2 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA

INDEX
SALUTE
FIREFIGHTERS
to
our
Recognizing Fire Prevention Month ...................3
Have 2 Ways Out ! ..............................................3
Establish a Home Fire Safety Plan ......................4
Teaching Children About 9-1-1 ...........................4
Don’t Compromise Your Family’s Fire Safety ......5
Fire Extinguisher Know-How ..............................6
Space Heaters Should Be Used With Caution .....6
Adamstown Fire Department .............................7
Akron Volunteer Fire Department ......................7
Bareville Fire Company ......................................8
Bart Township Fire Company ..............................8
Bowmansville Fire Company ..............................9
Brickerville Fire Company ..................................9
Columbia Consolidated Fire Department .........10
Columbia No. 1 Fire Department ......................10
East Petersburg Fire Company
No. 1 - Station 23 .........................................11
Elizabethtown Fire Department .......................12
Ephrata Pioneer Fire Company No. 1 ................12
Farmersville Fire Company ...............................13
Fivepointville Fire Company .............................13
Garden Spot Fire/Rescue ..................................14
Haz-Mat 2 Environmental Fire
& Rescue Company .......................................14
Keystone Wildfire Crew Inc. ..............................15
Lafayette Fire Company ...................................15
Lancaster Township Fire Department ...............16
Lincoln Fire Department ...................................16
Lititz Fire Company No. 1 .................................17
Middle Creek Search & Rescue .........................18
Fire Department Mount Joy ..............................19
Mountville Fire Company No. 1 ........................20
New Danville Fire Company .............................20
Penryn Fire Company No. 1 ......................21
Pequea Volunteer
Fire Company No. 1 ...........................21
Quarryville Fire Company No. 1 ..........22
Rawlinsville Volunteer
Fire Company ..............................22
Reinholds Fire Department ..............23
Rothsville Volunteer Fire Company ..................23
Schoeneck Fire Company ..................................24
Strasburg Fire Company No. 1 ..........................24
Susquehanna Fire & Rescue
Company No. 4 .............................................25
Upper Leacock Fire Company ...........................25
West Earl Fire Company ...................................26
West Hempfield Fire & Rescue Company .........26
Willow Street Fire Company .............................27
How to Prevent a Chimney Fire ........................28
What is Creosote Anyway? ...............................28
Prepping the Fireplace for the Season .............29
The ‘Silent Killer’ Should Be Taken Seriously ...30
Keep Your Dryer Running Safe and Smooth .....31
Page Page
Fire Department photos by Joyce Fitzpatrick and Kirk Neidermyer
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 3
Salute to Our Firefighters was created
to honor area firefighters, search
and rescue teams, fire police, and
fire company supporters in Lancaster
County. These volunteers give their
time and talents in an ongoing
effort to keep their neighbors and
neighborhoods safe.
Included in this section are articles
offering ideas, plans, and actions that
can be taken to keep your home safe
from fire; such as establishing a fire
safety plan, how to prevent chimney
fires, and fire extinguisher know how.
All fire companies in Lancaster
County were invited to participate in
this special tribute section. Featured in
these pages are those who responded.
Thank you for your willingness to be a
part of this project.
Fire companies not in this year’s
section who would like to participate
next year may contact:
Amanda E. Janaszek
Retail Advertising Sales Manager
717.291.8863
ajanaszek@lnpnews.com
Take the opportunity, during Fire
Prevention Month and every month, to
show your support of the firefighters
of Lancaster County. A simple “thank
you,” participation in their fund-raising
events, or a donation to your local fire
company would show your appreciation
for their commitment and efforts.
Lancaster Newspapers will donate
a portion of the proceeds of this
publication to participating fire
companies.
Fire companies are always looking for
volunteers to serve in many areas of
their organizations. Not every member
is trained to go into burning buildings,
but each role that supports those who
do is important.
“The reality is that when fire strikes, your
home could be engulfed in smoke and flames in
just a few minutes” according to the National Fire
Prevention Association (NFPA.org).
The NFPA emphasizes that “It is important to have
a home fire escape plan that prepares your family to
think fast and get out quickly when the smoke alarm
sounds. What if your first escape route is blocked by
smoke or flames? That’s why having two ways out is
such a key part of your plan.”
“This year’s theme, “Have 2 Ways Out!”, focuses on
the importance of fire escape planning and practice.”
Here are suggestions for your home plan:
■ Make a map of your home. Mark a door and a
window that can be used to get out of every room.
■ Choose a meeting place outside in front of your
home. This is where everyone can meet once they’ve
escaped. Draw a picture of your outside meeting place
on your escape plan.
■ Write the emergency telephone number for the fire
department on your escape plan.
■ Have a grown-up sound the smoke alarm and
practice your escape plan with everyone living in your
home.
■ Keep your escape plan on the refrigerator and
remind grown-ups to have your family practice the
plan twice a year or whenever anyone in your home
celebrates a birthday.
Source: NFPA.org
FIRE PREVENTION MONTH
Recognizing
Have 2 Ways Out!
4 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
People rely on fire and smoke detectors to
help keep them safe in their homes. Though fire
and smoke alarms are effective, a firm fire safety
plan that will keep everyone calm should a fire
occur could make the difference between life and
death.
The U.S. Fire Administration says that more
than 3,500 Americans die each year in fires, while
roughly 18,300 more men, women and children
are injured each year. Cooking accounts for the
greatest percentage of residential fires, followed
by arson. Dryer vent fires are also a big concern.
FEMA says that smoke, rather than the fire’s
flames, is responsible for 75 percent of all deaths
by fire.
In addition to physical injury and material
damage, fires can cause a host of problems.
Psychological distress, monetary damages
and loss of pets may come with fires. Loss of
irreplaceable personal items is also a concern.
Although fires can be devastating, they’re also
highly preventable, and smoke alarms and a home
fire safety plan are two precautionary measures
everyone should take.
Creating an evacuation plan doesn’t have to be
complicated. Such a plan can be established in a
few minutes and then reinforced through practice
every so often to keep everyone fresh on what to
do.
* Begin by assessing the layout of the home.
Figure out the two best exits from the home.
* If your home doesn’t have two doors, invest
in a fire ladder so that one of the windows can be
a point of exit.
* Know how to gain access to the exits,
including the best path to take to avoid injury. It’s
a good idea to consider a few different scenarios.
A kitchen adjacent to the upstairs staircase may
become engulfed in flames and make exit by way
of staircase impossible. Just because you have
doors to the outside doesn’t mean they’ll present
the best type of exit.
* Sketch out the layout of the home and the
escape plan. Smoke can make it difficult to know
up from down. Be sure everyone can reach the
exits even if vision is obstructed. Try it with your
eyes closed.
* Check fire alarms routinely, and change
batteries at least every year.
* Make sure windows can be easily opened if
they are an exit point.
* Make note of who will be helping children or
the elderly out of the home.
* Establish a place where the family will meet
outdoors. This area should be far enough away
from the home so that everyone will be safe from
smoke, flames and falling debris. Fires may ignite
fuel explosions, so be sure the meeting spot is a
good deal away.
* Children should be instructed to run to
the meeting spot immediately without waiting
behind for anyone to catch up. No one should
reenter the home after arriving at the meeting
spot.
* Do a few practice runs so that everyone will
be accustomed to getting out quickly.
* While in most cases it is better to escape and
let the fire department extinguish a fire, in the
event of a small fire, occupants may be able to
stanch it with a personal fire extinguisher. Follow
the acronym PASS to properly put out the fire.
- PULL the pin in the extinguisher.
- AIM the nozzle or hose at the base of the
flames.
- SQUEEZE the trigger.
- SWEEP the foam across the fire base; do not
just aim in one place.
Fire safety is very important. In conjunction
with smoke alarms, a fire safety plan can help
everyone get out alive.
In January, 3-year-old Jaden Bolli, of Maple Shade, N.J.
dialed 9-1-1 when his grandmother collapsed at home. The
toddler had learned how to call emergency services just days
before from his mother. The boy told the dispatcher that it
was his grandmother’s blood sugar. However, she really had
suffered a stroke. Paramedics arrived in time and were able
to help the woman. Bolli saved his grandma’s life.
A parent never knows when an emergency will strike. His
or her only hope may be the fast-thinking action of a young
child who has called for help.
Many parents wonder when the right time is for teaching
youngsters about 9-1-1 or calling for emergency services. It
doesn’t have to be based on age but rather maturity level.
A mature 3-year-old may be able to grasp the concept and
learn how to use the phone. However, parents may have to
wait a little longer for a less mature child.
Some adults are apprehensive about teaching the 9-1-1
lesson because they fear a child may dial the number by
accident or even on purpose when there is no emergency.
Many a police officer has responded to a call only to find
that a child has made the call. Some areas will give individu-
als a warning. Others may issue a fine if 9-1-1 is dialed too
many times without an emergency. This can be a deterrent to
teaching about calling the police. However, when done the
right way, many children can grasp the difference between
using 9-1-1 in the wrong and right way.
1. Explain the purpose of 9-1-1. It is a method of contact-
ing the police, fire department or ambulance when there
is an emergency only. An emergency is when Mom, Dad or
someone else in the house is hurt and can’t get up; there is
a fire; or the police are needed, like if there is a burglar or a
bad fight.
2. Indicate that the adults in the house will dial the phone
whenever possible if there is an emergency. The child is
learning only in case Mom or Dad can’t get to the phone.
3. Discuss the buttons on the phone. Show the child how
to push them in the right order.
4. Now may be the time to also teach the child his or her
full name and address. This is something many kindergart-
ners are urged to know.
5. Roll-play with the child. Go over instances that are
emergencies and non-emergencies so he or she will under-
stand the differences between both and when 9-1-1 may be
needed.
Again, stress the importance that 9-1-1 should not be
dialed just for fun. Mommy is not sick if she simply has a
headache! With time, children can grasp the concept of 9-1-1
and be a lifesaver at a time when an adult cannot reach the
phone.
Teaching Children About 9-1-1
Establish a
HOME FIRE SAFETY PLAN
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 5
Visa, MasterCard
& Discover Accepted
301 EASTORANGESTREET, LANC, PA
393-0451 • www.showcaseoffashions.com
Free Parking onShippenStreet
Four Blocks fromthe Marriott Hotel &ConventionCenter
Monday - Saturday 9:30am-5:00pm
Thank You
Volunteer
Firefighters.
TOALL OF THE
(ARA) - Most people have
experienced the shriek of a
smoke alarm when cooking a
meal or stepping out of a steamy
shower, when there is no hazard
present. The instant reaction is to
find a way to silence the alarm.
Unfortunately, some people may
even pull down the alarm to make
the piercing sound stop. To avoid
the problem in the future, many
choose not to reinstall the smoke
alarms, creating a potentially
deadly situation.
In fact, the U.S. Consumer
Product Safety Commission (CPSC)
reports that two-thirds of home
fire deaths resulted from fires in
homes with no smoke alarms or no
working smoke alarms.
Nuisance alarms, as they are
called, are caused by numerous
sources such as cooking, dust and
insect infestation - but no matter
the source, if you’ve heard them,
you don’t want to experience them
again. Since many of these day-to-
day issues are difficult to avoid, the
best solution to virtually eliminate
the nuisance and keep your alarm
intact is to choose a smart smoke
alarm, such as the IoPhic smoke and
fire alarm. With a microprocessor
that changes sensitivity according
to the nuisance source, the IoPhic
smart technology is inherently
immune to elements such as dust
and steam.
James Milke, professor and
chair of the Department of
Fire Protection Engineering at
the University of Maryland, is
constantly stressing the importance
of installing the appropriate alarm
and keeping it properly maintained
to ensure the maximum safety for
your family.
“As an expert in fire
engineering, I can say that
disabling smoke alarms after a
nuisance incidence is a very serious
problem and can lead to extremely
dangerous situations for families.
The best solution to protect your
family is to purchase a smoke alarm
that adapts to many situations and
only sounds in the case of a fire,”
says Milke. “In a study I recently
conducted at the University of
Maryland testing 10 different
smoke alarm technologies, the
IoPhic smoke and fire alarm from
Universal Security Instruments was
found to be an improvement in
smoke alarm technology.”
The first new technology to
launch in more than 30 years
and first ever smart alarm, the
IoPhic smoke and fire alarm from
Universal Security Instruments
uses Universal Smoke Sensing
Technology to help prevent
nuisance alarms. The recent study
from the University of Maryland’s
School of Fire Protection
Engineering confirmed that the
new IoPhic line of smoke and
fire alarms are more resistant to
nuisance alarms, even while you
are cooking.
In addition to safely reducing
nuisance incidences by using a
smart alarm, families should take
the following steps to ensure fire
safety in their homes:
* Smoke alarms should be
installed in every bedroom, outside
each separate sleeping area and on
every level of the home, including
the basement.
* Smoke alarms are an
important part of a home fire
escape plan, but remember they
are only one step. Keep your family
prepared for a fire emergency by
creating a plan and practicing it
once a month.
* Keep yourself up-to-date
on the fire safety industry by
reading resources such as NFPA.
org (National Fire Protection
Association).
For more information, visit
www.SmokeAlarms.com.
Don’t
compromise
your family’s
FIRE SAFETY
6 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
Fire Extinguisher
KNOW-HOW
Fire extinguishers are an
important safety component in
any home or building. They can
mean the difference between a
devastating fire or a minor incident.
Although a fire extinguisher in the
hands of a trained adult can be a
life- and property-saving tool, many
people are not properly skilled in
the use of fire extinguishers.
A large portion of the public
has not received training on fire
extinguisher use and when to use
them. Sometimes the use of the
wrong extinguisher can exacerbate
a fire, as there are different fire
extinguishers for different types of
fires. Learning when and where to
use an extinguisher can be a matter
of life and death.
TYPE OF EXTINGUISHER
Not all fires are alike, and fires
started from different materials
require the use of different
extinguishing agents to safely and
quickly put the fire out. There are
five different types of extinguishers,
and generally each will feature a
symbol to show the applicable fire
on which they can be used.
■ Class A: These are used on
ordinary substances, like cloth,
wood, paper, and plastics.
■ Class B: These extinguishers
are used on fires that feature
flammable liquids, such as oil-based
paints or gasoline.
■ Class C: These extinguishers are
used on electrical equipment, such
as tools or appliances that are
plugged in.
■ Class D: Commonly found
in specific factories, these
extinguishers are used on
flammable metals.
■ Class K: Combustible cooking
materials, like animal oils and
fats, can be extinguished with this
agent. They are commonly found in
commercial kitchens, but are now
infiltrating residential markets as
well.
■ Multipurpose: Some
extinguishers combine different
agents so they are applicable for a
range of fires.
WHEN TO USE A FIRE
EXTINGUISHER
Small fires may be smothered with
an extinguisher. If the fire has
spread or is already large in size, it’s
likely only a trained firefighter can
handle the blaze. Only use a fire
extinguisher in these circumstances.
1. The fire is small and contained.
2. You have already called the fire
department.
3. There is little chance of being
consumed by toxic smoke.
4. You can escape safely if
necessary.
5. The fire is not between you and
the escape route.
6. You are physically able to carry
its weight and exert the necessary
pressure to operate it.
Fire extinguishers should be
routinely inspected and maintained
to ensure they will be effective.
Some need to be shaken to keep
the dry chemicals from settling.
Others need to have the pressure
at the correct level. An extinguisher
may need to be recharged or
replaced if it is damaged.
Individuals can talk with
firefighters about possible
training courses in the use of fire
extinguishers. This will help a
person know the correct way to
handle and activate an extinguisher
should it need to be used.
Space heaters may seem like an excellent way to provide
supplemental heat on chilly days. However, research points out
that these units tend to be dangerous.
According to the National Fire Prevention Association,
around one-third of fires in the home can be attributed to
space heaters. They also account for three-quarters of fire-
related deaths in U.S. homes.
One of the biggest risk factors with space heaters is their
tendency to get hot on the surface. When a hot space heater
comes in contact with surrounding combustible materials, such
as draperies or bed linens, the risk for a serious fire will only
increase.
Space heaters should come with instructions for proper use
and placement, including several feet from walls and other
combustibles. However, in crowded living situations or homes
with small children and pets, it is easy for space heaters to be
inadvertently moved or knocked over.
If a space heater is needed in a home, select a type that will
be the safest option.
• Consider an electric model that doesn’t require the
replacement of fuel, such as kerosene.
• Choose a radiator type that doesn’t feature any external
heating coils.
• Look for models with a tip-over safety shut off. There are
others that will automatically shut off if the unit senses too
much heat from a close-by object.
• Select sturdy models that aren’t prone to tip over,
meaning look for short, stout heaters, rather than tall, skinny
ones.
• The best type of space heaters have the heating element
deep inside of the machine and only emit hot air.
• For those with an old-fashioned heater that features
heating coils directly behind a mesh screen, discard of this
unsafe appliance promptly.
• A space heater should be the only major appliance on one
circuit to avoid an electrical overload and fire.
• Do not use extension cords with a space heater, as the
cord tends to overheat quickly.
• Turn off the space heater when a room is unattended.
These heaters must be used under supervision. Leaving them
unmonitored in a room is a recipe for trouble.
• Use space heaters as a last resort. Heavy blankets and
clothing can chase away the chill.
Space
Heaters
Should
Be Used
With
Caution
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 7
ADAMSTOWN FIRE
DEPARTMENT
30 S. Poplar Street, Adamstown, PA 19501
(717) 484-4157
www.adamstownfire.com
adamstownfire@dejazzd.com
Steve Roth, Larry Hartranft, Jim Heale, Derek Miller, Hunter Martin, Mark Martin,
Ed Zalewski, Dwayne Shank, Travis Wieder, Tom Wieder
29 members
Organized: April 29, 1874
Fire Chief: Steven Karl Roth
President: Steve Dunn
Special activities and info:
• Santa rides a decorated fire truck on
Christmas Eve in Adamstown.
• The original building was destroyed in a fire in
1921. A new fire station was constructed circa
1926 for a cost of $14,035.22.
• The Adamstown Fire Company still owns the
first piece of firefighting apparatus, a “Little
Giant” hand-pumper, and Model-T fire fighting
pieces. They can be seen at the current
fire station.
AKRON VOLUNTEER
FIRE DEPARTMENT
1229 Main St., Akron, PA 17501
(717) 859-1351
www.akronfire.org
Scott Allen, Tim Hoffman, Louis Oberholtzer, David Deamer, Aaron Murray, Justin Gehman, Tom Murray, Tom Murray Jr., Tom Murray III, Harlan Zimmerman,
Andy Foreman, Lyn Beiler, Justin Beiler, Jeff Zimmerman, Ben Meiskey, Larry Weaver, Lynn Crills, Ken Lausch, Lurrin Zimmerman
79 members
Organized: 1893
Fire Chief: Tim Hoffman
President: Ken Lausch
Special activities and info:
• Founded in 1893, Akron Volunteer Fire
Company provides service to Akron Borough
and Ephrata and West Earl townships.
• The AVFC’s junior firefighter program allows
boys and girls, age 14 and older, to learn
service, commitment and dedication to
others while working alongside firefighters
at emergency calls in a safe and fun
environment.
8 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
BAREVILLE FIRE COMPANY
211 E. Main Street, Leola, PA 17540
(717) 656-7554
www.barevillefire.com
Bill Howard, Mike Ranck, Dave Swiger, Jake Ebersol, Earl Wenger, Abigail Rineer, Curtis Frey, Leroy Ebersol,
Andrew Oberholtzer, Keith McQuate, Melvin Jay Beiler, David Ray King, Andrew Sauder, Randy Smith,
John Lee King, Mel Stoltzfus
60 members
Organized: September 10, 1910
Fire Chief: Nelson Oberholtzer
President: Harvey Nolt
Special activities and info:
• In November of 1910, two hand-drawn chemical tanks were purchased at a cost of $535.
• The company recently purchased a 2012 Pierce 75’ Quint with a 500 gallon water tank and
a ladder that extends from the top of the truck.
• Bareville Fire Company visits approximately 15 schools in the area for fire prevention education.
• All You Can Eat Breakfast: First Saturday of each month from November to May
• Charcoal Steak Dinner: May 25, 2013
• Annual Consignment Auction: August 24, 2013
• Chicken Pot
Pie Supper:
September 28, 2013
BART TOWNSHIP
FIRE COMPANY
P.O. Box 72, Bart, PA 17503
(717) 786-3348
www.bart51.com
Dave King, Darlene Swisher, Frank Wright, George Welk, Brian Herr, Ken Klaassen, Cathy Frackman, David Arroyo, Travis Hoover, Deb Hoover, Mike Hoover,
Clinton Frackman, Dave Farmer, John Graybill, Ethel Armer, Mary England, Dorothy Grier, Sue Welk, Sue Fromm, Carol Farmer, Jodi LeFevre, Curt Woerth,
Sarah Glick, Levi Glick, Chad Graybill, Randy Hershey, George LeFevre, Eric LeFevre, Christy Frackman, John Woerth
216 members
Organized: September 24, 1946
Fire Chief: David King
President: Brian Herr
Special activities and info:
• Organized fire protection came to Bart
Townshp on March 5, 1946 when 38 residents
met at the Bart High School. Before the night
was over, they elected a president and a fire
chief.
• All You Can Eat Breakfast, 2nd Saturday of
every month, except March.
• All Day Mud Sale, 1st and 3rd Saturdays
in March.
• Turkey Shoot, November 17, 4 p.m.
• Annual Christmas Bazaar, December 1,
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
• Annual Chicken BBQ and Yard Sales,
1st Saturday in August.
Call Today For A FREE Consultation & Estimate
10 Trinity Dr. • Leola, PA 17540 717-656-8928
Mon. Through Fri. 9:00-5:00 • www.AtkinsDeck.com
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 9
BOWMANSVILLE
FIRE COMPANY
P.O. Box 302, Bowmansville, PA 17507
(717) 445-6293
www.bowmansvillefire.com
Jim Musser, Jeff Good, John Nolt, Mike Lehman, Mike Kulp, Torrey Sensenig, Eli Sauder,
Nevin Weaver, Ken Martin, Steve King, Matt Martin
46 members
Organized: 1913
Fire Chief: James Musser
President: Mike Lehman
Special activities and info:
• Bowmansville Fire Company will celebrate 100
years May 17, 2013, with an Open House, parade
and fireworks.
• The company protects about 15 square miles in
Brecknock Twp., and about 10 miles of PA
Turnpike. It annually runs approximately 130
calls a year in Lancaster and Berks counties.
• Bowmansville Fire Company is 100% volunteer.
BRICKERVILLE
FIRE COMPANY
10 Hopeland Road, Lititz, PA 17543 (717)626-6711
www.brickervillefire.com www.brickervillefire.net
Nevin May, Larry Eckert, Kevin Eckert, Jeff Strauss, Wesley Morgan, Dustin Bair
30 active members Organized: June 1947
President: Kurt Gardner
Fire Chief: Sid Adams
Special activities and info:
• In December, 1943, a committee was formed to provide fire
protection for the area. Three years later in 1946 the committee
built three cisterns which were sponsored by the Baron Stiegel
Lions Club. One year after the cisterns were built, a charter was
granted in June
1947 to the
Brickerville Fire
Company No. 1.
• Bingo, 7 p.m.
every Tuesday
evening.
Thank You
for your Service!
•Auto Body Repair & Painting
•Wheel & Frame
Alignment Service
Roy’s Body Shop
1313 Furnace Hills Pike
Lititz • 717-627-3603
10 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
COLUMBIA CONSOLIDATED
FIRE DEPARTMENT
265 S. Tenth St., P.O. Box 270, Columbia, PA 17512 (717) 684-2695
www.CCFD8-7.com
Lorenzo Gomez, Pauline Torbert, Hannah Deets, Picenti Moussa, Stephanie Wagner,
Edward McCauley Jr., Nichole McCauley, Brad Hemperly, Charles Snyder III
23 members Organized: 2000
Fire Chief: Charles E. Snyder III
President: Edward J. McCauley Jr.
Special activities and info:
• CCFD was formed when 3 Columbia Borough fire companies merged: Vigilant
Steam Fire Engine & Hose Company No. 2, Shawnee Fire Company No. 3 and
Keystone Hook & Ladder Company No. 5. Since 2011, CCFD staff members
have averaged more than 290 hours of
training each month as well as 260-
300 calls for services each year. The
department is actively recruiting
firefighting staff.
• Bingo every Sunday at 6 p.m. Meat
Bingo the first Saturday every month.
SWO Wrestling the third Saturday of
every month. Family Movie Night the
fourth Friday of every month.
• Assistant Chief Franz “Jodi” Fifolt
received the CCFD Valor Award and
was honored by Columbia Borough
for saving the life of an elderly
gentleman who was trapped in his
burning vehicle.
COLUMBIA NO. 1
FIRE DEPARTMENT
137 S. Front St., P.O. Box 57, Columbia, PA 17512-0057 (717) 684-5100
www.columbiafire.com
Scott Ryno, Michael Anderson, Gary Weber, Jr., Todd Stahl, Ken Falcon, Ashley Hoffmaster, Nikki Anderson, Tom Wise,
Curtis Shearer, Don Zink, Sheryl Kliewer, Tim Wright, Judy Anderson, Todd Lightcap, Jr., Dan Hatterer, Justin Warner, Nick Martin,
Percy Wise, Simon Veach III, Joseph Felus, Denny Hershey, Frank Splain, Jr.
35 members Organized: July 4, 1796
Fire Chief: Scott K. Ryno
President: Michael S. Anderson
Special activities and info:
• Volunteers also staff numerous fund raising activities, spend thousands of hours
each year in training and provide fire safety education programs, facility tours
and general public relations for groups throughout the community.
• Columbia No. 1 Fire Department is
believed to be the oldest ALL
volunteer Fire Department operating
in the Commonwealth of
Pennyslvania.
• Columbia No. 1 Fire Department
responds to 550+ incidents each year
in Columbia Borough and surrounding
communities. It operates a 2009
engine, 2012 ladder truck as well as
2 squads, 2 boats and a 6x6 all-terrain
vehicle.
• Bingo held every Thursday and
Saturday evenings.
HARDWARE
Columbia Shopping Center
1786-F Columbia Ave,
Columbia, PA
(717) 684-8515
Mon-Fri 7:30-8; Sat 7:30-6;
Sunday 10-5
“Where Good Friends Meet & Eat"
960 Lancaster Ave., Columbia, PA
Hours: Monday - Saturday 6 AM - 8 PM
Sunday 6 AM - 4 PM
684-7503
717-381-6377
301 Locust St., Columbia
Antiques, Jewelry, Candles,
Bakery & Chocolates
Watermelon
Rind
MUSSER
SUPPLY, INC.
1605 Lancaster Ave.
Columbia, PA
717-684-2243
Thank You for Your
Dedication
ESTABLISHED1893
Personal Professional Care
INKLE’ S
Pharmacy
261 Locust Street • Columbia, PA
717-684-2551
Restaurant
Gift Shop
Medical Equipment
Sales & Rentals
www.HinklesPharmacy.com
LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!
• Lottery
• Tobacco
• Magazines
• Groceries
• Deli
• Money Orders
• Phone Cards
• Turkey Hill
Products
Open 7 Days
5:00 am - 8:30 pm
STOVER’S NEWS
Family-Owned for Over 100 Years
22-24 N. 3rd St. • Columbia, PA 17512
717-684-2231
1224 Lancaster Avenue
Columbia, PA
717-684-2714
616 Union St. Columbia, PA17512
717-684-7886 717-684-7889
Mon-Fri 7:30-6:00 • Sat 7:30-4:00
Sun 8:00-4:00
U-HAUL DEALER • WWW.UHAUL.COM
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 11
We Support Our
Local Firefighters
1110 Enterprise Road • East Petersburg PA,17520
Ph: 717/299-4500 • Fax: 717/299-4628
www.warfelcc.com
Thank
You!
Firefighters
Vera A. Boak
2039 Miller Rd.
East Petersburg, PA
717-581-0100
www.allstate.com/veraboak
1801 Colebrook Rd. Lanc. • 898-7689 • 945-9740 • www.landyshade.com
*Ask for your free hat with delivery
$5.00
OFF
5 Yards Or
More Of Mulch
1 coupon per purchase. Not valid w/other
offers. Expires 11/30/12
We Have Colored Mulch • Free local Delivery (8 Yards Min) 2 Mile Radius
Starting at
$20.00
scoop(yd)
Starting at
$20.00
g
scoop(yd)
Starting at
$20.00
scoop(yd)
• Playground Mulch
• Railroad Ties
• Screened Top Soil
• Mushroom Soil
WE ALSO
HAVE
Thanks to all our Firefighters
East Petersburg
Firefighters
Thank
You!
- Sid & Adam Gochnauer
5984 Main St., East Petersburg
(717) 569-7930
123 East Gramby Street (MC GYM)
(717) 569-7930
WWW.WEECAREDAYSCHOOL.COM
We Care About Our
Firefighters!
EAST PETERSBURG FIRE COMPANY NO. 1 - STATION 23
6076 Pine Street, East Petersburg, PA 17520 (717) 569-5035 www.EPFC23.com
160 members
(includes 70+ active firefighters
and fire police)
Organized: December 8, 1909
Fire Chief: James Rohrer Jr.
President: Brandon Jumbelick
Special activities and info:
• It will hold its annual Pot Pie Take Out, Saturday, November 3
from 10 a.m. until sold out.
• Organized and held the second annual 9/11/01 Memorial Stair Climb,
Sunday, September 16, from 8 a.m. until noon at Clipper Stadium.
• East Petersburg Fire Company celebrated 100 years in December 2009.
• Since its organization in 1909 with 30 members, East Petersburg Fire
Company’s current location has three drive through bays, six pieces of
apparatus, two antique fire apparatuses and nearly 160 members.
John Wider, James Resch, Dana King, Maria Howard, Austin Howard, Dustin Harnly, Ed Kinney, Don Schoenberger, Kelsie Harnly,
Matthew Schneider, James Rohrer Jr., James Rohrer Sr., Steven Shenk, Sharon Baumann, Roger Howard Jr., Sid Gochnauer,
John Stauffer, Michael Jacunski, Glenn Garber
We Support Our Local
Firefighters
5988 MAIN ST., EAST PETERSBURG
PARK CITY CENTER
ßoscov's \íng - 7l7.399.l938
Thank you to our guardian angels!
12 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
ELIZABETHTOWN
FIRE DEPARTMENT
171 N. Mount Joy St., Elizabethtown, PA 17022
(717) 367-5300
www.etownfire.com
Tom Wagner, Ryan Myers, Kevin Basehore, William Splain, Nathan Klepping, Kayce Farris, Bill Bestwick, Matt Bigler, Matt Lenker,
Denise Bestwick, Marc Hershey, Jeff Kinsey, Dave Shriner, Gary Landvater, Roger Neuenschwander
55-65 members
Organized: Incorporated in 1878
President: Tom Wagner
Chief of Department: Jason Bock
Special activities and info:
• Motto: Semper Peratus (Always Ready)
• The Elizabethtown Fire Department was instituted in 1859
and incorporated in 1878. Records show that there was interest
and activities dating back to 1827.
EPHRATA PIONEER FIRE
COMPANY NO. 1
135 S. State St., Ephrata, PA 17522 (717) 733-4850
www.ephratafire.com
Jay Martin, Jeff Wilson, Steve Kintzler, Scott Zimmerman, Dennis Townsley, Dave Whitcraft, Jim Wiegand, Paul Swangren,
Ray Foltz, Cameron Hildebrand, Robert Zoll, Kevin Panzram, Matthew Hildebrand, Robert Crills, Larry Young, Paul Wise,
Bill Rockey, Troy Redcay, Scott Eichelberger, Bill Peters, Cody Bowen, Kyle Hackman, Allen Pettyjohn, James Kiefer, Mike Kiefer,
Ken Weber, Vernon Schmuck, John Eitnier
71 active members
Organized: September 17, 1888
Fire Chief: Allen Pettyjohn
President: James Kiefer
Special activities and info:
• The Ephrata Pioneer Fire Company was founded on September 17, 1888.
It had some of the first fire alarm boxes to alert the firefighters and
had motorized equipment by 1916. The first ladder truck for the
company was a horse-drawn cart purchased in 1921.
• In 2013, the Ephrata Pioneer Fire Company will celebrate
125 years of service.
711 East Main Street, Ephrata
733-4388 or 733-8040
www.EastEndMart.com
Thank You for
Serving our Community!
160 S. Poplar St., Elizabethtown
1-800-866-5919
Thank you to our
area firefighters!
256 South
Market Street,
Elizabethtown
Serving
Elizabethtown
since 1980
367-5878
Thank you!
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 13
FARMERSVILLE
FIRE COMPANY
74 E. Farmersville Road, Ephrata, PA 17522
(717) 354-5841
www.farmersvillefire.com
Randy Reiff, Galen Fisher, Mervin Zimmerman, Kenneth Zimmerman, Ammon Zimmerman, Jonas Reiff, A. Ray Zimmerman, Glenn Martin,
Earl Good, Earl Oberholtzer, Leon Oberholtzer, Lamar Zimmerman, Cleason High Jr., Alvin Burkholder, David Sensenig, Menno King,
Larry Weaver, David Rupp, Leroy Weaver, James Ulrich
52 active members
Organized: Incorporated March 2, 1948
Fire Chief: Earl Good
President: Amos Zimmerman
Special activities and info:
• Started Quick Response Service, June 1996
to respond to medical emergencies.
• Annual Mud Sale held on the Third Thursday
in March at 4:30 p.m.
FIVEPOINTVILLE
FIRE COMPANY
1087 Dry Tavern Road, Denver, PA 17517
(717) 445-4933
www.fivepointvillefire.net
Justin Martin, Rodney Good, Jeffrey Stewart, Jonathan House, Howard Martin, Glenn Mains, Jake Wise, Jesse Zimmerman, Stephanie Wolfe
35 members
Organized: June 1957
Chief: Nelson Shirk
President: Jake Wise
Special activities and info:
• Runs one engine and one tanker
• Serves western Brecknock Township
• Holds an
annual May
Sale on first
Saturday
in May
each year
1011 Dry Tavern Road, Denver, PA17522
717-445-6791 or 1-800-856-4031
We support
Fivepointsville Fire Co.
Thank You!
14 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
GARDEN SPOT FIRE/RESCUE
339 E. Main St., New Holland, PA 17557 (717) 354-8311 www.newhollandfire.net www.blueballfire.com www.GSFR39.com (January 1, 2013)
Nate Good, Jamie Weir,
EJ Hillard, Cory Simo,
Brendon Harnish, Stefan
Kuenzli, Mark Willwerth,
Bryan Buch, Chad Coblentz,
David Groff, Jerry Mason,
Michael Beiler, Thomas Curtis,
Alex Longland, Emory Hay,
Amador Cruz, Darryl Keiser,
Kirk Neidermyer, Jeff Martin,
Larry Martin, Butch Johnston,
Daniel Huyard, Paul Nolt,
Daniel Horning, Troy Kauffman,
Tom Lieberher, John Fischer,
Glenn Eberly, Earl Witmer,
Nelson Mohler
125 members
Organized: Liberty Fire Co., of New Holland and Blue Ball Fire Co.
will officially become Garden Spot Fire/Rescue January 1, 2013.
Blue Ball Fire Co., was organized June 17, 1909.
Liberty Fire Company was organized March 24, 1897.
HAZ-MAT 2
ENVIRONMENTAL
FIRE & RESCUE
COMPANY
101 Champ Boulevard, Manheim, PA 17545
(717) 537-4197
No names can be in the paper due to Home Land Security
26 members
Organized: 1983
Fire Chief: Chris Strayer
President: Kurt A. Windlebleck
Special activities and info:
• In 1983, Manheim Township Fire Company
and East Petersburg Fire Company formed a
specialized team to respond to hazardous
materials incidents. In 1984 the team became
an independant organization responding to
calls throughout Lancaster County.
• HazMat 2 will celebrate 30 years in 2013.
It recently completed a state inspection
and is licensed as a level one team.
2350 N. Reading Road
Adjacent to 7ia Maria
Denver, PA 17517
1344 Main Street
Shady MapIe CompIex
£ast £arI, PA 17519
7oII Iree: 1-877-854-3309
Life - HeaIth - PersonaI - 8usiness
Mon. &Wed. 9-7, 7ues., 7hurs., Iri. 9-5:30, Sat. 9-12 (by appt. onIy)
For All Your Insurance Needs
www.unruhinsurance.com
Special activities and info:
• Chicken & Waffle Dinner at the East Station (former Blue Ball),
Saturday, November 17, noon to 6 p.m. Eat in or Take out.
• November 3 - Craft Show & Soup Sale, East Station -
call 354-8094 to order soup
• Christmas trees will be sold in December at East Station.
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 15
KEYSTONE
WILDFIRE CREW
INC.
P.O. PO Box 117, Holtwood, PA 17532
462 Red Hill Road, Pequea, PA 17565
www.keystonewildfire.com
Sheron Shank, Mike Hall, Lorie Hall, Ron Cariello, Cody Hufford, Darren Pickel, Devon Pickel,
Adam Enterline, Zadok Leggett, Jeremy Culbertson
39 members
Organized: Incorporated in 1995.
Warden: Mike Hall
President: Jeremy Culbertson
Special activities and info:
• Keystone Wildfire Crew began as a satellite
support crew in 1984. In 1987, it took on
the name Keystone Wildfire Crew and
became incorporated in 1995. The crew
provides cooperative mutual aid fire
suppression to Lancaster County Fire
Companies and Forest Districts.
• Keystone Wildfire Crew can be found at
numerous community events and parades,
such as the Solanco Fair and Millersville
Parade.
LAFAYETTE FIRE COMPANY
63 Lafayette Way, Lancaster, PA 17603 (717) 392-5097 www.lafayettefire.com
Dave Phillips, Jeff Keens, Jeff Hatfield, Casey Morgan, Levi Freeburn, Eric Beiler, Scott Hershey,
John Long, Bob Landis
63 members
(32 active firefighters)
Organized: 1943
Fire Chief: Ron Nolt
President:
David Phillips
Special activities
and info:
• The Lafayette Fire
Company was founded
in 1943 to serve the
community of East
Lampeter Township
and continues to serve
a diverse community
today.
• The company moved
into its new station
in April 2012.
Dedication of the
stations will held in
spring 2013.
717-735-8772
J
.R
.
M
c
C
ullou
g
h
C
o
.
AWNI NGS
Thank you!
We support our
firefighters!
1657 Old Philadelphia Pike
717-509-9921
I
ta
lian
Garden &Pizzeria
16 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
LANCASTER
TOWNSHIP FIRE
DEPARTMENT
PO Box 210, Bausman, PA 17504
(717) 394-5353
www.LTFD.org
Back Row - Lt. Ed Slaymaker, Al Dorich, Ron Comfort Sr., Wes Cave, Craig Jordan, Chris Mosso, Irene Fitzkee, Dale Kline, Lori Jones, Eric Sheetz, Rich Walker,
Kevin Morrison, John Jones, Mark Clare, James Logan, Justin Brian, Jackie Brian
Front Row - Lt. Dick Ruhl, Tom Royer, Ed Mckenzie, Captain Brett Fassnacht, Andrew Foster, Barry Dusel, EMA Mike Pickard, Chief Ron Comfort Jr.,
Brandon Balmer, Mike Adams, Assistant Chief Steve Roy, Chris Wilson, Lt. Greg Leaman
50 members
Organized: 1991
President: Gregory Kolb
Fire Chief: Ron Comfort Jr.
Special activities and info:
• Lancaster Township Fire Department was formed
in 1991 with the consolidation of Bausman and
Wheatland fire companies.
• Fire Chief Ron Comfort Jr. leads approximately 50
volunteer firefighters housed in two fire stations.
One is at 125 Fairview Ave., in the village of
Bausman, and the other is at 1250 Maple Ave.,
in Hamilton Park.
• A new central fire station will be built in the near
future along Millersville Pike in Lancaster
Community Park to replace the two aging stations.
LINCOLN FIRE
DEPARTMENT
38 S. Market St., Ephrata, PA 17522
(717) 733-6214
www.lincolnfireco.com
Keith Weaver, Rob Coleman, Emma Witenski, Derrick Tryon, Shawn Conner, Craig Bouder, Josiah Fegley, Laura Martin, Brian Zimmerman,
Anthony Zimmerman, Karl Weaver, David Martin, Dale Martin, David Jaquay, Eric Carpenter, Loren Martzall, Susan Wargo, Joleen Dull, Chester Yeakel,
Rosalie Yeakel, Julie Wealand, Gloria Aseli, Richard Geaman, Tim Showalter, Lee Showalter, Matt Showalter, Eric Showalter, Randall Gockly,
Esther Mitchell, Darlene Weidman, John Coleman, James Gehman, Mary Louise Kurtz, Rich Ritter
65 members
Organized: 1943
President: Richard Ritter
Fire Chief: Randall Gockley
Special activities and info:
• A volunteer fire company, Washington Hose
Co., was formed in the village of New
Ephrata in 1851. New Ephrata became the
village of Lincoln in the late 1800s and the
fire company’s name changed to the Lincoln
Fire Company.
• The current station was constructed in 1998
and houses two engines, rescue, traffic unit
and squad. The company still has its first piece
of motorized equipment, a 1921 Reo
Speedwagon. In 2010, the Ephrata Area Rescue
Service merged into the Lincoln Fire Company.
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 17
LITITZ FIRE COMPANY NO. 1
24 W. Main St., Lititz, PA 17543 (717) 626-2486 www.lititzfire.org
300 W. Lemon St, Lititz, PA 17543 • www.moravianmanor.org
Moravian Manor is proud
to support our local community!
Thank You
to our firefighters
for their many years of
volunteer service!
41 Front St., Lititz, PA 17543
717-626-2209
THANK YOU
to all firefighters!
38 members
Organized: 1894
President: Jared Hahn
Fire Chief: Ron Oettel
Special activities and info:
• Lititz Fire Company #1 was formed in 1894.
The town council purchased two hose carts
and 1,000 feet of hose for the new company.
Its first motorized apparatus arrived in 1921.
• The Lititz Fire Department is continuously
accepting applications for membership.
Mike Smith, Ron Oettel, Mike Michael, Steve Sweigart,
Brentt Sechrist, Trent Myers, John Hendricks Jr., Christ Martin, Devin
Learn, John Shoultz, Erica Weaver, Mike Resh, Don Rogers,
Mark Welner, Doug Stoner, Samuel Habbershon, Ethan Etter
730 S Broad Street
Lititz, PA 17543
18 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
MIDDLE CREEK
SEARCH & RESCUE
P.O. Box 701, Ephrata, PA 17522
866-542-LOST
www.midsar.org
Thomas Froebel, Randy Maurer, Ken May, Dee Utz, Kaylee Biddison, Tiffany Yorgensen, Phil Yorgensen, Susan Stauffer, Lynn Walker, Wendy Ewing,
Janet Citron, Judy Caskey, Sharon Wise, Terry Fischetti, Cindy Fischetti, Hyacinth Hughes, Ron Small, Bill Hamberger, Sue Hambeger, Jim Stephens,
Fordy Carver, Scott Arndt, Steve Kintzler, Amanda Kintzler, Chris Eichfeld, Erin Eichfeld, Jeff Winters, Greg Chown
63 members
Organized: 1994
Fire Chief: Steve Kintzler
President: Mike Musser
Special activities and info:
• Middle Creek Search & Rescue (MIDSAR),
formed in 1994, is a team of trained volunteers
that serves a variety of search needs including
a dog team, horse team, emergency
communications, command officers, field officers,
and search volunteers.
• Based in Lancaster County, it serves six counties
in South Central PA.
• During a recent search, MIDSAR’s operations
trailer was severely damaged. Donations are
needed to fund its replacement..
25 Manor Ave., Millersville, PA 17551 717-872-5457 www.johnherrsvillagemarket.com
VILLAGE MARKETINC. TINC. TT
Your Full Service
Grocery Store!
To all the Volunteer Firefighters in Lancaster County:
THANK YOU
for your Dedication and Training to Keep Us Safe!
THE
BED & FURNITURE
WAREHOUSE
166 Arrowhead Dr, Manheim
717-653-8096
By the Water Tower.
In the Rapho Business Park.
Route 283 at Manheim/Mt. Joy Exit.
Cash, Visa, Mastercard, Discover
and approved Checks Accepted
bedandfurniture.com
Lancaster Regional Medical Center
250 College Avenue • Lancaster, PA
LancasterRegional.com
Heart of Lancaster
Regional Medical Center
1500 Highlands Drive • Lititz, PA
HeartofLancaster.com
These hospitals are partially owned by physicians.
3 mi. W. of Millersville on Rt. 999
3642 Blue Rock Rd.,
Lancaster, PA 17603
Call Sandi Breneman
717.872.8200
MILLERSVILLE MANOR
SELF STORAGE
the
BRENEMAN
COMPANY
OFFICE &WAREHOUSE
3642 Blue Rock Road
Lancaster, PA 17603
Call Tom Breneman
717.872.8474
Asphalt Seal Coating
–– SINCE 1968 ––
HARDWARE
Herrville Road & Rt. 272 S,
Willow Street, PA
(717) 464-3321
Mon-Fri 6:30-8; Sat 7:30-6;
Closed Sunday
124 Doe Run Road, Manheim
717-664-3340
www.doerunfurniture.com
Mon, Th 9-8; Tu, Wed, Fri 9-5; Sat 9-3
THANK YOU
To all firefighters!
Thank you Firefighters!
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 19
Special activities and info:
• Fire Department Mount Joy provides fire
and rescue services to all of Mount Joy
Borough and portions of East Donegal,
Mount Joy and Rapho townships,
encompassing 28 square miles.
• Fire Department Mount Joy is a
combination of the former Friendship Fire
Company (organized 1868) and the Florin
Fire Company (organized 1947) which
merged in 2001.
• Fire Department Mount Joy
currently operates a fleet of 7 units
1 - 2000 GPM Engine
1 - 1750 GPM Rescue/Engine
1 - 100’ Ladder Truck
1 - Traffic Unit
1 - Utility Pick-up
2 - Duty Chief/Officer Vehicles (SUV’s)
FIRE DEPARTMENT MOUNT JOY
111 New Haven St., Mount Joy, PA 17552 www.FDMJ.com
40 members
Organized: Incorported March 2, 1948
Fire Chief: Buddy Hess
President: Robert Purcell
Jimmy Carr, Jack Richard, Zachary Jones, Nathan Bowser, Mason Brandt, Matt Kratz, Buddy Hess, Andrew Wittle, Tyler Prickett, William Smith, Bob Lutz,
Kyle Malone, Philip Colvin, Barry Leber, Dan Zink, Terry Bradley, Matt Gohn, Bob Purcell
347 W. Main St., Mount Joy
717-653-2766
Thank you to
the Mount Joy
Fire Co.
Auto & Light Truck Repair and Towing
DAGGETT
1000 E. Main St.,
Mount Joy, PA 17552
717-653-1461
Thank you
firefighters!
Thank you Fire Dept.
of Mount Joy!
West Main Auto West Main Auto
14 W. Main St., Mount Joy
717-653-1761
Thank you!
3140 Mount Joy Road, Mount Joy
717-653-2652
3140 M J R d M J
THANK YOU!
215 E. Main St., Mount Joy
717-653-5775
1225 W. Main St., Mount Joy
717-653-1841
Thank you
Fire Dept. of
Mount Joy!
102 N. Market St., Mount Joy
717-653-2056
Thank
You!
Thank you
Fire Dept. of
Mount Joy!
970 Rear W. Main St., Mount Joy
717-653-8654
Thank you
Fire Dept. of
Mount Joy!
307 W. Main St., Mount Joy
717-653-5357
Mission Statement: It shall be the mission of Fire Department Mount Joy to deliver in a highly competent, professional manner,
a combination of proactive and reactive fire, rescue and emergency services. These services will provide the highest possible degree of
protection to Mount Joy citizens and their property, from the dangers of modern society.
20 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
MOUNTVILLE FIRE COMPANY NO. 1
26 N. Lemon St., Mountville, PA 17554 (717) 285-5456 www.mountvillefire.com
Chris Rossi, Michael Dicely, Paul Cook, Rodney Howard, Joe Iocono, Dean Gantz, Jr., Matt Foltz, Brian Saylor, Paul Rossi, Julio Jusino,
Andrew Kalbach, Adam Weitzel
245 members Organized: founded in 1874, chartered in 1907 Fire Chief: Dean Gantz Jr. President: Andrew Kalbach
Special activities and info:
• Mountville Fire Company No. 1
kicked off its 2013 calendar campaign
in September. The calendar that
features Mountville Fire Company
on the front and back and historic
fire history shots each month. They
sell for $20 and areavailable every
Monday night at the station or by
calling (717) 285-5456.
NEW DANVILLE
FIRE COMPANY
43 Marticville Road, Lancaster, PA 17603
(717) 872-2181
www.ndfc55.com
Chuck Haines, Bill Steele, Tim Kuntz, Matt DeMascolo, Brad Shenk, Cara Haines, Don Shenk, Ben Eddowes
31 active members
Organized: chartered in 1931
Fire Chief: Brad Shenk
President: Clyde Thomas
Special activities and info:
• New Danville Fire Company was originally part
of the Big Four Fire Co. (Refton, West Willow,
Lampeter and New Danville). The Big Four was
formed in 1920 and disolved in the late 1920s.
350 E. MAIN STREET
MOUNTVILLE, PA 17554
717-285-2327
Shakespeare
Home
Improvement Co.
One East Main St.
Mountville, PA
717-285-6900
IMAGE TRANSFER
SPECIALISTS
SLOAN’S
MOUNTVILLE
PHARMACY
2 College Ave.
Mountville, PA
717-285-7443
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 21
PENRYN FIRE
COMPANY NO. 1
PO Box 163, Penryn, PA 17564
(717) 665-2535
www.penrynfire.com
Jay Campbell, Ashley Martin, Sam Kochel, Lester Gerhart Jr, Sherri Parson, Zachary Petticoffer, Curtis Houchin, Artie Manchor, Gary Clack,
Julie Brandt, Dean Greiner, Doug Bollinger, Jered Hess, Bob Fichthorn, Gregory Schell, Jeri Martin, Shannon Martin, Gerry Wolfe, Ernie
Martin, Micah Diffenderfer, Kelly Saylor, Wilmer Zimmerman
180 members
Organized: 1912
Fire Chief: Shannon Martin
President: Doug Bollinger
Special activities and info:
• Penryn Fire Company #1 celebrates its 100th anniversary this year.
Recent activities included a breakfast, historic tour of Penryn,
and camping weekend at Penryn Park.
• It will hold its 8th annual Mud Sale, March 16, 2013.
PEQUEA VOLUNTEER
FIRE COMPANY NO. 1
PO Box 8, Pequea, PA 17565
656 Bridge Valley Road, Pequea
(717) 284-2948
Kevin Miller, Missy Miller, Debbie Mann, Brandon Evans
16 members
Organized: May 1947
Fire Chief: Brandon Evans
President: Kevin Miller
Special activities and info:
• Pequea Volunteer Fire Company No. 1 is located
in Martic Township, along the Susquehanna River.
• It recently celebrated 65 years in operation.
• Chicken BBQ, third Saturday of every month
from May through October.
ScreenedTopsoil ■Nutrisoil
Field RunSoil ■ Fill Dirt
PremiumBark Mulch ■ Black Dyed Mulch
SEASONEDAND SPLIT FIREWOOD
For Your Little Piece of the World:
MANOR SOILS
WARIHAY LANDSCAPING
CONESTOGA PAVING
Manheim, PA
800-551-5858 ■ 664-0810
Pick Up or Delivery ■ Manheim, PA
866-551-8999 664-0812
Residential & Commercial
We service all Makes and Models
24 Hour Emergency Service Available
Heating, Cooling,
& Plumbing
24 24 Hou Hour E r Emer me gen gency cy yy Ser Servic vice A e Avai vailab lable le
Garden Spot Mechanical, Inc.
717.665.0270
336 Hostetter Rd., Manheim
gardenspotmechanical.com
22 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
QUARRYVILLE FIRE
COMPANY NO. 1
217 E. State St., Quarryville, PA 17566 (717) 786-2898 www.QFD27.com
Jim Herr, Keith Wilkin, Tristan Axe, JC Woerth, Kevin Singles, Mike Carr, Curt Appler, Ernie Owen, Sherry Wertz, Michael
Swayne, Bill Mankin, Brian Thomas, Mike Ross, James Taylor, Steven Roop, Wayne Brion, Christopher Sharp, Tim Ryan,
Donnie Roop, Jeremy Welk, Carl Diem, Ron Weaver, James Welk, Bill Bare, Curt Woerth, Craig Hassinger, James Hassinger,
Jarrett Hassinger, David Drayovitch, William Wipprecht, Tom Worrell, Brian Henry, Steve Hastings, Brian Wertz
60 active members
Organized: December 1902
Fire Chief: Jamie Welk
President: Jim Hassinger
RAWLINSVILLE
VOLUNTEER
FIRE COMPANY
PO Box 1, Holtwood, PA 17532
(717) 284-3023
www.rvfd58.com
Jim Rhodes, Mike Trout, Nolan Frey, Donald Snyder, Anthony Williams Jr., Isaac Warren, Nate Barrett, Tim Nye,
Brittany Weidman, Joey Evans-McMillen, Carl Strickler Sr., Anthony Williams Sr., Matt Watson, David Wedge, David Walter Sr.,
Julia Perez, Jeremy Stone, Emily Ebaugh, David Walter Jr., John Ebaugh, Austin Brown, Matt Snyder, Tim Graver, Kenny Graver,
Kevin Evans, Megan Carr, Carl Strickler Jr., Trusty “dog”
86 total members, 36 active
Organized: 1952
Fire Chief: Carl Strickler
President: Dave Walter
Special activities and info:
• The Rawlinsville Volunteer Fire Company was founded in
1952 and housed a single engine. The fire company is now
located at 33 Martic Hights Drive.
• It currently operates two engines, a pumper tanker and a
brush truck. Specialty equipment includes two boats and
utv. The department covers all of Martic Township and parts
of Providence, Drumore and East Drumore townships, with
an average call volume of 350 emergencies each year.
• It is currently celebrating its 60th year of operation.
Special activities and info:
• Quarryville Fire Company #1 was organized in December
of 1902. On January 31, 1903 George W. Hensel Jr.
was installed as the first president of the department.
The company was chartered in April of 1903.
• A Stirling Fire siren was purchased in 1926 and is still
in use today on top of the firehouse in the bell tower.
• Quarryville Fire Company #1 will celebrate its 110th
Anniversary in 2013 and will host the 93rd LCFA
Convention in June 1, 2013.
NEWSWANGER
FURNITURE
12 SouthLime Street,
Quarryville, PA17566
(717) 786-2020
www.newswangerfurniture.com
Mon., Tues., Thurs. &Fri. 9-7;
Wed. 9-5 &Sat. 9-3
Most Major Credit Cards Accepted
Quality Lights
for a Bargain
CASH & CARRY
ELECTRICAL SUPPLY, INC.
306 S. Hess St., Quarryville, PA
(717) 786-2600 • 1-800-451-4273
Monday-Friday 9-5; Saturday 8-12
www.cashncarryelectric.com
WWW. WI L EYS PHARMACY. COM
LANCASTER • 898-8804
MILLERSVILLE • 871-1100
QUARRYVILLE • 786-1191
STRASBURG • 687-6058
Wiley’s
Pharmacy
Thank-you
QUARRYVILLE
FIREFIGHTERS!
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 23
REINHOLDS
FIRE DEPARTMENT
PO Box 225, Reinholds, PA 17569
(717) 336-7753
www.reinholdsfireco.com
Kent Reich, Ryan Brown, Jeremy Brubaker, Taylor Schmeck, Tom Showalter, Dustin Fox, Mike Youndt, Steve Kauffman,
Pat Gibson, Ryan Corwin, Talor Arndt, Scott Moyer, Zach Crills, Kurt Reich, Dennis Schmeck, Curt Crouse, John Reich,
Josh Miller, Jim Miller, Roger Weir, Kurt Knoll, Dwight Walters, Dwayne Shank
40 active members
Organized: December 18, 1914
Charter April 1915.
Fire Chief: Kent Reich
President: Dennis Schmeck
Special activities and info:
• Reinholds Fire Company maintains the latest equipment
to provide the best protection possible for residents and
businesses in the community.
• The current five bay fire station was completed December
1997, complete with meeting rooms, storage, offices and
small reception rooms.
• Reinholds Fireman’s Carnivals, June 1 and 8, 2013.
• Chicken and Waffle Dinner, February 2013
• Longaberger Basket Bingo, February 2013
ROTHSVILLE VOLUNTEER
FIRE COMPANY
2071 Main St., Rothsville, PA 17543
(717) 626-7805
www.rvfc.com
Jesse Roberts, Greg Young, Mark Steffy, Gordon Young, Dave Unangst, Craig Young, Bob Shreiner, Matt Purnell,
Zach Young, Dale Hurst, Ervin Zimmerman, Edward Martin, Jim Hoover, Jason Lutz, Emory Martin,
Elvin Zimmerman, Aaron Hoover, Shawn Conner, Sam Young
94 members
Organized: Chartered Sept. 4, 1917.
Fire Chief: Claude Young Jr.
President: Jesse Roberts Jr.
Special activities and info:
• The origin of the fire service in Rothsville began prior to 1900. Jeff Usner
purchased a hand-drawn two-wheel chemical cart with a tank and attached
cylinder to protect his property and that of his neighbors. As the 19th century
turned into the 20th, the community banded together. They purchased two
chemical carts like Usner’s and later
purchased a hand-pumper. In 1907
these fire apparatus were used to
fight one of the largest fires in the
county, at least at that time, as the
Moore and Reitz store in Millway.
One of the chemical carts used to
fight that fire is currently on display
at the Pennsylvania Farm Museum
on Landis Valley Road in Manheim
Township.
• November 10, Beef & Turkey Supper,
Take Out only, 2 p.m. to ?
1248 E. Newport Rd. Lititz, PA 17543
717.626.5511
www.progressivepressure.com
24 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
SCHOENECK
FIRE COMPANY
125 N. King St., Denver, PA 17517
(717) 336-6767
Andrew Showalter, Gerald Martin, Tim Hackman, Delbert Sensenig, Linda Weaver, Jay Weaver, Michael Fasnacht, Jerry Fasnacht, Jeff Hackman, Bob Hackman,
John Mertz, Jamie Pannebecker, Wendall High, Ivan Martin, Gerald Weaver, Marvin Showalter, John Shirk, Paul Gantert Jr, Derrick Smith, Scott Smith
32 active firefighters
10 active fire police
Organized: 1927
Chartered in 1928
Fire Chief: Jeff Hackman
President: Robert Hackman
Special activities and info:
• Schoeneck Fire Company has 225 social members.
• The department runs two engines and one squad.
• Soup and Sub Sale, October 27, 8 a.m. til sold out
• Craft Show, November 17, 8 a.m. til 2 p.m.
STRASBURG
FIRE COMPANY NO. 1
203 Franklin St., Strasburg, PA 17579
(717) 687-7232
www.strasburgfire.com
Brian Bauer, Gwen Bieber, Nathan Bieber, Ervin Jacob Blank, Ken Cramer, Kevin C. Cramer, Nathan Cramer, Robert R. Devonshire, Danny DiPaula, Noah Durling, Kirk Fernitz,
Dave Firestone, Amos K. Fisher, Eli Fisher, Elmer Fisher, Issac E. Fisher, Isaac M. Fisher, Ivan F. Fisher, Sam B. Fisher, Les Furlow, Ryan Furlow, Emory Hay, Anya Holmberg,
William Hutchinson, James Kiscaden, Bill Koch, Mark Lefever, Mike Lockard, Jeff Long, Allan Martin, Thomas Martin, Patrick Mccardell, Ed Millham, Andrew Neidinger,
Jonathon Peachy, Eli J. Stoltzfus, John F. Stoltzfus, Steve Straley, Josh Sullivan, Chuck Vaughn, Scott J. Weichler, Lenny Weitzel, Sam Welk, Rick Wentz, Dave Work, Justin Wright
Special activities and info:
• Formed in 1933, Strasburg Fire Company provides
protection to the Strasburg Borough, portions of
Strasburg, Paradise and Eden townships.
• In Sep. 2011,
the company
responded
to 167 calls.
• Annual Buffet
Turkey Supper,
November 10,
3 to 7 p.m.
Take outs
available. WWW. WI L EYS PHARMACY. COM
LANCASTER • 898-8804
MILLERSVILLE • 871-1100
QUARRYVILLE • 786-1191
STRASBURG • 687-6058
Wiley’s
Pharmacy
Thank-you
STRASBURG
FIREFIGHTERS!
41 members
Organized: 1933
Fire Chief: Rick Wentz
President: Jim Kiscaden
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 25
SUSQUEHANNA FIRE &
RESCUE COMPANY NO. 4
10th and Manor Streets, Columbia, PA 17512
(717) 684-5844
www.susquehannafire.org
44 active firefighters
Organized: Feb. 11, 1897
Fire Chief: Garry Wiseman
President: Mark A. Fritz
Special activities and info:
• A meeting of the citizen’s and taxpayers of the eastern part of the
Borough of Columbia was held at the Eagle Hotel on Feb. 11, 1897,
to discuss the matter of a fire company in the eastern part of the
Borough of Columbia. On Feb. 18, 1897, another meeting was held
and a motion was made to form a permanent organization and the first
officers were elected. The membership fee was set at 50 cents. A
motion was made to create a steam fire engine and hose company and
to go by the name of Susquehanna Steam Fire Engine And Hose
Company #4. The charter was granted by the County of Lancaster
at the March 24, 1897, meeting.
• Columbia borough’s designated rescue company.
UPPER LEACOCK
FIRE COMPANY
50 W. Main St., Leola, PA 17540
(717) 656-9881
www.upperleacockfire.org
50 members Organized: 1988
Fire Chief: Cory Imler President: Jared Nolt
Special activities and info:
• Upper Leacock Fire Company originated in 1988 when Leola and
Leacock fire companies merged. At that time they were the first
merger in the state of Pennsylvania.
• Annual raw sauerkraut sales, Thanksgiving weekend to New Year’s
Day. A Leola Community Christmas, Friday, Nov. 23 - Sunday, Dec. 23,
Meadow Brook Farmers Market.
Harold Hoover, Jeremiah Martin, Keith Greiner, Jared Nolt, Doug Imler, Cory Imler, Jaime Spangler, Larry Miller, Cody Houser, Melvin Beiler
Kevin Keyser, Mike Stock, Ryan Kuhn, Andrew Deets, Jay Barninger, Jared Mosteller, Justin Misal, Austin Peters, Sean Montgomery,
Bryan Keyser, Michael Splain
www.ConcreteAuthority.com • 717-556-0077
179 West Main Street • Leola, PA 17540
26 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
WEST EARL
FIRE COMPANY
14 School Lane Ave., Brownstown, PA 17508
(717) 656-6791
www.westearlfire.org
Ben Voran, Clair Hoover, Blake Zimmerman, Debbie Ayers, Ronald Ayers, John Fox, Joey Wright, Dave Stoltzfus, Tyler Stoltzfus, Bob Osborne, Bob Billett,
Chris Cardascia, Rick Haverstick, Dalton Kuhn, Lee Burkholder, Austyn Nolt, Leonard Nolt, Nate Stoltzfus
67 members
Organized: 1937
Fire Chief: Nate Stoltzfus
President: Ben Voran
Special activities and info:
• Founded in 1937, the West Earl Fire Company
serves Brownstown, Talmage and the
surrounding area.
• Celebrating 75
years of service
• All-You-Care-
to-Eat Breakfast
November 17
• Spring Quilt and
consignment
sale
WEST HEMPFIELD
FIRE & RESCUE
COMPANY
3519 Marietta Ave., P.O. Box 1, Silver Spring, PA 17575
(717) 285-4929
www.westhempfieldfire.com
Donald Lenox, Steve Lefever, Barry Carter, Andy Wright, Jeremy Sauder, Mike Root, Duane Kline
Special activities and info:
• West Hempfield Fire & Rescue Company was
formed in 2000 with the merger of Ironville and
Silver Spring
Fire Companies,
which had both
served West
Hempfield
Township since
the 1940s.
• Members spend
hundreds of
hours in training
each year.
WWW. WI L EYS PHARMACY. COM
LANCASTER • 898-8804
MILLERSVILLE • 871-1100
QUARRYVILLE • 786-1191
STRASBURG • 687-6058
Wiley’s
Pharmacy
Thank-you
WEST HEMPFIELD
FIREFIGHTERS!
www.hurshpainting.com • 717-656-3712
180 members
Organized: 2000
Fire Chief: Barry Carter
President: Duane Kline
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 27
WILLOW STREET FIRE COMPANY
Box 495, 2901 Willow Street Pike, Willow Street, PA 17584 (717) 464-3651 www.wsfc512.com
50 members Organized: 1924 Fire Chief: Mike Reese President: Carl Boyle
Special activities and info: Willow Street Fire Company has two fire engines, one ladder truck, one rescue, one squad, one duty vehicle
and one fire police van. It responds to about 400 calls a year.
Mike Reese, Seth Anastasio, Craig Rhineer, Jeff King, Chris Heisler, Jim Hogan, Cory Myers, Ralph Stoltzfus, Mike Stoltzfus, John Hostetler, Carl Boyle,
Bob Herman, Jennifer Anastasio, Tom Nitz
Caringabout our
community!
3012 Willow Street Pike North
Willow Street, PA 17584
717-464-9446 • Groffs.com
Heating & AC Systems
Plumbing Service &
Repair
Electrical Service
BathroomRemodeling
24-Hour Emergency
Service
PA1710
GOLDEN
WALL
Delicious Chinese Food
Szechuan / Hunan / Cantonese
2600 Willow Street Pike,
Willow Street, PA
Kendig Square Shopping Center
(717) 464-0914
GoldenWallPA.com
1002 N. Duke St., Lancaster
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Mon-Sat 7am-1am; Sun 9am-1am
MUST BE 21!!! Smoking Permitted
Thank You, Firefighters!
Where the little things
mean everything.
DoubleTreeLancaster.com
2400 Willow Street Pike, Lancaster
717.464.2711
20 Beaver Valley Pike,Willow Street, PA
(717) 464-1325 www.ebersolesvacuum.com
Mon-Thurs 8:30-5:30; Fri 8:30-8; Sat 8:30-3
EBERSOLE’S
VacuumCleaner Sales &Service
BAGS • PARTS • SERVICE
AMERICAN BUILTVACUUMS
STRAIGHT FROMTHE HEARTLAND
WSFC MOTTO
“Pride in
Helping
Others”
28 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
Professional Installation • Low Price Promise
Each Franchise Independently Owned and Operated
www.budgetblinds.com
CustomWindow Coverings
Shutters • Draperies • Blinds
Huge selection of the best brands!
1923 Fruitville Pike, Lancaster
717-519-6647
FREE In-Home Consultation
& Estimates
501 Service Rd., Lancaster
717-735-6760
hwfloorsLanc.net
“We Support
Our Local
Firefighters.”
OF LANCASTER
1264 Lititz Pike, Lancaster
717-945-6817
Mon-Fri 10am-7pm;
Sat 10am-6pm; Sun 11am-4pm

W
e
F
i t
Y
o
u
r
G
a
m
e
. ”
T
h
a
n
k
s
fo
r
a
ll
y
o
u
d
o
!
PERMANENT LICENSE PLATES
“Not Temporary Tags”
Instant Drivers License & Registration Renewal While You Wait
1354 Harrisburg Pike, Lancaster
Next To The Post Office
16 S. Lime St., Lancaster (JERE)
2060 Lincoln Hwy, E, Lancaster
Near Wal-Mart
State & Service Fees Apply
Penn Dot Authorized Agent
Monday thru Friday 9am-7pm;
Saturday 9am-2pm
BRIMMERS
LICENSE SERVICE, INC.
BRIMMERS
LICENSE SERVICE, INC.
717-394-9991 717-295-1799
1-800-427-5373 717-394-6030
SE HABLA ESPANOL
CASH
CHECK
233 College Avenue
Suite 101
Lancaster, PA
717.735.3920
LancasterCTVSurgery.com
409 Granite Run Drive
Lancaster
(717) 207-7171
www.christianfitnessfactory.com
Salutes Firefighters!
1937B Fruitville Pike, Lancaster
M-F 8:6:30, Sat 10-3 • 509-8989
THANK YOU
to all firefighters!
Chimney fires can result in minor damage
or major house fires that cause loss of life.
Whenever dealing with fire, it’s essential to
know safety protocol.
Most chimney fires result from carelessness
on the part of homeowners and lack of
chimney care. Simple maintenance and other
tips can help keep residents safe. Chimney
fires are easy to prevent if homeowners follow
these recommendations.
✔ Annual cleaning of the chimney will
remove build-up of soot and creosote from
inside the chimney. Leave this job to a certified
chimney sweep. Failing to clean the chimney
can result in these highly flammable materials
igniting and potentially spreading fire to the
rest of the house.
✔ Have the chimney inspected once a year for
wear and tear and anything that needs to be
replaced or mended.
✔ Build fires with dry, seasoned wood. Dry
wood produces less smoke and smoldering
than wet wood. Less smoke means less build-
up on chimney walls. Look for wood that has
been seasoning for at least 6 months to a year.
✔ Build small fires that are easier to control
and manage. A fire that burns compactly and
well will also produce less smoke and build-up.
✔ While most people tend to prefer the use
of hardwoods because they burn longer, it
really doesn’t matter which wood is used so
long as it is seasoned wood. Seasoned wood
burns hot and clean.
✔ A chimney liner can protect the chimney
structure from excessive heating and exhaust
fumes. It also enables the chimney to be
cleaned more easily.
✔ Install a chimney cap that will prevent
debris, including twigs and leaves that are
highly flammable, from entering the structure.
It can also prevent small animals from entering
the chimney and causing a fire.
✔ Never use combustible materials, such
as paper or liquid accelerants to start a fire.
These materials can cause embers to float up
the chimney and ignite creosote. Or, they may
cause the fire to burn out of control.
✔Leave the damper open so that there is
adequate air flow, which will limit the amount
of creosote that forms.
Thank You
Firefighters!
Bird-in-Hand, PA
656-7373
How to Prevent a
CHIMNEY FIRE
What Is Creosote Anyway?
Creosote is the condensation of unburned, flammable particulates present in the
exhausting flue gas (smoke). The cause of creosote is the temperature of the flue in
the chimney. If the surface temperature of the flue is cool, the carbon particles in the
smoke will condense and solidify, collecting on the flue. Because wet or “green” wood
burns at a lower temperature or smolders, it can cause the flue to have a cooler surface
temperature, thus leading to more creosote. Seasoned woods, or those that have
been left to dry for several months or a year, will burn hotter and thus increase the
temperature of the flue. A hotter flue means less creosote buildup.
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 29
We are proud to be associated with
the Lancaster County fire service.
77 Cooper Avenue Landisville, PA 17538 • (866) 238-6688
www.commandfireapparatus.com
That’s what we call
“The Command Advantage”.
With over 20 years of experience we
believe quality trucks and engines should
be provided at fair prices.
Command Fire Apparatus
Firefighters serving firefighters.
THANK YOU
to our dedicated firefighters!
with
e.
s.
People looking to embrace the cold-weather
season often find snuggling up in front of a roar-
ing fire is both relaxing and warming. Fireplaces
are popular components of homes across the coun-
try. Ensuring fireplaces are prepared for a season
of use is important from a safety standpoint and
for personal comfort as well.
The U.S. Fire Administration states that heating
fires account for 36 percent of residential home
fires in rural areas every year. Often these fires are
due to creosote buildup in chimneys and stove-
pipes. All home heating systems require regular
maintenance to function safely and efficiently.
One of the most important steps to fireplace
maintenance and preparation is having the entire
thing cleaned by a professional. A chimney sweep
provides a variety of services. According to Ace
Chimney Sweeps of Maryland, a chimney sweep
will clean out the entire chimney. Many use a high-
powered vacuum so that there is no soot or dust
entering the home. Depending on the range of
services, some sweeps also offer a series of inspec-
tions of the chimney, interior flue and checks of
attic spaces for any damaged areas that will need
repair.
The next step will be securing your source of
fuel. Many homeowners contract with a provider
of seasoned firewood. A delivery of one or two
cords of wood may take the average fireplace user
through the season. Wood can also be purchased
at supermarkets or picked up free in different
areas. It’s not adviseable to use wood that has
just been cut down. It likely contains high levels
of moisture that will result in more smoke than
burn power, and could lead to deposits forming on
the inside of the chimney. Synthetic logs are also
available, but use caution because they may burn
unevenly and put out higher levels of carbon mon-
oxide. Follow directions on the packages of these
products carefully.
It is important to inspect a fireplace screen
or guard to ensure it can safely protect against
embers escaping the fireplace. In homes where
there are young children, an added barrier may be
needed in front of the fireplace to prevent little
hands from touching the hot screen.
It is vital to open up the chimney flue before
starting any fire. This allows fresh air to feed
the fire and will enable smoke to exit the home.
Failure to open the flue can result in smothering,
dirty smoke filling the home quite quickly. The flue
should be closed after the fire is completely extin-
guished so that animals and outside debris don’t
enter the home via the opening.
Be sure to have a metal container for removing
and storing hot ashes handy. Embers and ashes can
stay hot for quite some time, so they should be
placed outdoors, ideally far from the home so they
don’t set anything ablaze.
Educate household members about the rules of
fireplace use. They should be aware that no items
should be discarded into the fire to avoid the emis-
sion of toxic fumes or dangerous embers. All it
takes is one stray ember to start a huge fire. Also,
improper fuel materials may lead to the buildup of
flammable creosote on the chimney.
A fireplace can be a focal point, a source of
home heating and just a nice place to which to
retire when the weather is cold. Preparing the
fireplace for use and maintaining it properly are
the keys to a safe season of use.
Prepping
the fireplace
for the
season
30 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA
233 College Avenue
Suite 203
Lancaster, PA
717.625.5000
BestSurgicalOptions.com
Cone or Cup
for Firefighters
In Town! In Town!
Best Ice
Cream
Yogurt
ff
2088
Fruitville Pk.
Lancaster
Next to Panera Bread
717.735.1999
maggiemoos.com
CC CC
FREE
with purchase of
a cone of equal
or greater value.
With this ad.
Exp. 11/15/12
and
233 College Avenue
Suite 101
Lancaster, PA
717.735.3918
InterventionalSpineAssociates.com
717.299.5220
ReynoldsHeating.com
Lancaster, PA
•Heating •Air Conditioning
•Plumbing
•Custom Metal Fabrication
•Water Softeners •Drinking
Water Systems
RETI REMENT COMMUNI TY
502 Elizabeth Drive, Lancaster, PA 17601
717.393.0711
www.calvaryhomes.org
Those experiencing dizziness or
flu-like symptoms might be quick to
assume they have a virus. However,
such symptoms could be a byproduct of
carbon monoxide exposure at home.
Carbon monoxide (CO) is an
odorless, colorless, toxic gas. In 2005,
U.S. fire departments responded to
roughly 61,100 carbon monoxide
incidents across the country. According
to the Journal of the American
Medical Association, carbon monoxide
poisoning is the leading cause of
accidental poisoning deaths in
America. Roughly 500 Americans and
400 Canadians die every year due to
CO poisoning. Thousands others are
hospitalized due to the poisonous gas.
Carbon monoxide forms from the
combustion of different types of fuels,
including natural gas, gasoline, wood,
and kerosene. If improper venting in
the home occurs, CO can build up to
hazardous levels. According to the
Environmental Protection Agency,
acute effects of CO illness are due to
the formation of carboxyhemoglobin
in the blood, which inhibits oxygen
intake. At moderate concentrations,
angina, impaired vision and reduced
brain function may result. At higher
concentrations, CO exposure can be
fatal.
CO detectors, like smoke alarms,
are the single best way to detect
harmful CO levels. The detectors work
on a chemical reaction causing a color
change, an electrochemical reaction
that produces current to trigger an
alarm or a semiconductor sensor that
changes its electrical resistance in
the presence of CO. Most detectors
require a continuous power
source, so they should be
plugged in and also have a
battery back-up.
The National Fire
Protection Association
recommends these tips with
regard to CO detectors.
• CO alarms should be installed in a
central location outside each sleeping
area and on every level of the home
and in other locations where required
by applicable laws, codes or standards.
For the best protection, interconnect all
CO alarms throughout the home. When
one sounds, they all sound.
• Follow the manufacturer’s instructions
for placement and mounting height.
• Choose a CO alarm that has the
label of a recognized testing
laboratory.
• Test all detectors at least
once a month.
• An alarm could
indicate a problem
or a low battery.
However, many
detectors beep
intermittently to
signal a battery needs
to be changed. If an
alarm sounds,
get out of
the house or
move to a
fresh-air
location,
like next
to an
open
window.
• Contact your local fire department’s
non-emergency number to find out
what number to call if the CO alarm
sounds.
It’s important to take CO alarms
seriously, as detectors are programmed
to indicate the start of a problem
before it becomes dangerous.
Preventing CO from building up
indoors is also beneficial.
• Never use an outdoor grill indoors.
• Make sure all heating equipment
is properly sized for the home and
vented.
• Open the flue when using a fireplace.
• Warm up a car outside of the garage.
• Hire a professional to routinely
inspect the equipment.
• Repair appliances and heat sources
promptly.
The ‘silent killer’ should be taken seriously
Carbon monoxide
poisoning can mimic
feelings of the
flu or feelings
of lethargy.
Lancaster, PA Salute to Our Firefighters October 21, 2012 • 31
www.FireLineEquipment.com • 717-354-8106
4652 Division Highway • East Earl, Pa 17543
Fire Apparatus
Sales, Service & Parts
We Buy, Sell and Broker
Used Fire Trucks
Dealer
Authorized Central
Pennsylvania
Nowadays, many homeowners are
understandably concerned about saving
money. In light of the country’s economic
woes, homeowners are increasingly looking
for ways to save money.
Though it’s important to save money,
it’s also important to stay safe, particularly
with respect to household appliances.
Fortunately, there are ways homeowners
can stay safe and save at the same time.
Take the household dryer, for instance. The
following tips can help a dryer run safely
and efficiently.
Consider metal ducts. Flexible ducts made
of plastic or foil can prove very problematic,
often sagging and letting lint build up,
decreasing efficiency and risking safety in
the process. Metal ducts can be flexible
but won’t sag, leading to less lint build up.
What’s more, a metal duct can contain a fire
better than plastic or foil ducts.
Clean all around the dryer. Lint does not
only build up within the ducts or lint traps,
it can also build up in the area surrounding
the dryer as well. This includes behind
and underneath the dryer, which can be
a significant safety hazard if not cleaned
regularly.
Don’t ignore the lint screen. A clean lint
screen pays numerous dividends, not the
least of which is making a dryer more safe.
Clothes also dry faster when the lint screen
is clean, meaning the dryer won’t run as
long and homeowners will save money.
Wash abnormally stained clothes.
Oftentimes, when working in the yard or
around the house, a homeowner can spill
gasoline or other flammable materials on
clothing. If that happens, wash these clothes
extra carefully, possibly even more than
once, before placing them in the dryer.
KEEP YOUR DRYER RUNNING
The report, Clothes Dryer Fires in Residential Buildings (2008-
2010) was developed by USFA’s National Fire Data Center and
is based on 2008 to 2010 data from the National Fire Incident
Reporting System (NFIRS).
✔An estimated 2,900 clothes dryer fires in
residential buildings are reported to U.S.
fire departments each year and cause an
estimated 5 deaths, 100 injuries, and $35
million in property loss.
✔Clothes dryer fire incidence in residential
buildings was higher in the fall and winter
months, peaking in January at 11 percent.
✔Failure to clean (34 percent) was the
leading factor contributing to the ignition
of clothes dryer fires in residential buildings.
✔Dust, fiber, and lint (28 percent) and clothing
not on a person (27 percent) were, by far, the
leading items first ignited in clothes dryer
fires in residential buildings.
✔Safe and Smooth
Saving People Thousands on New Toyotas Everyday is Our Way!
5270 Manheim Pike, East Petersburg, PA 17520
717.569.7373
www.LancasterToyota.com
We Salute Our Brave Firefighters
Visit Our All-New Showroom, TODAY!
We Salute Our Brave Firefighters
Saving People Thousands on New Toyotas Everyday is Our Way!
5270 Manheim Pike, East Petersburg, PA 17520
717.569.7373
www.LancasterToyota.com
Visit Our All-New Showroom, TODAY!
32 • October 21, 2012 Salute to Our Firefighters Lancaster, PA

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