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exhibitdesign

Making a Model ! Plan and Elevation Drawings

<--- Elevation Drawing of the Columns! ! Designs applied to the elevation 
 drawings for presentation. ---> !

! Designs applied to the elevation 
 drawings for presentation.! ! (colored and merged in photoshop) ---> !

Scott s House!

Ingall s House!

Step 1 : Attach your plan drawing to a sheet of foam core. ! Step 2 : Attach your outer walls. In this case, the elevation drawings were completed. They were mounted to the foam core with spray glue before cutting, The plan drawing tells us where to glue the walls onto the surface.! Step 3 : On your model, right on your walls, mark in a height indicator all the way up the walls, in 1 foot increments- to help you visualize where your horizons are (remember 29 - 63 is the area for close up details).!

Note : 1. Human Scale (a Person) for visualization, 
 2. Elevation Drawings on walls, 
 3. Floor tiles printed out and attached to floor (do this with your designs for the walls) 
 4. Corrugated cardboard for roof tiles, other materials to indicate 3-dimensional elements.! !

Detail shots ! • stairs are 1/2 width of foam core, 
 • door is cardboard with design drawn in
 • elevation drawings are applied to walls, 
 and some 3D elements protrude out. 
 • Fine detailing uses white card stock.!

MAKING AMODEL FROM FOAM CORE!

Using a Mass Model : Theme Park Space Planning: (indicating masses in your spatial design) The model is used very early on in the development of concepts and ideas. It helps put depth to an otherwise two dimensional space. Blocks of foam are cut into simple shapes and basic masses to compose this model.

The important thing to realize about a mass model is that it is a fluid object - nothing stays the same for long as the ideas are developed. Masses get moved, pushed, pulled, mirrored, squeezed and extended. Because of this, little detail is put into these models. Even an empty can of soda can be used as a mass if the scale a shape belongs to your design.

Simple rule: make sure the size and the scale of the objects in the space are accurate. Models are about determining proportion, scale, size, and shape

MAKING AMODEL FROM FOAM CORE!

The key is to get a sense of the space with very little effort. Before you begin, attach your plan drawing to the base of your model using spray glue, to help you plot where your elements will go. The models can be attached with minimal gluing so that your elements can be moved, changed. Two parts be can held together with a single drop of glue, using toothpicks to skewer the foam core together, much like a club sandwich until it dries.

Many times ordinary parts like cardboard, wood rods and wire are used to compose a model like this. (Michael s carries wood rods, etc.) The main material is foam core, but you may use other materials to indicate a change in color or building material (corrugated cardboard, etc.) The materials needed to construct a model are : Sheets of foam core, Elmer's (White) Glue, tooth picks, exacto blades, an architectural scale, and a straight edge for cutting. Glue guns instead of glue are faster.

You can mount your preliminary elevations of structures, 3D elements in your exhibit, etc, to the walls/sides of structures, before cutting out in foam core.

Keep in mind, when constructing your model, to account for the thickness of the foam core you can draw a line along the length of your cut using a piece of foam core on its side. Cut away the foam core to the outer paper laminate. Your two corners should fit like a puzzle.

( tip: always cut on a cutting pad, and replace your blades often )

You can play with the thickness and structure of foamcore By peeling away the outer paper laminate, you expose the inner foam, which can then be sculpted….

( tip: moisten the foam core first )

You can play with the thickness and structure of foamcore By peeling away the outer paper laminate, you expose ….. Or textured (in this case a brick pattern)

You can play with the thickness and structure of foamcore By peeling away the outer paper laminate, you expose the inner foam, which can then be sculpted

( tip: moisten the foam core first )

Sketchup demo : from sketchup for dummies on u-tube!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwj8Bd4GPYc

And many more……!

Foam core model process :!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ibz8mHKd_Xk