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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

INSIDE
Page 5 Cancer society seeks volunteer drivers Page 6 Old Forge backs their team Page 11 Obituaries Page 14 Acting classes aimed at teens Page 19 Crossword puzzles

WESTS HOMECOMING COURT ANNOUNCED

McGlynn

DuPuis

Robinson

STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

est Scranton High Schools 2012 Homecoming Court, from left, Eli Jackson, Marion Coyne, Matt Perry, Rikki Onhuandy, Justin Luciano, Rachel Fitz, Mike Hales, Alexandra Bolsar and Adam Hammer. The King and Queen are Rikki Onhuandy and Justin Luciano.

Riedmiller

Andes

COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Free clinic for uninsured extends hours. The University of Scrantons Edward R. Leahy Jr. Center Clinic for the Uninsured is extending hours for serving patients from Lackawanna County by appointment from noon to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays Oct. 30 through Nov. 13; and Nov. 27. Appointments can be made by calling 941.6112.The clinic is also open every Thursday from 2 to 6 p.m. Services on Thursdays are provided on a walk-in basis. TCCC Boys Basketball for boys in grades second through eighth will be held Oct. 29 and Nov. 1. Final day of sign ups and tryouts will be Thursday, Nov. 8 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Taylor Community Center Main Ave, Taylor. For more information, call 499.7996. Scranton Public Library Computer Learning Lab: Individual Assistance, Monday, Oct. 29, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.;

Excel 2007 Intermediate Level 2, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1 to 3 p.m.; Internet Basics Level 2, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Excel 2007 Intermediate Level 3, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Internet Basics Level 1, Thursday, Nov. 1, 10 to noon; Internet Basics Level 2, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2to 4 p.m.; Intro to Computers Level 1, Friday, Nov. 2, 10 a.m. to noon. Malanka Meeting to plan the 9th annual Ukrainian New Year Dinner Dance will be held at 7 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 29 at St. Michael Ukrainian Orthodox Church, North Main Avenue and Howell Street, Scranton. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Communitys Malanka will take place on Friday evening, January 11, 2013 at St. Vladimir Parish Center, N. 7th Avenue, Scranton. Info: 563.2275. The First United Methodist Church 402 S. Main St., Taylor will hold its annual roast chicken dinner

on Saturday Nov. 3 at the church from 4 to 7pm. The menu is roast chicken, baked potato, cake and beverage. Tickets are $9 and can be ordered by calling 357.8194. Backyard Ale House Hope Chest Auction Benefiting Marleys Mission will be held on Saturday, Nov. 10, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Backyard Ale House, 523 Linden St., Scranton. All proceeds of the auction will benefit the Third Annual Marleys Mission Blue Ribbon Gala, scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013 at the Hilton Hotel and Conference Center. The cost of this event is $50 per person, which includes a three-hour bar provided by Backyard Ale House and passed hors doeuvres provided by Mendicinos, Russells and Constantinos. To RSVP for the event, email auction@marleysmission.com. Veterans Day Fee Free Weekend at Steamtown National Historic Site, military veterans and their families

will not have to pay an entrance fee Veterans Day weekend, Nov. 10 to 12. For more information, call 340.5200 or visit www.nps.gov/stea. The West Scranton Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch will meet on Thursday, Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. at All Saints Auditorium, 1403 Jackson St., behind St. Patricks Church. Info: http://hydeparkneighborwatch.wordpress.com. Camp Life in the Union Army will be presented by John Moran during the Triboro Historical Societys November meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 20 at 6:45 p.m. in the Taylor Community Library. The program is free and open to the public. Info: 570.562.1225. Coal Mining info sought, Carl Orechovsky, research editor of Anthracite Archives, Old Forge, is seeking information about the coal mining industry during the 1950s and 60s in Old Forge. Info: call 702.4217.

ON THE COVER: Old Forge High School running back Brian Tomasetti. Photo by Jason Riedmiller

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2012-302


829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com Jim McCabe 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com
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Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

Police academy graduates honor fallen state trooper

JASON RIEDMILLER / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Course marks 200th class


By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

Lackawanna College Police Academy Director Dan Duffy speaks during graduation exercises Friday, Oct. 26 at the Mellow Theater.

Broad shouldered and muscular with close-cropped hair, Joseph F. McCullon looked every inch like a police cadet as he strode to the podium. What came out of his mouth sounded every bit like a dad. The most important thing is to go home to our families after every shift, McCullon told his fellow graduates of the Lackawanna College Police Academy gathered in the Mellow Theater Friday night.

Before every shift, keep in the back of your minds, Im going home tonight. The academy graduated its 200th and 201st classes during the Oct. 26 ceremony, with McCullon speaking as president of the nine-member Class 201 from the Scranton campus. They were preceded by the three-member Class 200 from Hazleton. Friday marked several milestones for the program: its
See ACADEMY, Page 10

ROGER DUPUIS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Dan Duffy speaks about fallen state Trooper Joseph Welsch, whose portrait is seen at left.

Cadet Abriya Wollett sings The Star Spangled Banner.

JASON RIEDMILLER/GO LACKAWANNA

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

Marketing your brand

Riverside graduates launch social media marketing agency

ocial media, like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest and LinkedIn, have changed the playing field in terms of where businesses can advertise their services, and whether they realize it or not, its changed the way they need to advertise as well. While these services all give businesses the opportunity to spread word of their business or product to a wider audience than ever before, if not used properly the time and resources spent trying to utilize these media sites could be wasted.
JASON RIEDMILLER / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

The problem that we noticed was that, especially in local markets, is that people think that social media marketing is free, where in reality its not, because it requires a lot of time, a lot of effort and you have to learn it usually through mistakes, said Charles Szymanski. Szymanski and Andrew Torba, both graduates of Riverside High Schools Class of 2009, founded Kuhcoon in October of 2011 to help guide businesses, both locally and internationally, as they venture into the world of social media. For a fee, the company can provide businesses with a social media community manager who will take the lead in managing the overall efforts of a businesss social media strategy. This can include writing and posting content, monitoring accounts and running targeted creative ad campaigns. In a short amount of time, Kuhcoon has already helped a number of businesses locally, like Bitty Bills Ice Cream, and internationally, like Burnetts & Struth Scottish Regalia Ltd., a kilt store based in Canada, using its in-house tech-

The staff of Kuhcoon includes, from left, co-founder Andrew Torba, Mike Toma, Allie Hollander, co-founder Charles Szymanski, Jeff Katra, Gwen Levy, Kara Cruciani and Eric Gula.

nology, created by Szymanski. Thanks to this technology, and their experience, the company has helped businesses avoid some of the common mistakes many make when they first start using social media. The biggest misunderstanding when business owners start doing it on their own is they want to push market. So they want to advertise in your face. But, the thing is social medias not about push marketing, its not about advertising, its about creating a conversation around the brand.and you have to offer something outside of heres my product, heres my service, come and buy it, said Torba. A lot of these local areas, restaurants and different types of companies, they create almost their own brand company, people that really like what they do, really like the stuff that they get there. But the problem is is that they dont really have a way to foster that community, to really bring it up and keep that brand in their

head, added Szymanski. Thats what we really try and do, is create, almost the content, for (the public) to be able to consistently see your company or see your brand giving them information they wouldnt get anywhere else. The idea for the business began a little over a year ago when Torba was working for Dino and Francescos in Moosic and noticed that the restaurant did not have a Facebook page. There was a big opportunity for them to expand their marketing reach, essentially for free, through Facebook, said Torba. I just charged them to set it up, and teach them the basics of it, and from there I talked to (Charles) and said, How can we scale this consulting idea? Because I knew right away there was a bigger opportunity outside just the local area, and I wanted to be able to take it international. The two eventually came up with the idea for creating a company that would become Kuhcoon.

Torba shared the idea with fellow Riverside graduate, Vince Smigiel, who came up with the name for the business. He is a branding genius, said Torba of Smigiel. (The idea is) you bring these companies into the cocoon and you transform them into a social media butterfly. Because the domain name cocoon.com was already taken, Torba and Szymanski got creative and changed the spelling to Kuhcoon, and officially began their business in October of 2011. A victory at the 10th annual Great Valley Business Plan Competition earlier this year really helped get things started for the business. Those eligible to enter the competition included students from the regions 14 colleges and universities along with non-collegiate entrepreneurs. Kuhcoon won $50,000 in cash and in-kind support, including free office space for the year at the Scranton Enterprise Center, 201 Lackawan-

na Ave., Scranton, Suite 225. The victory helped attract a few investors to the business, and the funds helped Kuhcoon increase its staff to 13 employees, who are just as dedicated to making the company a success as its founders. And, they hope to create between five to10 additional job opportunities in the coming months. Everyone in this office comes in here every day, and we all love what we do, said Torba. (The day) just flies by. Andwhat happens a lot of times is we go home and get some food and work some more at home. So its a long day, but its worth it, because its rewarding, and its fun. Torba and Szymanski, both 21, are the first to acknowledge that their idea of fun is a little different than their peers Were not your typical college students. We know how to have fun, but were not out at the bar every single night of the week, said Torba. On a Friday night youll
See MARKETING , Page 7

Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

Clothing store to be featured on American Pickers

Cancer Society seeks volunteer drivers


By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

Leo DAngelo, seated center, and his family met Frank Fritz, seated left, and Mike Wolfe, seated right, when the two shot an episode of their television show American Pickers in LaSalle The Image Makers fine mens clothing store earlier this year.

A store with history


By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

Depending on what corner of the business youre in you almost feel like youre in Scrantons version of the Smithsonian, with sports memorabilia like George Foremans boxing gloves, or antiques like a classic Coke-a-Cola soda machine on display. We have a lot of history in here. Im not bragging, but theres a lot of different things in here, a lot of history, said Leo DAngelo, who owns the store with his wife, Rita. DAngelo, who began his career as a clothing manufacturer, opened LaSalle almost 40 years ago after many of the factories in the area closed their doors. A collector of antiques all his life, he decided to display some of his collection in the store, which has only gotten larger over the years thanks to the help of those in the area. Somebody comes in and says, I got this. You want it? I say, Yeah. They say I got this. You want to buy it? I say, Yeah. Thats how I collected all this stuff, said DAngelo. Sometimes I see something in the garbage and pick it out of

fter taking a quick look around, its clear to most people that LaSalle The Image Makers fine mens clothing store in Scranton is not your average clothing store.
IF YOU GO
LaSalle The Image Makers fine mens clothing, located at 832 South Webster Ave., Scranton, will be featured in American Pickers Nov. 12 episode airing at 9 p.m. on the History Channel. Info: 344.0727

the garbage. Over the years, word of DAngelos display has spread around the area and beyond, and recently two of the countrys most famous collectors got wind of it and decided to take a trip to Scranton to see what all the fuss was about. In May of this year, Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz, the stars of the History Channels television series American Pickers paid a visit to LaSalle to give the collection a look. According to the History Channels website, www.history.com/shows/american-pickers, American Pickers follows Wolfe and Fritz as they scour the country for hidden gems in junkyards, basements, garages, barns, and in this case a clothing store, meeting characters and hearing their stories.

DAngelo and his son, Leo DAngelo Jr., said prior to Wolfe and Fritz ever stepping foot in the store, the show sent a photographer to take pictures of the collection and then an appraiser to give it a once-over. After the two visits, Wolfe and Fritz decided to take a look for themselves, and DAngelo thinks they left feeling the trip was worth it. I think they were impressed, said DAngelo. They liked everything in here. Filming the episode took around eight or nine hours, and DAngelo said he enjoyed every minute he got to spend with the popular television personalities. They were all great guys, DAngelo said of Wolfe and Fritz. They were the two nicest guys I met. They were cordial to the people outside, they signed autographs for them, they took pictures with them. Theyre real gentlemen as far as that goes. In addition to his collection, the crew was impressed with the other thing LaSalle is known for. I wound up selling the proSee PICKERS, Page 7

Delores Messarosh knows her way around Scranton. The lifelong West Side resident grew up in the 1400 block of Bryn Mawr Street, and remembers riding the trolley downtown to go dancing with friends. If we missed the last streetcar, we would just walk back, Messarosh, 89, said during a recent interview at the North Sumnner Avenue apartment she has called home for the past 43 years. After giving up driving nearly 20 years ago, Messarosh had no problem getting around the Electric City on public transit, just as she had in her youth. Im very independent, Ill tell you, she said. If theres a bus going there, Ill take a bus. That is exactly how Messarosh got to and from radiation treatments at Mercy Hospital when first fighting breast cancer eight years ago. It was a battle she hoped she had fought and won. Four months ago, she learned otherwise. Cancer had returned, in the other breast. And now the treatment center she needed to visit was Northeast Radiation Oncology Centers in Dunmore, a healthy half-mile walk from the nearest bus stop. I walk, honey, she exclaimed. But facing treatment five days a week for more than a month, even the indomitable Messarosh wondered if she would have the stamina to make the crosstown trip, complete with walking and transfers, on her own. A social worker at NROC recommended Messarosh for the American Cancer Societys Road to Recovery program, which matches patients with volunteer drivers. It takes me for a loop, she said of the radiation therapy. Because there is no shortage of area residents facing cancer, ACS is continuously seeking more people willing to transport them to and from medical appointments. Were always in need of drivers said Jill Giomboni, Health Initiatives Representative with the local ACS office in Taylor. From Sept. 1, 2011 through

ROGER DUPUIS II / GO LACKAWANNA

American Cancer Society volunteer driver Ken Quigley, right, talks with Delores Messarosh outside her West Scranton apartment recently after driving Messarosh home from cancer treatment in Dunmore.

Aug. 31, 2012, the local ACS office provided 1,692 rides to 55 Lackawanna County patients, Giomboni said, and currently has 22 drivers. Patients interested in the service can learn more through their medical providers or through ACS, while prospective drivers should call ACS at 562.9749. Drivers need a valid Pennsylvania drivers license, automobile insurance, a clear background and driver check. Orientation is provided, and volunteer assignments are flexible. Transportation is needed during the daytime hours during the week, Monday through Friday. Volunteers can drive their own vehicles or the American Cancer Society van, where available. While the patients are from Lackawanna County, some of their appointments may be in neighboring counties. Messarosh, who was scheduled to attend her last treatment earlier this month, found that the service and drivers -- proved a good fit. Ken is a doll, she said of Dunmore resident and volunteer driver Ken Quigley, one of the drivers who transported her during her treatments. I am learning a lot from these people, said Quigley, a semi-retired social worker. I get my strength from the people that I drive.

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Community makes extra effort to support Old Forge football


By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

Area grandmother inspired NYC clothing company

TheOldForgeHighSchoolfootball team is in the process of wrapping up a stellar regular season, clinching a share of the Division 3 championship with a 55-8 win over Holy Cross on Friday and improving to 9-0. As the team gets ready to try and finish off its perfect season, before heading into the playoffs, they have been able to find a little extra motivation in knowing they have an entire community cheering them on. Everybody in town is so excited for these kids, said Beverly Tomasetti, president of the Old Forge Quarterback Club. Especially right now, were (9-0) and I dont think any of these kids can go anywhere in this town without having someone coming up to them and telling them what a good job theyre doing. We have an unbelievable fan base and its growing by the week. And these fans arent jumping on the bandwagon, they start showing their support well before the season, be it through attending the teams yearly car wash over the summer, or by buying an ad in the teams advertising book. A number of area businesses and groups like Colarussos, Salernos, Elio Gs, Milano, Old Forge Veterans Club and Felittese Association, just to name a few, have been able to visibly show their support each year by buying an ad in the book. In addition to buying ads, restaurantsCafeRinaldi,ArcaroandGenell, Maries Diner and Agostini Bakery, as well as parents like Kandi Eigen and Lynne Marianelli, also donate food to be sold at the concession stand for

each game. ItsasignificanthelpbecauseArcaroandGenellwilldonateporketta,Rinaldi donates risotto, Maries Diner usually donates sausage and peppers and Agostini usually supplies the buns, so if we dont have to spend our money, its 100 percent profit for us, said Tomasetti. The money made through the fundraiser and the concession stand helps the Quarterback Club put on the yearly football banquet and purchase the letterman jackets for the junior players, but it also makes the dining experience at an Old Forge football game something to be looked forward to. I think its unique to Old Forge, said Tomasetti. Its unheard of to get a porketta sandwich or a dish of risottoorsausageandpeppersatanyother high school football game. WestilldotheregularFrenchfries, mozzarellasticksandallofthat,butin addition to that we have this, so this really is a boost and everybody knows it so we run out of a lot of these things even before halftime. Cafe Rinaldi and Arcaro and Genell also take turns hosting a team dinner for the Blue Devils every Thursday. They have a very good effect on theteam,saidcoachMikeSchuback. Themealsgivetheboystimetohang out and talk about things before the game we did in our pregame practice and a time for them to have some team unity following a week of practice. And the one donation from the community that the team seems to appreciate more than anything is that of their time. Schuback said that the team can count on their fans filling up
See COMMUNITY , Page 9

COURTESY PHOTOS

Rose Kampert credits her success in the fashion world to her grandmothers guidance.

A fashionable mentor
By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

he population of Old Forge in 1928 was a little under 400 people, and among those residents was Rose Lillian Monteforte, then Riviello.

A gifted woman, she graduated from Martha Washington School of Domestic Arts and Sciences in July of 1928 when she was 16 years old. This accomplishment gave her the ability to clothe herself and her family. She designed and made her own wedding gown with a Queen Anne collar at age 26, which she wore when she married Angelo Monteforte, from Pittston, at St. Marys Church in Old Forge. Over the years she found success advancing from a professional sample maker for the dif-

Rose Lillian Monteforte designed and made her own wedding gown with a Queen Anne collar.

ferent factories in Scranton, to a supervisor. She was part of the garment industry for 60 years. She began her career making clothes for her sisters and then outfits and gowns for the local doctors wives. She embroidered handkerchiefs, table runners

and lamp doilies. She was fantastic, I miss her every day. She was a hardworking, Italian woman, said her granddaughter Rose Kampert. She worked her whole life since she was a teenager. She ran factories of hundreds of people when I was growing up. She really took care of us. She cooked, she washed the clothes, she was just always there for us, and even as we got older, even in our 30s if I needed something, Id call her first. Monteforte served as a mentor to Kampert, teaching her how to sew at a very young age, so that by the time she was around 13 years old she was able to make her own clothes. This skill eventually became a passion for Kampert, who enrolled in the Pratt Institute after graduating from West Scranton High School. She entered colSee MENTOR , Page 9

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Paul Piemontese, Anthony Piccolini, Brenden Wahl, Mike Viera, Brian Tomasetti, Matt Mancuso, Tyler Salerno and Kyree Toomey enjoyed a team dinner at Cafe Rinaldi on Thursday, Oct. 25.

She was fantastic, I miss her every day. She was a hardworking, Italian woman.
Rose Kampert on her grandmother Rose Lillian Monteforte

Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

SCRANTON SCHOOL BOARD

Elementary students OKd to finish out year at Prescott


By TIM TYMON For Go Lackawanna

CREATING AWARENESS

PICKERS
Continued from page 5

The Scranton School Board approved a plan that will allow students to continue attending classes at William Prescott Elementary School for the remainder of the 2012-2013 school year during a special meeting on Monday, Oct. 22 at the elementary school. The motion was approved following the release of a lab report by Guzek Associates Inc. that states that no area sampled within the school indicates the presence of active mold growth or an airborne microbial concern. The plan of action was created by the Health & Safety Committee of the Board of Education in conjunction with Guzek Associates Inc., an environmental consultant hired by the district to investigate mold growth and air quality inside Prescott Elementary. Based on analytical results we conclude that each of these facilities (are) acceptable for use, said Superintendent William

King. The approved plan of action also delegated the power to alter the duration of the current school day to King. The district is considering lengthening each school day from Nov. 1 through the end of the year in order to achieve the staterequired 900 instructional hours and conclude three weeks ahead of schedule. This would allow Guzek Associates Inc. more time over the summer break to take action that would permanently eliminate the current mold problem, including the complete removal of the cafeteria wall known to be contaminated. If we extend the school day from 8:05 a.m. to 3 p.m. students could be excused by May 17, King said. Wed be starting 15 minutes earlier and getting out 25 minutes later with the new proposal. The restructuring of the school day is still tentative and is expectSee PRESCOTT , Page 10

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

he Riverside School District celebrated Red Ribbon Week Oct. 22 through 26. The week-long celebration is designed to create an awareness of drug and alcohol risks. Students from Riverside High School paid a visit to Riverside Elementary East and West Schools on Thursday, Oct. 25 to perform resistance skills related skits.

ducers some clothing, laughed DAngelo. The visit will be featured in an episode of American Pickers that will air on Monday, Nov. 12, at 9 p.m. Other than the suits, DAngelo said he couldnt say what, if anything, Wolfe and Fritz bought, but he did say that the two of them, like many others who have visited the store in the past, found out that not everything in the collection is for sale. We never sell anything that people gave to us, said Leo Jr. If I were to sell (an item that was donated) and the guy who gave that to me were to see that. Suppose you gave it to me, how would you like it if I sold it? said DAngelo. DAngelo is in the process of planning a party for Nov.12 in celebration of the episode, and he is encouraging everyone in the area to stop by the store and get an up-close look at the collection before, or after, the episode airs.

MARKETING
Continued from page 4

find us working until two in the morning and not partying until two in the morning. Its a lot of hard work, and a lot of discipline. Id rather do the work now.so that we keep seeing the success that were seeing, in this area, and more further abroad, added Szymanski. If there is a downside to be seen at the duo being as young as they are, it might be that theyre still in the process of finishing school. Torba is working while earning his degree in philosophy, with minors in both entrepreneurship and political science at the University of Scranton. Szymanski is a computer and electrical engineer major at Drexel University. The program gives students the option to work for a company six months out of the year during their second, third and fourth year of the five-year program, giving Szymanski the opportunity to work at Kuhcoon

for the next six months. While working and going to school makes the whole process a little harder, both said eliminating either is not an option. Education is super important to both of us, said Torba. Its really important to get our degree, because thats something that no one can ever take away. When Szymanski returns to

school he said he will continue to work for Kuhcoon, and the hope is have to an office set up in Philadelphia by the spring. The two said they also hope to have an office in San Francisco by the summer, and one in London, England within two years. For more information, call 888.827.5319 or email Sales@Kuhcoon.com.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Chris Farkaly and Carrie Simpson.

Halloween fun comes early

Lily Heier.

Nicolina Broskoskie and Alexis Koch.

Jayce Graham.

children in the community on Sunday, Oct. 21 in McDade Park. Those in attendance had the opportunity to have their picture taken with the Wicked Witch of the West and enjoy other activities.
Bailey Risch. Alexis Koch.

Batman and Thor, aka Vincent Quiles and Aiden Cordero, protected McDade Park on Oct. 21.

BRADLEY LANPHEAR PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

atrick OMalley held his 12 annual Free Halloween Party for

Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna
my fashion career anyway, which it did. After graduating from Pratt in 1994, Kampert started her career getting a job with a designer named Bettina Riedel and eventually started her own clothing company, Love NYC, in 1990. And as Kampert was getting her career started, she said she would still go to her grandmother for advice. Id bring stuff home. Id bring stuff to Scranton to have her help me figure it out. She ran factoriesconstruction she knew, said Kampert. She was an important resource, and she was a real kind of pillar of emotional support as I was growing up. She really taught me everything about business without teaching me about business. How to go through life and make ends meet. Monteforte passed away in 1992, but Kampert has found a way to keep her memory alive and pass on all the valuable information that was given to her as a part-time professor at the Pratt Institute. I love teaching. I really love teaching, said Kampert. "I just love being around the creativity, and I love being around all the fresh ideas.

MENTOR
Continued from page 6

lege as a fashion design major and quickly found that, thanks to her grandmother, she had a head start on some of her classmates. The beginning of fashion design was a lot of sewing and pattern making, and I knew a lot of that already, said Kampert. So, I switched to fine arts, figuring the art background would help

STAND UP AND CHEER

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

The West Scranton High School cheerleaders joined in the fun and participated in the William Prescott Elementary School Halloween parade on Friday, Oct. 26.

COMMUNITY
Continued from page 6

the stands no matter if the game is home or away. I know from playing at Old Forgewealwayshadagreatfollowing.Thefansreallytravelwell.Last

year on most of our road games we had more people from Old Forge there than the home team, said Schuback. Since I can remember, football meanteverythingtothistown,and the people come out every week since I have been here. Old Forge will travel to Susquehanna on Saturday, Nov. 3, for the last game of the regular season.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Tony DeSando, front, Rayn Paulish, Matt Trotta, Paul Papi, Brendon Yescavage, Joey Bruno, Tippy Clark and Warren Welsh, back from left, enjoyed a team dinner at Cafe Rinaldi.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

PRESCOTT
Continued from page 7

ROGER DUPUIS II / GO LACKAWANNA

Lackawanna College Police Academy Class 201 president Joseph F. McCullon, of Old Forge, at center left in his grey uniform, is seen with members of his family and relatives of the late state Trooper Joseph Welsch, whose portrait is at center, following Fridays academy graduation ceremonies. McCullon was awarded a bulletproof vest in the troopers memory based on an essay he wrote.

ACADEMY
Continued from page 3

200th class, the first ceremony under new director Dan Duffy, and the inauguration of what Duffy hopes will be an enduring tradition, in which each class will stand for a fallen police officer. Classes 200 and 201 were dedicated to state Trooper Joseph Welsch, an Archbald native who was killed in the line of duty in 1977. McCullons words could not have been more appropriate. Your story brought us to tears, said Jennifer Mercereau, one of Trooper Welschs nieces who was just 5 when her uncle was shot while attempting to serve a warrant in Tioga County. Mercereau and relatives attended to present a bullet-resistant vest to the author of a winning essay on becoming a police officer. That author was McCullon, a 32-year-old from Old Forge who was a stay-athome father before deciding to pursue his dream of a law-enforcement career. Like your speech said, this is so you come home every night, Mercereau said of the vest. Members of the troopers family have been raising money for several years to provide a memorial vest to one of the graduates. This year, a donation from the Tri-State Troopers Fund will help purchase vests for the next year or two, Mercereau

said. Thanks to a donation from Star Uniform, they also were able to give $100 Star gift certificates for body armor to two other cadets, Jason M. Gilbert of Scranton and Robert L. Shupp of Inkerman. They were three of the most powerful statements I have ever read, Mercereau said. For Duffy, the former Scranton Police chief and an academy graduate who became director earlier this year, the symbolism of honoring a fallen officer is about respect as well as an important lesson for cadets. I sat on the edge of my seat as police chief fearing the death of an officer said Duffy, who held the position for 22 months. We never did. We were very fortunate in that area. Duffy already has brought several innovations, including a new flag and logo, and he had the squad car used for training lettered and decaled in the style of a municipal police car both to feel more realistic for cadets and to act as a rolling billboard for the program. And the man who made headlines as chief for making arrests on his off-time emphasized that he will continue to uphold high standards for cadets, who he hopes will benefit from training and discipline in the style of a working municipal police department. Indeed, Duffy noted how two prospective applicants failed the pre-entrance agility test by ninetenths of a second. Nine-tenths is nine-tenths, he

said. We stick with the standard not everybody makes it. But its the new memorial rites that seem closest to his heart. At each ceremony, the graduating class will hang on the schools flag an embroidered streamer bearing the name of the officer to which they dedicated their studies, a tradition that began with streamers honoring Trooper Welsch. The unfortunate thing about it is that the streamers will continue to be tied on, and they wont stop, Duffy said. Mercereau and her family know that all too well. I have like three memories of him, she said of her uncle. And they were all in his uniform. Graduates from Class 200 Hazleton were: Tina M. Sullivan of Pottsville; Devon L. St. Clair of Danville and Gerald M. Heck of Mountaintop. Graduates from Class 201 Scranton were: Bobby Joe Bendersky of Carbondale; Christian J. Daletto of Lake Twp.; Jason M. Gilbert of Scranton; Matthew A. Granick of Union Dale; Joseph F. McCullon of Old Forge; Robert L. Shupp of Inkerman; Cody L. Smith of Wyoming; Matthew C. Thomas of Avoca; and Abriya L. Wollett of Blakeslee. In special awards, Sullivan won both the Driver and High Scholastic awards for Class 200, and Devon St. Clair of Danville won the Firearms Award. Jason Gilbert of Scranton garnered the Driver, Firearms and High Scholastic awards for Class 201.

ed to be voted on by the board at their regularly scheduled November meeting. The plan also recommended continued monitoring of the elementary school throughout the year to ensure a safe learning environment. The continued monitoring will include thorough cleaning, water damage inspections, removal and drying of water damaged areas and monitoring humidity levels. Guzek plans to continue his inspection of the school over Christmas break. Since the discovery of the mold last spring, Guzek Associates Inc. has issued other recommendations to the school including building a structure in the cafeteria that encloses the known, moldy area and reinforcing the exterior of the building where water was known to be entering. Guzek said that thus far every action he has recommended to the school board has been successfully com-

pleted. Jamie Hailstone, father of two children who attend Prescott Elementary, said he was satisfied with the job that the school district had done but that the issue hadnt yet seen its conclusion. Thank you for taking a bad situation and making it better, Hailstone said. Parents want to continue to be a part of this process; we want the school to re-open. Parents did express some concern over potential issues that an irregular school day, if approved, may create for them and their children. One mother asked what a parent would do if she had two children who were excused from different schools at the exact same time as a result of an altered schedule. King said there is no easy answer to those questions as of right now. King said preliminary discussions have taken place concerning the possibility of establishing a three-week, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. program that could be put into place as a substitute for the final three weeks of the traditional school year in order to reduce the burden on parents.

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Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

11

OBITUARIES

orma R. Duborgel, 91, of Old Forge died Sunday, Oct. 21, 2012 at the Hospice Community Care Dunmore. Her husband, William DuBorgel, died in 1983. Norma worked for GE and enlisted in the Womens Army Corps in 1943. She was a World War II Army veteran. She was a homemaker but also worked as a nurses aid and hospice grief counselor. Norma was a beautiful soul who touched the lives of many. Surviving are daughters, Charisse Kahler, Wichita, Kansas; Michele Turner , Greenville, S.C.; sons, Peter DuBorgel, Wichita, Kansas; Paul DuBorgel, Throop; a granddaughter, Brienna DuBorgel, Taylor; brother, Bruno Doriguzzi, Ballston Lake, N.Y.; sister, Ada DeZotto, Clifton Park, N.Y.; nieces and nephews. The funeral was held Tuesday, Oct. 23 in the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road, Old Forge.

arion H. Winski, of Cover Road, Tunkhannock, died Thursday, Oct 18, 2012, in the Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre. She was born in Scranton on January 14, 1943, a daughter of Joseph and Agnes McLaine. Marion enjoyed traveling, her family, grandchildren and the afternoon soap operas. Surviving are her husband of 48 years, David Winski; son, Joseph, and wife, Kym, of Warner Robins, Ga.; daughters, Donna Valoroso and her husband, Vincent, of Towanda; Marie Winski of Tunkhan-

nock; grandchildren, Samuel, Michael, Rachel, David, Marabeth, Madalyn and Aaron. Funeral services were held on Monday, Oct. 22 from the SheldonKukuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Interment was in Sunnyside Cemetery, Tunkhannock. Memorials may be sent to Triton Hose Co., PO Box 765, Tunkhannock, PA 18657, or to the Tunkhannock Ambulance Association, PO Box 322, Tunkhannock, PA 18657. Online condolences may be sent to www.sheldonkukuchkafuneralhome.com. by all who knew her. Surviving are a daughter, Patricia Leschinsky and husband, Keith, Old Forge; sister, Helen D. Hafner, Clarks Summit; nieces and nephews. Funeral was held Thursday, Oct. 25 in Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road, Old Forge, with Mass in the Prince of Peace Parish - St. Lawrences Church, South Main Street, Old Forge. Entombment in Cathedral Cemetery, Scranton. sisters, Mae Baker and Ida Prendergast. Surviving are his wife, Ruth Gregor Gilmore, South San Francisco; children, Dr. David T. Gilmore and his wife, Karen Trevethan Gilmore, Valparaiso, Ind., Donald V. Gilmore and his wife, Mary, St. Petersburg, Fla.; grandchildren, Mrs. Kristin Pasko and her husband, Matthew, Suffolk, Va., Electa and Hannah Gilmore, both of St. Petersburg , Fla.; a great-granddaughter, Madelyn Pasko, Suffolk, Va.; numerous nieces, nephews and also several stepchildren. A funeral was held on Saturday, Oct. 27 from the Laurel Run Primitive Methodist Church with the Rev. George Kropp, pastor, officiating. Interment was in Idetown Cemetery. The family requests that flowers are omitted and that memorial donations in the Rev. Dr. Gilmores memory be made to the Laurel Run Primitive Methodist Church, 3835 Laurel Run Road, Wilkes-Barre 18702 or the Gideons International, North Luzerne Camp, P.O. Box 344, WilkesBarre, PA 18703.

Tips for a free or discounted turkey DEAL DETECTIVE I


t seems a little early to be thinking about Turkey Day, but Thanksgiving is right around the corner and earning rewards towards a discounted or free turkey takes some planning. Each store offers a different way to earn rewards, which can get confusing. Although the offers vary at each store, the store goals are all the same, to encourage store loyalty of shoppers prior to the holiday season. And that is exactly what you need to do, choose one store to shop at for the next four weeks.
JENNA URBAN

ary Elizabeth Mauceri, 78, of Old Forge died Monday, Oct. 22, 2012. She was the widow of Paul "Bear" Mauceri who died June 2010. Born in Pittston, a daughter of the late John J. and Helen Leonard Dooner, she was a graduate of Dupont High School, class of 1952. She worked in the nursing profession in the Scranton area. She was a member of the Prince of Peace Parish, Old Forge. She will be deeply missed He had served Primitive Methodist Churches in Indiana and Pennsylvania. His first pastorate was at the Old Forge/Taylor Circuit, Pa., later pastoring at West Conshocken Primitive Methodist Church; Franklin St. Primitive Methodist Church, Plymouth, St. Johns Primitive Methodist Church, Avoca, and Laurel Run Primitive Methodist Church. He was the founding pastor and pastor of Calvary Primitive Methodist Church, Portage, Ind., where he served for 27 years. He officially retired in 1996, but continued as an interim pastor at Plains Presbyterian Church; Bethesda Congregational Church, Edwardsville and the Wyoming Avenue Christian Church, Kingston for some time following his official retirement. He also found time to write several books and articles on religious subjects. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Doris Van Buskirk Gilmore, in 1988; his second wife, Frances R. Becky Kelley Gilmore, in 2007; and by a grandson, Robert Nathan Gilmore in 1998; by brothers, Clayton and Robert Gilmore;

he Rev. Dr. Donald R. Gilmore, 85, South San Francisco, Calif., formerly of the Wyoming Valley, died Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, at St. Francis Pavilion, Daly City, Calif. The Rev. Dr. Gilmore was born in the Keystone Section, Plains Township, a son of the late Robert N. and Mabel Ralston Gilmore, and was a graduate of the class of 1944, Plains Memorial High School. He proudly served with the Navy during World War II at Sampson, N.Y., and aboard the USS Europa and the USS Monticello. He was awarded the European and American Theater Ribbons and the World War II Victory Medal. He later earned his Bachelor and Master of Divinity degrees from the Seminary of the Reformed Episcopal Church, Philadelphia, in 1949. He later received the AB degree from Wilkes College and a doctorate in sacred literature from the Manhattan School of Theology, Hollidaysburg, in 1950. He entered the ministry of the Primitive Methodist Church in 1950 and was ordained a Minister of the Gospel in 1954.

There are typically three ways to earn rewards towards your turkey. The first is to collect "points" by buying participating items. Giant Food Stores is offering a free turkey with 400 rewards points or Gas Extra Gas Rewards. Reward points are earned for purchasing a number of select products listed in the weekly circular. For example, the ad may request to buy six of the items listed to earn 300 points, which add up quickly. Points can be tracked online or at the bottom of your receipt and once the account reaches 400 points, a free turkey certificate will print at the register. The free turkey certificates can be redeemed Nov. 11 through 24. The advantage of shopping at Giant during this promotion is that they sometimes offer rewards on items purchased rather than the amount of money spent in each transaction. Since there are ways to earn rewards by purchasing a number of products rather

than by spending a certain amount, you should check for coupons on products listed in each promotion and buy items that have a long shelf life. ShopRite also has a special Thanksgiving offer. Spend $400 from Sunday, Oct. 14 through Thursday, Nov. 22 to qualify to get a free turkey, ham, turkey breast, kosher chicken, lasagna or Tofurky. The registers will automatically keep a running total of the purchases when using your Price Plus club card. Pick up the free item of choice through Nov. 22. ShurSave Markets are offering a similar promotion but you earn vouchers towards turkey rewards. Spend between $350 to $499.99 and receive a $10 certificate. Spend between $500 to $599.99 and receive a $15 certificate. Spend $600 or more and receive a $25 certificate. Purchasing must be made between Sept. 30 and Nov. 10 and must be redeemed between Nov. 11 and 22. Certificates will be printed on receipt. There are a few tips to keep in mind when saving for these Thanksgiving rewards. The most important is to pick one store to shop towards the reward until you reach the freebie. Also, try to purchase items that can be stored or larger items like cleaning supplies, brooms, baking pans or even toys at these stores as a way to earn rewards. Finally, make sure that you read the fine print and know the stores coupon policy before planning your shopping trip. What are your money saving tips for getting a Thanksgiving reward? Share them with us at facebook.com/golackawanna.

PAGE 12

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Acting classes aimed at teens


T
By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

erry Thompson is just16, a Scranton High School student with dreams of making it big on the stage and screen. I just tried out for my freshman year play and loved it, said Thompson, who was tapped for the role of Lysander in Shakespeares A Midsummer Nights Dream.
Already, though, he has learned a thing or two about Shakespeare so part in Januarys play must attend at least one workshop, Holgate said, followed by a two-week intensive program in early January. Interested students should call Holgate at 961.1592 ext114. Sponsored by a county ARTS Engage! grant, this program is UNCs first theater activity that is aimed solely at teens. REVs Hay remembered attendingherfirsttheaterproductionat5, when her mother took her to see the play Peter Pan in her native London, an extraordinary event that stays with her to this day. She andCaporasofeelstronglythatparticipating in theater not just watching does young people a world of good. Its hugely important in terms of building their self-esteem, their confidence, said Hay. Theater should not be elitist, Caparaso said, stressing the companys desire to bring live performance to as many people as possible. To that end, Hay said Scranton Shakespeare Festival hopes to stage a four-day run in Nay Aug next June, mounting a production of The Comedy of Errors. For Thompson, whose appearance at a session last week was his first, becoming a professional performer is very much the goal. I want to be famous one day, he said resolutely. Caporaso cautioned against fame for fames sake, to which Thompson replied his drive is more profound. I like the idea of making myself into somebody that Im not, he said, and trying to embody that character. Thompson and a small group of teens sat in a circle on the orange carpet in an upstairs room, listening as Caporaso and Hay talked about how to realistically project their characters through body and voice. They walked through random improvisation, role-playing, heated exchanges of Shakespear-

much so that during a recent acting workshop at the West Side Senior Center he tiptoed very carefully with his question about a certain star-crossed play. All that wacky stuff about the curse of the Scottish play? Its just B.S., instructor Rudy Caporaso replied, before continuing with the lesson. Perhaps. But interviewed by phone a few days later about an upcoming production that The REV Theatre Company plans to stage with youth participating in the classes hosted by United Neighborhood Centers of Northeastern Pennsylvania, he hesitated before invoking the name. Maybe the 400-year-old curse holds some weight with Caporaso after all? Macbeth! Macbeth! Macbeth! he burst out. There, I said it! Cursed or not, the Bards tragic tale of a bloodthirsty Scottish king remains one of Shakespeares most popularworks,withsomeofitslines among the most famous in English literature. It is set to be performed Jan. 18 and 19 by students taking part in eight weeks of drama classes with REVs Caporaso and Rosey Hay. The pair are co-artistic directors of the New York-based company that staged Midsummer Nights Dream, its take on the classic, for free in Nay Aug Park last summer as the inaugural production of the Scranton Shakespeare Festival. While the classes began in late September, Lackawanna County youths in grades 6 through 12 still have an opportunity to participate in upcoming classes, and in Januarys performances, said April Holgate,coordinatorofUNCsIllumination Youth Arts Program. Free workshops are scheduled from 4 to 8 p.m. on Oct. 29, Nov. 5 and Nov. 26 at the center on Jackson Street in West Scranton, with free dinner for participants, Holgate said. Students who would like to take

ROGER DUPUIS II PHOTOS/ GO LACKAWANNA

Victoria Hunsinger and Terry Thompson prepare to hurl Shakespearian insults at their fellow students during an Oct. 20 acting workshop at the West Side Senior Center in Scranton.

Rudy Caporaso, standing, discusses the craft of acting with Destiney Hunsinger, Patrick Sawyer, Victoria Hunsinger and Terry Thompson.

Scranton High School student Patrick Sawyer listens to instructions during the workshop.

ian insults and, finally, a bit of practice from the Scottish play itself. I call it Macbeth, Hay added later, dismissing the curse. I think thats an old wives tale. Thompson, joined by fellow SHS student Patrick Sawyer and West Scranton siblings Victoria and Des-

tiney Hunsinger, stalked about the room reciting lines uttered by the witches whose spells dog Macbeth and are cited by some as the very thing that gave rise to the legendary curse. Ive always loved acting, and when I get older, I want acting to be my profession, said Victoria, who

previously took part in UNCs youth theater program. Her sister admitted that while the language of Elizabethan England might seem strange at first, it began to grow on her. When you listen and get down to the basics of it, Id rather speak like that than how we speak today.

Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

15

Lencicki stars in West Side Story


By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

West Side Story will open the Broadway Theater League of NEPAs season on Friday, Nov. 2 at the Scranton Cultural Center.

IF YOU GO
What: West Side Story Where: The Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave. When: Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2 through 4 Info: 346.7369 or visit www.broadwayscranton.com.

est Scranton native Theo Lencicki will be proving the old saying you cant go home again wrong this weekend. The West Scranton High School graduate will be in town Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2 through 4, as part of the touring company of West Side Story, presented by the Broadway Theater League of NEPA, at the Scranton Cultural Center. Its always exciting to come back to Scranton. Its great to have the opportunity, especially since I was there with Hairspray and Young Frankenstein tours. They are always welcoming with opening arms, and its great to see the hometown crowd, said Lencicki. Lencicki said hes also excited to be returning to the area

Theo Lencicki with a production hes sure many are going to love. Written by Arthur Laurents, with music by Leonard Bernstein, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, and conception and choreography by Jerome Robbins, West Side Story was inspired by William Shakespeares play Romeo and Juliet. Set in New York City in the mid-1950s, the musical tells the story of two rival street gangs, the Jets and Sharks, of different ethnic backgrounds, and a member of the Jets, Tony, who falls in love with Maria, the sister of the leader of the Sharks. At the end of the day (its)

about how love cant survive in a world with hate, said Lencicki. I dont want to spoil the ending of what happens to characters, but its a really powerful message. Lencicki plays Riff in the play, leader of the Jets and Tonys best friend. Riff is parallel to Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet, who is Romeos best friend where I am Tonys best friend, explained Lencicki. He has been orphaned by his family. He lives with Tony, so his family is his gang and everyone looks to him as the leader to make the decisions. Its been a really great expe-

rience, and its been a role that Ive wanted to play for a while, so Im excited to have the opportunity. Lencicki first performed in the play in 2010 at the Gateway Playhouse in Long Island, N.Y. as a member of the Jets. He said hes happy that this time around he would be tackling the role of Riff. I think, as far as my musical theater background, its a great role that incorporates the acting as well as the singing, because Riff does sing two of the songs in the show as well as the dancing, said Lencicki. So its a very versatile role that showcases a lot. Lencicki started showcasing what he could do Oct. 29 when the tour officially began in Elmira, N.Y. West Side Story will be on tour until June making stops in up to 80 cities. The cast will be performing in Erie on Thursday, before coming to the

Scranton Cultural Center. I think the show will remain fresh and exciting throughout the tour, but its great that (Scrantons) one of the first stops. That they can experience it fresh out of the gate, said Lencicki. I think theyre going to get a great show. And, in addition to giving the audience a great show, being the only member of the cast from the area, hes also looking to show the cast and crew a good time while theyre in town. Ill be showing them the Electric City, laughed Lencicki. We have five shows that weekend, so its pretty jampacked, but if I could hop in my car and show them West Side High School and take them over to the hot spots over in West Side, I think it would be a perfect opportunity, especially given the show were doing.

16

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

at the Iron Furnaces


he second annual Bonfire at the Iron Furnaces was held on Saturday, Oct. 20 at the Scranton Iron Furnaces. This years celebration featured a bonfire, wood sculpture, PopUp Studio, story telling by Pam McNichols and Kait Burrier, The Tom Petty Appreciation Band, Day of the Dead display by Scranton Reads, readings by Jack McGuigan and food and beverages.

BONFIRE
The Scranton Iron Furnaces, located at 159 Cedar Ave.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Spectators enjoy locally themed, seasonal monologues by playwright Kait Burrier.

Pat Finnerty and Bill Orner perf

Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

17

Heather Stewart, Dan Brennan, Michael Coolbaugh and Rachel Arasim of Scranton.

Megan Fellows and Zoe McNichols of Clarks Summit.

Mike Maria of Scranton and Cat Keating of Dunmore.

form with The Tom Petty Appreciation Band.

Playwright Kait Burrier of Scranton.

18

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Jones making a big impact in Buffalo

Former Lackawanna College receiver Donald Jones now plays for the NFLs Buffalo Bills.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

UFFALO, N.Y. Former Lackawanna College receiver Donald Jones is enjoying the most productive of his three National Football League seasons with the Buffalo Bills. Jones caught his third touchdown pass of the season last week, scoring from 15 yards in a 35-34, home-field loss to the Tennessee Titans. With the Bills (3-4) off for their bye week, Jones already has 20 catches, three short of his total last season.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Mike Munchak, a Scranton Central and Penn State graduate, is the head coach of the Tennessee Titans.

When Buffalo lost David Nelson to a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his knee earlier in the season, Jones took over at the slot position in three- and four-receiver sets. Quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick and Jones are gradually becoming more comfortable working together. That showed in the touchdown pass against Buffalo. I had to trust my guys; make sure were on the same page and the timing was precise, Fitzpatrick said of touchdown passes to Jones and Steve Johnson in the third quarter. Releasing it before they were making their breaks. Donald did a great job.
See JONES, Page 23

BUFFALO, N.Y. Mike Munchaks second season as a National Football League head coach appeared to be headed the wrong way in a hurry. The Tennessee Titans have not yet stamped themselves as contenders, but their season has a much different outlook after beating the Pittsburgh Steelers, 26-23, then going on the road to pull out a 35-34 victory over the Buffalo

Righting the ship


KEEPING SCORE
TOM ROBINSON
Bills. Tennessee pulled out a 44-41 win against Detroit but lost by more than 20 points four times in the first five games, including a 30-7 loss in Minnesota to open October. When we lost that game in Minnesota, Munch kind
See SCORE , Page 23

Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Munchak speaks after the Titans 35-34 victory over the Buffalo Bills.

Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

19

20

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

OLD FORGE 55, HOLY CROSS 8

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

The Blue Devils follow Shane Schuback after he recovers a Holy Cross fumble.

O.F. too much for Holy Cross to handle


By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Old Forge scored on half of its first 14 offensive plays Friday night while blowing out visiting Holy Cross, 55-8, in a Lackawanna Football Conference Division 3 game. The contest matched one of the LFCs two unbeaten teams and one of its two winless teams. After a sluggish first few minutes for the Blue Devils, it looked just like what

would be expected from such a matchup. Old Forge, which is also preparing for the District 2 Class A playoffs, used the win to clinch at least a share of the Division 3 championship it won outright last season. The Blue Devils can keep the title to themselves with a win Saturday at Susquehanna, or if Lackawanna Trail loses to Holy Cross. Holy Cross (0-4 in the divi-

sion and 0-9 overall) picked a first down on the games second play. The Crusaders went for fourth-and-one to try to extend the drive, but Jorden Sekol stopped Connor Callejas for a two-yard loss. An interception by Thomas Ware of Holy Cross stopped the first Old Forge drive, but the Blue Devils could not be held back for long. The big problem playing games like this is you have

nothing to gain and sometimes you get complacent, Old Forge coach Mike Schuback said. Brian Tomasetti, on the way to his eighth 100-yard plus rushing effort of the season, ran for two of his three touchdowns to give Old Forge a 14-0 lead after one quarter. Brenden Wahl threw for two touchdowns and ran for another in the second quarter when the Blue Devils built a 40-8

halftime lead. Anthony Piccolini and Shane Schuback pulled in the touchdown passes and Tomasetti ran for another score. One offensive play into the second half, Old Forge put the game in the Mercy Rule by building the lead to 47-8 on a 35-yard Brandon Yescavage touchdown. The Blue Devils closed the
See OLD FORGE, Page 22

Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

21

LAKELAND 28, RIVERSIDE 21

VALLEY VIEW 41, WEST SCRANTON 28

Invaders run out of answers


STAFF REPORTS For Go Lackawanna

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Nick Dranchak passed for 137 yards in the first half and finished the game 16-for-27 for 205 yards.

Chiefs squeak by Vikings


By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

TAYLOR Lakeland turned to a ball-control ground attack in the second half to produce three straight scoring drives, effectively slowing down Riversides passing game on the way to a 28-21 Lackawanna Football Conference Division 2 victory. Lakeland knocked Riverside out of first place in the division, allowing Dunmore to clinch at least a share of the title. Riverside plays at Dunmore Friday, needing a win to force a first-

place tie. Lakeland will also be part of that tie if it beats Western Wayne. After the Vikings nearly doubled the Chiefs offensive output in the first half, Lakeland controlled play in the final two quarters. Lakeland had advantage of 10-5 in first downs, 136-49 in rushing yards, 177-117 in total yards and 13:3510:25 in time of possession. We didnt do anything differently scheme-wise, Lakeland coach Jeff Wasilchak said. We thought we would have been able to do that in the first half, but their kids

played tough. The Chiefs went from a 14-7 halftime deficit to a 21-21 tie entering the fourth quarter. Kyle Kiehart, who ran for one of the third-quarter scores, hit Tyler Brady with a 14-yard pass for the winning score with 9:14 left. Gavin ODonnell stopped Riversides Dave Sweetman for a oneyard loss on a third-and-goal pass from the 2. A mishandled shot-gun snap contributed to a seven-yard loss on fourth down and Lakeland
See VIKINGS , Page 22

Rob Castellani scored three Valley View touchdowns and West Scranton eventually ran out of answers Friday night as the Cougars emerged with a 41-28, home-field victory in a Lackawanna Football Conference Division 1 game. The teams combined for seven touchdowns in less than 15 minutes to start the game. Valley View jumped in front four times during that stretch and the first three times West Scranton answered with a Jordan McCloe touchdown pass in less than two minutes to tie the game. Castellanis third touchdown, on a 4-yard run, put the Cougars ahead to stay, 28-21. West Scranton (2-4 in the division and 4-5 overall) fumbled the ball away on the games first play. RaeKwon Patrick answered in two plays, scoring from the 16 for a 7-0 Valley View lead. West Scranton came back to score on a 29-yard pass from McCloe to Lou DiBileo. Castellanis 2-yard run was countered by a 57-yard pass from McCloe to Joe Devine. The first quarter ended with the teams tied, 14-14, and the teams produced touchdowns in each of the first three minutes of the second quarter. Castellani took a pass from Liam Callejas 33 yards for a score 40 seconds into the quarter. McCloe threw 52 yards to Cory Jackson-Bey for the tying touchdown. Billy Williams returned the ensuing kickoff 81 yards to the 7 to set up Castellanis third touchdown. Callejas turned a fourthand-seven play into a 27-yard touchdown pass to Garrett Rupe for a 35-21 lead after three quarters.

West Scranton fought back with a 13-yard pass from freshman Leo Ciullo to Cullen Fanning to cut the deficit to seven. Valley View (3-3, 6-3) put the game away with a 10-play, 55-yard drive that resulted in an 18-yard touchdown run by Brandon Ossont with 2:27 remaining. Demetris Garcia led the West Scranton defense with 10 tackles and a fumble recovery. Devine added eight tackles and an assist; Tyaire Quiller had seven tackles, an assist, a fumble recovery and a forced fumble; and Fanning had seven tackles.

AROUND THE LFC Scranton and Dunmore clinched at least ties for division titles with wins. Karlon Quiller turned his three catches into 132 yards and three touchdowns as Scranton remained undefeated with a 39-0 shutout of visiting Wallenpaupack. The game was delayed at the start by a power outage, but the Knights did not need long to get going. They scored three first-quarter touchdowns. Jake McCarthy carried 15 times for 144 yards and Marlinn Waiters passed for 141 yards and three touchdowns. Dunmore downed Mid Valley, 34-12, in Division 2 behind Daiqwon Buckleys 265 yards and two touchdowns on 20 carries. Brandon Kujawskis 55-yard touchdown pass to Mike Kolcharno opened the scoring for the Bucks. In other games: Western Wayne pulled away from Honesdale, 47-19, in Division 2; Carbondale downed Susquehanna, 41-6, in Division 3; and Lackawanna Trail topped Montrose, 28-7, in Division 3.

22

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS NOTEBOOK

Croker-Reilly team up for state doubles


By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Kendra Croker handled District 4 singles champion Pam Niditch, 6-1, 6-0, Tuesday but Scranton Prep fell short in a 3-2 loss to Loyalsock in a first-round Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Class AA girls tennis team tournament match at South Williamsport. Croker, an Old Forge resident, and number-three singles player Emily Johnson gave Scranton Prep its two points. Johnson defeated Kim Levy, 6-2, 6-3. The state tournament loss ended the season for five of the seven Classics, who teamed to win Lackawanna League Division 2 and District 2 Class AA titles this season. Croker and Moosics Grace Reilly will continue into the state doubles tournament, which is scheduled for Friday and Saturday at the Hershey Racquet Club. They begin play Friday at10:30 a.m. against Wyomissings Greta Koch-Caroline Pattillo, the third-place team from District 3. The quarterfinals are scheduled for Friday at 3 p.m. with the semifinals and finals set for Saturday. The state doubles tournament appearance is the continuation of a quick and impressive recovery by Croker, the 2011 district singles champion, from a torn anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus in her knee. She suffered the injury in a fall while skiing and had reconstructive surgery in late March. I was back out on the court in 90 days hitting, Croker said. Croker did have to eliminate her summer tournament schedule, but she kept working and, with the help of her uncle, Dr. Ken Sebastianelli, was ready for the start of the high school season. My uncle trained me, Croker said. I went through intensive therapy every night and did footwork drills to get my leg back to where it was or even healthier. He brought me to where I am today.

Abington Heights opened the Class AAA tournament with a 4-1 win over Hershey Tuesday at the Birchwood Racquet Club in Clarks Summit. That win advanced the Lady Comets to the Hershey Racquet Club for the team quarterfinals where they lost, 5-0, Friday to Unionville, which dropped just eight games in 10 sets. The loss was the first of the season for Abington Heights, the Lackawanna League Division 1 champion, which will send both a singles player and a doubles team back to Hershey Friday. Tyra Abdalla is the District 2-4 Class AAA singles champion and Allie Pusateri-Cierra Beck formed the District 2-4 champion doubles team. BOYS SOCCER District 2 moved all its semifinal games up to Monday to try to get them played before the impending storm. Jordan Paulus had a goal and an assist, Alix LeGrand also scored and Colin Moretti made five saves Friday when defending champion Scranton Prep shut out Tunkhannock, 2-0, to reach the Class AA semifinals. Abington Heights in Class AAA and Lakeland and Holy Cross in Class A are the other semifinalists from the county. Abington Heights eliminated West Scranton, 1-0, Friday. Lakeland beat Elk Lake and Holy Cross beat Dunmore Thursday in a pair of 1-0 quarterfinal games. Meyers knocked out Old Forge, 2-0, in a play-in game Tuesday. GIRLS SOCCER District 2 also moved up the girls semifinals to Monday. Abington Heights in Class AAA, Scranton Prep in Class AA and Forest City and Lakeland in Class A are among the semifinalists. Defending champion Scranton Prep beat Western Wayne, 6-0, Thursday.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Riversides Dave Sweetman finished with 18 carries for 118 yards while also catching four passes for 56 yards.

VIKINGS
Continued from page 21

ran the final 3:10 off the clock. Make a play here and make a player there and its a different outcome, Riverside coach Evan Prall said. Chris Roche, who carried 17 times for a game-high 160 yards, ran three straight times for 24 yards and the last two first downs that helped the Chiefs kill the clock. He was also a big factor early in the game. Riverside opened the scoring when Sweetman caught a 26-yard pass from Dranchak on fourth-andthree from the Lakeland 39, then scored on a 3-yard run.

Roche took Lakelands first play 57 yards for the tying touchdown. The Vikings responded for a 14-7 lead after one quarter. Jim Tucker caught an 18-yard pass from Dranchak for the score. Dranchak passed for 137 yards in the first half and finished 16-for-27 for 205 yards. They give you a lot to defend, Wasilchak said. The Chiefs, however, yielded just one touchdown over the final three quarters. Lakeland covered 65 yards in five plays to open the second half. Roche ran 14 yards for his second touchdown, one play after breaking off a 33-yard run. Kiehart made the second of his four extra points for a 14-14 tie with 9:40 left. Riverside then moved 71yards in 10 plays. Dranchak passed 11 yards

to Tucker, who finished with seven catches for 79 yards, to give Riverside a 21-14 lead midway through the third quarter. Tim Hackenberg returned the ensuing kickoff 39 yards to the Riverside 35. Bradys 22-yard run put the ball on the 1 and Kiehart scored from there. Kiehart intercepted Dranchak two plays later and Lakeland covered 42 yards on a nine-play drive that carried into the fourth quarter and resulted in the Kiehart-to-Brady game-winner on a rollout and pass into the right flat. Sweetman finished with 18 carries for 118 yards while also catching four passes for 56 yards. Mat Lucas made all three extrapoint kicks for the Vikings. Both teams are 3-1in the division and 6-3 overall.

OLD FORGE
Continued from page 20

scoring in the fourth quarter on a 27-yard run touchdown run by Tyler Salerno and a two-point conversion by Matthew Trotta. The Blue Devils played with-

out starting tackle Ryan Paulish for the second straight game because of an injury. Sekol moved from fullback to alternate with sophomore Corey Souryavong at Paulishs tackle position. Shane Schuback moved from tight end to alternate at fullback with Bobby Rinaldi, another sophomore.

Our focus now is to stay healthy and be ready to play in November, said coach Schuback, who is concerned about disruptions this week from the anticipated weather issues and heading to Susquehanna where the field has a history of not holding up well in wet conditions.

Sunday, October 28, 2012

GOLackawanna

23

Runners handle muddy conditions


By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

DISTRICT 2 CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIPS

DIMOCK Scranton Prep won the Class AA boys team title and Taylor Ross of Abington Heights finished first in the Class AAA girls race while Austin Martinelli of West Scranton and Nick Strenkoski of Riverside qualified for the state meet as some of the highlights Wednesday in the District 2 Cross Country Championships at Elk Lake High School.
Scranton Prep and Ross had the only championships from Lackawanna County although Lackawanna League member Elk Lake pulled off a sweep of the Class A

boys and girls team and individual titles in extremely muddy conditions on its home course. Martinelli finished seventh in Class AAA boys and Strenkoski was 15th in Class A boys to advance to the Nov. 3 Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Championships on the Hershey Parkview Course. The top team and best five other individuals in each Class AAA race advanced to Hershey along with the top two teams and10 other individuals from each Class AA and A race. Hazleton Area won the Class AAA girls title over Wallenpaupack, 46-53, to start the day. The Abington Heights combination of Taylor Ross and Erin Jaeger finished 1-2 to help Abington Heights take third with 60 points. West Scranton was sixth out of seven teams with 159 points. Emi-

ly Tuffy led the way for the Lady Invaders by finishing 15th. Regan Rome of Dallas won her third District 2 title but Holy Redeemer edged Dallas, 50-53, for the Class AA title. Rachel Sowinski, Marissa Durako and Cassandra Gill finished second, third and fifth for Holy Redeemer. Scranton Prep was third with 97 points after Kate Reilly and Emily Carr finished 13th and 14th. They qualified for the state meet along with North Poconos Kaitlyn Lewis, who was seventh. Elk Lake and Montrose are headed to the state meet in Class A girls after scoring 40 and 54 points and combining to take the top five spots. Elizabeth Trowbridge and Jenny Vanetten were 1-2 for Elk Lake. Holy Cross was fourth out of 10 teams with 112 points. Makenzie

Greenfield (seventh), Tess Kearns (11th) and Zoe Haggerty (16th) qualified for the state meet. Mid Valleys Nicole Kobylanski in sixth and Lackawanna Trails Keirnan Dougherty in 17th are also headed to Hershey. Riverside was eighth with 215 points. The Lady Vikes were led by Cassie Semyon in 20th place. Jacob Fetterman finished first to help Hazleton Area edge Abington Heights, 59-60, for the Class AAA boys team championship. In addition to Martinelli, the 3-4 combination of North Poconos Matt Warner and Mike Brenkosh and fifth-place finisher Jacob Ross of Abington Heights were among the individual qualifiers. West Scranton was seventh of nine teams with 204 points. Scranton Prep had five runners in the top 17 to win the Class AA

title over Tunkhannock, 54-65. Paul Labelle was fourth, Kyle Perry seventh and Ryan Burke 10th to lead the Cavaliers. Kieran Sutton of Lake-Lehman won the individual title. The state qualifiers included Lakelands Kyle Borland in 19th place. Luke Jones won another individual title and helped Elk Lake in the Class A boys championship, 46-69, over Lackawanna Trail. Rico Galassi of Holy Cross was second. Other state qualifiers included: Matt Murray and Brandon Murray, third and fourth for Dunmore; Nate Morgan and Mark Arzie of Lakeland eighth and 11th; Riversides Strenkoski and Ryan Brannon of Holy Cross in 18th. Strenkoskis 15th-place finish helped Riverside finish ninth out of 15 teams.

SCORE
Continued from page 18

of talked about his last year playing, his team was I think our same record, 1-4, stuff was against them and they went on a roll and won 11 in a row, quarterback Matt Hasselbeck said after throwing a 15-yard touchdown pass to Nate Washington on fourth down with 1:03 left. He said then that its not necessarily this teams history, its that teams history. But its a great opportunity just to know that it can be done. Were off to a good start for it. The playing days of Munchak, a Scranton Central and Penn State graduate, may have provided a blueprint, but they did not make a turnaround appear likely. Hasselbeck helped get it started a week earlier by throwing for 290 yards and leading a drive to the game-winning field goal as time expired. Weve been moving the ball, Munchak said. Chris Johnson, a 2,000-yard rusher in 2009 and a 1,000-yard rusher in each of his other three pro seasons, provided other positive signs by rushing for 91 yards against Pittsburgh. Buffalos defense was no match for Johnson, who had been held to fewer than 25 yards in four of the first five games.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Lackawanna College alum Donald Jones makes a reception for a first down in the Bills 35-34 loss to the Tennessee Titans on Sunday.

Johnson raced to an 83-yard run in the first quarter on the way to a season-high 195 yards and two touchdowns on 18 carries. Youre seeing his speed now; another 80-yarder, Munchak said. I think he has a record for 80-yard runs in the league. I think we picked up where we left off against Pittsburgh and kind of what we did in Houston. We know how to win games like this; we have to be able to do that. We cant be one-dimensional like weve been in our losses. Johnsons numbers are suddenly more

in line with expectations 496 yards rushing plus 110 more on 17 receptions. If Johnson can be effective against defenses less porous than Buffalos, Munchak can hold true to his roots as a Hall of Fame offensive lineman and build an attack that could continue lifting the Titans in the standings. Hes a great weapon, said Munchak, who guided the Titans to a 9-7 record but missed the playoffs on a tiebreaker in his head coaching debut last season. If we can continue to do that, well win more football games. Two weeks earlier, that seemed like an impossible task. If we execute, if they block well and I read well and be patient, I think its showing us what we can do every Sunday, Johnson said. A win today against Indianapolis would return the Titans to the .500 mark with games ahead against Chicago and in Miami before Tennessee takes a week off. Guys obviously are in a position where we can start to feel more confident about our performance, and at the same time work to get better, Titans safety Jordan Babineaux said. We start putting these games back to back, we will get this season turned around in a hurry before the bye week. Those may still be lofty aspirations, but without the past two weeks they would not have even been possible.

JONES
Continued from page 18

Jones said that he is comfortable as the slot as well as other receiver positions. Im not a stranger to this at all, Jones told buffalobills.com after Nelsons injury. I did it all preseason, getting me ready in case something like this was to happen. Jones had five-catch efforts in two of his first three games. He made four catches for 47 yards against Tennessee, giving him 20 catches for career-highs of 241 yards and three touchdowns. After playing at Lackawanna, Jones spent two seasons at Youngstown State. The 24-year-old from Plainfield, N.J. played 15 games, starting five, and made 18 catches for 213 yards in 2010. Last season, Jones started in seven of eight games and caught 23 catches for 231yards before missing the rest of the season with an ankle injury. He has been in the starting rotation of receivers in all seven games this season.

24

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 28, 2012

SPORTS BRIEFS
Pens get first win Paul Thompson scored with 13.7 seconds left in overtime Friday night to lift the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins to their first win of the season, 5-4, over the Rochester Americans. The Penguins led, 4-2, before giving up two powerplay goals in the final two minutes of regulation when Rochester also had its goalie pulled for an extra attacker. Wilkes-Barre/Scranton opened the season with four straight losses in which it scored a total of just six goals. The Penguins lost their home opener to Bridgeport, 3-2, Oct. 20 and fell again the next day against Syracuse, 2-1. U of Scranton men ranked 18th The University of Scranton, which was one of the final eight teams alive in the national title race last season, opens the mens basketball season ranked 18th in the country among NCAA Division III teams, according to the D3hoops.com preseason poll. The Royals went 23-8 last season and won three NCAA Tournament games after taking their fourth Landmark Conference championship in final years. It was the teams deepest tournament run since 1993. Senior Travis Farrell, junior Tommy Morgan and sophomore Ross Danzig return to the starting lineup. Farrell was a firstteam, all-star and Landmark Defensive Player of the Year last season. Danzig was the conference Rookie of the Year. The Royals will play an exhibition at Division I Rider Saturday. They open the regular season at home Nov. 16 against Oneonta State at 7:30 p.m. Pacers win womens tennis title Marywood University avenged a loss in its regularseason finale by ending Gwynedd-Mercy Colleges four-year run as Colonial States Athletic Conference womens tennis champion with a 5-3 victory in the conference final Oct. 20 in Easton. The Pacers (11-3) earned a spot in the May 2013 NCAA Division III Tournament. -Compiled by Tom Robinson

PIAA STATE GOLF TOURNAMENT

Scranton Prep finishes in the top five


S
STAFF REPORTS For Go Lackawanna

ophomore individual medal winner Chris Cerminaro and a pair of Moosic residents helped Scranton Prep finish fourth in Class AAA boys at the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Golf Championships at Heritage Hills Resort in York. Scranton Prep was fourth out of the six teams that qualified for the state event in Class AAA when it shot a four-player score of 315 Wednesday. Cerminaro, who placed fifth in Class AAA boys during the individual competition Monday and Tuesday, led the way with a 76. Nick Johnson added a 77 and Evan Joyce an 80. David Pompey completed the team score with an 82. Manheim Township won the title with a 299, followed by Council Rock North with 301 and St. Josephs Prep with 312. Pittsburgh Central Catholic and Meadville

came in behind Scranton Prep with 317 and 337. Scranton Prep was last among the five Class AAA girls teams that made it to York. Moosics Danielle Dalessandro shot 85, but none of the other Classics could produce better than a 108. Radnor won the title with 325, topping Penn Trafford (341), Central Dauphin (353), State College (391) and Scranton Prep (413). The Holy Cross girls finished third in Class AA. Selena Cerra shot a 79 to tie for the second-best score among the players from the four teams in the Class AA girls tournament. Central Valley won the title with a 342. Holy Redeemer, the only Wyoming Valley Conference team to represent District 2, tied Wyomissing at 321, but lost a one-hole playoff for the Class AA boys title. Mariano Medico of Holy Redeemer had the days best score

with a 3-under-par, 68. Cerminaro, who shared the lead after one round, shot 71-76 for a 5over-par, 147 for 36 holes. Craig Hornberger of Manheim Township won the Class AAA title by shooting 73-70-143. Anthony Sebastianelli of Abington Heights fell two shots short of a medal. The top 10 and ties in the 36-player field earned medals. Sebastianelli finished 13th with 7775-152. Mike Thomas of Lakeland and Cerra also took a run at medals. Thomas shot 78-79-157 to finish in a four-way tie for 12th in Class AA boys. Medico shot 73-77-150 to finish fifth, five shots behind champion Isaiah Logue of Fairfield. The top five in the 18-player girls tournaments received medals. Cerra finished sixth in Class AA with 83-82-165. Emily Okrepkie of Holy Cross finished 12th with 92-89-181.

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PAGE 25

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CLASSIC PEANUTS

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409 Autos under $5000

golackawanna.com
500 Employment 600 Financial
412 Autos for Sale

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classied ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classieds@golackawanna.com


150 Special Notices

110

LOST. Dog, female, brown, black & white Beagle named Greta, lost on Foote Ave., Duryea. 12 years old, needs daily heart medicine. REWARD. 570-457-5120 or 570-351-4968

FOSTER PARENT(S) NEEDED


IMMEDIATELY for teens or sibling groups. Compensation, training, and 24 hour on-call support provided. Please call FRIENDSHIP HOUSE (570) 3428305 x 2058. Compensation up to $1200.00 per month per child.

4x4. 1 Owner. 91K. 4.8 engine, auto. Runs great. New paint, stake body with metal floor. 570-675-5046. Leave message, will return call.

FORD 95 F150

Warranty. $6,495

CHEVY 04 MONTE CARLO SS Extra Sharp.


570-288-6227

MAFFEI Auto Sales

1298 Keystone Blvd. Pottsville, PA 17901 Phone: 570-544-3140 Fax: 570-544-8084


Due to increased business volumes, Fanelli Bros. Trucking Co. is adding both regional and local drivers to our Pottsville, PA terminal operation. Drivers are home most nights throughout the week. Drivers must have 2 years of OTR experience, acceptable MVR and pass a criminal background check and drug screen test.

120

Found

NOW $4,295

LIKE NEW
Used Tires & Batteries for $20 & Up

310

Attorney Services

FREE Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130


412 Autos for Sale

444 Market St. Kingston

The pay package offers: .36 cpm for qualied drivers Mileage Bonus Performance Bonus $1,500 sign on bonus Paid vacations and holidays Health/Dental/Vision Insurance 401K Plan

949 Wyoming Ave. Forty Fort

VITOS & GINOS


288-8995

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. Its a showroom in print! Classifieds got the directions!

412 Autos for Sale


AUDI 07 A4 2.0 TURBO, 98,000 miles, automatic, perfect condition, original owner, full window tint, black on black leather, built in bluetooth system, sunroof, MP3 player & more! $9,000 OBO. 949-439-3636

406

ATVs/Dune Buggies

150 Special Notices

HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV

Adopting your newborn is our dream. Joy filled home, endless love, security. Randi & Chuck 1-888-223-7941

ADOPT

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130

clean car! $3,995. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY 03 IMPALA auto, V6. very

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

Contact Gary Potter at 570-544-3140, Ext. 156 or visit us at 1298 Keystone Blvd. Pottsville, PA

Your baby will have a lifetime of love, support, encouragement, happiness and security with a devoted mom, dad, and extended family. Happily married and financial secure couple with strong education values would be lucky to adopt your baby. Expenses paid. 1-888-368-8909 or AileenAndKevin2 adopt.com

ADOPTION

NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,995 takes it away. 570-817-2952 Wilkes-Barre

TOMAHAWK`11

LOOKING FOR WADE GRIFFITH, JR. and Helen Griffith to probate their fathers will. Children must sign their consent for their fathers wishes in our state. Please contact Kim Patton krpatton48@ hotmail.com

ATV, 110 CC. Brand New Tomahawk Kids Quad. Only $695 takes it away! 570-817-2952 Wilkes-Barre

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 415 Autos-Antique & Classic 439 Motorcycles 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 457 Wanted to Buy Auto 509 Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

PAGE 27 548 Medical/Health

CROSSROAD MOTORS
700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! 04 Mitsibishi Outlander 4x4 112k $4,799 01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,399 06 Dodge Caravan 57k $6,999 06 Chrysler Sebring Conv. Touring 60K $7,299 05 Chrysler T & C 63k $7,399 06 FORD FREESTAR 62k, Rear air A/C $7,699 05 Dodge Durango SLT 106k warranty $7,799 05 CHEVY MALIBU Only 36k, Private Owner $8,499 07 Ford Escape 4X4 XLT 83K $9,899 12 Ford Fusion 25k factory warranty $15,099 11 Nissan Rogue AWD, 27k Factory warranty $16,999 11 Mitsubishi Endeavor 4x4 26k Factory warranty $17,399 11 Ford E250 Cruse. P.W. PDL Cargo Only 8k miles! $17,799 11 Ford E250 Cruse. P.W. PDL Cargo Only 3k miles! Factory Warranty, $18,599 11 Ford Escape XLT, 4x4, 26k, Factory Warranty, 6 Cylinder $18,899 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY
WE W I L L E N T E R T A I N OFFERS !

CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE


1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

570-825-7988

4 cylinder, 5 speed. Real Economical Car!!! $3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

MISTUBISHI 05 LANCER

Kit Car $5,500 OR TRADE JUST REDUCED (570) 655-4884

GREAT DEALS! MERCEDES 29

$47,000

YAMAHA 08 STAR RAIDER condition. RAVEN EDITION Mint


Very low miles. Asking $7400. Call for details. 570-472-2327

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

4 cylinder, 5 speed. One Owner! Extra Clean Car!!! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

SUNFIRE CONVERTIBLE

PONTIAC 00

SUBARU 04 FORESTER XT (Turbo) Symmetrical AWD, auto, 52,000 miles, 4 cylinder black metallic/ black grey interior, remote starter, heated seats, alloy wheels, towing package, AM/FM /6-CD, AC, original owner, excellent condition, $14,000, 570-8515549. Albrightsville, PA.

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. Its a showroom in print! Classifieds got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Priced to Sell! $23,000. Call 570-825-6272

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

YAMAHA 97 ROYALSTAR 1300

3rd row seat. VERY NICE SUV! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD 02 EXPLORER XLT 4X4

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted


Highest Prices Paid In CA$H
FREE PICKUP

Framing contractor looking for dependable employees. Experience necessary. Must have own transportation and hand tools. Call after 3:30pm. 570-430-1539

CARPENTERS

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

Requirements: Bachelor Degree in related field plus 1 year experience. 245 Old Lake Rd Dallas, PA 18612 E.O.E.

SOCIAL SERVICES DIRECTOR, FULL TIME

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

570-574-1275

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

4X4, leather, sunroof, like new! $5,495 570-696-4377

FORD 03 EXPLORER XLT

503

Accounting/ Finance

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR 6 cylinder


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CHEVY 03 SILVERADO 4X4 REG CAB

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment


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CHEVY 08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

4x4, 6 cyl., auto, 1 owner, great work truck $4495. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD 03 F150 XL

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT PART-TIME


Cornell Iron Works, a leading and growing manufacturer of Security Closure Products, is seeking a qualified Part-Time Accounting Assistant for our Mountaintop facility. Duties include coordinating and performing tasks related to various company billings and supporting company credit approval functions. The ideal candidate will have an Associates Degree or equivalent in business and have five or more years experience with billings in the manufacturing and construction industries. Excellent verbal communication skills are required. Must be detail oriented, well organized, and be able to work independently. Knowledge of AS400 systems and MS Excel required. This position is 5 hours per day Monday through Friday, with a flexible work schedule between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Interested candidates should apply in person, email their resume and salary history to janiney@cornelliron.com, or mail to: Cornell Iron Works Crestwood Industrial Park 24 Elmwood Ave. Mountaintop, PA 18707 www. cornelliron.com (No phone calls, please) Equal Opportunity Employer

To place your ad call...829-7130


439 Motorcycles

TOYOTA `03 HIGHLANDER


White. Original Owner. Garage kept. Excellent condition. $9,750. Neg.

BRAND NEW 12 SCOOTER

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130


DODGE 03 CARAVAN Auto, V6. Nice
clean car $4495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377 1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

5 speed, 2WD, Like New, 1 Owner Truck $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY 04 COLORADO SPORT

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park 4X4. Super Cab. Extra Clean! 1 owner truck! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD 99 F150

Action Lift, Inc., located in Pittston, PA, is the exclusive dealership for Crown and TCM forklifts for NEPA. We are seeking a full time forklift mechanic to troubleshoot, repair and diagnose Crown and other makes of lift trucks. Good written and verbal communication skills, as well as customer care skills are necessary. A valid drivers license and the ability to safely operate lift trucks are required. Previous forklift mechanical experience or technical school graduate will be considered. We offer an excellent wage and benefits package, as well as 401K Retirement Savings Plan, paid holidays, paid vacation and much more. Apply by e-mail mike.phelan@action liftinc.com or call 570-655-2100 x115.

FORKLIFT MECHANIC Looking for the right deal

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

on an automobile? Turn to classified. Its a showroom in print! Classifieds got the directions!

551

Other

In Luzerne County. Requirements are over 18 years old, U.S citizen, computer experience, valid drivers license and insurance, and a dependable car. NASDA-E.O.E Call Cindy Conley 610-295-7137

PART TIME WORK

566

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

548 Medical/Health

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

Highland Manor Nursing Home

6speed, collectors, this baby is 1 of only 750 GTS coupes built in 2002 and only 1 of 83 painted Race Yellow it still wears its original tires showing how it was babied. This car is spotless throughout and is ready for its new home. This vehicle is shown by appointment only. $39,999 or trade. 570-760-2365

DODGE 02 VIPER GTS 10,000 MILES V10

570-677-3892

112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT

All ready to ride, electric start, automatic transmission, disk brakes, rear luggage trunk, under seat storage, around 100 mpg, fully street legal, all ready to go! only $1,595. Call 570-817-2952

Front wheel drive, auto, V6 Extra Clean! $4,995. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

HYUNDAI 01 SANTA FE

SUZUKI 01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER


Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

seat, leather, sunroof. 1 Owner! Like New!!! $5,995 Call For details! 570-696-4377

DODGE 04 DURANGO SLT 4X4, 3rd row

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park Front wheel drive, 4 cyl, 5 speed, sunroof, clean, clean SUV! $4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

SATURN 04 VUE

don-highland@seniorsnorth.com
Also seeking Full and Part Time 3-11/ 11-7 EOE

Part Time 11-7 Seeking organized, motivated, professional RNs to supervise our nursing staff to maintain the highest quality of care for our residents. LTC and supervisory experience preferred. 750 Schooley Ave. Exeter, PA 18643 Ph: 570-655-3791 Fax: 570-655-4881

RN SUPERVISOR POSITIONS Part Time 3-11

CNAS

HVAC company is seeking a commercial/industrial maintenance sales representative. Applicants should have a proven sales record of cold-calling success. Heating and air conditioning knowledge is a plus but not required. Living wage base salary. Great incentive potential. Health benefits. Company car. IRA plan. Paid vacation. Paid holidays. Office space. Laptop. Smartphone. Extensive training and ongoing support by an international franchise. Send Resume to: Anthony Fornataro President ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 591 North Hunter Highway Drums, PA 18222 afornataro@ energyt.com

MAINTENANCE SALES REPRESENTATIVE Well-established

PAGE 28 726 Clothing 754 Machinery & Equipment 825 Kennels 906 Homes for Sale

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012 941

600 FINANCIAL
610 Business Opportunities

EVERYTHING MUST GO, to make room for our new Swimwear and Vacation Wear. Everything is $2, $3, $5 & $10.00. ABSOLUTELY everything must go. Come and see top of the line Designer clothing, most of them still have price tags. Come and tan as well after browsing the merchandise. SPECIAL PRICE FOR W.A. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. Come and Tan because a tan changes everything. Bloom Again European Tanning 918 Exeter Avenue Rte. 92 (Next to Rodano's Express) Exeter, PA 18643 570-883-0909 JACKETS, MENS Fall & winter (4) 3 size L and 1 M. Excellent condition. Brand names. All for $15. 570-655-1808

SNOW BLOWER. Craftsman. 12 HP, 32 dual stage. Electric start. Track Drive. $525. 570-675-5046

NANTICOKE
17 sq. ft. 5ft high, made of chain linked fence, with 4 stalls each 4 ft wide. Excellent for a group of dogs. $1000. 459 Wilson Street. 570-693-2423

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

DOG KENNEL

941
1472 S. Hanover St. Well maintained bilevel. This home features 2 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths, recreation room with propane stove. Walk out to a 3 season porch. Professionally landscaped yard. 1 car garage, storage shed, new appliances, ceiling fans. Close to LCCC. $153,900. Call 570-735-7594

762

Musical Instruments

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Newly remodeled, quiet neighborhood, living room, kitchen, laundry & bath on 1st floor. 2 bedrooms on 2nd floor. Sewer, water & garbage included. Off-street parking, no pets. $550/mo. Call 570-655-4533

PITTSTON TWP.

Two story, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large closets. Central air, all appliances, off-street parking. No pets or smoking. $700/ month + security. Water & sewer paid. 570-288-2627

SWOYERSVILLE

NEW DERMATOLOGY PRACTICE Moving back to my hometown! I am a PA-C practicing Dermatologist with over 13 years experience in a one-doctor office. A bright, hardworking, honest, motivated individual interested in partnering with an MD or DO in the Scranton/ Clarks Summit area to provide Exceptional Dermatologic care. CAPITAL AVAILABLE. Please call Sheli Tinkelman MS, PA-C at 248-788-0527

CLARINET Artley, solid wood, black with case & 4 new reeds. $175. Call 570-675-0460 or 574-1724

835

PetsMiscellaneous

776 Sporting Goods


BICYCLE

blue with pink trim accents & wheels, white tires. Front & rear brakes plus coaster foot brake. Good condition $40. 570-814-9574

MURRAY DAZZLER 20 girls. Powder

CHINCHILLA 3 year old, for sale, very large cage. $150. Call 570-379-3898 or 570-606-9312

3 rooms, w/w carpeting, appliances, coin-op washer and dryer, off street parking, security, no pets. $430/mo. 570-655-1606

AVOCA

784

Tools

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nations consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

To place your ad call...829-7130


941 Apartments/ Unfurnished
1st Ave. 1 bedroom, single occupancy, off-street parking, no pets, references. $450 + utilities. Call 570-655-9229

To place your ad call...829-7130


630 Money To Loan
We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say theyve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. Its a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

PLASMA CUTTER/WELDER. 3 in 1 unit. New, never used, $350. 570-759-1106

To place your ad call...829-7130


732 Exercise Equipment
INVERSION TABLE new with instruction video. EP-800 $200. 570-709-9350

To place your ad call...829-7130


796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. Also buying comics. 570-212-0398

BUYING SPORT for CARDS Pay Cash

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. Its a showroom in print! Classifieds got the directions!
3 bedroom home, 2 baths, concrete porch 3/4 around the house, garage. On six acres. Stonework, stone fireplace, heat with wood or oil. Commercial cook stove. Beautiful view. Well above flood or high water. Some farm equipment, track loader. With gas & oil rights. $250,000 570-665-9054

KINGSTON

To place your ad call...829-7130


KINGSTON APARTMENT RENTALS
KINGSTON: 2 bedroom 1st floor. $500. + utilities 1 bedroom 2nd floor $460. + utilities Appliances included Call 899-3407 for info/appt.

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130


Stylish 2 bedroom first floor. Kitchen with snack bar, modern bath, w/d hookup and storage in basement. Off street parking, large maintenance free yard. $550/mo plus utilities. Security, lease. Sorry, no smoking or pets. 570-824-9507

2 full baths, large living room, dining room, kitchen, stove, washer/dryer hookup. Off street parking. Spacious with heat and water included. $875/mo., security, credit check & references. AVAILABLE NOW! 917-753-8192

PITTSTON/JENKINS TOWNSHIP 3 1/2 bedrooms,

2 bedrooms, 2nd floor stove & refrigerator included, laundry hookup, carport off-street parking, no pets. Heat and water included. $650/ mo. security & references required. 570-299-7153

WEST PITTSTON

To place your ad call...829-7130


Century home, 1 bedroom, freshly painted and new carpet. Appliances included. No pets. $450/per month + utilities. Security & references required. Call (570) 283-3086

WEST PITTSTON

TUNKHANNOCK AREA REDUCED!

PLAINS

West Pittston

THE HITCHNER
530 Exeter Ave

744

Furniture & Accessories

Now Accepting Applications!


2 bedroom $547 3 bedroom $625 Elevator, parking lot, central air, appliances, wi-fi access & more.
Income Qualifications required.

CHAIRS, (2) Genuine leather, custom made recliners. Taupe color, like new. $550 each. 570-675-5046 DEN FURNITURE Wood/cloth. Regular size sofa, chair and ottoman. Coffee table, 2 end tables. Excellent condition. $325 for all. 570-675-5046 DESK, Antique childrens, $75, Armoire, 1940s, $75, BED, double, $100, TABLE, kitchen, $40, TABLES, end $25, BEDROOM SUITE, $250, RECLINERS (2) $50 each, DRESSERS, large (2) $20 each. 570-328-5169 HEADBOARD brass for double bed, custom made. Make offer 570-675-0460 or 574-1724 KITCHEN TABLE OAK, 4 CHAIRS $250. 570-823-8688

800 PETS & ANIMALS


815 Dogs

DALLAS 3 bedroom, 2 bath, modern country kitchen with Corian counters, family room with fireplace, wet bar and walkout to patio, multi-level decks. All appliances included. $217,000. 570-675-0446 evenings.

UPCOMING IN NOVEMBER:
WILKES-BARRE: 3 bedroom Home. Living room with fireplace, dining room, yard. $750. + utilities. WYOMING: 1st floor 2 bedroom Great Area! $500. + utilities. Call: 570-899-3407 for info....

700 MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques & Collectibles

DOLL HOUSE Vintage 1950s style 3 rooms down, staircase, 2 rooms up plus furniture. Make offer. 570-6750460/574-1724 All Contents of a 6x13 platform of Lionel trains from 1954. Vintage cars and buildings. Newer Santa Fe set. too much to list, must see. Offers accepted for complete lot or individual items. Call for appointment: 570-991-8647 Private Seller

LIONEL TRAINS

All colors and both genders available. $700 to $1,300 www.willowspring cavaliers.com 215-538-2179 ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPS. AKC Males and females, champion blood lines, prize litter $2000 each. Pics avail. 570-799-0192 Pure bred. 2 males first shots No papers. $300. 570840-3449 Serious inquiries only

HAVANESE PUPPIES

Registration available, health certified. $700 to $1,500.

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL PUPPIES

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. Its a showroom in print! Classifieds got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

US Treasury Dept. Online Auction Tues. 11/6 @ 10am. Single Family Duplex @ 102-104 Reese St., WilkesBarre. OPEN: Sat 10/27 & 11/3 from 10-2. www. cwsmarketing.com for details & bidding info. 703-273-7373

MINI SCHNAUZER PUPS

FOR SALE BY OWNER 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, garage, dining & living rooms, oil heat, 1,235 sq. ft. Vinyl replacement windows, new hot water heater. Central School District. Sold AS IS. $73,000, OBO. 570-379-2163 or 570-394-6111

MIFFLINVILLE

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. Its a showroom in print! Classifieds got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

1 bedroom first floor apartment. Gas heat and hot water. Range and refrigerator included. Garage parking. Laundry room on premises. $475 per month + utilities. Water, garbage, state and sewer included. No dogs. References and security. Call 570-696-3596

NANTICOKE

apartments, private, all redone.600 Block South Scranton. Non-smokers. $660 each. Pay heat & separate electric only. No washer/dryer. Nonsmoker. Background check. Call Nina 570-575-6280

SCRANTON/SOUTH Two, 2 bedroom

570-344-5999

REAL ESTATE PROCESSOR


United One Resources is seeking full time real estate processors. The successful candidates should be able to type a minimum of 50 wpm, possess excellent phone and organizational skills, the ability to multi-task, conscientious with an attention to detail, work in a fast pace environment and successfully meet daily goals. Previous title insurance processing, banking or lending experience preferred but not required. We offer a competitive benefit package. Hours: 10am-6pm.

PARSONS
2 bedroom, 1st floor Wall to wall carpeting throughout. Stove, fridge, washer & dryer included. $535 + utilities & security. Call 570-650-2494

For consideration, forward your resume to: iwanttowork@unitedoneresources.com EOE M/F/D/V

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012

PAGE 29

COMMUNITY OFFICE MANAGER


First Keystone Community Bank, an independently owned community bank is recruiting a dynamic and community minded manager to direct and organize the sales and service functions of their Dallas Oce located at 225 Memorial Hwy, Dallas. The successful candidate will be responsible for developing customer relationships and providing customers with direct service relating to all bank products in order to meet growth, sales, and prot objectives. Previous experience in related bank operations and/or management positions required. Must be self-motivated and possess excellent interpersonal and communication skills. We desire a candidate with strong ties to the Dallas/Back Mountain Communities. We oer a competitive compensation rate and an excellent benet package. Please send resume and cover letter with salary requirements or submit application to:

First Keystone Community Bank Human Resource Department 111 West Front Street, Berwick, PA 18603 EO/AA Employer

PAGE 30 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012

Beautiful 2 bedroom, 1 bath, all appliances incl. washer & dryer & air conditioning. Non smoker, security and references, off street parking, no pets. $630 plus utilities. 954-2972

WEST WYOMING Eighth Street

appliances, washer/dryer hook- up, no pets, close to Cross Valley. $600/month + utilities & security. 570-855-2790 570-406-3709

WILKES-BARRE/ NORTH 3 bedrooms, all

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished WILKESBARRE

947

Garages

950

Half Doubles

950

Half Doubles

953 Houses for Rent

953 Houses for Rent


52 SLYVANUS St. Single family home for rent. 1,450 sq ft. 3 bedrooms with closets. First floor tile bath, 1st floor washer/dryer hookup, new gas water heater, new carpets, modern kitchen, ceiling fan, new gas stove, dead bolt locks, enclosed front porch, basement, residential street, fenced yard, 1 car private driveway, 1 car garage. 1 year lease. 1 month security. Background checks. $750 plus utilities. call Bill 215-527-8133

1/2 DOUBLES AVAILABLE


11, 6 by 23 Cinder block walls, interior walls are steel studs with sheet rock. Concrete floor, steel over head door with locks, over head lighting. $110 a month. 1 year lease + security. 570-655-0530

KINGSTON & WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH 3 bedroom, 1.5


baths, small yard, front porch, off street parking. $615/month security required. Tenant pays all utilities. 570-357-0712 Spacious 1 bedroom renovated house. 1 1/2 baths, partially furnished, open dining & TV rooms with cozy wooden gas fireplace. New refrigerator, freezer, dishwasher, mounted micro-wave & new oak cabinets. Brand new gas furnace/water heater. New apartment sized washer/dryer on 1st floor. Brand new draperies, blinds & carpeting. Detached garage with driveway. Front & back yards in tranquil neighborhood. No smoking. $900 + utilities & security. 570-762-8265

WILKES-BARRE

AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS 570-288-1422

FORTY FORT

WILKES-BARRE: 4 bedroom, yard, off street parking. $750. + utilities KINGSTON: 3 bedroom, yard, new kitchen, off street parking. $825. + utilities Appliances included. Close to schools, parks. Call: 570-899-3407 for info/appt.

DURYEA

962

WILKES-BARRE 344 Madison Ave.


Room for Rent, in large house. $125/week. Call Pam or Vito 570-223-2779

Rooms

RENOVATED PERFECTION
GENERAL HOSPITAL DOORWAY... FIRST FLOOR. 1 Bedroom Under market at $625 + utilities (affordable). 2 years. New interiors, maple kitchens, aesthetic fireplaces, luxurious wall to wall. NO PETS/ NO SMOKING/ EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION.

953 Houses for Rent

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

To place your ad call...829-7130


950 Half Doubles

To place your ad call...829-7130

1015

Appliance Service

25 Years Experience fixing major appliances: Washer, Dryer, Refrigerator, Dishwasher, Compactors. Most brands. Free phone advice & all work guaranteed. No service charge for visit. 570-706-6577

ECO-FRIENDLY APPLIANCE TECH.

3 large bedrooms, large fenced yard, hardwood floors washer/dryer hookup, no pets. $625/month + utilities & 1 month security. Call 570-313-5414

EDWARDSVILLE

House for Rent. $750 + utilities. Water, sewer & all appliances included. Fenced back yard. One month security up front, no partial payment. Section 8 OK. Call Steve at 570-592-5764

PLYMOUTH

3 acre property, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, all appliances, washer/dryer hookup, 2 car attached garage, no pets. $1,200/ month + utilities & security. Month to month lease. (610)256-5352

CLARKS SUMMIT

To place your ad call...829-7130


FOR SALE OR RENT Single home in gated retirement village. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Granite countertops, gas fireplace, appliances included. Quiet 55+ community. No Pets. One year lease. $1575/mo. + utilities & security. Monthly maintenance fee included. 570-592-3023

DALLAS

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130


Remodeled 3 bedroom home with hardwood floors, new carpeting & fresh paint. Featuring modern kitchen with dishwasher, large yard & off street parking. $750/month + utilities. No pets or smoking. Call 570-466-6334

To place your ad call...829-7130


114 Govier St. 2 1/2 bedrooms, 1 bath. $650. No pets. 570-825-0908

WILKES-BARRE TWP.

ble. $600 + utilities. No pets. Call 570-855-2790

NANTICOKE 3 bedroom half dou518 Customer Support/Client Care

Shawnee Ave. 3 bedrooms, back yard, basement. $550/month + utilities and sewer. 570-332-5723

PLYMOUTH

PARSONS

518 Customer Support/Client Care

518 Customer Support/Client Care

518 Customer Support/Client Care

522

Education/ Training
Education

522

Education/ Training

522

Education/ Training

522

Education/ Training

At Telerx, our people are our most valuable asset because it takes great people to make a great company. Thats why we are looking for higher caliber people to join our team. If youre a star and are looking for a new career...Telerx is hiring!

for 2012!

FULL-TIME INBOUND CUSTOMER SERVICE REPS No Weekends or Holidays!


Start Date: November 5th
Shift: 11:30am - 8:00pm M-F Training Shift: 11:30am - 8:00pm M-F

McCann School Of Business & Technology Is Seeking A Full-Time

Start Date: November 26th


Shift: 1:30pm - 10:00pm M-F Training Shift: 9:30am - 6:00pm M-F

ADMISSIONS REPRESENTATIVE
At Our Wilkes-Barre Campus.

LOOKING FOR A FRENCH BILINGUAL REPRESENTATIVE!


Must read, write & speak uent French & English
We oer competitive pay and great benets. Apply online: www.telerx.com Questions? Contact Traci Roth: 267-942-3599

Associates Degree Required. Sales Experience Preferred. Benefits Include 401k, Medical, Dental, Vision, Vacation, Sick Time, Holidays.

TJ.Eltringham@McCann.Edu
785722

Please Send Resume To: No Phone Calls Please

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012

PAGE 31

V EH IC L ES IN A L L P R IC ES R A N G ES!
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O N LY 57K MI LES

SEL L DO W N
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EXIT 1 70B O FF I- 81 TO EXIT 1 . BEAR RIGH T O N BU SIN ESS RO U TE 309 TO SIXTH L IGH T J ST BEL O W W YO M IN G V AL L EY M AL L . . U

PAGE 32

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2012

TH TH A N K S T O O U R C U S T O M E R S TO TO Fo rM a k ing U s H IG H L OW TRA DE FIN A N CE 1 V OL UM E # V TH E R


H U R R Y ! O FFER S EN D O C T 31ST

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
N IS S A N
STK# N 22344 M O D EL# 26612 V IN # 618651 M SR P $57, 045

A T E S

2012 N IS S A N A RM A DA
P L A TIN UM 4X4

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2 A T T H IS IS P R IC E ! IC

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B U Y FO R $
2012 N IS S A N
STK# N 21750 M O D EL# 22112 V IN # 282868 M SR P $23, 050

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S TK # N 22155 M O D EL# 15112 V IN # 260196 M S R P $31, 530

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2013 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5 S E DA N


S TK # N 22847 M O D EL# 13013 V IN # 454405 M S R P $22, 410

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* $189 p er m o n t p lu s t x 39 m o n t lea s e; 12, 000 m iles p er y h a . h ea r Res id u a l= $12, 908; ; m u s tb e a p p r v o ed t u N M AC @ T ier 1; $1995 Ca s h d o w n o rT r d e E q u it ( + ) p lu s hr a y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; T o t l @ a d eliv er = $2202. 50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t in c y e lu d ed .

18 9

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2 A T T H IS IS P R IC E ! IC

2012 N IS S A N
STK# N 21727 M O D EL# 23212 V IN # 218668 M SR P $32, 850

M URA N O S A W D

SA V E O V ER $6000 O R M O R E O FF M SR P O N A L L 2012 IN M U R A N O S IN S T O C K O N L Y

O N LY 8 M U R A NO S L EFT A T T H IS IS P R IC E ! ! IC !! H U R R Y

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, L ea t her Pr , em iu m Pa cka ge, F o g L ight , M o o n r o f Bo s e s o , S o u n d , Cn v Pkg, & M u ch M o r . e!

SA VE

$2000 O FF M
B U Y FO R
OR

V6, CVT , Blu et o t AM / F M / CD , PW , PD L , o h, Cr is e, T ilt F lo o rM a t & S p la s h Gu a r s u , s d

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* $269 p er m o n t p lu s t x 39 m o n t lea s e; 12, 000 m iles p er y h a . h ea r Res id u a l= $17, 739; ; m u s tb e a p p r v o ed t u N M AC @ T ier 1; $1995 Ca s h d o w n o rT r d e E q u it ( + ) p lu s hr a y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; T o t l @ a d eliv er = $2202. 50. $1500 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t in c y e lu d ed .

269

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2012 N IS S A N S E N TRA 2.0S S E DA N


STK# N 22431 M O D EL# 12112 V IN # 757810 M SR P $19, 420

VEHICLES 300 IN STOCK!

* $259 p er m o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p er yea r Res id u a l= h a h ; $11,837.80; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier 1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o r t a d e o hr r eq u it . (+ ) p lu s r y egis t a t n f r io ees ; t t l d u e @ d eliver o a y= $2202.50.

259

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*$299 p erm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $16,710.90; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u h a h ; o hr NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rt a d e eq u it (+ ) p lu s r r y. egis t a t n f ; t t l d u e @ d eliver $2202.50. r io ees o a y=

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18 9

L EA S E FO R

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* $189 p erm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $10,292.60; h a h ; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $1500 ca s h d o w n o rt a d e eq u it . (+ ) p lu s o hr r y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; t t l d u e @ d eliver $2202.50. o a y=

* x a nd Ta g a d d it na l. Pr rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gr phic a l Er o r . All r a t & inc ent Ta io io a r s eb es ives a pplied . * % APR *0 As k fo rd et ils . * B a s ed o n N is s a n M o nt End Sa les R epo r a * h tfo rSept 2 0 1 . All o ffer ex pir 1 /3 1/1 . . 2 s e 0 2

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2012 N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S L IM ITE D E DITIO N

VEHICLES 300 IN STOCK!

STK# N 22368 M O D EL# 16112 V IN # 861635 M SR P $34, 435

2 7,4 3 5
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