www.smdailyjournal.

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Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 62
SUPERSTORM
NATION PAGE 7
THE HUNT
FOR 270
NATION PAGE 8
SOLITUDE IN THE
WIRED WORLD?
LIFESTYLE PAGE 31
EAST COAST BRACES FOR BAD
WEATHER
Bay Area’s most trusted gold buyer*
*According to our customers
816 Middlefield Road, Redwood City
New Location in Redwood City
Lic#41131012
Highest Prices Paid*
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
In California, a person who has
been convicted of two previous
“violent” or “serious” felonies and
is convicted of any third felony may
be sentenced to 25 years to life. This
is known as the “three strikes” law.
Proposition 36 would prevent dis-
trict attorneys and judges from pur-
suing the third strike sentence — 25
years to life — for defendants
whose current offense is a nonvio-
lent, non-serious felony, such as
shoplifting or simple drug posses-
sion.
If the proposition passes, those
who have already been sentenced to
25 years to life for a nonviolent,
non-serious third-strike offense
would be eligible for a resentencing
hearing.
Around 3,000 people in
California would be eligible for a
resentencing hearing, according to
Mike Romano, director of the
Stanford Three Strikes Project.
“Proposition 36 does not repeal
three strikes or eliminate it,” said
Romano, who co-authored the
proposition. He pointed out that this
law would not guarantee any person
will be released earlier from prison.
That decision would be up to the
judge in the resentencing hearing.
“You can only get out of prison if
the judge finds you are no longer a
public risk,” he said.
He stressed that under
Proposition 36 non-serious third
strikers would still have enhanced
sentences, just not life.
“They should get sentence
enhancements because of their
recidivism,” said Romano.
He is currently representing a
man from Riverside County whose
DAs differ on modifying three strikes
See STRIKES, Page 23
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A group of San Mateo Heights
residents is coming together to
oppose the addition of a 7-Eleven in
the neighborhood where
Stangelini’s Italian Deli & Hilltop
Market once stood.
City staff approved 7-Eleven ’s
zoning application Aug. 30 after
developer, Portfolio Development
Partners, held a community out-
reach meeting at the Martin Luther
King Jr. Center in February.
Deputy Mayor David Lim
requested a series of public hear-
ings, however, to determine whether
the land should be kept as residen-
tial, as it is currently zoned.
The deli was vacant for so long,
nearly two years, that the property
on North San
Mateo Drive is
now zoned for
multi-family
residences. A
7-Eleven or
any other
retail estab-
lishment proposed for the site is
considered a non-conforming use
since the land is zoned residential.
Ellsworth Court resident Sean
Johnston has started to rally opposi-
tion of the 7-Eleven and plans to
urge the Planning Commission at its
next meeting to terminate the non-
conforming use of land.
Johnston actually attempted to
buy the building at North San Mateo
Drive and East Bellevue Avenue
Group forming to
oppose 7-Eleven
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County officials said they were
disappointed but far from surprised
when Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed a
trailer bill that would have protected
more than $3 million in property
taxes forfeited from three Bay Area
counties.
Now those same officials are
holding out hope the governor may
still make San Mateo County whole
and, barring the possibility, that it
could prevail in court.
“There is a real question of equity
and fairness. It’s
wrong and we
can’t let this go,”
s a i d
As s embl yman
Jerry Hill, D-San
Mateo, who pro-
moted the pro-
posal by state
Sen. Mark Leno,
D - S a n
Francisco.
The trailer bill would have saved
San Mateo County more than $1
Assemblyman, county
hold out hope for ERAF
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Wendell Largo was on his way to
becoming a U.S. citizen.
He was a legal immigrant from
the Philippines and enrolled in all
the right classes. Largo followed his
family to the states Dec. 31, 2004.
Once he got identification, Largo
was able to find work at a retail shop
while he took the classes necessary
to get his citizenship. As a former
teacher, Largo was quickly
excelling through the course work.
The challenge for him was the $680
cost to submit the naturalization
application.
Through a relatively new pro-
gram, Lending Circles for
Citizenship (also known as
Citizenship Tandas), 57-year-old
Social lending: A path to citizenship
REUTERS
San Francisco Giants relief pitcher Sergio Romo celebrates after the Giants defeated the Detroit Tigers in Game
4 to win the MLB World Series baseball championship in Detroit, Mich. last night. SEE STORY PAGE 11.
A weekly look at the people who
shape our community
Jerry Hill
See ERAF, Page 21
Neighbors take issue with
market in residential area
See STORE, Page 22
See PATH, Page 31
SWEEP!
GIANTS WIN WORLD SERIES IN A
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actress Winona
Ryder is 41.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1929
Wall Street crashed on “Black
Tuesday,” heralding the beginning of
America’s Great Depression.
“An old error is always more
popular than a new truth.”
— German proverb.
Singer Melba
Moore is 67.
Actress India Eisley
is 19.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
People dressed as zombies pose for a photo during a night parade in the central avenue of San Jose in Costa Rica Saturday.
People dressed up as zombies took part in the “Zombie Walk”during Halloween celebrations.
Monday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the mid 60s. Northwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the
lower 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the mid
60s. Northwest winds around 5 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the
lower 50s.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of rain. Highs in
the lower 60s.
Wednesday night: Rain likely. Lows in the lower 50s.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Highs in the
lower 60s.
Thursday night through Saturday: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the lower 50s. Highs in the mid 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 05 Califor-
nia Classic in first place; No. 07 Eureka in second
place; and No. 02 Lucky Star in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:46.35.
(Answers tomorrow)
PRESS CLASH TUNEUP EXPERT
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When the baby wouldn’t sleep, the parents
got — REST LESS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TROOB
CORFE
MASNOL
GIRFTH
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
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n

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k

h
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:
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f
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Print answer here:
2 1 6
4 15 24 36 40 44
Mega number
Oct. 26 Mega Millions
1 2 13 34 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 5 4 5
Daily Four
0 1 2
Daily three evening
On this date:
In 1618, Sir Walter Raleigh, the English courtier, military
adventurer and poet, was executed in London.
In 1787, the opera “Don Giovanni” by Wolfgang Amadeus
Mozart had its world premiere in Prague.
In 1901, President William McKinley’s assassin, Leon
Czolgosz (CHAWL’-gahsh), was electrocuted.
In 1923, the Republic of Turkey was proclaimed.
In 1940, Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson drew the first
number — 158 — in America’s first peacetime military draft.
In 1956, during the Suez Canal crisis, Israel invaded Egypt’s
Sinai Peninsula. “The Huntley-Brinkley Report” premiered as
NBC’s nightly television newscast.
In 1960, a chartered plane carrying the California Polytechnic
State University football team crashed on takeoff from Toledo,
Ohio, killing 22 of the 48 people on board.
In 1966, the National Organization for Women was formally
organized during a conference in Washington, D.C.
In 1967, Expo 67 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, closed after
six months.
In 1979, on the 50th anniversary of the great stock market
crash, anti-nuclear protesters tried but failed to shut down the
New York Stock Exchange.
In 1987, following the confirmation defeat of Robert H. Bork to
serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, President Ronald Reagan
announced his choice of Douglas H. Ginsburg, a nomination that
fell apart over revelations of Ginsburg’s previous marijuana use.
In 1998, Sen. John Glenn, at age 77, roared back into space
aboard the shuttle Discovery, retracing the trail he’d blazed for
America’s astronauts 36 years earlier.
Ten years ago: A Minneapolis memorial service for the late
Sen. Paul Wellstone turned into a virtual political rally as
friends and relatives urged Minnesotans to honor his memory
by putting a Democrat in his seat on Election Day.
Bluegrass singer-musician Sonny Osborne (The Osborne
Brothers) is 75. Rock musician Denny Laine is 68. Musician
Peter Green is 66. Actor Richard Dreyfuss is 65. Actress Kate
Jackson is 64. The president of Turkey, Abdullah Gul, is 62.
Actor Dan Castellaneta (“The Simpsons”) is 55. Country musi-
cian Steve Kellough (Wild Horses) is 55. Comic strip artist Tom
Wilson (“Ziggy”) is 55. Singer Randy Jackson is 51. Rock musi-
cian Peter Timmins (Cowboy Junkies) is 47. Actress Joely Fisher
is 45. Rapper Paris is 45. . Actress Gabrielle Union is 39. Actress
Milena Govich is 36. Actor Jon Abrahams is 35. Actor Ben Foster
is 32. Rock musician Chris Baio (Vampire Weekend) is 28.
Reports: UK rocker arrested
as part of Savile case
LONDON — Police investigating
child sex abuse allegations against the
late BBC television host Jimmy Savile
arrested former glam rock star and con-
victed sex offender Gary Glitter on
Sunday, British media reported, raising
further questions about whether Savile
was at the center of a broader pedophile
ring.
Police would not directly identify the
suspect arrested Sunday, but media
including the BBC and Press
Association reported he was the 68-
year-old Glitter.
The musician, whose real name is
Paul Gadd, made it big with the crowd-
pleasing hit “Rock & Roll (Part 2),” a
mostly instrumental anthem that has
been a staple at American sporting
events, thanks to its catchy “hey” cho-
rus. But he fell into disgrace after being
convicted on child abuse charges in
Vietnam.
Sunday’s arrest was the first in a
widening scandal over Savile’s alleged
sex crimes, which started garnering
attention earlier this month when a tele-
vision documentary showed several
women claiming that Savile abused
them when they were teenagers.
Hundreds of potential victims have since
come forward to report similar claims to
police against Savile, a much-loved chil-
dren’s TV presenter and disc jockey who
died at the age of 84
last year.
Most have alleged
abuse by Savile, but
some said they were
abused by Savile and
others. Most claimed
they were assaulted
in their early teens.
The scandal has
raised questions
about whether the BBC, the publicly
funded and trusted broadcaster, had
ignored crimes it suspected over several
decades. Its executives have apologized
and vowed to uncover the true scale of
the alleged abuse.
“The BBC’s reputation is on the line,”
Chris Patten, the chairman of the BBC
Trust, wrote in The Mail on Sunday
newspaper. “The BBC risks squandering
public trust because one of its stars over
three decades was apparently a sexual
criminal ... and because others — BBC
employees and hangers-on — may also
have been involved.”
On Sunday, the BBC and Sky News
showed footage of Glitter, who wore a
hat, a dark coat and sunglasses, being
taken from his home by officers and
driven away.
Police would not directly identify the
suspect, but when asked about Glitter a
spokesman said the force arrested a man
in his 60s early Sunday morning in
London on suspicion of sexual offenses
in connection with the Savile probe. He
was released later Sunday and was due
to return to a London police station in
December for further questioning,
police said. British police do not gener-
ally identify suspects under arrest by
name until they are charged.
Glitter, known for his shiny jumpsuits
and bouffant wigs, was jailed in Britain
in 1999 for possessing child pornogra-
phy, and convicted in 2006 in Vietnam
of committing “obscene acts with chil-
dren” — offenses involving girls aged
10 and 11. He was deported back to
Britain in 2008.
In 2006, the NFL advised its football
teams not to use the Glitter version of
“Rock and Roll (Part 2)” at games.
One witness recently told a BBC-TV
show that she once saw Glitter having
sex with a schoolgirl in Savile’s dressing
room at the broadcaster’s TV center in
the 1970s. Glitter has denied the allega-
tions.
Police have said that though the major-
ity of cases it is investigating relate to
Savile alone, some involve the entertainer
and other unidentified suspects. In addi-
tion, some potential victims who reported
abuse by Savile also told police about
separate allegations against unidentified
men that did not involve the BBC host.
The scandal has horrified Britain with
revelations that Savile, the longtime host
of the popular BBC shows “Top of the
Pops” and “Jim will Fix It,” allegedly
cajoled and coerced vulnerable teens
into having sex with him in his car, his
camper van, and even in dingy dressing
rooms on BBC premises.
5 14 36 38 47 18
Mega number
Oct. 27 Super Lotto Plus
Gary Glitter
MILLBRAE
Disorderly conduct. A person was detained
for disorderly conduct on the 800 block of
Banbury Lane before 10:37 p.m. on
Wednesday, Oct. 17.
BURLINGAME
Burglary. A woman reported her car window
was smashed and her camera, along with
other items, were stolen from Bay View Place
Monday, Oct. 15.
Drunk. A man was arrested for being drunk
in public on the 200 block of Primrose Road
before 5:28 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15.
BELMONT
Vehicle burglary. The window of a car was
smashed and a laptop was stolen from Buena
Vista and Newlands Avenues before 6:04 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 17.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on
Continentals Way before 11:50 a.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 16.
DUI. A man was arrested for driving under
the influence on Sem Lane before 6:15 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 14.
Drunk in public. An drunk man was arrested
for walking away from officers on Twin Pines
Lane before 11:23 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10.
Battery. A man was assaulted by two people
on Ralston Avenue before 8:06 a.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 9.
3
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
S
an Francisco had a population around
35,000 in 1850 and it had increased to
56,000 by 1860. The observation of
alcalde John W. Geary in August 1849 said it
all: There is no money in the treasury. Without
means of acquiring a water system, a sewer
system, there are no hospitals or public means
of helping the injured or sick, we do not have
a police department with adequate men in it
nor a jail to adequately hold prisoners. The
city was in a crisis and the government is
overwhelmed due to the rapid increase in
miners and businessmen that are either pass-
ing through or trying to settle San Francisco.
Armed bands of armed hoodlums roamed
the city, day and night. Crimes went unreport-
ed and if they were reported the people knew
nothing would be done to bring justice to the
citizens.
The treasury was empty. The main means of
obtaining money by the council was by sell-
ing lots along the waterfront and around the
town. Another means that was very lucrative
was charging license fees for gambling. The
city finally got the brig Euphemia, anchored
at the intersection of Battery and Jackson
streets for use as a jail since the calaboose in
Portsmouth Square was inadequate.
Throughout the winter of 1848-49, a partic-
ular group of hoodlums that became named
“the Hounds” rampaged the ethnic groups in
the city by looting, murdering, setting fires,
pulling down tents, beating occupants and
keeping the city in turmoil. They formed
semi-military companies “law and order
group” and established a tent headquarters
near Portsmouth Square. In July 1849, they
raided “Spanish Town” and one of their men
was killed. This set off the Hounds and they
shot occupants of the colony and destroyed
the entire camp. The next day, when the citi-
zens heard of the destruction and acts of the
Hounds, they formed a group of volunteers,
about 250 men, and gave them arms, organ-
ized them into groups and ordered them to
round up those responsible for these acts.
Twenty were arrested and placed on a warship
in the Bay. A judge and jury were set up by
the citizens and, although it was not officially
sanctioned, it kept to the rules and appointed
a grand jury to hear the evidence. The men
were found guilty of rioting, conspiracy, rob-
bery and assault with intent to kill and given
sentences accordingly. However, the men
were released because the court had no means
of carrying out the sentence. Although it
seems like it was a failure to obtain justice,
the group exhibited the power of the citizens
to obtain justice if enough effort was exerted.
This episode did not stop the Hounds and,
before long, another gang became active,
called The Sydney Ducks. They congregated
at the bottom of Telegraph Hill at what was
called Sydney Town (This area later became
known as the Barbary Coast). Again they
operated at will on poor citizens in the same
manner as the Hounds, robbing, beating,
burning, etc., and the citizens were slow to act
to reform this activity until February 1851
when a merchant was brutally beaten. Two
men were arrested and the judge almost
immediately let him be released. Outraged
citizens immediately rearrested the men after
pleading to the judge to retry them. He did not
rearrest them so the committee did.
Unfortunately, after a trial by the citizens, he
was released due to lack of evidence.
This event led to the first organization of a
Vigilance Committee in June 1851. The first
act by this group was prompted by the rob-
bery by John Jenkins on June 10, 1851. He
was captured and hung over a beam at the
Custom House. On July 11, James Stuart was
found guilty of murder and he was hanged by
the members of the committee. At the same
time, the committee was turning “undesir-
ables” away from San Francisco and banish-
ing hundreds from the city because of their
Law and order in the 1840s and ’50s
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
A large crowd gathered to witness the hanging of Whittaker and McKenzie in San Francisco.
See HISTORY, Page 21
Police reports
Two?
A woman reported two of her vehicles
had been broken into and rifled through
on the 1500 block of Barroilhet Avenue in
Burlingame before 7:49 a.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 16.
4
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Terence Chea
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FREMONT — Learning how to
play tennis is hard enough. Now try
it when you can’t see.
That’s what students are doing at
the California School for the Blind.
They’re learning a form of tennis
adapted for the visually impaired —
and expanding the boundaries of
what the blind can do.
The state-supported campus in
Fremont is one of three American
schools for the blind that recently
began teaching adapted tennis,
which was invented in Japan in the
1980s. A nonprofit group called
Tennis Serves is working to pro-
mote the sport throughout the U.S.
“I didn’t know someone with no
vision could play tennis until I came
to this school,” said a 16-year-old
student from Modesto named
Jonathan. The school declined to
provide his last name, citing a state
law that protects the privacy of stu-
dents with disabilities.
Blind tennis features a smaller
court, lower net and junior tennis
rackets with bigger heads and short-
er handles. String is taped to the
floor so players can feel the bound-
aries with their feet.
Players use a foam ball filled with
metal beads that rattle on impact,
allowing them to locate the ball
when it hits the ground or racket.
Once served, they have to return the
ball before it bounces three times.
“The most difficult thing to teach
is timing their stroke,” said Sejal
Vallabh, the 17-year-old founder of
Tennis Serves. “Being able to listen
to the ball, locate it using their sense
of hearing and swing at the precise
moment the ball goes by is really
difficult to teach.”
While experienced players can keep
the ball in bounds and stage extended
rallies, just hitting the ball over the net
can be a challenge for beginners.
During a recent visit to the California
School for the Blind, students mostly
swatted balls into the ground, the net
and toward the ceiling and walls. Few
balls were returned, but teachers say
some are developing that capability.
Blind tennis was created in 1984
by Miyoshi Takei, a blind Japanese
high school student who designed the
adapted ball and helped the sport gain
popularity in Japan and other Asian
countries. He dominated blind tennis
competitions until he was killed in a
train accident last year at age 42.
Blind tennis players keep their ears on the ball
Blind tennis was created in 1984 by Miyoshi Takei, a blind Japanese high
school student who designed the adapted ball and helped the sport gain
popularity in Japan and other Asian countries.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The San Carlos Planning
Commission will hold a third hear-
ing Monday night on the proposed
mixed-use development around the
city’s train station, slowly making
its way through a long list of
issues before determining if the
environmental impact report is
sufficient.
The commission has already
devoted hours across two prior
meetings on the final environmen-
tal impact report and the Transit
Village’s possible impact to park-
ing, noise, traffic and soil. Next on
the list are visual and air quality,
cultural and biological resources,
hydrology, population and
employment, public services and
utilities.
City officials anticipate one or
two more meetings on the EIR in
November and assume the City
Council will likely need two meet-
ings to decide whether to certify
the document. Once the document
is certified, the city officials can
begin knuckling down on the mer-
its of the actual project.
The proposed development con-
cerns a 10.53-acre strip of land
within the existing Caltrain station
and running parallel to the railroad
corridor. Legacy’s proposal envi-
sions eight four-story buildings
with 281 housing units among a
mix of 407,298 square feet of resi-
dential, 23,797 square feet of
office space and 14,326 square feet
of retail space. The project would
also include 667 parking spaces
and a new SamTrans Transit
Center on 4.29 acres.
Residents of the east side neigh-
borhood worry the project will
unduly harm their property but, in
responses to comments on the final
EIR’s conclusions, the staff wrote
the location is no longer in a safe-
ty flood hazard zone and residents
and customers of the new space
are unlikely to park in their resi-
dential area rather than in the pro-
vided spaces. City staff also antic-
ipates the majority of tenants will
use public transportation, thereby
reducing traffic.
The San Carlos Planning
Commission meets 7 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 29 at City Hall, 600 Elm St.,
San Carlos.
Planners tackle Transit Village again
5
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/LOCAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State &Local taxes associated
with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Daily
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of any kind whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros,
Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE EIGHTH ANNUAL
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Week NINE
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TIEBREAKER: Philadelphia @ New Orleans __________
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By Marcia Dunn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — An
unmanned space capsule carrying
medical samples from the
International Space Station
splashed down in the Pacific Ocean
Sunday, completing the first official
private interstellar shipment under a
billion-dollar contract with NASA.
The California-based SpaceX
company gently guided the Dragon
into the water via parachutes at
12:22 p.m., a couple hundred miles
off the Baja California coast.
Astronauts aboard the
International Space Station used a
giant robot arm to release the com-
mercial cargo ship 255 miles up.
SpaceX provided updates of the
journey home via Twitter, including
a video of the Dragon separating
from the ISS.
The supply ship brought back
nearly 2,000 pounds of science
experiments and old station equip-
ment. Perhaps the most eagerly
awaited cargo is nearly 500 frozen
samples of blood and urine collect-
ed by station astronauts over the
past year.
The Dragon is the only delivery
ship capable of returning items, now
that NASA’s shuttles are retired to
museums. Atlantis made the last
shuttle haul to and from the station
in July 2011.
SpaceX — more formally Space
Exploration Technologies Corp. —
launched the capsule three weeks
ago from Cape Canaveral, full of
groceries, clothes and other station
supplies. Ice cream as well as fresh
apples were especially appreciated
by the station residents, now back
up to a full crew of six.
It’s the second Dragon to return
from the orbiting lab; the first mis-
sion in May was a flight demo. This
flight is the first of 12 deliveries
under a $1.6 billion contract with
NASA.
“It was nice while she was on
board,” space station commander
Sunita Williams said as the Dragon
backed away. “We tamed her, took
her home and, literally and figura-
tively, there’s a piece of us on that
spacecraft going home to Earth.”
She added to the SpaceX flight
controllers in Hawthorne, Calif.:
“Congratulations Hawthorne and
thank you for her.”
The Dragon will be retrieved
from the Pacific and loaded onto a
100-foot boat that will haul it to Los
Angeles. From there, it will be
transported to McGregor, Texas.
The medical samples will be
removed as quickly as possible, and
turned over to NASA within 48
hours of splashdown, according to
SpaceX. Everything else will wait
for unloading in McGregor.
A Russian supply ship, mean-
while, is set to blast off this week. It
burns up upon descent, however, at
mission’s end. So do the cargo ves-
sels provided by Europe and Japan.
SpaceX is working to transform
its Dragon cargo craft into vessels
that American astronauts could fly
in another four or five years.
Dragon ship back on Earth after space station trip
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HONOLULU — Officials in Hawaii can-
celed a tsunami advisory for the state’s coast-
line early Sunday, paving the way for beach-
es and harbors to reopen after widespread
fears of waves generated from a powerful
earthquake off the coast of Canada.
The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center lifted
its tsunami advisory Sunday morning just
before 4 a.m. local time, three hours after
downgrading from a warning and less than six
hours after the waves first hit the islands.
Center officials said wave heights were
diminishing, though swimmers and boaters
should be careful of strong or unusual cur-
rents.
The biggest waves — about 5 feet high —
appeared to hit Maui. A popular triathlon set
for the island was expected to go on as
planned, with county lifeguards giving the
OK for a 1 mile ocean swim.
There were no immediate reports of dam-
age, though one person died in a fatal crash
near a road that was closed because of the
threat near Oahu’s north shore.
Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie said the
state was lucky to avoid more severe surges.
“We’re very, very grateful that we can go
home tonight counting our blessings,”
Abercrombie said.
Meanwhile, the National Weather Service
canceled tsunami advisories for Canada,
Alaska, Washington, Oregon and California.
At first, officials said Hawaii wasn’t in any
danger of a tsunami after the 7.7-magnitude
earthquake, which sparked tsunami warnings
for southern Alaska and western Canada.
Later, officials issued a warning for Hawaii
as well, saying there had been a change in sea
readings. About the same time, a tsunami
advisory was issued for a 450-mile stretch of
U.S. coast running from north of San
Francisco to central Oregon.
A small tsunami created by the quake was
barely noticeable in Craig, Alaska, where the
first wave or surge was recorded Saturday
night.
The warning in Hawaii spurred residents to
stock up on essentials at gas stations and gro-
cery stores and sent tourists in beachside
hotels to higher floors in their buildings. Bus
service into Waikiki was cut off an hour
before the first waves, and police in down-
town Honolulu shut down a Halloween block
party.
Abercrombie proclaimed an emergency,
mobilizing extra safety measures.
Tsunami was smaller than
feared; advisory canceled
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Rescue teams were
back in the mountains Sunday resuming sep-
arate searches for two hikers missing in
California’s Sierra Nevada.
More ground crews were called in and two
more helicopters, including a California
Highway Patrol helicopter, joined the search
for Larry Conn of Pacific Palisades.
The 53-year-old departed on a three-day
backpacking trip in Inyo National Forest on Oct.
19 and never emerged from the wilderness.
Conn had planned on hiking through a
rugged wilderness area in the mountains of
the eastern Sierra, not far from the tiny town
of Independence, officials said.
His planned trip included a climb over the
Taboose Pass, a trail described as “strenuous”
and requiring a climb of more than 6,000 feet,
according to the parks service website.
Search crews were focusing their efforts on
the pass, an area considered to be a likely
camp location, Sequoia and Kings Canyon
National Parks spokeswoman Dana Dierkes
said.
Conditions continued to be challenging for
the search teams, who were working in cold
and icy conditions, with up to 18 inches of
snow on the ground.
Conn is an experienced hiker who’s famil-
iar with the region, having hiked the pass ear-
lier this year, according to his partner, Claus
Svendsen.
“I’m hopeful that he is working his way
towards an exit up there,” said Svendsen, 60.
“Or he’s just hunkered down and waiting for
rescue.”
In a second search in the Sierra, Fresno
County teams continue to look for Matthew
Hanson, 52, a Visalia man who was missing
after going on a backpacking trip near Shaver
Lake.
The search for Hanson was also taking
place in a mountainous area that has also been
covered with about a foot of snow on the
ground, Fresno County Sheriff’s Lt. Patrick
Hanson said.
One dead, three others hurt
in San Jose shootings
SAN JOSE — One man is dead and three
others are wounded after separate shootings
in San Jose early Sunday.
San Jose police say in the fatal shooting
officers found the man, whose name has not
been released, suffering from at least one
gunshot wound after getting called to inter-
section of Locust and Humboldt streets a lit-
tle before 3 a.m. Sunday.
The man died after being taken to a hospi-
tal. He is San Jose’s 39th homicide victim of
the year.
Police say in a separate shooting, one per-
son was left with wounds that were not con-
sidered life-threatening after getting hit by
gunfire around 1 a.m.
Another person was shot around 2:15 a.m.
The fourth shooting took place around 3 a.m.
when a man was hit by gunfire.
Police did not release details of the other
shootings.
Crews search for missing hikers
The Dragon is the only delivery ship
capable of returning items, now
that NASA’s shuttles are retired to
museums.
Local brief
6
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Mark Sherman
and Jay Reeves
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Three years ago, the
Supreme Court warned there could be consti-
tutional problems with a landmark civil rights
law that has opened voting booths to millions
of African-Americans. Now, opponents of a
key part of the Voting Rights Act are asking
the high court to finish off that provision.
The basic question is whether state and
local governments that once boasted of their
racial discrimination still can be forced in the
21st century to get federal permission before
making changes in the way they hold elec-
tions.
Some of the governments covered — most
of them are in the South — argue they have
turned away from racial discrimination over
the years. But Congress and lower courts that
have looked at recent challenges to the law
concluded that a history of discrimination and
more recent efforts to harm minority voters
justify continuing federal oversight.
The Supreme Court could say as early as
Monday whether it will consider ending the
Voting Rights Act’s advance approval require-
ment that has been held up as a crown jewel
of the civil rights era.
The justices sidestepped this very issue in a
case from Texas in 2009. In an opinion joined
by eight justices, Chief Justice John Roberts
wrote then that the issue of advance approval
“is a difficult constitutional question we do
not answer today.”
Since then, Congress has not addressed
potential problems identified by the court.
Meanwhile, the law’s opponents sensed its
vulnerability and filed several new lawsuits.
The advance approval, or preclearance
requirement, was adopted in the Voting Rights
Act in 1965 to give federal officials a potent
tool to defeat persistent efforts to keep blacks
from voting.
The provision was a huge success, and
Congress periodically has renewed it over the
years. The most recent occasion was in 2006,
when a Republican-led Congress overwhelm-
ingly approved and President George W. Bush
signed a 25-year extension.
The requirement currently applies to the
states of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia,
Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas
and Virginia. It also covers certain counties in
California, Florida, New York, North Carolina
and South Dakota, and some local jurisdic-
tions in Michigan and New Hampshire.
Coverage has been triggered by past discrim-
ination not only against blacks, but also
against American Indians, Asian-Americans,
Alaskan Natives and Hispanics.
Before these locations can change their vot-
ing rules, they must get approval either from
the U.S. Justice Department’s civil rights divi-
sion or from the federal district court in
Washington that the new rules won’t discrim-
inate.
Congress compiled a 15,000-page record
and documented hundreds of instances of
apparent voting discrimination in the states
covered by the law dating to 1982, the last
time it had been extended.
Among the incidents in the congressional
record:
• In 1998, Webster County, Ga., tried to
reduce the black population in several school
board districts after citizens elected a majori-
ty-black school board for the first time.
• In 2001, Kilmichael, Miss., canceled an
election when a large number of African-
American candidates sought local office fol-
lowing 2000 census results that showed
blacks had become the majority in the city.
• In 2004, Waller County, Texas, sought to
limit early voting near a historically black col-
lege and threatened to prosecute students for
illegal voting after two black students said
they would run for office.
But in 2009, Roberts indicated the court
was troubled about the ongoing need for a law
in the face of dramatically improved condi-
tions, including increased minority voter reg-
istration and turnout rates. Roberts attributed
part of the change to the law itself. “Past suc-
cess alone, however, is not adequate justifica-
tion to retain the preclearance requirements,”
he said.
He also raised concern that the formula by
which states are covered relies on data that is
now 40 years old.
High court weighs new look at voting rights law
President Lyndon B.Johnson signs the Voting
Rights Act of 1965.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Two small
earthquakes rattled Southern
California but there no reports of
damage or injury.
The US Geological Survey says a
3.9 magnitude quake struck at 8:24
a.m. Sunday and was centered about
5 miles east-southeast of Santa
Clarita.
Shaking was felt across the Santa
Clarita Valley, 25 miles to the south
in downtown Los Angeles, in West
Hollywood and along LA County
beaches.
A sheriff’s dispatcher in Santa
Clarita said there were no calls
reporting damage or injury.
Earlier Sunday a 3.9 magnitude
quake was reported in Riverside
County. The USGS says it struck at
12:47 a.m. about six miles southeast
of Valle Vista.
Two small quakes shake Southern California
Arrest after homeless
people struck, killed in LA
LOS ANGELES — Two home-
less people sleeping on a downtown
sidewalk were struck and killed by a
car driven by 19-year-old woman
who police say may have been
drinking.
Authorities say Carmen Elena
Chavez lost control of her 1989
Mercedes-Benz while making a
right turn in the Skid Row area of
Los Angeles.
A man and a woman sleeping on
the sidewalk were killed.
Chavez was booked on suspicion
of vehicular manslaughter.
State brief
NATION 7
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — From
Washington to Boston, big cities
and small towns Sunday buttoned
up against the onslaught of a super-
storm that could endanger 50 mil-
lion people in the most heavily pop-
ulated corridor in the nation, with
forecasters warning that New York
could get slammed by a wall of
water.
“The time for preparing and talk-
ing is about over,” Federal
Emergency Management
Administrator Craig Fugate said as
Hurricane Sandy made its way up
the Atlantic on a collision course
with two other weather systems that
could turn it into one of the most
fearsome storms on record in the
U.S. “People need to be acting
now.”
Airlines canceled more than
5,000 flights and Amtrak began sus-
pending train service across the
Northeast. New York and
Philadelphia moved to shut down
their subways, buses and trains
Sunday night and announced that
schools would be closed on
Monday. Boston, Washington and
Baltimore also called off school.
And non-essential government
employees in the nation’s capital
were told not to report for work in
the morning.
As rain from the leading edges of
the monster hurricane began to fall
over the Northeast, hundreds of
thousands of people from Maryland
to Connecticut were ordered to
evacuate low-lying coastal areas
Sunday, including 375,000 in lower
Manhattan and other parts of New
York City, 50,000 in Delaware and
30,000 in Atlantic City, N.J., where
the city’s 12 casinos were forced to
shut down for only the fourth time
ever.
“We were told to get the heck out.
I was going to stay, but it’s better to
be safe than sorry,” said Hugh
Phillips, who was one of the first in
line when a Red Cross shelter in
Lewes, Del., opened at noon.
“I think this one’s going to do us
in,” said Mark Palazzolo, who
boarded up his bait-and-tackle shop
in Point Pleasant Beach, N.J., with
the same wood he used in past
storms, crossing out the names of
Hurricanes Isaac and Irene and
spray-painting “Sandy” next to
them. “I got a call from a friend of
mine from Florida last night who
said, ‘Mark, get out! If it’s not the
storm, it’ll be the aftermath. People
are going to be fighting in the streets
over gasoline and food.”’
Authorities warned that the
nation’s biggest city could get hit
with an 11-foot wall of water that
could swamp parts of lower
Manhattan, flood subway tunnels
and cripple the network of electrical
and communications lines that are
vital to the nation’s financial center.
Sandy, a Category 1 hurricane
with sustained winds of 75 mph as
of Sunday evening, was blamed for
65 deaths in the Caribbean before it
began churning up the Eastern
Seaboard. As of 5 p.m., it was cen-
tered about 530 miles southeast of
New York City, moving at 15 mph,
with hurricane-force winds extend-
ing an incredible 175 miles from its
center.
It was expected to hook left
toward the mid-Atlantic coast and
come ashore late Monday or early
Tuesday, most likely in New Jersey,
colliding with a wintry storm mov-
ing in from the west and cold air
streaming down from the Arctic.
East braces for dangerous superstorm
REUTERS
A worker places plywood over the windows of a restaurant in preparation
for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy in Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Sunday.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — You’d think health
insurance CEOs would be chilling the bubbly
with Republican Mitt Romney’s improved
election prospects, but instead they’re in a
quandary.
Although the industry hates parts of
President Barack Obama’s health care law,
major outfits such as UnitedHealth Group and
BlueCross Blue Shield also stand to rake in
billions of dollars from new customers who’ll
get health insurance under the law. The com-
panies already have invested tens of millions
to carry it out.
Were Romney elected, insurers would be in
for months of uncertainty as his administra-
tion gets used to Washington and tries to make
good on his promise repeal Obama’s law.
Simultaneously, federal and state bureaucrats
and the health care industry would face a rush
of legal deadlines for putting into place the
major pieces of what Republicans deride as
“Obamacare.”
Would they follow the law on the books or
the one in the works? What would federal
Insurers nervous over possible Romney win
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CELINA, Ohio — Republican presidential
candidate Mitt Romney and President Barack
Obama frantically sought to close the deal
with voters with precious few days left in an
incredibly close race as this year’s October
surprise — an unprecedented storm menacing
the East Coast — wreaked havoc on their
best-laid plans.
Ever mindful of his narrow path to the req-
uisite 270 electoral votes, Romney looked to
expand his map, weighing an intensified effort
in traditionally left-leaning Minnesota.
Obama sought to defend historically
Democratic turf as the race tightened heading
into the final week.
Wary of being seen as putting their political
pursuits ahead of public safety, the two White
House hopefuls reshuffled their campaign
plans as the storm approached. Both candi-
dates were loath to forfeit face time with vot-
ers in battleground states like Virginia that are
likely to be afflicted when Hurricane Sandy, a
winter storm and a cold front collide to form a
freak hybrid storm.
“The storm will throw
havoc into the race,” said
Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va.
Obama, preparing to
depart for Florida Sunday, a
day early to beat the storm,
got an update from disaster
relief officials before speak-
ing by phone to affected
governors and mayors.
“Anything they need, we
will be there,” Obama
said. “And we are going to
cut through red tape. We
are not going to get
bogged down with a lot of
rules. We want to make
sure that we are anticipat-
ing and leaning forward.”
An opportunity for
Obama to demonstrate
steady leadership in the face of crisis was off-
Storm wreaks havoc
on presidential race
Barack Obama
Mitt Romney
See RACE, Page 21
See ROMNEY, Page 21
NATION/WORLD 8
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Timing
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By Thomas Beaumont
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AMES, Iowa — President
Barack Obama is poised to eke out
a victory in the race for the 270
electoral votes needed to win re-
election, having beaten back
Republican Mitt Romney’s attempts
to convert momentum from the
debates into support in all-impor-
tant Ohio, according to an
Associated Press analysis a week
before Election Day.
While the Democratic incumbent
has the upper hand in the electoral
vote hunt, Romney has pulled even,
or is slightly ahead, in polling in a
few pivotal states, including Florida
and Virginia. The Republican chal-
lenger also appears to have the
advantage in North Carolina, the
most conservative of the hotly con-
tested nine states that will determine
the winner.
While in a tight race with Obama
for the popular vote, Romney con-
tinues to have fewer state-by-state
paths than Obama to reach 270.
Without Ohio’s 18 electoral votes,
Romney would need last-minute
victories in nearly all the remaining
up-for-grabs
states and
manage to
pick off key
states now
l e a n i n g
O b a m a ’ s
way, such as
Iowa or Wisconsin.
To be sure, anything can happen
in the coming days to influence the
Nov. 6 election.
The AP analysis isn’t intended to
predict the outcome. Rather, it’s
meant to provide a snapshot of a
race that has been stubbornly close
in the small number of competitive
states all year. The analysis is based
on public polls and internal cam-
paign surveys as well as spending
on television advertising, candidate
visits, get-out-the-vote organiza-
tions and interviews with dozens of
Republican and Democratic strate-
gists in Washington and in the most
contested states.
The analysis shows that Obama
probably would win with at least
271 electoral votes from 21 states,
including Ohio, Wisconsin and
Iowa, and the District of Columbia.
Romney seems on track for 206
from 23 states, including North
Carolina. Obama won that state in
2008 and campaigned aggressively
there this year. But Obama’s team
acknowledges it is the most difficult
state for him to win, and he’s paid
less attention to it recently.
Colorado, Florida, Nevada, New
Hampshire and Virginia, with a
combined 61 votes at stake, could
go either way.
“I’m counting on Iowa! Iowa may
be the place that decides who the
next president is!” Romney said on
one of two visits to the state last
week. In Ohio last week, a hoarse
Obama reminded a Cleveland audi-
ence near the end of a six-state
marathon: “I need you, Ohio.
America needs you, Ohio.”
Romney is banking on what his
supporters say is late momentum.
Obama is betting that his aggressive
effort to register and lock in early
voters, mainly Democratic-leaning
younger and minority voters, will
give him an insurmountable advan-
tage heading into Election Day,
when more Republicans typically
vote than Democrats.
About 35 percent of voters are
expected to cast their ballots before
Nov. 6, either in person or by mail.
More than 5 million people already
have voted. No votes will be count-
ed until Nov 6, but some states
report the party affiliation of people
who have voted. Democrats have
the edge in Iowa, Nevada and North
Carolina, according to state figures
and data collected by the United
States Elections Project at George
Mason University. Republicans
have the early edge in Colorado.
Obama, who won in 2008 in
places where Democrats had not for
a generation, continues to have sev-
eral routes to electoral victory. His
easiest: win Ohio, Iowa and
Wisconsin, which are leaning his
way. He could keep the White
House with victories in Ohio,
Wisconsin and Nevada. If he loses
Ohio, he could prevail by sweeping
New Hampshire, Iowa, Wisconsin,
Nevada and Colorado.
Romney has fewer options. He
must carry Florida and Virginia,
where Republicans are feeling good
about his standing, as well as wrest
control of Ohio, and then also win
Nevada, Colorado or New
Hampshire. If he loses Ohio,
Romney must make up for the
state’s 18 electoral votes by cutting
his way through Obama-leaning ter-
ritory.
At the top of that target list are
Wisconsin, carried by Democrats in
six straight presidential elections
and where Obama has the edge, and
Iowa, a perennial swing-voting
state.
Romney’s campaign began airing
advertisements last week in
Minnesota, arguing he was staking a
claim in likely Obama territory. But
even GOP strategists acknowledged
the move was aimed at hitting vot-
ers in western Wisconsin and pres-
suring Obama to follow suit. By
Friday, Obama’s campaign had
done just that, although the presi-
dent has a healthy lead in both
polling and organization in
Minnesota.
“We have to keep working those
other states, in case Ohio doesn’t
come through,” said veteran GOP
presidential strategist Charlie
Black, who is advising Romney’s
campaign.
Ohio is a lynchpin for both candi-
dates.
Advantage Obama in hunt for 270
Analysis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RAMALLAH, West Bank — The
Palestinian president is moving for-
ward with his plan to seek upgraded
observer status at the United
Nations next month, despite
American and Israeli threats of
financial or diplomatic retaliation,
officials said Sunday.
The decision sets the stage for a
new showdown between Israel and
the Palestinians at the world body,
following last year’s attempt by the
Palestinians to seek status as a full
member state. Although that initia-
tive failed to pass the U.N. Security
Council, it caused months of diplo-
matic tensions with Israel.
“We will go to the U.N. regard-
less of any threats,” said Tawfik
Tirawi, a senior member of
President Mahmoud Abbas’ Fatah
movement. “I expect the Israelis to
take punitive measures against us, if
we win this status, but this is our
choice and we will not retract it.”
This year, the Palestinians are
seeking “nonmember state” status
in the U.N. General Assembly,
where passage is assured. The 193-
member assembly is dominated by
developing nations sympathetic to
the Palestinian cause. Officials say
they are looking for what they call a
“quality” majority that includes
European countries as well, though
Germany and Britain, for instance,
have been cool to the Palestinian
plan.
While upgraded status would not
change the situation on the ground,
the Palestinians say the move is still
significant. They will ask for inter-
national recognition of a Palestinian
state in the West Bank, Gaza Strip
and east Jerusalem, territories cap-
tured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast
war.
They believe the U.N. vote would
then require Israel to withdraw to
the pre-1967 lines or face interna-
tional legal action. Israel rejects a
full return to those lines, and says
the borders between Israel and a
future Palestine must be reached
through direct negotiations.
The Palestinians also hope to use
upgraded status to join additional
U.N. bodies, such as the
International Criminal Court, where
they could attempt to prosecute
Israel on war crimes violations. The
Palestinians last year received mem-
bership into UNESCO, the U.N. cul-
tural agency. Over Israeli objections,
they subsequently won recognition
of the Church of the Nativity in the
West Bank town of Bethlehem as an
endangered heritage site.
A Palestinian official said Abbas
is expected to formally put his
request to the General Assembly on
Nov. 15 or Nov. 29.
The official spoke on condition of
anonymity because no formal deci-
sion has been made.
Both dates are symbolic. The 15th
is the anniversary of the 1988
Palestinian declaration of independ-
ence. The 29th is the anniversary of
the 1947 U.N. decision to partition
of what was then British-ruled
Palestine into Israeli and Arab terri-
tories.
Palestinians to seek UN recognition next month
OPINION 9
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Vote no on Proposition 32
Editor,
After reading Mr. John Owen’s letter
(“The Wisconsin lesson” from the Oct.
25 issue of the Daily Journal), I must
say that Mr. Owen is wrong about
Proposition 32. There already exists
federal, state and local laws that govern
the use of donations from union mem-
bers in the state of California. How do I
know? I’ve been a member of two dif-
ferent very large labor unions for over
30 years. As union members, we all
received the information about the laws
governing donations or money taken
out of employees’ paychecks and were
informed that any political contribu-
tions were voluntary only. I also know
this to be true, because I’ve read the
information printed in the “California
General Election Voter Guide” that was
mailed to every citizen in California
and was issued by the state. Further
information about these existing laws
can be easily found online. Once more,
it’s clear that Proposition 32 is a union-
busting tactic that would serve to pre-
vent the “middle class” from the power
of the vote, whether they vote individu-
ally or as a group.
It is clear that the Koch Brothers and
Republicans are supporting and financ-
ing Prop. 32 simply by the list of
‘exemptions to Prop. 32 mandates’.
These exemptions include: real estate
developers, insurance companies, bil-
lionaire venture capitalists, corporate
special interest groups, business super
PACs and independent expenditure
committees. The list of who’s who, of
major contributors to Yes on
Proposition 32 are: former Wall Street
investors, insurance company execu-
tives, hedge fund managers and the
Koch Brothers. It is obvious that Mr.
Owen, a self-proclaimed “ignorant Tea
Party type,” was never a member of any
labor union, so he doesn’t know what
he is talking about.
Michael R. Oberg
San Mateo
Union dues and their uses
Editor,
I must respond to Mr. Owen’s com-
ment, published in his letter in the Oct.
25 edition of the Daily Journal, regard-
ing unions “stealing from paychecks to
promote political agendas contrary to
the wishes of the workers.” I was a
union member for over 40 years and
had money deducted from my pay all
40-plus years. It’s called dues. It pays
the salaries of union officials, secretari-
al staff and offices. If there is any
money left, they use it to help support
the campaigns of politicians who have
proven themselves to be supportive of
union workers.
Tom Dalton
South San Francisco
Vote down
propositions 30 and 38
Editor,
I believe educating our children is
one of our most important responsibili-
ties but, in California, we do not do it
well. The universal response from
politicians and teacher unions is to pro-
vide more money. This is a debatable
fix, but even so, our retread governor
has arrogantly stated that if we do not
raise our taxes, he will make deeper
cuts to education funds.
But consider this: more than 50 per-
cent of our taxes in this bankrupt state
already go to education, and we are
spending tens of billions of dollars to
build a high-speed train to nowhere,
planning a system to send more water
to the south, have secret accounts in
various unnecessary state departments,
have no employee unsustainable pen-
sion reform (the recently passed bill
provides no savings for years to come),
have not addressed teacher tenure, have
no illegal immigration policy (it is diffi-
cult and expensive to teach students
that do not speak English), build mas-
sive solar projects with long paybacks,
build swimming clubs at our colleges
and spend billions on stem cell
research, etc.
Please join me in sending a message
to our governor and Legislature — that
they should learn to live within their
means like we have to, by turning
down propositions 30 and 38. If they
do cut more education funds, they
should not bother to run for re-election.
Joe O’Connor
San Mateo
Kaiser hospital jaywalking
Editor,
Is there a little collusion going on
between the Redwood City Police
Department and the employees of
Kaiser Permanente? Two years ago, I
was cited for jaywalking across
Veterans Boulevard and had to pay a
$104 fine. I drive on Veterans
Boulevard daily and am constantly
swerving or slowing down to prevent
striking someone coming from the
Kmart parking lot. Where is Redwood
City Police Department? At $104 per
case, Redwood City should be swim-
ming in fines. Unfortunately, the police
seem to turn a blind eye. People cross-
ing Maple Street from Kaiser to the
parking garage walk against the light
and almost get hit. Where is the police
department? Park two motorcycle offi-
cers in the parking lots of Kmart and
behind Kaiser and start writing tickets.
Someone is going to get hit by a car
and it won’t be their fault.
James E. Laws
Redwood City
Letters to the editor
— Los Angeles Daily News
T
he California State University
has come out with its
“Legislative Scorecard” for
2011-12, grading Sacramento lawmak-
ers A to F.
Let’s hope Cal State is more fair
when it grades students.
The grades are based on how mem-
bers of the state Senate and Assembly
voted on bills pertaining to public uni-
versities, including bills that affect uni-
versity funding. The intent, according
to the CSU report, is “to inform the
public on lawmakers’ support of the
CSU and public higher education.”
What leaps off the page is that the
graders took points away from lawmak-
ers who voted for bills aimed at limit-
ing the controversial salary raises that
the CSU trustees have given to campus
presidents — the raises that angered
students whose tuition continues to rise.
CSU officials’ myopia must keep
them from seeing that for many people
(perhaps most people), votes against
pay hikes for already well-compensated
campus bosses are not votes against
education but votes for a more equi-
table policy amid state education fund-
ing cutbacks.
For what it’s worth, the CSU report
card lists no A’s for California lawmak-
ers this year. The highest-graded L.A.-
area representatives, each with a B+,
were Assemblymen Mike Feuer and
Sen. Alex Padilla. The only F among
local reps went to Assemblyman Steve
Knight.
Sen. Fran Pavley, a former school-
teacher who lists education as her top
issue, received a D-. She voted for a
bill that sought to prohibit raises for
CSU employees with salaries of more
than $200,000.
But CSU’s self-serving legislative
ratings should be taken no more seri-
ously than any other interest group’s.
CSU gets a fail for this report card
Four years
ago today
F
our years ago, I attended my first national political
convention. The Democrats’ nominating confab
was held in Colorado. The chosen candidate was
Barack Obama. Those were heady days. Some hoped for a
floor battle between Hillary Clinton and Obama that never
happened. Instead, convention goers of all persuasions
rallied behind the young senator from Illinois convinced
he could win the presidency. One had to arrive four hours
early because of the crowds (85,000 strong and every seat
taken) and security checks
to enter Invesco Field
where Obama would accept
his party’s nomination. It
was a perfect Colorado
night. No rain. Not too hot
or cold. There was as much
excitement in the stands as
in a close football game. In
January, I attended the
inauguration with millions
of others. No one thought
much about politics that
day. It was just great to be
an American. When some-
one tried to boo at the men-
tion of the outgoing President George Bush, that someone
was immediately silenced by the crowd. We were all part
of something bigger that day. Full of hope and change.
That was four years ago.
***
This year, I didn’t attend a convention nor do I plan to
attend an inauguration. Nothing could replicate the eupho-
ria of four years ago. Yet I am still an enthusiastic sup-
porter of Barack Obama and feel it is just as important to
re-elect him now as I felt it was important to elect him in
2008. I was relieved at how he handled the financial crisis
even though he should have been harsher on Wall Street. I
regretted he didn’t have Paul Volcker on his team instead
of Larry Sumner. But the banks did not fail and Obama
saved us from another Great Depression. I was thankful
he rescued the U.S. automobile industry. His actions not
only saved jobs, but our country’s prestige. Today, I like
the way Obama handles foreign policy (So does Colin
Powell). No more sabre-rattling but working with our
allies to get things done. He had to change the world’s
image of the United States, an almost impossible task
after the Iraq war and its fallout. I am frightened every
time his opponent talks about foreign policy — how he
would stare down Putin, show the Chinese who has the
money (they do), be bolder in Syria, show Iran who is
boss. He is not careful when he speaks, at home or
abroad. We cannot afford a loose-lipped president in these
turbulent times.
The biggest challenge to hope and change was Senate
Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s pledge to make sure
Obama was a one-term president. That meant Republicans
in the House of Representatives and the Senate weighed
every vote, every committee meeting, every act on what
would most damage an Obama presidency. A poor econo-
my, high unemployment were their best bets. And reduc-
ing the size of the stimulus to its bare bones was a good
first step.
***
Have I been disappointed in the last four years?
Absolutely. Obama shouldn’t have been so cozy with the
bankers, investors and hedge fund mangers who got us
into the financial mess. They were among his major cam-
paign supporters four years ago. This time they are sup-
porting his opponent. Obama should have left his idealism
in Chicago and realized there was no way to make a deal
with the Republican House. Instead, he should have sup-
ported Bowles-Simpson or similar plans even though it
would have made some Democrats unhappy. On health
care, he cut so many deals to make it work, it is cumber-
some. But it is a first step and a huge victory for the pres-
ident to get it passed. For many in this country it will be a
life-saver. Otherwise, Obama continues to impress and not
disappoint. Today, the country is better off than it was
four years ago. Certainly, the rich are much better off.
And maybe a few of them will invest here instead of over-
seas and create jobs. For too many individuals who have
lost work or their home because of the recklessness of
Wall Street and the Bush administration, it’s still a strug-
gle. But their lives and fortunes will improve with an
Obama presidency. Mitt Romney has just sent me a letter
asking for money and my vote. I don’t know why I am on
his list unless he sent a letter to every woman voter in the
United States. I don’t believe most women will support
him. In any event, this one is casting her ballot for Barack
Obama.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It’s halftime for
the season of corporate earnings reports,
and investors are in desperate need of a
locker-room pep talk.
Before Alcoa reported its third-quarter
results Oct. 9, marking the unofficial
start of earnings season, financial ana-
lysts were predicting that profit and rev-
enue for companies in the Standard &
Poor’s 500 would be lower than the year
before.
That would have been the first decline
by either measure since the third quarter
of 2009, just after the Great Recession
ended.
But a funny thing happened on the
way to the pity party: Some of the
biggest and most important U.S. compa-
nies started reporting revenue growth
and raising their guidance.
The quarter was no blockbuster, to be
sure, but by midweek analysts were
reassessing their grim predictions.
Halfway through earnings season, both
winning streaks — profit and revenue —
are on track to survive another quarter.
There are still plenty of reasons to
worry about corporate America.
Sales are hurting because of weaker
demand from Europe, which faces a
recession, and China, where economic
growth has slowed. A stronger dollar
means sales overseas translate into lower
revenue on the books back in the United
States.
Above all, analysts worry about weak-
er revenue. Net income grew for 11
straight quarters partly because so many
companies cut costs, borrowed money
more cheaply and employed other short-
term strategies to boost their profit mar-
gins.
In the fourth quarter of 2010, for
example, net income for the S&P 500
leapt 37 percent, but revenue increased
only 10 percent, according to S&P
Capital IQ, a research firm.
That gap can’t survive, analysts say,
and revenue growth is starting to weak-
en. Companies will need to beef up sales
to keep increasing their earnings, and
that takes stronger customer demand.
And yet: The winning streak appears
likely to continue.
With stronger reports piling up at mid-
week, it appeared that S&P 500 earnings
will increase 1.1 percent from last year,
says Sam Stovall, chief equity strategist
with S&P Capital IQ. Before earnings
season started, his firm predicted a 2 per-
cent decline.
At first, corporate reports appeared to
be as bad as many feared.
Alcoa said China’s economic slow-
down was reducing demand for its alu-
minum. Energy and commodity compa-
nies were similarly downbeat. Dow
Chemical CEO Andrew Liveris
announced layoffs and spending cuts,
saying weak sales in China and Europe
are contributing to a “slow-growth and
volatile world.”
The Dow Jones industrial average
plunged 243 points on Tuesday, its third-
biggest decline of the year, after more
comments about weak demand from
DuPont, 3M, UPS and Xerox.
Then on Wednesday, Aflac, the life-
insurance company known for its nasal-
voiced spokesduck, posted higher net
income on double-digit revenue growth.
Boeing, among the biggest U.S.
exporters, reported revenue growth and
raised its expectations for the rest of the
year. US Airways said net income and
revenue rose during peak travel season.
“I think it’s intriguing that everyone
thinks earnings are falling off the cliff,”
Stovall says. He expects earnings and
revenue to improve by the end of the
year and into 2013.
Winning streaks may survive
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The New York Stock
Exchange and the NYMEX are shutting
their trading floors in New York Monday
as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the
Big Apple.
But trading will continue electronical-
ly on both exchanges.
NYSE Euronext said Sunday it is put-
ting in place its contingency plans begin-
ning Monday and will announce later
when the trading floor will reopen.
The New York Mercantile Exchange, a
commodity futures exchange, also will
be shutting on Monday its trading floor
which is located in a mandatory evacua-
tion zone. The CME Group, which owns
NYMEX, said all electronic markets will
open at their regularly scheduled times.
The moves come as Hurricane Sandy
causes the shutdown of transportation
systems throughout the region.
Governor Andrew Cuomo said New
York City’s subways and buses will shut
down Sunday evening. New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered resi-
dents to evacuate some low-lying areas
Sunday and said city public schools will
close Monday.
Trading can still go on even without
people yelling orders to buy and sell
across the floor of the exchange because
many orders on the NYSE are already
handled electronically. On Monday,
securities normally handled on the
NYSE will shift to the purely electronic
NYSE Arca.
The servers that handle all of the
exchange’s transactions are housed in
Mahwah, N.J.
Trading has rarely stopped for weath-
er. A blizzard led to a late start and an
early close on Jan. 8, 1996, according to
the exchange’s parent company, NYSE
Euronext. The NYSE shut down on Sept.
27, 1985 for Hurricane Gloria.
Since the Great Depression, the
longest suspension in trading at the
NYSE occurred after the attacks on the
World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2011,
when the exchange closed for four days.
Sandy, a Category 1 hurricane with
sustained winds of 75 mph as of Sunday
afternoon, was blamed for 65 deaths in
the Caribbean before it began churning
up the Eastern Seaboard.
NYSE to trade electronically today
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Microsoft bills Windows 8 as a “re-
imagining” of the personal computer market’s dominant oper-
ating system, but the company still has a lot of work to do
before the makeover captures the imagination of most con-
sumers, based on the results of a recent poll by The Associated
Press and GfK.
The phone survey of nearly 1,200 adults in the U.S. found 52
percent hadn’t even heard of Windows 8 leading up to Friday’s
release of the redesigned software.
Among the people who knew something about the new oper-
ating system, 61 percent had little or no interest in buying a new
laptop or desktop computer running on Windows 8, according
to the poll. And only about a third of people who’ve heard
about the new system believe it will be an improvement (35
percent).
Chris Dionne of Waterbury, Conn., falls into that camp. The
43-year-old engineer had already seen Windows 8 and it didn’t
persuade him to abandon or upgrade his Hewlett-Packard lap-
top running on Windows 7, the previous version of the operat-
ing system released in 2009.
The California Assisted Living Association (CALA)
announced this week that Silverado Senior Living in
Belmont, a Silverado Senior Living community, will receive
the organization’s Assisted Living — Innovation in Quality
award at its fall conference in Orange County. CALA chooses
recipients of these awards based on their commitment to
employing creativity and innovation in their programming for
residents and staff. Daizel Gasperian, executive director, and
Sammy Hassan, assistant administrator, will accept the award
Nov. 5.
Poll: Scant demand for
Microsoft’s Windows 8
On the move
<< Palmer leads Raiders to victory, page 13
• Carlmont runners dominant in cross country, page 12
Monday, Oct. 29, 2012
BCS STANDINGS: NOTRE DAME LATEST TO PASS DUCKS IN BCS STANDINGS >>> PAGE 17
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Last year, the College of San
Mateo football team traveled to
Butte College after a heartbreaking
loss to City College of San
Francisco the week before and were
embarrassed on the field. So much
so that coaches said the three-hour
bus ride back home felt more like a
13 hour trip.
This season, there was no bus
ride, but the trot back to the Bulldog
locker room after a 19-11 loss prob-
ably had that same, torturous,
drawn-out feeling.
Turnovers, penalties and struggles
in the punting game added up to
CSM’s second straight defeat in
NorCal play.
“You have to listen to hear
words,” said CSM head coach Bret
Pollack. “Some people didn’t want
to listen — listening not hearing.”
It’s safe to say the entire football
team is all ears now. With two
games left on the regular season
schedule, the Bulldogs stand at 5-3
(1-2 conference) and need six wins
to be bowl eligible. Both games, De
Anza College and Santa Rosa
College, are on the road.
The game played itself out in
strange fashion — so much so that
the numbers don’t tell the entire
story. CSM actually outgained
Butte 346 to 333 and Bulldog quar-
terback Blake Plattsmier threw for
232 yards against a defense that
allowed just in average of 316 yards
per game in their first seven con-
tests.
What the roadrunners did so well
Saturday afternoon, as they’ve done
all season long, is shut down the
CSM rushing attack. Butte came in
as the only team in the NorCal con-
ference allowing under 100 (89
yards) per game. The Bulldogs did
better than that average with 114,
but only to the tune of 2.7 yards an
attempt.
Butte, on the other hands, aver-
aged 4.2 yards per rush with
Cameron Mikell leading at the
charge with 123 yards rushing on 18
carries.
The roadrunner defense set the
tone early, forcing a fumble on
CSM’s second play from scrim-
mage. And as they did all game
long, they capitalized on Bulldog
mistakes. The roadrunners turned
the Kenya Price fumble into a 27-
yard field goal to make it 3-0.
CSM did respond with a John
Odell 33-yard field goal with 4:21
left in the first quarter. But it only
took Butte two plays to regain the
lead when Mikell took a handoff
and busted through the CSM
defense on a 72-yard touchdown
run. The failed extra point made it
9-3.
On CSM’s next offensive charge,
the turnover monster reared it ugly
head again. The Bulldogs nickel and
Mistakes plague CSM in loss to Butte
See CSM, Page 14
By Ben Walker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Finally pressed in
the World Series, the San Francisco
Giants finished off a most unexpect-
ed and stunning sweep.
Marco Scutaro delivered one
more key hit this October, hitting a
go-ahead single with two outs in the
10th inning that lifted the Giants
over the Detroit Tigers 4-3 in Game
4 on Sunday night.
Nearly eliminated over and over
earlier in the playoffs, the Giants
sealed their second title in
three seasons when Triple
Crown winner Miguel
Cabrera looked at strike
three right down the
middle for the final
out.
On a night of biting cold, stiff
breezes and some rain, the Giants
combined the most important ele-
ments of championship baseball —
great pitching, timely
hitting and sharp
defense.
Series MVP
P a b l o
Sandoval
and the
under -
d o g
Giants celebrated in the center of
the diamond at Comerica Park after
winning six elimination games this
postseason.
“Tonight was a battle,” said
Giants star Buster Posey, who
homered. “And I think tonight was a
fitting way for us to end it because
those guys played hard. They didn’t
stop, and it’s an unbelievable feel-
ing.”
Cabrera deliv-
ered the first
big hit for
Detroit, interrupting San
Francisco’s run of dominant pitch-
ing with a two-run homer that blew
over the right-field wall in the third.
Posey put the Giants ahead 3-2
with a two-run homer in the sixth
and Delmon Young hit a tying home
run in the bottom half.
It then became a matchup of
bullpens, and the Giants prevailed.
Ryan Theriot led off the 10th with
a single against Phil Coke, moved
up on Brandon
Crawford’s sacri-
fice and
scored on
Scutaro’s shal-
low single.
Center fielder
Austin Jackson
made a throw
home, to no
avail.
Sergio Romo
struck out the side in the bottom of
the 10th for his third save of the
Series.
The Giants finished the month
with seven straight wins and their
seventh Series championship.
They handed the Tigers their
seventh straight
Giants beat Tigers 4-3 in 10 innings for sweep
THE BOYS ARE BACK!
See GIANTS
Page 15
SPORTS 12
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LIVING
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It would appear that it doesn’t
matter who heads the Carlmont
High School boys’ cross country
team. Domination is the name of
the game for the Scots and the boys
from Belmont have done it again.
At the Peninsula Athletic League
Championships on Saturday, the
Carlmont boys dominated the com-
petition, with all five of their scor-
ing runners finishing in the top
eight. Senior Daniel Bereket fin-
ished first overall with a 15:33. His
teammates, Ryan Dimick and
Arthur Schulte (both juniors), fin-
ished second and third. Dimick
was five seconds behind Bereket
and Schulte 15. Lucas Matison fin-
ished fifth and Tim Layten rounded
out the Scots with a 16:09 good for
eighth.
Rory Beyer of Aragon was the
first non-Scot on the scoresheet.
His 15:50 was good for fourth.
Grant Murphy on Mills finished
fifth and Logan Marshall of Half
Moon Bay sixth.
Menlo-Atherton had its top-3
finishers come in at ninth, 10th and
11th respectively.
On the girls’ side, the young,
upstart, Menlo-Atherton Bears
took the first step in what might be
a bit of dynasty in the making. The
Bears have five freshman and two
juniors on the 2012 squad. But
despite their youth, the Bears took
on the team crown, out-pointing
Half Moon Bay 40 to 71.
M-A had all its scoring runners
finish in the top 15 with Taylor
Fortnam pacing the charge in
fourth. Then, four freshman,
Annalisa Crowe, Maddie Worden,
Madeleine Baier and Katie Beebe,
rounded out the scoring.
“Being prepared to race that
day,” said M-A head coach Eric
Wilmurt when asked what the key
to victory was. “And running hard.
The girls were fairly motivated.
They did what they wanted to do. It
was a lot of fun to watch them run
and see them take home a league
championship which is something I
think they deserve.”
Carlmont was finally unseated as
the team champions. The Scots fin-
ished third with Allison Schwartz
as their finisher with a 20:34. In a
sense, M-A youth helped them a
bit in not knowing too much about
the Scots’ dominance of the team
sport in recent years.
“I think the juniors were very
aware of it,” Wilmurt said of
Carlmont’s reputation. “But I think
the freshmen, they’re out there to
run and enjoy the sport for what it
is.”
The individual stop atop the PAL
cross county scene finally, official-
ly, belongs to Westmoor Kylie
Goo.
After epic battles with former
Aragon Don Lauren Croshaw, Goo
dominated the field on the way to
her first individual title. The Ram
finished with an 18:23, a whole 26
seconds better than second place
finisher Catherine Lowdon of
Burlingame and almost a whole
minute faster than Chandra
Anderson of Half Moon Bay who
finished third.
“She’s had a good season,” said
Westmoor head coach Ron
DiMaggio. “It was her last race on
that course (Crystal Springs) and
she was looking to break the school
record.”
Goo, and the rest of the varsity
runners for that matter, showed
great mental fortitude as their race
was delayed 45 minutes following
a medical emergency on the course
that required an ambulance.
As such, the girls stood at the
starting line for three-quarters of
an hour before their race.
DiMaggio said the delay had a
clear effect on the overall times.
“She was disappointed in her time,
but she ran comfortable and she ran
enough to win.” DiMaggio said.
“It was pretty tough situation.”
Carlmont runners dominant in cross country
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Pablo Sandoval not
only has baseball’s neatest nick-
name, Kung Fu Panda has a World
Series MVP award to go along with
it.
Sandoval took home the trophy
following the San Francisco Giants’
sweep of Detroit, hitting .500 with
three home runs, a double and four
RBIs in 16 Series at-bats.
This Panda works with lumber,
not bamboo.
Sandoval got the Giants off to a
powerful start by hitting three
homers in the opener against the
Tigers, becoming the fourth player
to accomplish the feat in a World
Series game.
He made his big league debut
with the Giants on Aug. 14, 2008,
and earned his nickname just a
month later. That Sept. 19 at Dodger
Stadium, Sandoval scored from sec-
ond on Bengie Molina’s first-inning
single off Greg Maddux, leaping
sideways to avoid catcher Danny
Ardoin’s lunging tag on the throw
from center fielder Matt Kemp.
Maddux and Dodgers manager
Joe Torre argued Sandoval ran out
of the baseline. Barry Zito, on the
mound for the Giants that night,
coined the nickname for Sandoval’s
oversized personality and roly-poly
shape — the animated film “Kung
Fu Panda” had been released in the-
aters that June.
While Sandoval hit .330 in 2009
and finished second to Hanley
Ramirez in the NL batting race, the
Giants launched “Operation Panda”
that offseason, telling him to ditch
the Big Macs, fries and milkshakes
in favor of chicken breast on wheat
bread, watermelon slices, bananas
and oranges. He started lifting.
Panda named World Series MVP
REUTERS
Pablo Sandoval with the MVP trophy.
By Dave Skretta
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The
Oakland Raiders made themselves
right at home at Arrowhead
Stadium.
They’re making a habit of it, too.
Carson Palmer threw for 209
yards and two touchdowns, and the
Raiders pounded the struggling
Chiefs 26-16 on Sunday for their
sixth straight on Kansas City’s
home turf.
It was the Raiders’ first road win
since beating the Chiefs last
December.
Sebastian Janikowski was perfect
on four field-goal attempts, and the
Raiders (3-4) nearly became the
third straight team to keep the
Kansas City offense out of the end
zone.
The Chiefs got their lone touch-
down on Dexter McCluster’s catch
with 2:27 left in the game.
Darren McFadden ran for 114
yards, and Denarius Moore and
Darrius Heyward-Bey had touch-
down catches for Oakland, which
has won two straight after losing
four of its first five.
The Chiefs (1-6) have lost four
straight overall, their only win com-
ing in overtime at New Orleans, and
still have not led a game in regula-
tion this season.
Matt Cassel threw for 218 yards
in place of Brady Quinn, who left in
the first half with what the team
called a “head injury.” Quinn had
started his second straight game
even though Cassel was cleared to
play following his own concussion
sustained three weeks ago against
Baltimore.
Neither quarterback could get the
Kansas City offense going.
The Chiefs committed four
turnovers to run their league-lead-
ing total to 25, and the Raiders
turned them into 13 points. They
allowed three sacks to a team that
had seven coming in, and their
fourth-quarter touchdown was the
first by the offense since Sept. 30
against San Diego.
Jamaal Charles, the Chiefs’
biggest offensive
weapon, was a nonfac-
tor. He carried only
five times for 4 yards
and caught three pass-
es for 6 yards.
Al t oge t he r,
it’s little wonder
that two more
b a n n e r s
appeared prior
to the game,
towed behind an
airplane over
A r r o w h e a d
Stadium. They
were paid for by
disgruntled Chiefs fans and
renewed their plea from earlier this
season that general manager Scott
Pioli be fired.
The first play of the game pretty
much summed up the confrontation
between two of the league’s lousiest
teams: Palmer threw into tight cov-
erage and was intercepted by
Stanford Routt.
Naturally, the Chiefs countered
by going three-and-out and punting.
The Raiders finally got on the
board when Palmer found Moore
for a short completion that he turned
into a 38-yard
gain, and
Janikowski con-
nected from 36
yards for a 3-0
lead.
The field-goal
struggle was on.
Janikowski hit
from 38 yards
early in the sec-
ond quarter, and
Ryan Succop matched him with a
30-yarder. Succop hit again from
42 yards late in the half to tie the
game.
The Raiders took the lead into
halftime when the Chiefs’ Javier
Arenas fumbled a punt while
attempting to make a fair catch. Jon
Condo recovered it at the Kansas
City 11, and Palmer hit Moore in
the back of the end zone on third
down to give Oakland a 13-6 lead
with 49 seconds left.
The game’s circuslike nature con-
tinued in the second half.
Cassel fumbled the snap on the
first play of the third quarter and the
Raiders’ Tommy Kelly recovered it,
but Oakland couldn’t manage any-
thing in three plays — two of them
woeful throws by Palmer. The
Raiders had to settle for a 29-yard
field goal by Janikowski.
Succop added a 52-yarder later in
the quarter to get the Chiefs within
a touchdown, but Oakland answered
by going 80 yards in just six plays
for another score.
Palmer picked on Routt the whole
way, and his 36-yard touchdown
pass to Heyward-Bey gave the
Raiders a 23-9 lead.
How bad were things going for
Kansas City? Janikowski finally
missed a field goal in the fourth
quarter, only for Jalil Brown to be
called offsides on the play.
Janikowski knocked through the
redo with 8:14 left to put the game
away.
Palmer leads Raiders to win over Chiefs
SPORTS 13
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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SPORTS 14
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
dimed their way down to the Butte 20-yard line but a
Plattsmier interception meant zero points after a solid
drive. CSM did get two points back on a punt snapped
out of the back of the end zone to make it 9-5. But a
very poor punt with 53 seconds left in the half gave the
Roadrunners decent field position and four plays later,
Nelson Fishback completed a 5-yard pass to Geoff
Swaim to make it 16-7 heading into recess.
The CSM defense settled down in the second half,
limiting the Roadrunners to only 3 fourth-quarter
points. But other than a Plattsmier 3-yard touchdown
run in the third quarter, the CSM offense had no
answer for Butte’s pass rush and speed against the run.
“Not protecting the quarterback,” Pollack said,
referring to three huge sacks by the Butte defense on
key CSM drives. “That’s all it was. Defense played
great in the second half. Offense didn’t protect the
quarterback. If we had big plays, we had penalties. So,
they (Butte) did a good job of taking away the run.”
Another poor punt, this one of only 12 yards, set
Butte up for another field goal that made it 19-11 with
7:36 left in the game.
Plattsmier was CSM’s leading passer and rusher (39
yards) on Saturday. No other Bulldog runner had more
than 33 yards.
“Back to work on Monday,” Pollack said. “We have
a two-game season. We need six wins to get into a
bowl game. If they want to feel sorry for themselves,
we can just cash it in and call it a year. If they want to
fight, we can play in the Bulldog Bowl. It’s a choice
for them.”
Continued from page 11
CSM
PATRICK NGUYEN/CSM FOOTBALL
Cutline: College of San Mateo wide receiver Aaron Criswell reaches out for a pass in CSM’s 19-11 loss to Butte College.
SPORTS 15
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
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Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
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World Series loss dating to 2006.
“Obviously, there was no doubt
about it. They swept us,” Tigers
manager Jim Leyland said. “So
there was certainly no bad breaks,
no fluke.
“Simple, they did better than we
did.”
An NL team won the title for the
third straight season, a run that had-
n’t occurred in 30 years. Some find
the streak surprising, considering
the AL’s recent dominance in inter-
league play. Yet as every fan knows,
the club that pitches best in the post-
season usually prevails.
Until the end, the Tigers thought
one big hit could shift the momen-
tum. It was an all-too-familiar
October lament — Texas felt the
same way when the Giants throttled
them in 2010, and Tigers knew the
feeling when St. Louis wiped them
out in 2006.
Howling winds made it feel much
colder than the 44 degrees at game-
time. Two wrappers blew across
home plate after leadoff man Angel
Pagan struck out, and fly balls
played tricks in the breeze.
The Giants started with their
pregame ritual. They clustered
around Hunter Pence in the dugout,
quickly turning into a bobbing,
whooping, pulsing pack, showering
themselves with sunflower seeds. A
big league good-luck charm, Little
League style.
And once again, San Francisco
took an early lead. Pence hit a one-
hop drive over the center-field fence
for a double and Brandon Belt
tripled on the next pitch for a 1-0
lead in the second.
The next inning, Cabrera gave the
Tigers a reason to think this might
be their night.
With two outs and a runner on
first, Cabrera lofted an opposite-
field fly to right — off the bat, it
looked like a routine out shy of the
warning track. But with winds gust-
ing over 25 mph, the ball kept car-
rying, Pence kept drifting toward
the wall and the crowd kept getting
louder.
Just like that, it was gone.
20-inning scoreless streak
Cabrera’s homer gave Detroit its
first lead of the Series, ended its 20-
inning scoreless streak and reaf-
firmed a pregame observation by
Tigers Hall of Famer Al Kaline.
“The wind usually blows to right
at this time of year,” Kaline said.
In the fourth, Max Scherzer and
catcher Gerald Laird teamed on a
strike ‘em out-throw ‘em out double
play. Scherzer yelled, first baseman
Prince Fielder clenched his fist and
the Tigers ran off the field on a
chilly, windy, rainy evening. At last,
it seemed, all the elements were in
their favor.
Trailing for the first time since
Game 4 of the NL championship
series, Posey and the Giants put a
dent in Detroit’s optimism. Scutaro,
the NLCS MVP, led off the sixth
with a single and clapped all the
way around the bases when Posey
sent a shot that sailed just inside the
left-field foul pole for a 3-2 lead.
Posey, the only Giants player on
the field from the starting lineup in
the Game 5 clincher in 2010, almost
tripped nearing first base and he
watched the ball and began his trot.
Detroit wasn’t about to go quietly,
however. Young, the ALCS MVP,
made it 3-all with another opposite-
field homer to right, this one a no-
doubt drive.
Fielder finished 1 for 14 (.111) for
the Series.
All 24 teams to take a 3-0 lead in
the World Series have won it all. In
fact, none of those matchups even
reached a Game 6. This was the first
sweep for an NL team since
Cincinnati in 1990.
Working on nine days’ rest and
trying to extend the Tigers’ season,
Scherzer kept them close into the
seventh. Often recognized for his
eyes — one is light blue, the other is
brown — he’s also known as a solid
postseason pitcher.
Ditto-plus for Matt Cain, who
was working on a nearly perfect
year.
The Giants’ ace threw a perfect
game in June, was the winning
pitcher in the All-Star game in July,
beat Cincinnati to clinch the divi-
sion series and topped St. Louis in
Game 7 of the NL championship
series.
After they left, the relievers
decided it.
Octavio Dotel shouted, “Yeah!
Let’s go!” toward his dugout after
striking out Posey to end the eighth.
In the bottom half, winning pitcher
Jeremy Affeldt got around a leadoff
walk when he struck out Cabrera, a
flinching Fielder and Young.
Coke returned the favor in the top
of the ninth, fanning the side. With
Jose Valverde having lost his closer
role during a shaky month, Coke
stayed in for the 10th and faltered.
The Giants became the first
champion that hit the fewest home
runs in the majors since St. Louis in
1982. Sandoval’s three drives in
Game 1 started San Francisco’s
romp, and its dominant pitching
took over from there.
The parade to a sweep masked the
problems San Francisco overcame
to get this far.
Closer Brian Wilson pitched only
two innings before an elbow injury
ended his year. All-Star game MVP
Melky Cabrera was suspended 50
games for a positive testosterone
test, and not welcomed back when
the ban ended. Two-time Cy Young
winner Tim Lincecum struggled
and wound up in the bullpen.
Under .500
Swept in a three-game set at
Arizona to start the season, the
Giants were floundering under .500
in mid-May. They soon hit their
stride and, boosted by trade dead-
line deals for Scutaro and Pence,
passed the Dodgers in the NL West
for good in late August and posted
98 wins.
Getting past Cincinnati and St.
Louis in the playoffs presented
challenges. Down 2-0 in the best-of-
five division series, they rallied for
three straight victories in
Cincinnati. Trailing the defending
champion Cardinals 3-1 in the
NLCS, they again took three in a
row to advance, clinching in a driv-
ing rainstorm.
Six elimination games, six wins.
Facing the Tigers, San Francisco
proved it could play with a lead, too.
The Giants became the first NL
team since the Big Red Machine in
the mid-1970s to win two titles in a
three-year span. Shut out for 56
years — Juan Marichal, Willie
McCovey and Barry Bonds never
won it all — their self-described
“misfits” captured that elusive
crown in 2010.
While many of the pitchers have
remained, the lineup has seen quite
a turnover. Posey, the NL batting
champion, was the only position
player to start Sunday night who
also started the Game 5 clincher in
2010 at Texas.
The Tigers’ flop finished off a sea-
son in which Cabrera became base-
ball’s first Triple Crown winner
since 1967. Detroit overtook the
White Sox in the final week to win
the AL Central and wound up at 88-
74, the AL’s seventh-best record.
NOTES: Theriot and Laird had a
nice reunion at the plate. They were
St. Louis teammates last year when
the Cardinals won the title. ... Laird
started after Alex Avila was
scratched. Avila’s right arm was still
sore after being hit by a foul tip in
the opener. ... Ann Romney, wife of
Republican presidential candidate
Mitt Romney, was at the game. ...
Cabrera has reached base in all 24
of his postseason games with
Detroit.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
16
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA — Matt Ryan
threw touchdown passes on
Atlanta’s first three possessions
against Philadelphia and new defen-
sive coordinator Todd Bowles, and
the Falcons remained the NFL’s
only unbeaten team with a 30-17
victory over the Eagles on Sunday.
The Falcons improved to 7-0 for
the first time in franchise history
while the Eagles (3-4) lost after a
bye for the first time in 14 games
under coach Andy Reid since 1999.
Ryan finished 22 of 29 for 262
yards and three TDs for his first win
against his hometown team in three
tries.
Michael Vick didn’t turn the ball
over for once, but he played so-so
and failed to beat his former team in
his second start against the Falcons
since returning to the NFL in 2009.
The Falcons scored on their first
six possessions before punting for
the first time with 5:35 left.
LIONS 28, SEAHAWKS 24
DETROIT — Matthew Stafford
threw a 1-yard touchdown pass to
Titus Young with 20 seconds left.
Zach Miller made a spectacular,
16-yard catch on a toss from Russell
Wilson with 5:27 left to put the
Seahawks ahead.
Seattle (4-4) couldn’t stop the
Lions (3-4) on their last possession.
Stafford led a 16-play drive that
started at Detroit 20 with 5:27
remaining. The possession began
with a 15-yard pass to Calvin
Johnson and was kept alive with
third-down conversion passes to
Johnson in Lions territory and to
Joique Bell to set up the winning
score from just outside the goal line.
STEELERS 27, REDSKINS 12
PITTSBURGH — The Steelers
turned Robert Griffin III into just
another rookie quarterback, swarm-
ing Washington’s precocious star in
a dominant win.
Griffin completed just 16 of 34
passes for 177 yards and a score
while managing 8 yards rushing.
Pittsburgh quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger had no such issues,
throwing for 222 yards and three
touchdowns as the Steelers (4-3)
won consecutive games for the first
time this season.
Jonathan Dwyer added 107 yards
rushing in his second NFL start.
Pittsburgh jumped on Washington
(3-5) early, scoring on its first four
possessions and never letting Griffin
get loose.
Heath Miller caught four passes
for 46 yards and his sixth touch-
down of the season for the Steelers.
BROWNS 7, CHARGERS 6
CLEVELAND — Rookie Trent
Richardson rushed for 122 yards
and scored a touchdown in the
Browns’ soggy, wind-whipped win.
Richardson, pulled last week at
Indianapolis when he was ineffec-
tive because of a rib injury, carried
24 times as the Browns (2-6) won
their second straight game at home
— and first for new owner Jimmy
Haslam. Richardson scored on a 26-
yard run in the first quarter and the
Browns were able to hang on
despite not generating much offense
in blustery, rainy conditions.
The Chargers (3-4) dropped their
third straight. San Diego had a final
chance, but quarterback Philip
Rivers’ pass was batted away by
Browns cornerback Buster Skrine
with 1:24 left.
Rivers finished 18 of 34 for 154
yards
PATRIOTS 45, RAMS 7
LONDON — Tom Brady led
touchdown drives on the first five
possessions and New England
cruised at Wembley Stadium.
The Rams looked ready to put up
a fight when Sam Bradford hit Chris
Givens with a 50-yard touchdown
pass on the opening drive. But
Brady cut through the St. Louis
defense at will to give New England
a 28-7 lead by halftime, then hit
Brandon Lloyd for a 9-yard score to
start the third quarter.
New England surpassed 350
yards of total offense for the 17th
straight game, breaking an NFL
record set by the Rams in 1999-
2000.
COLTS 19, TITANS 13 OT
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Andrew
Luck threw a 16-yard touchdown
pass to Vick Ballard at 4:49 of over-
time.
The Colts (4-3) have beaten
Tennessee in seven of eight overall
and seven of the past 10 in
Nashville.
The Colts did it with Luck lead-
ing a pair of 80-yard touchdown
drives. The top pick overall in
April’s draft set up Delone Carter’s
1-yard TD run that tied it up at 13
with 3:24 left in the fourth quarter.
In overtime, Ballard capped the
drive, taking a screen pass and
going up the left side where he
jumped toward the goal line for the
TD.
The Titans fell to 3-5.
BEARS 23, PANTHERS 22
CHICAGO — Robbie Gould
kicked a 41-yard field goal as time
expired to rally the Bears.
The Bears trailed 19-7 in the
fourth quarter when the game
turned in a big way.
Chicago (6-1) took over on the
Carolina 38 after Brad Nortman
shanked a 6-yard punt, and Jay
Cutler connected with Kellen Davis
on a 12-yard scoring pass with just
under seven minutes left.
Then, on Carolina’s next play,
Steve Smith slipped on a pass pat-
tern and Tim Jennings returned his
second interception of the game 25
yards for the go-ahead score.
Cam Newton drove the Panthers
to the Chicago 27, and Justin
Medlock’s 45-yard field goal hit the
right upright and went through to
put Carolina (1-6) ahead 22-20 with
2:27 remaining. Medlock had five
field goals.
On the winning drive, Cutler
moved the Bears 55 yards to the 23
to set up Gould’s kick. The Panthers
lost their fifth straight game.
PACKERS 24, JAGUARS 15
GREEN BAY, Wis. — Aaron
Rodgers went back to an old
favorite, connecting with Donald
Driver on a 4-yard touchdown in the
fourth quarter.
Rodgers threw two touchdowns,
passing Bart Starr for second place
on Green Bay’s all-time list, and
Dezman Moses gave the Packers
their first touchdown on a blocked
punt in almost 22 years. But Green
Bay (5-3) had a surprisingly tough
time with the NFL’s worst team,
which lost its fourth straight.
Playing without top receivers
Greg Jennings and Jordy Nelson,
Green Bay’s offense struggled to
Falcons remain unbeaten; Patriots hammer Rams
See NFL, Page 17
SPORTS 17
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Center (PJCC)
find its groove all afternoon.
Jacksonville (1-6), meanwhile, looked
unfazed by the absence of Maurice
Jones-Drew. Backup Rashad Jennings
finished with 115 yards of offense, and
Cecil Shorts had a career-best 116 yards
on eight catches.
DOLPHINS 30, JETS 9
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Matt
Moore stepped in for an injured Ryan
Tannehill and Miami rolled to its third
straight victory.
Moore threw a touchdown pass to
Anthony Fasano, Olivier Vernon recov-
ered a blocked punt in the end zone for a
touchdown and blocked a field goal, and
the Dolphins smothered Mark Sanchez
and the Jets’ offense Sunday.
After a week of trash talking between
both sides, the argument was won on the
field by the Dolphins (4-3) — and it was
no contest.
They were helped by some hideous
play by the Jets (3-5), who have lost two
straight.
Tannehill injured his left knee and
quadriceps muscle on a sack on third
down by Calvin Pace on the Dolphins’
second possession of the game. Moore
finished 11 of 19 for 131 yards.
Sanchez was 28 of 54 for 283 yards
with a touchdown and interception.
GIANTS 29, COWBOYS 24
ARLINGTON, Texas — The New
York Giants are still undefeated at
Cowboys Stadium after another come-
back victory under Eli Manning.
None were quite like this one, the 20th
time in Manning’s career the Giants ral-
lied from behind in the fourth quarter.
Lawrence Tynes kicked two of his five
field goals in the fourth quarter and the
NFC East-leading Giants won 29-24
Sunday after blowing a 23-point lead —
and before the Cowboys thought they
had a game-winning play with 10 sec-
onds left.
New York (6-2) led 23-0 just 2 min-
utes into the second quarter when
defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul
returned an interception 28 yards for a
touchdown.
That was the third of four intercep-
tions thrown by Tony Romo, and among
six turnovers by Dallas (3-4).
Continued from page 16
NFL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Now Notre Dame is an ahead of
Oregon in the BCS standings.
The Fighting Irish became the lat-
est team to move past Oregon on
Sunday, taking third place behind
Alabama and Kansas State. The
Ducks remained fourth.
Florida fell out of the top five
with a 17-9 loss to Georgia, helping
to set the field in the race for the
BCS title game with a month to go
in the regular season.
Alabama is locked in at No. 1,
and if the Crimson Tide keep win-
ning it will play for its third cham-
pionship in four years. The Wildcats
(.9400), Fighting Irish (.9147) and
Ducks (.9136) need to remain
unbeaten, and keep an eye on each
other.
The computers ratings are still
holding the Ducks back because
their strength of schedule lags
behind the other contenders.
The Ducks are second in the
Harris poll and USA Today coach-
es’ poll, but ranked fifth by the com-
puters ratings.
Kansas State is third in each poll
and Notre Dame is fourth. But
according to the computers, the
Wildcats and Fighting Irish are tied
for first.
Oregon’s upcoming schedule
could help
solve the
D u c k s ’
p r o b l e m.
O r e g o n
plays three
opponents
in the BCS
top 25
(Sout hern
California,
S t a n f o r d
and Oregon
State) in its
last four
g a m e s ,
starting with the Trojans in Los
Angeles on Saturday. The Pac-12
title game, if the Ducks get there,
should give Oregon another quality
opponent.
Notre Dame, with four games
left, faces only one more team with
a winning record (USC). Kansas
State has three winning teams in its
four remaining opponents, though
only No. 25 Texas is in the BCS top
25.
Alabama is an overwhelming No.
1 in the Harris poll and USA Today
coaches’ polls, and comes in third
behind Notre Dame and Kansas
State in the computer ratings. The
Tide’s BCS average is .9759.
Alabama has what looks to be its
toughest test of the season coming
up this week, when it visits fifth-
place LSU on Saturday in an SEC
West showdown.
Kansas State plays Oklahoma
State at home Saturday and Notre
Dame faces Pittsburgh.
Down the list, it looks as if Boise
State could make another run at the
BCS, with help from the Big Ten.
The Broncos are 21st in the cur-
rent standings. If they can get into
the top 16 and be ahead of a cham-
pion from one of the automatic
qualifying conferences, the Broncos
would earn an automatic bid to the
marquee bowls,
The highest ranked Big Ten team
is Nebraska at 22nd.
Notre Dame latest to pass Oregon in BCS standings
NBC secures English Premier League soccer rights
LONDON — NBC’s networks will televise the English
Premier League under a $250 million, three-year deal that
begins next season. They will show every match from the
world’s most popular soccer league.
Sports brief
18
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 5 3 0 .625 262 170
Miami 4 3 0 .571 150 126
Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 171 227
N.Y. Jets 3 5 0 .375 168 200
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 6 1 0 .857 216 128
Indianapolis 4 3 0 .571 136 171
Tennessee 3 5 0 .375 162 257
Jacksonville 1 6 0 .143 103 188
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 5 2 0 .714 174 161
Pittsburgh 4 3 0 .571 167 144
Cincinnati 3 4 0 .429 166 187
Cleveland 2 6 0 .250 154 186
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 4 3 0 .571 204 152
San Diego 3 4 0 .429 154 144
Oakland 3 4 0 .429 139 187
Kansas City 1 6 0 .143 120 209
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 6 2 0 .750 234 161
Philadelphia 3 4 0 .429 120 155
Dallas 3 4 0 .429 137 162
Washington 3 5 0 .375 213 227
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 7 0 0 1.000 201 130
Tampa Bay 3 4 0 .429 184 153
New Orleans 2 5 0 .286 190 216
Carolina 1 6 0 .143 128 167
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 6 1 0 .857 185 100
Minnesota 5 3 0 .625 184 167
Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 208 170
Detroit 3 4 0 .429 161 174
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 5 2 0 .714 165 100
Arizona 4 3 0 .571 124 118
Seattle 4 4 0 .500 140 134
St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 137 186
Open: Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Houston
Monday’sGame
San Francisco at Arizona, 5:30 p.m.
NFL STANDINGS
10/27
End
Regular
Season
Playoffs
TBA
vs.Miami
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/9
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
@Rams
10 a.m.
FOX
12/2
vs.Bears
5:00p.m.
ESPN
11/19
@Saints
1:20p.m.
FOX
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/11
Bye
vs.Broncos
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
12/6 10/28
vs.Browns
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/2
vs.Tampa
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/4
@Ravens
10a.m.
CBS
11/11
vs.Saints
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/18
@Bengals
10a.m.
CBS
11/25
Oct. 27 Oct. 28
@Detroit
5:07p.m.
if necessary
Oct. 29
vs. Detroit
5:07p.m.
if necessary
Oct. 31
vs.Detroit
5:07p.m.
if necessary
Nov. 1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
y-Kansas City 18 7 9 63 42 27
x-D.C. 17 10 7 58 53 43
x-New York 16 9 9 57 57 46
x-Chicago 17 11 6 57 46 41
x-Houston 14 9 11 53 48 41
Columbus 15 12 7 52 44 44
Montreal 12 16 6 42 45 51
Philadelphia 10 18 6 36 37 45
New England 9 17 8 35 39 44
Toronto FC 5 21 8 23 36 62
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
y-San Jose 19 6 9 66 72 43
x-Real Salt Lake 17 11 6 57 46 35
x-Seattle 15 8 11 56 51 33
x-Los Angeles 16 12 6 54 59 47
x-Vancouver 11 13 10 43 35 41
FC Dallas 9 13 12 39 42 47
Colorado 11 19 4 37 44 50
Portland 8 16 10 34 34 56
Chivas USA 7 18 9 30 24 58
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
x- clinched playoff berth
y- clinched conference
Saturday’s Games
New York 3, Philadelphia 0
New England 1, Montreal 0
Chicago 1, D.C. United 1, tie
Portland 1, San Jose 1, tie
Real Salt Lake 0, Vancouver 0, tie
Colorado 2, Houston 0
Sunday’s Games
Columbus 2, Toronto FC 1
FC Dallas 2, Chivas USA 2, tie
Los Angeles 1, Seattle FC 0
MLS STANDINGS
Sunday’sSportsTransactions
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS — Waived F/C Melvin Ely
and F Chris Douglas-Roberts.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NEWYORKJETS—SignedTEHaydenSmithfrom
the practice squad.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Released G John
Malecki.Signed CB Da’Mon Cromartie-Smith from
the practice squad.
TAMPABAYBUCCANEERS — Released WR Tori
Gurley from the practice squad.Signed CB LeQuan
Lewis to the practice squad.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
WASHINGTONCAPITALS—ReassignedGPhilipp
Grubauer from Hershey (AHL) to Reading (ECHL).
AHL
AHL—Suspended Charlotte Checkers LW Chris
Terry for three games as a consequence of an el-
bowing incident in a game at Grand Rapids on
Oct. 26.
ECHL
READINGROYALS— Released G Nick Niedert.
COLLEGE
IDAHO— Suspended TE Taylor Elmo.
Saturday’sSportsTransactions
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
MINNESOTATWINS—Announced RHP P.J. Wal-
ters refused outright assignment and elected free
agency.
TAMPABAYRAYS—Announced OF Rich Thomp-
son refused outright assignment and elected free
agency.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Assigned RHP Tyson
Brummett outright to Buffalo (IL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Claimed SS Gus-
tavo Nunez off waivers from Pittsburgh.
CHICAGOCUBS—Assigned RHP Justin Germano,
OF Joe Mather and RHP Blake Parker outright to
Iowa (PCL). Announced RHP Manuel Corpas re-
fused outright assignment and elected free
agency.
ST.LOUISCARDINALS—ReinstatedSSRafael Fur-
cal from the 15-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELANDCAVALIERS—Waived F/C Michael
Eric, F Eric Jones and G D’Aundray Brown.
DALLASMAVERICKS—SignedF/CMelvinElyand
F Chris Douglas-Roberts.
LOS ANGELES LAKERS—Waived G Andrew
Goudelock.
TRANSACTIONS
Broncos
beat up
Saints
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER — A dinged-up right
thumb wasn’t enough to throw
Peyton Manning off his game, and
to no one’s surprise, neither was the
New Orleans Saints’ defense.
Despite banging his throwing
thumb on an opponent’s helmet in
the second quarter Sunday night,
Manning passed for 305 yards and
three scores, led a pair of 90-plus-
yard touchdown drives and easily
outplayed Drew Brees to lead the
Denver Broncos to a 34-14 victory
over the Saints.
Manning surpassed the 300-yard
mark for the fifth straight time to
match his personal best and set a
franchise record for Denver (4-3).
He completed 22 of 30 throws for a
passer rating of 138.9. Willis
McGahee ran for 122 yards and a
score for the Broncos, who won two
in a row for the first time this season
and took sole possession of first
place in the AFC West.
The Broncos gained 530 yards
against the NFL’s worst defense,
which came in allowing more yards
(2,793) over the first six games of a
season than any team since 1950.
DATEBOOK 19
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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W
hat happens to pets when their
humans can’t get along with
each other and file for divorce?
Sadly, the family pet is somewhere between
a couch and a child in legal terms. Pets are
considered property, legally speaking; their
value is based on what someone paid for
them or, in some cases, what they can earn.
For example, a dog adopted from our shelter
would be valued at $120 (our adoption fee),
while a show dog with a championship line
that could be used to breed and sell pups,
would be valued much higher, possibly
thousands of dollars, in a court of law. The
other question has to do with ownership. If a
couple has lived with a dog for years, which
half of the couple is the legal owner? Even
if all paper trails such as vet bills, license
renewals and microchip information are
linked to one half of the couple, both people
could make a valid claim that they co-
owned the pet. Aside from bills, there is also
daily care, such as walks, feeding, groom-
ing, training and overall companionship. If
neither member of the couple agreed to let
the other have ownership of the pet, I imag-
ine this would become something for attor-
neys to include in a settlement agreement;
hence, my earlier comment about a pet
being viewed in legal terms as something
between an item (couch, car ... property),
and a child. From a behavioral standpoint, a
dog or cat might be fine sharing time with
each half of the separated couple, moving
back and forth periodically. As is the case
with children, pets need routine and consis-
tency. The humans can help by having their
pet’s special items — crate, toys, bedding
— stay with the pet. Having two people
want a loved pet is much better than what
we see too often, when pets are products of
divorce and end up, unwanted, in shelters.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption,
Behavior and Training, Education,
Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty
Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR pro-
gram areas and staff from the new Tom and
Annette Lantos Center for Compassion.
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — It took three weeks,
but “Argo” finally found its way to the top of
the box office.
The Warner Bros. thriller from director and
star Ben Affleck, inspired by the real-life res-
cue of six U.S. embassy workers during the
1979 Iranian hostage crisis, made nearly
$12.4 million this weekend, according to
Sunday studio estimates. “Argo” had been in
second place the past two weeks and has now
made about $60.8 million total.
Debuting at No. 3 was the sprawling, star-
studded “Cloud Atlas,” which made a disap-
pointing $9.4 million. The nearly three-hour
drama, also from Warner Bros., was co-direct-
ed by siblings Lana and Andy Wachowski and
Tom Tykwer and features an ensemble cast
including Tom Hanks, Halle Berry and Hugh
Grant playing multiple roles over six story
lines.
Dan Fellman, head of distribution at Warner
Bros., said the studio thought there might be a
good chance of “Argo” coming out on top this
weekend.
“We’re thrilled. An accomplishment like
that is well deserved, they don’t happen very
often. You would probably have to do a lot of
searching to find a movie that opened in wide
release to have two No. 2 weekends in a row
and hit No. 1 in the third week,” Fellman said.
“It’s a tribute to the film. Word-of-mouth has
taken over the campaign. We have a long way
to go, we have a lot of year-end accolades
which will approach, and we’ll see what hap-
pens in terms of the Academy.”
On the flip side, Fellman acknowledged that
“Cloud Atlas” underperformed compared to
hopes that it would end up in the $11-12 mil-
lion range domestically. The movie had an
estimated budget of $100 million. But he
pointed out that it had a higher per-screen
average than any other film opening in the top
10 with $4,681.
“We did very well on the East and West
coasts in a number of major cities,” he said.
“We’re challenged in the Midwest and the
South.”
It was a soft weekend all around, though,
with several newcomers opening poorly,
Hollywood.com box-office analyst Paul
Dergarabedian pointed out. The horror sequel
“Silent Hill: Revelation 3-D” from Open
Road Films debuted at No. 5 with $8 million
and the Paramount Halloween comedy “Fun
Size” arrived in 10th place with just over $4
million. “Chasing Mavericks,” an inspira-
tional surfing drama from Fox 2000, didn’t
even open in the top 12 — it came in at No.
13 with $2.2 million.
The World Series might have been a factor
in keeping folks away from the theaters; also,
potential moviegoers along the East Coast in
the path of Hurricane Sandy might have
stayed home this weekend.
“The whole marketplace felt more like
September than October. Back in September,
we had four down weekends in a row. There
was no momentum in the marketplace,”
Dergarabedian said. “When a holdover is No.
1, it reflects a lack of strength in the market-
place. Every week should have a new movie
topping the chart.”
As for the philosophical, centuries-span-
ning “Cloud Atlas,” he said: “To have a) a big
budget, b) Tom Hanks and c) it’s a big, epic
film, it doesn’t necessarily follow that it’s
going to be a big box office hit. I admire that
they went for it.”
But there’s hope on the horizon with the
animated comedy “Wreck-It Ralph” coming
next weekend, the latest James Bond film,
“Skyfall,” opening Nov. 9 and the final install-
ment in the “Twilight” saga due out Nov. 16.
“Skyfall” opened this weekend overseas with
a whopping $77.7 million in 25 countries.
“This is just one of those box office week-
ends we’d rather forget,” Dergarabedian said.
“Unless you’re ‘Argo.”’
‘Argo’ finally tops box office
1.“Argo,”$12.4 million.
($5 million international.)
2.“Hotel Transylvania,”$9.5 million.
($18.1 million international.)
3.“Cloud Atlas,”$9.4 million.
4. “Paranormal Activity 4,” $8.7 million.
($14.1 million international.)
5. (tie) “Silent Hill: Revelation 3-D,”
$8 million.
6.“Taken 2,”$8 million. ($10.1 million.)
7.“Here Comes the Boom,”$5.5 million.
8.“Sinister,”$5.07 million.
9. Alex Cross,”$5.05 million.
10.“Fun Size,”$4.1 million.
Top 10 movies
The thriller from director and star Ben Affleck made nearly $12.4 million this weekend.
20
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
“Honest, professional and reliable.” – Yelp
Birth announcements:
Douglas and Lori Palmetier, of Redwood City, gave birth
to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 14.
Bob and Colleen Krumwiede, of San Mateo, gave birth to
a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 15.
Uriel Villa and Lydia Torres, of Redwood City, gave birth
to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 16.
Ovet and Yajahira Esparza, of San Carlos, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 16.
Among those in attendance at the Sept.8 OCA San Mateo Annual Fundraiser and Awards Gala
at the Green Hills Country Club are (left to right) David Liu; Monster Cable CFO Leo Lin; and
Irene Lin.The Gala dinner, which had as its theme “Pioneers – Inspiration for the Next Era,”is
OCA San Mateo’s major fundraiser, raising money for its high school senior academic schol-
arships; Speak & Lead with Pride (workshops designed to improve local high school students’
public speaking and leadership skills) Program; and Chapter internships.
OCA FUNDRAISER
JASON MAI
Cinderella Sophie Cabrera (left) and Sleeping Beauty Isabell Leyva (right) are greeted by Min-
nie Mouse at Hillsdale Shopping Center in San Mateo Oct. 23 during a visit by Disney on Ice
presents 100 Years of Magic.
100 YEARS OF MAGIC
LOCAL/NATION 21
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
character and acts of crime. The final act of
the Vigilance Committee was to hang two
burglars, Samual Whittaker and Robert
McKenzie, for their crime. The committee
never met again and drifted in obscurity (for a
while).
Full-scale corruption and graft by politi-
cians and others in city government egged cit-
izens to act and rejuvenate the committee in
1854 when James King of William, owner of
the newspaper, Evening Bulletin, was shot by
James P. Casey. The committee reorganized
their men and again threw out of the city
numerous hooligans, thus making San
Francisco a better place to live at least for a
while.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily
Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
set by the risk that the federal government, as
in past emergencies, could be faulted for an
ineffective response, with the president left to
take the fall.
Obama canceled campaign stops Monday
in Virginia and Tuesday in Colorado to moni-
tor the storm but planned to go forward with
other events Monday in Florida and Ohio,
with former President Bill Clinton at his side.
He planned to return to Ohio on Wednesday
with stops in Cincinnati and Akron.
On Thursday, he swing through Springfield,
Ohio, Boulder, Colo., and Las Vegas.
Romney nixed three stops in up-for-grabs
Virginia on Sunday, opting instead to cam-
paign with running mate Paul Ryan in Ohio
before heading Monday to Wisconsin, where
Romney has chipped away at Obama’s lead.
“I know that right now some people in the
country are a little nervous about a storm
about to hit the coast, and our thoughts and
prayers are with people who will find them-
selves in harm’s way,” Romney told several
hundred supporters crowded into a field house
at the University of Findlay, the second of
three Sunday rallies.
Romney’s campaign confirmed Sunday that
he would not travel to New Hampshire on
Tuesday as planned. The campaign already
canceled a Monday event in New Hampshire
featuring Romney’s wife, Ann. Advisers say
further travel changes are likely as they mon-
itor the storm’s progress.
Vice President Joe Biden canceled a
Monday event in New Hampshire. “The last
thing the president and I want to do is get in
the way of anything. The most important
thing is health and safety,” Biden said.
Ryan planned to keep his campaign sched-
ule. On Monday he is leaving Ohio at midday
for three stops in Florida. His Tuesday sched-
ule has Ryan going to Virginia, and aides said
nothing had yet changed.
The prospect that bad weather could hinder
early voting and get-out-the-vote efforts is
vexing to both Obama and Romney.
“Obviously, we want unfettered access to
the polls, because we think the more people
that come out, the better we’re going to do,”
said David Axelrod, a top adviser to Obama’s
campaign. “To the extent that it makes it hard-
er, that’s a source of concern.”
In Virginia, one of the most competitive
states in the race, election officials eased
absentee voting requirements for those affect-
ed by the storm.
“The state board of elections is already
planning for extended hours in advance for
absentee voting, and it’s now a priority,
moved up to the same level as hospitals and
police stations to have power restored,” said
Gov. Bob McDonnell, a top Romney ally.
Getting voters to the polls — whether early
or on Election Day — is one of the few ele-
ments of the race still in the candidates’ con-
trol. Although Romney and Obama are in a
close contest for the popular vote, the presi-
dent continues to have the upper hand in the
most contested states.
Reince Priebus, the GOP chairman, pointed
to recent gains for Romney that have lifted
him to a virtual tie in most national polls.
“The challenger always wins in a tie race,” he
said.
With time running out, both campaigns
appeared to be fine-tuning their map of the
states where they’re campaigning the hardest.
A senior Republican official, speaking on
the condition of anonymity to disclose private
deliberations, said Sunday that the Romney
team was seriously discussing sending
Romney, Ryan or both to Minnesota during
the final week.
The state hasn’t gone Republican in the
presidential race since 1972, but recent
polling shows a tighter race there than most
anticipated.
In a flashback to the 2008 race, Obama’s
campaign announced that Biden will cam-
paign Thursday in Pennsylvania, reprising a
visit to his hometown of Scranton that he
made during the final week four years ago.
Pennsylvania, too, has been Democratic terri-
tory in recent years, but Romney has contin-
ued to contest the state with an advertising
assist from the Republican Party.
Continued from page 7
RACE
million annually for local schools, cities and
special districts by tweaking the June redevel-
opment cleanup bill. But Brown vetoed the
bill at the end of September, leaving San
Mateo, Napa and Marin counties faced with
surrendering excess Educational Revenue
Augmentation Funds after funding local
schools. The three counties are the only ones
with a balance but Hill said the state’s grab is
unfair because it treats them differently.
Hill hopes the Legislature will revisit the
proposal and San Mateo County Deputy
County Manager Mary McMillan said she’s
been in talks with Brown’s office, too. If nei-
ther works out in the counties’ favor, Hill said
legal action is not out of the question.
The political tug-of-war over the money
began in June when Brown’s budget proposed
using the $3.2 million in excess ERAF to
repay local jurisdictions for the ongoing sales
tax and vehicle license fee revenue it previ-
ously diverted and promised to fund econom-
ic revenue bonds issued in 2004. But Hill said
local jurisdictions were told when money was
diverted before that they would not lose any
revenue. The June bill went back on that
promise and created an absurd situation in
which the state takes locally generated funds
today to pay its future debt to these same
counties, Hill said.
Hill said a lawsuit would be valid because
the taking violates Proposition 1A which pro-
hibits the state reallocating property taxes that
cause counties to lose revenue.
“It’s clear this taking goes beyond what is
allowed,” Hill said.
Despite their frustration with Brown’s veto,
neither Hill nor McMillan said they were sur-
prised by the move considering the state’s
financial problems.
“I would have been surprised had he signed
it,” Hill said.
In the meantime, McMillan said the county
isn’t scrambling to fill a million dollar gap
because the amount of property tax at stake
hasn’t yet been penciled out or taken.
“From the governor’s perspective, we
haven’t been harmed yet and won’t know the
loss until probably December, McMillan said.
McMillan thinks changing the ERAF plan
is still an uphill battle because the county,
along with Napa and Marin counties, are per-
ceived as wealthy and therefore able to serve
as an extra funding source for the state.
“They want to penalize us for doing good
work,” McMillan said.
Continued from page 1
ERAF
courts tell them to do?
The answers probably would hinge on an
always unwieldy Congress.
Things could get grim for the industry if
Republicans succeed in repealing the
Affordable Care Act’s subsidies and man-
dates, but leave standing its requirement that
insurers cover people with health problems. If
that’s the outcome, the industry fears people
literally could get health insurance on the way
to the emergency room, and that would drive
up premiums.
“There are a lot of dollars and a lot of staff
time that’s been put into place to make this
thing operational,” G. William Hoagland,
until recently a Cigna vice president, said of
the health care law.
Insurers “are not going to be out there say-
ing, ‘Repeal, repeal, repeal,”’ said Hoagland,
who oversaw public policy at the health insur-
ance company. “They will probably try to find
the particular provisions that cause them
heartburn, but not throw the baby out with the
bath water.”
The Romney campaign isn’t laying out
specifics on how the candidate would carry
out his repeal promise, other than to say the
push would begin on his first day in office.
Romney has hinted that he wants to help
people with medical conditions, doesn’t
say what parts of the health care law he’d
keep.
Continued from page 7
ROMNEY
WORLD/LOCAL
22
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Zeina Karam
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Syria’s air force
fired missiles and dropped barrel
bombs on rebel strongholds while
opposition fighters attacked regime
positions Sunday, flouting a U.N.-
backed cease-fire that was supposed
to quiet fighting over a long holiday
weekend but never took hold.
The failure to push through a
truce so limited in its ambitions —
just four days — has been a sober-
ing reflection of the international
community’s inability to ease 19
months of bloodshed in Syria. It
also suggests that the stalemated
civil war will drag on, threatening to
draw in Syria’s neighbors in this
highly combustible region such as
Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan.
“This conflict has now taken a
dynamic of its own which should be
worrying to everyone,” said Salman
Shaikh, director of the Brookings
Doha Center think tank.
The U.N. tried to broker a halt to
fighting over the four-day Eid al-
Adha Muslim feast that began on
Friday, one of the holiest times of
the Islamic calendar. But the truce
was violated almost immediately
after it was supposed to take effect,
the same fate other cease-fires in
Syria have met.
Activists said at least 110 people
were killed Sunday, a toll similar to
previous daily casualty tolls. They
include 16 who died in an airstrike
on the village of al-Barra in north-
ern Syria’s mountainous Jabal al-
Zawiya region.
The Observatory also reported a
car bomb that exploded in a resi-
dential area in the Damascus neigh-
borhood of Barzeh and wounded 15
people, but the target was not imme-
diately clear.
Though Syria’s death toll has
topped 35,000, the bloodiest and
most protracted crisis of the Arab
Spring, the West has been wary of
intervening. There is concern about
sparking a wider conflagration
because Syria borders Israel and is
allied with Iran and the powerful
Lebanese militant group Hezbollah.
There are already increasing inci-
dents of the civil war spilling across
borders.
Many in Lebanon blame Syria
and Hezbollah for the Oct. 19 car
bomb that killed the country’s intel-
ligence chief. The assassination
stirred up deadly sectarian tensions
in Lebanon, where Sunnis and
Shiites are deeply divided over the
Syrian civil war, raising the specter
of renewed sectarian fighting.
Lebanon’s two largest political
coalitions have lined up on opposite
sides of Syria’s civil war. Hezbollah
and its partners who dominate the
government have stood by Assad’s
regime, while the Sunni-led opposi-
tion backs the rebels seeking to top-
ple the Syrian government. Assad
and many in his inner circle are
Alawites — an offshoot of Shiite
Islam and a minority in Syria —
while the rebels come mostly from
the country’s Sunni majority.
Iraqi Shiites also increasingly fear
a spillover from Syria. Iraqi authori-
ties on Sunday forced an Iranian
cargo plane heading to Syria to land
for inspection in Baghdad to ensure
it was not carrying weapons, the sec-
ond such forced landing this month.
Syria truce collapse shows limits of diplomacy
with the intent of establishing a restaurant at
the site back in 2010.
But zoning issues with the land prompted
Johnston to pull out of the deal after dis-
cussing it with city planners, he said.
Seeing the city approve a 7-Eleven for the
site, which operates 24 hours a day all year,
puzzled Johnston since the market is sur-
rounded entirely by a residential neighbor-
hood.
“I was told it would be too high a risk to try
to develop it into a restaurant. I feel a little
deceived, for lack of a better word,” Johnston
said.
He has even hired an attorney for represen-
tation.
Portfolio was granted a zoning code amend-
ment, since the building is now considered
non-conforming, to reestablish a grocery store
use on the site.
Lim requested a hearing regarding the pos-
sible termination and removal of the non-con-
forming use at 501 N. San Mateo Drive, near
the Burlingame border, after hearing from
neighbors near the site who complained about
the potential for increased crime, traffic and
the oversaturation of convenience stores in the
area.
Lim suspects neighborhood residents would
be more favorable to a use similar to
Stangelini’s rather than a 7-Eleven, which
stays open 24 hours a day and sells alcohol
and cigarettes, he previously told the Daily
Journal.
Lim is seeking a review of the non-con-
forming use since the deli’s use was author-
ized more than 20 years ago.
Now is the time to determine whether the
non-conforming use is proper, so as to mini-
mize the impact on the property owners, Lim
wrote City Manager Susan Loftus when mak-
ing his request for a public hearing.
“The surrounding community deserves a
public hearing to weigh in on whether the cur-
rent non-conforming use should remain in the
community,” Lim wrote to Loftus.
Others in the neighborhood who have come
out against the project so far include Lane
Kashiwahara, Joanne Bennett and Alexis
Ercoli.
There are plenty of other markets in the area
that already serve alcohol and cigarettes, the
group contends.
Officials with Portfolio, the developer, and
the building’s owners did not return calls for
comment.
After the Planning Commission makes its
recommendation to council whether to termi-
nate the non-conforming use for the property,
the City Council will have final say on the
matter at its Nov. 15 meeting.
If the council votes to terminate the non-
conforming use for the property, the owners
will have between two to five years to use the
space as a grocery market or similar use,
depending on council direction.
The Planning Commission meets Tuesday,
Oct. 30, City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
STORE
Greece considered more
risky to invest than Syria
LONDON — The world’s markets may
believe that the worst of the financial crisis in
Europe is over after three turbulent years, but
those people who control the purse strings of the
world’s businesses are not breathing any easier.
An annual survey of finance directors from
global business consultancy BDO finds that
the crisis over too much government debt in
Europe remains one of their key concerns —
so much so that Greece is considered a riskier
place to invest and set up business in than
war-torn Syria.
Only Iran and Iraq are considered more
risky than Greece, which also struggles to
convince its international creditors that it
deserves bailout loans to avoid bankruptcy
and a possible euro exit.
“CFOs are becoming increasingly wary of
Southern Europe, parts of which they now see
as risky as the politically unstable countries of
the Middle East,” said BDO chief executive
Martin Van Roekel.
World brief
LOCAL 23
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, OCT. 29
Halloween Cupcake Decorating
Contest. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library,1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Prizes awarded to the best
cupcake. Materials will be provided.
Ages 13-19. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org
Monday Night Football Fundraiser.
Doors open at 5 p.m., kickoff is at 5:30
p.m. San Mateo Events Center, 2495 S.
Delaware St., San Mateo. Watch the
49ers play the Cardinals. $5 General
Admission or RSVP in advance online
to the avoid admission fee. $15 for an
all-you-can-eat buffet, free parking and
an outdoor cigar and media lounge.
Proceeds will go to Gomez & Picazo
Family Fund. For more information or
to RSVP visit
mancavemondays.eventbrite.com.
‘The Soul of Yosemite.’ 7 p.m. Town
and Country Village, 855 El Camino
Real, Palo Alto. Barbara Moritsch, a
Yosemite Valley biologist, discusses ‘The
Soul of Yosemite,’ her case for how to
improve management of one of the
most popular outdoor destinations in
the United States in order to better
preserve it. Free. For more information
call 321-0600.
Not Your Mother’s Book Club. 7 p.m.
Books Inc. Burlingame, 1375
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Becca
Fitzpatrick will discuss ‘Finale’alongside
Siobhan Vivian and Jenny Han, sharing
‘Burn for Burn.’ Free. For more
information call 685-4911.
TUESDAY, OCT. 30
AegisSenior Living: Communication
and Alzheimer’s Disease: New
Strategies for Successful
Engagement. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 2280
Gellert Boulevard, South San Francisco.
Presentation on Alzheimer’s disease.
Free. For more information or to RSVP
call 952-6100
Monster Plushies. 3:30pm. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Have a favorite monster?
Create your own monster plushie!
Materials provided. Ages 13-19. Free.
For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Burlingame True Crime, a lecture
presented byBurlingame Historical
Society. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Lane
Community Room, Burlingame Public
Library, 480 Primrose Road, Burlingame.
Retired Burlingame Police Chief Jack
Van Etten and retired Police
Commander John Parkin will recount
a few of Burlingame’s most intriguing
crimes that took place during their
tenure in the last decades of the 20th
Century. Free. For more information call
558-7444.
‘Lighthouse Tales.’ 7 p.m. Town and
Country Village, 855 El Camino Real,
Palo Alto. Get ready for Halloween with
Lance McVay’s spooky and chilling
‘Lighthouse Tales.’ One night, some
children sneak out of their homes and
head to the old lighthouse at Pigeon
Point to hear stories from a mysterious
man known only as The Reader. Free.
For more information call 321-0600.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31
Halloween Spooktacular. 9 a.m.Twin
Pines Senior and Community Center,
20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.There will
be face painting, a Halloween lunch,
performances and more. Lunch will be
served at 11:30 a.m.Those who wish to
attend must sign up by Monday, Oct.
29. $8.50 for adults under age 60, $4
suggested lunch donation for adults
over 60. For more information call 595-
7441.
Halloween Party: Dancing with the
BobGuttierezBandandLunch. 10:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San
Bruno. Costumes suggested. Tickets at
the front desk. For more information
call 616-7150.
Seventh Annual It’s Not A
Trick...Sweet Treats on Broadway.
Noon to 4 p.m. Broadway in
Burlingame. For costumed children to
trick-or-treat at participating stores.
Free. For more information call 867-
3449.
Teen Halloween Party. 3:30pm.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Halloween party and
movie at the library. Refreshments will
be served. Best costume will receive a
prize. Ages 13-19. Free. For more
information contact conrad@smcl.org.
Halloween at Serramonte Center.
3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Serramonte
Center, 3 Serramonte Center, Daly City.
There will be a costume contest for
children 12 and under, indoor trick-or-
treating for costumed children and
more. Free. For more information call
992-8686.
Halloween at the Library:
WednesdayStories and Crafts.4 p.m.
to 4:45 p.m. San Mateo Main Library, 55
W.Third Ave., San Mateo. Costumed kids
welcome. Great stories and a simple
craft for children ages 4 to 8 years. Free.
For more information visit
http://www.cityofsanmateo.org/calend
er.aspx.
Halloween at the Library: Books,
Babies and Rhymes. 10:15 a.m. to
10:40 a.m. Hillsdale Library, 205 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Rhymes,
songs and short books for the infant
through 23 months, with parent or
caregiver. Free. For more information
visit
http://www.cityofsanmateo.org/calend
er.aspx.
Halloween at the Library: Toddler
Storytime. 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Hillsdale Library, 205 W. Hillsdale Blvd.,
San Mateo. Stories, fingerplays, and
songs introduce children ages 2 to 4 to
the excitement of stories. Free. For more
information visit
http://www.cityofsanmateo.org/calend
er.aspx.
Halloween ‘Spook’tacular.5 p.m. to 7
p.m. Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st
Ave., San Mateo. Participating stores will
hand out treats to costumed children
ages 12 and under. There will also be
performances from Captain Jack
Spareribs and comedy magician
Timothy James, as well as face painting,
crafts, ballon twisting, cookie
decoration and slimy science. Free. For
more information go to
www.hillsdale.com.
Halloween Happenings at the King
Center. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. King
Community Center, 725 Diablo Ave.,
San Mateo. Bring the entire family to
enjoy crafts, enchanted forest, games,
and prizes. Be sure to enter costume
contest. Free. For more information call
522-7470.
THURSDAY, NOV. 1
Cultivating Employee Engagement.
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Verinata Health,
800 Saginaw Drive, Redwood City.
General $35, members of Northern
California Human Resources
Association free. For more information
call 415-291-1992.
Career workshop. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
SSF Main Library, 840 West Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. Explore your
characteristics, hobbies and interests
to help you map your career. Bring your
resume for the resume critique portion
of the program. Free parking and
admission. For more information call
829-3860.
Brews and Views: Richard North
Patterson and Lenny Mendonca. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Half Moon Bay Brewing
Company, 390 Capistrano Road, Half
Moon Bay. Patterson will discuss his
latest novel ‘Fall from Grace’ as well as
the impending election with
Mendonca, director of global
management consulting firm McKinsey
and Company and founder of the Half
Moon Bay Brewing Company. Snacks
will be provided. Beer, wine and other
beverages will be for sale. Free
admission. For more information call
728-2739 or go to hmbbrewingco.com.
San Mateo Homeowner Workshop:
Energy Savings and Rebates. 6:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. San Mateo Garden
Center, 605 Parkside Way, San Mateo.
Learn how a home energy upgrade can
help to lower utility bills, protect the
environment by saving energy and
improve home comfort. Free. For more
information call 520-4869.
‘Deathtrap.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets available 60 minutes prior to
curtain at Hillbarn Theatre. Adults and
seniors $34. Students ages 17 and
under with current student ID should
call 349-6411 for pricing. To purchase
tickets and for more information visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
FRIDAY, NOV. 2
The San Mateo County History
Museum ‘Free First Fridays’. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Old Courthouse, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For more
information go to www.historysmc.org.
PacificArt League’sNov. First Friday.
5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. 668 Ramona St., Palo
Alto. Come enjoy Pressing Matters, a
juried print exhibition in our Main
Gallery, Decker Walker's solo exhibition
of his oil paintings in the Norton Gallery
and Marjory Wilson's paintings in the
Corridor Gallery. Free. Refreshments
served. For more information contact
marketing@pacificartleague.org.
First Friday Flicks: ‘Madagascar 3 -
Europe’s Most Wanted.’ 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Alex the Lion, Marty
the Zebra, Gloria the Hippo and
Melman the Giraffe are still fighting to
get home to their beloved Big Apple.
Their journey takes them through
Europe where they find the perfect
cover: a traveling circus. which they
reinvent - Madagascar style. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
‘Cabaret.’ 7 p.m. Little Theatre at
Hillsdale High School, 3115 Del Monte
St., San Mateo. Director Allison Gamlen
and musical director Kevin Gallagher
are leading the Hillsdale High School
cast in sharing this tumultuous story in
the newly renovated Hillsdale Little
Theater. Adults $15. Students and
seniors $10. To purchase tickets visit
http://hillsdalehigh.com/drama.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Presents:‘HayFever’. 7:30 p.m. NDNU
Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The NDNU Theatre Department
presents Noel Coward’s play,‘Hay Fever’.
$10. For more information call 508-
3456.
‘Deathtrap.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets available 60 minutes prior to
curtain at Hillbarn Theatre. Adults and
seniors $34. Students ages 17 and
under with current student ID should
call 349-6411 for pricing. To purchase
tickets and for more information visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
SATURDAY, NOV. 3
Open House at Sportshouse Multi-
Sport Complex. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 3151
Edison Way, Redwood City.
Refreshments provided by Gatorade.
Free. For more information call 362-
4100 or go to
www.sportshouseonline.com.
Johnston House Winter Tea. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Experience a traditional
English tea in the lavishly decorated
train station. Experience a traditional
English tea in the lavishly decorated
train station. Free admission. For more
information contact Carolyn Waring at
events@johnsonhouse.org.
Books, Movies, and Apps Galore:
Downloading Media to Your Apple
Products. 11 a.m. Menlo Park City
Council Chambers, 701 Laurel St., Menlo
Park. Q&A session and demonstration
on how to operate digital book readers
and other Apple products. Free. For
more information call 330-2525.
Maritime Day. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. San
Mateo County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City, $5 for adults.
$3 for students and seniors. Free for
children ages five and under. For more
information call 299-0104 or go to
historysmc.org.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Presents: ‘Hay Fever’. 2 p.m. NDNU
Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The NDNU Theatre Department
presents Noel Coward’s play,‘Hay Fever’.
$10. For more information call 508-
3456.
ATour of Recent Genetic Advances:
A Slide Talk with Professor Tim
Stearns. 3 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
For more information call 369-2004.
Michael ParkesOneManShow.5 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Borsini-Burr Gallery, 401 Main
Street, Montara. Michael Parkes will
show new work from his 2013
Renaissance Collection. Refreshments
provided. Opportunity to win an
original Michael Parkes sketch. Free. For
more information go www.borsini-
burr.com.
Boy Scout Annual Auction. 6:30 p.m.
Lucie Stern Center Ballroom, 1305
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Silent and
live auction, proceeds will go to
scholarships for youth. Food and
refreshments provided. $30 per person.
To RSVP call 341-5633. For more
information go to www.packsy.org.
‘Cabaret.’ 7 p.m. Little Theatre at
Hillsdale High School, 3115 Del Monte
St., San Mateo. Director Allison Gamlen
and musical director Kevin Gallagher
are leading the Hillsdale High School
cast in sharing this tumultuous story in
the newly renovated Hillsdale Little
Theater. Adults $15. Students and
seniors $10. To purchase tickets visit
http://hillsdalehigh.com/drama.
‘Deathtrap.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets available 60 minutes prior to
curtain at Hillbarn Theatre. Adults and
seniors $34. Students ages 17 and
under with current student ID should
call 349-6411 for pricing. To purchase
tickets and for more information visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
third strike was shoplifting a pair of gloves
from Home Depot, and another man whose
third strike was possession of 0.03 grams of
methamphetamine.
A life sentence is disproportionate to these
crimes, he said.
District attorneys’ discretion
The decision to pursue a 25 years to life sen-
tence for a third-striker is up to the discretion
of the district attorney and the judge, said San
Mateo County District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
Just 13 of the 3,000 inmates that would be
eligible for resentencing are in San Mateo
County, Wagstaffe said. Several of these peo-
ple were sentenced around the time when the
three strikes law was passed in 1994, he said.
During the first seven years of three strikes,
the county was seeking three strikes for some
people committing non-serious crimes but
who were going in and out of prison.
“They were doing the life installment plan,”
said Wagstaffe.
In around 2001, the District Attorney’s
Office did a review of its applications of the
three strikes law, and ended up changing its
philosophy.
Since then, the county has shifted toward
pursuing the 25 years to life penalty only when
the third strike is a serious crime, or when one
of the defendant’s previous offenses was a sex-
ual or homicide offense, said Wagstaffe.
Currently, Wagstaffe said his office decides
to seek the 25 years to life penalty in just 5 per-
cent of the county’s three strikes cases.
“This law will have almost zero affect on
San Mateo County because we’re already
doing this,” he said. “We’re really already
there where it’s going.”
But Wagstaffe points out that other counties,
including Tulare and Riverside, have pursued
the third strike much more aggressively.
“Some counties are going to have to bring
back hundreds of people,” he said.
“[Proposition 36] will have an enormous
impact on how these counties approach crimi-
nal justice.”
Repeat offenders
While their third strike may have been non-
violent, some of county’s “third strikers” have
criminal histories that are pages long, said
Karen Guidotti, San Mateo County chief
deputy district attorney. Without viewing the
defendant’s criminal history, it is hard to get a
true picture of that person, she said.
“I was staggered by some of these rap
sheets,” she said.
She described one man in the county whose
third strike was a petty theft with prior petty
theft offenses. Then she listed off his previous
offenses, which include attempted robbery in
1974, attempted voluntary manslaughter and
assault with a deadly weapon in 1986 and
criminal threat in 1996.
Another “third striker” was sentenced to 25
years to life for driving a stolen vehicle in
1997, with a prior offense of driving a stolen
vehicle. According to Guidotti, this person
committed five residential burglaries in 1970,
and four more residential burglaries between
1976 and 1988.
“I think the public would be a little stunned
at what we’re dealing with,” she said. “Are we
going to be surprised when they re-offend?”
Scott Thorpe, chief executive officer of the
California District Attorneys Association,
agreed with Guidotti that the last offense is not
the only important factor in these cases.
“A person could have several serious and
violent prior convictions and then commit a
felony that isn’t serious,” he said. “We think
the current system is working primarily
because it gives prosecutors and judges more
discretion in dealing with people with long
criminal records.”
Thorpe stressed that the 25 years to life sen-
tence is not mandatory in these cases and that
even when a prosecutor may want it, the judge
may choose not to pursue it.
“You have the checks and balances of the
DA and the courts,” he said. “It’s not just one
person that has that power.”
DAs take sides
While the CDAA is against Proposition 36,
some California district attorneys are for it.
Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley is
a major proponent of the proposition. He calls
it a “very modest reform.”
Santa Clara County District Attorney Jeffrey
Rosen said the proposition is modest because
it does not alter the second strike penalty —
which is double the normal felony sentence.
Furthermore, Rosen said regardless of what
person’s third strike is, if they have prior con-
viction of murder, rape or child molestation,
they are still eligible for a life sentence.
“There’s only so much room in prison,” he
said. “We want to reserve prison for serious
offenders, not petty thieves and drug addicts.”
Rosen said there would be 118 people in
Santa Clara County who would be eligible for
resentencing if Proposition 36 passes. Some of
the eligible inmates would be granted a
reduced sentence, and some would not, he
said.
“I think more than half of them we won’t
object to being resentenced,” he said. “We
know that by definition these are people who
have not committed murder, rape or child
molestation, and whose third strike was non-
serious and nonviolent.”
Continued from page 1
STRIKES
What Proposition 36 would do:
• Prohibit judges and prosecutors from
seeking 25 years to life sentences for de-
fendants whose third strike is nonviolent
and non-serious, and does not have any
previous convictions of rape, murder or
child molestation;
• Continue to allow judges and prosecu-
tors to seek a 25 years to life sentence for
some nonviolent,non-serious felonies that
are sex, drug or firearm related; and
• Would make current inmates whose third
strike was nonviolent and non-serious el-
igible for a resentencing hearing.
For more information, visit sos.ca.gov
What it does
MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Be extremely tactful
with all your one-on-one relationships, especially
those that feature a comfortable rapport. You could
unintentionally say something way out of line.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Some big respon-
sibilities or critical tasks you’ve been successfully
sweeping under the rug could come up for air. Once
they’re out, they could get nasty.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Someone you know
only casually could make a play for your friends.
Sharing friendships is one thing, but crossing you out
of the picture is another.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You have exceptional
leadership qualities, but don’t become too self-serv-
ing. Victory will be far more gratifying if you include
everyone involved.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You naturally wouldn’t
like it if someone put you in a position to have to
defend everything you say. Bear this in mind should a
friend make a statement that you disagree with.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Although you’re in a
favorable cycle for joint endeavors, there could be
a few conditions attached. Any colleague you have
must be able to offer as much as you can.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- When it comes to a
matter of mutual concern in which you and another
are diametrically opposed, a compromise is required.
Be the frst to propose a solution that both parties
can accept.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- A weightier problem
than you originally anticipated may fall to you. If
someone for whom you’re responsible fails to take
care of something, it’ll be left to you to do the job.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Even though you’re
likely to be a welcome addition to a social gathering,
don’t be the last to leave. Head for the door before
your host or hostess starts to yawn.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You’ll have to be methodical,
bold and organized if you hope to achieve any kind of
important objective. If you don’t endow yourself with
these qualities, it isn’t likely you’ll succeed.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Avoid the company of
friends or associates who have a tendency to impose
their views on others. Your tolerance for self-appoint-
ed know-it-alls is slightly above zero.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Take extra pains to man-
age your resources as prudently as possible. Later,
when it becomes time to pay off these obligations,
they could hinder you at just the wrong moment.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
10-29-12
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kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


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ACROSS
1 Apple quantity
5 Likely
8 Harvest Moon mo.
11 John, in Siberia
12 Zodiac animal
14 Get the picture
15 Kind of lens
17 Menu term (2 wds.)
18 Roof topping
19 Winds around
21 Family men
23 Spill the beans
24 Be quiet!
27 Je ne sais --
29 Actress -- Ryan
30 Hip (hyph.)
34 Violent disturbance
37 Zippy’s word
38 Snatch
39 Took a nap
41 Burn soother
43 Ancient colonnade
45 Treasure holders
47 Erie neighbor
50 Jungle snake
51 Sir or ma’am
54 Dawn goddess
55 Yeasty brews
56 “Lonely Boy” singer
57 AAA offering
58 Forest grazer
59 Two- -- sloth
DOwN
1 Indy area
2 Nights, in classifeds
3 Pay a visit
4 Massages
5 Felt sore
6 Major leaguer
7 Trims a doily
8 Honshu port
9 Media star
10 Receptions
13 Candy
16 Nile god
20 What never to tell (2 wds.)
22 Young pigeons
24 Dallas campus
25 Like cool cats
26 “Yecch!”
28 Home page addr.
30 Water-power org.
31 Do Easter eggs
32 Oola’s guy
33 Can. region
35 Personality parts
36 Big name in soul
39 Tart
40 Rodeo rope
41 Not give -- --
42 Rental agreement
44 Not these
45 Driver with a handle
46 Talked into
48 Point -- -- return
49 Reebok rival
52 Opposite of “paleo”
53 Rascal
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24 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GARAGE DOOR
INSTALLER/
SERVICE TECHNICIAN
Experienced Garage Door Installer/Service
Technician needed. Installation and repair of
residential wood and steel garage doors, garage
opener installation and repair. Must be motivat-
ed, hard working, professional, customer service
oriented and a team player. Company truck pro-
vided. Apply at 1457 El Camino Real, Belmont,
email resume to:
econodoormaster@yahoo.com
or fax (650)594-1549
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNA’s
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimer’s or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
TENNIS LESSONS
Top 50 Mens Open Player
Call 650-518-1987
Email info@adsoncraigslist.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
FT/PT Live-In caregiver on the Penin-
sula and in the South Bay. Valid driv-
er’s license and car a must.Must have
exp. and refs. Call 415-683-3171 or
visit www.sageeldercare.com.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES
Full + Part-time + Seasonal
Start up to $13 Exp up to $20
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE
FOREMAN -Seeking experinced long
term employee. Must be Knowledgeable
in general landscape maintenance with
strong background in pruning, fertilizing,
irrigation and controllers. Must have
clean DMV and speak English. 32-36
hrs. per week (Tuesday - Friday). $15.00
per hour. Maintenance laborer: $9.00 per
hour. (650)347-3914
STYLIST/BARBER AND Assistant
Managers Built-in clientele. Hourly +
commissions + bonuses + Sign-on
Bonus $. Call Juan (650)387-3179
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SONY COMPUTER Entertainment
America produces & markets Sony’s sig-
nature PlayStation® family of interactive
comp entertainment products in the U.S.,
Canada and Latin America. We have an
opening in our Foster City, CA office for
a Compiler Engineer to contribute to
technologies related to compiler & SW
dev’t tools. Pls mail resume to 919 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., 2nd Fl, Foster City, CA
94404, Attn: Katherine Brady. No calls or
emails pls. DB2/ 23632530.1
110 Employment
YOU’RE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252655
The following person is doing business
as: Around the Clock Locksmith, 2515
Carlmont Dr., #7, BELMONT, CA 94002
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Mordechay Amar, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on 6/6/2012
/s/ Mordechay Amar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/5/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/08/12, 10/15/12, 10/22/12, 10/29/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252637
The following person is doing business
as: Peche Painting, 135 Palm Ave., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Alicia Peche,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Alicia Peche /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/4/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/15/12, 10/22/12, 10/29/12, 11/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252695
The following person is doing business
as: Family Cleaners, 412 E. 3rd Avenue,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Huiying
Wang, 101 Blossom Cir, #2E, San Ma-
teo, CA 94403. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/28/2012.
/s/ Huiying Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/22/12, 10/29/12, 11/05/12, 11/12/12).
26 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252555
The following person is doing business
as: M. S. Auto Repair, 501 S. Norfolk St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Mohammed
Sahid, 125 San Marco Ave. #2, San Bru-
no, CA 94066. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Mohammed Sahid /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/29/12, 11/05/12, 11/12/12, 11/19/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1 BAG of Hot Wheels and Matchbox
Cars, from the 70s, Appx 40, $30
(650)589-8348
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
298 Collectibles
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, playgoer August pro-
gram, featuring Gloria Stuart, George
Sanders, Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20.,
San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE - Special Issue,
“Off to the Moon”, featuring Armstrong,
Aldrin, and Collins, and a special article
by Charles Lindburgh, $25., San Mateo,
(650)341-8342
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 (650)787-8600
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection, SOLD!
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, SOLD!
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, collectible su-
perstars, Gretzki, Messier, more, OK
sold separately, SOLD!
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, SOLD!
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures, SOLD!
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6” diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)375-8044
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
298 Collectibles
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
2 MODEL ships in box $30
(650)589-8348
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 SOLD!
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
304 Furniture
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH & LOVE SEAT- Floral Design.
Great Condition, $350.00, (650)266-8025
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINET TABLE walnut with chrome legs.
36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50, San
Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O SOLD!
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)857-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
AS NEW Bar-B-Q electric outdoor/in-
door, easy clean, no scrubbing./brushing,
as new, $15., SOLD!
AUTO WINE OPENER - mint condition,
one-touch, rechargeable, adapter, foil
cutter, built-in light, easy open, great gift,
$12.00, SOLD!
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
BUFFET SERVER, stainless, cook &
serve same dish, $20 (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., 650-375-8044
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
LORUS WATCH- date, sweep second
hand, new battery, stainless steel adjust-
able band, perfect, $19., SOLD!
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw $80
(650)521-3542
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1” BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, $35., (650)521-3542
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)857-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 CUSTOM Medicine Cabinet, White
with Mirror $25 obo, (650)589-8348
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, SOLD!
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLANKET- Double bed size, dusty rose,
satin bindings, warm, like new, washa-
ble. $8., 650-375-8044
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, SOLD!
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HALLOWEEN DECORATIONS Pump-
kins, Lights, Large spiders, ect. all for
$20 D.C. SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
27 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Golf pros
regularly break it
4 Gemologist’s
weight
9 Force back
14 “__ had it up to
here!”
15 Single-celled
critter
16 Bo’s’n’s “Hold it!”
17 Blink of an eye
18 Rocky, for one
19 Midterms and
finals
20 Do-or-die
moment
23 “Para __, oprima
numero dos”:
customer service
option
24 Woos
27 Crystal ball
consulter
28 Bringing up the
rear
31 Cut back
32 Offbeat
35 Cowboy’s
footwear
37 Pieces on a
board
38 When the Brontës
wrote
43 Cannes crony
44 Arrow-shooting
god
45 Prez before Jack
46 Prefix with
second
48 Computer
operator
50 Bottom-line
concern
54 Hole for a
shoelace
56 Heart, soul, or
heart and soul
59 Precisely
62 Cheer for a diva
64 Fragrant
compound
65 Game based on
crazy eights
66 Seethed
67 Underground
Railroad traveler
68 Fort Worth sch.
69 Stockpile
70 Repaired, as a
shoe
71 “But then
again ...”
DOWN
1 The Fishes of the
zodiac
2 Opposed (to)
3 Bon Appétit
offering
4 Mountain retreat
5 BP merger partner
6 Drugstore name
derived from the
prescription
symbol
7 Genesis sibling
8 Infield protection
9 Betting odds, e.g.
10 Bring into
balance
11 Deli meat
12 Body shop quote:
Abbr.
13 Many USMA
grads
21 Card worth a
fortune?
22 Squid relatives
25 Palm smartphone
26 Mail out
29 Belittle
30 Trinity member
33 Deer mom
34 “Sex for
Dummies” author,
familiarly
36 “__War”: Shatner
novel
38 Rooftop rotator
39 Uncertain
response
40 Wide-screen
technique
introduced in the
’50s
41 Island in the
Aegean
42 CSA general
47 Antipasto tidbits
49 Beach house,
maybe
51 At one’s post
52 Wall-mounted
candleholder
53 Embark
55 “Holy moly!”
57 “Date Night” actor
Carell
58 Destroy, as
documents
60 Miss Trueheart of
“Dick Tracy”
61 Nobel Peace
Prize city
62 Painter’s deg.
63 Caribbean liquor
By Don Gagliardo & C.C. Burnikel
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
10/29/12
10/29/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, work great for small of-
fice/room, extra speakers, 4 1/2 in. high,
includes cords. $8.00, SOLD!
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
METAL COWBOY STATUE - $50.,
SOLD!
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEADER shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
310 Misc. For Sale
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color, $25., (650)873-8167
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
perfect condition ideal gift, Only $30.,
650-595-3933
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, $15., 650-375-8044
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
310 Misc. For Sale
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
(650)348-6428
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
(650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2 SAN Francisco Giants Jackets 1 is
made by (Starter) LG/XLG excellent con-
dition $99 for both (650)571-5790
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY SHIRTS - pearl snaps, pock-
ets, XL/XXL, perfect $15 each, cowboy
boots, 9D, black, $45., SOLD!
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HALLOWEEN COSTUME "Little miss
Muffet" outfit with blonde braided wig
never warn Fredrick of Hollywood $35
D.C. SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME 1950's Poodle
skirt Black & Pink from Fredrick of Holly-
wood $35 D.C. SOLD!
HALLOWEEN COSTUME Tony Martin
size 40 warn only once from Selix $25
D.C SOLD!
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 SOLD!
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
317 Building Materials
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, excellent condition,
$30.all, San Bruno, (650)588-1946
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHING EQUPMENT 3 rods with reels,
2 Tackle boxes full fo supplies, SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole $45
(650)521-3542
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20” rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
FORD ‘97 Arrowstar Van XLT - 130K
miles, $3500. obo, SOLD!
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
28 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Service
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims, SOLD!
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, $20.,
San Bruno, (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Don’t live in pain;
contact Will Chen for a free consultation and learn how to start getting relief naturally
Will Chen Acupuncture has been help-
ing heal Peninsula residents for nearly a
decade. He has a new, larger office located
at 1220 Sixth Street, behind the Safeway on
El Camino Real in Belmont.
He has a Masters of Science in Traditional
Chinese Medicine, He is licensed to prac-
tice Acupuncture in California, nationally
certified in the practice of Acupuncture,
and is a certified practitioner of Tui Na
Chinese body work. He currently has a
Traditional Chinese Medicine clinic in San
Mateo and is a volunteer Acupuncturist for
Herban Health in East Palo Alto.
Traditional Chinese Medicine dates back
5,000 years. It uses Acupuncture, Acupres-
sure, Tuina massage, Herbs, moxibustion,
cupping and other treatment methods
to restore health to the body. It treats the
symptom of a illness and reduces pain but
more importantly it treats the origin of
the illness and eliminate pain. That makes
TCM an excellent tool for maintaining
optimum health and preventing illness.
Will Chen Acupuncture can help you feel relief from many conditions, including:
Don’t live in pain. Call Will Chen Acupuncture at 650-235-6761 for an appointment today.
They are open Monday – Saturday. Credit cards and most insurance plans accepted.
• Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
• Depression
• High Blood Pressure
• Hot Flashes
• Irritable Bowl Syndrome
• Low back pain
• Migraine headaches
• And more.
1220 6th Ave, Belmont
(Behind the Safeway on El Camino Real)
650-235-6761 www.willchenacupuncture.com willchenlac@gmail.com
Cabinetry Cleaning Concrete
Construction
Construction Construction
Pictures on Yelp
Qualifing
Special
flat & low
slope roofs
650-594-1717
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
29 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance • Clean
Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 461-0326
Lic#933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Remodeling
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
30 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING
Top Attorney With Masters
In Tax Law Offers Reduced
Fees For New October Clients.
(650)342-3777
Ira Harris Zelnigher, Esq.
(”Ira Harris”)
1840 Gateway Dr., Ste. 200
San Mateo
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Business Services
PUT YOUR
BUSINESS INFO
ON THE
INTERNET
FREE
Link the phone number
in your classified ad
directly to online details
about your business
ZypPages.com
Barbara@ZypPages.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
Food
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Health & Medical
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
MANUFACTURED
HOME COMMUNITY
For Ages 55+
Canada Cove,
Half Moon Bay
(650) 726-5503
www.theaccenthome.com
Walk to the Beach
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
LIFESTYLE 31
Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Martha Irvine
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — When was the last
time you were alone, and unwired?
Really, truly by yourself. Just you
and your thoughts — no cellphone,
no tablet, no laptop.
Many of us crave that kind of
solitude, though in an increasingly
wired world, it’s a rare commodity.
We check texts and emails, and
update our online status, at any
hour — when we’re lying in bed or
sitting at stop lights or on trains.
Sometimes, we even do so when
we’re on the toilet.
We feel obligated, yes. But we’re
also fascinated with this connected-
ness, constantly tinkering and
checking in — an obsession that’s
starting to get pushback from a
small but growing legion of tech
users who are feeling the need to
unplug and get away.
“What might have felt like an
obligation at first has become an
addiction. It’s almost as if we don’t
know how to be alone, or we are
afraid of what we’ll find when we
are alone with ourselves,” says
Camille Preston, a tech and com-
munication consultant based in
Cambridge, Mass.
“It’s easier to keep doing, than it
is to be in stillness.”
One could argue that, in this
economy, it’s wise to be constantly
wired — to stay on top of things, to
please the boss. Preston knows peo-
ple who get up in the middle of the
night to see if their boss has sent
them an email.
But she and others also see more
hints of limit-setting going on, this
movement of solitude-seekers with
roots in the technology industry,
ironically enough.
“When I think about truly discon-
necting, I look to my truly techy
friends,” says Cathy Davidson, a
Duke University professor who co-
directs the school’s PhD Lab in
Digital Knowledge.
Those friends, she says, take
long, unwired vacations and set
“away messages” telling people to
write back after they return. “And
they stick to it,” Davidson says,
wishing she could do the same.
“They’ve come up with a socially
acceptable convention for their own
absence from the world of technol-
ogy and everybody recognizes it.”
One organization called Reboot
has started the Sabbath Manifesto,
a call to unplug one day a week to
find solitude — or to simply take a
day of rest with family and friends.
Bigger corporations, some out-
side the tech industry, are starting
to catch on to this type of limit-set-
ting.
To encourage work-life balance,
Volkswagen shuts off mobile email
in Germany 30 minutes after
employees’ shifts end and turns it
back on 30 minutes before their
next shift starts.
Google, Nike and the Huffington
Post, among others, provide space
for employees to take naps, or to
meditate. The idea is that employ-
ees who take time to themselves to
reenergize will be more productive.
John Cacioppo, a University of
Chicago psychologist, thinks there
might just be something to that.
He has spent much of his career
tackling the topic of loneliness and
isolation, which researchers have
proven can affect humans adverse-
ly, all the way down to gene
expression.
“Feeling ignored sparks feelings
of loneliness,” says Cacioppo,
director of the University of
Chicago’s Center for Cognitive and
Social Neuroscience.
But getting away, he says —
“that’s the opposite of being lone-
ly.”
It’s time that you take by choice,
Cacioppo says. So while the cogni-
tive effects are still being studied,
he says it’s very likely that that type
of solitude is good for the brain.
Dan Rollman had little doubt of
that when he and a few others from
Reboot, a group of Jewish “thought
leaders,” gathered in 2009. That’s
when they created the Sabbath
Manifesto, inspired by the tradi-
tional Jewish sabbath, but aimed at
people from any background who
are encouraged to unplug one day
— any day — of the week.
The idea came to Rollman when
he found himself craving a simpler
time, when stores closed on
Sundays and life slowed down.
“I knew I wanted a day of rest,”
says Rollman, who is CEO of the
company RecordSetter.com.
Can true solitude be found in a wired world?
Largo was able to finance the cost
without any interest.
Funded by the Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, the new
social lending program helps immi-
grants save the money and provides
them with a 25 percent charitable
match to meet the goal. The pro-
gram, run by Mission Asset Fund,
was launched in San Francisco, San
Jose and San Mateo counties. Largo
was the first to achieve his citizen-
ship through the program.
“One-hundred-and-seventy-dol-
lars saved is a lot for those of us
who work for $10, $8, $9 an hour,”
Largo said. “Most of us doing the
Tandas, our budgets are tight, espe-
cially nowadays.”
In Largo’s case, the program
brought together a group of six peo-
ple who all contributed $85 a month
for six months and took turns
receiving the funds for citizenship
application. With the matching
grant from Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, instead of
paying the full $680 application fee,
they pay a total of $510, explained
Jose Quinonez, Mission Asset Fund
executive director.
The idea was very successful for
Largo who, after becoming a citizen
earlier this year, has already voted
for the first time. He also plans to
help on Election Day at local
polling places.
Mission Asset Fund originally
started with a simple social lending
program, something common
amongst immigrants. Formalizing
the process allowed all to benefit
and create a credit history, said
Quinonez. Then, the organization
wondered if the idea could be
applied to helping people achieve
their citizenship goals.
Many microloan options were
available for people struggling to
make the application payment but
they often come with 10 percent to
14 percent interest, said Quinonez.
“That just adds to the cost. Our
goal was to lower the cost by adding
a charitable contribution,” he said.
The idea was rolled out by part-
nering with organizations who were
offering citizenship classes. That
way, the model would be directly
reaching those who the lending cir-
cles were supposed to help. With its
success, Quinonez said the program
has now evolved to offer help to
those eligible for deferred action
through the recently-passed Dream
Act.
“Citizenship is a fundamental
aspect of social and economic
opportunity and it helps strengthen
our communities. Studies have
shown that immigrants who become
citizens become more civic-minded
and have greater economic opportu-
nities,” said Quinonez.
The challenge now is finding part-
ners and donors to help allow the
charitable donation portion of the
idea to continue, he said.
For more information about
Lending Circles for Citizenship, or
to donate to the program, visit
www.MissionAssetFund.org.
Continued from page 1
PATH
32 Monday • Oct. 29, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
There Is
New Hope!
A Health Center
Dedicated to
Severe Disc
Conditions
You’ve seen the ads and heard the
radio commercials about my Non-
Surgical Spinal Decompression
treatment. At Crossroads Health
Center, I’ve created an entire facility
dedicated to patients with severe disc
conditions that have not responded
to traditional care. My revolutionary,
Crossroads Method, provides a very
high success rate to patients with
serious back, neck, leg and arm pain
– even when all else has failed. This
FDA cleared; non-surgical treatment
allows us to rehabilitate your
herniated or degenerative disc(s)
by reversing internal pressure and
enabling your disc(s) to heal from the
inside out. We succeed where other
treatments have failed – by removing
the pressure that is causing pain to
your disc(s) and nerves – without
drugs, injections, invasive surgery or
harmful side effects.
The only office to have
“The Crossroads Method”
This method which includes
computerized true disc
decompression is considered by
many doctors to be the most
advanced and successful non-
invasive treatment of serious back,
neck, leg or arm pain.
This procedure allows for a much
higher success rate by increasing
hydration of your discs, fexibility,
relaxation of muscles and ligaments
along with improving muscle and
core strength, balance and posture.
This results in a more effective and
lasting solution to your pain. There
are no side effects and no recovery
time is required.
This gentle and relaxing treatment
has proven to be effective… even
when drugs, epidurals, traditional
chiropractic, physical therapy
and surgery have failed… The
Crossroads Method has shown
dramatic results.
Patient Testimonials
During the 1 1/2 years of having
constant daily lower back pain and
spasms, I took anti-infammatory
and pain medication, but nothing
helped lessen the pain. When
an MRI showed that I had two
degenerative discs, I went through a
series of lumbar epidural injections
without success. The only thing
that made the pain and spasms go
away was Spinal Decompression
treatments at Crossroads Health
Center. Four years later and I am
still pain-free!
Lisa K.
My severe low back and sciatica
pain have been reduced signifcantly
since receiving spinal decompression
therapy at Crossroads Health Center.
I am now able to walk, golf, and do
things that I haven’t been able to do in
years! I would also like to say thanks
to Dr. Ferrigno and the offce staff as
they went above and beyond to make
sure my back problem was resolved. I
couldn’t be happier!!
C.M. Allard
How Will I Know If I Qualify
for Treatment?
When you come in for a
complimentary consultation we will
ask a series of questions and perform
a comprehensive examination to
determine exactly where the pain is
coming from. If x-rays are necessary,
we can take them in our offce. Once
we determine the cause of your
pain we will let you know if we can
help you and if you qualify for our
treatment protocol.
If we don’t feel like we can help we
will refer you to someone who can.
Serious Back or Neck Trouble?
Leg/Arm Pain or Numbness?
Have You Been Diagnosed With a
Bulging, Herniated or Degenerative Disc?
Crossroads Health Center
San Mateo: 177 Bovet Rd. #150 • San Mateo, CA 94402 (in the NeuroLink offces) 650-231-4754
Campbell: 420 Marathon Dr., Campbell, CA 95008 • 408-866-0300 • www.BayAreaBackPain.com
2011 Best Chiropractor in Campbell Nominee
CALL NOW
Free
Consultation
and
Examination
with
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
Crossroads Health Center
San Mateo 650-231-4754
Campbell 408-866-0300
www.BayAreaBackPain.com
Free visit cannot be used with Medicare or
Federal Insurance Plans.
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