EdWeb Analysis and Design

Proposal Instructions and Template

Table of Contents
Table of Contents.............................................................................................................1 Introduction......................................................................................................................2 Instructions......................................................................................................................4 Executive Summary.........................................................................................................5 Analysis............................................................................................................................7 Design.............................................................................................................................22 Evaluation Criteria.........................................................................................................31 Ed Web A&D Update #1.................................................................................................37 EdWeb A&D Update #2 .................................................................................................49

EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 1 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

Introduction
Project Description
The EdWeb project includes the analysis, design, and development of an instructional website. Unlike the Webinar project, your EdWeb focuses on asynchronous instruction. It is an individual project, which extends through the first two courses in the eLearning program: In INTE 5660 (this course), you will analyze and design your EdWeb by completing this EdWeb Analysis and Design (A&D) document. In INTE 5670 Developing eLearning Instruction, you will add new sections to this EdWeb A&D document. You will conduct formative evaluations on a design prototype and a functional prototype of your EdWeb. You will also “complete” all of the instruction, i.e., you will build out (develop) all of your Absorb, Do, and Connect activities plus all of the dual coding for at least two objectives. The word “complete” is in quotations. If you plan to include learning activities like video, animations, simulations, or podcasts in your EdWeb, you may learn how to use technologies to generate them in INTE 5680 Integrating Media into eLearning Environments. Those of you taking INTE 5680 this summer (it is OK to take INTE 5680 before INTE 5670) will be able to add learning activities you create in INTE 5680 to your EdWeb during INTE 5670. Those of you taking INTE 5680 after you take INTE 5670 can add activities to your EdWeb as you complete them in INTE 5680. The topic or focus of your EdWeb is your decision. We encourage you to select something you can use at work. If that is not possible, then perhaps you can develop an EdWeb for a non-profit at which you volunteer, the school your child attends, the retirement facility where you parents or grandparents live, or perhaps a business you want to start. Your EdWeb can be either self-paced or group-paced eLearning, like our INTE 5660 course. The EdWeb examples we provide in the course shell are all self-paced eLearning. We think our INTE 5660 course provides a good example of a group-paced course, though it is much larger in scope than what we would expect for a group-paced EdWeb. It is a good idea to select a small topic. Your EdWeb will ideally take your audience about an hour to complete if it is self-paced instruction. If you choose to design group-paced instruction, your EdWeb would ideally be a 10-day unit (one hour of instruction per day). The research indicates that it takes approximately 200 to 400 hours to create one hour of self-paced eLearning. There is an article about this development time in DocSharing and more information below. We believe that a 10-day unit of grouppaced eLearning would take a similar amount of time to create, though the research on time to develop group-paced eLearning is not well documented or researched. Most importantly, your EdWeb must apply the effective instructional and visual design strategies we study in this course and INTE 5670. While the EdWeb project is an individual project, we will form some small groups using similar topics, type of instruction (self-paced vs. group-paced) and/or similar audiences as the grouping criteria. The purpose of these groups will only be to support each other with activities like:  Idea generation (brainstorming)  Sharing learner needs and characteristic info  Proof reading documents before submission EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 2 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

You can decide as a group how much group activity you will do. We offer these groups in support of our Social CIV, but they are optional. There is no requirement for any group activity. There will be no grade for group work and you will not develop a “team agreement.” Jackie and Dave will meet with groups via Adobe Connect to discuss learning objectives and assessments during Unit 7.

Timeline
Submit the Analysis and Design sections of your EdWeb proposal separately:  Analysis: Due Monday, May 2nd  Design and Executive Summary: Due Monday, May 9th You will add new sections to your EdWeb A&D document in INTE 5670. Do not separate the document by sections. Your Analysis, Design and Executive Summary need to remain as one unified proposal document (just as you did for the Webinar proposal).

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Instructions
Read the entire document before beginning. Answer each question to the best of your knowledge and ability. This is an iterative process; your initial answers need not be comprehensive. “I am researching this question” is acceptable for at least the first iteration. Eventually, you need to answer each question. Even some of the answers you are confident about today may change in the future. Be sure to revise your answers as you learn more about this project, your content, your learners, and your instructional setting. Note: This job aid is designed for both K-12 and corporate EdWeb projects. Some questions may not apply to both settings. Enter “N/A” for questions that do not apply to your project. We may challenge your answer, or you might change your mind, but it is okay to respond “N/A” to some questions initially. For the EdWeb Analysis assignment, please use the following convention for naming your file: StudentFirstNameLastNameInitial_EdWebAnalysis_submission_date>.doc (or .docx) Example: DaveY_EdWebAnalysis_May1_2011.docx Be sure to add the word “revision” and update the submission date in the file name, if you chose to submit your revised EdWeb Analysis. Example: DaveY_EdWebAnalysis_revision_May6_2011.docx For the EdWeb Design assignment, please use the following convention for naming your file: StudentFirstNameLastNameInitial_EdWebDesign_submission_date.doc (or .docx) Example: DaveY_EdWebDesign_May7_2011.docx Be sure to add the word “revision” and update the submission date in the file name if you chose to submit your revised EdWeb Design. Example: DaveY_EdWebDesign_revision_May12_2011.docx

Please keep the table of contents, introduction, instructions and evaluation criteria in this document when you submit it.
Do not separate the document by sections. Your Analysis, Design and Executive Summary need to remain as one unified proposal document (just as you did for the Webinar proposal).

Write only in the tinted boxes.

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Executive Summary
Readers should be able to find all the most important facts about your project in the Executive Summary. It is a one-page snapshot of your Analysis and Design, intended to help stakeholders (sponsors or anyone interested in the project) understand and support your EdWeb. Do not overwhelm your audience with too much detail. Even though it is the first section the reader sees, write the Executive Summary last. Do not complete this section until you complete the Analysis and Design sections below. Your Executive Summary should not exceed one single-spaced page, and should include a one- to threesentence summary of each section in your EdWeb A&D document. Provide all information listed in the box below. Write only in the tinted box.

Executive Summary
 Name: John Paul Sharp  Date: 4/13/11  Summaries:  EdWeb Title: Using an Image to Write a SongInspiration for Songwriters 1. Instructional setting: This free online edWeb is a free, self-paced activity for amateur and seasoned songwriters who can record and upload music. 2. song. Goals and outcomes: Students will use an image to write, record, and share a full

3. Learner needs and characteristics: Students are adults who are possibly facing a creative block and looking for a new method to create songs. 4. Instructional objectives: Using the Write A Song job aid, students will write a song based on one of four provided images. The song must be at least 1 minute in length with a purposeful mood, based on abstract reflection. Using the Record A Song job aid, students will record the written song with their own equipment. Recordings must contain singing with mainly lyrics and at least one accompanying instrument (e.g., guitar, piano). Using the Share A Song job aid, students will upload their recording and share the direct link to their published work. Students are encouraged to use SoundCloud.com or their own preferred media sharing service. Using the Reflection job aid, students will listen to each other's works and provide feedback. Feedback must contain only respectful and constructive criticisms and praise. 5. Project management: John Paul Sharp has a Bachelor of Science in Vocal Performance with an emphasis in Songwriting from the University of Colorado Denver. He has written and self-published 21 albums of music. He has written and produced three original musicals. For expert assistance, Doug Kraus is the Coordinator of Online Course Development for the College of Arts & Media under the same university. 6. Tool assessment: Page 5 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

EdWeb Analysis and Design

7. 8.

Instructional design model: Learning activities:

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Analysis
Write only in the tinted box.   Your name: John Paul Sharp Tentative EdWeb title: Inspiration for SongwritersUsing an Image to Write a Song

Instructional Setting
Describe the following: a. What is the name of the organization for which you are developing your EdWeb? b. What is the mission of this organization? c. Is this a new course or a conversion of an existing course? d. Instructional need or opportunity: What business or learning problem does your EdWeb need to address? e. Will this online course be self-paced or group-paced? (For example, INTE 5660 is a group paced, online course. The examples we provide in the eCollege course shell are all self-paced.) Include a rationale for your decision and describe the benefits and potential drawbacks of your answer. f. What hardware and software are your learners likely to be using? Example: Are they using MS Office and are therefore familiar with that interface?

g. What browsers and version numbers are your learners using? h. What kind of Internet access do your learners have, i.e., cable, dish, T-1, phone? i. j. What security tools or controls, such as virus scanning software, firewalls or filters, do your learners use or are in place on the networks your learners use? Who are your stakeholders: For example, in a K-12 setting, the stakeholders are probably students, teachers, parents, and perhaps the school board and/or the community. In a corporate setting, the stakeholders are probably learners, managers, executive sponsors, perhaps HR, and the CEO or board of directors. Stakeholders are those who have a specific interest in the project, outcome, or budget. List your stakeholders by title and/or name here.

k. What other instructional context issues, challenges or problems are important in this situation?

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Instructional Setting a. Name of organization: John Paul Sharp / little speckles music publishing music. I enlighten by producing sound art that stimulates the mind, body, and soul. I inspire by educating others on what I've learned. c. New course or conversion of existing course: This is a new course. process of developing a library of your own work. This initial course is designed to help songwriters stay active in the journey of their creation by taking a different or new approach to writing a single song. and is meant as the start to a larger course for songwriters interested in learning how to write musicals.

b. Mission of organization: Artist Statement: I entertain by performing creative, commercially viable

d. Instructional need or opportunity: Often, it is easy to get a creative block or 'hit-a-wall' in the

e. Pacing and rationale: In order to maximize the educational benefits of sharing songs and giving
and receiving feedback, tThis courseedWeb is an online, group-paced course. self-paced with the intent that anyone can visit the course at any time and receive educational benefits. The course could easily be expanded into a group-paced course if the opportunity for group-classes presented itself.

f.

Hardware and software: Learners will need to be able to play a musical instrument and sing and be able to write and/or, preferably, record their songs. This course is designed for songwriting students with home recording studios. Learners should be familiar with audio-editing software, interface hardware and microphones. Students are familiar with a variety of tools to record songs: analog and digital four-track recorders, audio-editing software (e.g., ProTools, Audition, FruityLoops), and internal and external interface hardware (e.g., M-Audio's FireWire 410, Digital Audiolabs CardDeluxe, MOTU Audio 896HD). The most common microphones used for vocal recordings are the Shure SM 57 and SM 58. There are a variety of other microphones used to record audio, from using a cell phones to laptop webcams. Students have a variety of experience when it comes to recording audio and sharing it with others. acceptable for this course. Students use Apple Safari (v. 5.0.5), Google Chrome (v. 11.0.696.65), Microsoft Explorer 9, and Mozilla FireFox (v. 4.0.1). These versions are for Mac OS X and Windows 7, English (US).

g. Browsers and version numbers: Any browser with a version updated in the last few years will be

h. Internet access: Learners will need a reliable internet service provider with download speeds of 1 –
4 Mbps and upload speeds of a minimum 700kbps, preferably 1Mbps or more. Due to downloading and uploading music files, the speeds necessary to enjoy the course depend on the type of music file the learner chooses to upload. By using a service like SoundCloud.com, download speeds are not as affected through the site's conversion process for streaming. DSL or Cable internet service providers are preferred as companies who provide 3G or 4G internet are less reliable.Students have a variety of venues from which to access the Internet. Most students have a LAN or WLAN connection through their university when they are physically on campus. Other times, they may access the internet through cable, DSL, 3G/4G, or even dial-up.

i.

Firewalls, parental control, access, or security: Learners will have a variety of different setups for their own firewalls, parental controls access and security. Learner content may be affected by parental controls as the subjects of songs are not always children friendly. It is not my intent to censure the creativity of an artist, but to help them guide their journey. A terms of service to ensure safety will be enforced, but language in the context of Artistic Expression will not. Stakeholders: Amateur and seasoned songwriters.

EdWeb Analysis and Design INTE 5660, Spring 2011

j.

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Firewalls, parental control, access, or security: Most PC computers are equipped with an internal firewall, while Apple computers have Security Batches that can be updated automatically. Additionally, students may have antivirus software (e.g., Norton, McAfee) that allows for further filtering of sites that aren't certified as safe or contain questionable content. Stakeholders: Amateur and seasoned songwriters. Other instructional context issues:

Goals and Outcomes
What does each group of stakeholders need to see to consider this instruction successful? These “results” might be standards set by stakeholders, such as the State or your school district, competencies set by a professional organization or licensing agency, etc. In a corporate setting, it might be an increase in sales or a decrease in error reports. Use the table below to answer this question. Notice in the table below, you need to determine if the instruction meets the desired outcomes of each group of stakeholders. For example, if one of the outcomes a group of stakeholders needs to see is an increase in sales, how will you measure that increase? Obviously, if the desired outcome is increase in sales then you need to collect baseline data in order to calculate the increase in sales. It is important that your goals and outcomes align with the mission of your organization.

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Using the table below, identify your stakeholders, their preferred or required outcomes, and measurement plans.

Goals and Outcomes (examples)
Stakeholder group
Department managers 4th grade students Students in a driver’s education class

Goal and/or outcome desired by stakeholders
5% increase in sales

Data collection and measurement
Compare baseline sales data collected July 1, – December 31, 2010 with post-training sales data: January 1 – July 31 2011. Group discussion: compare current instructional activity with EdWeb. Scores earned on the written part of the Division of Motor Vehicle driving test.

Fun, entertaining, interactive instruction Acquire a thorough knowledge of traffic laws and safe driving practices

Goals and Outcomes
(add rows as needed) Stakeholder group
Amateur and Seasoned Songwriters

Goal and/or outcome desired by stakeholders
Students will use an image to write, record, and share a full song.

Data collection and measurement
Full participation in the course (i.e. recording a song, uploading and sharing a song) measures the success of this goal.

Learner Needs and Characteristics
a. What are the demographics of your learners?  Age range   Education levels, degrees, etc. Other factors, e.g., gender, race, ethnicity, languages, disabilities?

b. Are these learners volunteers? That is, are they required to take this instruction, or will they consider your EdWeb “self-improvement?” Note: Volunteer learners do not have to participate they can leave your EdWeb at any time. Your challenge is to keep them motivated. c. What are your learners’ experiences and attitudes toward the topic of your EdWeb?  Do they have a positive, mixed or negative attitude toward your EdWeb topic?

What relevant prior experiences do your learners have with the content of your EdWeb?

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Examples:  Perhaps your students have no prior experience with a specific piece of equipment, but are familiar with similar equipment, e.g., the instructional content is panoramic photography and the students are photographers who use digital SLRs.  The EdWeb topic is using smart boards, and students have extensive experience using traditional whiteboards. This information is important because in your Absorb activities you can compare and contrast prior experiences with new information, helping learners connect the new with the old. d. What prior experiences do your learners have with technology and eLearning?  Have none, few, some, or most of your learners taken online instruction before?   Do your learners use the Internet for educational or professional reasons? Do your learners generally have a positive or negative attitude toward eLearning?

Online instruction can be frightening or frustrating to users with no prior experiences with eLearning. Additionally, users who have had negative experiences with eLearning may not expect to like your EdWeb. When you design your EdWeb, you want to consider these prior experiences. Motivation precedes effort, so an important part of your EdWeb Design is motivating your learners. e. What are the learning styles and skills or your learners? Please read the article entitled “Impact of Learning Styles” in DocSharing. The author is a graduate of our program. f. What is the reading level of your learners? Note: American corporations assume a 10th grade reading level. In INTE 5670, you will run a readability test on your EdWeb and compare the results to your answer to this question.

g. What attitude do your learners have toward instruction?  Do they have a positive, mixed or negative attitude toward instruction?  What do they want or expect from instruction? h. Describe other learner needs or characteristics important and/or relevant to this project.

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Learner Needs and Characteristics
a. Demographics :  Age range: 18+  Education levels, degrees, etc. : All education levels.  Other factors: Ability to sing, play an instrument, record and share online.

b. Volunteer or compulsory learners: Volunteer learners

c. Experiences and attitudes toward EdWeb content:  Attitudes toward EdWeb topic: Excited, Curious, Noncommittal  Prior experience: Most learners will have some level of prior experience.

d. Prior experience with technology:  Online instruction: Learners may have experience with online classes from college, or they might be well-accustomed to online research.  Internet use: Learners will use the internet for both educational and professional uses. to take classes for college but also promote their work on social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook.  Attitude toward eLearning: Learners will have mixed attitudes toward eLearning. e. Learning styles and skills: This course will address the four main types of learning styles by incorporating a journal of self-reflection and asking learners to call on their past experiences in order to relate to abstract ideas. All learners will be expected to put these ideas into application in the recording and sharing of their song. These types of students are accustomed to integrating multiple learning styles. For example, a musician must exercise kinesthetic memorization to rehearse songs. Musicians learn how to write melodies based on creating intervals with their voice and must hone their auditory skills through ear-training. Visual learning happens when students watch others perform their songs. These types of activities are common for contemporary music students. f. Reading level: Students for this course exhibit at least a 10th grade level of reading. Higherlearning level reading and comprehension skills for learners will help them get the best from their experience.

g. Attitudes toward instruction:  Attitude toward instruction: Learners will have mixed attitudes towards instruction.  Expectations or needs for instruction: To write a new or first full song to record and share with others online. h. Other learner needs or characteristics: Learners will most importantly need to have the desire and discipline to follow through with the course.Students of songwriting can have a variety of characteristics. Some might be perfectionists who have a hard time presenting a finished product. Others might be procrastinators with the same problem following a deadline. Usually students have the desire to share their music, but following rules can be a difficult concept.

Project Management
Compare the ILT eLearning Program Timeline with the requirements of your EdWeb. EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 12 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

Your EdWeb will be nearly complete at the end of the Certificate Program. You will complete the Analysis and Design in this course, INTE 5660. You will develop the instruction for at least two objectives in INTE 5670 and you may add special features such as podcasts, animations, simulations and other multimedia in INTE 5680. Note: INTE 5680 does not have any assignment that requires you to enhance or update your EdWeb. On what date will you complete the Certificate Program, i.e., INTE 5660, INTE 5670, and INTE 5680? Does that date fit with the needs and/or expectations of the organization sponsoring your EdWeb? If not, describe how you plan to handle the discrepancy. Who are the subject matter experts (SMEs)?  Are you the content expert? If not, is an expert available to help you develop the content and review it for accuracy? Do you anticipate any problems in working with this expert, e.g., time available, schedules, time zone differences?  If you are a content expert, you may still want a “second set of eyes” to review your content. Who will be available to provide this support? What other experts or resources do you need? For example, do you need to work with the IT department when you are ready to implement your EdWeb? When do you plan to discuss this project with each expert? Identify your experts and decide when you will inform them of your EdWeb using the table below.

Expert Interview or Request for Assistance (Example)
Name/Title of Expert
John Doe, IT Manager

Approximate Date for Discussion
June 3rd

Notes about what you want to say
Need to check on firewall issues.

Who has to approve your EdWeb? For example, must someone in your school or HR department approve your design before you develop it? When do you need to get their approval? List the names and titles of the people who need to approve your EdWeb. What, if any, organizational changes challenges might you encounter? When eLearning projects fail, it is frequently due to resistance to organizational change. Are you breaking new ground in your organization with your EdWeb? See the Lance Dublin chapter entitled Success With E-Learning: People Issues Are the Key (available at http://tinyurl.com/ylfhbqt). Please use titles, not personal names, in your responses:  Who directly supervises the learners who will take your EdWeb? Does this person support eLearning? Does this person support your approach to eLearning?  Are there people who are threatened by or fearful of eLearning and/or your EdWeb? If yes, list their titles and how your EdWeb threatens or concerns each person. EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 13 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

 List each group of stakeholders and describe how and when you will inform them about your EdWeb. What other resources or project management issues are important or relevant to this project?

Project Management
Program Timeline: I plan to have this edWeb in its first completed version by the end of 2011. Subject Matter Experts (SMEs): I consider myself a subject matter expert due to my experience and education. I plan to get feedback from a former professor, Doug Krouse, who has experience creating songwriting courses for the University of Colorado Denver. Other Resources (see table below)

Expert Interview or Request for Assistance
(add rows as needed) Name/Title of Expert
Doug Krouse, Coordinator of Online Course Development, College of Arts & Media, University of Colorado Denver

Approximate Date for Discussion
Mid-late July 2011

Discussion Notes
What types of songwriting courses have you always wanted to develop, but never had the time or desire? Are there any gaps in online instruction related to music theory and songwriting? What are some potential problems to be cognizant of in relation to teaching music-oriented content to students?

a. Approvals: N/A Organizational change issues: N/A Other resource or project management issues: N/A

Scoping your EdWeb
There are four factors to consider when deciding what to include in your EdWeb: EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 14 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

a. What is the “big picture” of your EdWeb? Will your project stand alone, or is it one section or unit of a larger course or curriculum? Is it new instruction, or are you converting an existing face-to-face program? b. How much time do you have to develop your EdWeb (Time Budget)? Will you be able to work on it during “normal” working hours? How many hours per week outside of work can you devote to your EdWeb? Remember, you will develop your EdWeb in INTE 5670, a 15-week course. Here’s an example of a Time Budget: Hours per week at work: Hours per week at home: Total hours per week: INTE 5670 duration Total available time
*does not include INTE 5660 project hours

0 +30 30 x15 450 hours*

c. Approximately how many hours will you need to develop your EdWeb? As a rule of thumb, one hour of self-paced, online instruction requires between 200 and 400 hours of analysis, design, and development. Given our example budget of 270 hours, you would only be able to complete about one hour of self-paced instruction by the end of INTE 5670. Of course, you may work on your EdWeb in INTE 5680 and/or after you complete the Certificate Program. To estimate how long it will take students to complete your EdWeb, consider how long it takes to complete the same course in a traditional, face-to-face (F2F) course. Self-paced eLearning typically takes the learner about 60% of the time required to complete the same F2F course. For example, review the data below for converting a 16-hour seminar to self-paced eLearning: F2F instruction time (hours): 8 Equivalent online instruction time (8 x 60%): 4.8 Minimum development hours required (4.8 x200): 960 Maximum development hours required (4.8 x 400): 1920 It will take between 960 and 1920 hours to replace the F2F seminar with a self-paced eLearning course Calculating the time needed to create group-paced instruction is also difficult to gauge. Brian Chapman estimates 34 hours of analysis, design, and development per hour of instructor-led instruction (ILT) (see page 20 – 21 of this PDF file: http://bit.ly/gvwwOR). A 10-day unit of group-paced eLearning (one hour per day) might take about 350 hours to create. There are factors that can affect the amount of time it will take to develop your group-paced instruction. For example, if some materials are already available for use in a Web-based format, the amount of development time might be less. If you will need to convert media for use online, development time may increase. If you will need to design and develop media from scratch to use with your eLearning, your development time will significantly increase. For more information about estimating self-paced eLearning development projects, see How Long Does It Take in DocSharing. Notice that one of the variables is “expertise.” This applies to EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 15 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

your expertise as a subject matter expert, as an instructional designer, and with eLearning authoring tools. For more information about estimating group-paced eLearning development projects, see the two worksheets DocSharing developed by Brent Wilson, Ph.D. and his students, which may prove useful for calculating time and adjusting time estimates for complexity. How does your Time Budget (paragraph b above) compare to the number of hours you will probably need to develop your EdWeb (paragraph c)? Are those numbers close enough to make this project doable? If not, you must either increase the amount of time available or reduce the scope of the project. Our example course would take at least 1920 hours to develop, but only 270 hours are available in our example Time Budget! That is a significant misalignment. There are several ways to reduce the scope of your EdWeb. If it is part of a larger course or curriculum, consider converting fewer units or sections of the overall program to eLearning. For a stand-alone program, you may not be able to include as many objectives as you might like.

Scoping your EdWeb
Big picture: This online learning course will be standalone, but it could also act as a Resources/Inspiration section connected to further defined, larger group-paced courses (e.g., Songwriting I & II, Writing and Producing a Musical I & II). While this is a new course, I am creating it based on experiences from my baccalaureate education and can estimate the F2F equivalent to this type of edWeb. Time Budget: Hours per week at work: Hours per week at home: Total hours per week: INTE 5670 duration Total available time
*does not include INTE 5660 project hours

0 +30 30 x15 450 hours*

Hours you need to develop your EdWeb (please show the calculations): F2F instruction time (hours): 8 Equivalent online instruction time (8 x 60%): 4.8 Minimum development hours required (4.8 x200): 960 Maximum development hours required (4.8 x 400): 1920 It will take between 960 and 1920 hours to replace the F2F seminar with a selfgroup-paced eLearning course. EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 16 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

Compare Time Budget with hours you need to develop your EdWeb: My total available time is a little more than half of the minimum development hours required. This is not a large concern to me as much of the F2F time can be condensed into the creation of a message board. Most the F2F instruction time consists of sharing reflections and songs for a small group of musicians. This course allows students to do all those things with a message board, which does not take as long to develop.

Instructional Goals, Objectives & Assessments
Instructional goals and instructional objectives are not the same thing. Goals are long-range intended outcomes. Objectives, on the other hand, are descriptions of skills or abilities students will demonstrate after they successfully complete a specific unit of instruction. Another interesting description of goals and objectives is entitled Shaping Department Goals and Objectives for Assessment (http://web.bsu.edu/IRAA/AA/WB/chapter2.htm). Goals, objectives and assessments must align! In other words, your students must be able to achieve your overall goals and outcomes by successfully achieving the instructional objectives. Often a goal requires two or more objectives. See our driving example below. See http://learningelements.weebly.com/ for a fun activity to see this alignment in action. Also, take time to review the INTE 5660 Goals and Objectives in the Course Home navigation tree of our course shell. Note that our INTE 5660 goals, objectives, activities and assessments align with the mission of the ILT program. It is important to know the mission of the organization for which you are developing your EdWeb (see the Instructional Setting section above in Part 1). Jackie and Dave will meet with groups via Adobe Connect to discuss learning objectives and assessments during Unit 7. Three Parts of Every Objective Every objective needs to have a condition, an action verb, and a description of the criteria by which you will measure the degree to which students learned the new information. A condition might be instructional materials, such as job aid or a formula. Action verbs are measureable, e.g. calculate, match, select. See http://bit.ly/fb0Kj0 for a good list of action verbs. Note: “Understand” is not an action verb because it is not clear how will you measure “understand.” Similarly, words like “appreciate,” “be familiar with” and “know” do not describe an observable behavior. The word “learn” is too general to be measurable. You need to dig deeper to describe exactly what the student must do (something observable) to demonstrate they understand, appreciate, are familiar with, know, or have learned. Avoid the use of these types of non-action verbs when writing your instructional objectives. Criteria are statements about how you will measure success, e.g., “7 out of 10 correct” or “The essay must address these variables.”

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This UCD Faculty tutorial is a good resource for how to write instructional objectives: http://www.ucdenver.edu/faculty_staff/faculty/center-for-facultydevelopment/Documents/Tutorials/Assessment/index.htm. Use the following template for writing the instructional objectives for your EdWeb: (condition) . . . students will (be able to) (action verb) . . . according to a specific criteria. Examples of Objectives  Given the Cloud Type job aid, students will correctly identify 15 out of 20 photographs of the following three types of clouds: Stratus, Cumulus, and Cirrus.   Given the Writing job aid, students will write a 50 to 75 word essay describing three writing techniques Ernest Hemmingway used in his novels. By the end of the guided instruction and practice sessions, students will be able to parallel park within 18 inches of the curb within three attempts, without touching the traffic cones or white lines.

Objectives and Mastery Assessment Sometimes a well-written objective can also be your mastery assessment. Examples of mastery assessments from the example objectives above:    Given the Cloud Type job aid, correctly identify 15 out of 20 photographs of the following three types of clouds: Stratus, Cumulus, and Cirrus. Given the Writing job aid write a 50 to 75 word essay describing three writing techniques Ernest Hemmingway used in his novels. By the end of the guided instruction and practice sessions, parallel park within 18 inches of the curb within three attempts, without touching the traffic cones or white lines.

Job Aids and Memorization Job aids replace memorization. The first question to ask yourself as you develop your instructional objectives is, "Is it necessary for my learners to memorize this information?" If not, then a job aid is a good strategy. When you include a job aid in your objective, it means your EdWeb will help students practice using the job aid so they are ready to use it after they finish your EdWeb. In other words, the Do and Connect activities you design will focus on examples or cases where students can use the job aid. Job aids are also crucial if students must apply what they learned with few or no errors, perhaps for safety reasons. Our memories can fail but a job aid can enable a novice to perform nearly as well as an expert. As you write your objectives, be sure to ask yourself these two questions: 1. Is it necessary for your learners to memorize this information? 2. After completing your EdWeb, is it important for your learners to perform the task(s) perfectly? Assessments and “Volunteer” students If your students are volunteers, taking your EdWeb for personal or self-improvement reasons, measuring how much they learned involves self-assessment, rather than mastery assessment. The mastery assessments listed above could also be self-assessments.

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Examples

Instructional Objectives, aligned with Goals and Outcomes (example 1)
(Compulsory learners)

Goal or Outcome
Students will develop competence in all aspects of vehicle operation.

Instructional Objective

By the end of the guided instruction and practice sessions, students will be able to parallel park within 18 inches of the curb within three attempts, without touching the traffic cones or white lines.

Driving their own car, the learner will drive around the city for 15 minutes, encountering at least four stoplights and four stop signs. Learners will stop at all yellow and red stoplights and all stop signs without encroaching on the cross walks.

Instructional Objectives, aligned with Goals and Outcomes (example 2)
(Voluntary learners)

Goal or Outcome
Students will make healthy food choices.

Instructional Objective

Given the Food Additives job aid, the learner will identify MSG in food as one possible cause for the following five health issues:  Headaches  Nausea  Diarrhea  Mood changes  Sleep problems

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Enter your instructional objectives in the table below. Align each objective with the appropriate goal or outcome from Part 2 above.

Instructional Objectives, aligned with Goals and Outcomes
Goal or Outcome
Students will use an image to write, record, and share a full song.

Instructional Objective in this format:

(condition) . . . students will (be able to) (action verb) . . . according to a specific criteria

Using the Write A Song job aid, students will write a song based on one of four provided images. The song must be at least 1 minute in length with a purposeful mood, based on abstractdriven by self-written reflections assigned through four weeks of activities.

Using the Record A Song job aid, students will record the written song with their own equipment. Recordings must contain singing with mainly lyrics and at least one accompanying instrument (e.g., guitar, piano).

Using the Share A Song job aid, students will upload their recording and share the direct link to their published work. Students are encouraged to use SoundCloud.com or their own preferred media sharing service.

Using the Reflection job aid, students will listen to each other's works and provide feedback. Feedback must contain only respectful and constructive criticisms and praise. Constructive criticism requires students to provide substantial information beyond likes and dislikes (i.e., What about the song speaks to the student the most?) and provide rationale for their opinions (i.e., Why?). For example, comments like “It Sucks” are not acceptable just as much as “I Love It” because the songwriter has little to 'take away' from the feedback. What sucks? What makes you feel that way? When the student is asked to create details, they will need to talk in terms of music, which becomes less personal and more productive.

Add or delete “Objective” rows (in the right column). Add or delete “Goal or Outcome” row groups as needed (a row group has a row for one Goal or Outcome in the left column and a group of two or more rows in the right column associated with that one Goal or Outcome.) Remember, four objectives are probably the most you can develop in INTE 5670.

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This is the end of the Analysis Section. The Analysis Section is due Monday, May 2nd. Keep this document together as one file. That is, send all sections each time you submit it for review.

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Design
Keep this document together as one file. That is, send all sections each time you submit it for review. Write only in the tinted boxes. Note: This is the first part of your Design work for the EdWeb project. You will complete a second part of Design in INTE 5670.

Instructional Design Model and Learning Theory
a. What is your theory, model or definition of learning? For example, some say learning is the process of personalizing new information, while others feel it is the process of memorizing new information. What is your definition? For summaries of the three major theories, see http://classweb.gmu.edu/ndabbagh/Resources/IDKB/models_theories.htm b. Other than the CIVs and Horton’s Absorb, Do, Connect model, what, if any, other instructional design models do you plan to use? See Instructional Design Models: http://carbon.ucdenver.edu/~mryder/itc_data/idmodels.html. c. What other instructional design issues are important or relevant to this project? Note: You are only required to use the CIVs and Horton for this class, but your organization might require you to use a different instructional design model, strategy or template. If you plan to use ADDIE, please describe what assumptions the ADDIE model makes about how students learn.

Instructional Design Model and Learning Theory
a. Your theory, model or definition of learning: I believe that learning is a transformative process with cycles of clarity and confusion that lead to a culmination of one's world view. I borrow ideas from Robert Kegan's Theory of psychological evolution, which is based in Constructive/Developmental thoery. I believe that students come from all types of levels of experience and learning, but what we all share in common is our daily attachment to society. When creating educational experiences, it is important to recognize that everyone is under some sort of duress from life's existence and that no one's experience out-trumps another. Everyone has something to bring to the table in an educational setting. b. Other instructional design models: I will follow the ADDIE design as I believe the educational process is iterative. Content should update as learner's needs change from one group-paced course to the next because each course will have different students with different backgrounds. What works in one course may not work as well for another group. c. Other instructional design issues: The integration and sharing of numerous media files may not overload student's browsers if their songs are shared in the same forum, but students might feel hassled if they are forced to visit individual forums to give feedback on everyone's songs.

Learning Activities
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a. Use the table below to describe the activities you plan to include for each objective.  In the first column, enter all your objectives from the Instructional Objectives table above.  In the second column, describe four or more activities for each objective. Each objective will probably have at least one Absorb, two Do and one Connect activity. Note: Horton recommends at least 50% of our activities should be Do activities (p. 106)  For each activity, indicate if it is an Absorb, Do, or Connect activity and provide a page reference from the Horton text to justify each activity.  In the last column, list the applicable CIV(s) for each activity. If you feel the justification for connecting a CIV to a particular learning activity is not self-evident, use the row at the bottom of the table to supply justification. Be sure to identify the specific objective, learning activity and CIV you are addressing.  Note the additional rows in the table, which ask you to do some counting and percentage calculations. b. What additional issues, related to learning activities, are important or relevant to this project?

Note: Once you complete this table, with all the objectives, associated Absorb, Do and Connect activities, and connections to our CIVs, the instruction for your EdWeb is nearly complete. See the table below for an example.

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Learning Activities (example)
Objective
By the end of the guided instruction and practice sessions, students will be able to parallel park within 18 inches of the curb within three attempts, without touching the traffic cones or white lines. Students will practice parallel parking in the practice area using the white lines and traffic cones to represent other vehicles. In small groups of three or four, students will tell stories about other drivers with whom they have ridden. They will describe how well the other drivers did with parallel parking. Students may view the instructional DVD at home as often as desired. Students will practice parallel parking using the driving simulator. p. 56 p. 141

Activity

Absorb

Do

Connect

CIV(s)

Supportive

p. 110

Learner-centered; Active; Contextual Learner-centered; Active; Contextual p. 70

Social; Learner-centered; Contextual

Numbers Percentages CIV Justification:

4

1 25%

2 50%

1 25%

First objective, watch instructional video, Supportive CIV:  Educators: ... provide clear and complete directions/information....  Learning environments are: ... resource rich, multimodal, multimedia ...  W. Horton quotation: “The demonstration shows the right or wrong way to interact with a three-dimensional object. Such demonstrations are almost always conveyed as video.” (p. 52).

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a.

Learning Activities
Activity
Students will choose an image and write reflections and a story about the image. Students will share and discuss upon these reflections and their story with the group. Student will write a song based on their reflections, story and discussions. Students will practice their song so they can record it the way they've written it. p.70

Add “Activity” rows (in columns 2 through 6) and/or “Objective” row groups as needed. Remember, four objectives are probably the most you can develop in INTE 5670. Objective
1. Using the Write A Song job aid, students will write a song based on one of four provided images. The song must be at least 1 minute in length with a purposeful mood, driven by self-written reflections assigned through four weeks of activities.

Absorb

Do

Connect
p. 181

CIV(s)

Learner-Centered, Contextual

Social, Supportive

p.110

Contextual, Active

p.108

Learner Centered, Active p.56

2. Using the Record A Song job aid, students will record the written song with their own equipment. Recordings must contain singing with mainly lyrics and at least one accompanying instrument (e.g., guitar, piano).

Students will watch a short YouTube film presentation on a guide to recording a song. Students will record their song. Students will write reflections on their process of writing and recording their song. Students will discuss their reflections with the group.

Supportive

p.110 p.209

Contextual, Active

Learner Centered, Contextual p.210 Students will read and view a guide on how to upload and share their music through SoundCloud. p.78

Social, Supportive

3. Using the Share A Song job aid, students will upload their recording and share the

Supportive

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direct link to their published work. Students are encouraged to use SoundCloud.com. 4.Using the Reflection job aid, students will listen to each other's works and provide feedback. Constructive criticism requires students to provide substantial information beyond likes and dislikes and provide rationale for their opinions. Student will write a final reflection on their experience participating in the edWeb. Numbers 4 3 Students will listen to and provide constructive feedback to each student's song.

Students will upload and share their song with the group.

p.183

Active

p.210

Learner-Centered, Social, Contextual, Supportive p.209

Learner Centered, Contextual

3

6

Percentages

25.00%

25.00%

50.00%

CIV Justification:

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b. Other issues: I believe a few documents will need to be created for students to absorb to learn what constructive feedback is. Another document that might be helpful would be to ask students to think about how much they want to divulge on a message board on the Internet. I will be making this edWeb public as part of my portfolio and so they shouldn't share anything they wouldn't want anyone to see. This could be come an overall issue to make this an online course, but the message boards in an online course for a university would technically be more secure.

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Authoring Tools Assessment
Use this section to select the best eLearning authoring tool for your EdWeb. Consider the following: a. Organizational Requirement: If you are developing your EdWeb for an organization, does it already use an eLearning authoring tool? If yes, then you may be required to use that tool. You may also be able to take advantage of existing support and technical resources, and you probably will not have to pay for it. b. Cost: How much can you afford to spend? If your project is not for an organization, you may have to pay for a tool. If cost is a consideration, a freeware authoring tool may be a good choice. c. Experience: What eLearning authoring tools do you have experience using? Perhaps you should use one of those. d. Marketability: What eLearning authoring tool do you think you should learn to increase your skill set? For example, if you are thinking of looking for a new job (or new position with your current organization), what eLearning authoring tool(s) might be helpful in your desired position? e. Complexity: What eLearning authoring tool will be the "best" to use in terms of the number of hours you have to develop your EdWeb? (i.e., Udutu will require less development time than Dreamweaver because it is less robust.) f. Exposure: Which eLearning authoring tools presented in our Webinars or the webinar recordings by previous students are interesting to you?

g. Application: Review your instructional objectives and learning activities. Are there any that may require special features, such as a simulation or animation? If yes, consider those capabilities when selecting a tool. Check out the following three websites for information about different authoring tools.  Learning Tools Directory 2010: http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/Directory/Tools/instructional.html  MindMeister concept map with feedback from users: http://www.mindmeister.com/12257499  Brandon Hall also reviews authoring tools, but while his information is extensive, his prices are very high, i.e., $795 for a one year access to this information. http://www.brandon-hall.com/publications/atkb/atkb.shtml? gclid=COis67CLtKACFR0pawodeBIcTg h. Tentative decision: Given your answers to these questions, what authoring tool do you think you will use? Note: In INTE 5670, you will have one HTML project, one project to learn a few basic features of Dreamweaver, and one assignment to learn CSS (cascading style sheets) in Dreamweaver. For the two Dreamweaver assignments, you can download a 30-day free trial of the current version of Dreamweaver. It is important for you to learn these basic eLearning-authoring skills but Dreamweaver may, or may not, be a good tool for you to use to develop your EdWeb. Base your decision solely on your answers to the questions in this section.

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Tools Assessment
a. Organizational Requirement: I am developing this public edWeb for my portfolio, so I have more responsibility and control over the tools I choose to produce my work. b. Cost: $500 c. Experience: I have years of experience putting basic HTML pages together, so I think I'm prepared to start using Dreamweaver, with a little extra time put in. d. Marketability: I need to be more familiar with analyzing consumer metrics and the software that helps you put that information together. It appears that a lot of corporate jobs for eLearning expect a working fluency in programming as well. e. Complexity: GoogleSites or Udutu might be the best choices, at least for the prototype, because I know I can put together a course on those sites without too much struggle. f. Exposure: Udutu is the most interesting to me because it seems to integrate media well. g. Application: Whichever tool I use needs to allow the instructor and students to integrate their video and audio together in a way that supports sharing. h. Tentative decision: I'm going to prototype the course in GoogleSites and might spend time working with it in Uduto. If I find I need something more substantial, I'll go with Dreamweaver.

Reflection Questions
a. How do you feel about your EdWeb Analysis and Design? Does it feel accurate and complete? Is there anything you feel is missing? I feel that completing the A&D has helped me to shape my idea into something more concrete and purposeful. I don't think it's at 100% completion because I believe the prototype process will invariably continue to shape what the course becomes. b. What was the most challenging or difficult part of writing this document? For my specific circumstance, there is a bit of speculation that must take place in order to reach conclusions about much of the A&D. I don't think there's anything wrong with that, but it is difficult to wrap my mind around who my students are. I try to go back to my own experiences learning songwriting and remember the types of students I was learning with. c. What questions or concerns do you have? I am slightly concerned about the feasibility of getting people to volunteer and take this edWeb so that I can get feedback to improve the course. It's hard to get people to do things, but not completely impossible. d. How are you feeling about developing your EdWeb, based on this document? I am feeling much more organized and I feel this document will save time for me when it comes to prototyping and sorting out how the information and activities will be structured.

Note 1: Once the Analysis and Design sections of your proposal are complete, remember to return to and complete the Executive Summary. EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 29 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

Note 2: In INTE 5670, you will add several new sections to the Design section. For example, you will add a section about the interface of your EdWeb, including typography, images, and color scheme. You will also describe your formative evaluation plans for the Design and Functional Prototypes.

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Evaluation Criteria
Section
Analysis Instructional Setting Goals and Outcomes Learner Needs and Characteristics Project Management Scoping Your EdWeb Instructional Objectives & Assessments Grammar, spelling, file naming errors Section Total Design Instructional Design Model Learning Activities Tool Assessment Reflection Questions Executive Summary Grammar, spelling, file naming errors Section Total 40 80 40 15 25 -1 point each 200 30 30 60 40 60 80 -1 point each 300 234 18 25 48 40 40 63

Points

Your Score

Do not separate the document by sections. Your Analysis, Design and Executive Summary needs to remain as one unified proposal document (just as you did for the Webinar proposal). If your EdWeb proposal does not earn full points, we will return it to you with comments and suggestions for improvement. You may revise and resubmit the document to pick up additional points. If you resubmit a document, be sure to use Track Changes or Comments and retain all original text, comments, and suggestions. Be sure to add the word “revision” in the file name and update the submission date if you chose to submit your revised proposal. Example: DaveY_EdWebAnalysis_revision_May6_2011.docx Example: DaveY_EdWebDesign_revision_May12_2011.docx

Please keep the table of contents, introduction, instructions and evaluation criteria in this document when you submit it.

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A. Typography

Heading 1 (Verdana 26)
Heading 2 (Verdana 16)
Body text (Verdana 12)

B. Color Scheme
Color Scheme for “Using an Image to Write a Song” EdWeb
I plan to use the color palette below. I developed the color scheme using http://www.degraeve.com/ Palette Generator based on the photo I took of the sunset at San Juan Island. I am using this photo as my banner image and the photo is meant to inspire students. I used the more vibrant color scheme and kept all the text the same color except for the various forms of links (hyper, hover and active). Visited links will have the same as the regular text color so students will know they have already clicked them. I feel the color scheme is calm and that, to me, is important as writing songs can be an intimidating process for many. Color RGB 238 – 204 - 119 68 – 51 - 34 68 – 51 - 34 68 – 51 - 34 238 – 153 - 34 68 – 51 - 34 187 – 102 - 51 255 – 187 - 102 0–0-0 Hex # #eecc77 #443322 #443322 #443322 #ee9922 #443322 #bb6633 #ffbb66 #000000 Purpose Background Body text Heading 1 Heading 2 Hyperlink Visited link Hover link Active link Banner text

C. Justification and description of the layout of your Absorb, Do, and Connect activities
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I have created three separate icons to cue learners for each type of activity. For absorb activities, there is a multi-colored download arrow. For the do activities, there is a yellow music note icon. For the connect activities, there is a yellow journal/page icon. On the home page, I have briefly described these icons so learners can recognize their representations as they go along. Because my absorb activities are often the viewing of video instruction, I felt the download icon makes sense – as in, the learners are 'downloading' the information. I created the music note icon to represent do activities since they are centered on the creation of music. Finally, my connect activities are dedicated to self-written journal entries and the sharing of those reflections on a message board forum. I feel the journal/page icon best represents those activities and will make sense to learners.

D. Advance Organizer (AO)
I am using these same icons for navigational purposes, using the specific adjacent words of PREVIOUS and NEXT. This way, at the end of each individual page, learners get the bigger picture of where they are in the context of each unit. The first unit page will only have a NEXT with a music note icon and the last page will only have a PREVIOUS with the same music note icon (each unit has an absorb, do and connect page).

E. Formative Evaluation Plan
Your formative evaluation plan includes three components: 1. A brief description of your formative evaluation process 2. A brief description of the students who will participate in your formative evaluation 3. The questions you are going to ask your formative evaluation participants. 1. Formative Evaluation Process: I plan to ask for and receive my evaluations through e-mail, but also giving them the option to call me if they would like. I will ask them to have their answers back to me in one week. Note: It is important to set the expectations of your Formative Evaluation reviewers, i.e., explain that you are asking them for their feedback on the interface design. You might say something like this in whatever communication you have with them: “This is an evaluation of the appearance and layout of the Using an Image to Write a Song. My goal for this educational website (edWeb) is to guide students with writing and recording a song based on a chosen image. Please help me improve the way this eLearning mini-module will look. The questions in this evaluation focus on interface issues such as color scheme, layout, and fonts. In the future, I will ask you for input on some of the content of the course.” EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 33 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

2. Formative Evaluation Participants: You need a minimum of 4 formative evaluation participants and a maximum of 8. Please do not use family members, i.e., no spouses, parents, etc. The brief description of the students who will participate in your formative evaluation should be similar to one of the following examples.

Formative Evaluation Participants
Example 1: Four current or former students of the Music and Entertainment Industry Studies program at the University of Colorado Denver. These people represent the exact type of students who would most likely take this type of an edWeb. Example 2: Two (or three) faculty members at the same program from the College of Arts & Media. Specifically, Douglas Krauss, David Bondelevich and possibly Dr. Judith Coe (if she's available). Krauss teaches songwriting online and is the coordinator for distance learning at the College of Arts & Media and Dr. Coe has taught ensemble songwriting and is the chair for the Music & Entertainment Industries Studies program. Bondelevich teaches music in the same program and has a background in film music composition. 3. Formative Evaluation Questions: Your formative evaluation questions need to focus on the questions you have about the interface design of your EdWeb. The questions below are just examples. It is helpful to ask your formative evaluation participants to explain their answers because this type of feedback can help you identify specific revisions you need to make. It does not make sense to ask participants if the navigation is easy to use because in a design prototype the navigation does not work. Save that question for the Formative Evaluation of your Functional Prototype. You will ask participants (perhaps the same participants) if the navigation is easy for them to actually use in that evaluation.

1. I used a color scheme based on the San Juan Island sunset graphic used as the banner for the edWeb. Do you like or dislike this color scheme? 1. I dislike it a lot because ____________________ 2. I dislike it because ________________________ 3. Neutral but I suggest the following improvements_____ 4. I like it because __________________________ 5. I like it a lot because _____________________ 2. The goal of the home page of this Design Prototype is to excite students about this topic. How would you rate the home page in terms of exciting students about this topic? 1. The home page will definitely not excite students. My suggestions for making it more exciting are ____________________ EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 34 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

2. The home page will not excite students. My suggestions for making it more exciting are ________________________ 3. Neutral but I suggest the following improvements________ 4. The home page will excite students but I suggest the following ideas to make it more exciting _____________________ 5. The home page will definitely excite students about this topic. The best part of the home page is _____________________ 3. I would like your feedback on the fonts I used for the headings. Please provide suggestions for making the heading fonts easier to read. 1. The heading fonts are very difficult to read. I suggest you make the following revisions____________________ 2. The heading fonts are difficult to read. I suggest you make the following revisions ________________________ 3. Neutral but I suggest the following improvements to make the heading fonts easier to read ____________________ 4. The heading fonts are easy to read. They would be easier to read if you __________________________ 5. The heading fonts are very easy to read. Do not change them. 4. How would you rate the fonts I am using for the body text? Please provide suggestions for making the body text font easier to read. 1. The body text fonts are very difficult to read. I suggest you make the following revisions____________________ 2. The body text fonts are difficult to read. I suggest you make the following revisions ________________________ 3. Neutral but I suggest the following improvements to make the body text fonts easier to read____________________ 4. The body text fonts are easy to read. They would be easier to read if you __________________________ 5. The body text fonts are very easy to read. Do not change them. 5. I am using three icons to represent Absorb, Do & Connect activities as a way to help students get the bigger picture of where they are and what they are doing within each page of each section. Do you feel these icons are effective? 1. No, because ____________________ 2. Neutral but suggest the following improvements_____ 3. Yes, because _____________________ 6. I am going to have a job aid (5th page) that students will use during part of the instruction to learn how to upload to SoundCloud.com. They can then take it with them (print it out) after they complete the instruction. I provided you with a mock-up of the job aid to show you how it might look. What do you think about the job aid? 1. I dislike it a lot because ____________________ EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 35 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

2. I dislike it because ________________________ 3. Neutral but suggest the following changes_____ 4. I like it because __________________________ 5. I like it a lot because _____________________ Note: Notice that each of the Likert scale questions have the same polarity, i.e., option “1” is the most negative option and option “5” is the most positive option. You could switch these so “1” is the most positive and “5” is the most negative but it is important for all Likert scale questions to have the same polarity.

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Ed Web A&D Update #1
Add these three sections to the end of your EdWeb A&D document. This assignment is worth 200 points and is due the end of Unit 4, October 16, 2011. Design Prototype formative evaluation: Please use the following table format for reporting the results of the Formative Evaluation of your Design Prototype and the revisions you plan to make based on this data.

While we think it is a good idea to use Likert scale questions for formative evaluations, you do not have to use that question style. If you used a different question style, please create a table similar to the one shown below for reporting your data. Question 1 I used a color scheme based on the San Juan Island sunset graphic used as the banner for the edWeb. Do you like or dislike this color scheme? Reviewer 1 (2) I dislike it because the color scheme is not what brings "songwriting " to mind for me. Reviewer 2 (5) It was colorful and engaging, but nothing was painful to look at and it still looked professional and soothing in different lighting levels Reviewer 3 (5) the web pages are easy to read with your use of the appropriate contrast of background color compared to all other components of the pages and it sets a calm mood conductive of absorbing the material presented. Reviewer 4 (4) I like it because it’s warm and welcoming and easy on the eyes.

Mean [average] score of all your reviewers on this question: 4 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. Not much will be changed with the color scheme, but I will change the colors of my hyperlinks so that they are easier to read.

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Question 2 The goal of the home page of this Design Prototype is to excite students about this topic. How would you rate the home page in terms of exciting students about this topic?

Reviewer 1 (2) The home page will not excite students. My suggestions for making it more exciting are again, the homepage does not scream "songwriting. " If this is a music education site, it would be helpful to have an immediate music association. For example, check out these links to other music education sites: http://www.le arnandmaster .com/piano/ https://secure .peerypiano.c om/

Reviewer 2 (3) It seems a bit cluttered (maybe changing the formatting so it's not so column based?) and it was hard to tell what parts of the page were the most important/en gaging...may be keep the focus on fewer parts of it and either link to the rest or have smaller boxes that can be expanded?

Reviewer 3 (4) Try providing more variety in the types of images offered for selection. Images that have the potential of strongly and or deeply inspiring songs of different kinds. You have gotten to a great start with the images of natural disasters. You could consider presenting images of emotional situations between people, adventure scenes, a scene where someone is facing fear or adversity, etc.. Choosing images with people may help one to put themselves into the picture easier, be

Reviewer 4 (4) The welcome should draw the students in with the same kind of passion and interest that the quotes at the bottom have. Then you can get to the clinical explanations about what they’re going to be doing.

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involved, and in turn understand how a song associated with the image would sound. Some additional types of images that come to mind in general are: narrative images, dream or fantasy themed situations, or action images. Mean [average] 3.25 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I'm going to take the advice of Patrick and the 4th reviewer by highlighting the quotations in the welcome page over any 'clinical' instruction. The 3rd reviewer's comments aren't so much about the design but about the content of images choices, which I will also take under consideration.

Question 3 I would like your feedback on the fonts I used for the headings. Please provide suggestions for making the heading fonts easier to read.

Reviewer 1 (3) The headings are easy to read, but I think there are some placement issues. Sometimes the headings appear too close to the links at the top of the

Reviewer 2 -5

Reviewer 3 -5

Reviewer 4 (5) They seem fine to me.

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page.

Mean [average] score of all your reviewers on this question: 4.5 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I don't think any revisions are necessary for this. The one complaint was in regard to my own challenges in layout with GIMP and will not be affecting the functional prototype.

Question 4 How would you rate the fonts I am using for the body text? Please provide suggestions for making the body text font easier to read.

Reviewer 1 (3) The fonts are easy to read, but I agree that there are some contrast issues.

Reviewer 2

Reviewer 3

Reviewer 4 (4) They would be easier to read if you made the welcome text bigger maybe.

(2) Some of 5 them are just too small and the letters seem too close together on my laptop screen. I'd maybe up the font a little bit more; for example, the "It's time for you first reflection" page was almost all too small, but the "which image calls to you" bit on the previous page was perfect

Mean [average] score of all your reviewers on this question: 3.5 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data.

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Question 5 I am using three icons to represent Absorb, Do & Connect activities as a way to help students get the bigger picture of where they are and what they are doing within each page of each section. Do you feel these icons are effective?

Reviewer 1 (3) Not sure about this one . . . but I'm going to say that I understand the icons and what they represent.

Reviewer 2 (3) I felt the Do and Connect icons were effective but the arrow for Absorb was just sort of blah, it wasn't intuitive remembering what it was for. Maybe use like a book icon, or if that's too close to the Connect icon, maybe a "listening" icon or an info icon?

Reviewer 3 (3) Icons that are more symbolic of the activities could be used. Ones that are more strongly associated with the actions taken for each activity. The musical note works well, but the arrow used for absorb and the sheet of writing for do could be improved upon. Some study of iconography might be helpful. Doing some image searches focused on the concept of "absorb" and "connect" could possibly lend some insight.

Reviewer 4 (3) I’m not too good at judging icons. I think they work fine.

Mean [average] score of all your reviewers on this question: 3 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. It seems like most students were fine with the icons except for the download icon. So, I'll keep the other two and create one new icon for the absorb activities. I'm thinking of doing a “TV” icon since my absorb activities will always have some type of video instruction. EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 41 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

Question 6 I am going to have a job aid (5th page) that students will use during part of the instruction to learn how to upload to SoundCloud. com. They can then take it with them (print it out) after they complete the instruction. I provided you with a mockup of the job aid to show you how it might look. What do you think about the job aid?

Reviewer 1 (3) The job looks like it's off to a good start. I'd like to see more of a linear approach to the instructions.

Reviewer 2 (2) It's too cluttered, by far. It makes it hard to follow the order of the steps. I'd suggest just putting them in a vertical list format; I know that may take up more page space, but I personally would rather scroll down than stare at a cluttered, busy screen. Or put the text list on one side of the screen and the images opposite them, like newspaper columns; that would help clean things up a lot as well.

Reviewer 3 (3) The steps could be arranged in a more organized fashion that facilitates a better flow of comprehensi on. Instead of a strict left to right order, maybe a top to bottom order would be easier to follow. The varying sizes of the reference images does present a problem that causes a staggering effect that a top to bottom order could possibly solve.

Reviewer 4 (4) I like it because it is a practical application for them to develop and use in the future. It is relevant to their activities as a songwriter.

Mean [average] score of all your reviewers on this question: 3 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I will make the job aid more linear and straight forward. I was trying to be creative with the layout, but it's clear to me that students want instructions to be more traditional.

Advance organizer EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 42 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

Provide the image, chart, or visual you will use for your AO at the beginning of the EdWeb, at the end of the instruction for each objective, and at the end of the EdWeb. Be sure to optimize your images so they are as small as possible for this document. You may want higher quality in your EdWeb but for this Word document, please include the smallest file size possible. You do not have to use the table below but we need to see your original AO and then how you plan to use it as a transition tool to show students the big picture after the instruction for each objective and/or as they start the instruction for a new objective.

AO Location Original state

AO: Image, chart or visual (Optimized)

After objective 1

After objective 2

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After objective 3

After objective 4

End of the EdWeb

Style Guide Issues  Icons: Describe and provide examples of the icons you plan to use throughout your EdWeb, e.g., a “print” icon if you want students to print a handout or job aid or a “Do” icon for when you want students to practice or “do” something.

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EdWeb Reflections: Answer the three reflection questions listed below.

Functional Prototype Content: Objective: Given eight images to choose from and guided questions for reflections, students will choose the image that calls out to them the most and write and share their reflections on their chosen image. Introduction: Why use an image to write a song? What are the benefits of doing this? Mastery questions: Why did you choose this image? List the colors and objects you see. What memories and stories of your experiences come to mind when you study this image? Why was this image created and who is, or is not, pictured that might be involved with this image? How do you know what you think you know about this image? Choose five words to describe how you feel about this image. These questions determine the level of thought a student has dedicated to the objective. Description of Content: Absorb – Video with instruction. Do – Images to choose from. Connect – Questions to reflect on with a link to a message board to share reflections. Functional Prototype Formative Evaluation Process: I will e-mail all the participants with a link to the functional prototype with a list of questions for them to respond with. I will also ask them to give some open ended comments. I plan to give them a week to do it as that seemed to be helpful for those who contributed their feedback. Functional Prototype Formative Evaluation Participants: My participants will consists of two students with extensive experience in and understanding of songwriting, one student who has a moderate level of experience in and understanding of songwriting and one professor who is an expert at teaching songwriting online. Functional Prototype Formative Evaluation Questions: For SME: How would you rate the educational substance of the Unit 1 video? The educational substance of the Unit 1 video was poor. Comments & suggestions: The educational substance of the Unit 1 video was okay. Comments & suggestions: The educational substance of the Unit 1 video was good. Comments & suggestions: The educational substance of the Unit 1 video was excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement. How would you rate the appropriateness of images provided in Unit 1? The images provided are inappropriate. Comments & suggestions: I am neutral about the images provided. Comments & suggestions: The images provided are appropriate. I have no suggestions for improvement. How would you rate the quality of reflection questions provided? The reflection questions were not good enough. Comments & suggestions: The reflection questions were okay. Comments & suggestions: The reflection questions were good. Comments & suggestions: The reflection questions were excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement. Questions for Students: What did you think of the navigation? EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 46 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

The navigation was very difficult to understand. Comments & suggestions: The navigation was okay. Comments & suggestions: The navigation was good. Comments & suggestions: The navigation was excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement. What did you think of the Welcome Video? The Welcome Video was very difficult to understand. Comments & suggestions: The Welcome Video was okay. Comments & suggestions: The Welcome Video was good. Comments & suggestions: The Welcome Video was excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement Was the Unit 1 Video straightforward and did it help you understand what Unit 1 was all about? The Unit 1 Video was totally confusing. Comments & suggestions: I am totally neutral about the Unit 1 Video. Comments & suggestions: The Unit 1 Video was straightforward and helped me to understand what Unit 1 was about. I have no suggestions for improvement. Were the images provided interesting and inspiring? The images provided were uninteresting and dull. Comments & suggestions: I am completely neutral about the images provided. Comments & suggestions: The images were interesting and inspiring. I have no suggestions for improvement.

5. Navigation Justification: There are three ways to navigate my edWeb: I. There is a drop-down, expanding vertical menu with the full titles just under the banner. Each menu item has either 3 or 0 choices. “Research on computer menus suggests that wide menus are better than deep ones.” pg. 542 II. The second navigation is at the bottom of the screen with icons and arrows pointing to either the previous or the next page. I made them consistent throughout the site in case any users come to my edWeb that might not be savvy to drop-down menus. “Paging is … useful when learners lack the computer skills or subject-matter knowledge necessary to use other mechanisms reliably.” pg. 537 III. My final navigational tool is a visual sitemap I created, which can be accessed by clicking the Sitemap link at the bottom of every page. This third way to navigate was created under the assumption that there are different types of learners out there who can benefit from different types of navigation. This sitemap allows the learner to get the big, visual picture of the entire site. “In e-learning all learners can have a direct path from their current levels of knowledge and skill to their desired levels. Provided we designers supply the necessary navigation mechanisms.” pg. 532 6. EdWeb Reflections: Please reflect on your EdWeb by answering the following three questions. EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 47 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

d. How are you feeling about your EdWeb? I'm feeling great about it now. I'm really starting to see it come together. e. What is the most important thing you have learned about designing and developing elearning instruction? There are many aspects to consider when putting together an edWeb. You can't hold on to any one idea as the content and structure are bound to evolve through the process from start to finish. I think the key to creating successful online instruction is to be flexible enough to make sure that your objectives are what you really want and that you are able to convey those objectives appropriately. f. If you could travel back in time to the beginning of this semester, i.e., August 22, 2011, what would you do differently in terms of your EdWeb?

I actually wouldn't change anything. This has been a learning process and if I knew what I was doing from the beginning, I wouldn't need to be here, doing this work.

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EdWeb A&D Update #2
Please add these 10 new sections to the end of your EdWeb A&D document. Be very careful of CARP, i.e., make sure your new sections follow the CARP guidelines. See the Evaluation Criteria below. 1. Functional Prototype formative evaluation results. Please use a table like the one below for reporting the results of the Formative Evaluation of your Functional Prototype and the revisions you plan to make based on this data. Note: If you did not use a Likert scale question, then you do not need to report the mean score as shown below. Subject-matter Experts:
Question 1 What did you think of the navigation? Reviewer 1 The navigation was good. Comments & suggestions: I wouldn’t necessarily suggest any changes, but one thing to think about is trying to limit the amount of up and down scrolling that needs to be done for someone to work in a page. This is something that is subjective, but if a viewer has to scroll too far down to reach the end of a page, they might get lost in it. Maybe you use thumbnails that blow up to full size in a new tiles or window. The thread of navigation is logical and easy to follow. Reviewer 2 The navigation was excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement.

Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 4.375 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. My first reviewer has a good point about having to scroll so far down for the images on the first unit. However, in this specific case, I like the idea of scrolling down and seeing the images as large as they are. I want the students to 'get lost' on this particular page. Question 2 What did you think of the Welcome Video? Reviewer 1 The Welcome Video was good. Comments & suggestions: The video seemed a bit long. Think about breaking videos into smaller units one leading to another. A short welcome video might be followed by a couple of orientation installments. It might be difficult to keep their attention through the entire video in one installment. Reviewer 2 The Welcome Video was okay. Comments & suggestions: Try to keep videos short to the human attention span, 3-4 minutes. This would be better as 2-3 short video. This will also help people with slow internet connections, which many students are likely to have.

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Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 3.125 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. Even the potential students seemed to have an issue with how long the welcome video is. I am going to go back and see where I can split the video into different parts. I also got some feedback from fellow students in my Integrating Media class about the sound levels so I'm going to make sure those get normalized as well. Question 3 Was the Unit 1 Video straightforward and did it help you understand what Unit 1 was all about? Reviewer 1 The Unit 1 Video was straightforward and helped me to understand what Unit 1 was about. I have no suggestions for improvement. Reviewer 2 The Unit 1 Video was straightforward and helped me to understand what Unit 1 was about. I have no suggestions for improvement.

Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 5 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I do not plan on making changes to my Unit 1 video. Question 4 SME: How would you rate the educational substance of the Unit 1 video? Reviewer 1 The educational substance of the Unit 1 video was excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement. Reviewer 2 The educational substance of the Unit 1 video was excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement.

Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 5 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I do not plan to make changes to my Unit 1 video.

Question 5 Were the images provided interesting and inspiring?

Reviewer 1 The images were interesting and inspiring. I did notice that they lean toward deeper and darker images. You might consider some “lighter” or less socially conscious images for balance, too. They could be just as compelling for some people who might be put off by the social context implied by some of the images. You want to stimulate their creativity, not necessarily provoke social awareness or run the risk of having your political or social ideas associated with the pictures you present I would think. A variety stimulates thought and creativity and helps you remain neutral.

Reviewer 2 The images were interesting and inspiring. I have no suggestions for improvement.

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Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 5 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I have gotten a number of responses about the 'darkness' of the images used for this edWeb and I have taken some considerable time to think about making changes. I've come to the conclusion that I have a specific purpose for this and it is part of my educational angle and I do not want to compromise with this. Question 6 How would you rate the appropriateness of images provided in Unit 1? Reviewer 1 I guess I answered this above. Reviewer 2 The images provided are appropriate. I have no suggestions for improvement.

Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 5 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I do not plan on changing the images. Question 7 How would you rate the quality of reflection questions provided? Reviewer 1 The reflection questions were excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement. Reviewer 2 The reflection questions were excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement.

Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 5 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I do not plan on making changes to my reflection questions.

Potential Students:
Question 1 Reviewer #1 Reviewer #2 The navigation was good. Comments & suggestions: The only suggestion I had would be to have the drop down menus appear in a different color than the rest of the site background. Occasionally it was hard to tell when the menu had appeared and was just loading and I would end up double-clicking on the link instead of the individual drop-down portions, which added an extra step. Other than that, I loved it! Reviewer #3 The navigation was good. Comments & suggestions: I kept wanting to click on the main tabs. I didn't realize at first, that you don't have to.

What did you think of The navigation was the navigation? excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement.

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Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 4.16 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I'm thinking of making the main tabs non-clickable. That might remove the confusion. Question 2 Reviewer #1 Reviewer #2 The Welcome Video was okay. Comments & suggestions: Two things detracted from this video for me; the fact that the volume difference between the music and your voice was so different, and the angle of the camera and background. The instructions and presentation were professional, but the volume issues were problematic when suddenly there'd be a blast of music that I'd have to turn down and then crank the volume again to be able to hear you a second later. As for the angle and the background, it just looked a bit unprofessional. I'd suggest finding a way to have the camera film you at eye level, either in front of your music stuff or a neutral background (which you had but because of the camera angle it made it clear that it was in your home and there were so many shadows that it made it all look very dark) Reviewer #3 The Welcome Video was good. Comments & suggestions: Good job on videos, however you are always facing down, which can be a little awkward.

What did you think of The Welcome Video was the Welcome Video? excellent. I have no suggestions for improvement

Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 3.75 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I am definitely going to cut down the video to something shorter and I am going to fix the audio levels to normalize and be at the same levels. Question 3 Was the Unit 1 Video straightforward and did it help you understand what Unit 1 was all about? Reviewer #1 The Unit 1 Video was straightforward and helped me to understand what Unit 1 was about. I have no suggestions for improvement. Reviewer #2 The Unit 1 Video was straightforward and helped me to understand what Unit 1 was about. I have no suggestions for improvement: Actually, I'd just suggest the same thing about a straight-on camera Reviewer #3 The Unit 1 Video was straightforward and helped me to understand what Unit 1 was about. I have no suggestions for improvement.

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angle, and also I found the video within the video when you were showing the photos on the site a bit distracting. But as for the content, it was VERY clear and I have no suggestions! Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 5 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. While I do not plan on changing this video, I am taking Reviewer #2's suggestions for my other videos in the edWeb. Question 4 Were the images provided interesting and inspiring? Reviewer #1 The images were interesting and inspiring. I have no suggestions for improvement. Reviewer #2 The images were interesting and inspiring. I have no suggestions for improvement. (Yep, pretty much.) Reviewer #3 I am completely neutral about the images provided. Comments & suggestions: I liked the hubble space telescope, however I do find an overall darkness in the choices of images. Don't get me wrong, I'm all about darkness! It's just unexpected with regard to the nice "calm" image of a light house, and the neutral orange glow of the website.

Mean [average] for Likert scale questions: 4.56 Revisions you will make to your EdWeb based on this data. I do not plan on changing my images.

2. Reading Level Assessment. Conduct a reading level assessment on your Functional Prototype and report the results here. Use the job aid called Readability Statistics in DocSharing. Provide a screen capture of the results table. Passive sentences should be below 10%. Screen shot of reading level assessment results

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3. Reflections on the results of your Readability Statistics. Go to the Learner Needs and Characteristics section of your EdWeb Analysis document (section IV>3>g) to see what you said about the reading level of your learners. Did you “hit” the reading level you identified in in the Learner Characteristics section? I believe my reading level is perfectly acceptable for my target students. I am not trying to challenge their reading comprehension, so the easier my text is to understand and read, the better. What did you learn from conducting this readability assessment? This was truly a fascinating experience for me! I am definitely going to do these readability checks for all types of written work in the future. I've learned that I use contractions a lot and that I still struggle a bit with passive voice, but on the whole, my writing is not terrible! What revisions, if any, do you plan to make to your EdWeb? I am going to run all my finished text through the spelling & grammar check before I finish my edWeb to make sure my text is readable at the appropriate level for my students.

4. Categorization of your images. Option 2: Complete the table below to indicate how many of each type of image (from the Graphics job aid, located in DocSharing) you have in your EdWeb. We are not asking, nor do we think it is a EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 54 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

good idea, to have images in all categories or even an even distribution. We just think it is informative to know what the distribution is. For examples of each category, see the Graphics job aid in DocSharing. Category name Definition of category Number of images in each category One example (optimized screen shot) of an image from your fp that exemplifies that category.

Decorative

Decorative visuals are often used to motivate or gain the attention of the learner. For online instruction. These visuals enable learners to move around the instruction.

1

Navigational

3

Representative

Representative visuals provide the same information as the text. Typically, but not always, Representative visuals dual code a small section of text. They make the text more concrete. Simulations and animations are often Representative “images.” Organizational visuals provide structure, sequence or hierarchy information.

0

Organizational

2

Interpretive

Interpretive visuals are typically used to clarify ambiguous or difficult content. Transformational visuals often are visual mnemonics or analogies.

0

Transformational

0

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Transformational images help learners understand an abstract concept.

5. Reflections on the distribution of images in your EdWeb. You do not have to have images in each category and you do not have to have an even distribution of images by category. How many images do you have in each category? How do you feel about that distribution? I have one repeated decorative, three navigational and two organizational images for my first objective. I also have eight other images that are part of the content and the text actually explains the images, so I'm not sure they would qualify as dual coding. What changes, if any, do plan to make to your images? The feedback I received on my navigation and images were all very positive, so I do not plan on making any changes. However, I do want to look into whether I should consider creating graphics for these other categories in the next three units.

6. Dual Coding examples. Provide three examples of the dual coding in your EdWeb. Please use a table like the one below.

Screen shot (optimized or thumbnail)

Location of this image, i.e., the URL or name of the page in your EdWeb http://ouray.ucdenver.edu/~jp sharp/edweb/imagineC.html and http://ouray.ucdenver.edu/~jp sharp/edweb/createC.html

What text does this image replace or “dual code?” It dual codes the questions that I have listed for students to answer in their songwriting journals.

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http://ouray.ucdenver.edu/~jp sharp/edweb/imagineA.html

My Unit 1 video dual-codes text from my Unit 1 content, most especially from the “Do” section.

http://ouray.ucdenver.edu/~jp sharp/edweb/index.html

My welcome video replaces most introductory text and it accompanies some short text.

7. ADA Accessibility. There are three parts to this new section. Part 1: Go to https://amp.ssbbartgroup.com/express and test your EdWeb for “section 508” compliance. Part 2: Report the results. Part 3: Review the following two websites and in 50 to 100 words describe how you might assess the ADA compliance of your EdWeb. There are three levels of “accessibility” and typically, developers aim to meet only the level 1 standards. For more information, see the ADA site http://www.ada.gov/adahom1.htm and the W3C site http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG/ The primary reason we want students to investigate ADA criteria is to experience how designing for ADA is a lot of work and needs to have a decent budget. It is not something you can do in an afternoon.

Report the results of the ADA test 508.22 = 96% Describe how you might assess the ADA compliance of your EdWeb There are some pages missing title frames and that's mostly because not all the pages of the site are actually finished yet. There are a few graphics on Unit 1 that need alternative text. Basically, I fell just a little short on the perceivable area of compliance and I met all the requirements for the operable, understandable and robust areas. It's important to make sure that all non-text items have full alternative descriptions so that if someone cannot make use of your media, they will be able to perceive what the content is about. Basically, ADA helps to make EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 57 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

sure that the Internet is useable for people of all types of abilities.

8. Reflections on ADA. Does the organization for which you are developing your EdWeb require ADA compliance? No. If yes, what level?

If yes, what are your plans to insure your EdWeb meets the required compliance level?

What is the most important thing you learned about ADA? Remember to provide alternative text for all non-text items! This site was great for checking those things as it is often difficult to catch those on your own.

9. Peer Review What did you learn from the Peer Review another student conducted on your site? The biggest thing I realized is that you really have to check your edWeb on all the different browsers. I had some issues with menus being hidden by my videos when viewing my edWeb with Internet Explorer. Even though I don't use the browser, others may, so I should have it to do quality checks. What revisions did you make (or do you plan to make) to your EdWeb based on the Peer Review? I dual-coded my journal questions with a question mark icon. I also fixed my menus being buried by videos. I fixed a lot of the passive voice contained in my text that Jamie was able to help me revise.

10. Future plans for your EdWeb After INTE 5670, what are your plans for your EdWeb? What content might you still need to add? EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 58 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

Well, I hope to get all my content up on my edWeb by the end of this year and then I'm going to take next semester to see where I can improve upon that content. I definitely want to do a better AO as I now finally understand how I could integrate it into my edWeb. What instructional strategies, such as simulations, animations, or podcasts do you need to add? None, though I am considering adding my Colors Musical Theory podcast as a fun 'extra' for students to listen to, perhaps somewhere in the middle of the edWeb as a fun break. I might, instead, put it in the resources page. I'm not sure yet. When do you plan to implement your EdWeb with “real” students? I think the Summer of 2012 would be a great time for me to get students to actually take the edWeb. Most potential students I've been working with will probably not have school to bog them down.

Evaluation Criteria
i. j. Copy and paste the 10 questions, and the text input boxes for each question, at the end of your EdWeb A&D document. CARP is important. Be sure to apply CARP to this new section in your EdWeb A&D document.

k. There are 10 questions. Question #1, about the results of the Formative Evaluation of your Functional Prototype, is worth 100 points. Questions 2 – 10 are each worth 9 points (for a total of 99 points). Total points for the EdWeb A&D Update #2 is 200. l. We will deduct one point for each typo, grammatical error and passive voice sentence.

m. The name of the file you submit should follow this format: Firstname Initial of last name_EdWebA&DUpdate2_Date you submit this assignment. For example: TonyW_EdWebA&DUpdate2_Dec2_2011. This assignment is due Monday, November 28th. n. If your EdWeb Update #2 does not earn the full 200 points, we will return it to you with comments and suggestions for improvement. You can then revise and resubmit the document if you want to pick up the remaining points. o. Important: If you resubmit a document, be sure to retain all of our comments and suggestions. Use Track Changes or Comments for all your revisions. This insures we can see the evolution of the document and that we are consistent in our feedback and suggestions. EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 59 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011

EdWeb Analysis and Design Page 60 of 60 INTE 5660, Spring 2011