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VOL.19 ISSUE 51 OCTOBER 31 - NOVEMBER 6 2012 • THEWEEKENDER.

COM
weekender
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY
MORE THAN 172,000 READERS WEEKLY*
2012 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION
WINNER TAKES ALL. WHO HAS YOUR VOTE?
OBAMA VS ROMNEY
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staff
Contributors
Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Marie Burrell, Kait Burrier, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Stephanie DeBalko,
Janelle Engle, Tim Hlivia, Michael Irwin, Amy Longsdorf, Matt Morgis, Kacy Muir, Ryan O’Malley, Jason Riedmiller, Lisa
Schaeffer, Alan Sculley, Chuck Shepherd, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Estella Sweet, Bill Thomas, Noelle Vetrosky
Interns
Megan Lange • Bill Rigotti • Tom Taraszewski • Jolisa Tokar
Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
Fax 570.831.7375
E-mail Weekender@theweekender.com
Online theweekender.com • myspace.com/weekender93 • facebook.com/theweekender • follow us on Twitter: @wkdr
Circulation
The Weekender is available at more than 1,000 locations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania.
For distribution problems call 570.829.5000 • To suggest a new location call 570.831.7398 • To place a classified ad call 570.829.7130
Editorial policy
The Weekender is published weekly from offices at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703.
The opinions of independent contributors of the weekender do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or staff.
Rating system
WWWWW = superb WWWW = excellent WWW = good WW = average W = listenable/watchable
* Scarborough Research
John Popko
General manager • 570.831.7349
jpopko@theweekender.com
“Bill Murray.”
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Account executive • 570.831.7321
kinglis@theweekender.com
“Dante from ‘Grandma’s Boy.’”
Amanda Dittmar
Graphic Designer • 570.970.7401
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“I would say ‘Hayley Stark,’ Ellen
Paige’s character from ‘Hard
Candy.’ She’s pretty badass.”
Mike Golubiewski
Production editor • 570.829.7209
mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
“Johnny Mayeski or Tim Tebow.”
Rich Howells
Editor • 570.829.7132
rhowells@theweekender.com
“Captain America for president.”
Chris Hughes
Staff Writer • 570.831.7322
chughes@theweekender.com
“Richard Nixon’s head on
Bender Bending Rodriguez’
body. Haroo!”
If you could elect ANYONE for
president, who would you choose?
Tell @wkdr
who you’d
choose to be
president.
social
Blake Henderson @WorkaholicBlake
Online comment
of the week.
“I cut the sleeves off my
snuggie and called it a
thuggie.”
The Weekender has 10,316
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Letter from the editor
As the country begins to recov-
er from the awful mess that Hur-
ricane Sandy left, I consider
myself one of the lucky.
My home in Scranton was
largely unaffected by the storm,
and we retained power throughout
the evening, allowing me to finish
several of the articles you’ll read
later in this issue. On Tuesday
morning, our office had power
and our presses were running.
It’s just one of many strokes of
luck I’ve had lately.
In August, I left my position as
the founding staff writer of Scran-
ton newspaper Go Lackawanna to
come to the Weekender, and I was
greeted warmly by a hard-work-
ing and energetic staff. Before I
had fully adjusted, however, long-
time editor Nikki Mascali put in
her two weeks, but thankfully my
good friend and former Go editor
Chris Hughes stepped up to the
plate and filled in as interim
editor while The Times Leader
searched for someone to fill the
position.
Having just moved into a new
role myself, I didn’t think to apply
for the editor’s seat, instead focus-
ing on making the Weekender the
best arts and entertainment week-
ly it could be. Chris and I had
worked together for years, so we
easily fell back into our old hab-
its, working long hours to im-
prove our event listings, writing
unique and compelling cover
stories, and experimenting with
new types of content and page
presentation with the help of
graphic designer Amanda Ditt-
mar, general manager John Pop-
ko, and account executive Kieran
Inglis.
We formed a solid team faster
than Nick Fury formed “The
Avengers.” More good luck.
We all begged Mr. Hughes to
stay, but he had hoped to return to
his position as online editor at the
Leader as soon as possible. As the
weeks went by, we both began to
wonder who would become the
permanent editor. Then, I re-
ceived a call I never expected.
Lady Luck was not only knocking
– she was setting up shop in my
cubicle.
Two weeks later, I’ve moved
over one place in the staff listing,
but my goal remains the same –
to make this the strongest publi-
cation it can be. Expect a lot of
fun and positive changes moving
forward, but rest assured that all
your favorite Weekender features
will still be waiting for you each
week. Send your thoughts and
suggestions to rhowells@thewee-
kender.com.
You can also wish us luck
finding a new staff writer, but I
have a feeling we’re on a roll
here.
W
-Rich Howells,
Weekender Editor W
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HEROES IN A HALF SHELL
Voice of Michelangelo in Nickelodeon
reboot talks ‘Turtles’
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THE MAN IN BLACK
Full house for Lewis Black’s return to Scranton Cultural Center
inside O
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PHISH FACE
Anastasio cruises through
new material at Sherman W
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COVER STORY
2012 ELECTION …14-15
LISTINGS
THIS JUST IN ... 7
SPEAK & SEE ... 13
CONCERTS ... 20-21
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT .... 22
AGENDA ... 28, 34, 39, 41, 48
THEATER .... 31
ON CAMPUS … 45
MIND AND BODY … 49
FITNESS … 53
MUSIC
DETHKLOK …17
BRUCE HORNSBY …18
ALBUM REVIEWS ... 24
CHARTS ... 24
ALEXIS P. SUTER … 25
TREY ANASTASIO BAND … 26
STAGE & SCREEN
MOVIE REVIEW... 27
RALPHIE REPORT ... 30
STARSTRUCK ... 30
NOVEL APPROACH ... 31
TMNT … 32
LEWIS BLACK ... 33
WEST SIDE STORY … 38
FOOD & FASHION
GREEN PIECE ... 42
GIRL TALK … 42
MISC.
NEWS OF THE WEIRD ... 10
TECH TALK ... 16
PUZZLE ... 28
LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED … 36, 37, 47, 51
INFINITE IMPROBABILITY … 40
SORRY MOM & DAD ... 52
GET YOUR GAME ON … 52
SHOWUS SOME SKIN ... 54
MOTORHEAD ... 54
TELL US ... 55
SIGN LANGUAGE ... 57
WEEKENDER MAN ... 69
WEEKENDER MODEL ... 70
ON THE COVER
AP PHOTOS BY
ERIC GAY AND DAVID GOLDMAN
DESIGN BY AMANDA DITTMAR
VOLUME 19 • ISSUE 51
index
Oct. 31-Nov. 6, 2012
this just in
LATEST LOCAL NEWS
Weekender Staff | weekender@theweekender.com
21ST CENTURY
BREAKDOWN
Green Day announced that
they will cancel their national
tour that was due to launch in
Seattle at the Paramount Theatre
on Sept. 26 and stop by the Mo-
hegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza
in Wilkes-Barre Jan. 10.
The announcement comes just
weeks after singer Billie Joe
Armstrong entered rehab for
substance abuse.
Tickets for these shows will be
refunded at point of purchase.
Additionally, Green Day will
postpone all scheduled appear-
ances for the months of January
and February 2013. New dates
for these rescheduled shows will
be announced shortly, and previ-
ously purchased tickets will be
honored on the new dates, ac-
cording to an Oct. 29 press re-
lease.
“Obviously the timing for this
isn’t ideal, but Billie Joe’s well-
being is our main concern,” said
bassist Mike Dirnt in a statement.
“We are happy to say that
Billie Joe is doing well, and we
want to thank you all for the
outpouring of support and well
wishes that we have received, and
we can’t wait to see you all again
soon.”
The band is also moving up the
release date of its eleventh studio
album, “¡Tré!” to December 11,
2012 from its original date of
January 15, 2013.
GETTING ‘THE
MESSENGER’ OUT
Jonah Productions recently
released two movie-quality trail-
ers to promote the local premiere
of the award-winning drama
“The Messenger” at the Phoenix
Performing Arts Centre (409
Main St., Duryea) in November.
Set in real time, “The Mess-
enger” is a play chronicling the
last hour of a death row inmate.
Theatergoers follow a death row
inmate through his final 60 min-
utes as a priest desperately tries
to get the man’s final confession.
As these men fight their own
personal demons with time run-
ning out, all under the eagle eye
of a clock-watching guard, the
audience will find that redemp-
tion from sin often comes from
the unlikeliest of places, accord-
ing to a press release.
Written by Paul Kodiak, a
former resident of East Strouds-
burg, “The Messenger” had
several developmental readings
in New York leading to an Equity
Showcase Production at Polaris
North Theatre in the early 1990s,
and following rewrites, the play
went on to win the 2011 Original
Playwrights Contest winner at
Shawnee Playhouse for a Dra-
matic One Act, which led to a
production there last January.
The promotional trailers can be
found on the play’s Facebook
event page at facebook.com/
events/125490230935057/.
After a preview Nov. 8, “The
Messenger” will run Nov. 9, 10,
16, and 17 at 8 p.m. and Nov. 11
and 18 at 2 p.m. Call
570.457.3589 for tickets. W
This Sept. 21, 2012 file photo shows Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day on stage at
the iHeart Radio Music Festival at the MGM Grand Arena in Las Vegas. Green Day has
canceled its upcoming performance in New Orleans. The band first cancelled a
headlining gig at the Voodoo Music + Arts Experience before chopping a number of
tour dates, including a January stop in Wilkes-Barre. The announcement comes less
than a month after Armstrong headed into treatment for substance abuse.
(Photo by Eric Reed/Invision/AP)
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news of the weird
STRANGE CRIME STORIES & MORE
Chuck Shepherd | Weekender Wire Services
THE RESURRECTION WILL
BE TELEVISED
“If the Messiah descends from
the Mount of Olives as foretold
in the Bible,” wrote the Los An-
geles Times in an October dis-
patch from Jerusalem, the two
largest Christian television net-
works in the U.S. promise to
cover the arrival live from a
hilltop in the city. Daystar Televi-
sion has already been beaming a
24/7 webcam view, and Trinity
Broadcasting Network bought
the building next door to Days-
tar’s in September and has al-
ready begun staging live and
pre-recorded programs using the
broad expanse of the Holy Land
city as background.
PUBLIC URINATION
Once again, in September, the
upscale Standard Hotel, in New
York City’s lower Manhattan,
made headlines for the views it
provides to amazed pedestrians.
In 2009, it was the hotel’s floor-
to-ceiling windows showcasing
amorous couples at play (unless
the guests knew to draw the
curtains), especially delighting
out-of-towners seeking inexpen-
sive entertainment. Now, a Sep-
tember 2012 report in the New
York Daily News revealed that
the restrooms at the hotel’s
Boom-Boom Room restaurant
posed a bigger problem: no cur-
tains at all. One restroom user,
from Australia, said, “Sitting on
the royal throne, you don’t expect
a public viewing.” On the other
hand, the Daily News noted one
gentleman relieving himself and
waving merrily at the gawking
crowd below.
BITE SIZED BOUNTY
Earlier this year, the National
Football League suspended some
New Orleans Saints players and
the head coach for having a re-
ward system that paid players for
purposely injuring opponents. In
September, coach Darren Craw-
ford of the Tustin (Calif.) Pee
Wee Red Cobras team was sus-
pended when former players
reported that the coach ran an
apparently similar scheme among
his 10- and 11-year-olds, using a
cash reward of up to $50 for the
“hit of the game” (with last year’s
top prize going to the boy who
left an opposing running back
with a mild concussion). At press
time, the investigation was ongo-
ing, and no charges had been
filed.
YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT
In September, the National
Geographic cable TV show “Ta-
boo” featured three young Tokyo
partiers as examples of the “ba-
gel head” craze in which fun-
lovers inject saline just under the
skin of the forehead to create a
swelling and then pressure the
center to achieve a donut look
that lasts up to 24 hours before
the saline is absorbed into the
body. Some adventurers have
injected other areas of the body
-- even the scrotum.
MONEY FOR NOTHING
In Ventura, Calif., in Septem-
ber, once again, a scammer tried
to bilk victims out of money by
assuring them that he could dou-
ble their cash (in this case,
$14,000) merely by spraying it
with a secret chemical. (Of
course, the victims had to wait
several hours for their newly
doubled cash to dry and eventu-
ally discovered that the scammer
had substituted blank paper and
by that time was long gone.) But
the weirdest aspect of the scam is
that people who are so unsophis-
ticated as to fall for it somehow
managed to amass, in this tight
economy, $14,000 cash to begin
with.
BOOMERANG BIRDS
In October, Britain’s Gra-
vesham Borough Council, weary
of neighbors’ complaints about
the noise and smell from Roy
Day’s brood of 20 birds, ordered
him to remove them and find
them a new home. Day, a mem-
ber of the National Pigeon Rac-
ing Association, told reporters of
the futility of the order: “They
are homing pigeons.” Said a
friend, wherever Day sends them,
“(T)hey will just fly straight back
to him. ... He has never lost one.”
FINAL RESTING PLACE
James Davis, 73, has been
ordered by the town of Steven-
son, Ala., to disinter his wife’s
body from his front yard and
re-bury it in a cemetery. The
front yard is where she wanted to
be, said Davis, and this way he
can visit her every time he walks
out the front door. Davis, who is
challenging the order at the
Court of Appeals, said he feels
singled out, since people in Ste-
venson “have raised pigs in their
yard,” have “horses in the road
here” and “gravesites here all
over the place.”
WHAT’S ON THE MENU?
It has been four years since
News of the Weird mentioned the
growing controversy over one
response to Peru’s stray-cat prob-
lem, especially in the suburbs of
Lima, and still, the outrage con-
tinues. Each September, the city
of La Quebrada holds its Gastro-
nomic Festival of the Cat, in
which the country’s chefs try to
out-do each other with creative
gourmet feline (e.g., cat stew,
grilled cat with huacatay herbs),
which some Peruvians, of course,
believe to be aphrodisiacs. Said
one Peruvian, such cultural
events “are our roots and can’t be
forgotten.” Even so, animal rights
activists have stepped up their
protests.
W
HOW ABOUT THOSE MEASUREMENTS?
For a September beauty contest of female
college students in China’s Hubei province,
certain minimum body requirements were
established at the outset (beyond the
traditional chest, waist and hip sizes). Among
them, according to a report in China’s Global
Post: The space between the candidate’s
pupils should be 46 percent of the distance
between each pupil and the nearer ear, and the
distance between a candidate’s nipples should
be at least 20cm (7.8 inches). W
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speak and see
POETIC
Barnes & Noble Wilkes-
King’s Booksellers (7 S. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.4700)
❏ Events/Book Clubs:
• Open Mic Night: last Tues. of
every month, 6:30 p.m.
• Writer’s Workgroup: Wyoming
Valley Wordsmiths: first/third Tues.
monthly, 7 p.m.
❏ Children’s Events:
• Weekly Sat. morning story time, 11
a.m.-noon.
Converge Gallery (140 West
Fourth St., Williamsport, 570.447.5778,
convergegallery.com)
Gallery hours: Wed.-Fri. 11 a.m.-7 p.m.,
Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock: 570.996.1500)
• Writers Group: Thurs., 7-8:30 p.m.
18+. Celebrates all types of writing
styles, formats. Join anytime. Free. Call
to register.
Lizza Studios (900 Rutter Ave.,
Suite 10, Forty Fort, 570.991.6611, be-
tsy@lizzastudios.com)
• On display: A private collection of
work by Czech artist Colini.
The Osterhout Free Library
(71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre,
www.osterhout.info, 570.821.1959)
• Open Computer Lab: Mon./Wed.,
5-8 p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m.
• Protect Your Identity: Oct. 24, 3-4
p.m. Protect yourself from identity
theft, pizza and soft drinks served.
Free.
• Costume Party for Adults: Oct. 31,
7-8 p.m. Free.
• “Fifty Shades of Grey” book
discussion: Nov. 1, 6-7:30 p.m. Free
• “Tutankhamun: Beyond the
Tomb”: Nov. 3, 2 p.m. Free.
• Socrates Cafe Discussion Group:
Nov. 8, 6:30-8 p.m. Free.
• Rebekah Armusik author dis-
cussion: Nov. 10, 1 p.m. Free.
Pages & Places
• Cafe Programs every Thurs.
Happy hour 6 p.m., programs 7 p.m.
(Platform Lounge at Trax in Radisson
Lackawanna Station Hotel, 700 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Scranton)
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565, pitmem-
lib@comcast.net)
• Craftastic Kids Craft Club: 3rd Sat.
every month, starting Oct. 20, 10 a.m.
Grades 2-5. Call/email to register.
• Crochet Club: Tues., 10 a.m.,
Thurs., 6 p.m. New members welcome.
• Kids Science Club: First Sat. every
month, 10 a.m. Grades 2-5. Call/email to
register.
• Lego Club: Meets Mondays, 4 p.m.
Wait list only, call.
• Page Turners Kids Book Club:
First Thurs. every month. Grades 3-5.
• Story Time: Toddlers Tues., 10 a.m.
or Wed., 1:30 p.m.; Preschool Tues., 1:30
p.m. or Wed., 10 a.m.
Plymouth Public Library (107
W. Main St., Plymouth, 570.779.4775)
• Looking for volunteers: Call to
sign up.
• Adult computer lessons: Daily,
call to register.
• Story Time: Mon., 11 a.m. or Wed.,
10:30 a.m. Toddlers/preschool children.
STACKS Writing Group Every
other Tues., 6 p.m., The Banshee, (320
Penn Ave., Scranton). Info: stackswri-
tinggroup@gmail.com
Taylor Community Library
(710 S. Main St., Taylor)
Book signing with Grannie Christ-
mas: Nov. 3, noon-2 p.m. Books include
“Taylor” and “Green Ridge” from
Margo L. Azzarelli in the Images of
America series. Info: 570.346.6179
The Vintage Theater (326
Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantons-
vintagetheater.com)
• Poetry open mic: Nov. 15.
• Scranton Story Slam III: Nov. 16.
West Pittston Library (200
Exeter Ave., www.wplibrary.org,
570.654.9847)
• Book Club: First Tues., 6:45 p.m.
Free. Informal discussion of member-
selected books.
• Weekly story time for children:
Fri., 1 p.m. Free.
VISUAL
AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton: 570.969.1040 or Art-
istsforart.org)
Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m.
• Life Drawing sessions: every
Tues., 7-9 p.m. Contact ted@tedmicha-
lowski.com for info.
• Drawing Socials: every Sun., 6-9
p.m. $5 GA, $2 student.
• “Out of the Dark,” series of self
portraits by Lori Ryan: Nov. 1-10.
Artspace Gallery (221 Center
St., Bloomsburg, 570.784.0737, art-
space-bloomsburg.com)
Gallery Hours: Thurs.-Sat., noon-8
p.m., Sun., noon-5 p.m., or by appoint-
ment.
• “Handiwork and Play:” through
Nov. 10, ceramics and paintings of Deb
and Dave Stabley.
ARTSPACE Gallery (18 N. 7th
St., Stroudsburg, 570.476.4460, art-
spacegallery.net)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4
p.m., Sat-Sun, noon-4 p.m.
• “Brodhead Creek - Autumn” by
Will Daskal: Featured throughout Oct.
• “Falls on Tobyhanna Creek” by
Gary Kresge: Featured throughout Oct.
Bella Faccias (516 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton)
• Camera For a Cure, photographs
and paiting by Timmy Walsh: Nov. 2,
6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov.
The Butternut Gallery &
Second Story Books (204 Church
St, Montrose, 570.278.4011, butter-
nutgallery.com). Gallery hours: Wed.-
Sat., 11a.m.-5 p.m., Sun., 12 p.m.-4 p.m.
• “Motion and Grace: Constantinos
Sfikas and Deb Youngling”: through
Nov. 18.
Camerawork Gallery (Down-
stairs in the Marquis Gallery, Laundry
Building, 515 Center St., Scranton,
570.510.5028. www.cameraworkgalle-
ry.org, rross233@aol.com) Gallery
hours Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat., 10
a.m.-5 p.m.
• “Up Close and Personal,” pho-
tographs of Laurinda Faye Rubin: Nov.
2-Dec. 3, opening reception, Nov. 2,
6-8:20 p.m. Free.
• Accepting submissions for new
shows during 2012-2013. Photography
only; all photographic methods consid-
ered. Check out submissions procedure
on website for details.
Converge Gallery (140 W.
Fourth St., Williamsport, 570.435.7080,
convergegallery.com)
• Works of Matthew Rose: Nov.
2-30.
• “Saints and Sinners” feat. works
of 14 artists: Nov. 1-Dec. 22. Opening
reception, Nov. 1, 6-10 p.m.
Hope Horn Gallery (Hyland
Hall, University of Scranton,
570.941.4214)
Gallery Hours: Sun.-Fri., noon-4 p.m.;
Wed., 6-8 p.m.
• “The Lackawanna Iron Furnaces
of Scranton, Pennsylvania: History, Art,
Heritage:” through Nov. 6.
The Linder Gallery at Keys-
tone College (570.945.8335, keys-
tone.edu/lindergallery)
• “Robert Stark: Inside the Studio:”
through Nov. 30.
Marquis Art & Frame (122 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.0518)
Gallery hours Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
• “Something Just a Bit Different:”
through Nov. 3.
Misericordia University (301
Lake St., Dallas, 570.674.6286)
❏ Pauly Friedman Art Gallery,
Tues.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri., 10
a.m.-5p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 1-5 p.m.
• “Form and Process: Sculpture in
Stone, Bronze and Steel”: through Dec.
9.
❏ MacDonald Gallery, Tues.-Thurs.,
1-5 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.; Fri.-Sun., 1-5 p.m.
“Elizabeth Fulton: Giclee Landscape
Prints”: through Dec. 9.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine St., Scranton, www.new-
visionstudio.com, 570.878.3970)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun., noon-6
p.m. and by appointment.
• “SAME: An Artistic Exploration of
Humanity and Media, exhibit and play
by Mary Chappell”: companion per-
formances on Nov. 2, 8 p.m.; Nov. 3, 7
p.m.; and Nov. 4, 4 p.m. Exhibit contin-
ued Nov. 2-29. Opening reception, Nov.
2, 6-10 p.m. Free.
Schulman Gallery (2nd floor of
LCCC Campus Center, 1333 S. Prospect
St., Nanticoke, www.luzerne.edu/
schulmangallery, 570.740.0727)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
• Old Masters: through Nov. 22
• Annual Faculty/Alumni Exhibit:
Nov. 30-Jan. 3
Something Special (23 W.
Walnut St., Kingston, 570.288.8386)
Open Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat.,
7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
• “Impressions of a Perfect Day”
exhibit: through Nov. 9.
The Vintage Theater (326
Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantons-
vintagetheater.com)
• “Rock, Paper, Scissor:” Nov. 2-29.
Opening reception Nov. 2, includes
light fare, drink, and live music.
Widmann Gallery (Located in
King’s College’s Sheehy-Farmer Cam-
pus Center between North Franklin and
North Main Streets, Wilkes-Barre,
570.208.5900, ext. 5328)
Gallery hours: Mon. through Fri. 9
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sat. and Sun. as
arranged. Free and open to the public.
“Recent Works” by Peter Nardone:
through Nov. 2. Photography,
W
- compiled by Chris Hughes,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
Everything is the ‘SAME’
"SAME: An Artistic Exploration of Humanity and Media,” an exhibit
and play written by Mary Chappell, begins Nov. 2 at 8 p.m. at New
Visions Studio and Gallery (201 Vine St., Scranton) and continues
Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. and Nov. 4 to 4 p.m. The play examines humanity as
it is seen through the media and focuses on the core similarities of
people. Accompanying artwork for the show was created by Chappell,
a current Baptist Bible College arts student. For more information,
visit newsvisionsstudio.com.
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By Christopher J. Hughes
Weekender Staff Writer
J
eff Brauer predicted
the presidential race
in Pennsylvania was
over a long time
ago.
“We’re not a swing state.
I didn’t think we were going
to be a swing state since last
spring when (former U.S.
Sen.) Rick Santorum pulled
out. When he did, a lot of the
attention left Pennsylvania and
never returned,” the Keystone
College professor of political
science said.
“The reality is we haven’t
been important this year.”
That’s one message, like
so many others this election
season, that Republicans aren’t
buying.
“Earlier in the year, when
we didn’t think Pennsylvania
was going to be in play, it
was easier to not do so much
with (the campaign to elect
Mass. Gov. Mitt) Romney.
Now, everything’s heating
up, so we’re going non-
stop,” countered Mountain
Top resident Bob Zaruta, 28,
president and co-founder of
the Luzerne County Young
Republicans. “I absolutely
think it’s a battleground state.”
“I’m seeing a tremendous
amount of enthusiasm,
particularly on the Republican
side. It’s a reverse of the 2008
campaign when (President
Barack) Obama had his
troops all fired up,” added
Bill Urbanski, of Kingston,
the chairman of the Luzerne
County Republican Party.
Local Democrats
Political parties locally, nationally not done vying for votes
and Republicans aren’t willing
to give up the ghost of their
candidate bringing home the
spoils of victory in the general
election on Nov. 6 – even if
the candidates haven’t shown
heavy interest here in months.
“All you have to do is look
at where they’re going and
where they’re spending the
money... If we were in play,
the candidates themselves
would be here,” Brauer said.
“Most importantly, they’d be
spending more money here.”
If the Romney campaign
had spent money here, the
state could have been more of
a battleground, according to
Wilkes University professor of
political science Tom Baldino.
The lack of attention could be
somewhat of a relief.
“Personally, I’m glad
it’s not, because I couldn’t
have handled all of those
commercials,” Baldino said.
Urbanski still hopes that
Republicans in NEPAcan
gain a boost if either Romney
or vice presidential nominee
Paul Ryan touch down at
the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
International Airport in
Avoca before Nov. 6.
Avisit from one of
the nation’s top two
Republicans couldn’t hurt
their chances, considering
Pennsylvania has gone blue
in terms of electoral college
votes since 1992, according
to the National Archives.
ONE CENTRAL
ISSUE
“As it is in every election,
people want to know who’s
going to be best for them,
for their family, and for
their profession. That’s
always the issue that
people have, no matter
what year it is,”
Plains resident and
Luzerne County Young
Democrats President
Thomas Shubilla, 28,
said.
This year, the unifying
issue is the economy.
“It is the major issue,”
Baldino said.
“Unemployment is relatively
high; wages have not kept
pace, unless you’re in the
1 percent and then they’ve
outpaced the cost of living
by a dramatic amount; and
people are fearful, even those
with jobs, about whether or
not they will have a job going
forward.”
Funding for education and
social issues are also driving
the discussion for students at
both Wilkes and Keystone,
according to professors.
Issues at the state level
may help fill polling
places, rather than national
politics simply trickling
down, one local leader
suggested.
“I firmly believe we
are going to have a strong
Democratic showing in
Pennsylvania... I believe
people here are looking
at what’s going on in
our Republican-
controlled state
FIGHT TO THE W
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Special thanks to World Class Boxing (239 Schuyler
Ave. Kingston) for the use of their facility in this photo.
(Photo by Amanda Dittmar)
E FINISH
government,” Luzerne County
Democratic Committee
Chairperson and Wyoming
Mayor Bob Boyer, 46, said.
“I think some of the things
that the Republican majority
is proposing here are going to
assist the Democratic vote.
“I think you often look in
your own backyard anymore.”
That may bring a different
electorate out on Tuesday.
While Pennsylvania may
not be a swing state in the
presidential election, at least in
Brauer’s eyes, other races on
the local level and in the U.S.
Congress are still largely up
for grabs, he said.
YOUNG
ENOUGH TO
VOTE
There is still a remnant of
the movement among young
voters who rallied behind
Obama in
2008. That support resulted in
record high voter registration
and turnout in the Keystone
State, according to the
Pennsylvania Department of
State.
“It was clearly Obama
whose message resonated with
lots of people, but particularly
young voters. What he was
offering, this hope and change,
was inspirational and
future-oriented,”
Baldino said. “Four
years later, they
don’t see a lot
of change,
and they’ve
lost some
hope.
For better or worse, they’ve
disengaged. Not all of them,
but enough of them.”
Voter registration is only
down by 268,495 people
from 2008 with 8,487,093
registered for 2012, according
to statistics retrieved from the
Pennsylvania Department of
State on Oct. 24.
Shubilla said he has
witnessed a slight
scaling back of
participation in
this election
cycle among Young Dems.
There is, however, “absolutely
not” a sense of apathy among
area voters, he noted.
Similarly, the Young
Republicans have not had a
hard time finding volunteers to
knock on doors or make phone
calls, Zaruta said.
AN IMPORTANT
DECISION
“We can all sit back and
complain, but we can’t do
anything if we really don’t
vote,” Boyer stressed.
Voting is critical for the
legitimacy of the democracy,
Baldino echoed.
“Imagine if you had an
election and only five people
voted,” he said. “How many of
the rest of the population are
going to say that the outcome
is legitimate?”
Urbanski pointed to U.S.
Sen. Pat Toomey’s race two
DIG THROUGH
THE MESS
“I think the problem is that we kind of expect that
they’re not going to tell the truth,” Keystone College
professor Jeff Brauer said of the half-truths and
double talk that can come out in an election year.
Interview subjects for this story suggested a variety
of sites and news networks for voters to weed
through campaign rhetoric and do their own fact
checking on the issues:
politifact.com •
factcheck.org •
politicspa.com •
realclearpolitics.com •
“You shouldn’t believe the first thing you hear...
Be cautious and sample different sources,” Luzerne
County Republican Party Chair Bill Urbanski added.
years ago as a “razor thin” win
and evidence that every vote
does, indeed, count. That race,
he added, was only accurately
predicted by Susquehanna
Polling and Research, which
put Romney with a slight
advantage over Obama in poll
results released Oct. 18.
“The youth have been
greatly disillusioned by
what he promised them in
2008 because so many of
his campaign promises have
simply not turned out,”
Urbanski said, adding that
those voters either may not
turn out at all on Tuesday or
may instead vote for Romney.
Either way, voters of all
ages have an important say in
the next four years.
“It’s your future,” Shubilla
emphasized. W
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tech talk
By Nick Delorenzo
Special to the Weekender
Goldilocks would be in her
glory – at least as far as
mobile computing is con-
cerned.
The arrival of the iPad
Mini means tablet devices
are now available that run
the gamut from micro- to
mega-sized.
There still seems to be
some debate about what
functionality to include in
which sized devices.
I’ve seen mid-sized tablets
with normal telephone func-
tionality, and I’ve seen
smallish tablets only slightly
larger than a regular smart-
phone that only sported Wi-
Fi connectivity.
While traveling recently, I
found that a full-sized iPad
can be inconvenient to use in
situations where space is at a
premium. I saw that a small-
er device could retain the
practical aspects of a tablet
and allow me to not irritate
fellow air passengers while
retrieving the device, for
example, or to drop it in a
pocket while walking around.
The release of the iPad
Mini seems to show that
Apple recognizes those vir-
tues as well.
Another point in the favor
of smaller tablets – the
smaller size can come with a
reduced price tag, at least in
some cases.
For the Apple Mini, the
entry price is a relatively
steep $329. But the least
expensive iPad Mini does fit
neatly into Apple’s current
pricing structure, with the
absolute top-of-the-line mod-
el clocking in at $659, some-
what above where the full-
sized iPad falls.
Despite the Mini’s smaller
screen real-estate – 7.9 inch-
es diagonal compared to its
larger sibling’s 9.7-inch dis-
play – the performance
hasn’t been substantially
reduced – so come Novem-
ber when the iPad Mini goes
on sale, early adopters can
trade a small chunk of
screen real estate for some
savings.
There has always been a
wide range of Android-pow-
ered tablets, ranging in price
from $200 to $800, but it
doesn’t seem like there will
be standardized sizes for
them anytime soon.
This poses something of a
problem for application de-
velopers – it’s hard to make
an app look good on both a
4-inch and a 9-inch screen –
and in some cases, they may
not work properly, even
while running on hardware
that is substantially similar.
Apple at least requires sub-
mission of separate apps
optimized for any device
they are to be published on.
The iPad Mini begins ship-
ping Nov. 2.
W
- Nick DeLorenzo is director
of interactive and new media
for The Times Leader.
Email him
atndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
There is more practicality
to the iPad Mini than
some first expected.
Apple's new iPad Mini
stakes out its territory
A full-sized iPad can be
inconvenient to use in
situations where space
is at a premium. W
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Music
It’s easy to see why Brendon
Small still remembers his first
guitar.
It was a toy guitar with a built-
in speaker he purchased from
Toys “R” Us at the age of 11 or
12 with money he saved from
mowing lawns. At 14, he met a
friend who became like a “cool
big brother” with a musical li-
brary “to be reckoned with” that
may have pushed his passion
even further.
“I knew Guns N’ Roses at that
point and Def Leppard. That’s
about it. He’s like, ‘OK, that
stuff’s cool, but there’s a lot of
other cool stuff.’ So we made me
a mix tape of Slayer and King
Diamond and Megadeth and
Exodus and Metallica and all
kinds of s--t. Everything,” Small
recalled.
“By the end of that day, I was
playing (Black Sabbath’s) ‘Iron
Man’ and like a blues shuffle,
and I hadn’t even really heard the
real ‘Iron Man’ at that point.”
Worshipping “guitar gods” like
Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, and Eddie
Van Halen, the Springfield, Ill.
native thought he was ready to
perform in front of an audience.
“I think the big leadoff point
for me to become a worthy guitar
player was I had to go and humil-
iate myself publicly first and do a
terrible job at this guitar competi-
tion when I was 15. I really, really
ate s--t hard. I really sucked. I got
nervous, I flailed,” he related.
“My ego was just crushed
because that’s how I identified
myself. I introduced myself as a
guy who played guitar.”
Also interested in becoming an
actor, writer, and comedian, he
knew he had to conquer his stage
fright, which he eventually did
through open mics. He would
become known for his animated
sitcom “Home Movies,” running
from1999 until 2004, but he
never stopped playing guitar,
writing and performing the
show’s music and opening the
door to his next project, “Metal-
ocalypse,” also on Cartoon Net-
work’s “Adult Swim.”
Small went from a show about
young kids making movies to
one about a death metal band
called Dethklok who becomes
the seventh largest economy on
the planet. Keeping other band
parodies in mind, he was careful
not to make just another “Spinal
Tap.”
“That’s what most comedy
music projects are – a farce about
a band on its way out. That’s
Tenacious D, that’s Flight of the
Conchords, that’s all that stuff,
and they’re really, really talented,
funny people, so I thought, ‘I
can’t add to that. I have to do
something else.’ It’s a very sim-
ple switcheroo,” he said.
While he admits its production
is a “Herculean effort,” he essen-
tially created a job he “can’t be
fired from,” serving as head
writer, voice actor, composer,
and performer of the successful
cartoon, which has run for four
seasons thus far. It has also pro-
duced three albums, most of
which focus on everyday brutal-
ity rather than death, as the genre
implies.
“When a house is worth less
than it was, like when the market
just drops…and then it’s worth
half that, where does that other
half of the money go? …The
analyst (on TV) goes, ‘Well,
that’s a really good question
because that money disappears. It
turns into nothing… I thought,
‘That is the most brutal thing I’ve
ever heard in my life,’” Small
said of the inspiration for “Crush
the Industry” from their latest
record, “Dethalbum III,” which
recently debuted at number 10 on
the Billboard Top 200.
“Being dead is pretty brutal,
but there’s a lot of other s--t that’s
brutal that’s not being dead, like
going to the dentist is brutal.
Flying coach is brutal. Humidity
is brutal.”
Small also takes the fictional
band on the road in a live multi-
media experience, joining Machi-
nehead, All That Remains, and
Black Dahlia Murder at The
Electric Factory (421 North 7th
St., Philadelphia) on Oct. 31.
It’s clear that his days of stage
fright are long over.
“You can enjoy it, and you get
this whole visual experience…
It’s a really great back-and-forth
that we have with the audience
that I don’t think you could get
anywhere else,” he noted. “This I
really enjoy doing… It’s the best
possible scenario.”
In the end, though, Small em-
phasizes that it’s still all about his
guitar.
“I want to make sure my guitar
playing is good on every record.
That’s what I care about the
most. Again, that’s what this
whole project is – it’s me trying
to reconnect with my guitar. It’s a
big honeymoon with me and my
guitar. It really is.”
W
A boy and his guitar
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
Dethklok with Machinehead,
All That Remains, and Black
Dahlia Murder, Oct. 31, 6:30
p.m., The Electric Factory (421
North 7th St., Philadelphia).
$35.
Brendon Small portrays three of the five members of
Dethklok in the death metal cartoon ’Metalocalypse.’
The band performs in Philly on Halloween night.
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Having amassed an impressive
number of his own hit songs and
performing on studio hits with
everyone from Don Henley to
Bonnie Raitt, Bruce Hornsby’s
“plateau” may have occurred in
1987 when his first single, “The
Way It Is,” climbed the charts
and helped him receive the tro-
phy for Best New Artist at the
Grammy Awards.
While the accolades are cer-
tainly respectful to the career
Hornsby has had, there have been
many changes throughout his last
few decades, including numerous
hit songs (“Mandolin Rain,” and
“Valley Road” amongst others), a
brief stint in the Grateful Dead,
and a new band, The Noise-
makers, with whom he has been
enjoying constant touring.
So, what can his longtime fans
expect when he comes to the
F.M. Kirby Center this Friday,
Nov. 2, for a solo piano tour?
Sure, the hits will be there, but
Hornsby has been dabbling in
some new music which breaks
away from the Adult Top 40
classification that followed him
in the late 80s and 90s.
“I consider myself to be really
nice in playing four or five of the
hits every show,” Hornsby said
from his home in Williamsburg,
Va. “Actually, the most popular
parts of my solo concerts are
songs that I perform from our
play, ‘SCKBSTD’ (read ‘Sick
Bastard’). I play two or three of
the songs from it…There’s a
song sung by the FedEx driver,
the UPS driver, and the postal
delivery man known as The Holy
Trinity of Home Delivery: ‘We
are The Holy Trinity of Home
Delivery/Guided by divinity,
exemplary, proficiency/The three
guys you admire most/FedEx,
Brown and the Holy Post/Wives
in our vicinity/We make their
legs go quivery/We are the Holy
Trinity of Home Delivery.’”
Another example?
“There’s another song that I
sing as a woman,” he said. “A
wife whose husband drives her so
crazy, she fantasizes about taking
a baseball bat and whacking his
head off called ‘Where’s the Bat.’
‘It’s morbid little fun to imagine
that head/Louisville Sluggered
and swept under the bed.’ This is
pretty entertaining stuff. As I get
older, I just like to write funny
stuff.”
Aside from the “SCKBSTD”
tracks, Hornsby’s solo shows
allow the pianist more room to
explore his music, which is
something he enjoys doing in the
band format, but finds different
freedom in when it’s just him on
stage.
“Musically, it’s very different
in some senses, and very similar
in others,” he said. “Our Noise-
makers gig is very free and we
haven’t had a set list in years. We
take a lot of requests, so there’s
always a lot of spontaneity that’s
possible there. That’s the same
here (solo). What’s different is,
since it’s just one person, I can
really be even freer…I can go
anywhere I want. I can slow it
down if I want to, I can change
keys or go into a different feel on
the spot. We do that a lot, as
much as any band I know does it.
Obviously, it’s easier to do when,
as The Troggs would say, ‘there’s
just one (expletive) mind on it.’”
That mind has been working
meticulously to adapt his songs
into a solo performance where he
finds himself getting back to his
musical roots, while adding
different arrangements to some
of the tracks.
“There’s a lot of rootsy playing
in the solo shows,” he said.” Like
say ‘Valley Road’ played blues
style. That’s more elemental and
traditional in its approach than
lots of things we’ll do with the
band. It’s more singer/songwriter
you can say…It’s all about pro-
jecting a strong pulse, even when
I’m solo piano. It’s also very
much about two-handed inde-
pendence, which is something
I’ve been heavily involved with
for the last 16 or 17 years. Basi-
cally having a strong groove in
the left hand, but being very free
rhythmically in the right hand.
It’s sort of like splitting your
brain.”
As far as his Kirby Center
show, Hornsby feels his audience
has come to appreciate what can
be done with only a piano and
promises a night full of hits and,
more importantly, just some
all-around good music.
“Certain people come to my
concerts to hear a nostalgic night
out, and I’m feeling pretty kind
about that,” he said. “I even play
a song I didn’t write but played
on the record, Bonnie Raitt’s ‘I
Can’t Make You Love Me,’
which has become a classic no-
w…Often times the best mo-
ments of the concert are either
the ‘SCKBSTD’ songs or some
of the songs that are sort of pian-
istic tour-de-forces. I think it’s a
very literate audience that comes
to my concerts, and they really
recognize what’s going on.”
W
Hornsby readies roots,
new material for W-B
By Ryan O’Malley
Weekender Correspondent
Bruce Hornsby: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.,
F.M. Kirby Center (71 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre). $29.50-
$75. Info: kirbycenter.org.
Bruce Hornsby brings his hits, including ’The Way It Is,’
and a number of songs from an original play titled
’SCKBSTD’ to the F.M. Kirby Center on Nov. 2. W
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concerts
ALICE C. WILTSIE
PERFORMING ARTS
CENTER
700 N. Wyoming St., Hazleton
570.861.0510
www.wiltsiecenter.org
- The Righteous Brothers’ Bill
Medley: Nov. 4, $27-$52
- Bret Michaels: Nov. 17, $45-$72
- An Evening with Michael Fein-
stein, “A Gershwin Holiday”: Nov. 24,
$37-$72
- Christmas with The Celts: Dec. 1,
$20-$36
16TH ANNUAL BRIGGS
FARMBLUESFEST
88 Old Berwick Highway, Ne-
scopeck
570.379.3342, briggsfarm.com
- July 12-13. $28-$90. Discounts
available through Jan. 1.
COVE HAVEN
ENTERTAINMENT
RESORTS
1.877.800.5380
www.CPResorts.com
- Justin Willman: Nov. 18
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
Phone: 570.826.1100
- Bruce Hornsby: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.,
$29.50-$75
- Liza Minnelli: Nov. 3, 8 p.m.,
$69-$150
- Brian Regan: Nov. 10, 8 p.m.,
$39.50
- Shaolin Warriors: Nov. 14, 7:30
p.m., $45.95-$56.70
- YOUniversal Suzuki Strings: Nov.
17, 1:30 p.m., part of Wilkes-Barre
Christmas Parade Day.
- NEPA Philharmonic presents “A
Night in Vienna”: Nov. 17, 8 p.m.,
$34-$65
- Shawn Klush / The Sweet In-
spirations: Nov. 24, 8 p.m., $35-$75
- Paul Anka: Dec. 7, 8 p.m., $49.55-
$138.10
MAUCH CHUNK OPERA
HOUSE
14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe
570.325.0249
mauchchunkoperahouse.com
- Montana Skies / Victor and
Penny: Nov. 2, 8 p.m., $18
- Boolesque: Nov. 3, 8 p.m., $20-
$35
- Claire Lynch and the Front Porch
String Band: Nov. 9, 8:30 p.m., $20
- The “The Band” Band “Last
Waltz” Celebration: Nov. 10, 7 p.m., $8
p.m.
- Start Making Sense / The Great
White Caps: Nov. 17, 8:30 p.m., $20
- Free Range Folk: Nov. 21, 7 p.m.,
$10
- Eric Mintel Quartet: Nov. 23, 8:30
p.m., $15
- The Funk Ark: Nov. 24, 8:30 p.m.,
$20
- Twelve Twenty Four: Dec. 1, 7:30
p.m., $23
MOHEGAN SUN ARENA
255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-
Barre Twp.
- Ringling Bros. and Barnum &
Bailey: Barnum Bash: Nov. 1-4, TIMES
VARY, $33.85-$93.75
- Trans-Siberian Orchestra: Nov.
25, 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., $38-$58
- Disney’s Phineas and Ferb: The
Best LIVE Tour Ever: Dec. 2, 2 p.m., 5
p.m. $26-$60
MOUNT AIRY CASINO
RESORT
44 Woodland Rd., Mount Pocono
Phone: 877.682.4791
www.mountairycasino.com
- Aaron Lewis: Nov. 2, 9 p.m.; Nov.
3, 8 p.m. $40-$55.
- The Trammps: Nov. 24, 8 p.m.,
$20-$30
- Thunder From Down Under: Dec.
7-8, 8 p.m., $20-$30
NEWVISIONS STUDIO &
GALLERY
201 Vine St., Scranton
570.878.3970
- Petal / These Elk Forever / Short-
hand / 3 to Breathe: Nov. 9, 8 p.m.
$7.
- Endless Mike and The Beagle
Club / Down to Six / The Feral Chil-
dren / Shop Local: Nov. 17, 8 p.m. $7.
PENN’S PEAK
325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe
866.605.7325 or visit pennspeak-
.com.
- Uriah Heep: Nov. 1, 8 p.m., $22
- Umphrey’s McGee / The Bright
Light Social Hour: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.,
$27.50
- Ryan Pelton: Nov. 9, 8 p.m.,
$22-$37
- Lonestar: Nov. 16, 8 p.m., $49.25-
$65.25
- Get the Led Out, Nov. 17, 8 p.m.,
$31-$41.75
- Dark Star Orchestra: Nov. 21, 8
p.m., $32
- Travis Tritt: Nov. 30, 8 p.m.,
$37-$52
- Blue Oyster Cult: Dec. 7, 8 p.m.,
$35.75
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
667 N. River St., Plains
Phone: 570.822.2992
- Suze: Oct. 31, 7 p.m., $5
- Mullen, “A Salute to U2”: Nov. 2,
8 p.m., $5
- Alexis P. Suter Band: Nov. 3, 9
p.m., $10 advance, $15 day of show
- Flux Capacitor: Nov. 8, 8 p.m., $5
- The Ends of the Earth / Ol’ Cab-
bage: Nov. 9, 8 p.m., $5
- George Wesley All-Star Band (Bob
Marley tribute): Nov. 10, 8 p.m., $5
- Ryan Montbleau Band: Nov. 15, 8
p.m., $12
- Kung Fu / Mystery Fire: Nov. 16, 8
p.m., $10
- Floodwood: Nov. 17, 8 p.m., $10
- Cabinet: Nov. 21, 9 p.m., $10
- Dopapod: Nov. 23, 8 p.m., $10
- MIZ / Nathyn Knott: Nov. 24, 8
p.m., $8
- Popa Chubby: Nov. 30, 8 p.m., $10
- The Ends of the Earth: Dec. 1, 8
p.m., $5
SCRANTON COMMUNITY
CONCERTS
Mellow Theater, 501 Vine St. Scran-
ton
Phone: 570.955.1455, lackawanna.e-
du, etix.com
Prices vary, student and group
rates available
- The Virgin Consort: Dec. 6, 7 p.m.,
$20, $15 students
- Tim Warfield’s tribute to Shirley
Scott: March 22, 8 p.m., $25-$30, $15
students
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton
Phone: 888.669.8966
- Listen Local featuring Rogue
Chimp: Nov. 2, 8 p.m., $10
- Michael Smerconish “Angry is
Over Tour”: Nov. 9, 8 p.m., $25.50
- Froggy 101’s Guitars and Stars 5:
Nov. 27, 7 p.m., $10-$35
- Appalachian Christmas with NEPA
Philharmonic: Dec. 14, 7 p.m., $34-$65
SHERMAN THEATER
524 Main St., Stroudsburg
Phone: 570.420.2808, www.sher-
mantheater.com
- Foam N Glow feat. Adventure
Club: Nov. 3, 9 p.m., $30
- Theory of a Dead Man: Nov. 4,
7:30 p.m., $20-$22
- Too Much Cake Dance and DJ
Party: Nov. 9, 10 p.m., $10
- Motionless in White: Nov. 10, 7
p.m., $15-$18
- Falling In Reverse: Nov. 11, $18-$20
- Lamb of God / In Flames / Ha-
tebreed / Sylosis: Nov. 14, 7 p.m.,
$35-$38
- The Loft: Nov. 16, 8 p.m., $8
- Megadeth: Nov. 19, 8 p.m., $35
- Railroad Earth: Nov. 23 and 24, 8
p.m., $30 single day or $50 for two-
day pass
- Vienna Boys Choir: Nov. 29, 8
p.m., $25-$45.
- Never Shout Never: Nov. 30, 8
p.m., $20
- Change: A Christmas Spectacular:
Dec. 9, 4 p.m., $10-$15.
VINTAGE THEATER
326 Spruce St., Scranton
info@scrantonsvintagetheater.com
- Eye On Attraction: Nov. 3
- EWW Yaboo / Kid Icarus / Mock
Sun: Nov. 10
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
3421 Willow St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.LOVE.222
- Dethklok / Machinehead / All
That Remains / The Black Dahlia
Murder: Oct. 31, 6:30 p.m.
- Grouplove / Ms Mr: Nov. 1, 8:30
p.m.
- Richie Hawtin / Dice / Josh Wink
/ DJ Tech Tools: Nov. 2, 8:30 p.m.
- Social Distortion / Lindi Ortega /
The Biters: Nov. 3, 8:30 p.m.
- Nas / Ms. Lauryn Hill: Nov. 7, 8:30
p.m.
- Cody Simpson: Nov. 8, 8:30 p.m.
- Falling In Reverse / Enter Shikari
/ I See Stars / Letlive: Nov. 9, 7:30
p.m.
- Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin
Experience: Nov. 10, 8:30 p.m.
- Taking Back Sunday / Bayside /
Transit: Nov. 13 and 14, 8 p.m.
- Grace Potter & the Nocturnals /
The Stepkids: Nov. 15, 8:30 p.m.
- Yellowcard / The Wonder Years /
We Are The In Crowd / Sandlot He-
roes: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
- Kreayshawn / Rye Rye / Honey
Cocaine / Chippy Nonstop: Nov. 17,
8:30 p.m.
- A$AP Rocky / A$AP Mob / School-
boy Q / Danny Brown: Nov. 18, 8 p.m.
- Pauly D: Nov. 21, 8 p.m.
- Tommy Conwell and the Young
Rumblers / Bricklin: Nov. 23, 8:30
p.m.
- Lamb of God / In Flames / Hel-
lyeah / Sylosis: Nov. 24, 7p.m.
- The Gaslight Anthem / The Men-
zingers / Matthew Ryan: Nov. 27, 8
p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT THE
TLA
334 South St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.922.1011
- Foxy Shazam / The Endless
March: Oct. 31, 8 p.m.
- Further Seems Forever: Nov. 1, 7
p.m.
- Soulive / Lettuce: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
- Xavier Rudd: Nov. 3, 8 p.m.
- Motion City Soundtrack / Juke-
box The Ghost / Now, Now / I Was
Totally Destroying It: Nov. 4, 6 p.m.
- Pierce the Veil / Tonight Alice /
Hands Like Houses: Nov. 5, 6:30 p.m.
- Dredg / Benjamin Henderson:
Nov. 8, 7 p.m.
- Yelawolf / Rittz / Trouble Andrew
/ Vajra: Nov. 9, 7 p.m.
- Gary Clark, Jr. / Kat Edmonson:
Nov. 10, 7 p.m.
- The Tragically Hip: Nov. 13, 7 p.m.
- Macklemore / Ryan Lewis / Dee-1
/ Xperience: Nov. 14, 7 p.m.
- Sum 41 ‘Does This Look Infected’
10 year anniversary: Nov. 15, 7 p.m.
- The Hush Sound: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
- All Time Low / The Summer Set /
Hit the Lights, more: Nov. 17, 6 p.m.
- Kill the Noise / Birdy Nam Nam:
Nov. 18, 7 p.m.
- Trash Talk / Mellowhype: Nov. 19,
7 p.m.
- LIGHTS / Arkells: Nov. 20, 7 p.m.
- Dance Gavin Dance / A Lot Like
Birds / I the Mighty, more: Nov. 21, 5
p.m.
- Delta Spirit / Jeff the Brother-
hood / FIDLAR: Nov. 23, 8 p.m.
- Conspirator / Eoto: Nov. 24, 8
p.m.
KESWICK THEATER
Easton Road-Keswick Ave, Glen-
side, Pa.
Phone: 215.572.7650
- Roger Hodgson: Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m.
- Keb’ Mo’: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
- The Capitol Steps: Nov. 3-4,
TIMES VARY
- Ben Gibbard: Nov. 7, 8 p.m.
- Robert Randolph & the Family
Band: Nov. 9, 8 p.m.
- David Bromberg: Nov. 10, 8 p.m.
- Ani DiFranco / Pearl and the
Beard: Nov. 11, 7:30 p.m.
- The Machine (Pink Floyd tribute):
Nov. 23, 8 p.m.
- Songs of The Band feat. Jimmy
Vivino and Garth Hudson: Nov. 24, 8
p.m.
- Scott Weiland: Nov. 25, 8 p.m.
- Tedeschi Trucks Band: Nov.
27-28, 7:30 p.m.
- The Monkees: Nov. 29, 8 p.m.
TOWER THEATER
69th and Ludlow Sts. Upper Darby
Phone: 610.352.2887
- STS9: Oct. 31, 8 p.m.
- Pretty Lights: Nov. 4, 8 p.m.
- Ray LaMontagne: Nov. 17, 8 p.m.
- Steel Panther: Nov. 23, 9 p.m.
- Of Monsters and Men / Soley /
Elle King: Nov. 24, 8 p.m.
TROCADERO
10th & Arch St, Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.2000
- Eric Hutchinson / Jessie Payo:
Nov. 1, 8 p.m. W
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- Cypress Hill / Action Bronson:
Nov. 2, 9 p.m.
- Mimosa: Nov. 3, 9 p.m.
- Deicide / Alustrium: Nov. 7, 7:30
p.m.
- The Wallflowers / My Jerusalem:
Nov. 8, 8 p.m.
- Paul Banks / The Neighborhood:
Nov. 10, 9 p.m.
- Joe Budden: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
- Travia / 13:1 / Reckless Behavior /
Sick Trust: Nov. 17, 6:30 p.m.
- Panzie / Clashing Plaid / Ammu-
nition: Nov. 23, 9 p.m.
SUSQUEHANNA BANK
CENTER
1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, NJ.
Phone: 609.365.1300
- Smashing Pumpkins / Morning
Parade: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
- The Script: Nov. 10, 8 p.m.
WELLS FARGO CENTER
Broad St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.3600
- Bob Dylan and His Band: Nov. 19,
7:30 p.m.
- Neil Young / Crazy Horse / Patti
Smith / Everest: Nov. 29, 8 p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
BRYCE JORDAN CENTER
Penn State University, State Col-
lege, Pa.
Phone: 814.865.5555
- Bruce Springsteen and the E
Street Band: Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m.
- Maybach Music Group / Machine
Gun Kelly / Rick Ross, more: Nov. 4, 7
p.m.
- Carrie Underwood / Hunter
Hayes: Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m.
CROCODILE ROCK
520 Hamilton St, Allentown
Phone: 610.434.460
- King Conquer: Nov. 1, 6 p.m.
- MxPx / Unwritten Law / Versus
The World: Nov. 2, 6 p.m.
- Born of Osiris / Unearth: Nov. 3,
5:30 p.m.
- The Rocket Summer / The Classic
Crime: Nov. 3, 6:30 p.m.
- State Radio: Nov. 7, 7 p.m.
- Late Nite Reading / Rocky Loves
Emily / Farewell My Love: Nov. 9,
5:30 p.m.
- Smile Empty Soul / Hurt / Giv-
ensix: Nov. 9, 6 p.m.
- Alex Goot: Nov. 10, 5:30 p.m.
- Dope / Team Cybergeist: Nov. 10,
7 p.m.
- Kung Fu Vampire / Mars / Liquid
Assassin: Nov. 11, 5:30 p.m.
- Anberlin: Nov. 11, 6 p.m.
- Straight Line Stitch: Nov. 15, 5:30
p.m.
- All Time Low / The Summer Set /
The Downtown Fiction / Hit The
Lights: Nov. 16: 6 p.m.
- Endwell / My Bitter End: Nov. 17,
5:30 p.m.
- G. Love & Special Sauce / Giant
Panda Guerilla Dub Squad: Nov. 17, 8
p.m.
- Timeflies: Nov. 18, 7 p.m.
- Dio Disciples / Witchburn: Nov.
20, 7 p.m.
- Sum 41: Nov. 23, 7 p.m.
- Aaron Jennings: Nov. 24, 5:30
p.m.
- Sparks the Rescue / Handguns /
The Composure: Nov. 24, 5:30 p.m.
GIANT CENTER
950 Hersheypark Dr., Hershey
Phone: 717.534.3911
- Gaither Christmas Homecoming:
Dec. 7, 7 p.m.
- tobyMac: Dec. 9, 7 p.m.
SANDS BETHLEHEM
77 Sands Blvd., Bethlehem
- Cheap Trick: Nov. 24, 8 p.m.
- B.B. King: Nov. 27, 8 p.m.
STABLER ARENA
Lehigh University, Bethlehem
Phone: 610.758.6611
- Harlem Globetrotters: Feb. 7, 7
p.m.
WHITAKER CENTER
222 Market St., Harrisburg
Phone: 717.214.ARTS
- The Machine: Nov. 21, 7:30 p.m.
- The Bacon Brothers: May 4, 8
p.m.
NEWYORK / NEWJERSEY
BEACON THEATER
2124 Broadway, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.496.7070
- Meat Loaf / Katrina: Nov. 1, 8 p.m.
- Chris Isaak: Nov. 2
- Citizen Cope: Nov. 3, 8 p.m.
- “Stand Up For Heroes” feat.
Ricky Gervais, Patton Oswalt, Robin
Williams, more: Nov. 8, 8 p.m.
- Brian Regan: Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m.
- Bill Maher: Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m.
- So You Think You Can Dance:
Nov. 13 and 14, 7:30 p.m.
- Grace Potter & the Nocturnals:
Nov. 16 and 17, 8 p.m.
BETHEL WOODS CENTER
Bethel NY
www.bethelwoodscenter.org
- Rusted Root / Lauren Mann: Nov.
9, 8 p.m.
- Judy Collins: Dec. 15, 7:30 p.m.
BROOME COUNTY ARENA
1 Stuart Street, Binghamton, NY
Phone: 670.778.6626
- K-Ci & Jo-Jo / Silk / Dru Hill: Nov.
3, 7:30 p.m.
- 3 Doors Down / Daughtry / Oth-
erwise: Dec. 1, 7 p.m.
HAMMERSTEIN
BALLROOM
311 W. 34th St, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.279.7740
- Little Feat / Leon Russell: Nov. 9,
8 p.m.
- Do the Math: Nov. 16, 7 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT IRVING
PLAZA
17 Irving Place, New York, N.Y.
Phone: 212.777.6800
- Walk Off The Earth: Oct. 31, 7 p.m.
- Woodkid: Nov. 1, 7 p.m.
- Grits and Biscuits: Nov. 3, 10 p.m.
- Motion City Soundtrack / Juke-
box The Ghost / Now, Now: Nov. 6, 7
p.m.
- Chris Robinson Brotherhood:
Nov. 9 and 10, 8 p.m.
- Pinback: Nov. 12, 8 p.m.
- Sum 41 / Iamdynamite: Nov. 14, 8
p.m.
- Kreayshawn / Rye Rye: Nov. 15, 7
p.m.
- …And You Will Know Us By the
Trail of Dead / The Coathangers /
Hussle Clue: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
- All Time Low / The Summer Set /
The Downtown Fiction / Hit The
Lights: Nov. 18, 6 p.m.
- Macklemore / Ryan Lewis / Dee-1:
Nov. 20 and 21, 7 p.m.
- Dance Gavin Dance / A Lot Like
Birds / I the Mighty, more: Nov. 23, 5
p.m.
- Q-Tip: Nov. 23, 11 p.m.
- Hoodie Allen: Nov. 24, 6 p.m.
- Delta Spirit / Jeff the Brother-
hood / FIDLAR: Nov. 27, 7 p.m.
IZOD CENTER
50 State Rt. 120, East Rutherford,
N.J.
Phone: 201.935.3900
- Justin Bieber: Nov. 9, 7 p.m.
- Zac Brown Band: Nov. 18, 7 p.m.
MADISON SQUARE
GARDEN
7th Ave., New York, NY
Phone: 212.465.MSG1
- Madonna: Nov. 12-13, 8 p.m.
- Zac Brown Band: Nov. 17, 7:30
p.m.
- Aerosmith / Cheap Trick: Nov. 20,
7:30 p.m.
- Neil Young / Crazy Horse: Nov.
27, 7:30 p.m.
RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL
1260 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY
Phone: 212.307.717
- Nas / Elle Varner: Dec. 31, 9 p.m.
- Ed Sheeran: Jan. 30, 7 p.m.
ROSELAND BALLROOM
239 52nd Street, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.777.6800
- Sonar / Die Antwoord / Azari and
Ill, more: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
- Dethklok / All That Remains /
Machine Head / The Black Dahlia
Murder: Nov. 3, 6 p.m.
- Sammy Adams: Nov. 9, 8 p.m.
- Phil Lesh and Friends: Nov. 11-13,
7:30 p.m.
- Lamb of God / In Flames / Sylo-
sis, more: Nov. 16, 6 p.m.
- Eric Prydz: Nov. 21 and 24, 9 p.m.
THE THEATRE AT MSG
7th Ave., New York, NY
Phone: 212.465.MSG1
- Serrat and Sabina: Nov. 18, 7 p.m.
- R. Kelly / Tamia: Nov. 21 and 23,
TIMES VARY
BORGATA HOTEL AND
CASINO
Atlantic City, NJ
Phone:1.866.MYBORGATA.com
- Jim Breuer: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
- Jay Mohr: Nov. 3, 8 p.m.
- Morgan Page: Nov. 5, 10 p.m.
- Wanda Sykes: Nov. 16-17, 9 p.m.
W
- compiled by Rich Howells,
Weekender Editor.
Send your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
AP PHOTO
‘The Road’ leads to Mt. Airy
Aaron Lewis, the singer known for his time as front man of the band Staind, brings his solo act to the Mt.
Airy Casino Resort (44 Woodland Rd., Mount Pocono) for two shows this week. Lewis performs Nov. 2 at
9 p.m. and Nov. 3 at 8 p.m. His new album, ‘The Road,’ is out Nov. 13.
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Wednesday:
Arturo’s: Free Jukebox
Bart & Urbys: Halloween Party & Anniversary Party, Jimi Hendrix
Tribute Band w/ Dustin, Rahboo & AJ Jump
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Halloween Boo Bash, UUU
Graces Vault: Halloween Party w/ White & Grey
Hops & Barley’s: Halloween Party w/ DJ Bounce
Leisure Tavern: Zombie Apocalypse Party w/ DJ King B
Metro: Scaryoke w/ Joe Miraglia
Overpour: Halloween Bash w/ Dodge City Duo @9
River Street Jazz Caféé: Jazz Halloween Party, Suze
Rox 52: Halloween Party
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Stan’s Caféé: Register to win WBS Penguins Tickets
Tommyboy’s: Beer Pong
Woodlands: Evolution: Bosco & The Storm-Streamside, Woodlands
Annual Halloween Bash w/ DJ Kev w/host Fishboy of 98.5 KRZ.
Vesuvio’s: DJ Mo
V-Spot: Halloween Bash w/ Johnny V Wedding Band & Nervous Wreck
Thursday:
Arturo’s: Mark Maros
Bart & Urby’s: Twisted Team Trivia
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Karaoke Contest
Carey’s Pub: Gone Crazy Duo
Chacko’s: Kartune
Huns Caféé West: What’s Going On Duo
Metro: Free Jukebox & Pool Table
River Grille: DJ Tonez
River Street Jazz Caféé: Tony Carfora, Bob O’Connell, Pat Marchinko @
7
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Rox 52: Beer Pong
Tommyboys: NFL ticket
Woodlands: Club HD inside Evolution w/ DJ Data & Streamside-DJ Kev
hosted by 97BHT
V-Spot: Teddy Young Duo
Friday:
Bart & Urby’s: Third Degree Trio
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Lucky You
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Big Daddy Dex
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Country Night w/ DJ Crocket
Charlie B’s: Maros
Grotto, Harveys Lake: Mr. Rodgers’Neighborhood
Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall: The Sperazzo Duo
Metro: Big Daddy Dex 6-9 on heated patio, Ostrich Hat 9-1 inside
OverPour: DJ Short N Poor @ 9:30
River Grille: DJ Ooh Wee
River Street Jazz Caféé: Mullen a salute to U2
Rob’s Pub & Grub: DJ Dance Party
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Senunas’: Dustin Drevitch Duo
Stan’s Caféé: Karl Metzgar
Tommyboy’s Bar & Grill: Doug & Sean Duo
Wellingtons: Clark Summit – Mr. Echo 9:30-1:30
Woodlands: Inkin The Valley & Evolution Neon Glow Party w/ Host
97BHT & DJ Godfather in the Exec Lounge
V-Spot: The Fallen
Saturday:
Bart & Urby’s: That 90’s Band
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Total White Out
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Gone Crazy & Stand Bac a Stevie Nicks
Tribute
Brews Brothers, Pittston: DJ Mike Riley
Charlie B’s: DJ Tony K & Karaoke @9
Chacko’s: Mr. Echo 9:30-1
Grace’s Vault: Speaker Jam Karaoke
Metro: Classic Rock Express
River Grille: DJ Tonez
River Street Jazz Caféé: Alexis P. Suter Band w/ open act Mic
Dougherty
Rob’s Pub & Grub: DJ Dance Party
Rox 52: Free Juke Box
Senunas’: DJ Hersh
Stan’s Caféé: Killer Bee’s
Tommyboy’s: Larry George Trio
Woodlands: Inkin The Valley & Evolution Nightclub - Resident DJ
playing Top 40 & Club Music w/ Host “Fishboy” of 98.5 KRZ & DJ
Godfather Streamside & Exec Lounge.
V-Spot: Headlock
Sunday:
Banko’s: Mr. Echo 6-9
Brews Brothers Luzerne & Pittston: NFL Ticket
Carey’s Pub: NFL Ticket, Karaoke w/ DJ Santiago
Charlie B’s: NFL Ticket
King’s, Mountain Top: NFL Ticket
Metro: Jazz Brunch w/ Angelo Miraglia 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., Dog House
Charlie Trio 8-11
Over Pour: NFL Ticket
River Grille: NFL Ticket
Rox 52: NFL Ticket
Stan’s Caféé: NFL Ticket
Tommyboy’s: NFL Ticket
Woodlands: Inkin The Valley & Crescenzo’s NFL GameDay, 30
something again in Evolution w/ DJ Godfather & 40 Something w/ DJ
Godfather
Vesuvios: NFL Ticket
V-Spot: Gong Show Karaoke & NFL Ticket
Monday:
Charlie B’s: NFL Ticket
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Tommyboy’s: NFL Ticket
Woodlands: Crescenzo’s NFL Monday
Tuesday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic Night w/ Paul Martin
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Open Mic Night
V-Spot: Open Mic w/ Jay Luke W
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There are certain traits about
any Taylor Swift song – new or
old – that are pretty much given.
The tunes are always going to be
emotional, confessional, and
bluntly honest.
But with “Red,” Swift’s fourth
go at a studio album, she jumps
outside of the country box and
experiments a bit.
Swift has taken a giant leap
away from her traditional country
style. There are a few cliché-
twangy country ballads that you
would expect, but she strongly
travels down the pop road. The
first organic instrument doesn’t
appear until the third track).
Opening the record with indie
rock vibes, “State of Grace”
sounds like it could be played
between sets at a Coldplay con-
cert. From that, she leads into a
love-story, sure-country hit, the
title track. Even with some Lady
Gaga- and Katy Perry-inspired
effects, it might be one of her
best.
Swift embraces heavier pro-
duction, including auto-tune, on
tracks “I Knew You Were Trou-
ble” and “22.” The middle of the
album is where the record gets
bland. The lyrics are weak, mun-
dane, and sound like any past
Swift record. She fails to give
listeners something fresh and
stays quite predictable.
“Stay Stay Stay” is one to
expect big things from. It con-
tains the same “pop-country”
traits that first single “We Are
Never Ever Getting Back Togeth-
er” has, but may be even more
contagious. “Sad Beautiful Trag-
ic” is a complete 180 degree turn
and may be the most heart-
wrenching song Swift has ever
composed.
Diehard fans will fall in love
with “Red,” but the average lis-
tener may be disappointed. Out
of the 16 tracks, the shortest is
3:17 with some pushing five
minutes – which causes it to drag
on at times.
Overall, it’s the same story
with Taylor. Expect four to six
monster hits, huge stadium tours
themed to the record, and then
another batch of tunes on a new
record in about two years.
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- Matt Morgis,
Weekender Correspondent
RATING:
W W W
Taylor Swift
‘Red’
ALBUM REVIEWS
Taylor Swift shifts
sound to mixed results
charts
8. Enrique Iglesias/Sammy
Adams: ‘Finally Found You’
7. Alex Clare: ‘Too Close’
6. Chris Brown: ‘Don’t Wake Me
Up’
5. fun.: ‘Some Nights’
4. Maroon 5: ‘One More Night’
3. Justin Bieber/Big Sean: ‘As
Long As You Love Me’
2. Owl City/Carly Rae Jepsen:
‘Good Time’
1. P!nk: ‘Blow Me (One Last Kiss)’
Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa
1. Psy: ‘Gangnam Style’
2. Taylor Swift: ‘State of Grace’
3. Ke$ha: ‘Die Young’
4. Taylor Swift: ‘I Knew You Were
Trouble.’
5. Maroon 5: ‘One More Night’
6. fun.: ‘Some Nights’
7. Rihanna: ‘Diamonds’
8. Taylor Swift: ‘We Are Never
Ever Getting Back Together’
9. Bruno Mars: ‘Locked Out of
Heaven’
10. T.I. feat. Lil Wayne: ‘Ball’
Billboard Top 10 digital songs
Arguably, noone canchannel somuch
anger, despair, andmental meltdownintothe
release that accompanies hardrock/metal
savageryquite as goodas CoreyTaylor.
Fans alreadyknowTaylor’s motive
throughthe darklybrutal Slipknot. His other
band, Stone Sour, has just equaled, if not
bestedthe mothershipinterms of unhinging
the inner demons andcopingwiththe beasts.
It’s not pretty, but it’s merciless inits ca-
tharsis.
Taylor’s crafteda veritable headbanger’s
delight onthis, the first installment of what
he calls essentiallya “moralityplay” (part
twois due in2013) –it’s easilythe most
‘metal’ albumof Stone Sour’s catalog. From
the segueinghammer strike of opening
tracks “Gone Sovereign” and“Absolute
Zero,” guitarists JimRoot (alsopulling
double dutyfromSlipknot) andJoshRand
cover “Painkiller”-era Judas Priest’s dual-
guitar ferocitybywayof Sevendust’s melo-
dic thrust –Taylor fumingvocallyamidhis
self-questioningwith“I’mnot the devil, but I
won’t be your hero.”
The more mid-tempo, radio-friendlyfare
is noless intense. “Tired,” amidsome of
Taylor’s most layered, orchestratedvocals
andinstrumentation, sees himbeggingtobe
spiritually“somewhere I knowI’ll never live
inchains.”
“Taciturn” is equallyemotional, recalling
Stone Sour’s 2002hit “Bother.” Through
acoustic passages Taylor’s voice, here im-
pressingwitha clean, lower-register vibrato,
seems indesperate needof unburdening–
“maybe tonight, I’ll tell youeverything.”
Taylor’s headspace mayhave beenbleak
andunnervingfor the experiences that in-
spiredthis music, but the product of his
disaffectionis alsoanexplosivelysatisfying
hardrockexperience.
W
- MarkUricheck,
Weekender Correspondent
Stone Sour
‘House of Gold and Bones
Part 1’
Rating: W W W W W
'House of Gold'
a dark delight
The eccentric, heavyset Brazilian
soul iconoclast born Sebastiao Ro-
drigues Maia lived only 55 years —
enough to leave behind a wealth of
timelessly fresh, vibrantly funky
music.
Coinciding with what would have
been his 70th birthday, Luaka Bop
recently released this enthralling set
of prime ‘70s Maia material, his
gruff yet elastic Portuguese and
English vocals heard on 15 original
songs proving him an estimable era
contemporary of Sly and the Family
Stone or Curtis Mayfield.
It caps the label’s decade-plus
efforts to compile a worthy show-
case for the hard-living artist, still
under-recognized outside his native
country. (Tellingly, the album is the
latest in the World Psychedelic
Classics series that the imprint
launched with its revelatory “Os
Mutantes” compilation in 1999.)
Liner notes detail Maia’s colorful
rise from Rio de Janeiro poverty to
youthful sojourn in New York to
cult membership back home in Bra-
zil.
The tunes make him unforgettable,
from thoughtful, slow-burn jams
such as the title track to the guitar-
flash-fortified “Que Beleza,” remi-
niscent of the Isley Brothers, to the
easy-swangin’ early disco-funk ver-
sion of Maia’s irresistible hometown
homage “Do Leme Ao Pontal” —
which, truly, one might want to go
on forever, but of course.
W
—David R. Stampone,
Philadelphia Inquirer / MCT
Late, under-
recognized Maia
gets his due
Tim Maia
‘Nobody Can Live Forever:
The Existential Soul
of Tim Maia’
Rating: W W W W W
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“Theydon’t knowwhere toput
us,” jokedAlexis P. Suter of her
band’s eclectic, genre-bendingroots
smorgasbord. The Brooklyn-born
Suter andher banddabble in every-
thingfromrock, blues, gospel, and
funk, all wrapped upinthe boom-
ing, soul-shudderingvocal thunder
that is Suter’s vocal delivery–a
baritone growl breathed fromthe
veryvoice of God.
Her music maydefylabeling, but
one thing’s clear –she’s goingto
make sure everylast ear that’s
willingtolistenis picking upwhat
she’s puttingdown.
“I want the world to hear us,” she
said. “This message is for the
world. Theyneedthe healing.
We’re ministers of sound, andI’m
fromthe political party of love.”
Headliningthe River Street Jazz
Café onSaturday, Nov. 3in support
of her current Hipbone Records
release, “TwoSides,” Suter brings a
showthat’s part spiritual revival,
part juke joint throwdown-
straight-from-the-heart testifying
that drips with rawemotion.
Recentlynominated for a Blues
Music Award for Best Female
Blues/Soul Artist, Suter has muses
as diverse as a devotional church
upbringing, anda mother with a
musical education fromNewYork
City’s JulliardSchool – her mother
sangwitheveryone fromMavis
Staples toDionne Warwick.
“I remember beingas young as 3,
doingchurchrecitals,” Suter re-
called. “It just grewfromthere -
I’ve beenaroundit all my life. Then
I got intothe blues, it’s like Gospel
upside down - they’re both in-
spiring. Some of it has a message of
suffering. Blues andGospel go
handinhand, andthat’s what I’m
doingnow.”
Inthe years since her 2005 debut
disc, “Suga Fix,” Suter’s managed
tocatchthe ears of some musical
heavyweights, sharing the stage
withartists like B.BKing and Etta
James. She perhaps had no bigger
fanthanthe late Levon Helmof
The Bandfame.
“Levonreallyunderstood us,”
Suter explained. “He really got our
music.”
As anearlysupporter, Helm
wouldhave Suter andher band play
at his Midnight Rambles, late-night
concerts heldat his Woodstock,
N.Y. home studio, affectionately
dubbed“The Barn.”
“We openedhis Rambles around
97-98times,” Suter recalled.
WithHelm’s blessing, Suter and
her bandbeganto hit the road hard.
“We didn’t want torely on Levon
for anything,” she said. “We wanted
to spread our wings and go as far as
we could. Levonalways wanted us
to get to the next level. He always
wanted to knowwhere we were and
howwe were doing. It’s been a
steady climb, but we keep it mov-
ing.
“Anytime people tryto knock us
down, we just send’emlove.”
Inthe end, it’s all about connect-
ing with anaudience for Suter, who
noted that she andthe band are
constantly working on newmateri-
al, tirelesslyplugging away at fes-
tivals and clubs nationwide. She
spoke of turning the next gener-
ation on to her creedof hope, love,
andrebirth through music.
“Those are the hearts you have to
grasp,” she said. “They’re the ones
that can continue the message. It’s
all about communicating through
the music.
“When youlook deep in your-
self, you find that you’re probably
sharing something that you’ve
never sharedwith anyone else,
except through song.”
W
The genre-defying Alexis P. Suter Band brings its gospel/funk/blues sound to the
River Street Jazz Cafe on Nov. 3.
(Photo by Jim Gavenus)
'Ministers of sound'
due at Jazz Cafe
By Mark Uricheck
Weekender Correspondent
Alexis P. Suter Band: Nov. 3,
doors at 7 p.m., River Street
Jazz Café (667 N. River St.,
Plains). $10.
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Melissa

s Mind
In a perfect world,
life would be
like Facebook:
everyone’s
concise and very
attractive. And you
can never EVER
smell farts.
Lissa of KRZ has a lot on
her mind, and she needs
to speak it. Check out the
Weekender every week
to read her deep thoughts
and philosophical
approach to life.
For more of Melissa’s wisdom, follow her on Facebook and read her blog.
facebook.com/melissakrahnkerocks • 985krz.com/Lissa/11276840
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For the better part of three dec-
ades, Trey Anastasio has been
known as the singer and guitarist
for perennial jamband favorites,
Phish. Though the jampowerhouse
has helped establish Anastasio’s
name in the music scene and given
himthe opportunity to play every-
where fromcolleges to festivals like
Bonnaroo, the guitarist has found
time to be involved with different
ensembles.
One of those outfits, the Trey
Anastasio Band, made its way to
the Sherman Theater in Strouds-
burg on Oct. 22 for a nearly sold-
out showon its brief East Coast tour
in support of its newalbum, “Trav-
eler.”
While Anastasio and Co. per-
formed all of “Traveler” throughout
the night, the songs were wisely
separated into different spots of the
show, which allowed for some
fan-friendly material like the funky
opening of “Cayman Review.” It’s
hard not to appreciate the tight
musicians Anastasio has on the
road with him, like keyboardist Ray
Paczkowski, who added some fine
almost clavicle-sounding fills
throughout the evening.
Following an upbeat take on
“Last Tube” and a jazzy version of
“Magilla,” cuts from“Traveler”
started making their way into the
mix beginning with the opening
track, a piano-heavy “Corona.”
“Scabbard,” a rhythmically tight
jazz fusion track fromhis new
album, led perfectly into one of the
higher points of “Traveler,” a slow
but concise “Frost.”
After a groove heavy “Drifting”
and some fine saxophone work
fromRussell Remington on “Bur-
lap Sack and Pumps,” fans were
treated to one of the better live jams
in Phish’s repertoire, a trippy “Gotta
Jibboo.” Paczkowski again added
brilliant fills on the keys, while
Anastasio rounded out the sound
with tight soloing.
“Valentine,” another cut from
“Traveler,” came off brilliantly with
some nice harmonies and brass
playing fromsingers Natalie Cress-
man and Jennifer Hartswick. “Push
on ‘Til the Day” ended the first set
with some salsa-influenced drum-
ming fromRuss Lawton.
Following a brief break, the
second set brought six cuts from
“Traveler,” including the set open-
ing “The Land of Nod.” Anastasio
delved into a stoic take on the Phish
staple “Sand” before launching into
another newcut, the haunting
“Architect.” The slower “Wherever
You Find It” served as a nice mo-
mentumchange before kicking
things up with the new, “Pigtail.”
Showing his musical diversity,
the reggae-influenced “Windora
Bug” and the exploratory “Good-
bye Head” meshed into more songs
fromhis newalbum, beginning
with the laid-back “Let Me Lie.” In
a bit of appreciation fromhis fans,
Anastasio seemed genuinely hum-
bled by the crowd singing along to
the lyrics on the trippiest cut from
“Traveler,” a cover of the Gorillaz
hit “Clint Eastwood.”
Wrapping up the second set with
the newalbums’ title track, Anasta-
sio brought out the fan favorites
during the encore. Throughout the
night, Anastasio led the band with
his famous Languedoc electric
guitar, but for the encore he brought
out his custom-made Martin acous-
tic for a rousing version of the Phish
mainstay “Heavy Things.” Switch-
ing back to the electric and telling a
story about howthe next song was
the first one he wrote with the Trey
Anastasio Band, the group ended
the night with a rousing version of
“First Tube.”
While Anastasio is primarily
known for his role in Phish, his side
projects – mainly the Trey Anasta-
sio Band – allowthe musician to
explore angles that may not be
found at Phish concerts. If Mon-
day’s near-capacity showwas any
indication, it appears as though
Anastasio will keep this band “trav-
elling” for many years to come.
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Trey Anastasio performs with his Band at the Sherman Theater on Oct. 22.
(Photo by Jason Riedmiller)
Trey travels between
new cuts, favorites
By Ryan O’Malley
Weekender Correspondent
Annual
Annual
Halloween Party
Halloween Party
w/ DJ Bounce w/ DJ Bounce
OCTOBER 31st
WEAR YOUR BEST WEAR YOUR BEST
COSTUME! ONE OF COSTUME! ONE OF
OUR BIGGEST NIGHTS OUR BIGGEST NIGHTS
OF THE YEAR!! OF THE YEAR!!
KARAOKE
WEDNESDAYS
W/ DJ BOUNCE
ARE BACK
9 P.M.-1 A.M.
THURSDAY — $1 THURSDAY — $1
COORS LIGHT COORS LIGHT
DRAFTS, 10-12 DRAFTS, 10-12
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Anthracite Newstand
1 E. MARKET ST., WILKES-BARRE (NEXT TO KIRBY)• (570) 823-7848
FRIDAY
5-7 • Beer Pong
and Free Jukebox
TAKE OUT BEER
SATURDAY
2-5 • Free Bingo
and Football Games
5-7 • Happy Hour
($1.50 drafts) and
Karaoke
BEST WINGS IN TOWN
(Homemade Sauce)
WHY PLAY
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1. Second Chance Drawings
2. Chance in Money Booth
3. 42 inch tv giveaways
See store for more!!!
$1.00 draft giveaways
EVERY DAY!
HOMEMADE FOOD
AND DESSERTS W
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movie review
From the perspective of
“Cloud Atlas,” our lives are not
defined by birth, death, and the
vast in-between. We return
throughout time as different
people, influencing events and
the fates of others in unimagina-
ble ways. Nothing is accidental.
That sounds like a good recipe
for a flop, and the limp perform-
ance of “Cloud Atlas” at the box
office superficially suggests
that’s the case. (By the same
logic, you could say that the poor
debut of “Fun Size” means peo-
ple hate Halloween.)
“Cloud Atlas” is enjoyable,
perhaps memorable, because
directors Lana and Andy Wa-
chowski (the “Matrix” trilogy)
and Tom Tykwer (“Run Lola
Run”) present its heady concepts
early, clearly, and use them to
entertain us—not as a form of
philosophical indoctrination.
Adapted from David Mitchell’s
acclaimed 2004 book, “Cloud
Atlas” employs a high-profile,
heavily made-up cast—including
Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, and
Hugh Grant—playing different
roles over six plotlines in six
different eras.
Here’s the distilled version:
More than 100 years from now, a
robotic “fabricant” and fast food
worker in Neo Seoul (Doona
Bae) discovers she is a tool of
revolution. In 1970s San Francis-
co, an intrepid reporter (Berry)
discovers a nuclear cover-up,
thanks to an elderly source
(James D’Arcy) with a deep
connection to Robert Frobisher
(Ben Whishaw), the composer of
a beautiful, obscure classical
piece from the 1930s. After work,
Frobisher reads the 19th century
travel journal of a wealthy young
man (Jim Sturgess), who was
helped by a stowaway slave (Da-
vid Gyasi).
Each plotline employs a differ-
ent style. Frobisher’s battle with
his impatient, heartless mentor
(Jim Broadbent) is a romantic
drama; the wonderful Broadbent
also stars in the loopy, modern-
day comedy segment that takes
place in an insane asylum. An-
other, starring Hanks and Berry,
occurs in an apocalyptic far-away
future featuring horse-riding
psychopaths and everyone talk-
ing like Adam Sandler’s charac-
ter in “The Waterboy.”
Under the steady hand of
Tykwer and the Wachowski sib-
lings (the trio also wrote the
screenplay), the movie jumps
from one era to another but noth-
ing feels jagged or disconnected.
It’s visually sumptuous and fea-
tures impeccable editing. Images
and dialogue effortlessly steer
one scene into the next; the mo-
mentum never falters. The direc-
tors assemble this massive puzzle
piece by piece, keeping the mess-
age steady even when the tone
shifts.
That’s why the movie rarely
drags despite its nearly three-
hour running time. “Cloud Atlas”
isn’t about ideas, but watching
the beliefs we’ve pondered dur-
ing idle moments— Is everything
connected? Do we live forev-
er?—unfold in every possible,
delicious genre: the detective
story, the caper comedy, the
heart-breaking romance.
“Cloud Atlas” is unapologet-
ically, unabashedly epic. But,
really, how else do you expect to
tell the story of our lives? The
good news is we may get more
than one chance to make things
right. When other movies stiff-
arm us with their intellectual
precociousness, mistaking in-
scrutability for depth, Tykwer
and the Wachowskis want us to
understand that we can be better
than our current selves.
Forget about the stars, the time
jumping, and how “everything is
connected.” The compassion and
humanity in “Cloud Atlas” mat-
ter the most.
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- For more of Pete’s cinematic
musings, please visit
whatpeteswatching.blogspot.com or
follow him on Twitter,
@PeteCroatto.
Tom Hanks and Halle Berry portray a variety of character is the new ’Cloud Atlas.’
By Pete Croatto
Weekender Correspondent
Sharp edits keep
epic 'Atlas' moving
The movie jumps from one era to another but noth-
ing feels jagged or disconnected. It’s visually sump-
tuous and features impeccable editing.
Rating: W W W
reel attractions
Don’t judge a Bond by his movie title. Tarantino takes on kung-fu. Count us in.
OPENING THIS WEEK:
‘Flight’
‘The Man With The Iron Fists’
‘Wreck-It Ralph’
COMING NEXT WEEK:
‘Skyfall’
‘A Royal Affair’
‘Citadel’
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BAZAARS/FESTIVALS
• Holiday Craft and Gift
Fair: Nov. 9, 6-9 p.m., Irem Club-
house (64 Ridgway Dr., Dallas).
Vendors needed, $15 each. In-
fo:570.675.1134 ext. 100.
BENEFITS/CHARITY
EVENTS
American Red Cross
• Seeking crafters for Annual
Holiday Craft Show (held Nov. 24-25,
Kingston Armory). Proceeds benefit
programs/services of local Red
Cross. To be considered, complete
application by calling 570.823.7161.
Items must be at least 75 percent
handmade; no resale items. Rent
booth for $85 plus $30 event li-
cense fee. booths, booths with
electricity and corner booths.
Chacko’s Family Bowling
Center (195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.BOWL,
www.chackosfamilybowlingcen-
ter.com)
• “Deliver the Cure for MDA”: Nov.
4, 3-5 p.m. $25; $15, children 10 and
under. Includes two hours of bowl-
ing, shoe rental, pizza, soda, prizes.
Cash prizes awarded for top 3
teams $300 for first place, $200 for
second place, $100 for third place.
Proceeds benefit Muscular Dys-
trophy Association. Register at
570.239.4804.
• “Striking out SIDS” in memory of
Luke Thomas: Nov. 10, 6-8 p.m. $20;
$10 children under 12; $80, team of
five. Event includes two hours
unlimited bowling, shoe rental,
pizza, soda, and prizes. Proceeds
benefit the CJ Foundation. Register
at 570.417.0826.
• “Strike Out Epilepsy”: Nov. 11, 3-5
p.m. $15. Includes two hours of
bowling, shoe rental, pizza, soda
and prizes. Proceeds benefit the
Epilepsy Foundation of Eastern
Pennsylvania. Register at
570.256.7823.
• “Strike Out Heart Disease”: Nov.
11, 6-8 p.m. $20 per person in teams
of five or six. Includes two hours of
bowling, shoe rental, pizza, soda,
t-shirt and basket raffles. Proceeds
benefit the American Heart Associ-
ation. Register at 570.825.2717.
• “Bowling 4 Bullies” with Sweet
Bark Pit Rescue: Nov. 18, 1-3 p.m. $15,
general; $10, children 10 and under.
Info:sweetbackpbr@gmail.com
Relay for Life of Wyoming
Valley Kick-Off Breakfast
• Nov. 10, 9 a.m., Saxton Pavilion,
Kingston. Info: relayforlife.org/
pawyomingvalley.
Safe Haven Dog Rescue
(www.SafeHavenPa.org, Safe-
Haven@epix.net)
• Volunteer meeting: Nov. 20, 6:30
p.m., Cherry’s Restaurant (Rt. 209,
Kresgeville).
• Pet pictures with Santa Claws:
Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Berger’s Agway
(Rt. 209, Brodheadsville). $8.
CAR & BIKE EVENTS
Gunners PA Law Enforce-
ment MC (gunnerspa-
lemc@gmail.com, $20/rider, $10/
passenger unless noted otherwise)
• Phantom Rider Program: If unable
to make it to ride, donate $10 pas-
senger fee and new stuffed animal,
which will go to children in need,
any left end of season go to Toys
For Tots. Send to Gunners 11 Hem-
lock Dr., Tunkhannock, PA 18657.
Hi Lites Motor Club (www.hili-
tesmotorclub.com, Jack
570.477.2477, John 574.7470).
Events feature door prizes, food,
music, 50/50 drawing, more. No
alcohol permitted.
Uncle Buck’s BBQ Pit Bike
Night Wed., 6-9 p.m., 361 W. Main
St., Plymouth. Food, drink specials.
CHURCHES
Church of Christ Uniting
(Market Street and Sprague Avenue,
Kingston, 570.288.8434)
• Veterans service: Nov. 11, 10 a.m.
Conyngham United Metho-
dist Church (411 Main Street,
Conyngham, 570.788.3960, conyng-
hamumc.com)
• Sisters: Tues., 10 a.m., began Sept.
25. Andy Stanley six-week study,
“Twisting the Truth.” All women
welcome.
First Presbyterian Church
of Clarks Summit (300 School
St., Clarks Summit, 570.586.6306,
www.fpccs.org)
• Centennial Concert: Nov. 18
• Tim Coombs’ Interpretation of
Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol:” Nov.
30
Holiday Craft and Gift Fair:
Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., St. Joseph’s
Oblates (Rt. 315, Pittston). Free.
Sponsored by St. John’s P.M.
Church, Avoca. Info: 570.655.8860
Holiday Craft and Gift Fair:
Nov. 17-18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., St. Maria
Goretti Parish Hall (42 Redwood Dr.,
Laflin). Info: 570.655.8956.
agenda
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 34
puzzles
ACROSS
1 “Monty Python” opener
4 Met melody
8 Raggedy Ann, e.g.
12 Calendar abbr.
13 Gangster’s companion
14 Pennsylvania port
15 Pennsylvania Dutch
pork concoction
17 Appellation
18 With skill
19 Monarch
20 Comfortably inviting
22 Pebbles’ papa
24 French cleric
25 Sit-ins and such
29 Part of AT&T
30 Water nymph
31 Greek X
32 Glittery cosmetic
34 Actor Pitt
35 Census stats
36 Cheer up
37 Inundated
40 Amorphous mass
41 Mail
42 Earn an F in
penmanship
46 Satan’s specialty
47 Owl’s call
48 Shelter
49 Challenge
50 Oxen’s burden
51 Corn spike
DOWN
1 Picks out of a lineup
2 Sleuth
3 Mix up
4 Without stinting
5 Thickly fibrous
6 Under the weather
7 Hearty brew
8 Strip
9 Exam format
10 Rickey flavoring
11 Ogler’s look
16 Busy as -
19 Emeritus (Abbr.)
20 Loathe
21 Do as you’re told
22 McDonald’s offering
23 Bellow
25 Sheet of glass
26 Where “TWELVE” is
worth 12
27 Just one of those things
28 22-Down, e.g.
30 Approaching
33 In conclusion
34 Sci-fi villain
36 Upper-class group
37 Mimicked
38 Made on a loom
39 “Yeah, right!”
40 Understand, slangily
42 Bashful
43 Dove’s call
44 Meadow
45 Always, in verse
last week W
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ralphie report
the
ENTERTAINMENT REPORT
Ralphie Aversa | Special to the Weekender
Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your pictures for our Starstruck.
It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when
and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail
high resolution JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com, or send your
photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18703.
starstruck
Daniele Lavele, right, with Chad Szeliga of
Breaking Benjamin at Liam’s Place in Aug. 2009.
Justin Bieber’s mentor, super-
star singer Usher, thought some
good came from the teenage
heartthrob’s recent on-stage mis-
haps.
“We all have those things that
happen, whether it’s falling on
stage or having those moments,”
said the artist, born Usher Ray-
mond, in a phone interview on
“The Ralphie Show.” “But you
know what’s cool? That makes
you human.”
Usher said there were times
during his career where he ate
something bad before taking the
stage. Of course, the big differ-
ence now is that there are 20,000
people in the crowd who are all
armed with Internet-ready cam-
eras.
“That’s the craziest thing,
ever,” he noted. “It’s weird, really.
It’s like, ‘Did you come to the
show to film it?’”
The performer is no stranger to
cameras either – and he’ll be
willingly in front of them next
season as a coach on NBC’s
“The Voice.” Despite reports to
the contrary, Usher says his in-
volvement thus far has been, “a
really great fit.”
“We’ve actually been able to
meet, greet, have a good time out
in Los Angeles and the show’s
gonna be incredible man,” he
said of his vibe with fellow
coaches Adam Levine and
Blake Shelton. “It’s a respectful
place, a respectful vibe. I came in
and had a good time. It’s been
pleasant man.”
Usher is especially looking
forward to coaching, mentoring,
and showing America a different
side to his personality.
“I think what they’ve done
with the talent that they’ve
coached… they go through the
process of finding people who
are at least at a place where they
can either take constructive crit-
icism or they be a part of the
show and we really help make
them the artist that they can be.”
Meanwhile for the Atlanta-
based singer, he is continuing to
diversify and build off a record-
ing career that has spanned over
20 years and 65 million records
sold worldwide. But while he is
getting in to television and
wouldn’t rule out a possible
return to Broadway or off-Broad-
way, Usher is also trying to enjoy
himself a little. He recently cele-
brated his 34th birthday in Lon-
don.
“I had to get out a little bit, and
had some friends and family at a
club or something like that, and
then on to the after spot,” he
recalled. “We just had a good
time.”
Usher would eventually elab-
orate a little more – noting that
after a big birthday dinner, he
linked up with Tom Cruise and a
few other people for the night
cap. But to put it in his context –
the “major joint” would be the
celebration for birthday number
35.
W
- Listen to “The Ralphie
Radio Show” weeknights from 7
p.m.-midnight on 97 BHT.
Usher celebrates his birthday in London.
(via Instagram)
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ALAN’S
20TH
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COVERING
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After years of introspection,
Salman Rushdie has finally pub-
lished “Joseph Anton” — a
memoir that discloses his exten-
sive account of life spent off the
grid following controversy.
By 1981, Rushdie had already
become a popular name in the
literary world having acquired
great success for his novel, “Mid-
night’s Children.” But, as of
1988, Rushdie’s novel, “The
Satanic Verses,” would transform
his career overnight, changing
the fate of his mortality for years
to follow.
After publishing “The Satanic
Verses,” Rushdie became uni-
versally recognized for all the
wrong reasons. On Valentine’s
Day, Feb. 14, 1989, former su-
preme leader of Iran, Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini, found the
work to be nothing short of here-
sy against Islam. Khomeini then
issued a fatwâ, calling for Rush-
die’s death. In only a matter of
hours, Rushdie was forced to
leave his home in exchange for
safety.
Animosity, which was previ-
ously looming over Rushdie in
the wake of a dwindling mar-
riage, had now become ever-
present with the onslaught of
Khomeini’s threat. Rushdie’s only
choice was to flee.
“He unlocked the front door,
went outside, got into the car and
was driven away, and although he
did not know it then, so that the
moment of leaving his home did
not feel unusually freighted with
meaning, he would not go back
to that house, his home for five
years, until three years later, by
which time it was no longer his.”
Written in third-person, this
memoir is a deep reflection of
Rushdie’s time spent amid Kho-
meini’s fatwâ. The title of the
memoir, formed from Rushdie’s
two favorite authors, Joseph
Conrad and Anton Chekhov,
depicts those nine years spent
under the constant threat of
death, and above all, a life with-
out freedom of speech.
While Rushdie survives those
dreaded years, he feels responsib-
le and apologetic to those who
were also placed in harms way
standing by his words. After all,
Khomeini’s fatwâ extended to
“all those involved in its publi-
cation who are aware of its con-
tent.” The event, which would
remain foreboding for nearly a
decade, became lethal in 1991,
when translator Hitoshi Igarashi,
was murdered only months fol-
lowing Khomeini’s command.
In 1998, the war of words
finally came to an end following
a decree from the Iranian govern-
ment. In that same year, Rushdie
would come out of hiding and
resume his life physically un-
scathed, but emotionally
changed.
At 633 pages, “Joseph Anton”
delves into Rushdie’s experience
while living under the constant
threat of death, richly coloring
the memoir with discourse of his
varied works, accomplishments,
and even failures. Throughout
the work, readers follow Rushdie
as he attempts to remain alive,
suffering through the deteriora-
tion of multiple relationships and
loss only to eventually find a
passage to hope.
W
War of words
By Kacy Muir
Weekender Correspondent
‘Joseph Anton’
By Salman Rushdie
Rating: W W W W
Actors Circle at Providence
Playhouse (1256 Providence Rd,
Scranton, reservations: 570.342.9707,
actorscircle.org)
• “Any Wednesday”: Nov. 8-11, 16-18,
Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m. $12,
general; $10, senior citizens; $8 students.
Nov. 8 preview, $8 general and senior
citizens; $6, students.
Applause Theatre Co. (64
Church St., Pittston, applausetheatre-
.webs.com, 570.430.1149, applauseth-
eatre@gmail.com)
• “The Wizard of Oz:” Nov. 16-18, 23-25.
$15.
• Raymond the Amish Comic: Dec. 1, 8
p.m. $15.
• “Winter Wonderettes:” Dec. 14-16. $15.
F.M. Kirby Center (71 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre, 570.826.1100)
• Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian
“Nutcracker:” Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., $37.25-
$79.75
• “A Chorus Line:” Jan. 11, 8 p.m.,
$39.80-$71.55
• “Rock of Ages:” Feb. 15, 8 p.m.,
$44.95-$74.10
• “Pirates of Penzance:” March 22, 8
p.m., $38.80-$69
The Gaslight Theatre Compa-
ny (570.824.8266 or visit gaslight-
theatre.org, gaslighttheatre@gmail.com)
• “[Title of Show]:” Jan. 4-5, 7:30 p.m.,
Jan. 6, 2 p.m., Mellow Theater (501 Vine
St. Scranton). Contains adult language/
situations. Not suited for children. $10.
Jason Miller Playwrights’
Project (570.344.3656, SubVerseAphro-
desia.com, nepaplaywrights@live.com)
• “The Resurrection of Campbell
Colgate” by Sarah Regan: Nov. Multime-
dia staging of new play in process.
Lackawanna College (Mellow
Theater, 501 Vine St., Scranton)
• “The Marvelous Wonderettes:” Feb.
8, 8 p.m. $25-$30, $15 student.
Misericordia University Play-
ers (Lemmond Theater at Walsh Hall,
570.674.6400, misercordia.edu/theart-
sandmore)
“A Murder is Announced”: Nov. 15-17, 8
p.m. $5, adults; $3, senior citizens and
students.
Moose Exchange (203 West Main
St., Bloomsburg, 570.317.2596)
“Greased!”: Nov. 3, doors 6:30 p.m.,
show 7:30 p.m. Murder-mystery, dessert
fundraising event. $25
Music Box Players (196 Hughes
St., Swoyersville: 570.283.2195 or
800.698.PLAY or musicbox.org)
• Auditions for ‘It’s a Wonderful Life:
The Musical,’ all roles open. Call
570.283.2195 for dates and times.
• “It’s a Wonderful Life the Musical:”
Nov. 24-Dec. 16, Thursdays-Sundays.
Pennsylvania Theatre of
Performing Arts (JJ Ferrara Center,
212 W. Broad St., Hazleton, 570.454.5451,
ptpashows.org)
• “Cabaret:” Begins Oct. 19.
• “Nuncrackers:” Begins Nov. 30.
The Phoenix Performing Arts
Centre (409-411 Main St., Duryea,
570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb.com,
phoenixpac08@aol.com)
• “The Messenger”: A Jonah Produc-
tions presentation, Nov. 9-10 and 16-17, 8
p.m., and Nov. 11 and 19, 2 p.m., Phoenix
Performing Arts Centre (409 Main St.,
Duryea). Info: 570.457.3589.
Scranton Cultural Center (420
N. Washington Ave., Scranton,
570.346.7369)
❏ Broadway Scranton (broadway-
scranton.com) presents:
• “West Side Story:” Nov. 2-4, Fri., 8
p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• “The Midtown Men:” Jan. 18-20, Fri., 8
p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• “The Addams Family:” Feb. 15-17, Fri.,
8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• “Stomp:” March 5-6, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat.,
2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• Cathy Rigby is “Peter Pan:” April 5-7,
Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6
p.m.
• “Hair:” April 15-16, 7:30 p.m.
• “Dreamgirls:” May 10-12, Fri., 8 p.m.,
Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
Shawnee Playhouse
(570.421.5093, theshawneeplay-
house.com)
• “Laugh Lines: Poking Fun in the
Poconos” with Kaleidoscope Players:
through Nov. 3, Fri., 8 p.m., Thurs. and
Sat., 2 p.m. $18, adults; $15, senior citi-
zens; $10, students.
• “Much Ado About Nothing” by
Shakespeare Company of the Poconos:
through Nov. 3, Fri. and Sun., 2 p.m., Sat.,
8 p.m. $18, adults; $15, senior citizens; $10,
students.
• “Magic and Mystery” with Mark
Mysterrio: Nov. 2-17, Fri. and Sat., 10 a.m.
$10.
• “Ripe”: Nov. 2, 7 p.m. $18, adults; $15,
senior citizens; $10, children. Info. johnji-
ler.com
The Vintage Theater (326
Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantons-
vintagetheater.com)
• Staged reading of Ted LoRusso’s “A
Lie Is A Venial Sin:” Nov. 11
• Comedy Mini-Fest: Nov. 17-18, featur-
ing stand-up comics, sketch actors and
improv troupes from Scranton, Allen-
town, Philadelphia and New York.
W
- compiled by Rich Howells,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
Of all the days
Actors Circle continues its 31st season with the 1964 Tony Award
winning farcical comedy,‘Any Wednesday,’ by Muriel Resnik. John, a
corporate president, uses an executive suite to house his mistress.
Cass, a young businessman is misdirected to the suite. John’s wife
also arrives and mistakes Cass and the mistress as a nice married cou-
ple before John arrives. Performances are Nov. 8-11 and 16-17 at the
Providence Playhouse (1256 Providence Rd., Scranton) For reserva-
tions, call 570.342.9707.
Cast members in ‘Any Wednesday’ are, from left, Patricia Purcell,
John Jacobs, Ashley A. Michaels,and John Arena.
novel approach
theater listings
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As soon as Greg Cipes picks
up the phone for an interview
with The Weekender, it’s clear
why Nickelodeon cast him as the
voice of Michelangelo in its new
“Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”
cartoon.
He sounds exactly like his
animated counterpart without
even trying.
The young actor, musician, and
professional surfer fell into voice
acting with the encouragement of
his agent, scoring the role of
Beast Boy in the “Teen Titans”
animated series.
“She’s like, ‘You should do
animation.’ Of course I’m down!
Are you kidding me? I always do
voices. I’m a big prank caller kid.
Jerky Boys was actually one of
my favorite things to listen to
growing up,” Cipes recalled.
“The Jerky Boys inspired me, for
sure, to mess around with voic-
es.”
The inspiration for many other
aspects of his life, however, came
from Michelangelo, the fun-
loving radical dude he watched in
the 1987 “Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles” cartoon that launched
the worldwide popularity of the
heroes in a half shell, so when he
was cast in the 2012 relaunch of
the series, it easily became his
favorite role.
“It’s the coolest part I ever
could have got because Mikey
had such an influence on my life.
I grew up watching the ‘Teenage
Mutant Ninja Turtles.’ They
taught me how to meditate, got
me into martial arts, inspired me
to be a skateboarder and a pro
surfer. Actually, a couple years
later after the Turtles got me into
martial arts I became East Coast
champion martial artist. I got to
be a red and black belt, and to
this day I’m still practicing mar-
tial arts. I’m a ninja because of
the Ninja Turtles,” he enthused.
“I never could have imagined
that I would be playing him, so
it’s such a blessing to be able to
offer this to this next generation
and for those of us that grew up
with it.”
All of the character’s classic
traits remain intact, he noted,
allowing him to easily step into
the sewers.
“He’s the class clown, the
goofy one, the one who was
always having the best time, and
I naturally gravitate towards just
having a great time and being
happy and carefree and all of
those qualities Mikey had…I also
liked his weapons the best. I
thought nunchucks were the
coolest weapons, and orange! I
have to say orange is probably
my favorite color,” he explained.
The Turtles have been rebooted
and re-imagined many times over
the years in comic books, mo-
vies, and television shows, but
Cipes believes the cast and crew
of this version have nailed one of
the best adaptations yet.
“It’s the artists involved. It’s
the executives. Everybody has
really put their heart ands soul
into this, and it’s coming through
and you’re feeling it. It’s a very
healing show to watch. It’s so
fun. I have grown-ups, I have
30-40-year-old people coming up
to me saying, ‘Dude, it’s the best
show on TV,’ not even just for
their kids,” he pointed out.
The show also boasts an all-
star cast of Sean Astin of “Lord
of the Rings” as Raphael, “Amer-
ican Pie” actor Jason Biggs as
Leonardo, and Rob Paulsen as
Donatello, the actor who voiced
Raphael in the original series.
Some changes were made in
the new series, such as Mikey’s
nunchaku converting into kusari-
gama when necessary, but the
most obvious update may be his
signature battle cry from “Cow-
abunga!” with “Booyakasha!”
though Cipes insists it was han-
dled with the utmost respect.
“They asked me if I had a
catchphrase idea during a record-
ing session, and they said give it
a shot. From the depths of who I
am came ‘Booyakasha!’ and I
felt like the whole world shook at
that moment. I remember look-
ing out of the recording booth
into all the executives and every-
one was laughing and smiling
and cracking up and I just knew
that ‘booyakasha’ was going to
be the new ‘cowabunga,’” he
said.
“It means ‘All glories to the
most high,’ or ‘Praise be.’ Basi-
cally, it means ‘love.’ It’s another
way to say love, and love is the
fiercest and sweetest thing there
is. And that’s what the Turtles
are. ...You can’t beat love, and
that’s why the Turtles will never
be beat.”
Cipes “felt like a Beatle” when
he was mobbed by eager fans at
New York Comic Con a few
weeks ago, but it was his turn to
be the fan when he met the origi-
nal “Turtles” comic book co-
creator Kevin Eastman, who just
so happened to be doing a “Tur-
tles”-themed gallery at a comic
store next to his favorite vegan
restaurant on the day he was cast.
“It’s him. He’s sitting there
drawing and hanging out, and
I’m like, ‘Dude, I’m Mikey!’
He’s like, ‘No way!’ It was just
serendipity. The whole thing has
been serendipity really. His bless-
ing and his encouragement and
his friendship has definitely
helped everyone, and especially
me.”
W
Former fan now
TMNT's party dude
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
’Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’
airs Saturdays at 11 a.m. on
Nickelodeon.
Voice actors in ’Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ on
Nickelodeon are, from left, Greg Cipes as Michelangelo,
Jason Biggs as Leonardo, Mae Whitman as April, Sean
Astin as Raphael, and Rob Paulsen as Donatello.
(Photo: Frank Micelota/Nickelodeon)
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stage
Maybe it was too much excite-
ment for a school night, as Lewis
Black suggested.
The near capacity house at the
Scranton Cultural Center didn’t
seem to mind a bit.
Strolling on stage to “Lonely
Boy” by The Black Keys at 8:58
p.m. on Oct. 25, Black quickly
set the tone for his “Running on
Empty” tour, fresh off eight
nights on Broadway.
“We’re going to have a great
time tonight, but you can count
on this. No matter what happens,
nothing is going to change,” he
said. “You’re going to wake up
tomorrow and be swimming in
the same river of s--t.”
Largely armed with brand new
material, Black fell on some
jokes from the “In God We Rust”
tour - which also featured a stop
at the Cultural Center in Jan.
2011 - mainly to segue into ex-
panded F-word-filled, finger-
wagging material.
Take, for example, his impres-
sions of the first 12 years of the
new millennium:
“This century is s--t, folks! I
was born and raised in the 20th
century, and that was awful. But
wait, we were told! Wait for the
21st century... Look what the f--k
we got!”
Or the difference between
Democrats and Republicans:
“The Democrats are dumb.
When you ask them a question...
you never get an answer. When
you ask a Republican a question,
they answer immediately, and
you go, ‘Holy f--k! How did you
even think of that, and why did
you say it out loud?’”
And the origins of Earth Day:
“Earth Day came about when I
was in school and we were doing
a lot of drugs. We came up with
Earth Day so we had one day
every year to remind us what
f--cking planet we lived on.”
From science fiction becoming
plain fiction to the outrageous
cost of health care, and from
which states should really be
territories to adult attention def-
icit disorder, Black was on a roll
for 81 minutes. He kept many in
the audience bent over in laugh-
ter and wiping tears from their
eyes for most of the set.
A hit-and-miss followspot
plagued Black and his longtime
opener, John Bowman, creating a
bit of impromptu play with the
audience.
When the light went out on
Black less than 10 minutes into
his set, he paced away from the
microphone and looked offstage
for answers on the issue.
“I thought for a minute it was a
lunar eclipse,” he quipped. “Ev-
ery night I work with a spotlight.
Now, it’s like, f--k, I’m not here.”
“You’re in Scranton,” an audi-
ence member replied.
“Don’t think I don’t know it,”
Black snapped back.
Dressed in a black shirt with a
gray suit coat and blue jeans,
Black didn’t hesitate to give the
audience what it wanted, in-
cluding witty replies to their poor
attempts at comedy.
During a riff on television, he
rhetorically asked why so many
pay for a cable service that offers
so few valuable programs.
“HBO,” suggested one man
from the balcony.
“What a f--king steal!” Black
replied. “That’s why you had to
sit in the cheap seats.”
When another audience mem-
ber in the balcony tried to equate
the vice presidential debate to
Monty Python, Black smugly
thanked her for the “old college
try,” adding, “Just don’t jump.”
Clearly, each was outwitted
and should have known to leave
the jokes to the pros they paid to
see.
After exiting the stage to Jack-
son Browne’s “Running On Emp-
ty,” Black graciously took a seat
in the Cultural Center lobby to
sign autographs for more than an
hour.
The tour heads to the Mirage
Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas,
Nev., on Nov. 9-10.
If fans are fortunate, he’ll be
back again in another 21 months
or so with more than a full tank.
W
No emptiness in
Lewis Black's new tour
You’ll love him when he’s angry. Lewis Black delivered
non-stop laughs on Oct. 25 at the Scranton Cultural
Center on his ’Running on Empty’ tour.
(Photo by Jason Riedmiller)
R E V I E W
By Christopher J. Hughes
Weekender Staff Writer
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www.theweekender.com
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St. John’s Primitive Metho-
dist Church (316 Main St., Avoca)
• Holiday craft and gift show: Nov.
3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Oblates of St. Jo-
seph (1880 Rt. 315, Pittston), bene-
fitting St. John’s PM. Info:
570.655.8860
St. Mary’s International
Spanish Night dinner club:
Nov. 8, seatings at 5:30 and 6:30
p.m., St. Mary’s Center (320 Mifflin
Ave., Scranton). Deadline for tickets
is Nov. 5. Info: 570.343.5151.
St. Michael’s Church (corner
of Church/Winter Sts., Old Forge,
570.457.2875)
Pierogie sale: Nov. 6, 2-5 p.m. $6 per
dozen. Orders due by Oct. 31.
Halupki sale: Nov. 17, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $1.
Orders due by Nov. 11.
St. Michael’s Ukrainian Or-
thodox Church (540 N. Main
Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165)
• Pierogi Sale every Fri., 11 a.m.-5
p.m.
St. Stephens Episcopal Pro-
Cathedral (35 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.346.4600)
• Food Pantry open Mon.-Fri.,
noon-4 p.m.
• Clothing Closet: free clothing for
men, women, children. Open Tues.,
4-6:30 p.m., Wed., noon-3:30 p.m.
St. Thomas More Society (St.
Clare Church, 2301 N. Washington
Ave., Scranton, 570.343.0634, sttho-
masmoresociety.org)
• Guardian of the Redeemer Fel-
lowship: First, third Mon. of month
for men interested in adult dis-
cussion of Catholic faith.
• YOUCAT Teen Group welcomes
post-Confirmation youth from all
parishes for discussion of Theology
of the Body for Teens. Meets first,
third Thurs. of month, 5:30 p.m.
Trucksville United Metho-
dist Church (40 Knob Hill Rd.,
Trucksville, 570.696.3897, of-
fice@trucksvilleumc.com)
• All Gods Children special needs
program: every Sun. 9:45-10:45 a.m.
EVENTS
67th Annual Wyoming Val-
ley Veterans Day Parade,
Kingston Corners to Public Square,
Nov. 11, 2 p.m. Donations accepted
via SSgt. Christopher Keen at
570.288.6641.
Bartolai Winery (2377 State Rt.
92 Highway, Coolidge Ave., Exeter
Twp.)
• Rhythm & Wine: Nov. 16, 6:30-9:30
p.m. Wine tasting, food, and music
to benefit Catholic Social Services.
Appetizers and desserts by Dente
Catering, music by Paul Oschal. $50,
call 570.822.7118 ex. 357 for tickets.
Browndale Fire Co. (Route 247,
620 Marion St., Browndale,
43fire.com)
• Homemade Pierogi For Sale:
donation $6/dozen. Potato and
cheese. To order, contact any mem-
ber, call 570.499.4908, e-mail
jdoyle@nep.net, go online.
Cameo House Bus Tours
(Anne Postupack, 570.655.3420,
anne.cameo@verizon.net, checks to
933 Wyoming Ave., W. Pittston, Pa.
18643)
• The Chocolate Show and 9/11
Memorial: Nov. 10
• Philadelphia — The Barnes and
Rodin Museums, Lunch at Union
League: Nov. 17
Celebrity Guest Bartending
Night benefiting Wyoming
Valley Children’s Associ-
ation: Nov. 28, 6-9 p.m., Lucky’s
Sporthouse (Schechter Dr., Wilkes-
Barre). $25 per stool, $50 per table
for two, $100 per table of four, $200
per table of eight. Info:
570.208.3267.
Chicory House and Folklore
Society (www.folkloresociety.org,
570.333.4007)
• Dance series: Nov. 3, 7 p.m.,
Church of Christ Uniting (776 Market
St., Kingston). $9, adults; $25, fam-
ilies.
"Christmas in Montrose":
Dec. 2, 3 p.m., Montrose Area High
School. Freewill offering will benefit
local charities.
Conyngham United Metho-
dist Church (411 Main Street,
Conyngham, 570.788.3960, conyng-
hamumc.com)
• Sisters: Tues., 10 a.m., began Sept.
25. Andy Stanley six-week study,
“Twisting the Truth.” All women
welcome.
“Crossing Borders, 1962: A
Latin-American Time Trav-
el” with Symphonic Chorus
of the Choral Society of
Northeast Pennsylvania:
Nov. 4, 3 p.m., St. Luke’s Episcopal
Church (corner of Linden and
Wyoming Avenues, Scranton). $15,
adults; $12, senior citizens, adults
students, Lackawanna County Li-
brary System card holders, WVIA
members and Scranton Cultural
Center Hood Room members; free,
18 and under. Info: 570.343.6707,
choralsociety.net.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
Street, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500,
www.dietrichtheater.com)
• Airing of the Quilts: through Nov.
15. Free.
• Golden Days of Radio Players:
Tues. through Dec. 4, 7-9 p.m., ages
18 and up. Free.
• Quilting for Everyone: “Carpen-
ter’s Wheel”: Wed. through Dec. 12,
6-7:30 p.m. $6 per class.
• Quilting for Kids - “Birds in the
Air”: Wed. through Dec. 12, 3:30-5
p.m. $6 per class.
• Decorative Painting: Wed.,
through Nov. 28, ages 16 and up.
$20 per class plus cost of painting
surface.
• Yoga for You: Wed., through Nov.
14 and Nov. 28, ages 16 and up. $60
for six-class series or $15 per class.
• Kundalini Yoga: Sat., through Nov.
17 and Dec. 1, 10-11:30 a.m., ages 16
and up. $60 for six class series or
$15 per class.
• Movement and Storytelling for
Preschoolers: Wed., Oct. 24-Nov. 14,
Nov. 28, 10-10:45 a.m. Free.
• Jewelry Making: Introduction to
Silver Clay: Nov. 5, 6-9 p.m. $65, all
materials provided. Ages 16 and up.
• Painting From Life: Mon., Nov.
5-26, 7-8:30 p.m., ages 13 and up.
$60 for four-class series.
• Introduction to Sculpture: Tues.,
Nov. 6-27, 7-8:30 p.m. $60 for four
classes.
• Preschool Mask Making: Thurs.,
Nov. 8-15, Nov. 29-Dec. 6, 10-10:45
a.m. Free.
• Mask Making: Ages 5-8, Fri., Nov.
9-16, Nov. 30-Dec. 7, 4-5:30 p.m.;
Ages 9-12, Thurs., Nov. 8-15, Nov.
29-Dec. 6, 4-5:30 p.m. $40 for four
classes.
• Holiday Candy Crafts: Nov. 10,
10-11:30 a.m. Free. For families with
kids ages 6-12.
• Northeastern Pennsylvania in
America History: Nov. 14, 7 p.m. Free.
• Gingerbread House Workshop:
Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. For ages
13 and up.
• Knit a Ruffled Scarf: Nov. 20, 7-9
p.m. $30, all materials provided.
Ages 16 and up.
• Tips and Tricks for Making Jew-
elry: Nov. 26, 6-9 p.m. $60, all mate-
rials provided. Ages 16 and up.
• Dietrich Radio Players Perform-
ance: Dec. 4, 7 p.m. Free.
• “Emmet Otter’s Jug-Band Christ-
mas”: Dec. 7-8, 5:30 and 7 p.m. Free.
• Holiday Workshop: Dec. 8, 11
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free.
• “It’s a Wonderful Life”: Dec. 18, 2,
7 and 8 p.m. Free.
• Holiday Camp: Dec. 27-28, 9:30-11
a.m. $25. For ages 5-12.
Doug Smith Music (dougsmith-
bass@comcast.net, 570.343.7271)
• Erin Malloy trio: Nov. 6, noon-2
p.m., Mall at Steamtown (300 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Scranton)
• Jazz trio: Nov. 8, noon-2 p.m.,
Mall at Steamtown (300 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton)
• Ferdie Bistocchi Memorial Or-
chestra: Nov. 11, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., St.
Mary’s Center (320 Mifflin Ave.,
Scranton) $25. Info:570.348.1968
• SAGE Awards: Nov. 12, 6:30-9 p.m.,
Mellow Theater (501 Vine St., Scran-
ton). Info:scrantonchamber.com
• Brenda Fernandes: Nov. 15, noon-2
p.m., Mall at Steamtown (300 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Scranton)
• Senior lunch: Nov. 19, 12:45-1:45
p.m., Jewish Community Center (601
Jefferson Ave., Scranton). In-
fo:570.346.6595
• Friends of the Poor Thanksgiving
Dinner: Nov. 20, 5:30-7:30 p.m.,
Scranton Cultural Center (420 N.
Washington Ave., Scranton). Free.
• Dec. 1, 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Santa
Trail, train ride from Carbondale to
Steamtown National Historic Site.
Info: 570.963.6730
Eastern Pocono Animal
Alliance Spay/Neuter Clinic
in need of volunteers, one day/week
to check in clients, more; arrive by
8:15 a.m., commit to every week.
Positions to help w/ vaccination
clinics, substitute desk work. Stop in
to office in back of Rainbow Plaza,
Route 209, Brodheadsville, vis-
itepaaonline.com, call 570.994.5846.
Eckley Miners’ Village (2
Eckley Main St., Weatherly,
570.636.2070, www.eckleyminers-
villagemuseum.com)
• Fall Foliage Photo Contest:
through Nov. 30. $5 registration fee,
submissions due to museum Dec. 3.
Geisinger blood center
drive: Nov. 7 and Nov. 19, 9 a.m.-3
p.m. Geisinger-Community Medical
Center, Professional Building Audi-
torium (316 Colfax Ave., Scranton).
Info: 1.866.996.5100, geisingerblood-
center.org.
Girls Night In Slumber Par-
ty: Nov. 16, 6-11 p.m., The Hilton
Scranton and Conference Center
(100 Adams Ave., Scranton). Present-
ed by Mom Prom of NEPA. Free
when you book an overnight stay at
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 28
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 39
Insanely fit
Shaun Thompson, better known simply as Shaun T, the creator
of the popular “Insanity” workout regimen, will bring his intense
brand of physical fitness to Wilkes University for a special mas-
ter class on Saturday, Nov. 3.
In addition to having the chance to work out with the man him-
self, attendees will also participate in a special question-and-
answer session and a photo-op/autograph session. The event,
which is open to the public, will be held in the University Center
on Main Street from1-5 p.m. Ticket holders must be present by
12:30 p.m. on the day of the event for their spot to stay reserved.
Tickets for the master class are limited to 300 and are available
on a first-come first-serve basis. Tickets for the general public are
$10.
For more information, email the Health and Wellness Club atH-
AWC@wilkes.edu. W
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big red W...
weekender
LET THE SEARCH BEGIN.
CHECK OUT BIGREDW.COM
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Brews Brothers West Halloween Bash • 10.27.12.
Photos by Amanda Dittmar and Bill Rigotti • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com W
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
‘Laughter’ Movie Premiere • 10.29.12.
Photos by Jason Riedmiller
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West Scranton native Theo
Lencicki will be proving the old
saying “you can’t go home again”
wrong this weekend.
The West Scranton High
School graduate will be in town
Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2-4,
as part of the touring company of
“West Side Story,” presented by
the Broadway Theater League of
NEPA, at the Scranton Cultural
Center (420 N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton).
“It’s always exciting to come
back to Scranton. It’s great to
have the opportunity, especially
since I was there with ‘Hairspray’
and ‘Young Frankenstein’ tours.
They are always welcoming with
opening arms, and it’s great to see
the hometown crowd,” said Len-
cicki.
Lencicki said he’s also excited
to be returning to the area with a
production he’s sure many are
going to love.
Written by Arthur Laurents,
with music by Leonard Bernstein,
lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, and
concept and choreography by
Jerome Robbins, “West Side
Story” was inspired by William
Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and
Juliet.”
Set in New York City in the
mid-1950s, the musical tells the
story of two rival street gangs, the
Jets and Sharks, of different eth-
nic backgrounds, and a member
of the Jets, Tony, who falls in love
with Maria, the sister of the lead-
er of the Sharks.
“At the end of the day, (it’s)
about how love can’t survive in a
world with hate,” said Lencicki.
Lencicki plays Riff in the play,
leader of the Jets and Tony’s best
friend.
“Riff is parallel to Mercutio in
‘Romeo and Juliet,’ who is Ro-
meo’s best friend where I am
Tony’s best friend,” explained
Lencicki. “He has been orphaned
by his family. He lives with Tony,
so his family is his gang and
everyone looks to him as the
leader to make the decisions.
“It’s been a really great experi-
ence, and it’s been a role that I’ve
wanted to play for a while, so I’m
excited to have the opportunity.”
Lencicki first performed in the
play in 2010 at the Gateway Play-
house in Long Island, N.Y. as a
member of the Jets. He said he’s
happy that this time around he
would be tackling the role of Riff.
“It’s a great role that incorpo-
rates the acting as well as the
singing, because Riff does sing
two of the songs in the show… as
well as the dancing,” said Len-
cicki. “So it’s a very versatile role
that showcases a lot.”
The tour began Oct. 29 in El-
mira, N.Y. and continues until
June making stops in up to 80
cities. The cast will be perform-
ing in Erie on Thursday, before
coming to the Scranton Cultural
Center.
“I think the show will remain
fresh and exciting throughout the
tour, but it’s great that (Scran-
ton’s) one of the first stops, that
they can experience it fresh out of
the gate,” said Lencicki. “I think
they’re going to get a great show.”
In addition to giving the audi-
ence a great show, being the only
member of the cast from the area,
he’s also looking to show the cast
and crew a good time while
they’re in town.
“I’ll be showing them the Elec-
tric City,” laughed Lencicki.
“We have five shows that week-
end, so it’s pretty jam-packed, but
if I could hop in my car and show
them West Side High School and
take them over to the hot spots
over in West Side, I think it would
be a perfect opportunity, especial-
ly given the show we’re doing.”
W
Here come the Jets like a bat out of hell. ’West Side Story’ is at the Scranton Cultural
Center from Nov. 2-4.
West Sider stars in
'West Side Story'
By Don McGlynn
For The Weekender
“West Side Story”: Nov. 2-4,
Scranton Cultural Center (420
N. Washington Ave., Scranton).
$39-$59. Info: 570.346.7369,
broadwayscranton.com.
West Scranton grad Theo
Lencicki portray Riff in
’West Side Story.’
ONLY ONE LOCAL
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“THE
WALKING
DEAD”
ACTOR
IRONE SINGLETON
BEFORE HE CAME TO NEPA.
PHOTO BY JASON RIEDMILLER
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the Hilton for that evening. Info:
570.561.5714
Holiday Craft Fair: Nov. 10, 10
a.m.-3 p.m., West Side Career and
Technology Center (75 Evans St.,
Kingston). Proceeds aid community
projects and assist students in their
competitions. Info: 570.881.1882
Holiday Craft and Gift Fair:
Nov. 9, 6-9 p.m., Irem Clubhouse (64
Ridgway Dr., Dallas). Info:
570.675.1134, ext. 100.
"In dulci jubilo: In Sweet
Rejoicing": Choral Arts of Lu-
zerne County, Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m., First
Presbyterian Church (97 S. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre) and Dec. 9, 3 p.m.,
Christ Lutheran Church (467 Main
St., Conyngham). $15, adults; $10,
students and senior citizens.
“Leadership on Tap,” Susque-
hanna Brewing Co. (635 S. Main St.,
Pittston), Nov. 9, 5-8 p.m. $15 in
advance, $20 at door. Proceeds
benefit Leadership Wilkes-Barre
Scholarship and Development Fund.
Info: 570.823.2101, ext. 135.
“Learn to Homebrew Day,”
hosted by Scranton Brew-
ers Guild and Wyoming Val-
ley Home Brewers: Nov. 3, 10
a.m.-4 p.m., Waldorf Park (13 Waldorf
Ln., Scranton). Info: Find Scranton
Brewers Guild or Wyoming Valley
Homebrewers on Facebook, home-
brewersassociation.org.
Lung Cancer Alliance
Scranton Chapter fundrais-
er: Nov. 1, 6-9 p.m., Anna Maria’s
(984 E. Drinker St., Dunmore).
The Mall at Steamtown (300
Lackawanna Ave., Scranton,
570.343.3400)
• Live music and/or magic and
children’s entertainment: Every
Tues., Thurs., noon-2 p.m.; every
Sun. 12:30-2:30 p.m.
• Open Mic with Sarah Yzkanin or
Janice Gambo Chesna: Every Wed.,
6-8 p.m.
Monroe County Garden Club
• “It’s a Winter Wonderland” flower
show: Nov. 2 from 3-5 p.m.; Nov. 3,
10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Nov. 4, 1-3 p.m.;
Hughes Public Library (N. 9th Street,
Stroudsburg). Free, donations ac-
cepted.
• Monthly meeting Nov. 8, 11:30 a.m.
Hughes Public Library (1002 N. Ninth
Street, Stroudsburg). $5. Info:
570.420.0283.
Monroe County Unity Semi-
nar Nov. 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., East
Stroudsburg University Innovation
Center (314 Independence Road,
Route 447 and E. Brown St., East
Stroudsburg) Info: 570.445.4292.
National Adoption Month
event: Nov. 20, 6-8 p.m., Wyoming
Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre. Info: fam-
ilies4kids.org.
New England Contra dance:
Nov. 3, 7 p.m., Church of Christ
Uniting (776 Market St., Kingston).
$9, adults; $24, families. In-
fo:570.333.4007,folkloresociety.org/
dancing.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine Street, Scranton,
570.878.3970, newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com, newvisionsstu-
dio.com)
Northern Tier Symphony
Orchestra (570.289.1090, north-
erntiersymphony@yahoo.com,
northerntiersymphony.org)
• Concert: Nov. 4, 3 p.m., Towanda
High School. Advance: $8/adult,
$4/student. Door: $9/adult, $5/
student
• Concert: Nov. 17, 8 p.m., Tunk-
hannock Middle School. Advance:
$8/adult, $4/student. Door: $9/adult,
$5/student
The Osterhout Free Library
(71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre,
www.osterhout.info, 570.821.1959)
• International Games Day: Nov. 3,
10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info:ilovelibraries.org/
gaming
• Learn How to Knit of Crochet:
Nov. 7, 6:30-8 p.m. Free.
• Apply to College seminar: Nov. 8,
6-7:30 p.m. Free.
• Knit and Crochet Group: Sat., Nov.
10 and 24, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free.
"Oz for Paws" benefit for
Blue Chip Farms Animal
Refuge: Nov. 4, 2 p.m.-close, The
Getaway Lounge (1477 W. Main St.,
Plymouth). $3 cover, 21+.
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565, pit-
memlib@comcast.net)
• Crochet club, Tues., 10 a.m.,
Thurs., 6 p.m.
• Kids’ craft club: Third Sat., Nov.
17, 10 a.m. For grades 2-5.
• Kids Science Club, first Sat. of
each month, open to students in
grades 2-5. November meeting is
Nov. 3 at 10 a.m.
• ‘Page Turners’ kids’ book club,
first Thurs. of each month, 4 p.m.,
grades 3-5.
• Adult Baked Goods and Book
Club, Nov. 5, 6 p.m.
• Teen Advisory Group, Nov. 8, 6
p.m., open to middle and senior
high school students.
• Lego club, Nov. 11, 3:45 p.m.
• Christmas card collection for
troops: Cards due by Nov. 12, card
making party Nov. 12 at 6 p.m.
Submitted cards should not be
sealed or stamped.
• Holiday Gift Fair, Dec. 8, 10 a.m.-3
p.m. $10.00.
The Regal Room (216 Lackawan-
na Ave., Olyphant, 570.489.1901)
• Deluxe Semi-private Christmas
Party: Dec. 8, 7 p.m.-midnight. $35-
52, due Nov. 30. Full course dinner,
open bar, music by Jeffrey James
Band, 21+.
“Regional Entertainment
Investments in the Future:
Yankees and Mohegan Sun
Arena”: Nov. 9, 7:45 a.m., Best
Western Genetti Hotel and Confer-
ence Center (77 E. Market St.,
Wilkes-Barre). $15. RSVP:
sxr50@psu.edu, 570.675.9253.
Special master class with
“Insanity” workout creator
Shaun T: Nov. 3, 1-5 p.m. Doors
open at 12:30 p.m. Only 300 tickets
available, first-come, first-served,
sale begins Oct. 30. Sale Tues. and
Thurs., 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Wilkes Uni-
versity Henry Student Center (84 W.
South St., Wilkes-Barre). $10. Info:
hawc@wilkes.edu.
Stress Management for the
Holidays, presented by Holistic
Moms Network of Wyoming Valley:
Nov. 3, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Hoyt
Library (284 Wyoming Ave., King-
ston). Free, memberships available
for $45 per year. Info: 570.466.1347,
hmnwyomingvalley@hotmail.com,
wyomingvalleypa.holisticmoms.org.
“Tattoos For Life”: Nov. 10,
noon-8 p.m., Stormi Steel Tattoos
and Body Piercing (364 East St.,
Bloomsburg). Proceeds benefit
American Foundation for Suicide
Prevention. Tattoo designs themed
around “Love Life” available for $20
per tattoo, 50 percent of each
tattoo benefits foundation. Four
artists available Nov. 10. First-come,
first-served; appointments sched-
uled if necessary. Info: face-
book.com/stormisteeltattoosforlife,
570.387.8085.
Trauma expo: Nov. 19, 9 a.m.-3
p.m., Geisinger-Community Medical
Center, Professional Building Audi-
torium (316 Colfax Ave., Scranton).
Volunteers needed for “Op-
eration Friendship”: Program
organized by Serving Seniors
(Scranton Life Building, 538 Spruce
St., Suite 408, Scranton). “Operation
Friendship” works to bring holiday
cheer and greetings to residents of
nursing and assisted living or per-
sonal care homes. Individuals and
groups needed to write and send
personalized Christmas cards. Info:
570.344.3931.
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Wa-
verly, waverlycomm.org)
• 29th annual Artisans’ Market-
place: Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Nov. 18,
11 a.m.-4 p.m. $6. Info: 570.586-8191,
ext. 5.
• Wreathmaking with Abby Peck:
Dec. 7, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $2. Info:
570.586.8191, ext. 5,
• Breakfast with Santa: Dec. 8,
10:30 a.m. $8. Info: 570.586.8191, ext.
5
Wilkes-Barre City Events
• Farmers’ Market: Thurs., through
Nov. 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Public Square.
Thurs. Info: wilkes-barre.pa.us/
farmersm.php
Wyoming Farmers Market
(Butlers Park, corner of 8th and
Butler Streets)
• Every Saturday 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Fresh produce, crafts, and food
vendors. Vendor opportunities
available at 570.693.0291, option 1.
Your Dog’s Place, LLC
(570.729.8977, yourdogsplace@ya-
hoo.com)
• K9 Nose Work: Intro to Nose
Work, Sat., 11:30 a.m.; Wed., 10 a.m.
Intro to Odor, Mon., 8:15 p.m. Intro
to Vehicles and Exteriors, Mon., 7
p.m. Continuing Nose Work, Mon., 5
p.m.
• Kinderpuppy: Wed., 6 p.m., Sat., 10
a.m. Puppy parenting 101.
• Canine Life & Social Skills: Thurs.,
5:30, 6:30, 7:30 p.m.
• Reliable Recalls: Fri., 6-7:30 p.m.
LOCAL HISTORY
Eckley Miners’ Village (locat-
ed nine miles east of Hazleton, just
off Route 940; 570.636.2070;
www.eckleyminers.org)
Mon.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun.,
noon-5 p.m. $6, adults; $5.50, senior
citizens; $4, children 12 and under.
Electric City Trolley Mu-
seum and Coal Mine Tour
(Cliff Street, Scranton 570.963.6590)
Museum open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Ex-
cursions: Wed.-Sun. 10:30 a.m., noon,
1:30 p.m., 3 p.m. Rides: $10 adults, $9
seniors, $7.75 ages 3-12. Mine open
daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tours hourly, $8
adults, $7.50 seniors, $5.50 ages
3-12.
Everhart Museum (1901 Mulber-
ry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
• European River Cruise: April 8-15,
2013. From $2,549/member, double
occupancy, plus air. Info:
570.504.7575, EverhartRiverCruise-
.com
The Houdini Museum (1433 N.
Main Ave., Scranton)
Every weekend by reservation. Open
1 p.m., closes 4 p.m. Also available
weekdays for school groups, bus,
hotel groups. $17.95/adults, $14.95/11
and under.
• Ghost Tours: Scheduled daily, 7
p.m., reservations required. Secret
time/meeting place divulged upon
reservation, call 570.383.1821.$20/
adults, $15/11 and under. Rain or
shine, year-round. Daytime walks
also available on limited basis.
Private tours can be arranged for
groups. Info: scrantonghosttour-
s.com, magicus@comcast.net.
Lackawanna Historical So-
ciety (The Catlin House, 232 Mon-
roe Avenue, Scranton, 570.344.3841)
❏ Downtown Walking Tours (free
and open to the public):
• Custom Tours: 7-8 blocks, about
2 hours. Routes selected based on
interests of participants Most days,
noon-6 p.m. $5/person, min. 4 peo-
ple, max. 30. Call 955.0244.
• Step-on bus tours, Costume
Tours: Call for info.
Luzerne County Historical
Society (49 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.823.6244, lchs@epix.net)
• LCHS Annual Historic Preserva-
tion Awards: Nov. 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m.,
Westmoreland Club (59 S. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre). $40, LCHS mem-
bers; $50, non-members. Info:
570.823.6244, ext. 1.
• “Death and Mourning at the
Swetland Homestead”: Nov. 2-3, 7-9
p.m., Swetland Homestead (885
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming). $8, LCHS
members; $10, non-members. RSVP:
570.823.6244, ext. 3.
• Denison House Afternoons of
Colonial Hospitality: Dec. 8-9, 1-5
p.m., Nathan Denison House (35
Denison St., Kingston). $4, adults;
$2, children; free, under 5.
Pennsylvania’s Anthracite
Heritage Museum (McDade
Park, Scranton: 570.963.4804,
www.phmc.state.pa.ust) Open year
round, Mon.-Sat. from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
and Sun., noon-5 p.m.
Scranton Iron Furnaces (159
Cedar Ave., Scranton, www.anthraci-
temuseum.org)
For guided tours, call Anthracite
Heritage Museum at 570.963.4804
for schedule/fees.
St. Ann’s National Basilica
Shrine and Monastery (Scran-
ton: 570.347.5691) Group tours
available by appointment. Open 9
a.m.-8 p.m. daily.
Steamtown National Histor-
ic Site (I-81 to Exit 53, Scranton:
570.340.5200 or 888.693.9391,
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 41
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 34
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Enter your pet for Weekender’s
PET OFTHEWEEK
by sending photo, pet’s name, breed
if applicable, owner’s name and
hometown to:
weekender@theweekender.com
subject line: Pet of the Week
Owner:
Holly Olejnik
Huntington Mills
Turken
CHEEP CHEEP
Infinite Improbability
GEEK CULTURE & MORE
Rich Howells | Weekender Staff Writer
We can debate all day which
presidential candidate is the
smartest, most qualified, or the
most morally fit to run this fine
country of ours, but as your
four-eyed columnist of choice, I
am obligated to ask, “Which is
the bigger geek?”
Unlike races or religions, we
geeks are not being courted by
either candidate, but it’s obvious
to us which one fits the profile.
We can smell our own.
Humorist author, actor, and
fellow geek John Hodgman re-
ferred to Barack Obama as “the
first nerd president of the mod-
ern era” at the 2009 Radio and
TV Correspondents’ Dinner, and
he may not be exaggerating. The
commander-in-chief collected
Spider-Man and Conan the Bar-
barian comic books as a kid;
starred in one as an adult (Amaz-
ing Spider-Man #583, giving our
hero a fist bump); flashed Leo-
nard Nimoy the Vulcan salute;
posed in front of a Superman
statue for a famous photo on his
official Senate website and with
a toy lightsaber on the White
House lawn years later; hosted an
“Ask Me Anything” thread on
the social news site Reddit in
August; and is a well-document-
ed BlackBerry addict.
His challenger, former Mass.
Governor Mitt Romney, certainly
dresses dorkier than the incum-
bent, but I came up short when I
attempted to compile a similar
list of geek credentials. When
asked by Fox News what his
favorite novel was, he replied that
it was “Battlefield Earth.” While
he does get points for choosing a
science fiction book over some
bestseller like “Twilight,” no
self-respecting nerd would ever
admit to enjoying the work of
crazypants Scientology founder
and L. Ron Hubbard nowadays,
especially after that infamously
awful movie adaptation starring
John Travolta.
Then there was that Washing-
ton Post story in May about
Mitt’s prep school days and some
pranks that “might have gone too
far,” including an alleged in-
cident in which he held down a
classmate and cut his bleached
blond hair. The Republican nom-
inee said he couldn’t recall the
day in question, however, and the
validity of the story has since
been questioned by friends and
even the victim’s own family. The
fact remains that Romney did
admit to pulling pranks and other
hijinks. Everyone knows that
geeks are usually the butt of such
jokes, not the culprits.
If he was hoping to scoop up
that vote at all, he probably
would have lost it this week when
“Avengers” director and geek god
Joss Whedon “endorsed” him for
president in a satirical video that
said he is the right candidate to
bring about the zombie apoc-
alypse we’ve all been waiting for.
A jab from the creator of “Buffy
the Vampire Slayer” and “Fire-
fly” would have been a right
hook in the geek race.
C’mon, Mitt – with a name
like that, you could have been a
contender.
Now imagine if this is how I
really voted, choosing who would
be the leader of the free world by
who could quote “Star Wars”
more accurately or who wore the
cleverest t-shirt. It’s just plain
silly, but this is exactly how mil-
lions of people vote every elec-
tion year.
While it’s nice to pick a candi-
date you can relate to, I’ll admit,
it’s not the right way to vote. You
shouldn’t select someone based
on their looks or how many sub-
jects you both agree upon – you
select the best man or woman for
the job, the one with the best
plan for the country that will
benefit the most amount of peo-
ple, whether you agree with
those people or not.
If bumper stickers and cheesy
slogans are any indication, many
citizens cast their votes around
only one issue, but we all know
that there’s much more at stake in
this election than your favorite
talking point. If your personal
bias pits you against others, so be
it, but be open-minded to other
beliefs, lifestyles, and view-
points. If we’re going to brag that
it’s a free country, it should be
exactly that – free for everyone to
live as they please, as jocks,
nerds, or otherwise.
It may be obvious who I’m
voting for, but I assure you that it
has nothing to do with geek cred.
It has been fun having a Trekkie
as president, but the only way
we’ll truly live long and prosper
is if we all just learn to get along.
W
Commander-in-geek
President Barack Obama wields a toy light saber in
2009 during a White House event. He’s clearly the
geekier of the presidential candidates, but there’s so
much more at stake in this election.
(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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www.nps.gov/stea)
• Ongoing: Interpretive programs,
visitor center, theater, a history
museum. Open daily, 9-5 p.m. $7
adults, $6 senior citizens, $2 chil-
dren ages 6-12.
• The “Scranton Limited” train ride:
Wed.-Sun. 30 minute rides depart
from Roundhouse boarding area
Wed., 10:30 & 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 2:15
p.m. A historic steam locomotive
operates Thurs.-Sun. 10:30 & 11:30
a.m., 1:30 & 2:15 p.m. $3 per person,
all ages 6+. Visit www.nps.gov/stea
for train schedule or call
570.340.5200.
Tripp House (1011 N. Main Ave.,
Scranton: 570.961.3317). The oldest
structure in Lackawanna County.
Tours are conducted by appoint-
ment.
LEARNING
Art Classes at the Georgia-
na Cray Bart Studio (123
Brader Dr., Wilkes-Barre,
570.947.8387, gcraybart@aol.com,
gcraybart-artworks.com)
❏ Painting, drawing, creative arts/
pencil, charcoal, oil, acrylic, pastel,
colored pencil, mixed media:
• Adults (Ages 13+): Mon.-Tues.,
noon-4 p.m.; Tues.-Wed., 6-9 p.m.
Student may choose length of time
from 1-3 hrs. for evening class
• Children (Ages 8-12): Weekdays,
4:30-5:30 p.m.
ArtWorks Gallery & Studio
(503 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.
570.207.1815, artworksnepa.com):
• ‘Let’s Build a Snowman!”: Nov. 10,
1:30-3 p.m., for ages 7-12. $25, all
supplies included.
“Jewelry Making Goes Green -
Recycled Earrings Workshop”: Nov.
17, 12:30-2:30 p.m. $35, supplies
included.
Ballroom Dancing taught by
certified members of Dance Educa-
tors of America. Available for pri-
vate groups, clubs, organizations,
senior centers, more. Call
570.785.9459.
Blue Diamond Toastmas-
ters International: Nov. 6, 5:15
p.m., Sundance Vacations (264
Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre).
Join the area’s public speaking,
leadership, and self-improvement
club the first and third Tues. of
each month. Info: 570.338.2194,
toastmasters.org, toastmas-
terswb@gmail.com
Bridge. Beginning or Intermediate
Lessons, playing time for regular
games and tournaments. Jewish
Community Center (River Street,
Wilkes-Barre). Call Rick Evans at
570.824.4646 or Rev. Ken McCrea at
570.823.5957.
Downtown Arts at Arts
YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787, www.art-
syouniverse.com)
• Kids Craft Hour with Liz Revit:
Sat., 10:15 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Make jewelry,
paper mache, more. $15, includes
supplies. For info or to register, call
817.0176.
Drawing and Painting Les-
sons: Realist painter teaches
techniques of old masters. Private
lessons Fri.-Sun. To schedule, call
570.820.0469, e-mail bekshev@ya-
hoo.com or visit www.artistvs.com.
Everhart Museum (1901 Mulber-
ry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
• “Everybody’s Art” New Series of
Adult Art Classes: $25/workshop
members, $30 non-members. Pre-
registration required.
• Rosen Method easy movement
program, Thurs., 2-3 p.m., Folk art
gallery, $5/class, free to members.
Must pre-register.
• Early Explorers: Mon., 1-1:45 p.m.
Free, suitable for ages 3-5. Pre-
registration required, groups wel-
come. For info, to register, call or
e-mail education@everhart-mu-
seum.org.
GreenBeing (334 Adams Ave.,
Scranton, info@shopgreenbe-
ing.com)
• Not Your Granny’s Sewing: one-
on-one lessons: $40/lesson, $140/4
sessions, 2-3 hour sessions. Tailored
to individual needs.
Guitar & Bass Lessons avail-
able from Fox Studios (11 Rhine
Creek Rd., Drums) Mon.-Thurs. 1-10
p.m. $16 per hour. All ages, all styles
of music, all levels. Call
570.788.4797 for info.
Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Instrumental Music Instruction
• Private Ballroom Lessons
• Private Vocal Instruction: Tues.
evenings.
• Private Guitar Instruction: Classi-
cal, acoustic, electric for all ages.
Healthcare provider CPR
class: Nov. 6 and 19, 6-10 p.m.,
Geisinger-Community Medical Cen-
ter, Professional Building Audi-
torium (316 Colfax Ave., Scranton).
Healthcare provider renewal
CPR class: Nov. 7 and 20, 6-9
p.m., Geisinger-Community Medical
Center, Professional Building Audi-
torium (316 Colfax Ave., Scranton).
Horse Back Riding Lessons
Elk Stables, Uniondale, by appoint-
ment only. All levels welcome. Call
570.575.8649 to schedule.
Math Tutoring and Coaching
Highly qualified and experienced
teacher. All levels tutoring, coach-
ing, homework help. Individuals/
groups. Fun-filled Math Anxiety
Buster Workshops. Open all week.
Ongoing enrollment. Call
570.899.5576, e-mail sib-
ut4710@aol.com.
Moscow Clayworks (moscow-
clayworks.com)
• Focus on hand-building tech-
niques: Adults, Tues., 6-8 p.m.; kids,
Thurs., 6-8 p.m. $125/5 sessions.
Reservations required.
• Potters Wheel for Beginners:
Mon., Wed., 6-8 p.m. $125/5 sessions.
Reservations required.
NEPA Bonsai Society (Mid-
way Garden Center, 1865 Hwy. 315,
Pittston, 570.654.6194, www.mys-
pace.com/nepabonsai).
• Monthly meeting last Wed., 7 p.m.
Features business sessions, demon-
strations/programs/workshops.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine Street, Scranton,
570.878.3970, newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com, newvisionsstu-
dio.com)
• Kid’s Art Class: Ages 11-16, Sat., 3-5
p.m.; Ages 5-10, Sun., 3-5 p.m. $100
for four weeks or $30 per class. All
supplies included.
• Adult Acrylic Painting Class: Mon.,
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 48
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 39
Swing your partner
As part of the Chicory House Dance Series on Saturday, Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. at the Church of Christ
Uniting (776 Market St, Kingston), a New England Contra dance will feature the music of “Lucy
and the Lil’ iPods,” with Lucy Warrington and Lily Williams playing fiddle, Chris Martin on banjo,
Rob Lewis on guitar, Margaret Bakker on the cello, and Tim Curtis on the pennywhistle. Calling
will be by Ted Crane of Ithaca.
Contra dancing is energetic and involves mixing with the other dancers as each couple performs a
short routine with another couple before progressing onto the next couple and repeating the se-
quence. A different routine is taught before each dance by the caller. No partner or previous expe-
rience is necessary.
Admission is $9 for adults and $24 for families. The Chicory House is an all-volunteer non-profit
coffeehouse sponsoring folk music and dance in the Wyoming Valley. Dancers are invited to bring
a snack to share at intermission. Dancers are also invited to a dish-to-pass pot-luck dinner at 6 p.m.
For more info, call 570.333.4007 or visit folkloresociety.org/dancing.
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I was moving apartments and
had gotten to the point where I
could no longer carry the remain-
ing items.
The guy I was dating, Arnold,
told me that he would come by
with his two nephews, Chris and
Mark, to help me load our cars
and carry the items into the new
house. I had gotten to the point
that I was out of boxes and want-
ed to get into the new house so
badly that I was taking drawers of
things and just absentmindedly
dumping these items into large
trash bags.
We had been working all day
and were finally onto the last
load. It was small, only a few
final bags, so we all decided to
ride in one car to save on gas and
grab a drink at the conclusion of
the load.
We got to the house and loaded
the back of my SUV. There was
one final bag that we threw into
the back seat between Chris and
Mark. We all piled back into my
car and started the drive across
town.
As is typical in northeastern
Pennsylvania, we hit a pothole
and the whole car jumped. Upon
landing, I heard a faint buzzing.
The buzzing got louder and loud-
er and everyone heard it.
Chris looked at me and pointed
out that the bag wedged between
him and Mark had begun to
vibrate against his arm. It is at
this moment that I realize what
drawer had been emptied into
that particular bag: the goodie
drawer.
Yes, that bedroom drawer
every single girl has that is kept
under lock and key and is full of
all sorts of unmentionable, pri-
vate items which are not general-
ly discussed in public.
My public was a car full of
men and I forgot to take out the
batteries.
Apparently, the pothole had
turned this particular toy on
mountain climber-mode. It start-
ed out low and worked its way
past medium and high before
reaching screaming orgasm-
mode.
Of course, the men all found
this to be hilarious. I was morti-
fied. It wouldn’t stop. We hit
another pothole and thankfully it
shut off, or so I thought.
As luck would have it, it shift-
ed in the bag and turned on the
power to yet another goodie
drawer item, creating an epic
vibration war in this Hefty bag
full of embarrassment.
The boys were laughing so
hard that there were tears running
down their faces. We finally
arrived at the apartment and I
grabbed the bag and ran inside
with it, hiding it deep within the
caverns of my new apartment.
Lesson learned? Get more
boxes the next time I move, and
remove all of the batteries.
W
Melissa learned the hard way that it’s important to
empty the batteries out of certain things before you
move.
(AP Photo/Steven Senne)
And the bee
says buzz...
With the recent “franken-
storm” that rolled through
this week, a lot of people
are upset with all of the
damage caused by high
winds and rain.
The annual hurricane sea-
son officially begins June 1
and ends November 30. The
peak of the season is now
through late October, so that
means we can still see a
few more big storms like
Sandy.
Hurricane Sandy was a
result of global warming’s
extreme weather and was a
rare hybrid superstorm cre-
ated by an Arctic jet stream
from the north surrounding
itself in a tropical storm
from the south. Jeff Masters,
director of meteorology at
the Weather Underground,
says that global warming is
causing more and more
storms like this.
“When you heat the
oceans up more, you extend
the length of hurricane sea-
son,” Masters said. “There’s
been ample evidence over
the last decade or so that
hurricane season is getting
longer… starts earlier, ends
later.
“You’re more likely to get
these sort of late October
storms now, and you’re more
likely to have this sort of
situation where a late Octo-
ber storm meets up with a
regular winter low-pressure
system and gives us this
ridiculous combination of a
nor’easter and a hurricane
that comes ashore, bringing
all kinds of destructive ef-
fects.”
With the election just a
week away, Sandy is making
it clear that climate change
has been completely ignored
during this campaign.
This year, we had record
breaking temperatures across
the U.S., a record drought in
the corn belt, and now a
storm that has affected our
nation’s most populated ci-
ties, so you would think our
presidential candidates would
have mentioned global
warming. Federal disaster
declarations are up, winter
storm losses have doubled
since the 1980’s and thunder-
storms last year caused over
$25 billion in damages.
As Sandy slammed the
East Coast, roads and sub-
ways closed, homes flooded,
and property damage from
wind and storm surges were
record breaking. Regardless
of the storm’s origin, meteo-
rologists are calling this the
worst storm the East Coast
has seen.
Author of “The Ravaging
Tide,” Mike Tidwell, thinks
the storm is a wake up call
for our government.
“The irony is that the two
presidential candidates decid-
ed not to speak about cli-
mate change, and now they
are seeing the climate speak
to them,” said Tidwell.
Whether our elected offi-
cials choose to acknowledge
global warming or not, we
can expect weather to con-
tinue in this pattern if noth-
ing is done to change it.
W
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorologists, Vasil Koleci, left,
and Ingrid Amberger, right, monitor Hurricane Sandy, Monday morning Oct. 30, 2012,
at the NOAA weather facility in Albany, N.Y.
(AP Photo/Times Union, Will Waldron)
The ignored issue
rears its head
Girl talk
TALES OF DATING DISASTERS
Melissa Hughes | Weekender Correspondent
Green piece
ECO-FRIENDLY ADVICE
Jen Stevens | Special to the Weekender W
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CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
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Keystone College (One
College Green, La Plume,
570.945.8000, keys-
tone.edu)
• “The Curate Shak-
espeare As You Like It”:
Nov. 2-3, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 4,
2 p.m., Theater in Brooks.
$8, general admission; $4,
senior citizens and chil-
dren under 12; $1, Keys-
tone students and faculty.
Info: jane.honchell@keys-
tone.edu.
• 198th Army Concert
Band: Nov. 8, 7 p.m.
Brooks Theater. Free. Info:
570.945.8161
King’s College (133
North River St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.208.5957 or
kings.edu)
• Writing workshop with
Campion Literary Society:
Nov. 8, 3:30 p.m., Room
117 of Sheehy-Farmer Cam-
pus Center (between N.
Main and N. Franklin
Streets). Free. Info:
570.208.5900, ext. 5487.
Lackawanna College
(501 Vine St., Scranton,
1.877.346.3552, lackawan-
na.edu)
• Fall Craft Fair: Nov. 17,
8 a.m.-3 p.m., Student
Union. Vendors can con-
tact mallicka@lackawan-
na.edu. Free, open to pub-
lic.
❏ Environmental Insti-
tute (10 Moffat Dr., Coving-
ton Twp.)
• “Save Energy & Mon-
ey: Whole House Energy
Auditing”: Oct. 18, 6:30-
8:30 p.m. Free, donations
accepted. Pre-registration
required, 570.842.1506 or
yaniks@lackawanna.edu.
Luzerne County Com-
munity College (1333 S.
Prospect St., Nanticoke,
1.800.377.LCCC, lu-
zerne.edu)
• “Old Masters”: Schul-
man Gallery, Nanticoke,
through Nov. 22. Free.
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9
a.m.-5 p.m.
McCann School of Busi-
ness and Technology
(888-844-2503)
Misericordia University
(www.misericordia.edu,
570.674.6400; box office,
674.6719, misericordia.edu)
• “Elizabeth Fulton: Gi-
clee Landscape Prints”:
through Dec. 9, MacDonald
Gallery.
• “Form and Process:
Sculpture in Stone, Bronze
and Steel”: through Dec.
9, Pauly Friedman Art Gal-
lery.
• “The Future of Health
Care: A Washington Per-
spective” with Janet L.
Shikles: Thurs., Nov. 1, 7:45
a.m.; Dudrick, Muth,
Huntzinger and Alden
Trust Rooms of Sanday
and Marlene Insalaco Hall.
Free, registration required
by calling (570) 674-6332.
• “Walking with Justice”
by Mollie Marti, J.D., Ph.D.:
Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m., Huntz-
inger and Alden Trust
Rooms 218-219 of Sandy
and Marlene Insalaco Hall.
Free. Info: 570.674.6400,
walkingwithjustice.com.
• “Truth Talks: Frank
LittleBear – Being Native
American in America”:
Nov. 13, 6-8 p.m., Huntz-
inger and Alden Trust
Rooms 218-219 in Sandy
and Marlene Insalaco Hall.
Free.
• “A Murder is An-
nounced”: Nov. 15-17, 8
p.m., Lemmond Theater of
Walsh Hall. $5, adults; $3,
senior citizens and stu-
dents.
• Brunch with Santa:
Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.,
Banks Student Life Center.
$10, adults; $5, children
5-12; free, children 5 and
under. Info: 570.674.6768.
Penn State Wilkes-
Barre (Rte. 115, Lehman,
570.675.2171, wb.psu.edu)
• Civil Engineering Ex-
am Review: Every Thurs.
through March 21, 6-9 p.m.
$1,025 (handouts includ-
ed).
• TV Tailgate Party:
Nov. 10, either noon or
3:30 p.m. depending on
game time, River Grille
(670 N. River St., Plains).
$27. 21+. RSVP:
570.675.9228.
• Great Books Discus-
sion “Air-Conditioned
Nightmare:” Nov. 26, 7
p.m., Hayfield House,
Room H-105.
The University of
Scranton (800 Linden St.,
Scranton, 570.941.7400,
scranton.edu)
• East German Film Fes-
tival, “Filming Women: Iris
Gusner’s Portrayal of Work
and Love”: Nov. 6-8, 7
p.m., Pearn Auditorium of
Brennan Hall. Free. Info:
570.941.7430
❏ Schemel Forum Cours-
es, $60/person, $100/cou-
ple. To register, contact
570.941.7816, fet-
skok2@scranton.edu:
• ‘Chaucer’s Chivalry:
Knights and the Ladies
Who Love Them’ by Re-
becca Beal, Ph.D.: Wednes-
days, through Nov. 7, 6
p.m. Registration required,
fees vary. Info:
570.941.7816.
Wilkes University (84
W. South St, Wilkes-Barre,
1.800.WILKES.U,
wilkes.edu)
• Special master class
with “Insanity” workout
creator Shaun T: Nov. 3,
1-5 p.m. Doors open at
12:30 p.m. Only 300 tick-
ets available, first-come,
first-served, sale begins
Oct. 30. Sale Tues. and
Thurs., 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Henry
Student Center (84 W.
South St., Wilkes-Barre).
$10. Info: hawc@wilkes.edu.
• “The Community and
Environmental Health Im-
plications of Shale Gas
Development”: Nov. 7, 7:30
p.m., Stark Learning Cen-
ter 101. Free. Info:
570.408.5543.
• “Godspell”: Nov. 9-10
and 16-17, 8 p.m.; Nov. 11
and 18, 2 p.m., Dorothy
Dickston Darte Center for
the Performing Arts. $10,
general admission and
alumni; $5, students and
senior citizens; free, with
valid Wilkes student ID.
Info: 570.408.4540.
• “Climate Change and
the United Nations” with
Mohammad Reza Salamat:
Nov. 15, 4 p.m., Gies Hall
of the Darte Center. Free.
• Literary publishing
seminar with Phil Brady
and Johnny Temple: Jan.
9-13, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. In-
cludes info about current
publishing environment,
editorial policies, book
design and more. $2,488,
general; $1,244 for Wilkes
students and alumni. Info:
570.408.4547, cwrit-
ing@wilkes.edu.
W
- compiled by Chris Hughes,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
A tempest brews at Keystone
The Keystone Players will present Don Nigro’s rollicking comedy, ‘The Curate Shakespeare As You Like
It,’ on Nov. 2-3 at 7:30 p.m., and Nov. 4 at 2 p.m. in the recently renovated Theatre in Brooks on Keystone
College’s campus in La Plume. In this hilarious play, a small troupe of desperate actors tries to perform
Shakespeare’s romantic comedy, ‘As You Like It.’ Because of the loss of its stars, the troupe, which now
consists of only seven actors and a stage manager, must attempt to play nearly 30 characters.
General admission tickets are $8; tickets for senior citizens and children under 12 are $4; and tickets for
Keystone College students and faculty are $1. To reserve tickets or attend the preview, contact Jane Hon-
chell at jane.honchell@keystone.edu.
Presided over by Kaitlyn Schott, top, as the Curate, cast members in ‘The Curate Shakespeare As You
Like It’ also include, seated, from left, Josh Harris as William, and Jila Rusavage as Rosalind. Standing,
Patrick Burne as Amiens, Sarah Langan as Celia, Joseph Croft as the Clown, and Heather Bixby as Audrey.
on Campus
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The Sapphire Salon’s Hair Team The Sapphire Salon’s Hair Team The Sapphire Salon’s Hair Team
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Book your Free hair color/haircut consultaon and receive an
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worth $150.00, when you book your appointment.
Call 602-7700 Piston locaon
414-7700 Montage locaon W
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
THIRD ANNUAL ZOMBIE WALK TO BENEFIT
TOYS FOR TOTS • 10.27.12 IN WILKES-BARRE
Photos courtesy Bill Tarutis
Infinite Improbability:
A column focusing on geek
culture, discussing, analyzing, and
debating the impact of comics,
movies, music, and anything that
has a dedicated following.
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Nov. 5-26, 5-6:30 p.m. $100, all
supplies included.
Northeast Photography
Club (www.northeastphotography-
club.org) meets first Wed. of month
7 p.m. in boardroom of Prime Med
(old Wes Freedman Building) off
Morgan Hwy. Variety of topics,
monthly contest, guest speakers.
Membership open.
Phoenix Performing Arts
Centre (409-411 Main St., Duryea,
570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb-
.com, phoenixpac08@aol.com)
• Ballet and jazz classes: Tues.,
5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages 10 and up. $10,
first class; $5, second class.
• Dimensions in Dance w/ Lee
LaChette: Jazz, tap, ballet for adults
& kids. $10/hour, $5/second class.
E-mail or call 991.1817.
• Tap classes: Tues., 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Ages 10 and up. $10, first class; $5,
second class.
• Tap / jazz / ballet: Tues., 7:30-
8:30 p.m. $10, first class; $5, second
class.
• Vocal lessons w/ Joelle Colombo
Witner: Wed., Sun. E-mail or call
991.1817.
• Vocal Coaching w/ Nicole Ras-
mus: $15/half hour
• Stage Combat Lessons w/ Paul J.
Gallo: 12 weeks, date/time TBA. 1.5
hours, prepare for intense physical
activity, dress appropriately. $20/
week or $200 up front.
Piano and Flute Lessons
(Anne, 570.881.2433)
• Private studio in Kingston, enthu-
siastic approach, learn at own pace
and in natural learning style. Pro-
fessional teacher/performer (Bache-
lors in Music Performance, SUNY
Purchase Conservatory of Music;
Masters in Music Performance,
University of Texas at Austin Butler
School of Music). Accepting new
students of all ages, time slots
available early mornings into eve-
nings weekdays for 30, 45, 60
minutes.
Pocono Arts Council (18 N.
Seventh St., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org)
• Memoir writing: Fri., Nov. 2-23, 10
a.m.-noon. $72, member; $80, non-
member; $60, senior member; $65,
senior non-member.
• Beginner watercolor: Mon., Nov.
5-26, 6-8 p.m., $85, member; $95,
non-member; $65, senior member;
$70, senior non-member.
• Intermediate watercolor: Wed.,
Nov. 7-28, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $110, mem-
ber; $120, non-member; $90, senior
member; $95, senior non-member.
• Drawing: Wed., Nov. 7-28, 6:30-
8:30 p.m., $72, member; $80, non-
member; $60, senior member; $65,
senior non-member.
• Creative writing, Christmas letter
workshop: Nov. 13, 6:30-9:30 p.m.,
$25, member; $35, non-member; $15,
senior member; $20, senior non-
member.
• Gift workshop, polymer jewelry
making: Nov. 27, 6:30-9:30 p.m., $25,
member; $35, non-member; $15,
senior member; $20, senior non-
member.
Private Voice Lessons Mon.-
Thurs. by appointment. Learn prop-
er singing technique in downtown
Wilkes-Barre studio. Specializing in
opera/classical/musical theater.
Hour, half-hour lessons. Student
discounts available. Please call
824.5428 or visit www.katrinaly-
kes.com for info.
Something Special: (23 West
Walnut Street Kingston,
570.540.6376, angiethear-
tist@aol.com, www.angelademu-
roart.com)
• MANGA Art Class: (Japanese
Cartooning) Wed., 4-5 p.m. Learn the
art of Japanese cartooning. 4-week
session, supplies included: $60 per
child. Call or e-mail to register.
Southside Senior Center
(425 Alder St., Scranton,
570.346.2487)
• Language Partnership English &
Spanish Classes: Fri., 10 a.m. Free,
open to all. For info, call 346.0759.
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly,
570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org)
• Ballroom Dancing Lessons: Wed.,
7:15 p.m., Comm auditorium. Basic &
advanced ballroom, swing. $15/
person. For info, call Vince Brust at
489.3111.
Wyoming Valley Art League
• Painting with Irina Krawitz: $15/
hour, $120/4-weeks. Call
570.793.3992 for info.
SEASONAL EVENTS
Brokenharts Asylum (Luzerne
County Fairgrounds, Route 118, Dal-
las, 570.760.8027, screaminde-
monshaunts.com)
• Fri. and Sat., 7 p.m.-midnight;
Sun., 7-11 p.m. $10, immediate re-ride
for $5 more.
Dracula’s Forest (2828 Rock
Dr., Clarks Summit, 570.586.5084,
draculasforest.com) • Fri.-Sun.,
through Oct. Tickets available at
6:30 p.m. Haunted hay ride $15 for
adults, $7 for kids 10 and under;
Shockwalk $7; Little Screamers,
Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m., $7.
Halloween Open House: Oct.
31, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Justus Fire Com-
pany (159 Fieldstone Dr., Scott Twp.).
Free fire prevention info plus candy
and hot chocolate for children.
Chicken wings for sale, $7 for 10;
chicken fritters, $5 for 3. Info:
jfc28fire.com.
Halloween Party, to benefit
the Palermo Heart to Heart
Foundation: Oct. 31, 6-10 p.m.,
Damenti’s Restaurant (870 N. Hun-
ter Highway, Mountain Top). Fun-
draiser dinner is $50 per person.
Info: 570.788.2004
Reaper’s Revenge (456 Swika
Ln., Scott Township, 570.253-GRIM,
reapersrevenge.net) • Fri. and Sat.,
6-11 p.m.; Sun. and Nov. 2-3, 6-10 p.m.,
through Nov. 3. $25.
Safe Halloween: Oct. 31, 6-9
p.m., St. Faustina’s Church (520 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke). Free.
SOCIAL GROUPS
Better Breathers Club: Nov.
8, 6:30 p.m., continues second
Tuesday of every month, Geisinger-
Community Medical Center, Profes-
sional Building Auditorium (316
Colfax Ave., Scranton). Info:
570.969.8986.
Building Industry Associ-
ation of NEPA (570.287.3331)
• Sponsorship: Become host of a
monthly General Membership Meet-
ing. Call or e-mail danielle@bi-
anepa.com for details.
• Accepting entries for Outdoor
Theme Project from builders, trade
schools, Vo-Techs, Job Corps. For
info, call 570.287.3331.
Diabetes support group: Nov.
9, 10 a.m., Geisinger-Community
Medical Center, Professional Build-
ing Auditorium (316 Colfax Ave.,
third floor, Scranton).Info:
570.969.7272.
Living with Grief: free six-
week bereavement support
group (2-3:30 p.m., 6-7:30 p.m.,
Spiritual Center, Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center, 1000 E. Moun-
tain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre,
570.808.5539)
Oakwood Terrace (400 Gleason
Dr., Moosic, 570.451.3171 ext. 116 or 101)
• Support Group Meetings: third
Wed. of each month, 6:30 p.m.
Overeaters Anon. meetings
Mon., Tues., Thurs., 7 p.m.; Wed.,
7:30 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. No fee, new-
comers welcome. Call 570.829.1341
for details/meeting locations of visit
www.oa.org.
Pride of NEPA meetings the
second Tues. of each month. Visit
prideofnepa.org for details.
Suicide Bereavement Sup-
port Group First/Third Thurs.
every month, 7 p.m., at Catholic
Social Services (33 E. Northampton
St., Wilkes-Barre). Call 570.822.7118
ext. 307 for info.
W
- compiled by Chris Hughes,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 41
Turkeys come early
On Saturday, November 3, The Commonwealth Medical College’s students will host the third
annual Turkey Trot: 5K Walk/Run in downtown Scranton. The event will also feature a Tot Trot
for those 13 years of age and under. Proceeds of the student’s community fundraiser will benefit
the Friends of the Poor annual Thanksgiving community dinner.
Check in for the walk/run begins at 7:30 a.m. in the main lobby of the Medical Sciences Building
(525 Pine St., Scranton). The Tot Trot steps off at 8:30 a.m. and the walk/run begins at 9 a.m.
T-shirts will be provided to all registered participants.
Race day registration fee is $25 (ages 14 and above) or participants can pre-register online for $20.
Registration for the Tot Trot is $5 or two canned goods to be donated to the food drive. Participa-
nts are also invited to bring food and clothing donations the morning of race day.
For more information or to pre-register, visit thecommonwealthmedical.com/turkeytrot.
Turkey Trot committee members seated from left: Jenni Xu, Carol Fouad, Nina Cohen, and Suma
Chandrasekaran. Standing from left: Hannah Canty, David Louis, Alexandra Belcher, Danielle
DeSantis, Nicholas Stanzione, and Mary Koethe. W
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Trey Anastasio Band @ Sherman Theater, 10.22.12.
Photos by Jason Riedmiller • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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TONIGHT! HALLOWEEN PARTY & ANNIVERSARY PARTY
AT BART & URBY’S IN DOWNTOWN WILKES-BARRE W
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SUBMIT TWO
RECENT PHOTOS TO
MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM
INCLUDE YOUR AGE, FULL
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get your game on
VIDEO GAME REVIEWS
Robbie Vanderveken | Special to the Weekender
sorry mom&dad
A 20-SOMETHING’S WILD ADVENTURES
Justin Brown | Weekender Correspondent
Since it is Halloween, I decid-
ed to pick up a re-mastered
version of a game that scared
the crap out of me back in the
day: “Doom 3 BFG Edition” is
out, and it is just as scary as I
remember.
I didn’t have a great computer
when “Doom 3” came out in
2004, but I did get to play it on
the original Xbox in 2005. At
the time, not only was it terrify-
ing, it was one of the best look-
ing games I had ever seen.
“Doom 3,” as a first-person
shoot, had a compelling story
told mostly through cut-scenes,
emails, audio logs, and notes
you could pick up and read. The
story is similar to the first two
“Doom” games: your character,
a nameless marine, is sent to a
space station on Mars to discov-
er the cause of some disturb-
ances.
At first, it was simply reports
of strange noises and missing
scientists, but what’s really go-
ing on is much more sinister.
When constructing the Mars
base, they unearthed - or un
“Mars-ed” - an ancient artifact.
Some of the scientists in the lab
tried to use the artifacts and
accidently unlocked the gates of
hell.
The problem is, not all of hell
broke loose. Only some of it did,
and it is much harder to contain.
The Mars base is now over run
with all sorts of different types
of demons, from imps, dog-like
brutes, and even huge dragon
demons. The thing that makes
this game really scary is the
great lighting and sound design
that make the claustrophobic
Mars base truly terrifying. The
lighting system was truly ahead
of its time in 2004 and it still
holds up to this day.
There are several really good
jump scares that haven’t been
seen much in recent horror
games. One of the best things is
the updated graphics make the
game look even better at 60
frames per second.
The BFG edition comes with
the “Resurrection of Evil” ex-
pansion pack, an all new eight-
level mini-campaign, plus
“Doom 1,” “Doom 2,” and most
of their expansions all for
$39.99. The special edition is
available on Xbox 360, PC, and,
for the first time, PS3. You get
the classic “Doom” experience
with all of the trophies and
achievements that weren’t
around during their origins.
“Doom 3” carries a sense of
vulnerability lacking from other
current FPS titles. When your
health doesn’t regenerate and
enemies don’t drop ammunition,
it makes every fight a tense
experience. There is also a real
sense of exploration in the
game. You need health packs
and ammo, so you must explore
the environment as much as you
can. It is possible to beat the
game without exploring, but you
run the risk of missing out on all
of the good guns and hidden
collectables.
The game comes with some
agonizing load times, randomly
auto-saves taking you away from
the action, and removed custom-
ization over your controls, long
a staple of the FPS genre.
Overall, the game is just as I
remember. “Doom” and general
horror fans won’t want to miss
this one.
W
- Robbie Vanderveken is the
digital operations specialist at
The Times Leader. E-mail him
at rvanderveken
@timesleader.com
Welcome to
your 'Doom'
’Doom 3 BFG Edition’ looks sharper than ever.
Exploration is a necessary evil in the cramped quarters
of the Mars base that your Marine must explore.
Other than Mama June, the
woman whose womb is respon-
sible for developing the creature
known as Honey Boo Boo to full
term, there’s only one woman I
would never want to date: Mother
Nature.
First of all, she’s unpredictable,
and not in the good wake-you-
up-with-a-blow-job kind of way.
Second, she’s bipolar, and not in
the fun Britney Spears-faking-an-
accent-and-believing-it kind of
way.
Finally, she ruined my reality
television show debut.
It was the summer of 2009.
The reality show I skipped two
months of school to film was
about to premiere on ABC pri-
metime, and I wanted to cele-
brate in style. I found a water-
front bar near my college to host
the occasion, agreeing to open
during the week especially for
me if I brought people who were
ready to drink a lot and make
them money.
To ensure the party was a
success, I hired a DJ and a band.
The party got off to a great
start as over 100 of my closest
friends and Facebook friends
came to celebrate my debut on
primetime television.
What was destined to be the
best party ever quickly turned
into the premiere party from hell!
“We interrupt your regularly
scheduled program to bring you
this breaking news,” the local
Pittsburgh meteorologist said just
moments before “I Survived A
Japanese Game Show” was set to
air. “A severe flash flood and
tornado will be hitting the sur-
rounding areas.”
To my dismay, the dude didn’t
end on that note. Instead, he and
all of the other local stations
decided it was severe enough to
need continuous coverage.
“Why can’t you just put some-
thing across the screen like every
other time there’s a flash flood
you a--hole!” I screamed over the
phone to the news station in
between the tequila shots I was
downing to make me feel better
about my show not being seen.
They hung up.
I then realized I had a band, a
DJ, and a bar open just for me
and decided to make the best of
it. Even though I didn’t get to see
the premiere of my show, I did
throw the biggest party anyone
ever had for a tornado.
As for Mother Nature, she
eventually went away. But like
every whore, they always come
back for disruption, like Hurri-
cane Sandy. And what’s the best
way to piss off a temperamental
woman? Throw a party and act
like she doesn’t exist.
So don’t let the hurricane get
you down, unless it’s down on a
tap for a keg stand!
W
Justin’s poor reality TV debut? Blame it on the rain.
Bite me,
Mother Nature W
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CHARITY
WALKS/RUNS
Kathryn M. Freeman Race
for Ovarian Cancer
• Half marathon, 5-mile: Nov. 3,
South Williamsport Community Park.
Proceeds benefit Susquehanna Health
Foundation. Info: www.kmfraceforovar-
iancancer.com
TCMC Turkey Trot 5K Walk/
Run: Nov. 3, registration at 7:30 a.m.,
tot trot at 8:30 a.m. for ages 13 and
under, race at 9 a.m. $20, pre-regis-
tration; $25, day of the event; $5 or
two canned goods for tot trot. Pro-
ceeds benefit Friends of the Poor
annual Thanksgiving community din-
ner. Info:thecommonwealthmedi-
cal.com/turkeytrot.
CLASSES
Academy of Northern Mar-
tial Arts (79 N. Main St., Pittston)
Traditional Kung Fu & San Shou. For
Health and Defense. Adult & Children’s
Classes, Mon.-Thurs., Sat. First class
free. Walk-ins welcome, call 371.9919,
817.2161 for info.
Adult Kung Fu (Kung Fu & Tai
Chi Center, Wilkes-Barre: 570.829.2707)
Ongoing classes. Tues./Thurs., 6:30
p.m. Study of Chinese Martial Art open
hand, weapons sets. Mon., Wed., 6:30
p.m. Covers Chinese style theories,
concepts, applications. “Sport” fighting
concepts explained, practiced.
Aikido of Scranton, Inc. (1627
N. Main Ave., Scranton, 570.963.0500)
• Self-Defense Class taught by
Aikido Master Ven Sensei, every Mon. &
Wed., 7-9 p.m. $10.
• Traditional Weapons Class, Thurs.,
7-9 p.m. $10.
Back Mountain Martial Arts
Center & Mountaintop Karate
Center
For info, call either location, Back
Mountain (4 Carr Ave., 570.675.9535) or
Mountaintop (312 S. Mountain Blvd.,
466.6474): Visit Website at www.fu-
doshinkai1.com.
• Instruction in Traditional Karate,
Jujutsu, Sivananda Yoga (Back Moun-
tain): Tues., Wed., Thurs., 4:30-9 p.m.,
Sat., 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m. (Mountaintop
Karate Center Mon., Weds., Fri., 4:30-9
p.m.
• Instruction in Traditional Karate,
Jujutsu, Sivananda Yoga (Mountain-
top): Mon., Wed., Fri., 4:30-9 p.m.
Beauty Lies Within School
of Pole Dance (32 Forrest St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.793.5757, sl.beauty-
lieswithin@gmail.com). Hours by ap-
pointment, free sample appointment.
Call or e-mail for details.
Dance Contours (201 Bear Creek
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.0152,
www.dancecontours.com)
• Adult classes: ballet, tap, lyrical,
CardioSalsa, ballroom dance.
• Children/teen classes: ballet, tap,
CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a form of
dance blending basic Jazz Technique
with styles of street dance, hip hop.
• Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6
p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free.
• Adult ballet: Sat. morn.
Danko’s Core Wrestling
Strength Training Camp (Danko-
sAllAmericanFitness.com)
• Four sessions/week, features two
clinics, two core strength. 4 sessions/
week. Increase power, speed, agility.
Group discounts, coaches, teams,
clubs, free stuff. Visit website or call
Larry Danko at 570.825.5989 for info.
Downtown Arts at Arts
YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787, www.art-
syouniverse.com)
• Traditional Egyptian Belly Dance:
Wed., beginners 6-7 p.m.; intermediate
7-8 p.m. intermediate. $10. Call
343.2033 for info.
• Tribal Fusion Dance: Thurs.,
beginners 6-7 p.m.; intermediate 7-8
p.m. $10. Call 836.7399 for info.
• Cabaret with Helena: Sat., 4:30
p.m. Pre-registration required. Call
553.2117 for info.
• African Dance: Wed. & Sun., 1 p.m.
Traditional African moves with jazz
and hip-hop. $10, registration required,
call 212.9644 or visit hipbodysoul.com
for info.
Downtown Dojo Karate
Academy (84 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.262.1778)
Offering classes in traditional kar-
ate, weapons, self defense. Mon-Thurs.,
5:30-8:45 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-noon.
• Zumba Classes: Tues., Thurs., 7-8
p.m.; Sat., 12:30-1:30 p.m. $5/class. Call
for info.
Extreme M.M.A.(2424 Old
Berwick Rd., Bloomsburg.
570.854.2580)
• MMA Class: Mon., Wed., 6-7 p.m.
First visit free. Wrestling fundamentals,
basic Brazilian Ju-Jitsu No Gi. Call for
info.
• Boxing/Kickboxing Fitness Class:
Mon., Wed., 7-8 p.m. First visit free.
Non-combative class.
• Personal Training: Call 317.7250
for info.
Fazio’s Hapkido Do Jang (61
Main St., Luzerne, 570.239.1191)
Accepting new students. Children
(age 7-12) Mon./Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Teen/adult Mon./Wed., 6:45-8:15 p.m.;
Tues.-Thurs., 6:30-8 p.m. Private lesson
also available.
Learn Hapkido. Self defense applica-
tions. $50 monthly, no contract.
GregWorks Professional
Fitness Training (107 B Haines
Court, Blakely, 570.499.2349, gregs-
bootcamp@hotmail.com, www.vip-
fitnesscamp.com)
• Beach Body Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri.,
6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m.
• Bridal Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 &
8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m. Bridal party group
training, couples personal training
available.
• Fitness Bootcamp: 4-week ses-
sions, Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1
p.m.
• New Year’s Resolution Flab to Fab
Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m., Sat.,
1 p.m. Guaranteed results.
• Private/Semi-Private sessions
available, e-mail for info.

Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Dragons’ Tale Karate: Mon., 5:30-7
p.m.; Wed., 6-7:30 p.m. Ages 5+.
• Tumbling: Fri., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages
5+. $30/month.
Kwonkodo Lessons – by
reservation at The Hapkido Teakwondo
Institute (210 Division St., Kingston).
$40/month. Call 570.287.4290 for info.
Northeastern Ju-Jitsu (1047
Main St., Swoyersville, 570.714.3839,
nejujitsu.com)
Open 7 days/week, offers training in
Traditional Karate, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu,
boxing, Judo, Women’s self defense.
Group, private self defense classes
available by appointment.
Riot Hooping and Aerial
Dance (210 Division Street, King-
ston,www.riothooping.com,
912.656.4649). Offering Aerial Silks Intro
classes, Mon./Tues., 7pm. Aerial Silks
Beginner Series (four classes), Mon./
Tues., 8pm. Visit riothooping.comfor
info and registration.
Royce Gracie Jiu-Jitsu
Network, Scranton. Day, evening
classes for men, women, children.
Ongoing classes 6 days/week. Covers
sport, combat, self-defense aspects of
Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. For info visit gracie-
nepa.com or call 570.347.1107.
School of Combat Arts (24
Forrest St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.468.9701,
schoolofcombatarts.com)
Open 6 days/week. Offering classes
in Brazilian jiu jitsu, submission grap-
pling, Russian sambo, boxing, Muay
Thai, kickboxing, Ninjutsu, wrestling.
Classes for men, women, children.
Group, private classes available. Chil-
dren’s class now for $35/month.
Shaolin White Crane Fist
(Wyoming)
Teaching traditional Chinese martial
arts of Shaolin White Crane Fist, Wing
Chun Gong Fu, Yang Style Taijiquan,
Qigong-Energy work, Shauijiao-Chinese
Wrestling, more. $35/week, first week
free. Three levels of training, ages 15+.
Contact Master Mike DiMeglio
570.371.8898.
Sil-Lum Kung-Fu & Tai-Chi
Academy (509 Pittston Ave., Scran-
ton)
• Specializing in Traditional Chinese
Martial Arts as taught in The Central
Guoshu Institute. Instruction in classi-
cal Shaolin styles includes: Sil-Lum
Hung-Gar Tiger Claw, Shaolin White
Crane Boxing, Northern Long Fist
Kung-Fu. Info: 570.341.8089, 249.1087
St. Joseph’s School classes
(1627 N. Main Ave., Scranton,
570.963.0500):
• Traditional Weapons Class: Thurs.,
7-9 p.m. Self-defense techniques using
cane, club, short stick, wooden sword,
escrima sticks, more. Learn history
principles, practical use. No prior
martial arts experience. $10/class.
• Women’s Self-Defense Class: Sat.,
10 a.m.-12 p.m. Self-defense techniques
to protect from variety of attacks. No
prior martial arts experience. Wear
loose fitting clothes. $10/class.
Traditional Hung-Gar Tiger/
Crane Kung-Fu The Tiger’s Ark,
Kingston. Unlock the real power, learn
true meaning behind all martial move-
ments by focusing on development of
conceptual body language skills
through use of age-old training appa-
ratuses. Training more difficult than
mainstream martial arts, done at own
pace. Info: 570.817.5070
Unity: A Center for Spiritual
Living (140 South Grant St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.824.7722)
• A Course in Miracles / Holistic
Fitness-Yoga Sessions: Tues., 6:30-8:30
p.m.
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly,
570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org)
• Tennis Clinics Beginner-Intermedi-
ate: Private, semi-private lessons.
World Class Boxing (239
Schuyler Ave., Kingston, www.wcbbox-
ing.net, 570.262.0061)
• Boxing & Kickboxing Fitness
Bootcamp: Mon.-Sat. non-contact
program
Programs include Kids & Teen
Boxing programs, striking for MMA &
competition training, women’s-only
kickboxing Boot Camp, Zumba, more.
Wyoming Valley Goju Ryu
Karate Academy
• Classes Tues., Thurs. (kids: 5:30-7
p.m.; teens/adults: 7-8:30 p.m.); Sat.
(kids: 10:30 a.m.-noon; teens/adults:
Noon-1:30 p.m.), Kingston Rec. Center
(655 Third Ave., Kingston).Info:
888.328.3218, valleygojukarate.com
Y Walk Wed. Guided evening
walks in Wilkes-Barre and Hazleton.
Begin 6 p.m., meet in lobby either
city’s YMCA. In case of rain, walk same
time following day. Info: Wilkes-Barre
YMCA, 570.823.2191; Hazleton, 455.2046
OUTSIDE
Carbondale Chiropractic
Center (267 Brooklyn St.,
570.282.1240, www.carbondalechi-
ropractic.com).
• Run with Doc: Sun. 9-10 a.m. at
Lake Scranton. Jog around Lake Scran-
ton with Dr. Andrew Rivera. Visit
website for info.
Greater Scranton YMCA (706
N. Blakely St., Dunmore)
• Senior Citizen outing to Martins
Creek: Three miles moderate along
Delaware River. Meet in the YMCA
parking lot.$5 YMCA members, $8
non-members. Info: 570.343.5144.
Hickory Run State Park (1137
Honey Hole Road, Drums,
570.403.2006)
Night Hike: Nov. 9, 6 p.m. Ages 8 and
up.
Geocaching 101: Nov. 12, 1 p.m. RSVP
required.
Guided hike: Nov. 15, 9 a.m.
Junior Bird Club Night Hike: Nov. 16,
6 p.m. Ages 9 and up. $5 fee for new
members. RSVP required.
Scavenger hunt: Nov. 18, 11 a.m.-3
p.m.
Wallenpaupack Scenic Boat
Tour 11 a.m.-6 p.m., $14/regular, $13/
senior, $10/12 and under. Celebrating
50th year on the lake with daily one-
hour cruises. Info: 570.226.3293, wal-
lenpaupackboattour.com.
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- compiled by Chris Hughes,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
Fitness
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motorhead
RIDE OF THE WEEK
Michael Golubiewski | Special to the Weekender
To submit your vehicle,
email: mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
1978
CHEVROLET CAMARO Z28
Owner:
Michael Laury
Wilkes-Barre
“This car is my pride and joy,”
Laury said. “My father bought
it in 1980 and it has been in the
family ever since. The two of
us enjoy driving it to shows,
and I can’t wait until my son is
old enough to join us. I plan on
keeping it in the family.” W
show us some skin
Name: Kristin Mancia
Town: Eynon
E-mail a photo of your tattoo (at least 200 dpi) with your full name,
address and phone number to weekender@theweekender.com to
enter our weekly contest. Each month, Weekender readers vote for their
favorite, and the winner receives a $75 gift certificate to Marc’s Tattooing.
Must be 18 to participate
HOWTO ENTER:
sponsored by
NEPATATTOO.COM
Atwater Self Storage
(570) 779-9568
Area’s Largest Climate
Controlled Storage Facility
Motorcycles
$
25 per month
Cars
$
65 per month
Secure • Wooden Floors • Clean
Plymouth • (Located minutes from 81 & 29)
Reserve Your Spot
for Your Motorcycle
or Car Today!!!
Advertise
with Kieran
831.7321. W
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tell us...
If you could elect
ANYONE for president,
who would you choose?
Amy
Brown
20, West Wyoming
“John Green”
Nick
Klem
20, Williamsport
“Cole Hamels”
Kaitlin
Falatovich
21, Hazelton
“Optimus Prime”
Dominic
Massino
21, Jermyn
“Michael Scott”
Justin
Eimers
22, Hunlock Creek
“Chris Christie”
Justine
Lisella
21, Athens
“Yolandi Visser”
by Tom Taraszewski, Weekender Intern
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WyomingValleyMotors
126 Narrows Rd. Larksville, PA
570-288-7411
www.wyomingvalleymotorsvw.com
42
MPG
*
*EPA highway estimate 2012 Jetta TDI Sedan
UP TO
NEPA’s largest selection of Volkswagen Jetta models!
AVAILABLE ONANYINSTOCK
2012VOLKSWAGEN!* 0%FINANCING
*Offer valid upon credit approval. 0% financing is available for up to 66 months on a 2012 Gas Volkswagen and for up to 36 months on all 2012 Diesel Volkswagen models. Cannot be combined with dealer cash incentives. Expires 10/31/2012.
25
MPG
***
2012 Routan
*In stock only. Excludes special financing. $8,000 discount deducted from MSRP.
All MPG estimates are EPA highway estimates. Expires 10/31/12.
2013 CC
0% FORUPTO72 MONTHS*
FINANCING
*Offer Valid upon credit approval. See dealer for details.
All MPG estimates are EPA highway estimates.
31
MPG
***
31
MPG
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$8,000!*
SAVE
ONANYONE INSTOCK
2013 Passat
Gas
*Gas model only. Valid upon credit approval. See dealer for details.
All MPG estimates are EPA highway estimates. Expires 10/31/12.
0% FORUPTO60 MONTHS*
FINANCING
50
+
IN STOCK!
*Plus tax & tags. 36 months 10,000 mi/yr $999 plus tax and tags totals. $1,237.65 include first payment, bank fee and tags. Security deposit waved. Expires 10/31/12.
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33
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$0
SECURITY
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SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)
You’re not a cold person, even though
some see you that way. I’d argue that you
burn hotter than most. Antares, the red
supergiant star that forms the heart of the
Scorpio constellation, is about 700 times
the diameter of our sun. If our sun were
that big, it’d engulf most of our inner solar
system, including Earth. Antares is one of
the brightest stars in the sky despite the
fact that it’s hundreds of times further than
many of them—500 light years away. It’s
only distance and difference that makes
you seem aloof. Those who’ve seen inside
that fiery heart of yours know better. In
order to improve not only your rep but that
of frosty Scorps everywhere, let a couple
more people touch the nuclear fires of
your love this week.
SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)
Between the mess in your head and the
knots in the brain of your chief love in-
terest, you may feel like there’s no dancing
room. Your ankles keep getting tangled in
the thorny briars of your pasts, tripping
you up when you’d like to move forward.
This isn’t a hopeless situation, though.
Due to one of the karmic tax cuts the
universe is offering now, you’re in luck;
only one of you is getting trapped at any
given time. The key to getting through this
mess is taking turns leading the waltz—
which means letting go of any ideas about
who’s in charge.
CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)
The universe rarely outwits you. But
since you lost your cheat-sheet this week,
you’re down here with the rest of us mere
mortals. Try to look at it as a good thing;
your tendency to know all the answers
ahead of time was not only obnoxious, it
kept you from developing yourself or
being challenged, at times. Getting an
honest score on life’s tests will not only
earn you valuable self-knowledge, it will
bring you closer to the real answers, the
ones that will mean something to you,
unlike those you lifted straight out of a
book.
AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)
When was the last time you climbed a
tree? Or dug in the garden? It may be
getting too chilly for constructively root-
ing around in flowerbeds, but your soul
doesn’t care about that. I’ve detected an
unfortunate headiness pervading your life
lately. Besides sex, time spent actually
consciously inhabiting your body has been
depressingly small. Don’t you remember
the realization you had last year—the one
where your internal balance depended on
regular, meditative time communing with
nature, one way or another? Honor that
lesson, and you’ll find that the vast major-
ity of things that have been plaguing you
will simply slip away.
PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)
Somewhere along the way you got ac-
cess to the casino control room, the one
the rest of us are convinced exists. You
snuck into that backroom with walls of
surveillance monitors, where some Las
Vegas demigod decides whose slot ma-
chines hit the jackpot and whose don’t,
and rigged the whole setup. It’s the only
explanation for your continued good for-
tune, which defies reasonable odds. Al-
though people are happy for you, they
can’t help feeling a bit of resentment. In
order to quash riotous discontent before a
full-scale revolution erupts, share the
wealth this week. Pour your clinking
windfall into the cups of your neighbors,
and they’ll let you keep the secret of your
continued providence.
ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)
It’s not like you’re planning a trip over
the Niagara Falls in a barrel, or leaping the
Grand Canyon on a motorcycle. The risks
you’re planning may fly in the face of
something at least slightly awesome and
powerful, but they’re not truly dangerous;
they’re more like confronting the phony
wizard of Emerald City, Oz. All you have
to do is hold your ground and be alert.
Don’t let the nervous, nay-saying Munch-
kins dismay you. They’re easily impressed
and deluded. Trust your vision to pierce
the facades of blustering illusion to see the
small, ridiculous people behind them, and
trust your ability to kick their asses.
TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)
Even though you’re surprisingly open-
minded at times, you’re not exactly noto-
rious for your flexibility. No one expects
you to put your feet behind your head or
bend over backwards. In fact, just the
opposite: People count on you to stand
your ground in certain territories, as un-
yielding and unchanging as a stone. Con-
sistency is a good thing, but come on. At
the very least, consider the facts. If your
position is well-founded, it won’t be shak-
en by questioning or criticism. Blind faith
is for the weak. Changing your mind be-
cause of a well-reasoned argument? That’s
strength.
GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)
Luckily your heart has the regenerative
capabilities of a starfish. Not literally, of
course, but emotionally you are able to
restore it to wholeness, if you give your-
self enough time and loving care. Any
piece of a starfish with part of the central
body intact can grow into a whole animal.
Your heart is similar. It sucks that it’s been
thrashed to pieces at times. But losing
your ability to love would be a gruesome
victory for the thrashers. Don’t let that
happen. Pluck out the biggest chunk, put it
somewhere with lots of sunlight and ad-
oration, and show off how little the hurt
can hold you back.
CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)
After executing a series of sickening
belly flops and frustrated cannon balls,
your hesitant approach to the diving board
invites cringes all around. It’s painful to
witness your self-torture. I hope you’ll
notice none of your die-hard fans have left
the bleachers, however; we’re still cheering
you on, albeit anxiously. Don’t turn away
from the ladder that’ll take you up to that
daunting 30-foot drop. Practice is practice,
even if you’ve only been practicing what
not to do. Try again. If not for yourself,
you owe it to us, and our faith in you. This
time, you’ll not only pull off the unques-
tionably difficult maneuver you’ve been
attempting, you’ll do it so precisely that
people won’t believe what they’ve seen.
They may, in fact, demand that you do it
again. Go ahead. I predict a perfect 10,
both times.
LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)
No one hates suffering punishment
more than you do, especially when you
haven’t done anything wrong. Being pe-
nalized for your precociousness is so
unfair—it takes you back to the days when
you were forced to wait some arbitrary
amount of time for responsibilities you
knew you could handle, like a driver’s
license. Some of this unfair discipline
stems from a desire to do you good: Sure,
you can handle the responsibilities of
someone much older and wiser, but you
don’t need to. Enjoy the moment for what
it is, and leave that s--t for later. By the
time you have to shoulder those burdens,
you’ll be glad you didn’t way back when
you could have.
VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)
What if there were witches? What if,
back during the witch-hunts in Salem,
Mass., and elsewhere, there were mutants,
people who’d evolved past normal hu-
mankind to have paranormal abilities? In
that case, the Puritans of the era squashed
humanity’s potential by rooting them out
and burning them. Keeping us ordinary.
Okay, it’s a ridiculously farfetched scena-
rio, but something like it (on a much
smaller scale) is playing itself out in your
life. Before you take the seemingly dan-
gerous elements of your current situation
and tie them to the pyre, ask yourself:
Could these things I fear actually be the
next stages of my personal evolution?
LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)
Kiss a Pisces this week. You’re the sign
most able to understand their dualism and
persistent internal conflict, and therefore
commiserate. Surely you can remember
many moments when you froze while your
mental arguments played themselves out.
Paralyzed by indecision, you may have
wished that someone, anyone, would bail
you out and tell you which part of you was
“right.” Here’s your chance. Your Pisces
buddies need you to clear up the myriad
tiny debates that make them just so in-
effective at times. Tell them what to do.
It’ll be fun for both of you.
W
- To contact Caeriel, send mail to
sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.
By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS
VANILLA ICE
Oct. 31, 1967
JENNY MCCARTHY
Nov. 1, 1972
U.S. PRESIDENT JAMES K. POLK
Nov. 2, 1795
ROSEANNA
Nov. 3, 1952
SEAN DIDDY COMBS
Nov. 4, 1969
KEVIN JONAS
Nov. 5, 1987
EMMA STONE
(pictured)
Nov. 6, 1988
sign language
P
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100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
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800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@theweekender.com
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412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
FA LL FE STIVA L O F SA VINGS!!!
W E SE RVICE A LL
M A KE S A ND M O DE LS!
W INTE RIZE Y O UR VE H ICLE NO W !
E XPE RT SE RVICE
FO R O VE R 65 Y E A RS
$AVE $AVE $AVE
TAKE $10.00 OFF YOUR
M E CH ANICAL RE PAIRS
OF $100.00 OR M ORE
W ITH TH IS COUPON
O NE CO UPO N PE R RE PA IR O RDE R,
CA NNO T BE CO M BINE D W ITH O TH E R
CO UPO N O FFE RS,NO CA SH VA LUE
E XPIRE S 12-31-2012
BRAKE SE RVICE
$AVE 10% OFF
W ITH COUPON
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M A STE R CY LINDE R A ND LINE S
O NE CO UPO N PE R RE PA IR O RDE R,
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CO UPO N O FFE RS,NO CA SH VA LUE
E XPIRE S 12-31-2012
TIRE S! TIRE S!
TIRE S
GRE A T PRICE S
A NY SIZE
RE GULA R O R SNO W S
FRE E COL L ISION
RE PAIR E STIM ATE S
570-825-4581
1280 SANS SOUCIPKW Y
H ANOVE R TW P,PA 18706
H OURS
M ON-FRI8AM -5PM
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
110 Lost
LOST. Dog, female,
brown, black &
white Beagle nam-
ed Greta, lost on
Foote Ave., Duryea.
12 years old, needs
daily heart medi-
cine. REWARD.
570-457-5120 or
570-351-4968
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Adopting your
newborn is our
dream. Joy filled
home, endless
love, security.
Randi & Chuck
1-888-223-7941
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
ADOPTION
Your baby will have
a lifetime of love,
support, encour-
agement, happi-
ness and security
with a devoted
mom, dad, and
extended family.
Happily married and
financial secure
couple with strong
education values
would be lucky to
adopt your baby.
Expenses paid.
1-888-368-8909 or
AileenAndKevin2
adopt.com
LOOKING FOR
WADE GRIFFITH, JR.
and Helen Griffith to
probate their father’s
will. Children must
sign their consent
for their father’s
wishes in our state.
Please contact Kim
Patton krpatton48@
hotmail.com
150 Special Notices
FOSTER PARENT(S)
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570) 342-
8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
310 Attorney
Services
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
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You’re in bussiness
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406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
LINEUP
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INCLASSIFIED!
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You’re in bussiness
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409 Autos under
$5000
FORD ’95
F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.8 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
NOW
$4,295
412 Autos for Sale
AUDI ‘07 A4 2.0
TURBO, 98,000
miles, automatic,
perfect condition,
original owner, full
window tint, black
on black leather,
built in bluetooth
system, sunroof,
MP3 player & more!
$9,000 OBO.
949-439-3636
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
SUBARU ‘04
FORESTER XT
(Turbo) Symmetrical
AWD, auto, 52,000
miles, 4 cylinder
black metallic/ black
grey interior, remote
starter, heated
seats, alloy wheels,
towing package,
AM/FM /6-CD, AC,
original owner,
excellent condition,
$14,000, 570-851-
5549. Albrightsville,
PA.
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
96 Ford Taurus,
30 V6, 4 door,
power window &
door locks, A/C
$1,800
79 Chevy Pickup
with Plow.
$1,995
90 GMC Pickup
with Plow.
$1,995
96 Buick Skylark
Auto, 4 door, 81K
$2,300
00 Chevy S10
Blazer. 4 door.
4wd. Red.
$2,500
96 Pontiac Grand
Prix. White, Air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good.
106K.
$2,995
02 Ford Windstar
44K, auto, 6
cylinder, air, all
power options,
runs good.
$4,600
95 Buick Park Ave
54k. $3,995
03 Ford Windstar
LX, 6 cylinder,
A/C, 94K, all
power options,
$4,300
94Cadillac Fleet-
wood Limo, ex -
cellent condition,
40K $6,000
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $10,000
04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pas-
senger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $11,900
09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pas-
senger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$47,000
Junk
Cars,
Used Cars
& Trucks
wanted.
Cash paid.
574 -1275 W
E
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412 Autos for Sale
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
TOYOTA `03
HIGHLANDER
White.
Original Owner.
Garage kept.
Excellent condition.
$9,750. Neg.
570-677-3892
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
GREAT DEALS!
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ
`73 450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
$1500. OBO
570-899-1896
439 Motorcycles
BRAND NEW
‘12 SCOOTER
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA ‘08 STAR
RAIDER RAVEN EDITION
Mint condition.
Very low miles.
Asking $7400.
Call for details.
570-472-2327
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
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IN CLASSIFIED!
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WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
503 Accounting/
Finance
ACCOUNTING
ASSISTANT
PART-TIME
Cornell Iron Works,
a leading and grow-
ing manufacturer of
Security Closure
Products, is seeking
a qualified Part-Time
Accounting Assis-
tant for our Moun-
taintop facility.
Duties include coor-
dinating and per-
forming tasks relat-
ed to various com-
pany billings and
supporting compa-
ny credit approval
functions.
The ideal candidate
will have an Associ-
ate’s Degree or
equivalent in busi-
ness and have five
or more years expe-
rience with billings in
the manufacturing
and construction
industries. Excellent
verbal communica-
tion skills are
required. Must be
detail oriented, well
organized, and be
able to work inde-
pendently. Knowl-
edge of AS400 sys-
tems and MS Excel
required.
This position is 5
hours per day Mon-
day through Friday,
with a flexible work
schedule between
the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Interested candi-
dates should apply
in person, email
their resume and
salary history to
janiney@cornell-
iron.com, or mail to:
Cornell Iron Works
Crestwood
Industrial Park
24 Elmwood Ave.
Mountaintop, PA
18707
www.
cornelliron.com
(No phone calls,
please)
Equal Opportunity
Employer
To place your
ad call...829-7130
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTERS
Experienced. Must
have valid drivers
license. Starting
salary $15/hour
Apply at:
197 Courtdale Ave.,
Courtdale or call
570-287-5313
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
FRONT DESK
Must be detailed
oriented, flexible,
and team player.
Accepting applica-
tions online at
RedRoof.com or in
person at
1035 Highway 315.
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new apartment?
Classified lets
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533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
Thanks to our loyal
customers, JACK
WILLIAMS TIRE AND
AUTO SERVICE is
growing again! We
are looking to add
top-notch
MASTER AUTOMOTIVE
AND ALIGNMENT
TECHNICIANS
to help satisfy our
customers’ needs.
The qualified candi-
date should be
experienced in
alignments, air-con-
ditioning, and diag-
nostics. State
inspection license
and ASE certifica-
tions preferred.
Valid PA Driver
License a must! We
offer competitive
hourly rates PLUS
an aggressive com-
mission plan.
Health Insurance,
Vision & Dental, 401-
K Retirement Plan,
paid holidays, vaca-
tion, closed Sun-
days, Employee
training programs
and discounts!
Apply now by phone
1-877-WORK 4 JW
or online at
www.jackwilliams.com
EOE
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
FORKLIFT MECHANIC
Action Lift, Inc.,
located in Pittston,
PA, is the exclusive
dealership for
Crown and TCM
forklifts for NEPA.
We are seeking a
full time forklift
mechanic to trou-
bleshoot, repair and
diagnose Crown
and other makes of
lift trucks. Good
written and verbal
communication
skills, as well as
customer care skills
are necessary. A
valid driver’s license
and the ability to
safely operate lift
trucks are required.
Previous forklift
mechanical experi-
ence or technical
school graduate will
be considered. We
offer an excellent
wage and benefits
package, as well as
401K Retirement
Savings Plan, paid
holidays, paid vaca-
tion and much
more.
Apply by e-mail
mike.phelan@action
liftinc.com or call
570-655-2100 x115.
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
CLEANING PERSON
Needed for busi-
ness. Evening hours
(6pm-?) and week-
ends. $10/hour. Part
time or full time
hours available.
Employment refer-
ences required.
Call 570-823-7907
for an interview.
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in classified
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
BUS DRIVER
Part time.
Apply at: CYC
36 S. Washington St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-823-6121
GENERAL
SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
West Side, semi re-
tired & home mak-
ers welcome, will
train. 570-288-8035
548 Medical/Health
Highland Manor
Nursing Home
RN SUPERVISOR
POSITIONS
Part Time 3-11
Part Time 11-7
Seeking organ-
ized, motivated,
professional RN’s
to supervise our
nursing staff to
maintain the high-
est quality of care
for our residents.
LTC and supervi-
sory experience
preferred.
750 Schooley Ave.
Exeter, PA 18643
Ph: 570-655-3791
Fax: 570-655-4881
don-highland@seniorsnorth.com
Also seeking
CNAS
Full and Part Time
3-11/ 11-7
EOE
SOCIAL SERVICES
DIRECTOR, FULL TIME
Requirements:
Bachelor Degree in
related field plus 1
year experience.
245 Old Lake Rd
Dallas, PA 18612
E.O.E.
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566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
CUSTOMER
SERVICE/ SALES
AN INVITATION TO
JOIN OUR
ADVERTISING
SALES TEAM!
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TELEPHONE
PROFESSIONAL?
The Times Leader
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available in our
Classified Dept.
Qualified applicant
will be goal orient-
ed, able to work
within daily dead-
lines, have solid
computer and inter-
net knowledge,
superior verbal and
written communica-
tion skills, excellent
typing and grammar
skills, a high energy
level and an eager-
ness to learn. Com-
pensation includes
base pay plus
monthly commission
up to $500. If you
meet these require-
ments and want to
start an exciting
new career send
your resume by
November 2,
2012 to:
lbyrnes@
timesleader.com
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO
COMMERCIAL
CLEANING OF
NORTHEASTERN PA
Concerned
about your
future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or
Part time
Accounts
available
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Luzerne &
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Investment
Required
We’re ready –
Are you?
contact JAN-
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info and about
VetConnection
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5 7 0 - 8 2 4 - 5 7 7 4
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630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
DOLL HOUSE Vin-
tage 1950’s style 3
rooms down, stair-
case, 2 rooms up
plus furniture. Make
offer. 570-675-
0460/574-1724
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
timesleader.com W
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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
$900.00
Routes Currently Available:
Wyoming - Potential Proft - $800
W. 8th St. • Ensign St. • Hill Top Dr. • Holden St.
Butler St. • W. Brady St. • Shoemaker Ave.
177 Daily Papers • 187 Sunday Papers
89 Sunday Dispatch
Pittston - Potential Proft - $380
Center St. • Searle St. • Lambert St. • Washington Terr.
101 Daily Papers • 101 Sunday Papers
Plymouth - Potential Proft - $920
Cole St. • Flat St. • W. Main St. • North St.
Davenport St. • Lee St. • Orchard St.
166 Daily Papers • 221 Sunday Papers
Duryea - Potential Proft - $560
Adams St. • Blueberry Hill Development
Columbia St. • Foote Ave. • Wright St. • Green St.
151 Daily Papers • 150 Sunday Papers
P
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551 Other 551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
$900.00
Routes Currently Available:
Wyoming - Potential Proft - $800
W. 8th St. • Ensign St. • Hill Top Dr. • Holden St.
Butler St. • W. Brady St. • Shoemaker Ave.
177 Daily Papers • 187 Sunday Papers
89 Sunday Dispatch
Pittston - Potential Proft - $380
Center St. • Searle St. • Lambert St. • Washington Terr.
101 Daily Papers • 101 Sunday Papers
Plymouth - Potential Proft - $920
Cole St. • Flat St. • W. Main St. • North St.
Davenport St. • Lee St. • Orchard St.
166 Daily Papers • 221 Sunday Papers
Duryea - Potential Proft - $560
Adams St. • Blueberry Hill Development
Columbia St. • Foote Ave. • Wright St. • Green St.
151 Daily Papers • 150 Sunday Papers
We currently offer this employment opportunity:
A regional multimedia company headquartered in Wilkes-Barre, we provide
news, information and entertainment across multiple media platforms. Our
fagship publication, The Times Leader, and several weekly and specialized
publications serve the readers and advertisers of northeastern Pennsylvania
well. We provide commercial and other services in the region and surrounding
states.
Building on our solid print foundation, we offer various multimedia products:
website development; social media marketing; search engine optimization and
marketing; QR code marketing and tracking; and many other services.
Day & night shifts positions available in our Packaging Department. Experience is
preferred, but we will train the right candidate. This position reports directly to the
Packaging Supervisor.
Duties include, but are not limited to:
• Opening of insert skids
• Feeding of circulars into assigned hoppers
• Stackdown of ROP
• Clean up of Packaging Department at the end of assigned shift
Employees must be able to work fexible hours, be able to lift at least 25 lbs., and have
reliable transportation. Pre-employment drug screening and background check required.
Inserter/Packager - Part Time
Please send cover letter, resume and salary history to:
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
THEOS METRO
Now Hiring for experienced
Kitchen Help
Servers, Hostess,
Daytime Bartenders,
and Waitstaff.
Apply in person
596 Mercer Ave.
Kingston, PA
570-283-2050
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
LIONEL TRAINS
All Contents of a
6x13 platform of
Lionel trains from
1954. Vintage cars
and buildings.
Newer Santa Fe set.
too much to list,
must see. Offers
accepted for com-
plete lot or individual
items. Call for
appointment:
570-991-8647
Private Seller
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
726 Clothing
JACKETS, MEN’S
Fall & winter (4) 3
size L and 1 M.
Excellent condition.
Brand names. All for
$15. 570-655-1808
732 Exercise
Equipment
INVERSION TABLE
new with instruction
video. EP-800 $200.
570-709-9350
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
HEADBOARD brass
for double bed, cus-
tom made. Make
offer 570-675-0460
or 574-1724
KITCHEN TABLE
OAK, 4 CHAIRS
$250.
570-823-8688
744 Furniture &
Accessories
DEN
FURNITURE
Wood/cloth. Reg-
ular size sofa,
chair and
ottoman. Coffee
table, 2 end
tables. Excellent
condition. $325
for all.
570-675-5046
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
DESK, Antique chil-
dren’s, $75,
Armoire, 1940’s,
$75, BED, double,
$100, TABLE,
kitchen, $40,
TABLES, end $25,
BEDROOM SUI TE,
$250, RECLINERS
(2) $50 each,
DRESSERS, large
(2) $20 each.
570-328-3169
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOW
BLOWER.
Craftsman. 12
HP, 32” dual
stage. Electric
start. Track
Drive. $525.
570-675-5046
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
756 Medical
Equipment
JAZZY POWER chair
needs new batter-
ies. Used 1 year,
$250. 824-7015
758 Miscellaneous
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
762 Musical
Instruments
CLARINET Artley,
solid wood, black
with case & 4 new
reeds. $175.
Call 570-675-0460
or 574-1724
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
776 Sporting Goods
BICYCLE
MURRAY “DAZZLER”
20” girl’s. Powder
blue with pink trim
accents & wheels,
white tires. Front &
rear brakes plus
coaster foot brake.
Good condition
$40. 570-814-9574
782 Tickets
JUSTIN BIEBER
concert, Nov 4th in
Phila. Each ticket is
$190.. They are sep-
arate seats, but 2
sections apart. One
ticket is on the
Lower Level, Sect
102, Row 5, Seat 9.
2nd ticket is Lower
Level, Sect 104,
Row 8, Seat 10.
Contact cher.mazz
50@yahoo.com
784 Tools
PLASMA
CUTTER/WELDER. 3
in 1 unit. New, never
used, $350.
570-759-1106
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports.
Sets, singles &
wax. Also buying
comics.
570-212-0398
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNNLL NNNL N YONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLE LLE LEE LE LE LLE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
GET IT
TOGO.
Search the app store
and install The Times Leader
mobile app now for when
you need your news to go. W
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796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HDI Metals
Cash Paid for Gold Silver Jewelry Coins
any type or condition
We will beat any competitors advertised
price by up to 20% Guaranteed
Licensed & Insured
(11AM - 6PM | M-Sat)
Confidential & Secure
570-735-1487
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
modern country
kitchen with Corian
counters, family
room with fireplace,
wet bar and walkout
to patio, multi-level
decks. All appli-
ances included.
$217,000.
570-675-0446
evenings.
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom
home in mint metic-
ulous condition, with
2 full baths, and a 2
car garage, hard-
wood floors, tile
floors, exterior com-
posite wood deck,
fully finished lower
level family room,
large closets, up-
graded kitchen with
stainless steel appli-
ances, granite
countertops, gas
heat, excellent
neighborhood.
$174,900
Bob Stackhouse
654-1490
MIFFLINVILLE
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
garage, dining &
living rooms, oil
heat, 1,235 sq. ft.
Vinyl replacement
windows, new hot
water heater. Cen-
tral School District.
Sold “AS IS”.
$73,000, OBO.
570-379-2163 or
570-394-6111
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained bi-
level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3 sea-
son porch. Profes-
sionally landscaped
yard. 1 car garage,
storage shed, new
appliances, ceiling
fans. Close to
LCCC. $153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
TUNKHANNOCK AREA
REDUCED!
3 bedroom home,
2 baths, concrete
porch 3/4 around
the house, garage.
On six acres.
Stonework, stone
fireplace, heat with
wood or oil. Com-
mercial cook stove.
Beautiful view. Well
above flood or high
water. Some farm
equipment, track
loader. With gas &
oil rights. $250,000
570-665-9054
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
35 STARK ST
Completely
Remodeled 3 bed-
room. Home in a
great neighbor-
hood. Includes
refinished hard-
wood and new tile
floors, new bath-
room and kitchen
with stainless steel
appliances and
granite counter-
tops. Gas heat, nice
yard and porches.
$74,900
Call (570)654-1490
US Treasury Dept.
Online Auction
Tues. 11/6 @ 10am.
Single Family
Duplex @ 102-104
Reese St., Wilkes-
Barre. OPEN: Sat
10/27 & 11/3 from
10-2. www. cws-
marketing.com for
details & bidding
info. 703-273-7373
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
938 Apartments/
Furnished
HANOVER TWP.
Carey Ave. Bridge
FULLY FURNISHED
NEW LOFT APARTMENT
with one bedroom,
Includes all utilities.
stove, laundry,
fridge, micro, dish-
washer, disposal,
WIFI, cable, A/C,
granite, plasma TV,
hardwood, lovely
modern furniture,
large closets, pri-
vate entrance with
deck. Share pool &
grill Pictures on
request. MUST SEE!
4 miles to 81. Non
smoking unit. Pet
considered. $725/
month. Additional
charge for each
additional person.
570-332-8026
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
3 rooms, w/w car-
peting, appliances,
coin-op washer and
dryer, off street
parking, security, no
pets. $430/mo.
570-655-1606
DUPONT
Large modern 2
bedroom half dou-
ble with interior attic
and basement
access, includes
refrigerator, stove,
washer dryer
hookup, new carpet
and freshly painted,
great neighborhood,
plenty of parking,
heat included. $675.
No pets. 479-6722
KINGSTON
1 bedroom,
All Utilities Included.
$535/month. No
pets, Section 8 OK
Call 570-817-3332
KINGSTON
2 bedroom, water
included.
$580/month.
NO PETS
Section 8 OK
Call 570-817-3332
KINGSTON
Apartment 2, 1 bed-
room. Newly reno-
vated. Heat and hot
water included. No
pets. $550 per/
month + security.
570-288-5893
KINGSTON AREA
Large 2 bedroom
with living & dining
rooms. One floor,
stove, washer/dryer
hook up, off street
parking. Gas heat.
Wall to wall carpet.
No pets. $560/mo.
References, lease
& security deposit.
Call 570-301-3401
NANTICOKE
1 bedroom first floor
apartment. Gas
heat and hot water.
Range and refriger-
ator
included. Garage
parking. Laundry
room on premises.
$475 per month +
utilities. Water,
garbage, state and
sewer included. No
dogs. References
and security. Call
570-696-3596
PARSONS
2 bedroom, 1st
floor Wall to wall
carpeting
throughout. Stove,
fridge, washer &
dryer included.
$535 + utilities &
security. Call
570-650-2494
PITTSTON TWP.
Newly remodeled,
quiet neighborhood,
living room, kitchen,
laundry & bath on
1st floor. 2 bed-
rooms on 2nd floor.
Sewer, water &
garbage included.
Off-street parking,
no pets. $550/mo.
Call 570-655-4533
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON/JENKINS
TOWNSHIP
3 1/2 bedrooms,
2 full baths, large
living room, dining
room, kitchen,
stove, washer/dryer
hookup. Off street
parking. Spacious
with heat and
water included.
$875/mo., security,
credit check &
references.
AVAILABLE NOW!
917-753-8192
PITTSTON-
HUGHESTOWN
Large modern 1
bedroom apart-
ment, includes
refrigerator, stove,
washer dryer hook-
up, new carpet and
freshly painted,
great neighborhood,
off street parking,
gas heat and hot
water. $495. No
pets 479-6722.
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PLAINS
Available Nov. 1st
First Floor. 3 room
apartment. CLEAN
AND QUIET.
$550/month
includes heat,
water & sewers.
Definitely no smok-
ing and no pets. Off
street parking. First
months rent, first
months security.
Credit and back-
ground check done.
570-899-6710 or
570-820-3906
PLAINS
Stylish 2 bedroom
first floor. Kitchen
with snack bar,
modern bath, w/d
hookup and storage
in basement. Off
street parking,
large maintenance
free yard. $550/mo
plus utilities. Securi-
ty, lease. Sorry, no
smoking or pets.
570-824-9507
SCRANTON/SOUTH
Two, 2 bedroom
apartments, private,
all redone.600
Block South Scran-
ton. Non-smokers.
$660 each. Pay
heat & separate
electric only. No
washer/dryer. Non-
smoker. Back-
ground check.
Call Nina
570-575-6280
WEST PITTSTON
Century home, 1
bedroom, freshly
painted and new
carpet. Appliances
included. No pets.
$450/per month +
utilities. Security &
references
required. Call
(570) 283-3086
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST PITTSTON
Out of flood
area
Charming, large,
4 rooms,
2nd floor, living
room, den, new
eat in kitchen, all
appliances
Includes heat,
off street parking,
w/d hookup,
garbage.
$585/month, lease
and security
570-328-0784
WEST WYOMING
Eighth Street
Beautiful 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, all
appliances incl.
washer & dryer &
air conditioning.
Non smoker, secu-
rity and references,
off street parking,
no pets. $630 plus
utilities. 954-2972
WILKES-BARRE
17 Beaumont St.
1st floor, large 2
bedroom with new
w/w carpeting and
paint. Front porch,
shared back yard,
kitchen with appli-
ances and dining
room. Heat, hot
water and water
incl. Tenant pays
electric. $575 plus
security, no pets.
Call 570-814-1356
947 Garages
FORTY FORT
11’, 6” by 23’
Cinder block
walls, interior
walls are steel
studs with sheet
rock. Concrete
floor, steel over
head door with
locks, over head
lighting. $110 a
month. 1 year
lease + security.
570-655-0530
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
950 Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
3 large bedrooms,
large fenced yard,
hardwood floors
washer/dryer
hookup, no pets.
$625/month +
utilities & 1 month
security. Call
570-313-5414
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
hardwood, washer /
dryer & stove, close
to schools. No pets.
$700 + utilities,
security, refer-
ences, lease requir-
ed. 570-283-3086
950 Half Doubles
KINGST KINGSTON ON
Clean & freshly
painted. Large 6
room half double. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath,
gas heat, utilities by
tenant. No pets.
security & lease
$625. month.
570-690-3367
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
Charming, spacious
6 room, 2 bedroom
duplex, includes 2nd
& 3rd floor. Ample
closets. Washer
/dryer hook-up.
$575/ month + utili-
ties, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLAINS
Spacious 3
bedroom, 1 bath
with Victorian
charm with hard-
wood floors, neutral
decor, stained glass
window, large
kitchen. Washer
/dryer hook-up,
off-street parking.
$700 month +
utilities, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLYMOUTH
House for Rent.
$750 + utilities.
Water, sewer & all
appliances includ-
ed. Fenced back
yard. One month
security up front, no
partial payment.
Section 8 OK.
Call Steve at
570-592-5764
PLYMOUTH
Shawnee Ave.
3 bedrooms, back
yard, basement.
$550/month +
utilities and sewer.
570-332-5723
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths, small yard,
front porch, off
street parking.
$615/month
security required.
Tenant pays
all utilities.
570-357-0712
953Houses for Rent
CLARKS SUMMIT
3 acre property, 4
bedrooms, 2 baths,
all appliances,
washer/dryer
hookup, 2 car
attached garage,
no pets. $1,200/
month + utilities &
security. Month to
month lease.
(610)256-5352
HARVEY’S LAKE
HOUSE ON LAKE
includes partial use
of boat house.
Spectacular view,
4 bedrooms, all
appliances, ample
parking. $1475/
month plus utilities.
570-822-2992
P
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566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS
FOR SALE
OR RENT
Single home in
gated retirement
village. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 2 car
garage. Granite
countertops, gas
fireplace,
appliances
included. Quiet 55+
community. No
Pets. One year
lease. $1575/mo. +
utilities & security.
Monthly mainte-
nance fee included.
570-592-3023
DURYEA
Spacious 1 bed-
room renovated
house. 1 1/2
baths, partially
furnished, open
dining & TV rooms
with cozy wooden
gas fireplace.
New refrigerator,
freezer, dishwash-
er, mounted
micro-wave &
new oak cabinets.
Brand new gas
furnace/water
heater. New
apartment sized
washer/dryer on
1st floor. Brand
new draperies,
blinds & carpet-
ing. Detached
garage with drive-
way. Front &
back yards in
tranquil neighbor-
hood. No smok-
ing. $800 + utili-
ties & security.
570-762-8265
EXETER
Beautiful magnifi-
cent Cape Cod style
home. 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, finished
lower level, 2 car
garage with a rear
deck area. Master
bedroom and bath
on first floor, new
carpets, recently
painted, hardwood
& tile floors, granite
counters & stainless
steel appliances in
kitchen. Gas heat.
$1500 per/ month.
570-479-6722
953Houses for Rent
LAKE SILKWORTH
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
single home. Lake
view with lake and
dock rights. Hard-
wood and tile
floors. $725/mo
plus utilities, securi-
ty, and 1 year lease.
Lake Lehman
School District. No
Pets or smoking.
Call 570-696-3289
PARSONS
114 Govier St.
2 1/2 bedrooms, 1
bath. $650. No
pets. 570-825-0908
PLAINS
Modern 6 rooms,
laundry, base-
ment, gas
heat/water, fenced
yard $700/per
month, plus utili-
ties and security,
no pets
570-472-3837
SWOYERSVILLE
RENT TO OWN
3 bedrooms,all
appliances, pets ok,
hardwood floors,
yard, pool,
shed/garage,
driveway, deck,
concrete basement,
$1150/per month
Call (570)237-6956
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room home with
hardwood floors,
new carpeting &
fresh paint. Featur-
ing modern kitchen
with dishwasher,
large yard & off
street parking.
$750/month + utili-
ties. No pets or
smoking. Call
570-466-6334
959 Mobile Homes
MIDDLEBURG RD.
Crestwood
School District
2 bedroom. Country
setting, on side of
mountain. 1 car
garage, paved
driveway. Porch.
Situated on 3/4
acre lot. 15 minutes
from Crestwood
Industrial Park also
close to Lehigh
river, ski resorts &
all major highways.
Includes refrigera-
tor, stove, washer,
sewer & water. All
other utilities by
tenant. Oil heat.
$450 month +
security. Call
(570) 474-0388
or 570-417-8751
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HILTON HEAD
Island Marriott’s
newest ocean front
resort. 3 bedrooms,
3 baths, accommo-
dates 12. December
23-30, 2012. Call
570-299-5189 or
570-262-3443
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
Selling a Business?
Reach more poten-
tial buyers with an
ad in the classified
section!
570-829-7130
SNOW
PLOWING
RESIDENTIAL/
COMMERCIAL
SIDEWALKS
Insured & Bonded
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
1132 Handyman
Services
20 YEARS EXPERI ENCE
All types of home
repairs & alterations
Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-256-3150
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.R.E. PAINTING
Interior, exterior,
spraying and power
washing, decks and
wall repairs. “We
A.R.E. affordable
with quality work-
manship guaran-
teed!” 825-9741
1252 Roofing &
Siding
J & F
CONSTRUCTION
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LEE LE LLEEEE DER DD .
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T.S. FARM
GIRL
10 WAYS
TO PLAY
(513) 301-8388
Discrete, Independent, Mature,
Attractive. 36D, 110 lbs.
Small waist, Blonde Escort-
Dancer-Lingerie Model
570-299-0064
242 N. M em orial H wy., Sh avertown,PA
675-1245
H E AL T H &
RE L AX AT IO N S PA
IN T RO DUC IN G
C ARL A
A Y o ung Bo d acio us Re d
He ad e d Be auty.
Av ail. T hurs.- S at. 4- 12
W E L C O M E ABO ARD!
As usual, w e acce ptco m pe tito rs
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SENSATIO NS
New A m ericanStaff
A cceptingallm ajor credit cards
5 70 -779 -4 5 5 5
14 75 W.MainSt.,Plym outh
SUND AY NOW OP E N
12 -8 P M
INTR OD UCING
SUM M E R & STAR
D AILY SP E CIAL
1 H OUR $40
M OND AY 4-8P M
2 0 M INS. F OR $30
TH UR S. 2 -6 P M
2 F OR 1
F R ID AY
1/2 OF F AL L SE SSIONS
SUN. 12 -6 P M
2 0 M INS. F OR $30
7
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ULTIMA II
1-866-858-4611
570-970-3971
CALL TO HEAR
OUR DAILY
SPECIALS!
NOW HIRING
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IMMEDIATE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
7
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ELITE SPA
N E W S TA F F !
Orien ta l S ta ff
Body S ha m poo
M a ssa ge-Ta n n in g
318 W ilkes-Ba rre Tow n ship Blv d., R ou te 309
L a rge P a rkin g A rea • Open D a ily 9a m -M idn ight
570.824.9017
B E A U T IF U L Y O U N G
A S IA N G IR L S
Profes s iona l
M a s s a ge
Open 7 days
9:30 am -11 pm
Fash ion M all
Rt. 6
7
5
7
9
7
8
570-341-5852
South Rt. 309 • Hazleton
(entrance in
back, 2nd
floor)
FREE
PARKING PARKING
570-861-9027
Spa 21
7
7
2
5
3
9
Magical Asian
Massage
570-540-5333
177 South Market Street, Nanticoke
OPEN:
9:30 A.M.-12:30 A.M.
Featuring Table Shampoo
7
7
2
5
4
1
19 Asian
Spa
Open 7 Days 10am-11:30pm
FEATURING BODY AND
FOOT MASSAGES
$10 OFF HOUR
SESSIONS
570-337-3966
Unit 19A Gateway Shopping
Center, Edwardsville
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Holistic Healing Spa
Holistic Healing Spa
Tanning & Wellness Center Tanning & Wellness Center
THE LADIES OF HOLISTIC DAY SPA!! THE LADIES OF HOLISTIC DAY SPA!!
COME TO THE DAY SPA TO MEET AMBER, NICKKI & MISTI! COME TO THE DAY SPA TO MEET AMBER, NICKKI & MISTI!
WITH A HEAVENLY TOUCH RELAX WITH CHRISTIANA & WITH A HEAVENLY TOUCH RELAX WITH CHRISTIANA &
SAMANTHA! THEY ARE DOUBLE TROUBLE ON SAMANTHA! THEY ARE DOUBLE TROUBLE ON
SUNDAY ALL DAY & NITE!! SUNDAY ALL DAY & NITE!!
SPECIAL PRICE FOR THE TWO OF THEM TOGETHER, SPECIAL PRICE FOR THE TWO OF THEM TOGETHER,
SUNDAYS ONLY! SUNDAYS ONLY!
YOU WILL GET A NICE SENSATION MASSAGE WITH YOU WILL GET A NICE SENSATION MASSAGE WITH
SHANNON, SELENA, SHELBY IS OUR NEWEST HOT SHANNON, SELENA, SHELBY IS OUR NEWEST HOT
REDHEAD! REDHEAD!
570-714-3369 or 570-714-3369 or
570-406-3127 570-406-3127
697 Market St. Kingston 697 Market St. Kingston
HOURS: 10AM-11:30PM HOURS: 10AM-11:30PM
7 DAYS A WEEK 7 DAYS A WEEK
7
7
9
6
4
9
NEW HOURS: Mon-Sat 10-11 NEW HOURS: Mon-Sat 10-11
12-6 pm Sunday 12-6 pm Sunday
Aura
Aura
Massage
Massage
460 S. Empire St. 460 S. Empire St.
Wilkes-Barre •970.4700 Wilkes-Barre •970.4700
HALF HOUR HALF HOUR
$20 $20
HOUR HOUR
$40 $40
With Coupon With Coupon
7
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Secret Moments Massage
SENSUAL MASSAGE
PRIVATE BY APPOINTMENT
DAILY 10AM-10PM
81N EXIT 182 / 81S EXIT 191B
SCRANTON 570-702-2241
S w e d is h & R e la xa tion M a s s a ge
750 Ju m p e r R oa d , W ilk e s - B a rre
M in u te s from
the M ohe ga n S u n Ca s in o
$10 off 60 m in . m a s s a ge
H EAVEN LY TOU CH
M AS S AGE
Tra c to rTra ilerPa rk ingAva ila b le
Sho w erAva ila b le
8 29- 30 10
Im m e d ia te H irin g
N ew Cu s to m ers Only
T.S. BUNNY
Brazilian & Blk beauty
FUN! FUN! FUN!
Satisfaction Guaranteed
Call 24 hours
(267) 516-3265
ATTENTION
TRANNY LOVERS
Ht 5’5 Wr 125
Top 38DD
24/7 1st timers welcome
(775) 285-6803
3 weeks ...
‘til the biggest night
out of the year —
THANKSGIVING
EVE!
Place your ad in the
Wednesday, Nov. 21
issue of the
Weekender
Call 831.7349
for information
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We currently offer this employment opportunity:
A regional multimedia company headquartered in Wilkes-Barre, we provide
news, information and entertainment across multiple media platforms. Our
fagship publication, The Times Leader, and several weekly and specialized
publications serve the readers and advertisers of northeastern Pennsylvania
well. We provide commercial and other services in the region and surrounding
states.
Building on our solid print foundation, we offer various multimedia products:
website development; social media marketing; search engine optimization and
marketing; QR code marketing and tracking; and many other services.
Day & night shifts positions available in our Packaging Department. Experience is
preferred, but we will train the right candidate. This position reports directly to the
Packaging Supervisor.
Duties include, but are not limited to:
• Opening of insert skids
• Feeding of circulars into assigned hoppers
• Stackdown of ROP
• Clean up of Packaging Department at the end of assigned shift
Employees must be able to work fexible hours, be able to lift at least 25 lbs., and have
reliable transportation. Pre-employment drug screening and background check required.
Inserter/Packager - Part Time
Please send cover letter, resume and salary history to: W
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
AMATEUR NIGHT
THE HOTTEST AMATEURS
ANYWHERE IN NEPA!
SUBMIT TWO
RECENT PHOTOS TO
MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM
INCLUDE YOUR AGE, FULL
NAME, HOMETOWN AND PHONE
NUMBER. (MUST BE 18+)
THINK
YOU’RE
ATTRACTIVE?
ASPIRING
TO BE A
MODEL?
2012 MODEL OF THE YEAR
DOMINIQUE KOZUCH
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weekender
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
DJ TONEZ
AGE: 22
HOMETOWN: DALLAS
FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE:
ANYTHING FEATURING THE BEATTEKS
MY BEST CONCERT WAS…
KANYE WEST, GLOW IN THE DARK TOUR
FOR MORE
PHOTOS OF
DJ TONEZ, VISIT
THEWEEKENDER.COM.
PHOTOS BY
AMANDA
DITTMAR
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T
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L
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weekender
BRANDY GELEZINSKY
AGE: 28
HOMETOWN: FREELAND
FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE:
NEWS OF THE WEIRD
WHO DO YOU ADMIRE?
NINJAS
FOR MORE
PHOTOS OF
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HAIR AND
MAKEUP
PROVIDED
BY SAPPHIRE
SALON AND
DAY SPA
WARDROBE
PROVIDED
BY BRATTY
NATTY’S
BOUTIQUE
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
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