You are on page 1of 5

Theorems and Postulates 21/11/2008 17:49:00

Postulates:
Postulate 1: Ruler postulate- The points on a line can be paired with real numbers in such a
way that any two points can have the coordinates 0 and 1. Once a coordinate system has
been chosen in this way, the distance between any two points equals the absolute value of
the difference of the coordinates.
Postulate 2: Segment Addition postulate- States that segment of lines can be added.
Postulate 3: Protractor postulate- On AB in a given plane chose any point O between A and
B. Consider OA and OB all the rays that can be drawn from O on one side of AB. These rays
can be paired with real numbers from 0 to 180 in such a way that (1) OA is paired with 0,
and OB with 180 (2) If OP is paired with x and OQ with y, then POQ = |x-y|.
Postulate 4: Angle addition postulate- States that angles can be added.
Postulate 5: A line contains at least two points; a plane three noncollinear points; and space
four points noncoplanar.
Postulate 6: Through any two points there is exactly one line.
Postulate 7: Through any three points there is exactly one plane, and through any three
noncollinear points there is exactly one plane.
Postulate 8: If two points are in a plane, then the line that contains those two points is also
in that plane.
Postulate 9: If two planes intersect, their intersection is a line.
Postulate 10: If two parallel lines are cut by a transversal, then the corresponding angles are
congruent.
Postulate 11: If two lines are cut by a transversal, and the corresponding angles are
congruent, the lines are parallel.
Postulate 12: SSS; if three sides of one triangle are congruent to three sides of another
triangle, then the triangles are congruent.
Postulate 13: SAS; if two sides and the included angle of one triangle are congruent to the
other triangles, then the triangles are congruent.
Postulate 14: ASA; If two angles and the included side of one triangle are congruent to the
other triangles, then the two triangles are congruent.

Theorems:
POINTS, LINES, PLANES, AND ANGLES
Theorem 1-1: If two lines intersect, then they intersect in exactly one point.
Theorem 1-2: Through a line and a point not in the line, there is exactly one plane.
Theorem 1-3: If two lines intersect, then exactly one plane contains the lines.
DEDUCTIVE REASONING
Theorem 2-1: (Midpoint Theorem)- If M is the midpoint of AB, then AM = ½ AB and MB = ½
AB.
Theorem 2-2: (Angle Bisector Theorem)- If BX is the bisector of angle ABC, then ABX = ½
ABC and XBC = ½ ABC.
Theorem 2-3: Vertical angles are congruent.
Theorem 2-4: If two lines are perpendicular, then they form congruent adjacent angles.
Theorem 2-5: If two lines form congruent adjacent angles, then the lines are perpendicular.
Theorem 2-6: If the exterior sides of two adjacent acute angles are perpendicular, then the
angles are complementary.
Theorem 2-7: If two angles are supplements of congruent angles (or of the same angle),
then the two angles are congruent.
Theorem 2-8: If two angles are complements of congruent angles (or of the same angle),
then the two angles are congruent.
PARALLEL LINES AND PLANES
Theorem 3-1: If two parallel planes are cut by a third plane, then the lines of intersection are
parallel.
Theorem 3-2: If two parallel lines are cut by a transversal, then AIA are congruent.
Theorem 3-3: If two parallel lines are cut by a transversal, then SSI angles are
supplementary.
Theorem 3-4: If a transversal is perpendicular to one of two parallel lines, then it is
perpendicular to the other line as well.
Theorem 3-5: Two lines are cut by a transversal and the AIA are congruent, then the lines
are parallel.
Theorem 3-6: If two lines are cut by a transversal and SSI angles are supplementary then
the lines are parallel.
Theorem 3-7: In a plane two lines perpendicular to the same line are parallel.
Theorem 3-8: Through a point outside a line, there is exactly one parallel to the given line.
Theorem 3-9: Through a point outside a line, there is exactly one perpendicular to the given
line.
Theorem 3-10: Two lines parallel to a third line are parallel to each other.
Theorem 3-11: The sum of the measures of the angles of a triangle is 180 degrees.
C 1: If two angles of one triangle are congruent to two angles of another triangle, then the
third angles are congruent.
C 2: Each angle of an equiangular triangle has a measure of 60 degrees.
C 3: In a triangle, there can be at most one right angle or obtuse angle.
C 4: The acute angles of a right triangle are complementary.
Theorem 3-12: The measure of an exterior angle of a triangle equals the sum of the
measures of the two remote interior angles.
Theorem 3-13: The sum of the measures of the angles of a convex polygon with n sides is
(n-2)180.
Theorem 3-14: The sum of the measures of the exterior angles of any convex polygon, one
angle at each vertex, is 360 degrees.
CONGRUENT TRIANGLES
Theorem 4-1: If two sides of a triangle are congruent, then the angles opposite those sides
are congruent.
C 1: An equilateral triangle is also equiangular.
C 2: An equilateral triangle has three 60 degree angles.
C 3: The bisector of the vertex angle of an isosceles triangle is perpendicular to the base at
its midpoint.
Theorem 4-2: Converse of theorem 4-1.
Theorem 4-3: AAS; if two angles and a non-included side of one triangle are congruent to
the corresponding parts of another right triangle, then they are congruent.
Theorem 4-4: HL; if the hypotenuse and a leg on a right triangle, are congruent to that of
another, then the two triangles are congruent.
Theorem 4-5: If a point lies on the perpendicular bisector of a segment, then the point is
equidistant from both ends of the segment.
Theorem 4-6: Converse of theorem 4-5.
Theorem 4-7: If a point is equidistant from the endpoints of a segment, then the point is
equidistant from the sides of the angle.
Theorem 4-8: If a point is equidistant from the sides of an angle, then the point lies on the
bisector of the angle.

QUADRILATERALS
Theorem 5-1: Opposite sides of a parallelogram are congruent
Theorem 5-2: Opposite angles of a parallelogram are congruent.
Theorem 5-3: Diagonals of a parallelogram bisect each other.
Theorem 5-4: If both pairs of opposite sides of a quadrilateral are congruent, then it is a
parallelogram.
Theorem 5-5: If one pair of opposite sides is both congruent and parallel, then the
quadrilateral is a parallelogram.
Theorem 5-6: If both pairs of opposite angles of a quadrilateral are congruent, then it is a
parallelogram.
Theorem 5-7: If the diagonals of a parallelogram bisect each other, then the quadrilateral is
a parallelogram.
Theorem 5-8: If two lines are parallel, then all points on one line are equidistant from the
other line.
Theorem 5-9: If three parallel lines are cut off into congruent segments on one transversal,
then they cut off congruent segments in every transversal.
Theorem 5-10: A line that contains the midpoint of one side of a triangle and is parallel to
another side passes thought the midpoint of the third side.
Theorem 5-11: The segment that joins the midpoints of two sides of a triangle (1) is parallel
to the third side (2) is half as long as the third side.
Theorem 5-12: The diagonals of a rectangle are congruent.
Theorem 5-13: The diagonals of a rhombus are perpendicular.
Theorem 5-14: Each diagonal of a rhombus bisects two angles of the rhombus.
Theorem 5-15: The midpoint of the hypotenuse of aright triangle is equidistant from the
three vertices.
Theorem 5-16: If an angle of a parallelogram is a right angle, the parallelogram is a
rectangle.
Theorem 5-17: If two consecutive sides of a parallelogram are congruent, then the
parallelogram is a rhombus.
Theorem 5-18: Base angles of an isosceles trapezoid are congruent.
Theorem 5-19: The median of a trapezoid (1) Is parallel to the bases (2) has a length equal
to the average of the base lengths.
INEQUALITIES IN TRIANGLES
Theorem 6-1: The measure of the exterior of a triangle is greater than the measure of either
remote interior angle.
Theorem 6-2: If one side of a triangle is longer than a second side, then the angle opposite
the first side is larger than the angle opposite the second side.
Theorem 6-3: If one angles of a triangle is larger than a second angle, then the side
opposite the first angle is longer than the side opposite the second angle.
C 1: The perpendicular segment from a point to a line is the shortest segment to the
line.
C 2: The perpendicular segment from a point to a plane is the shortest segment to
the plane
Theorem 6-4: Triangle Inequality: The sum of the lengths of two sides of a triangle is always
greater than the length of the third.
Theorem 6-5: If two sides of one triangle are congruent to two sides of another triangle, but
the included angle of the first triangle is larger than the included angle of the second, then
the third side of the first triangle is longer than the third side of the second triangle.
Theorem 6-6: If two sides of one triangle are congruent t two sides of another triangle, but
the third side of the first triangle is longer that the third side of the second, then the
included angle of the first triangle is larger that the included angle of the second.
SIMILAR POLYGONS
Theorem 7-1: SAS ~ Theorem: If an angles of one triangle is congruent to an angle of
another triangle and the sides including those angles are in proportion, then the triangles
are similar.
Theorem 7-2: SSS ~ Theorem: If the sides of two triangles are in proportion, then the
triangles are similar.
Theorem 7-3: Triangle Proportionality Theorem: If a line parallel to one side of a triangle
intersects the other two sides, then it divides those sides proportionally.
Theorem 7-4: Triangle Angle-Bisector Theorem: If a ray bisects an angle of a triangle, hen I
divides the opposite side into segments proportional to the other two sides.