Principles of phylogeny, classification, nomenclature, and evolution; demonstrations, field study and laboratory practice in collection, preserving and identifying plants. Lecturelaboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 4 credits* BIOL 311/311L. Principles of Ecology. Basic principles of ecology including the subdisciplines of physiological ecology, population ecology, community ecology, evolutionary ecology, and ecosystems ecology from both a theoretical and applied aspect. Lecture-laboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 153-153L. 4 credits* BIOL 325/325L. Physiology. Basic cell physiology, neural, hormonal and neuroendocrine control systems. Coordinated body functions. Lecture-laboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 151, CHEM 112 and CHEM 114. 4 credits BIOL 331/331L. Microbiology. This will be a study of the morphology and physiology of various groups of microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria. Lecturelaboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 151, CHEM 112, CHEM 114. 4 credits BIOL 343/343L. Cell and Molecular Biology. Studies of structure, molecular composition, physiology, heredity and growth of cells form the contents of this course. Lecture/lab six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 151, CHEM 114. 4 credits* BIOL 351-351L. Plant Structure and Function. Plant diversity (including algae and fungi): structure, function, and evolutionary relationships. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. Lecturelaboratory, six hours per week. 4 credits BIOL 357/357L. Invertebrate Zoology. A systematic study of the invertebrates, including their physical characteristics, relationships, life histories, and economic importance makes up the course. Lecture-laboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 4 credits* BIOL 363/363L. Ornithology. Identification of bird species; life histories, ecology, habits, and special structural and physiological adaptations of various groups. Lecturelaboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 4 credits* BIOL 365/365L. Vertebrate Zoology. Structure and ways of life of the vertebrate classes. General anatomy, organ systems, and special characteristics of each class of vertebrates as well as detailed classification of the major taxa down to the family level. Lecture-laboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 4 credits* BIOL 371/371L. Genetics. Principles governing the nature, transmission and function of hereditary material with application to plants, animals, humans and microorganisms. Lecture-laboratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 4 credits BIOL 373. Evolution. Surveys evidence for biological evolution and the historical development of evolutionary theory, and examines genetic and other mechanisms responsible for life’s diversity. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 2 credits* BIOL 422/422L. Immunology. Immunology and immunochemistry, mechanisms of immunologic injury, and their application to clinical immunology. Serological techniques for detecting and measuring the presence of antigens or antibodies in specimens and production of immune serum. Prerequisite: CHEM 114-114L. 4 credits* BIOL 465. Molecular Biology II Lab. Screening recombinant DNA libraries; DNA sequencing; analysis of proteins; detection of proteins; RNA transfer and hybridization analyses; use of nucleic acid and protein databases. Laboratory six hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 343, CHEM 112-/114. 2 credits BIOL 467/467L. Parasitology. This course will prepare students in the area of ecological effects of toxic substances and to other contaminants. Wildlife toxicology and impacts of agriculture on the northern plains will be emphasized. Topics covered will include pesticides, heavy metals, aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicity and other topics related to wildlife toxicology. Lecture-laboratory, four hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 3 credits* BIOL 468. Scientific Imaging. This course is a technology course enabling students to become proficient at scientific imaging. The course will contain the following components: digital microscopy techniques, digital/multimedia file editing and web publishing, field photography techniques and analysis, and GPS and GIS systems. 3 credits* BIOL 483/483/L. Developmental Biology. Analysis of the processes of animal development beginning with the formation of female and male gametes (ova and sperm) and ending with organ differentiation. Evolutionary concepts of animal development, developmental genetics, and molecular biological approaches to the analysis of development. Prerequisite: BIOL 153. 4 credits* BIOL 484/484L. Environmental Science and Conservation. An in-depth coverage of the impact of mankind on natural resources exploring ways in which these can be harnessed in an environmentally sustainable fashion. Topics covered include: population, habitat conservation, biodiversity, soil erosion, water supplies, pollution, waste disposal and the energy crisis. Lectures are complemented with films and class surveys of current environmental statistics using library resources and the Internet. Prerequisites: BIOL 151 and 153. 3 credits*

*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BIOL 490. Senior Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. An examination of professional ethics and emphasizing access to the scientific literature, use of the library, and presentation of a seminar. 1 credit BIOL 491/591. Independent Study/Independent Research. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Research opportunity at three levels: one semester hour at the freshman-sophomore level, and one or two semester hours at upper class and graduate level in a specific area of student interest. Prerequisite: consent of project advisor. 1-4 credits BIOL 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollment are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. In depth exploration of topics in biology selected to complement current course offerings. Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 153. 1-5 credits BIOL 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. An experience in the practical application of biological studies to a specific job situation. An elective course. Prerequisite: consent of biology faculty supervisor and department coordinator. 1-12 credits BIOL 495. Practicum. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Student assistants will attend, help set up and help teach an introductory science laboratory, in collaboration with a faculty instructor. Prerequisites: junior standing, 16 hours completed in appropriate lab courses, and permission of the lab instructor and department coordinator. 1 credit BIOL 496. Field Experience. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study established between the student, instructor and field experience supervisor. Due to the presence of a field experience supervisor, a lower level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case in an internship or practicum course. 1-12 credits BIOL 700. Principles of Biology. A general review with emphasis on the latest theories and concepts in areas such as biochemistry of life, cell theory and ultrastructure, physiological functions, general and molecular genetics, developmental patterns, diversity of life, evolution and ecology. Includes field and laboratory experiments in modern biological problems. 4 credits* BIOL 798. Thesis or Project Paper. 6 or 3 credits* MICR 433/433L. Medical Microbiology and Lab. Principles of medical microbiology including a survey of the most clinically significant bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral diseases in the world, with an emphasis on those most prevalent in North America. Case studies will address: morphology, physiology, adn virulence of the microbes adn the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of the diseases they cause. Prerequisite: BIOL 331 or CHEM 112 or CHEM 114. 4 credts SEED 413. 7-12 Science Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of 7-12 science; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to 7-12 science; the ability to assess student learning in 7-12 science; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Current approaches to secondary teaching in science. Laboratory experiences, science facilities and purchases. Students with majors and/or minors in more than one science field will enroll for three hours credit, others will enroll for two hours credit. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2-3 credits CENTER OF EXCELLENCE (CEX) CEX 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits. CEX 498. Undergraduate Research/Scholarship. Independent research problems/projects or scholarship activities. The plan of study is negotiated by the faculty member and the student. Contact between the two may be extensive and intensive. Does not include research courses which are theoretical. 1-6 credits. COUNSELOR EDUCATION (CGPS) CGPS 710. Introduction to School Counseling. A survey of student personnel services in the secondary schools with emphasis on guidance services. Examines the role of the teacher, administrator, and the student personnel worker in relation to students and parents. 2 credits CGPS 711. Counseling of Children and Adolescents. A study of individual and group counseling approaches with children and adolescents, developmental, preventative and remedial guidance activities and consulting practices with teachers and parents. Investigation into at-risk and pathological behavior patterns and treatment methods. 3 credits
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
CGPS 713. Administration Counseling Services. Examines the organization, administration and evaluation of counseling and guidance programs in the school and in community settings. 2 credits CGPS 736. Individual Appraisal. An intensive study of the process of collecting, summarizing, interpreting, and utilizing information pertaining to the understanding of the individual. 3 credits CGPS 737. Psychopathology & Diagnosis. Study of causes, manifestations, and treatment of behavioral deviations and mental disorders occurring over the life span. Emphasis on diagnosis according to DSM classifications. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A or equivalent. 3 credits CGPS 739. Psychopharmacology. A study of brain chemistry and its interaction with drugs, both prescribed and illicit. Behavioral aspects related to the use of drugs as it relates to treatment and therapy. 2 credits CGPS 740. Case Management and Treatment Planning. A holistic approach will be taught when developing case management plans for a variety of clients, problems and needs. The importance of professional writing and reporting will be presented. The study, review and completion of different styles of treatment plans. Introduction to technology within the field of counseling utilized for casenotes, diagnostics and treatment planners. 2 credits CGPS 742. Career and Lifespan Development. Collecting, evaluating, and using occupational, educational and social information as it applies to career counseling and guidance in schools and community settings. Career development and career counseling techniques also are addressed. 3 credits CGPS 755. Human Development. A study of the nature and needs of individuals throughout the life span. Theories of human development, cognition, personality and learning as they relate to normal and abnormal behavior are addressed. Cultural perspectives in development are explored. 2 credits CGPS 758. Counseling Skills. The study and application of effective communication and counseling/therapy skills utilized by community and school counselors. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 credits CGPS 761. Theories of Counseling. Theories, skills and approaches in counseling. Emphasizes characteristics of the counselor and evaluation of counseling. 3 credits CGPS 762. Socio-Cultural Foundations. A study of the social changes, mores and trends underlying age, gender, racial, religious and socioeconomic issues and conflicts and strategies for intervention with these issues and conflicts. 3 credits CGPS 763. Applications of Counseling Techniques. A study of the use of counseling techniques from a theoretical perspective. Client problems will be studied and discussed. Students will determine the best intervention strategy to be utilized with presenting problem. By using two-way mirrors and video taping students will do counseling in the lab setting. Prerequisites: CGPS 758, and 761. 3 credits CGPS 765. Group Counseling I. A study of group dynamics and group counseling theory. Emphasis on experiential group experiences. 3 credits (Must be followed by CGPS 766.) CGPS 766. Group Counseling II. Application of group dynamics and group counseling theory to the counseling process. Twenty group hours required in addition to class meetings. Prerequisite: CGPS 765 and permission of the instructor. 3 credits CGPS 768. Family Counseling. An introduction to the systems approach in counseling interventions with families. Major theories of systems change are studied along with experiential techniques that may be used by school and agency counselors. 2 credits CGPS 769. Ethics in the Counseling Profession. A study of ethical principles and professionalism within the counseling profession. Investigations into therapy and techniques used with clients. The Ethical Standards of the American Counseling Association will be utilized. 2 credits CGPS 790. Seminar in Current Trends and Issues in Counseling. Graduate students investigate a variety of specific topics, problems, and issues related to guidance and counseling. Consult current course schedule for selected topics. 1-3 credits CGPS 791. Individual Projects in Guidance. Qualified students research problems of special concern in the area of guidance. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies. 1-3 credits CGPS 792. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits. CGPS 794. Internship. Extended supervised professional counseling experience in the elementary and/or secondary school. 100 clock hours of counseling activity per semester hour is required. Extended supervised professional counseling experience in Community Counseling Agencies. 100 clock hours of counseling activity per semester hour is required. Prerequisite: CGPS 786 or 787, 4-6 credits CGPS 795. Practicum. Supervised counseling experience in elementary/secondary schools. A minimum of 300 clock hours in counseling activities is required. The student must also have been admitted to, and be currently pursuing a graduate degree in counseling. Supervised counseling experience in community counseling agencies. A minimum of 300 clock hours in counseling activities is required. Prerequisites: CGPS 736, 742, 758, 761, 765, and permission of the instructor. The student must also have been admitted to, and be currently pursuing a graduate degree in counseling. 3 credits CGPS 798. Research Paper or Project Paper or Thesis. All guidance/counseling students are required to complete a research paper. This paper is an extension of EDER 761 and is designed to give the student experience in actual research. The research paper is graded S/U and carries no credit. In lieu of the research paper, the student may take the Project Paper for 3 semester hours or the Thesis for 6 semester hours. The Thesis may be taken in one semester or in two semesters of three hours each. 0 or 3 or 6 credits Other graduate courses pertaining to counselor education may be found in the Psychology and School Psychology sections of this catalog.

*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CHEMISTRY (CHEM) CHEM 106/106L. Chemistry Survey. A one-semester survey of chemistry. Not intended for those needing an extensive chemistry background. Introduction to the properties of matter, atomic structure, bonding, stoichiometry, kinetics, equilibrium, states of matter, solutions, and acid-base concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 102 (concurrent enrollment allowed). 4 credits (3 Lecture, 1 Lab) CHEM 112/112L. General Chemistry I. An introduction to the basic principles of chemistry for students needing an extensive background in chemistry (including chemistry majors, science majors, and pre-professional students). Completion of a high school course in chemistry is recommended. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or concurrent enrollment. 4 credits (3 Lecture, 1 Lab) CHEM 114/114L. General Chemistry II. A continuation of CHEM 112. An introduction to the basic principles of chemistry for students needing an extensive background in chemistry. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 112 and MATH 102. 4 credits (3 Lecture, 1 Lab) CHEM 185. The Impact of Modern Science on Society. A detailed study of selected scientific questions which have immediate impact on societal problems. Analyses will require application of scientific principles and information in a societal context. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or CHEM 106 recommended. 2 credits* CHEM 291. Independent Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or few students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-3 credits CHEM 314. Criminalistics. Criminalistics is defined as the application of scientific knowledge to the investigation of crimes. Students will learn to apply various avenues of scientific inquiry to examination of criminal evidence. Topics will include hair, fiber and paint analysis, forensic toxicology, forensic toxicology, forensic serology, fingerprint identification, and DNA testing. Prerequisites: BIOL 343, CHEM 112, CHEM 114, CHEM 326, CHEM 328, and CJUS 313 or concurrent enrollment in CJUS 313. 3 credits CHEM 328/328L. Organic Chemistry II. A continuation of CHEM 326. A systematic treatment of chemistry of carbon compounds, including nomenclature, structurereactivity relationships, reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and spectroscopy. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 326. 4 credits (3 Lecture, 1 Lab) CHEM 332/332L. Analytical Chemistry. Fundamental concepts and principles of quantitative chemical analysis including quantitative chemical equilibrium calculations and error analysis applied to the evaluation of experimental measurements and data. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 114. 4 credits (3 Lecture, 1 Lab) CHEM 342. Physical Chemistry I. A study of the fundamental principles governing the behavior of chemical systems. Topics covered in the two-semester sequence include thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 211, 213, CHEM 326, MATH 225 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 225. 3 credits* CHEM 344. Physical Chemistry II. A continuation of Physical Chemistry I. A study of the fundamental principles governing the behavior of chemical systems. Prerequisites: PHYS 211, PHYS 213, CHEM 326, and MATH 125 (or concurrent enrollment in MATH 125). Lecture: 3 hours. 3 credits CHEM 384. Advanced Laboratory Techniques. Introduction to synthetic techniques, and spectrophotometric and spectroscopic means of characterization of compounds. Projects will cover organic, inorganic and organometallic compounds, provide an introduction to material research and illustrate the applications of thermodynamics in the laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 326 and CHEM 328. 1 credit CHEM 391. Independent Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or few students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-5 credits CHEM 434/434L. Instrumental Analysis. Theory and application of modern instrumental methods to chemical analysis. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 332. 4 credits* (3 Lecture, 1 Lab) CHEM 452/552. Inorganic Chemistry. Theoretical and periodic aspects of inorganic chemistry. Lecture, three hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 211, PHYS 213 and MATH 121 or concurrent enrollment. 3 credits* CHEM 460/460L. Biochemistry. A one-semester course in biomolecules, metabolism, and transmission of genetic information. The structures, properties, and biochemical functions of mono- and polysaccharides, lipids, amino acids, proteins and nucleic acids are introduced. Metabolic pathways and cycles for the catabolism and anabolism of sugars, triglycerides, steroids, amino acids, proteins, and polynucleotides are detailed. Energetics, the potential fates of chemical intermediates, and information storage and transmission are studied. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week.Prerequisites: CHEM 326. 4 credits* CHEM 482. Environmental Chemistry. Examination of the chemistry and chemical processes of the environment, including the role of chemistry in current environmental issues. 3 credits* CHEM 490. Senior Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. An examination of professional ethics and emphasizing access to the scientific literature, use of the library, and presentation of a seminar. 1 credit
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
CHEM 491-491L/591-591L. Independent Study in Chemistry. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Conducted on a staff consultation basis. 1-9 credits CHEM 492/592. Special Topics in Chemistry. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollment are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-onone student/teacher involvement. As arranged. 1-4 credits* CHEM 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. An experience in the practical application of chemistry studies to a specific job situation. An elective course for the basic chemistry major. 5-6 credits are required for the forensic science specialization. Prerequisite: consent of chemistry supervisor and department coordinator. 1-12 credits CHEM 495. Practicum in Teaching Chemistry Laboratory. Student assistants will attend, help set up and help teach an introductory science laboratory, in collaboration with a faculty instructor. Prerequisites: lab courses, and permission of the lab instructor and department coordinator. 1 credit CHEM 498. Undergraduate Research. Independent research problems/projects or scholarship activities. The plan of study is negotiated by the faculty member and the student. Contact between the two may be extensive and intensive. Does not include research courses which are theoretical. The approach to a typical research problem is carefully analyzed with emphasis on originality, familiarity with current literature, advanced laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: staff approval required. 1-2 credits CHEM 689. Modern Methods in the Teaching of Chemistry. Modern secondary chemistry curricula. Topics include Chem Com, use of CD ROMS, videodiscs, multimedia, computers and probes and laboratory activities. 3 credits* CHEM 712. Principles of Chemistry. Atomic structure and modern orbital theory as applied to the periodic table and chemical bonding, names, formulas, and equations. Acids, bases, salts and the physical states of matter will also be examined in terms of modern concepts of the chemical bond. 3 credits CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJUS) CJUS 201. Introduction to Criminal Justice. Overviews of the criminal justice institutions involved in the operations of criminal law including the police, the attorney, the bail system, the trial, the guilty plea, sentencing, corrections and an analysis of criminal law in terms of why certain kinds of conduct are criminal in our society. 3 credits CJUS 203. Policing in a Free Society. Presents the role of law enforcement within the criminal justice system, including law enforcement organizations and functions of separate operational units. Also examines the role of the police in a democratic society, covering concepts such as police services, crime deterrence, discretion and enforcement policies. 3 credits CJUS 313. Crime Scene Investigation. This course will focus on the law enforcement aspects of forensic science. It will include sections on crime science protocol, collection of evidence, interpretation of crime scene data, and photographic documentation techniques. Use of computer technologies and crime scene equipment will be implemented as appropriate throughout the course. Prerequisites: CHEM 112, CHEM 114 and CJUS 433. 3 credits CJUS 314. Criminalistics. Criminalistics is defined as the application of scientific knowledge to the investigation of crimes. Students will learn to apply various avenues of scientific inquiry to examination of criminal evidence. Topics will include hair, fiber and paint analysis, forensic toxicology, forensic toxicology, forensic serology, fingerprint identification, and DNA testing. Prerequisites: BIOL 343, CHEM 112, CHEM 114, CHEM 326, CHEM 328, and CJUS 313 or concurrent enrollment in CJUS 313 3 credits CJUS 401. Law and Society. Provides a theoretical overview, analyzing such topics as legal reasoning, law and values, law and conflicting interests, law and popular will, law and status/wealth/power, and law and official discretion. Also examines law in context issues, such as those concerning the structure of legal relations, the connections between legal and social relations, and the interdependence of ideology and organization. 3 credits* CJUS 431. Criminal Law. Examines the substantive criminal law, exploring the larger issues concerning the relationship of the individual to the state through analyzing such topics as the nature of criminal liability and the functions and justifications for criminal punishment, legal limitations upon criminalization, the general principles of criminal liability such as the “act” and “state of mind” requirements. Specific offenses against persons and property, the law of attempt, the law of complicity, and conspiracy. 3 credits CJUS 433. Criminal Procedure. Constitutional analysis of the criminal procedures, focusing primarily on the fourth, fifth, and sixth amendments, respectively the right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure, the privilege against self-incrimination, and the right to counsel. Examines the need to protect individual defendants from abuse at the hands of the state while enhancing law enforcement efficiency. 3 credits CJUS 452. Prisons and Penology. Study of the history and theory of justice and the treatment of the adult and juvenile offender, considering the processes from trial through execution of sentence. 3 credits* CJUS 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-3 credits. CJUS 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
instructors. Enrollment are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 3 credits COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSC) CSC 105. Introduction to Computers. Overview of computer applications with emphasis on word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation tools and internet-based applications. 3 credits CSC 130. Visual Basic Programming. Fundamentals of programming using Visual Basic. Focus on problem solving, visual design, and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, procedures, and functions. 3 credits CSC 140. Web Programming. This course provides an introduction to Java programming and its applications. It is offered for the students in all disciplines with little or no computer programming experience. Topics include Java applications, Java applets, data types, operations, control structures, methods and object oriented programming concepts. Prerequisites: MATH 102 and MIS/CSC 105 or MIS/CSC 205. 3 credits CSC 150. Computer Science I. An introduction to computer programming. Focus on problem solving, algorithm development, design, and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, functions, and arrays. 3 credits CSC 160. Programming .NET with Visual Basic. This course provides an introduction to Visual Basic programming and its applications using .NET. It is offered for the student in all disciplines with little or no computer programming experience. Topics include data types, operations, control structures, graphical user interface design and object oriented programming concepts. Prerequisites: MATH 102 and MIS/ CSC 105 or MIS/CSC 205. 3 credits CSC 205. Advanced Computer Applications. This course covers advanced topics in word processing and spreadsheet applications such as m across, advanced functions, graphics, merging, linking, and transferring data. The course emphasizes the efficient use of software packages. Operating systems/ environment topics are also addressed. 3 credits. CSC 210. Web Authoring. This course focuses on techniques and methods for writing specifically for the Internet. Topics will include designing and creating documents for the World Wide Web, design considerations, and publishing and maintaining Web sites. Students will use HTML, Web authoring software, and other software for Web development. Prerequisite MIS 105 or MIS 205. 3 credits CSC 250. Computer Science II. Problem solving, algorithm design, standards of program style, debugging and testing. Extension of the control structures and data structures and data structures of the high-level language introduced in CSC 150. Elementary data structures and basic algorithms that include sorting and searching. Topics include more advanced treatment of functions, data types such as arrays and structures, and files. 3 credits CSC 273. Computer Mathematics with Excel and VBA. This course provides an introducation to problem solving and computer mathematiccs using MS Excel and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). It is offered for the students in all disciplines with little or no computer programming experience. Topics include advanced Excel functions and formulas, using Excel as a data analysis, decision support and data management tool, using Excel for advanced charting, VBA data types, control structures and forms, creating custom functions using VBA, graphical user interface design and implementation, Excel objects model and object oriented programming concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 102 and MIS/CSC 105 or MIS 205. 3 credits* CSC 291. Independent Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or few students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-5 credits CSC 373. Computer Mathematics. Advanced FORTRAN, Boolean algebra, structure of algorithms, computer
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organization, applications of computers to mathematics. Prerequisites: MATH 123 and CSC 130 or CSC 371. 3 credits CSC 461. Programming Languages. This course consists of two parts. The first part introduces how programming languages are designed, including an introduction to the concepts of parsing and compiling. Issues related to implementation such s type checking, binding, and memory management are discussed. Secondly, the course will survey the spectrum of programming languages paradigms, including traditional imperative, objective oriented, functional, and logic languages. Prerequisite: CSC/MIS 150. 3 credits CSC 491. Independent Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or few students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits CSC 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-5 credits CSC 572. Computer Assisted Instruction. Uses of microcomputers in the classroom, selecting software, using computers to assist teachers, and development of coursework for individual classes. Prerequisite: experience with BASIC or Fortran or consent of the instructor. 2 credits* DRIVER EDUCATION (DRED) DRED 460. Driver and Traffic Safety Education. Recommended policies and practices in driver eduation and traffic safety. Emphasis on traffic safety. Department of Transportation’s traffic safety program, use of simulators, driver improvement through enforcement. 3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
DRED 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-3 credits DRED 480. Special Methods in the Teaching of Driver Education. Driver education and traffic safety courses with experience in classroom and behind-the-wheel phases of driver education; lesson plans, films, scheduling and testing techniques. Prerequisite: SEED 300 or consent of instructor. 3 credits DRED 776. Problems in Driver and Safety Education. 2-8 credits EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (ECE) ECE 211. Introduction to Early Childhood Education. The course gives an instruction to the field of early childhood education concentrating on children ages 2 through 8. Emphasis is on teaching practices and how young children learn best. Includes our role as professionals and advocates for quality learning experiences. 2 credits (Fall) ECE 228. Observation and Participation in Early Childhood. Observation and participation in a pre-school setting under supervision of a professional practitioner. 2 credits (Spring) ECE 411. Social Development for Early Childhood. The study of various cultural, enviromental, and developmental factors that shape young children from infancy through 8 years of age. Emphasis on understanding and meeting the individual social/emotional needs of children. 2 credits (Fall) ECE 413. Early Childhood Curriculum. The materials and methods employed with young children in early childhood education programs with programs with emphasis on developmentally appropriate practices. 2 credits (Spring) ECE 488. Preschool Student Teaching. Students preparing for teaching in the early childhood setting will observe, participate, and teach under the supervision of the regular classroom teacher in an approved early childhood setting. An additional “Mandatory Fee” applies to this course. A
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supervised, five-week, half-day (100 hrs) student teaching experience in an approved preschool setting. Prerequisite: EED 211, 316, 411, 416 and Admission to Teacher Education. S/U grading only. 1-12 credits ECE 489. Kindergarten Student Teaching. Students preparing for teaching in the early childhood setting will observe, participate, and teach under the supervision of the regular classroom teacher in an approved early childhood setting. An additional “Mandatory Fee” applies to this course. A supervised, five-week, full-day (200 hrs) student teaching experience in Kindergarten. Prerequisite: EED 211 or ECE 411, and Admission to Teacher Education. S/U grading only. 1-12 credits ECE 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits ECONOMICS (ECON) ECON 201. Principles of Microeconomics. Principles of microeconomics studies basic economic concepts as they relate to consumer, worker, and business decisions. Emphasis is given to satisfaction maximizing behavior by individuals and profit maximization by firms. Market structures are thoroughly analyzed regarding their effect on price, output, and competitiveness. 3 credits ECON 202. Principles of Macroeconomics. Principles of macroeconomics considers the economy as a whole, how its sectors interact, an how monetary and fiscal policy can influence output, inflation, interest rates, unemployment, poverty, debt, and other factors. 3 credits ECON 220. Business Statistics. Data analysis, sampling, tests of significance, simple linear regression and correlation. 3 credits ECON 301. Intermediate Microeconomics. Intermediate microeconomics examines more advanced microeconomic theory, then applies it to consumers’ and businesses’

consumption, pricing, and output decisions in various types of markets. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and ECON 202. 3 credits ECON 302. Intermediate Macroeconomics. Intermediate macroeconomics examines more advanced macroeconomics theories, then uses them to understand the determinants of national output, prices, interest rates, and employment under various conditions, and to evaluate effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policies. Prerequisite: ECON 202. 3 credits ECON 304. Managerial Economics. Managerial problem decision-making using tools and techniques of microeconomics. Prerequisite: ECON 201, 202 and BADM/ ECON 220. 3 credits ECON 330. Money and Banking. Money and banking examines the historical development of money, the bank system, and the Federal Reserve in the United States. The course studies interest rate determination and how monetary policy affects rates and the economy. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and ECON 202. 3 credits ECON 391. Independent Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or few students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits ECON 423/523. Statistics II. Statistics II studies probability, point and interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, multiple regression and correlation, chi-square analysis, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: BADM 220, ECON 201 and ECON 202. 3 credits* ECON 433. Public Finance. Public finance focuses on the role of the public sector in the United States economy. It uses economic analysis to examine when government intervention in a market economy might be justified and to evaluate public spending and taxes. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and ECON 202. 3 credits*

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ECON 441. International Trade. International trade studies the basis of international trade, investment, migration, and regional integration, and considers contemporary international economic problems and policies. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and BADM 220. 3 credits ECON 442/542. International Finance. The analysis of the theories and empirical investigations of international finance. Topics include foreign exchange rates and markets, capital flows, the balance of payments, adjustments to balance of payment disequilibrium international monetary arrangements and organizations and monetary reform. Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202 and BADM/ECON 220. 3 credits ECON 482. Labor Economics. Labor economics studies the functioning of labor markets. Topics include the theory of labor supply, unions, discrimination, and the government role in labor markets. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and ECON 202. 3 credits* ECON 490. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. 1-3 credits ECON 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Independent study and investigations of an assigned economic problem, under the guidance of department members. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 1-3 credits ECON 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits ECON 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Economics internships are graded S/U. 1-12 credits* EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION (EDAD) EDAD 700. Models of Educational Leadership. An investigation of philosophies and models of educational leadership to include roles of administrators and staff in P-12 schools. Particular emphasis is placed on staff, student, and community matters as related to both instructional and noninstructional issues in school operation. 2-3 credits EDAD 715. Supervision and Mentoring. Analysis of the supervisory functions of the superintendent, principal and master teacher in the improvement of instruction in the elementary and secondary school through cooperative participation and creative leadership. 3 credits EDAD 720. Selecting and Developing School Personnel. This seminar will examine general principles of personnel selection and management. The course will move towards specific processes for recruiting and selecting teachers and other school personnel. It will also address how to build staff teams and how to evaluate and plan the professional development of the staff in a school building. 2 credits* EDAD 730. Public School Finance. Principles and practice in financial management of elementary and secondary schools. Examines funding sources provided by local, state, and federal revenue; school assets including tax base; budget making; and acceptable financial record keeping. 2 credits* EDAD 732. The School Plant. Principles and procedures used in selection of school sites, building plans, specifications, construction and financing. Technical problems in the purchase and care of supplies and equipment, and maintenance and operation of elementary and secondary school plants. 2 credits* EDAD 735. School Law. Legal foundations of elementary and secondary education in American society. Includes the legal powers, relationships and responsibilities of school boards, administrators, teachers, parents and students. Special emphasis on Section 504 of the EAHC and the Individuals with Disabilities Act because of the unique legal demands and requirements of special education. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3 credits EDAD 740. Readings and Issues for Administrators. An overview of relevant issues as identified through current publications, books, and articles, will be carried out. Solutions to issues will evolve through seminar approaches to these issues. Of particular concern will be problems/issues centering on multicultural education and special education. Issues and solutions will be primarily of administrative concerns. 2 credits EDAD 742. Public Relations for School Personnel. Basic principles underlying sound community, school public relations will be studied on a seminar basis. Emphasis will be placed on inter-communications for professional personnel and lay citizens. Seminar will stress the need for a design of continuous, broad and well balanced programs. 2 credits* EDAD 747. Implementing Change in Education. This seminar is designed to assist incumbent and future school administrators to understand the process of change in the context of schools. It will provide skills to plan, promote, implement and evaluate change in the educational setting. 2 credits* EDAD 790. Seminar in Educational Administration. Graduate students investigate a variety of topics depending on current need and issues relating to educational administration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. 1-3 credits* EDAD 791. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 1-3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
EDAD 792. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits EDAD 794. Internship in Educational Administration. A field experience under the supervision of a successful, practicing school administrator that offers practical experiences acquired in day-to-day administration and operation of a school. The experience will include a fieldbased research project and paper in one or more of the specified objectives for the internship. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 2 or 4 credits Each student is required to complete four semester hours (160 clock hours) of internship. The student may be registered for and complete 4 credits in one semester or register for 2 credits in each of two consecutive semesters. EDAD 798. Thesis or Project Paper. May be taken in one semester or in two semesters of three hours each. 3 or 6 credits EDUCATION EVALUATION AND RESEARCH (EDER) EDER 415. Educational Assessment. A study of educational measurements covering both the elementary and secondary fields. 2 credits EDER 761. Graduate Research and Design. Students will learn elements of research design from selection of topics, development of hypothesis, use of statistical methodologies, and sampling to final format of field-based research project paper. 3 credits EDER 751. Interpretation of Educational Research. This course will help students to become critical consumers of professional information by addressing the interpretation, evaluation, use and communication of information. Particular emphasis is placed on the knowledge needed to be an informed and effective consumer of research. 2 credits EDER 791. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 1-3 credits EDER 792. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS (EDFN) EDFN 325. Instructional Design. This course provides instruction in the current best practices for the development of lessons, units and courses. The role of national and state standards, learned societies, and benchmarks in development of curriculum will be investigated as well as consideration of developmentally appropriate activities for students. 1 credit EDFN 338. Foundations of American Education. A survey of the goals, history, organization, and philosophy of pre-K-12 American education, with emphasis on teaching as a profession; contemporary issues and practices, legal and ethical responsibilities, and attributes of effective teachers. 2 credits EDFN 365. Computer-Based Technology and Learning. Prepares students to integrate computers into the curriculum by exploring the evolving uses and expectations of technology as a teaching and learning tool. Course objectives based on ISTE standards. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits EDFN 425/525. Case Studies in Instructional Design. Students will work in groups to analyze professional practice situations and problems through exploring a variety of case studies. Students will focus on identifying and describing the instructional problems presented in each case study. Through focusing on developing instructional plans to address each case, students will develop experience and professional knowledge. The student groups will evaluate their plans with regard to standards. Students may have an opportunity to enter instructional design case competitions with other academic institutions. Prerequisites: EDFN 325. 2 credits EDFN 439. K-12 Issues. Historical and philosophical foundations of American education; organization and support of schools, role of schools in society. Concerns of prospective teachers, including professional responsibilities, organization, ethics, contracts, securing positions, etc. are presented as well. 2 credits EDFN 442/542. Meeting the Diverse Needs of Students and Their Families. In this course, students develop an understanding of the changing dynamics of families and society as well as the diverse needs of P-12 students, to include English as a Second Language and differentiated instruction. 2 credits EDFN 455/555. Research-Based Literacy Instruction and Assessment. This course will focus on current research in the area of literacy, including effective instructional strategies and methodologies. Students will also investigate the use of formal and informal literacy assessment instruments. 3 credits EDFN 475/575. Human Relations. Focuses on characteristics, contributions, and strengths of a pluralistic society; various cultural perspectives and specific information about cultures; the dehumanizing impact of biases and negative stereotypes; and the human relations approach to teaching. Junior Standing 3 credits EDFN 490/590. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. 1-3 credits EDFN 491/591. Special Projects/Independent Study in Education Foundations. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one studentteacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
the requirements of the topic. Students are provided an opportunity to explore areas of relevance and interest pertaining to educational foundations. 1-3 credits EDFN 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits EDFN 493/593. Workshop. Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hrs. of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may include lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity. 1-3 credits EDFN 710. Education in American Society. An examination of the historical background of American education and its effect on issues confronting the American educational system of today. 2 credits* EDFN 720. Philosophies of Education. Graduate students will experience, develop and model diverse pedagogical practices and relate their utilization to diverse educational philosophies. 3 credits* EDFN 740. Comparative Education. A study of present day educational systems in selected nations with respect to historical, national and cultural differences reflected by each. 2 credits* EDFN 750. Technology in Education. Students will explore the uses of current technology and the integration of technology into classroom learning activities. Students will develop applications of technology for their curricular areas and levels. 3 credits* EDFN 760. Writing for Learning. Philosophy, theory, research and application of writing in all curricular areas and at all levels of instruction, K-16 and beyond. 3 credits* EDFN 790. Seminar in Current Issues in Educational Foundations. Graduate students investigate a variety of topics depending on current need and issues relating to educational foundations. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. 1-3 credits* ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (ELED) ELED 301. Elementary Field Experience. A pre-student teaching field experience in an elementary school classroom. This course consists of approximately eighty hours in schools, along with seminars discussing facets of teaching and school life. Required of all elementary majors. It is taken concurrently with both the morning and afternoon junior methods courses. S/U grade awarded. 1 credit each ELED 303. Earth and Physical Science for Elementary Teachers. A non-methods course that presents major concepts and theories in astronomy, geology, meteorology, chemistry, and physics. Scientific concepts and theories for elementary teachers working with K-8 students. 3 credits ELED 320. K-8 Science Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 science; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 science; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 science; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits ELED 330. K-8 Math Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 math; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 math; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 math; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits ELED 351. Approaches to Reading in the Lower Elementary Grades. Methods, materials, and skills for teaching beginning reading in the lower grades, covering needs of the beginner, readiness, ways to teach beginning reading, working with individual differences, and the correction of reading problems. 2 credits ELED 352. Teaching Reading in the Middle Grades. A study and practice of understandings, methods, materials, and skills for teaching reading in grades four through eight. Covers the roles of word attack skills, comprehension, content reading, corrective approaches, and informal evaluation. 2 credits ELED 360. K-8 Social Science Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 social science; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 social science; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 social science; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits ELED 395. Reading Clinic Practium I. Problems of the basal approach to reading and how those problems might be corrected. Topics include the other language and special child, diagnosis, and the computer in reading instruction. 2 credits ELED 440. K-8 Language Arts Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 language arts; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 language arts; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 language arts; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits ELED 450. K-8 Reading Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 reading; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 reading; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 reading; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits ELED 451. Reading Clinic I. This course provides an opportunity for elementary education majors to provide one-to-one literacy tutoring for elementary-aged students.
*indicates course is not offered every year

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Participants will administer pre- and post-reading inventories and will design literacy instruction based on the specific needs of their students. 1-3 credits ELED 457. Administration and Supervision of Reading Programs. Includes organizing, implementing, and evaluating developmental, remedial, corrective, and adaptive reading programs to improve reading services. Examines duties of and the relationships between reading consultants, administrators, classroom teachers, special reading teachers, and other school staff. Includes materials, tests, and instructional equipment used in reading programs. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 2 credits ELED 488. K-8 Student Teaching. Students preparing for teaching in the elementary school setting will observe, participate, and teach under the supervision of the regular classroom teacher in an approved elementary school. An additional “Mandatory Fee” applies to this course. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Full-time teaching in one classroom for an eleven-week period under intensive supervision. (May be for less than full-time for students with previously earned credits in student teaching.) S/U grading only. 1-12 credits ELED 491/591. Special Projects in Education. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Students select workshops, seminars or individualized study in their area of interest. Prerequisites: consent of advisor and department coordinator 1-3 credits ELED 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits ELED 493/593. Workshop. Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time
*indicates course is not offered every year

range but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may include lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity. 1-3 credits ELED 520. Educational Applications of Computers. This course examines the applications of microcomputers in the classroom and school system. It includes evaluation and selection procedures for computer software for instructional and administrative purposes. 2 credits ELED 720. Research and Teaching in Science and Mathematics. An examination of the current research and instructional strategies for the teaching of mathematics and science. The course will include constructivist views and integrated experiences. Participants will explore nationally recognized curriculum materials relevant to the grade level they teach. Grade-level appropriate project required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 2 credits* ELED 740. School Curriculum. An overview of the historical background, current issues, trends and research findings by subjects and levels to include a critical analyses of local, state and national standards. Administrators and teachers work on individual projects directed toward the improvement of curriculum in specified grade levels and content areas. 2 credits ELED 742. Research and Teaching in Language Arts. Current research and instructional practices in the teaching of language arts to include whole language and integrated experiences and the methodologies of teaching speaking, expository and creative writing, poetry, literature, drama, spelling, handwriting and listening in P-12 schools. 3 credits* ELED 750. Literature and Literacy. Students investigate issues and strategies in the use of literature (including child and adolescent) in the various academic content areas with application to all levels. 3 credits ELED 753. Issues and Trends in Literacy Development. Current research and practice about language process and literacy development to include specific applications to primary, middle and upper elementary grades and secondary grades. 2 credits*

ELED 757. Administration and Supervision of Literacy Programs. Models for implementation, administration and maintenance of quality literacy programs in schools P-12. Collaboration with parents, current literature, issues and models for literacy development will be explored. 3 credits ELED 761. Research and Teaching in the Humanities. This course provides the opportunity to explore current research and instructional practices in the teaching of humanities to include the social sciences and integrated experiences. By combining educators from all levels, participants will become knowledgeable about the entire educational experience in the humanities. Participants will read current literature and explore curriculum materials specific to their needs. 2 credits* ELED 790. Seminar in Elementary Education. Graduate students investigate a variety of topics depending on current need and issues relating to elementary education. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. 1-3 credits ELED 791. Individual Projects in Curriculum or Teaching. Qualified students investigate problems of special concern in the area of curriculum or teaching. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and the Director of Graduate and Extended Studies. 1-6 credits ELED 794. Internship in Elementary Classroom Teaching. Supervised internship in advanced practices of teaching. Students implement new teaching strategies with coaching from supervisor and/or peers. Experience includes a field-based research component. 2 or 4 credits Students may take 4 credits one semester or 2 credits each for 2 semesters. ELED 798. Thesis or Project Paper. May be taken in one semester or in two semesters of three hours each. 6 or 3 credits E-LEARNING (ELRN) ELRN 330. Basic Methods in E-learning. Through readings, examples, and ongoing discussions, students will define their concepts of e-learning methods. The course includes a discussion of learning theories and their application to methods practiced in e-learning environments. Through the facilities in NSU’s Center for Statewide E-learning, the students

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will have an opportunity to observe effective methods as practiced in various classes. Students will synthesize their readings and observations by developing a project or paper that describes an effective e-learning method for enabling a learner to develop course content knowledge. 3 credits ELRN 385. Educational Technology and Distance Teaching. This course will prepare education majors to integrate evolving technologies into the curriculum. In addition, the course will include the design, implementation, and assessment of instruction offered via distance in an electronic learning environment. 3 credits ELRN 410/510. E-learning and Communication Technologies. Students will investigate methods for content delivery including text, sound, graphics and video with concentration on computer hardware and presentation software. The course includes examination of browsers, media players, networking, Internet, bulletin boards, discussion groups and search engines. Discussions will focus on typical and high-end technology-enhanced learning environments. Prerequisite: MIS 105. 3 credits ELRN 420/520. Technology Support for Educational Systems. Introduction to administration and maintenance of information system in education: network/domains, servers, student accounts, security, lab organization, system updates. This course is a survey of tools and techniques used in the support of computing systems. Included will be client administration, network access, remote administration, system administration tasks, disc maintenance, file security, data warehouse and data mining. Prerequisite: MIS 105 and two computer courses at the 200 level or higher. 3 credits ELRN 430/530. Interactive Web Site Programming. This course extends basic aspects of HTML and multimedia programming. The WEB technologies involving dynamic web page development using Java Script, layering, Cascading Style Sheet, client and server-side interactive mapping will be covered. Topics covered include Internet communication applications such as telnet, FTP, remote access, and the basics of digital image, audio, and video techniques necessary for web page development and publishing. Prerequisite: MIS 105 and one of the following ENGL 302 or ARTD 333 or similar course. 3 credits ELRN 435/535. Lesson Planning for Electronic Delivery. Students will engage in a problem-based approach to developing the planning skills for planning effective lessons in a variety of electronic delivery environments. The course includes a critique of electronically mediated practices. Students will develop several lessons plans by determining lesson objectives, selecting appropriate methods of electronically mediated teaching, and assessing the students’ success in achieving the stated objectives. The context is that of a public school, however, the planning strategies and processes will also apply to other educational and training settings. 3 credits ELRN 440/540. Multimedia Learning Tools. Students will explore and compare a variety of multi-media lesson-authoring software programs. Students will develop several multimediaenhanced lessons designed to meet one or more learning objectives. This is a project-based course. 3 credits ELRN 445/545. Design and Administration of E-learning Networks. This course will examine the issues related to planning new networks and implementing changes to existing networks. Students will learn principals of network design based on identified needs and constraints. The tasks of selecting, configuring and administering services in an internetworking environment will include user administration, security and privacy issues and data access. Students completing this course will have experience in administering an intranet of computers with a variety of services, including file, print, application, name, FTP, WEB and remote control services. Students will assess network status and utilization of distance education and academic network services at NSU. Prerequisites: ELRN 410/510 or MIS 422. 3 credits ELRN 453/553. Copyright Law and Electronic Media. This course surveys copyright law and applies the principles to electronic media issues. Related topics include registration of domain names and federal anti-cyber squatting statutes. The course also deals with typical educational transactions as impacted by the Uniform Electronic Transaction Act and the Uniform Computer Information Transaction Act. Privacy issues related to educational records in the electronic age are related to FERPA, FOIA, open meeting and public records laws. Applications will include content ownership, management, presentation, and fair use concepts. 1 credit ELRN 455/555. Electronically-mediated Research. Through selected readings and discussion, students will explore the use of electronic methods to collect research data. Students will gain experience in creating online surveys and interviews. Students will develop a research question and plan a method of data collection. The course will include a discussion on ethics in research methods and representation. 2 credits ELRN 460/560. Content Administration in Database Environments. This course will involve design of databases containing educational and multimedia content. Students will learn how to manipulate information using different models and techniques of data storage and retrieval. The techniques that apply to text, image, video and sound will be discussed. Prerequisites: MIS 105 and MIS 280 or database related course. 3 credits ELRN 465/565. Digital Audio and Video Production and Editing. Students will investigate methods for recording, editing, mixing, and delivering audio and video for elearning applications. Emphasis will be on audio and video production technology hardware and software. The course includes examination of recording and editing equipment, media players, and streaming technology. Discussions will focus on typical and high-end technology-enhanced learning environments. Prerequisites: MIS 105. 3 credits ELRN 475/575. Scripting Techniques. During this course, students will learn how to enhance educational multimedia content by using dynamic Internet presentations. Students will manipulate educational content using advanced Java Script, client/server site mapping, and CSS. This hands-on development course will introduce techniques that apply to text, image, sound and video using content data from existing NSU and e-learning Internet presentations. Prerequisites: ELRN 430/530. 2 credits ELRN 489. Senior Electronic Portfolio. A one-hour course in which students create an electronic portfolio to document their achievement of program outcomes and to support the students’ search for employment. Specific requirements for portfolio components will vary by school and will be determined by that school’s faculty. The objectives for

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
the course are for students to demonstrate their proficiency in technology by designing and producing the electronic portfolio and to showcase the skills and knowledge that qualify them for employment in their field. Course may be repeated for up to 3 credits. S/U grading only. 0-3 credits ELRN 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Students are provided an opportunity to explore areas of relevance and interest pertaining to educational foundations. 1-3 credits ELRN 492. Special Topics in E-learning. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollment are usually of 10 fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. A one-hour course designed to help students gain personal knowledge of how technology has impacted careers and the level of technological expertise required of graduates seeking employment in the 21st century. This variable topic course will provide an opportunity for in depth exploration of issues related to e-learning undergraduate studies. The course carries a S/U grade. 0-3 credits ELRN 494. Internship in E-learning. Provides a handson experience in the practical application of e-learning in Northern State University’s Center for Statewide E-learning. Students will serve as technical assistants for DDN courses, prepare course materials for the DDN classroom, use WebCT software to develop and deliver lessons and interact with remote students, and learn to troubleshoot distance delivery hardware and software technologies. Internship experiences may vary from one to three credits and be focused according to the students’ career goals and program objectives. 1-3 credits ELRN 592. Special Topics in E-learning. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollment are usually of 10 fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher
*indicates course is not offered every year

involvement. A variable credit course designed to help beginning graduate students gain personal knowledge of how technology has impacted careers and the level of technological expertise required of graduates seeking employment in the 21st century. This variable topic course will provide an opportunity for in-depth exploration of issues related to elearning graduate studies. The course carries a Pass/Fail grade. 1-3 credits ELRN 715. Multimedia Theory and Interface Design. In both lecture and laboratory settings, students will study multimedia theory and critique a variety of multimedia examples. From readings, lectures, and critiques, students will develop guidelines for designing and delivering effective multimedia presentations. Interface Design explores computer-human interactions and helps students to design appropriate and “user friendly” interfaces for multimedia projects. Students will apply their knowledge by developing and delivering a professional level presentation. Emphasis will be on the educational uses of multimedia. This course will help students to evaluate the needs of the educational content producer as well as the end user and choose the best way to achieve the required educational outcomes. 3 credits ELRN 720. Emerging Technologies in E-learning. This course will focus on technological resources leading to new learning models that combine physical and virtual learning spaces and techniques. The following topics will be discussed: overview of current technologies, technologies inducing new methods, methods inducing new technologies, development of collaborative learning networks. Examples of emerging technologies and their possible impact on the future of elearning will be reviewed. Students will provide suggestions for future directions in the E-learning Center. Prerequisites: ELRN 510 or ELRN 530. 1 credit ELRN 725. Instructional Design in E-learning. Students will synthesize current e-learning theories and models of instruction with the goal of developing an instructional design or instructional materials to be delivered in the E-learning Center. The students will compare business and academic e-learning environments and their influences on the practice of instructional design. Prerequisite: EDFN 325 or EDFN 425. 3 credits

ELRN 728. Interactive Methods in E-learning. Students will have opportunities to examine current trends and apply learning theories to e-learning environments with the goals of maximizing interaction and enhancing student learning. In the E-learning Center environment, students will practice methods such as teaching to a camera, writing in styles appropriate for the web, facilitating student interaction, and developing meaningful dialogue at a distance. Students will study strategies that support collaborative learning in videobased and web-based e-learning environments. 3 credits ELRN 745. Technology Implementation Strategies. Students will develop action plans that incorporate technology into teaching curricula. The course will explore challenges related to technology implementation in e-learning including organizational, social, computing/networking, financial and content development issues. Students will learn how to assess resources needed at different stages of technology implementation by analyzing needs and expected outcomes. The existing educational paradigms in e-learning settings in higher education, business, professional education, government and military including barriers to technology integration will be discussed. Prerequisite: ELRN 520. 2 credits ELRN 748. Business Analysis and Marketing for E-learning Courses. Students will learn how to conduct business analysis and how to market e-learning courses. The following subjects will be introduced: assessment of topic-specific learning needs, evaluation of available resources, course development process, cost analysis of course development/production and delivery and marketing a course. During this class students will work on subjectspecific projects to facilitate development of marketing and business plans for explicit learning needs, then conduct field research to obtain feedback from targeted learners. The students’ research will be conducted in subject areas where e-learning courses are mostly needed for local businesses and communities. Prerequisite: ELRN 510. 2 credits ELRN 750. Course Authoring Tools. Course Authoring Tools is an exploration of the various multimedia authoring environments, including time-based, user guided, simulation, and progressive authoring systems. This course will help

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students evaluate the needs of the educational content producer as well as those of the end user and choose the best way to achieve the required educational outcomes. 3 credits ELRN 766. Vector-Based Graphic Environments. Students will develop facility in creating vector graphics, an important mainstay of web-based multimedia, in order to build instructional content. Various programs and platforms will be used to allow students to explore vector illustration and animation (time-based) content construction for multimedia. Vector illustration and animation are primary multimedia tools for military and industrial simulation learning. SCROM and AICC standards relating to vector-based Content Objects will be addressed. 3 credits ELRN 772. Application of Learning Theory Models to E-learning Environments. Students will explore how virtual learning environments and instructional models can be used to analyze learning outcomes. Students will learn to assess and evaluate technology use in learner-centered instruction. Models and simulations, applying Kolb’s experiential learning theory and Bloom’s taxonomy, will be used to analyze options of technology implementations and their impact on studentcentered assessment. The technologies available at the E-learning Center, combined with appropriate instructional techniques will be used to analyze a variety of instructional scenarios. This course provides theoretical background along with implementation of practical assessment techniques. Prerequisites: EDFN 525 or ELRN 530. 2 credits ELRN 774. Elements of Artificial Intelligence in Elearning Systems. During this course students will learn how to implement intelligent tutoring and assessment elements into traditional e-learning systems. Using chosen Internet courses taught in the E-learning Center as a teaching model, students will analyze the content knowledge, technical architecture, pedagogical style and presentation format of the course. The basics of simulation models used in case-based learning will be included as part of expert system techniques. Course participants will develop intelligent heuristic modules to assess student knowledge and learning preferences. Course participants will implement these modules into authoring programs to create interactive presentations that adapt methods of instruction to individual needs of the learner. Prerequisites: ELRN 410/510 and ELRN 772. 3 credits ELRN 780. Multimedia Programming. This course introduces design and programming techniques related to development of the Internet multimedia delivery systems. During this course students will design and develop on-line presentations for e-learning using animations, sound and video clips. Students will use multimedia markup languages to complete projects involving media servers and streaming techniques. Prerequisites: ELRN 530 and ELRN 560 or equivalent. 2 credits ELRN 788. Master’s Special Project. In the special project, the student will demonstrate a culmination of the knowledge developed in the e-learning master’s program. The student will work under the direction of a faculty member to design and develop a field-based project illustrating his or her knowledge, skills, aptitudes, and abilities. A three-person graduate committee will evaluate the special project. One person on the committee must be selected from outside the university from a field appropriate to the student’s area of interest. Two persons on the committee must be from the Elearning Center. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3 credits ELRN 789. Master’s Special Project-Sustaining. The student will continue to work under the direction of a faculty member to design and develop a field-based special project that demonstrates his or her knowledge, skills, aptitudes, and abilities. The student will work under the guidance of a three person graduate committee. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3 credits ELRN 790. E-learning Graduate Seminar. Students will read and discuss current issues related to distance learning technologies and theories. The seminar topics may vary each semester. Each student will select a topic for in-depth exploration and class presentation using the appropriate technology. 1 credit ELRN 791. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-3 credits ELRN 792. Special Topics in E-learning: Advanced. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollment are usually of 10 fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. A variable credit course designed to help advanced graduate students gain personal knowledge of how technology has impacted careers and the level of technological expertise required of graduates seeking employment in the 21st century. This variable topic course will provide an opportunity for in-depth exploration of issues related to e-learning graduate studies. The course carries a Pass/Fail grade. 1-3 credits ELRN 794. Internship in E-learning. Students will have a hands-on learning experience in a distance learning environment. During the internship students will develop an e-learning research project and create a distance deliverable presentation. Students will use videoconference classrooms to present via distance technologies. Students must have completed at least 20 credits before applying for an internship. 2-4 credits ENGLISH (ENGL) ENGL 003. English as a Second Language: Grammar Review and Intermediate Composition. Conversation, listening and reading comprehension, vocabulary and idioms, grammar review and intermediate composition. 3 credits ENGL 013. English as a Second Language: More Complex Structural Patterns and Advanced Composition. Conversation, listening and reading comprehension, vocabulary and idioms, more complex structural patterns, and advanced composition. Prerequisite: ENGL 003 or placement. 3 credits ENGL 023. English as a Second Language: Listening and Reading, Grammar, Comprehension. Written and oral responses to written and oral sources. Reading and listening comprehension, vocabulary building, pronunciation, grammar and sentence structure, and formal and informal written and spoken English. Prerequisite: placement or permission of the instructor. 3-5 credits
*indicates course is not offered every year

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ENGL 031, 032, 033. Basic Writing. Individualized instruction in the Writing Center. By arrangement. Prerequisite: Placement. 1-3 credits ENGL 099. English as a Second Language. For students who do not speak English as their concentrated study in aspects of the English native language. May be repeated with a change of language and the culture of its speakers. Designed subject matter for a maximum of 9 hours. ENGL 099 does not count towards graduation. 1-8 credits ENGL 101. Composition I. Practice in the skills, research, and documentation needed for effective academic writing. Analysis of a variety of academic and non-academic texts, rhetorical structures, critical thinking, and audience will be included. Prerequisite: Appropriate student placement based on entry level assessment or completion of (or concurrent enrollment in) ENGL 031, ENGL 032, or ENGL 033. 3 credits ENGL 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits ENGL 201. Composition II. Study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 210. Introduction to Literature. Readings in fiction, drama, and poetry to acquaint students with literature and aesthetic form. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 213. Backgrounds to Literature. A study of important influences on literary tradition. May include topics like Mythology, the Bible, or the King Arthur Legend. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 215. Literature in Global Contexts. Each offering of this course will focus on a literary tradition outside of the United States and England. The focus may include national literatures in translation or post-colonial literature in English during specific periods ranging from ancient times to the present. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits
*indicates course is not offered every year

ENGL 221. British Literature I. A chronological survey of British literature from Old English through the 18th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 222. British Literature II. A chronological survey of British literature from the 19th century to the present. ENGL 221 and 222 need not be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 230. Literature for Younger Readers. Study of literature written for children or adolescents. May include topics like Adolescent Novels, Fairy Tales, or the Golden Age of Children’s Literature. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 241. American Literature I. Background to and survey of major works from the beginnings to the Civil War. ENGL 241 and 242 need not be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 242. American Literature II. Background to and survey of major works from the Civil War to the present. ENGL 241 and 242 need not be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 258. Literature and Culture. A study of a particular topic reflecting the cultural aspects of literature. May include Ethnic Literature, Folk Literature, or Literature of the Upper Plains. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 284. Introduction to Criticism. A writing-intensive course in analyzing and interpreting literature for English majors and minors. Includes instruction in critical approaches to literature and research tools. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 292. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 3 credits ENGL 301. Advanced Composition. A course offering advanced study and practice in the process of developing both expressive and transactional writings. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits*

ENGL 302. Hypertext Writing. A basic Web publishing course including HTML coding, preparing images for the Web and designing hyptertext. No prior computer experience required. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits* ENGL 305. Professional, Technical and Grant Writing. Professional and technical writing in such areas as grant research and proposal, progress and project reports, abstracts, technical articles and correspondence. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits* ENGL 363. Literary Genres. A concentrated study of a particular literary genre. May include historical development of a particular literary genre (poetry, drama, the novel), or a more concentrated study of a genre in the twentieth century (modern drama, modern poetry, film as literature). May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits* ENGL 422/522. Age of Chaucer. Literature of the later medieval period, especially the 14th century, with some attention to continental works. Major focus on Geoffrey Chaucer, with readings in Middle English. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Co-requisite: ENGL 488. 3 credits* ENGL 425/525. Age of Milton. Verse and Prose of the 17th Century, include that of Donne, Marvell, and Milton. Corequisite: ENGL 488. 3 credits* ENGL 431/531. Shakespeare I. Studies of the comedies and their background. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits* ENGL 432/532. Shakespeare II. Studies of the tragedies and their background. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits* ENGL 476. Creative Writing: Fiction. Advanced study of the writing process concentrating on fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 478. Creative Writing: Poetry. Advanced study of the writing process concentrating on poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits ENGL 484. Literary Criticism. The theory and practice of various critical approaches to literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits* ENGL 486/586. Rhetorical Theory and Practice. Survey of the developments and applications of the theories of rhetoric. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits

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ENGL 488. Literary Studies Review. A review of the historical and generic categories of literary expression, with particular attention to the distinctions between literary periods and literary works representative of those periods; a review of vocabulary specific to literary study; preparation for exit examinations; review of students’ portfolios. Required of all English majors immediately preceding or during the semester of their graduation; taken in conjunction with the capstone seminar course (ENGL 422,425 or 490). S/U grading. 1 credit ENGL 490/590. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Co-requisite: ENGL 488 1-4 credits ENGL 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Individual investigation of a problem or area not otherwise examined through existing courses. Prerequisite: consent of the department coordinator. 1-5 credits ENGL 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-5 credits ENGL 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. An experience in the practical application of English studies to a specific job situation—may include writing, editing, researching, teaching. Required of all majors. Prerequisite: junior standing and consent of English faculty supervisor and department coordinator. 1-12 credits ENGL 690. English Seminar. Selected research topics. 1-3 credits* ENGL 707. New Concepts in Teaching English. Practical problems in resources, literature, composition, and language. Workshops for teachers who are or will be teaching junior or senior high school English. 2 credits* ENGL 790. Writing Seminar. Students will explore personal writing abilities in a seminar format with emphasis on the writing process, use of revising and editing techniques and formats for field-based research papers. 1 credit ENGL 791. Independent Readings. By arrangement. 1-3 credits ENGL 792. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits SEED 424. 7-12 Language Arts Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of 7-12 language arts; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to 7-12 language arts; the ability to assess student learning in 7-12 language arts; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (EPSY) EPSY 302. Educational Psychology. A comprehensive study of the fundamental psychological facts, principles and theories that apply to the nature of the learner and the learning process. 3 credits EPSY 327. Child & Adolescent Development. A study of the physical, language, cognitive, and social/emotional growth and development of the child from birth to young adult in the contexts of family, school, peer and community. 3 credits EPSY 328. Child and Adolescent Development. A study of the physical, cognitive, and social/emotional growth and development of children and adolescents from birth to age 21 in the contexts of family, school, peer group, and community. 2 credits EPSY 420/520. Classroom Management and Discipline. The ecological factors of classroom management and discipline. Particular emphasis will be placed on what teachers can do to enhance their management and organizational skills, and how to incorporate good discipline techniques into their management program. Teacher attitudes toward students, student behaviors, and ethical problems of classroom management will be explored. 2 credits EPSY 422. Psychology of Adolescence. A study of the behavior and development of middle and secondary level students. 2 credits EPSY 741. Psychology of Learning. An intensive study of the nature of human learning based on traditional and current learning theories, information processing theory, and current research for their implications for curriculum and instruction. Also addressed are the variables influencing individual differences, cultural aspects of the learner and motivation. 3 credits FRENCH (FREN) Students with previous experience or preparation may choose to skip a course or courses in the beginning and intermediate language sequences (101, 102, 201, 202). If a grade of C or better is attained in the higher numbered course, a grade of S will be transcripted for the lower level course or courses in the sequence. Credit will be granted in this manner for a maximum of four courses. When considering this option, note that one year of language in high school is generally equivalent to one semester of the language at the college level.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
FREN 101. Introductory French I. Fundamentals of language structure and introduction to French culture enabling students to converse, read, and write simple French. Classwork may be supplemented with required aural/oral practice outside of class. 4 credits FREN 102. Introductory French II. Fundamentals of language structure and introduction to French culture enabling students to converse, read, and write simple French. Classwork may be supplemented with required aural/oral practice outside of class. Prerequisite: FREN 101. 4 credits FREN 201. Intermediate French I. Goals of the introductory course continued. Emphasis on cultural and intellectual aspects of French life and literature. Classwork may be supplemented with required aural/oral practice outside of class. Prerequisite: FREN 102. 4 credits FREN 202. Intermediate French II. Continues FREN 201. Laboratory as required. Prerequisite: FREN 201. 4 credits FREN 291. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Students may select a topic or a problem of interest to them and may research it independently or in collaboration with one or more students at other institutions under the supervision of a faculty member at one of the three primary institutions. Instructor permission is required; course offered only when staff is available. 1-3 credits FREN 292. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. Topics of interest to faculty and students. May include, but is not limited to film, translation and intensive practice of oral skills. Prerequisite: FREN 202. 1-4 credits FREN 310. French Language Skills. A video- and computer-assisted, advanced-level course designed to strengthen and expand aural comprehension, conversation
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and composition within the context of contemporary French culture. Prerequisite: FREN 202. 3 credits FREN 333. Topics in Francophone Culture. Overview of the historical events in francophone civilizations as they relate to contemporary culture. Second semester emphasizes contemporary culture and civilization. Prerequisite: FREN 202. 3 credits FREN 350. Business Communications in French. An introduction to the language of business and business practices in French-speaking countries. Included are commercial terminology, business forms, office correspondence and the common expressions used in a business setting. Prerequisite: FREN 202. 3 credits FREN 353. Exploring Literature in French. Study of literary texts from throughout the French-speaking world. Prerequisite: FREN 202. 3 credits FREN 385. Travel and Study Abroad in Francophone Countries. Offered to students engaged in an approved program of studies under faculty supervision. Hours of credit as contracted with instructor and approved by the cooperating institutions. 1-6 credits FREN 450. Business French II. An advanced course in the language of business in French-speaking countries. Graded readings in commerce and marketing, finance and accounting, and economics. Prerequisite: FREN 202. 3 credits FREN 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Students may select a topic or a problem of interest to them and may research it independently or in collaboration with one or more students at other institutions under the supervision of a faculty member at one of the three primary institutions. Instructor permission is required; course offered only when staff is available. 1-3 credits FREN 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in

the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. Topics of interest to faculty and students. May include, but is not limited to film, translation and intensive practice of oral skills. Prerequisite: FREN 202. 1-3 credits FREN 493. Workshop. Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may include lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity. Prerequisite FREN 202. 1-6 credits FREN 498. Undergraduate Research/Scholarship French Studies Capstone Experience. The senior capstone experience is designed and approved by the faculty member supervising the course in collaboration with the other faculty and administrators at the cooperating institutions. Typical experiences require service-learning projects, internships and study abroad. A report and/or a public presentation may be required as part of this experience. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 3 credits GEOGRAPHY (GEOG) GEOG 131/131L. Physical Geography I and Lab. An introduction to the physical patterns to the Earth. Location, Earth-sun relationships, portrayal of the Earth, cartographic analyses, weather and climate phenomena, along with the scientific method and consideration of soil and vegetation patterns and environmental relationships and consideration of cultural diversity factors from the Native American and other perspectives. 4 credits GEOG 132/132L. Physical Geography II and Lab. A continuation of GEOG 131/131L focusing on: location, cartographic analysis (genesis, development, situation) in various physical environments plus soil and vegetation patterns and environmental relationships with consideration of cultural diversity factors from the Native American and other perspectives. 4 credits GEOG 200. Introduction to Human Geography. Systematic study of world culture from the perspective of five

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
integrating themes: cultural region, cultural diffusion, cultural ecology, cultural integration, and cultural landscape. Topics include population, agriculture, political and economic systems, religion and language, folk and popular culture, and ethnicity. 3 credits GEOG 210. World Regional Geography. A survey of the earth from a broad global framework through the differentiation of the world in terms of both natural and human environmental features and characteristics on a regional basis. 3 credits GEOG 212. Geography of North America. A regional and topical analysis of the geographic patterns of the United States and Canada. Focus is upon the interaction of groups of people with the natural environment to produce regional differentiation. Geographic aspects of the physical geography, population, culture groups, economy, settlement system, land division, and use of natural resources. 3 credits* GEOG 316. Asia. Southern, southeastern, and eastern Asia. 3 credits* GEOG 385. World Cultures and Current Affairs. Students will delve beyond the headlines of international news stories to develop an in-depth understanding of the cultural, geographic, historical, and economic contexts of current events. Small groups of students will conduct library research and share their findings with the class through briefings and distribute reports and bibliographies. 3 credits* GEOG 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Readings and reports in a selected topic. Prerequisites: ten semester hours of geography and permission of the instructor. (May be repeated for credit not to exceed a total of four semester hours.) 1-4 credits* GEOG 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issued in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with signifigant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits. GEOLOGY (GEOL) GEOL 101/101L. General Geology. An introduction to the minerals and rocks that form earth’s crust, the processes of volcanism and diastrophism, weathering and erosion, the interior of the earth and earth history. Field work will be an integral part of the course. Lecture-laboratory, four hours per week. 3 credits* GEOL 492/592. Topics. Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specific field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits GERMAN (GER) Students with previous experience or preparation may choose to skip a course or courses in the beginning and intermediate language sequences (101, 102, 201, 202). If a grade of C or better is attained in the higher numbered course, a grade of S will be transcripted for the lower level course or courses in the sequence. Credit will be granted in this manner for a maximum of four courses. When considering this option, note that one year of language in high school is generally equivalent to one semester of the language at the college level. Exceptionally well qualified students (e.g., native speakers) may earn additional credit by institutional exam. GER 101. Introductory German I. Becoming sensitized to authentic listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture skills at the elementary level. Introduction to basic functional grammar and sentence structure. 4 credits GER 102. Introductory German II. Continued emphasis on authentic listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural skills at the elementary level. Prerequisite: GER 101. 4 credits GER 201. Intermediate German I. Develop active listening skills, functional language skills, reading skills related to student learners immediate environment, guided free writing and understanding of interrelationships of language and culture. Prerequisite: GER 101 and GER 102. 3 credits GER 202. Intermediate German II. Develop interactive listening and speaking skills toward initiating and responding to simple statements and questions; ability to understand selected descriptive readings to include literature of various types, and continued refinement of language and culture, traditions, customs, folklore, etc. Prerequisite: GER 101, GER 102, and GER 201. 3 credits GER 291. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Readings and discussions in German as directed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GER 202. 1-4 credits GER 292. Topics. Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specific field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits GER 311. Composition and Conversation I. Oral and written work. Grammar review and composition; emphasis on German conversation. May be taken concurrently with GER 411. Prerequisite: GER 202. 2 credits GER 312. Composition and Conversation II. Oral and written work. Grammar review and composition; emphasis on German conversation. May be taken concurrently with GER 412. Prerequisite: GER 202. 2 credits GER 350. German for Commerce. The goal of this course is to enable learners to communicate competently in the world of German business, to read, understand, and express themselves orally and in writing areas such as job search, contract negotiation, product presentation, relations with
*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
co-workers, complaint management, and other facets of commercial communication. Prerequisite: GER 202 or permission of instructor. 3 credits GER 380. Deutschland Heute. An examination of contemporary German society, politics, country and people. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GER 311 and GER 312. 3 credits GER 391. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Readings and discussions in German as directed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GER 202. 1-4 credits GER 392. Topics. Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specific field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits GER 411. Advanced Composition and Conversation I. Conversational work, oral reports, discussion, diction. May be taken concurrently with GER 311. Prerequisite: GER 202. 3 credits GER 412. Advanced Composition and Conversation II. Conversational work, oral reports, discussion, diction. May be taken concurrently with GER 312. Prerequisite: GER 202. 3 credits GER 433. German Culture. The culture of the Germanspeaking countries from the beginning to modern times including literary and artistic trends, governmental structures, and the life and customs of the people. Reading and discussions in German. Prerequisite: GER 202 or consent of the instructor. 3 credits* GER 434. German Civilization II. The culture of Germanspeaking countries from the beginning of the 18th century and then to modern times including literary and artistic trends, and customs. Reading and discussion in German. 3 credits GER 453. Survey of German Literature I. Main currents of German literature from the earliest times to the age of Goethe. 3 credits GER 454. Survey of German Literature II. The main currents of German literature from romanticism to present. 3 credits* GER 460. Study and Travel Abroad. Designed for students who wish to complement travel in a Germanspeaking country with a formal plan of study. Number of credits determined by level and performance expectancy. Students must present for approval an outline of a proposed study/travel project. 1-12 credits GER 490. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. 3 credits* GER 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Readings and discussions in German as directed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GER 202. 1-3 credits GER 492. Special Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. Special courses designed to complement the existing curriculum in such areas as business, politics, economy, literature, and history of the language. 2-3 credits HISTORY (HIST) HIST 121. Western Civilization I. Surveys the evolution of western civilization from its beginnings into the Reformation and religious wars. 3 credits HIST 122. Western Civilization II. Surveys the development of western civilization from the Reformation era to the present. 3 credits HIST 151. United States History I. Surveys the background and development of the United States from its colonial origins to the Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 credits HIST 152. United States History II. Surveys development of the United States since the Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 credits* HIST 191. Indepedent Study. Students complete indivdualized plans of study which include signifgant oneon-one student-teacher involvment. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewers students. Meeting depending upon the requirments of the topic. 1-5 credits HIST 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits HIST 311. Chinese History. A survey of Chinese history to 1840. 3 credits* HIST 312. History of Modern Asia. Focuses on the history of modern Chinese and Japanese civilizations. 3 credits* HIST 313. History of the Middle East. Surveys the history of the Middle East from Muhammad to the present, emphasizing the political development of the last 200 years. 3 credits* HIST 326. Renaissance and Reformation. A study of the major European political powers in the 14th-16th centuries. This course will examine the dramatic changes in politics, society, religion, economics and world view occasioned by the phenomena known as the Renaissance and the Reformation. 3 credits*

*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
HIST 329. French Revolution and Napoleon 17891815. A study of the major changes in the European political powers due to the French Revolution and the emergence of Napoleon. The effects of the Congress of Vienna will also be evaluated. 3 credits* HIST 330. Nineteenth Century European History. A study of developments in Western Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of the Great War. 3 credits* HIST 341. English History to 1688. English history from earliest times through the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Prerequisite: HIST 121. 3 credits* HIST 358. The United State Since 1941. Social, economic, and political change. The consequences, domestic and foreign, of global power and rising affluence. 3 credits* HIST 360. Antebellum America and the Civil War. A survey of antebellum America emphasizing the West, factories and reform, slavery, and the Civil War. Prerequisite: HIST 151. 3 credits* HIST 361. The United States During the 1960’s. This course examines American politics, foreign affairs, civil unrest, and popular culture during the 1960’s. Prerequisite: HIST 152. 3 credits* HIST 363. The U.S. From 1890-1940. This course examines the social, political, and economic history of America from 1890-1940. Prerequisite: HIST 152. 3 credits* HIST 365. Cold War. This course examines America during the Cold War. Prerequisite: HIST 152. 3 credits* HIST 368. History and Culture of the American Indian. Presents history and culture of North American Indians from before white contact to the present, emphasizing regional Dakota cultures. 3 credits HIST 369. Modern American Indian History and Culture. Surveys the North American Indian social, cultural, political, and economic history from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, including current conditions of life, problems and activities, lifestyles, beliefs and aspirations. 3 credits* HIST 375. European Social History. This class will examine family life, marriage, sexual behavior and attitudes, women, health, diet, crime, popular religion, and recreation between about 1500 and 1800. 3 credits* HIST 413. Hebrews. A survey of Hebrew history from the time of the Patriarchs to the time of the Great Diaspora. Prerequisite: HIST 121. 3 credits* HIST 420. Contemporary Europe. Presents the history, politics, and culture of Europe from approximately 1890 to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 122. 3 credits* HIST 422. Ancient Rome. A survey of Roman history from its beginnings through the reign of Constantine. 3 credits* HIST 424. Early Church. This class will examine the growth and development of Christianity from its beginning through the reign of Constantine. Prerequisite: HIST 121. 3 credits* HIST 440. Ancient Greece. A survey of Greek history from its beginning through the Hellensistic Age. 3 credits* HIST 425. Medieval Europe. Examines the history of Western Europe from the end of the Roman Empire to the beginning of the Renaissance and emphasizes religious, political, economic, and social developments. Prerequisite: HIST 121. 3 credits* HIST 443. History of Russia Under Tsars. Examines the history of Russia to approximately 1917, including the development of the Russian land and character, the growth of the tsarist autocracy, reform and revolutionary movements, and the cultural heritage of imperial Russia. Prerequisite: HIST 122. 3 credits* HIST 444. History of Soviet Russia. Political development, economic systems, social and cultural patterns, and foreign relations since 1917. Prerequisite: HIST 122. 3 credits* HIST 450. American Colonial History. Provides an indepth look at the English colonies in America, emphasizing how and why they were founded, and tracing their growth and development through the Revolutionary period. Prerequisite: HIST 151. 3 credits* HIST 459. Vietnam War 1945-1975. A survey of the Vietnam War from 1945 to 1975 emphasizing both American and Vietnamese perspectives. 3 credits* HIST 460. American Military History. Examines the origins and development of military institutions, traditions, tactics, and practices in the United States from 1775 to the present, including the relation between the armed forces and other government agencies. 3 credits* HIST 464. 20th Century Frontier. Examines the transMississippi West, emphasizing twentieth-century federal influence and regulation, shifting demographics, business and capitalism, plus the relationship between racial and ethnic groups. 3 credits* HIST 470. World War II. Study of the war from a political, military, social, and economic point of view. American or European emphasis dependent on instructor. 3 credits HIST 476. History of South Dakota. Examines the history of South Dakota’s physical environment, Native American presence, European settlement, economic developments, political institutions, and social life. 3 credits* HIST 480. Historical Methods and Historiography. Introduces the problems, materials, and techniques of historical research and writing, explains the larger meaning and directions of history, and examines major schools of historical thought. 3 credits* HIST 490. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. Advanced study in selected problems in U.S. history. Permission of the instructor is required. May be repeated once for a different topic. 1-3 credits* HIST 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Independent studies in history directed by members of the history staff. 1-3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
HIST 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits HIST 493/593. Workshop. Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range, but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may be lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity. 1-3 credits HIST 780. Historiography and Historical Problems. Development of historical writing; methods and materials of historical research; theories of history. Required of all graduate students whose academic field is history. 2 credits* HIST 798. Thesis or Project Paper. Thesis is six semester hours and may be taken in one semester or in two semesters of three hours each. Project paper is three hours, one semester only. 6 or 3 credits HEALTH (HLTH) HLTH 103. Personal Health. The dynamics of health in modern life in a rapidly changing world; modern concepts of health, disease, and longevity; current medical findings relative to emotional health, human sexuality, family planning, disease control, environmental health, and quackery are included. 2 credits (Fall only) HLTH 250. Pre-Professional First Aid and CPR. Instruction of those who are in a frequently position to provide first aid/CPR and emergency care. Provides essential knowledge and skills needed to develop the functional first aid/CPR capabilities required by a basic first responders, including nurses, teachers, athletic trainers, and other special interest groups. 2 credits HLTH 251. First Aid and CPR. First Aid instruction meeting the requirements of the American Red Cross responding to emergencies, standard First Aid course is given. Safety in everyday living is emphasized, with special consideration given to the kindergarten and elementary school levels. 1 credit
*indicates course is not offered every year

HLTH 320. Community Health. This course presents the structural organization, functional roles, and political foundations of public and private health agencies relative to community health. The roles and responsibilities of community health educators and professional associations/ career opportunities receive particular attention. Prerequisite: WEL 100 and WEL 100L. 2-3 credits* (Fall only) HLTH 340. Health and Fitness for Older Adults. This course is designed to prepare students to understand the importance of lifelong health and fitness, especially for the older adult. The student will be prepared to design and implement health and fitness programs which will enable the older adult to remain independent and functional as long as possible. Prerequisite: WEL 100/100L and HLTH 103. 3 credits HLTH 361. School Health and Safety Education. Emphasis on school safety, coordinated school health programs and curriculum evaluation. 2 credits* (Spring only) HLTH 400. Elements of Health. Discusses the scientific foundation of health and the role of behavior in advancing individual levels of health. Focus of the course will be on principles of disease prevention in understanding basic elements of accident prevention, substance abuse, nutrition, mental health, family, planning, infection control, chronic disease prevention, sexually transmitted diseases and organization of health services as they relate to the education of children and adolescents. 2 credits HLTH 420. K-12 Methods of Health Instruction. Curriculum content at elementary and secondary levels. Methods of presentation include direct, correlated, and integrated health instruction. Organization of health and safety education. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 2-3 credits (Every other Spring) HLTH 422. Nutrition. This course investigates the science of food relative to human performance, nutrition, and health education. Areas of emphasis include nutrient chemistry, function, and interactions; energy consumption and metabolism; and resources for nutrition education. Prerequisite: CHEM 106. 3 credits

HLTH 491. Independent Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or few students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits HLTH 492. Topics. Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specific field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits HLTH 770. Perspectives in Health Promotion and Education. An overview of the history and philosophy of public health as it relates to current health practices in health promotion and education. Model building and the application of health promotion theory will be examined in relation to current health problems. 3 credits HLTH 771. School Health Principles and Practices. An in-depth examination of comprehensive school health education, exploration of controversial issues in school health education, and an understanding of the principles of wellschools. 3 credits HONORS (HON) HON 190. Honors Seminar I. Personal and academic values and ethics applied to university life and critical thinking, writing, and reading. 1 credit HON 263. Special Problems in Service Learning. Honors students with the supervision of the honors director arrange for special learning/service experiences with community organizations. 1 credit HON 390. Honors Seminar. Professional values and ethics applied to career interests of the students and graduate school opportunities. 2 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
HON 391. Independent Study. Honors students may petition to take regularly scheduled courses for honors credit. The student must submit to the Honors Program Director a proposal indicating what will be done in addition to, or instead of, the regular course requirements. No more than nine credit hours of contract courses may be counted toward graduation from the program. Prerequisite: Approval of the course instructor and the Honors Director. 1-5 credits HON 498. Honors Thesis. In consultation with the student’s honors committee, the student will choose a topic and write a substantial research paper and orally defend it. This is required of all honors students for graduation from the program. Prerequisite: Approval of the honors committee. 2-5 credits HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION (HPE) HPE 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits HPE 740. Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education. Organizational and administrative problems of health and physical education on the high school level. Aims and objectives, management of inter-scholastic and intramural sports, the physical plant, and administrative policies. 2 credits HPE 790. Seminar in Health and Physical Education. The class topic will change each time class is offered. The basic topic will examine problems connected with the administration of community and school health, physical education and athletic programs, with particular attention given to the specific problems presented by members of the group. 2 credits HPE 794. Internship in Teaching and Coaching in Health and Physical Education. Supervised internship in advanced practice of teaching and/or coaching. Students implement new teaching and/or coaching strategies with coaching from supervisor and/or peers. Experience includes a field-based research component. 2 or 4 credits Student may take 4 credits one semester or 2 credits each for 2 semesters. HPE 798. Thesis or Project Paper. May be taken in one semester or two semesters of three hours each. Project paper is three hours, one semester only. 6 or 3 credits INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (IDL) IDL 101, University Success. This class focuses on the skills needed to complete a bachelor’s degree including notetaking, textbook reading, test taking skills for essay and multiple choice exams, library skills and study habits. Time management and university resources will also be included. Personal responsibility for the student’s education is stressed. 1 credit IDL 190. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. 1-3 credits IDL 191. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 1-3 credits IDL 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. May be repeated for credit. 1-3 credits IDL 201. Advanced Academic Skills. This course is designed to further develop learning, academic and test-taking skills that are related to successful academic performance. In particular it focuses on improving reading and writing skills for academically at-risk students and reviews relevant materials for other courses. Required for students with ACT scores < 17 or a comparable score on the COMPASS exam in their sophomore year. 2 credits INDIAN EDUCATION (INED) INED 411/511. South Dakota Indian Studies. A basic knowledge of Indian history with emphasis on the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota speaking people. Current cultural issues are presented including values, family structures, traditional religion, fine arts, legends, economics, governmental policies, treaties, acts and related areas. Focuses on teaching methods. Content and materials to equip students to teach bi-culturally. Junior Standing. 3 credits LIBRARY MEDIA (LIBM) LIBM 155. On-line Inormation Literacy. Covers concepts of information: research processes; and techniques and skills necessary for efficient use and evaluation of information resources. 1 credit LIBM 191. Independent Study in Library Media. Closely supervised individual investigation of a problem area not otherwise examined through existing courses. Open only to students who have completed Library Media Program. Prerequisite: permission of advisor and department coordinator. 1-4 credits LIBM 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits LIBM 205. Children’s Literature. An introduction to children’s literature with emphasis on historical types of literature; selection and evaluation of books according to levels, interests, special needs, and educational objectives. 2 credits

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*indicates course is not offered every year

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
LIBM 306. Reference. Introduction to on-line databases such as SDLN, copyright laws, and standard reference works found in small school and public libraries. 3 credits* LIBM 322. Cataloging and Classification. Problems in acquisitions, descriptive and subject cataloguing, and classification of library materials. Serial work, copyright, and materials preservation. Emphasis on technical services work in school libraries. 3 credits LIBM 410. Library Media Center Administration. Administration, supervision, evaluation, and management of human and media resources in the school library media center. 3 credits* LIBM 407. Selection of Library Media Materials. Selection of and criteria for evaluation of books and nonprint materials for the school library/media center and public library, including developing selection policies, and censorship issues. Emphasis on reading interests, kindergarten through the young adult years. 3 credits* LIBM 441. Instructional Technologies. Selection, evaluation, acquisition and utilization of appropriate instructional technologies to enhance student learning in the school library/media center. Technological issues include the production of computer-based instructional materials, integration of Internet, computer, and video-based resources in the classroom, copyright issues, and the role of the school media specialist. 3 credits LIBM 480. Methods of Bibliographic Instruction. The educational role of the librarian: bibliographic instruction and the development of information programs in school library media centers. Included are information and media literacy concepts and instructional design. 3 credits LIBM 487. Practicum in Library Media. Practical application of library science theory to a selected library problem or problems. A portion of the course is on-site in an academic, public, or school library. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of library media courses. 1-3 credits* LIBM 491/591. Independent Study in Library Media. Closely supervised individual investigation of a problem area not otherwise examined through existing courses. Open only to students who have completed Library Media
*indicates course is not offered every year

Program. Prerequisite: permission of advisor and department coordinator. 1-3 credits LIBM 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits LINGUISTICS (LING) LING 403. Introduction to Linguistics. History of linguistics and basic principles of its subareas. Prerequisite to all other linguistic courses. 3 credits* LING 409. English Syntax. This course is designed to provide (1) a linguistic analysis and description of some central processes in English syntax, (2) an appreciation of the regularity and irregularity inherent in syntactic form and the difficulty this poses constructing a syntactic grammar, and (3) some familiarity with a basic generative-transformational model of syntax. 3 credits* LING 413/513. Sociolinguistics. This course explores the relationship between English language and society and how social structure may influence or determine linguistic structures and behaviors (and vice versa). Topics covered include language and culture, linguistic variation, dialects, etc. Prerequisite: LING 403. 3 credits* LING 425. Modern Grammar. Structures of modern English through analyses that are primarily traditional, structural and transformational. 3 credits* LING 435/535. Second Language Development. An applied linguistic course designed to provide an overview of psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic variables affecting the development and use of a second language and to familiarize students with current theories of second language learning. Prerequisite: LING 403. 3 credits* LING 436/536. Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language. This is an applied linguistics course designed for students who are new to the field of Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) and for those who have

practical experience but little formal exposure to the area. It is intended to provide students with an introduction to ESL methodologies and at the same time encourage an analytical approach to teaching. Students will explore the underlying assumptions of the various methods, materials and techniques to be studied. In addition, students will have an opportunity to observe in an ESL setting and develop and teach a lesson in that setting. The course aims to build toward a comprehensive, integrated understanding of the relation ship between second language teaching practices and the process of second language learning. 3 credits* LING 443. History of the English Language. Phonological, syntactic, and semantic study of the origin and development of the English language (Indo-European through Early Modern English). 3 credits* MATHEMATICS (MATH) MATH 021 Basic Algebra. This course prepares students for college level mathematics. Topics generally include: basic properties of real numbers, exponents and radicals, rectangular coordinate geometry, solutions to linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, polynomials and factoring. Students may also be introduced to functions and systems of equations. Note: this course is remedial level and no credit for MATH 021 will be granted for graduation. Prerequisite: Appropriate mathematics placement. 3 credits MATH 101 Intermediate Algebra. Basic properties of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, systems of equations, polynomials and factoring, rational expression and equations, and radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions such as polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 021 or appropriate mathematics placement. 3 credits MATH 102 College Algebra. Equations and inequalities; polynomial functions and graphs; exponents, radicals, binomial theorem, zeros of polynomials; systems of equations; exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions, applications and graphs. Other topics selected from sequences, series, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 101 (minimum of a C required) or appropriate mathematics placement. 3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MATH 104 Finite Mathematics. This course includes: linear systems of equations, matrices, linear programming, mathematics of finance, probability, statistics, and other topics. This course cannot be used as the prerequisite for courses requiring MATH 102. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or appropriate mathematics placement. 4 credits MATH 115 Precalculus. A preparatory course for the calculus sequence. Topics include: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs; systems of equations, inequalities and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or appropriate mathematics placement. 5 credits MATH 120 Trigonometry. Topics include: trigonometric functions, equations, and identities; inverse trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications of these functions. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or appropriate mathematics placement. 3 credits MATH 121 Survey of Calculus. A survey of calculus including an intuitive approach to limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration with an emphasis on applications of the derivative and the integral as well as topics from multivariable calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or MATH 115 or a combination of MATH 102 and MATH 120, or appropriate mathematics placement. 4 credits MATH 123 Calculus I. The study of limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of the derivative, antiderivatives, the definite and indefinite integral, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or appropriate mathematics placement. 4 credits MATH 125 Calculus II. A continuation of the study of calculus, including the study of sequences, series, polar coordinates, parametric equations, techniques of integration, applications of integration, indeterminate forms, and improper integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 123. 4 credits MATH 225 Calculus III. A continuation of the study of calculus, including an introduction to vectors, vector calculus, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 125. 4 credits MATH 273. Computer Mathematics with Excel and VBA. This course provides an introducation to problem solving and computer mathematiccs using MS Excel and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). It is offered for the students in all disciplines with little or no computer programming experience. Topics include advanced Excel functions and formulas, using Excel as a data analysis, decision support and data management tool, using Excel for advanced charting, VBA data types, control structures and forms, creating custom functions using VBA, graphical user interface design and implementation, Excel objects model and object oriented programming concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 102 and MIS/CSC 105. 3 credits* MATH 291. Indepedent Study. Students complete indivdualized plans of study which include signifgant oneon-one student-teacher involvment. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewers students. Meeting depending upon the requirments of the topic. 1-5 credits MATH 292. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits MATH 315 Linear Algebra. Course topics include: the theory and applications of systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 225. 3 credits* MATH 316 Discrete Mathematics. Selected topics from Boolean algebra, set theory, graph theory, functions and relations, discrete probability, algebraic structures, and logic. Prerequisite: MATH 125. 3 credits MATH 321 Differential Equations. Selected topics from ordinary differential equations including development and applications of first order, higher order linear and systems of linear equations, general solutions and solutions to initialvalue problems using matrices. Additional topics may include Laplace transforms and power series solutions. Prerequisite: MATH 125. 3 credits* MATH 341 Math Concepts for Teachers I. An introduction to sets, numeration systems, arithmetic operations/algorithms, problem solving, and other topics. This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement nor any mathematics area requirements other than those for a degree in elementary education. Prerequisite: MATH 102. 3 credits MATH 342 Math Concepts for Teachers II. An introduction to geometry concepts, measurement, problem solving, probability, statistics, and other topics. This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement nor any mathematics area requirements other than those for a degree in elementary education. Prerequisite: MATH 102, MATH 115, MATH 120, MATH 121, MATH 123, MATH 125, MATH 281 or MATH 341. 3 credits MATH 346. Applications of Mathematics for Elementary and Secondary Teachers. Applications of arithmetic, geometry, including solid geometry, algebra, modeling, and probability as they relate to other areas of study. The course will include the study of sets, logic, linear programming, metric system, systems of numeration, statistics and game theory. 2 credits MATH 361 Modern Geometry. In this course topics will be chosen from: axiomatic systems, finite geometries, Euclidean plane geometry, transformational geometry, three dimensional geometry, and non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite: MATH 125. 3 credits* MATH 373 Introduction to Numerical Analysis. This course is an introduction to numerical methods. Topics include elementary discussion of errors, polynomial interpolation, quadrature, non-linear equations, and systems of linear equations. The algorithmic approach and efficient use of the computer will be emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 125 and MIS 150. 3 credits MATH 381 Introduction to Probability and Statistics. Introduction to probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions and the Central Limit Theorem with general principles for statistical inference and applications of random sampling to hypothesis testing, confidence limits, correlation, and regression. Prerequisite: MATH 125. 3 credits*
*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
MATH 391. Independent Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or few students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-5 credits MATH 392. Topics. Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specific field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-5 credits MATH 411. Theory of Numbers. Properties of integers, divisibility, primes, congruences, diophantine equations, quadratic residues, continued fractions and the distribution of primes. Prerequisite: MATH 125. 3 credits* MATH 413. Abstract Algebra I. Introduction to the theory and applications of algebraic structures including groups, rings, and fields. Prerequisite: MATH 315 or MATH 316. 3 credits MATH 414. Abstract Algebra II. This is a continuation of topics from MATH 413. Prerequisite: MATH 413. 3 credits* MATH 421. Complex Analysis. The algebra of complex numbers; complex functions; contour integration and Cauchy integral theorems; Taylor and Laurent series and the residue theorem; the evaluation of real definite integrals; elementary mapping problems. Prerequisite: MATH 225. 3 credits* MATH 425. Real Analysis I. Properties of real numbers, sequences, and series of real numbers, limits of functions, uniform continuity, differentiation, sequences and series of functions, uniform convergence, and theories of integration. Extensions of R^n may be considered. Prerequisite: MATH 225. 3 credits* MATH 426. Real Analysis II. This is a continuation of MATH 425. Prerequisite: MATH 425. 3 credits* MATH 450. History of Mathematics. A general presentation of historical topics in mathematics including contributions to mathematics from ancient civilizations; developments leading to the creation of modern geometries, calculus and modern algebra; and contributions of outstanding mathematicians. Prerequisite: MATH 125. 3 credits* MATH 461. Introduction to Topology. Introduction to topological and metric spaces with specific emphasis on topology of the real line. Prerequisite: MATH 225. 3 credits* MATH 466. Projective Geometry. Concepts of invariants of binary forms, cross ratio, fixed points, and polar forms are used to study the projective geometry of the line. These and other concepts are extended to the projective geometry of the plane by use of homogeneous projective coordinates. Collineations, conics, correlations, duality, pole and polar theory, and non-Euclidean geometry are treated by projective methods. Prerequisite: MATH 125. 3 credits* MATH 471. Numerical Analysis I. Analysis of rounding errors, numerical solutions of nonlinear equations, numerical differentiation, numerical integration, interpolation and approximation, numerical methods for solving linear systems. Prerequisite: MATH 225. 3 credits* MATH 490. Senior Seminar. Students and faculty jointly discuss aspects of the mathematics professions, emphasizing methods of written and oral communications. Students will present a research seminar. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. 1 credit MATH 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 1-3 credits MATH 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-6 credits MATH 494. Internship. An experience in the practical application of mathematics to a specific job situation. An elective course. Prerequisite: consent of mathematics faculty supervisor and department coordinator. 1-6 credits MATH 740. Seminar in Teaching Secondary School Mathematics. Theory and techniques for presenting secondary school mathematics: films, filmstrips and theory and techniques of measurement in mathematics. May be oriented to particular secondary school subjects such as algebra and geometry, trigonometry, matrix theory, game theory, probability, and calculus. Prerequisite: fifteen hours of mathematics and a teaching certificate. 2 credits* MATH 798. Thesis or Project Paper. Thesis is six semester hours and may be taken in one semester or in two semester of three hours each. Project paper is three hours, one semester only. 6 or 3 credits SEED 418. 7-12 Math Methods. Not applicable toward major or minor. Should be the semester before student teaching. Prerequisite: MATH 225 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 225. 2 credits MASS COMMUNICATIONS (MCOM) MCOM 210. Basic Newswriting. Introduces students to gathering, evaluating and writing news. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits MCOM 311. News Editing. The evaluation and editing of news stories, with an examination of editing problems, copy reading techniques, page makeup and design, headlines, picture usage, legal and ethical issues. Prerequisite: MCOM 210. 3 credits* MCOM 495. Practicum. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses. 1-3 credits

*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES (MFL) MFL 100. Language in Life. This course introduces students to the major types and uses of human language systems. Specific emphases in up to six different academic areas are provided by instructors from amoung the disciplines of Art, Biology, Business/Accounting, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, History/Anthropology/Sociology, Literature, Mathematics/Physics, Music/Theater, Modern Foreign Languages/Linguistics, Philosophy, and Physical Education/Health. 3 credits MFL 101. Introduction to Foreign Language and Culture I. Fundamentals of the language and introduction to the culture where the language is spoken. Classwork may be supplemented with required aural/oral practice outside of class. 4 credits MFL 102. Introduction to Foreign Language and Culture II. Fundamentals of the language and introduction to the culture where the language is spoken. Classwork may be supplemented with required aural/oral practice outside of class. 4 credits MFL 103. Culture as Communication. This course examines the phenomenon known as culture with a small “c” and posits the view that every culture is in reality a system of communication, a silent language which can be studied and learned, just as a foreign language can be studied and learned. Indeed, learning the language of a culture is not enough to ensure good communication: one must also learn its cultural norms. The course includes an attempt to define culture, to discuss its origins, to stress the link between language and cultures and to lay down some general principles which will help individuals to learn and understand when they are confronted with cultural difference in the United States and abroad. 3 credits MFL 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits MFL 392, Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits MFL 420. K-12 Foreign Language Methods. Methods and materials for teaching modern languages in high school. 3 credits MFL 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. 1-12 credits MICROBIOLOGY (MICR) MICR 433/433L. Medical Microbiology and Lab. Principles of medical microbiology including a survey of the most clinically significant bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral diseases in the world, with an emphasis on those most prevalent in North America. Case studies will address: morphology, physiology, adn virulence of the microbes adn the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of the diseases they cause. Prerequisite: BIOL 331 or CHEM 112 or CHEM 114. 4 credits MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) MIS 101/201. Application Software Instruction. Handson instruction in an application software package. Basic concepts of the general category of software in use, as well as discussion of appropriate applications. 1-3 credits MIS 105. Introduction to Computers. Overview of computer applications with emphasis on word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation tools and internet-based applications. 3 credits MIS 150, Computer Science I. An introduction to computer programming. Focus on problem solving, algorithm development, design, and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, functions, and arrays. 3 credits. MIS 205. Advanced Computer Applications. This course covers advanced topics in word processing and spreadsheet applications such as macros, advanced functions, graphics, merging, linking, and transferring data. The course emphasizes the efficient use of software packages. Operating system/environment topics are also addressed. Prerequisite: MIS 105, or Placement Test Score of 70%. 3 credits MIS 210. Web Authoring. This course focuses on techniques and methods for writing specifically for the Internet. Topics will include designing and creating documents for the World Wide Web, design considerations, and publishing and maintaining Web sites. Students will use HTML, Web authoring software, and other software for Web development. Prerequisite: MIS 105 or MIS 205. 3 credits MIS 231. Desktop Publishing. Fundamental processes in the writing, assembling and design of publications, such as business reports, newsletters and trade journals, in a business or editorial office by the use of microcomputers, printers and scanners. Systems to be learned shall include Aldus Pagemaker. 3 credits MIS 250. Computer Science II. Problem solving, algorithm design, standards of program style, debugging and testing. Extension of the control structures and data structures of the high-level language introduced in MIS 150. Elementary data structures and basic algorithms that include sorting and searching. Topics include more advanced treatment of functions, data types such as arrays and structures, and files. Prerequisite: MIS 150. 3 credits MIS 291. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-5 credits

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*indicates course is not offered every year

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
MIS 325. Management Information Systems. Introduction to the application of information technology in organizations, roles of managers and staff professionals in developing and using information systems with current and future technology. 3 credits MIS 332. Structured Systems Analysis and Design. The study of Systems Development Life Cycle, including strategies and techniques of structured analysis, planning and design, testing, and implementation is stressed. Case studies will be used along with hands-on application of concepts. Prerequisite: MIS 205. 3 credits MIS 335. Telecommunications and Networks for Business. This course is designed to include those topics beyond the user level that will be essential for supervisors and managers of an automated facility. The course will include strategic telecommunications and network planning, network analysis, network maintenance and network applications. Course projects will include evaluation of networks, networking opportunities and decision processes for acquiring and maintaining network and telecommunications systems. Students will be expected to use existing systems and applications during the course. Prerequisite: MIS 105 or MIS 205, or equivalent experience. 3 credits MIS 371. Survey of Data Structures. This course establishes a basic understanding of data structures and their applications to structured/object oriented programming. Topics covered include arrays, lists, stacks, queues and trees. Problems such as sorting, searching and file methods will also be discussed. Prerequisite: MIS 250. 3 credits MIS 384. Decision Support Systems. Concepts underlying decision support systems and their application to the analysis of business problems. Prerequisites: MIS 325. 3 credits MIS 389. Expert Systems. The basic concepts of expert systems technology for business. An expert system development tool will be used to apply these basic concepts. Prerequisite: MIS 150. 3 credits* MIS 421. Computer and Hardware Maintenance. Maintenance, diagnostic and basic repair procedures of typical personal computers and auxiliary hardware including the CPU, keyboard, disk drive and mouse. 3 credits
*indicates course is not offered every year

MIS 423/523. Server Construction and Configuration. Hands-on introduction to computer architecture and system administration. The microcomputer architecture including classic CPU, memory organization and access, internal and external bus structures, and storage schemes will be discussed. During a course students will build multiprocessor computer using basic hardware components, then configure it as a file and Internet server. Included will be system installation, halting and booting the system, file systems and file and directory permission structures, device configuration and management, and user account administration. Course will cover topics related to data and storage organization, security, optimization of data access along with an analysis of multiprocessor system performance. Prerequisite: MIS 105 and two computer related courses at least 200 level. 3 credits MIS 461. Programming Languages. This course consists of two parts. The first part introduces how programming languages are designed, including an introduction to the concepts of parsing and compiling. Issues related to implementation such as type checking, binding, and memory management are discussed. Secondly, the course will survey the spectrum of programming languages paradigms, including traditional imperative, object oriented, functional, and logic languages. Prerequisite: MIS 150. 3 credits MIS 484. Database Management Systems. The study of formalized database design. This course will focus on relational model design and the use of SQL. Students will use a modern relational database to implement designs and learn the basics of data management. Prerequisite: MIS 332. 3 credits MIS 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits* MIS 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-5 credits

MIS 498. Undergraduate Research/Scholarship. Independent research problems/projects or scholarship activities. The plan of study is negotiated by the faculty member and the student. Contact between the two may be extensive and intensive. Does not include research courses which are theoretical. 1-6 credits MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION (MLED) MLED 461/561. Issues in Middle Level Education. This course will examine how middle level schools can best meet the needs of students in a rapidly changing society. The goals outlined in recent reports and the program components of exemplary middle level schools will be examined. 3 credits MLED 480/580. Middle Level Methods. Students develop the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to the developmental characteristics of middle level learners; the ability to assess student learning in middle level; concepts of middle level education; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits MLED 495. Practicum in Middle Level Teaching. Practicum experience in middle level education. Minimum 40-hour experience. 1 credit MLED 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 1-3 credits MLED 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MLED 790. Seminar in Middle Level Education. Graduate students investigate a variety of topics depending on current need and issues relating to middle level education. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. 1-3 credits MUSICAL PERFORMANCE (MUAP) PRIVATE LESSONS. One semester hour credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two hours of credit. Any credit hours of major applied over the one hour per semester requirement will be in excess of the hours required for graduation and will not serve as music elective hours. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. MUAP 100/200/300/400. Applied Music-Voice. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 101/201/301/401. Applied Music-Voice. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students.1-2 credits MUAP 110/210/310/410. Applied Music-Keyboard/ Organ. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 111/211/311/411. Applied Music-Keyboard. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 120/220/320/420. Applied Music-Woodwinds. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 121/221/321/421. Applied Music-Woodwinds. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 130/230/330/430. Applied Music-Brass. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 131/231/331/431. Applied Music-Brass. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 140/240/340/440. Applied Music-Percussion. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 141/241/341/441. Applied Music-Percussion. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 150/250/350/450. Applied Music-Strings. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week
*indicates course is not offered every year

for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1-2 credits MUAP 151/251/351/451. Applied Music-Strings. One to two semester hours credit for private lessons is given for one half-hour lesson per week. Music majors studying in the major performance area may elect two half-hour lessons per week for two to four hours of credit. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students.1-2 credits MUAP 181/381/781. Piano Accompanying. Development of intelligent and sympathetic accompanists under the supervision of instructors in each performance area. Prerequisite: considerable piano background and experience. 1 credit each.* CLASS LESSONS. One semester hour credit for class lessons is based upon two one-hour classes per week with adequate preparation through practice. May be taken more than once, using the same number. MUAP 102/302. Class Instruction-Voice. Class voice instruction is open to anyone interested. Emphasis is placed on the development of the fundamental voice techniques. 1 credit MUAP 105/305. Class Instruction–Guitar. Beginning students will learn guitar in a class room setting studying basic techniques and styles. 1 credit MUAP 115/315. Class Instruction-Keyboard. One to two semester hours credit for class instruction is given for two one-hour class meetings. Adequate preparation through practice is expected of all students. 1 credit ENSEMBLES (MUEN) MUEN 100/300/500. Concert Choir. An ensemble performing accompanied and unaccompanied literature for mixed voices. Membership determined by instructor’s permission and audition only. 0-1 credit

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
MUEN 104/304. Chamber Singers. Specialization in the chamber literature of early through contemporary periods. Membership determined by instructor’s permission and audition only. 0-1 credit MUEN 105/305. Vocal Jazz Ensemble. A vocal ensemble specializing in contemporary jazz styles and genre. Membership determined by instructor’s permission and audition only. 0-1 credit MUEN 110/310/510. Orchestra. A joint enterprise of the university and interested public-area musicians. The orchestra studies and performs standard orchestra literature and presents public concerts. 0-1 credit MUEN 120/320. Marching Band. Active during the fall, the marching band performs at all home football games. 0-1 credit MUEN 121/321. Symphonic Band. Members are selected by audition to perform the finest in original and transcribed literature in concert performances on and off-campus. 0-1 credit MUEN 122/322/522 Concert Band. A joint enterprise open to university students and interested area musicians. Includes rehearsals and performance of band literature culminating in a public performance. 0-1 credit MUEN 130. Chamber Music Ensemble. A select group of string players and such incidental instrumentalists as required for the preparation and performance of chamber music. 0-1 credit MUEN 150/350. Woodwind Ensemble. A select woodwind instrument group which performs music composed or arranged for this medium. 0-1 credit MUEN 160/360. Brass Ensemble. A select group of brass instrumentalists who perform music composed or arranged for this medium. 0-1 credit MUEN 170/370. Percussion Ensemble. A select group of percussionists who perform music composed or arranged for this medium. 0-1 credit MUEN 180/380/580. Jazz Ensemble. Gives students the opportunity to experience and perform music in the popular idiom and to relate it to practical use in secondary school music programs. Open only by audition or consent of the instructor. 0-1 credit MUSIC THEORY (MUS) MUS 110. Basic Music Theory I. An integrated study and application of tonality, melody, harmony, texture and form, from basic notation through modulation. Includes sight singing, ear training and dictation. Introduction to composition and arranging, i.e.: instrument ranges, transposition, tessitura and preliminary score analysis. 4 credits with lab. MUS 111. Basic Music Theory II. An integrated study and application of tonality, melody, harmony, texture and form, from basic notation through modulation. Includes sight singing, ear training and dictation. Introduction to composition and arranging, i.e.: instrument ranges, transposition, tessitura and preliminary score analysis. Prerequisite: MUS 110. 4 credits with lab. MUS 210. Advanced Music Theory I. A more advanced continuation of MUS 110, 111 with similar objectives and organization. A continuation of vocal/instrumental arranging and composition. Prerequisite: MUS 111. 4 credits with lab. MUS 211. Advanced Music Theory II. A more advanced continuation of MUS 110, 111 with similar objectives and organization. A continuation of vocal/instrumental arranging and composition. Prerequisite: MUS 210. 4 credits with lab. MUS 311. Counterpoint. Analysis and composition in contrapuntal techniques, with a concentration on the music of J.S. Bach. 3 credits MUS 313. Form and Analysis. Analysis of music in the student’s major performance area. The course is normally completed under the direction of the student’s major applied teacher. Prerequisite: MUS 210 or MUS 211. 2 credits MUS 420. Orchestration and Arranging. A study of instruments alone and in combinations. Orchestration and arranging for instrumental and vocal ensembles. Preparation of parts and participation in the conducting and performing of works scored. Prerequisite: MUS 211. 2 credits MUS 424. Music Composition. The composition of vocal and instrumental music for solo and small ensembles. Analysis of contemporary music. Prerequisite: MUS 111. 2 credits* MUSIC LITERATURE (MUS) MUS 100. Music Appreciation. A non-technical discussion designed to increase the enjoyment and appreciation of music. Fulfills the music requirement in the general education program. 3 credits MUS 185. Recital Attendance. Designed to expose students to a large and varied body of music through attendance at recitals, solo classes, concerts and other performances. Required of all music majors each semester they are enrolled in applied music. Student teaching semesters excepted. S/U grade. 0 credits MUS 205. Rock and Roll Appreciation. An historical exploration of the development of Rock and Roll music using lecture, videos, and online video resources. Current trends and rock music genres will also be explored. 2 credits MUS 332. History of Music I. A study of the development of music in Western Civilization to the end of the Renaissance Era. Representative works and styles are emphasized as related to the musical concepts of the time. 2 credits MUS 333. History of Music II. A study of the Baroque period and its move from monody to its combination with polyphony. Representative works and styles are emphasized as related to the musical concepts of the time. 2 credits MUS 340. Keyboard Literature. A critical survey of keyboard literature by major composers of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries through performance, recordings and study of scores. Includes an examination of teaching materials on various levels. 2 credits* MUS 342. Diction and Literature. This course will present the International Phonetic Alphabet as a basis for diction studies. Principles of diction in English, Italian, French and German will be studied along with literature for solo voice in each language suitable for teaching use in the public school format. 2 credits*

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MUS 343. The Study of Opera. The study of opera through live music, recordings, scores and readings. 2 credits* MUS 344. History of Jazz. Historical overview of performers, composers, and major events of jazz music in the twentieth century. 2 credits* MUS 432. History of Music III. A study of the move from the ideals of classicism to those of romanticism. Extensive use will be made of recordings and scores to demonstrate the similarities and disparities of the two ideals. 2 credits MUS 433. History of Music IV. A study of music from the breakdown of tonality to the present. Emphasis will be placed upon modern music as both a continuation of and a reaction to earlier periods of music history. 2 credits MUS 446. Organ Literature, Registration and Materials. A survey of the literature of the pipe organ, including both recital repertoire and church music. Emphasizes registration, service playing and publications available to the organist. 2 credits* PROFESSIONAL MUSIC EDUCATION (MUS) MUS 191/391/591. Special Projects. Students may pursue specific goals in their area of music specialization and interest under the guidance of a member of the music department. Studies may pertain to performance, theory, history and literature and/or music education. 1-4 credits (not more than two hours per semester) MUS 272. Brass Methods and Materials in the Elementary School. Practical courses in brass methods and materials of teaching the basic principles of these instruments in class and individual instruction situations. 1 credit with lab. MUS 273, Brass Methods and Materials in Secondary School. Continuation of MUS 272 1 credit MUS 274. String Methods and Materials in the Elementary School. Practical courses in string methods and materials of teaching the basic principles of these instruments in class and individual instruction situations. 1 credit with lab. MUS 275, String Methods and Materials in Secondary School. Continuation of MUS 274. 1 credit MUS 292. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-5 credits MUS 321. Music Technology. Creative hands-on experience with state-of-the-art electronic and computer music studio equipment and representative music software. Topics discussed include MIDI, synthesis techniques, electronic composition, software. Prerequisite: Background in music or consent of instructor. 2 credits MUS 341. Vocal Techniques and Literature. The vocal mechanism and pedagogy, techniques and literature, including material suitable for high schools’ large and small vocal ensembles for contest and public performance. 3 credits MUS 351. Elementary School Music Methods. Methods and materials K-6 for guiding children’s musical growth through singing, listening, playing and creating. Students entering this class must have sufficient background in reading music notation, terminology and basic music performance. 2 credits MUS 353. K-8 Music Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 music; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 music; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 music; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. 2 credits MUS 354. Listening Lessons for Children. Materials and methods of teaching music listening in the public schools. 2 credits MUS 361. Instrumental Conducting, Methods and Literature. A study of baton technique, score reading and practice in conducting instrumental music. Includes the organization and administration of high school bands and orchestras, rehearsal techniques, band literature and program building. Required for Plan I music majors. To be taken before the professional semester. 2 credits MUS 362. Choral Conducting, Methods and Literature. The organization and development of high school choral groups, effective conducting and rehearsal procedure. Required for Plan II music majors. To be taken before the professional semester. Prerequisite: MUS 111 2 credits MUS 372. Woodwind Methods and Materials in the Elementary School. Practical courses in woodwind methods and materials of teaching the basic principles of these instruments in class and individual instruction situations. 1 credit with lab. MUS 373, Woodwind Methods and Materials in Secondary School. Continuation of MUS 372. 1 credit MUS 374. Percussion Methods and Materials in the Elementary School. Practical courses in percussion methods and materials of teaching the basic principles of these instruments in class and individual instruction situations. 1 credit with lab. MUS 375, Percussion Methods and Materials in Secondary School. Continuation of MUS 374. 1 credit MUS 395. Practicum. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. 1-5 credits MUS 450. Advanced Music Methods in the Elementary School. A continuation of the study of methods and materials in teaching musical concepts, grades K-6, in singing, listening, playing rhythms and creativity. 2 credits MUS 466. The School Music Program/Media. All method/ media aspects of organizing and administering a complete elementary and secondary vocal and instrumental program including media methods and materials. 3 credits
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
MUS 469. Instrumental Techniques. The course includes marching band, jazz and instrumental repair techniques and methods. The marching band component includes organization, administration, charting and arranging. The jazz techniques component includes the study of literature, jazz styles and blues progression/scales/modes. The instrument repair component includes daily care and repair of band instruments. Fall only. 2 credits MUS 472/572. Piano Pedagogy. Procedures and materials for piano instruction from the beginning to the intermediate level. Includes a discussion of leading piano methods and teaching repertoire. Required of all majors whose principle performing area is the piano. 2 credits* MUS 480. Secondary School Methods. Students are assigned to thirty hours of Junior Aide service in public school music classrooms. Includes a component on fretted instruments. Offered only in the spring semester of the junior year; no substitutes are allowed for this course. Prerequisite: EPSY 302. 3 credits MUS 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-5 credits MUS 791. Individual Problems in Music Education. Students work on problems of special interest in music education under the guidance of a member of the music department. 2 credits each. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE) No more than EIGHT HOURS of credit for PE 100 and 210 may be counted toward the required 128 hours for graduation. Students must provide their own equipment for tennis, handball and racquetball. PE 100. Activity Courses. Activities stressing individual physical fitness and lifetime activities according to student needs and interest. 1/2 -1 credit Aerobic Dance 1 credit Aerobic Super Circuit 1 credit Badminton 1/2 to 1 credit Beginning Tennis 1/2 to 1 credit Jogging and Walking 1 credit Racquetball 1/2 to 1 credit Table Tennis 1/2 to 1 credit Volleyball 1/2 to 1 credit Weight Training 1 credit PE 123. Community Water Safety. Emphasizes the personal knowledge and skill necessary to provide a safe aquatic experience. 1 credit* PE 127. Adapted Aquatics. Methodologies used to teach swimming to exceptional people, especially for aquatics instructors, adapted physical education instructors, and athletic trainers. Concentration on practical application. 1 credit (Offered Spring odd years) PE 180. Foundations of HPER/A. A survey of the historical background, sociological implications, and philosophical basis of physical education. This course includes a review of the modern principles and related concepts which are applicable to physical activity. 2 credits PE 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits PE 200. Professional Preparation: Fitness. Knowledge and skill necessary to enable students to lead, analyze and prescribe improvement for skills and activities which are part of lifetime fitness development. 1 credit PE 201. Professional Preparation: Gymnastics. Knowledge and skill necessary to enable student to lead, analyze and prescribe improvements for skills and activities which are part of gymnastics movement. Focus will be on developmentally appropriate activities. To be take concurrently with PE 204. 1 credit PE 202. Professional Preparation: Individual and Dual Activities. Knowledge and skill necessary to enable student to lead, analyze and prescribe improvements for skills and activities involved in participating in individual and dual sport and game activities. Focus will be on activities appropriate for school settings, leading to personal skill development. 1-2 credits PE 203. Professional Preparation: Team Activities. Knowledge and skill necessary to enable student to lead, analyze and prescribe improvement for skills and activities involved in participating in team sports and game activities. Focus will be on activities appropriate for school settings, leading to personal skill development. To be taken concurrently with PE 208. 1 Credit PE 204. Professional Preparation: Rhythm and Dance. Knowledge and skill necessary to enable student to lead, analyze and prescribe improvements forskills and activities involved in participating in rhythms and lifetime dance activities. Focus will be on activities appropriate for school settings which contribute to personal development. To be taken concurrently with PE 201. 1 credit PE 208. Professional Preparation: Camping Activities. Knowledge and skill necessary to enable student to lead, analyze and prescribe outdoor education activities appropriate for school settings which lead to personal development. 1 credit PE 210. Varsity Sports. Grade assigned S/U. 1 credit PE 250/250L. Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab. This is a one-semester human anatomy and physiology course. The structure and function of the entire human body is covered, including all of the organ systems. Concurrent registration in PE 250L is required. PE 250L is designed to compliment PE 250. Activities are designed to reinforce the studentís understanding of concepts and topics introduced in PE 250. 4 credits (3 lecture; 1 lab) PE 320. Lifeguard Training. The course focuses on skills and knowledge to properly assume responsibilities of lifeguards at swimming pools and non-surf beaches. 1-2 credits

*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
PE 321. Water Safety Instructor. Method of instruction and evaluation of water safety techniques. Successful students may earn American Red Cross water safety instructor certification. 1 credit PE 334. Behavioral & Social Science Issues in Physical Education. This course will focus on behavioral and social sciences and reading pertinent to physical education. 2 credits PE 341. Curriculum Development and Evaluation. This course is designed to teach students concepts related to the selection and implementation of teaching resources and curriculum materials. In addition students will gain experience in curriculum development and evaluation and in linking physical activity concepts to appropriate learning experiences. Prerequisite: PE 180 2-3 credits PE 350. Exercise Physiology. Study of physiological responses and adaptations to exercise related to human performance limitations, training effects, and health-related benefits. Prerequisite: PE 250/250L. 3 credits PE 352. Adapted Physical Education. Students are exposed to those impairments addressed in idea as they relate to physical education. Assessments, IEP development, and other elements necessary to successful inclusion are addressed. In addition, physical activities for special populations outside the school setting are also addressed. 2 credits (Fall only) PE 354. Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. Course teaches general and emergency treatment of athletic injuries, competitive or noncompetitive. Emphasis is placed on practicle preventative and rehabilitative exercises and taping/bandagind/wrapping. 2 credits PE 355. Philosophies, Concepts and Contemporary Issues in Coaching. The examination of coaching as a profession, including issues of philosophy and ethics; effective practice/competition planning; positive coaching, communication, and motivational techniques; performance analysis; program organization; risk management; contest administration; equipment and facility management; and contemporary issues related to coaching. 3 credits PE 360. K-8 Physical Education Methods. In this course, students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 physical education; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 physical education; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 physical education; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. 2 credits PE 377. Motor Development for Adapted Physical Activity Educators. Introduction to the concepts of motor development and individual differences in growth, development and function of individuals with and without disabilities. A focus of the course will be on developmentally appropriate activities adaptation, and individualization of physical activity curricula for individuals with disabilities. Prerequisites: PE 352 or concurrent enrollment. 2 credits* PE 378. Assessment in Adapted Physical Education. Introduction to appropriate instruments for assessing the motor and fitness needs of disabled people in physical education. Practical experience in administering standardized, norm referenced and criterion referenced tests. Students will develop IEPs. Prerequisite: PE 352 or concurrent enrollment. 2 credits* PE 379. Sports for Individuals with Disabilities. Provides a working knowledge of the official sports organizations recognized by the United States Olympic Committee. Emphasis is on classifications, organizational structure, sporting events, and coaching disabled people. Prerequisite: PE 352 or concurrent enrollment. 2 credits* PE 380. Teaching Adapted Physical Education. Selected methods and techniques used by adapted physical education teachers which include issues, methods, practical application, classroom management, program development, and analysis of physical education curricula. Prerequisite: PE 352 or PE 377. 3 credits* PE 395. Practicum. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Fitness internship associated with the university based physical fitness programs. Prerequisite: PE 400. 3 credits PE 400. Exercise Test and Prescription. This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to assess different areas of physical fitness and prescribe individualized exercise programs based on these objective measures. Prerequisite: PE 350. 3 credits PE 410/510. Personal Training. Philosophy and interpretations of leadership as it relates to recreational activities.Prerequisite: PE 350. 3 credits PE 411/511. Sport Marketing. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the major promotions and marketing issues facing the sport industry. Topics include the history of sport marketing, principles of sport marketing, sport consumer behavior, research tools, corporate sponsorships, and evaluation of sport marketing programs. Prerequisite: BADM 370. 3 credits PE 412/512. Financial Aspects of Sport. This course is designed to provide knowledge and understanding of the principles, processes, strategies related to the financial aspects of sport organizations, and to apply these concepts to the sport business industry. Prerequisite: ACCT 210. 3 credits PE 413/513. Sport Administration Colloquium. This capstone course will focus on case studies and applications in managerial problem solving and decision making, time management, legal aspects of sport management, ethics in sport management, interpersonal and mass communication, fund raising, and facility management. Prerequisites: PE 412, BADM 350, BADM 360 and BADM 457. 3 credits PE 440. Organization and Administration of HPER/A. Administrative policies and procedures of physical education and athletes, including intramural and interscholastic activity and athletics. Consideration is given to programming, leadership, budget facilities, public relations, and related matters. 2-3 credits PE 451. Tests and Measurements. This course will include use of various tests and instruments used for measuring progress in physical education and how statistical concepts
*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
apply to testing in physical education. Development of the knowledge and ability to utilize both formative and summative assessments for psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Additionally, techniques to evaluate one’s own teaching performance and make adjustments to enhance subsequent teaching and program effectiveness. Prerequisite: MATH 102. 2 credits PE 452. Motor Learning and Development. The application of principles of learning in the psychomotor domain. Included will be a review of the physiological basis of skill behavior, state of the performer, and didactic strategies in motor learning and skill performance. 3 credits PE 453. Sport Psychology. This course examines the effects of psychological factors, such as personality, motivation, groups dynamics, psychomotor activity, and other psychological aspects of sports on participation and performance, as well as examining the effects of participation on the psychological make-up of the individual. 2-3 credits PE 454. Biomechanics. This course emphasizes the mechanical principles of human movement (including muscular and skeletal principles) during physical education, wellness, and sport. Prerequisite: PE 250/250L. 3 credits PE 456/556. Social Aspects of Sport. A study of sport as a microcosm of the society. The role that sport plays in American values, education, politics, the economy, and religion will be discussed, with particular reference to the role of sports in social mobility and racism. 2 credits* PE 457. Exercise Psychology. This course will review theoretical foundations as well as research and its application in exercise psychology. Reasons for exercising, exercise adherence, and the psychological effects of exercise will be explored. In addition, applied issues such as motivation, cognitive and behavioral change strategies, leadership, and counseling in exercise will be addressed. 3 credits PE 468. Coaching Tennis. Teaching of fundamental skills for competitive tennis for men and women. Tennis singles and doubles strategy; management and coaching procedures; classroom, court demonstration, and participation. 2 credits PE 469. Coaching Baseball/Softball. Course studies the theory and practice of individual skill fundamentals, team strategies, organization and management principles. The students conduct an intensive analysis of game strategies and will execute playing skills. 1-2 credits PE 470. Coaching Basketball. Fundamental techniques and strategies with emphasis on offensive and defensive skills, developing and using player personnel for basketball. 1-2 credits PE 471. Coaching Football. Fundamental techniques and strategies with emphasis on offensive and defensive skills, developing and using player personnel for football. 1-2 credits PE 473. Coaching Track and Field/Cross Country. Study of the techniques of teaching fundamentals of track and field/cross country skills, scientific training methods, rules and event techniques. 1-2 credits PE 474. Coaching Wrestling. The teaching of fundamental skills in competitive wrestling. Skills, fundamentals, and basic moves will be discussed and demonstrated with class participation. Strategy for individual wrestler on the mat and for team situations will be included. 1-2 credits PE 475. Coaching Volleyball. Fundamental techniques and strategy with emphasis on offensive and defensive skills, developing and using player personnel for volleyball. 1-2 credits PE 477. Coaching Soccer. Techniques and skills used in soccer. 1-2 credits PE 480. K-12 Methods of Teaching Physical Education. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-12 physical education; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-12 physical education; the ability to assess student learning in K-12 physical education; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. 3 credits PE 482/582. Theory of Strength Training and Conditioning. This course is designed to help students learn the specific scientific foundation knowledge and the practical/applied knowledge necessary to be an effective strength and conditioning coach. The emphasis is on optional human performance in sport. Prerequisites: PE 250/250L, PE 350. 3 credits PE 486. Senior Capstone in Physical Education. This is a capstone course in which teacher candidates will review and update their Physical Education philosophy; showcase their Physical Education portfolio; further develop their professional goals and plan for professional development; review and further develop their advocacy plan, and complete a practical examination demonstrating competence in a variety of areas related to the major. Pre-requisite: Admission to teacher education, concurrent enrollment in PE 480 and senior standing. 3 credits PE 488/588. Movement Activity Program for Individuals with Disabilities. Program planning, assessing motor skills, development of an individual education plan in a program setting, teaching and evaluating students with disabilities in an on-campus based movement activity program. 3 credits* PE 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-4 credits PE 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits PE 496. Field Experience. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study established between the student, instructor and field experience supervisor. Due to the presence of a field experience supervisor, a lower level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than in the case with an Internship or Practicum course. 1-12 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
PE 520. Adapted Physical Education. Classification, identification and teaching of children with disabilities in physical education. The focus of class prepares the elementary and secondary teacher for children with disabilities in regular and adapted physical education class. 2 credits (Fall only) PE 577. Motor Development for Adapted Physical Activity Educators. Introduction to the concepts of motor development and individual differences in growth, development and function of individuals with and without disabilities. A focus of the course will be on developmentally appropriate activities adaptation, and individualization of physical activity curricula for individuals with disabilities. Prerequisites: PE 352 or concurrent enrollment. 2 credits PE 578. Assessment in Adapted Physical Education. Introduction to appropriate instruments for assessing the motor and fitness needs of disabled people in physical education. Practical experience in administering standardized, norm referenced and criterion referenced tests. Students will develop IEPs. Prerequisite: PE 352 or concurrent enrollment. 2 credits* PE 579. Sports for Individuals with Disabilities. Provides a working knowledge of the official sports organizations recognized by the United States Olympic Committee. Emphasis is on classifications, organizational structure, sporting events, and coaching disabled people. Prerequisite: PE 352 or concurrent enrollment. 2 credits* PE 580. Teaching Adapted Physical Education. Selected methods and techniques used by adapted physical education teachers which include issues, methods, practical application, classroom management, program development, and analysis of physical education curricula. Prerequisite: PE 352 or PE 377. 3 credits* PE 670. Innovations in Theory and Coaching of Basketball. Advanced techniques and strategies with emphasis on general coaching philosophy, offensive and defensive principles, and skill development workouts. Prerequisite: PE 470 Coaching Basketball or permission of the instructor. 2 credits PE 711. Sport Physiology and Motor Learning Lab. Concepts and practices in the assessment of physical abilities and motor skills in children and athletes. Laboratory and field activities that can be adapted by the researcher, teacher, and coach. 2 credits* PE 727. Adapted Aquatics. Methodologies used to teach swimming to exceptional people, especially for aquatic instructors, adapted physical education instructors and athletic trainers. Concentration on practical application. The course is individually supervised with required class attendance during the undergraduate section of PE 127. 1 credit* PE 752. Analysis and Mechanical Principles of Sport Skills. An objective and scientific approach to the teaching of techniques and skills in sport activities. 2 credits PE 753. Applied Sport Physiology. The effect of muscular activity on the human body. A degree of emphasis will be placed on sport physiology research. 2 credits* PE 754. Applied Sport Psychology of Effective Coaching. A range of psychological procedures appropriate for improving sport performance is considered. Laboratory and field situations as they apply to teaching and coaching sport skills will be explored. 2 credits* PE 755. Analysis of Teaching in Physical Education. The current issues, methods, strategies, and application for implementing effective teaching in physical education will be studied and explored. 2 credits PE 782. Seminar in Pedagogy. An in-depth study of contemporary educational topics under the guidance of a qualified graduate faculty member. 2 credits* PHILOSOPHY (PHIL) PHIL 100. Introduction to Philosophy. Introduces competing philosophical views of reality, perception, learning, and values, emphasizing their relevance to the contemporary world. 3 credits* PHIL 200. Introduction to Logic. Introduces the formal study of argumentation, including forms of logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, proofs, refutations, and fallacies. 3 credits* PHIL 270. Philosophy of Religion. Critical exploration of philosophical attitudes (mainly theistic but including agnostics and atheistic) toward religious ideas: for example, the nature and existence of God, religious faith, immortality and eternal life, ethics and phenomenology. The course will also include a feminist perspective and will compare western and nonwestern thought and mysticism. 3 credits* PHIL 391. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Guided study of specific philosophers or philosophical problems for the advanced student. Permission of the instructor is required. 1-3 credits* PHIL 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. A variable content course providing intensive analysis of a major figure (e.g., Hegel, Whitehead), a school of thought (e.g., Stoicism, existentialism), or a theme within philosophy (e.g., aesthetics, epistemology). May be repeated for different topics. 1-5 credits* PHYSICS (PHYS) PHYS 101/101L. Survey of Physics. This is a one-semester conceptual course, designed to cover a broad range of physics topics. Critical thinking skills are developed as students apply topics to various problems situations. Students are encouraged to relate concepts learned to personal areas of interest. Topics include mechanics, states of matter, wave motion, sound, and electricity and magnetism. Lecture, three hours; laboratory or demonstration, two hours per week. 4 credits PHYS 105. Acoustics of Music and Speech. Application of physical principles in explaining and describing many phenomena of acoustics. Predominantly lecture with some laboratory experiences. 3 credits*
*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
PHYS 111/111L. Introduction to Physics I. This is the first in a two semester algebra-level sequence, covering fundamental concepts of physics. This sequence is appropriate for pre-professional majors requiring two semesters of physics. Topics include classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 123. 4 credits PHYS 113/113L. Introduction to Physics II. This course is the second course in a two semester algebra-level sequence, covering fundamental concepts of physics. Topics include electricity and magnetism, sound, light, optics, and some modern physics concepts. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. 4 credits PHYS 211/211L. University Physics I. This is the first course in a two semester calculus-level sequence, covering fundamental concepts of physics. This is the preferred sequence for students majoring in physical science or engineering. Topics include classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 123. 4 credits PHYS 213/213L. University Physics II. This course is the second course in a two semester calculus-level sequence, covering fundamental concepts of physics. This is the preferred sequence for students majoring in physical science or engineering. Topics include electricity and magnetism, sound, light, and optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 211. 4 credits PHYS 327-327L. Electronics. Lecture and laboratory. Analysis techniques for dc and ac circuits. Basic analog and digital circuitry using integrated circuit technology. Instrumentation and measurement. Prerequisites: PHYS 211, 213, and the consent of the instructor. 4 credits* PHYS 341. Thermodynamics. This is an intermediate level thermodynamics course dealing with systems from a macroscopic perspective. Topics include the first and second laws of thermodynamics, phase diagrams, and equilibria. Prerequisite: PHYS 213 and MATH 225. 3 credits* PHYS 471. Quantum Mechanics. This is a systematic introduction to quantum mechanics, emphasizing the Schrödinger equation. Topics include simple soluble problems, the hydrogen atom, approximation methods and other aspects of quantum theory. Prerequisite: MATH 321. 3 credits*
*indicates course is not offered every year

PHYS 490. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. An examination of professional ethics and emphasizing access to the scientific literature, use of the library, and presentation of a seminar. 1-3 credits PHYS 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Study or investigation of special interest topics or problems in the field of physics. Credit will depend upon work done. Prerequisite: senior standing and consent of department coordinator. 1-4 credits* PHYS 495. Practicum. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Student assistants will attend, help set up and help teach an introductory science laboratory, in collaboration with a faculty instructor. Prerequisites: junior standing, 16 hours completed in appropriate lab courses, and permission of the lab instructor and department coordinator. 1 credit PHYS 684. Modern Methods in Teaching Physics. Lecture and laboratory to acquaint the in-service teacher with new approaches to teaching physics. 3 credits* PHYS 781. Principles of Physics. A general review of all areas of physics with emphasis on the most recent developments in mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, optics, electricity and magnetism. Prerequisites: college algebra and trigonometry. 3 credits*

POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS) POLS 100. American Government. A study of the basic principles of the American system of government with emphasis on problems relating to governmental structure and policies. 3 credits POLS 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits POLS 206. Human Nature and Human Values. An introduction to the influences of biology, and especially Darwinism, on the social sciences. Course topics include heredity and culture, the roots of aggression, evolutionary psychology and sexual behavior, the evolution of cooperation, and the moral sense. 3 credits POLS 210. State and Local Government. An analysis of the legal status, powers and functions, intergovernmental relations and political problems of state and local governments. 3 credits* POLS 250. World Politics. A study of international relations including the sources of power and conflict, and the methods by which states compete and cooperate with each other. Additional international actors and contemporary issues will be addressed. 3 credits* POLS 320. Public Administration. This course uses simulations and public management cases, as well as contemporary public administration literature, to introduce students to the theory and practice of public administration. Students work in teams to resolve issues and problems common to the public service environment. 3 credits* POLS 331. US Congress. This course provides intensive examination of the role of Congress in American government, including congressional elections, representation, the organization of Congress, and congressional policy making. It examines the larger context of congressional politics, including political parties, the president, and interest groups. 3 credits*

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
POLS 335. American National Processes and Institutions. A variable content course that will examine different institutions and processes of American national politics. Topics which will be covered in different semesters include Congress, the presidency, political parties, and the judiciary. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: POLS 100. 3 credits* POLS 339. Courts and Judicial Politics. Explores the process of state and federal judicial systems, judicial selection, agenda setting, decision making, and the influence of outside parties on legal policy. 3 credits POLS 380. Government Internships. Supervised work with government agencies, political parties, or interest groups to provide practical experience, supervised and evaluated by an off-campus professional. 1-12 credits A maximum of six semester hours in POLS 380 may be used as electives in the political science major; a maximum of three semester hours may be used as electives in the political science minor. Credits in excess may be applied toward general college electives. No more than twelve semester hours in POLS 380 and/or SS 396, Fieldwork in Community Services, may be applied to an undergraduate degree at Northern State University. POLS 391. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Independent study in political science directed by members of the political science faculty. Prerequisite: POLS 100. 1-6 credits POLS 408. Local Government Administration and Politics. Structure, functions, problems and political processes of modern city governments. Prerequisite: POLS 100. 3 credits* POLS 415. South Dakota Government and Politics. An analysis of South Dakota state government with special emphasis on current political issues and problems, and proposals for governmental change. 3 credits* POLS 430. Constitutional Law. A study of the interpretation of the federal constitution through leading decisions of the Supreme Court. 3 credits* POLS 432. The American Presidency. A study of the constitutional background, development, powers, responsibilities and roles of the American presidency, with comparisons to other executives. 3 credits* POLS 440. Comparative Government. A comparative study of the governmental institutions and processes of leading countries of the world. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. 3 credits* POLS 453. American Foreign Policy. An analysis of the formulation and execution of American foreign policy. Emphasis will be placed on national security issues and American policies with regard to particular regions and countries. 3 credits* POLS 459. Political Geography. An examination of world regions and concepts that have political significance, such as language, boundaries, electoral geography, the law of the sea, and nationalism. International, national, and local perspectives are addressed. 3 credits POLS 461. Early Political Philosophy. Focus on classical Greek and Roman political thought. Basis on which these theories rest and the explanatory power of the various thought structures. includes Plato, Aristotle. 3 credits* POLS 462. Modern Political Philosophy. Focus on political theory since the Renaissance. Includes Locke, Rousseau, and others. 3 credits* POLS 466. American Political Thought. An examination of the history of American political thought as expressed in the works of major political philosophers, thinkers and statesmen. The course considers a range of topics including the tension between equality and inequality in our constitutional system and mores: slavery and its aftereffects; wealth and poverty; aristocratic excellence and democratic mediocrity; and the inherent tensions between individualism and community. 3 credits* POLS 468. Politics and Religion. An examination of the interplay between religious and political ideas in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. A special emphasis will be placed on harmony or tension between religion and liberal democracy. Prerequisite: POLS 100. 3 credits* POLS 490. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. Research in political science. Directed by members of the faculty in the department of Social Science. Prerequisite: POLS 100. 1-3 credits* PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC) PSYC 101/101A. General Psychology. This course is an introductory survey of the field of psychology with consideration of the biological bases of behavior, sensory and perceptual processes, learning and memory, human growth and development, social behavior and normal and abnormal behavior. 3 credits PSYC 221. Lifespan Development Psychology. This course will cover human development from conception to death. Students will examine changes in the physical, cognitive, and social domains across the life course. Students will also consider the interactions among those domains and the effects on human development. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 267. Psychology of Personal Adjustment. This course covers the dynamics of normal human personality and behavior with an emphasis on the mechanisms used to promote effective personal and interpersonal behavior. 3 credits PSYC 300. Introduction to Scientific Psychology. A study of the fundamentals of neuroscience, experimentation and critical research report writing. Students will write several papers with a scientific approach and format. Primary topical emphasis will be in the areas of experimental, physiological, sensory, perceptual, cognitive, and comparative psychology Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits

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*indicates course is not offered every year

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
PSYC 302. Cognition and Learning. A study of learning as effected by classical and operant conditioning and the cognitive processes of thinking, memory and information processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 313. Biological Psychology. This course is designed to introduce the student to the biological basis of behavior. Both basic animal research and application to the human organism are stressed. Laboratory practice and selected journal readings familiarize the student with research methodology and reporting. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 325. Child & Adolescent Development. A study of the physical, language, cognitive, and social/emotional growth and development of the child from birth to age 21 in the contexts of family, school, peer and community. Also addressed are multicultural aspects of development, child needs, developmental problems and parenting practices/ interactions as they affect goal-directed behaviors and social controls of the child in various settings/situations. 3 credits PSYC 328. Psychology of Adulthood and Aging. A study of the characteristics, needs, problems, and concerns of adults with emphasis on the middle and later years of life. The course includes, but is not limited to, an awareness of the changes in the psychological, physical, vocational and avocational lives of these age groups. Positive coping behavior and strategies for adjustment will be presented and discussed. 2 credits PSYC 354. Counseling Skills. Emphasis on understanding self, knowledge of interviewing and helping skills, and experience in applying these skills in interpersonal relationships. Prerequisite: Junior status. 3 credits PSYC 371. Statistics in Psychological Research. This course provides the student with an introduction to statistical methods used in psychology. The topics include: graphing and frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, measures of spread, regression, correlation, interval, estimation and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 373. Research Methods in Experimental Psychology. A detailed survey of methods for conducting
*indicates course is not offered every year

psychological research, this course covers experimental design, reliability, validity, and the nature of controls. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A and PSYC 300. 3 credits PSYC 422. Psychology of Adolescence. The student will learn to understand the major influences on adolescent development and behavior including biological, cultural, education, peer, and family influences. Emphasis will also be placed on methodology necessary to aid adolescent in their development process. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 2 credits PSYC 430. Organizational Psychology. This course is a survey of the application of psychological principles to the understanding of organizational effects on individual and group behavior. It includes: organizational climate and culture, work-related attitudes, employee motivation, leadership, group dynamics and team work, organizational change and development, and minorities and women in organizations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 441/541. Social Psychology. This course covers basic principles of social psychology including concepts and methods utilized in analyzing individual and group interactions. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 451. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. This course is a comprehensive survey of abnormal personality and behavior. It includes an examination of the origin, symptoms and treatment of psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 461. Theories of Personality. Students will learn about the role of philosophy and science and their contributions to the development of personality theory. Students will examine, in depth, the theoretical contributions made in the areas of psychoanalytic, behavioristic, and humanistic personality theories. The students will be able to articulate their own beliefs concerning the development of human personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 477/577. Psychology Testing and Measurement. Test theory is covered in this course along with principles of construction and analysis of psychological tests. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits

PSYC 489. Senior Capstone. This capstone course is required for all psychology majors. It is intended to provide an opportunity for the synthesis of the ideas and concepts in psychology. The seminar includes an examination of ethical systems and their applications in psychology, discussions of controversial issues in both experimental and applied areas, and consideration of the future of the field. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A. 3 credits PSYC 490/590. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. In depth study of selected topics in psychology. The title of the seminar will identify the topic studied. 1-3 credits PSYC 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Qualified students investigate problems of special concern in the area of psychology. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 1-3 credits PSYC 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. Investigation of selected topics in Psychology. Consult current course schedule for selected topics. 1-4 credits PSYC 763. Personality Theory. A study of the major theoretical perspectives on personality with an emphasis on the application of these principles to personality dynamics and change. Prerequisite: PSYC 101/101A or equivalent. 3 credits PSYC 792. Variable Topics in Psychology. Investigation of selected topics in Psychology. Consult current course schedule for selected topics. 2-3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
READING (READ) READ 041. Reading for College Success. This course provides students with reading strategies necessary for making the transition to collegiate level reading. The course will present students with multiple strategies to promote comprehension skills, develop vocabulary and enhance metacognition to become strategic readers. This course will be required for students with ACT score in Reading at 17 or below (or a comparable COMPASS score [77]). 3 credits RUSSIAN (RUSS) RUSS 101. Introductory Russian I. Fundamentals of language, enabling the student to understand, speak, read, and write simple Russian. Emphasis on practical usage. 4 credits RUSS 102. Introductory Russian II. Fundamentals of language, enabling the student to understand, speak, read, and write simple Russian. Emphasis on practical usage. Prerequisite: RUSS 101. 4 credits RUSS 201. Intermediate Russian I. Continuation of first year Russian. More intensive drill of both grammar and conversation. Emphasis on conversation, grammar review, and the short story. Prerequisite: RUSS 102. 3 credits RUSS 202. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of first year Russian. More intensive drill of both grammar and conversation. Emphasis on conversation, grammar review, and the short story. Prerequisite: RUSS 201. 3 credits SECONDARY EDUCATION (SEED) SEED 300. General Middle Level and Secondary Education Methods. Selected methods and techniques used by a secondary education teacher, including motivation, discipline, classroom planning, development of a creative teaching philosophy, and general problems faced by secondary teachers. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education. 2-3 credits SEED 301. Secondary Education Junior Field Experience. A pre-student teaching field experience in middle level, junior high, or secondary school classrooms. This course consists of approximately seventy clock hours in the schools, along with seminars discussing facets of teaching and school life. Required of all secondary education majors. Must be taken concurrently with SEED 300. S/U grade awarded. 1-3 credits SEED 411. 7-12 Speech Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of 7-12 speech; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to 7-12 speech; the ability to assess student learning in 7-12 speech; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits* SEED 413. 7-12 Science Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of 7-12 science; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to 7-12 science; the ability to assess student learning in 7-12 science; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2-3 credits SEED 415. 7-12 Social Science Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of 7-12 social science; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to 7-12 social science; the ability to assess student learning in 7-12 social science; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits SEED 418. 7-12 Math Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of 7-12 math; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to 7-12 math; the ability to assess student learning in 7-12 math; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits SEED 424. 7-12 Language Arts Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of 7-12 language arts; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to 7-12 language arts; the ability to assess student learning in 7-12 language arts; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits SEED 450/550. 7-12 Teaching Reading in the Content Area. Introduction to the teaching of basic reading skills in all content areas in K-12 and secondary education. Methods, materials, and research findings used in teaching discipline-specific reading. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits SEED 451. Reading Clinic I. This course provides an opportunity for secondary education majors to provide one-to-one literacy tutoring for a middle-level or high school student. Participants will administer pre- and post-assessments and will design literacy instruction based on the specific needs of their students. 1-3 credits SEED 488. 7-12 Student Teaching. Students preparing for teaching in the secondary school will observe, participate, and teach under the supervision of the regular classroom teacher in an approved secondary school. An additional “Mandatory Fee” applies to this course. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Full-time teaching, generally in the student’s major field, for an eleven-week period under intensive supervision. (May be for less than full-time for students with previously earned credits in student teaching.) K-12 students will split the student teaching between elementary and secondary classrooms. S/U grading only. 1-12 credits SEED 491/591. Special Projects in Education. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The
*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Students select workshops, seminars, or individualized study in their area of interest. Prerequisite: consent of advisor and department coordinator. 1-3 credits SEED 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits SEED 615. Advanced 7-12 Social Science Methods. Instruction and practice of teaching skills necessary for teachin social sciences effectively at the secondary level. This course is intended for those who already certified/seeking certificatrion in a teaching area outside the social sciences and wish additional certification in history, geography, government, sociology, psychology, and/or anthropology. 2 credits SEED 720. Research and Teaching in Science and Mathematics. An examination of the current research and instructional strategies for the teaching of mathematics and science. The course will include constructivist views and integrated experiences. Participants will explore nationally recognized curriculum materials relevant to the grade level they teach. Grade-level appropriate project required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 2 credits* SEED 740. School Curriculum. An overview of the historical background, current issues, trends and research findings by subjects and levels to include a critical analyses of local, state and national standards. Administrators and teachers work on individual projects directed toward the improvement of curriculum in specified grade levels and content areas. 2 credits* SEED 742. Research and Teaching in Language Arts. Current research and instructional practices in the teaching of language arts to include whole language and integrated experiences and the methodologies of teaching speaking, expository and creative writing, poetry, literature, drama, spelling, handwriting and listening in P-12 schools. 3 credits*
*indicates course is not offered every year

SEED 750. Literature and Literacy. Students investigate issues and strategies in the use of literature (including child and adolescent) in the various academic content areas with application to all levels. 3 credits* SEED 753. Issues and Trends in Literacy Development. Current research and practice about language process and literacy development to include specific applications to primary, middle and upper elementary grades and secondary grades. 2 credits* SEED 757. Administration and Supervision of Literacy Programs. Models for implementation, administration and maintenance of quality literacy programs in schools P-12. Collaboration with parents, current literature, issues and models for literacy development will be explored. 3 credits* SEED 761. Research and Teaching in the Humanities. This course provides the opportunity to explore current research and instructional practices in the teaching of humanities to include the social sciences and integrated experiences. By combining educators from all levels, participants will become knowledgeable about the entire educational experience in the humanities. Participants will read current literature and explore curriculum materials specific to their needs. 2 credits* SEED 790. Seminar in Secondary Education. Graduate students investigate a variety of topics depending on current need and issues relating to secondary education. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. 1-3 credits SEED 791. Individual Projects in Curriculum or Teaching. Qualified students investigate problems of special concern in the area of curriculum or teaching. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and Director of Graduate Studies. 1-6 credits SEED 794. Internship in Secondary Classroom Teaching. Supervised internship in advanced practices of teaching. Students implement new teaching strategies with coaching from supervisor and/or peers. Experience includes a field-based research component. 2 or 4 credits Students may take 4 credits one semester or 2 credits each for 2 semesters.

SOCIOLOGY (SOC) SOC 100. Introduction to Sociology. Comprehensive study of society, with analysis of group life, and other forces shaping human behavior. 3 credits SOC 150. Social Problems. A study of present day problems in contemporary societies, such as racism, sexism, ageism, alcoholism, drug addiction, physical and mental health, war and environmental issues-their significance and current policies and action. 3 credits SOC 205. Introduction to Aging. An overview of the aging process and the impact the growing number of older people will have in society in the years ahead. The intergenerational roles of older people and new forms of senior social behavior will be studied. Needs and services for older adults will be examined through use of videos and field visits. Information on careers in aging will also be presented. Students may also have the opportunity to do a field experience in which they will “job shadow” a professional working in aging service careers. 3 credits SOC 209. Statistical Reasoning for Social Science. An applied introduction to univariate and multivariate statistical analysis in the social sciences. Emphasis will be upon rationales, interpretations and applications of quantitative logical and methods. Topics include distributions, central tendencies, variance, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, association and correlation, ANOVA, regression, categorical data analysis and selected advanced topics. This course is a prerequisite to SOC 410. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits SOC 250. Courtship and Marriage. Courtship and marriage period given special emphasis, as are problems of mate selection, marital adjustments, reproduction, childparent relations, divorce, and later years of marriage. 3 credits* SOC 260. Introduction to Planning and Techniques of Zoning. Course will focus on the processes of non-metropolitan planning including economic trends and resources available to support community development as well as special problems and opportunities in small community development. It will examine various instruments used in planning and zoning. Included are land use regulations, ownership, taxation and public investment. 3 credits

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SOC 270. Introduction to Social Work. A study of social services to children, family, aged, public welfare clients, mentally ill, and the criminal justice system; also includes history of social work methods. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits SOC 291. Independent Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or few students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1-3 credits SOC 292. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits SOC 305. Aging and the Humanities. Human aging will be viewed through the lens of writers and artists more than through the statistics of science. The meaning in life will be a central thread throughout as films, novels, plays and music are used along with some socio-philosophical writings to probe the rich subject matter. Application of the wisdom of elders to all human lives will be the goal as we explore aging as the universal human event. Prerequisite: SOC 100. 3 credits SOC 315. Social Work Practice I. Basic concepts and skills common to all social work practice. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 320. Social Work Practice II. Resource development and social worker in the community. The lab involves actual contact with community persons and a community project. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 330. Self and Society. A social psychological exploration of the factors linking self and society, with an examination of the social construction of reality. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 340. Sociology of the Community. Theory, research, and analysis in contemporary community studies. Includes the rural-urban continua, ecology, decentralization, demographics, power structure, suburbs, problems of urban environment, and social planning. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 350. Race and Ethnic Relations. A survey of contemporary ethnic and racial groups and selected minorities in South Dakota, the United States and other countries; special attention will be given to sociological dynamics, social structures, and communication. 3 credits SOC 351. Criminology. Focuses on theories of crime, juvenile delinquency and justice, law, systems of criminal behavior, victimization, and corrections. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 353. Sociology of Work. Focus on human behavior in work environments. Topics include social organization of work; managing human resources; management-labor relations; role of pay and benefits; problems of personnel adjustments; and work related social tensions and conflict. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 361. Community and Organizational Leadership. Course will give basic skill development in working with and leading groups including volunteer management. It will emphasize both inter-agency cooperation and interprofessional teamwork and will deal with the informal as well as the formal processes by which community development and change occurs in non-metropolitan settings. 3 credits SOC 382. The Family. Focus is on the development and maintenance of the family as a social institution with emphasis on comparative family systems and the contemporary American family from the standpoint of social class, ethnic background and family crises. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 400. Social Policy. A review of social welfare legislation; current trends and issues in, and implementation and administration of, social policy in a variety of practice areas. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 401. Law and Society. Provides a theoretical overview, analyzing such topics as legal reasoning, law and values, law and conflicting interests, law and popular will, law and status/wealth/power, and law and official discretion. Also examines law in context issues, such as those concerning the structure of legal relations, the connections between legal and social relations, and the interdependence of ideology and organization. 3 credits* SOC 402. Social Deviance. This course examines the nature of negatively evaluated behaviors and the process by which customs, rules and normative structure of society are constructed. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 403. Sociological Theory. This is an introduction to the classics in social theory, various schools of social thought, and modern developments in the discipline. It also covers the major ideas of the classical and modern theorists, the social environment in which they wrote, and the implications of their contributions. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits SOC 410. Methods of Social Research. An examination of the research process, including research design, questionnaire construction, interviewing techniques and the analysis and interpretation of data. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150 and SOC 209. 3 credits SOC 423/523. Social Stratification. A study of the bases, varieties, changes, and consequences of systems of stratification. Major attention is directed to social class patterns in American society. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 455. Juvenile Delinquency. A study of the youthful offender and the causes and consequences of delinquent behavior; preventive and rehabilative programs are also discussed. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits SOC 458/558. Sociology of Aging. A comprehensive study of the aged population in American society, including discussions of socio-demographic changes, life-course issues, relevant social policy, and cross-cultural comparisons. Prerequisite: SOC 100. 3 credits*

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
SOC 459/559. Sociology of Death and Dying. This is a study of the beliefs, attitudes, and values toward death and dying, as well as a probe of the customs, laws, social norms, scientific information, and anthropolical and sociological viewpoints of death and dying. Prerequisite: SOC 100. 3 credits* SOC 462. Population Studies. A study of human populations with respect to size, distribution, and structure, with emphasis on theories of population growth and decline, population policies, and impacts on the environment. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits* SOC 470/570. Child Abuse and Neglect. Child abuse and neglect in human society. Though comparison with other times and cultures are made, the emphasis is on present day United States of America. The course will include identification and investigation procedures, causes and effects, treatment and prevention of child abuse and neglect. 3 credits* SOC 483. Sociology of Gender Roles. Female and male roles in relation to one another in a changing world are foci of this course. The nature of gender roes, their origin and maintenance, institutional features, and their variations over time and across cultures are examined. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 150. 3 credits SOC 490. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. Research in sociology, directed by the staff. 1-3 credits* SOC 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Reading and research under the direction and guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: SOC 100. 1-3 credits SPANISH (SPAN) Students with previous experience or preparation may choose to skip a course or courses in the beginning and intermediate language sequences (101, 102, 201, 202). If a grade of C or better is attained in the higher numbered course, a grade of S will be transcripted for the lower level course or courses in the sequence. Credit will be granted in this manner for a maximum of four courses. Exceptionally well-qualified students (e.g., native speakers) may earn additional credit by institutional exam. When considering this option, note that one year of language in high school is generally equivalent to one semester of the language at the college level. SPAN 101. Introductory Spanish I. Introduces the fundamental elements of Spanish sentence structure and vocabulary. Promotes speaking, listening and writing within a cultural context. Classwork may be supplemented with required aural/oral practice outside of class. 4 credits SPAN 102. Introductory Spanish II. Introduces the fundamental elements of Spanish sentence structure and vocabulary. Promotes speaking, listening and writing within a cultural context. Classwork may be supplemented with required aural/oral practice outside of class. Prerequisite: SPAN 101. 4 credits SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I. Students use previously learned elements of fundamental Spanish to improve speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. Authentic materials promote the understanding of Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 102. 3 credits SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II. Continuation of 201 with more emphasis on using grammar structures in an interactive way. Further study of the Hispanic world. 3 credits SPAN 311. Integrated Writing Conversation and Grammar I. Part of a 2-course sequence of SPAN 311/312. May be taken out order. Content based on grammar, conversation, composition, and translation. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. 2-3 credits SPAN 312. Integrated Writing Conversation and Grammar II. Part of a 2-course sequence of SPAN 311/312. May be taken out of order. Content based on grammar, conversation, composition, and translation. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. 2-3 credits SPAN 350. Spanish for Business Communication. An introduction to the Spanish language of everyday business dealings and an overview of practical and relevant information necessary for people doing business in Spanish-speaking countries. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. 2-3 credits SPAN 353. Introduction to Spanish Literature I. Introduction to Spanish literature through reading and discussion. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. 3 credits* SPAN 354. Introduction to Spanish Literature II. Continuation of readings in Spanish literature with discussion in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. 3 credits* SPAN 355. Introduction to Latin-American Literature I. Introduction to Spanish American literature through readings and discussion in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. 3 credits* SPAN 356. Introduction to Latin American Literature II. Continuation of readings in Spanish American literature with discussion in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. 3 credits* SPAN 392. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits SPAN 433. Spanish Civilization and Culture. Geography, history, politics, and arts of Spain. 3 credits* SPAN 490. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. 1-3 credits SPAN 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. A guided course in reading Spanish prose, poetry, and drama. 1-6 credits

*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SPEECH COMMUNICATION (SPCM) SPCM 101. Fundamentals of Speech. Introduces the study of speech fundamentals and critical thinking through frequent public speaking practice, including setting, purpose, audience, and subject. 3 credits SPCM 150. Introduction to Public Relations. A survey of the discipline of public relatons. it will survey aspects of ethics, law and theory of public relations, as well as the process, audiences, and professional practice involved in the discipline, why it is important, and hot to do basic public relations functions. 3 credits SPCM 201. Interpersonal Communication. Studies modes of interpersonal communication through readings, and experiential discussions of the role of interpersonal communications in common situations within our society. 3 credits SPCM 210. Individual Speaking Events. Preparation and presentation of various individual speaking events. Events to be covered will include persuasive speaking, extemporaneous speaking, dramatic interpretation, poetry interpretation, prose interpretation, and duo interpretation. A less thorough investigation will be made of communication analysis, informative speaking, impromptu speaking, and program oral interpretation. 3 credits SPCM 215. Public Speaking. Sharpens student’s skills in platform speaking events, covering the preparation for and delivery of competitive speaking formats including oral interpretation, persuasive, expository, impromptu, extemporaneous, and after dinner speaking. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 credits* SPCM 222. Argumentation and Debate. Explores argument as a communication activity, constructing sound arguments in a variety of venues and analyzing the contribution of argument to public dialogue on contemporary issues. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3 credits* SPCM 223. Mass Communication. An examination of the nature of mass communication, including newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, photography/ photojournalism, motion pictures, recording industry and advertising; its development; its impact; and the social and ethical issues it has and will promulgate. 3 credits* SPCM 281. Speech and Debate Activities. Initiates active participation in competitive public speaking, including debate, oral interpretation, and non-competitive public performances. 1-4 credits SPCM 291. Indepedent Study. Students complete indivdualized plans of study which include signifgant oneon-one student-teacher involvment. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewers students. Meeting depending upon the requirments of the topic. 1-3 credits SPCM 292. Topics. Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specific field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits SPCM 294. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Lab interns will be responsible for services in the oral communication lab. Included will be operation of videotaping equipment, playback equipment, audio equipment, and computers. Lab interns will also keep hours to assist Fundamentals of Speech students with outlining, delivery, etc. Interns must have satisfactorily completed SPCM 101 and have instructor approval. Students will learn to apply concepts ranging from traditional television studio production to advanced techniques in scripting, audio and video postproduction, multimedia integration, and telecommunication of audio and video programming. 3 credits SPCM 405. Theories of Communication. Daily communication processes, and relating theory to traditional and developing research methods. 3 credits* SPCM 416. Rhetorical Criticism. Evaluates American speakers from colonial to contemporary times. 3 credits* SPCM 422. Persuasion. Develops conceptual understanding of persuasion dynamics by analyzing theories, perspectives, and research findings while improving skills in critically analyzing the role of persuasive messages in society and culture. 3 credits* SPCM 434. Small Group Communication. Explores prominent concepts and theories of human small group interaction, cultivating critical assessments of communication strategies in task, social, and therapeutic groups. 3 credits* SPCM 481. Speech and Debate Activities. Active participation in competitive public speaking, including debate, oral interpretation, and non-competitive public performances. 1-2 credits SPCM 491. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Any area of speech communication can be used for individual study in cooperation with a speech faculty member. 1-3 credits SPCM 492. Topics. Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specific field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-5 credits SPCM 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Practice in preparation, teaching, and evaluation of the fundamentals of oral communication, under staff supervision. An experience in the practical application of public relations in

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
a specific job situation. Prerequisite: consent of speech faculty supervisor and department coordinator. 1-16 credits SEED 411. 7-12 Speech Methods. An examination of the pedagogy of speech communication, including all the various in class options for instruction units that might be encountered in the speech classroom. 3 credits* SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPED) Courses numbered above 300 require admission to teacher education. SPED 100. Introduction to Persons with Exceptionalities. A survey of the various exceptionalities and implications for education; the history and philosophy of special education; and state and federal legislation affecting special education. 3 credits SPED 192. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-3 credits SPED 201. Survey of Learning Disabilities. Etiology and characteristics of learning disabilities and the impact of this disability on the learning process. Prerequisite: SPED 100. 1 credit SPED 202. Survey of Behavioral Disorders. Etiology and characteristics of emotional/behavioral disorders and the impact of this disability on the learning process. Prerequisite: SPED 100. 1 credit SPED 203. Survey of Developmental Disabilities. Introduction to developmental disabilities of K-12 learners including discussion of etiology, characteristics, and ramifications of students with developmental disabilities in the public school system. Prerequisite: SPED 100. 1 credit SPED 204. Survey of Sensory Impairments. Introduction to sensory impairments of K-12 learners including discussion of etiology, characteristics, and ramifications of students with sensory impairments in the public school system. Prerequisite: SPED 100. 1 credit
*indicates course is not offered every year

SPED 205. Survey of Physical Impairments. Introduction to physical impairments of K-12 learners including discussion of etiology, characteristics, and ramifications of students with physical impairments in the public school system. Prerequisite: SPED 100. 1 credit SPED 206. Survey of Language Impairments. Introduction to language impairments of K-12 learners including discussion of etiology, characteristics, and ramifications of students with language impairments in the public school system. Prerequisite: SPED 100. 1 credit SPED 301. Methods of Language Arts. Methods of teaching language arts for students K-12 in special education. Prerequisites: SPED 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206. 1 credit SPED 302. Methods of Functiona1 Math. Methods of teaching functional math for students K-12 in special education. Prerequisites: SPED 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206. 1 credit SPED 303. Methods of Functional Writing. Methods of teaching functional writing for students K-12 in special education. Prerequisites: SPED 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206. 1 credit SPED 304. Methods of Independent Living Management. Methods of teaching independent living skills for students K-12 in special education. Prerequisites: SPED 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206. 1 credit SPED 305. Methods of Behavior Management. Methods of teaching behavior management strategies for students K-12 in special education. Prerequisites: SPED 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206. 1 credit. SPED 306. Methods of Classroom Management. Methods of teaching inclusive classroom management strategies for students K-12 in special education. Prerequisites: SPED 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206. 1 credit SPED 401/501. Introduction to Educating Secondary Students with Disabilities. An introduction to the characteristics and needs of exceptional individuals including review of special education legislation and focusing on middle and secondary level students. 1 credit

SPED 417/517. Vocational-Transitional Programming. This course presents knowledge and skills regarding vocational and transition planning and programming, including an overview of internal and community resources such as rehabilitation services and interagency services. Prerequisite: SPED 100. 2-3 credits SPED 421/521. Introduction to Orientation and Mobility for the Blind. This course will explore the role of the teacher/companion in the development of skill areas for successful independent travel. It will provide experiences under blindfold in cane travel, sighted guide, some daily living skills and social contacts. The course covers technical advances, laws, the multi-handicapped, dog services, partial sight, and personal and public attitudes, with an emphasis on developing appropriate proficiency. 3 credits SPED 422/522. Teaching of Braille. This course provides the student an opportunity to learn the arrangement of the Braille cell, the Braille alphabet, the 190 contractions of Grade II Braille, marks of composition and punctuation, and the rules governing the application and use of each. In addition, the Nemeth code of mathematics and scientific notation will be introduced as well as basic mathematical operations using the Cramner abacus. Throughout the course, emphasis will be introduced as well as developing proficiency in reading (by sight) and writing Braille with accepted writing instruments. 3 credits SPED 423/523. Introduction to Teaching Students Who Are Blind. This course explores the physical, social, emotional, and psychological aspects of a visual impairment and discusses how these factors influence a child’s educational program. This course is available only through the Internet, and includes reading assignments, discussion questions, videos, and quizzes in addition to several on-campus experiences. 2 credits SPED 424/524. Introduction to Educational Aids and Appliances for Students Who Are Blind. This course provides an introduction to the specialized devices and techniques designed to help children and adults who are blind or visually impaired function more independently in their sighted world. This course is available only through the Internet and includes reading assignments, discussion

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
questions, videos and quizzes in addition to several oncampus experiences. 1 credit SPED 425/525. Anatomy and Function of the Eye. A study of the anatomy of the eye and surrounding area together with an examination of the individual components of the eye. This includes an understanding of the normal eye and some of the more common anomalies affecting children as well as how these conditions may influence the child psychologically and educationally. Also included is a general prognosis for each condition and techniques, if any, that may be available to provide a more productive learning environment. Finally, the psychological effects upon the blind or partially sighted child resulting from the visual impairment will be discussed. 3 credits SPED 431/531. Identification and Assessment in Special Education. The course covers the development, selection, administration and interpretation of assessment instruments and strategies used to determine whether students have a disability and require special education or related services and to evaluate their level of performance to develop and monitor progress on individual education programs. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits SPED 440/540. Assessing and Correcting Reading and Writing Difficulties. Procedures for the diagnosis of reading difficulties/disabilities and the correction of reading and spelling programs. Prerequisite: ELED 450 or SEED 450 or consent of instructor. 2 credits SPED 450. Gifted and Talented. This course focuses on the nature and needs of the gifted child. 2 credits SPED 451. Curriculum and Instruction in Gifted Education. This course focuses on curriculum development and teaching strategies for the gifted. 3 credits SPED 452. Nature of Creativity and Assessment. This course focuses on the nature of creativity and assessment of creativity. 2-3 credits SPED 460/560. Family Systems and Professional Collaboration. This course covers the collaboration and communication and communication skills necessary to work within family systems and the use of resources and services supporting birth through lifespan services, multidisciplinary team functioning, and the placement committee processes. 2 credits SPED 470/570. Educational Programming. Developing appropriate individualized education programs for students with disabilities, provision of least restrictive environment and compliance with Federal mandates and State regulations. 2 credits SPED 485/485. Special Education Law. An overview of the historical background of special education law, current issues, trends, and a critical analysis of local, state, and national laws regulating special education. 2 credits. SPED 488. Student Teaching in Special Education. Supervised placement in a special education classroom. Students assume full responsibility for planning, instruction, evaluation, and classroom management during their experience. Practice and observation with methods and materials for teaching exceptional children in Special Education settings for 10 weeks. An additional “Mandatory Fee” applies to this course. Prerequisite: Completion of 75% of major coursework, major GPA of 2.6, total GPA of 2.5. S/U grading only. 4 or 8 credits SPED 490/590. Seminar. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. Undergraduate and graduate students investigate a variety of topics depending on current need and issues relating to special education. 1-3 credits SPED 491/591. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. An individual investigation in a specific area of interest in Special Education. Prerequisite: SPED 100 and consent of instructor. 1-3 credits SPED 492/592. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-4 credits SPED 495/595. Reading Clinic Practicum II. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. Intensive work with individual children who are experiencing reading problems. Includes diagnosis of reading problems through formal and informal assessments and procedures for correcting deficits. 2 credits SPED 710. Applied Behavior Analysis. Analysis of behavioral strategies and application of behavioral management strategies for students with disabilities in Preschool-12 special education programs. 2 credits* SPED 740. Special Education Curriculum: Students at Risk and Special Needs. Development of curriculum in special education; in inclusive and special education settings. 3 credits* SPED 757. Linking Reading Assessment to Corrective Instruction. Students explore current theories and practices in diagnosing and remediating individual student reading deficiencies and investigate a range of literature, materials and techniques. Prerequisite: SPED 440. 3 credits* SPED 760. Special Education Systems: Family and Education Programs. Analysis of parent/child relationships, family interaction and parent reactions to exceptionalities. Introduction to interviewing and intervention techniques followed by an orientation to special education systems, collaboration and consulting models. 3 credits* SPED 770. Special Education Assessment and Programming. Individualized assessment instruments and administration of assessment instruments for students with special needs. Development of appropriate individualized education programs for students with disabilities, provision of least restrictive environment and compliance with federal and state laws. 3 credits*
*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions
SPED 780. Special Education Methods. Methods of teaching students with disabilities in a regular classroom setting or special education resource room. 3 credits* SPED 785. Special Education Law. An overview of the historical background of special education law, current issues, trends, and a critical analysis of local, state, and national laws regulating special education. 2 credits* SPED 788. Practicum. Practical experience in observing, refining assessment skills, selecting and/or developing materials and providing instructional services. Students will spend 9 weeks in the classroom. 1-9 credits SPED 790. Seminar in Special Education. Graduate students investigate a variety of topics depending on current need and issues relating to special education. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. 1-3 credits* SPED 791. Special Projects. Individually designed research projects and/or special reading assignments in the area of curriculum and/or teaching exceptional children. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Director of Graduate Study. 1-3 credits SPED 794. Internship in Special Education. Supervised internship in advanced practices of teaching. Students implement new teaching strategies with coaching from supervisor and/or peers. Experience includes a field-based research component. 2 or 4 credits Students may take 4 credits one semester or 2 credits each for 2 semesters. SOCIAL SCIENCES (SS) SS 140. Introduction to Museum Management. Goals, functions and basic techniques, including accessing, care and restoration of artifacts, basic workshop techniques and the use of power and hand tools. 3 credits* SS 240. Museum Education and Advanced Techniques. Philosophies, techniques and curriculum of museum education, including exhibit design and construction, lighting and security. 3 credits* SS 360. The Traveling Classroom. Credit arranged.* SS 390. World Cultures and Current Affairs. Students will delve beyond the headlines of international news stories to develop an in-depth understanding of the cultural, geographic, historical, and economic contexts of current events. Small groups of students will conduct library research and share their findings with the class through briefings and distribute reports and bibliographies. 3 credits* SS 391. Independent Study. Individual or group investigation of selected topics relating to American Indians, guided by a qualified member of the faculty. May be taken for credit in Social Science or in other disciplines appropriate to the topics covered. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 1-3 credits SS 396. Fieldwork in Community Services. Practical experience in an area of community service, guided and supervised by the social sciences staff. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and advisor. 1-12 credits A maximum of six semester hours in SS 396 may be used as electives in all majors if fieldwork is related to the major and approved by the student’s advisor. A maximum of three semester hours in SS 396 may be used as electives in minors. Credits in excess of the above may be applied toward the general college electives. No more than twelve semester hours in POLS 380, Government Internships, and/or SS 396 may be applied toward completion of an undergraduate degree at Northern State University. SS 411. South Dakota Indian Studies. A study of the history and cultural dynamics of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota peoples of South Dakota. Special emphasis will be given to past and present educational policies and practices relevant to American Indian education. 3 credits SS 484. Career Planning in the Social Sciences. The course is designed to assist students in selecting a specific career to pursue and in the development of skills necessary to successfully compete for the positions in the field they have chosen. Among the topics to be covered will be interviewing skills, resume preparation, strategies for locating available positions, effective approaches to presenting one’s self to prospective employers. In addition students will be introduced to various professional fields and codes of conduct. The course will involve skill development sessions, guest speakers from various fields, and lectures. Course is graded on a pass/fail basis only. Prerequisites: Declared major in a social science field of permission of instructor. 1 credit SS 490/590. Seminar in Contemporary Affairs. A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division and graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students. Problems or issues in the contemporary world of particular concern to the historian and the social scientist. A different topic is investigated each semester. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students with the approval of the department coordinator. 1-3 credits* SS 791. Readings and Research. Independent study under the guidance of one or more of the Social Science and History faculty. 1-3 credits SS 798. Thesis or Project Paper. Thesis is six semester hours and may be taken in one semester or in two semesters of three hours each. Project paper is three hours, one semester only. 6 or 3 credits SEED 415. 7-12 Social Science Methods. Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of 7-12 social science; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to 7-12 social science; the ability to assess student learning in 7-12 social science; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2 credits SEED 615. Advanced 7-12 Social Science Methods. Instruction and practice of teaching skills necessary for teachin social sciences effectively at the secondary level. This course is intended for those who already certified/seeking certificatrion in a teaching area outside the social sciences and wish additional certification in history, geography, government, sociology, psychology, and/or anthropology. 2 credits

*indicates course is not offered every year

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
THEATER (THEA) THEA 100. Introduction to Theater. Introductory course designed to enhance the student’s enjoyment and understanding of the theatrical experience. Play readings, films, and demonstrations acquaint the students with the history and techniques of the theatrical art. 3 credits THEA 131. Introduction to Acting. Designed to the nonmajor interested in exploring acting as a means of improving communication skills and self-expression. Includes specific process for role development, text analysis, and opportunities to practice the craft and art of acting. 3 credits THEA 241. Stagecraft. Theory and practical experience in theater production. Lab work on two major theater productions. 3 credits THEA 243. Make-Up. Principles of theatrical makeup techniquies, including character analysis and practical application. 3 credits (Pending BOR approval) THEA 282 Jazz Dance I. This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of jass through a wide range of styles. 2 credits (Pending BOR approval) THEA 289. Theater Activities. Limited to participants in major play production. Late registration permitted. Course may be taken more than once. 0-2 credits THEA 351. Directing. Introduction to the techniques and concerns of the stage director, including composition, movement, and tempo-rhythm. Script analysis and scene presentation form the core of the course. 3 credits THEA 353. Creative Dramatics. The theory and techniques of informal drama, improvisation, story telling, and dramatic play. 2 credits (Pending BOR approval) THEA 355. Children’s Theater. Children’s theater as an art form. Students become proficient in organization, design, and presentation of a children’s theater program. 3 credits THEA 381. Tap Dance I. This course introduces student to the fundamental techniques of tap dance through a wide range of styes. 2 credits (Pending BOR approval) THEA 358. Dance. Musical Theater Styles. This couse provides students with the opportunity to apply dance technique to musical theater repertoire by working with a variety of styles within the spectrum of musical theater dance. 2 credits (Pending BOR approval) THEA 391. Independent Study. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant oneon-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meeting depending upon the requirements of the topic. Group and individual study in special areas of theater. Specific subjects offered on demand. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 1-3 credits THEA 435. History of American Musical Theater. History and development of American musical theater from 1866 to the present. 3 credits (Pending BOR approval) THEA 441. Scene Design. Principles and practices of scenic design, including the scenic image, movement patterns, color, form, and rendering techniques. 3 credits THEA 445. Lighting. Basic principles and practices of lighting design, including basic electricity, script analysis, color and directionality. 3 credits THEA 451. Advanced Directing. Advanced problems in stage directing, emphasizinf text analysis, communication, and style as applied to one-act plays. 3 credits (Pending BOR approval) THEA 455. Advanced Acting. Textual analysis, movement and acting styles for the theater. 3 credits THEA 491. Independant Study. Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. 1 to 6 credits (Pending BOR approval) THEA 492. Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. 1-5 credits
*indicates course is not offered every year

THEA 494. Internship. Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses. 1-16 credits THEA 498. Senior Project. This course is the culminating production project, including appropriate research, preparation and production. 1 credit (Pending BOR approval) WELLNESS (WEL) WEL 100/100L. Wellness for Life. This course introduces the importance and holistic nature of the six dimensions of personal wellness and fitness. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to make informed decisions which will lead to the development of a healthy lifestyle. Various issues related to the dimensions of wellness will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current health status and identify potential risk factors. Labunderstanding about one’s personal fitness level as well as learn a variety of skills to enhance personal wellness. Lecture, 1 hour per week; laboratory activities, 2 hours per week. 2 credits (1 credit lecture, 1 credit lab)

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