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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

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WORDS FROM THE PUBLISHER

by Todd McGreevy

T

Time for New Blood on Scott County Board of Supervisors
achieved consolidated dispatching in Scott County. You can especially thank two of the incumbents on the ballot this year, Tom Sunderbruch and Jim Hancock, for helping usher in a new taxing authority (a.k.a. a new layer of government) that has an unlimited ability to tax as much as that new board sees fit. Never mind that the project was sold as a tax-saving measure and as a necessary efficiency – neither of which has been achieved. Expense budgets are not made available for public review before hearings; supervisors pay analysts to read them and advise them about their content, and to make recommendations on whether to approve – in other words, to do the tasks the supervisors should be doing themselves. These county politicians are so entrenched, they give little thought to transparency, or to accountability when residents seek answers. This lack of engagement is illustrative that taxpayers do not have supervisors who supervise in Scott County. Instead we have supervisors who rubber-stamp most of what staff puts before them, including the annual operating budget. The mantra one will hear from this board, nearly in unison, is: “We will do what allows our people to have the quality of life that we think they should have.” When pressed about their oaths of office, and how they dictate that the board shall protect each individual’s right to determine his/her own quality of life, the response from one of the incumbent candidates was: “That world does not exist.” It’s time for some new blood. Jim Hancock has been on the board for 20 years. Tom Sunderbruch has been on the county board for 12 years. If we had engaged, involved, and informed decision-making by these two, we wouldn’t have expenditures that have doubled in the past 10 years and property taxes that have doubled in the past 10 years, while we have a population that has only grown slightly more than 5 percent in the same amount of time. At a recent candidate forum, both Sunderbruch and Hancock repeated over and over: “We need more revenue, more revenue, more resources.” The tail is clearly wagging the dog here. In their world, the public is here to serve the needs of the ever-growing county government. In their world, the public must accommodate the double standards for zoning that would have helped the board fast-track the fertilizer company if it had not chosen to go elsewhere. (The lack of transparency and back-room dealing for that boondoggle have been widely publicized.) So nowhere is there ever a discussion of cutting expenses, tightening one’s belt, making do with less, much like nearly every private business and family in Scott County has had to do during this recession. At the candidate forum, the

here are two Scott County Board of Supervisors seats up for grabs in this year’s election. Voters who want a supervisor who actually supervises and reads the materials being presented prior to a vote would do well to give Jesse Anderson’s candidacy some serious consideration, regardless of your political affiliation. With experience and age, wisdom and knowledge should logically follow. Not so with the Scott County Board of Supervisors and how it has conducted business over the past several years, especially relative to big issues that impact all taxpayers in Scott County. When the Smart Planning Principles resolution was adopted in February of 2011, all the supervisors, before adopting the guidelines proposed by the state in Senate Bill 2389, admitted they had not even read the legislation prior to approving it (RCReader.com/y/ smartplanning). Most people don’t pay attention to the consolidated dispatching entity known as SECC 911, but if your property taxes went up, you can thank, in part, this $24-million project, which still has not

Continued On Page 16

CorrectionCensored Stories The article “Additional

of 2012” (River Cities’ Reader Issue 815, October 11-24, 2012) incorrectly included Naomi Wolf as a plaintiff in a lawsuit over the National Defense Authorization Act. She is not.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012 by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

NEWS

An End to One-Party Rule?

I

Rock Island County Republicans Put the County Board in Play with “Clean the Slate”
the Democrats. Clean the Slate shows that the organization is making far more than a token effort, though; even in such a heavily Democratic county, one could see the GOP making significant gains by focusing on the perils of sustained one-party rule. The River Cities’ Reader interviewed four of the Clean the Slate candidates, and it was refreshing that even though the initiative has four components to its mission statement, there was notable variance among individuals’ positions. The mission includes the vague pledges of transparency and new hiring guidelines, along with more-concrete promises to eliminate board-member salaries in favor of per-meeting pay and to reduce the board’s size from 25 to 15 people. Yet the people to whom I talked expressed differences in how they would tackle those issues. That might reflect the fact that the mission statement was developed by the candidates themselves after they were recruited. “We signed on, and then had a lot of group discussion to decide what our goals were going to be,” said Kevin Goveia, who is running in District 16. While all four supported eliminating the $2,400 base salary for county-board members, for example, they disagreed whether to get rid of health-insurance and pension benefits for board members. (In May, the county board established that base salary, with an additional $100 per diem for meetings – effective on December 1. If a member were to attend 36 board and committee meetings in a year, they would be paid a total of $6,000.) Goveia said he might support allowing board members to be eligible for health insurance – if they pay higher premiums and co-pays. But he said he favors eliminating pension benefits except for the full-time board chair. Mark Archibald, from District 3, said he favors maintaining both health-insurance and pension benefits for board members, although he was open to increasing their contributions. “We have to have some motivation for good people to want to do this kind of work,” he said. “It is a motivation to do good work.” (Archibald said he has a disability and has difficulty getting health insurance.) Both John “Mike” McColl (the current county-board member from District 12) and Linda Soyke Haake (the Clean the Slate candidate from District 20) said they favor eliminating both health-insurance and pension

t doesn’t take a genius to see through the “Clean the Slate” effort. Its newsletter, promoting 23 candidates for the Rock Island County Board, asks: “Tired of one party controlling all jobs in the county? Unless you are related to or know key people in the county government; your chances of being hired or promoted are unlikely.” There’s no mention of party affiliation – and no branding by the Rock Island County Republicans – in the newsletter, which notes that it was paid for by the Clean the Slate PAC. On the other hand, its Web site (CleanSlate2012.net) includes a photo showing the Rock Island County Republicans logo, and the county-party Web site includes a link to Clean the Slate. Even if the connections aren’t explicit, Clean the Slate is a pretty naked attempt to recast the county-board election in nonpartisan, good-government terms. Republicans are clearly hoping that common-sense critiques will loosen the grip held on the body by the Democratic party. Yet you’d be hard-pressed to argue that the initiative doesn’t have valid points. The 25-seat Rock Island County Board presently has four Republican members, and the issue is less philosophical uniformity than organizational comfort. Because most county boards operate with little public or media scrutiny, the absence of oversight or internal opposition can result in their members acting with collective nearimpunity. And Clean the Slate has articulated a handful of areas in which the Rock Island County Board needs improvement – from being more flexible with public comment to stopping nepotism to ending the practice of paid absenteeism for board members. It’s a smart approach that’s likely to appeal to many conscientious liberals. Given Rock Island County’s strong Democratic history, it would be foolish to expect Clean the Slate to produce a GOP takeover of the county board. But several statewide and local Republican candidates performed strongly in Rock Island County in 2010, and the county party organization under chair Susan Carpentier (first elected in 2006) appears serious about not letting Democrats take any elected office for granted. In 2008, only two of 14 county-board races were contested. In 2010, all 12 were. And this year, Clean the Slate is fielding candidates for 23 of the 25 seats. Obviously, the county board was never in play for Rock Island County Republicans when they didn’t bother to run anybody against

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

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ILLINOIS POLITICS

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Two Races Show the Perils of Independence

by Rich Miller CapitolFax.com

ver since I published a poll last month showing indicted former state Representative Derrick Smith (D-Chicago) leading third-party candidate Lance Tyson in the 10th Illinois House District race by a mind-boggling 47 percent to 9 percent, there’s been a lot of grumbling about how Chicago voters ought to know better. Smith was arrested and indicted, after all. It was all over the news. People should know that, for crying out loud. At the time the poll was taken, however, Tyson hadn’t spent much if any money on his campaign. He isn’t a known quantity in the district. And he’s not a Democrat – at least, he’s not a Democrat on the ballot. Likely voters were given the choice between Smith and Tyson and told their party affiliations. Smith won the Democratic primary; Tyson belongs to the newly created 10th District Unity Party. Convincing voters to take a look at thirdparty or independent candidates is never easy. Go back to 1986, when some members of Lyndon LaRouche’s cultish organization won some statewide Democratic primary races here. Democrat Adlai Stevenson’s running mate was beaten by one of those candidates, and Stevenson had to form a third party to run for governor. Stevenson, who had run four years before and nearly defeated Republican Jim Thompson, got just 40 percent of the vote as a member of his new Solidarity Party. This in a year when Democrat Neil Hartigan won the attorney general’s race with 62 percent and Democrat Alan Dixon won the U.S. Senate race with 65 percent. But Stevenson’s Solidarity Party candidate for secretary of state received just 17 percent against the LaRouche Democrat’s 15 percent. Voters are hard-wired to look at party affiliation. If you say “Democrat” or “Republican” to a voter, he or she knows pretty much what you’re talking about. If you say “10th District Unity Party” to a voter, you’ll likely get a blank stare and plenty of suspicion, especially if that candidate is completely unknown. And the same goes for independents. Just ask Forrest Claypool, who was a wellknown Cook County politician and ran as an independent for county assessor two years ago. Claypool spent a pile of money yet received just 32 percent of the vote against Democrat Joe Berrios.

Both candidates have two foes on the ballot: their fleshand-blood opponents and the legions of voters who can’t get past party labels.

So it should’ve been little surprise when polling last month showed that independent candidate Dee Beaubien was getting only 26 percent against Republican David McSweeney in the 52nd District state House battle. Beaubien has a pretty well-known name because her late husband served in the Illinois House. And, unlike Lance Tyson, she had spent a considerable amount of money by then. But that “independent” label was hurting her, even in an area where voters pride themselves on their independence. Beaubien recently put $100,000 of her own money into her campaign, and once a self-funder breaks that mark, all state contribution caps are off. McSweeney countered with $70,000 of his own cash, plus Jack Roeser’s Otto Engineering put $100,000 into the contest. It’s now a free-for-all. Well, not free, exactly. It’s gonna be a financial bloodbath if the House Democrats stay in the race, if the pro-choice Personal PAC goes all-in against the pro-life McSweeney, and if Beaubien keeps her checkbook open. Lance Tyson, on the other hand, is still struggling to raise money. He’s reported receiving or loaning himself just $33,000 since September 28. Both Beaubien and Tyson really have two foes on the ballot: their flesh-and-blood opponents and the legions of voters who can’t get past party labels. Beaubien is betterpositioned financially to challenge both problems, but she’s being matched at least dollar-for-dollar by McSweeney. Tyson will have the media behind him and presumably some ground troops. But both candidates are running uphill. The bottom line is that it’s hugely difficult to undo decades of voter behavior. That doesn’t mean it’s impossible. State Senator James Meeks ran as an independent against a sitting Democratic incumbent and won his 2002 campaign. Meeks was extremely well-known in the district because his church has tens of thousands of members. He also spent more than $400,000 to win the race and got big help from some major unions and area politicos. It can happen. Independents and third-party candidates can win. But it’s awfully rare. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

7

Vol. 19 · No. 816
Oct. 25 - Nov. 7, 2012
River Cities’ Reader
532 W. 3rd St. Davenport IA 52801 RiverCitiesReader.com (563)324-0049 (phone) (563)323-3101 (fax) info@rcreader.com

A Novelty, but Not a Novelty Act

THEATRE

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

I

Jeff Wichmann, October 26 at Rozz-Tox

Publishing since 1993
The River Cities’ Reader is an independent newspaper published every other Thursday, and available free throughout the Quad Cities and surrounding areas. © 2012 River Cities’ Reader AD DEADLINE: 5 p.m. Wednesday prior to publication

PUBLISHER Todd McGreevy EDITOR Kathleen McCarthy
Managing Editor: Jeff Ignatius • jeff@rcreader.com Arts Editor, Calendar Editor: Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com Contributing Writers: Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Rich Miller, Frederick Morden, Bruce Walters, Thom White Account Executive: Jason Farrell • jason@rcreader.com Advertising Coordinator: Nathan Klaus Advertising rates, publishing schedule, demographics, and more are available at

EDITORIAL

ADVERTISING

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DESIGN/PRODUCTION

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ADMINISTRATION

n what is likely a statement of the painfully obvious, Jeff Wichmann said that his new album Aあhhhhh!!!!! is “something that, as far as I can tell, no one’s ever created before, which is a koto/trumpet album with a lot of electronic blips and bleeps.” And that’s not all. “I wanted to create an experimental rock album using the koto and the trumpet, as opposed to recording a koto album” of traditional compositions, Wichmann said in a recent phone interview. “Most koto players just do that. I found that limiting ... .” Wichmann, a former Quad Citian (and former Reader employee) now based in Chicago, will be headlining the official release show for Aあhhhhh!!!!! at Rozz-Tox on October 26, and it’s almost certain to be a unique experience. The trumpeter and koto player will be joined by guitarist Jeff Kmieciak (a bandmate in Tenki, which plans to release its final album next year) and, on at least one song, Konrad (the Quad Cities electronic-music artist whose remix of the title track is included on the new record). While the koto/trumpet core is certainly a novelty, Wichmann is not a novelty act; he’s not passing rock songs through the filter of traditional instruments, as has been done countless times with pianos and orchestras and string quartets. Instead, he’s using his instruments within the rock aesthetic. Trumpets date back many millennia, and the koto – a traditional stringed instrument from Japan to which Wichmann was introduced at Augustana College – is well over a thousand years old. His use of them, however, is wholly contemporary. For many tracks on Aあhhhhh!!!!!, layers of kotos were run through phasers in post-production, so they sometimes “sound like maybe electric

guitar,” he said. “The koto can be kind of challenging to record sometimes, because it can sound plunky – beautiful, yet plunky. So I wanted to dirty it up, and make it more approachable for audiences to listen to.” The title track – which opens Aあ hhhhh!!!!! – serves as a bold, driving, and concise primer, in two minutes laying the groundwork for the remainder. Big, scuffed beats push things forward, and the trumpets build to a frenzied climax, but the two sets of koto sounds – one largely unprocessed, carrying the melody and interest, and the other functioning as rhythm guitar – show how artfully Wichmann has brought his primary instrument into a foreign land. That’s followed by the cinematic textures of “Sunrise” – suitable for scoring an unbearably patient and tense cat-andmouse scene – and “Run,” which continues down the path of “Aあhhhhh!!!!!” but brings vocals into the mix. Then “F--- it! I’m Rod Blagojevich!” is a soulful workout for trumpet, bass, and beats. After that, Aあhhhhh!!!!! takes a decidedly different turn. The most Easternsounding thing on the album to that point – purposefully, one guesses – is the melody line of “Voodoo,” which as a whole is a careful but largely faithful teleportation of one of Jimi Hendrix’s signature tunes to Japan. Wichmann said it was the first

cover song he learned on the koto: “It is weird. You can play blues on the koto. That’s all it is.” In a followup e-mail, he wrote that the first time he played his version of the song for an audience, “I realized people could relate to the koto in a direct way that didn’t sound so foreign. It was an ‘Ahhhhh’ moment for everyone.” Then comes “Tokyo 2010” (arranged and mixed by HAL, who also contributed two remixes), a 12-minute digital cut-up of koto, noise, and street sounds in which the natural placidity of the Japanese instrument is ripped apart by a modern cacophony. From there, things calm down for a while. The expansive and seemingly narrative composition for unadorned koto “初秋 – Shoshuu (Early Autumn),” leads naturally into “Look” and its gradual introductions of trumpet and electronics. Then the progression of the three distinct sections of “Time” closes the album proper with a ballsy incoherence that ultimately coalesces, as sleepy, somber vocals and koto give way to agitation, what sounds like a bagpipe, and a final, satisfying coming together of everything that’s come before: koto, trumpet, electronics, and voice. Wichmann said that working on the album over the past five years wasn’t a revelatory experience – that he didn’t see his instruments in a new light through the rock context. But he admitted that there was no guarantee the project would gel: “The only surprise was that it worked.” Jeff Wichmann will perform on Friday, October 26, at Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island; RozzTox.com). The 9 p.m. all-ages show also features Konrad and The Multiple Cat, and admission is $5. For more information on Wichmann, visit JeffWichmann.com.

MUSIC

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012 by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Piano Mover and Shaker

O

Quad City Arts Visiting Artist Leon Bates, October 27 at Augustana College
early interest in music – began, as he says, with the encouragement of his kindergarten teacher: “She was someone who really appreciated how important music can be in one’s life, and she let us play the upright piano that was in our classroom, and there was something about all those notes on the keyboard that really impressed me. And I remember once playing the piano for the class – just making something up – and when I finished, she gave me this strange look and said, ‘Very. Good.’” He laughs. “I wish that somehow or other there could’ve been a tape recording of that, because I’d love to know what it was that I did! But that just kind of got me excited, and that was when I went home and told my mother about it, and my mother told my father, and they were like, ‘Well, we’ve got to get this kid a piano now.’” They did, Bates practiced daily and worked with private instructors, and the artist says that “by the time I got to be 12 or 13, I definitely felt that I wanted to be a musician. I even had dreams about what it would be like to be the pianist who comes in at the last minute to replace somebody. And this was not a nightmare for me. This was a good dream.” After high school, Bates was accepted into the Esther Boyer College of Music, won several piano competitions, and found himself playing alongside such noted ensembles as the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Cincinnati Symphony – performances that he calls “incredible catapults that helped make a music career possible.” He also landed his first professional engagement while still a student, performing as a guest artist at Texas Tech University. “I obtained concert management when I was around 20, 21 years old,” says Bates. “Certainly, you learn to play the notes and all that, and you want to be as good a musician as you can be. But at the same time, you need to have someone who’s plugged into the concert world. Someone who can be the bridge between that world and you, to connect you, so that you can get opportunities to perform. I mean, it’s a business.” And following that first professional booking in Texas, business, for Bates, was booming. “We just kept working from

n any given day, you can find the acclaimed classical pianist Leon Bates headlining one of the world’s most renowned concert halls, or playing alongside one of America’s most prestigious symphony orchestras, or performing and educating as an artist-in-residence – a position he’s currently filling as Quad City Arts’ latest Visiting Artist. But your best chance of running into Bates – whose public concert for Quad City Arts will be held at Augustana College on October 27 – might actually be at the gym, as he’s no doubt one of the few professional pianists who is also, as we discussed during a recent phone interview, an avid bodybuilder. “I got involved in bodybuilding in college when I was about 18,” says Bates, a Philadelphia native and 1972 graduate of Temple University’s esteemed Esther Boyer College of Music. “And I still go to the gym every day and work out. Being a musician’s very demanding – all the travel that’s involved, the work of actually playing performances. And I think that all of my weight-training has been very helpful in terms of giving me the stamina I need to simply carry on with the musical lifestyle.” With a laugh, though, he adds, “I have been mistaken for the piano mover on a few occasions.” It’s unlikely, however, that this mistake has been made by those who’ve seen the pianist in concert. Locally, classical-music devotees may remember Bates from his performance with the Quad City Symphony Orchestra in the spring of 2009, and his previous tenure as a Quad City Arts Visiting Artist for the organization’s 1982-3 season. But over the past four decades, the pianist’s intimidating career has also taken him from the Kennedy Center to Carnegie Hall, and from France to Africa, and from appearances on The Today Show and CBS Sunday Morning to sessions in numerous recording studios, such as the one that recorded Bates’ 1991 CD of George Gershwin and Chick Corea compositions that Fanfare magazine called “recommended with pleasure.” “My gosh, I’ve had so many experiences with symphonies and orchestras and different places over the years,” says Bates, “and I think that each one, in a way, is a career highlight.” Bates’ early interest in music – his very

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

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Carnival Cruising Lines
eremy Mahr Angelica to vow seems to be revenge. But as dancing with serious as that sounds, there his dialogue as are more laughWillmore, the titular worthy moments character in the in Burrough’s Prenzie Players’ The piece than tragic, Rover. Author or even romantic, Aphra Behn’s words ones. In one of trip the light fantasthe best, following tic off his tongue, Willmore’s liaison with Mahr presentwith Angelica, he’s ing his rakish playKathleen Israel and Diane Emmert approached by a boy so playfully that masked Hellena, pressing the need for him it’s as though he’s fluent in the stylized, 17th to remove the evidence of his recent actions Century language of the period. And when – namely, Angelica’s lipstick – quickly. This the meaning of what he’s saying is expressed causes Andy Koski’s Frederick to rush to through his entire body – particularly during Willmore’s more amorous lines – the obviously wipe the stains from his friend Willmore’s forehead, lips, and neck, with Koski, at his fully invested Mahr is incredibly fun to watch. most hysterical, attempting to mask what he’s There’s a particular, fully amusing doing by leaning on Mahr’s shoulder with a moment here that exemplifies the tone of his Cheshire-cat grin on his face. characterization, when Mahr, in one fluid It is Reader employee Mike Schulz, however, move, grabs a beer from under a bench while who gets to be a part of Burrough’s funniest spinning 360 degrees and descending to a scene, during which Schulz’s dippy Blunt is seated, side-saddle position. But this kind convinced that a woman he’s just met loves of playful suaveness inhabits Mahr’s entire him, not knowing she’s a prostitute. Blunt’s performance as a man who, during carnival struggle to quickly undress elicits loud season in Naples, falls in love with Diane laughter, which is prolonged when he tries out Emmert’s Hellena – prior to her brother’s several seductive poses while Catie Osborn’s imposed imprisonment of her in a convent Lucetta, in the next room, slips into something – and also wins the love of Maggie Woolley’s more comfortable. The most nuanced moment Angelica, a beautiful and well-known in Schulz’s performance, though, comes when courtesan. Blunt tells his friends of his newfound love; There’s not much that’s subtle about with excitement in the actor’s voice and a director Stephanie Burrough’s telling of this twinkle in his eye, he delivers undertones of tale, starting with Emmert’s exaggerated naïve love and childlike wonder. enunciation – and the matching physical In another subplot, Cole McFarren offers interpretations of her words – in the opening an earnest portrayal of Belville, the friend of scene. And many of the other actors here Frederick and Blunt who loves Hellena’s sister match this style of voicing and playing Behn’s Florinda, played with equal sincerity, and characters with similar broadness. Yet while dashes of innocence and hope, by Kathleen their efforts sometimes border on overacting, Isreal. And Florinda, we discover, is betrothed they land on the comedic side of acceptability, to Don Antonio, a character that showcases as The Rover is, after all, a comedy – and a Patrick Gimm’s ability to wear pompous class rather crass one at that. Woolley, as usual, drips with sexuality, from believably and well. At almost three hours in length including her sultry alto voice to her sensual demeanor its intermission, The Rover does feel a bit long, to – why not? – her pole dance, one that particularly in the final scenes that find Behn elicited applause during Friday’s performance. wrapping up her storylines. However, under When Woolley and Mahr share the stage, just Burrough’s direction, the Prenzie Players the two of them, they create that which I most bring quite a bit of laughter to those hours – love about theatre: the undeniable invitation inducing more than a few really hearty laughs to escape into a dream world. There’s a magic – along the way. in their chemistry that adds credibility to their staged infatuation, and I was lost in their The Rover runs at the QC Theatre Workshop moments together just as much as Woolley (1730 Wilkes Avenue, Davenport) through and Mahr appeared lost in each other’s eyes. October 28, and more information and tickets The characters’ affections, however, are are available by calling (309)278-8426 or fleeting, as Willmore quickly returns his visiting PrenziePlayers.com. attention and love to Hellena, prompting

THEATRE

By Thom White

J

The Rover, at the QC Theatre Workshop through October 28

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012 by Frederick Morden f.morden@mchsi.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

MUSIC

The Quiet Outlier

I

The Quad City Symphony Performs Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6, November 3 and 4
n the middle of the turbulently self-expressive, politically conflicted, structurally groundbreaking nine symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven is a quiet outlier, a revolutionary work whose only discord is a thunderstorm. It’s hard to believe, but the tumultuous Fifth and the mild-mannered Sixth symphonies were premiered in the same ice-cold Vienna theater on December 22, 1808. Conceptually contrasting pieces, each work taps into a distinctly different aspect of Beethoven’s personality. No. 5 is an emphatic example of how he portrayed his life through music – bitterness with Vienna, romantic failures, increasing deafness, and frustration with the music politics of the aristocracy. But Symphony No. 6 (“Pastorale”) is devoid of this me-againstthe-world battle. The conflict is gone because Beethoven had no conflict with nature. No. 6 is simply an observation and organization of what he called “the feelings of nature” put into music, and it enlarged the possibilities for the symphony as a form. When Maestro Mark Russel Smith cues the Quad City Symphony to begin the “Pastorale” on November 3 and 4, don’t listen for themes of fate, politics, or philosophy; let Beethoven’s retreat into nature be your respite for 40 minutes. He points the way in his musical story by titling each movement so we know exactly what it’s depicting – a first for a large-scale symphony. The opening movement is titled “Awakening of Joyful Feelings on Arrival in the Country” and has a free and easy beat with simple melodies that jump back and forth between instruments like playing children. There are also extended sections of long thematic sequences that provide panoramic “views” of the countryside. In the second movement, “Scene by a Brook,” Beethoven writes unmistakably undulating music in the lower instruments with overlapping waves of babbling melodies in the violins and woodwinds. In a quiet transition, the flute actually imitates a nightingale, the oboe a quail, and the clarinet a cuckoo. While the first two movements have brief pauses after them, the last three movements are played without interruption to tie together both the literary drama introduced in the titles and his musical depiction. When the third movement, “Happy Gathering of Country Folk,” begins, it sounds like a familiar Beethoven “Scherzo” used in other symphonies, but the form of the music changes abruptly from 3/4 to 2/4 to reveal a hidden passion of the German composer: Austrian country dances. Musicologists have identified the tunes and movements from indigenous Austrian “Forest People,” groups that spent a lifetime isolated from city life and that Beethoven discovered on one of his woodland strolls. Beethoven wrote dance music for his country friends, typically a “Landler,” with its hopping and stamping. And there was drinking of the native brew in the music as well. In his detailed biography Life of Beethoven, Alexander Thayer noted that Beethoven’s Sixth had “the sleep-drunken bassoon” playing extra notes that made the phrases irregular. With the fourth movement, a storm overshadows the idyllic reverie. Beethoven creates thunder from the basses and cellos, sudden lighting strikes with the timpani, and swirling wind in a chromatic piccolo. If there is tension at all in this symphony, it is within nature – rather than between people – in this vivid section. After the storm passes, a horn call signals a return to frivolity, and Beethoven goes directly into the fifth and final section called “Shepherds’ Song; Cheerful & Thankful Feelings After the Storm.” There is a prayerlike section in which Beethoven instructs the orchestra to “whisper,” and quietly, they diminuendo to the end with only two chords of “fortissimo” to bring the symphony to its conclusion. By contrast, the “very fortissimo” ending of No. 5 is repeated for more than 40 measures. Beethoven’s Sixth gives us the opportunity to connect to our own pastoral setting. Imagine Iowa farmland with its squares of carefully cultivated rows, a clear, quiet, starry night, the powerfully flowing Mississippi, our abundant wildlife, the pods of forests that dot our countryside. His “Pastorale” is, quite simply, a refuge. The Quad City Symphony Orchestra will perform Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 – alongside two pieces from Mozart – at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 3, at the Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport), and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 4, at Augustana College’s Centennial Hall (3703 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). For more information, visit QCSymphony.com. Frederick Morden is a retired orchestra-music director, conductor, composer, arranger, educator, and writer who has served on the executive board of the Conductors Guild.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

11

Movie Reviews
Robbie May Be Bloody Bonkers
PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4
Pity those who walk into Paranormal Activity 4 having no familiarity with this popular horror series’ previous entries. You should really pity the rest of us, too, but first things first. After interrupting the chronology with last year’s prequel Paranormal Activity 3, which was set in the late 1980s, directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman open their latest with home-movie footage from 2006, and a reprise of the toddler Hunter’s abduction by PA1 star Katie Featherston at the end of PA2. (Got all that?) We then jump five years, with a new family of unlucky suburbanites – among them a sixyear-old boy – contending with the same supernatural phenomena that plagued their franchise forebears: eerie noises, strangely mobile furniture, and a threatening, invisible presence with a fondness for 3 a.m. wake-up calls. They’re also contending with frequent, unanticipated visits by a creepy little boy named Robbie, also about six, who just moved in across the street, and whose single mother never seems to be at home. Could it be-e-e ... Katie?! For fans of this mock-doc serial – and despite my dissatisfaction with PA2, I consider myself one – this setup should be foolproof. Shot, like its predecessors, as a faux documentary with every image purportedly taken from a video recorder, surveillance tape, laptop, or smart phone, PA4 gives us the presentation we expect and have enjoyed in the past, and gooses us with its questions of “Whatever happened to Hunter?” and “Is darling little Robbie a psychopath?” I’d imagine that PA newbies,

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

however, might deathly static, nobe hopelessly budget version of confused, and every supernatural even actively scare flick you’ve irritated, by ever seen. It will elements here that come as absolutely we series veterans no shock that have simply the climax come to accept. conveniently What’s with the Kathryn Newton in Paranormal Activity 4 sets us up for random, nearly Paranormal throwaway references to a coven of witches Activity 5, yet that’s actually fitting. Since and some character named Toby? What’s it’s lacking from the beginning, why bother with the characters’ obsessive need to record introducing shock at the end? their every waking and sleeping moment? What’s with that maddening non-ending of an ALEX CROSS ending? And why is the acting so poor and the In the action-thriller Alex Cross, Tyler Perry dialogue seemingly one long variant on “What assumes the role of the police psychologist the f--- was that?!” portrayed by Morgan Freeman in Kiss the Girls I’m unhappy to report, though, that this and Along Came a Spider, which is kind of like franchise admirer was just as bothered by trading in a Lexus for a ... . Gosh, I dunno. A Joost’s and Schulman’s latest outing, mainly Pacer? A cardboard box with wheels attached? because the movie seemed like it was just When playing Madea, Perry routinely delivers spinning its wheels; there’s not enough personality, fire, and crack comic timing. Yet that’s fresh here to make this follow-up feel while, when out of drag, Perry is a genialat all necessary, and its too-few scares feel enough screen presence, he’s also mostly dull completely derivative. (The movie really and hopelessly lacking in nuance, and nuance could’ve used a stylistic innovation such as the is about the only thing that could’ve saved slowly rotating fan from PA3; the employment director Rob Cohen’s rote, clichéd, weakly of Skype, it turns out, is a weak substitute.) staged adaptation of James Patterson’s novel To be fair, we are treated to some cleverly Cross. Some welcome professionalism is low-rent effects, particularly those involving provided by Jean Reno and the silky-smooth an unfathomably ambulatory kitchen knife. Giancarlo Esposito, and Matthew Fox’s But even at fewer than 90 minutes, the film outrageous, pop-eyed overacting as a serial feels overlong for its meager payoffs, and there killer provides a few (unintentional?) giggles. are so damned many recording devices now In general, though, Alex Cross is the sort of being employed for the narrative – a camera generically lousy cop movie in which the seems positioned in every last room in the dependably unpleasant Edward Burns – who house – that PA4 winds up looking like a

must have dozens of generically lousy cop movies on his résumé – inevitably pops up as a sarcastic Irish-American detective. If he didn’t, you’d spend the whole movie wondering why he didn’t.

MEERKATS 3D
I entered Meerkats 3D – the 40-minute National Geographic documentary currently being screened at the Putnam Museum – expecting cute. I mean, come on ... : furry little creatures who stand on their hind legs and, in my head at least, talk like Nathan Lane? But not having previously seen TV’s nature series Meerkat Manor (created by this film’s director, Caroline Hawkins), here’s what I didn’t expect: These things are mean as hell. Warring meerkat tribes? Violent dissections of millipedes? Attacks on a king cobra? A meerkat matriarch banishing her pregnant daughter and forcing the poor creature to miscarry – as opposed, narrator Emily Watson informs us, to the more traditional Mama Meerkat habit of killing her grandchildren herself? You’ll get your share of cute from this beautifully filmed, terrifically informative edu-tainment, but who would’ve guessed that, with Meerkats 3D, we’d also get freakin’ Shakespeare? For reviews of Argo, Seven Psychopaths, Sinister, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, and other current releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com. Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter/com/ MikeSchulzNow.

Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 104-9 FM with Dave & Darren

12

Music
F

What’s Happenin’ What’s Happenin’
Attractive Sin – a collaboration with the musicians of Parallel Thought – praised by Paste magazine for “the dexterity evident in both the beats and lyrical delivery,” Del the Funky Homosapien is clearly at the top of his game more than 20 years after his professional debut. Yet I’m guessing that I don’t have to sell Del’s musical bona fides to hardcore gamers, who are no doubt well acquainted with the artist’s output. Del’s song “If You Must,” for instance, is featured on Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 3. “Catch All This” is on Street Sk8er 2. “Burnt” is among the song selections on Tony Hawk’s American Wasteland. “Jaw Gymnastics” can be heard on Knockout Kings. And “Positive Contact” will be familiar to players of Tony Hawk’s Underground. Sadly, though, I’m personally unacquainted with Del’s video-game contributions, as the only game I ever played obsessively was PlayStation’s Hot Shots Golf, and it probably would’ve been hard to hear the man’s music through the screen spectators’ heated whisperings of “Sh-h-h-h!” Del the Funky Homosapien performs locally with guests DJ Hi-Tech and D.O.P.E., and more information is available by calling (309)793-4060 or visiting RIBCO.com.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Del the Funky Homosapien
Rock Island Brewing Company Friday, October 26, 9 p.m.

Music

Jorma Kaukonen

The Redstone Room Friday, November 2, 7:30 p.m.

ans of funk, rap, and hip hop aren’t going to want to miss the October 26 concert at the Rock Island Brewing Company, considering the venue has booked an evening with the legendary underground artist and hip-hop emcee Del the Funky Homosapien. But there’s actually a sect of people who might be even more jazzed by the arrival of this Californiabased music sensation: videogame fanatics. The cousin of iconic rapper and frequent film actor Ice Cube, Del recorded his first solo album, I Wish My Brother George Was Here, at the tender age of 18. Since the release of that 1991 smash, the man has been acclaimed for his unique gifts for rhyme and rhythm on such albums as No Need for Alarm, Eleventh Hour, and Both Sides of the Brain, the latter of which, according to Rolling Stone, “cements his status as rap’s staunchly independent lord of the underground.” And with his talents on 2012’s

O

n November 2, Davenport’s Redstone Room will host a special concert event billed as “An Evening with Jorma Kaukonen.” And I’m presuming that when he performs, the blues, folk, and rock guitarist will only play the absolute highest of highlights from his notable career, because otherwise the event would have to be called “An Evening & Night & Morning & Afternoon & Another Evening with Jorma Kaukonen.” Named among Rolling Stone’s roster of the 20 greatest acoustic guitarists of all time, the 71-year-

old Kaukonen is a certified music legend – literally certified, if entry in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame counts as certification. (And it should.) It was, in fact, 50 years ago that Kaukonen first burst upon the professional music scene, performing as a solo artist in small clubs and coffee houses in San Francisco. Kaukonen’s career, however, skyrocketed after he was invited by guitarist Paul Kanter to join the man’s fledgling music ensemble – a rock outfit eventually named Jefferson Airplane. Performing with the iconic rockers of “White Rabbit” and “Somebody to Love” fame, Kaukonen lent his exceptional acoustic- and electric-guitar gifts to such hits as “Greasy Heart,” “If You Feel,” and “Hey, Frederick,” and formed a strong musical partnership with bass player Jack Casady, with whom he’d form the spin-off group Hot Tuna in 1969. Thirty-three years later, Kaukonen, Casady, and Hot 1) “Any American who is prepared to run for president should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so.” 2) “By the time a man gets to be presidential material, he’s been bought 10 times over.” 3) “Apparently, a democracy is a place where numerous elections are held at great cost without issues and with interchangeable candidates.” 4) “Half of the American people have never read a newspaper, and half never voted for president. One hopes it is the same half.” 5) “Hairdressing in general hasn’t been given the kudos it deserves.”

Tun out will than also his albu CD in h Kau adm than star he’s F Red (563

Theatre
The Best Man
District Theatre Tuesday, November 6, through Sunday, November 18

N

ot that anyone needs to be told, but it’s an election year. And on November 6, we’ll all finally be given the answer to the burning political question: Will the presidential victor be the “likable, forceful, and humorous” liberal, or the “unscrupulous” populist who’s also “a bigot and a charlatan”? Whoa whoa whoa!!! Relax! I’m not talking about our national election! I’m talking about the election between the warring candidates in Gore Vidal’s political comedy/drama The Best Man, playing at Rock Island’s District Theatre November 6 through 18! Seriously, those words in quotes are from New York Times theatre critic Brooks Atkinson’s 1960 review of the play!

Sheesh ... we all get so touchy in election years ... ! In any case, even those who are currently exhausted by politics will likely want to catch director Bryan Tank’s take on this smart and thought-provoking

piec thre Bes pres opp of th mem Den Vid sure Ju divi who answ to th T info (309

MUSIC

Continued From Page 8

Piano Mover and Shaker
there,” he says. “I was getting recital dates, I was getting opportunities to play with orchestras ... . I was a very fortunate person, because there’s a lot of talent out there, and it’s all over the place. And you realize that you need some sort of catapult – winning a competition, or playing with a major symphony orchestra – for anyone to focus on you specifically.” These days, Bates is frequently a specific focus even when performing among some of the world’s most notable musicians, be they members of such North American ensembles as the New York Philharmonic or the Atlanta Symphony, or European ensembles such as the Vienna Symphony, the Strasbourg Philharmonic, or the RadioOrchestra of Dublin. And to hear Bates tell it, his music career is as gratifying now as it was during its beginnings. “In many ways, it’s even more satisfying,” he says. “As a kid, it was all very much a matter of discovery. But as your talent expands, you find that it’s still that – still discovery. Because as a pianist, there’s so much that’s been written, and is being written, that you’re constantly opening new doors. So that’s what it’s about now. Finding doors that open to give me greater and greater experiences.”

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

October 11 Crossword Answers

Leon Bates performs his Quad City Arts Visiting Artist public concert at Augustana College’s Wallenberg Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island) at 7 p.m. on Saturday, October 27, and also plays for the “Fridays at Deere-Wiman” series at the Butterworth Center (1105 Eighth Street, Moline) at 3 p.m. on Friday, October 26. Admission to both events is free, with donations accepted, and more information on the pianist’s area residency is available by calling (309)793-1213 or visiting QuadCityArts.com.

RiverCitiesReader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

13

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

na are still recording albums and performing to soldcrowds nationwide. And as Redstone Room guests l discover on November 2, Kaukonen – with more n 40 albums spanning his solo and band career – o remains an exhilarating artist when performing on own, as evidenced by the raves for his most recent um, River of Time. (AcousticMusic.com called the D “the best collection Jorma Kaukonen has released his long career.”) So plan on having a blast during ukonen’s Davenport set – and, if you’re a longtime mirer of Jefferson Airplane and Hot Tuna, be sure to nk the Grammy nominee for the show’s 7:30 p.m. rt time. “Our fans have been with us a long time,” s quoted as saying. “They just don’t stay up as late.” For more information on, and tickets to, the dstone Room’s Jorma Kaukonen concert, call 3)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org.

Music

Jackson Browne

Adler Theatre Thursday, November 1, 7:30 p.m.

M

ce, one whose 2012 Broadway engagement received ee Tony Award nominations, including one for st Revival of a Play. In the District Theatre’s timely sentation, The Best Man finds its two presidential ponents and their aides fighting for the endorsement he current commander-in-chief, and with cast mbers Pat Flaherty, Matt Mercer, Jonathan Grafft, nise Yoder, Susan Perrin-Sallak, and others attacking dal’s legendarily acidic dialogue, verbal sparks are e to fly. ust as they did seemingly every time the famously isive author spoke. So, in honor of the gentleman o passed away this past July at the age of 86, try wering the following: Which of the words of wisdom he left have not been attributed to Gore Vidal? The Best Man runs through November 18, and more ormation and reservations are available by calling 9)235-1654 or visiting DistrictTheatre.com. Answer: 5. That’s actually a quote by Vidal Sassoon. Too obvious?

, ou mber 1. Y know the Davenport’s Adler Theatre on Nove up. So for you in the boulevard outside I waited Browne. But you didn’t show song ndary singer/ writer Jackson tears night of the concert with lege of sorrow. And here come those white fountain walking slow through a black and now I’m again. running on empty. Still, I ers in love, our relationship was I know that while we were lawy happen. I felt the night a miracle. After all, anything can wanted to hold on, hold out for you into the light in a world of night . . - and pictured chasing inside me - oh, tender is the " and you can’t stay motion, shouting, " Let it be me! admit that my problem is you, about my imagination. I have to But enough broken, some bridges can’t who isn’t mine. I guess that once here, and you’re somebody’s baby in the balance. , be rebuilt even when there are lives days. I’ll cut my Adler Theatre I’m alive. I’ll take it easy these In the meantime, though you’re miles away, and the the shape of a heart. And even ticket stub - cut it away - in go, remember sky blue and black everywhere I who adores you. that I’m the cat Love from your redneck friend, rete The P nder Jackson Browne performs in st Davenport with special gue for tickets to Sara Watkins, and the November 1’s evening with k & Roll Hall of headlining Roc Fame inductee - and the chance to hear some of the artist’s 33 aforementioned songs - call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com.

y darling,

Thursday, October 25, and Friday, October 26 – Scott Ainslie. Concerts with the noted blues guitarist performing and educating in the Blues in the Schools program, presented by the Mississippi Valley Blues Society. Thursday – River Music Experience Community Stage (131 West Second Street, Davenport), 7 p.m., donations encouraged. Friday – The Muddy Waters (1708 State Street, Bettendorf), 9 p.m., $5. For information, call (563)322-5837 or visit MVBS.org. Friday, October 26 – Jeff Wichmann. Concert with the koto player, trumpeter, and former employee of the River Cities’ Reader, with opening sets by Konrad and The Multiple Cat. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 9 p.m. $5 at the door. For information, call (309)200-0978 or visit RozzTox.com. Saturday, October 27 – Leon Bates. Acclaimed pianist and Quad City Arts Visiting Artist in concert. Augustana College’s Wallenberg Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. Donations encouraged. For information, call (309)7931213 or visit QuadCityArts.com. Sunday, October 28 – Sphinx Virtuosi. Concert with the conductor-less ensemble of renowned string players, performing in a Hancher Auditorium Visiting Artists presentation. Iowa City West High School

MUSIC

What Else Is Happenin’

Continued On Page 15

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012 Continued From Page 4

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

An End to One-Party Rule?
benefits for board members. The Clean the Slate mission includes reducing board size from 25 to 15, but an advisory referendum on the November 6 ballot is more specific, asking voters whether they support having three districts electing five members each. It was clear that one talking point for Clean the Slate is advocating for districts with multiple members rather than the current single-member districts. Several candidates cited the examples of multi-member districts having benefits when a board member leaves town for the winter, or when a constituent has a conflict with his or her board member. But Haake said she supports retaining single-member districts, and both she and Archibald said they were concerned that large districts would make it difficult for some populations to get representation on the board. Goveia said he could support either multi- or single-member districts. And while McColl was the strongest advocate for larger districts with several members apiece, he said he wasn’t tied to one specific configuration. On hiring practices, nepotism was a universal concern. The Clean the Slate newsletter targets County Board Chair Jim Bohnsack specifically, saying that his son-inlaw and niece were hired for county positions,

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and that the firm employing his daughter-inlaw became the county’s outside auditor. Haake said that although she doesn’t know of specific examples of nepotism elsewhere in county government, she suspects it’s common at Hope Creek Care Center: “You look at the employee list, and there’s so many people with the same names.” McColl said he believes the county should not hire any immediate relative of another county employee. The other three candidates said they thought that was too restrictive. There was some agreement on specific measures. The four to whom I talked all supported eliminating the requirement of two business days’ notice for a citizen to address the county board – especially, they said, because that deadline often passes before the full board agenda is available. County-board meetings are held on Tuesday, and the county Web site states: “All requests to address the Board must be received in writing no later than the Friday prior to the Board Meeting.” Republicans feel this requirement is a violation of the Illinois Open Meetings Act, which says, “Any person shall be permitted an opportunity to address public officials” – although it adds “under the rules established and recorded by the public body.” The four candidates also supported having the county post notices of all job openings – not merely those whose postings are required. The lack of unanimity on solutions for all perceived problems is less important than the fact that the issues are being raised. What matters, Archibald said, is making sure these things are discussed and addressed. “Overall, what we need to concentrate more on is making sure that things are public,” he said. “We can do a lot in changing the perception of how this county is run by just being more open with people.” And the reality is that even if a Republican majority is unlikely, the party’s efforts are already paying some dividends. McColl said that because of questions he’s asked, the county has begun enforcing its policy on credit-card usage, and it has developed a petty-cash policy. The new part-salary, part-per-diem pay schedule for county-board members was a clear response to concerns Republicans raised about board members being paid for meetings they didn’t attend. And the resolution (passed this month) to put a referendum on the April ballot concerning single-member county-board districts is an obvious riposte to the board-sizereduction proposal on the November ballot. So while Republicans aren’t in charge of the Rock Island County Board and probably won’t grab control on November 6, it’s clear they’ve gotten the board’s attention.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com Continued From Page 13

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

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What Else Is Happenin’
(2901 Melrose Avenue, Iowa City). 2 p.m. $10-40. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www.Hancher. UIowa.edu. Thursday, November 1, and Friday, November 2 – How Great Thou Art: The Gospel Music of Elvis Presley. The King’s hits performed by Robert Shaw & the Lonely Street Band. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). Thursday 5:45 p.m. doors, 6-7 p.m. buffet, 7:15 p.m. show; $47.55. Friday 11:45 a.m. doors, noon-12:45 p.m. plated lunch, 1 p.m. show; $41.28. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Friday, November 2 – Pam Tillis. Concert with the famed musician of “Don’t Tell Me What to Do” and “Mi Vida Loca (My Crazy Life).” Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf). 7:30 p.m. $15-25. For information, call (800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com. Friday, November 2 – Brian Stokes Mitchell. Jazz standards, show tunes, classics, and more with the Tony Awardwinning actor and vocalist, in a Hancher Auditorium presentation. Riverside Casino Event Center (3184 Highway 22, Riverside). 7:30 p.m. $10-42. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu. Saturday, November 3, and Sunday, November 4 – Quad City Symphony Orchestra: Mozart & Beethoven. The Masterworks II concerts featuring conductor Mark Russell Smith and clarinetist Burt Hara, and a program including Beethoven’s Pastorale Symphony and Hara performing Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto. Saturday – Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport), 7:30 p.m. Sunday – Augustana College’s Centennial Hall (3703 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island), 2 p.m. $10-53. For tickets and information, call (563)322-0931 or visit QCSymphony.com. Monday, November 5 – Supersuckers. Noted punk, grunge, and country-rock musicians in concert, with opening sets by The Krank Daddies and Deadstring Brothers. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $10. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com. Wednesday, November 7 – Shawn Mullins. Acclaimed folk-rock and Americana musician in concert. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $20-25. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. Friday, October 26, through Wednesday, October 31 – The Rocky Horror Show. Participatory production of Richard O’Brien’s musical camp classic. District Theatre (1611 Second Avenue, Rock Island). Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, and Wednesday – 8 p.m.; Friday and Saturday – midnight. $20. For tickets and information, call (309)235-1654 or visit DistrictTheatre.com. Thursday, November 1, through Saturday, November 10 – The Actor’s Nightmare. Christopher Durang’s surreal one-act comedy, directed by Steve Flanigin. Scott Community College’s Student Life Center (500 Belmont Road, Room #2400, through Door 5, Bettendorf). ThursdaySaturday 7 p.m. $5 at the door. For information, e-mail sflanigin@eicc.edu. Thursday, November 1, through Saturday, November 3 – Almost, Maine. Student-directed production of John Cariani’s romantic-comedy vignettes. St. Ambrose University Studio Theatre, Galvin Fine Arts Center (518 West Locust Street, Davenport). Thursday and Friday 7:30 p.m., Saturday 3 p.m. $6. For tickets and information, call (563)333-6251 or visit SAU. edu/theatre. Thursday, November 1, through Saturday, November 3 – The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940. John Bishop’s theatrical mystery, directed by Tom Naab. Black Hawk College Theatre – Building 1, Room 306 (6600 34th Avenue, Moline). 7:30 p.m. $5 at the door. For information, call (309)796-5051 or visit BHC.edu. Thursday, October 25, through Sunday, November 4 – Dance Gala 2012. The University of Iowa dance department’s annual event, featuring the early signature piece by legendary choreographer Jennifer Muller and works by faculty members Charlotte Adams, Eloy Barragán, Deanna Carter, Armando Duarte, Jennifer Kayle, and Alan Sener. University of Iowa’s Space/ Place Theatre (20 Davenport Street, Iowa City). Thursday-Saturday 8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $10-20. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit UIowa.edu. Saturday, October 27, through Sunday, January 20 – Rose Frantzen: Portrait of Maquoketa. Exhibit of works suspended from the ceiling, forming an intimate portrait of a small, close-knit community in Iowa. Figge Art Museum (225 West Second Street, Davenport). Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sunday

THEATRE

noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-7 museum admission. For information, call (563)3267804 or visit FiggeArt.org. Tuesday, October 30, through Sunday, November 25 – Physiognomie: Portraits of Imaginary Women and Girls. Exhibit of drawings by Leslie Bell, art professor emeritus at St. Ambrose University. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). TuesdaySaturday 2 p.m.-1 a.m., Sunday 2-11 p.m. For information, call (309)200-0978 or visit RozzTox.com. Saturday, November 3, through Sunday, February 3 – Quilts: Masterworks from the American Folk Art Museum. Exhibition of 27 quilts, with examples of many major quilt types from the beginning of the 19th Century to the end of the 20th Century. Figge Art Museum (225 West Second Street, Davenport). TuesdaySaturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sunday noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-7 museum admission. For information, call (563)326-7804 or visit FiggeArt.org. Friday, October 26 – Second City for President. Chicago’s legendary sketchcomedy troupe takes on the election. Orpheum Theatre (57 South Kellogg Street, Galesburg). 7:30 p.m. $15-40. For tickets and information, call (309)342-2299 or visit TheOrpheum.org. Friday, October 26 – Patton Oswalt. Stand-up concert with the Grammynominated comedian and actor, and the voice of Remy in Ratatouille. Riverside Casino Event Center (3184 Highway 22, Riverside). 9 p.m. $25-35. For tickets and information, call (877)677-3456 or visit RiversideCasinoAndResort.com. Saturday, October 27 – Gabriel Iglesias. Storytelling, parodies, characters, and sound effects with the touring comedian and TV star. Riverside Casino Event Center (3184 Highway 22, Riverside). 6 and 8 p.m. $35-45. For tickets and information, call (877)677-3456 or visit RiversideCasinoAndResort.com. Sunday, October 28 – Rich Little. Concert performance with the legendary comedian and impersonator. Riverside Casino Event Center (3184 Highway 22, Riverside). 5 p.m. $20-30. For tickets and information, call (877)677-3456 or visit RiversideCasinoAndResort.com. Wednesday, November 7 – David Sedaris. An evening with the acclaimed author, wit, and National Public Radio contributor. Iowa Memorial Union (125 North Madison Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $39.50-46.15. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit ScopeProductions.org.

Tuesday, November 6 – Prague to Paris & a Cruise, Too. Screenings in the museum’s World Adventure Series, presented by filmmaker Clint Denn. Putnam Museum (1717 West 12th Street, Davenport). 1, 4, and 7 p.m. $5-7. For tickets and information, call (563)324-1933 or visit Putnam.org. Thursday, October 25 – Fright Night in the District. Annual outdoor Halloween party for kids, with crafts, activities, novelties, treats, demonstrations, a costume contest, and more. District of Rock Island. 5-8 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (309)788-6311 or visit RIDistrict.com. Friday, October 26 – Deadstock. Annual fundraiser for Midcoast Fine Arts featuring works for sale, live music, refreshments, and more; show up as your favorite dead artist or musician and get a free hand-made button. Bucktown Center for the Arts (225 East Second Street, Davenport). 6 p.m. For information, e-mail carolyn@midcoast.org or visit Midcoast.org. Friday, October 26, and Saturday, October 27 – Bottoms Up Quad City Burlesque: The Seven Deadly Sins. A Halloween celebration featuring burlesque dancers and area comedians. Circa ’21 Speakeasy (1818 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $15-18. For information and tickets, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Saturday, October 27 – Boneyard Boogie. Annual Halloween party in the District of Rock Island, with a costume contest, music by the Cal Stage Band and DJ Neewollah, a performance by Bottoms Up Quad City Burlesque, and more. Daiquiri Factory (1809 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. gates. For information, call (309)7861016 or visit DaiquiriFactory.com. Wednesday, October 31 – Zombie Pride Parade. Annual undead stumble through the streets of Davenport, with makeup applied at 2 p.m., the parade beginning at 5 p.m., and an after-party at the River Music Experience. Bucktown Center for the Arts (225 East Second Street, Davenport). For information, visit ZombiePride.org. Friday, November 2, through Sunday, November 4 – Fall Antique Spectacular. Annual event with exhibitors offering furniture, art pottery, stoneware, books, prints, and more. QCCA Expo Center (2621 Fourth Avenue, Rock Island). Friday 5-9 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $7 three-day admission. For information, call (712)324-9942 or visit AntiqueSpectacular.com.

MOVIE

EVENTS

COMEDY

DANCE

EXHIBITS

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

Local Elections Count More Than Ever

A

fascinating and foolproof strategy for political speechifying is to make mostly sweeping statements that are vague enough that listeners are forced to subconsciously fill in the blanks for themselves. Take this sweeping-butvague statement: “We need to create good-paying jobs to bring this country back to its former greatness.” To be truly meaningful for listeners, this statement needs more specific definitions of terms, such as an actual wage range in place of “good-paying.” However, instead of providing specific details, politicians purposely allow each listener to mentally substitute his/her own version of “goodpaying” with satisfactory wage ranges of their own. What is meant by “former greatness” in the above statement? It doesn’t matter because listeners will specify the meaning internally. Each of us will automatically plug in our own definitions, while simultaneously giving the politicians the credit for delivering speeches we can relate to, yet avoiding any accountability for their details. For your own amazement, deconstruct politicians’ campaign rhetoric by examining the prolific use of the above tactic. Perhaps this exercise will help illuminate how politicians from both sides of the aisle have no real political distinctions other than those of our own conjuring. It certainly explains why decades of vacuous, repetitive political rhetoric still persuades the majority of voters yet produces few results. The glaring lack of accountability is testimony that a new political class has emerged. National security no longer

refers to the protection and safety of the American people. Instead, national security concerns itself first and foremost with the protection and safeguarding of the “continuity of government.” Once Americans understand this systemic change, abusive agencies such as the Transportation Security Administration and unlawful legislation such as the National Defense Authorization Act come into much sharper focus as tools for dismantling the Bill of Rights. This is critical if continuity of government is to take priority over the protection of Americans’ natural rights in a free society. Politicians and bureaucrats must be released from their oaths of office to preserve and protect the U.S. Constitution. Administrative procedural law must trump common law so that rules can cross borders for global application. The United Nations’ Agenda 21 is the blueprint for this umbrella purpose. Type “United Nations Agenda 21” into a search engine for an exhaustive list of information on this topic. Agenda 21 openly promotes abolishing private property, relocating people based on population-density formulas, and creating mega-regions to allocate and control resources globally, for starters. Agenda 21 is currently underway in local jurisdictions (counties, cities, townships, etc.) using soft law (resolutions, ordinances, etc.) to coordinate preordained objectives within each state. In Iowa, the Scott County Board of Supervisors is quietly working behind closed doors on yet another no-cap

taxing authority for a mental-health region that includes surrounding counties. In other words, Scott County taxpayers will pay the lion’s share of other counties’ mental-health care, including another bureaucracy to administer the new “region.” The no-cap tax will allow taxes to be raised as needed, with no limit, to support this new layer of government. For this reason, local elections are more important than ever. Voters have a much harder time directly engaging federal politicians, but our local elected officials are our neighbors, friends, and relatives. These folks are accessible, and can be held accountable much more easily. In other words, residents can create change locally if we choose to. The leverage voters have is politicians’ rabid desire for re-election. Nothing matters more, and if voters are seen and heard civically engaging in their respective counties and cities, politicians will set special interests aside in favor of voter volume, or risk being ousted. The good news is that civic participation is doable, and can create enormous positive change using peaceful and civilized means. Attend council meetings or watch them on cable; attend countyboard meetings; read the minutes from meetings; keep current with the information sheets on agenda items, most of which can be obtained online; join a meet-up group to discuss issues and delegate tasks; organize an online town hall to share information; consider running for an office. There are many activities that can inspire change, but it requires showing up.

Time for New Blood on Scott County Board of Supervisors
two incumbents lauded the fiscal health of the county budget, “if you take out the SECC 911 and the new county jail.” Did you take out those two line items when it came time to increase our property taxes? Fortunately, we have a candidate who is very serious about doing things much differently in county government, and that is Jesse Anderson. He has attended many county-board meetings over the past several years, studying the processes and players. He has testified at important public hearings, including the Sustainability Plan hearing where, after researching what was being voted on, he pointed out that the very building-code standards their plan would adopt would preclude each one of the supervisors’ homes from being built (RCReader. com/y/sustain). Jesse has worked in the hospitality and restaurant business and in the manufacturing sector for his familyowned business, and he is self-employed as a graphic artist and marketer. He graduated from Augustana College with a degree in public administration and political science. And he has lived in both rural and urban settings in Scott County, giving him a wide-ranging perspective on life in Scott County. Jesse has outlined more than 20 principles and action steps he would take as a supervisor to actually supervise and uphold his oath of office at his Web site VoteJesse.com. Whether you take the time to consider all the non-standard things he promises to do (e.g., get board meetings broadcast or at least recorded for the public and document his reasoning for every vote at his blog) or not, please take away from this endorsement that at least Jesse will read before he votes. That’s how low the bar is in Scott County. Let’s help Jesse raise that bar.

WORDS FROM THE PUBLISHER

Continued From Page 3

by Todd McGreevy

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

17

Bohemian Rhapsody

MUSIC

by Frederick Morden f.morden@mchsi.com

I

The Quad City Symphony, October 6 at the Adler Theatre
t was standard repertoire in the expected order, but the performance that Music Director and Conductor Mark Russell Smith and the orchestra gave at the opening of the Quad City Symphony’s 98th Masterworks Series on October 6 was anything but typical because of the thorough, culturally sensitive thinking behind the showcase piece. Richard Wagner’s youthful Overture to Rienzi and Max Bruch’s lyric Violin Concerto No. 1 were executed consistent with German performance practices, largely confined to the composer’s instructions in the score. But Smith created a sharp contrast of musical styles to the concert’s first two pieces with “country kid” Antonín Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8. Instead of the typical literal interpretation of the score, he transformed it through unwritten, moreexpressive Bohemian playing techniques, creating a performance that felt authentic – similar to what audiences might have heard in its Dvořák-conducted 1890 debut in Prague. Smith modified Dvořák’s music by altering marked tempos and adding indigenous musical nuances. The second movement was slower than indicated in the score, allowing for a wider, more dramatic expansion of tension and conversely more transparency and serenity in lyrical sections. Each additional dance-like lift of the bow, gypsy slide of the finger along the fingerboard, and kick of a beat moved the feel of the music away from Germany and deeper into central Europe. While the artistic interpretation of Dvořák seemed clear, the performance itself was uneven, with moments of bold ensemble sturdiness interspersed with destabilizing rhythmic and tonal frailty. In the third movement, Smith’s opening “Allegretto grazioso” was decidedly more “vivace” than the orchestra could maintain and slowly slipped into a more lilting tempo. Horns and trombones struggled with the composer’s awkward octave leaps in chromatic sequences in the first movement, and the trumpets were challenged to match pitch in the last movement. But generally speaking, the orchestra’s collective tone was balanced, focused, and well-blended, activating rich overtones – the timbre sparkle that makes symphonic sound so compelling. When the horns, trombones, cellos, and basses played the same melodic fragments together – a common doubling in Dvořák – it created a robust, thick, broad-based core around which some of the most exciting moments were built. In addition, principal wind players carefully shaped thematic phrases in both solo and duet sections. Clarinets were hauntingly quiet and mysterious in the lower reaches while a bit edgy up top. Horns provided a uniform section sound while offering a variety of colors in, for example, the well-defined trills in the symphony’s last movement and the fluffy staccato notes in the second movement. The solo horn molded brief melodic lines into artful musical statements. In the second movement, the principal flute and oboe melted together in long, arching thematic lines, producing a clear, persuasive sound that soared over the violin spiccato accompaniments. But the heart of this Dvořák interpretation was the stylized playing of the string section, bringing Bohemian legitimacy and emotion to the performance. Its ability to create a dichotomy of sounds – infusing suspense or intimacy into the soft parts, innocence or passion into tutti sections, and especially the portamento “sighing” into melodic lines – helped make the musical movement seem more elastic than the more restricted playing practices Americans normally hear. At the beginning of the last movement and just before its coda, the strings made the repeating phrases “breathe” through the natural ebb and flow of their bowing and generated excitement by applying pressure into the string. In melodic sections, the violins’ tone and intensity were searing, and, in the variations of the last movement, pulling whole bows instead of chopping at the accented quarter notes added vitality to the dance-like rhythms. The concert also introduced the Quad City Symphony’s new concertmaster in a performance of Bruch’s frequently played first violin concerto. Naha Greenholtz, winner of the orchestra’s concertmaster search, played with grace and emotional conciseness. The petite sweetness of sound within her lyrical approach was an attractive veil that enhanced deep technical strength in a concerto based on double stops and virtuosity; she made something difficult sound elegantly easy. Never attacking the instrument, she produced a centered, always flowing smooth tone even in the rough spiccato sections. The challenging double and triple stops were not only in tune but skillfully integrated into her singing style of playing. Soloist and conductor communicated effectively, producing sensitive, living musical exchanges. In the slow second movement, Smith gave Greenholtz plenty of time to make full, rich musical phrases, adding “gemütlichkeit” to the performance. There was supple melodic dovetailing between Greenholtz and the first violins, oboe, and flute. When playing by itself, the orchestra was carefully guided to radiant, climactic points, but it provided soft, placid – one might say “suppressed” – accompaniment that guaranteed the soloist was always heard. It will be interesting to see how Greenholtz influences the rest of the string section throughout the season. Wagner’s Rienzi overture, with its amusing Italian march and melodic Tristan harbinger, had a tentative beginning but ultimately produced a rousing opening musical work despite the crisp, deep-sounding, but unfortunately smothering snare drum. Frederick Morden is Aa retired orchestra-music director, conductor, composer, arranger, educator, and writer who has served on the executive board of the Conductors Guild.

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18

Ask

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

the

You wrote in your column, “Men, especially, are compelled to ditch what’s chasing them and chase what’s trying to ditch them.” It seems you’re advising that the simple desire to love a man must be approached without authenticity and personal integrity. Must a woman really scheme to get a man, using a painfully conscious strategy based on men’s psychological makeup, and wait and wait like Cinderella until he reaches out to her? – Truth-Teller For a woman of character, honesty is the best policy – except when judicious honesty is a better policy, like on the second date, when you refrain from telling a guy that you and he should pick out side-by-side burial plots: “The moment I saw you, I just knew I wanted to decompose next to you!” You think of employing restraint as “scheming.” Um, scheming is talking a guy into a $10-million insurance policy and then sending him skydiving with a busted parachute. The notion that it’s morally bankrupt to refrain from chasing a man is an idea out of some future gender-neutral utopia where everyone wears Star Trek uniforms, eats single little cubes of lunch, and grows babies in a Mason jar in their front room. As I’ve written before, any sexual encounter had a hefty potential cost for a woman during the Stone Age – a particularly crappy time to be a single mother. Because of this, women evolved to be choosier about partners, and men co-evolved to expect that of them. Times have changed, but our psychology really hasn’t. So, when a woman throws herself at a man like a big flopping flounder, he’s likely to duck – suspecting that she probably isn’t worth having (for anything beyond a quick romp) if she’s so easy to get. This is unfortunate, but whining endlessly about it is an ineffective strategy for getting what you want, unless what you want are polyps on your vocal cords. What you’re really arguing for is: “Why shouldn’t I be able to throw all self-discipline out the window and have the man I want drop down my chimney like Santa?” In a similar vein, I often wonder why I’ve been unable to become incredibly wealthy by napping. (Welcome to real life. Please visit often in the future.) The answer is neither throwing yourself at a man nor waiting for him to notice that you

I Got Spew, Babe

Advice Goddess

Be in the audience for this once-in-a-lifetime event to support local public television and radio.
BY AMY ALKON

dropped your glass slipper. You flirt to indicate that you’d be interested in going out with him, if only he’d ask. Flirting takes patience and selfcontrol, but it isn’t exactly a horrible chore. It’s playful and fun. Kind of like tag. You run a little, and if all goes well, the guy chases you. Men just love to chase things – women, animals, purse-snatchers. In the UK, they even have a tradition of chasing a big wheel of cheese down a hill. Wait – don’t get ideas. You will need to flip your hair and make eye contact and teasing remarks. You can’t just throw yourself down a grassy incline.

husband of 10 years can no longer get an erection, and our sex life has dried up. Sitting side by side on the couch watching the Food Network is, no doubt, a marvelous way to spend an evening; it’s just that we thought those kinds of evenings were a bit further down the road for us. No offense, but writing you this has been the most romantic thing we’ve done as a couple in quite some time. Help! – Prematurely Old

Schlong Story Short Thanks to recent medical issues, my

The production will be taped and then aired in December on both WQPT–Quad Cities PBS and WVIK, Augustana Public Radio.
For tickets ($20.00 each), call 309/794-7306 or online: augustana.edu/tickets

Friday, November 16 Saturday, November 17
2:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

Saturday, November 17
Potter Theatre Augustana College Rock Island, Illinois

So, his penis refuses to stand up anymore: “Is that a piece of lasagna in your pocket ... ?” As devastating as this may seem, it’s no reason to have a funeral for your entire sex life. (If your stove broke, would you stop eating?) Chances are, your retirement from sex has less to do with recent penile developments than believing that the only “real” sex is the hot dog into the Lincoln Tunnel variety. Sex therapist Dr. Marty Klein points out in Sexual Intelligence that many people make the mistake of defining what sex is by how their bodies work at 18 or 25, and then, ridiculously, cling to that vision into their 30s, 40s, and beyond, when they have far different bodies. Because physical intimacy is pretty essential for maintaining emotional intimacy, thinking this way can be relationship-wrecking. Turn off the TV and start making out and doing the kajillion sex things that don’t require perfectly functioning hydraulics. Watching Paula Deen re-enact Last Tango in Paris with a pork chop has its merits, but exploring Klein’s advice – that “there isn’t any part of your body that can’t be erotically charged” – should prove far sexier and a lot less likely to give you diabetes.

171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2012, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.

Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

19

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the coming days, many of your important tasks will be best accomplished through caginess and craftiness. Are you willing to work behind the scenes and beneath the surface? I suspect you will have a knack for navigating your way skillfully and luckily through mazes and their metaphorical equivalents. The mists may very well part at your command, revealing clues that no one else but you can get access to. You might also have a talent for helping people to understand elusive or difficult truths. Halloween costume suggestions: spy, stage magician, ghost whisperer, exorcist. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The coming week could have resemblances to the holiday known as Opposite Day. Things people say may have meanings that are different from or even contrary to what they supposedly mean. Qualities you usually regard as liabilities might temporarily serve as assets, and strengths could seem problematical or cause confusion. You should also be wary of the possibility that the advice you get from people you trust may be misleading. For best results, make liberal use of reverse psychology, freaky logic, and mirror magic. Halloween costume suggestion: the opposite of who you really are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I don’t have a big problem with your tendency to contradict yourself. I’m rarely among the consistency freaks who would prefer you to stick with just one of your many selves instead of hopscotching among all nine. In fact, I find your multi-level multiplicity interesting and often alluring. I take it as a sign that you are in alignment with the fundamentally paradoxical nature of life. Having said all that, however, I want to alert you to an opportunity that the universe is currently offering you, which is to feel unified, steady, and stable. Does that sound even vaguely enticing? Why not try it out for a few weeks? Halloween costume suggestion: an assemblage or collage of several of your different personas. CANCER (June 21-July 22): An avocado tree may produce so much fruit that the sheer weight of its exuberant creation causes it to collapse. Don’t be like that in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Without curbing your luxuriant mood, simply monitor your outpouring of fertility so that it generates just the right amount of beautiful blooms. Be vibrant and bountiful and fluidic, but not unconstrained or overwrought or recklessly lavish. Halloween costume suggestion: a bouquet, an apple tree, a rich artist, or an exotic dancer with a bowl of fruit on your head. LEO (July 23-August 22): I hope your father didn’t beat you or scream at you or molest you. If he did, I am so sorry for your suffering. I also hope that your father didn’t ignore you or withhold his best energy from you. I hope he didn’t disappear for weeks at a time and act oblivious to your beauty. If he did those things, I mourn for your loss. Now it’s quite possible that you were spared such mistreatment, Leo. Maybe your dad gave you conscientious care and loved you for who you really are. But whatever the case might be, this is the right time to acknowledge it. If you’re one of the lucky ones, celebrate to the max. If you’re one of the wounded ones, begin or renew your quest for serious and intensive healing. Halloween costume suggestion: your father. VIRGO (August 23-September 22): Do you know how to tell the difference between superstitious hunches and dependable intuitions? Are you good at distinguishing between mediocre gossip that’s only 10 percent accurate and reliable rumors that provide you with the real inside dope? I suspect that you will soon get abundant opportunities to test your skill in these tasks. To increase the likelihood of your success, ask yourself the following question on a regular basis: Is what you think you’re seeing really there or is it mostly a projection of your expectations and theories? Halloween costume suggestions: a lie detector, an interrogator with syringes full of truth serum, a superhero with X-ray vision, a lab scientist. LIBRA (September 23-October 22): I am officially protesting you, Libra. I am staging a walkout and mounting a demonstration and launching a boycott unless you agree to my demand. And yes, I have just one demand: that you take better care of the neglected, disempowered, and underprivileged parts of your life. Not a year from now; not when you have more leisure time; now! If and when you do this, I predict the arrival of a flood of personal inspiration. Halloween costume suggestion: a symbolic representation of a neglected, disempowered, or underprivileged part of your life. SCORPIO (October 23-November 21): “It’s so fine and yet so terrible to stand in front of a blank canvas,” said French painter Paul Cezanne. Many writers make similar comments about the excruciating joy they feel when first sitting down in front of an empty page. For artists in any genre, in fact, getting started may seem painfully impossible. And yet there can also be a delicious anticipation as the ripe chaos begins to coalesce into coherent images or words or music. Even if you’re not an artist, Scorpio, you’re facing a comparable challenge in your own chosen field. Halloween costume suggestion: a painter with a blank canvas. SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 21): As you contemplate what you want to be for Halloween, don’t consider any of the following options: a thoroughbred racehorse wearing a blindfold; a mythic centaur clanking around

by Rob Brezsny
in iron boots; a seahorse trying to dance on dry land. For that matter, Sagittarius, I hope you won’t come close to imitating any of those hapless creatures even in your non-Halloween life. It’s true that the coming days will be an excellent time to explore, analyze, and deal with your limitations. But that doesn’t mean you should be overwhelmed and overcome by them. Halloween costume suggestions: Houdini, an escaped prisoner, a snake molting its skin. CAPRICORN (December 22-January 19): “Does anyone know where I can find dinosaur costumes for cats?” asked a Halloween shopper on Reddit. com. In the comments section, someone else said that he needed a broccoli costume for his Chihuahua. I bring this up, Capricorn, because if anyone could uncover the answers to these questions, it would be you. You’ve got a magic touch when it comes to hunting down solutions to unprecedented problems. Halloween costume suggestion: a cat wearing a dinosaur costume. AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18): The Live Monarch Foundation made a video on how to fix a butterfly’s broken wing (TinyURL.com/FixWing). It ain’t easy. You need 10 items, including tweezers, talcum powder, toothpicks, and glue. You’ve got to be patient and summon high levels of concentration. But it definitely can be done. The same is true about the delicate healing project you’ve thought about attempting on your own wound, Aquarius. It will require you to be ingenious, precise, and tender, but I suspect you’re primed to rise to the challenge. Halloween costume suggestion: herbalist, acupuncturist, doctor, shaman, or other healer. PISCES (February 19-March 20): It’s not a good time to wear Super-Control Higher-Power Spanx, or any other girdle, corset, or restrictive garment. In fact, I advise you not to be a willing participant in any situation that pinches, hampers, or confines you. You need to feel exceptionally expansive. In order to thrive, you’ve got to give yourself permission to spill over, think big, and wander freely. As for those people who might prefer you to keep your unruly urges in check and your natural inclinations concealed: Tell them your astrologer authorized you to seize a massive dose of slack. Halloween costume suggestions: a wild man or wild woman; a mythical bird such as the Garuda or Thunderbird; the god or goddess of abundance. Homework: Exhausted by the ceaseless barrage of depressing stories you absorb from the news media? Here’s an antidote: ProniaResources.com.

EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's

1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700

20

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

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SUCCESS STORY · October 25, 2012

October 11 Answers: Page 12

ACROSS 1. Twaddle 5. YouTube offerings 10. Jamaican spiritual movement 15. _ of ale 19. Bewildered 20. Books exam 21. Sir _ Hercules John, CBE 22. Cavatina cousin 23. An easing 24. Part of an opera 25. Fritter away 26. Aka Superman 27. Trouble 29. Stiff hairs 31. Start of a quip by anonymous 33. Particular 35. Prima donnas 37. Latvian 38. Civil War battle site 42. Gem weight 44. God of the winds 48. _ cross 49. A Musketeer 51. Rocky debris 53. _ avis 54. Part 2 of quip: 7 wds. 59. Milkshake ingredient 60. Auld _ syne 61. Antagonist 62. Gendered contraction 63. Chooses 66. Old form of a verb 69. Only just 71. What’s caught 73. Travel headache 75. Mr. Heyerdahl 76. Holds fast: 2 wds. 80. Theater curtain 82. Weak 86. Pinna 87. Chord of three tones 89. Casing 91. _ of Sandwich 92. Part 3 of quip: 5 wds. 98. _ -European 99. Something to manage, for some 100. Big seabird 101. Word in place names

102. Parts of boats 105. Parisian carpet 107. Some convertibles: 2 wds. 109. Defense org. 111. Take root: 2 wds. 113. _ palm 114. End of the quip: 2 wds. 118. Candy shape 120. Amble 124. Dugout shelter 125. Committee 127. Descendant of Adam 129. Disconsolate 130. Soil 131. Edict 132. Of the number eight 133. Certain trees 134. Additions 135. Summoned 136. Like a panhandler 137. Transported DOWN 1. Kind of salts 2. DOL agency 3. Cauterize 4. The Big Island 5. CD predecessor 6. Jean- _ Godard 7. Day of infamy 8. Ached 9. Broadcast problem 10. Fact-finding 11. Mount 12. Stanch 13. Talon anagram 14. SS _ Doria 15. Japanese fare 16. Range 17. Grommet 18. Go steady with 28. Fish serving 30. Exclamation at sea 32. Abbr. on some maps 34. Taj _ 36. Garment for a ranee 38. Whale of _ _ 39. Twangy 40. Fabric for gowns 41. Unicellular organism

43. Gulls 45. Item for a turner 46. An archangel 47. Like a hoyden 50. Council of churches 52. Jettison 55. Fretful 56. Double-curve moldings 57. Nebraska tribe 58. Great British poet 64. Preference 65. Ubi _ 67. Cable channel 68. Unkind 70. Angler’s basket 72. Verdi’s “_ Miller” 74. Egad! 76. Big rigs 77. Childish remark 78. _ _ Triomphe de l’Etoile 79. Sully 81. King of ancient Crete 83. Potato state 84. Bugged 85. Balls of yarn 88. French painter 90. A polymer 93. Spectacles: Hyph. 94. Revolted 95. Compose 96. In the manner of churls 97. Inappropriate 103. Seize 104. Congest: 2 wds. 106. Son of Jacob and Leah 108. Shaver 110. Yodo River city 112. For the _ 114. Lock brand 115. Greek weight 116. River to the Caspian 117. Get 119. Distinction 121. Pot 122. Sugar serving 123. For fear that 126. Pt. on a compass 128. Bounder

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Live Music Live Music Live Music
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

21

2012/10/25 (Thu)

THURSDAY

25

2012/10/26 (Fri)

ABC Karaoke -Frick’s Tap, 1402 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

FRIDAY

26

2012/10/27 (Sat)

CJ the DJ -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Claire Lynch Trio -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Dana Telsrow - Huge Lewis - Mirror Coat - Leland Sundries - The Howling Monkeys -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jazz Rep Ensemble & Johnson County Landmark (6pm) - Mike Mangione & the Union - Crushed Out (10pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Live Lunch w/ Esme (noon) - Scott Ainslie (7pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

1st Impression (6pm) -Clarion Hotel - Muscatine, Jct. Highways 61 & 38 North Muscatine, IA 3rd Annual Horror/Whorror Fest -Club Mohkan, 4227 W. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Members-Only Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Cornmeal -The Blue Moose Tap, 211 Iowa Ave. Iowa City, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Firehouse Bar & Grill, 2006 Hickor y Grove Rd. Davenport, IA Del the Funky Homosapien - DJ HiTech - D.O.P.E. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Dennis Florine -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Fifth of Country (5:30pm) - North of 40 (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

The Kickback @ The Mill – November 4
Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL Lee Blackmon -Bleyarts Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Randy Leasman (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Lovedogs -Del’s Pub, 102 W. LeClaire Eldridge, IA Rob Dahms (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Robyn McVey w/ Roger Carlson -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Scott Ainslie (9pm) - Hal’s Birthday Weekend Jam with Wade Braggs (9:45pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Smooth Groove -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA The Phamily Berzerker Phish Tribute -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds - Firesale - Mike Page - Bam Musik - DJ Pat - Darius Bowie -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Tony Hamilton Orchestra -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Tronicity -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Virgin Whores - The Statistix - No Coast Criminals - Minor Decline -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA We Funk: George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic Tribute -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Wheatland Fireman’s Dance: North of 40 -Downtown Wheatland, Wheatland, IA

Funktastic Five -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL
Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL

Jazz After Five: Steve Grismore Trio (5pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Jeff Wichmann - Konrad - The Multiple Cat w/ Orchard Keeper -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Justin Morrissey -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Back 4 More -Hillsdale American Legion, 402 Main St Hillsdale, IL Boneyard Boogie: The Cal Stage Band - DJ Neewollah -Daiquiri Factory, 1809 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Community Drum Circle (10:30am) Live Lunch w/ EmJay (noon) - Monster Mash Music Bash: Winter Blues All-Stars - Sunset 4 Ever - Kellen Myers -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Cosmic -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Danika Holmes -The Grape Life Wine Emporium - Davenport, 3402 Elmore Ave. Davenport, IA Dennis Florine -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA DJ O.M.S. - CJ the DJ -2nd Ave. Dance Club, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL E11eventh Hour -Mt. Carroll Bowling Center, 206 N. Main St. Mt. Carroll, IL Evolution -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Funktastic Five -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Goldendust - Cuticle - Lady Espina Carnap - Nemnock -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Hal Reed’s Birthday Weekend Jam with Kinsey Report -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Halloween Hoe-Down: Evergreen Grass Band - WhiteWater Ramble -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Have Your Cake & Eat It, Too -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL

SATURDAY

27

Hi-Fi -The Dew Drop Inn, 602 5th St Durant, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Jordan Danielsen (1:30pm) -Creekside Vineyards Winery & Inn, 7505 120th Ave. Coal Valley, IL Judas Kristian -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Leon Bates -Wallenberg Hall, Augustana College, 3520 7th Ave. Rock Island, IL Lovedogs -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Mike Blomme Trio (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Mommy’s Little Monster -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st Ave Coal Valley, IL Night People (5:30pm) -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Rootless Experience -Jammerz Roadhouse, 3729 248th St N Hillsdale, IL Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Tangent -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA The Car Thief - DJ ST3 - El3ctrolights - DJ Dolla - Higgy - DJ OHMS - C.J. the DJ -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Continued On Page 22

22

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Weekend Warriors -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2012/10/29 (Mon)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 21

The Hooks -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

Them Som’Bitches - American Dust -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL Tronicity -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Wylde Nept -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/10/28 (Sun)

MONDAY

29

Andy Frasco -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

2012/11/02 (Fri)

ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Kaki King -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic w/ J. Night -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2012/10/30 (Tue)

SUNDAY

28

TUESDAY

30

ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Anthony Catalfano Quartet (10:30am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Funday Sunday with Dave Ellis (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke for Kids (3-5pm) -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Mija - Nightosaur - We Took the Hill - Woglake -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Open Mic w/ the J Spot -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Danika Holmes -The Clubhouse, 2501 53rd Ave. Bettendorf, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Musical Happy Hour w/ Tony Hoeppnes (4pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Polish Ambassador - Liminus - Unlimited Gravity - Elfkowitz -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Southern Thunder DJ Service (5pm) & Karaoke (9pm) -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL

Supersuckers @ RIBCO – November 5
The Harris Collec tion Open Jam -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA

Tuesday Night Dance Party -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2012/10/31 (Wed)

WEDNESDAY

31

4th Annual Halloween Tribute Show -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -McClellan Stockade, 2124 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA

C.J. the DJ -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Hart 2 Hart DJ: Halloween Party & Costume Con -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Human Aftertaste - Item 9 & the Mad Hatters - Caterwaulla -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL KRUI Halloween Bash: Zeta June - Das Thunderfoot - Gone South - Velcro Moxie - Mirror Coat -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA RME Open Mic & Jam (6:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Old 57’s (6pm) - Karaoke King (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA 2012/11/01 (Thu)

Danika Holmes -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Datsik -The Blue Moose Tap, 211 Iowa Ave. Iowa City, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL How Great Thou Art: The Gospel Music of Elvis Presley -Circa ‘21 Dinner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Jackson Browne - Sara Watkins -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jonah Smith -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Live Lunch w/ Nick Vasquez (noon) Musical Happy Hour w/ Keith Soko (4:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

FRIDAY

00 2

The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

THURSDAY

1

ABC Karaoke -Frick’s Tap, 1402 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL University of Iowa Jazz Combo & Latin Jazz Ensemble (6pm) - The Daredevil Christopher Wright Cuddle Magic (10pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Yuppies - Falter - Solid Attitude - Los Voltage - Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA

ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Members-Only Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Brian Stokes Mitchell -Riverside Casino Event Center, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Buddy Olson -Lancers Grille, 350 E. LeClaire Road Eldridge, IA CJ the DJ’s Birfday Blowout -2nd Ave. Dance Club, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Firehouse Bar & Grill, 2006 Hickor y Grove Rd. Davenport, IA Dale Thomas Band -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Dr. Z’s Experiment Phish Tribute -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Eleven Fifty Two - Pilot Down - Dynoride -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Grand Larsony -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL How Great Thou Art: The Gospel Music of Elvis Presley (1pm) -Circa ‘21 Dinner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Iowa City Song Project Record Release Show: Pieta Brown & the Sawdust Collective - Caroline Smith & the

Figge Art MuseuM

Quilts
american folk art museum
November 3, 2012 through February 3, 2013

Masterwork
from the

Lureca Outland (c. 1904–2009), Wedding Ring Interpretation Quilt (detail), Boligee, Alabama, 1991, cotton, wool, and synthetics, collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, Museum purchase made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, with matching funds from the Great American Quilt Festival 3, 1991.13.5

Davenport, Iowa • 563.326.7804 www.figgeartmuseum.org

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2012/11/03 (Sat)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

23

Jorma Kaukonen -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

Goodnight Sleeps - Brooks Strause & the Gory Details - Christopher the Conquered - Chasing Shade -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL

SATURDAY

3

3 Non Cops: Police Tribute -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Justin Morrissey -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kevin Presbrey -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL Live Lunch w/ Melanie Devaney (noon) - Musical Happy Hour w/ Dave Smith (4:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Night Light -Bleyarts Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA

Pam Tillis -Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway Bettendorf, IA

Rockin’ Johnny -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Simon Says Uncle -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Sims - Imperfekt (7pm) - Black Skies - Caltrop - The Oculus (10:15pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Wooden Nickel Saloon, 2042 W 3rd St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Allen Cruz - Charlie Saddoris -Krusteezs Pizza, 411 2nd St. Matherville, IL Chase Garrett’s 3rd Annual Blues & Boogie Woogie Piano Stomp -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Chris Avey Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Crossroads -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Dennis McMurrin & the Demolition Band -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Freddie Gibbs -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Hi-Fi -Blu Shamrock, 311 S. 13th Ave. Cordova, IL Iowa City Song Project Record Release Show: We Shave - Emperors Club Skye Carrasco - Lwa - Tallgrass -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA The Kickback - All Dogs Invited -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA The Manny Lopez Quartet (10am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA 2012/11/05 (Mon)

The Harris Collec tion Open Jam -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA The Tanks - Roomrunner - Acoustic Guillotine -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA

MONDAY

5

Tuesday Night Dance Party -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2012/11/07 (Wed)

WEDNESDAY

7

Virgin Whores @ River Music Experience – October 26
Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kevin Presbrey -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Night People -Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA RME Guitar Circle (2pm) - River Prairie Minstrels (6pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/11/04 (Sun) ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Bryan Lee & the Blues Power Band (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL Caught in the Act -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Gina Forsyth -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Indigo Girls -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Karaoke for Kids (3-5pm) -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Open Mic w/ the J Spot -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA

ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Horse Feathers -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Supersuckers - The Krank Daddies Deadstring Brothers -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL 2012/11/06 (Tue)

SUNDAY

4

ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) - Blues Cafe (6:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder DJ Service (5pm) & Karaoke (9pm) -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL

TUESDAY

6

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -McClellan Stockade, 2124 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Giant Giant Sand - The Old Ceremony -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Musical Happy Hour w/ Lojo Russo (4pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

Shawn Mullins -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Helio Sequence - Ramona Falls -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA

24

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 816 • October 25 - November 7, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Route

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30 KENNEDY SQ
Ride Metro to work or your favorite location. Run, walk or bike back. Save money. Help the environment. Maintain your active lifestyle.

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Visit gogreenmetro.com and get on your Route to the Good Life.

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